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Sample records for acid herbicides mcpa

  1. Toxicity of synthetic herbicides containing 2,4-D and MCPA moieties towards Pseudomonas putida mt-2 and its response at the level of membrane fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Syguda, Anna; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2016-02-01

    One of the attempts to create more effective herbicidal compounds includes the use of ionic liquids. Herbicidal ionic liquids have more effective biological activity, they are less volatile, more thermally stable, and exhibit superior efficiency in comparison to typically employed herbicides, allowing the reduction of the herbicide dose applied per hectare. However, studies on the environmental toxicity of this group of compounds are very rarely available. Environmental toxicity is an important factor, showing the concentration of compounds that has negative effects on soil bacteria including those responsible for biodegradation processes. Therefore, potential toxicity of four herbicidal ionic liquids (HILs) precursors containing 2,4-D and MCPA moieties was tested with the well investigated model organism for toxicity and adaptation, Pseudomonas putida mt-2. Results were compared to those obtained for commercial 2,4-D and MCPA herbicides. Next to growth inhibition, given as EC50, changes in the isomerisation of cis to trans unsaturated fatty acids were applied as proxy for cellular stress adaptation to toxic substances. The results revealed that all investigated precursors of HILs showed lower toxicity compared to commercialized synthetic herbicides 2,4-D and MCPA. The collected data on toxicity of HILs together with their physico-chemical properties might be useful for assessing the potential risk of the environmental pollution as well as guidelines for setting the legislation for their future use.

  2. The effects of woodchip- and straw-derived biochars on the persistence of the herbicide 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in soils.

    PubMed

    Muter, Olga; Berzins, Andrejs; Strikauska, Silvija; Pugajeva, Iveta; Bartkevics, Vadims; Dobele, Galina; Truu, Jaak; Truu, Marika; Steiner, Christoph

    2014-11-01

    Sorption and degradation are the primary processes controlling the efficacy and runoff contamination risk of agrochemicals. This study assessed the influence of two biochars, made from woodchips and straw at a pyrolysis temperature of 725°C and applied to a loamy sand and a sandy soil in the concentration of 5.3 g 100 g(-1) sandy soil and 4.1 g 100 g(-1) loamy sand soil, or 53 t ha(-1) for both soil types, on degradation of the herbicide 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA). Soils were spiked with 50 mg MCPA kg(-1) soil. In the sandy soil, significantly more MCPA remained after 100 days if amended with straw-derived biochar in comparison to wood-derived biochar. Both biochars types significantly increased urease activity (p<0.05) after 37 days in the loamy sand soil, but these differences disappeared after 100 days. A root and shoot elongation test demonstrated that the soils containing straw-derived biochar and spiked with MCPA, showed the highest phytotoxicity. Both biochars were found to retard MCPA degradation in loamy sand and sandy soils. This effect could not be explained only by sorption processes due to comparatively low developed micro/mesoporous structure of both biochars shown by BET surface analysis. However, an enhanced MCPA persistence and soil toxicity in sandy soil amended with straw biochar was observed and further studies are needed to reveal the responsible mechanisms.

  3. Comparative sorption and leaching study of the herbicides fluometuron and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in a soil amended with biochars and other sorbents.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Alegria; Cox, Lucia; Spokas, Kurt A; Celis, Rafael; Hermosín, M Carmen; Cornejo, Juan; Koskinen, William C

    2011-12-14

    Biochar, the solid residual remaining after the thermochemical transformation of biomass for carbon sequestration, has been proposed to be used as a soil amendment, because of its agronomic benefits. The effect of amending soil with six biochars made from different feedstocks on the sorption and leaching of fluometuron and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) was compared to the effect of other sorbents: an activated carbon, a Ca-rich Arizona montmorillonite modified with hexadecyltrimethylammonium organic cation (SA-HDTMA), and an agricultural organic residue from olive oil production (OOW). Soil was amended at 2% (w/w), and studies were performed following a batch equilibration procedure. Sorption of both herbicides increased in all amended soils, but decreased in soil amended with a biochar produced from macadamia nut shells made with fast pyrolysis. Lower leaching of the herbicides was observed in the soils amended with the biochars with higher surface areas BC5 and BC6 and the organoclay (OCl). Despite the increase in herbicide sorption in soils amended with two hardwood biochars (BC1 and BC3) and OOW, leaching of fluometuron and MCPA was enhanced with the addition of these amendments as compared to the unamended soil. The increased leaching is due to some amendments' soluble organic compounds, which compete or associate with herbicide molecules, enhancing their soil mobility. Thus, the results indicate that not all biochar amendments will increase sorption and decrease leaching of fluometuron and MCPA. Furthermore, the amount and composition of the organic carbon (OC) content of the amendment, especially the soluble part (DOC), can play an important role in the sorption and leaching of these herbicides.

  4. Layered double hydroxides as adsorbents and carriers of the herbicide (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid (MCPA): systems Mg-Al, Mg-Fe and Mg-Al-Fe.

    PubMed

    Bruna, F; Celis, R; Pavlovic, I; Barriga, C; Cornejo, J; Ulibarri, M A

    2009-09-15

    Hydrotalcite-like compounds [Mg(3)Al(OH)(8)]Cl x 4H(2)O; [Mg(3)Fe(OH)(8)]Cl x 4H(2)O; [Mg(3)Al(0.5)Fe(0.5)(OH)(8)]Cl x 4H(2)O (LDHs) and calcined product of [Mg(3)Al(OH)(8)]Cl x 4H(2)O, Mg(3)AlO(4.5) (HT500), were studied as potential adsorbents of the herbicide MCPA [(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid] as a function of pH, contact time and pesticide concentration, and also as support for the slow release of this pesticide, with the aim to reduce the hazardous effects that it can pose to the environment. The information obtained in the adsorption study was used for the preparation of LDH-MCPA complexes. The results showed high and rapid adsorption of MCPA on the adsorbents as well as that MCPA formulations based on LDHs and HT500 as pesticide supports displayed controlled release properties and reduced herbicide leaching in soil columns compared to a standard commercial MCPA formulation. Thereby, we conclude that the LDHs employed in this study can be used not only as adsorbents to remove MCPA from aqueous solutions, but also as supports for the slow release of this highly mobile herbicide, thus controlling its immediate availability and leaching.

  5. 40 CFR 180.339 - MCPA; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; tolerances for residues. (a) General. (1) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide MCPA ((4... for residues of the herbicide MCPA ((4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid) resulting from the...

  6. 40 CFR 180.339 - MCPA; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...; tolerances for residues. (a) General. (1) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide MCPA ((4... for residues of the herbicide MCPA ((4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid) resulting from the...

  7. 40 CFR 180.339 - MCPA; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; tolerances for residues. (a) General. (1) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide MCPA ((4... for residues of the herbicide MCPA ((4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid) resulting from the...

  8. 40 CFR 180.339 - MCPA; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; tolerances for residues. (a) General. (1) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide MCPA ((4... for residues of the herbicide MCPA ((4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid) resulting from the...

  9. 40 CFR 180.339 - MCPA; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; tolerances for residues. (a) General. (1) Tolerances are established for residues of the herbicide MCPA ((4... for residues of the herbicide MCPA ((4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid) resulting from the...

  10. 2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    2 - Methyl - 4 - chlorophenoxyacetic acid ( MCPA ) ; CASRN 94 - 74 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard

  11. Influence of soil biochar aging on sorption of the herbicides MCPA, nicosulfuron, terbuthylazine, indaziflam, and fluoroethyldiaminotriazine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorption of four herbicides and a metabolite of indaziflam on a fresh macadamia nut biochar and biochars aged one or two years in soil was characterized. On fresh biochar, the sorption was terbuthylazine (Kd = 595) > indaziflam (Kd = 162) > MCPA (Kd = 7.5) > fluoroethyldiaminotriazine (Kd = 0.26) a...

  12. Environmental fate of the herbicide MCPA in agricultural soils amended with fresh and aged de-oiled two-phase olive mill waste.

    PubMed

    Peña, David; López-Piñeiro, Antonio; Albarrán, Ángel; Becerra, Daniel; Sánchez-Llerena, Javier

    2015-09-01

    Olive oil agrifood industry generates large amounts of waste whose recycling as organic amendment represents an alternative to their disposal. The impact of de-oiled two-phase olive mill waste (DW) on the fate of 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in Mediterranean agricultural soils was evaluated. Furthermore, the effect of the transformation of organic matter from this waste under field conditions was assessed. Four Mediterranean agricultural soils were selected and amended in laboratory with fresh DW and field-aged DW (DW and ADW treatments, respectively). Adsorption capacity increased by factors between 1.18 and 3.59, for the DW-amended soils, and by factor of 4.93, for ADW-amended soil, with respect to unamended soils, when 5% amendment was applied. The DW amendment had inhibitory effect on dehydrogenase activity and slowed herbicide dissipation, whereas the opposite effect was observed in ADW treatments. In the field-amended soil, the amount of MCPA leached was significantly reduced from 56.9% for unamended soil to 15.9% at the 5% rate. However, leaching losses of MCPA increased in the laboratory-amended soils, because of their high water-soluble organic carbon values which could enhance MCPA mobility, especially in the acidic soils. Therefore, the application of DW as organic amendment in Mediterranean agricultural soils could be an important management strategy to reduce MCPA leaching, especially if the organic matter had been previously transformed by ageing processes.

  13. Phytotoxicity and antioxidative enzymes of green microalga (Desmodesmus subspicatus) and duckweed (Lemna minor) exposed to herbicides MCPA, chloridazon and their mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bisewska, Joanna; Sarnowska, Emilia I; Tukaj, Zbigniew H

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we evaluate the toxicity of MCPA (auxin-like growth inhibitor), chloridazon (CHD) (PSII-inhibitor) and their mixtures to floating plants and planktonic algae. Toxicity of MCPA (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid) and CHD (5-amino-4-chloro-2-phenyl-3(2H)-pyridazinone) was first assessed in two growth inhibition tests with Lemna minor (ISO/DIS 20079) and Desmodesmus subspicatus (ISO 8692). Next, herbicide mixtures at concentrations corresponding to the EC values were used to assess their interactive effects, and the biomarkers were: for duckweed fresh weight, frond area, chlorophyll content and number of fronds, and for algae cell count and cell volume. The 3d EC₁₀ and EC₅₀ values using cell counts of D. subspicatus were 142.7 and 529.1 mg/L for MCPA and 1.7 and 5.1 mg/L for CHD. The 7d EC₁₀ and EC₅₀ values using frond number of L. minor amounted to 0.8 and 5.4 mg/L for MCPA and 0.7 and 10.4 mg/L for CHD. Higher sensitivity of reproductive (number of cells/fronds) than growth processes (cell volume/frond area) to herbicides applied individually and in mixtures was especially pronounced in the responses of Desmodesmus. Herbicide interactions were assessed by the two-way ANOVA and Abbott's formula. Generally, an antagonistic interaction with Lemna was revealed by MCPA and chloridazon, whereas additive effect of both herbicides was observed for Desmodesmus. A significant stimulation of SOD and APX activity by binary mixtures was noted in algal cells mainly after 24 and 48 hours of exposure. The extremely high stimulation of the activity of both enzymes was induced by the combination EC₁₀CHD + EC₅₀MCPA (48 h). Presumably due to oxidative stress, the treatment with CHD at concentration EC₅₀ after 72 h was lethal for algae grown in aerated cultures, in contrast to standardized test conditions. Taking into account the consequences of risk assessment for herbicide mixtures we can state that a relatively low toxicity, as well as the

  14. Influence of soil biochar aging on sorption of the herbicides MCPA, nicosulfuron, terbuthylazine, indaziflam, and fluoroethyldiaminotriazine.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Carmen; Spokas, Kurt A; Cox, Lucia; Koskinen, William C

    2014-11-12

    Sorption of four herbicides and a metabolite of indaziflam on a fresh macadamia nut biochar and biochars aged one or two years in soil was characterized. On fresh biochar, the sorption was terbuthylazine (Kd = 595) > indaziflam (Kd = 162) > MCPA (Kd = 7.5) > fluoroethyldiaminotriazine (Kd = 0.26) and nicosulfuron (Kd = 0). Biochar surface area increased with aging attributed to the loss of a surface film. This was also manifested in a decline in water extractable organic carbon with aging. Correspondingly, an increase in the aromaticity was observed. The higher surface area and porosity in aged biochar increased sorption of indaziflam (KdBC-2yr = 237) and fluoroethyldiaminotriazine (KdBC-1yr = 1.2 and KdBC-2yr = 3.0), but interestingly decreased sorption of terbuthylazine (KdBC-1yr = 312 and KdBC-2yr = 221) and MCPA (KdBC-1yr = 2 and KdBC-2yr = 2). These results will facilitate development of biochars for specific remediation purposes.

  15. Microencapsulation of herbicide MCPA with native β-cyclodextrin and its methyl and hydroxypropyl derivatives: An experimental and theoretical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, Jorge; Cagide, Fernando; Melle-Franco, Manuel; Borges, Fernanda; Garrido, E. Manuela

    2014-03-01

    When a pesticide is released into the environment, most of it is lost before it reaches its target. An effective way to reduce environmental losses of pesticides is by using controlled release technology. Microencapsulation becomes a promising technique for the production of controlled release agricultural formulations. In this work, the microencapsulation of chlorophenoxy herbicide MCPA with native β-cyclodextrin and its methyl and hydroxypropyl derivatives was investigated. The phase solubility study showed that both native and β-CD derivatives increased the water solubility of the herbicide and inclusion complexes are formed in a stoichiometric ratio of 1:1. The stability constants describing the extent of formation of the complexes have been determined by phase solubility studies. 1H NMR experiments were also accomplished for the prepared solid systems and the data gathered confirm the formation of the inclusion complexes. 1H NMR data obtained for the MCPA/CDs complexes disclosed noticeable proton shift displacements for OCH2 group and H6 aromatic proton of MCPA provided clear evidence of inclusion complexation process, suggesting that the phenyl moiety of the herbicide was included in the hydrophobic cavity of CDs. Free energy molecular mechanics calculations confirm all these findings.

  16. Application of MCPA herbicide on soils amended with biostimulants: short-time effects on soil biological properties.

    PubMed

    Tejada, Manuel; García-Martínez, Ana M; Gómez, Isidoro; Parrado, Juan

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we studied in the laboratory the effect of MCPA herbicide at a rate of 1.5lha(-1) (manufactures rate recommended) on biological properties of a Plagic Antrosol amended with four biostimulants (WCDS, wheat condensed distillers soluble; PA-HE, hydrolyzed poultry feathers; CGHE, carob germ enzymatic extract; and RB, rice bran extract). Seven hundred grams of soil were mixed with WCDS at a rate of 10%, CGHE at a rate of 4.7%, PA-HE at a rate of 4.3%, and RB at a rate of 4.4%, respectively, in order to applying the same amount of organic matter to the soil (16.38 g organic matter). An unamended polluted and amended non-polluted soil were used as control. For all treatments, the soil ergosterol, dehydrogenase, urease, and phosphatase activities were measured at two incubation times (0 and 60 d). The 16S rDNA-DGGE profiles in all treatments were determined at the beginning and end of the incubation period. The results indicated that at the end of the incubation period and compared with the control soil, the dehydrogenase, urease and phosphatase activities and ergosterol decreased 39.3%, 20%, 15.7% and 56.5%, respectively in the non-organic amended polluted soil. The application of organic matter to unpolluted soil increased the enzymatic activities and ergosterol. However, this stimulation was higher in the soil amended with RB, followed by PA-HE, WCDS and CGHE. The application of herbicide in organic-amended soils decreased the enzymatic activities and ergosterol content. However, this decrease was lower than for the non-amended herbicide polluted soil. Possibly the low molecular weight protein content easily assimilated by soil microorganisms and the adsorption capacity of humic substances are responsible for less inhibition of these enzyme activities and soil ergosterol. The 16S rDNA-DGGE profiles indicated that herbicide did not negatively affect soil bacterial biodiversity.

  17. Effect of DDT and MCPA (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid) on reproduction of the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis L

    SciTech Connect

    Woin, P.; Broenmark, C. )

    1992-01-01

    Reproduction is the single most important function in the life cycle of an organism. Successful reproduction determines fitness of organisms. The inability of an organism to complete any one stage of the reproductive process severely reduces its lifetime reproductive success. Disruptions in the reproduction will ultimately affect the abundance and distribution of the species. Therefore, laboratory tests of long-term impact of sublethal pollutant concentrations on organisms preferably is done on the reproductive success. Pollutants of diverse structure may affect the reproductive system which is sensitive to toxic agents. Certain pollutants, notably the organochlorine compounds, have been shown to affect the male and female reproductive systems. The authors have studied the effect of sublethal concentrations of DDT and the herbicide 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) on the reproductive output of the pulmonate snail Lymnaea stagnalis under a 2-mon exposure period.

  18. Adsorption and characterization of MCPA on DDTMA- and raw-montmorillonite: Surface sites involved.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Cintia C; Fernández, Mariela A; Torres Sánchez, Rosa M

    2016-01-01

    The 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy acid (MCPA) is an herbicide widely used in agriculture, which generates a great concern about contamination of surface water and serious consequences for human health and the environment. In this work, the adsorption of MCPA on an Argentine montmorillonite (MMT) and its organo-montmorillonite product (OMMT) with different dodecyl trimethyl ammonium loading was investigated. MCPA adsorption on OMMT increases at least 3 times, with respect to the amount determined for MMT. X-ray diffraction and zeta potential analyses indicated the inner (interlayer) and outer surface participate as adsorption sites. Changes in surface electric charge and also interlayer expansion suggest that dimethyl amine (MCPA counterion) was also surface-adsorbed. The larger aggregates of OMMT, without and with MCPA, obtained compared to those of MMT samples, generate an improvement in the coagulation efficiency. This property, particularly after MCPA retention, allows an easier separation of the solids from the solution and enables a simple technological process application.

  19. Uptake of 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) from the apical membrane of Caco-2 cells by the monocarboxylic acid transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Osamu; Tsukagoshi, Kensuke; Endo, Tetsuya

    2008-03-15

    The cellular uptake mechanism of 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), a phenoxyacetic acid derivative, was investigated using Caco-2 epithelial cells. The cells were incubated with 50 {mu}M MCPA at pH 6.0 and 37 deg. C, and the uptake of MCPA from the apical membranes was measured. The uptake of MCPA was significantly decreased by incubation at low temperature (4 {sup o}C) and markedly increased by lowering the extracellular pH. Pretreatment with a protonophore, carbonylcyanide-p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (25 {mu}M), or metabolic inhibitors, 2,4-dinitrophenol (1 mM) and sodium azide (10 mM), significantly decreased the uptake of MCPA by 53%, 45% and 48%, respectively. Coincubation of MCPA with 10 mM L-lactic acid or {alpha}-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate, which is a substrate or an inhibitor of the monocarboxylic acid transporters (MCTs), significantly decreased the uptake of MCPA by 31% and 20%, respectively, and coincubation with benzoic acid profoundly decreased the uptake by 68%. In contrast, coincubation with succinic acid (a dicarboxylic acid) did not affect the uptake. Kinetic analysis of initial MCPA uptake suggested that MCPA is taken up via a carrier-mediated process [K{sub m} = 1.37 {+-} 0.15 mM, V{sub max} = 115 {+-} 6 nmol (mg protein){sup -1} (3 min){sup -1}]. Lineweaver-Burk plots show that benzoic acid competitively inhibits the uptake of MCPA with a K{sub i} value of 4.68 {+-} 1.76 mM. A trans-stimulation effect on MCPA uptake was found in cells preloaded with benzoic acid. These results suggest that the uptake of MCPA from the apical membrane of Caco-2 cells is mainly mediated by common MCTs along with benzoic acid but also in part by L-lactic acid.

  20. The earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa stimulates abundance and activity of phenoxyalkanoic acid herbicide degraders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya-Jun; Zaprasis, Adrienne; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Drake, Harold L; Horn, Marcus A

    2011-01-01

    2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) is a widely used phenoxyalkanoic acid (PAA) herbicide. Earthworms represent the dominant macrofauna and enhance microbial activities in many soils. Thus, the effect of the model earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae) on microbial MCPA degradation was assessed in soil columns with agricultural soil. MCPA degradation was quicker in soil with earthworms than without earthworms. Quantitative PCR was inhibition-corrected per nucleic acid extract and indicated that copy numbers of tfdA-like and cadA genes (both encoding oxygenases initiating aerobic PAA degradation) in soil with earthworms were up to three and four times higher than without earthworms, respectively. tfdA-like and 16S rRNA gene transcript copy numbers in soil with earthworms were two and six times higher than without earthworms, respectively. Most probable numbers (MPNs) of MCPA degraders approximated 4 × 105 gdw−1 in soil before incubation and in soil treated without earthworms, whereas MPNs of earthworm-treated soils were approximately 150 × higher. The aerobic capacity of soil to degrade MCPA was higher in earthworm-treated soils than in earthworm-untreated soils. Burrow walls and 0–5 cm depth bulk soil displayed higher capacities to degrade MCPA than did soil from 5–10 cm depth bulk soil, expression of tfdA-like genes in burrow walls was five times higher than in bulk soil and MCPA degraders were abundant in burrow walls (MPNs of 5 × 107 gdw−1). The collective data indicate that earthworms stimulate abundance and activity of MCPA degraders endogenous to soil by their burrowing activities and might thus be advantageous for enhancing PAA degradation in soil. PMID:20740027

  1. Evidence for the importance of litter as a co-substrate for MCPA dissipation in an agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Omar; Pagel, Holger; Enowashu, Esther; Devers, Marion; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Streck, Thilo; Kandeler, Ellen; Poll, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Environmental controls of 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) degradation are poorly understood. We investigated whether microbial MCPA degraders are stimulated by (maize) litter and whether this process depends on concentrations of MCPA and litter. In a microcosm experiment, different amounts of litter (0, 10 and 20 g kg(-1)) were added to soils exposed to three levels of the herbicide (0, 5 and 30 mg kg(-1)). The treated soils were incubated at 20 °C for 6 weeks, and samples were taken after 1, 3 and 6 weeks of incubation. In soils with 5 mg kg(-1) MCPA, about 50 % of the MCPA was dissipated within 1 week of the incubation. Almost complete dissipation of the herbicide had occurred by the end of the incubation with no differences between the three litter amendments. At the higher concentration (30 mg kg(-1)), MCPA endured longer in the soil, with only 31 % of the initial amount being removed at the end of the experiment in the absence of litter. Litter addition greatly increased the dissipation rate with 70 and 80 % of the herbicide being dissipated in the 10 and 20 g kg(-1) litter treatments, respectively. Signs of toxic effects of MCPA on soil bacteria were observed from related phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analyses, while fungi showed higher tolerance to the increased MCPA levels. The abundance of bacterial tfdA genes in soil increased with the co-occurrence of litter and high MCPA concentration, indicating the importance of substrate availability in fostering MCPA-degrading bacteria and thereby improving the potential for removal of MCPA in the environment.

  2. Adsorption and degradation of phenoxyalkanoic acid herbicides in soils: A review.

    PubMed

    Paszko, Tadeusz; Muszyński, Paweł; Materska, Małgorzata; Bojanowska, Monika; Kostecka, Małgorzata; Jackowska, Izabella

    2016-02-01

    The primary aim of the present review on phenoxyalkanoic acid herbicides-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) acetic acid (2,4-D), 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) acetic acid (MCPA), (2R)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) propanoic acid (dichlorprop-P), (2R)-2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) propanoic acid (mecoprop-P), 4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) butanoic acid (2,4-DB), and 4-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) butanoic acid (MCPB)-was to compare the extent of their adsorption in soils and degradation rates to assess their potential for groundwater contamination. The authors found that adsorption decreased in the sequence of 2,4-DB > 2,4-D > MCPA > dichlorprop-P > mecoprop-P. Herbicides are predominantly adsorbed as anions-on organic matter and through a water-bridging mechanism with adsorbed Fe cations-and their neutral forms are adsorbed mainly on organic matter. Adsorption of anions of 2,4-D, MCPA, dichlorprop-P, and mecoprop-P is inversely correlated with their lipophilicity values, and modeling of adsorption of the compounds based on this relationship is possible. The predominant dissipation mechanism of herbicides in soils is bacterial degradation. The contribution of other mechanisms, such as degradation by fungi, photodegradation, or volatilization from soils, is much smaller. The rate of bacterial degradation decreased in the following order: 2,4-D > MCPA > mecoprop-P > dichlorprop-P. It was found that 2,4-D and MCPA have the lowest potential for leaching into groundwater and that mecoprop-P and dichlorprop-P have slightly higher potential. Because of limited data on adsorption and degradation of 2,4-DB and MCPB, estimation of their leaching potential was not possible.

  3. OH-radical induced degradation of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA): A pulse radiolysis and gamma-radiolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zona, Robert; Solar, Sonja; Sehested, Knud

    2012-02-01

    The reactions of rad OH, H rad and e aq- with 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) were studied by pulse radiolysis. The site of rad OH-radicals addition to the aromatic ring of 2,4,5-T was found to be—C1: ˜18%, C2/C4/C5: total ˜28% and C3/C6: total ˜41%. The overall rate constants with OH-radicals were k( rad OH+2,4,5-T)=6.4 (±0.5)×10 9 mol dm -3 s -1 and k( rad OH+MCPA)=8.5 (±0.8)×10 9 mol dm -3 s -1. The radiation induced decomposition of the pesticides, chloride- and product formation (phenolic compounds, aliphatic acids) was studied by gamma radiolysis as a function of dose. A mechanism for acetate formation is discussed. The presence of oxygen during irradiation affected the decomposition rate only indiscernibly, however, chloride elimination, ring fragmentation (formation of aliphatic acids), TOC- and toxicity reduction were strongly enhanced. For complete removal of 500 μmol dm -3 herbicides a dose of ˜4 kGy was required. Using air saturation during irradiation a reduction of 37-40% of the TOC was observable at 5 kGy, detoxification (luminescence inhibition <20%) was achieved with 10 kGy.

  4. Impact of wheat straw biochar addition to soil on the sorption, leaching, dissipation of the herbicide (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid and the growth of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Tatarková, Veronika; Hiller, Edgar; Vaculík, Marek

    2013-06-01

    Biochar addition to agricultural soils might increase the sorption of herbicides, and therefore, affect other sorption-related processes such as leaching, dissipation and toxicity for plants. In this study, the impact of wheat straw biochar on the sorption, leaching and dissipation in a soil, and toxicity for sunflower of (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid (MCPA), a commonly used ionizable herbicide, was investigated. The results showed that MCPA sorption by biochar and biochar-amended soil (1.0wt% biochar) was 82 and 2.53 times higher than that by the non-amended soil, respectively. However, desorption of MCPA from biochar-amended soil was only 1.17 times lower than its desorption in non-amended soil. Biochar addition to soil reduced both MCPA leaching and dissipation. About 35% of the applied MCPA was transported through biochar-amended soil, while up to 56% was recovered in the leachates transported through non-amended soil. The half-life value of MCPA increased from 5.2d in non-amended soil to 21.5 d in biochar-amended soil. Pot experiments with sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) grown in MCPA-free, but biochar-amended soil showed no positive effect of biochar on the growth of sunflower in comparison to the non-amended soil. However, biochar itself significantly reduced the content of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a, b) in sunflower. There was no significant difference in the phytotoxic effects of MCPA on sunflowers between the biochar-amended soil and the non-amended soil. Furthermore, MCPA had no effect on the photosynthetic pigment contents in sunflower.

  5. Behavior of MCPA in four intensive cropping soils amended with fresh, composted, and aged olive mill waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Piñeiro, Antonio; Peña, David; Albarrán, Angel; Sánchez-Llerena, Javier; Becerra, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    An evaluation was made of the impact of olive mill waste and its organic matter transformation on the sorption, desorption, leaching, and degradation of the herbicide MCPA when the waste was applied to four Mediterranean soils. The soils were amended in the laboratory with fresh, composted, and field-aged olive mill waste (OW, COW, and AOW treatments, respectively). It was found that the greater the amount of OW applied to the soils, but especially the greater its organic matter maturity, the greater the adsorption of MCPA. Compared with unamended soils, at the 5% rate of application the adsorption capacity increased by between 9.8% and 40%, 148% and 224%, and by 258% for the OW, COW, and AOW amended soils, respectively. The hysteresis coefficients were significantly lower in the OW-amended soils than in AOW or COW-amended soils, indicating that the adsorbed MCPA could be easily desorbed in OW-amended soils if the amendment is not aged or composted. While the OW addition greatly extended the persistence of MCPA, the application of COW enhanced MCPA degradation in all the soils, as corresponded to the increased soil microbial activity indicated by the higher levels of soil dehydrogenase activity. Fresh OW amendment significantly increased the amount of MCPA leached (from 13.7% in the most alkaline soil to 36.7% in the most acidic, at the 5% rate of application), favored by the higher levels of water soluble organic carbon content. However, leaching losses of the herbicide were reduced by up to 39.9% and 55.3% in the COW- and AOW-amended soils at the 5% loading rate, respectively. The use of OW with a high degree of organic matter maturity may be regarded as a potentially useful management practice to reduce MCPA leaching in soils with low organic matter content. The application of fresh OW, however, could well increase the risk of groundwater contamination by this herbicide, especially in acidic soils.

  6. Solar photoelectro-Fenton degradation of the herbicide 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid optimized by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Segura, Sergi; Almeida, Lucio Cesar; Bocchi, Nerilso; Brillas, Enric

    2011-10-30

    A central composite rotatable design and response surface methodology (RSM) were used to optimize the experimental variables of the solar photoelectro-Fenton (SPEF) treatment of the herbicide 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA). The experiments were made with a flow plant containing a Pt/air-diffusion reactor coupled to a solar compound parabolic collector (CPC) under recirculation of 10 L of 186 mg L(-1) MCPA solutions in 0.05 M Na(2)SO(4) at a liquid flow rate of 180 L h(-1) with an average UV irradiation intensity of about 32 Wm(-2). The optimum variables found for the SPEF process were 5.0 A, 1.0mM Fe(2+) and pH 3.0 after 120 min of electrolysis. Under these conditions, 75% of mineralization with 71% of current efficiency and 87.7 k Wh kg(-1) TOC of energy consumption were obtained. MCPA decayed under the attack of generated hydroxyl radicals following a pseudo-first-order kinetics. Hydroxyl radicals also destroyed 4-chloro-2-methylphenol, methylhydroquinone and methyl-p-benzoquinone detected as aromatic by-products. Glycolic, maleic, fumaric, malic, succinic, tartronic, oxalic and formic acids were identified as generated carboxylic acids, which form Fe(III) complexes that are quickly photodecarboxylated by the UV irradiation of sunlight at the CPC photoreactor. A reaction sequence for the SPEF degradation of MCPA was proposed.

  7. Radiolytic degradation of pesticide 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA)—Experimental data and kinetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojanowska-Czajka, Anna; Drzewicz, Przemysław; Zimek, Zbigniew; Nichipor, Henrietta; Nałęcz-Jawecki, Grzegorz; Sawicki, Józef; Kozyra, Czesław; Trojanowicz, Marek

    2007-11-01

    The aqueous solutions of MCPA have been γ-irradiated in different conditions, where particular active radical species from water radiolysis predominate. The obtained data confirmed that largest yield of radiolytic decomposition is obtained in oxidation processes, where oxidation is carried out with hydroxyl radicals. The obtained data have been compared with kinetic modelling. A fair agreement was obtained for degradation of MCPA in different experimental conditions, including also irradiation in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, that in optimised conditions can be used to enhance the yield of decomposition. The obtained data have also shown a strong effect of the presence of large amount of chloride on yield of MCPA decomposition, which can be attributed to strong oxidation properties of chlorine radicals formed. It is also shown that MCPA can be completely decomposed in industrial wastes from various stages of MCPA production, although this is not accompanied by satisfactory reduction of toxicity of examined wastes.

  8. Cm-scale Heterogeneity in Degradation - Potential Impact on Leaching of MCPA through a Variably-Saturated Macroporous Clayey Till

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbom, A. E.; Johnsen, A. R.; Aamand, J.; Binning, P. J.; Dechesne, A.; Smets, B. F.; "Cream-Spatial Heterogeneity"-Team

    2011-12-01

    Recent research has revealed a large variation in pesticide mineralization potentials, but little is known about the scale at which these heterogeneities impact the spreading of contaminants. A modeling study aiming at quantifying how heterogeneous degradation potentials in agricultural soil will affect MCPA degradation and leaching was conducted. 2D-distributions (96-well micro plate mineralization assay) of the mineralization potentials of phenoxy acid herbicides (MCPA, 2,4-D) representing layers in the upper meter of variably-saturated clayey till were applied. The rapid mineralization measured was represented by Monod mineralization kinetics, whereas the rest were either represented by slow 0-order mineralization kinetics or no degradation. Five 3D-modelling scenarios were set up using the COMSOL Multiphysics 4.1 toolbox (COMSOL Inc., Burlington, MA, USA): 1) simple matrix flow of water with no biodegradation of the MCPA at all nodes; 2) preferential flow (including a wormhole) of water with no biodegradation of the MCPA at all nodes; 3) simple matrix flow of water with average biodegradation of the MCPA at all nodes, which corresponds to results derived from a conventional homogenized soil sample; 4) simple matrix flow of water with the observed high variation in biodegradation of the MCPA corresponding to random variation in degradation; and 5) vertical structure in water flow combined with vertically structured degradation (defined hot spots and cold spots), which corresponds to a situation where both flow and degradation are associated with macropores/wormholes. Results show that cm-scale heterogeneity in degradation potential with simple matrix flow has a negligible effect on MCPA leaching at one meter below soil surface. By introducing a wormhole in the low-permeable 3D-soil modeling domain, however, the risk of MCPA-leaching below one meter depth increase drastically with low degradation potential along the wall of macropores/wormholes.

  9. Isotope dilution high-resolution gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry method for analysis of selected acidic herbicides in surface water.

    PubMed

    Woudneh, Million B; Sekela, Mark; Tuominen, Taina; Gledhill, Melissa

    2006-11-10

    In this work, an isotope dilution method for determination of selected acidic herbicides by high-resolution gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS) was developed for surface water samples. Average percent recoveries of native analytes were observed to be between 70.8 and 93.5% and average recoveries of labeled quantification standards [(13)C(6)]2,4-D and [(13)C(6)]2,4,5-T were 85.5 and 101%, respectively. Using this method, detection limits of 0.05 ng/L for dicamba, MCPA, MCPP, and triclopyr, and 0.5 ng/L for 2,4-D were routinely achieved. The method was applied to measuring the concentration of these analytes in surface water samples collected from five sampling locations in the Lower Fraser Valley region of British Columbia, Canada. All of the herbicides monitored were detected at varying levels in the surface water samples collected. The highest concentrations detected for each analyte were 345 ng/L for 2,4-D, 317 ng/L for MCPA, 271 ng/L for MCPP, 15.7 ng/L for dicamba, and 2.18 ng/L for triclopyr. Average detection frequencies of the herbicides were 95% for MCPA, 80% for MCPP, 70% for dicamba, 65% for 2,4-D, and 46% for triclopyr. Seasonal variations of herbicide levels are also discussed.

  10. Assessment of Envi-Carb™ as a passive sampler binding phase for acid herbicides without pH adjustment.

    PubMed

    Seen, Andrew; Bizeau, Oceane; Sadler, Lachlan; Jordan, Timothy; Nichols, David

    2014-05-01

    The graphitised carbon solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbent Envi-Carb has been used to fabricate glass fibre filter- Envi-Carb "sandwich" disks for use as a passive sampler for acid herbicides. Passive sampler uptake of a suite of herbicides, including the phenoxyacetic acid herbicides 4-chloro-o-tolyloxyacetic acid (MCPA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid (Dicamba), was achieved without pH adjustment, demonstrating for the first time a suitable binding phase for passive sampling of acid herbicides at neutral pH. Passive sampling experiments with Duck River (Tasmania, Australia) water spiked at 0.5 μg L(-1) herbicide concentration over a 7 d deployment period showed that sampling rates in Duck River water decreased for seven out of eight herbicides, and in the cases of 3,6-dichloro-2-pyridinecarboxylic acid (Clopyralid) and Dicamba no accumulation of the herbicides occurred in the Envi-Carb over the deployment period. Sampling rates for 4-amino-3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinecarboxylic acid (Picloram), 2,4-D and MCPA decreased to approximately 30% of the sampling rates in ultrapure water, whilst sampling rates for 2-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-ylcarbamoylsulfamoyl) benzoic acid, methyl ester (Sulfometuron-methyl) and 3,5,6-Trichloro-2-pyridinyloxyacetic acid (Triclopyr) were approximately 60% of the ultrapure water sampling rate. For methyl N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-N-(methoxyacetyl)-D-alaninate (Metalaxyl-M) there was little variation in sampling rate between passive sampling experiments in ultrapure water and Duck River water. SPE experiments undertaken with Envi-Carb disks using ultrapure water and filtered and unfiltered Duck River water showed that not only is adsorption onto particulate matter in Duck River water responsible for a reduction in herbicide sampling rate, but interactions of herbicides with dissolved or colloidal matter (matter able to pass through a 0.2 μm membrane filter) also reduces the herbicide sampling

  11. Factors responsible for rapid dissipation of acidic herbicides in the coastal lagoons of the Camargue (Rhône River Delta, France).

    PubMed

    Al Housari, Fadi; Höhener, Patrick; Chiron, Serge

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating which processes cause acidic herbicides (e.g., bentazone, MCPA and dichlorprop) to rapidly disappear in the lagoons of the Rhône delta, which are peculiar brackish and shallow aquatic environments. The use of the model MASAS (Modeling of Anthropogenic Substances in Aquatic Systems) revealed that sorption, sedimentation, volatilization, flushing and abiotic hydrolysis had a minor role in the attenuation of the investigated herbicides. Laboratory scale biodegradation and photodegradation studies were conducted to better assess the significance of these two processes in the natural attenuation of herbicides in brackish (lagoons) waters with respect to fresh waters (canals draining paddy fields). Herbicide biodegradation rates were significantly lower in lagoon water than in canal water. Consequently, photodegradation was the main dissipation route of all investigated herbicides. The contribution of indirect photolysis was relevant for MCPA and dichlorprop while direct photolysis dominated for bentazone removal. There is a need to further investigate the identity of phototransformation products of herbicides in lagoons.

  12. Comparative Inter-Species Pharmacokinetics of Phenoxyacetic Acid Herbicides and Related Organic Acids. Evidence that the Dog is Not a Relevant Species for Evaluation of Human Health Risk.

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Chuck

    2004-07-15

    Phenoxyacetic acids including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) are widely utilized organic acid herbicides that have undergone extensive toxicity and pharmacokinetic analyses. The dog is particularly susceptible to the toxicity of phenoxyacetic acids and related organic acids relative to other species. Active renal clearance mechanisms for organic acids are ubiquitous in mammalian species, and thus a likely mechanism responsible for the increased sensitivity of the dog to these agents is linked to a lower capacity to secrete organic acids from the kidney. Using published data describing the pharmacokinetics of phenoxyacetic and structurally related organic acids in a variety of species including humans, inter-species comparative pharmacokinetics were evaluated using allometic parameter scaling. For both 2,4-D and MCPA the dog plasma half-life (t1/2) and renal clearance (Clr; ml hr-1) rates did not scale as a function of body weight across species; whereas for all other species evaluated, including humans, these pharmacokinetic parameters reasonably scaled. This exceptional response in the dog is clearly illustrated by comparing the plasma t1/2 at comparable doses of 2,4-D and MCPA, across several species. At a dosage of 5 mg/kg, in dogs the plasma t1/2 for 2,4-D and MCPA were {approx}92 - 106 hr and 63 hr, respectively, which is substantially longer than in the rat ({approx}1 and 6 hr, respectively) or in humans (12 and 11 hr, respectively). This longer t1/2, and slower elimination in the dog, results in substantially higher body burdens of these organic acids, at comparable doses, relative to other species. Although these results indicate the important role of renal transport clearance mechanisms as determinants of the clearance and potential toxicity outcomes of phenoxyacetic acid herbicides across several species, other contributing mechanisms such as reabsorption from the renal tubules is highly likely. These

  13. Influence of oligomeric herbicidal ionic liquids with MCPA and Dicamba anions on the community structure of autochthonic bacteria present in agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Ławniczak, Ł; Syguda, A; Borkowski, A; Cyplik, P; Marcinkowska, K; Wolko, Ł; Praczyk, T; Chrzanowski, Ł; Pernak, J

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of selected herbicidal ionic liquids (HILs), which exhibit high efficacy in terms of weed control and low toxicity, but may be persistent due to limited biodegradability, on the community structure of autochthonic bacteria present in agricultural soil. Four different oligomeric HILs (with two types of cations and different ratio of herbicidal anions) were synthesized and characterized by employing (1)H and (13)C NMR. The results of biodegradation assay indicated that none of the tested HILs could be classified as readily biodegradable (biodegradation rate ranged from 0 to 7%). The conducted field studies confirmed that the herbicidal efficacy of the HILs was higher compared to the reference herbicide mixture by 10 to 30%, depending on the dose and weed species. After termination of field studies, the soil treated with the tested HILs was subjected to next generation sequencing in order to investigate the potential changes in the bacterial community structure. Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum in all studied samples. Treatment with the studied HILs resulted in an increase of Actinobacteria compared to the reference herbicidal mixture. Differenced among the studied HILs were generally associated with a significantly higher abundance of Bacteroidetes in case of 1-HIL-Dicamba 1/3 and Firmicutes in case of 2-HIL-Dicamba 1/3.

  14. Variation of MCPA, metribuzine, methyltriazine-amine and glyphosate degradation, sorption, mineralization and leaching in different soil horizons.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Carsten S; van der Keur, Peter; Iversen, Bo V; Rosenberg, Per; Barlebo, Heidi C; Torp, Søren; Vosgerau, Henrik; Juhler, René K; Ernstsen, Vibeke; Rasmussen, Jim; Brinch, Ulla Catrine; Jacobsen, Ole Hørbye

    2008-12-01

    Pesticide mineralization and sorption were determined in 75 soil samples from 15 individually drilled holes through the vadose zone along a 28km long transect of the Danish outwash plain. Mineralization of the phenoxyacetic acid herbicide MCPA was high both in topsoils and in most subsoils, while metribuzine and methyltriazine-amine was always low. Organic matter and soil pH was shown to be responsible for sorption of MCPA and metribuzine in the topsoils. The sorption of methyltriazine-amine in topsoil was positively correlated with clay and negatively correlated with the pH of the soil. Sorption of glyphosate was tested also high in the subsoils. One-dimensional MACRO modeling of the concentration of MCPA, metribuzine and methyltriazine-amine at 2m depth calculated that the average concentration of MCPA and methyltriazine-amine in the groundwater was below the administrative limit of 0.1mug/l in all tested profiles while metribuzine always exceeded the 0.1mug/l threshold value.

  15. Investigation of MCPA (4-Chloro-2-ethylphenoxyacetate) resistance in wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum L.).

    PubMed

    Jugulam, Mithila; Dimeo, Natalie; Veldhuis, Linda J; Walsh, Michael; Hall, J Christopher

    2013-12-26

    The phenoxy herbicides (e.g., 2,4-D and MCPA) are used widely in agriculture for the selective control of broadleaf weeds. In Western Australia, the reliance on phenoxy herbicides has resulted in the widespread evolution of phenoxy resistance in wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum) populations. In this research the inheritance and mechanism of MCPA resistance in wild radish were determined. Following classical breeding procedures, F1, F2, and backcross progeny were generated. The F1 progeny showed an intermediate response to MCPA, compared to parents, suggesting that MCPA resistance in wild radish is inherited as an incompletely dominant trait. Segregation ratios observed in F2 (3:1; resistant:susceptible) and backcross progeny (1:1; resistant to susceptible) indicated that the MCPA resistance is controlled by a single gene in wild radish. Radiolabeled MCPA studies suggested no difference in MCPA uptake or metabolism between resistant and susceptible wild radish; however, resistant plants rapidly translocated more (14)C-MCPA to roots than susceptible plants, which may have been exuded from the plant. Understanding the genetic basis and mechanism of phenoxy resistance in wild radish will help formulate prudent weed management strategies to reduce the incidence of phenoxy resistance.

  16. Comparing Metabolic Functionalities, Community Structures, and Dynamics of Herbicide-Degrading Communities Cultivated with Different Substrate Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Gözdereliler, Erkin; Boon, Nico; Aamand, Jens; De Roy, Karen; Granitsiotis, Michael S.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Two 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA)-degrading enrichment cultures selected from an aquifer on low (0.1 mg liter−1) or high (25 mg liter−1) MCPA concentrations were compared in terms of metabolic activity, community composition, population growth, and single cell physiology. Different community compositions and major shifts in community structure following exposure to different MCPA concentrations were observed using both 16S rRNA gene denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting and pyrosequencing. The communities also differed in their MCPA-mineralizing activities. The enrichments selected on low concentrations mineralized MCPA with shorter lag phases than those selected on high concentrations. Flow cytometry measurements revealed that mineralization led to cell growth. The presence of low-nucleic acid-content bacteria (LNA bacteria) was correlated with mineralization activity in cultures selected on low herbicide concentrations. This suggests that LNA bacteria may play a role in degradation of low herbicide concentrations in aquifers impacted by agriculture. This study shows that subpopulations of herbicide-degrading bacteria that are adapted to different pesticide concentrations can coexist in the same environment and that using a low herbicide concentration enables enrichment of apparently oligotrophic subpopulations. PMID:23124226

  17. Determination of chlorinated acid herbicides in vegetation and soil by liquid chromatography/electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schaner, Angela; Konecny, Jaclyn; Luckey, Laura; Hickes, Heidi

    2007-01-01

    The method presented uses reversed-phase liquid chromatography with negative electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry to analyze 9 chlorinated acid herbicides in soil and vegetation matrixes: clopyralid, dicamba, MCPP, MCPA, 2,4-DP, 2,4-D, triclopyr, 2,4-DB, and picloram. A 20 g portion is extracted with a basic solution and an aliquot acidified and micropartitioned with 3 mL chloroform. Vegetation samples are subjected to an additional cleanup with a mixed-mode anion exchange solid-phase extraction cartridge. Two precursor product ion transitions per analyte are measured and evaluated to provide the maximum degree of confidence in results. Average recoveries for 3 different soil types tested ranged from 72 to 107% for all compounds with the exception of 2,4-DB at 56-99%. Average recoveries for the 3 different vegetation types studied were lower and ranged from 53 to 80% for all compounds.

  18. Combination of graphene oxide-based solid phase extraction and electro membrane extraction for the preconcentration of chlorophenoxy acid herbicides in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Tabani, Hadi; Fakhari, Ali Reza; Shahsavani, Abolfath; Behbahani, Mohammad; Salarian, Mani; Bagheri, Akbar; Nojavan, Saeed

    2013-07-26

    Combination of different extraction methods is an interesting and debatable work in the field of sample preparation. In the current study, for the first time, solid phase extraction combined with electro membrane extraction (SPE-EME) was developed for ultra-preconcentration and determination of chlorophenoxy acid herbicides in environmental samples using capillary electrophoresis (CE). In the mentioned method, first, a 100mL of chlorophenoxy acid herbicides (2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), 2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) propanoic acid (2,4-DP) and 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) propanoic acid (MCPP)) was passed through a column of graphene oxide as a solid phase, and then the adsorbed herbicides were eluted by 4.0mL of 8% acetic acid (HOAC) in methanol. Then, the elution solvent was evaporated and the herbicides residue was dissolved in 4.0mL of double distilled water (pH 9.0). Afterwards, the herbicides in 4.0mL of the aqueous solution were transferred to an EME glass vial. In the EME step, the herbicides were extracted from the sample solution into the basic acceptor solution (pH 13.0) under electrical potential, which was held inside the lumen of the fiber with 1-octanol as the supported liquid membrane (SLM). Under the optimized conditions, high enrichment factors were obtained in the range of 1950-2000. The limits of quantification (LOQs) and method detection limits (MDLs) were obtained in the range of 1.0-1.5 and 0.3-0.5ngmL(-1), respectively. Finally, the performance of the present method was evaluated for extraction and determination of chlorophenoxy acid herbicides in environmental samples.

  19. Pelargonic acid as a herbicide in sweet bell peppers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pelargonic acid, although not certified as organic, is naturally occurring in many plants, animals, and foods. It is also phytotoxic to plants as a contact herbicide, injuring and killing plants by destroying the cell membrane. Vegetable producers would benefit from additional herbicide options tha...

  20. Modeling of Phenoxy Acid Herbicide Mineralization and Growth of Microbial Degraders in 15 Soils Monitored by Quantitative Real-Time PCR of the Functional tfdA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Bælum, Jacob; Prestat, Emmanuel; David, Maude M.; Strobel, Bjarne W.

    2012-01-01

    Mineralization potentials, rates, and kinetics of the three phenoxy acid (PA) herbicides, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), and 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)propanoic acid (MCPP), were investigated and compared in 15 soils collected from five continents. The mineralization patterns were fitted by zero/linear or exponential growth forms of the three-half-order models and by logarithmic (log), first-order, or zero-order kinetic models. Prior and subsequent to the mineralization event, tfdA genes were quantified using real-time PCR to estimate the genetic potential for degrading PA in the soils. In 25 of the 45 mineralization scenarios, ∼60% mineralization was observed within 118 days. Elevated concentrations of tfdA in the range 1 × 105 to 5 × 107 gene copies g−1 of soil were observed in soils where mineralization could be described by using growth-linked kinetic models. A clear trend was observed that the mineralization rates of the three PAs occurred in the order 2,4-D > MCPA > MCPP, and a correlation was observed between rapid mineralization and soils exposed to PA previously. Finally, for 2,4-D mineralization, all seven mineralization patterns which were best fitted by the exponential model yielded a higher tfdA gene potential after mineralization had occurred than the three mineralization patterns best fitted by the Lin model. PMID:22635998

  1. Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on soil and its components. III. Influence of clay acidity, humic acid coating and herbicide structure on acetanilide herbicide adsorption on homoionic clays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-ping; Fang, Zhuo; Liu, Hui-jun; Yang, Wei-chun

    2002-04-01

    Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on homoionic montmorillonite, soil humic acid, and their mixtures was studied by coupling batch equilibration and FT-IR analysis. Adsorption isotherms of acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor and propachlor on Ca(2+)-, Mg(2+)-, Al(3+)- and Fe(3+)-saturated clays were well described by the Freundlich equation. Regardless of the type of exchange cations, Kf decreased in the order of metolachlor > acetolachlor > alachlor > propachlor on the same clay. FT-IR spectra showed that the carbonyl group of the herbicide molecule was involved in binding, probably via H-bond with water molecules in the clay interlayer. The type and position of substitutions around the carbonyl group may have affected the electronegativity of oxygen, thus influencing the relative adsorption of these herbicides. For the same herbicide, adsorption on clay increased in the order of Mg2+ < Ca2+ < Al3+ < or = Fe3+ which coincided with the increasing acidity of homoionic clays. Acidity of cations may have affected the protonation of water, and thus the strength of H-bond between the clay water and herbicide. Complexation of clay and humic acid resulted in less adsorption than that expected from independent adsorption by the individual constituents. The effect varied with herbicides, but the greatest decrease in adsorption occurred at a 60:40 clay-to-humic acid ratio for all the herbicides. Causes for the decreased adsorption need to be characterized to better understand adsorption mechanisms and predict adsorption from soil compositions.

  2. Betaine and Carnitine Derivatives as Herbicidal Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Pernak, Juliusz; Niemczak, Michał; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Ławniczak, Łukasz; Fochtman, Przemysław; Marcinkowska, Katarzyna; Praczyk, Tadeusz

    2016-08-16

    This study focused on the synthesis and subsequent characterization of herbicidal ionic liquids based on betaine and carnitine, two derivatives of amino acids, which were used as cations. Four commonly used herbicides (2,4-D, MCPA, MCPP and Dicamba) were used as anions in simple (single anion) and oligomeric (two anions) salts. The obtained salts were subjected to analyzes regarding physicochemical properties (density, viscosity, refractive index, thermal decomposition profiles and solubility) as well as evaluation of their herbicidal activity under greenhouse and field conditions, toxicity towards rats and biodegradability. The obtained results suggest that the synthesized herbicidal ionic liquids displayed low toxicity (classified as category 4 compounds) and showed similar or improved efficacy against weed compared to reference herbicides. The highest increase was observed during field trials for salts containing 2,4-D as the anion, which also exhibited the highest biodegradability (>75 %).

  3. A Systematic Review of Carcinogenic Outcomes and Potential Mechanisms from Exposure to 2,4-D and MCPA in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    von Stackelberg, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Chlorophenoxy compounds, particularly 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid (MCPA), are amongst the most widely used herbicides in the United States for both agricultural and residential applications. Epidemiologic studies suggest that exposure to 2,4-D and MCPA may be associated with increased risk non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL), Hodgkin's disease (HD), leukemia, and soft-tissue sarcoma (STS). Toxicological studies in rodents show no evidence of carcinogenicity, and regulatory agencies worldwide consider chlorophenoxies as not likely to be carcinogenic or unclassifiable as to carcinogenicity. This systematic review assembles the available data to evaluate epidemiologic, toxicological, pharmacokinetic, exposure, and biomonitoring studies with respect to key cellular events noted in disease etiology and how those relate to hypothesized modes of action for these constituents to determine the plausibility of an association between exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of 2,4-D and MCPA and lymphohematopoietic cancers. The combined evidence does not support a genotoxic mode of action. Although plausible hypotheses for other carcinogenic modes of action exist, a comparison of biomonitoring data to oral equivalent doses calculated from bioassay data shows that environmental exposures are not sufficient to support a causal relationship. Genetic polymorphisms exist that are known to increase the risk of developing NHL. The potential interaction between these polymorphisms and exposures to chlorophenoxy compounds, particularly in occupational settings, is largely unknown. PMID:23533401

  4. Proteolytic Pathways Induced by Herbicides That Inhibit Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zulet, Amaia; Gil-Monreal, Miriam; Villamor, Joji Grace; Zabalza, Ana; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Royuela, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Background The herbicides glyphosate (Gly) and imazamox (Imx) inhibit the biosynthesis of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids, respectively. Although these herbicides inhibit different pathways, they have been reported to show several common physiological effects in their modes of action, such as increasing free amino acid contents and decreasing soluble protein contents. To investigate proteolytic activities upon treatment with Gly and Imx, pea plants grown in hydroponic culture were treated with Imx or Gly, and the proteolytic profile of the roots was evaluated through fluorogenic kinetic assays and activity-based protein profiling. Results Several common changes in proteolytic activity were detected following Gly and Imx treatment. Both herbicides induced the ubiquitin-26 S proteasome system and papain-like cysteine proteases. In contrast, the activities of vacuolar processing enzymes, cysteine proteases and metacaspase 9 were reduced following treatment with both herbicides. Moreover, the activities of several putative serine protease were similarly increased or decreased following treatment with both herbicides. In contrast, an increase in YVADase activity was observed under Imx treatment versus a decrease under Gly treatment. Conclusion These results suggest that several proteolytic pathways are responsible for protein degradation upon herbicide treatment, although the specific role of each proteolytic activity remains to be determined. PMID:24040092

  5. Spatial variation in 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid mineralization and sorption in a sandy soil at field level.

    PubMed

    Fredslund, L; Vinther, F P; Brinch, U C; Elsgaard, L; Rosenberg, P; Jacobsen, C S

    2008-01-01

    The phenoxyacetic acid herbicide MCPA (2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid) is frequently detected in groundwater beneath Danish agricultural fields. We investigated spatial variation in microbial MCPA mineralization potential in a flat agricultural field of fine sandy soil (USDA classification: Humic Dystrudept) located on the Yoldia plains of Northern Jutland, Denmark. Samples for determination of MCPA mineralization and sorption were collected from the Ap and Bs horizons at 51 sampling sites located in a 200 x 220 m grid. Spatial variation in sorption was low in both horizons (distribution coefficient, 0.36-4.16 L kg(-1)). Sorption correlated strongly with soil organic carbon content in both horizons (CV, 93 and 83%, respectively) and negatively with soil pH. [Ring-(14)C]-MCPA mineralized readily in the Ap horizon, with 49 to 62% of the (14)C-MCPA being converted to (14)CO(2) during the 67-d incubation period. With the subsoil, mineralization of (14)C-MCPA varied considerably between samples (0.5-72.8%). At neither depth was there correlation between (14)C-MCPA mineralization and sorption, soil pH, organic carbon content, clay content, number of colony-forming units (CFU), pseudomonad CFU, or any of the four microbial activity parameters measured. The presence of microbial genes encoding for the TfdA enzyme was quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction. No correlation was found between MCPA mineralization potential and the natural background number of tfdA genes present in the soil samples. The degradation kinetics suggests that the high (14)C-MCPA mineralization rate detected in soil samples was linked to growth of the MCPA-degrading soil microbial community.

  6. Cancer incidence in Danish phenoxy herbicide workers, 1947-1993.

    PubMed Central

    Lynge, E

    1998-01-01

    A cohort study was undertaken of 2119 workers from Denmark who were potentially exposed to phenoxy herbicides. The workers were from two factories that produced phenoxy herbicides since 1947 and 1951, respectively. They had been employed either in the manufacture of phenoxy herbicide or in the manual service functions. The main product was 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA). From 1947 to 1993 the 2119 workers had a slightly lower overall cancer incidence than the Danish population (observed = 204; expected [Exp] = 234.23; standardized incidence ratio [SIR] = 0.87; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8-1.0). Four soft-tissue sarcoma cases were observed (Exp = 2.47; SIR = 1.62; 95% CI = 0.4-4.1). All four cases occurred among men from Kemisk Vaerk Køge (Exp = 1.68; SIR = 2.38; 95% CI = 0.7-6.1). There were six cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Exp = 5.07; SIR = 1.10; 95% CI = 0.4-2.6) and no significantly elevated risk of other cancers. Based on small numbers, the study suggests an association between the exposure to MCPA and related phenoxy herbicides and the risk of soft-tissue sarcoma. The study does not indicate a risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma after exposure to these phenoxy herbicides or a risk of other cancer diseases. PMID:9599717

  7. Influence of herbicide structure, clay acidity, and humic acid coating on acetanilide herbicide adsorption on homoionic clays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weiping; Gan, Jianying; Yates, Scott R

    2002-07-03

    Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on homoionic montmorillonite was studied by coupling batch equilibration and FT-IR analysis. Adsorption decreased in the order metolachlor > acetochlor > alachlor > propachlor on Ca(2+)- or Mg(2+)-saturated clays and in the order metolachlor > alachlor > acetachlor > propachlor on Al(3+)- or Fe(3+)-saturated clays. FT-IR spectra showed that the carbonyl group of the herbicide molecule was involved in bonding. For the same herbicide, adsorption of alachlor, acetachlor, and metolachlor on clay followed the order Ca(2+) approximately Mg(2+) < Al(3+) < or = Fe(3+), which coincided with the increasing acidity of homoionic clays. Adsorption of propachlor, however, showed an opposite dependence, suggesting a different governing interaction. In clay and humic acid mixtures, herbicide adsorption was less than that expected from independent additive adsorption by the individual constituents, and the deviation was dependent on the clay-to-humic acid ratio, with the greatest deviation consistently occurring at a 60:40 clay-to-humic acid ratio.

  8. Identification of the mcpA and mcpM genes, encoding methyl-accepting proteins involved in amino acid and l-malate chemotaxis, and involvement of McpM-mediated chemotaxis in plant infection by Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum (formerly Ralstonia solanacearum phylotypes I and III).

    PubMed

    Hida, Akiko; Oku, Shota; Kawasaki, Takeru; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi

    2015-11-01

    Sequence analysis has revealed the presence of 22 putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (mcp) genes in the Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum GMI1000 genome. PCR analysis and DNA sequencing showed that the highly motile R. pseudosolanacearum strain Ps29 possesses homologs of all 22 R. pseudosolanacearum GMI1000 mcp genes. We constructed a complete collection of single mcp gene deletion mutants of R. pseudosolanacearum Ps29 by unmarked gene deletion. Screening of the mutant collection revealed that R. pseudosolanacearum Ps29 mutants of RSp0507 and RSc0606 homologs were defective in chemotaxis to l-malate and amino acids, respectively. RSp0507 and RSc0606 homologs were designated mcpM and mcpA. While wild-type R. pseudosolanacearum strain Ps29 displayed attraction to 16 amino acids, the mcpA mutant showed no response to 12 of these amino acids and decreased responses to 4 amino acids. We constructed mcpA and mcpM deletion mutants of highly virulent R. pseudosolanacearum strain MAFF106611 to investigate the contribution of chemotaxis to l-malate and amino acids to tomato plant infection. Neither single mutant exhibited altered virulence for tomato plants when tested by root dip inoculation assays. In contrast, the mcpM mutant (but not the mcpA mutant) was significantly less infectious than the wild type when tested by a sand soak inoculation assay, which requires bacteria to locate and invade host roots from sand. Thus, McpM-mediated chemotaxis, possibly reflecting chemotaxis to l-malate, facilitates R. pseudosolanacearum motility to tomato roots in sand.

  9. Identification of the mcpA and mcpM Genes, Encoding Methyl-Accepting Proteins Involved in Amino Acid and l-Malate Chemotaxis, and Involvement of McpM-Mediated Chemotaxis in Plant Infection by Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum (Formerly Ralstonia solanacearum Phylotypes I and III)

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Akiko; Oku, Shota; Kawasaki, Takeru; Tajima, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Sequence analysis has revealed the presence of 22 putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (mcp) genes in the Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum GMI1000 genome. PCR analysis and DNA sequencing showed that the highly motile R. pseudosolanacearum strain Ps29 possesses homologs of all 22 R. pseudosolanacearum GMI1000 mcp genes. We constructed a complete collection of single mcp gene deletion mutants of R. pseudosolanacearum Ps29 by unmarked gene deletion. Screening of the mutant collection revealed that R. pseudosolanacearum Ps29 mutants of RSp0507 and RSc0606 homologs were defective in chemotaxis to l-malate and amino acids, respectively. RSp0507 and RSc0606 homologs were designated mcpM and mcpA. While wild-type R. pseudosolanacearum strain Ps29 displayed attraction to 16 amino acids, the mcpA mutant showed no response to 12 of these amino acids and decreased responses to 4 amino acids. We constructed mcpA and mcpM deletion mutants of highly virulent R. pseudosolanacearum strain MAFF106611 to investigate the contribution of chemotaxis to l-malate and amino acids to tomato plant infection. Neither single mutant exhibited altered virulence for tomato plants when tested by root dip inoculation assays. In contrast, the mcpM mutant (but not the mcpA mutant) was significantly less infectious than the wild type when tested by a sand soak inoculation assay, which requires bacteria to locate and invade host roots from sand. Thus, McpM-mediated chemotaxis, possibly reflecting chemotaxis to l-malate, facilitates R. pseudosolanacearum motility to tomato roots in sand. PMID:26276117

  10. Potential organic herbicides for squash production: Pelargonic acid herbicides AXXE® and Scythe®

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) producers need appropriate herbicides that can effectively provide season-long weed control. Although corn gluten meal has shown promise as an early-season pre-emergent organic herbicide in squash production, any uncontrolled weeds can inflict serious yield reducti...

  11. Potential organic herbicides for squash production: Pelargonic acid herbicides AXXE (registered trademark) and Scythe (registered trademark)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) producers need appropriate herbicides that can effectively provide season- long weed control. Research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma (Atoka County, Lane, OK) to determine the impact of potential organic herbicides on weed control efficacy, crop injury, and y...

  12. Resistance to herbicides inhibiting the biosynthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Busi, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    Herbicides that act by inhibiting the biosynthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) have been used to control grass weeds in major crops throughout the world for the past 60 years. VLCFA-inhibiting herbicides are generally highly selective in crops, induce similar symptoms in susceptible grasses and can be found within the herbicide groups classified by the HRAC as K3 and N. Even after many years of continuous use, only 12 grass weed species have evolved resistance to VLCFA-inhibiting herbicides. Here, the cases of resistance that have evolved in major grass weed species belonging to the Avena, Echinochloa and Lolium genera in three different agricultural systems are reviewed. In particular we explore the possible reasons why VLCFA herbicides have been slow to select resistant weeds, outline the herbicide mode of action and discuss the resistance mechanisms that are most likely to have been selected.

  13. Calibration of a passive sampling device for time-integrated sampling of hydrophilic herbicides in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Tran, Anh T K; Hyne, Ross V; Doble, P

    2007-03-01

    Two types of solid-phase materials, a styrenedivinylbenzene copolymer sorbent (embedded in a SDB-XC Empore disk) and a styrenedivinylbenzene copolymer sorbent modified with sulfonic acid functional groups (embedded in a SDB-RPS Empore disk), were compared as a receiving phase in a passive sampling device for monitoring polar pesticides. The SDB-XC Empore disk was selected for further evaluation, overlayed with either a polysulfone or a polyethersulfone diffusion membrane. The target herbicides included five nonionized herbicides (simazine, atrazine, diuron, clomazone, and metolachlor) and four phenoxy acid herbicides (dicamba, (2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetic acid [2,4-D], (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid [MCPA], and triclopyr) with log octanol/water partition coefficient (log K(OW)) values of less than three in water. Uptake of these herbicides generally was higher into a device constructed of a SDB-XC Empore disk as a receiving phase covered with a polyethersulfone membrane compared to a similar device covered with a polysulfone membrane. Using the device with a SDB-XC Empore disk covered with a polyethersulfone membrane, linear uptake of simazine, atrazine, diuron, clomazone, and metolachlor was observed for up to 21 d, and daily sampling rates of the herbicides from water in a laboratory flow-through system were determined. The uptake rate of each nonionized herbicide by the Empore disk-based passive sampler was linearly proportional to its concentration in the water, and the sampling rate was independent of the water concentrations over the 21-d period. Uptake of the phenoxy acid herbicides (2,4-D, MCPA, and triclopyr) obeyed first-order kinetics and rapidly reached equilibrium in the passive sampler after approximately 12 d of exposure. The Empore disk-based passive sampler displayed isotropic kinetics, with a release half-life for triclopyr of approximately 6 d.

  14. Biodegradation of the Herbicide 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid by a New Isolated Strain of Achromobacter sp. LZ35.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhen-Yuan; Zhang, Long; Zhao, Yan; Yan, Xin; Li, Shun-Peng; Gu, Tao; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a bacterial strain of Achromobacter sp. LZ35, which was capable of utilizing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxy acetic acid (MCPA) as the sole sources of carbon and energy for growth, was isolated from the soil in a disused pesticide factory in Suzhou, China. The optimal 2,4-D degradation by strain LZ35 occurred at 30 °C and pH 8.0 when the initial 2,4-D concentration was 200 mg L(-1). Strain LZ35 harbored the conserved 2,4-D/alpha-ketoglutarate dioxygenase (96%) and 2,4-dichlorophenol hydroxylase (99%), and catabolized 2,4-D via the intermediate 2,4-dichlorophenol. The inoculation of 7.8 × 10(6) CFU g(-1) soil of strain LZ35 cells to 2,4-D-contaminated soil could efficiently remove over 75 and 90% of 100 and 50 mg L(-1) 2,4-D in 12 days and significantly released the phytotoxicity of maize caused by the 2,4-D residue. This is the first report of an Achromobacter sp. strain that was capable of mineralizing both 2,4-D and MCPA. This study provides us a promising candidate for its application in the bioremediation of 2,4-D- or MCPA-contaminated sites.

  15. Pelargonic acid as a post-directed herbicide for onions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic onion producers need appropriate herbicides that can effectively provide post-emergent weed control. Research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma (Atoka County, Lane, OK) to determine the impact of a potential organic herbicide on weed control efficacy, crop injury, and yields. The experim...

  16. Acidic herbicides in surface waters of Lower Fraser Valley, British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Woudneh, Million B; Sekela, Mark; Tuominen, Taina; Gledhill, Melissa

    2007-01-12

    In the period 2003-2005 a study was conducted to determine the occurrence, spatial and temporal distribution of five acidic herbicides in the Lower Fraser Valley (LFV) region of British Columbia, Canada. A high-resolution gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS) method capable of detecting analytes at the sub ng/L level was developed for this study. Samples were collected and analyzed from two references, five agricultural, two urban and five agricultural and urban mixed sites. Only (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid and triclopyr were detected at the reference sites. The highest concentration of herbicide detected at the reference sites was 0.109ng/L for (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid. Varying levels of all of the herbicides monitored were detected at the urban, agricultural and the mixed sites. For the urban sites the highest concentration of herbicide detected was 66.6ng/L for 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)propanoic acid. For the agricultural sites the highest concentration of herbicide detected was 345ng/L for (2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetic acid (2,4-D). For the mixed sites the highest concentration of herbicide detected was 1230ng/L for 2,4-D. Overall the mixed sites showed highest concentrations and detection frequencies followed by the agricultural and urban sites. With few exceptions higher concentrations of herbicides were observed for samples collected during spring than for samples collected during fall. The detected concentrations of herbicides were evaluated against established water quality criteria. Herbicide data presented in this study provide reference levels for future pesticide monitoring programs in the region.

  17. Determination and occurrence of phenoxyacetic acid herbicides and their transformation products in groundwater using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McManus, Sarah-Louise; Moloney, Mary; Richards, Karl G; Coxon, Catherine E; Danaher, Martin

    2014-12-10

    A sensitive method was developed and validated for ten phenoxyacetic acid herbicides, six of their main transformation products (TPs) and two benzonitrile TPs in groundwater. The parent compounds mecoprop, mecoprop-p, 2,4-D, dicamba, MCPA, triclopyr, fluroxypr, bromoxynil, bentazone, and 2,3,6-trichlorobenzoic acid (TBA) are included and a selection of their main TPs: phenoxyacetic acid (PAC), 2,4,5-trichloro-phenol (TCP), 4-chloro-2-methylphenol (4C2MP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP), 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (T2P), and 3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybenzoic acid (BrAC), as well as the dichlobenil TPs 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) and 3,5-dichlorobenzoic acid (DBA) which have never before been determined in Irish groundwater. Water samples were analysed using an efficient ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) method in an 11.9 min separation time prior to detection by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The limit of detection (LOD) of the method ranged between 0.00008 and 0.0047 µg·L(-1) for the 18 analytes. All compounds could be detected below the permitted limits of 0.1 µg·L(-1) allowed in the European Union (EU) drinking water legislation. The method was validated according to EU protocols laid out in SANCO/10232/2006 with recoveries ranging between 71% and 118% at the spiked concentration level of 0.06 µg·L(-1). The method was successfully applied to 42 groundwater samples collected across several locations in Ireland in March 2012 to reveal that the TPs PAC and 4C2MP were detected just as often as their parent active ingredients (a.i.) in groundwater.

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Identification of New Sulfonic Acid Metabolites of Chloroacetanilide Herbicides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, M.D.; Walters, F.H.; Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Larive, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    The detection of the sulfonic acid metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, propachlor, and, more recently, metolachlor in surface and ground water suggests that a common mechanism for dechlorination exists via the glutathione conjugation pathway. The identification of these herbicides and their metabolites is important due to growing public awareness and concern about pesticide levels in drinking water. Although these herbicides are regulated, little is known about the fate of their metabolites in soil. The sulfonic acid metabolites were synthesized by reaction of the parent compounds with an excess of sodium sulfite. Acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, metolachlor, and propachlor and their sulfonic acid metabolites were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. This paper provides a direct method for the preparation and characterization of these compounds that will be useful in the analysis and study of chloracetanilide herbicides and their metabolites.

  19. [Use of peptide bioregulators in intoxication with the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid].

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, S N; Zhamsaranova, S D

    2004-01-01

    The paper shows it promising to use peptide bioregulators--fractions obtained from the cattle immune system (thymus, spleen, and lymph nodes) during immunotherapy for intoxication experimentally caused by the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Oral administration of the fractions in a dose of 0.1 mg/kg body weight eliminated the suppressive effect of the herbicide on murine cellular and humoral immune reactions, which manifested by the recovery of the studied parameters to those in control animals.

  20. Chemoproteomic Profiling of Acetanilide Herbicides Reveals Their Role in Inhibiting Fatty Acid Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Counihan, Jessica L; Duckering, Megan; Dalvie, Esha; Ku, Wan-Min; Bateman, Leslie A; Fisher, Karl J; Nomura, Daniel K

    2017-03-17

    Acetanilide herbicides are among the most widely used pesticides in the United States, but their toxicological potential and mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we have used chemoproteomic platforms to map proteome-wide cysteine reactivity of acetochlor (AC), the most widely used acetanilide herbicide, in vivo in mice. We show that AC directly reacts with >20 protein targets in vivo in mouse liver, including the catalytic cysteines of several thiolase enzymes involved in mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. We show that the fatty acids that are not oxidized, due to impaired fatty acid oxidation, are instead diverted into other lipid pathways, resulting in heightened free fatty acids, triglycerides, cholesteryl esters, and other lipid species in the liver. Our findings show the utility of chemoproteomic approaches for identifying novel mechanisms of toxicity associated with environmental chemicals like acetanilide herbicides.

  1. Study on the toxicity of phenolic and phenoxy herbicides using the submitochondrial particle assay.

    PubMed

    Argese, E; Bettiol, C; Marchetto, D; De Vettori, S; Zambon, A; Miana, P; Ghetti, P F

    2005-12-01

    A simple and rapid in vitro toxicological assay, utilizing submitochondrial particles (SMP), has been used to evaluate the toxic effects of fifteen herbicides belonging to the phenol and phenoxyalkanoic acid chemical classes. The SMP assay allows the quantitative evaluation of the toxicity of compounds with different mechanisms of action: uncouplers, inhibitors of the enzyme complexes involved in reverse electron transfer and in oxidative phosphorylation and chemicals that alter the membrane structure. The two groups of herbicides showed different levels of toxicity. For phenol derivatives, EC50 values ranged from 0.16 microM (ioxynil) to 6.7 microM (2,4-dinitrophenol), whereas for phenoxy herbicides EC50 values ranged from 21 microM (2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 2,4,5-T) to 110 microM (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid, MCPA). On the average, the toxicity of phenolic compounds is greater than that of phenoxyalkanoic acids by two orders of magnitude. Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) were developed between EC50 values and various molecular descriptors. The results suggest the existence of different mechanisms of action for the two classes of compounds. The findings obtained for phenolic herbicides are consistent with a protonophoric uncoupling mechanism, whereas for phenoxy herbicides a non-specific mode of action at membrane level can be hypothesized.

  2. Fermentation and alternative oxidase contribute to the action of amino acid biosynthesis-inhibiting herbicides.

    PubMed

    Zulet, Amaia; Gil-Monreal, Miriam; Zabalza, Ana; van Dongen, Joost T; Royuela, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    Acetolactate synthase inhibitors (ALS-inhibitors) and glyphosate (GLP) are two classes of herbicide that act by the specific inhibition of an enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of branched-chain or aromatic amino acids, respectively. The physiological effects that are detected after application of these two classes of herbicides are not fully understood in relation to the primary biochemical target inhibition, although they have been well documented. Interestingly, the two herbicides' toxicity includes some common physiological effects suggesting that they kill the treated plants by a similar pattern despite targeting different enzymes. The induction of aerobic ethanol fermentation and alternative oxidase (AOX) are two examples of these common effects. The objective of this work was to gain further insight into the role of fermentation and AOX induction in the toxic consequences of ALS-inhibitors and GLP. For this, Arabidopsis T-DNA knockout mutants of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) 1 and AOX1a were used. The results found in wild-type indicate that both GLP and ALS-inhibitors reduce ATP production by inducing fermentation and alternative respiration. The main physiological effects in the process of herbicide activity upon treated plants were accumulation of carbohydrates and total free amino acids. The effects of the herbicides on these parameters were less pronounced in mutants compared to wild-type plants. The role of fermentation and AOX regarding pyruvate availability is also discussed.

  3. Determination of phenoxy acid herbicides in water by electron-capture and microcoulometric gas chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goerlitz, D.F.; Lamar, William L.

    1967-01-01

    A sensitive gas chromatographic method using microcoulometric titration and electron-capture detection for the analysis of 2,4-D, silvex, 2,4,5-T, and other phenoxy acid herbicides in water is described. The herbicides are extracted from unfiltered water samples (800-1,000 ml) by use of ethyl ether ; then the herbicides are concentrated and esterilied. To allow the analyst a choice, two esterilication procedures--using either boron trifluoride-methanol or diazomethane--are evaluated. Microcoulometric gas chromatography is specific for the detection of halogenated compounds such as the phenoxy acid herbicides whereas it does not respond to nonhalogenated components. Microcoulometric gas chromatography requires care and patience. It is not convenient for rapid screening of l-liter samples that contain less than 1 microgram of the herbicide. Although electroncapture gas chromatography is less selective and more critically affected by interfering substances, it is, nevertheless, convenient and more sensitive than microcoulometric gas chromatography. Two different liquid phases are used in the gas chromatographic columns--DC-200 silicone in one column and QF-1 silicone in the other. The performance of both columns is improved by the addition of Carbowax 20M. The Gas Chrom Q support is coated with the liquid phases by the 'frontal-analysis' technique. The practical lower limits for measurement of the phenoxy acid herbicides in water primarily depend upon the sample size, interferences present, anal instrumentation used. With l-liter samples of water, the practical lower limits of measurement are 10 ppt (parts per trillion) for 2,4-D and 2 ppt for silvex and 2,4,5-T when electron-capture detection is used, and approximately 20 ppt for each herbicide when analyzed by microcoulometric-titration gas chromatography. Recoveries of the herbicides immediately after addition to unfiltered water samples averaged 92 percent for 2,4-D, 90 percent for silvex, and 98 percent for 2

  4. Determination of commonly used polar herbicides in agricultural drainage waters in Australia by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Tran, Anh T K; Hyne, Ross V; Doble, Philip

    2007-03-01

    The present study describes the application of different extraction techniques for the preconcentration of ten commonly found acidic and non-acidic polar herbicides (2,4-D, atrazine, bensulfuron-methyl, clomazone, dicamba, diuron, MCPA, metolachlor, simazine and triclopyr) in the aqueous environment. Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with dichloromethane, solid-phase extraction (SPE) using Oasis HLB cartridges or SBD-XC Empore disks were compared for extraction efficiency of these herbicides in different matrices, especially water samples from contaminated agricultural drainage water containing high concentrations of particulate matter. Herbicides were separated and quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with an ultraviolet detector. SPE using SDB-XC Empore disks was applied to determine target herbicides in the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area (NSW, Australia) during a two-week survey from October 2005 to November 2005. The daily aqueous concentrations of herbicides from 24-h composite samples detected at two sites increased after run-off from a storm event and were in the range of: 0.1-17.8 microg l(-1), < 0.1-0.9 microg l(-1) and 0.2-17.8 microg l(-1) at site 1; < 0.1-3.5 microg l(-1), < 0.1-0.2 microg l(-1) and < 0.2-3.2 microg l(-1) at site 2 for simazine, atrazine and diuron, respectively.

  5. DEVELOPMENTS IN THE SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTION OF CHLOROPHENOXY ACID HERBICIDES FROM SOIL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extraction of chlorophenoxy acid herbicides from soil samples with supercritical carbon dioxide as extractant and tetrabutylammonium hydroxide and methyl iodide as derivatization agents was investigated. The extraction was carried out at 400 atm and 80 C for 15 min static, follow...

  6. Impairment of cellulose- and cellobiose-degrading soil Bacteria by two acidic herbicides.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Stefanie; Drake, Harold L; Kolb, Steffen

    2012-02-01

    Herbicides have the potential to impair the metabolism of soil microorganisms. The current study addressed the toxic effect of bentazon and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid on aerobic and anaerobic Bacteria that are involved in cellulose and cellobiose degradation in an agricultural soil. Aerobic saccharide degradation was reduced at concentrations of herbicides above environmental values. Microbial processes (e.g. fermentations, ferric iron reduction) that were linked to anaerobic cellulose and cellobiose degradation were reduced in the presence of both herbicides at concentrations above and at those that occur in crop field soil. 16S rRNA gene transcript numbers of total Bacteria, and selected bacterial taxa (Clostridia [Group I], Planctomycetaceae, and two uncultivated taxa of Bacteroidetes) decreased more in anoxic than in oxic cellulose-supplemented soil microcosms in the presence of both herbicides. Collectively, the results suggested that the metabolism of anaerobic cellulose-degrading Bacteria was impaired by typical in situ herbicide concentrations, whereas in situ concentrations did not impair metabolism of aerobic cellulose- and cellobiose-degrading soil Bacteria.

  7. Kidney biomarkers in MCPA-induced acute kidney injury in rats: reduced clearance enhances early biomarker performance.

    PubMed

    Wunnapuk, Klintean; Liu, Xin; Gobe, Glenda C; Endre, Zoltan H; Peake, Philip W; Grice, Jeffrey E; Roberts, Michael S; Buckley, Nicholas A

    2014-03-21

    For improved early detection and assessment of severe acute kidney damage following accidental or intentional ingestion of the herbicide MCPA, we compared a panel of 14 novel kidney injury biomarkers with plasma creatinine. Male Wistar rats received four different oral doses of MCPA and plasma and urine biomarker levels were measured at 8, 24 and 48 h after MCPA exposure. Diagnostic performances using absolute levels, urine levels normalized to urine creatinine or urinary excretion rate were determined by ROC analysis. Plasma creatinine remained the best early biomarker for predicting histological changes at 48 h. The performance of plasma cystatin C in mirroring kidney function was similar to that of plasma creatinine. While urine concentrations were generally less predictive, normalization by urine creatinine greatly improved the performance of several biomarkers. This may be due to an apparent amplification of the biomarker signal on normalizing to creatinine, in the presence of a declining glomerular filtration rate prior to reaching steady state. Normalized 8 h osteopontin and albumin concentrations outperformed other normalized biomarkers in predicting histological changes at later times. Normalized urinary kidney injury molecule-1 at 48 h also correlated well with the degree of kidney damage.

  8. Does microbial centimeter-scale heterogeneity impact MCPA degradation in and leaching from a loamy agricultural soil?

    PubMed

    Rosenbom, Annette E; Binning, Philip J; Aamand, Jens; Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F; Johnsen, Anders R

    2014-02-15

    The potential for pesticide degradation varies greatly at the centimeter-scale in agricultural soil. Three dimensional numerical simulations were conducted to evaluate how such small-scale spatial heterogeneity may affect the leaching of the biodegradable pesticide 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in the upper meter of a variably-saturated, loamy soil profile. To incorporate realistic spatial variation in degradation potential, we used data from a site where 420 mineralization curves over 5 depths have been measured. Monod kinetics was fitted to the individual curves to derive initial degrader biomass values, which were incorporated in a reactive transport model to simulate heterogeneous biodegradation. Six scenarios were set up using COMSOL Multiphysics to evaluate the difference between models having different degrader biomass distributions (homogeneous, heterogeneous, or no biomass) and either matrix flow or preferential flow through a soil matrix with a wormhole. MCPA leached, within 250 days, below 1m only when degrader biomass was absent and preferential flow occurred. Both biodegradation in the plow layer and the microbially active lining of the wormhole contributed to reducing MCPA-leaching below 1m. The spatial distribution of initial degrader biomass within each soil matrix layer, however, had little effect on the overall MCPA-leaching.

  9. TRACE ANALYSIS OF FLUORESCEIN-DERIVATIZED PHENOXY ACID HERBICIDES BY MICELLAR ELECTROKINETIC CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH LASER-INDUCTED FLUORESCENCE DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection was used for the trace analysis of phenoxy acid herbicides. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) with LIF detection, which has not previously been used for pesticide analysis, overcomes the po...

  10. Strategies to evaluate biodegradability: application to chlorinated herbicides.

    PubMed

    Sanchis, S; Polo, A M; Tobajas, M; Rodriguez, J J; Mohedano, A F

    2014-01-01

    The biodegradability of nitrochlorinated (diuron and atrazine) and chlorophenoxy herbicides (2,4-D and MCPA) has been studied through several bioassays using different testing times and biomass/substrate ratios. A fast biodegradability test using unacclimated activated sludge yielded no biodegradation of the herbicides in 24 h. The inherent biodegradability test gave degradation percentages of around 20-30% for the nitrochlorinated herbicides and almost complete removal of the chlorophenoxy compounds. Long-term biodegradability assays were performed using sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and sequencing batch membrane bioreactor (SB-MBR). Fixed concentrations of each herbicide below the corresponding EC50 value for activated sludge were used (30 mg L(-1) for diuron and atrazine and 50 mg L(-1) for 2,4-D and MCPA). No signs of herbicide degradation appeared before 35 days in the case of diuron and atrazine and 21 days for 2,4-D, whereas MCPA was partially degraded since the early stages. Around 25-36% degradation of the nitrochlorinated herbicides and 53-77% of the chlorophenoxy ones was achieved after 180 and 135 days, respectively, in SBR, whereas complete disappearance of 2,4-D was reached after 80 days in SB-MBR.

  11. Determination of Acid Herbicides Using Modified QuEChERS with Fast Switching ESI(+)/ESI(-) LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Sack, Chris; Vonderbrink, John; Smoker, Michael; Smith, Robert E

    2015-11-04

    A method for the determination of 35 acid herbicides in food matrices was developed, validated, and implemented. It utilizes a modified QuEChERS extraction procedure coupled with quantitation by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The acid herbicides analyzed are all organic carboxylic acids, including the older chlorophenoxy acid herbicides such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), dicamba, 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (4-CPA), quinclorac, and many of the newer imidazolinone herbicides such as imazethapyr and imazaquin. In the procedure, 10 mL of water is added to 5 g of sample and then extracted with 1% formic acid in acetonitrile for 1 min. The acetonitrile phase is salted out of the extract by adding sodium chloride and magnesium sulfate, followed by centrifugation. The acetonitrile is diluted 1:1 with water to enable quantitation by LC-MS/MS using fast switching between positive and negative electrospray ionization modes. The average recoveries for all the compounds except aminocyclopyrachlor were 95% with a precision of 8%. The method detection limits for all residues were less than 10 ng/g, and the correlation coefficients for the calibration curves was greater than 0.99 for all but two compounds tested. The method was used successfully for the quantitation of acid herbicides in the FDA's total diet study. The procedure proved to be accurate, precise, linear, sensitive, and rugged.

  12. Mapping of amino acid substitutions conferring herbicide resistance in wheat glutathione transferase.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Sridhar; Mannervik, Bengt; Silverman, Joshua A; Wright, Kathy; Regitsky, Drew; Hegazy, Usama; Purcell, Thomas J; Welch, Mark; Minshull, Jeremy; Gustafsson, Claes

    2015-03-20

    We have used design of experiments (DOE) and systematic variance to efficiently explore glutathione transferase substrate specificities caused by amino acid substitutions. Amino acid substitutions selected using phylogenetic analysis were synthetically combined using a DOE design to create an information-rich set of gene variants, termed infologs. We used machine learning to identify and quantify protein sequence-function relationships against 14 different substrates. The resulting models were quantitative and predictive, serving as a guide for engineering of glutathione transferase activity toward a diverse set of herbicides. Predictive quantitative models like those presented here have broad applicability for bioengineering.

  13. Occurrence and fate of the herbicide glyphosate and its degradate aminomethylphosphonic acid in the atmosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, Feng-Chih; Simcik, M.F.; Capel, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    This is the first report on the ambient levels of glyphosate, the most widely used herbicide in the United States, and its major degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), in air and rain. Concurrent, weekly integrated air particle and rain samples were collected during two growing seasons in agricultural areas in Mississippi and Iowa. Rain was also collected in Indiana in a preliminary phase of the study. The frequency of glyphosate detection ranged from 60 to 100% in both air and rain. The concentrations of glyphosate ranged from 3 and from <0.1 to 2.5 µg/L in air and rain samples, respectively. The frequency of detection and median and maximum concentrations of glyphosate in air were similar or greater to those of the other high-use herbicides observed in the Mississippi River basin, whereas its concentration in rain was greater than the other herbicides. It is not known what percentage of the applied glyphosate is introduced into the air, but it was estimated that up to 0.7% of application is removed from the air in rainfall. Glyphosate is efficiently removed from the air; it is estimated that an average of 97% of the glyphosate in the air is removed by a weekly rainfall ≥30 mm.

  14. Occurrence and fate of the herbicide glyphosate and its degradate aminomethylphosphonic acid in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Chang, Feng-chih; Simcik, Matt F; Capel, Paul D

    2011-03-01

    This is the first report on the ambient levels of glyphosate, the most widely used herbicide in the United States, and its major degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), in air and rain. Concurrent, weekly integrated air particle and rain samples were collected during two growing seasons in agricultural areas in Mississippi and Iowa. Rain was also collected in Indiana in a preliminary phase of the study. The frequency of glyphosate detection ranged from 60 to 100% in both air and rain. The concentrations of glyphosate ranged from <0.01 to 9.1 ng/m(3) and from <0.1 to 2.5 µg/L in air and rain samples, respectively. The frequency of detection and median and maximum concentrations of glyphosate in air were similar or greater to those of the other high-use herbicides observed in the Mississippi River basin, whereas its concentration in rain was greater than the other herbicides. It is not known what percentage of the applied glyphosate is introduced into the air, but it was estimated that up to 0.7% of application is removed from the air in rainfall. Glyphosate is efficiently removed from the air; it is estimated that an average of 97% of the glyphosate in the air is removed by a weekly rainfall ≥ 30 mm.

  15. BOREAS TGB-7 Dry Deposition Herbicide and Organochlorine Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, Don; Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-7 team measured the concentration and flux of several agricultural pesticides in air, rainwater, and dry deposition samples in order to determine the associated yearly deposition rates. This data set contains information on the dry deposition flux of seven herbicides [2,4- dichlorophenoxyacidic_acid (2,4-D), bromoxynil, dicamb, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), triallate, trifluralin, and diclop-methyl] known to appear in the atmosphere of the Canadian prairies. Also, the concentration of three herbicides (atrazine, alachlor, and metolachlor), two groups of insecticides (lindane and breakdown products and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) and breakdown products), and several polychlorinated biphenyls commonly used in the central United States was measured. All of these chemicals are reported, in the literature, to be transported in the atmosphere. Many have been reported to occur in boreal and arctic food chains. The sampling was carried out from 16-Jun to 13-Aug-1993 and 04-May to 20-Jul-1994 at the BOREAS site in the Prince Albert National Park (Waskesiu). The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  16. BOREAS TGB-7 Rainwater Herbicide and Organochlorine Concentration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, Don; Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-7 team measured the concentration and flux of several agricultural pesticides in air and rainwater samples in order to determine the associated yearly deposition rates. This data set contains information on the rainwater concentration of seven herbicides [2,4- dichlorophenoxyacidic_acid (2,4-D), bromoxynil, dicamb, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), triallate, trifluralin, and diclop-methyl] known to appear in the atmosphere of the Canadian prairies. Also, the concentration of three herbicides (atrazine, alachlor, and metolachlor), two groups of insecticides (lindane and breakdown products and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) and breakdown products), and several polychlorinated biphenyls commonly used in the central United States was measured. All of these chemicals are reported, in the literature, to be transported in the atmosphere. Many have been reported to occur in boreal and arctic food chains. The sampling was carried out from 16-Jun to 13-Aug-1993 and 04-May to 20-Jul-1994 at the BOREAS site in the Prince Albert National Park (Waskesiu). The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  17. BOREAS TGB-7 Ambient Air Herbicide and Organochlorine Concentration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, Don; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Trace Gas Biogeochemistry (BOREAS TGB)-7 team measured the concentration and flux of several agricultural pesticides in air, rainwater, and dry deposition samples in order to determine the associated yearly deposition rates. This data set contains information on the ambient air concentration of seven herbicides [2,4- dichlorophenoxyacidic_acid (2,4-D), bromoxynil, dicamb, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), triallate, trifluralin, and diclop-methyl] known to appear in the atmosphere of the Canadian prairies. Also, the concentration of three herbicides (atrazine, alachlor, and metolachlor), two groups of insecticides (lindane and breakdown products and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) and breakdown products), and several polychlorinated biphenyls commonly used in the central United States was measured. All of these chemicals are reported, in the literature, to be transported in the atmosphere. Many have been reported to occur in boreal and arctic food chains. The sampling was carried out from 16-Jun to 13-Aug-1993 and 04-May to 20-Jul-1994 at the BOREAS site in the Prince Albert National Park (Waskesiu). The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  18. Effect of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid herbicide Escherichia coli growth, chemical, composition, and cellular envelope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J.M.; Hooten, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is a herbicide widely used in the world and mainly excreted by the renal route in exposed humans and animals. Herbicides can affect other nontarget organisms, such as Escherichia coli. We observed that a single exposure to 1 mM 2,4-D diminished growth and total protein content in all E. coli strains tested in vitro. In addition, successive exposures to 0.01 mM 2,4-D had a toxic effect decreasing growth up to early stationary phase. Uropathogenic E. coli adhere to epithelial cells mediated by fimbriae, adhesins, and hydrophobic properties. 2,4-D exposure of uropathogenic E. coli demonstrated altered hydrophobicity and fimbriation. Hydrophobicity index values obtained by partition in p-xylene/water were 300-420% higher in exposed cells than in control ones. Furthermore, values of hemagglutination titer, protein contents in fimbrial crude extract, and electron microscopy demonstrated a significant diminution of fimbriation in treated cells. Other envelope alterations could be detected, such as lipoperoxidation, evidenced by decreased polyunsaturated fatty acids and increased lipid degradation products (malonaldehyde), and motility diminution. These alterations decreased cell adherence to erythrocytes, indicating a diminished pathogenic capacity of the 2,4-D-exposed E. coli. ?? 2001 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Controlled Release Formulations of Auxinic Herbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Witold J.; Siłowiecki, Andrzej.; Romanowska, Iwona; Glazek, Mariola; Bajor, Justyna; Cieciwa, Katarzyna; Rychter, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    Controlled release formulations are applied extensively for the release of active ingredients such as plant protection agents and fertilizers in response to growing concern for ecological problems associated with increased use of plant protection chemicals required for intensive agricultural practices [1]. We synthesized oligomeric mixtures of (R,S)-3-hydroxy butyric acid chemically bonded with 2,4-D, Dicamba and MCPA herbicides (HBA) respectively, and determined their molecular structure and molecular weight dispersion by the size exclusion chromatography, proton magnetic resonance spectrometry and electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry. Further we carried out bioassays of herbicidal effectiveness of the HBA herbicides vs. series of dicotyledonous weeds and crop injury tests [2, 3, 4]. Field bioassays were accomplished according to the EPPO standards [5]. Groups of representative weeds (the development stages in the BCCH scale: 10 - 30) were selected as targets. Statistical variabilities were assessed by the Fisher LSD test for plants treated with the studied herbicides in form of HBA oligomers, the reference herbicides in form of dimethyl ammonium salts (DMA), and untreated plants. No statistically significant differences in the crop injuries caused by the HBA vs. the DMA reference formulation were observed. The effectiveness of the HBA herbicides was lower through the initial period (ca. 2 weeks) relative to the DMA salts, but a significant increase in the effectiveness of the HBA systems followed during the remaining fraction of each assay. After 6 weeks all observed efficiencies approached 100%. The death of weeds treated with the HBA herbicides was delayed when compared with the DMA reference herbicides. The delayed uptake observed for the HBA oligomers relative to the DMA salts was due to controlled release phenomena. In case of the DMA salts the total amount of active ingredients was available at the target site. By contrast, the amount of an active

  20. Acute intentional self-poisoning with a herbicide product containing fenoxaprop-P-ethyl, ethoxysulfuron and isoxadifen ethyl. A prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    ZAWAHIR, SHUKRY; ROBERTS, DARREN M.; PALANGASINGHE, CHATHURA; MOHAMED, FAHIM; EDDLESTON, MICHAEL; DAWSON, ANDREW H.; BUCKLEY, NICK A.; REN, LINGLING; MEDLEY, GREGORY A.; GAWARAMMANA, INDIKA

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Herbicides are commonly ingested for self-harm; however, relatively little has been published on poisoning with herbicides other than paraquat and glyphosate. We report here a case series of patients with acute exposure to a combination herbicide (brand name Tiller Gold or Whip Super) containing the selective phenoxy herbicide fenoxaprop-P-ethyl, the sulfonylurea herbicide ethoxysulfuron and the safener isoxadifen ethyl. METHOD Clinical data on all patients presenting with Tiller Gold or Whip Super poisoning to two General Hospital in Sri Lanka from 2002-2008 were collected prospectively until discharge. RESULTS Eighty-six patients with a history of Tiller Gold or Whip Super ingestion were included. The median time to presentation was 4 hours post-ingestion (IQR 2 to 10 hrs) and the median volume ingested was 22.5ml (IQR: 20-60; n=64). Most patients demonstrated limited clinical signs of poisoning and none required mechanical ventilation or intensive care treatment. The main clinical features were an epigastric burning sensation and vomiting; however, most of those who vomited had received gastric lavage or forced emesis. Eight patients had a reduced level of consciousness on admission (GCS 9 -14) that resolved without intervention over several hours. Only symptomatic and supportive care was required. The median hospital stay was 1 day (IQR: 1 to 2) and the case fatality was zero (95% CI: zero to 4.2%). This low case fatality compared favorably with the case fatality of other common herbicides in our cohort: paraquat >40%, propanil >10%, 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) > 5% and glyphosate >2%. CONCLUSION This combination herbicide product appears to be safe in patients with acute self-poisoning, particularly in comparison with other herbicides, and causing few clinical features PMID:19663557

  1. Enhanced degradation of Herbicide Isoproturon in wheat rhizosphere by salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi Chen; Zhang, Shuang; Miao, Shan Shan; Jiang, Chen; Huang, Meng Tian; Liu, Ying; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-14

    This study investigated the herbicide isoproturon (IPU) residues in soil, where wheat was cultivated and sprayed with salicylic acid (SA). Provision of SA led to a lower level of IPU residues in rhizosphere soil compared to IPU treatment alone. Root exudation of tartaric acid, malic acid, and oxalic acids was enhanced in rhizosphere soil with SA-treated wheat. We examined the microbial population (e.g., biomass and phospholipid fatty acid), microbial structure, and soil enzyme (catalase, phenol oxidase, and dehydrogenase) activities, all of which are associated with soil activity and were activated in rhizosphere soil of SA-treated wheat roots. We further assessed the correlation matrix and principal component to figure out the association between the IPU degradation and soil activity. Finally, six IPU degraded products (derivatives) in rhizosphere soil were characterized using ultraperformance liquid chromatography with a quadrupole-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometer (UPLC/Q-TOF-MS/MS). A relatively higher level of IPU derivatives was identified in soil with SA-treated wheat than in soil without SA-treated wheat plants.

  2. Determination of herbicides paraquat, glyphosate, and aminomethylphosphonic acid in marijuana samples by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lanaro, Rafael; Costa, José L; Cazenave, Silvia O S; Zanolli-Filho, Luiz A; Tavares, Marina F M; Chasin, Alice A M

    2015-01-01

    In this work, two methods were developed to determine herbicides paraquat, glyphosate, and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in marijuana samples by capillary electrophoresis. For paraquat analysis, sample was extracted with aqueous acetic acid solution and analyzed by capillary zone electrophoresis with direct UV detection. The running electrolyte was 50 mmol/L phosphate buffer (pH 2.50). For glyphosate and AMPA, indirect UV/VIS detection was used, as these substances do not present chromophoric groups. Samples were extracted with 5 mmol/L hydrochloric acid. The running electrolyte was 10 mmol/L gallic acid, 6 mmol/L TRIS, and 0.1 mmol/L CTAB (pH = 4.7). The methods presented good linearity, precision, accuracy, and recovery. Paraquat was detected in 12 samples (n = 130), ranging from 0.01 to 25.1 mg/g. Three samples were positive for glyphosate (0.15-0.75 mg/g), and one sample presented AMPA as well. Experimental studies are suggested to evaluate the risks of these concentrations to marijuana user.

  3. Degradation of herbicide 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid by advanced electrochemical oxidation methods.

    PubMed

    Boye, Birame; Dieng, Momar M; Brillas, Enric

    2002-07-01

    The herbicide 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (4-CPA) has been degraded in aqueous medium by advanced electrochemical oxidation processes such as electro-Fenton and photoelectro-Fenton with UV light, using an undivided cell containing a Pt anode. In these environmentally clean methods, the main oxidant is the hydroxyl radical produced from Fenton's reaction between Fe2+ added to the medium and H2O2 electrogenerated from an 02-diffusion cathode. Solutions of a 4-CPA concentration <400 ppm within the pH range of 2.0-6.0 at 35 degrees C can be completely mineralized at low current by photoelectro-Fenton, while electro-Fenton leads to ca. 80% of mineralization. 4-CPA is much more slowly degraded by anodic oxidation in the absence and presence of electrogenerated H2O2. 4-Chlorophenol, 4-chlorocatechol, and hydroquinone are identified as aromatic intermediates by CG-MS and quantified by reverse-phase chromatography. Further oxidation of these chloroderivatives yields stable chloride ions. Generated carboxylic acids such as glycolic, glyoxylic, formic, malic, maleic, fumaric, and oxalic are followed by ion exclusion chromatography. The highest mineralization rate found for photoelectro-Fenton is accounted for by the fast photodecomposition of complexes of Fe3+ with such short-chain acids, mainly oxalic acid, under the action of UV light.

  4. Glyphosate-based herbicides produce teratogenic effects on vertebrates by impairing retinoic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, Alejandra; Gnazzo, Victoria; Acosta, Helena; López, Silvia L; Carrasco, Andrés E

    2010-10-18

    The broad spectrum herbicide glyphosate is widely used in agriculture worldwide. There has been ongoing controversy regarding the possible adverse effects of glyphosate on the environment and on human health. Reports of neural defects and craniofacial malformations from regions where glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH) are used led us to undertake an embryological approach to explore the effects of low doses of glyphosate in development. Xenopus laevis embryos were incubated with 1/5000 dilutions of a commercial GBH. The treated embryos were highly abnormal with marked alterations in cephalic and neural crest development and shortening of the anterior-posterior (A-P) axis. Alterations on neural crest markers were later correlated with deformities in the cranial cartilages at tadpole stages. Embryos injected with pure glyphosate showed very similar phenotypes. Moreover, GBH produced similar effects in chicken embryos, showing a gradual loss of rhombomere domains, reduction of the optic vesicles, and microcephaly. This suggests that glyphosate itself was responsible for the phenotypes observed, rather than a surfactant or other component of the commercial formulation. A reporter gene assay revealed that GBH treatment increased endogenous retinoic acid (RA) activity in Xenopus embryos and cotreatment with a RA antagonist rescued the teratogenic effects of the GBH. Therefore, we conclude that the phenotypes produced by GBH are mainly a consequence of the increase of endogenous retinoid activity. This is consistent with the decrease of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling from the embryonic dorsal midline, with the inhibition of otx2 expression and with the disruption of cephalic neural crest development. The direct effect of glyphosate on early mechanisms of morphogenesis in vertebrate embryos opens concerns about the clinical findings from human offspring in populations exposed to GBH in agricultural fields.

  5. Potential effects of rainwater-borne H2O2 on competitive degradation of herbicides and in the presence of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Qin, Junhao; Li, Yongjun; Li, Shengan; Li, Huashou; Lin, Chuxia

    2017-03-01

    In a previous piece of work, we reported some preliminary experimental results showing that hydrogen peroxide at a concentration range frequently encountered in rainwater could lead to degradation of three common herbicides (diuron, butachlor and glyphosate). However, the work was limited to the observation on the effects of Fenton process on the individual herbicides. In field conditions, different types of herbicides along with other organic molecules may occur concurrently. It is unclear how different herbicides and various organic molecules compete for the available hydroxyl radical. In this study, further laboratory experiments were conducted to observe the changes in the herbicides in the scenarios where multiple herbicides or humic acid are present. The results show that humic acid impeded hydroxyl radical-driven degradation of the diuron and butachlor. However, humic acid had no significant effects on reducing glyphosate removal rate. Glyphosate could compete strongly with the humic acid for the available hydroxyl radical in the reaction systems. The reactivity of glyphosate with hydroxyl radical was much higher than those of diuron and butachlor due possibly to its relatively simpler chemical structure, as compared to either diuron or butachlor, which are aromatic compounds that have higher chemical stability. Butachlor degradation was much weaker in the combined diuron and butachlor system than in the combined glyphosate and butachlor system. In the glyphosate-butachlor system, the opposite was observed. The findings have moved another step forward to understanding the potential role of rainwater-borne H2O2 in degrading herbicides in open water environments.

  6. Nanosized silica modified with carboxylic acid as support for controlled release of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Prado, Alexandre G S; Moura, Aline O; Nunes, Alecio R

    2011-08-24

    Hexagonal mesoporous silica modified with carboxylic acid (SiAc) has been obtained by reaction between chloroacetic acid and 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane, which was immobilized on porous material by a sol-gel process in the presence of an n-dodecylamine template. SiAc was characterized by TG, FT-IR, (29)Si NMR, (13)C NMR, SEM, surface charge density, surface area and porous diameter, which proved that the carboxylic group was chemically bonded to an inorganic structure, and the material presented a nanometric structure with spheres <50 nm and porous diameter of 10 nm. Herbicides 2,4-D and picloram were anchored on SiAc porous gel to produce the materials named SiD and SiPi, respectively. The controlled release of picloram from the SiAc was less than that of 2,4-D. After 26 days of releasing, 4.43 × 10(-5) mol L(-1) of picloram was delivered by SiPi, and 5.0 × 10(-5) L(-1) was released from the SiD in 30 days.

  7. Simultaneous quantification of acetanilide herbicides and their oxanilic and sulfonic acid metabolites in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Heberle, S A; Aga, D S; Hany, R; Müller, S R

    2000-02-15

    This paper describes a procedure for simultaneous enrichment, separation, and quantification of acetanilide herbicides and their major ionic oxanilic acid (OXA) and ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) metabolites in groundwater and surface water using Carbopack B as a solid-phase extraction (SPE) material. The analytes adsorbed on Carbopack B were eluted selectively from the solid phase in three fractions containing the parent compounds (PCs), their OXA metabolites, and their ESA metabolites, respectively. The complete separation of the three compound classes allowed the analysis of the neutral PCs (acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor) and their methylated OXA metabolites by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The ESA compounds were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection. The use of Carbopack B resulted in good recoveries of the polar metabolites even from large sample volumes (1 L). Absolute recoveries from spiked surface and groundwater samples ranged between 76 and 100% for the PCs, between 41 and 91% for the OXAs, and between 47 and 96% for the ESAs. The maximum standard deviation of the absolute recoveries was 12%. The method detection limits are between 1 and 8 ng/L for the PCs, between 1 and 7 ng/L for the OXAs, and between 10 and 90 ng/L for the ESAs.

  8. Immunological changes among farmers exposed to phenoxy herbicides: preliminary observations.

    PubMed Central

    Faustini, A; Settimi, L; Pacifici, R; Fano, V; Zuccaro, P; Forastiere, F

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate short term immunological changes after agricultural exposure to commercial formulations of chlorophenoxy herbicides. METHODS: Blood samples were collected from 10 farmers within seven days before exposure, one to 12 days after exposure, and again 50 to 70 days after exposure. Whole blood was used to count lymphocyte subsets with monoclonal antibodies. Peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM) cells were used to measure natural killer (NK) cell activity and lymphocyte response to mitogenic stimulations. Values before exposure were used as reference. RESULTS: In comparison with concentrations before exposure, a significant reduction was found one to 12 days after exposure in the following variables (P < 0.05): circulating helper (CD4) and suppressor T cells (CD8), CD8 dim, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), natural killer cells (NK), and CD8 cells expressing the surface antigens HLA-DR (CD8-DR), and lymphoproliferative response to mitogen stimulations. All immunological values found 50-70 days after exposure were comparable with concentrations before exposure, but mitogenic proliferative responses of lymphocytes were still significantly decreased. CONCLUSIONS: According to our data agricultural exposure to commercial 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) formulations may exert short term immunosuppressive effects. Further studies should clarify whether the immunological changes found may have health implications and can specifically contribute to cancer aetiology. PMID:8882113

  9. Simultaneous determination of three chloroacetic acids, three herbicides, and 12 anions in water by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ximing; Chen, Liang; Zhao, Yanqing

    2015-09-01

    An ion chromatography method was developed for the simultaneous detection of three soluble herbicides (glyphosate, bentazone and picloram), three chlorine disinfection byproducts (monochloroacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid) and 12 anions in water (Cl(-), Br(-), SO4(2-), CO3(2-), ClO3(-), ClO4(-), BrO3(-), PO4(3-), NO2(-), NO3(-), CH3COO(-) and COO(-)). High linearity (r(2) > 0.996) was observed for all target analytes for each respective concentration range. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation were between 0.21-0.85 and 0.06-25.46 μg/L, respectively. However, the interference effect of Cl(-), NO3(-) , SO4 (2-) and CO3(2-) on some target analytes must be considered during the analysis. Sample pre-treatment by a hydrogen column (H-column) required to reduce the negative effect of CO3(2-). Additionally, sample pre-treatment by a sliver-hydrogen column (Ag-H-column) is required when Cl(-) > 100 mg/L and SO4(2-) < 50 mg/L, and pre-treatment by both a barium column (Ba-column) and an H-column is required when Cl(-) > 100 mg/L and SO4(2-) > 50 mg/L. When Cl(-) > 100 mg/L, SO4(2-) > 50 mg/L and CO3(2-) > 20 mg/L, the sample pre-treatment by either an Ag-H-Ba-column or an Ag-H-column and Ba-column is required to minimize interference.

  10. Microbial degradation of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Singh, Baljinder; Singh, Kashmir

    2016-01-01

    Herbicides remain the most effective, efficient and economical way to control weeds; and its market continues to grow even with the plethora of generic products. With the development of herbicide-tolerant crops, use of herbicides is increasing around the world that has resulted in severe contamination of the environment. The strategies are now being developed to clean these substances in an economical and eco-friendly manner. In this review, an attempt has been made to pool all the available literature on the biodegradation of key herbicides, clodinafop propargyl, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, atrazine, metolachlor, diuron, glyphosate, imazapyr, pendimethalin and paraquat under the following objectives: (1) to highlight the general characteristic and mode of action, (2) to enlist toxicity in animals, (3) to pool microorganisms capable of degrading herbicides, (4) to discuss the assessment of herbicides degradation by efficient microbes, (5) to highlight biodegradation pathways, (6) to discuss the molecular basis of degradation, (7) to enlist the products of herbicides under degradation process, (8) to highlight the factors effecting biodegradation of herbicides and (9) to discuss the future aspects of herbicides degradation. This review may be useful in developing safer and economic microbiological methods for cleanup of soil and water contaminated with such compounds.

  11. Acceleration of the herbicide isoproturon degradation in wheat by glycosyltransferases and salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi Chen; Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Isoproturon (IPU) is a herbicide widely used to prevent weeds in cereal production. Due to its extensive use in agriculture, residues of IPU are often detected in soils and crops. Overload of IPU to crops is associated with human health risks. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop an approach to mitigate its accumulation in crops. In this study, the IPU residues and its degradation products in wheat were characterized using ultra performance liquid chromatography-time of fight tandem-mass spectrometer/mass spectrometer (UPLC-TOF-MS/MS). Most detected IPU-derivatives were sugar-conjugated. Degradation and glycosylation of IPU-derivatives could be enhanced by applying salicylic acid (SA). While more sugar-conjugated IPU-derivatives were identified in wheat with SA application, lower levels of IPU were detected, indicating that SA is able to accelerate intracellular IPU catabolism. All structures of IPU-derivatives and sugar-conjugated products were characterized. Comparative data were provided with specific activities and gene expression of certain glucosyltransferases. A pathway with IPU degradation and glucosylation was discussed. Our work indicates that SA-accelerated degradation is practically useful for wheat crops growing in IPU-contaminated soils because such crops with SA application can potentially lower or minimize IPU accumulation in levels below the threshold for adverse effects.

  12. Solanum lycopersicum IAA15 functions in the 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid herbicide mechanism of action by mediating abscisic acid signalling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Wang, Yanling; Liu, Xin; Gao, Song; Qi, Mingfang; Li, Tianlai

    2015-07-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), an important plant growth regulator, is the herbicide most commonly used worldwide to control weeds. However, broad-leaf fruits and vegetables are extremely sensitive to herbicides, which can cause damage and result in lost crops when applied in a manner inconsistent with the directions. Despite detailed knowledge of the mechanism of 2,4-D, the regulation of auxin signalling is still unclear. For example, although the major mediators of auxin signalling, including auxin/indole acetic acid (AUX/IAA) proteins and auxin response factors (ARFs), are known to mediate auxinic herbicides, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, the effects of 2,4-D on AUX/IAA gene expression in tomato were investigated, and the two most notably up-regulated genes, SlIAA15 and SlIAA29, were selected for further study. Western blotting revealed the substantial accumulation of both SlIAA15 and SlIAA29, and the expression levels of the corresponding genes were increased following abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene treatment. Overexpressing SlIAA15, but not SlIAA29, induced a 2,4-D herbicide damage phenotype. The 35S::SlIAA15 line exhibited a strong reduction in leaf stomatal density and altered expression of some R2R3 MYB genes that are putatively involved in the regulation of stomatal differentiation. Further study revealed that root elongation in 35S::SlIAA15 was sensitive to ABA treatment, and was most probably due to the altered expression of an ABA signal transduction gene. In addition, the altered auxin sensitivities of SlIAA15 transformants were also explored. These results suggested that SlIAA15 plays an important role in determining the effects of the herbicide 2,4-D.

  13. Analysis and detection of the herbicides dimethenamid and flufenacet and their sulfonic and oxanilic acid degradates in natural water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, L.R.; Schneider, R.J.; Thurman, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    Dimethenamid [2-chloro-N-(2,4-dimethyl-3-thienyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)acetamide] and flufenacet [N-(4-fluorophenyl)-N-(1-methylethyl)-2-(5-(trifluoromethyl)-1,3,4- thiadiazol-2-yl)oxy] were isolated by C-18 solid-phase extraction and separated from their ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) and oxanilic acid (OXA) degradates during their elution using ethyl acetate for the parent compound, followed by methanol for the polar degradates. The parent compounds were detected using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in selected-ion mode. The ESA and OXA degradates were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESPMS) in negative-ion mode. The method detection limits for a 123-mL sample ranged from 0.01 to 0.07 μg/L. These methods are compatible with existing methods and thus allow for analysis of 17 commonly used herbicides and 18 of their degradation compounds with one extraction. In a study of herbicide transport near the mouth of the Mississippi River during 1999 and 2000, dimethenamid and its ESA and OXA degradates were detected in surface water samples during the annual spring flushes. For flufenacet, the only detections at the study site were for the ESA degradates in samples collected at the peak of the herbicide spring flush in 2000. The low frequency of detections in surface water likely is due to dimethenamid and flufenacet being relatively new herbicides. In addition, detectable amounts of the stable degradates have not been detected in ground water.

  14. UV and visible activation of Cr(III)-doped TiO2 catalyst prepared by a microwave-assisted sol-gel method during MCPA degradation.

    PubMed

    Mendiola-Alvarez, S Y; Guzmán-Mar, J L; Turnes-Palomino, G; Maya-Alejandro, F; Hernández-Ramírez, A; Hinojosa-Reyes, L

    2016-11-10

    Photocatalytic degradation of 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in aqueous solution using Cr(III)-doped TiO2 under UV and visible light was investigated. The semiconductor material was synthesized by a microwave-assisted sol-gel method with Cr(III) doping contents of 0.02, 0.04, and 0.06 wt%. The catalyst was characterized using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen physisorption, UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The photocatalytic activity for the photodegradation of MCPA was followed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and total organic carbon (TOC) analysis. The intermediates formed during degradation were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Chloride ion evolution was measured by ion chromatography. Characterization results showed that Cr(III)-doped TiO2 materials possessed a small crystalline size, high surface area, and mesoporous structure. UV-Vis DRS showed enhanced absorption in the visible region as a function of the Cr(III) concentration. The Cr(III)-doped TiO2 catalyst with 0.04 wt% of Cr(III) was more active than bare TiO2 for the degradation of MCPA under both UV and visible light. The intermediates identified during MCPA degradation were 4-chloro-2-methylphenol (CMP), 2-(4-hydroxy-2-methylphenoxy) acetic acid (HMPA), and 2-hydroxybuta-1,3-diene-1,4-diyl-bis (oxy)dimethanol (HBDM); the formation of these intermediates depended on the radiation source.

  15. Resistance to herbicides caused by single amino acid mutations in acetyl-CoA carboxylase in resistant populations of grassy weeds.

    PubMed

    Jang, SoRi; Marjanovic, Jasmina; Gornicki, Piotr

    2013-03-01

    Eleven spontaneous mutations of acetyl-CoA carboxylase have been identified in many herbicide-resistant populations of 42 species of grassy weeds, hampering application of aryloxyphenoxypropionate, cyclohexadione and phenylpyrazoline herbicides in agriculture. IC(50) shifts (resistance indices) caused by herbicide-resistant mutations were determined using a recombinant yeast system that allows comparison of the effects of single amino acid mutations in the same biochemical background, avoiding the complexity inherent in the in planta experiments. The effect of six mutations on the sensitivity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase to nine herbicides representing the three chemical classes was studied. A combination of partially overlapping binding sites of the three classes of herbicides and the structure of their variable parts explains cross-resistance among and between the three classes of inhibitors, as well as differences in their specificity. Some degree of resistance was detected for 51 of 54 herbicide/mutation combinations. Introduction of new herbicides targeting acetyl-CoA carboxylase will depend on their ability to overcome the high degree of cross-resistance already existing in weed populations.

  16. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry for acidic herbicides and metabolites analysis in fresh water.

    PubMed

    Fauvelle, Vincent; Mazzella, Nicolas; Morin, Soizic; Moreira, Sylvia; Delest, Brigitte; Budzinski, Hélène

    2015-03-01

    Theoretical papers and environmental applications of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) have been published for a wide range of analytes, but to our knowledge, no study focused on acidic herbicides (e.g., triketones, phenoxy acids, sulfonylurea, and acidic metabolites of chloroacetanilides). Matrix effects are the main obstacle to natural sample analysis by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS) via an electrospray ionization (ESI) interface. Therefore, we paid particular attention on limiting interference by (i) adapting the emerging HILIC technique, which is generally considered more sensitive than conventional reversed phase liquid chromatography and (ii) optimizing the solid phase extraction (SPE) step using a design of experiment. A rapid and reliable off line SPE-HILIC-ESI-MS/MS method was thus developed for the quantification of acidic herbicides in fresh water, with limits of quantifications (LOQs) ranging from 5 to 22 ng L(-1). Then, the analysis of freshwater samples highlighted the robustness of the method, and the importance of the chloroacetanilides metabolites among the studied analytes.

  17. Measurement of aspartic acid in oilseed rape leaves under herbicide stress using near infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chu; Kong, Wenwen; Liu, Fei; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Oilseed rape is used as both food and a renewable energy resource. Physiological parameters, such as the amino acid aspartic acid, can indicate the growth status of oilseed rape. Traditional detection methods are laborious, time consuming, costly, and not usable in the field. Here, we investigate near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a fast and non-destructive detection method of aspartic acid in oilseed rape leaves under herbicide stress. Different spectral pre-processing methods were compared for optimal prediction performance. The variable selection methods were applied for relevant variable selection, including successive projections algorithm (SPA), Monte Carlo-uninformative variable elimination (MC-UVE) and random frog (RF). The selected effective wavelengths (EWs) were used as input by multiple linear regression (MLR), partial least squares (PLS) and least-square support vector machine (LS-SVM). The best predictive performance was achieved by SPA-LS-SVM (Raw) model using 22 EWs, and the prediction results were Rp = 0.9962 and RMSEP = 0.0339 for the prediction set. The result indicated that NIR combined with LS-SVM is a powerful new method to detect aspartic acid in oilseed rape leaves under herbicide stress.

  18. Contamination of rice field water with sulfonylurea and phenoxy herbicides in the Muda Irrigation Scheme, Kedah, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ismail, B S; Prayitno, S; Tayeb, M A

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the potential risk of herbicide contamination (2,4-dichlorophenoxy (2,4-D), 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), metsulfuron, bensulfuron, and pyrazosulfuron) in the rice fields of the Muda Irrigation Scheme, Kedah, Malaysia. The study included two areas with different irrigation water sources namely non-recycled (N-RCL) and recycled (RCL) water. Periodic water sampling was carried out from the drainage canals during the planting period of the wet season 2006/2007 and dry season 2007. The HPLC-UV was used to detect herbicide residues in the water samples collected from the rice fields. The results showed that the concentration of sulfonylurea herbicides such as bensulfuron and metsulfuron in the rice field was 0.55 and 0.51 μg/L, respectively. The potential risk of contamination depended on the actual dosage of each herbicide applied by farmers to their rice fields. The potential risk of water pollution by the five herbicides studied in the area with RCL water tended to be more widespread compared to the area with N-RCL water due to surface water runoff with higher levels of weedicides to the surrounding areas. During the two seasons, 50-73% of the water samples collected from the area receiving RCL water contained the five herbicides studied at concentrations of more than 0.05 μg/L, and this percentage was higher than that from the areas receiving N-RCL water (45-69%). During the wet season, the overall total mean concentration of the eight herbicides found in the samples collected from the area with RCL water (6.27 μg/L) was significantly higher (P < 0.01) than that from the area receiving N-RCL water (2.39 μg/L). Meanwhile, during the dry season, there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the herbicide concentrations between the areas receiving RCL (6.16 μg/L) and N-RCL water (7.43 μg/L) water.

  19. Mixed-mode solid-phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to determine phenoxy acid, sulfonylurea, triazine and other selected herbicides at nanogram per litre levels in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei; Bui, Anhduyen; Rose, Gavin; Allinson, Graeme

    2014-01-17

    The method presented uses a mixed-mode anion exchange SPE and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to analyze 5 sulfonylurea, 8 phenoxy acid, 12 triazine and 6 other herbicides in environmental waters. The mixed-mode SPE cartridge is able to retain a wide range of herbicides with acidic-neutral-basic characteristics, particularly the highly polar and acidic compounds clopyralid, dicamba and picloram. The neutral and basic herbicides can be effectively eluted with methanol, after which the acidic herbicides can be eluted using acidified methanol. The method has achieved an LOD of 0.7-3ng/L for the sulfonylureas, 4-12ng/L for the phenoxy acids and 0.4-30ng/L for the triazine and additional herbicides, with recoveries in the range 76-107%, 73-126%, and 65-104%, respectively. The precision of the method, calculated as relative standard deviation (RSD), was below 10% for both sulfonylurea and phenoxy acid herbicides, and less than 20% for the remaining herbicides. The developed method was used to determine the concentration of target herbicides in a range of environmental waters, and many of the target herbicides were detected at ng/L level.

  20. Enterobacter sp. I-3, a bio-herbicide inhibits gibberellins biosynthetic pathway and regulates abscisic acid and amino acids synthesis to control plant growth.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Park, Jae-Man; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-12-01

    Very few bacterial species were identified as bio-herbicides for weed control. The present research was focused to elucidate the plant growth retardant properties of Enterobacter sp. I-3 during their interaction by determining the changes in endogenous photosynthetic pigments, plant hormones and amino acids. The two bacterial isolates I-4-5 and I-3 were used to select the superior bacterium for controlling weed seeds (Echinochloa crus-galli L. and Portulaca oleracea L.) germination. The post-inoculation of I-3 (Enterobacter sp. I-3) significantly inhibited the weeds seed germination than their controls. The mechanism of bacterium induced plant growth reduction was identified in lettuce treated with I-3 bacterium and compared their effects with known chemical herbicide, trinexapac-ethyl (TE). The treatment of I-3 and TE showed a significant inhibitory effect on shoot length, leaf number, leaf length, leaf width, shoot weight, root weight and chlorophyll content in lettuce seedlings. The endogenous gibberellins (GAs) and abscisic acid (ABA) analysis showed that Enterobacter sp. I-3 treated plants had lower levels of GAs (GA12, GA19, GA20 and GA8) and GAs/ABA ratio and then, the higher level of ABA when compared to their controls. Indeed, the individual amino acids ie., aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, threonine, alanine, serine, leucine, isoleucine and tyrosine were declined in TE and I-3 exposed plants. Our results suggest that the utilization of Enterobacter sp. I-3 inhibits the GAs pathway and amino acids synthesis in weeds to control their growth can be an alternative to chemical herbicides.

  1. Quaternary herbicides retention by the amendment of acid soils with a bentonite-based waste from wineries.

    PubMed

    Pateiro-Moure, M; Nóvoa-Muñoz, J C; Arias-Estévez, M; López-Periago, E; Martínez-Carballo, E; Simal-Gándara, J

    2009-05-30

    The agronomic utility of a solid waste, waste bentonite (WB), from wine companies was assessed. In this sense, the natural characteristics of the waste were measured, followed by the monitoring of its effects on the adsorption/desorption behaviour of three quaternary herbicides in acid soils after the addition of increasing levels of waste. This was done with the intention of studying the effect of the added organic matter on their adsorption. The high content in C (294 g kg(-1)), N (28 g kg(-1)), P (584 mg kg(-1)) and K (108 g kg(-1)) of WB turned it into an appropriate amendment to increase soil fertility, solving at the same time its disposal. WB also reduced the potential Cu phytotoxicity due to a change in Cu distribution towards less soluble fractions. The adsorption of the herbicides paraquat, diquat and difenzoquat by acid soils amended with different ratios of WB was measured. In all cases, Langmuir equation was fitted to the data. Paraquat (PQ) and diquat (DQ) were adsorbed and retained more strongly than difenzoquat (DFQ) in the acid soil studied. However, the lowest retention of DFQ in an acid soil can be increased by amendment with organic matter through a solid waste from wineries, and it is enough for duplicate retention a dosage rate of 10t/ha. Anyway, detritivores ecology can still be affected. Detritivores are the organisms that consume organic material, and in doing so contribute to decomposition and the recycling of nutrients. The term can also be applied to certain bottom-feeders in wet environments, which play a crucial role in benthic ecosystems, forming essential food chains and participating in the nitrogen cycle.

  2. QUANTITATION OF ABERRANT INTERLOCUS T-CELL RECEPTOR REARRANGEMENTS IN MOUSE THYMOCYTES AND THE EFFECT OF THE HERBICIDE 2,4- DICHLOROPHENOXYACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitation of aberrant interlocus T-cell receptor rearrangements in mouse thymocytes and the effect of the herbicide 2,4- Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid

    Small studies in human populations have suggested a correlation between the frequency of errors in antigen receptor gene a...

  3. Role of exogenously supplied ferulic and p-coumaric acids in mimicking the mode of action of acetolactate synthase inhibiting herbicides.

    PubMed

    Orcaray, Luis; Igal, María; Zabalza, Ana; Royuela, Mercedes

    2011-09-28

    Chlorsulfuron and imazethapyr (herbicides that inhibit acetolactate synthase; ALS, EC 4.1.3.18) produced a strong accumulation of hydroxycinnamic acids that was related to the induction of the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (EC 2.5.2.54). The exogenous application of two hydroxycinnamic acids, ferulic and p-coumaric acids, to pea plants resulted in their internal accumulation, arrested growth, carbohydrate and quinate accumulation in the leaves, and the induction of ethanolic fermentation. These effects resemble some of the physiological effects detected after acetolactate synthase inhibition and suggest important roles for ferulic and p-coumaric acids in the mode of action of herbicides inhibiting the biosynthesis of branched chain amino acids.

  4. Simultaneous enantiomeric determinations of acid and ester imidazolinone herbicides in a soil sample by two-dimensional direct chiral liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Polo-Díez, L M; Santos-Delgado, M J; Valencia-Cabrerizo, Y; León-Barrios, Y

    2015-11-01

    A two-dimensional HPLC method for the simultaneous direct chiral enantiomeric determination of acid and ester IMI herbicides has been described. Difficulties arising from differences in polarity were overcome. Firstly, the imazaphyr, imazethapyr and imazamethabenz methyl herbicides were separated in a C18 achiral column. Then, their respective enantiomers were separated using a protein chiral AGP(TM) column; a heart-cut mode was used. Mobile phases of the two systems were compatibilized, after optimizing by factorial design using multiple response analysis. The proposed method has been validated by recovery studies from an enriched soil sample. Important enantiomer parameters such as enantioresolution higher than 1.12, enantiomeric ratio (ER) close to 1 and enantiomeric fraction (EF) around 0.5 were obtained for standards, confirming that herbicides are present as racemates.

  5. Both foliar and residual applications of herbicides that inhibit amino acid biosynthesis induce alternative respiration and aerobic fermentation in pea roots.

    PubMed

    Armendáriz, O; Gil-Monreal, M; Zulet, A; Zabalza, A; Royuela, M

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this work was to ascertain whether there is a general pattern of carbon allocation and utilisation in plants following herbicide supply, independent of the site of application: sprayed on leaves or supplied to nutrient solution. The herbicides studied were the amino acid biosynthesis-inhibiting herbicides (ABIH): glyphosate, an inhibitor of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, and imazamox, an inhibitor of branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis. All treated plants showed impaired carbon metabolism; carbohydrate accumulation was detected in both leaves and roots of the treated plants. The accumulation in roots was due to lack of use of available sugars as growth was arrested, which elicited soluble carbohydrate accumulation in the leaves due to a decrease in sink strength. Under aerobic conditions, ethanol fermentative metabolism was enhanced in roots of the treated plants. This fermentative response was not related to a change in total respiration rates or cytochrome respiratory capacity, but an increase in alternative oxidase capacity was detected. Pyruvate accumulation was detected after most of the herbicide treatments. These results demonstrate that both ABIH induce the less-efficient, ATP-producing pathways, namely fermentation and alternative respiration, by increasing the key metabolite, pyruvate. The plant response was similar not only for the two ABIH but also after foliar or residual application.

  6. [Synchronous extraction and determination of phenoxy acid herbicides in water by on-line monolithic solid phase microextraction-high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiabin; Wu, Fangling; Zhao, Qi

    2015-08-01

    A C18 monolithic capillary column was utilized as the solid phase microextraction column to construct an in-tube SPME-HPLC system which was used to simultaneously extract and detect five phenoxy acid herbicides, including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 2- (2-chloro)-phenoxy propionic acid (2,2-CPPA), 2-(3-chloro)-phenoxy propionic acid (2,3- CPPA), phenoxy propionic acid (PPA) and 2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) propionic acid (2,4-DP). The operating parameters of the in-tube SPME-HPLC system, including the length of the monolithic column, the sampling flow rate, the sampling time, the elution flow rate and the elution time, had been investigated in detail. The optimized operating parameters of the in-tube SPME-HPLC system were as follow: the length of the monolithic column was 20 cm, the sampling flow rate was 0. 04 mL/min, sampling time was 13 min; the elution flow rate was 0.02 mL/min, elution time was 5 min. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits of the five phenoxy acid herbicides were as follows: 9 µg/L for PPA, 4 µg/L for 2,2-CPPA, 4 µg/L for 2,3-CPPA, 5 µg/L for 2,4-D, 5 µg/L for 2,4-DP. Compared with the HPLC method with direct injection, the combined system showed a good enrichment factors to the analytes. The recoveries of the five phenoxy acid herbicides were between 79.0% and 98.0% (RSD ≤ 3.9%). This method was successfully used to detect the five phenoxy acid herbicides in water samples with satisfactory results.

  7. The discovery of Arylex™ active and Rinskor™ active: Two novel auxin herbicides.

    PubMed

    Epp, Jeffrey B; Alexander, Anita L; Balko, Terry W; Buysse, Ann M; Brewster, William K; Bryan, Kristy; Daeuble, John F; Fields, Stephen C; Gast, Roger E; Green, Renard A; Irvine, Nicholas M; Lo, William C; Lowe, Christian T; Renga, James M; Richburg, John S; Ruiz, James M; Satchivi, Norbert M; Schmitzer, Paul R; Siddall, Thomas L; Webster, Jeffery D; Weimer, Monte R; Whiteker, Gregory T; Yerkes, Carla N

    2016-02-01

    Multiple classes of commercially important auxin herbicides have been discovered since the 1940s including the aryloxyacetates (2,4-D, MCPA, dichlorprop, mecoprop, triclopyr, and fluroxypyr), the benzoates (dicamba), the quinoline-2-carboxylates (quinclorac and quinmerac), the pyrimidine-4-carboxylates (aminocyclopyrachlor), and the pyridine-2-carboxylates (picloram, clopyralid, and aminopyralid). In the last 10 years, two novel pyridine-2-carboxylate (or picolinate) herbicides were discovered at Dow AgroSciences. This paper will describe the structure activity relationship study that led to the discovery of the 6-aryl-picolinate herbicides Arylex™ active (2005) and Rinskor™ active (2010). While Arylex was developed primarily for use in cereal crops and Rinskor is still in development primarily for use in rice crops, both herbicides will also be utilized in additional crops.

  8. Transdermal absorption of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid is enhanced by both ethanol consumption and sunscreen application.

    PubMed

    Brand, R M; McMahon, L; Jendrzejewski, J L; Charron, A R

    2007-01-01

    Xenobiotics absorption is a health concern and skin is a major exposure site for many of these chemicals. Both alcohol consumption and topical sunscreen application act as transdermal penetration enhancers for model xenobiotics. The effect of combining these two treatments on transdermal absorption of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was therefore examined. Skin from rats ingesting low (1.5 g/kg) medium (4.3 g/kg) or high (6 g/kg) ethanol doses or saline control was treated with a commercially available sunscreen containing titanium dioxide and octyl methoxycinnimate and transdermal absorption of 2,4-D was monitored. Ethanol increased penetration by a factor of 1.9, 2.0 and 2.5 for animals treated with 1.5, 4.3 and 6 g/kg respectively, demonstrating an ethanol-induced dose response. Sunscreen application to skin from ethanol gavaged rats caused 2,4-D absorption above that induced by ethanol alone by an additional factor of 1.3, 2.1 and 2.9 for 1.5, 4.3 and 6 g/kg respectively. Comparing 2,4-D transdermal absorption after exposure to both ethanol and sunscreen with a theoretical value (sum of penetration after ethanol or sunscreen treatment) demonstrates that these two treatments enhance additively at the higher doses tested. Results of this study emphasize the importance of limiting excessive alcohol consumption in individuals with potential herbicide exposure rather than discouraging the use of sunscreens, since the consequences of UV-induced skin cancer are far more series than the risks that would be associated with observed increases in chemical exposure.

  9. Active ingredients in sunscreens act as topical penetration enhancers for the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Pont, Adam R; Charron, Anna R; Brand, Rhonda M

    2004-03-15

    Agricultural workers are encouraged to use sunscreen to decrease the risk of UV-related skin cancer. Our previous studies have shown certain commercial sunscreens to be penetration enhancers. The focus of this project is to determine whether active ingredients in sunscreen formulations (i.e., the UV absorbing components and insect repellants for the sunscreen/bug repellant combinations) also act as dermal penetration enhancers for herbicides in vitro. The total percentages of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) penetrating through hairless mouse skin in 24 h ranged from 54.9 +/- 4.7 for the no sunscreen control to 86.9 +/- 2.5 for padimate-o. Of the active ingredients tested (7.5% octyl methoxycinnamate, 7% octocrylene, 0.6% oxybenzone, 5% homosalate, 5% octyl salicylate, 8% padimate-o, 10% sulisobenzone, and 9.5% and 19% N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide [DEET]), all but octocrylene led to a significant increase in total 2,4-D penetration as compared to the control (P < 0.05), and only octocrylene and oxybenzone did not significantly decrease the corresponding lag time. Octyl salicylate (P < 0.01) and octyl methoxycinnimate (P < 0.05) significantly increased the 3H2O penetration across mouse skin, indicating physical damage to the stratum corneum. Additional studies demonstrated that the penetration enhancement seen across hairless mouse skin also occurred with human skin. Thus, the active ingredients of sunscreen formulations enhance dermal penetration of the moderately lipophilic herbicide 2,4-D.

  10. Moisturizing lotions can increase transdermal absorption of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxacetic acid across hairless mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Brand, R M; Charron, A R; Sandler, V L; Jendrzejewski, J L

    2007-01-01

    Moisturizing lotions can be an effective treatment for occupationally induced dry skin. These compounds are designed to be hygroscopic and retain water to keep the stratum corneum hydrated, while at the same time enhancing the horny layer to prevent increases in transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Skin hydration levels, however, are known to influence barrier properties. The purpose of this work was to compare skin moisture levels induced by four commercially available moisturizing lotions with their capacity as transdermal penetration enhancers using the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) as a model chemical. Further, the effect of moisturizing the skin after washing with sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) on transdermal absorption was determined. Skin moisture levels were also measured noninvasively and were correlated to penetration enhancement. Hairless mouse skin was pretreated with commercially available moisturizing lotions either with or without SLS washing and in vitro permeability studies were performed with the herbicide 2,4-D. The data demonstrate that pretreatment with three of the four lotions tested increased the transdermal absorption of 2,4-D as evidenced by cumulative penetration or faster lag times (p < 0.05). Skin moisture levels correlated with the penetration enhancement capabilities of the lotion. Washing the skin with 5% SDS increased the transdermal absorption of 2,4-D (p < 0.05) and application of moisturizing lotions increased the absorption further. In summary moisturizing lotions may influence transdermal penetration of the skin, with the more effective moisturizers having a greater effect on 2,4-D absorption.

  11. Dachtal Isomers and Acidic Herbicides and Pesticides in Eggs of Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) from the Seattle and Everett Areas, Washington, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chu, S.; Henny, Charles J.; Kaiser, James L.; Drouillard, K.G.; Haffner, G.D.; Letcher, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Current-use chlorophenoxy herbicides including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, dicamba, triclopyr, dicamba, dimethyl tetrachloroterephthalate (DCPA or dacthal), and the metabolite of pyrethroids, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), and the fungicide, chlorothalonil, were investigated in the eggs of osprey (Pandion haliaetus) that were collected from 15 sites from five study areas Puget Sound/Seattle area of Washington State, USA. DCPA differs from acidic chlorophenoxy herbicides, and is not readily hydrolyzed to free acid or acid metabolites, and thus we developed a new method. Of the 12 chlorophenoxy herbicides and chlorothalonil analyzed only DCPA could be quantified at six of these sites (2.0 to 10.3 pg/g fresh weight). However, higher levels (6.9 to 85.5 pg/g fresh weight) of the unexpected DCPA structural isomer, dimethyl tetrachlorophthalate (diMe-TCP) were quantified in eggs from all sites. diMe-TCP concentrations tended to be higher in eggs from the Everett Harbor area. As diMe-TCP is not an industrial product, and not commercially available, the source of diMe-TCP is unclear. Regardless, these findings indicate that DCPA and diMe-TCP can be accumulated in the food chain of fish-eating osprey, and transferred in ovo to eggs, and thus may be of concern to the health of the developing chick and the general reproductive health of this osprey population.

  12. Long-term sub-lethal effects of low concentration commercial herbicide (glyphosate/pelargonic acid) formulation in Bryophyllum pinnatum.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Lok R; Karsai, Istvan

    2015-12-15

    Potential long-term (~7months) sub-lethal impacts of soil-applied low levels of Roundup herbicide formulation were investigated in a greenhouse environment using the vegetative clones of succulent non-crop plant model, Bryophyllum pinnatum (Lam.) Oken. An eleven day LC50 (concentration that killed 50% of the plants) was found to be 6.25% (~1.25mg glyphosate/mL and 1.25mg pelargonic acid/mL combined), and complete mortality occurred at 12.5%, of the field application rate (i.e., ~20mg glyphosate/mL and 20mg pelargonic acid/mL as active ingredients). While sub-lethal Roundup (1-5%) exposures led to hormesis-characterized by a significant increase in biomass and vegetative reproduction, higher concentrations (≥6.25%) were toxic. A significant interaction between Roundup concentrations and leaf biomass was found to influence the F1 plantlets' biomass. Biomass asymmetry generally increased with increasing Roundup concentrations, indicating that plants were more stressed at higher Roundup treatments but within the low-dose regime (≤5% of the as-supplied formulation). While leaf apex region demonstrated higher reproduction with lower biomass increase, leaf basal area showed lower reproduction with greater biomass increase, in plantlets. The results suggest long-term exposures to drifted low levels of Roundup in soil may promote biomass and reproduction in B. pinnatum.

  13. Isolation and characterization of a novel 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid-degrading Enterobacter sp. strain SE08.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lin; Hu, Qiulong; Xiong, Xingyao; Su, Xiaojun; Huang, Yanning; Jiang, Ziwei; Zhou, Qingming; Zhao, Songyi; Zeng, Wei-ai

    2013-10-01

    A bacterial strain (SE08) capable of utilizing 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxy acetic acid (MCPA) as the sole carbon and energy source for growth was isolated by continuous enrichment culturing in minimal salt medium (MSM) from a long term MCPA exposed soil. This bacterial strain was identified as Enterobacter sp. based on morphological, physiological and biochemical tests, as well as 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Its ability to degrade MCPA was determined using high performance liquid chromatography. The strain SE08 can tolerate unusually high MCPA concentrations (125-2000mg/L). The influences of culturing factors (initial concentration, pH, and temperature) on the bacterial growth and substrate degradation were studied. The results showed that the optimal MCPA degradation occurred at an MCPA concentration of 500mg/L, 30°C and pH 6.0. Under these conditions, 68.5 percent of MCPA in MSM was degraded by SE08, and the OD600nm reached 0.64 after culturing for 72h. The degradation of MCPA could be enhanced by addition of both carbon and nitrogen sources. At an initial MCPA concentration of 500mg/L, when 5g/L glucose and 2.5g/L yeast extract were added into the MSM media, the MCPA degradation was significantly increased to 83.8 percent, and OD600nm was increased to 1.09 after incubation at 30°C and pH 6.0 for 72h. This is the first study showing that an Enterobacter sp. strain is capable of degrading MCPA, which might provide a new approach for the remediation of MCPA contaminated soil and contribute to the limited knowledge about the function of Enterobacter species.

  14. 77 FR 43595 - Product Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... Bronate Herbicide... MCPA, 2-ethylhexyl ester Bromoxynil octanoate. 000264-00477 Buctril + Atrazine.... 000264-00699 Rhino Brand MCPA, 2-ethylhexyl Herbicide. ester Bromoxynil octanoate Heptanoic acid, 2,6-dibromo-4- cyanophenyl ester. 000264-00799 Weco Max Brand 2,4-D, 2-ethylhexyl Herbicide. ester...

  15. Effects of active sunscreen ingredient combinations on the topical penetration of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Pont, Adam R; Charron, Anna R; Wilson, Roselyn M; Brand, Rhonda M

    2003-02-01

    Sunscreen use can reduce the incidence of certain skin cancers. However, a number of commercially available formulations have been shown to enhance the transdermal penetration of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Most of the active ingredients used in these compounds can individually act as penetration enhancers. Commercial sunscreens frequently contain multiple active ingredients in order to provide broad sunscreen protection. The purpose of this study was therefore to examine the effect of these active ingredient combinations on the transdermal absorption of 2,4-D in vitro. All six of the combinations tested resulted in increased cumulative penetration (P <0.01) and faster lag times (P <0.05). The 2,4-D cumulative penetration in the presence of the OFF! Deepwoods combination was significantly greater than the absorption with either the individual ingredients or their average (P <0.05). A systematic study designed to isolate the chemicals responsible for this enhancement demonstrated that with UV absorbers DEET synergistically increased the 2,4-D penetration and that DEET's cumulative enhancement properties correlate with its concentration. By contrast, octocrylene significantly slowed the lag time when used in combinations and was the only active ingredient that showed any antagonistic effects on 2,4-D penetration. Because none of the active ingredient combinations were able to inhibit dermal uptake of 2,4-D, it seems that proper selection of inert ingredients may be the most feasible solution for reducing penetration enhancement.

  16. The hormonal herbicide, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, inhibits Xenopus oocyte maturation by targeting translational and post-translational mechanisms.

    PubMed

    LaChapelle, Alexis M; Ruygrok, Michael L; Toomer, MaryEllen; Oost, Jason J; Monnie, Michelle L; Swenson, Jacob A; Compton, Alex A; Stebbins-Boaz, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    The widely used hormonal herbicide, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, blocks meiotic maturation in vitro and is thus a potential environmental endocrine disruptor with early reproductive effects. To test whether maturation inhibition was dependent on protein kinase A, an endogenous maturation inhibitor, oocytes were microinjected with PKI, a specific PKA inhibitor, and exposed to 2,4-D. Oocytes failed to mature, suggesting that 2,4-D is not dependent on PKA activity and likely acts on a downstream target, such as Mos. De novo synthesis of Mos, which is triggered by mRNA poly(A) elongation, was examined. Oocytes were microinjected with radiolabelled in vitro transcripts of Mos RNA and exposed to progesterone and 2,4-D. RNA analysis showed progesterone-induced polyadenylation as expected but none with 2,4-D. 2,4-D-activated MAPK was determined to be cytoplasmic in localization studies but poorly induced Rsk2 phosphorylation and activation. In addition to inhibition of the G2/M transition, 2,4-D caused abrupt reduction of H1 kinase activity in MII phase oocytes. Attempts to rescue maturation in oocytes transiently exposed to 2,4-D failed, suggesting that 2,4-D induces irreversible dysfunction of the meiotic signaling mechanism.

  17. Photosynthetic Performance of the Imidazolinone Resistant Sunflower Exposed to Single and Combined Treatment by the Herbicide Imazamox and an Amino Acid Extract

    PubMed Central

    Balabanova, Dobrinka A.; Paunov, Momchil; Goltsev, Vasillij; Cuypers, Ann; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Vassilev, Andon

    2016-01-01

    The herbicide imazamox may provoke temporary yellowing and growth retardation in IMI-R sunflower hybrids, more often under stressful environmental conditions. Although, photosynthetic processes are not the primary sites of imazamox action, they might be influenced; therefore, more information about the photosynthetic performance of the herbicide-treated plants could be valuable for a further improvement of the Clearfield technology. Plant biostimulants have been shown to ameliorate damages caused by different stress factors on plants, but very limited information exists about their effects on herbicide-stressed plants. In order to characterize photosynthetic performance of imazamox-treated sunflower IMI-R plants, we carried out experiments including both single and combined treatments by imazamox and a plant biostimulants containing amino acid extract. We found that imazamox application in a rate of 132 μg per plant (equivalent of 40 g active ingredient ha−1) induced negative effects on both light-light dependent photosynthetic redox reactions and leaf gas exchange processes, which was much less pronounced after the combined application of imazamox and amino acid extract. PMID:27826304

  18. Efficient removal of herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid from water using Ag/reduced graphene oxide co-decorated TiO2 nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanhong; Luo, Shenglian; Teng, Yarong; Liu, Chengbin; Xu, Xiangli; Zhang, Xilin; Chen, Liang

    2012-11-30

    A new photocatalyst, Ag nanoparticles (NPs) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) co-decorated TiO(2) nanotube arrays (NTs) (Ag/RGO-TiO(2) NTs), was designed and facilely produced by combining electrodeposition and photoreduction processes. The structures and properties of the photocatalysts were characterized. The ternary catalyst exhibited almost 100% photocatalytic removal efficiency of typical herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) from water under simulated solar light irradiation. The photodegradation rate toward 2,4-D over Ag/RGO-TiO(2) NTs is 11.3 times that over bare TiO(2) NTs. After 10 successive cycles with 1600 min of irradiation, Ag/RGO-TiO(2) NTs maintained as high 2,4-D removal efficiency as 97.3% with excellent stability and easy recovery, which justifies the photocatalytic system a promising application for herbicide removal from water.

  19. Grass roots chemistry: meta-Tyrosine, an herbicidal nonprotein amino acid

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Cécile; Weston, Leslie A.; Huang, Tengfang; Jander, Georg; Owens, Thomas; Meinwald, Jerrold; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2007-01-01

    Fine fescue grasses displace neighboring plants by depositing large quantities of an aqueous phytotoxic root exudate in the soil rhizosphere. Via activity-guided fractionation, we have isolated and identified the nonprotein amino acid m-tyrosine as the major active component. m-Tyrosine is significantly more phytotoxic than its structural isomers o- and p-tyrosine. We show that m-tyrosine exposure results in growth inhibition for a wide range of plant species and propose that the release of this nonprotein amino acid interferes with root development of competing plants. Acid hydrolysis of total root protein from Arabidopsis thaliana showed incorporation of m-tyrosine, suggesting this as a possible mechanism of phytotoxicity. m-Tyrosine inhibition of A. thaliana root growth is counteracted by exogenous addition of protein amino acids, with phenylalanine having the most significant effect. The discovery of m-tyrosine, as well as a further understanding of its mode(s) of action, could lead to the development of biorational approaches to weed control. PMID:17940026

  20. The economic value of pelargonic acid as a natural herbicide in sweet bell peppers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Economic return on investment in respect to weed control management practices continue to be an essential element in use of naturally occurring substances for weed control in vegetable production. Pelargonic acid, although not certified as organic, is naturally occurring in many plants, animals, and...

  1. DFT computation and experimental analysis of vibrational and electronic spectra of phenoxy acetic acid herbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arul Dhas, D.; Hubert Joe, I.; Roy, S. D. D.; Balachandran, S.

    2013-05-01

    An absolute vibrational analysis has been attempted on the basis of experimental FTIR and NIR-FT Raman spectra with calculated vibrational wavenumbers and intensities of phenoxy acetic acids. The equilibrium geometry, bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers have been calculated with the help of B3LYP method with Dunning correlation consistent basis set aug-cc-pVTZ. The electronic structures of molecular fragments were described in terms of natural bond orbital analysis, which shows intermolecular Osbnd H⋯O and intramolecular Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The electronic absorption spectra with different solvents have been investigated in combination with time-dependent density functional theory calculation. The pKa values of phenoxy acetic acids were compared.

  2. Comparing effects of low levels of herbicides on greenhouse- and field-grown potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), soybeans (Glycine max L.), and peas (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Pfleeger, Thomas; Olszyk, David; Lee, E Henry; Plocher, Milton

    2011-02-01

    Although laboratory toxicology tests are generally easy to perform, cost effective, and readily interpreted, they have been questioned for their environmental relevance. In contrast, field tests are considered realistic while producing results that are difficult to interpret and expensive to obtain. Toxicology tests were conducted on potatoes, peas, and soybeans grown in a native soil in pots in the greenhouse and were compared to plants grown outside under natural environmental conditions to determine toxicological differences between environments, whether different plant developmental stages were more sensitive to herbicides, and whether these species were good candidates for plant reproductive tests. The reproductive and vegetative endpoints of the greenhouse plants and field-grown plants were also compared. The herbicides bromoxynil, glyphosate, MCPA ([4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy] acetic acid), and sulfometuron-methyl were applied at below field application rates to potato plants at two developmental stages. Peas and soybeans were exposed to sulfometuron-methyl at similar rates at three developmental stages. The effective herbicide concentrations producing a 25% reduction in a given measure differed between experimental conditions but were generally within a single order of magnitude within a species, even though there were differences in plant morphology. This study demonstrated that potatoes, peas, and soybeans grown in pots in a greenhouse produce phytotoxicity results similar to those grown outside in pots; that reproductive endpoints in many cases were more sensitive than vegetative ones; and that potato and pea plants are reasonable candidates for asexual and sexual reproductive phytotoxicity tests, respectively. Plants grown in pots in a greenhouse and outside varied little in toxicity. However, extrapolating those toxicity results to native plant communities in the field is basically unknown and in need of research.

  3. Oocyte maturation in Xenopus laevis is blocked by the hormonal herbicide, 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Stebbins-Boaz, Barbara; Fortner, Katherine; Frazier, Jessie; Piluso, Suzanne; Pullen, Samuel; Rasar, Melissa; Reid, William; Sinclair, Kristin; Winger, Elisa

    2004-02-01

    Oocyte maturation is dependent on a complex program of morphological, ultrastructural, and biochemical signaling events, and if disrupted could lead to decreased fertility and population decline. The in vitro sensitivity of amphibian oocytes and oocyte maturation to plant growth factor and widely used hormonal herbicide, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), was examined in this study to determine its potential impact on early development and possible contribution to the global amphibian decline. Progesterone, which acts through a membrane receptor, triggers meiotic maturation in full grown (stage VI) Xenopus oocytes, characterized by cytoskeletal reorganization, nuclear dissolution, chromosome condensation, and spindle formation. Biochemically, the Mos/MAPK/MPF signaling pathway is activated, in part dependent on translational activation of specific maternal mRNAs such as c-Mos. Light microscopy revealed unusual asymmetric morphotypes in oocytes exposed to 2,4-D alone characterized by a white spot and bulge, termed coning, in the animal pole where the germinal vesicle (nucleus) persisted intact. Treatment of oocytes with cytochalasin B, a microfilament inhibitor, blocked these morphotypes but nocodazole, a microtubule depolymerizing agent, did not. Confocal microscopy showed that 2,4-D, itself, caused substantial depolymerization of perinuclear microtubules. Importantly, 2,4-D blocked progesterone-induced maturation as measured by the lack of nuclear breakdown, confirmed by the lack of Mos expression, MPF activation, and cytoplasmic polyadenylation of cyclin B1 mRNA. However, Western blot analysis and U0126 inhibitor studies showed that 2,4-D, either alone or in the presence of progesterone, induced MAPK phosphorylation through MAPKK. These results show that 2,4-D disrupts oocyte cytoskeletal organization and blocks maturation while stimulating an independent MAPK signaling pathway.

  4. Removal of 2,4-Dichlorophenolyxacetic acid (2,4-D) herbicide in the aqueous phase using modified granular activated carbon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low cost 2,4-Dichlorophenolyxacetic acid (2,4-D) widely used in controlling broad-leafed weeds is frequently detected in water resources. The main objectives of this research were focused on evaluating the feasibility of using granular activated carbon modified with acid to remove 2,4-D from aqueous phase, determining its removal efficiency and assessing the adsorption kinetics. Results The present study was conducted at bench-scale method. The influence of different pH (3–9), the effect of contact time (3–90 min), the amount of adsorbent (0.1-0.4 g), and herbicide initial concentration (0.5-3 ppm) on 2,4-D removal efficiency by the granular activated carbon were investigated. Based on the data obtained in the present study, pH of 3 and contact time of 60 min is optimal for 2,4-D removal. 2,4-D reduction rate increased rapidly by the addition of the adsorbent and decreased by herbicide initial concentration (63%). The percent of 2,4-D reduction were significantly enhanced by decreasing pH and increasing the contact time. The adsorption of 2,4-D onto the granular activated carbon conformed to Langmuir and Freundlich models, but was best fitted to type II Langmuir model (R2 = 0.999). The second order kinetics was the best for the adsorption of 2,4-D by modified granular activated carbon with R2 > 0.99. Regression analysis showed that all of the variables in the process have been statistically significant effect (p < 0.001). Conclusions In conclusion, granular activated carbon modified with acid is an appropriate method for reducing the herbicide in the polluted water resources. PMID:24410737

  5. Herbicide Persistence in Seawater Simulation Experiments.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Philip; Mueller, Jochen F; Eaglesham, Geoff; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Herbicides are detected year-round in marine waters, including those of the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef (GBR). The few previous studies that have investigated herbicide persistence in seawater generally reported half-lives in the order of months, and several studies were too short to detect significant degradation. Here we investigated the persistence of eight herbicides commonly detected in the GBR or its catchments in standard OECD simulation flask experiments, but with the aim to mimic natural conditions similar to those found on the GBR (i.e., relatively low herbicide concentrations, typical temperatures, light and microbial communities). Very little degradation was recorded over the standard 60 d period (Experiment 1) so a second experiment was extended to 365 d. Half-lives of PSII herbicides ametryn, atrazine, diuron, hexazinone and tebuthiuron were consistently greater than a year, indicating high persistence. The detection of atrazine and diuron metabolites and longer persistence in mercuric chloride-treated seawater confirmed that biodegradation contributed to the breakdown of herbicides. The shortest half-life recorded was 88 d for growth-regulating herbicide 2,4-D at 31°C in the dark, while the fatty acid-inhibitor metolachlor exhibited a minimum half-life of 281 d. The presence of moderate light and elevated temperatures affected the persistence of most of the herbicides; however, the scale and direction of the differences were not predictable and were likely due to changes in microbial community composition. The persistence estimates here represent some of the first appropriate data for application in risk assessments for herbicide exposure in tropical marine systems. The long persistence of herbicides identified in the present study helps explain detection of herbicides in nearshore waters of the GBR year round. Little degradation of these herbicides would be expected during the wet season with runoff and associated flood plumes

  6. Automated dynamic liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection for the determination of phenoxy acid herbicides in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingming; Ee, Kim Huey; Lee, Hian Kee

    2005-08-05

    Automated dynamic liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction (D-LLLME) controlled by a programmable syringe pump and combined with HPLC-UV was investigated for the extraction and determination of 5 phenoxy acid herbicides in aqueous samples. In the extraction procedure, the acceptor phase was repeatedly withdrawn into and discharged from the hollow fiber by the syringe pump. The repetitive movement of acceptor phase into and out of the hollow fiber channel facilitated the transfer of analytes into donor phase, from the organic phase held in the pore of the fiber. Parameters such as the organic solvent, concentrations of the donor and acceptor phases, plunger movement pattern, speed of agitation and ionic strength of donor phase were evaluated. Good linearity of analytes was achieved in the range of 0.5-500 ng/ml with coefficients of determination, r2 > 0.9994. Good repeatabilities of extraction performance were obtained with relative standard deviations lower than 7.5%. The method provided up-to 490-fold enrichment within 13 min. In addition, the limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 0.1 to 0.4 ng/mL (S/N = 3). D-LLLME was successfully applied for the analysis of phenoxy acid herbicides from real environmental water samples.

  7. The effects of sublethal levels of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid herbicide (2,4-D) on feeding behaviors of the crayfish O. rusticus.

    PubMed

    Browne, Amanda M; Moore, Paul A

    2014-08-01

    The widespread use of herbicides across the globe has increased the probability of synthetic chemicals entering freshwater habitats. On entering aquatic habitats, these chemicals target and disrupt both physiological and behavioral functioning in various aquatic organisms. Herbicides, such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), can have negative impacts on chemoreception because these receptor cells are in direct contact with water-soluble chemicals in the environment. Studies focusing on lethal concentration (LC50) levels may understate the impact of herbicides within aquatic habitats because damage to the chemoreceptors can result in modified behaviors or lack of appropriate responses to environmental or social cues. The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether exposure to sublethal levels of 2,4-D alters the foraging behaviors of crayfish Orconectes rusticus. We hypothesized that crayfish exposed to greater concentrations of 2,4-D would be less successful in locating food or on locating food would consume smaller amounts possibly due to an inability to recognize the food odors in the contaminated waters. Crayfish were exposed to three sublethal levels of 2,4-D for 96 h and placed into a Y-maze system with a fish gelatin food source placed randomly in the right or left arm. Average walking speed, average time spent in the correct arm, and percent consumption were analyzed. Our data show that crayfish were impaired in their ability to forage effectively. These inabilities to locate and consume adequate amounts of food could result in lower body weights and decreased fitness in populations of crayfish exposed to 2,4-D in natural habitats.

  8. Application of pH-sensitive magnetic nanoparticles microgel as a sorbent for the preconcentration of phenoxy acid herbicides in water samples.

    PubMed

    Tabani, Hadi; Khodaei, Kamal; Bide, Yasamin; Zare, Farzaneh Dorabadi; Mirzaei, Saeed; Fakhari, Ali Reza

    2015-08-14

    Introducing new sorbents is an interesting and debatable issue in the field of sample preparation. In this study, for the first time, a pH-sensitive magnetic nanoparticles microgel, Fe3O4-SiO2-oly(4-vinylpyridine), was introduced as a new sorbent. The operating mechanism of this sorbent is based on changing the pH value of the sample and consequently the structure of this pH-sensitive microgel is changed. So that, at pH 6.0 the microgel was ready to accept and load the analytes (partial swelling), and when the pH was increased to 8.0, the microgel was closed and analytes were trapped inside the sorbent (deswelling). At pH 2.0 the microgel was opened and the analytes were released from the microgel (swelling). As the adsorption and desorption mechanism is based on changing the pH and only aqueous medium is used as the effluent solvent, this method is introduced as a green extraction method. The use of this microgel resulted in excellent figures of merit. The limits of quantitation and detection for herbicides were obtained within the range of 10-30 and 3-10 ng mL(-1), respectively. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to determine the concentration of phenoxy acid herbicides as hazardous materials in water samples.

  9. Fluorescence characterization of the interaction Suwannee river fulvic acid with the herbicide dichlorprop (2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propionic acid) in the absence and presence of aluminum or erbium.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Kelly M; Dickerson, Matthew A; Traudt, Elizabeth M

    2011-11-01

    This study uses fluorescence spectroscopy to better understand the role of environmental metal ions in the interaction of charged herbicides with biochemical degradation product Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA). The interactions between the widely-used herbicide dichlorprop (2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propionic acid) (DCPPA) with Al(3+) and the comparative metal Er(3+) were probed at pH 4.0. Fluorescence experiments on binary solutions at pH 4.0 clearly indicated that Al(3+) and Er(3+) strongly interact with both SRFA and DCPPA alone in solution as demonstrated by fluorescence quenching with DCPPA and enhancement with SRFA by Al(3+) and fluorescence quenching of both SRFA and DCPPA fluorescence by Er(3+). Titrating Al(3+) or Er(3+) to SRFA-DCPPA quenched SRFA fluorescence as compared to the SRFA-metal ion binary complexes. Formation constants were determined using the Ryan-Weber model for the titration data. The DCPPA fluorescence results strongly support the formation of DCPPA-Al(3+) and DCPPA-Er(3+) complexes at pH values above the pK(a) (3.0) of DCPPA. Excitation and emission data obtained on ternary solutions of SRFA-Al(3+)-DCPPA and SRFA-Er(3+)-DCPPA complexes at pH 4.0 suggest that at this pH where the predominant DCPPA species is negatively-charged, Al(3+) and Er(3+) metal ions may function to "bridge" negatively-charged fulvic acids to negatively-charged pesticides. Fluorescence data collected on UV-irradiated ternary complexes indicate that both metals can also bridge DCPPA interactions with SRFA under those conditions. The results of our studies suggest that creation of a herbicide-free boundary corridor is recommended near mines and runoff areas with metal ions in surface waters to control possible complexation among fulvic acids, DCPPA and metal ions that maintains these molecules in a bioavailable state to plants and animals.

  10. The Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes with herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid - Synthesis and structural studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drzewiecka-Antonik, Aleksandra; Ferenc, Wiesława; Wolska, Anna; Klepka, Marcin T.; Cristóvão, Beata; Sarzyński, Jan; Rejmak, Paweł; Osypiuk, Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    The Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes with herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) were synthesized and structurally characterized. The geometry of metal-ligand interaction was refined using XAFS and DFT studies. The Co(2,4-D)2·6H2O and Ni(2,4-D)2·4H2O complexes have octahedral geometry with two carboxylate groups of 2,4-D anions and four water molecules in the coordination sphere. The square planar geometry around metal cations formed by the carboxylate groups from two monodentate ligands and two water molecules, is observed for Cu(2,4-D)2·4H2O complex. In the recrystallized Ni(II) complex dinuclear 'Chinese lantern' structures with bridging carboxylate groups of 2,4-D were observed.

  11. Single, competitive, and dynamic adsorption on activated carbon of compounds used as plasticizers and herbicides.

    PubMed

    Abdel daiem, Mahmoud M; Rivera-Utrilla, José; Sánchez-Polo, Manuel; Ocampo-Pérez, Raúl

    2015-12-15

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the single, competitive, and dynamic adsorption of phthalic acid (PA), bisphenol A (BPA), diphenolic acid (DPA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid (2,4-D), and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) on two activated carbons with different chemical natures and similar textural characteristics. The adsorption mechanism was also elucidated by analyzing the influence of solution pH and ionic strength. The activated carbons demonstrated high adsorption capacity to remove all micropollutants due to the presence of active sites on their surfaces, which increase dispersive interactions between the activated carbon graphene layers and the aromatic ring of pollutants. The adsorption capacity of the activated carbons increased in the order: DPAMCPA, which is directly related to: i) molecular size of pollutants; ii) chemical structure of pollutants, and iii) chemical properties of adsorbents. In most cases, the adsorption of contaminants is favored at acid pH (pH<5) due to the establishment of attractive electrostatic interactions. In dynamic regime, the amount of pollutant adsorbed was much higher for PA, followed by DPA, and was approximately similar for BPA, 2,4-D, and MCPA. Finally, the amount of BPA and DPA adsorbed on activated carbon decreased by around 50% and 70% in the presence of DPA and BPA, respectively, indicating that both compounds are adsorbed on the same adsorption sites of the activated carbon.

  12. Changes in mitochondrial electron partitioning in response to herbicides inhibiting branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis in soybean.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Susana; Ribas-Carbo, Miquel; Busquets, Silvia; Berry, Joseph A; Zabalza, Ana; Royuela, Mercedes

    2003-11-01

    The adaptation of the respiratory metabolism in roots of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv Ransom) treated with herbicides that inhibit the enzyme acetolactate synthase (ALS) was analyzed. A new gas phase dual-inlet mass spectrometry system for simultaneous measurement of 34O2 to 32O2 and O2 to N2 ratios has been developed. This system is more accurate than previously described systems, allows measurements of much smaller oxygen gradients, and, as a consequence, works with tissues that have lower respiration rates. ALS inhibition caused an increase of the alternative oxidase (AOX) protein and an accumulation of pyruvate. The combination of these two effects is likely to induce the activation of the alternative pathway and its participation in the total respiration. Moreover, the start of the alternative pathway activation and the increase of AOX protein were before the decline in the activity of cytochrome pathway. The possible role of AOX under ALS inhibition is discussed.

  13. Photocatalytic removal of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid herbicide on copper oxide/titanium dioxide prepared by co-precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shu Chin; Hasan, Norhasnita; Lintang, Hendrik O.; Shamsuddin, Mustaffa; Yuliati, Leny

    2016-02-01

    In this work, suppression of the charge recombination on the titanium dioxide (TiO2) was reported by the addition of copper oxide (CuO), which led to a higher activity of TiO2 for removal of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) herbicide. A series of CuO/TiO2 with CuO loadings of 0.1-1 wt% was prepared through a co-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that the presence of CuO could not be detected as the low loading amount of CuO might have good dispersion on the surface of TiO2. Diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectra suggested that low loading amount of CuO did not influence the optical property of TiO2. Fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that TiO2 possessed a dominant emission peak of 407 nm at an excitation wavelength of 218 nm. The increasing loading amount of CuO decreased the emission intensity of TiO2, suggesting the successful reduction of charge recombination. After irradiation under UV light for 1 h, CuO(0.1 wt%)/TiO2 gave the highest percentage removal of the herbicide among the samples. The optimum loading amount of CuOmight improve the charge separation and reduce the electron-hole recombination on TiO2 without blocking the active sites, thus leading to the improved photocatalytic activity. This work showed that CuO/TiO2 is a potential photocatalyst for environmental remediation.

  14. Characterization of (R/S)-mecoprop [2-(2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) propionic acid]-degrading Alcaligenes sp.CS1 and Ralstonia sp. CS2 isolated from agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Smejkal, C W; Vallaeys, T; Seymour, F A; Burton, S K; Lappin-Scott, H M

    2001-04-01

    The herbicide mecoprop [2-(2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) propionic acid] is widely applied to corn fields in order to control broad-leaved weeds. However, it is often detected in groundwater where it can be a persistent contaminant. Two mecoprop-degrading bacterial strains were isolated from agricultural soils through their capability to degrade (R/S)-mecoprop rapidly. 16S rDNA sequencing of the isolates demonstrated that one was closely related to the genera Alcaligenes sp. (designated CS1) and the other to Ralstonia sp. (designated CS2). Additionally, these isolates demonstrated ability to grow on other related herbicides, including 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid), MCPA [4-chloro-2-methyl phenoxy acetic acid] and (R/S)-2,4-DP [2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propionic acid] as sole carbon sources. tfdABC gene-specific probes derived from the 2,4-D-degrading Variovorax paradoxus TV1 were used in hybridization analyses to establish whether tfd-like genes are present in mecoprop-degrading bacteria. Hybridization analysis demonstrated that both Alcaligenes sp. CS1 and Ralstonia sp. CS2 harboured tfdA, tfdB and tfdC genes on plasmids that have approximately > 60% sequence similarity to the tfdA, tfdB and tfdC genes of V. paradoxus. It is therefore likely that tfd-like genes may be involved in the degradation of mecoprop, and we are currently investigating this further.

  15. Degradation of chloroacetanilide herbicides: The prevalence of sulfonic and oxanilic acid metabolites in Iowa groundwaters and surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkhoff, S.J.; Kolpin, D.W.; Thurman, E.M.; Ferrer, I.; Barcelo, D.

    1998-01-01

    Water samples were collected from 88 municipal wells throughout Iowa during the summer and were collected monthly at 12 stream sites in eastern Iowa from March to December 1996 to study the occurrence of the sulfonic and oxanilic metabolites of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor. The sulfonic and oxanilic metabolites were present in almost 75% of the groundwater samples and were generally present from 3 to 45 times more frequently than their parent compounds. In groundwater, the median value of the summed concentrations of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor was less than 0.05 μg/L, and the median value of the summed concentrations of the six metabolites was 1.2 μg/L. All surface water samples contained at least one detectable metabolite compound. Individual metabolites were detected from 2 to over 100 times more frequently than the parent compounds. In surface water, the median value of the summed concentrations of the three parent compounds was 0.13 μg/L, and the median value of the summed concentrations of the six metabolites was 6.4 μg/L. These data demonstrate the importance of analyzing both parent compounds and metabolites to more fully understand the environmental fate and transport of herbicides in the hydrologic system.

  16. Rapid determination of acid herbicides in soil by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection based on dispersive solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Kaczyński, Piotr; Łozowicka, Bożena; Jankowska, Magdalena; Hrynko, Izabela

    2016-05-15

    This study determined twenty six the highly sensitive phenoxy, pyridines, aliphatic and aromatic acid compounds in soil with a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The samples were prepared by modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe (QuEChERS) analytical procedure in solid samples. Herbicides extraction effectiveness was evaluated at three different spiking levels (0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mg kg(-1)). Fourteen different dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) sorbents in clean-up step were tested. The QuEChERS protocol with acidic alumina provided the highest number of pesticides with recoveries in the 70-120% range. The soil matrix effect was evaluated and for the majority of compounds were not significant, showing suppression or enhancement (±81-123%). The precision calculated as relative standard deviation (RSD) was below 22%. The linear relation was observed in the range 0.01-2.0 mg kg(-1) and the correlation coefficient R>0.999. The expanded measurement uncertainty was estimated as being on average, and was between 9% and 33%. The validated method was employed in the analysis of 309 real soil samples.

  17. Solid-phase extraction of phosphorous-containing amino acid herbicides from biological specimens with a zirconia-coated silica cartridge.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Ohta, Hikoto; Yamamuro, Tadashi

    2014-10-15

    We report a rapid solid-phase extraction method for glyphosate (Glyp), glufosinate (Gluf), and bialaphos (Bial) using a zirconia-coated silica cartridge, which interacts specifically with phosphorous-containing amino acid herbicides (PAAHs). We extracted PAAHs from serum and urine samples. The PAAHs were derivatized with trimethyl orthoacetate-acetic acid and analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The intra-day and inter-day accuracy was within ±13% RE, the intra-day and inter-day precision was less than 12% RSD, and the total recovery was more than 60% for Glyp and more than 80% for Gluf and Bial. The linearity ranges of the calibration curves of the serum samples were 0.2-10,000μg/mL for Glyp, 0.1-1000μg/L for Gluf, and 0.5-1000μg/L for Bial; and those of the urine samples were 0.4-20,000μg/L for Glyp, 0.2-2000μg/L for Gluf, and 0.1-2000μg/L for Bial. This range covers almost all the reported poisoning cases involving these compounds, from very mild to fatal cases. The present paper offers a universal cleanup method for PAAHs in serum and urine samples for clinical and forensic analysis.

  18. Alterations in fatty acids of polar lipids in Salmo trutta on long-term exposure to a glyphosate-based herbicide (Roundup).

    PubMed

    Bayir, Mehtap; Sirkecioglu, A Necdet; Bayir, Abdulkadir; Aras, Mevlut

    2013-10-15

    Abstract: In present study, the effects of sublethal doses (10 and 20 mg L(-1)) of Roundup on fatty acid pattern in muscle and liver of brown trout were investigated. For this purpose, fish were held in experiment tanks for 1 month. While total MUFA wasn't influenced, the highest total SFA and total n-6 PUFA were determined in group 10 mg L(-1) and the lowest values were determined in control group and group 20 mg L(-1) in muscle, respectively. The highest and the lowest total n-3 PUFA was found in control group and group of 10 mg L(-1) in muscle, respectively. Total n-3/n-6 PUFA ratio and EPA+DHA level of group 10 mg L(-1) were lower than other groups in muscle. The amount of total n-3/n-6 PUFA, EPA + DHA and total n-3 PUFA of control group were found higher than treatment groups in liver. While the highest total SFA was determined in group 10 mg L(-1), there wasn't difference between control group and group 20 mg L(-1) in liver. Both of doses herbicide had higher value than control for total MUFA in liver. While Roundup didn't inhibit n-3 PUFA synthesis in the muscle, both concentrations, exhibited inhibitory effect on n-3 PUFA synthesis in the liver. This result probably consequence of its indirect effect on the some enzyme activities or gene expressions in fatty acid metabolism of brown trout.

  19. Effects of Chlorophenoxy Herbicides and Their Main Transformation Products on DNA Damage and Acetylcholinesterase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Benfeito, Sofia; Silva, Tiago; Garrido, Jorge; Andrade, Paula B.; Sottomayor, M. J.; Borges, Fernanda; Garrido, E. Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pesticide transformation products (TPs) are increasingly being detected among different environmental compartments, including groundwater and surface water. However, there is no sufficient experimental data on their toxicological potential to assess the risk associated with TPs, even if their occurrence is known. In this study, the interaction of chlorophenoxy herbicides (MCPA, mecoprop, 2,4-D and dichlorprop) and their main transformation products with calf thymus DNA by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy has been assessed. Additionally, the toxicity of the chlorophenoxy herbicides and TPs was also assessed evaluating the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity. On the basis of the results found, it seems that AChE is not the main target of chlorophenoxy herbicides and their TPs. However, the results found showed that the transformation products displayed a higher inhibitory activity when compared with the parent herbicides. The results obtained in the DNA interaction studies showed, in general, a slight effect on the stability of the double helix. However, the data found for 4-chloro-2-methyl-6-nitrophenol suggest that this transformation product can interact with DNA through a noncovalent mode. PMID:24795892

  20. Sublethal Exposure to Commercial Formulations of the Herbicides Dicamba, 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid, and Glyphosate Cause Changes in Antibiotic Susceptibility in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Kurenbach, Brigitta; Marjoshi, Delphine; Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos F.; Ferguson, Gayle C.; Godsoe, William; Gibson, Paddy

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biocides, such as herbicides, are routinely tested for toxicity but not for sublethal effects on microbes. Many biocides are known to induce an adaptive multiple-antibiotic resistance phenotype. This can be due to either an increase in the expression of efflux pumps, a reduced synthesis of outer membrane porins, or both. Exposures of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to commercial formulations of three herbicides—dicamba (Kamba), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), and glyphosate (Roundup)—were found to induce a changed response to antibiotics. Killing curves in the presence and absence of sublethal herbicide concentrations showed that the directions and the magnitudes of responses varied by herbicide, antibiotic, and species. When induced, MICs of antibiotics of five different classes changed up to 6-fold. In some cases the MIC increased, and in others it decreased. Herbicide concentrations needed to invoke the maximal response were above current food maximum residue levels but within application levels for all herbicides. Compounds that could cause induction had additive effects in combination. The role of soxS, an inducer of the AcrAB efflux pump, was tested in β-galactosidase assays with soxS-lacZ fusion strains of E. coli. Dicamba was a moderate inducer of the sox regulon. Growth assays with Phe-Arg β-naphtylamide (PAβN), an efflux pump inhibitor, confirmed a significant role of efflux in the increased tolerance of E. coli to chloramphenicol in the presence of dicamba and to kanamycin in the presence of glyphosate. Pathways of exposure with relevance to the health of humans, domestic animals, and critical insects are discussed. PMID:25805724

  1. 7-Methoxy-(9H-β-Carbolin-1-il)-(E)-1-Propenoic Acid, a β-Carboline Alkaloid From Eurycoma longifolia, Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory Effects by Activating the Nrf2/Heme Oxygenase-1 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hai Dang; Choo, Young-Yeon; Nguyen, Tien Dat; Nguyen, Hoai Nam; Chau, Van Minh; Lee, Jeong-Hyung

    2016-03-01

    Eurycoma longifolia is an herbal medicinal plant popularly used in Southeast Asian countries. In the present study, we show that 7-methoxy-(9H-β-carbolin-1-il)-(E)-1-propenoic acid (7-MCPA), a β-carboline alkaloid isolated from E. longifolia, exerted anti-inflammatory effects by activating the nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway. 7-MCPA inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in RAW264.7 cells and rescued C57BL/6 mice from LPS-induced lethality in vivo. LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and IL-6 was also significantly suppressed by treatment of 7-MCPA in RAW264.7 cells. 7-MCPA induced nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and increased transcription of its target genes, such as HO-1. Treating RAW264.7 cells with 7-MCPA increased the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the phosphorylation level of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK); however, co-treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) blocked 7-MCPA-induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Moreover, NAC or SB203580 (p38 MAPK inhibitor) blocked 7-MCPA-induced nuclear translocation of Nrf2, suggesting that 7-MCPA activated Nrf2 via a ROS-dependent p38 pathway. 7-MCPA induced HO-1 protein and mRNA expression and knockdown of Nrf2 with siRNA or SB203580 blocked 7-MCPA-mediated induction of HO-1 expression. Inhibiting Nrf2 or HO-1 abrogated the anti-inflammatory effects of 7-MCPA in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. We also demonstrated that 7-MCPA suppressed LPS-induced nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation. These results provide the first evidence that 7-MCPA exerts its anti-inflammatory effect by modulating the Nrf2 and NF-κB pathways and may be a potential Nrf2 activator to prevent or treat inflammatory diseases.

  2. Analysis of the herbicidal mechanism of 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy cinnamic acid ethyl ester using iTRAQ and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingyue; Liu, Ce; Yang, Juan; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Lihui; Dong, Jingao

    2017-02-24

    Absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) is the latest development in the new quantitative proteomics technology for high-throughput identification and quantitation of proteins. The mechanisms underlying the 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy cinnamic acid ethyl ester treatment in Arabidopsis thaliana was investigated. Deficiency-induced changes in the protein profile of A. thaliana caused by this compound were analyzed using iTRAQ and quantitative real-time PCR. A total of 2909 proteins were quantified, of which 49 and 34 proteins were upregulated and downregulated, respectively, in the experimental plants compared with the controls. Treatment results showed that numerous proteins were involved in photosystemII, energy metabolism, and cell structure formation. Based on the upregulated and downregulated proteins, high amount of AT4G21280 protein acted on the oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 3-1, while low amount of AT1G10340 protein affected the catabolic process of the photosystemII-associated light-harvesting complex II. We selected these proteins to preliminarily verify the expression of proteins using quantitative real-time PCR to provide a reliable basis for further studies after proteomics analysis. Results show that the combined use of iTRAQ and quantitative real-time PCR provides an effective method to study proteins, leading to the determination of a new herbicide mechanism.

  3. Herbicides and plant hormesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide hormesis is commonly observed at sub-toxic doses of herbicides and other phytotoxins. The occurrence and magnitude of this phenomenon is influenced by plant growth stage and physiological status, environmental factors, the endpoint measured, and the timing between treatment and endpoint me...

  4. Photoinhibition and recovery in a herbicide-resistant mutant from Glycine max (L.) Merr. cell cultures deficient in fatty acid unsaturation.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Miguel; Collados, Raquel; Yruela, Inmaculada; Picorel, Rafael

    2004-07-01

    Photoinhibition and recovery were studied in two photosynthetic cell suspensions from soybean (Glycine max L. Merr): the wild type (WT) and the herbicide-resistant D1 mutant STR7. This mutant also showed an increase in saturated fatty acids from thylakoid lipids. STR7 was more sensitive to photoinhibition under culture conditions. In vivo photoinhibition experiments in the presence of chloramphenicol, in vitro studies in isolated thylakoid membranes, and immunoblot analysis indicated that the process of light-induced degradation of the D1 protein was not involved in the response of STR7 to light. At growth temperature (24 degrees C), the recovery rate of photoinhibited photosystem II (PSII) was slower in STR7 relative to WT. Photoinhibition and recovery were differentially affected by temperature in both cell lines. The rates of photoinhibition were faster in STR7 at any temperature below 27 degrees C. The rates of PSII recovery from STR7 were more severely affected than those of WT at temperatures lower than 24 degrees C. The photoinhibition and recovery rates of WT at 17 degrees C mimicked those of STR7 at 24 degrees C. In organelle translation studies indicated that synthesis and elongation of D1 were substantially similar in both cell lines. However, sucrose gradient fractionation of chloroplast membranes demonstrated that D1 and also other PSII proteins such as D2, OEE33, and LCHII had a reduced capability to incorporate into PSII to yield a mature assembled complex in STR7. This effect may become the rate-limiting step during the recovery of photoinhibited PSII and may explain the increased sensitivity to high light found in STR7. Our data may hint at a possible role of fatty acids from membrane lipids in the assembly and dynamics of PSII.

  5. Herbicides and trace metals in urban waters in Melbourne, Australia (2011-12): concentrations and potential impact.

    PubMed

    Allinson, Mayumi; Zhang, Pei; Bui, AnhDuyen; Myers, Jackie H; Pettigrove, Vincent; Rose, Gavin; Salzman, Scott A; Walters, Robert; Allinson, Graeme

    2017-01-19

    Urban stormwater samples were collected from five aquatic systems in Melbourne, Australia, on six occasions between October 2011 and March 2012 and tested for 30 herbicides and 14 trace metals. Nineteen different herbicides were observed in one or more water samples from the five sites; chemicals observed at more than 40% of sites were simazine (100%), MCPA (83%), diuron (63%) and atrazine (53%). Using the toxicity unit (TU) concept to assess potential risk to aquatic ecosystems, none of the detected herbicides were considered to pose an individual, group or collective short-term risk to fish or zooplankton in the waters studied. However, 13 herbicides had TU values suggesting they might have posed an individual risk to primary producers at the time of sampling. Water quality guideline levels were exceeded on many occasions for Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb and Zn. Similarly, RQmed and RQmax exceeded 1 for Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, V and Zn. Almost all the metals screened exceeded a log10TU of -3 for every trophic level, suggesting that there may have been some impact on aquatic organisms in the studied waterbodies. Our data indicate that Melbourne's urban aquatic environments may be being impacted by approved domestic, industrial and sporting application of herbicides and that stormwater quality needs to be carefully assessed prior to reuse. Further research is required to understand the performance of different urban stormwater wetland designs in removing pesticides and trace metals. Applying the precautionary principle to herbicide regulation is important to ensure there is more research and assessment of the long-term 'performance' standard of all herbicides and throughout their 'life cycle'. Implementing such an approach will also ensure government, regulators, decision makers, researchers, policy makers and industry have the best possible information available to improve the management of chemicals, from manufacture to use.

  6. Effects of a herbicide mixture on primary and bacterial productivity in four prairie wetlands with varying salinities: an enclosure approach.

    PubMed

    Sura, Srinivas; Waiser, Marley J; Tumber, Vijay; Raina-Fulton, Renata; Cessna, Allan J

    2015-04-15

    Wetlands in the Prairie pothole region of Saskatchewan and Manitoba serve an important role in providing wildlife habitat, water storage and water filtration. They display a wide range of water quality parameters such as salinity, nutrients and major ions with sulfate as the dominant ion for the most saline wetlands. The differences in these water quality parameters among wetlands are reflected in the composition of aquatic plant communities and their productivity. Interspersed within an intensely managed agricultural landscape where pesticides are commonly used, mixtures of herbicides are often detected in these wetlands as well as in rivers, and drinking water reservoirs. One freshwater and three wetlands of varying salinity in the St. Denis National Wildlife Area, Saskatchewan, Canada were selected to study the effects of a mixture of eight herbicides (2,4-D, MCPA, dicamba, clopyralid, bromoxynil, mecoprop, dichlorprop, and glyphosate) on wetland microbial communities using an outdoor enclosure approach. Six enclosures (three controls and three treatments) were installed in each wetland and the herbicide mixture added to the treatment enclosures. The concentration of each herbicide in the enclosure water was that which would have resulted from a direct overspray of a 0.5-m deep wetland at its recommended field application rate. After herbicide addition, primary and bacterial productivity, and algal biomass were measured in both planktonic and benthic communities over 28 days. The herbicide mixture had a stimulatory effect on primary productivity in the nutrient-sufficient freshwater wetland while no stimulatory effect was observed in the nutrient-deficient saline wetlands. The differences observed in the effects of the herbicide mixture appear to be related to the nutrient bioavailability in these wetlands.

  7. Adsorption and photodegradation kinetics of herbicide 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid with MgFeTi layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Kim Phuong; Beak, Min-wook; Huy, Bui The; Lee, Yong-Ill

    2016-03-01

    The calcined layered double hydroxides (cLDHs) Ti-doped and undoped MgFe for this study were prepared by co-precipitation method followed by calcination at 500 °C. The as-prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectrum (DRS) techniques and tested for adsorption and photodegradation (including photocatalytic and photo-Fenton-like) of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) in aqueous solutions under visible light irradiation. In the range of studied operating conditions, the as-prepared samples exhibited excellent photo-Fenton-like activity, leading to more than 80-95% degradation of 2,4,5-T at initial concentration of 100 mg L(-1) with 4 g calcined LDHs per liter, was accomplished in 360 min, while 2,4,5-T half-life time was as short as 99-182 min. The kinetics of adsorption and photodegradation of 2,4,5-T were also discussed. These results offered a green, low cost and high efficiency photocatalyst for environmental remediation.

  8. Optimisation of the separation of herbicides by linear gradient high performance liquid chromatography utilising artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Tran, Anh T K; Hyne, Ross V; Pablo, Fleur; Day, W Roy; Doble, P

    2007-02-28

    An artificial neural network (ANN) was employed to model the chromatographic response surface for the linear gradient separation of 10 herbicides that are commonly detected in storm run-off water in agricultural catchments. The herbicides (dicamba, simazine, 2,4-D, MCPA, triclopyr, atrazine, diuron, clomazone, bensulfuron-methyl and metolachlor) were separated using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography and detected with a photodiode array detector. The ANN was trained using the pH of the mobile phase and the slope of the acetonitrile/water gradient as input variables. A total of nine experiments were required to generate sufficient data to train the ANN to accurately describe the retention times of each of the herbicides within a defined experimental space of mobile phase pH range 3.0-4.8 and linear gradient slope 1-4% acetonitrile/min. The modelled chromatographic response surface was then used to determine the optimum separation within the experimental space. This approach allowed the rapid determination of experimental conditions for baseline resolution of all 10 herbicides. Illustrative examples of determination of these components in Milli-Q water, Sydney mains water and natural water samples spiked at 0.5-1mug/L are shown. Recoveries were over 70% for solid-phase extraction using Waters Oasis((R)) HLB 6cm(3) cartridges.

  9. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  10. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  11. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  12. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  13. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  14. Herbicide levels in rivers draining two prairie agricultural watersheds

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, D.C.G.; Grift, N.P.

    1987-01-01

    A monitoring survey was conducted during 1984 on the Ochre and Turtle Rivers, which flow into Dauphin Lake in western Manitoba, Canada, to determine levels of the herbicides MCPA, diclofop-methyl, dicamba, bromoxynil, 2,4-D, triallate and trifluralin which were widely used in each watershed. Triallate concentrations exceeded 4 ng/L in 50% and 10% of the 21 samples taken from each of the Turtle and Ochre River, respectively, during the period March to October 1984. Trifluralin concentrations exceeded 3 ng/L in 14% and 10% of the samples from the respective rivers. Maximum concentrations did not exceed 25 ng/L and were unrelated to changes in river flow. Bromoxynil and diclofop were detected in the Turtle River, at concentrations of 113 and 476 ng/L, respectively, following a major high water event in late June, but were undetectable (<2 and 12 ng/L, respectively) at other sampling times. Dicamba and 2,4-D were detectable.

  15. ANALYTICAL MASS SPECTROMETRY OF HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herbicides are chemical substances that are applied to agricultural soils, gardens, lawns, or plants to destroy or to prevent the growth of undesirable vegetation. The herbicides included in this review are generally syntehtic organic compuonds that are ingredients in commercial...

  16. The herbicide glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Malik, J; Barry, G; Kishore, G

    1989-03-01

    Glyphosate has broad spectrum herbicidal activity against a wide range of annual and perennial weeds. The environmental properties of this herbicide such as its soil immobility, rapid soil inactivation and soil biodegradation are outstanding. This herbicide is practically non-toxic to non-plant life forms such as aquatic and avian species, animals and man. Metabolism studies with pure bacterial cultures indicate that glyphosate is metabolized to either aminomethylphosphonate and glyoxylate or sarcosine and phosphate in most bacteria. The enzyme C-P lyase, which catalyzes the cleavage of the carbon-phosphorus bond of phosphonates including glyphosate, appears to be complex, containing multiple subunits. Mode of action studies have demonstrated that glyphosate kills plants by inhibiting the enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase, involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic compounds. The status of our understanding of these aspects of glyphosate is reviewed.

  17. A Community-Engaged Approach to Developing a Mobile Cancer Prevention App: The mCPA Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Rapid growth of mobile technologies has resulted in a proliferation of lifestyle-oriented mobile phone apps. However, most do not have a theoretical framework and few have been developed using a community-based participatory research approach. A community academic team will develop a theory-based, culturally tailored, mobile-enabled, Web-based app—the Mobile Cancer Prevention App (mCPA)—to promote adherence to dietary and physical activity guidelines. Objective The aim of this study is to develop mCPA content with input from breast cancer survivors. Methods Members of SISTAAH (Survivors Involving Supporters to Take Action in Advancing Health) Talk (N=12), treated for Stages I-IIIc breast cancer for less than 1 year, 75 years of age or younger, and English-speaking and writing, will be recruited to participate in the study. To develop the app content, breast cancer survivors will engage with researchers in videotaped and audiotaped sessions, including (1) didactic instructions with goals for, benefits of, and strategies to enhance dietary intake and physical activity, (2) guided discussions for setting individualized goals, monitoring progress, and providing or receiving feedback, (3) experiential nutrition education through cooking demonstrations, and (4) interactive physical activity focused on walking, yoga, and strength training. Qualitative (focus group discussions and key informant interviews) and quantitative (sensory evaluation) methods will be used to evaluate the participatory process and outcomes. Results Investigators and participants anticipate development of an acceptable (frequency and duration of usage) feasible (structure, ease of use, features), and accessible mobile app available for intervention testing in early 2017. Conclusions Depending on the availability of research funding, mCPA testing, which will be initiated in Miami, will be extended to Chicago, Houston, Philadelphia, and Los Angeles. PMID:26935995

  18. [Effects of herbicide on grape leaf photosynthesis and nutrient storage].

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei; Wang, Hui; Zhai, Heng

    2011-09-01

    Selecting three adjacent vineyards as test objects, this paper studied the effects of applying herbicide in growth season on the leaf photosynthetic apparatus and branch nutrient storage of grape Kyoho (Vitis vinfrraxVitis labrusca). In the vineyards T1 and T2 where herbicide was applied in 2009, the net photosynthesis rate (Pa) of grape leaves had a significant decrease, as compared with that in vineyard CK where artificial weeding was implemented. The leaves at the fourth node in vineyard T1 and those at the sixth node in vineyard T2 had the largest decrement of Pn (40.5% and 32.1%, respectively). Herbicide had slight effects on the leaf stomatal conductance (Gs). In T1 where herbicide application was kept on with in 2010, the Pn, was still significantly lower than that in CK; while in T2 where artificial weeding was implemented in 2010, the Pn and Gs of top- and middle node leaves were slightly higher than those in T1, but the Pn was still lower than that in CK, showing the aftereffects of herbicide residual. The herbicide application in 2009 decreased the leaf maximum photochemical efficiency of PS II (Fv/Fm) and performance index (P1) while increased the relative variable fluorescence in the J step and K step, indicating the damage of electron transportation of PS II center and oxygen-evolving complex. Herbicide application decreased the pigment content of middle-node leaves in a dose-manner. Applying herbicide enhanced the leaf catalase and peroxidase activities significantly, increased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of middle-node leaves, but decreased the SOD activity of top- and bottom node leaves. After treated with herbicide, the ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity of middle- and bottom node leaves increased, but that of top-node leaves decreased. Herbicide treatment aggravated leaf lipid peroxidation, and reduced the soluble sugar, starch, free amino acids, and soluble protein storage in branches.

  19. A follow-up study of cancer incidence among workers in manufacture of phenoxy herbicides in Denmark.

    PubMed Central

    Lynge, E.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this cohort study is to shed further light on the potential carcinogenic effect indicated by a Swedish case control study of the 2,4-dichlorophenol and 4-chloro-ortho-cresol based phenoxy herbicides, unlikely to be contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD). In the present study it was the intention to include all persons employed in manufacture of phenoxy herbicides in Denmark before 1982. The predominant product was MCPA and only a very limited amount of 2,4,5-T was processed in one of the two factories included in the study. Registration of the cohort was based on company records, supplemented with data from a public pension scheme from 1964 onwards. Ninety-nine percent of registered employees could be followed up. Cancer cases were identified by linkage with the National Cancer Register. Totals of 3,390 males and 1,069 females were included in the study. In the analysis special attention was given to soft tissue sarcomas (STS) and malignant lymphomas (ML) which are the diagnostic groups indicated to be associated with exposure to phenoxy herbicides in the Swedish studies. Five cases of STS were observed among male employees in contrast to 1.84 expected cases. This result supports the Swedish observation of an increased risk of STS following exposure to phenoxy herbicides unlikely to be contaminated with 2,3,7,8-TCDD. However, several potential biases have to be taken into account in interpretation of this observation and these are discussed. Seven cases of ML were observed among male employees in contrast to 5.37 expected which does not support the Swedish observation of an excess risk. The total cancer risk among persons employed in manufacture and packaging of phenoxy herbicides was equivalent to the cancer risk in the Danish population. Among males thus employed 11 lung cancer cases were observed in contrast to 5.33 expected. Attention should be given to exposure to spray dried MCPA-sodium salt in the plants, but

  20. Postemergence herbicides for calendula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calendula is an alternative oilseed crop whose seed oil is valued as a substitute for tung oil and a replacement for petroleum-based volatile organic compounds in paints and other coatings. Calendula is not yet grown extensively as an agronomic crop, and its tolerances to most herbicides are unknown...

  1. Weed control without herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Managing weeds without herbicides is challenging and requires an integration of tactics and a change in how weeds problems are approached. Weeds should be managed in a holistic, intentional and proactive manner. Growers that successfully manage weeds in organic systems examine why certain weed speci...

  2. Synthesis and herbicidal activities of benzothiazole N,O-acetals.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhiqin; Zhou, Fengxing; Wei, Shaopeng

    2015-10-01

    A new series of N,O-acetals were prepared via a simple one-pot reaction by the condensation of 2-amino-methybenzothiazole with aldehydes and alcohols. The title compounds were obtained in moderate to good yields in the presence of acid catalyst. Bioassay results indicated that some synthesized compounds had good herbicidal activity against both dicotyledon and monocotyledon weeds. This investigation provided a new type of herbicidal lead compounds, as well as its facile preparation method.

  3. NOVEL CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION AND CARBON SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION OF ACETANILIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Six acetanilide herbicides are currently registered for use in the U.S. Over the past several years, ethanesufonic acid (ESA) and oxanilic acid (OA) degradatoin products of these acetanilide herbicides have been found in U.S. ground waters and surface waters. "Alachlor ESA and ...

  4. Low-dimensional coordination polymeric structures in alkali metal complex salts of the herbicide (2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetic acid (2,4-D).

    PubMed

    Smith, Graham

    2015-02-01

    The Li, Rb and Cs complexes with the herbicide (2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetic acid (2,4-D), namely poly[[aqua[μ3-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetato-κ(3)O(1):O(1):O(1')]lithium(I)] dihydrate], {[Li(C8H5Cl2O3)(H2O)]·2H2O}n, (I), poly[μ-aqua-bis[μ3-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetato-κ(4)O(1):O(1'):O(1'),Cl(2)]dirubidium(I)], [Rb2(C8H5Cl2O3)2(H2O)]n, (II), and poly[μ-aqua-bis[μ3-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetato-κ(5)O(1):O(1'):O(1'),O(2),Cl(2)]dicaesium(I)], [Cs2(C8H5Cl2O3)2(H2O)]n, (III), respectively, have been determined and their two-dimensional polymeric structures are described. In (I), the slightly distorted tetrahedral LiO4 coordination involves three carboxylate O-atom donors, of which two are bridging, and a monodentate aqua ligand, together with two water molecules of solvation. Conjoined six-membered ring systems generate a one-dimensional coordination polymeric chain which extends along b and interspecies water O-H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions give the overall two-dimensional layers which lie parallel to (001). In hemihydrate complex (II), the irregular octahedral RbO5Cl coordination about Rb(+) comprises a single bridging water molecule which lies on a twofold rotation axis, a bidentate O(carboxy),Cl-chelate interaction and three bridging carboxylate O-atom bonding interactions from the 2,4-D ligand. A two-dimensional coordination polymeric layer structure lying parallel to (100) is formed through a number of conjoined cyclic bridges, including a centrosymmetric four-membered Rb2O2 ring system with an Rb...Rb separation of 4.3312 (5) Å. The coordinated water molecule forms intralayer aqua-carboxylate O-H...O hydrogen bonds. Complex (III) comprises two crystallographically independent (Z' = 2) irregular CsO6Cl coordination centres, each comprising two O-atom donors (carboxylate and phenoxy) and a ring-substituted Cl-atom donor from the 2,4-D ligand species in a tridentate chelate mode, two O-atom donors from bridging carboxylate groups and one from a

  5. Leaching and persistence of herbicides for kudzu (Pueraria montana) control on pine regeneration sites

    SciTech Connect

    Berisford, Yvette, C.; Bush, Parshall, B.; Taylor, John, W.

    2006-03-01

    Kudzu is an exotic vine that threatens forests in the southeastern United States. It can climb, overtop, and subsequently kill new seedlings or mature trees. Herbicides are commonly used to control kudzu; however, eradication might require retreatment for 3 to 10 yr in young stands and 7 to 10 yr for mature stands. Clopyralid, picloram, triclopyr, metsulfuron, and tebuthiuron exert various degrees of control, depending on soil type, meteorological conditions, herbicide formulation, seasonal application, characteristics of the kudzu stand, and frequency and number of herbicide. Field residue data for soil or leachate are lacking for all of these herbicides when they are used in actual forest regeneration programs in the Coastal Plain. These data are needed to assess the relative potential for the herbicides to leach into groundwater or to move off-site into sensitive ecological areas of the Coastal Plain in which sandy soils predominate and the groundwater tends to be shallow. As part of an integrated pest management program to control kudzu on forest regeneration areas at the Savannah River Site near New Ellenton, SC, five herbicides were evaluated from the standpoints of herbicide leaching, kudzu control, and plant community development. Three herbicide chemical families were represented. This included pyridinecarboxylic acid herbicides (clopyralid, picloram 1 2,4-D, and triclopyr), a sulfonylurea herbicide (metsulfuron), and a substituted urea herbicide (tebuthiuron).

  6. Herbicidal Activity of an Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase Inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Wittenbach, V. A.; Teaney, P. W.; Hanna, W. S.; Rayner, D. R.; Schloss, J. V.

    1994-01-01

    Isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) is the third enzyme specific to leucine biosynthesis. It catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of 3-isopropylmalate (3-IPM) to 2-ketoisocaproic acid. The partially purified enzyme from pea (Pisum sativum L.) shows a broad pH optimum of 7.8 to 9.1 and has Km values for 3-IPM and NAD of 18 and 40 [mu]M, respectively. O-Isobutenyl oxalylhydroxamate (O-IbOHA) has been discovered to be an excellent inhibitor of the pea IPMDH, with an apparent inhibitor constant of 5 nM. As an herbicide, O-IbOHA showed only moderate activity on a variety of broadleaf and grass species. We characterized the herbicidal activity of O-IbOHA on corn (Zea mays L.), a sensitive species; giant foxtail (Setaria faberi) and morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea [L.] Roth), moderately tolerant species; and soybean [Glycine max L. Merr.), a tolerant species. Differences in tolerance among the species were not due to differences in the sensitivity of IPMDH. Studies with [14C]O-IbOHA suggested that uptake and translocation were not major limitations for herbicidal activity, nor were they determinants of tolerance. Moreover, metabolism could not account for the difference in tolerance of corn, foxtail, and morning glory, although it might account for the tolerance of soybean. Herbicidal activity on all four species was correlated with the accumulation of 3-IPM in the plants. PMID:12232331

  7. Herbicide resistance in Aster squamatus conferred by a less sensitive form of acetolactate synthase.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Maria D; Fischer, Albert J; De Prado, Rafael

    2003-11-01

    A biotype of Aster squamatus (Sprengel) Hieronymus with suspected resistance to the ALS-inhibiting herbicide imazapyr was detected in a chicken farm in the province of Seville, Spain, which had been treated once a year with imazapyr for 10 years. Resistance to imazapyr in this biotype was studied using dose-response experiments, absorption and translocation assays, metabolism studies and ALS activity assays. The rate of imazapyr required to inhibit A squamatus growth by 50% (ED50) was 15 times higher for the R (resistant) than for the S (susceptible) biotype. Cross-resistance existed for the ALS-inhibitors imazamox, imazethapyr, amidosulfuron, nicosulfuron, rimsulfuron, triasulfuron and tribenuron, but not for bensulfuron. Control of A squamatus using alternative herbicides was poor with clopyralid, intermediate with quinclorac, amitrole and MCPA, and excellent with 2,4-D, glufosinate and glyphosate. Absorption of [14C]imazapyr increased over time for both the R and S biotypes, and translocation from the treated leaf to shoots and roots was similar in both biotypes, with most of the radioactivity remaining in the treated leaf. No metabolites of imazapyr were detected in either biotype. Sensitivity of the ALS enzyme (target site) to imazapyr was lower for the R biotype (I50(R) = 4.28 x I50(S)). The mechanism of imazapyr resistance in this R biotype appears to be an altered ALS conferring decreased sensitivity to imazapyr at the whole-plant level.

  8. Rationale for a natural products approach to herbicide discovery.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Franck E; Owens, Daniel K; Duke, Stephen O

    2012-04-01

    Weeds continue to evolve resistance to all the known modes of herbicidal action, but no herbicide with a new target site has been commercialized in nearly 20 years. The so-called 'new chemistries' are simply molecules belonging to new chemical classes that have the same mechanisms of action as older herbicides (e.g. the protoporphyrinogen-oxidase-inhibiting pyrimidinedione saflufenacil or the very-long-chain fatty acid elongase targeting sulfonylisoxazoline herbicide pyroxasulfone). Therefore, the number of tools to manage weeds, and in particular those that can control herbicide-resistant weeds, is diminishing rapidly. There is an imminent need for truly innovative classes of herbicides that explore chemical spaces and interact with target sites not previously exploited by older active ingredients. This review proposes a rationale for a natural-products-centered approach to herbicide discovery that capitalizes on the structural diversity and ingenuity afforded by these biologically active compounds. The natural process of extended-throughput screening (high number of compounds tested on many potential target sites over long periods of times) that has shaped the evolution of natural products tends to generate molecules tailored to interact with specific target sites. As this review shows, there is generally little overlap between the mode of action of natural and synthetic phytotoxins, and more emphasis should be placed on applying methods that have proved beneficial to the pharmaceutical industry to solve problems in the agrochemical industry.

  9. Evolution of herbicide resistance mechanisms in grass weeds.

    PubMed

    Matzrafi, Maor; Gadri, Yaron; Frenkel, Eyal; Rubin, Baruch; Peleg, Zvi

    2014-12-01

    Herbicide resistant weeds are becoming increasingly common, threatening global food security. Here, we present BrIFAR: a new model system for the functional study of mechanisms of herbicide resistance in grass weeds. We have developed a large collection of Brachypodium accessions, the BrI collection, representing a wide range of habitats. Wide screening of the responses of the accessions to four major herbicide groups (PSII, ACCase, ALS/AHAS and EPSPS inhibitors) identified 28 herbicide-resistance candidate accessions. Target-site resistance to PSII inhibitors was found in accessions collected from habitats with a known history of herbicide applications. An amino acid substitution in the psbA gene (serine264 to glycine) conferred resistance and also significantly affected the flowering and shoot dry weight of the resistant accession, as compared to the sensitive accession. Non-target site resistance to ACCase inhibitors was found in accessions collected from habitats with a history of herbicide application and from a nature reserve. In-vitro enzyme activity tests and responses following pre-treatment with malathion (a cytochrome-P450 inhibitor) indicated sensitivity at the enzyme level, and give strong support to diclofop-methyl and pinoxaden enhanced detoxification as NTS resistance mechanism. BrIFAR can promote better understanding of the evolution of mechanisms of herbicide resistance and aid the implementation of integrative management approaches for sustainable agriculture.

  10. Dechlorination of chloroacetanilide herbicides by plant growth regulator sodium bisulfite.

    PubMed

    Bian, Haitao; Chen, Jingwen; Cai, Xiyun; Liu, Ping; Wang, Ying; Huang, Liping; Qiao, Xianliang; Hao, Ce

    2009-08-01

    Chloroacetanilide herbicides are frequently detected in groundwater and surface waters, and pose high risks to aquatic biota. In this study, sodium bisulfite (NaHSO(3)), a plant growth regulator used in China, was used to remove three chloroacetanilide herbicides including alachlor, acetochlor and S-metolachlor. These herbicides were rapidly dechlorinated by NaHSO(3) in neutral conditions. The dechlorination was accelerated with increasing pH, temperature and NaHSO(3) concentrations. Kinetic analysis and mass spectrum identification revealed that the reaction followed S(N)2 nucleophilic substitution, in which the chlorine was replaced by the reactive specie sulfite. Alachlor and its isomer acetochlor had similar reaction rates, whereas they were more readily transformed than S-metolachlor that had larger steric hindrance and weaker electrophilicity. The transformation products were chloroacetanilide ethane sulfonic acids (ESAs), which were also encountered as major metabolites of these herbicides in natural environment via common metabolic pathways and were less toxic to green algae compared to the parent herbicides. These results indicate that NaHSO(3) can accelerate transformation of chloroacetanilide herbicides to the less toxic transformation products by nucleophilic substitution and dechlorination in aquatic environment. NaHSO(3) can be potentially used for the removal of chloroacetanilide herbicides from wastewater effluent, spill sites and accidental discharge.

  11. Evaluation of the genotoxicity of a herbicide formulation containing 3,6-dichloro-2-metoxybenzoic acid (dicamba) in circulating blood cells of the tropical fish Cnesterodon decemmaculatus.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Arcaute, C; Soloneski, S; Larramendy, M L

    2014-10-01

    Acute toxicity and genotoxicity of the dicamba-based commercial herbicide formulation Banvel(®) were evaluated on Cnesterodon decemmaculatus (Pisces, Poeciliidae) exposed under laboratory conditions. A lethal effect was used as the end point for mortality, whereas frequency of micronuclei (MNs) and DNA single-strand breaks evaluated by the single cell gel electrophoresis assay were employed as end points for genotoxicity. Mortality studies revealed an LC50 96 h value of 1639 mg/L (range, 1471-1808) of dicamba. Furthermore, behavioral changes, e.g., gathering at the bottom of the aquarium, slowness in motion, abnormal swimming, and slow reaction, were observed. Whereas increased frequency of MNs was observed when 1229 mg/L dicamba was assayed for 48 h, no induction of MNs was observed in fish exposed to the herbicide for 96 h, regardless of the concentration of dicamba. Furthermore, other nuclear abnormalities, i.e., binucleated cells and lobed and notched nuclei, were induced in fish exposed for 48 h but not 96 h. Increase in the genetic damage index was observed in those treatments (lasting for both 48 and 96 h) within the 410-1229 mg/L dicamba concentration-range. This study represents the first evidence of acute lethal and sublethal effects exerted by dicamba on a piscine species native to Argentina. The results could indicate that dicamba-based formulation Banvel(®) is the less toxic emerging pollutant reported so far for C. decemmaculatus. Finally, our findings highlight the properties of this herbicide that jeopardize nontarget living species exposed to this agrochemical.

  12. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.D.; Scott-Craig, J.S.

    1999-10-26

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is presented. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with vectors and seeds from the plants.

  13. Biodegradation of acetanilide herbicides acetochlor and butachlor in soil.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chang-ming; Wang, Xing-jun; Zheng, He-hui

    2002-10-01

    The biodegradation of two acetanilide herbicides, acetochlor and butachlor in soil after other environmental organic matter addition were measured during 35 days laboratory incubations. The herbicides were applied to soil alone, soil-SDBS (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate) mixtures and soil-HA (humic acid) mixtures. Herbicide biodegradation kinetics were compared in the different treatment. Biodegradation products of herbicides in soil alone samples were identified by GC/MS at the end of incubation. Addition of SDBS and HA to soil decreased acetochlor biodegradation, but increased butachlor biodegradation. The biodegradation half-life of acetochlor and butachlor in soil alone, soil-SDBS mixtures and soil-HA mixtures were 4.6 d, 6.1 d and 5.4 d and 5.3 d, 4.9 d and 5.3 d respectively. The biodegradation products were hydroxyacetochlor and 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline for acetochlor, and hydroxybutachlor and 2,6-diethylaniline for butachlor.

  14. Disposition of Orange Herbicide by Incineration. Revised Draft Environmental Statement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-04-01

    hexoxide, chlorine heptoxide, chlorates, hydrogen chloride, hydrochloric acid , chlorinated water, hypochlorous 4 acid , chlorous acid , chloric acid ...was held prior to initiating the test program to acquaint all TMC and USAF personnel with the operations to be con- ducted and the applicable safety...repetitive applications of herbicides) in- dicatod that the cenera present ware those exp~ected in warm, acid (rp11 5.5), seepaqc~, or stand ing ia tors

  15. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Herbicides

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the herbicides module, when to list herbicides as a candidate cause, ways to measure herbicides, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for herbicides, herbicides module references and literature reviews.

  16. Herbicide and nutrient transport from an irrigation district into the South Saskatchewan River.

    PubMed

    Cessna, A J; Elliott, J A; Tollefson, L; Nicholaichuk, W

    2001-01-01

    Pesticides and nutrients can be transported from treated agricultural land in irrigation runoff and thus can affect the quality of receiving waters. A 3-yr study was carried out to assess possible detrimental effects on the downstream water quality of the South Saskatchewan River due to herbicide and plant nutrient inputs via drainage water from an irrigation district. Automated water samplers and flow monitors were used to intensively sample the drainage water and to monitor daily flows in two major drainage ditches, which drained approximately 40% of the flood-irrigated land within the irrigation district. Over three years, there were no detectable inputs of ethalfluralin into the river and those of trifluralin were less than 0.002% of the amount applied to flood-irrigated fields. Inputs of MCPA, bromoxynil, dicamba and mecoprop were 0.06% or less of the amounts applied, whereas that for clopyralid was 0.31%. The relatively higher input (1.4%) of 2,4-D to the river was probably due its presence in the irrigation water. Corresponding inputs of P (as total P) and N (as nitrate plus ammonia) were 2.2 and 1.9% of applied fertilizer, respectively. Due to dilution of the drainage water in the river, maximum daily herbicide (with the exception of 2,4-D) and nutrient loadings to the river would not have resulted in significant concentration increases in the river water. There was no consistent remedial effect on herbicides entering the river due to passage of the drainage water through a natural wetland. In contrast, a considerable portion of the nutrients entering the river originated from the wetland.

  17. A composite transcriptional signature differentiates responses towards closely related herbicides in Arabidopsis thaliana and brassica napus

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, genome-wide expression profiling based on Affymetrix ATH1 arrays was used to identify discriminating responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to five herbicides, which contain active ingredients targeting two different branches of amino acid biosynthesis. One herbicide co...

  18. Cytogenetic characteristics of herbicide production workers in Ufa.

    PubMed

    Kaioumova, D F; Khabutdinova, L Kh

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of dioxin-containing products on the cytogenetic characteristics of peripheral blood lymphocytes of herbicide plant workers in Ufa. We found that the mean incidence of cells with chromosomal abberations (CHA) was two fold higher in the herbicide plant workers than the mean incidence level of controls groups consisting of people with no professional contact to herbicides or hospital stuff working in the close vicinity of the herbicide plant in Ufa (for both cases: p < 0.05). Moreover, the mean CHA cell incidence in the controls groups was also two times higher than the average level of spontaneous abberations in humans. The chemical herbicides 2,4,5-trichlorphenol (2,4,5-T) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxiacetic acid (2,4-D) appeared to affect various cellular cycle phases. Chromosomal type abberations occurred in the G0 stage of cellular cycle and chromatic type aberrations in the G2 stage. In the S stage, the aberrations of both types were observed. Our results indicate that the herbicides 2,4,5-T and 2,4-D have mutagenic effects in humans.

  19. Herbicide off-site transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicides are an important part of modern agriculture as they control weeds that would otherwise reduce yields by competing for water and nutrients. In the future herbicides will play an increasing role as agriculture strives to meet food, fuel, and fiber requirements of a growing global populatio...

  20. Current state of herbicides in herbicide-resistant crops.

    PubMed

    Green, Jerry M

    2014-09-01

    Current herbicide and herbicide trait practices are changing in response to the rapid spread of glyphosate-resistant weeds. Growers urgently needed glyphosate when glyphosate-resistant crops became available because weeds were becoming widely resistant to most commonly used selective herbicides, making weed management too complex and time consuming for large farm operations. Glyphosate made weed management easy and efficient by controlling all emerged weeds at a wide range of application timings. However, the intensive use of glyphosate over wide areas and concomitant decline in the use of other herbicides led eventually to the widespread evolution of weeds resistant to glyphosate. Today, weeds that are resistant to glyphosate and other herbicide types are threatening current crop production practices. Unfortunately, all commercial herbicide modes of action are over 20 years old and have resistant weed problems. The severity of the problem has prompted the renewal of efforts to discover new weed management technologies. One technology will be a new generation of crops with resistance to glyphosate, glufosinate and other existing herbicide modes of action. Other technologies will include new chemical, biological, cultural and mechanical methods for weed management. From the onset of commercialization, growers must now preserve the utility of new technologies by integrating their use with other weed management technologies in diverse and sustainable systems.

  1. Induction of the multispecific organic anion transporter (cMoat/mrp2) gene and biliary glutathione secretion by the herbicide 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid in the mouse liver.

    PubMed Central

    Wielandt, A M; Vollrath, V; Manzano, M; Miranda, S; Accatino, L; Chianale, J

    1999-01-01

    The canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter, cMoat, is an ATP-binding-cassette protein expressed in the canalicular domain of hepatocytes. In addition to the transport of endo- and xenobiotics, cMoat has also been proposed to transport GSH into bile, the major driving force of bile-acid-independent bile flow. We have shown previously that the herbicide 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), a peroxisome-proliferator agent, significantly increases bile-acid-independent bile flow in mice. On this basis, the effect of the herbicide on cMoat gene expression was studied. A 3.6-fold increase in cMoat mRNA levels and a 2.5-fold increase in cMoat protein content were observed in the liver of mice fed on a diet supplemented with 0.125% 2,4,5-T. These effects were due to an increased rate of gene transcription (3.9-fold) and were not associated with peroxisome proliferation. Significant increases in bile flow (2.23+/-0.39 versus 1.13+/-0.15 microl/min per g of liver; P<0.05) and biliary GSH output (7.40+/-3.30 versus 2.65+/-0.34 nmol/min per g of liver; P<0.05) were observed in treated animals. The hepatocellular concentration of total glutathione also increased in hepatocytes of treated mice (10.95+/-0.84 versus 5.12+/-0.47 mM; P<0.05), because of the induction (2.4-fold) of the heavy subunit of the gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GCS-HS) gene. This is the first model of co-induction of cMoat and GCS-HS genes in vivo in the mouse liver, associated with increased glutathione synthesis and biliary glutathione output. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the cMoat transporter plays a crucial role in the secretion of biliary GSH. PMID:10377250

  2. Sorption of polar herbicides and herbicide metabolites by biochar-amended soil.

    PubMed

    Dechene, Annika; Rosendahl, Ingrid; Laabs, Volker; Amelung, Wulf

    2014-08-01

    Biochar-amended soil has been proven to possess superior sorption capacities for several environmental pollutants compared with pure soil. However, the role of biochar in the immobilization of polar pesticides and their metabolites has hardly been tested. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the effect of a soil amendment with biochar on the sorption of selected polar herbicides and herbicide metabolites (log Kow 0.3-<2). To simulate worst-case sorption, a sandy soil (1.7% organic matter) was amended with 1.5% biochar (fresh or composted) to determine sorption/desorption isotherms of the test compounds. One herbicide (imazamox) and three herbicide metabolites (methyl-desphenyl-chloridazon, metazachlor oxalic acid, metazachlor sulfonic acid) were tested, i.e. three anionic and one neutral polar compound. The results showed that the presence of biochar increased the sorption capacity of the soil only in the case of the uncharged compound methyl-desphenyl-chloridazon, for which the average distribution coefficients in biochar-amended soils were higher than in pure soil by a factor of 2.1-2.5. However, this effect rather seemed to reflect the increased soil organic carbon content after the addition of biochar than a preferred sorption of methyl-desphenyl-chloridazon to biochar. In the case of the three anionic compounds imazamox, metazachlor oxalic acid and metazachlor sulfonic acid, biochar amendment did not increase the sorption capacity of the soil for these compounds, presumably as a result of its negative net charge. Similarly, desorption experiments did not show any significant effect of the biochar amendment on desorption. This suggests that the potential of using biochar to mitigate the leaching of the tested polar pesticides or metabolites is limited.

  3. Physiological and genetic characteristics of two bacterial strains utilizing phenoxypropionate and phenoxyacetate herbicides.

    PubMed

    Müller, R H; Kleinsteuber, S; Babel, W

    2001-01-01

    Two strains, Rhodoferax sp. P230 and Delftia (Comamonas) acidovorans MCI, have previously been shown to carry activities for the degradation of the two enantiomers of (RS)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy-)propionate (dichlorprop) and (RS)-2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy-)propionate (mecoprop) and, in addition, are capable of degrading phenoxyacetate derivatives 2.4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetate (MCPA). Metabolism of the herbicides is initiated by alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases for both enantiomers of the phenoxypropionate herbicides and for 2,4-D. These activities were constitutively expressed for both enantiomers of dichlorprop in strain MC1 and for the Renantiomer in strain P230. Enzyme activities for the complete degradation of phenoxyacetate and phenoxypropionate herbicides were induced during incubation on either of these herbicides. Strain MC1 has about threefold higher activities for the degradation of dichlorprop and for growth on this substrate (mumax = 0.15 h(-1)) than strain P230; the maximum growth rate on 2,4-D amounts to 0.045 h(-1) with strain MC1. Dichlorprop is utilized faster than mecoprop and the R-enantiomers are cleaved with higher rates than the S-enantiomers. The degradation of the chlorophenolic intermediates seems to proceed via the modified ortho cleavage pathway as indicated by activities of the respective enzymes. The enzymatic results were supported by genetic investigations by which the presence of the genes tfdB (encoding a dichlorophenol hydroxylase), tfdC (encoding a chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase) and tfdD (encoding a chloromuconate cycloisomerase) could be demonstrated in both strains by PCR after application of respective primers. The presence of the tfdA gene (encoding a 2,4-D/alpha-ketoglutarate dioxygenase) was only shown for strain P230 but was lacking in strain MC1. Sequence analysis of the tfd gene fragments revealed high homology to the degradative genes of other proteobacterial strains

  4. Herbicidal properties of antimalarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Maxime G.; Leroux, Julie; Stubbs, Keith A.; Mylne, Joshua S.

    2017-01-01

    The evolutionary relationship between plants and the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum is well established and underscored by the P. falciparum apicoplast, an essential chloroplast-like organelle. As a result of this relationship, studies have demonstrated that herbicides active against plants are also active against P. falciparum and thus could act as antimalarial drug leads. Here we show the converse is also true; many antimalarial compounds developed for human use are highly herbicidal. We found that human antimalarial drugs (e.g. sulfadiazine, sulfadoxine, pyrimethamine, cycloguanil) were lethal to the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana at similar concentrations to market herbicides glufosinate and glyphosate. Furthermore, the physicochemical properties of these herbicidal antimalarial compounds were similar to commercially used herbicides. The implications of this finding that many antimalarial compounds are herbicidal proffers two novel applications: (i) using the genetically tractable A. thaliana to reveal mode-of-action for understudied antimalarial drugs, and (ii) co-opting antimalarial compounds as a new source for much needed herbicide lead molecules. PMID:28361906

  5. Herbicide concentrations in the Mississippi River Basin - The importance of chloroacetanilide herbicide degradates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rebich, R.A.; Coupe, R.H.; Thurman, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    The proportion of chloroacetanilide herbicide degradates, specifically the ethane sulfonic (ESA) and oxanilic (OA) acids, averaged 70% of the total herbicide concentration in samples from the Upper Mississippi River. In samples from the Missouri River and the Ohio River, the proportion of chloroacetanilide degradates in the total herbicide concentration was much less, 24% and 41%, respectively. The amount of tile drainage throughout the Mississippi River Basin appeared to be related to the occurrence and distribution of chloroacetanilide degradates in water samples. Pesticide concentrations in streams of the Mississippi River Basin have been well characterized. However, recent research demonstrates that in order to more fully understand the fate and transport of pesticides, the major pesticide degradates need to be included in the analysis. From March 1999 through May 2001, water samples from four major junctures of the Mississippi River Basin were collected and analyzed for a suite of herbicides and their degradate compounds. Each sampling site was selected to represent a major part of the Mississippi River: upper and lower Mississippi, Missouri and Ohio Rivers. Each basin has unique landscape variables, geology, hydrology, precipitation, and land use, which is reflected in the pesticide content at the most downstream sample site near the mouth of the Mississippi River. Atrazine was the most frequently detected herbicide (detected in 97% of the samples), followed by metolachlor (60%), and acetochlor (31%). The most frequently detected degradates were metolachlor ESA (69%), followed by deethylatrazine (62%), metolachlor OA (37%), and alachlor ESA (37%). Metolachlor ESA was detected more frequently than its parent compound (69 vs. 60%), as was alachlor ESA (37 vs. 9%). After an improvement was made in the analytical method, metolachlor ESA was detected in every sample, metolachlor OA in 89% of the samples, alachlor ESA in 84%, acetochlor ESA in 71%, and acetochlor

  6. Herbicide concentrations in the Mississippi River Basin-the importance of chloroacetanilide herbicide degradates.

    PubMed

    Rebich, R A; Coupe, R H; Thurman, E M

    2004-04-05

    The proportion of chloroacetanilide herbicide degradates, specifically the ethane sulfonic (ESA) and oxanilic (OA) acids, averaged 70% of the total herbicide concentration in samples from the Upper Mississippi River. In samples from the Missouri River and the Ohio River, the proportion of chloroacetanilide degradates in the total herbicide concentration was much less, 24% and 41%, respectively. The amount of tile drainage throughout the Mississippi River Basin appeared to be related to the occurrence and distribution of chloroacetanilide degradates in water samples. Pesticide concentrations in streams of the Mississippi River Basin have been well characterized. However, recent research demonstrates that in order to more fully understand the fate and transport of pesticides, the major pesticide degradates need to be included in the analysis. From March 1999 through May 2001, water samples from four major junctures of the Mississippi River Basin were collected and analyzed for a suite of herbicides and their degradate compounds. Each sampling site was selected to represent a major part of the Mississippi River: upper and lower Mississippi, Missouri and Ohio Rivers. Each basin has unique landscape variables, geology, hydrology, precipitation, and land use, which is reflected in the pesticide content at the most downstream sample site near the mouth of the Mississippi River. Atrazine was the most frequently detected herbicide (detected in 97% of the samples), followed by metolachlor (60%), and acetochlor (31%). The most frequently detected degradates were metolachlor ESA (69%), followed by deethylatrazine (62%), metolachlor OA (37%), and alachlor ESA (37%). Metolachlor ESA was detected more frequently than its parent compound (69 vs. 60%), as was alachlor ESA (37 vs. 9%). After an improvement was made in the analytical method, metolachlor ESA was detected in every sample, metolachlor OA in 89% of the samples, alachlor ESA in 84%, acetochlor ESA in 71%, and acetochlor

  7. SulE, a sulfonylurea herbicide de-esterification esterase from Hansschlegelia zhihuaiae S113.

    PubMed

    Hang, Bao-Jian; Hong, Qing; Xie, Xiang-Ting; Huang, Xing; Wang, Cheng-Hong; He, Jian; Li, Shun-Peng

    2012-03-01

    De-esterification is an important degradation or detoxification mechanism of sulfonylurea herbicide in microbes and plants. However, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of sulfonylurea herbicide de-esterification are still unknown. In this study, a novel esterase gene, sulE, responsible for sulfonylurea herbicide de-esterification, was cloned from Hansschlegelia zhihuaiae S113. The gene contained an open reading frame of 1,194 bp, and a putative signal peptide at the N terminal was identified with a predicted cleavage site between Ala37 and Glu38, resulting in a 361-residue mature protein. SulE minus the signal peptide was synthesized in Escherichia coli BL21 and purified to homogeneity. SulE catalyzed the de-esterification of a variety of sulfonylurea herbicides that gave rise to the corresponding herbicidally inactive parent acid and exhibited the highest catalytic efficiency toward thifensulfuron-methyl. SulE was a dimer without the requirement of a cofactor. The activity of the enzyme was completely inhibited by Ag(+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), methamidophos, and sodium dodecyl sulfate. A sulE-disrupted mutant strain, ΔsulE, was constructed by insertion mutation. ΔsulE lost the de-esterification ability and was more sensitive to the herbicides than the wild type of strain S113, suggesting that sulE played a vital role in the sulfonylurea herbicide resistance of the strain. The transfer of sulE into Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 conferred on it the ability to de-esterify sulfonylurea herbicides and increased its resistance to the herbicides. This study has provided an excellent candidate for the mechanistic study of sulfonylurea herbicide metabolism and detoxification through de-esterification, construction of sulfonylurea herbicide-resistant transgenic crops, and bioremediation of sulfonylurea herbicide-contaminated environments.

  8. Toxic and genotoxic effects of the 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-based herbicide on the Neotropical fish Cnesterodon decemmaculatus.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Arcaute, C; Soloneski, S; Larramendy, M L

    2016-06-01

    Acute toxicity and genotoxicity of the 54.8% 2,4-D-based commercial herbicide DMA® were assayed on Cnesterodon decemmaculatus (Pisces, Poeciliidae). Whereas lethal effect was used as the end point for mortality, frequency of micronuclei (MNs), other nuclear abnormalities and primary DNA damage evaluated by the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay were employed as end points for genotoxicity. Mortality studies demonstrated an LC50 96 h value of 1008 mg/L (range, 929-1070) of 2,4-D. Behavioral changes, e.g., gathering at the bottom of the aquarium, slowness in motion, slow reaction and abnormal swimming were observed. Exposure to 2,4-D within the 252-756 mg/L range increased the frequency of MNs in fish exposed for both 48 and 96 h. Whereas blebbed nuclei were induced in treatments lasting for 48 and 96 h, notched nuclei were only induced in fish exposed for 96 h. Regardless of both concentration and exposure time, 2,4-D did not induce lobed nuclei and binucleated erythrocytes. In addition, we found that exposure to 2,4-D within the 252-756 mg/L range increased the genetic damage index in treatments lasting for either 48 and 96 h. The results represent the first experimental evidence of the lethal and several sublethal effects, including behavioral alterations and two genotoxic properties namely the induction of MNs and primary DNA strand breaks, exerted by 2,4-D on an endemic organism as C. decemmaculatus.

  9. Herbicide (Roundup) pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Pushnoy, L A; Avnon, L S; Carel, R S

    1998-12-01

    A case of acute intoxication presented as toxic pneumonitis after exposure to Roundup (glyphosate) (Solaris Group, Monsanto; San Ramon, CA) herbicide in an agriculture worker. The correct etiologic factor causing this specific clinical picture was identified only 2 weeks later, after a thorough occupational history was taken and meticulous delineation of the working conditions and exposures of the involved worker were made. As a rule, occupational related diseases are not readily elucidated by nonoccupational physicians. However, most acute intoxication events are first encountered by such physicians. In these situations, rapid and comprehensive evaluation is necessary in order to clearly identify the causative agent(s) and to initiate the appropriate treatment. Consulting occupational physicians at this early stage may facilitate early and accurate diagnosis.

  10. The direct and indirect effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide and nutrients on Chironomidae (Diptera) emerging from small wetlands.

    PubMed

    Baker, Leanne F; Mudge, Joseph F; Houlahan, Jeff E; Thompson, Dean G; Kidd, Karen A

    2014-09-01

    Laboratory and mesocosm experiments have demonstrated that some glyphosate-based herbicides can have negative effects on benthic invertebrate species. Although these herbicides are among the most widely used in agriculture, there have been few multiple-stressor, natural system-based investigations of the impacts of glyphosate-based herbicides in combination with fertilizers on the emergence patterns of chironomids from wetlands. Using a replicated, split-wetland experiment, the authors examined the effects of 2 nominal concentrations (2.88 mg acid equivalents/L and 0.21 mg acid equivalents/L) of the glyphosate herbicide Roundup WeatherMax, alone or in combination with nutrient additions, on the emergence of Chironomidae (Diptera) before and after herbicide-induced damage to macrophytes. There were no direct effects of treatment on the structure of the Chironomidae community or on the overall emergence rates. However, after macrophyte cover declined as a result of herbicide application, there were statistically significant increases in emergence in all but the highest herbicide treatment, which had also received no nutrients. There was a negative relationship between chironomid abundance and macrophyte cover on the treated sides of wetlands. Fertilizer application did not appear to compound the effects of the herbicide treatments. Although direct toxicity of Roundup WeatherMax was not apparent, the authors observed longer-term impacts, suggesting that the indirect effects of this herbicide deserve more consideration when assessing the ecological risk of using herbicides in proximity to wetlands.

  11. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, Jonathan D.; Scott-Craig, John S.

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is set forth in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 1. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 2. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with said vectors and seeds from said plants.

  12. Comparative toxicity of 20 herbicides to 5 periphytic algae and the relationship with mode of action.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takashi; Taya, Kiyoshi; Yoda, Ikuko

    2016-02-01

    The authors used 5 species of periphytic algae to conduct toxicity assays of 20 herbicides. The 5 tested species represent riverine primary producers most likely to be affected by herbicides. A fluorescence microplate toxicity assay was used as an efficient and economical high-throughput assay. Toxicity characteristics were analyzed, focusing on their relationship to herbicide mode of action. The relative differences between 50% and 10% effect concentrations depended on herbicide mode of action, rather than tested species. Moreover, a clear relationship between sensitive species and herbicide mode of action was also observed. Green alga was most sensitive to herbicides of 2 mode of action groups: inhibitors of protoporphyrinogen oxidase and very long-chain fatty acid synthesis. Diatoms were most sensitive to herbicides of 1 mode of action group: 4-hydroxyphenyl-pyruvate-dioxygenase inhibitors. Cyanobacterium was most sensitive to herbicides of 1 mode of action group: inhibitors of acetolactate synthase. The species sensitivity distribution based on obtained data was also analyzed. The slopes of the species sensitivity distribution significantly differed among modes of action, suggesting that difference in species sensitivity is specific to the mode of action. In particular, differences in species sensitivity were markedly large for inhibitors of acetolactate synthase, protoporphyrinogen oxidase, and very long-chain fatty acid synthesis. The results clearly showed that a single algal species cannot represent the sensitivity of an algal assemblage. Therefore, multispecies algal toxicity data are essential for substances with specific modes of action.

  13. Herbicides interfere with antigrazer defenses in Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuexia; Sun, Yunfei; Zhang, Xingxing; Heng, Hailu; Nan, Haihong; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Yuan; Yang, Zhou

    2016-11-01

    The extensive application of herbicides has led to a serious threat of herbicide contamination to aquatic ecosystem. Herbicide exposure affects aquatic communities not only by exerting toxicity on single species but also by changing interspecific interactions. This study investigated the antigrazer defenses of the common green alga Scenedesmus obliquus against different herbicides [glyphosate, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), and atrazine] at various concentrations (0-2.0 mg L(-1)). In the presence of grazer (Daphnia)-derived cues, S. obliquus populations without herbicides formed high proportions of multicelled (e.g., four- and eight-celled) colonies. This result confirms that S. obliquus exhibits a morphological defense against grazing risk. At the low concentration range of 0.002-0.02 mg L(-1), the three herbicides exerted no influence on the growth and photosynthetic efficiency of S. obliquus, and multicelled colonies showed constant proportions. At the high concentration range of 0.20-2.0 mg L(-1), atrazine significantly inhibited the algal growth and photosynthesis whereas glyphosate or 2,4-D did not. Nonetheless, these levels of glyphosate or 2,4-D remarkably decreased the proportion of multicelled colonies, with reduced numbers of cells per particle in Daphnia filtrate-treated population. No eight-celled colony was formed after treatment with atrazine at 0.20-2.0 mg L(-1) despite the addition of Daphnia filtrate. These results suggest that herbicide exposure impairs antigrazer colonial morphs in phytoplankton although it is not sufficient to hamper algal growth. This phenomenon can increase the risk of predation by herbivores, thereby disrupting the inducible phytoplankton community. Furthermore, the predator-prey interactions between herbivores and phytoplankton can be potentially changed more seriously than previously considered.

  14. Proximity to crops and residential to agricultural herbicides in Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, M.H.; Lubin, J.; Giglierano, J.; Colt, J.S.; Wolter, C.; Bekiroglu, N.; Camann, D.; Hartge, P.; Nuckols, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Rural residents can be exposed to agricultural pesticides through the proximity of their homes to crop fields. Previously, we developed a method to create historical crop maps using a geographic information system. The aim of the present study was to determine whether crop maps are useful for predicting levels of crop herbicides in carpet dust samples from residences. From homes of participants in a case-control study of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Iowa (1998-2000), we collected vacuum cleaner dust and measured 14 herbicides with high use on corn and soybeans in Iowa. Of 112 homes, 58% of residences had crops within 500 m of their home, an intermediate distance for primary drift from aerial and ground applications. Detection rates for herbicides ranged from 0% for metribuzin and cyanazine to 95% for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Six herbicides used almost exclusively in agriculture were detected in 28% of homes. Detections and concentrations were highest in homes with an active farmer. Increasing acreage of corn and soybean fields within 750 m of homes was associated with significantly elevated odds of detecting agricultural herbicides compared with homes with no crops within 750 m (adjusted odds ratio per 10 acres = 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.11). Herbicide concentrations also increased significantly with increasing acreage within 750 m. We evaluated the distance of crop fields from the home at < 100, 101-250, 251-500, and 501-750 m. Including the crop buffer distance parameters in the model did not significantly improve the fit compared with a model with total acres within 750 m. Our results indicate that crop maps may be a useful method for estimating levels of herbicides in homes from nearby crop fields.

  15. DEGRADATION OF THE CHLORINATED PHENOXYACETATE HERBICIDES 2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXYACETIC ACID AND 2,4,5- TRICHLOROPHENOXYACETIC BY PURE AND MIXED BACTERIAL CULTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combined cell suspensions of the 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T)-metabolizing organism Pseudomonas cepacia AC1100, and the 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-metabolizing organism Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134 were shown to effectively degrade either of these compo...

  16. Natural compounds as next-generation herbicides.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Franck E; Duke, Stephen O

    2014-11-01

    Herbicides with new modes of action (MOAs) are badly needed due to the rapidly evolving resistance to commercial herbicides, but a new MOA has not been introduced in over 20 years. The greatest pest management challenge for organic agriculture is the lack of effective natural product herbicides. The structural diversity and evolved biological activity of natural phytotoxins offer opportunities for the development of both directly used natural compounds and synthetic herbicides with new target sites based on the structures of natural phytotoxins. Natural phytotoxins are also a source for the discovery of new herbicide target sites that can serve as the focus of traditional herbicide discovery efforts. There are many examples of strong natural phytotoxins with MOAs other than those used by commercial herbicides, which indicates that there are molecular targets of herbicides that can be added to the current repertoire of commercial herbicide MOAs.

  17. Natural Compounds as Next-Generation Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Franck E.; Duke, Stephen O.

    2014-01-01

    Herbicides with new modes of action (MOAs) are badly needed due to the rapidly evolving resistance to commercial herbicides, but a new MOA has not been introduced in over 20 years. The greatest pest management challenge for organic agriculture is the lack of effective natural product herbicides. The structural diversity and evolved biological activity of natural phytotoxins offer opportunities for the development of both directly used natural compounds and synthetic herbicides with new target sites based on the structures of natural phytotoxins. Natural phytotoxins are also a source for the discovery of new herbicide target sites that can serve as the focus of traditional herbicide discovery efforts. There are many examples of strong natural phytotoxins with MOAs other than those used by commercial herbicides, which indicates that there are molecular targets of herbicides that can be added to the current repertoire of commercial herbicide MOAs. PMID:24784133

  18. Methods comparison, transport and distribution of polar herbicides in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Skeff, Wael; Orlikowska, Anna; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E

    2017-01-30

    Two LC-MS/MS methods including different sample preparation and quantitative processes showed a good agreement for analysis of the herbicides MCPA, mecoprop, isoproturon, bentazon and chloridazon, and the metabolite chloridazon-methyl-desphenyl (CMD) in estuarine waters. Due to different sensitivity of the methods only one could be used to analyze marine samples. The transport of these compounds to the Baltic Sea via ten German estuaries and their distribution between coastal water and sediments was studied. The results showed that all selected compounds can be transported to the Baltic Sea (0.9-747ng/L). Chloridazon, bentazon, isoproturon and CMD were detected (0.9-8.9ng/L) in the coastal waters and chloridazon and isorproturon in the sediments (5-136pg/g d.w.). Levels of contaminants in the sediments could be influenced by the total organic carbon content. Concentrations observed in the Baltic Sea are most likely not high enough to cause acute effects, but long term effect studies are strongly recommended.

  19. Evaluation of potential embryotoxicity and teratogenicity of 42 herbicides, insecticides, and petroleum contaminants to mallard eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Albers, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    Results are reported for the embryotoxicity of 42 environmental contaminants applied externally to mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) eggs including crude and refined petroleum, and commercial formulations of herbicides and insecticides. Many of the petroleum pollutants were embryotoxic and moderately teratogenic and had LD50s of 0.3 to 5 ?l per egg (~6?90 ?g/g egg). The most toxic was a commercial oil used for control of road dust followed by South Louisiana crude oil, Kuwait crude, no. 2 fuel oil, bunker C fuel oil, and industrial and automotive waste oil. Prudhoe Bay crude, unused crankcase oil, aviation kerosene, and aliphatic hydrocarbon mixtures were less toxic ( LD50s of 18 to over 75 ? l) and less teratogenic. The LD50s of herbicides and insecticides in aqueous emulsion were measured by egg immersion; the most toxic were paraquat and trifluralin (LD50s of about 1.5 Ibs/A; 1.7 kg/ha). Propanil, bromoxynil with MCPA, methyl diclofop, prometon, endrin, sulprofos, and parathion were toxic (LD50s of 7 to 40 Ibs/A; 7.8?44.8 kg/ha), whereas 2,4-D, glyphosate, atrazine, carbaryl, dalapon, dicamba, methomyl, and phosmet were only slightly toxic or not toxic (LD50s of 178 to over 500 Ibs/A; 199?560 kg/ha). Pesticides in nontoxic oil vehicle applied by microliter pipet were up to 18 times more toxic than when applied in water vehicle, which was probably due to better penetration of the pesticide past the eggshell and its membranes. Teratogenic effects and impaired embryonic growth are reported and results discussed in terms of potential hazard at field levels of application. A discussion is provided on the effects of pollutants on the eggs of other species of birds under laboratory and field conditions.

  20. Herbicides and herbicide degradates in shallow groundwater and the Cedar River near a municipal well field, Cedar Rapids, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Water samples were collected near a Cedar Rapids, Iowa municipal well field from June 1998 to August 1998 and analyzed for selected triazine and acetanilide herbicides and degradates. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the occurrence of herbicides and herbicide degradates in the well field during a period following springtime application of herbicides to upstream cropland. The well field is in an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Cedar River. Parent herbicide concentrations generally were greatest in June, and decreased in July and August. Atrazine was most frequently detected and occurred at the greatest concentrations; acetochlor, cyanazine and metolachlor also were detected, but at lesser concentrations than atrazine. Triazine degradate concentrations were relatively small (<0.50 ??g/l) and generally decreased from June to August. Although the rate of groundwater movement is relatively fast (approx. 1 m per day) in the alluvial aquifer near the Cedar River, deethylatrazine (DEA) to atrazine ratios in groundwater samples collected near the Cedar River indicate that atrazine and DEA probably are gradually transported into the alluvial aquifer from the Cedar River. Deisopropylatrazine (DIA) to DEA ratios in water samples indicate most DIA in the Cedar River and alluvial aquifer is produced by atrazine degradation, although some could be from cyanazine degradation. Acetanilide degradates were detected more frequently and at greater concentrations than their corresponding parent herbicides. Ethanesulfonic-acid (ESA) degradates comprised at least 80% of the total acetanilide-degradate concentrations in samples collected from the Cedar River and alluvial aquifer in June, July and August; oxanilic acid degradates comprised less than 20% of the total concentrations. ESA-degradate concentrations generally were smallest in June and greater in July and August. Acetanilide degradate concentrations in groundwater adjacent to the Cedar River indicate acetanilide

  1. Review of literature on herbicides, including phenoxy herbicides and associated dioxins. Volume 13: Analysis of recent literature on health effects and Volume 14: Annotated bibliography of recent literature on health effects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-15

    The report consists of a bibliography and critical review of scientific literature that became available during 1988 on the health effects of the herbicides (including impurities) used as defoliants in the Vietnam conflict. An attempt has been made to identify all scientific literature (including unpublished reports) relevant to the potential human health effects of the herbicidal preparation commonly referred to as Agent Orange, the herbicidal active ingredients 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4,5-trichloroacetic acid and their esters, as well as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin, henceforth referred to as TCDD, known to be contaminating impurities of some phenoxy herbicide preparations, an the herbicides, picloram and cacodylic acid. The scope of the review does not include literature dealing exclusively with the chemistry, analysis, or environmental fate and effects of these compounds.

  2. Glyphosate and dicamba herbicide tank mixture effects on native plant and non-genetically engineered soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Olszyk, David; Pfleeger, Thomas; Lee, E Henry; Plocher, Milton

    2015-07-01

    Crops engineered to contain genes for tolerance to multiple herbicides may be treated with several herbicides to manage weeds resistant to each herbicide. Thus, nearby non-target plants may be subjected to increased exposure to several herbicides used in combination. Of particular concern are native plants, as well as adjacent crops which have not been genetically engineered for tolerance to herbicides. We evaluated responses of seven species of native plants grown in a greenhouse and treated less than field application rates of glyphosate and/or dicamba: Andropogon gerardii, Asclepias syriaca, Eutrochium purpureum, Oenothera biennis, Polyganum lapathifolium, Solidago canadensis and Tridens flavus, and non-herbicide resistant soybean (Glycine max, Oregon line M4). Herbicide concentrations were 0.03 or 0.1 × field application rates of 1122 g ha(-1) active ingredient (a.i) (831 g ha(-1) acid glyphosate) for glyphosate and 562 g ha(-1) a.i. for dicamba. In general, plant growth responses to combinations of glyphosate and dicamba were less than the sum of growth responses to the individual herbicides (i.e., antagonistic effect), primarily when one or both herbicides alone caused a large reduction in growth. E. purpureum, P. lapathifolium and S. canadensis were the most sensitive species to both herbicides, while A. gerardii was the most tolerant, with no response to either herbicide. The combinations of herbicides resulted in responses most similar to that from dicamba alone for G. max and from glyphosate alone for T. flavus. The results of this study indicated the need for more data such as effects on native plants in the field to assess risks to non-target plants from combinations of herbicides.

  3. Sarmentine, a natural herbicide from Piper species with multiple herbicide mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Franck E.; Owens, Daniel K.; Watson, Susan B.; Asolkar, Ratnakar N.; Boddy, Louis G.

    2015-01-01

    Sarmentine, 1-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-(2E,4E)-2,4-decadien-1-one, is a natural amide isolated from the fruits of Piper species. The compound has a number of interesting biological properties, including its broad-spectrum activity on weeds as a contact herbicide. Initial studies highlighted a similarity in response between plants treated with sarmentine and herbicidal soaps such as pelargonic acid (nonanoic acid). However, little was known about the mechanism of action leading to the rapid desiccation of foliage treated by sarmentine. In cucumber cotyledon disc-assays, sarmentine induced rapid light-independent loss of membrane integrity at 100 μM or higher concentration, whereas 3 mM pelargonic acid was required for a similar effect. Sarmentine was between 10 and 30 times more active than pelargonic acid on wild mustard, velvetleaf, redroot pigweed and crabgrass. Additionally, the potency of 30 μM sarmentine was greatly stimulated by light, suggesting that this natural product may also interfere with photosynthetic processes. This was confirmed by observing a complete inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport at that concentration. Sarmentine also acted as an inhibitor of photosystem II (PSII) on isolated thylakoid membranes by competing for the binding site of plastoquinone. This can be attributed in part to structural similarities between herbicides like sarmentine and diuron. While this mechanism of action accounts for the light stimulation of the activity of sarmentine, it does not account for its ability to destabilize membranes in darkness. In this respect, sarmentine has some structural similarity to crotonoyl-CoA, the substrate of enoyl-ACP reductase, a key enzyme in the early steps of fatty acid synthesis. Inhibitors of this enzyme, such as triclosan, cause rapid loss of membrane integrity in the dark. Sarmentine inhibited the activity of enoyl-ACP reductase, with an I50app of 18.3 μM. Therefore, the herbicidal activity of sarmentine appears to be a

  4. Degradation of isoxaflutole (balance) herbicide by hypochlorite in tap water.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Ho; Lerch, Robert N; Garrett, Harold E; George, Milon F

    2003-12-31

    Chlorine has been widely employed for the disinfection of drinking water. Additionally, it has the capacity to oxidize many organic compounds in water. Isoxaflutole (Balance; IXF) belongs to a new class of isoxazole herbicides. Isoxaflutole has a very short soil half-life and rapidly degrades to a stable and phytotoxic metabolite, diketonitrile (DKN). Further degradation of DKN produces a nonbiologically active benzoic acid (BA) metabolite. In experiments using high-performance liquid chromatography-UV spectroscopy (HPLC-UV) and HPLC tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS), DKN was found to rapidly react with hypochlorite in tap water, yielding the BA metabolite as the major end product. One milligram per liter (19 microM) of hypochlorite residue in tap water was able to completely oxidize up to 1600 microg/L (4.45 micromol/L) of DKN. In tap water, the disappearance of IXF was much more rapid than in DI water. As soon as the IXF is hydrolyzed to DKN, the DKN quickly reacts with the OCl(-) to form nonphytotoxic BA. As a result, the herbicide solutions prepared with tap water at 500 microg/L will no longer possess any herbicidal activity after 48 h of storage. However, in agronomic settings, highly concentrated tank solutions (600-800 mg/L) may be prepared with tap water since the conversion of IXF to BA would represent <5% of the herbicide; therefore, any impact on the herbicide efficacy would be negligible. Results of this study show that current chlorination disinfection protocols in municipal water systems would completely eliminate the phytotoxic form of this new herbicide, DKN, from drinking water supplies; yet, farmers can use chlorinated tap water without significant loss of efficacy.

  5. Resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase-inhibiting herbicides.

    PubMed

    Kaundun, Shiv S

    2014-09-01

    Resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase herbicides is documented in at least 43 grass weeds and is particularly problematic in Lolium, Alopecurus and Avena species. Genetic studies have shown that resistance generally evolves independently and can be conferred by target-site mutations at ACCase codon positions 1781, 1999, 2027, 2041, 2078, 2088 and 2096. The level of resistance depends on the herbicides, recommended field rates, weed species, plant growth stages, specific amino acid changes and the number of gene copies and mutant ACCase alleles. Non-target-site resistance, or in essence metabolic resistance, is prevalent, multigenic and favoured under low-dose selection. Metabolic resistance can be specific but also broad, affecting other modes of action. Some target-site and metabolic-resistant biotypes are characterised by a fitness penalty. However, the significance for resistance regression in the absence of ACCase herbicides is yet to be determined over a practical timeframe. More recently, a fitness benefit has been reported in some populations containing the I1781L mutation in terms of vegetative and reproductive outputs and delayed germination. Several DNA-based methods have been developed to detect known ACCase resistance mutations, unlike metabolic resistance, as the genes remain elusive to date. Therefore, confirmation of resistance is still carried out via whole-plant herbicide bioassays. A growing number of monocotyledonous crops have been engineered to resist ACCase herbicides, thus increasing the options for grass weed control. While the science of ACCase herbicide resistance has progressed significantly over the past 10 years, several avenues provided in the present review remain to be explored for a better understanding of resistance to this important mode of action.

  6. Best management practices for herbicide resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of the recent focus on herbicide resistant weeds, herbicide resistant weeds are not new to agriculture; the first herbicide resistant weed was documented in 1957, with the first widespread resistance occurring in common groundsel with atrazine in the early 1970’s. Glyphosate resistant weed...

  7. Comparisons of herbicide treated and cultivated herbicide-resistant corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four glyphosate resistant corn (Zea mays L.) hybrids, a glufosinate-ammonium resistant hybrid, and a conventional atrazine resistant hybrid grown at Stoneville, MS in 2005, 2006, and 2007 with furrow irrigation were treated with thier respective herbicides and their growth, yeild, and mycotoxin inci...

  8. Biosensor for organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Sun, Samio; Li, Chen-Zhong; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Rosen, Barry P

    2014-01-21

    The toxic metalloid arsenic is widely distributed in food, water, and soil. While inorganic arsenic enters the environment primarily from geochemical sources, methylarsenicals either result from microbial biotransformation of inorganic arsenic or are introduced anthropogenically. Methylarsenicals such as monosodium methylarsonic acid (MSMA) have been extensively utilized as herbicides, and aromatic arsenicals such as roxarsone (Rox) are used as growth promoters for poultry and swine. Organoarsenicals are degraded to inorganic arsenic. The toxicological effects of arsenicals depend on their oxidation state, chemical composition, and bioavailability. Here we report that the active forms are the trivalent arsenic-containing species. We constructed a whole-cell biosensor utilizing a modified ArsR repressor that is highly selective toward trivalent methyl and aromatic arsenicals, with essentially no response to inorganic arsenic. The biosensor was adapted for in vitro detection of organoarsenicals using fluorescence anisotropy of ArsR-DNA interactions. It detects bacterial biomethylation of inorganic arsenite both in vivo and in vitro with detection limits of 10(-7) M and linearity to 10(-6) M for phenylarsenite and 5 × 10(-6) M for methylarsenite. The biosensor detects reduced forms of MSMA and roxarsone and offers a practical, low cost method for detecting activate forms and breakdown products of organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters.

  9. New effects of Roundup on amphibians: predators reduce herbicide mortality; herbicides induce antipredator morphology.

    PubMed

    Relyea, Rick A

    2012-03-01

    The use of pesticides is important for growing crops and protecting human health by reducing the prevalence of targeted pest species. However, less attention is given to the potential unintended effects on nontarget species, including taxonomic groups that are of current conservation concern. One issue raised in recent years is the potential for pesticides to become more lethal in the presence of predatory cues, a phenomenon observed thus far only in the laboratory. A second issue is whether pesticides can induce unintended trait changes in nontarget species, particularly trait changes that might mimic adaptive responses to natural environmental stressors. Using outdoor mesocosms, I created simple wetland communities containing leaf litter, algae, zooplankton, and three species of tadpoles (wood frogs [Rana sylvatica or Lithobates sylvaticus], leopard frogs [R. pipiens or L. pipiens], and American toads [Bufo americanus or Anaxyrus americanus]). I exposed the communities to a factorial combination of environmentally relevant herbicide concentrations (0, 1, 2, or 3 mg acid equivalents [a.e.]/L of Roundup Original MAX) crossed with three predator-cue treatments (no predators, adult newts [Notophthalmus viridescens], or larval dragonflies [Anax junius]). Without predator cues, mortality rates from Roundup were consistent with past studies. Combined with cues from the most risky predator (i.e., dragonflies), Roundup became less lethal (in direct contrast to past laboratory studies). This reduction in mortality was likely caused by the herbicide stratifying in the water column and predator cues scaring the tadpoles down to the benthos where herbicide concentrations were lower. Even more striking was the discovery that Roundup induced morphological changes in the tadpoles. In wood frog and leopard frog tadpoles, Roundup induced relatively deeper tails in the same direction and of the same magnitude as the adaptive changes induced by dragonfly cues. To my knowledge, this

  10. Biotechnology: herbicide-resistant crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic, herbicide-resistant (HR) crops are planted on about 80% of the land covered by transgenic crops. More than 90% of HR crios are glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, the others being resistant to glufosinate. The wide-scale adoption of HR crops, largely for economic reasons, has been the mos...

  11. Transgenic Crops for Herbicide Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since their introduction in 1995, crops made resistant to the broad-spectrum herbicides glyphosate and glufosinate with transgenes are widely available and used in much of the world. As of 2008, over 80% of the transgenic crops grown world-wide have this transgenic trait. This technology has had m...

  12. Introduction to Weeds and Herbicides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartwig, Nathan L.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University is an introduction to weed control and herbicide use. An initial discussion of the characteristics of weeds includes scientific naming, weed competition with crops, weed dispersal and dormancy, and conditions affecting weed seed germination. The main body of the…

  13. A codon deletion confers resistance to herbicides inhibiting protoporphyrinogen oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Patzoldt, William L.; Hager, Aaron G.; McCormick, Joel S.; Tranel, Patrick J.

    2006-01-01

    Herbicides that act by inhibiting protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) are widely used to control weeds in a variety of crops. The first weed to evolve resistance to PPO-inhibiting herbicides was Amaranthus tuberculatus, a problematic weed in the midwestern United States that previously had evolved multiple resistances to herbicides inhibiting two other target sites. Evaluation of a PPO-inhibitor-resistant A. tuberculatus biotype revealed that resistance was a (incompletely) dominant trait conferred by a single, nuclear gene. Three genes predicted to encode PPO were identified in A. tuberculatus. One gene from the resistant biotype, designated PPX2L, contained a codon deletion that was shown to confer resistance by complementation of a hemG mutant strain of Escherichia coli grown in the presence and absence of the PPO inhibitor lactofen. PPX2L is predicted to encode both plastid- and mitochondria-targeted PPO isoforms, allowing a mutation in a single gene to confer resistance to two herbicide target sites. Unique aspects of the resistance mechanism include an amino acid deletion, rather than a substitution, and the dual-targeting nature of the gene, which may explain why resistance to PPO inhibitors has been rare. PMID:16894159

  14. A codon deletion confers resistance to herbicides inhibiting protoporphyrinogen oxidase.

    PubMed

    Patzoldt, William L; Hager, Aaron G; McCormick, Joel S; Tranel, Patrick J

    2006-08-15

    Herbicides that act by inhibiting protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) are widely used to control weeds in a variety of crops. The first weed to evolve resistance to PPO-inhibiting herbicides was Amaranthus tuberculatus, a problematic weed in the midwestern United States that previously had evolved multiple resistances to herbicides inhibiting two other target sites. Evaluation of a PPO-inhibitor-resistant A. tuberculatus biotype revealed that resistance was a (incompletely) dominant trait conferred by a single, nuclear gene. Three genes predicted to encode PPO were identified in A. tuberculatus. One gene from the resistant biotype, designated PPX2L, contained a codon deletion that was shown to confer resistance by complementation of a hemG mutant strain of Escherichia coli grown in the presence and absence of the PPO inhibitor lactofen. PPX2L is predicted to encode both plastid- and mitochondria-targeted PPO isoforms, allowing a mutation in a single gene to confer resistance to two herbicide target sites. Unique aspects of the resistance mechanism include an amino acid deletion, rather than a substitution, and the dual-targeting nature of the gene, which may explain why resistance to PPO inhibitors has been rare.

  15. Analysis of selected herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, E.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Zimmerman, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary goals of the US Geological Survey (USGS) Laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas, is to develop analytical methods for the analysis of herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water that are vital to the study of herbicide fate and degradation pathways in the environment. Methods to measure metabolite concentrations from three major classes of herbicides - triazine, chloroacetanilide and phenyl-urea - have been developed. Methods for triazine metabolite detection cover nine compounds: six compounds are detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; one is detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection; and eight are detected by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Two metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides - ethane sulfonic acid and oxanilic acid - are detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Alachlor ethane sulfonic acid also has been detected by solid-phase extraction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Six phenylurea metabolites are all detected by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry; four of the six metabolites also are detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Additionally, surveys of herbicides and their metabolites in surface water, ground water, lakes, reservoirs, and rainfall have been conducted through the USGS laboratory in Lawrence. These surveys have been useful in determining herbicide and metabolite occurrence and temporal distribution and have shown that metabolites may be useful in evaluation of non-point-source contamination. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  16. Herbicides for Calendula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rising need for replacements for volatile organic compounds (VOC), which are used in the manufacture of paints, plastics, pesticides, etc., has placed demands on drying oils that may not be met by current sources. The primary source is eleostearic acid, or tung oil, which is derived from the see...

  17. Molecular Basis for Resistance Against Phosphonate Antibiotics and Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Chekan, Jonathan R.; Cogan, Dillon P.; Nair, Satish K.

    2015-01-01

    Research in recent years have illuminated data on the mechanisms and targets of phosphonic acid antibiotics and herbicides, including fosfomycin, glyphosate, fosmidomycin and FR900098. Here we review the current state of knowledge of the structural and biochemical characterization of resistance mechanisms against these bioactive natural products. Advances in the understanding of these resistance determinants have spurred knowledge-based campaigns aimed towards the design of derivatives that retain biological activity but are less prone to tolerance. PMID:26811741

  18. Photochemical behaviour of phenylurea herbicides.

    PubMed

    Amine-Khodja, Amina; Boulkamh, Abdelaziz; Boule, Pierre

    2004-02-01

    The photochemical behaviour of phenylurea herbicides in aqueous solution is highly dependent on the nature and position of substituents on the ring. Most of these herbicides are methylated on the urea moiety, the other substituents are usually halogens or methoxy groups. The main reaction involving the aromatic ring of unhalogenated phenylureas excited at wavelengths shorter than 300 nm is an intramolecular rearrangement, similar to photo-Fries rearrangement, whereas with halogenated derivatives, photohydrolysis is the main transformation pathway. In the particular case of para-halogenated phenylureas, the intermediate formation of a carbene is observed. When the urea moiety is substituted with a methoxyl group, demethoxylation is a competitive reaction. N-Demethylation or oxidation of methyl groups is also observed, but with a lower yield. Photooxidation of phenylureas can also be induced by photocatalysis, iron salts or humic substances. In the absence of water, the main route for phototransformation of diuron is the oxidation or elimination of methyl groups. It is entirely possible that a photochemical intermediate could turn out to be more toxic than the initial herbicide.

  19. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Herbicides - Simple Conceptual Diagram

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the herbicides module, when to list herbicides as a candidate cause, ways to measure herbicides, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for herbicides, herbicides module references and literature reviews.

  20. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Herbicides - Detailed Conceptual Diagram

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the herbicides module, when to list herbicides as a candidate cause, ways to measure herbicides, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for herbicides, herbicides module references and literature reviews.

  1. Application of electrokinetic soil flushing to four herbicides: A comparison.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, E Vieira; Souza, F; Saez, C; Cañizares, P; Lanza, M R V; Martinez-Huitle, C A; Rodrigo, M A

    2016-06-01

    In this work, four bench-scale plants containing soil spiked with four herbicides (2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), oxyfluorfen, chlorsulfuron and atrazine) undergo treatment consisting of an electrokinetic soil flushing (EKSF). Results clearly demonstrate that efficiency of EKSF depends on the chemical characteristic of the pesticide used. The amount of pesticide collected in the anode well is more significant than that collected in the cathode wells, indicating that the electromigration is much more important than drainage by electro-osmotic flux for this application. After 15 d of treatment, the 2,4-D is the pesticide most efficiently removed (95% of removal), while chlorsulfuron is the pesticide more resilient to the treatment. Additionally, volatilization was found to be a process of the major significance in the application of electrokinetic techniques to soil polluted with herbicides and because of that it should always be taken into account in the future design of full-scale processes.

  2. The impact of altered herbicide residues in transgenic herbicide-resistant crops on standard setting for herbicide residues.

    PubMed

    Kleter, Gijs A; Unsworth, John B; Harris, Caroline A

    2011-10-01

    The global area covered with transgenic (genetically modified) crops has rapidly increased since their introduction in the mid-1990s. Most of these crops have been rendered herbicide resistant, for which it can be envisaged that the modification has an impact on the profile and level of herbicide residues within these crops. In this article, the four main categories of herbicide resistance, including resistance to acetolactate-synthase inhibitors, bromoxynil, glufosinate and glyphosate, are reviewed. The topics considered are the molecular mechanism underlying the herbicide resistance, the nature and levels of the residues formed and their impact on the residue definition and maximum residue limits (MRLs) defined by the Codex Alimentarius Commission and national authorities. No general conclusions can be drawn concerning the nature and level of residues, which has to be done on a case-by-case basis. International residue definitions and MRLs are still lacking for some herbicide-crop combinations, and harmonisation is therefore recommended.

  3. Effects of the herbicide dicamba on nontarget plants and pollinator visitation.

    PubMed

    Bohnenblust, Eric W; Vaudo, Anthony D; Egan, J Franklin; Mortensen, David A; Tooker, John F

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 80% of all pesticides applied to row crops are herbicides, and these applications pose potentially significant ecotoxicological risks to nontarget plants and associated pollinators. In response to the widespread occurrence of weed species resistant to glyphosate, biotechnology companies have developed crops resistant to the synthetic-auxin herbicides dicamba and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D); and once commercialized, adoption of these crops is likely to change herbicide-use patterns. Despite current limited use, dicamba and 2,4-D are often responsible for injury to nontarget plants; but effects of these herbicides on insect communities are poorly understood. To understand the influence of dicamba on pollinators, the authors applied several sublethal, drift-level rates of dicamba to alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and Eupatorium perfoliatum L. and evaluated plant flowering and floral visitation by pollinators. The authors found that dicamba doses simulating particle drift (≈1% of the field application rate) delayed onset of flowering and reduced the number of flowers of each plant species; however, plants that did flower produced similar-quality pollen in terms of protein concentrations. Further, plants affected by particle drift rates were visited less often by pollinators. Because plants exposed to sublethal levels of dicamba may produce fewer floral resources and be less frequently visited by pollinators, use of dicamba or other synthetic-auxin herbicides with widespread planting of herbicide-resistant crops will need to be carefully stewarded to prevent potential disturbances of plant and beneficial insect communities in agricultural landscapes.

  4. Post-emergence herbicides useful in calendula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Easy and effective weed control is required by growers who are considering new industrial crops. Post-emergence herbicides typically are the products of choice by today’s growers. Unfortunately, post-emergence herbicides with proven safety margins are not known for calendula (Calendula officinalis),...

  5. Control of Butterfly Bush with Postemergence Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butterfly bush (Buddleja davidii) is classified as invasive in several parts of the United States. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of four herbicides and two application methods on postemergence butterfly bush control. The four herbicides included: Roundup (glyphosate)...

  6. Resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides: current understanding.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen B

    2014-09-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) inhibitor herbicides currently comprise the largest site-of-action group (with 54 active ingredients across five chemical groups) and have been widely used in world agriculture since they were first introduced in 1982. Resistance evolution in weeds to AHAS inhibitors has been rapid and identified in populations of many weed species. Often, evolved resistance is associated with point mutations in the target AHAS gene; however non-target-site enhanced herbicide metabolism occurs as well. Many AHAS gene resistance mutations can occur and be rapidly enriched owing to a high initial resistance gene frequency, simple and dominant genetic inheritance and lack of major fitness cost of the resistance alleles. Major advances in the elucidation of the crystal structure of the AHAS (Arabidopsis thaliana) catalytic subunit in complex with various AHAS inhibitor herbicides have greatly improved current understanding of the detailed molecular interactions between AHAS, cofactors and herbicides. Compared with target-site resistance, non-target-site resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides is less studied and hence less understood. In a few well-studied cases, non-target-site resistance is due to enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism (metabolic resistance), mimicking that occurring in tolerant crop species and often involving cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. However, the specific herbicide-metabolising, resistance-endowing genes are yet to be identified in resistant weed species. The current state of mechanistic understanding of AHAS inhibitor herbicide resistance is reviewed, and outstanding research issues are outlined.

  7. Natural compounds as next generation herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicides with new modes of action (MOAs) are badly needed because of rapidly evolving resistance to commercial herbicides, for which a new MOA has not been introduced for more than 20 years. The biggest pest management challenge for organic agriculture is the lack of effective natural product her...

  8. Differential Clomazone, Herbicide Tolerance among Sweetpotato Genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clomazone (Command 3ME) is a broad spectrum preemergence herbicide that is registered for use in sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas L. (Lam.)]. It controls several important annual weeds that are not controlled by the other sweetpotato herbicides. Following clomazone application for weed control in the ...

  9. Managing the evolution of herbicide resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide-resistant (HR) weeds are widespread threats to the sustainability, productivity, and profitability of many cropping systems. Efforts to combat their spread through herbicide rotation schedules have been marginally effective at best. Despite the scope of the problem, we lack sound empirical...

  10. Resistance to aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides in Amazon sprangletop: Confirmation, control, and molecular basis of resistance.

    PubMed

    Tehranchian, Parsa; Norsworthy, Jason K; Korres, Nicholas E; McElroy, Scott; Chen, Shu; Scott, Robert C

    2016-10-01

    Amazon sprangletop is problematic weed of rice in the midsouthern USA. Two biotypes of this species from rice fields approximately 100km apart in Louisiana were unaffected when sprayed with the labeled field rate of cyhalofop-butyl (314g ai ha(-1)) in 2008. Dose response studies were conducted to confirm the level of resistance to cyhalofop-butyl over a range of doses. Cross-resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase)-inhibiting herbicides from two different chemical families and multiple herbicide resistance to other mechanisms of action were evaluated. Sequencing using the Illumina Hiseq platform and ACCase gene sequencing revealed two different amino acid substitutions, Trp2027-to-Cys in the first resistant biotype and Asp2078-to-Gly in the second resistant biotype, within the CT domain of the ACCase gene. Two known amino acid substitutions confirmed resistance to cyhalofop-butyl and fenoxaprop-P-ethyl in resistant Amazon sprangletop biotypes. Asp2078-to-Gly amino acid substitution that was detected in one of the resistant biotypes did not result in cross-resistance to clethodim, an ACCase-inhibiting cyclohexandione herbicide which has endowed clethodim resistance in other weed species. Based on this research, both resistant Amazon sprangletop biotypes have evolved target-site resistance to the APP herbicides; yet, alternative herbicides are still active on these plants.

  11. Bacterial degradation of phenoxy herbicide mixtures 2,4-D and MCPP

    SciTech Connect

    Kyeheon Oh; Tuovinen, O.H. )

    1991-08-01

    The phenoxy herbicides 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2-(2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxy)propionic acid (MCPP) have auxin-like growth regulating properties and are extensively used for the control of broad-leaf angiosperm weeds. The microbiological degradation of 2,4-D by pure and mixed cultures has been examined in a number of studies. The authors have previously evaluated the concurrent microbiological degradation of 2,4-D and MCPP in stirred tank reactors. For the present paper, they examined the utilization of the two substrates by three mixed cultures that had a previous history of growth with the respective single phenoxy herbicide.

  12. Precision Herbicide Application Technologies To Decrease Herbicide Losses in Furrow Irrigation Outflows in a Northeastern Australian Cropping System.

    PubMed

    Davis, Aaron M; Pradolin, Jordan

    2016-05-25

    This study compared water quality benefits of using precision herbicide application technologies in relation to traditional spraying approaches across several pre- and postemergent herbicides in furrow-irrigated canefarming systems. The use of shielded sprayers (herbicide banding) provided herbicide load reductions extending substantially beyond simple proportionate decreases in amount of active herbicide ingredient applied to paddocks. These reductions were due largely to the extra management control available to irrigating growers in relation to where both herbicides and irrigation water can be applied to paddocks, coupled with knowledge of herbicide toxicological and physicochemical properties. Despite more complex herbicide mixtures being applied in banded practices, banding provided capacity for greatly reduced environmental toxicity in off-paddock losses. Similar toxicological and loss profiles of alternative herbicides relative to recently regulated pre-emergent herbicides highlight the need for a carefully considered approach to integrating alternative herbicides into improved pest management.

  13. Toxicological effects of selective herbicides on plant growth promoting activities of phosphate solubilizing Klebsiella sp. strain PS19.

    PubMed

    Ahemad, Munees; Saghir Khan, Md

    2011-02-01

    This study examines the effect of four herbicides, quizalafop-p-ethyl, clodinafop, metribuzin and glyphosate, on plant growth promoting activities like phosphate solubilization, siderophores, indole acetic acid, exo-polysaccharides, hydrogen cyanide and ammonia production by herbicide tolerant Klebsiella sp. strain PS19. The strain was isolated from mustard rhizosphere. The selected herbicides were applied two to three times at the recommended rates. Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 tolerated a concentration of 1600 μg/ml each of quizalafop-p-ethyl and clodinafop, and 3200 and 2800 μg/ml of metribuzin and glyphosate, respectively. The activities of Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 observed under in vitro environment were persistent in the presence of all herbicides at lower rates. The plant growth promoting activities even-though decreased regularly, but was not lost completely, as the concentration of each herbicide was increased from the recommended to three times of higher doses. Among all herbicides, quizalafop-p-ethyl, generally, showed maximum toxicity to plant growth promoting activities of Klebsiella sp. strain PS19. As an example, 40, 80 and 120 μg/l of quizalafop-p-ethyl added to liquid culture Pikovskaya medium, decreased phosphate solubilizing activity of strain PS19 by 93, 95 and 97%, respectively over untreated control. The study revealed that the higher rates of herbicides though decreased the plant growth promoting activity but it did not completely inhibit the metabolic activities of strain PS19. The herbicide tolerance together with growth promoting activities observed under herbicide stress suggests that Klebsiella sp. strain PS19 could be used as bacterial preparation for facilitating the growth and yields of crops even in soils polluted with herbicides.

  14. Herbicide safener-inducible gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    De Veylder, L; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D

    1997-05-01

    The potential use of a new chemical-inducible gene expression system in Arabidopsis thaliana has been examined. The system is based on the maize In2-2 promoter which is activated by benzenesulfonamide herbicide safeners. Plants transformed with the beta-glucuronidase (gus) reporter gene under the control of the In2-2 promoter were grown in the presence of different safeners and the induced GUS activity pattern was studied histochemically. In the absence of safeners, the In2-2 promoter was not active. Application of different safeners induced distinct gus expression patterns, including expression in the root, hydathodes, and the shoot apical meristem. Plants maintained continuously on inducing concentrations of the safeners were retarded in growth. The growth inhibition effects of the Sa5 safener could be overcome in a sulfonylurea-resistant background. In2-2 promoter activity could also be induced by the sulfonylurea herbicide chlorsulfuron. In the sulfonylurea-resistant background, which derives from herbicide-resistant acetolactate synthase activity, induction of the In2-2 promoter by chlorsulfuron was lower. Furthermore, branched-chain amino acids, known to inhibit acetolactate synthase activity, also induced In2-2 promoter activity. Our data suggest a strong correlation between In2-2 expression and inhibition of the acetolactate synthase activity.

  15. Selective disruption of wheat secondary metabolism by herbicide safeners.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Ian; Brazier-Hicks, Melissa; Stobiecki, Maciej; Franski, Rafa; Edwards, Robert

    2006-08-01

    In wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), treatment with herbicide safeners enhances the expression of enzymes involved in pesticide detoxification and reduces crop sensitivity to herbicides. Since these same enzymes are involved in plant secondary metabolism, it was of interest to determine whether or not the safener cloquintocet mexyl perturbed phenolic metabolism in wheat seedlings. LC/ESI/MS analysis identified 14 phenolic substrates in the shoots of young wheat plants. Fragmentation imposed by collision induced dissociation identified specific C-glycosidic conjugates of 4',5,7-trihydroxflavone (apigenin), 3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone (luteolin) and 3'-O-methylluteolin. Treatment of 7-day-old wheat shoots with cloquintocet mexyl resulted in an accelerated depletion of the conjugates of all three flavones, most notably with the glycosides of luteolin. In contrast, safener treatment caused the selective accumulation of 4',5,7-trihydroxy-3',5'-dimethoxyflavone (tricin) and the phenylpropanoid ferulic acid. Changes in phenolic content were associated with an increase in O-methyltransferase and C-glucosyltransferase activity toward flavonoid substrates as well as the classic enhancement of detoxifying glutathione transferases. Our results suggest that in addition to altering the capacity of wheat to metabolise herbicides and other xenobiotics, safeners can also cause a selective shift in the metabolism of endogenous phenolics.

  16. Physiological Basis for Differential Sensitivities of Plant Species to Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase-Inhibiting Herbicides 1

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Timothy D.; Becerril, José M.; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Duke, Mary V.; Jacobs, Judy M.; Jacobs, Nicholas J.; Duke, Stephen O.

    1991-01-01

    With a leaf disc assay, 11 species were tested for effects of the herbicide acifluorfen on porphyrin accumulation in darkness and subsequent electrolyte leakage and photobleaching of chlorophyll after exposure to light. Protoporphyrin IX (Proto IX) was the only porphyrin that was substantially increased by the herbicide in any of the species. However, there was a wide range in the amount of Proto IX accumulation caused by 0.1 millimolar acifluorfen between species. Within species, there was a reduced effect of the herbicide in older tissues. Therefore, direct quantitative comparisons between species are difficult. Nevertheless, when data from different species and from tissues of different age within a species were plotted, there was a curvilinear relationship between the amount of Proto IX caused to accumulate during 20 hours of darkness and the amount of electrolyte leakage or chlorophyll photobleaching caused after 6 and 24 hours of light, respectively, following the dark period. Herbicidal damage plateaued at about 10 nanomoles of Proto IX per gram of fresh weight. Little difference was found between in vitro acifluorfen inhibition of protoporphyrinogen oxidase (Protox) of plastid preparations of mustard, cucumber, and morning glory, three species with large differences in their susceptibility at the tissue level. Mustard, a highly tolerant species, produced little Proto IX in response to the herbicide, despite having a highly susceptible Protox. Acifluorfen blocked carbon flow from δ-aminolevulinic acid to protochlorophyllide in mustard, indicating that it inhibits Protox in vivo. Increasing δ-aminolevulinic acid concentrations (33-333 micromolar) supplied to mustard with 0.1 millimolar acifluorfen increased Proto IX accumulation and herbicidal activity, demonstrating that mustard sensitivity to Proto IX was similar to other species. Differential susceptibility to acifluorfen of the species examined in this study appears to be due in large part to

  17. Modified cellulose synthase gene from 'Arabidopsis thaliana' confers herbicide resistance to plants

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scieble, Wolf

    2000-10-11

    Cellulose synthase ('CS'), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl) phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  18. Modified cellulose synthase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana confers herbicide resistance to plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris R.; Scheible, Wolf

    2007-07-10

    Cellulose synthase ("CS"), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl)phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  19. Herbicide-resistant weeds: Management strategies and upcoming technologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicides have contributed to substantial increase in crop yields over the past seven decades. Over reliance on herbicides for weed control has led to rapid evolution of herbicide-resistant (HR) weeds. Increased awareness of herbicide resistance and adoption of diversified weed control tactics by f...

  20. Mitigation of plant penetration into radioactive waste utilizing herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, G.R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the use of herbicides as an effective method of precluding plant root penetration into buried radioactive wastes. The discussed surface applications are selective herbicides to control broadleaf vegetation in grasses; nonselective herbicides, which control all vegetation; and slow-release forms of these herbicides to prolong effectiveness.

  1. Global perspective of herbicide-resistant weeds.

    PubMed

    Heap, Ian

    2014-09-01

    Two hundred and twenty weed species have evolved resistance to one or more herbicides, and there are now 404 unique cases (species × site of action) of herbicide-resistant weeds globally. ALS inhibitor-resistant weeds account for about a third of all cases (133/404) and are particularly troublesome in rice and cereals. Although 71 weed species have been identified with triazine resistance, their importance has dwindled with the shift towards Roundup Ready® crops in the USA and the reduction of triazine usage in Europe. Forty-three grasses have evolved resistance to ACCase inhibitors, with the most serious cases being Avena spp., Lolium spp., Phalaris spp., Setaria spp. and Alopecurus myosuroides, infesting more than 25 million hectares of cereal production globally. Of the 24 weed species with glyphosate resistance, 16 have been found in Roundup Ready® cropping systems. Although Conyza canadensis is the most widespread glyphosate-resistant weed, Amaranthus palmeri and Amaranthus tuberculartus are the two most economically important glyphosate-resistant weeds because of the area they infest and the fact that these species have evolved resistance to numerous other herbicide sites of action, leaving growers with few herbicidal options for their control. The agricultural chemical industry has not brought any new herbicides with novel sites of action to market in over 30 years, making growers reliant on using existing herbicides in new ways. In addition, tougher registration and environmental regulations on herbicides have resulted in a loss of some herbicides, particularly in Europe. The lack of novel herbicide chemistries being brought to market combined with the rapid increase in multiple resistance in weeds threatens crop production worldwide.

  2. Hybridization using cytoplasmic male sterility, cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance, and herbicide tolerance from nuclear genes

    SciTech Connect

    Beversdorf, W.D.; Erickson, L.R.; Grant, I.

    1987-04-14

    An improved process is described for producing a substantially homogeneous population of plants of a predetermined hybrid variety of crop which is capable of undergoing self-pollination and cross-pollination. The process comprises: growing in a first planting area a substantially random population of cytoplasmic male sterile plants which exhibit cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance to at least one Type A herbicide and exhibit tolerance to at least one Type B herbicide which is attributable solely to homozygous dominant nuclear genes and male fertile plants which are homozygous recessive maintainer plants for the cytoplasmic male sterile plants and which lack the cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance to at least one Type A herbicide and exhibit tolerance to at least one Type B herbicide attributable solely to the homozygous dominant nuclear genes.

  3. Acetamide herbicides and their degradation products in ground water and surface water of the United States, 1993-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, Elisabeth A.; Dietze, Julie E.; Thurman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    During 1993 through 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a number of studies to investigate and document the occurrence, fate, and transport of acetamide herbicides and their degradation products in ground and surface water. As part of these studies, approximately 5,100 water samples were collected and analyzed for the acetamide parent herbicides acetochlor, alachlor, dimethenamid, flufenacet, and metolachlor and their degradation products ethanesulfonic acid, oxanilic acid, and sulfinyl acetic acid. During this period, various analytical methods were developed to detect and measure concentrations of acetamide herbicides and their degradation products in ground water and surface water. Results showed that the degradation products of acetamide herbicides in ground water were detected more frequently and occurred at higher concentrations than their parent compounds. Further study showed that the acetamide herbicides and their degradation products were detected more frequently in surface water than in ground water. In general, the parent compounds were detected at similar or greater frequencies than the degradation products in surface water. The developed methods and data were valuable for acquiring information about the occurrence, fate, and transport of the herbicides and their degradation products and the importance of analyzing for both parent compounds and their degradate products in water-quality studies.

  4. Herbicide safeners: uses, limitations, metabolism, and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Abu-Qare, Aqel W; Duncan, Harry J

    2002-09-01

    Several methods were examined to minimize crops injury caused by herbicides. Thus increase their selectivity. A selective herbicide is one that controls weeds at rates that do not injure the crop. Herbicides are selective in a particular crop within certain limits imposed by the herbicide, the plant, the application rate, the method and time of application, and environment conditions. Herbicide safeners are compounds of diverse chemical families. They are applied with herbicides to protect crops against their injury. Using chemical safeners offer practical, efficient and simple method of improving herbicide selectivity. This method has been applied successfully in cereal crops such as maize, rice and sorghum, against pre-emergence thiocarbamate and chloroacetanilide herbicides. Some reports indicate promising results for the development of safeners for post-emergence herbicides in broadleaved crops. Various hypotheses were proposed explaining mechanisms of action of herbicide safeners: interference with uptake and translocation of the herbicide, alteration in herbicide metabolism, and competition at site of action of the herbicide. Even though progress was made in the development of herbicide safeners and in understanding their mechanisms of action, more research is needed to elucidate clearly how these chemicals act and why their activity is restricted to particular crops and herbicides.

  5. Going natural: Effective weed control in squash with pelargonic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pelargonic acid, a natural, but not certified organic herbicide, has been shown to be phytotoxic, acting as a contact herbicide, injuring and killing plants through cell membrane disruption. Pelargonic acid, a fatty acid also known as nonanoic acid, is a nine-carbon chained organic compound found in...

  6. Occurrence and load of selected herbicides and metabolites in the lower Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Gregory M.; Goolsby, Donald A.

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of water samples collected from the Mississippi River at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, during 1991–1997 indicate that hundreds of metric tons of herbicides and herbicide metabolites are being discharged annually to the Gulf of Mexico. Atrazine, metolachlor, and the ethane-sulfonic acid metabolite of alachlor (alachlor ESA) were the most frequently detected herbicides and, in general, were present in the largest concentrations. Almost 80% of the annual herbicide load to the Gulf of Mexico occurred during the growing season from May to August. The concentrations and loads of alachlor in the Mississippi River decreased dramatically after 1993 in response to decreased use in the basin. In contrast, the concentrations and loads of acetochlor increased after 1994, reflecting its role as a replacement for alachlor. The peak annual herbicide load occurred in 1993, when approximately 640 metric tons (t) of atrazine, 320 t of cyanazine, 215 t of metolachlor, 53 t of simazine, and 50 t of alachlor were discharged to the Gulf of Mexico. The annual loads of atrazine and cyanazine were generally 1–2% of the amount annually applied in the Mississippi River drainage basin; the annual loads of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor were generally less than 1%. Despite a reduction in atrazine use, historical data do not indicate a long-term downward trend in the atrazine load to the Gulf of Mexico. Although a relation (r2=0.62) exists between the atrazine load and stream discharge during May to August, variations in herbicide use and rainfall patterns within subbasins can have a large effect on herbicide loads in the Mississippi River Basin and probably explain a large part of the annual variation in atrazine load to the Gulf of Mexico.

  7. Occurrence and load of selected herbicides and metabolites in the lower Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, G.M.; Goolsby, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of water samples collected from the Mississippi River at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, during 1991-1997 indicate that hundreds of metric tons of herbicides and herbicide metabolites are being discharged annually to the Gulf of Mexico. Atrazine, metolachlor, and the ethane-sulfonic acid metabolite of alachlor (alachlor ESA) were the most frequently detected herbicides and, in general, were present in the largest concentrations. Almost 80% of the annual herbicide load to the Gulf of Mexico occurred during the growing season from May to August. The concentrations and loads of alachlor in the Mississippi River decreased dramatically after 1993 in response to decreased use in the basin. In contrast, the concentrations and loads of acetochlor increased after 1994, reflecting its role as a replacement for alachlor. The peak annual herbicide load occurred in 1993, when approximately 640 metric tons (t) of atrazine, 320 t of cyanazine, 215 t of metolachlor, 53 t of simazine, and 50 t of alachlor were discharged to the Gulf of Mexico. The annual loads of atrazine and cyanazine were generally 1-2% of the amount annually applied in the Mississippi River drainage basin; the annual loads of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor were generally less than 1%. Despite a reduction in atrazine use, historical data do not indicate a long-term downward trend in the atrazine load to the Gulf of Mexico. Although a relation (r2=0.62) exists between the atrazine load and stream discharge during May to August, variations in herbicide use and rainfall patterns within subbasins can have a large effect on herbicide loads in the Mississippi River Basin and probably explain a large part of the annual variation in atrazine load to the Gulf of Mexico. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  8. Robust crop resistance to broadleaf and grass herbicides provided by aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase transgenes.

    PubMed

    Wright, Terry R; Shan, Guomin; Walsh, Terence A; Lira, Justin M; Cui, Cory; Song, Ping; Zhuang, Meibao; Arnold, Nicole L; Lin, Gaofeng; Yau, Kerrm; Russell, Sean M; Cicchillo, Robert M; Peterson, Mark A; Simpson, David M; Zhou, Ning; Ponsamuel, Jayakumar; Zhang, Zhanyuan

    2010-11-23

    Engineered glyphosate resistance is the most widely adopted genetically modified trait in agriculture, gaining widespread acceptance by providing a simple robust weed control system. However, extensive and sustained use of glyphosate as a sole weed control mechanism has led to field selection for glyphosate-resistant weeds and has induced significant population shifts to weeds with inherent tolerance to glyphosate. Additional weed control mechanisms that can complement glyphosate-resistant crops are, therefore, urgently needed. 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is an effective low-cost, broad-spectrum herbicide that controls many of the weeds developing resistance to glyphosate. We investigated the substrate preferences of bacterial aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase enzymes (AADs) that can effectively degrade 2,4-D and have found that some members of this class can act on other widely used herbicides in addition to their activity on 2,4-D. AAD-1 cleaves the aryloxyphenoxypropionate family of grass-active herbicides, and AAD-12 acts on pyridyloxyacetate auxin herbicides such as triclopyr and fluroxypyr. Maize plants transformed with an AAD-1 gene showed robust crop resistance to aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides over four generations and were also not injured by 2,4-D applications at any growth stage. Arabidopsis plants expressing AAD-12 were resistant to 2,4-D as well as triclopyr and fluroxypyr, and transgenic soybean plants expressing AAD-12 maintained field resistance to 2,4-D over five generations. These results show that single AAD transgenes can provide simultaneous resistance to a broad repertoire of agronomically important classes of herbicides, including 2,4-D, with utility in both monocot and dicot crops. These transgenes can help preserve the productivity and environmental benefits of herbicide-resistant crops.

  9. Robust crop resistance to broadleaf and grass herbicides provided by aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase transgenes

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Terry R.; Shan, Guomin; Walsh, Terence A.; Lira, Justin M.; Cui, Cory; Song, Ping; Zhuang, Meibao; Arnold, Nicole L.; Lin, Gaofeng; Yau, Kerrm; Russell, Sean M.; Cicchillo, Robert M.; Peterson, Mark A.; Simpson, David M.; Zhou, Ning; Ponsamuel, Jayakumar; Zhang, Zhanyuan

    2010-01-01

    Engineered glyphosate resistance is the most widely adopted genetically modified trait in agriculture, gaining widespread acceptance by providing a simple robust weed control system. However, extensive and sustained use of glyphosate as a sole weed control mechanism has led to field selection for glyphosate-resistant weeds and has induced significant population shifts to weeds with inherent tolerance to glyphosate. Additional weed control mechanisms that can complement glyphosate-resistant crops are, therefore, urgently needed. 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is an effective low-cost, broad-spectrum herbicide that controls many of the weeds developing resistance to glyphosate. We investigated the substrate preferences of bacterial aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase enzymes (AADs) that can effectively degrade 2,4-D and have found that some members of this class can act on other widely used herbicides in addition to their activity on 2,4-D. AAD-1 cleaves the aryloxyphenoxypropionate family of grass-active herbicides, and AAD-12 acts on pyridyloxyacetate auxin herbicides such as triclopyr and fluroxypyr. Maize plants transformed with an AAD-1 gene showed robust crop resistance to aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides over four generations and were also not injured by 2,4-D applications at any growth stage. Arabidopsis plants expressing AAD-12 were resistant to 2,4-D as well as triclopyr and fluroxypyr, and transgenic soybean plants expressing AAD-12 maintained field resistance to 2,4-D over five generations. These results show that single AAD transgenes can provide simultaneous resistance to a broad repertoire of agronomically important classes of herbicides, including 2,4-D, with utility in both monocot and dicot crops. These transgenes can help preserve the productivity and environmental benefits of herbicide-resistant crops. PMID:21059954

  10. Transgenic plants for phytoremediation of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Kawahigashi, Hiroyuki

    2009-04-01

    Herbicides are economically important, but the non-point pollution that they cause may disrupt the surrounding environment. Phytoremediation of herbicides has been well studied using conventional plants. Transgenic plants produced for metabolizing herbicides and long-persisting pollutants can be used for phytoremediation of foreign chemicals in contaminated soil and water. The genes involved in the metabolism of chemical compounds can be isolated from various organisms, including bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals, and these genes are then introduced into candidate plants. Transgenic plants expressing mammalian P450s and the other enzymes showed tolerance and phytoremediation activity toward target herbicides. Transgenic plants can also enhance the absorption and detoxification of pollutants, thereby aiding the phytoremediation of contaminated environments.

  11. Dechlorination of chloroacetanilide herbicides by thiosulfate salts

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Jianying; Wang, Qiquan; Yates, Scott R.; Koskinen, William C.; Jury, William A.

    2002-01-01

    Halogenated organic compounds (XOCs) are among the most widely used synthetic chemicals. Many XOCs are recalcitrant to natural degradation and have become prominent environmental contaminants. One group of such XOCs are the heavily used chloroacetanilide herbicides. We have found that chloroacetanilide herbicides are rapidly dechlorinated in water, sand, and soil by thiosulfate salts under ambient conditions. Structural and kinetics analysis suggests that the reaction occurred by SN2 nucleophilic substitution, in which the chlorine was replaced by thiosulfate and the herbicide was detoxified. Laboratory studies showed that this reaction could be used for removing residues of chloroacetanilide herbicides in water, soil, and sand. Our findings also suggest that some other XOCs may be subject to this reaction. Because common thiosulfate salts are innocuous products (e.g., fertilizers) and the reaction selectively detoxifies XOCs at low thiosulfate levels, this discovery may lead to a new way for safe removal of certain XOCs from the environment. PMID:11943844

  12. Peanut response to naturally-derived herbicides used in organic crop production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed-free irrigated trials were conducted in 2004 and 2005 to quantify phytotoxic effects of herbicides with the potential to be used in organic peanut production. Clove oil and citric plus acetic acid were each applied at vegetative emergence of peanut (VE), two weeks after VE (2 wk), four weeks a...

  13. Assessment of herbicide sorption by biochars and organic matter associated with soil and sediment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorption of two herbicides, fluridone (FLUN) and norflurazon (NORO), by whole sediment, two types of biochars and various soil/sediment organic matter (OM) fractions including nonhydrolyzable carbon (NHC), black carbon (BC) and humic acid (HA) was examined. The single-point organic carbon (OC)-norma...

  14. ENZYMATIC COUPLING OF THE HERBICIDE BENTAZON WITH HUMUS MONOMERS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF REACTION PRODUCTS (R823847)

    EPA Science Inventory

    To elucidate the binding mechanism of the herbicide bentazon
    (3-isopropyl-1H-2,1,3-benzothiadiazine-4(3H)-one 2,2-dioxide) with
    humic monomers in the presence of an oxidative enzyme, the reaction of bentazon
    with catechol, caffeic acid, protocatechuic...

  15. Glyphosate, other herbicides, and transformation products in Midwestern streams, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Kolpin, D.W.; Scribner, E.A.; Kuivila, K.M.; Sandstrom, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    The use of glyphosate has increased rapidly, and there is limited understanding of its environmental fate. The objective of this study was to document the occurrence of glyphosate and the transformation product aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in Midwestern streams and to compare their occurrence with that of more commonly measured herbicides such as acetochlor, atrazine, and metolachlor. Water samples were collected at sites on 51 streams in nine Midwestern states in 2002 during three runoff events: after the application of pre-emergence herbicides, after the application of post-emergence herbicides, and during harvest season. All samples were analyzed for glyphosate and 20 other herbicides using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry or high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The frequency of glyphosate and AMPA detection, range of concentrations in runoff samples, and ratios of AMPA to glyphosate concentrations did not vary throughout the growing season as substantially as for other herbicides like atrazine, probably because of different seasonal use patterns. Glyphosate was detected at or above 0.1 μg/1 in 35 percent of pre-emergence, 40 percent of post-emergence, and 31 percent of harvest season samples, with a maximum concentration of 8.7 μg/1. AMPA was detected at or above 0.1 μg/1 in 53 percent of pre-emergence, 83 percent of post-emergence, and 73 percent of harvest season samples, with a maximum concentration of 3.6 μg/1. Glyphosate was not detected at a concentration at or above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contamination level (MCL) of 700 μg/1 in any sample. Atrazine was detected at or above 0.1 μg/1 in 94 percent of pre-emergence, 96 percent of post-emergence, and 57 percent of harvest season samples, with a maximum concentration of 55 μg/1. Atrazine was detected at or above its MCL (3 μg/1) in 57 percent of pre-emergence and 33 percent of post-emergence samples

  16. Glyphasate, other herbicides, and transformation products in midwestern streams, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, William A.; Koplin, Dana W.; Scribner, Elizabeth A.; Kuivila, Kathryn; Sandstrom, Mark W.

    2005-01-01

    The use of glyphosate has increased rapidly, and there is limited understanding of its environmental fate. The objective of this study was to document the occurrence of glyphosate and the transformation product aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in Midwestern streams and to compare their occurrence with that of more commonly measured herbicides such as acetochlor, atrazine, and metolachlor. Water samples were collected at sites on 51 streams in nine Midwestern states in 2002 during three runoff events: after the application of pre-emergence herbicides, after the application of post-emergence herbicides, and during harvest season. All samples were analyzed for glyphosate and 20 other herbicides using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry or high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The frequency of glyphosate and AMPA detection, range of concentrations in runoff samples, and ratios of AMPA to glyphosate concentrations did not vary throughout the growing season as substantially as for other herbicides like atrazine, probably because of different seasonal use patterns. Glyphosate was detected at or above 0.1 μg/1 in 35 percent of pre-emergence, 40 percent of post-emergence, and 31 percent of harvest season samples, with a maximum concentration of 8.7 μg/1. AMPA was detected at or above 0.1 μg/1 in 53 percent of pre-emergence, 83 percent of post-emergence, and 73 percent of harvest season samples, with a maximum concentration of 3.6 μg/1. Glyphosate was not detected at a concentration at or above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contamination level (MCL) of 700 μg/1 in any sample. Atrazine was detected at or above 0.1 μg/1 in 94 percent of pre-emergence, 96 percent of post-emergence, and 57 percent of harvest season samples, with a maximum concentration of 55 μg/1. Atrazine was detected at or above its MCL (3 μg/1) in 57 percent of pre-emergence and 33 percent of post-emergence samples.

  17. Phenoxy herbicides and fibrates potently inhibit the human chemosensory receptor subunit T1R3

    PubMed Central

    Maillet, Emeline L.; Margolskee, Robert F.; Mosinger, Bedrich

    2009-01-01

    We show that phenoxy-auxin herbicides and lipid-lowering fibrates inhibit human but not rodent T1R3. T1R3 as a co-receptor in taste cells responds to sweet compounds and amino-acids; in endocrine cells of gut and pancreas T1R3 contributes to glucose sensing. Thus, certain effects of fibrates in treating hyperlipidemia and type II diabetes may be via actions on T1R3. Likewise, phenoxy-herbicides may have adverse metabolic effects in humans that would have gone undetected in studies on rodents. PMID:19817384

  18. Multivariate correlation between concentrations of selected herbicides and derivatives in outflows from selected U.S. midwestern reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tauler, R.; Barcelo, D.; Thurman, E.M.

    2000-01-01

    Multivariate correlations between the concentrations of selected herbicides and herbicide derivatives in outflows from selected reservoirs in the Midwestern United States for April 1992 through September 1993 were investigated using principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariate curve resolution (MCR). Two independent sources for alachlor ethanesulfonic acid, one major source related to spring flush and seasonal runoff and another minor source related to groundwater, were identified using PCA. Results of MCR provided a semiquantitative interpretation of the environmental sources of the observed herbicide concentrations in reservoir outflows and allowed the examination of their temporal and geographical distributions. Samples with higher herbicide concentrations were collected from reservoirs in Indiana and Ohio, especially during the late spring and summer.

  19. Differential expression of acetohydroxyacid synthase genes in sunflower plantlets and its response to imazapyr herbicide.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Gabriela; Vega, Tatiana; Felitti, Silvina A; Picardi, Liliana; Nestares, Graciela

    2013-07-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) catalyzes the first reaction in branch chain amino acids biosynthesis. This enzyme is the target of several herbicides, including all members of the imidazolinone family. Little is known about the expression of the three acetohydroxyacid synthase genes (ahas1, ahas2 and ahas3) in sunflower. The aim of this work was to evaluate ahas gene expression and AHAS activity in different tissues of sunflower plantlets. Three genotypes differing in imidazolinone resistance were evaluated, two of which carry an herbicide resistant-endowing mutation known as Ahasl1-1 allele. In vivo and in vitro AHAS activity and transcript levels were higher in leaves than in roots. The ahas3 transcript was the less abundant in both tissues. No significant difference was observed between ahas1 and ahas2 transcript levels of the susceptible genotype but a higher ahas1 transcript level was observed in leaves of genotypes carrying Ahasl1-1 allele. Similar transcript levels were found for ahas1 and ahas2 in roots of genotypes carrying Ahasl1-1 allele whereas higher ahas2 abundance was found in the susceptible genotype. Herbicide treatment triggered tissue-specific, gene and genotype-dependent changes in ahas gene expression. AHAS activity was highly inhibited in the susceptible genotype. Differential responses were observed between in vitro and in vivo AHAS inhibition assays. These findings enhance our understanding of AHAS expression in sunflower genotypes differing for herbicide resistance and its response to herbicide treatment.

  20. Core-shell magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers as sorbent for sulfonylurea herbicide residues.

    PubMed

    Miao, Shan Shan; Wu, Mei Sheng; Zuo, Hai Gen; Jiang, Chen; Jin, She Feng; Lu, Yi Chen; Yang, Hong

    2015-04-15

    Sulfonylurea herbicides are widely used at lower dosage for controlling broad-leaf weeds and some grasses in cereals and economic crops. It is important to develop a highly efficient and selective pretreatment method for analyzing sulfonylurea herbicide residues in environments and samples from agricultural products based on magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). The MIPs were prepared by a surface molecular imprinting technique especially using the vinyl-modified Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticle as the supporting matrix, bensulfuron-methyl (BSM) as the template molecule, methacrylic acid (MAA) as a functional monomer, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) as a cross-linker, and azodiisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as an initiator. The MIPs show high affinity, recognition specificity, fast mass transfer rate, and efficient adsorption performance toward BSM with the adsorption capacity reaching up to 37.32 mg g(-1). Furthermore, the MIPs also showed cross-selectivity for herbicides triasulfuron (TS), prosulfuron (PS), and pyrazosulfuron-ethyl (PSE). The MIP solid phase extraction (SPE) column was easier to operate, regenerate, and retrieve compared to those of C18 SPE column. The developed method showed highly selective separation and enrichment of sulfonylurea herbicide residues, which enable its application in the pretreatment of multisulfonylurea herbicide residues.

  1. Protective responses induced by herbicide safeners in wheat.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Victoria L; Cummins, Ian; Brazier-Hicks, Melissa; Edwards, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Safeners are agrochemicals which enhance tolerance to herbicides in cereals including wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by elevating the expression of xenobiotic detoxifying enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs). When wheat plants were spray-treated with three safener chemistries, namely cloquintocet mexyl, mefenpyr diethyl and fenchlorazole ethyl, an apparently identical subset of GSTs derived from the tau, phi and lambda classes accumulated in the foliage. Treatment with the closely related mefenpyr diethyl and fenchlorazole ethyl enhanced seedling shoot growth, but this effect was not determined with the chemically unrelated cloquintocet mexyl. Focussing on cloquintocet mexyl, treatments were found to only give a transient induction of GSTs, with the period of elevation being dose dependent. Examining the role of safener metabolism in controlling these responses, it was determined that cloquintocet mexyl was rapidly hydrolysed to the respective carboxylic acid. Studies with cloquintocet showed that the acid was equally effective at inducing GSTs as the ester and appeared to be the active safener. Studies on the tissue induction of GSTs showed that whilst phi and tau class enzymes were induced in all tissues, the induction of the lambda enzymes was restricted to the meristems. To test the potential protective effects of cloquintocet mexyl in wheat on chemicals other than herbicides, seeds were pre-soaked in safeners prior to sowing on soil containing oil and a range of heavy metals. Whilst untreated seeds were unable to germinate on the contaminated soil, safener treatments resulted in seedlings briefly growing before succumbing to the pollutants. Our results show that safeners exert a range of protective and growth promoting activities in wheat that extend beyond enhancing tolerance to herbicides.

  2. Protective responses induced by herbicide safeners in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Victoria L.; Cummins, Ian; Brazier-Hicks, Melissa; Edwards, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Safeners are agrochemicals which enhance tolerance to herbicides in cereals including wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by elevating the expression of xenobiotic detoxifying enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs). When wheat plants were spray-treated with three safener chemistries, namely cloquintocet mexyl, mefenpyr diethyl and fenchlorazole ethyl, an apparently identical subset of GSTs derived from the tau, phi and lambda classes accumulated in the foliage. Treatment with the closely related mefenpyr diethyl and fenchlorazole ethyl enhanced seedling shoot growth, but this effect was not determined with the chemically unrelated cloquintocet mexyl. Focussing on cloquintocet mexyl, treatments were found to only give a transient induction of GSTs, with the period of elevation being dose dependent. Examining the role of safener metabolism in controlling these responses, it was determined that cloquintocet mexyl was rapidly hydrolysed to the respective carboxylic acid. Studies with cloquintocet showed that the acid was equally effective at inducing GSTs as the ester and appeared to be the active safener. Studies on the tissue induction of GSTs showed that whilst phi and tau class enzymes were induced in all tissues, the induction of the lambda enzymes was restricted to the meristems. To test the potential protective effects of cloquintocet mexyl in wheat on chemicals other than herbicides, seeds were pre-soaked in safeners prior to sowing on soil containing oil and a range of heavy metals. Whilst untreated seeds were unable to germinate on the contaminated soil, safener treatments resulted in seedlings briefly growing before succumbing to the pollutants. Our results show that safeners exert a range of protective and growth promoting activities in wheat that extend beyond enhancing tolerance to herbicides. PMID:23564986

  3. Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonny, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite. In fact, since 1996, most cultivated GMOs have been GMHT crops, which involve the use of an associated herbicide, generally glyphosate. In their very first years of adoption, HT crops often led to some decrease in herbicide use. However, the repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds, using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on recent data. The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA. Finally, the last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds. The concluding comments deal more widely with trends in GM crops.

  4. Genetically Modified Herbicide-Tolerant Crops, Weeds, and Herbicides: Overview and Impact.

    PubMed

    Bonny, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been and continue to be a subject of controversy despite their rapid adoption by farmers where approved. For the last two decades, an important matter of debate has been their impact on pesticide use, particularly for herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops. Some claim that these crops bring about a decrease in herbicide use, while others claim the opposite. In fact, since 1996, most cultivated GMOs have been GMHT crops, which involve the use of an associated herbicide, generally glyphosate. In their very first years of adoption, HT crops often led to some decrease in herbicide use. However, the repetition of glyphosate-tolerant crops and of glyphosate only applications in the same fields without sufficient alternation and herbicide diversity has contributed to the appearance of glyphosate-resistant weeds. These weeds have resulted in a rise in the use of glyphosate and other herbicides. This article explores this situation and the impacts of herbicide-resistant weeds, using an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on recent data. The paper analyzes the spread of GMHT crops worldwide and their consequences on herbicide use in the USA in particular. It then addresses the global development of glyphosate-resistant weeds and their impact, particularly focusing on the USA. Finally, the last section explores how industry, farmers, and weed scientists are coping with the spread of resistant weeds. The concluding comments deal more widely with trends in GM crops.

  5. Herbicide resistance and biodiversity: agronomic and environmental aspects of genetically modified herbicide-resistant plants.

    PubMed

    Schütte, Gesine; Eckerstorfer, Michael; Rastelli, Valentina; Reichenbecher, Wolfram; Restrepo-Vassalli, Sara; Ruohonen-Lehto, Marja; Saucy, Anne-Gabrielle Wuest; Mertens, Martha

    2017-01-01

    Farmland biodiversity is an important characteristic when assessing sustainability of agricultural practices and is of major international concern. Scientific data indicate that agricultural intensification and pesticide use are among the main drivers of biodiversity loss. The analysed data and experiences do not support statements that herbicide-resistant crops provide consistently better yields than conventional crops or reduce herbicide amounts. They rather show that the adoption of herbicide-resistant crops impacts agronomy, agricultural practice, and weed management and contributes to biodiversity loss in several ways: (i) many studies show that glyphosate-based herbicides, which were commonly regarded as less harmful, are toxic to a range of aquatic organisms and adversely affect the soil and intestinal microflora and plant disease resistance; the increased use of 2,4-D or dicamba, linked to new herbicide-resistant crops, causes special concerns. (ii) The adoption of herbicide-resistant crops has reduced crop rotation and favoured weed management that is solely based on the use of herbicides. (iii) Continuous herbicide resistance cropping and the intensive use of glyphosate over the last 20 years have led to the appearance of at least 34 glyphosate-resistant weed species worldwide. Although recommended for many years, farmers did not counter resistance development in weeds by integrated weed management, but continued to rely on herbicides as sole measure. Despite occurrence of widespread resistance in weeds to other herbicides, industry rather develops transgenic crops with additional herbicide resistance genes. (iv) Agricultural management based on broad-spectrum herbicides as in herbicide-resistant crops further decreases diversity and abundance of wild plants and impacts arthropod fauna and other farmland animals. Taken together, adverse impacts of herbicide-resistant crops on biodiversity, when widely adopted, should be expected and are indeed very hard

  6. 78 FR 35265 - Notice of Receipt of Requests To Voluntarily Cancel Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... Prentox Larva-Lur Propoxur. Contains Propoxur. 009779-00262 MCPA Amine Herbicide... MCPA, dimethylamine... Ethephon. Plant Regulator. OR-040031 Rovral 4 Flowable Iprodione. Fungicide. OR-050017 Simazine 4L...

  7. METHOD 535: MEASUREMENT OF CHLOROACETANILIDE AND CHLOROACETAMIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATES IN DRINKING WATER BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION AND LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY (LC/MS/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) and oxanilic acid (OA) degradation products of acetanilide/acetamide herbicides have been found in U.S. ground waters and surface waters. The substitution of the sulfonic acid or the carbonic acid for the chlorine atom great...

  8. The chiral herbicide beflubutamid (I): Isolation of pure enantiomers by HPLC, herbicidal activity of enantiomers, and analysis by enantioselective GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Buerge, Ignaz J; Bächli, Astrid; De Joffrey, Jean-Pierre; Müller, Markus D; Spycher, Simon; Poiger, Thomas

    2013-07-02

    For many chiral pesticides, little information is available on the properties and fate of individual stereoisomers. A basic data set would, first of all, include stereoisomer-specific analytical methods and data on the biological activity of stereoisomers. The herbicide beflubutamid, which acts as an inhibitor of carotenoid biosynthesis, is currently marketed as racemate against dicotyledonous weeds in cereals. Here, we present analytical methods for enantiomer separation of beflubutamid and two metabolites based on chiral HPLC. These methods were used to assign the optical rotation and to prepare milligram quantities of the pure enantiomers for further characterization with respect to herbicidal activity. In addition, sensitive analytical methods were developed for enantiomer separation and quantification of beflubutamid and its metabolites at trace level, using chiral GC-MS. In miniaturized biotests with garden cress, (-)-beflubutamid showed at least 1000× higher herbicidal activity (EC50, 0.50 μM) than (+)-beflubutamid, as determined by analysis of chlorophyll a in 5-day-old leaves. The agricultural use of enantiopure (-)-beflubutamid rather than the racemic compound may therefore be advantageous from an environmental perspective. In further biotests, the (+)-enantiomer of the phenoxybutanoic acid metabolite showed effects on root growth, possibly via an auxin-type mode of action, but at 100× higher concentrations than the structurally related herbicide (+)-mecoprop.

  9. Herbicide resistance modelling: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Renton, Michael; Busi, Roberto; Neve, Paul; Thornby, David; Vila-Aiub, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Computer simulation modelling is an essential aid in building an integrated understanding of how different factors interact to affect the evolutionary and population dynamics of herbicide resistance, and thus in helping to predict and manage how agricultural systems will be affected. In this review, we first discuss why computer simulation modelling is such an important tool and framework for dealing with herbicide resistance. We then explain what questions related to herbicide resistance have been addressed to date using simulation modelling, and discuss the modelling approaches that have been used, focusing first on the earlier, more general approaches, and then on some newer, more innovative approaches. We then consider how these approaches could be further developed in the future, by drawing on modelling techniques that are already employed in other areas, such as individual-based and spatially explicit modelling approaches, as well as the possibility of better representing genetics, competition and economics, and finally the questions and issues of importance to herbicide resistance research and management that could be addressed using these new approaches are discussed. We conclude that it is necessary to proceed with caution when increasing the complexity of models by adding new details, but, with appropriate care, more detailed models will make it possible to integrate more current knowledge in order better to understand, predict and ultimately manage the evolution of herbicide resistance.

  10. The benefits of herbicide-resistant crops.

    PubMed

    Green, Jerry M

    2012-10-01

    Since 1996, genetically modified herbicide-resistant crops, primarily glyphosate-resistant soybean, corn, cotton and canola, have helped to revolutionize weed management and have become an important tool in crop production practices. Glyphosate-resistant crops have enabled the implementation of weed management practices that have improved yield and profitability while better protecting the environment. Growers have recognized their benefits and have made glyphosate-resistant crops the most rapidly adopted technology in the history of agriculture. Weed management systems with glyphosate-resistant crops have often relied on glyphosate alone, have been easy to use and have been effective, economical and more environmentally friendly than the systems they have replaced. Glyphosate has worked extremely well in controlling weeds in glyphosate-resistant crops for more than a decade, but some key weeds have evolved resistance, and using glyphosate alone has proved unsustainable. Now, growers need to renew their weed management practices and use glyphosate with other cultural, mechanical and herbicide options in integrated systems. New multiple-herbicide-resistant crops with resistance to glyphosate and other herbicides will expand the utility of existing herbicide technologies and will be an important component of future weed management systems that help to sustain the current benefits of high-efficiency and high-production agriculture.

  11. Reconnaissance data for glyphosate, other selected herbicides, their degradation products, and antibiotics in 51 streams in nine midwestern states, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, Elisabeth A.; Battaglin, William A.; Dietze, Julie E.; Thurman, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1989, the U.S. Geological Survey has conducted periodic reconnaissance studies of streams in the Midwestern United States to determine the geographic and seasonal distribution of herbicide compounds. These studies have documented that large amounts of acetochlor, alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, metolachlor, and their degradation products are flushed into streams during post-application runoff. Additional studies show that peak herbicide concentrations tend to occur during the first runoff after herbicide application and that herbicide flushes can occur during runoff for several weeks to months following application. Since the first stream study conducted in 1989, several significant changes in herbicide use have occurred. The most substantial change is the tripling in the use of glyphosate during the past 5 years. Over this same time period (1997-2001), usage of acetochlor and atrazine increased slightly, whereas alachlor, cyanazine, and metolachlor usage decreased. During 2002, 154 samples were collected from 51 streams in nine Midwestern States during three periods of runoff. This report provides a compilation of the analytical results of five laboratory methods. Results show that glyphosate was detected in 55 (36 percent) of the samples, and aminomethylphosphonic acid (a degradation product of glyphosate) was detected in 107 (69 percent) of the samples. Atrazine, the most frequently detected herbicide, was found in 93 percent of the samples, followed by metolachlor, found in 73 percent of the samples; metolachlor ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) and oxanilic acid (OXA) were the most frequently detected herbicide degradation products, both being found in more than 95 percent of the samples. The data presented here are valuable for comparison with results from the earlier reconnaissance studies.

  12. Occurrence of selected herbicides and herbicide degradation products in Iowa's Ground Water, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Kalkhoff, S.J.; Goolsby, D.A.; Sneck-Fahrer, D. A.; Thurman, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    The occurrence of herbicide compounds had a significant, inverse relation to well depth and a significant, positive relation to dissolved-oxygen concentration. It is felt that both well depth and dissolved oxygen are acting as rough surrogates to ground-water age, with younger ground water being more likely to contain herbicide compounds. The occurrence of herbicide compounds was substantially different among the major aquifer types across Iowa, being detected in 82.5% of the alluvial, 81.8% of the bedrock/ karst region, 40.0% of the glacial-drift, and 25.0% of the bedrock/nonkarst region aquifers. The observed distribution was partially attributed to variations in general ground-water age among these aquifer types. A significant, inverse relation was determined between total herbicide compound concentrations in ground water and the average soil slope within a 2-km radius of sampled wells. Steeper soil slopes may increase the likelihood of surface runoff occurring rather than ground-water infiltration–decreasing the transport of herbicide compounds to ground water. As expected, a significant positive relation was determined between intensity of herbicide use and herbicide concentrations in ground water.

  13. Herbicide-resistant crops: utilities and limitations for herbicide-resistant weed management.

    PubMed

    Green, Jerry M; Owen, Micheal D K

    2011-06-08

    Since 1996, genetically modified herbicide-resistant (HR) crops, particularly glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, have transformed the tactics that corn, soybean, and cotton growers use to manage weeds. The use of GR crops continues to grow, but weeds are adapting to the common practice of using only glyphosate to control weeds. Growers using only a single mode of action to manage weeds need to change to a more diverse array of herbicidal, mechanical, and cultural practices to maintain the effectiveness of glyphosate. Unfortunately, the introduction of GR crops and the high initial efficacy of glyphosate often lead to a decline in the use of other herbicide options and less investment by industry to discover new herbicide active ingredients. With some exceptions, most growers can still manage their weed problems with currently available selective and HR crop-enabled herbicides. However, current crop management systems are in jeopardy given the pace at which weed populations are evolving glyphosate resistance. New HR crop technologies will expand the utility of currently available herbicides and enable new interim solutions for growers to manage HR weeds, but will not replace the long-term need to diversify weed management tactics and discover herbicides with new modes of action. This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of anticipated weed management options and the best management practices that growers need to implement in HR crops to maximize the long-term benefits of current technologies and reduce weed shifts to difficult-to-control and HR weeds.

  14. Herbicide-Resistant Crops: Utilities and Limitations for Herbicide-Resistant Weed Management

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Since 1996, genetically modified herbicide-resistant (HR) crops, particularly glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, have transformed the tactics that corn, soybean, and cotton growers use to manage weeds. The use of GR crops continues to grow, but weeds are adapting to the common practice of using only glyphosate to control weeds. Growers using only a single mode of action to manage weeds need to change to a more diverse array of herbicidal, mechanical, and cultural practices to maintain the effectiveness of glyphosate. Unfortunately, the introduction of GR crops and the high initial efficacy of glyphosate often lead to a decline in the use of other herbicide options and less investment by industry to discover new herbicide active ingredients. With some exceptions, most growers can still manage their weed problems with currently available selective and HR crop-enabled herbicides. However, current crop management systems are in jeopardy given the pace at which weed populations are evolving glyphosate resistance. New HR crop technologies will expand the utility of currently available herbicides and enable new interim solutions for growers to manage HR weeds, but will not replace the long-term need to diversify weed management tactics and discover herbicides with new modes of action. This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of anticipated weed management options and the best management practices that growers need to implement in HR crops to maximize the long-term benefits of current technologies and reduce weed shifts to difficult-to-control and HR weeds. PMID:20586458

  15. 75 FR 28155 - Acephate, Cacodylic acid, Dicamba, Dicloran et al.; Proposed Tolerance Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ...EPA is proposing to revoke certain tolerances for the fungicides dicloran and thiophanate-methyl; the herbicides EPTC, hexazinone, picloram, and propazine; the defoliant and herbicide cacodylic acid; the plant growth regulator and herbicide diquat, the insecticides disulfoton, malathion, methamidophos, methomyl, phosmet, piperonyl butoxide, pyrethrins, and thiodicarb; the fumigant......

  16. Effects of an herbicide on physiology, morphology, and fitness of the dung beetle Euoniticellus intermedius (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae).

    PubMed

    González-Tokman, Daniel; Martínez-Morales, Imelda; Farrera, Arodi; Del Rosario Ortiz-Zayas, María; Lumaret, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Some agrochemical compounds threaten nontarget organisms and their functions in the ecosystem. The authors experimentally evaluated the effects of one of the most common herbicide mixtures used worldwide, containing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and picloram, on dung beetles, which play fundamental roles in the function of natural and managed ecosystems. The present study employed techniques of physiology and geometric morphometrics, besides including fitness measurements, to assess the effects of the herbicide in the introduced beetle Euoniticellus intermedius. Because herbicide components promote oxidative stress and affect survival in certain insects, the authors predicted negative effects on the beetles. Unexpectedly, no effect of herbicide concentration was found on clutch size, sex ratio, and fluctuating asymmetry, and it even increased physiological condition and body size in exposed beetles. Because the studied species presents 2 male morphs, the authors, for the first time, evaluated the effect of a pollutant on the ratio of these morphs. Contrary to the prediction, the herbicide mixture increased the proportion of major males. Thus, the herbicide does not threaten populations of the studied beetles. The present study discusses how both negative and positive effects of pollutants on wild animals modify natural and sexual selection processes occurring in nature, which ultimately impact population dynamics. The authors recommend the use of physiological and geometric morphometrics techniques to assess the impact of pollutants on nontarget animals. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:96-102. © 2016 SETAC.

  17. Inhibition of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase by two classes of grass-selective herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Rendina, A.R.; Craig-Kennard, A.C.; Beaudoin, J.D.; Breen, M.K. )

    1990-05-01

    The selective grass herbicides diclofop, haloxyfop, and trifop (((aryloxy)phenoxy)propionic acids) and alloxydim, sethoxydim, and clethodim (cyclohexanediones) are potent, reversible inhibitors of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) partially purified from barley, corn, and wheat. Although inhibition of the wheat enzyme by clethodim and diclofop is noncompetitive versus each of the substrates adenosine triphosphate (ATP), HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), diclofop and clethodim are nearly competitive versus acetyl-CoA since the level of inhibition is most sensitive to the concentration of acetyl-CoA (K{sub is} < K{sub ii}). To conclusively show whether the herbicides interact at the biotin carboxylation site or the carboxyl transfer site, the inhibition of isotope exchange and partial reactions catalyzed at each site was studied with the wheat enzyme. Only the ({sup 14}C)acetyl-CoA-malonyl-CoA exchange and decarboxylation of ({sup 14}C)malonyl-CoA reactions are strongly inhibited by clethodim and diclofop, suggesting that the herbicides interfere with the carboxyl transfer site rather than the biotin carboxylation site of the enzyme. Double-inhibition studies with diclofop and clethodim suggest that the ((aryloxy)phenoxy)propionic acid and cyclohexanedione herbicides may bind to the same region of the enzyme.

  18. Effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide on the development of Common toads (Bufo bufo L.; Amphibia) at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, Fabian; Gruber, Edith; Spangl, Bernhard; Zaller, Johann G.

    2016-04-01

    Herbicides based on the active ingredient glyphosate are frequently applied in agriculture, horticulture and private gardens all over the world. Recently, leaching of glyphosate or its metabolite (AMPA) into water bodies inhabited by amphibians has been reported. However, very little is known about non-target effects of these herbicides on amphibians and even less is known to what extent different temperatures might alter these effects. Using climate chambers, we investigated the effects of the glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup PowerFlex® (480 g L-1 glyphosate, formulated as 588 g L-1 potassium salt) on the larval development of Common toads (Bufo bufo L.; Amphibia: Anura) under different temperature regimes (15°C vs. 20°C). We established five herbicide concentrations: 0, 1.5, 3, 4 mg acid equivalent L-1 and a 4 mg a.e. L-1 pulse treatment (totally three applications of 1.5, 1.5 and another 1 mg a.e. L-1) at each temperature in a full-factorial design. Each treatment combination was replicated five times, the experiment ran for 24 days. Results showed a highly significant effect of temperature on body length and body width but no effect of herbicide concentration on these growth parameters. Moreover, highly significant interactions between herbicide and temperature on body length and body width were observed suggesting that herbicides had different effects on different temperatures. In conclusion, although Roundup PowerFlex® at the tested concentrations appeared to have no acute toxicity to larvae of Common toads, the observed effects on tadpole morphology will potentially affect competitive interactions in spawning ponds of amphibia. Our findings of herbicide x temperature interactions might become more prevalent when human-induced climate change will lead to more extreme temperatures.

  19. Effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide and predation threat on the behaviour of agile frog tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Mikó, Zsanett; Ujszegi, János; Gál, Zoltán; Hettyey, Attila

    2017-06-01

    The widespread application of pesticides emphasises the importance of understanding the impacts of these chemicals on natural communities. The most commonly applied broad-spectrum herbicides in the world are glyphosate-based herbicides, which have been suggested to induce significant behavioural changes in non-target organisms even at low environmental concentrations. To scrutinize the behavioural effects of herbicide-exposure we exposed agile frog (Rana dalmatina) tadpoles in an outdoor mesocosm experiment to three concentrations of a glyphosate-based herbicide (0, 2 and 6.5mg acid equivalent (a.e.) / L). To assess whether anti-predator behaviour is affected by the pesticide, we combined all levels of herbicide-exposure with three predator treatments (no predator, caged Aeshna cyanea dragonfly larvae or Lissotriton vulgaris newt adults) in a full factorial design. We observed hiding, activity, proximity to the predator cage and vertical position of tadpoles. We found that at the higher herbicide concentration tadpoles decreased their activity and more tadpoles were hiding, and at least at the lower concentration their vertical position was closer to the water surface than in tadpoles of the control treatment. Tadpoles also decreased their activity in the presence of dragonfly larvae, but did not hide more in response to either predator, nor did tadpoles avoid predators spatially. Further, exposure to the herbicide did not significantly influence behavioural responses to predation threat. Our study documents a definite influence of glyphosate-based herbicides on the behaviour of agile frog tadpoles and indicates that some of these changes are similar to those induced by dangerous predators. This may suggest that the underlying physiological mechanisms or the adaptive value of behavioural changes may similar.

  20. The aquatic ecotoxicology of triazine herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, J.M.

    1996-10-01

    Triazine herbicides control plant growth by inhibiting photophosphorylation, but typically do not cause permanent cell damage or death. Effects on aquatic plants are reversible; photosynthesis resumes when the herbicide disappears from the water, and sometimes even while it is still present. Effects on aquatic plant communities are further ameliorated by species replacements, so the communities as a whole are less sensitive than their most sensitive species. Atrazine, a representative triazine herbicide, is toxic to aquatic plants (algae and macrophytes) at concentrations in the range of 20 to 200 {mu}g/L or less. Aquatic invertebrates and fish are much less sensitive than plants, with acute toxicity occurring at 1000 {mu}g/L or higher. Ecologically significant effects in aquatic ecosystems are likely only if plant communities are severely damaged by prolonged exposure to high atrazine concentrations.

  1. Forecasting residual herbicide concentrations in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Gavan; Scanlan, Craig; van Zwieten, Lukas; Rose, Mick; Rose, Terry

    2016-04-01

    High concentrations of herbicides remaining in soil at the time of planting can adversely impact agricultural production and lead to off-site impacts in streams and groundwater. Being able to forecast the likelihood of residual concentrations at specific times in the future offers the potential to improve environmental and economic outcomes. Here we develop a solution for the full transient probability density function for herbicide concentrations in soil as a function of rainfall variability. Quasi-analytical solutions that account for rainfall seasonality are also demonstrated. In addition, new rapid and relatively cost-effective bioassays to quantify herbicide concentrations in near real-time, offers opportunities for data assimilation approaches to improve forecast risks.

  2. Unintended effects of the herbicides 2,4-D and dicamba on lady beetles.

    PubMed

    Freydier, Laurène; Lundgren, Jonathan G

    2016-08-01

    Weed resistance to glyphosate and development of new GM crops tolerant to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and dicamba is expected to lead to increased use of these herbicides in cropland. The lady beetle, Coleomegilla maculata is an important beneficial insect in cropland that is commonly used as an indicator species in safety evaluations of pesticides. Here, we examined the lethal and non-lethal effects of 2,4-D and dicamba active ingredients and commercial formulations to this lady beetle species, and tested for synergistic effects of the herbicides. Second instars of lady beetles were exposed to an experimental treatment, and their mortality, development, weight, sex ratio, fecundity, and mobility was evaluated. Using similar methods, a dose-response study was conducted on 2,4-D with and without dicamba. The commercial formulation of 2,4-D was highly lethal to lady beetle larvae; the LC90 of this herbicide was 13 % of the label rate. In this case, the "inactive" ingredients were a key driver of the toxicity. Dicamba active ingredient significantly increased lady beetle mortality and reduced their body weight. The commercial formulations of both herbicides reduced the proportion of males in the lady beetle population. The herbicides when used together did not act synergistically in their toxicity toward lady beetles versus when the chemistries were used independently. Our work shows that herbicide formulations can cause both lethal and sublethal effects on non-target, beneficial insects, and these effects are sometimes driven by the "inactive" ingredients. The field-level implications of shifts in weed management practices on insect management programs should receive further attention.

  3. Tolerance evaluation of vegetatively established Miscanthus x giganteus to herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of the recent focus on herbicide resistant weeds, herbicide resistant weeds are not new to agriculture; the first herbicide resistant weed was documented in 1957, with the first widespread resistance occurring in common groundsel with atrazine in the early 1970’s. Glyphosate resistant weed...

  4. Discovery of new herbicide modes of action with natural phytotoxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    About 20 modes of action (MOAs) are utilized by commercial herbicides, and almost 30 years have passed since the last new MOA was introduced. Rapidly increasing evolution of resistance to herbicides with these MOAs has greatly increased the need for herbicides with new MOAs. Combinatorial chemistry ...

  5. Imprinting of molecular recognition sites combined with π-donor-acceptor interactions using bis-aniline-crosslinked Au-CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles array on electrodes: Development of electrochemiluminescence sensor for the ultrasensitive and selective detection of 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yukun; Fang, Guozhen; Wang, Xiaomin; Liu, Guiyang; Wang, Shuo

    2016-03-15

    A novel strategy is reported for the fabrication of bis-aniline-crosslinked Au nanoparticles (NPs)-CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) array composite by facil one-step co-electropolymerization of thioaniline-functionalized AuNPs and thioaniline-functionalized CdSe/ZnS QDs onto thioaniline-functionalized Au elctrodes (AuE). Stable and enhanced cathodic electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of CdSe/ZnS QDs is observed on the modified electrode in neutral solution, suggesting promising applications in ECL sensing. An advanced ECL sensor is explored for detection of 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) which quenches the ECL signal through electron-transfer pathway. The sensitive determination of MCPA with limit of detection (LOD) of 2.2 nmolL(-1) (S/N=3) is achieved by π-donor-acceptor interactions between MCPA and the bis-aniline bridging units. Impressively, the imprinting of molecular recognition sites into the bis-aniline-crosslinked AuNPs-CdSe/ZnS QDs array yields a functionalized electrode with an extremely sensitive response to MCPA in a linear range of 10 pmolL(-1)-50 μmolL(-1) with a LOD of 4.3 pmolL(-1 ()S/N=3). The proposed ECL sensor with high sensitivity, good selectivity, reproducibility and stability has been successfully applied for the determination of MCPA in real samples with satisfactory recoveries. In this study, ECL sensor combined the merits of QDs-ECL and molecularly imprinting technology is reported for the first time. The developed ECL sensor holds great promise for the fabrication of QDs-based ECL sensors with improved sensitivity and furthermore opens the door to wide applications of QDs-based ECL in food safety and environmental monitoring.

  6. A biosensor for organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Sun, Samio; Li, Chen-Zhong; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    The toxic metalloid arsenic is widely distributed in food, water, and soil. While inorganic arsenic enters the environment primarily from geochemical sources, methylarsenicals either result from microbial biotransformation of inorganic arsenic or are introduced anthropogenically. Methylarsenicals such as monosodium methylarsonic acid (MSMA) have been extensively utilized as herbicides, and aromatic arsenicals such as roxarsone (Rox) are used as growth promoters for poultry and swine. Organoarsenicals are degraded to inorganic arsenic. The toxicological effects of arsenicals depend on their oxidation state, chemical composition, and bioavailability. Here we report that the active forms are the trivalent arsenic-containing species. We constructed a whole-cell biosensor utilizing a modified ArsR repressor that is highly selective toward trivalent methyl and aromatic arsenicals, with essentially no response to inorganic arsenic. The biosensor was adapted for in vitro detection of organoarsenicals using fluorescence anisotropy of ArsR-DNA interactions. It detects bacterial biomethylation of inorganic arsenite both in vivo and in vitro with detection limits of 10−7 M and linearity to 10−6 M for phenylarsenite and 5×10−6 M for methylarsenite. The biosensor detects reduced forms of MSMA and roxarsone and offers a practical, low cost method for detecting activate forms and breakdown products of organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters. PMID:24359149

  7. Mode of Action Studies on Nitrodiphenyl Ether Herbicides 1

    PubMed Central

    Bowyer, John R.; Hallahan, Beverly J.; Camilleri, Patrick; Howard, Joy

    1989-01-01

    The nitrodiphenyl ether herbicide 5-[2-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-2-nitroacetophenone oxime-o-(acetic acid, methyl ester) (DPEI) induces light- and O2-dependent lipid peroxidation and chlorophyll (Chl) bleaching in the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. Under conditions of O2-limitation, these effects are diminished by prometyne and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), both inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport. Mutants in which photosynthetic electron transport is blocked are also resistant to DPEI under conditions of O2-limitation. Light- and O2-dependent lipid peroxidation and Chl bleaching are also induced by 5-[2-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-3-methoxyphthalide (DPEII), a diphenyl ether whose redox properties preclude reduction by photosystem I. However, these effects of DPEII are also inhibited by DCMU. Under conditions of high aeration, DCMU does not protect Scenedesmus cells from Chl bleaching induced by DPEI, but does protect against paraquat. DPEI, but not paraquat, induces tetrapyrrole formation in treated cells in the dark. This is also observed in a mutant lacking photosystem I but is suppressed under conditions likely to lead to O2 limitation. Our results indicate that, in contrast to paraquat, the role of photosynthetic electron transport in diphenyl ether toxicity in Scenedesmus is not to reduce the herbicide to a radical species which initiates lipid peroxidation. Its role is probably to maintain a sufficiently high O2 concentration, through water-splitting, in the algal suspension. PMID:16666600

  8. The 1975 Insecticide, Herbicide, Fungicide Quick Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Bill G.; Thomson, W. T.

    This is a quick guide for choosing a chemical to use to control a certain pest on a specific crop. Information in the book was obtained from manufacturers' labels and from the USDA and FDA pesticide summary. The book is divided into four parts: (1) insecticides, (2) herbicides, (3) fungicides, and (4) conversion tables. Each of the first three…

  9. Kudzu response to foliar applied herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical control is presently the most cost-effective means to control kudzu, however, many of the herbicides labeled for kudzu control have substantial non-target toxicity, poor selectivity, high cost, long soil persistence, high soil mobility and / or high use rates. The present study evaluated ot...

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herbicides comprise over 75% of all the agricultural pesticide use in the United States. This amounts to over 500 million pounds of active ingredients applied each year. The US EPA has the responsibility to register these products and label them for use such that unintended effec...

  11. Herbicide dissipation from low density polyethylene mulch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted to examine herbicide dissipation when applied to low density polyethylene (LDPE) mulch for dry scenarios vs. washing off with water. In field studies, halosulfuron, paraquat, carfentrazone, glyphosate, and flumioxazin were applied to black 1.25-mil LDPE at...

  12. Herbicides as probes in plant biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicides are small molecules that inhibit specific molecular target sites within plant biochemical pathways and/or physiological processes. Inhibition of these sites often has catastrophic consequences that are lethal to plants. The affinity of these compounds for their respective target sites ...

  13. Managing weeds in potato rotations without herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Managing weeds without herbicides requires an integration of methods and strategies and a change in how weeds are perceived. Weeds should be managed in a holistic, intentional and proactive manner. Successful weed management in organic systems attempts to understand the interactions between the crop...

  14. Determination of antagonism between cyhalofop-butyl and other rice (Oryza sativa) herbicides in barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli).

    PubMed

    Ottis, Brian V; Mattice, John D; Talbert, Ronald E

    2005-05-18

    Herbicide antagonism is defined as the reduction of control of certain weeds as the result of applying mixtures of two or more herbicides. Cyhalofop-butyl, a graminicide used for postemergence grass weed control in rice, is antagonized by some rice herbicides when applied simultaneously. The result of this type of antagonism usually results in decreased control of grass weeds. Research has shown that herbicide antagonism between graminicides and other herbicides may be caused by different mechanisms as the result of activity of the tank-mix partner. Using HPLC, the objective of this experiment was to analyze the fate of cyhalofop-butyl in barnyardgrass tissue when applied alone and in combination with halosulfuron, propanil, or triclopyr. Results indicated that absorption of cyhalofop-butyl and hydrolysis to its phytotoxic metabolite, cyhalofop-acid, was rapid and that halosulfuron and triclopyr had no effect. Because of a likely interaction of propanil with an apoplastic esterase enzyme, increased levels of cyhalofop-butyl and cyhalofop-acid were detected in barnyardgrass tissue, indicating that cyhalofop-butyl metabolism was hindered by propanil.

  15. Enantioselective stable isotope analysis (ESIA) of polar Herbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Michael; Qiu, Shiran; Elsner, Martin

    2013-04-01

    The complexity of aquatic systems makes it challenging to assess the environmental fate of chiral micropolutants. As an example, chiral herbicides are frequently detected in the environment (Buser and Muller, 1998); however, hydrological data is needed to determine their degradability from concentration measurements. Otherwise declining concentrations cannot unequivocally be attributed to degradation, but could also be caused by dilution effects. In contrast, isotope ratios or enantiomeric ratios are elegant alternatives that are independent of dilution and can even deliver insights into reaction mechanisms. To combine the advantages of both approaches we developed an enatioselective stable isotope analysis (ESIA) method to investigate the fate of the chiral herbicides 4-CPP ((RS)-2-(4-chlorophenoxy)-propionic acid), mecoprop (2-(4-Chloro-2-methylphenoxy)-propionic acid) and dichlorprop (2-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy)-propionic acid). After testing the applicable concentration range of the method, enantioselective isotope fractionation was investigated by microbial degradation using dichlorprop as a model compound. The method uses enantioselective gas-chromatography (GC) to separate enantiomers. Subsequently samples are combusted online to CO2 and carbon isotope ratios are determined for each enantiomer by isotope-ratio-mass-spectrometry (IRMS). Because the analytes contain a polar carboxyl-group, samples were derivatised prior to GC-IRMS analysis with methanolic BF3 solution. Precise carbon isotope analysis (2σ ≤0.5‰) was achieved with a high sensitivity of ≥ 7 ng C that is needed on column for one analysis. Microbial degradation of the model compound dichlorprop was conducted with Delftia acidovorans MC1 and pronounced enantiomer fractionation, but no isotope fractionation was detected. The absence of isotope fractionation can be explained by two scenarios: either the degrading enzyme has no isotopic preference, or another step in the reaction without an isotopic

  16. Molecularly imprinted polymers for triazine herbicides prepared by multi-step swelling and polymerization method. Their application to the determination of methylthiotriazine herbicides in river water.

    PubMed

    Sambe, Haruyo; Hoshina, Kaori; Haginaka, Jun

    2007-06-08

    Uniformly-sized, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for atrazine, ametryn and irgarol were prepared by a multi-step swelling and polymerization method using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a cross-linker and methacrylic acid (MAA), 2-(trifluoromethyl) acrylic acid (TFMAA) or 4-vinylpyridine either as a functional monomer or not. The MIP for atrazine prepared using MAA showed good molecular recognition abilities for chlorotriazine herbicides, while the MIPs for ametryn and irgarol prepared using TFMAA showed excellent molecular recognition abilities for methylthiotriazine herbicides. A restricted access media-molecularly imprinted polymer (RAM-MIP) for irgarol was prepared followed by in situ hydrophilic surface modification using glycerol dimethacrylate and glycerol monomethacrylate as hydrophilic monomers. The RAM-MIP was applied to selective pretreatment and enrichment of methylthiotriazine herbicides, simetryn, ametryn and prometryn, in river water, followed by their separation and UV detection via column-switching HPLC. The calibration graphs of these compounds showed good linearity in the range of 50-500 pg/mL (r > 0.999) with a 100 mL loading of a river water sample. The quantitation limits of simetryn, ametryn and prometryn were 50 pg/mL, and the detection limits were 25 pg/mL. The recoveries of simetryn, ametryn and prometryn at 50 pg/mL were 101%, 95.6% and 95.1%, respectively. This method was successfully applied for the simultaneous determination of simetryn, ametryn and prometryn in river water.

  17. Optimal growth of Dunaliella primolecta in axenic conditions to assay herbicides.

    PubMed

    Santín-Montanyá, I; Sandín-España, P; García Baudín, J M; Coll-Morales, J

    2007-01-01

    To develop an assay for herbicides in marine environments using microalgae, we have optimized the specie, cell culture media and physical conditions to obtain maximal cellular densities in a 96 well micro format to allow mass assays. We first surveyed several species of 7 unicellular eukaryotic algae genera (Dunaliella, Tetraselmis, Chlorella, Ellipsoidon, Isochrysis, Nannochloropsis, and Phaeodactylum) for vigorous in vitro axenic growth. Once the genus Dunaliella was selected, Dunaliella primolecta was preferred among 9 species (bioculata, minuta, parva, peircei, polymorpha, primolecta, quartolecta, salina and tertiolecta) because it showed the highest growth rates. The components (oligo elements, sugars, amino acids and vitamins) and conditions (light, CO(2), temperature) of the culture media were further optimized to obtain the highest cellular densities (up to 60x10(6)cellsml(-1)) and the shortest cell cycle duration ( approximately 12h) for D. primolecta. Then the toxicity of four representative herbicides, alloxydim, and sethoxydim (inhibitors of acetyl-coA carboxilase), metamitron (inhibitor of photosynthesis) and clopyralid (inhibitor of respiration), were assayed on the optimal culture conditions for D. primolecta during 96h. The results showed that D. primolecta was susceptible to those herbicides in the following order: metamitron > sethoxydim > alloxydim. In contrast, clopyralid did not have any effects. Therefore, D. primolecta microcultures can be used to assay a large number of samples for the presence of herbicides under a saline environment.

  18. Slow-release formulations of the herbicide picloram by using Fe-Al pillared montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Marco-Brown, Jose L; Undabeytia, Tomás; Torres Sánchez, Rosa M; Dos Santos Afonso, María

    2017-04-01

    Slow-release formulations of the herbicide picloram (PCM, 4-amino-3,5,6-trichloropyridine-2-carboxylic acid) were designed based on its adsorption on pillared clays (pillared clays (PILCs)) for reducing the water-polluting risk derived from its use in conventional formulations. Fe-Al PILCs were synthesized by the reaction of Na(+)-montmorillonite (SWy-2) with base-hydrolyzed solutions of Fe and Al. The Fe/(Fe + Al) ratios used were 0.15 and 0.50. The PCM adsorption isotherms on Fe-Al PILCs were well fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich models. The PCM adsorption capacity depended on the Fe content in the PILCs. Slow-release formulations were prepared by enhanced adsorption of the herbicide from PCM-cyclodextrin (CD) complexes in solution. CDs were able to enhance up to 2.5-fold the solubility of PCM by the formation of inclusion complexes where the ring moiety of the herbicide was partially trapped within the CD cavity. Competitive adsorption of anions such as sulfate, phosphate, and chloride as well as the FTIR analysis of PCM-PILC complexes provided evidence of formation of inner sphere complexes of PCM-CD on Fe-Al PILCs. Release of the herbicide in a sandy soil was lower from Fe-Al PILC formulations relative to a PCM commercial formulation.

  19. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K.; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  20. Acute toxicity of Roundup® herbicide to three life stages of the freshwater shrimp Caridina nilotica (Decapoda: Atyidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensah, P. K.; Muller, W. J.; Palmer, C. G.

    Glyphosate based herbicides, including Roundup®, are frequently used in the chemical control of weeds and invading alien plant species in South Africa. These herbicides ultimately get into water courses directly or indirectly through processes such as drifting, leaching, surface runoff and foliar spray of aquatic nuisance plants. Despite their widespread use, no water quality guideline exists to protect indigenous South African freshwater organisms from the toxic effects of these herbicides. The toxicity of the herbicide Roundup® was assessed using three different life stages of the freshwater shrimp Caridina nilotica, a prevalent species in South African freshwater ecosystems. Neonate (<7 days post hatching (dph)), juvenile (>7 dph and <20 dph) and adult (>40 dph) shrimps were exposed to varying concentrations (1.5-50 mg/L acid equivalence (a.e.)) of the herbicide in 48 and 96 h acute toxicity tests in order to determine the most sensitive life-stage. The results showed neonates to be more sensitive to Roundup® than both juveniles and adults with mean 96 h LC 50 values of 2.5, 7.0 and 25.3 mg/L a.e. respectively. The estimated 96 h LC 50 of neonates is much lower than the application rate (20-30 mg/L a.e.), although the application’s impact will depend on the dilution rate of the applied concentration in the environment. All three life-stages of unexposed animals exhibited active and coordinated movement but exposed shrimps were erratic and slow in their movements, with neonates showing most of these behavioral irregularities. This study shows that low levels of the herbicide Roundup® may adversely affect C. nilotica health and survival. Thus, the herbicide should be carefully managed to minimize any negative impact on non-target freshwater organisms.

  1. A Powerful Molecular Engineering Tool Provided Efficient Chlamydomonas Mutants as Bio-Sensing Elements for Herbicides Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lambreva, Maya D.; Giardi, Maria Teresa; Rambaldi, Irene; Antonacci, Amina; Pastorelli, Sandro; Bertalan, Ivo; Husu, Ivan; Johanningmeier, Udo; Rea, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    This study was prompted by increasing concerns about ecological damage and human health threats derived by persistent contamination of water and soil with herbicides, and emerging of bio-sensing technology as powerful, fast and efficient tool for the identification of such hazards. This work is aimed at overcoming principal limitations negatively affecting the whole-cell-based biosensors performance due to inadequate stability and sensitivity of the bio-recognition element. The novel bio-sensing elements for the detection of herbicides were generated exploiting the power of molecular engineering in order to improve the performance of photosynthetic complexes. The new phenotypes were produced by an in vitro directed evolution strategy targeted at the photosystem II (PSII) D1 protein of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, using exposures to radical-generating ionizing radiation as selection pressure. These tools proved successful to identify D1 mutations conferring enhanced stability, tolerance to free-radical-associated stress and competence for herbicide perception. Long-term stability tests of PSII performance revealed the mutants capability to deal with oxidative stress-related conditions. Furthermore, dose-response experiments indicated the strains having increased sensitivity or resistance to triazine and urea type herbicides with I50 values ranging from 6×10−8 M to 2×10−6 M. Besides stressing the relevance of several amino acids for PSII photochemistry and herbicide sensing, the possibility to improve the specificity of whole-cell-based biosensors, via coupling herbicide-sensitive with herbicide-resistant strains, was verified. PMID:23613953

  2. Stress reactions in Vitis vinifera L. following soil application of the herbicide flumioxazin.

    PubMed

    Saladin, Gaëlle; Magné, Christian; Clément, Christophe

    2003-10-01

    In order to evaluate the stress effects of flumioxazin (fmx) on grapevine, a non-target plant (Vitis vinifera L.), physiological parameters such as carbohydrate content, water status or nitrogenous metabolites were investigated on fruiting cuttings and plants grown in vineyard. In the leaves of cuttings, the soil-applied herbicide induced stress manifestations including a decrease of the dry weight percentage and the soluble carbohydrate content during the first week after treatment. Thereafter, a decrease of the osmotic potential was observed, as well as a decrease of total protein content and a parallel accumulation of free amino acids, including proline. Altogether, these results suggest that soil-applied fmx induced a stress in grapevines, leading to leaf proteolysis. However, this stress was partially recovered 3 weeks after herbicide application, suggesting that the cuttings were capable to adapt to the fmx exposure. In the vineyard, the flumioxazin effects were still significant 5 months after the treatment, particularly in the CH cv. They included a decrease of the leaf dry weight percentage and soluble carbohydrate content, as well as an increase of the osmotic potential. The decrease of leaf soluble carbohydrates may have dramatic consequences for the berry growth and the reserve constitution. Moreover, treated plants were characterized by a decrease of the free amino acid content and an accumulation of ammonium, while the protein level did not significantly increase, suggesting a degradation of amino acids. The alteration of carbon and nitrogen status after herbicide treatment may affect the grapevine vigour in a long term.

  3. Virtual imprinting as a tool to design efficient MIPs for photosynthesis-inhibiting herbicides.

    PubMed

    Breton, Florent; Rouillon, Regis; Piletska, Elena V; Karim, Kal; Guerreiro, Antonio; Chianella, Iva; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2007-04-15

    Molecular modelling and computational screening were used to identify functional monomers capable of interacting with several different photosynthesis-inhibiting herbicides. The process involved the design of a virtual library of molecular models of functional monomers containing polymerizable residues and residues able to interact with the template through electrostatic, hydrophobic, Van der Waals forces and dipole-dipole interactions. Each of the entries in the virtual library was probed for its possible interactions with molecular models of the template molecules. It was anticipated that the monomers giving the highest binding score would represent good candidates for the preparation of affinity polymers. Strong interactions were computationally determined between acidic functional monomers like methacrylic acid (MAA) or itaconic acid (IA) with triazines, and between vinylimidazole with bentazone and bromoxynil. Nevertheless, weaker interactions were seen with phenylureas. The corresponding blank polymers were prepared using the selected monomers and tested in the solid phase extraction (SPE) of herbicides from chloroform solutions. A good correlation was found between the binding score of the monomers and the affinities of the corresponding polymers. The use of computationally designed blanks can potentially eliminate the need for molecular imprinting, (adding a template to the monomer mixture to create specific binding sites). Data also showed that some monomers have a natural selectivity for some herbicides, which can be further enhanced by imprinting. Thus, in regard to retention on the blank polymer, we can estimate if the resulting imprinted polymer will be effective or not.

  4. Maize, switchgrass, and ponderosa pine biochar added to soil increased herbicide sorption and decreased herbicide efficacy.

    PubMed

    Clay, Sharon A; Krack, Kaitlynn K; Bruggeman, Stephanie A; Papiernik, Sharon; Schumacher, Thomas E

    2016-08-02

    Biochar, a by-product of pyrolysis made from a wide array of plant biomass when producing biofuels, is a proposed soil amendment to improve soil health. This study measured herbicide sorption and efficacy when soils were treated with low (1% w/w) or high (10% w/w) amounts of biochar manufactured from different feedstocks [maize (Zea mays) stover, switchgrass (Panicum vigatum), and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa)], and treated with different post-processing techniques. Twenty-four hour batch equilibration measured sorption of (14)C-labelled atrazine or 2,4-D to two soil types with and without biochar amendments. Herbicide efficacy was measured with and without biochar using speed of seed germination tests of sensitive species. Biochar amended soils sorbed more herbicide than untreated soils, with major differences due to biochar application rate but minor differences due to biochar type or post-process handling technique. Biochar presence increased the speed of seed germination compared with herbicide alone addition. These data indicate that biochar addition to soil can increase herbicide sorption and reduce efficacy. Evaluation for site-specific biochar applications may be warranted to obtain maximal benefits without compromising other agronomic practices.

  5. Herbicide and pesticide occurrence in the soils of children's playgrounds in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    PubMed

    Sapcanin, Aida; Cakal, Mirsada; Imamovic, Belma; Salihovic, Mirsada; Pehlic, Ekrem; Jacimovic, Zeljko; Jancan, Gordan

    2016-08-01

    Pesticide pollution in Sarajevo public playgrounds is an important health and environmental issue, and the lack of information about it is causing concerns amongst the general population as well as researchers. Since children are in direct contact with surface soils on children's playgrounds, such soils should be much more carefully examined. Furthermore, herbicides and pesticides get transmitted from soil surfaces brought from outside the urban areas, or they get dispersed following their direct applications in urban areas. Infants' and children's health can be directly affected by polluted soils because of the inherent toxicity and widespread use of the different pesticides in urban environments such as playgrounds. In addition to that, the presence of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) wood preservative pesticide found as soil pollutant in playing equipment was also documented. Soil samples from playgrounds were collected and analyzed for triazines, carbamates, dithiocarbamates, phenolic herbicides and organochlorine pesticides. Samples for the determination of heavy metals Cu, Cr and As were prepared by microwave-assisted acid digestion, and the findings were determined by using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer. Triazines, carbamates, dithiocarbamates, chlorphenoxy compounds, phenolic herbicides, organochlorine pesticides and organotin compounds were detected in playground soils and their determined concentrations (mg/kg) were respectively found as follows: <0.005, <0.05, <0.5, < 0.4, <0.1, <0.001 and <0.004. The determined contents (mg/kg) of Cu, Cr and As were in the ranges from 16.77 to 80.21, from 7.14 to 15.45 and from 3.31 to 4.43, respectively. Our preliminary results raise concerns about potential adverse effects of herbicides and pesticides on human health, which strengthens the case for a more preventative and protective approach to the uncontrolled presence of herbicides and pesticides in Sarajevo's playground soils.

  6. Potential mineralization of four herbicides in a ground water--fed wetland area.

    PubMed

    Larsen, L; Jørgensen, C; Aamand, J

    2001-01-01

    Herbicides may leach from agricultural fields into ground water feeding adjacent wetlands. However, only little is known of the fate of herbicides in wetland areas. The purpose of the study was to examine the potential of a riparian fen to mineralize herbides that could leach from an adjacent catchment area. Slurries were prepared from sediment and ground water collected from different parts of a wetland representing different redox conditions. The slurries were amended with O2, NO3-, SO4(2-), and CO2, or CO2 alone as electron acceptors to simulate the in situ conditions and their ability to mineralize the herbides mecoprop, metsulfuron-methyl, isoproturon and atrazine. In addition, the abundance of bacteria able to utilize O2, NO3-, SO4(2-) + CO2, and CO2 as electron acceptors was investigated along with the O2-reducing and methanogenic potential of the sediment. The recalcitrance to bacterial degradation depended on both the type of herbicide and the redox conditions pertaining. Mecoprop was the most readily degraded herbicide, with 36% of [ring-U-14C]mecoprop being mineralized to 14CO2 under aerobic conditions after 473 d. In comparison, approximately 29% of [phenyl-U-14C]metsulfuron-methyl and 16% of [ring-U-14C]isoproturon mineralized in aerobic slurries during the same period. Surprisingly, 8 to 13% of mecoprop also mineralized under anaerobic conditions. Neither metsulfuron-methyl nor isoproturon were mineralized under anaerobic conditions and atrazine was not mineralized under any of the redox conditions examined. The present study is the first to report mineralization of meco-prop in ground water in a wetland area, and the first to report mineralization of a phenoxyalcanoic acid herbicide under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

  7. Aryl Hydroxylation of the Herbicide Diclofop by a Wheat Cytochrome P-450 Monooxygenase 1

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerlin, Alfred; Durst, Francis

    1992-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Etoile de Choisy) microsomes catalyzed the cytochrome P-450-dependent oxidation of the herbicide diclofop to three hydroxy-diclofop isomers. Hydroxylation was predominant at carbon 4, with migration of chlorine to carbon 5 (67%) and carbon 3 (25%). The 2,4-dichloro-5-hydroxy isomer was identified as a minor reaction product (8%). Substrate-specificity studies showed that the activity was not inhibited or was weakly inhibited by a range of xenobiotic or physiological cytochrome P-450 substrates, with the exception of lauric acid. Wheat microsomes also catalyze the metabolism of the herbicides chlorsulfuron, chlortoluron, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and of the model substrate ethoxycoumarin, as well as the hydroxylation of the endogenous substrates cinnamic and lauric acids. Treatments of wheat seedlings with phenobarbital or the safener naphthalic acid anhydride enhanced the cytochrome P-450 content of the microsomes and all related activities except that of cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase, which was reduced. The stimulation patterns of diclofop aryl hydroxylase and lauric acid hydroxylase were similar, in contrast with the other activities tested. Lauric acid inhibited competitively (Ki = 9 μm) the oxidation of diclofop and reciprocally. The similarity of diclofop aryl hydroxylase and lauric acid hydroxylase was further investigated by alternative substrate kinetics, autocatalytic inactivation, and computer-aided molecular modelisation studies, and the results suggest that both reactions are catalyzed by the same cytochrome P-450 isozyme. PMID:16653070

  8. Synonymous mutation gene design to overexpress ACCase in creeping bentgrass to obtain resistance to ACCase-inhibiting herbicides.

    PubMed

    Heckart, Douglas L; Schwartz, Brian M; Raymer, Paul L; Parrott, Wayne A

    2016-08-01

    Overexpression of a native gene can cause expression of both introduced and native genes to be silenced by posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) mechanisms. PTGS mechanisms rely on sequence identity between the transgene and native genes; therefore, designing genes with mutations that do not cause amino acid changes, known as synonymous mutations, may avoid PTGS. For proof of concept, the sequence of acetyl-coA carboxylase (ACCase) from creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) was altered with synonymous mutations. A native bentgrass ACCase was cloned and used as a template for the modified gene. Wild-type (WT) and modified genes were further modified with a non-synonymous mutation, coding for an isoleucine to leucine substitution at position 1781, known to confer resistance to ACCase-inhibiting herbicides. Five-hundred calli of creeping bentgrass 'Penn A-4' were inoculated with Agrobacterium containing either the WT or modified genes, with or without the herbicide-resistance mutation. Six herbicide-resistant-transgenic events containing the modified gene with the 1781 mutation were obtained. Transcription of the modified ACCase was confirmed in transgenic plants, showing that gene-silencing mechanisms were avoided. Transgenic plants were confirmed to be resistant to the ACCase-inhibiting herbicide, sethoxydim, providing evidence that the modified gene was functional. The result is a novel herbicide-resistance trait and shows that overexpression of a native enzyme with a gene designed with synonymous mutations is possible.

  9. Molecular basis of multiple resistance to ACCase- and ALS-inhibiting herbicides in Alopecurus japonicus from China.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yaling; Liu, Weitang; Guo, Wenlei; Li, Lingxu; Yuan, Guohui; Du, Long; Wang, Jinxin

    2016-01-01

    Fenoxaprop-P-ethyl-resistant Alopecurus japonicus has become a recurring problem in winter wheat fields in eastern China. Growers have resorted to using mesosulfuron-methyl, an acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicide, to control this weed. A single A. japonicus population (AH-15) resistant to fenoxaprop-P-ethyl and mesosulfuron-methyl was found in Anhui Province, China. The results of whole-plant dose-response experiments showed that AH-15 has evolved high-level resistance to fenoxaprop-P-ethyl (95.96-fold) and mesosulfuron-methyl (39.87-fold). It was shown via molecular analysis that resistance to both fenoxaprop-P-ethyl and mesosulfuron-methyl was due to an amino acid substitution of Ile1781 to Leu in acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) and a substitution of Trp 574 to Leu in ALS, respectively. Whole-plant bioassays indicated that the AH-15 population was resistant to the ACCase herbicides clodinafop-propargyl, clethodim, sethoxydim and pinoxaden as well as the ALS herbicides pyroxsulam, flucarbazone-Na and imazethapyr, but susceptible to the ACCase herbicide haloxyfop-R-methyl. This work reports for the first time that A. japonicus has developed resistance to ACCase- and ALS-inhibiting herbicides due to target site mutations in the ACCase and ALS genes.

  10. Herbicide resistances in Amaranthus tuberculatus: a call for new options.

    PubMed

    Tranel, Patrick J; Riggins, Chance W; Bell, Michael S; Hager, Aaron G

    2011-06-08

    Amaranthus tuberculatus is a major weed of crop fields in the midwestern United States. Making this weed particularly problematic to manage is its demonstrated ability to evolve resistance to herbicides. Herbicides to which A. tuberculatus has evolved resistance are photosystem II inhibitors, acetolactate synthase inhibitors, protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitors, and glyphosate. Many populations of A. tuberculatus contain more than one of these resistances, severely limiting the options for effective herbicide control. A survey of multiple-herbicide resistance in A. tuberculatus revealed that all populations resistant to glyphosate contained resistance to acetolactate synthase inhibitors, and 40% contained resistance to protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitors. The occurrences of multiple-herbicide resistances in A. tuberculatus illustrate the need for continued herbicide discovery efforts and/or the development of new strategies for weed management.

  11. Hazard and risk of herbicides for marine microalgae.

    PubMed

    Sjollema, Sascha B; Martínezgarcía, Gema; van der Geest, Harm G; Kraak, Michiel H S; Booij, Petra; Vethaak, A Dick; Admiraal, Wim

    2014-04-01

    Due to their specific effect on photosynthesis, herbicides pose a potential threat to coastal and estuarine microalgae. However, comprehensive understanding of the hazard and risk of these contaminants is currently lacking. Therefore the aim of the present study was to investigate the toxic effects of four ubiquitous herbicides (atrazine, diuron, Irgarol(®)1051 and isoproturon) and herbicide mixtures on marine microalgae. Using a Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM) fluorometry based bioassay we demonstrated a clear species and herbicide specific toxicity and showed that the current environmental legislation does not protect algae sufficiently against diuron and isoproturon. Although a low actual risk of herbicides in the field was demonstrated, monitoring data revealed that concentrations occasionally reach potential effect levels. Hence it cannot be excluded that herbicides contribute to observed changes in phytoplankton species composition in coastal waters, but this is likely to occur only occasionally.

  12. Herbicide Metabolites in Surface Water and Groundwater: Introduction and Overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Meyer, M.T.

    1996-01-01

    Several future research topics for herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water are outlined in this chapter. They are herbicide usage, chemical analysis of metabolites, and fate and transport of metabolites in surface and ground water. These three ideas follow the themes in this book, which are the summary of a symposium of the American Chemical Society on herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water. First, geographic information systems allow the spatial distribution of herbicide-use data to be combined with geochemical information on fate and transport of herbicides. Next these two types of information are useful in predicting the kinds of metabolites present and their probable distribution in surface and ground water. Finally, methods development efforts may be focused on these specific target analytes. This chapter discusses these three concepts and provides an introduction to this book on the analysis, chemistry, and fate and transport of herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water.

  13. Chromatographic methods for analysis of triazine herbicides.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Hana Hassan; Elbashir, Abdalla A; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to different detectors, and in combination with different sample extraction methods, are most widely used for analysis of triazine herbicides in different environmental samples. Nowadays, many variations and modifications of extraction and sample preparation methods such as solid-phase microextraction (SPME), hollow fiber-liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME), stir bar sportive extraction (SBSE), headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet (DLLME-SFO), ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME), and others have been introduced and developed to obtain sensitive and accurate methods for the analysis of these hazardous compounds. In this review, several analytical properties such as linearity, sensitivity, repeatability, and accuracy for each developed method are discussed, and excellent results were obtained for the most of developed methods combined with GC and HPLC techniques for the analysis of triazine herbicides. This review gives an overview of recent publications of the application of GC and HPLC for analysis of triazine herbicides residues in various samples.

  14. Electrochemical degradation and mineralization of glyphosate herbicide.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nam; Drogui, Patrick; Doan, Tuan Linh; Le, Thanh Son; Nguyen, Hoai Chau

    2017-01-23

    The presence of herbicide is a concern for both human and ecological health. Glyphosate is occasionally detected as water contaminants in agriculture areas where the herbicide is used extensively. The removal of glyphosate in synthetic solution using advanced oxidation process is a possible approach for remediation of contaminated waters. The ability of electrochemical oxidation for the degradation and mineralization of glyphosate herbicide was investigated using Ti/PbO2 anode. The current intensity, treatment time, initial concentration and pH of solution are the influent parameters on the degradation efficiency. An experimental design methodology was applied to determine the optimal condition (in terms of cost/effectiveness) based on response surface methodology. Glyphosate concentration (C0 = 16.9 mg L(-1)) decreased up to 0.6 mg L(-1) when the optimal conditions were imposed (current intensity of 4.77A and treatment time of 173 min). The removal efficiencies of glyphosate and total organic carbon were 95 ±16% and 90.31%, respectively. This work demonstrates that electrochemical oxidation is a promising process for degradation and mineralization of glyphosate.

  15. Phytotoxicity of four photosystem II herbicides to tropical seagrasses.

    PubMed

    Flores, Florita; Collier, Catherine J; Mercurio, Philip; Negri, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    Coastal waters of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are contaminated with agricultural pesticides, including the photosystem II (PSII) herbicides which are the most frequently detected at the highest concentrations. Designed to control weeds, these herbicides are equally potent towards non-target marine species, and the close proximity of seagrass meadows to flood plumes has raised concerns that seagrasses may be the species most threatened by herbicides from runoff. While previous work has identified effects of PSII herbicides on the photophysiology, growth and mortality in seagrass, there is little comparative quantitative toxicity data for seagrass. Here we applied standard ecotoxicology protocols to quantify the concentrations of four priority PSII herbicides that inhibit photochemistry by 10, 20 and 50% (IC10, IC20 and IC50) over 72 h in two common seagrass species from the GBR lagoon. The photosystems of seagrasses Zosteramuelleri and Haloduleuninervis were shown to be generally more sensitive to the PSII herbicides Diuron, Atrazine, Hexazinone and Tebuthiuron than corals and tropical microalgae. The herbicides caused rapid inhibition of effective quantum yield (∆F/F m '), indicating reduced photosynthesis and maximum effective yields (Fv/Fm ) corresponding to chronic damage to PSII. The PSII herbicide concentrations which affected photosynthesis have been exceeded in the GBR lagoon and all of the herbicides inhibited photosynthesis at concentrations lower than current marine park guidelines. There is a strong likelihood that the impacts of light limitation from flood plumes and reduced photosynthesis from PSII herbicides exported in the same waters would combine to affect seagrass productivity. Given that PSII herbicides have been demonstrated to affect seagrass at environmental concentrations, we suggest that revision of environmental guidelines and further efforts to reduce PSII herbicide concentrations in floodwaters may both help protect seagrass meadows of

  16. Phytotoxicity of Four Photosystem II Herbicides to Tropical Seagrasses

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Florita; Collier, Catherine J.; Mercurio, Philip; Negri, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    Coastal waters of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are contaminated with agricultural pesticides, including the photosystem II (PSII) herbicides which are the most frequently detected at the highest concentrations. Designed to control weeds, these herbicides are equally potent towards non-target marine species, and the close proximity of seagrass meadows to flood plumes has raised concerns that seagrasses may be the species most threatened by herbicides from runoff. While previous work has identified effects of PSII herbicides on the photophysiology, growth and mortality in seagrass, there is little comparative quantitative toxicity data for seagrass. Here we applied standard ecotoxicology protocols to quantify the concentrations of four priority PSII herbicides that inhibit photochemistry by 10, 20 and 50% (IC10, IC20 and IC50) over 72 h in two common seagrass species from the GBR lagoon. The photosystems of seagrasses Zosteramuelleri and Haloduleuninervis were shown to be generally more sensitive to the PSII herbicides Diuron, Atrazine, Hexazinone and Tebuthiuron than corals and tropical microalgae. The herbicides caused rapid inhibition of effective quantum yield (∆F/Fm′), indicating reduced photosynthesis and maximum effective yields (Fv/Fm) corresponding to chronic damage to PSII. The PSII herbicide concentrations which affected photosynthesis have been exceeded in the GBR lagoon and all of the herbicides inhibited photosynthesis at concentrations lower than current marine park guidelines. There is a strong likelihood that the impacts of light limitation from flood plumes and reduced photosynthesis from PSII herbicides exported in the same waters would combine to affect seagrass productivity. Given that PSII herbicides have been demonstrated to affect seagrass at environmental concentrations, we suggest that revision of environmental guidelines and further efforts to reduce PSII herbicide concentrations in floodwaters may both help protect seagrass meadows of

  17. Phytotoxicity of Delayed Applications of Dinitroaniline Herbicides in Strip-Tillage Peanut Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dinitroaniline herbicides are typically applied preplant incorporated or preemergence (PRE) immediately after seeding peanut. Situations frequently arise where dinitroaniline herbicides are not applied in a timely manner in strip-tillage peanut production. In these cases, dinitroaniline herbicides...

  18. Multiple-herbicide resistance in Echinochloa crus-galli var. formosensis, an allohexaploid weed species, in dry-seeded rice.

    PubMed

    Iwakami, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Masato; Matsushima, Ken-ichi; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Hamamura, Kenshiro; Uchino, Akira

    2015-03-01

    Biotypes of Echinochloa crus-galli var. formosensis with resistance to cyhalofop-butyl, an acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitor, have been found in dry-seeded rice fields in Okayama, Japan. We collected two lines with suspected resistance (Ecf27 and Ecf108) from dry-seeded rice fields and investigated their sensitivity to cyhalofop-butyl and other herbicides. Both lines exhibited approximately 7-fold higher resistance to cyhalofop-butyl than a susceptible line. Ecf108 was susceptible to penoxsulam, an acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitor. On the other hand, Ecf27 showed resistance to penoxsulam and two other ALS inhibitors: propyrisulfuron and pyriminobac-methyl. The alternative herbicides butachlor, thiobencarb, and bispyribac-sodium effectively controlled both lines. To examine the molecular mechanisms of resistance, we amplified and sequenced the target-site encoding genes in Ecf27, Ecf108, and susceptible lines. Partial sequences of six ACCase genes and full-length sequences of three ALS genes were examined. One of the ACCase gene sequences encodes a truncated aberrant protein due to a frameshift mutation in both lines. Comparisons of the genes among Ecf27, Ecf108, and the susceptible lines revealed that none of the ACCases and ALSs in Ecf27 and Ecf108 have amino acid substitutions that are known to confer herbicide resistance, although a single amino acid substitution was found in each of three ACCases in Ecf108. Our study reveals the existence of a multiple-herbicide resistant biotype of E. crus-galli var. formosensis at Okayama, Japan that shows resistance to cyhalofop-butyl and several ALS inhibitors. We also found a biotype that is resistant only to cyhalofop-butyl among the tested herbicides. The resistance mechanisms are likely to be non-target-site based, at least in the multiple-herbicide resistant biotype.

  19. Uses of thaxtomin and thaxtomin compositions as herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Koivunen, Marja; Marrone, Pamela

    2016-12-27

    There is a need for a selective, low-risk herbicide that can be used to control weeds in cereal cultures and turf. The present invention discloses that a bacterial secondary metabolite, thaxtomin and optionally another herbicide is an effective herbicide on broadleaved, sedge and grass weeds. Thaxtomin A and structurally similar compounds can be used as natural herbicides to control the germination and growth of weeds in cereal, turf grass, Timothy grass and pasture grass cultures with no phytotoxicity to these crops. As a natural, non-toxic compound, thaxtomin can be used as a safe alternative for weed control in both conventional and organic farming and gardening systems.

  20. Non-target effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide on Common toad larvae (Bufo bufo, Amphibia) and associated algae are altered by temperature

    PubMed Central

    Baier, Fabian; Gruber, Edith; Bondar-Kunze, Elisabeth; Ivanković, Marina; Mentler, Axel; Brühl, Carsten A.; Spangl, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Background Glyphosate-based herbicides are the most widely used pesticides in agriculture, horticulture, municipalities and private gardens that can potentially contaminate nearby water bodies inhabited by amphibians and algae. Moreover, the development and diversity of these aquatic organisms could also be affected by human-induced climate change that might lead to more periods with extreme temperatures. However, to what extent non-target effects of these herbicides on amphibians or algae are altered by varying temperature is not well known. Methods We studied effects of five concentrations of the glyphosate-based herbicide formulation Roundup PowerFlex (0, 1.5, 3, 4 mg acid equivalent glyphosate L−1 as a one time addition and a pulse treatment of totally 4 mg a.e. glyphosate L−1) on larval development of Common toads (Bufo bufo, L.; Amphibia: Anura) and associated algae communities under two temperature regimes (15 vs. 20 °C). Results Herbicide contamination reduced tail growth (−8%), induced the occurrence of tail deformations (i.e. lacerated or crooked tails) and reduced algae diversity (−6%). Higher water temperature increased tadpole growth (tail and body length (tl/bl) +66%, length-to-width ratio +4%) and decreased algae diversity (−21%). No clear relation between herbicide concentrations and tadpole growth or algae density or diversity was observed. Interactive effects of herbicides and temperature affected growth parameters, tail deformation and tadpole mortality indicating that the herbicide effects are temperature-dependent. Remarkably, herbicide-temperature interactions resulted in deformed tails in 34% of all herbicide treated tadpoles at 15 °C whereas no tail deformations were observed for the herbicide-free control at 15 °C or any tadpole at 20 °C; herbicide-induced mortality was higher at 15 °C but lower at 20 °C. Discussion These herbicide- and temperature-induced changes may have decided effects on ecological interactions in

  1. Fenton's treatment of actual agriculture runoff water containing herbicides.

    PubMed

    Sangami, Sanjeev; Manu, Basavaraju

    2017-01-01

    This research was to study the efficiency of the Fenton's treatment process for the removal of three herbicides, namely 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D), ametryn and dicamba from the sugarcane field runoff water. The treatment process was designed with the Taguchi approach by varying the four factors such as H2O2/COD (1-3.5), H2O2/Fe(2+) (5-50), pH (2-5) and reaction time (30-240 min) as independent variables. Influence of these parameters on chemical oxygen demand (COD), ametryn, dicamba and 2,4-D removal efficiencies (dependent variables) were investigated by performing signal to noise ratio and other statistical analysis. The optimum conditions were found to be H2O2/COD: 2.125, H2O2/Fe(2+): 27.5, pH: 3.5 and reaction time of 135 min for removal efficiencies of 100% for ametryn, 95.42% for dicamba, 88.2% for 2,4-D and with 75% of overall COD removal efficiencies. However, the percentage contribution of H2O2/COD ratio was observed to be significant among all four independent variables and were 44.16%, 67.57%, 51.85% and 50.66% for %COD, ametryn, dicamba and 2,4-D removal efficiencies, respectively. The maximum removal of herbicides was observed with the H2O2 dosage of 5.44 mM and Fe(2+) dosage of 0.12 mM at pH 3.5.

  2. Assessment of herbicide leaching risk in two tropical soils of Reunion Island (France).

    PubMed

    Bernard, H; Chabalier, P F; Chopart, J L; Legube, B; Vauclin, M

    2005-01-01

    Application of organic chemicals to a newly irrigated sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) area located in the semiarid western part of Reunion Island has prompted local regulatory agencies to determine their potential to contaminate ground water resources. For that purpose, simple indices known as the ground water ubiquity score (Gustafson index, GUS), the retardation factor (RF), the attenuation factor (AF), and the log-transformed attenuation factor (AFT) were employed to assess the potential leaching of five herbicides in two soil types. The herbicides were alachlor [2-chloro-2',6'-diethyl-N-(methoxy-methy) acetanilide], atrazine [2-chloro-4-(ethylamino)-6-(isopropylamino)-1,3,5-triazine], diuron [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea], 2,4-D [(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) acetic-acid], and triclopyr [((3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridyl)oxy) acetic-acid]. The soil types were Vertic (BV) and Andepts (BA) Inceptisols, which are present throughout the Saint-Gilles study area on Reunion Island. To calculate the indices, herbicide sorption (K(oc)) and dissipation (half-life, DT50) properties were determined from controlled batch experiments. Water fluxes below the root zone were estimated by a capacity-based model driven by a rainfall frequency analysis performed on a 13-yr data series. The results show a lower risk of herbicide leaching than in temperate regions due to the tropical conditions of the study area. Higher temperatures and the presence of highly adsorbent soils may explain smaller DT50 and higher K(oc) values than those reported in literature concerning temperate environments. Based on the RF values, only 2,4-D and triclopyr appear mobile in the BV soil, with all the other herbicides being classified from moderately to very immobile in both soils. The AFT values indicate that the potential leaching of the five herbicides can be considered as unlikely, except during the cyclonic period (about 40 d/yr) when there is a 2.5% probability of recharge rates equal to or

  3. DNA analysis of herbarium Specimens of the grass weed Alopecurus myosuroides reveals herbicide resistance pre-dated herbicides.

    PubMed

    Délye, Christophe; Deulvot, Chrystel; Chauvel, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) alleles carrying one point mutation that confers resistance to herbicides have been identified in arable grass weed populations where resistance has evolved under the selective pressure of herbicides. In an effort to determine whether herbicide resistance evolves from newly arisen mutations or from standing genetic variation in weed populations, we used herbarium specimens of the grass weed Alopecurus myosuroides to seek mutant ACCase alleles carrying an isoleucine-to-leucine substitution at codon 1781 that endows herbicide resistance. These specimens had been collected between 1788 and 1975, i.e., prior to the commercial release of herbicides inhibiting ACCase. Among the 734 specimens investigated, 685 yielded DNA suitable for PCR. Genotyping the ACCase locus using the derived Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence (dCAPS) technique identified one heterozygous mutant specimen that had been collected in 1888. Occurrence of a mutant codon encoding a leucine residue at codon 1781 at the heterozygous state was confirmed in this specimen by sequencing, clearly demonstrating that resistance to herbicides can pre-date herbicides in weeds. We conclude that point mutations endowing resistance to herbicides without having associated deleterious pleiotropic effects can be present in weed populations as part of their standing genetic variation, in frequencies higher than the mutation frequency, thereby facilitating their subsequent selection by herbicide applications.

  4. Variation in amphibian response to two formulations of glyphosate-based herbicides.

    PubMed

    Edge, Christopher; Gahl, Meghan; Thompson, Dean; Hao, Chunyan; Houlahan, Jeff

    2014-11-01

    Variation in toxicity among formulations and species makes it difficult to extrapolate results to all species and all formulations of herbicides. The authors exposed larval wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) from 4 populations to 2 glyphosate-based herbicides, Roundup Weed and Grass Control® and Roundup WeatherMax®. The 96-h median lethal concentration values for both formulations varied among the populations (Roundup Weed and Grass Control, 0.14 mg acid equivalents (a.e.)/L to 1.10 mg a.e./L; Roundup WeatherMax, 4.94 mg a.e./L to 8.26 mg a.e./L), demonstrating that toxicity varies among the formulations and that susceptibility may differ among populations.

  5. Hyperspectral sensing to detect the impact of herbicide drift on cotton growth and yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, L. A.; Apan, A.; Werth, J.

    2016-10-01

    Yield loss in crops is often associated with plant disease or external factors such as environment, water supply and nutrient availability. Improper agricultural practices can also introduce risks into the equation. Herbicide drift can be a combination of improper practices and environmental conditions which can create a potential yield loss. As traditional assessment of plant damage is often imprecise and time consuming, the ability of remote and proximal sensing techniques to monitor various bio-chemical alterations in the plant may offer a faster, non-destructive and reliable approach to predict yield loss caused by herbicide drift. This paper examines the prediction capabilities of partial least squares regression (PLS-R) models for estimating yield. Models were constructed with hyperspectral data of a cotton crop sprayed with three simulated doses of the phenoxy herbicide 2,4-D at three different growth stages. Fibre quality, photosynthesis, conductance, and two main hormones, indole acetic acid (IAA) and abscisic acid (ABA) were also analysed. Except for fibre quality and ABA, Spearman correlations have shown that these variables were highly affected by the chemical. Four PLS-R models for predicting yield were developed according to four timings of data collection: 2, 7, 14 and 28 days after the exposure (DAE). As indicated by the model performance, the analysis revealed that 7 DAE was the best time for data collection purposes (RMSEP = 2.6 and R2 = 0.88), followed by 28 DAE (RMSEP = 3.2 and R2 = 0.84). In summary, the results of this study show that it is possible to accurately predict yield after a simulated herbicide drift of 2,4-D on a cotton crop, through the analysis of hyperspectral data, thereby providing a reliable, effective and non-destructive alternative based on the internal response of the cotton leaves.

  6. Degradation of the Phosphonate Herbicide Glyphosate by Arthrobacter atrocyaneus ATCC 13752

    PubMed Central

    Pipke, Rüdiger; Amrhein, Nikolaus

    1988-01-01

    Of nine authentic Arthrobacter strains tested, only A. atrocyaneus ATCC 13752 was capable of using the herbicide glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] as its sole source of phosphorus. Contrary to the previously isolated Arthrobacter sp. strain GLP-1, which degrades glyphosate via sarcosine, A. atrocyaneus metabolized glyphosate to aminomethylphosphonic acid. The carbon of aminomethylphosphonic acid was entirely converted to CO2. This is the first report on glyphosate degradation by a bacterial strain without previous selection for glyphosate utilization as a source of phosphorus. PMID:16347639

  7. Racer as a potential organic herbicide: Application volumes and herbicide rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Racer (40% ammonium pelargonate/ammonium nonanoate) is labeled for non-food use and efforts are currently underway to label it as a bio-herbicide for organically grown food crops. The main component of Racer is ammonium pelargonate which occurs in nature and is primarily formed from biodegradation ...

  8. Herbicides and herbicide degradation products in upper midwest agricultural streams during august base-flow conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkhoff, S.J.; Lee, K.E.; Porter, S.D.; Terrio, P.J.; Thurman, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Herbicide concentrations in streams of the U.S. Midwest have been shown to decrease through the growing season due to a variety of chemical and physical factors. The occurrence of herbicide degradation products at the end of the growing season is not well known. This study was conducted to document the occurrence of commonly used herbicides and their degradation products in Illinois, Iowa, and Minnesota streams during base-flow conditions in August 1997. Atrazine, the most frequently detected herbicide (94%), was present at relatively low concentrations (median 0.17 μg L−1). Metolachlor was detected in 59% and cyanazine in 37% of the samples. Seven of nine compounds detected in more than 50% of the samples were degradation products. The total concentration of the degradation products (median of 4.4 μg L−1) was significantly greater than the total concentration of parent compounds (median of 0.26 μg L−1). Atrazine compounds were present less frequently and in significantly smaller concentrations in streams draining watersheds with soils developed on less permeable tills than in watersheds with soils developed on more permeable loess. The detection and concentration of triazine compounds was negatively correlated with antecedent rainfall (April–July). In contrast, acetanalide compounds were positively correlated with antecedant rainfall in late spring and early summer that may transport the acetanalide degradates into ground water and subsequently into nearby streams. The distribution of atrazine degradation products suggests regional differences in atrazine degradation processes.

  9. Effect of herbicide adjuvants on the biodegradation rate of the methylthiotriazine herbicide prometryn.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bárcena, José Fernando; Ahuatzi-Chacón, Deifilia; Castillo-Martínez, Karla Lizzette; Ruiz-Ordaz, Nora; Galíndez-Mayer, Juvencio; Juárez-Ramírez, Cleotilde; Ramos-Monroy, Oswaldo

    2014-06-01

    A microbial community, selected by its ability to degrade triazinic herbicides was acclimatized by successive transfers in batch cultures. Initially, its ability to degrade prometryn, was evaluated using free cells or cells attached to fragments of a porous support. As carbon, nitrogen and sulfur sources, prometryn, (98.8 % purity), or Gesagard, a herbicide formulation containing 44.5 % prometryn and 65.5 % of adjuvants, were used. In batch cultures, a considerable delay in the degradation of prometryn, presumptively caused by the elevated concentration of inhibitory adjuvants, occurred. When pure prometryn was used, volumetric removal rates remarkably higher than those obtained with the herbicide formulation were estimated by fitting the raw experimental data to sigmoidal decay models, and differentiating them. When the microbial consortium was immobilized in a continuously operated biofilm reactor, the negative effect of adjuvants on the rate and removal efficiency of prometryn could not be detected. Using the herbicide formulation, the consortium showed volumetric removal rates greater than 20 g m(-3) h(-1), with prometryn removal efficiencies of 100 %. The predominant bacterial strains isolated from the microbial consortium were Microbacterium sp., Enterobacter sp., Acinetobacter sp., and Flavobacterium sp. Finally, by comparison of the prometryn removal rates with others reported in the literature, it can be concluded that the use of microbial consortia immobilized in a biofilm reactor operated in continuous regime offer better results than batch cultures of pure microbial strains.

  10. Sarmentine, a natural herbicide from Piper species with multiple herbicide mechanisms of action

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sarmentine, 1-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-(2E,4E)-2,4-decadien-1-one, is a natural amide isolated from the fruits of Piper species. The compound has a number of interesting biological properties, including its broad-spectrum activity on weeds as a contact herbicide. Initial studies highlighted a similarity in ...

  11. Effects of the glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup WeatherMax® on metamorphosis of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) in natural wetlands.

    PubMed

    Lanctôt, C; Robertson, C; Navarro-Martín, L; Edge, C; Melvin, S D; Houlahan, J; Trudeau, V L

    2013-09-15

    Amphibian tadpoles develop in aquatic environments where they are susceptible to the effects of pesticides and other environmental contaminants. Glyphosate-based herbicides are currently the most commonly used herbicide in the world and have been shown to affect survival and development of tadpoles under laboratory and mesocosm conditions. In the present study, whole wetland manipulations were used to determine if exposure to an agriculturally relevant application of Roundup WeatherMax(®), a herbicide formulation containing the potassium salt of glyphosate and an undisclosed surfactant, influences the development of wood frog tadpoles (Lithobates sylvaticus) under natural conditions. Wetlands were divided in half with an impermeable curtain so that each wetland contained a treatment and control side. Tadpoles were exposed to two pulses of this herbicide at an environmentally realistic concentration (ERC, 0.21 mg acid equivalent (a.e.)/L) and the predicted maximum environmental concentration (PMEC, 2.89 mg a.e./L), after which abundance, growth, development, and mRNA levels of genes involved in tadpole metamorphosis were measured. Results present little evidence that exposure to this herbicide affects abundance, growth and development of wood frog tadpoles. As part of the Long-term Experimental Wetlands Area (LEWA) project, this research demonstrates that typical agricultural use of Roundup WeatherMax(®) poses minimal risk to larval amphibian development. However, our gene expression data (mRNA levels) suggests that glyphosate-based herbicides have the potential to alter hormonal pathways during tadpole development.

  12. Herbicide-resistant crop biotechnology: potential and pitfalls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide-resistant crops are an important agricultural biotechnology that can enable farmers to effectively control weeds without harming their crops. Glyphosate-resistant (i.e. Roundup Ready) crops have been the most commercially successful varieties of herbicide-resistant crops and have been plan...

  13. Confirmation of resistance to herbicides and evaluation of resistance levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As cases of resistance to herbicides escalate worldwide, there is increasing demand from growers to test for weed resistance and how to manage it. Scientists have developed resistance testing protocols for numerous herbicides and weed species. Growers need immediate answers and scientists are faced ...

  14. Growth Regulator Herbicides Prevent Invasive Annual Grass Seed Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Auxinic herbicides, such as 2,4-D and dicamba, that act as plant growth regulators are commonly used for broadleaf weed control in cereal crops (e.g. wheat, barley), grasslands, and non-croplands. If applied at later growth stages, while cereals are developing reproductive parts, the herbicides can...

  15. Comparison of herbicide runoff and volatilization fluxes over multiple years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface runoff and volatilization are two processes critical to herbicide off-site transport. To determine critical field scale processes influence off-site herbicide transport, runoff and turbulent vapor fluxes were simultaneously monitored on the same site for eight years. Site location, herbici...

  16. Herbicide volatilization trumps runoff losses, a multi-year investigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface runoff and volatilization are two processes critical to herbicide off-site transport. To determine the relevance of these off-site transport mechanisms, runoff and turbulent vapor fluxes were simultaneously monitored on the same site for eight years. Site location, herbicide formulations, ...

  17. Are Herbicide Resistant Crops The Answer To Controlling Cascuta?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide tolerant crop technology could provide new management strategies for the control of parasitic plants. Three herbicide-tolerant oilseed rape genotypes were used to examine the response of attached C. campestris to glyphosate, imazamox and glufosinate. C. campestris was allowed to establi...

  18. Factors Influencing Observed Tillage Impacts on Herbicide Transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The widespread use and potential human health effects of the herbicides atrazine and glyphosate have generated interest in establishing how no-tillage impacts loading of these herbicides to runoff water in comparison to other tillage practices. In this study, potentially confounding factors such as ...

  19. Herbicide Leaching Column for a Weed Science Teaching Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahrens, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an experiment which enables weed science students to observe first-hand the process of herbicide leaching in soils. Features of this technique which demonstrate the movement of herbicide within a column of soil are outlined. Diagrams are provided of the apparatus employed in the exercise. (ML)

  20. Kudzu Suppression by Herbicides in Two-Year Field trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicides are currently the principle means of halting the spread of kudzu (Pueraria montana var lobata) and reclaiming kudzu-infested lands. The efficacy of several herbicides on this invasive weed has been well-established, but these chemicals can be prohibitively expensive, come with significan...

  1. Manuka oil a natural herbicide with preemergence activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural herbicides approved in organic agriculture are primarily non-selective burn-down essential oils applied POST. Multiple applications are often required due to their low efficacy. To address this problem, the in vivo herbicidal activity of manuka oil, the essential oil distilled from Leptosp...

  2. ACETANILIDE HERBICIDE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS BY LC/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acetanilide herbicides are frequently applied in the U.S. on crops (corn, soybeans, popcorn, etc.) to control broadleaf and annual weeds. The acetanilide and acetamide herbicides currently registered for use in the U.S. are alachlor, acetochlor, metolachlor, propachlor, flufen...

  3. Rationale for a natural products approach to herbicide discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weeds continue to evolve resistance to all the known modes of herbicidal action, but no herbicide with a new target site has been commercialized in nearly 20 years. The so-called ‘new chemistries’ are simply molecules belonging to new chemical classes that have the same mechanisms of action as olde...

  4. Clues to new herbicide mechanisms of action from natural sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than 20 years have passed since the last herbicide with a new mode of action (MOA) was introduced (1). Before this time, a new herbicide MOA was introduced about every 2.5 to 3 years (2), accumulating to the approximately 20 MOAs that are now available (1). During the past 20 years, the incid...

  5. Cross and Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance of Palmer amaranth (PA) to ALS inhibitor herbicides was discovered in Georgia in 2000 and resistance to glyphosate was in 2005. A study was conducted to evaluate two different families of ALS herbicides, imazapic (imidazolinone) and diclosulam (sulfonanilides) for absorption and mobility ...

  6. Thirteen year summary of field-scale herbicide volatilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Once lost to the atmosphere, herbicide transport can result in unintended re-deposition to inhabited areas, streams, rivers, and lakes. To better understand factors governing herbicide volatilization and to determine its impact relative to other loss pathways, field-scale turbulent volatilization fl...

  7. Adhesion to sand and ability to mineralise low pesticide concentrations are required for efficient bioaugmentation of flow-through sand filters.

    PubMed

    Samuelsen, Elin Djurhuus; Badawi, Nora; Nybroe, Ole; Sørensen, Sebastian R; Aamand, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Pesticide-polluted drinking water may be remediated by inoculating waterworks sand filters with specific degrading bacteria. However, degradation efficiency is often hampered by the poor adhesion behaviour of the introduced bacteria. The phenoxy acid herbicide 4-chloro-2-methyl-phenoxy-acetic acid (MCPA) is a widespread groundwater contaminant. The aim of this study was to investigate whether specific surface characteristics of MCPA-degrading bacteria could be linked to their degrading capabilities in sand filters. Four MCPA degraders with different taxonomic affiliations and original habitats (Sphingomonas sp. PM2, Sphingomonas sp. ERG5, Burkholderia sp. TFD34, Cupriavidus sp. TFD38) were characterised with regard to their motility, cell surface hydrophobicity, biofilm formation, adhesion behaviour and ability to mineralise MCPA. Strains PM2 and ERG5 were non-motile and hydrophobic, whilst strains TFD34 and TFD38 were motile and less hydrophobic. All the strains except ERG5 showed low biofilm formation on polystyrene, although it was significantly higher on glass. PM2 was the most efficient MCPA degrader as it displayed no lag phase and reached >50 % mineralisation at all concentrations (0.0016-25 mg L(-1)). PM2 adhered significantly better to sand than the other strains. No link was found between motility, biofilm formation and the ability to adhere to sand. PM2 completely removed MCPA for 14 days when inoculated in sand columns with a constant inlet of 1 mg L(-1) MCPA. These results demonstrate that besides the ability to degrade the contaminant, surface hydrophobicity and adherence abilities are significant parameters controlling sustained degradation in flow-through sand columns and must be considered when selecting bacteria for bioaugmentation.

  8. Analysis of the chloroacetanilide herbicides in water using SPME with CAR/PDMS and GC/ECD.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ying-Ming; Wong, Yih-Gang; Ho, Wu-Hsiung

    2005-01-01

    The solid-phase microextraction (SPME) technique using a 75 mm film of carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane was applied to the analysis of chloroacetanilide herbicides (acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, metolachlor, and propachlor) residues. The feasibility of SPME with gas chromatography electron capture detection analysis has been evaluated. The effects of experimental parameters such as magnetic stirring, salt addition, humic acid addition, pH value, and extraction time, as well as desorption temperature and time, were investigated. Analytical parameters such as linearity, repeatability and limit of detection were also evaluated. The inhibition of humic acid to the extraction of chloroacetanilide herbicides was observed. A standard addition method for calibration was recommended to reduce deviations caused by matrix interferences. The proposed method provided a simple and rapid analytical procedure for chloroacetanilide herbicides in water with limits of detection 0.002-0.065 microg/L for deionized water, and 0.005-0.22 microg/L for farm water. The relative standard deviations (n = 5) for analyses of farm water were 7-20% for 5 [corrected] microg/L chloroacetanilide herbicides. This application was illustrated by the analysis of sample collected from farm water in the Chung-hwa area, Taiwan.

  9. Groundwater resources impact assessment for triazine herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, E.; Barrett, M.R.; Behl, E.

    1996-10-01

    The Environmental Fate and Ground Water Branch of EPA`s Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP) has conducted a Water Resources Impact Assessment of the potential for triazine herbicides to be transported to ground and surface waters (only ground-water is discussed in this paper). The herbicides discussed in this document include atrazine, cyanazine, simazine, and prometon. Part of OPP`s regulatory mission is to prevent contamination of ground and surface water resources resulting from the normal use of registered pesticides. OPP has recently produced several resource documents to support such activities at the federal, state, and local levels (e.g., the Pesticides and Ground-Water Strategy and the Pesticides in Ground Water Database). This Water Resources Impact Assessment will also be useful in assisting state and regional agencies in customizing risk reduction strategies and to implement proposed pollution prevention measures. Major conclusions include: Atrazine is the most frequently detected pesticide in ground water in virtually the entire Midwestern United States, and especially in Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana. The Pesticides in Ground Water Database 1992 Report indicates that atrazine has been detected in 32 out of the 40 states that have reported monitoring data, and in 1,512 wells (6%) of the wells sampled. Based on EPA`s National Pesticide Survey (NPS), 4.7% of rural domestic drinking water wells in the U.S. (490,000 wells) are estimated to contain atrazine, mostly at concentrations less than 0.12 {mu}g/L (the MCL for atrazine is 3 {mu}g/L). Triazine herbicides other than atrazine (simazine, cyanazine, and prometon) have had much less impact on ground-water quality than atrazine, primarily because they are less intensively used.

  10. Development of multi-residue analysis of herbicides in cereal grain by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xinfeng; Liang, Shuxuan; Shi, Zhihong; Sun, Hanwen

    2016-02-01

    A rapid and sensitive method was developed for the determination of 50 herbicides in cereal grain by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS). Using acetonitrile effectively extracted 22 kinds of triazine and other basic herbicides, and using 90:10 v/v acetonitrile-phosphate buffer (pH = 7.5) effectively extracted other 28 herbicides. Chromatographic separation was achieved using gradient elution with acetonitrile-water as a mobile phase for 22 triazine and phenylurea herbicides and with 5mM ammonium acetate aqueous solution containing 0.1% formic acid-acetonitrile as a mobile phase for other 28 herbicides. Using matrix-matched standard calibration curve effectively reduced the indirect matrix effects, ensured accurate quantification for these herbicides. The response was linear over two orders of magnitude with a correlation coefficients (r(2)) higher than 0.992. The limits of quantification for the herbicides varied from 0.2 to 25.6 μg kg(-1). The intra- and inter-day precisions (relative standard deviation, RSD) were 2.2-9.3% and 5.7-17.1%, respectively. The recovery varied from 61.6% to 110% with the RSD of 1.6-11.8%. Analyzing soybean, corn and wheat samples from 17 counties evaluated this method. The developed and validated method has high sensitivity, satisfactory recovery and precision, can ensure the multi-class multi-residue analysis at low μg kg(-1) level for the most herbicides in cereal grain.

  11. Underlying Resistance Mechanisms in the Cynosurus echinatus Biotype to Acetyl CoA Carboxylase-Inhibiting Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Pablo; Alcántara-de la Cruz, Ricardo; Cruz-Hipólito, Hugo; Osuna, María D.; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog dogtail (Cynosurus echinatus) is an annual grass, native to Europe, but also widely distributed in North and South America, South Africa, and Australia. Two hedgehog dogtail biotypes, one diclofop-methyl (DM)-resistant and one DM-susceptible were studied in detail for experimental dose-response resistance mechanisms. Herbicide rates that inhibited shoot growth by 50% (GR50) were determined for DM, being the resistance factor (GR50R/GR50S) of 43.81. When amitrole (Cyt. P450 inhibitor) was applied before treatment with DM, the R biotype growth was significantly inhibited (GR50 of 1019.9 g ai ha-1) compared with the GR50 (1484.6 g ai ha-1) found for the R biotype without pretreatment with amitrole. However, GR50 values for S biotype do not vary with or without amitrole pretreatment. Dose-response experiments carried out to evaluate cross-resistance, showed resistance to aryloxyphenoxypropionate (APP), cyclohexanedione (CHD) and phenylpyrazoline (PPZ) inhibiting herbicides. Both R and S biotypes had a similar 14C-DM uptake and translocation. The herbicide was poorly distributed among leaves, the rest of the shoot and roots with unappreciable acropetal and/or basipetal DM translocation at 96 h after treatment (HAT). The metabolism of 14C-DM, D-acid and D-conjugate metabolites were identified by thin-layer chromatography. The results showed that DM resistance in C. echinatus is likely due to enhanced herbicide metabolism, involving Cyt. P450 as was demonstrated by indirect assays (amitrole pretreatment). The ACCase in vitro assays showed that the target site was very sensitive to APP, CHD and PPZ herbicides in the C. echinatus S biotype, while the R biotype was insensitive to the previously mentioned herbicides. DNA sequencing studies confirmed that C. echinatus cross-resistance to ACCase inhibitors has been conferred by specific ACCase double point mutations Ile-2041-Asn and Cys-2088-Arg. PMID:27148285

  12. Effects of herbicide applications in wheat fields

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Sugandha; Hayat, Shamshul; Alyemeni, Mohammed Nasser; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-01-01

    The present review encompasses the physiological and yield constraints of herbicide applications with special reference to wheat productivity. Post-independence lagging of Indian agriculture to feed its population led to haphazard use of chemical pesticides and weedicides which deteriorated the productivity pay-off particularly of wheat and rice. Past some decades witnessed the potential use of certain phytohormones in augmenting abiotic stress to get rid of yield gap and productivity constraints. We summed up with reviewing the potential role of these natural regulators in overcoming above mentioned drawbacks to substitute or to integrate these chemicals with the use of plant hormones. PMID:22516826

  13. Deciphering the evolution of herbicide resistance in weeds.

    PubMed

    Délye, Christophe; Jasieniuk, Marie; Le Corre, Valérie

    2013-11-01

    Resistance to herbicides in arable weeds is increasing rapidly worldwide and threatening global food security. Resistance has now been reported to all major herbicide modes of action despite the development of resistance management strategies in the 1990s. We review here recent advances in understanding the genetic bases and evolutionary drivers of herbicide resistance that highlight the complex nature of selection for this adaptive trait. Whereas early studied cases of resistance were highly herbicide-specific and largely under monogenic control, cases of greatest concern today generally involve resistance to multiple modes of action, are under polygenic control, and are derived from pre-existing stress response pathways. Although 'omics' approaches should enable unraveling the genetic bases of complex resistances, the appearance, selection, and spread of herbicide resistance in weed populations can only be fully elucidated by focusing on evolutionary dynamics and implementing integrative modeling efforts.

  14. Herbicides: a new threat to the Great Barrier Reef.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Stephen E; Brodie, Jon E; Bainbridge, Zoë T; Rohde, Ken W; Davis, Aaron M; Masters, Bronwyn L; Maughan, Mirjam; Devlin, Michelle J; Mueller, Jochen F; Schaffelke, Britta

    2009-01-01

    The runoff of pesticides (insecticides, herbicides and fungicides) from agricultural lands is a key concern for the health of the iconic Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Relatively low levels of herbicide residues can reduce the productivity of marine plants and corals. However, the risk of these residues to Great Barrier Reef ecosystems has been poorly quantified due to a lack of large-scale datasets. Here we present results of a study tracing pesticide residues from rivers and creeks in three catchment regions to the adjacent marine environment. Several pesticides (mainly herbicides) were detected in both freshwater and coastal marine waters and were attributed to specific land uses in the catchment. Elevated herbicide concentrations were particularly associated with sugar cane cultivation in the adjacent catchment. We demonstrate that herbicides reach the Great Barrier Reef lagoon and may disturb sensitive marine ecosystems already affected by other pressures such as climate change.

  15. Fate of Herbicides and Their Degradation Products Entering a Forested Riparian Buffer Following Herbicides Application to an Adjacent Corn Field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fate of two herbicides, atrazine and metolachlor, were followed as they entered and moved through a forested riparian wetland located in the mid-Atlantic coastal plain of Maryland. The herbicides were applied as pre-emergent treatments to a 20-ha corn field directly upgradient of the riparian w...

  16. Atrazine, triketone herbicides, and their degradation products in sediment, soil and surface water samples in Poland.

    PubMed

    Barchanska, Hanna; Sajdak, Marcin; Szczypka, Kornelia; Swientek, Angelika; Tworek, Martyna; Kurek, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the sediment, soil and surface water contamination with selected popular triketone herbicides (mesotrione (MES) and sulcotrione(SUL)), atrazine (ATR) classified as a possible carcinogen and endocrine disrupting chemical, as well as their degradation products, in Silesia (Poland). Seventeen sediment samples, 24 soil samples, and 64 surface water samples collected in 2014 were studied. After solid-liquid extraction (SLE) and solid phase extraction (SPE), analytes were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode array detection (DAD). Ten years after the withdrawal from the use, ATR was not detected in any of the collected samples; however, its degradation products are still present in 41 % of sediment, 71 % of soil, and 8 % of surface water samples. SUL was determined in 85 % of soil samples; its degradation product (2-chloro-4-(methylosulfonyl) benzoic acid (CMBA)) was present in 43 % of soil samples. In 17 % of sediment samples, CMBA was detected. Triketones were detected occasionally in surface water samples. The chemometric analysis (clustering analysis (CA), single-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), N-Way ANOVA) was applied to find relations between selected soil and sediment parameters and herbicides concentration. In neither of the studied cases a statistically significant relationship between the concentrations of examined herbicides, their degradation products and soil parameters (organic carbon (OC), pH) was observed.

  17. Proteomic and histopathological response in the gills of Poecilia reticulata exposed to glyphosate-based herbicide.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Thiago Lopes; Santos, Ana Paula Rezende Dos; Yamada, Áureo Tatsumi; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Borges, Clayton Luiz; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Sabóia-Morais, Simone Maria Teixeira

    2015-07-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH) are one of the most used herbicide nowadays, whilst there is growing concern over their impact on aquatic environment. Since data about the early proteomic response and toxic mechanisms of GBH in fish is very limited, the aim of this study was to investigate the early toxicity of GBH in the gills of guppies Poecilia reticulata using a proteomic approach associated with histopathological index. Median lethal concentration (LC50,96 h) was determined and LC50,96h values of guppies exposed to GBH were 3.6 ± 0.4 mg GLIL(-1). Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis associated with mass spectrometry, 14 proteins regulated by GBH were identified, which are involved in different cell processes, as energy metabolism, regulation and maintenance of cytoskeleton, nucleic acid metabolism and stress response. Guppies exposed to GBH at 1.82 mg GLIL(-1) showed time-dependent histopathological response in different epithelial and muscle cell types. The histopathological indexes indicate that GBH cause regressive, vascular and progressive disorders in the gills of guppies. This study helped to unravel the molecular and tissue mechanisms associated with GBH toxicity, which are potential biomarkers for biomonitoring water pollution by herbicides.

  18. 2,4-D resistance in wild radish: reduced herbicide translocation via inhibition of cellular transport

    PubMed Central

    Goggin, Danica E.; Cawthray, Gregory R.; Powles, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to auxinic herbicides is increasing in a range of dicotyledonous weed species, but in most cases the biochemical mechanism of resistance is unknown. Using 14C-labelled herbicide, the mechanism of resistance to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in two wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum L.) populations was identified as an inability to translocate 2,4-D out of the treated leaf. Although 2,4-D was metabolized in wild radish, and in a different manner to the well-characterized crop species wheat and bean, there was no difference in metabolism between the susceptible and resistant populations. Reduced translocation of 2,4-D in the latter was also not due to sequestration of the herbicide, or to reduced uptake by the leaf epidermis or mesophyll cells. Application of auxin efflux or ABCB transporter inhibitors to 2,4-D-susceptible plants caused a mimicking of the reduced-translocation resistance phenotype, suggesting that 2,4-D resistance in the populations under investigation could be due to an alteration in the activity of a plasma membrane ABCB-type auxin transporter responsible for facilitating long-distance transport of 2,4-D. PMID:26994475

  19. Structure-activity relationships for a new family of sulfonylurea herbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Guo; Li, Zheng-Ming; Ma, Ning; Wang, Bao-Lei; Jiang, Lin; Pang, Siew Siew; Lee, Yu-Ting; Guddat, Luke W.; Duggleby, Ronald G.

    2005-11-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS; EC 2.2.1.6) catalyzes the first common step in branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis. The enzyme is inhibited by several chemical classes of compounds and this inhibition is the basis of action of the sulfonylurea and imidazolinone herbicides. The commercial sulfonylureas contain a pyrimidine or a triazine ring that is substituted at both meta positions, thus obeying the initial rules proposed by Levitt. Here we assess the activity of 69 monosubstituted sulfonylurea analogs and related compounds as inhibitors of pure recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana AHAS and show that disubstitution is not absolutely essential as exemplified by our novel herbicide, monosulfuron (2-nitro- N-(4'-methyl-pyrimidin-2'-yl) phenyl-sulfonylurea), which has a pyrimidine ring with a single meta substituent. A subset of these compounds was tested for herbicidal activity and it was shown that their effect in vivo correlates well with their potency in vitro as AHAS inhibitors. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships were developed using comparative molecular field analysis and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis. For the latter, the best result was obtained when steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic and H-bond acceptor factors were taken into consideration. The resulting fields were mapped on to the published crystal structure of the yeast enzyme and it was shown that the steric and hydrophobic fields are in good agreement with sulfonylurea-AHAS interaction geometry.

  20. Research methods in weed science: herbicide absorption and translocation in plants using radioisotopes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide absorption and translocation in plants is a key component in the study of herbicide physiology, mode of action, selectivity, resistance mechanisms, and in the registration process. Radioactive herbicides have been in use for over half-a-century in the research and study of herbicide absorp...

  1. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: The Challenge of Herbicides for Aquatic Weeds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Dean F.; Martin, Barbara B.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses problems in selecting the correct herbicide for use in controlling aquatic weeds, considering specificity, size of the market, fear of trace contaminants, and herbicide resistance in weeds. Also summarizes some successful herbicides, providing a table listing mode of action of some herbicides used for control of aquatic plants. (JN)

  2. Mixtures of herbicides and metals affect the redox system of honey bees.

    PubMed

    Jumarie, Catherine; Aras, Philippe; Boily, Monique

    2017-02-01

    The increasing loss of bee colonies in many countries has prompted a surge of studies on the factors affecting bee health. In North America, main crops such as maize and soybean are cultivated with extensive use of pesticides that may affect non-target organisms such as bees. Also, biosolids, used as a soil amendment, represent additional sources of metals in agroecosystems; however, there is no information about how these metals could affect the bees. In previous studies we investigated the effects of environmentally relevant doses of herbicides and metals, each individually, on caged honey bees. The present study aimed at investigating the effects of mixtures of herbicides (glyphosate and atrazine) and metals (cadmium and iron), as these mixtures represent more realistic exposure conditions. Levels of metal, vitamin E, carotenoids, retinaldehyde, at-retinol, retinoic acid isomers (9-cis RA, 13-cis RA, at-RA) and the metabolites 13-cis-4-oxo-RA and at-4-oxo-RA were measured in bees fed for 10 days with contaminated syrup. Mixtures of herbicides and cadmium that did not affect bee viability, lowered bee α- and β-carotenoid contents and increased 9-cis-RA as well as 13-cis-4-oxo-RA without modifying the levels of at-retinol. Bee treatment with either glyphosate, a combination of atrazine and cadmium, or mixtures of herbicides promoted lipid peroxidation. Iron was bioconcentrated in bees and led to high levels of lipid peroxidation. Metals also decreased zeaxanthin bee contents. These results show that mixtures of atrazine, glyphosate, cadmium and iron may affect different reactions occurring in the metabolic pathway of vitamin A in the honey bee.

  3. Protocols for Robust Herbicide Resistance Testing in Different Weed Species.

    PubMed

    Panozzo, Silvia; Scarabel, Laura; Collavo, Alberto; Sattin, Maurizio

    2015-07-02

    Robust protocols to test putative herbicide resistant weed populations at whole plant level are essential to confirm the resistance status. The presented protocols, based on whole-plant bioassays performed in a greenhouse, can be readily adapted to a wide range of weed species and herbicides through appropriate variants. Seed samples from plants that survived a field herbicide treatment are collected and stored dry at low temperature until used. Germination methods differ according to weed species and seed dormancy type. Seedlings at similar growth stage are transplanted and maintained in the greenhouse under appropriate conditions until plants have reached the right growth stage for herbicide treatment. Accuracy is required to prepare the herbicide solution to avoid unverifiable mistakes. Other critical steps such as the application volume and spray speed are also evaluated. The advantages of this protocol, compared to others based on whole plant bioassays using one herbicide dose, are related to the higher reliability and the possibility of inferring the resistance level. Quicker and less expensive in vivo or in vitro diagnostic screening tests have been proposed (Petri dish bioassays, spectrophotometric tests), but they provide only qualitative information and their widespread use is hindered by the laborious set-up that some species may require. For routine resistance testing, the proposed whole plant bioassay can be applied at only one herbicide dose, so reducing the costs.

  4. Washoff of Residual Photosystem II Herbicides from Sugar Cane Trash under a Rainfall Simulator.

    PubMed

    Dang, Aaditi; Silburn, Mark; Craig, Ian; Shaw, Melanie; Foley, Jenny

    2016-05-25

    Herbicides are often applied to crop residues, but their fate has not been well studied. We measured herbicide washoff from sugar cane trash during simulated rainfall, at 1, 8, and 40 days after spraying (DAS), to provide insight into herbicide fate and for use in modeling. Herbicides included are commonly used in the sugar industry, either in Australia or in Brazil. Concentrations of all herbicides and applied Br tracer in washoff declined exponentially over time. The rate of washoff during rainfall declined with increasing DAS. Cumulative washoff as a function of rainfall was similar for most herbicides, although the most soluble herbicides did have more rapid washoff. Some but not all herbicides became more resistant to washoff with increasing DAS. Of the total mass washed off, 80% washed off in the first 30 mm (∼40 min) of rainfall for most herbicides. Little herbicide remained on the trash after rainfall, implying nearly complete washoff.

  5. Simultaneous Expression of PDH45 with EPSPS Gene Improves Salinity and Herbicide Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco Plants.

    PubMed

    Garg, Bharti; Gill, Sarvajeet S; Biswas, Dipul K; Sahoo, Ranjan K; Kunchge, Nandkumar S; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the problem of salinity- and weed-induced crop losses, a multi-stress tolerant trait is need of the hour but a combinatorial view of such traits is not yet explored. The overexpression of PDH45 (pea DNA helicase 45) and EPSPS (5-enoylpruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase) genes have been reported to impart salinity and herbicide tolerance. Further, the understanding of mechanism and pathways utilized by PDH45 and EPSPS for salinity and herbicide tolerance will help to improve the crops of economical importance. In the present study, we have performed a comparative analysis of salinity and herbicide tolerance to check the biochemical parameters and antioxidant status of tobacco transgenic plants. Collectively, the results showed that PDH45 overexpressing transgenic lines display efficient tolerance to salinity stress, while PDH45+EPSPS transgenics showed tolerance to both the salinity and herbicide as compared to the control [wild type (WT) and vector control (VC)] plants. The activities of the components of enzymatic antioxidant machinery were observed to be higher in the transgenic plants indicating the presence of an efficient antioxidant defense system which helps to cope with the stress-induced oxidative-damages. Photosynthetic parameters also showed significant increase in PDH45 and PDH45+EPSPS overexpressing transgenic plants in comparison to WT, VC and EPSPS transgenic plants under salinity stress. Furthermore, PDH45 and PDH45+EPSPS synergistically modulate the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid mediated signaling pathways for combating salinity stress. The findings of our study suggest that pyramiding of the PDH45 gene with EPSPS gene renders host plants tolerant to salinity and herbicide by enhancing the antioxidant machinery thus photosynthesis.

  6. Simultaneous Expression of PDH45 with EPSPS Gene Improves Salinity and Herbicide Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Bharti; Gill, Sarvajeet S.; Biswas, Dipul K.; Sahoo, Ranjan K.; Kunchge, Nandkumar S.; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the problem of salinity- and weed-induced crop losses, a multi-stress tolerant trait is need of the hour but a combinatorial view of such traits is not yet explored. The overexpression of PDH45 (pea DNA helicase 45) and EPSPS (5-enoylpruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase) genes have been reported to impart salinity and herbicide tolerance. Further, the understanding of mechanism and pathways utilized by PDH45 and EPSPS for salinity and herbicide tolerance will help to improve the crops of economical importance. In the present study, we have performed a comparative analysis of salinity and herbicide tolerance to check the biochemical parameters and antioxidant status of tobacco transgenic plants. Collectively, the results showed that PDH45 overexpressing transgenic lines display efficient tolerance to salinity stress, while PDH45+EPSPS transgenics showed tolerance to both the salinity and herbicide as compared to the control [wild type (WT) and vector control (VC)] plants. The activities of the components of enzymatic antioxidant machinery were observed to be higher in the transgenic plants indicating the presence of an efficient antioxidant defense system which helps to cope with the stress-induced oxidative-damages. Photosynthetic parameters also showed significant increase in PDH45 and PDH45+EPSPS overexpressing transgenic plants in comparison to WT, VC and EPSPS transgenic plants under salinity stress. Furthermore, PDH45 and PDH45+EPSPS synergistically modulate the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid mediated signaling pathways for combating salinity stress. The findings of our study suggest that pyramiding of the PDH45 gene with EPSPS gene renders host plants tolerant to salinity and herbicide by enhancing the antioxidant machinery thus photosynthesis. PMID:28392794

  7. Double-disk solid-phase extraction--Simultaneous cleanup and trace enrichment of herbicides and metabolites from environmental samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrar, Imma; Barceló, Damià; Thurman, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    Phenylurea and triazine herbicides, including some metabolites, were isolated from water and soil extracts by solid-phase extraction using a layered system of two extraction disks, a method called double-disk solid-phase extraction. The first disk consisted of strong anion exchange (SAX) of 10-μm styrene divinylbenzene (SDB) particles embedded in Teflon, and the second disk was a C18 disk of 10-μm particles also embedded in Teflon. A volume of 500 mL of water or aqueous soil extract is passed through the layered system with the SAX disk first. The purpose of the SAX disk is to remove the humic and fulvic acids from the water or aqueous soil extract by ion exchange through their carboxyl groups. Even during methanol elution of herbicides, the humic substances remain bound to the SAX disk with >85% retention. Elution with methanol results in more than 90% recovery of the herbicides from the layered extraction disks. Removal of the humic and fulvic acids results in greater sensitivity for diode array detection quantitation (0.05 μg/L for herbicides) by substantially reducing the absorbance of the humic peak on the LC chromatogram. The herbicides adsorb to the SAX disk either through hydrogen bonding to the anion-exchange sites or by hydrophobic interaction with the SDB surface of the anion-exchange disk. The method was tested for the analysis of natural water samples from the Mississippi Embayment, a cotton-growing area of the southeastern United States.

  8. Herbicide contamination and dispersion pattern in lowland springs.

    PubMed

    Laini, Alex; Bartoli, Marco; Lamastra, Lucrezia; Capri, Ettore; Balderacchi, Matteo; Trevisan, Marco

    2012-11-01

    Herbicides reduce the diversity of flora and fauna in freshwater ecosystems and also contaminate groundwater due to leaching. Herbicide contamination can be a serious threat for all groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDE), altering their chemical and biological quality. Successful management to protect GDE is dependent on detailed knowledge of the hydrogeological and hydrochemical features of the surrounding environment. We consider the possible diffuse contamination by herbicides of groundwater and of GDE as lowland springs, semi-artificial ecosystems with elevated biodiversity. The main objectives of the present work were thus: (1) to map herbicide contamination in lowland springs, (2) to evaluate the potential risk for biota and (3) to quantify the extent of the area from which the herbicide use can affect the water quality of lowland springs. In June and August 2009, nearly 23 springs within the Po River Plain (Northern Italy) were sampled and analyzed for five herbicides used to control weeds in maize. Hydrogeological properties, half-lives of the herbicides and their concentrations in both groundwater and springs were used to quantify the area from which the contamination could originate. Such evaluation was performed by means of GIS techniques. Terbuthylazine were the only herbicide found, together with its metabolite desethylterbuthylazine. In 16 out of 84 measurements, their concentrations were above the threshold for drinking water; however, they were always below the ecotoxicological end-points of aquatic flora and fauna. Spatial analyses reveal that the theoretical area from which herbicides can contaminate spring water is within a distance varying between a few and 1800 m. Our findings indicate that conservation plans should focus on the fields adjacent to or surrounding the springs and should address the optimization of irrigation practices, restoration of buffer strips, crop rotation and in general more sustainable agricultural practices in the

  9. Environmental behavior of the chiral herbicide haloxyfop. 2. Unchanged enantiomer composition in blackgrass (Alopecurus myosuroides) and garden cress (Lepidium sativum).

    PubMed

    Buerge, Ignaz J; Bächli, Astrid; Heller, Werner E; Keller, Martina; Poiger, Thomas

    2015-03-18

    Haloxyfop-methyl is a chiral herbicide against grasses in dicotyledonous crops. In plants and soil, haloxyfop-methyl is rapidly hydrolyzed to haloxyfop-acid, whose R-enantiomer carries the actual herbicidal activity. In soil, S-haloxyfop-acid is converted within less than 1 day and almost completely into R-haloxyfop-acid. In this study, we investigated the possible interconversion of the enantiomers of haloxyfop-methyl and haloxyfop-acid in blackgrass and garden cress. Racemic or enantiopure haloxyfop-methyl was applied to the leaves of plants grown in agar. The metabolism was followed during 4 days using enantioselective GC-MS. In contrast to soils, no interconversion was observed in plants, and metabolism was nonenantioselective. These findings are consistent with the fact that after pre-emergence application to soil and uptake by roots, the observed herbicidal effect is basically independent of the enantiomer composition of the applied substance, whereas after postemergence application, the efficacy clearly is different for the two enantiomers.

  10. Triazine herbicide resistance in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alfred E.; Gilbert, Carl W.; Guy, Rachel; Arntzen, Charles J.

    1984-01-01

    The photoaffinity herbicide azidoatrazine (2-azido-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) selectively labels the L subunit of the reaction center of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Herbicide-resistant mutants retain the L subunit and have altered binding properties for methylthio- and chloro-substituted triazines as well as altered equilibrium constants for electron transfer between primary and secondary electron acceptors. We suggest that a subtle alteration in the L subunit is responsible for herbicide resistance and that the L subunit is the functional analog of the 32-kDa QB protein of chloroplast membranes. Images PMID:16593520

  11. Variability of herbicide losses from 13 fields to surface water within a small catchment after a controlled herbicide application.

    PubMed

    Leu, Christian; Singer, Heinz; Stamm, Christian; Müller, Stephan R; Schwarzenbach, René P

    2004-07-15

    Diffuse losses from agricultural fields are a major input source for herbicides in surface waters. In this and in a companion paper, we present the results of a comprehensive field study aimed at assessing the overall loss dynamics of three model herbicides (i.e., atrazine, dimethenamid, and metolachlor) from a small agricultural catchment (2.1 km2) and evaluating the relative contributions of various fields having different soil and topographical characteristics. An identical mixture of the three model herbicides as well as an additional pesticide for identification of a given field were applied within 12 h on 13 cornfields (total area approximately 12 ha), thus ensuring that the herbicides were exposed to identical meteorological conditions. After the simultaneous application, the concentrations of the compounds were monitored in the soils and at the outlets of three subcatchments containing between 4 and 5 cornfields each. Particular emphasis was placed on the two rain events that led to the major losses of the herbicides. The rank orders of herbicide dissipation in the soils and of the compound-specific mobilization into runoff were the same in all three subcatchments and were independent of the field characteristics. In contrast, the field properties caused the relative losses from two subcatchments to differ by up to a factor of 56 during the most important event, whereas compound-specific differences of the three neutral herbicides caused the losses to vary only by a factor of 2 during the same event. The enormous spatial variability was mainly caused by factors influencing the fraction of rain that was lost to surface water by fast transport mechanisms. Thus, the key factors determining the spatially variable herbicide losses were the permeability of the soils, the topography, and the location of subsurface drainage systems. These results illustrate the large potential to reduce herbicide losses by avoiding application on risk areas.

  12. Climate change and decreasing herbicide persistence.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Steven W

    2004-02-01

    A herbicide degradation model, using real weather data for the period 1980-2001, has been used to estimate the change in persistence of autumn-applied isoproturon over this period. The results suggest that soil residues fell to the minimum for weed control on average approximately 30 days earlier over the last 5 years of this period than in the first 5 years, equivalent to a reduction of approximately 25% in the duration of weed control. This decline in persistence is attributed to increasing soil temperature. The results are discussed in relation to recent observations and predictions on climate change. The relevance of the findings to other pesticides and future weed control is considered.

  13. Surrogates for herbicide removal in stormwater biofilters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kefeng; Deletic, Ana; Page, Declan; McCarthy, David T

    2015-09-15

    Real time monitoring of suitable surrogate parameters are critical to the validation of any water treatment processes, and is of particularly high importance for validation of natural stormwater treatment systems. In this study, potential surrogates for herbicide removal in stormwater biofilters (also known as stormwater bio-retention or rain-gardens) were assessed using field challenge tests and matched laboratory column experiments. Differential UV absorbance at 254mn (ΔUVA254), total phosphorus (ΔTP), dissolved phosphorus (ΔDP), total nitrogen (ΔTN), ammonia (ΔNH3), nitrate and nitrite (ΔNO3+NO2), dissolved organic carbon (ΔDOC) and total suspended solids (ΔTSS) were compared with glyphosate, atrazine, simazine and prometryn removal rates. The influence of different challenge conditions on the performance of each surrogate was studied. Differential TP was significantly and linearly related to glyphosate reduction (R(2) = 0.75-0.98, P < 0.01), while ΔTP and ΔUVA254 were linearly correlated (R(2) = 0.44-0.84, P < 0.05) to the reduction of triazines (atrazine, simazine and prometryn) in both field and laboratory tests. The performance of ΔTP and ΔUVA254 as surrogates for herbicides were reliable under normal and challenge dry conditions, but weaker correlations were observed under challenge wet conditions. Of those tested, ΔTP is the most promising surrogate for glyphosate removal and ΔUVA254 is a suitable surrogate for triazines removal in stormwater biofilters.

  14. The herbicide Glyphosate affects nitrification in the Elbe estuary, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Tina; Lassen, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The Elbe River is one of the biggest European rivers discharging into the North Sea. It also transports high amounts of nutrients and pollutants like pesticides. Important source regions of both nutrients and pollutants are located within the river catchment, which is dominated by agricultural land-use. From these agricultural soils, pesticides can be carried via the river and estuary into the North Sea. Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine) is the most commonly used herbicide worldwide and mainly used to regulate unwanted plant growth and for the expedition of crop ripening. In Germany, ~ 6000 tons of glyphosate are applied yearly in agriculture and private use. Glyphosate is degradable by microorganisms and has a half-life in water of 35 to 60 days. This herbicide specifically inhibits 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), an enzyme that catalyzes the biosynthesis of essential aromatic amino acids in plants, fungi, and bacteria. Nitrifying bacteria, which play an important role in the internal nitrogen cycling in the Elbe estuary, also possess this enzyme. The aim of our study was to quantify the concentration of glyphosate in water and sediment samples of the Elbe to get an overview about relevant environmental levels and to assess the impact of glyphosate on inhibition of nitrifying activities. To quantify the effect of glyphosate on nitrification activity, natural samples as well as pure cultures of Nitrosomonas europea (strain Nm50) were incubated with different concentrations of glyphosate over a period of some weeks. The nitrifying activity was determined according to changes of the nitrite and nitrate concentration as well as the cell number. Glyphosate was detectable in water and sediment samples in the Elbe estuary with up to 5 ppb mainly in the Port of Hamburg region. In both incubation experiments an inhibiting effect of glyphosate on nitrification could be shown. The incubated natural water sample was affected by a glyphosate

  15. A silviculture application of the glyphosate-based herbicide VisionMAX to wetlands has limited direct effects on amphibian larvae.

    PubMed

    Edge, Christopher B; Thompson, Dean G; Hao, Chunyan; Houlahan, Jeff E

    2012-10-01

    Herbicides are commonly used in agriculture and silviculture to reduce interspecific competition among plants and thereby enhance crop growth, quality, and volume. Internationally, glyphosate-based herbicides are the most widely used herbicides in both of these sectors. Laboratory and mesocosm studies have demonstrated that some formulations are toxic to amphibian larvae below concentrations that approximate predicted maximal or "worst-case" exposure scenarios. However, field studies have not found evidence of toxicity at these concentrations. The authors conducted a replicated field experiment involving 10 naturalized wetlands split in half with an impermeable plastic barrier to assess the direct toxicity of a glyphosate formulation commonly used in silviculture (VisionMAX™). The herbicide formulation was applied directly to the surface of one side of each wetland at one of two target aqueous exposure rates (high = 2,880, low = 550 µg acid equivalents [a.e.]/L), and the other side was left as an untreated control. The survival and growth of green frog larvae (Lithobates clamitans) were assessed for two years following herbicide treatment. The herbicide did not have a negative impact on survival or growth of L. clamitans larvae at either treatment level. In fact, mean larval abundance was typically greater in the treated sides than in control sides within the year of herbicide application. These results indicate that typical silviculture use of VisionMAX poses negligible risk to larval amphibians, likely because the combined effects of sorption and degradation in natural wetlands limit the exposure magnitude and duration.

  16. Response of avian communities to herbicide-induced vegetation changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, M.L.; Meslow, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    The relationships between avian communities and herbicide modification of vegetation were analyzed on early-growth clear-cuts in western Oregon that had received phenoxy herbicide treatment 1 or 4 years previously. For both 1 and 4 years post-spray, vegetation development was greater in the third height interval (> 3.0 m) on untreated sites. All measures of vegetative diversity on untreated sites exceeded those on treated sites. Overall density and diversity of birds were similar between treated and untreated sites. Several bird species altered their foraging behavior on treated sites, i.e., birds using deciduous trees increased use of shrubs on treated sites. The primary effect of herbicide application was a reduction in the complexity of vegetation, a condition due primarity to the removal of deciduous trees. Small patches of deciduous trees scattered in clear-cuts treated with phenoxy herbicides can maintain an avian community similar to that on untreated sites.

  17. Commercial Herbicides Can Trigger the Oxidative Inactivation of Acetohydroxyacid Synthase.

    PubMed

    Lonhienne, Thierry; Nouwens, Amanda; Williams, Craig M; Fraser, James A; Lee, Yu-Ting; West, Nicholas P; Guddat, Luke W

    2016-03-18

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) inhibitors are highly successful commercial herbicides. New kinetic data show that the binding of these compounds leads to reversible accumulative inhibition of AHAS. Crystallographic data (to a resolution of 2.17 Å) for an AHAS-herbicide complex shows that closure of the active site occurs when the herbicidal inhibitor binds, thus preventing exchange with solvent. This feature combined with new kinetic data shows that molecular oxygen promotes an accumulative inhibition leading to the conclusion that the exceptional potency of these herbicides is augmented by subversion of an inherent oxygenase side reaction. The reactive oxygen species produced by this reaction are trapped in the active site, triggering oxidation reactions that ultimately lead to the alteration of the redox state of the cofactor flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), a feature that accounts for the observed reversible accumulative inhibition.

  18. Ragweed Parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorus) Control with Preemergence and Postemergence Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field and greenhouse experiments were conducted during 2005 and 2006 at Stoneville, MS to determine control of ragweed parthenium with several preemergence (PRE) and postemergence (POST) herbicides registered for use in corn, cotton, peanut, rice, and soybean. Norflurazon, pendimethalin, clomazone, ...

  19. Impacts of forest herbicides on wildlife: Toxicity and habitat alteration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, M.L.; Meslow, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper begins with a review of both laboratory and field studies on tbe possible direct toxic effects of herbicides on terrestrial vertebrates, primarily birds and mammals. Alteration of the palatability of forage and changes in reproductive success are also discussed. Emphasis is placed on the use of herbicides in forestry; studies dealing with agricultural systems are referenced where appropriate. The indirect effects of herbicides on wildlife-habitat are then conceptualized and quantified using data from a 3-year study on effects of phenoxy and glyphosate herbicides on bird and small mammal communities in western Oregon. Data on density and habitat use are presented and compared with data available from other geographic regions.

  20. Pelargonic acid - a potential organic aquatic herbicide for duckweed management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Duckweed (Lemna spp.) are small, free floating aquatic plants that flourish on stagnant, or slow moving, water surfaces throughout the continental U.S. Members of the genus are among the smallest flowering plants, providing food for fish and fowl, but their aggressive growth and invasive habit make...

  1. Genetic mapping of non-target site resistance to a sulfonylurea herbicide (Envoke®) in Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acetolactate synthase (ALS) is responsible for a rate limiting step in the synthesis of essential branched chain amino acids. Resistance to ALS-inhibiting herbicides, such as trifloxysulfuron sodium (Envoke®), can be due to mutations in the target gene itself. Alternatively, plants may exhibit herb...

  2. Urinary Concentrations of Insecticide and Herbicide Metabolites among Pregnant Women in Rural Ghana: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Blair J; Ae-Ngibise, Kenneth A; Boamah, Ellen A; Mujtaba, Mohammed; Messerlian, Carmen; Hauser, Russ; Coull, Brent; Calafat, Antonia M; Jack, Darby; Kinney, Patrick L; Whyatt, Robin; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Asante, Kwaku P

    2017-03-29

    Use of pesticides by households in rural Ghana is common for residential pest control, agricultural use, and for the reduction of vectors carrying disease. However, few data are available about exposure to pesticides among this population. Our objective was to quantify urinary concentrations of metabolites of organophosphate (OP), pyrethroid, and select herbicides during pregnancy, and to explore exposure determinants. In 2014, 17 pregnant women from rural Ghana were surveyed about household pesticide use and provided weekly first morning urine voids during three visits (n = 51 samples). A total of 90.1% (46/51) of samples had detectable OP metabolites [geometric mean, GM (95% CI): 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol 0.54 µg/L (0.36-0.81), para-nitrophenol 0.71 µg/L (0.51-1.00)], 75.5% (37/49) had detectable pyrethroid metabolites [GM: 3-phenoxybenzoic acid 0.23 µg/L (0.17, 0.32)], and 70.5% (36/51) had detectable 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid levels, a herbicide [GM: 0.46 µg/L (0.29-0.73)]. Concentrations of para-nitrophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in Ghanaian pregnant women appear higher when compared to nonpregnant reproductive-aged women in a reference U.S.

  3. Metabolic responses in root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris and Vicia sativa exposed to the imazamox herbicide.

    PubMed

    García-Garijo, A; Tejera, N A; Lluch, C; Palma, F

    2014-05-01

    Alterations on growth, amino acids metabolism and some antioxidant enzyme activities as result of imazamox treatment were examined in determinate and indeterminate nodules, formed by Phaseolus vulgaris and Vicia sativa, respectively. Young seedlings of both legumes were inoculated with their respective microsymbionts and grown under controlled conditions. At vegetative growth, plants were treated with imazamox (250μM) in the nutrient solution and harvested 7days after. Imazamox was mainly accumulated in V. sativa where concentrations were more than six fold higher than those detected in P. vulgaris. Nodule dry weight and total nitrogen content were reduced by the herbicide treatment: the highest decrease of nodule biomass (50%) and nitrogen content (40%) were registered in V. sativa and P. vulgaris, respectively. The concentration of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) did not change in neither determinate nor indeterminate nodules even though the acetohydroxyacid synthase activity decreased in root and nodules of both symbioses with the herbicide application. Based on this last result and taking into account that total free amino acids increased in roots but not in nodules of common vetch, a possible BCAA translocation from root to nodule could occur. Our results suggest that the maintenance of BCAA balance in nodule become a priority for the plant in such conditions. The involvement of activities glutathione-S-transferase, guaiacol peroxidase and superoxide dismutase in the response of the symbioses to imazamox are also discussed.

  4. Protoporphyrin IX Content Correlates with Activity of Photobleaching Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Becerril, Jose M.; Duke, Stephen O.

    1989-01-01

    Several laboratories have demonstrated recently that photobleaching herbicides such as acifluorfen and oxadiazon cause accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), a photodynamic pigment capable of herbicidal activity. We investigated, in acifluorfen-treated tissues, the in vivo stability of PPIX, the kinetics of accumulation, and the correlation between concentration of PPIX and herbicidal damage. During a 20 hour dark period, PPIX levels rose from barely detectable concentrations to 1 to 2 nanomoles per 50 cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) cotyledon discs treated with 10 micromolar acifluorfen. When placed in 500 micromoles per square meter per second PAR, PPIX levels decayed logarithmically, with an initial half-life of about 2.5 hours. PPIX levels at each time after exposure to light correlated positively with the cellular damage that occurred during the following 1 hour in both green and yellow (tentoxin-treated) cucumber cotyledon tissues. PPIX levels in discs incubated for 20 hours in darkness correlated positively with the acifluorfen concentration in which they were incubated. In cucumber, the level of herbicidal damage caused by several p-nitrodiphenyl other herbicides, a p-chlorodiphenylether herbicide, and oxadiazon correlated positively with the amount of PPIX induced to accumulate by each of the herbicide treatments. Similar results were obtained with acifluorfen-treated pigweed and velvetleaf primary leaf tissues. In cucumber, PPIX levels increased within 15 and 30 minutes after exposure of discs to 10 micromolar acifluorfen in the dark and light, respectively. These data strengthen the view that PPIX is responsible for all or a major part of the photobleaching activity of acifluorfen and related herbicides. PMID:16666869

  5. Herbicide Orange Site Characterization Study Naval Construction Battalion Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    revrs if necU~ary and identify by block muenbers IELD GROUP sue, GR. Herbicide Orange) -2,4-D’ Analytical Methods) 1 ,ni IDioxin Soil Samli~ 3*3TRACT...THIS PAGE Cont-mination levels ranged between rordetectable and approximately 200 ppb. Average values were below 10 ppt in surface soils and...analysis of a soil sampling program performed at the former Herbicide Orange storage site on the Naval Construction Battalion Center. Over 1700 soil

  6. Impact of dry-wet and freeze-thaw events on pesticide mineralizing populations and their activity in wetland ecosystems: A microcosm study.

    PubMed

    Vandermeeren, Pieter; Baken, Stijn; Vanderstukken, Ruben; Diels, Jan; Springael, Dirk

    2016-03-01

    Riparian wetlands are proposed to mitigate diffuse pollution of surface water by pesticides in agricultural landscapes. Wetland ecosystems though are highly dynamic environments and seasonal disturbances such as freezing and drying can affect microbial population sizes in the sediment and their functionality including pesticide biodegradation, which has hardly been studied. This study examined the effect of artificially induced dry-wet or freeze-thaw events on the mineralization of the pesticides isoproturon (IPU) and 2-methoxy-4-chlorophenoxy acetic acid (MCPA) in wetland microcosms, either without or with prior enrichment of IPU/MCPA degrading populations. Without prior enrichment, mineralization of IPU and MCPA was significantly reduced after exposure to especially freeze-thaw events, as evidenced by lower mineralization rates and longer lag times compared to non-exposed microcosms. However, herbicide mineralization kinetics correlated poorly with cell numbers of herbicide mineralizers as estimated by a most probable number (MPN) approach and the number of IPU and MCPA mineralizers was unexpectedly higher in freeze-thaw and dry-wet cycle exposed setups compared to the control setups. This suggested that the observed effects of season-bound disturbances were due to other mechanisms than decay of pesticide mineralizers. In addition, in systems in which the growth of pesticide mineralizing bacteria was stimulated by amendment of IPU and MCPA, exposure to a freeze-thaw or dry-wet event only marginally affected the herbicide mineralization kinetics. Our results show that season bound environmental disturbances can affect pesticide mineralization kinetics in wetlands but that this effect can depend on the history of pesticide applications.

  7. The chiral herbicide beflubutamid (II): Enantioselective degradation and enantiomerization in soil, and formation/degradation of chiral metabolites.

    PubMed

    Buerge, Ignaz J; Müller, Markus D; Poiger, Thomas

    2013-07-02

    Beflubutamid is a chiral soil herbicide currently marketed as racemate against dicotyledonous weeds in cereals. Biotests have shown that (-)-beflubutamid is at least 1000× more active than (+)-beflubutamid. Potential substitution of the racemate by (-)-beflubutamid should therefore be further considered. Here, we investigated the degradation behavior in soils and formation and degradation of two chiral metabolites. Laboratory incubation experiments were performed with an alkaline and an acidic soil. The compounds were analyzed by enantioselective GC-MS. Degradation rate constants were determined by kinetic modeling. In the alkaline soil, degradation of beflubutamid was slightly enantioselective, with slower degradation of the herbicidally active (-)-enantiomer. In the acidic soil, however, both enantiomers were degraded at similar rates. In contrast, degradation of a phenoxybutanamide metabolite was highly enantioselective. Chiral stability of beflubutamid and its metabolites was studied in separate incubations with the pure enantiomers in the same soils. In these experiments, (-)-beflubutamid was not converted to the nonactive (+)-enantiomer and vice versa. Significant enantiomerization was, however, observed for the major metabolite, a phenoxybutanoic acid. With regard to biological activity and behavior in soils, enantiopure (-)-beflubutamid definitively has the potential to substitute for the racemic herbicide.

  8. The increasing importance of herbicides in worldwide crop production.

    PubMed

    Gianessi, Leonard P

    2013-10-01

    Herbicide use is increasingly being adopted around the world. Many developing countries (India, China, Bangladesh) are facing shortages of workers to hand weed fields as millions of people move from rural to urban areas. In these countries, herbicides are far cheaper and more readily available than labor for hand weeding. History shows that in industrializing countries in the past, including the United States, Germany, Japan and South Korea, the same phenomenon has occurred-as workers have left agriculture, herbicides have been adopted. It is inevitable that herbicide use will increase in sub-Saharan Africa, not only because millions of people are leaving rural areas, creating shortages of hand weeders, but also because of the need to increase crop yields. Hand weeding has never been a very efficient method of weed control-often performed too late and not frequently enough. Uncontrolled weeds have been a major cause of low crop yields in sub-Saharan Africa for a long time. In many parts of the world, herbicides are being increasingly used to replace tillage in order to improve environmental conditions. In comparison with tillage, herbicide use reduces erosion, fuel use, greenhouse gas emissions and nutrient run-off and conserves water.

  9. Molecular genotyping of herbicide resistance in P. minor: ACCase resistance.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajender; Sharma, Davinder; Raghav, Nishu; Chhokar, Rajender Singh; Sharma, Indu

    2015-02-01

    Little seed canary grass (Phalaris minor Retz.) populations resistant to herbicides that inhibit acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) represent an increasingly important weed control problem in northern India. The objective of this study was to develop DNA-based markers to differentiate herbicide-resistant and herbicide-susceptible population of P. minor. Primers were designed to amplify the conserved region carrying two reported mutations Trp2027 to Cys and Ile2041 to Asn conferring ACCase inhibitor resistance in several grass weeds and subjected to single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) to detect the mutations. Five distinctive electrophoretic patterns on non-denaturing PAGE were observed, and four patterns were found to be associated with ACCase herbicide resistance in P. minor. The PCR-SSCP test developed in this study confirmed 17 resistant populations to contain mutations in CT domain of ACCase gene. This is the first report of rapid and easy molecular diagnosis of ACCase herbicide-resistant and herbicide-sensitive population of P. minor through PCR-SSCP analysis.

  10. Herbicidal treatments for control of Papaver somniferum L.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, M

    1980-01-01

    Fifty-five commercially available herbicides were evaluated for possible use to destroy illicit opium poppy crops (Papaver somniferum). In the first stage, herbicides were sprayed on poppy plants grown in containers. The following compounds killed poppy plants: (a) herbicides with typical foliar activity--amitrole, bromoxynil, 2,4-D, glyphosate, ioxynil and paraquat; and (b) herbicides with root and foliar activity--the triazines ametryn, atrazine, metribuzin, prometryn, simazine and terbutryn; the substituted ureas benzthiazuron, chloroxuron, diuron, fluometuron, linuron, methabenzthiazuron, neburon and phenobenzuron; and the miscellaneous compounds karbutilate, methazole, oxadiazon and pyrazon. Severe but sublethal injury was caused by cycloate, EPTC, molinate, pobulate, cacodylate + MSMA, ethofumesate, perfluidone and phenmedipham. Abnormal development of vegetative or reproductive parts of the plant was induced by benefin, butralin, dinitramine, pendimethalin, trifluralin, diphenamid, napropamide, dalapon and propham. Efficient herbicides with negligible persistence in soil at the doses applied were evaluated on poppy plants in the field at various stages of growth. Small plants were severely injured by 2,4-D, killed rapidly by bromoxynil, ioxynil, paraquat (in mixture + diquat), and more slowly by glyphosate and metribuzin. The resistance to herbicides increased with the age of the poppy plant. Severe damage with partial kill of developed plants was obtained with bromoxynil, ioxynil, glyphosate, and paraquat + diquat; the last treatment produced the fastest effect.

  11. Combined herbicide and saline stress differentially modulates hormonal regulation and antioxidant defense system in Oryza sativa cultivars.

    PubMed

    Islam, Faisal; Ali, Basharat; Wang, Jian; Farooq, Muhammad A; Gill, Rafaqat A; Ali, Shafaqat; Wang, Danying; Zhou, Weijun

    2016-10-01

    Plants are simultaneously exposed to a combination of biotic and abiotic stresses in field conditions. Crops respond to the combined stress in a unique way which cannot be understood by extrapolating the results of individual stress. In the present study, effects of individual and combined stress of herbicide (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) and salinity (NaCl) on two Oryza sativa cultivars (ZJ 88 and XS 134) were investigated. Both herbicide and saline stress affected the plant growth differentially and produced oxidative stress in rice cultivars. Interestingly, the combination of herbicide and salinity showed a significant protection to both rice cultivars by reducing ROS (H2O2, O2(-)) and lipid peroxidation through modulation of enzymatic (SOD, POD, CAT and APX) and non-enzymatic (TSP, sugars, phenolic and proline) antioxidants. In addition, active regulation of transcript levels of genes encoding Na(+) and K(+) (OsHKT1;5, OsLti6a,b, OsHKT2;1, OsSOS1, OsCNGC1, OsNHX1 and OsAKT1) transporter proteins reduced sodium and enhanced potassium accumulation under combined stress, resulted a better growth and ionic homeostasis in both rice cultivars. The production of ABA and IAA was significantly higher in cultivar XS 134 compared to cultivar ZJ 88 under control conditions. However, combined herbicide and saline stress enhanced the accumulation of phytohormones (IAA and ABA) and transcription of ethylene in cultivar ZJ 88, which might be one of the factors responsible for poor salt tolerance in sensitive cultivar. These findings indicated that herbicide application under saline stress confers tolerance to salinity in rice cultivars, likely by reducing oxidative damage, modulating mineral absorption, upgradation of antioxidant defense and by dynamic regulation of key genes involved in Na(+) and K(+) homeostasis in plants.

  12. Measuring Rates of Herbicide Metabolism in Dicot Weeds with an Excised Leaf Assay.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rong; Skelton, Joshua J; Riechers, Dean E

    2015-09-07

    In order to isolate and accurately determine rates of herbicide metabolism in an obligate-outcrossing dicot weed, waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus), we developed an excised leaf assay combined with a vegetative cloning strategy to normalize herbicide uptake and remove translocation as contributing factors in herbicide-resistant (R) and -sensitive (S) waterhemp populations. Biokinetic analyses of organic pesticides in plants typically include the determination of uptake, translocation (delivery to the target site), metabolic fate, and interactions with the target site. Herbicide metabolism is an important parameter to measure in herbicide-resistant weeds and herbicide-tolerant crops, and is typically accomplished with whole-plant tests using radiolabeled herbicides. However, one difficulty with interpreting biokinetic parameters derived from whole-plant methods is that translocation is often affected by rates of herbicide metabolism, since polar metabolites are usually not mobile within the plant following herbicide detoxification reactions. Advantages of the protocol described in this manuscript include reproducible, accurate, and rapid determination of herbicide degradation rates in R and S populations, a substantial decrease in the amount of radiolabeled herbicide consumed, a large reduction in radiolabeled plant materials requiring further handling and disposal, and the ability to perform radiolabeled herbicide experiments in the lab or growth chamber instead of a greenhouse. As herbicide resistance continues to develop and spread in dicot weed populations worldwide, the excised leaf assay method developed and described herein will provide an invaluable technique for investigating non-target site-based resistance due to enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism and detoxification.

  13. Mobility and efficacy of 2,4-D herbicide from slow-release delivery systems based on organo-zeolite and organo-bentonite complexes.

    PubMed

    Shirvani, Mehran; Farajollahi, Edris; Bakhtiari, Somayeh; Ogunseitan, Oladele A

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to develop slow-release formulations (SRFs) of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) using zeolite and bentonite minerals modified with cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA) surfactant. Adsorption-desorption, greenhouse bioassay and column experiments were carried out to assess the potential of the SRFs to control weeds while reducing the herbicide leaching losses to deep layers of soil. The results showed that only 6.5 mmol 2,4-D kg(-1) was retained by Na-bent, and the herbicide was not adsorbed by Na-zeol at all. The surface modification with CTMA surfactant, however, improved the 2,4-D adsorption capacity of the zeolite and bentonite up to 207.5 and 415.8 mmol kg(-1), respectively. The synthesized organo-minerals slowly released the retained 2,4-D discharging 22 to 64% of the adsorbed 2,4-D to the solution phase within 7 days. The SRFs significantly (P = 0.05) reduced the herbicide mobility within the soil columns keeping a great portion of the herbicide active ingredient in the upper 5 cm soil layer. The SRFs were significantly (P = 0.05) as effective as the free technical herbicide in weed control without harming the ryegrass as the main plant. Therefore, the synthesized SRFs could be considered as useful tools for weed control in sustainable agriculture.

  14. Surface water-ground water interaction: Herbicide transport into municipal collector wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verstraeten, Ingrid M.; Carr, J.D.; Steele, G.V.; Thurman, E.M.; Bastian, K.C.; Dormedy, D.F.

    1999-01-01

    During spring runoff events, herbicides in the Platte River are transported through an alluvial aquifer into collector wells located on an island in the river in 6 to 7 d. During two spring runoff events in 1995 and 1996, atrazine [2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine] concentrations in water from these wells reached approximately 7 ??g/L, 70 times more than the background concentration in ground water. Concentrations of herbicides and metabolites in the collector wells generally were one-half to one-fifth the concentrations of herbicides in the river for atrazine, alachlor [2-chloro-2'-6'-diethyl-N-(methoxymethyl)-acetanilide], alachlor ethane-sulfonic acid (ESA) [2-((2,6-diethylphenyl) (methoxymethyl)amino)-2- oxoethane-sulfonic acid], metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N- (2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)acetamide], cyanazine [2-((4-chloro-6-(ethyl-amino)- 1,3,5 triazin-2-yl)-amino)-2-methylpropionitrile], and acetochlor [2-chloro- N-(ethoxymethyl)-N-(2-ethyl-6methyl-phenyl) acetamide], suggesting that 20 to 50% river water could be present in the water from the collector wells, assuming no degradation. The effect of the river on the quality of water from the collector wells can be reduced through selective management of horizontal laterals of the collector wells. The quality of the water from the collector wells is dependent on the (i) selection of the collector well used, (ii) number and selection of laterals used, (iii) chemical characteristics of the contaminant, and (iv) relative mixing of the Platte River and a major upstream tributary.

  15. Work plan for determining the occurrence of glyphosate, its transformation product AMPA, other herbicide compounds, and antibiotics in midwestern United States streams, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Kolpin, D.W.; Scribner, E.A.; Sandstrom, M.W.; Kuivila, K.M.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the distribution of glyphosate and its primary transformation product aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in midwestern streams during post-application and harvest-season runoff events. Water samples will be collected in 2002 during two post-herbicide-application runoff events and one harvest-season runoff event from 53 sites on streams in the Midwestern United States. All samples will be analyzed at the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas, for glyphosate and 20 other herbicides. Samples will also be analyzed for a glyphosate transformation product (AMPA) and 26 other herbicide transformation products, using GC/MS or HPLC/MS. Selected samples will be analyzed for 36 antibiotics or antibiotic transformational products. Results from this study will represent the first broad-scale investigation of glyphosate and AMPA in U.S. water resources.

  16. Festuca arundinacea, glutathione S-transferase and herbicide safeners: a preliminary case study to reduce herbicidal pollution.

    PubMed

    Scarponi, Luciano; Del Buono, Daniele

    2009-11-01

    The expression of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in Festuca arundinacea was investigated in response to the following herbicide safeners: benoxacor, cloquintocet-mexyl, fenchlorazol-ethyl, fenclorim, fluxofenim and oxabetrinil. All the above compounds enhanced the GST activity tested towards the "model" substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Assays of GST activity towards the herbicides terbuthylazine (N(2)-tert-butyl-6-chloro-N(4)-ethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) and butachlor (N-butoxymethyl-2-chloro-2',6'-diethylacetanilide) as substrates also showed the ability of the safeners to enhance the enzyme activity towards both these herbicides, with the exception of cloquintocet-mexyl for the enzyme activity towards butachlor. As a consequence of the above effects at a macro-scale level, decreased herbicide accumulation and persistence were ascertained in response to the addition of the safener benoxacor to both terbuthylazine and butachlor treatments. These results are discussed in terms of capacity of benoxacor to induce herbicide detoxification in Festuca arundinacea with a view to utilizing them in reducing herbicide pollution.

  17. Establishment of Bacterial Herbicide Degraders in a Rapid Sand Filter for Bioremediation of Phenoxypropionate-Polluted Groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Louise; Nielsen, Tue Kjærgaard; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Aamand, Jens

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the establishment of natural bacterial degraders in a sand filter treating groundwater contaminated with the phenoxypropionate herbicides (RS)-2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)propanoic acid (MCPP) and (RS)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propanoic acid (DCPP) and the associated impurity/catabolite 4-chlorophenoxypropanoic acid (4-CPP). A pilot facility was set up in a contaminated landfill site. Anaerobic groundwater was pumped up and passed through an aeration basin and subsequently through a rapid sand filter, which is characterized by a short residence time of the water in the filter. For 3 months, the degradation of DCPP, MCPP, and 4-CPP in the sand filter increased to 15 to 30% of the inlet concentration. A significant selection for natural bacterial herbicide degraders also occurred in the sand filter. Using a most-probable-number (MPN) method, we found a steady increase in the number of culturable phenoxypropionate degraders, reaching approximately 5 × 105 degraders per g sand by the end of the study. Using a quantitative PCR targeting the two phenoxypropionate degradation genes, rdpA and sdpA, encoding stereospecific dioxygenases, a parallel increase was observed, but with the gene copy numbers being about 2 to 3 log units higher than the MPN. In general, the sdpA gene was more abundant than the rdpA gene, and the establishment of a significant population of bacteria harboring sdpA occurred faster than the establishment of an rdpA gene-carrying population. The identities of the specific herbicide degraders in the sand filter were assessed by Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from sand filter samples and from selected MPN plate wells. We propose a list of potential degrader bacteria involved in herbicide degradation, including representatives belonging to the Comamonadaceae and Sphingomonadales. PMID:26590282

  18. Establishment of Bacterial Herbicide Degraders in a Rapid Sand Filter for Bioremediation of Phenoxypropionate-Polluted Groundwater.

    PubMed

    Feld, Louise; Nielsen, Tue Kjærgaard; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Aamand, Jens; Albers, Christian Nyrop

    2015-11-20

    In this study, we investigated the establishment of natural bacterial degraders in a sand filter treating groundwater contaminated with the phenoxypropionate herbicides (RS)-2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)propanoic acid (MCPP) and (RS)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propanoic acid (DCPP) and the associated impurity/catabolite 4-chlorophenoxypropanoic acid (4-CPP). A pilot facility was set up in a contaminated landfill site. Anaerobic groundwater was pumped up and passed through an aeration basin and subsequently through a rapid sand filter, which is characterized by a short residence time of the water in the filter. For 3 months, the degradation of DCPP, MCPP, and 4-CPP in the sand filter increased to 15 to 30% of the inlet concentration. A significant selection for natural bacterial herbicide degraders also occurred in the sand filter. Using a most-probable-number (MPN) method, we found a steady increase in the number of culturable phenoxypropionate degraders, reaching approximately 5 × 10(5) degraders per g sand by the end of the study. Using a quantitative PCR targeting the two phenoxypropionate degradation genes, rdpA and sdpA, encoding stereospecific dioxygenases, a parallel increase was observed, but with the gene copy numbers being about 2 to 3 log units higher than the MPN. In general, the sdpA gene was more abundant than the rdpA gene, and the establishment of a significant population of bacteria harboring sdpA occurred faster than the establishment of an rdpA gene-carrying population. The identities of the specific herbicide degraders in the sand filter were assessed by Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from sand filter samples and from selected MPN plate wells. We propose a list of potential degrader bacteria involved in herbicide degradation, including representatives belonging to the Comamonadaceae and Sphingomonadales.

  19. Metabolism-based herbicide resistance and cross-resistance in crop weeds: a threat to herbicide sustainability and global crop production.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    Weedy plant species that have evolved resistance to herbicides due to enhanced metabolic capacity to detoxify herbicides (metabolic resistance) are a major issue. Metabolic herbicide resistance in weedy plant species first became evident in the 1980s in Australia (in Lolium rigidum) and the United Kingdom (in Alopecurus myosuroides) and is now increasingly recognized in several crop-weed species as a looming threat to herbicide sustainability and thus world crop production. Metabolic resistance often confers resistance to herbicides of different chemical groups and sites of action and can extend to new herbicide(s). Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, glycosyl transferase, and glutathione S-transferase are often implicated in herbicide metabolic resistance. However, precise biochemical and molecular genetic elucidation of metabolic resistance had been stalled until recently. Complex cytochrome P450 superfamilies, high genetic diversity in metabolic resistant weedy plant species (especially cross-pollinated species), and the complexity of genetic control of metabolic resistance have all been barriers to advances in understanding metabolic herbicide resistance. However, next-generation sequencing technologies and transcriptome-wide gene expression profiling are now revealing the genes endowing metabolic herbicide resistance in plants. This Update presents an historical review to current understanding of metabolic herbicide resistance evolution in weedy plant species.

  20. Metabolism-Based Herbicide Resistance and Cross-Resistance in Crop Weeds: A Threat to Herbicide Sustainability and Global Crop Production1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Weedy plant species that have evolved resistance to herbicides due to enhanced metabolic capacity to detoxify herbicides (metabolic resistance) are a major issue. Metabolic herbicide resistance in weedy plant species first became evident in the 1980s in Australia (in Lolium rigidum) and the United Kingdom (in Alopecurus myosuroides) and is now increasingly recognized in several crop-weed species as a looming threat to herbicide sustainability and thus world crop production. Metabolic resistance often confers resistance to herbicides of different chemical groups and sites of action and can extend to new herbicide(s). Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, glycosyl transferase, and glutathione S-transferase are often implicated in herbicide metabolic resistance. However, precise biochemical and molecular genetic elucidation of metabolic resistance had been stalled until recently. Complex cytochrome P450 superfamilies, high genetic diversity in metabolic resistant weedy plant species (especially cross-pollinated species), and the complexity of genetic control of metabolic resistance have all been barriers to advances in understanding metabolic herbicide resistance. However, next-generation sequencing technologies and transcriptome-wide gene expression profiling are now revealing the genes endowing metabolic herbicide resistance in plants. This Update presents an historical review to current understanding of metabolic herbicide resistance evolution in weedy plant species. PMID:25106819

  1. Herbicide incorporation by irrigation and tillage impact on runoff loss.

    PubMed

    Potter, Thomas L; Truman, Clint C; Strickland, Timothy C; Bosch, David D; Webster, Theodore M

    2008-01-01

    Runoff from farm fields is a common source of herbicide residues in surface waters. Incorporation by irrigation has the potential to reduce herbicide runoff risks. To assess impacts, rainfall was simulated on plots located in a peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) field in Georgia's Atlantic Coastal Plain region after pre-emergence application of metolachlor (2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-[(1S)-2-methoxy-1-methylethyl]-acetamide) and pendimethalin (N-(1-ethylpropyl)-3,4-dimethyl-2,6-dinitro-benzenamine). Runoff, sediment, and herbicide loss as function of strip tillage (ST) versus conventional tillage (CT) were compared with and without irrigation (12.5 mm) after application of an herbicide tank mixture. For the CT system, metolachlor runoff was reduced 2x and pendimethalin 1.2x when compared with the non-irrigated treatment. The difference in irrigated and non-irrigated metolachlor means was significant (P = 0.05). Irrigation reduced metolachlor runoff by 1.3x in the ST system, but there was a 1.4x increase for pendimethalin. Overall results indicated that irrigation incorporation reduces herbicide runoff with the greatest impact when CT is practiced and products like metolachlor, which have relatively low K(oc) and high water solubility, are used. The lower ST system response was likely due to a combination of spray interception and retention by the ST system cover crop mulch and higher ST soil organic carbon content and less total runoff. During the study, the measured K(oc) of both herbicides on runoff sediment was found to vary with tillage and irrigation after herbicide application. Generally, K(oc) was higher for ST sediment and when irrigation incorporation was used with the CT system. These results have significant implications for simulation model parametization.

  2. Herbicide phosphinothricin causes direct stimulation hormesis.

    PubMed

    Dragićević, Milan; Platiša, Jelena; Nikolić, Radomirka; Todorović, Slađana; Bogdanović, Milica; Mitić, Nevena; Simonović, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Herbicide phosphinothricin (PPT) inhibits glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme in nitrogen assimilation, thus causing ammonia accumulation, glutamine depletion and eventually plant death. However, the growth response of Lotus corniculatus L. plants immersed in solutions with a broad range of PPT concentrations is biphasic, with pronounced stimulating effect on biomass production at concentrations ≤ 50 μM and growth inhibition at higher concentrations. The growth stimulation at low PPT concentrations is a result of activation of chloroplastic isoform GS2, while the growth suppression is caused by inhibition of both cytosolic GS1 and GS2 at higher PPT concentrations. Since the results are obtained in cell-free system (e.g. protein extracts), to which the principles of homeostasis are not applicable, this PPT effect is an unambiguous example of direct stimulation hormesis. A detailed molecular mechanism of concentration-dependent interaction of both PPT and a related GS inhibitor, methionine sulfoximine, with GS holoenzymes is proposed. The mechanism is in concurrence with all experimental and literature data.

  3. Novel chromatographic separation and carbon solid-phase extraction of acetanilide herbicide degradation products.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Jody A

    2002-01-01

    One acetamide and 5 acetanilide herbicides are currently registered for use in the United States. Over the past several years, ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) and oxanilic acid (OA) degradation products of these acetanilide/acetamide herbicides have been found in U.S. ground waters and surface waters. Alachlor ESA and other acetanilide degradation products are listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) 1998 Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List. Consequently, EPA is interested in obtaining national occurrence data for these contaminants in drinking water. EPA currently does not have a method for determining these acetanilide degradation products in drinking water; therefore, a research method is being developed using liquid chromatography/negative ion electrospray/mass spectrometry with solid-phase extraction (SPE). A novel chromatographic separation of the acetochlor/alachlor ESA and OA structural isomers was developed which uses an ammonium acetate-methanol gradient combined with heating the analytical column to 70 degrees C. Twelve acetanilide degradates were extracted by SPE from 100 mL water samples using carbon cartridges with mean recoveries >90% and relative standard deviations < or =16%.

  4. Degradation of chloroacetanilide herbicides and bacterial community composition in lab-scale wetlands.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Omniea Fawzy; Maillard, Elodie; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Millet, Maurice; Imfeld, Gwenaël

    2015-07-01

    Degradation of chloroacetanilide herbicides rac-metolachlor, acetochlor, and alachlor, as well as associated bacterial populations, were evaluated in vertical upflow wetland columns using a combination of hydrochemical and herbicide analyses, and DNA-based approaches. Mass dissipation of chloroacetanilides, continuously supplied at 1.8-1.9 μM for 112 days, mainly occurred in the rhizosphere zone under nitrate and sulphate-reducing conditions, and averaged 61±14%, 52±12% and 29±19% for acetochlor, alachlor and rac-metolachlor, respectively. Metolachlor enantiomer fractions of 0.494±0.009 in the oxic zone and 0.480±0.005 in the rhizosphere zone indicated preferential biodegradation of the S-enantiomer. Chloroacetanilide ethane sulfonic acid and oxanilic acid degradates were detected at low concentrations only (0.5 nM), suggesting extensive degradation and the operation of yet unknown pathways for chloroacetanilide degradation. Hydrochemical parameters and oxygen concentration were major drivers of bacterial composition, whereas exposure to chloroacetanilides had no detectable impact. Taken together, the results underline the importance of anaerobic degradation of chloroacetanilides in wetlands, and highlight the potential of complementary chemical and biological approaches to characterise processes involved in the environmental dissipation of chloroacetanilides.

  5. Finding minimal herbicide concentrations in ground water? Try looking for their degradates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Thurman, E.M.; Linhart, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    Extensive research has been conducted regarding the occurrence of herbicides in the hydrologic system, their fate, and their effects on human health and the environment. Few studies, however, have considered herbicide transformation products (degradates). In this study of Iowa ground water, herbicide degradates were frequently detected. In fact, herbicide degradates were eight of the 10 most frequently detected compounds. Furthermore, a majority of a herbicide's measured concentration was in the form of its degradates — ranging from 55 to over 99%. The herbicide detection frequencies and concentrations varied significantly among the major aquifer types sampled. These differences, however, were much more pronounced when herbicide degradates were included. Aquifer types presumed to have the most rapid recharge rates (alluvial and bedrock/karst region aquifers) were those most likely to contain detectable concentrations of herbicide compounds. Two indirect estimates of ground-water age (depth of well completion and dissolved-oxygen concentration) were used to separate the sampled wells into general vulnerability classes (low, intermediate, and high). The results show that the herbicide detection frequencies and concentrations varied significantly among the vulnerability classes regardless of whether or not herbicide degradates were considered. Nevertheless, when herbicide degradates were included, the frequency of herbicide compound detection within the highest vulnerability class approached 90%, and the median total herbicide residue concentration increased over an order of magnitude, relative to the parent compounds alone, to 2 μg/l. The results from this study demonstrate that obtaining data on herbicide degradates is critical for understanding the fate of herbicides in the hydrologic system. Furthermore, the prevalence of herbicide degradates documented in this study suggests that to accurately determine the overall effect on human health and the environment of

  6. Herbicides and transformation products in surface waters of the Midwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Kalkhoff, S.J.; Porter, S.D.

    2003-01-01

    Most herbicides applied to crops are adsorbed by plants or transformed (degraded) in the soil, but small fractions are lost from fields and either move to streams in overland runoff, near surface flow, or subsurface drains, or they infiltrate slowly to ground water. Herbicide transformation products (TPs) can be more or less mobile and more or less toxic in the environment than their source herbicides. To obtain information on the concentrations of selected herbicides and TPs in surface waters of the Midwestern United States, 151 water samples were collected from 71 streams and five reservoir outflows in 1998. These samples were analyzed for 13 herbicides and 10 herbicide TPs. Herbicide TPs were found to occur as frequently or more frequently than source herbicides and at concentrations that were often larger than their source herbicides. Most samples contained a mixture of more than 10 different herbicides or TPs. The ratios of TPs to herbicide concentrations can be used to determine the source of herbicides in streams. Results of a two-component mixing model suggest that on average 90 percent or more of the herbicide mass in Midwestern streams during early summer runoff events originates from the runoff and 10 percent or less comes from increased ground water discharge.

  7. Simultaneous screening of herbicide degradation byproducts in water treatment plants using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaoliang; Shi, Honglan; Adams, Craig D; Timmons, Terry; Ma, Yinfa

    2010-04-28

    Currently, herbicides are widely used in various combinations at many stages of cultivation and during postharvest storage. There are increasing concerns about the public health impact of herbicide degradation byproducts that may be present in water bodies used either as drinking water or for recreational purposes. This work investigated the sulfonic acid and oxanilic acid degradation products of metolachlor, alachlor, acetochlor, and propachlor in a variety of water bodies. The objective was to develop a fast, accurate, and easy method for quantitative analysis of herbicide degradation products using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry without solid phase extraction, but performing levels of detection lower than those obtained in previous studies with solid phase extraction. This research also screened 68 water samples, both untreated source water and treated water, from 34 water treatment plants in Missouri. Finally, it examined seasonal trends in levels of those degradation products by collecting and testing samples monthly. This highly sensitive method can analyze these degradation products to low ng/L levels. The method limit of quantification ranges from 0.04 to 0.05 ppb for each analyte; and quantitative analyses show a precision with RSDs of around 0.6% to 3% in treated water and 2% to 19% in untreated source water. Concentrations of alachlor ESA, acetochlor OA, metolachlor OA, and metolachlor ESA were detected from the Missouri River and the Mississippi River water bodies in summer time. Occurrences of these compounds in treated water samples are all lower than those in the untreated source water samples.

  8. Isolation from agricultural soil and characterization of a Sphingomonas sp. able to mineralize the phenylurea herbicide isoproturon.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, S R; Ronen, Z; Aamand, J

    2001-12-01

    A soil bacterium (designated strain SRS2) able to metabolize the phenylurea herbicide isoproturon, 3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (IPU), was isolated from a previously IPU-treated agricultural soil. Based on a partial analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and the cellular fatty acids, the strain was identified as a Sphingomonas sp. within the alpha-subdivision of the proteobacteria. Strain SRS2 was able to mineralize IPU when provided as a source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. Supplementing the medium with a mixture of amino acids considerably enhanced IPU mineralization. Mineralization of IPU was accompanied by transient accumulation of the metabolites 3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-1-methylurea, 3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-urea, and 4-isopropyl-aniline identified by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, thus indicating a metabolic pathway initiated by two successive N-demethylations, followed by cleavage of the urea side chain and finally by mineralization of the phenyl structure. Strain SRS2 also transformed the dimethylurea-substituted herbicides diuron and chlorotoluron, giving rise to as-yet-unidentified products. In addition, no degradation of the methoxy-methylurea-substituted herbicide linuron was observed. This report is the first characterization of a pure bacterial culture able to mineralize IPU.

  9. Isolation from Agricultural Soil and Characterization of a Sphingomonas sp. Able To Mineralize the Phenylurea Herbicide Isoproturon

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Sebastian R.; Ronen, Zeev; Aamand, Jens

    2001-01-01

    A soil bacterium (designated strain SRS2) able to metabolize the phenylurea herbicide isoproturon, 3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (IPU), was isolated from a previously IPU-treated agricultural soil. Based on a partial analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and the cellular fatty acids, the strain was identified as a Sphingomonas sp. within the α-subdivision of the proteobacteria. Strain SRS2 was able to mineralize IPU when provided as a source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. Supplementing the medium with a mixture of amino acids considerably enhanced IPU mineralization. Mineralization of IPU was accompanied by transient accumulation of the metabolites 3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-1-methylurea, 3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-urea, and 4-isopropyl-aniline identified by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, thus indicating a metabolic pathway initiated by two successive N-demethylations, followed by cleavage of the urea side chain and finally by mineralization of the phenyl structure. Strain SRS2 also transformed the dimethylurea-substituted herbicides diuron and chlorotoluron, giving rise to as-yet-unidentified products. In addition, no degradation of the methoxy-methylurea-substituted herbicide linuron was observed. This report is the first characterization of a pure bacterial culture able to mineralize IPU. PMID:11722885

  10. Broad 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase Inhibitor Herbicide Tolerance in Soybean with an Optimized Enzyme and Expression Cassette[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Siehl, Daniel L.; Tao, Yumin; Albert, Henrik; Dong, Yuxia; Heckert, Matthew; Madrigal, Alfredo; Lincoln-Cabatu, Brishette; Lu, Jian; Fenwick, Tamara; Bermudez, Ericka; Sandoval, Marian; Horn, Caroline; Green, Jerry M.; Hale, Theresa; Pagano, Peggy; Clark, Jenna; Udranszky, Ingrid A.; Rizzo, Nancy; Bourett, Timothy; Howard, Richard J.; Johnson, David H.; Vogt, Mark; Akinsola, Goke; Castle, Linda A.

    2014-01-01

    With an optimized expression cassette consisting of the soybean (Glycine max) native promoter modified for enhanced expression driving a chimeric gene coding for the soybean native amino-terminal 86 amino acids fused to an insensitive shuffled variant of maize (Zea mays) 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD), we achieved field tolerance in transgenic soybean plants to the HPPD-inhibiting herbicides mesotrione, isoxaflutole, and tembotrione. Directed evolution of maize HPPD was accomplished by progressively incorporating amino acids from naturally occurring diversity and novel substitutions identified by saturation mutagenesis, combined at random through shuffling. Localization of heterologously expressed HPPD mimicked that of the native enzyme, which was shown to be dually targeted to chloroplasts and the cytosol. Analysis of the native soybean HPPD gene revealed two transcription start sites, leading to transcripts encoding two HPPD polypeptides. The N-terminal region of the longer encoded peptide directs proteins to the chloroplast, while the short form remains in the cytosol. In contrast, maize HPPD was found almost exclusively in chloroplasts. Evolved HPPD enzymes showed insensitivity to five inhibitor herbicides. In 2013 field trials, transgenic soybean events made with optimized promoter and HPPD variant expression cassettes were tested with three herbicides and showed tolerance to four times the labeled rates of mesotrione and isoxaflutole and two times the labeled rates of tembotrione. PMID:25192697

  11. Phenylurea herbicide sorption to biochars and agricultural soil

    PubMed Central

    WANG, DAOYUAN; MUKOME, FUNGAI N. D.; YAN, DENGHUA; WANG, HAO; SCOW, KATE M.; PARIKH, SANJAI J.

    2016-01-01

    Biochar is increasingly been used as a soil amendment to improve water holding capacity, reduce nutrient leaching, increase soil pH and also as a means to reduce contamination through sorption of heavy metals or organic pollutants. The sorption behavior of three phenylurea herbicides (monuron, diuron, linuron) on five biochars (Enhanced Biochar, Hog Waste, Turkey Litter, Walnut Shell and Wood Feedstock) and an agricultural soil (Yolo silt loam) was investigated using a batch equilibration method. Sorption isotherms of herbicides to biochars were well described by the Freundlich model (R2 = 0.93 -- 0.97). The adsorption KF values ranged from 6.94 to 1306.95 mg kg−1 and indicated the sorption of herbicides in the biochars and Yolo soil was in the sequence of linuron > diuron > monuron and walnut shell biochar > wood feedstock biochar > turkey litter biochar > enhanced biochar > hog waste biochar > Yolo soil. These data show that sorption of herbicides to biochar can have both positive (reduced off-site transport) and negative (reduced herbicide efficacy) implications and specific biochar properties, such as H/C ratio and surface area, should be considered together with soil type, agriculture chemical and climate condition in biochar application to agricultural soil to optimize the system for both agricultural and environmental benefits. PMID:26065514

  12. Herbicide retention in soil as affected by sugarcane mulch residue.

    PubMed

    Selim, H M; Zhou, L; Zhu, H

    2003-01-01

    Reducing surface and subsurface losses of herbicides in the soil and thus their potential contamination of water resources is a national concern. This study evaluated the effectiveness of sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) residue (mulch cover) in reducing nonpoint-source contamination of applied herbicides from sugarcane fields. Specifically, the effect of mulch residue on herbicide retention was quantified. Two main treatments were investigated: a no-till treatment and a no-mulch treatment. The amounts of extractable atrazine [2-chloro-4-(isopropylamino)-6-ethylamino-s-triazine], metribuzin [4-amino-6-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-3-(methylthio)-1,2,4-triazin-5(4H)-one], and pendimethalin [N-(ethylpropyl)-3,4-dimethyl-2,6-dinitroaniline] from the mulch residue and the surface soil layer were quantified during the 1999 and 2000 growing seasons. Significant amounts of applied herbicides were intercepted by the mulch residue. Extractable concentrations were at least one order of magnitude higher for the mulch residue compared with that retained by the soil. Moreover, the presence of mulch residue on the sugarcane rows was highly beneficial in minimizing runoff losses of the herbicides applied. When the residue was not removed, a reduction in runoff-effluent concentrations, as much as 50%, for atrazine and pendimethalin was realized. Moreover, the presence of mulch residue resulted in consistently lower estimates for rates of decay or disappearance of atrazine and pendimethalin in the surface soil.

  13. The structure-activity relationship in herbicidal monosubstituted sulfonylureas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zheng-Ming; Ma, Yi; Guddat, Luke; Cheng, Pei-Quan; Wang, Jian-Guo; Pang, Siew S; Dong, Yu-Hui; Lai, Cheng-Ming; Wang, Ling-Xiu; Jia, Guo-Feng; Li, Yong-Hong; Wang, Su-Hua; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Wei-Guang; Wang, Bao-Lei

    2012-05-24

    The herbicide sulfonylurea (SU) belongs to one of the most important class of herbicides worldwide. It is well known for its ecofriendly, extreme low toxicity towards mammals and ultralow dosage application. The original inventor, G Levitt, set out structure-activity relationship (SAR) guidelines for SU structural design to attain superhigh bioactivity. A new approach to SU molecular design has been developed. After the analysis of scores of SU products by X-ray diffraction methodology and after greenhouse herbicidal screening of 900 novel SU structures synthesized in the authors laboratory, it was found that several SU structures containing a monosubstituted pyrimidine moiety retain excellent herbicidal characteristics, which has led to partial revision of the Levitt guidelines. Among the novel SU molecules, monosulfuron and monosulfuron-ester have been developed into two new herbicides that have been officially approved for field application and applied in millet and wheat fields in China. A systematic structural study of the new substrate-target complex and the relative mode of action in comparison with conventional SU has been carried out. A new mode of action has been postulated.

  14. Effects of the herbicide imazapyr on juvenile Oregon spotted frogs.

    PubMed

    Yahnke, Amy E; Grue, Christian E; Hayes, Marc P; Troiano, Alexandra T

    2013-01-01

    Conflict between native amphibians and aquatic weed management in the Pacific Northwest is rarely recognized because most native stillwater-breeding amphibian species move upland during summer, when herbicide application to control weeds in aquatic habitats typically occurs. However, aquatic weed management may pose a risk for aquatic species present in wetlands through the summer, such as the Oregon spotted frog (OSF, Rana pretiosa), a state endangered species in Washington. Acute toxicity of herbicides used to control aquatic weeds tends to be low, but the direct effects of herbicide tank mixes on OSFs have remained unexamined. We exposed juvenile OSFs to tank mixes of the herbicide imazapyr, a surfactant, and a marker dye in a 96-h static-renewal test. The tank mix was chosen because of its low toxicity to fish and its effectiveness in aquatic weed control. Concentrations were those associated with low-volume (3.5 L/ha) and high-volume (7.0 L/ha) applications of imazapyr and a clean-water control. Following exposure, frogs were reared for two months in clean water to identify potential latent effects on growth. Endpoints evaluated included feeding behavior, growth, and body and liver condition indices. We recorded no mortalities and found no significant differences for any end point between the herbicide-exposed and clean-water control frogs. The results suggest that imazapyr use in wetland restoration poses a low risk of direct toxic effects on juvenile OSFs.

  15. Cloud based, Open Source Software Application for Mitigating Herbicide Drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraswat, D.; Scott, B.

    2014-12-01

    The spread of herbicide resistant weeds has resulted in the need for clearly marked fields. In response to this need, the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service launched a program named Flag the Technology in 2011. This program uses color-coded flags as a visual alert of the herbicide trait technology within a farm field. The flag based program also serves to help avoid herbicide misapplication and prevent herbicide drift damage between fields with differing crop technologies. This program has been endorsed by Southern Weed Science Society of America and is attracting interest from across the USA, Canada, and Australia. However, flags have risk of misplacement or disappearance due to mischief or severe windstorms/thunderstorms, respectively. This presentation will discuss the design and development of a cloud-based, free application utilizing open-source technologies, called Flag the Technology Cloud (FTTCloud), for allowing agricultural stakeholders to color code their farm fields for indicating herbicide resistant technologies. The developed software utilizes modern web development practices, widely used design technologies, and basic geographic information system (GIS) based interactive interfaces for representing, color-coding, searching, and visualizing fields. This program has also been made compatible for a wider usability on different size devices- smartphones, tablets, desktops and laptops.

  16. Effects of the herbicide imazapyr on juvenile Oregon spotted frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yahnke, Amy E.; Grue, Christian E.; Hayes, Marc P.; Troiano, Alexandra T.

    2013-01-01

    Conflict between native amphibians and aquatic weed management in the Pacific Northwest is rarely recognized because most native stillwater-breeding amphibian species move upland during summer, when herbicide application to control weeds in aquatic habitats typically occurs. However, aquatic weed management may pose a risk for aquatic species present in wetlands through the summer, such as the Oregon spotted frog (OSF, Rana pretiosa), a state endangered species in Washington. Acute toxicity of herbicides used to control aquatic weeds tends to be low, but the direct effects of herbicide tank mixes on OSFs have remained unexamined. We exposed juvenile OSFs to tank mixes of the herbicide imazapyr, a surfactant, and a marker dye in a 96-h static-renewal test. The tank mix was chosen because of its low toxicity to fish and its effectiveness in aquatic weed control. Concentrations were those associated with low-volume (3.5 L/ha) and high-volume (7.0 L/ha) applications of imazapyr and a clean-water control. Following exposure, frogs were reared for two months in clean water to identify potential latent effects on growth. Endpoints evaluated included feeding behavior, growth, and body and liver condition indices. We recorded no mortalities and found no significant differences for any end point between the herbicide-exposed and clean-water control frogs. The results suggest that imazapyr use in wetland restoration poses a low risk of direct toxic effects on juvenile OSFs.

  17. Catchment-scale herbicides transport: Theory and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Thomet, M.; Botter, G.; Rinaldo, A.

    2013-02-01

    This paper proposes and tests a model which couples the description of hydrologic flow and transport of herbicides at catchment scales. The model accounts for streamflow components' age to characterize short and long term fluctuations of herbicide flux concentrations in stream waters, whose peaks exceeding a toxic threshold are key to exposure risk of aquatic ecosystems. The model is based on a travel time formulation of transport embedding a source zone that describes near surface herbicide dynamics. To this aim we generalize a recently proposed scheme for the analytical derivation of travel time distributions to the case of solutes that can be partially taken up by transpiration and undergo chemical degradation. The framework developed is evaluated by comparing modeled hydrographs and atrazine chemographs with those measured in the Aabach agricultural catchment (Switzerland). The model proves reliable in defining complex transport features shaped by the interplay of long term processes, related to the persistence of solute components in soils, and short term dynamics related to storm inter-arrivals. The effects of stochasticity in rainfall patterns and application dates on concentrations and loads in runoff are assessed via Monte Carlo simulations, highlighting the crucial role played by the first rainfall event occurring after herbicide application. A probabilistic framework for critical determinants of exposure risk to aquatic communities is defined. Modeling of herbicides circulation at catchment scale thus emerges as essential tools for ecological risk assessment.

  18. Bioactivity of Several Herbicides on the Nanogram Level Under Different Soil Moisture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jung, S C; Kuk, Y I; Senseman, S A; Ahn, H G; Seong, C N; Lee, D J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a double-tube centrifuge method was employed to determine the effects of soil moisture on the bioactivity of cafenstrole, pretilachlor, benfuresate, oxyfluorfen and simetryn. In general, the available herbicide concentration in soil solution (ACSS) showed little change as soil moisture increased for herbicides. The total available herbicide in soil solution (TASS) typically increased as soil moisture increased for all herbicides. The relationship between TASS and % growth rate based on dry weight showed strong linear relationships for both cafenstrole and pretilachlor, with r2 values of 0.95 and 0.84, respectively. Increasing TASS values were consistent with increasing herbicide water solubility, with the exception of the ionizable herbicide simetryn. Plant absorption and % growth rate exhibited a strong linear relationship with TASS. According to the results suggested that TASS was a better predictor of herbicidal bioactivity than ACSS for all herbicides under unsaturated soil moisture conditions.

  19. ASSESSING THE RISKS OF NON-TARGET TERRESTRIAL PLANTS FROM HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of chemical herbicides to reduce weed competition is a major contributing factor to the high productivity of conventional intensive agricultural cropping systems. However, because of their inherent phytotoxicity, movement of herbicides from target crops and soils can adverse...

  20. Redstem filaree control in sugarbeets with micro-rate herbicide treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field experiments were conducted at the University of Wyoming Powell Research and Extension Center to evaluate redstem filaree control and sugarbeet response to several herbicide treatments. Preplant herbicides used were ethofumesate and pyrazon applied alone or in combination. Postemergence herbici...

  1. Assessing the additive risks of PSII herbicide exposure to the Great Barrier Reef.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Stephen E; Schaffelke, Britta; Shaw, Melanie; Bainbridge, Zoë T; Rohde, Ken W; Kennedy, Karen; Davis, Aaron M; Masters, Bronwyn L; Devlin, Michelle J; Mueller, Jochen F; Brodie, Jon E

    2012-01-01

    Herbicide residues have been measured in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon at concentrations which have the potential to harm marine plant communities. Monitoring on the Great Barrier Reef lagoon following wet season discharge show that 80% of the time when herbicides are detected, more than one are present. These herbicides have been shown to act in an additive manner with regards to photosystem-II inhibition. In this study, the area of the Great Barrier Reef considered to be at risk from herbicides is compared when exposures are considered for each herbicide individually and also for herbicide mixtures. Two normalisation indices for herbicide mixtures were calculated based on current guidelines and PSII inhibition thresholds. The results show that the area of risk for most regions is greatly increased under the proposed additive PSII inhibition threshold and that the resilience of this important ecosystem could be reduced by exposure to these herbicides.

  2. Preparation of antibodies and development of a sensitive immunoassay with fluorescence detection for triazine herbicides.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Sonia; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Benito-Peña, Elena; Marazuela, María Dolores; Marco, María Pilar; Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz

    2008-07-01

    Specific polyclonal antibodies against s-triazine herbicides were obtained by preparing immunogens coupling home-synthesized haptens derivatives of simazine (6-chloro-N-ethyl-N'-ethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) to lysine groups of hemocyanin from keyhole limpets and bovine serum albumin carrier proteins. Three highly sensitive rabbit antisera were obtained and evaluated with a battery of six enzyme tracers derived from triazine structures in an optimized ELISA format. The antiserum As8 and the HRP-2f tracer, which yield the best assay sensitivity for simazine (detection limit 0.11 +/- 0.02 microg L(-1), IC(50) 0.88 +/- 0.04 microg L(-1)), were applied to the development of a sensitive flow-through immunoassay for the analysis of this herbicide. The automated assay was based on a direct competitive immunosorbent assay and fluorescence detection. The optimized method presents an IC(50) value of 0.35 +/- 0.04 microg L(-1) with a detection limit of 1.3 +/- 0.9 ng L(-1) and a dynamic range from 0.010 to 7.5 microg L(-1) simazine. The generic nature of the antiserum was shown by good relative cross-reactivities with other triazines such as atrazine (420%) or propazine (130%) and a lower response to terbutylazine (6.4%) and desethyl-atrazine (2.2%). No cross-reactivity was obtained for nonrelated pesticides such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid or linuron and the assay could be applied as a screening method for triazine herbicides. The total analysis time was 30 min per determination and the immunosensor could be reused for more than 150 cycles without significant loss of activity. The immunosensor has been successfully applied to the direct analysis of simazine in surface water samples at the nanogram per liter level. The results obtained by comparative analysis of the immunosensor with a chromatographic procedure for triazines showed a close correspondence.

  3. Triazolopyrimidines as a New Herbicidal Lead for Combating Weed Resistance Associated with Acetohydroxyacid Synthase Mutation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Chao; Qu, Ren-Yu; Chen, Qiong; Yang, Jing-Fang; Cong-Wei, Niu; Zhen, Xi; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2016-06-22

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS; also known as acetolactate synthase; EC 2.2.1.6, formerly EC 4.1.3.18) is the first common enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the branched-chain amino acids in plants and a wide range of microorganisms. Weed resistance to AHAS-inhibiting herbicides, increasing at an exponential rate, is becoming a global problem and leading to an urgent demand of developing novel compounds against both resistant and wild AHAS. In the present work, a series of novel 2-aroxyl-1,2,4-triazolopyrimidine derivatives (a total of 55) were designed and synthesized with the aim to discover an antiresistant lead compound. Fortunately, the screening results indicated that many of the newly synthesized compounds showed a better, even excellent, inhibition effect against both the wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana AHAS and P197L mutants. Among them, compounds 5-3 to 5-17, compounds 5-19 to 5-26, compounds 5-28 to 5-45, and compound 5-48 have the lower values of resistance factor (RF) and display a potential power to overcome resistance associated with the P197L mutation in the enzyme levels. Further greenhouse in vivo assay showed that compounds 5-15 and 5-20 displayed "moderate" to "good" herbicidal activity against both the wild type-and the resistant (P197L mutation) Descurainia sophia, even at a rate as low as 0.9375 (g of ai/ha). The above results indicated that these two compounds could be used as new leads for the future development of antiresistance herbicides.

  4. Fluorescent Pseudomonas isolates from Mississippi Delta oxbow lakes: in vitro herbicide biotransformations.

    PubMed

    Zablotowicz, R M; Locke, M A; Hoagland, R E; Knight, S S; Cash, B

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescent pseudomonads were a major component [log (10) 4.2-6.1 colony-forming units mL-1] of the culturable heterotrophic gram-negative bacterioplankton observed in three Mississippi Delta oxbow lakes in this study. Pure cultures of fluorescent pseudomonads were isolated from three Mississippi Delta oxbow lakes (18 per lake), using selective media S-1. Classical physiological tests and Biolog GN plates were used in criteria for taxonomic identification. Most isolates were identified as biotypes of Pseudomonas fluorescens 55% (II), 7% (III), and 25% (V). About 7% of the isolates were identified as P. putida and 7% as non-fluorescent Pseudomonas-like. Cell suspensions of these isolates were tested for their ability to metabolize/co-metabolize six 14C-radiolabeled herbicides (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), cyanazine, fluometuron, metolachlor, propanil, and trifluralin) that are commonly used for crop production in this geographical area. Almost all (53 of 54) isolates transformed trifluralin via aromatic nitroreduction. Most isolates (70%) dechlorinated metolachlor to polar metabolites via glutathione conjugation. About 60% of the isolates hydrolyzed the amide bond of propanil (a rice herbicide) to dichloroaniline, with the highest frequency of propanil-hydrolyzing isolates observed in the lake from the watershed with rice cultivation. All propanil-hydrolyzing isolates were identified as P. fluorescens biotype II. No metabolism of cyanazine or fluometuron was observed by any isolates tested, indicating little or no potential for N-dealkylation among this group of bacterioplankton. No mineralization of 2,4-D labeled in either the carboxyl or ring position was observed. These results indicate that reductive and hydrolytic pathways for herbicide co-metabolism (aromatic nitroreduction, aryl acylamidase, and glutathione conjugation) are common in Mississippi Delta aquatic fluorescent pseudomonads; however, the potential for certain oxidative transformations (N

  5. Interaction of chiral herbicides with soil microorganisms, algae and vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Asad, Muhammad Asad Ullah; Lavoie, Michel; Song, Hao; Jin, Yujian; Fu, Zhengwei; Qian, Haifeng

    2017-02-15

    Chiral herbicides are often used in agriculture as racemic mixtures, although studies have shown that the fate and toxicity of herbicide enantiomers to target and non-target plants can be enantioselective and that herbicide toxicity can be mediated by only one enantiomer. If one enantiomer is active against the target plant, the use of enantiomer-rich herbicide mixtures instead of racemic herbicides could decrease the amount of herbicide applied to a crop and the cost of herbicide application, as well as unintended toxic herbicide effects in the environment. Such a change in the management of herbicide applications requires in-depth knowledge and a critical analysis of the fate and effects of herbicide enantiomers in the environment. This review article first synthesizes the current state of knowledge on soil and plant biodegradation of herbicide enantiomers. Second, we discuss our understanding of the biochemical toxicity mechanisms associated with both enantiomers in target and non-target plants gained from state-of-the-art genomic, proteomic and metabolomic tools. Third, we present the emerging view on the "side effects" of herbicides in the root microbiome and their repercussions on target or non-target plant metabolism. Although our review of the literature indicates that the toxicity of herbicide enantiomers is highly variable depending on plant species and herbicides, we found general trends in the enantioselective toxic effects of different herbicides in vascular plants and algae. The present study will be helpful for pesticide risk assessments as well as for the management of applying enriched-enantiomer herbicides.

  6. Holadysenterine, a natural herbicidal constituent from Drechslera australiensis for management of Rumex dentatus.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Muhammad; Javaid, Arshad; Ahmed, Ejaz; Javed, Tariq; Clary, Jacob

    2014-01-15

    Rumex dentatus L. is a problematic weed of wheat. Bioassay-directed isolation of culture filtrates of a plant pathogenic fungus Drechslera australiensis gave holadysenterine as the main herbicidal constituent against this weed of wheat. Leaf disc bioassay showed that herbicidal activity of holadysenterine was comparable to that of synthetic herbicide 2,4-D. This is the first report of this herbicidal compound from the genus Drechslera.

  7. Effects of the acute exposition to glyphosate-based herbicide on oxidative stress parameters and antioxidant responses in a hybrid Amazon fish surubim (Pseudoplatystoma sp).

    PubMed

    Sinhorin, Valéria Dornelles Gindri; Sinhorin, Adilson Paulo; Teixeira, Jhonnes Marcos dos Santos; Miléski, Kelly Márcia Lazarotto; Hansen, Paula Carine; Moreira, Paula Sueli Andrade; Kawashita, Nair Honda; Baviera, Amanda Martins; Loro, Vania Lúcia

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute glyphosate (active ingredient) exposure on the oxidative stress biomarkers and antioxidant defenses of a hybrid surubim (Pseudoplatystoma sp). The fish were exposed to different herbicide concentrations for 96 h. The thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyls and antioxidant responses were verified. The 15 mg a.pL(-1) of herbicide resulted in the death of 50% of the fish after 96 h. An increase in liver and muscle TBARS levels was observed when fish were exposed to the herbicide. The protein carbonyl content was also increased in the liver (4.5mg a.pL(-1) concentration) and brain (2.25 mg a.pL(-1) concentration). The antioxidant activities decreased in the liver and brain after exposure to herbicide. Levels of ascorbic acid in the liver (2.25 mg a.pL(-1) and 4.5 mg a.pL(-1) concentrations) and brain (2.25 mg a.pL(-1) concentration) were increased post-treatment. Levels of total thiols were increased in the liver and brain (2.25 mg L(-1) and 7.5mg a.pL(-1), respectively). Glyphosate exposure, at the tested concentrations affects surubim health by promoting changes that can affect their survival in natural environment. Some parameters as TBARS and protein carbonyl could be early biomarkers for Roundup exposure in this fish species.

  8. Enantioselective effects of herbicide imazapyr on Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yu-Ling; Wang, Yei-Shung; Yen, Jui-Hung

    2014-01-01

    The enantioselective toxicity of chiral herbicides in the environment is of increasing concern. To investigate the enantioselective effects of the chiral herbicide imazapyr on target organisms, we exposed Arabidopsis thaliana to imazapyr enantiomers and racemate. The results show that imazapyr was enantioselectively toxic to A. thaliana. The total chlorophyll content in A. thaliana was affected more by (+)-imazapyr than (±)-imazapyr and (-)-imazapyr. Concentrations of proline and malondialdehyde reflected a toxic effect in the order of (+)-imazapyr > (±)-imazapyr > (-)-imazapyr at every concentration. Acetolactate synthase (ALS) activity was inhibited more by (+)-imazapyr than (±)-imazapyr or (-)-imazapyr. At 100 mg L(-1) of imazapyr, ALS activity was 78%, 43%, and 19% with (-)-, (±)-, and (+)-imazapyr, respectively. The results suggest the significant enantioselective toxicity of imazapyr in A. thaliana for greater toxicity with (+)-imazapyr than (±)-imazapyr and (-)-imazapyr, which suggests that (+)-imazapyr has more herbicidal effect.

  9. Transcript markers of herbicide stress in Arabidopsis and their cross-species extrapolation to Brassica

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low concentrations and short environmental persistence times of some herbicides make it difficult to develop analytical methods to detect herbicide residues in plants or soils. In contrast, genomics may provide tools to identify herbicide exposure to plants in field settings. Usi...

  10. Why have no new herbicide modes of action appeared in recent years?

    PubMed

    Duke, Stephen O

    2012-04-01

    Herbicides with new modes of action are badly needed to manage the evolution of resistance of weeds to existing herbicides. Yet no major new mode of action has been introduced to the market place for about 20 years. There are probably several reasons for this. New potential products may have remained dormant owing to concerns that glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops have reduced the market for a new herbicide. The capture of a large fraction of the herbicide market by glyphosate with GR crops led to significantly diminished herbicide discovery efforts. Some of the reduced herbicide discovery research was also due to company consolidations and the availability of more generic herbicides. Another problem might be that the best herbicide molecular target sites may have already been discovered. However, target sites that are not utilized, for which there are inhibitors that are highly effective at killing plants, suggests that this is not true. Results of modern methods of target site discovery (e.g. gene knockout methods) are mostly not public, but there is no evidence of good herbicides with new target sites coming from these approaches. In summary, there are several reasons for a long dry period for new herbicide target sites; however, the relative magnitude of each is unclear. The economic stimulus to the herbicide industry caused by the evolution of herbicide-resistant weeds, especially GR weeds, may result in one or more new modes of action becoming available in the not too distant future.

  11. 81 FR 35767 - Pesticides; Draft Guidance for Pesticide Registrants on Herbicide Resistance Management Labeling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2016-06-03

    ... draft PR Notice (2016-XX) communicates the Agency's approach to addressing herbicide-resistant weeds by...-resistant weeds by providing guidance on labeling, education, training, and stewardship for herbicides... approach to slow the development and spread of herbicide- resistant weeds, and prolong the useful...

  12. Agricultural herbicide transport in a first-order intermittent stream, Nebraska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vogel, J.R.; Linard, J.I.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of herbicides in surface waters is a function of many variables, including scale of the watershed, physical and chemical properties of the herbicide, physical and chemical properties of the soil, rainfall intensity, and time of year. In this study, the transport of 6 herbicides and 12 herbicide degradates was examined during the 2004 growing season in an intermediate-scale agricultural watershed (146 ha) that is drained by a first-order intermittent stream, and the mass load for each herbicide in the stream was estimated. The herbicide load during the first week of storm events after application ranged from 17% of annual load for trifluralin to 84% of annual load for acetochlor. The maximum weekly herbicide load in the stream was generally within the first 3 weeks after application for those compounds that were applied within the watershed during 2004, and later for herbicides not applied within the watershed during 2004 but still detected in the stream. The apparent dominant mode of herbicide transport in the stream-determined by analysis amongst herbicide and conservative ion concentrations at different points in the hydrograph and in base flow samples-was either overland runoff or shallow subsurface flow, depending on the elapsed time after application and type of herbicide. The load as a percentage of use (LAPU) for the parent compounds in this study was similar to literature values for those compounds applied by the farmer within the watershed, but smaller for those herbicides that had rainfall as their only source within the watershed.

  13. 33 CFR Appendix E to Part 273 - Preventive Safety Measures in Handling of Herbicides

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Handling of Herbicides E Appendix E to Part 273 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS...—Preventive Safety Measures in Handling of Herbicides 1. Follow the label on each container before using the... accidental poisoning to the public or domestic animals. 3. Smoking is not permitted while herbicides...

  14. 33 CFR Appendix E to Part 273 - Preventive Safety Measures in Handling of Herbicides

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Handling of Herbicides E Appendix E to Part 273 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS...—Preventive Safety Measures in Handling of Herbicides 1. Follow the label on each container before using the... accidental poisoning to the public or domestic animals. 3. Smoking is not permitted while herbicides...

  15. 33 CFR Appendix E to Part 273 - Preventive Safety Measures in Handling of Herbicides

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Handling of Herbicides E Appendix E to Part 273 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS...—Preventive Safety Measures in Handling of Herbicides 1. Follow the label on each container before using the... accidental poisoning to the public or domestic animals. 3. Smoking is not permitted while herbicides...

  16. 75 FR 17857 - Removal of Obsolete References to Herbicides Containing Dioxin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 1 RIN 2900-AN56 Removal of Obsolete References to Herbicides Containing Dioxin AGENCY... regulation concerning evaluation of studies relating to the health effects of exposure to herbicides containing dioxin and radiation to remove the obsolete references to herbicides containing dioxin. This...

  17. 78 FR 54763 - Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents: Peripheral Neuropathy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AO32 Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents... peripheral neuropathy associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents. This amendment implements a... governing retroactive awards for certain diseases associated with herbicide exposure as required by...

  18. 76 FR 4245 - Herbicide Exposure and Veterans With Covered Service in Korea

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Parts 3, 17, and 21 RIN 2900-AN27 Herbicide Exposure and Veterans With Covered Service in... Benefits Act of 2003. Specifically, this document amends VA regulations regarding herbicide exposure of... regarding herbicide exposure of certain veterans who served in or near the Korean demilitarized zone...

  19. 77 FR 76170 - Presumption of Exposure to Herbicides for Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Not Supported

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... AFFAIRS Presumption of Exposure to Herbicides for Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Not Supported ACTION... Veterans were exposed to Agent Orange-associated herbicides during the Vietnam War. After careful review of... establishing a presumption of exposure to herbicides for Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans. VA will continue...

  20. 77 FR 47795 - Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents: Peripheral Neuropathy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AO32 Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents... connection for acute and sub-acute peripheral neuropathy associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents... associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents. DATES: Comments must be received by VA on or...

  1. 33 CFR Appendix E to Part 273 - Preventive Safety Measures in Handling of Herbicides

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Handling of Herbicides E Appendix E to Part 273 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS...—Preventive Safety Measures in Handling of Herbicides 1. Follow the label on each container before using the... accidental poisoning to the public or domestic animals. 3. Smoking is not permitted while herbicides...

  2. Soil microbial community response to surfactants and herbicides in two soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of herbicides on more than just the target weed and the effect of some herbicides on the soil biota is of environmental interest. The surfactants that are often used with herbicides are also coming under fire as a potential harm to the soil life. We used a silt loam and a silty clay loam ...

  3. Changes in concentrations of triazine and acetamide herbicides by bank filtration, ozonation, and chlorination in a public water supply

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verstraeten, Ingrid M.; Thurman, E.M.; Lindsey, M.E.; Lee, E.C.; Smith, R.D.

    2002-01-01

    The changes in triazine and acetamide concentrations in water during natural and artificial treatment by bank filtration, ozonation, filtration, and chlorination were measured at the well field and drinking water treatment plant of Lincoln, Nebraska, USA. The city's groundwater supply is affected by induced infiltration and transport of triazines and acetamide herbicides from the Platte River in late spring and early summer. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of infiltration and treatment on the presence of triazines and acetamides in drinking water. Samples of river water, well water, and public supply water at various stages of water treatment were collected from 1997-1999 during spring-runoff when the presence of herbicides in the Platte River is largest. In 1999, parent compounds were reduced by 76% of the concentration present in river water (33% by bank filtration, 41% by ozonation, and 1.5% by chlorination). Metabolites of herbicides for which analytical techniques existed were reduced by 21% (plus 26% by bank filtration, minus 23% by ozonation, and minus 24% by chlorination). However, increases in concentrations of specific metabolite compounds were identified after bank filtration and ozonation. After bank filtration, increases in cyanazine amide, cyanazine acid, and deethylcyanazine acid were identified. After ozonation, concentrations of deisopropylatrazine, deethylatrazine, didealkylatrazine, atrazine amide-I, hydroxydeethylatrazine, hydroxydeisopopylatrazine, deethylcyanazine acid, and deethylcyanazine increased. Concentrations of cyanazine acid and ethanesulfonic and oxanilic acids of acetamides decreased during ozonation. Our findings suggest that bank filtration and ozonation of water in part can shift the assessment of risk to human health associated with the consumption of the water from the parent compounds to their degradation products.

  4. Residual herbicide study on selected Hanford Site roadsides

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.L.; Kemp, C.J.; Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1993-08-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company routinely treats roadsides with herbicides to control undesirable plant growth. An experiment was conducted to test perennial grass germination in soils adjacent to roadways of the Hanford Site. The primary variable was the distance from the roadside. A simple germination test was executed in a controlled-environment chamber to determine the residual effects of these applications. As expected, the greatest herbicide activity was found directly adjacent to the roadway, approximately 0 to 20 ft (0 to 6.3 m) from the roadway.

  5. Dacthal and chlorophenoxy herbicides and chlorothalonil fungicide in eggs of osprey (Pandion haliaetus) from the Duwamish-Lake Washington-Puget Sound area of Washington state, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chu, S.; Henny, C.J.; Kaiser, J.L.; Drouillard, K.G.; Haffner, G.D.; Letcher, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Current-use chlorophenoxy herbicides including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, dicamba, triclopyr, dicamba, dimethyl tetrachloroterephthalate (DCPA or dacthal), and the metabolite of pyrethroids, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), and the fungicide, chlorothalonil, were investigated in the eggs of osprey (Pandion haliaetus) that were collected from 15 sites from five study areas Puget Sound/Seattle area of Washington State, USA. DCPA differs from acidic chlorophenoxy herbicides, and is not readily hydrolyzed to free acid or acid metabolites, and thus we developed a new method. Of the 12 chlorophenoxy herbicides and chlorothalonil analyzed only DCPA could be quantified at six of these sites (2.0 to 10.3 pg/g fresh weight). However, higher levels (6.9 to 85.5 pg/g fresh weight) of the unexpected DCPA structural isomer, dimethyl tetrachlorophthalate (diMe-TCP) were quantified in eggs from all sites. diMe-TCP concentrations tended to be higher in eggs from the Everett Harbor area. As diMe-TCP is not an industrial product, and not commercially available, the source of diMe-TCP is unclear. Regardless, these findings indicate that DCPA and diMe-TCP can be accumulated in the food chain of fish-eating osprey, and transferred in ovo to eggs, and thus may be of concern to the health of the developing chick and the general reproductive health of this osprey population. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dacthal and chlorophenoxy herbicides and chlorothalonil fungicide in eggs of osprey (Pandion haliaetus) from the Duwamish-Lake Washington-Puget Sound area of Washington state, USA.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shaogang; Henny, Charles J; Kaiser, James L; Drouillard, Ken G; Haffner, G Douglas; Letcher, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Current-use chlorophenoxy herbicides including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, dicamba, triclopyr, dicamba, dimethyl tetrachloroterephthalate (DCPA or dacthal), and the metabolite of pyrethroids, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), and the fungicide, chlorothalonil, were investigated in the eggs of osprey (Pandion haliaetus) that were collected from 15 sites from five study areas Puget Sound/Seattle area of Washington State, USA. DCPA differs from acidic chlorophenoxy herbicides, and is not readily hydrolyzed to free acid or acid metabolites, and thus we developed a new method. Of the 12 chlorophenoxy herbicides and chlorothalonil analyzed only DCPA could be quantified at six of these sites (2.0 to 10.3 pg/g fresh weight). However, higher levels (6.9 to 85.5 pg/g fresh weight) of the unexpected DCPA structural isomer, dimethyl tetrachlorophthalate (diMe-TCP) were quantified in eggs from all sites. diMe-TCP concentrations tended to be higher in eggs from the Everett Harbor area. As diMe-TCP is not an industrial product, and not commercially available, the source of diMe-TCP is unclear. Regardless, these findings indicate that DCPA and diMe-TCP can be accumulated in the food chain of fish-eating osprey, and transferred in ovo to eggs, and thus may be of concern to the health of the developing chick and the general reproductive health of this osprey population.

  7. Xenobiotic responsiveness of Arabidopsis thaliana to a chemical series derived from a herbicide safener.

    PubMed

    Skipsey, Mark; Knight, Kathryn M; Brazier-Hicks, Melissa; Dixon, David P; Steel, Patrick G; Edwards, Robert

    2011-09-16

    Plants respond to synthetic chemicals by eliciting a xenobiotic response (XR) that enhances the expression of detoxifying enzymes such as glutathione transferases (GSTs). In agrochemistry, the ability of safeners to induce an XR is used to increase herbicide detoxification in cereal crops. Based on the responsiveness of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to the rice safener fenclorim (4,6-dichloro-2-phenylpyrimidine), a series of related derivatives was prepared and tested for the ability to induce GSTs in cell suspension cultures. The XR in Arabidopsis could be divided into rapid and slow types depending on subtle variations in the reactivity (electrophilicity) and chemical structure of the derivatives. In a comparative microarray study, Arabidopsis cultures were treated with closely related compounds that elicited rapid (fenclorim) and slow (4-chloro-6-methyl-2-phenylpyrimidine) XRs. Both chemicals induced major changes in gene expression, including a coordinated suppression in cell wall biosynthesis and an up-regulation in detoxification pathways, whereas only fenclorim selectively induced sulfur and phenolic metabolism. These transcriptome studies suggested several linkages between the XR and oxidative and oxylipin signaling. Confirming links with abiotic stress signaling, suppression of glutathione content enhanced GST induction by fenclorim, whereas fatty acid desaturase mutants, which were unable to synthesize oxylipins, showed an attenuated XR. Examining the significance of these studies to agrochemistry, only those fenclorim derivatives that elicited a rapid XR proved effective in increasing herbicide tolerance (safening) in rice.

  8. Xenobiotic Responsiveness of Arabidopsis thaliana to a Chemical Series Derived from a Herbicide Safener*

    PubMed Central

    Skipsey, Mark; Knight, Kathryn M.; Brazier-Hicks, Melissa; Dixon, David P.; Steel, Patrick G.; Edwards, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Plants respond to synthetic chemicals by eliciting a xenobiotic response (XR) that enhances the expression of detoxifying enzymes such as glutathione transferases (GSTs). In agrochemistry, the ability of safeners to induce an XR is used to increase herbicide detoxification in cereal crops. Based on the responsiveness of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to the rice safener fenclorim (4,6-dichloro-2-phenylpyrimidine), a series of related derivatives was prepared and tested for the ability to induce GSTs in cell suspension cultures. The XR in Arabidopsis could be divided into rapid and slow types depending on subtle variations in the reactivity (electrophilicity) and chemical structure of the derivatives. In a comparative microarray study, Arabidopsis cultures were treated with closely related compounds that elicited rapid (fenclorim) and slow (4-chloro-6-methyl-2-phenylpyrimidine) XRs. Both chemicals induced major changes in gene expression, including a coordinated suppression in cell wall biosynthesis and an up-regulation in detoxification pathways, whereas only fenclorim selectively induced sulfur and phenolic metabolism. These transcriptome studies suggested several linkages between the XR and oxidative and oxylipin signaling. Confirming links with abiotic stress signaling, suppression of glutathione content enhanced GST induction by fenclorim, whereas fatty acid desaturase mutants, which were unable to synthesize oxylipins, showed an attenuated XR. Examining the significance of these studies to agrochemistry, only those fenclorim derivatives that elicited a rapid XR proved effective in increasing herbicide tolerance (safening) in rice. PMID:21778235

  9. Crystal structures of two novel sulfonylurea herbicides in complex with Arabidopsis thaliana acetohydroxyacid synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Guo; Lee, Patrick K.-M.; Dong, Yu-Hui; Pang, Siew Siew; Duggleby, Ronald G.; Li, Zheng-Ming; Guddat, Luke W.

    2009-08-17

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS; EC 2.2.1.6) is the first enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of the branched-chain amino acids. It catalyzes the conversion of two molecules of pyruvate into 2-acetolactate or one molecule of pyruvate and one molecule of 2-ketobutyrate into 2-aceto-2-hydroxybutyrate. AHAS requires the cofactors thiamine diphosphate (ThDP), Mg{sup 2+} and FAD for activity. The herbicides that target this enzyme are effective in protecting a broad range of crops from weed species. However, resistance in the field is now a serious problem worldwide. To address this, two new sulfonylureas, monosulfuron and monosulfuron ester, have been developed as commercial herbicides in China. These molecules differ from the traditional sulfonylureas in that the heterocyclic ring attached to the nitrogen atom of the sulfonylurea bridge is monosubstituted rather than disubstituted. The structures of these compounds in complex with the catalytic subunit of Arabidopsis thaliana AHAS have been determined to 3.0 and 2.8 {angstrom}, respectively. In both complexes, these molecules are bound in the tunnel leading to the active site, such that the sole substituent of the heterocyclic ring is buried deepest and oriented towards the ThDP. Unlike the structures of Arabidopsis thaliana AHAS in complex with the classic disubstituted sulfonylureas, where ThDP is broken, this cofactor is intact and present most likely as the hydroxylethyl intermediate.

  10. Interaction of Herbicides and Quinone with the QB-Protein of the Diuron-Resistant Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Mutant Dr2

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Philip; Steinback, Katherine E.

    1987-01-01

    We have used the diuron-resistant Dr2 mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which is altered in the 32 kilodalton QB-protein at amino acid 219 (valine to isoleucine), to investigate the interactions of herbicides and plastoquinone with the 32 kilodalton QB-protein. The data contained in this report demonstrate that the effects of this mutation are different from those of the more completely characterized mutant which confers extreme resistance to triazines in higher plants. The mutation in C. reinhardtii Dr2 confers only slight resistance to a number of inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport. Extreme triazine resistance results from an increase in the binding constant of the herbicide with the 32 kilodalton QB-protein, in contrast the diuron binding constant for chloroplasts isolated from wild-type (sensitive) Chlamydomonas and the resistant Dr2 are indistinguishable. We conclude that the altered structure in the 32 kilodalton QB-protein of Dr2 does not directly affect the diuron binding site. This mutation appears to alter the steric properties of the binding protein in such a way that diuron and plastoquinone do not directly compete for binding. This steric perturbation confers mild resistance to other herbicidal inhibitors of photosynthesis and alters the kinetics of QA to QB electron transfer. PMID:16665318

  11. An innovative bovine odorant binding protein-based filtering cartridge for the removal of triazine herbicides from water.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Federica; Basini, Giuseppina; Grolli, Stefano; Conti, Virna; Bianchi, Francesco; Grasselli, Francesca; Careri, Maria; Ramoni, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Odorant binding protein (OBP) is a multi-functional scavenger for small hydrophobic molecules dissolved in the mucus lining the nasal epithelia of mammals, characterized by broad ligand binding specificity towards a large number of structurally unrelated natural and synthetic molecules of different chemical classes. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the application of OBP as the active element of an innovative filtering matrix for the removal of environmental pollutants such as triazine herbicides from water samples. The filtering device, obtained by coupling histidine-tagged bovine OBP to a nickel nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) agarose resin, was characterized in terms of retention capacity for the herbicides atrazine, simazine, and propazine. Analysis of these herbicides at trace levels with solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using the selected ion monitoring mode proved the capabilities of the proposed device for the decontamination of surface and groundwater samples in the 0.2-2,300 μg/L concentration range, obtaining a reduction in the triazine content greater than 97 %, thus suggesting its possible use for the potabilization of water.

  12. Effervescence assisted on-site liquid phase microextraction for the determination of five triazine herbicides in water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueke; Shen, Zhigang; Wang, Peng; Liu, Chang; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Liu, Donghui

    2014-12-05

    A novel effervescence assisted on-site liquid phase microextraction has been developed for the determination of five triazine herbicides in water. The use of an effervescent tablet composed of citric acid, sodium bicarbonate and 1-undecanol (extraction solvent) was the core of the method. The triazine herbicides in water were extracted by 1-undecanol released from tablet under effervescence and determined by ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometer. The experimental variables, including NaCl concentration, temperature, weight of effervescent tablet, volume of extraction solvent and pH value, were screened by a Plackett-Burman design and optimized by a Box-Behnken design. Under the optimized conditions, good linearity was obtained in the range of 0.05-10 μg L(-1) with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9936 to 0.9988. The limits of quantification were between 7.6 and 26.4 ng L(-1), and the recoveries were in 71.4-93.2% with relative standard deviations of 2.5-10.9%. This method, which does not require centrifugation and any special apparatus, was successfully applied to determine triazine herbicides in real waters, promising to be a way to speed field sampling procedures for the organic pollutants monitoring in water.

  13. Effect of release herbicide on mortality, avoidance response, and growth of amphibian larvae in two forest wetlands.

    PubMed

    Wojtaszek, Barbara F; Buscarini, Teresa M; Chartrand, Derek T; Stephenson, Gerald R; Thompson, Dean G

    2005-10-01

    Effects of Release herbicide (triclopyr butoxyethyl ester, [TBEE]) on mortality, avoidance response, and growth of larval amphibians (Rana clamitans, Rana pipiens) were investigated using in situ enclosures deployed in two forest wetlands in northern Ontario, Canada. Release was applied at nominal concentrations ranging from 0.26 to 7.68 mg TBEE acid equivalents (AE)/L. No significant deleterious effects of this herbicide on larval growth were detected. However, concentration-dependent mortality and abnormal avoidance response were observed. Most mortality occurred within 96 h following treatment. Median lethal concentration (LC50) values for each species and experimental site ranged from 2.79 to 3.29 mg AE/L, while median effective concentration (EC50) values (abnormal avoidance response) ranged from 1.67 to 3.84 mg AE/L. The LC10 and EC10 endpoints approximated aqueous concentrations (0.59 mg AE/L) expected under direct aerial overspray scenarios, indicating a potential risk of impacts for a small proportion of native amphibian larvae. However, given the low frequency and limited use of this herbicide formulation in Canadian forestry, these risks are considered negligible. Changes in usage patterns would require concurrent chemical and biological monitoring of operational spray programs to accurately quantify the probability and magnitude of real-world exposures and to relate these exposure levels to concentration-response relationships including those described in this study.

  14. Factors affecting herbicide yields in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, June 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hainly, R.A.; Kahn, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Median concentrations and instantaneous yields of alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and simazine were generally highest at sites in the Lower Susquehanna River Basin and in agricultural subbasins. Instantaneous herbicide yields are related to land use, hydrogeologic setting, streamflow yield, and agricultural row cropping practices. The significance of these relations may be affected by the interdependence of the factors. The percentage of basin area planted in corn is the most influential factor in the prediction of herbicide yield. Instantaneous yields of all five herbicides measured in June 1994 related poorly to averaged 199094 herbicide use. Annually averaged herbicide-use data are too general to use as a predictor for short-term herbicide yields. An evaluation of factors affecting herbicide yields could be refined with more-current land use and land cover information and a more accurate estimate of the percentage of basin area planted in corn. Factors related to herbicide yields can be used to predict herbicide yields in other basins within the Chesapeake Bay watershed and to develop an estimate of herbicide loads to Chesapeake Bay.Median concentrations and instantaneous yields of alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and simazine were generally highest at sites in the Lower Susquehanna River Basin and in agricultural subbasins. Instantaneous herbicide yields are related to land use, hydrogeologic setting, streamflow yield, and agricultural row cropping practices. The significance of these relations may be affected by the interdependence of the factors. The percentage of basin area planted in corn is the most influential factor in the prediction of herbicide yield. Instantaneous yields of all five herbicides measured in June 1994 related poorly to averaged 1990-94 herbicide use. Annually averaged herbicide-use data are too general to use as a predictor for short-term herbicide yields. An evaluation of factors affecting herbicide yields could

  15. Herbicides and nitrate in near-surface aquifers in the midcontinental United States, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, Dana W.; Burkart, Michael R.; Thurman, E. Michael

    1994-01-01

    Hydrogeologic factors, land use, agricultural practices, local features, and water chemistry were analyzed for possible relation to herbicide and excess-nitrate detections. Herbicides and excess nitrate were detected more frequently in near-surface unconsolidated aquifers than in nearsurface bedrock aquifers. The depth to the top of the aquifer was inversely related to the frequency of detection of herbicides and excess nitrate. The proximity of streams to sampled wells also affected the frequency of herbicide detection. Significant seasonal differences were determined for the frequency of herbicide detection, but not for the frequency of excess nitrate.

  16. Influence of herbicide active ingredient, nozzle type, orifice size, spray pressure, and carrier volume rate on spray droplet size characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent concerns on herbicide spray drift and its subsequent impact on the surrounding environment and herbicide efficacy have prompted applicators to focus on methods to reduce off-target movement of herbicides. Herbicide applications are complex processes and as such few studies have been conducted...

  17. Herbicide safener-binding protein of maize. Purification, cloning, and expression of an encoding cDNA.

    PubMed

    Scott-Craig, J S; Casida, J E; Poduje, L; Walton, J D

    1998-03-01

    Dichloroacetamide safeners protect maize (Zea mays L.) against injury from chloroacetanilide and thiocarbamate herbicides. Etiolated maize seedlings have a high-affinity cytosolic-binding site for the safener [3H](R,S)-3-dichloroacetyl-2,2,5-trimethyl-1, 3-oxazol-idine ([3H]Saf), and this safener-binding activity (SafBA) is competitively inhibited by the herbicides. The safener-binding protein (SafBP), purified to homogeneity, has a relative molecular weight of 39,000, as shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and an isoelectric point of 5.5. Antiserum raised against purified SafBP specifically recognizes a 39-kD protein in etiolated maize and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.), which have SafBA, but not in etiolated wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), oat (Avena sativa L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), or Arabidopsis, which lack SafBA. SafBP is most abundant in the coleoptile and scarcest in the leaves, consistent with the distribution of SafBA. SBP1, a cDNA encoding SafBP, was cloned using polymerase chain reaction primers based on purified proteolytic peptides. Extracts of Escherichia coli cells expressing SBP1 have strong [3H]Saf binding, which, like binding to the native maize protein, is competitively inhibited by the safener dichlormid and the herbicides S-ethyl dipropylthiocarbamate, alachlor, and metolachlor. SBP1 is predicted to encode a phenolic O-methyltransferase, but SafBP does not O-methylate catechol or caffeic acid. The acquisition of its encoding gene opens experimental approaches for the evaluation of the role of SafBP in response to the relevant safeners and herbicides.

  18. A herbicide antidote (safener) induces the activity of both the herbicide detoxifying enzyme and of a vacuolar transporter for the detoxified herbicide.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, C; Dufaud, A; Tommasini, R; Kreuz, K; Amrhein, N; Martinoia, E

    1994-09-26

    In plants potentially toxic compounds are ultimately deposited in the large central vacuole. In this report we show that isolated barley mesophyll vacuoles take up the glucoside conjugate of the herbicide derivate [5-hydroxyphenyl]primisulfuron. Transport is stimulated by Mg-ATP and is distinct from that previously described for glutathione conjugates. Treatment of barley with different herbicide antidotes (safeners) revealed that the safener cloquintocet-mexyl doubles the vacuolar transport activities for both the glutathione and glucoside conjugates. Stimulation of the uptake of the metolachlor-glutathione conjugate was the result of an increased uptake velocity whereas the Km remained unaltered, suggesting that the higher activity was due to a higher expression of the transporter. These results indicate that modulation of vacuolar transport activities are an integral part of the detoxification mechanism of plants.

  19. Effects of herbicide-treated host plants on the development of Mamestra brassicae L. caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Melanie; Geisthardt, Martin; Brühl, Carsten A

    2014-11-01

    Herbicides are widely used pesticides that affect plants by changing their chemistry. In doing so, herbicides might also influence the quality of plants as food for herbivores. To study the effects of herbicides on host plant quality, 3 plant species (Plantago lanceolata L., P. major L., and Ranunculus acris L.) were treated with sublethal rates of either a sulfonylurea (Atlantis WG, Bayer CropScience) or a glyphosate (Roundup LB Plus, Monsanto) herbicide, and the development of caterpillars of the cabbage moth Mamestra brassicae L. that fed on these plants was observed. Of the 6 tested plant-herbicide combinations, 1 combination (R. acris + sulfonylurea herbicide) resulted in significantly lower caterpillar weight, increased time to pupation, and increased overall development time compared with larvae that were fed unsprayed plants. These results might be caused by a lower nutritional value of these host plants or increased concentrations of secondary metabolites that are involved in plant defense. The results of the present and other studies suggest potential risks to herbivores that feed on host plants treated with sublethal rates of herbicides. However, as the effects of herbicides on host plant quality appear to be species-specific and as there are numerous plant-herbicide-herbivore relationships in agricultural landscapes, a general reduction in herbicide contamination of nontarget habitats (e.g., field margins) might mitigate the negative effects of herbicides on host plant quality.

  20. Fourier transform of delayed fluorescence as an indicator of herbicide concentration.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ya; Tan, Jinglu

    2014-12-21

    It is well known that delayed fluorescence (DF) from Photosystem II (PSII) of plant leaves can be potentially used to sense herbicide pollution and evaluate the effect of herbicides on plant leaves. The research of using DF as a measure of herbicides in the literature was mainly conducted in time domain and qualitative correlation was often obtained. Fourier transform is often used to analyze signals. Viewing DF signal in frequency domain through Fourier transform may allow separation of signal components and provide a quantitative method for sensing herbicides. However, there is a lack of an attempt to use Fourier transform of DF as an indicator of herbicide. In this work, the relationship between the Fourier transform of DF and herbicide concentration was theoretically modelled and analyzed, which immediately yielded a quantitative method to measure herbicide concentration in frequency domain. Experiments were performed to validate the developed method.

  1. Sorption of the herbicide aminocyclopyrachlor by cation modified clay minerals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aminocyclopyrachlor is a newly registered herbicide for the control of broadleaf weeds, grasses, vines and woody species in non-crops, turf, sod farms, and residential areas. At typical soil pH levels, aminocyclopyrachlor is in the anionic form. Anionic pesticides are generally weakly retained by mo...

  2. Analysis of Herbicide Transport from Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmental impacts caused by herbicide loss from agricultural production are well documented in the surface runoff-prone claypan region. The most widely known impact was for atrazine, which caused the Mark Twain Lake to be listed in the original 303(d) list for impaired waters. While this lake ha...

  3. Herbicide resistance in weeds: Survey, characterization, and mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this paper is to present a systematic diagnostic approach towards the characterization of herbicide resistance in a given weed population with regards to profile (single, multiple, cross resistance), magnitude (fold level), mechanism, and related bio-physiological aspects. Diagnosing her...

  4. Cytogenetic studies of three triazine herbicides. I. In vitro studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atrazine, simazine, and cyanazine are widely used pre-emergence and post-emergence triazine herbicides that have made their way into the potable water supply of many agricultural communities. Because of this and the prevalence of contradictory cytogenetic studies in the literatur...

  5. Cotton Response to Herbicide Technologies, Row Patterns, and Tillage Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton producers must make decisions related to cotton varieties, herbicide systems, tillage systems, and row patterns. A study was conducted to compare a conventional variety, a glyphosate tolerant variety, and a glufosinate tolerant variety in both conventional tillage and conservation tillage sys...

  6. Assessing off-taraget impacts of herbicide drift on plants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plants and plant communities provide vital economic services including production of food and fiber crops for direct human consumption and ecosystem services including wildlife habitat and cycling of nutrients and energy. These services can be impacted if herbicides drift from t...

  7. Herbicides for establishment of seeded pearl millet x napiergrass hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The establishment of warm-season grasses in pastures from seed is difficult partly because of competition from both annual broad leaf and grass weed seedlings. Use of herbicides is often problematic because many that kill annual grass seedlings are detrimental to seedlings of the desired species. ...

  8. Palmer Amaranth Identification and Documentation of Herbicide Resistance in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Palmer amaranth (Amaranthuspalmeri S. Wats.) has greatly disrupted agricultural practices in the US with its rapid growth and rapid evolution of herbicide resistance. This weed species is now suspected in Argentina. To document whether the suspected plant populations are indeed Palmer amaranth, mo...

  9. Evaluation of Reflex (fomesafen) herbicide for watermelon in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective preemergence herbicides are needed for weed control in watermelon grown from transplants. Reflex (fomesafen) was found to be effective and to exhibit crop safety in southeast USA. Trials were conducted during 2011 and 2012 in southeast Oklahoma to determine if this product would be useful...

  10. Herbicide-resistant weed management: focus on glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Beckie, Hugh J

    2011-09-01

    This review focuses on proactive and reactive management of glyphosate-resistant (GR) weeds. Glyphosate resistance in weeds has evolved under recurrent glyphosate usage, with little or no diversity in weed management practices. The main herbicide strategy for proactively or reactively managing GR weeds is to supplement glyphosate with herbicides of alternative modes of action and with soil-residual activity. These herbicides can be applied in sequences or mixtures. Proactive or reactive GR weed management can be aided by crop cultivars with alternative single or stacked herbicide-resistance traits, which will become increasingly available to growers in the future. Many growers with GR weeds continue to use glyphosate because of its economical broad-spectrum weed control. Government farm policies, pesticide regulatory policies and industry actions should encourage growers to adopt a more proactive approach to GR weed management by providing the best information and training on management practices, information on the benefits of proactive management and voluntary incentives, as appropriate. Results from recent surveys in the United States indicate that such a change in grower attitudes may be occurring because of enhanced awareness of the benefits of proactive management and the relative cost of the reactive management of GR weeds.

  11. 59 FR- Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-02-03

    ... Vietnam era and the subsequent development of Hodgkin's disease and porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT). The... consistent with chloracne Hodgkin's disease Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Porphyria cutanea tarda Soft-tissue... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AG69 Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents...

  12. Modelling the effect of fluctuating herbicide concentrations on algae growth.

    PubMed

    Copin, Pierre-Jean; Coutu, Sylvain; Chèvre, Nathalie

    2015-03-01

    Herbicide concentrations fluctuate widely in watercourses after crop applications and rain events. The level of concentrations in pulses can exceed the water chronic quality criteria. In the present study, we proposed modelling the effects of successive pulse exposure on algae. The deterministic model proposed is based on two parameters: (i) the typical growth rate of the algae, obtained by monitoring growth rates of several successive batch cultures in growth media, characterizing both the growth of the control and during the recovery periods; (ii) the growth rate of the algae exposed to pulses, determined from a dose-response curve obtained with a standard toxicity test. We focused on the herbicide isoproturon and on the freshwater alga Scenedesmus vacuolatus, and we validated the model prediction based on effect measured during five sequential pulse exposures in laboratory. The comparison between the laboratory and the modelled effects illustrated that the results yielded were consistent, making the model suitable for effect prediction of the herbicide photosystem II inhibitor isoproturon on the alga S. vacuolatus. More generally, modelling showed that both pulse duration and level of concentration play a crucial role. The application of the model to a real case demonstrated that both the highest peaks and the low peaks with a long duration affect principally the cell density inhibition of the alga S. vacuolatus. It is therefore essential to detect these characteristic pulses when monitoring of herbicide concentrations are conducted in rivers.

  13. NEGATIVE-ION MASS SPECTROMETRY OF SULFONYLUREA HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfonylurea herbicides have been studied using neg-ion desorption chem.-ionization (DCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and DCI-MS/MS techniques. Both {M-H]- and M.- ions were obsd. in the DCI mass spectra. The collisonally activated dissocn. (CAD) spectra were characteristic of the str...

  14. PREDICTING RISKS TO WILDLIFE FROM THE OFFTARGET MOVEMENT OF HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    While insecticide applications are generally thought of as the greatest pesticide risk to wildlife, the recent literature would suggest the indirect effects of herbicides on wildlife are much greater. The resulting alteration of habitat and decrease in food sources from the off ...

  15. Factors Influencing Observed Tillage Impacts on Herbicide Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, E. A.; Huang, C.; Smith, D. R.

    2009-04-01

    The widespread use and potential human health effects of the herbicides atrazine and glyphosate have generated interest in establishing how no-tillage impacts loading of these herbicides to runoff water in comparison to other tillage practices. In this study, potentially confounding factos such as time in tillage practice and type and distribution of residue cover, are weighed against inherent tillage impacts to soil structure in terms of relative effects on herbicide transport with runoff water. In this study, two small watersheds (one in no-till (NT) and one rotational till (RT)) were monitored during the first three years since conversion of the RT watershed from NT. In addition, rainfall simulation was applied to plots within each watershed during the first, third, and fifth years since the conversion. Runoff atrazine and glyphosate losses from RT areas were compared to losses from NT areas as a ratio of RT:NT. Results indicate a trend of increasing RT:NT value with time in tillage. Watershed monitoring indicated greater herbicide loading to runoff water from the NT watershed than the RT watershed during the first year since RT conversion, but this relationship reversed by the third year since conversion to RT. In addition, rainfall simulations were performed on small boxes of NT or RT soil having varying types and levels of residue cover in an attempt to isolate residue cover effects from true tillage effects.

  16. Vinegar as a broadcast herbicide for spring-transplanted onions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The weed control challenges for onion production are formidable; however, these challenges are even greater for those considering organic crop production. Organic onion producers need additional organic herbicides that can effectively provide post-emergent weed control. Field research was conducted...

  17. Reactions of Sweet Corn Hybrids to Prevalent Diseases and Herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This 27-year summary is of University of Illinois sweet corn nurseries from 1984 to 2010, and includes the reactions of 800 hybrids to eight diseases and three herbicides. Commercially-available and pre-commercial hybrids included 547 shrunken-2 hybrids (317 yellow, 152 bi-color, and 78 white), 117 ...

  18. Online coupling of in-tube solid-phase microextraction with direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry for rapid determination of triazine herbicides in water using carbon-nanotubes-incorporated polymer monolith.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Li, Xianjiang; Li, Ze; Zhang, Yiding; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2014-05-20

    Online coupling of in-tube solid phase microextraction (IT-SPME) with direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) was realized for the first time and applied in the analysis of triazine herbicides in lake water and orange juice. We incorporated single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into a polymer monolith containing methacrylic acid (MAA) and ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) to form a novel poly(methacrylic acid-co-ethylene dimethacrylate-co-single wall carbon nanotubes) (poly(MAA-EDMA-SWNT)) monolith, which was then used in IT-SPME for enrichment of six triazine herbicides from water samples. With the online combination of IT-SPME with DART-MS, the analytes desorbed from the monolith were directly ionized by DART and transferred into MS for detection, thus rapid determination was achieved. Compared with regular DART-MS method, this online IT-SPME-DART-MS method was more sensitive and reproducible, because of the IT-SPME procedures and the isotope-labeled internal standard used in the experiment. Six triazine herbicides were determined simultaneously using this method with good linearity (R(2) > 0.998). The limit of quantification (signal-to-noise ratio of S/N = 10) of the six herbicides were only 0.06-0.46 ng/mL. The proposed method has been applied to determine triazine herbicides in lake water and orange juice, showing satisfactory recovery (85%-106%) and reproducibility (relative standard deviation of RSD = 3.1%-10.9%).

  19. Effect of sugarcane cropping systems on herbicide losses in surface runoff.

    PubMed

    Nachimuthu, Gunasekhar; Halpin, Neil V; Bell, Michael J

    2016-07-01

    Herbicide runoff from cropping fields has been identified as a threat to the Great Barrier Reef ecosystem. A field investigation was carried out to monitor the changes in runoff water quality resulting from four different sugarcane cropping systems that included different herbicides and contrasting tillage and trash management practices. These include (i) Conventional - Tillage (beds and inter-rows) with residual herbicides used; (ii) Improved - only the beds were tilled (zonal) with reduced residual herbicides used; (iii) Aspirational - minimum tillage (one pass of a single tine ripper before planting) with trash mulch, no residual herbicides and a legume intercrop after cane establishment; and (iv) New Farming System (NFS) - minimum tillage as in Aspirational practice with a grain legume rotation and a combination of residual and knockdown herbicides. Results suggest soil and trash management had a larger effect on the herbicide losses in runoff than the physico-chemical properties of herbicides. Improved practices with 30% lower atrazine application rates than used in conventional systems produced reduced runoff volumes by 40% and atrazine loss by 62%. There were a 2-fold variation in atrazine and >10-fold variation in metribuzin loads in runoff water between reduced tillage systems differing in soil disturbance and surface residue cover from the previous rotation crops, despite the same herbicide application rates. The elevated risk of offsite losses from herbicides was illustrated by the high concentrations of diuron (14μgL(-1)) recorded in runoff that occurred >2.5months after herbicide application in a 1(st) ratoon crop. A cropping system employing less persistent non-selective herbicides and an inter-row soybean mulch resulted in no residual herbicide contamination in runoff water, but recorded 12.3% lower yield compared to Conventional practice. These findings reveal a trade-off between achieving good water quality with minimal herbicide contamination and

  20. Determination of chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites in water using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostetler, K.A.; Thurman, E.M.

    2000-01-01

    Analytical methods using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) were developed for the analysis of the following chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites in water: alachlor ethanesulfonic acid (ESA); alachlor oxanilic acid; acetochlor ESA; acetochlor oxanilic acid; metolachlor ESA; and metolachlor oxanilic acid. Good precision and accuracy were demonstrated for both the HPLC-DAD and HPLC/MS methods in reagent water, surface water, and ground water. The average HPLC-DAD recoveries of the chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites from water samples spiked at 0.25, 0.5 and 2.0 ??g/l ranged from 84 to 112%, with relative standard deviations of 18% or less. The average HPLC/MS recoveries of the metabolites from water samples spiked at 0.05, 0.2 and 2.0 ??g/l ranged from 81 to 118%, with relative standard deviations of 20% or less. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) for all metabolites using the HPLC-DAD method was 0.20 ??g/l, whereas the LOQ using the HPLC/MS method was at 0.05 ??g/l. These metabolite-determination methods are valuable for acquiring information about water quality and the fate and transport of the parent chloroacetanilide herbicides in water. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  1. Modifying sorbents in controlled release formulations to prevent herbicides pollution.

    PubMed

    Flores Céspedes, F; Villafranca Sánchez, M; Pérez García, S; Fernández Pérez, M

    2007-10-01

    The herbicides chloridazon and metribuzin, identified as groundwater pollutants, were incorporated in alginate-based granules to obtain controlled release properties. In this research the effect of incorporation of sorbents such as bentonite, anthracite and activated carbon in alginate basic formulation were not only studied on encapsulation efficiency but also on the release rate of herbicides which was studied using water release kinetic tests. In addition, sorption studies of herbicides with bentonite, anthracite and activated carbon were made. The kinetic experiments of chloridazon and metribuzin release in water have shown that the release rate is higher in metribuzin systems than in those prepared with chloridazon, which has lower water solubility. Besides, it can be deduced that the use of sorbents reduces the release rate of the chloridazon and metribuzin in comparison to the technical product and to the alginate formulation without sorbents. The highest decrease in release rate corresponds to the formulations prepared with activated carbon as a sorbent. The water uptake, permeability, and time taken for 50% of the active ingredient to be released into water, T(50), were calculated to compare the formulations. On the basis of a parameter of an empirical equation used to fit the herbicide release data, the release of chloridazon and metribuzin from the various formulations into water is controlled by a diffusion mechanism. Sorption capacity of the sorbents for chloridazon and metribuzin, ranging from 0.53mgkg(-1) for the metribuzin sorption on bentonite to 2.03x10(5)mgkg(-1) for the sorption of chloridazon on the activated carbon, was the most important factor modulating the herbicide release.

  2. Cross-resistance to herbicides in annual ryegrass (lolium rigidum)

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher, J.T.; Powles, S.B.; Liljegren, D.R.; Holtum, J.A.M. )

    1991-04-01

    Lolium rigidum Gaud. biotype SLR31 is resistant to the herbicide diclofop-methyl and cross-resistant to several sulfonylurea herbicides. Wheat and the cross-resistant ryegrass exhibit similar patterns of resistance to sulfonylurea herbicides, suggesting that the mechanism of resistance may be similar. Cross-resistant ryegrass is also resistant to the wheat-selective imidazolinone herbicide imazamethabenz. The cross-resistant biotype SLR31 metabolized (phenyl-U-{sup 14}C)chlorsulfuron at a faster rate than a biotype which is susceptible to both diclofop-methyl and chlorsulfuron. A third biotype which is resistant to diclofop-methyl but not to chlorsulfuron metabolized chlorsulfuron at the same rate as the susceptible biotype. The increased metabolism of chlorsulfuron observed in the cross-resistant biotype is, therefore, correlated with the patterns of resistance observed in these L. rigidum biotypes. During high performance liquid chromatography analysis the major metabolite of chlorsulfuron in both susceptible and cross-resistant ryegrass coeluted with the major metabolite produced in wheat. The major product is clearly different from the major product in the tolerant dicot species, flax (Linium usitatissimum). The elution pattern of metabolites of chlorsulfuron was the same for both the susceptible and cross-resistant ryegrass but the cross-resistant ryegrass metabolized chlorsulfuron more rapidly. The investigation of the dose response to sulfonylurea herbicides at the whole plant level and the study of the metabolism of chlorsulfuron provide two independent sets of data which both suggest that the resistance to chlorsulfuron in cross-resistant ryegrass biotype SLR31 involves a wheat-like detoxification system.

  3. Assessment of potential aquatic herbicide impacts to California aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Siemering, Geoffrey S; Hayworth, Jennifer D; Greenfield, Ben K

    2008-10-01

    A series of legal decisions culminated in 2002 with the California State Water Resources Control Board funding the San Francisco Estuary Institute to develop and implement a 3-year monitoring program to determine the potential environmental impacts of aquatic herbicide applications. The monitoring program was intended to investigate the behavior of all aquatic pesticides in use in California, to determine potential impacts in a wide range of water-body types receiving applications, and to help regulators determine where to direct future resources. A tiered monitoring approach was developed to achieve a balance between program goals and what was practically achievable within the project time and budget constraints. Water, sediment, and biota were collected under "worst-case" scenarios in close association with herbicide applications. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat dibromide, glyphosate, fluridone, triclopyr, and 2,4-D were monitored. A range of chemical analyses, toxicity tests, and bioassessments were conducted. At each site, risk quotients were calculated to determine potential impacts. For sediment-partitioning herbicides, sediment quality triad analysis was performed. Worst-case scenario monitoring and special studies showed limited short-term and no long-term toxicity directly attributable to aquatic herbicide applications. Risk quotient calculations called for additional risk characterizations; these included limited assessments for glyphosate and fluridone and more extensive risk assessments for diquat dibromide, chelated copper products, and copper sulfate. Use of surfactants in conjunction with aquatic herbicides was positively associated with greater ecosystem impacts. Results therefore warrant full risk characterization for all adjuvant compounds.

  4. Herbicide-resistant forms of Arabidopsis thaliana acetohydroxyacid synthase: characterization of the catalytic properties and sensitivity to inhibitors of four defined mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, A K; Duggleby, R G

    1998-01-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) catalyses the first step in the synthesis of the branched-chain amino acids and is the target of several classes of herbicides. Four mutants (A122V, W574S, W574L and S653N) of the AHAS gene from Arabidopsis thaliana were constructed, expressed in Escherichia coli, and the enzymes were purified. Each mutant form and wild-type was characterized with respect to its catalytic properties and sensitivity to nine herbicides. Each enzyme had a pH optimum near 7.5. The specific activity varied from 13% (A122V) to 131% (W574L) of the wild-type and the Km for pyruvate of the mutants was similar to the wild-type, except for W574L where it was five-fold higher. The activation by cofactors (FAD, Mg2+ and thiamine diphosphate) was examined. A122V showed reduced affinity for all three cofactors, whereas S653N bound FAD more strongly than wild-type AHAS. Six sulphonylurea herbicides inhibited A122V to a similar degree as the wild-type but S653N showed a somewhat greater reduction in sensitivity to these compounds. In contrast, the W574 mutants were insensitive to these sulphonylureas, with increases in the Kiapp (apparent inhibition constant) of several hundred fold. All four mutants were resistant to three imidazolinone herbicides with decreases in sensitivity ranging from 100-fold to more than 1000-fold. PMID:9677339

  5. Effect of new auxin herbicide formulations on control of herbicide resistant weeds and on microbial activities in the rhizosphere

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Widespread distribution of glyphosate-resistant weeds in soybean-growing areas across Mississippi has economically affected soybean planting and follow-up crop management operations. New multiple herbicide-resistant crop (including soybean) technologies with associated formulations will soon be comm...

  6. Regulation of catabolic enzymes during long-term exposure of Delftia acidovorans MC1 to chlorophenoxy herbicides.

    PubMed

    Benndorf, Dirk; Davidson, Ian; Babel, Wolfgang

    2004-04-01

    Delftia acidovorans MC1 is able to grow on chlorophenoxy herbicides such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxypropionic acid (2,4-DCPP) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid as sole sources of carbon and energy. High concentrations of the potentially toxic organics inhibit the productive degradation and poison the organism. To discover the target of chlorophenoxy herbicides in D. acidovorans MC1 and to recognize adaptation mechanisms, the response to chlorophenoxy acids at the level of proteins was analysed. The comparison of protein patterns after chemostatic growth on pyruvate and 2,4-DCPP facilitated the discovery of several proteins induced and repressed due to the substrate shifts. Many of the induced enzymes, for example two chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenases, are involved in the metabolism of 2,4-DCPP. A stronger induction of some catabolic enzymes (chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase TfdC(II), chloromuconate cycloisomerase TfdD) caused by an instant increase in the concentration of 2,4-DCPP resulted in increased rates of productive detoxification and finally in resistance of the cells. Nevertheless, the decrease of the (S)-2,4-DCPP-specific 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase in 2D gels reveals a potential bottleneck in 2,4-DCPP degradation. Well-known heat-shock proteins and oxidative-stress proteins play a minor role in adaptation, because apart from DnaK only a weak or no induction of the proteins GroEL, AhpC and SodA was observed. Moreover, the modification of elongation factor Tu (TufA), a strong decrease of asparaginase and the induction of the hypothetical periplasmic protein YceI point to additional resistance mechanisms against chlorophenoxy herbicides.

  7. Photoassisted Degradation of a Herbicide Derivative, Dinoseb, in Aqueous Suspension of Titania

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Niyaz A.; Haque, Malik M.; Khan, Abuzar; Muneer, Mohd.; Boxall, Colin

    2012-01-01

    The titanium dioxide (TiO2) photoassisted degradation of herbicide dinoseb has been examined in aqueous suspensions under UV light irradiation. The degradation kinetics were studied under various conditions such as substrate concentration, type of catalyst, catalyst dosage, pH, and light intensity as well as in presence of electron acceptors such as hydrogen peroxide, potassium bromate, and potassium persulphate under continuous air purging, and the degradation rates were found to be strongly influenced by these parameters. The Degussa P25 was found to be more efficient photocatalyst as compared to other photocatalysts tested. Dinoseb was found to degrade efficiently in acidic pH and all the electron acceptors studied enhanced the degradation rate. The results manifested that the photocatalysis of dinoseb followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. A qualitative study of the degradation products generated during the process was performed by GC-MS, and a degradation mechanism was proposed. PMID:22536127

  8. THE ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF TRICHLORACETIC ACID (TCAA) IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) is a member of the family of compounds known as chloroacetic acids, which includes mono-, di- and trichloroacetic acid. The significant property these compounds share is that they are all phytotoxic. TCAA once was widely used as a potent herbicide. ...

  9. The environmental occurrence of herbicides: The importance of degradates in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Thurman, E.M.; Linhart, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    Numerous studies are being conducted to investigate the occurrence, fate, and effects on human health and the environment from the extensive worldwide use of herbicides to control weeds. Few studies, however, are considering the degradates of these herbicides in their investigations. Our study of herbicides in aquifers across Iowa found herbicide degradates to be prevalent in ground water, being detected in about 75% of the wells sampled. With the exception of atrazine, the frequencies of detection in ground water for a given herbicide increased multifold when its degradates were considered. Furthermore, a majority of the measured concentration for a given herbicide was in the form of its degradates—even for a relatively persistent compound such as atrazine. For this study, degradates comprised from 60 to over 99% of a herbicide's measured concentration. Because herbicide degradates can have similar acute and chronic toxicity as their parent compounds, these compounds have environmental significance as well as providing a more complete understanding of the fate and transport of a given herbicide. Thus, it is essential that degradates are included in any type of herbicide investigation.

  10. CSR1, the sole target of imidazolinone herbicide in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Yuzuki; Tinker, Nicholas; Colville, Adam; Miki, Brian

    2007-09-01

    The imidazolinone-tolerant mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, csr1-2(D), carries a mutation equivalent to that found in commercially available Clearfield crops. Despite their widespread usage, the mechanism by which Clearfield crops gain imidazolinone herbicide tolerance has not yet been fully characterized. Transcription profiling of imazapyr (an imidazolinone herbicide)-treated wild-type and csr1-2(D) mutant plants using Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip microarrays was performed to elucidate further the biochemical and genetic mechanisms of imidazolinone resistance. In wild-type shoots, the genes which responded earliest to imazapyr treatment were detoxification-related genes which have also been shown to be induced by other abiotic stresses. Early-response genes included steroid sulfotransferase (ST) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO), as well as members of the glycosyltransferase, glutathione transferase (GST), cytochrome P450, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE) and alternative oxidase (AOX) protein families. Later stages of the imazapyr response involved regulation of genes participating in biosynthesis of amino acids, secondary metabolites and tRNA. In contrast to the dynamic changes in the transcriptome profile observed in imazapyr-treated wild-type plants, the transcriptome of csr1-2(D) did not exhibit significant changes following imazapyr treatment, compared with mock-treated csr1-2(D). Further, no substantial difference was observed between wild-type and csr1-2(D) transcriptomes in the absence of imazapyr treatment. These results indicate that CSR1 is the sole target of imidazolinone and that the csr1-2(D) mutation has little or no detrimental effect on whole-plant fitness.

  11. Growth in Coculture Stimulates Metabolism of the Phenylurea Herbicide Isoproturon by Sphingomonas sp. Strain SRS2

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Sebastian R.; Ronen, Zeev; Aamand, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Metabolism of the phenylurea herbicide isoproturon by Sphingomonas sp. strain SRS2 was significantly enhanced when the strain was grown in coculture with a soil bacterium (designated strain SRS1). Both members of this consortium were isolated from a highly enriched isoproturon-degrading culture derived from an agricultural soil previously treated regularly with the herbicide. Based on analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, strain SRS1 was assigned to the β-subdivision of the proteobacteria and probably represents a new genus. Strain SRS1 was unable to degrade either isoproturon or its known metabolites 3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-1-methylurea, 3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-urea, or 4-isopropyl-aniline. Pure culture studies indicate that Sphingomonas sp. SRS2 is auxotrophic and requires components supplied by association with other soil bacteria. A specific mixture of amino acids appeared to meet these requirements, and it was shown that methionine was essential for Sphingomonas sp. SRS2. This suggests that strain SRS1 supplies amino acids to Sphingomonas sp. SRS2, thereby leading to rapid metabolism of 14C-labeled isoproturon to 14CO2 and corresponding growth of strain SRS2. Proliferation of strain SRS1 suggests that isoproturon metabolism by Sphingomonas sp. SRS2 provides unknown metabolites or cell debris that supports growth of strain SRS1. The role of strain SRS1 in the consortium was not ubiquitous among soil bacteria; however, the indigenous soil microflora and some strains from culture collections also stimulate isoproturon metabolism by Sphingomonas sp. strain SRS2 to a similar extent. PMID:12089031

  12. Quantitative Evaluation of the Environmental Impact Quotient (EIQ) for Comparing Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Kniss, Andrew R; Coburn, Carl W

    2015-01-01

    Various indicators of pesticide environmental risk have been proposed, and one of the most widely known and used is the environmental impact quotient (EIQ). The EIQ has been criticized by others in the past, but it continues to be used regularly in the weed science literature. The EIQ is typically considered an improvement over simply comparing the amount of herbicides applied by weight. Herbicides are treated differently compared to other pesticide groups when calculating the EIQ, and therefore, it is important to understand how different risk factors affect the EIQ for herbicides. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the suitability of the EIQ as an environmental indicator for herbicides. Simulation analysis was conducted to quantify relative sensitivity of the EIQ to changes in risk factors, and actual herbicide EIQ values were used to quantify the impact of herbicide application rate on the EIQ Field Use Rating. Herbicide use rate was highly correlated with the EIQ Field Use Rating (Spearman's rho >0.96, P-value <0.001) for two herbicide datasets. Two important risk factors for herbicides, leaching and surface runoff potential, are included in the EIQ calculation but explain less than 1% of total variation in the EIQ. Plant surface half-life was the risk factor with the greatest relative influence on herbicide EIQ, explaining 26 to 28% of the total variation in EIQ for actual and simulated EIQ values, respectively. For herbicides, the plant surface half-life risk factor is assigned values without any supporting quantitative data, and can result in EIQ estimates that are contrary to quantitative risk estimates for some herbicides. In its current form, the EIQ is a poor measure of herbicide environmental impact.

  13. Plan of study to determine the effect of changes in herbicide use on herbicide concentrations in Midwestern streams, 1989-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goolsby, Donald A.; Boyer, Laurie L.; Battaglin, William A.

    1994-01-01

    An approach was developed to determine if recent changes in the use of herbicides has affected herbicide concentrations in Midwestern streams. This approach also provides a plan to determine if the abnormally high rainfall and flooding in 1993 has an effect on nitrate concentrations in 1994 in streams that flooded in 1993. The approach involves sampling 53 stream sites, 50 of which were sampled in 1989 and 1990 as part of a reconnaissance to determine the geographic and seasonal distribution of herbicides in 10 Midwestern States. Sites will be sampled twice, once prior to application of herbicides, in March or early April, and once during the first runoff event after application of herbicides. Samples will be analyzed for 11 herbicide and 2 atrazine metabolites by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Samples will also be analyzed for ESA (an alachlor metabolite), two cyanazine metabolites, and nutrients. Changes to the manufacturers' label have decreased the maximum recommended application rate for atrazine on com and sorghum by about 50 percent since the 1989-90 study. Conversely, the use of other herbicides, such as cyanazine, has increased by more than 25 percent since 1989. Statistical procedures such as Wilcoxon signed rank tests for paired samples will be used to determine if the distributions of herbicide and nitrate concentrati