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Sample records for acid hybridization probes

  1. Fluorescent hybridization probes for nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Ju, Jingyue; Turro, Nicholas J

    2012-04-01

    Due to their high sensitivity and selectivity, minimum interference with living biological systems, and ease of design and synthesis, fluorescent hybridization probes have been widely used to detect nucleic acids both in vivo and in vitro. Molecular beacons (MBs) and binary probes (BPs) are two very important hybridization probes that are designed based on well-established photophysical principles. These probes have shown particular applicability in a variety of studies, such as mRNA tracking, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) monitoring, and microorganism identification. Molecular beacons are hairpin oligonucleotide probes that present distinctive fluorescent signatures in the presence and absence of their target. Binary probes consist of two fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide strands that can hybridize to adjacent regions of their target and generate distinctive fluorescence signals. These probes have been extensively studied and modified for different applications by modulating their structures or using various combinations of fluorophores, excimer-forming molecules, and metal complexes. This review describes the applicability and advantages of various hybridization probes that utilize novel and creative design to enhance their target detection sensitivity and specificity.

  2. Kit for detecting nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2001-01-01

    A kit is provided for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample, the kit comprising: a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent; and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the first hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker; a third hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the third hybridization probe including the same detectable marker as the second hybridization probe; and a fourth hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the third hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the fourth hybridization probe including the first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with the second complexing agent; wherein the first and second hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence and the third and fourth hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence, the detectable marker is not present on the first or fourth hybridization probes and the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes each include a competitive nucleic acid sequence which is sufficiently complementary to a third portion of the target sequence that the competitive sequences of the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes compete with each other to hybridize to the third portion of the

  3. Continuously tunable nucleic acid hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lucia R; Wang, Juexiao Sherry; Fang, John Z; Evans, Emily R; Pinto, Alessandro; Pekker, Irena; Boykin, Richard; Ngouenet, Celine; Webster, Philippa J; Beechem, Joseph; Zhang, David Yu

    2015-12-01

    In silico-designed nucleic acid probes and primers often do not achieve favorable specificity and sensitivity tradeoffs on the first try, and iterative empirical sequence-based optimization is needed, particularly in multiplexed assays. We present a novel, on-the-fly method of tuning probe affinity and selectivity by adjusting the stoichiometry of auxiliary species, which allows for independent and decoupled adjustment of the hybridization yield for different probes in multiplexed assays. Using this method, we achieved near-continuous tuning of probe effective free energy. To demonstrate our approach, we enforced uniform capture efficiency of 31 DNA molecules (GC content, 0-100%), maximized the signal difference for 11 pairs of single-nucleotide variants and performed tunable hybrid capture of mRNA from total RNA. Using the Nanostring nCounter platform, we applied stoichiometric tuning to simultaneously adjust yields for a 24-plex assay, and we show multiplexed quantitation of RNA sequences and variants from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples.

  4. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1997-04-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided. 7 figs.

  5. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided.

  6. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using a bifunctional hybridization probe

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detecting and isolating a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids is provided using a bifunctional hybridization probe capable of hybridizing to the target sequence that includes a detectable marker and a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent. A kit is also provided for detecting a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids using a bifunctional hybridization probe according to this method.

  7. Interactive fluorophore and quencher pairs for labeling fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Marras, Salvatore A E

    2008-03-01

    The use of fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes that generate a fluorescence signal only when they bind to their target enables real-time monitoring of nucleic acid amplification assays. Real-time nucleic acid amplification assays markedly improves the ability to obtain qualitative and quantitative results. Furthermore, these assays can be carried out in sealed tubes, eliminating carryover contamination. Fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes are available in a wide range of different fluorophore and quencher pairs. Multiple hybridization probes, each designed for the detection of a different nucleic acid sequence and each labeled with a differently colored fluorophore, can be added to the same nucleic acid amplification reaction, enabling the development of high-throughput multiplex assays. In order to develop robust, highly sensitive and specific real-time nucleic acid amplification assays it is important to carefully select the fluorophore and quencher labels of hybridization probes. Selection criteria are based on the type of hybridization probe used in the assay, the number of targets to be detected, and the type of apparatus available to perform the assay. This article provides an overview of different aspects of choosing appropriate labels for the different types of fluorescent hybridization probes used with different types of spectrofluorometric thermal cyclers currently available.

  8. Hybridization properties of long nucleic acid probes for detection of variable target sequences, and development of a hybridization prediction algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ohrmalm, Christina; Jobs, Magnus; Eriksson, Ronnie; Golbob, Sultan; Elfaitouri, Amal; Benachenhou, Farid; Strømme, Maria; Blomberg, Jonas

    2010-11-01

    One of the main problems in nucleic acid-based techniques for detection of infectious agents, such as influenza viruses, is that of nucleic acid sequence variation. DNA probes, 70-nt long, some including the nucleotide analog deoxyribose-Inosine (dInosine), were analyzed for hybridization tolerance to different amounts and distributions of mismatching bases, e.g. synonymous mutations, in target DNA. Microsphere-linked 70-mer probes were hybridized in 3M TMAC buffer to biotinylated single-stranded (ss) DNA for subsequent analysis in a Luminex® system. When mismatches interrupted contiguous matching stretches of 6 nt or longer, it had a strong impact on hybridization. Contiguous matching stretches are more important than the same number of matching nucleotides separated by mismatches into several regions. dInosine, but not 5-nitroindole, substitutions at mismatching positions stabilized hybridization remarkably well, comparable to N (4-fold) wobbles in the same positions. In contrast to shorter probes, 70-nt probes with judiciously placed dInosine substitutions and/or wobble positions were remarkably mismatch tolerant, with preserved specificity. An algorithm, NucZip, was constructed to model the nucleation and zipping phases of hybridization, integrating both local and distant binding contributions. It predicted hybridization more exactly than previous algorithms, and has the potential to guide the design of variation-tolerant yet specific probes.

  9. Application of locked nucleic acid-based probes in fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Carvalho, Daniel; Guimarães, Nuno; Madureira, Pedro; Figueiredo, Céu; Wengel, Jesper; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) employing nucleic acid mimics as probes is becoming an emerging molecular tool in the microbiology area for the detection and visualization of microorganisms. However, the impact that locked nucleic acid (LNA) and 2'-O-methyl (2'-OMe) RNA modifications have on the probe that is targeting microorganisms is unknown. In this study, the melting and hybridization efficiency properties of 18 different probes in regards to their use in FISH for the detection of the 16S rRNA of Helicobacter pylori were compared. For the same sequence and target, probe length and the type of nucleic acid mimics used as mixmers in LNA-based probes strongly influence the efficiency of detection. LNA probes with 10 to 15 mers showed the highest efficiency. Additionally, the combination of 2'-OMe RNA with LNA allowed an increase on the fluorescence intensities of the probes. Overall, these results have significant implications for the design and applications of LNA probes for the detection of microorganisms.

  10. Permeabilization of mycolic-acid-containing actinomycetes for in situ hybridization with fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Macnaughton, S J; O'Donnell, A G; Embley, T M

    1994-10-01

    The application of whole-cell hybridization using labelled oligonucleotide probes in microbial systematics and ecology is limited by difficulties in permeabilizing many Gram-positive organisms. In this investigation paraformaldehyde treatment, acid methanolysis and acid hydrolysis were evaluated as a means of permeabilizing mycolic-acid-containing actinomycetes prior to hybridization with a fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probe designed to bind to a conserved sequence of bacterial 16S rRNA. Methods were evaluated on stationary-phase cultures of Gordona bronchialis, Mycobacterium fortuitum, Nocardia asteroides, N. brasiliensis, Rhodococcus equi, R. erythropolis, R. fascians, R. rhodochrous and Tsukamurella paurometabola, none of which could be probed following 4% (w/v) paraformaldehyde fixation. For comparison and to test the general applicability of mild acid pretreatments, Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida were also studied. The data showed that most of the mycolic-acid-containing organisms were successfully permeabilized by mild acid hydrolysis in 1 M HCl at 37 degrees C. Cells were treated for different lengths of time. In general, the mycolic-acid-containing organisms required between 30 and 50 min hydrolysis, whereas B. subtilis, E. coli and P. putida were rendered permeable in only 10 min. Interestingly, L. plantarum could not be permeabilized using acid hydrolysis even after 60 min exposure to 1 M HCl.

  11. Intrinsically Labeled Fluorescent Oligonucleotide Probes on Quantum Dots for Transduction of Nucleic Acid Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Shahmuradyan, Anna; Krull, Ulrich J

    2016-03-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) have been widely used in chemical and biosensing due to their unique photoelectrical properties and are well suited as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Selective hybridization interactions of oligonucleotides on QDs have been determined by FRET. Typically, the QD-FRET constructs have made use of labeled targets or have implemented labeled sandwich format assays to introduce dyes in proximity to the QDs for the FRET process. The intention of this new work is to explore a method to incorporate the acceptor dye into the probe molecule. Thiazole orange (TO) derivatives are fluorescent intercalating dyes that have been used for detection of double-stranded nucleic acids. One such dye system has been reported in which single-stranded oligonucleotide probes were doubly labeled with adjacent thiazole orange derivatives. In the absence of the fully complementary (FC) oligonucleotide target, the dyes form an H-aggregate, which results in quenching of fluorescence emission due to excitonic interactions between the dyes. The hybridization of the FC target to the probe provides for dissociation of the aggregate as the dyes intercalate into the double stranded duplex, resulting in increased fluorescence. This work reports investigation of the dependence of the ratiometric signal on the type of linkage used to conjugate the dyes to the probe, the location of the dye along the length of the probe, and the distance between adjacent dye molecules. The limit of detection for 34mer and 90mer targets was found to be identical and was 10 nM (2 pmol), similar to analogous QD-FRET using labeled oligonucleotide target. The detection system could discriminate a one base pair mismatch (1BPM) target and was functional without substantial compromise of the signal in 75% serum. The 1BPM was found to reduce background signal, indicating that the structure of the mismatch affected the environment of the intercalating dyes.

  12. Human papillomavirus 35 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorincz, A.T.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes an HPV 35 hybridization probe comprising a member selected from the group consisting of (i) HPV 35 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and (ii) HPV 35 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  13. Human papillomavirus 43 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorincz, A.T.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes an HPV 43 hybridization probe comprising a member selected from the group consisting of (i) HPV 43 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and (ii) HPV 43 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  14. Human papillomavirus 56 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorinez, A.T.

    1990-03-13

    This patent describes an HPV 56 hybridization probe. It comprises: a member selected from the group consisting of HPV 56 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and HPV 56 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  15. Human papillomavirus 44 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorincz, A.T.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes an HPV 44 hybridization probe comprising a member selected from the group consisting of (1) HPV 44 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and (ii) HPV 44 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  16. Exploring the Hybridization Thermodynamics of Spherical Nucleic Acids to Tailor Probes for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeria, Pratik Shailesh

    Spherical nucleic acids (SNAs), three-dimensional nanoparticle conjugates composed of densely packed and highly oriented oligonucleotides around organic or inorganic nanoparticles, are an emergent class of nanostructures that show promise as single-entity agents for intracellular messenger RNA (mRNA) detection and gene regulation. SNAs exhibit superior biocompatibility and biological properties compared to linear oligonucleotides, enabling them to overcome many of the limitations of linear oligonucleotides for use in biomedical applications. However, the origins of these biologically attractive properties are not well understood. In this dissertation, the chemistry underlying one such property is studied in detail, and the findings are applied towards the rational design of more effective SNAs for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Chapter 1 introduces the synthesis of SNAs, the unique properties that make them superior to linear nucleic acids for biomedicine, and previously studied applications of these structures. Chapter 2 focuses on quantitatively studying the impact of the chemical structure of the SNA on its ability to hybridize multiple complementary nucleic acids. This chapter lays the groundwork for understanding the factors that govern SNA hybridization thermodynamics and how to tailor SNAs to increase their binding affinity to target mRNA strands. Chapters 3 and 4 capitalize on this knowledge to engineer probes for intracellular mRNA detection and gene regulation applications. Chapter 3 reports the development of an SNA-based probe that can simultaneously report the expression level of two different mRNA transcripts in live cells and differentiate diseased cells from non-diseased cells. Chapter 4 investigates the use of topically-applied SNAs to down-regulate a critical mediator of impaired wound healing in diabetic mice to accelerate wound closure. This study represents the first topical therapeutic application of SNA nanotechnology to treat open

  17. Hybridization probe for femtomolar quantification of selected nucleic acid sequences on a disposable electrode.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Daniel M; Chami, Bilal; Kreuzer, Matthias; Presting, Gernot; Alvarez, Anne M; Liaw, Bor Yann

    2006-04-01

    Mixed monolayers of electroactive hybridization probes on gold surfaces of a disposable electrode were investigated as a technology for simple, sensitive, selective, and rapid gene identification. Hybridization to the ferrocene-labeled hairpin probes reproducibly diminished cyclic redox currents, presumably due to a displacement of the label from the electrode. Observed peak current densities were roughly 1000x greater than those observed in previous studies, such that results could easily be interpreted without the use of algorithms to correct for background polarization currents. Probes were sensitive to hybridization with a number of oligonucleotide sequences with varying homology, but target oligonucleotides could be distinguished from competing nontarget sequences based on unique "melting" profiles from the probe. Detection limits were demonstrated down to nearly 100 fM, which may be low enough to identify certain genetic conditions or infections without amplification. This technology has rich potential for use in field devices for gene identification as well as in gene microarrays.

  18. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-03-24

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. 14 figs.

  19. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration.

  20. Identification of Dekkera bruxellensis (Brettanomyces) from Wine by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes

    PubMed Central

    Stender, Henrik; Kurtzman, Cletus; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens J.; Sørensen, Ditte; Broomer, Adam; Oliveira, Kenneth; Perry-O'Keefe, Heather; Sage, Andrew; Young, Barbara; Coull, James

    2001-01-01

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization method using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Brettanomyces is described. The test is based on fluorescein-labeled PNA probes targeting a species-specific sequence of the rRNA of Dekkera bruxellensis. The PNA probes were applied to smears of colonies, and results were interpreted by fluorescence microscopy. The results obtained from testing 127 different yeast strains, including 78 Brettanomyces isolates from wine, show that the spoilage organism Brettanomyces belongs to the species D. bruxellensis and that the new method is able to identify Brettanomyces (D. bruxellensis) with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. PMID:11157265

  1. Differentiation of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis by Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization with Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Kenneth; Haase, Gerhard; Kurtzman, Cletus; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens Jo/rgen; Stender, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    The recent discovery of Candida dubliniensis as a separate species that traditionally has been identified as Candida albicans has led to the development of a variety of biochemical and molecular methods for the differentiation of these two pathogenic yeasts. rRNA sequences are well-established phylogenetic markers, and probes targeting species-specific rRNA sequences have been used in diagnostic assays for the detection and identification of microorganisms. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a DNA mimic with improved hybridization characteristics, and the neutral backbone of PNA probes offers significant advantages in whole-cell in situ hybridization assays. In this study, we developed PNA probes targeting the rRNAs of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis and applied them to a fluorescence in situ hybridization method (PNA FISH) for differentiation between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. Liquid cultures were smeared onto microscope slides, heat fixed, and then hybridized for 30 min. Unhybridized PNA probe was removed by washing, and smears were examined by fluorescence microscopy. Evaluation of the PNA FISH method using smears of 79 C. dubliniensis and 70 C. albicans strains showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for both PNA probes. We concluded that PNA FISH is a powerful tool for the differentiation of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. PMID:11682542

  2. Visualization of the mycelia of wood-rotting fungi by fluorescence in situ hybridization using a peptide nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Yuji; Nakaba, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Hiroshi; Funada, Ryo; Yoshida, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    White rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and brown rot fungus, Postia placenta, grown on agar plates, were visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe. Mycelia grown on wood chips were also clearly detected by PNA-FISH following blocking treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the visualization of fungi in wood by FISH.

  3. Probing the transition state for nucleic acid hybridization using phi-value analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jandi; Shin, Jong-Shik

    2010-04-27

    Genetic regulation by noncoding RNA elements such as microRNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) involves hybridization of a short single-stranded RNA with a complementary segment in a target mRNA. The physical basis of the hybridization process between the structured nucleic acids is not well understood primarily because of the lack of information about the transition-state structure. Here we use transition-state theory, inspired by phi-value analysis in protein folding studies, to provide quantitative analysis of the relationship between changes in the secondary structure stability and the activation free energy. Time course monitoring of the hybridization reaction was performed under pseudo-steady-state conditions using a single fluorophore. The phi-value analysis indicates that the native secondary structure remains intact in the transition state. The nativelike transition state was confirmed via examination of the salt dependence of the hybridization kinetics, indicating that the number of sodium ions associated with the transition state was not substantially affected by changes in the native secondary structure. These results propose that hybridization between structured nucleic acids undergoes a transition state leading to formation of a nucleation complex and then is followed by sequential displacement of preexisting base pairings involving successive small energy barriers. The proposed mechanism might provide new insight into physical processes during small RNA-mediated gene silencing, which is essential to selection of a target mRNA segment for siRNA design.

  4. Peptide nucleic acid probe for protein affinity purification based on biotin-streptavidin interaction and peptide nucleic acid strand hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tse, Jenny; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zengeya, Thomas; Rozners, Eriks; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2015-02-01

    We describe a new method for protein affinity purification that capitalizes on the high affinity of streptavidin for biotin but does not require dissociation of the biotin-streptavidin complex for protein retrieval. Conventional reagents place both the selectively reacting group (the "warhead") and the biotin on the same molecule. We place the warhead and the biotin on separate molecules, each linked to a short strand of peptide nucleic acid (PNA), synthetic polymers that use the same bases as DNA but attached to a backbone that is resistant to attack by proteases and nucleases. As in DNA, PNA strands with complementary base sequences hybridize. In conditions that favor PNA duplex formation, the warhead strand (carrying the tagged protein) and the biotin strand form a complex that is held onto immobilized streptavidin. As in DNA, the PNA duplex dissociates at moderately elevated temperature; therefore, retrieval of the tagged protein is accomplished by a brief exposure to heat. Using iodoacetate as the warhead, 8-base PNA strands, biotin, and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, we demonstrate retrieval of the cysteine protease papain. We were also able to use our iodoacetyl-PNA:PNA-biotin probe for retrieval and identification of a thiol reductase and a glutathione transferase from soybean seedling cotyledons.

  5. [Oligonucleotide derivatives in the nucleic acid hybridization analysis. I. Covalent immobilization of oligonucleotide probes onto the nylon].

    PubMed

    Dmitrienko, E V; Pyshnaia, I A; Pyshnyĭ, D V

    2010-01-01

    The features of UV-induced immobilization of oligonucleotides on a nylon membranes and the effectiveness of enzymatic labeling of immobilized probes at heterophase detection of nucleic acids are studied. Short terminal oligothymidilate (up to 10 nt) sequences are suggested to attach to the probe via a flexible ethylene glycol based linker. The presence of such fragment enhances the intensity of immobilization and reduces UV-dependent degradation of the targeted (sequence-specific) part of the probe by reducing the dose needed for the immobilization of DNA. The optimum dose of UV-irradiation is determined to be ~0.4 J/cm(2) at the wavelength 254 nm. This dose provides high level of hybridization signal for immobilized probes with various nucleotide composition of the sequence specific moiety. The amide groups of the polyamide are shown to play the key role in the photoinduced immobilization of nucleic acids, whereas the primary amino groups in the structure of PA is not the center responsible for the covalent binding of DNA by UV-irradiation, as previously believed. Various additives in the soaking solution during the membrane of UV-dependent immobilization of probes are shown to influence its effectiveness. The use of alternative to UV-irradiation system of radical generation are shown to provide the immobilization of oligonucleotides onto the nylon membrane.

  6. Hybridization-based detection of Helicobacter pylori at human body temperature using advanced locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Guimarães, Nuno; Leite, Marina; Figueiredo, Céu; Wengel, Jesper; Filipe Azevedo, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of the human microbiome and its influence upon human life has long been a subject of study. Hence, methods that allow the direct detection and visualization of microorganisms and microbial consortia (e.g. biofilms) within the human body would be invaluable. In here, we assessed the possibility of developing a variant of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), named fluorescence in vivo hybridization (FIVH), for the detection of Helicobacter pylori. Using oligonucleotide variations comprising locked nucleic acids (LNA) and 2'-O-methyl RNAs (2'OMe) with two types of backbone linkages (phosphate or phosphorothioate), we were able to successfully identify two probes that hybridize at 37 °C with high specificity and sensitivity for H. pylori, both in pure cultures and in gastric biopsies. Furthermore, the use of this type of probes implied that toxic compounds typically used in FISH were either found to be unnecessary or could be replaced by a non-toxic substitute. We show here for the first time that the use of advanced LNA probes in FIVH conditions provides an accurate, simple and fast method for H. pylori detection and location, which could be used in the future for potential in vivo applications either for this microorganism or for others.

  7. Quantification of Syntrophic Fatty Acid-β-Oxidizing Bacteria in a Mesophilic Biogas Reactor by Oligonucleotide Probe Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kaare H.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Raskin, Lutgarde

    1999-01-01

    Small-subunit rRNA sequences were obtained for two saturated fatty acid-β-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, Syntrophomonas sapovorans and Syntrophomonas wolfei LYB, and sequence analysis confirmed their classification as members of the family Syntrophomonadaceae. S. wolfei LYB was closely related to S. wolfei subsp. wolfei, but S. sapovorans did not cluster with the other members of the genus Syntrophomonas. Five oligonucleotide probes targeting the small-subunit rRNA of different groups within the family Syntrophomonadaceae, which contains all currently known saturated fatty acid-β-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, were developed and characterized. The probes were designed to be specific at the family, genus, and species levels and were characterized by temperature-of-dissociation and specificity studies. To demonstrate the usefulness of the probes for the detection and quantification of saturated fatty acid-β-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria in methanogenic environments, the microbial community structure of a sample from a full-scale biogas plant was determined. Hybridization results with probes for syntrophic bacteria and methanogens were compared to specific methanogenic activities and microbial numbers determined with most-probable-number estimates. Most of the methanogenic rRNA was comprised of Methanomicrobiales rRNA, suggesting that members of this order served as the main hydrogen-utilizing microorganisms. Between 0.2 and 1% of the rRNA was attributed to the Syntrophomonadaceae, of which the majority was accounted for by the genus Syntrophomonas. PMID:10543784

  8. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Rapid Identification of Candida albicans Directly from Blood Culture Bottles

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Susan; Procop, Gary W.; Haase, Gerhard; Wilson, Deborah; Hall, Geraldine; Kurtzman, Cletus; Oliveira, Kenneth; Von Oy, Sabina; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens J.; Coull, James; Stender, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method that uses peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Candida albicans directly from positive-blood-culture bottles in which yeast was observed by Gram staining (herein referred to as yeast-positive blood culture bottles) is described. The test (the C. albicans PNA FISH method) is based on a fluorescein-labeled PNA probe that targets C. albicans 26S rRNA. The PNA probe is added to smears made directly from the contents of the blood culture bottle and hybridized for 90 min at 55°C. Unhybridized PNA probe is removed by washing of the mixture (30 min), and the smears are examined by fluorescence microscopy. The specificity of the method was confirmed with 23 reference strains representing phylogenetically related yeast species and 148 clinical isolates covering the clinically most significant yeast species, including C. albicans (n = 72), C. dubliniensis (n = 58), C. glabrata (n = 5), C. krusei (n = 2), C. parapsilosis (n = 4), and C. tropicalis (n = 3). The performance of the C. albicans PNA FISH method as a diagnostic test was evaluated with 33 routine and 25 simulated yeast-positive blood culture bottles and showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. It is concluded that this 2.5-h method for the definitive identification of C. albicans directly from yeast-positive blood culture bottles provides important information for optimal antifungal therapy and patient management. PMID:12037084

  9. DNA/DNA in situ hybridization with enzyme linked probes

    SciTech Connect

    Grillo, S.; Mosher, M.; Charles, P.; Henry, S.; Taub, F.

    1987-05-01

    A non-radioactive in situ nucleic acid hybridization method which requires no antibodies, haptens, avidin or biotin intermediateries is presented. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled nucleic acid probes are hybridized in situ for 2 hours or less, followed by brief washing of hybridized cells and the direct detection of in situ hybrids with diaminobenzidine (DAB). Application of this method to the detection of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in human cells is shown.

  10. Positively charged polymer brush-functionalized filter paper for DNA sequence determination following Dot blot hybridization employing a pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Laopa, Praethong S; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Hoven, Voravee P

    2013-01-07

    As inspired by the Dot blot analysis, a well known technique in molecular biology and genetics for detecting biomolecules, a new paper-based platform for colorimetric detection of specific DNA sequences employing peptide nucleic acid (PNA) as a probe has been developed. In this particular study, a pyrrolidinyl PNA bearing a conformationally rigid d-prolyl-2-aminocyclopentanecarboxylic acid backbone (acpcPNA) was used as a probe. The filter paper was modified to be positively charged with grafted polymer brushes of quaternized poly(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (QPDMAEMA) prepared by surface-initiated polymerization of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate from the filter paper via ARGET ATRP followed by quaternization with methyl iodide. Following the Dot blot format, a DNA target was first immobilized via electrostatic interactions between the positive charges of the QPDMAEMA brushes and negative charges of the phosphate backbone of DNA. Upon hybridization with the biotinylated pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (b-PNA) probe, the immobilized DNA can be detected by naked eye observation of the yellow product generated by the enzymatic reaction employing HRP-labeled streptavidin. It has been demonstrated that this newly developed assay was capable of discriminating between complementary and single base mismatch targets at a detection limit of at least 10 fmol. In addition, the QPDMAEMA-grafted filter paper exhibited a superior performance to the commercial membranes, namely Nylon 66 and nitrocellulose.

  11. Focused upon hybridization: rapid and high sensitivity detection of DNA using isotachophoresis and peptide nucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Ostromohov, Nadya; Schwartz, Ortal; Bercovici, Moran

    2015-09-15

    We present a novel assay for rapid and high sensitivity detection of nucleic acids without amplification. Utilizing the neutral backbone of peptide nucleic acids (PNA), our method is based on the design of low electrophoretic mobility PNA probes, which do not focus under isotachophoresis (ITP) unless bound to their target sequence. Thus, background noise associated with free probes is entirely eliminated, significantly improving the signal-to-noise ratio while maintaining a simple single-step assay requiring no amplification steps. We provide a detailed analytical model and experimentally demonstrate the ability to detect targets as short as 17 nucleotides (nt) and a limit of detection of 100 fM with a dynamic range of 5 decades. We also demonstrate that the assay can be successfully implemented for detection of DNA in human serum without loss of signal. The assay requires 15 min to complete, and it could potentially be used in applications where rapid and highly sensitive amplification-free detection of nucleic acids is desired.

  12. Cellular delivery of quantum dot-bound hybridization probe for detection of intracellular pre-microRNA using chitosan/poly(γ-glutamic acid) complex as a carrier.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yao; Lin, Dajie; Shao, Lijia; Yan, Feng; Ju, Huangxian

    2013-01-01

    A quantum dot (QD)-bound hybridization probe was designed for detection of intracellular pre-miRNA using chitosan (CS)/poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) complex as a gene vector. The probe was prepared by assembling thiolated RNA to gold nanoparticle (Au NP) via Au-S bond and then binding 3'-end amine of the RNA to the carboxy group capped on quantum dot surface. The QD-RNA-Au NP probe was assembled on the vector by mixing with aqueous γ-PGA solution and then CS solution to construct a gene delivery system for highly effective cellular uptake and delivery. After the probe was released from CS/γ-PGA complex to the cytoplasm by electrostatic repulsion at intracellular pH, it hybridized with pre-miRNA precursor as target. The formed product was then cleaved by RNase III Dicer, leading to the separation of QDs from Au NPs and fluorescence emission of QDs, which could be detected by confocal microscopic imaging to monitor the amount of the intracellular pre-miRNA precursor. The in vitro assays revealed that the QD-RNA-Au NP was a robust, sensitive and selective probe for quantitative detection of target pre-miRNA. Using MDA-MB231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells as models, the relative amount of pre-miRNA let-7a could be successfully compared. Since the amount of miRNA is related to the progress and prognosis of cancer, this strategy could be expected to hold promising application potential in medical research and clinical diagnostics.

  13. Arrays of probes for positional sequencing by hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, Charles R.; Prezetakiewiczr, Marek; Smith, Cassandra L.; Sano, Takeshi

    2008-01-15

    This invention is directed to methods and reagents useful for sequencing nucleic acid targets utilizing sequencing by hybridization technology comprising probes, arrays of probes and methods whereby sequence information is obtained rapidly and efficiently in discrete packages. That information can be used for the detection, identification, purification and complete or partial sequencing of a particular target nucleic acid. When coupled with a ligation step, these methods can be performed under a single set of hybridization conditions. The invention also relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for making and replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5'- and/or 3'-overhangs.

  14. A nucleic acid probe labeled with desmethyl thiazole orange: a new type of hybridization-sensitive fluorescent oligonucleotide for live-cell RNA imaging.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Akimitsu; Sugizaki, Kaori; Yuki, Mizue; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Shuji; Sueoka, Takuma; Hayashi, Gosuke; Wang, Dan Ohtan

    2013-01-14

    A new fluorescent nucleotide with desmethyl thiazole orange dyes, D'(505), has been developed for expansion of the function of fluorescent probes for live-cell RNA imaging. The nucleoside unit of D'(505) for DNA autosynthesis was soluble in organic solvents, which made the preparation of nucleoside units and the reactions in the cycles of DNA synthesis more efficient. The dyes of D'(505)-containing oligodeoxynucleotide were protonated below pH 7 and the oligodeoxynucleotide exhibited hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission through the control of excitonic interactions of the dyes of D'(505). The simplified procedure and effective hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission produced multicolored hybridization-sensitive fluorescent probes, which were useful for live-cell RNA imaging. The acceptor-bleaching method gave us information on RNA in a specific cell among many living cells.

  15. Signal enhancement for gene detection based on a redox reaction of [Fe(CN)(6)](4-) mediated by ferrocene at the terminal of a peptide nucleic acid as a probe with hybridization-amenable conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Hiroshi; Tao, Hiroaki

    2008-07-01

    Electrochemically enhanced DNA detection was demonstrated by utilizing the couple of a synthesized ferrocene-terminated peptide nucleic acid (PNA) with a cysteine anchor and a sacrificial electron donor [Fe(CN)(6)](4-). DNA detection sensors were prepared by modifying a gold electrode surface with a mixed monolayer of the probe PNA and 11-hydroxy-1-undecanethiol (11-HUT), protecting [Fe(CN)(6)](4-) from any unexpected redox reaction. Before hybridization, the terminal ferrocene moiety of the probe was subject to a redox reaction due to the flexible probe structure and, in the presence of [Fe(CN)(6)](4-), the observed current was amplified based on regeneration of the ferrocene moiety. Hybridization decreased the redox current of the ferrocene. This occurred because hybridization rigidified the probe structure: the ferrocene moiety was then removed from the electrode surface, and the redox reaction of [Fe(CN)(6)](4-) was again prevented. The change in the anodic current before and after hybridization was enhanced 1.75-fold by using the electron donor [Fe(CN)(6)](4-). Sequence-specific detection of the complementary target DNA was also demonstrated.

  16. Simulation-guided DNA probe design for consistently ultraspecific hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juexiao Sherry; Zhang, David Yu

    2015-07-01

    Hybridization of complementary sequences is one of the central tenets of nucleic acid chemistry; however, the unintended binding of closely related sequences limits the accuracy of hybridization-based approaches to analysing nucleic acids. Thermodynamics-guided probe design and empirical optimization of the reaction conditions have been used to enable the discrimination of single-nucleotide variants, but typically these approaches provide only an approximately 25-fold difference in binding affinity. Here we show that simulations of the binding kinetics are both necessary and sufficient to design nucleic acid probe systems with consistently high specificity as they enable the discovery of an optimal combination of thermodynamic parameters. Simulation-guided probe systems designed against 44 sequences of different target single-nucleotide variants showed between a 200- and 3,000-fold (median 890) higher binding affinity than their corresponding wild-type sequences. As a demonstration of the usefulness of this simulation-guided design approach, we developed probes that, in combination with PCR amplification, detect low concentrations of variant alleles (1%) in human genomic DNA.

  17. Optimizing the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, David Yu; Chen, Sherry Xi; Yin, Peng

    2012-03-01

    The specific hybridization of complementary sequences is an essential property of nucleic acids, enabling diverse biological and biotechnological reactions and functions. However, the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization is compromised for long strands, except near the melting temperature. Here, we analytically derived the thermodynamic properties of a hybridization probe that would enable near-optimal single-base discrimination and perform robustly across diverse temperature, salt and concentration conditions. We rationally designed ‘toehold exchange’ probes that approximate these properties, and comprehensively tested them against five different DNA targets and 55 spurious analogues with energetically representative single-base changes (replacements, deletions and insertions). These probes produced discrimination factors between 3 and 100+ (median, 26). Without retuning, our probes function robustly from 10 °C to 37 °C, from 1 mM Mg2+ to 47 mM Mg2+, and with nucleic acid concentrations from 1 nM to 5 µM. Experiments with RNA also showed effective single-base change discrimination.

  18. Optimizing the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, David Yu; Chen, Sherry Xi; Yin, Peng

    2012-01-22

    The specific hybridization of complementary sequences is an essential property of nucleic acids, enabling diverse biological and biotechnological reactions and functions. However, the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization is compromised for long strands, except near the melting temperature. Here, we analytically derived the thermodynamic properties of a hybridization probe that would enable near-optimal single-base discrimination and perform robustly across diverse temperature, salt and concentration conditions. We rationally designed 'toehold exchange' probes that approximate these properties, and comprehensively tested them against five different DNA targets and 55 spurious analogues with energetically representative single-base changes (replacements, deletions and insertions). These probes produced discrimination factors between 3 and 100+ (median, 26). Without retuning, our probes function robustly from 10 °C to 37 °C, from 1 mM Mg(2+) to 47 mM Mg(2+), and with nucleic acid concentrations from 1 nM to 5 µM. Experiments with RNA also showed effective single-base change discrimination.

  19. Computer programs used to aid in the selection of DNA hybridization probes.

    PubMed Central

    Raupach, R E

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a package of three programs which used together aid in selecting the best possible sequence to be used as a DNA hybridization probe. This system searches an amino acid sequence for four adjacent amino acids with the fewest possible corresponding mRNA sequences, calculates their probability of occurrence, and locates the positions of wobbles and mismatches between the DNA hybridization probe and the possible mRNA sequences. PMID:6546442

  20. Probing Compositional Variation within Hybrid Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhas, Benjamin D.; Habas, Susan E.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Mokari, Taleb

    2010-06-22

    We present a detailed analysis of the structural and magnetic properties of solution-grown PtCo-CdS hybrid structures in comparison to similar free-standing PtCo alloy nanoparticles. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is utilized as a sensitive probe for identifying subtle differences in the structure of the hybrid materials. We found that the growth of bimetallic tips on a CdS nanorod substrate leads to a more complex nanoparticle structure composed of a PtCo alloy core and thin CoO shell. The core-shell architecture is an unexpected consequence of the different nanoparticle growth mechanism on the nanorod tip, as compared to free growth in solution. Magnetic measurements indicate that the PtCo-CdS hybrid structures are superparamagnetic despite the presence of a CoO shell. The use of X-ray spectroscopic techniques to detect minute differences in atomic structure and bonding in complex nanosystems makes it possible to better understand and predict catalytic or magnetic properties for nanoscale bimetallic hybrid materials.

  1. In situ hybridization for Coccidioides immitis 5.8S ribosomal RNA sequences in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded pulmonary specimens using a locked nucleic acid probe: a rapid means for identification in tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Montone, Kathleen T; Litzky, Leslie A; Feldman, Michael D; Peterman, Heather; Mathis, Benjamin; Baliff, Jeffrey; Kaiser, Larry R; Kucharczuk, John; Nachamkin, Irving

    2010-06-01

    Coccidioides immitis/Coccidioides posadasii are common causes of pulmonary infection in certain geographic areas, and are highly infectious when working with culture isolates in the laboratory. Rapid techniques to accurately identify this pathogen in tissues may be of benefit for diagnosis and in limiting the exposure of laboratory personnel to this agent. Locked nucleic acids (LNA) are modified nucleotides in which a ribonucleoside is linked between the 2'-oxygen and the 4'-carbon atoms with a methylene unit. LNA oligonucleotides exhibit increased thermal stability and make excellent probes for in situ hybridization (ISH). In this study, ISH utilizing a biotin-labeled LNA probe targeting Coccidioides sp. ribosomal RNA sequences in 6 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded pulmonary tissue specimens from 6 patients with culture positive or histologic findings suggestive of Coccidioides sp. infection is described. The cultures of the pulmonary specimens confirmed C. immitis in 3 of 6 patients. The ISH procedure with the LNA probe was positive in all 6 cases, although the number of organisms that were highlighted varied from rare to numerous. ISH with a biotin-labeled DNA probe of the same sequence was positive in 4 of the 6 cases and the signal intensity and number of organisms was much less than that observed with the LNA probe. Negative control tissues containing a variety of different fungal pathogens including Aspergillus sp., Fusarium sp., Blastomyces dermatitidis, Candida sp, Histoplasma capsulatum, and Zygomyces did not hybridize with the LNA and DNA probes. ISH with an LNA oligonucleotide probe targeting Coccidioides sp. ribosomal RNA is useful for rapid ISH. ISH could be rapidly performed when fungal pathogens are observed in tissue but cultures are negative or have not been performed.

  2. [Diagnosed tuberculosis using specific DNA probe hybridization methods].

    PubMed

    Furuta, Itaru; Yamazumi, Toshiaki

    2002-11-01

    In Japan, reported cases of tuberculosis had declined nearly every year until 1995. However, in 1997 newly recorded cases began increasing for the first time in more than 38 years. Recent studies using DNA fingerprinting show that person- to person transmission may account for as many as one-third of new cases of tuberculosis in citizen populations. Nucleic acid hybridization methods using specific DNA probes can specifically identify M. tuberculosis and other mycobacterial species. Rapid nucleic acid amplification techniques such as polymerase chain reaction methods allow direct identification of M. tuberculosis in clinical specimens. Is 6110 has been exploited extensively as a clonal marker in molecular epidemiology studies of tuberculosis. The emergence of resistance to antituberculosis drugs is a relevant matter worldwide. A recent genotypic method allows earlier detection of RFP-resistant and INH-resistant stains using probes for mutation in rpoB and in katG.

  3. Unravelling the Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Biofilm: A Multiplex Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Liselotte; Jespers, Vicky; Dahchour, Nassira; Mwambarangwe, Lambert; Musengamana, Viateur; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Crucitti, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a condition defined by increased vaginal discharge without significant inflammation, is characterized by a change in the bacterial composition of the vagina. Lactobacillus spp., associated with a healthy vaginal microbiome, are outnumbered by BV-associated organisms. These bacteria could form a polymicrobial biofilm which allows them to persist in spite of antibiotic treatment. In this study, we examined the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae in vaginal biofilms using Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes targeting these bacteria. For this purpose, we developed three new PNA probes for A. vaginae. The most specific A. vaginae probe, AtoITM1, was selected and then used in an assay with two existing probes, Gard162 and BacUni-1, to evaluate multiplex FISH on clinical samples. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) as the gold standard, we demonstrated a sensitivity of 66.7% (95% confidence interval: 54.5% - 77.1%) and a specificity of 89.4% (95% confidence interval: 76.1% - 96%) of the new AtoITM1 probe. FISH enabled us to show the presence of a polymicrobial biofilm in bacterial vaginosis, in which Atopobium vaginae is part of a Gardnerella vaginalis-dominated biofilm. We showed that the presence of this biofilm is associated with high bacterial loads of A. vaginae and G. vaginalis.

  4. Unravelling the Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Biofilm: A Multiplex Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Liselotte; Jespers, Vicky; Dahchour, Nassira; Mwambarangwe, Lambert; Musengamana, Viateur; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Crucitti, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a condition defined by increased vaginal discharge without significant inflammation, is characterized by a change in the bacterial composition of the vagina. Lactobacillus spp., associated with a healthy vaginal microbiome, are outnumbered by BV-associated organisms. These bacteria could form a polymicrobial biofilm which allows them to persist in spite of antibiotic treatment. In this study, we examined the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae in vaginal biofilms using Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes targeting these bacteria. For this purpose, we developed three new PNA probes for A. vaginae. The most specific A. vaginae probe, AtoITM1, was selected and then used in an assay with two existing probes, Gard162 and BacUni-1, to evaluate multiplex FISH on clinical samples. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) as the gold standard, we demonstrated a sensitivity of 66.7% (95% confidence interval: 54.5% - 77.1%) and a specificity of 89.4% (95% confidence interval: 76.1% - 96%) of the new AtoITM1 probe. FISH enabled us to show the presence of a polymicrobial biofilm in bacterial vaginosis, in which Atopobium vaginae is part of a Gardnerella vaginalis-dominated biofilm. We showed that the presence of this biofilm is associated with high bacterial loads of A. vaginae and G. vaginalis. PMID:26305575

  5. Functional nucleic acid probes and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2006-10-03

    The present invention provides functional nucleic acid probes, and methods of using functional nucleic acid probes, for binding a target to carry out a desired function. The probes have at least one functional nucleic acid, at least one regulating nucleic acid, and at least one attenuator. The functional nucleic acid is maintained in an inactive state by the attenuator and activated by the regulating nucleic acid only in the presence of a regulating nucleic acid target. In its activated state the functional nucleic acid can bind to its target to carry out a desired function, such as generating a signal, cleaving a nucleic acid, or catalyzing a reaction.

  6. Controlling microarray DNA hybridization efficiency by probe-surface distance and external surface electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamhieh, K.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2015-03-01

    DNA microarrays are analytical devices designed to determine the composition of multicomponent solutions of nucleic acids, DNA or RNA. These devices are promising technology for diverse applications, including sensing, diagnostics, and drug/gene delivery. Here, we modify a hybridization adsorption isotherm to study the effects of probe-surface distance and the external electrostatic fields, on the oligonucleotide hybridization in microarray and how these effects are varies depending on surface probe density and target concentration. This study helps in our understanding on-surface hybridization mechanisms, and from it we can observe a significant effect of the probe-surface distance, and the external electrostatic fields, on the hybridization yield. In addition we present a simple new criteria to control the oligonucleotide hybridization efficiency by providing a chart illustrating the effects of all factors on the DNA-hybridization efficiency.

  7. A Nucleic Acid Probe and Method for the Detection of Shigella and Enteroinvasive E. coli Bacteria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This invention relates to nucleic acid probes and a method for the rapid detection of Shigella and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, the causative agents of bacterial dysentery, by use of a nucleic acid hybridization probe, equivalent to a plasmid DNA region encoding one of 4 specific invasion-associated, peptides of all strains of Shigella and enterinvasive E . coli , in a nucleic acid hybridization reaction with a clinical specimen containing dysentery bacteria.

  8. Nucleic acid probes in diagnostic medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberry, Phillip A.

    1991-01-01

    The need for improved diagnostic procedures is outlined and variations in probe technology are briefly reviewed. A discussion of the application of probe technology to the diagnosis of disease in animals and humans is presented. A comparison of probe versus nonprobe diagnostics and isotopic versus nonisotopic probes is made and the current state of sequence amplification is described. The current market status of nucleic acid probes is reviewed with respect to their diagnostic application in human and veterinary medicine. Representative product examples are described and information on probes being developed that offer promise as future products is discussed.

  9. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Probe Preparation.

    PubMed

    Tolomeo, Doron; Stanyon, Roscoe R; Rocchi, Mariano

    2017-01-01

    The public human genome sequencing project utilized a hierarchical approach. A large number of BAC/PAC clones, with an insert size approximate from 50 kb to 300 kb, were identified and finely mapped with respect to the Sequence Tagged Site (STS) physical map and with respect to each other. A "golden path" of BACs, covering the entire human genome, was then selected and each clone was fully sequenced. The large number of remaining BACs was not fully sequenced, but the availability of the end sequence (~800-1000 bp) at each end allowed them to be very precisely mapped on the human genome.The search for copy number variations of the human genome used several strategies. One of these approaches took advantage of the fact that fosmid clones, contrary to BAC/PAC clones, have a fixed insert size (~40 kb) (Kidd et al., Nature 453: 56-64, 2008). In this context, the ends of ~7 million fosmid clones were sequenced, and therefore it was possible to precisely map these clones on the human genome.In summary, a large number of genomic clones (GC) are available for FISH experiments. They usually yield bright FISH signals and are extremely precious for molecular cytogenetics, and in particular cancer cytogenetics. The already-labeled probes available commercially are usually based on a combination of such GCs. The present chapter summarizes the protocols for extracting, labeling, and hybridization onto slides of DNA obtained from GC.

  10. Method for analyzing nucleic acids by means of a substrate having a microchannel structure containing immobilized nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences.

  11. Method for analyzing nucleic acids by means of a substrate having a microchannel structure containing immobilized nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.

    2003-12-09

    A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences.

  12. Employing double-stranded DNA probes on colloidal substrates for competitive hybridization events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Bryan Alexander

    DNA has found application beyond its biological function in the cell in a variety of materials assembly systems as well as nucleic acid-based detection devices. In the current research, double-stranded DNA probes are applied in both a colloidal particle assembly and fluorescent assay approach utilizing competitive hybridization interactions. The responsiveness of the double-stranded probes (dsProbes) was tuned by sequence design and tested against a variety of nucleic acid targets. Chapter 1 provides a review of the particle substrate used in the current research, colloidal particles, as well as examines previous applications of DNA in assembly and nucleic acid detection formats. Chapter 2 discusses the formation of fluorescent satellites, or similarly termed fluorescent micelles, via DNA hybridization. The effects of DNA duplex sequence, temperature at which assembly occurs, and oligonucleotide density are variables considered with preferential assembly observed for low oligonucleotide density particles. Chapter 3 demonstrates the controlled disassembly of these satellite structures via competitive hybridization with a soluble target strand. Chapter 4 examines DNA duplexes as fluorescent dsProbes and characterizes the kinetics of competitive hybridization between immobilized dsProbes and solution targets of interest. The sequence-based affinities of dsProbes as well as location of an embedded target sequence are both variables explored in this study. Based on the sequence design of the dsProbes, a range of kinetics responses are observed. Chapter 5 also examines the kinetics of competitive hybridization with dsProbes but with a focus on the specificity of competitive target by including mismatches within a short 15 base competitive target. Chapter 6 examines the effects of dsProbe orientation relative to the particle surface as well as substrate particle size. The kinetics of displacement of DNA targets with those of RNA targets of analogous sequence are also

  13. Nonenzymatic catalytic signal amplification for nucleic acid hybridization assays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Wenhong (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Devices, methods, and kits for amplifying the signal from hybridization reactions between nucleic acid probes and their cognate targets are presented. The devices provide partially-duplexed, immobilized probe complexes, spatially separate from and separately addressable from immobilized docking strands. Cognate target acts catalytically to transfer probe from the site of probe complex immobilization to the site of immobilized docking strand, generating a detectable signal. The methods and kits of the present invention may be used to identify the presence of cognate target in a fluid sample.

  14. Identification of Cannabis sativa L. using the 1-kbTHCA synthase-fluorescence in situ hybridization probe.

    PubMed

    Jeangkhwoa, Pattraporn; Bandhaya, Achirapa; Umpunjun, Puangpaka; Chuenboonngarm, Ngarmnij; Panvisavas, Nathinee

    2017-03-01

    This study reports a successful application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique in the identification of Cannabis sativa L. cells recovered from fresh and dried powdered plant materials. Two biotin-16-dUTP-labeled FISH probes were designed from the Cannabis-specific tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase (THCAS) gene and the ITS region of the 45S rRNA gene. Specificity of probe-target hybridization was tested against the target and 4 non-target plant species, i.e., Humulus lupulus, Mitragyna speciosa, Papaver sp., and Nicotiana tabacum. The 1-kb THCA synthase hybridization probe gave Cannabis-specific hybridization signals, unlike the 700-bp Cannabis-ITS hybridization probe. Probe-target hybridization was also confirmed against 20 individual Cannabis plant samples. The 1-kb THCA synthase and 700-bp Cannabis-ITS hybridization probes clearly showed 2 hybridization signals per cell with reproducibility. The 1-kb THCA synthase probe did not give any FISH signal when tested against H. lupulus, its closely related member of the Canabaceae family. It was also showed that 1-kb THCA synthase FISH probe can be applied to identify small amount of dried powdered Cannabis material with an addition of rehydration step prior to the experimental process. This study provided an alternative identification method for Cannabis trace.

  15. Nucleic acid in-situ hybridization detection of infectious agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Curtis T.

    2000-04-01

    Limitations of traditional culture methods and newer polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for detection and speciation of infectious agents demonstrate the need for more rapid and better diagnostics. Nucleic acid hybridization is a detection technology that has gained wide acceptance in cancer and prenatal cytogenetics. Using a modification of the nucleic acid hybridization technique known as fluorescence in-situ hybridization, infectious agents can be detected in a variety of specimens with high sensitivity and specificity. The specimens derive from all types of human and animal sources including body fluids, tissue aspirates and biopsy material. Nucleic acid hybridization can be performed in less than one hour. The result can be interpreted either using traditional fluorescence microscopy or automated platforms such as micro arrays. This paper demonstrates proof of concept for nucleic acid hybridization detection of different infectious agents. Interpretation within a cytologic and histologic context is possible with fluorescence microscopic analysis, thereby providing confirmatory evidence of hybridization. With careful probe selection, nucleic acid hybridization promises to be a highly sensitive and specific practical diagnostic alternative to culture, traditional staining methods, immunohistochemistry and complicated nucleic acid amplification tests.

  16. Fast hybridization solution for the detection of immobilized nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Yang, T T; Kain, S R

    1995-03-01

    We have developed a fast hybridization solution, termed ExpressHyb, for the rapid and sensitive detection of nucleic acids immobilized on membrane supports. This solution reduces typical hybridization times of 12-24 h to as little as 1 h while simultaneously increasing the sensitivity of detection in many applications. Using ExpressHyb, human beta-actin mRNA was detected on a human multiple tissue Northern (MTN) blot following a 30-min hybridization, with optimal detection occurring with a 1-h hybridization interval. The moderately abundant human glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH) mRNA was detected using similar hybridization conditions and yielded improved signal-to-background characteristics relative to overnight hybridizations in conventional solutions. ExpressHyb can be used with either 32P- or digoxigenin-labeled probes and works effectively with both cDNA and oligonucleotide probes. For non-isotopic detection in particular, ExpressHyb reduces the nonspecific background commonly encountered with this technique. In cDNA library screening, ExpressHyb was found to both reduce the time required for effective hybridizations and to increase the number of positive colonies obtained relative to conventional overnight procedures. Taken together, these results illustrate the broad capability of ExpressHyb Hybridization Solution to improve nucleic acid detection in a variety of important techniques.

  17. Linear RNA amplification for the production of microarray hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Klebes, Ansgar; Kornberg, Thomas B

    2008-01-01

    To understand Drosophila development and other genetically controlled processes, it is often desirable to identify differences in gene expression levels. An experimental approach to investigate these processes is to catalog the transcriptome by hybridization of mRNA to DNA microbar-rays. In these experiments mRNA-derived hybridization probes are produced and hybridized to an array of DNA spots on a solid support. The labeled cDNAs of the complex hybridization probe will bind to their complementary sequences and provide quantification of the relative concentration of the corresponding transcript in the starting material. However, such approaches are often limited by the scarcity of the experimental sample because standard methods of probe preparation require microgram quantities of mRNA template. Linear RNA amplification can alleviate such limitations to support the generation of microarray hybridization probes from a few 100 pg of mRNA. These smaller quantities can be isolated from a few 100 cells. Here, we present a linear amplification protocol designed to preserve both the relative abundance of transcripts as well as their sequence complexity.

  18. Method for nucleic acid hybridization using single-stranded DNA binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Method of nucleic acid hybridization for detecting the presence of a specific nucleic acid sequence in a population of different nucleic acid sequences using a nucleic acid probe. The nucleic acid probe hybridizes with the specific nucleic acid sequence but not with other nucleic acid sequences in the population. The method includes contacting a sample (potentially including the nucleic acid sequence) with the nucleic acid probe under hybridizing conditions in the presence of a single-stranded DNA binding protein provided in an amount which stimulates renaturation of a dilute solution (i.e., one in which the t.sub.1/2 of renaturation is longer than 3 weeks) of single-stranded DNA greater than 500 fold (i.e., to a t.sub.1/2 less than 60 min, preferably less than 5 min, and most preferably about 1 min.) in the absence of nucleotide triphosphates.

  19. DNA hybridization probe for clinical diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, J; Acuna-Soto, R; Reed, S; Biagi, F; Wirth, D

    1989-01-01

    As an alternative to microscopic identification of Entamoeba histolytica parasites isolated from stool, a sensitive and species-specific DNA hybridization probe was made for rapid diagnosis of E. histolytica parasites in clinical samples directly applied to nylon membranes. The DNA hybridization probe was made by screening a genomic library of a virulent HM-1:IMSS strain of E. histolytica to detect recombinant plasmids containing highly repeated parasite DNA sequences. Four plasmid clones that reacted across Entamoeba species coded for highly repeated rRNA genes of E. histolytica. Four other plasmid clones were E. histolytica specific in that they bound to four axenized and nine xenic strains of E. histolytica but did not recognize closely related E. histolytica-like Laredo, Entamoeba moshkovskii, or Entamoeba invadens parasites. The diagnostic clones detected as few as eight cultured amoebae and did not distinguish between pathogenic and nonpathogenic zymodemes of E. histolytica. The diagnostic clones were sequenced and contained 145-base-pair sequences which appear to be tandemly repeated in the genome. No stable transcript which is homologous to the diagnostic DNA was detected. In a study of stool samples from Mexico City shown by microscopy to contain E. histolytica, Entamoeba coli, Giardia lamblia, Endolimax nana, Trichuris trichiuria, and Chilomastix mesnili parasites, the DNA hybridization probe demonstrated a sensitivity of 1.0 and a specificity of 0.93. We conclude that the DNA hybridization probe can be used for rapid and accurate diagnosis of E. histolytica parasites. Images PMID:2542361

  20. Time-resolved detection probe for homogeneous nucleic acid analyses in one-step format.

    PubMed

    Laitala, Ville; Ylikoski, Alice; Raussi, Hanna-Mari; Ollikka, Pia; Hemmilä, Ilkka

    2007-02-01

    We report here an extension of homogeneous assays based on fluorescence intensity and lifetime measuring on DNA hybridization. A novel decay probe that allows simple one-step nucleic acid detection with subnanomolar sensitivity, and is suitable for closed-tube applications, is introduced. The decay probe uses fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between a europium chelate donor and an organic fluorophore acceptor. The substantial change in the acceptor emission decay time on hybridization with the target sequence allows the direct separation of the hybridized and unhybridized probe populations in a time-resolved measurement. No additional sample manipulation or self-hybridization of the probes is required. The wavelength and decay time of a decay probe can be adjusted according to the selection of probe length and acceptor fluorophore, thereby making the probes applicable to multiplexed assays. Here we demonstrate the decay probe principle and decay probe-based, one-step, dual DNA assay using celiac disease-related target oligonucleotides (single-nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) as model analytes. Decay probes showed specific response for their complementary DNA target and allowed good signal deconvolution based on simultaneous optical and temporal filtering. This technique potentially could be used to further increase the number of simultaneously detected DNA targets in a simple one-step homogeneous assay.

  1. Peptide nucleic acid probes with charged photocleavable mass markers

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Rachel J; Green, Philip S; Gale, Nittaya; Langley, G John

    2010-01-01

    Halogen-labelled peptide organic acid (HPOA) monomers have been synthesised and incorporated into sequence-specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes. Three different types of probe have been prepared; the unmodified PNA probe, the PNA probe with a mass marker, and the PNA probe with photocleavable mass marker. All three types of probe have been used in model studies to develop a mass spectrometry-based hybridisation assay for detection of point mutations in DNA. PMID:21687524

  2. Detection of cyclin D1 mRNA by hybridization sensitive NIC-oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Kovaliov, Marina; Segal, Meirav; Kafri, Pinhas; Yavin, Eylon; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Fischer, Bilha

    2014-05-01

    A large group of fluorescent hybridization probes, includes intercalating dyes for example thiazole orange (TO). Usually TO is coupled to nucleic acids post-synthetically which severely limits its use. Here, we have developed a phosphoramidite monomer, 10, and prepared a 2'-OMe-RNA probe, labeled with 5-(trans-N-hexen-1-yl-)-TO-2'-deoxy-uridine nucleoside, dU(TO), (Nucleoside bearing an Inter-Calating moiety, NIC), for selective mRNA detection. We investigated a series of 15-mer 2'-OMe-RNA probes, targeting the cyclin D1 mRNA, containing one or several dU(TO) at various positions. dU(TO)-2'-OMe-RNA exhibited up to 7-fold enhancement of TO emission intensity upon hybridization with the complementary RNA versus that of the oligomer alone. This NIC-probe was applied for the specific detection of a very small amount of a breast cancer marker, cyclin D1 mRNA, in total RNA extract from cancerous cells (250 ng/μl). Furthermore, this NIC-probe was found to be superior to our related NIF (Nucleoside with Intrinsic Fluorescence)-probe which could detect cyclin D1 mRNA target only at high concentrations (1840 ng/μl). Additionally, dU(T) can be used as a monomer in solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis, thus avoiding the need for post-synthetic modification of oligonucleotide probes. Hence, we propose dU(TO) oligonucleotides, as hybridization probes for the detection of specific RNA in homogeneous solutions and for the diagnosis of breast cancer.

  3. Hybridization-based biosensor containing hairpin probes and use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Benjamin L.; Strohsahl, Christopher M.

    2010-10-12

    A sensor chip that includes: a fluorescence quenching surface; a nucleic acid probe that contains first and second ends with the first end bound to the fluorescence quenching surface, and is characterized by being able to self-anneal into a hairpin conformation; and a first fluorophore bound to the second end of the first nucleic acid molecule. When the first nucleic acid molecule is in the hairpin conformation, the fluorescence quenching surface substantially quenches fluorescent emissions by the first fluorophore; and when the first nucleic acid molecule is in a non-hairpin conformation, fluorescent emissions by the fluorophore are substantially free of quenching by the fluorescence quenching surface. Various nucleic acid probes, methods of making the sensor chip, biological sensor devices that contain the sensor chip, and their methods of use are also disclosed.

  4. Hybridization probe pairs and single-labeled probes: an alternative approach for genotyping and quantification.

    PubMed

    Froehlich, Thomas; Geulen, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has become a standard tool in both quantitative gene expression and genetic variation analysis. Data collection is performed throughout the PCR process, thus combining amplification and detection into a single step. This can be achieved by combining a variety of different fluorescent chemistries that correlate the concentration of an amplified PCR product to changes in fluorescence intensity. Hybridization probe pairs and single-labeled probes are sequence-specific, dye-labeled oligonucleotides, used in real-time PCR approaches, in particular for genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In that case, a detector probe is designed to cover the polymorphism. Allelic variants are identified and differentiated via post-PCR melting curve analysis. A single melting curve can distinguish different T (m)s, and differently labeled probes may be used, theoretically allowing multiplexed genotyping of several SNPs.

  5. Detection of hepatitis A virus in seeded estuarine samples by hybridization with cDNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Estes, M.K.; Metcalf, T.G.; Melnick, J.L

    1986-10-01

    The development and trials of a nucleic acid hybridization test for the detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in estuarine samples within 48 h are described. Approximately 10/sup 4/ physical particlels of HAV per dot could be detected. Test sensitivity was optimized by the consideration of hydbridization stringency, /sup 32/P energy level, probe concentration, and nucleic acid binding to filters. Test specificity was shown by a lack of cross-hybridization with other enteroviruses and unrelated nucleic acids. Potential false-positive reactions between bacterial DNA in samples and residual vector DNA contamination of purified nucleotide sequences in probes were eliminated by DNase treatment of samples. Humic acid at concentrations of up to 100 mg/liter caused only insignificant decreases in test sensitivity. Interference with hybridization by organic components of virus-containing eluates was removed by proteinase K digestion followed by phenol extraction and ethanol precipitation. The test is suitable for detecting naturally occurring HAV in samples from polluted estuarine environments.

  6. Comparative examination of probe labeling methods for microarray hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, David I.; Woodward, Karen; Setterquist, Robert A.; Kawasaki, Ernest S.

    2001-06-01

    For detection of differential gene expression, confocal laser based scanners are now capable of analyzing microarrays using one to five wavelengths. This allows investigators to choose among several labeling methods. Here we compare direct incorporation and indirect methods (amino-allyl and dendrimers) for labeling cDNA probes. We assessed reproducible sensitivity of each probe preparation method in two ways. First, by comparing hybridization intensities for limit of signal detection and second by measuring the lowest detectable concentration of a known ratio of mixed DNA (spikes). Limit of detection assay was done using arrays of mixed targets consisting of a serially diluted human specific gene fragment (HU1) and an undiluted DNA of chloramphenicol acetyl tranferase (CAT) gene. Then, individual single target arrays of CAT and HU1 DNA were used to determine the lowest detectable spike ratio of each labeling method. The results of this study will be presented and their significance for the analysis of microarrays will be discussed.

  7. A novel fluorescent probe: europium complex hybridized T7 phage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chin-Mei; Jin, Qiaoling; Sutton, April; Chen, Liaohai

    2005-01-01

    We report on the creation of a novel fluorescent probe of europium-complex hybridized T7 phage. It was made by filling a ligand-displayed T7 ghost phage with a fluorescent europium complex particle. The structure of the hybridized phage, which contains a fluorescent inorganic core surrounded by a ligand-displayed capsid shell, was confirmed by electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), bioassays, and fluorescence spectrometer. More importantly, as a benefit of the phage display technology, the hybridized phage has the capability to integrate an affinity reagent against virtually any target molecules. The approach provides an original method to fluorescently "tag" a bioligand and/or to "biofunctionalize" a fluorophore particle. By using other types of materials such as radioactive or magnetic particles to fill the ghost phage, we envision that the hybridized phages represent a new class of fluorescent, magnetic, or radioprobes for imaging and bioassays and could be used both in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Synthesis of circular double-stranded DNA having single-stranded recognition sequence as molecular-physical probe for nucleic acid hybridization detection based on atomic force microscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Koji; Matsunaga, Hideshi; Murata, Masaharu; Soh, Nobuaki; Imato, Toshihiko

    2009-08-01

    A new class of DNA probes having a mechanically detectable tag is reported. The DNA probe, which consists of a single-stranded recognition sequence and a double-stranded circular DNA entity, was prepared by polymerase reaction. M13mp18 single strand and a 32mer oligodeoxynucleotide whose 5'-end is decorated with the recognition sequence were used in combination as template and primer, respectively. We have successfully demonstrated that the DNA probe is useful for bioanalytical purposes: by deliberately attaching target DNA molecules onto Au(111) substrates and by mechanically reading out the tag-entity using a high-resolution microscopy including atomic force microscopy, visualization/detection of the individual target/probe DNA conjugate was possible simply yet straightforwardly. The present DNA probe can be characterized as a 100%-nucleic acid product material. It is simply available by one-pod synthesis. A surface topology parameter, image roughness, has witnessed its importance as a quantitative analysis index with particular usability in the present visualization/detection method.

  9. Probe kit for identifying a base in a nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  10. Methods of staining target chromosomal DNA employing high complexity nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Ol'li-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2006-10-03

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  11. Photoswitchable non-fluorescent thermochromic dye-nanoparticle hybrid probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Walter N.; Haji, Mwafaq R.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Nima, Zeid A.; Watanabe, Fumiya; Ghosh, Anindya; Biris, Alexandru S.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2016-11-01

    Photoswitchable fluorescent proteins with controllable light–dark states and spectral shifts in emission in response to light have led to breakthroughs in the study of cell biology. Nevertheless, conventional photoswitching is not applicable for weakly fluorescent proteins and requires UV light with low depth penetration in bio-tissue. Here we introduce a novel concept of photoswitchable hybrid probes consisting of thermochromic dye and absorbing nanoparticles, in which temperature-sensitive light–dark states and spectral shifts in absorption can be switched through controllable photothermal heating of doped nanoparticles. The proof-of-concept is demonstrated through the use of two different types of temperature-sensitive dyes doped with magnetic nanoparticles and reversibly photoswitched by a near-infrared laser. Photoacoustic imaging revealed the high contrast of these probes, which is sufficient for their visualization in cells and deep tissue. Our results suggest that these new photoswitchable multicolour probes can be used for multimodal cellular diagnostics and potentially for magnetic and photothermal therapy.

  12. Photoswitchable non-fluorescent thermochromic dye-nanoparticle hybrid probes

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Walter N.; Haji, Mwafaq R.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Nima, Zeid A.; Watanabe, Fumiya; Ghosh, Anindya; Biris, Alexandru S.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2016-01-01

    Photoswitchable fluorescent proteins with controllable light–dark states and spectral shifts in emission in response to light have led to breakthroughs in the study of cell biology. Nevertheless, conventional photoswitching is not applicable for weakly fluorescent proteins and requires UV light with low depth penetration in bio-tissue. Here we introduce a novel concept of photoswitchable hybrid probes consisting of thermochromic dye and absorbing nanoparticles, in which temperature-sensitive light–dark states and spectral shifts in absorption can be switched through controllable photothermal heating of doped nanoparticles. The proof-of-concept is demonstrated through the use of two different types of temperature-sensitive dyes doped with magnetic nanoparticles and reversibly photoswitched by a near-infrared laser. Photoacoustic imaging revealed the high contrast of these probes, which is sufficient for their visualization in cells and deep tissue. Our results suggest that these new photoswitchable multicolour probes can be used for multimodal cellular diagnostics and potentially for magnetic and photothermal therapy. PMID:27824110

  13. Photoswitchable non-fluorescent thermochromic dye-nanoparticle hybrid probes.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Walter N; Haji, Mwafaq R; Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Nima, Zeid A; Watanabe, Fumiya; Ghosh, Anindya; Biris, Alexandru S; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2016-11-08

    Photoswitchable fluorescent proteins with controllable light-dark states and spectral shifts in emission in response to light have led to breakthroughs in the study of cell biology. Nevertheless, conventional photoswitching is not applicable for weakly fluorescent proteins and requires UV light with low depth penetration in bio-tissue. Here we introduce a novel concept of photoswitchable hybrid probes consisting of thermochromic dye and absorbing nanoparticles, in which temperature-sensitive light-dark states and spectral shifts in absorption can be switched through controllable photothermal heating of doped nanoparticles. The proof-of-concept is demonstrated through the use of two different types of temperature-sensitive dyes doped with magnetic nanoparticles and reversibly photoswitched by a near-infrared laser. Photoacoustic imaging revealed the high contrast of these probes, which is sufficient for their visualization in cells and deep tissue. Our results suggest that these new photoswitchable multicolour probes can be used for multimodal cellular diagnostics and potentially for magnetic and photothermal therapy.

  14. Quantitative rRNA-targeted solution-based hybridization assay using peptide nucleic acid molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2008-12-01

    The potential of a solution-based hybridization assay using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) molecular beacon (MB) probes to quantify 16S rRNA of specific populations in RNA extracts of environmental samples was evaluated by designing PNA MB probes for the genera Dechloromonas and Dechlorosoma. In a kinetic study with 16S rRNA from pure cultures, the hybridization of PNA MB to target 16S rRNA exhibited a higher final hybridization signal and a lower apparent rate constant than the hybridizations to nontarget 16S rRNAs. A concentration of 10 mM NaCl in the hybridization buffer was found to be optimal for maximizing the difference between final hybridization signals from target and nontarget 16S rRNAs. Hybridization temperatures and formamide concentrations in hybridization buffers were optimized to minimize signals from hybridizations of PNA MB to nontarget 16S rRNAs. The detection limit of the PNA MB hybridization assay was determined to be 1.6 nM of 16S rRNA. To establish proof for the application of PNA MB hybridization assays in complex systems, target 16S rRNA from Dechlorosoma suillum was spiked at different levels to RNA isolated from an environmental (bioreactor) sample, and the PNA MB assay enabled effective quantification of the D. suillum RNA in this complex mixture. For another environmental sample, the quantitative results from the PNA MB hybridization assay were compared with those from clone libraries.

  15. Multiplexed quantification of bacterial 16S rRNA by solution hybridization with oligonucleotide probes and affinity capture.

    PubMed

    Satokari, Reetta M; Kataja, Kari; Söderlund, Hans

    2005-07-01

    Multiplexed and quantitative analysis of nucleic acid sequences in complex mixtures is essential in various applications of microbiological research. We have developed a method based on solution hybridization between biotinylated nucleic acid targets and multiple fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotide probes of distinct sizes. The biotin-nucleic acid-probe complexes are captured on magnetic streptavidin-coated microparticles and washed. The hybridized probes are eluted and their identity and quantity are determined by capillary electrophoresis. The signal intensities of the recorded probes correspond to the amount of target nucleic acid in the mixture, and the size indicates the target. Based on this principle and 16S rRNA-specific oligonucleotide probes, we set up an application for the relative quantification of different groups of clostridia and related organisms in a mixed bacterial population. The lower detection limit is 0.05 ng of total RNA and the linear range of measurement is 10(2). The method allowed accurate and highly repeatable quantification of the proportion of clostridia in human feces. Further, we discuss other applications of the method such as quantitative transcriptional analysis of eukaryotic microorganisms, which can be performed without conversion of mRNA to cDNA.

  16. Development of Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Detection of the HER2 Oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young K.; Evangelista, Jennifer; Aschenbach, Konrad; Johansson, Peter; Wen, Xinyu; Chen, Qingrong; Lee, Albert; Hempel, Heidi; Gheeya, Jinesh S.; Getty, Stephanie; Gomez, Romel; Khan, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have gained much interest as molecular recognition tools in biology, medicine and chemistry. This is due to high hybridization efficiency to complimentary oligonucleotides and stability of the duplexes with RNA or DNA. We have synthesized 15/16-mer PNA probes to detect the HER2 mRNA. The performance of these probes to detect the HER2 target was evaluated by fluorescence imaging and fluorescence bead assays. The PNA probes have sufficiently discriminated between the wild type HER2 target and the mutant target with single base mismatches. Furthermore, the probes exhibited excellent linear concentration dependence between 0.4 to 400 fmol for the target gene. The results demonstrate potential application of PNAs as diagnostic probes with high specificity for quantitative measurements of amplifications or over-expressions of oncogenes. PMID:23593123

  17. The effects of multiple probes on the hybridization of target DNA on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Welling, Ryan C; Knotts, Thomas A

    2015-01-07

    DNA microarrays have disruptive potential in many fields including genetics and medicine, but the technology has yet to find widespread clinical use due to poor reliability. Microarrays work on the principle of hybridization and can only be as dependable as this process is reliable. As such, a significant amount of theoretical research has been done to understand hybridization on surfaces on the molecular level. Previous simulations of a target strand with a single, surface-tethered probe molecule have yielded valuable insights, but such is an ideal system and little is known about the effects of multiple probes-a situation that more closely approximates the real system. This work uses molecular simulation to determine the specific differences in duplex stability between one, three, six, and nine tethered probes on a surface. The results show that it is more difficult for a single target to hybridize to a probe as the number of probes on the surface increases due to crowding effects; however, once hybridized, the duplex is more stable than when fewer probes are present. The data also indicate that hybridization of a target to a probe on the face of a group of probes is more stable than hybridization to probes at the edge or center locations. Taken as a whole, the results offer new insights into the cause of the poor reproducibility exhibited by microarrays.

  18. Quantification of Gordona amarae Strains in Foaming Activated Sludge and Anaerobic Digester Systems with Oligonucleotide Hybridization Probes

    PubMed Central

    de los Reyes, M. Fiorella; de los Reyes, Francis L.; Hernandez, Mark; Raskin, Lutgarde

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the predominance of mycolic acid-containing filamentous actinomycetes (mycolata) in foam layers in activated sludge systems. Gordona (formerly Nocardia) amarae often is considered the major representative of this group in activated sludge foam. In this study, small-subunit rRNA genes of four G. amarae strains were sequenced, and the resulting sequences were compared to the sequence of G. amarae type strain SE-6. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the five strains used represent two lines of evolutionary descent; group 1 consists of strains NM23 and ASAC1, and group 2 contains strains SE-6, SE-102, and ASF3. The following three oligonucleotide probes were designed: a species-specific probe for G. amarae, a probe specific for group 1, and a probe targeting group 2. The probes were characterized by dissociation temperature and specificity studies, and the species-specific probe was evaluated for use in fluorescent in situ hybridizations. By using the group-specific probes, it was possible to place additional G. amarae isolates in their respective groups. The probes were used along with previously designed probes in membrane hybridizations to determine the abundance of G. amarae, group 1, group 2, bacterial, mycolata, and Gordona rRNAs in samples obtained from foaming activated sludge systems in California, Illinois, and Wisconsin. The target groups were present in significantly greater concentrations in activated sludge foam than in mixed liquor and persisted in anaerobic digesters. Hybridization results indicated that the presence of certain G. amarae strains may be regional or treatment plant specific and that previously uncharacterized G. amarae strains may be present in some systems. PMID:9647822

  19. Terbium fluorescence as a sensitive, inexpensive probe for UV-induced damage in nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    El-Yazbi, Amira F; Loppnow, Glen R

    2013-07-05

    Much effort has been focused on developing methods for detecting damaged nucleic acids. However, almost all of the proposed methods consist of multi-step procedures, are limited, require expensive instruments, or suffer from a high level of interferences. In this paper, we present a novel simple, inexpensive, mix-and-read assay that is generally applicable to nucleic acid damage and uses the enhanced luminescence due to energy transfer from nucleic acids to terbium(III) (Tb(3+)). Single-stranded oligonucleotides greatly enhance the Tb(3+) emission, but duplex DNA does not. With the use of a DNA hairpin probe complementary to the oligonucleotide of interest, the Tb(3+)/hairpin probe is applied to detect ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage. The hairpin probe hybridizes only with the undamaged DNA. However, the damaged DNA remains single-stranded and enhances the intrinsic fluorescence of Tb(3+), producing a detectable signal directly proportional to the amount of DNA damage. This allows the Tb(3+)/hairpin probe to be used for sensitive quantification of UV-induced DNA damage. The Tb(3+)/hairpin probe showed superior selectivity to DNA damage compared to conventional molecular beacons probes (MBs) and its sensitivity is more than 2.5 times higher than MBs with a limit of detection of 4.36±1.2 nM. In addition, this probe is easier to synthesize and more than eight times cheaper than MBs, which makes its use recommended for high-throughput, quantitative analysis of DNA damage.

  20. A DNA origami nanorobot controlled by nucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed

    Torelli, Emanuela; Marini, Monica; Palmano, Sabrina; Piantanida, Luca; Polano, Cesare; Scarpellini, Alice; Lazzarino, Marco; Firrao, Giuseppe

    2014-07-23

    A prototype for a DNA origami nanorobot is designed, produced, and tested. The cylindrical nanorobot (diameter of 14 nm and length of 48 nm) with a switchable flap, is able to respond to an external stimulus and reacts by a physical switch from a disarmed to an armed configuration able to deliver a cellular compatible message. In the tested design the robot weapon is a nucleic acid fully contained in the inner of the tube and linked to a single point of the internal face of the flap. Upon actuation the nanorobot moves the flap extracting the nucleic acid that assembles into a hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme catalyzing a colorimetric reaction or chemiluminescence generation. The actuation switch is triggered by an external nucleic acid (target) that interacts with a complementary nucleic acid that is beard externally by the nanorobot (probe). Hybridization of probe and target produces a localized structural change that results in flap opening. The flap movement is studied on a two-dimensional prototype origami using Förster resonance energy transfer and is shown to be triggered by a variety of targets, including natural RNAs. The nanorobot has potential for in vivo biosensing and intelligent delivery of biological activators.

  1. Efficient in vitro synthesis of biologically active RNA and RNA hybridization probes from plasmids containing a bacteriophage SP6 promoter.

    PubMed

    Melton, D A; Krieg, P A; Rebagliati, M R; Maniatis, T; Zinn, K; Green, M R

    1984-09-25

    A simple and efficient method for synthesizing pure single stranded RNAs of virtually any structure is described. This in vitro transcription system is based on the unusually specific RNA synthesis by bacteriophage SP6 RNA polymerase which initiates transcription exclusively at an SP6 promoter. We have constructed convenient cloning vectors that contain an SP6 promoter immediately upstream from a polylinker sequence. Using these SP6 vectors, optimal conditions have been established for in vitro RNA synthesis. The advantages and uses of SP6 derived RNAs as probes for nucleic acid blot and solution hybridizations are demonstrated. We show that single stranded RNA probes of a high specific activity are easy to prepare and can significantly increase the sensitivity of nucleic acid hybridization methods. Furthermore, the SP6 transcription system can be used to prepare RNA substrates for studies on RNA processing (1,5,9) and translation (see accompanying paper).

  2. The effects of multiple probes on the hybridization of target DNA on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welling, Ryan C.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarrays have disruptive potential in many fields including genetics and medicine, but the technology has yet to find widespread clinical use due to poor reliability. Microarrays work on the principle of hybridization and can only be as dependable as this process is reliable. As such, a significant amount of theoretical research has been done to understand hybridization on surfaces on the molecular level. Previous simulations of a target strand with a single, surface-tethered probe molecule have yielded valuable insights, but such is an ideal system and little is known about the effects of multiple probes—a situation that more closely approximates the real system. This work uses molecular simulation to determine the specific differences in duplex stability between one, three, six, and nine tethered probes on a surface. The results show that it is more difficult for a single target to hybridize to a probe as the number of probes on the surface increases due to crowding effects; however, once hybridized, the duplex is more stable than when fewer probes are present. The data also indicate that hybridization of a target to a probe on the face of a group of probes is more stable than hybridization to probes at the edge or center locations. Taken as a whole, the results offer new insights into the cause of the poor reproducibility exhibited by microarrays.

  3. High affinity γPNA sandwich hybridization assay for rapid detection of short nucleic acid targets with single mismatch discrimination.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Johnathan M; Zhang, Li Ang; Manna, Arunava; Armitage, Bruce A; Ly, Danith H; Schneider, James W

    2013-07-08

    Hybridization analysis of short DNA and RNA targets presents many challenges for detection. The commonly employed sandwich hybridization approach cannot be implemented for these short targets due to insufficient probe-target binding strengths for unmodified DNA probes. Here, we present a method capable of rapid and stable sandwich hybridization detection for 22 nucleotide DNA and RNA targets. Stable hybridization is achieved using an n-alkylated, polyethylene glycol γ-carbon modified peptide nucleic acid (γPNA) amphiphile. The γPNA's exceptionally high affinity enables stable hybridization of a second DNA-based probe to the remaining bases of the short target. Upon hybridization of both probes, an electrophoretic mobility shift is measured via interaction of the n-alkane modification on the γPNA with capillary electrophoresis running buffer containing nonionic surfactant micelles. We find that sandwich hybridization of both probes is stable under multiple binding configurations and demonstrate single base mismatch discrimination. The binding strength of both probes is also stabilized via coaxial stacking on adjacent hybridization to targets. We conclude with a discussion on the implementation of the proposed sandwich hybridization assay as a high-throughput microRNA detection method.

  4. Zip nucleic acids are potent hydrolysis probes for quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Clément; Moreau, Valérie; Deglane, Gaëlle; Voirin, Emilie; Erbacher, Patrick; Lenne-Samuel, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Zip nucleic acids (ZNAs) are oligonucleotides conjugated with cationic spermine units that increase affinity for their target. ZNAs were recently shown to enable specific and sensitive reactions when used as primers for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse-transcription. Here, we report their use as quantitative PCR hydrolysis probes. Ultraviolet duplex melting data demonstrate that attachment of cationic residues to the 3′ end of an oligonucleotide does not alter its ability to discriminate nucleotides nor the destabilization pattern relative to mismatch location in the oligonucleotide sequence. The stability increase provided by the cationic charges allows the use of short dual-labeled probes that significantly improve single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping. Longer ZNA probes were shown to display reduced background fluorescence, therefore, generating greater sensitivity and signal level as compared to standard probes. ZNA probes thus provide broad flexibility in assay design and also represent an effective alternative to minor groove binder- and locked nucleic-acid-containing probes. PMID:20071749

  5. Genotyping male-specific RNA coliphages by hybridization with oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, F C; Shieh, Y S; van Duin, J; Beekwilder, M J; Sobsey, M D

    1995-01-01

    F-specific (F+) RNA coliphages are prevalent in sewage and other fecal wastes of humans and animals. There are four antigenically distinct serogroups of F+ RNA coliphages, and those predominating in humans (groups II and III) differ from those predominating in animals (groups I and IV). Hence, it may be possible to distinguish between human and animal wastes by serotyping F+ RNA coliphage isolates. Because serotyping is laborious and requires scarce antiserum reagents, we investigated genotyping using synthetic oligonucleotide probes as an alternative approach to distinguishing the four groups of F+ RNA coliphages. Oligoprobes I, II, III, IV, A, and B were selected to detect group I, II, III, IV, I plus II, and III plus IV phages, respectively. Methods for phage transfer from zones of lysis on a host cell lawn to candidate membrane filters and fixation of genomic nucleic acid on the membranes were optimized. The oligoprobes, which were end labeled with digoxigenin, were applied in DNA-RNA hybridization, and hybrids were observed by colorimetric, immunoenzymatic detection. Of 203 isolates of F+ RNA coliphages from environmental samples of water, wastes, and shellfish, 99.5 and 96.6% could be classified into each group by serotyping and genotyping, respectively. Probes A and B correctly identified 100% of the isolates. On the basis of these results, this method for genotyping F+ RNA coliphages appears to be practical and reliable for typing isolates in field samples. PMID:8526509

  6. Whole-cell hybridization of Methanosarcina cells with two new oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, A H; Torsvik, V L; Torsvik, T; Poulsen, L K; Ahring, B K

    1997-01-01

    Two new oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16S rRNA of the methanogenic genus Methanosarcina were developed. The probes have the following sequences (Escherichia coli numbering): probe SARCI551, 5'-GAC CCAATAATCACGATCAC-3', and probe SARCI645, 5'-TCCCGGTTCCAAGTCTGGC-3'. In situ hybridization with the fluorescently labelled probes required several modifications of standard procedures. Cells of Methanosarcina mazeii S-6 were found to lyse during the hybridization step if fixed in 3% formaldehyde and stored in 50% ethanol. Lysis was, however, not observed with cells fixed and stored in 1.6% formaldehyde-0.85% NaCl. Extensive autofluorescence of the cells was found upon hybridization in the presence of 5 mM EDTA, but successful hybridization could be obtained without addition of this compound. The mounting agent Citifluor AF1, often used in conjugation with the fluorochrome fluorescein, was found to wash the labelled probes out of the cells. Stable labelling could be obtained with rhodamine-labelled probes when the specimen was mounted in immersion oil, and high hybridization intensities of the Methanosarcina cells were found even in the presence of biomass from an anaerobic reactor. The inherent high autofluorescence of the biomass could be lowered by use of a highly specific narrow-band filter. The probes were found to be specific for Methanosarcina and useful for detection of this genus in samples from anaerobic reactors. PMID:9251192

  7. Identification of vaccine-related polioviruses by hybridization with specific RNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    De, L; Nottay, B; Yang, C F; Holloway, B P; Pallansch, M; Kew, O

    1995-01-01

    We developed RNA probes for the identification of poliovirus isolates by blot hybridization. Two sets of vaccine strain-specific probes were prepared. They complemented variable genomic domains within (i) the 5'-untranslated region and (ii) the amino-terminal codons of VP1. An enterovirus group probe (EV/5UT) matching highly conserved 5'-untranslated region sequences was used to estimate the quantities of poliovirus (or enterovirus) RNA in the samples. Poliovirus sequences amplified from Sabin strain virion RNA templates by PCR were inserted into the pUC18 plasmid vector. The antisense PCR primer for each probe set contained sequences encoding a T7 promoter. Hybrids were detected by a sensitive nonisotopic method. RNA probes were labeled by incorporation of digoxigenin-uridylate into the transcripts. The binding of probe to immobilized poliovirus RNAs was visualized by hydrolysis of the chemiluminescent substrate 4-methoxy-4-(3-phosphate-phenyl)-spiro-(1,2-dioxetane-3,2'-adamant ane) catalyzed by alkaline phosphatase conjugated to anti-digoxigenin (Fab) fragments. The specificities of the probes were evaluated with a panel of poliovirus isolates that had previously been characterized by sequence analysis. The RNAs of vaccine-related isolates hybridized with the appropriate probe sets. Wild polioviruses representing a broad spectrum of contemporary genotypes were recognized by the inabilities of their genomes to form stable hybrids with the Sabin strain-specific probes. PMID:7751358

  8. Mismatch discrimination in fluorescent in situ hybridization using different types of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Silvia; Silvia, Fontenete; Barros, Joana; Joana, Barros; Madureira, Pedro; Pedro, Madureira; Figueiredo, Céu; Céu, Figueiredo; Wengel, Jesper; Jesper, Wengel; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Filipe, Azevedo Nuno

    2015-05-01

    In the past few years, several researchers have focused their attention on nucleic acid mimics due to the increasing necessity of developing a more robust recognition of DNA or RNA sequences. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an example of a method where the use of these novel nucleic acid monomers might be crucial to the success of the analysis. To achieve the expected accuracy in detection, FISH probes should have high binding affinity towards their complementary strands and discriminate effectively the noncomplementary strands. In this study, we investigate the effect of different chemical modifications in fluorescent probes on their ability to successfully detect the complementary target and discriminate the mismatched base pairs by FISH. To our knowledge, this paper presents the first study where this analysis is performed with different types of FISH probes directly in biological targets, Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter acinonychis. This is also the first study where unlocked nucleic acids (UNA) were used as chemistry modification in oligonucleotides for FISH methodologies. The effectiveness in detecting the specific target and in mismatch discrimination appears to be improved using locked nucleic acids (LNA)/2'-O-methyl RNA (2'OMe) or peptide nucleic acid (PNA) in comparison to LNA/DNA, LNA/UNA, or DNA probes. Further, the use of LNA modifications together with 2'OMe monomers allowed the use of shorter fluorescent probes and increased the range of hybridization temperatures at which FISH would work.

  9. Rapid sex determination on buccal smears using DNA probes and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldez, R.A.; Harris, C.

    1994-09-01

    Hybridization of dual-labeled DNA probes for the repetitive sequences on the X and Y chromosomes allows a fast, non-invasive, more reliable method for sex determination that current cytogenetic Barr body and Y chromatin assays. Scrapes of squamous epithelial cells were collected from the oral cavity of 14 subjects (5{male}, 9{female}) and smeared onto silanized slides. The smears were allowed to air dry. Samples were blinded and then fixed in 50% methanol/50% glacial acetic acid for 10 minutes, and allowed to dry. The slides were incubated in a pretreatment solution containing 30% sodium bisulfite at 45{degrees}C for 10 minutes. They were rinsed in 2XSSC pH 7.0 and then dehydrated through a series of 70%, 85%, and 100% ethanols at room temperature and allowed to air dry. A probe mixture (30 {mu}L containing 10 ng/{mu}L biotin-labeled DXZ1 and digoxigenin-labeled DYZ1/DYZ3 in 70% Formamide/2XSSC) was aliquoted onto each slide, coverslipped, and sealed with rubber cement. Probe and target DNA were simultaneously denatured at 72{degrees}C on a slide warmer for 6 minutes. Probe was allowed to hybridize overnight in a humidified chamber at 37{degrees}C. Slides were postwashed at 72{degrees}C in 0.5xSSC pH 7.0 for 5 minutes, then soaked at room temperature 1XPBD for 2 minutes, and detected with rhodamine/anti-digoxigenin-FITC/avidin for 15 minutes at 37{degrees}C. Slides were soaked 3X in 1XPBD and then counterstained with 15 {mu}L 0.05 {mu}g/mL DAP1/Antifade. 200 nuclei were scored for the presence of one green (X), two green (XX), one green and one red (XY), or a single red (Y) signal, using a fluorescent microscope equipped with a triple band pass filter. Greater than 90% of the hybridized nuclei from each of the 14 cases studied conformed to the sex chromosome pattern. The modal number in 9 cases showed two green signals (XX), and a green and a red signal (XY) in the other 5 cases; this was in complete agreement with the cytogenetic results.

  10. Hybridization and sequencing of nucleic acids using base pair mismatches

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  11. Group-specific small-subunit rRNA hybridization probes to characterize filamentous foaming in activated sludge systems.

    PubMed Central

    de los Reyes, F L; Ritter, W; Raskin, L

    1997-01-01

    Foaming in activated sludge systems is characterized by the formation of a thick, chocolate brown-colored scum that floats on the surface of aeration basins and secondary clarifiers. These viscous foams have been associated with the presence of filamentous mycolic acid-containing actinomycetes. To aid in evaluating the microbial representation in foam, we developed and characterized group-, genus-, and species-specific oligonucleotide probes targeting the small subunit rRNA of the Mycobacterium complex, Gordona spp., and Gordona (Nocardia) amarae, respectively. The use of a universal base analog, 5-nitroindole, in oligonucleotide probe design was evaluated by comparing the characteristics of two different versions of the Mycobacterium complex probe. The temperature of dissociation of each probe was determined. Probe specificity studies with a diverse collection of 67 target and nontarget rRNAs demonstrated the specificity of the probes to the target groups. Whole-cell hybridizations with fluorescein- and rhodamine-labeled probes were performed with pure cultures of various members of the Mycobacterium complex as well as with environmental samples from a full-scale activated sludge plant which experienced foaming. Quantitative membrane hybridizations with activated sludge and anaerobic digester foam showed that 15.0 to 18.3% of the total small-subunit rRNAs could be attributed to members of the Mycobacterium complex, of which a vast majority consisted of Gordona rRNA. Several G. amarae strains made up only a very small percentage of the Gordona strains present. We demonstrated that group-specific rRNA probes are useful tools for the in situ monitoring and identification of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge systems. PMID:9055425

  12. Time-Resolved Nucleic Acid Hybridization Beacons Utilizing Unimolecular and Toehold-Mediated Strand Displacement Designs.

    PubMed

    Massey, Melissa; Ancona, Mario G; Medintz, Igor L; Algar, W Russ

    2015-12-01

    Nucleic acid hybridization probes are sought after for numerous assay and imaging applications. These probes are often limited by the properties of fluorescent dyes, prompting the development of new probes where dyes are paired with novel or nontraditional luminescent materials. Luminescent terbium complexes are an example of such a material, and these complexes offer several unique spectroscopic advantages. Here, we demonstrate two nonstem-loop designs for light-up nucleic acid hybridization beacons that utilize time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) between a luminescent Lumi4-Tb cryptate (Tb) donor and a fluorescent reporter dye, where time-resolved emission from the dye provides an analytical signal. Both designs are based on probe oligonucleotides that are labeled at their opposite termini with Tb and a fluorescent reporter dye. In one design, a probe is partially blocked with a quencher dye-labeled oligonucleotide, and target hybridization is signaled through toehold-mediated strand displacement and loss of a competitive FRET pathway. In the other design, the intrinsic folding properties of an unblocked probe are utilized in combination with a temporal mechanism for signaling target hybridization. This temporal mechanism is based on a recently elucidated "sweet spot" for TR-FRET measurements and exploits distance control over FRET efficiencies to shift the Tb lifetime within or outside the time-gated detection window for measurements. Both the blocked and unblocked beacons offer nanomolar (femtomole) detection limits, response times on the order of minutes, multiplexing through the use of different reporter dyes, and detection in complex matrices such as serum and blood. The blocked beacons offer better mismatch selectivity, whereas the unblocked beacons are simpler in design. The temporal mechanism of signaling utilized with the unblocked beacons also plays a significant role with the blocked beacons and represents a new and effective

  13. A simple and rapid method for the preparation of homologous DNA oligonucleotide hybridization probes from heterologous gene sequences and probes.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, E S; Sarge, K D

    1988-11-30

    We describe a simple and rapid method for the preparation of homologous DNA oligonucleotide probes for hybridization analysis and/or cDNA/genomic library screening. With this method, a synthetic DNA oligonucleotide derived from a known heterologous DNA/RNA/protein sequence is annealed to an RNA preparation containing the gene transcript of interest. Any unpaired 3'-terminal oligonucleotides of the heterologous DNA primer are then removed using the 3' exonuclease activity of the DNA Polymerase I Klenow fragment before primer extension/dideoxynucleotide sequencing of the annealed RNA species with AMV reverse transcriptase. From the determined RNA sequence, a completely homologous DNA oligonucleotide probe is then prepared. This approach has been used to prepare a homologous DNA oligonucleotide probe for the successful library screening of the yeast hybRNA gene starting with a heterologous mouse hybRNA DNA oligonucleotide probe.

  14. A comparative hybridization analysis of yeast DNA with Paramecium parafusin- and different phosphoglucomutase-specific probes.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E; Satir, B H

    2000-01-01

    Molecular probes designed for the parafusin (PFUS), the Paramecium exocytic-sensitive phosphoglycoprotein, gave distinct hybridization patterns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic DNA when compared with different phosphoglucomutase specific probes. These include two probes identical to segments of yeast phosphoglucomutase (PGM) genes 1 and 2. Neither of the PGM probes revealed the 7.4 and 5.9 kb fragments in Bgl II-cut yeast DNA digest detected with the 1.6 kb cloned PFUS cDNA and oligonucleotide constructed to the PFUS region (insertion 3--I-3) not found in other species. PCR amplification with PFUS-specific primers generated yeast DNA-species of the predicted molecular size which hybridized to the I-3 probe. A search of the yeast genome database produced an unassigned nucleotide sequence that showed 55% identity to parafusin gene and 37% identity to PGM2 (the major isoform of yeast phosphoglucomutase) within the amplified region.

  15. Phylogenetic group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes for single-cell detection of lactic acid bacteria in oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for the single-cell detection and enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, in particular organisms belonging to the major phylogenetic groups and species of oral lactobacilli and to Abiotrophia/Granulicatella. Results As lactobacilli are known for notorious resistance to probe penetration, probe-specific assay protocols were experimentally developed to provide maximum cell wall permeability, probe accessibility, hybridization stringency, and fluorescence intensity. The new assays were then applied in a pilot study to three biofilm samples harvested from variably demineralized bovine enamel discs that had been carried in situ for 10 days by different volunteers. Best probe penetration and fluorescent labeling of reference strains were obtained after combined lysozyme and achromopeptidase treatment followed by exposure to lipase. Hybridization stringency had to be established strictly for each probe. Thereafter all probes showed the expected specificity with reference strains and labeled the anticipated morphotypes in dental plaques. Applied to in situ grown biofilms the set of probes detected only Lactobacillus fermentum and bacteria of the Lactobacillus casei group. The most cariogenic biofilm contained two orders of magnitude higher L. fermentum cell numbers than the other biofilms. Abiotrophia/Granulicatella and streptococci from the mitis group were found in all samples at high levels, whereas Streptococcus mutans was detected in only one sample in very low numbers. Conclusions Application of these new group- and species-specific FISH probes to oral biofilm-forming lactic acid bacteria will allow a clearer understanding of the supragingival biome, its spatial architecture and of structure-function relationships implicated during plaque homeostasis and caries development. The probes should prove of value far beyond the field of oral microbiology, as many of

  16. Genotyping of the CCR5 chemokine receptor by isothermal NASBA amplification and differential probe hybridization.

    PubMed

    Romano, J W; Tetali, S; Lee, E M; Shurtliff, R N; Wang, X P; Pahwa, S; Kaplan, M H; Ginocchio, C C

    1999-11-01

    The human CCR5 chemokine receptor functions as a coreceptor with CD4 for infection by macrophage-tropic isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). A mutated CCR5 allele which encodes a protein that does not function as a coreceptor for HIV-1 has been identified. Thus, expression of the wild-type and/or mutation allele is relevant to determining the infectability of patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and affects disease progression in vivo. We developed a qualitative CCR5 genotyping assay using NASBA, an isothermal nucleic acid amplification technology. The method involves three enzymes and two oligonucleotides and targets the CCR5 mRNA, which is expressed in PBMC at a copy number higher than 2, the number of copies of DNA present encoding the gene. The single oligonucleotide set amplifies both alleles, and genotyping is achieved by separate hybridizations of wild-type- and mutation-specific probes directly to the single-stranded RNA amplification product. Assay sensitivity and specificity were demonstrated with RNAs produced in vitro from plasmid clones bearing the DNA encoding each allele. No detectable cross-reactivity between wild-type and mutation probes was found, and 50 copies of each allele were readily detectable. Analysis of patient samples found that 20% were heterozygous and 1% were homozygous for the CCR5 mutation. Thus, NASBA is a sensitive and specific means of rapidly determining CCR5 genotype and provides several technical advantages over alternative assay systems.

  17. Genotyping of the CCR5 Chemokine Receptor by Isothermal NASBA Amplification and Differential Probe Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Joseph W.; Tetali, Surya; Lee, Eun Mi; Shurtliff, Roxanne N.; Wang, Xue Ping; Pahwa, Savita; Kaplan, Mark H.; Ginocchio, Christine C.

    1999-01-01

    The human CCR5 chemokine receptor functions as a coreceptor with CD4 for infection by macrophage-tropic isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). A mutated CCR5 allele which encodes a protein that does not function as a coreceptor for HIV-1 has been identified. Thus, expression of the wild-type and/or mutation allele is relevant to determining the infectibility of patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and affects disease progression in vivo. We developed a qualitative CCR5 genotyping assay using NASBA, an isothermal nucleic acid amplification technology. The method involves three enzymes and two oligonucleotides and targets the CCR5 mRNA, which is expressed in PBMC at a copy number higher than 2, the number of copies of DNA present encoding the gene. The single oligonucleotide set amplifies both alleles, and genotyping is achieved by separate hybridizations of wild-type- and mutation-specific probes directly to the single-stranded RNA amplification product. Assay sensitivity and specificity were demonstrated with RNAs produced in vitro from plasmid clones bearing the DNA encoding each allele. No detectable cross-reactivity between wild-type and mutation probes was found, and 50 copies of each allele were readily detectable. Analysis of patient samples found that 20% were heterozygous and 1% were homozygous for the CCR5 mutation. Thus, NASBA is a sensitive and specific means of rapidly determining CCR5 genotype and provides several technical advantages over alternative assay systems. PMID:10548593

  18. Development of a diagnostic test for Johne's disease using a DNA hybridization probe.

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, S S; Splitter, G A; Welch, R A

    1989-01-01

    A DNA probe, M13 mpHAW71, that detects Mycobacterium paratuberculosis in the fecal material of infected animals was developed for use in the diagnosis of Johne's disease. The probe detected as few as 10(5) M. paratuberculosis when hybridized under stringent conditions to total genomic DNA purified from bovine fecal material. When the probe was used diagnostically, it did not differentiate members of the Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare-M. paratuberculosis complex. Compared with culturing, the DNA probe identified 34.4% more mycobacterium-containing fecal samples, and testing took only 72 h to complete. Images PMID:2768445

  19. Directly incorporating fluorochromes into DNA probes by PCR increases the efficience of fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmer, Joy

    1996-05-01

    The object of this study was to produce a directly labeled whole chromosome probe in a Degenerative Oligonucleotide Primed-Polymerase Chain Reaction (DOP-PCR) that will identify chromosome breaks, deletions, inversions and translocations caused by radiation damage. In this study we amplified flow sorted chromosome 19 using DOP-PCR. The product was then subjected to a secondary DOP PCR amplification, After the secondary amplification the DOP-PCR product was directly labeled in a tertiary PCR reaction with rhodamine conjugated with dUTP (FluoroRed) to produce a DNA fluorescent probe. The probe was then hybridized to human metaphase lymphocytes on slides, washed and counterstained with 4{prime},6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). The signal of the FluoroRed probe was then compared to a signal of a probe labeled with biotin and stained with avidin fluorescein isothio cynate (FITC) and anti-avidin FITC. The results show that the probe labeled with FluoroRed gave signals as bright as the probe with biotin labeling. The FluoroRed probe had less noise than the biotin labeled probe. Therefore, a directly labeled probe has been successfully produced in a DOP-PCR reaction. In future a probe labeled with FluoroRed will be produced instead of a probe labeled with biotin to increase efficiency.

  20. Fiber-based hybrid probe for non-invasive cerebral monitoring in neonatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehberger, Matthias; Giovannella, Martina; Pagliazzi, Marco; Weigel, Udo; Durduran, Turgut; Contini, Davide; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Pifferi, Antonio; Torricelli, Alessandro; Schmitt, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Improved cerebral monitoring systems are needed to prevent preterm infants from long-term cognitive and motor restrictions. Combining advanced near-infrared diffuse spectroscopy measurement technologies, time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) will introduce novel indicators of cerebral oxygen metabolism and blood flow for neonatology. For non-invasive sensing a fiber-optical probe is used to send and receive light from the infant head. In this study we introduce a new fiber-based hybrid probe that is designed for volume production. The probe supports TRS and DCS measurements in a cross geometry, thus both technologies gain information on the same region inside the tissue. The probe is highly miniaturized to perform cerebral measurements on heads of extreme preterm infants down to head diameters of 6cm. Considerations concerning probe production focus on a reproducible accuracy in shape and precise optical alignment. In this way deviations in measurement data within a series of probes should be minimized. In addition to that, requirements for clinical use like robustness and hygiene are considered. An additional soft-touching sleeve made of FDA compatible silicone allows for a flexible attachment with respect to the individual anatomy of each patient. We present the technical concept of the hybrid probe and corresponding manufacturing methods. A prototype of the probe is shown and tested on tissue phantoms as well as in vivo to verify its operational reliability.

  1. Designer nucleic acids to probe and program the cell.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Yamuna; Bathe, Mark

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in nucleic acid sequencing, structural, and computational technologies have resulted in dramatic progress in our understanding of nucleic acid structure and function in the cell. This knowledge, together with the predictable base-pairing of nucleic acids and powerful synthesis and expression capabilities now offers the unique ability to program nucleic acids to form precise 3D architectures with diverse applications in synthetic and cell biology. The unique modularity of structural motifs that include aptamers, DNAzymes, and ribozymes, together with their well-defined construction rules, enables the synthesis of functional higher-order nucleic acid complexes from these subcomponents. As we illustrate here, these highly programmable, smart complexes are increasingly enabling researchers to probe and program the cell in a sophisticated manner that moves well beyond the use of nucleic acids for conventional genetic manipulation alone.

  2. Biomimetic growth of gallic acid-ZnO hybrid assemblies and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarker, Nazmul H.; Barnaby, Stacey N.; Fath, Karl R.; Frayne, Stephen H.; Nakatsuka, Nako; Banerjee, Ipsita A.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we probed the biomimetic formation of gallic acid (GA)-ZnO nanoparticle hybrids. It was found that the morphologies formed were dependent upon pH values, resulting in GA-ZnO hybrids of varying shapes such as micro or nanoplates or fibers. The formed supramolecular GA-ZnO hybrids were found to be luminescent as indicated by confocal microscopy and were utilized for the photocatalytic degradation of the organic dye methylene blue. We also explored the bactericidal effects of the hybrids on Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus) as well as Escherichia Coli ( E. Coli). Thus, we have developed a new class of shape-controlled nanohybrid assemblies via mild, green synthetic methods that may be utilized for photocatalytic degradation for environmental remediation as well as for antibacterial applications.

  3. Color multiplexing hybridization probes using the apolipoprotein E locus as a model system for genotyping.

    PubMed

    Bernard, P S; Pritham, G H; Wittwer, C T

    1999-09-10

    Fluorescent hybridization probes were multiplexed for color genotyping of the apolipoprotein E locus using model oligonucleotide targets. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer was observed during adjacent hybridization of 3'-fluorescein-labeled "donor" probes paired with 5'-labeled "acceptor" probes with different emission spectra reporting at codons 112 and 158. The acceptor dyes emitted at either 640 nm (LightCycler Red 640) or 705 nm (LightCycler Red 705) and were monitored with a LightCycler, a thermal cycler with an integrated fluorimeter. The color of the acceptor dye identified each site and the characteristic melting temperatures of the fluorescein-labeled probes identified single base changes within each codon. Color compensation of temperature-dependent spectral overlap was applied to completely separate each channel. Competition between the probes and the complementary strand for the target sequence decreased resonance energy transfer, indicating an advantage of single-stranded target. Hybridization probes of the same length, but different GC content are T(m) shifted by the same amount during A:C mismatch duplex melting. Genotyping was optimal at both sites if melting curve analysis was preceded by a slow (1 degrees C/s) annealing phase. Although each site preferred different concentrations of Mg(2+) and target strand for optimal genotyping, conditions for multiplexing were found. This method, along with an appropriate amplification technique, should allow real-time multiplex genotyping from genomic DNA.

  4. In situ hybridization with labeled probes: assessment of african Swine Fever virus in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Ballester, Maria; Rodríguez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    In situ hybridization (ISH) has become a very valuable molecular diagnostic tool to detect specific DNA or RNA sequences in biological samples through the use of complementary DNA- or RNA-labeled probes. Here, we describe an optimized in situ hybridization protocol to detect African swine fever virus (ASFV) DNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues using digoxigenin-labeled probes.

  5. Silver ions-mediated conformational switch: facile design of structure-controllable nucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongxiang; Li, Jishan; Wang, Hao; Jin, Jianyu; Liu, Jinhua; Wang, Kemin; Tan, Weihong; Yang, Ronghua

    2010-08-01

    Conformationally constraint nucleic acid probes were usually designed by forming an intramolecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. The disadvantages of these approaches are the inflexibility and instability in complex environment of the Watson-Crick-based duplex. We report that this hydrogen bonding pattern can be replaced by metal-ligation between specific metal ions and the natural bases. To demonstrate the feasibility of this principle, two linear oligonucleotides and silver ions were examined as models for DNA hybridization assay and adenosine triphosphate detection. The both nucleic acids contain target binding sequences in the middle and cytosine (C)-rich sequences at the lateral portions. The strong interaction between Ag(+) ions and cytosines forms stable C-Ag(+)-C structures, which promises the oligonucleotides to form conformationally constraint formations. In the presence of its target, interaction between the loop sequences and the target unfolds the C-Ag(+)-C structures, and the corresponding probes unfolding can be detected by a change in their fluorescence emission. We discuss the thermodynamic and kinetic opportunities that are provided by using Ag(+) ion complexes instead of traditional Watson-Crick-based duplex. In particular, the intrinsic feature of the metal-ligation motif facilitates the design of functional nucleic acids probes by independently varying the concentration of Ag(+) ions in the medium.

  6. Automated design of probes for rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization reveals the advantages of using dual probes for accurate identification.

    PubMed

    Wright, Erik S; Yilmaz, L Safak; Corcoran, Andrew M; Ökten, Hatice E; Noguera, Daniel R

    2014-08-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a common technique for identifying cells in their natural environment and is often used to complement next-generation sequencing approaches as an integral part of the full-cycle rRNA approach. A major challenge in FISH is the design of oligonucleotide probes with high sensitivity and specificity to their target group. The rapidly expanding number of rRNA sequences has increased awareness of the number of potential nontargets for every FISH probe, making the design of new FISH probes challenging using traditional methods. In this study, we conducted a systematic analysis of published probes that revealed that many have insufficient coverage or specificity for their intended target group. Therefore, we developed an improved thermodynamic model of FISH that can be applied at any taxonomic level, used the model to systematically design probes for all recognized genera of bacteria and archaea, and identified potential cross-hybridizations for the selected probes. This analysis resulted in high-specificity probes for 35.6% of the genera when a single probe was used in the absence of competitor probes and for 60.9% when up to two competitor probes were used. Requiring the hybridization of two independent probes for positive identification further increased specificity. In this case, we could design highly specific probe sets for up to 68.5% of the genera without the use of competitor probes and 87.7% when up to two competitor probes were used. The probes designed in this study, as well as tools for designing new probes, are available online (http://DECIPHER.cee.wisc.edu).

  7. Hybridization-triggered fluorescence detection of DNA with minor groove binder-conjugated probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonina, Irina A.; Lokhov, Sergey G.; Belousov, Yevheniy S.; Reed, Michael W.; Lukhtanov, Eugeny A.; Shishkina, Irina G.; Gorn, Vladimir V.; Sanders, Silvia M.; Walburger, David K.; Hoekstra, Merl F.; Vermeulen, Nicolaas M. J.

    2002-06-01

    Fluorogenic 2'-deoxynucleotide probes containing a minor groove binding-quencher compound at the 5'-end and a fluorophore at the 3'-end, were recently described. These probes fluoresce upon hybridization to the complementary target. The 5'-MGB-quencher group prevents 5'-nuclease digestion by Taq polymerase during homogeneous amplification. The 5'-MGB-quencher-oligonucleotide-fluor (MGB-Q-ODN-Fl) probes displayed a dynamic range of 7 order of magnitude, with an ultimate sensitivity of better than 5 copies per sample. The high sensitivity and specificity is illustrated by the application of the probes in single nucleotide polymorphism detection, final load determination and gene expression analyses. This paper summarizes new developments in sequence detection, gene expression and SNP analysis using new Tm prediction software to design robust 5'-MGB-Q-ODN-Fl probes. Furthermore, the software is capable of estimating the Tm of probes containing a modified base. Due to G:G self-association, many G-rich probes and primers are poor performers in amplification reactions. The software recognizes such sequences and substitution of G with 6-Amino-1,5-dihydro-pyrazolo(3,4- d)pyrimidin-4-one (PPG) is indicated, when necessary to eliminate G:G self-association. Examples of improved performance of PPG containing primers and probes is demonstrated.

  8. Amplified detection of nucleic acid by G-quadruplex based hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Dong, Juan; Cui, Xin; Deng, Yun; Tang, Zhuo

    2012-01-01

    A protein-free, isothermal, self-amplified nucleic acid sensing system which was a G-quadruplex integrated hybridization chain reaction (GQ-HCR) system was developed. The G-quadruplex was closed two-thirds in the loop and one-third in the stem of one of the GQ-HCR hairpin probes. In the absence of the target molecule, the GQ-HCR probes stayed as inactive meta-stable hairpin structures and the G-quadruplex was inert. Reversely, the GQ-HCR probes could be cross-opened to start a hybridization chain reaction and the closed G-quadruplex could be released to be free when the GQ-HCR probes came across the target molecule. The GQ-HCR nucleic acid sensing system could detect as low as 7.5 nM ssDNA or RNA by the colorimetric method and 4 nM ssDNA by the fluorometric method. Less than 10 copies of dsDNA template could also be detected when PCR was combined with the GQ-HCR system (PCR+GQ-HCR). Because of these advantages, the GQ-HCR system was also studied for application in visual chip detection to obtain a satisfactory repeatable and specific result.

  9. Hybrids of Nucleic Acids and Carbon Nanotubes for Nanobiotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Umemura, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the combination of nucleic acids and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been briefly reviewed here. Since discovering the hybridization phenomenon of DNA molecules and CNTs in 2003, a large amount of fundamental and applied research has been carried out. Among thousands of papers published since 2003, approximately 240 papers focused on biological applications were selected and categorized based on the types of nucleic acids used, but not the types of CNTs. This survey revealed that the hybridization phenomenon is strongly affected by various factors, such as DNA sequences, and for this reason, fundamental studies on the hybridization phenomenon are important. Additionally, many research groups have proposed numerous practical applications, such as nanobiosensors. The goal of this review is to provide perspective on biological applications using hybrids of nucleic acids and CNTs. PMID:28347014

  10. What controls the hybridization thermodynamics of spherical nucleic acids?

    PubMed

    Randeria, Pratik S; Jones, Matthew R; Kohlstedt, Kevin L; Banga, Resham J; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2015-03-18

    The hybridization of free oligonucleotides to densely packed, oriented arrays of DNA modifying the surfaces of spherical nucleic acid (SNA)-gold nanoparticle conjugates occurs with negative cooperativity; i.e., each binding event destabilizes subsequent binding events. DNA hybridization is thus an ever-changing function of the number of strands already hybridized to the particle. Thermodynamic quantification of this behavior reveals a 3 orders of magnitude decrease in the binding constant for the capture of a free oligonucleotide by an SNA conjugate as the fraction of pre-hybridized strands increases from 0 to ∼30%. Increasing the number of pre-hybridized strands imparts an increasing enthalpic penalty to hybridization that makes binding more difficult, while simultaneously decreasing the entropic penalty to hybridization, which makes binding more favorable. Hybridization of free DNA to an SNA is thus governed by both an electrostatic barrier as the SNA accumulates charge with additional binding events and an effect consistent with allostery, where hybridization at certain sites on an SNA modify the binding affinity at a distal site through conformational changes to the remaining single strands. Leveraging these insights allows for the design of conjugates that hybridize free strands with significantly higher efficiencies, some of which approach 100%.

  11. D-region blunt probe data analysis using hybrid computer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhard, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of performing data reduction techniques with a hybrid computer was studied. The data was obtained from the flight of a parachute born probe through the D-region of the ionosphere. A presentation of the theory of blunt probe operation is included with emphasis on the equations necessary to perform the analysis. This is followed by a discussion of computer program development. Included in this discussion is a comparison of computer and hand reduction results for the blunt probe launched on 31 January 1972. The comparison showed that it was both feasible and desirable to use the computer for data reduction. The results of computer data reduction performed on flight data acquired from five blunt probes are also presented.

  12. Genotype-specific RNA probes for direct identification of wild polioviruses by blot hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    De, L; Yang, C F; Da Silva, E; Boshell, J; Cáceres, P; Gómez, J R; Pallansch, M; Kew, O

    1997-01-01

    We have developed RNA probes for the direct identification of wild poliovirus isolates by blot hybridization. The probes are complementary to sequences of the first 30 to 32 codons of VP1, which evolve more extensively (approximately 1.5-fold) than the rest of VP1. To illustrate our general approach, we describe the design of probes specific to each of four major genotypes recently endemic (1981 to 1991) to the Americas: Andean type 1, Brazil type 1, Brazil type 3, and Central America-Mexico type 3. A wild isolate of each genotype was selected according to molecular and epidemiologic criteria to be representative of the principal lineages in circulation. Variable VP1 sequences of the representative isolates were amplified by the reverse transcriptase PCR and were inserted into a plasmid vector containing a T7 promoter. The in vitro transcripts, labeled with digoxigenin, served as probes. These formed stable hybrids only with RNAs of isolates of the corresponding genotypes. Hybrids were detected by a sensitive chemiluminescence assay, capable under normal diagnostic conditions of detecting specific wild poliovirus sequences in samples containing up to a 100-fold excess of Sabin vaccine strain-related sequences of the same serotype. PMID:9350743

  13. Analysis of microRNA expression by in situ hybridization with RNA oligonucleotide probes

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Robert C.; Deo, Monika; Turner, David L.

    2007-01-01

    In situ hybridization is an important tool for analyzing gene expression and developing hypotheses about gene functions. The discovery of hundreds of microRNA (miRNA) genes in animals has provided new challenges for analyzing gene expression and functions. The small size of the mature miRNAs (∼20-24 nucleotides in length) presents difficulties for conventional in situ hybridization methods. However, we have developed a modified in situ hybridization method for detection of mammalian miRNAs in tissue sections, based upon the use of RNA oligonucleotide probes in combination with highly specific wash conditions. Here we present detailed procedures for detection of miRNAs in tissue sections or cultured cells. The methods described can utilize either nonradioactive hapten-conjugated probes that are detected by enzyme-coupled antibodies, or radioactively labeled probes that are detected by autoradiography. The ability to visualize miRNA expression patterns in tissue sections provides an additional tool for the analyses of miRNA expression and function. In addition, the use of radioactively labeled probes should facilitate quantitative analyses of changes in miRNA gene expression. PMID:17889803

  14. Fluorescence energy transfer as a probe for nucleic acid structures and sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Mergny, J L; Boutorine, A S; Garestier, T; Belloc, F; Rougée, M; Bulychev, N V; Koshkin, A A; Bourson, J; Lebedev, A V; Valeur, B

    1994-01-01

    The primary or secondary structure of single-stranded nucleic acids has been investigated with fluorescent oligonucleotides, i.e., oligonucleotides covalently linked to a fluorescent dye. Five different chromophores were used: 2-methoxy-6-chloro-9-amino-acridine, coumarin 500, fluorescein, rhodamine and ethidium. The chemical synthesis of derivatized oligonucleotides is described. Hybridization of two fluorescent oligonucleotides to adjacent nucleic acid sequences led to fluorescence excitation energy transfer between the donor and the acceptor dyes. This phenomenon was used to probe primary and secondary structures of DNA fragments and the orientation of oligodeoxynucleotides synthesized with the alpha-anomers of nucleoside units. Fluorescence energy transfer can be used to reveal the formation of hairpin structures and the translocation of genes between two chromosomes. PMID:8152922

  15. Fabrication of uniform DNA-conjugated hydrogel microparticles via replica molding for facile nucleic acid hybridization assays.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Christina L; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Lin, Yan; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yi, Hyunmin

    2010-07-01

    We identify and investigate several critical parameters in the fabrication of single-stranded DNA conjugated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microparticles based on replica molding (RM) for highly uniform and robust nucleic acid hybridization assays. The effects of PEG-diacrylate, probe DNA, and photoinitiator concentrations on the overall fluorescence and target DNA penetration depth upon hybridization are examined. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy results illustrate high conjugation capacity of the probe and target DNA, femtomole sensitivity, and sequence specificity. Combined, these findings demonstrate a significant step toward simple, robust, and scalable procedures to manufacture highly uniform and high-capacity hybridization assay particles in a well-controlled manner by exploiting many advantages that the batch processing-based RM technique offers. We envision that the results presented here may be readily applied to rapid and high-throughput hybridization assays for a wide variety of applications in bioprocess monitoring, food safety, and biological threat detection.

  16. DNA Hybridization Probe for Use in Determining Restricted Nodulation among Bradyrhizobium japonicum Serocluster 123 Field Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Sadowsky, Michael J.; Cregan, Perry B.; Keyser, Harold H.

    1990-01-01

    Several soybean plant introduction (PI) genotypes have recently been described which restrict nodulation of Bradyrhizobium japonicum serocluster 123 in an apparently serogroup-specific manner. While PI 371607 restricts nodulation of strains in serogroup 123 and some in serogroup 127, those in serogroup 129 are not restricted. When DNA regions within and around the B. japonicum I-110 common nodulation genes were used as probes to genomic DNA from the serogroup strains USDA 123, USDA 127, and USDA 129, several of the probes differentially hybridized to the nodulation-restricted and -unrestricted strains. One of the gene regions, cloned in plasmid pMJS12, was subsequently shown to hybridize to 4.6-kilobase EcoRI fragments from DNAs from nodulation-restricted strains and to larger fragments in nodulation-unrestricted strains. To determine if the different hybridization patterns could be used to predict nodulation restriction, we hybridized pMJS12 to EcoRI-digested genomic DNAs from uncharacterized serocluster 123 field isolates. Of the 36 strains examined, 15 were found to have single, major, 4.6-kilobase hybridizing EcoRI fragments. When tested for nodulation, 80% (12 of 15) of the strains were correctly predicted to be restricted for nodulation of the PI genotypes. In addition, hybridization patterns obtained with pMJS12 and nodulation phenotypes on PI 371607 indicated that there are at least three types of serogroup 127 strains. Our results suggest that the pMJS12 gene probe may be useful in selecting compatible host-strain combinations and in determining the suitability of field sites for the placement of soybean genotypes containing restrictive nodulation alleles. Images PMID:16348217

  17. Hybride magnetic nanostructure based on amino acids functionalized polypyrrole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Alexandrina; Bunge, Alexander; Turcu, Rodica

    2015-12-01

    Conducting polypyrrole is especially promising for many commercial applications because of its unique optical, electric, thermal and mechanical properties. We report the synthesis and characterization of novel pyrrole functionalized monomers and core-shell hybrid nanostructures, consisting of a conjugated polymer layer (amino acids functionalized pyrrole copolymers) and a magnetic nanoparticle core. For functionalization of the pyrrole monomer we used several amino acids: tryptophan, leucine, phenylalanine, serine and tyrosine. These amino acids were linked via different types of hydrophobic linkers to the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole monomer. The magnetic core-shell hybrid nanostructures are characterized by various methods such as FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements.

  18. Hybride magnetic nanostructure based on amino acids functionalized polypyrrole

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Alexandrina Bunge, Alexander; Turcu, Rodica

    2015-12-23

    Conducting polypyrrole is especially promising for many commercial applications because of its unique optical, electric, thermal and mechanical properties. We report the synthesis and characterization of novel pyrrole functionalized monomers and core-shell hybrid nanostructures, consisting of a conjugated polymer layer (amino acids functionalized pyrrole copolymers) and a magnetic nanoparticle core. For functionalization of the pyrrole monomer we used several amino acids: tryptophan, leucine, phenylalanine, serine and tyrosine. These amino acids were linked via different types of hydrophobic linkers to the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole monomer. The magnetic core-shell hybrid nanostructures are characterized by various methods such as FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements.

  19. Molecular hybridization with DNA-probes as a laboratory diagnostic test for influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Pljusnin, A Z; Rozhkova, S A; Nolandt, O V; Bryantseva, E A; Kuznetsov, O K; Noskov, F S

    1987-01-01

    The possibilities of using DNA-copies of different influenza A virus genes cloned with recombinant bacterial plasmids for the detection of virus-specific RNA by molecular dot-hybridization were analyzed. High specificity of RNA identification has been demonstrated and it has been shown expedient to use DNA-probes with high-conservative virus genes (polymerase, nucleoprotein, or matrix) for the detection of influenza A virus subtypes (H1N1, H2N2, H3N2) and probes with corresponding hemagglutinin genes for the differentiation of the subtypes H3N2 and H1N1. The results of nasopharyngeal specimens testing proved the effectiveness of molecular dot-hybridization in epidemiological studies of influenza outbreaks, especially of mixed etiology.

  20. Identification of cDNAs by direct hybridization using cosmid probes

    SciTech Connect

    Lennon, G.G.; Lieuallen, K.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this effort is to quickly obtain as many chromosome-specific cDNAs with as much map and sequence detail as possible. Many techniques have been proposed to isolate and identify genes within defined genomic regions; the technique discussed here is direct hybridization of a relatively complex genomic probe, an entire cosmid clone, to cDNA libraries. This method continues to be a straightforward technique with a fair number of successes.

  1. Probe hybridization array typing: a binary typing method for Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, U; Zhang, L; France, A M; Ghosh, D; Shalaby, W; Xie, J; Marrs, C F; Foxman, B

    2007-01-01

    The ability to distinguish between Escherichia coli strains is critical for outbreak investigations. Binary typing, based on the presence or absence of genetic material, provides a high-throughput alternative to gel- and PCR-based typing techniques that generate complex banding patterns and lack uniform interpretation criteria. We developed, validated, and determined the discriminatory power of an E. coli binary typing method, probe hybridization array typing (PHAT). In PHAT, the absence or presence of genetic material is identified by using DNA hybridization to produce a reproducible and portable fingerprint for each genome. PHAT probes were generated from genome subtractive hybridization experiments. We PHAT typed the ECOR collection of strains from a variety of geographical locations, and 33 rectal E. coli strains selected from college-aged women with urinary tract infection. In the set of 33 human rectal strains, the discriminatory power of PHAT (98%) equaled that of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. However, for ECOR strains, which include nonhuman strains, the current set of PHAT probes was less discriminating than MLST, ribotyping, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence PCR (80% versus 97, 92, and 97%, respectively). When we limited the analysis to ECOR strains of B2 and D lineage, which are associated with human infection, current PHAT probes were highly discriminatory (94%). PHAT can be applied in a high-throughput format (i.e., "library on a slide"), the discriminatory ability can be varied based on the probe set, and PHAT is readily adapted to other bacterial species with high variation in genetic content.

  2. Design and Application of Hybrid Magnetic Field-Eddy Current Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Wallace, Terryl; Newman, Andy; Leser, Paul; Simpson, John

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of magnetic field sensors into eddy current probes can result in novel probe designs with unique performance characteristics. One such example is a recently developed electromagnetic probe consisting of a two-channel magnetoresistive sensor with an embedded single-strand eddy current inducer. Magnetic flux leakage maps of ferrous materials are generated from the DC sensor response while high-resolution eddy current imaging is simultaneously performed at frequencies up to 5 megahertz. In this work the design and optimization of this probe will be presented, along with an application toward analysis of sensory materials with embedded ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy (FSMA) particles. The sensory material is designed to produce a paramagnetic to ferromagnetic transition in the FSMA particles under strain. Mapping of the stray magnetic field and eddy current response of the sample with the hybrid probe can thereby image locations in the structure which have experienced an overstrain condition. Numerical modeling of the probe response is performed with good agreement with experimental results.

  3. Detection of human papillomavirus type 6/11 DNA in conjunctival papillomas by in situ hybridization with radioactive probes

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, P.J.; McDonnell, J.M.; Kessis, T.; Green, W.R.; Shah, K.V.

    1987-11-01

    Twenty-three conjunctival papillomas and 28 conjunctival dysplasias were examined for human papillomavirus (HPV)-DNA sequences by in situ hybridization with nick-translated /sup 35/S-labeled HPV probes. Adjacent paraffin sections were hybridized with HPV type 2, 6, 16, and 18 probes at Tm - 17 degrees C. Fifteen tissues, all papillomas, displayed positive hybridization with the HPV-6 probe. Infection with HPV-6 (or the closely related HPV-11) appeared to be responsible for most of the conjunctival papillomas of children and young adults. The presence of genital tract HPV-6 in these lesions suggests that some of the infections were acquired during passage through an infected birth canal. The lack of hybridization in adult conjunctival dysplasias indicates either that HPVs are not associated with this condition or that the probes and the technique utilized were not adequate for demonstration of this association.

  4. ESTIMATION OF BACTERIAL CELL NUMBERS IN HUMIC ACID-RICH SALT MARSH SEDIMENTS WITH PROBES DIRECTED TO 16S RIBOSOMAL DNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of using probes directed towards ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) as a quantitative approach to estimating cell numbers was examined and applied to study the structure of a bacterial community in humic acid-rich salt marsh sediments. Hybridizations were performed with membr...

  5. Association of a cucumber mosaic virus strain with mosaic disease of banana, Musa paradisiaca--an evidence using immuno/nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A; Raj, S K; Haq, Q M; Srivastava, K M; Singh, B P; Sane, P V

    1995-12-01

    Virus causing severe chlorosis/mosaic disease of banana was identified as a strain of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). Association of CMV with the disease was established by Western immunoblot using polyclonal antibodies to CMV-T and slot blot hybridization with nucleic acid probe of CMV-P genome.

  6. Human leukocyte antigen haplotype phasing by allele-specific enrichment with peptide nucleic acid probes

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Nicholas M; Pouton, Colin W; Irving, Helen R

    2014-01-01

    Targeted capture of large fragments of genomic DNA that enrich for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system haplotypes has utility in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Current methods of HLA matching are based on inference or familial studies of inheritance; and each approach has its own inherent limitations. We have designed and tested a probe–target-extraction method for capturing specific HLA haplotypes by hybridization of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes to alleles of the HLA-DRB1 gene. Short target fragments contained in plasmids were initially used to optimize the method followed by testing samples of genomic DNA from human subjects with preselected HLA haplotypes and obtained approximately 10% enrichment for the specific haplotype. When performed with high-molecular-weight genomic DNA, 99.0% versus 84.0% alignment match was obtained for the specific haplotype probed. The allele-specific target enrichment that we obtained can facilitate the elucidation of haplotypes between the 65 kb separating the HLA-DRB1 and the HLA-DQA1 genes, potentially spanning a total distance of at least 130 kb. Allele-specific target enrichment with PNA probes is a straightforward technique that has the capability to improve the resolution of DNA and whole genome sequencing technologies by allowing haplotyping of enriched DNA and crucially, retaining the DNA methylation profile. PMID:24936514

  7. Computer selection of oligonucleotide probes from amino acid sequences for use in gene library screening.

    PubMed

    Yang, J H; Ye, J H; Wallace, D C

    1984-01-11

    We present a computer program, FINPROBE, which utilizes known amino acid sequence data to deduce minimum redundancy oligonucleotide probes for use in screening cDNA or genomic libraries or in primer extension. The user enters the amino acid sequence of interest, the desired probe length, the number of probes sought, and the constraints on oligonucleotide synthesis. The computer generates a table of possible probes listed in increasing order of redundancy and provides the location of each probe in the protein and mRNA coding sequence. Activation of a next function provides the amino acid and mRNA sequences of each probe of interest as well as the complementary sequence and the minimum dissociation temperature of the probe. A final routine prints out the amino acid sequence of the protein in parallel with the mRNA sequence listing all possible codons for each amino acid.

  8. High accuracy plasma density measurement using hybrid Langmuir probe and microwave interferometer method.

    PubMed

    Deline, C; Gilchrist, B E; Dobson, C; Jones, J E; Chavers, D G

    2007-11-01

    High spatial resolution plasma density measurements have been taken as part of an investigation into magnetic nozzle physics at the NASA/MSFC Propulsion Research Center. These measurements utilized a Langmuir triple probe scanned across the measurement chord of either of two stationary rf interferometers. By normalizing the scanned profile to the microwave interferometer line-integrated density measurement for each electrostatic probe measurement, the effect of shot-to-shot variation of the line-integrated density can be removed. In addition, by summing the voltage readings at each radial position in a transverse scan, the line density can be reconstituted, allowing the absolute density to be determined, assuming that the shape of the profile is constant from shot to shot. The spatial and temporal resolutions of this measurement technique depend on the resolutions of the scanned electrostatic probe and the interferometer. The measurement accuracy is 9%-15%, which is on the order of the accuracy of the rf interferometer. The measurement technique was compared directly with both scanning rf interferometer and standard Langmuir probe theory. The hybrid technique compares favorably with the scanning rf interferometer, and appears more accurate than probe theory alone. Additionally, our measurement technique is generally applicable even for nonaxisymmetric plasmas.

  9. A ribosomal DNA fragment of Listeria monocytogenes and its use as a genus-specific probe in an aqueous-phase hybridization assay.

    PubMed Central

    Emond, E; Fliss, I; Pandian, S

    1993-01-01

    cDNAs were prepared from the total RNA of Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19118 and used as probes to screen a genomic library of the same strain. Four clones were identified which contained ribosomal DNA fragments. Recombinant DNA from one of them was fractionated and differentially hybridized with the cDNA probes to RNA of L. monocytogenes and Kurthia zopfii. The resulting hybridization pattern revealed an HpaII fragment of 0.8 kb that was specific for the L. monocytogenes strain. The nucleotide sequence of this fragment showed 159 bases of the 3' end of the 16S rRNA gene, 243 bases of the spacer region, and 382 bases of the 5' end of the 23S rRNA gene. In dot blot hybridization assays, the 32P-labeled 784-bp fragment was specific only for Listeria species. Dot blot assays revealed that the 32P-labeled fragment can easily detect > or = 10 pg of total nucleic acids from pure cultures of L. monocytogenes, which corresponds to approximately 300 bacteria. This fragment was also used as a probe in an assay named the heteroduplex nucleic acid (HNA) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In this system, the biotinylated DNA probe is hybridized in the aqueous phase with target RNA molecules and then specific HNAs are captured by HNA-specific antibodies. Captured HNA molecules are revealed with an enzyme conjugate of streptavidin. In a preliminary HNA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the 784-bp fragment maintained its specificity for Listeria spp. and could detect 5 x 10(2) cells in artificially contaminated meat homogenate. Images PMID:8368854

  10. Caged molecular beacons: controlling nucleic acid hybridization with light.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunming; Zhu, Zhi; Song, Yanling; Lin, Hui; Yang, Chaoyong James; Tan, Weihong

    2011-05-28

    We have constructed a novel class of light-activatable caged molecular beacons (cMBs) that are caged by locking two stems with a photo-labile biomolecular interaction or covalent bond. With the cMBs, the nucleic acid hybridization process can be easily controlled with light, which offers the possibility for a high spatiotemporal resolution study of intracellular mRNAs.

  11. Method for producing labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J.; Quesada, Mark A.; Randesi, Matthew

    1999-10-19

    Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment. More specifically, the method comprises providing a recombinant DNA construct comprising a DNA segment of interest inserted in a cloning vector, the cloning vector having an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment of interest. The recombinant DNA construct is then contacted with the protein pII encoded by gene II of phage f1 thereby generating a single-stranded nick. The nicked DNA is then contacted with E. coli Exonuclease III thereby expanding the single-stranded nick into a single-stranded gap. The single-stranded gapped DNA is then contacted with a single-strand-specific endonuclease thereby producing a linearized DNA molecule containing a double-stranded deletion corresponding in size to the single-stranded gap. The DNA treated in this manner is then incubated with DNA ligase under conditions appropriate for ligation. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes. In this embodiment, single-stranded gapped DNA, produced as described above, is contacted with a DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides to fill in the gap. This DNA is then linearized by digestion with a restriction enzyme which cuts outside the DNA segment of interest. The product of this digestion is then denatured to produce a labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probe.

  12. [Fluorescence in situ hybridization with DNA probes derived from individual chromosomes and chromosome regions].

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, A G; Karamysheva, T V; Rubtsov, N B

    2014-01-01

    A significant part of the eukaryotic genomes consists of repetitive DNA, which can form large clusters or distributed along euchromatic chromosome regions. Repeats located in chromosomal regions make a problem in analysis and identification of the chromosomal material with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In most cases, the identification of chromosome regions using FISH requires detection of the signal produced with unique sequences. The feasibility, advantages and disadvantages of traditional methods of suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization, methods of repeats-free probe construction and methods of chromosome-specific DNA sequences visualization using image processing of multicolor FISH results are considered in the paper. The efficiency of different techniques for DNA probe generation, different FISH protocols, and image processing of obtained microscopic images depends on the genomic size and structure of analyzing species. This problem was discussed and different approaches were considered for the analysis of the species with very large genome, rare species and species which specimens are too small in size to obtain the amount of genomic and Cot-1 DNA required for suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization.

  13. Single and multiple molecular beacon probes for DNA hybridization studies on a silica glass surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiaohong; Liu, Xiaojing; Tan, Weihong

    1999-05-01

    Surface immobilizable molecular beacons have been developed for DNA hybridization studies on a silica glass plate. Molecular beacons are a new class of oligonucleotide probes that have a loop-and-stem structure with a fluorophore and a quencher attached to the two ends of the stem. They only emit intense fluorescence when hybridize to their target molecules. This provides an excellent selectivity for the detection of DNA molecules. We have designed biotinylated molecular beacons which can be immobilized onto a solid surface. The molecular beacon is synthesized using DABCYL as the quencher and an optical stable dye, tetramethylrhodamine, as the fluorophore. Mass spectrometry is used to confirm the synthesized molecular beacon. The molecular beacons have been immobilized onto a silica surface through biotin-avidin binding. The surface immobilized molecular beacons have been used for the detection of target DNA with subnanomolar analytical sensitivity. have also immobilized two different molecular beacons on a silica surface in spatially resolved microscopic regions. The hybridization study of these two different molecular beacon probes has shown excellent selectivity for their target sequences. The newly designed molecular beacons are intended for DNA molecular interaction studies at an interface and for the development of ultrasensitive DNA sensors for a variety of applications including disease diagnosis, disease mechanism studies, new drug development, and in the investigation of molecular interactions between DNA molecules and other interesting biomolecules.

  14. Hybrid probing technique for coordinate measurement with optically trapped micro sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuki; Michihata, Masaki; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Takaya, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-01

    Engineered surfaces have been fabricated to provide enhanced properties such as low friction, anti-adhesive behavior, or low reflection of light. At micro-scales, surface force highly affects the functionality of mechanical parts. In order to reduce surface force such as friction, micro mechanical parts that have engineered surfaces are demanded. In order to investigate the functionality of the textured micro parts, it is necessary to evaluate both the three-dimensional shape and the surface topography along with its geometry. Then we propose novel hybrid probing technique using an optically trapped micro sphere. Tightly focused laser beam makes it possible for a dielectric micro sphere to sustain near the focal point in the air. The dynamic behavior of the micro sphere changes as the result of the interaction of the surface. Therefore, the surface is detected by monitoring the micro sphere. This enables the three-dimensional shape measurement of the substrate. On the other hand, Surface topography is imaged with the lensing effect of the trapped micro sphere. Therefore, this trapped sphere is used as both a probe for coordinate metrology and a micro-lens in optical microscopy in this study. This present investigation deals with the development and fundamental validation of the hybrid probing system with the optically trapped micro sphere. The measurement result with high performance was demonstrated using the tilted diffraction grating.

  15. Detection of chromosomal inversions using non-repetitive nucleic acid probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Susan M. (Inventor); Ray, F. Andrew (Inventor); Goodwin, Edwin H. (Inventor); Bedford, Joel S. (Inventor); Cornforth, Michael N. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for the identification of chromosomal inversions is described. Single-stranded sister chromatids are generated, for example by CO-FISH. A plurality of non-repetitive, labeled probes of relatively small size are hybridized to portions of only one of a pair of single-stranded sister chromatids. If no inversion exists, all of the probes will hybridize to a first chromatid. If an inversion has occurred, these marker probes will be detected on the sister chromatid at the same location as the inversion on the first chromatid.

  16. Detection of Chromosomal Inversions Using Non-Repetitive Nucleic Acid Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Susan M. (Inventor); Ray, F. Andrew (Inventor); Goodwin, Edwin H. (Inventor); Bedford, Joel S. (Inventor); Cornforth, Michael N. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method and a kit for the identification of chromosomal inversions are described. Single-stranded sister chromatids are generated, for example by CO-FISH. A plurality of non-repetitive, labeled probes of relatively small size are hybridized to portions of only one of a pair of single-stranded sister chromatids. If no inversion exists, all of the probes will hybridize to a first chromatid. If an inversion has occurred, these marker probes will be detected on the sister chromatid at the same location as the inversion on the first chromatid.

  17. Probing the Specificity Determinants of Amino Acid Recognition by Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Shishova, E.; Di Costanzo, L; Emig, F; Ash, D; Christianson, D

    2009-01-01

    Arginase is a binuclear manganese metalloenzyme that serves as a therapeutic target for the treatment of asthma, erectile dysfunction, and atherosclerosis. In order to better understand the molecular basis of inhibitor affinity, we have employed site-directed mutagenesis, enzyme kinetics, and X-ray crystallography to probe the molecular recognition of the amino acid moiety (i.e., the ?-amino and ?-carboxylate groups) of substrate l-arginine and inhibitors in the active site of arginase I. Specifically, we focus on (1) a water-mediated hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and T135, (2) a direct hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and N130, and (3) a direct charged hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-amino group and D183. Amino acid substitutions for T135, N130, and D183 generally compromise substrate affinity as reflected by increased KM values but have less pronounced effects on catalytic function as reflected by minimal variations of kcat. As with substrate KM values, inhibitor Kd values increase for binding to enzyme mutants and suggest that the relative contribution of intermolecular interactions to amino acid affinity in the arginase active site is water-mediated hydrogen bond < direct hydrogen bond < direct charged hydrogen bond. Structural comparisons of arginase with the related binuclear manganese metalloenzymes agmatinase and proclavaminic acid amidinohydrolase suggest that the evolution of substrate recognition in the arginase fold occurs by mutation of residues contained in specificity loops flanking the mouth of the active site (especially loops 4 and 5), thereby allowing diverse guanidinium substrates to be accommodated for catalysis.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Hybrid Hyaluronic Acid-Gelatin Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Camci-Unal, Gulden; Cuttica, Davide; Annabi, Nasim; Demarchi, Danilo; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Biomimetic hybrid hydrogels have generated broad interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Hyaluronic acid (HA) and gelatin (hydrolyzed collagen) are naturally derived polymers and biodegradable under physiological conditions. Moreover, collagen and HA are major components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in most of the tissues (e.g. cardiovascular, cartilage, neural). When used as a hybrid material, HA-gelatin hydrogels may enable mimicking the ECM of native tissues. Although HA-gelatin hybrid hydrogels are promising biomimetic substrates, their material properties have not been thoroughly characterized in the literature. Herein, we generated hybrid hydrogels with tunable physical and biological properties by using different concentrations of HA and gelatin. The physical properties of the fabricated hydrogels including swelling ratio, degradation, and mechanical properties were investigated. In addition, in vitro cellular responses in both two and three dimensional (2D and 3D) culture conditions were assessed. It was found that the addition of gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) into HA methacrylate (HAMA) promoted cell spreading in the hybrid hydogels. Moreover, the hybrid hydrogels showed significantly improved mechanical properties compared to their single component analogs. The HAMA-GelMA hydrogels exhibited remarkable tunability behavior and may be useful for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications. PMID:23419055

  19. Nucleic acid sandwich hybridization assay with quantum dot-induced fluorescence resonance energy transfer for pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Chou, Cheng-Chung; Huang, Yi-Han

    2012-12-04

    This paper reports a nucleic acid sandwich hybridization assay with a quantum dot (QD)-induced fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporter system. Two label-free hemagglutinin H5 sequences (60-mer DNA and 630-nt cDNA fragment) of avian influenza viruses were used as the targets in this work. Two oligonucleotides (16 mers and 18 mers) that specifically recognize two separate but neighboring regions of the H5 sequences were served as the capturing and reporter probes, respectively. The capturing probe was conjugated to QD655 (donor) in a molar ratio of 10:1 (probe-to-QD), and the reporter probe was labeled with Alexa Fluor 660 dye (acceptor) during synthesis. The sandwich hybridization assay was done in a 20 μL transparent, adhesive frame-confined microchamber on a disposable, temperature-adjustable indium tin oxide (ITO) glass slide. The FRET signal in response to the sandwich hybridization was monitored by a homemade optical sensor comprising a single 400 nm UV light-emitting diode (LED), optical fibers, and a miniature 16-bit spectrophotometer. The target with a concentration ranging from 0.5 nM to 1 μM was successfully correlated with both QD emission decrease at 653 nm and dye emission increase at 690 nm. To sum up, this work is beneficial for developing a portable QD-based nucleic acid sensor for on-site pathogen detection.

  20. Carrier-phonon interactions in hybrid halide perovskites probed with ultrafast anisotropy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivett, Jasmine P. H.; Richter, Johannes M.; Price, Michael B.; Credgington, Dan; Deschler, Felix

    2016-09-01

    Hybrid halide perovskites are at the frontier of optoelectronic research due to their excellent semiconductor properties and solution processability. For this reason, much attention has recently been focused on understanding photoexcited charge-carrier generation and recombination in these materials. Conversely, very few studies have so far been devoted to understanding carrier-carrier and carrier-phonon scattering mechanisms in these materials. This is surprising given that carrier scattering mechanisms fundamentally limit charge-carrier motilities and therefore the performance of photovoltaic devices. We apply linear polarization selective transient absorption measurements to polycrystalline CH3NH3PbBr3 hybrid halide perovskite films as an effective way of studying the scattering processes in these materials. Comparison of the photo induced bleach signals obtained when the linear polarizations of the pump and probe are aligned either parallel or perpendicular to one another, reveal a significant difference in spectral intensity and shape within the first few hundred femtoseconds after photoexcitation.

  1. Monitoring of microbial communities by flow cytometry and rRNA-targeted hybridization probes

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, G.; Amann, R. |

    1995-12-31

    Flow cytometry in combination with ribosomal RNA (rRNA) based fluorescence in situ hybridization is a new technique for the analysis of microbial communities. Oligonucleotide probes directed against ribosomal RNA allow the identification of species or groups of microorganisms. Combined with flow cytometry, up to several thousand cells per second can be classified. In addition to the identification and specific enumeration of microorganisms, further information on the distribution of cell size, DNA and ribosome content -- and therefore an assessment of activity -- within the entire community of subpopulations can be obtained. This technique is much more accurate, informative, and rapid than classical culture-dependent methods. Data of activated sludge samples hybridized with fluorescein labelled oligonucleotides and counterstained with the DNA-specific dye Hoechst 33342 are presented as examples for its applicability to complex microbial communities.

  2. Label-free DNA hybridization detection by various spectroscopy methods using triphenylmethane dyes as a probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jiaojiao; Cai, Changqun; Ma, Ying; Luo, Lin; Weng, Chao; Chen, Xiaoming

    2012-12-01

    A new assay is developed for direct detection of DNA hybridization using triphenylmethane dye as a probe. It is based on various spectroscopic methods including resonance light scattering (RLS), circular dichroism (CD), ultraviolet spectra and fluorescence spectra, as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM), six triphenylmethane dyes interact with double strand DNA (dsDNA) and single strand DNA (ssDNA) were investigated, respectively. The interaction results in amplified resonance light scattering signals and enables the detection of hybridization without the need for labeling DNA. Mechanism investigations have shown that groove binding occurs between dsDNA and these triphenylmethane dyes, which depends on G-C sequences of dsDNA and the molecular volumes of triphenylmethane dyes. Our present approaches display the advantages of simple and fast, accurate and reliable, and the artificial samples were determined with satisfactory results.

  3. Monitoring of microbial communities by flow cytometry and rRNA-targeted hybridization probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, Guenter; Amann, Rudolf

    1995-10-01

    Flow cytometry in combination with ribosomal RNA (rRNA) based fluorescence in situ hybridization is a new technique for the analysis of microbial communities. Oligonucleotide probes directed against ribosomal RNA allow the identification of species or groups of micro- organisms. Combined with flow cytometry, up to several thousand cells per second can be classified. In addition to the identification and specific enumeration of micro-organisms, further information on the distribution of cell size, DNA and ribosome content -- and therefore an assessment of activity -- within the entire community or subpopulations can be obtained. This technique is much more accurate, informative, and rapid than classical culture-dependent methods. Data of activated sludge samples hybridized with fluorescein labeled oligonucleotides and counterstained with the DNA-specific dye Hoechst 33342 are presented as examples for its applicability to complex microbial communities.

  4. Visual detection of nucleic acids based on lateral flow biosensor and hybridization chain reaction amplification.

    PubMed

    Ying, Na; Ju, Chuanjing; Li, Zhongyi; Liu, Wensen; Wan, Jiayu

    2017-03-01

    In this study, a new lateral flow nucleic acid biosensor (LFNAB) using hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for signal amplification was developed for visual detection of nucleic acids with high sensitivity and low cost. A "sandwich-type" detection strategy was employed in our design. The sandwich system of capture probe (CP)/target DNA/reporter probe (RP)-HCR complexes was fabricated as the sensing platform. As the initiator strand, reporter probe propagated a chain reaction of hybridization events between the two hairpin probes modified with biotin, and determined whether long nicked DNA polymers were formed. The biotin-labeled double-strand DNA polymers then introduced numerous Streptavidin (SA)-labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the lateral flow device. The CP/target DNA/RP-HCR complexes were captured on the test zone by the specific reaction between anti-Fam monoclonal antibody (anti-Fam mAb) on the test zone and Fam of the complexes. The accumulation of AuNPs on the test zone of the biosensor enabled the visual detection of specific sequences. The detection limit of specific DNA was as low as 1.76pM, which was about 2 orders lower than that of the LFNAB without HCR amplification. And the detection limit of Salmonella was 3×10(3)cfumL(-1). In conclusion, this visual detection system, HCR-LFNAB, is suitable for non-specialist personnel and point-of-care (POC) diagnosis in low-resource settings.

  5. Localization of miRNAs by In Situ Hybridization in Plants Using Conventional Oligonucleotide Probes.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Castellano, Sara; Nic-Can, Geovanny I; De-la-Peña, Clelia

    2017-01-01

    Among the epigenetic mechanisms studied with a greater interest in the last decade are the microRNAs (miRNAs). These small noncoding RNA sequences that are approximately 17-22 nucleotides in length play an essential role in many biological processes of various organisms, including plants. The analysis of spatiotemporal expression of miRNAs provides a better understanding of the role of these small molecules in plant development, cell differentiation, and other processes; but such analysis is also an important method for the validation of biological functions. In this work, we describe the optimization of an efficient protocol for the spatiotemporal analysis of miRNA by in situ hybridization using different plant tissues embedded in paraffin. Instead of LNA-modified probes that are typically used for this work, we use conventional oligonucleotide probes that yield a high specificity and clean distribution of miRNAs.

  6. A novel design of whole-genome microarray probes for Saccharomyces cerevisiae which minimizes cross-hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Talla, Emmanuel; Tekaia, Fredj; Brino, Laurent; Dujon, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    Background Numerous DNA microarray hybridization experiments have been performed in yeast over the last years using either synthetic oligonucleotides or PCR-amplified coding sequences as probes. The design and quality of the microarray probes are of critical importance for hybridization experiments as well as subsequent analysis of the data. Results We present here a novel design of Saccharomyces cerevisiae microarrays based on a refined annotation of the genome and with the aim of reducing cross-hybridization between related sequences. An effort was made to design probes of similar lengths, preferably located in the 3'-end of reading frames. The sequence of each gene was compared against the entire yeast genome and optimal sub-segments giving no predicted cross-hybridization were selected. A total of 5660 novel probes (more than 97% of the yeast genes) were designed. For the remaining 143 genes, cross-hybridization was unavoidable. Using a set of 18 deletant strains, we have experimentally validated our cross-hybridization procedure. Sensitivity, reproducibility and dynamic range of these new microarrays have been measured. Based on this experience, we have written a novel program to design long oligonucleotides for microarray hybridizations of complete genome sequences. Conclusions A validated procedure to predict cross-hybridization in microarray probe design was defined in this work. Subsequently, a novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae microarray (which minimizes cross-hybridization) was designed and constructed. Arrays are available at Eurogentec S. A. Finally, we propose a novel design program, OliD, which allows automatic oligonucleotide design for microarrays. The OliD program is available from authors. PMID:14499002

  7. Kinetics of Oligonucleotide Hybridization to DNA Probe Arrays on High-Capacity Porous Silica Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Marc I.; Fidanza, Jacqueline A.; McGall, Glenn H.; Trulson, Mark O.; Forman, Jonathan E.; Frank, Curtis W.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of DNA hybridization to oligonucleotide arrays on high-capacity porous silica films that were deposited by two techniques. Films created by spin coating pure colloidal silica suspensions onto a substrate had pores of ∼23 nm, relatively low porosity (35%), and a surface area of 17 times flat glass (for a 0.3-μm film). In the second method, latex particles were codeposited with the silica by spin coating and then pyrolyzed, which resulted in larger pores (36 nm), higher porosity (65%), and higher surface area (26 times flat glass for a 0.3-μm film). As a result of these favorable properties, the templated silica hybridized more quickly and reached a higher adsorbed target density (11 vs. 8 times flat glass at 22°C) than the pure silica. Adsorption of DNA onto the high-capacity films is controlled by traditional adsorption and desorption coefficients, as well as by morphology factors and transient binding interactions between the target and the probes. To describe these effects, we have developed a model based on the analogy to diffusion of a reactant in a porous catalyst. Adsorption values (ka, kd, and K) measured on planar arrays for the same probe/target system provide the parameters for the model and also provide an internally consistent comparison for the stability of the transient complexes. The interpretation of the model takes into account factors not previously considered for hybridization in three-dimensional films, including the potential effects of heterogeneous probe populations, partial probe/target complexes during diffusion, and non-1:1 binding structures. The transient complexes are much less stable than full duplexes (binding constants for full duplexes higher by three orders of magnitude or more), which may be a result of the unique probe density and distribution that is characteristic of the photolithographically patterned arrays. The behavior at 22°C is described well by the predictive equations for

  8. Organic/inorganic hybrid amine and sulfonic acid tethered silica materials: Synthesis, characterization and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Jason Christopher

    The major goals of this thesis were to: (1) create a site-isolated aminosilica material with higher amine loadings than previously reported isolation methods, (2) use spectroscopic, reactivity, and catalytic (olefin polymerization precatalysts) probes to determine isolation of amine groups on these organic/inorganic hybrid materials, (3) synthesize an organic/inorganic hybrid material capable of activating Group 4 olefin polymerization precatalysts, and (4) synthesize a high amine loaded organic/inorganic hybrid material capable of reversibly capturing CO2 in a simulated flue gas stream. The underlying motivation of this research involved the synthesis and design of novel amine and sulfonic acid materials. Traditional routes to synthesize aminosilicas have led to the formation of a high loading of multiple types of amine sites on the silica surface. Part of this research involved the creation of a new aminosilica material via a protection/deprotection method designed to prevent multiple sites, while maintaining a relatively high loading. As a characterization technique, fluorescence spectroscopy of pyrene-based fluorophores loaded on traditional aminosilicas and site-isolated aminosilicas was used to probe the degree of site-isolation obtained with these methods. Also, this protection/deprotection method was compared to other reported isolation techniques with heterogeneous Group 4 constrained-geometry inspired catalysts (CGCs). It was determined that the degree of separation of the amine sites could be controlled with protection/deprotection methods. Furthermore, an increase in the reactivity of the amines and the catalytic activity of CGCs built off of the amines was determined for aminosilicas synthesized by a protection/deprotection method. The second part of this work involved developing organic/inorganic hybrid materials as heterogeneous Bronsted acidic cocatalysts for activation of olefin polymerization precatalysts. This was the first reported organic

  9. Natural cinnamic acids, synthetic derivatives and hybrids with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Juan David

    2014-11-25

    Antimicrobial natural preparations involving cinnamon, storax and propolis have been long used topically for treating infections. Cinnamic acids and related molecules are partly responsible for the therapeutic effects observed in these preparations. Most of the cinnamic acids, their esters, amides, aldehydes and alcohols, show significant growth inhibition against one or several bacterial and fungal species. Of particular interest is the potent antitubercular activity observed for some of these cinnamic derivatives, which may be amenable as future drugs for treating tuberculosis. This review intends to summarize the literature data on the antimicrobial activity of the natural cinnamic acids and related derivatives. In addition, selected hybrids between cinnamic acids and biologically active scaffolds with antimicrobial activity were also included. A comprehensive literature search was performed collating the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each cinnamic acid or derivative against the reported microorganisms. The MIC data allows the relative comparison between series of molecules and the derivation of structure-activity relationships.

  10. Method for replicating an array of nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, C.R.; Przetakiewicz, M.; Smith, C.L.; Sano, T.

    1998-08-18

    The invention relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5{prime}- and/or 3{prime}-overhangs. 16 figs.

  11. Method for replicating an array of nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, Charles R.; Przetakiewicz, Marek; Smith, Cassandra L.; Sano, Takeshi

    1998-01-01

    The invention relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5'- and/or 3'-overhangs.

  12. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Characteristics of Hybridization of Species-Specific Fluorescent Oligonucleotide Probes to rRNA of Marine Nanoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Rice, J.; Sleigh, M. A.; Burkill, P. H.; Tarran, G. A.; O'Connor, C. D.; Zubkov, M. V.

    1997-01-01

    Identification problems restrict quantitative ecological research on specific nanoflagellates. Identification by specific oligonucleotide probes permits use of flow cytometry for enumeration and measurement of size of nanoflagellates in statistically meaningful samples. Flow cytometry also permits measurement of intensity of probe binding by cells. Five fluorescent probes targeted to different regions of the small subunit rRNA of the common marine flagellate Paraphysomonas vestita all hybridized with cells of this flagellate. Cells fixed with trichloroacetic acid gave detectable signals at a probe concentration of 15 aM and specific fluorescence increased almost linearly to 1.5 fM, but at higher concentrations nonspecific binding increased sharply. Three flagellates, P. vestita, Paraphysomonas imperforata, and Pteridomonas danica, all bound a general eukaryotic probe approximately in proportion to their cell size, but the specific P. vestita probe gave 14 times more fluorescence with P. vestita than with either of the other flagellates. Cell fluorescence increased during the early growth of a batch culture and decreased toward the stationary phase; cell size changed in a comparable manner. Cell fluorescence intensity may allow inferences about growth rate, but whether fluorescence (assumed to reflect ribosome number) merely correlates with cell biomass or changes in a more complex manner remains unresolved. PMID:16535558

  13. Locked Nucleic Acid Flow Cytometry-fluorescence in situ Hybridization (LNA flow-FISH): A Method for Bacterial Small RNA Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-10

    Friedrich, U. & Lenke, J. Improved Enumeration of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Mesophilic Dairy Starter Cultures by Using Multiplex Quantitative Real...messenger RNA using locked nucleic acid probes. Anal. Biochem. 390, 109-114 (2009). 13. Waters, L. & Storz, G. Regulatory RNAs in bacteria . Cell. 136, 615...Video Article Locked Nucleic Acid Flow Cytometry-fluorescence in situ Hybridization (LNA flow-FISH): a Method for Bacterial Small RNA Detection Kelly

  14. A quick and simple FISH protocol with hybridization-sensitive fluorescent linear oligodeoxynucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan Ohtan; Matsuno, Hitomi; Ikeda, Shuji; Nakamura, Akiko; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Yasunori; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful tool used in karyotyping, cytogenotyping, cancer diagnosis, species specification, and gene-expression analysis. Although widely used, conventional FISH protocols are cumbersome and time consuming. We have now developed a FISH method using exciton-controlled hybridization-sensitive fluorescent oligodeoxynucleotide (ECHO) probes. ECHO-FISH uses a 25-min protocol from fixation to mounting that includes no stringency washing steps. We use ECHO-FISH to detect both specific DNA and RNA sequences with multicolor probes. ECHO-FISH is highly reproducible, stringent, and compatible with other fluorescent cellular labeling techniques. The resolution allows detection of intranuclear speckles of poly(A) RNA in HeLa cells and dissociated hippocampal primary cultures, and mRNAs in the distal dendrites of hippocampal neurons. We also demonstrate detection of telomeric and centromeric DNA on metaphase mouse chromosomes. The simplicity of the ECHO-FISH method will likely accelerate cytogenetic and gene-expression analysis with high resolution.

  15. Estimation of Bacterial Cell Numbers in Humic Acid-Rich Salt Marsh Sediments with Probes Directed to 16S Ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Edgcomb, Virginia P.; McDonald, John H.; Devereux, Richard; Smith, David W.

    1999-01-01

    The feasibility of using probes directed towards ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) as a quantitative approach to estimating cell numbers was examined and applied to study the structure of a bacterial community in humic acid-rich salt marsh sediments. Hybridizations were performed with membrane-bound nucleic acids by using seven group-specific DNA oligonucleotide probes complementary to 16S rRNA coding regions. These included a general eubacterial probe and probes encompassing most members of the gram-negative, mesophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). DNA was extracted from sediment samples, and contaminating materials were removed by a series of steps. Efficiency of DNA extraction was 48% based on the recovery of tritiated plasmid DNA added to samples prior to extraction. Reproducibility of the extraction procedure was demonstrated by hybridizations to replicate samples. Numbers of target cells in samples were estimated by comparing the amount of hybridization to extracted DNA obtained with each probe to that obtained with a standard curve of genomic DNA for reference strains included on the same membrane. In June, numbers of SRB detected with an SRB-specific probe ranged from 6.0 × 107 to 2.5 × 109 (average, 1.1 × 109 ± 5.2 × 108) cells g of sediment−1. In September, numbers of SRB detected ranged from 5.4 × 108 to 7.3 × 109 (average, 2.5 × 109 ± 1.5 × 109) cells g of sediment−1. The capability of using rDNA probes to estimate cell numbers by hybridization to DNA extracted from complex matrices permits initiation of detailed studies on community composition and changes in communities based on cell numbers in formerly intractable environments. PMID:10103245

  16. Sensitive determination of nucleic acids using organic nanoparticle fluorescence probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yunyou; Bian, Guirong; Wang, Leyu; Dong, Ling; Wang, Lun; Kan, Jian

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes the preparation of organic nanoparticles by reprecipitation method under sonication and vigorous stirring. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to characterize the size and size distribution of the luminescent nanoparticles. Their average diameter was about 25 nm with a size variation of ±18%. The fluorescence decay lifetime of the nanoparticles also was determined on a self-equipped fluorospectrometer with laser light source. The lifetime (˜0.09 μs) of nanoparticles is about three times long as that of the monomer. The nanoparticles were in abundant of hydrophilic groups, which increased their miscibility in aqueous solution. These organic nanoparticles have high photochemical stability, excellent resistance to chemical degradation and photodegradation, and a good fluorescence quantum yield (25%). The fluorescence can be efficiently quenched by nucleic acids. Based on the fluorescence quenching of nanoparticles, a fluorescence quenching method was developed for determination of microamounts of nucleic acids by using the nanoparticles as a new fluorescent probe. Under optimal conditions, maximum fluorescence quenching is produced, with maximum excitation and emission wavelengths of 345 and 402 nm, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range 0.4-19.0 μg ml -1 for calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) and 0.3-19.0 μg ml -1 for fish sperm DNA (fs-DNA). The corresponding detection limits are 0.25 μg ml -1 for ct-DNA and 0.17 μg ml -1 for fs-DNA. The relative standard deviation of six replicate measurements is 1.3-2.1%. The method is simple, rapid and sensitive with wide linear range. The recovery and relative standard deviation are very satisfactory.

  17. Reactive Microcontact Printing of DNA Probes on (DMA-NAS-MAPS) Copolymer-Coated Substrates for Efficient Hybridization Platforms.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Rossella; Bertucci, Alessandro; Prasetyanto, Eko Adi; Monticelli, Marco; Conca, Dario Valter; Massetti, Matteo; Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Damin, Francesco; Chiari, Marcella; De Cola, Luisa; Bertacco, Riccardo

    2016-04-05

    High-performing hybridization platforms fabricated by reactive microcontact printing of DNA probes are presented. Multishaped PDMS molds are used to covalently bind oligonucleotides over a functional copolymer (DMA-NAS-MAPS) surface. Printed structures with minimum width of about 1.5 μm, spaced by 10 μm, are demonstrated, with edge corrugation lower than 300 nm. The quantification of the immobilized surface probes via fluorescence imaging gives a remarkable concentration of 3.3 × 10(3) oligonucleotides/μm(2), almost totally active when used as probes in DNA-DNA hybridization assays. Indeed, fluorescence and atomic force microscopy show a 95% efficiency in target binding and uniform DNA hybridization over printed areas.

  18. Nucleic acid hybridization-an alternative tool in diagnostic microbiology.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, U; Hyypiä, T

    1985-09-01

    The use of radioimmunoossays (RIAs) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) has revolutionized diagnostic microbiology. Their high specificity and sensitivity make them versatile, they are simple to carry out either for direct detection of microorganisms in specimens or for serological diagnosis, and they can easily and reliably be standardized. Monoclonal antibodies have further improved these immunoassays. However, the development of simple and highly sensitive detection methods for nucleic acids has nevertheless promoted an interest also in diagnostic methods based on nucleic acid hybridization. Here Ulf Pettersson and Timo Hyypiä discuss methods which are likely to become a useful complement to the immunoassays in the near future.

  19. Optical response of a quantum dot-metal nanoparticle hybrid interacting with a weak probe field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosionis, Spyridon G.; Terzis, Andreas F.; Sadeghi, Seyed M.; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    We study optical effects in a hybrid system composed of a semiconductor quantum dot and a spherical metal nanoparticle that interacts with a weak probe electromagnetic field. We use modified nonlinear density matrix equations for the description of the optical properties of the system and obtain a closed-form expression for the linear susceptibilities of the quantum dot, the metal nanoparticle, and the total system. We then investigate the dependence of the susceptibility on the interparticle distance as well as on the material parameters of the hybrid system. We find that the susceptibility of the quantum dot exhibits optical transparency for specific frequencies. In addition, we show that there is a range of frequencies of the applied field for which the susceptibility of the semiconductor quantum dot leads to gain. This suggests that in such a hybrid system quantum coherence can reverse the course of energy transfer, allowing flow of energy from the metallic nanoparticle to the quantum dot. We also explore the susceptibility of the metal nanoparticle and show that it is strongly influenced by the presence of the quantum dot.

  20. Optical response of a quantum dot-metal nanoparticle hybrid interacting with a weak probe field.

    PubMed

    Kosionis, Spyridon G; Terzis, Andreas F; Sadeghi, Seyed M; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2013-01-30

    We study optical effects in a hybrid system composed of a semiconductor quantum dot and a spherical metal nanoparticle that interacts with a weak probe electromagnetic field. We use modified nonlinear density matrix equations for the description of the optical properties of the system and obtain a closed-form expression for the linear susceptibilities of the quantum dot, the metal nanoparticle, and the total system. We then investigate the dependence of the susceptibility on the interparticle distance as well as on the material parameters of the hybrid system. We find that the susceptibility of the quantum dot exhibits optical transparency for specific frequencies. In addition, we show that there is a range of frequencies of the applied field for which the susceptibility of the semiconductor quantum dot leads to gain. This suggests that in such a hybrid system quantum coherence can reverse the course of energy transfer, allowing flow of energy from the metallic nanoparticle to the quantum dot. We also explore the susceptibility of the metal nanoparticle and show that it is strongly influenced by the presence of the quantum dot.

  1. [Oligonucleotide derivatives in the nucleic acid hybridization analysis. II. Isothermal signal amplification in process of DNA analysis by minisequencing].

    PubMed

    Dmitrienko, E V; Khomiakova, E A; Pyshnaia; Bragin, A G; Vedernikov, V E; Pyshnyĭ, D V

    2010-01-01

    The isothermal amplification of reporter signal via limited probe extension (minisequencing) upon hybridization of nucleic acids has been studied. The intensity of reporter signal has been shown to increase due to enzymatic labeling of multiple probes upon consecutive hybridization with one DNA template both in homophase and heterophase assays using various kinds of detection signal: radioisotope label, fluorescent label, and enzyme-linked assay. The kinetic scheme of the process has been proposed and kinetic parameters for each step have been determined. The signal intensity has been shown to correlate with physicochemical characteristics of both complexes: probe/DNA and product/DNA. The maximum intensity has been observed at minimal difference between the thermodynamic stability of these complexes, provided the reaction temperature has been adjusted near their melting temperature values; rising or lowering the reaction temperature reduces the amount of reporting product. The signal intensity has been shown to decrease significantly upon hybridization with the DNA template containing single-nucleotide mismatches. Limited probe extension assay is useful not only for detection of DNA template but also for its quantitative characterization.

  2. Interfacial transduction of nucleic acid hybridization using immobilized quantum dots as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Algar, W Russ; Krull, Ulrich J

    2009-01-06

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) using immobilized quantum dots (QDs) as energy donors was explored as a transduction method for the detection of nucleic acid hybridization at an interface. This research was motivated by the success of the QD-FRET-based transduction of nucleic acid hybridization in solution-phase assays. This new work represents a fundamental step toward the assembly of a biosensor, where immobilization of the selective chemistry on a surface is desired. After immobilizing QD-probe oligonucleotide conjugates on optical fibers, a demonstration of the retention of selectivity was achieved by the introduction of acceptor (Cy3)-labeled single-stranded target oligonucleotides. Hybridization generated the proximity required for FRET, and the resulting fluorescence spectra provided an analytical signal proportional to the amount of target. This research provides an important framework for the future development of nucleic acid biosensors based on QDs and FRET. The most important findings of this work are that (1) a QD-FRET solid-phase hybridization assay is viable and (2) a passivating layer of denatured bovine serum albumin alleviates nonspecific adsorption, ultimately resulting in (3) the potential for a reusable assay format and mismatch discrimination. In this, the first incarnation of a solid-phase QD-FRET hybridization assay, the limit of detection was found to be 5 nM, and the dynamic range was almost 2 orders of magnitude. Selective discrimination of the target was shown using a three-base-pairs mismatch from a fully complementary sequence. Despite a gradual loss of signal, reuse of the optical fibers over multiple cycles of hybridization and dehybridization was possible. Directions for further improvement of the analytical performance by optimizing the design of the QD-probe oligonucleotide interface are identified.

  3. Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization for identification of Listeria genus, Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Shan; Li, Ke; Shuai, Jiangbing; Dong, Qiang; Fang, Weihuan

    2012-07-02

    A fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) method in conjunction with fluorescin-labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes (PNA-FISH) for detection of Listeria species was developed. In silico analysis showed that three PNA probes Lis-16S-1, Lm-16S-2 and Liv-16S-5 were suitable for specific identification of Listeria genus, Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii, respectively. These probes were experimentally verified by their reactivity against 19 strains of six Listeria species (excluding newly described species Listeria marthii and Listeria rocourtiae) and eight other bacterial species. The PNA-FISH method was optimized as 30 min of hybridization with 0.2% Triton X-100 in the solution and used to identify 85 Listeria strains from individual putative Listeria colonies on PALCAM agar plates streaked from selectively enriched cultures of 780 food or food-related samples. Of the 85 Listeria strains, thirty-seven were identified as L. monocytogenes with the probe Lm-16S-2 and two as L. ivanovii with the probe Liv-16S-5 which was in agreement with the results obtained by the API LISTERIA method. Thus, the PNA-FISH protocol has the potential for identification of pathogenic Listeria spp. from food or food-related samples.

  4. Electrostatic nucleic acid nanoassembly enables hybridization chain reaction in living cells for ultrasensitive mRNA imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhan; Liu, Gao-Qin; Yang, Xiao-Li; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2015-06-03

    Efficient approaches for intracellular delivery of nucleic acid reagents to achieve sensitive detection and regulation of gene and protein expressions are essential for chemistry and biology. We develop a novel electrostatic DNA nanoassembly that, for the first time, realizes hybridization chain reaction (HCR), a target-initiated alternating hybridization reaction between two hairpin probes, for signal amplification in living cells. The DNA nanoassembly has a designed structure with a core gold nanoparticle, a cationic peptide interlayer, and an electrostatically assembled outer layer of fluorophore-labeled hairpin DNA probes. It is shown to have high efficiency for cellular delivery of DNA probes via a unique endocytosis-independent mechanism that confers a significant advantage of overcoming endosomal entrapment. Moreover, electrostatic assembly of DNA probes enables target-initialized release of the probes from the nanoassembly via HCR. This intracellular HCR offers efficient signal amplification and enables ultrasensitive fluorescence activation imaging of mRNA expression with a picomolar detection limit. The results imply that the developed nanoassembly may provide an invaluable platform in low-abundance biomarker discovery and regulation for cell biology and theranostics.

  5. Revealing Nucleic Acid Mutations Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Probes

    PubMed Central

    Junager, Nina P. L.; Kongsted, Jacob; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid mutations are of tremendous importance in modern clinical work, biotechnology and in fundamental studies of nucleic acids. Therefore, rapid, cost-effective and reliable detection of mutations is an object of extensive research. Today, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes are among the most often used tools for the detection of nucleic acids and in particular, for the detection of mutations. However, multiple parameters must be taken into account in order to create efficient FRET probes that are sensitive to nucleic acid mutations. In this review; we focus on the design principles for such probes and available computational methods that allow for their rational design. Applications of advanced, rationally designed FRET probes range from new insights into cellular heterogeneity to gaining new knowledge of nucleic acid structures directly in living cells. PMID:27472344

  6. Fluorescence in situ hybridization probes targeting members of the phylum Candidatus Saccharibacteria falsely target Eikelboom type 1851 filaments and other Chloroflexi members.

    PubMed

    Nittami, Tadashi; Speirs, Lachlan B M; Fukuda, Junji; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Seviour, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    The FISH probe TM7-305 is thought to target the filamentous Eikelboom morphotype 0041 as a member of the Candidatus ‘Saccharibacteria’ (formerly TM7) phylum. However, with activated sludge samples in both Japan and Australia, this probe hybridized consistently with filamentous bacteria fitting the description of the morphotype 1851, which also responded positively to the CHL1851 FISH probe designed to target Chloroflexi members of this morphotype. 16S rRNA clone libraries from samples containing type 1851 TM7-305-positive filaments yielded Chloroflexi clones with high sequence similarity to Kouleothrix aurantiaca. These contained a variant TM7-305 probe target site possessing weakly destabilizing mismatches insufficient to prevent probe hybridization. Furthermore, the TM7-905 FISH probe, designed to target members of the entire Candidatus ‘Saccharibacteria’ phylum, also hybridized with the filament morphotypes 0041/0675, which responded also to the phylum level Chloroflexi probes. Many Chloroflexi sequences have only a single base mismatch to the TM7-905 probe target sequence. When competitor probes for both the TM7-305 and TM7-905 Chloroflexi non-target sites were applied, no fluorescent signal was seen in any of the filamentous organisms also hybridizing with the aforementioned Chloroflexi probes. These data indicate that these competitor probes must be included in hybridizations when both the TM7-905 and TM7-305 FISH probes are applied, to minimize potential false positive FISH results.

  7. Bipolar lead-acid battery for hybrid vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saakes, M.; Woortmeijer, R.; Schmal, D.

    Within the framework of the European project bipolar lead-acid power source (BILAPS), a new production route is being developed for the bipolar lead-acid battery. The performance targets are 500 W kg -1, 30 Wh kg -1 and 100 000 power-assist life cycles (PALCs). The operation voltage of the battery can be, according to the requirements, 12, 36 V or any other voltage. Tests with recently developed 4 and 12 V prototypes, each of 30 Ah capacity have demonstrated that the PALC can be operated using 10 C discharge and 9 C charge peaks. The tests show no overvoltage or undervoltage problems during three successive test periods of 16 h with 8 h rest in between. The temperature stabilizes during these tests at 40-45 °C using a thermal-management system. The bipolar lead acid battery is operated at an initial 50% state-of-charge. During the tests, the individual cell voltages display only very small differences. Tests are now in progress to improve further the battery-management system, which has been developed at the cell level, during the period no PALCs are run in order to improve the hybrid behaviour of the battery. The successful tests show the feasibility of operating the bipolar lead-acid battery in a hybrid mode. The costs of the system are estimated to be much lower than those for nickel-metal-hydride or Li-ion based high-power systems. An additional advantage of the lead-acid system is that recycling of lead-acid batteries is well established.

  8. Multiplexed interfacial transduction of nucleic acid hybridization using a single color of immobilized quantum dot donor and two acceptors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Algar, W Russ; Krull, Ulrich J

    2010-01-01

    A multiplexed solid-phase assay for the detection of nucleic acid hybridization was developed on the basis of a single color of immobilized CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD) as a donor in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). This work demonstrated that two channels of detection did not necessitate two different QD donors. Two probe oligonucleotides were coimmobilized on optical fibers modified with QDs, and a sandwich assay was used to associate the acceptor dyes with interfacial hybridization events without target labeling. FRET-sensitized acceptor emission provided an analytical signal that was concentration dependent down to 10 nM. Changes in the ratio of coimmobilized probe oligonucleotides were found to yield linear changes in the relative amounts of acceptor emission. These changes were compared to previous studies that used mixed films of two QD donors for two detection channels. The analysis indicated that probe dilution effects were primarily driven by changes in acceptor number density and that QD dilution effects or changes in mean donor-acceptor distance were secondary. Hybridization kinetics were found to be consistent between different ratios of coimmobilized probes, suggesting that hybridization in this type of system occurred via the accepted model for solid-phase hybridization, where adsorption and then diffusion at the solid interface drove hybridization.

  9. Photoacoustic guidance of diffusive optical tomography with a hybrid reflection geometry probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamelin, John; Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Aguirre, Andres; Takavoli, Behnoosh; Zhu, Quing

    2009-02-01

    We report experimental investigations of photoacoustic guidance of diffusive optical tomography for detection and characterization of optical contrast targets. The hybrid system combined an 8-source, 10-detector frequency domain DOT with a clinical reflection geometry probe. For the photoacoustic tomography (PAT) functionality, a high-energy 1×7 optical fiber delivery system illuminated a 2 cm central region for localization of absorptive targets. Two-dimensional PAT images along one central axis of the probe defined of regions of interest for a dual-zone mesh DOT imaging algorithm. PVC Plastisol phantom absorbers, 1 cm on a side, with absorption coefficients ranging from 0.075 to 0.23 cm-1 were imaged at depths up to 2.5 cm. Pairs of absorbers simulating a multi-lobed heterogeneous tumor were also investigated. Without PAT guidance, the absorber location was not clear and lower contrast targets in the twoabsorber configurations were not distinguishable. With PAT guidance, the two targets were well resolved and the reconstructed absorption coefficients improved to within 15% of the true values.

  10. Estimate of true incomplete exchanges using fluorescence in situ hybridization with telomere probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the frequency of true incomplete exchanges in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human lymphocytes were exposed to 2 Gy and 5 Gy of gamma-rays. Chromosome aberrations were studied using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with whole chromosome-specific probes, together with human telomere probes. Chromosomes 2 and 4 were chosen in the present study. RESULTS: The percentage of incomplete exchanges was 27% when telomere signals were not considered. After excluding false incomplete exchanges identified by the telomere signals, the percentage of incomplete exchanges decreased to 11%. Since telomere signals appear on about 82% of the telomeres, the percentage of true incomplete exchanges should be even lower and was estimated to be 3%. This percentage was similar for chromosomes 2 and 4 and for doses of both 2 Gy and 5 Gy. CONCLUSIONS: The percentage of true incomplete exchanges is significantly lower in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes than the frequencies reported in the literature.

  11. Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in-situ hybridization for identification of Vibrio spp. in aquatic products and environments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Li, Ke; Wu, Shan; Shuai, Jiangbing; Fang, Weihuan

    2015-08-03

    A peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) method was developed for specific detection of the Vibrio genus. In silico analysis by BLAST and ProbeCheck showed that the designed PNA probe targeting the 16S rRNAs was suitable for specific identification of Vibrio. Specificity and sensitivity of the probe Vib-16S-1 were experimentally verified by its reactivity against 18 strains of 9 Vibrio species and 14 non-Vibrio strains of 14 representative species. The PNA-FISH assay was able to identify 47 Vibrio positive samples from selectively enriched cultures of 510 samples of aquatic products and environments, comparable with the results obtained by biochemical identification and real-time PCR. We conclude that PNA-FISH can be an alternative method for rapid identification of Vibrio species in a broad spectrum of seafood or related samples.

  12. Fluorescence probe for the convenient and sensitive detection of ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Yuta; Yamato, Mayumi; Yamada, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is an important antioxidant that plays an essential role in the biosynthesis of numerous bioactive substances. The detection of ascorbic acid has traditionally been achieved using high-performance liquid chromatography and absorption spectrophotometry assays. However, the development of fluorescence probes for this purpose is highly desired because they provide a much more convenient and highly sensitive technique for the detection of this material. OFF-ON-type fluorescent probes have been developed for the detection of non-fluorescent compounds. Photo-induced electron transfer and fluorescence resonance energy transfer are the two main fluorescence quenching mechanisms for the detection of ascorbic acid, and several fluorescence probes have been reported based on redox-responsive metals and quantum dots. Profluorescent nitroxide compounds have also been developed as non-metal organic fluorescence probes for ascorbic acid. These nitroxide systems have a stable unpaired electron and can therefore react with ascorbic acid and a strong fluorescence quencher. Furthermore, recent synthetic advances have allowed for the synthesis of α-substituted nitroxides with varying levels of reactivity towards ascorbic acid. In this review, we have discussed the design strategies used for the preparation of fluorescent probes for ascorbic acid, with particular emphasis on profluorescent nitroxides, which are unique radical-based redox-active fluorescent probes. PMID:26798193

  13. Comparison of peroxidase-labeled DNA probes with radioactive RNA probes for detection of human papillomaviruses by in situ hybridization in paraffin sections

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.S.; Kurman, R.J.; Kessis, T.D.; Shah, K.V. )

    1991-01-01

    A study comparing in situ hybridization using nonradioactive DNA probes directly conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and {sup 35}S-labeled antisense RNA probes for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6/11, 16, and 18 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from 34 lesions of the cervix and vulva. These lesions included exophytic condylomas and intraepithelial and invasive neoplasms. HPV 6/11 was detected in two of four condylomata acuminata by both in situ techniques. HPV 16 was detected in 13 of 30 cases of intraepithelial and invasive neoplasms by both methods. Discordance between the two methods occurred in two instances. The radiolabeled probe but not the HRP probe detected HPV 16 in one case of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 3), whereas the converse occurred in one case of vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN 3). HPV 18 was not detected in any of the specimens by either method. This study demonstrates that nonradioactive HRP-labeled probes for the detection of specific HPV types are as sensitive as the more laborious and potentially hazardous radioactive probes.

  14. Improved DNA hybridization parameters by Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid (TINA).

    PubMed

    Schneider, Uffe Vest

    2012-01-01

    This thesis establishes oligonucleotide design rules and applications of a novel group of DNA stabilizing molecules collectively called Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid - TINA. Three peer-reviewed publications form the basis for the thesis. One publication describes an improved and rapid method for determination of DNA melting points and two publications describe the effects of positioning TINA molecules in parallel triplex helix and antiparallel duplex helix forming DNA structures. The third publication establishes that TINA molecules containing oligonucleotides improve an antiparallel duplex hybridization based capture assay's analytical sensitivity compared to conventionel DNA oligonucleotides. Clinical microbiology is traditionally based on pathogenic microorganisms' culture and serological tests. The introduction of DNA target amplification methods like PCR has improved the analytical sensitivity and total turn around time involved in clinical diagnostics of infections. Due to the relatively weak hybridization between the two strands of double stranded DNA, a number of nucleic acid stabilizing molecules have been developed to improve the sensitivity of DNA based diagnostics through superior binding properties. A short introduction is given to Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen based DNA binding and the derived DNA structures. A number of other nucleic acid stabilizing molecules are described. The stabilizing effect of TINA molecules on different DNA structures is discussed and considered in relation to other nucleic acid stabilizing molecules and in relation to future use of TINA containing oligonucleotides in clinical diagnostics and therapy. In conclusion, design of TINA modified oligonucleotides for antiparallel duplex helixes and parallel triplex helixes follows simple purpose dependent rules. TINA molecules are well suited for improving multiplex PCR assays and can be used as part of novel technologies. Future research should test whether combinations of TINA

  15. Quantum-dot-labeled DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the microorganism Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sheng-Mei; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Xie, Hai-Yan; Tian, Zhi-Quan; Peng, Jun; Lu, Zhe-Xue; Pang, Dai-Wen; Xie, Zhi-Xiong

    2006-05-12

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as a kind of nonisotopic biological labeling material have many unique fluorescent properties relative to conventional organic dyes and fluorescent proteins, such as composition- and size-dependent absorption and emission, a broad absorption spectrum, photostability, and single-dot sensitivity. These properties make them a promising stable and sensitive label, which can be used for long-term fluorescent tracking and subcellular location of genes and proteins. Here, a simple approach for the construction of QD-labeled DNA probes was developed by attaching thiol-ssDNA to QDs via a metal-thiol bond. The as-prepared QD-labeled DNA probes had high dispersivity, bioactivity, and specificity for hybridization. Based on such a kind of probe with a sequence complementary to multiple clone sites in plasmid pUC18, fluorescence in situ hybridization of the tiny bacterium Escherichia coli has been realized for the first time.

  16. Differential sensitivity of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes used for fluorescence in situ hybridization is a result of ribosomal higher order structure.

    PubMed

    Frischer, M E; Floriani, P J; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S A

    1996-10-01

    The use of 16S rRNA targeted gene probes for the direct analysis of microbial communities has revolutionized the field of microbial ecology, yet a comprehensive approach for the design of such probes does not exist. The development of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes for use with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures has been especially difficult as a result of the complex nature of the rRNA target molecule. In this study a systematic comparison of 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide gene probes was conducted to determine if target location influences the hybridization efficiency of oligonucleotide probes when used with in situ hybridization protocols for the detection of whole microbial cells. Five unique universal 12-mer oligonucleotide sequences, located at different regions of the 16S rRNA molecule, were identified by a computer-aided sequence analysis of over 1000 partial and complete 16S rRNA sequences. The complements of these oligomeric sequences were chemically synthesized for use as probes and end labeled with either [gamma-32P]ATP or the fluorescent molecule tetramethylrhodamine-5/-6. Hybridization sensitivity for each of the probes was determined by hybridization to heat-denatured RNA immobilized on blots or to formaldehyde fixed whole cells. All of the probes hybridized with equal efficiency to denatured RNA. However, the probes exhibited a wide range of sensitivity (from none to very strong) when hybridized with whole cells using a previously developed FISH procedure. Differential hybridization efficiencies against whole cells could not be attributed to cell wall type, since the relative probe efficiency was preserved when either Gram-negative or -positive cells were used. These studies represent one of the first attempts to systematically define criteria for 16S rRNA targeted probe design for use against whole cells and establish target site location as a critical parameter in probe design.

  17. Artificial mismatch hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Guo, Zhen; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    An improved nucleic acid hybridization process is provided which employs a modified oligonucleotide and improves the ability to discriminate a control nucleic acid target from a variant nucleic acid target containing a sequence variation. The modified probe contains at least one artificial mismatch relative to the control nucleic acid target in addition to any mismatch(es) arising from the sequence variation. The invention has direct and advantageous application to numerous existing hybridization methods, including, applications that employ, for example, the Polymerase Chain Reaction, allele-specific nucleic acid sequencing methods, and diagnostic hybridization methods.

  18. Fluorescent macrocyclic probes with pendant functional groups as markers of acidic organelles within live cells.

    PubMed

    Wadhavane, Prashant D; Izquierdo, M Ángeles; Lutters, Dennis; Burguete, M Isabel; Marín, María J; Russell, David A; Galindo, Francisco; Luis, Santiago V

    2014-02-07

    A new family of acidity sensitive fluorescent macrocycles has been synthesized and fully characterized. Their photophysical properties including emission quantum yield and fluorescence lifetime have been determined. The acid-base properties of the new molecules can be tuned by the incorporation of pendant functional groups. The nature of such functional groups (carboxylic acid or ester) influences dramatically the pKa of the probes, two compounds of which exhibit low values. Preliminary intracellular studies using confocal microscopy together with emission spectra of the probes from the cellular environment have shown that the synthesized fluorescent macrocycles mark the acidic organelles of RAW 264.7 macrophage cells.

  19. 16S rRNA in situ Hybridization Followed by Flow Cytometry for Rapid Identification of Acetic Acid Bacteria Involved in Submerged Industrial Vinegar Production

    PubMed Central

    Lipoglavšek, Luka; Avguštin, Gorazd

    2016-01-01

    Summary Acetic acid bacteria are involved in many biotechnological processes such as vitamin C, gluconic acid, miglitol or acetic acid production, and others. For a technologist trying to control the industrial process, the ability to follow the microbiological development of the process is thus of importance. During the past few years hybridization in a combination with flow cytometry has often been used for this purpose. Since vinegar is a liquid, it is an ideal matrix for flow cytometry analysis. In this work we have constructed a specific probe for highly acetic acid-resistant species of the acetic acid bacteria and a protocol for in situ hybridization, which in combination with flow cytometry enables direct monitoring of bacteria producing vinegar with >10% of acetic acid. The approach was successfully applied for monitoring microbiota during industrial vinegar production. PMID:27904400

  20. 16S rRNA in situ Hybridization Followed by Flow Cytometry for Rapid Identification of Acetic Acid Bacteria Involved in Submerged Industrial Vinegar Production.

    PubMed

    Trček, Janja; Lipoglavšek, Luka; Avguštin, Gorazd

    2016-03-01

    Acetic acid bacteria are involved in many biotechnological processes such as vitamin C, gluconic acid, miglitol or acetic acid production, and others. For a technologist trying to control the industrial process, the ability to follow the microbiological development of the process is thus of importance. During the past few years hybridization in a combination with flow cytometry has often been used for this purpose. Since vinegar is a liquid, it is an ideal matrix for flow cytometry analysis. In this work we have constructed a specific probe for highly acetic acid-resistant species of the acetic acid bacteria and a protocol for in situ hybridization, which in combination with flow cytometry enables direct monitoring of bacteria producing vinegar with >10% of acetic acid. The approach was successfully applied for monitoring microbiota during industrial vinegar production.

  1. Preparation and characterization of zinc oxide nanoparticles and their sensor applications for electrochemical monitoring of nucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed

    Yumak, Tugrul; Kuralay, Filiz; Muti, Mihrican; Sinag, Ali; Erdem, Arzum; Abaci, Serdar

    2011-09-01

    In this study, ZnO nanoparticles (ZNP) of approximately 30 nm in size were synthesized by the hydrothermal method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Braun-Emmet-Teller (BET) N2 adsorption analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). ZnO nanoparticles enriched with poly(vinylferrocenium) (PVF+) modified single-use graphite electrodes were then developed for the electrochemical monitoring of nucleic acid hybridization related to the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV). Firstly, the surfaces of polymer modified and polymer-ZnO nanoparticle modified single-use pencil graphite electrodes (PGEs) were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The electrochemical behavior of these electrodes was also investigated using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Subsequently, the polymer-ZnO nanoparticle modified PGEs were evaluated for the electrochemical detection of DNA based on the changes at the guanine oxidation signals. Various modifications in DNA oligonucleotides and probe concentrations were examined in order to optimize the electrochemical signals that were generated by means of nucleic acid hybridization. After the optimization studies, the sequence-selective DNA hybridization was investigated in the case of a complementary amino linked probe (target), or noncomplementary (NC) sequences, or target and mismatch (MM) mixture in the ratio of (1:1).

  2. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes to identify small phytoplankton by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, N; LeBot, N; Marie, D; Partensky, F; Vaulot, D

    1995-01-01

    Because of their tiny size (0.2 to 2 microns), oceanic picophytoplanktonic cells (either cultured strains or natural communities) are difficult to identify, and some basic questions concerning their taxonomy, physiology, and ecology are still largely unanswered. The present study was designed to test the suitability of in situ hybridization with rRNA fluorescent probes detected by flow cytometry for the identification of small photosynthetic eukaryotes. Oligonucleotide probes targeted against regions of the 18S rRNAs of Chlorophyta lineage (CHLO probe) and of non-Chlorophyta (NCHLO probe) algal species were designed. The CHLO and NCHLO probes, which differed by a single nucleotide, allowed discrimination of chlorophyte from nonchlorophyte cultured strains. The sensitivity of each probe was dependent upon the size of the cells and upon their growth stage. The mean fluorescence was 8 to 80 times higher for specifically labeled than for nonspecifically labeled cells in exponential growth phase, but it decreased sharply in stationary phase. Such taxon-specific probes should increase the applicability of flow cytometry for the rapid identification of cultured pico- and nanoplanktonic strains, especially those that lack taxonomically useful morphological features. PMID:7618862

  3. Simulations of ordering and sequence reconstruction of random DNA clones hybridized with a small number of oligomeric probes

    SciTech Connect

    Labat, I.; Drmanac, R.

    1992-12-01

    The sequencing by hybridization (SBH) method has been developed for assaying millions of 0.5- to 2-kb-tong clones. This opens up an efficient way for defining the order of short clones and creating a physical map at 100-bp resolution. Moreover, complete sequences can be obtained using a modest number (about 3000) of probes if hybridization and gel sequence data from overlapped or similar sequences are used. In light of these possibilities, various heuristic algorithms have been developed and tested in simulation experiments. This approach can influence the interpretation of the intuitively obvious term, ``known sequence.``

  4. Use of Peptide Nucleic Acid-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Definitive, Rapid Identification of Five Common Candida Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Mallonee, Amanda B.; Kwiatkowski, Nicole P.; Merz, William G.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated a 2.5-h peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) assay with five Candida species-specific probes to identify Candida colonies and compared it to standard 2-h to 5-day phenotypic identification methods. Suspensions were made and slides were prepared and read for fluorescence per the manufacturer's instructions. Sensitivity was 99% (109/110), and specificity was 99% (129/130). PNA-FISH can rapidly identify those Candida species isolated most frequently. PMID:17804657

  5. Detection of circovirus infection in pigeons by in situ hybridization using cloned DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Smyth, J A; Weston, J; Moffett, D A; Todd, D

    2001-11-01

    Degenerate primers were designed based on known sequence information for the circoviruses psittacine beak and feather disease virus and porcine circovirus and applied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to known virus-infected bursa of Fabricius (BF) from a pigeon. A 548-bp DNA fragment was amplified and shown to be specific to a novel circovirus, named pigeon circovirus (PiCV), and was used to produce sensitive and specific probes for detection of circovirus DNA by in situ hybridization (ISH). Using ISH on BF from 107 pigeons submitted for necropsy, infection was detected in 89%, compared with a histologic detection rate of 66%. Using the ISH technique, infected cells were also found in liver, kidney, trachea, lung, brain, crop, intestine, spleen, bone marrow, and heart of some birds. Large quantities of DNA were present in some of these tissues, and in the absence of BF, liver in particular is identified as a potentially useful organ to examine for presence of PiCV. This high prevalence of infection in diseased birds is noteworthy, emphasizing the need for studies to determine the precise role of this virus as a disease-producing agent.

  6. Probing nanoscale chemical segregation and surface properties of antifouling hybrid xerogel films.

    PubMed

    Destino, Joel F; Gatley, Caitlyn M; Craft, Andrew K; Detty, Michael R; Bright, Frank V

    2015-03-24

    Over the past decade there has been significant development in hybrid polymer coatings exhibiting tunable surface morphology, surface charge, and chemical segregation-all believed to be key properties in antifouling (AF) coating performance. While a large body of research exists on these materials, there have yet to be studies on all the aforementioned properties in a colocalized manner with nanoscale spatial resolution. Here, we report colocalized atomic force microscopy, scanning Kelvin probe microscopy, and confocal Raman microscopy on a model AF xerogel film composed of 1:9:9 (mol:mol:mol) 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), n-octyltriethoxysilane (C8), and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) formed on Al2O3. This AF film is found to consist of three regions that are chemically and physically unique in 2D and 3D across multiple length scales: (i) a 1.5 μm thick base layer derived from all three precursors; (ii) 2-4 μm diameter mesa-like features that are enriched in free amine (from APTES), depleted in the other species and that extend 150-400 nm above the base layer; and (iii) 1-2 μm diameter subsurface inclusions within the base layer that are enriched in hydrogen-bonded amine (from APTES) and depleted in the other species.

  7. Photodegradation of lipopolysaccharides and the inhibition of macrophage activation by anthraquinone-boronic acid hybrids.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Miura, Takuya; Toshima, Kazunobu

    2012-08-07

    Target-selective photodegradation of 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulopyranosonic acid (KDO) was achieved without additives and under neutral conditions using a designed anthraquinone-boronic acid hybrid and long wavelength UV light irradiation. The hybrid can photodegrade lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and inhibit macrophage activation induced by LPS.

  8. DNA hybridization activity of single-stranded DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles used as probes for DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Atsushi; Matsuo, Kosuke; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) have potential applications in bio-sensing technologies as labels or signal enhancers. In order to meet demands for a development of biomolecular assays by a quantitative understanding of single-molecule, it is necessary to regulate accuracy of the NPs probes modified with biomolecules to optimize the characteristics of NPs. However, to our knowledge, there is little information about the structural effect of conjugated biomolecules to the NPs. In this study, we investigated the contribution of a density of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) conjugating gold NP to hybridization activity. Hybridization activity decreased in accordance with increases in the density of attached ssDNAs, likely due to electrostatic repulsion generated by negatively charged phosphate groups in the ssDNA backbone. These results highlight the importance of controlling the density of ssDNAs attached to the surface of NPs used as DNA detection probes.

  9. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis by a new multiplex peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization method

    PubMed Central

    Machado, António; Castro, Joana; Cereija, Tatiana; Almeida, Carina

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is one of most common vaginal infections. However, its diagnosis by classical methods reveals low specificity. Our goal was to evaluate the accuracy diagnosis of 150 vaginal samples with research gold standard methods and our Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probes by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) methodology. Also, we described the first PNA-FISH methodology for BV diagnosis, which provides results in approximately 3 h. The results showed a sensitivity of 84.6% (95% confidence interval (CI), from 64.3 to 95.0%) and a specificity of 97.6% (95% CI [92.6–99.4%]), demonstrating the higher specificity of the PNA-FISH method and showing false positive results in BV diagnosis commonly obtained by the classical methods. This methodology combines the specificity of PNA probes for Lactobacillus species and G. vaginalis visualization and the calculation of the microscopic field by Nugent score, allowing a trustful evaluation of the bacteria present in vaginal microflora and avoiding the occurrence of misleading diagnostics. Therefore, the PNA-FISH methodology represents a valuable alternative for BV diagnosis. PMID:25737820

  10. Detecting Microbial Nucleic Acids within Nematode Bodies: A Photo Essay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We developed a taxa-specific, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique to localize microbial nucleic acids within nematode bodies. This technique involves hybridization of a nucleic acid probe to target microbial sequences. Hybridization is detected microscopically, as the probes have f...

  11. A novel acidic pH fluorescent probe based on a benzothiazole derivative.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiujuan; Li, Xian; Feng, Suxiang; Liang, Beibei; Zhou, Tiqiang; Xu, Min; Ma, Zhuoyi

    2017-04-15

    A novel acidic pH fluorescent probe 1 based on a benzothiazole derivative has been designed, synthesized and developed. The linear response range covers the acidic pH range from 3.44 to 6.46, which is valuable for pH researches in acidic environment. The evaluated pKa value of the probe 1 is 4.23. The fluorescence enhancement of the studied probe 1 with an increase in hydrogen ions concentration is based on the hindering of enhanced photo-induced electron transfer (PET) process. Moreover, the pH sensor possesses a highly selective response to H(+) in the presence of metal ions, anions and other bioactive small molecules which would be interfere with its fluorescent pH response. Furthermore, the probe 1 responds to acidic pH with short response time that was less than 1min. The probe 1 has been successfully applied to confocal fluorescence imaging in live HeLa cells and can selectively stain lysosomes. All of such good properties prove it can be used to monitoring pH fluctuations in acidic environment with high sensitivity, pH dependence and short response time.

  12. A novel acidic pH fluorescent probe based on a benzothiazole derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qiujuan; Li, Xian; Feng, Suxiang; Liang, Beibei; Zhou, Tiqiang; Xu, Min; Ma, Zhuoyi

    2017-04-01

    A novel acidic pH fluorescent probe 1 based on a benzothiazole derivative has been designed, synthesized and developed. The linear response range covers the acidic pH range from 3.44 to 6.46, which is valuable for pH researches in acidic environment. The evaluated pKa value of the probe 1 is 4.23. The fluorescence enhancement of the studied probe 1 with an increase in hydrogen ions concentration is based on the hindering of enhanced photo-induced electron transfer (PET) process. Moreover, the pH sensor possesses a highly selective response to H+ in the presence of metal ions, anions and other bioactive small molecules which would be interfere with its fluorescent pH response. Furthermore, the probe 1 responds to acidic pH with short response time that was less than 1 min. The probe 1 has been successfully applied to confocal fluorescence imaging in live HeLa cells and can selectively stain lysosomes. All of such good properties prove it can be used to monitoring pH fluctuations in acidic environment with high sensitivity, pH dependence and short response time.

  13. Probing linker design in citric acid-ciprofloxacin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Milner, Stephen J; Snelling, Anna M; Kerr, Kevin G; Abd-El-Aziz, Ahmad; Thomas, Gavin H; Hubbard, Roderick E; Routledge, Anne; Duhme-Klair, Anne-Kathrin

    2014-08-15

    A series of structurally related citric acid-ciprofloxacin conjugates was synthesised to investigate the influence of the linker between citric acid and ciprofloxacin on antibacterial activities. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined against a panel of reference strains and clinical isolates of bacteria associated with infection in humans and correlated with the DNA gyrase inhibitory activity. The observed trend was rationalised by computational modelling.

  14. An atomic force microscopy study of DNA hairpin probes monolabelled with gold nanoparticle: Grafting and hybridization on oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavalley, V.; Chaudouët, P.; Stambouli, V.

    2007-12-01

    First and original results are reported regarding the surface evolution of two kinds of oxide film after covalent grafting and hybridization of hairpin oligonucleotide probes. These hairpin probes were monolabelled with a 1.4 nm gold nanoparticle. One kind of oxide film was rough Sb doped SnO 2 oxide film and the other kind was smooth SiO 2 film. Same process of covalent grafting, involving a silanization step, was performed on both oxide surfaces. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the evolution of each oxide surface after different steps of the process: functionalization, probe grafting and hybridization. In the case of rough SnO 2 films, a slight decrease of the roughness was observed after each step whereas in the case of smooth SiO 2 films, a maximum of roughness was obtained after probe grafting. Step height measurements of grafted probes could be performed on SiO 2 leading to an apparent thickness of around 3.7 ± 1.0 nm. After hybridization, on the granular surface of SnO 2, by coupling AFM with SEM FEG analyses, dispersed and well-resolved groups of gold nanoparticles linked to DNA duplexes could be observed. Their density varied from 6.6 ± 0.3 × 10 10 to 2.3 ± 0.3 × 10 11 dots cm -2. On the contrary, on smooth SiO 2 surface, the DNA duplexes behave like a dense carpet of globular structures with a density of 2.9 ± 0.5 × 10 11 globular structures cm -2.

  15. Efficient ratiometric fluorescence probe based on dual-emission quantum dots hybrid for on-site determination of copper ions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianlei; Zhang, Kui; Zhu, Houjuan; Ma, Fang; Sun, Mingtai; Yu, Huan; Sun, Jian; Wang, Suhua

    2013-07-02

    Of various chemosensory protocols, the color change observed by the naked eye is considered to be a conceivable and on-site way to indicate the presence of an analyte. We herein designed a ratiometric fluorescence probe by hybridizing dual-emission quantum dots (QDs) and demonstrated its efficiency for on-site visual determination of copper ions. The hybrid probe comprises two sizes of cadmium telluride QDs emitting red and green fluorescence, respectively, in which the red-emitting ones are embedded in silica nanoparticles and the green-emitting ones are covalently linked onto the surface. The fluorescence of the embedded QDs is insensitive to the analyte, whereas the green emissive QDs are functionalized to be selectively quenched by the analyte. Upon exposure to different amounts of copper ions, the variations of the dual emission intensity ratios display continuous color changes from green to red, which can be clearly observed by the naked eye. The limit of detection for copper is estimated to be 1.1 nM, much lower than the allowable level of copper (~20 μM) in drinking water set by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The probe is demonstrated for the determination of copper ions in lake water and mineral water samples, especially for visually monitoring copper residues on herb leaves. This prototype ratiometric probe is simple, fully self-contained, and thus potentially attractive for visual identification without the need for elaborate equipment.

  16. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay.

  17. Nucleic Acid-Peptide Complex Phase Controlled by DNA Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieregg, Jeffrey; Lueckheide, Michael; Leon, Lorraine; Marciel, Amanda; Tirrell, Matthew

    When polyanions and polycations are mixed, counterion release drives formation of polymer-rich complexes that can either be solid (precipitates) or liquid (coacervates) depending on the properties of the polyelectrolytes. These complexes are important in many fields, from encapsulation of industrial polymers to membrane-free segregation of biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. Condensation of long double-stranded DNA has been studied for several decades, but comparatively little attention has been paid to the polyelectrolyte behavior of oligonucleotides. We report here studies of DNA oligonucleotides (10 - 88 nt) complexed with polylysine (10 - 100 aa). Unexpectedly, we find that the phase of the resulting complexes is controlled by the hybridization state of the nucleic acid, with double-stranded DNA forming precipitates and single-stranded DNA forming coacervates. Stability increases with polyelectrolyte length and decreases with solution salt concentration, with complexes of the longer double-stranded polymers undergoing precipitate/coacervate/soluble transitions as ionic strength is increased. Mixing coacervates formed by complementary single-stranded oligonucleotides results in precipitate formation, raising the possibility of stimulus-responsive material design.

  18. Radical-generating coordination complexes as tools for rapid and effective fragmentation and fluorescent labeling of nucleic acids for microchip hybridization.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J. J.; Chernov, B. K.; Tovstanovsky, I.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Bavykin, S. G.; Biochip Technology Center; Northwestern Univ.; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    2002-12-15

    DNA microchip technology is a rapid, high-throughput method for nucleic acid hybridization reactions. This technology requires random fragmentation and fluorescent labeling of target nucleic acids prior to hybridization. Radical-generating coordination complexes, such as 1,10-phenanthroline-Cu(II) (OP-Cu) and Fe(II)-EDTA (Fe-EDTA), have been commonly used as sequence nonspecific 'chemical nucleases' to introduce single-strand breaks in nucleic acids. Here we describe a new method based on these radical-generating complexes for random fragmentation and labeling of both single- and double-stranded forms of RNA and DNA. Nucleic acids labeled with the OP-Cu and the Fe-EDTA protocols revealed high hybridization specificity in hybridization with DNA microchips containing oligonucleotide probes selected for identification of 16S rRNA sequences of the Bacillus group microorganisms.We also demonstrated cDNA- and cRNA-labeling and fragmentation with this method. Both the OP-Cu and Fe-EDTA fragmentation and labeling procedures are quick and inexpensive compared to other commonly used methods. A column-based version of the described method does not require centrifugation and therefore is promising for the automation of sample preparations in DNA microchip technology as well as in other nucleic acid hybridization studies.

  19. Acidity characterization of heterogeneous catalysts by solid-state NMR spectroscopy using probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the surface acidic properties of solid acid catalysts is a key issue in heterogeneous catalysis. Important acid features of solid acids, such as their type (Brønsted vs. Lewis acid), distribution and accessibility (internal vs. external sites), concentration (amount), and strength of acid sites are crucial factors dictating their reactivity and selectivity. This short review provides information on different solid-state NMR techniques used for acidity characterization of solid acid catalysts. In particular, different approaches using probe molecules containing a specific nucleus of interest, such as pyridine-d5, 2-(13)C-acetone, trimethylphosphine, and trimethylphosphine oxide, are compared. Incorporation of valuable information (such as the adsorption structure, deprotonation energy, and NMR parameters) from density functional theory (DFT) calculations can yield explicit correlations between the chemical shift of adsorbed probe molecules and the intrinsic acid strength of solid acids. Methods that combine experimental NMR data with DFT calculations can therefore provide both qualitative and quantitative information on acid sites.

  20. Rapid detection of sequence variation in Clostridium difficile genes using LATE-PCR with multiple mismatch-tolerant hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Kenneth E; Khan, Huma; Mistry, Rohit; Goldenberg, Simon D; French, Gary L; Wangh, Lawrence J

    2012-11-01

    A novel molecular assay for Clostridium difficile was developed using Linear-After-The-Exponential polymerase chain reaction (LATE-PCR). Single-stranded DNA products generated by LATE-PCR were detected and distinguished by hybridization to fluorescent mismatch-tolerant probes, as the temperature was lowered after amplification in 5(°)C intervals between 65°C and 25°C. Single-tube multiplex reactions for tcdA, tcdB, tcdC, and cdtB (binary toxin) sequences were initially optimized using synthetic targets and were subsequently done using genomic DNA; each target was detected and characterized by hybridization to one or more probes of a different fluorescent color. In the case of tcdC, three probes, each labeled with a Quasar fluorophore, hybridize to different locations with known mutations, including the deletion at nucleotide 117 in ribotype 027 strains and the premature stop codon mutation at nucleotide 184 in ribotype 078 strains, each of which is associated with hypervirulent infections. These and other tcdC mutations were distinguished from the reference sequence, as well as from each other by changes in the fluorescent contour generated from the combined Quasar-labeled probes. Specific variations in tcdA and tcdB were also identified in the multiplex assay, including those that identified strains lacking toxin A production. This single closed-tube assay generates substantially more information about virulent C. difficile than currently available commercial assays and could be further expanded to provide strain typing.

  1. Tethered phytic acid as a probe for measuring phytase activity.

    PubMed

    Berry, Duane F; Berry, David A

    2005-06-15

    A novel approach for measuring phytase activity is presented. We have developed a new chromophoric substrate analog of phytic acid, 5-O-[6-(benzoylamino)hexyl]-d-myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,6-pentakisphosphate that permits direct measurement of the phosphate ester bond-cleavage reaction using HPLC. This compound, along with its dephosphorylated T-phosphatidylinositol intermediates, are quantified using reversed phase chromatography with UV detection.

  2. Probing lipid peroxidation by using linoleic acid and benzophenone.

    PubMed

    Andreu, Inmaculada; Neshchadin, Dmytro; Rico, Enrique; Griesser, Markus; Samadi, Abdelouahid; Morera, Isabel M; Gescheidt, Georg; Miranda, Miguel A

    2011-08-29

    A thorough mechanistic study has been performed on the reaction between benzophenone (BZP) and a series of 1,4-dienes, including 1,4-cyclohexadiene (CHD), 1,4-dihydro-2-methylbenzoic acid (MBA), 1,4-dihydro-1,2-dimethylbenzoic acid (DMBA) and linoleic acid (LA). A combination of steady-state photolysis, laser flash photolysis (LFP), and photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) have been used. Irradiation of BZP and CHD led to a cross-coupled sensitizer-diene product, together with 6, 7, and 8. With MBA and DMBA as hydrogen donors, photoproducts arising from cross-coupling of sensitizer and diene radicals were found; compound 7 was also obtained, but 6 and o-toluic acid were only isolated in the irradiation of BZP with MBA. Triplet lifetimes were determined in the absence and in the presence of several diene concentrations. All three model compounds showed similar reactivity (k(q) ≈10(8)  M(-1)  s(-1)) towards triplet excited BZP. Partly reversible hydrogen abstraction of the allylic hydrogen atoms of CHD, MBA, and DMBA was also detected by photo-CIDNP on different timescales. Polarizations of the diamagnetic products were in full agreement with the results derived from LFP. Finally, LA also underwent partly reversible hydrogen abstraction during photoreaction with BZP. Subsequent hydrogen transfer between primary radicals led to conjugated derivatives of LA. The unpaired electron spin population in linoleyl radical (LA(.)) was predominantly found on H(1-5) protons. To date, LA-related radicals were only reported upon hydrogen transfer from highly substituted model compounds by steady-state EPR spectroscopy. Herein, we have experimentally established the formation of LA(.) and shown that it converts into two dominating conjugated isomers on the millisecond timescale. Such processes are at the basis of alterations of membrane structures caused by oxidative stress.

  3. Probing fatty acid metabolism in bacteria, cyanobacteria, green microalgae and diatoms with natural and unnatural fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Abbriano, Raffaela; Finzel, Kara; Hildebrand, Mark; Burkart, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, fatty acid synthases are responsible for the biosynthesis of fatty acids in an iterative process, extending the fatty acid by two carbon units every cycle. Thus, odd numbered fatty acids are rarely found in nature. We tested whether representatives of diverse microbial phyla have the ability to incorporate odd-chain fatty acids as substrates for their fatty acid synthases and their downstream enzymes. We fed various odd and short chain fatty acids to the bacterium Escherichia coli, cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Major differences were observed, specifically in the ability among species to incorporate and elongate short chain fatty acids. We demonstrate that E. coli, C. reinhardtii, and T. pseudonana can produce longer fatty acid products from short chain precursors (C3 and C5), while Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacks this ability. However, Synechocystis can incorporate and elongate longer chain fatty acids due to acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasS) activity, and knockout of this protein eliminates the ability to incorporate these fatty acids. In addition, expression of a characterized AasS from Vibrio harveyii confers a similar capability to E. coli. The ability to desaturate exogenously added fatty acids was only observed in Synechocystis and C. reinhardtii. We further probed fatty acid metabolism of these organisms by feeding desaturase inhibitors to test the specificity of long-chain fatty acid desaturases. In particular, supplementation with thia fatty acids can alter fatty acid profiles based on the location of the sulfur in the chain. We show that coupling sensitive gas chromatography mass spectrometry to supplementation of unnatural fatty acids can reveal major differences between fatty acid metabolism in various organisms. Often unnatural fatty acids have antibacterial or even therapeutic properties. Feeding of short

  4. Babesia gibsoni: detection in blood smears and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues using deoxyribonucleic acid in situ hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Nakamura, Kensuke; Sasaki, Noboru; Murakami, Masahiro; Rajapakshage, Bandula Kumara Wickramasekara; Ohta, Hiroshi; Yamato, Osamu; Maede, Yoshimitsu; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to detect Babesia gibsoni in blood smears and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from B. gibsoni-infected dogs using in situ hybridization. Using a digoxigenin-conjugated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probe, both intraerythrocytic and exoerythrocytic parasites in the culture could be specifically stained in blood smears fixed with 4% phosphate-buffered paraformaldehyde. This indicated that genomic DNA extracted from the parasites could be detected using in situ hybridization. Moreover, the parasite could be specifically stained in paraffin-embedded spleen, lymph node, and kidney sections using in situ hybridization. Infected erythrocytes in blood vessels in the spleen and kidney, hemosiderin-laden macrophages in the spleen, and phagocytized erythrocytes, which seemed to be infected with the parasites, in lymph nodes were also specifically stained. This suggests that in situ hybridization can be utilized to investigate both the life cycle of B. gibsoni and the pathological condition of canine babesiosis.

  5. Electrostatic surface plasmon resonance: Direct electric field-induced hybridization and denaturation in monolayer nucleic acid films and label-free discrimination of base mismatches

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Richard J.; Peterson, Alexander W.; Georgiadis, Rosina M.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate that in situ optical surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy can be used to monitor hybridization kinetics for unlabeled DNA in tethered monolayer nucleic acid films on gold in the presence of an applied electrostatic field. The dc field can enhance or retard hybridization and can also denature surface-immobilized DNA duplexes. Discrimination between matched and mismatched hybrids is achieved by simple adjustment of the electrode potential. Although the electric field at the interface is extremely large, the tethered single-stranded DNA thiol probes remain bound and can be reused for subsequent hybridization reactions without loss of efficiency. Only capacitive charging currents are drawn; redox reactions are avoided by maintaining the gold electrode potential within the ideally polarizable region. Because of potential-induced changes in the shape of the surface plasmon resonance curve, we account for the full curve rather than simply the shift in the resonance minimum. PMID:11259682

  6. Experimental characterization of the lower hybrid wave field on the first pass using a magnetic probe array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinya, T.; Baek, S. G.; Wallace, G. M.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Takase, Y.

    2016-10-01

    Experimental characterization of the lower hybrid (LH) wave propagation from the launcher to the core plasma is important to validate an antenna spectrum model and to identify parasitic wave-edge plasma interactions occurring in front of the launcher. On Alcator C-Mod, the wave frequency spectrum and dominant parallel wavenumber are characterized with two probe arrays installed near the edge plasma. The first one is mounted on a radially movable structure that is about 108 deg toroidally away from the launcher. A phasing scan experiment at moderate density suggests a resonance-cone propagation of the launched slow LH wave with a finite spectral width. As plasma density is raised, the measured power decreases, correlated with the observed loss of efficiency. Recently, the second probe array with an increased number of probes has been installed on a limiter that is 54 deg. toroidally away from the launcher, which is expected to be dominantly sensitive to the wave-field directly leaving the launcher. An initial measurement shows that the probe array detects a coherent wave field. A full-wave model to evaluate the wave electric-field pattern in front of the probe array is under development. If available, further experimental and modeling results will be presented. Supported by USDoE Award(s) DE-FC02-99ER54512 and Japan/U.S. Cooperation in Fusion Research and Development.

  7. Intra-albumin migration of bound fatty acid probed by spin label ESR

    SciTech Connect

    Gurachevsky, Andrey . E-mail: a.gurachevsky@medinnovation.de; Shimanovitch, Ekaterina; Gurachevskaya, Tatjana; Muravsky, Vladimir

    2007-09-07

    Conventional ESR spectra of 16-doxyl-stearic acid bound to bovine and human serum albumin were recorded at different temperatures in order to investigate the status of spin-labeled fatty acid in the interior of the protein globule. A computer spectrum simulation of measured spectra, performed by non-linear least-squares fits, clearly showed two components corresponding to strongly and weakly immobilized fatty acid molecules. The two-component model was verified on spectra measured at different pH. Thermodynamic parameters of the spin probe exchange between two spin probe states were analyzed. It was concluded that at physiological conditions, fatty acid molecules permanently migrate in the globule interior between the specific binding sites and a space among albumin domains.

  8. Optimization of a peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) method for the detection of bacteria and disclosure of a formamide effect.

    PubMed

    Santos, Rita S; Guimarães, Nuno; Madureira, Pedro; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2014-10-10

    Despite the fact that fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a well-established technique to identify microorganisms, there is a lack of understanding concerning the interaction of the different factors affecting the obtained fluorescence. In here, we used flow cytometry to study the influence of three essential factors in hybridization - temperature, time and formamide concentration - in an effort to optimize the performance of a Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) probe targeting bacteria (EUB338). The PNA-FISH optimization was performed with bacteria representing different families employing response surface methodology. Surprisingly, the optimum concentration of formamide varied according to the bacterium tested. While hybridization on the bacteria possessing the thickest peptidoglycan was more successful at nearly 50% (v/v) formamide, hybridization on all other microorganisms appeared to improve with much lower formamide concentrations. Gram staining and transmission electron microscopy allowed us to confirm that the overall effect of formamide concentration on the fluorescence intensity is a balance between a harmful effect on the bacterial cell envelope, affecting cellular integrity, and the beneficial denaturant effect in the hybridization process. We also conclude that microorganisms belonging to different families will require different hybridization parameters for the same FISH probe, meaning that an optimum universal PNA-FISH procedure is non-existent for these situations.

  9. Sets of RNA Repeated Tags and Hybridization-Sensitive Fluorescent Probes for Distinct Images of RNA in a Living Cell

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Takeshi; Ikeda, Shuji; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Yuki, Mizue; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2010-01-01

    Background Imaging the behavior of RNA in a living cell is a powerful means for understanding RNA functions and acquiring spatiotemporal information in a single cell. For more distinct RNA imaging in a living cell, a more effective chemical method to fluorescently label RNA is now required. In addition, development of the technology labeling with different colors for different RNA would make it easier to analyze plural RNA strands expressing in a cell. Methodology/Principal Findings Tag technology for RNA imaging in a living cell has been developed based on the unique chemical functions of exciton-controlled hybridization-sensitive oligonucleotide (ECHO) probes. Repetitions of selected 18-nucleotide RNA tags were incorporated into the mRNA 3′-UTR. Pairs with complementary ECHO probes exhibited hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission for the mRNA expressed in a living cell. The mRNA in a nucleus was detected clearly as fluorescent puncta, and the images of the expression of two mRNAs were obtained independently and simultaneously with two orthogonal tag–probe pairs. Conclusions/Significance A compact and repeated label has been developed for RNA imaging in a living cell, based on the photochemistry of ECHO probes. The pairs of an 18-nt RNA tag and the complementary ECHO probes are highly thermostable, sequence-specifically emissive, and orthogonal to each other. The nucleotide length necessary for one tag sequence is much shorter compared with conventional tag technologies, resulting in easy preparation of the tag sequences with a larger number of repeats for more distinct RNA imaging. PMID:20885944

  10. Construction and Use of a Nonradioactive DNA Hybridization Probe for Detection of Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato on Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Cuppels, D. A.; Moore, R. A.; Morris, V. L.

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, the causal agent for bacterial speck of tomato, produces the phytotoxin coronatine. A 5.3-kilobase XhoI fragment from the chromosomal region controlling toxin production was cloned into the plasmid pGB2, and the resulting recombinant plasmid, pTPR1, was tested for its ability to serve as a diagnostic probe for P. syringae pv. tomato. In a survey of 75 plant-associated bacteria, pTPR1 hybridized exclusively to those strains that produced coronatine. The detection limit for this probe, which was labeled with the Chemiprobe nonradioactive reporter system, was approximately 4 × 103 CFU of lesion bacteria. During the 1989 growing season, a total of 258 leaf and fruit lesions from nine tomato fields were screened for P. syringae pv. tomato by using pTPR1 and the culture method of detection. The best agreement between the two methods, 90%, occurred early in the season with samples taken from relatively young (5-week-old) plants. Young plants also had a higher percentage of P. syringae pv. tomato-positive lesions. P. syringae pv. tomato was the only coronatine producer recovered from the nine tomato fields. All 244 P. syringae pv. tomato strains isolated during this study reacted strongly with the probe. The P. syringae pv. tomato population of healthy field tomato leaves was determined by a pTPR1 colony hybridization procedure. Every probe-positive colony that was isolated and characterized was identified as P. syringae pv. tomato. The pTPR1 probe should expedite disease diagnosis and facilitate epidemiological studies of this pathogen. It also should aid in screening transplant seedlings for bacterial speck infestation. Images PMID:16348215

  11. Molecular imaging of biothiols and in vitro diagnostics based on an organic chromophore bearing a terbium hybrid probe.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhan; Wang, Qianming; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Gao, Jinwei

    2016-04-25

    In this research, a novel terbium-based luminescent hybrid inorganic/organic probe was designed and synthesized. Mesoporous silica nanospheres dispersed in water were used as the appropriate host for the covalently linked lanthanide-containing organic structures. The lanthanide structure was linked to a sulfonate ester unit, which, in the presence of biothiols, was cleaved to result in terbium emission. The hybrid probe exhibited the capabilities of quantitative determination and detection limits for biothiols were presented (36.8 nM for Cys, 32.5 nM for GSH, and 34.7 nM for Hcy). Evaluation of luminescence changes in cell culture demonstrated that this smart probe is cell membrane permeable and selectively lights up in the presence of cysteine and glutathione in human embryonic kidney cells and human lung adenocarcinoma cells. This variation in the presence of biothiols can be controlled by the treatment with N-methylmaleimide. The narrow line-like bands and long-lived excited states of this terbium luminescent sensor allows the discrimination of scattering signals and interfering fluorescence derived from biological tissues.

  12. Bioavailability of xenobiotics in unsaturated soils – implications for nucleic acid based stable isotope probing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of stable isotopes to label phylogenetically informative biomolecules (phospholipid fatty acids, DNA, or RNA), typically referred to as stable isotope probing (SIP) has the potential of providing definitive evidence that a detected population is active in a specific process, if that process ...

  13. Variability in coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) germplasm and hybrids for fatty acid profile of oil.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Naresh

    2011-12-28

    Coconut oil, the main product of coconut fruit, is the richest source of glycerol and lauric acid and hence is called lauric oil. This paper reports the fatty acid profile of oil from 60 Talls, 14 Dwarfs, and 34 hybrids. These include collections from 13 countries covering a large coconut-growing area of the world, apart from the indigenous ones. Capillary gas chromatography analysis of oil indicated a wider variation for the fatty acid profile than earlier reported. Apart from this, for the first time other fatty acids such as behenic and lignoceric acids were detected. Oil from cultivars and hybrids of coconut has significantly differed, particularly for commercially important fatty acids such as lauric acid and unsaturated fatty acids. However, coconut oil seems to have a conserved fatty acid profile, mainly because of low unsaturated fatty acids, indicating the possibility of grouping cultivars on the basis of their fatty acid profiles. The cluster analysis based on fatty acid profile indicated grouping together of geographically and typically closely related cultivars. Cultivars with high concentrations of specific fatty acids can be of potential use for industrial exploitation, whereas those with high concentrations of short- and medium-chain fatty acids and unsaturated fatty acids are more suitable for human consumption. Cultivars and hybrids with high and low values for each of the fatty acids are also identified.

  14. Design, Synthesis and Microbiological Evaluation of Ampicillin Tetramic acid Hybrid Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Philip T.; Deshpande, Aditi; Cheramie, Martin N.; Bruhn, David F.; Hurdle, Julian G.; Lee, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting iron-uptake pathways by conjugating β-lactam antibiotics with iron-chelators such as catechol and hydroxamic acid is a proven strategy to overcome permeability-related resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. Since naturally occurring iron chelating tetramic acids have not been previously examined for this purpose, an exploratory series of novel ampicillin-tetramic acid hybrids that structurally resemble ureidopenicillins was designed and synthesized. The new analogs were evaluated for the ability to chelate iron and their MIC activities determined against a representative panel of clinically significant bacterial pathogens. The tetramic acid β-lactam hybrids demonstrated a high affinity to iron in the order of 10−30 M3. The hybrids were less active against Gram-positive bacteria. However, against Gram-negative bacteria, their activity was species dependent with several hybrids displaying improved activity over ampicillin against wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The anti-Gram-negative activities of the hybrids improved in the presence of clavulanic acid revealing that the tetramic acid moiety did not provide added protection against β-lactamases. Additionally, the hybrids were found to be efflux pump substrates as their activities markedly improved against pump-inactivated strains. Unlike the catechol and hydroxamic acid siderophore β-lactam conjugates, the activities of the hybrids did not improve under iron-deficient conditions. These results suggest that the tetramic acid hybrids gain permeability via different membrane receptors, or they are out competed by native bacterial siderophores with stronger affinities for iron. This study provides a foundation for the further exploitation of the tetramic acid moiety to achieve novel β-lactam anti-Gram-negative agents, providing that efflux and β-lactamase mediated resistance is addressed. PMID:27189120

  15. Paper-based solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization assay using immobilized quantum dots as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Noor, M Omair; Shahmuradyan, Anna; Krull, Ulrich J

    2013-02-05

    A paper-based solid-phase assay is presented for transduction of nucleic acid hybridization using immobilized quantum dots (QDs) as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The surface of paper was modified with imidazole groups to immobilize QD-probe oligonucleotide conjugates that were assembled in solution. Green-emitting QDs (gQDs) were FRET-paired with Cy3 acceptor. Hybridization of Cy3-labeled oligonucleotide targets provided the proximity required for FRET-sensitized emission from Cy3, which served as an analytical signal. The assay exhibited rapid transduction of nucleic acid hybridization within minutes. Without any amplification steps, the limit of detection of the assay was found to be 300 fmol with the upper limit of the dynamic range at 5 pmol. The implementation of glutathione-coated QDs for the development of nucleic acid hybridization assay integrated on a paper-based platform exhibited excellent resistance to nonspecific adsorption of oligonucleotides and showed no reduction in the performance of the assay in the presence of large quantities of noncomplementary DNA. The selectivity of nucleic acid hybridization was demonstrated by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection at a contrast ratio of 19 to 1. The reuse of paper over multiple cycles of hybridization and dehybridization was possible, with less than 20% reduction in the performance of the assay in five cycles. This work provides an important framework for the development of paper-based solid-phase QD-FRET nucleic acid hybridization assays that make use of a ratiometric approach for detection and analysis.

  16. Ultrasensitive flow injection chemiluminescence detection of DNA hybridization using signal DNA probe modified with Au and CuS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shusheng; Zhong, Hua; Ding, Caifeng

    2008-10-01

    A novel and sensitive flow injection chemiluminescence assay for sequence-specific DNA detection based on signal amplification with nanoparticles (NPs) is reported in the present work. The "sandwich-type" DNA biosensor was fabricated with the thiol-functionalized capture DNA first immobilized on an Au electrode and hybridized with one end of target DNA, the other end of which was recognized with a signal DNA probe labeled with CuS NPs and Au NPs on the 3'- and 5'-terminus, respectively. The hybridization events were monitored by the CL intensity of luminol-H2O2-Cu(2+) after the cupric ions were dissolved from the hybrids. We demonstrated that the incorporation of Au NPs in this sensor design significantly enhanced the sensitivity and the selectivity because a single Au NP can be loaded with hundreds of signal DNA probe strands, which were modified with CuS NPs. The ratios of Au NPs, signal DNA probes, and CuS NPs modified on the gold electrode were approximately 1/101/103. A preconcentration process of cupric ions performed by anodic stripping voltammetry technology further increased the sensor performance. As a result of these two combined effects, this DNA sensor could detect as low as femtomolar target DNA and exhibited excellent selectivity against two-base mismatched DNA. Under the optimum conditions, the CL intensity was increased with the increase of the concentration of target DNA in the range of 2.0 x 10(-14)-2.0 x 10(-12) M. A detection limit of 4.8 x 10(-15) M target DNA was achieved.

  17. Synthesis of organic/inorganic hybrid gel with acid activated clay after γ-ray radiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyun; Lee, Hoik; Sohn, Daewon

    2014-08-01

    A hybrid gel was prepared from acid activated clay (AA clay) and acrylic acid by gamma ray irradiation. Irradiated inorganic particles which have peroxide groups act as initiator because it generates oxide radicals by increasing temperature. Inorganic nanoparticles which are rigid part in hybrid gel also contribute to increase the mechanical property as a crosslinker. We prepared two hybrid gels to compare the effect of acid activated treatment of clay; one is synthesized with raw clay particles and another is synthesized with AA clay particles. The composition and structure of AA clay particles and raw clay particles were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence instrument and surface area analyzer. And chemical and physical property of hybrid gel with different ratios of acrylic acid and clay particle was tested by Raman spectroscope and universal testing machine (UTM). The synthesized hydrogel with 76% gel contents can elongated approximately 1000% of its original size.

  18. Trimethylamine as a probe molecule to differentiate acid sites in Y-FAU zeolite: FTIR study.

    PubMed

    Sarria, Francisca Romero; Blasin-Aubé, Vanessa; Saussey, Jacques; Marie, Olivier; Daturi, Marco

    2006-07-06

    In heterogeneous catalysis acidity has a very important influence on activity and selectivity: correct determination of acidic properties is a base to improve industrial processes. The aim of this work was to study trimethylamine (TMA) as a probe molecule able to distinguish between the different Brønsted acid sites in zeolitic frameworks. Our work mainly focused on faujasite-type zeolites because the HY zeolite is one of the most used acidic catalysts in industrial processes. In this paper, typical IR bands assigned to TMA-protonated species (formed in supercages) are detected in the HY zeolite. TMA interacting by hydrogen bonding with the acid sites located in the sodalite units is also observed. The wavenumbers of some typical IR bands assigned to TMA-protonated species appear to depend on the acidic strength, and a complementary study with ZSM-5 and X-FAU samples confirms this proposition.

  19. Detection of human cytomegalovirus by slot-blot hybridization assay employing oligo-primed /sup 32/P-labelled probe

    SciTech Connect

    Agha, S.A.; Coleman, J.C.; Selwyn, S.; Mahmound, L.A.; Abd-Elaal, A.M.; Archard, L.C.

    1988-12-01

    A /sup 32/P-labelled Hind III-0 DNA fragment (nine Kilobases; Kb) from human cytomegalovirus AD-169 (HCMV) was used in slot-blot hybridization assay for the detection of HCMV in clinical samples. The results obtained with DNA hybridization assay (DNA HA) were compared with virus isolation using conventional tube cell culture (CTC) and centrifugation vial culture (CVC), immunofluorescence (IF), and complement fixation test (CFT). Of 15 CTC-positive samples, 13 were positive with DNA HA (sensitivity 86.7%). Also, 14 additional samples were DNA HA-positive but CTC-negative. CVC and/or IF confirmed the diagnosis in nine of 14; the remaining five samples were from three patients who showed fourfold rising antibody titre by CFT. Although DNA HA using /sup 32/P-labelled probes is relatively cumbersome and expensive, it is a valuable test for quantitation of viral shedding in patients with HCMV infections who may benefit from antiviral therapy.

  20. Catalytic performance of hybrid nanocatalyst for levulinic acid production from glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ya'aini, Nazlina; Amin, Nor Aishah Saidina

    2012-11-01

    Levulinic acid is one of the potential and versatile biomass-derived chemicals. Product analysis via HPLC revealed that the heterogeneous dehydration of glucose over hybrid nanocatalyst exhibited better performance compared to single catalyst. Hybrid nanocatalyst containing H-Y zeolite and CrCl3 could substitute homogenous acid catalyst for attaining high levulinic acid yield. Different CrC3 and H-Y zeolite weight ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1 were prepared according to the wetness impregnation method. The hybrid catalyst with a 1:1 weight ratio performed better compared to others with the highest levulinic acid yield reported (93.5%) at 140 °C, 180 min reaction time, 0.1 g catalyst loading and 0.1 g glucose feed. Characterization results revealed that properties such as surface area, mesoporosity and acidic strength of the catalyst have significant effects on glucose dehydration for levulinic acid production.

  1. Measuring nanometer distances in nucleic acids using a sequence-independent nitroxide probe

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Peter Z; Haworth, Ian S; Cai, Qi; Kusnetzow, Ana K; Grant, Gian Paola G; Price, Eric A; Sowa, Glenna Z; Popova, Anna; Herreros, Bruno; He, Honghang

    2008-01-01

    This protocol describes the procedures for measuring nanometer distances in nucleic acids using a nitroxide probe that can be attached to any nucleotide within a given sequence. Two nitroxides are attached to phosphorothioates that are chemically substituted at specific sites of DNA or RNA. Inter-nitroxide distances are measured using a four-pulse double electron–electron resonance technique, and the measured distances are correlated to the parent structures using a Web-accessible computer program. Four to five days are needed for sample labeling, purification and distance measurement. The procedures described herein provide a method for probing global structures and studying conformational changes of nucleic acids and protein/nucleic acid complexes. PMID:17947978

  2. Application of rRNA probes and fluorescence in situ hybridization for rapid detection of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xianghai; Yu, Rencheng; Zhou, Mingjiang; Yu, Zhigang

    2012-03-01

    The dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum is often associated with harmful algal blooms (HABs). This species consists of many strains that differ in their ability to produce toxins but have similar morphology, making identification difficult. In this study, species-specific rRNA probes were designed for whole-cell fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to distinguish A. minutum from two phylogenetic clades. We acquired the complete SSU to LSU rDNA sequences (GenBank accession numbers JF906989-JF906999) of 11 Alexandrium strains and used these to design rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes. Three ribotype-specific probes, M-GC-1, M-PC-2, and M-PC-3, were designed. The former is specific for the GC clade ("Global clade") of A. minutum, the majority of which have been found non-toxic, and the latter two are specific for the PSP (paralytic shellfish poisoning)-producing PC clade ("Pacific clade"). The specificity of these three probes was confirmed by FISH. All cells in observed fields of view were fluorescently labeled when probes and target species were incubated under optimized FISH conditions. However, the accessibility of rRNA molecules in ribosomes varied among the probe binding positions. Thus, there was variation in the distribution of positive signals in labeled cells within nucleolus and cytosol (M-GC-1, M-PC-3), or just nucleolus (M-PC-2). Our results provide a methodological basis for studying the biogeography and population dynamics of A. minutum, and providing an early warning of toxic HABs.

  3. Modeling aqueous ozone/UV process using oxalic acid as probe chemical.

    PubMed

    Garoma, Temesgen; Gurol, Mirat D

    2005-10-15

    A kinetic model that describes the removal of organic pollutants by an ozone/UV process is described. Oxalic acid, which reacts with a very low rate constant with ozone and relatively high rate constant with hydroxyl radical (OH*), was used as the probe chemical to model the process. The model was verified by experimental data on concentrations of oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H202) under various experimental conditions, i.e., ozone gas dosage, UV light intensity, and varying oxalic acid concentrations.

  4. Validation of break-apart and fusion MYC probes using a digital fluorescence in situ hybridization capture and imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Michael; Rowe, Leslie; Clement, Parker W.; Miles, Rodney R.; Salama, Mohamed E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Detection of MYC translocations using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is important in the evaluation of lymphomas, in particular, Burkitt lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Our aim was to validate a digital FISH capture and imaging system for the detection of MYC 8q24 translocations using LSI-MYC (a break-apart probe) and MYC 8;14 translocation using IGH-MYC (a fusion probe). Materials and Methods: LSI-MYC probe was evaluated using tissue sections from 35 patients. IGH-MYC probe was evaluated using tissue sections from forty patients. Sections were processed for FISH and analyzed using traditional methods. FISH slides were then analyzed using the GenASIs capture and analysis system. Results: Results for LSI-MYC had a high degree of correlation between traditional method of FISH analysis and digital FISH analysis. Results for IGH-MYC had a 100% concordance between traditional method of FISH analysis and digital FISH analysis. Conclusion: Annotated whole slide images of H and E and FISH sections can be digitally aligned, so that areas of tumor within a section can be matched and evaluated with a greater degree of accuracy. Images can be archived permanently, providing a means for examining the results retrospectively. Digital FISH imaging of the MYC translocations provides a better diagnostic tool compared to traditional methods for evaluating lymphomas. PMID:27217970

  5. Local density probing of atomic gas via cold Li-Ca+ inelastic collisions in an atom-ion hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Ryoichi; Haze, Shinsuke; Fujinaga, Munekazu; Kyuno, Kazuki; Mukaiyama, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold atoms in a harmonic trap inevitably has an inhomogeneous density distribution, which makes an atomic gas an ensemble of atoms in different physical phases. Recent technical advances in the determination of local physical quantities in an atomic gas overcome this complexity and make it possible to directly compare experimental results with many-body theories of a homogeneous atomic gas. A laser-cooled ion can be used as a high-spatial resolution probe of physical quantities of an atomic gas. The spatial spread of an ion can be reduced to sub-microns, which is even small enough for the application of the local probe of atoms in optical lattices. In our experiment, we constructed Li and Ca+ ultracold hybrid system and observed inelastic collisions as a loss of ions. The inelastic collision is confirmed to be a charge-exchange process, whose rate depends linearly on the local atomic density. From the measurement of the rate of the charge-exchange, we can reproduce an atomic density profile. This is an important step toward a local probe of physical quantities of atoms with cold ions. In this presentation, we report on the observation of charge-exchange collisions between Li atom and Ca+ ions, and discuss the feasibility of the ions as a probe of the atoms.

  6. Sensitive electrochemical detection of telomerase activity using spherical nucleic acids gold nanoparticles triggered mimic-hybridization chain reaction enzyme-free dual signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Jing; Li, Jing-Jing; Rui, Kai; Gai, Pan-Pan; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-03-03

    We report an electrochemical sensor for telomerase activity detection based on spherical nucleic acids gold nanoparticles (SNAs AuNPs) triggered mimic-hybridization chain reaction (mimic-HCR) enzyme-free dual signal amplification. In the detection strategy, SNAs AuNPs and two hairpin probes were employed. SNAs AuNPs as the primary amplification element, not only hybridized with the telomeric repeats on the electrode to amplify signal but also initiated the subsequent secondary amplification, mimic-hybridization chain reaction of two hairpin probes. If the cells' extracts were positive for telomerase activity, SNAs AuNPs could be captured on the electrode. The carried initiators could trigger an alternative hybridization reaction of two hairpin probes that yielded nicked double helices. The signal was further amplified enzyme-free by numerous hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride ([Ru(NH3)6](3+), RuHex) inserting into double-helix DNA long chain by electrostatic interaction, each of which could generate an electrochemical signal at appropriate potential. With this method, a detection limit of down to 2 HeLa cells and a dynamic range of 10-10,000 cells were achieved. Telomerase activities of different cell lines were also successfully evaluated.

  7. Dominant microbial composition and its vertical distribution in saline meromictic Lake Kaiike (Japan) as revealed by quantitative oligonucleotide probe membrane hybridization.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Yoshikazu; Kojima, Hisaya; Fukui, Manabu

    2004-08-01

    Vertical distributions of dominant bacterial populations in saline meromictic Lake Kaiike were investigated throughout the water column and sediment by quantitative oligonucleotide probe membrane hybridization. Three oligonucleotide probes specific for the small-subunit (SSU) rRNA of three groups of Chlorobiaceae were newly designed. In addition, three general domain (Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya)-specific probes, two delta-Proteobacteria-specific probes, a Chlorobiaceae-specific probe, and a Chloroflexi-specific probe were used after optimization of their washing conditions. The abundance of the sum of SSU rRNAs hybridizing with probes specific for three groups of Chlorobiaceae relative to total SSU rRNA peaked in the chemocline, accounting for up to 68%. The abundance of the delta-proteobacterial SSU rRNA relative to total SSU rRNA rapidly increased just below the chemocline up to 29% in anoxic water and peaked at the 2- to 3-cm sediment depth at ca. 34%. The abundance of SSU rRNAs hybridizing with the probe specific for the phylum Chloroflexi relative to total SSU rRNA was highest (31 to 54%) in the top of the sediment but then steeply declined with depth and became stable at 11 to 19%, indicating the robust coexistence of sulfate-reducing bacteria and Chloroflexi in the top of the sediment. Any SSU rRNA of Chloroflexi in the water column was under the detection limit. The summation of the signals of group-specific probes used in this study accounted for up to 89% of total SSU rRNA, suggesting that the DGGE-oligonucleotide probe hybridization approach, in contrast to conventional culture-dependent approaches, was very effective in covering dominant populations.

  8. Ternary surface monolayers for ultrasensitive (zeptomole) amperometric detection of nucleic acid hybridization without signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Campuzano, Susana; Halford, Colin; Haake, David A; Wang, Joseph

    2010-11-01

    A ternary surface monolayer, consisting of coassembled thiolated capture probe, mercaptohexanol and dithiothreitol, is shown to offer dramatic improvements in the signal-to-noise characteristics of electrochemical DNA hybridization biosensors based on common self-assembled monolayers. Remarkably low detection limits down to 40 zmol (in 4 μL samples) as well as only 1 CFU Escherichia coli per sensor are thus obtained without any additional amplification step in connection to the commonly used horseradish peroxidase/3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine system. Such dramatic improvements in the detection limits (compared to those of common binary alkanethiol interfaces and to those of most electrochemical DNA sensing strategies without target or signal amplification) are attributed primarily to the remarkably higher resistance to nonspecific adsorption. This reflects the highly compact layer (with lower pinhole density) produced by the coupling of the cyclic- and linear-configuration "backfillers" that leads to a remarkably low background noise even in the presence of complex sample matrixes. A wide range of surface compositions have been investigated, and the ternary mixed monolayer has been systematically optimized. Detailed impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetric studies shed useful insights into the surface coverage. The impressive sensitivity and high specificity of the simple developed methodology indicate great promise for a wide range of nucleic acid testing, including clinical diagnostics, biothreat detection, food safety, and forensic analysis.

  9. Toward a multiplexed solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization assay using quantum dots as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Algar, W Russ; Krull, Ulrich J

    2009-05-15

    Solid-phase assays using immobilized quantum dots (QDs) as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed for the selective detection of nucleic acids. QDs were immobilized on optical fibers and conjugated with probe oligonucleotides. Hybridization with acceptor labeled target oligonucleotides generated FRET-sensitized acceptor fluorescence that was used as the analytical signal. A sandwich assay was also introduced and avoided the need for target labeling. Green and red emitting CdSe/ZnS QDs were used as donors with Cy3 and Alexa Fluor 647 acceptors, respectively. Quantitative measurements were made via spectrofluorimetry or fluorescence microscopy. Detection limits as low as 1 nM were obtained, and the discrimination of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with contrast ratios as high as 31:1 was possible. The assays retained their selectivity and at least 50% of their signal when tested in bovine serum and against a large background of noncomplementary genomic DNA. Mixed films of the two colors of QD and two probe oligonucleotide sequences were prepared for multiplexed solid-phase hybridization assays. It was possible to simultaneously detect two target sequences with retention of selectivity, including SNP discrimination. This research provides an important precedent and framework for the future development of QD-based bioassays and biosensors.

  10. Lead-acid batteries in micro-hybrid vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Joern; Meissner, Eberhard; Shirazi, Sepehr

    More and more vehicles hit the European automotive market, which comprise some type of micro-hybrid functionality to improve fuel efficiency and reduce emissions. Most carmakers already offer at least one of their vehicles with an optional engine start/stop system, while some other models are sold with micro-hybrid functions implemented by default. But these car concepts show a wide variety in detail-the term "micro-hybrid" may mean a completely different functionality in one vehicle model compared to another. Accordingly, also the battery technologies are not the same. There is a wide variety of batteries from standard flooded and enhanced flooded to AGM which all are claimed to be "best choice" for micro-hybrid applications. A technical comparison of micro-hybrid cars available on the European market has been performed. Different classes of cars with different characteristics have been identified. Depending on the scope and characteristics of micro-hybrid functions, as well as on operational strategies implemented by the vehicle makers, the battery operating duties differ significantly between these classes of vehicles. Additional laboratory investigations have been carried out to develop an understanding of effects observed in batteries operated in micro-hybrid vehicles pursuing different strategies, to identify limitations for applications of different battery technologies.

  11. Immobilization of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots on glass beads for the detection of nucleic acid hybridization using fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algar, W. Russ; Krull, Ulrich J.

    2011-03-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) properties of quantum dots (QD) are of significant interest in the development of new methods for bioanalysis. Multiplexed solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization assays that use immobilized QDs as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are one such example, and offer several unique advantages over other methods. In this work, new interfacial chemistry is described for the immobilization of red-emitting CdSe/ZnS QDs on glass beads for use in hybridization assays. The beads were chemically modified with a dithiolate surface ligand and the QDs immobilized via self-assembly. Further derivatization of the QDs with dithiolate-terminated probe oligonucleotides enabled a hybridization assay that could detect unlabeled target down to nanomolar levels with discrimination of single base-pair mismatches. The use of beads as an immobilization platform afforded shorter analysis times and superior reusability compared to previous studies using optical fibers. Hybridization between probe, target, and Alexa Fluor 647 (A647) labeled reporter oligonucleotides in a sandwich format generated a spectroscopic signal by introducing the proximity needed for FRET between the QDs and A647. The results indicate clear directions for the optimization of solid-phase hybridization assays, and are important for the future development of true multiplexed biosensors based on QDs and FRET.

  12. Development of specific fluorescent oligonucleotide probes for in situ identification of wine lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Blasco, Lucía; Ferrer, Sergi; Pardo, Isabel

    2003-08-08

    A rapid method for the identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from wine has been developed. This method is based on fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), using fluorescent oligonucleotide probes, homologous to 16S rDNA of those species of LAB commonly found in wines. The protocol for the specific detection of these bacteria was established through the hybridisation of 36 reference strains. The specificity of the probes was evaluated by using pure cultures. Probes were used to identify species in different wines, making it evident that direct identification and quantification from natural samples without culturing is also possible. The results show that FISH is a promising technique for the rapid identification of LAB, allowing positive identification in a few hours (4-16 h).

  13. Optimization of levulinic acid from lignocellulosic biomass using a new hybrid catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ya'aini, Nazlina; Amin, Nor Aishah Saidina; Asmadi, Mohd

    2012-07-01

    Conversion of glucose, empty fruit bunch (efb) and kenaf to levulinic acid over a new hybrid catalyst has been investigated in this study. The characterization and catalytic performance results revealed that the physico-chemical properties of the new hybrid catalyst comprised of chromium chloride and HY zeolite increased the levulinic acid production from glucose compared to the parent catalysts. Optimization of the glucose conversion process using two level full factorial designs (2(3)) with two center points reported 55.2% of levulinic acid yield at 145.2 °C, 146.7 min and 12.0% of reaction temperature, reaction time and catalyst loading, respectively. Subsequently, the potential of efb and kenaf for producing levulinic acid at the optimum conditions was established after 53.2% and 66.1% of efficiencies were reported. The observation suggests that the hybrid catalyst has a potential to be used in biomass conversion to levulinic acid.

  14. Deoxyribonucleic acid-ribonucleic acid hybridization studies on the L-Arabinose operon of Escherichia coli B-r.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, G; Singer, J; Heffernan, L

    1971-10-01

    An increase in the rate of synthesis of ara-specific messenger ribonucleic acid as measured by deoxyribonucleic acid-ribonucleic acid hybridization has been detected in the induced wild-type (ara(+)) strain of Escherichia coli B/r as compared with the uninduced control, thus providing evidence that regulation of the positively controlled l-arabinose operon is at the level of transcription.

  15. Electron spin echo modulation studies of doxylstearic acid spin probes in frozen vesicles: Interaction of the spin probe with D sub 2 O and effects of cholesterol addition

    SciTech Connect

    Hiff, T.; Kevan, L. )

    1989-02-23

    Electron spin echo studies have been carried out for a series of x-doxylstearic acid (x = 5, 7, 10, 12 and 16) spin probes in frozen deuteriated aqueous solutions of phospholipid vesicles and cationic dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride (DODAC) vesicles. Modulation effects due to interactions of the nitroxide group of the spin probes with D{sub 2}O give information about the conformations of the probes and the degree of hydration of the surfactant headgroups as well as about the degree of packing of the alkyl chain. We show that DODAC headgroups are more hydrated than choline headgroups and that the doxylstearic acid probes show a larger tendency for bending in DODAC vesicles than in phospholipid vesicles. Upon addition of cholesterol into phospholipid vesicles, the headgroups are separated and their degree of hydration increases.

  16. Formation of a hybrid plasmonic waveguide mode probed by dispersion measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, H.; Kurata, H.

    2015-04-07

    Hybrid waveguides, i.e., dielectric waveguides combined with plasmonic waveguides, have great potential for concomitantly exhibiting subwavelength confinement and long range propagation, enabling a highly integrated photonic circuit. We report the characterization of hybrid waveguide modes excited in Si/SiO{sub 2}/Al films, by dispersion measurement using angle-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy. This experiment directly verifies the formation of the hybrid waveguide mode with a strongly localized electromagnetic field in a 6-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer. The results clearly describe the characteristic behavior of the hybrid waveguide mode, which depends on the effective index of the constituent dielectric waveguide and the surface plasmon-polariton modes.

  17. Strategies for optimizing DNA hybridization on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ravan, Hadi; Kashanian, Soheila; Sanadgol, Nima; Badoei-Dalfard, Arastoo; Karami, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Specific and predictable hybridization of the polynucleotide sequences to their complementary counterparts plays a fundamental role in the rational design of new nucleic acid nanodevices. Generally, nucleic acid hybridization can be performed using two major strategies, namely hybridization of DNA or RNA targets to surface-tethered oligonucleotide probes (solid-phase hybridization) and hybridization of the target nucleic acids to randomly distributed probes in solution (solution-phase hybridization). Investigations into thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of these two strategies showed that hybridization on surfaces is less favorable than that of the same sequence in solution. Indeed, the efficiency of DNA hybridization on surfaces suffers from three constraints: (1) electrostatic repulsion between DNA strands on the surface, (2) steric hindrance between tethered DNA probes, and (3) nonspecific adsorption of the attached oligonucleotides to the solid surface. During recent years, several strategies have been developed to overcome the problems associated with DNA hybridization on surfaces. Optimizing the probe surface density, application of a linker between the solid surface and the DNA-recognizing sequence, optimizing the pH of DNA hybridization solutions, application of thiol reagents, and incorporation of a polyadenine block into the terminal end of the recognizing sequence are among the most important strategies for enhancing DNA hybridization on surfaces.

  18. Cassava interspecific hybrids with increased protein content and improved amino acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Gomes, P T C; Nassar, N M A

    2013-04-12

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is a principal food for large populations of poor people in the tropics and subtropics. Its edible roots are poor in protein and lack several essential amino acids. Interspecific hybrids may acquire high protein characteristics from wild species. We analyzed 19 hybrids of M. esculenta with its wild relative, M. oligantha, for crude protein, amino acid profile, and total cyanide. Some hybrids produced roots with high protein content of up to 5.7%, while the common cultivar that we examined had just 2.3% crude protein. The essential amino acids alanine, phenylalanine, and valine were detected in the hybrids. The sulfur-containing amino acids cysteine and methionine were found at relatively high concentrations in the roots of 4 hybrids. The proportion of lysine in one hybrid was 20 times higher than in the common cultivar. The levels of total cyanide ranged from 19.73 to 172.56 mg/kg and most of the roots analyzed were classified as "non-toxic" and "low toxic". Furthermore, 2 progenies showed reasonable levels of cyanide, but higher protein content and amino acid profile more advantageous than the common cassava.

  19. Docosahexaenoic acid conjugated near infrared flourescence probe for in vivo early tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siwen; Cao, Jie; Qin, Jingyi; Zhang, Xin; Achilefu, Samuel; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-02-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid(DHA) is an omega-3 C22 natural fatty acid with six cis double bonds and as a constituent of membranes used as a precursor for metabolic and biochemical path ways. In this manuscript,we describe the synthesis of near-infrared(NIR) flourescence ICG-Der-01 labeled DHA for in vitro and vivo tumor targeting.The structure of the probe was intensively characterized by UV and MS. The in vitro and vivo tumor targeting abilities of the DHA-based NIR probes were investigeted in MCF-7 cells and MCF-7 xenograft mice model differently by confocal microscopy and CCD camera. The cell cytotoxicity were tested in tumor cells MCF-7 .The results shows that the DHA-based NIR probes have high affinity with the tumor both in vitro and vivo.In addition ,we also found that the DHA-based NIR probes have the apparent cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cells .which demonstrated that DHA was conjugated with other antitumor drug could increase the abilities of antirumor efficacy .So DHA-ICG-Der-01 is a promising optical agent for diagnosis of tumors especially in their early stage.

  20. Open L-lactic acid fermentation of food refuse using thermophilic Bacillus coagulans and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of microflora.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenji; Ezaki, Yutaka

    2006-06-01

    In the production of commercially useful poly-L-lactic acid plastic from biomass wastes, a feasible fermentation process to produce optically active L-lactic acid would be required. Here, model kitchen refuse (MKR) was inoculated with Bacillus coagulans NBRC12583 under nonsterilized openculture conditions. At temperatures below 45 degrees C, a racemic mixture of D- and L-lactic acids was accumulated, whereas only L-lactic acid was selectively accumulated by incubation at 50-65 degrees C. At 45 degrees C, the results of fermentation could not be consistently reproduced. To analyze microflora in this type of mixed culture system, whole-cell fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for B. coagulans, Bcoa191, and LAC722(L), a group-specific probe for a wide range of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria was applied. The dominancy of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria at lower temperatures, and that of B. coagulans at higher temperatures were confirmed. By using a saccharified liquid of collected kitchen refuse, 86 g/l of L-lactic acid was accumulated under nonsterile conditions by a 5-d incubation at 55 degrees C, pH 6.5, with 53% carbon yield and 97% optical purity. To conclude, high temperature open lactic acid fermentation is a simple and promising method for producing high-grade L-lactic acid from biomass waste, and FISH analysis of such mixed-culture systems is helpful for monitoring the microflora in these cultures.

  1. Hybridization study of developmental plastid gene expression in mustard (Sinapsis alba L.) with cloned probes for most plastid DNA regions.

    PubMed

    Link, G

    1984-07-01

    An approach to assess the extent of developmental gene expression of various regions of plastid (pt)DNA in mustard (Sinapis alba L.) is described. It involves cloning of most ptDNA regions. The cloned regions then serve as hybridization probes to detect and assess the abundance of complementary RNA sequences represented in total plastid RNA. By comparison of the hybridization pattern observed with plastid RNA from either dark-grown or light-grown plants it was found that many ptDNA regions are constitutively expressed, while several 'inducible' regions account for much higher transcript levels in the chloroplast than in the etioplast stage. The reverse situation, i.e. 'repressed' regions which would account for higher transcript levels in the etioplast, was not observed. The hybridization results obtained with RNA from 'intermediatetype' plastids suggest that transient gene expression is a common feature during light-induced chloroplast development. The time-course of gene expression differs for various ptDNA regions.

  2. Pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid homologues: effect of ring size on hybridization properties.

    PubMed

    Mansawat, Woraluk; Vilaivan, Chotima; Balázs, Árpád; Aitken, David J; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2012-03-16

    The effect of ring size of four- to six-membered cyclic β-amino acid on the hybridization properties of pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid with an alternating α/β peptide backbone is reported. The cyclobutane derivatives (acbcPNA) show the highest T(m) and excellent specificity with cDNA and RNA.

  3. Detection of Helicobacter Pylori Genome with an Optical Biosensor Based on Hybridization of Urease Gene with a Gold Nanoparticles-Labeled Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrashoob, M.; Mohsenifar, A.; Tabatabaei, M.; Rahmani-Cherati, T.; Mobaraki, M.; Mota, A.; Shojaei, T. R.

    2016-05-01

    A novel optics-based nanobiosensor for sensitive determination of the Helicobacter pylori genome using a gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-labeled probe is reported. Two specific thiol-modified capture and signal probes were designed based on a single-stranded complementary DNA (cDNA) region of the urease gene. The capture probe was immobilized on AuNPs, which were previously immobilized on an APTES-activated glass, and the signal probe was conjugated to different AuNPs as well. The presence of the cDNA in the reaction mixture led to the hybridization of the AuNPs-labeled capture probe and the signal probe with the cDNA, and consequently the optical density of the reaction mixture (AuNPs) was reduced proportionally to the cDNA concentration. The limit of detection was measured at 0.5 nM.

  4. Localization of glucocorticoid receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in hippocampus of rat brain using in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Matocha, M.F.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1988-08-01

    An in situ hybridization procedure was applied to quantify glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNAs in the hippocampus of rat brain. Hybridization was carried out using a radiolabeled antisense probe complementary to the rat liver GR gene. The specificity of the method was validated by showing: 1) a high cellular grain density in sections hybridized with an antisense but not a sense probe; 2) agreement between the experimental and theoretical temperature at which 50% of the hybrids melted, and 3) a high signal distribution of GR mRNA in the hippocampus, a region of brain known to preferentially concentrate steroid hormones. Within the hippocampus, however, subregional differences in hybridization densities were observed. Quantitative autoradiography indicated that the average neuronal silver grain number was highest in the pyramidal cell layers of CA2 and CA4 and lowest in those of CA1 and CA3. Also, there was a significant difference in the average grain number between all of the cell fields except for that between CA2 and CA4. These results show that contiguous but neuroanatomically distinct cell fields of the hippocampus express different levels of GR transcripts, and indicate that differential regulation of GR expression occurs in subpopulations of hippocampal neurons.

  5. Computationally Probing the Performance of Hybrid, Heterogeneous, and Homogeneous Iridium-Based Catalysts for Water Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    García-Melchor, Max; Vilella, Laia; López, Núria; Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2016-04-29

    An attractive strategy to improve the performance of water oxidation catalysts would be to anchor a homogeneous molecular catalyst on a heterogeneous solid surface to create a hybrid catalyst. The idea of this combined system is to take advantage of the individual properties of each of the two catalyst components. We use Density Functional Theory to determine the stability and activity of a model hybrid water oxidation catalyst consisting of a dimeric Ir complex attached on the IrO2(110) surface through two oxygen atoms. We find that homogeneous catalysts can be bound to its matrix oxide without losing significant activity. Hence, designing hybrid systems that benefit from both the high tunability of activity of homogeneous catalysts and the stability of heterogeneous systems seems feasible.

  6. Identification of human rotavirus serotype by hybridization to polymerase chain reaction-generated probes derived from a hyperdivergent region of the gene encoding outer capsid protein VP7

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, J.; Sears, J.; Schael, I.P.; White, L.; Garcia, D.; Lanata, C.; Kapikian, A.Z. )

    1990-08-01

    We have synthesized {sup 32}P-labeled hybridization probes from a hyperdivergent region (nucleotides 51 to 392) of the rotavirus gene encoding the VP7 glycoprotein by using the polymerase chain reaction method. Both RNA (after an initial reverse transcription step) and cloned cDNA from human rotavirus serotypes 1 through 4 could be used as templates to amplify this region. High-stringency hybridization of each of the four probes to rotavirus RNAs dotted on nylon membranes allowed the specific detection of corresponding sequences and thus permitted identification of the serotype of the strains dotted. The procedure was useful when applied to rotaviruses isolated from field studies.

  7. A simple, rapid method of nucleic acid extraction without tissue homogenization for detecting viroids by hybridization and RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, K; Hataya, T; Uyeda, I

    1999-01-01

    A simple, rapid method of nucleic acid extraction on a microcentrifuge tube scale for detecting viroids is presented. Five distinct citrus viroids (CVds), chrysanthemum stunt viroid (CSVd), hop stunt viroid (HSVd), hop latent viroid (HLVd) and potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) were detected in their natural host plants by hybridization using cRNA probes and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Nucleic acids (NA) were liberated from tissues by incubation in a buffer containing potassium ethyl xanthogenate (PEX) without tissue homogenization, and then precipitated with ethanol (NA-PEX). All the viroids except CVd-IV could be detected clearly in NA-PEX by hybridization. HSVd, HLVd and PSTVd could also be detected in NA-PEX by RT-PCR. Although CVds and CSVd could not be detected in NA-PEX by RT-PCR, they were detected after further purification: differential precipitation with 2-butoxyethanol and HCl treatment followed by ethanol-precipitation. In addition, PCR in the presence of tetramethylammonium chloride specifically amplified the cDNA of all five distinct CVds under the same temperature and cycle conditions. Since all the viroids could be detected in NA liberated by PEX, the amount of NA extracted by the method described here is sufficient for detecting viroids, enabling the processing of a large number of samples.

  8. Unlocked nucleic acids with a pyrene-modified uracil: synthesis, hybridization studies, fluorescent properties and i-motif stability.

    PubMed

    Perlíková, Pavla; Karlsen, Kasper K; Pedersen, Erik B; Wengel, Jesper

    2014-01-03

    The synthesis of two new phosphoramidite building blocks for the incorporation of 5-(pyren-1-yl)uracilyl unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) monomers into oligonucleotides has been developed. Monomers containing a pyrene-modified nucleobase component were found to destabilize an i-motif structure at pH 5.2, both under molecular crowding and noncrowding conditions. The presence of the pyrene-modified UNA monomers in DNA strands led to decreases in the thermal stabilities of DNA*/DNA and DNA*/RNA duplexes, but these duplexes' thermal stabilities were better than those of duplexes containing unmodified UNA monomers. Pyrene-modified UNA monomers incorporated in bulges were able to stabilize DNA*/DNA duplexes due to intercalation of the pyrene moiety into the duplexes. Steady-state fluorescence emission studies of oligonucleotides containing pyrene-modified UNA monomers revealed decreases in fluorescence intensities upon hybridization to DNA or RNA. Efficient quenching of fluorescence of pyrene-modified UNA monomers was observed after formation of i-motif structures at pH 5.2. The stabilizing/destabilizing effect of pyrene-modified nucleic acids might be useful for designing antisense oligonucleotides and hybridization probes.

  9. Producing a trimethylpentanoic acid using hybrid polyketide synthases

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2014-10-07

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS and when cultured produces the trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a method of producing the trimethylpentanoic acid, comprising: providing a host cell of the present invention, and culturing said host cell in a suitable culture medium such that the trimethylpentanoic acid is produced, optionally isolating the trimethylpentanoic acid, and optionally, reducing the isolated trimethylpentanoic acid into a trimethylpentanol or an iso-octane.

  10. Nucleic acid hybridization with RNA immobilized on filter paper.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxinger, W. C.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Gillespie, D.

    1972-01-01

    RNA has been immobilized in a manner suitable for use in molecular hybridization experiments with dissolved RNA or DNA by a nonaqueous solid-phase reaction with carbonyldiimidazole and RNA 'dry coated' on cellulose or, preferably, on previously activated phosphocellulose filters. Immobilization of RNA does not appear to alter its chemical character or cause it to acquire affinity for unspecific RNA or DNA. The versatility and efficiency of this method make it potentially attractive for use in routine analytical or preparative hybridization experiments, among other applications.

  11. A peptide nucleic acid-functionalized carbon nitride nanosheet as a probe for in situ monitoring of intracellular microRNA.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xianjiu; Wang, Quanbo; Ju, Huangxian

    2015-06-21

    A novel probe for recognition of both cancer cells and intracellular microRNA (miRNA) is designed by functionalizing a carbon nitride nanosheet (f-CNNS) with a Cy5-labeled peptide nucleic acid (Cy5-PNA) and folate. The interaction between Cy5-PNA and CNNS quenches the fluorescence of Cy5, and the presence of folate endows the probe with good specificity to folate acceptor overexpressed cells. The probe can be specifically taken up by cancer cells with an incubation step. Upon the recognition of the PNA to complementary miRNA, the hybridization product is released from the CNNS surface, which leads to the fluorescence recovery and provides a specific method for sensing of miRNA. Thus, this probe can be used for cell-specific intracellular miRNA sensing with a confocal microscope. Using miRNA-18a as a target model, the dynamic changes of its expression level inside living cells can be monitored with the proposed method. This method possesses promising applications in the study of miRNA related bioprocesses and biomedicine.

  12. Design and Synthesis of Novel Isoxazole Tethered Quinone-Amino Acid Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Ravi Kumar, P.; Sambaiah, M.; Kandula, Venu; Payili, Nagaraju; Jaya Shree, A.; Yennam, Satyanarayana

    2014-01-01

    A new series of isoxazole tethered quinone-amino acid hybrids has been designed and synthesized involving 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction followed by an oxidation reaction using cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN). Using this method, for the first time various isoxazole tethered quinone-phenyl alanine and quinone-alanine hybrids were synthesized from simple commercially available 4-bromobenzyl bromide, propargyl bromide, and 2,5-dimethoxybenzaldehyde in good yield. PMID:25709839

  13. Repeat sequence chromosome specific nucleic acid probes and methods of preparing and using

    DOEpatents

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Gray, Joe W.

    1995-01-01

    A primer directed DNA amplification method to isolate efficiently chromosome-specific repeated DNA wherein degenerate oligonucleotide primers are used is disclosed. The probes produced are a heterogeneous mixture that can be used with blocking DNA as a chromosome-specific staining reagent, and/or the elements of the mixture can be screened for high specificity, size and/or high degree of repetition among other parameters. The degenerate primers are sets of primers that vary in sequence but are substantially complementary to highly repeated nucleic acid sequences, preferably clustered within the template DNA, for example, pericentromeric alpha satellite repeat sequences. The template DNA is preferably chromosome-specific. Exemplary primers ard probes are disclosed. The probes of this invention can be used to determine the number of chromosomes of a specific type in metaphase spreads, in germ line and/or somatic cell interphase nuclei, micronuclei and/or in tissue sections. Also provided is a method to select arbitrarily repeat sequence probes that can be screened for chromosome-specificity.

  14. Repeat sequence chromosome specific nucleic acid probes and methods of preparing and using

    DOEpatents

    Weier, H.U.G.; Gray, J.W.

    1995-06-27

    A primer directed DNA amplification method to isolate efficiently chromosome-specific repeated DNA wherein degenerate oligonucleotide primers are used is disclosed. The probes produced are a heterogeneous mixture that can be used with blocking DNA as a chromosome-specific staining reagent, and/or the elements of the mixture can be screened for high specificity, size and/or high degree of repetition among other parameters. The degenerate primers are sets of primers that vary in sequence but are substantially complementary to highly repeated nucleic acid sequences, preferably clustered within the template DNA, for example, pericentromeric alpha satellite repeat sequences. The template DNA is preferably chromosome-specific. Exemplary primers and probes are disclosed. The probes of this invention can be used to determine the number of chromosomes of a specific type in metaphase spreads, in germ line and/or somatic cell interphase nuclei, micronuclei and/or in tissue sections. Also provided is a method to select arbitrarily repeat sequence probes that can be screened for chromosome-specificity. 18 figs.

  15. Visual, base-specific detection of nucleic acid hybridization using polymerization-based amplification.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ryan R; Johnson, Leah M; Bowman, Christopher N

    2009-03-15

    Polymerization-based signal amplification offers sensitive visualization of biotinylated biomolecules functionalized to glass microarrays in a manner suitable for point-of-care use. Here we report using this method for visual detection of multiplexed nucleic acid hybridizations from complex media and develop an application toward point mutation detection and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing. Primer extension reactions were employed to label selectively and universally all complementary surface DNA hybrids with photoinitiators, permitting simultaneous and dynamic photopolymerization from positive sites to 0.5-nM target concentrations. Dramatic improvements in signal ratios between complementary and mismatched hybrids enabled visual discrimination of single base differences in KRAS codon-12 biomarkers.

  16. Development and Application of Nucleic Acid Hybridization Techniques to Arbovirus Surveillance and Diagnosis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-27

    Department of Microbiology and Enviromental Health College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Colorado State University Fort Collins, C) 80523...1983). Detection of viral genomes in cultured cells and paraffin-embedded tissue sections using biotin-labeled hybridization probes. Virology 126: 32-50...sequence of the M RIA of snowshoe hare burzavirus reveals the presenoe of internal hydrophoic domains in the viral glycoprotein. Virology 137: 227-240. 15

  17. Synthesis of hybrid hydrazino peptides: protected vs unprotected chiral α-hydrazino acids.

    PubMed

    Suć, Josipa; Jerić, Ivanka

    2015-01-01

    Peptidomimetics based on hydrazino derivatives of α-amino acids represent an important class of peptidic foldamers with promising biological activities, like protease inhibition and antimicrobial activity. However, the lack of straightforward method for the synthesis of optically pure hydrazino acids and efficient incorporation of hydrazino building blocks into peptide sequence hamper wider exploitation of hydrazino peptidomimetics. Here we described the utility of N (α)-benzyl protected and unprotected hydrazino derivatives of natural α-amino acids in synthesis of peptidomimetics. While incorporation of N (α)-benzyl-hydrazino acids into peptide chain and deprotection of benzyl moiety proceeded with difficulties, unprotected hydrazino acids allowed fast and simple construction of hybrid peptidomimetics.

  18. A Paper-Based Sandwich Format Hybridization Assay for Unlabeled Nucleic Acid Detection Using Upconversion Nanoparticles as Energy Donors in Luminescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feng; Noor, M. Omair; Krull, Ulrich J.

    2015-01-01

    Bioassays based on cellulose paper substrates are gaining increasing popularity for the development of field portable and low-cost diagnostic applications. Herein, we report a paper-based nucleic acid hybridization assay using immobilized upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) as donors in luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET). UCNPs with intense green emission served as donors with Cy3 dye as the acceptor. The avidin functionalized UCNPs were immobilized on cellulose paper and subsequently bioconjugated to biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. Introduction of unlabeled oligonucleotide targets resulted in a formation of probe-target duplexes. A subsequent hybridization of Cy3 labeled reporter with the remaining single stranded portion of target brought the Cy3 dye in close proximity to the UCNPs to trigger a LRET-sensitized emission from the acceptor dye. The hybridization assays provided a limit of detection (LOD) of 146.0 fmol and exhibited selectivity for one base pair mismatch discrimination. The assay was functional even in undiluted serum samples. This work embodies important progress in developing DNA hybridization assays on paper. Detection of unlabeled targets is achieved using UCNPs as LRET donors, with minimization of background signal from paper substrates owing to the implementation of low energy near-infrared (NIR) excitation. PMID:28347081

  19. Efficacy of Nucleic Acid Probes for Detection of Poliovirus in Water Disinfected by Chlorine, Chlorine Dioxide, Ozone, and UV Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Norman J.; Margolin, Aaron B.

    1994-01-01

    MilliQ water was inoculated with poliovirus type 1 strain LSc-1 and was treated with disinfectants, including chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, and UV light. No relationship between probes and plaque assays were seen, demonstrating that viral nucleic acids were not destroyed. These findings suggest that nucleic acid probes cannot distinguish between infectious and noninfectious viruses and cannot be used in the evaluation of treated waters. PMID:16349448

  20. Analysis of messenger RNA expression by in situ hybridization using RNA probes synthesized via in vitro transcription

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Bradley S.; Fletcher, Jonathan S.; Thompson, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of the spatial patterning of mRNA expression is critically important for assigning functional and physiological significance to a given gene product. Given the tens of thousands of mRNAs in the mammalian genome, a full assessment of individual gene functions would ideally be overlaid upon knowledge of the specific cell types expressing each mRNA. In situ hybridization approaches represent a molecular biological/histological method that can reveal cellular patterns of mRNA expression. Here, we present detailed procedures for the detection of specific mRNAs using radioactive RNA probes in tissue sections followed by autoradiographic detection. These methods allow for the specific and sensitive detection of spatial patterns of mRNA expression, thereby linking mRNA expression with cell type and function. Radioactive detection methods also facilitate semi-quantitative analyses of changes in mRNA gene expression. PMID:20699122

  1. Using NV centers to probe magnetization dynamics in normal metal/magnetic insulator hybrid system at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huiliang; Ku, Mark J. H.; Han, Minyong; Casola, Francesco; van der Sar, Toeno; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding magnetization dynamics induced by electric current is of great interest for both fundamental and practical reasons. Great endeavor has been dedicated to spin-orbit torques (SOT) in metallic structures, while quantitative study of analogous phenomena in magnetic insulators remains challenging where transport measurements are not feasible. Recently we have developed techniques using nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond to probe few-nanometre-scale correlated-electron magnetic excitations (i.e., spin waves). Here we demonstrate how this powerful tool can be implemented to study magnetization dynamics inside ferromagnetic insulator, Yttrium iron garnet (YIG) with spin injection from electrical current through normal metal (Platinum in our case). Particularly our work will focus on NV magnetic detection, imaging, and spectroscopy of coherent auto-oscillations in Pt/YIG microdisc. Magnetic fluctuations and local temperature measurements, both with nearby NV centers, will also be interesting topics relevant to SOT physics in Pt/YIG hybrid system.

  2. The chromatin remodeler DDM1 promotes hybrid vigor by regulating salicylic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingzhu; Li, Yanqiang; Xu, Tao; Srivastava, Ashish Kumar; Wang, Dong; Zeng, Liang; Yang, Lan; He, Li; Zhang, Heng; Zheng, Zhimin; Yang, Dong-Lei; Zhao, Cheng; Dong, Juan; Gong, Zhizhong; Liu, Renyi; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    In plants, hybrid vigor is influenced by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms; however, the molecular pathways are poorly understood. We investigated the potential contributions of epigenetic regulators to heterosis in Arabidposis and found that the chromatin remodeler DECREASED DNA METHYLATION 1 (DDM1) affects early seedling growth heterosis in Col/C24 hybrids. ddm1 mutants showed impaired heterosis and increased expression of non-additively expressed genes related to salicylic acid metabolism. Interestingly, our data suggest that salicylic acid is a hormetic regulator of seedling growth heterosis, and that hybrid vigor arises from crosses that produce optimal salicylic acid levels. Although DNA methylation failed to correlate with differential non-additively expressed gene expression, we uncovered DDM1 as an epigenetic link between salicylic acid metabolism and heterosis, and propose that the endogenous salicylic acid levels of parental plants can be used to predict the heterotic outcome. Salicylic acid protects plants from pathogens and abiotic stress. Thus, our findings suggest that stress-induced hormesis, which has been associated with increased longevity in other organisms, may underlie specific hybrid vigor traits.

  3. The chromatin remodeler DDM1 promotes hybrid vigor by regulating salicylic acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingzhu; Li, Yanqiang; Xu, Tao; Srivastava, Ashish Kumar; Wang, Dong; Zeng, Liang; Yang, Lan; He, Li; Zhang, Heng; Zheng, Zhimin; Yang, Dong-Lei; Zhao, Cheng; Dong, Juan; Gong, Zhizhong; Liu, Renyi; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    In plants, hybrid vigor is influenced by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms; however, the molecular pathways are poorly understood. We investigated the potential contributions of epigenetic regulators to heterosis in Arabidposis and found that the chromatin remodeler DECREASED DNA METHYLATION 1 (DDM1) affects early seedling growth heterosis in Col/C24 hybrids. ddm1 mutants showed impaired heterosis and increased expression of non-additively expressed genes related to salicylic acid metabolism. Interestingly, our data suggest that salicylic acid is a hormetic regulator of seedling growth heterosis, and that hybrid vigor arises from crosses that produce optimal salicylic acid levels. Although DNA methylation failed to correlate with differential non-additively expressed gene expression, we uncovered DDM1 as an epigenetic link between salicylic acid metabolism and heterosis, and propose that the endogenous salicylic acid levels of parental plants can be used to predict the heterotic outcome. Salicylic acid protects plants from pathogens and abiotic stress. Thus, our findings suggest that stress-induced hormesis, which has been associated with increased longevity in other organisms, may underlie specific hybrid vigor traits. PMID:27551435

  4. Paper-based solid-phase multiplexed nucleic acid hybridization assay with tunable dynamic range using immobilized quantum dots as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Noor, M Omair; Krull, Ulrich J

    2013-08-06

    A multiplexed solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization assay on a paper-based platform is presented using multicolor immobilized quantum dots (QDs) as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The surface of paper was modified with imidazole groups to immobilize two types of QD-probe oligonucleotide conjugates that were assembled in solution. Green-emitting QDs (gQDs) and red-emitting QDs (rQDs) served as donors with Cy3 and Alexa Fluor 647 (A647) acceptors. The gQD/Cy3 FRET pair served as an internal standard, while the rQD/A647 FRET pair served as a detection channel, combining the control and analytical test zones in one physical location. Hybridization of dye-labeled oligonucleotide targets provided the proximity for FRET sensitized emission from the acceptor dyes, which served as an analytical signal. Hybridization assays in the multicolor format provided a limit of detection of 90 fmol and an upper limit of dynamic range of 3.5 pmol. The use of an array of detection zones was designed to provide improved analytical figures of merit compared to that which could be achieved on one type of array design in terms of relative concentration of multicolor QDs. The hybridization assays showed excellent resistance to nonspecific adsorption of oligonucleotides. Selectivity of the two-plex hybridization assay was demonstrated by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection at a contrast ratio of 50:1. Additionally, it is shown that the use of preformed QD-probe oligonucleotide conjugates and consideration of the relative number density of the two types of QD-probe conjugates in the two-color assay format is advantageous to maximize assay sensitivity and the upper limit of dynamic range.

  5. Import of desired nucleic acid sequences using addressing motif of mitochondrial ribosomal 5S-rRNA for fluorescent in vivo hybridization of mitochondrial DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Zelenka, Jaroslav; Alán, Lukáš; Jabůrek, Martin; Ježek, Petr

    2014-04-01

    Based on the matrix-addressing sequence of mitochondrial ribosomal 5S-rRNA (termed MAM), which is naturally imported into mitochondria, we have constructed an import system for in vivo targeting of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or mt-mRNA, in order to provide fluorescence hybridization of the desired sequences. Thus DNA oligonucleotides were constructed, containing the 5'-flanked T7 RNA polymerase promoter. After in vitro transcription and fluorescent labeling with Alexa Fluor(®) 488 or 647 dye, we obtained the fluorescent "L-ND5 probe" containing MAM and exemplar cargo, i.e., annealing sequence to a short portion of ND5 mRNA and to the light-strand mtDNA complementary to the heavy strand nd5 mt gene (5'-end 21 base pair sequence). For mitochondrial in vivo fluorescent hybridization, HepG2 cells were treated with dequalinium micelles, containing the fluorescent probes, bringing the probes proximally to the mitochondrial outer membrane and to the natural import system. A verification of import into the mitochondrial matrix of cultured HepG2 cells was provided by confocal microscopy colocalizations. Transfections using lipofectamine or probes without 5S-rRNA addressing MAM sequence or with MAM only were ineffective. Alternatively, the same DNA oligonucleotides with 5'-CACC overhang (substituting T7 promoter) were transcribed from the tetracycline-inducible pENTRH1/TO vector in human embryonic kidney T-REx®-293 cells, while mitochondrial matrix localization after import of the resulting unlabeled RNA was detected by PCR. The MAM-containing probe was then enriched by three-order of magnitude over the natural ND5 mRNA in the mitochondrial matrix. In conclusion, we present a proof-of-principle for mitochondrial in vivo hybridization and mitochondrial nucleic acid import.

  6. Interactions of ibuprofen with hybrid lipid bilayers probed by complementary surface-enhanced vibrational spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Carly S.; Kundu, Janardan; Janesko, Benjamin G.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Raphael, Robert M.; Halas, Naomi J.

    2016-01-01

    The incorporation of small molecules into lipid bilayers is a process of biological importance and clinical relevance that can change the material properties of cell membranes and cause deleterious side effects for certain drugs. Here we report the direct observation, using surface enhanced Raman and IR spectroscopies (SERS, SEIRA), of the insertion of ibuprofen molecules into hybrid lipid bilayers. The alkanethiol-phospholipid hybrid bilayers were formed onto gold nanoshells by self-assembly, where the underlying nanoshell substrates provided the necessary enhancements for SERS and SEIRA. The spectroscopic data reveal specific interactions between ibuprofen and phospholipid moieties and indicate that the overall hydrophobicity of ibuprofen plays an important role in its intercalation in these membrane mimics. PMID:18942873

  7. Nanofiltration, bipolar electrodialysis and reactive extraction hybrid system for separation of fumaric acid from fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Prochaska, Krystyna; Staszak, Katarzyna; Woźniak-Budych, Marta Joanna; Regel-Rosocka, Magdalena; Adamczak, Michalina; Wiśniewski, Maciej; Staniewski, Jacek

    2014-09-01

    A novel approach based on a hybrid system allowing nanofiltration, bipolar electrodialysis and reactive extraction, was proposed to remove fumaric acid from fermentation broth left after bioconversion of glycerol. The fumaric salts can be concentrated in the nanofiltration process to a high yield (80-95% depending on pressure), fumaric acid can be selectively separated from other fermentation components, as well as sodium fumarate can be conversed into the acid form in bipolar electrodialysis process (stack consists of bipolar and anion-exchange membranes). Reactive extraction with quaternary ammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) or alkylphosphine oxides (Cyanex 923) solutions (yield between 60% and 98%) was applied as the final step for fumaric acid recovery from aqueous streams after the membrane techniques. The hybrid system permitting nanofiltration, bipolar electrodialysis and reactive extraction was found effective for recovery of fumaric acid from the fermentation broth.

  8. A new probe using hybrid virus-dye nanoparticles for near-infrared fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Changfeng; Barnhill, Hannah; Liang, Xiaoping; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Huabei

    2005-11-01

    A fluorescent probe based on bionanoparticle cowpea mosaic virus has been developed for near-infrared fluorescence tomography. A unique advantage of this probe is that over 30 dye molecules can be loaded onto each viral nanoparticle with an average diameter of 30 nm, making high local dye concentration (∼1.8 mM) possible without significant fluorescence quenching. This ability of high loading of local dye concentration would increase the signal-to-noise ratio considerably, thus sensitivity for detection. We demonstrate successful tomographic fluorescence imaging of a target containing the virus-dye nanoparticles embedded in a tissue-like phantom. Tomographic fluorescence data were obtained through a multi-channel frequency-domain system and the spatial maps of fluorescence quantum yield were recovered with a finite-element-based reconstruction algorithm.

  9. Interactions of hybrid gold-tannic acid nanoparticles with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Sekowski, Szymon; Tomaszewska, Emilia; Soliwoda, Katarzyna; Celichowski, Grzegorz; Grobelny, Jaroslaw

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles present a wide spectrum of chemical, biological, and physical properties which result in their usage in many branches of science. We present an investigation of the interaction between human serum albumin and hybrid gold-tannic acid nanoparticles synthesized via a chemical reduction method. The results obtained demonstrate that tannic acid can be a very effective reducing and stabilizing agent and allows monodisperse hybrid gold nanomaterial to be obtained. The synthesized hybrid gold-tannic acid nanoparticles strongly interact with human serum albumin by formation of protein-corona complexes. The strength of the interaction with albumin depends on the number of tannic acid molecules on the surface of the nanoparticles and the presence of citric acid. Nanoparticles of large size and rich in tannic acid react more strongly with the protein [K SV = (8.00 ± 0.2) × 10(5) M(-1)] compared with smaller ones [K SV = (6.83 ± 0.5) × 10(4) M(-1)] containing citric acid and low concentration of tannic acid.

  10. Specific identification of human papillomavirus type in cervical smears and paraffin sections by in situ hybridization with radioactive probes: a preliminary communication

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, J.; Gendelman, H.E.; Naghashfar, Z.; Gupta, P.; Rosenshein, N.; Sawada, E.; Woodruff, J.D.; Shah, K.

    1985-01-01

    Cervical Papanicolaou smears and paraffin sections of biopsy specimens obtained from women attending dysplasia clinics were examined for viral DNA sequences by in situ hybridization technique using TVS-labeled cloned recombinant DNA probes of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, and 16. These and one unrelated DNA probe complementary to measles virus RNA were labeled by nick translation using either one or two TVS-labeled nucleotides. Paraffin sections and cervical smears were collected on pretreated slides, hybridized with the probes under stringent or nonstringent conditions for 50 h, and autoradiographed. Additional cervical specimens from the same women were examined for the presence of genus-specific papillomavirus capsid antigen by the immunoperoxidase technique. Preliminary results may be summarized as follows. The infecting virus could be identified in smears as well as in sections. Viral DNA sequences were detected only when there were condylomatous cells in the specimen and in only a proportion of the condylomatous cells. Even under stringent conditions, some specimens reacted with both HPV-6 and HPV-11. In some instances, the cells did not hybridize with any of the three probes even when duplicate specimens contained frankly condylomatous, capsid antigen-positive cells. In situ hybridization of Papanicolaou smears or of tissue sections is a practical method for diagnosis and follow-up of specific papillomavirus infection using routinely collected material.

  11. Oligodeoxynucleotide Probes for Detecting Intact Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosson, Reinhardt A.; Maurina-Brunker, Julie; Langley, Kim; Pynnonen, Christine M.

    2004-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive test using chemiluminescent oligodeoxynucleotide probes has been developed for detecting, identifying, and enumerating intact cells. The test is intended especially for use in detecting and enumerating bacteria and yeasts in potable water. As in related tests that have been developed recently for similar purposes, the oligodeoxynucleotide probes used in this test are typically targeted at either singlecopy deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) genes (such as virulence genes) or the multiple copies (10,000 to 50,000 copies per cell) of 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acids (rRNAs). Some of those tests involve radioisotope or fluorescent labeling of the probes for reporting hybridization of probes to target nucleic acids. Others of those tests involve labeling with enzymes plus the use of chemiluminescent or chromogenic substrates to report hybridization via color or the emission of light, respectively. The present test is of the last-mentioned type. The chemiluminescence in the present test can be detected easily with relatively simple instrumentation. In developing the present test, the hybridization approach was chosen because hybridization techniques are very specific. Hybridization detects stable, inheritable genetic targets within microorganisms. These targets are not dependent on products of gene expression that can vary with growth conditions or physiological states of organisms in test samples. Therefore, unique probes can be designed to detect and identify specific genera or species of bacteria or yeast (in terms of rRNA target sequences) or can be designed to detect and identify virulence genes (genomic target sequences). Because of the inherent specificity of this system, there are few problems of cross-reactivity. Hybridization tests are rapid, but hybridization tests now available commercially lack sensitivity; typically, between 10(exp 6) and 10(exp 7) cells of the target organism are needed to ensure a reliable test. Consequently, the numbers of

  12. Hybrid femtosecond/picosecond rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering at flame temperatures using a second-harmonic bandwidth-compressed probe.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Sean P; Scoglietti, Daniel J

    2013-03-15

    We demonstrate an approach for picosecond probe-beam generation that enables hybrid femtosecond/picosecond pure-rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) measurements in flames. Sum-frequency generation of bandwidth-compressed picosecond radiation from femtosecond pumps with phase-conjugate chirps provides probe pulses with energies in excess of 1 mJ that are temporally locked to the femtosecond pump/Stokes preparation. This method overcomes previous limitations on hybrid femtosecond/picosecond rotational CARS techniques, which have relied upon less efficient bandwidth-reduction processes that have generally resulted in prohibitively low probe energy for flame measurements. We provide the details of the second-harmonic approach and demonstrate the technique in near-adiabatic hydrogen/air flames.

  13. Probing photocurrent generation mechanisms in hybrid IR-senstive quantum dot/conjugated polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strein, Elisabeth

    The work in this dissertation aims to improve the ability of hybrid polymer/quantum dot solar cells to harvest and utilize sunlight by contributing mechanistic insights into photocurrent generation. The mechanisms of charge transfer and energy transfer are explored spectroscopically in chapter three and both are found to contribute to photocurrent. Chapter four looks at excitation energy in excess of the bandgap and finds a rise in polaron yield which correlates with excess photon energy. Chapter two discusses details of the experimental techniques used to access the data discussed in the chapters that follow.

  14. Probing the structure and function of biopolymer-carbon nanotube hybrids with molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert R.

    2009-12-01

    Nanoscience deals with the characterization and manipulation of matter on the atomic/molecular size scale in order to deepen our understanding of condensed matter and develop revolutionary technology. Meeting the demands of the rapidly advancing nanotechnological frontier requires novel, multifunctional nanoscale materials. Among the most promising nanomaterials to fulfill this need are biopolymer-carbon nanotube hybrids (Bio-CNT). Bio-CNT consists of a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) coated with a self-assembled layer of biopolymers such as DNA or protein. Experiments have demonstrated that these nanomaterials possess a wide range of technologically useful properties with applications in nanoelectronics, medicine, homeland security, environmental safety and microbiology. However, a fundamental understanding of the self-assembly mechanics, structure and energetics of Bio-CNT is lacking. The objective of this thesis is to address this deficiency through molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, which provides an atomic-scale window into the behavior of this unique nanomaterial. MD shows that Bio-CNT composed of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) self-assembles via the formation of high affinity contacts between DNA bases and the CNT sidewall. Calculation of the base-CNT binding free energy by thermodynamic integration reveals that these contacts result from the attractive pi--pi stacking interaction. Binding affinities follow the trend G > A > T > C. MD reveals that long ssDNA sequences are driven into a helical wrapping about CNT with a sub-10 nm pitch by electrostatic and torsional interactions in the backbone. A large-scale replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation reveals that ssDNA-CNT hybrids are disordered. At room temperature, ssDNA can reside in several low-energy conformations that contain a sequence-specific arrangement of bases detached from CNT surface. MD demonstrates that protein-CNT hybrids composed of the Coxsackie-adenovirus receptor are biologically

  15. Probing carrier dynamics in wide-bandgap semiconductor-metal nanoparticle hybrids (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratchford, Daniel; Dunkelberger, Adam D.; Owrutsky, Jeff C.; Pehrsson, Pehr E.

    2016-09-01

    Transient absorption spectra were measured to demonstrate carrier injection in multi-layered stacks of Au nanoparticles sandwiched in between TiO2 atomic layer deposited (ALD) thin films. Similar structures were fabricated with ALD Al2O3 for control samples. Sub-percolation thin films of Au resulted in <20 nm particles with plasmon resonances at 650 nm ( 590 nm) in the TiO2 (Al2O3) samples. Two separate pump-probe experiments were preformed to monitor transient heating of the metal and carrier injection in the TiO2. In the first experiment, the metal nanoparticles were excited at 400 nm, and the metal electron dynamics were probed at wavelengths around the plasmon resonance. We measured a decay time of 1.7 ps in the TiO2-Au layered samples compared to 2.2 ps in the Al2O3-Au layered samples. The decay times are attributed to electron-phonon coupling. The faster decay in TiO2 may be the result of charge injection into the TiO2. In the second experiment, carriers were excited in the Au nanoparticles by pumping on the plasmon resonance, and the system was probed in the mid-IR to measure free carrier absorption in the TiO2. The TiO2-Au layered sample exhibited transient signals similar to the free carrier absorption signals following excitation of TiO2 films, however, no signal was observed on the Al2O3-Au layered sample. This provides clear evidence that the signal measured in the TiO2-Au layered sample was not from the Au nanoparticles alone but instead originated from charge injection from the Au into the TiO2.

  16. Mesoporous cerium phosphonate nanostructured hybrid spheres as label-free Hg²⁺ fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun-Pei; Ma, Tian-Yi; Ren, Tie-Zhen; Yuan, Zhong-Yong

    2014-09-24

    Porous phosphonate-based organic-inorganic hybrid materials have been shown to have novel and amazing physicochemical properties due to the integration of superiorities from both inorganic components and organic moieties. Herein, mesoporous cerium phosphonate nanostructured hybrid spheres are prepared with the assistance of cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide while using ethylene diamine tetra(methylene phosphonic acid) as the coupling molecule. The resulting hybrid is constructed from the cerium phosphonate nanoparticles, accompanied by high specific surface area of 455 m(2) g(-1). The uniform incorporation of rare-earth element cerium and organophosphonic functionalities endows mesoporous cerium phosphonate with excellent fluorescence properties for the development of an optical sensor for selective Hg(2+) detection on the basis of the fluorescence-quenching mechanism. The signal response of mesoporous cerium phosphonate against the Hg(2+) concentration is linear over the range from 0.05 to 1.5 μmol L(-1), giving a limit of detection of 16 nmol L(-1) (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3). Most of the common physiologically relevant cations and anions did not interfere with the detection of Hg(2+). This label-free system provides a promising platform for further use in bioimaging and biomedical fields.

  17. A new method for ABO genotyping using fluorescence melting curve analysis based on peptide nucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungmyung; Park, Hyun-Chul; An, Sanghyun; Ahn, Eu-Ree; Lee, Yang-Han; Kim, Mi-Jung; Lee, Eun-Jung; Park, Jae Sin; Jung, Jin Wook; Lim, Sikeun

    2015-09-01

    ABO genotyping has been routinely used to identify suspects or unknown remains in crime investigations. Probe-based fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA) is a powerful tool for mutation detection and is based on melting temperature shifts due to thermal denaturation. In the present study, we developed a new method for ABO genotyping using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe-based FMCA. This method allowed for the simultaneous detection of three single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites in the ABO gene (nucleotide positions 261, 526, and 803) and the determination of 14 ABO genotypes (A/A, A/O01 or A/O02, A/O03, B/B, B/O01 or B/O02, B/O03, O01/O01 or O01/O02 or O02/O02, O01/O03 or O02/O03, O03/O03, A/B, cis-AB01/A, cis-AB01/B, cis-AB01/O01 or cis-AB01/O02, and cis-AB01/cis-AB01). Using this method, we analyzed 80 samples and successfully identified ABO genotypes (A/A [n=5], A/O01 or A/O02 [n=23], B/B [n=3], B/O01 or B/O02 [n=18], A/B [n=9], O01/O01 or O01/O02 or O02/O02 [n=20], cis-AB01/A [n=1], and cis-AB01/O01 or cis-AB01/O02 [n=1]). In addition, all steps in the method, including polymerase chain reaction, PNA probe hybridization, and FMCA, could be performed in one single closed tube in less than 3h. Since no processing or separation steps were required during analysis, this method was more convenient and rapid than traditional methods and reduced the risk of contamination. Thus, this method may be an effective and helpful tool in forensic investigations.

  18. Probing the interactions between boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lü, Chenchen; Li, Hengye; Wang, Heye; Liu, Zhen

    2013-02-19

    The affinity of boronic acids to cis-diol-containing biomolecules has found wide applications in many fields, such as sensing, separation, drug delivery, and functional materials. A sound understanding of the binding interactions will greatly facilitate exquisite applications of this chemistry. Although a few analytical tools have been available for the characterization of the interactions, these techniques are associated with some apparent drawbacks, so they are only applicable to a limited range of boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules. Therefore, a widely applicable method is still greatly needed. In this work, an affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method was established and validated to probe the interactions between boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules. The method was proven to be applicable to almost all types of cis-diol-containing biomolecules and boronic acids. Based on this method, a quantitative, comparative study on the interactions between 14 boronic acids that have important potentials for application with 5 typical monosaccharides of biological importance was carried out. The findings provided new insights into boronate affinity interactions, particularly the relationship between the binding strength with the molecular structures of the binding species. Besides, effects of pH and temperature on the binding strength were also investigated. This method exhibited several significant advantages, including (1) possibility of simultaneous study of multiple interactions, (2) low requirement on the purity of the binding species, (3) wide applicability, and (4) high accuracy and precision.

  19. Folic acid-conjugated europium complexes as luminescent probes for selective targeting of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Quici, Silvio; Casoni, Alessandro; Foschi, Francesca; Armelao, Lidia; Bottaro, Gregorio; Seraglia, Roberta; Bolzati, Cristina; Salvarese, Nicola; Carpanese, Debora; Rosato, Antonio

    2015-02-26

    We report the synthesis of three optical probes (Eu(3+)⊂1, Eu(3+)⊂2, and Eu(3+)⊂3) having a luminescent Eu complex (signaling unit) bonded in different positions to folic acid (FA), the folate receptor (FR) targeting unit. The structures of the two regioisomers Eu(3+)⊂1 and Eu(3+)⊂2 were assigned by mass spectrometric experiments. The optical properties and stability of these probes were assessed in phosphate-buffered saline, cell culture medium, rat serum, and cellular lysate, and results indicated that they are chemically and photophysically stable. Cytotoxicity was studied with ovarian cancer cells having high (SKOV-3), intermediate (OVCAR-3), low (IGROV-1), or null (A2780) expression of FRs. The internalized probe, evaluated in SKOV-3, IGROV-1, and A2780 cells, was in the order Eu(3+)⊂2 > Eu(3+)⊂1 > Eu(3+)⊂3. No internalization was observed for A2780 cells. Such results, together with those obtained in competition experiments of FA versus Eu(3+)⊂2 and FA or Eu(3+)⊂2 versus (3)H-FA, indicate that internalization is receptor-mediated and that Eu(3+)⊂2 shows high selectivity and specificity for FR.

  20. Community Analysis of Biofilters Using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Including a New Probe for the Xanthomonas Branch of the Class Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Udo; Naismith, Michèle M.; Altendorf, Karlheinz; Lipski, André

    1999-01-01

    Domain-, class-, and subclass-specific rRNA-targeted probes were applied to investigate the microbial communities of three industrial and three laboratory-scale biofilters. The set of probes also included a new probe (named XAN818) specific for the Xanthomonas branch of the class Proteobacteria; this probe is described in this study. The members of the Xanthomonas branch do not hybridize with previously developed rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for the α-, β-, and γ-Proteobacteria. Bacteria of the Xanthomonas branch accounted for up to 4.5% of total direct counts obtained with 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. In biofilter samples, the relative abundance of these bacteria was similar to that of the γ-Proteobacteria. Actinobacteria (gram-positive bacteria with a high G+C DNA content) and α-Proteobacteria were the most dominant groups. Detection rates obtained with probe EUB338 varied between about 40 and 70%. For samples with high contents of gram-positive bacteria, these percentages were substantially improved when the calculations were corrected for the reduced permeability of gram-positive bacteria when formaldehyde was used as a fixative. The set of applied bacterial class- and subclass-specific probes yielded, on average, 58.5% (± a standard deviation of 23.0%) of the corrected eubacterial detection rates, thus indicating the necessity of additional probes for studies of biofilter communities. The Xanthomonas-specific probe presented here may serve as an efficient tool for identifying potential phytopathogens. In situ hybridization proved to be a practical tool for microbiological studies of biofiltration systems. PMID:10427047

  1. Translational and rotational diffusion of flexible PEG and rigid dendrimer probes in sodium caseinate dispersions and acid gels.

    PubMed

    Salami, Souad; Rondeau-Mouro, Corinne; Barhoum, Myriam; van Duynhoven, John; Mariette, François

    2014-09-01

    The dynamics of rigid dendrimer and flexible PEG probes in sodium caseinate dispersions and acid gels, including both translational diffusion and rotational diffusion, were studied by NMR. Above the onset of the close-packing limit (C ∼ 10 g/100 g H2 O), translational diffusion of the probe depended on its flexibility and on the fluctuations of the matrix chains. The PEG probe diffused more rapidly than the spherical dendrimer probe of corresponding hydrodynamic radius. The greater conformational flexibility of PEG facilitated its motion through the crowded casein matrix. Rotational diffusion was, however, substantially less hindered than the translational diffusion and depended on the local protein-probe friction which became high when the casein concentration increased. The coagulation of the matrix led to the formation of large voids, which resulted in an increase in the translational diffusion of the probes, whereas the rotational diffusion of the probes was retarded in the gel, which could be attributed to the immobilized environment surrounding the probe. Quantitative information from PFG-NMR and SEM micrographs have been combined for characterizing microstructural details in SC acid gels.

  2. Boronic Acid: A Bio-Inspired Strategy To Increase the Sensitivity and Selectivity of Fluorescent NADH Probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jingye; Kim, Beomsue; Peng, Juanjuan; Berry, Stuart N; Ni, Yong; Su, Dongdong; Lee, Jungyeol; Yuan, Lin; Chang, Young-Tae

    2016-08-24

    Fluorescent probes have emerged as an essential tool in the molecular recognition events in biological systems; however, due to the complex structures of certain biomolecules, it remains a challenge to design small-molecule fluorescent probes with high sensitivity and selectivity. Inspired by the enzyme-catalyzed reaction between biomolecule and probe, we present a novel combination-reaction two-step sensing strategy to improve sensitivity and selectivity. Based on this strategy, we successfully prepared a turn-on fluorescent reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) probe, in which boronic acid was introduced to bind with NADH and subsequently accelerate the sensing process. This probe shows remarkably improved sensitivity (detection limit: 0.084 μM) and selectivity to NADH in the absence of any enzymes. In order to improve the practicality, the boronic acid was further modified to change the measurement conditions from alkalescent (pH 9.5) to physiological environment (pH 7.4). Utilizing these probes, we not only accurately quantified the NADH weight in a health care product but also evaluated intracellular NADH levels in live cell imaging. Thus, these bio-inspired fluorescent probes offer excellent tools for elucidating the roles of NADH in biological systems as well as a practical strategy to develop future sensitive and selective probes for complicated biomolecules.

  3. Method and apparatus for staining immobilized nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.; Jacobson, Stephen C.

    2000-01-01

    A method for staining immobilized nucleic acids includes the steps of affixing DNA probes to a solid substrate, moving target DNA material into proximity with the DNA probes, whereby the target DNA hybridized with specific ones of the DNA probes, and moving a fluorescent dye into proximity with the hybridized target DNA, whereby the fluorescent dye binds to the hybridized DNA to enable subsequent detection of fluorescence.

  4. Selective local lysis and sampling of live cells for nucleic acid analysis using a microfluidic probe

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Aditya; Autebert, Julien; Delamarche, Emmanuel; Kaigala, Govind V.

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity is inherent to biology, thus it is imperative to realize methods capable of obtaining spatially-resolved genomic and transcriptomic profiles of heterogeneous biological samples. Here, we present a new method for local lysis of live adherent cells for nucleic acid analyses. This method addresses bottlenecks in current approaches, such as dilution of analytes, one-sample-one-test, and incompatibility to adherent cells. We make use of a scanning probe technology - a microfluidic probe - and implement hierarchical hydrodynamic flow confinement (hHFC) to localize multiple biochemicals on a biological substrate in a non-contact, non-destructive manner. hHFC enables rapid recovery of nucleic acids by coupling cell lysis and lysate collection. We locally lysed ~300 cells with chemical systems adapted for DNA or RNA and obtained lysates of ~70 cells/μL for DNA analysis and ~15 cells/μL for mRNA analysis. The lysates were introduced into PCR-based workflows for genomic and transcriptomic analysis. This strategy further enabled selective local lysis of subpopulations in a co-culture of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, validated by characteristic E-cadherin gene expression in individually extracted cell types. The developed strategy can be applied to study cell-cell, cell-matrix interactions locally, with implications in understanding growth, progression and drug response of a tumor. PMID:27411740

  5. Hall probe measurements of the poloidal magnetic field in Compact Toroidal Hybrid plasmas.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, B A; Knowlton, S F; Hartwell, G J; Hanson, J D; Maurer, D A

    2014-09-01

    A linear array of 16 Hall effect sensors has been developed to directly measure the poloidal magnetic field inside the boundary of a non-axisymmetric hybrid torsatron/tokamak plasma. The array consists of miniature gallium arsenide Hall sensor elements mounted 8 mm apart on a narrow, rotatable printed circuit board inserted into a re-entrant stainless steel tube sheathed in boron nitride. The sensors are calibrated on the bench and in situ to provide accurate local measurements of the magnetic field to aid in reconstructing the equilibrium plasma current density profiles in fully three-dimensional plasmas. Calibrations show that the sensor sensitivities agree with the nominal manufacturers specifications of 1.46 V/T. Poloidal fields measured with the Hall sensor array are found to be within 5% of poloidal fields modeled with a Biot-Savart code.

  6. Hall probe measurements of the poloidal magnetic field in Compact Toroidal Hybrid plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, B. A.; Knowlton, S. F.; Hartwell, G. J. Hanson, J. D.; Maurer, D. A.

    2014-09-15

    A linear array of 16 Hall effect sensors has been developed to directly measure the poloidal magnetic field inside the boundary of a non-axisymmetric hybrid torsatron/tokamak plasma. The array consists of miniature gallium arsenide Hall sensor elements mounted 8 mm apart on a narrow, rotatable printed circuit board inserted into a re-entrant stainless steel tube sheathed in boron nitride. The sensors are calibrated on the bench and in situ to provide accurate local measurements of the magnetic field to aid in reconstructing the equilibrium plasma current density profiles in fully three-dimensional plasmas. Calibrations show that the sensor sensitivities agree with the nominal manufacturers specifications of 1.46 V/T. Poloidal fields measured with the Hall sensor array are found to be within 5% of poloidal fields modeled with a Biot-Savart code.

  7. Exploring 12'-apo-beta-carotenoic-12'-acid as an ultrafast polarity probe for ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Peter W; Bürsing, Reinhard; Lenzer, Thomas; Oum, Kawon

    2008-03-13

    The ultrafast excited-state dynamics of the carbonyl-containing carotenoid 12'-apo-beta-carotenoic-12'-acid (12'CA) have been used for probing the microscopic environment in various ionic liquids (ILs). The following IL cations were investigated: 1,3-di-n-alkyl-imidazolium featuring different n-alkyl chain lengths and also additional methylation at the C2 position, triethylsulfonium, as well as two tetraalkylammonium ions. These were combined with different anions: [BF4]-, [PF6]-, ethyl sulfate ([EtOSO3]-), and bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([Tf2N]-). The probe molecule was excited via the S0 --> S2 transition at 425 or 430 nm, and the characteristic stimulated emission decay of the low-lying excited electronic S1/ICT (intramolecular charge transfer) state of 12'CA was monitored in the near IR (850 or 860 nm). Its lifetime tau1 is sensitive to the micropolarity-induced stabilization of S1/ICT relative to S0. The lifetime tau1 of the S1/ICT state varies only moderately in all ionic liquids studied here ( approximately 40-110 ps), which lies in the range between ethanol (109 ps) and methanol (49 ps). While organic solvents show an excellent correlation of tau1 with the solvent polarity function Deltaf = (epsilon - 1)/(epsilon + 2) - (n2 - 1)/(n2 + 2), where epsilon and n are the static dielectric constant and the refractive index of the solvent, respectively, this is not the case for ILs. This is due to dominant local electrostatic probe-cation interactions which cannot be easily quantified by macroscopic quantities. Methylation at the C2 position of 1,3-di-n-alkyl-imidazolium reduces the accessibility of the cation and therefore the electrostatic stabilization of the probe, resulting in an increase of tau1. A similar increase is observed upon extension of one of the n-alkyl chains from ethyl to n-decyl. Tetraalkylammonium ILs show an increased tau1 probably due to their more delocalized positive charge which cannot interact so favorably with the probe, in

  8. N-Terminal Fatty Acid Substitution Increases the Leishmanicidal Activity of CA(1-7)M(2-9), a Cecropin-Melittin Hybrid Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Chicharro, Cristina; Granata, Cesare; Lozano, Rosario; Andreu, David; Rivas, Luis

    2001-01-01

    In order to improve the leishmanicidal activity of the synthetic cecropin A-melittin hybrid peptide CA(1-7)M(2-9) (KWKLFKKIGAVLKVL-NH2), a systematic study of its acylation with saturated linear fatty acids was carried out. Acylation of the Nɛ-7 lysine residue led to a drastic decrease in leishmanicidal activity, whereas acylation at lysine 1, in either the α or the ɛ NH2 group, increased up to 3 times the activity of the peptide against promastigotes and increased up to 15 times the activity of the peptide against amastigotes. Leishmanicidal activity increased with the length of the fatty acid chain, reaching a maximum for the lauroyl analogue (12 carbons). According to the fast kinetics, dissipation of membrane potential, and parasite membrane permeability to the nucleic acid binding probe SYTOX green, the lethal mechanism was directly related to plasma membrane permeabilization. PMID:11502512

  9. Differentiation of Moraxella nonliquefaciens, M. lacunata, and M. bovis by using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and hybridization with pilin-specific DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Tønjum, T; Caugant, D A; Bøvre, K

    1992-01-01

    Genetic relationships among strains of Moraxella nonliquefaciens, M. lacunata, and M. bovis were studied by using multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and DNA-DNA hybridization. The 74 isolates analyzed for electrophoretic variation at 12 enzyme loci were assigned to 59 multilocus genotypes. The multilocus genotypes were grouped in four major clusters, one representing strains of M. nonliquefaciens, two representing strains of M. lacunata, and one comprising strains of M. bovis and the single strain of M. equi analyzed. DNA-DNA hybridization with total genomic probes also revealed four major distinctive entities that corresponded to those identified by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. The two distinct clusters recognized among the M. lacunata strains apparently corresponded to the species previously designated M. lacunata and M. liquefaciens. Distinction of the four entities was improved by hybridization with polymerase chain reaction products of nonconserved parts of pilin genes as DNA probes. With these polymerase chain reaction probes, new isolates of M. nonliquefaciens, M. lacunata, M. liquefaciens, and M. bovis can be identified easily by hybridization. PMID:1452691

  10. Complexation of malic acid with cadmium(II) probed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana; Jakl, Michal; Schröder, Detlef

    2012-02-15

    Electrospray ionization was used as a technique for the characterization of the interactions between cadmium(II) ions and malic acid (1) in aqueous solution. Particular attention was paid to the nature of the species formed, which generally correspond to complexes of CdX(+) cations with neutral malic acid, where X either is the counterion of the metal salt used as a precursor (i.e. X=Cl, I) or corresponds to singly deprotonated malic acid. In pure water solutions, also highly coordinated complexes [Cd(1-H)(1)(2)](+) and [CdCl(1)(2)](+) were detected, whereas the most abundant complexes detected in a sample of soil solution were: [Cd(1-H)(1)](+) and [CdCl(1)](+). With respect to possible application in environmental analysis, the effects of (i) metal salts present in solution, (ii) modest mineralization, and (iii) the matrices of real soil solutions were probed. While the presence of other metals leads to additional complexes, the characteristic species containing both cadmium(II) and malic acid can still be detected with good sensitivity.

  11. Screening of Israeli Holstein-Friesian cattle for restriction fragment length polymorphisms using homologous and heterologous deoxyribonucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Hallerman, E M; Nave, A; Soller, M; Beckmann, J S

    1988-12-01

    Genomic DNA of Israeli Holstein-Friesian dairy cattle were screened with a battery of 17 cloned or subcloned DNA probes in an attempt to document restriction fragment length polymorphisms at a number of genetic loci. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were observed at the chymosin, oxytocin-neurophysin I, lutropin beta, keratin III, keratin VI, keratin VII, prolactin, and dihydrofolate reductase loci. Use of certain genomic DNA fragments as probes produced hybridization patterns indicative of satellite DNA at the respective loci. Means for distinguishing hybridizations to coding sequences for unique genes from those to satellite DNA were developed. Results of this study are discussed in terms of strategy for the systematic development of large numbers of bovine genomic polymorphisms.

  12. [Fatty acids profile characterization of white maize hybrids grown in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Alezones, Jesús; Avila, Manuel; Chassaigne, Alberto; Barrientos, Venancio

    2010-12-01

    In Venezuela, white corn is the most important crop regarding production, harvest area and consumption. One of its main by-products is corn oil, whose positive effect on health caused by the high content of unsaturated fatty acids has been widely recognized. In order to characterize the fatty acids profile of twelve white grained maize hybrids extensively grown in Venezuela, and the effect that divergent localities has on this profile, three semi commercial scale trials where established in Portuguesa, Yaracuy and Guárico states. Proportions of the main fatty acids in the raw oil of the different grain samples were determined using gas chromatography. Significant differences (p < 0,01) between hybrids were found for arachidic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, gadoleic and linoleic acids; non significant differences were found for linolenic acid. Significant differences between localities were found for all the fatty acids evaluated. High and significant correlations between fatty acids content were found; the most important relations were: linoleic-oleic (Rho = -0,98**), arachidic-palmitic (Rho = -0,61**), linoleic-stearic (Rho = -0,61**) and oleic-stearic (Rho = 0,58**). Corn produced in Venezuela presents lower levels of linoleic and higher levels of palmitic, stearic and oleic acids than the levels found in temperate corn. These differences involve significant changes in the nutritional properties of Venezuelan corn oil that should be considered in the development of new cultivars and industrial processes for oil production.

  13. Application of ELN cosmid probes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) towards a clinical diagnostic test for Williams syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Lowery, M.; Brothman, L.; Leonard, C.

    1994-09-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by mental deficiency, gregarious personalities, dysmorphic facies, supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS), and idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia. Expression of the phenotype is variable. Deletions including an elastin allele (ELN) are thought to be the basis of the connective tissue and vascular abnormalities in WS patients. Patients with WS are hemizygous for ELN, exhibiting a submicroscopic deletion at 7q11.23 detected by FISH. To substantiate the hemizygosity hypothesis and define molecular cytogenetics in patients with familial and sporadic WS, a series of 71 patients were evaluated. EBV-transformed lymphocytes from 48 selected patients were cultured and harvested according to cytogenetic protocol. Cosmids containing ELN were biotinylated and hybridized to metaphase cells by routine procedures. In addition, an alpha-satellite probe for chromosome 7 was included in hybridizations as an internal control. Thirty-one of these 48 patients (65%) showed a deletion in one ELN allele by FISH. Negative patients were shown to be non-affected family members or patients in the {open_quotes}uncertain{close_quotes} category (expressing some, but not all features characteristic of WS). The FISH data were consistent with molecular analyses of ELN deletions. Twenty-three additional patients were referred to confirm or rule out a diagnosis of WS. Nine patients (39%) showed a deletion of ELN by FISH. Correlations between phenotype and FISH results are in progress. These results suggest that a rapid, accurate diagnostic technique for WS using FISH can be implemented in the cytogenetics laboratory as a routine clinical service. Identification of the deletion in patients suspected of having WS will facilitate classification of these patients and improve clinical management.

  14. Toward an on-chip multiplexed nucleic acid hybridization assay using immobilized quantum dot-oligonucleotide conjugates and fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, Anthony J.; Noor, M. Omair; Algar, W. Russ; Vannoy, Charles H.; Chen, Lu; Krull, Ulrich J.

    2011-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QD) are a class of NP with photophysical properties that are ideally suited for optical multiplexing and use as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). A new strategy is presented for the development of multiplexed DNA hybridization assays using immobilized QDs in a microfluidic system. Green- or red-emitting QDs were immobilized via self-assembly with a multidentate-thiol-derivatized glass slide, and subsequently conjugated with amine-terminated probe oligonucleotides using carbodiimide activation. Immobilized QD-probe conjugates were then passivated with adsorbed non-complementary oligonucleotides to achieve selectivity in microfluidic assays. Target nucleic acid sequences hybridized with QD-probe conjugates and were labeled with Cy3 or Alexa Fluor 647 as acceptor dyes for the QD donors, where FRET-sensitized dye emission provided a signal for the detection of picomolar quantities of target. The simultaneous immobilization of green- and red-emitting QDs at different ratios within a microfluidic channel was demonstrated as a step toward multiplexed assays.

  15. Molecular hybridization between rat liver deoxyribonucleic acid and complementary ribonucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Melli, Marialuisa; Bishop, J. O.

    1970-01-01

    RNA (cRNA) was synthesized in vitro on a template of rat liver DNA and its hybridization with rat liver DNA was studied by using the nitrocellulose-filter method. Sonication of the DNA diminished its apparent capacity to hybridize with RNA by about 50%. This is not due to cross-linkage of DNA molecules, because it could be shown that less than 2% of the sonicated DNA was cross-linked. The effect is due instead to the small size of the sonicated DNA molecules. Below a single-stranded molecular weight of 5×105 the DNA showed a progressive loss of capacity to hybridize with decrease in molecular weight. Evidence is presented suggesting that the apparently diminished capacity of the DNA to hybridize is due to loss of hybridized DNA from the membrane filters. When cRNA at concentrations of up to 25μg/ml is annealed with sonicated total DNA, an apparent hybridization saturation value is found at which about 2.5% of the DNA is hybridized with RNA. Increasing the cRNA concentration tenfold brought about the hybridization of a second component of the DNA approximately equal in amount to the first. The renaturation of rat liver DNA was studied by measuring the fall in the extinction at 260nm and two different components of renaturation were observed within the reiterated fraction of DNA. By hybridizing cRNA with different fractions of rat DNA the two components of the hybridization curve are shown to correspond to the two components of the renaturation curve. The conclusion is drawn that at a cRNA concentration of 250μg/ml most of the reiterated fraction of rat liver DNA is hybridized after annealing for 16h under standard conditions (0.30m-sodium chloride–30mm-sodium citrate at 65°C). Even with such a high cRNA concentration little or no hybridization of the slowly renaturing DNA fraction occurs. It is suggested that the most highly reiterated DNA component is poorly transcribed in vitro. PMID:5493851

  16. A collagen-poly(lactic acid-co-ɛ-caprolactone) hybrid scaffold for bladder tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Eva-Maria; Micol, Lionel A; Houis, Stephanie; Wurm, Florian M; Hilborn, Jöns; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Frey, Peter

    2011-06-01

    Scaffold materials should favor cell attachment and proliferation, and provide designable 3D structures with appropriate mechanical strength. Collagen matrices have proven to be beneficial scaffolds for tissue regeneration. However, apart from small intestinal submucosa, they offer a limited mechanical strength even if crosslinking can enhance their mechanical properties. A more cell-friendly way to increase material strength is to combine synthetic polymer meshes with plastic compressed collagen gels. This work describes the potential of plastic compressed collagen-poly(lactic acid-co-ɛ-caprolactone) (PLAC) hybrids as scaffolds for bladder tissue regeneration. Human bladder smooth muscle and urothelial cells were cultured on and inside collagen-PLAC hybrids in vitro. Scaffolds were analyzed by electron microscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and AlamarBlue assay. Both cell types proliferated in and on the hybrid, forming dense cell layers on top after two weeks. Furthermore, hybrids were implanted subcutaneously in the backs of nude mice. Host cell infiltration, scaffold degradation, and the presence of the seeded bladder cells were analyzed. Hybrids showed a lower inflammatory reaction in vivo than PLAC meshes alone, and first signs of polymer degradation were visible at six months. Collagen-PLAC hybrids have potential for bladder tissue regeneration, as they show efficient cell seeding, proliferation, and good mechanical properties.

  17. Probing particle acceleration in lower hybrid turbulence via synthetic diagnostics produced by PIC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; Rigby, A.; Gregori, G.; Bamford, R. A.; Bingham, R.; Koenig, M.

    2016-10-01

    Efficient particle acceleration in astrophysical shocks can only be achieved in the presence of initial high energy particles. A candidate mechanism to provide an initial seed of energetic particles is lower hybrid turbulence (LHT). This type of turbulence is commonly excited in regions where space and astrophysical plasmas interact with large obstacles. Due to the nature of LH waves, energy can be resonantly transferred from ions (travelling perpendicular to the magnetic field) to electrons (travelling parallel to it) and the consequent motion of the latter in turbulent shock electromagnetic fields is believed to be responsible for the observed x-ray fluxes from non-thermal electrons produced in astrophysical shocks. Here we present PIC simulations of plasma flows colliding with magnetized obstacles showing the formation of a bow shock and the consequent development of LHT. The plasma and obstacle parameters are chosen in order to reproduce the results obtained in a recent experiment conducted at the LULI laser facility at Ecole Polytechnique (France) to study accelerated electrons via LHT. The wave and particle spectra are studied and used to produce synthetic diagnostics that show good qualitative agreement with experimental results. Work supported by the European Research Council (Accelerates ERC-2010-AdG 267841).

  18. Hydroxyapatite-phosphonoformic acid hybrid compounds prepared by hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turki, Thouraya; Othmani, Masseoud; Bantignies, Jean-Louis; Bouzouita, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxyapatites were prepared in the presence of different amounts of phosphonoformic acid (PFA) via the hydrothermal method. The obtained powders were characterized through chemical analysis, XRD, IR, 31P MAS-NMR, TEM, and TG-TDA. The XRD showed that the PFA did not affect the apatite composition. Indeed, only a reduction of the crystallite size was noted. After grafting of PFA, the IR spectroscopy revealed the appearance of new bands belonging to HPO42- and carboxylate groups of the apatite and organic moiety, respectively. Moreover, the 31P MAS-NMR spectra exhibited a peak with a low intensity assigned to the terminal phosphonate group of the organic moiety in addition to that of the apatite. Based on these results, a reaction mechanism involving the surface hydroxyl groups (tbnd Casbnd OH) of the apatite and the carboxyl group of the acid was proposed.

  19. Application of in situ hybridization probes for MLH-1 and MSH-2 in tissue microarrays of paraffin-embedded malignant melanomas: correlation with immunohistochemistry and tumor stage.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Jaenckel, Fredericke; Stachura, Jerzy; Fischer, Gösta; Brinck, Ulrich

    2004-12-01

    Defects in DNA mismatch-repair genes MLH1 and MSH2 reported primarily in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma are present in many sporadic tumors, including malignant melanomas. The main aim of this study was to investigate the expression of these genes in malignant melanomas in relation to tumor stage. An experiment was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue microarrays of malignant melanomas applying in situ hybridization with probes produced by our research group and immunohistochemical techniques. In situ hybridization demonstrated MLH1 expression in 45 of 59 melanomas and MSH2 expression in 51 of 59 melanomas. Immunohistochemistry detected MLH1 expression in 46 of 59 melanomas and MSH2 expression in 50 of 59 melanomas. Down-regulation of expression of both DNA mismatch repair genes in malignant melanomas was observed. The findings obtained by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry correlated significantly. Our study demonstrates the suitability of in situ hybridization with MLH1 and MSH2 probes for paraffin-embedded tissue. Tissue microarrays can be used successfully in both in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to analyze the expression of DNA mismatch-repair genes.

  20. Identification of Bacillus strains isolated from milk and cream with classical and nucleic acid hybridization methods.

    PubMed

    Tatzel, R; Ludwig, W; Schleifer, K H; Wallnöfer, P R

    1994-11-01

    A total of 529 bacterial strains have been isolated from milk and cream sampled at different sites in a dairy production plant under conditions selective for aerobic sporeforming bacteria. Identification with classical methods based on morphological, physiological and biochemical criteria showed Bacillus licheniformis to be the most frequently occurring Bacillus sp. The investigation also revealed 62 unidentified strains. Classical identification methods were time consuming (3-7 d), lacked specificity and--because of their dependence on phenotypic gene expression--sometimes produced ambiguous results. Consequently, a colony hybridization method developed for the identification of B. licheniformis strains and using nonradioactive labelled 23S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes was also used. Identification of B. licheniformis with both classical and hybridization methods revealed diverging identification results for 70 strains.

  1. A versatile solid support system for oligodeoxynucleotide probe-based hybridization assays.

    PubMed Central

    Van Ness, J; Kalbfleisch, S; Petrie, C R; Reed, M W; Tabone, J C; Vermeulen, N M

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for immobilization of well-defined quantities of oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) to a versatile nylon support is described. The solid support, a nylon-6/6 bead, is covalently coated with poly(ethyleneimine) to provide a reactive spacer-arm for attachment of ODNs. 5'-Aminohexyl-tailed ODNs are selectively activated using 2,4,6-trichloro-1,3,5-triazine (cyanuric chloride) and then covalently attached to the bead via the triazine moiety. The modified nylon support has a low level of binding of nonspecific nucleic acid and efficiently captures both RNA and DNA targets. PMID:2062652

  2. Monitoring Methanotrophic Bacteria in Hybrid Anaerobic-Aerobic Reactors with PCR and a Catabolic Gene Probe

    PubMed Central

    Miguez, Carlos B.; Shen, Chun F.; Bourque, Denis; Guiot, Serge R.; Groleau, Denis

    1999-01-01

    We attempted to mimic in small upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) bioreactors the metabolic association found in nature between methanogens and methanotrophs. UASB bioreactors were inoculated with pure cultures of methanotrophs, and the bioreactors were operated by using continuous low-level oxygenation in order to favor growth and/or survival of methanotrophs. Unlike the reactors in other similar studies, the hybrid anaerobic-aerobic bioreactors which we used were operated synchronously, not sequentially. Here, emphasis was placed on monitoring various methanotrophic populations by using classical methods and also a PCR amplification assay based on the mmoX gene fragment of the soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO). The following results were obtained: (i) under the conditions used, Methylosinus sporium appeared to survive better than Methylosinus trichosporium; (ii) the PCR method which we used could detect as few as about 2,000 sMMO gene-containing methanotrophs per g (wet weight) of granular sludge; (iii) inoculation of the bioreactors with pure cultures of methanotrophs contributed greatly to increases in the sMMO-containing population (although the sMMO-containing population decreased gradually with time, at the end of an experiment it was always at least 2 logs larger than the initial population before inoculation); (iv) in general, there was a good correlation between populations with the sMMO gene and populations that exhibited sMMO activity; and (v) inoculation with sMMO-positive cultures helped increase significantly the proportion of sMMO-positive methanotrophs in reactors, even after several weeks of operation under various regimes. At some point, anaerobic-aerobic bioreactors like those described here might be used for biodegradation of various chlorinated pollutants. PMID:9925557

  3. Homoeologous chromosome pairing in the distant hybrid Alstroemeria aurea x A. inodora and the genome composition of its backcross derivatives determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization with species-specific probes.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, S A; Ramanna, M S; de Jeu, M J; Kuipers, A G; Jacobsen, E

    1999-01-01

    A distant hybrid between two diploid species (2n = 2x = 16), Alstroemeria aurea and A. inodora, was investigated for homoeologous chromosome pairing, crossability with A. inodora and chromosome transmission to its BC1 offspring. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with two species-specific probes, A001-I (A. aurea specific) and D32-13 (A. inodora specific), was used to analyse chromosome pairing in the hybrid and the genome constitution of its BC1 progeny plants. High frequencies of associated chromosomes were observed in both genotypes of the F1 hybrid, A1P2-2 and A1P4. In the former, both univalents and bivalents were found at metaphase I, whereas the latter plant also showed tri- and quadrivalents. Based on the hybridization sites of DNA probes on the chromosomes of both parental species, it was established that hybrid A1P4 contains a reciprocal translocation between the short arm of chromosome 1 and the long arm of chromosome 8 of A. inodora. Despite regular homoeologous chromosome pairing in 30% of the pollen mother cells, both hybrids were highly sterile. They were backcrossed reciprocally with one of the parental species, A. inodora. Two days after pollination, embryo rescue was applied and, eventually, six BC1 progeny plants were obtained. Among these, two were aneuploids (2n = 2x + 1 = 17) and four were triploids (2n = 3x = 24). The aneuploid plants had originated when the interspecific hybrid was used as a female parent, indicating that n eggs were functional in the hybrid. In addition, 2n gametes were also functional in the hybrid, resulting in the four triploid BC1 plants. Of these four plants, three had received 2n pollen grains from the hybrid and one a 2n egg. Using FISH, homoeologous crossing over between the chromosomes of the two parental species in the hybrid was clearly detected in all BC1 plants. The relevance of these results for the process of introgression and the origin of n and 2n gametes are discussed.

  4. Proteomic Stable Isotope Probing Reveals Taxonomically Distinct Patterns in Amino Acid Assimilation by Coastal Marine Bacterioplankton

    PubMed Central

    Bryson, Samuel; Li, Zhou; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Hettich, Robert L.; Mayali, Xavier; Pan, Chongle

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heterotrophic marine bacterioplankton are a critical component of the carbon cycle, processing nearly a quarter of annual primary production, yet defining how substrate utilization preferences and resource partitioning structure microbial communities remains a challenge. In this study, proteomic stable isotope probing (proteomic SIP) was used to characterize population-specific assimilation of dissolved free amino acids (DFAAs), a major source of dissolved organic carbon for bacterial secondary production in aquatic environments. Microcosms of seawater collected from Newport, Oregon, and Monterey Bay, California, were incubated with 1 µM 13C-labeled amino acids for 15 and 32 h. The taxonomic compositions of microcosm metaproteomes were highly similar to those of the sampled natural communities, with Rhodobacteriales, SAR11, and Flavobacteriales representing the dominant taxa. Analysis of 13C incorporation into protein biomass allowed for quantification of the isotopic enrichment of identified proteins and subsequent determination of differential amino acid assimilation patterns between specific bacterioplankton populations. Proteins associated with Rhodobacterales tended to have a significantly high frequency of 13C-enriched peptides, opposite the trend for Flavobacteriales and SAR11 proteins. Rhodobacterales proteins associated with amino acid transport and metabolism had an increased frequency of 13C-enriched spectra at time point 2. Alteromonadales proteins also had a significantly high frequency of 13C-enriched peptides, particularly within ribosomal proteins, demonstrating their rapid growth during incubations. Overall, proteomic SIP facilitated quantitative comparisons of DFAA assimilation by specific taxa, both between sympatric populations and between protein functional groups within discrete populations, allowing an unprecedented examination of population level metabolic responses to resource acquisition in complex microbial communities

  5. Proteomic Stable Isotope Probing Reveals Taxonomically Distinct Patterns in Amino Acid Assimilation by Coastal Marine Bacterioplankton.

    PubMed

    Bryson, Samuel; Li, Zhou; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Hettich, Robert L; Mayali, Xavier; Pan, Chongle; Mueller, Ryan S

    2016-01-01

    Heterotrophic marine bacterioplankton are a critical component of the carbon cycle, processing nearly a quarter of annual primary production, yet defining how substrate utilization preferences and resource partitioning structure microbial communities remains a challenge. In this study, proteomic stable isotope probing (proteomic SIP) was used to characterize population-specific assimilation of dissolved free amino acids (DFAAs), a major source of dissolved organic carbon for bacterial secondary production in aquatic environments. Microcosms of seawater collected from Newport, Oregon, and Monterey Bay, California, were incubated with 1 µM (13)C-labeled amino acids for 15 and 32 h. The taxonomic compositions of microcosm metaproteomes were highly similar to those of the sampled natural communities, with Rhodobacteriales, SAR11, and Flavobacteriales representing the dominant taxa. Analysis of (13)C incorporation into protein biomass allowed for quantification of the isotopic enrichment of identified proteins and subsequent determination of differential amino acid assimilation patterns between specific bacterioplankton populations. Proteins associated with Rhodobacterales tended to have a significantly high frequency of (13)C-enriched peptides, opposite the trend for Flavobacteriales and SAR11 proteins. Rhodobacterales proteins associated with amino acid transport and metabolism had an increased frequency of (13)C-enriched spectra at time point 2. Alteromonadales proteins also had a significantly high frequency of (13)C-enriched peptides, particularly within ribosomal proteins, demonstrating their rapid growth during incubations. Overall, proteomic SIP facilitated quantitative comparisons of DFAA assimilation by specific taxa, both between sympatric populations and between protein functional groups within discrete populations, allowing an unprecedented examination of population level metabolic responses to resource acquisition in complex microbial communities

  6. A hybrid analog-digital phase-locked loop for frequency mode non-contact scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mehta, M M; Chandrasekhar, V

    2014-01-01

    Non-contact scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has developed into a powerful technique to image many different properties of samples. The conventional method involves monitoring the amplitude, phase, or frequency of a cantilever oscillating at or near its resonant frequency as it is scanned across the surface of a sample. For high Q factor cantilevers, monitoring the resonant frequency is the preferred method in order to obtain reasonable scan times. This can be done by using a phase-locked-loop (PLL). PLLs can be obtained as commercial integrated circuits, but these do not have the frequency resolution required for SPM. To increase the resolution, all-digital PLLs requiring sophisticated digital signal processors or field programmable gate arrays have also been implemented. We describe here a hybrid analog/digital PLL where most of the components are implemented using discrete analog integrated circuits, but the frequency resolution is provided by a direct digital synthesis chip controlled by a simple peripheral interface controller (PIC) microcontroller. The PLL has excellent frequency resolution and noise, and can be controlled and read by a computer via a universal serial bus connection.

  7. Probing titanate nanowire surface acidity through methylene blue adsorption in colloidal suspension and on thin films.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Endre; Szilágyi, István; Forró, László; Magrez, Arnaud

    2014-02-15

    The interaction of the cationic dye methylene blue (MB) with titanate nanowires (TiONWs) was investigated in different pH environments using visible spectroscopy and electrophoresis on thin films as well as in aqueous suspension. The surface charge of the TiONWs depends on the pH and ionic strength leading to positive charge under acidic and negative under alkaline conditions. The TiONWs have the same adsorption capacity on films and in suspensions at neutral pH while under alkaline conditions they are able to adsorb significantly more MB in suspension due to their higher surface area. Detailed adsorption studies in water revealed that dye cations form monomers, dimers and larger aggregates of H-type (face-to-face) on the TiONW films. The results indicate that below pH = 4.0 the TiONWs' external surface consists of Brøntsted acid sites capable of protonating MB. It was suggested that reversible indicator role of MB molecule dimers probes the TiONW surface acidity (Brøntsted sites).

  8. Location and binding mechanism of an ESIPT probe 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid in unsaturated fatty acid bound serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Ghorai, Shyamal Kr; Tripathy, Debi Ranjan; Dasgupta, Swagata; Ghosh, Sanjib

    2014-02-05

    The binding site and the binding mechanism of 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (3HNA) in oleic acid (OA) bound serum albumins (bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA)) have been determined using steady state and time resolved emission of tryptophan residues (Trp) in proteins and the ESIPT emission of 3HNA. Time resolved anisotropy of the probe 3HNA and low temperature phosphorescence of Trp residues of BSA in OA bound BSA at 77K reveals a drastic change of the binding site of 3HNA in the ternary system compared to that in the free protein. 3HNA binds near Trp213 in the ternary system whereas 3HNA binds near Trp134 in the free protein. The structure of OA bound BSA generated using docking methodology exhibits U-bend configuration of all bound OA. The docked pose of 3HNA in the free protein and in OA bound albumins (ternary systems) and the concomitant perturbation of the structure of proteins around the binding region of 3HNA corroborate the enhanced ESIPT emission of 3HNA and the energy transfer efficiency from the donor Trp213 of BSA to 3HNA acceptor in 3HNA-OA-BSA system.

  9. A novel biocompatible hyaluronic acid-chitosan hybrid hydrogel for osteoarthrosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaderli, S; Boulocher, C; Pillet, E; Watrelot-Virieux, D; Rougemont, A L; Roger, T; Viguier, E; Gurny, R; Scapozza, L; Jordan, O

    2015-04-10

    A conventional therapy for the treatment of osteoarthrosis is intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid, which requires repeated, frequent injections. To extend the viscosupplementation effect of hyaluronic acid, we propose to associate it with another biopolymer in the form of a hybrid hydrogel. Chitosan was chosen because of its structural similarity to synovial glycosaminoglycans, its anti-inflammatory effects and its ability to promote cartilage growth. To avoid polyelectrolyte aggregation and obtain transparent, homogeneous gels, chitosan was reacetylated to a 50% degree, and different salts and formulation buffers were investigated. The biocompatibility of the hybrid gels was tested in vitro on human arthrosic synoviocytes, and in vivo assessments were made 1 week after subcutaneous injection in rats and 1 month after intra-articular injection in rabbits. Hyaluronic acid-chitosan polyelectrolyte complexes were prevented by cationic complexation of the negative charges of hyaluronic acid. The different salts tested were found to alter the viscosity and thermal degradation of the gels. Good biocompatibility was observed in rats, although the calcium-containing formulation induced calcium deposits after 1 week. The sodium chloride formulation was further tested in rabbits and did not show acute clinical signs of pain or inflammation. Hybrid HA-Cs hydrogels may be a valuable alternative viscosupplementation agent.

  10. Neutrophil chemotaxis and arachidonic acid metabolism are not linked: evidence from metal ion probe studies

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, S.R.; Turner, R.A.; Smith, D.M.; Johnson, J.A.

    1986-03-05

    Heavy metal ions can inhibit arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism protect against ionophore cytotoxicity (ibid) and inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis. In this study they used Au/sup 3 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, Cr/sup 3 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/ and Cu/sup 2 +/ as probes of the interrelationships among AA metabolism, ionophore-mediated cytotoxicity, and chemotaxis. Phospholipid deacylation was measured in ionophore-treated cells prelabeled with /sup 3/H-AA. Eicosanoid release from ionophore-treated cells was monitored by radioimmunoassay. Cytoprotection was quantitated as ability to exclude trypan blue. Chemotaxis toward f-met-leu-phe was measured by leading front analysis. The results imply that metal ions attenuate ionophore cytotoxicity by blocking phospholipid deacylation and eicosanoid release. In contrast to previous reports, no correlation between AA metabolism and chemotaxis was demonstrated, suggesting that these 2 processes are not linked.

  11. Real-time PCR Detection of Brucella Abortus: A Comparative Study of SYBR Green I, 5'-exonuclease, and Hybridization Probe Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, Deborah Trishelle; Hadfield, Ted; Roberto, Francisco Figueroa

    2003-08-01

    Real-time PCR provides a means of detecting and quantifying DNA targets by monitoring PCR product accumulation during cycling as indicated by increased fluorescence. A number of different approaches can be used to generate the fluorescence signal. Three approaches—SYBR Green I (a double-stranded DNA intercalating dye), 5'-exonuclease (enzymatically released fluors), and hybridization probes (fluorescence resonance energy transfer)—were evaluated for use in a real-time PCR assay to detect Brucella abortus. The three assays utilized the same amplification primers to produce an identical amplicon. This amplicon spans a region of the B. abortus genome that includes portions of the alkB gene and the IS711 insertion element. All three assays were of comparable sensitivity, providing a linear assay over 7 orders of magnitude (from 7.5 ng down to 7.5 fg). However, the greatest specificity was achieved with the hybridization probe assay.

  12. An Activity-Based Probe for N-Acylethanolamine Acid Amidase

    PubMed Central

    Armirotti, Andrea; Summa, Maria; Bertozzi, Fabio; Garau, Gianpiero; Bandiera, Tiziano; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    N-Acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA) is a lysosomal cysteine hydrolase involved in the degradation of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEs), a family of endogenous lipid signaling molecules that includes oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA). Among the reported NAAA inhibitors, α–amino–β–lactone (3–aminooxetan–2–one) derivatives have been shown to prevent FAE hydrolysis in innate-immune and neural cells and to reduce reactions to inflammatory stimuli. Recently, we disclosed two potent and selective NAAA inhibitors, the compounds ARN077 (5-phenylpentyl N-[(2S,3R)-2-methyl-4-oxo-oxetan-3-yl]carbamate) and ARN726 (4-cyclohexylbutyl-N-[(S)-2-oxoazetidin-3-yl]carbamate). The former is active in vivo by topical administration in rodent models of hyperalgesia and allodynia, while the latter exerts systemic anti-inflammatory effects in mouse models of lung inflammation. In the present study, we designed and validated a derivative of ARN726 as the first activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probe for the in vivo detection of NAAA. The newly synthesized molecule 1 is an effective in vitro and in vivo click-chemistry activity based probe (ABP), which is able to capture the catalytically active form of NAAA in Human Embryonic Kidney 293 (HEK293) cells overexpressing human NAAA as well as in rat lung tissue. Competitive ABPP with 1 confirmed that ARN726 and ARN077 inhibit NAAA in vitro and in vivo. Compound 1 is a useful new tool to identify activated NAAA both in vitro and in vivo, and to investigate the physiological and pathological roles of this enzyme. PMID:26102511

  13. Amperometric microsensor for direct probing of ascorbic acid in human gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Emily A; Pauliukaitė, Rasa; Hocevar, Samo B; Ogorevc, Božidar; Smyth, Malcolm R

    2010-09-30

    This article reports on a novel microsensor for amperometric measurement of ascorbic acid (AA) under acidic conditions (pH 2) based on a carbon fiber microelectrode (CFME) modified with nickel oxide and ruthenium hexacyanoferrate (NiO-RuHCF). This sensing layer was deposited electrochemically in a two-step procedure involving an initial galvanostatic NiO deposition followed by a potentiodynamic RuHCF deposition from solutions containing the precursor salts. Several important parameters were examined to characterize and optimize the NiO-RuHCF sensing layer with respect to its current response to AA by using cyclic voltammetry, and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods. With the NiO-RuHCF coated CFME, the AA oxidation potential under acidic conditions was shifted to a less positive value for about 0.2 V (E(p) of ca. 0.23 V vs. Ag/AgCl) as compared to a bare CFME, which greatly improves the electrochemical selectivity. Using the hydrodynamic amperometry mode, the current vs. AA concentration in 0.01 M HCl, at a selected operating potential of 0.30 V, was found to be linear over a wide range of 10-1610 μM (n=22, r=0.999) with a calculated limit of detection of 1.0 μM. The measurement repeatability was satisfactory with a relative standard deviation (r.s.d.) ranging from 4% to 5% (n=6), depending on the AA concentration, and with a sensor-to-sensor reproducibility (r.s.d.) of 6.9% at 100 μM AA. The long-term reproducibility, using the same microsensor for 112 consecutive measurements of 20 μM AA over 11 h of periodic probing sets over 4 days, was 16.1% r.s.d., thus showing very good stability at low AA levels and suitability for use over a prolonged period of time. Moreover, using the proposed microsensor, additionally coated with a protective cellulose acetate membrane, the calibration plot obtained in the extremely complex matrix of real undiluted gastric juice was linear from 10 to 520 μM (n=14, r=0.998). These results

  14. Microsatellite instability typing in serum and tissue of patients with colorectal cancer: comparing real time PCR with hybridization probe and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mokarram, P; Rismanchi, M; Alizadeh Naeeni, M; Mirab Samiee, S; Paryan, M; Alipour, A; Honardar, Z; Kavousipour, S; Naghibalhossaini, F; Mostafavi-Pour, Z; Monabati, A; Hosseni, S V; Shamsdin, S A

    2014-05-01

    Allelic variation of BAT-25 (a 25-repeat quasimonomorphic poly T) and BAT-26 (a 26-repeat quasimonomorphic polyA) loci as two mononucleotide microsatellite markers, were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) compared with Real-Time PCR using hybridization probes. BAT-26 and BAT-25 markers were used to determine an appropriate screening technique with high sensitivity and specificity to diagnose microsatellite instability (MSI) status in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). One of the pathways in colorectal tumor genesis is microsatellite instability (MSI+). MSI is detected in about 15% of all CRCs; 3% are of these are associated with Lynch syndrome and the other 12% are caused by sporadic. Colorectal tumors with MSI have distinctive features compared with microsatellite stable tumors. Due to the high percentage of MSI+ CRC in Iran, screening of this type of CRC is imperative. Two markers were analyzed in tissues and sera of 44 normal volunteers and tumor and matched normal mucosal tissues as well as sera of 44 patients with sporadic CRC. The sensitivity and specificity of BAT-26 with real time PCR method (Hybridization probe) were 100% in comparison with sequencing method as the gold standard, while HPLC had a lower sensitivity and specificity. According to HPLC data, BAT-26 was more sensitive than BAT-25 in identifying MSI tumors. Therefore, MSI typing using the BAT-26 hybridization probe method compared to HPLC could be considered as an accurate method for diagnosing MSI in CRC tumors but not in serum circulating DNAs.

  15. Fluorescent Whole-Cell Hybridization with 16S rRNA-Targeted Oligonucleotide Probes To Identify Brucella spp. by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Lago, Luis; Vallejo, F. Javier; Trujillano, Ignacio; Vizcaíno, Nieves

    2000-01-01

    A whole-cell hybridization assay with fluorescent oligonucleotide probes derived from the 16S rRNA sequence of Brucella abortus in combination with flow cytometry has been developed. With the three fluorescent probes selected, a positive signal was observed with all the representative strains of the species and biovars of Brucella and with a total of nine different Brucella clinical isolates. Using the B9 probe in the hybridization assay, it was possible to discriminate between Brucella suis biovars 2, 3, 4, and 5 and almost all the other Brucella spp. On the basis of differences in fluorescence intensities, no discrimination was established between Brucella spp. and other phylogenetically related microorganisms. No positive fluorescence signals were detected with any of the bacteria showing serological cross-reactions with Brucella spp. and with a total of 17 clinical isolates not belonging to the genus Brucella. These results suggest that the 16S rRNA whole-cell hybridization technique could be a valuable diagnostic tool for the detection and identification of Brucella spp. PMID:10878084

  16. New fluorescent octadecapentaenoic acids as probes of lipid membranes and protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, C R; Souto, A A; Amat-Guerri, F; Acuña, A U

    1996-01-01

    The chemical and spectroscopic properties of the new fluorescent acids all(E)-8, 10, 12, 14, 16-octadecapentaenoic acid (t-COPA) and its (8Z)-isomer (c-COPA) have been characterized in solvents of different polarity, synthetic lipid bilayers, and lipid/protein systems. These compounds are reasonably photostable in solution, present an intense UV absorption band (epsilon(350 nm) approximately 10(5) M(-1) cm(-1)) strongly overlapped by tryptophan fluorescence and their emission, centered at 470 nm, is strongly polarized (r(O) = 0.385 +/- 0.005) and decays with a major component (85%) of lifetime 23 ns and a faster minor one of lifetime 2 ns (D,L-alpha-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), 15 degrees C). Both COPA isomers incorporate readily into vesicles and membranes (K(p) approximately 10(6)) and align parallel to the lipids. t-COPA distributes homogeneously between gel and fluid lipid domains and the changes in polarization accurately reflect the lipid T(m) values. From the decay of the fluorescence anisotropy in spherical bilayers of DMPC and POPC it is shown that t-COPA also correctly reflects the lipid order parameters, determined by 2H NMR techniques. Resonance energy transfer from tryptophan to the bound pentaenoic acid in serum albumin in solution, and from the tryptophan residues of gramicidin in lipid bilayers also containing the pentaenoic acid, show that this probe is a useful acceptor of protein tryptophan excitation, with R(O) values of 30-34 A. Images FIGURE 10 PMID:8889194

  17. Hierarchical assembly of viral nanotemplates with encoded microparticles via nucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wui Siew; Lewis, Christina L; Horelik, Nicholas E; Pregibon, Daniel C; Doyle, Patrick S; Yi, Hyunmin

    2008-11-04

    We demonstrate hierarchical assembly of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based nanotemplates with hydrogel-based encoded microparticles via nucleic acid hybridization. TMV nanotemplates possess a highly defined structure and a genetically engineered high density thiol functionality. The encoded microparticles are produced in a high throughput microfluidic device via stop-flow lithography (SFL) and consist of spatially discrete regions containing encoded identity information, an internal control, and capture DNAs. For the hybridization-based assembly, partially disassembled TMVs were programmed with linker DNAs that contain sequences complementary to both the virus 5' end and a selected capture DNA. Fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and confocal microscopy results clearly indicate facile assembly of TMV nanotemplates onto microparticles with high spatial and sequence selectivity. We anticipate that our hybridization-based assembly strategy could be employed to create multifunctional viral-synthetic hybrid materials in a rapid and high-throughput manner. Additionally, we believe that these viral-synthetic hybrid microparticles may find broad applications in high capacity, multiplexed target sensing.

  18. Colorimetric detection of Ehrlichia canis via nucleic acid hybridization in gold nano-colloids.

    PubMed

    Muangchuen, Ajima; Chaumpluk, Piyasak; Suriyasomboon, Annop; Ekgasit, Sanong

    2014-08-08

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME) is a major thick-bone disease of dog caused by Ehrlichia canis. Detection of this causal agent outside the laboratory using conventional methods is not effective enough. Thus an assay for E. canis detection based on the p30 outer membrane protein gene was developed. It was based on the p30 gene amplification using loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification (LAMP). The primer set specific to six areas within the target gene were designed and tested for their sensitivity and specificity. Detection of DNA signals was based on modulation of gold nanoparticles' surface properties and performing DNA/DNA hybridization using an oligonucleotide probe. Presence of target DNA affected the gold colloid nanoparticles in terms of particle aggregation with a plasmonic color change of the gold colloids from ruby red to purple, visible by the naked eye. All the assay steps were completed within 90 min including DNA extraction without relying on standard laboratory facilities. This method was very specific to target bacteria. Its sensitivity with probe hybridization was sufficient to detect 50 copies of target DNA. This method should provide an alternative choice for point of care control and management of the disease.

  19. The Use of Atomic Force Microscopy for 3D Analysis of Nucleic Acid Hybridization on Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Dubrovin, E V; Presnova, G V; Rubtsova, M Yu; Egorov, A M; Grigorenko, V G; Yaminsky, I V

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are considered today to be one of the most efficient methods of gene diagnostics. The capability of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize the three-dimensional morphology of single molecules on a surface allows one to use it as an effective tool for the 3D analysis of a microarray for the detection of nucleic acids. The high resolution of AFM offers ways to decrease the detection threshold of target DNA and increase the signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, we suggest an approach to the evaluation of the results of hybridization of gold nanoparticle-labeled nucleic acids on silicon microarrays based on an AFM analysis of the surface both in air and in liquid which takes into account of their three-dimensional structure. We suggest a quantitative measure of the hybridization results which is based on the fraction of the surface area occupied by the nanoparticles.

  20. Wollastonite hybridizing stearic acid as thermal energy storage material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dawei; Yang, Huaming

    2014-11-01

    This paper reported on the preparation of a novel stearic acid (SA)/wollastonite (W) composite as a form-stable phase change material (PCM) for thermal energy-storage (TES) by vacuum impregnation, and especially investigated the effect of the size grade of W on the thermal properties of the SA/W composite. Samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), laser particle-size analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Natural W (Wr) was classified into four size grades by wet screening. The results indicate that no chemical reaction took place between SA and W, and the SA load in the SA/W composite increased with an increase in the length/diameter (L/D) ratio of the W. The SA/W composite with a W L/D ratio of 22.5 exhibited latent heats of melting and freezing of 58.64 J/g and 56.95 J/g, respectively, which was higher than those of the composite incorporating natural W. We believe that the as-prepared form-stable PCM composite could provide a potential means of TES for the concentrated solar power.

  1. Application of new in situ hybridization probes for Ku70 and Ku80 in tissue microarrays of paraffin-embedded malignant melanomas: correlation with immunohistochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; Bauer, Hanne; Quentin, Tomas; Stachura, Jerzy; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Brinck, Ulrich

    2004-02-01

    Ku70 and Ku80 proteins are responsible for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and function as a regulatory subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase. In this study we analyzed expression of both genes in malignant melanoma tissue arrays applying in situ hybridization probes produced by our research group and using immunohistochemical analysis. Expression of both genes was down-regulated as melanoma progressed. In situ hybridization demonstrated more Ku70- and Ku80-positive cells than immunohistochemical methods, but the correlation between the two methods was highly significant (P <0.01). We conclude that the in situ hybridization assay for the detection of Ku70 and Ku80 expression used in this study is also suitable for tissue microarray analysis of paraffin-embedded melanoma samples. The laboratory procedure is much more complicated than the immunohistochemical method, however.

  2. Hybrid femtosecond/picosecond rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering temperature and concentration measurements using two different picosecond-duration probes.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Sean P; Scoglietti, Daniel J; Kliewer, Christopher J

    2013-05-20

    A hybrid fs/ps pure-rotational CARS scheme is characterized in furnace-heated air at temperatures from 290 to 800 K. Impulsive femtosecond excitation is used to prepare a rotational Raman coherence that is probed with a ps-duration beam generated from an initially broadband fs pulse that is bandwidth limited using air-spaced Fabry-Perot etalons. CARS spectra are generated using 1.5- and 7.0-ps duration probe beams with corresponding coarse and narrow spectral widths. The spectra are fitted using a simple phenomenological model for both shot-averaged and single-shot measurements of temperature and oxygen mole fraction. Our single-shot temperature measurements exhibit high levels of precision and accuracy when the spectrally coarse 1.5-ps probe beam is used, demonstrating that high spectral resolution is not required for thermometry. An initial assessment of concentration measurements in air is also provided, with best results obtained using the higher resolution 7.0-ps probe. This systematic assessment of the hybrid CARS technique demonstrates its utility for practical application in low-temperature gas-phase systems.

  3. On-chip multiplexed solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization assay using spatial profiles of immobilized quantum dots and fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Noor, M Omair; Tavares, Anthony J; Krull, Ulrich J

    2013-07-25

    A microfluidic based solid-phase assay for the multiplexed detection of nucleic acid hybridization using quantum dot (QD) mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is described herein. The glass surface of hybrid glass-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels was chemically modified to assemble the biorecognition interface. Multiplexing was demonstrated using a detection system that was comprised of two colors of immobilized semi-conductor QDs and two different oligonucleotide probe sequences. Green-emitting and red-emitting QDs were paired with Cy3 and Alexa Fluor 647 (A647) labeled oligonucleotides, respectively. The QDs served as energy donors for the transduction of dye labeled oligonucleotide targets. The in-channel assembly of the biorecognition interface and the subsequent introduction of oligonucleotide targets was accomplished within minutes using a combination of electroosmotic flow and electrophoretic force. The concurrent quantification of femtomole quantities of two target sequences was possible by measuring the spatial coverage of FRET sensitized emission along the length of the channel. In previous reports, multiplexed QD-FRET hybridization assays that employed a ratiometric method for quantification had challenges associated with lower analytical sensitivity arising from both donor and acceptor dilution that resulted in reduced energy transfer pathways as compared to single-color hybridization assays. Herein, a spatial method for quantification that is based on in-channel QD-FRET profiles provided higher analytical sensitivity in the multiplexed assay format as compared to single-color hybridization assays. The selectivity of the multiplexed hybridization assays was demonstrated by discrimination between a fully-complementary sequence and a 3 base pair sequence at a contrast ratio of 8 to 1.

  4. A triterpene oleanolic acid conjugate with 3-hydroxyflavone derivative as a new membrane probe with two-color ratiometric response.

    PubMed

    Turkmen, Zeynep; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Oncul, Sule; Duportail, Guy; Topcu, Gulacti; Demchenko, Alexander P

    2005-07-29

    We report on the synthesis by coupling of a triterpenoid oleanolic acid with 4'-diethylamino-3-hydroxyflavone (FE) to produce an environment-sensitive biomembrane probe with two-band ratiometric response in fluorescence emission. The synthesized compound (probe FOT) was tested in a series of model solvents and demonstrated the response to solvent polarity and intermolecular hydrogen bonding very similar to that of parent probe FE. Meantime when incorporated into lipid bilayer membranes, it showed new features differing in response between lipids of different surface charges as well as between glycerophospholipids and sphingomyelin. We observed that in the conditions of coexistence of rafts and non-raft structures the probe is excluded from the rafts.

  5. Determination of bismuth in pharmaceutical products using phosphoric acid as molecular probe by resonance light scattering.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yanru; Cui, Fengling; Geng, Shaoguang; Jin, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    A novel method for the sensitive determination of bismuth(III) in pharmaceutical products using phosphoric acid as a molecular probe by resonance light scattering (RLS) is discussed. In 0.5 mol/L phosphoric acid (H3 PO4) medium, bismuth(III) reacted with PO4 (3-) to form an ion association compound, which resulted in the significant enhancement of RLS intensity and the appearance of the corresponding RLS spectral characteristics. The maximum scattering peak of the system existed at 364 nm. Under optimal conditions, there was linear relationship between the relative intensity of RLS and concentration of bismuth(III) in the range of 0.06-10.0 µg/mL for the system. A low detection limit for bismuth(III) of 3.22 ng/mL was achieved. The relative standard deviations (RSD) for the determination of 0.40 and 0.80 µg/mL bismuth(III) were 2.1% and 1.1%, respectively, for five determinations. Based on this fact, a simple, rapid, and sensitive method was developed for the determination of bismuth(III) at nanogram level by RLS technique with a common spectrofluorimeter. This analytical system was successfully applied to determine the trace amounts of bismuth(III) in pharmaceutical products, which was in good agreement with the results obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS).

  6. Alginic acid-based macromolecular chemiluminescent probe for universal protein assay on a solid-phase membrane.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Tomasz; Kondo, Midori; Azam, Md Golam; Zhang, Huan; Shibata, Takayuki; Kai, Masaaki

    2010-11-01

    A novel chemiluminescent (CL) technique for the rapid determination of proteins on a membrane is described. The method utilizes an interaction between luminol-labeled alginic acid macromolecule and proteins. The synthesis of the macromolecular probe consists of the oxidation of alginic acid with NaIO(4), the introduction of luminol through imine formation as a CL tag, and the reduction of the conjugate with NaBH(4) to obtain the stable probe. The analytical protocol consists of adsorbing proteins on a poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) membrane, incubating the membrane for 30 min with the probe solution in the presence of boric acid and a surfactant, two short washing steps in order to remove an excess of the probe, and detection of CL intensity with hemin, tetra-n-propylammonium hydroxide and H(2)O(2). This proposed CL assay for proteins can be finished within 1 h, and indicates the detection limit of 15-250 ng of proteins on the membrane. The CL signals in the calibration curves for some proteins such as albumin show proportional intensities against the amounts of the proteins less than ca. 125 ng, though there is a logarithmic relationship between the CL signals and the protein amounts larger than ca. 125 ng. However, some other proteins indicate the proportional CL intensities against the increasing amounts in wider range up to 500 ng of the proteins. The synthesised alginic acid-based probe indicates specific selectivity towards proteins, and should be used as a CL probe for the universal detection of various proteins on a solid-phase membrane even in the presence of DNA and RNA.

  7. Investigation of an acetate-fed denitrifying microbial community by stable isotope probing, full-cycle rRNA analysis, and fluorescent in situ hybridization-microautoradiography.

    PubMed

    Ginige, Maneesha P; Keller, Jürg; Blackall, Linda L

    2005-12-01

    The acetate-utilizing microbial consortium in a full-scale activated sludge process was investigated without prior enrichment using stable isotope probing (SIP). [13C]acetate was used in SIP to label the DNA of the denitrifiers. The [13C]DNA fraction that was extracted was subjected to a full-cycle rRNA analysis. The dominant 16S rRNA gene phylotypes in the 13C library were closely related to the bacterial families Comamonadaceae and Rhodocyclaceae in the class Betaproteobacteria. Seven oligonucleotide probes for use in fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were designed to specifically target these clones. Application of these probes to the sludge of a continuously fed denitrifying sequencing batch reactor (CFDSBR) operated for 16 days revealed that there was a significant positive correlation between the CFDSBR denitrification rate and the relative abundance of all probe-targeted bacteria in the CFDSBR community. FISH-microautoradiography demonstrated that the DEN581 and DEN124 probe-targeted cells that dominated the CFDSBR were capable of taking up [14C]acetate under anoxic conditions. Initially, DEN444 and DEN1454 probe-targeted bacteria also dominated the CFDSBR biomass, but eventually DEN581 and DEN124 probe-targeted bacteria were the dominant bacterial groups. All probe-targeted bacteria assessed in this study were denitrifiers capable of utilizing acetate as a source of carbon. The rapid increase in the number of organisms positively correlated with the immediate increase in denitrification rates observed by plant operators when acetate is used as an external source of carbon to enhance denitrification. We suggest that the impact of bacteria on activated sludge subjected to intermittent acetate supplementation should be assessed prior to the widespread use of acetate in the wastewater industry to enhance denitrification.

  8. Probe depth matters in dermal microdialysis sampling of benzoic acid after topical application: an ex vivo study in human skin.

    PubMed

    Holmgaard, R; Benfeldt, E; Bangsgaard, N; Sorensen, J A; Brosen, K; Nielsen, F; Nielsen, J B

    2012-01-01

    Microdialysis (MD) in the skin - dermal microdialysis (DMD) - is a unique technique for sampling of topically as well as systemically administered drugs at the site of action, e.g. sampling of dermatological drug concentrations in the dermis. Debate has concerned the existence of a correlation between the depth of the sampling device - the probe - in the dermis and the amount of drug sampled following topical drug administration. This study evaluates the relation between probe depth and drug sampling using dermal DMD sampling ex vivo in human skin. We used superficial (<1 mm), intermediate (1-2 mm) and deep (>2 mm) positioning of the linear MD probe in the dermis of human abdominal skin, followed by topical application of 4 mg/ml of benzoic acid (BA) in skin chambers overlying the probes. Dialysate was sampled every hour for 12 h and analysed for BA content by high-performance liquid chromatography. Probe depth was measured by 20-MHz ultrasound scanning. The area under the time-versus-concentration curve (AUC) describes the drug exposure in the tissue during the experiment and is a relevant parameter to compare for the 3 dermal probe depths investigated. The AUC(0-12) were: superficial probes: 3,335 ± 1,094 μg·h/ml (mean ± SD); intermediate probes: 2,178 ± 1,068 μg·h/ml, and deep probes: 1,159 ± 306 μg·h/ml. AUC(0-12) sampled by the superficial probes was significantly higher than that of samples from the intermediate and deeply positioned probes (p value <0.05). There was a significant inverse correlation between probe depth and AUC(0-12) sampled by the same probe (p value <0.001, r(2) value = 0.5). The mean extrapolated lag-times (±SD) for the superficial probes were 0.8 ± 0.1 h, for the intermediate probes 1.7 ± 0.5 h, and for the deep probes 2.7 ± 0.5 h, which were all significantly different from each other (p value <0.05). In conclusion, this paper demonstrates that there is an inverse relationship between the depth of the probe in the dermis

  9. Final Report Nucleic Acid System - Hybrid PCR and Multiplex Assay Project Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, R P; Langlois, R G; Nasarabadi, S; Benett, W J; Colston, B W; Johnson, D C; Brown, S B; Stratton, P L; Milanovich, F P

    2002-04-17

    This report covers phase 2 (year 2) of the Nucleic Acid System--Hybrid PCR and Multiplex Assay project. The objective of the project is to reduce to practice the detection and identification of biological warfare pathogens by the nucleic acid recognition technique of PCR (polymerase chain reaction) in a multiplex mode using flow cytometry. The Hybrid instrument consists of a flow-through PCR module capable of handling a multiplexed PCR assay, a hybridizing module capable of hybridizing multiplexed PCR amplicons and beads, and a flow cytometer module for bead-based identification, all controlled by a single computer. Multiplex immunoassay using bead-based Luminex flow cytometry is available, allowing rapid screening for many agents. PCR is highly specific and complements and verifies immunoassay. It can also be multiplexed and detection provided using the bead-based Luminex flow cytometer. This approach allows full access to the speed and 100-fold multiplex capability of flow cytometry for rapid screening as well as the accuracy and specificity of PCR. This project has two principal activities: (1) Design, build and test a prototype hybrid PCR/flow cytometer with the basic capabilities for rapid, broad spectrum detection and identification, and (2) Develop and evaluate multiplex flow analysis assay protocols and reagents for the simultaneous detection of PCR products. This project requires not only building operationally functional instrumentation but also developing the chemical assays for detection of priority pathogens. This involves development and evaluation of multiplex flow analysis assay protocols and reagents for the simultaneous detection of PCR products.

  10. Novel molecular beacon DNA probes for protein-nucleic acid interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianwei J.; Perlette, John; Fang, Xiaohong; Kelley, Shannon; Tan, Weihong

    2000-03-01

    We report a novel approach to study protein-nucleic acid interactions by using molecular beacons (MBs). Molecular beacons are hairpin-shaped DNA oligonucleotide probes labeled with a fluorophore and a quencher, and can report the presence of target DNA/RNA sequences. MBs can also report the existence of single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB) through non-sequence specific binding. The interaction between SSB and MB has resulted in significant fluorescence restoration of the MB. The fluorescence enhancement brought by SSB and by complementary DNA is very comparable. The molar ratio of the binding between SSB and the molecular beacon is 1:1 with a binding constant of 2 X 107 M-1. Using the MB-SSB binding, we are able to determine SSB at 2 X 10-10 M with a conventional spectrometer. We have also applied MB DNA probes for the analysis of an enzyme lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), and for the investigation of its binding properties with ssDNA. The biding process between MB and different isoenzymes of LDH has been studied. We also show that there are significant differences in MB binding affinity to different proteins, which will enable selective binding studies of a variety of proteins. This new approach is potentially useful for protein-DNA/RNA interaction studies that require high sensitivity, speed and convenience. The results also open the possibility of using easily obtainable, custom designed, modified DNA molecules for studies of drug interactions and targeting. Our results demonstrate that MB can be effectively used for sensitive protein quantitation and for efficient protein-DNA interaction studies. MB has the signal transduction mechanism built within the molecule, and can thus be used for quick protein assay development and for real-time measurements.

  11. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-07-21

    A method is disclosed for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe. 11 figs.

  12. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe.

  13. Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization with centromeric DNA probes as a new approach to distinguish chromosome breakage from aneuploidy in interphase cells and micronuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Eastmond, D.A.; Rupa, D.S.; Chen, H.W.; Hasegawa, L.

    1993-12-31

    Chromosomal abnormalities are believed to contribute significantly to human reproductive failure, carcinogenesis and other pathophysiological conditions. For example, approximately 15% of recognized pregnancies terminate in spontaneous abortion, and of these approximately 30% have been shown to be chromosomally abnormal. The contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to early embryonic and fetal death appears to decrease with gestational age, suggesting that as many as 67% of the aborted embryos in early embryonic deaths are chromosomally abnormal. Furthermore, clinically significant chromosomal abnormalities can also be found to be present in approximately 0.58 to 0.67% of live births. These figures indicate that within a given year, hundreds of thousands of chromosomally abnormal babies will be born throughout the world and additional millions of chromosomally abnormal embryos will have been spontaneously aborted. For the past several years, our research has focused on utilizing new molecular cytogenetic techniques to develop assays for detecting aneuploidy-inducing agents in mammalian cells. One approach that we have sucessfully employed involves the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific DNA probes to determine the number of copies of a representative chromosome present within the nucleus following chemical exposure. DNA sequences (probes) which hybridize to blocks of repetitive centromeric DNA on specific chromosomes have been developed for most of the human chromosomes. In situ hybridization with these probes results in the staining of a compact chromosomal region which can be easily detected in interphase nuclei. The presence of 3 (or more) hybridization domains in an interphase nucleus indicates the presence of three centromeric regions and has been presumed to indicate that three copies of the entire chromosome were present in the nucleus.

  14. Localization of neuropeptide Y mRNA in neurons of human cerebral cortex by means of in situ hybridization with a complementary RNA probe

    SciTech Connect

    Terenghi, G.; Polak, J.M.; Hamid, Q.; O'Brien, E.; Denny, P.; Legon, S.; Dixon, J.; Minth, C.D.; Palay, S.L.; Yasargil, G.

    1987-10-01

    The distribution of mRNA encoding neuropeptide Y (NPY) in neurons of the normal human cerebral cortex in surgical biopsy specimens and postmortem brain was studied in situ hybridization techniques. A /sup 32/P-labeled complementary RNA (cRNA) probe was used on cryostat sections of 13 formaldehyde-fixed cortical biopsy specimens. Hybridization to NPY mRNA was found in all samples: after autoradiography, discrete deposits of silver granules were observed on neuronal cell bodies abundantly distributed in the deep layers of the cortex, particularly laminae IV and VI, and on smaller cell bodies in the white matter. The localization of the neurons hybridized for NPY mRNA was comparable to that of NPY-immunoreactive cells as shown in sections from the same tissue blocks immunostained by using NPY antibodies. The specificity of the in situ hybridization technique was confirmed by blot hybridization analysis of electrophoretically fractionated RNA. This study clearly demonstrated the consistent localization of NPY gene transcription and expression in normal human cortical neurons.

  15. Locked Nucleic Acid and Flow Cytometry-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for the Detection of Bacterial Small Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Kelly L.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the development and testing of a high-throughput method that enables the detection of small noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) from single bacterial cells using locked nucleic acid probes (LNA) and flow cytometry-fluorescence in situ hybridization (flow-FISH). The LNA flow-FISH method and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) were used to monitor the expression of three ncRNAs (6S, CsrB, and TPP-2) in Vibrio campbellii ATCC BAA-1116 cultures during lag phase, mid-log phase, and stationary phase. Both LNA flow-FISH and qRT-PCR revealed that CsrB and TPP-2 were highly expressed during lag phase but markedly reduced in mid-log phase and stationary phase, whereas 6S demonstrated no to little expression during lag phase but increased thereafter. Importantly, while LNA flow-FISH and qRT-PCR demonstrated similar overall expression trends, only LNA flow-FISH, which enabled the detection of ncRNAs in individual cells as opposed to the lysate-based ensemble measurements generated by qRT-PCR, was able to capture the cell-to-cell heterogeneity in ncRNA expression. As such, this study demonstrates a new method that simultaneously enables the in situ detection of ncRNAs and the determination of gene expression heterogeneity within an isogenic bacterial population. PMID:22057868

  16. Design and validation of an oligonucleotide probe for the detection of protozoa from the order Trichomonadida using chromogenic in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Mostegl, Meike Marissa; Richter, Barbara; Nedorost, Nora; Maderner, Anton; Dinhopl, Nora; Kulda, Jaroslav; Liebhart, Dieter; Hess, Michael; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2010-07-15

    Infections with protozoal parasites of the order Trichomonadida are often observed in veterinary medicine. Based on the trichomonad species involved these infections are either asymptomatic or can lead to sometimes serious disease. To further study protozoal agents of the order Trichomonadida the establishment of a method to detect trichomonads directly in the tissue, allowing parasite-lesion correlation, is necessary. Here we describe the design and evaluation of an oligonucleotide probe for chromogenic in situ hybridization, theoretically allowing detection of all hitherto known members of the order Trichomonadida. The probe was designed on a region of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene homologue for all representatives of the order Trichomonadida available in the GenBank. Functionality of the probe was proven using protozoal cultures containing different trichomonads (Monocercomonas colubrorum, Hypotrichomonas acosta, Pentatrichomonas hominis, Trichomitus batrachorum, Trichomonas gallinae, Tetratrichomonas gallinarum, Tritrichomonas foetus, and Tritrichomonas augusta). Furthermore, three different tissue sections containing either T. gallinae, T. foetus or Histomonas meleagridis were tested positive. Additionally, to rule out cross-reactivity of the probe a large number of different pathogenic protozoal agents, fungi, bacteria and viruses were tested and gave negative results. The probe presented here can be considered an important tool for diagnosis of all to date described relevant protozoal parasites of the order Trichomonadida in tissue samples.

  17. Method of preparing and applying single stranded DNA probes to double stranded target DNAs in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for producing single stranded non-self-complementary nucleic acid probes, and for treating target DNA for use therewith. Probe is constructed by treating DNA with a restriction enzyme and an exonuclease to form template/primers for a DNA polymerase. The digested strand is resynthesized in the presence of labeled nucleoside triphosphate precursor. Labeled single stranded fragments are separated from the resynthesized fragments to form the probe. Target DNA is treated with the same restriction enzyme used to construct the probe, and is treated with an exonuclease before application of the probe. The method significantly increases the efficiency and specificity of hybridization mixtures by increasing effective probe concentration by eliminating self-hybridization between both probe and target DNAs, and by reducing the amount of target DNA available for mismatched hybridizations.

  18. Method of preparing and applying single stranded DNA probes to double stranded target DNAs in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Pinkel, D.

    1991-07-02

    A method is provided for producing single stranded non-self-complementary nucleic acid probes, and for treating target DNA for use therewith. The probe is constructed by treating DNA with a restriction enzyme and an exonuclease to form template/primers for a DNA polymerase. The digested strand is resynthesized in the presence of labeled nucleoside triphosphate precursor. Labeled single stranded fragments are separated from the resynthesized fragments to form the probe. Target DNA is treated with the same restriction enzyme used to construct the probe, and is treated with an exonuclease before application of the probe. The method significantly increases the efficiency and specificity of hybridization mixtures by increasing effective probe concentration by eliminating self-hybridization between both probe and target DNAs, and by reducing the amount of target DNA available for mismatched hybridizations. No Drawings

  19. Sucrose esters of carboxylic acids in glandular trichomes ofSolanum berthaultii deter settling and probing by green peach aphid.

    PubMed

    Neal, J J; Tingey, W M; Steffens, J C

    1990-02-01

    Removal of type B trichome exudate fromSolanum berthaultii leaflets leads to a decrease in tarsal gumming and mortality and an increase in feeding by the green peach aphid,Myzus persicae. Type B trichome exudate of theS. berthaultii accession PI 473331 is composed of a complex of 3',3,4,6-tetra-O-acyl sucroses containing primarily short-chain branched carboxylic acids. The acyl constituents are primarily derived from 2-methylpropanoic, 2-methylbutyric, and 8-methylnonanoic acids but constituents derived fromn-decanoic and dodecanoic acids are also present. Sucrose esters inhibit settling and probing by aphids in glass feeding cages.

  20. Porous Zirconium-Phytic Acid Hybrid: a Highly Efficient Catalyst for Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley Reductions.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinliang; Zhou, Baowen; Zhou, Huacong; Wu, Lingqiao; Meng, Qinglei; Liu, Zhimin; Han, Buxing

    2015-08-03

    The utilization of compounds from natural sources to prepare functional materials is of great importance. Herein, we describe for the first time the preparation of organic-inorganic hybrid catalysts by using natural phytic acid as building block. Zirconium phosphonate (Zr-PhyA) was synthesized by reaction of phytic acid and ZrCl4 and was obtained as a mesoporous material with pore sizes centered around 8.5 nm. Zr-PhyA was used to catalyze the mild and selective Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley (MPV) reduction of various carbonyl compounds, e.g., of levulinic acid and its esters into γ-valerolactone. Further studies indicated that both Zr and phosphate groups contribute significantly to the excellent performance of Zr-PhyA.

  1. Probing Porosity and Pore Interconnectivity in Self-Assembled TiO2–Graphene Hybrid Nanostructures Using Hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li Qiong; Wang, Donghai; Liu, Jun; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    2012-01-12

    Hyperpolarized (HP) {sup 129}Xe NMR was used to probe the porosity and interconnectivity of pores in self-assembled hybrid TiO{sub 2}-graphene nanostructures. We have demonstrated that HP {sup 129}Xe NMR is a powerful technique in probing any changes in porosity and interconnectivity of the pores caused by addition of a small amount of functionalized graphene sheets (FGSs) (1% weight percent) into the network of mesoporous TiO{sub 2}. To obtain the information on the changes in porosity and interconnectivity of the pores caused by addition of a small amount of FGSs, a comparative study has been carried out by acquiring HP {sup 129}Xe NMR spectra under identical experimental conditions for both pure mesoporous TiO{sub 2} and hybrid TiO{sub 2}-FGSs. The HP {sup 129}Xe NMR results from our comparative study suggest that TiO{sub 2} and graphene are mixed uniformly on the nanoscale and the resulting hybrid nanostructure has better channel connectivity between different domains, enhancing the transport property for Li-insertion/extraction.

  2. Evaluation of three-dimensional microchannel glass biochips for multiplexed nucleic acid fluorescence hybridization assays.

    PubMed

    Benoit, V; Steel, A; Torres, M; Yu, Y Y; Yang, H; Cooper, J

    2001-06-01

    Three-dimensional, flow-through microchannel glass substrates have a potential for enhanced performance, including increased sensitivity and dynamic range, over traditional planar substrates used in medium-density microarray platforms. This paper presents a methodology for the implementation of multiplexed nucleic acid hybridization fluorescence assays on microchannel glass substrates. Fluorescence detection was achieved, in a first instance, using conventional low-magnification microscope objective lenses, as imaging optics whose depth-of-field characteristics match the thickness of the microchannel glass chip. The optical properties of microchannel glass were shown, through experimental results and simulations, to be compatible with the quantitative detection of heterogeneous hybridization events taking place along the microchannel sidewalls, with detection limits for oligonucleotide targets in the low-attomole range.

  3. Effect of acidic solutions on the surface degradation of a micro-hybrid composite resin.

    PubMed

    Münchow, Eliseu A; Ferreira, Ana Cláudia A; Machado, Raissa M M; Ramos, Tatiana S; Rodrigues-Junior, Sinval A; Zanchi, Cesar H

    2014-01-01

    Composite resins may undergo wear by the action of chemical substances (e.g., saliva, alcohol, bacterial acids) of the oral environment, which may affect the material's structure and surface properties. This study evaluated the effect of acidic substances on the surface properties of a micro-hybrid composite resin (Filtek Z-250). Eighty specimens were prepared, and baseline hardness and surface roughness (KMN0 and Ra0, respectively) were measured. The specimens were subjected to sorption (SO) and solubility (SL) tests according to ISO 4049:2009, but using different storage solutions: deionized water; 75/25 vol% ethanol/water solution; lactic acid; propionic acid; and acetic acid. The acids were used in two concentrations: PA and 0.02 N. pH was measured for all solutions and final hardness (KMN1) and surface roughness (Ra1) were measured. Data were analyzed with paired t-tests and one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=5%). All solutions decreased hardness and increased the Ra values, except for the specimens stored in water and 0.02 N lactic acid, which maintained the hardness. All solutions produced similar SO and SL phenomena, except for the 0.02 N lactic acid, which caused lower solubility than the other solutions. Ethanol showed the highest pH (6.6) and the 0.02 N lactic acid the lowest one (2.5). The solutions affected negatively the surface properties of the composite resin; in addition, an acidic pH did not seem to be a significant factor that intensifies the surface degradation phenomena.

  4. Variability in fatty acid and triacylglycerol composition of the oil of coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) hybrids and their parentals.

    PubMed

    Laureles, Lucita R; Rodriguez, Felicito M; Reaño, Consorcia E; Santos, Gerardo A; Laurena, Antonio C; Mendoza, Evelyn Mae Tecson

    2002-03-13

    The fatty acid profiles and triacylglycerol (TAG) compositions of oils from the solid endosperm of different Philippine coconut hybrids and their parentals were determined by using gas chromatography (GC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In general, varietal differences in fatty acid composition were observed. Lauric acid (C12) content was significantly higher in the hybrids PCA 15-8 (50.45%) and PCA 15-9 (50.26%) by about 3.16% points as compared to other hybrids, and higher in Tacunan Green Dwarf (50.50%) among the parentals. Among the fatty acids, lauric acid exhibited the least variation. In general, none of the hybrids had higher fatty acid content than their parentals. The HPLC chromatogram of triacylglycerols (TAG) showed 8 major peaks which differ in carbon number (CN) by two: identified as TAG CN 30, 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, and 44. TAGs CN 30 (4.08%) and CN 34 (19.20%) were found to be significantly higher in PCA 15-9 than in the other hybrids. CN 36 was highest (21.94-23.66%) in all hybrids and parentals. The TAG CNs varied significantly among hybrids and parents, i.e., in CN 30, 32, and 34, which are high in medium chain triacylglycerols (MCTs), and in CN 30 (for parentals only), 40, 42, and 44 (the latter two for parentals only), and none in CN 36. MCTs calculated for two hybrids and their parents ranged from 13.81% to 20.55%.

  5. Synthesis and anti-tumor activity evaluation of gallic acid-mangiferin hybrid molecule.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang-yu; Deng, Jia-gang; Wang, Lin; Yuan, Ye-fei

    2013-12-01

    To improve the anti-tumor effects of gallic acid and mangiferin, a gallic acid-mangiferin hybrid molecule (GAMA) was synthesized from gallic acid with mangiferin in the presence of ionic liquid ChC1(choline chloride)·2SnC12. Chemical and spectroscopic methods, such as (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, and HR-ESIMS were used for the structure identification of GA-MA. Using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, the in vitro anti-tumor effects were compared between GA-MA, gallic acid and mangiferin on human hepatoma HepG2, human nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE, human lung cancer NCI-H460, human ovarian cancer SK-OV-3, and human cervical cancer Hela cells. The results showed that the half inhibitory concentration (IC50) of GA-MA on HepG2, CNE, NCI-H460, SK-OV-3, and Hela cells was significantly lower than that of gallic acid or mangiferin. This showed that GA-MA has a better in vitro anti-tumor effect than gallic acid and mangi-ferin.

  6. A high power spiral wound lead-acid battery for hybrid electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.B.; Sexton, E.D.

    1997-12-01

    Optima Batteries, Inc. is currently in development of a high power (660 W/kg) spiral wound lead-acid 6V battery with a nominal capacity of 15 Ah. Its exceptional power and excellent thermal characteristics make it a promising choice for hybrid electric vehicle applications. The hybrid electric vehicle presents a new and unique challenge for energy storage systems. The batteries require high power for acceleration and hill climbing and good charge acceptance for regenerative braking and overall energy efficiency. Since the on board auxiliary power unit results in much lower demands for battery energy capacity, lead-acid batteries fit quite well into these performance requirements. Many of the remaining challenges involve the development of battery management systems which must function to maintain the battery pack at peak performance and achieve an economical cycle life. Related to the issue of battery management is information about conditions that may cause damage or unbalance of the pack. Experiments are described investigating the effects of extreme cell reversal on battery capacity and cycle life. The results demonstrate the amazing robustness of the lead-acid battery for tolerating over discharge.

  7. Evaluation of Peptide Nucleic Acid-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Identification of Clinically Relevant Mycobacteria in Clinical Specimens and Tissue Sections

    PubMed Central

    Lefmann, Michael; Schweickert, Birgitta; Buchholz, Petra; Göbel, Ulf B.; Ulrichs, Timo; Seiler, Peter; Theegarten, Dirk; Moter, Annette

    2006-01-01

    With fluorescently labeled PNA (peptide nucleic acid) probes targeting 16S rRNA, we established a 3-h fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure for specific visualization of members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, M. leprae, M. avium, and M. kansasii. Probe specificity was tested against a panel of 25 Mycobacterium spp. and 10 gram-positive organisms. After validation, probes were used to identify 52 mycobacterial culture isolates. Results were compared to conventional genotypic identification with amplification-based methods. All isolates (M. tuberculosis complex, n = 24; M. avium, n = 7; M. kansasii, n = 1) were correctly identified by FISH. In addition, the technique was used successfully for visualization of mycobacteria in biopsies from infected humans or animals. In conclusion, PNA-FISH is a fast and accurate tool for species-specific identification of culture-grown mycobacteria and for direct visualization of these organisms in tissue sections. It may be used successfully for both research and clinical microbiology. PMID:17021106

  8. Synthesis and spectral properties of polymethine-cyanine dye-nitroxide radical hybrid compounds for use as fluorescence probes to monitor reducing species and radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shingo; Tsunoda, Minoru; Suzuki, Minoru; Kutsuna, Masahiro; Takido-uchi, Kiyomi; Shindo, Mitsuru; Mizuguchi, Hitoshi; Obara, Heitaro; Ohya, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    Various hybrid compounds comprised of two types of nitroxide radicals and either a pentamethine (Cy5) or trimethine cyanine (Cy3) were synthesized. The nitroxide radicals were linked either via an ester-bond to one or two N-alkyl carboxyl-terminated groups of Cy5, or via two amido-bonds (aminocarbonyl or carbonylamino group) to the 5-position of the indolenine moieties of Cy5 and Cy3. Changes in fluorescence and ESR intensities of the hybrid compounds were measured before and after addition of Na ascorbate in PBS (pH 7.0) to reduce the radicals. Among the hybrid compounds synthesized, those that linked the nitroxide radicals via an aminocarbonyl residue at the 5-position of the indolenine moieties on Cy5 and Cy3 exhibited a 1.8- and 5.1-fold increase in fluorescence intensity with the reduction of the nitroxide segment by the addition of Na ascorbate, respectively. In contrast, fluorescence intensity was not enhanced in the other hybrid compounds. Thus, the hybrid compounds which exhibited an increase in fluorescent intensity with radical reduction can be used in the quantitative measurement of reducing species such as Fe 2+ and ascorbic acid, and hydroxyl radicals. Because these hybrid compounds have the advantage of fluorescing at longer wavelengths—661 (Cy5) or 568 (Cy3) nm, respectively, they can be used to measure radical-reducing species or radicals either in solution or in vivo.

  9. The dietary branched chain amino acid requirements of hybrid striped bass(Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The requirements for branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are unknown in hybrid striped bass and necessary for formulating efficient and nutritious diets. Moreover, the dietary balance among these three amino acids can substantially influence the performance of meat animals fed those diets. The diet...

  10. A novel chaotic based image encryption using a hybrid model of deoxyribonucleic acid and cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enayatifar, Rasul; Sadaei, Hossein Javedani; Abdullah, Abdul Hanan; Lee, Malrey; Isnin, Ismail Fauzi

    2015-08-01

    Currently, there are many studies have conducted on developing security of the digital image in order to protect such data while they are sending on the internet. This work aims to propose a new approach based on a hybrid model of the Tinkerbell chaotic map, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and cellular automata (CA). DNA rules, DNA sequence XOR operator and CA rules are used simultaneously to encrypt the plain-image pixels. To determine rule number in DNA sequence and also CA, a 2-dimension Tinkerbell chaotic map is employed. Experimental results and computer simulations, both confirm that the proposed scheme not only demonstrates outstanding encryption, but also resists various typical attacks.

  11. Comparative mapping of DNA probes derived from the V{sub k} immunoglobulin gene regions on human and great ape chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, N.; Wienberg, J.; Ermert, K.

    1995-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of cosmid clones of human V{sub K} gene regions to human and primate chromosomes contributed to the dating of chromosome reorganizations in evolution. A clone from the K locus at 2p11-p12 (cos 106) hybridized to the assumed homologous chromosome bands in the chimpanzees Pan troglodytes (PTR) and P. paniscus (PPA), the Gorilla gorilla (GGO), and the orangutan Pongo Pygmaeus (PPY). Human and both chimpanzees differed from gorilla and orangutan by the mapping of cos 170, a clone derived from chromosome 2cen-q11.2; the transposition of this orphon to the other side of the centromere can, therefore, be dated after the human/chimpanzee and gorilla divergence. Hybridization to homologous bands was also found with a cosmid clone containing a V{sub K}I orphon located on chromosome 1 (cos 115, main signal at 1q31-q32), although the probe is not fully unique. Also, a clone derived from the orphon V{sub K} region on chromosome 22q11 (cos 121) hybridized to the homologous bands in the great apes. This indicates that the orphons on human chromosomes 1 and 22 had been translocated early in primate evolution. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes by direct colony hybridization on hydrophobic grid-membrane filters by using a chromogen-labeled DNA probe.

    PubMed Central

    Peterkin, P I; Idziak, E S; Sharpe, A N

    1991-01-01

    A DNA probe specific for Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from a beta-hemolytic recombinant clone of an L. monocytogenes gene bank. It was labeled with horseradish peroxidase and used in a direct colony hybridization method on hydrophobic grid-membrane filters for the detection of the organism. Following color development of the chromogen, a commercial counter (HGMF Interpreter) was able to detect and count the organisms electronically. The method gave a positive reaction with 70 L. monocytogenes strains, while showing a negative reaction with 10 strains of other Listeria spp. and with 20 organisms of other genera. Images PMID:1901711

  13. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes by direct colony hybridization on hydrophobic grid-membrane filters by using a chromogen-labeled DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Peterkin, P I; Idziak, E S; Sharpe, A N

    1991-02-01

    A DNA probe specific for Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from a beta-hemolytic recombinant clone of an L. monocytogenes gene bank. It was labeled with horseradish peroxidase and used in a direct colony hybridization method on hydrophobic grid-membrane filters for the detection of the organism. Following color development of the chromogen, a commercial counter (HGMF Interpreter) was able to detect and count the organisms electronically. The method gave a positive reaction with 70 L. monocytogenes strains, while showing a negative reaction with 10 strains of other Listeria spp. and with 20 organisms of other genera.

  14. Characterisation of the UFXC32k hybrid pixel detector for time-resolved pump-probe diffraction experiments at Synchrotron SOLEIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawiec, A.; Maj, P.; Ciavardini, A.; Gryboś, P.; Laulhé, C.; Menneglier, C.; Szczygieł, R.

    2017-03-01

    The experimental set-up for time-resolved studies of ultra-fast photo-induced structural dynamics at the Synchrotron SOLEIL is based on a general pump-probe scheme that has been developed and implemented on the CRISTAL hard X-ray diffraction beamline [1,2]. In a so-called pump-probe cycle, the sample is excited with an ultra-short laser pulse of ≈40 fs duration (the pump), and induced changes in its atomic structure are studied by measuring, with a precisely controlled delay, a diffraction pattern from a single pulse of synchrotron radiation (the probe) with a 2-D pixel detector. An improvement to the classical scheme is proposed, where the sample's response is probed at two different delays after each laser excitation. The first measurement at short delays allows studying the photo-induced dynamics. The second one is a reference measurement taken after sample's relaxation, which permits detection of drifts in the experimental conditions (e.g. beam misalignment, sample degradation). A hybrid pixel detector with a very fast readout time, a high dynamic range and extended linearity was tested to achieve the experiment objectives. In this paper, the first results obtained with the UFXC32k single photon counting detector are presented.

  15. Split-probe hybrid femtosecond/picosecond rotational CARS for time-domain measurement of S-branch Raman linewidths within a single laser shot.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Brian D; Gao, Yi; Seeger, Thomas; Kliewer, Christopher J

    2013-11-15

    We introduce a multiplex technique for the single-laser-shot determination of S-branch Raman linewidths with high accuracy and precision by implementing hybrid femtosecond (fs)/picosecond (ps) rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) with multiple spatially and temporally separated probe beams derived from a single laser pulse. The probe beams scatter from the rotational coherence driven by the fs pump and Stokes pulses at four different probe pulse delay times spanning 360 ps, thereby mapping collisional coherence dephasing in time for the populated rotational levels. The probe beams scatter at different folded BOXCARS angles, yielding spatially separated CARS signals which are collected simultaneously on the charge coupled device camera. The technique yields a single-shot standard deviation (1σ) of less than 3.5% in the determination of Raman linewidths and the average linewidth values obtained for N(2) are within 1% of those previously reported. The presented technique opens the possibility for correcting CARS spectra for time-varying collisional environments in operando.

  16. Intracellular surface-enhanced Raman scattering probe based on gold nanorods functionalized with mercaptohexadecanoic acid with reduced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Wang, Zhuyuan; Zong, Shenfei; Zhang, Ruohu; Yang, Jing; Cui, Yiping

    2012-01-01

    A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probe for intracellular detection was demonstrated by utilizing gold nanorods (GNRs) coated with p-aminothiophenol as the Raman reporters. In this probe, to reduce the cytotoxicity of GNRs, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) molecules adsorbed on the surfaces of GNRs as ligands were replaced by mercaptohexadecanoic acid via a "round-trip" phase change method. Such a ligand exchange can reduce the toxicity of the probe compared to the original CTAB-stabilized GNRs, which were confirmed by both 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and bright field view of HeLa cells. Meanwhile, the transmission electron microscopy images indicated that there is no significant morphologic change of GNRs before and after the ligand exchange. Moreover, its SERS performance was adequately retained after the incorporation of the probe into living HeLa cells. This new type of SERS probe is expected to have great potential in intracellular imaging or sensing applications.

  17. Detection and quantification of genetically modified organisms using very short, locked nucleic acid TaqMan probes.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Sergio; D'Orso, Fabio; Morelli, Giorgio

    2008-06-25

    Many countries have introduced mandatory labeling requirements on foods derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based upon the TaqMan probe chemistry has become the method mostly used to support these regulations; moreover, event-specific PCR is the preferred method in GMO detection because of its high specificity based on the flanking sequence of the exogenous integrant. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of very short (eight-nucleotide long), locked nucleic acid (LNA) TaqMan probes in 5'-nuclease PCR assays for the detection and quantification of GMOs. Classic TaqMan and LNA TaqMan probes were compared for the analysis of the maize MON810 transgene. The performance of the two types of probes was tested on the maize endogenous reference gene hmga, the CaMV 35S promoter, and the hsp70/cryIA(b) construct as well as for the event-specific 5'-integration junction of MON810, using plasmids as standard reference molecules. The results of our study demonstrate that the LNA 5'-nuclease PCR assays represent a valid and reliable analytical system for the detection and quantification of transgenes. Application of very short LNA TaqMan probes to GMO quantification can simplify the design of 5'-nuclease assays.

  18. Chlorogenic acid-arabinose hybrid domains in coffee melanoidins: Evidences from a model system.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Ana S P; Coimbra, Manuel A; Nunes, Fernando M; Passos, Cláudia P; Santos, Sónia A O; Silvestre, Armando J D; Silva, André M N; Rangel, Maria; Domingues, M Rosário M

    2015-10-15

    Arabinose from arabinogalactan side chains was hypothesized as a possible binding site for chlorogenic acids in coffee melanoidins. To investigate this hypothesis, a mixture of 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA), the most abundant chlorogenic acid in green coffee beans, and (α1 → 5)-L-arabinotriose, structurally related to arabinogalactan side chains, was submitted to dry thermal treatments. The compounds formed during thermal processing were identified by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and characterized by tandem MS (ESI-MS(n)). Compounds composed by one or two CQAs covalently linked with pentose (Pent) residues (1-12) were identified, along with compounds bearing a sugar moiety but composed exclusively by the quinic or caffeic acid moiety of CQAs. The presence of isomers was demonstrated by liquid chromatography online coupled to ESI-MS and ESI-MS(n). Pent1-2CQA were identified in coffee samples. These results give evidence for a diversity of chlorogenic acid-arabinose hybrids formed during roasting, opening new perspectives for their identification in melanoidin structures.

  19. Direct RNA detection without nucleic acid purification and PCR: Combining sandwich hybridization with signal amplification based on branched hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yao; Zheng, Zhi

    2016-05-15

    We have developed a convenient, robust and low-cost RNA detection system suitable for high-throughput applications. This system uses a highly specific sandwich hybridization to capture target RNA directly onto solid support, followed by on-site signal amplification via 2-dimensional, branched hybridizing chain polymerization through toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction. The assay uses SYBR Green to detect targets at concentrations as low as 1 pM, without involving nucleic acid purification or any enzymatic reaction, using ordinary oligonucleotides without modification or labeling. The system was demonstrated in the detection of malaria RNA in blood and GAPDH gene expression in cell lysate.

  20. A high-resolution mitochondria-targeting ratiometric fluorescent probe for detection of the endogenous hypochlorous acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liyi; Lu, Dan-Qing; Wang, Qianqian; Hu, Shunqin; Wang, Haifei; Sun, Hongyan; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    Hypochlorite anion, one of the biologically important reactive oxygen species, plays an essential role in diverse normal biochemical functions and abnormal pathological processes. Herein, an efficient high-resolution mitochondria-targeting ratiometric fluorescent probe for hypochlorous acid detection has been designed, synthesized and characterized. It is easily synthesized by the condensation reaction (Cdbnd C) of a 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl) quinazolin-4(3H)-one fluorophore and a cyanine group (mitochondria-targeting), which made the whole molecular a large Stokes shift (210 nm) and the two well-resolved emission peaks separated by 140 nm. As a result, it is considered as a good candidate for high resolution hypochlorous acid imaging in live cells. The ratiometric fluorescent probe exhibited outstanding features of high sensitivity, high selectivity, rapid response time (within 50 s), and excellent mitochondria-targeting ability. Moreover, the probe can also be successfully applied to imaging endogenously hypochlorous acid in the mitochondria of living cells with low cytotoxicity, and high resolution.

  1. A carbon dot-based "off-on" fluorescent probe for highly selective and sensitive detection of phytic acid.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhao; Wang, Libing; Su, Rongxin; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2015-08-15

    We herein report a facile, one-step pyrolysis synthesis of photoluminescent carbon dots (CDs) using citric acid as the carbon source and lysine as the surface passivation reagent. The as-prepared CDs show narrow size distribution, excellent blue fluorescence and good photo-stability and water dispersivity. The fluorescence of the CDs was found to be effectively quenched by ferric (Fe(III)) ions with high selectivity via a photo-induced electron transfer (PET) process. Upon addition of phytic acid (PA) to the CDs/Fe(III) complex dispersion, the fluorescence of the CDs was significantly recovered, arising from the release of Fe(III) ions from the CDs/Fe(III) complex because PA has a higher affinity for Fe(III) ions compared to CDs. Furthermore, we developed an "off-on" fluorescence assay method for the detection of phytic acid using CDs/Fe(III) as a fluorescent probe. This probe enables the selective detection of PA with a linear range of 0.68-18.69 μM and a limit of detection (signal-to-noise ratio is 3) of 0.36 μM. The assay method demonstrates high selectivity, repeatability, stability and recovery ratio in the detection of the standard and real PA samples. We believe that the facile operation, low-cost, high sensitivity and selectivity render this CD-based "off-on" fluorescent probe an ideal sensing platform for the detection of PA.

  2. Spiral wound valve-regulated lead-acid batteries for hybrid vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, M. L.; Trinidad, F.; Lacadena, J. M.; Valenciano, J.; Arce, G.

    Future vehicle applications require the development of reliable and long life batteries operating under high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) working conditions. This paper updates work carried out to develop spiral wound valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries for vehicles with different hybridisation degrees, ranging from stop-start to mild hybrid applications. Former work on design optimisation and active material formulations has been implemented in two spiral wound VRLA batteries, rated 12 V 50 Ah and 6 V 24 Ah, and these two products are currently being tested both in benches and in vehicles with different hybridisation degrees within a demonstration project funded by the Advanced Lead Acid Battery Consortium and in collaboration with several European vehicle and electrical component manufacturers.

  3. Particle-rod hybrids: growth of arachidic acid molecular rods from capped cadmium selenide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongzhong; Wang, Ruomiao; Arachchige, Indika; Mao, Guangzhao; Brock, Stephanie L

    2004-12-22

    This communication describes a spin-coating method to nucleate organic molecular rods of uniform size from an inorganic nanoparticle at a solid surface. The particle-rod hybrid structure spontaneously forms when a film is spin coated from a mixed 2-propanol solution of arachidic acid (AA) and nanoparticles of cadmium selenide capped by mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA-CdSe) on graphite. AFM images show that MUA-CdSe nanoparticles nucleate single crystalline rods of AA with a cross section of a single unit cell of the C-form. The solution-based process potentially allows the precise tuning of the wetting profile of the solution on the surface-attached nanoparticle, which provides the reservoir for the growth of the single crystalline rods. The results suggest that nanoparticles can be regarded as nanoseeds for the nucleation of guest crystals. It should be possible to further functionalize the AA rods by electrostatic complexation with metal or organic ions.

  4. Developing mixed films of immobilized oligonucleotides and quantum dots for the multiplexed detection of nucleic acid hybridization using a combination of fluorescence resonance energy transfer and direct excitation of fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Algar, W Russ; Krull, Ulrich J

    2010-04-20

    Methods have been developed for the simultaneous and selective detection of three target nucleic acid sequences based on mixed films of immobilized quantum dots (QDs) and oligonucleotide probes. CdSe/ZnS QDs were immobilized on optical fibers and conjugated with mixtures of different probe oligonucleotides. Hybridization events were detected using a combination of fluorescence from direct excitation and fluorescence sensitized by resonance energy transfer (FRET). A sandwich assay format was used to associate dye labeled reporter oligonucleotides with probe-target hybrids formed at the surface of the optical fiber. One detection channel utilized direct excitation of Pacific Blue and the two other detection channels were based on FRET. In one strategy, green emitting QDs were used as donors with Cy3 and Rhodamine Red-X acceptors. In a second strategy, green and red emitting QDs were coimmobilized and used as donors with Cy3 and Alexa Fluor 647 acceptors, respectively. Selective three-plex detection was demonstrated with both strategies. Several key design criteria that were explored to optimize the relative signal magnitude between channels included: the ratio of probe associated with direct excitation versus probes associated with FRET; the relative amounts of each FRET probe and corresponding spectral overlap; and the photoluminescence ratio between immobilized green and red emitting QDs (where applicable). Careful selection of probe sequences and lengths were important for the discrimination of single nucleotide polymorphisms in one channel without suppressing binding of target in the other two channels. This work provides a basis for the development of multiplexed biosensors that are ensemble compatible and do not require discrete sensor elements, spatial registration, sorting technology, or single molecule spectroscopy.

  5. Theoretical study of the NLO responses of some natural and unnatural amino acids used as probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Derrar, S N; Sekkal-Rahal, M; Derreumaux, P; Springborg, M

    2014-08-01

    The first hyperpolarizabilities β of the natural aromatic amino acids tryptophan and tyrosine have been investigated using several methods and basis sets. Some of the theoretical results obtained were compared to the only experimental hyper-Rayleigh scattering data available. The sensitivity of tryptophan to its local environment was analyzed by constructing two-dimensional potential energy plots around the dipeptide tryptophan-lysine. Static hyperpolarizabilities β(0) of the found minima were calculated by a second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) method in combination with the 6-31+G(d) basis set. Moreover, the efficiency of tryptophan and those of a series of unnatural amino acids as endogenous probe molecules were tested by calculating the nonlinear responses of some peptides. Impressive results were obtained for the amino acid ALADAN, which shows significantly improved nonlinear performance compared to other amino acids with weak nonlinear responses.

  6. p-Aminophenylacetic acid-mediated synthesis of monodispersed titanium oxide hybrid microspheres in ethanol solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongye; Xie, Yun; Liu, Zhimin; Tao, Ranting; Sun, Zhenyu; Ding, Kunlun; An, Guimin

    2009-10-15

    Monodispersed TiO2 hybrid microspheres were prepared via the hydrolysis of titanium isopropoxide (TTIP) in ethanol solution containing p-aminophenylacetic acid (APA). The effects of the APA:TTIP molar ratio, water content, reaction time and reaction temperature on the morphology of the resultant spheres were investigated. The products were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray diffraction. It was demonstrated that the diameters of the resultant TiO2 spheres could be tuned in the range of 380-800 nm by changing the APA:TTIP molar ratio (1:3 to 3:1) and water content (1-3 v/v%) in the reaction medium, and that increasing the APA:TTIP molar ratio led to larger TiO2 hybrid spheres while increasing the water content decreased their size. The loading content of APA in the hybrid spheres could reach 20 wt.% as they were prepared with the APA:TTIP ratio of 3:1. The possible formation mechanism of the hybrid spheres was also investigated. It was found that APA slowed down the hydrolysis rate of the titanium precursor so that resulted in the formation of the TiO2 spheres. In addition, the APA present in TiO2 spheres acted as a reducing agent to in situ convert HAuCl4 into metallic Au on the surface of the TiO2 spheres. The catalytic activity of the resultant Au/APA-TiO2 composite was examined using transfer hydrogenation of phenylacetone with 2-propanol, and it was indicated that the catalyst displayed high efficiency for this reaction.

  7. Development of rapeseed with high erucic acid content by asymmetric somatic hybridization between Brassica napus and Crambe abyssinica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y P; Sonntag, K; Rudloff, E

    2003-05-01

    PEG-induced asymmetric somatic hybridization between Brassica napus and Crambe abyssinica was carried out. C. abyssinica is an annual cruciferous oil crop with a high content of erucic acid in the seed oil valuable for technical purposes. UV-irradiated mesophyll protoplasts of C. abyssinica cv 'Carmen' and cv 'Galactica' were fused with hypocotyl protoplasts of different genotypes of B. napus cv 'Maplus' and breeding line '11502'. Shoot regeneration frequency varied between 6.1% and 20.8% among the different doses of UV-irradiation, ranging from 0.05 J/cm(2) to 0.30 J/cm(2). In total, 124 shoots were regenerated, of which 20 asymmetric somatic hybrids were obtained and verified by nuclear DNA content and AFLP analysis. AFLP data showed that some of the characteristic bands from C. abyssinica were present in the hybrids. Cytological analysis of these hybrids showed that 9 out of 20 asymmetric hybrids had 38 chromosomes, the others contained 40-78 chromosomes, having additional chromosomes between 2 and 40 beyond the 38 expected for B. napus. The investigation into the fertility of asymmetric somatic hybrids indicated that the fertility increased with increasing UV-doses ranging from 0.05 J/cm(2) to 0.15 J/cm(2). All of the hybrids were cultured to full maturity, and could be fertilized and set seeds after self-pollination or backcrosses with B. napus. An analysis of fatty acid composition in the seeds was conducted and found to contain significantly greater amounts of erucic acid than B. napus. This study indicates that UV-irradiation could be used as a tool to produce asymmetric somatic hybrids and to promote the fertility of the hybrids.

  8. Hybrid Processes Combining Photocatalysis and Ceramic Membrane Filtration for Degradation of Humic Acids in Saline Water

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lili; Zhu, Bo; Gray, Stephen; Duke, Mikel; Muthukumaran, Shobha

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the combined effects of photocatalysis with ceramic membrane filtration for the removal of humic acid in the presence of salt; to simulate saline wastewater conditions. The effects of operating parameters, such as salinity and TiO2 concentration on permeate fluxes, total organic carbon (TOC), and UV absorbance removal, were investigated. The interaction between the humic acids and TiO2 photocatalyst played an important role in the observed flux change during ceramic membrane filtration. The results for this hybrid system showed that the TOC removal was more than 70% for both without NaCl and with the 500 ppm NaCl concentration, and 62% and 66% for 1000 and 2000 ppm NaCl concentrations. The reduction in UV absorbance was more complete in the absence of NaCl compared to the presence of NaCl. The operation of the integrated photoreactor-ceramic membrane filter over five repeat cycles is described. It can be concluded that the overall removal performance of the hybrid system was influenced by the presence of salts, as salt leads to agglomeration of TiO2 particles by suppressing the stabilising effects of electrostatic repulsion and thereby reduces the effective surface contact between the pollutant and the photocatalyst. PMID:26938568

  9. Hybrid Processes Combining Photocatalysis and Ceramic Membrane Filtration for Degradation of Humic Acids in Saline Water.

    PubMed

    Song, Lili; Zhu, Bo; Gray, Stephen; Duke, Mikel; Muthukumaran, Shobha

    2016-03-01

    This study explored the combined effects of photocatalysis with ceramic membrane filtration for the removal of humic acid in the presence of salt; to simulate saline wastewater conditions. The effects of operating parameters, such as salinity and TiO₂ concentration on permeate fluxes, total organic carbon (TOC), and UV absorbance removal, were investigated. The interaction between the humic acids and TiO₂ photocatalyst played an important role in the observed flux change during ceramic membrane filtration. The results for this hybrid system showed that the TOC removal was more than 70% for both without NaCl and with the 500 ppm NaCl concentration, and 62% and 66% for 1000 and 2000 ppm NaCl concentrations. The reduction in UV absorbance was more complete in the absence of NaCl compared to the presence of NaCl. The operation of the integrated photoreactor-ceramic membrane filter over five repeat cycles is described. It can be concluded that the overall removal performance of the hybrid system was influenced by the presence of salts, as salt leads to agglomeration of TiO₂ particles by suppressing the stabilising effects of electrostatic repulsion and thereby reduces the effective surface contact between the pollutant and the photocatalyst.

  10. Effect of Backbone Design on Hybridization Thermodynamics of Oligo-nucleic Acids: A Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Jayaraman, Arthi

    DNA hybridization is the basis of various bio-nano technologies, such as DNA origami and assembly of DNA-functionalized nanoparticles. A hybridized double stranded (ds) DNA is formed when complementary nucleobases on hybridizing strands exhibit specific and directional hydrogen bonds through canonical Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions. In recent years, the need for cheaper alternatives and significant synthetic advances have driven design of DNA mimics with new backbone chemistries. However, a fundamental understanding of how these backbone modifications in the oligo-nucleic acids impact the hybridization and melting behavior of the duplex is still lacking. In this talk, we present our recent findings on impact of varying backbone chemistry on hybridization of oligo-nucleic acid duplexes. We use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to isolate the effect of strand flexibility, electrostatic interactions and nucleobase spacing on the melting curves for duplexes with various strand sequences and concentrations. Since conjugation of oligo-nucleic acids with polymers serve as building blocks for thermo-responsive polymer networks and gels, we also present the effect of such conjugation on hybridization thermodynamics and polymer conformation.

  11. Detection of Sialic Acid-Utilising Bacteria in a Caecal Community Batch Culture Using RNA-Based Stable Isotope Probing

    PubMed Central

    Young, Wayne; Egert, Markus; Bassett, Shalome A.; Bibiloni, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Sialic acids are monosaccharides typically found on cell surfaces and attached to soluble proteins, or as essential components of ganglioside structures that play a critical role in brain development and neural transmission. Human milk also contains sialic acid conjugated to oligosaccharides, glycolipids, and glycoproteins. These nutrients can reach the large bowel where they may be metabolised by the microbiota. However, little is known about the members of the microbiota involved in this function. To identify intestinal bacteria that utilise sialic acid within a complex intestinal community, we cultured the caecal microbiota from piglets in the presence of 13C-labelled sialic acid. Using RNA-based stable isotope probing, we identified bacteria that consumed 13C-sialic acid by fractionating total RNA in isopycnic buoyant density gradients followed by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Addition of sialic acid caused significant microbial community changes. A relative rise in Prevotella and Lactobacillus species was accompanied by a corresponding reduction in the genera Escherichia/Shigella, Ruminococcus and Eubacterium. Inspection of isotopically labelled RNA sequences suggests that the labelled sialic acid was consumed by a wide range of bacteria. However, species affiliated with the genus Prevotella were clearly identified as the most prolific users, as solely their RNA showed significantly higher relative shares among the most labelled RNA species. Given the relevance of sialic acid in nutrition, this study contributes to a better understanding of their microbial transformation in the intestinal tract with potential implications for human health. PMID:25816158

  12. Detection of oligonucleotide hybridization on a single microparticle by time-resolved fluorometry: hybridization assays on polymer particles obtained by direct solid phase assembly of the oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Hakala, H; Heinonen, P; Iitiä, A; Lönnberg, H

    1997-01-01

    Oligodeoxyribonucleotides were assembled by conventional phosphoramidite chemistry on uniformly sized (50 microns) porous glycidyl methacrylate/ethylene dimethacrylate (SINTEF) and compact polystyrene (Dynosphere) particles, the aminoalkyl side chains of which were further derivatized with DMTrO-acetyl groups. The linker was completely resistant toward ammonolytic deprotection of the base moieties. The quality of oligonucleotides was assessed by repeating the synthesis on the same particles derivatized with a cleavable ester linker. The ability of the oligonucleotide-coated particles to bind complementary sequences via hybridization was examined by following the attachment of oligonucleotides bearing a photoluminescent europium(III) chelate to the particles. The fluorescence emission was measured directly on a single particle. The effects of the following factors on the kinetics and efficiency of hybridization were studied: number of particles in a given volume of the assay solution, loading of oligonucleotide on the particle, concentration of the target oligonucleotide in solution, length of the hybridizing sequence, presence of noncomplementary sequences, and ionic strength. The fluorescence signal measured on a single particle after hybridization was observed to be proportional to the concentration of the target oligonucleotide in solution over a concentration range of 5 orders of magnitude.

  13. The Interaction of the Solar Wind with Solar Probe Plus - 3D Hybrid Simulation. Report 1; The Study for the Distance 4.5Rs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, Richard E.; Cooper, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Our report devotes a 3D numerical hybrid model of the interaction of the solar wind with the Solar Probe spacecraft. The Solar Probe Plus (SPP) model includes 3 main parts, namely, a non-conducting heat shield, a support system, and cylindrical section or spacecraft bus that contains the particle analysis devices and antenna. One observes an excitation of the low frequency Alfven and whistler type wave directed by the magnetic field with an amplitude of about (0.06-0.6) V/m. The compression waves and the jumps in an electric field with an amplitude of about (0.15-0.7) V/m were also observed. The wave amplitudes are comparable to or greater than previously estimated max wave amplitudes that SPP is expected to measure. The results of our hybrid simulation will be useful for understanding the plasma environment near the SPP spacecraft at the distance 4.5 Rs. Future simulation will take into account the charging of the spacecraft, the charge separation effects, an outgassing from heat shield, a photoionization and an electron impact ionization effects near the spacecraft.

  14. Salinomycin Hydroxamic Acids: Synthesis, Structure, and Biological Activity of Polyether Ionophore Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Borgström, Björn; Huang, Xiaoli; Chygorin, Eduard; Oredsson, Stina; Strand, Daniel

    2016-06-09

    The polyether ionophore salinomycin has recently gained attention due to its exceptional ability to selectively reduce the proportion of cancer stem cells within a number of cancer cell lines. Efficient single step strategies for the preparation of hydroxamic acid hybrids of this compound varying in N- and O-alkylation are presented. The parent hydroxamic acid, salinomycin-NHOH, forms both inclusion complexes and well-defined electroneutral complexes with potassium and sodium cations via 1,3-coordination by the hydroxamic acid moiety to the metal ion. A crystal structure of an cationic sodium complex with a noncoordinating anion corroborates this finding and, moreover, reveals a novel type of hydrogen bond network that stabilizes the head-to-tail conformation that encapsulates the cation analogously to the native structure. The hydroxamic acid derivatives display down to single digit micromolar activity against cancer cells but unlike salinomycin selective reduction of ALDH(+) cells, a phenotype associated with cancer stem cells was not observed. Mechanistic implications are discussed.

  15. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for identifying the Y chromosome in SITU

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    1999-01-01

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences.

  16. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for determining the Y chromosome in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Weier, H.U.

    1998-11-24

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences. 9 figs.

  17. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for determining the Y chromosome in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    1998-01-01

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences.

  18. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for determining the Y chromosome in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences.

  19. Y chromosome specific nucleic acid probe and method for identifying the Y chromosome in SITU

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Weier, H.U.

    1999-03-30

    A method for producing a Y chromosome specific probe selected from highly repeating sequences on that chromosome is described. There is little or no nonspecific binding to autosomal and X chromosomes, and a very large signal is provided. Inventive primers allowing the use of PCR for both sample amplification and probe production are described, as is their use in producing large DNA chromosome painting sequences. 9 figs.

  20. NanoCluster Beacon - A New Molecular Probe for Homogeneous Detection of Nucleic Acid Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    requires only a single preparation step (i.e. nanocluster formation on NC probes), but because there is no need to remove excess silver ions or...Oligonucleotide-templated nanoclusters consisting of a few atoms of silver (DNA/Ag NCs) have been made into a new molecular probe that “lights up...upon target DNA binding, termed a NanoCluster Beacon (NCB). We discovered that interactions between silver nanoclusters and a proximal, guanine- rich

  1. A universal strategy for visual chiral recognition of α-amino acids with L-tartaric acid-capped gold nanoparticles as colorimetric probes.

    PubMed

    Song, Guoxin; Zhou, Fulin; Xu, Chunli; Li, Baoxin

    2016-02-21

    The ability to recognize and quantify the chirality of alpha-amino acids constitutes the basis of many critical areas for specific targeting in drug development and metabolite probing. It is still challenging to conveniently distinguish the enantiomer of amino acids largely due to the lack of a universal and simple strategy. In this work, we report a strategy for the visual recognition of α-amino acids. It is based on the chirality of L-tartaric acid-capped gold nanoparticles (L-TA-capped AuNPs, ca. 13 nm in diameter). All of 19 right-handed α-amino acids can induce a red-to-blue color change of L-TA-capped AuNP solution, whereas all of the left-handed amino acids (except cysteine) cannot. The chiral recognition can be achieved by the naked eye and a simple spectrophotometer. This method does not require complicated chiral modification, and excels through its low-cost, good availability of materials and its simplicity. Another notable feature of this method is its high generality, and this method can discriminate almost all native α-amino acid enantiomers. This versatile method could be potentially used for high-throughput chiral recognition of amino acids.

  2. Development of SSR Markers Linked to Low Hydrocyanic Acid Content in Sorghum-Sudan Grass Hybrid Based on BSA Method.

    PubMed

    Xiao-Xia, Yu; Zhi-Hua, Liu; Zhuo, Yu; Yue, Shi; Xiao-Yu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Sorghum-Sudan grass hybrid containing high hydrocyanic acid content can cause hydrocyanic acid poisoning to the livestock and limit the popularization of this forage crop. Molecular markers associated with low hydrocyanic acid content can speed up the process of identification of genotypes with low hydrocyanic acid content. In the present study, 11 polymorphic SSR primers were screened and used for bulked segregant analysis and single marker analysis. Three SSR markers Xtxp7230, Xtxp7375 and Bnlg667960 associated with low hydrocyanic acid content were rapidly identified by BSA. In single marker analysis, six markers Xtxp7230, Xtxp7375, Bnlg667960, Xtxp67-11, Xtxp295-7 and Xtxp12-9 were linked to low hydrocyanic acid content, which explained the proportion of phenotypic variation from 7.6 % to 41.2 %. The markers identified by BSA were also verified by single marker analysis. The three SSR marker bands were then cloned and sequenced for sequence homology analysis in NCBI. It is the first report on the development of molecular markers associated with low hydrocyanic acid content in sorghum- Sudan grass hybrid. These markers will be useful for genetic improvement of low hydrocyanic acid sorghum-Sudan grass hybrid by marker-assisted breeding.

  3. Probing the Substrate Specificity and Protein-Protein Interactions of the E. coli Fatty Acid Dehydratase, FabA

    PubMed Central

    Finzel, Kara; Nguyen, Chi; Jackson, David R.; Gupta, Aarushi; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan; Burkart, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Microbial fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes are important targets for areas as diverse as antibiotic development to biofuel production. Elucidating the molecular basis of chain length control during fatty acid biosynthesis is crucial for the understanding of regulatory processes of this fundamental metabolic pathway. In Escherichia coli, the acyl carrier protein (AcpP) plays a central role by sequestering and shuttling the growing acyl chain between fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes. FabA, a β-hydroxylacyl-AcpP dehydratase, is an important enzyme in controlling fatty acid chain length and saturation levels. FabA-AcpP interactions are transient in nature and thus difficult to visualize. In this study, four mechanistic crosslinking probes mimicking varying acyl chain lengths were synthesized to systematically probe for modified chain length specificity of fourteen FabA mutants. These studies provide evidence for the AcpP interacting “positive patch,” FabA mutations that altered substrate specificity, and the roles that the FabA “gating residues” play in chain-length selection. PMID:26526101

  4. Fluorescent amino acid undergoing excited state intramolecular proton transfer for site-specific probing and imaging of peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Sholokh, Marianna; Zamotaiev, Oleksandr M; Das, Ranjan; Postupalenko, Viktoriia Y; Richert, Ludovic; Dujardin, Denis; Zaporozhets, Olga A; Pivovarenko, Vasyl G; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Mély, Yves

    2015-02-12

    Fluorescent amino acids bearing environment-sensitive fluorophores are highly valuable tools for site-selective probing of peptide/ligand interactions. Herein, we synthesized a fluorescent l-amino acid bearing the 4'-methoxy-3-hydroxyflavone fluorophore (M3HFaa) that shows dual emission, as a result of an excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The dual emission of M3HFaa was found to be substantially more sensitive to hydration as compared to previous analogues. By replacing the Ala30 and Trp37 residues of a HIV-1 nucleocapsid peptide, M3HFaa was observed to preserve the peptide structure and functions. Interaction of the labeled peptides with nucleic acids and lipid vesicles produced a strong switch in their dual emission, favoring the emission of the ESIPT product. This switch was associated with the appearance of long-lived fluorescence lifetimes for the ESIPT product, as a consequence of the rigid environment in the complexes that restricted the relative motions of the M3HFaa aromatic moieties. The strongest restriction and thus the longest fluorescence lifetimes were observed at position 37 in complexes with nucleic acids, where the probe likely stacks with the nucleobases. Based on the dependence of the lifetime values on the nature of the ligand and the labeled position, two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging was used to identify the binding partners of the labeled peptides microinjected into living cells. Thus, M3HFaa appears as a sensitive tool for monitoring site selectively peptide interactions in solution and living cells.

  5. Serotypic differentiation of rotaviruses in field samples from diarrheic pigs by using nucleic acid probes specific for porcine VP4 and human and porcine VP7 genes.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, B I; Parwani, A V; Lopez, S; Flores, J; Saif, L J

    1994-01-01

    Of 216 fecal and intestinal samples collected from nursing or weaned diarrheic pigs in the United States and Canada, 57 were identified as group A rotavirus positive by RNA electrophoresis and silver staining. Fifty-seven and 52 rotavirus-positive samples were analyzed by hybridization with Gottfried and OSU PCR-derived gene 9 and 4 probes, respectively. Only 17 samples were identified with either homologous VP4 (P)- or VP7 (G)-coding genes or both. One rotavirus identified as G4 and P7 was similar to the previously characterized interserotype rotavirus, SB-1A. Additional hybridization analyses were performed with PCR-derived probes prepared from gene 9 cDNA of the human rotaviruses Wa (G1), DS-1 (G2), and P (G3) and of the porcine rotavirus YM (G11). Eleven of 52 samples collected and analyzed from swine in Ohio, California, and Nebraska were identified as G11. No samples with G1-, G2-, or G3-type specificities were detected among the 25 of 57 rotavirus-positive samples analyzed with human rotavirus-derived probes. Further investigations with a PCR-derived gene 4 probe prepared from porcine rotavirus YM revealed hybridization specificities similar to those of the OSU gene 4 probe. Images PMID:8150940

  6. Fast reciprocating probe system for local scrape-off layer measurements in front of the lower hybrid launcher on JT-60U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakura, N.; Tsuji-Iio, S.; Ikeda, Y.; Neyatani, Y.; Seki, M.

    1995-12-01

    A fast reciprocating probe system with a long drive shaft was incorporated into a multi-junction lower hybrid (LH) wave launcher on JT-60U in order to investigate an improved coupling mechanism of the radio frequency wave to the core plasma. The system has been operated reliably over a horizontal scan of 25 cm in 1.5 s using a compact pneumatic cylinder drive and springs. A double probe measurement provided the scrape-off layer plasma profile between the last closed flux surface and the first wall with the spatial resolution of 1-2 mm measured with a laser displacement gauge. The profiles of the electron density ne and temperature Te were in good agreement with those obtained with a triple probe method. During the LH wave injection with good coupling to the core plasma, an increase in the local Te was observed in front of the LH launcher mouth. The local ne was (7-10)×1016 m-3, consistent values needed for the good coupling.

  7. Fast reciprocating probe system for local scrape-off layer measurements in front of the lower hybrid launcher on JT-60U

    SciTech Connect

    Asakura, N.; Tsuji-Iio, S.; Ikeda, Y.; Neyatani, Y.; Seki, M.

    1995-12-01

    A fast reciprocating probe system with a long drive shaft was incorporated into a multi-junction lower hybrid (LH) wave launcher on JT-60U in order to investigate an improved coupling mechanism of the radio frequency wave to the core plasma. The system has been operated reliably over a horizontal scan of 25 cm in 1.5 s using a compact pneumatic cylinder drive and springs. A double probe measurement provided the scrape-off layer plasma profile between the last closed flux surface and the first wall with the spatial resolution of 1{minus}2 mm measured with a laser displacement gauge. The profiles of the electron density {ital n}{sub {ital e}} and temperature {ital T}{sub {ital e}} were in good agreement with those obtained with a triple probe method. During the LH wave injection with good coupling to the core plasma, an increase in the local {ital T}{sub {ital e}} was observed in front of the LH launcher mouth. The local {ital n}{sub {ital e}} was (7{minus}10){times}10{sup 16} m{sup {minus}3}, consistent values needed for the good coupling. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  8. Direct detection of Brucella spp. in raw milk by PCR and reverse hybridization with 16S-23S rRNA spacer probes.

    PubMed Central

    Rijpens, N P; Jannes, G; Van Asbroeck, M; Rossau, R; Herman, L M

    1996-01-01

    The 16S-23S rRNA spacer regions of Brucella abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis were cloned and subcloned after PCR amplification. Sequence analysis of the inserts revealed a spacer of about 800 bp with very high ( > 99%) homology among the three species examined. Two genus-specific primer pairs, BRU-P5-BRU-P8 and BRU-P6-BRU-P7, that could be used in a nested PCR format and three genus-specific DNA probes, BRU-ICG2, BRU-ICG3, and BRU-ICG4, were deduced from this spacer. The specificity and sensitivity of both primer sets and probes were examined by testing them against a collection of 18 Brucella strains and 56 strains from other relevant taxa by using PCR and the Line Probe Assay (LiPA), respectively. A method for direct detection of Brucella spp. in 1 ml of raw milk was developed on the basis of enzymatic treatment of the milk components and subsequent PCR and LiPA hybridization. After a single PCR, sensitivities of 2.8 x 10(5) and 2.8 x 10(4) CFU/ml were obtained for detection by agarose gel electrophoresis and LiPA, respectively. Nested PCR yielded a sensitivity of 2.8 x 10(2) CFU/ml for both methods. PMID:8633866

  9. Probe-pulse optimization for nonresonant suppression in hybrid fs/ps coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joseph D; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Meyer, Terrence R

    2011-07-04

    Hybrid femtosecond/picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs/ps CARS) offers accurate thermometry at kHz rates for combustion diagnostics. In high-temperature flames, selection of probe-pulse characteristics is key to simultaneously optimizing signal-to-nonresonant-background ratio, signal strength, and spectral resolution. We demonstrate a simple method for enhancing signal-to-nonresonant-background ratio by using a narrowband Lorentzian filter to generate a time-asymmetric probe pulse with full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) pulse width of only 240 fs. This allows detection within just 310 fs after the Raman excitation for eliminating nonresonant background while retaining 45% of the resonant signal at 2000 K. The narrow linewidth is comparable to that of a time-symmetric sinc2 probe pulse with a pulse width of ~2.4 ps generated with a conventional 4-f pulse shaper. This allows nonresonant-background-free, frequency-domain vibrational spectroscopy at high temperature, as verified using comparisons to a time-dependent theoretical fs/ps CARS model.

  10. Hybridization probes for conventional DNA fingerprinting used as single primers in the polymerase chain reaction to distinguish strains of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, W; Mitchell, T G; Freedman, E Z; Vilgalys, R

    1993-01-01

    In conventional DNA fingerprinting, hypervariable and repetitive sequences (minisatellite or microsatellite DNA) are detected with hybridization probes. As demonstrated here, these probes can be used as single primers in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to generate individual fingerprints. Several conventional DNA fingerprinting probes were used to prime the PCR, yielding distinctive, hypervariable multifragment profiles for different strains of Cryptococcus neoformans. PCR fingerprinting with the oligonucleotide primers (GTG)5, (GACA)4, and the phage M13 core sequence (GAGGGTGGXGGXTCT), but not with (CA)8 or (CT)8, generated DNA polymorphisms with all 42 strains of C. neoformans investigated. PCR fingerprints produced by priming with (GTG)5, (GACA)4, or the M13 core sequence differentiated the two varieties of C. neoformans, C. neoformans var. neoformans (serotypes A and D) and C. neoformans var. gattii (serotypes B and C). Furthermore, strains of serotypes A, D, and B or C could be distinguished from each other by specific PCR fingerprint patterns. These primers, which also successfully amplified hypervariable DNA segments from other species, provide a convenient method of identification at the species or individual level. Amplification of polymorphic DNA patterns by PCR with these primers offers several advantages over classical DNA fingerprinting techniques, appears to be more reliable than other PCR-based methods for detecting polymorphic DNA, such as analysis of random-amplified polymorphic DNA, and should be applicable to many other organisms. Images PMID:8408543

  11. Effect of backbone chemistry on hybridization thermodynamics of oligonucleic acids: a coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F; Jayaraman, Arthi

    2016-02-28

    In this paper we study how varying oligonucleic acid backbone chemistry affects the hybridization/melting thermodynamics of oligonucleic acids. We first describe the coarse-grained (CG) model with tunable parameters that we developed to enable the study of both naturally occurring oligonucleic acids, such as DNA, and their chemically-modified analogues, such as peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and locked nucleic acids (LNAs). The DNA melting curves obtained using such a CG model and molecular dynamics simulations in an implicit solvent and with explicit ions match with the melting curves obtained using the empirical nearest-neighbor models. We use these CG simulations to then elucidate the effect of backbone flexibility, charge, and nucleobase spacing along the backbone on the melting curves, potential energy and conformational entropy change upon hybridization and base-pair hydrogen bond residence time. We find that increasing backbone flexibility decreases duplex thermal stability and melting temperature mainly due to increased conformational entropy loss upon hybridization. Removing charges from the backbone enhances duplex thermal stability due to the elimination of electrostatic repulsion and as a result a larger energetic gain upon hybridization. Lastly, increasing nucleobase spacing decreases duplex thermal stability due to decreasing stacking interactions that are important for duplex stability.

  12. Real-time, in-situ analysis of silver ions using nucleic acid probes modified silica microfiber interferometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bo; Huang, Yunyun; Zhou, Jun; Guo, Tuan; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2017-04-01

    A sensitive Ag(+) sensor based on nucleic acid probes modified silica microfiber interferometry is designed and developed. The probes on microfiber surface plays the part on catching Ag(+) as tentacles, while their conformation change from random coils to hairpins. It induces the fiber surface refractive index change, which is captured by the optical fiber and translated into a significant wavelength shift in the interferometric fringe. Such a combination enables an improved concentration sensitivity of 0.22nm/log M and limit of detection of 1.36 × 10(-9)M, taking the advantage of real-time and in-situ analysis. It shows good selectivity in the present of many other metal ions and offers potential to analysis in real matrix, especially in the environmental samples must be analyzed in a short time. This may provide insights into the preparation of sensing platforms for optical quantification of other small molecular, supplementing the existing tools.

  13. Synthesis and conformational analysis of hybrid α/β-dipeptides incorporating S-glycosyl-β(2,2)-amino acids.

    PubMed

    García-González, Iván; Mata, Lara; Corzana, Francisco; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Avenoza, Alberto; Busto, Jesús H; Peregrina, Jesús M

    2015-01-12

    We synthesized and carried out the conformational analysis of several hybrid dipeptides consisting of an α-amino acid attached to a quaternary glyco-β-amino acid. In particular, we combined a S-glycosylated β(2,2)-amino acid and two different types of α-amino acid, namely, aliphatic (alanine) and aromatic (phenylalanine and tryptophan) in the sequence of hybrid α/β-dipeptides. The key step in the synthesis involved the ring-opening reaction of a chiral cyclic sulfamidate, inserted in the peptidic sequence, with a sulfur-containing nucleophile by using 1-thio-β-D-glucopyranose derivatives. This reaction of glycosylation occurred with inversion of configuration at the quaternary center. The conformational behavior in aqueous solution of the peptide backbone and the glycosidic linkage for all synthesized hybrid glycopeptides was analyzed by using a protocol that combined NMR experiments and molecular dynamics with time-averaged restraints (MD-tar). Interestingly, the presence of the sulfur heteroatom at the quaternary center of the β-amino acid induced θ torsional angles close to 180° (anti). Notably, this value changed to 60° (gauche) when the peptidic sequence displayed aromatic α-amino acids due to the presence of CH-π interactions between the phenyl or indole ring and the methyl groups of the β-amino acid unit.

  14. Enhanced photocatalytic performance of ZnO-reduced graphene oxide hybrid synthesized via ultrasonic probe-assisted study

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, A.; Sahu, N. K.; Bahadur, D.

    2013-02-05

    A facile ultrasonic horn-assisted reaction has been used to synthesize zinc oxide-reduced graphene oxide (ZnO-RGO) hybrids in dimethylformamide. The incorporation of graphene oxide prevents the cluster formation of ZnO nanoparticles. The photocatalytic performance in degradation of methylene blue has been investigated with ZnO and ZnO-RGO hybrids and the results show that the RGO plays an important role in the enhancement of photocatalytic performance of ZnO-RGO. A direct evidence of electron exchange between ZnO and RGO is confirmed by zeta potentials measurements, which is an established reason for photocatalytic degradation of organic dyes.

  15. A hybrid Li-air battery with buckypaper air cathode and sulfuric acid electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Li, YF; Huang, K; Xing, YC

    2012-10-30

    We demonstrate a type of carbon nanotube based buckypaper cathode in a hybrid electrolyte Li-air battery (HyLAB) that showed outstanding discharging performances. The HyLAB has sulfuric acid as the catholyte and a large active electrode area (10 cm(2)). The active cathode layer was made from a buckypaper with 5 wt.% Pt supported on carbon nanotubes (Pt/CNTs) for oxygen reduction and evolution. A similar cathode was constructed with a catalyst of 5 wt.% Pt supported on carbon black (Pt/CB). It is demonstrated that sulfuric acid can achieve high discharging current densities while maintaining relatively high cell potentials. The cell with Pt/CNTs showed a much better performance than with Pt/CB at high current densities. The HyLAB with Pt/CNTs achieved a discharging capacity of 306 mAh/g and a cell voltage of 3.15 V at 0.2 mA/cm(2). The corresponding specific energy is 1067 Wh/kg based on the total weight of the sulfuric acid. Slow decrease in performance was observed, but it can be recovered by refilling the cell with new electrolyte after continuous discharging of more than 75 h. A charge-discharge experiment at 0.2 mA/cm(2) showed that the cell was rechargeable with a capacity of more than 300 mAh/g. (c) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rheological, microstructural, and in vitro characterization of hybrid chitosan-polylactic acid/hydroxyapatite composites.

    PubMed

    Araújo, A B A; Lemos, A F; Ferreira, J M F

    2009-03-15

    In this work, hybrid chitosan/hydroxyapatite composites material were developed and characterized. The polymer matrix was first dissolved in polylactic acid, and then hydroxyapatite (HA) was added as filler material. The effects of the added amounts of a crosslinking agent (genipin) and of the concentrations of lactic acid, and of the presence of HA powder on the evolution of rheological properties were evaluated. A significant decrease of gelation time with increasing amounts of crosslinking agent was observed, the effect being even more pronounced in the presence of HA. The chitosan matrix and the composites with a chitosan/HA weight ratio of 2/5 were characterized using microstructural analysis and in vitro tests. The formation of large pore sizes in the chitosan-based scaffolds was favored by low concentrations of lactic acid and genipin. The in vitro tests in synthetic body fluid revealed an extensive formation of an apatitic layer onto the surface of the chitosan/HA composite scaffolds crosslinked with genipin.

  17. Nanoleakage in Hybrid Layer and Acid-Base Resistant Zone at the Adhesive/Dentin Interface.

    PubMed

    Nikaido, Toru; Nurrohman, Hamid; Takagaki, Tomohiro; Sadr, Alireza; Ichinose, Shizuko; Tagami, Junji

    2015-10-01

    The aim of interfacial nanoleakage evaluation is to gain a better understanding of degradation of the adhesive-dentin interface. The acid-base resistant zone (ABRZ) is recognized at the bonded interface under the hybrid layer (HL) in self-etch adhesive systems after an acid-base challenge. The purpose of this study was to evaluate nanoleakage in HL and ABRZ using three self-etch adhesives; Clearfil SE Bond (SEB), Clearfil SE One (SEO), and G-Bond Plus (GBP). One of the three adhesives was applied on the ground dentin surface and light cured. The specimens were longitudinally divided into two halves. One half remained as the control group. The others were immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate solution, followed by photo developing solution under fluorescent light. Following this, the specimens were subjected to acid-base challenges with an artificial demineralization solution (pH4.5) and sodium hypochlorite, and prepared in accordance with common procedures for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination. The TEM images revealed silver depositions in HL and ABRZ due to nanoleakage in all the adhesives; however, the extent of nanoleakage was material dependent. Funnel-shaped erosion beneath the ABRZ was observed only in the all-in-one adhesive systems; SEO and GBP, but not in the two-step self-etch adhesive system; SEB.

  18. Development and operation of a hybrid acid-alkaline advanced water electrolysis cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschke, O.; Zwanziger, M.

    A hybrid acid-alkaline water electrolysis cell has been developed for hydrogen production. The cell is based on the use of an acidic solution at the cathode and a basic solution at the anode to reduce the minimum theoretical voltage for water decomposition from the thermoneutral potential of 1.47 V to close to 1.4 V at 25 C and 1 atm. The pH differential is maintained by the removal of OH ions from the cathode section and water removal from the anode section, which can be driven by heat energy. A practical cell has been built using a solid polymer electrolyte in which, however, the cathodic compartment is not acidic but neutral. Tests with a platinum black cathode catalyst and a platinum-iridium anode catalyst have resulted in steady-state water hydrolysis at an applied voltage of 0.9 V, and a V-I diagram with a considerably lower slope than that of a conventional cell has been obtained at 90 C.

  19. Assessment of methods for covalent binding of nucleic acids to magnetic beads, Dynabeads, and the characteristics of the bound nucleic acids in hybridization reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Lund, V; Schmid, R; Rickwood, D; Hornes, E

    1988-01-01

    Dynabeads are magnetic monosized beads with high stability, high uniformity, unique paramagnetic properties, low particle-particle interaction, and high dispersibility. Different reactive groups; hydroxyl, carboxyl and amino groups can be attached to the surface. Several methods for covalent attachment of DNA or oligonucleotides to the beads were investigated. Best coupling yields were obtained by carbodiimide-mediated end-attachment of 5'-phosphate and 5'-NH2 modified nucleic acids to respectively amino and carboxyl beads. The carboxyl beads showed a low degree of non-specific binding, while a better yield of end-attached nucleic acids was obtained using the amino beads. The DNA-beads worked efficiently in hybridization experiments, and the kinetics of hybridization approach those of solution hybridization. PMID:3205723

  20. Enzymatic hybridization of α-lipoic acid with bioactive compounds in ionic solvents.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Athena A; Katsoura, Maria H; Chatzikonstantinou, Alexandra; Kyriakou, Eleni; Polydera, Angeliki C; Tzakos, Andreas G; Stamatis, Haralambos

    2013-05-01

    The lipase-catalyzed molecular hybridization of α-lipoic acid (LA) with bioactive compounds pyridoxine, tyrosol and tyramine was performed in ionic solvents and deep eutectic solvents. The biocatalytic reactions were catalyzed by Candida antarctica lipase B immobilized onto various functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs-CaLB), as well as by commercial Novozym 435. The use of f-CNTs-CaLB leads, in most cases, to higher conversion yields as compared to Novozym 435. The nature and ion composition of ionic solvents affect the performance of the biocatalytic process. The highest conversion yield was observed in (mtoa)NTf2. The high enzyme stability and the relatively low solubility of substrates in specific media account for the improved biocatalytic synthesis of molecular hybrids of LA. Principal component analysis was used to screen for potential lipoxygenase inhibitors. In vitro studies showed that the synthesized compounds exhibit up to 10-fold increased inhibitory activity on lipoxygenase mediated lipid peroxidation as compared to parent molecules.

  1. Hybridization chain reaction-based colorimetric aptasensor of adenosine 5'-triphosphate on unmodified gold nanoparticles and two label-free hairpin probes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhuangqiang; Qiu, Zhenli; Lu, Minghua; Shu, Jian; Tang, Dianping

    2017-03-15

    This work designs a new label-free aptasensor for the colorimetric determination of small molecules (adenosine 5'-triphosphate, ATP) by using visible gold nanoparticles as the signal-generation tags, based on target-triggered hybridization chain reaction (HCR) between two hairpin DNA probes. The assay is carried out referring to the change in the color/absorbance by salt-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles after the interaction with hairpins, gold nanoparticles and ATP. To construct such an assay system, two hairpin DNA probes with a short single-stranded DNA at the sticky end are utilized for interaction with gold nanoparticles. In the absence of target ATP, the hairpin DNA probes can prevent gold nanoparticles from the salt-induced aggregation through the interaction of the single-stranded DNA at the sticky end with gold nanoparticles. Upon target ATP introduction, the aptamer-based hairpin probe is opened to expose a new sticky end for the strand-displacement reaction with another complementary hairpin, thus resulting in the decreasing single-stranded DNA because of the consumption of hairpins. In this case, gold nanoparticles are uncovered owing to the formation of double-stranded DNA, which causes their aggregation upon addition of the salt, thereby leading to the change in the red-to-blue color. Under the optimal conditions, the HCR-based colorimetric assay presents good visible color or absorbance responses for the determination of target ATP at a concentration as low as 1.0nM. Importantly, the methodology can be further extended to quantitatively or qualitatively monitor other small molecules or biotoxins by changing the sequence of the corresponding aptamer.

  2. Nucleic acid hybridization analyses confirm the presence of a hitherto unknown morbillivirus in Mediterranean dolphins.

    PubMed

    Bolt, G; Blixenkrone-Møller, M

    1994-08-15

    In 1990 an epidemic caused by a morbillivirus was noticed among Mediterranean dolphins. RNA was extracted from the tissues of dolphins and from cell cultures infected with a corresponding dolphin morbillivirus isolate. By nucleic acid hybridization this RNA was compared to RNA extracted from animal tissue or cell cultures infected with canine distemper virus (CDV), phocine distemper virus (PDV) or measles virus (MV). The presence of morbillivirus RNA in the dolphin tissue was demonstrated. Morbillivirus N, P, M and F gene mRNAs were detected in the RNA from dolphin morbillivirus infected cells. These mRNA species seemed to be of approximately the same size as the corresponding mRNA species of CDV, PDV and MV. The results of the comparison demonstrated that the dolphin morbillivirus is genetically different from CDV, PDV and MV. No indication of a close relationship between the dolphin isolate and either CDV, PDV or MV was found.

  3. Lead-acid batteries in micro-hybrid applications. Part II. Test proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeck, S.; Stoermer, A. O.; Albers, J.; Weirather-Koestner, D.; Kabza, H.

    In the first part of this work [1] selected key parameters for applying lead-acid (LA) batteries in micro-hybrid power systems (MHPS) were investigated. Main results are integrated in an accelerated, comprehensive test proposal presented here. The test proposal aims at a realistic representation of the pSoC operation regime, which is described in Refs. [1,6]. The test is designed to be sensitive with respect to dynamic charge acceptance (DCA) at partially discharged state (critical for regenerative braking) and the internal resistance at high-rate discharge (critical for idling stop applications). First results are presented for up-to-date valve-regulated LA batteries with absorbent glass mat (AGM) separators. The batteries are close to the limits of the first proposal of pass/fail-criteria. Also flooded batteries were tested; the first out of ten units failed already.

  4. Nanoporous gold on three-dimensional nickel foam: An efficient hybrid electrode for hydrogen peroxide electroreduction in acid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xi; Xu, Yantong; Yu, Changchun; Zhao, Jie; Cui, Guofeng; Higgins, Drew; Li, Qing; Wu, Gang

    2014-12-01

    A hybrid structure of nanoporous gold (NPG) on three-dimensional (3D) macroporous Ni foam has been synthesized by electrodeposition of Au-Sn alloy film followed by a facile chemical dealloying process under free corrosion conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are used to characterize the morphology and structure of the NPG/Ni foam hybrids. It is shown that the Ni foam skeletons are uniformly wrapped by the NPG film which is composed of bicontinuous nanostructures consisting of interconnected ligaments and nanopores. Electroreduction of H2O2 on the NPG/Ni foam hybrid electrode in acid media is investigated by linear scan voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is found that such hierarchical porous electrode displays superior activity, durability and mass transport property for H2O2 electroreduction. These results demonstrate the potential of the NPG/Ni foam hybrid electrodes for the applications in fuel cell technology.

  5. A paper-based resonance energy transfer nucleic acid hybridization assay using upconversion nanoparticles as donors and quantum dots as acceptors.

    PubMed

    Doughan, Samer; Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Krull, Ulrich J

    2015-06-09

    Monodisperse aqueous upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) were covalently immobilized on aldehyde modified cellulose paper via reduction amination to develop a luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET)-based nucleic acid hybridization assay. This first account of covalent immobilization of UCNPs on paper for a bioassay reports an optically responsive method that is sensitive, reproducible and robust. The immobilized UCNPs were decorated with oligonucleotide probes to capture HPRT1 housekeeping gene fragments, which in turn brought reporter conjugated quantum dots (QDs) in close proximity to the UCNPs for LRET. This sandwich assay could detect unlabeled oligonucleotide target, and had a limit of detection of 13 fmol and a dynamic range spanning nearly 3 orders of magnitude. The use of QDs, which are excellent LRET acceptors, demonstrated improved sensitivity, limit of detection, dynamic range and selectivity compared to similar assays that have used molecular fluorophores as acceptors. The selectivity of the assay was attributed to the decoration of the QDs with polyethylene glycol to eliminate non-specific adsorption. The kinetics of hybridization were determined to be diffusion limited and full signal development occurred within 3 min.

  6. Lead-acid batteries in micro-hybrid applications. Part I. Selected key parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeck, S.; Stoermer, A. O.; Kaiser, F.; Koehler, L.; Albers, J.; Kabza, H.

    Micro-hybrid electric vehicles were launched by BMW in March 2007. These are equipped with brake energy regeneration (BER) and the automatic start and stop function (ASSF) of the internal combustion engine. These functions are based on common 14 V series components and lead-acid (LA) batteries. The novelty is given by the intelligent onboard energy management, which upgrades the conventional electric system to the micro-hybrid power system (MHPS). In part I of this publication the key factors for the operation of LA batteries in the MHPS are discussed. Especially for BER one is high dynamic charge acceptance (DCA) for effective boost charging. Vehicle rest time is identified as a particular negative parameter for DCA. It can be refreshed by regular fully charging at elevated charge voltage. Thus, the batteries have to be outstandingly robust against overcharge and water loss. This can be accomplished for valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries at least if they are mounted in the trunk. ASSF goes along with frequent high-rate loads for warm cranking. The internal resistance determines the drop of the power net voltage during cranking and is preferably low for reasons of power net stability even after years of operation. Investigations have to be done with aged 90 Ah VRLA-absorbent glass mat (AGM) batteries. Battery operation at partial state-of-charge gives a higher risk of deep discharging (overdischarging). Subsequent re-charging then is likely to lead to the formation of micro-short circuits in the absorbent glass mat separator.

  7. A new route for local probing of inner interactions within a layered double hydroxide/benzene derivative hybrid material.

    PubMed

    Fleutot, S; Dupin, J C; Baraille, I; Forano, C; Renaudin, G; Leroux, F; Gonbeau, D; Martinez, H

    2009-05-14

    This paper presents the preparation and characterization of hybrid hydrotalcite-type layered double hydroxides (Zn1-xAlx(OH)2HBSx.nH2O, with x=0.33) where HBS is the 4-phenol sulfonate, with a detailed analysis of the grafting process of this organic entity onto the host lattice. As a set of the usual techniques (XRD, TG-DT/MS, FTIR and 27Al MAS NMR) was used to characterize the hybrid materials, this work focuses on a joint study by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and some quantum-calculation modeling in order to highlight the nature of the interactions between the organic and the mineral sub-systems. For the as-prepared hybrid material, the main results lead to a quasi-vertical orientation of the organic molecules within the mineral sheets via H-bond stabilization. By heating the hybrid material up to 200 degrees C, the structure shrinks with the condensation of the organics; the different theoretical modeling done gives an energy-stable situation when a direct attachment of the HBS sulfonate group sets up with the mineral layers, in agreement with the recorded XPS experimental data.

  8. Real-Time PCR Genotyping using Taqman Probes to Detect High Oleic Acid Peanuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oleic acid, a monounsaturated, omega-9 fatty acid is an important agronomic trait in peanut cultivars because it provides increased shelf life, improved flavor, enhanced fatty acid composition, and a beneficial effect on human health. Currently, most high oleic peanuts confer limited resistance to ...

  9. Probing the acidity of carboxylic acids in protic ionic liquids, water, and their binary mixtures: activation energy of proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shashi Kant; Kumar, Anil

    2013-02-28

    Acidity functions were used to express the ability of a solvent/solution to donate/accept a proton to a solute. The present work accounts for the acidity determination of HCOOH, CH3COOH, and CH3CH2COOH in the alkylimidazolium-based protic ionic liquids (PILs), incorporated with carboxylate anion, water, and in a binary mixture of PIL and water using the Hammett acidity function, H0. A reversal in the acidity trend was observed, when organic acids were transferred from water to PIL. It was emphasized that an increased stabilization offered by PIL cation toward the more basic conjugate anion of organic acid was responsible for this anomalous change in acidity order in PILs, which was absent in water. The greater stabilization of a basic organic anion by PIL cation is discussed in terms of the stable hard–soft acid base (HSAB) pairing. A change in the H0 values of these acids was observed with a change in temperature, and a linear correlation between the ln H0 and 1/T was noted. This relationship points toward the activation energy of proton transfer (E(a,H+)), a barrier provided by the medium during the proton transfer from Brønsted acid to indicator. The H0 function in binary mixtures points to the involvement of pseudosolvent, the behavior of which changes with the nature and concentration of acid. The presence of the maxima/minima in the H0 function is discussed in terms of the synergetic behavior of the pseudosolvent composed of the mixtures of aqueous PILs.

  10. Photochemical properties in flag leaves of a super-high-yielding hybrid rice and a traditional hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.) probed by chlorophyll a fluorescence transient.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meiping; Shan, YongJie; Kochian, Leon; Strasser, Reto J; Chen, GuoXiang

    2015-12-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorescence of flag leaves in a super-high-yielding hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.) LYPJ, and a traditional hybrid rice SY63 cultivar with lower grain yield, which were grown in the field, were investigated from emergence through senescence of flag leaves. As the flag leaf matured, there was an increasing trend in photosynthetic parameters such as quantum efficiency of primary photochemistry ([Formula: see text] Po) and efficiency of electron transport from PS II to PS I (Ψ Eo). The overall photosynthetic performance index (PIABS) was significantly higher in the high-yielding LYPJ compared to SY63 during the entire reproductive stage of the plant, the same to MDA content. However, [Formula: see text] Po(=F V/F M), an indicator of the primary photochemistry of the flag leaf, did not display significant changes with leaf age and was not significantly different between the two cultivars, suggesting that PIABS is a more sensitive parameter than [Formula: see text] Po (=F V/F M) during leaf age for distinguishing between cultivars differing in yield.

  11. Proteomic-based stable isotope probing reveals taxonomically Distinct Patterns in Amino Acid Assimilation by Coastal Marine Bacterioplankton

    DOE PAGES

    Bryson, Samuel; Li, Zhou; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; ...

    2016-04-26

    Heterotrophic marine bacterioplankton are a critical component of the carbon cycle, processing nearly a quarter of annual global primary production, yet defining how substrate utilization preferences and resource partitioning structure these microbial communities remains a challenge. In this study, we utilized proteomics-based stable isotope probing (proteomic SIP) to characterize the assimilation of amino acids by coastal marine bacterioplankton populations. We incubated microcosms of seawater collected from Newport, OR and Monterey Bay, CA with 1 M 13C-amino acids for 15 and 32 hours. Subsequent analysis of 13C incorporation into protein biomass quantified the frequency and extent of isotope enrichment for identifiedmore » proteins. Using these metrics we tested whether amino acid assimilation patterns were different for specific bacterioplankton populations. Proteins associated with Rhodobacterales and Alteromonadales tended to have a significantly high number of tandem mass spectra from 13C-enriched peptides, while Flavobacteriales and SAR11 proteins generally had significantly low numbers of 13C-enriched spectra. Rhodobacterales proteins associated with amino acid transport and metabolism had an increased frequency of 13C-enriched spectra at time-point 2, while Alteromonadales ribosomal proteins were 13C- enriched across time-points. Overall, proteomic SIP facilitated quantitative comparisons of dissolved free amino acids assimilation by specific taxa, both between sympatric populations and between protein functional groups within discrete populations, allowing an unprecedented examination of population-level metabolic responses to resource acquisition in complex microbial communities.« less

  12. Spectroscopic quantification of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in genomic DNA using boric acid-functionalized nano-microsphere fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua-Yan; Wei, Jing-Ru; Pan, Jiong-Xiu; Zhang, Wei; Dang, Fu-Quan; Zhang, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Jing

    2017-05-15

    5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is the sixth base of DNA. It is involved in active DNA demethylation and can be a marker of diseases such as cancer. In this study, we developed a simple and sensitive 2-(4-boronophenyl)quinoline-4-carboxylic acid modified poly (glycidyl methacrylate (PBAQA-PGMA) fluorescent probe to detect the 5hmC content of genomic DNA based on T4 β-glucosyltransferase-catalyzed glucosylation of 5hmC. The fluorescence-enhanced intensity recorded from the DNA sample was proportional to its 5-hydroxymethylcytosine content and could be quantified by fluorescence spectrophotometry. The developed probe showed good detection sensitivity and selectivity and a good linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of 5 hmC within a 0-100nM range. Compared with other fluorescence detection methods, this method not only could determine trace amounts of 5 hmC from genomic DNA but also could eliminate the interference of fluorescent dyes and the need for purification. It also could avoid multiple labeling. Because the PBAQA-PGMA probe could enrich the content of glycosyl-5-hydroxymethyl-2-deoxycytidine from a complex ground substance, it will broaden the linear detection range and improve sensitivity. The limit of detection was calculated to be 0.167nM after enrichment. Furthermore, the method was successfully used to detect 5-hydroxymethylcytosine from mouse tissues.

  13. Visual detection of telomerase activity with a tunable dynamic range by using a gold nanoparticle probe-based hybridization protection strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiasi; Wu, Li; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-01-01

    We developed a novel telomere complementary (TC) oligonucleotide modified AuNP probe (TC-AuNPs) for colorimetric analysis of telomerase activity. The mechanism of this method is that the telomerase reaction products (TRP), which can hybridize with the TC-AuNPs, are able to protect the AuNPs from the aggregation induced by salt. It is demonstrated that the colorimetric method enabled the analysis of the telomerase activity in 1000 HeLa cells with the naked eye, and down to 100 HeLa cells with the aid of UV-Vis spectroscopy. This strategy is not only convenient and sensitive, but also has a tunable dynamic range. The platform is also applicable for the initial screening of a telomerase inhibitor to discover new anticancer drugs.We developed a novel telomere complementary (TC) oligonucleotide modified AuNP probe (TC-AuNPs) for colorimetric analysis of telomerase activity. The mechanism of this method is that the telomerase reaction products (TRP), which can hybridize with the TC-AuNPs, are able to protect the AuNPs from the aggregation induced by salt. It is demonstrated that the colorimetric method enabled the analysis of the telomerase activity in 1000 HeLa cells with the naked eye, and down to 100 HeLa cells with the aid of UV-Vis spectroscopy. This strategy is not only convenient and sensitive, but also has a tunable dynamic range. The platform is also applicable for the initial screening of a telomerase inhibitor to discover new anticancer drugs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05185d

  14. Onsite naked eye determination of cysteine and homocysteine using quencher displacement-induced fluorescence recovery of the dual-emission hybrid probes with desired intensity ratio.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kan; Qian, Jing; Jiang, Ding; Yang, Zhengting; Du, Xiaojiao; Wang, Kun

    2015-03-15

    Simple, inexpensive, portable sensing strategies for those clinically relevant molecules have attained a significant positive impact on the health care system. Herein, we have prepared a dual-emission ratiometric fluorescence probe with desired intensity ratio and demonstrated its efficiency for onsite naked eye determination of cysteine (Cys) and homocysteine (Hcy). The hybrid probe has been designed by hybridizing two differently sized CdTe quantum dots (QDs), in which the red-emitting CdTe QDs (rQDs) entrapped in the silica sphere acting as the reference signal, and the green-emitting CdTe QDs (gQDs) covalently attached on the silica surface serving as the response signal. When 1,10-phenanthroline with strong coordination ability to Cd atoms in gQDs was introduced, the fluorescence of the gQDs was effectively quenched, while the fluorescence of the rQDs stayed constant. Upon exposure to different contents of Cys or Hcy, the fluorescence of gQDs can be recovered gradually due to the displacement of the quencher. Based on the background signal of rQDs, the variations of the sensing system display continuous fluorescence color changes from red to green, which can be easily observed by the naked eye. The assay requires ∼20min and has a detection limit of 2.5 and 1.7μM for Cys and Hcy, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this sensing scheme can be fully integrated in a filter paper-based assay, thus enabling a potential point-of-care application featuring easy operation, low power consumption, and low fabrication costs.

  15. Novel conducting polymer-heteropoly acid hybrid material for artificial photosynthetic membranes.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Michael B; Freund, Michael S

    2011-04-01

    Artificial photosynthetic (AP) approaches to convert and store solar energy will require membranes capable of conducting both ions and electrons while remaining relatively transparent and chemically stable. A new approach is applied herein involving previously described in situ chemical polymerization of electronically conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) in the presence of proton conducting heteropoly acid (HPA) phosphomolybdic acid (PMA). The electrochemical behaviour of the PEDOT/PMA hybrid material was investigated and it was found that the conducting polymer (CP) is susceptible to irreversible oxidative processes at potentials where water is oxidized. This will be problematic in AP devices should the process occur in very close proximity to a conducting polymer-based membrane. It was found that PEDOT grants the system good electrical performance in terms of conductivity and stability over a large pH window; however, the presence of PMA was not found to provide sufficient proton conductivity. This was addressed in an additional study by tuning the ionic (and in turn, electronic) conductivity in creating composites with the proton-permselective polymer Nafion. It was found that a material of this nature with near-equal conductivity for optimal chemical conversion efficiency will consist of roughly three parts Nafion and one part PEDOT/PMA.

  16. THE EFFECT OF ANOLYTE PRODUCT ACID CONCENTRATION ON HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.; Summers, W.

    2010-03-24

    The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) cycle (Fig. 1) is one of the simplest, all-fluids thermochemical cycles that has been devised for splitting water with a high-temperature nuclear or solar heat source. It was originally patented by Brecher and Wu in 1975 and extensively developed by Westinghouse in the late 1970s and early 1980s. As its name suggests, the only element used besides hydrogen and oxygen is sulfur, which is cycled between the +4 and +6 oxidation states. HyS comprises two steps. One is the thermochemical (>800 C) decomposition of sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) to sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), oxygen (O{sub 2}), and water. H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} = SO{sub 2} + 1/2 O{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O. The other is the SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis of water to H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and hydrogen (H{sub 2}), SO{sub 2} + 2 H{sub 2}O = H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}, E{sup o} = -0.156 V, explaining the 'hybrid' designation. These two steps taken together split water into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} using heat and electricity. Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and at the University of South Carolina (USC) have successfully demonstrated the use of proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzers (Fig. 2) for the SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis (sulfur oxidation) step, while Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) successfully demonstrated the high-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition (sulfur reduction) step using a bayonet-type reactor (Fig. 3). This latter work was performed as part of the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) cycle Integrated Laboratory Scale demonstration at General Atomics (GA). The combination of these two operations results in a simple process that will be more efficient and cost-effective for the massive production of hydrogen than alkaline electrolysis. Recent developments suggest that the use of PEMs other than Nafion will allow sulfuric acid to be produced at higher concentrations (>60 wt%), offering the possibility of net thermal efficiencies around 50% (HHV basis

  17. Synthesis and utilization of chitin humic acid hybrid as sorbent for Cr(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santosa, Sri Juari; Siswanta, Dwi; Sudiono, Sri; Sehol, Muhamad

    2007-11-01

    New types of hybrid material have been synthesized by using four different methods of immobilization of humic acid (HA) on chitin. The most stable hybrid material toward the change of medium acidity was then utilized as sorbent for Cr(III). The HA was extracted from peat soil of Gambut District, South Kalimantan, Indonesia, using the recommended procedure of International Humic Substances Society (IHSS), while the chitin was isolated from crab shell waste through deproteination using 3.5% (w/v) NaOH and followed by removal of inorganic impurities using 1 M HCl. The four methods of immobilization of HA on chitin were (i) Method A: chitin powder (4 g) was gently poured into the stirred solution of 0.4 g HA in 40 mL of 0.01 M NaOH. After overnight stirring, the solid was separated, washed with water, and dried in oven at 70 °C. (ii) Method B: gelatinous chitin (40 g) in 250 mL of 0.5 M HCl was reacted with HA (4 g) in 500 mL of 0.5 M NaOH and aged for 24 h. The product was washed with water and dried. (iii) Method C: HA powder (0.5 g) was mixed with the stirred gel of chitin (2.5 g) in 60 mL of CaCl 2 saturated methanol and the mixture was then washed with the mixed solution of 25 mL of 2 M sodium citrate and ethylene glycol 1:1. The solid was separated, washed with water, and dried. (iv) Method D: the solution of HA (0.056 g) in 10 mL of 0.01 M NaOH was reacted with the gel of chitin (0.2 g) in 10 mL of CaCl 2 saturated methanol. After 24 h stirring, the solid was separated from the reaction medium, washed with the mixed solution of 2 M sodium citrate and ethylene glycol 1:1, and followed by washing with water and drying. Parameters investigated in this study consisted of the stability test of the immobilized HA, as well as the rate constant ( k1), capacity ( b), and energy ( E) of sorption as well as the rate constant of desorption ( k-1). The k1 and k-1 were determined according to a kinetic model of first order sorption reaching equilibrium, while the b and E

  18. Universal Dynamic DNA Assembly-Programmed Surface Hybridization Effect for Single-Step, Reusable, and Amplified Electrochemical Nucleic Acid Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Fang, Li; Wang, Yanqun; Wang, Li

    2017-03-07

    The traditional sensitive electrochemical biosensors are commonly confronted with the cumbersome interface operation and washing procedures and the inclusion of extra exogenous reagents, which impose the challenge on the detection simplicity, reliability, and reusability. Herein, we present the proof-of-principle of a unique biosensor architecture based on dynamic DNA assembly programmed surface hybridization, which confers the single-step, reusable, and enzyme-free amplified electrochemical nucleic acid analysis. To demonstrate the fabrication universality three dynamic DNA assembly strategies including DNA-fueled target recycling, catalytic hairpin DNA assembly, and hybridization chain reaction were flexibly harnessed to convey the homogeneous target recognition and amplification events into various DNA scaffolds for the autonomous proximity-based surface hybridization. The current biosensor architecture features generalizability, simplicity, low cost, high sensitivity, and specificity over the traditional nucleic acid-related amplified biosensors. The lowest detection limit of 50 aM toward target DNA could be achieved by hybridization chain reaction-programmed surface hybridization. The reliable working ability for both homogeneous solution and heterogeneous inteface facilitates the target analysis with a robust reliability and reproducibility, also making it to be readily extended for the integration with the kinds of detecting platforms. Thus, it may hold great potential for the biosensor fabrication served for the point-of-care applications in resource constrained regions.

  19. Mercaptopropionic acid-capped CdTe quantum dots as fluorescence probe for the determination of salicylic acid in pharmaceutical products.

    PubMed

    Bunkoed, Opas; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2015-11-01

    Mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-capped cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dot (QDs) fluorescent probes were synthesized in aqueous solution and used for the determination of salicylic acid. The interaction between the MPA-capped CdTe QDs and salicylic acid was studied using fluorescence spectroscopy and some parameters that could modify the fluorescence were investigated to optimize the measurements. Under optimum conditions, the quenched fluorescence intensity of MPA-capped CdTe QDs was linearly proportional to the concentration of salicylic acid in the range of 0.5-40 µg mL(-1) with a coefficient of determination of 0.998, and the limit of detection was 0.15 µg mL(-1). The method was successfully applied to the determination of salicylic acid in pharmaceutical products, and satisfactory results were obtained that were in agreement with both the high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and the claimed values. The recovery of the method was in the range 99 ± 3% to 105 ± 9%. The proposed method is simple, rapid, cost effective, highly sensitivity and eminently suitable for the quality control of pharmaceutical preparation. The possible mechanisms for the observed quenching reaction was also discussed.

  20. The Interaction of the Solar Wind with Solar Probe Plus - 3D Hybrid Simulation. Report 1; The Study for the Distance 4.5Rs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, Richard E.; Cooper, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Our report devotes a 3D numerical hybrid model of the interaction of the solar wind with the Solar Probe spacecraft. The SPP model includes 3 main parts, namely, a non-conducting heat shield, a support system, and cylindrical section or spacecraft bus that contains the particle analysis devices and antenna. One observes an excitation of the low frequency Alfven and whistler type wave directed by the magnetic field with an amplitude of about (0.06-0.6) V/m. The compression waves and the jumps in an electric field with an amplitude of about (0.15-0.7) V/m were also observed. The wave amplitudes are comparable to or greater than previously estimated max wave amplitudes that SPP is expected to measure. The results of our hybrid simulation will be useful for understanding the plasma environment near the SPP spacecraft at the distance 4.5 Rs. Future simulation will take into account the charging of the spacecraft, the charge separation effects, an outgassing from heat shield, a photoionization and an electron impact ionization effects near the spacecraft.

  1. A confocal study on the visualization of chromaffin cell secretory vesicles with fluorescent targeted probes and acidic dyes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Alfredo; SantoDomingo, Jaime; Fonteriz, Rosalba I; Lobatón, Carmen D; Montero, Mayte; Alvarez, Javier

    2010-12-01

    Secretory vesicles have low pH and have been classically identified as those labelled by a series of acidic fluorescent dyes such as acridine orange or neutral red, which accumulate into the vesicles according to the pH gradient. More recently, several fusion proteins containing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and targeted to the secretory vesicles have been engineered. Both targeted fluorescent proteins and acidic dyes have been used, separately or combined, to monitor the dynamics of secretory vesicle movements and their fusion with the plasma membrane. We have now investigated in detail the degree of colocalization of both types of probes using several fusion proteins targeted to the vesicles (synaptobrevin2-EGFP, Cromogranin A-EGFP and neuropeptide Y-EGFP) and several acidic dyes (acridine orange, neutral red and lysotracker red) in chromaffin cells, PC12 cells and GH(3) cells. We find that all the acidic dyes labelled the same population of vesicles. However, that population was largely different from the one labelled by the targeted proteins, with very little colocalization among them, in all the cell types studied. Our data show that the vesicles containing the proteins more characteristic of the secretory vesicles are not labelled by the acidic dyes, and vice versa. Peptide glycyl-L-phenylalanine 2-naphthylamide (GPN) produced a rapid and selective disruption of the vesicles labelled by acidic dyes, suggesting that they could be mainly lysosomes. Therefore, these labelling techniques distinguish two clearly different sets of acidic vesicles in neuroendocrine cells. This finding should be taken into account whenever vesicle dynamics is studied using these techniques.

  2. Short Wavelength Electromagnetic Perturbations Excited Near the Solar Probe Plus Spacecraft in the Inner Heliosphere: 2.5D Hybrid Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, Richard E.; Cooper, John F.

    2011-01-01

    A 2.5D numerical plasma model of the interaction of the solar wind (SW) with the Solar Probe Plus spacecraft (SPPSC) is presented. These results should be interpreted as a basic plasma model derived from the SW-interaction with the spacecraft (SC), which could have consequences for both plasma wave and electron plasma measurements on board the SC in the inner heliosphere. Compression waves and electric field jumps with amplitudes of about 1.5 V/m and (12-18) V/m were also observed. A strong polarization electric field was also observed in the wing of the plasma wake. However, 2.5D hybrid modeling did not show excitation of whistler/Alfven waves in the upstream connected with the bidirectional current closure that was observed in short-time 3D modeling SPPSC and near a tether in the ionosphere. The observed strong electromagnetic perturbations may be a crucial point in the electromagnetic measurements planned for the future Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission. The results of modeling electromagnetic field perturbations in the SW due to shot noise in absence of SPPSC are also discussed.

  3. Frequencies of complex chromosome exchange aberrations induced by 238Pu alpha-particles and detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization using single chromosome-specific probes.

    PubMed

    Griffin, C S; Marsden, S J; Stevens, D L; Simpson, P; Savage, J R

    1995-04-01

    We undertook an analysis of chromosome-type exchange aberrations induced by alpha-particles using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome-specific probes for human chromosomes 1 or 4, together with a pan-centromeric probe. Contact-inhibited primary human fibroblasts (in G1) were irradiated with 0.41-1.00 Gy 238Pu alpha-particles and aberrations were analysed at the next mitosis following a single chromosome paint. Exchange and aberration painting patterns were classified according to Savage and Simpson (1994a). Of exchange aberrations, 38-47% were found to be complex derived, i.e. resulting from three or more breaks in two or more chromosomes, and the variation with dose was minimal. The class of complex aberrations most frequently observed were insertions, derived from a minimum of three breaks in two chromosomes. There was also an elevated frequency of rings. The high level of complex aberrations observed after alpha-particle irradiation indicates that, when chromosome domains are traversed by high linear energy transfer alpha-particle tracks, there is an enhanced probability of production of multiple localized double-strand breaks leading to more complicated interactions.

  4. Preparation of graphene quantum dots based core-satellite hybrid spheres and their use as the ratiometric fluorescence probe for visual determination of mercury(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Hua, Mengjuan; Wang, Chengquan; Qian, Jing; Wang, Kan; Yang, Zhenting; Liu, Qian; Mao, Hanping; Wang, Kun

    2015-08-12

    We herein proposed a simple and effective strategy for preparing graphene quantum dots (GQDs)-based core-satellite hybrid spheres and further explored the feasibility of using such spheres as the ratiometric fluorescence probe for the visual determination of Hg(2+). The red-emitting CdTe QDs were firstly entrapped in the silica nanosphere to reduce their toxicity and improve their photo and chemical stabilities, thus providing a built-in correction for environmental effects, while the GQDs possessing good biocompatibility and low toxicity were electrostatic self-assembly on the silica surface acting as reaction sites. Upon exposure to the increasing contents of Hg(2+), the blue fluorescence of GQDs can be gradually quenched presumably due to facilitating nonradiative electron/hole recombination annihilation. With the embedded CdTe QDs as the internal standard, the variations of the tested solution display continuous fluorescence color changes from blue to red, which can be easily observed by the naked eye without any sophisticated instrumentations and specially equipped laboratories. This sensor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity toward Hg(2+) in a broad linear range of 10 nM-22 μM with a low detection limit of 3.3 nM (S/N = 3), much lower than the allowable Hg(2+) contents in drinking water set by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This prototype ratiometric probe is of good simplicity, low toxicity, excellent stabilities, and thus potentially attractive for Hg(2+) quantification related biological systems.

  5. Identification of human DNA in forensic evidence by loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a colorimetric gold nanoparticle hybridization probe.

    PubMed

    Watthanapanpituck, Khanistha; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika; Chu, Eric; Panvisavas, Nathinee

    2014-11-01

    A DNA test based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and colorimetric gold nanoparticle (AuNP) hybridization probe to detect the presence of human DNA in forensic evidence was developed. The LAMP primer set targeted eight regions of the human cytochrome b, and its specificity was verified against the DNA of 11 animal species, which included animals closely related to humans, such as chimpanzee and orangutan. By using the AuNP probe, sequence-specific LAMP product could be detected and the test result could be visualized through the change in color. The limit of detection was demonstrated with reproducibility to be as low as 718 fg of genomic DNA, which is equivalent to approximately 100 plasmid DNA copies containing the cytochrome b DNA target region. A simple DNA extraction method for the commonly found forensic biological samples was also devised to streamline the test process. This LAMP-AuNP human DNA test showed to be a robust, specific, and cost-effective tool for the forensic identification of human specimens without requiring sophisticated laboratory instruments.

  6. Camera-based ratiometric fluorescence transduction of nucleic acid hybridization with reagentless signal amplification on a paper-based platform using immobilized quantum dots as donors.

    PubMed

    Noor, M Omair; Krull, Ulrich J

    2014-10-21

    Paper-based diagnostic assays are gaining increasing popularity for their potential application in resource-limited settings and for point-of-care screening. Achievement of high sensitivity with precision and accuracy can be challenging when using paper substrates. Herein, we implement the red-green-blue color palette of a digital camera for quantitative ratiometric transduction of nucleic acid hybridization on a paper-based platform using immobilized quantum dots (QDs) as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). A nonenzymatic and reagentless means of signal enhancement for QD-FRET assays on paper substrates is based on the use of dry paper substrates for data acquisition. This approach offered at least a 10-fold higher assay sensitivity and at least a 10-fold lower limit of detection (LOD) as compared to hydrated paper substrates. The surface of paper was modified with imidazole groups to assemble a transduction interface that consisted of immobilized QD-probe oligonucleotide conjugates. Green-emitting QDs (gQDs) served as donors with Cy3 as an acceptor. A hybridization event that brought the Cy3 acceptor dye in close proximity to the surface of immobilized gQDs was responsible for a FRET-sensitized emission from the acceptor dye, which served as an analytical signal. A hand-held UV lamp was used as an excitation source and ratiometric analysis using an iPad camera was possible by a relative intensity analysis of the red (Cy3 photoluminescence (PL)) and green (gQD PL) color channels of the digital camera. For digital imaging using an iPad camera, the LOD of the assay in a sandwich format was 450 fmol with a dynamic range spanning 2 orders of magnitude, while an epifluorescence microscope detection platform offered a LOD of 30 fmol and a dynamic range spanning 3 orders of magnitude. The selectivity of the hybridization assay was demonstrated by detection of a single nucleotide polymorphism at a contrast ratio of 60:1. This work provides an

  7. Carboxylic Acid Ionophores as Probes of the Role of Calcium in Biological Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, P. W.

    1983-01-01

    The biological effects of calcium ionophores are described, focusing on arachidonic acid oxygenation, and the formation of a number of oxygenated metabolites of arachidonic acid. These metabolites are involved in a number of bodily functions, and their production may be regulated by calcium.

  8. Probing acid-amide intermolecular hydrogen bonding by NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Sachin Rama; Suryaprakash, N.

    2012-05-01

    Benzene carboxylic acids and benzamide act as their self-complement in molecular recognition to form inter-molecular hydrogen bonded dimers between amide and carboxylic acid groups, which have been investigated by 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy. Extensive NMR studies using diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY), variable temperature 1D, 2D NMR, established the formation of heterodimers of benzamide with benzoic acid, salicylic acid and phenyl acetic acid in deuterated chloroform solution. Association constants for the complex formation in the solution state have been determined. The results are ascertained by X-ray diffraction in the solid state. Intermolecular interactions in solution and in solid state were found to be similar. The structural parameters obtained by X-ray diffraction studies are compared with those obtained by DFT calculations.

  9. Molecular cytogenetics using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.W.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lucas, J.; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H-U.; Yu, Loh-Chung.

    1990-12-07

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific probes enables several new areas of cytogenetic investigation by allowing visual determination of the presence and normality of specific genetic sequences in single metaphase or interphase cells. in this approach, termed molecular cytogenetics, the genetic loci to be analyzed are made microscopically visible in single cells using in situ hybridization with nucleic acid probes specific to these loci. To accomplish this, the DNA in the target cells is made single stranded by thermal denaturation and incubated with single-stranded, chemically modified probe under conditions where the probe will anneal only with DNA sequences to which it has high DNA sequence homology. The bound probe is then made visible by treatment with a fluorescent reagent such as fluorescein that binds to the chemical modification carried by the probe. The DNA to which the probe does not bind is made visible by staining with a dye such as propidium iodide that fluoresces at a wavelength different from that of the reagent used for probe visualization. We show in this report that probes are now available that make this technique useful for biological dosimetry, prenatal diagnosis and cancer biology. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Cationic liposome-hyaluronic acid hybrid nanoparticles for intranasal vaccination with subunit antigens

    PubMed Central

    Ochyl, Lukasz J.; Akerberg, Jonathan; Moon, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the development of a new cationic liposome-hyaluronic acid (HA) hybrid nanoparticle (NP) system and present our characterization of these NPs as an intranasal vaccine platform using a model antigen and F1-V, a candidate recombinant antigen for Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. Incubation of cationic liposomes composed of DOTAP and DOPE with anionic HA biopolymer led to efficient ionic complexation and formation of homogenous liposome-polymer hybrid NPs, as evidenced by fluorescence resonance energy transfer, dynamic light scattering, and nanoparticle tracking analyses. Incorporation of cationic liposomes with thiolated HA allowed for facile surface decoration of NPs with thiol-PEG, resulting in the formation of DOTAP/HA core-PEG shell nanostructures. These NPs, termed DOTAP-HA NPs, exhibited improved colloidal stability and prolonged antigen release. In addition, cytotoxicity associated with DOTAP liposomes (LC50 ~0.2 mg/ml) was significantly reduced by at least 20-fold with DOTAP-HA NPs (LC50 > 4 mg/ml), as measured with bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDCs). Furthermore, NPs co-loaded with ovalbumin (OVA) and a molecular adjuvant, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) promoted BMDC maturation and upregulation of co-stimulatory markers, including CD40, CD86, and MHC-II, and C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with NPs via intranasal route generated robust OVA-specific CD8+ T cell and antibody responses. Importantly, intranasal vaccination with NPs co-loaded with F1-V and MPLA induced potent humoral immune responses with 11-, 23-, and 15-fold increases in F1-V-specific total IgG, IgG1, and IgG2c titers in immune sera by day 77, respectively, and induced balanced Th1/Th2 humoral immune responses, compared with the lack of sero-conversion in mice immunized with the equivalent doses of soluble F1-V vaccine. Overall, these results suggest that liposome-polymer hybrid NPs may serve as a promising vaccine delivery platform for intranasal vaccination against Y

  11. Cationic liposome-hyaluronic acid hybrid nanoparticles for intranasal vaccination with subunit antigens.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuchen; Sahdev, Preety; Ochyl, Lukasz J; J Akerberg, Jonathan; Moon, James J

    2015-06-28

    Here we report the development of a new cationic liposome-hyaluronic acid (HA) hybrid nanoparticle (NP) system and present our characterization of these NPs as an intranasal vaccine platform using a model antigen and F1-V, a candidate recombinant antigen for Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. Incubation of cationic liposomes composed of DOTAP and DOPE with anionic HA biopolymer led to efficient ionic complexation and formation of homogenous liposome-polymer hybrid NPs, as evidenced by fluorescence resonance energy transfer, dynamic light scattering, and nanoparticle tracking analyses. Incorporation of cationic liposomes with thiolated HA allowed for facile surface decoration of NPs with thiol-PEG, resulting in the formation of DOTAP/HA core-PEG shell nanostructures. These NPs, termed DOTAP-HA NPs, exhibited improved colloidal stability and prolonged antigen release. In addition, cytotoxicity associated with DOTAP liposomes (LC50~0.2mg/ml) was significantly reduced by at least 20-fold with DOTAP-HA NPs (LC50>4mg/ml), as measured with bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). Furthermore, NPs co-loaded with ovalbumin (OVA) and a molecular adjuvant, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) promoted BMDC maturation and upregulation of co-stimulatory markers, including CD40, CD86, and MHC-II, and C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with NPs via intranasal route generated robust OVA-specific CD8(+) T cell and antibody responses. Importantly, intranasal vaccination with NPs co-loaded with F1-V and MPLA induced potent humoral immune responses with 11-, 23-, and 15-fold increases in F1-V-specific total IgG, IgG1, and IgG2c titers in immune sera by day 77, respectively, and induced balanced Th1/Th2 humoral immune responses, whereas mice immunized with the equivalent doses of soluble F1-V vaccine failed to achieve sero-conversion. Overall, these results suggest that liposome-polymer hybrid NPs may serve as a promising vaccine delivery platform for intranasal vaccination against Y

  12. Characterization of a Chinese hamster-human hybrid cell line with increased system L amino acid transport activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lobaton, C D; Moreno, A; Oxender, D L

    1984-01-01

    We have studied leucine transport in several Chinese hamster-human hybrid cell lines obtained by fusion of a temperature-sensitive line of Chinese hamster ovary cells, ts025C1, and normal human leukocytes. A hybrid cell line exhibiting a twofold increase in L-leucine uptake over that in the parental cell line was found. This hybrid cell line, 158CnpT-1, was temperature resistant, whereas the parental Chinese hamster ovary mutant, ts025C1, contained a temperature-sensitive leucyl-tRNA synthetase mutation. An examination of the different amino acid transport systems in this hybrid cell line revealed a specific increase of system L activity with no significant changes in systems A and ASC. The Vmax for L-leucine uptake exhibited by the hybrid 158CnpT-1 was twice that in the CHO parental mutant, ts025C1. Cytogenetic analysis showed that the hybrid 158CnpT-1 contains four complete human chromosomes (numbers 4, 5, 10, and 21) and three interspecific chromosomal translocations in a total complement of 34 chromosomes. Biochemical and cytogenetic analysis of segregant clones obtained from hybrid 158CnpT-1 showed that the primary temperature resistance and high system L transport phenotypes can be segregated from this hybrid independently. The loss of the primary temperature resistance was associated with the loss of the human chromosome 5, as previously reported by other laboratories, whereas the loss of the high leucine transport phenotype, which is associated with a lesser degree of temperature resistance, was correlated with the loss of human chromosome 20. Images PMID:6717430

  13. Characterization of a Chinese hamster-human hybrid cell line with increased system L amino acid transport activity.

    PubMed

    Lobaton, C D; Moreno, A; Oxender, D L

    1984-03-01

    We have studied leucine transport in several Chinese hamster-human hybrid cell lines obtained by fusion of a temperature-sensitive line of Chinese hamster ovary cells, ts025C1, and normal human leukocytes. A hybrid cell line exhibiting a twofold increase in L-leucine uptake over that in the parental cell line was found. This hybrid cell line, 158CnpT-1, was temperature resistant, whereas the parental Chinese hamster ovary mutant, ts025C1, contained a temperature-sensitive leucyl-tRNA synthetase mutation. An examination of the different amino acid transport systems in this hybrid cell line revealed a specific increase of system L activity with no significant changes in systems A and ASC. The Vmax for L-leucine uptake exhibited by the hybrid 158CnpT-1 was twice that in the CHO parental mutant, ts025C1. Cytogenetic analysis showed that the hybrid 158CnpT-1 contains four complete human chromosomes (numbers 4, 5, 10, and 21) and three interspecific chromosomal translocations in a total complement of 34 chromosomes. Biochemical and cytogenetic analysis of segregant clones obtained from hybrid 158CnpT-1 showed that the primary temperature resistance and high system L transport phenotypes can be segregated from this hybrid independently. The loss of the primary temperature resistance was associated with the loss of the human chromosome 5, as previously reported by other laboratories, whereas the loss of the high leucine transport phenotype, which is associated with a lesser degree of temperature resistance, was correlated with the loss of human chromosome 20.

  14. Probing the Sophisticated Synergistic Allosteric Regulation of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using ᴅ-Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Reichau, Sebastian; Blackmore, Nicola J.; Jiao, Wanting; Parker, Emily J.

    2016-01-01

    Chirality plays a major role in recognition and interaction of biologically important molecules. The enzyme 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAH7PS) is the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, which is responsible for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in bacteria and plants, and a potential target for the development of antibiotics and herbicides. DAH7PS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtuDAH7PS) displays an unprecedented complexity of allosteric regulation, with three interdependent allosteric binding sites and a ternary allosteric response to combinations of the aromatic amino acids l-Trp, l-Phe and l-Tyr. In order to further investigate the intricacies of this system and identify key residues in the allosteric network of MtuDAH7PS, we studied the interaction of MtuDAH7PS with aromatic amino acids that bear the non-natural d-configuration, and showed that the d-amino acids do not elicit an allosteric response. We investigated the binding mode of d-amino acids using X-ray crystallography, site directed mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry. Key differences in the binding mode were identified: in the Phe site, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the allosteric ligands to the side chain of Asn175 is not established due to the inverted configuration of the ligands. In the Trp site, d-Trp forms no interaction with the main chain carbonyl group of Thr240 and less favourable interactions with Asn237 when compared to the l-Trp binding mode. Investigation of the MtuDAH7PSN175A variant further supports the hypothesis that the lack of key interactions in the binding mode of the aromatic d-amino acids are responsible for the absence of an allosteric response, which gives further insight into which residues of MtuDAH7PS play a key role in the transduction of the allosteric signal. PMID:27128682

  15. Probing the Sophisticated Synergistic Allosteric Regulation of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using ᴅ-Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Reichau, Sebastian; Blackmore, Nicola J; Jiao, Wanting; Parker, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    Chirality plays a major role in recognition and interaction of biologically important molecules. The enzyme 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAH7PS) is the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, which is responsible for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in bacteria and plants, and a potential target for the development of antibiotics and herbicides. DAH7PS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtuDAH7PS) displays an unprecedented complexity of allosteric regulation, with three interdependent allosteric binding sites and a ternary allosteric response to combinations of the aromatic amino acids l-Trp, l-Phe and l-Tyr. In order to further investigate the intricacies of this system and identify key residues in the allosteric network of MtuDAH7PS, we studied the interaction of MtuDAH7PS with aromatic amino acids that bear the non-natural d-configuration, and showed that the d-amino acids do not elicit an allosteric response. We investigated the binding mode of d-amino acids using X-ray crystallography, site directed mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry. Key differences in the binding mode were identified: in the Phe site, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the allosteric ligands to the side chain of Asn175 is not established due to the inverted configuration of the ligands. In the Trp site, d-Trp forms no interaction with the main chain carbonyl group of Thr240 and less favourable interactions with Asn237 when compared to the l-Trp binding mode. Investigation of the MtuDAH7PSN175A variant further supports the hypothesis that the lack of key interactions in the binding mode of the aromatic d-amino acids are responsible for the absence of an allosteric response, which gives further insight into which residues of MtuDAH7PS play a key role in the transduction of the allosteric signal.

  16. Tuning of an active photonic crystal cavity by an hybrid silica/silicon near-field probe.

    PubMed

    Le Gac, G; Rahmani, A; Seassal, C; Picard, E; Hadji, E; Callard, S

    2009-11-23

    The influence of a near-field tip on the spectral characteristics of a resonant mode of an active photonic crystal micro-cavity was investigated. The wavelength shift of the mode was theoretically and experimentally demonstrated and evaluated as a function of the nature and the position of the tip above the cavity. Experiment showed that the shift induced is ten times higher with a Si-coated silica probe than with a bare silica tip: a shift until 2 nm was reached with Si-coated tip whereas the shift with bare silica tip is in the range of the tenth of nanometer, for wavelengths around 1,55 microm.

  17. Probing Protein Structure by Amino Acid-Specific Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Vanessa Leah; Vachet, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    For many years, amino acid-specific covalent labeling has been a valuable tool to study protein structure and protein interactions, especially for systems that are difficult to study by other means. These covalent labeling methods typically map protein structure and interactions by measuring the differential reactivity of amino acid side chains. The reactivity of amino acids in proteins generally depends on the accessibility of the side chain to the reagent, the inherent reactivity of the label and the reactivity of the amino acid side chain. Peptide mass mapping with ESI- or MALDI-MS and peptide sequencing with tandem MS are typically employed to identify modification sites to provide site-specific structural information. In this review, we describe the reagents that are most commonly used in these residue-specific modification reactions, details about the proper use of these covalent labeling reagents, and information about the specific biochemical problems that have been addressed with covalent labeling strategies. PMID:19016300

  18. Four dimensional hybrid ultrasound and optoacoustic imaging via passive element optical excitation in a hand-held probe

    SciTech Connect

    Fehm, Thomas Felix; Razansky, Daniel; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís

    2014-10-27

    Ultrasonography and optoacoustic imaging share powerful advantages related to the natural aptitude for real-time image rendering with high resolution, the hand-held operation, and lack of ionizing radiation. The two methods also possess very different yet highly complementary advantages of the mechanical and optical contrast in living tissues. Nonetheless, efficient integration of these modalities remains challenging owing to the fundamental differences in the underlying physical contrast, optimal signal acquisition, and image reconstruction approaches. We report on a method for hybrid acquisition and reconstruction of three-dimensional pulse-echo ultrasound and optoacoustic images in real time based on passive ultrasound generation with an optical absorber, thus avoiding the hardware complexity of active ultrasound generation. In this way, complete hybrid datasets are generated with a single laser interrogation pulse, resulting in simultaneous rendering of ultrasound and optoacoustic images at an unprecedented rate of 10 volumetric frames per second. Performance is subsequently showcased in phantom experiments and in-vivo measurements from a healthy human volunteer, confirming general clinical applicability of the method.

  19. Multifunctional compact hybrid Au nanoshells: a new generation of nanoplasmonic probes for biosensing, imaging, and controlled release.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yongdong

    2014-01-21

    Gold nanoshells (AuNSs) with tunable localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peaks in the near-infrared (NIR) region possess unique optical properties-particularly that soft tissues are "transparent" at these wavelengths-making them of great interest in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Since 1998 when Halas and co-workers invented the first generation of AuNS, with a silica core and Au shell, researchers have studied and designed AuNSs for theranostic-individualized, combination diagnosis and therapy-nanomedicine. As demand has increased for more powerful and practical theranostic applications, so has demand for the next generation of AuNSs-compact yet complex multifunctional AuNSs with finely integrated plasmonic and nonplasmonic inorganic components. For in vivo biomedical applications, such a hybrid AuNS offers the desirable optical properties of NIR LSPR. Size, however, has proved a more challenging parameter to control in hybrid AuNSs. The ideal size of therapeutic NPs is 10-100 nm. Larger particles have limited diffusion in the extracellular space, while particles less than 5 nm are rapidly cleared from the circulation through extravasation or renal clearance. Conventional methods of preparing AuNS have failed to obtain small-sized hybrid AuNSs with NIR LSPR responses. In this Account, we present a new class of multifunctional hybrid AuNSs with ultrathin AuNSs and varied, functional (nonplasmonic) core components ranging from "hard" semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), to superparamagnetic NPs, to "soft" liposomes made using poly-l-histidine as a template to direct Au deposition. The resultant hybrid AuNSs are uniform and compact (typically 15-60 nm) but also preserve the optical properties and shell-type NIR response necessary for biomedical use. We also demonstrate these particles' innovative plasmonic applications in biosensing, multimodal imaging and controlled release. More importantly, the magnetic-plasmonic Fe3O4/Au core-shell NP enables a new

  20. Silylated melamine and cyanuric acid as precursors for imprinted and hybrid silica materials with molecular recognition properties.

    PubMed

    Arrachart, Guilhem; Carcel, Carole; Trens, Philippe; Moreau, Jöel J E; Wong Chi Man, Michel

    2009-06-15

    Two monotrialkoxysilylated compounds that consist of complementary fragments of melamine (M) and cyanuric acid (CA) have been synthesised. The molecular recognition properties of the M and CA fragments through complementary hydrogen bonds (DAD and ADA; D=donor, A=acceptor) are the key factor used to direct the formation of hybrid silica materials by using a sol-gel process. These materials were synthesised following two methods: First, an organo-bridged silsesquioxane was obtained by the hydrolysis of the two complementary monotrialkoxysilylated melamine and cyanuric acid derivatives, with fluoride ions as a catalyst. The hydrogen-bonding interactions between the two organic fragments are responsible for the formation of the bridging unit. The transcription of the assembly into the hybrid material was characterised and evidenced by solid-state NMR (29Si, 13C) and FTIR spectroscopic experiments. Second, the molecular recognition was exploited to synthesise an imprinted hybrid silica. This material was prepared by co-condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) with the monosilylated cyanuric acid derivative (CA) templated by nonsilylated melamine. The melamine template was completely removed by treating the solid material with hydrochloric acid. The reintroduction of the template was performed by treating the resulting material with an aqueous suspension of melamine. These steps were monitored and analysed by several techniques, such as solid-state NMR (29Si, 13C) and FTIR spectroscopic analysis and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms.

  1. Increased stability and specificity through combined hybridization of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) and locked nucleic acid (LNA) to supercoiled plasmids for PNA-anchored "Bioplex" formation.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Karin E; Hasan, Maroof; Moreno, Pedro M; Törnquist, Elisabeth; Oprea, Iulian; Svahn, Mathias G; Simonson, E Oscar; Smith, C I Edvard

    2005-12-01

    Low cellular uptake and poor nuclear transfer hamper the use of non-viral vectors in gene therapy. Addition of functional entities to plasmids using the Bioplex technology has the potential to improve the efficiency of transfer considerably. We have investigated the possibility of stabilizing sequence-specific binding of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) anchored functional peptides to plasmid DNA by hybridizing PNA and locked nucleic acid (LNA) oligomers as "openers" to partially overlapping sites on the opposite DNA strand. The PNA "opener" stabilized the binding of "linear" PNA anchors to mixed-base supercoiled DNA in saline. For higher stability under physiological conditions, bisPNA anchors were used. To reduce nonspecific interactions when hybridizing highly cationic constructs and to accommodate the need for increased amounts of bisPNA when the molecules are uncharged, or negatively charged, we used both PNA and LNA oligomers as "openers" to increase binding kinetics. To our knowledge, this is the first time that LNA has been used together with PNA to facilitate strand invasion. This procedure allows hybridization at reduced PNA-to-plasmid ratios, allowing greater than 80% hybridization even at ratios as low as 2:1. Using significantly lower amounts of PNA-peptides combined with shorter incubation times reduces unspecific binding and facilitates purification.

  2. One-year monitoring of an oligonucleotide fluorescence in situ hybridization probe panel laboratory-developed test for bladder cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Tinawi-Aljundi, Rima; King, Lauren; Knuth, Shannon T; Gildea, Michael; Ng, Carrie; Kahl, Josh; Dion, Jacqueline; Young, Chris; Schervish, Edward W; Frontera, J Rene; Hafron, Jason; Kernen, Kenneth M; Di Loreto, Robert; Aurich-Costa, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Background Previously, we had developed and manufactured an oligonucleotide fluorescence in situ hybridization (OligoFISH) probe panel based on the most clinically sensitive chromosomes found in a reference set of bladder carcinoma cases. The panel was clinically validated for use as a diagnostic and monitoring assay for bladder cancer, reaching 100% correlation with the results of the UroVysion test. After 1 year of using this probe panel, we present here the comparison of cytology, cystoscopy, and pathology findings to the OligoFISH probe panel results to calculate its clinical performance. Materials and methods In order to calculate clinical performance, we compared the OligoFISH results to the cytology and cystoscopy/pathology findings for 147 initial diagnoses and 399 recurrence monitorings. Finally, we compared clinical performance to published values for the UroVysion test, including both low- and high-grade tumors. Results Chromosomes 3, 6, 7, and 20 were highly involved in bladder carcinoma aneuploidy. At the initial diagnosis, we obtained 90.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 84.5%–94.7%) accuracy, 96.8% sensitivity (95% CI: 91.0%–99.3%), 79.2% specificity (95% CI: 65.9%–87.8%), 89.2% positive predictive value (PPV; 95% CI: 81.5%–94.5%), and 93.3% negative predictive value (NPV; 95% CI: 81.7%–97.3%). When monitoring for recurrence, we obtained 85.2% accuracy (95% CI: 81.3%–88.5%), 82.0% sensitivity (95% CI: 76.0%–87.1%), 88.4% specificity (95% CI: 83.2%–92.5%), 87.7% PPV (95% CI: 82.1%–92.0%), and 83.0% NPV (95% CI: 77.3%–87.8%). When looking at low- and high-grade tumors, the test showed 100% sensitivity for high-grade tumors (95% CI: 92.5%–100%) and 87.5% sensitivity (95% CI: 68.8%–95.5%) for low-grade tumors. All the clinical parameters for the OligoFISH panel were higher than the UroVysion test’s published performance. We found significantly higher clinical sensitivity and NPV at initial diagnosis and significantly higher

  3. Probing Phosphorus Efficient Low Phytic Acid Content Soybean Genotypes with Phosphorus Starvation in Hydroponics Growth System.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Varun; Singh, Tiratha Raj; Hada, Alkesh; Jolly, Monica; Ganapathi, Andy; Sachdev, Archana

    2015-10-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient required for soybean growth but is bound in phytic acid which causes negative effects on both the environment as well as the animal nutrition. Lowering of phytic acid levels is associated with reduced agronomic characteristics, and relatively little information is available on the response of soybean plants to phosphorus (P) starvation. In this study, we evaluated the effects of different P starvation concentrations on the phytic acid content, growth, and yield of seven mutant genotypes along with the unirradiated control, JS-335, in a hydroponics growth system. The low phytic acid containing mutant genotypes, IR-JS-101, IR-DS-118, and IR-V-101, showed a relatively high growth rate in low P concentration containing nutrient solution (2 μM), whereas the high P concentration (50 μM) favored the growth of IR-DS-111 and IR-DS-115 mutant genotypes containing moderate phytate levels. The mutant genotypes with high phytic acid content, IR-DS-122, IR-DS-114, and JS-335, responded well under P starvation and did not have any significant effect on the growth and yield of plants. Moreover, the reduction of P concentration in nutrient solution from 50 to 2 μM also reduced the phytic acid content in the seeds of all the soybean genotypes under study. The desirable agronomic performance of low phytic acid containing mutant genotype IR-DS-118 reported in this study suggested it to be a P-efficient genotype which could be considered for agricultural practices under P limiting soils.

  4. Boronic acids as probes for investigation of allosteric modulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR3.

    PubMed

    Bernat, Viachaslau; Admas, Tizita Haimanot; Brox, Regine; Heinemann, Frank W; Tschammer, Nuska

    2014-11-21

    The chemokine receptor CXCR3 is a G protein-coupled receptor, which conveys extracellular signals into cells by changing its conformation upon agonist binding. To facilitate the mechanistic understanding of allosteric modulation of CXCR3, we combined computational modeling with the synthesis of novel chemical tools containing boronic acid moiety, site-directed mutagenesis, and detailed functional characterization. The design of boronic acid derivatives was based on the predictions from homology modeling and docking. The choice of the boronic acid moiety was dictated by its unique ability to interact with proteins in a reversible covalent way, thereby influencing conformational dynamics of target biomolecules. During the synthesis of the library we have developed a novel approach for the purification of drug-like boronic acids. To validate the predicted binding mode and to identify amino acid residues responsible for the transduction of signal through CXCR3, we conducted a site-directed mutagenesis study. With the use of allosteric radioligand RAMX3 we were able to establish the existence of a second allosteric binding pocket in CXCR3, which enables different binding modes of structurally closely related allosteric modulators of CXCR3. We have also identified residues Trp109(2.60) and Lys300(7.35) inside the transmembrane bundle of the receptor as crucial for the regulation of the G protein activation. Furthermore, we report the boronic acid 14 as the first biased negative allosteric modulator of the receptor. Overall, our data demonstrate that boronic acid derivatives represent an outstanding tool for determination of key receptor-ligand interactions and induction of ligand-biased signaling.

  5. Cloning and characterization of the gene for L-amino acid oxidase in hybrid tilapia.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yubang; Fu, Gui Hong; Liu, Feng; Yue, Gen Hua

    2015-12-01

    Tilapia is the common name for a group of cichlid fishes. Identification of DNA markers significantly associated with important traits in candidate genes may speed up genetic improvement. L-Amino acid oxidase (LAO) plays a crucial role in the innate immune defences of animals. Previously, whether LAO variants were associated with economic traits had not been studied in fish. We characterized the cDNA sequence of the LAO gene of hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis spp.). Its ORF was 1536 bp, encoding a flavoenzyme of 511 amino acids. This gene consisted of seven exons and six introns. Its expression was detected in the intestine, blood, kidney, skin, liver. It was highly expressed in the intestine. After a challenge with a bacterial pathogen, Streptococcus agalactiae, its expression was up-regulated significantly in the liver, intestine and spleen (P < 0.05). We identified one SNP in the genomic sequence of the gene and found that this SNP was associated significantly with body length (P < 0.05), but not with resistance to S. agalactiae. The results of this study suggest that the LAO gene plays an important role in innate immune responses to the bacterial pathogen in tilapia. The investigation of relationship between polymorphism of LAO gene and disease resistance and growth in tilapia showed that one SNP was associated significantly with body length. Further experiments on whether SNPs in the LAO gene are associated with growth in tilapia and other populations could be useful in understanding more functions of the LAO gene.

  6. Array of nucleic acid probes on biological chips for diagnosis of HIV and methods of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Chee, Mark; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Hubble, Earl A.; Morris, MacDonald S.

    1999-01-19

    The invention provides an array of oligonucleotide probes immobilized on a solid support for analysis of a target sequence from a human immunodeficiency virus. The array comprises at least four sets of oligonucleotide probes 9 to 21 nucleotides in length. A first probe set has a probe corresponding to each nucleotide in a reference sequence from a human immunodeficiency virus. A probe is related to its corresponding nucleotide by being exactly complementary to a subsequence of the reference sequence that includes the corresponding nucleotide. Thus, each probe has a position, designated an interrogation position, that is occupied by a complementary nucleotide to the corresponding nucleotide. The three additional probe sets each have a corresponding probe for each probe in the first probe set. Thus, for each nucleotide in the reference sequence, there are four corresponding probes, one from each of the probe sets. The three corresponding probes in the three additional probe sets are identical to the corresponding probe from the first probe or a subsequence thereof that includes the interrogation position, except that the interrogation position is occupied by a different nucleotide in each of the four corresponding probes.

  7. Probing the Influence of Amino Acids on Photoluminescence from Carbon Nanotubes Suspended with DNA.

    PubMed

    Kurnosov, N V; Leontiev, V S; Karachevtsev, V A

    2016-11-01

    The quantitative analysis of amino acid levels in the human organism is required for the early clinical diagnosis of a variety of diseases. In this work the influence of 13 amino acid doping on the photoluminescence (PL) from the semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) suspended with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in water has been studied. Amino acid doping leads to the PL enhancement and the strongest increase was found after cysteine doping of the nanotube suspension while addition of other amino acids yielded the significantly smaller effect. The emphasis of cysteine molecules is attributed to presence of the reactive thiol group that turns cysteine into reducing agent that passivates the p-defects on the nanotube sidewall and increases the PL intensity. The reasons of PL enhancement after doping with other amino acids are discussed. The response of nanotube PL to cysteine addition depends on the nanotube aqueous suspension preparation with tip or bath sonication treatment. The enhancement of the emission from different nanotube species after cysteine doping was analyzed too. It was shown that the increase of the carbon nanotube PL at addition of cysteine allows successful monitoring of the cysteine concentration in aqueous solution in the range of 50-1000 μM.

  8. d-Amino Acid Probes for Penicillin Binding Protein-based Bacterial Surface Labeling*

    PubMed Central

    Fura, Jonathan M.; Kearns, Daniel; Pires, Marcos M.

    2015-01-01

    Peptidoglycan is an essential and highly conserved mesh structure that surrounds bacterial cells. It plays a critical role in retaining a defined cell shape, and, in the case of pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, it lies at the interface between bacterial cells and the host organism. Intriguingly, bacteria can metabolically incorporate unnatural d-amino acids into the peptidoglycan stem peptide directly from the surrounding medium, a process mediated by penicillin binding proteins (PBPs). Metabolic peptidoglycan remodeling via unnatural d-amino acids has provided unique insights into peptidoglycan biosynthesis of live bacteria and has also served as the basis of a synthetic immunology strategy with potential therapeutic implications. A striking feature of this process is the vast promiscuity displayed by PBPs in tolerating entirely unnatural side chains. However, the chemical space and physical features of this side chain promiscuity have not been determined systematically. In this report, we designed and synthesized a library of variants displaying diverse side chains to comprehensively establish the tolerability of unnatural d-amino acids by PBPs in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In addition, nine Bacillus subtilis PBP-null mutants were evaluated with the goal of identifying a potential primary PBP responsible for unnatural d-amino acid incorporation and gaining insights into the temporal control of PBP activity. We empirically established the scope of physical parameters that govern the metabolic incorporation of unnatural d-amino acids into bacterial peptidoglycan. PMID:26499795

  9. Ninhydrin-sodium molybdate chromogenic analytical probe for the assay of amino acids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Anantharaman, Shivakumar; Padmarajaiah, Nagaraja; Al-Tayar, Naef Ghllab Saeed; Shrestha, Ashwinee Kumar

    2017-02-15

    A sensitive method has been proposed for the quantification of amino acids and proteins using ninhydrin and sodium molybdate as chromogenic substrates in citrate buffer of pH5.6. A weak molybdate-hydrindantin complex plays the role in the formation of Ruhemann's purple. The linear response for the amino acid, amino acid mixture and Bovine serum albumin is between 0.999 and 66.80μM, 1.52 and 38μM and 5 and 100μg/L, respectively. The molar absorptivity of the individual amino acid by the proposed reaction extends from 0.58×10(4) to 2.86×10(4)M(-1)cm(-1). The linearity equations for the proposed ninhydrin-molybdate for amino acid mixture is Abs=0.021×Conc (μM)-0.002. The applicability of the proposed method has been justified in food and biological samples in conjunction with Kjeldahl method.

  10. Ninhydrin-sodium molybdate chromogenic analytical probe for the assay of amino acids and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantharaman, Shivakumar; Padmarajaiah, Nagaraja; Al-Tayar, Naef Ghllab Saeed; Shrestha, Ashwinee Kumar

    2017-02-01

    A sensitive method has been proposed for the quantification of amino acids and proteins using ninhydrin and sodium molybdate as chromogenic substrates in citrate buffer of pH 5.6. A weak molybdate-hydrindantin complex plays the role in the formation of Ruhemann's purple. The linear response for the amino acid, amino acid mixture and Bovine serum albumin is between 0.999 and 66.80 μM, 1.52 and 38 μM and 5 and 100 μg/L, respectively. The molar absorptivity of the individual amino acid by the proposed reaction extends from 0.58 × 104 to 2.86 × 104 M- 1 cm- 1. The linearity equations for the proposed ninhydrin-molybdate for amino acid mixture is Abs = 0.021 × Conc (μM) - 0.002. The applicability of the proposed method has been justified in food and biological samples in conjunction with Kjeldahl method.

  11. Yeasts identification in microfluidic devices using peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, André M; Cruz-Moreira, Daniela; Cerqueira, Laura; Miranda, João M; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2017-03-01

    Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) is a highly specific molecular method widely used for microbial identification. Nonetheless, and due to the detection limit of this technique, a time-consuming pre-enrichment step is typically required before identification. In here we have developed a lab-on-a-chip device to concentrate cell suspensions and speed up the identification process in yeasts. The PNA-FISH protocol was optimized to target Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a common yeast that is very relevant for several types of food industries. Then, several coin-sized microfluidic devices with different geometries were developed. Using Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), we modeled the hydrodynamics inside the microchannels and selected the most promising options. SU-8 structures were fabricated based on the selected designs and used to produce polydimethylsiloxane-based microchips by soft lithography. As a result, an integrated approach combining microfluidics and PNA-FISH for the rapid identification of S. cerevisiae was achieved. To improve fluid flow inside microchannels and the PNA-FISH labeling, oxygen plasma treatment was applied to the microfluidic devices and a new methodology to introduce the cell suspension and solutions into the microchannels was devised. A strong PNA-FISH signal was observed in cells trapped inside the microchannels, proving that the proposed methodology works as intended. The microfluidic designs and PNA-FISH procedure described in here should be easily adaptable for detection of other microorganisms of similar size.

  12. Mapping the regioisomeric distribution of fatty acids in triacylglycerols by hybrid mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Kornél; Sandoz, Laurence; Destaillats, Frédéric; Schafer, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the use of hybrid mass spectrometry for the mapping, identification, and semi-quantitation of triacylglycerol regioisomers in fats and oils. The identification was performed based on the accurate mass and fragmentation pattern obtained by data-dependent fragmentation. Quantitation was based on the high-resolution ion chromatograms, and relative proportion of sn-1(3)/sn-2 regioisomers was calculated based on generalized fragmentation models and the relative intensities observed in the product ion spectra. The key performance features of the developed method are inter-batch mass accuracy < 1 ppm (n = 10); lower limit of detection (triggering threshold) 0.1 μg/ml (equivalent to 0.2 weight % in oil); lower limit of quantitation 0.2 μg/ml (equivalent to 0.4 weight % in oil); peak area precision 6.5% at 2 μg/ml concentration and 15% at 0.2 μM concentration; inter-batch precision of fragment intensities < 1% (n = 10) independent of the investigated concentration; and averaged accuracy using the generic calibration 3.8% in the 1-10 μg/ml range and varies between 1-23% depending on analytes. Inter-esterified fat, beef tallow, pork lard, and butter fat samples were used to show how well regioisomeric distribution of palmitic acid can be captured by this method.

  13. Proteomic-based stable isotope probing reveals taxonomically Distinct Patterns in Amino Acid Assimilation by Coastal Marine Bacterioplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Bryson, Samuel; Li, Zhou; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Robert L. Hettich; Mayali, Xavier; Pan, Chongle; Mueller, Ryan S.

    2016-04-26

    Heterotrophic marine bacterioplankton are a critical component of the carbon cycle, processing nearly a quarter of annual global primary production, yet defining how substrate utilization preferences and resource partitioning structure these microbial communities remains a challenge. In this study, we utilized proteomics-based stable isotope probing (proteomic SIP) to characterize the assimilation of amino acids by coastal marine bacterioplankton populations. We incubated microcosms of seawater collected from Newport, OR and Monterey Bay, CA with 1 M 13C-amino acids for 15 and 32 hours. Subsequent analysis of 13C incorporation into protein biomass quantified the frequency and extent of isotope enrichment for identified proteins. Using these metrics we tested whether amino acid assimilation patterns were different for specific bacterioplankton populations. Proteins associated with Rhodobacterales and Alteromonadales tended to have a significantly high number of tandem mass spectra from 13C-enriched peptides, while Flavobacteriales and SAR11 proteins generally had significantly low numbers of 13C-enriched spectra. Rhodobacterales proteins associated with amino acid transport and metabolism had an increased frequency of 13C-enriched spectra at time-point 2, while Alteromonadales ribosomal proteins were 13C- enriched across time-points. Overall, proteomic SIP facilitated quantitative comparisons of dissolved free amino acids assimilation by specific taxa, both between sympatric populations and between protein functional groups within discrete populations, allowing an unprecedented examination of population-level metabolic responses to resource acquisition in complex microbial communities.

  14. Biomedical nanocomposites of poly(lactic acid) and calcium phosphate hybridized with modified carbon nanotubes for hard tissue implants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Hyoung; Sang Shin, Ueon; Lee, Jae-Ho; Kim, Hae-Won

    2011-08-01

    Degradable polymer-based materials are attractive in orthopedics and dentistry as an alternative to metallic implants for use as bone fixatives. Herein, a degradable polymer poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was combined with novel hybrid nanopowder of carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-calcium phosphate (CP) for this application. In particular, CNTs-CP hybrid nanopowders (0.1 and 0.25% CNTs) were prepared from the solution of ionically modified CNTs (mCNTs), which was specifically synthesized to be well-dispersed and thus to effectively adsorb onto the CP nanoparticles. The mCNTs-CP hybrid nanopowders were then mixed with PLA (up to 50%) to produce mCNTs-CP-PLA nanocomposites. The mechanical tensile strength of the nanocomposites was significantly improved by the addition of mCNTs-CP hybrid nanopowders. Moreover, nanocomposites containing low concentration of mCNTs (0.1%) showed significantly stimulated biological responses including cell proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation in terms of gene and protein expressions. Based on this study, the addition of novel mCNT-CP hybrid nanopowders to PLA biopolymer may be considered a new material choice for developing hard tissue implants.

  15. Label-free electronic probing of nucleic acids and proteins at the nanoscale using the nanoneedle biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Esfandyarpour, Rahim; Javanmard, Mehdi; Koochak, Zahra; Esfandyarpour, Hesaam; Harris, James S.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2013-01-01

    Detection of proteins and nucleic acids is dominantly performed using optical fluorescence based techniques, which are more costly and timely than electrical detection due to the need for expensive and bulky optical equipment and the process of fluorescent tagging. In this paper, we discuss our study of the electrical properties of nucleic acids and proteins at the nanoscale using a nanoelectronic probe we have developed, which we refer to as the Nanoneedle biosensor. The nanoneedle consists of four thin film layers: a conductive layer at the bottom acting as an electrode, an oxide layer on top, and another conductive layer on top of that, with a protective oxide above. The presence of proteins and nucleic acids near the tip results in a decrease in impedance across the sensing electrodes. There are three basic mechanisms behind the electrical response of DNA and protein molecules in solution under an applied alternating electrical field. The first change stems from modulation of the relative permittivity at the interface. The second mechanism is the formation and relaxation of the induced dipole moment. The third mechanism is the tunneling of electrons through the biomolecules. The results presented in this paper can be extended to develop low cost point-of-care diagnostic assays for the clinical setting. PMID:24404047

  16. Novel emissive bio-inspired non-proteinogenic coumarin-alanine amino acid: fluorescent probe for polyfunctional systems.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Elisabete; Capelo, José Luis; Lima, João Carlos; Lodeiro, Carlos

    2012-10-01

    Two new bio-inspired non-proteinogenic compounds L1 and L2, containing coumarin and/or acridine chromophores and bearing as spacer an alanine amino acid were successfully synthesized and fully characterized by elemental analysis, (1)H and (13)C NMR, infrared spectroscopy (KBr discs), melting point, ESI-TOF (electrospray ionization-time of flight-mass), UV-vis absorption and emission spectroscopy, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime measurements. A relative fluorescence quantum yield of 0.02 was determined for both compounds. In L2 the presence of an intramolecular energy transfer from the coumarin to the acridine unit was observed. L1 and L2 are quite sensitive to the basicity of the environment. At alkaline values both compounds show a strong quenching in the fluorescence emission, attributed to the photoinduced electron transfer (PET). However, both deprotonated forms recover the emission with the addition of Zn(2+), Cd(2+) and Al(3+) metal ions. As multifunctional emissive probes, the titration of L1 and L2 with lanthanides (III), Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) was also explored as new visible bio-probes in the absence and in the presence of liposomes. In a liposomal environment a lower energy transfer was observed.

  17. Identification and quantification of acetic acid bacteria in wine and vinegar by TaqMan-MGB probes.

    PubMed

    Torija, M J; Mateo, E; Guillamón, J M; Mas, A

    2010-04-01

    A Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR) assay was developed using TaqMan minor groove binder (MGB) probes for the specific detection and quantification of five acetic acid bacteria (AAB) species (Acetobacter pasteurianus, Acetobacter aceti, Gluconacetobacter hansenii, Gluconacetobacter europaeus and Gluconobacter oxydans) in wine and vinegar. The primers and probes, designed from the 16S rRNA gene, showed good specificity with the target AAB species. The technique was tested on AAB grown in glucose medium (GY) and inoculated samples of red wine and wine vinegar. Standard curves were constructed with the five target species in all these matrices. Quantification was linear over at least 5 log units using both serial dilution of purified DNA and cells. When this technique was tested in GY medium and inoculated matrices, at least 10(2)-10(3) cells/ml were detected. To quantify low populations of AAB in microbiologically complex samples, a PCR enrichment including part of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS region was needed to increase the amount of target DNA compared to non-target DNA. The RT-PCR assay used in this study is a reliable, specific and fast method for quantifying these five AAB species in wine and vinegar.

  18. Phenylboronic acid-based (19)F MRI probe for the detection and imaging of hydrogen peroxide utilizing its large chemical-shift change.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; An, Qi; Sugihara, Fuminori; Doura, Tomohiro; Tsuchiya, Akira; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Sando, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report on a new (19)F MRI probe for the detection and imaging of H2O2. Our designed 2-fluorophenylboronic acid-based (19)F probe promptly reacted with H2O2 to produce 2-fluorophenol via boronic acid oxidation. The accompanying (19)F chemical-shift change reached 31 ppm under our experimental conditions. Such a large chemical-shift change allowed for the imaging of H2O2 by (19)F chemical-shift-selective MRI.

  19. Degradation of Acid Orange 7 Dye in Two Hybrid Plasma Discharge Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yongjun; Lei, Lecheng; Zhang, Xingwang; Ding, Jiandong

    2014-11-01

    To get an optimized pulsed electrical plasma discharge reactor and to increase the energy utilization efficiency in the removal of pollutants, two hybrid plasma discharge reactors were designed and optimized. The reactors were compared via the discharge characteristics, energy transfer efficiency, the yields of the active species and the energy utilization in dye wastewater degradation. The results showed that under the same AC input power, the characteristics of the discharge waveform of the point-to-plate reactor were better. Under the same AC input power, the two reactors both had almost the same peak voltage of 22 kV. The peak current of the point-to-plate reactor was 146 A, while that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor was only 48.8 A. The peak powers of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.38 MW and 1.01 MW, respectively. The energy per pulse of the point-to-plate reactor was 0.2221 J, which was about 29.4% higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (0.1716 J). To remove 50% Acid Orange 7 (AO7), the energy utilizations of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.02 × 10-9 mol/L and 0.61 × 10-9 mol/L, respectively. In the point-to-plate reactor, the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in pure water was 3.6 mmol/L after 40 min of discharge, which was higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (2.5 mmol/L). The concentration of liquid phase ozone in the point-to-plate reactor (5.7 × 10-2 mmol/L) was about 26.7% higher than that in the wire-to-cylinder reactor (4.5 × 10-2 mmol/L). The analysis results of the variance showed that the type of reactor and reaction time had significant impacts on the yields of the hydrogen peroxide and ozone. The main degradation intermediates of AO7 identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GCMS) were acetic acid, maleic anhydride, p-benzoquinone, phenol, benzoic acid, phthalic anhydride, coumarin and 2-naphthol. Proposed degradation pathways were

  20. Detection of {open_quotes}cryptic{close_quotes}karyotypic rearrangements in closely related primate species by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using human subtelomeric DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblom, J.J.; Trask, B.J.; Friedman, C.

    1994-09-01

    Specific human subtelomeric DNA probes were used to reveal cryptic chromosomal rearrangements that cannot be detected by conventional high resolution cytogenetic techniques, or by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization using whole chromosome paint analysis. Two cosmids containing different subtelomeric DNA sequences were derived from human chromosome 19 and designated as 7501 and 16432. Cosmid 7501 was hybridized to chromosomes from humans, chimpanzee, gorilla and orangutan. In humans, 7501 consistently labeled chromosomes 3q, 15q, and 19p. Additional chromosomes were labeled in different individuals, indicating a polymorphic distribution of this sequence in the human genome. In contrast, 7501 consistently and strongly labeled only the q arm terminus of chromosome 3 in both chimp and gorilla. The identification of the chromosome was made by two-color FISH analysis using human chromosome 4-specific paint and homologous to human chromosome 4. None of the human subjects showed labeling of chromosome 4 with 7501. This finding suggests that in the course of human evolution, subsequent to the divergence of humans and African apes, a cryptic translocation occurred between the ancestral human chromosome 4 and one or more of the other human chromosomes that now contain this DNA segment. In orangutan, 7501 labeled a single acrocentric chromosome pair, a distinctly different chromosome than that labeled in chimp and gorilla. Comparison of chromosome sites labeled with cosmid 16432 showed the distribution of signals on chromosome 1q arm is the same for humans and chimp, but different in the gorilla. Humans and chimps show distinct labeling on sites 1q terminus and 1q41-42. In gorilla, there is instead a large cluster of intense signal near the terminus of 1q that clearly does not extend all the way to the terminus. A paracentric inversion or an unequal cross-over event may account for the observed difference between these species.

  1. Probing the microstructural evolution of polyviologen-silica hybrid nanopowders during intermediate processing using X-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundogdu, O.; Jenneson, P. M.; Tuzun, U.; Gray, G. M.; Hay, J. N.

    2006-11-01

    Polyviologen polymers are potential template agents for hydrolytic sol-gel processing of silica particles. The resultant polyviologen-silica hybrid nanopowders are amorphous aggregates of roughly spherical shape, which can be harvested from the sol-gel solution and processed to green body products under different environmental conditions. A bench-top X-ray microtomography system, with a spatial resolution of 5 μm is used to produce three-dimensional images of the dynamic processing of the nanopowders. Various processing routes are imaged using a custom built environmental chamber where the temperature, atmospheric pressure, and compaction force can be controlled. This allows processes such as vacuum sintering and microwave sintering to be studied. The three-dimensional images reveal the axial and radial distributions of the molten polyviologen polymer within a matrix of agglomerates of the silica nanoparticles. Such observations are crucial to the optimisation of the processes that are used to produce the green body products so as to preserve desirable nano-intensive properties.

  2. Towards monitoring dysplastic progression in the oral cavity using a hybrid fiber-bundle imaging and spectroscopy probe

    PubMed Central

    Greening, Gage J.; James, Haley M.; Dierks, Mary K.; Vongkittiargorn, Nontapoth; Osterholm, Samantha M.; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Intraepithelial dysplasia of the oral mucosa typically originates in the proliferative cell layer at the basement membrane and extends to the upper epithelial layers as the disease progresses. Detection of malignancies typically occurs upon visual inspection by non-specialists at a late-stage. In this manuscript, we validate a quantitative hybrid imaging and spectroscopy microendoscope to monitor dysplastic progression within the oral cavity microenvironment in a phantom and pre-clinical study. We use an empirical model to quantify optical properties and sampling depth from sub-diffuse reflectance spectra (450–750 nm) at two source-detector separations (374 and 730 μm). Average errors in recovering reduced scattering (5–26 cm−1) and absorption coefficients (0–10 cm−1) in hemoglobin-based phantoms were approximately 2% and 6%, respectively. Next, a 300 μm-thick phantom tumor model was used to validate the probe’s ability to monitor progression of a proliferating optical heterogeneity. Finally, the technique was demonstrated on 13 healthy volunteers and volume-averaged optical coefficients, scattering exponent, hemoglobin concentration, oxygen saturation, and sampling depth are presented alongside a high-resolution microendoscopy image of oral mucosa from one volunteer. This multimodal microendoscopy approach encompasses both structural and spectroscopic reporters of perfusion within the tissue microenvironment and can potentially be used to monitor tumor response to therapy. PMID:27220821

  3. Subcellular localization of low-abundance human immunodeficiency virus nucleic acid sequences visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, J.B.; Marselle, L.M.; Byron, K.S.; Johnson, C.V.; Sullivan, J.L.; Singer, R.H. )

    1990-07-01

    Detection and subcellular localization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were investigated using sensitive high-resolution in situ hybridization methodology. Lymphocytes infected with HIV in vitro or in vivo were detected by fluorescence after hybridization with either biotin or digoxigenin-labeled probes. At 12 hr after infection in vitro, a single intense signal appeared in the nuclei of individual cells. Later in infection, when cytoplasmic fluorescence became intense, multiple nuclear foci frequently appeared. The nuclear focus consisted of newly synthesized HIV RNA as shown by hybridization in the absence of denaturation and by susceptibility to RNase and actinomycin D. Virus was detected in patient lymphocytes and it was shown that a singular nuclear focus also characterizes cells infected in vivo. The cell line 8E5/LAV containing one defective integrated provirus revealed a similar focus of nuclear RNA, and the single integrated HIV genome was unequivocally visualized on a D-group chromosome. This demonstrates an extremely sensitive single-cell assay for the presence of a single site of HIV transcription in vitro and in vivo and suggests that it derives from one (or very few) viral genomes per cell. In contrast, productive Epstein-Barr virus infection exhibited many foci of nuclear RNA per cell.

  4. Energetics of side-chain snorkeling in transmembrane helices probed by nonproteinogenic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Öjemalm, Karin; Higuchi, Takashi; Lara, Patricia; Lindahl, Erik; Suga, Hiroaki; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2016-09-20

    Cotranslational translocon-mediated insertion of membrane proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum is a key process in membrane protein biogenesis. Although the mechanism is understood in outline, quantitative data on the energetics of the process is scarce. Here, we have measured the effect on membrane integration efficiency of nonproteinogenic analogs of the positively charged amino acids arginine and lysine incorporated into model transmembrane segments. We provide estimates of the influence on the apparent free energy of membrane integration (ΔGapp) of "snorkeling" of charged amino acids toward the lipid-water interface, and of charge neutralization. We further determine the effect of fluorine atoms and backbone hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) on ΔGapp These results help establish a quantitative basis for our understanding of membrane protein assembly in eukaryotic cells.

  5. Energetics of side-chain snorkeling in transmembrane helices probed by nonproteinogenic amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Öjemalm, Karin; Higuchi, Takashi; Lara, Patricia; Lindahl, Erik; Suga, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Cotranslational translocon-mediated insertion of membrane proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum is a key process in membrane protein biogenesis. Although the mechanism is understood in outline, quantitative data on the energetics of the process is scarce. Here, we have measured the effect on membrane integration efficiency of nonproteinogenic analogs of the positively charged amino acids arginine and lysine incorporated into model transmembrane segments. We provide estimates of the influence on the apparent free energy of membrane integration (ΔGapp) of “snorkeling” of charged amino acids toward the lipid–water interface, and of charge neutralization. We further determine the effect of fluorine atoms and backbone hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) on ΔGapp. These results help establish a quantitative basis for our understanding of membrane protein assembly in eukaryotic cells. PMID:27601675

  6. Ordering in bio-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials probed by in situ scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jonathan R. I.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Tunuguntla, Ramya; ...

    2015-04-15

    Here, phospholipid bilayer coated Si nanowires are one-dimensional (1D) composites that provide versatile bio-nanoelectronic functionality via incorporation of a wide variety of biomolecules into the phospholipid matrix. The physiochemical behaviour of the phospholipid bilayer is strongly dependent on its structure and, as a consequence, substantial modelling and experimental efforts have been directed at the structural characterization of supported bilayers and unsupported phospholipid vesicles; nonetheless, the experimental studies conducted to date have exclusively involved volume-averaged techniques, which do not allow for the assignment of spatially resolved structural variations that could critically impact the performance of the 1D phospholipid-Si NW composites. Inmore » this manuscript, we use scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) to probe bond orientation and bilayer thickness as a function of position with a spatial resolution of ~30 nm for Δ9-cis 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine layers prepared Si NWs. When coupled with small angle X-ray scattering measurements, the STXM data reveal structural motifs of the Si NWs that give rise to multi-bilayer formation and enable assignment of the orientation of specific bonds known to affect the order and rigidity of phospholipid bilayers.« less

  7. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) with a fibre-optic probe for the prediction of the amino acid composition in animal feeds.

    PubMed

    González-Martín, Inmaculada; Alvarez-García, Noelia; González-Cabrera, José Miguel

    2006-05-15

    The amino acids alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, phenylalanine, valine, lysine, proline, and tyrosine present in feeds with different textures (blocks, tablets, granules and flour (meal) and used in different stages of animal feeding regimes (lactation, growth, maintenance, etc.) were analysed using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) technology together with a remote reflectance fibre-optic probe. The method allows immediate control of the animal feeds without prior sample treatment or destruction through direct application of the fibre-optic probe on the sample. The regression method used was Modified Partial Least Squares (MPLS). The equations developed to determine the amino acid contents of the feeds afforded high values for the RSQ coefficient (0.814-0.963) in all the amino acids with the exception of lysine (0.687). The statistical prediction descriptors SEP, SEP(C) (with values between 0.134 for valine and 0.015 for aspartic acid) and bias indicated that the amino acid values in feeds predicted with NIRS with a fibre optic probe are comparable to those obtained with the chemical ion-exchange HPLC method.

  8. Amino acid-based ionic liquids: using XPS to probe the electronic environment via binding energies.

    PubMed

    Hurisso, Bitu Birru; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Licence, Peter

    2011-10-21

    Here we report the synthesis and characterisation by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of eight high purity amino acid-based ionic liquids (AAILs), each containing the 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium, [C(8)C(1)Im](+), as a standard reference cation. All expected elements were observed and the electronic environments of these elements identified. A fitting model for the carbon 1s region of the AAILs is reported; the C aliphatic component of the cation was used as an internal reference to obtain a series of accurate and reproducible binding energies. Comparisons are made between XP spectra of the eight AAILs and selected non-functionalised ionic liquids. 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate was also studied as a model of the carboxyl containing amino acid anion. The influence of anionic substituent groups on the measured binding energies of all elements is presented, and communication between anion and cation is investigated. This data is interpreted in terms of hard and soft anions and compared to the Kamlet-Taft hydrogen bond acceptor ability, β, for the ionic liquids. A linear correlation is presented which suggests that the functional side chain, or R group, of the amino acid has little impact upon the electronic environment of the charge-bearing moieties within the anions and cations studied.

  9. Re-engineering of CYP2C9 to probe acid-base substrate selectivity.

    PubMed

    Tai, Guoying; Dickmann, Leslie J; Matovic, Nicholas; DeVoss, James J; Gillam, Elizabeth M J; Rettie, Allan E

    2008-10-01

    A common feature of many CYP2C9 ligands is their weak acidity. As revealed by crystallography, the structural basis for this behavior involves a charge-pairing interaction between an anionic moiety on the substrate and an active site R108 residue. In the present study we attempted to re-engineer CYP2C9 to better accept basic ligands by charge reversal at this key residue. We expressed and purified the R108E and R108E/D293N mutants and compared their ability with that of native CYP2C9 to interact with (S)-warfarin, diclofenac, pyrene, propranolol, and ibuprofen amine. As expected, the R108E mutant maintained all the native enzyme's pyrene 1-hydroxylation activity, but catalytic activity toward diclofenac and (S)-warfarin was abrogated. In contrast, the double mutant displayed much less selectivity in its behavior toward these control ligands. Neither of the mutants displayed significant enhancement of propranolol metabolism, and all three preparations exhibited a type II (inhibitor) rather than type I (substrate) spectrum with ibuprofen amine, although binding became progressively weaker with the single and double mutants. Collectively, these data underscore the importance of the amino acid at position 108 in the acid substrate selectivity of CYP2C9, highlight the accommodating nature of the CYP2C9 active site, and provide a cautionary note regarding facile re-engineering of these complex cytochrome P450 active sites.

  10. Using modern tools to probe the structure-function relationship of fatty acid synthases

    PubMed Central

    Burkart, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is essential to life and represents one of the most conserved pathways in Nature, preserving the same handful of chemical reactions over all species. Recent interest in the molecular details of the de novo fatty acid synthase (FAS) has been heightened by demand for renewable fuels and the emergence of multidrug resistant bacterial strains. Central to FAS is the acyl carrier protein (ACP), a protein chaperone that shuttles the growing acyl chain between catalytic enzymes within the FAS. Human efforts to alter fatty acid biosynthesis for oil production, chemical feedstock or antimicrobial purposes has been met with limited success in part due to a lack of detailed molecular information behind the ACP-partner protein interactions inherent to the pathway. This review will focus on recently developed tools for the modification of ACP and analysis of protein-protein interactions, such as mechanism-based crosslinking, and the studies exploiting them. Discussion specific to each enzymatic domain focuses first on mechanism and known inhibitors, followed by available structures and known interactions with ACP. While significant unknowns remain, new understandings into the intricacies of FAS point to future advances in manipulating this complex molecular factory. PMID:25676190

  11. Vanadium-fulvic acid chemistry: conformational and binding studies by electron spin probe techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, G. Daniel, III; Chasteen, N. Dennis

    1980-05-01

    Two fractions of soil fulvic acid (FA) were separated by gel filtration chromatography. An observed increase in volume of the heavier fraction (FA I) with increasing pH was attributed to aggregation, intramolecular negative charge repulsions and the rupture of hydrogen bonds, which control molecular conformation. Optical absorption properties and elemental analyses of both fractions were determined. The stability constants and stoichiometries of FA complexes with vanadyl, VO 2+, at pH 5.0 and ionic strength of 0.04 M were measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. EPR spectra of model VO 2+ complexes with phthalic and salicylic acids, which are the probable functional groups present in FA, are identical to those of the VO 2+-FA complexes. Aggregation of FA I occurs in the presence of VO 2+ to form a complex that can be approximated as '(VO) 2(FA I) 6'. The average site distance between vanadyl ions in this complex is shown to be greater than 1.2 nm. EPR parameters for FA I suggest binding by carboxylate groups. These parameters are compared with those of other vanadyl complexes with fulvic and humic acids reported by others. Reduction of VO 3- to VO 2+ by these materials is discussed.

  12. Probing the meiotic mechanism of intergenomic exchanges by genomic in situ hybridization on lampbrush chromosomes of unisexual Ambystoma (Amphibia: Caudata).

    PubMed

    Bi, Ke; Bogart, James P

    2010-04-01

    The meiotic mechanism of unisexual salamanders in the genus Ambystoma was previously explained by observing lampbrush chromosomes (LBCs). In polyploid unisexual females, a pre-meiotic endomitotic event doubles the chromosome number so that, after meiotic reduction, the mature eggs have the same ploidy as the female. It was assumed that synapses during meiotic I prophase, which result in observed bivalents, join duplicated sister chromosomes. Previous studies also found LBC quadrivalents in some oocytes that could be explained by occasional synapses between homologs. The discovery of widespread intergenomic exchanges among unisexual populations has prompted new speculations on this meiotic mechanism. Synapses that involve homeologous chromosomes may be frequent during meiosis and could be responsible for intergenomic exchanges and the high embryonic mortality of unisexuals. Furthermore, LBC quadrivalents may be established by associations between homeologous rather than homologous chromosomes. The present study investigated these two important aspects pertaining to the mechanism of intergenomic exchanges: the frequency of homeologous synapses and the relationship between homeologous associations and meiotic quadrivalents. We applied genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) on LBCs from oocytes of 14 triploid and two tetraploid unisexual females. Homeologous bivalents were not observed, and all 13 LBC quadrivalents that we found were the result of homologous synapses and were not associated with any homeologous or exchanged LBCs. Intergenomic exchanges were used as markers to compare the same chromosomes at meiotic diplotene and mitotic metaphase stages. We conclude that contemporary intergenomic exchanges are very rare, and no direct link exists between intergenomic exchanges and high embryonic mortality. The actual mechanisms and evolutionary implications of intergenomic exchanges appear to be complicated and difficult to assess. The application of GISH-type molecular

  13. Probing the role of interfacial waters in protein-DNA recognition using a hybrid implicit/explicit solvation model.

    PubMed

    Li, Shen; Bradley, Philip

    2013-08-01

    When proteins bind to their DNA target sites, ordered water molecules are often present at the protein-DNA interface bridging protein and DNA through hydrogen bonds. What is the role of these ordered interfacial waters? Are they important determinants of the specificity of DNA sequence recognition, or do they act in binding in a primarily nonspecific manner, by improving packing of the interface, shielding unfavorable electrostatic interactions, and solvating unsatisfied polar groups that are inaccessible to bulk solvent? When modeling details of structure and binding preferences, can fully implicit solvent models be fruitfully applied to protein-DNA interfaces, or must the individualistic properties of these interfacial waters be accounted for? To address these questions, we have developed a hybrid implicit/explicit solvation model that specifically accounts for the locations and orientations of small numbers of DNA-bound water molecules, while treating the majority of the solvent implicitly. Comparing the performance of this model with that of its fully implicit counterpart, we find that explicit treatment of interfacial waters results in a modest but significant improvement in protein side-chain placement and DNA sequence recovery. Base-by-base comparison of the performance of the two models highlights DNA sequence positions whose recognition may be dependent on interfacial water. Our study offers large-scale statistical evidence for the role of ordered water for protein-DNA recognition, together with detailed examination of several well-characterized systems. In addition, our approach provides a template for modeling explicit water molecules at interfaces that should be extensible to other systems.

  14. Ordering in bio-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials probed by in situ scanning transmission X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jonathan R. I.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Tunuguntla, Ramya; Kim, Kyunghoon; Bangar, Mangesh; Willey, Trevor M.; Tran, Ich C.; Kilcoyne, David A.; Noy, Aleksandr; van Buuren, Tony

    2015-05-01

    Phospholipid bilayer coated Si nanowires are one-dimensional (1D) composites that provide versatile bio-nanoelectronic functionality via incorporation of a wide variety of biomolecules into the phospholipid matrix. The physiochemical behaviour of the phospholipid bilayer is strongly dependent on its structure and, as a consequence, substantial modelling and experimental efforts have been directed at the structural characterization of supported bilayers and unsupported phospholipid vesicles; nonetheless, the experimental studies conducted to date have exclusively involved volume-averaged techniques, which do not allow for the assignment of spatially resolved structural variations that could critically impact the performance of the 1D phospholipid-Si NW composites. In this manuscript, we use scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) to probe bond orientation and bilayer thickness as a function of position with a spatial resolution of ~30 nm for Δ9-cis 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine layers prepared Si NWs. When coupled with small angle X-ray scattering measurements, the STXM data reveal structural motifs of the Si NWs that give rise to multi-bilayer formation and enable assignment of the orientation of specific bonds known to affect the order and rigidity of phospholipid bilayers.Phospholipid bilayer coated Si nanowires are one-dimensional (1D) composites that provide versatile bio-nanoelectronic functionality via incorporation of a wide variety of biomolecules into the phospholipid matrix. The physiochemical behaviour of the phospholipid bilayer is strongly dependent on its structure and, as a consequence, substantial modelling and experimental efforts have been directed at the structural characterization of supported bilayers and unsupported phospholipid vesicles; nonetheless, the experimental studies conducted to date have exclusively involved volume-averaged techniques, which do not allow for the assignment of spatially resolved structural

  15. Hybrid molecularly imprinted poly(methacrylic acid-TRIM)-silica chemically modified with (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane for the extraction of folic acid in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Fernanda Midori; Segatelli, Mariana Gava; Tarley, César Ricardo Teixeira

    2016-02-01

    In the present study a hybrid molecularly imprinted poly(methacrylic acid-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate)-silica (MIP) was synthesized and modified with (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GPTMS) with posterior opening of epoxy ring to provide hydrophilic properties of material in the extraction of folic acid from aqueous medium. The chemical and structural aggregates of hybrid material were characterized by means of Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and textural data. Selectivity data of MIP were compared to non-imprinted polymer (NIP) through competitive sorption studies in the presence of caffeine, paracetamol or 4-aminobenzamide yielding relative selectivity coefficients (k′) higher than one unit, thus confirming the selective character of MIP even in the presence of structurally smaller compounds than the folic acid. The lower hydrophobic sorption by bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the MIP as compared to unmodified MIP proves the hydrophilicity of polymer surface by using GPTMS with opening ring. Under acid medium(pH 1.5) the sorption of folic acid onto MIP from batch experiments was higher than the one achieved for NIP. Equilibrium sorption of folic acid was reached at 120 min for MIP, NIP and MIP without GPTMS and kinetic sorption data were well described by pseudo-second-order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion models. Thus, these results indicate the existence of different binding energy sites in the polymers and a complex mechanism consisting of both surface sorption and intraparticle transport of folic acid within the pores of polymers.

  16. Development of a lauric acid/albumin hybrid iron oxide nanoparticle system with improved biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Jan; Janko, Christina; Nowak, Johannes; Matuszak, Jasmin; Knaup, Sabine; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Tietze, Rainer; Unterweger, Harald; Friedrich, Ralf P; Duerr, Stephan; Heimke-Brinck, Ralph; Baum, Eva; Cicha, Iwona; Dörje, Frank; Odenbach, Stefan; Lyer, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey; Alexiou, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The promising potential of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in various nanomedical applications has been frequently reported. However, although many different synthesis methods, coatings, and functionalization techniques have been described, not many core-shell SPION drug delivery systems are available for clinicians at the moment. Here, bovine serum albumin was adsorbed onto lauric acid-stabilized SPIONs. The agglomeration behavior, zeta potential, and their dependence on the synthesis conditions were characterized with dynamic light scattering. The existence and composition of the core-shell-matrix structure was investigated by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and zeta potential measurements. We showed that the iron oxide cores form agglomerates in the range of 80 nm. Moreover, despite their remarkably low tendency to aggregate even in a complex media like whole blood, the SPIONs still maintained their magnetic properties and were well attractable with a magnet. The magnetic properties were quantified by vibrating sample magnetometry and a superconducting quantum interference device. Using flow cytometry, we further investigated the effects of the different types of nanoparticle coating on morphology, viability, and DNA integrity of Jurkat cells. We showed that by addition of bovine serum albumin, the toxicity of nanoparticles is greatly reduced. We also investigated the effect of the particles on the growth of primary human endothelial cells to further demonstrate the biocompatibility of the particles. As proof of principle, we showed that the hybrid-coated particles are able to carry payloads of up to 800 μg/mL of the cytostatic drug mitoxantrone while still staying colloidally stable. The drug-loaded system exhibited excellent therapeutic potential in vitro, exceeding that of free mitoxantrone. In conclusion, we have synthesized a biocompatible ferrofluid that shows great potential for clinical

  17. Development of a lauric acid/albumin hybrid iron oxide nanoparticle system with improved biocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Zaloga, Jan; Janko, Christina; Nowak, Johannes; Matuszak, Jasmin; Knaup, Sabine; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Tietze, Rainer; Unterweger, Harald; Friedrich, Ralf P; Duerr, Stephan; Heimke-Brinck, Ralph; Baum, Eva; Cicha, Iwona; Dörje, Frank; Odenbach, Stefan; Lyer, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey; Alexiou, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The promising potential of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in various nanomedical applications has been frequently reported. However, although many different synthesis methods, coatings, and functionalization techniques have been described, not many core-shell SPION drug delivery systems are available for clinicians at the moment. Here, bovine serum albumin was adsorbed onto lauric acid-stabilized SPIONs. The agglomeration behavior, zeta potential, and their dependence on the synthesis conditions were characterized with dynamic light scattering. The existence and composition of the core-shell-matrix structure was investigated by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and zeta potential measurements. We showed that the iron oxide cores form agglomerates in the range of 80 nm. Moreover, despite their remarkably low tendency to aggregate even in a complex media like whole blood, the SPIONs still maintained their magnetic properties and were well attractable with a magnet. The magnetic properties were quantified by vibrating sample magnetometry and a superconducting quantum interference device. Using flow cytometry, we further investigated the effects of the different types of nanoparticle coating on morphology, viability, and DNA integrity of Jurkat cells. We showed that by addition of bovine serum albumin, the toxicity of nanoparticles is greatly reduced. We also investigated the effect of the particles on the growth of primary human endothelial cells to further demonstrate the biocompatibility of the particles. As proof of principle, we showed that the hybrid-coated particles are able to carry payloads of up to 800 μg/mL of the cytostatic drug mitoxantrone while still staying colloidally stable. The drug-loaded system exhibited excellent therapeutic potential in vitro, exceeding that of free mitoxantrone. In conclusion, we have synthesized a biocompatible ferrofluid that shows great potential for clinical

  18. Analyses of Genotypes and Phenotypes of Ten Chinese Patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification and Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Xu; Pan, Hong; Li, Lin; Wu, Hai-Rong; Wang, Song-Tao; Bao, Xin-Hua; Jiang, Yu-Wu; Qi, Yu

    2016-01-01

    B