Science.gov

Sample records for acid hydrate xtt

  1. Aqueous phase hydration and hydrate acidity of perfluoroalkyl and n:2 fluorotelomer aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Rayne, Sierra; Forest, Kaya

    2016-01-01

    The SPARC software program and comparative density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to investigate the aqueous phase hydration equilibrium constants (Khyd) of perfluoroalkyl aldehydes (PFAlds) and n:2 fluorotelomer aldehydes (FTAlds). Both classes are degradation products of known industrial compounds and environmental contaminants such as fluorotelomer alcohols, iodides, acrylates, phosphate esters, and other derivatives, as well as hydrofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons. Prior studies have generally failed to consider the hydration, and subsequent potential hydrate acidity, of these compounds, resulting in incomplete and erroneous predictions as to their environmental behavior. In the current work, DFT calculations suggest that all PFAlds will be dominantly present as the hydrated form in aqueous solution. Both SPARC and DFT calculations suggest that FTAlds will not likely be substantially hydrated in aquatic systems or in vivo. PFAld hydrates are expected to have pKa values in the range of phenols (ca. 9 to 10), whereas n:2 FTAld hydrates are expected to have pKa values ca. 2 to 3 units higher (ca. 12 to 13). In order to avoid spurious modeling predictions and a fundamental misunderstanding of their fate, the molecular and/or dissociated hydrate forms of PFAlds and FTAlds need to be explicitly considered in environmental, toxicological, and waste treatment investigations. The results of the current study will facilitate a more complete examination of the environmental fate of PFAlds and FTAlds. PMID:26980678

  2. Formation of nitric acid hydrates - A chemical equilibrium approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Roland H.

    1990-01-01

    Published data are used to calculate equilibrium constants for reactions of the formation of nitric acid hydrates over the temperature range 190 to 205 K. Standard enthalpies of formation and standard entropies are calculated for the tri- and mono-hydrates. These are shown to be in reasonable agreement with earlier calorimetric measurements. The formation of nitric acid trihydrate in the polar stratosphere is discussed in terms of these equilibrium constants.

  3. Thermal Regeneration of Sulfuric Acid Hydrates after Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, Mark J.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to more completely understand the surface chemistry of the jovian icy satellites, we have investigated the effect of heating on two irradiated crystalline sulfuric acid hydrates, H2SO4 4H2O and H2SO4 H2O. At temperatures relevant to Europa and the warmer jovian satellites, post-irradiation heating recrystallized the amorphized samples and increased the intensities of the remaining hydrate's infrared absorptions. This thermal regeneration of the original hydrates was nearly 100% efficient, indicating that over geological times, thermally-induced phase transitions enhanced by temperature fluctuations will reform a large fraction of crystalline hydrated sulfuric acid that is destroyed by radiation processing. The work described is the first demonstration of the competition between radiation-induced amorphization and thermally-induced recrystallization in icy ionic solids relevant to the outer Solar System.

  4. Crystal Violet and XTT Assays on Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Quantification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenbo; Liang, Yanrui; Lin, Shiqi; Chen, Dingqiang; Li, Bing; Li, Lin; Deng, Yang

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. Aureus) is a common food-borne pathogenic microorganism. Biofilm formation remains the major obstruction for bacterial elimination. The study aims at providing a basis for determining S. aureus biofilm formation. 257 clinical samples of S. aureus isolates were identified by routine analysis and multiplex PCR detection and found to contain 227 MRSA, 16 MSSA, 11 MRCNS, and 3 MSCNS strains. Two assays for quantification of S. aureus biofilm formation, the crystal violet (CV) assay and the XTT (tetrazolium salt reduction) assay, were optimized, evaluated, and further compared. In CV assay, most isolates formed weak biofilm 74.3 %), while the rest formed moderate biofilm (23.3 %) or strong biofilm (2.3 %). However, most isolates in XTT assay showed weak metabolic activity (77.0 %), while the rest showed moderate metabolic activity (17.9 %) or high metabolic activity (5.1 %). In this study, we found a distinct strain-to-strain dissimilarity in terms of both biomass formation and metabolic activity, and it was concluded from this study that two assays were mutual complementation rather than being comparison. PMID:27324342

  5. Influence of citric acid on the hydration of Portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Moeschner, Goeril Lothenbach, Barbara; Figi, Renato; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2009-04-15

    Citric acid can be used to retard the hydration of cement. Experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of citric acid on the composition of solid and liquid phases during cement hydration. Analyses of the solid phases showed that dissolution of alite and aluminate slowed down while analyses of the pore solution showed that citric acid was removed almost completely from the pore solution within the first hours of hydration. The complexation of the ions by citrate was weak, which could also be confirmed by thermodynamic calculations. Only 2% of the dissolved Ca and 0.001% of the dissolved K formed complexes with citrate during the first hours. Thus, citric acid retards cement hydration not by complex formation, but by slowing down the dissolution of the clinker grains. Thermodynamic calculations did not indicate precipitation of a crystalline citrate species. Thus, it is suggested that citrate sorbed onto the clinker surface and formed a protective layer around the clinker grains retarding their dissolution.

  6. Calculation of Vibrational Spectra of p-Ethylbenzenesulfonic Acid Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenkovskii, V. M.; Bezyazychnaya, T. V.; Soldatov, V. S.

    2013-09-01

    Quantum-chemical calculations of vibrational spectra of the sulfonated ion-exchanger model p-ethylbenzenesulfonic acid hydrated by 1-10 water molecules and its dimer were calculated by the non-empirical SCF MO LCAO method with the 6-31G(d) basis set. The calculated results were compared with experimental IR and Raman spectra of sulfonated ion exchangers. The infl uence of hydration on the vibrational frequencies of functional groups in the ion exchangers was analyzed. It was shown that the sulfonic acid was completely dissociated if three and more water molecules per functional group were present. Bands near 1130 cm-1 were due to S-O-H bending vibrations in the absence of water molecules and C-S-O-H3O combination vibrations with 3-6 water molecules per sulfonic acid.

  7. Rejuvenating Hydrator: Restoring Epidermal Hyaluronic Acid Homeostasis With Instant Benefits.

    PubMed

    Narurkar, Vic A; Fabi, Sabrina G; Bucay, Vivian W; Tedaldi, Ruth; Downie, Jeanine B; Zeichner, Joshua A; Butterwick, Kimberly; Taub, Amy; Kadoya, Kuniko; Makino, Elizabeth T; Mehta, Rahul C; Vega, Virginia L

    2016-01-01

    Skin aging is a combination of multifactorial mechanisms that are not fully understood. Intrinsic and extrinsic factors modulate skin aging, activating distinctive processes that share similar molecular pathways. One of the main characteristics of youthful skin is its large capacity to retain water, and this decreases significantly as we age. A key molecule involved in maintaining skin hydration is hyaluronic acid (HA). Concentration of HA in the skin is determined by the complex balance between its synthesis, deposition, association with cellular structures, and degradation. HA bio-equivalency and bio-compatibility have been fundamental in keeping this macromolecule as the favorite of the skincare industry for decades. Scientific evidence now shows that topically applied HA is unable to penetrate the skin and is rapidly degraded on the skin surface. SkinMedica's HA5 Rejuvenating Hydrator (SkinMedica Inc., an Allergan company, Irvine, CA) promotes restoration of endogenous epidermal HA homeostasis and provides instant smoothing and hydration of the skin. These dual benefits are accomplished through the combination of 2 breakthrough technologies: 1) a unique blend of actives powered by SkinMedica proprietary flower-derived stem cell extract that restores the endogenous production of HA; and 2) a proprietary mix of 5 HA forms that plump the skin, decreasing the appearance of fine lines/wrinkles. Pre-clinical studies demonstrated that HA5 induces expression of key epidermal differentiation and barrier markers as well as epidermal HA synthases. A decrease expression of hyaluronidases was also observed upon HA5 application. Initial clinical studies showed that within 15 minutes of application, HA5 instantly improves the appearance of fine lines/wrinkles and skin hydration. Subjects that continue using HA5 (for 8 weeks) demonstrated significant improvements in fine lines/wrinkles, tactile roughness, and skin hydration. In summary, the blend of these 2 key technologies

  8. Effect of fatty acids on phase behavior of hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer: saturated versus unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Yanagihara, S; Misono, Y; Suzuki, M

    2001-02-01

    The effect of some fatty acids on the phase behavior of hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer was investigated with special interest in possible difference between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. The phase behavior of hydrated DPPC bilayer was followed by a differential scanning calorimetry and a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The addition of palmitic acid (PA) increased the bilayer phase transition temperature with the increase of the PA content in the mixture. In addition, DPPC molecules in gel phase bilayer became more rigid in the presence of PA compared with those in the absence of PA. This effect of PA on the phase behavior of hydrated DPPC bilayer is common to other saturated fatty acids, stearic acid, myristic acid, and also to unsaturated fatty acid with trans double bond, elaidic acid. Contrary to these fatty acids, oleic acid (OA), the unsaturated fatty acid with cis double bond in the acyl chain, exhibited quite different behavior. The effect of OA on the bilayer phase transition temperature was rather small, although a slight decrease in the temperature was appreciable. Furthermore, the IR spectral results demonstrated that the perturbing effect of OA on the gel phase bilayer of DPPC was quite small. These results mean that OA does not disturb the hydrated DPPC bilayer significantly. PMID:11269932

  9. Periodic quantum chemical studies on anhydrous and hydrated acid clinoptilolite.

    PubMed

    Valdiviés Cruz, Karell; Lam, Anabel; Zicovich-Wilson, Claudio M

    2014-08-01

    Periodic quantum chemistry methods as implemented in the crystal09 code were considered to study acid clinoptilolite (HEU framework type), both anhydrous and hydrated. The most probable location of acid sites and water molecules together with other structural details has been the object of particular attention. Calculations were performed at hybrid and pristine DFT levels of theory with a VDZP quality basis set in order to compare performances. It arises that PBE0 provides the best agreement with experimental data as concerns structural features and the most stable Al distribution in the framework. The role of the water molecule distribution in the stability of the systems, the most probable structure that they induce in the material, and their eventual influence on further chemical modification processes, such as dealumination, are discussed in detail. Results show that, apart from the usually considered interactions of water molecules with the zeolite framework, that is, a H-bond with Brönsted acid sites and coordination with framework Al as Lewis ones, it is necessary to consider cooperation of other weaker effects so as to fully understand the hydration effect in this kind of materials. PMID:24730675

  10. Growth of nitric acid hydrates on thin sulfuric acid films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Wilson, Margaret A.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1994-01-01

    Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are thought to nucleate and grow on stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs). To model this system, thin sulfuric acid films were exposed to water and nitric acid vapors (1-3 x 10(exp -4) Torr H2O and 1-2.5 x 10(exp -6) Torr HNO3) and subjected to cooling and heating cycles. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to probe the phase of the sulfuric acid and to identify the HNO3/H2O films that condensed. Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was observed to grow on crystalline sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) films. NAT also condensed in/on supercooled H2SO4 films without causing crystallization of the sulfuric acid. This growth is consistent with NAT nucleation from ternary solutions as the first step in PSC formation.

  11. Growth of nitric acid hydrates on thin sulfuric acid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Wilson, Margaret A.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1994-05-01

    Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are thought to nucleate and grow on stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs). To model this system, thin sulfuric acid films were exposed to water and nitric acid vapors (1 - 3 × 10-4 Torr H2O and 1 - 2.5 × 10-6 Torr HNO3) and subjected to cooling and heating cycles. FTIR spectroscopy was used to probe the phase of the sulfuric acid and to identify the HNO3/H2O films that condensed. Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was observed to grow on crystalline sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) films. NAT also condensed in/on supercooled H2SO4 films without causing crystallization of the sulfuric acid. This growth is consistent with NAT nucleation from ternary solutions as the first step in PSC formation.

  12. Hydrophobic amino acids as a new class of kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Park, Da-Hye; Han, Kunwoo; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    As the foundation of energy industry moves towards gas, flow assurance technology preventing pipelines from hydrate blockages becomes increasingly significant. However, the principle of hydrate inhibition is still poorly understood. Here, we examined natural hydrophobic amino acids as novel kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs), and investigated hydrate inhibition phenomena by using them as a model system. Amino acids with lower hydrophobicity were found to be better KHIs to delay nucleation and retard growth, working by disrupting the water hydrogen bond network, while those with higher hydrophobicity strengthened the local water structure. It was found that perturbation of the water structure around KHIs plays a critical role in hydrate inhibition. This suggestion of a new class of KHIs will aid development of KHIs with enhanced biodegradability, and the present findings will accelerate the improved control of hydrate formation for natural gas exploitation and the utilization of hydrates as next-generation gas capture media. PMID:23938301

  13. Hydrophobic amino acids as a new class of kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Park, Da-Hye; Han, Kunwoo; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    As the foundation of energy industry moves towards gas, flow assurance technology preventing pipelines from hydrate blockages becomes increasingly significant. However, the principle of hydrate inhibition is still poorly understood. Here, we examined natural hydrophobic amino acids as novel kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs), and investigated hydrate inhibition phenomena by using them as a model system. Amino acids with lower hydrophobicity were found to be better KHIs to delay nucleation and retard growth, working by disrupting the water hydrogen bond network, while those with higher hydrophobicity strengthened the local water structure. It was found that perturbation of the water structure around KHIs plays a critical role in hydrate inhibition. This suggestion of a new class of KHIs will aid development of KHIs with enhanced biodegradability, and the present findings will accelerate the improved control of hydrate formation for natural gas exploitation and the utilization of hydrates as next-generation gas capture media. PMID:23938301

  14. Hydrophobic amino acids as a new class of kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Park, Da-Hye; Han, Kunwoo; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2013-08-01

    As the foundation of energy industry moves towards gas, flow assurance technology preventing pipelines from hydrate blockages becomes increasingly significant. However, the principle of hydrate inhibition is still poorly understood. Here, we examined natural hydrophobic amino acids as novel kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs), and investigated hydrate inhibition phenomena by using them as a model system. Amino acids with lower hydrophobicity were found to be better KHIs to delay nucleation and retard growth, working by disrupting the water hydrogen bond network, while those with higher hydrophobicity strengthened the local water structure. It was found that perturbation of the water structure around KHIs plays a critical role in hydrate inhibition. This suggestion of a new class of KHIs will aid development of KHIs with enhanced biodegradability, and the present findings will accelerate the improved control of hydrate formation for natural gas exploitation and the utilization of hydrates as next-generation gas capture media.

  15. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  16. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  17. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  18. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  19. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  20. Rates and mechanisms of conversion of ice nanocrystals to hydrates of HCl and HBr: acid diffusion in the ionic hydrates.

    PubMed

    Devlin, J Paul; Gulluru, Dheeraj B; Buch, Victoria

    2005-03-01

    This FTIR study focuses on solid-state chemistry associated with formation and interconversion of the ionic HX (X = Cl, Br) hydrates. Kinetic data are reported for conversions of ice nanocrystal arrays exposed to the saturation pressure of the acids in the 110 approximately 125 K range. The product is amorphous acid dihydrate in the case of HBr, and amorphous monohydrate for HCl. The rate-determining step is identified as HX diffusion through the hydrate product crust toward the interfacial reaction zone, rather than diffusion through ice, as commonly believed. Slowing of the conversion process is thus observed with increasing thickness of the crust. The diffusion coefficient (D(e)) and activation energy values for HX diffusion through the hydrates were evaluated with the help of the shrinking-core model. Hydrate crystallization occurs as a separate step, upon heating above 130 K. Subsequently, rates of reversible transitions between crystal di- and monohydrates were observed upon exposure to acid vapor and acid evacuation. In conversion from di- to monohydrate, the rate slows after fast formation of several layers; subsequently, diffusion through the product crust appears to be the rate-controlling step. The activation energy for HBr diffusion through crystal dihydrate is found to be significantly higher than that for the amorphous analogue. Conjecture is offered for a molecular mechanism of HX transport through the crystal hydrate, based on (i) spectroscopic/computational evidence for the presence of molecular HX bonded to X(-) in each of the ionic hydrate phases and (ii) the relative E(a) values found for HBr and HCl diffusion. Monte Carlo modeling suggests acid transport to the reaction zone along boundaries between "nanocrystallites" generated by multiple hydrate nucleation events at the particle surfaces. The reverse conversion, of crystalline monohydrate particles to the dihydrate phase, as well as dihydrate to trihydrate, displays nearly constant rate

  1. Site-specific analysis of protein hydration based on unnatural amino acid fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Amaro, Mariana; Brezovský, Jan; Kováčová, Silvia; Sýkora, Jan; Bednář, David; Němec, Václav; Lišková, Veronika; Kurumbang, Nagendra Prasad; Beerens, Koen; Chaloupková, Radka; Paruch, Kamil; Hof, Martin; Damborský, Jiří

    2015-04-22

    Hydration of proteins profoundly affects their functions. We describe a simple and general method for site-specific analysis of protein hydration based on the in vivo incorporation of fluorescent unnatural amino acids and their analysis by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. Using this method, we investigate the hydration of functionally important regions of dehalogenases. The experimental results are compared to findings from molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:25815779

  2. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of selected plant extracts by rapid XTT colorimetry and bacterial enumeration.

    PubMed

    Al-Bakri, Amal G; Afifi, Fatma U

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen and evaluate the antimicrobial activity of indigenous Jordanian plant extracts, dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide, using the rapid XTT assay and viable count methods. XTT rapid assay was used for the initial screening of antimicrobial activity for the plant extracts. Antimicrobial activity of potentially active plant extracts was further assessed using the "viable plate count" method. Four degrees of antimicrobial activity (high, moderate, weak and inactive) against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively, were recorded. The plant extracts of Hypericum triquetrifolium, Ballota undulata, Ruta chalepensis, Ononis natrix, Paronychia argentea and Marrubium vulgare had shown promising antimicrobial activity. This study showed that while both XTT and viable count methods are comparable when estimating the overall antimicrobial activity of experimental substances, there is no strong linear correlation between the two methods. PMID:16831479

  3. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Biedermannová, Lada Schneider, Bohdan

    2015-10-27

    The hydration of protein crystal structures was studied at the level of individual amino acids. The dependence of the number of water molecules and their preferred spatial localization on various parameters, such as solvent accessibility, secondary structure and side-chain conformation, was determined. Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  4. Hydration of potassiated amino acids in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Wincel, Henryk

    2007-12-01

    The thermochemistry of stepwise hydration of several potassiated amino acids was studied by measuring the gas-phase equilibria, AAK(+)(H(2)O)(n-1) + H(2)O = AAK(+)(H(2)O)(n) (AA = Gly, AL, Val, Met, Pro, and Phe), using a high-pressure mass spectrometer. The AAK(+) ions were obtained by electrospray and the equilibrium constants K(n-1,n) were measured in a pulsed reaction chamber at 10 mbar bath gas, N(2), containing a known partial pressure of water vapor. Determination of the equilibrium constants at different temperatures was used to obtain the DeltaH(n)(o), DeltaS(n)(o), and DeltaG(n)(o) values. The results indicate that the water binding energy in AAK(+)(H(2)O) decreases as the K(+) affinity to AA increases. This trend in binding energies is explained in terms of changes in the side-chain substituent, which delocalize the positive charge from K(+) to AA in AAK(+) complexes, varying the AAK(+)-H(2)O electrostatic interaction. PMID:17928233

  5. Infrared optical constants of H2O ice, amorphous nitric acid solutions, and nitric acid hydrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Koehler, Birgit G.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Jordon, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    We determined the infrared optical constants of nitric acid trihydrate, nitric acid dihydrate, nitric acid monohydrate, and solid amorphous nitric acid solutions which crystallize to form these hydrates. We have also found the infrared optical constants of H2O ice. We measured the transmission of infrared light throught thin films of varying thickness over the frequency range from about 7000 to 500/cm at temperatures below 200 K. We developed a theory for the transmission of light through a substrate that has thin films on both sides. We used an iterative Kramers-Kronig technique to determine the optical constants which gave the best match between measured transmission spectra and those calculated for a variety of films of different thickness. These optical constants should be useful for calculations of the infrared spectrum of polar stratospheric clouds.

  6. Microwave Spectra of Fluorinated Propionic Acids and Their Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenchain, Daniel A.; Grubbs, G. S. Grubbs, Ii; Novick, Stewart E.; Cooke, Stephen A.; Serrato, Agapito Serrato, Iii; Lin, Wei

    2013-06-01

    The microwave spectra of three fluorinated propionic acids, namely pentafluoropropionic acid, 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropionic acid, and 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropionic acid have been observed and assigned. The spectra of pentafluoropropionic acid and its monohydrate were reported in this meeting last year. The conformational analysis of 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropionic acid and 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropionic acid will be compared to that of pentafluoropropionic acid. The structures of the three monohydrates will be discussed in terms of hydrogen bonding.

  7. Hydration effect on proton transfer in melamine-cyanuric acid complex.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shihai; Kang, Baotao; Lee, Jin Yong; Sun, Lixiang

    2016-07-01

    Self-assembly of melamine-cyanuric acid (MC) leads to urinary tract calculi and renal failure. The hydration effects on molecular geometry, the IR spectra, the frontier molecular orbital, the energy barrier of proton transfer (PT), as well as the stability of MC were explored by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The intramolecular PT breaks the big π-conjugated ring of melamine or converts the p-π conjugation (:N-C'=O) to π-π conjugation (O=C-N=C') of cyanuric acid. The intermolecular PT varies the coupling between melamine and cyanuric acid from pure hydrogen bonds (Na…HNd and NH…O) to the cooperation of cation…anion electrostatic interaction (NaH(+)…Nd (-)) and two NH…O hydrogen bonds. Distinct IR spectra shifts occur for Na…HNd stretching mode upon PT, i.e., blue-shift upon intramolecular PT and red-shift upon intermolecular PT. It is expected that the PT would inhibit the generation of rosette-like structure or one-dimensional tape conformer for the MC complexes. Hydration obviously effects the local geometric structure around the water binding site, as well as the IR spectra of NH…O and N…HN hydrogen bonds. Hydration decreases the intramolecular PT barrier from ~45 kcal mol(-1) in anhydrous complex to ~11.5 kcal mol(-1) in trihydrated clusters. While, the hydration effects on intermolecular PT barrier is slight. The relative stability of MC varies slightly by hydration due to the strong hydrogen bond interaction between melamine and cyanuric acid fragments. Graphical Abstract Hydration effect on proton transfer in melamine-cyanuric acid complex. PMID:27351422

  8. New insight on structural properties of hydrated nucleic acid bases from ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Furmanchuk, Al'ona; Shishkin, Oleg V; Isayev, Olexandr; Gorb, Leonid; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2010-09-01

    The correlation between hydration of Nucleic Acid Bases (NABs) and their conformational flexibility was analyzed based on the results of Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics (CPMD) simulations of NABs in bulk water environment. Correlations with quantum chemical results were drawn whenever it was possible. Statistical analysis confirmed that hydration causes bond length alteration in NABs and formation of zwitter-ionic resonance structures. In contrast to the gas phase, bulk hydration results in restricted mobility of amino group and increase in population of its planar-like conformations. At the same time, rings of all NABs become almost equally flexible in the dynamic aqueous environment. Therefore, each NAB possesses a non-planar effective conformation of pyrimidine ring despite the fact that planar geometry corresponds to minimum on the potential energy surface. PMID:20532343

  9. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes. PMID:27526869

  10. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes. PMID:27526869

  11. Exogenic controls on sulfuric acid hydrate production at the surface of Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, J. B.; Cassidy, T.; Paranicas, C.; Shirley, J. H.; Prockter, L. M.; Kamp, L. W.

    2013-03-01

    External agents have heavily weathered the visible surface of Europa. Internal and external drivers competing to produce the surface we see include, but are not limited to: aqueous alteration of materials within the icy shell, initial emplacement of endogenic material by geologic activity, implantation of exogenic ions and neutrals from Jupiter's magnetosphere, alteration of surface chemistry by radiolysis and photolysis, impact gardening of upper surface layers, and redeposition of sputtered volatiles. Separating the influences of these processes is critical to understanding the surface and subsurface compositions at Europa. Recent investigations have applied cryogenic reflectance spectroscopy to Galileo Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) observations to derive abundances of surface materials including water ice, hydrated sulfuric acid, and hydrated sulfate salts. Here we compare derived sulfuric acid hydrate (H2SO4·nH2O) abundance with weathering patterns and intensities associated with charged particles from Jupiter's magnetosphere. We present models of electron energy, ion energy, and sulfur ion number flux as well as the total combined electron and ion energy flux at the surface to estimate the influence of these processes on surface concentrations, as a function of location. We found that correlations exist linking both electron energy flux (r∼0.75) and sulfur ion flux (r=0.93) with the observed abundance of sulfuric acid hydrate on Europa. Sulfuric acid hydrate production on Europa appears to be limited in some regions by a reduced availability of sulfur ions, and in others by insufficient levels of electron energy. The energy delivered by sulfur and other ions has a much less significant role. Surface deposits in regions of limited exogenic processing are likely to bear closest resemblance to oceanic composition. These results will assist future efforts to separate the relative influence of endogenic and exogenic sources in establishing the

  12. Effect of Sulfuric and Triflic Acids on the Hydration of Vanadium Cations: An ab Initio Study.

    PubMed

    Sepehr, Fatemeh; Paddison, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) may be a promising solution for large-scale energy storage applications, but the crossover of any of the redox active species V(2+), V(3+), VO(2+), and VO2(+) through the ion exchange membrane will result in self-discharge of the battery. Hence, a molecular level understanding of the states of vanadium cations in the highly acidic environment of a VRFB is needed. We examine the effects of sulfuric and triflic (CF3SO3H) acids on the hydration of vanadium species as they mimic the electrolyte and functional group of perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) membranes. Hybrid density functional theory in conjunction with a continuum solvation model was utilized to obtain the local structures of the hydrated vanadium cations in proximity to H2SO4, CF3SO3H, and their conjugate anions. The results indicate that none of these species covalently bond to the vanadium cations. The hydration structure of V(3+) is more distorted than that of V(2+) in an acidic medium. The oxo-group of VO2(+) is protonated by either acid, in contrast to VO(2+) which is not protonated. The atomic partial charge of the four oxidation states of vanadium varies from +1.7 to +2.0. These results provide the local solvation structures of vanadium cations in the VRFBs environment that are directly related to the electrolytes stability and diffusion of vanadium ions into the membrane. PMID:25954916

  13. Self-assembled nanostructures of fully hydrated monoelaidin-elaidic acid and monoelaidin-oleic acid systems.

    PubMed

    Yaghmur, Anan; Sartori, Barbara; Rappolt, Michael

    2012-07-01

    In recent years, there has been a surge of interest in exploring the effect of trans-fatty acids (TFAs) on biological membrane properties. The research studies are motivated by an increasing body of evidence suggesting that the consumption of TFAs increases the risk of developing negative health effects such as coronary heart disease and cancer. The ultimate goal of studying the lipid-fatty acid interactions at the molecular level is to predict the biological role of fatty acids in cells. In this regard, it is interesting to elucidate the effect of loading TFAs and their counterpart cis-fatty acids (CFAs) on the physical properties of lipid model membranes. Here, the present study focuses on discussing the following: (1) the effect of mixing monoelaidin (ME, TFA-containing lipid) with its counterpart monoolein (MO, CFA-containing lipid) on modulating the fully hydrated self-assembled structure, and (2) the influence of solubilizing oleic acid (OA) and its trans counterpart elaidic acid (EA) on the fully hydrated ME system. The ME model membrane was selected due to its sensitivity to variations in lipid composition and temperature. Synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was applied for studying the temperature-dependent structural behavior of the fully hydrated ME/MO-based system prepared with an equal ME/MO weight ratio and also for characterizing the fully hydrated OA- and EA-loaded ME systems. Wide-angle X-ray (WAXS) experiments were also performed for characterizing the formed crystalline lamellar phases at ambient temperatures. The results demonstrate the significant influence of the partial replacement of ME by MO on the phase behavior. The addition of MO induces the lamellar-nonlamellar phase transitions at ambient temperatures and promotes the formation of the inverted type hexagonal (H(2)) phase above 72 °C. The fully hydrated ME/EA and ME/OA systems with their rich polymorphism exhibit an interesting temperature-dependent complex behavior. The

  14. Hydration energies of sodiated amino acids from gas-phase equilibria determinations.

    PubMed

    Wincel, Henryk

    2007-07-01

    The sequential hydration of a number of sodiated amino acids is investigated using a high-pressure mass spectrometer. Ions produced continuously by electrospray are injected into the reaction chamber in the pulsed mode where the hydration equilibria, AANa+(H2O)n-1+H2O=AANa+(H2O)n (AA=Val, Pro, Met, Phe, and Gln), and the temperature dependence of the equilibrium constants are measured in the gas phase at 10 mbar (N2 bath gas and known pressure of H2O). The thermochemical properties, DeltaH degrees n, DeltaS degrees n, and DeltaG degrees n, for the hydrated systems are determined and discussed in conjunction with the structural forms. The results show that the binding energies of water to the AANa+ complexes decrease with the increasing number of water molecules. The present results from equilibrium measurements are compared to those from earlier studies obtained by other techniques. A correlation between the free energy changes for the addition of the first and second water molecules to AANa+, and the corresponding sodium ion affinities, is observed. Generally, the hydration free energy becomes weaker as the AA-Na+ bond strength increases. PMID:17559201

  15. Interactions between hydrated cement paste and organic acids: Thermodynamic data and speciation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    De Windt, Laurent; Bertron, Alexandra; Larreur-Cayol, Steeves; Escadeillas, Gilles

    2015-03-15

    Interactions of short-chain organic acids with hydrated cement phases affect structure durability in the agro-food and nuclear waste industries but can also be used to modify cement properties. Most previous studies have been experimental, performed at fixed concentrations and pH, without quantitatively discriminating among polyacidity effects, or complexation and salt precipitation processes. This paper addresses such issues by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for acetic, citric, oxalic, succinic acids and a simplified hydrated CEM-I. The thermodynamic constants collected from the literature allow the speciation to be modeled over a wide range of pH and concentrations. Citric and oxalic had a stronger chelating effect than acetic acid, while succinic acid was intermediate. Similarly, Ca-citrate and Ca-oxalate salts were more insoluble than Ca-acetate and Ca-succinate salts. Regarding aluminium complexation, hydroxyls, sulfates, and acid competition was highlighted. The exploration of acid mixtures showed the preponderant effect of oxalate and citrate over acetate and succinate.

  16. Kinetics of the acid-catalyzed hydration of allene and propyne

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, P.; Tidwell, T.T.

    1981-06-19

    The kinetics of the conversion of allene and propyne to acetone in aqueous sulfuric acid have been measured. The solvent isotope effects k/sub H/sup +//k/sub D/sup +// and the dependence of the rates on acidity are consistent with the Ad/sub E/2 mechanism of rate-limiting protonation at the terminal carbons leading to the intermediate 2-propenyl cation CH/sub 3/C/sup +/H=CH/sub 2/ in each case, followed by hydration to the enol and isomerization to acetone. This route is strongly favored by published theoretical studies. (2 tables)

  17. Vapor pressures of solid hydrates of nitric acid - Implications for polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worsnop, Douglas R.; Fox, Lewis E.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    1993-01-01

    Thermodynamic data are presented for hydrates of nitric acid: HNO3.H2O, HNO3.2H2O, HNO3.3H2O, and a higher hydrate. Laboratory data indicate that nucleation and persistence of metastable HNO3.2H2O may be favored in polar stratospheric clouds over the slightly more stable HNO3.3H2O. Atmospheric observations indicate that some polar stratospheric clouds may be composed of HNO3.2H2O and HNO3.3H2O. Vapor transfer from HNO3.2H2O to HNO3.3H2O could be a key step in the sedimentation of HNO3, which plays an important role in the depletion of polar ozone.

  18. Vapor pressures of solid hydrates of nitric Acid: implications for polar stratospheric clouds.

    PubMed

    Worsnop, D R; Zahniser, M S; Fox, L E; Wofsy, S C

    1993-01-01

    Thermodynamic data are presented for hydrates of nitric acid: HNO(3).H(2)O, HNO(3).2H(2)O, HNO(3).3H(2)O, and a higher hydrate. Laboratory data indicate that nucleation and persistence of metastable HNO(3).2H(2)O may be favored in polar stratospheric clouds over the slightly more stable HNO(3).3H(2)O. Atmospheric observations indicate that some polar stratospheric clouds may be composed of HNO(3).2H(2)O and HNO(3).3H(2)O. Vapor transfer from HNO(3).2H(2)O to HNO(3).3H(2)O could be a key step in the sedimentation of HNO(3), which plays an important role in the depletion of polar ozone. PMID:17757475

  19. A new diatom growth inhibition assay using the XTT colorimetric method.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weina; Akagi, Takuya; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Takimoto, Ayaka; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Marine biofouling, which leads to significant operational stress and economic damage on marine infrastructures, is a major problem in marine related industries. Currently, the most common way to avoid marine biofouling involves the use of biocidal products in surface coatings. However, the need for environmentally friendly antibiofouling compounds has increased rapidly with the recent global prohibition of harmful antifoulants, such as tributyltin (TBT). In particular, periphytic diatoms have been shown to contribute significantly to biofilms, which play an important role in biofouling. Therefore, inhibiting the proliferation of fouling diatoms is a very important step in the prevention of marine biofouling. In this study, we developed a new, rapid, accurate, and convenient growth inhibition assay using the XTT colorimetric method to prevent the growth of the fouling periphytic diatom, Nitzschia amabilis Hidek. Suzuki (replaced synonym, Nitzschia laevis Hustedt). The feasibility of this method was verified by determining the growth inhibition activities of two standard photosynthetic inhibitors, DCMU and CuSO4. However, neither inhibitor had any cytotoxic activities at the range of concentrations tested. Moreover, this method was applied by screening and purification of herbicidic but non-cytotoxic compounds from cyanobacteria extracts. Our results demonstrate the utility of this newly established growth inhibition assay for the identification of marine anti-biofouling compounds. PMID:26945522

  20. Hydration studies of electrospray ions from amino acids and small peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Chuong (Steve)

    This project was undertaken to gain a better understanding of the hydration behaviors of gas phase ions from solutions containing amino acids and peptides. In order to characterize their hydration behavior, the molecules of interest in solutions were first converted into gas phase ions by electrospray ionization (ESI). The completely desolvated ions were then deliberately dispersed into an inert bath gas, usually nitrogen, containing accurately known concentrations of solvent vapor. The resulting mixtures of ions and bath gas were subsequently passed into a vacuum chamber by way of an adiabatic supersonic free jet expansion. The cooling during that expansion caused solvation of the ions, the extent of which was determined by a quadrupole mass analyzer. Mass analysis of the solute ions in the absence of vapor showed peaks with the mass to charge ratios corresponding to the desolvated ions. On the other hand, mass spectrometric analyses of ions in the presence of solvent vapor showed sequences of peaks corresponding to the solvated ions with varying numbers of water molecules. The extent of the ion solvation was controlled by varying the concentration of solvent vapor in the bath gas. Two different scales were proposed for the evaluation of the relative affinities of amino acids for water molecules. One was based primarily on the assumption that the affinities of amino acids for water molecules are directly proportional to their gas phase solvation rate constants ( k). An alternative approach produced an affinity scale based on the extent of ion hydration occurred during the free jet expansion. It was found that the addition of a polar solvent vapor to the bath gas at low concentrations substantially enhanced the production of the bare solute ions from the evaporating charged droplets. This remarkable result not only provided a means to increase the ion production and thus detection sensitivity of mass spectrometric analyses, but also yielded important information

  1. A laboratory study of the nucleation kinetics of nitric acid hydrates under stratospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Alexander D.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the kinetics of crystallisation of ternary H2O-H2SO4-HNO3 mixtures to produce nitric acid hydrate phases, as occurs in the lower stratosphere, have been a long-standing challenge for investigators in the laboratory. Understanding polar stratospheric chlorine chemistry and thereby ozone depletion is increasingly limited by descriptions of nucleation processes. Meteoric smoke particles have been considered in the past as heterogeneous nuclei, however recent studies suggest that these particles will largely dissolve, leaving mainly silica and alumina as solid inclusions. In this study the nucleation kinetics of nitric acid hydrate phases have been measured in microliter droplets at polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) temperatures, using a droplet freezing assay. A clear heterogeneous effect was observed when silica particles were added. A parameterisation based on the number of droplets activated per nuclei surface area (ns) has been developed and compared to global model data. Nucleation experiments on identical droplets have been performed in an X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) to determine the nature of the phase which formed. β-Nitric Acid Trihydrate (NAT) was observed alongside a mixture of Nitric Acid Dihydrate (NAD) phases. It is not possible to determine whether NAT nucleates directly or is formed by a phase transition from NAD (likely requiring the presence of a mediating liquid phase). Regardless, these results demonstrate the possibility of forming NAT on laboratory timescales. In the polar stratosphere, sulfuric acid (present at several weight percent of the liquid under equilibrium conditions) could provide such a liquid phase. This study therefor provides insight into previous discrepancies between phases formed in the laboratory and those observed in the atmosphere. It also provides a basis for future studies into atmospheric nucleation of solid PSCs.

  2. Structures, Hydration, and Electrical Mobilities of Bisulfate Ion-Sulfuric Acid-Ammonia/Dimethylamine Clusters: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Tsona, Narcisse T; Henschel, Henning; Bork, Nicolai; Loukonen, Ville; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2015-09-17

    Despite the well-established role of small molecular clusters in the very first steps of atmospheric particle formation, their thermochemical data are still not completely available due to limitation of the experimental techniques to treat such small clusters. We have investigated the structures and the thermochemistry of stepwise hydration of clusters containing one bisulfate ion, sulfuric acid, base (ammonia or dimethylamine), and water molecules using quantum chemical methods. We found that water facilitates proton transfer from sulfuric acid or the bisulfate ion to the base or water molecules, and depending on the hydration level, the sulfate ion was formed in most of the base-containing clusters. The calculated hydration energies indicate that water binds more strongly to ammonia-containing clusters than to dimethylamine-containing and base-free clusters, which results in a wider hydrate distribution for ammonia-containing clusters. The electrical mobilities of all clusters were calculated using a particle dynamics model. The results indicate that the effect of humidity is negligible on the electrical mobilities of molecular clusters formed in the very first steps of atmospheric particle formation. The combination of the results of this study with those previously published on the hydration of neutral clusters by our group provides a comprehensive set of thermochemical data on neutral and negatively charged clusters containing sulfuric acid, ammonia, or dimethylamine. PMID:26304742

  3. Deciphering the role of charge, hydration, and hydrophobicity for cytotoxic activities and membrane interactions of bile acid based facial amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manish; Singh, Ashima; Kundu, Somanath; Bansal, Sandhya; Bajaj, Avinash

    2013-08-01

    We synthesized four cationic bile acid based facial amphiphiles featuring trimethyl ammonium head groups. We evaluated the role of these amphiphiles for cytotoxic activities against colon cancer cells and their membrane interactions by varying charge, hydration and hydrophobicity. The singly charged cationic Lithocholic acid based amphiphile (LCA-TMA1) is most cytotoxic, whereas the triply charged cationic Cholic acid based amphiphile (CA-TMA3) is least cytotoxic. Light microscopy and Annexin-FITC assay revealed that these facial amphiphiles caused late apoptosis. In addition, we studied the interactions of these amphiphiles with model membrane systems by Prodan-based hydration, DPH-based anisotropy, and differential scanning calorimetry. LCA-TMA1 is most hydrophobic with a hard charge causing efficient dehydration and maximum perturbations of membranes thereby facilitating translocation and high cytotoxicity against colon cancer cells. In contrast, the highly hydrated and multiple charged CA-TMA3 caused least membrane perturbations leading to low translocation and less cytotoxicity. As expected, Chenodeoxycholic acid and Deoxycholic acid based amphiphiles (CDCA-TMA2, DCA-TMA2) featuring two charged head groups showed intermediate behavior. Thus, we deciphered that charge, hydration, and hydrophobicity of these amphiphiles govern membrane interactions, translocation, and resulting cytoxicity against colon cancer cells. PMID:23590996

  4. Amino Acids Generated from Hydrated Titan Tholins: Comparison with Miller-Urey Electric Discharge Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleaves, H. James, II; Neish, Catherine; Callahan, Michael P.; Parker, Eric; Fernandez, Facundo M.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2014-01-01

    Various analogues of Titan haze particles (termed tholins) have been made in the laboratory. In certain geologic environments on Titan, these haze particles may come into contact with aqueous ammonia (NH3) solutions, hydrolyzing them into molecules of astrobiological interest. A Titan tholin analogue hydrolyzed in aqueous NH3 at room temperature for 2.5 years was analyzed for amino acids using highly sensitive ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-FDToF-MS) analysis after derivatization with a fluorescent tag. We compare here the amino acids produced from this reaction sequence with those generated from room temperature Miller-Urey (MU) type electric discharge reactions. We find that most of the amino acids detected in low temperature MU CH4N2H2O electric discharge reactions are generated in Titan simulation reactions, as well as in previous simulations of Triton chemistry. This argues that many processes provide very similar mixtures of amino acids, and possibly other types of organic compounds, in disparate environments, regardless of the order of hydration. Although it is unknown how life began, it is likely that given reducing conditions, similar materials were available throughout the early Solar System and throughout the universe to facilitate chemical evolution.

  5. Amino acids generated from hydrated Titan tholins: Comparison with Miller-Urey electric discharge products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleaves, H. James; Neish, Catherine; Callahan, Michael P.; Parker, Eric; Fernández, Facundo M.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2014-07-01

    Various analogues of Titan haze particles (termed ‘tholins’) have been made in the laboratory. In certain geologic environments on Titan, these haze particles may come into contact with aqueous ammonia (NH3) solutions, hydrolyzing them into molecules of astrobiological interest. A Titan tholin analogue hydrolyzed in aqueous NH3 at room temperature for 2.5 years was analyzed for amino acids using highly sensitive ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-FD/ToF-MS) analysis after derivatization with a fluorescent tag. We compare here the amino acids produced from this reaction sequence with those generated from room temperature Miller-Urey (MU) type electric discharge reactions. We find that most of the amino acids detected in low temperature MU CH4/N2/H2O electric discharge reactions are generated in Titan simulation reactions, as well as in previous simulations of Triton chemistry. This argues that many processes provide very similar mixtures of amino acids, and possibly other types of organic compounds, in disparate environments, regardless of the order of hydration. Although it is unknown how life began, it is likely that given reducing conditions, similar materials were available throughout the early Solar System and throughout the universe to facilitate chemical evolution.

  6. Infrared and density functional theory studies of formic acid hydrate clusters in noble gas matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Fumiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Infrared absorption spectra of formic acid hydrate clusters (HCOOH)m(H2O)n have been measured in noble gas matrices (Ar and Kr). The concentration dependence of the spectra and the comparison with a previous experimental study on HCOOH(H2O) and HCOOH(H2O)2 [Geoge et al., Spectrochim. Acta, Part A 60 (2004) 3225] led to the identification of large clusters. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP-DCP/6-31+G(2d,2p) level were carried out to determine the anharmonic vibrational properties of the clusters, enabling a consistent assignment of the observed vibrational peaks to specific clusters.

  7. Exploring Jupiter's icy moons with old techniques and big facilities - new insights on sulfuric acid hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard-Casely, H. E.; Avdeev, M.; Brand, H.; Wallwork, K.

    2013-12-01

    Sulfuric acid hydrates have been proposed to be abundant on the surface of Europa [1], and hence would be important planetary forming materials for this moon and its companions Ganymede and Callisto. Understanding of the surface features and subsurface of these moons could be advanced by firmer knowledge of the icy materials that comprise them [2], insight into which can be drawn from firmer knowledge of physical properties and phase behaviour of the candidate materials. We wish to present results from a study that started with the question ';What form of sulfuric acid hydrate would form on the surface of Europa'. The intrinsic hydrogen-domination of planetary ices, makes studying these materials with laboratory powder diffraction very challenging. Insights into their crystalline phase behavior and the extraction of a number of thermal and mechanical properties is often only accessible with high-flux synchrotron x-ray diffraction and utilization of the large scattering cross section with neutron diffraction. We have used the Powder Diffraction beamline at Australian synchrotron [4] and the Echidna (High-resolution neutron powder diffraction) instrument of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, [5] to obtain an number of new insights into the crystalline phases formed from sulfruic acid and water mixtures. These instruments have enabled the discovery a new water-rich sulfuric acid hydrate form [6], improved structural characterisation of existing forms [7] and a charting the phase diagram of this fundamental binary system [8]. This has revealed exciting potential for understanding more about the surface of Europa from space, perhaps even providing a window into its past. [1] Carlson, R.W., R.E. Johnson, and M.S. Anderson, Science, 1999. 286(5437): p. 97-99. [2] Fortes, A.D. and M. Choukroun. Space Sci Rev, 2010. 153(1-4): p. 185-218. [3] Blake, D., et al., Space Sci Rev,, 2012. 170(1-4): p. 341-399. [4] Wallwork, K.S., Kennedy B. J. and Wang, D

  8. Polymorphs, hydrates and solvates of a co-crystal of caffeine with anthranilic acid.

    PubMed

    Madusanka, Nadeesh; Eddleston, Mark D; Arhangelskis, Mihails; Jones, William

    2014-02-01

    A polymorph screen on a new 1:1 co-crystal of caffeine, C8H10N4O2, with anthranilic acid, C7H7NO2, has revealed a rich diversity of crystal forms (two polymorphs, two hydrates and seven solvates, including two sets of isostructural solvates). These forms were prepared by liquid-assisted grinding and solution crystallization, and the crystal structures of nine of these forms have been solved using either single-crystal or powder X-ray data. The structures contain O-H...N and N-H...O hydrogen bonds through which caffeine and anthranilic acid molecules assemble to form zigzag-type chains. These chains can interact in an anti-parallel and offset manner to form cage- or channel-type skeletons within which solvent molecules can be located, giving rise to the diversity of forms observed for this co-crystal. In contrast, an equivalent series of liquid-assisted grinding and solution crystallization experiments with the closely related system of theobromine, C7H8N4O2, and anthranilic acid resulted in the formation of only one 1:1 co-crystal form. PMID:24441130

  9. Absolute Hydration Free Energies of Blocked Amino Acids: Implications for Protein Solvation and Stability

    PubMed Central

    König, Gerhard; Bruckner, Stefan; Boresch, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Most proteins perform their function in aqueous solution. The interactions with water determine the stability of proteins and the desolvation costs of ligand binding or membrane insertion. However, because of experimental restrictions, absolute solvation free energies of proteins or amino acids are not available. Instead, solvation free energies are estimated based on side chain analog data. This approach implies that the contributions to free energy differences are additive, and it has often been employed for estimating folding or binding free energies. However, it is not clear how much the additivity assumption affects the reliability of the resulting data. Here, we use molecular dynamics–based free energy simulations to calculate absolute hydration free energies for 15 N-acetyl-methylamide amino acids with neutral side chains. By comparing our results with solvation free energies for side chain analogs, we demonstrate that estimates of solvation free energies of full amino acids based on group-additive methods are systematically too negative and completely overestimate the hydrophobicity of glycine. The largest deviation of additive protocols using side chain analog data was 6.7 kcal/mol; on average, the deviation was 4 kcal/mol. We briefly discuss a simple way to alleviate the errors incurred by using side chain analog data and point out the implications of our findings for the field of biophysics and implicit solvent models. To support our results and conclusions, we calculate relative protein stabilities for selected point mutations, yielding a root-mean-square deviation from experimental results of 0.8 kcal/mol. PMID:23442867

  10. Proton transport in triflic acid hydrates studied via path integral car-parrinello molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Robin L; Paddison, Stephen J; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2009-12-31

    The mono-, di-, and tetrahydrates of trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, which contain characteristic H(3)O(+), H(5)O(2)(+), and H(9)O(4)(+) structures, provide model systems for understanding proton transport in materials with high perfluorosulfonic acid density such as perfluorosulfonic acid membranes commonly employed in hydrogen fuel cells. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations indicate that protons in these solids are predisposed to transfer to the water most strongly bound to sulfonate groups via a Grotthuss-type mechanism, but quickly return to the most solvated defect structure either due to the lack of a nearby species to stabilize the new defect or a preference for the proton to be maximally hydrated. Path integral molecular dynamics of the mono- and dihydrate reveal significant quantum effects that facilitate proton transfer to the "presolvated" water or SO(3)(-) in the first solvation shell and increase the Zundel character of all the defects. These trends are quantified in free energy profiles for each bonding environment. Hydrogen bonding criteria for HOH-OH(2) and HOH-O(3)S are extracted from the two-dimensional potential of mean force. The quantum radial distribution function, radius of gyration, and root-mean-square displacement position correlation function show that the protonic charge is distributed over two or more water molecules. Metastable structural defects with one excess proton shared between two sulfonate groups and another Zundel or Eigen type cation defect are found for the mono- and dihydrate but not for the tetrahydrate crystal. Results for the tetrahydrate native crystal exhibit minor differences at 210 and 250 K. IR spectra are calculated for all native and stable defect structures. Graph theory techniques are used to characterize the chain lengths and ring sizes in the hydrogen bond network. Low conductivities when limited water is present may be attributable to trapping of protons between SO(3)(-) groups and the increased

  11. Number of free hydroxyl groups on bile acid phospholipids determines the fluidity and hydration of model membranes.

    PubMed

    Sreekanth, Vedagopuram; Bajaj, Avinash

    2013-10-10

    Interactions of synthetic phospholipids with model membranes determines the drug release capabilities of phospholipid vesicles at diseased sites. We performed 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH)-based fluorescence anisotropy, Laurdan-based membrane hydration, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies to cognize the interactions of three bile acid phospholipids, lithocholic acid-phosphocholine (LCA-PC), deoxycholic acid-phosphocholine (DCA-PC), and cholic acid-phosphocholine (CA-PC) with model membranes. These studies revealed that bile acid phospholipids increases membrane fluidity in DCA-PC > CA-PC > LCA-PC order, indicating that induction of membrane fluidity is contingent on the number and positioning of free hydroxyl groups on bile acids. Similarly, DCA-PC causes maximum membrane perturbations due to the presence of a free hydroxyl group, whereas LCA-PC induces gel phase in membranes due to hydrophobic bile acid acyl chain interactions. These DCA-PC-induced membrane perturbations induce a drastic decrease in phase transition temperature (Tm) as determined by calorimetric studies, whereas doping of LCA-PC causes phase transition broadening without change in Tm. Doping of CA-PC induces membrane perturbations and membrane hydration like DCA-PC but sharpening of phase transition at higher doping suggests self-association of CA-PC molecules. Therefore these differential mode of interactions between bile acid phospholipids and model membranes would help in the future for their use in drug delivery. PMID:24079709

  12. Bis(allyl)-ruthenium(iv) complexes with phosphinous acid ligands as catalysts for nitrile hydration reactions.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Mendivil, Eder; Francos, Javier; González-Fernández, Rebeca; González-Liste, Pedro J; Borge, Javier; Cadierno, Victorio

    2016-09-14

    Several mononuclear ruthenium(iv) complexes with phosphinous acid ligands [RuCl2(η(3):η(3)-C10H16)(PR2OH)] have been synthesized (78-86% yield) by treatment of the dimeric precursor [{RuCl(μ-Cl)(η(3):η(3)-C10H16)}2] (C10H16 = 2,7-dimethylocta-2,6-diene-1,8-diyl) with 2 equivalents of different aromatic, heteroaromatic and aliphatic secondary phosphine oxides R2P([double bond, length as m-dash]O)H. The compounds [RuCl2(η(3):η(3)-C10H16)(PR2OH)] could also be prepared, in similar yields, by hydrolysis of the P-Cl bond in the corresponding chlorophosphine-Ru(iv) derivatives [RuCl2(η(3):η(3)-C10H16)(PR2Cl)]. In addition to NMR and IR data, the X-ray crystal structures of representative examples are discussed. Moreover, the catalytic behaviour of complexes [RuCl2(η(3):η(3)-C10H16)(PR2OH)] has been investigated for the selective hydration of organonitriles in water. The best results were achieved with the complex [RuCl2(η(3):η(3)-C10H16)(PMe2OH)], which proved to be active under mild conditions (60 °C), with low metal loadings (1 mol%), and showing good functional group tolerance. PMID:27510460

  13. Evidence for microscopic, long-range hydration forces for a hydrophobic amino acid

    PubMed Central

    Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Soper, Alan K.; Sorenson, Jon M.; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    1999-01-01

    We have combined neutron solution scattering experiments with molecular dynamics simulation to isolate an excess experimental signal that is caused solely by N-acetyl-leucine-amide (NALA) correlations in aqueous solution. This excess signal contains information about how NALA molecule centers are correlated in water, and we show how these solute–solute correlations might be determined at dilute concentrations in the small angle region. We have tested qualitatively different pair distribution functions for NALA molecule centers—gas, cluster, and aqueous forms of gc(r)—and have found that the excess experimental signal is adequate enough to rule out gas and cluster pair distribution functions. The aqueous form of gc(r) that exhibits a solvent-separated minimum, and possibly longer-ranged correlations as well, is not only physically sound but reproduces the experimental data reasonably well. This work demonstrates that important information in the small angle region can be mined to resolve solute–solute correlations, their lengthscales, and thermodynamic consequences even at dilute concentrations. The hydration forces that operate on the microscopic scale of individual amino acid side chains, implied by the small angle scattering data, could have significant effects on the early stages of protein folding, on ligand binding, and on other intermolecular interactions. PMID:9892659

  14. {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance study of hydrated water dynamics in perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer Nafion

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jun Hee; Lee, Kyu Won; Jeon, G. W.; Lee, Cheol Eui; Park, W. K.; Choi, E. H.

    2015-01-12

    We have studied the dynamics of hydrated water molecules in the proton exchange membrane of Nafion by means of high-resolution {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. “Bound” and “free” states of hydrated water clusters as well as the exchange protons were identified from the NMR chemical shift measurements, and their activation energies were obtained from the temperature-dependent laboratory- and rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation measurements. Besides, a peculiar motional transition in the ultralow frequency region was observed at 373 K for the “free” hydrated water from the rotating-frame NMR spin-lattice relaxation time measurements.

  15. Acid attack on hydrated cement — Effect of mineral acids on the degradation process

    SciTech Connect

    Gutberlet, T.; Hilbig, H.; Beddoe, R.E.

    2015-08-15

    During acid attack on concrete structural components, a degraded layer develops whose properties as a protective barrier are decisive for durability. {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopy and {sup 27}Al NMR spectroscopy were used with XRD to investigate the degraded layer on hardened cement paste exposed to HCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The layer comprises an amorphous silica gel with framework silicates, geminate and single silanol groups in which Si is substituted by Al. Amorphous Al(OH){sub 3} and Fe(OH){sub 3} are present. The gel forms by polycondensation and cross-linking of C-A-S-H chains at AlO{sub 4} bridging tetrahedra. In the transition zone between the degraded layer and the undamaged material, portlandite dissolves and Ca is removed from the C-A-S-H phases maintaining their polymer structure at first. With HCl, monosulphate in the transition zone is converted into Friedel's salt and ettringite. With H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, gypsum precipitates near the degradation front reducing the thickness of the transition zone and the rate of degradation.

  16. Thermodynamic studies of ionic hydration and interactions for amino acid ionic liquids in aqueous solutions at 298.15 K.

    PubMed

    Dagade, Dilip H; Madkar, Kavita R; Shinde, Sandeep P; Barge, Seema S

    2013-01-31

    Amino acid ionic liquids are a special class of ionic liquids due to their unique acid-base behavior, biological significance, and applications in different fields such as templates in synthetic chemistry, stabilizers for biological macromolecules, etc. The physicochemical properties of these ionic liquids can easily be altered by making the different combinations of amino acids as anion along with possible cation modification which makes amino acid ionic liquids more suitable to understand the different kinds of molecular and ionic interactions with sufficient depth so that they can provide fruitful information for a molecular level understanding of more complicated biological processes. In this context, volumetric and osmotic coefficient measurements for aqueous solutions containing 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ([Emim]) based amino acid ionic liquids of glycine, alanine, valine, leucine, and isoleucine are reported at 298.15 K. From experimental osmotic coefficient data, mean molal activity coefficients of ionic liquids were estimated and analyzed using the Debye-Hückel and Pitzer models. The hydration numbers of ionic liquids in aqueous solutions were obtained using activity data. Pitzer ion interaction parameters are estimated and compared with other electrolytes reported in the literature. The nonelectrolyte contribution to the aqueous solutions containing ionic liquids was studied by calculating the osmotic second virial coefficient through an application of the McMillan-Mayer theory of solution. It has been found that the second osmotic virial coefficient which includes volume effects correlates linearly with the Pitzer ion interaction parameter estimated independently from osmotic data as well as the hydrophobicity of ionic liquids. The enthalpy-entropy compensation effect, explained using the Starikov-Nordén model of enthalpy-entropy compensation, and partial molar entropy analysis for aqueous [Emim][Gly] solutions are made by using experimental Gibb

  17. Computational Study on the Effect of Hydration on New Particle Formation in the Sulfuric Acid/Ammonia and Sulfuric Acid/Dimethylamine Systems.

    PubMed

    Henschel, Henning; Kurtén, Theo; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2016-03-24

    The formation of new particles through condensation from the gas phase is an important source of atmospheric aerosols. The properties of the electrically neutral clusters formed in the very first steps of the condensation process are, however, not directly observable by experimental means. We present here electronic structure calculations on the hydrates of clusters of three molecules of sulfuric acid and three molecules of ammonia or dimethylamine. On the basis of the results of these new calculations together with previously published material we simulate the influence of hydration on the dynamic processes involved in particle formation. Most strongly affected by hydration and most important as a mediator for the effect on particle formation rates are the evaporation rates of clusters. The results give an estimate of the sensitivity of the atmospheric particle formation rate for humidity. The particle formation rate can change approximately two orders of magnitude in either direction due to hydration; the net effect, however, is highly dependent on the exact conditions. PMID:26918813

  18. Complete Defluorination of Perfluorinated Compounds by Hydrated Electrons Generated from 3-Indole-acetic-acid in Organomodified Montmorillonite

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Haoting; Gao, Juan; Li, Hui; Boyd, Stephen A.; Gu, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe a unique process that achieves complete defluorination and decomposition of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) which comprise one of the most recalcitrant and widely distributed classes of toxic pollutant chemicals found in natural environments. Photogenerated hydrated electrons derived from 3-indole-acetic-acid within an organomodified clay induce the reductive defluorination of co-sorbed PFCs. The process proceeds to completion within a few hours under mild reaction conditions. The organomontmorillonite clay promotes the formation of highly reactive hydrated electrons by stabilizing indole radical cations formed upon photolysis, and prevents their deactivation by reaction with protons or oxygen. In the constrained interlayer regions of the clay, hydrated electrons and co-sorbed PFCs are brought in close proximity thereby increasing the probability of reaction. This novel green chemistry provides the basis for in situ and ex situ technologies to treat one of the most troublesome, recalcitrant and ubiquitous classes of environmental contaminants, i.e., PFCs, utilizing innocuous reagents, naturally occurring materials and mild reaction conditions. PMID:27608658

  19. Complete Defluorination of Perfluorinated Compounds by Hydrated Electrons Generated from 3-Indole-acetic-acid in Organomodified Montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Tian, Haoting; Gao, Juan; Li, Hui; Boyd, Stephen A; Gu, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe a unique process that achieves complete defluorination and decomposition of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) which comprise one of the most recalcitrant and widely distributed classes of toxic pollutant chemicals found in natural environments. Photogenerated hydrated electrons derived from 3-indole-acetic-acid within an organomodified clay induce the reductive defluorination of co-sorbed PFCs. The process proceeds to completion within a few hours under mild reaction conditions. The organomontmorillonite clay promotes the formation of highly reactive hydrated electrons by stabilizing indole radical cations formed upon photolysis, and prevents their deactivation by reaction with protons or oxygen. In the constrained interlayer regions of the clay, hydrated electrons and co-sorbed PFCs are brought in close proximity thereby increasing the probability of reaction. This novel green chemistry provides the basis for in situ and ex situ technologies to treat one of the most troublesome, recalcitrant and ubiquitous classes of environmental contaminants, i.e., PFCs, utilizing innocuous reagents, naturally occurring materials and mild reaction conditions. PMID:27608658

  20. The Structure of Hydrated Poly (D, L - Lactic Acid) Studied With X-Ray Diffraction and Molecular Simulation Methods

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianfeng; Murthy, N. Sanjeeva; Latour, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of hydration on the molecular structure of amorphous poly (D, L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) with 50:50 L-to-D ratio has been studied by combining experiments with molecular simulations. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed significant changes upon hydration in the structure functions of the copolymer. Large changes in the structure functions at ~ 10 days of incubation coincided with the large increase in the water uptake from ~1 to ~40% and the formation of voids in the film. Computer modeling based on the recently developed TIGER2/TIGER3 mixed sampling scheme was used to interpret these changes by efficiently equilibrating both dry and hydrated models of PDLLA. Realistic models of bulk amorphous PDLLA structure were generated as demonstrated by close agreement between the calculated and the experimental structure functions. These molecular simulations were used to identify the interactions between water and the polymer at the atomic level including the change of positional order between atoms in the polymer due to hydration. Changes in the partial O-O structure functions, about 95% of which were due to water-polymer interactions, were apparent in the radial distribution functions. These changes, and somewhat smaller changes in the C-C and C-O partial structure functions, clearly demonstrated the ability of the model to capture the hydrogen bonding interactions between water and the polymer, with the probability of water forming hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl oxygen of the ester group being about four times higher than with its ether oxygen. PMID:22707795

  1. Structure of Hydrated Poly(d,l-lactic acid) Studied with X-ray Diffraction and Molecular Simulation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xianfeng; Murthy, N. Sanjeeva; Latour, Robert A.

    2012-10-10

    The effect of hydration on the molecular structure of amorphous poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) with 50:50 L-to-D ratio has been studied by combining experiments with molecular simulations. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed significant changes upon hydration in the structure functions of the copolymer. Large changes in the structure functions at 10 days of incubation coincided with the large increase in the water uptake from {approx} 1 to {approx} 40% and the formation of voids in the film. Computer modeling based on the recently developed TIGER2/TIGER3 mixed sampling scheme was used to interpret these changes by efficiently equilibrating both dry and hydrated models of PDLLA. Realistic models of bulk amorphous PDLLA structure were generated as demonstrated by close agreement between the calculated and the experimental structure functions. These molecular simulations were used to identify the interactions between water and the polymer at the atomic level including the change of positional order between atoms in the polymer due to hydration. Changes in the partial O-O structure functions, about 95% of which were due to water-polymer interactions, were apparent in the radial distribution functions. These changes, and somewhat smaller changes in the C-C and C-O partial structure functions, clearly demonstrated the ability of the model to capture the hydrogen-bonding interactions between water and the polymer, with the probability of water forming hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl oxygen of the ester group being about 4 times higher than with its ether oxygen.

  2. Hydrate detection

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, W.P.; Ahlbrandt, T.S.

    1992-01-01

    Project objectives were: (1) to create methods of analyzing gas hydrates in natural sea-floor sediments, using available data, (2) to make estimates of the amount of gas hydrates in marine sediments, (3) to map the distribution of hydrates, (4) to relate concentrations of gas hydrates to natural processes and infer the factors that control hydrate concentration or that result in loss of hydrate from the sea floor. (VC)

  3. Hydrate detection

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, W.P.; Ahlbrandt, T.S.

    1992-06-01

    Project objectives were: (1) to create methods of analyzing gas hydrates in natural sea-floor sediments, using available data, (2) to make estimates of the amount of gas hydrates in marine sediments, (3) to map the distribution of hydrates, (4) to relate concentrations of gas hydrates to natural processes and infer the factors that control hydrate concentration or that result in loss of hydrate from the sea floor. (VC)

  4. Investigation of pH-induced conformational change and hydration of poly(methacrylic acid) by analytical ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Ye, Xiaodong; Zhang, Guangzhao

    2015-07-14

    Analytical ultracentrifugation was performed on poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) with a series of weight average molar masses (Mw) in aqueous solutions as a function of pH. The scales of the sedimentation coefficient (s) and the diffusion coefficient (D) to Mw at infinite dilutions were obtained at different pH values, indicating that PMAA chains adopt a collapsed structure at low pH values, and stretch at pH higher than 5.2. Our results show that the sedimentation coefficient exhibits a minimum at pH ∼ 6.0, presumably due to the effect of the conformational change and the hydration state of PMAA chains. When pH increases from 6.0 to 8.5, PMAA chains with high molar mass shrink a little bit, presumably because the sodium ions act as a bridging agent between nonadjacent carboxylate groups. Furthermore, the weight average molar mass of PMAA at pH 8.5 increases by one fold than that at pH 4.0, indicating the condensation of sodium ions and the increase in the number of hydration water molecules around carboxylate groups at high pH values. PMID:26059391

  5. Laboratory Investigation of the Growth and Crystal Structure of Nitric Acid Hydrates by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A great deal of recent laboratory work has focussed on the characterization of the nitric acid hydrates, thought to be present in type I Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs). Phase relationships and vapor pressure measurements (1-3) and infrared characterizations (4-5) have been made. However, the observed properties of crystalline solids (composition, melting point, vapor pressure, surface reactivity, thermodynamic stability, extent of solid solution with other components, etc.) are controlled by their crystal structure. The only means of unequivocal structural identification for crystalline solids is diffraction (using electrons, X-rays, neutrons, etc.). Other observed properties of crystalline solids, such as their infrared spectra, their vapor pressure as a function of temperature, etc. yield only indirect information about what phases are present, their relative proportions, or whether they are crystalline or amorphous.

  6. A Comparative Ab Initio Study of the Primary Hydration and Proton Dissociation of Various Imide and Sulfonic Acid Ionomers

    SciTech Connect

    Clark II, Jeffrey K.; Paddison, Stephen J.; Eikerling, Michael; Dupuis, Michel; Zawodzinski, Jr., Thomas A.

    2012-03-29

    We compare the role of neighboring group substitutions on proton dissociation of hydrated acidic moieties suitable for proton exchange membranes through electronic structure calculations. Three pairs of ionomers containing similar electron withdrawing groups within the pair were chosen for the study: two fully fluorinated sulfonyl imides (CF3SO2NHSO2CF3 and CF3CF2SO2NHSO2CF3), two partially fluorinated sulfonyl imides (CH3SO2NHSO2CF3 and C6H5SO2NHSO2CF2CF3), and two aromatic sulfonic acid based material s (CH3C6H4SO3H and CH3 OC6 - H3OCH3C6H4SO3H). Fully optimized counterpoise (CP) corrected geometries were obtained for each ionomer fragment with the inclusion of water molecules at the B3LYP/6-311G** level of density functional theory. Spontaneous proton dissociation was observed upon addition of three water molecules in each system, and the transition to a solvent-separated ion pair occurred when four water molecules were introduced. No considerable quantitative or qualitative differences in proton dissociation, hydrogen bond networks formed, or water binding energies were found between systems containing similar electron withdrawing groups. Each of the sulfonyl imide ionomers exhibited qualitatively similar results regarding proton dissociation and separation. The fully fluorinated sulfonyl imides, however, showed a greater propensity to exist in dissociated and ion-pair separated states at low degrees of hydration than the partially fluorinated sulfonyl imides. This effect is due to the additional electron withdrawing groups providing charge stabilization as the dissociated proton migrates away from the imide anion.

  7. Synthesis, characterization, solubility and stability studies of hydrate cocrystal of antitubercular Isoniazid with antioxidant and anti-bacterial Protocatechuic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashhadi, Syed Muddassir Ali; Yunus, Uzma; Bhatti, Moazzam Hussain; Ahmed, Imtiaz; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz

    2016-08-01

    Isoniazid is an important component used in "triple therapy" to combat tuberculosis. It has reduced Tabletting formulations stability. Anti-oxidants are obligatory to counter oxidative stress, pulmonary inflammation, and free radical burst from macrophages caused in tuberculosis and other diseases. In the present study a hydrate cocrystal of Isoniazid with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial Protocatechuic acid (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid) in 1:1 is reported. This Cocrystal may have improved tabletting stability and anti-oxidant properties. Cocrystal structure analysis confirmed the existence of pyridine-carboxylic acid synthon in the Cocrystal. Other synthons of different graph sets involving Nsbnd H···O and Osbnd H···N bonds are formed between hydrazide group of isoniazid and coformer. Solubility studies revealed that cocrystal is less soluble as compared to isoniazid in buffer at pH 7.4 at 22 °C while stability studies at 80 °C for 24 h period disclosed the fact that cocrystal has higher stability than that of isoniazid.

  8. Chloral Hydrate

    MedlinePlus

    Chloral hydrate, a sedative, is used in the short-term treatment of insomnia (to help you fall asleep and ... Chloral hydrate comes as a capsule and liquid to take by mouth and as a suppository to insert rectally. ...

  9. Catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of epoxidized soybean oil by hydrated and anhydrous fluoroantimonic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ring-opening polymerization of epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) catalyzed by the super acid, fluroantimonic acid hexahydrate (HSbF6-6H2O), and the anhydrous form (HSbF6) in ethyl acetate was conducted in an effort to develop useful biodegradable polymers. The resulting polymerized ESO (SA-RPESO and SAA-...

  10. The effect of sample hydration on 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of fulvic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Wilson, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three fulvic acids, two of which have been well studied by a number of other groups (Armadale and Suwannee river fulvic acids) have been examined by high resolution solid-state 13C-NMR techniques to delineate the effect of absorbed water. Two main effects of absorbed water were observed: (1) changes in spin lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame and cross polarization times and (2) total loss of signal so that some fulvic acid is effectively in solution. These results suggest that discrepancies in the literature concerning observed relative signal intensities from different structural groups are due to absorbed water and emphasize the necessity for proper precautionary drying before spectroscopic analysis. ?? 1991.

  11. Direct evidence for modified solvent structure within the hydration shell of a hydrophobic amino acid.

    PubMed Central

    Pertsemlidis, A; Saxena, A M; Soper, A K; Head-Gordon, T; Glaeser, R M

    1996-01-01

    Neutron scattering experiments are used to determine scattering profiles for aqueous solutions of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acid analogs. Solutions of hydrophobic solutes show a shift in the main diffraction peak to smaller angle as compared with pure water, whereas solutions of hydrophilic solutes do not. The same difference for solutions of hydrophobic and hydrophilic side chains is also predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. The neutron scattering curves of aqueous solutions of hydrophobic amino acids at room temperature are qualitatively similar to differences between the liquid molecular structure functions measured for ambient and supercooled water. The nonpolar solute-induced expansion of water structure reported here is also complementary to recent neutron experiments where compression of aqueous solvent structure has been observed at high salt concentration. PMID:8855255

  12. Reaction of cis-3-Chloroacrylic Acid Dehalogenase with an Allene Substrate, 2,3-Butadienoate: Hydration Via an Enamine

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Gottfried K.; Johnson, William H.; Huddleston, Jamison P.; Serrano, Hector; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2011-01-01

    cis -3-Chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (cis-CaaD) catalyzes the hydrolytic dehalogenation of cis-3-haloacrylates to yield malonate semialdehyde. The enzyme processes other substrates including an allene (2,3-butadienoate) to produce acetoacetate. In the course of a stereochemical analysis of the cis-CaaD-catalyzed reaction using this allene, the enzyme was unexpectedly inactivated in the presence of NaBH4 by the reduction of a covalent enzyme-substrate bond. Covalent modification was surprising because the accumulated evidence for cis-CaaD dehalogenation favored a mechanism involving direct substrate hydration mediated by Pro-1. However, the results of subsequent mechanistic, pre-steady state and full progress kinetic experiments are consistent with a mechanism in which an enamine forms between Pro-1 and the allene. Hydrolysis of the enamine or an imine tautomer produces acetoacetate. Reduction of the imine species is likely responsible for the observed enzyme inactivation. This is the first reported observation of a tautomerase superfamily member functioning by covalent catalysis. The result may suggest that some fraction of the cis-CaaD-catalyzed dehalogenation of cis-3-haloacrylates also proceeds by covalent catalysis. PMID:22129074

  13. Molecular structure of hydrated complex of trigonelline with L(+)-tartaric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dega-Szafran, Z.; Dutkiewicz, G.; Kosturkiewicz, Z.; Szafran, M.; Barczyński, P.

    2011-04-01

    Crystal structure of the 1:1:1 complex of trigonelline with L(+)-tartaric acid and water has been determined by X-ray diffraction. The crystals are monoclinic, space group P2 1. Trigonelline is protonated and it is linked with the semi-tartrate anion by the COOH⋯OOC hydrogen bond of 2.475(2) Å. The semi-tartrate anions form infinite chains through the COOH⋯OOC hydrogen bonds of 2.599(2) Å. Water molecules play a role of double donors and double acceptors of hydrogen bonds with the semi-tartrate anions and link them into a three-dimensional net. In the optimized structure of the title complex at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory trigonelline is linked with L(+)-tartaric acid by the COO⋯HOOC hydrogen bond of 2.473 Å. The solid-state FTIR spectrum is consistent with the X-ray results. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra elucidate the structure of the complex investigated in aqueous solutions. The value of p Ka of trigonelline has been determined by the potentiometric titration of its hydrochloride.

  14. Spectral identification of hydrated sulfates on Mars and comparison with acidic environments on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Darby Dyar, M.; Lane, Melissa D.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2004-10-01

    We interpret recent spectral data of Mars collected by the Mars Exploration Rovers to contain substantial evidence of sulfate minerals and aqueous processes. We present visible/near-infrared (VNIR), mid-IR and Mössbauer spectra of several iron sulfate minerals and two acid mine drainage (AMD) samples collected from the Iron Mountain site and compare these combined data with the recent spectra of Mars. We suggest that the sulfates on Mars are produced via aqueous oxidation of sulfides known to be present on Mars from Martian meteorites. The sulfate-rich rock outcrops observed in Meridiani Planum may have formed in an acidic environment similar to AMD environments on Earth. Because microorganisms are typically involved in the oxidation of sulfides to sulfates in terrestrial AMD sites, sulfate-rich rock outcrops on Mars may be a good location to search for evidence of life on that planet. Whether or not life evolved on Mars, following the trail of sulfate minerals is likely to lead to aqueous processes and chemical weathering. Our results imply that sulfate minerals formed in Martian soils via chemical weathering, perhaps over very long time periods, and that sulfate minerals precipitated following aqueous oxidation of sulfides to form the outcrop rocks at Meridiani Planum.

  15. Brillouin-scattering study of hyaluronic acid: Dynamic coupling with the water of hydration and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. A.; Flowers, M. R.; Oliver, W. F.; Rupprecht, A.; Lindsay, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    Brillouin spectra have been measured from wet-spun films of Li and Na hyaluronate (NaHA) between 0% and 93% relative humidity (RH). The speed of sound is very high (about 5 km/s) in both Li and NaHA films at low values of RH. The Brillouin spectra show substantial coupling between the longitudinal-acoustic phonons and a relaxation mode of the water of hydration. A coupled-modes model is used to interpret these data. This analysis shows that the relaxation time of the water of hydration (about 50 ps) is constant over the range of hydration. The microscopic coupling constant also appears to be independent of hydration. Between 84% and 88% RH, the uncoupled phonon frequency for both Li and NaHA is found to drop by ~40%, and ~25% for phonons propagating in the parallel and perpendicular directions, respectively, indicative of a phase transition.

  16. The microstructure of the stratum corneum lipid barrier: mid-infrared spectroscopic studies of hydrated ceramide:palmitic acid:cholesterol model systems.

    PubMed

    Garidel, Patrick; Fölting, Bettina; Schaller, Ingrid; Kerth, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    The current mid-infrared spectroscopic study is a systematic investigation of hydrated stratum corneum lipid barrier model systems composed of an equimolar mixture of a ceramide, free palmitic acid and cholesterol. Four different ceramide molecules (CER NS, CER NP, CER NP-18:1, CER AS) were investigated with regard to their microstructure arrangement in a stratum corneum lipid barrier model system. Ceramide molecules were chosen from the sphingosine and phytosphingosine groups. The main differences in the used ceramide molecules result from their polar head group architecture as well as hydrocarbon chain properties. The mixing properties with cholesterol and palmitic acid are considered. This is feasible by using perdeuterated palmitic acid and proteated ceramides. Both molecules can be monitored separately, within the same experiment, using mid-infrared spectroscopy; no external label is necessary. At physiological relevant temperatures, between 30 and 35 degrees C, orthorhombic as well as hexagonal chain packing of the ceramide molecules is observed. The formation of these chain packings are extremely dependent on lipid hydration, with a decrease in ceramide hydration favouring the formation of orthorhombic hydrocarbon chain packing, as well as temperature. The presented data suggest in specific cases phase segregation in ceramide and palmitic acid rich phases. However, other ceramides like CER NP-18:1 show a rather high miscibility with palmitic acid and cholesterol. For all investigated ternary systems, more or less mixing of palmitic acid with cholesterol is observed. The investigated stratum corneum mixtures exhibit a rich polymorphism from crystalline domains with heterogeneous lipid composition to a "fluid" homogeneous phase. Thus, a single gel phase is not evident for the presented stratum corneum model systems. The study shows, that under skin physiological conditions (pH 5.5, hydrated, 30-35 degrees C) ternary systems composed of an equimolar ratio of

  17. Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry examination of the structures, stabilities, and extents of hydration of dimethylamine-sulfuric acid clusters.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jikku M; He, Siqin; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; DePalma, Joseph W; Johnston, Murray V; Hogan, Christopher J

    2016-08-17

    We applied an atmospheric pressure differential mobility analyzer (DMA) coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer to examine the stability, mass-mobility relationship, and extent of hydration of dimethylamine-sulfuric acid cluster ions, which are of relevance to nucleation in ambient air. Cluster ions were generated by electrospray ionization and were of the form: [H((CH3)2NH)x(H2SO4)y](+) and [(HSO4)((CH3)2NH)x(H2SO4)y](-), where 4 ≤ x ≤ 8, and 5 ≤ y ≤ 12. Under dry conditions, we find that positively charged cluster ions dissociated via loss of both multiple dimethylamine and sulfuric acid molecules after mobility analysis but prior to mass analysis, and few parent ions were detected in the mass spectrometer. Dissociation also occurred for negative ions, but to a lesser extent than for positive ions for the same mass spectrometer inlet conditions. Under humidified conditions (relative humidities up to 30% in the DMA), positively charged cluster ion dissociation in the mass spectrometer inlet was mitigated and occurred primarily by H2SO4 loss from ions containing excess acid molecules. DMA measurements were used to infer collision cross sections (CCSs) for all identifiable cluster ions. Stokes-Millikan equation and diffuse/inelastic gas molecule scattering predicted CCSs overestimate measured CCSs by more than 15%, while elastic-specular collision model predictions are in good agreement with measurements. Finally, cluster ion hydration was examined by monitoring changes in CCSs with increasing relative humidity. All examined cluster ions showed a modest amount of water molecule adsorption, with percentage increases in CCS smaller than 10%. The extent of hydration correlates directly with cluster ion acidity for positive ions. PMID:27485283

  18. HEPATOCARCINOGENICITY OF CHLORAL HYDRATE, 2-CHLOROACETALDEHYDE, AND DICHLOROACETIC ACID IN THE MALE B6C3F1 MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chloral hydrate (CH) and 2-chloroacetaldehyde (CAA) have been identified as chlorination by-products in drinking water. oth chemicals are genotoxic, but their carcinogenic potential had not been adequately tested. hese bioassays were conducted using male B6C3F1 mice exposed to 1 ...

  19. RBC deformability and amino acid concentrations after hypo-osmotic challenge may reflect chronic cell hydration status in healthy young men

    PubMed Central

    Stookey, Jodi D; Klein, Alexis; Hamer, Janice; Chi, Christine; Higa, Annie; Ng, Vivian; Arieff, Allen; Kuypers, Frans A; Larkin, Sandra; Perrier, Erica; Lang, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Biomarkers of chronic cell hydration status are needed to determine whether chronic hyperosmotic stress increases chronic disease risk in population-representative samples. In vitro, cells adapt to chronic hyperosmotic stress by upregulating protein breakdown to counter the osmotic gradient with higher intracellular amino acid concentrations. If cells are subsequently exposed to hypo-osmotic conditions, the adaptation results in excess cell swelling and/or efflux of free amino acids. This study explored whether increased red blood cell (RBC) swelling and/or plasma or urine amino acid concentrations after hypo-osmotic challenge might be informative about relative chronic hyperosmotic stress in free-living men. Five healthy men (20–25 years) with baseline total water intake below 2 L/day participated in an 8-week clinical study: four 2-week periods in a U-shaped A-B-C-A design. Intake of drinking water was increased by +0.8 ± 0.3 L/day in period 2, and +1.5 ± 0.3 L/day in period 3, and returned to baseline intake (0.4 ± 0.2 L/day) in period 4. Each week, fasting blood and urine were collected after a 750 mL bolus of drinking water, following overnight water restriction. The periods of higher water intake were associated with significant decreases in RBC deformability (index of cell swelling), plasma histidine, urine arginine, and urine glutamic acid. After 4 weeks of higher water intake, four out of five participants had ½ maximal RBC deformability below 400 mmol/kg; plasma histidine below 100 μmol/L; and/or undetectable urine arginine and urine glutamic acid concentrations. Work is warranted to pursue RBC deformability and amino acid concentrations after hypo-osmotic challenge as possible biomarkers of chronic cell hydration. PMID:24303184

  20. Vibrational analysis of amino acids and short peptides in hydrated media. VIII. Amino acids with aromatic side chains: L-phenylalanine, L-tyrosine, and L-tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Belén; Pflüger, Fernando; Adenier, Alain; Kruglik, Sergei G; Ghomi, Mahmoud

    2010-11-25

    hydrated amino acids. PMID:21043521

  1. Effect of Temperature on Acidity and Hydration Equilibrium Constants of Delphinidin-3-O- and Cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside Calculated from Uni- and Multiwavelength Spectroscopic Data.

    PubMed

    Vidot, Kévin; Achir, Nawel; Mertz, Christian; Sinela, André; Rawat, Nadirah; Prades, Alexia; Dangles, Olivier; Fulcrand, Hélène; Dornier, Manuel

    2016-05-25

    Delphinidin-3-O-sambubioside and cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside are the main anthocyanins of Hibiscus sabdariffa calyces, traditionally used to make a bright red beverage by decoction in water. At natural pH, these anthocyanins are mainly in their flavylium form (red) in equilibrium with the quinonoid base (purple) and the hemiketal (colorless). For the first time, their acidity and hydration equilibrium constants were obtained from a pH-jump method followed by UV-vis spectroscopy as a function of temperature from 4 to 37 °C. Equilibrium constant determination was also performed by multivariate curve resolution (MCR). Acidity and hydration constants of cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside at 25 °C were 4.12 × 10(-5) and 7.74 × 10(-4), respectively, and were significantly higher for delphinidin-3-O-sambubioside (4.95 × 10(-5) and 1.21 × 10(-3), respectively). MCR enabled the obtaining of concentration and spectrum of each form but led to overestimated values for the equilibrium constants. However, both methods showed that formations of the quinonoid base and hemiketal were endothermic reactions. Equilibrium constants of anthocyanins in the hibiscus extract showed comparable values as for the isolated anthocyanins. PMID:27124576

  2. Elastomer coated filler and composites thereof comprising at least 60% by weight of a hydrated filler and an elastomer containing an acid substituent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D.; Reilly, W. W. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The impact resistance of flame retardant composites, especially thermoplastic molding: compounds containing over 60% hydrated mineral filler such as Al(OH)3 or Mg(OH)2 as improved by coating the filler with 1 to 20% of an elastomer. The composite will fail by crazing or shearing rather than by brittle fracture. A well bonded elastomeric interphase resulted by utilizing acidic substituted resins such as ethyl-hexyl acrylate-acrylic acid copolymers which bond to and are cross-linked by the basic filler particles. Further improvement in impact resistance was provided by incorporating 1 to 10% of a resin fiber reinforcement such as polyvinyl alcohol fibers that decompose to yield at least 30% water when heated to decomposition temperature.

  3. Chloral hydrate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chloral hydrate ; CASRN 302 - 17 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  4. Effect of food preservatives on the hydration properties and taste behavior of amino acids: a volumetric and viscometric approach.

    PubMed

    Banipal, Tarlok S; Kaur, Navalpreet; Kaur, Amanpreet; Gupta, Mehak; Banipal, Parampaul K

    2015-08-15

    Thermodynamic and transport properties of aqueous solutions are very useful in the elucidation of solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions, which help to understand the hydration and taste behavior of solutes. The densities and viscosities of L-glycine, β-alanine and L-leucine have been determined in water and in aqueous solutions of sodium propionate (NaP) and calcium propionate (CaP) at temperatures 298.15 and 308.15K. From these data, apparent molar volumes (V2,ϕ), viscosity B-coefficients and corresponding transfer parameters (ΔtrV2,ϕo and ΔtrB) have been calculated. The dB/dT values suggest that L-glycine and β-alanine act as structure-breaker, while L-leucine acts as structure-maker both in water and in aqueous solutions of NaP and CaP. The decrease in hydration number and change in taste behavior have also been observed with increasing concentration of the cosolute. PMID:25794759

  5. Hydrate habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Whoever said there is nothing new under the sun did not delve deeply enough to the bottom of the ocean. There in the Gulf of Mexico, about 150 miles south of New Orleans, scientists have just discovered what could be a new species of centipede—like worms living on or within gas hydrates— mounds of methane ice— rising from the ocean floor.Scientists have previously recognized an association between some bacteria and these hydrates. However, this is the first discovery of a higher life form there.

  6. Hydrogen bonding and molecular association in 2-(quinuclidinium)-butyric acid bromide hydrate studied by X-ray diffraction, DFT calculations, FTIR and NMR spectroscopy, and potentiometric titration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dega-Szafran, Z.; Katrusiak, A.; Szafran, M.; Barczyński, P.

    2010-06-01

    The structure of 2-(quinuclidinium)-butyric acid bromide hydrate (QNBu·H 2O·HBr, 3) has been determined by X-ray diffraction, DFT calculations and characterized by FTIR and NMR spectroscopy. Crystals of 3 are monoclinic, space group P2 1. The water molecule interacts with the carboxylic group of 2-(quinuclidinium)-butyric acid and with the bromide anion by the COOH⋯OH 2 and HOH⋯Br hydrogen bonds of 2.575(3) and 3.293(2) Å, respectively. The structures of monomer ( 4) and dimeric cation ( 5) of the title complex have been optimized by the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) approach, yielding conformations consistent with this in the crystal. The solid-state FTIR spectra of 3 and its deuterated analogue have been measured and compared with the theoretical spectrum of 4. The assignments of the observed and predicted bands have been proposed. The molecule of 3 has a chiral center at the C(9) atom, which is responsible for the non-magnetically equivalence of the α-ring and C(11)H 2 methylene protons in 1H NMR spectrum. The values of p Ka of quinuclidinium-acetate (quinuclidine betaine), 2-(quinuclidinium)-propionate and 2-(quinuclidinium)-butyrate have been determined by the potentiometric titration of their hydrohalides.

  7. Hydrated and anhydrous forms of copper(II) complex of 3-methylpicolinic acid, and spectroscopic studies of their ROS-inducing and proteasome inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Jing Wei; Chan, Cheang Wei; Ng, Chew Hee; Ooi, Ing Hong; Tan, Kong Wai; Maah, Mohd Jamil; Ng, Seik Weng

    2016-02-01

    The hydrated and anhydrous forms of the copper(II) complex of 3-methylpicolinic acid, monomeric [Cu(3Me-pic)2(H2O)]·H2O 1 and polymeric [Cu(3Me-pic)2]n2, were synthesized and characterized by FTIR, UV-visible spectroscopy, conductivity measurement, magnetic susceptibility determination, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and light scattering. Crystal structure analysis of 2 shows that it has a doubly-bridged polymeric structure, involving diagonally stacked Cu(3Me-pic)2 units which are linked via carbonyl oxygen atoms of the 3Me-pic moieties. Analysis of EPR spectra at 133 K and 293 K suggests isotropic intermolecular spin interaction only in 2. Complex 2 dissolved in DMF and DMSO solvents to yield nano-size particles. Solution studies show aqueous solutions of 1 and 2 contain the same neutral Cu(3Me-pic)2 species, which generates less hydroxyl radicals from the reaction with hydrogen peroxide than their precursor CuCl2. The Cu(3Me-pic)2 species exhibit more selective inhibition of the β2 site of the 20S proteasome, among the three proteolytic sites.

  8. Polygonum aviculare L. and its active compounds, quercitrin hydrate, caffeic acid, and rutin, activate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and induce cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seol Hwa; Lee, Soung-Hoon; Cha, Pu-Hyeon; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Min, Do Sik; Choi, Kang-Yell

    2016-05-01

    Polygonum aviculare L. is a member of the Polygonaceae family of plants, which has been known for its antioxidant and anti-obesity effects. However, the wound healing function of P. aviculare extract has not been assessed. In this study, we identified a novel property of P. aviculare extract as a Wnt/β-catenin pathway activator based on a screen of 350 plant extracts using HEK293-TOP cells retaining the Wnt/β-catenin signaling reporter gene. P. aviculare extract accelerated the migration of HaCaT keratinocytes without showing significant cytotoxicity. Moreover, P. aviculare extract efficiently re-epithelized wounds generated on mice. Additionally, ingredients of P. aviculare extract, such as quercitrin hydrate, caffeic acid, and rutin, also accelerated the motility of HaCaT keratinocytes with the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Therefore, based on our findings, P. aviculare extract and its active ingredients could be potential therapeutic agents for wound healing. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26929003

  9. Gas hydrate and humans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    2000-01-01

    The potential effects of naturally occurring gas hydrate on humans are not understood with certainty, but enough information has been acquired over the past 30 years to make preliminary assessments possible. Three major issues are gas hydrate as (1) a potential energy resource, (2) a factor in global climate change, and (3) a submarine geohazard. The methane content is estimated to be between 1015 to 1017 m3 at STP and the worldwide distribution in outer continental margins of oceans and in polar regions are significant features of gas hydrate. However, its immediate development as an energy resource is not likely because there are various geological constraints and difficult technological problems that must be solved before economic recovery of methane from hydrate can be achieved. The role of gas hydrate in global climate change is uncertain. For hydrate methane to be an effective greenhouse gas, it must reach the atmosphere. Yet there are many obstacles to the transfer of methane from hydrate to the atmosphere. Rates of gas hydrate dissociation and the integrated rates of release and destruction of the methane in the geo/hydro/atmosphere are not adequately understood. Gas hydrate as a submarine geohazard, however, is of immediate and increasing importance to humans as our industrial society moves to exploit seabed resources at ever-greater depths in the waters of our coastal oceans. Human activities and installations in regions of gas-hydrate occurrence must take into account the presence of gas hydrate and deal with the consequences of its presence.

  10. Understanding gas hydrate dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, Laura; Chanton, Jeffrey; MacDonald, Ian; Martens, Christopher

    2010-05-01

    In order to understand the role gas hydrates play in climate change or their potential as an energy source, we must first understand their basic behaviors. One such behavior not well understood is their dissolution and the factors that control it. Theoretically, hydrates are stable in areas of high pressure, low temperature, moderate salt concentrations, and saturated methane. Yet in nature, we observe hydrate to outcrop seafloor sediments into overlying water that is under-saturated with respect to methane. How do these hydrates not dissolve away? To address this question, we combine both field and laboratory experiments. In the field, we have collected pore-waters directly surrounding gas hydrate outcrops and measured for in situ methane concentrations. This gives us an understanding of the concentration gradients, and thus methane flux, directly from the hydrate to the surrounding environment. From these samples, we found that methane concentrations decreased further from hydrate yet are always under-saturated with respect to methane hydrate. The resulting low methane gradients were then used to calculate low dissolution rates. This result suggests that hydrates are meta-stable in the environment. What controls their apparent meta-stability? We hypothesize that surrounding oils or microbial slimes help protect the hydrate and slow down their dissolution. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a series of laboratory experiments where hydrate was formed at in situ pressure and temperature and the source gas removed; first with no oils, then with oils. Dissolved methane concentrations were then measured in surrounding fluids over time and dissolution rates calculated. To date, both methane and mixed gas hydrate (methane, ethane, and propane) have similar dissolution rates of 0.12 mM/hr. Future experiments will add oils to determine how different hydrate dissolves with such contaminants. This study will further our understanding of factors that control hydrate

  11. Hydrate-phobic surfaces: fundamental studies in clathrate hydrate adhesion reduction.

    PubMed

    Smith, J David; Meuler, Adam J; Bralower, Harrison L; Venkatesan, Rama; Subramanian, Sivakumar; Cohen, Robert E; McKinley, Gareth H; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2012-05-01

    Clathrate hydrate formation and subsequent plugging of deep-sea oil and gas pipelines represent a significant bottleneck for deep-sea oil and gas operations. Current methods for hydrate mitigation are expensive and energy intensive, comprising chemical, thermal, or flow management techniques. In this paper, we present an alternate approach of using functionalized coatings to reduce hydrate adhesion to surfaces, ideally to a low enough level that hydrodynamic shear stresses can detach deposits and prevent plug formation. Systematic and quantitative studies of hydrate adhesion on smooth substrates with varying solid surface energies reveal a linear trend between hydrate adhesion strength and the practical work of adhesion (γ(total)[1 + cos θ(rec)]) of a suitable probe liquid, that is, one with similar surface energy properties to those of the hydrate. A reduction in hydrate adhesion strength by more than a factor of four when compared to bare steel is achieved on surfaces characterized by low Lewis acid, Lewis base, and van der Waals contributions to surface free energy such that the practical work of adhesion is minimized. These fundamental studies provide a framework for the development of hydrate-phobic surfaces, and could lead to passive enhancement of flow assurance and prevention of blockages in deep-sea oil and gas operations. PMID:22441203

  12. Origins of hydration lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  13. Methane Hydrate Field Program

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-31

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report. • Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report • Methane Hydrate Workshop Report • Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan • Final Scientific/Technical Report

  14. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication. PMID:25585501

  15. TOUGH-Fx/Hydrate

    2005-02-01

    TOUGH-Fx/HYORATL can model the non-isothermal gas release. phase behavior and flow of fluids and heat in complex geologic media. The code can simulate production from natural gas hydrate deposits in the subsurtace (i.e., in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments), as well as laboratory experiments of hydrate dissociation/formation in porous/fractured media. T006H-Fx/HYDRATE vi .0 includes both an equilibrium and a kinetic model of hydrate Ibmiation and dissociation. The model accounts for heat and upmore » to four mass components-- i.e., water, CH4, hydrate, and water-soluble inhibitors such as salts or alcohols. These are partitioned among four possible phases (gas phase, liquid phase, ice phase and hydrate phase). Hydrate dIssociation or formation, phase changes, and the corresponding thermal effects are fully described, as are the effects of inhibitors. The model can describe all possible hydrate dissociation mechanisms, i.e., depressurization, thermal stimulation, salting-out effects, and inhibItor-Induced effects.« less

  16. Gas hydrate inhibition by perturbation of liquid water structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2015-06-01

    Natural gas hydrates are icy crystalline materials that contain hydrocarbons, which are the primary energy source for this civilization. The abundance of naturally occurring gas hydrates leads to a growing interest in exploitation. Despite their potential as energy resources and in industrial applications, there is insufficient understanding of hydrate kinetics, which hinders the utilization of these invaluable resources. Perturbation of liquid water structure by solutes has been proposed to be a key process in hydrate inhibition, but this hypothesis remains unproven. Here, we report the direct observation of the perturbation of the liquid water structure induced by amino acids using polarized Raman spectroscopy, and its influence on gas hydrate nucleation and growth kinetics. Amino acids with hydrophilic and/or electrically charged side chains disrupted the water structure and thus provided effective hydrate inhibition. The strong correlation between the extent of perturbation by amino acids and their inhibition performance constitutes convincing evidence for the perturbation inhibition mechanism. The present findings bring the practical applications of gas hydrates significantly closer, and provide a new perspective on the freezing and melting phenomena of naturally occurring gas hydrates.

  17. Gas hydrate inhibition by perturbation of liquid water structure.

    PubMed

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are icy crystalline materials that contain hydrocarbons, which are the primary energy source for this civilization. The abundance of naturally occurring gas hydrates leads to a growing interest in exploitation. Despite their potential as energy resources and in industrial applications, there is insufficient understanding of hydrate kinetics, which hinders the utilization of these invaluable resources. Perturbation of liquid water structure by solutes has been proposed to be a key process in hydrate inhibition, but this hypothesis remains unproven. Here, we report the direct observation of the perturbation of the liquid water structure induced by amino acids using polarized Raman spectroscopy, and its influence on gas hydrate nucleation and growth kinetics. Amino acids with hydrophilic and/or electrically charged side chains disrupted the water structure and thus provided effective hydrate inhibition. The strong correlation between the extent of perturbation by amino acids and their inhibition performance constitutes convincing evidence for the perturbation inhibition mechanism. The present findings bring the practical applications of gas hydrates significantly closer, and provide a new perspective on the freezing and melting phenomena of naturally occurring gas hydrates. PMID:26082291

  18. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years. PMID:17782901

  19. Combustion of Methane Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshandell, Melika

    A significant methane storehouse is in the form of methane hydrates on the sea floor and in the arctic permafrost. Methane hydrates are ice-like structures composed of water cages housing a guest methane molecule. This caged methane represents a resource of energy and a potential source of strong greenhouse gas. Most research related to methane hydrates has been focused on their formation and dissociation because they can form solid plugs that complicate transport of oil and gas in pipelines. This dissertation explores the direct burning of these methane hydrates where heat from the combustion process dissociates the hydrate into water and methane, and the released methane fuels the methane/air diffusion flame heat source. In contrast to the pipeline applications, very little research has been done on the combustion and burning characteristics of methane hydrates. This is the first dissertation on this subject. In this study, energy release and combustion characteristics of methane hydrates were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The experimental study involved collaboration with another research group, particularly in the creation of methane hydrate samples. The experiments were difficult because hydrates form at high pressure within a narrow temperature range. The process can be slow and the resulting hydrate can have somewhat variable properties (e.g., extent of clathration, shape, compactness). The experimental study examined broad characteristics of hydrate combustion, including flame appearance, burning time, conditions leading to flame extinguishment, the amount of hydrate water melted versus evaporated, and flame temperature. These properties were observed for samples of different physical size. Hydrate formation is a very slow process with pure water and methane. The addition of small amounts of surfactant increased substantially the hydrate formation rate. The effects of surfactant on burning characteristics were also studied. One finding

  20. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  1. Withdrawing Nutrition, Hydration

    Cancer.gov

    Module eleven of the EPEC-O Self-Study Original Version discusses the general aspects of withholding or withdrawing of life-sustaining therapies, and presents a specific application to artificial nutrition and hydration.

  2. Transformations in methane hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Chou, I-Ming; Sharma, Anurag; Burruss, Robert C.; Shu, Jinfu; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Stern, Laura A.; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2000-01-01

    Detailed study of pure methane hydrate in a diamond cell with in situ optical, Raman, and x-ray microprobe techniques reveals two previously unknown structures, structure II and structure H, at high pressures. The structure II methane hydrate at 250 MPa has a cubic unit cell of a = 17.158(2) Å and volume V = 5051.3(13) Å3; structure H at 600 MPa has a hexagonal unit cell of a = 11.980(2) Å, c = 9.992(3) Å, and V = 1241.9(5) Å3. The compositions of these two investigated phases are still not known. With the effects of pressure and the presence of other gases in the structure, the structure II phase is likely to dominate over the known structure I methane hydrate within deep hydrate-bearing sediments underlying continental margins. PMID:11087836

  3. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  4. Physicochemical and structural studies of clathrate hydrates of tetrabutylammonium polyacrylates.

    PubMed

    Terekhova, Irina S; Manakov, Andrey Yu; Komarov, Vladislav Yu; Villevald, Galina V; Burdin, Alexander A; Karpova, Tamara D; Aladko, Eugeny Ya

    2013-03-01

    In this work, physicochemical and structural studies have been carried out for semiclathrate hydrates of linear (un-cross-linked) and cross-linked tetrabutylammonium polyacrylates with different degrees of cross-linking of the polymeric guest molecules (n = 0.5, 1, 2, 3%) and different degrees of substitution of proton ions of carboxylic groups in poly(acrylic acid) for TBA cations (x = 1, 0.8, 0.6). The changes in the hydrates' stability and composition depending on the outlined parameters were examined in the course of phase diagram studies of the binary systems water-tetrabutylammonium polyacrylates using differential thermal analysis method and calorimetric measurements of fusion enthalpies of the hydrates. Phase diagram studies of the binary system water-linear tetrabutylammonium polyacrylate revealed the formation of four hydrates. Based on the data of chemical analysis of hydrate crystals the compositions of all hydrates have been determined. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies revealed a tetragonal structure, space group 4/m, and unit cell parameters are close for different hydrates and lie in the ranges a = 23.4289-23.4713 Å and c = 12.3280-12.3651 Å (150 K). The structure can be related to tetragonal structure I typical for the clathrate hydrates of tetraalkylammonium salts with monomeric anions. Powder X-ray diffraction analyses confirmed the identity of the above crystal structure to that of the hydrates with cross-linked tetrabutylammonium polyacrylates. The behavior of TBA polyacrylate hydrates under the pressure of methane was studied and quantitative assessment of the gas content in the hydrates was made using volumetric analysis method. PMID:23383955

  5. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large

  6. Dynamics of protein hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, M.; Emmert, S.; Gulich, R.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Loidl, A.

    2015-09-01

    We present the frequency- and temperature-dependent dielectric properties of lysozyme solutions in a broad concentration regime, measured at subzero temperatures, and compare the results with measurements above the freezing point of water and on hydrated lysozyme powder. Our experiments allow examining the dynamics of unfreezable hydration water in a broad temperature range. The obtained results prove the bimodality of the hydration shell dynamics. In addition, we find indications of a fragile-to-strong transition of hydration water.

  7. Dynamics of protein hydration water.

    PubMed

    Wolf, M; Emmert, S; Gulich, R; Lunkenheimer, P; Loidl, A

    2015-09-01

    We present the frequency- and temperature-dependent dielectric properties of lysozyme solutions in a broad concentration regime, measured at subzero temperatures, and compare the results with measurements above the freezing point of water and on hydrated lysozyme powder. Our experiments allow examining the dynamics of unfreezable hydration water in a broad temperature range. The obtained results prove the bimodality of the hydration shell dynamics. In addition, we find indications of a fragile-to-strong transition of hydration water. PMID:26465518

  8. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  9. Phyllosilicate and Hydrated Sulfate Deposits in Meridiani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, S. M.; Avidson, R. E.; Murchie, S.; Poulet, F.; Andrews-Hanna, J. C.; Morris, R. V.; Seelos, F. P.

    2008-01-01

    Several phyllosilicate and hydrated sulfate deposits in Meridiani have been mapped in detail with high resolution MRO CRISM [1] data. Previous studies have documented extensive exposures of outcrop in Meridiani (fig 1), or etched terrain (ET), that has been interpreted to be sedimentary in origin [e.g., 2,3]. These deposits have been mapped at a regional scale with OMEGA data and show enhanced hydration (1.9 m absorption) in several areas [4]. However, hydrated sulfate detections were restricted to valley exposures in northern Meridiani ET [5]. New high resolution CRISM images show that hydrated sulfates are present in several spatially isolated exposures throughout the ET (fig 1). The hydrated sulfate deposits in the valley are vertically heterogeneous with layers of mono and polyhydrated sulfates and are morphologically distinct from other areas of the ET. We are currently mapping the detailed spatial distribution of sulfates and searching for distinct geochemical horizons that may be traced back to differential ground water recharge and/or evaporative loss rates. The high resolution CRISM data has allowed us to map out several phyllosilicate deposits within the fluvially dissected Noachian cratered terrain (DCT) to the south and west of the hematite-bearing plains (Ph) and ET (fig 1). In Miyamoto crater, phyllosilicates are located within 30km of the edge of Ph, which is presumably underlain by acid sulfate deposits similar to those explored by Opportunity. The deposits within this crater may record the transition from fluvial conditions which produced and/or preserved phyllosilicates deposits to a progressively acid sulfate dominated groundwater system in which large accumulations of sulfate-rich evaporites were deposited .

  10. Phase equilibria of H2SO4, HNO3, and HCl hydrates and the composition of polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooldridge, Paul J.; Zhang, Renyi; Molina, Mario J.

    1995-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria behavior for the hydrates and coexisting pairs of hydrates of common acids which exist in the stratosphere are assembled from new laboratory measurements and standard literature data. The analysis focuses upon solid-vapor and solid-solid-vapor equilibria at temperatures around 200 K and includes new calorimetric and vapor pressure data. Calculated partial pressures versus 1/T slopes for the hydrates and coexisting hydrates agree well with experimental data where available.

  11. Phase Equilibria of H2SO4, HNO3, and HCl Hydrates and the Composition of Polar Stratospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooldridge, Paul J.; Zhang, Renyi; Molina, Mario J.

    1995-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria behavior for the hydrates and coexisting pairs of hydrates of common acids which exist in the stratosphere are assembled from new laboratory measurements and standard literature data. The analysis focuses upon solid-vapor and solid-solid-vapor equilibria at temperatures around 200 K and includes new calorimetric and vapor pressure data. Calculated partial pressures versus 1/T slopes for the hydrates and coexisting hydrates agree well with experimental data where available.

  12. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-09-01

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces.

  13. Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization of Acid-Sulfate Alteration of Basaltic Material on Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii: Jarosite and Hydrated Halloysite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, Trevor G.; Morris, R. V.; Archilles C. N.; Agresti, D. G.; Ming, D. W.; Hamilton, J. C.; Mertzman, S. A.; Smith, J.

    2012-01-01

    Sulfates have been identified on the martian surface during robotic surface exploration and by orbital remote sensing. Measurements at Meridiani Planum (MP) by the Alpha-Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and Mossbauer (MB) instruments on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity document the presence of a ubiquitous sulfate-rich outcrop (20-40% SO3) that has jarosite as an anhydrous Fe3+-sulfate [1- 3]. The presence of jarosite implies a highly acidic (pH <3) formation environment [4]. Jarosite and other sulfate minerals, including kieserite, gypsum, and alunite have also been identified in several locations in orbital remote sensing data from the MEx OMEGA and MRO CRISM instruments [e.g. 5-8]. Acid sulfate weathering of basaltic materials is an obvious pathway for formation of sulfate-bearing phases on Mars [e.g. 4, 9, 10]. In order to constrain acid-sulfate pathways on Mars, we are studying the mineralogical and chemical manifestations of acid-sulfate alteration of basaltic compositions in terrestrial environments. We have previously shown that acidsulfate alteration of tephra under hydrothermal conditions on the Puu Poliahu cone (summit region of Mauna Kea volcano, Hawaii) resulted in jarosite and alunite as sulfate-bearing alteration products [11-14]. Other, more soluble, sulfates may have formed, but were leached away by rain and melting snow. Acidsulfate processes on Puu Poliahu also formed hematite spherules similar (except in size) to the hematite spherules observed at MP as an alteration product [14]. Phyllosilicates, usually smectite }minor kaolinite are also present as alteration products [13]. We discuss here an occurrence of acid-sulfate alteration on Mauna Kea Volcano (Hawaii). We report VNIR spectra (0.35-2.5 microns ASD spectrometer), Mossbauer spectra (MER-like ESPI backscatter spectrometer), powder XRD (PANalytical), and major element chemical compositions (XRF with LOI and Fe redox) for comparison to similar data acquired or to be acquired by MRO

  14. Methane Clathrate Hydrate Prospecting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N.; Romanovsky, V.

    2003-01-01

    A method of prospecting for methane has been devised. The impetus for this method lies in the abundance of CH4 and the growing shortages of other fuels. The method is intended especially to enable identification of subpermafrost locations where significant amounts of methane are trapped in the form of methane gas hydrate (CH4(raised dot)6H2O). It has been estimated by the U.S. Geological Survey that the total CH4 resource in CH4(raised dot) 6H2O exceeds the energy content of all other fossil fuels (oil, coal, and natural gas from non-hydrate sources). Also, CH4(raised dot)6H2O is among the cleanest-burning fuels, and CH4 is the most efficient fuel because the carbon in CH4 is in its most reduced state. The method involves looking for a proxy for methane gas hydrate, by means of the combination of a thermal-analysis submethod and a field submethod that does not involve drilling. The absence of drilling makes this method easier and less expensive, in comparison with prior methods of prospecting for oil and natural gas. The proposed method would include thermoprospecting in combination with one more of the other non-drilling measurement techniques, which could include magneto-telluric sounding and/or a subsurface-electrical-resistivity technique. The method would exploit the fact that the electrical conductivity in the underlying thawed region is greater than that in the overlying permafrost.

  15. Hydration-dependent dynamic crossover phenomenon in protein hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Fratini, Emiliano; Li, Mingda; Le, Peisi; Mamontov, Eugene; Baglioni, Piero; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2014-10-01

    The characteristic relaxation time τ of protein hydration water exhibits a strong hydration level h dependence. The dynamic crossover is observed when h is higher than the monolayer hydration level hc=0.2-0.25 and becomes more visible as h increases. When h is lower than hc, τ only exhibits Arrhenius behavior in the measured temperature range. The activation energy of the Arrhenius behavior is insensitive to h, indicating a local-like motion. Moreover, the h dependence of the crossover temperature shows that the protein dynamic transition is not directly or solely induced by the dynamic crossover in the hydration water.

  16. Gas hydrate measurements at Hydrate Ridge using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, K. C.; Dunk, R. M.; White, S. N.; Brewer, P. G.; Peltzer, E. T.; Sloan, E. D.

    2007-06-01

    Oceanic gas hydrates have been measured near the seafloor for the first time using a seagoing Raman spectrometer at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon, where extensive layers of hydrates have been found to occur near the seafloor. All of the hydrates analyzed were liberated from the upper meter of the sediment column near active gas venting sites in water depths of 770-780 m. Hydrate properties, such as structure and composition, were measured with significantly less disturbance to the sample than would be realized with core recovery. The natural hydrates measured were sI, with methane as the predominant guest component, and minor/trace amounts of hydrogen sulfide present in three of the twelve samples measured. Methane large-to-small cage occupancy ratios of the hydrates varied from 1.01 to 1.30, in good agreement with measurements of laboratory synthesized and recovered natural hydrates. Although the samples visually appeared to be solid, varying quantities of free methane gas were detected, indicating the possible presence of occluded gas in a hydrate bubble fabric.

  17. Chemical characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and its hydration reaction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed in early 1990s and has been successfully used for root perforation repair, root end filling, and one-visit apexification. MTA is composed mainly of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate. When MTA is hydrated, calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide is formed. Formed calcium hydroxide interacts with the phosphate ion in body fluid and form amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) which finally transforms into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). These mineral precipitate were reported to form the MTA-dentin interfacial layer which enhances the sealing ability of MTA. Clinically, the use of zinc oxide euginol (ZOE) based materials may retard the setting of MTA. Also, the use of acids or contact with excessive blood should be avoided before complete set of MTA, because these conditions could adversely affect the hydration reaction of MTA. Further studies on the chemical nature of MTA hydration reaction are needed. PMID:23429542

  18. Chemical characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and its hydration reaction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seok-Woo

    2012-11-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed in early 1990s and has been successfully used for root perforation repair, root end filling, and one-visit apexification. MTA is composed mainly of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate. When MTA is hydrated, calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide is formed. Formed calcium hydroxide interacts with the phosphate ion in body fluid and form amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) which finally transforms into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). These mineral precipitate were reported to form the MTA-dentin interfacial layer which enhances the sealing ability of MTA. Clinically, the use of zinc oxide euginol (ZOE) based materials may retard the setting of MTA. Also, the use of acids or contact with excessive blood should be avoided before complete set of MTA, because these conditions could adversely affect the hydration reaction of MTA. Further studies on the chemical nature of MTA hydration reaction are needed. PMID:23429542

  19. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  20. Clathrate hydrates for ozone preservation.

    PubMed

    Muromachi, Sanehiro; Ohmura, Ryo; Takeya, Satoshi; Mori, Yasuhiko H

    2010-09-01

    We report the experimental evidence for the preservation of ozone (O(3)) encaged in a clathrate hydrate. Although ozone is an unstable substance and is apt to decay to oxygen (O(2)), it may be preserved for a prolonged time if it is encaged in hydrate cavities in the form of isolated molecules. This possibility was assessed using a hydrate formed from an ozone + oxygen gas mixture coexisting with carbon tetrachloride or xenon. Each hydrate sample was stored in an air-filled container at atmospheric pressure and a constant temperature in the range between -20 and 2 degrees C and was continually subjected to iodometric measurements of its fractional ozone content. Such chronological measurements and structure analysis using powder X-ray diffraction have revealed that ozone can be preserved in a hydrate-lattice structure for more than 20 days at a concentration on the order of 0.1% (hydrate-mass basis). PMID:20707330

  1. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  2. Micromechanical measurements of the effect of surfactants on cyclopentane hydrate shell properties.

    PubMed

    Brown, Erika P; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the effect of surfactants on clathrate hydrate growth and morphology, especially particle shell strength and cohesion force, is critical to advancing new strategies to mitigate hydrate plug formation. In this study, dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid and polysorbate 80 surfactants were included during the growth of cyclopentane hydrates at several concentrations above and below the critical micelle concentration. A novel micromechanical method was applied to determine the force required to puncture the hydrate shell using a glass cantilever (with and without surfactants), with annealing times ranging from immediately after the hydrate nucleated to 90 minutes after formation. It was shown that the puncture force was decreased by the addition of both surfactants up to a maximum of 79%. Over the entire range of annealing times (0-90 minutes), the thickness of the hydrate shell was also measured. However, there was no clear change in shell thickness with the addition of surfactants. The growth rate of the hydrate shell was found to vary less than 15% with the addition of surfactants. The cohesive force between two hydrate particles was measured for each surfactant and found to be reduced by 28% to 78%. Interfacial tension measurements were also performed. Based on these results, microscopic changes to the hydrate shell morphology (due to the presence of surfactants) were proposed to cause the decrease in the force required to break the hydrate shell, since no macroscopic morphology changes were observed. Understanding the hydrate shell strength can be critical to reducing the capillary bridge interaction between hydrate particles or controlling the release of unconverted water from the interior of the hydrate particle, which can cause rapid hydrate conversion. PMID:26618773

  3. A co-crystal of nona-hydrated disodium(II) with mixed anions from m-chloro-benzoic acid and furosemide.

    PubMed

    London, Bianca King; Claville, Michelle O Fletcher; Babu, Sainath; Fronczek, Frank R; Uppu, Rao M

    2015-10-01

    In the title compound, [Na2(H2O)9](C7H4ClO2)(C12H10ClN2O5S) {systematic name: catena-poly[[[triaquasodium(I)]-di-μ-aqua-[triaquasodium(I)]-μ-aqua] 3-chlorobenzoate 4-chloro-2-[(furan-2-ylmethyl)amino]-5-sulfamoylbenzoate]}, both the original m-chloro-benzoic acid and furosemide exist with deprotonated carboxyl-ates, and the sodium cations and water mol-ecules exist in chains with stoichiometry [Na2(OH2)9](2+) that propagate in the [-110] direction. Each of the two independent Na(+) ions is coordinated by three monodentate water mol-ecules, two double-water bridges, and one single-water bridge. There is considerable cross-linking between the [Na2(OH2)9](2+) chains and to furosemide sulfonamide and carboxyl-ate by inter-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. All hydrogen-bond donors participate in a complex two-dimensional array parallel to the ab plane. The furosemide NH group donates an intra-molecular hydrogen bond to the carboxyl-ate group, and the furosemide NH2 group donates an intra-molecular hydrogen bond to the Cl atom and an inter-molecular one to the m-chloro-benzoate O atom. The plethora of hydrogen-bond donors on the cation/water chain leads to many large rings, up to graph set R 4 (4)(24), involving two chains and two furosemide anions. The chloro-benzoate is involved in only one R 2 (2)(8) ring, with two water mol-ecules cis-coordinated to Na. The furan O atom is not hydrogen bonded. PMID:26594422

  4. Vibrational analysis of amino acids and short peptides in hydrated media. II. Role of KLLL repeats to induce helical conformations in minimalist LK-peptides.

    PubMed

    Guiffo-Soh, Guy; Hernandez, Belén; Coïc, Yves-Marie; Boukhalfa-Heniche, Fatima-Zohra; Ghomi, Mahmoud

    2007-11-01

    Aqueous solution secondary structures of minimalist LK-peptides, with the generic sequence defined as KLL(KLLL)nKLLK, have been analyzed by means of circular dichroism (CD) and Raman scattering techniques. Our discussion in the present paper is mainly focused on four synthetic peptides (from 5 to 19 amino acids), KLLLK, KLLKLLLKLLK, KLLKLLLKLLLKLLK, and KLLKLLLKLLLKLLLKLLK, corresponding to the repeat unit, and to the peptide chains with the values of n = 1-3, respectively. CD and Raman spectra were analyzed in order to study both structural features of the peptide chains and their capability to form aggregates. On the basis of the obtained results it was concluded that the conformational flexibility of the shortest peptides (5-mer and 11-mer) is high enough to adopt random, beta-type, and helical chains in aqueous solution. However, the 11-mer shows a clear tendency to form beta-strands in phosphate buffer. The conformational equilibrium can be completely shifted to beta-type structures upon increasing ionic strength, i.e., in PBS and tris buffers. This equilibrium can also be shifted toward helical chains in the presence of methanol. Finally, the longest peptides (15-mer and 19-mer) are shown to form alpha-helical chains with an amphipathic character in aqueous solution. The possibility of bundle formation between helical chains is discussed over the temperature-dependent H-D exchange on labile hydrogens and particularly by considering the particular behavior of an intense Raman mode at 1127 cm-1 originating from the leucine residue side chain. The conformational dependence of this mode observed upon selective deuteration has never been documented up to now. PMID:17918991

  5. Preparation, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of polymeric nanoparticles based on hyaluronic acid-poly(butyl cyanoacrylate) and D-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate for tumor-targeted delivery of morin hydrate.

    PubMed

    Abbad, Sarra; Wang, Cheng; Waddad, Ayman Yahia; Lv, Huixia; Zhou, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we describe the preparation of a targeted cellular delivery system for morin hydrate (MH), based on a low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid-poly(butyl cyanoacrylate) (HA-PBCA) block copolymer. In order to enhance the therapeutic effect of MH, D-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) was mixed with HA-PBCA during the preparation process. The MH-loaded HA-PBCA "plain" nanoparticle (MH-PNs) and HA-PBCA/TPGS "mixed" nanoparticles (MH-MNs) were concomitantly characterized in terms of loading efficiency, particle size, zeta potential, critical aggregation concentration, and morphology. The obtained MH-PNs and MH-MNs exhibited a spherical morphology with a negative zeta potential and a particle size less than 200 nm, favorable for drug targeting. Remarkably, the addition of TPGS resulted in about 1.6-fold increase in drug-loading. The in vitro cell viability experiment revealed that MH-MNs enhanced the cytotoxicity of MH in A549 cells compared with MH solution and MH-PNs. Furthermore, blank MNs containing TPGS exhibited selective cytotoxic effects against cancer cells without diminishing the viability of normal cells. In addition, the cellular uptake study indicated that MNs resulted in 2.28-fold higher cellular uptake than that of PNs, in A549 cells. The CD44 receptor competitive inhibition and the internalization pathway studies suggested that the internalization mechanism of the nanoparticles was mediated mainly by the CD44 receptors through a clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway. More importantly, MH-MNs exhibited a higher in vivo antitumor potency and induced more tumor cell apoptosis than did MH-PNs, following intravenous administration to S180 tumor-bearing mice. Overall, the results imply that the developed nanoparticles are promising vehicles for the targeted delivery of lipophilic anticancer drugs. PMID:25609946

  6. Preparation, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of polymeric nanoparticles based on hyaluronic acid-poly(butyl cyanoacrylate) and D-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate for tumor-targeted delivery of morin hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Abbad, Sarra; Wang, Cheng; Waddad, Ayman Yahia; Lv, Huixia; Zhou, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we describe the preparation of a targeted cellular delivery system for morin hydrate (MH), based on a low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid-poly(butyl cyanoacrylate) (HA-PBCA) block copolymer. In order to enhance the therapeutic effect of MH, D-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) was mixed with HA-PBCA during the preparation process. The MH-loaded HA-PBCA “plain” nanoparticle (MH-PNs) and HA-PBCA/TPGS “mixed” nanoparticles (MH-MNs) were concomitantly characterized in terms of loading efficiency, particle size, zeta potential, critical aggregation concentration, and morphology. The obtained MH-PNs and MH-MNs exhibited a spherical morphology with a negative zeta potential and a particle size less than 200 nm, favorable for drug targeting. Remarkably, the addition of TPGS resulted in about 1.6-fold increase in drug-loading. The in vitro cell viability experiment revealed that MH-MNs enhanced the cytotoxicity of MH in A549 cells compared with MH solution and MH-PNs. Furthermore, blank MNs containing TPGS exhibited selective cytotoxic effects against cancer cells without diminishing the viability of normal cells. In addition, the cellular uptake study indicated that MNs resulted in 2.28-fold higher cellular uptake than that of PNs, in A549 cells. The CD44 receptor competitive inhibition and the internalization pathway studies suggested that the internalization mechanism of the nanoparticles was mediated mainly by the CD44 receptors through a clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway. More importantly, MH-MNs exhibited a higher in vivo antitumor potency and induced more tumor cell apoptosis than did MH-PNs, following intravenous administration to S180 tumor-bearing mice. Overall, the results imply that the developed nanoparticles are promising vehicles for the targeted delivery of lipophilic anticancer drugs. PMID:25609946

  7. Bubble migration during hydrate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagapov, V. Sh.; Chiglintseva, A. S.; Rusinov, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    A model of the process of migration of methane bubbles in water under thermobaric conditions of hydrate formation is proposed. The peculiarities of the temperature field evolution, migration rate, and changes in the radius and volume fraction of gas hydrate bubbles are studied. It is shown that, with a constant mass flow of gas from the reservoir bottom, for all parameters of the surfacing gas hydrate disperse system, there is a quasistationary pattern in the form of a "step"-like wave. Depending on the relationship of the initial gas bubble density with the average gas density in the hydrate composition determined by the depth from which bubbles rise to the surface, the final radius of hydrate particles may be larger or smaller than the initial gas bubble radii. It is established that the speed at which gas hydrate inclusions rise to the surface decreases by several times due to an increase in their weight during hydrate formation. The influence of the depth of the water reservoir whose bottom is a gas flow source on the dynamics of hydrate formation is studied.

  8. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  9. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water

    SciTech Connect

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Stanley, H. Eugene; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-06-07

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature.

  10. Gas Hydrate Petroleum System Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, T. S.

    2012-12-01

    In a gas hydrate petroleum system, the individual factors that contribute to the formation of gas hydrate accumulations, such as (1) gas hydrate pressure-temperature stability conditions, (2) gas source, (3) gas migration, and (4) the growth of the gas hydrate in suitable host sediment can identified and quantified. The study of know and inferred gas hydrate accumulations reveal the occurrence of concentrated gas hydrate is mostly controlled by the presence of fractures and/or coarser grained sediments. Field studies have concluded that hydrate grows preferentially in coarse-grained sediments because lower capillary pressures in these sediments permit the migration of gas and nucleation of hydrate. Due to the relatively distal nature of the deep marine geologic settings, the overall abundance of sand within the shallow geologic section is usually low. However, drilling projects in the offshore of Japan, Korea, and in the Gulf of Mexico has revealed the occurrence of significant hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs. The 1999/2000 Japan Nankai Trough drilling confirmed occurrence of hydrate-bearing sand-rich intervals (interpreted as turbidite fan deposits). Gas hydrate was determined to fill the pore spaces in these deposits, reaching saturations up to 80% in some layers. A multi-well drilling program titled "METI Toaki-oki to Kumano-nada" also identified sand-rich reservoirs with pore-filling hydrate. The recovered hydrate-bearing sand layers were described as very-fine- to fine-grained turbidite sand layers measuring from several centimeters up to a meter thick. However, the gross thickness of the hydrate-bearing sand layers were up to 50 m. In 2010, the Republic of Korea conducted the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate (UBGH2) Drilling Expedition. Seismic data clearly showed the development of a thick, potential basin wide, sedimentary sections characterized by mostly debris flows. The downhole LWD logs and core data from Site UBGH2-5 reveal that each debris flows is

  11. Navigating the Waters of Unconventional Crystalline Hydrates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the crystal structures, transformations, and thermodynamics of the two zwitterionic hydrates (Hy2 and HyA) of 3-(4-dibenzo[b,f][1,4]oxepin-11-yl-piperazin-1-yl)-2,2-dimethylpropanoic acid (DB7) rationalizes the complex interplay of temperature, water activity, and pH on the solid form stability and transformation pathways to three neutral anhydrate polymorphs (Forms I, II°, and III). HyA contains 1.29 to 1.95 molecules of water per DB7 zwitterion (DB7z). Removal of the essential water stabilizing HyA causes it to collapse to an amorphous phase, frequently concomitantly nucleating the stable anhydrate Forms I and II°. Hy2 is a stoichiometric dihydrate and the only known precursor to Form III, a high energy disordered anhydrate, with the level of disorder depending on the drying conditions. X-ray crystallography, solid state NMR, and H/D exchange experiments on highly crystalline phase pure samples obtained by exquisite control over crystallization, filtration, and drying conditions, along with computational modeling, provided a molecular level understanding of this system. The slow rates of many transformations and sensitivity of equilibria to exact conditions, arising from its varying static and dynamic disorder and water mobility in different phases, meant that characterizing DB7 hydration in terms of simplified hydrate classifications was inappropriate for developing this pharmaceutical. PMID:26075319

  12. Navigating the Waters of Unconventional Crystalline Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Braun, Doris E; Koztecki, Lien H; McMahon, Jennifer A; Price, Sarah L; Reutzel-Edens, Susan M

    2015-08-01

    Elucidating the crystal structures, transformations, and thermodynamics of the two zwitterionic hydrates (Hy2 and HyA) of 3-(4-dibenzo[b,f][1,4]oxepin-11-yl-piperazin-1-yl)-2,2-dimethylpropanoic acid (DB7) rationalizes the complex interplay of temperature, water activity, and pH on the solid form stability and transformation pathways to three neutral anhydrate polymorphs (Forms I, II°, and III). HyA contains 1.29 to 1.95 molecules of water per DB7 zwitterion (DB7z). Removal of the essential water stabilizing HyA causes it to collapse to an amorphous phase, frequently concomitantly nucleating the stable anhydrate Forms I and II°. Hy2 is a stoichiometric dihydrate and the only known precursor to Form III, a high energy disordered anhydrate, with the level of disorder depending on the drying conditions. X-ray crystallography, solid state NMR, and H/D exchange experiments on highly crystalline phase pure samples obtained by exquisite control over crystallization, filtration, and drying conditions, along with computational modeling, provided a molecular level understanding of this system. The slow rates of many transformations and sensitivity of equilibria to exact conditions, arising from its varying static and dynamic disorder and water mobility in different phases, meant that characterizing DB7 hydration in terms of simplified hydrate classifications was inappropriate for developing this pharmaceutical. PMID:26075319

  13. The curious case of the hydrated proton.

    PubMed

    Knight, Chris; Voth, Gregory A

    2012-01-17

    results to a simpler and more efficient representation. The process allows sampling of longer time and length scales, which would normally be too computationally expensive with AIMD alone. With the MS-EVB methodology, the statistically important components of the excess proton solvation and hopping mechanisms in liquid water have been identified. The most likely solvation structure for the hydrated proton is a distorted Eigen-type complex (H(9)O(4)(+)). In this state, the excess proton charge defect rapidly resonates between three possible distorted Eigen-type structures until a successful proton hop occurs. This process, termed the "special-pair dance", serves as a kind of preparatory phase for the proton hopping while the neighboring water hydrogen-bonding network fluctuates and ultimately rearranges to facilitate a proton hop. The modifications of the solvation structure and transport properties of the excess proton in concentrated acid solutions were further investigated. The Eigen-type solvation structure also possesses both "hydrophilic" and "hydrophobic" sides, which accounts for the affinity of the hydrated proton for the air-water interface. This unusual "amphiphilic" character of the hydrated proton further leads to the metastable formation of contact ion pairs between two hydrated protons. It also engenders a surprisingly constant degree of solubility of hydrophobic species as a function of acid concentration, which contrasts with a markedly variable solubility as a function of salt (such as NaCl or KCl) concentration. PMID:21859071

  14. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    PubMed Central

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  15. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates.

    PubMed

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P; Andreev, Andrey S; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F; Flatt, Robert J; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of (29)Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  16. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured.

  17. [NMF and cosmetology of cutaneous hydration].

    PubMed

    Marty, J-P

    2002-01-01

    In the stratum corneum, the water binds to the intracellular hygroscopic and hydrosoluble substances called "natural moisturizing factors" or NMF. These "natural moisturizing factors" contained in the corneocytes are formed during epidermal differentiation and may represent up to 10 p. cent of the corneocyte mass. They are principally amino acids, carboxylic pyrrolidone acid, lactic acid, urea, glucose and mineral ions. Keratinization plays an important part in the formation of NMF that exhibit strong osmotic potential attracting the water molecules. The binding of water to NMF is the static aspect of cutaneous hydration. The second, dynamic, aspect is related to the selective permeability of the stratum corneum and to its lipid barrier properties, the permeability of which depends on the integrity and nature of the inter-corneocyte lipids and their lamellar organization between the cells. In these conditions, hydration cosmetics rely on two concepts that can be isolated or associated: the supply of hydrophilic substances to the stratum corneum, capable of attracting and retaining water (moisturizer) or capable of restoring the barrier in order to restore normal water loss or of protecting it against aggression (occlusive). PMID:11976540

  18. Water, Hydration and Health

    PubMed Central

    Popkin, Barry M.; D’Anci, Kristen E.; Rosenberg, Irwin H.

    2010-01-01

    This review attempts to provide some sense of our current knowledge of water including overall patterns of intake and some factors linked with intake, the complex mechanisms behind water homeostasis, the effects of variation in water intake on health and energy intake, weight, and human performance and functioning. Water represents a critical nutrient whose absence will be lethal within days. Water’s importance for prevention of nutrition-related noncommunicable diseases has emerged more recently because of the shift toward large proportions of fluids coming from caloric beverages. Nevertheless, there are major gaps in knowledge related to measurement of total fluid intake, hydration status at the population level, and few longer-term systematic interventions and no published random-controlled longer-term trials. We suggest some ways to examine water requirements as a means to encouraging more dialogue on this important topic. PMID:20646222

  19. Hydrated hydride anion clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han Myoung; Kim, Dongwook; Singh, N. Jiten; Kołaski, Maciej; Kim, Kwang S.

    2007-10-01

    On the basis of density functional theory (DFT) and high level ab initio theory, we report the structures, binding energies, thermodynamic quantities, IR spectra, and electronic properties of the hydride anion hydrated by up to six water molecules. Ground state DFT molecular dynamics simulations (based on the Born-Oppenheimer potential surface) show that as the temperature increases, the surface-bound hydride anion changes to the internally bound structure. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations are also carried out for the spectral analysis of the monohydrated hydride. Excited-state ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that the photoinduced charge-transfer-to-solvent phenomena are accompanied by the formation of the excess electron-water clusters and the detachment of the H radical from the clusters. The dynamics of the detachment process of a hydrogen radical upon the excitation is discussed.

  20. A Hydration of an Alkyne Illustrating Steam and Vacuum Distillation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasacz, J. P.; Badding, V. G.

    1982-01-01

    Reports on the conversion 2,5-dimethylhexyne-2,5-diol(I) to 2,2,5,5-tetramethyltetrahydrofuran-3-one(II) using aqueous mercuric sulfate without the use of acid. The experiment has been successfully performed in introductory organic chemistry laboratories demonstrating alkyne hydration, steam distillation, vacuum distillation, drying of organic…

  1. 75 FR 9886 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. Federal... Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of methane hydrate...

  2. Obsidian Hydration: A New Paleothermometer

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Riciputi, Lee R; Cole, David R; Fayek, Mostafa; Elam, J. Michael

    2006-01-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  3. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow. PMID:17806883

  4. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Pierce, K.L.; Obradovich, J.D.; Long, W.D.

    1973-01-01

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming . The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  5. Hydration of polyethylene glycol-grafted liposomes.

    PubMed

    Tirosh, O; Barenholz, Y; Katzhendler, J; Priev, A

    1998-03-01

    This study aimed to characterize the effect of polyethylene glycol of 2000 molecular weight (PEG2000) attached to a dialkylphosphatidic acid (dihexadecylphosphatidyl (DHP)-PEG2000) on the hydration and thermodynamic stability of lipid assemblies. Differential scanning calorimetry, densitometry, and ultrasound velocity and absorption measurements were used for thermodynamic and hydrational characterization. Using a differential scanning calorimetry technique we showed that each molecule of PEG2000 binds 136 +/- 4 molecules of water. For PEG2000 covalently attached to the lipid molecules organized in micelles, the water binding increases to 210 +/- 6 water molecules. This demonstrates that the two different structural configurations of the PEG2000, a random coil in the case of the free PEG and a brush in the case of DHP-PEG2000 micelles, differ in their hydration level. Ultrasound absorption changes in liposomes reflect mainly the heterophase fluctuations and packing defects in the lipid bilayer. The PEG-induced excess ultrasound absorption of the lipid bilayer at 7.7 MHz for PEG-lipid concentrations over 5 mol % indicates the increase in the relaxation time of the headgroup rotation due to PEG-PEG interactions. The adiabatic compressibility (calculated from ultrasound velocity and density) of the lipid bilayer of the liposome increases monotonically with PEG-lipid concentration up to approximately 7 mol %, reflecting release of water from the lipid headgroup region. Elimination of this water, induced by grafted PEG, leads to a decrease in bilayer defects and enhanced lateral packing of the phospholipid acyl chains. We assume that the dehydration of the lipid headgroup region in conjunction with the increase of the hydration of the outer layer by grafting PEG in brush configuration are responsible for increasing thermodynamic stability of the liposomes at 5-7 mol % of PEG-lipid. At higher PEG-lipid concentrations, compressibility and partial volume of the lipid phase

  6. Hydrate control in deepwater drilling

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Gas-hydrate formation during deepwater offshore drilling and production is a well-recognized operational hazard. In water depths greater than 1,000 ft, seabed conditions of pressure and temperature become conducive to gas-hydrate formation. In a well-control situation, although the kick fluid leaves the formation at a high temperature, it can cool to seabed temperature with an extended shut-in period. With high enough hydrostatic pressure at the mudline, hydrates could form in the blowout-preventer (BOP) stack and choke and kill lines, as has been observed in field operations. The current practice in deepwater drilling is to suppress the hydrate-formation temperature by use of highly saline drilling fluids formulated from NaCl or other salts. This solution is applicable for the Gulf of Mexico but insufficient for the conditions encountered in Norwegian deep waters. At extreme water depths or extremely low mudline temperatures, this thermodynamic inhibition alone may not be sufficient to prevent hydrate formation. Instead, the use of kinetic inhibitors or crystal modifiers, in conjunction with thermodynamic inhibitors, may allow successful operations in such an environment. The definition of kinetic inhibitors (to distinguish them from the classic thermodynamic inhibitors, such as polar compounds and electrolytes) comes from the effect of the chemicals on the nucleation and growth of natural gas hydrates, both of which are time-dependent, stochastic processes. The paper describes deepwater drilling fluids, polar and surface-active additives, kinetic inhibition and crystal modifiers, laboratory measurements, and test results.

  7. Laser Desorption Supersonic Jet Spectroscopy of Hydrated Tyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Hikari; Shimozono, Yoko; Ishiuchi, Shun-Ichi; Fujii, Masaaki; Carcabal, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    The structure of tyrosine (tyr) consists of amino-acid chain and phenol, and it has roughly two possible binding sites for water, amino-acid site and phenolic OH site. Investigating how water molecule binds to tyr will give fundamental information for hydrations of peptide and protein. Resonance enhanced multi photon ionization (REMPI) spectrum of tyr-water 1:1 cluster has already been reported by de Vries and co-workers, however, no analysis on the hydrated structures has been reported. In the REMPI spectrum, two clusters of bands are observed; one appears at ˜35600 cm^{-1} energy region which is the almost same with 0-0 transitions of tyr monomer, and another is observed at ˜300 cm^{-1} lower than the former. Based on the electronic transition energy of phenylalanine and the hydrated clusters, the former is expected to be derived from a structure that water binds to amino acid site. On the other hand, it is plausibly predicted that the latter originates from a structure that water binds to phenolic OH group, because the electronic transition of mono hydrated phenol is ˜300 cm^{-1} red-shifted from the monomer. We applied IR dip spectroscopy which can measure conformer selective IR spectra to the tyr-(H_{2}O)_{1} clusters by using laser desorption supersonic jet technique to confirm the assignments. Especially in the phenolic OH bound isomer, it was found that the intra molecular hydrogen bond within amino-acid chain, which is far from the water molecule and cannot interact directly with each other, is strengthened by the hydration. A. Abio-Riziq et al., J. Phys. Chem. A, 115, 6077 (2011). Y. Shimozono, et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., (2013) DOI: 10.1039/c3cp43573c. T. Ebata et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 8, 4783 (2006). T. Watanabe et al., J. Chem. Phys., 105, 408 (1996).

  8. Impacts of Hydrate Pore Habit on Physical Properties of Hydrate Bearing Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, Y.; Dai, S.; Choi, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate bearing sediments, to a large extent, are governed by the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. For sediments containing the same amount of hydrates, their overall physical properties may vary several orders of magnitude depending on hydrate pore habit. We investigate the interplay among hydrate formation methods, hydrate pore habits, and fundamental physical properties of hydrate bearing sediments. We have developed a new method to synthesize noncementing hydrate in sands, a multi-properties characterization chamber to test the hydrate bearing sediments, and pore network models to simulate fluid flow processes in hydrate bearing sediments. We have found that (1) the growth pattern of hydrate crystal in the pore spaces of water saturated sediments is dominated by the relative magnitude of the capillary force (between hydrate crystal and pore fluid) and the skeleton force, which will result in pore-filling or grain-displacing type of hydrate pore character; (2) the existing capillary tube models of water permeability in hydrate bearing sediments are sensitive to pore geometry and hydrate pore habit; and (3) preliminary CT results suggest that hydrate nucleation in partially water saturated sands tends to agglomerate in patches, rather than in an uniformly-distributed contact-cementing morphology. Additional CT results with a small amount of fines (5wt%) and visualization via micro-CT of hydrate pore habits in sediments using different hydrate formation methods will be discussed.

  9. Energy resource potential of natural gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of large gas hydrate accumulations in terrestrial permafrost regions of the Arctic and beneath the sea along the outer continental margins of the world's oceans has heightened interest in gas hydrates as a possible energy resource. However, significant to potentially insurmountable technical issues must be resolved before gas hydrates can be considered a viable option for affordable supplies of natural gas. The combined information from Arctic gas hydrate studies shows that, in permafrost regions, gas hydrates may exist at subsurface depths ranging from about 130 to 2000 m. The presence of gas hydrates in offshore continental margins has been inferred mainly from anomalous seismic reflectors, known as bottom-simulating reflectors, that have been mapped at depths below the sea floor ranging from about 100 to 1100 m. Current estimates of the amount of gas in the world's marine and permafrost gas hydrate accumulations are in rough accord at about 20,000 trillion m3. Disagreements over fundamental issues such as the volume of gas stored within delineated gas hydrate accumulations and the concentration of gas hydrates within hydrate-bearing strata have demonstrated that we know little about gas hydrates. Recently, however, several countries, including Japan, India, and the United States, have launched ambitious national projects to further examine the resource potential of gas hydrates. These projects may help answer key questions dealing with the properties of gas hydrate reservoirs, the design of production systems, and, most important, the costs and economics of gas hydrate production.

  10. Trace Element Analysis as an Exploration Tool for Unconfined Class 2 Hydrate Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A. D.; Max, M. P.; Osegovic, J. P.; Brazel, L.; Tatro, S.

    2007-12-01

    Hydrate system analysis, analogous to hydrocarbon system analysis, is based on confirming significant gas flux, suitable thickness of hydrate stability zone, and suitably porous and permeable hydrate 'trap' beds in which economically significant hydrate crystallization may take place. Unconfined Class 2 hydrate deposits, which form by crystallization of dissolved natural gas in more porous and permeable sediments whose pore fluids may vent from the seafloor carry the dissolved rejected material. Analysis of superficial pore or vent water may provide a sensitive means of suggesting whether the water was once associated with hydrate crystallization. The rejection of dissolved ions and compounds during carbon dioxide hydrate precipitation on a chilled surface was determined to quantify the reject rate of specific materials from the hydrate matrix. Seawater and seawater doped with boric acid (H3BO3, MW 61.83 g/mol) and sodium borate decahydrate (Na2B4O7*10H2O, MW 381.37 g/mol) were used as crystallization solvents. Initial boron concentrations ranged from 4.1 to 27mg/L. Hydrate formation occurred with significant rejection of boron from the hydrate matrix, increasing the concentration in the crystallizing fluid. The initial boron concentration level did not affect the rejection efficiency, determined by comparing the initial concentration of boron to the concentration in the hydrate melt water. In addition to boron, naturally occurring calcium and magnesium concentration levels were also studied and showed a similar concentration reduction. Our experiments have shown that non-ionic dissolved species that occur in sediment pore water, in which hydrate may form, are rejected and concentrated during hydrate formation. The measurement of NaCl may provide a clue to the water having once been involved in subjacent hydrate formation, but other species that do not have additional crystallization opportunities in the sediment may be better clues to the extent of a hydrate

  11. Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-Hypothesis)

    PubMed Central

    Ostrovskii, Victor; Kadyshevich, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The paper develops the Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-hypothesis), according to which living-matter simplest elements (LMSEs, which are N-bases, riboses, nucleosides, nucleotides), DNA- and RNA-like molecules, amino-acids, and proto-cells repeatedly originated on the basis of thermodynamically controlled, natural, and inevitable processes governed by universal physical and chemical laws from CH4, niters, and phosphates under the Earth's surface or seabed within the crystal cavities of the honeycomb methane-hydrate structure at low temperatures; the chemical processes passed slowly through all successive chemical steps in the direction that is determined by a gradual decrease in the Gibbs free energy of reacting systems. The hypothesis formulation method is based on the thermodynamic directedness of natural movement and consists ofan attempt to mentally backtrack on the progression of nature and thus reveal principal milestones alongits route. The changes in Gibbs free energy are estimated for different steps of the living-matter origination process; special attention is paid to the processes of proto-cell formation. Just the occurrence of the gas-hydrate periodic honeycomb matrix filled with LMSEs almost completely in its final state accounts for size limitation in the DNA functional groups and the nonrandom location of N-bases in the DNA chains. The slowness of the low-temperature chemical transformations and their “thermodynamic front” guide the gross process of living matter origination and its successive steps. It is shown that the hypothesis is thermodynamically justified and testable and that many observed natural phenomena count in its favor. PMID:25382120

  12. Hydration water in dynamics of a hydrated beta-lactoglobulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.; Longeville, S.

    2007-02-01

    Incoherent spin-echo signals of a hydrated β-lactoglobulin protein were investigated, at 275 and 293 K. The intermediate scattering functions I(Q,t) were divided in two contributions from surface water and protein, respectively. On one hand, the dynamics of the surface water follows a KWW stretched exponential function (the exponent is ~0.5), on the other hand, that of the protein follows a single exponential. The present results are consistent with our previous results of hydrated C-phycocyanin combining elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering and by molecular dynamics simulation.

  13. Hydration water dynamics and instigation of protein structuralrelaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-09-01

    Until a critical hydration level is reached, proteins do not function. This critical level of hydration is analogous to a similar lack of protein function observed for temperatures below a dynamical temperature range of 180-220K that also is connected to the dynamics of protein surface water. Restoration of some enzymatic activity is observed in partially hydrated protein powders, sometimes corresponding to less than a single hydration layer on the protein surface, which indicates that the dynamical and structural properties of the surface water is intimately connected to protein stability and function. Many elegant studies using both experiment and simulation have contributed important information about protein hydration structure and timescales. The molecular mechanism of the solvent motion that is required to instigate the protein structural relaxation above a critical hydration level or transition temperature has yet to be determined. In this work we use experimental quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate hydration water dynamics near a greatly simplified protein system. We consider the hydration water dynamics near the completely deuterated N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA) solute, a hydrophobic amino acid side chain attached to a polar blocked polypeptide backbone, as a function of concentration between 0.5M-2.0M under ambient conditions. We note that roughly 50-60% of a folded protein's surface is equally distributed between hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains, domains whose lengths are on the order of a few water diameters, that justify our study of hydration dynamics of this simple model protein system. The QENS experiment was performed at the NIST Center for Neutron Research, using the disk chopper time of flight spectrometer (DCS). In order to separate the translational and rotational components in the spectra, two sets of experiments were carried out using different incident neutron wavelengths of 7

  14. Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

  15. Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence? Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

  16. Complex gas hydrate from the Cascadia margin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hailong; Seo, Yu-taek; Lee, Jong-won; Moudrakovski, Igor; Ripmeester, John A; Chapman, N Ross; Coffin, Richard B; Gardner, Graeme; Pohlman, John

    2007-01-18

    Natural gas hydrates are a potential source of energy and may play a role in climate change and geological hazards. Most natural gas hydrate appears to be in the form of 'structure I', with methane as the trapped guest molecule, although 'structure II' hydrate has also been identified, with guest molecules such as isobutane and propane, as well as lighter hydrocarbons. A third hydrate structure, 'structure H', which is capable of trapping larger guest molecules, has been produced in the laboratory, but it has not been confirmed that it occurs in the natural environment. Here we characterize the structure, gas content and composition, and distribution of guest molecules in a complex natural hydrate sample recovered from Barkley canyon, on the northern Cascadia margin. We show that the sample contains structure H hydrate, and thus provides direct evidence for the natural occurrence of this hydrate structure. The structure H hydrate is intimately associated with structure II hydrate, and the two structures contain more than 13 different hydrocarbon guest molecules. We also demonstrate that the stability field of the complex gas hydrate lies between those of structure II and structure H hydrates, indicating that this form of hydrate is more stable than structure I and may thus potentially be found in a wider pressure-temperature regime than can methane hydrate deposits. PMID:17230188

  17. Life in the hydrated suboceanic mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménez, Bénédicte; Pasini, Valerio; Brunelli, Daniele

    2012-02-01

    The recesses of the oceanic crust harbour microbes that influence geochemical fluxes between the solid Earth and the hydrosphere. In the roots of the crust, mantle-derived rocks are progressively hydrated by hydrothermal circulation, a process known as serpentinization. The associated release of molecular hydrogen could provide metabolic energy for microbes. Phylogenetic analyses of chimneys associated with seafloor hydrothermal systems have provided direct but spatially restricted evidence for the existence of active microbial communities in these hydrated rocks; indirect evidence comes from isotopic analyses of drill cores. Here, we examine fully serpentinized peridotites recovered from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, using Raman microspectroscopy and electron microscopy. We detect high concentrations of organic matter, of two types, intimately associated with serpentine-hosted hydrogarnets. One type contains a complex mixture of aliphatic and aromatic compounds and functional groups such as amides, usually associated with biopolymers such as proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. The other corresponds to dense aggregates of thermally evolved carbonaceous matter, with a weak structural organization, which we attribute to the maturation of carbon compounds present in the other type of organic matter identified. We suggest that the observed endogenic accumulations of organic matter result from past microbial activity within the serpentinized oceanic crust, potentially supported by the by-products of serpentinization. We further suggest that the proposed crustal community mediates elemental fluxes from the Earth's mantle to the oceans.

  18. Gas Hydrate and Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinivella, Umberta; Giustiniani, Michela

    2014-05-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to quantify excess pore pressures related to gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments below the BSR using several approaches. Dissociation of gas hydrates in proximity of the BSR, in response to a change in the physical environment (i.e., temperature and/or pressure regime), can liberate excess gas incrising the local pore fluid pressure in the sediment, so decreasing the effective normal stress. So, gas hydrate dissociation may lead to excess pore pressure resulting in sediment deformation or failure, such as submarine landslides, sediment slumping, pockmarks and mud volcanoes, soft-sediment deformation and giant hummocks. Moreover, excess pore pressure may be the result of gas hydrate dissociation due to continuous sedimentation, tectonic uplift, sea level fall, heating or inhibitor injection. In order to detect the presence of the overpressure below the BSR, we propose two approachs. The fist approach models the BSR depth versus pore pressure; in fact, if the free gas below the BSR is in overpressure condition, the base of the gas hydrate stability is deeper with respect to the hydrostatic case. This effect causes a discrepancy between seismic and theoretical BSR depths. The second approach models the velocities versus gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and pore pressure, considering the approximation of the Biot theory in case of low frequency, i.e. seismic frequency. Knowing the P and S seismic velocity from seismic data analysis, it is possibile to jointly estimate the gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and the pore pressure regime. Alternatively, if the S-wave velocity is not availbale (due to lack of OBS/OBC data), an AVO analysis can be performed in order to extract information about Poisson ratio. Our modeling suggests that the areas characterized by shallow waters (i.e., areas in which human infrastructures, such as pipelines, are present) are significantly affected by the presence of overpressure condition

  19. Natural Gas Hydrates Update 1998-2000

    EIA Publications

    2001-01-01

    Significant events have transpired on the natural gas hydrate research and development front since "Future Supply Potential of Natural Gas Hydrates" appeared in Natural Gas 1998 Issues and Trends and in the Potential Gas Committee's 1998 biennial report.

  20. Compact apparatus for photogeneration of hydrated electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, E.; Schmidt, K.

    1970-01-01

    Flash-photolysis instrument generates hydrated electrons and studies their reactions. It has a three-dimensional, multiple-reaction cell and the capacity to produce up to .1 micromole hydrated electron in a single 40 microsec light pulse.

  1. Observation of hydration of single, modified carbon aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyslouzil, B. E.; Carleton, K. L.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.; Rawlins, W. T.; Arnold, S.

    1994-01-01

    We have compared the hydration behavior of single carbon particles that have been treated by exposure to gaseous H2SO4 with that of untreated particles. Untreated carbon particles did not hydrate as the relative humidity varied from 0 to 80% at 23 C. In contrast, treated particles hydrated under subsaturation conditions; mass increases of up to 30% were observed. The mass increase is consistent with sulfuric acid equilibration with the ambient relative humidity in the presence of inert carbon. For the samples studied, the average amount of absorbed acid was 14% +/- 6% by weight, which corresponds to a surface coverage of approximately 0.1 monolayer. The mass fraction of surface-absorbed acid is comparable to the soluble mass fraction observed by Whitefield et al. (1993) in jet aircraft engine aerosols. Estimates indicate this mass fraction corresponds to 0.1% of the available SO2 exiting an aircraft engine ending up as H2SO4 on the carbon aerosol. If this heterogeneous process occurs early enough in the exhaust plume, it may compete with homogeneous nucleation as a mechanism for producing sulfuric acid rich aerosols.

  2. Observation of hydration of single, modified carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyslouzil, B. E.; Carleton, K. L.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.; Rawlins, W. T.; Arnold, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have compared the hydration behavior of single carbon particles that have been treated by exposure to gaseous H2SO4 with that of untreated particles. Untreated carbon particles did not hydrate as the relative humidity varied from 0 to 80% at 23°C. In contrast, treated particles hydrated under subsaturation conditions; mass increases of up to 30% were observed. The mass increase is consistent with sulfuric acid equilibration with the ambient relative humidity in the presence of inert carbon. For the samples studied, the average amount of adsorbed acid was 14% ± 6% by weight, which corresponds to a surface coverage of ˜0.1 monolayer. The mass fraction of surface-adsorbed acid is comparable to the soluble mass fraction observed by Whitefield et al. (1993) in jet aircraft engine aerosols. Estimates indicate this mass fraction corresponds to 0.1% of the available SO2 exiting an aircraft engine ending up as H2SO4 on the carbon aerosol. If this heterogeneous process occurs early enough in the exhaust plume, it may compete with homogeneous nucleation as a mechanism for producing sulfuric acid rich aerosols.

  3. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  4. Proteorhodopsin Activation Is Modulated by Dynamic Changes in Internal Hydration.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Mertz, Blake

    2015-12-01

    Proteorhodopsin, a member of the microbial rhodopsin family, is a seven-transmembrane α-helical protein that functions as a light-driven proton pump. Understanding the proton-pumping mechanism of proteorhodopsin requires intimate knowledge of the proton transfer pathway via complex hydrogen-bonding networks formed by amino acid residues and internal water molecules. Here we conducted a series of microsecond time scale molecular dynamics simulations on both the dark state and the initial photoactivated state of blue proteorhodopsin to reveal the structural basis for proton transfer with respect to protein internal hydration. A complex series of dynamic hydrogen-bonding networks involving water molecules exists, facilitated by water channels and hydration sites within proteorhodopsin. High levels of hydration were discovered at each proton transfer site-the retinal binding pocket and proton uptake and release sites-underscoring the critical participation of water molecules in the proton-pumping mechanism. Water-bridged interactions and local water channels were also observed and can potentially mediate long-distance proton transfer between each site. The most significant phenomenon is after isomerization of retinal, an increase in water flux occurs that connects the proton release group, a conserved arginine residue, and the retinal binding pocket. Our results provide a detailed description of the internal hydration of the early photointermediates in the proteorhodopsin photocycle under alkaline pH conditions. These results lay the fundamental groundwork for understanding the intimate role that hydration plays in the structure-function relationship underlying the proteorhodopsin proton-pumping mechanism, as well as providing context for the relationship of hydration in proteorhodopsin to other microbial retinal proteins. PMID:26562497

  5. 77 FR 40032 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice... Federal Officer; Welcome by the Chair of the Committee; Committee Business; Update on Prudhoe Bay Testing; FY 2012 Methane Hydrate Program Activities; Update on International Activity; Methane Hydrate...

  6. 76 FR 59667 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. Federal... of the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice...

  7. 78 FR 37536 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. The Federal... of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of...

  8. Hydration rind dates rhyolite flows.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I

    1968-02-23

    Hydration of obsidian has been used to date rhyolite flows, containing obsidian or porphyritic glass, at Glass Mountain (Medicine Lake Highlands) and Mono Lake, California. The method is simple and rapid and can be used to date flows that erupted between 200 and approximately 200,000 years ago. PMID:17768978

  9. Hydration rind dates rhyolite flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.

    1968-01-01

    Hydration of obsidian has been used to date rhyolite flows, containing obsidian or porphyritic glass, at Glass Mountain (Medicine Lake Highlands) and Mono Lake, California. The method is simple and rapid and can be used to date flows that erupted between 200 and approximately 200,000 years ago.

  10. Attraction between hydrated hydrophilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanduč, Matej; Schneck, Emanuel; Netz, Roland R.

    2014-08-01

    According to common knowledge, hydrophilic surfaces repel via hydration forces while hydrophobic surfaces attract, but mounting experimental evidence suggests that also hydrophilic surfaces can attract. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations at prescribed water chemical potential we study the crossover from hydration repulsion to hydrophobic attraction for planar polar surfaces of varying stiffness and hydrogen-bonding capability. Rescaling the partial charges of the polar surface groups, we cover the complete spectrum from very hydrophobic surfaces (characterized by contact angles θ ≃ 135°) to hydrophilic surfaces exhibiting complete wetting (θ = 0°). Indeed, for a finite range θadh < θ < 90°, we find a regime where hydrophilic surfaces attract at sub-nanometer separation and stably adhere without intervening water. The adhesive contact angle θadh depends on surface type and lies in the range 65° < θadh < 80°, in good agreement with experiments. Analysis of the total number of hydrogen bonds (HBs) formed by water and surface groups rationalizes this crossover between hydration repulsion and hydrophilic attraction in terms of a subtle balance: Highly polar surfaces repel because of strongly bound hydration water, less polar hydrophilic surfaces attract because water-water HBs are preferred over surface-water HBs. Such solvent reorganization forces presumably underlie also other important phenomena, such as selective ion adsorption to interfaces as well as ion pair formation.

  11. Physical activity, hydration and health.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Ascensión; Manonelles, Pedro; Palacios, Nieves; Wärnberg, Julia; Casajús, José A; Pérez, Margarita; Aznar, Susana; Benito, Pedro J; Martínez-Gomez, David; Ortega, Francisco B; Ortega, Eduardo; Urrialde, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of mankind, man has sought ways to promote and preserve health as well as to prevent disease. Hydration, physical activity and exercise are key factors for enhancing human health. However, either a little dose of them or an excess can be harmful for health maintenance at any age. Water is an essential nutrient for human body and a major key to survival has been to prevent dehydration. However, there is still a general controversy regarding the necessary amount to drink water or other beverages to properly get an adequate level of hydration. In addition, up to now the tools used to measure hydration are controversial. To this end, there are several important groups of variables to take into account such as water balance, hydration biomarkers and total body water. A combination of methods will be the most preferred tool to find out any risk or situation of dehydration at any age range. On the other hand, physical activity and exercise are being demonstrated to promote health, avoiding or reducing health problems, vascular and inflammatory disea ses and helping weight management. Therefore, physical activity is also being used as a pill within a therapy to promote health and reduce risk diseases, but as in the case of drugs, dose, intensity, frequency, duration and precautions have to be evaluated and taken into account in order to get the maximum effectiveness and success of a treatment. On the other hand, sedentariness is the opposite concept to physical activity that has been recently recognized as an important factor of lifestyle involved in the obesogenic environment and consequently in the risk of the non-communicable diseases. In view of the literature consulted and taking into account the expertise of the authors, in this review a Decalogue of global recommendations is included to achieve an adequate hydration and physical activity status to avoid overweight/obesity consequences. PMID:24972459

  12. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates.

    PubMed

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-02-23

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C-S-H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C-S-H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C-S-H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C-S-H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C-S-H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  13. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J.; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G.; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C–S–H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C–S–H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C–S–H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C–S–H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C–S–H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  14. [alpha]-Oxocarboxylic Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.; Fernando, Marian S.

    2010-01-01

    Several [alpha]-oxocarboxylic acids play key roles in metabolism in plants and animals. However, there are inconsistencies between the structures as commonly portrayed and the reported acid ionization constants, which result because the acids are predominantly hydrated in aqueous solution; that is, the predominant form is RC(OH)[subscript 2]COOH…

  15. Gas hydrate dissociation prolongs acidification of the Anthropocene oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreau, Bernard P.; Luo, Yiming; Meysman, Filip J. R.; Middelburg, Jack J.; Dickens, Gerald R.

    2015-11-01

    Anthropogenic warming of the oceans can release methane (CH4) currently stored in sediments as gas hydrates. This CH4 will be oxidized to CO2, thus increasing the acidification of the oceans. We employ a biogeochemical model of the multimillennial carbon cycle to determine the evolution of the oceanic dissolved carbonate system over the next 13 kyr in response to CO2 from gas hydrates, combined with a reasonable scenario for long-term anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Hydrate-derived CO2 will appreciably delay the neutralization of ocean acidity and the return to preindustrial-like conditions. This finding is the same with CH4 release and oxidation in either the deep ocean or the atmosphere. A change in CaCO3 export, coupled to CH4 release, would intensify the transient rise of the carbonate compensation depth, without producing any changes to the long-term evolution of the carbonate system. Overall, gas hydrate destabilization implies a moderate additional perturbation to the carbonate system of the Anthropocene oceans.

  16. Handbook of gas hydrate properties and occurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Kuustraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.

    1983-12-01

    This handbook provides data on the resource potential of naturally occurring hydrates, the properties that are needed to evaluate their recovery, and their production potential. The first two chapters give data on the naturally occurring hydrate potential by reviewing published resource estimates and the known and inferred occurrences. The third and fourth chapters review the physical and thermodynamic properties of hydrates, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of hydrates that are discussed include dissociation energies and a simplified method to calculate them; phase diagrams for simple and multi-component gases; the thermal conductivity; and the kinetics of hydrate dissociation. The final chapter evaluates the net energy balance of recovering hydrates and shows that a substantial positive energy balance can theoretically be achieved. The Appendices of the Handbook summarize physical and thermodynamic properties of gases, liquids and solids that can be used in designing and evaluating recovery processes of hydrates. 158 references, 67 figures, 47 tables.

  17. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cortes, D.D.; Martin, A.I.; Yun, T.S.; Francisca, F.M.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. The effect of hydrate saturation on water retention curves in hydrate-bearing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabadi, Nariman; Zheng, Xianglei; Jang, Jaewon

    2016-05-01

    The experimental measurement of water retention curve in hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behavior of hydrate dissociation and gas production. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is selected as hydrate former. The pore habit of THF hydrates is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel. It is confirmed that THF hydrates are not wetting phase on the quartz surface of the micromodel and occupy either an entire pore or part of pore space resulting in change in pore size distribution. And the measurement of water retention curves in THF hydrate-bearing sediments with hydrate saturation ranging from Sh = 0 to Sh = 0.7 is conducted for excess water condition. The experimental results show that the gas entry pressure and the capillary pressure increase with increasing hydrate saturation. Based on the experimental results, fitting parameters for van Genuchten equation are suggested for different hydrate saturation conditions.

  19. Pockmark formation and evolution in deep water Nigeria: Rapid hydrate growth versus slow hydrate dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, N.; Bohrmann, G.; Ruffine, L.; Pape, T.; Riboulot, V.; Colliat, J.-L.; De Prunelé, A.; Dennielou, B.; Garziglia, S.; Himmler, T.; Marsset, T.; Peters, C. A.; Rabiu, A.; Wei, J.

    2014-04-01

    In previous works, it has been suggested that dissolution of gas hydrate can be responsible for pockmark formation and evolution in deep water Nigeria. It was shown that those pockmarks which are at different stages of maturation are characterized by a common internal architecture associated to gas hydrate dynamics. New results obtained by drilling into gas hydrate-bearing sediments with the MeBo seafloor drill rig in concert with geotechnical in situ measurements and pore water analyses indicate that pockmark formation and evolution in the study area are mainly controlled by rapid hydrate growth opposed to slow hydrate dissolution. On one hand, positive temperature anomalies, free gas trapped in shallow microfractures near the seafloor and coexistence of free gas and gas hydrate indicate rapid hydrate growth. On the other hand, slow hydrate dissolution is evident by low methane concentrations and almost constant sulfate values 2 m above the Gas Hydrate Occurrence Zone.

  20. Ruthenium hydroxide supported on magnetic nanoparticles: a benign aqueous protocol for hydration of nitriles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Amides are an important class of compounds in the chemical and pharmaceutical industry1,2. Conventionally, amides have been synthesized by the hydration of nitriles, catalyzed by strong acids3 and bases4. Many by-products such as carboxylic acids are produced due to hydrolysis of...

  1. Gemini near-infrared observations of Europa's Hydrated Surface Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, C.; Spencer, J. R.; Grundy, W. M.; Dalton, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Europa is a highly dynamic icy moon of Jupiter. It is thought the moon harbors a subsurface ocean, with the potential to sustain life, with Europa being a key target of ESA's forthcoming Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JUICE) mission. However, much is not known concerning the chemistry of the subsurface ocean. The surface is dominated by water ice, with a hydrated non-ice material component providing the distinctive albedo contrasts seen at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. These non-ice materials are concentrated at disrupted surface regions, providing a diagnostic probe for the chemistry and characteristics of the liquid ocean beneath. Leading but potentially competing theories on the composition of these hydrated non-ice materials suggest either sulfuric acid-water mixtures (Carlson et al., 1999) or hydrated magnesium/sodium salts (McCord et al., 1999). Recent reanalysis of Galileo-NIMS observations suggest a mixture of both - hydrated salts are present at all longitudes but the sulfuric acid hydrates are localized on the trailing side. We present preliminary analysis of new ground-based Gemini disk-resolved spectroscopy of Europa using the Near-Infrared Integrated Field Spectrometer (NIFS), taken in late 2011, at H (1.49 - 1.80 μm) and K bands (1.99 - 2.40 μm) with spectral resolving powers of ~ 5300. At these NIR wavelengths, with spectral resolution much better than Galileo-NIMS, the spectral absorption and continuum characteristics of these ice and non-ice materials can be separated out. In addition, the spatial resolution potentially allows identification of localized materials whose signature would be diluted in disk-integrated spectra. These observations of the trailing hemisphere use Altair adaptive optics to achieve spatial resolutions of 0.1" (~310 km per pixel) or better, potentially leading to better identification of the non-ice materials and their spatial distributions. References Carlson, R.W., R.E. Johnson, and M.S. Anderson 1999. Sulfuric acid

  2. Photoisomerization and photo-hydration of 3-hydroxystyrylnaphthalenes.

    PubMed

    Bandini, Elisa; Bortolus, Pietro; Manet, Ilse; Monti, Sandra; Galiazzo, Guido; Gennari, Giorgio

    2005-11-01

    Fluorescence and trans-->cis photoisomerization are the main deactivation paths following excitation of trans-1-(2'-naphthyl)-2-(3'-hydroxyphenyl)ethene (trans-2,3NOH) in cyclohexane, methanol and acetonitrile. The quantum yield of both processes is wavelength dependent: this is due to the presence of conformational isomers deriving from rotation of the naphthyl group around the single bond with ethene. Addition of water to acetonitrile quenches the fluorescence (lambda(max)= 380 nm). In CH(3)CN/H(2)O (4/6, v/v) the emission spectrum displays a broad band with maximum at approximately 550 nm besides the original quenched fluorescence. This indicates that 2,3-NOH undergoes acid-base equilibration in the singlet excited state as supported by the enhancement of the fluorescence quantum yield with increasing acidity of the medium. Ground and excited state acidity constants have been determined. The main photochemical process is photo-hydration, i.e. water addition to the ethene bond. Fluorescence and photo-hydration have the same sigmoidal dependence on the acid concentration, which indicates that the undissociated form of singlet excited 2,3NOH is the photoreactive species. Laser flash photolysis experiments allowed identification of the reactive intermediates. The photophysics of trans-1-(1'-naphthyl)-2-(3'-hydroxyphenyl)ethene (trans-1,3NOH) is similar to that of 2,3NOH as regards the effect of water on fluorescence and the acid-base behaviour in the ground and first excited singlet state; the main photochemical process is trans-->cis photoisomerization together with photo-cylization to hydroxychrysene in neutral water/acetonitrile, but with lower yield compared to cyclohexane, and photo-hydration in strongly acidic medium. PMID:16252041

  3. National workshop on gas hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Michael D.; Dillon, William P.; Malone, Rodney D.; Kvenvolden, Keith A.

    The range of present knowledge on the subject of gas hydrates and related federal research programs was the topic of discussion at the National Workshop on Gas Hydrates, April 23-24. The intention of the meeting was to provide the impetus for an expanded and broader-based national research program in both academia and government. Held at the U.S. Geological Survey National Center, Reston, Va., the workshop was organized by Michael D. Max, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.; William P. Dillon, USGS, Woods Hole, Mass.; and Rodney D. Malone, U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, W.Va. The 33 attendees represented academia (33%), federal agencies (58%), and industry (9%).

  4. Dynamics of hydrated starch saccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bari, M.; Deriu, A.; Albanese, G.; Cavatorta, F.

    2003-08-01

    We report here elastic neutron scattering data on glucose and on two of its polymeric forms: amylose and amylopectin. We have covered the hydration range from the dry state to about 0.6 g water/g dry saccharide. The data indicate, in all the analysed systems, the presence of a dynamic glass-like transition similar to that observed in hydrated proteins. The fact that this feature is observed also in a relatively small molecule like glucose confirms the hypothesis already put forward by other authors, that this transition in biomolecular species is essentially triggered and driven by the interaction of the macromolecule with the network of fluctuating H-bond of the solvent.

  5. Hydrated Sulfates in the Southern High Latitudes of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackiss, S. E.; Wray, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Sulfates on Mars appear largely concentrated in sedimentary rocks dating to the Late Noachian or Hesperian [e.g., 1], but they are also abundant in Amazonian sand dunes around the north polar cap [2]. The gypsum in those dunes derives from the polar layered deposits [e.g., 3], where it may form when sunlight causes minor melting and weathering of embedded dust. We are investigating whether such processes might have also contributed to sulfate formation elsewhere, specifically in regions surrounding the south polar terrain. Our study regions to date include the Sisyphi Montes (20W-40E and 55-75S) and other mountainous areas near the Thyles Rupes (110-140E and 55-75S), the Ulyxis Rupes (150-180E and 55-70S), and Chamberlin Crater (110-150W and 55-75S). We searched for sulfates using the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM). TRR3 images were evaluated using standard CRISM procedures, including the "volcano scan" atmospheric correction. We used spectral parameters to identify regions of interest, from which we extracted spectra, which we divided by spectrally neutral regions in the same scene to remove systematic artifacts. The resulting ratio spectra were visually compared to library spectra to identify possible hydrated mineral constituents. Some sulfates in the southern high latitudes appear localized to mountains of the Sisyphi Montes, which have been interpreted as volcanoes that erupted under a Hesperian ice sheet [4]. These sulfates might have formed via volcanic hydrothermal or acid fog alteration. We found that nearly 50% of the images on putative volcanoes in the Sisyphi Montes show a 1.9 μm absorption consistent with hydration. The percentage for images on the plains between volcanoes is actually higher; i.e., hydration is not unique to the volcanoes. Nevertheless, the three locations at which we found the strongest absorptions are all on volcanoes. In the Thyles Rupes region, 25% of the images on putative volcanoes are hydrated with

  6. Uranyl p-toluenesulphonate and its crystal hydrates. Synthesis and dehydration-hydration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, A. V.; Mityakhina, V. S.; Bogachev, S. V.; Suglobova, I. G.

    2003-01-01

    Lowest hydrates of uranyl p-toluenesulphonate (UPTS) and anhydrous salt were synthesised. The dehydration-hydration processes were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis. It has been established that the hydrate shell of UPTS has a layered structure. The IR spectra of UPTS and its hydrates were recorded. It was found that the IR spectra of UPTS crystal hydrates of the same composition, produced in dehydration-hydration, noticeably differ in the range of water vibrations and are the same in the range corresponding to vibrations of sulphonate groups.

  7. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ternes, Mark P.; Kedl, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    This invention is a process for formation of a gas hydrate to be used as a cool storage medium using a refrigerant in water. Mixing of the immiscible refrigerant and water is effected by addition of a surfactant and agitation. The difficult problem of subcooling during the process is overcome by using the surfactant and agitation and performance of the process significantly improves and approaches ideal.

  8. Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkman, H.K. Jr.

    1983-05-31

    An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means for separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means. 7 figs.

  9. Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkman, Jr., Harry K.

    1983-05-31

    An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means or separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means.

  10. A novel retinoic acid, catechin hydrate and mustard oil-based emulsion for enhanced cytokine and antibody responses against multiple strains of HIV-1 following mucosal and systemic vaccinations

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mingke; Vajdy, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Non-replicating protein- or DNA-based antigens generally require immune-enhancing adjuvants and delivery systems. It has been particularly difficult to raise antibodies against gp120 of HIV-1, which constitutes an important approach in HIV vaccine design. While almost all effort in adjuvant research has focused on mimicking the pathogens and the danger signals they engender in the host, relatively little effort has been spent on nutritive approaches. In this study, a new nutritive immune-enhancing delivery system (NIDS) composed of vitamin A, a polyphenol-flavonoid catechin hydrate, and mustard oil was tested for its adjuvant effect in immune responses against the gp120 protein of HIV-1CN54. Following a combination of two mucosal and two systemic vaccinations of mice, we found significant enhancement of both local and systemic antibodies as well as cytokine responses. These data have important implications for vaccine and adjuvant design against HIV-1 and other pathogens. PMID:21272602

  11. The Development Path for Hydrate Natural Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A. H.; Max, M. D.

    2008-12-01

    The question of when gas hydrate will become a commercially viable resource most concerns those nations with the most severe energy deficiencies. With the vast potential attributed to gas hydrate as a new gas play, the interest is understandable. Yet the resource potential of gas hydrate has persistently remained just over the horizon. While technical and economic hurdles have pushed back the timeline for development, considerable progress has been made in the past five years. An important lesson learned is that an analysis of the factors that control the formation of high grade hydrate deposits must be carried out so that both exploration and recovery scenarios can be modeled and engineered. Commercial hydrate development requires high concentrations of hydrate in porous, permeable reservoirs. It is only from such deposits that gas may be recovered in commercial quantities. While it is unrealistic to consider the global potential of gas hydrate to be in the hundreds of thousands of tcfs, there is a strong potential in the hundreds of tcfs or thousands of tcfs. Press releases from several national gas hydrate research programs have reported gas hydrate "discoveries". These are, in fact, hydrate shows that provide proof of the presence of hydrate where it may previously only have been predicted. Except in a few isolated areas, valid resource assessments remain to be accomplished through the identification of suitable hosts for hydrate concentrations such as sandstone reservoirs. A focused exploration effort based on geological and depositional characteristics is needed that addresses hydrate as part of a larger petroleum system. Simply drilling in areas that have identifiable bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) is unlikely to be a viable exploration tool. It is very likely that with drilling on properly identified targets, commercial development could become a reality in less than a decade.

  12. Gas hydrates: Technology status report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    In 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) assumed the responsibility for expanding the knowledge base and for developing methods to recover gas from hydrates. These are ice-like mixtures of gas and water where gas molecules are trapped within a framework of water molecules. This research is part of the Unconventional Gas Recovery (UGR) program, a multidisciplinary effort that focuses on developing the technology to produce natural gas from resources that have been classified as unconventional because of their unique geologies and production mechanisms. Current work on gas hydrates emphasizes geological studies; characterization of the resource; and generic research, including modeling of reservoir conditions, production concepts, and predictive strategies for stimulated wells. Complementing this work is research on in situ detection of hydrates and field tests to verify extraction methods. Thus, current research will provide a comprehensive technology base from which estimates of reserve potential can be made, and from which industry can develop recovery strategies. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Micelle Structure and Hydrophobic Hydration.

    PubMed

    Long, Joshua A; Rankin, Blake M; Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2015-08-26

    Despite the ubiquity and utility of micelles self-assembled from aqueous surfactants, longstanding questions remain regarding their surface structure and interior hydration. Here we combine Raman spectroscopy with multivariate curve resolution (Raman-MCR) to probe the hydrophobic hydration of surfactants with various aliphatic chain lengths, and either anionic (carboxylate) or cationic (trimethylammonium) head groups, both below and above the critical micelle concentration. Our results reveal significant penetration of water into micelle interiors, well beyond the first few carbons adjacent to the headgroup. Moreover, the vibrational C-D frequency shifts of solubilized deuterated n-hexane confirm that it resides in a dry, oil-like environment (while the localization of solubilized benzene is sensitive to headgroup charge). Our findings imply that the hydrophobic core of a micelle is surrounded by a highly corrugated surface containing hydrated non-polar cavities whose depth increases with increasing surfactant chain length, thus bearing a greater resemblance to soluble proteins than previously recognized. PMID:26222042

  14. Energy landscape of clathrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmedt, A.; Bedouret, L.; Pefoute, E.; Pouvreau, M.; Say-Liang-Fat, S.; Alvarez, M.

    2012-11-01

    Clathrate hydrates are nanoporous crystalline materials made of a network of hydrogen-bonded water molecules (forming host cages) that is stabilized by the presence of foreign (generally hydrophobic) guest molecules. The natural existence of large quantities of hydrocarbon hydrates in deep oceans and permafrost is certainly at the origin of numerous applications in the broad areas of energy and environmental sciences and technologies (e.g. gas storage). At a fundamental level, their nanostructuration confers on these materials specific properties (e.g. their "glass-like" thermal conductivity) for which the host-guest interactions play a key role. These interactions occur on broad timescale and thus require the use of multi-technique approach in which neutron scattering brings unvaluable information. This work reviews the dynamical properties of clathrate hydrates, ranging from intramolecular vibrations to Brownian relaxations; it illustrates the contribution of neutron scattering in the understanding of the underlying factors governing chemical-physics properties specific to these nanoporous systems.

  15. Development of media for dynamic latent heat storage for the low-temperature range. Part 1: Thermal analyses of selected salt hydrate systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanwischer, H.; Tamme, R.

    1985-01-01

    Phase change temperatures and phase change enthalpies of seventeen salt hydrates, three double salts, and four eutectics were measured thermodynamically and the results reported herein. Good results were obtained, especially for congruently melting salt hydrates. Incongruently melting salt hydrates appear less suitable for heat storage applications. The influence of the second phase - water, acid and hydroxide - to the latent heat is described. From these results, basic values of the working temperatures and storage capabilities of various storage media compositions may be derived.

  16. Study of Formation Mechanisms of Gas Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, which had been found in subsurface geological environments of deep-sea sediments and permafrost regions, are solid crystalline compounds of gas molecules and water. The estimated energy resources of hydrates are at least twice of that of the conventional fossil fuel in the world. Gas hydrates have a great opportunity to become a dominating future energy. In the past years, many laboratory experiments had been conducted to study chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of gas hydrates in order to investigate the formation and dissociation mechanisms of hydrates. However, it is difficult to observe the formation and dissociation of hydrates in a porous media from a physical experiment directly. The purpose of this study was to model the dynamic formation mechanisms of gas hydrate in porous media by reservoir simulation. Two models were designed for this study: 1) a closed-system static model with separated gas and water zones; this model was a hydrate equilibrium model to investigate the behavior of the formation of hydrates near the initial gas-water contact; and 2) an open-system dynamic model with a continuous bottom-up gas flow; this model simulated the behavior of gas migration and studied the formation of hydrates from flowed gas and static formation water in porous media. A phase behavior module was developed in this study for reservoir simulator to model the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) behavior of hydrates. The thermodynamic equilibriums and chemical reactions were coupled with the phase behavior module to have functions modelling the formation and dissociation of hydrates from/to water and gas. The simulation models used in this study were validated from the code-comparison project proposed by the NETL. According to the modelling results of the closed-system static model, we found that predominated location for the formation of hydrates was below the gas-water contact (or at the top of water zone). The maximum hydrate saturation

  17. Use of Hydration Inhibitors to Improve Bond Durability of Aluminum Adhesive Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. D.; Ahearn, J. S.; Matienzo, L. J.; Venables, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the mechanisms by which nitrilotris methylene phosphonic acid (NTMP) and related compounds are adsorbed onto oxidized aluminum surfaces to inhibit hydration and increase the durability of adhesive bonds formed with inhibitor-treated panels. P - O - Al bonds are identified as the basis of adsorption, and it is found that water initially adsorbed onto the etched aluminum surfaces is displaced by the NTMP. The hydration of the NTMP-treated surfaces occurs in three stages, namely the reverisble physisorption of water, the slow dissolution of NTMP followed by rapid hydration of the freshly exposed Al2O3 to AlOOH and further hydration of the surface to Al(OH)3. Five properties of an ideal inhibitor are identified.

  18. Geomechanical Modeling of Gas Hydrate Bearing Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, M. J.; Gai, X., Sr.

    2015-12-01

    This contribution focuses on an advance geomechanical model for methane hydrate-bearing soils based on concepts of elasto-plasticity for strain hardening/softening soils and incorporates bonding and damage effects. The core of the proposed model includes: a hierarchical single surface critical state framework, sub-loading concepts for modeling the plastic strains generally observed inside the yield surface and a hydrate enhancement factor to account for the cementing effects provided by the presence of hydrates in sediments. The proposed framework has been validated against recently published experiments involving both, synthetic and natural hydrate soils, as well as different sediments types (i.e., different hydrate saturations, and different hydrates morphologies) and confinement conditions. The performance of the model in these different case studies was very satisfactory.

  19. Fundamentals and applications of gas hydrates.

    PubMed

    Koh, Carolyn A; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Wu, David T

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of gas hydrate formation and decomposition processes is critical in many energy and environmental areas and has special importance in flow assurance for the oil and gas industry. These areas represent the core of gas hydrate applications, which, albeit widely studied, are still developing as growing fields of research. Discovering the molecular pathways and chemical and physical concepts underlying gas hydrate formation potentially can lead us beyond flowline blockage prevention strategies toward advancing new technological solutions for fuel storage and transportation, safely producing a new energy resource from natural deposits of gas hydrates in oceanic and arctic sediments, and potentially facilitating effective desalination of seawater. The state of the art in gas hydrate research is leading us to new understanding of formation and dissociation phenomena that focuses on measurement and modeling of time-dependent properties of gas hydrates on the basis of their well-established thermodynamic properties. PMID:22432618

  20. Structural characteristics of hydration sites in lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Soda, Kunitsugu; Shimbo, Yudai; Seki, Yasutaka; Taiji, Makoto

    2011-06-01

    A new method is presented for determining the hydration site of proteins, where the effect of structural fluctuations in both protein and hydration water is explicitly considered by using molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). The whole hydration sites (HS) of lysozyme are composed of 195 single HSs and 38 clustered ones (CHS), and divided into 231 external HSs (EHS) and 2 internal ones (IHS). The largest CHSs, 'Hg' and 'Lβ', are the IHSs having 2.54 and 1.35 mean internal hydration waters respectively. The largest EHS, 'Clft', is located in the cleft region. The real hydration structure of a CHS is an ensemble of multiple structures. The transition between two structures occurs through recombinations of some H-bonds. The number of the experimental X-ray crystal waters is nearly the same as that of the estimated MDS hydration waters for 70% of the HSs, but significantly different for the rest of HSs. PMID:21435773

  1. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  2. Gas hydrates of outer continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Kvenvolden, K.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances in which a rigid framework of water molecules traps molecules of gas, mainly methane. Gas-hydrate deposits are common in continental margin sediment in all major oceans at water depths greater than about 300 m. Thirty-three localities with evidence for gas-hydrate occurrence have been described worldwide. The presence of these gas hydrates has been inferred mainly from anomalous lacoustic reflectors seen on marine seismic records. Naturally occurring marine gas hydrates have been sampled and analyzed at about tensites in several regions including continental slope and rise sediment of the eastern Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Except for some Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate occurrences, the analyzed gas hydrates are composed almost exclusively of microbial methane. Evidence for the microbial origin of methane in gas hydrates includes (1) the inverse relation between methane occurence and sulfate concentration in the sediment, (2) the subparallel depth trends in carbon isotopic compositions of methane and bicarbonate in the interstitial water, and (3) the general range of {sup 13}C depletion ({delta}{sub PDB}{sup 13}C = {minus}90 to {minus}60 {per thousand}) in the methane. Analyses of gas hydrates from the Peruvian outer continental margin in particular illustrate this evidence for microbially generated methane. The total amount of methane in gas hydrates of continental margins is not known, but estimates of about 10{sup 16} m{sup 3} seem reasonable. Although this amount of methane is large, it is not yet clear whether methane hydrates of outer continental margins will ever be a significant energy resource; however, these gas hydrates will probably constitute a drilling hazard when outer continental margins are explored in the future.

  3. Effects of suspension pH and mineral dissolution on carbon dioxide hydrate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W.; Lamorena, R. B.

    2008-12-01

    CO2 sequestration as a form of hydrate into geological formations could be significantly affected by soil mineral heterogeneity potentially contributing to the stochastic behavior of hydrate formation. In this study, we controlled the pH of soil mineral suspensions (Na-montmorillonite, kaolinite mixture, and pyrite) by the addition of 2M/10M NaOH and 2M/10M HCl before the dissolution of CO2. The soil mineral suspensions were prepared in deionized water (DIW) and NaCl (3.5 %) solutions. The formation of mass of CO2 hydrates was observed in most of the soil mineral suspensions at 30 bar and 0.3°C. In montmorillonite and kaolinite mixture suspensions with and without NaCl near neutral (pH 6~8) suspension pHs can provide the fastest hydrate formation kinetics followed by basic (~pH 12.0) and acidic (pH 2.0) suspension pHs. Acidic suspension pH gives the fastest kinetics in pyrite suspensions without NaCl followed by neutral and basic pHs, while no hydrate formations were observed in basic and near neutral pyrite suspensions with NaCl. The experimental results suggest that different types of soil mineral structures and chemical species can form under different suspension pHs, significantly affecting the hydrate formation time. Chemical species (e.g. Al+3) that could potentially affect hydrate formation times were identified by a chemical equilibrium modeling software, PHREEQC. The results obtained from this research could provide promising avenues for hydrate formation mechanism studies.

  4. Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gabitto, Jorge F.; Tsouris, Costas

    2010-01-01

    Memore » thane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 10 16   m 3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.« less

  5. Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Gabitto, Jorge; Tsouris, Costas

    2010-01-01

    Methane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 1016?m3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.

  6. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2008-01-01

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations

  7. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  8. Observations related to tetrahydrofuran and methane hydrates for laboratory studies of hydrate-bearing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.Y.; Yun, T.S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction among water molecules, guest gas molecules, salts, and mineral particles determines the nucleation and growth behavior of gas hydrates in natural sediments. Hydrate of tetrahydrofuran (THF) has long been used for laboratory studies of gas hydrate-bearing sediments to provide close control on hydrate concentrations and to overcome the long formation history of methane hydrate from aqueous phase methane in sediments. Yet differences in the polarizability of THF (polar molecule) compared to methane (nonpolar molecule) raise questions about the suitability of THF as a proxy for methane in the study of hydrate-bearing sediments. From existing data and simple macroscale experiments, we show that despite its polar nature, THF's large molecular size results in low permittivity, prevents it from dissolving precipitated salts, and hinders the solvation of ions on dry mineral surfaces. In addition, the interfacial tension between water and THF hydrate is similar to that between water and methane hydrate. The processes that researchers choose for forming hydrate in sediments in laboratory settings (e.g., from gas, liquid, or ice) and the pore-scale distribution of the hydrate that is produced by each of these processes likely have a more pronounced effect on the measured macroscale properties of hydrate-bearing sediments than do differences between THF and methane hydrates themselves.

  9. Methane hydrate research at NETL: Research to make methane production from hydrates a reality

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.E.; Link, D.D.; English, N.

    2007-03-01

    Research is underway at NETL to understand the physical properties of methane hydrates. Five key areas of research that need further investigation have been identified. These five areas, i.e. thermal properties of hydrates in sediments, kinetics of natural hydrate dissociation, hysteresis effects, permeability of sediments to gas flow and capillary pressures within sediments, and hydrate distribution at porous scale, are important to the production models that will be used for producing methane from hydrate deposits. NETL is using both laboratory experiments and computational modeling to address these five key areas. The laboratory and computational research reinforce each other by providing feedback. The laboratory results are used in the computational models and the results from the computational modeling is used to help direct future laboratory research. The data generated at NETL will be used to help fulfill The National Methane Hydrate R&D Program of a “long-term supply of natural gas by developing the knowledge and technology base to allow commercial production of methane from domestic hydrate deposits by the year 2015” as outlined on the NETL Website [NETL Website, 2005. http://www.netl.doe.gov/scngo/Natural%20Gas/hydrates/index.html]. Laboratory research is accomplished in one of the numerous high-pressure hydrate cells available ranging in size from 0.15 mL to 15 L in volume. A dedicated high-pressure view cell within the Raman spectrometer allows for monitoring the formation and dissociation of hydrates. Thermal conductivity of hydrates (synthetic and natural) at a certain temperature and pressure is performed in a NETL-designed cell. Computational modeling studies are investigating the kinetics of hydrate formation and dissociation, modeling methane hydrate reservoirs, molecular dynamics simulations of hydrate formation, dissociation, and thermal properties, and Monte Carlo simulations of hydrate formation and dissociation.

  10. Zirconium tungstate hydroxide hydrate revisited: Crystallization dependence on halide and hydronium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Colin, Julie A. Camper, DeMarco V.; Gates, Stacy D.; Simon, Monty D. Witker, Karen L. Lind, Cora

    2007-12-15

    The formation of zirconium tungstate hydroxide hydrate, a precursor to the negative thermal expansion material cubic zirconium tungstate, shows a strong dependence on hydrothermal reaction conditions. It was found that not only the acid concentration, but also the acid counterion plays a significant role in the crystallization of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O. High temperatures, high acid concentrations, and the presence of chloride or bromide ions promote the formation of well-crystallized ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O. For low acid concentrations, a new zirconium tungstate hydrate polymorph is observed, which transforms to tetragonal ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O at longer reaction times. A study of crystallization kinetics in hydrochloric acid is presented. - Graphical abstract: The formation of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O shows a strong dependence on reaction conditions. Both acid concentration and acid counterion play a significant role in the crystallization. High temperatures, high acid concentrations, and the presence of chloride or bromide ions promote the formation of well-crystallized ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O. For low acid concentrations, a new zirconium tungstate hydrate polymorph is observed.

  11. Vibrational lifetimes of hydrated phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadidi, Tayebeh; Anvari, Mehrnaz; Mashaghi, Alireza; Sahimi, Muhammad; Rahimi Tabar, M. Reza

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations have been carried out to compute, at human-body temperature, the vibrational modes and lifetimes of pure and hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipids. The projected atomic vibrations calculated from the spectral energy density are used to compute the vibrational modes and the lifetimes. All the normal modes of the pure and hydrated DPPC and their frequencies are identified. The computed lifetimes incorporate the full anharmonicity of the atomic interactions. The vibrational modes of the water molecules close to the head group of DPPC are active (possess large projected spectrum amplitudes) in the frequency range 0.5-55 THz, with a peak at 2.80 THz in the energy spectrum. The computed lifetimes for the high-frequency modes agree well with the recent data measured at room temperature where high-order phonon scattering is not negligible. The computed lifetimes of the low-frequency modes can be tested using the current experimental capabilities. Moreover, the approach may be applied to other lipids and biomolecules, in order to predict their vibrational dispersion relations, and to study the dynamics of vibrational energy transfer.

  12. Gas hydrates in the ocean environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, William P.

    2002-01-01

    A GAS HYDRATE, also known as a gas clathrate, is a gas-bearing, icelike material. It occurs in abundance in marine sediments and stores immense amounts of methane, with major implications for future energy resources and global climate change. Furthermore, gas hydrate controls some of the physical properties of sedimentary deposits and thereby influences seafloor stability.

  13. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the revolutionary and new

  14. Natural Gas Hydrates: Occurrence, Distribution, and Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paull, Charles K.; Dillon, William P.

    We publish this volume at a time when there is a growing interest in gas hydrates and major expansion in international research efforts. The first recognition of natural gas hydrate on land in Arctic conditions was in the mid-1960s (by I. Makogon) and in the seabed environment only in the early 1970s, after natural seafloor gas hydrate was drilled on the Blake Ridge during Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 11. Initial scientific investigations were slow to develop because the study of natural gas hydrates is unusually challenging. Gas hydrate exists in nature in conditions of temperature and pressure where human beings cannot survive, and if gas hydrate is transported from its region of stability to normal Earth-surface conditions, it dissociates. Thus, in contrast to most minerals, we cannot depend on drilled samples to provide accurate estimates of the amount of gas hydrate present. Even the heat and changes in chemistry (methane saturation, salinity, etc.) introduced by the drilling process affect the gas hydrate, independent of the changes brought about by moving a sample to the surface. Gas hydrate has been identified in nature generally by inference from indirect evidence in drilling data or by using remotely sensed indications, mostly from seismic data. Obviously, the established techniques ofgeologic analysis, which require direct observation and sampling, do not apply to gas hydrate studies, and controversy has surrounded many interpretations. Pressure/temperature conditions appropriate for the existence of gas hydrate occur over the greater part of the shallow subsurface of the Earth beneath the ocean at water depths exceeding about 500 m (shallower beneath colder Arctic seas) and on land beneath high-latitude permafrost. Gas hydrate actually will be present in such conditions, however, only where methane is present at high concentrations. In the Arctic, these methane concentrations are often associated with petroleum deposits, whereas at continental margins

  15. Hydration forces at solid and fluid biointerfaces.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Buddha Ratna; Banquy, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    The authors review the different molecular mechanisms giving rise to the repulsive hydration force between biologically relevant surfaces such as lipid bilayers and bioceramics. As the authors will show, the hydration force manifests itself in very different and subtle ways depending on the substrates. Soft, mobile surfaces such as lipid bilayers tend to exhibit monotonic, decaying hydration force, originated from the entropic constriction of the lipid head groups. Solid surfaces, on the other hand, tend to exhibit a periodic oscillatory hydration force, originated from the surface induced polarization of water molecules. In this review, the authors will describe both subtle faces of this important interaction by first describing the early experiments performed on solid surfaces and their interpretation by recent simulation studies. Then, the authors will describe the hydration force between fluid interfaces such as bilayers and explain how experimentally researchers have unraveled the dominant role of the lipid head groups' conformation. PMID:26795057

  16. Heterogeneous Hydration of p53/MDM2 Complex

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Water-mediated interactions play critical roles in biomolecular recognition processes. Explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the variational implicit-solvent model (VISM) are used to study those hydration properties during binding for the biologically important p53/MDM2 complex. Unlike simple model solutes, in such a realistic and heterogeneous solute–solvent system with both geometrical and chemical complexity, the local water distribution sensitively depends on nearby amino acid properties and the geometric shape of the protein. We show that the VISM can accurately describe the locations of high and low density solvation shells identified by the MD simulations and can explain them by a local coupling balance of solvent–solute interaction potentials and curvature. In particular, capillary transitions between local dry and wet hydration states in the binding pocket are captured for interdomain distance between 4 to 6 Å, right at the onset of binding. The underlying physical connection between geometry and polarity is illustrated and quantified. Our study offers a microscopic and physical insight into the heterogeneous hydration behavior of the biologically highly relevant p53/MDM2 system and demonstrates the fundamental importance of hydrophobic effects for biological binding processes. We hope our study can help to establish new design rules for drugs and medical substances. PMID:24803860

  17. Correlation Between Chain Architecture and Hydration Water Structure in Polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Grossutti, Michael; Dutcher, John R

    2016-03-14

    The physical properties of confined water can differ dramatically from those of bulk water. Hydration water associated with polysaccharides provides a particularly interesting example of confined water, because differences in polysaccharide structure provide different spatially confined environments for water sorption. We have used attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy to investigate the structure of hydration water in films of three different polysaccharides under controlled relative humidity (RH) conditions. We compare the results obtained for films of highly branched, dendrimer-like phytoglycogen nanoparticles to those obtained for two unbranched polysaccharides, hyaluronic acid (HA), and chitosan. We find similarities between the water structuring in the two linear polysaccharides and significant differences for phytoglycogen. In particular, the results suggest that the high degree of branching in phytoglycogen leads to a much more well-ordered water structure (low density, high connectivity network water), indicating the strong influence of chain architecture on the structuring of water. These measurements provide unique insight into the relationship between the structure and hydration of polysaccharides, which is important for understanding and exploiting these sustainable nanomaterials in a wide range of applications. PMID:26859153

  18. Correlation Between Chain Architecture and Hydration Water Structure in Polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossutti, Michael; Dutcher, John

    The physical properties of confined water can differ dramatically from those of bulk water. Hydration water associated with polysaccharides provides a particularly important example of confined water, with differences in polysaccharide structure providing different spatially confined environments for water adsorption. We have used attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy to investigate the structure of hydration water in films of three different polysaccharides under controlled relative humidity (RH) conditions. We compare the results obtained for films of highly branched, monodisperse phytoglycogen nanoparticles to those obtained for two unbranched polysaccharides, hyaluronic acid (HA) and chitosan. We find similarities between water structuring in the two linear polysaccharides, and significant differences for phytoglycogen. In particular, the phytoglycogen nanoparticles exhibited high network water connectivity, and a large increase in the fraction of multimer water clusters with increasing RH, whereas the water structure for HA and chitosan was found to be insensitive to changes in RH. These measurements provide unique insight into the relationship between the chain architecture and hydration of polysaccharides.

  19. Compound Natural Gas Hydrate: A Natural System for Separation of Hydrate-Forming Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, M. D.; Osegovic, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Natural processes that separate materials from a mixture may exert a major influence on the development of the atmospheres and surfaces of planets, moons, and other planetary bodies. Natural distillation and gravity separation, amongst others, are well known means of differentiating materials through liquid-gas partitioning. One of the least known attributes of clathrate (gas) hydrates is their potential effect on the evolution of planetary system oceans and atmospheres. Gas hydrates separate gases from mixtures of gases by concentrating preferred hydrate-forming materials (HFM) guests within the water-molecule cage structure of crystalline hydrate. Different HFMs have very different fields of stability. When multiple hydrate formers are present, a preference series based on their selective uptake exists. Compound hydrate, which is formed from two or more species of HFM, extract preferred HFM from a mixture in very different proportions to their relative percentages of the original mixture. These compound hydrates can have different formation and dissociation conditions depending on the evolution of the environment. That is, the phase boundary of the compound hydrate that is required for dissociation lies along a lower pressure - higher temperature course. Compound hydrates respond to variations in temperature, pressure, and HFM composition. On Earth, the primary naturally occurring hydrate of interest to global climate modeling is methane hydrate. Oceanic hydrate on Earth is the largest store of carbon in the biosphere that is immediately reactive to environmental change, and is capable of releasing large amounts of methane into the atmosphere over a short geological time span. Hydrate formation is essentially metastable and is very sensitive to environmental change and to gas flux. Where natural variations in temperature and pressure varies so that hydrate will form and dissociate in some cyclical manner, such as in oceans where sea level is capable of rising and

  20. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-07-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  1. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is

  2. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-06-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  3. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  4. Hydration-dehydration interactions between glycine and anhydrous salts: Implications for a chemical evolution of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio; Yokoyama, Tadashi; Nakashima, Satoru

    2011-11-01

    Polymerizations of organic monomers including amino acids, nucleotides and monosaccharides are essential processes for chemical evolution of life. Since these reactions proceed with "dehydration" reactions, they are possibly promoted if combined with thermodynamically favorable "hydration" reactions of minerals and salts. To test the possibility, we conducted heating experiments of the simplest amino acid "glycine (Gly)" mixed with four simple anhydrous salts (MgSO 4, SrCl 2, BaCl 2 and Li 2SO 4) at 140 °C up to 20 days. Gly polymerization was strongly promoted by mixing with the salts in the order of MgSO 4 > SrCl 2 > BaCl 2 > Li 2SO 4. Up to 6-mer of Gly polymers were synthesized in the Gly-MgSO 4 mixture, and a total yield of Gly polymers attained about 7% of the initial amount of Gly by the 20 days heating. The total yield was about 200 times larger than that from the heating of Gly alone. XRD measurements of the Gly-MgSO 4 mixture revealed the generation of MgSO 4 monohydrate during Gly polymerization. These observations indicate that Gly polymerization was promoted by the salt hydrations through the hydration-dehydration interactions. Based on the observations, we tried to find a relationship between thermodynamic characteristics of the interactions and the promotion effects of each salt on Gly polymerization. It was found that the salts having lower hydration Δ rG0 (easier to hydrate) promote Gly polymerization more strongly. The relationship was used to estimate promotion effects of simple oxide minerals on Gly polymerization. The estimations were consistent with previous observations about the effects of these minerals on Gly polymerization. The fact suggests that the hydration-dehydration interactions between amino acids and minerals are an important mechanism for amino acids' polymerizations on minerals.

  5. DNA hydration studied by neutron fiber diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, W.; Forsyth, V.T.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Langan, P.; Pigram, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    The development of neutron high angle fiber diffraction to investigate the location of water around the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-helix is described. The power of the technique is illustrated by its application to the D and A conformations of DNA using the single crystal diffractometer, D19, at the Institute Laue-Langevin, Grenoble and the time of flight diffractometer, SXD, at the Rutherford Appleton ISIS Spallation Neutron Source. These studies show the existence of bound water closely associated with the DNA. The patterns of hydration in these two DNA conformations are quite distinct and are compared to those observed in X-ray single crystal studies of two-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. Information on the location of water around the DNA double-helix from the neutron fiber diffraction studies is combined with that on the location of alkali metal cations from complementary X-ray high angle fiber diffraction studies at the Daresbury Laboratory SRS using synchrotron radiation. These analyses emphasize the importance of viewing DNA, water and ions as a single system with specific interactions between the three components and provide a basis for understanding the effect of changes in the concentration of water and ions in inducing conformations] transitions in the DNA double-helix.

  6. Interactions of Organic Additives with Ionic Crystal Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füredi-Milhofer, H.; Sikirić, M.; Tunik, L.; Filipović-Vinceković, N.; Garti, N.

    The interactions of two groups of hydrated model crystals, calcium hydrogenphosphate dihydrate (DCPD) vs. octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) vs. calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) with different organic additives are considered. DCPD precipitates as platelet-like crystals with the dominant faces shielded by hydrated layers and charged lateral faces. In the second system COM has charged surfaces, while all faces of COD are covered with layers containing water molecules. The organic molecules tested include negatively charged, flexible and rigid small and macromolecules (glutamic and aspartic acid, citrate, hexaammonium polyphosphate, phytate and polyaspartate) and anionic surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS, sodium diisooctyl sulfosuccinate, AOT, sodium cholate NaC and disodium oleoamido PEG-2 sulfosuccinate, PEG). Two types of effects have been demonstrated: (1) Effect on crystal growth morphology: Flexible organic molecules with high charge density and anionic surfactants affected the growth morphology of DCPD and COM by selectively interacting with the charged lateral faces while rigid molecules (phytate, polyaspartate) specifically recognized the dominant (010) face of DCPD due to structural and stereochemical compatibility. (2) Effect on phase composition: Anionic surfactants at concentrations above the cmc promoted growth of OCP and COD respectively by selectively adsorbing at, and inhibiting growth oif nuclei of DCPD and/or COM, which were dominant in the respective control systems. The effect was especially pronounced in the calcium oxalate precipitation system, where in some cases complete reversal of the phase composition occurred. The important role of the hydrated layer, as part of the structure of the investigated crystal hydrates, in the above crystal additive interactions is discussed.

  7. Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

    2011-04-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with

  8. Clathrate hydrate tuning for technological purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Profio, Pietro; Germani, Raimondo; Savelli, Gianfranco

    2010-05-01

    Gas hydrates are being increasingly considered as convenient media for gas storage and transportation as the knowledge of their properties increases, in particular as relates to methane and hydrogen. Clathrate hydrates may also represent a feasible sequestration technology for carbon dioxide, due to a well defined P/T range of stability, and several research programs are addressing this possibility. Though the understanding of the molecular structure and supramolecular interactions which are responsible of most properties of hydrates have been elucitated in recent years, the underlying theoretical physico-chemical framework is still poor, especially as relates to the role of "conditioners" (inhibitors and promoters) from the molecular/supramolecular point of view. In the present communication we show some results from our research approach which is mainly focused on the supramolecular properties of clathrate hydrate systems - and their conditioners - as a way to get access to a controlled modulation of the formation, dissociation and stabilization of gas hydrates. In particular, this communication will deal with: (a) a novel, compact apparatus for studying the main parameters of formation and dissociation of gas hydrates in a one-pot experiment, which can be easily and rapidly carried out on board of a drilling ship;[1] (b) the effects of amphiphile molecules (surfactants) as inhibitors or promoters of gas hydrate formation;[2] (c) a novel nanotechnology for a reliable and quick production of hydrogen hydrates, and its application to fuel cells;[3,4] and (d) the development of a clathrate hydrate tecnology for the sequestration and geological storage of man-made CO2, possibly with concomitant recovery of natural gas from NG hydrate fields. Furthermore, the feasibility of catalyzing the reduction of carbon dioxide to energy-rich species by hydrates is being investigated. [1] Di Profio, P., Germani, R., Savelli, G., International Patent Application PCT/IT2006

  9. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  10. Diffusion of CO2 During Hydrate Formation and Dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin M. Orr, Jr.

    2002-08-20

    Experiments were performed to measure the rate of diffusion of CO2 through hydrate films. Hydrate films were created in a capillary tube, and the growth of the hydrate film was measured. Difficulties were encountered in creating hydrate repeatedly, and some non-uniform growth of the films was observed. Sufficient observations were obtained to demonstrate that hydrate growth occurs preferentially on the hydrate/water side of the interface, rather than at the hydrate/CO2 interface. Diffusion coefficients were estimated from observations of the rate of growth of the hydrate film along with estimates of the solubility of CO2 in water and of the concentration gradient across the hydrate layer. The experimental observations indicate that hydrate formation occurs much more rapidly at the hydrate water interface than at the hydrate/CO2 interface. Any growth of hydrate at the CO2/hydrate interface was too slow to be observed at the time scale of the experiments. That observation is consistent with the idea that CO2 can move more easily through the hydrate, presumably by hopping between hydrate cages, than water can move through the hydrate, presumably by lattice hopping. Estimated diffusion coefficients were in the range 1-3E-06 cm2/sec. Those values are about an order of magnitude lower than the diffusion coefficient for CO2 in liquid water, but four orders of magnitude larger than the value for diffusion of CO2 in a solid. The rate of diffusion through the hydrate controls both the creation of new hydrate at the hydrate/water interface and the rate at which CO2 dissolves in the liquid water and diffuses away from the hydrate layer. Formation of a hydrate layer reduces the rate at which CO2 dissolves in liquid water.

  11. Mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate: Implications for naturally occurring gas hydrate dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Stern, Laura; Pohlman, John W.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings may presently be dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the ocean-atmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the impact of dissociating gas hydrates on global atmospheric methane is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sediments (some newly thawed), coal beds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic fractionation during methane formation provides a first-order constraint on the processes (microbial or thermogenic) of methane generation. However, because gas hydrate formation and dissociation do not cause significant isotopic fractionation, a stable isotope-based hydrate-source determination is not possible. Here, we investigate patterns of mass-dependent noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  12. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand processes

  13. Surface topography dependence of biomolecular hydrophobic hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuen-Kit; Rossky, Peter J.

    1998-04-01

    Many biomolecules are characterized by surfaces containing extended nonpolar regions, and the aggregation and subsequent removal of such surfaces from water is believed to play a critical role in the biomolecular assembly in cells. A better understanding of the hydrophobic hydration of biomolecules may therefore yield new insights into intracellular assembly. Conventional views hold that the hydration shell of small hydrophobic solutes is clathrate-like, characterized by local cage-like hydrogen-bonding structures and a distinct loss in entropy. The hydration of extended nonpolar planar surfaces, however, appears to involve structures that are orientationally inverted relative to clathrate-like hydration shells,, with unsatisfied hydrogen bonds that are directed towards the hydrophobic surface. Here we present computer simulations of the interaction between the polypeptide melittin and water that demonstrate that the two different hydration structures also exist near a biomolecular surface. We find that the two structures are distinguished by a substantial difference in the water-water interaction enthalpy, and that their relative contributions depend strongly on the surface topography of the melittin molecule: clathrate-like structures dominate near convex surface patches, whereas the hydration shell near flat surfaces fluctuates between clathrate-like and less-ordered or inverted structures. The strong influence of surface topography on the structure and free energy of hydrophobic hydration is likely to hold in general, and will be particularly important for the many biomolecules whose surfaces contain convex patches, deep or shallow concave grooves and roughly planar areas.

  14. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  15. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du Frane, Wyatt L.; Stern, Laura A.; Weitemeyer, Karen A.; Constable, Steven; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2011-01-01

    As part of our DOE-funded proposal to characterize gas hydrate in the Gulf of Mexico using marine electromagnetic methods, a collaboration between SIO, LLNL, and USGS with the goal of measuring the electrical properties of lab-created methane (CH4) hydrate and sediment mixtures was formed. We examined samples with known characteristics to better relate electrical properties measured in the field to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns. Here we discuss first-ever electrical conductivity (σ) measurements on unmixed CH4 hydrate (Du Frane et al., 2011): 6 x 10-5 S/m at 5 °C, which is ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater. This difference allows electromagnetic (EM) techniques to distinguish highly resistive gas hydrate deposits from conductive water saturated sediments in EM field surveys. More recently, we performed measurements on CH4 hydrate mixed with sediment and we also discuss those initial findings here. Our results on samples free of liquid water are important for predicting conductivity of sediments with pores highly saturated with gas hydrate, and are an essential starting point for comprehensive mixing models.

  16. Ab Initio Studies of Calcium Carbonate Hydration.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Berganza, Josue A; Diao, Yijue; Pamidighantam, Sudhakar; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M

    2015-11-25

    Ab initio simulations of large hydrated calcium carbonate clusters are challenging due to the existence of multiple local energy minima. Extensive conformational searches around hydrated calcium carbonate clusters (CaCO3·nH2O for n = 1-18) were performed to find low-energy hydration structures using an efficient combination of Monte Carlo searches, density-functional tight binding (DFTB+) method, and density-functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP level, or Møller-Plesset perturbation theory at the MP2 level. This multilevel optimization yields several low-energy structures for hydrated calcium carbonate. Structural and energetics analysis of the hydration of these clusters revealed a first hydration shell composed of 12 water molecules. Bond-length and charge densities were also determined for different cluster sizes. The solvation of calcium carbonate in bulk water was investigated by placing the explicitly solvated CaCO3·nH2O clusters in a polarizable continuum model (PCM). The findings of this study provide new insights into the energetics and structure of hydrated calcium carbonate and contribute to the understanding of mechanisms where calcium carbonate formation or dissolution is of relevance. PMID:26505205

  17. Mechanisms for thermal conduction in hydrogen hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Niall J.; Gorman, Paul D.; MacElroy, J. M. D.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate thermal conduction mechanisms via the Green-Kubo approach for (type II) hydrogen hydrate, at 0.05 kbar and between 30 and 250 K, for both lightly filled H2 hydrates (1s4l) and for more densely filled H2 systems (2s4l), in which four H2 molecules are present in the large cavities, with respective single- and double-occupation of the small cages. The TIP4P water model was used in conjunction with a fully atomistic hydrogen potential along with long-range Ewald electrostatics. It was found that substantially less damping in guest-host energy transfer is present in hydrogen hydrate as is observed in common type I clathrates (e.g., methane hydrate), but more akin in to previous results for type II and H methane hydrate polymorphs. This gives rise to larger thermal conductivities relative to common type I hydrates, and also larger than type II and H methane hydrate polymorphs, and a more crystal-like temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity.

  18. Prospecting for marine gas hydrate resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boswell, Ray; Shipp, Craig; Reichel, Thomas; Shelander, Dianna; Saeki, Tetsuo; Frye, Matthew; Shedd, William; Collett, Timothy S.; McConnell, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    As gas hydrate energy assessment matures worldwide, emphasis has evolved away from confirmation of the mere presence of gas hydrate to the more complex issue of prospecting for those specific accumulations that are viable resource targets. Gas hydrate exploration now integrates the unique pressure and temperature preconditions for gas hydrate occurrence with those concepts and practices that are the basis for conventional oil and gas exploration. We have aimed to assimilate the lessons learned to date in global gas hydrate exploration to outline a generalized prospecting approach as follows: (1) use existing well and geophysical data to delineate the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), (2) identify and evaluate potential direct indications of hydrate occurrence through evaluation of interval of elevated acoustic velocity and/or seismic events of prospective amplitude and polarity, (3) mitigate geologic risk via regional seismic and stratigraphic facies analysis as well as seismic mapping of amplitude distribution along prospective horizons, and (4) mitigate further prospect risk through assessment of the evidence of gas presence and migration into the GHSZ. Although a wide range of occurrence types might ultimately become viable energy supply options, this approach, which has been tested in only a small number of locations worldwide, has directed prospect evaluation toward those sand-hosted, high-saturation occurrences that were presently considered to have the greatest future commercial potential.

  19. Selective recovery of arsenic from aqueous solutions with hydrated titanium dioxide. Report of investigations/1983

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, B.W.; Martin, D.A.

    1983-04-01

    Bureau of Mines research to recover arsenic from mining industry waste material and process streams is reported. Batch and column approaches were investigated for adsorbing arsenic from acid leach solutions and ion-exchange eluate solutions with hydrated titanium dioxide granules.

  20. Temperature and pH Changes Associated with the Hydration of Amorphous Silicate Smokes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizmadia, L. J.; Lebrón-Rivera, S. A.

    2010-03-01

    The hydration of Fe-Si smokes results in acidic pH levels and negligible change in temperature. When mixed with Mg-Si smokes, pH becomes alkaline and temperature increases slightly. Water-rock ratio is a minor variable relative to composition.

  1. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2003-12-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the US have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by maurer Technology, noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R and D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. They plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. They also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. They are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. They hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, the goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

  2. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by Maurer Technology, Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. We plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. We also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. We are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. We hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, our goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

  3. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Frane, Wyatt L.; Stern, Laura A.; Constable, Steven; Weitemeyer, Karen A.; Smith, Megan M.; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of the electrical properties of multicomponent systems with gas hydrate, sediments, and pore water is needed to help relate electromagnetic (EM) measurements to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns in nature. Toward this goal, we built a pressure cell capable of measuring in situ electrical properties of multicomponent systems such that the effects of individual components and mixing relations can be assessed. We first established the temperature-dependent electrical conductivity (σ) of pure, single-phase methane hydrate to be ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater, a substantial contrast that can help differentiate hydrate deposits from significantly more conductive water-saturated sediments in EM field surveys. Here we report σ measurements of two-component systems in which methane hydrate is mixed with variable amounts of quartz sand or glass beads. Sand by itself has low σ but is found to increase the overall σ of mixtures with well-connected methane hydrate. Alternatively, the overall σ decreases when sand concentrations are high enough to cause gas hydrate to be poorly connected, indicating that hydrate grains provide the primary conduction path. Our measurements suggest that impurities from sand induce chemical interactions and/or doping effects that result in higher electrical conductivity with lower temperature dependence. These results can be used in the modeling of massive or two-phase gas-hydrate-bearing systems devoid of conductive pore water. Further experiments that include a free water phase are the necessary next steps toward developing complex models relevant to most natural systems.

  4. Clathrate hydrates in cometary nuclei and porosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoluchowski, R.

    1988-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of formation and decomposition of CO2-clathrate hydrate in cometary nuclei are discussed. As far as it is known, this is the only clathrate hydrate which is unstable at low temperatures. Calculation shows that, in accord with other evidence, neither volume nor grain boundary diffusion in the clathrate lattice can be responsible for the rate of these reactions and that a surface mechanism with the attendant sensitivity to pressure must play a crucial role. Density changes accompanying CO2-clathrate decomposition and formation can lead to microporosity and enhanced brittleness or even to fracture of cometary nuclei at low temperatures. Other clathrate hydrates and mixed clathrates are also discussed.

  5. Carbon dioxide hydrate and floods on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milton, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Ground ice on Mars probably consists largely of carbon dioxide hydrate. This hydrate dissociates upon release of pressure at temperatures between 0 and 10 C. The heat capacity of the ground would be sufficient to produce up to 4% (by volume) of water at a rate equal to that at which it can be drained away. Catastrophic dissociation of carbon dioxide hydrate during some past epoch when the near-surface temperature was in this range would have produced chaotic terrain and flood channels.

  6. Dissociation of Natural and Artificial Methane Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misyura, S. Y.

    2016-02-01

    Present work deals with natural and artificial methane hydrate dissociation. The heating of the powder produced due to the temperature difference between the external air and the powder. The dissociation rate was determined by gravimetric method. The range of the partial self-preservation for the natural hydrate is significantly longer than for the artificial one and moved to higher temperatures. The destruction of the natural sample is slower than the artificial one. The time-averaged dissociation rate for the artificial sample is equal to 1,25 %/s and for the natural hydrate corresponds to 0,59 %/s.

  7. Glass powder blended cement hydration modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Huda

    The use of waste materials in construction is among the most attractive options to consume these materials without affecting the environment. Glass is among these types of potential waste materials. In this research, waste glass in powder form, i.e. glass powder (GP) is examined for potential use in enhancing the characteristics of concrete on the basis that it is a pozzolanic material. The experimental and the theoretical components of the work are carried out primarily to prove that glass powder belongs to the "family" of the pozzolanic materials. The chemical and physical properties of the hydrated activated glass powder and the hydrated glass powder cement on the microstructure level have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The work presented in this thesis consists of two main phases. The first phase contains experimental investigations of the reaction of glass powder with calcium hydroxide (CH) and water. In addition, it includes experiments that are aimed at determining the consumption of water and CH with time. The reactivity, degree of hydration, and nature of the pore solution of the glass powder-blended cement pastes and the effect of adding different ratios of glass powder on cement hydration is also investigated. The experiments proved that glass powder has a pozzolanic effect on cement hydration; hence it enhances the chemical and physical properties of cement paste. Based on the experimental test results, it is recommended to use a glass powder-to-cement ratio (GP/C) of 10% as an optimum ratio to achieve the best hydration and best properties of the paste. Two different chemical formulas for the produced GP C-S-H gel due to the pure GP and GP-CH pozzolanic reaction hydration are proposed. For the pure GP hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a calcium-to-silica ratio (C/S) of 0.164, water-to-silica ratio (H/S) of 1.3 and sodium/silica ratio (N/S) of 0.18. However, for the GP-CH hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a C/S ratio of 1

  8. Three-dimensional distribution of gas hydrate beneath southern Hydrate Ridge: Constraints from ODP Leg 204

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trehu, A.M.; Long, P.E.; Torres, M.E.; Bohrmann, G.; Rack, F.R.; Collett, T.S.; Goldberg, D.S.; Milkov, A.V.; Riedel, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Bangs, N.L.; Barr, S.R.; Borowski, W.S.; Claypool, G.E.; Delwiche, M.E.; Dickens, G.R.; Gracia, E.; Guerin, G.; Holland, M.; Johnson, J.E.; Lee, Y.-J.; Liu, C.-S.; Su, X.; Teichert, B.; Tomaru, H.; Vanneste, M.; Watanabe, M. E.; Weinberger, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, we sampled the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) from the seafloor to its base in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space or 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs. Elsewhere, the average gas hydrate content of the sediments in the gas hydrate stability zone is generally <2% of the pore space, although this estimate may increase by a factor of 2 when patchy zones of locally higher gas hydrate content are included in the calculation. These patchy zones are structurally and stratigraphically controlled, contain up to 20% hydrate in the pore space when averaged over zones ???10 m thick, and may occur in up to ???20% of the region imaged by 3D seismic data. This heterogeneous gas hydrate distribution is an important constraint on models of gas hydrate formation in marine sediments and the response of the sediments to tectonic and environmental change. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Understanding effect of structure and stability on transformation of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinxiang; Yan, Yujie; Liu, Haiying; Xu, Jiafang; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Gang

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the transformation process of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate is crucial to develop the CH4sbnd CO2 replacement technique for CH4 production and CO2 sequestration. Ab initio calculations show that the transformation will slightly distort the host lattice and decrease the binding strength of guest molecules, but it is a thermodynamically spontaneous process dominated by the entropic contribution. Moreover, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the dynamics of the host lattice is independent on the guest molecules, while CO2 in hydrate exhibits slower translational and rotational motion than CH4 in hydrate.

  10. Weakly Hydrated Surfaces and the Binding Interactions of Small Biological Solutes

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, J. W.; Tavagnacco, L.; Ehrlich, L.; Chen, M.; Schnupf, U.; Himmel, M. E.; Saboungi, M. L.; Cesaro, A.

    2012-04-01

    Extended planar hydrophobic surfaces, such as are found in the side chains of the amino acids histidine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, exhibit an affinity for the weakly hydrated faces of glucopyranose. In addition, molecular species such as these, including indole, caffeine, and imidazole, exhibit a weak tendency to pair together by hydrophobic stacking in aqueous solution. These interactions can be partially understood in terms of recent models for the hydration of extended hydrophobic faces and should provide insight into the architecture of sugar-binding sites in proteins.

  11. Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Savidge

    2008-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

  12. Polyethylene oxide hydration in grafted layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Zilu

    Hydration of water soluble polymers is one of the key-factors defining their conformation and properties, similar to biopolymers. Polyethylene oxide (PEO) is one of the most important biomedical-applications polymers and is known for its reverse temperature solubility due to hydrogen bonding with water. As in many practical applications PEO chains are grafted to surfaces, e.g. of nanoparticles or planar surfaces, it is important to understand PEO hydration in such grafted layers. Using atomistic molecular dynamic simulations we investigate the details of molecular conformation and hydration of PEO end-grafted to gold surfaces. We analyze polymer and water density distribution as a function of distance from the surface for different grafting densities. Based on a detailed analysis of hydrogen bonding between polymer and water in grafted PEO layers, we will discuss the extent of PEO hydration and its implication for polymer conformation, mobility and layer properties. This research is supported by NSF (DMR-1410928).

  13. Infrared Spectroscopy of Hydrated Nitromethane Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcum, Jesse C.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2009-06-01

    The hydration of molecular anions is still not as thoroughly explored as for atomic anions. We present IR spectra and quantum chemical calculations of hydrated nitromethane anions. In the monohydrate, the nitro group of the ion interacts with the water molecule via two hydrogen bonds, one from each O atom. This motif is partially conserved in the dihydrate. Adding the third water molecule results in a ring-like structure of the water ligands, each of which forms one H bond to one of the O atoms of the nitro group and another to a neighboring water ligand, reminiscent of the hydration motif of the heavier halides. Interestingly, while the methyl group is not directly involved in the interaction with the water ligands, its infrared signature is strongly affected by the changes in the intramolecular charge distribution through hydration.

  14. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Donn McGuire; Thomas Williams; Bjorn Paulsson; Alexander Goertz

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a drilling hazard by the oil and gas industry for years. Drilling engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous problems, including drilling kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates as a potential energy source agree that the resource potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained from physical samples taken from actual hydrate-bearing rocks. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The project team drilled and continuously cored the Hot Ice No. 1 well on Anadarko-leased acreage beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and used for determining physical characteristics of hydrates and surrounding rock. After the well was logged, a 3D vertical seismic profile (VSP) was recorded to calibrate the shallow geologic section with seismic data and to investigate techniques to better resolve lateral subsurface variations of potential hydrate-bearing strata. Paulsson Geophysical Services, Inc. deployed their 80 level 3C clamped borehole seismic receiver array in the wellbore to record samples every 25 ft. Seismic vibrators were successively positioned at 1185 different surface positions in a circular pattern around the wellbore. This technique generated a 3D image of the subsurface. Correlations were

  15. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  16. Overview: Gas hydrate geology and geography

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    Several geological factors which are directly responsible for the presence or absence of gas hydrates have been reviewed and are: tectonic position of the region; sedimentary environments; structural deformation; shale diapirism; hydrocarbon generation and migration; thermal regime in the hydrate formation zone (HFZ); pressure conditions; and hydrocarbon gas supply to the HFZ. Work on gas hydrate formation in the geological environment has made significant advances, but there is still much to be learned. Work is continuing in the deeper offshore areas through the Ocean Drilling Program, Government Agencies, and Industry. The pressure/temperature conditions necessary for formation has been identified for various compositions of natural gas through laboratory investigations and conditions for formation are being advanced through drilling in areas where gas hydrates exist.

  17. ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test

    SciTech Connect

    Schoderbek, David; Farrell, Helen; Howard, James; Raterman, Kevin; Silpngarmlert, Suntichai; Martin, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Klein, Perry

    2013-06-30

    Work began on the ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrates Production Test (DOE award number DE-NT0006553) on October 1, 2008. This final report summarizes the entire project from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013.

  18. Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.; Riedel, M.; Boswell, R.; Presley, J.; Kumar, P.; Sathe, A.; Sethi, A.; Lall, M.; NGHP Expedition Scientists

    2015-01-01

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 was designed to study the gas-hydrate occurrences off the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. During Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01, dedicated gas-hydrate coring, drilling, and downhole logging operations were conducted from 28 April 2006 to 19 August 2006.

  19. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  20. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2004-11-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in the

  1. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Runyon; Mike Globe; Kent Newsham; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  2. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in the

  3. Spectroscopic methods in gas hydrate research.

    PubMed

    Rauh, Florian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline structures comprising a guest molecule surrounded by a water cage, and are particularly relevant due to their natural occurrence in the deep sea and in permafrost areas. Low molecular weight molecules such as methane and carbon dioxide can be sequestered into that cage at suitable temperatures and pressures, facilitating the transition to the solid phase. While the composition and structure of gas hydrates appear to be well understood, their formation and dissociation mechanisms, along with the dynamics and kinetics associated with those processes, remain ambiguous. In order to take advantage of gas hydrates as an energy resource (e.g., methane hydrate), as a sequestration matrix in (for example) CO(2) storage, or for chemical energy conservation/storage, a more detailed molecular level understanding of their formation and dissociation processes, as well as the chemical, physical, and biological parameters that affect these processes, is required. Spectroscopic techniques appear to be most suitable for analyzing the structures of gas hydrates (sometimes in situ), thus providing access to such information across the electromagnetic spectrum. A variety of spectroscopic methods are currently used in gas hydrate research to determine the composition, structure, cage occupancy, guest molecule position, and binding/formation/dissociation mechanisms of the hydrate. To date, the most commonly applied techniques are Raman spectroscopy and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Diffraction methods such as neutron and X-ray diffraction are used to determine gas hydrate structures, and to study lattice expansions. Furthermore, UV-vis spectroscopic techniques and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have assisted in structural studies of gas hydrates. Most recently, waveguide-coupled mid-infrared spectroscopy in the 3-20 μm spectral range has demonstrated its value for in situ studies on the formation and dissociation of gas

  4. Exploitation of subsea gas hydrate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates are considered to be a potential energy resource in the future. They occur in permafrost areas as well as in subsea sediments and are stable at high pressure and low temperature conditions. According to estimations the amount of carbon bonded in natural gas hydrates worldwide is two times larger than in all known conventional fossil fuels. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e.g. depressurization and/or injection of carbon dioxide) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR«. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into a numerical model. The physics of the process leads to strong non-linear couplings between hydraulic fluid flow, hydrate dissociation and formation, hydraulic properties of the sediment, partial pressures and seawater solution of components and the thermal budget of the system described by the heat equation. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the recent development regarding the production of natural gas from subsea gas hydrate reservoirs. It aims at giving a broad insight into natural gas hydrates and covering relevant aspects of the exploitation process. It is focused on the thermodynamic principles and technological approaches for the exploitation. The effects occurring during natural gas production within hydrate filled sediment layers are identified and discussed by means of numerical simulation results. The behaviour of relevant process parameters such as pressure, temperature and phase saturations is described and compared for different strategies. The simulations are complemented by calculations for different safety relevant problems.

  5. Experimental Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Through Depressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgfeldt, T.; Flemings, P. B.; Meyer, D.; You, K.

    2015-12-01

    We dissociated methane hydrates by stepwise depressurization. The initial hydrates were formed by injecting gas into a cylindrical sample of brine-saturated, coarse-grained sand at hydrate-stable conditions with the intention of reaching three-phase equilibrium. The sample was initially at 1°C with a pore pressure of 1775 psi and a salinity of 7 wt. % NaBr. The depressurization setup consisted of one pump filled with tap water attached to the confining fluid port and a second pump attached to the inlet port where the methane was injected. Depressurization was conducted over sixteen hours at a constant temperature of 1°C. The pore pressure was stepwise reduced from 1775 psi to atmospheric pressure by pulling known volumes of gas from the sample. After each extraction, we recorded the instantaneous and equilibrium pore pressure. 0.503 moles of methane were removed from the sample. The pore pressure decreased smoothly and nonlinearly with the cumulative gas withdrawn from the sample. We interpret that hydrate began to dissociate immediately with depressurization, and it continued to dissociate when the pressure decreased below the three-phase pressure for 1°C and 0 wt. % salinity. Two breaks in slope in the pressure vs. mass extracted data are bounded by smooth, nonlinear curves with differing slopes on either side. We attribute the breaks to dissociation of three zones of hydrate concentration. We created a box model to simulate the experimental behavior. For a 10% initial gas saturation (estimated from the hydrate formation experiment and based on mass conservation), an initial hydrate saturation of 55% is required to match the total methane extracted from the sample. Future experiments will be conducted over a longer timespan while monitoring hydrate dissociation with CT imaging throughout the process.

  6. Preservation of methane hydrate at 1 atm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    A "pressure-release" method that enables reproducible bulk preservation of pure, porous, methane hydrate at conditions 50 to 75 K above its equilibrium T (193 K) at 1 atm is refined. The amount of hydrate preserved by this method appears to be greatly in excess of that reported in the previous citations, and is likely the result of a mechanism different from ice shielding.

  7. Measurement of clathrate hydrates via Raman spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sum, A.K.; Burruss, R.C.; Sloan, E.D., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Raman spectra of clathrate hydrate guest molecules are presented for three known structures (I (sI), II (sII), and H (sH)) in the following systems: CH4 (sI), CO2 (sI), C3H8 (sII), CH4 + CO2 (sI), CD4 + C3H8 (sII), CH4 + N2 (sI), CH4 + THF-d8 (sII), and CH4 + C7D14 (sH). Relative occupancy of CH4 in the large and small cavities of sI were determined by deconvoluting the ??1 symmetric bands, resulting in hydration numbers of 6.04 ?? 0.03. The frequency of the ??1 bands for CH4 in structures I, II, and H differ statistically, so that Raman spectroscopy is a potential tool to identify hydrate crystal structure. Hydrate guest compositions were also measured for two vapor compositions of the CH4 + CO2 system, and they compared favorably with predictions. The large cavities were measured to be almost fully occupied by CH4 and CO2, whereas only a small fraction of the small cavities are occupied by CH4. No CO2 was found in the small cavities. Hydration numbers from 7.27 to 7.45 were calculated for the mixed hydrate.

  8. Fe-containing phases in hydrated cements

    SciTech Connect

    Dilnesa, B.Z.; Wieland, E.; Lothenbach, B.; Dähn, R.; Scrivener, K.L.

    2014-04-01

    In this study synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been applied, an element specific technique which allows Fe-containing phases to be identified in the complex mineral mixture of hydrated cements. Several Fe species contributed to the overall Fe K-edge spectra recorded on the cement samples. In the early stage of cement hydration ferrite was the dominant Fe-containing mineral. Ferrihydrite was detected during the first hours of the hydration process. After 1 day the formation of Al- and Fe-siliceous hydrogarnet was observed, while the amount of ferrihydrite decreased. The latter finding agrees with thermodynamic modeling, which predicts the formation of Fe-siliceous hydrogarnet in Portland cement systems. The presence of Al- and Fe-containing siliceous hydrogarnet was further substantiated in the residue of hydrated cement by performing a selective dissolution procedure. - Highlights: • Fe bound to ferrihydrite at early age hydration • Fe found to be stable in siliceous hydrogarnet at longer term age hydration • Fe-containing AFt and AFm phases are less stable than siliceous hydrogarnet. • The study demonstrates EXAFS used to identify amorphous or poorly crystalline phases.

  9. Electrical properties of polycrystalline methane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du Frane, W. L.; Stern, L.A.; Weitemeyer, K.A.; Constable, S.; Pinkston, J.C.; Roberts, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) remote-sensing techniques are demonstrated to be sensitive to gas hydrate concentration and distribution and complement other resource assessment techniques, particularly seismic methods. To fully utilize EM results requires knowledge of the electrical properties of individual phases and mixing relations, yet little is known about the electrical properties of gas hydrates. We developed a pressure cell to synthesize gas hydrate while simultaneously measuring in situ frequency-dependent electrical conductivity (σ). Synthesis of methane (CH4) hydrate was verified by thermal monitoring and by post run cryogenic scanning electron microscope imaging. Impedance spectra (20 Hz to 2 MHz) were collected before and after synthesis of polycrystalline CH4 hydrate from polycrystalline ice and used to calculate σ. We determined the σ of CH4 hydrate to be 5 × 10−5 S/m at 0°C with activation energy (Ea) of 30.6 kJ/mol (−15 to 15°C). After dissociation back into ice, σ measurements of samples increased by a factor of ~4 and Ea increased by ~50%, similar to the starting ice samples.

  10. Clathrate hydrates in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, S. L.

    1985-01-01

    Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds in which an expanded ice lattice forms cages that contain gas molecules. There are two principal hydrate structures. Structure I, with a 12 A cubic unit cell, contains 46 water molecules and 8 cages of two types, giving an ideal formula (for CH4) of CH4.5.75H2O. The actual formula contains somewhat more water as the cages are not completely filled. Other examples that form Structure I hydrates are C2H6, C2H4, C2H2, CO2, SO2, OCS, Xe, H2S. Structure II, with a 17 A cubic unit cell, contains 136 water molecules, and 8 large and 16 small cages. The ideal formula for CHCl3 is CHCL3.17H2O. Other examples of Structure II hydrates include C3H8, C2H5Cl, acetone, and tetrahydrofuran. Small molecules such as Ar, Kr and probably N2 and O2 also form a Structure II hydrate. The small molecules occupy both the large and small cages, giving an ideal formula of Ar.5.67H2O. The conditions of pressure and temperature for hydrate formation are discussed.

  11. [Preoperative oral hydration for pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Okutomi, Toshiyuki; Kato, Rie

    2011-07-01

    Preoperative oral hydration is an important component of "enhanced recovery after surgery" strategies. This was originally developed for patients undergoing colon surgery. The Obstetric Anesthesia Practice Guideline issued by American Society of Anesthesiologists states that intake of minimum amount of clear fluid 2 hours prior to surgery may be safe. However, anesthesiologists have to consider physiological changes that parturients undergo during pregnancy, such as increased risk of aspiration and impaired glucose tolerance. We also have to consider the potential effect of glucose loading on neonates. Mothers are more likely to develop ketosis by glucose loading. It also stimulates insulin release in the fetus, which can result in neonatal hypoglycemia. In addition, sodium overloading may deteriorate intra-vascular dehydration and cause lung edema to mothers. On the other hand, oral hydration can alleviate a sense of thirst and increase maternal satisfaction. Our data showed that maternal urinal ketone body at delivery tended to decrease with oral hydration during labor. Moreover, some articles suggest that oral hydration may improve utero-placental perfusion. Therefore, we have to balance risks and benefits of oral hydration in parturients. Further investigations are needed among this specific subgroup of patients in order to establish the safe application of preoperative oral hydration. PMID:21800658

  12. Pf1 bacteriophage hydration by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeyev, Ivan V.; Bahri, Salima; Day, Loren A.; McDermott, Ann E.

    2014-12-01

    High resolution two- and three-dimensional heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy (1H-13C, 1H-15N, and 1H-13C-13C HETCOR) has provided a detailed characterization of the internal and external hydration water of the Pf1 virion. This long and slender virion (2000 nm × 7 nm) contains highly stretched DNA within a capsid of small protein subunits, each only 46 amino acid residues. HETCOR cross-peaks have been unambiguously assigned to 25 amino acids, including most external residues 1-21 as well as residues 39-40 and 43-46 deep inside the virion. In addition, the deoxyribose rings of the DNA near the virion axis are in contact with water. The sets of cross-peaks to the DNA and to all 25 amino acid residues were from the same hydration water 1H resonance; some of the assigned residues do not have exchangeable side-chain protons. A mapping of the contacts onto structural models indicates the presence of water "tunnels" through a highly hydrophobic region of the capsid. The present results significantly extend and modify results from a lower resolution study, and yield a comprehensive hydration surface map of Pf1. In addition, the internal water could be distinguished from external hydration water by means of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. The internal water population may serve as a conveniently localized magnetization reservoir for structural studies.

  13. Pf1 bacteriophage hydration by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeyev, Ivan V.; Bahri, Salima; McDermott, Ann E.; Day, Loren A.

    2014-12-14

    High resolution two- and three-dimensional heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy ({sup 1}H–{sup 13}C, {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N, and {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C–{sup 13}C HETCOR) has provided a detailed characterization of the internal and external hydration water of the Pf1 virion. This long and slender virion (2000 nm × 7 nm) contains highly stretched DNA within a capsid of small protein subunits, each only 46 amino acid residues. HETCOR cross-peaks have been unambiguously assigned to 25 amino acids, including most external residues 1–21 as well as residues 39–40 and 43–46 deep inside the virion. In addition, the deoxyribose rings of the DNA near the virion axis are in contact with water. The sets of cross-peaks to the DNA and to all 25 amino acid residues were from the same hydration water {sup 1}H resonance; some of the assigned residues do not have exchangeable side-chain protons. A mapping of the contacts onto structural models indicates the presence of water “tunnels” through a highly hydrophobic region of the capsid. The present results significantly extend and modify results from a lower resolution study, and yield a comprehensive hydration surface map of Pf1. In addition, the internal water could be distinguished from external hydration water by means of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. The internal water population may serve as a conveniently localized magnetization reservoir for structural studies.

  14. Thermodynamics of the maleate and citraconate hydration reactions catalysed by malease from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes.

    PubMed

    van der Werf, M J; van den Tweel, W J; Hartmans, S

    1993-11-01

    Malease from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes catalyses the hydration of both maleate and citraconate to D-malate and D-citramalate, respectively. The Kapp for these hydration reactions were 2050 and 104, respectively, under standard biochemical conditions (25 degrees C, pH 7.0, I = 0.1). The influence of the pH (6.0-8.5) on Kapp was determined. The Gibbs-free-energy changes under standard biochemical conditions for the hydration of the dianionic acids were calculated to be -19.28 kJ.mol-1 and -11.65 kJ.mol-1, respectively. From the obtained data together with data from the literature, the Gibbs free energy of formation of maleate2- and citraconate2- were calculated to be -588.91 kJ.mol-1 and -600.56 kJ.mol-1, respectively. The influence of the temperature (10-40 degrees C) on Kapp was determined for both hydration reactions. The enthalpy change (delta H degrees') and entropy change (delta S degrees') under standard biochemical conditions for the maleate2- (delta H degrees' = 18.07 kJ.mol-1, delta S degrees' = 2.94 J.mol-1 x K-1) and citraconate2- (delta H degrees' = -22.55 kJ.mol-1, delta S degrees' = -35.92 kJ.mol-1 x K-1) hydration reactions were calculated. The reaction rate of malease from Ps. pseudoalcaligenes was studied for both hydration reactions as a function of temperature. From these studies, the Gibbs free energies of activation for the maleate and citraconate hydration reactions catalysed by malease from Ps. pseudoalcaligenes were calculated to be 62.21 kJ.mol-1 and 63.43 kJ.mol-1, respectively. PMID:8223624

  15. Kinetic fractionation of carbon and oxygen isotopes during hydration of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeebe, Richard E.

    2014-08-01

    Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) during the inorganic hydration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in aqueous solution cause reduced stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios (13C/12C and 18O/16O) in the reaction product carbonic acid (H2CO3) or bicarbonate ion (HCO3-), relative to CO2. While such KIEs are of importance in various physicochemical, geochemical, and biological systems, very few experimental and theoretical studies have attempted to determine the magnitude of the carbon and oxygen kinetic isotope fractionation (KIF) during hydration of CO2. Here I use transition state theory (TST) and quantum chemistry calculations to investigate the reaction rates of isotopic reactants CO2+nH2O (n = 1-8) along the hydration pathway to H2CO3 or HCO3-. Locating transition states is difficult and the quantum chemistry calculations time-consuming at large n. My results suggest that the hydration mechanism for n = 1-3 is unlikely to be the dominant pathway producing KIFs during CO2 hydration in aqueous solution; hydration mechanisms for n ⩾ 4 appear more likely. For n = 4-8, the predicted KIF based on MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ calculations at 25 °C is ∼1.023-1.033 and ∼1.013-1.015, for carbon and oxygen, respectively. However, these values are uncertain and the results of the present study suggest that new experimental work is required to accurately determine the KIF of carbon and oxygen during CO2 hydration.

  16. Hydration during intense exercise training.

    PubMed

    Maughan, R J; Meyer, N L

    2013-01-01

    Hydration status has profound effects on both physical and mental performance, and sports performance is thus critically affected. Both overhydration and underhydration - if sufficiently severe - will impair performance and pose a risk to health. Athletes may begin exercise in a hypohydrated state as a result of incomplete recovery from water loss induced in order to achieve a specific body mass target or due to incomplete recovery from a previous competition or training session. Dehydration will also develop in endurance exercise where fluid intake does not match water loss. The focus has generally been on training rather than on competition, but sweat loss and fluid replacement in training may have important implications. Hypohydration may impair training quality and may also increase stress levels. It is unclear whether this will have negative effects (reduced training quality, impaired immunity) or whether it will promote a greater adaptive response. Hypohydration and the consequent hyperthermia, however, can enhance the effectiveness of a heat acclimation program, resulting in improved endurance performance in warm and temperate environments. Drinking in training may be important in enhancing tolerance of the gut when athletes plan to drink in competition. The distribution of water between body water compartments may also be important in the initiation and promotion of cellular adaptations to the training stimulus. PMID:23899752

  17. Phase Transition of Methane Gas Hydrate and Response of Marine Gas Hydrate Systems to Environmental Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.

    2003-12-01

    Gas hydrates, which contain mostly methane as the gas component in marine sediment, are stable under relatively high pressure and low temperature conditions such as those found along continental margins and permafrost regions. Its stability is mostly controlled by in-situ pressure, temperature and salinity of pore fluid. Environmentally introduced changes in pressure and temperature can affect the stability of gas hydrate in marine sediment. While certain changes may enhance the process of gas hydrate formation, we are much more interested in the resultant dissociation processes, which may contribute to sub-marine slope instability, seafloor sediment failure, formation of mud volcanoes and pock marks, potential vulnerability of engineering structures, and the risk to drilling and production. We have been developing models to quantify phase transition processes of marine gas hydrates and to investigate the response of marine gas hydrate systems to environmental changes. Methane gas hydrate system is considered as a three-component (water, methane, salt) four-phase (liquid, gas, hydrate, halite) system. Pressure, temperature and salinity of pore fluid constrain the stability of gas hydrate and affect phase transition processes via their effects on methane solubility and fluid density and enthalpy. Compared to the great quantity of studies on its stability in the literature, in-depth research on phase transition of gas hydrate is surprisingly much less. A method, which employs pressure, enthalpy, salinity and methane content as independent variables, is developed to calculate phase transition processes of the three-component four-phase system. Temperature, an intensive thermodynamic parameter, is found not sufficient in describing phase transition of gas hydrate. The extensive thermodynamic parameter enthalpy, on the other hand, is found to be sufficient both in calculation of the phase transition processes and in modeling marine gas hydrate systems. Processes

  18. Mild hydration of didecyldimethylammonium chloride modified DNA by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance and by sorption isotherm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harańczyk, H.; Kobierski, J.; Nizioł, J.; Hebda, E.; Pielichowski, J.; Zalitacz, D.; Marzec, M.; El-Ghayoury, A.

    2013-01-01

    The gaseous phase hydration of deoxyribonucleic acid and didecyldimethylammonium chloride (C19H42ClN) complexes (DNA-DDCA) was observed using hydration kinetics, sorption isotherm, and high power nuclear magnetic resonance. Three bound water fractions were distinguished: (i) a very tightly bound water not removed by incubation over silica gel, (ii) a tightly bound water saturating with the hydration time t1h = (0.59 ± 0.04) h, and a loosely bound water fraction, (iii) with the hydration time t2h = (20.9 ± 1.3) h. Proton free induction decay was decomposed into the signal associated with the solid matrix of DNA-DDCA complex (T2S∗≈ 30 μs) and two liquid signal components coming from tightly bound (T2L1∗≈ 100 μs) and from loosely bound water fraction (T2L2∗≈ 1000 μs).

  19. Hydrate pingoes at Nyegga: some characteristic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovland, M.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrate pingoes were observed on the seafloor during two different remotely operated vehicle (ROV)-dives, conducted by Statoil at complex-pockmark G11, at Nyegga, off Mid-Norway. Confirmation that these structures actually represent hydrate ice-cored sediment mounds (pingoes), was done by other investigators (Ivanov et al., 2006). Because it is expected that hydrate pingoes represent relatively dynamic seafloor topographic structures and that their shape and size most probably will change over relatively short time, it is important to know how to recognise them visually. Hovland and Svensen (2006) highlighted five different characteristic aspects that define hydrate pingoes on the sea floor: 1) They are dome- or disc-shaped features, which may attain any size from ~0.5 m in height and upwards. Inside pockmark G11, they were up to 1 m high. 2) They are circular or oval in plan view and may attain lateral sizes on the seafloor ranging upwards from ~0.5 m. Inside G11 they had lengths of several metres and widths of up to 4 m. 3) They have dense communities of organisms growing on their surfaces. At G11, they were overgrown with small pogonophoran tube-worms. 4) They have patches of white or grey bacterial mats growing on their surface, indicating advection (seepage) of reduced pore-waters. 5) They have small pits and patches of fluidized sediments on their surface, indicating pit corrosion of the sub-surface gas hydrate. Because gas hydrates often form in high-porosity, near-surface sediments, where water is readily available, it is thought that they will build up at locations where gases are actively migrating upwards from depth. However, gas hydrates are not stable in the presence of ambient seawater, as seawater is deficient in guest molecule gases (normally methane). Therefore, they tend to build up below surface above conduits for gas flow from depth. But, the near-surface hydrate ice-lenses will continually be corroded by seawater circulating into the sediments

  20. Facile synthesis of highly active hydrated yttrium oxide towards arsenate adsorption.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Yu, Ling; Sun, Min; Paul Chen, J

    2016-07-15

    A novel hydrated yttrium oxide adsorbent with high capacity towards the arsenate (As(V)) adsorption was fabricated by a one-step hydrothermal process. Structure analysis identified the hydrated yttrium oxide to be Y2O(OH)4·1.5H2O, which displayed as irregular rods in the range of tens to hundreds of nanometers. The adsorbent exhibited favorable As(V) adsorption efficiency in a wide pH range from 4.0 to 7.0, with the maximum adsorption capacity of 480.2mg-As/g obtained at pH 5.0. Both the kinetics and isotherm studies demonstrated that the adsorption of the As(V) was a monolayer chemical adsorption process, in which the ion exchange between the hydroxyl groups on the hydrated yttrium oxide and arsenate anions played a key role in the uptake of the As(V). During the adsorption, the As(V) anions were replaced the hydroxyl groups and bound to the hydrated yttrium oxide via the linkage of AsOY. The presence of fluoride and phosphate greatly hindered the As(V) uptake on the hydrated yttrium oxide, whereas the bicarbonate, sulfate and humic acid showed insignificant impacts on the removal. PMID:27135142

  1. Influence of polymeric excipient properties on crystal hydrate formation kinetics of caffeine in aqueous slurries.

    PubMed

    Gift, Alan D; Southard, Leslie A; Riesberg, Amanda L

    2012-05-01

    The influence of polymeric excipients on the hydrate transformation of caffeine (CAF) was studied. Anhydrous CAF was added to aqueous solutions containing different additives and the transformation to the hydrate form was monitored using in-line Raman spectroscopy. Various properties of two known inhibitors of CAF hydrate formation, polyacrylic acid (PAA) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), were investigated. For inhibition by PAA, a pH dependence was observed: at low pH, the inhibition was greatest, whereas no inhibitory effects were observed at pH above 6.5. For PVA, grades with high percent hydrolysis were the most effective at inhibiting the transformation. In addition, PVA with higher molecular weight showed slightly more inhibition than the shorter chain PVA polymers. A variety of other hydroxyl containing compounds were examined but none inhibited the CAF anhydrate-to-hydrate transformation. The observed inhibitory effects of PAA and PVA are attributed to the large number of closely spaced hydrogen bond donating groups of the polymer molecule, which can interact with the CAF hydrate crystal. PMID:22271407

  2. Using magnetic resonance imaging to monitor CH4 hydrate formation and spontaneous conversion of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate in porous media.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Bernard A; Stevens, Jim; Howard, James J; Graue, Arne; Kvamme, Bjorn; Aspenes, Erick; Ersland, Geir; Husebø, Jarle; Zornes, David R

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to monitor and quantify methane hydrate formation and exchange in porous media. Conversion of methane hydrate to carbon dioxide hydrate, when exposed to liquid carbon dioxide at 8.27 MPa and approximately 4 degrees C, was experimentally demonstrated with MRI data and verified by mass balance calculations of consumed volumes of gases and liquids. No detectable dissociation of the hydrate was measured during the exchange process. PMID:19168304

  3. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  4. Properties of equilibrium carbon dioxide hydrate in porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, V. P.; Gorodetskii, E. E.; Podnek, V. E.; Grigoriev, B. A.

    2016-09-01

    Specific heat capacity, dissociation heat and hydration number of carbon dioxide hydrate in porous medium are determined by adiabatic calorimetry method. The measurements were carried out in the temperature range 250-290 K and in pressure range 1-5 MPa. The measured specific heat of the hydrate is approximately 2.7 J/(g K), which is significantly larger than the specific heat of methane hydrate. In particular, at heating, larger value of the specific heat of carbon dioxide hydrate is a result of gas emission from the hydrate. The hydration number at the hydrate-gas coexistence changes from 6.2 to 6.9. The dissociation heat of carbon dioxide hydrate varies from the 55 kJ/mol near the upper quadruple point to the 57 kJ/mol near the lower quadruple point.

  5. Depressurization and electrical heating of hydrate sediment for gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we performed a study on electrical heating of the hydrate core combined with depressurization for gas production. In-situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary for commercial recovery of natural gas from natural gas hydrate sediment. Thermal stimulation is an effective dissociation method, along with depressurization.To simulate methane gas production from methane hydrate layer, we investigated electrical heating of methane hydrate sediment. A decrease in core temperature due to the endothermic reaction of methane hydrate dissociation was suppressed and the core temperature increased between 1oC and 4oC above the control temperature with electric heating. A current density of 10A/m2 with depressurization would effectively dissociate hydrate. Therefore, depressurization and additional electrode heating of hydrate sediment saturated with electrolyte solution was confirmed to enable higher gas production from sediment with less electric power.

  6. High-Altitude Hydration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott E.; Orndoff, Evelyne; Bue, Grant C.; Schaefbauer, Mark E.; Urban, Kase

    2010-01-01

    Three methods are being developed for keeping water from freezing during high-altitude climbs so that mountaineers can remain hydrated. Three strategies have been developed. At the time of this reporting two needed to be tested in the field and one was conceptual. The first method is Passive Thermal Control Using Aerogels. This involves mounting the fluid reservoir of the climber s canteen to an inner layer of clothing for better heat retention. For the field test, bottles were mounted to the inner fleece layer of clothing, and then aerogel insulation was placed on the outside of the bottle, and circumferentially around the drink straw. When climbers need to drink, they can pull up the insulated straw from underneath the down suit, take a sip, and then put it back into the relative warmth of the suit. For the field test, a data logger assessed the temperatures of the water reservoir, as well as near the tip of the drink straw. The second method is Passive Thermal Control with Copper-Shielded Drink Straw and Aerogels, also mounted to inner layers of clothing for better heat retention. Braided wire emanates from the inside of the fleece jacket layer, and continues up and around the drink straw in order to use body heat to keep the system-critical drink straw warm enough to keep water in the liquid state. For the field test, a data logger will be used to compare this with the above concept. The third, and still conceptual, method is Active Thermal Control with Microcontroller. If the above methods do not work, microcontrollers and tape heaters have been identified that could keep the drink straw warm even under extremely cold conditions. Power requirements are not yet determined because the thermal environment inside the down suit relative to the external environment has not been established. A data logger will be used to track both the external and internal temperatures of the suit on a summit day.

  7. Study on propane-butane gas storage by hydrate technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Nurkholis; Wijayanti, Widya; Widhiyanuriyawan, Denny

    2016-03-01

    Different technology has been applied to store and transport gas fuel. In this work the storage of gas mixture of propane-butane by hydrate technology was studied. The investigation was done on the effect of crystallizer rotation speed on the formation of propane-butane hydrate. The hydrates were formed using crystallizer with rotation speed of 100, 200, and 300 rpm. The formation of gas hydrates was done at initial pressure of 3 bar and temperature of 274K. The results indicated that the higher rotation speed was found to increase the formation rate of propane-butane hydrate and improve the hydrates stability.

  8. Complex admixtures of clathrate hydrates in a water desalination method

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Blake A.; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Anderson, David W.

    2009-07-14

    Disclosed is a method that achieves water desalination by utilizing and optimizing clathrate hydrate phenomena. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds of gas and water that desalinate water by excluding salt molecules during crystallization. Contacting a hydrate forming gaseous species with water will spontaneously form hydrates at specific temperatures and pressures through the extraction of water molecules from the bulk phase followed by crystallite nucleation. Subsequent dissociation of pure hydrates yields fresh water and, if operated correctly, allows the hydrate-forming gas to be efficiently recycled into the process stream.

  9. Hydrate problems in pipelines: A study from Norwegian continental waters

    SciTech Connect

    Lysne, D.; Larsen, R.; Lund, A.; Thomsen, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    This study was undertaken by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate and SINTEF to identify hydrate problems occurring in pipelines on the Norwegian continental shelf. A brief review of hydrate dissociation theory is given. Three major techniques for hydrate removal are discussed, as well as hazards related to hydrate plug removal. Questionnaire answers from 15 companies operating in Norwegian waters show three specific occurrences of hydrate plugs in the North Sea. Problems from other geographical areas are also discussed. Hydrate problems are reported for a wide variety of pipe lengths, diameters, profiles, insulations characteristics and fluids. Most problems occur during normal operation.

  10. Gas storage through impermeation of porous media by hydrate formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzikiriakos, S.G.; Englezos, P.

    1994-12-31

    A mathematical model was developed for the simulation of the methane hydrate formation in a homocline. The rate of hydrate growth was computed by calculating the movement of the hydrate-water interface. This movement was found to be very slow (less than 0.01 mm/hr) and strongly dependent on the value of the effective diffusivity of the gas in the hydrate zone. The temperature at the hydrate-water interface was found to remain practically constant. Finally, the simulations indicate that the development of a hydrate barrier in the permeable formation creates favorable gas storage conditions in the homocline.

  11. Nucleation and Growth of Gas Hydrate in Natural Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, S. A.; Osegovic, J. P.; Young, J. C.; Max, M. D.; Ames, A. L.

    2003-12-01

    Large-scale nucleation of gas hydrate takes place when hydrate-forming gas and seawater are brought together under suitable pressure-temperature conditions or where dissolved hydrate-forming gas in saturated or near-saturated seawater is chilled or brought to higher pressures. Profuse formation of hydrate shells on gas bubbles and nucleation of at least five different forms of gas hydrate have been achieved in fresh natural seawater. Growth of masses of solid gas hydrate takes place when hydrate-forming gas reactant dissolved in seawater is brought into the vicinity of the hydrate. The gas concentration of the enriched water in the vicinity of hydrate is higher than the hydrate equilibrium gas concentration. Hydrate growth under these conditions is accelerated due to the chemical potential difference between the enriched water and the hydrate crystals, which induces mass flux of dissolved hydrate forming gas into new hydrate crystals. As long as water enriched in the hydrate-forming gas is circulated into the vicinity of the hydrate, growth proceeds into the water space. Experimental approaches for growth of examples of solid masses of hydrate are presented. Results of these experiments provide an insight into the growth of gas hydrate under natural conditions where interstitial water in marine sediments is captured by burial from open seawater, and where solid gas hydrate forms on the seafloor. By using fresh natural seawater, which is a chemically and materially complex fluid, our experiments in pressurized, refrigerated reactors should closely track the growth history of solid hydrate in the natural environment. In our model for hydrate growth in sediments, nearly complete pore fill by diagenetic hydrate can best be accomplished by nucleation of hydrate at a point source within the pore water or at a particular point on sediment particulate, with growth outward into the water space that is refreshed with ground water having high concentrations of hydrate

  12. Development of hydrate risk quantification in oil and gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Piyush N.

    Subsea flowlines that transport hydrocarbons from wellhead to the processing facility face issues from solid deposits such as hydrates, waxes, asphaltenes, etc. The solid deposits not only affect the production but also pose a safety concern; thus, flow assurance is significantly important in designing and operating subsea oil and gas production. In most subsea oil and gas operations, gas hydrates form at high pressure and low temperature conditions, causing the risk of plugging flowlines, with a undesirable impact on production. Over the years, the oil and gas industry has shifted their perspective from hydrate avoidance to hydrate management given several parameters such as production facility, production chemistry, economic and environmental concerns. Thus, understanding the level of hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines is an important in developing efficient hydrate management techniques. In the past, hydrate formation models were developed for various flow-systems (e.g., oil dominated, water dominated, and gas dominated) present in the oil and gas production. The objective of this research is to extend the application of the present hydrate prediction models for assessing the hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines that are prone to hydrate formation. It involves a novel approach for developing quantitative hydrate risk models based on the conceptual models built from the qualitative knowledge obtained from experimental studies. A comprehensive hydrate risk model, that ranks the hydrate risk associated with the subsea production system as a function of time, hydrates, and several other parameters, which account for inertial, viscous, interfacial forces acting on the flow-system, is developed for oil dominated and condensate systems. The hydrate plugging risk for water dominated systems is successfully modeled using The Colorado School of Mines Hydrate Flow Assurance Tool (CSMHyFAST). It is found that CSMHyFAST can be used as a screening tool in

  13. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  14. Gas hydrates: past and future geohazard?

    PubMed

    Maslin, Mark; Owen, Matthew; Betts, Richard; Day, Simon; Dunkley Jones, Tom; Ridgwell, Andrew

    2010-05-28

    Gas hydrates are ice-like deposits containing a mixture of water and gas; the most common gas is methane. Gas hydrates are stable under high pressures and relatively low temperatures and are found underneath the oceans and in permafrost regions. Estimates range from 500 to 10,000 giga tonnes of carbon (best current estimate 1600-2000 GtC) stored in ocean sediments and 400 GtC in Arctic permafrost. Gas hydrates may pose a serious geohazard in the near future owing to the adverse effects of global warming on the stability of gas hydrate deposits both in ocean sediments and in permafrost. It is still unknown whether future ocean warming could lead to significant methane release, as thermal penetration of marine sediments to the clathrate-gas interface could be slow enough to allow a new equilibrium to occur without any gas escaping. Even if methane gas does escape, it is still unclear how much of this could be oxidized in the overlying ocean. Models of the global inventory of hydrates and trapped methane bubbles suggest that a global 3( degrees )C warming could release between 35 and 940 GtC, which could add up to an additional 0.5( degrees )C to global warming. The destabilization of gas hydrate reserves in permafrost areas is more certain as climate models predict that high-latitude regions will be disproportionately affected by global warming with temperature increases of over 12( degrees )C predicted for much of North America and Northern Asia. Our current estimates of gas hydrate storage in the Arctic region are, however, extremely poor and non-existent for Antarctica. The shrinking of both the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets in response to regional warming may also lead to destabilization of gas hydrates. As ice sheets shrink, the weight removed allows the coastal region and adjacent continental slope to rise through isostacy. This removal of hydrostatic pressure could destabilize gas hydrates, leading to massive slope failure, and may increase the risk of

  15. Characterization of Gas-Hydrate Sediment: In Situ Evaluation of Hydrate Saturation in Pores of Pressured Sedimental Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Y.; Konno, Y.; Kida, M.; Nagao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrate saturation of gas-hydrate bearing sediment is a key of gas production from natural gas-hydrate reservoir. Developable natural gas-hydrates by conventional gas/oil production apparatus almost exist in unconsolidated sedimental layer. Generally, hydrate saturations of sedimental samples are directly estimated by volume of gas generated from dissociation of gas hydrates in pore spaces, porosity data and volume of the sediments. Furthermore, hydrate saturation can be also assessed using velocity of P-wave through sedimental samples. Nevertheless, hydrate saturation would be changed by morphological variations (grain-coating, cementing and pore-filling model) of gas hydrates in pore spaces. Jin et al.[1,2] recently observed the O-H stretching bands of H2O molecules of methane hydrate in porous media using an attenuated total reflection IR (ATR-IR) spectra. They observed in situ hydrate formation/dissociation process in sandy samples (Tohoku Keisya number 8, grain size of ca. 110 μm). In this presentation, we present IR spectroscopy approach to in situ evaluation of hydrate saturation of pressured gas-hydrate sediments. This work was supported by funding from the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) planned by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), Japan. [1] Jin, Y.; Konno, Y.; Nagao, J. Energy Fules, 2012, 26, 2242-2247. [2] Jin, Y.; Oyama, H.; Nagao, J. Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 2009, 48, No. 108001.

  16. Interfacial phenomena in gas hydrate systems.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-03-21

    Gas hydrates are crystalline inclusion compounds, where molecular cages of water trap lighter species under specific thermodynamic conditions. Hydrates play an essential role in global energy systems, as both a hinderance when formed in traditional fuel production and a substantial resource when formed by nature. In both traditional and unconventional fuel production, hydrates share interfaces with a tremendous diversity of materials, including hydrocarbons, aqueous solutions, and inorganic solids. This article presents a state-of-the-art understanding of hydrate interfacial thermodynamics and growth kinetics, and the physiochemical controls that may be exerted on both. Specific attention is paid to the molecular structure and interactions of water, guest molecules, and hetero-molecules (e.g., surfactants) near the interface. Gas hydrate nucleation and growth mechanics are also presented, based on studies using a combination of molecular modeling, vibrational spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffraction. The fundamental physical and chemical knowledge and methods presented in this review may be of value in probing parallel systems of crystal growth in solid inclusion compounds, crystal growth modifiers, emulsion stabilization, and reactive particle flow in solid slurries. PMID:26781172

  17. Novel Hydrogen Hydrate Structures under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Guang-Rui; Lyakhov, Andriy O.; Zhu, Qiang; Oganov, Artem R.; Dong, Xiao

    2014-07-01

    Gas hydrates are systems of prime importance. In particular, hydrogen hydrates are potential materials of icy satellites and comets, and may be used for hydrogen storage. We explore the H2O-H2 system at pressures in the range 0-100 GPa with ab initio variable-composition evolutionary simulations. According to our calculation and previous experiments, the H2O-H2 system undergoes a series of transformations with pressure, and adopts the known open-network clathrate structures (sII, C0), dense ``filled ice'' structures (C1, C2) and two novel hydrate phases. One of these is based on the hexagonal ice framework and has the same H2O:H2 ratio (2:1) as the C0 phase at low pressures and similar enthalpy (we name this phase Ih-C0). The other newly predicted hydrate phase has a 1:2 H2O:H2 ratio and structure based on cubic ice. This phase (which we name C3) is predicted to be thermodynamically stable above 38 GPa when including van der Waals interactions and zero-point vibrational energy, and explains previously mysterious experimental X-ray diffraction and Raman measurements. This is the hydrogen-richest hydrate and this phase has a remarkable gravimetric density (18 wt.%) of easily extractable hydrogen.

  18. Dynamical Disorder in the DNA Hydration Shell.

    PubMed

    Duboué-Dijon, Elise; Fogarty, Aoife C; Hynes, James T; Laage, Damien

    2016-06-22

    The reorientation and hydrogen-bond dynamics of water molecules within the hydration shell of a B-DNA dodecamer, which are of interest for many of its biochemical functions, are investigated via molecular dynamics simulations and an analytic jump model, which provide valuable new molecular level insights into these dynamics. Different sources of heterogeneity in the hydration shell dynamics are determined. First, a pronounced spatial heterogeneity is found at the DNA interface and explained via the jump model by the diversity in local DNA interfacial topographies and DNA-water H-bond interactions. While most of the hydration shell is moderately retarded with respect to the bulk, some water molecules confined in the narrow minor groove exhibit very slow dynamics. An additional source of heterogeneity is found to be caused by the DNA conformational fluctuations, which modulate the water dynamics. The groove widening aids the approach of, and the jump to, a new water H-bond partner. This temporal heterogeneity is especially strong in the minor groove, where groove width fluctuations occur on the same time scale as the water H-bond rearrangements, leading to a strong dynamical disorder. The usual simplifying assumption that hydration shell dynamics is much faster than DNA dynamics is thus not valid; our results show that biomolecular conformational fluctuations are essential to facilitate the water motions and accelerate the hydration dynamics in confined groove sites. PMID:27240107

  19. Fragmentation and hydration of tektites and microtektites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glass, B.P.; Muenow, D.W.; Bohor, B.F.; Meeker, G.P.

    1997-01-01

    An examination of data collected over the last 30 years indicates that the percent of glass fragments vs. whole splash forms in the Cenozoic microtektite strewn fields increases towards the source crater (or source region). We propose that this is due to thermal stress produced when tektites and larger microtektites fall into water near the source crater while still relatively hot (>1150 ??C). We also find evidence (low major oxide totals, frothing when melted) for hydration of most of the North American tektite fragments and microtektites found in marine sediments. High-temperature mass spectrometry indicates that these tektite fragments and microtektites contain up to 3.8 wt% H2O. The H2O-release behavior during the high-temperature mass-spectrometric analysis, plus high Cl abundances (???0.05 wt%), indicate that the North. American tektite fragments and microtektites were hydrated in the marine environment (i.e., the H2O was not trapped solely on quenching from a melt). The younger Ivory Coast and Australasian microtektites do not exhibit much evidence of hydration (at least not in excess of 0.5 wt% H2O); this suggests that the degree of hydration increases with age. In addition, we find that some glass spherules (with 65 wt% SiO2 can undergo simple hydration in the marine environment, while impact glasses (with <65 wt% SiO2) can also undergo palagonitization.

  20. Novel hydrogen hydrate structures under pressure.

    PubMed

    Qian, Guang-Rui; Lyakhov, Andriy O; Zhu, Qiang; Oganov, Artem R; Dong, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Gas hydrates are systems of prime importance. In particular, hydrogen hydrates are potential materials of icy satellites and comets, and may be used for hydrogen storage. We explore the H₂O-H₂ system at pressures in the range 0-100 GPa with ab initio variable-composition evolutionary simulations. According to our calculation and previous experiments, the H₂O-H₂ system undergoes a series of transformations with pressure, and adopts the known open-network clathrate structures (sII, C₀), dense "filled ice" structures (C₁, C₂) and two novel hydrate phases. One of these is based on the hexagonal ice framework and has the same H₂O:H₂ ratio (2:1) as the C₀ phase at low pressures and similar enthalpy (we name this phase Ih-C₀). The other newly predicted hydrate phase has a 1:2 H₂O:H₂ ratio and structure based on cubic ice. This phase (which we name C₃) is predicted to be thermodynamically stable above 38 GPa when including van der Waals interactions and zero-point vibrational energy, and explains previously mysterious experimental X-ray diffraction and Raman measurements. This is the hydrogen-richest hydrate and this phase has a remarkable gravimetric density (18 wt.%) of easily extractable hydrogen. PMID:25001502

  1. On the structure selectivity of clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2011-06-30

    We propose a strategic method to search for a new clathrate hydrate by investigating the selectivity of its crystalline structure, which has been expected to depend mostly on the guest species and less on the thermodynamic conditions. Relative stability among various morphologies is examined in terms of the chemical potential of water of clathrate hydrates in equilibrium with guest gases. This evaluation is performed by calculating the free energy of cage occupancy according to the standard statistical mechanical theory with the aid of the Yarmolyuk and Kripyakevich's rule on the Frank-Kasper type alloys to estimate the numbers of cages of various types. Thus, a comprehensive interpretation of the selectivity of crystalline structures is successfully made. We explain why two major structures are stable in most of the thermodynamic conditions and establish a relation between polymorphism of clathrate hydrate and the guest size and other parameters, thereby suggesting a way to find a new clathrate hydrate by appropriate choice of the guest species and/or the thermodynamic properties. It is found that there is a small room in the above parameter space for the other structure than the major two to be the most stable, including a new structure. In addition, simple but thorough elucidation is given for preferential formation of TS-I structure in bromine hydrate. PMID:21619053

  2. Blue LED irradiation to hydration of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Requena, Michelle B.; Lizarelli, Rosane F., Z.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    Blue LED system irradiation shows many important properties on skin as: bacterial decontamination, degradation of endogenous skin chromophores and biostimulation. In this clinical study we prove that the blue light improves the skin hydration. In the literature none authors reports this biological property on skin. Then this study aims to discuss the role of blue light in the skin hydration. Twenty patients were selected to this study with age between 25-35 years old and phototype I, II and III. A defined area from forearm was pre determined (A = 4.0 cm2). The study was randomized in two treatment groups using one blue light device (power of 5.3mW and irradiance of 10.8mW/cm2). The first treatment group was irradiated with 3J/cm2 (277seconds) and the second with 6J/cm2 (555 seconds). The skin hydration evaluations were done using a corneometer. The measurements were collected in 7, 14, 21 and 30 days, during the treatment. Statistical test of ANOVA, Tukey and T-Student were applied considering 5% of significance. In conclusion, both doses were able to improve the skin hydration; however, 6J/cm2 has kept this hydration for 30 days.

  3. Stability evaluation of hydrate-bearing sediments during thermally-driven hydrate dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, T.; Cho, G.; Santamarina, J.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrate-bearing sediments may destabilize spontaneously as part of geological processes, unavoidably during petroleum drilling/production operations, or intentionally as part of gas extraction from the hydrate itself. In all cases, high pore fluid pressure generation is anticipated during hydrate dissociation. This study examined how thermal changes destabilize gas hydrate-bearing sediments. First, an analytical formulation was derived for predicting fluid pressure evolution in hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to thermal stimulation without mass transfer. The formulation captures the self-preservation behavior, calculates the hydrate and free gas quantities during dissociation, considering effective stress-controlled sediment compressibility and gas solubility in aqueous phase. Pore fluid pressure generation is proportional to the initial hydrate fraction and the sediment bulk stiffness; is inversely proportional to the initial gas fraction and gas solubility; and is limited by changes in effective stress that cause the failure of the sediment. Second, the analytical formulation for hydrate dissociation was incorporated as a user-defined function into a verified finite difference code (FLAC2D). The underlying physical processes of hydrate-bearing sediments, including hydrate dissociation, self-preservation, pore pressure evolution, gas dissolution, and sediment volume expansion, were coupled with the thermal conduction, pore fluid flow, and mechanical response of sediments. We conducted the simulations for a duration of 20 years, assuming a constant-temperature wellbore transferred heat to the surrounding hydrate-bearing sediments, resulting in dissociation of methane hydrate in the well vicinity. The model predicted dissociation-induced excess pore fluid pressures which resulted in a large volume expansion and plastic deformation of the sediments. Furthermore, when the critical stress was reached, localized shear failure of the sediment around the borehole was

  4. Quantifying hydrate solidification front advancing using method of characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Kehua; DiCarlo, David; Flemings, Peter B.

    2015-10-01

    We develop a one-dimensional analytical solution based on the method of characteristics to explore hydrate formation from gas injection into brine-saturated sediments within the hydrate stability zone. Our solution includes fully coupled multiphase and multicomponent flow and the associated advective transport in a homogeneous system. Our solution shows that hydrate saturation is controlled by the initial thermodynamic state of the system and changed by the gas fractional flow. Hydrate saturation in gas-rich systems can be estimated by 1-cl0/cle when Darcy flow dominates, where cl0 is the initial mass fraction of salt in brine, and cle is the mass fraction of salt in brine at three-phase (gas, liquid, and hydrate) equilibrium. Hydrate saturation is constant, gas saturation and gas flux decrease, and liquid saturation and liquid flux increase with the distance from the gas inlet to the hydrate solidification front. The total gas and liquid flux is constant from the gas inlet to the hydrate solidification front and decreases abruptly at the hydrate solidification front due to gas inclusion into the hydrate phase. The advancing velocity of the hydrate solidification front decreases with hydrate saturation at a fixed gas inflow rate. This analytical solution illuminates how hydrate is formed by gas injection (methane, CO2, ethane, propane) at both the laboratory and field scales.

  5. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  6. Curvature Dependence of Hydrophobic Hydration Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, R. Gregor; Heyden, Matthias; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the solute curvature dependence of water dynamics in the vicinity of hydrophobic spherical solutes using molecular dynamics simulations. For both the lateral and perpendicular diffusivity, as well as for H-bond kinetics of water in the first hydration shell, we find a nonmonotonic solute-size dependence, exhibiting extrema close to the well-known structural crossover length scale for hydrophobic hydration. Additionally, we find an apparent anomalous diffusion for water moving parallel to the surface of small solutes, which, however, can be explained by topology effects. Our findings regarding the intimate connection between solute curvature and water dynamics has implications for our understanding of hydration dynamics at heterogeneous biomolecular surfaces.

  7. Method for production of hydrocarbons from hydrates

    DOEpatents

    McGuire, Patrick L.

    1984-01-01

    A method of recovering natural gas entrapped in frozen subsurface gas hydrate formations in arctic regions. A hot supersaturated solution of CaCl.sub.2 or CaBr.sub.2, or a mixture thereof, is pumped under pressure down a wellbore and into a subsurface hydrate formation so as to hydrostatically fracture the formation. The CaCl.sub.2 /CaBr.sub.2 solution dissolves the solid hydrates and thereby releases the gas entrapped therein. Additionally, the solution contains a polymeric viscosifier, which operates to maintain in suspension finely divided crystalline CaCl.sub.2 /CaBr.sub.2 that precipitates from the supersaturated solution as it is cooled during injection into the formation.

  8. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    1999-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel in order to mix its respective portion of liquid water with the corresponding portion of the stream. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  9. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  10. Relaxation mechanism of the hydrated electron.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Madeline H; Williams, Holly L; Shreve, Alexander T; Neumark, Daniel M

    2013-12-20

    The relaxation dynamics of the photoexcited hydrated electron have been subject to conflicting interpretations. Here, we report time-resolved photoelectron spectra of hydrated electrons in a liquid microjet with the aim of clarifying ambiguities from previous experiments. A sequence of three ultrashort laser pulses (~100 femtosecond duration) successively created hydrated electrons by charge-transfer-to-solvent excitation of dissolved anions, electronically excited these electrons via the s→p transition, and then ejected them into vacuum. Two distinct transient signals were observed. One was assigned to the initially excited p-state with a lifetime of ~75 femtoseconds, and the other, with a lifetime of ~400 femtoseconds, was attributed to s-state electrons just after internal conversion in a nonequilibrated solvent environment. These assignments support the nonadiabatic relaxation model. PMID:24357314

  11. Apparatus investigates geological aspects of gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Dillon, William P.

    1999-01-01

    The US Geological Survey has developed a laboratory research system which allows the study of the creation and dissociation of gas hydrates under deepwater conditions and with different sediment types and pore fluids. The system called GHASTLI (gas hydrate and sediment test laboratory instrument) comprises a pressure chamber which holds a sediment specimen, and which can simulate water depths to 2,500m and different sediment overburden. Seawater and gas flow through a sediment specimen can be precisely controlled and monitored. It can simulate a wide range of geology and processes and help to improve understanding of gas hydrate processes and aid prediction of geohazards, their control and potential use as an energy source. This article describes GHASTLI and how it is able to simulate natural conditions, focusing on fluid volume, acoustic velocity-compressional and shear wave, electric resistance, temperature, pore pressure, shear strength, and permeability.

  12. Aggregation of Calcium Silicate Hydrate Nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Delhorme, Maxime; Labbez, Christophe; Turesson, Martin; Lesniewska, Eric; Woodward, Cliff E; Jönsson, Bo

    2016-03-01

    We study the aggregation of calcium silicate hydrate nanoplatelets on a surface by means of Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations at thermodynamic equilibrium. Calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is the main component formed in cement and is responsible for the strength of the material. The hydrate is formed in early cement paste and grows to form platelets on the nanoscale, which aggregate either on dissolving cement particles or on auxiliary particles. The general result is that the experimentally observed variations in these dynamic processes generically called growth can be rationalized from interaction free energies, that is, from pure thermodynamic arguments. We further show that the surface charge density of the particles determines the aggregate structures formed by C-S-H and thus their growth modes. PMID:26859614

  13. Design of a Brønsted acid with two different acidic sites: synthesis and application of aryl phosphinic acid-phosphoric acid as a Brønsted acid catalyst.

    PubMed

    Momiyama, N; Narumi, T; Terada, M

    2015-12-11

    A Brønsted acid with two different acidic sites, aryl phosphinic acid-phosphoric acid, has been synthesized. Its catalytic performance was assessed in the hetero-Diels-Alder reaction of aldehyde hydrates with Danishefsky's diene, achieving high reaction efficiency. PMID:26445921

  14. Terahertz time-lapse imaging of hydration in physiological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, David B.; Taylor, Zachary D.; Bajwa, Neha; Tewari, Priyamvada; Maccabi, Ashkan; Sung, Shijun; Singh, Rahul S.; Culjat, Martin O.; Grundfest, Warren S.; Brown, Elliott R.

    2011-02-01

    This study describes terahertz (THz) imaging of hydration changes in physiological tissues with high water concentration sensitivity. A fast-scanning, pulsed THz imaging system (centered at 525 GHz; 125 GHz bandwidth) was utilized to acquire a 35 mm x 35 mm field-of-view with 0.5 mm x 0.5 mm pixels in less than two minutes. THz time-lapsed images were taken on three sample systems: (1) a simple binary system of water evaporating from a polypropylene towel, (2) the accumulation of fluid at the site of a sulfuric acid burn on ex vivo porcine skin, and (3) the evaporative dehydration of an ex vivo porcine cornea. The diffusion-regulating behavior of corneal tissue is elucidated, and the correlation of THz reflectivity with tissue hydration is measured using THz spectroscopy on four ex vivo corneas. We conclude that THz imaging can discern small differences in the distribution of water in physiological tissues and is a good candidate for burn and corneal imaging.

  15. Intrinsic Hydration of Uranyl-Hydroxide, -Nitrate and -Acetate Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Winnie Chien; Dorothy Hanna; Victor Anbalagan; Garold Gresham; Gary Groenewold; Michael Van Stipdonk

    2004-06-01

    The intrinsic hydration of three monopositive uranyl-anion complexes (UO2A)+ (where A = acetate, nitrate, or hydroxide) was investigated using ion-trap mass spectrometry (IT-MS). The relative rates for the formation of the monohydrates [(UO2A)(H2O)]+, with respect to the anion, followed the trend: Acetate = nitrate >> hydroxide. This finding was rationalized in terms of the donation of electron density by the strongly basic OH- to the uranyl metal center, thereby reducing the Lewis acidity of U and its propensity to react with incoming nucleophiles, viz., H2O. An alternative explanation is that the more complex acetate and nitrate anions provide increased degrees of freedom that could accommodate excess energy from the hydration reaction. The monohydrates also reacted with water, forming dihydrates and then trihydrates. The rates for formation of the nitrate and acetate dihydrates [(UO2A)(H2O)2]+ were very similar to the rates for formation of the monohydrates; the presence of the first H2O ligand had no influence on the addition of the second. In contrast, formation of the [(UO2OH)(H2O)2]+ was nearly three times faster than the formation of the monohydrate.

  16. Biogeochemical Investigations of Methane Seepage, Hydrate Ridge, OR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, D. L.; Solem, R. C.; Kastner, M.; Wardlaw, G. D.; Boone, D. R.; Kendall, M.; Wang, X.; Hill, T. M.; Purdy, A.; Bartlett, D. H.

    2003-12-01

    During July, 2002 we conducted a series of biogeochemical studies at the southern summit of Hydrate Ridge, OR. Using the DSV Alvin we collected sediment push cores from 2 distinct types of seep environments (clam beds and microbial mats) and from control sites (bare sediment). Samples from each setting were analyzed for the depth distributions of microbial abundance, most probable number counts for methanogenic archaea, volatile organic acids, dissolved organic carbon (including δ 13C), total organic carbon (including δ 13C and Δ 14C), sulfate, alkalinity (including δ 13C-DIC), δ 13C-CH4, as well as the distribution of bacterial and archaeal 16S rDNA genes. These distributions provide the basis for a comparative analysis of the distinct seep environments and of biogeochemical controls on methane hydrate. Primary production in the seeps appears to be driven by anaerobic methane oxidation in the sediments and sulfide oxidation at the sediment-water interface. However, results indicate distinctive microbial habitats in the different seep settings. Results further indicate a vigorous, secondary microbial community living off the wastes of the primary producers. High levels (up to 4%) of 13C-depleted ( ˜-45‰ ) organic carbon in the seeps and high C:N ratios (as high as 50:1) indicate a buildup of CH4-derived organic carbon, and raise the possibility of nitrogen limitation impacting seep communities.

  17. Mapping the hydration dynamics of ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Nucci, Nathaniel V; Pometun, Maxim S; Wand, A Joshua

    2011-08-17

    The nature of water's interaction with biomolecules such as proteins has been difficult to examine in detail at atomic resolution. Solution NMR spectroscopy is potentially a powerful method for characterizing both the structural and temporal aspects of protein hydration but has been plagued by artifacts. Encapsulation of the protein of interest within the aqueous core of a reverse micelle particle results in a general slowing of water dynamics, significant reduction in hydrogen exchange chemistry and elimination of contributions from bulk water thereby enabling the use of nuclear Overhauser effects to quantify interactions between the protein surface and hydration water. Here we extend this approach to allow use of dipolar interactions between hydration water and hydrogens bonded to protein carbon atoms. By manipulating the molecular reorientation time of the reverse micelle particle through use of low viscosity liquid propane, the T(1ρ) relaxation time constants of (1)H bonded to (13)C were sufficiently lengthened to allow high quality rotating frame nuclear Overhauser effects to be obtained. These data supplement previous results obtained from dipolar interactions between the protein and hydrogens bonded to nitrogen and in aggregate cover the majority of the molecular surface of the protein. A wide range of hydration dynamics is observed. Clustering of hydration dynamics on the molecular surface is also seen. Regions of long-lived hydration water correspond with regions of the protein that participate in molecular recognition of binding partners suggesting that the contribution of the solvent entropy to the entropy of binding has been maximized through evolution. PMID:21761828

  18. Component analysis of the protein hydration entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2012-05-01

    We report the development of an atomic decomposition method of the protein solvation entropy in water, which allows us to understand global change in the solvation entropy in terms of local changes in protein conformation as well as in hydration structure. This method can be implemented via a combined approach based on molecular dynamics simulation and integral-equation theory of liquids. An illustrative application is made to 42-residue amyloid-beta protein in water. We demonstrate how this method enables one to elucidate the molecular origin for the hydration entropy change upon conformational transitions of protein.

  19. Experimental Study of Gas Hydrate Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fandino, O.; Ruffine, L.

    2011-12-01

    Important quantities of methane and other gases are trapped below the seafloor and in the permafrost by an ice-like solid, called gas hydrates or clathrate hydrates. The latter is formed when water is mixing with different gases at high pressures and low temperatures. Due to a their possible use as a source of energy [1] or the problematic related to flow assurance failure in pipelines [2] the understanding of their processes of formation/destabilisation of these structures becomes a goal for many laboratories research as well as industries. In this work we present an experimental study on the stochastic behaviour of hydrate formation from a bulk phase. The method used here for the experiments was to repeat several time the same hydrate formation procedure and to notice the different from one experiment to another. A variable-volume type high-pressure apparatus with two sapphire windows was used. This device, already presented by Ruffine et al.[3], allows us to perform both kinetics and phase equilibrium measurements. Three initial pressure conditions were considered here, 5.0 MPa, 7.5 MPa and 10.0 MPa. Hydrates have been formed, then allowed to dissociate by stepwise heating. The memory effect has also been investigated after complete dissociation. It turned out that, although the thermodynamics conditions of formation and/or destabilization were reproducible. An attempt to determine the influence of pressure on the nucleation induction time will be discussed. References 1. Sum, A. K.; Koh, C. A.; Sloan, E. D., Clathrate Hydrates: From Laboratory Science to Engineering Practice. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research 2009, 48, 7457-7465. 2. Sloan, E. D., A changing hydrate paradigm-from apprehension to avoidance to risk management. Fluid Phase Equilibria 2005, 228, 67-74. 3. Ruffine, L.; Donval, J. P.; Charlou, J. L.; Cremière, A.; Zehnder, B. H., Experimental study of gas hydrate formation and destabilisation using a novel high-pressure apparatus. Marine

  20. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Foropoulos, Jr., Jerry; Avens, Larry R.; Trujillo, Eddie A.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride is provided.

  1. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Foropoulos, J. Jr.; Avens, L.R.; Trujillo, E.A.

    1992-03-24

    A process is described for preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride.

  2. Simulation of subsea gas hydrate exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2014-05-01

    The recovery of methane from gas hydrate layers that have been detected in several subsea sediments and permafrost regions around the world is a promising perspective to overcome future shortages in natural gas supply. Being aware that conventional natural gas resources are limited, research is going on to develop technologies for the production of natural gas from such new sources. Thus various research programs have started since the early 1990s in Japan, USA, Canada, India, and Germany to investigate hydrate deposits and develop required technologies. In recent years, intensive research has focussed on the capture and storage of CO2 from combustion processes to reduce climate impact. While different natural or man-made reservoirs like deep aquifers, exhausted oil and gas deposits or other geological formations are considered to store gaseous or liquid CO2, the storage of CO2 as hydrate in former methane hydrate fields is another promising alternative. Due to beneficial stability conditions, methane recovery may be well combined with CO2 storage in the form of hydrates. Regarding technological implementation many problems have to be overcome. Especially mixing, heat and mass transfer in the reservoir are limiting factors causing very long process times. Within the scope of the German research project »SUGAR« different technological approaches for the optimized exploitation of gas hydrate deposits are evaluated and compared by means of dynamic system simulations and analysis. Detailed mathematical models for the most relevant chemical and physical processes are developed. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into simulation programs. Simulations based on geological field data have been carried out. The studies focus on the potential of gas production from turbidites and their fitness for CO2 storage. The effects occurring during gas production and CO2 storage within

  3. Natural gas: Formation of hydrates -- Transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskara Rao, B.K.

    1998-07-01

    The significant growth of Natural gas based industries in India and elsewhere obviously forced the industry to hunt for new fields and sources. This has naturally led to the phenomenal growth of gas networks. The transportation of gas over thousands of kilometers through caprious ambient conditions requires a great effort. Many difficulties such as condensation of light liquids (NGLS), choking of lines due to formation of hydrates, improper distribution of gas into branches are experienced during pipe line transportation of Natural gas. The thermodynamic conditions suitable for formation of solid hydrates have been derived depending upon the constituents of natural gas. Further effects of branching in pipe line transportation have been discussed.

  4. Arctic Gas hydrate, Environment and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mienert, Jurgen; Andreassen, Karin; Bünz, Stefan; Carroll, JoLynn; Ferre, Benedicte; Knies, Jochen; Panieri, Giuliana; Rasmussen, Tine; Myhre, Cathrine Lund

    2015-04-01

    Arctic methane hydrate exists on land beneath permafrost regions and offshore in shelf and continental margins sediments. Methane or gas hydrate, an ice-like substrate, consists mainly of light hydrocarbons (mostly methane from biogenic sources but also ethane and propane from thermogenic sources) entrapped by a rigid cage of water molecules. The pressure created by the overlying water and sediments offshore stabilizes the CH4 in continental margins at a temperature range well above freezing point; consequently CH4 exists as methane ice beneath the seabed. Though the accurate volume of Arctic methane hydrate and thus the methane stored in hydrates throughout the Quaternary is still unknown it must be enormous if one considers the vast regions of Arctic continental shelves and margins as well as permafrost areas offshore and on land. Today's subseabed methane hydrate reservoirs are the remnants from the last ice age and remain elusive targets for both unconventional energy and as a natural methane emitter influencing ocean environments and ecosystems. It is still contentious at what rate Arctic warming may govern hydrate melting, and whether the methane ascending from the ocean floor through the hydrosphere reaches the atmosphere. As indicated by Greenland ice core records, the atmospheric methane concentration rose rapidly from ca. 500 ppb to ca. 750 ppb over a short time period of just 150 years at the termination of the younger Dryas period ca. 11600 years ago, but the dissociation of large quantities of methane hydrates on the ocean floor have not been documented yet (Brook et al., 2014 and references within). But with the major projected warming and sea ice melting trend (Knies et al., 2014) one may ask, for how long will CH4 stay trapped in methane hydrates if surface and deep-ocean water masses will warm and permafrost continuous to melt (Portnov et al. 2014). How much of the Arctic methane will be consumed by the micro- and macrofauna, how much will

  5. Morphology of methane hydrate host sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, K.W.; Feng, H.; Tomov, S.; Winters, W.J.; Eaton, M.; Mahajan, D.

    2005-01-01

    The morphological features including porosity and grains of methane hydrate host sediments were investigated using synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) technique. The sediment sample was obtained during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 164 on the Blake Ridge at water depth of 2278.5 m. The CMT experiment was performed at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source facility. The analysis gave ample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity. The method was found to be highly effective for the study of methane hydrate host sediments.

  6. Mechanical instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianyang; Ning, Fulong; Trinh, Thuat T; Kjelstrup, Signe; Vlugt, Thijs J H; He, Jianying; Skallerud, Bjørn H; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    Despite observations of massive methane release and geohazards associated with gas hydrate instability in nature, as well as ductile flow accompanying hydrate dissociation in artificial polycrystalline methane hydrates in the laboratory, the destabilising mechanisms of gas hydrates under deformation and their grain-boundary structures have not yet been elucidated at the molecular level. Here we report direct molecular dynamics simulations of the material instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates under mechanical loading. The results show dislocation-free brittle failure in monocrystalline hydrates and an unexpected crossover from strengthening to weakening in polycrystals. Upon uniaxial depressurisation, strain-induced hydrate dissociation accompanied by grain-boundary decohesion and sliding destabilises the polycrystals. In contrast, upon compression, appreciable solid-state structural transformation dominates the response. These findings provide molecular insight not only into the metastable structures of grain boundaries, but also into unusual ductile flow with hydrate dissociation as observed during macroscopic compression experiments. PMID:26522051

  7. Mechanical instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianyang; Ning, Fulong; Trinh, Thuat T.; Kjelstrup, Signe; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; He, Jianying; Skallerud, Bjørn H.; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2015-11-01

    Despite observations of massive methane release and geohazards associated with gas hydrate instability in nature, as well as ductile flow accompanying hydrate dissociation in artificial polycrystalline methane hydrates in the laboratory, the destabilising mechanisms of gas hydrates under deformation and their grain-boundary structures have not yet been elucidated at the molecular level. Here we report direct molecular dynamics simulations of the material instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates under mechanical loading. The results show dislocation-free brittle failure in monocrystalline hydrates and an unexpected crossover from strengthening to weakening in polycrystals. Upon uniaxial depressurisation, strain-induced hydrate dissociation accompanied by grain-boundary decohesion and sliding destabilises the polycrystals. In contrast, upon compression, appreciable solid-state structural transformation dominates the response. These findings provide molecular insight not only into the metastable structures of grain boundaries, but also into unusual ductile flow with hydrate dissociation as observed during macroscopic compression experiments.

  8. Mechanical instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianyang; Ning, Fulong; Trinh, Thuat T.; Kjelstrup, Signe; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; He, Jianying; Skallerud, Bjørn H.; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    Despite observations of massive methane release and geohazards associated with gas hydrate instability in nature, as well as ductile flow accompanying hydrate dissociation in artificial polycrystalline methane hydrates in the laboratory, the destabilising mechanisms of gas hydrates under deformation and their grain-boundary structures have not yet been elucidated at the molecular level. Here we report direct molecular dynamics simulations of the material instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates under mechanical loading. The results show dislocation-free brittle failure in monocrystalline hydrates and an unexpected crossover from strengthening to weakening in polycrystals. Upon uniaxial depressurisation, strain-induced hydrate dissociation accompanied by grain-boundary decohesion and sliding destabilises the polycrystals. In contrast, upon compression, appreciable solid-state structural transformation dominates the response. These findings provide molecular insight not only into the metastable structures of grain boundaries, but also into unusual ductile flow with hydrate dissociation as observed during macroscopic compression experiments. PMID:26522051

  9. Lipid and carbon isotopic evidence of methane-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in association with gas hydrates from the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuanlun L.; Li, Yiliang; Wall, Judy D.; Larsen, Lise; Sassen, Roger; Huang, Yongsong; Wang, Yi; Peacock, Aaron; White, David C.; Horita, Juske; Cole, David R.

    2002-03-01

    An integrated lipid biomarker carbon isotope approach reveals new insight to microbial methane oxidation in the Gulf of Mexico gas-hydrate system. Hydrate-bearing and hydrate-free sediments were collected from the Gulf of Mexico slope using a research submersible. Phospholipid fatty acids consist mainly of C16 C18 compounds, which are largely derived from bacteria. The phospholipid fatty acids suggest that total biomass is enhanced 11 30-fold in gas-hydrate bearing sediment compared to hydrate-free sediment. Lipid biomarkers indicative of sulfate-reducing bacteria are strongly depleted in 13C (δ13C = -48‰ to -70‰) in the hydrate-bearing samples, suggesting that they are involved in the oxidation of methane (δ13C = -47‰ for thermogenic methane and -70‰ for biogenic methane). Isotopic properties of other biomarkers suggest that sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Beggiatoa) may also contribute to the lipid pool in hydrate-bearing samples, which are characterized by less negative δ13C values (to -11.2‰). In the hydrate-free sample, fatty acid biomarkers have δ13C values of -27.6‰ to -39.6‰, indicating that crude oil (average ˜-27‰) or terrestrial organic carbon (average ˜-20‰) are the likely carbon sources. Our results provide the first lipid biomarker stable isotope evidence that sulfate- reducing bacteria play an important role in anaerobic methane oxidation in the Gulf of Mexico gas hydrates. The coupled activities of methane-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing organisms contribute to the development of ecosystems in deep-sea environments and result in sequestration of carbon as buried organic carbon and authigenic carbonates. These have implications for studying climate change based on carbon budgets.

  10. Study of nanoscale structures in hydrated biomaterials using small-angle neutron scattering

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Arnold; Murthy, N. Sanjeeva; Wang, Wenjie; Rojas, Ramiro; Kohn, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Distribution of water in three classes of biomedically relevant and degradable polymers was investigated using small-angle neutron scattering. In semicrystalline polymers, such as poly(lactic acid) and poly(glycolic acid), water was found to diffuse preferentially into the noncrystalline regions. In amorphous polymers, such as poly(D,L-lactic acid) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), the scattering after 7-days of incubation was attributed to water in microvoids that form following the hydrolytic degradation of the polymer. In amorphous copolymers containing hydrophobic segments (desaminotyrosyl-tyrosine ethyl ester) and hydrophilic blocks (poly(ethylene glycol) PEG), a sequence of distinct regimes of hydration were observed: homogeneous distribution (~ 10 Å length scales) at <13 wt% PEG (~ 1 water per EG), clusters of hydrated domains (~50 Å radius) separated at 24 wt% PEG (1 to 2 water per EG), uniformly distributed hydrated domains at 41 wt% PEG (~ 4 water per EG), and phase inversion at > 50 wt% PEG ( > 6 water per EG ). Increasing PEG content increased the number of these domains with only a small decrease in distance between the domains. These discrete domains appeared to coalesce to form submicron droplets at ~60 °C, above the melting temperature of crystalline PEG. Significance of such observations on the evolution of μm size channels that form during hydrolytic erosion is discussed. PMID:22227373

  11. Pressure and temperature dependence of hydrophobic hydration: Volumetric, compressibility, and thermodynamic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Maria Sabaye; Chan, Hue Sun

    2007-03-01

    The combined effect of pressure and temperature on hydrophobic hydration of a nonpolar methanelike solute is investigated by extensive simulations in the TIP4P model of water. Using test-particle insertion techniques, free energies of hydration under a range of pressures from 1to3000atm are computed at eight temperatures ranging from 278.15to368.15K. Corresponding enthalpy, entropy, and heat capacity accompanying the hydration process are estimated from the temperature dependence of the free energies. Partial molar and excess volumes calculated using pressure derivatives of the simulated free energies are consistent with those determined by direct volume simulations; but direct volume determination offers more reliable estimates for compressibility. At 298.15K, partial molar and excess isothermal compressibilities of methane are negative at 1atm. Partial molar and excess adiabatic (isentropic) compressibilities are estimated to be also negative under the same conditions. But partial molar and excess isothermal compressibilities are positive at high pressures, with a crossover from negative to positive compressibility at ˜100-1000atm. This trend is consistent with experiments on aliphatic amino acids and pressure-unfolded states of proteins. For the range of pressures simulated, hydration heat capacity exhibits little pressure dependence, also in apparent agreement with experiment. When pressure is raised at constant room temperature, hydration free energy increases while its entropic component remains essentially constant. Thus, the increasing unfavorability of hydration under raised pressure is seen as largely an enthalpic effect. Ramifications of the findings of the authors for biopolymer conformational transitions are discussed.

  12. SAXS/SANS on Supercharged Proteins Reveals Residue-Specific Modifications of the Hydration Shell.

    PubMed

    Kim, Henry S; Martel, Anne; Girard, Eric; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Madern, Dominique; Blackledge, Martin; Franzetti, Bruno; Gabel, Frank

    2016-05-24

    Water molecules in the immediate vicinity of biomacromolecules, including proteins, constitute a hydration layer characterized by physicochemical properties different from those of bulk water and play a vital role in the activity and stability of these structures, as well as in intermolecular interactions. Previous studies using solution scattering, crystallography, and molecular dynamics simulations have provided valuable information about the properties of these hydration shells, including modifications in density and ionic concentration. Small-angle scattering of x-rays (SAXS) and neutrons (SANS) are particularly useful and complementary techniques to study biomacromolecular hydration shells due to their sensitivity to electronic and nuclear scattering-length density fluctuations, respectively. Although several sophisticated SAXS/SANS programs have been developed recently, the impact of physicochemical surface properties on the hydration layer remains controversial, and systematic experimental data from individual biomacromolecular systems are scarce. Here, we address the impact of physicochemical surface properties on the hydration shell by a systematic SAXS/SANS study using three mutants of a single protein, green fluorescent protein (GFP), with highly variable net charge (+36, -6, and -29). The combined analysis of our data shows that the hydration shell is locally denser in the vicinity of acidic surface residues, whereas basic and hydrophilic/hydrophobic residues only mildly modify its density. Moreover, the data demonstrate that the density modifications result from the combined effect of residue-specific recruitment of ions from the bulk in combination with water structural rearrangements in their vicinity. Finally, we find that the specific surface-charge distributions of the different GFP mutants modulate the conformational space of flexible parts of the protein. PMID:27224484

  13. Sorption of palladium(II) from sulfate and perchlorate media on hydrated zirconium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Abovskaya, N.V.; Boichinova, E.S.; Simanova, S.A.

    1988-09-20

    Hydrated zirconium dioxide (HZD) is an amphoteric sorbent, acting as an anion-exchanger in acid solutions and a cation-exchanger in alkaline. The purpose of this work was to study the sorption activity of (HZD) with respect to palladium(II) in solutions of PdSO/sub 4/ x 3H/sub 2/O in sulfuric or perchloric acids. It was shown that HZD can extract cationic palladium(II) aqua complexes selectively and rapidly from weakly acidic solutions. The sorbed aqua complexes of Pd(II) undergo conversions with formation of hydroxo complexes in the sorbent phase.

  14. Site-specific hydration dynamics in the nonpolar core of a molten globule by dynamic nuclear polarization of water.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Brandon D; Choi, Jennifer; López, Carlos; Wesener, Darryl A; Hubbell, Wayne; Cavagnero, Silvia; Han, Songi

    2011-04-20

    Water-protein interactions play a direct role in protein folding. The chain collapse that accompanies protein folding involves extrusion of water from the nonpolar core. For many proteins, including apomyoglobin (apoMb), hydrophobic interactions drive an initial collapse to an intermediate state before folding to the final structure. However, the debate continues as to whether the core of the collapsed intermediate state is hydrated and, if so, what the dynamic nature of this water is. A key challenge is that protein hydration dynamics is significantly heterogeneous, yet suitable experimental techniques for measuring hydration dynamics with site-specificity are lacking. Here, we introduce Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization at 0.35 T via site-specific nitroxide spin labels as a unique tool to probe internal and surface protein hydration dynamics with site-specific resolution in the molten globular, native, and unfolded protein states. The (1)H NMR signal enhancement of water carries information about the local dynamics of the solvent within ∼10 Å of a spin label. EPR is used synergistically to gain insights on local polarity and mobility of the spin-labeled protein. Several buried and solvent-exposed sites of apoMb are examined, each bearing a covalently bound nitroxide spin label. We find that the nonpoloar core of the apoMb molten globule is hydrated with water bearing significant translational dynamics, only 4-6-fold slower than that of bulk water. The hydration dynamics of the native state is heterogeneous, while the acid-unfolded state bears fast-diffusing hydration water. This study provides a high-resolution glimpse at the folding-dependent nature of protein hydration dynamics. PMID:21443207

  15. Elastic properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2001-01-01

    Downhole-measured compressional- and shear-wave velocities acquired in the Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well, northwestern Canada, reveal that the dominant effect of gas hydrate on the elastic properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments is as a pore-filling constituent. As opposed to high elastic velocities predicted from a cementation theory, whereby a small amount of gas hydrate in the pore space significantly increases the elastic velocities, the velocity increase from gas hydrate saturation in the sediment pore space is small. Both the effective medium theory and a weighted equation predict a slight increase of velocities from gas hydrate concentration, similar to the field-observed velocities; however, the weighted equation more accurately describes the compressional- and shear-wave velocities of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. A decrease of Poisson's ratio with an increase in the gas hydrate concentration is similar to a decrease of Poisson's ratio with a decrease in the sediment porosity. Poisson's ratios greater than 0.33 for gas hydrate-bearing sediments imply the unconsolidated nature of gas hydrate-bearing sediments at this well site. The seismic characteristics of gas hydrate-bearing sediments at this site can be used to compare and evaluate other gas hydrate-bearing sediments in the Arctic.

  16. 21 CFR 582.2729 - Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. 582.2729... Agents § 582.2729 Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  17. 21 CFR 182.2729 - Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. 182.2729... § 182.2729 Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  18. 21 CFR 182.2729 - Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. 182.2729... § 182.2729 Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  19. 21 CFR 582.2729 - Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. 582.2729... Agents § 582.2729 Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium silicoaluminate). (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally recognized as...

  20. 21 CFR 182.2729 - Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. 182.2729... (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2729 Sodium calcium aluminosilicate, hydrated. (a) Product. Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (sodium calcium...

  1. Videos of Experiments from ORNL Gas Hydrate Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gas hydrate research performed by the Environmental Sciences Division utilizes the ORNL Seafloor Process Simulator, the Parr Vessel, the Sapphire Cell, a fiber optic distributed sensing system, and Raman spectroscopy. The group studies carbon sequestration in the ocean, desalination, gas hydrates in the solar system, and nucleation and dissociation kinetics. The videos available at the gas hydrates website are very short clips from experiments.

  2. The role of calcium ions and lignosulphonate plasticiser in the hydration of cement

    SciTech Connect

    Grierson, L.H.; Knight, J.C.; Maharaj, R

    2005-04-01

    Experiments involving equilibrium dialysis, conductivity, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) have been carried out to investigate the role of calcium ions and polymeric plasticisers in cement/admixture hydration. Results from a study of lignosulphonic acid, sodium salt, acetate as a plasticiser shows that a plasticiser has dual role; one mainly as a kinetic inhibitor (poison) in cement hydration mechanism and the other as a dispersant. Evidence of a weak Ca{sup 2+} binding to lignosulphonate sulphonic moieties was found at low ionic strengths of 0.1 M using ITC. No evidence of formal Ca{sup 2+} binding to lignosulphonate sulphonic acid moieties was found using equilibrium dialysis at higher ionic strength of 1 M (ionic strengths of 0.4 M are typically found in Portland cement pore solution), as is often suggested in cement/admixture literature.

  3. When proteins are completely hydrated in crystals.

    PubMed

    Carugo, Oliviero

    2016-08-01

    In the crystalline state, protein surface patches that do not form crystal packing contacts are exposed to the solvent and one or more layers of hydration water molecules can be observed. It is well known that these water molecules cannot be observed at very low resolution, when the scarcity of experimental information precludes the observation of several parts of the protein molecule, like for example side-chains at the protein surface. On the contrary, more details are observable at high resolution. Here it is shown that it is necessary to reach a resolution of about 1.5-1.6Å to observe a continuous hydration layer at the protein surface. This contrasts previous estimations, which were more tolerant and according to which a resolution of 2.5Å was sufficient to describe at the atomic level the structure of the hydration layer. These results should prove useful in guiding a more rigorous selection of structural data to study protein hydration and in interpreting new crystal structures. PMID:27112977

  4. Obsidian Hydration Dating in the Undergraduate Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manche, Emanuel P.; Lakatos, Stephen

    1986-01-01

    Provides an overview of obsidian hydration dating for the instructor by presenting: (1) principles of the method; (2) procedures; (3) applications; and (4) limitations. The theory of the method and one or more laboratory exercises can be easily introduced into the undergraduate geology curriculum. (JN)

  5. Hydrated Minerals on Asteroids: The Astronomical Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkin, A. S.; Howell, E. S.; Vilas, F.; Lebofsky, L. A.

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge of the hydrated mineral inventory on the asteroids is important for deducing the origin of Earth's water, interpreting the meteorite record, and unraveling the processes occurring during the earliest times in solar system history. Reflectance spectroscopy shows absorption features in both the 0.6-0.8 and 2.5-3.5 micrometers regions, which are diagnostic of or associated with hydrated minerals. Observations in those regions show that hydrated minerals are common in the mid-asteroid belt, and can be found in unexpected spectral groupings, as well. Asteroid groups formerly associated with mineralogies assumed to have high temperature formation, such as M- and E-class asteroids, have been observed to have hydration features in their reflectance spectra. Some asteroids have apparently been heated to several hundred degrees Celsius, enough to destroy some fraction of their phyllosilicates. Others have rotational variation suggesting that heating was uneven. We summarize this work, and present the astronomical evidence for water- and hydroxyl-bearing minerals on asteroids.

  6. Hydration of Acetylene: A 125th Anniversary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponomarev, Dmitry A.; Shevchenko, Sergey M.

    2007-01-01

    The year 2006 is the 125th anniversary of a chemical reaction, the discovery of which by Mikhail Kucherov had a profound effect on the development of industrial chemistry in the 19-20th centuries. This was the hydration of alkynes catalyzed by mercury ions that made possible industrial production of acetaldehyde from acetylene. Historical…

  7. Dynamics of Kr in dense clathrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, D. D.; Tse, J. S.; Zhao, J. Y.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Tulk, C. A.

    2011-05-01

    The dynamics of Kr atoms as guests in dense clathrate hydrate structures are investigated using site specific Kr83 nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. The dense structure H hydrate and filled-ice structures are studied at high pressures in a diamond anvil high-pressure cell. The dynamics of Kr in the structure H clathrate hydrate quench recovered at 77 K is also investigated. The Kr phonon density of states obtained from the experimental NRIXS data are compared with molecular dynamics simulations. The temperature and pressure dependence of the phonon spectra provide details of the Kr dynamics in the clathrate hydrate cages. Comparison with the dynamics of Kr atoms in the low-pressure structure II obtained previously was made. The Lamb-Mossbauer factor obtained from NRIXS experiments and molecular dynamics calculations are in excellent agreement and are shown to yield unique information on the strength and temperature dependence of guest-host interactions.

  8. 78 FR 26337 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open...; Committee Business; FY 2012 Arctic Production test--data and results; Update on the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management's Lower 48 Assessment; Results of Consortium for Ocean Leadership Workshop; Update...

  9. Hydrated Minerals on Asteroids: The Astronomical Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkin, A. S.; Howell, E. S.; Vilas, F.; Lebofsky, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of the hydrated mineral inventory on the asteroids is important for deducing the origin of Earth's water, interpreting the meteorite record, and unraveling the processes occurring during the earliest times in solar system history. Reflectance spectroscopy shows absorption features in both the 0.6-0.8 and 2.5-3.5-micron regions, which are diagnostic of or associated with hydrated minerals. Observations in those regions show that hydrated minerals are common in the mid-asteroid belt, and can be found in unexpected spectral groupings as well. Asteroid groups formerly associated with mineralogies assumed to have high-temperature formation, such as M- and E-class steroids, have been observed to have hydration features in their reflectance spectra. Some asteroids have apparently been heated to several hundred degrees Celsius, enough to destroy some fraction of their phyllosilicates. Others have rotational variation suggesting that heating was uneven. We summarize this work, and present the astronomical evidence for water- and Hydroxl-bearing minerals on asteroids.

  10. The phase behavior of hydrated cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Loomis, C R; Shipley, G G; Small, D M

    1979-05-01

    The thermotropic phase behavior of cholesterol monohydrate in water was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, polarizing light microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. In contrast to anhydrous cholesterol which undergoes a polymorphic crystalline transition at 39 degrees C and a crystalline to liquid transition at 151 degrees C, the closed system of cholesterol monohydrate and water exhibited three reversible endothermic transitions at 86, 123, and 157 degrees C. At 86 degrees C, cholesterol monohydrate loses its water of hydration, forming the high temperature polymorph of anhydrous cholesterol. At least 24 hours were required for re-hydration of cholesterol and the rate of hydration was dependent on the polymorphic crystalline form of anhydrous cholesterol. At 123 degrees C, anhydrous crystalline cholesterol in the presence of excess water undergoes a sharp transition to a birefringent liquid crystalline phase of smectic texture. The x-ray diffraction pattern obtained from this phase contained two sharp low-angle reflections at 37.4 and 18.7 A and a diffuse wide-angle reflection centered at 5.7 A, indicating a layered smectic type of liquid crystalline structure with each layer being two cholesterol molecules thick. The liquid crystalline phase is stable over the temperature range of 123 to 157 degrees C before melting to a liquid dispersed in water. The observation of a smectic liquid crystalline phase for hydrated cholesterol correlates with its high surface activity and helps to explain its ability to exist in high concentrations in biological membranes. PMID:458269

  11. Stabilization/solidification on chromium (III) wastes by C(3)A and C(3)A hydrated matrix.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangguo; He, Chao; Bai, Yun; Ma, Baoguo; Wang, Guandong; Tan, Hongbo

    2014-03-15

    Hazardous wastes are usually used in the Portland cement production in order to save energy, costs and/or stabilize toxic substances and heavy metals inside the clinker. This work focus on the stabilization/solidification on chromium (III) wastes by C(3)A and C(3)A hydrated matrix. The immobilization rate of chromium in C(3)A and the leaching characteristics of the C(3)A hydrated matrixes containing chromium were investigated by ICP-AES. The results indicated that C(3)A had a good solidifying effect on chromium using the clinkering process, however, the Cr leaching content of Cr-doped C(3)A was higher than that of hydrated C(3)A matrix in Cr(NO(3))3 solution and was lower than that of the hydrated C(3)A matrix in K(2)CrO(4) solution, no matter the leachant was sulphuric acid & nitric acid or water. To explain this, C(3)A formation, chemical valence states of chromium in C(3)A, hydration products and Cr distribution in the C(3)A-gypsum hydrated matrixes were studied by XRD, XPS and FESEM-EDS. The investigation showed that part of Cr(3+) was oxidized to Cr(6+) in the clinkering process and identified as the chromium compounds Ca(4)Al(6)O(12)CrO(4) (3CaO·Al(20O(3)·CaCrO(4)), which resulted in the higher leaching of hydrated matrix of Cr-doped C(3)A. PMID:24468527

  12. Influences of Dilute Organic Adsorbates on the Hydration of Low-Surface-Area Silicates.

    PubMed

    Sangodkar, Rahul P; Smith, Benjamin J; Gajan, David; Rossini, Aaron J; Roberts, Lawrence R; Funkhouser, Gary P; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Chmelka, Bradley F

    2015-07-01

    Competitive adsorption of dilute quantities of certain organic molecules and water at silicate surfaces strongly influence the rates of silicate dissolution, hydration, and crystallization. Here, we determine the molecular-level structures, compositions, and site-specific interactions of adsorbed organic molecules at low absolute bulk concentrations on heterogeneous silicate particle surfaces at early stages of hydration. Specifically, dilute quantities (∼0.1% by weight of solids) of the disaccharide sucrose or industrially important phosphonic acid species slow dramatically the hydration of low-surface-area (∼1 m(2)/g) silicate particles. Here, the physicochemically distinct adsorption interactions of these organic species are established by using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) surface-enhanced solid-state NMR techniques. These measurements provide significantly improved signal sensitivity for near-surface species that is crucial for the detection and analysis of dilute adsorbed organic molecules and silicate species on low-surface-area particles, which until now have been infeasible to characterize. DNP-enhanced 2D (29)Si{(1)H}, (13)C{(1)H}, and (31)P{(1)H} heteronuclear correlation and 1D (29)Si{(13)C} rotational-echo double-resonance NMR measurements establish hydrogen-bond-mediated adsorption of sucrose at distinct nonhydrated and hydrated silicate surface sites and electrostatic interactions with surface Ca(2+) cations. By comparison, phosphonic acid molecules are found to adsorb electrostatically at or near cationic calcium surface sites to form Ca(2+)-phosphonate complexes. Although dilute quantities of both types of organic molecules effectively inhibit hydration, they do so by adsorbing in distinct ways that depend on their specific architectures and physicochemical interactions. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNP-enhanced NMR techniques to measure and assess dilute adsorbed molecules and their molecular interactions on low

  13. Hydration layer structures on calcite facets and their roles in selective adsorptions of biomolecules: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Beibei; Xu, Xurong; Tang, Ruikang

    2013-12-21

    The selective adsorptions of biomolecules onto crystal faces are the key issues in the studies of biomineralization. Frequently, the adsorption processes are understood by using the direct binding model between organic compounds and inorganic crystals during the molecular dynamic studies. However, water molecules near crystals always exhibit intense ordering and preferential orientation to form structured hydration layer. By using the adsorption of poly acrylic acid oligomer, acrylic acid (AA) dimer, onto calcite as an example, we demonstrate that the induced hydration layers contribute significant effects on the organic-inorganic interactions. In particular, on calcite (104) plane, two carboxyl groups of AA dimer both interact with the crystal but the molecule has to compete with water due to the well-structured hydration layer. On (110) plane, although only one carboxyl group of AA dimer interacts with this surface, the water layer is relatively loose so that the molecule can easily replace water. With a consideration of the hydration layer, our free energy analysis indicates that AA dimer has a stronger interaction with (110) face than with (104) face, which is consistent with the experimental observations. The study follows that the attachment of organic additive onto inorganic crystal facet is greatly mediated by near-surface hydration layers, and therefore, the critical role of structured water layers must be taken into account in the understanding of biomineralization interfaces. PMID:24359384

  14. Hydration layer structures on calcite facets and their roles in selective adsorptions of biomolecules: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Beibei; Xu, Xurong; Tang, Ruikang

    2013-12-01

    The selective adsorptions of biomolecules onto crystal faces are the key issues in the studies of biomineralization. Frequently, the adsorption processes are understood by using the direct binding model between organic compounds and inorganic crystals during the molecular dynamic studies. However, water molecules near crystals always exhibit intense ordering and preferential orientation to form structured hydration layer. By using the adsorption of poly acrylic acid oligomer, acrylic acid (AA) dimer, onto calcite as an example, we demonstrate that the induced hydration layers contribute significant effects on the organic-inorganic interactions. In particular, on calcite (104) plane, two carboxyl groups of AA dimer both interact with the crystal but the molecule has to compete with water due to the well-structured hydration layer. On (110) plane, although only one carboxyl group of AA dimer interacts with this surface, the water layer is relatively loose so that the molecule can easily replace water. With a consideration of the hydration layer, our free energy analysis indicates that AA dimer has a stronger interaction with (110) face than with (104) face, which is consistent with the experimental observations. The study follows that the attachment of organic additive onto inorganic crystal facet is greatly mediated by near-surface hydration layers, and therefore, the critical role of structured water layers must be taken into account in the understanding of biomineralization interfaces.

  15. Direct measurement of methane hydrate composition along the hydrate equilibrium boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    The composition of methane hydrate, namely nW for CH 4??nWH2O, was directly measured along the hydrate equilibrium boundary under conditions of excess methane gas. Pressure and temperature conditions ranged from 1.9 to 9.7 MPa and 263 to 285 K. Within experimental error, there is no change in hydrate composition with increasing pressure along the equilibrium boundary, but nW may show a slight systematic decrease away from this boundary. A hydrate stoichiometry of n W = 5.81-6.10 H2O describes the entire range of measured values, with an average composition of CH4??5.99(??0.07) H2O along the equilibrium boundary. These results, consistent with previously measured values, are discussed with respect to the widely ranging values obtained by thermodynamic analysis. The relatively constant composition of methane hydrate over the geologically relevant pressure and temperature range investigated suggests that in situ methane hydrate compositions may be estimated with some confidence. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  16. Three-dimensional distribution of gas hydrate beneath southern Hydrate Ridge: constraints from ODP Leg 204

    SciTech Connect

    Trehu, Ann M.; Long, Philip E.; Torres, M E.; Bohrmann, G; Rack, F R.; Collett, T S.; Goldberg, D S.; Milkov, A V.; Riedel, M; Schultheiss, P; Bangs, N L.; Barr, S R.; Borowski, W S.; Claypool, G E.; Delwiche, Mark E.; Dickens, G R.; Gracia, E; Guerin, G; Holland, M; Johnson, Jerry E.; Lee, Y J.; Liu, C S.; Su, X; Teichert, B; Tomaru, H; Vanneste, M; Watanabe, M; Weinberger, Jill L.

    2004-03-01

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, the entire gas hydrate stability zone was sampled in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space of 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs.

  17. Hydration dependent viscoelastic tensile behavior of cornea.

    PubMed

    Hatami-Marbini, Hamed

    2014-08-01

    The cornea is a protective transparent connective tissue covering the front of the eye. The standard uniaxial tensile experiments are among the most popular techniques for investigating biomechanical properties of the cornea. This experimental method characterizes the stress-strain response of corneal strips immersed in a bathing solution. In the present study, the important roles of corneal hydration on tensile viscoelastic properties were investigated. The thickness was used as a surrogate for hydration and uniaxial tensile experiments were performed on bovine corneal samples with four different average thickness (hydration), i.e., 1100 μm (4.87 mg water/mg dry tissue), 900 μm (4.13 mg water/mg dry tissue), 700 μm (3.20 mg water/mg dry tissue), and 500 μm (1.95 mg water/mg dry tissue). The samples were immersed in mineral oil in order to prevent their swelling during the experiments. A quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) model was used to analyze the experimental measurements and determine viscoelastic material constants. It was observed that both maximum and equilibrium (relaxed) stresses were exponentially increased with decreasing tissue thickness (hydration). Furthermore, the QLV model successfully captured the corneal viscoelastic response with an average R (2) value greater than 0.99. Additional experiments were conducted in OBSS in order to confirm that these significant changes in viscoelastic properties were because of corneal hydration and not the bathing solution. The findings of this study suggest that extra care must be taken in interpreting the results of earlier uniaxial tensile testings and their correspondence to the corneal biomechanical properties. PMID:24668183

  18. Allergic contact dermatitis to panthenol and cocamidopropyl PG dimonium chloride phosphate in a facial hydrating lotion.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Hugh; Williams, Jason; Tate, Bruce

    2006-12-01

    Dexpanthenol is the alcohol corresponding to pantothenic acid (the water-soluble vitamin B(5)). Although it is a common ingredient in many pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, contact allergy is relatively uncommon. Cocamidopropyl PG dimonium chloride phosphate is a phospholipid complex derived from pure coconut oil, and contact allergy is rare. We report a case of allergic contact dermatitis to panthenol and cocamidopropyl PG dimonium chloride phosphate in a facial hydrating lotion. PMID:17101018

  19. Natural Methane and Carbon Dioxide Hydrates in the Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Research Team; Milkereit, B.

    2004-05-01

    Both CH4 and CO2 are abundant volatiles in the earth's crust. Methane hydrates occur in permafrost regions and continental slopes of oceans. It is currently estimated that the energy stored in CH4 hydrate reserves totals more than twice the global reserves of all conventional oil, gas, and coal deposits combined. This means that methane hydrate could prove to be a very important source of energy in the future. Pressure versus temperature phase diagrams for methane and carbon dioxide define characteristic stability fields for gas, fluid and hydrates states. Sequestration of carbon dioxide in the earths crust and production of methane hydrate reservoirs are critically dependent on knowledge of the in situ elastic moduli of natural hydrates. The physical properties of simple methane and carbon dioxide hydrates are similar [1]. Our compilation of experimental data confirms high compressional wave velocities and elastic moduli for CH4 and CO2 hydrates and low compressional wave velocities for the fluid and gas phases. As methane and carbon dioxide hydrates are stable over similar pressure-temperature ranges, the two types of hydrates form in similar settings in the earth's crust. For example, temperature and pressure conditions in deepwater marine environments require both CO2 and CH4 to be in hydrate phase. However, not much is known about the origin, distribution and total volume of natural carbon dioxide hydrates stored in the earth's crust. For a number of tectonic/geological settings, CO2-rich fluids from deep crustal reservoirs must be considered: rifted margins, volcanic arcs, deepwater vents [2], mud volcanoes and mud diapirs [3]. Both methane and carbon dioxide hydrates work to cement sea floors in similar ways. Slope failure, a phenomenon usually taken as a hallmark of the presence of methane hydrate, could also be attributed to the existence of carbon dioxide hydrates. Perhaps most critically, many of the estimations of the amounts of methane hydrates are

  20. Effect of hydration on the structure of caveolae membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Caracciolo, Giulio; Sciubba, Fabio; Caminiti, Ruggero

    2009-04-13

    In situ energy dispersive x-ray diffraction was used to investigate the effect of hydration on the structure of caveolae membranes. The structure of caveolae membrane was found to be strongly dependent on hydration. At low hydration two lamellar phases with distinct repeat spacings were found to coexist with segregated cholesterol crystallites. Upon hydration, the lamellar phases did swell, while diffraction peak of cholesterol crystals disappeared suggesting that cholesterol molecules redistributed homogeneously within the caveolae membrane. At full hydration, unbinding of caveolae membrane occurred. Upon dehydration the system returned to the bound state, demonstrating that the unbinding transition is fully reversible.

  1. Differences in hydration structure near hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Head-Gordon, T; Sorenson, J M; Pertsemlidis, A; Glaeser, R M

    1997-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics to simulate recent neutron scattering experiments on aqueous solutions of N-acetyl-leucine-amide and N-acetyl-glutamine-amide, and break down the total scattering function into contributions from solute-solute, solute-water, water-water, and intramolecular correlations. We show that the shift of the main diffraction peak to smaller angle that is observed for leucine, but not for glutamine, is attributable primarily to alterations in water-water correlations relative to bulk. The perturbation of the water hydrogen-bonded network extends roughly two solvation layers from the hydrophobic side chain surface, and is characterized by a distribution of hydrogen bonded ring sizes that are more planar and are dominated by pentagons in particular than those near the hydrophilic side chain. The different structural organization of water near the hydrophobic solute that gives rise to the inward shift in the main neutron diffraction peak under ambient conditions may also provide insight into the same directional shift for pure liquid water as it is cooled and supercooled. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:9336206

  2. In situ molecular imaging of hydrated biofilm in a microfluidic reactor by ToF-SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Xin; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Zhaoying; Yang, Li; Liu, Bingwen; Zhu, Zihua; Tucker, Abigail E.; Chrisler, William B.; Hill, Eric A.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Lin, Yuehe; Liu, Songqin; Marshall, Matthew J.

    2014-02-26

    The first results of using a novel single channel microfluidic reactor to enable Shewanella biofilm growth and in situ characterization using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) in the hydrated environment are presented. The new microfluidic interface allows direct probing of the liquid surface using ToF-SIMS, a vacuum surface technique. The detection window is an aperture of 2 m in diameter on a thin silicon nitride (SiN) membrane and it allows direct detection of the liquid surface. Surface tension of the liquid flowing inside the microchannel holds the liquid within the aperture. ToF-SIMS depth profiling was used to drill through the SiN membrane and the biofilm grown on the substrate. In situ 2D imaging of the biofilm in hydrated state was acquired, providing spatial distribution of the chemical compounds in the biofilm system. This data was compared with a medium filled microfluidic reactor devoid of biofilm and dried biofilm samples deposited on clean silicon wafers. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) was used to investigate these observations. Our results show that imaging biofilms in the hydrated environment using ToF-SIMS is possible using the unique microfluidic reactor. Moreover, characteristic biofilm fatty acids fragments were observed in the hydrated biofilm grown in the microfluidic channel, illustrating the advantage of imaging biofilm in its native environment.

  3. Coarse-grained model of water diffusion and proton conductivity in hydrated polyelectrolyte membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we simulate nanoscale segregation, water diffusion, and proton conductivity in hydrated sulfonated polystyrene (sPS). We employ a novel model [Lee et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11(9), 4395-4403 (2015)] that incorporates protonation/deprotonation equilibria into DPD simulations. The polymer and water are modeled by coarse-grained beads interacting via short-range soft repulsion and smeared charge electrostatic potentials. The proton is introduced as a separate charged bead that forms dissociable Morse bonds with the base beads representing water and sulfonate anions. Morse bond formation and breakup artificially mimics the Grotthuss mechanism of proton hopping between the bases. The DPD model is parameterized by matching the proton mobility in bulk water, dissociation constant of benzenesulfonic acid, and liquid-liquid equilibrium of water-ethylbenzene solutions. The DPD simulations semi-quantitatively predict nanoscale segregation in the hydrated sPS into hydrophobic and hydrophilic subphases, water self-diffusion, and proton mobility. As the hydration level increases, the hydrophilic subphase exhibits a percolation transition from isolated water clusters to a 3D network. The analysis of hydrophilic subphase connectivity and water diffusion demonstrates the importance of the dynamic percolation effect of formation and breakup of temporary junctions between water clusters. The proposed DPD model qualitatively predicts the ratio of proton to water self-diffusion and its dependence on the hydration level that is in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  4. Coarse-grained model of water diffusion and proton conductivity in hydrated polyelectrolyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we simulate nanoscale segregation, water diffusion, and proton conductivity in hydrated sulfonated polystyrene (sPS). We employ a novel model [Lee et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11(9), 4395-4403 (2015)] that incorporates protonation/deprotonation equilibria into DPD simulations. The polymer and water are modeled by coarse-grained beads interacting via short-range soft repulsion and smeared charge electrostatic potentials. The proton is introduced as a separate charged bead that forms dissociable Morse bonds with the base beads representing water and sulfonate anions. Morse bond formation and breakup artificially mimics the Grotthuss mechanism of proton hopping between the bases. The DPD model is parameterized by matching the proton mobility in bulk water, dissociation constant of benzenesulfonic acid, and liquid-liquid equilibrium of water-ethylbenzene solutions. The DPD simulations semi-quantitatively predict nanoscale segregation in the hydrated sPS into hydrophobic and hydrophilic subphases, water self-diffusion, and proton mobility. As the hydration level increases, the hydrophilic subphase exhibits a percolation transition from isolated water clusters to a 3D network. The analysis of hydrophilic subphase connectivity and water diffusion demonstrates the importance of the dynamic percolation effect of formation and breakup of temporary junctions between water clusters. The proposed DPD model qualitatively predicts the ratio of proton to water self-diffusion and its dependence on the hydration level that is in reasonable agreement with experiments. PMID:26747818

  5. Methane hydrate in the global organic carbon cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    2002-01-01

    The global occurrence of methane hydrate in outer continental margins and in polar regions, and the magnitude of the amount of methane sequestered in methane hydrate suggest that methane hydrate is an important component in the global organic carbon cycle. Various versions of this cycle have emphasized the importance of methane hydrate, and in the latest version the role of methane hydrate is considered to be analogous to the workings of an electrical circuit. In this circuit the methane hydrate is a condenser and the consequences of methane hydrate dissociation are depicted as a resistor and inductor, reflecting temperature change and changes in earth surface history. These consequences may have implications for global change including global climate change.

  6. Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gay Hydrate Production Methods

    SciTech Connect

    M. D. White; B. P. McGrail; S. K. Wurstner

    2009-06-30

    Displacing natural gas and petroleum with carbon dioxide is a proven technology for producing conventional geologic hydrocarbon reservoirs, and producing additional yields from abandoned or partially produced petroleum reservoirs. Extending this concept to natural gas hydrate production offers the potential to enhance gas hydrate recovery with concomitant permanent geologic sequestration. Numerical simulation was used to assess a suite of carbon dioxide injection techniques for producing gas hydrates from a variety of geologic deposit types. Secondary hydrate formation was found to inhibit contact of the injected CO{sub 2} regardless of injectate phase state, thus diminishing the exchange rate due to pore clogging and hydrate zone bypass of the injected fluids. Additional work is needed to develop methods of artificially introducing high-permeability pathways in gas hydrate zones if injection of CO{sub 2} in either gas, liquid, or micro-emulsion form is to be more effective in enhancing gas hydrate production rates.

  7. Rapid gas hydrate formation processes: Will they work?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Bernardo, Mark P.

    2010-06-07

    Researchers at DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETL’s 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. The results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuousmore » formation of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve.« less

  8. Competitive Oxidation and Hydration During Aqueous Alteration of Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolotov, M. Y.; Mironenko, M. V.; Shock, E. L.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Studies of chondrites show that incorporation of H2O ice during formation of asteroids followed by radioactive heating caused partial oxidation and hydration of primary reduced and anhydrous rocks. Oxidation of kamacite, phosphides, troilite and organic polymers occurred through consumption of water s oxygen and release of H2. Hydration caused formation of serpentine, saponite, chlorite, talc and hydrated salts. Since H2O was the major reactant in oxidation and hydration, these processes could have been competitive. Redox reactions in asteroids should have been closely connected to hydration (dehydration) during aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism. For example, dehydration and reduction release H2O that can be consumed in oxidation and hydration, respectively. We model asteroidal processes in order to quantify the fate of H2O and water s oxygen in major redox and hydration/dehydration reactions. Model: Equilibrium compositions in the gas-solid-liquid

  9. Seismic reflections identify finite differences in gas hydrate resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, W.; Max, M.

    1999-01-01

    What processes control methane hydrate concentrations? Gas hydrate occurs naturally at the pressure/ temperature/chemical conditions that are present within ocean floor sediments at water depths greater than about 500 meters. The gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) extends from the sea bottom downward to a depth where the natural increase in temperature causes the hydrate to melt (dissociate), even though the downward pressure increase is working to increase gas hydrate stability. Thus, the base of the GHSZ tends to parallel the seafloor at any given water depth (pressure), because the sub-seafloor isotherms (depths of constant temperature) generally parallel the seafloor. The layer at which gas hydrate is stable commonly extends from the sea floor to several hundred meters below it. The gas in most gas hydrates is methane, generated by bacteria in the sediments. In some cases, it can be higher carbon-number, thermogenic hydrocarbon gases that rise from greater depths.

  10. Rapid gas hydrate formation processes: Will they work?

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Bernardo, Mark P.

    2010-06-07

    Researchers at DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETL’s 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. The results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuous formation of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve.

  11. Concept of Methane Hydrate System in the eastern Nankai Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagakubo, S.; Fujii, T.; Noguchi, S.; Kawasaki, T.

    2008-12-01

    By the study of the Phase 1 (FY2001-2008) of the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium), MH21 Research Consortium showed that methane hydrates pore-filled in sandy sediments had a potential to develop in the future. It is important to clarify the accumulation mechanism and processes of methane hydrates pore-filled in sandy sediment because it would contribute to explore new methane hydrate field to develop other than the eastern Nankai Trough in the future. Therefore Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (JOGMEC), as a member of MH21 Research Consortium, has been constructing a concept of Methane Hydrate System (methane generation and migration, MH formation and dissociation) with methane hydrates pore-filled in sandy sediment. We extracted critical elements and executed processes to summarize Methane Hydrate System in the eastern Nankai Trough by reviewing past geochemical analysis, well logs and core analyses, seismic interpretations, and laboratory studies for the eastern Nankai Trough. We also conducted case studies using 1D and 2D numerical simulators developed for the clarification of methane hydrate accumulation mechanism. It was determined that there are still many unsolved issues as listed below though we try to construct a concept of Methane Hydrate System in the eastern Nankai Trough. 1.Methane source and migration -methane-dominant generation depth -methane generation rate. -driving forces of methane migration 2.Occurrences and distribution -occurrences and distribution of methane hydrates other than methane hydrates pore-filled in sandy sediment. -methane-bearing fluid condition (properties, distribution) below methane hydrate bearing zones. 3.Relation between seafloor phenomena and methane hydrate occurences. 4.Impact of geohistory and sea level (water depth) change to methane hydrate accumulation. New investigation surveys (drilling and geological/geochemical surveys on seafloor) are required to

  12. PMR Characterization of the Water Structure in Tibetan Milk Mushroom Zooglea: Influence of Medium Hydration and Hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupskaya, T. V.; Prylutskyy, Yu. I.; Evstigneev, M. P.; Tsapko, M. D.; Turov, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    The state of water in Tibetan milk mushroom zooglea with different degrees of hydration (h) was investigated using low-temperature PMR spectroscopy in air and in contact with the hydrophobic media polydimethylsiloxane PDMS-1000 and CHCl3 with added trifl uoroacetic acid (TFA). The maximum hydration of the zooglea amounted to h = 32 g/g (of dry matter). Water existed as polyassociates (clusters or domains) of strongly and weakly associated water. Bound water decomposed into clusters in the presence of TFA. The NMR spectra showed six types of bound water at h = 0.3 g/g.

  13. Spatial resolution of gas hydrate and permeability changes from ERT data in LARS simulating the Mallik gas hydrate production test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priegnitz, Mike; Thaler, Jan; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Abendroth, Sven

    2014-05-01

    The German gas hydrate project SUGAR studies innovative methods and approaches to be applied in the production of methane from hydrate-bearing reservoirs. To enable laboratory studies in pilot scale, a large reservoir simulator (LARS) was realized allowing for the formation and dissociation of gas hydrates under simulated in-situ conditions. LARS is equipped with a series of sensors. This includes a cylindrical electrical resistance tomography (ERT) array composed of 25 electrode rings featuring 15 electrodes each. The high-resolution ERT array is used to monitor the spatial distribution of the electrical resistivity during hydrate formation and dissociation experiments over time. As the present phases of poorly conducting sediment, well conducting pore fluid, non-conducting hydrates, and isolating free gas cover a wide range of electrical properties, ERT measurements enable us to monitor the spatial distribution of these phases during the experiments. In order to investigate the hydrate dissociation and the resulting fluid flow, we simulated a hydrate production test in LARS that was based on the Mallik gas hydrate production test (see abstract Heeschen et al., this volume). At first, a hydrate phase was produced from methane saturated saline water. During the two months of gas hydrate production we measured the electrical properties within the sediment sample every four hours. These data were used to establish a routine estimating both the local degrees of hydrate saturation and the resulting local permeabilities in the sediment's pore space from the measured resistivity data. The final gas hydrate saturation filled 89.5% of the total pore space. During hydrate dissociation, ERT data do not allow for a quantitative determination of free gas and remaining gas hydrates since both phases are electrically isolating. However, changes are resolved in the spatial distribution of the conducting liquid and the isolating phase with gas being the only mobile isolating phase

  14. Advances in understanding hydration of Portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Scrivener, Karen L.; Juilland, Patrick; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2015-12-15

    Progress in understanding hydration is summarized. Evidence supports the geochemistry dissolution theory as an explanation for the induction period, in preference to the inhibiting layer theory. The growth of C–S–H is the principal factor controlling the main heat evolution peak. Electron microscopy indicates that C–S–H “needles” grow from the surface of grains. At the peak, the surface is covered, but deceleration cannot be attributed to diffusion control. The shoulder peak comes from renewed reaction of C{sub 3}A after depletion of sulfate in solution, but release of sulfate absorbed on C–S–H means that ettringite continues to form. After several days space becomes the major factor controlling hydration. The use of new analytical technique is improving our knowledge of the action of superplasticizers and leading to the design of molecules for different applications. Atomistic modeling is becoming a topic of increasing interest. Recent publications in this area are reviewed.

  15. Methane hydrates and contemporary climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2011-01-01

    As the evidence for warming climate became better established in the latter part of the 20th century (IPCC 2001), some scientists raised the alarm that large quantities of methane (CH4) might be liberated by widespread destabilization of climate-sensitive gas hydrate deposits trapped in marine and permafrost-associated sediments (Bohannon 2008, Krey et al. 2009, Mascarelli 2009). Even if only a fraction of the liberated CH4 were to reach the atmosphere, the potency of CH4 as a greenhouse gas (GHG) and the persistence of its oxidative product (CO2) heightened concerns that gas hydrate dissociation could represent a slow tipping point (Archer et al. 2009) for Earth's contemporary period of climate change.

  16. Obsidian hydration dating of volcanic events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Obradovich, J.

    1981-01-01

    Obsidian hydration dating of volcanic events had been compared with ages of the same events determined by the 14C and KAr methods at several localities. The localities, ranging in age from 1200 to over 1 million yr, include Newberry Craters, Oregon; Coso Hot Springs, California; Salton Sea, California; Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming; and Mineral Range, Utah. In most cases the agreement is quite good. A number of factors including volcanic glass composition and exposuretemperature history must be known in order to relate hydration thickness to age. The effect of composition can be determined from chemical analysis or the refractive index of the glass. Exposure-temperature history requires a number of considerations enumerated in this paper. ?? 1981.

  17. THF water hydrate crystallization: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarakonda, Surya; Groysman, Alexander; Myerson, Allan S.

    1999-08-01

    Supersaturated solutions of THF-water hydrate system were experimentally studied before and during crystallization, to examine the system's behavior in the metastable zone and observe any anomalies suggesting cluster formation. Nucleation induction time measurements, with and without additives, were performed to screen potential growth inhibitors. Shifts in the onset points of crystallization for water and THF-water mixtures with additives were measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Aspartame was among one of the few successfully screened inhibitors. Preliminary on-line crystal size distribution (CSD) measurements were performed on this system to monitor the crystal size during crystallization. The CSD data was also used to compute the hydrate crystal growth rates, which were found to be in the order of 145 μm/h.

  18. A statistical mechanical description of biomolecular hydration

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    We present an efficient and accurate theoretical description of the structural hydration of biological macromolecules. The hydration of molecules of almost arbitrary size (tRNA, antibody-antigen complexes, photosynthetic reaction centre) can be studied in solution and in the crystal environment. The biomolecular structure obtained from x-ray crystallography, NMR, or modeling is required as input information. The structural arrangement of water molecules near a biomolecular surface is represented by the local water density analogous to the corresponding electron density in an x-ray diffraction experiment. The water-density distribution is approximated in terms of two- and three-particle correlation functions of solute atoms with water using a potentials-of-mean-force expansion.

  19. Hydrated Minerals in the Martian Southern Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wray, James J.; Seelos, F. P.; Murchie, S. L.; Squyres, S. W.

    2008-09-01

    Hydrated minerals including sulfates, phyllosilicates, and hydrated silica have been observed on the surface of Mars by the orbital near-infrared spectrometers OMEGA and CRISM [1,2]. Global maps from OMEGA [3,4] show that km-scale and larger exposures of these minerals are scattered widely throughout the planet's low and mid latitudes, but are relatively rare. Yet CRISM has found hundreds to thousands of Fe/Mg-phyllosilicate exposures in the highlands of Terra Tyrrhena alone [2], suggesting that smaller exposures may be much more common. To search for such exposures, we have surveyed the browse products from all PDS-released CRISM targeted observations (as of July 2008) across a large fraction of the Southern highlands, including the Noachis, Cimmeria, and Sirenum regions. Sulfates are observed in Noachian-aged terrains in each of these regions, including as far South as -63º latitude, suggesting that sulfate formation may have occurred locally or regionally throughout a large fraction of Martian history. Some of our strongest phyllosilicate detections occur adjacent to inferred chloride-bearing deposits [5] in Terra Sirenum. Also in Sirenum, the D 100 km Columbus crater contains light-toned, hydrated sulfate-bearing layers overlying materials that contain both a kaolin group clay and Fe/Mg-smectite clay, in different locations. However, phyllosilicates do not appear predominantly associated with impact craters in the regions surveyed, in contrast with Terra Tyrrhena [2]. We are currently searching for additional hydrated mineral exposures using CRISM multispectral data, providing further detail on their global distribution and identifying local areas of interest for future focused studies. [1] Bibring, J.-P. et al. (2005) Science 307, 1576-1581. [2] Mustard, J. F. et al. (2008) Nature 454, 305-309. [3] Bibring, J.-P. et al. (2006) Science 312, 400-404. [4] Poulet, F. et al. (2007) Mars 7, Abs. #3170. [5] Osterloo M. M. et al. (2008) Science 319, 1651-1654.

  20. Mesostructure from hydration gradients in demosponge biosilica.

    PubMed

    Neilson, James R; George, Nathan C; Murr, Meredith M; Seshadri, Ram; Morse, Daniel E

    2014-04-22

    Organisms of the phylum Porifera, that is, sponges, utilize enzymatic hydrolysis to concatenate bioavailable inorganic silicon to produce lightweight, strong, and often flexible skeletal elements called spicules. In their optical transparency, these remarkable biomaterials resemble fused silica, despite having been formed under ambient marine biological conditions. Although previous studies have elucidated the chemical mechanisms of spicule formation and revealed the extensive hydration of these glasses, their precise composition and local and medium-range structures had not been determined. We have employed a combination of compositional analysis, (1) H and (29) Si solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and synchrotron X-ray total scattering to characterize spicule-derived silica produced by the demosponge Tethya aurantia. These studies indicate that the materials are highly hydrated, but in an inhomogeneous manner. The spicule-derived silica is, on average, perfectly dense for the given extent of hydration and regions of fully condensed and unstrained SiO networks persist throughout each monolithic spicule. To accommodate chemical strain and defects, the extensive hydration is concentrated in distinct regions that give rise to mesostructural features. The chemistry responsible for producing spicule silica resembles hydrolytic sol-gel processing, which offers exceptional control over the precise local atomic arrangement of materials. However, the specific processing involved in forming the sponge spicule silica further results in regions of fully condensed silica coexisting with regions of incomplete condensation. This mesostructure suggests a mechanism for atomistic defect tolerance and strain relief that may account for the unusual mechanical properties of the biogenic spicules. PMID:24633700

  1. Hydrating skin by stimulating biosynthesis of aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Marc; Sadick, Neil S; Noblesse, Emmanuelle; Juan, Milène; Lachmann-Weber, Nadège; Boury-Jamot, Mathieu; Sougrat, Rachid; Verbavatz, Jean Marc; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Bonté, Frédéric

    2007-06-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are proteins that facilitate the transport of water across cell membranes. AQP3 expression is related to the expressions of other epidermal proteins involved in water maintenance (ie, CD44, claudin-1, and filaggrin). The expressions of AQP3 water channels are strongly affected by age and chronic sun exposure, and a defective osmotic equilibrium could occur in the epidermis, which would account for the skin dryness observed in older people and skin areas most exposed to sunlight. We investigated active ingredients that are able to increase AQP3 levels in order to improve hydration in human skin keratinocytes. We selected an ethanolic/water (70/30 v/v) extract of Ajuga turkestanica, a plant from Central Asia, as the hydrating agent. After 17 days of treatment every 2 days with this extract (2.5 microg/mL) in vitro, AQP3 expression measured at the protein level in human reconstructed epidermis was significantly increased. Water transport through both aquaporins and aquaglyceroporins and glycerol transport through aquaglyceroporins alone are important to skin hydration. The distribution and the variability of aquaporins in human skin cells suggest that these channels may have important roles in skin physiology. AQPs appear to be key protein targets to improve the resistance and quality of the skin surface as well as to improve aging and sun exposure-induced dryness as shown by their roles in 1) hydrating the living layers of the epidermis where the keratinocyte differentiation takes place and 2) barrier formation and recovery. PMID:17691206

  2. Bioimpedance in medicine: Measuring hydration influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlubik, J.; Hlubik, P.; Lhotska, L.

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the paper is to present results of our ongoing research focused on the influence of body hydration on the body impedance measurements and also on the influence of the frequency used for the measurement. The question is why to measure human body composition and if these values have beneficial results. First goal of the work deals with a question of measuring human body composition. The performed measurements showed certain influence which must be verified by repeated experiments.

  3. CO₂ processing and hydration of fruit and vegetable tissues by clathrate hydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Satoshi; Nakano, Kohei; Thammawong, Manasikan; Umeda, Hiroki; Yoneyama, Akio; Takeda, Tohoru; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Matsuo, Seiji

    2016-08-15

    CO2 hydrate can be used to preserve fresh fruits and vegetables, and its application could contribute to the processing of carbonated frozen food. We investigated water transformation in the frozen tissue of fresh grape samples upon CO2 treatment at 2-3 MPa and 3°C for up to 46 h. Frozen fresh bean, radish, eggplant and cucumber samples were also investigated for comparison. X-ray diffraction indicated that after undergoing CO2 treatment for several hours, structure I CO2 hydrate formed within the grape tissue. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging using the diffraction-enhanced imaging technique revealed the presence of CO2 hydrate within the intercellular spaces of these tissues. The carbonated produce became effervescent because of the dissociation of CO2 hydrate through the intercellular space, especially above the melting point of ice. In addition, suppressed metabolic activity resulting from CO2 hydrate formation, which inhibits water and nutrient transport through intercellular space, can be expected. PMID:27006222

  4. Coupled THCM Modeling of Gas Hydrate Bearing Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, M. J.; Gai, X., Sr.; Shastri, A.; Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline clathrate compounds made of water and a low molecular gas, like methane. Gas hydrates are generally present in oil-producing areas and in permafrost regions. Methane hydrate deposits can lead to large-scale submarine slope failures, blowouts, platform foundation failures, and borehole instability. Gas hydrates constitute also an attractive source of energy as they are estimated to contain very large reserves of methane. Hydrate formation, dissociation and methane production from hydrate bearing sediments are coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) processes that involve, amongst other, exothermic formation and endothermic dissociation of hydrate and ice phases, mixed fluid flow and large changes in fluid pressure. A comprehensive THM formulation is briefly presented here. Momentum balance, mass balance and energy balance equations take into consideration the interaction among all phases (i.e. solid, liquid, gas, hydrates and ice) and mechanical equilibrium. Constitutive equations describe the intrinsic THM behavior of the sediment. Simulation results conducted for hydrate bearing sediments subjected to boundary conditions highlight the complex interaction among THM processes in hydrate bearing sediments.

  5. Terahertz spectroscopy of concrete for evaluating the critical hydration level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Jyotirmayee; Ray, Shaumik; Nallappan, Kathirvel; Sasmal, Saptarshi; Pesala, Bala

    2014-03-01

    Concrete, a mixture of cement, coarse aggregate, sand and filler material (if any), is widely used in the construction industry. Cement, mainly composed of Tricalcium Silicate (C3S) and Dicalcium Silicate (C2S) reacts readily with water, a process known as hydration. The hydration process forms a solid material known as hardened cement paste which is mainly composed of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H), Calcium Hydroxide and Calcium Carbonate. To quantify the critical hydration level, an accurate and fast technique is highly desired. However, in conventional XRD technique, the peaks of the constituents of anhydrated and hydrated cement cannot be resolved properly, where as Mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy has low penetration depth and hence cannot be used to determine the hydration level of thicker concrete samples easily. Further, MIR spectroscopy cannot be used to effectively track the formation of Calcium Hydroxide, a key by-product during the hydration process. This paper describes a promising approach to quantify the hydration dynamics of cement using Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy. This technique has been employed to track the time dependent reaction mechanism of the key constituents of cement that react with water and form the products in the hydrated cement, viz., C-S-H, Calcium Hydroxide and Calcium Carbonate. This study helps in providing an improved understanding on the hydration kinetics of cement and also to optimise the physio-mechanical characteristics of concrete.

  6. Investigation of mechanisms of gas hydrates accumulation in permafrost environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvilin, E. M.

    2012-12-01

    The feature of permafrost sediments is capability to accumulate a quantity of natural gases foremost methane with low admixture of carbon dioxide. In consequence of natural and climatic changes, formation of favorable thermobaric conditions for transformation of intra-permafrost gas accumulations from free state into gas hydrate is possible. In consideration of high gas-saturation of frozen sediments, the active processes of hydrate formation in permafrost during the transgression of arctic seas or under continental glaciations can be expected. A special experimental technique was elaborated to perform physical modeling of hydrate formation conditions in cryogenic ice-containing sediments. The experiments were carried out under constant negative temperatures in interval from -2 oC to -9 oC. Methane (99.98%) was used as hydrate-former gas. During the experiments the kinetics of gas consumption in porous media was investigated and also part of porous water turned into hydrate and hydrate- saturation of sediment samples were estimated. Experiments show that hydrate formation in gas saturated sediments occurs actively not only in freezing sediments (above 0 oC) but also in frozen sediments (below 0 oC). Intensity of hydrate formation in frozen sediments depends on such factors as ice-saturation, thermobaric conditions and gas composition. Experimental data shows that after attenuation of hydrate formation in frozen sediments the considerable activization of hydrate accumulation processes during the increasing of temperature above 0 oC can occur. That leads to the thawing of porous ice, which does not turn into hydrate, and attendant this process structural-textural changes result in appearance of new gas-water contacts. As a result there is second hydrate formation on background of thawing of ice. Based on analysis of geological data and experimental researches possible geological models of gas hydrates formation in shallow permafrost under the sea transgression and

  7. Wax and hydrate control with electrical power

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    Electrical heating of subsea flowlines is an effective way to prevent wax and hydrate information, especially for long transportation distances and in low-temperature deep water. Systems are available for use in conjunction with bundles, pipe-in-pipe, and wet-thermal-insulation systems. These systems provide environmentally friendly fluid-temperature control without chemicals or flaring for pipeline depressurizing. Enhanced production is achieved because no time is lost by unnecessary depressurizing, pigging, heating-medium circulation, or removal of hydrate and wax blockages. The seabed temperature at 100-m and greater water depths may range from 7 to {minus}1.5 C, causing a rapid cooling of the hot well streams being transported in subsea flowlines. Under these supercooling conditions, vulnerable crude oils and multiphase compositions will deposit wax and asphalts; also the gas/water phase may freeze solid with hydrate particles. The paper discusses thermal-insulated flowlines, heat-loss compensation with electrical power, electrical power consumption and operation, and subsea electrical-power distribution system.

  8. Hydration energies of protonated and sodiated thiouracils.

    PubMed

    Wincel, Henryk

    2014-12-01

    Hydration reactions of protonated and sodiated thiouracils (2-thiouracil, 6-methyl-2-thiouracil, and 4-thiouracil) generated by electrospray ionization have been studied in a gas phase at 10 mbar using a pulsed ion-beam high-pressure mass spectrometer. The thermochemical data, ΔH(o)n, ΔS(o)n, and ΔG(o)n, for the hydrated systems were obtained by equilibrium measurements. The water binding energies of protonated thiouracils, [2SU]H(+) and [6Me2SU]H(+), were found to be of the order of 51 kJ/mol for the first, and 46 kJ/mol for the second water molecule. For [4SU]H(+), these values are 3-4 kJ/mol lower. For sodiated complexes, these energies are similar for all studied systems, and varied between 62 and 68 kJ/mol for the first and between 48 and 51 kJ/mol for the second water molecule. The structural aspects of the precursors for hydrated complexes are discussed in conjunction with available literature data. PMID:25270881

  9. Ethical issues in artificial nutrition and hydration.

    PubMed

    Fine, Robert L

    2006-04-01

    From the time of Hippocrates, approximately 2500 years ago, medical ethics has been seen as an essential complement to medical science in pursuit of the healing art of medicine. This is no less true today, not only for physicians but also for other essential professionals involved in patient care, including clinical nutrition support practitioners. One aspect of medical ethics that the clinical nutritionist must face involves decisions to provide, withhold, or withdraw artificial nutrition and hydration. Such a decision is not only technical but often has a strong moral component as well. Although it is the physician who writes any such order, the clinical nutritionist as fellow professional should be a part not only of the scientific aspects of the order but of the moral discourse leading to such an order and may certainly be involved in counseling physicians, other healthcare providers, patients, and families alike. This paper is intended to give the clinical nutritionist a familiarity with the discipline of medical ethics and its proper relationship to medical science, politics, and law. This review will then offer a more specific analysis of the ethical aspects of decisions to initiate, withhold, or withdraw artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH) and offer particular commentary on the ethically significant pronouncements of Pope John Paul II in March of 2004 related to vegetative patients and artificial or "assisted" nutrition and hydration. PMID:16556921

  10. Intermittent contact hydration scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisi, G.; Bacci, F.; Carlà, M.; Dolci, D.

    2010-07-01

    Hydration scanning probe microscopy is a technique similar to scanning tunneling microscopy, in which the probe current, sustained by the slight surface conduction of a thin hydration layer covering an insulating support surface, is essentially electrochemical in nature instead of electronic tunneling. Such a technique allows the imaging of a great variety of samples, including insulators, provided that they are hydrophilic, as well as the study of molecular samples of biological interest (such as DNA) fixed on a suitable supporting surface. The main problem to obtain stable and reproducible images comes from the very critical determination of the operating conditions under which the probe-hydration layer interaction does not lead to the formation of a relatively large water meniscus. It has been suggested that this issue can be removed by adding a high frequency oscillation to the probe movement, as in tapping atomic force microscopy. Meniscus formation and breakup have been investigated in order to determine the best values for the amplitude and the frequency of the oscillation. Results obtained in this mode are discussed in comparison with the usual continuous contact mode.

  11. Estimating the Aqueous Solubility of Pharmaceutical Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Stephen J; Younis, Usir S; Myrdal, Paul B

    2016-06-01

    Estimation of crystalline solute solubility is well documented throughout the literature. However, the anhydrous crystal form is typically considered with these models, which is not always the most stable crystal form in water. In this study, an equation which predicts the aqueous solubility of a hydrate is presented. This research attempts to extend the utility of the ideal solubility equation by incorporating desolvation energetics of the hydrated crystal. Similar to the ideal solubility equation, which accounts for the energetics of melting, this model approximates the energy of dehydration to the entropy of vaporization for water. Aqueous solubilities, dehydration and melting temperatures, and log P values were collected experimentally and from the literature. The data set includes different hydrate types and a range of log P values. Three models are evaluated, the most accurate model approximates the entropy of dehydration (ΔSd) by the entropy of vaporization (ΔSvap) for water, and utilizes onset dehydration and melting temperatures in combination with log P. With this model, the average absolute error for the prediction of solubility of 14 compounds was 0.32 log units. PMID:27238488

  12. Protein crowding affects hydration structure and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Ryuhei; Sugita, Yuji; Feig, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The effect of protein crowding on the structure and dynamics of water was examined from explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of a series of protein G and protein G/villin systems at different protein concentrations. Hydration structure was analyzed in terms of radial distribution functions, three-dimensional hydration sites, and preservation of tetrahedral coordination. Analysis of hydration dynamics focused on self-diffusion rates and dielectric constants as a function of crowding. The results show significant changes in both structure and dynamics of water under highly crowded conditions. The structure of water is altered mostly beyond the first solvation shell. Diffusion rates and dielectric constants are significantly reduced following linear trends as a function of crowding reflecting highly constrained water in crowded environments. The reduced dynamics of diffusion is expected to be strongly related to hydrodynamic properties of crowded cellular environments while the reduced dielectric constant under crowded conditions has implications for the stability of biomolecules in crowded environments. The results from this study suggest a prescription for modeling solvation in simulations of cellular environments. PMID:22352398

  13. Is Iodate a Strongly Hydrated Cation?

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel D.; Pham, Thai V.; Fulton, John L.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2011-10-06

    We show, through a combination of density function theory based molecular dynamics simulations (DFTMD) and experimental x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) studies, that the iodate ion (IO3-) is a zwitterion in solution. The local region adjoining the I atom is sufficiently electropositive that three hydrating waters are oriented with their O’s atoms directly interacting with the iodine atom at an I-OH2O distance of 2.95 Å. This is the orientation of water hydrating a cation. Further, approximately 2-3 water molecules hydrate each O of IO3 - through a single H atom in an orientation of the water that is expected for an anion at an IOH2O distance of 3.85 Å. We predict that this structure persists, although to a much lesser degree, for BrO3 -, and ClO3 -. This type of local microstructure profoundly affects the behavior of the "anion" at interfaces and how it interacts with other ionic species in solution.

  14. Combinatorial molecular optimization of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Abdolhosseini Qomi, M.J.; Krakowiak, K.J.; Bauchy, M.; Stewart, K.L.; Shahsavari, R.; Jagannathan, D.; Brommer, D.B.; Baronnet, A.; Buehler, M.J.; Yip, S.; Ulm, F.-J; Van Vliet, K.J.; Pellenq, R.J-.M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its ubiquitous presence in the built environment, concrete’s molecular-level properties are only recently being explored using experimental and simulation studies. Increasing societal concerns about concrete’s environmental footprint have provided strong motivation to develop new concrete with greater specific stiffness or strength (for structures with less material). Herein, a combinatorial approach is described to optimize properties of cement hydrates. The method entails screening a computationally generated database of atomic structures of calcium-silicate-hydrate, the binding phase of concrete, against a set of three defect attributes: calcium-to-silicon ratio as compositional index and two correlation distances describing medium-range silicon-oxygen and calcium-oxygen environments. Although structural and mechanical properties correlate well with calcium-to-silicon ratio, the cross-correlation between all three defect attributes reveals an indentation modulus-to-hardness ratio extremum, analogous to identifying optimum network connectivity in glass rheology. We also comment on implications of the present findings for a novel route to optimize the nanoscale mechanical properties of cement hydrate. PMID:25248305

  15. Hydration Energies of Protonated and Sodiated Thiouracils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincel, Henryk

    2014-12-01

    Hydration reactions of protonated and sodiated thiouracils (2-thiouracil, 6-methyl-2-thiouracil, and 4-thiouracil) generated by electrospray ionization have been studied in a gas phase at 10 mbar using a pulsed ion-beam high-pressure mass spectrometer. The thermochemical data, ΔH o n, ΔS o n, and ΔG o n, for the hydrated systems were obtained by equilibrium measurements. The water binding energies of protonated thiouracils, [2SU]H+ and [6Me2SU]H+, were found to be of the order of 51 kJ/mol for the first, and 46 kJ/mol for the second water molecule. For [4SU]H+, these values are 3-4 kJ/mol lower. For sodiated complexes, these energies are similar for all studied systems, and varied between 62 and 68 kJ/mol for the first and between 48 and 51 kJ/mol for the second water molecule. The structural aspects of the precursors for hydrated complexes are discussed in conjunction with available literature data.

  16. Stratigraphy and formation of clays, sulfates, and hydrated silica within a depression in Coprates Catena, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitz, Catherine M.; Bishop, Janice L.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the morphology, mineralogy, and stratigraphy of light-toned layered deposits within a trough of Coprates Catena, centered at -15°N, 300°E. One of the deposits in the eastern portion of the trough contains numerous hydrated minerals, including Al-phyllosilicates, Fe/Mg-phyllosilicates, hydrated silica, hydrated sulfates, jarosite and acid alteration products characterized by a spectral doublet between 2.2 and 2.3 µm, and weakly hydrated materials. The Al-phyllosilicates are observed both stratigraphically above and below the Fe/Mg-phyllosilicate unit, which is a rare and perhaps unique association on Mars. Most of the western light-toned layered deposit underlies a terraced fan. This deposit contains hydrated materials, including Al-phyllosilicates and Fe/Mg-phyllosilicates. Dip measurements indicate that both the eastern and western deposits dip toward the center of the trough, indicating that they postdate formation of the trough and are consequently Late Hesperian or younger in age. Volcanic ash, most likely erupted during formation of the pit crater in the eastern portion of the trough, seems to best explain our observations for several of the units. Valleys sourced from water along the plateau may have flowed into the trough and altered the sediments, with changing aqueous chemistries over time resulting in the diverse range of mineralogies now observed in the eastern light-toned deposit. Our results reveal a complex sedimentary and aqueous history within the Coprates Catena trough, indicating that localized habitable conditions were possible relatively late in Martian history at a time when colder, drier conditions likely dominated the majority of the planet.

  17. Impact of Compound Hydrate Dynamics on Phase Boundary Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osegovic, J. P.; Max, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    Compound hydrate reactions are affected by the local concentration of hydrate forming materials (HFM). The relationship between HFM composition and the phase boundary is as significant as temperature and pressure. Selective uptake and sequestration of preferred hydrate formers (PF) has wide ranging implications for the state and potential use of natural hydrate formation, including impact on climate. Rising mineralizing fluids of hydrate formers (such as those that occur on Earth and are postulated to exist elsewhere in the solar system) will sequester PF before methane, resulting in a positive relationship between depth and BTU content as ethane and propane are removed before methane. In industrial settings the role of preferred formers can separate gases. When depressurizing gas hydrate to release the stored gas, the hydrate initial composition will set the decomposition phase boundary because the supporting solution takes on the composition of the hydrate phase. In other settings where hydrate is formed, transported, and then dissociated, similar effects can control the process. The behavior of compound hydrate systems can primarily fit into three categories: 1) In classically closed systems, all the material that can form hydrate is isolated, such as in a sealed laboratory vessel. In such systems, formation and decomposition are reversible processes with observed hysteresis related to mass or heat transfer limitations, or the order and magnitude in which individual hydrate forming gases are taken up from the mixture and subsequently released. 2) Kinetically closed systems are exposed to a solution mass flow across a hydrate mass. These systems can have multiple P-T phase boundaries based on the local conditions at each face of the hydrate mass. A portion of hydrate that is exposed to fresh mineralizing solution will contain more preferred hydrate formers than another portion that is exposed to a partially depleted solution. Examples of kinetically closed

  18. Introducing Charge Hydration Asymmetry into the Generalized Born Model.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Abhishek; Aguilar, Boris H; Tolokh, Igor S; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2014-04-01

    The effect of charge hydration asymmetry (CHA)-non-invariance of solvation free energy upon solute charge inversion-is missing from the standard linear response continuum electrostatics. The proposed charge hydration asymmetric-generalized Born (CHA-GB) approximation introduces this effect into the popular generalized Born (GB) model. The CHA is added to the GB equation via an analytical correction that quantifies the specific propensity of CHA of a given water model; the latter is determined by the charge distribution within the water model. Significant variations in CHA seen in explicit water (TIP3P, TIP4P-Ew, and TIP5P-E) free energy calculations on charge-inverted "molecular bracelets" are closely reproduced by CHA-GB, with the accuracy similar to models such as SEA and 3D-RISM that go beyond the linear response. Compared against reference explicit (TIP3P) electrostatic solvation free energies, CHA-GB shows about a 40% improvement in accuracy over the canonical GB, tested on a diverse set of 248 rigid small neutral molecules (root mean square error, rmse = 0.88 kcal/mol for CHA-GB vs 1.24 kcal/mol for GB) and 48 conformations of amino acid analogs (rmse = 0.81 kcal/mol vs 1.26 kcal/mol). CHA-GB employs a novel definition of the dielectric boundary that does not subsume the CHA effects into the intrinsic atomic radii. The strategy leads to finding a new set of intrinsic atomic radii optimized for CHA-GB; these radii show physically meaningful variation with the atom type, in contrast to the radii set optimized for GB. Compared to several popular radii sets used with the original GB model, the new radii set shows better transferability between different classes of molecules. PMID:24803871

  19. Cisplatin intrastrand adducts sensitize DNA to base damage by hydrated electrons.

    PubMed

    Behmand, B; Wagner, J R; Sanche, L; Hunting, D J

    2014-05-01

    The oligonucleotide TTTTTGTGTTT with or without a cisplatin adduct was reacted with hydrated electrons generated by ionizing radiation. Hydroxyl radicals were quenched with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and the solutions were bubbled with wet nitrogen to eliminate oxygen, a scavenger of hydrated electrons. Prior to irradiation, the structure of the initial cisplatin adduct was identified by mass spectrometry as G-cisplatin-G. Radiation damage to DNA bases was quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), after enzymatic digestion of the TTTTTGTGTTT-cisplatin complex to deoxyribonucleosides. The masses of the platinum adducts following digestion and separation by HPLC were measured by mass spectrometry. Our results demonstrate that hydrated electrons induce damage to thymines as well as detachment of the cisplatin moiety from both guanines in the oligonucleotide. This detachment regenerates both unmodified guanine and damaged guanine, in equimolar amounts. At 1000 Gy, a net average of 2.5 thymines and 1 guanine are damaged for each platinum lost from the oligonucleotide. Given the extensive base damage that occurs for each cisplatin adduct lost, it is clear that, prior to undergoing detachment, these adducts must catalyze several cycles of reactions of hydrated electrons with DNA bases. It is likely that a single reaction leads to the loss of the cisplatin adduct and the damage observed on the guanine base; however, the damage to the thymine bases must require the continued presence of the cisplatin adduct, acting as a catalyst. To our knowledge, this is the first time that platinum-DNA adducts have been shown to have catalytic activity. We propose two pathways for the interaction of hydrated electrons with TTTTTGTGTTT-cisplatin: (1) the hydrated electron is initially captured by a thymine base and transferred by base to base electron hopping to the guanine site, where the cisplatin moiety detaches from the oligonucleotide via dissociative

  20. Terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) of hydrated biomolecular polymers and monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glancy, Paul Michael

    Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) was utilized to obtain the complex dielectric spectra of hydrated biomolecules, betwixt the frequency range of 50 GHz to 2 THz. Two biological systems are observed; nucleic acid and carbohydrates. Monomers and polymers will be of interest for both. Utilizing both the Debye relaxation model and the suspension model, we observed both the mobility of biomolecules in solution as well as the influence they have on their surrounding water. Nucleotides and glucose (monomers) were found to have a small part in the overall dynamics of the polymers. Hydrated nucleotides were shown to form transition materials. The pyrimidine nucleotides act much like an ion where they break up the original structure of water and set up a less complicated structure (smaller main relaxation times than water) than water. Purine nucleotides act more like a hydrogen bond building material they set up a more complex hydrogen bond network (larger main relaxation times than water) than water. These nucleotides were shown to have an influence in water out to four water layers. The concentration studies that were preformed on native DNA, shows that concentration in the hydrated state is an important factor in the dielectric response. In addition, it was found that impurities in our samples did not play an important role in the dielectric response of our DNA solutions. Native DNA was shown to have a reach of six hydration layers. The influence temperature has on DNA solutions was observed, temperature has a large influence on hydrated DNA. It was found that hydrated DNA is more susceptible to change in temperature then that of bulk water. The main relaxation time increases at a much larger proportion to that of water. Using two synthetic DNA molecules with the same structure but different compositions and two carbohydrates with different structures but the same composition we found that the structure of a biopolymer is the most domination factor, rather than

  1. Effects of hydration on laser soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Eric K.; Brown, Dennis T.; Kovach, Ian S.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1997-05-01

    Laser welding with albumin-based tissue solder has been investigated as an alternative to surgical suturing. Many surgical procedures require the soldered tissues to be in a hydrated environment. We have studied the effects of hydration on laser soldered rat dermis and baboon articular cartilage in vitro. The solder is composed of human serum albumin, sodium hyaluronate and indocyanine green. We used a micro-pipette to deposit 2 (mu) l of solder on each tissue specimen. An 808 nm cw laser beam with irradiance of 27 W/cm2 was scanned 4 times over the same solder area at a constant speed of 0.84 mm/sec. After photo-coagulation, each tissue specimen was cut into two halves at the center of the solder, perpendicular to the direction of the scanning laser beam. One half was reserved as control while the other half was soaked in phosphate buffered saline for a designated hydration period. The hydration periods were 1 hr, 1, 2, and 7 days. All tissue specimens were fixed in glutaraldahyde, then prepared for scanning electron microcopy analysis. For most of the specimens, there was non-uniform coagulation across the thickness of the solder. Closer to the laser beam, the upper solder region formed a more dense coagulum. While the region closer to solder-tissue interface, the solder aggregated into small globules. This non-uniform coagulation was likely caused by non-uniform energy distribution during photocoagulation. The protein globules and coagulum seem to be responsible for the solder attachment from the specimen surface. However, we have noted that the solder detached from the cartilage substrate as early as after 1 hr of hydration. On the other hand, the solder attached to the dermis much better than to cartilage. This may be explained by the difference in surface roughness of the two tissue types. The dermal layer of the skin is composed of collagen matrix which may provide a better entrapment of the solder than the smooth surface of articular cartilage.

  2. Feedbacks of Rock Hydration on Hydrothermal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, K.; Ruepke, L.

    2009-04-01

    Hydration of the oceanic lithosphere is an important process which alters both the chemical and physical properties of the affected lithologies. Although hydrothermal convection has been extensively researched, little work has been done on the effects of hydration reactions occurring during convection. One of the most important reactions occurring in the oceanic lithosphere is serpentinization of ultramafic rocks. We present a numerical solution for hydrothermal circulation which explores the feedbacks generated during serpentinization of mantle rocks. The model is two dimensional and uses the FEM approach. Three coupled, time-dependent equations are solved: the first equation is mass conserving and is based on Darcy flow. The second equation describes heat transport and accounts for advective and diffusive heat transfer as well as latent heat effects. The final equation describes the serpentinization rate of olivine in ultramafic rocks (Emmanuel and Berkowitz, 2006) and is derived from experimental results (Martin and Fyfe, 1970). Serpentinization is a fluid-consuming process and manifests itself as a sink term in the Darcy flow equation. The exothermic heat of reaction is added as a source term in the heat transport equation. Moreover, serpentinization is associated with a large positive volume change. This large volume change may decrease the porosity of the rock but can also increase permeability by deformation. The rate of serpentinization used in the model is, therefore, also coupled to the porosity and permeability. We investigate the role of hydration in a box model using thermodynamically constrained fluid properties where the lower part is composed of reactive mantle rocks. The effects of serpentinization on the temperatures of the venting fluids and variations in flow pathways are explored. Furthermore, the model is also used in a mid-ocean ridge setting and the amount and depth of serpentinization, in addition to the above mentioned effects, is also

  3. cis-terpin hydrate metabolism by a Brevibacterium: patterns of enzyme induction, and accumulation of -terpineol in growth.

    PubMed

    Baum, R H; Marr, E K

    1972-04-01

    A brevibacterium, strain TH-4, previously isolated by aerobic enrichment on the monocyclic monoterpenoid cis-terpin hydrate as a sole carbon and energy source, was found to grow on alpha-terpineol and on a number of common sugars and organic acids. Oxidation of these terpenoids was shown to occur via an induced enzyme system, as measured manometrically by oxygen uptake and prevention of protein synthesis with chloramphenicol or puromycin. Oxidation of terpin hydrate by cell suspensions appeared to be coincidentally induced by growth on alpha-terpineol, and oxidation of alpha-terpineol similarly appeared to be induced by growth on terpin hydrate. Culture fluids in which the TH-4 organism was grown at the expense of cis-terpin hydrate were found to contain (-)-alpha-terpineol in combined butanol-ether extracts. The isolated compound was shown to be chromatographically and spectrophotometrically identical to an authentic sample of alpha-terpineol. The stereospecificity of an enzymatic dehydration of terpin hydrate to alpha-terpineol is considered. PMID:4336108

  4. Microscopic Origin of Strain Hardening in Methane Hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jihui; Liang, Yunfeng; Tsuji, Takeshi; Murata, Sumihiko; Matsuoka, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported for a long time that methane hydrate presents strain hardening, whereas the strength of normal ice weakens with increasing strain after an ultimate strength. However, the microscopic origin of these differences is not known. Here, we investigated the mechanical characteristics of methane hydrate and normal ice by compressive deformation test using molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that methane hydrate exhibits strain hardening only if the hydrate is confined to a certain finite cross-sectional area that is normal to the compression direction. For normal ice, it does not present strain hardening under the same conditions. We show that hydrate guest methane molecules exhibit no long-distance diffusion when confined to a finite-size area. They appear to serve as non-deformable units that prevent hydrate structure failure, and thus are responsible for the strain-hardening phenomenon. PMID:27009239

  5. Clathrate type 2 hydrate formation in vacuo under astrophysical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, D. F.; Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Freund, F.

    The properties of clathrate hydrates were used to explain the complex and poorly understood physical processes taking place within cometary nuclei and other icy solar system bodies. Most of all the experiments previously conducted used starting compositions which would yield clathrate types I hydrates. The main criterion for type I vs. type II clathrate hydrate formation is the size of the guest molecule. The stoichiometry of the two structure types is also quite different. In addition, the larger molecules which would form type II clathrate hydrates typically have lower vapor pressures. The result of these considerations is that at temperatures where we identified clathrate formation (120-130 K), it is more likely that type II clathrate hydrates will form. We also formed clathrate II hydrates of methanol by direct vapor deposition in the temperature range 125-135 K.

  6. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  7. Microscopic Origin of Strain Hardening in Methane Hydrate.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jihui; Liang, Yunfeng; Tsuji, Takeshi; Murata, Sumihiko; Matsuoka, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported for a long time that methane hydrate presents strain hardening, whereas the strength of normal ice weakens with increasing strain after an ultimate strength. However, the microscopic origin of these differences is not known. Here, we investigated the mechanical characteristics of methane hydrate and normal ice by compressive deformation test using molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that methane hydrate exhibits strain hardening only if the hydrate is confined to a certain finite cross-sectional area that is normal to the compression direction. For normal ice, it does not present strain hardening under the same conditions. We show that hydrate guest methane molecules exhibit no long-distance diffusion when confined to a finite-size area. They appear to serve as non-deformable units that prevent hydrate structure failure, and thus are responsible for the strain-hardening phenomenon. PMID:27009239

  8. Clathrate type 2 hydrate formation in vacuo under astrophysical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, D. F.; Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Freund, F.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of clathrate hydrates were used to explain the complex and poorly understood physical processes taking place within cometary nuclei and other icy solar system bodies. Most of all the experiments previously conducted used starting compositions which would yield clathrate types I hydrates. The main criterion for type I vs. type II clathrate hydrate formation is the size of the guest molecule. The stoichiometry of the two structure types is also quite different. In addition, the larger molecules which would form type II clathrate hydrates typically have lower vapor pressures. The result of these considerations is that at temperatures where we identified clathrate formation (120-130 K), it is more likely that type II clathrate hydrates will form. We also formed clathrate II hydrates of methanol by direct vapor deposition in the temperature range 125-135 K.

  9. Structure H hydrates: The state-of-the-art

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, A.P.; Sloan, E.D.

    1996-12-31

    Structure H (sH) hydrates are unique since they form with both a light gas such as methane and molecules typically present in oils and condensates. Several sH formers such as methylcyclopentane, methylcyclohexane, neohexane, and adamantane are indigenous to petroleum. Significant strides since the discovery of sH in 1987, provide a comprehensive thermodynamic overview of the new hydrate conditions. Phase equilibrium data and a predictive model for sH indicate that temperatures and pressures for sH hydrate stability are consistent with conditions in hydrocarbon transportation and processing. The occurrence of sH hydrates calls into question all existing hydrate prediction programs and suggests that the hydrate phase itself should be measured, in contrast to previous experimental practice.

  10. Methane gas hydrate effect on sediment acoustic and strength properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winters, W.J.; Waite, W.F.; Mason, D.H.; Gilbert, L.Y.; Pecher, I.A.

    2007-01-01

    To improve our understanding of the interaction of methane gas hydrate with host sediment, we studied: (1) the effects of gas hydrate and ice on acoustic velocity in different sediment types, (2) effect of different hydrate formation mechanisms on measured acoustic properties (3) dependence of shear strength on pore space contents, and (4) pore pressure effects during undrained shear. A wide range in acoustic p-wave velocities (Vp) were measured in coarse-grained sediment for different pore space occupants. Vp ranged from less than 1 km/s for gas-charged sediment to 1.77–1.94 km/s for water-saturated sediment, 2.91–4.00 km/s for sediment with varying degrees of hydrate saturation, and 3.88–4.33 km/s for frozen sediment. Vp measured in fine-grained sediment containing gas hydrate was substantially lower (1.97 km/s). Acoustic models based on measured Vp indicate that hydrate which formed in high gas flux environments can cement coarse-grained sediment, whereas hydrate formed from methane dissolved in the pore fluid may not. The presence of gas hydrate and other solid pore-filling material, such as ice, increased the sediment shear strength. The magnitude of that increase is related to the amount of hydrate in the pore space and cementation characteristics between the hydrate and sediment grains. We have found, that for consolidation stresses associated with the upper several hundred meters of sub-bottom depth, pore pressures decreased during shear in coarse-grained sediment containing gas hydrate, whereas pore pressure in fine-grained sediment typically increased during shear. The presence of free gas in pore spaces damped pore pressure response during shear and reduced the strengthening effect of gas hydrate in sands.

  11. Detection of gas hydrate sediments using prestack seismic AVA inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ru-Wei; Li, Hong-Qi; Zhang, Bao-Jin; Huang, Han-Dong; Wen, Peng-Fei

    2015-09-01

    Bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) in seismic profile always indicate the bottom of gas hydrate stability zone, but is difficult to determine the distribution and features of gas hydrate sediments (GHS). In this study, based on AVA forward modeling and angle-domain common-image gathers we use prestack AVA parameters consistency inversion in predicting gas hydrate sediments in the Shenhu area at northern slope of South China Sea, and obtain the vertical and lateral features and saturation of GHS.

  12. Obsidian hydration profiles measured by sputter-induced optical emission.

    PubMed

    Tsong, I S; Houser, C A; Yusef, N A; Messier, R F; White, W B; Michels, J W

    1978-07-28

    The variation of concentrations of hydrogen, sodium, potassium, lithium, calcium, magnesium, silicon, and aluminum as a function of depth in the hydration layer of obsidian artifacts has been determined by sputter-induced optical emission. The surface hydration is accompanied by dealkalization, and there is a buildup of alkaline earths, calcium and magnesium in the outermost layers. These results have clarified the phenomena underlying the obsidian hydration dating technique. PMID:17793728

  13. New Methods for Gas Hydrate Energy and Climate Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppel, C. D.; Pohlman, J.; Waite, W. F.; Hunt, A. G.; Stern, L. A.; Casso, M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few years, the USGS Gas Hydrates Project has focused on advancements designed to enhance both energy resource and climate-hydrate interaction studies. On the energy side, the USGS now manages the Pressure Core Characterization Tools (PCCTs), which includes the Instrumented Pressure Testing Chamber (IPTC) that we have long maintained. These tools, originally built at Georgia Tech, are being used to analyze hydrate-bearing sediments recovered in pressure cores during gas hydrate drilling programs (e.g., Nankai 2012; India 2015). The USGS is now modifying the PCCTs for use on high-hydrate-saturation and sand-rich sediments and hopes to catalyze third-party tool development (e.g., visualization). The IPTC is also being used for experiments on sediments hosting synthetic methane hydrate, and our scanning electron microscope has recently been enhanced with a new cryo-stage for imaging hydrates. To support climate-hydrate interaction studies, the USGS has been re-assessing the amount of methane hydrate in permafrost-associated settings at high northern latitudes and examined the links between methane carbon emissions and gas hydrate dissociation. One approach relies on the noble gas signature of methane emissions. Hydrate dissociation uniquely releases noble gases partitioned by molecular weight, providing a potential fingerprint for hydrate-sourced methane emissions. In addition, we have linked a DOC analyzer with an IRMS at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, allowing rapid and precise measurement of DOC and DIC concentrations and carbon isotopic signatures. The USGS has also refined methods to measure real-time sea-air flux of methane and CO2 using cavity ring-down spectroscopy measurements coupled with other data. Acquiring ~8000 km of data on the Western Arctic, US Atlantic, and Svalbard margins, we have tested the Arctic methane catastrophe hypothesis and the link between seafloor methane emissions and sea-air methane flux.

  14. How Hydrate Saturation Anomalies are Diffusively Constructed and Advectively Smoothed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, A. W.; Irizarry, J. T.; VanderBeek, B. P.; Handwerger, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    The physical processes that control the bulk characteristics of hydrate reservoirs are captured reasonably well by long-established model formulations that are rooted in laboratory-verified phase equilibrium parameterizations and field-based estimates of in situ conditions. More detailed assessments of hydrate distribution, especially involving the occurrence of high-saturation hydrate anomalies have been more difficult to obtain. Spatial variations in sediment properties are of central importance for modifying the phase behavior and promoting focussed fluid flow. However, quantitative predictions of hydrate anomaly development cannot be made rigorously without also addressing the changes in phase behavior and mechanical balances that accompany changes in hydrate saturation level. We demonstrate how pore-scale geometrical controls on hydrate phase stability can be parameterized for incorporation in simulations of hydrate anomaly development along dipping coarse-grained layers embedded in a more fine-grained background that is less amenable to fluid transport. Model simulations demonstrate how hydrate anomaly growth along coarse-layer boundaries is promoted by diffusive gas transport from the adjacent fine-grained matrix, while advective transport favors more distributed growth within the coarse-grained material and so effectively limits the difference between saturation peaks and background levels. Further analysis demonstrates how sediment contacts are unloaded once hydrate saturation reaches sufficient levels to form a load-bearing skeleton that can evolve to produce segregated nodules and lenses. Decomposition of such growth forms poses a significant geohazard that is expected to be particularly sensitive to perturbations induced by gas extraction. The figure illustrates the predicted evolution of hydrate saturation Sh in a coarse-grained dipping layer showing how prominent bounding hydrate anomalies (spikes) supplied by diffusive gas transport at early times

  15. Formation and durability of hydrated layers for several oxide glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Nishii, Junji; Akai, Tomoko; Yamashita, Masaru; Yamanaka, Hiroshi; Wakabayashi, Hajimu

    1995-12-31

    Formations and durabilities of hydrated layers were compared between a soda-aluminosilicate (NAS), a soda-lime-aluminosilicate (NCAS) and a soda-lime-alumino-borosilicate (NCABS) glasses. The first step of the study was to prepare the optically transparent hydrated layers on the surface of specimens by an autoclave (400 C, 20 kgf/cm{sup 2}) treatment. Distributions of OH groups in hydrated layers were analyzed by an etch sectioning and FTIR measurement. The rates of hydration of the glasses were in the order NAS {much_gt} NCAS > NCABS. The hydration of the NCABS glass, which is a modified nuclear waste glass, required the treatment longer than those of the NAS and NCAS glasses. In the second step, the authors investigated the durabilities of hydrated layers by immersing the specimens into a distilled water at 100 C. The dissolutions of hydrated layers were confirmed for each glass. The dissolution rates of hydrated layers were in the order NCAS > NCABS {much_gt} NAS. It has become apparent by an XPS analysis that the highest durability of the hydrated NAS glass was due to the formation of a sodium free Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} layer on the surface. The hydrated layer of the NCAS glass, while the sodium ions were almost leached out during immersion, dissolved to water most quickly than those of other glasses. In the hydrated layer of the NCABS glass, a half amount of sodium and boron ions remained and inhibited the dissolution of hydrated layer.

  16. [Laser Raman Spectroscopy and Its Application in Gas Hydrate Studies].

    PubMed

    Fu, Juan; Wu, Neng-you; Lu, Hai-long; Wu, Dai-dai; Su, Qiu-cheng

    2015-11-01

    Gas hydrates are important potential energy resources. Microstructural characterization of gas hydrate can provide information to study the mechanism of gas hydrate formation and to support the exploitation and application of gas hydrate technology. This article systemly introduces the basic principle of laser Raman spectroscopy and summarizes its application in gas hydrate studies. Based on Raman results, not only can the information about gas composition and structural type be deduced, but also the occupancies of large and small cages and even hydration number can be calculated from the relative intensities of Raman peaks. By using the in-situ analytical technology, laser Raman specstropy can be applied to characterize the formation and decomposition processes of gas hydrate at microscale, for example the enclathration and leaving of gas molecules into/from its cages, to monitor the changes in gas concentration and gas solubility during hydrate formation and decomposition, and to identify phase changes in the study system. Laser Raman in-situ analytical technology has also been used in determination of hydrate structure and understanding its changing process under the conditions of ultra high pressure. Deep-sea in-situ Raman spectrometer can be employed for the in-situ analysis of the structures of natural gas hydrate and their formation environment. Raman imaging technology can be applied to specify the characteristics of crystallization and gas distribution over hydrate surface. With the development of laser Raman technology and its combination with other instruments, it will become more powerful and play a more significant role in the microscopic study of gas hydrate. PMID:26978895

  17. Catalytic behavior of graphene oxide for cement hydration process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Changqing; Wei, Wei; Hu, Yun Hang

    2016-02-01

    Hydration is a critical step that determines the performance of cement-based materials. In this paper, the effect of GO on the hydration of cement was evaluated by XRD and FTIR. It was found that GO can remarkably accelerate the hydration rate of cement due to its catalytic behavior. This happened because the oxygen-containing functional groups of GO provide adsorption sites for both water molecules and cement components.

  18. Structure H clathrate hydrate equilibria of methane and adamantane

    SciTech Connect

    Lederhos, J.P.; Mehta, A.P.; Nyberg, G.B.; Narn, K.J.; Sloan, E.D. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining)

    1992-07-01

    In this paper, the first phase equilibrium data are presented for Structure H hydrates. The data represent the initial formation of these hydrates from methane, with adamantane - a previously determined Structure H former. Temperature and pressure conditions are consistent with hydrocarbon production/transportation/ processing facilities. Structure H hydrates are shown to contain molecules indigenous to petroleum, which may not be present in natural gas.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of DNA fragment hydration in the presence of alkaline cations using novel atom-atom potential functions.

    PubMed

    Teplukhin, A V; Malenkov, G G; Poltev, V I

    1998-10-01

    The set of atom-atom potential functions specially adjusted to simulation of nucleic acid fragment hydration (Poltev, Grokhlina & Malenkov, J. Biomol. Struct. Dyn. 2, 413, 1984) is extended by including alkaline cation interactions. The choice of new potential functions was realized using experimental data on crystal hydrates of nucleotides and related compounds as well as thermodynamic data on ion solutions. The extended set of potential functions allows to reproduce many features of interactions between alkaline cations and nucleic acid fragments in water solutions. The sites of preferential cation localization near bases and phosphate groups were obtained and examined. The potential functions reproduce the dissociation tendency of cation-phosphate group and cation-base complexes in aqueous medium. Pathways of cation dissociations from nucleic acid components have been studied, and metastable water-bridged positions of cations near bases and phosphate group have been revealed. PMID:9833668

  20. Mechanical properties of sand, silt, and clay containing tetrahydrofuran hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yun, T.S.; Santamarina, C.J.; Ruppel, C.

    2007-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to large strains has relevance for the stability of the seafloor and submarine slopes, drilling and coring operations, and the analysis of certain small-strain properties of these sediments (for example, seismic velocities). This study reports on the results of comprehensive axial compression triaxial tests conducted at up to 1 MPa confining pressure on sand, crushed silt, precipitated silt, and clay specimens with closely controlled concentrations of synthetic hydrate. The results show that the stress-strain behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments is a complex function of particle size, confining pressure, and hydrate concentration. The mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments at low hydrate concentration (probably 50% of pore space), the behavior becomes more independent of stress because the hydrates control both stiffness and strength and possibly the dilative tendency of sediments by effectively increasing interparticle coordination, cementing particles together, and filling the pore space. The cementation contribution to the shear strength of hydrate-bearing sediments decreases with increasing specific surface of soil minerals. The lower the effective confining stress, the greater the impact of hydrate formation on normalized strength.

  1. Impact of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Lei Zhao Qinglin Yao Chukang; Zhou Mingkai

    2012-02-15

    The retarding effect of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration, as a partial system of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) hydration, was investigated with several methods. The tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration behavior in the presence or absence of welan gum was researched by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and zeta potential analysis. Meanwhile, we studied the surface electrochemical properties and adsorption characteristics of welan gum by utilizing a zeta potential analyzer and UV-VIS absorption spectrophotometer. By adding welan gum, the morphology change of ettringite and retardation of hydration stages in tricalcium aluminate-gypsum system was observed. Moreover, we detected the adsorption behavior and zeta potential inversion of tricalcium aluminate and ettringite, as well as a rapid decrease in the zeta potential of tricalcium aluminate-gypsum system. The reduction on nucleation rate of ettringite and hydration activity of C{sub 3}A was also demonstrated. Thus, through the adsorption effect, welan gum induces a retarding behavior in tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption characteristics of welan gum on C{sub 3}A and ettringite have been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C{sub 3}A-gypsum hydration behavior and the hydration products are examined in L/S = 3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Welan gum retards the process of C{sub 3}A-gypsum hydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The addition of welan gum changes the nucleation growth of ettringite.

  2. Identifying inhibitors of hydrate formation rate with viscometric experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kalbus, J.S.; Christiansen, R.L.; Sloan, D. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Inhibiting the rate of hydrate formation with low concentration additives is an economically and environmentally attractive alternative to prevention of hydrates with large doses of methanol. Here, a method for screening possible rate inhibitors is described. In the method, a viscometer is used to follow the development of hydrate formation for water-THF solutions and for water-gas solutions at conditions favoring hydrate formation. The method was applied to about 30 different chemicals, plus binary combinations of many of these chemicals. The best chemical additives included BASF F-127, Mirawet ASC, Surfynol-465, sodium dodecyl sulfate(SDS), Mirataine CBS with polyvinylpyrrolidone(PVP), and SDS with PVP.

  3. Micromechanical cohesion force measurements to determine cyclopentane hydrate interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Joshi, Sanjeev E; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2012-06-15

    Hydrate aggregation and deposition are critical factors in determining where and when hydrates may plug a deepwater flowline. We present the first direct measurement of structure II (cyclopentane) hydrate cohesive forces in the water, liquid hydrocarbon and gas bulk phases. For fully annealed hydrate particles, gas phase cohesive forces were approximately twice that obtained in a liquid hydrocarbon phase, and approximately six times that obtained in the water phase. Direct measurements show that hydrate cohesion force in a water-continuous bulk may be only the product of solid-solid cohesion. When excess water was present on the hydrate surface, gas phase cohesive forces increased by a factor of three, suggesting the importance of the liquid or quasi-liquid layer (QLL) in determining cohesive force. Hydrate-steel adhesion force measurements show that, when the steel surface is coated with hydrophobic wax, forces decrease up to 96%. As the micromechanical force technique is uniquely capable of measuring hydrate-surface forces with variable contact time, the present work contains significant implications for hydrate applications in flow assurance. PMID:22484169

  4. Method for the photocatalytic conversion of gas hydrates

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.; Bockrath, Bradley C.

    2001-01-01

    A method for converting methane hydrates to methanol, as well as hydrogen, through exposure to light. The process includes conversion of methane hydrates by light where a radical initiator has been added, and may be modified to include the conversion of methane hydrates with light where a photocatalyst doped by a suitable metal and an electron transfer agent to produce methanol and hydrogen. The present invention operates at temperatures below 0.degree. C., and allows for the direct conversion of methane contained within the hydrate in situ.

  5. Nuclear Well Log Properties of Natural Gas Hydrate Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchwell, A.; Cook, A.

    2015-12-01

    Characterizing gas hydrate in a reservoir typically involves a full suite of geophysical well logs. The most common method involves using resistivity measurements to quantify the decrease in electrically conductive water when replaced with gas hydrate. Compressional velocity measurements are also used because the gas hydrate significantly strengthens the moduli of the sediment. At many gas hydrate sites, nuclear well logs, which include the photoelectric effect, formation sigma, carbon/oxygen ratio and neutron porosity, are also collected but often not used. In fact, the nuclear response of a gas hydrate reservoir is not known. In this research we will focus on the nuclear log response in gas hydrate reservoirs at the Mallik Field at the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada, and the Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg 2 sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Nuclear logs may add increased robustness to the investigation into the properties of gas hydrates and some types of logs may offer an opportunity to distinguish between gas hydrate and permafrost. For example, a true formation sigma log measures the thermal neutron capture cross section of a formation and pore constituents; it is especially sensitive to hydrogen and chlorine in the pore space. Chlorine has a high absorption potential, and is used to determine the amount of saline water within pore spaces. Gas hydrate offers a difference in elemental composition compared to water-saturated intervals. Thus, in permafrost areas, the carbon/oxygen ratio may vary between gas hydrate and permafrost, due to the increase of carbon in gas hydrate accumulations. At the Mallik site, we observe a hydrate-bearing sand (1085-1107 m) above a water-bearing sand (1107-1140 m), which was confirmed through core samples and mud gas analysis. We observe a decrease in the photoelectric absorption of ~0.5 barnes/e-, as well as an increase in the formation sigma readings of ~5 capture units in the water-bearing sand as

  6. Geomechanical Performance of Hydrate-Bearing Sediment in Offshore Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Holditch; Tad Patzek; Jonny Rutqvist; George Moridis; Richard Plumb

    2008-03-31

    The objective of this multi-year, multi-institutional research project was to develop the knowledge base and quantitative predictive capability for the description of geomechanical performance of hydrate-bearing sediments (hereafter referred to as HBS) in oceanic environments. The focus was on the determination of the envelope of hydrate stability under conditions typical of those related to the construction and operation of offshore platforms. We have developed a robust numerical simulator of hydrate behavior in geologic media by coupling a reservoir model with a commercial geomechanical code. We also investigated the geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS using pore-scale models (conceptual and mathematical) of fluid flow, stress analysis, and damage propagation. The objective of the UC Berkeley work was to develop a grain-scale model of hydrate-bearing sediments. Hydrate dissociation alters the strength of HBS. In particular, transformation of hydrate clusters into gas and liquid water weakens the skeleton and, simultaneously, reduces the effective stress by increasing the pore pressure. The large-scale objective of the study is evaluation of geomechanical stability of offshore oil and gas production infrastructure. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we have developed the numerical model TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate how the formation and disassociation of hydrates in seafloor sediments affects seafloor stability. Several technical papers were published using results from this model. LBNL also developed laboratory equipment and methods to produce realistic laboratory samples of sediments containing gas hydrates so that mechanical properties could be measured in the laboratory. These properties are required to run TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate seafloor stability issues. At Texas A&M University we performed a detailed literature review to determine what gas hydrate formation properties had been measured and reported in the literature. We

  7. Critical pressure and multiphase flow in Blake Ridge gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flemings, P.B.; Liu, Xiuying; Winters, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    We use core porosity, consolidation experiments, pressure core sampler data, and capillary pressure measurements to predict water pressures that are 70% of the lithostatic stress, and gas pressures that equal the lithostatic stress beneath the methane hydrate layer at Ocean Drilling Program Site 997, Blake Ridge, offshore North Carolina. A 29-m-thick interconnected free-gas column is trapped beneath the low-permeability hydrate layer. We propose that lithostatic gas pressure is dilating fractures and gas is migrating through the methane hydrate layer. Overpressured gas and water within methane hydrate reservoirs limit the amount of free gas trapped and may rapidly export methane to the seafloor.

  8. Occurence characteristics of hydrates in fine-grained sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joo Yong; Ahn, Taewoong; Lee, Jaehyoung; Kim, Sejoon

    2016-04-01

    Hydrate occurrences in sediments are affected by the sediment characteristics in various aspects and scales. The grain-displacing hydrates form in fine-grained sediments since filling pre-existing fractures or inducing frost heaves takes less energy than overcoming capillarity induced inhibition in fine-grained sediments. The geometry of grain-displacing hydrate formed by filling pre-existing hydrates are mostly governed by the geometry of fracture, whereas those formed by heaving mechanisms are governed by in-situ stress conditions and geomechanical properties. The thickness, spacing, dip angle, and number of grain-displacing hydrates have been extracted using X-ray CT images of pressure cores recovered from Ulleug Basin, East Sea, Korea. The thickness of both horizontal and vertical grain-displacing hydrates, and the number of horizontal hydrates decreases with depth (i.e. with the increase of the overburden stress) while the number of vertical hydrates does not decrease with depth, implying that the formation mechanisms of horizontal and vertical hydrates differ while growth mechanisms are similar to each other in different growth directions.

  9. Nutrition and hydration in older adults in critical care.

    PubMed

    Dimaria-Ghalili, Rose Ann; Nicolo, Michele

    2014-03-01

    Nutrition and hydration are vital components of critical care nursing. However, meeting the nutrition and hydration needs of the critically ill older adult is often complex, because of preexisting risk factors (malnutrition, unintentional weight loss, frailty, and dehydration); as well as intensive care unit-related challenges (catabolism, eating and feeding, end-of-life care). This article highlights the challenges of managing nutrition and hydration in the critically ill older adult, reviews assessment principles, and offers strategies for optimizing nutrition and hydration. PMID:24484922

  10. Method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems

    DOEpatents

    Sloan, Jr., Earle D.

    1995-01-01

    Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from impeding the flow of fluid in a fluid system. An additive is contacted with clathrate hydrate masses in the system to prevent those clathrate hydrate masses from impeding fluid flow. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member and/or six member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) and hydroxyethylcellulose, either in combination or alone.

  11. Phase field modeling of CH4 hydrate conversion into CO2 hydrate in the presence of liquid CO2.

    PubMed

    Tegze, G; Gránásy, L; Kvamme, B

    2007-06-28

    We present phase field simulations to estimate the conversion rate of CH(4) hydrate to CO(2) hydrate in the presence of liquid CO(2) under conditions typical for underwater gas hydrate reservoirs. In the computations, all model parameters are evaluated from physical properties taken from experiment or molecular dynamics simulations. It has been found that hydrate conversion is a diffusion controlled process, as after a short transient, the displacement of the conversion front scales with t(1/2). Assuming a diffusion coefficient of D(s) = 1.1 x 10(-11) m(2) s(-1) in the hydrate phase, the predicted time dependent conversion rate is in reasonable agreement with results from magnetic resonance imaging experiments. This value of the diffusion coefficient is higher than expected for the bulk hydrate phase, probably due to liquid inclusions remaining in the porous sample used in the experiment. PMID:17612734

  12. Sulfuric Acid and Water: Paradoxes of Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenson, I. A.

    2004-01-01

    On equilibrium properties of aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid, Julius Thomsen has marked that the heat evolved on diluting liquid sulfuric acid with water is a continuous function of the water used, and excluded absolutely the acceptance of definite hydrates as existing in the solution. Information about thermochemical measurement, a discussion…

  13. Increasing Gas Hydrate Formation Temperature for Desalination of High Salinity Produced Water with Secondary Guests

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Jong-Ho; Seol, Yongkoo

    2013-10-07

    We suggest a new gas hydrate-based desalination process using water-immiscible hydrate formers; cyclopentane (CP) and cyclohexane (CH) as secondary hydrate guests to alleviate temperature requirements for hydrate formation. The hydrate formation reactions were carried out in an isobaric condition of 3.1 MPa to find the upper temperature limit of CO2 hydrate formation. Simulated produced water (8.95 wt % salinity) mixed with the hydrate formers shows an increased upper temperature limit from -2 °C for simple CO2 hydrate to 16 and 7 °C for double (CO2 + CP) and (CO2 + CH) hydrates, respectively. The resulting conversion rate to double hydrate turned out to be similar to that with simple CO2 hydrate at the upper temperature limit. Hydrate formation rates (Rf) for the double hydrates with CP and CH are shown to be 22 and 16 times higher, respectively, than that of the simple CO2 hydrate at the upper temperature limit. Such mild hydrate formation temperature and fast formation kinetics indicate increased energy efficiency of the double hydrate system for the desalination process. Dissociated water from the hydrates shows greater than 90% salt removal efficiency for the hydrates with the secondary guests, which is also improved from about 70% salt removal efficiency for the simple hydrates.

  14. Formation of methane nano-bubbles during hydrate decomposition and their effect on hydrate growth.

    PubMed

    Bagherzadeh, S Alireza; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John; Englezos, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations are performed to study the conditions for methane nano-bubble formation during methane hydrate dissociation in the presence of water and a methane gas reservoir. Hydrate dissociation leads to the quick release of methane into the liquid phase which can cause methane supersaturation. If the diffusion of methane molecules out of the liquid phase is not fast enough, the methane molecules agglomerate and form bubbles. Under the conditions of our simulations, the methane-rich quasi-spherical bubbles grow to become cylindrical with a radius of ∼11 Å. The nano-bubbles remain stable for about 35 ns until they are gradually and homogeneously dispersed in the liquid phase and finally enter the gas phase reservoirs initially set up in the simulation box. We determined that the minimum mole fraction for the dissolved methane in water to form nano-bubbles is 0.044, corresponding to about 30% of hydrate phase composition (0.148). The importance of nano-bubble formation to the mechanism of methane hydrate formation, growth, and dissociation is discussed. PMID:26049510

  15. Formation of methane nano-bubbles during hydrate decomposition and their effect on hydrate growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagherzadeh, S. Alireza; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John; Englezos, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations are performed to study the conditions for methane nano-bubble formation during methane hydrate dissociation in the presence of water and a methane gas reservoir. Hydrate dissociation leads to the quick release of methane into the liquid phase which can cause methane supersaturation. If the diffusion of methane molecules out of the liquid phase is not fast enough, the methane molecules agglomerate and form bubbles. Under the conditions of our simulations, the methane-rich quasi-spherical bubbles grow to become cylindrical with a radius of ˜11 Å. The nano-bubbles remain stable for about 35 ns until they are gradually and homogeneously dispersed in the liquid phase and finally enter the gas phase reservoirs initially set up in the simulation box. We determined that the minimum mole fraction for the dissolved methane in water to form nano-bubbles is 0.044, corresponding to about 30% of hydrate phase composition (0.148). The importance of nano-bubble formation to the mechanism of methane hydrate formation, growth, and dissociation is discussed.

  16. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures: The σ of CH4 Hydrate + Sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Du Frane, Wyatt L.; Stern, Laura A.; Constable, Steven; Weitemeyer, Karen A.; Smith, Megan M.; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2015-07-30

    Knowledge of the electrical properties of multicomponent systems with gas hydrate, sediments, and pore water is needed to help relate electromagnetic (EM) measurements to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns in nature. We built a pressure cell capable of measuring in situ electrical properties of multicomponent systems such that the effects of individual components and mixing relations can be assessed. We first established the temperature-dependent electrical conductivity (σ) of pure, single-phase methane hydrate to be ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater, a substantial contrast that can help differentiate hydrate deposits from significantly more conductive water-saturated sediments in EM field surveys. We report σ measurements of two-component systems in which methane hydrate is mixed with variable amounts of quartz sand or glass beads. Sand by itself has low σ but is found to increase the overall σ of mixtures with well-connected methane hydrate. Alternatively, the overall σ decreases when sand concentrations are high enough to cause gas hydrate to be poorly connected, indicating that hydrate grains provide the primary conduction path. Our measurements suggest that impurities from sand induce chemical interactions and/or doping effects that result in higher electrical conductivity with lower temperature dependence. Finally, these results can be used in the modeling of massive or two-phase gas-hydrate-bearing systems devoid of conductive pore water. Further experiments that include a free water phase are the necessary next steps toward developing complex models relevant to most natural systems.

  17. Are seafloor pockmarks on the Chatham Rise, New Zealand, linked to CO2 hydrates? Gas hydrate stability considerations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecher, I. A.; Davy, B. W.; Rose, P. S.; Coffin, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Vast areas of the Chatham Rise east of New Zealand are covered by seafloor pockmarks. Pockmark occurrence appears to be bathymetrically controlled with a band of smaller pockmarks covering areas between 500 and 700 m and large seafloor depressions beneath 800 m water depth. The current depth of the top of methane gas hydrate stability in the ocean is about 500 m and thus, we had proposed that pockmark formation may be linked to methane gas hydrate dissociation during sealevel lowering. However, while seismic profiles show strong indications of fluid flow, geochemical analyses of piston cores do not show any evidence for current or past methane flux. The discovery of Dawsonite, indicative of significant CO2 flux, in a recent petroleum exploration well, together with other circumstantial evidence, has led us to propose that instead of methane hydrate, CO2 hydrate may be linked to pockmark formation. We here present results from CO2 hydrate stability calculations. Assuming water temperature profiles remain unchanged, we predict the upper limit of pockmark occurrence to coincide with the top of CO2 gas hydrate stability during glacial-stage sealevel lowstands. CO2 hydrates may therefore have dissociated during sealevel lowering leading to gas escape and pockmark formation. In contrast to our previous model linking methane hydrate dissociation to pockmark formation, gas hydrates would dissociate beneath a shallow base of CO2 hydrate stability, rather than on the seafloor following upward "grazing" of the top of methane hydrate stability. Intriguingly, at the water depths of the larger seafloor depressions, the base of gas hydrate stability delineates the phase boundary between CO2 hydrates and super-saturated CO2. We caution that because of the high solubility of CO2, dissociation from hydrate to free gas or super-saturated CO2 would imply high concentrations of CO2 and speculate that pockmark formation may be linked to CO2 hydrate dissolution rather than dissociation

  18. Hydration of hyaluronan polysaccharide observed by IR spectrometry. II. Definition and quantitative analysis of elementary hydration spectra and water uptake.

    PubMed

    Haxaire, K; Maréchal, Y; Milas, M; Rinaudo, M

    2003-01-01

    We recorded a series of spectra of sodium hyaluronan (HA) films that were in equilibrium with their surrounding humid atmosphere. The hygrometry of this atmosphere extended from 0 to 0.97% relative humidity. We performed a quantitative analysis of the corresponding series of hydration spectra that are the difference spectra of the film at a defined hygrometry minus the spectrum of the dried film (hygrometry = 0). The principle of this analysis is to use this series of hydration spectra to define a limited number (four) of "elementary hydration spectra" over which we can decompose all hydration spectra with good accuracy. This decomposition, combined with the measurements of the numbers of H(2)O molecules at the origin in these elementary hydration spectra of the three characteristic vibrational bands of H(2)O, allowed us to calculate the hydration number under different relative humidity conditions. This number compares well with that determined by thermogravimetry. Furthermore, the decomposition defines for each hygrometry value which chemical mechanisms represented by elementary hydration spectra are active. This analysis is pursued by determining for the elementary hydration spectra the number of hydrogen bonds established by each of the four alcohol groups found in each disaccharide repeat unit before performing the same analysis for amide and carboxylate groups. These results are later utilized to discuss the structure of HA at various stages of hydration. PMID:12722111

  19. Hydration force fluctuations in hydrophilic planar systems.

    PubMed

    Kanduč, Matej; Netz, Roland R

    2016-03-01

    Utilizing all-atom simulations with explicit solvent, the authors model hydrophilic surfaces interacting across water at a fixed chemical potential. They extract the hydration forces acting between the surfaces and assess force fluctuations as well as interlamellar water number fluctuations. The trends obtained from the simulations are captured by a continuum-based description with effective model parameters. The significance of fluctuations depends on surface hydrophilicity and rigidity. The authors show that the force fluctuations play an important role in kinetic processes in systems with lateral sizes smaller than several tens of nanometers. PMID:26746163

  20. Hydrated nucleus pulposus herniation in seven dogs.

    PubMed

    Manunta, M L; Evangelisti, M A; Bergknut, N; Grinwis, G C M; Ballocco, I; Meij, B P

    2015-03-01

    The clinical signs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, treatment and follow-up in seven dogs with hydrated nucleus pulposus extrusion (HNPE) are reported. All dogs had tetraparesis or tetraplegia. T2-weighted MRI revealed extradural hyperintense homogeneous material compressing the cervical spinal cord. After conservative treatment (five dogs) or surgical decompression (two dogs), all dogs returned to ambulatory function within 1 month. Follow-up MRI in conservatively treated dogs revealed complete disappearance of the extruded material. Histopathological examination of surgical specimens confirmed that the retrieved material was extruded nucleus pulposus with evidence of early degeneration. PMID:25599897

  1. Collagen stability, hydration and native state.

    PubMed

    Mogilner, Inés G; Ruderman, Graciela; Grigera, J Raúl

    2002-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a collagen-like peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)4-Pro-Hyp-Ala-(Pro-Hyp-Gly)5 have been done in order to study the contribution of the hydration structure on keeping the native structure of collagen. The simulation shows that the absence of water produces a distortion on the molecular conformation and an increase in the number of intra-molecular hydrogen bonds. This is in agreement with previous experimental results showing the stiffness of collagen under severe drying and its increase in the thermal stability. This dehydrated material does not keep, however, the native structure. PMID:12463639

  2. Three-dimensional gas migration and gas hydrate systems of south Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, E. M.; Bangs, N. L.; Hornbach, M. J.; Berndt, C.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrate Ridge is a peanut shape bathymetric high located about 80 km west of Newport, Oregon on the Pacific continental margin, within the Cascadia subduction zone’s accretionary wedge. The ridge's two topographic highs (S. and N. Hydrate Ridge) are characterized by gas vents and seeps that were observed with previous ODP drilling, fluid flow monitoring, seafloor bathymetric surveys and seismic surveys including a 3D seismic survey in 2000. In 2008, we acquired a 3D seismic reflection data set using the P-Cable acquisition system, which had 10-single channel streamers and two 75/75 cu in GI airguns, to characterize the subsurface fluid migration pathways that feed the seafloor vent at S. Hydrate Ridge. These new 3D seismic data complement previous drilling and seismic imaging with the highest resolution of subsurface structure to date. The new high-resolution data reveal a complex 3D structure of localized faulting within the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). We interpret two groups of fault-related migration pathways. The first group is defined by regularly- and widely-spaced (100-150 m) faults that extend greater than 300ms TWT (~ 250 m) below seafloor and coincide with the regional thrust fault orientations of the Oregon margin. The deep extent of these faults makes them potential conduits for deeply sourced methane and may include thermogenic methane, which was found with shallow drilling during ODP Leg 204. As a fluid pathway these faults may complement the previously identified sand-rich, gas-filled stratigraphic horizon, Horizon A, which is a major gas migration pathway to the summit of S. Hydrate Ridge. The second group of faults is characterized by irregularly but closely spaced (~ 50 m), shallow fractures (extending < 160ms TWT below seafloor, ~ 115 m) found almost exclusively in the GHSZ directly beneath the seafloor vent at the summit of S. Hydrate Ridge. These faults form a closely-spaced network of fractures that provide multiple migration pathways

  3. X-ray Diffraction Analysis of ProRoot Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Hydrated at Different pH Values

    PubMed Central

    Akhavan, Hengameh; Mohebbi, Pooneh; Firouzi, Amir; Noroozi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the chemical compounds of white ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) hydrated at different pH environments. Methods and Materials: Mixed samples of WMTA were kept in acidic (pH=5.4), neutral (pH=7.4) and alkaline (pH=9.4) environments for 48 h. Then, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was performed for both hydrated and powder forms of WMTA. Portlandite crystalline structures of environments were compared from three aspects: intensity (height of the peak, corresponding to the concentration), crystallinity (peak area/total area) and crystal size (full-width at half-maximum of the peak). Results: After matching the peaks of each sample with those of the International Center for Diffraction Data (ICDD) database, the main constituent of all set cements and powder form was found to be bismuth oxide. Acidic environment exhibited lower intensity and crystallinity of portlandite in comparison with neutral environment. Conclusion: The highest concentration and crystallinity of portlandite were observed in WMTA samples hydrated at neutral pH and the highest crystal size was detected after hydration in alkaline pH. PMID:27141218

  4. Investigating the Metastability of Clathrate Hydrates for Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Carolyn Ann

    2014-11-18

    Important breakthrough discoveries have been achieved from the DOE award on the key processes controlling the synthesis and structure-property relations of clathrate hydrates, which are critical to the development of clathrate hydrates as energy storage materials. Key achievements include: (i) the discovery of key clathrate hydrate building blocks (stable and metastable) leading to clathrate hydrate nucleation and growth; (ii) development of a rapid clathrate hydrate synthesis route via a seeding mechanism; (iii) synthesis-structure relations of H2 + CH4/CO2 binary hydrates to control thermodynamic requirements for energy storage and sequestration applications; (iv) discovery of a new metastable phase present during clathrate hydrate structural transitions. The success of our research to-date is demonstrated by the significant papers we have published in high impact journals, including Science, Angewandte Chemie, J. Am. Chem. Soc. Intellectual Merits of Project Accomplishments: The intellectual merits of the project accomplishments are significant and transformative, in which the fundamental coupled computational and experimental program has provided new and critical understanding on the key processes controlling the nucleation, growth, and thermodynamics of clathrate hydrates containing hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, and other guest molecules for energy storage. Key examples of the intellectual merits of the accomplishments include: the first discovery of the nucleation pathways and dominant stable and metastable structures leading to clathrate hydrate formation; the discovery and experimental confirmation of new metastable clathrate hydrate structures; the development of new synthesis methods for controlling clathrate hydrate formation and enclathration of molecular hydrogen. Broader Impacts of Project Accomplishments: The molecular investigations performed in this project on the synthesis (nucleation & growth)-structure-stability relations of clathrate

  5. Sonic and resistivity measurements on Berea sandstone containing tetrahydrofuran hydrates: a possible analogue to natural-gas-hydrate deposits. [Tetrahydrofuran hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, C.; Murphy, J.; Halleck, P.; Hermes, R.; Mathews, M.

    1983-01-01

    Deposits of natural gas hydrates exist in arctic sedimentary basins and in marine sediments on continental slopes and rises. However, the physical properties of such sediments are largely unknown. In this paper, we report laboratory sonic and resistivity measurements on Berea sandstone cores saturated with a stoichiometric mixture of tetrahydrofuran (THF) and water. We used THF as the guest species rather than methane or propane gas because THF can be mixed with water to form a solution containing proportions of the proper stoichiometric THF and water. Because neither methane nor propane is soluble in water, mixing the guest species with water sufficiently to form solid hydrate is difficult. Because THF solutions form hydrates readily at atmospheric pressure it is an excellent experimental analogue to natural gas hydrates. Hydrate formation increased the sonic P-wave velocities from a room temperature value of 2.5 km/s to 4.5 km/s at -5/sup 0/C when the pores were nearly filled with hydrates. Lowering the temperature below -5/sup 0/C did not appreciably change the velocity however. In contrast, the electrical resistivity increases nearly two orders of magnitude upon hydrate formation and continues to increase more slowly as the temperature is further decreased. In all cases the resistivities are nearly frequency independent to 30 kHz and the loss tangents are high, always greater than 5. The dielectric loss shows a linear decrease with frequency suggesting that ionic conduction through a brine phase dominates at all frequencies, even when the pores are nearly filled with hydrates. We find that the resistivities are strongly a function of the dissolved salt content of the pore water. Pore water salinity also influences the sonic velocity, but this effect is much smaller and only important near the hydrate formation temperature.

  6. The Growth and Decay of Hydrate Anomalies in Marine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irizarry, J. T.; Rempel, A. W.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates, stored in huge quantities beneath permafrost, and in submarine sediments on the continental shelf, have the potential to become a vital clean-burning energy source. However, clear evidence is recorded in coastal sediments worldwide that past changes in environmental conditions have caused hydrates to become unstable and trigger both massive submarine landslides and the development of crater-like pockmarks, thereby releasing methane into the overlying seawater and atmosphere, where it acts as a powerful greenhouse gas. Arctic permafrost is thawing, and environmental changes can alter ocean circulation to warm the seafloor, causing hydrates to dissociate or dissolve in the sediments beneath. Decades of focused research provide a firm understanding of laboratory conditions under which hydrates become unstable and dissociate, and how hydrate reserves form when microbes convert organic material into methane, which can also dissolve and be carried by pore waters into the hydrate stability zone. Despite these advances, many key questions that concern both the resource potential of hydrates and their role in causing environmental geohazards, are intimately tied to the more poorly understood behavior of hydrate anomalies, which tend to be concentrated in the large pores of sand layers and form segregated lenses and nodules in muds. We present simple models designed to unravel the importance of the diverse physical interactions (i.e. flow focusing, free-gas infiltration, and pore-scale solubility effects) that help control how hydrate anomalies form. Predicted hydrate distributions are qualitatively different when accumulation in anomalies is supplied primarily by: 1. aqueous flow through sediments with enhanced permeability, 2. free-gas transport high above the three-phase stability boundary, or 3. diffusive transport along solubility gradients associated with pore-scale effects. We discuss examples that illustrate each of these distinct generation

  7. Natural gas hydrates on the North Slope of Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S.

    1991-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, mainly methane, in which a solid-water lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure, or clathrate. These substances often have been regarded as a potential (unconventional) source of natural gas. Significant quantities of naturally occurring gas hydrates have been detected in many regions of the Arctic including Siberia, the Mackenzie River Delta, and the North Slope of Alaska. On the North Slope, the methane-hydrate stability zone is areally extensive beneath most of the coastal plain province and has thicknesses as great as 1000 meters in the Prudhoe Bay area. Gas hydrates have been identified in 50 exploratory and production wells using well-log responses calibrated to the response of an interval in one well where gas hydrates were recovered in a core by ARCO Alaska and EXXON. Most of these gas hydrates occur in six laterally continuous Upper Cretaceous and lower Tertiary sandstone and conglomerate units; all these gas hydrates are geographically restricted to the area overlying the eastern part of the Kuparuk River Oil Field and the western part of the Prudhoe Bay Oil Field. The volume of gas within these gas hydrates is estimated to be about 1.0 {times} 10{sup 12} to 1.2 {times} 10{sup 12} cubic meters (37 to 44 trillion cubic feet), or about twice the volume of conventional gas in the Prudhoe Bay Field. Geochemical analyses of well samples suggest that the identified hydrates probably contain a mixture of deep-source thermogenic gas and shallow microbial gas that was either directly converted to gas hydrate or first concentrated in existing traps and later converted to gas hydrate. The thermogenic gas probably migrated from deeper reservoirs along the same faults thought to be migration pathways for the large volumes of shallow, heavy oil that occur in this area. 51 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Detailed analysis of methane hydrate concentrated zone of lobe type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Saeki, T.; Inamori, T.; Fujii, T.; Shimoda, N.

    2007-12-01

    Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (hereinafter called JOGMEC), as a member of MH21 Research Consortium, takes charge of a study of the Research for Resources Assessment, and is pursuing a possibility that methane hydrate, which is presumed to be distributed around ocean area of Japan, will be energy resources. JOGMEC is currently conducting analysis of seismic data which was acquired by 3D seismic survey conducted from Tokai-Oki to Kumano-nada in the eastern Nankai Trough by METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) in 2002 under the national program of assessment for methane hydrates as energy resources. It was understood that methane hydrate was correlated to high resistivity and high velocity based on the results of drilling surveys and velocity analysis, and that methane hydrate concentrated zones can be roughly classified into the channels and lobes in seismic geomorphology because they were characterized with reserves consisting turbidite sand bodies. In this study, the detailed analysis of the inner structure of the methane hydrate concentrated zone of lobe type was conducted to understand the occurrence configurations of methane hydrates. The reflected waves that construct the methane hydrate concentrated zones in the seismic data were extracted and those reflected waves were classified into some groups every one reflector. As the result, some reflectors that construct the methane hydrate concentrated zones were revealed. Those reflectors show the layers including methane hydrates, and the detailed distribution of the methane hydrates in those layers was revealed by the intensity distribution of the amplitude. This time, we introduce the example of the detailed analysis of the methane hydrate concentrated zone in the lobe of submarine fan.

  9. Buffering agents modify the hydration landscape at charged interfaces.

    PubMed

    Trewby, William; Livesey, Duncan; Voïtchovsky, Kislon

    2016-02-23

    Buffering agents are widely used to stabilise the pH of solutions in soft matter and biological sciences. They are typically composed of weak acids and bases mixed in an aqueous solution, and can interact electrostatically with charged surfaces such as biomembranes. Buffers can induce protein aggregation and structural modification of soft interfaces, but a molecular-level picture is still lacking. Here we use high-resolution atomic force microscopy to investigate the effect of five commonly used buffers, namely 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES), monosodium phosphate, saline sodium citrate (SSC) and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) on the hydration landscape of Muscovite mica in solution. Mica is an ideal model substrate due to its negative surface charge and identical lattice parameter when compared with gel-phase lipid bilayers. We show that buffer molecules can produce cohesive aggregates spanning over tens of nanometres of the interface. SSC, Tris and monosodium phosphate tend to create an amorphous mesh layer several molecules thick and with no preferential ordering. In contrast, MES and HEPES adopt epitaxial arrangements commensurate with the underlying mica lattice, suggesting that they offer the most suitable solution for high-resolution studies. To confirm that this effect persisted in biologically-relevant interfaces, the experiments were repeated on a silica-supported lipid bilayer. Similar trends were observed for this system using atomic force microscopy as well as ellipsometry. The effect of the buffering agents can be mitigated by the inclusion of salt which helps displace them from the interface. PMID:26837938

  10. Surfactant process for promoting gas hydrate formation and application of the same

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Rudy E.; Zhong, Yu

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of storing gas using gas hydrates comprising forming gas hydrates in the presence of a water-surfactant solution that comprises water and surfactant. The addition of minor amounts of surfactant increases the gas hydrate formation rate, increases packing density of the solid hydrate mass and simplifies the formation-storage-decomposition process of gas hydrates. The minor amounts of surfactant also enhance the potential of gas hydrates for industrial storage applications.

  11. Neutron Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Chatake, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The hydration shells surrounding nucleic acids and hydrogen-bonding networks involving water molecules and nucleic acids are essential interactions for the structural stability and function of nucleic acids. Water molecules in the hydration shells influence various conformations of DNA and RNA by specific hydrogen-bonding networks, which often contribute to the chemical reactivity and molecular recognition of nucleic acids. However, X-ray crystallography could not provide a complete description of structural information with respect to hydrogen bonds. Indeed, X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for determining the locations of water molecules, i.e., the location of the oxygen atom of H2O; however, it is very difficult to determine the orientation of the water molecules, i.e., the orientation of the two hydrogen atoms of H2O, because X-ray scattering from the hydrogen atom is very small.Neutron crystallography is a specialized tool for determining the positions of hydrogen atoms. Neutrons are not diffracted by electrons, but are diffracted by atomic nuclei; accordingly, neutron scattering lengths of hydrogen and its isotopes are comparable to those of non-hydrogen atoms. Therefore, neutron crystallography can determine both of the locations and orientations of water molecules. This chapter describes the current status of neutron nucleic acid crystallographic research as well as the basic principles of neutron diffraction experiments performed on nucleic acid crystals: materials, crystallization, diffraction experiments, and structure determination. PMID:26227050

  12. Entrapment of Hydrate-coated Gas Bubbles into Oil and Separation of Gas and Hydrate-film; Seafloor Experiments with ROV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiruta, A.; Matsumoto, R.

    2015-12-01

    We trapped gas bubbles emitted from the seafloor into oil-containing collector and observed an unique phenomena. Gas hydrate formation needs water for the crystal lattice; however, gas hydrates in some areas are associated with hydrophobic crude oil or asphalt. In order to understand gas hydrate growth in oil-bearing sediments, an experiment with cooking oil was made at gas hydrate stability condition. We collected venting gas bubbles into a collector with canola oil during ROV survey at a gas hydrate area in the eastern margin of the Sea of Japan. When the gas bubbles were trapped into collector with oil, gas phase appeared above the oil and gas hydrates, between oil and gas phase. At this study area within gas hydrate stability condition, control experiment with oil-free collector suggested that gas bubbles emitted from the seafloor were quickly covered with gas hydrate film. Therefore it is improbable that gas bubbles entered into the oil phase before hydrate skin formation. After the gas phase formation in oil-containing collector, the ROV floated outside of hydrate stability condition for gas hydrate dissociation and re-dived to the venting site. During the re-dive within hydrate stability condition, gas hydrate was not formed. The result suggests that moisture in the oil is not enough for hydrate formation. Therefore gas hydrates that appeared at the oil/gas phase boundary were already formed before bubbles enter into the oil. Hydrate film is the only possible origin. This observation suggests that hydrate film coating gas hydrate was broken at the sea water/oil boundary or inside oil. Further experiments may contribute for revealing kinetics of hydrate film and formation. This work was a part of METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry)'s project entitled "FY2014 Promoting research and development of methane hydrate". We also appreciate support of AIST (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology).

  13. Reaction of disodium cromoglycate with hydrated electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, A.J.; Arroyo, C.M.; Cockerham, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    A possible mechanism by which disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) prevents a decrease in regional cerebral blood flow but not hypotension in primates following whole body gamma-irradiation was studied. Several studies have implicated superoxide radicals (O/sub 2//sup -/.) in intestinal and cerebral vascular disorders following ischemia and ionizing radiation, respectively. O/sub 2//sup -/. is formed during radiolysis in the reaction between hydrated electrons (e-aq) and dissolved oxygen. For this reason, the efficiency of DSCG to scavenge e-q and possibly prevent the formation of O/sub 2//sup -/. was studied. Hydrated electrons were produced by photolysis of potassium ferrocyanide solutions. The rate constant, k = 2.92 x 10(10) M-1s-1 for the reaction between e-aq and DSCG was determined in competition experiments using the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO). This spin trap reacts rapidly with e-aq followed by protonation to yield the ESR observable DMPO-H spin adduct. The results show that DSCG is an efficient e-aq scavenger and may effectively compete with oxygen for e-aq preventing the radiolytic formation of O/sub 2//sup -/..

  14. Weakening of ice by magnesium perchlorate hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lenferinka, Hendrick J.; Durhama, William B.; Sternb, Laura A.; Patharec, Asmin V.

    2013-01-01

    We show that perchlorate hydrates, which have been detected at high circumpolar martian latitudes, have a dramatic effect upon the rheological behavior of polycrystalline water ice under conditions applicable to the North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD). We conducted subsolidus creep tests on mixtures of ice and magnesium perchlorate hydrate, Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O (MP6), of 0.02, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.47 volume fraction MP6. We found these mixtures to be increasingly weak with increasing MP6 content. For mixtures with ⩽0.10 volume fraction MP6, we resolved a stress exponent of n ≈ 2 at low stresses transitioning to n ≈ 4 above 10 MPa. Scanning electron microscopy of deformed specimens revealed MP6 to be distributed as an interconnected film between ice grains. These results suggest that grain boundary sliding (GBS) may be enhanced with respect to pure ice. As the enhancement of GBS is expected in polycrystalline aggregates containing a few percent melt or otherwise weak material distributed along grain boundaries, the observed n ≈ 2 is consistent with the mutual accommodation of basal slip and GBS. If ice containing trace concentrations of MP6 is also much weaker than pure ice at low stresses, flow in the NPLD could be significantly enhanced, particularly at the warmer basal temperatures associated with higher martian obliquities.

  15. Weakening of ice by magnesium perchlorate hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenferink, Hendrik J.; Durham, William B.; Stern, Laura A.; Pathare, Asmin V.

    2013-08-01

    We show that perchlorate hydrates, which have been detected at high circumpolar martian latitudes, have a dramatic effect upon the rheological behavior of polycrystalline water ice under conditions applicable to the North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD). We conducted subsolidus creep tests on mixtures of ice and magnesium perchlorate hydrate, Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O (MP6), of 0.02, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.47 volume fraction MP6. We found these mixtures to be increasingly weak with increasing MP6 content. For mixtures with ⩽0.10 volume fraction MP6, we resolved a stress exponent of n ≈ 2 at low stresses transitioning to n ≈ 4 above 10 MPa. Scanning electron microscopy of deformed specimens revealed MP6 to be distributed as an interconnected film between ice grains. These results suggest that grain boundary sliding (GBS) may be enhanced with respect to pure ice. As the enhancement of GBS is expected in polycrystalline aggregates containing a few percent melt or otherwise weak material distributed along grain boundaries, the observed n ≈ 2 is consistent with the mutual accommodation of basal slip and GBS. If ice containing trace concentrations of MP6 is also much weaker than pure ice at low stresses, flow in the NPLD could be significantly enhanced, particularly at the warmer basal temperatures associated with higher martian obliquities.

  16. Gas Hydrate Dissociation in the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Devin; Smith, Stefan Llewellyn

    2006-11-01

    Methane gas is known to exist in extremely large quantities below the sea floor in the sediment of the deep and cold oceanic and in permafrost regions. Due to the large hydrostatic pressure and cool temperatures the gas reacts with the surrounding water to form a crystalline substance known as a gas hydrate. The fate of these reserves is very important to climate on earth because methane is a much more efficient greenhouse gas then carbon dioxide. The dissociation process in general can occur by either a decrease in pressure or an increase in temperature. In this study we concentrate on the latter. Once the hydrate dissociates, water and free gas remain above the phase boundary, occupying a larger volume than the original solid, and are be transported through the sediment. We have modeled this physical mechanism using volume averaged equations in a porous medium with a coupled two-phase flow. The movement of the phase boundary, which is proportional to the rate of heat transfer to this interface, is modeled as a Stefan type melting problem. The resultant governing equations are solved numerically, using a front fixing method to fix the phase boundary, to determine the rate of gas flux through the sediment and the dissociation rate.

  17. A pilot-scale continuous-jet hydrate reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Szymcek, Phillip; McCallum, Scott; Taboada Serrano, Patricia L; Tsouris, Costas

    2008-01-01

    A three-phase, pilot-scale continuous-jet hydrate reactor (CJHR) has been developed for the production of gas hydrates. The reactor receives water and a hydrate-forming species to produce the solid gas hydrate. The CJHR has been tested for the production of CO{sub 2} hydrate for the purpose of ocean carbon sequestration. Formation of CO{sub 2} hydrate was investigated using various reactor/injector designs in a 72-l high-pressure vessel. Designs of the CJHR varied from single-capillary to multiple-capillary injectors that dispersed (1) liquid CO{sub 2} into water or (2) water into liquid CO{sub 2}. The novel injector is designed to improve the dispersion of one reactant into the other and, thus, eliminate mass transfer barriers that negatively affect conversion. An additional goal was an increase in production rates of two orders of magnitude. The designed injectors were tested in both distilled and saline water. Hydrate production experiments were conducted at different CO{sub 2} and water flow rates and for pressures and temperatures equivalent to intermediate ocean depths (1100-1700 m). The pilot-scale reactor with the novel injection system successfully increased hydrate production rates and efficiency.

  18. Lactate Dehydrogenase Catalysis: Roles of Keto, Hydrated, and Enol Pyruvate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meany, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Many carbonyl substrates of oxidoreductase enzymes undergo hydration and enolization so that these substrate systems are partitioned between keto, hydrated (gem-diol), and enol forms in aqueous solution. Some oxidoreductase enzymes are subject to inhibition by high concentrations of substrate. For such enzymes, two questions arise pertaining to…

  19. Hydrated multivalent cations are new class of molten salt mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    Electrical conductance and activation energy measurements on mixtures of calcium and potassium nitrate show the hydrated form to be a new class of molten salt. The theoretical glass transition temperature of the hydrate varied in a manner opposite to that of the anhydrous system.

  20. Strengthening mechanism of cemented hydrate-bearing sand at microscales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Jun; Jin, Yusuke; Katagiri, Jun; Tenma, Norio

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of hypothetical particle-level mechanisms, several constitutive models of hydrate-bearing sediments have been proposed previously for gas production. However, to the best of our knowledge, the microstructural large-strain behaviors of hydrate-bearing sediments have not been reported to date because of the experimental challenges posed by the high-pressure and low-temperature testing conditions. Herein, a novel microtriaxial testing apparatus was developed, and the mechanical large-strain behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments with various hydrate saturation values (Sh = 0%, 39%, and 62%) was analyzed using microfocus X-ray computed tomography. Patchy hydrates were observed in the sediments at Sh = 39%. The obtained stress-strain relationships indicated strengthening with increasing hydrate saturation and a brittle failure mode of the hydrate-bearing sand. Localized deformations were quantified via image processing at the submillimeter and micrometer scale. Shear planes and particle deformation and/or rotation were detected, and the shear band thickness decreased with increasing hydrate saturation.

  1. Noble gas encapsulation: clathrate hydrates and their HF doped analogues.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sukanta; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2014-09-01

    The significance of clathrate hydrates lies in their ability to encapsulate a vast range of inert gases. Although the natural abundance of a few noble gases (Kr and Xe) is poor their hydrates are generally abundant. It has already been reported that HF doping enhances the stability of hydrogen hydrates and methane hydrates, which prompted us to perform a model study on helium, neon and argon hydrates with their HF doped analogues. For this purpose 5(12), 5(12)6(8) and their HF doped analogues are taken as the model clathrate hydrates, which are among the building blocks of sI, sII and sH types of clathrate hydrate crystals. We use the dispersion corrected and gradient corrected hybrid density functional theory for the calculation of thermodynamic parameters as well as conceptual density functional theory based reactivity descriptors. The method of the ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation is used through atom centered density matrix propagation (ADMP) techniques to envisage the structural behaviour of different noble gas hydrates on a 500 fs timescale. Electron density analysis is carried out to understand the nature of Ng-OH2, Ng-FH and Ng-Ng interactions. The current results noticeably demonstrate that the noble gas (He, Ne, and Ar) encapsulation ability of 5(12), 5(12)6(8) and their HF doped analogues is thermodynamically favourable. PMID:25047071

  2. Hydrates in the Ocean beneath, around, and above Production Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Karl; Bhatnagar, Gaurav; Crosby, Daniel; Hatton, Greg; Manfield, Philip; Kuzmicki, Adam; Fenwick, Nevil; Pontaza, Juan; Wicks, Moye; Socolofsky, Scott; Brady, Cole; Svedeman, Steve; Sum, Amadeu K.; Koh, Carolyn; Levine, Jonathan; Warzinski, Robert P.; Shaffer, Franklin

    2012-07-19

    Hydrates amass beneath and around production equipment and can also form in hydrocarbon-seawater jets and plumes. The sources of hydrocarbons in these hydrates are natural seeps or temporary production system leaks. This paper focuses on two areas: the formation parameters and the impacts on normal production operations and hydrocarbon-spill capture systems.

  3. A primer on the geological occurrence of gas hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is part of the special publication Gas hydrates: relevance to world margin stability and climatic change (eds J.P. Henriet and J. Mienert).Natural gas hydrates occur world-wide in polar regions, usually associated with onshore and offshore permafrost, and in sediment of outer continental and insular margins. The total amount of methane in gas hydrates probably exceeds 1019 g of methane carbon. Three aspects of gas hydrates are important: their fossil fuel resource potential; their role as a submarine geohazard; and their effects on global climate change. Because gas hydrates represent a large amount of methane within 2000 m of the Earth's surface, they are considered to be an unconventional, unproven source of fossil fuel. Because gas hydrates are metastable, changes of pressure and temperature affect their stability. Destabilized gas hydrates beneath the sea floor lead to geological hazards such as submarine slumps and slides, examples of which are found world-wide. Destabilized gas hydrates may also affect climate through the release of methane, a 'greenhouse' gas, which may enhance global warming and be a factor in global climate change.

  4. Water-network percolation transitions in hydrated yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokołowska, Dagmara; Król-Otwinowska, Agnieszka; Mościcki, Józef K.

    2004-11-01

    We discovered two percolation processes in succession in dc conductivity of bulk baker’s yeast in the course of dehydration. Critical exponents characteristic for the three-dimensional network for heavily hydrated system, and two dimensions in the light hydration limit, evidenced a dramatic change of the water network dimensionality in the dehydration process.

  5. Gas-hydrate formation and lithogenesis in ocean sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, G.D.; Gramberg, I.S.; Ivanov, V.L.; Solov'ev, V.A.

    1986-05-01

    The demonstration of the presence of gas hydrates is a major finding of deep-water oceanic drilling. There is now no doubt that gas hydrates occur in the upper layers of sea floor sediments over considerable areas. Although hydrates have been observed directly in cores only in two regions (on the continental slope of the Central American Trench in the Pacific and on the Blake Outer Ridge in the Atlantic), the known and indicated occurrences of gas hydrates point to certain regularities. First, the hydrates are associated with continental slopes, where the combination of favorable thermobaric conditions and comparatively high contents of organic matter favors the biogenic generation of methane. Second, the hydrates do not completely fill the pore space in all beds within this zone, but appear to be under some lithologic control: larger amounts of hydrates occur in relatively coarse-grained beds such as tuffaceous and sandy horizons. In this paper, the authors point out analogies between ground ice on the continents and hydrate zones in marine sediments. 14 references.

  6. Determination of the Formula of a Hydrate: A Greener Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingshirn, Marc A.; Wyatt, Allison F.; Hanson, Robert M.; Spessard, Gary O.

    2008-01-01

    We are currently in the process of incorporating green chemistry throughout the chemistry curriculum. In this article we describe how we applied the principles of green chemistry in one of our first-semester general chemistry courses, specifically in relation to the determination of the formula of a hydrate. We utilize a copper hydrate salt that…

  7. Ice method for production of hydrogen clathrate hydrates

    DOEpatents

    Lokshin, Konstantin; Zhao, Yusheng

    2008-05-13

    The present invention includes a method for hydrogen clathrate hydrate synthesis. First, ice and hydrogen gas are supplied to a containment volume at a first temperature and a first pressure. Next, the containment volume is pressurized with hydrogen gas to a second higher pressure, where hydrogen clathrate hydrates are formed in the process.

  8. Dynamics of the gas hydrate system off Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, Christian; Feseker, Tomas; Treude, Tina; Krastel, Sebastian; Liebetrau, Volker; Niemann, Helge; Bertics, Victoria; Dumke, Ines; Dünnbier, Karolin; Ferre, Benedicte; Graves, Carolyn; Gross, Felix; Hissmann, Karen; Hühnerbach, Veit; Krause, Stefan; Lieser, Kathrin; Schauer, Jürgen; Steinle, Lea

    2013-04-01

    Marine methane hydrate is an ice-like substance stable at high-pressure and low temperature found frequently in continental margins. Since discovery of a large number of gas flares between 380 and 400 m water depth at the landward termination of the gas hydrate stability zone off Svalbard, there is concern that warming bottom waters have already started to melt large amounts of marine gas hydrate and may possibly accelerate global warming. The location of gas flares observed in PARASOUND data, geochemical anomalies in sediment cores, and anomalies in heat flow profiles suggest that hydrates play a role in the observed seepage of gas. However, the observation of thick carbonate crusts during manned submersible dives and their subsequent dating suggest that seepage off Svalbard has been ongoing for at least several hundred years and that decadal scale warming of the West Svalbard Current is at most of minor importance for the bulk of the observed seepage. Thus, the seeps off Svalbard do not necessarily represent the beginning of large-scale hydrate dissociation in the Arctic. Instead, it is likely that seasonal bottom water temperature fluctuations of 1-2°C cause periodic gas hydrate formation and dissociation, which focuses seepage at the observed gas flare depth. The results show that hydrate is highly sensitive to bottom water temperature changes and that bottom water warming will affect the stability of any large hydrate accumulations at the seabed on a short time scale.

  9. Hydration characteristics of switchgrass, big bluestem, and bromegrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biomass storage affects its quality and processing, which in turn influences the biomass final utilization applications. Moisture status in biomass is the most influential factor of biomass storage, and hydration kinetics controls the dynamic moisture condition of the biomass. Hydration characteris...

  10. Salinity-buffered methane hydrate formation and dissociation in gas-rich systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Kehua; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Flemings, Peter B.; Polito, Peter; Bryant, Steven L.

    2015-02-01

    Methane hydrate formation and dissociation are buffered by salinity in a closed system. During hydrate formation, salt excluded from hydrate increases salinity, drives the system to three-phase (gas, water, and hydrate phases) equilibrium, and limits further hydrate formation and dissociation. We developed a zero-dimensional local thermodynamic equilibrium-based model to explain this concept. We demonstrated this concept by forming and melting methane hydrate from a partially brine-saturated sand sample in a controlled laboratory experiment by holding pressure constant (6.94 MPa) and changing temperature stepwise. The modeled methane gas consumptions and hydrate saturations agreed well with the experimental measurements after hydrate nucleation. Hydrate dissociation occurred synchronously with temperature increase. The exception to this behavior is that substantial subcooling (6.4°C in this study) was observed for hydrate nucleation. X-ray computed tomography scanning images showed that core-scale hydrate distribution was heterogeneous. This implied core-scale water and salt transport induced by hydrate formation. Bulk resistivity increased sharply with initial hydrate formation and then decreased as the hydrate ripened. This study reproduced the salinity-buffered hydrate behavior interpreted for natural gas-rich hydrate systems by allowing methane gas to freely enter/leave the sample in response to volume changes associated with hydrate formation and dissociation. It provides insights into observations made at the core scale and log scale of salinity elevation to three-phase equilibrium in natural hydrate systems.

  11. Exploitation of marine gas hydrates: Benefits and risks (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallmann, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Vast amounts of natural gas are stored in marine gas hydrates deposited at continental margins. The global inventory of carbon bound as methane in gas hydrates is currently estimated as 1000 × 500 Gt. Large-scale national research projects located mostly in South-East Asia but also in North America and Europe are aiming to exploit these ice-like solids as new unconventional resource of natural gas. Japan, South Korea and other Asian countries are taking the lead because their national waters harbor exploitable gas hydrate deposits which could be developed to reduce the dependency of these nations on costly LGN imports. In 2013, the first successful production test was performed off Japan at water depths of ca. 1000 m demonstrating that natural gas can be released and produced from marine hydrates by lowering the pressure in the sub-seabed hydrate reservoirs. In an alternative approach, CO2 from coal power plans and other industrial sources is used to release natural gas (methane) from hydrates while CO2 is bound and stored in the sub-surface as solid hydrate. These new approaches and technologies are still in an early pre-commercial phase; the costs of field development and gas production exceed the value of natural gas being produced from the slowly dissociating hydrates. However, new technologies are currently under development in the German SUGAR project and elsewhere to reduce costs and enhance gas production rates such that gas hydrates may become commercially exploitable over the coming decade(s). The exploitation of marine gas hydrates may help to reduce CO2 emissions from the fossil fuel sector if the produced natural gas is used to replace coal and/or LNG. Hydrate development could also provide important incentives for carbon capture technologies since CO2 can be used to produce natural gas from hydrates. However, leakage of gas may occur during the production process while slope failure may be induced by the accompanying dissociation/conversion of gas

  12. Effect of lipid-containing, positively charged nanoemulsions on skin hydration, elasticity and erythema--an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Erol; Borchert, Hans-Hubert

    2006-01-13

    Dry skin and other skin disorders such as atopic dermatitis are characterized by impaired stratum corneum (SC) barrier function and by an increase in transepidermal water loss (TEWL) leading to a decrease in skin hydration. The possibility that dermatological and cosmetic products containing SC lipids could play a part in the restoration of disturbed skin barrier function is of great interest in the field of dermatology and cosmetics. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of positively charged oil/water nanoemulsions (PN) containing ceramide 3B and naturally found SC lipids (PNSC) such as ceramide 3, cholesterol, and palmitic acid on skin hydration, elasticity, and erythema. Creams of PNSC were compared to PN creams, to creams with negatively charged o/w nanoemulsion and SC lipids (NNSC) and to Physiogel cream, a SC lipid containing formulation, which is already on the market. The formulations (PN, PNSC, and NNSC) were prepared by high-pressure homogenization. After adding Carbopol 940 as thickener, particle size and stability of the creams were not significantly changed compared to the nanoemulsions. The studies were carried out on three groups, each with 14 healthy female test subjects between 25 and 50 years of age, using Corneometer 825, Cutometer SEM 575 and Mexameter 18 for measurements of skin hydration, elasticity, and erythema of the skin, respectively. The creams were applied regularly and well tolerated throughout the study. All formulations increased skin hydration and elasticity. There was no significant difference between PNSC and Physiogel. However, PNSC was significantly more effective in increasing skin hydration and elasticity than PN and NNSC indicating that phytosphingosine inducing the positive charge, SC lipids and ceramide 3B are crucial for the enhanced effect on skin hydration and viscoelasticity. PMID:16289984

  13. Structural characteristics of hydrated protons in the conductive channels: effects of confinement and fluorination studied by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Song, Yuechun; Ruan, Xuehua; Yan, Xiaoming; Liu, Zhao; Shen, Zhuanglin; Wu, Xuemei; He, Gaohong

    2016-09-21

    The relationship between the proton conductive channel and the hydrated proton structure is of significant importance for understanding the deformed hydrogen bonding network of the confined protons which matches the nanochannel. In general, the structure of hydrated protons in the nanochannel of the proton exchange membrane is affected by several factors. To investigate the independent effect of each factor, it is necessary to eliminate the interference of other factors. In this paper, a one-dimensional carbon nanotube decorated with fluorine was built to investigate the independent effects of nanoscale confinement and fluorination on the structural properties of hydrated protons in the nanochannel using classical molecular dynamics simulation. In order to characterize the structure of hydrated protons confined in the channel, the hydrogen bonding interaction between water and the hydrated protons has been studied according to suitable hydrogen bond criteria. The hydrogen bond criteria were proposed based on the radial distribution function, angle distribution and pair-potential energy distribution. It was found that fluorination leads to an ordered hydrogen bonding structure of the hydrated protons near the channel surface, and confinement weakens the formation of the bifurcated hydrogen bonds in the radial direction. Besides, fluorination lowers the free energy barrier of hydronium along the nanochannel, but slightly increases the barrier for water. This leads to disintegration of the sequential hydrogen bond network in the fluorinated CNTs with small size. In the fluorinated CNTs with large diameter, the lower degree of confinement produces a spiral-like sequential hydrogen bond network with few bifurcated hydrogen bonds in the central region. This structure might promote unidirectional proton transfer along the channel without random movement. This study provides the cooperative effect of confinement dimension and fluorination on the structure and hydrogen

  14. Residue specific hydration of primary cell wall potato pectin identified by solid-state 13C single-pulse MAS and CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Byg, Inge; Damager, Iben; Diaz, Jerome; Engelsen, Søren B; Ulvskov, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Hydration of rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) derived from potato cell wall was analyzed by (13)C single-pulse (SP) magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and (13)C cross-polarization (CP) MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and supported by (2)H SP/MAS NMR experiments. The study shows that the arabinan side chains hydrate more readily than the galactan side chains and suggests that the overall hydration properties can be controlled by modifying the ratio of these side chains. Enzymatic modification of native (NA) RG-I provided samples with reduced content of arabinan (sample DA), galactan (sample DG), or both side chains (sample DB). Results of these samples suggested that hydration properties were determined by the length and character of the side chains. NA and DA exhibited similar hydration characteristics, whereas DG and DB were difficult to hydrate because of the less hydrophilic properties of the rhamnose-galacturonic acid (Rha-GalA) backbone in RG-I. Potential food ingredient uses of RG-I by tailoring of its structure are discussed. PMID:21462966

  15. Hydration effects on enzyme-substrate complex of nylon oligomer hydrolase: inter-fragment interaction energy study by the fragment molecular orbital method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Hiroyuki; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Baba, Takeshi; Watanabe, Chiduru; Okiyama, Yoshio; Mochizuki, Yuji; Nakano, Masayoshi

    2015-02-01

    Fragment molecular orbital calculations were successfully applied to a nylon oligomer hydrolase, NylB, to investigate the hydration effects on an enzyme-substrate binding structure. Statistically corrected inter-fragment interaction energy analyses were performed on this system to quantitatively characterise the interactions between the substrate, 6-aminohexanoate linear dimer (ALD), and the amino acid residues, such as Asp181, Ser112, and Ile 345, which are regarded as important for enzyme-substrate complex formation by NylB. We found that the direct interaction between ALD and NylB is weakened by hydration, because water molecules cause charge translation or polarisation of ALD or each amino acid residue. However, including the interaction energy between ALD and water molecules greatly stabilises this complex. These results indicate the importance of the hydration effects in enzyme-substrate complex formation.

  16. Theoretical description of biomolecular hydration - Application to A-DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A.E.; Hummer, G.; Soumpasis, D.M.

    1994-12-31

    The local density of water molecules around a biomolecule is constructed from calculated two- and three-points correlation functions of polar solvents in water using a Potential-of-Mean-Force (PMF) expansion. As a simple approximation, the hydration of all polar (including charged) groups in a biomolecule is represented by the hydration of water oxygen in bulk water, and the effect of non-polar groups on hydration are neglected, except for excluded volume effects. Pair and triplet correlation functions are calculated by molecular dynamics simulations. We present calculations of the structural hydration for ideal A-DNA molecules with sequences [d(CG){sub 5}]{sub 2} and [d(C{sub 5}G{sub 5})]{sub 2}. We find that this method can accurately reproduce the hydration patterns of A-DNA observed in neutron diffraction experiments on oriented DNA fibers.

  17. Temporal constraints on hydrate-controlled methane seepage off Svalbard.

    PubMed

    Berndt, C; Feseker, T; Treude, T; Krastel, S; Liebetrau, V; Niemann, H; Bertics, V J; Dumke, I; Dünnbier, K; Ferré, B; Graves, C; Gross, F; Hissmann, K; Hühnerbach, V; Krause, S; Lieser, K; Schauer, J; Steinle, L

    2014-01-17

    Methane hydrate is an icelike substance that is stable at high pressure and low temperature in continental margin sediments. Since the discovery of a large number of gas flares at the landward termination of the gas hydrate stability zone off Svalbard, there has been concern that warming bottom waters have started to dissociate large amounts of gas hydrate and that the resulting methane release may possibly accelerate global warming. Here, we corroborate that hydrates play a role in the observed seepage of gas, but we present evidence that seepage off Svalbard has been ongoing for at least 3000 years and that seasonal fluctuations of 1° to 2°C in the bottom-water temperature cause periodic gas hydrate formation and dissociation, which focus seepage at the observed sites. PMID:24385604

  18. Hydration in the Pediatric Athlete - How to Guide Your Patients.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Hydration is arguably among the foremost priorities youth athletes, parents, and coaches habitually consider as vital for sports. Insufficient hydration and a resultant measurable sweat-induced body water deficit can negatively affect performance and, in some athletic scenarios, can be a danger to a young athlete's health and safety, especially during vigorous physical activity in a warm-to-hot environment. Accordingly, it is essential to be well hydrated prior to practice, training, and competition and minimize total body water deficits incurred while being mindful of the greater sweat losses and hydration needs/challenges that accompany physical growth and maturation. Informed clinicians can play a key role as trusted resources in providing the most effective guidelines and making the best overall individual recommendations regarding hydration for youth athletes. PMID:26166053

  19. Hydration of Portland cement with additions of calcium sulfoaluminates

    SciTech Connect

    Le Saout, Gwenn; Lothenbach, Barbara; Hori, Akihiro; Higuchi, Takayuki; Winnefeld, Frank

    2013-01-15

    The effect of mineral additions based on calcium aluminates on the hydration mechanism of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated using isothermal calorimetry, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and pore solution analysis. Results show that the addition of a calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA) to the OPC does not affect the hydration mechanism of alite but controls the aluminate dissolution. In the second blend investigated, a rapid setting cement, the amorphous calcium aluminate reacts very fast to ettringite. The release of aluminum ions strongly retards the hydration of alite but the C-S-H has a similar composition as in OPC with no additional Al to Si substitution. As in CSA-OPC, the aluminate hydration is controlled by the availability of sulfates. The coupling of thermodynamic modeling with the kinetic equations predicts the amount of hydrates and pore solution compositions as a function of time and validates the model in these systems.

  20. Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Amos Nur

    2009-01-08

    We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

  1. Heat of Hydration of Low Activity Cementitious Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Nasol, D.

    2015-07-23

    During the curing of secondary waste grout, the hydraulic materials in the dry mix react exothermally with the water in the secondary low-activity waste (LAW). The heat released, called the heat of hydration, can be measured using a TAM Air Isothermal Calorimeter. By holding temperature constant in the instrument, the heat of hydration during the curing process can be determined. This will provide information that can be used in the design of a waste solidification facility. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the heat of hydration and other physical properties are being collected on grout prepared using three simulants of liquid secondary waste generated at the Hanford Site. From this study it was found that both the simulant and dry mix each had an effect on the heat of hydration. It was also concluded that the higher the cement content in the dry materials mix, the greater the heat of hydration during the curing of grout.

  2. Dissociation of methane hydrate in aqueous NaCl solutions.

    PubMed

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2014-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the dissociation of methane hydrate in aqueous NaCl solutions are performed. It is shown that the dissociation of the hydrate is accelerated by the formation of methane bubbles both in NaCl solutions and in pure water. We find two significant effects on the kinetics of the hydrate dissociation by NaCl. One is slowing down in an early stage before bubble formation, and another is swift bubble formation that enhances the dissociation. These effects arise from the low solubility of methane in NaCl solution, which gives rise to a nonuniform spatial distribution of solvated methane in the aqueous phase. We also demonstrate that bubbles form near the hydrate interface in dense NaCl solutions and that the hydrate dissociation proceeds inhomogeneously due to the bubbles. PMID:25237735

  3. Fundamental challenges to methane recovery from gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Servio, P.; Eaton, M.W.; Mahajan, D.; Winters, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    The fundamental challenges, the location, magnitude, and feasibility of recovery, which must be addressed to recover methane from dispersed hydrate sources, are presented. To induce dissociation of gas hydrate prior to methane recovery, two potential methods are typically considered. Because thermal stimulation requires a large energy input, it is less economically feasible than depressurization. The new data will allow the study of the effect of pressure, temperature, diffusion, porosity, tortuosity, composition of gas and water, and porous media on gas-hydrate production. These data also will allow one to improve existing models related to the stability and dissociation of sea floor hydrates. The reproducible kinetic data from the planned runs together with sediment properties will aid in developing a process to economically recover methane from a potential untapped hydrate source. The availability of plentiful methane will allow economical and large-scale production of methane-derived clean fuels to help avert future energy crises.

  4. Methane hydrate formation in confined nanospace can surpass nature.

    PubMed

    Casco, Mirian E; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín; Ramírez-Cuesta, Anibal J; Rey, Fernando; Jordá, Jose L; Bansode, Atul; Urakawa, Atsushi; Peral, Inma; Martínez-Escandell, Manuel; Kaneko, Katsumi; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Natural methane hydrates are believed to be the largest source of hydrocarbons on Earth. These structures are formed in specific locations such as deep-sea sediments and the permafrost based on demanding conditions of high pressure and low temperature. Here we report that, by taking advantage of the confinement effects on nanopore space, synthetic methane hydrates grow under mild conditions (3.5 MPa and 2 °C), with faster kinetics (within minutes) than nature, fully reversibly and with a nominal stoichiometry that mimics nature. The formation of the hydrate structures in nanospace and their similarity to natural hydrates is confirmed using inelastic neutron scattering experiments and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. These findings may be a step towards the application of a smart synthesis of methane hydrates in energy-demanding applications (for example, transportation). PMID:25728378

  5. Submarine gas hydrate estimation: Theoretical and empirical approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, G.D.; Soloviev, V.A.

    1995-12-01

    The published submarine gas hydrate resource estimates are based on the concepts of their continuous extent over large areas and depth intervals and/or the regionally high hydrate concentrations in sediments. The observational data are in conflict with these concepts. At present such estimates cannot be made to an accuracy better than an order of magnitude. The amount of methane in shallow subbottom (seepage associated) gas-hydrate accumulations is estimated at 10{sup 14} m{sup 3} STP, and in deep-seated hydrates at 10{sup 15} m{sup 3} according to observational data. From the genetic standpoint for the time being gas hydrate potential could be only assessed as far less than 10{sup 17} m{sup 3} because rates of related hydrogeological and geochemical processes have not been adequately studied.

  6. Hydration and protein folding in water and in reverse micelles: compressibility and volume changes.

    PubMed

    Valdez, D; Le Huérou, J Y; Gindre, M; Urbach, W; Waks, M

    2001-06-01

    The partial specific volume and adiabatic compressibility of proteins reflect the hydration properties of the solvent-exposed protein surface, as well as changes in conformational states. Reverse micelles, or water-in-oil microemulsions, are protein-sized, optically-clear microassemblies in which hydration can be experimentally controlled. We explore, by densimetry and ultrasound velocimetry, three basic proteins: cytochrome c, lysozyme, and myelin basic protein in reverse micelles made of sodium bis (2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate, water, and isooctane and in aqueous solvents. For comparison, we use beta-lactoglobulin (pI = 5.1) as a reference protein. We examine the partial specific volume and adiabatic compressibility of the proteins at increasing levels of micellar hydration. For the lowest water content compatible with complete solubilization, all proteins display their highest compressibility values, independent of their amino acid sequence and charge. These values lie within the range of empirical intrinsic protein compressibility estimates. In addition, we obtain volumetric data for the transition of myelin basic protein from its initially unfolded state in water free of denaturants, to a folded, compact conformation within the water-controlled microenvironment of reverse micelles. These results disclose yet another aspect of the protein structural properties observed in membrane-mimetic molecular assemblies. PMID:11371450

  7. Hydration and protein folding in water and in reverse micelles: compressibility and volume changes.

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, D; Le Huérou, J Y; Gindre, M; Urbach, W; Waks, M

    2001-01-01

    The partial specific volume and adiabatic compressibility of proteins reflect the hydration properties of the solvent-exposed protein surface, as well as changes in conformational states. Reverse micelles, or water-in-oil microemulsions, are protein-sized, optically-clear microassemblies in which hydration can be experimentally controlled. We explore, by densimetry and ultrasound velocimetry, three basic proteins: cytochrome c, lysozyme, and myelin basic protein in reverse micelles made of sodium bis (2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate, water, and isooctane and in aqueous solvents. For comparison, we use beta-lactoglobulin (pI = 5.1) as a reference protein. We examine the partial specific volume and adiabatic compressibility of the proteins at increasing levels of micellar hydration. For the lowest water content compatible with complete solubilization, all proteins display their highest compressibility values, independent of their amino acid sequence and charge. These values lie within the range of empirical intrinsic protein compressibility estimates. In addition, we obtain volumetric data for the transition of myelin basic protein from its initially unfolded state in water free of denaturants, to a folded, compact conformation within the water-controlled microenvironment of reverse micelles. These results disclose yet another aspect of the protein structural properties observed in membrane-mimetic molecular assemblies. PMID:11371450

  8. Skin Hydration Assessment through Modern Non-Invasive Bioengineering Technologies

    PubMed Central

    CONSTANTIN, Maria-Magdalena; POENARU, Elena; POENARU, Calin; CONSTANTIN, Traian

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive bioengineering technologies continuously discovered and developed in recent decades provide a significant input to research development and remarkably contribute to the improvement of medical education and care to our patients. Aim: Assessing skin hydration by using the capacitance method for a group of patients with allergic contact dermatitis versus healthy subjects, before and after applying a moisturiser (assessing the immediate and long-term effectiveness of hydration). Results: For both groups, but especially for the patients with dry skin, there was a clear improvement of hydration, statistically significant after applying the moisturiser. In the case of the patients with allergic contact dermatitis, hydration was at a maximum immediately after the first application, and then maintained an increased level after 7 and 28 days, respectively. In the healthy subjects, the increase in hydration was lower, but progressive. The moisturiser determined an increase in hydration for all age groups, but those who showed the most obvious effect were the young adults (18-29 years old) with an increase of 19.9%. The maintenance effect of hydration lasted for 28 days, while the improvement was important for allergic skin (17.1%) and significant for healthy skin (10.9%). Conclusion: The assessment of epidermal hydration performed by using the corneometer showed very good hydration of the stratum corneum for both groups studied, with immediate and long-term effect. This study also showed that the degree of skin hydration was inversely proportional with age. The corneometer is easy to use, efficient and widely utilised in international studies for measurements in healthy or pathological conditions, for quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of various preparations intended for application to the skin surface, under well-controlled and standardised conditions. PMID:25553123

  9. X-ray Computed Tomography Observation of Methane Hydrate Dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomutsa, L.; Freifeld, B.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Stern, L.A.

    2002-01-01

    Deposits of naturally occurring methane hydrate have been identified in permafrost and deep oceanic environments with global reserves estimated to be twice the total amount of energy stored in fossil fuels. The fundamental behavior of methane hydrate in natural formations, while poorly understood, is of critical importance if the economic recovery of methane from hydrates is to be accomplished. In this study, computed X-ray tomography (CT) scanning is used to image an advancing dissociation front in a heterogeneous gas hydrate/sand sample at 0.1 MPa. The cylindrical methane hydrate and sand aggregate, 2.54 cm in diameter and 6.3 cm long, was contained in a PVC sample holder that was insulated on all but one end. At the uninsulated end, the dissociated gas was captured and the volume of gas monitored. The sample was initially imaged axially using X-ray CT scanning within the methane hydrate stability zone by keeping the sample temperature at 77??K. Subsequently, as the sample warmed through the methane hydrate dissociation point at 194??K and room pressure, gas was produced and the temperature at the bottom of the sample plug was monitored while CT images were acquired. The experiment showed that CT imaging can resolve the reduction in density (as seen by a reduction in beam attenuation) of the hydrate/sand aggregate due to the dissociation of methane hydrate. In addition, a comparison of CT images with gas flow and temperature measurements reveals that the CT scanner is able to resolve accurately and spatially the advancing dissociation front. Future experiments designed to better understand the thermodynamics of hydrate dissociation are planned to take advantage of the temporal and spatial resolution that the CT scanner provides.

  10. Reflective terahertz (THz) imaging: system calibration using hydration phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, Neha; Garritano, James; Lee, Yoon Kyung; Tewari, Priyamvada; Sung, Shijun; Maccabi, Ashkan; Nowroozi, Bryan; Babakhanian, Meghedi; Sanghvi, Sajan; Singh, Rahul; Grundfest, Warren; Taylor, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) hydration sensing continues to gain traction in the medical imaging community due to its unparalleled sensitivity to tissue water content. Rapid and accurate detection of fluid shifts following induction of thermal skin burns as well as remote corneal hydration sensing have been previously demonstrated in vivo using reflective, pulsed THz imaging. The hydration contrast sensing capabilities of this technology were recently confirmed in a parallel 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging study, in which burn areas are associated with increases in local mobile water content. Successful clinical translation of THz sensing, however, still requires quantitative assessments of system performance measurements, specifically hydration concentration sensitivity, with tissue substitutes. This research aims to calibrate the sensitivity of a novel, reflective THz system to tissue water content through the use of hydration phantoms for quantitative comparisons of THz hydration imagery.Gelatin phantoms were identified as an appropriate tissue-mimicking model for reflective THz applications, and gel composition, comprising mixtures of water and protein, was varied between 83% to 95% hydration, a physiologically relevant range. A comparison of four series of gelatin phantom studies demonstrated a positive linear relationship between THz reflectivity and water concentration, with statistically significant hydration sensitivities (p < .01) ranging between 0.0209 - 0.038% (reflectivity: %hydration). The THz-phantom interaction is simulated with a three-layer model using the Transfer Matrix Method with agreement in hydration trends. Having demonstrated the ability to accurately and noninvasively measure water content in tissue equivalent targets with high sensitivity, reflective THz imaging is explored as a potential tool for early detection and intervention of corneal pathologies.

  11. New Simulator for Non-Equilibrium Modeling of Hydrate Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvamme, B.; Qorbani Nashaqi, K.; Jemai, K.; Vafaei, M.

    2014-12-01

    Due to Gibbs phase rule and combination of first and second law of thermodynamics, hydrate in nature cannot be in equilibrium since they come from different parent phases. In this system hydrate formation and dissociation is affected by local variables such as pressure, temperature and composition with mass and energy transport restrictions. Available simulators have attempted to model hydrate phase transition as an equilibrium reaction. Although those which treated the processes of formation and dissociation as kinetics used model of Kim and Bishnoi based on laboratory PVT experiment, and consequently hard to accept up scaling to real reservoirs condition. Additionally, they merely check equilibrium in terms of pressure and temperature projections and disregard thermodynamic requirements for equilibrium especially along axes of concentrations in phases. Non-equilibrium analysis of hydrate involves putting aside all the phase transitions which are not possible and use kinetic evaluation to measure phase transitions progress in each grid block for each time step. This procedure is Similar to geochemical reservoir simulators logic. As a result RetrasoCodeBright has been chosen as hydrate reservoir simulator and our work involves extension of this code. RetrasoCodeBright (RCB) is able to handle competing processes of formation and dissociation of hydrates as pseudo reactions at each node and each time step according to the temperature, pressure and concentration. Hydrates can therefore be implemented into the structure as pseudo minerals, with appropriate kinetic models. In order to implement competing nature of phase transition kinetics of hydrate formation, we use classical nucleation theory based on Kvamme et al. as a simplified model inside RCB and use advanced theories to fit parameters for the model (PFT). Hydrate formation and dissociation can directly be observed through porosity changes in the specific areas of the porous media. In this work which is in

  12. Geochemistry of a naturally occurring massive marine gas hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Claypool, G.E.; Threlkeld, C.N.; Dendy, Sloan E.

    1984-01-01

    During Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Leg 84 a core 1 m long and 6 cm in diameter of massive gas hydrate was unexpectedly recovered at Site 570 in upper slope sediment of the Middle America Trench offshore of Guatemala. This core contained only 5-7% sediment, the remainder being the solid hydrate composed of gas and water. Samples of the gas hydrate were decomposed under controlled conditions in a closed container maintained at 4??C. Gas pressure increased and asymptotically approached the equilibrium decomposition pressure for an ideal methane hydrate, CH4.5-3/4H2O, of 3930 kPa and approached to this pressure after each time gas was released, until the gas hydrate was completely decomposed. The gas evolved during hydrate decomposition was 99.4% methane, ???0.2% ethane, and ???0.4% CO2. Hydrocarbons from propane to heptane were also present, but in concentrations of less than 100 p.p.m. The carbon-isotopic composition of methane was -41 to -44 permil(( 0 00), relative to PDB standard. The observed volumetric methane/water ratio was 64 or 67, which indicates that before it was stored and analyzed, the gas hydrate probably had lost methane. The sample material used in the experiments was likely a mixture of methane hydrate and water ice. Formation of this massive gas hydrate probably involved the following processes: (i) upward migration of gas and its accumulation in a zone where conditions favored the growth of gas hydrates, (ii) continued, unusually rapid biological generation of methane, and (iii) release of gas from water solution as pressure decreased due to sea level lowering and tectonic uplift. ?? 1984.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of a new structure of gas hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Tulk, Christopher A; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Ehm, Lars; Klug, Dennis D; Parise, John B; Yang, Ling; Martin, Dave; Ripmeester, John; Moudrakovski, Igor; Ratcliffe, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Atoms and molecules 0.4 0.9 nm in diameter can be incorporated in the cages formed by hydrogen-bonded water molecules making up the crystalline solid clathrate hydrates. There are three structural families of these hydrates , known as sI, sII and sH, and the structure usually depends on the largest guest molecule in the hydrate. Species such as Ar, Kr, Xe and methane form sI or sII hydrate, sH is unique in that it requires both small and large cage guests for stability. All three structures, containing methane, other hydrocarbons, H2S and CO2, O2 and N2 have been found in the geosphere, with sI methane hydrate by far the most abundant. At high pressures (P > 0.7 kbar) small guests (Ar, Kr, Xe, methane) are also known to form sH hydrate with multiple occupancy of the largest cage in the hydrate. The high-pressure methane hydrate of sH has been proposed as playing a role in the outer solar system, including formation models for Titan , and yet another high pressure phase of methane has been reported , although its structure remains unknown. In this study, we report a new and unique hydrate structure that is derived from the high pressure sH hydrate of xenon. After quench recovery at ambient pressure and 77 K it shows considerable stability at low temperatures (T < 160 K) and is compositionally similar to the sI Xe clathrate starting material. This evidence of structural complexity in compositionally similar clathrate compounds indicates that thermodynamic pressure temperature conditions may not be the only important factor in structure determination, but also the reaction path may have an important effect.

  14. Instant conversion of air to a clathrate hydrate: CO(2) hydrates directly from moist air and moist CO(2)(g).

    PubMed

    Devlin, J Paul; Monreal, I Abrrey

    2010-12-23

    The rapid conversion of vapor mixtures containing the gases CO(2), H(2)S, and HCN to clathrate hydrates was reported recently. The novel method is based on the pulsing of warm vapor mixtures, including a carrier gas, into a cold condensation chamber. With cooling, the vapors, which also include ∼1% water and either tetrahydrofuran or trimethylene oxide as a catalyst, nucleate aqueous solution nanodroplets that, on a millisecond time scale, crystallize as hydrate nanoparticles that consume 100% of the water. Humid air approximates the content of mixtures used successfully in the vapor-to-hydrate conversions. FTIR spectra are examined for gas hydrates formed directly from air and air enriched with CO(2), as well as hydrate particles for which CO(2)(g) serves as both guest and aerosol medium. In each instance all of the water in the condensed phase converts to a clathrate hydrate. The subsecond ether-catalyzed formation of the hydrates near 230 K requires only a few percent of the CO(2) pressure used in conventional processes that yield fractional amounts of gas hydrates on an hour time scale in the same temperature range. PMID:21105676

  15. Acoustic and resistivity measurements on rock samples containing tetrahydrofuran hydrates: Laboratory analogues to natural gas hydrate deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, C.; Murphy, J.; Hermes, R.

    1986-12-01

    In this paper we report laboratory acoustic velocity and electrical resistivity measurements on Berea Sandstone and Austin Chalk samples saturated with a stoichiometric mixture of tetrahydrofuran (THF) and water. THF and water is an excellent experimental analogue to natural gas hydrates because THF solutions form hydrates similar to natural gas hydrates readily at atmospheric pressures. Hydrate formation in both the chalk and sandstone samples increased the acoustic P wave velocities by more than 80% when hydrates formed in the pore spaces; however, the velocities soon plateaued and further lowering the temperature did not appreciably increase the velocity. In contrast, the electrical resistivity increased nearly 2 orders of magnitude upon hydrate formation and continued to increase slowly as the temperature was decreased. In all cases resistivities were nearly frequency independent to 30 kHz, and the loss tangents were high, always greater than 5. The dielectric loss showed a linear decrease with frequency suggesting that ionic conduction through a brine phase dominates at all frequencies, even when the pores are nearly filled with hydrates. We find that resistivities were strongly a function of the dissolved salt content of the pore water. Pore water salinity also influenced the sonic velocity, but this effect is much smaller and only important near the hydrate formation temperature.

  16. Effect of hydration state on resistance exercise-induced endocrine markers of anabolism, catabolism, and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Judelson, Daniel A; Maresh, Carl M; Yamamoto, Linda M; Farrell, Mark J; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S; Spiering, Barry A; Casa, Douglas J; Anderson, Jeffrey M

    2008-09-01

    Hypohydration (decreased total body water) exacerbates the catabolic hormonal response to endurance exercise with unclear effects on anabolic hormones. Limited research exists that evaluates the effect of hypohydration on endocrine responses to resistance exercise; this work merits attention as the acute postexercise hormonal environment potently modulates resistance training adaptations. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of hydration state on the endocrine and metabolic responses to resistance exercise. Seven healthy resistance-trained men (age = 23 +/- 4 yr, body mass = 87.8 +/- 6.8 kg, body fat = 11.5 +/- 5.2%) completed three identical resistance exercise bouts in different hydration states: euhydrated (EU), hypohydrated by approximately 2.5% body mass (HY25), and hypohydrated by approximately 5.0% body mass (HY50). Investigators manipulated hydration status via controlled water deprivation and exercise-heat stress. Cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, testosterone, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin, glucose, lactate, glycerol, and free fatty acids were measured during euhydrated rest, immediately preceding resistance exercise, immediately postexercise, and during 60 min of recovery. Body mass decreased 0.2 +/- 0.4, 2.4 +/- 0.4, and 4.8 +/- 0.4% during EU, HY25, and HY50, respectively, supported by humoral and urinary changes that clearly indicated subjects achieved three distinct hydration states. Hypohydration significantly 1) increased circulating concentrations of cortisol and norepinephrine, 2) attenuated the testosterone response to exercise, and 3) altered carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. These results suggest that hypohydration can modify the hormonal and metabolic response to resistance exercise, influencing the postexercise circulatory milieu. PMID:18617629

  17. Structural and thermotropic properties of synthetic C16:0 (palmitoyl) ceramide: effect of hydration.

    PubMed

    Shah, J; Atienza, J M; Duclos, R I; Rawlings, A V; Dong, Z; Shipley, G G

    1995-09-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction techniques have been used to investigate the structure and thermotropic properties of synthetic, non-hydroxy fatty acid (16:0) ceramide (NFA(C16)CER) as a function of hydration. Anhydrous NFA(C16)CER shows a single, broad endothermic transition at 95.4 degrees C (delta H = 10.4 kcal/mol). On hydration, a broad exothermic transition appears at approximately 50-70 degrees C while the main endothermic transition decreases to 90.0 degrees C (delta H = 13.8 kcal/mol). The enthalpy of the exothermic transition increases with hydration to a maximum value, delta H = 4.8 kcal/mol. This polymorphic phase behavior depends on the low temperature incubation time and prior cooling rate. X-ray diffraction of fully hydrated NFA(C16)CER at 26 degrees C, shows a well-ordered lamellar phase with a bilayer periodicity d = 46.9 A. At 68 degrees C, above the first exothermic transition, X-ray diffraction shows again a lamellar phase with reduced bilayer periodicity d = 41.8 A and an increased number of both lamellar and wide-angle reflections indicative of enhanced layer and chain packing order, respectively. At 90.0 degrees C, above the main transition, the diffraction pattern shows a broad, intense reflection at 29.9 A and a diffuse reflection at 4.6 A, indicative of a melted chain phase. On cooling, NFA(C16)CER exhibits polymorphic phase behavior involving the conversion of the melted chain phase to a metastable bilayer phase. On heating, this metastable phase undergoes an exothermic transition to a stable bilayer phase; on further heating, NFA(C16)CER converts endothermically to the melted-chain phase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8558082

  18. Natural and synthetic gas hydrates studied by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savy, Jean-Philippe; Bigalke, Nikolaus; Aloisi, Giovanni; Kossel, Elke; Pansegrau, Moritz; Haeckel, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    Over the past decade, the interest in using CH4-hydrates as an energy resource and CO2-hydrates as a storage option for anthropogenic CO2 has grown in the scientific community as well as in the oil and gas industry. Among all the techniques used to characterize gas hydrates, the non-destructive, non-invasive Raman spectroscopy provides significant insights into the structure and composition of hydrates. In this study, we compare gas hydrates synthetically produced in the laboratory with natural hydrate samples collected from marine sediments. CO2 and CH4 gas hydrates were investigated with a high-resolution Raman microscope at in-situ p-T conditions. A water-filled glass capillary (inner diameter: 1.7 mm) was placed in a stainless steel cell, which was sealed, cooled down to 3.6 ° C and pressurized to 60 bar with liquid CO2. Video images taken after 1 h revealed droplets (~10 μm in diameter) trapped in the ice-like solid. The two Fermi dyads of CO2 in the liquid and hydrate phase at 1274 & 1381 cm1 and 1280 & 1384 cm-1, respectively, confirm the presence of liquid CO2 droplets trapped in a CO2-hydrate matrix. Equivalent experiments were conducted with CH4 gas at 1 ° C and 90 bar. The nucleation of CH4-hydrate was followed in the Raman spectral region of the C-H stretching mode. At the early stage of the nucleation, the peak at 2915 cm-1 (CH4 in small cages) was stronger than the one at 2904 cm-1 (CH4 in large cages) indicating that methane starts to populate the small 512 cages of the s-I hydrate structure first and then, as nucleation continues, the large cages are stabilized leading to a quickly growing peak at 2904 cm-1 until a final peak intensity ratio of 3.7 is established. In contrast to other studies, intermediate stabilization of the s-II structure was not observed. Video images confirmed the absence of gas inclusions. The hydrate density, 1.1 & 0.9 for CO2-hydrate and CH4-hydrate respectively, compared to the one of water may explain the formation of

  19. Cooperative hydration effect causes thermal unfolding of proteins and water activity plays a key role in protein stability in solutions.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Osato; Dozen, Michiko; Hirota, Kaede

    2016-08-01

    The protein unfolding process observed in a narrow temperature range was clearly explained by evaluating the small difference in the enthalpy of hydrogen-bonding between amino acid residues and the hydration of amino acid residue separately. In aqueous solutions, the effect of cosolute on the protein stability is primarily dependent on water activity, aw, the role of which has been long neglected in the literature. The effect of aw on protein stability works as a power law so that a small change in aw is amplified substantially through the cooperative hydration effect. In the present approach, the role of hydrophobic interaction stands behind. This affects protein stability indirectly through the change in solution structure caused by the existence of cosolute. PMID:26896315

  20. Kinetics Characteristics of Nitrogen Hydrates Respond to Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Liu, C.; Ye, Y.; Gong, J.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, a high pressure differential scanning calorimetry (HP DSC) based on thermo-analytical technique was applied to investigate the kinetics and thermodynamics characteristics of nitrogen hydrates. Nitrogen hydrates was synthesized in the sample vessel under different pressures as temperature decreased from 293 to 233 K with a constant cooling rate of 0.2 K/min controlled by the DSC. To measure the hydrates dissociation enthalpies , the temperature was slowly raised up from 233 to 293 K at a constant rate ranging of 0.05 K/min. 1. Peak area on the heat flow curves represents the amount of heat during phase transition. In these experiments, the total water added to the sample vessel (mt) is already known. By integrating the peak areas of ice and hydrate, we know the total heats of ice (Qi) and hydrate (Qh), respectively. As the heat of ice per gram can be measured easily (336.366 J/g), the mass of ice (mi) can be obtain. Then, the dissociation heat of nitrogen hydrate per gram (Hh ) can be calculated by the equation: H(J/g)=Qh/(mt-mi) It is shown that the dissociation heats of nitrogen hydrates are a little larger than ice, but do not change a lot with different pressures. The average value of dissociation heat is 369.158 J/g. 2. During the DSC cooling stage, hydrate formed at temperature much lower than equilibrium. The biggest sub-cooling is about 291 K, while the smallest one is about 279 K. However, during these experiments, the pressure did not show obvious relationship with sub-cooling. It confirmed that even the proper conditions were achieved, formation was still a stochastic process. For one thing, due to the random distribution of dissolved gas in water, the interfacial tension and the water activity were not equal in the whole system. And if there was a free gas phase, which leads to different fugacity on water-gas interface, the stochastic behavior would be more significant in the sample vessel. 3. The energy released from hydrates formation as