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Sample records for acid hydrolysis pretreatment

  1. Investigating Mass Transport Limitations on Xylan Hydrolysis During Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Ashutosh; Pilath, Heid M.; Parent, Yves; Chatterjee, Siddharth G.; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Yarbrough, John M.; Himmel, Michael E.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Johnson, David K.

    2014-04-28

    Mass transport limitations could be an impediment to achieving high sugar yields during biomass pretreatment and thus be a critical factor in the economics of biofuels production. The objective of this work was to study the mass transfer restrictions imposed by the structure of biomass on the hydrolysis of xylan during dilute acid pretreatment of biomass. Mass transfer effects were studied by pretreating poplar wood at particle sizes ranging from 10 micrometers to 10 mm. This work showed a significant reduction in the rate of xylan hydrolysis in poplar when compared to the intrinsic rate of hydrolysis for isolated xylan that is possible in the absence of mass transfer. In poplar samples we observed no significant difference in the rates of xylan hydrolysis over more than two orders of magnitude in particle size. It appears that no additional mass transport restrictions are introduced by increasing particle size from 10 micrometers to 10 mm. This work suggests that the rates of xylan hydrolysis in biomass particles are limited primarily by the diffusion of hydrolysis products out of plant cell walls. A mathematical description is presented to describe the kinetics of xylan hydrolysis that includes transport of the hydrolysis products through biomass into the bulk solution. The modeling results show that the effective diffusion coefficient of the hydrolysis products in the cell wall is several orders of magnitude smaller than typical values in other applications signifying the role of plant cell walls in offering resistance to diffusion of the hydrolysis products.

  2. Optimization of dilute acid pretreatment of water hyacinth biomass for enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production

    PubMed Central

    Idrees, Muhammad; Adnan, Ahmad; Sheikh, Shahzad; Qureshic, Fahim Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted for the optimization of pretreatment process that was used for enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass (Water Hyacinth, WH), which is a renewable resource for the production of bioethanol with decentralized availability. Response surface methodology has been employed for the optimization of temperature (oC), time (hr) and different concentrations of maleic acid (MA), sulfuric acid (SA) and phosphoric acid (PA) that seemed to be significant variables with P < 0.05. High F and R2 values and low P-value for hydrolysis yield indicated the model predictability. The pretreated biomass producing 39.96 g/l, 39.86 g/l and 37.9 g/l of reducing sugars during enzymatic hydrolysis with yield 79.93, 78.71 and 75.9 % from PA, MA and SA treated respectively. The order of catalytic effectiveness for hydrolysis yield was found to be phosphoric acid > maleic acid > sulfuric acid. Mixture of sugars was obtained during dilute acid pretreatment with glucose being the most prominent sugar while pure glucose was obtained during enzymatic hydrolysis. The resulting sugars, obtained during enzymatic hydrolysis were finally fermented to ethanol, with yield 0.484 g/g of reducing sugars which is 95 % of theoretical yield (0.51 g/g glucose) by using commercial baker's yeast (Sacchromyces cerveasiae). PMID:26417215

  3. The effect of acid hydrolysis pretreatment on crystallinity and solubility of kenaf cellulose membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Saidi, Anis Syuhada Mohd; Zakaria, Sarani; Chia, Chin Hua; Jaafar, Sharifah Nabihah Syed; Padzil, Farah Nadia Mohammad

    2015-09-25

    Cellulose was extracted from kenaf core pulp (KCP) by series of bleaching steps in the sequence (DEED) where D and E are referred as acid and alkali treatment. The bleached kenaf pulp (BKCP) is then pretreated with acid hydrolysis at room temperature for 1 and 3 h respectively. The pretreated cellulose is dissolved in lithium hydroxide/urea (LiOH/urea) and cellulose solution produced was immersed in distilled water bath. BKCP without treatment was also conducted for comparison purpose. The effects of acid hydrolysis pretreatment on solubility and crystallinity are investigated. Higher solubility of cellulose solution is achieved for treated samples. Cellulose II formation and crystallinity index of the cellulose membrane were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD)

  4. The effect of acid hydrolysis pretreatment on crystallinity and solubility of kenaf cellulose membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, Anis Syuhada Mohd; Zakaria, Sarani; Chia, Chin Hua; Jaafar, Sharifah Nabihah Syed; Padzil, Farah Nadia Mohammad

    2015-09-01

    Cellulose was extracted from kenaf core pulp (KCP) by series of bleaching steps in the sequence (DEED) where D and E are referred as acid and alkali treatment. The bleached kenaf pulp (BKCP) is then pretreated with acid hydrolysis at room temperature for 1 and 3 h respectively. The pretreated cellulose is dissolved in lithium hydroxide/urea (LiOH/urea) and cellulose solution produced was immersed in distilled water bath. BKCP without treatment was also conducted for comparison purpose. The effects of acid hydrolysis pretreatment on solubility and crystallinity are investigated. Higher solubility of cellulose solution is achieved for treated samples. Cellulose II formation and crystallinity index of the cellulose membrane were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  5. Phosphoric acid pretreatment of Achyranthes aspera and Sida acuta weed biomass to improve enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Siripong, Premjet; Duangporn, Premjet; Takata, Eri; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Achyranthes aspera and Sida acuta, two types of weed biomass are abundant and waste in Thailand. We focus on them as novel feedstock for bio-ethanol production because they contain high-cellulose content (45.9% and 46.9%, respectively) and unutilized material. Phosphoric acid (70%, 75%, and 80%) was employed for the pretreatment to improve by enzymatic hydrolysis. The pretreatment process removed most of the xylan and a part of the lignin from the weeds, while most of the glucan remained. The cellulose conversion to glucose was greater for pretreated A. aspera (86.2 ± 0.3%) than that of the pretreated S. acuta (82.2 ± 1.1%). Thus, the removal of hemicellulose significantly affected the efficiency of the enzymatic hydrolysis. The scanning electron microscopy images showed the exposed fibrous cellulose on the cell wall surface, and this substantial change of the surface structure contributed to improving the enzyme accessibility. PMID:26744804

  6. Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    2006-06-01

    Activities in this project are aimed at overcoming barriers associated with high capital and operating costs and sub-optimal sugar yields resulting from pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass.

  7. Powerful peracetic acid-ionic liquid pretreatment process for the efficient chemical hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Uju; Goto, Masahiro; Kamiya, Noriho

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to design a new method for the efficient saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass (LB) using a combination of peracetic acid (PAA) pretreatment with ionic liquid (IL)-HCl hydrolysis. The pretreatment of LBs with PAA disrupted the lignin fractions, enhanced the dissolution of LB and led to a significant increase in the initial rate of the IL-HCl hydrolysis. The pretreatment of Bagasse with PAA prior to its 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim][Cl])-HCl hydrolysis, led to an improvement in the cellulose conversion from 20% to 70% in 1.5h. Interestingly, the 1-buthyl-3-methylpyridium chloride ([Bmpy][Cl])-HCl hydrolysis of Bagasse gave a cellulose conversion greater than 80%, with or without the PAA pretreatment. For LB derived from seaweed waste, the cellulose conversion reached 98% in 1h. The strong hydrolysis power of [Bmpy][Cl] was attributed to its ability to transform cellulose I to II, and lowering the degree of polymerization of cellulose. PMID:27174616

  8. Dilute oxalic acid pretreatment for high total sugar recovery in pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Qing, Qing; Huang, Meizi; He, Yucai; Wang, Liqun; Zhang, Yue

    2015-12-01

    Oxalic acid was evaluated as an alternative reagent to mineral inorganic acid in pretreatment of corncob to achieve high xylose yield in addition to highly digestible solid residue. A quadratic polynomial model of xylose formation was developed for optimization of pretreatment process by the response surface methodology based on the impact factors of pretreatment temperature, reaction time, acid concentration, and solid-to-liquid ratio. The highest xylose yield was 94.3 % that was obtained under the pretreatment condition of 140 °C for 40 min with 0.5 wt% oxalic acid at a solid loading of 7.5 %. Under these conditions, the xylose yield results of verification experiments were very close to the model prediction, which indicated that the model was applicable. The solid residue generated under this condition also demonstrated a satisfactory enzymatic digestibility and fermentability. PMID:26494137

  9. Acid and enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated cellulosic materials as an analytical tool

    SciTech Connect

    Ladisch, C.M.; Chiasson, C.M.; Tsao, G.T.

    1982-07-01

    A rapid and accurate procedure for the quantitative analysis of cellulose in textiles based on acid and enzymatic hydrolysis was investigated. Total hydrolysis was achieved by a two-step procedure: the cellulose in the sample was first dissolved in cadoxen and then reprecipitated. The material, thus pretreated, was then hydrolyzed with acid or enzyme catalytic agents. Hydrolysis products were detected and quantified by colorimetric, enzymic, and liquid chromatographic methods of analysis. Samples examined included cotton, rayon, Avicel, CF-11, and cotton/polyester blends. The specificity of the enzyme hydrolysis method allowed analysis of raw cotton without prior purification. Results of the analyses were compared to those obtained by existing methods of analysis.

  10. Dilute acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of sorghum biomass for sugar recovery--a statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Akanksha, Karthik; Prasad, Arjun; Sukumaran, Rajeev K; Nampoothiri, Madhavan; Pandey, Ashok; Rao, S S; Parameswaran, Binod

    2014-11-01

    Sorghum is one of the commercially feasible lignocellulosic biomass and has a great potential of being sustainable feedstock for renewable energy. As with any lignocellulosic biomass, sorghum also requires pretreatment which increases its susceptibility to hydrolysis by enzymes for generating sugars which can be further fermented to alcohol. In the present study, sorghum biomass was evaluated for deriving maximum fermentable sugars by optimizing various pretreatment parameters using statistical optimization methods. Pretreatment studies were done with H2SO4, followed by enzymatic saccharification. The efficiency of the process was evaluated on the basis of production of the total reducing sugars released during the process. Compositional analysis was done for native as well as pretreated biomass and compared. The biomass pretreated with the optimized conditions could yield 0.408 g of reducing sugars /g of pretreated biomass upon enzymatic hydrolysis. The cellulose content in the solid portion obtained after pretreatment using optimised conditions was found to be increased by 43.37% with lesser production of inhibitors in acid pretreated liquor. PMID:25434103

  11. EFFECT OF ANATOMICAL FRACTIONATION ON THE ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF ACID AND ALKALINE PRETREATED CORN STOVER

    SciTech Connect

    K. B. Duguid; M. D. Montross; C. W. Radtke; C. L. Crofcheck; L. M. Wendt; S. A. Shearer

    2009-11-01

    Due to concerns with biomass collection systems and soil sustainability there are opportunities to investigate the optimal plant fractions to collect for conversion. An ideal feedstock would require low severity pretreatment to release a maximum amount of sugar during enzymatic hydrolysis. Corn stover fractions were separated by hand and analyzed for glucan, xylan, acid soluble lignin, acid insoluble lignin, and ash composition. The stover fractions were also pretreated with either 0, 0.4, or 0.8% NaOH for 2 hours at room temperature, washed, autoclaved and saccharified. In addition, acid pretreated samples underwent simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to ethanol. In general, the two pretreatments produced similar trends with cobs, husks, and leaves responding best to the pretreatments, the tops of stalks responding slightly less, and the bottom of the stalks responding the least. For example, corn husks pretreated with 0.8% NaOH released over 90% (standard error of 3.8%) of the available glucan, while only 45% (standard error of 1.1%) of the glucan was produced from identically treated stalk bottoms. Estimates of the theoretical ethanol yield using acid pretreatment followed by SSF were 65% (standard error of 15.9%) for husks and 29% (standard error of 1.8%) for stalk bottoms. This suggests that integration of biomass collection systems to remove sustainable feedstocks could be integrated with the processes within a biorefinery to minimize overall ethanol production costs.

  12. Co-hydrolysis of hydrothermal and dilute acid pretreated populus slurries to support development of a high-throughput pretreatment system

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) developed a high-throughput screening method to rapidly identify low-recalcitrance biomass variants. Because the customary separation and analysis of liquid and solids between pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis used in conventional analyses is slow, labor-intensive and very difficult to automate, a streamlined approach we term 'co-hydrolysis' was developed. In this method, the solids and liquid in the pretreated biomass slurry are not separated, but instead hydrolysis is performed by adding enzymes to the whole pretreated slurry. The effects of pretreatment method, severity and solids loading on co-hydrolysis performance were investigated. Results For hydrothermal pretreatment at solids concentrations of 0.5 to 2%, high enzyme protein loadings of about 100 mg/g of substrate (glucan plus xylan) in the original poplar wood achieved glucose and xylose yields for co-hydrolysis that were comparable with those for washed solids. In addition, although poplar wood sugar yields from co-hydrolysis at 2% solids concentrations fell short of those from hydrolysis of washed solids after dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment even at high enzyme loadings, pretreatment at 0.5% solids concentrations resulted in similar yields for all but the lowest enzyme loading. Conclusions Overall, the influence of severity on susceptibility of pretreated substrates to enzymatic hydrolysis was clearly discernable, showing co-hydrolysis to be a viable approach for identifying plant-pretreatment-enzyme combinations with substantial advantages for sugar production. PMID:21749707

  13. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of dilute acid pretreated cornstalk to biohydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, C. M.; Fan, Y. T.; Hou, H. W.

    2010-03-01

    The coupling method of acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of cornstalk for hydrogen production was investigated in this study. Experimental results showed that temperature, pH and enzyme loading all had an individual significant influence on soluble sugar yield and Ps. The optimum condition for soluble sugar was close to that for Ps. The maximum hydrogen yield from cornstalk by anaerobic mixed microflora was 209.8 ml/g-TVS on the optimum enzymatic hydrolysis condition which was 52 °C of temperature, pH4.8 and 9.4 IU/g of enzyme loading.

  14. Facile, room-temperature pre-treatment of rice husks with tetrabutylphosphonium hydroxide: Enhanced enzymatic and acid hydrolysis yields.

    PubMed

    Lau, B B Y; Luis, E T; Hossain, M M; Hart, W E S; Cencia-Lay, B; Black, J J; To, T Q; Aldous, L

    2015-12-01

    Aqueous solutions of tetrabutylphosphonium hydroxide have been evaluated as pretreatment media for rice husks, prior to sulphuric acid hydrolysis or cellulase enzymatic hydrolysis. Varying the water:tetrabutylphosphonium hydroxide ratio varied the rate of delignification, as well as silica, lignin and cellulose solubility. Pre-treatment with 60wt% hydroxide dissolved the rice husk and the regenerated material was thus heavily disrupted. Sulphuric acid hydrolysis of 60wt%-treated samples yielded the highest amount of glucose per gram of rice husk. Solutions with good lignin and silica solubility but only moderate to negligible cellulose solubility (10-40wt% hydroxide) were equally effective as pre-treatment media for both acid and enzymatic hydrolysis. However, pre-treatment with 60wt% hydroxide solutions was incompatible with downstream enzymatic hydrolysis. This was due to significant incorporation of phosphonium species in the regenerated biomass, which significantly inhibited the activity of the cellulase enzymes. PMID:26342336

  15. Kinetic study of enzymatic hydrolysis of acid-pretreated coconut coir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatmawati, Akbarningrum; Agustriyanto, Rudy

    2015-12-01

    Biomass waste utilization for biofuel production such as bioethanol, has become more prominent currently. Coconut coir is one of lignocellulosic food wastes, which is abundant in Indonesia. Bioethanol production from such materials consists of more than one step. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis is crucial steps to produce sugar which can then be fermented into bioethanol. In this research, ground coconut coir was pretreated using dilute sulfuric acid at 121°C. This pretreatment had increased the cellulose content and decreased the lignin content of coconut coir. The pretreated coconut coir was hydrolyzed using a mix of two commercial cellulase enzymes at pH of 4.8 and temperature of 50°C. The enzymatic hydrolysis was conducted at several initial coconut coir slurry concentrations (0.1-2 g/100 mL) and reaction times (2-72 hours). The reducing sugar concentration profiles had been produced and can be used to obtain reaction rates. The highest reducing sugar concentration obtained was 1,152.567 mg/L, which was produced at initial slurry concentration of 2 g/100 mL and 72 hours reaction time. In this paper, the reducing sugar concentrations were empirically modeled as a function of reaction time using power equations. Michaelis-Menten kinetic model for enzymatic hydrolysis reaction is adopted. The kinetic parameters of that model for sulfuric acid-pretreated coconut coir enzymatic hydrolysis had been obtained which are Vm of 3.587×104 mg/L.h, and KM of 130.6 mg/L.

  16. Modeling Sucrose Hydrolysis in Dilute Sulfuric Acid Solutions at Pretreatment Conditions for Lignocellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, S.; Wickramasinghe, R.; Nagle, N. J.; Schell, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    Agricultural and herbaceous feedstocks may contain appreciable levels of sucrose. The goal of this study was to evaluate the survivability of sucrose and its hydrolysis products, fructose and glucose, during dilute sulfuric acid processing at conditions typically used to pretreat lignocellulose biomass. Solutions containing 25 g/l sucrose with 0.1-2.0% (w/w) sulfuric acid concentrations were treated at temperatures of 160-200 C for 3-12 min. Sucrose was observed to completely hydrolyze at all treatment conditions. However, appreciable concentrations of fructose and glucose were detected and glucose was found to be significantly more stable than fructose. Different mathematical approaches were used to fit the kinetic parameters for acid-catalyzed thermal degradation of these sugars. Since both sugars may survive dilute acid pretreatment, they could provide an additional carbon source for production of ethanol and other bio-based products.

  17. Fuel ethanol production from corn stover under optimized dilute phosphoric acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethanol is a renewable oxygenated fuel. Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising pretreatment technology for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuel ethanol. Generation of fermentable sugars from corn stover involves pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification. Pretreatment is crucial as nat...

  18. Sulfuric Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Photoperiod Sensitvie Sorghum for Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect

    F Xu; Y Shi; X Wu

    2011-12-31

    Photoperiod sensitive (PS) sorghum, with high soluble sugar content, high mass yield and high drought tolerance in dryland environments, has great potential for bioethanol production. The effect of diluted sulfuric acid pretreatment on enzymatic hydrolysis was investigated. Hydrolysis efficiency increased from 78.9 to 94.4% as the acid concentration increased from 0.5 to 1.5%. However, the highest total glucose yield (80.3%) occurred at the 1.0% acid condition because of the significant cellulose degradation at the 1.5% concentration. Synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction was used to study changes of the degree of crystallinity. With comparison of cellulosic crystallinity and adjusted cellulosic crystallinity, the crystalline cellulose decreased after low acidic concentration (0.5%) applied, but did not change significantly, as the acid concentration increased. Scanning electron microscopy was also employed to understand how the morphological structure of PS sorghum changed after pretreatment. Under current processing conditions, the total ethanol yield is 74.5% (about 0.2 g ethanol from 1 g PS sorghum). A detail mass balance was also provided.

  19. Effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment on low temperature acid hydrolysis of oil palm empty fruit bunch.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Robiah; Salleh, Shanti Faridah; Abdullah, Nurhafizah; Biak, Dyg Radiah Awg

    2010-12-01

    Various pre-treatment techniques change the physical and chemical structure of the lignocellulosic biomass and improve hydrolysis rates. The effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment on oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fibre prior to acid hydrolysis has been evaluated. The main objective of this study was to determine if ultrasonic pre-treatment could function as a pre-treatment method for the acid hydrolysis of OPEFB fibre at a low temperature and pressure. Hydrolysis at a low temperature was studied using 2% sulphuric acid; 1:25 solid liquid ratio and 100 degrees C operating temperature. A maximum xylose yield of 58% was achieved when the OPEFB fibre was ultrasonicated at 90% amplitude for 45min. In the absence of ultrasonic pre-treatment only 22% of xylose was obtained. However, no substantial increase of xylose formation was observed for acid hydrolysis at higher temperatures of 120 and 140 degrees C on ultrasonicated OPEFB fibre. The samples were then analysed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to describe the morphological changes of the OPEFB fibre. The SEM observations show interesting morphological changes within the OPEFB fibre for different acid hydrolysis conditions. PMID:20719502

  20. Effect of sulfuric and phosphoric acid pretreatments on enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover.

    PubMed

    Um, Byung-Hwan; Karim, M; Henk, Linda

    2003-01-01

    The pretreatment of corn stover with H2SO4 and H3PO4 was investigated. Pretreatments were carried out from 30 to 120 min in a batch reactor at 121 degrees C, with acid concentrations ranging from 0 to 2% (w/v) at a solid concentration of 5% (w/v). Pretreated corn stover was washed with distilled water until the filtrate was adjusted to pH 7.0, followed by surfactant swelling of the cellulosic fraction in a 0-10% (w/v) solution of Tween-80 at room temperature for 12 h. The dilute acid treatment proved to be a very effective method in terms of hemicellulose recovery and cellulose digestibility. Hemicellulose recovery was 62-90%, and enzymatic digestibility of the cellulose that remained in the solid was >80% with 2% (w/v) acid. In all cases studied, the performance of H2SO4 pretreatment (hemicellulose recovery and cellulose digestibility) was significantly better than obtained with H3PO4. Enzymatic hydrolysis was more effective using surfactant than without it, producing 10-20% more sugar. Furthermore, digestibility was investigated as a function of hemicellulose removal. It was found that digestibility was more directly related to hemicellulose removal than to delignification. PMID:12721479

  1. Solid acid catalysts pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of macroalgae cellulosic residue for the production of bioethanol.

    PubMed

    Tan, Inn Shi; Lee, Keat Teong

    2015-06-25

    The aim of this study is to investigate the technical feasibility of converting macroalgae cellulosic residue (MCR) into bioethanol. An attempt was made to present a novel, environmental friendly and economical pretreatment process that enhances enzymatic conversion of MCR to sugars using Dowex (TM) Dr-G8 as catalyst. The optimum yield of glucose reached 99.8% under the optimal condition for solid acid pretreatment (10%, w/v biomass loading, 4%, w/v catalyst loading, 30min, 120°C) followed by enzymatic hydrolysis (45FPU/g of cellulase, 52CBU/g of β-glucosidase, 50°C, pH 4.8, 30h). The yield of sugar obtained was found more superior than conventional pretreatment process using H2SO4 and NaOH. Biomass loading for the subsequent simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of the pretreated MCR was then optimized, giving an optimum bioethanol yield of 81.5%. The catalyst was separated and reused for six times, with only a slight drop in glucose yield. PMID:25839825

  2. Structural features of dilute acid, steam exploded, and alkali pretreated mustard stalk and their impact on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Manali; Raj, Tirath; Vijayaraj, M; Chopra, Anju; Gupta, Ravi P; Tuli, Deepak K; Kumar, Ravindra

    2015-06-25

    To overcome the recalcitrant nature of biomass several pretreatment methodologies have been explored to make it amenable to enzymatic hydrolysis. These methodologies alter cell wall structure primarily by removing/altering hemicelluloses and lignin. In this work, alkali, dilute acid, steam explosion pretreatment are systematically studied for mustard stalk. To assess the structural variability after pretreatment, chemical analysis, surface area, crystallinity index, accessibility of cellulose, FT-IR and thermal analysis are conducted. Although the extent of enzymatic hydrolysis varies upon the methodologies used, nevertheless, cellulose conversion increases from <10% to 81% after pretreatment. Glucose yield at 2 and 72h are well correlated with surface area and maximum adsorption capacity. However, no such relationship is observed for xylose yield. Mass balance of the process is also studied. Dilute acid pretreatment is the best methodology in terms of maximum sugar yield at lower enzyme loading. PMID:25839820

  3. A novel diffusion-biphasic hydrolysis coupled kinetic model for dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longjian; Zhang, Haiyan; Li, Junbao; Lu, Minsheng; Guo, Xiaomiao; Han, Lujia

    2015-02-01

    Kinetic experiments on the dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover were performed. A high xylan removal and a low inhibitor concentration were achieved by acid pretreatment. A novel diffusion-hydrolysis coupled kinetic model was proposed. The contribution to the xylose yield was analyzed by the kinetic model. Compared with the inhibitor furfural negatively affecting xylose yield, the fast and slow-hydrolyzing xylan significantly contributed to the xylose yield, however, their dominant roles were dependent on reaction temperature and time. The impact of particle size and acid concentration on the xylose yield were also investigated. The diffusion process may significantly influence the hydrolysis of large particles. Increasing the acid concentration from 0.15 M to 0.30 M significantly improved the xylose yield, whereas the extent of improvement decreased to near-quantitative when further increasing acid loading. These findings shed some light on the mechanism for dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of corn stover. PMID:25479388

  4. Antioxidative Peptides Derived from Enzyme Hydrolysis of Bone Collagen after Microwave Assisted Acid Pre-Treatment and Nitrogen Protection

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yun-Jian; Le, Guo-Wei; Wang, Jie-Yun; Li, Ya-Xin; Shi, Yong-Hui; Sun, Jin

    2010-01-01

    This study focused on the preparation method of antioxidant peptides by enzymatic hydrolysis of bone collagen after microwave assisted acid pre-treatment and nitrogen protection. Phosphoric acid showed the highest ability of hydrolysis among the four other acids tested (hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid and/or citric acid). The highest degree of hydrolysis (DH) was 9.5% using 4 mol/L phosphoric acid with a ratio of 1:6 under a microwave intensity of 510 W for 240 s. Neutral proteinase gave higher DH among the four protease tested (Acid protease, neutral protease, Alcalase and papain), with an optimum condition of: (1) ratio of enzyme and substrate, 4760 U/g; (2) concentration of substrate, 4%; (3) reaction temperature, 55 °C and (4) pH 7.0. At 4 h, DH increased significantly (P < 0.01) under nitrogen protection compared with normal microwave assisted acid pre-treatment hydrolysis conditions. The antioxidant ability of the hydrolysate increased and reached its maximum value at 3 h; however DH decreased dramatically after 3 h. Microwave assisted acid pre-treatment and nitrogen protection could be a quick preparatory method for hydrolyzing bone collagen. PMID:21151439

  5. Strategies to achieve high-solids enzymatic hydrolysis of dilute-acid pretreated corn stover.

    PubMed

    Geng, Wenhui; Jin, Yongcan; Jameel, Hasan; Park, Sunkyu

    2015-01-01

    Three strategies were presented to achieve high solids loading while maximizing carbohydrate conversion, which are fed-batch, splitting/thickening, and clarifier processes. Enzymatic hydrolysis was performed at water insoluble solids (WIS) of 15% using washed dilute-acid pretreated corn stover. The carbohydrate concentration increased from 31.8 to 99.3g/L when the insoluble solids content increased from 5% to 15% WIS, while the final carbohydrate conversion was decreased from 78.4% to 73.2%. For the fed-batch process, a carbohydrate conversion efficiency of 76.8% was achieved when solid was split into 60:20:20 ratio, with all enzymes added first. For the splitting/thickening process, a carbohydrate conversion of 76.5% was realized when the filtrate was recycled to simulate a steady-state process. Lastly, the clarifier process was evaluated and the highest carbohydrate conversion of 81.4% was achieved. All of these results suggests the possibility of enzymatic hydrolysis at high solids to make the overall conversion cost-competitive. PMID:25836373

  6. Production of 2,3-butanediol from cellulose and Jatropha hulls after ionic liquid pretreatment and dilute-acid hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abundant Jatropha waste is a promising renewable feedstock for the production of sugars and 2,3-butanediol fermentation. To obtain high yield of water-soluble products and high concentration of reducing-sugars, ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment and dilute acid hydrolysis at 150°C were combined in this work. The destruction of crystalline structure and increase surface area of biomasses after IL-pretreatment, made their hydrolysis more efficient. Compared with original cellulose, after IL-pretreatment, both the yield and concentration of reducing-sugars increased by 139%, and the water-soluble products yield increased by 128% after hydrolysis. Compared with water-washed Jatropha hulls, after IL-pretreatment, the yield and concentration of reducing-sugars increased by 80% and 76%, respectively, and the water-soluble products yield increased by 70% after hydrolysis. IL-pretreatment benefited the fermentation of Jatropha hull hydrolysate with 66.58% diol yield and its productivity increased from 0.35 to 0.40 g/(L · h). PMID:23958155

  7. Preparation of highly charged cellulose nanofibrils using high-pressure homogenization coupled with strong acid hydrolysis pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Tian, Cuihua; Yi, Jianan; Wu, Yiqiang; Wu, Qinglin; Qing, Yan; Wang, Lijun

    2016-01-20

    Cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) are attracting much attention for the advantages of excellent mechanical strength, good optical transparency, and high surface area. An eco-friendly and energy-saving method was created in this work to produce highly negative charged CNFs using high-pressure mechanical defibrillation coupled with strong acid hydrolysis pretreatments. The morphological development, zeta potential, crystal structure, chemical composition and thermal degradation behavior of the resultant materials were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), zeta potential analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). These CNFs were fully separated, surface-charged, and highly entangled. They showed a large fiber aspect ratio compared to traditional cellulose nanocrystrals that are produced by strong acid hydrolysis. Compared to hydrochloric acid hydrolysis, the CNFs produced by sulfuric acid pretreatments were completely defibrillated and presented stable suspensions (or gels) even at low fiber content. On the other hand, CNFs pretreated by hydrochloric acid hydrolysis trended to aggregate because of the absence of surface charge. The crystallinity index (CI) of CNFs decreased because of mechanical defibrillation, and then increased dramatically with increased sulfuric acid concentration and reaction time. FTIR analysis showed that the C-O-SO3 group was introduced on the surfaces of CNFs during sulfuric acid hydrolysis. These sulfate groups accelerated the thermal degradation of CNFs, which occurred at lower temperature than wood pulp, indicating that the thermal stability of sulfuric acid hydrolyzed CNFs was decreased. The temperature of the maximum decomposition rate (Tmax) and the maximum weight-loss rates (MWLRmax) were much lower than for wood pulp because of the retardant effect of sulfuric acid during the combustion of CNFs. By contrast, the CNFs treated with hydrochloric acid

  8. Potential of phosphoric acid-catalyzed pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis for biosugar production from Gracilaria verrucosa.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh-Min; Kim, Sung-Koo; Jeong, Gwi-Taek

    2016-07-01

    This study combined phosphoric acid-catalyzed pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis to produce biosugars from Gracilaria verrucosa as a potential renewable resource for bioenergy applications. We optimized phosphoric acid-catalyzed pretreatment conditions to 1:10 solid-to-liquid ratio, 1.5 % phosphoric acid, 140 °C, and 60 min reaction time, producing a 32.52 ± 0.06 % total reducing sugar (TRS) yield. By subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis, a 68.61 ± 0.90 % TRS yield was achieved. These results demonstrate the potential of phosphoric acid to produce biosugars for biofuel and biochemical production applications. PMID:27003825

  9. Hydrolysis of Miscanthus for bioethanol production using dilute acid presoaking combined with wet explosion pre-treatment and enzymatic treatment.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Annette; Teller, Philip J; Hilstrøm, Troels; Ahring, Birgitte K

    2008-09-01

    Miscanthus is a high yielding bioenergy crop. In this study we used acid presoaking, wet explosion, and enzymatic hydrolysis to evaluate the combination of the different pre-treatment methods for bioethanol production with Miscanthus. Acid presoaking is primarily carried out in order to remove xylose prior to wet explosion. The acid presoaking extracted 63.2% xylose and 5.2% glucose. Direct enzymatic hydrolysis of the presoaked biomass was found to give only low sugar yields of 24-26% glucose. Wet explosion is a pre-treatment method that combines wet-oxidation and steam explosion. The effect of wet explosion on non-presoaked and presoaked Miscanthus was investigated using both atmospheric air and hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizing agent. All wet explosion pre-treatments showed to have a disrupting effect on the lignocellulosic biomass, making the sugars accessible for enzymatic hydrolysis. The combination of presoaking, wet explosion, and enzymatic hydrolysis was found to give the highest sugar yields. The use of atmospheric air gave the highest xylose yield (94.9% xylose, 61.3% glucose), while hydrogen peroxide gave the highest glucose yield (82.4% xylose, 63.7% glucose). PMID:18164954

  10. Improving enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover pretreated by ethylene glycol-perchloric acid-water mixture.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Cai; Liu, Feng; Gong, Lei; Lu, Ting; Ding, Yun; Zhang, Dan-Ping; Qing, Qing; Zhang, Yue

    2015-02-01

    To improve the enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass, a mixture of ethylene glycol-HClO4-water (88.8:1.2:10, w/w/w) was used for pretreating corn stover in this study. After the optimization in oil-bath system, the optimum pretreatment temperature and time were 130 °C and 30 min, respectively. After the saccharification of 10 g/L pretreated corn stover for 48 h, the saccharification rate was obtained in the yield of 77.4 %. To decrease pretreatment temperature and shorten pretreatment time, ethylene glycol-HClO4-water (88.8:1.2:10, w/w/w) media under microwave irradiation was employed to pretreat corn stover effectively at 100 °C and 200 W for 5 min. Finally, the recovered hydrolyzates containing glucose obtained from the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated corn stovers could be fermented into ethanol efficiently. These results would be helpful for developing a cost-effective pretreatment combined with enzymatic saccharification of cellulosic materials for the production of lignocellulosic ethanol. PMID:25384544

  11. Integrated chemical and multi-scale structural analyses for the processes of acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longjian; Li, Junbao; Lu, Minsheng; Guo, Xiaomiao; Zhang, Haiyan; Han, Lujia

    2016-05-01

    Corn stover was pretreated with acid under moderate conditions (1.5%, w/w, 121°C, 60min), and kinetic enzymolysis experiments were performed on the pretreated substrate using a mixture of Celluclast 1.5L (20FPU/g dry substrate) and Novozyme 188 (40CBU/g dry substrate). Integrated chemical and multi-scale structural methods were then used to characterize both processes. Chemical analysis showed that acid pretreatment removed considerable hemicellulose (from 19.7% in native substrate to 9.28% in acid-pretreated substrate) and achieved a reasonably high conversion efficiency (58.63% of glucose yield) in the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Multi-scale structural analysis indicated that acid pretreatment caused structural changes via cleaving acetyl linkages, solubilizing hemicellulose, relocating cell wall surfaces and enlarging substrate porosity (pore volume increased from 0.0067cm(3)/g in native substrate to 0.019cm(3)/g in acid-pretreated substrate), thereby improving the polysaccharide digestibility. PMID:26876990

  12. Response surface optimization of corn stover pretreatment using dilute phosphoric acid for enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Avci, Ayse; Saha, Badal C; Dien, Bruce S; Kennedy, Gregory J; Cotta, Michael A

    2013-02-01

    Dilute H(3)PO(4) (0.0-2.0%, v/v) was used to pretreat corn stover (10%, w/w) for conversion to ethanol. Pretreatment conditions were optimized for temperature, acid loading, and time using central composite design. Optimal pretreatment conditions were chosen to promote sugar yields following enzymatic digestion while minimizing formation of furans, which are potent inhibitors of fermentation. The maximum glucose yield (85%) was obtained after enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover pretreated with 0.5% (v/v) acid at 180°C for 15min while highest yield for xylose (91.4%) was observed from corn stover pretreated with 1% (v/v) acid at 160°C for 10min. About 26.4±0.1g ethanol was produced per L by recombinant Escherichia coli strain FBR5 from 55.1±1.0g sugars generated from enzymatically hydrolyzed corn stover (10%, w/w) pretreated under a balanced optimized condition (161.81°C, 0.78% acid, 9.78min) where only 0.4±0.0g furfural and 0.1±0.0 hydroxylmethyl furfural were produced. PMID:23334017

  13. Evaluation of soluble fraction and enzymatic residual fraction of dilute dry acid, ethylenediamine, and steam explosion pretreated corn stover on the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lei; Liu, Li; Li, Wen-Chao; Zhu, Jia-Qing; Li, Bing-Zhi; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-06-01

    This study is aimed to examine the inhibition of soluble fraction (SF) and enzymatic residual fraction (ERF) in dry dilute acid (DDA), ethylenediamine (EDA) and steam explosion (SE) pretreated corn stover (CS) on the enzymatic digestibility of cellulose. SF of DDA, EDA and SE pretreated CS has high xylose, soluble lignin and xylo-oligomer content, respectively. SF of EDA pretreated CS leads to the highest inhibition, followed by SE and DDA pretreated CS. Inhibition of ERF of DDA and SE pretreated CS is higher than that of EDA pretreated CS. The inhibition degree (A0/A) of SF is 1.76 and 1.21 times to that of ERF for EDA and SE pretreated CS, respectively. The inhibition degree of ERF is 1.05 times to that of SF in DDA pretreated CS. The quantitative analysis shows that SF of EDA pretreated CS, SF and ERF of SE pretreated CS cause significant inhibition during enzymatic hydrolysis. PMID:26970919

  14. Microwave Pretreatment For Hydrolysis Of Cellulose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; George, Clifford E.; Lightsey, George R.

    1993-01-01

    Microwave pretreatment enhances enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic wastes into soluble saccharides used as feedstocks for foods, fuels, and other products. Low consumption of energy, high yield, and low risk of proposed hydrolysis process incorporating microwave pretreatment makes process viable alternative to composting.

  15. Enhancing bio-butanol production from biomass of Chlorella vulgaris JSC-6 with sequential alkali pretreatment and acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Guo, Wanqian; Cheng, Chieh-Lun; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ren, Nanqi

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a successful butanol production method using alkali and acid pretreated biomass of Chlorella vulgaris JSC-6. The butanol concentration, yield, and productivity were 13.1g/L, 0.58mol/mol sugar, 0.66g/L/h, respectively. Nearly 2.93L/L of biohydrogen was produced during the acidogenesis phase in ABE fermentation. The hydrogen yield and productivity were 0.39mol/mol sugar and 104.2g/L/h respectively. In addition, the high glucose consumption efficiency (97.5%) suggests that the hydrolysate pretreated with NaOH (1%) followed by H2SO4 (3%) did not contain inhibitors to the fermentation. It was also discovered that an excess amount of nitrogen sources arising from hydrolysis of highly concentrated microalgal biomass negatively affected the butanol production. This work demonstrates the technical feasibility of producing butanol from sustainable third-generation feedstock (i.e., microalgal biomass). PMID:26528906

  16. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corredor, Deisy Y.

    The performance of soybean hulls and forage sorghum as feedstocks for ethanol production was studied. The main goal of this research was to increase fermentable sugars' yield through high-efficiency pretreatment technology. Soybean hulls are a potential feedstock for production of bio-ethanol due to their high carbohydrate content (≈50%) of nearly 37% cellulose. Soybean hulls could be the ideal feedstock for fuel ethanol production, because they are abundant and require no special harvesting and additional transportation costs as they are already in the plant. Dilute acid and modified steam-explosion were used as pretreatment technologies to increase fermentable sugars yields. Effects of reaction time, temperature, acid concentration and type of acid on hydrolysis of hemicellulose in soybean hulls and total sugar yields were studied. Optimum pretreatment parameters and enzymatic hydrolysis conditions for converting soybean hulls into fermentable sugars were identified. The combination of acid (H2SO4, 2% w/v) and steam (140°C, 30 min) efficiently solubilized the hemicellulose, giving a pentose yield of 96%. Sorghum is a tropical grass grown primarily in semiarid and dry parts of the world, especially in areas too dry for corn. The production of sorghum results in about 30 million tons of byproducts mainly composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Forage sorghum such as brown midrib (BMR) sorghum for ethanol production has generated much interest since this trait is characterized genetically by lower lignin concentrations in the plant compared with conventional types. Three varieties of forage sorghum and one variety of regular sorghum were characterized and evaluated as feedstock for fermentable sugar production. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-Ray diffraction were used to determine changes in structure and chemical composition of forage sorghum before and after pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis

  17. Response surface optimization of corn stover pretreatment using dilute phosphoric acid for enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dilute H3PO4 (0.0 - 2.0%, v/v) was used to pretreat corn stover (10%, w/w) for conversion to ethanol. Pretreatment conditions were optimized for temperature, acid loading, and time using a central composite design. Optimal pretreatment conditions were chosen to promote sugar yields following enzym...

  18. Structural modifications of lignocellulosics by pretreatments to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gharpuray, M.M.; Lee, Y.F.; Fan, L.T.

    1983-01-01

    In this work an evaluation was made of a wide variety of single and multiple pretreatment methods for enhancing the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw. A multiple pretreatment consisted of a physical pretreatment followed by a chemical pretreatment. The structural features of wheat straw, including the specific surface area, crystallinity index, and lignin content, were measured to understand the mechanism of the enhancement in the hyrolysis rate upon pretreatment. It has been found that, in general, multiple pretreatments were not promising, since the hydrolysis rates rarely exceeded those achieved by single pretreatments. Ball-milling pretreatment was found to be effective in increasing the specific surface area and decreasing the crystallinity index. Treatment with ethylene glycol was highly effective in increasing the specific surface area, in addition to a high degree of delignification. Peracetic acid pretreatment was highly effective in delignifying substrate. Among multiple pretreatments, those involving peracetic acid treatment generally had lower crystallinity indices and lignin content values. The relationship between the hydrolysis rate and the set of structural features indicated that an increase in surface area and a decrease in the crystallinity and lignin content enhance the hydrolysis; the specific surface area is the most influential of the structural features, followed by the lignin content. (Refs. 23).

  19. Isolation and structural characterization of sugarcane bagasse lignin after dilute phosphoric acid plus steam explosion pretreatment and its effect on cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jijiao; Tong, Zhaohui; Wang, Letian; Zhu, J Y; Ingram, Lonnie

    2014-02-01

    The structure of lignin after dilute phosphoric acid plus steam explosion pretreatment process of sugarcane bagasse in a pilot scale and the effect of the lignin extracted by ethanol on subsequent cellulose hydrolysis were investigated. The lignin structural changes caused by pretreatment were identified using advanced nondestructive techniques such as gel permeation chromatography (GPC), quantitative (13)C, and 2-D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The structural analysis revealed that ethanol extractable lignin preserved basic lignin structure, but had relatively lower amount of β-O-4 linkages, syringyl/guaiacyl units ratio (S/G), p-coumarate/ferulate ratio, and other ending structures. The results also indicated that approximately 8% of mass weight was extracted by pure ethanol. The bagasse after ethanol extraction had an approximate 22% higher glucose yield after enzyme hydrolysis compared to pretreated bagasse without extraction. PMID:24412855

  20. Pretreatment of Dried Distiller Grains with Solubles by Soaking in Aqueous Ammonia and Subsequent Enzymatic/Dilute Acid Hydrolysis to Produce Fermentable Sugars.

    PubMed

    Nghiem, Nhuan P; Montanti, Justin; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2016-05-01

    Dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), a co-product of corn ethanol production in the dry-grind process, was pretreated by soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) using a 15 % w/w NH4OH solution at a solid/liquid ratio of 1:10. The effect of pretreatment on subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis was studied at two temperatures (40 and 60 °C) and four reaction times (6, 12, 24, and 48 h). Highest glucose yield of 91 % theoretical was obtained for the DDGS pretreated at 60 °C and 24 h. The solubilized hemicellulose in the liquid fraction was further hydrolyzed with dilute H2SO4 to generate fermentable monomeric sugars. The conditions of acid hydrolysis included 1 and 4 wt% acid, 60 and 120 °C, and 0.5 and 1 h. Highest yields of xylose and arabinose were obtained at 4 wt% acid, 120 °C, and 1 h. The fermentability of the hydrolysate obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of the SAA-pretreated DDGS was demonstrated in ethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The fermentability of the hydrolysate obtained by consecutive enzymatic and dilute acid hydrolysis was demonstrated using a succinic acid-producing microorganism, strain Escherichia coli AFP184. Under the fermentation conditions, complete utilization of glucose and arabinose was observed, whereas only 47 % of xylose was used. The succinic acid yield was 0.60 g/g total sugar consumed. PMID:26797927

  1. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose to yield glucose

    DOEpatents

    Tsao, George T.; Ladisch, Michael R.; Bose, Arindam

    1979-01-01

    A process to yield glucose from cellulose through acid hydrolysis. Cellulose is recovered from cellulosic materials, preferably by pretreating the cellulosic materials by dissolving the cellulosic materials in Cadoxen or a chelating metal caustic swelling solvent and then precipitating the cellulose therefrom. Hydrolysis is accomplished using an acid, preferably dilute sulfuric acid, and the glucose is yielded substantially without side products. Lignin may be removed either before or after hydrolysis.

  2. Pretreatment by NaOH swelling and then HCl regeneration to enhance the acid hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose.

    PubMed

    Sun, Binzhe; Peng, Gege; Duan, Lian; Xu, Aihua; Li, Xiaoxia

    2015-11-01

    A simple pretreatment method, NaOH swelling at a low temperature and then HCl regeneration, was developed for depolymerization of cellulose to glucose. Cellulose was transformed into amorphous hydrogel during the treatment; and due to the easy diffusion of H(+) and Cl(-) ions into the cellulose hydrogel network as well as the strong ability of Cl(-) to disrupt the massive hydrogen bond, the hydrolysis rate was greatly enhanced. The method is effective for α-cellulose, microcrystalline cellulose, filter paper, ramie fiber and absorbent cotton. Even at a high α-cellulose concentration of 50g/L, 29.1% yield of glucose was still obtained within 10min at 160°C under microwave irradiation, where up to 16.2g/L of glucose solution was given. The influence of NaOH concentration, HCl concentration, hydrolysis temperature and time on the hydrolysis rate was investigated. The structure of cellulose hydrogel was also studied to confirm the reaction mechanism. PMID:26280097

  3. Deposition of Lignin Droplets Produced During Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Maize Stems Retards Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, M. J.; Viamajala, S.; Decker, S. R.; Tucker, M. P.; Himmel, M. E.; Vinzant, T. B.

    2007-01-01

    Electron microscopy of lignocellulosic biomass following high-temperature pretreatment revealed the presence of spherical formations on the surface of the residual biomass. The hypothesis that these droplet formations are composed of lignins and possible lignin carbohydrate complexes is being explored. Experiments were conducted to better understand the formation of these lignin droplets and the possible implications they might have on the enzymatic saccharification of pretreated biomass. It was demonstrated that these droplets are produced from corn stover during pretreatment under neutral and acidic pH at and above 130C, and that they can deposit back onto the surface of residual biomass. The deposition of droplets produced under certain pretreatment conditions (acidic pH; T > 150C) and captured onto pure cellulose was shown to have a negative effect (5-20%) on the enzymatic saccharification of this substrate. It was noted that droplet density (per unit area) was greater and droplet size more variable under conditions where the greatest impact on enzymatic cellulose conversion was observed. These results indicate that this phenomenon has the potential to adversely affect the efficiency of enzymatic conversion in a lignocellulosic biorefinery.

  4. Fermentative l-lactic acid production from pretreated whole slurry of oil palm trunk treated by hydrothermolysis and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Eom, In-Yong; Oh, Young-Hoon; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Yu, Ju-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    A simple and cost-effective biochemical conversion process consisting of hydrothermal treatment, enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated whole slurry (PWS) was developed for producing l-lactic acid (L-LA) from oil palm trunk (OPT). When OPT was hydrothermally treated at optimal condition capable of achieving maximum yield of hemicellulosic sugars after enzymatic hydrolysis, the enzymatic digestibility of the PWS afforded a yield of 81.4% of the theoretical glucose yield (TGY). However, glucose yield from washed pretreated solid (WPS) was only 43.5% of TGY. The use of two hydrolysates from PWS and WPS for fermentation by Lactobacillus paracasei engineered to selectively produce L-LA afforded yields of 89.5% and 45.8% of the theoretical LA yield (TLY), respectively. This study confirmed the inevitable extensive sugar loss during washing of pretreated slurry due to loss of soluble starch. Alternatively, the proposed design process is considered suitable for converting OPT to L-LA without such starch loss. PMID:25768416

  5. Comparative Study of Corn Stover Pretreated by Dilute Acid and Cellulose Solvent-Based Lignocellulose Fractionation: Enzymatic Hydrolysis, Supramolecular Structure, and Substrate Accessibility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z.; Sathitsuksanoh, N.; Vinzant, T.; Schell, D. J.; McMillian, J. D.; Zhang, Y. H. P.

    2009-07-01

    Liberation of fermentable sugars from recalcitrant biomass is among the most costly steps for emerging cellulosic ethanol production. Here we compared two pretreatment methods (dilute acid, DA, and cellulose solvent and organic solvent lignocellulose fractionation, COSLIF) for corn stover. At a high cellulase loading [15 filter paper units (FPUs) or 12.3 mg cellulase per gram of glucan], glucan digestibilities of the corn stover pretreated by DA and COSLIF were 84% at hour 72 and 97% at hour 24, respectively. At a low cellulase loading (5 FPUs per gram of glucan), digestibility remained as high as 93% at hour 24 for the COSLIF-pretreated corn stover but reached only {approx}60% for the DA-pretreated biomass. Quantitative determinations of total substrate accessibility to cellulase (TSAC), cellulose accessibility to cellulase (CAC), and non-cellulose accessibility to cellulase (NCAC) based on adsorption of a non-hydrolytic recombinant protein TGC were measured for the first time. The COSLIF-pretreated corn stover had a CAC of 11.57 m{sup 2}/g, nearly twice that of the DA-pretreated biomass (5.89 m{sup 2}/g). These results, along with scanning electron microscopy images showing dramatic structural differences between the DA- and COSLIF-pretreated samples, suggest that COSLIF treatment disrupts microfibrillar structures within biomass while DA treatment mainly removes hemicellulose. Under the tested conditions COSLIF treatment breaks down lignocellulose structure more extensively than DA treatment, producing a more enzymatically reactive material with a higher CAC accompanied by faster hydrolysis rates and higher enzymatic digestibility.

  6. Pretreatment of sallow prior to enzymatic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Galbe, M.; Zacchi, G.; Scott, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    Pretreatment of fast-growing sallow by steam explosion prior to enzymic hydrolysis was investigated to find optimum conditions regarding pretreatment temperature and time. Some preliminary experiments with impregnation of the material with H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or Na/sub 2/SO/sub 3/ were performed to reduce the byproduct formation and to increase the xylose yield. A temperature of 220 degrees for 15 minutes gave the highest yield, approximately 80% of the glucose available based on raw material. The xylose recovered was equal to or less than 20% when no chemicals were added. Impregnation with Na/sub 2/SO/sub 3/ gave an improvement compared with the unimpregnated material. About 30% of the xylose content could thus be recovered after the enzymic hydrolysis. The results are promising. (Refs. 5).

  7. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, H.

    1980-12-01

    One of the alternatives to increase world production of etha nol is by the hydrolysis of cellulose content of agricultural residues. Studies have been made on the types of hydrolysis: enzimatic and acid. Data obtained from the sulphuric acid hydrolysis of cellulose showed that this process proceed in two steps, with a yield of approximately 95% glucose. Because of increases in cost of alternatives resources, the high demand of the product and the more economic production of ethanol from cellulose materials, it is certain that this technology will be implemented in the future. At the same time further studies on the disposal and reuse of the by-products of this production must be undertaken.

  8. Pretreatment of dried distillers grains with solubles by soaking in aqueous ammonia and subsequent enzymatic/dilute acid hydrolysis to produce fermentable sugars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), a co-product of corn ethanol production in the dry-grind process, was pretreated by soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) using a 15% w/w NH4OH solution at a solid:liquid ratio of 1:10. The effect of pretreatment on subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis was studied...

  9. Improving the enzymatic hydrolysis of dilute acid pretreated wheat straw by metal ion blocking of non-productive cellulase adsorption on lignin.

    PubMed

    Akimkulova, Ardak; Zhou, Yan; Zhao, Xuebing; Liu, Dehua

    2016-05-01

    Eleven salts were selected to screen the possible metal ions for blocking the non-productive adsorption of cellulase onto the lignin of dilute acid pretreated wheat straw. Mg(2+) was screened finally as the promising candidate. The optimal concentration of MgCl2 was 1mM, but the beneficial action was also dependent on pH, hydrolysis time and cellulase loading. Significant improvement of glucan conversion (19.3%) was observed at low cellulase loading (5FPU/g solid). Addition of isolated lignins, tannic acid and lignin model compounds to pure cellulose hydrolysis demonstrated that phenolic hydroxyl group (Ph-OH) was the main active site blocked by Mg(2+). The interaction between Mg(2+) and Ph-OH of lignin monomeric moieties followed an order of p-hydroxyphenyl (H)>guaiacyl (G)>syringyl (S). Mg(2+) blocking made the lignin surface less negatively charged, which might weaken the hydrogen bonding and electrostatically attractive interaction between lignin and cellulase enzymes. PMID:26930032

  10. [Enhancement of sewage sludge anaerobic digestibility by thermal hydrolysis pretreatment].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-jun; Wang, Wei

    2005-01-01

    Biochemical methane potential (BMP) experiments of thermo-hydrolyzed sewage sludge are carried out to investigate the effects of thermal hydrolysis on the digestibility of sewage sludge. The results show that thermal hydrolysis pretreatment can facilitate the dissolving of organic solid in sludge, and soluble organics hydrolyzed into low molecular organics, in which volatile fat acids accounted for 30% - 40 % of soluble COD, so the digestibility of sewage sludge remarkably improved. The optimum pretreatment temperature and holding time were 170 degrees C and 30 minutes, under which the total COD removal rate enhanced from original 38.11% to 56.78%, and biogas production rate of COD in feeding sludge from 160mL/g to 250mL/g. PMID:15859411

  11. Carbonic Acid Pretreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    G. Peter van Walsum; Kemantha Jayawardhana; Damon Yourchisin; Robert McWilliams; Vanessa Castleberry

    2003-05-31

    This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. 1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO2/H2O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. 2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. 3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. 4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. 5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic

  12. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Grohmann, K.; Bothast, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    Corn fiber is a co-product of the corn wet milling industry which is usually marketed as a low value animal feed ingredient. Approximately 1.2 x 10{sup 6} dry tons of this material are produced annually in the United States. The fiber is composed of kernel cell wall fractions and a residual starch which can all be potentially hydrolyzed to a mixture of glucose, xylose, arabinose and galactose. We have investigated a sequential saccharification of polysaccharides in corn fiber by a treatment with dilute sulfuric acid at 100 to 160{degrees}C followed by partial neutralization and enzymatic hydrolysis with mixed cellulose and amyloglucosidase enzymes at 45{degrees}C. The sequential treatment achieved a high (approximately 85%) conversion of all polysaccharides in the corn fiber to monomeric sugars, which were in most cases fermentable to ethanol by the recombinant bacterium Escherichia coli KOll.

  13. Effects of thermo-chemical pre-treatment on anaerobic biodegradability and hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, T V; Bos, G J Klaasse; Zeeman, G; Sanders, J P M; van Lier, J B

    2009-05-01

    The effects of different thermo-chemical pre-treatment methods were determined on the biodegradability and hydrolysis rate of lignocellulosic biomass. Three plant species, hay, straw and bracken were thermo-chemically pre-treated with calcium hydroxide, ammonium carbonate and maleic acid. After pre-treatment, the plant material was anaerobically digested in batch bottles under mesophilic conditions for 40 days. From the pre-treatment and subsequent anaerobic digestion experiments, it was concluded that when the lignin content of the plant material is high, thermo-chemical pre-treatments have a positive effect on the biodegradability of the substrate. Calcium hydroxide pre-treatment improves the biodegradability of lignocellulosic biomass, especially for high lignin content substrates, like bracken. Maleic acid generates the highest percentage of dissolved COD during pre-treatment. Ammonium pre-treatment only showed a clear effect on biodegradability for straw. PMID:19144515

  14. Acid-functionalized nanoparticles for biomass hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena Duque, Leidy Eugenia

    Cellulosic ethanol is a renewable source of energy. Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex material composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Biomass pretreatment is a required step to make sugar polymers liable to hydrolysis. Mineral acids are commonly used for biomass pretreatment. Using acid catalysts that can be recovered and reused could make the process economically more attractive. The overall goal of this dissertation is the development of a recyclable nanocatalyst for the hydrolysis of biomass sugars. Cobalt iron oxide nanoparticles (CoFe2O4) were synthesized to provide a magnetic core that could be separated from reaction using a magnetic field and modified to carry acid functional groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the crystal structure was that of cobalt spinel ferrite. CoFe2O4 were covered with silica which served as linker for the acid functions. Silica-coated nanoparticles were functionalized with three different acid functions: perfluoropropyl-sulfonic acid, carboxylic acid, and propyl-sulfonic acid. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images were analyzed to obtain particle size distributions of the nanoparticles. Total carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur were quantified using an elemental analyzer. Fourier transform infra-red spectra confirmed the presence of sulfonic and carboxylic acid functions and ion-exchange titrations accounted for the total amount of catalytic acid sites per nanoparticle mass. These nanoparticles were evaluated for their performance to hydrolyze the beta-1,4 glycosidic bond of the cellobiose molecule. Propyl-sulfonic (PS) and perfluoropropyl-sulfonic (PFS) acid functionalized nanoparticles catalyzed the hydrolysis of cellobiose significantly better than the control. PS and PFS were also evaluated for their capacity to solubilize wheat straw hemicelluloses and performed better than the control. Although PFS nanoparticles were stronger acid catalysts, the acid functions leached out of the nanoparticle during

  15. Effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Particle size reduction is a crucial factor in transportation logistics as well as cellulosic conversion. The effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus x giganteus was determined. Miscanthus was ground using a hammer mill equipped with screens having 0.08, 2.0 or 6.0...

  16. Physicochemical structural changes of poplar and switchgrass during biomass pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meng, Xianzhi; Sun, Qining; Kosa, Matyas; Huang, Fang; Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-07-27

    Converting lignocellulosics to simple sugars for second generation bioethanol is complicated due to biomass recalcitrance, and it requires a pretreatment stage prior to enzymatic hydrolysis. In this study, native, pretreated (acid and alkaline) and partially hydrolyzed poplar and switchgrass were characterized by using Simons’ staining for cellulose accessibility, GPC for degree of polymerization (DP), and FTIR for chemical structure of plant cell wall. The susceptibility of the pretreated biomass to enzymatic hydrolysis could not be easily predicted from differences in cellulose DP and accessibility. During hydrolysis, the most significant DP reduction occurred at the very beginning of hydrolysis, and themore » DP began to decrease at a significantly slower rate after this initial period, suggesting an existence of a synergistic action of endo- and exoglucanases that contribute to the occurrence of a “peeling off” mechanism. Cellulose accessibility was found to be increased at the beginning of hydrolysis, after reaching a maximum value then started to decrease. In conclusion, the fresh enzyme restart hydrolysis experiment along with the accessibility data indicated that the factors associated with the nature of enzyme such as irreversible nonspecific binding of cellulases by lignin and steric hindrance of enzymes should be responsible for the gradual slowing down of the reaction rate.« less

  17. Pretreatment for cellulose hydrolysis by carbon dioxide explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y.; Lin, H.M.; Tsao, G.T.

    1998-11-01

    Cellulosic materials were treated with supercritical carbon dioxide to increase the reactivity of cellulose, thereby to enhance the rate and the extent of cellulose hydrolysis. In this pretreatment process, the cellulosic materials such as Avicel, recycled paper mix, sugarcane bagasse and the repulping waste of recycled paper are placed in a reactor under pressurized carbon dioxide at 35 C for a controlled time period. Upon an explosive release of the carbon dioxide pressure, the disruption of the cellulosic structure increases the accessible surface area of the cellulosic substrate to enzymatic hydrolysis. Results indicate that supercritical carbon dioxide is effective for pretreatment of cellulose. An increase in pressure facilitates the faster penetration of carbon dioxide molecules into the crystalline structures, thus more glucose is produced from cellulosic materials after the explosion as compared to those without the pretreatment. This explosion pretreatment enhances the rate of cellulosic material hydrolysis as well as increases glucose yield by as much as 50%. Results from the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation tests also show the increase in the available carbon source from the cellulosic materials for fermentation to produce ethanol. As an alternative method, this supercritical carbon dioxide explosion has a possibility to reduce expense compared with ammonia explosion, and since it is operated at the low temperature, it will not cause degradation of sugars such as those treated with steam explosion due to the high-temperature involved.

  18. Effect of lime pre-treatment on the synergistic hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse by hemicellulases.

    PubMed

    Beukes, Natasha; Pletschke, Brett I

    2010-06-01

    Agricultural crop wastes are typically lignocellulosic in composition and thus partially recalcitrant to enzymatic degradation. The recalcitrant nature of plant biomass and the inability to obtain complete enzymatic hydrolysis has led to the establishment of various pre-treatment strategies. Alkaline pre-treatments increase the accessibility of the exposed surface to enzymatic hydrolysis through the removal of acetyl and uronic acid substituents on hemicelluloses. Unlike the use of steam and acid pre-treatments, alkaline pre-treatments (e.g. lime) solubilise lignin and a small percentage of the hemicelluloses. The most common alkaline pre-treatments that are employed make use of sodium hydroxide and lime. This study compared the synergistic degradation of un-treated and lime pre-treated sugarcane bagasse using cellulosomal and non-cellulosomal hemicellulases as free enzymes. The enzyme combination of 37.5% ArfA and 62.5% ManA produced the highest amount of reducing sugar of 91.834 micromol/min for the degradation of un-treated bagasse. This enzyme combination produced a degree of synergy of 1.87. The free enzymes displayed an approximately 6-fold increase in the enzyme activity, i.e. the total amount of reducing sugar released (593.65 micromol/min) with the enzyme combination of 37.5% ArfA, 25% ManA and 37.5% XynA for the lime pre-treated substrate and a degree of synergy of 2.14. To conclude, this study indicated that pre-treating the sugarcane bagasse is essential, in order to increase the efficiency of lignocellulose enzymatic hydrolysis by disruption of the lignin sheath, that the lime pre-treatment did not have any dramatic effect on the synergistic relationship between the free enzymes, and that time may play an important role in the establishment of synergistic relationships between enzymes. PMID:20156678

  19. NREL 2012 Achievement of Ethanol Cost Targets: Biochemical Ethanol Fermentation via Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, L.; Schell, D.; Davis, R.; Tan, E.; Elander, R.; Bratis, A.

    2014-04-01

    For the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office, the annual State of Technology (SOT) assessment is an essential activity for quantifying the benefits of biochemical platform research. This assessment has historically allowed the impact of research progress achieved through targeted Bioenergy Technologies Office funding to be quantified in terms of economic improvements within the context of a fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production process. As such, progress toward the ultimate 2012 goal of demonstrating cost-competitive cellulosic ethanol technology can be tracked. With an assumed feedstock cost for corn stover of $58.50/ton this target has historically been set at $1.41/gal ethanol for conversion costs only (exclusive of feedstock) and $2.15/gal total production cost (inclusive of feedstock) or minimum ethanol selling price (MESP). This year, fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production data generated by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers in their Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) successfully demonstrated performance commensurate with both the FY 2012 SOT MESP target of $2.15/gal (2007$, $58.50/ton feedstock cost) and the conversion target of $1.41/gal through core research and process improvements in pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation.

  20. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose in zinc chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, N.J.; Xu, Q.; Chen, L.F.

    1995-12-31

    The efficient conversion of cellulosic materials to ethanol has been hindered by the low yield of sugars, the high energy consumption in pretreatment processes, and the difficulty of recycling the pre-treatment agents. Zinc chloride may provide an alternative for pre-treating biomass prior to the hydrolysis of cellulose. The formation of a zinc-cellulose complex during the pretreatment of cellulose improves the yield of glucose in both the enzymatic and acid hydrolysis of cellulose. Low-temperature acid hydrolysis of cellulose in zinc chloride solution is carried out in two stages, a liquefaction stage and a saccharification stage. Because of the formation of zinc-cellulose complex in the first stage, the required amount of acid in the second stage has been decreased significantly. In 67% zinc chloride solution, a 99.5% yield of soluble sugars has been obtained at 70{degrees}C and 0.5M acid concentration. The ratio of zinc chloride to cellulose has been reduced from 4.5 to 1.5, and the yield of soluble sugars is kept above 80%. The rate of hydrolysis is affected by the ratio of zinc chloride to cellulose, acid concentration, and temperature.

  1. Effects of the pretreatment method on high solids enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation of the cellulosic fraction of sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Martins, Luiza Helena da Silva; Rabelo, Sarita Cândida; da Costa, Aline Carvalho

    2015-09-01

    This work evaluated ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse at high solids loadings in the pretreatment (20-40% w/v) and hydrolysis (10-20% w/v) stages. The best conditions for diluted sulfuric acid, AHP and Ox-B pretreatments were determined and mass balances including pretreatment, hydrolysis and fermentation were calculated. From a technical point of view, the best pretreatment was AHP, which enabled the production of glucose concentrations near 8% with high productivity (3.27 g/Lh), as well as ethanol production from 100.9 to 135.4 kg ethanol/ton raw bagasse. However, reagent consumption for acid pretreatment was much lower. Furthermore, for processes that use pentoses and hexoses separately, this pretreatment produces the most desirable pentoses liquor, with higher xylose concentration in the monomeric form. PMID:26004382

  2. Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect

    Humbird, D.; Davis, R.; Tao, L.; Kinchin, C.; Hsu, D.; Aden, A.; Schoen, P.; Lukas, J.; Olthof, B.; Worley, M.; Sexton, D.; Dudgeon, D.

    2011-03-01

    This report describes one potential biochemical ethanol conversion process, conceptually based upon core conversion and process integration research at NREL. The overarching process design converts corn stover to ethanol by dilute-acid pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, and co-fermentation. Building on design reports published in 2002 and 1999, NREL, together with the subcontractor Harris Group Inc., performed a complete review of the process design and economic model for the biomass-to-ethanol process. This update reflects NREL's current vision of the biochemical ethanol process and includes the latest research in the conversion areas (pretreatment, conditioning, saccharification, and fermentation), optimizations in product recovery, and our latest understanding of the ethanol plant's back end (wastewater and utilities). The conceptual design presented here reports ethanol production economics as determined by 2012 conversion targets and 'nth-plant' project costs and financing. For the biorefinery described here, processing 2,205 dry ton/day at 76% theoretical ethanol yield (79 gal/dry ton), the ethanol selling price is $2.15/gal in 2007$.

  3. Effect of hemicellulose and lignin removal on enzymatic hydrolysis of steam pretreated corn stover.

    PubMed

    Ohgren, Karin; Bura, Renata; Saddler, Jack; Zacchi, Guido

    2007-09-01

    Ethanol can be produced from lignocellulosic biomass using steam pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation. The sugar yields, from both hemicellulose and cellulose are critical parameters for an economically-feasible ethanol production process. This study shows that a near-theoretical glucose yield (96-104%) from acid-catalysed steam pretreated corn stover can be obtained if xylanases are used to supplement cellulases during hydrolysis. Xylanases hydrolyse residual hemicellulose, thereby improving the access of enzymes to cellulose. Under these conditions, xylose yields reached 70-74%. When pre-treatment severity was reduced by using autocatalysis instead of acid-catalysed steam pretreatment, xylose yields were increased to 80-86%. Partial delignification of pretreated material was also evaluated as a way to increase the overall sugar yield. The overall glucose yield increased slightly due to delignification but the overall xylose yield decreased due to hemicellulose loss in the delignification step. The data also demonstrate that steam pretreatment is a robust process: corn stover from Europe and North America showed only minor differences in behaviour. PMID:17113771

  4. Dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover for enzymatic hydrolysis and efficient ethanol production by recombinant Escherichia coli FBR5 without detoxification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A pretreatment strategy for dilute H2SO4 pretreatment of corn stover was developed for the purpose of reducing the generation of inhibitory substances during pretreatment so that a detoxification step is not required prior to fermentation while maximizing the sugar yield. We have optimized dilute su...

  5. Acid Hydrolysis of Trioxalatocobaltate (III) Ion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggans, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an investigation involving acid hydrolysis and using both volumetric and kinetic techniques. Presents examples of the determination of the rate constant and its variation with temperature. (GS)

  6. Dilute acid pretreatment of lignocellulose for whole slurry ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Hoon; Kim, In Jung; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2013-03-01

    Dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) followed by the whole slurry fermentation of the pretreated EFB slurry was investigated. The optimized pretreatment conditions were at 1% (w/v) sulfuric acid with 3 min ramping to 190 °C in a microwave digester. Pretreated and washed EFB exhibited enzymatic digestibility of 88.5% of theoretical glucose yield after 48 h of hydrolysis. When the whole slurry of pretreated and neutralized EFB was used in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using cellulase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, sulfuric acid-pretreated EFB resulted in 52.5% of theoretical ethanol yield based on total glucan in the untreated initial EFB after 72 h of SSF. When pretreated EFB slurry was treated with activated carbon before subjecting to SSF, the SSF furnished 87.5% ethanol yield based on the initial glucan content in untreated EFB (after 48 h of SSF). PMID:23395763

  7. Effect of alkali lignins with different molecular weights from alkali pretreated rice straw hydrolyzate on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Qi, Benkun; Luo, Jianquan; Wan, Yinhua

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of alkali lignins with different molecular weights on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose. Different alkali lignins fractions, which were obtained from cascade ultrafiltration, were added into the dilute acid pretreated (DAP) and alkali pretreated (AP) rice straws respectively during enzymatic hydrolysis. The results showed that the addition of alkali lignins enhanced the hydrolysis and the enhancement for hydrolysis increased with increasing molecular weights of alkali lignins, with maximum enhancement being 28.69% for DAP and 20.05% for AP, respectively. The enhancement was partly attributed to the improved cellulase activity, and filter paper activity increased by 18.03% when adding lignin with highest molecular weight. It was found that the enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis was correlated with the adsorption affinity of cellulase on alkali lignins, and the difference in surface charge and hydrophobicity of alkali lignins were responsible for the difference in affinity between cellulase and lignins. PMID:26496216

  8. Hydrothermal pretreatment enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis and glucose production from oil palm biomass.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Mohd Rafein; Hirata, Satoshi; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2015-01-01

    The present works investigate hydrothermal pretreatment of oil palm empty fruit bunch and oil palm frond fiber in a batch tube reactor system with temperature and time range from 170 to 250°C and 10 to 20min, respectively. The behavior of soluble sugars, acids, furans, and phenols dramatically changed over treatment severities as determined by HPLC. The cellulose-rich treated solids were analyzed by SEM, WAXD, and BET surface area. Enzymatic hydrolysis was performed from both pretreated slurries and washed solid, and data obtained suggested that tannic acid derived from lignin degradation was a potential cellulase inhibitor. Both partial removal of hemicellulose and migration of lignin during hydrothermal pretreatment caused structural changes on the cellulose-hemicellulose-lignin matrix, resulting in the opening and expansion of specific surface area and pore volume. The current results provided important factors that maximize conversion of cellulose to glucose from oil palm biomass by hydrothermal process. PMID:25460995

  9. Total fractionation of green tea residue by microwave-assisted alkaline pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Shuntaro; Azuma, Jun-ichi

    2013-03-01

    Total refinery of constituents of green tea residue was achieved by combination of microwave-assisted alkaline pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Alkaline pretreatment was effective at separating pectic polysaccharides, protein, phenolic compounds and aliphatic compounds (probably originating from cuticular components), and the solubilization rate was attained 64–74% by heating at 120–200 °C. The higher heating value (HHV) of alkali-soluble fraction attained 20.1 MJ/kg, indicating its usability as black-liquor-like biofuel. Successive cellulolytic enzymatic hydrolysis mainly converted cellulose into glucose and attained the maximum solubilization rate of 89%. Final residue was predominantly composed of aliphatic cuticular components with high proportion in 9,10,18-trihydroxyoctadecanoic acid (30.1–48.6%). These cuticular components are potential alternative feedstock for aliphatic compounds commonly found in oil plants. PMID:23384782

  10. Pretreatment and hydrolysis methods for recovery of fermentable sugars from de-oiled Jatropha waste.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Sen, Biswarup; Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2013-10-01

    The release of reducing sugars (RS) upon various pretreatments and hydrolysis methods from de-oiled Jatropha waste (DJW) was studied. The highest RS concentration of 12.9 g/L was observed at 10% enzyme hydrolysis. The next highest RS of 8.0 g/L and 7.8 g/L were obtained with 10% HCl and 2.5% H2SO4, respectively. The NaOH (2.5%), ultrasonication and heat (90°C for 60 min) treatments showed the RS concentration of 2.5 g/L, 1.1 g/L and 2.0 g/L, respectively. Autoclave treatment slightly enhanced the sugar release (0.9 g/L) compared to no treatment (0.7 g/L). Glucose release (11.4 g/L) peaked in enzyme hydrolysis. Enzyme treated acid unhydrolysed biomass showed 11.1 g/L RS. HCl and H2SO4 pretreatment gave maximal xylose (6.89 g/L and 6.16 g/L, respectively). Combined (acid and enzyme) hydrolysis employed was efficient and its subsequent batch hydrogen fermentation showed a production 3.1 L H2/L reactor. PMID:23562180

  11. HIGH TEMPERATURE DILUTE ACID HYDROLYSIS OF WASTE CELLULOSE: BATCH AND CONTINUOUS PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 5-year investigation on the dilute acid hydrolysis of waste cellulose to glucose has emphasized the crucial step of continuously converting cellulose to glucose. Initial batch studies emphasized pretreatments to improve accessibility of the cellulose, and established suitable...

  12. Improved enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw by combined use of gamma ray and dilute acid for bioethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun Hong, Sung; Taek Lee, Jae; Lee, Sungbeom; Gon Wi, Seung; Ju Cho, Eun; Singh, Sudhir; Sik Lee, Seung; Yeoup Chung, Byung

    2014-01-01

    Pretreating wheat straw with a combination of dilute acid and gamma irradiation was performed in an attempt to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis for bioethanol production. The glucose yield was significantly affected by combined pretreatment (3% sulfuric acid-gamma irradiation), compared with untreated wheat straw and individual pretreatment. The increasing enzymatic hydrolysis after combined pretreatment is resulting from decrease in crystallinity of cellulose, loss of hemicelluloses, and removal or modification of lignin. Therefore, combined pretreatment is one of the most effective methods for enhancing the enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw biomass.

  13. Hydrolysis of macromolecular components of primary and secondary wastewater sludge by thermal hydrolytic pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christopher A; Novak, John T

    2009-10-01

    A laboratory simulation of the thermal hydrolytic pretreatment (THP) process was performed on wastewater sludge, as well as key macromolecular components: proteins, lipids, and polysaccharides. Hydrolysis temperatures from 130 to 220 degrees C were investigated. The objectives of this study were to determine how and over which temperature range THP specifically affects sludge components, and whether hydrolysis temperature can be used to minimize the previously reported drawbacks of THP such as high total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) loads and the production of highly-colored recalcitrant organics. In addition, the applicability of THP to primary sludge (PS) was investigated. The breakdown of proteins, lipids, and polysaccharides was determined to be temperature dependent, and both waste activated sludge (WAS) and PS responded similarly to THP apart from intrinsic differences in lipid and protein content. Pure carbohydrate solutions were not largely converted to mono- or dimeric reducing sugar units at temperatures below 220 degrees C, however significant caramelization of starch and production of dextrose and maltose was observed to occur at 220 degrees C. Volatile fatty acid production during thermal hydrolysis was largely attributed to the breakdown of unsaturated lipids, and long-chain fatty acid production was not significant in terms of previous reports of methanogenic inhibition. Ammonia was produced from protein during thermal hydrolysis, however solids loading rather than thermal hydrolysis temperature appeared to be a more meaningful control for ammonia levels in downstream anaerobic digestion. PMID:19695659

  14. Effect of anion structures on cholinium ionic liquids pretreatment of rice straw and the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xue-Dan; Xu, Jie; Li, Ning; Zong, Min-Hua

    2015-01-01

    In this work, 28 cholinium ionic liquids (ILs), most of which are good solvents for dissolving lignin, were used for rice straw pretreatment to improve subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. The anion exerted a significant effect on the pretreatment effectiveness of the IL as well as the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency of rice straw residues. The presence of the basic group(s) in the anion significantly enhanced the IL pretreatment effectiveness, while the carboxyl, hydroxyl and aromatic groups had a negative impact on IL delignification. Except for amino acid-based ILs, the delignification abilities of the ILs are linearly and positively correlated with the pKa values of the conjugate acids of the anions. Of the ILs tested, amino acid-based ILs, especially basic amino acid-based ILs, are the most effective pretreatment solvents. Satisfactory reducing sugar yields (81% for glucose and 26% for xylose) were obtained in the enzymatic hydrolysis of rice straw pretreated by cholinium argininate ([Ch][Arg]) under a pretty mild pretreatment severity (60°C, 6 h). The results presented in this work may be useful for rational design of novel and green ILs for delignification of lignocellulose. PMID:25067792

  15. Simultaneous pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of forage biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Henk, L.; Linden, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    Sweet sorghum is an attractive fermentation feedstock because as much as 40% of the dry weight consists of readily femented sugars such as sucrose, glucose and frutose. Cellulose and hemicellulose comprise another 50%. However, if this material is to be used a year-round feedstock for ethanol production, a stable method of storage must be developed to maintain the sugar content. A modified version of the traditional ensiling process is made effective by the addition of cellulolytic/hemicellulolytic enzymes and lactic acid bacteria to freshly chopped sweet sorghum prior to the production of silage. In situ hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose occurs concurrently with the acidic ensiling fementation. By hydolyzing the acetyl groups using acetyl xylan esterase and 3-0-methyl glucuronyl side chains using pectinase from hemicellulose, cellulose becomes accessible to hydrolysis by cellulase, both during in situ ensiling with enzymes and in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to ethanol.

  16. Effect of thermal hydrolysis pre-treatment on anaerobic digestion of municipal biowaste: a pilot scale study in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yingjun; Takaoka, Masaki; Wang, Wei; Liu, Xiao; Oshita, Kazuyuki

    2013-07-01

    Co-digestion of wasted sewage sludge, restaurant kitchen waste, and fruit-vegetable waste was carried out in a pilot plant with thermal hydrolysis pre-treatment. Steam was used as heat source for thermal hydrolysis. It was found 38.3% of volatile suspended solids were dissolved after thermal hydrolysis, with digestibility increased by 115%. These results were more significant than those from lab studies using electricity as heat source due to more uniform heating. Anaerobic digesters were then operated under organic loading rates of about 1.5 and 3 kg VS/(m³ d). Little difference was found for digesters with and without thermal pre-treatment in biogas production and volatile solids removal. However, when looking into the digestion process, it was found digestion rate was almost doubled after thermal hydrolysis. Digester was also more stable with thermal hydrolysis pre-treatment. Less volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were accumulated and the VFAs/alkalinity ratio was also lower. Batch experiments showed the lag phase can be eliminated by thermal pre-treatment, implying the advantage could be more significant under a shorter hydraulic retention time. Moreover, it was estimated energy cost for thermal hydrolysis can be partly balanced by decreasing viscosity and improving dewaterability of the digestate. PMID:23419457

  17. Comparison of separate hydrolysis and fermentation versus simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of pretreated wheat straw to ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y- 2034 from wheat straw (WS) by separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) was studied. The yield of glucose from dilute acid pretreated WS (86 g L-1) after enzymatic saccharification was 2...

  18. Biological pretreatment of corn stover with white-rot fungus for improved enzymatic hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass by white-rot fungus can represent a low-cost and eco-friendly alternative to harsh physical, chemical or physico-chemical pretreatment methods to facilitate enzymatic hydrolysis. However, fungal pretreatment can cause carbohydrate loss and it is, th...

  19. Enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis of sugar cane bagasse by steam explosion pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kling, S.H.; Neto, C.C.; Ferrara, M.A.; Torres, J.C.R.; Magalhaes, D.B.; Ryu, D.D.Y.

    1987-01-01

    In this study, the possibility of applying a steam explosion pretreatment process to sugarcane bagasse was investigated, and the effectiveness of the pretreatment in terms of hemicellulose solubilization and enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis was determined. The steam requirement for the pretreatment was also investigated at the pilot-plant scale, and these results are presented.

  20. Effect of pretreatment methods on the synergism of cellulase and xylanase during the hydrolysis of bagasse.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lili; Gonçalves, Geisa A L; Takasugi, Yusaku; Mori, Yutaro; Noda, Shuhei; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ichinose, Hirofumi; Kamiya, Noriho

    2015-06-01

    The effect of pretreatment with peracetic acid (PAA) or an ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, [Emim][OAc]) on the synergism between endoglucanase and endoxylanase in the hydrolysis of bagasse was investigated. An endoglucanase, Cel6A, with a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) and two endoxylanases, XynZ-C without a CBM and Xyn11A with an intrinsic xylan/cellulose binding module (XBM), were selected. The hemicellulose content, especially arabinan, and the cellulose crystallinity of bagasse were found to affect the cellulase-xylanase synergism. More specifically, higher synergism (above 3.4) was observed for glucan conversion, at low levels of arabinan (0.9%), during the hydrolysis of PAA pretreated bagasse. In contrast, [Emim][OAc] pretreated bagasse, showed lower cellulose crystallinity and achieved higher synergism (over 1.9) for xylan conversion. Ultimately, the combination of Cel6A and Xyn11A resulted in higher synergism for glucan conversion than the combination of Cel6A with XynZ-C, indicating the importance of the molecular architecture of enzymes for metabolic synergism. PMID:25768418

  1. Comparison of methods to assess the enzyme accessibility and hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic substrates.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Richard P; Ewanick, Shannon M; Chung, Pablo A; Au-Yeung, Kathy; Del Rio, Luis; Mabee, Warren; Saddler, Jack N

    2009-08-01

    Fiber size analysis, water retention value, and Simons' stain measurements were assessed for their potential to predict the susceptibility of a given substrate to enzymatic hydrolysis. Slight modifications were made to the fiber size analysis and water retention protocols to adapt these measurements to evaluate substrates for cellulolytic hydrolysis rather than pulps for papermaking. Lodgepole pine was pretreated by the steam and ethanol-organosolv processes under varying conditions. The Simons' stain procedure proved to be an effective method for indicating the potential ease of enzymatic hydrolysis of substrates pretreated by either process or when the pretreatment conditions were altered. PMID:19357812

  2. Obtaining fermentable sugars by dilute acid hydrolysis of hemicellulose and fast pyrolysis of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liqun; Zheng, Anqing; Zhao, Zengli; He, Fang; Li, Haibin; Liu, Weiguo

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to get fermentable sugars by dilute acid hydrolysis of hemicellulose and fast pyrolysis of cellulose from sugarcane bagasse. Hemicellulose could be easily hydrolyzed by dilute acid as sugars. The remained solid residue of acid hydrolysis was utilized to get levoglucosan by fast pyrolysis economically. Levoglucosan yield from crystalline cellulose could be as high as 61.47%. Dilute acid hydrolysis was also a promising pretreatment for levoglucosan production from lignocellulose. The dilute acid pretreated sugarcane bagasse resulted in higher levoglucosan yield (40.50%) in fast pyrolysis by micropyrolyzer, which was more effective than water washed (29.10%) and un-pretreated (12.84%). It was mainly ascribed to the effective removal of alkali and alkaline earth metals and the accumulation of crystalline cellulose. This strategy seems a promising route to achieve inexpensive fermentable sugars from lignocellulose for biorefinery. PMID:25690683

  3. Hydrolysis of organosolv wheat pulp in formic acid at high temperature for glucose production.

    PubMed

    Kupiainen, Laura; Ahola, Juha; Tanskanen, Juha

    2012-07-01

    Organosolv methods can be used to delignify lignocellulosic crop residues for pulp production or to pretreat them prior to enzymatic hydrolysis for bioethanol production. In this study, organic solvent was used as an acidic hydrolysis catalyst to produce glucose. Hydrolysis experiments were carried out in 5-20% formic acid at 180-220 °C. Wheat straw pulp delignified with a formicodeli™ method was used as a raw material. It was found that glucose yields from pulp are significantly higher than yields from microcrystalline cellulose, a model component for cellulose hydrolysis. The results indicate that cellulose hydrolysis of real fibers takes place more selectively to glucose than hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose particles does. The effect of the particle size on pulp hydrolysis was investigated, the crystallinity of hydrolyzed pulp was measured by XRD analysis, and the product distribution and its influence on the process was discussed. PMID:22609651

  4. Utilization of waste cellulose. VI. Pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials with sodium hypochlorite and enzymatic hydrolysis by Trichoderma viride

    SciTech Connect

    David, C.; Fornasier, R.; Thiry, P.

    1985-10-01

    A pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials with sodium hypochlorite-hypochlorous acid at controlled pH (between 7 and 9) considerably increases the accessibility of the cellulosic part of the substrate to chemical and biochemical reactants. As a consequence, the yield and rate of the enzymatic hydrolysis to glucose is largely increased. Wheat straw and spruce sawdust have been investigated. The increase in accessibility is assigned to degradation and (or) detachment of the lignin network. The loss in cellulose and hemicellulose is not important, lignin being preferentially degraded under carefully controlled pH conditions. When applied to pure cellulose, the pretreatment decreases the yield of enzymatic hydrolysis; in the absence of lignin, oxidation of the anhydroglucose units is important and results in the inhibition of the enzymatic hydrolysis. 12 references.

  5. Critical cellulase and hemicellulase activities for hydrolysis of ionic liquid pretreated biomass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Critical cellulase and hemicellulase activities are identified for hydrolysis of ionic liquid (IL) pretreated poplar and switchgrass; hemicellulase rich substrates with amorphous cellulose. Enzymes from Aspergillus nidulans were expressed and purified: an endoglucanase (EG) a cellobiohydrolase (CBH)...

  6. Optimization of dilute acid hydrolysis of Enteromorpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Dawei; Liu, Haiyan; Li, Fuchao; Jiang, Peng; Qin, Song

    2011-11-01

    Acid hydrolysis is a simple and direct way to hydrolyze polysaccharides in biomass into fermentable sugars. To produce fermentable sugars effectively and economically for fuel ethanol, we have investigated the hydrolysis of Enteromorpha using acids that are typically used to hydrolyze biomass: H2SO4, HCl, H3PO4 and C4H4O4 (maleic acid). 5%(w/w) Enteromorpha biomass was treated for different times (30, 60, and 90 min) and with different acid concentrations (0.6, 1.0, 1.4, 1.8, and 2.2%, w/w) at 121°C. H2SO4 was the most effective acid in this experiment. We then analyzed the hydrolysis process in H2SO4 in detail using high performance liquid chromatography. At a sulfuric acid concentration of 1.8% and treatment time of 60 min, the yield of ethanol fermentable sugars (glucose and xylose) was high, (230.5 mg/g dry biomass, comprising 175.2 mg/g glucose and 55.3 mg/g xylose), with 48.6% of total reducing sugars being ethanol fermentable. Therefore, Enteromorpha could be a good candidate for production of fuel ethanol. In future work, the effects of temperature and biomass concentration on hydrolysis, and also the fermentation of the hydrolysates to ethanol fuel should be focused on.

  7. Dilute acid and autohydrolysis pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E

    2009-01-01

    Exposure of cellulosic biomass to temperatures of about 120-210 degrees C can remove most of the hemicellulose and produce cellulose-rich solids from which high glucose yields are possible with cellulase enzymes. Furthermore, the use of dilute sulfuric acid in this pretreatment operation can increase recovery of hemicellulose sugars substantially to about 85-95% of the maximum possible versus only about 65% if no acid is employed. The use of small-diameter tubes makes it possible to employ high solids concentrations similar to those preferred for commercial operations, with rapid heat-up, good temperature control, and accurate closure of material balances. Mixed reactors can be employed to pretreat larger amounts of biomass than possible in such small-diameter tubes, but solids concentrations are limited to about 15% or less to provide uniform temperatures. Pretreatment of large amounts of biomass at high solids concentrations is best carried out using direct steam injection and rapid pressure release, but closure of material balances in such "steam gun" devices is more difficult. Although flow of water alone or containing dilute acid is not practical commercially, such flow-through configurations provide valuable insight into biomass deconstruction kinetics not possible in the batch tubes, mixed reactors, or steam gun systems. PMID:19768619

  8. Effect of Varying Acid Hydrolysis Condition in Gracilaria Sp. Fermentation Using Sasad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansuit, H.; Samsuri, M. D. C.; Sipaut, C. S.; Yee, C. F.; Yasir, S. M.; Mansa, R.

    2015-04-01

    Macroalgae or seaweed is being considered as promising feedstock for bioalcohol production due to high polysaccharides content. Polysaccharides can be converted into fermentable sugar through acid hydrolysis pre-treatment. In this study, the potential of using carbohydrate-rich macroalgae, Gracilaria sp. as feedstock for bioalcohol production via various acid hydrolysis conditions prior to the fermentation process was investigated and evaluated. The seaweed used in this research was from the red algae group, using species of Gracilaria sp. which was collected from Sg. Petani Kedah, Malaysia. Pre-treatment of substrate was done using H2SO4 and HCl with molarity ranging from 0.2M to 0.8M. The pretreatment time were varied in the range of 15 to 30 minutes. Fermentation was conducted using Sasad, a local Sabahan fermentation agent as a starter culture. Alcohol extraction was done using a distillation unit. Reducing sugar analysis was done by Benedict test method. Alcohol content analysis was done using specific gravity test. After hydrolysis, it was found out that acid hydrolysis at 0.2M H2SO4 and pre-treated for 20 minutes at 121°C has shown the highest reducing sugar content which has yield (10.06 mg/g) of reducing sugar. It was followed by other samples hydrolysis using 0.4M HCl with 30 minutes pre-treatment and 0.2M H2SO4, 15 minutes pre-treatment with yield of 8.06 mg/g and 5.75 mg/g reducing sugar content respectively. In conclusion, acid hydrolysis of Gracilaria sp. can produce higher reducing sugar yield and thus it can further enhance the bioalcohol production yield. Hence, acid hydrolysis of Gracilaria sp. should be studied more as it is an important step in the bioalcohol production and upscaling process.

  9. Impacts of microalgae pre-treatments for improved anaerobic digestion: thermal treatment, thermal hydrolysis, ultrasound and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Ometto, Francesco; Quiroga, Gerardo; Pšenička, Pavel; Whitton, Rachel; Jefferson, Bruce; Villa, Raffaella

    2014-11-15

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of microalgae is primarily inhibited by the chemical composition of their cell walls containing biopolymers able to resist bacterial degradation. Adoption of pre-treatments such as thermal, thermal hydrolysis, ultrasound and enzymatic hydrolysis have the potential to remove these inhibitory compounds and enhance biogas yields by degrading the cell wall, and releasing the intracellular algogenic organic matter (AOM). This work investigated the effect of four pre-treatments on three microalgae species, and their impact on the quantity of soluble biomass released in the media and thus on the digestion process yields. The analysis of the composition of the soluble COD released and of the TEM images of the cells showed two main degradation actions associated with the processes: (1) cell wall damage with the release of intracellular AOM (thermal, thermal hydrolysis and ultrasound) and (2) degradation of the cell wall constituents with the release of intracellular AOM and the solubilisation of the cell wall biopolymers (enzymatic hydrolysis). As a result of this, enzymatic hydrolysis showed the greatest biogas yield increments (>270%) followed by thermal hydrolysis (60-100%) and ultrasounds (30-60%). PMID:25150520

  10. Long term storage of dilute acid pretreated corn stover feedstock and ethanol fermentability evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Shao, Shuai; Bao, Jie

    2016-02-01

    This study reported a new solution of lignocellulose feedstock storage based on the distributed pretreatment concept. The dry dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment (DDAP) was conducted on corn stover feedstock, instead of ammonia fiber explosion pretreatment. Then the dry dilute acid pretreated corn stover was stored for three months during summer season with high temperature and humidity. No negative aspects were found on the physical property, composition, hydrolysis yield and ethanol fermentability of the long term stored pretreated corn stover, plus the additional merits including no chemicals recovery operation, anti-microbial contaminant environment from stronger acid and inhibitor contents, as well as the mild and slow hydrolysis in the storage. The new pretreatment method expanded the distributed pretreatment concept of feedstock storage with potential for practical application. PMID:26639616

  11. Thermochemical pretreatments for enhancing succinic acid production from industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Ingólfur B; Kuglarz, Mariusz; Karakashev, Dimitar; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an efficient thermochemical method for treatment of industrial hemp biomass, in order to increase its bioconversion to succinic acid. Industrial hemp was subjected to various thermochemical pretreatments using 0-3% H2SO4, NaOH or H2O2 at 121-180°C prior to enzymatic hydrolysis. The influence of the different pretreatments on hydrolysis and succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z was investigated in batch mode, using anaerobic bottles and bioreactors. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of hemp material pretreated with 3% H2O2 resulted in the highest overall sugar yield (73.5%), maximum succinic acid titer (21.9 g L(-1)), as well as the highest succinic acid yield (83%). Results obtained clearly demonstrated the impact of different pretreatments on the bioconversion efficiency of industrial hemp into succinic acid. PMID:25682224

  12. Using a combined hydrolysis factor to optimize high titer ethanol production from sulfite-pretreated poplar without detoxification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingzhi; Gu, Feng; Zhu, J Y; Zalesny, Ronald S

    2015-06-01

    Sulfite pretreatment to overcome the recalcitrance of lignocelluloses (SPORL) was applied to poplar NE222 chips in a range of chemical loadings, temperatures, and times. The combined hydrolysis factor (CHF) as a pretreatment severity accurately predicted xylan dissolution by SPORL. Good correlations between CHF and pretreated solids enzymatic digestibility, sugar yield, and the formations of furfural and acetic acid were obtained. Therefore, CHF was used to balance sugar yield with the formation of fermentation inhibitors for high titer ethanol production without detoxification. The results indicated that optimal sugar yield can be achieved at CHF=3.1, however, fermentation using un-detoxified whole slurries of NE222 pretreated at different severities by SPORL indicated CHF≈2 produced best results. An ethanol titer of 41 g/L was achieved at total solids of approximately 20 wt% without detoxification with a low cellulase loading of 15 FPU/g glucan (27 mL/kg untreated wood). PMID:25817033

  13. Sodium sulfite-formaldehyde pretreatment of mixed hardwoods and its effect on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yongcan; Yang, Linfeng; Jameel, Hasan; Chang, Hou-min; Phillips, Richard

    2013-05-01

    In this work, mixed hardwoods were pretreated by sodium sulfite-formaldehyde (SF). The effects of SF pretreatment on the chemical compositions and enzymatic hydrolysis of mixed hardwoods were investigated. SF pretreatment temperature had a significant effect on pulp yield and delignification, resulting in an increased efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. After 96 h of enzymatic hydrolysis at the cellulase loading of 40 FPU/g substrate, the yields of glucan and xylan on the basis of original wood were 37% and 11% for the pulp produced with 12% sulfite charge at 170 °C for 2 h. The total sugar recovery based on the sugar in original wood was 74%. These results indicate that sulfite-formaldehyde cooking is of great potential to be a pretreatment method for a greenfield mill to produce fuel ethanol from hardwood. PMID:23127844

  14. Mechanisms of lactone hydrolysis in acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; Calle, Emilio; Casado, Julio

    2013-07-19

    The acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of linear esters and lactones was studied using a hybrid supermolecule-polarizable continuum model (PCM) approach including up to six water molecules. The compounds studied included two linear esters, four β-lactones, two γ-lactones, and one δ-lactone: ethyl acetate, methyl formate, β-propiolactone, β-butyrolactone, β-isovalerolactone, diketene (4-methyleneoxetan-2-one), γ-butyrolactone, 2(5H)-furanone, and δ-valerolactone. The theoretical results are in good quantitative agreement with the experimental measurements reported in the literature and also in excellent qualitative agreement with long-held views regarding the nature of the hydrolysis mechanisms at molecular level. The present results help to understand the balance between the unimolecular (A(AC)1) and bimolecular (A(AC)2) reaction pathways. In contrast to the experimental setting, where one of the two branches is often occluded by the requirement of rather extreme experimental conditions, we have been able to estimate both contributions for all the compounds studied and found that a transition from A(AC)2 to A(AC)1 hydrolysis takes place as acidity increases. A parallel work addresses the neutral and base-catalyzed hydrolysis of lactones. PMID:23731203

  15. Liquid hot water pretreatment of multi feedstocks and enzymatic hydrolysis of solids obtained thereof.

    PubMed

    Michelin, Michele; Teixeira, José António

    2016-09-01

    Agricultural feedstocks (brewers' spent grain - BSG, corncob - CC, corn husk - CH, wheat straw - WS and Luffa sponge - LS) were pretreated by liquid hot water (LHW) in order to increase cellulose recovery and enzymatic saccharification. LHW-pretreatment resulted in hemicellulose solubilization, and solids enriched in cellulose. Chemical analysis showed different susceptibilities of the feedstocks to LHW-pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Pretreated feedstocks presented higher crystallinity (determined through X-ray diffraction) and thermal stability (determined through thermogravimetric analysis) than untreated feedstocks. SEM images confirmed the effect of LHW-pretreatment on structural changes. Moreover, enzymatic hydrolysis and cellulose conversion to glucose (CCG) were improved for pretreated feedstocks, with exception of LS. CCG (in relation to glucose potential on solids) followed the order: BSG>CH>WS>CC>LS. LHW-pretreatment showed to be a good technology to pretreat multi feedstocks and for improving the enzymatic hydrolysis of recalcitrant agricultural feedstocks to sugars, which can be further converted to ethanol-fuel and other value-added chemicals. PMID:27318165

  16. Biological Pretreatment of Rubberwood with Ceriporiopsis subvermispora for Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Bioethanol Production

    PubMed Central

    Nazarpour, Forough; Abdullah, Dzulkefly Kuang; Abdullah, Norhafizah; Motedayen, Nazila; Zamiri, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Rubberwood (Hevea brasiliensis), a potential raw material for bioethanol production due to its high cellulose content, was used as a novel feedstock for enzymatic hydrolysis and bioethanol production using biological pretreatment. To improve ethanol production, rubberwood was pretreated with white rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora to increase fermentation efficiency. The effects of particle size of rubberwood (1 mm, 0.5 mm, and 0.25 mm) and pretreatment time on the biological pretreatment were first determined by chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction and their best condition obtained with 1 mm particle size and 90 days pretreatment. Further morphological study on rubberwood with 1 mm particle size pretreated by fungus was performed by FT-IR spectra analysis and SEM observation and the result indicated the ability of this fungus for pretreatment. A study on enzymatic hydrolysis resulted in an increased sugar yield of 27.67% as compared with untreated rubberwood (2.88%). The maximum ethanol concentration and yield were 17.9 g/L and 53% yield, respectively, after 120 hours. The results obtained demonstrate that rubberwood pretreated by C. subvermispora can be used as an alternative material for the enzymatic hydrolysis and bioethanol production. PMID:24167813

  17. [Effect of Residual Hydrogen Peroxide on Hydrolysis Acidification of Sludge Pretreated by Microwave -H2O2-Alkaline Process].

    PubMed

    Jia, Rui-lai; Liu, Ji-bao; Wei, Yuan-song; Cai, Xing

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have found that in the hydrolysis acidification process, sludge after microwave -H2O2-alkaline (MW-H2O2-OH, pH = 10) pretreatment had an acid production lag due to the residual hydrogen peroxide. In this study, effects of residual hydrogen peroxide after MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10 or pH = 11) pretreatment on the sludge hydrolysis acidification were investigated through batch experiments. Our results showed that catalase had a higher catalytic efficiency than manganese dioxide for hydrogen peroxide, which could completely degraded hydrogen peroxide within 10 min. During the 8 d of hydrolysis acidification time, both SCOD concentrations and the total VFAs concentrations of four groups were firstly increased and then decreased. The optimized hydrolysis times were 0.5 d for four groups, and the optimized hydrolysis acidification times were 3 d for MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) group, MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) + catalase group and MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 11) + catalase group. The optimized hydrolysis acidification time for MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 11) group was 4 d. Residual hydrogen peroxide inhibited acid production for sludge after MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) pretreatment, resulting in a lag in acidification stage. Compared with MW-H2O2-OH ( pH = 10) pretreatment, MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 11 ) pretreatment released more SCOD by 19.29% and more organic matters, which resulted in the increase of total VFAs production significantly by 84.80% at 5 d of hydrolysis acidification time and MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 11) group could shorten the lag time slightly. Dosing catalase (100 mg x -L(-1)) after the MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10 or pH = 11) pretreatment not only significantly shortened the lag time (0.5 d) in acidification stage, but also produced more total VFAs by 23.61% and 50.12% in the MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) + catalase group and MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 11) + catalase group, compared with MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) group at 3d of hydrolysis acidification time. For MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) group, MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) + catalase group and

  18. Ethanol production from industrial hemp: effect of combined dilute acid/steam pretreatment and economic aspects.

    PubMed

    Kuglarz, Mariusz; Gunnarsson, Ingólfur B; Svensson, Sven-Erik; Prade, Thomas; Johansson, Eva; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, combined steam (140-180°C) and dilute-acid pre-hydrolysis (0.0-2.0%) were applied to industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.), as pretreatment for lignocellulosic bioethanol production. The influence of the pretreatment conditions and cultivation type on the hydrolysis and ethanol yields was also evaluated. Pretreatment with 1% sulfuric acid at 180°C resulted in the highest glucose yield (73-74%) and ethanol yield of 75-79% (0.38-0.40 g-ethanol/g-glucose). Taking into account the costs of biomass processing, from field to ethanol facility storage, the field-dried hemp pretreated at the optimal conditions showed positive economic results. The type of hemp cultivation (organic or conventional) did not influence significantly the effectiveness of the pretreatment as well as subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation. PMID:24821202

  19. Development of a combined pretreatment and hydrolysis strategy of rice straw for the production of bioethanol and biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, Raveendran; Kuttiraja, Mathiyazhakan; Prabisha, Thunoli Payyanvalappil; Binod, Parameswaran; Sukumaran, Rajeev K; Pandey, Ashok

    2016-09-01

    The present study highlights the development of a combined pretreatment and hydrolysis strategy of rice straw for the production of bioethanol and biopolymer (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate). Maximum reducing sugar yield was 0.374g/g. The hydrolyzate is devoid of major fermentation inhibitors like furfural and organic acids and can be used for fermentation without any detoxification. Fermentation of the non-detoxified hydrolyzate with Saccharomyces cerevisiae yielded 1.48% of ethanol with a fermentation efficiency of 61.25% and with Comamonas sp. yielded 35.86% of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate without any nutrient supplementation. Characterization of native, control as well as the residue left out after combined pretreatment and hydrolysis of RS by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction showed difference. Compositional analysis revealed that the residue contains lignin and hemicellulose as the major component indicating that major portion of cellulose were hydrolyzed in this strategy. PMID:26949053

  20. Cell-wall properties contributing to improved deconstruction by alkaline pre-treatment and enzymatic hydrolysis in diverse maize (Zea mays L.) lines

    PubMed Central

    Li, Muyang; Heckwolf, Marlies; Crowe, Jacob D.; Williams, Daniel L.; Magee, Timothy D.; Kaeppler, Shawn M.; de Leon, Natalia; Hodge, David B.

    2015-01-01

    A maize (Zea mays L. subsp. mays) diversity panel consisting of 26 maize lines exhibiting a wide range of cell-wall properties and responses to hydrolysis by cellulolytic enzymes was employed to investigate the relationship between cell-wall properties, cell-wall responses to mild NaOH pre-treatment, and enzymatic hydrolysis yields. Enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulose in the untreated maize was found to be positively correlated with the water retention value, which is a measure of cell-wall susceptibility to swelling. It was also positively correlated with the lignin syringyl/guaiacyl ratio and negatively correlated with the initial cell-wall lignin, xylan, acetate, and p-coumaric acid (pCA) content, as well as pCA released from the cell wall by pre-treatment. The hydrolysis yield following pre-treatment exhibited statistically significant negative correlations to the lignin content after pre-treatment and positive correlations to the solubilized ferulic acid and pCA. Several unanticipated results were observed, including a positive correlation between initial lignin and acetate content, lack of correlation between acetate content and initial xylan content, and negative correlation between each of these three variables to the hydrolysis yields for untreated maize. Another surprising result was that pCA release was negatively correlated with hydrolysis yields for untreated maize and, along with ferulic acid release, was positively correlated with the pre-treated maize hydrolysis yields. This indicates that these properties that may negatively contribute to the recalcitrance in untreated cell walls may positively contribute to their deconstruction by alkaline pre-treatment. PMID:25871649

  1. [Influencing Factors for Hydrolysis of Sewage Sludge Pretreated by Microwave-H2O2-Alkaline Process].

    PubMed

    Jia, Rui-lai; Wei, Yuan-song; Liu, Ji-bao

    2015-06-01

    Pretreatment can improve carbon source utilization of sludge. In this study, influencing factors of hydrolysis including hydrolysis time, ratio of seed sludge and temperature were investigated for sewage sludge pretreated by microwave-H2O2-alkaline process through batch experiments. Meanwhile, effects of hydrolysis and releasing characteristics of organic matters were also investigated under the optimized conditions. The results showed that the optimal hydrolysis time was 12 h and the optimized inoculum to substrate ratio (I/S) was 0.07. Under optimized conditions (12 h, I/S =0.07), SCOD, soluble proteins, soluble sugars and total VFAs content increased with increasing temperature, reaching the maximum at 65 degrees C. Acetic, propionic and iso-valeric acids were the dominant VFAs produced, and the percentage of acetic acid accounting for total VFAs was between 42.7% and 59.7%. In terms of carbon source composition, SCOD accounted for 37.8%-40.8% of total COD, soluble proteins accounted for 38.3%-41.3% of SCOD, soluble sugars accounted for 9.0%-9.3% of SCOD and total VFAs accounted for 3.3%-5.5% of SCOD. The COD/TN watio was between 15.79 and 16.50 in the sludge supernatant. The results of the three-dimensional fluorescence spectra and apparent molecular weight distributions showed that the fluorescence intensity of tyrosine-like substances in the soluble microbial products was the highest and increased with the increasing temperature in the sludge supernatant. After the sewage sludge was pretreated by microwave-H2O2-OH process, a lot of organic matters were released, including small molecule organics (M 100-350), while after hydrolysis, M, 3000-60,000 organics were degraded. PMID:26387329

  2. Improved enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass through pretreatment with plasma electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Chen, Li; Zhang, Jian; Yan, Zongcheng

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive research on plasma electrolysis as pretreatment method for water hyacinth (WH) was performed based on lignin content, crystalline structure, surface property, and enzymatic hydrolysis. A large number of active particles, such as HO and H2O2, generated by plasma electrolysis could decompose the lignin of the biomass samples and reduce the crystalline index. An efficient pretreatment process made use of WH pretreated at a load of 48 wt% (0.15-0.18 mm) in FeCl3 solution for 30 min at 450 V. After the pretreatment, the sugar yield of WH was increased by 126.5% as compared with unpretreated samples. PMID:25205055

  3. Effect of pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis on the physical-chemical composition and morphologic structure of sugarcane bagasse and sugarcane straw.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Marcia Maria de Souza; Perrone, Olavo Micali; Nunes, Christiane da Costa Carreira; Taboga, Sebastião; Boscolo, Maurício; da Silva, Roberto; Gomes, Eleni

    2016-11-01

    The present work aimed to study the effect of the pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse and straw with microwave irradiation in aqueous and acid glycerol solutions on their chemical composition, fiber structure and the efficiency of subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that the pretreatment acted mainly on the lignin and hemicellulose fractions of the bagasse, whereas, in the straw, lesser structural and chemical changes were observed. The images from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that treating bagasse and straw with acid glycerol solution loosened the cell walls and there was a breakdown in the pit membrane. The treated material was submitted to hydrolysis for 72h and higher yields of reducing sugars were observed compared to the untreated material (250.9mg/g from straw and 197.4mg/g from bagasse). TEM images after hydrolysis confirmed the possible points of access of the enzymes to the secondary cell wall region of the pretreated biomass. PMID:27578061

  4. Non-ionic Surfactants and Non-Catalytic Protein Treatment on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Pretreated Creeping Wild Ryegrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Pan, Zhongli; Zhang, Ruihong; Wang, Donghai; Jenkins, Bryan

    Our previous research has shown that saline Creeping Wild Ryegrass (CWR), Leymus triticoides, has a great potential to be used for bioethanol production because of its high fermentable sugar yield, up to 85% cellulose conversion of pretreated CWR. However, the high cost of enzyme is still one of the obstacles making large-scale lignocellulosic bioethanol production economically difficult. It is desirable to use reduced enzyme loading to produce fermentable sugars with high yield and low cost. To reduce the enzyme loading, the effect of addition of non-ionic surfactants and non-catalytic protein on the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated CWR was investigated in this study. Tween 20, Tween 80, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were used as additives to improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of dilute sulfuric-acid-pretreated CWR. Under the loading of 0.1 g additives/g dry solid, Tween 20 was the most effective additive, followed by Tween 80 and BSA. With the addition of Tween 20 mixed with cellulase loading of 15 FPU/g cellulose, the cellulose conversion increased 14% (from 75 to 89%), which was similar to that with cellulase loading of 30 FPU/g cellulose and without additive addition. The results of cellulase and BSA adsorption on the Avicel PH101, pretreated CWR, and lignaceous residue of pretreated CWR support the theory that the primary mechanism behind the additives is prevention of non-productive adsorption of enzymes on lignaceous material of pretreated CWR. The addition of additives could be a promising technology to improve the enzymatic hydrolysis by reducing the enzyme activity loss caused by non-productive adsorption.

  5. Comparison of cell wall polysaccharide hydrolysis by a dilute acid/enzymatic saccharification process and rumen microorganisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluation of biomass crops for breeding or pricing purposes requires an assay that predicts performance of biomass in the bioenergy conversion process. Cell wall polysaccharide hydrolysis by dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment at 121 degrees C followed by cellulase hydrolysis for 72 h (CONV) and in v...

  6. [Effects of hot-NaOH pretreatment on Jerusalem artichoke stalk composition and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Qiu, Jingwen; Li, Yang; Shen, Fei

    2015-10-01

    In order to explore the possibility of Jerusalem artichoke stalk for bioenergy conversion, we analyzed the main composition of whole stalk, pitch, and core of the stalk. Meanwhile, these parts were pretreated with different NaOH concentrations at 121 degrees C. Afterwards, enzymatic hydrolysis was performed to evaluate the pretreatment efficiency. Jerusalem artichoke stalk was characterized by relatively high lignin content (32.0%) compared with traditional crop stalks. The total carbohydrate content was close to that of crop stalks, but with higher cellulose content (40.5%) and lower hemicellulose (19.6%) than those of traditional crop stalks. After pretreatment, the lignin content in the whole stalk, pitch, and core decreased by 13.1%-13.4%, 8.3%-13.5%, and 19.9%-27.2%, respectively, compared with the unpretreated substrates. The hemicellulose content in the whole stalk, pitch, and core decreased 87.8%-96.9%, 87.6%-95.0%, and 74.0%-90.2%, respectively. Correspondingly, the cellulose content in the pretreated whole stalk, pitch, and core increased by 56.5%-60.2%, 52.2%-55.4%, and 62.7%-73.2%, respectively. Moreover, increase of NaOH concentration for pretreatment could improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of the whole stalk and pitch by 2.3-2.6 folds and 10.3-18.5 folds, respectively. The hydrolysis of pretreated stalk core decreased significantly as 2.0 mol/L NaOH was employed, although the increased NaOH concentration can also improve its hydrolysis performance. Based on these results, hot-NaOH can be regarded as an option for Jerusalem artichoke stalk pretreatment. Increasing NaOH concentration was beneficial to hemicellulose and lignin removal, and consequently improved sugar conversion. However, the potential decrease of sugar conversion of the pretreated core by higher NaOH concentration suggested further optimization on the pretreatment conditions should be performed. PMID:26964335

  7. Hydrolysis of Ammonia-pretreated Sugar Cane Bagasse with Cellulase, β-Glucosidase, and Hemicellulase Preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, Bernard A.; Day, Donal F.

    Sugar cane bagasse consists of hemicellulose (24%) and cellulose (38%), and bioconversion of both fractions to ethanol should be considered for a viable process. We have evaluated the hydrolysis of pretreated bagasse with combinations of cellulase, β-glucosidase, and hemicellulase. Ground bagasse was pretreated either by the AFEX process (2NH3: 1 biomass, 100 °C, 30 min) or with NH4OH (0.5 g NH4OH of a 28% [v/v] per gram dry biomass; 160 °C, 60 min), and composition analysis showed that the glucan and xylan fractions remained largely intact. The enzyme activities of four commercial xylanase preparations and supernatants of four laboratory-grown fungi were determined and evaluated for their ability to boost xylan hydrolysis when added to cellulase and β-glucosidase (10 filter paper units [FPU]: 20 cellobiase units [CBU]/g glucan). At 1% glucan loading, the commercial enzyme preparations (added at 10% or 50% levels of total protein in the enzyme preparations) boosted xylan and glucan hydrolysis in both pretreated bagasse samples. Xylanase addition at 10% protein level also improved hydrolysis of xylan and glucan fractions up to 10% glucan loading (28% solids loading). Significant xylanase activity in enzyme cocktails appears to be required for improving hydrolysis of both glucan and xylan fractions of ammonia pretreated sugar cane bagasse.

  8. Pretreatment technologies for an efficient bioethanol production process based on enzymatic hydrolysis: A review.

    PubMed

    Alvira, P; Tomás-Pejó, E; Ballesteros, M; Negro, M J

    2010-07-01

    Biofuel produced from lignocellulosic materials, so-called second generation bioethanol shows energetic, economic and environmental advantages in comparison to bioethanol from starch or sugar. However, physical and chemical barriers caused by the close association of the main components of lignocellulosic biomass, hinder the hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose to fermentable sugars. The main goal of pretreatment is to increase the enzyme accessibility improving digestibility of cellulose. Each pretreatment has a specific effect on the cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin fraction thus, different pretreatment methods and conditions should be chosen according to the process configuration selected for the subsequent hydrolysis and fermentation steps. This paper reviews the most interesting technologies for ethanol production from lignocellulose and it points out several key properties that should be targeted for low-cost and advanced pretreatment processes. PMID:20042329

  9. Does densification influence the steam pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of softwoods to sugars?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Linoj; Tooyserkani, Zahra; Sokhansanj, Shahab; Saddler, Jack N

    2012-10-01

    The global trade in wood pellets continues to grow. However, their potential as a feedstock for large scale cellulosic ethanol production has not been evaluated. We anticipated that the reduced moisture content and pressure exerted on the wood biomass during the pelletisation process would result in some carbohydrate loss as well as making the biomass more recalcitrant to pretreatment and subsequent hydrolysis. However, when softwood chips and pellets were steam pretreated at medium severity, little hemicellulose loss occurred while more than two-thirds of the cellulose present in the cellulose rich water insoluble fractions were hydrolysed (at 20 FPU cellulase/g cellulose). In addition, prior steaming substantially reduced the particle size of the wood chips enabling direct pelletisation without the need for grinding. Surprisingly, it was also possible to apply a single steam pretreatment to facilitate both pelletisation and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis without the need for a further pretreatment step. PMID:22858485

  10. Thermo-chemical pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis for enhancing saccharification of catalpa sawdust.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shuguang; Zhang, Guangming; Zhang, Panyue; Li, Fan; Fan, Shiyang; Li, Juan

    2016-04-01

    To improve the reducing sugar production from catalpa sawdust, thermo-chemical pretreatments were examined and the chemicals used including NaOH, Ca(OH)2, H2SO4, and HCl. The hemicellulose solubilization and cellulose crystallinity index (CrI) were significantly increased after thermo-alkaline pretreatments, and the thermo-Ca(OH)2 pretreatment showed the best improvement for reducing sugar production comparing to other three pretreatments. The conditions of thermo-Ca(OH)2 pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis were systematically optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the reducing sugar yield increased by 1185.7% comparing to the control. This study indicates that the thermo-Ca(OH)2 pretreatment is ideal for the saccharification of catalpa sawdust and that catalpa sawdust is a promising raw material for biofuel. PMID:26802185

  11. Optimization of the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of wheat straw

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In this study, the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of wheat straw is optimized, using pretreatment time, temperature and maleic acid concentration as design variables. A central composite design was applied to the experimental set up. The response factors used in this study are: (1) glucose benefits from improved enzymatic digestibility of wheat straw solids; (2) xylose benefits from the solubilization of xylan to the liquid phase during the pretreatment; (3) maleic acid replenishment costs; (4) neutralization costs of pretreated material; (5) costs due to furfural production; and (6) heating costs of the input materials. For each response factor, experimental data were fitted mathematically. After data translation to €/Mg dry straw, determining the relative contribution of each response factor, an economic optimization was calculated within the limits of the design variables. Results When costs are disregarded, an almost complete glucan conversion to glucose can be reached (90% from solids, 7%-10% in liquid), after enzymatic hydrolysis. During the pretreatment, up to 90% of all xylan is converted to monomeric xylose. Taking cost factors into account, the optimal process conditions are: 50 min at 170°C, with 46 mM maleic acid, resulting in a yield of 65 €/Mg (megagram = metric ton) dry straw, consisting of 68 €/Mg glucose benefits (from solids: 85% of all glucan), 17 €/Mg xylose benefits (from liquid: 80% of all xylan), 17 €/Mg maleic acid costs, 2.0 €/Mg heating costs and 0.68 €/Mg NaOH costs. In all but the most severe of the studied conditions, furfural formation was so limited that associated costs are considered negligible. Conclusions After the dilute maleic acid pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis, almost complete conversion of wheat straw glucan and xylan is possible. Taking maleic acid replenishment, heating, neutralization and furfural formation into account, the optimum in the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of

  12. Effects of ultrasonic-assisted thermophilic bacteria pretreatment on hydrolysis, acidification, and microbial communities in waste-activated sludge fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunxue; Zhou, Aijuan; He, Zhangwei; Jiang, Lei; Guo, Zechong; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Wenzong

    2015-06-01

    A novel pretreatment method combining ultrasonic with thermophilic bacteria (Geobacillus sp. G1) was employed to pretreat waste-activated sludge (WAS) for enhancing the WAS hydrolysis and subsequent volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production. The soluble protein and carbohydrate were mostly released from intracellular ultrasonic-assisted Geobacillus sp. G1 pretreatment, and accumulated to 917 ± 70 and 772 ± 89 mg COD/L, respectively, which were 2.53- and 2.62-fold higher than that obtained in control test. Excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy revealed the highest fluorescence intensity (FI) of protein-like substances, indicating the synergistic effect of ultrasonic and Geobacillus sp. G1 pretreatments on WAS hydrolysis. The maximum VFAs accumulation was 4437 ± 15 mg COD/L obtained in ultrasonic-assisted Geobacillus sp. G1 pretreatment test. High-throughput pyrosequencing analysis investigated that the microbial communities were substantial determined by the pretreatment used. The hydrolysis enhancement was caused by an increase in extracellular enzymes, which was produced by one of dominant species Caloramator sp. The positive effect was well explained to the enhancement of WAS hydrolysis and final VFAs accumulation. PMID:25874413

  13. Modeling enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic substrates using fluorescent confocal microscopy II: pretreated biomass.

    PubMed

    Luterbacher, Jeremy S; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M; Burkholder, Eric W; Walker, Larry P

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we extend imaging and modeling work that was done in Part I of this report for a pure cellulose substrate (filter paper) to more industrially relevant substrates (untreated and pretreated hardwood and switchgrass). Using confocal fluorescence microscopy, we are able to track both the structure of the biomass particle via its autofluorescence, and bound enzyme from a commercial cellulase cocktail supplemented with a small fraction of fluorescently labeled Trichoderma reseii Cel7A. Imaging was performed throughout hydrolysis at temperatures relevant to industrial processing (50°C). Enzyme bound predominantly to areas with low autofluorescence, where structure loss and lignin removal had occurred during pretreatment; this confirms the importance of these processes for successful hydrolysis. The overall shape of both untreated and pretreated hardwood and switchgrass particles showed little change during enzymatic hydrolysis beyond a drop in autofluorescence intensity. The permanence of shape along with a relatively constant bound enzyme signal throughout hydrolysis was similar to observations previously made for filter paper, and was consistent with a modeling geometry of a hollowing out cylinder with widening pores represented as infinite slits. Modeling estimates of available surface areas for pretreated biomass were consistent with previously reported experimental results. PMID:25042048

  14. Consolidated pretreatment and hydrolysis of plant biomass expressing cell wall degrading enzymes

    DOEpatents

    Raab, R. Michael; Zhang, Dongcheng; Bougri, Oleg

    2016-02-02

    Methods for consolidated pretreatment and hydrolysis of genetically engineered plants expressing cell wall degrading enzymes are provided. Expression cassettes and vectors for making transgenic plants are described. Plants engineered to express one or more cell wall degrading enzymes using expression cassettes and vectors of the invention are also provided.

  15. Analysis of by-product formation and sugar monomerization in sugarcane bagasse pretreated at pilot plant scale: differences between autohydrolysis, alkaline and acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    van der Pol, Edwin; Bakker, Rob; van Zeeland, Alniek; Sanchez Garcia, David; Punt, Arjen; Eggink, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is an interesting feedstock for the biobased economy since a large fraction is polymerized sugars. Autohydrolysis, alkaline and acid pretreatment conditions combined with enzyme hydrolysis were used on lignocellulose rich bagasse to acquire monomeric. By-products found after pretreatment included acetic, glycolic and coumaric acid in concentrations up to 40, 21 and 2.5 g/kg dry weight bagasse respectively. Alkaline pretreated material contained up to 45 g/kg bagasse DW of sodium. Acid and autohydrolysis pretreatment results in a furan formation of 14 g/kg and 25 g/kg DW bagasse respectively. Enzyme monomerization efficiencies of pretreated solid material after 72 h were 81% for acid pretreatment, 77% for autohydrolysis and 57% for alkaline pretreatment. Solid material was washed with superheated water to decrease the amount of by-products. Washing decreased organic acid, phenol and furan concentrations in solid material by at least 60%, without a major sugar loss. PMID:25643957

  16. The role of pretreatment in improving the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaoni; Sun, Shaolong; Cao, Xuefei; Sun, Runcang

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic materials are among the most promising alternative energy resources that can be utilized to produce cellulosic ethanol. However, the physical and chemical structure of lignocellulosic materials forms strong native recalcitrance and results in relatively low yield of ethanol from raw lignocellulosic materials. An appropriate pretreatment method is required to overcome this recalcitrance. For decades various pretreatment processes have been developed to improve the digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass. Each pretreatment process has a different specificity on altering the physical and chemical structure of lignocellulosic materials. In this paper, the chemical structure of lignocellulosic biomass and factors likely affect the digestibility of lignocellulosic materials are discussed, and then an overview about the most important pretreatment processes available are provided. In particular, the combined pretreatment strategies are reviewed for improving the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose and realizing the comprehensive utilization of lignocellulosic materials. PMID:26321216

  17. Utilization of sugarcane bagasse for bioethanol production: sono-assisted acid hydrolysis approach.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, Rajendran; Muthukumar, Karuppan

    2011-07-01

    In this study, the production of sugar monomers from sugarcane bagasse (SCB) by sono-assisted acid hydrolysis was performed. The SCB was subjected to sono-assisted alkaline pretreatment. The cellulose and hemicellulose recovery observed in the solid content was 99% and 78.95%, respectively and lignin removal observed during the pretreatment was about 75.44%. The solid content obtained was subjected to sono-assisted acid hydrolysis. Under optimized conditions, the maximum hexose and pentose yield observed was 69.06% and 81.35% of theoretical yield, respectively. The hydrolysate obtained was found to contain very less inhibitors, which improved the bioethanol production and the ethanol yield observed was 0.17 g/g of pretreated SCB. PMID:21570831

  18. Effects of pressing lignocellulosic biomass on sugar yield in two-stage dilute-acid hydrolysis process.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Heon; Tucker, Melvin P; Nguyen, Quang A

    2002-01-01

    Dilute sulfuric acid catalyzed hydrolysis of biomass such as wood chips often involves pressing the wood particles in a dewatering step (e.g., after acid impregnation) or in compression screw feeders commonly used in continuous hydrolysis reactors. This study addresses the effects of pressing biomass feedstocks using a hydraulic press on soluble sugar yield obtained from two-stage dilute-acid hydrolysis of softwood. The pressed acid-impregnated feedstock gave significantly lower soluble sugar yields than the never-pressed (i.e., partially air-dried or filtered) feedstock. Pressing acid-impregnated feedstocks before pretreatment resulted in a soluble hemicellulosic sugar yield of 76.9% from first-stage hydrolysis and a soluble glucose yield of 33.7% from second-stage hydrolysis. The dilute-acid hydrolysis of partially air-dried feedstocks having total solids and acid concentrations similar to those of pressed feedstocks gave yields of 87.0% hemicellulosic sugar and 46.9% glucose in the first and second stages, respectively. Microscopic examination of wood structures showed that pressing acid-impregnated wood chips from 34 to 54% total solids (TS) did not cause the wood structure to collapse. However, pressing first-stage pretreated wood chips (i.e., feedstock for second-stage hydrolysis) from approximately 30 to 43% TS caused the porous wood matrix to almost completely collapse. It is hypothesized that pressing alters the wood structure and distribution of acid within the cell cavities, leading to uneven heat and mass transfer during pretreatment using direct steam injection. Consequently, lower hydrolysis yield of soluble sugars results. Dewatering of corn stover by pressing did not impact negatively on the sugar yield from single-stage dilute-acid pretreatment. PMID:12052064

  19. Hydrolysis of acid and alkali presoaked lignocellulosic biomass exposed to electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Karthika, K; Arun, A B; Melo, J S; Mittal, K C; Kumar, Mukesh; Rekha, P D

    2013-02-01

    In this study, synergetic effect of mild acid and alkali with electron beam irradiation (EBI) on the enzymatic hydrolysis of a selected grass biomass was assessed. Biomass samples prepared by soaking with 1% H2SO4, or 1% NaOH, were exposed to 75 and 150 kGy of EBI. Water presoaked biomass was used as control. Hydrolysis of pretreated samples was carried out using cellulase (15 FPU/g biomass) for 120 h. Structural changes were studied by FTIR and XRD analyses. Reducing sugar and glucose yields from enzymatic hydrolysis were significantly higher in acid and alkali presoaked EBI exposed samples. Theoretical glucose yield showed 40% increase from control in alkali presoaked EBI exposed (150 kGy) samples. Removal of hemicellulose, decreased crystallinity and structural changes were major factors for the combined treatment effect favoring the hydrolysis. PMID:23298772

  20. Topochemical pretreatment of wood biomass to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis of polysaccharides to sugars.

    PubMed

    Mou, Hong-Yan; Orblin, Elina; Kruus, Kristiina; Fardim, Pedro

    2013-08-01

    The surface chemistry of milled birch and pine wood pretreated by ionic liquid, hydrothermal and hydrotropic methods, followed by enzymatic hydrolysis was studied in this work. Surface coverage by lignin was measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to describe the surface chemical composition after pretreatment in detail, and the morphology after pretreatment was investigated by FE-SEM. Ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride) pretreatment at room temperature made the samples swell but did not dissolve the wood. Comparing the surface coverage by lignin, both in the case of birch and pine wood, hydrotropic worked best to remove the lignin hampering enzymatic hydrolysis. ToF-SIMS supported this finding, and showed that in birch, the carbohydrates were degraded more than in pine after hydrotropic pretreatment. The glucose yield of birch was improved by hydrotropic pretreatment from 5.1% to 83.9%, more significantly than in case of pine. PMID:23774220

  1. Pretreatment of Sugar Beet Pulp with Dilute Sulfurous Acid is Effective for Multipurpose Usage of Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Kharina, M; Emelyanov, V; Mokshina, N; Ibragimova, N; Gorshkova, T

    2016-05-01

    Sulfurous acid was used for pretreatment of sugar beet pulp (SBP) in order to achieve high efficiency of both extraction of carbohydrates and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of the remaining solids. The main advantage of sulfurous acid usage as pretreatment agent is the possibility of its regeneration. Application of sulfurous acid as hydrolyzing agent in relatively low concentrations (0.6-1.0 %) during a short period of time (10-20 min) and low solid to liquid ratio (1:3, 1:6) allowed effective extraction of carbohydrates from SBP and provided positive effect on subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest obtained concentration of reducing substances (RS) in hydrolysates was 8.5 %; up to 33.6 % of all carbohydrates present in SBP could be extracted. The major obtained monosaccharides were arabinose and glucose (9.4 and 7.3 g/l, respectively). Pretreatment of SBP with sulfurous acid increased 4.6 times the yield of glucose during subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of remaining solids with cellulase cocktail, as compared to the untreated SBP. Total yield of glucose during SBP pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis amounted to 89.4 % of the theoretical yield. The approach can be applied directly to the wet SBP. Hydrolysis of sugar beet pulp with sulfurous acid is recommended for obtaining of individual monosaccharides, as well as nutritional media. PMID:26821256

  2. The pretreatment of corn stover with Gloeophyllum trabeum KU-41 for enzymatic hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pretreatment is an essential step in the enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass for bio-ethanol production. The dominant concern in this step is how to decrease the high cost of pretreatment while achieving a high sugar yield. Fungal pretreatment of biomass was previously reported to be effective, with the advantage of having a low energy requirement and requiring no application of additional chemicals. In this work, Gloeophyllum trabeum KU-41 was chosen for corn stover pretreatment through screening with 40 strains of wood-rot fungi. The objective of the current work is to find out which characteristics of corn stover pretreated with G. trabeum KU-41 determine the pretreatment method to be successful and worthwhile to apply. This will be done by determining the lignin content, structural carbohydrate, cellulose crystallinity, initial adsorption capacity of cellulase and specific surface area of pretreated corn stover. Results The content of xylan in pretreated corn stover was decreased by 43% in comparison to the untreated corn stover. The initial cellulase adsorption capacity and the specific surface area of corn stover pretreated with G. trabeum were increased by 7.0- and 2.5-fold, respectively. Also there was little increase in the cellulose crystallinity of pretreated corn stover. Conclusion G. trabeum has an efficient degradation system, and the results indicated that the conversion of cellulose to glucose increases as the accessibility of cellulose increases due to the partial removal of xylan and the structure breakage of the cell wall. This pretreatment method can be further explored as an alternative to the thermochemical pretreatment method. PMID:22559172

  3. Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of poplar bark by combined use of gamma ray and dilute acid for bioethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Lee, Jae Taek; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Kim, Ung-Jin; Bae, Hyeun-Jong; Gon Wi, Seung; Cho, Jae-Young

    2012-08-01

    Pretreatment of poplar bark with a combination of sulfuric acid (3%, w/w, H2SO4) and gamma irradiation (0-1000 kGy) was performed in an attempt to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis for bioethanol production. The yields of reducing sugar were slightly increased with an increasing irradiation dose, ranging from 35.4% to 51.5%, with a 56.1% reducing sugar yield observed after dilute acid pretreatment. These results clearly showed that soluble sugars were released faster and to a greater extent in dilute acid-pretreated poplar bark than in gamma irradiation-pretreated bark. When combined pretreatment was carried out, a drastic increase in reducing sugar yield (83.1%) was found compared with individual pretreatment, indicating the possibility of increasing the convertibility of poplar bark following combined pretreatment. These findings are likely associated with cellulose crystallinity, lignin modification, and removal of hemicelluloses.

  4. The effect of dilute acid pre-treatment process in bioethanol production from durian (Durio zibethinus) seeds waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazali, K. A.; Salleh, S. F.; Riayatsyah, T. M. I.; Aditiya, H. B.; Mahlia, T. M. I.

    2016-03-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is one of the promising feedstocks for bioethanol production. The process starts from pre-treatment, hydrolysis, fermentation, distillation and finally obtaining the final product, ethanol. The efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass depends heavily on the effectiveness of the pre-treatment step which main function is to break the lignin structure of the biomass. This work aims to investigate the effects of dilute acid pre-treatment on the enzymatic hydrolysis of durian seeds waste to glucose and the subsequent bioethanol fermentation process. The yield of glucose from dilute acid pre-treated sample using 0.6% H2SO4 and 5% substrate concentration shows significant value of 23.4951 g/L. Combination of dilute acid pre-treatment and enzymatic hydrolysis using 150U of enzyme able to yield 50.0944 g/L of glucose content higher compared to normal pre-treated sample of 8.1093 g/L. Dilute acid pre-treatment sample also shows stable and efficient yeast activity during fermentation process with lowest glucose content at 2.9636 g/L compared to 14.7583g/L for normal pre-treated sample. Based on the result, it can be concluded that dilute acid pre-treatment increase the yield of ethanol from bioethanol production process.

  5. The enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated pulp fibers predominantly involves “peeling/erosion” modes of action

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is still considerable debate regarding the actual mechanism by which a “cellulase mixture” deconstructs cellulosic materials, with accessibility to the substrate at the microscopic level being one of the major restrictions that limits fast, complete cellulose hydrolysis. In the work reported here we tried to determine the predominant mode of action, at the fiber level, of how a cellulase mixture deconstructs pretreated softwood and hardwood pulp fibers. Quantitative changes in the pulp fibers derived from different pretreated biomass substrates were monitored throughout the course of enzymatic hydrolysis to see if the dominant mechanisms involved either the fragmentation/cutting of longer fibers to shorter fibers or their “peeling/delamination/erosion,” or if both cutting and peeling mechanisms occurred simultaneously. Results Regardless of the source of biomass, the type of pretreatment and the chemical composition of the substrate, under typical hydrolysis conditions (50°C, pH 4.8, mixing) longer pulp fibers (fiber length >200 μm) were rapidly broken down until a relatively constant fiber length of 130 to 160 μm was reached. In contrast, shorter fibers with an initial average fiber length of 130 to 160 μm showed no significant change in length despite their substantial hydrolysis. The fragmentation/cutting mode of deconstruction was only observed on longer fibers at early stages of hydrolysis. Although the fiber fragmentation mode of deconstruction was not greatly influenced by enzyme loading, it was significantly inhibited by glucose and was mainly observed during initial mixing of the enzyme and substrate. In contrast, significant changes in the fiber width occurred throughout the course of hydrolysis for all of the substrates, suggesting that fiber width may limit the rate and extent of cellulose hydrolysis. Conclusion It appears that, at the fiber level, pretreated pulp fibers are hydrolyzed through a two-step mode of action

  6. The influence of solid/liquid separation techniques on the sugar yield in two-step dilute acid hydrolysis of softwood followed by enzymatic hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Monavari, Sanam; Galbe, Mats; Zacchi, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Background Two-step dilute acid hydrolysis of softwood, either as a stand-alone process or as pretreatment before enzymatic hydrolysis, is considered to result in higher sugar yields than one-step acid hydrolysis. However, this requires removal of the liquid between the two steps. In an industrial process, filtration and washing of the material between the two steps is difficult, as it should be performed at high pressure to reduce energy demand. Moreover, the application of pressure leads to more compact solids, which may affect subsequent processing steps. This study was carried out to investigate the influence of pressing the biomass, in combination with the effects of not washing the material, on the sugar yield obtained from two-step dilute acid hydrolysis, with and without subsequent enzymatic digestion of the solids. Results Washing the material between the two acid hydrolysis steps, followed by enzymatic digestion, resulted in recovery of 96% of the mannose and 81% of the glucose (% of the theoretical) in the liquid fraction, regardless of the choice of dewatering method (pressing or vacuum filtration). Not washing the solids between the two acid hydrolysis steps led to elevated acidity of the remaining solids during the second hydrolysis step, which resulted in lower yields of mannose, 85% and 74% of the theoretical, for the pressed and vacuum-filtered slurry, respectively, due to sugar degradation. However, this increase in acidity resulted in a higher glucose yield (94.2%) from pressed slurry than from filtered slurry (77.6%). Conclusion Pressing the washed material between the two acid hydrolysis steps had no significant negative effect on the sugar yields of the second acid hydrolysis step or on enzymatic hydrolysis. Not washing the material resulted in a harsher second acid hydrolysis step, which caused greater degradation of the sugars during subsequent acid hydrolysis of the solids, particularly in case of the vacuum-filtered solids. However

  7. Pretreatment of wheat straw using combined wet oxidation and alkaline hydrolysis resulting in convertible cellulose and hemicellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerre, A.B.; Olesen, A.B.; Fernqvist, T.; Ploeger, A.; Schmidt, A.S.

    1996-03-05

    The wet oxidation process of wheat straw has been studied as a pretreatment method to attain the main goal: to break down cellulose to glucose enzymatic, and secondly, to dissolve hemicellulose (e.g., for fermentation) without producing microbial inhibitors. Wet oxidation combined with base addition readily oxidizes lignin from wheat straw facilitating the polysaccharides for enzymatic hydrolysis. By using a specially constructed autoclave system, the wet oxidation process was optimized with respect to both reaction time and temperature. The best conditions (20 g/L straw, 170 C, 5 to 10 min) gave about 85% w/w yield of converting cellulose to glucose. The process water, containing dissolved hemicellulose and carboxylic acids, has proven to be a direct nutrient source for the fungus Aspergillus niger producing exo-{beta}-xylosidase. Furfural and hydroxymethyl-furfural, known inhibitors of microbial growth when other pretreatment systems have been applied, were not observed following the wet oxidation treatment.

  8. Combination of liquid hot water pretreatment and wet disk milling to improve the efficiency of the enzymatic hydrolysis of eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Weiqi, Wei; Shubin, Wu; Liguo, Liu

    2013-01-01

    Combination of liquid hot water pretreatment (LHWP) and wet disk milling (WDM) was investigated in this study to enhance the sugar recovery yield both in prehydrolyzate and enzymatic hydrolyzate. The results show that WDM with LHWP at 180 °C for 20 min produced maximum xylose and glucose yields of 91.62% and 88.12%, respectively, which are higher than that of dilute acid pretreatment or individual LHWP. Corresponding concentration of fermentation inhibitors such as acetic acid, HMF, and furfural in the prehydrolyzate are about 0.98, 0.07 and 0.78 g/L, respectively, which indicated that the detoxification may be not required in the next fermentation step. The acid-insoluble lignin recovery in the insoluble solid resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis, was 25.67/100g raw material, representing 90.7% of acid-insoluble lignin in the eucalyptus biomass. It can be concluded that liquid hot water pretreatment combined with wet disk milling can be successfully applied to eucalyptus. PMID:23260273

  9. Enhanced functional properties of tannic acid after thermal hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal hydrolysis processing of fresh tannic acid was carried out in a closed reactor at four different temperatures (65, 100, 150 and 200°C). Pressures reached in the system were 1.3 and 4.8 MPa at 150 and 200°C, respectively. Hydrolysis products (gallic acid and pyrogallol) were separated and qua...

  10. A Kinetic Study of DDGS Hemicellulose Acid Hydrolysis and NMR Characterization of DDGS Hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanchi; Liu, Shijie

    2015-09-01

    Liquid hot water (LHW) extraction was used as a pretreatment method to separate the hemicellulose fraction from dried distiller's grain with solubles (DDGS) into liquid phase. Acid hydrolysis using 3.264 % w/w sulfuric acid at 130 °C was performed to convert polysaccharides in LHW extract to monosaccharides. The structure characterization of DDGS in anomeric carbon region based on proton NMR and heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) during acid hydrolysis was studied in this work. It reveals that the sugar units in DDGS hemicelluloses are constructed with (1-4)-β-D-xylopyranose and α-L-arabinofuranosyl residues. A kinetic model is included to explain the changing concentration of monomer, oligomer, and sugar units. The model was further tested based on the changing concentration of five carbon sugar units during hydrolysis. PMID:26198022

  11. Pretreatment of garden biomass by alkali-assisted ultrasonication: effects on enzymatic hydrolysis and ultrastructural changes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation aims at studying the effectiveness of alkali-assisted ultrasonication on pretreatment of garden biomass (GB). Dry and powdered GB suspended in 1% NaOH was ultrasonicated for 15, 30 and 60 minutes at a frequency of 25 KHZ. The mode of action and effectiveness of alkali-assisted ultrasonication on GB was established through microscopic, scanning electron microscopic and X-ray diffraction studies. A perusal of results showed that alkali-assisted ultrasonication led to fibrillation of GB which ultimately facilitated enzymatic hydrolysis. The results also indicated that alkali-assisted ultrasonication is an efficient means of pretreatment of GB at moderate (45-50°C) working temperature and low (1%) concentration of alkali. The yield of reducing sugar after enzymatic hydrolysis increased almost six times as compared to control due to alkali-assisted ultrasonication. PMID:24843790

  12. Saccharification of microalgae biomass obtained from wastewater treatment by enzymatic hydrolysis. Effect of alkaline-peroxide pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Martín Juárez, Judit; Lorenzo Hernando, Ana; Muñoz Torre, Raúl; Blanco Lanza, Saúl; Bolado Rodríguez, Silvia

    2016-10-01

    An enzymatic method for the carbohydrate hydrolysis of different microalgae biomass cultivated in domestic (DWB) and pig manure (PMWB) wastewaters, at different storage conditions (fresh, freeze-dried and reconstituted), was evaluated. The DWB provided sugars yields between 40 and 63%, although low xylose yields (< 23.5%). Approximately 2% of this biomass was converted to byproducts as succinic, acetic and formic acids. For PMWB, a high fraction of the sugars (up to 87%) was extracted, but mainly converted into acetic, butyric and formic acids, which was attributed to the bacterial action. In addition, the performance of an alkaline-peroxide pretreatment, conducted for 1h, 50°C and H2O2 concentrations from 1 to 7.5% (w/w), was essayed. The hydrolysis of pretreated microalgae supported a wide range of sugars extraction for DWB (55-90%), and 100% for PMWB. Nevertheless, a large fraction of these sugars (∼30% for DWB and 100% for PMWB) was transformed to byproducts. PMID:27372005

  13. Ultrasound-assisted dilute acid hydrolysis of tea processing waste for production of fermentable sugar.

    PubMed

    Germec, Mustafa; Tarhan, Kübra; Yatmaz, Ercan; Tetik, Nedim; Karhan, Mustafa; Demirci, Ali; Turhan, Irfan

    2016-03-01

    Lignocellulosic materials that are the most abundant plant biomass in the world have the potential to become sustainable sources of the produced value added products. Tea processing waste (TPW) is a good lignocellulosic source to produce the value added products from fermentable sugars (FSs). Therefore, the present study is undertaken to produce FSs by using ultrasound-assisted dilute acid (UADA) and dilute acid (DA) hydrolysis of TPW followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. UADA hydrolysis of TPW was optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) at maximum power (900 W) for 2 h. The optimum conditions were determined as 50°C, 1:6 (w/v) solid:liquid ratio, and 1% (w/v) DA concentration, which yielded 20.34 g/L FS concentration. Furthermore, its DA hydrolysis was also optimized by using RSM for comparison and the optimized conditions were found as 120°C, 1:8 solid:liquid ratio, and 1% acid concentration, which produced 25.3 g/L FS yield. Even though the produced sugars with UADA hydrolysis are slightly less, but it can provide significant cost saving due to the lower temperature requirement and less liquid consumption. Besides, enzymatic hydrolysis applied after pretreatments of TPW were very more economic than the conventional enzymatic hydrolysis in the literature due to shorter time requiring. In conclusion, ultrasound-assisted is a promising technology that can be successfully applied for hydrolysis of biomass and can be an alternative to the other hydrolysis procedures and also TPW can be considered as suitable carbon source for the production of value-added products like biofuels, organic acids, and polysaccharides. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:393-403, 2016. PMID:26749037

  14. Responses of biomass briquetting and pelleting to water-involved pretreatments and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Li, Xiaotong; Shen, Fei; Wang, Zhanghong; Yang, Gang; Lin, Lili; Zhang, Yanzong; Zeng, Yongmei; Deng, Shihuai

    2014-01-01

    Although lignocellulosic biomass has been extensively regarded as the most important resource for bioethanol, the wide application was seriously restricted by the high transportation cost of biomass. Currently, biomass densification is regarded as an acceptable solution to this issue. Herein, briquettes, pellets and their corresponding undensified biomass were pretreated by diluted-NaOH and hydrothermal method to investigate the responses of biomass densification to these typical water-involved pretreatments and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. The densified biomass auto-swelling was initially investigated before pretreatment. Results indicated pellets could be totally auto-swollen in an hour, while it took about 24 h for briquettes. When diluted-NaOH pretreatment was performed, biomass briquetting and pelleting improved sugar conversion rate by 20.1% and 5.5% comparing with their corresponding undensified biomass. Pelleting improved sugar conversion rate by 7.0% after hydrothermal pretreatment comparing with the undensified biomass. However, briquetting disturbed hydrothermal pretreatment resulting in the decrease of sugar conversion rate by 15.0%. PMID:24189385

  15. Comparison of sodium carbonate pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw stem and leaf to produce fermentable sugars.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yongcan; Huang, Ting; Geng, Wenhui; Yang, Linfeng

    2013-06-01

    The specific characteristics of biomass structure and chemical composition of straw stem and leaf may result in different behavior of pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. In this work, sodium carbonate (SC) was employed as a pretreatment to improve the enzymatic digestibility of wheat straw. The chemical composition and enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw stem and leaf (sheath included) were investigated comparatively. Most of the polysaccharides are kept in the solid fractions after SC pretreatment, while the stem has better delignification selectivity than leaf at high temperature. The enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency of wheat straw leaf is significantly higher than that of stem. The maximum total sugar yield from SC pretreated leaf was about 16% higher than stem. The results show that sodium carbonate is of great potential to be used as a pretreatment for the production of bioethanol from straw handling waste in a straw pulp mill with a low feedstock cost. PMID:23587832

  16. Helically agitated mixing in dry dilute acid pretreatment enhances the bioconversion of corn stover into ethanol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dry dilute acid pretreatment at extremely high solids loading of lignocellulose materials demonstrated promising advantages of no waste water generation, less sugar loss, and low steam consumption while maintaining high hydrolysis yield. However, the routine pretreatment reactor without mixing apparatus was found not suitable for dry pretreatment operation because of poor mixing and mass transfer. In this study, helically agitated mixing was introduced into the dry dilute acid pretreatment of corn stover and its effect on pretreatment efficiency, inhibitor generation, sugar production, and bioconversion efficiency through simultaneous saccharification and ethanol fermentation (SSF) were evaluated. Results The overall cellulose conversion taking account of cellulose loss in pretreatment was used to evaluate the efficiency of pretreatment. The two-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model on dry pretreatment was established and applied to analyze the mixing mechanism. The results showed that the pretreatment efficiency was significantly improved and the inhibitor generation was reduced by the helically agitated mixing, compared to the dry pretreatment without mixing: the ethanol titer and yield from cellulose in the SSF reached 56.20 g/L and 69.43% at the 30% solids loading and 15 FPU/DM cellulase dosage, respectively, corresponding to a 26.5% increase in ethanol titer and 17.2% increase in ethanol yield at the same fermentation conditions. Conclusions The advantage of helically agitated mixing may provide a prototype of dry dilute acid pretreatment processing for future commercial-scale production of cellulosic ethanol. PMID:24387051

  17. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose pretreated with ionic liquids and N-methyl Morpholine N-Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau Li, Elizabeth

    The effect of N-methyl Morpholine N-Oxide (NMMO), 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium acetate ([Emim]Ac) and 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium diethyl phosphate ([Emim]DEP) on pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of dissolving pulp was studied. X-ray diffraction measurements of regenerated cellulose from these solvents showed that solvent pretreatment reduces the crystallinity of cellulose. However, crystallinity might not be a major factor affecting the in-situ enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in these solvents. Although regenerated cellulose from [Emim]DEP showed the lowest crystallinity index (˜15%), in-situ enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose dissolved in NMMO showed the highest cellulose conversion (68% compared to 65% for [Emim]Ac and 37% for [Emim]DEP at enzyme loading of 122 FPU/g). Moreover, results showed that enzymes could tolerate up to NMMO concentration of 100 g/L and still yield full conversion of cellulose. Since it is not necessary to remove all the NMMO, less amount of water will be required for the washing step and thus the process will be more economical. The HCH-1 model was used in an attempt to model the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in NMMO. With the incorporation of NMMO inhibition and a factor to account for unreacted cellulose, the model was able to correlate the experimental data of the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose (6.68 g/L) at various NMMO concentrations (0, 50, 100, 150 and 250 g/L). However, the experimental results also suggest that NMMO might be deactivating the enzymes rather than inhibiting them. More studies need to be done at varying cellulose, NMMO and enzyme concentrations to find the exact nature of this deactivation of NMMO.

  18. Comparison of Dilute Acid and Ionic Liquid Pretreatment of Switchgrass: Biomass Recalcitrance, Delignification and Enzymatic Saccharification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficiency of two biomass pretreatment technologies, dilute acid hydrolysis and dissolution in an ionic liquid, are compared in terms of delignification, saccharification efficiency and saccharide yields with switchgrass serving as a model bioenergy crop. When subject to ionic liquid pretreatme...

  19. A novel sono-assisted acid pretreatment of chili post harvest residue for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, Raveendran; Binod, Parameswaran; Pandey, Ashok

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a sono-assisted acid pretreatment strategy for the effective removal of lignin and hemicelluloses and to improve the sugar yield from chili post harvest residue. Operational parameters that affect the pretreatment efficiency were studied and optimized. Inhibitor analysis of the hydrolyzate revealed that major fermentation inhibitors like furfural, hydroxymethyl furfural and organic acids like citric acid, succinic acid and propionic acid were absent. Changes in structural properties of the biomass were studied in relation to the pretreatment process using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis, and the changes in chemical composition was also monitored. The biomass pretreated with the optimized novel method yielded 0.465g/g of reducing sugars on enzymatic hydrolysis. Fermentation of the non-detoxified hydrolysate yielded 2.14% of bioethanol with a fermentation efficiency of 71.03%. PMID:26949055

  20. Torque measurements reveal large process differences between materials during high solid enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A common trend in the research on 2nd generation bioethanol is the focus on intensifying the process and increasing the concentration of water insoluble solids (WIS) throughout the process. However, increasing the WIS content is not without problems. For example, the viscosity of pretreated lignocellulosic materials is known to increase drastically with increasing WIS content. Further, at elevated viscosities, problems arise related to poor mixing of the material, such as poor distribution of the enzymes and/or difficulties with temperature and pH control, which results in possible yield reduction. Achieving good mixing is unfortunately not without cost, since the power requirements needed to operate the impeller at high viscosities can be substantial. This highly important scale-up problem can easily be overlooked. Results In this work, we monitor the impeller torque (and hence power input) in a stirred tank reactor throughout high solid enzymatic hydrolysis (< 20% WIS) of steam-pretreated Arundo donax and spruce. Two different process modes were evaluated, where either the impeller speed or the impeller power input was kept constant. Results from hydrolysis experiments at a fixed impeller speed of 10 rpm show that a very rapid decrease in impeller torque is experienced during hydrolysis of pretreated arundo (i.e. it loses its fiber network strength), whereas the fiber strength is retained for a longer time within the spruce material. This translates into a relatively low, rather WIS independent, energy input for arundo whereas the stirring power demand for spruce is substantially larger and quite WIS dependent. By operating the impeller at a constant power input (instead of a constant impeller speed) it is shown that power input greatly affects the glucose yield of pretreated spruce whereas the hydrolysis of arundo seems unaffected. Conclusions The results clearly highlight the large differences between the arundo and spruce materials, both in terms of

  1. Pretreatment of microcrystalline cellulose in organic electrolyte solutions for enzymatic hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that the crystalline structure of cellulose is negatively correlated with enzymatic digestibility, therefore, pretreatment is required to break down the highly ordered crystalline structure in cellulose, and to increase the porosity of its surface. In the present study, an organic electrolyte solution (OES) composed of an ionic liquid (1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([AMIM]Cl)) and an organic solvent (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) was prepared, and used to pretreat microcrystalline cellulose for subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis; to our knowledge, this is the first time that this method has been used. Results Microcrystalline cellulose (5 wt%) rapidly dispersed and then completely dissolved in an OES with a molar fraction of [AMIM]Cl per OES (χ [AMIM]Cl) of greater than or equal to 0.2 at 110°C within 10 minutes. The cellulose was regenerated from the OES by precipitation with hot water, and enzymatically hydrolyzed. As the χ [AMIM]Cl of the OES increased from 0.1 to 0.9, both the hydrolysis yield and initial hydrolysis rate of the regenerated cellulose also increased gradually. After treatment using OES with χ [AMIM]Cl of 0.7, the glucose yield (54.1%) was 7.2 times that of untreated cellulose. This promotion of hydrolysis yield was mainly due to the decrease in the degree of crystallinity (that is, the crystallinity index of cellulose I). Conclusions An OES of [AMIM]Cl and DMSO with χ [AMIM]Cl of 0.7 was chosen for cellulose pretreatment because it dissolved cellulose rapidly to achieve a high glucose yield (54.1%), which was only slightly lower than the value (59.6%) obtained using pure [AMIM]Cl. OES pretreatment is a cost-effective and environmentally friendly technique for hydrolysis, because it 1) uses the less expensive OES instead of pure ionic liquids, 2) shortens dissolution time, 3) requires lower energy for stirring and transporting, and 4) is recyclable. PMID:22099703

  2. Structural Changes of Lignin after Liquid Hot Water Pretreatment and Its Effect on the Enzymatic Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Zhuang, Xinshu; Yuan, Zhenhong; Qi, Wei; Yu, Qiang; Wang, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    During liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment, lignin is mostly retained in the pretreated biomass, and the changes in the chemical and structural characteristics of lignin should probably refer to re-/depolymerization, solubilization, or glass transition. The residual lignin could influence the effective enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. The pure lignin was used to evaluate the effect of LHW process on its structural and chemical features. The surface morphology of LHW-treated lignin observed with the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was more porous and irregular than that of untreated lignin. Compared to the untreated lignin, the surface area, total pore volume, and average pore size of LHW-treated lignin tested with the Brunner-Emmet-Teller (BET) measurement were increased. FTIR analysis showed that the chemical structure of lignin was broken down in the LHW process. Additionally, the impact of untreated and treated lignin on the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was also explored. The LHW-treated lignin had little impact on the cellulase adsorption and enzyme activities and somehow could improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. PMID:27563678

  3. Structural Changes of Lignin after Liquid Hot Water Pretreatment and Its Effect on the Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xinshu; Qi, Wei; Yu, Qiang; Wang, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    During liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment, lignin is mostly retained in the pretreated biomass, and the changes in the chemical and structural characteristics of lignin should probably refer to re-/depolymerization, solubilization, or glass transition. The residual lignin could influence the effective enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. The pure lignin was used to evaluate the effect of LHW process on its structural and chemical features. The surface morphology of LHW-treated lignin observed with the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was more porous and irregular than that of untreated lignin. Compared to the untreated lignin, the surface area, total pore volume, and average pore size of LHW-treated lignin tested with the Brunner-Emmet-Teller (BET) measurement were increased. FTIR analysis showed that the chemical structure of lignin was broken down in the LHW process. Additionally, the impact of untreated and treated lignin on the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was also explored. The LHW-treated lignin had little impact on the cellulase adsorption and enzyme activities and somehow could improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. PMID:27563678

  4. Effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on kinetics of gelatin hydrolysis by collagenase and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Long; Zeng, Wei-Cai; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Liao, Xue-Pin; Shi, Bi

    2016-03-01

    Gelatin is a mixture of soluble proteins prepared by partial hydrolysis of native collagen. Gelatin can be enzymatically hydrolyzed to produce bioactive hydrolysates. However, the preparation of gelatin peptide with expected activity is usually a time-consuming process. The production efficiency of gelatin hydrolysates needs to be improved. In present work, effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on kinetic parameters of gelatin hydrolysis by collagenase was investigated based on an established kinetic model. With ultrasonic pretreatment, reaction rate constant and enzyme inactivation constant were increased by 27.5% and 27.8%, respectively. Meanwhile, hydrolysis activation energy and enzyme inactivation energy were reduced by 36.3% and 43.0%, respectively. In order to explore its possible mechanism, influence of sonication on structural properties of gelatin was determined using atomic force microscopy, particle size analyzer, fluorescence spectroscopy, protein solubility test and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide was used as a positive control for potential sonochemical effect. It was found that reduction of gelatin particle size was mainly caused by physical effect of ultrasound. Increased solubility and variation in β-sheet and random coil elements of gelatin were due to sonochemical effect. Both physical and chemical effects of sonication contributed to the change in α-helix and β-turn structures. The current results suggest that ultrasound can be potentially applied to stimulate the production efficiency of gelatin peptides, mainly due to its effects on modification of protein structures. PMID:26558996

  5. Characterization of oxalic acid pretreatment on lignocellulosic biomass using oxalic acid recovered by electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong-Joo; Seo, Young-Jun; Lee, Jae-Won

    2013-04-01

    The properties of pretreated biomass and hydrolysate obtained by oxalic acid pretreatment using oxalic acid recovered through electrodialysis (ED) were investigated. Most of the oxalic acid was recovered and some of the fermentation inhibitors were removed by ED. For the original hydrolysate, the ethanol production was very low and fermentable sugars were not completely consumed by Pichia stipitis during fermentation. Ethanol yield was less than 0.12 g/g in all stage. For the ED-treated hydrolysate, ethanol production was increased by up to two times in all stages compared to the original hydrolysate. The highest ethanol production was 19.38 g/l after 72 h which correspond to the ethanol yield of 0.33 g/g. Enzymatic conversion of the cellulose to glucose for all the pretreated biomass was in the range of 76.03 and 77.63%. The hydrolysis rate on each pretreated biomass was not significantly changed when oxalic acid recovered by ED was used for pretreatment. PMID:23422303

  6. Enhancing the hydrolysis and methane production potential of mixed food waste by an effective enzymatic pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Esra Uçkun; Trzcinski, Antoine P; Liu, Yu

    2015-05-01

    In this study, a fungal mash rich in hydrolytic enzymes was produced by solid state fermentation (SSF) of waste cake in a simple and efficient manner and was further applied for high-efficiency hydrolysis of mixed food wastes (FW). The enzymatic pretreatment of FW with this fungal mash resulted in 89.1 g/L glucose, 2.4 g/L free amino nitrogen, 165 g/L soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) and 64% reduction in volatile solids within 24h. The biomethane yield and production rate from FW pretreated with the fungal mash were found to be respectively about 2.3 and 3.5-times higher than without pretreatment. After anaerobic digestion of pretreated FW, a volatile solids removal of 80.4±3.5% was achieved. The pretreatment of mixed FW with the fungal mash produced in this study is a promising option for enhancing anaerobic digestion of FW in terms of energy recovery and volume reduction. PMID:25722182

  7. ESTIMATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACID ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate hydrolysis rate constants for carboxylic acid esters from molecular structure. The energy differences between the initial state and the transition state for a molecule of interest are factored into internal and external...

  8. [Application of Micro-aerobic Hydrolysis Acidification in the Pretreatment of Petrochemical Wastewater].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chen; Wu, Chang-yong; Zhou, Yue-xi; Fu, Xiao-yong; Chen, Xue-min; Qiu, Yan-bo; Wu, Xiao-feng

    2015-10-01

    Micro-aerobic hydrolysis acidification technology was applied in the reconstruction of ananaerobic hydrolysis acidification tank in a north petrochemical wastewater treatment plant. After put into operation, the monitoring results showed that the average removal rate of COD was 11.7% when influent COD was 490.3-673.2 mg x L(-1), hydraulic retention time (HRT) was 24 and the dissolved oxygen (DO) was 0.2-0.35 mg x L(-1). In addition, the BOD5/COD value was increased by 12.4%, the UV254 removal rate reached 11.2%, and the VFA concentration was increased by 23.0%. The relative molecular weight distribution (MWD) results showed that the small molecule organic matter (< 1 x 10(3)) percentage was increased from 59.5% to 82.1% and the high molecular organic matter ( > 100 x 10(3)) percentage was decreased from 31.8% to 14.0% after micro-aerobic hydrolysis acidification. The aerobic biodegradation batch test showed that the degradation of petrochemical wastewater was significantly improved by the pretreatment of micro-aerobic hydrolysis acidification. The COD of influent can be degraded to 102.2 mg x L(-1) by 48h aerobic treatment while the micro-aerobic hydrolysis acidification effluent COD can be degraded to 71.5 mg x L(-1) on the same condition. The effluent sulfate concentration of micro-aerobic hydrolysis acidification tank [(930.7 ± 60.1) mg x L(-1)] was higher than that of the influent [(854.3 ± 41.5) mg x L(-1)], indicating that sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) was inhibited. The toxic and malodorous gases generation was reduced with the improvement of environment. PMID:26841606

  9. Improvement of enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production from corn stalk by alkali and N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ling-Yan; Ma, Yu-Long; Ma, Xiao-Xia; Lv, Jun-Min

    2016-07-01

    A combinative technology of alkali and N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMMO) was used to pretreat corn stalk (CS) for improving the efficiencies of subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation. The results showed that this strategy could not only remove hemicellulose and lignin but also decrease the crystallinity of cellulose. About 98.0% of enzymatic hydrolysis yield was obtained from the pretreated CS as compared with 46.9% from the untreated sample. The yield for corresponding ethanol yield was 64.6% while untreated CS was only 18.8%. Besides, xylose yield obtained from the untreated CS was only 11.1%, while this value was 93.8% for alkali with NMMO pretreated sample. These results suggest that a combination of alkali with 50% (wt/wt) NMMO solution may be a promising alternative for pretreatment of lignocellulose, which can increase the productions of subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation. PMID:27078206

  10. Comparative study on chemical pretreatments to accelerate enzymatic hydrolysis of aquatic macrophyte biomass used in water purification processes.

    PubMed

    Mishima, D; Tateda, M; Ike, M; Fujita, M

    2006-11-01

    In this study, enzymatic hydrolysis of two floating aquatic plants which are suitable for water purification, water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) and water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes L.), was performed to produce sugars. Twenty chemical pretreatments were comparatively examined in order to improve the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. As a result, the alkaline/oxidative (A/O) pretreatment, in which sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide were used, was the most effective pretreatment in terms of improving enzymatic hydrolysis of the leaves of water hyacinth and water lettuce. The amount of reducing sugars in enzymatic hydrolysate of water lettuce leaves was 1.8 times higher than that of water hyacinth leaves, therefore water lettuce seems to be more attractive as a biomass resource than water hyacinth. Although roots of these plants contained large amounts of polysaccharides such as cellulose and hemicellulose, they generated less monosaccharides than from leaves, no matter which chemical pretreatment was tested. PMID:16309902

  11. Membrane-based recovery of glucose from enzymatic hydrolysis of ionic liquid pretreated cellulose.

    PubMed

    Abels, Christian; Thimm, Kristof; Wulfhorst, Helene; Spiess, Antje Christine; Wessling, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    In this work, a membrane-based downstream process for the recovery of glucose from cellulose hydrolysis is described and evaluated. The cellulose is pretreated with the ionic liquid 1,3-dimethyl-imidazolium dimethylphosphate to reduce its crystallinity. After enzymatic conversion of cellulose to glucose the hydrolysate is filtered with an ultrafiltration membrane to remove residual particulates and enzymes. Nanofiltration is applied to purify the glucose from molecular intermediates, such as cellobiose originating from the hydrolysis reaction. Finally, the ionic liquid is removed from the hydrolysate via electrodialysis. Technically, these process steps are feasible. An economic analysis of the process reveals that the selling price of glucose from this production process is about 2.75 €/kg which is too high as compared to the current market price. PMID:24084205

  12. Cellulose accessibility limits the effectiveness of minimum cellulase loading on the efficient hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic substrates.

    PubMed

    Arantes, Valdeir; Saddler, Jack N

    2011-01-01

    A range of lignocellulosic feedstocks (including agricultural, softwood and hardwood substrates) were pretreated with either sulfur dioxide-catalyzed steam or an ethanol organosolv procedure to try to establish a reliable assessment of the factors governing the minimum protein loading that could be used to achieve efficient hydrolysis. A statistical design approach was first used to define what might constitute the minimum protein loading (cellulases and β-glucosidase) that could be used to achieve efficient saccharification (defined as at least 70% glucan conversion) of the pretreated substrates after 72 hours of hydrolysis. The likely substrate factors that limit cellulose availability/accessibility were assessed, and then compared with the optimized minimum amounts of protein used to obtain effective hydrolysis. The optimized minimum protein loadings to achieve efficient hydrolysis of seven pretreated substrates ranged between 18 and 63 mg protein per gram of glucan. Within the similarly pretreated group of lignocellulosic feedstocks, the agricultural residues (corn stover and corn fiber) required significantly lower protein loadings to achieve efficient hydrolysis than did the pretreated woody biomass (poplar, douglas fir and lodgepole pine). Regardless of the substantial differences in the source, structure and chemical composition of the feedstocks, and the difference in the pretreatment technology used, the protein loading required to achieve efficient hydrolysis of lignocellulosic substrates was strongly dependent on the accessibility of the cellulosic component of each of the substrates. We found that cellulose-rich substrates with highly accessible cellulose, as assessed by the Simons' stain method, required a lower protein loading per gram of glucan to obtain efficient hydrolysis compared with substrates containing less accessible cellulose. These results suggest that the rate-limiting step during hydrolysis is not the catalytic cleavage of the

  13. Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate pretreatment of eucalyptus wood for enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Long; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Endo, Takashi

    2013-07-01

    Ground eucalyptus wood was pretreated with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([EMIM]OAc)-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solutions with different mixing ratios under various conditions. The changes in the composition and structure of the biomass were investigated; and the enzymatic hydrolysis performance of the pretreated biomass was evaluated. [EMIM]OAc-DMSO pretreatment had a relatively mild effect on the composition of the biomass, but excessively high pretreatment temperatures led to massive loss of xylan after pretreatment. The enzymatic digestibility of the biomass was significantly improved with increased pretreatment temperature. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the disruption of cellulose crystal structure by [EMIM]OAc at a sufficiently high temperature was primarily responsible for the remarkable improvement in the digestibility. Appropriate addition of DMSO could help minimize the consumption of [EMIM]OAc without impairing the performance of the ionic liquid, and contribute to the improvement in pretreatment efficiency due to the viscosity reduction effect on the pretreatment liquor. PMID:23685645

  14. Cellulose degradation in alkaline media upon acidic pretreatment and stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Testova, Lidia; Nieminen, Kaarlo; Penttilä, Paavo A; Serimaa, Ritva; Potthast, Antje; Sixta, Herbert

    2014-01-16

    The present study reports on a revised kinetic model for alkaline degradation of cellulose accounting for primary peeling/stopping reactions as well as for alkaline hydrolysis followed by secondary peeling. Oxalic acid pretreated cotton linters was utilised as the model substrate for the prehydrolysis-soda anthraquinone process. The main emphasis was investigating the effect of end-group stabilising additives such as sodium borohydride (BH), anthraquinone (AQ), and anthraquinone-2-sulphonic acid sodium salt (AQS) on the rates of the yield loss reactions. BH and AQS ensured a cellulose yield gain of 13% and 11%, respectively, compared to the reference. Both stabilisation agents decreased the content of the reducing end groups in the samples, while in the case of AQS stabilisation a 25% increase in carboxyl group content compared to the reference was also observed. As expected, the addition of end group stabilisers resulted in a significant decrease in the peeling-to-stopping rate constants ratio. PMID:24188853

  15. Natural deep eutectic solvent mediated pretreatment of rice straw: bioanalytical characterization of lignin extract and enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated biomass residue.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Adepu K; Parikh, Bhumika S; Pravakar, Mohanty

    2016-05-01

    The present investigation demonstrated pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass rice straw using natural deep eutectic solvents (NADESs), and separation of high-quality lignin and holocellulose in a single step. Qualitative analysis of the NADES extract showed that the extracted lignin was of high purity (>90 %), and quantitative analysis showed that nearly 60 ± 5 % (w/w) of total lignin was separated from the lignocellulosic biomass. Addition of 5.0 % (v/v) water during pretreatment significantly enhanced the total lignin extraction, and nearly 22 ± 3 % more lignin was released from the residual biomass into the NADES extract. X-ray diffraction studies of the untreated and pretreated rice straw biomass showed that the crystallinity index ratio was marginally decreased from 46.4 to 44.3 %, indicating subtle structural alterations in the crystalline and amorphous regions of the cellulosic fractions. Thermogravimetric analysis of the pretreated biomass residue revealed a slightly higher T dcp (295 °C) compared to the T dcp (285 °C) of untreated biomass. Among the tested NADES reagents, lactic acid/choline chloride at molar ratio of 5:1 extracted maximum lignin of 68 ± 4 mg g(-1) from the rice straw biomass, and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of the residual holocellulose enriched biomass showed maximum reducing sugars of 333 ± 11 mg g(-1) with a saccharification efficiency of 36.0 ± 3.2 % in 24 h at 10 % solids loading. PMID:26032452

  16. Alkaline-sulfite pretreatment and use of surfactants during enzymatic hydrolysis to enhance ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Jéssica Faria; Ferraz, André; Aguiar, André

    2016-03-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is a by-product from the sugar and ethanol industry which contains approximately 70 % of its dry mass composed by polysaccharides. To convert these polysaccharides into fuel ethanol it is necessary a pretreatment step to increase the enzymatic digestibility of the recalcitrant raw material. In this work, sugarcane bagasse was pretreated by an alkaline-sulfite chemithermomechanical process for increasing its enzymatic digestibility. Na2SO3 and NaOH ratios were fixed at 2:1, and three increasing chemical loads, varying from 4 to 8 % m/m Na2SO3, were used to prepare the pretreated materials. The increase in the alkaline-sulfite load decreased the lignin content in the pretreated material up to 35.5 % at the highest chemical load. The pretreated samples presented enhanced glucose yields during enzymatic hydrolysis as a function of the pretreatment severity. The maximum glucose yield (64 %) was observed for the samples pretreated with the highest chemical load. The use of 2.5 g l(-1) Tween 20 in the hydrolysis step further increased the glucose yield to 75 %. Semi-simultaneous hydrolysis and fermentation of the pretreated materials indicated that the ethanol yield was also enhanced as a function of the pretreatment severity. The maximum ethanol yield was 56 ± 2 % for the sample pretreated with the highest chemical load. For the sample pretreated with the lowest chemical load (2 % m/m NaOH and 4 % m/m Na2SO3), adding Tween 20 during the hydrolysis process increased the ethanol yield from 25 ± 3 to 39.5 ± 1 %. PMID:26718203

  17. Use of anaerobic hydrolysis pretreatment to enhance ultrasonic disintegration of excess sludge.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianjin; Zhu, Tong; Shen, Yang; Chai, Tianyu; Xie, Yuanhua; You, Meiyan; Wang, Youzhao

    2016-01-01

    To improve the excess sludge disintegration efficiency, reduce the sludge disintegration cost, and increase sludge biodegradability, a combined pretreatment of anaerobic hydrolysis (AH) and ultrasonic treatment (UT) was proposed for excess sludge. Results showed that AH had an advantage in dissolving flocs, modifying sludge characteristics, and reducing the difficulty of sludge disintegration, whereas UT was advantageous in damaging cell walls, releasing intracellular substances, and decomposing macromolecular material. The combined AH-UT process was an efficient method for excess sludge pretreatment. The optimized solution involved AH for 3 days, followed by UT for 10 min. After treatment, chemical oxygen demand, protein, and peptidoglycan concentrations reached 3,949.5 mg O2/L, 752.5 mg/L and 619.1 mg/L, respectively. This work has great significance for further engineering applications, namely, reducing energy consumption, increasing the sludge disintegration rate, and improving the biochemical properties of sludge. PMID:26942542

  18. Enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw by gamma irradiation-alkaline pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yanan; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-06-01

    Pretreatment of wheat straw with gamma irradiation and NaOH was performed to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw for production of reducing sugar. The results showed that the irradiation of wheat straw at 50 kGy decreased the yield of reducing sugar, however, the reducing sugar yield increased with increasing dose from 50 kGy to 400 kGy. The irradiation of wheat straw at 100 kGy can significantly decrease NaOH consumption and treatment time. The reducing sugar yield could reach 72.67% after irradiation at 100 kGy and 2% NaOH treatment for 1 h. The combined pretreatment of wheat straw by gamma radiation and NaOH immersion can increase the solubilization of hemicellulose and lignin as well as the accessible surface area for enzyme molecules.

  19. Furfural/ethanol coproduction from biomass feedstocks using acid hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barrier, J.W.; Bulls, M.M.; Broder, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has been involved in research and development to produce high-value chemicals from biomass for over 15 years. Use of biomass releases less carbon dioxide than use of fossil fuels, and thus represents a more environmentally friendly source of chemicals and fuels. Two biomass conversion processes have been developed as a result of TVA`s work--concentrated acid hydrolysis and dilute acid hydrolysis. Both processes use sulfuric acid as a catalyst. Early hydrolysis research focused on improving ethanol yields through hydrolysis and five-carbon sugar fermentation research. Both processes have been demonstrated at the pilot plant scale. Current work is focused on the development of integrated systems for producing ethanol and a variety of other chemicals and products from biomass. Production of furfural and ethanol from high hemicellulose feedstocks has been identified by TVA as an integrated system with technical and economic potential for commercial success. A system design has been developed to produce ethanol and furfural using dilute acid hydrolysis of sycamore. Furfural yields for the system are estimated at 180--240 pound/ton. Ethanol process yields are 25--38 gallon/ton. Capital and operating costs for a 4,500 ton/day facility are estimated to be $609 million and $183 million, respectively. The dilute acid hydrolysis process proposed by TVA will be described along with additional process economics and potential furfural markets.

  20. A laboratory-scale pretreatment and hydrolysis assay for determination of reactivity in cellulosic biomass feedstocks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The rapid determination of the release of structural sugars from biomass feedstocks is an important enabling technology for the development of cellulosic biofuels. An assay that is used to determine sugar release for large numbers of samples must be robust, rapid, and easy to perform, and must use modest amounts of the samples to be tested. In this work we present a laboratory-scale combined pretreatment and saccharification assay that can be used as a biomass feedstock screening tool. The assay uses a commercially available automated solvent extraction system for pretreatment followed by a small-scale enzymatic hydrolysis step. The assay allows multiple samples to be screened simultaneously, and uses only ~3 g of biomass per sample. If the composition of the biomass sample is known, the results of the assay can be expressed as reactivity (fraction of structural carbohydrate present in the biomass sample released as monomeric sugars). Results We first present pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis experiments on a set of representative biomass feedstock samples (corn stover, poplar, sorghum, switchgrass) in order to put the assay in context, and then show the results of the assay applied to approximately 150 different feedstock samples covering 5 different materials. From the compositional analysis data we identify a positive correlation between lignin and structural carbohydrates, and from the reactivity data we identify a negative correlation between both carbohydrate and lignin content and total reactivity. The negative correlation between lignin content and total reactivity suggests that lignin may interfere with sugar release, or that more mature samples (with higher structural sugars) may have more recalcitrant lignin. Conclusions The assay presented in this work provides a robust and straightforward method to measure the sugar release after pretreatment and saccharification that can be used as a biomass feedstock screening tool. We demonstrated

  1. Electron beam pretreatment of switchgrass to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis to produce sugars for biofuels.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Smith; Bergey, N Scott; Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Stipanovic, Arthur; Driscoll, Mark

    2014-01-16

    Conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to value added products such as ethanol and other platform chemicals is enhanced by pretreatment, which reduces the crystallinity and molecular weight of cell wall polymers, thus increasing the available reaction sites. In this study, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) was pretreated with high energy electron beam (EB) irradiation to reduce its recalcitrance and achieve higher sugar conversion rates during treatment with cellulases and β-glucosidase. Conversion rates to sugars were compared before and after hot water (HW) extraction of EB-treated and control samples of switchgrass. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was employed to determine peak degradation temperature of these EB-treated biomass samples before and after HW extraction, and near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) was used as a rapid technique to determine cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin contents in the samples. TGA data confirm previously reported results that EB pretreatment reduces the molecular weight and crystallinity of cellulose and hemicellulose. This leaves hemicellulose more amenable to HW extraction and creates more cellulase-accessible sites, as shown by NIR and glucose yield data, respectively. Hemicellulose content was reduced from 30.2 to 16.9% after HW extraction and 1000 kGy EB treatment, and ultimate glucose yield after cellulase hydrolysis increased more than 4-fold. This study provides evidence that when EB pretreatment is utilized in combination with HW extraction, higher conversion rates and yields of glucose can be obtained from the cellulosic fraction of switchgrass. PMID:24188854

  2. Sweet sorghum as feedstock for ethanol production: enzymatic hydrolysis of steam-pretreated bagasse.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Bálint; Réczey, Jutka; Somorai, Zsolt; Kádár, Zsófia; Dienes, Dóra; Réczey, Kati

    2009-05-01

    Sweet sorghum is an attractive feedstock for ethanol production. The juice extracted from the fresh stem is composed of sucrose, glucose, and fructose and can therefore be readily fermented to alcohol. The solid fraction left behind, the so-called bagasse, is a lignocellulosic residue which can also be processed to ethanol. The objective of our work was to test sweet sorghum, the whole crop, as a potential raw material of ethanol production, i.e., both the extracted sugar juice and the residual bagasse were tested. The juice was investigated at different harvesting dates for sugar content. Fermentability of juices extracted from the stem with and without leaves was compared. Sweet sorghum bagasse was steam-pretreated using various pretreatment conditions (temperatures and residence times). Efficiency of pretreatments was characterized by the degree of cellulose hydrolysis of the whole pretreated slurry and the separated fiber fraction. Two settings of the studied conditions (190 degrees C, 10 min and 200 degrees C, 5 min) were found to be efficient to reach conversion of 85-90%. PMID:19015818

  3. Comparative study of different alcoholate pretreatments for enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing; Yan, Qiuli; Fu, Jing; Lv, Xiaojing; Xiong, Chunjiang; Lin, Jianghai; Liu, Zehuan

    2016-07-01

    Pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse (SCB) with alcoholates, sodium methoxide (CH3ONa), potassium methoxide (CH3OK) and sodium ethoxide (C2H5ONa), was investigated. Analyses of lignocellulose composition and enzymatic saccharification indicated that C2H5ONa showed the highest enzymatic efficiency of 102.1%. The response surface optimization of C2H5ONa pretreatment showed that under optimal conditions (4% of C2H5ONa, 121°C, 1h), 65.4% of lignin was removed and the enzymatic efficiency reached 105.2%. Hydrolysis of SCB with cellulases and xylanase at a ratio of 4:1 showed the strongest synergism with reducing sugar production of 21g/L and conversion rates of cellulose and xylan reaching 110.4% and 94.5%, respectively. These results indicated that C2H5ONa is a promising alkali to pretreat SCB and the synergism between cellulases and xylanase has a significant effect on enzymatic saccharification of the pretreated SCB. PMID:27035479

  4. Ultrasonic enhance acid hydrolysis selectivity of cellulose with HCl-FeCl3 as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinbao; Zhang, Xiangrong; Zhang, Meiyun; Xiu, Huijuan; He, Hang

    2015-03-01

    The effect of ultrasonic pretreatment coupled with HCl-FeCl3 catalyst was evaluated to hydrolyze cellulose amorphous regions. The ultrasonic pretreatment leads to cavitation that affects the morphology and microstructure of fibers, enhancing the accessibility of chemical reagent to the loosened amorphous regions of cellulose. In this work, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to identify characteristic absorption bands of the constituents and the crystallinity was evaluated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The results indicated that appropriate ultrasonic pretreatment assisted with FeCl3 can enhance the acid hydrolysis of amorphous regions of cellulose, thus improving the crystallinity of the remaining hydrocellulose. It was observed that sonication samples that were pretreated for 300 W and 20 min followed by acid hydrolysis had maximum of 78.9% crystallinity. The crystallinity was 9.2% higher than samples that were not subjected to ultrasound. In addition, the average fines length decreased from 49 μm to 37 μm. PMID:25498717

  5. Distinct roles of residual xylan and lignin in limiting enzymatic hydrolysis of organosolv pretreated loblolly pine and sweetgum.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Tu, Maobing; Cao, Dongxu; Bass, Patrick; Adhikari, Sushil

    2013-01-23

    The interactions between xylan/lignin and cellulase enzymes play a key role in the effective hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass. Organosolv pretreated loblolly pine (OPLP) and sweetgum (OPSG) were used to quantitatively elucidate the distinct roles of residual xylan and lignin on enzymatic hydrolysis, based on the initial hydrolysis rates and the final hydrolysis yields. The initial hydrolysis rates of OPLP and OPSG were 1.45 (glucose) and 1.19 g/L/h (glucose), respectively, under the enzyme loading of 20 FPU/g glucan. The final glucan hydrolysis yields of OPLP and OPSG at 72 h were 76.4 and 98.9%, respectively. By correlating the amount of residual lignin and xylan to the initial hydrolysis rate and the final hydrolysis yield in OPLP and OPSG, a more accurate fundamental understanding of the roles of xylan and lignin in limiting the enzymatic hydrolysis has been developed. The higher amount of residual xylan (9.7%) in OPSG resulted in lower initial hydrolysis rate (1.19 g/L/h). The higher amount of residual lignin in OPLP (18.6%) resulted in lower final hydrolysis yield of glucan (76.4%). In addition, we observed in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) that ethyl xyloside was produced by the enzymatic catalysis of xylose/xylan and ethanol. PMID:23270516

  6. Enzymatic hydrolysis of beer brewers' spent grain and the influence of pretreatments

    SciTech Connect

    Beldman, G.; Hennekam, J.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    1987-01-01

    The enzymatic saccharification of plant material has been shown to be of interest in various fields, such as the production of fruit juices and the utilization of biomass. A combination of cellulase, pectinase, and hemicellulases is usually used because of the chemical composition of the matrix of plant cell walls. For apples, beet pulp, and potato fiber, almost a complete hydrolysis of polysaccharides is obtained by combining cellulase and pectinase. For nonparenchymatic tissue, the situation is somewhat different: pectin is a minor component and the hemicellulose content is much higher. Enzyme action is restricted by the lignin barrier and by the high crystallinity of cellulose in this material. For such materials, mechanical, thermal, or chemical pretreatments are necessary to achieve efficient hydrolysis. This communication describes various enzymatic treatments and chemical and physical pretreatment, using brewers' spent grain as substrate. Spent grain is the residue of malt and grain which remains in the mash-kettle after the liquefied and saccharified starch has been removed by filtration. (Refs. 15).

  7. Ammonia fiber expansion pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis on two different growth stages of reed canarygrass.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Tamika C; Alizadeh, Hasan; Teymouri, Farzaneh; Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E

    2007-04-01

    Plant materials from the vegetative growth stage of reed canarygrass and the seed stage of reed canarygrass are pretreated by ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) and enzymatically hydrolyzed using 15 filter paper units (FPU) cellulase/g glucan to evaluate glucose and xylose yields. Percent conversions of glucose and xylose, effects of temperature and ammonia loading, and hydrolysis profiles are analyzed to determine the most effective AFEX treatment condition for each of the selected materials. The controls used in this study were untreated samples of each biomass material. All pretreatment conditions tested enhanced enzyme digestibility and improved sugar conversions for reed canarygrass compared with their untreated counterparts. Based on 168 h hydrolysis results using 15 FPU Spezyme CP cellulase/g glucan the most effective AFEX treatment conditions were determined as: vegetative growth stage of reed canarygrass--100 degrees C, 60% moisture content, 1.2:1 kg ammonia/kg of dry matter (86% glucose and 78% xylose) and seed stage of reed canarygrass--100 degrees C, 60% moisture content, 0.8:1 kg ammonia/kg of dry matter (89% glucose and 81% xylose). Supplementation by commercial Multifect 720 xylanase along with cellulase further increased both glucose and xylose yields by 10-12% at the most effective AFEX conditions. PMID:18478404

  8. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. II. ACID AND GENERAL BASE CATALYZED HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate acid and neutral hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition states of a ...

  9. Scale-up and evaluation of high solid ionic liquid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of switchgrass

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment is receiving significant attention as a potential process that enables fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass and produces high yields of fermentable sugars suitable for the production of renewable fuels. However, successful optimization and scale up of IL pretreatment involves challenges, such as high solids loading, biomass handling and transfer, washing of pretreated solids and formation of inhibitors, which are not addressed during the development stages at the small scale in a laboratory environment. As a first in the research community, the Joint BioEnergy Institute, in collaboration with the Advanced Biofuels Process Demonstration Unit, a Department of Energy funded facility that supports academic and industrial entities in scaling their novel biofuels enabling technologies, have performed benchmark studies to identify key challenges associated with IL pretreatment using 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate and subsequent enzymatic saccharification beyond bench scale. Results Using switchgrass as the model feedstock, we have successfully executed 600-fold, relative to the bench scale (6 L vs 0.01 L), scale-up of IL pretreatment at 15% (w/w) biomass loading. Results show that IL pretreatment at 15% biomass generates a product containing 87.5% of glucan, 42.6% of xylan and only 22.8% of lignin relative to the starting material. The pretreated biomass is efficiently converted into monosaccharides during subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis at 10% loading over a 150-fold scale of operations (1.5 L vs 0.01 L) with 99.8% fermentable sugar conversion. The yield of glucose and xylose in the liquid streams were 94.8% and 62.2%, respectively, and the hydrolysate generated contains high titers of fermentable sugars (62.1 g/L of glucose and 5.4 g/L cellobiose). The overall glucan and xylan balance from pretreatment and saccharification were 95.0% and 77.1%, respectively. Enzymatic inhibition by [C2mim][OAc] at high solids

  10. Characterization of acidic polysaccharides from the mollusks through acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiuling; Wen, Chengrong; Lu, Jiaojiao; Teng, Nan; Song, Shuang; Zhu, Beiwei

    2015-10-01

    Uronic acid-containing polysaccharides (UACPs) including glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) exist widely in nature. Herein we propose an elegant methodology to identify UACPs by analyzing their disaccharides produced from the acid hydrolysis using HPLC-MS(n) upon 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) derivatization. Based on the optimization of experimental conditions by the single factor experiment and orthogonal test design, the combination of 1.3M TFA at 105°C for 3h is found to be the optimum. Subsequently, these conditions were applied to investigate the distribution of UACPs in 20 selected species of edible Bivalvia and Gastropoda. PMP-disaccharides derived from UACPs in mollusks were identified by comparing the retention time and mass spectra with those of the reference PMP-disaccharides from hyaluronic acid (HA), chondroitin sulfate (CS), heparin (HP), and AGSP with →4)-GlcA(1→2)-Man(1→ repeating units. The analysis reveals the prevalence of CS in the shellfishes as well as the HP, and existence of three non-GAG UACPs in 7 mollusks. PMID:26076626

  11. Impacts of Deacetylation Prior to Dilute Acid Pretreatment on the Bioethanol Process

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Shekiro, J.; Franden, M. A.; Wang, W.; Johnson, D. K.; Zhang, M.; Kuhn, E.; Tucker, M. P.

    2011-12-01

    Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising pretreatment technology for the biochemical production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. During dilute acid pretreatment, xylan depolymerizes to form soluble xylose monomers and oligomers. Because the xylan found in nature is highly acetylated, the formation of xylose monomers requires two steps: (1) cleavage of the xylosidic bonds, and (2) cleavage of covalently bonded acetyl ester groups. Results: In this study, we show that the latter may be the rate limiting step for xylose monomer formation. Furthermore, acetyl groups are also found to be a cause of biomass recalcitrance and hydrolyzate toxicity. While the removal of acetyl groups from native corn stover by alkaline de-esterification prior to pretreatment improves overall process yields, the exact impact is highly dependent on the corn stover variety in use. Xylose monomer yields in pretreatment generally increases by greater than 10%. Compared to pretreated corn stover controls, the deacetylated corn stover feedstock is approximately 20% more digestible after pretreatment. Finally, by lowering hydrolyzate toxicity, xylose utilization and ethanol yields are further improved during fermentation by roughly 10% and 7%, respectively. In this study, several varieties of corn stover lots were investigated to test the robustness of the deacetylation-pretreatment-saccharification-fermentation process. Conclusions: Deacetylation shows significant improvement on glucose and xylose yields during pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis, but it also reduces hydrolyzate toxicity during fermentation, thereby improving ethanol yields and titer. The magnitude of effect is dependent on the selected corn stover variety, with several varieties achieving improvements of greater than 10% xylose yield in pretreatment, 20% glucose yield in low solids enzymatic hydrolysis and 7% overall ethanol yield.

  12. Optimization of wastewater microalgae saccharification using dilute acid hydrolysis for acetone, butanol, and ethanol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Yessica; Ellis, Joshua T.; Miller, Charles D.; Sims, Ronald C.

    2015-02-01

    Exploring and developing sustainable and efficient technologies for biofuel production are crucial for averting global consequences associated with fuel shortages and climate change. Optimization of sugar liberation from wastewater algae through acid hydrolysis was determined for subsequent fermentation to acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) by Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4. Acid concentration, retention time, and temperature were evaluated to determine optimal hydrolysis conditions by assessing the sugar and ABE yield as well as the associated costs. Sulfuric acid concentrations ranging from 0-1.5 M, retention times of 40-120 min, and temperatures from 23°C- 90°C were combined to form a full factorial experiment. Acid hydrolysis pretreatment of 10% dried wastewater microalgae using 1.0 M sulfuric acid for 120 min at 80-90°C was found to be the optimal parameters, with a sugar yield of 166.1 g for kg of dry algae, concentrations of 5.23 g/L of total ABE, and 3.74 g/L of butanol at a rate of USD $12.83 per kg of butanol.

  13. Optimizing ethanol and methane production from steam-pretreated, phosphoric acid-impregnated corn stover.

    PubMed

    Bondesson, Pia-Maria; Dupuy, Aurélie; Galbe, Mats; Zacchi, Guido

    2015-02-01

    Pretreatment is of vital importance in the production of ethanol and methane from agricultural residues. In this study, the effects of steam pretreatment with phosphoric acid on enzymatic hydrolysis (EH), simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF), anaerobic digestion (AD) and the total energy output at three different temperatures were investigated. The effect of separating the solids for SSF and the liquid for AD was also studied and compared with using the whole slurry first in SSF and then in AD. Furthermore, the phosphoric acid was compared to previous studies using sulphuric acid or no catalyst. Using phosphoric acid resulted in higher yields than when no catalyst was used. However, compared with sulphuric acid, an improved yield was only seen with phosphoric acid in the case of EH. The higher pretreatment temperatures (200 and 210 °C) resulted in the highest yields after EH and SSF, while the highest methane yield was obtained with the lower pretreatment temperature (190 °C). The highest yield in terms of total energy recovery (78 %) was obtained after pretreatment at 190 °C, but a pretreatment temperature of 200 °C is, however, the best alternative since fewer steps are required (whole slurry in SSF and then in AD) and high product yields were obtained (76 %). PMID:25399069

  14. Improved Sugar Production by Optimizing Planetary Mill Pretreatment and Enzyme Hydrolysis Process

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jeong Heo; Lee, Siseon; Lee, Jae-Won; Hong, Youn-Woo; Chang, Jeong Ho; Sung, Daekyung; Kim, Sung Hyun; Sang, Byoung-In; Mitchell, Robert J.; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an optimization of planetary mill pretreatment and saccharification processes for improving biosugar production. Pitch pine (Pinus rigida) wood sawdust waste was used as biomass feedstock and the process parameters optimized in this study were the buffering media, the milling time, the enzyme quantity, and the incubation time. Glucose yields were improved when acetate buffer was used rather than citrate buffer. Initially, with each process variable tests, the optimal values were 100 minutes of milling, an enzyme concentration of 16 FPU/g-biomass, and a 12-hour enzymatic hydrolysis. Typically, interactions between these experimental conditions and their effects on glucose production were next investigated using RSM. Glucose yields from the Pinus rigida waste exceeded 80% with several of the conditions tested, demonstrating that milling can be used to obtain high levels of glucose bioconversion from woody biomass for biorefinery purposes. PMID:26539475

  15. A comparative study of ethanol production using dilute acid, ionic liquid and AFEX™ pretreated corn stover

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In a biorefinery producing cellulosic biofuels, biomass pretreatment will significantly influence the efficacy of enzymatic hydrolysis and microbial fermentation. Comparison of different biomass pretreatment techniques by studying the impact of pretreatment on downstream operations at industrially relevant conditions and performing comprehensive mass balances will help focus attention on necessary process improvements, and thereby help reduce the cost of biofuel production. Results An on-going collaboration between the three US Department of Energy (DOE) funded bioenergy research centers (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) and BioEnergy Science Center (BESC)) has given us a unique opportunity to compare the performance of three pretreatment processes, notably dilute acid (DA), ionic liquid (IL) and ammonia fiber expansion (AFEXTM), using the same source of corn stover. Separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) was carried out using various combinations of commercially available enzymes and engineered yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A) strain. The optimal commercial enzyme combination (Ctec2: Htec2: Multifect Pectinase, percentage total protein loading basis) was evaluated for each pretreatment with a microplate-based assay using milled pretreated solids at 0.2% glucan loading and 15 mg total protein loading/g of glucan. The best enzyme combinations were 67:33:0 for DA, 39:33:28 for IL and 67:17:17 for AFEX. The amounts of sugar (kg) (glucose: xylose: total gluco- and xylo-oligomers) per 100 kg of untreated corn stover produced after 72 hours of 6% glucan loading enzymatic hydrolysis were: DA (25:2:2), IL (31:15:2) and AFEX (26:13:7). Additionally, the amounts of ethanol (kg) produced per 100 kg of untreated corn stover and the respective ethanol metabolic yield (%) achieved with exogenous nutrient supplemented fermentations were: DA (14.0, 92.0%), IL (21.2, 93.0%) and AFEX (20.5, 95.0%), respectively

  16. Acid hydrolysis of Jerusalem artichoke for ethanol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1986-01-01

    An excellent substrate for ethanol production is the Jerusalem artichoke (JA) tuber (Helianthus tuberosus). This crop contains a high level of inulin that can be hydrolyzed mainly to D-fructose and has several distinct advantages as an energy source compared to others. The potential ethanol yield of ca. 4678 L/ha on good agricultural land is equivalent to that obtained from sugar beets and twice that of corn. When JA is to be used for ethanol fermentation by conventional yeast, it is first converted to fermentable sugars by enzymes or acids although various strains of yeast were used for the direct fermentation of JA extracts. Fleming and GrootWassink compared various acids (hydrochloric, sulfuric, citric, and phosphoric) and strong cation exchange resin for their effectiveness on inulin hydrolysis and reported that no differences were noted among the acids or resin in their influence on inulin hydrolysis. Undesirable side reactions were noted during acid hydrolysis leading to the formation of HMF and 2-(2-hydroxy acetyl) furan. The HMF at a level of 0.1% is known to inhibit growth and ethanol fermentation by yeast. In this study the authors established optimal conditions for complete acid-hydrolysis of JA with minimum side reactions and maximum sugar-ethanol production. A material balance for the ethanol production was also determined.

  17. Role of bifidobacteria in the hydrolysis of chlorogenic acid

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Stefano; Anighoro, Andrew; Quartieri, Andrea; Amaretti, Alberto; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Rastelli, Giulio; Rossi, Maddalena

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the capability of potentially probiotic bifidobacteria to hydrolyze chlorogenic acid into caffeic acid (CA), and to recognize the enzymes involved in this reaction. Bifidobacterium strains belonging to eight species occurring in the human gut were screened. The hydrolysis seemed peculiar of Bifidobacterium animalis, whereas the other species failed to release CA. Intracellular feruloyl esterase activity capable of hydrolyzing chlorogenic acid was detected only in B. animalis. In silico research among bifidobacteria esterases identified Balat_0669 as the cytosolic enzyme likely responsible of CA release in B. animalis. Comparative modeling of Balat_0669 and molecular docking studies support its role in chlorogenic acid hydrolysis. Expression, purification, and functional characterization of Balat_0669 in Escherichia coli were obtained as further validation. A possible role of B. animalis in the activation of hydroxycinnamic acids was demonstrated and new perspectives were opened in the development of new probiotics, specifically selected for the enhanced bioconversion of phytochemicals into bioactive compounds. PMID:25515139

  18. Role of bifidobacteria in the hydrolysis of chlorogenic acid.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Stefano; Anighoro, Andrew; Quartieri, Andrea; Amaretti, Alberto; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Rastelli, Giulio; Rossi, Maddalena

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to explore the capability of potentially probiotic bifidobacteria to hydrolyze chlorogenic acid into caffeic acid (CA), and to recognize the enzymes involved in this reaction. Bifidobacterium strains belonging to eight species occurring in the human gut were screened. The hydrolysis seemed peculiar of Bifidobacterium animalis, whereas the other species failed to release CA. Intracellular feruloyl esterase activity capable of hydrolyzing chlorogenic acid was detected only in B. animalis. In silico research among bifidobacteria esterases identified Balat_0669 as the cytosolic enzyme likely responsible of CA release in B. animalis. Comparative modeling of Balat_0669 and molecular docking studies support its role in chlorogenic acid hydrolysis. Expression, purification, and functional characterization of Balat_0669 in Escherichia coli were obtained as further validation. A possible role of B. animalis in the activation of hydroxycinnamic acids was demonstrated and new perspectives were opened in the development of new probiotics, specifically selected for the enhanced bioconversion of phytochemicals into bioactive compounds. PMID:25515139

  19. Effect of thermal hydrolysis and ultrasounds pretreatments on foaming in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, N; Cano, R; Fdz-Polanco, F

    2014-10-01

    Foam appears regularly in anaerobic digesters producing operational and safety problems. In this research, based on the operational observation at semi-industrial pilot scale where sludge pretreatment mitigated foaming in anaerobic digesters, this study aimed at evaluating any potential relationship between foaming tools applied to activated sludge at lab-scale (foam potential, foam stability and Microthrix parvicella abundance) and the experimental behavior observed in pilot scale and full-scale anaerobic digesters. The potential of thermal hydrolysis and ultrasounds for reducing foaming capacity was also evaluated. Filamentous bacteria abundance was directly linked to foaming capacity in anaerobic processes. A maximum reduction of M.parvicella abundance (from 5 to 2) was reached using thermal hydrolysis with steam explosion at 170°C and ultrasounds at 66.7kWh/m(3), showing both good anti-foaming properties. On the other hand, foam potential and stability determinations showed a lack of consistency with the bacteria abundance results and experimental evidences. PMID:25168914

  20. Optimization of Alkaline and Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Agave Bagasse by Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Ávila-Lara, Abimael I; Camberos-Flores, Jesus N; Mendoza-Pérez, Jorge A; Messina-Fernández, Sarah R; Saldaña-Duran, Claudia E; Jimenez-Ruiz, Edgar I; Sánchez-Herrera, Leticia M; Pérez-Pimienta, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of lignocellulosic materials for the production of value-added chemicals or biofuels generally requires a pretreatment process to overcome the recalcitrance of the plant biomass for further enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation stages. Two of the most employed pretreatment processes are the ones that used dilute acid (DA) and alkaline (AL) catalyst providing specific effects on the physicochemical structure of the biomass, such as high xylan and lignin removal for DA and AL, respectively. Another important effect that need to be studied is the use of a high solids pretreatment (≥15%) since offers many advantaged over lower solids loadings, including increased sugar and ethanol concentrations (in combination with a high solids saccharification), which will be reflected in lower capital costs; however, this data is currently limited. In this study, several variables, such as catalyst loading, retention time, and solids loading, were studied using response surface methodology (RSM) based on a factorial central composite design of DA and AL pretreatment on agave bagasse using a range of solids from 3 to 30% (w/w) to obtain optimal process conditions for each pretreatment. Subsequently enzymatic hydrolysis was performed using Novozymes Cellic CTec2 and HTec2 presented as total reducing sugar (TRS) yield. Pretreated biomass was characterized by wet-chemistry techniques and selected samples were analyzed by calorimetric techniques, and scanning electron/confocal fluorescent microscopy. RSM was also used to optimize the pretreatment conditions for maximum TRS yield. The optimum conditions were determined for AL pretreatment: 1.87% NaOH concentration, 50.3 min and 13.1% solids loading, whereas DA pretreatment: 2.1% acid concentration, 33.8 min and 8.5% solids loading. PMID:26442260

  1. Optimization of Alkaline and Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Agave Bagasse by Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Ávila-Lara, Abimael I.; Camberos-Flores, Jesus N.; Mendoza-Pérez, Jorge A.; Messina-Fernández, Sarah R.; Saldaña-Duran, Claudia E.; Jimenez-Ruiz, Edgar I.; Sánchez-Herrera, Leticia M.; Pérez-Pimienta, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of lignocellulosic materials for the production of value-added chemicals or biofuels generally requires a pretreatment process to overcome the recalcitrance of the plant biomass for further enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation stages. Two of the most employed pretreatment processes are the ones that used dilute acid (DA) and alkaline (AL) catalyst providing specific effects on the physicochemical structure of the biomass, such as high xylan and lignin removal for DA and AL, respectively. Another important effect that need to be studied is the use of a high solids pretreatment (≥15%) since offers many advantaged over lower solids loadings, including increased sugar and ethanol concentrations (in combination with a high solids saccharification), which will be reflected in lower capital costs; however, this data is currently limited. In this study, several variables, such as catalyst loading, retention time, and solids loading, were studied using response surface methodology (RSM) based on a factorial central composite design of DA and AL pretreatment on agave bagasse using a range of solids from 3 to 30% (w/w) to obtain optimal process conditions for each pretreatment. Subsequently enzymatic hydrolysis was performed using Novozymes Cellic CTec2 and HTec2 presented as total reducing sugar (TRS) yield. Pretreated biomass was characterized by wet-chemistry techniques and selected samples were analyzed by calorimetric techniques, and scanning electron/confocal fluorescent microscopy. RSM was also used to optimize the pretreatment conditions for maximum TRS yield. The optimum conditions were determined for AL pretreatment: 1.87% NaOH concentration, 50.3 min and 13.1% solids loading, whereas DA pretreatment: 2.1% acid concentration, 33.8 min and 8.5% solids loading. PMID:26442260

  2. Rapid selection and identification of Miscanthus genotypes with enhanced glucan and xylan yields from hydrothermal pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Because many Miscanthus genotypes can be cultivated with relatively high productivity and carbohydrate content, Miscanthus has great potential as an energy crop that can support large scale biological production of biofuels. Results In this study, batch hydrothermal pretreatment at 180°C for 35 min followed by enzymatic hydrolysis was shown to give the highest total sugar yields for Miscanthus x giganteus cv. Illinois planted in Illinois. High throughput pretreatment at 180°C for 35 min and 17.5 min followed by co-hydrolysis in a multi-well batch reactor identified two varieties out of 80 that had significantly higher sugar yields from pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis than others. The differences in performance were then related to compositions of the 80 varieties to provide insights into desirable traits for Miscanthus that enhance sugar yields. Conclusions High throughput pretreatment and co-hydrolysis (HTPH) rapidly identified promising genotypes from a wide range of Miscanthus genotypes, including hybrids of Miscanthus sacchariflorus/M. sinensis and Miscanthus lutarioriparius, differentiating the more commercially promising species from the rest. The total glucan plus xylan content in Miscanthus appeared to influence both mass and theoretical yields, while lignin and ash contents did not have a predictable influence on performance. PMID:22863302

  3. Ethanol production with dilute acid hydrolysis using partially dried lignocellulosics

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Quang A.; Keller, Fred A.; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2003-12-09

    A process of converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol, comprising hydrolyzing lignocellulosic materials by subjecting dried lignocellulosic material in a reactor to a catalyst comprised of a dilute solution of a strong acid and a metal salt to lower the activation energy (i.e., the temperature) of cellulose hydrolysis and ultimately obtain higher sugar yields.

  4. Acetic acid oxidation and hydrolysis in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.C.; Marrone, P.A.; Tester, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    Acetic acid (CH{sub 3}COOH) hydrolysis and oxidation in supercritical water were examined from 425--600 C and 246 bar at reactor residence times of 4.4 to 9.8 s. Over the range of conditions studied, acetic acid oxidation was globally 0.72 {+-} 0.15 order in acetic acid and 0.27 {+-} 0.15 order in oxygen to a 95% confidence level, with an activation energy of 168 {+-} 21 kJ/mol, a preexponential factor of 10{sup 9.9{+-}1.7}, and an induction time of about 1.5 s at 525 C. Isothermal kinetic measurements at 550 C over the range 160 to 263 bar indicated that pressure or density did not affect the rate of acetic acid oxidation as much as was previously observed in the oxidation of hydrogen or carbon monoxide in supercritical water. Major products of acetic acid oxidation in supercritical water are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, and hydrogen. Trace amounts of propenoic acid were occasionally detected. Hydrolysis or hydrothermolysis in the absence of oxygen resulted in approximately 35% conversion of acetic acid at 600 C, 246 bar, and 8-s reactor residence time. Regression of the limited hydrolysis runs assuming a reaction rate first-order in organic gave a global rate expression with a preexponential factor of 10{sup 4.4{+-}1.1} and an activation energy of 94 {+-} 17 kJ/mol.

  5. High selective delignification using oxidative ionic liquid pretreatment at mild conditions for efficient enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zhiqiang; Lyu, Wenkang; Dong, Cuihua; Li, Hongxing; Yang, Guihua

    2016-08-01

    Herein, the oxidative ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment for overcoming recalcitrance of lignocellulose with selective delignification was investigated, and the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis was evaluated. IL pretreatment incorporating oxygen delignification could enhance lignin extraction with high selectivity at low carbohydrate loss. The dual-action of oxidative decomposition and dissolution by 1-butyl-3-methlimidazolium chloride (BmimCl) on biomass were synergistically acted, accounting for efficient recalcitrance removal. In addition, the mild oxidative IL treatment only slightly converted crystalline cellulose into amorphous structure, and the extensive extraction of the amorphous lignin and carbohydrate resulted to the expose of cellulose with high susceptibility. Correspondingly, the enzymatic hydrolysis of the pretreated lignocellulose was greatly enhanced. The oxidative IL treatment at mild conditions, collaborating BmimCl treatment with oxygen delignification is a promising and effective system for overcoming the robust structure of lignocellulose. PMID:27128194

  6. Enhancement of hydrolysis of Chlorella vulgaris by hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Charnho; Lee, Ja Hyun; Yang, Xiaoguang; Yoo, Hah Young; Lee, Ju Hun; Lee, Soo Kweon; Kim, Seung Wook

    2016-06-01

    Chlorella vulgaris is considered as one of the potential sources of biomass for bio-based products because it consists of large amounts of carbohydrates. In this study, hydrothermal acid hydrolysis with five different acids (hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, peracetic acid, phosphoric acid, and sulfuric acid) was carried out to produce fermentable sugars (glucose, galactose). The hydrothermal acid hydrolysis by hydrochloric acid showed the highest sugar production. C. vulgaris was hydrolyzed with various concentrations of hydrochloric acid [0.5-10 % (w/w)] and microalgal biomass [20-140 g/L (w/v)] at 121 °C for 20 min. Among the concentrations examined, 2 % hydrochloric acid with 100 g/L biomass yielded the highest conversion of carbohydrates (92.5 %) into reducing sugars. The hydrolysate thus produced from C. vulgaris was fermented using the yeast Brettanomyces custersii H1-603 and obtained bioethanol yield of 0.37 g/g of algal sugars. PMID:26899601

  7. Carbon-based strong solid acid for cornstarch hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nata, Iryanti Fatyasari; Irawan, Chairul; Mardina, Primata; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2015-10-15

    Highly sulfonated carbonaceous spheres with diameter of 100–500 nm can be generated by hydrothermal carbonization of glucose in the presence of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid and acrylic acid at 180 °C for 4 h. The acidity of the prepared carbonaceous sphere C4-SO{sub 3}H can reach 2.10 mmol/g. It was used as a solid acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of cornstarch. Total reducing sugar (TRS) concentration of 19.91 mg/mL could be obtained by hydrolyzing 20 mg/mL cornstarch at 150 °C for 6 h using C4-SO{sub 3}H as solid acid catalyst. The solid acid catalyst demonstrated good stability that only 9% decrease in TRS concentration was observed after five repeat uses. The as-prepared carbon-based solid acid catalyst can be an environmentally benign replacement for homogeneous catalyst. - Highlights: • Carbon solid acid was successfully prepared by one-step hydrothermal carbonization. • The acrylic acid as monomer was effectively reduce the diameter size of particle. • The solid acid catalyst show good catalytic performance of starch hydrolysis. • The solid acid catalyst is not significantly deteriorated after repeated use.

  8. Effects of agitation on particle-size distribution and enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated spruce and giant reed

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mixing is an energy demanding process which has been previously shown to affect enzymatic hydrolysis. Concentrated biomass slurries are associated with high and non-Newtonian viscosities and mixing in these systems is a complex task. Poor mixing can lead to mass and/or heat transfer problems as well as inhomogeneous enzyme distribution, both of which can cause possible yield reduction. Furthermore the stirring energy dissipation may impact the particle size which in turn may affect the enzymatic hydrolysis. The objective of the current work was to specifically quantify the effects of mixing on particle-size distribution (PSD) and relate this to changes in the enzymatic hydrolysis. Two rather different materials were investigated, namely pretreated Norway spruce and giant reed. Results Changes in glucan hydrolysis and PSD were measured as a function of agitation during enzymatic hydrolysis at fiber loadings of 7 or 13% water-insoluble solids (WIS). Enzymatic conversion of pretreated spruce was strongly affected by agitation rates at the higher WIS content. However, at low WIS content the agitation had almost no effect on hydrolysis. There was some effect of agitation on the hydrolysis of giant reed at high WIS loading, but it was smaller than that for spruce, and there was no measurable effect at low WIS loading. In the case of spruce, intense agitation clearly affected the PSD and resulted in a reduced mean particle size, whereas for giant reed the decrease in particle size was mainly driven by enzymatic action. However, the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis was not increased after size reduction by agitation. Conclusions The impact of agitation on the enzymatic hydrolysis clearly depends not only on feedstock but also on the solids loading. Agitation was found to affect the PSD differently for the examined pretreated materials spruce and giant reed. The fact that the reduced mean particle diameter could not explain the enhanced hydrolysis rates found for

  9. Enhanced hydrolysis and methane yield by applying microaeration pretreatment to the anaerobic co-digestion of brown water and food waste

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Jun Wei; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Microaeration pretreatment was effective for brown water and food waste mixture. ► The added oxygen was consumed fully by facultative microorganisms. ► Enhanced solubilization, acidification and breakdown of SCFAs to acetate. ► Microaeration pretreatment improved methane yield by 10–21%. ► Nature of inoculum influenced the effects of microaeration. - Abstract: Microaeration has been used conventionally for the desulphurization of biogas, and recently it was shown to be an alternative pretreatment to enhance hydrolysis of the anaerobic digestion (AD) process. Previous studies on microaeration pretreatment were limited to the study of substrates with complex organic matter, while little has been reported on its effect on substrates with higher biodegradability such as brown water and food waste. Due to the lack of consistent microaeration intensities, previous studies were not comparable and thus inconclusive in proving the effectiveness of microaeration to the overall AD process. In this study, the role of microaeration pretreatment in the anaerobic co-digestion of brown water and food waste was evaluated in batch-tests. After a 4-day pretreatment with 37.5 mL-O{sub 2}/L{sub R}-d added to the liquid phase of the reactor, the methane production of substrates were monitored in anaerobic conditions over the next 40 days. The added oxygen was consumed fully by facultative microorganisms and a reducing environment for organic matter degradation was maintained. Other than higher COD solubilization, microaeration pretreatment led to greater VFA accumulation and the conversion of other short chain fatty acids to acetate. This could be due to enhanced activities of hydrolytic and acidogenic bacteria and the degradation of slowly biodegradable compounds under microaerobic conditions. This study also found that the nature of inoculum influenced the effects of microaeration as a 21% and 10% increase in methane yield was observed when pretreatment was

  10. Influence of surfactant-free ionic liquid microemulsions pretreatment on the composition, structure and enzymatic hydrolysis of water hyacinth.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fan; Chen, Li; Wang, Aili; Yan, Zongcheng

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the pretreatment performance of surfactant-free ionic liquid microemulsions (ILMs) on water hyacinth. Pretreatment effects were evaluated in terms of lignocellulosic composition, structure and enzymatic hydrolysis. Analysis of the regenerated water hyacinth indicated that the content of the lignocellulosic composition changed, and the surface became more porous. After being pretreated with ILM(a) (mass ratio of toluene: ethanol: 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([Emim]Ac)=0.35:0.3:0.35) at 70°C for 12h, the maximum delignification of 63.6% was observed. The cellulose of the water hyacinth was well protected and retained during the pretreatment process. After being enzymatically hydrolyzed for 48 h, the reducing sugar yield of the water hyacinth pretreated with ILM(a) at 70°C for 6 h was 563.7 mg/g, and its hydrolysis yield (86.1%) was nearly four and a half times of that of the untreated one (20.2%). In conclusion, the designed surfactant-free ILMs exhibit promising potential application in biomass pretreatment. PMID:26913644

  11. Enhanced cellulase hydrolysis of eucalyptus waste fibers from pulp mill by Tween80-assisted ferric chloride pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liheng; Fu, Shiyu

    2013-04-01

    Pretreatment combining FeCl3 and Tween80 was performed for cellulose-to-ethanol conversion of eucalyptus alkaline peroxide mechanical pulping waste fibers (EAWFs). The FeCl3 pretreatment alone showed a good effect on the enzymatic hydrolysis of EAWFs, but inhibited enzyme activity to some extent. A surfactant, Tween80, added during FeCl3 pretreatment was shown to significantly enhance enzyme reaction by eluting enzymatic inhibitors such as iron(III) that are present at the surface of the pretreated biomass. Treatment temperature, liquid-solid ratio, treatment time, FeCl3 concentration, and Tween80 dosage for pretreatment were optimized as follows: 180 °C, 8:1, 30 min, 0.15 mol/L, and 1% (w/v). Pretreated EAWFs under such optimal conditions provided enzymatic glucose (based on 100 g of oven-dried feedstock) and substrate enzymatic digestibility of EAWFs of 34.8 g and 91.3% after 72 h of enzymatic hydrolysis, respectively, with an initial cellulase loading of 20 FPU/g substrate. PMID:23480567

  12. Hydrolysis of cellulose catalyzed by novel acidic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Kelei; Du, Quanzhou; Bai, Guangyue; Wang, Congyue; Chen, Yujuan; Wang, Jianji

    2015-01-22

    The conversion of cellulosic biomass directly into valuable chemicals becomes a hot subject. Six novel acidic ionic liquids (ILs) based on 2-phenyl-2-imidazoline were synthesized and characterized by UV-VIS, TGA, and NMR. The novel acidic ionic liquids were investigated as catalysts for the hydrolysis of cellulose in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl). The acidic ionic liquids with anions HSO4(-) and Cl(-) showed better catalytic performance for the hydrolysis of cellulose than those with H2PO4(-). The temperature and dosage of water affect significantly the yield of total reducing sugar (TRS). When the hydrolysis of cellulose was catalyzed by 1-propyl sulfonic acid-2-phenyl imidazoline hydrogensulfate (IL-1) and the dosage of water was 0.2g, the TRS yield was up to 85.1% within 60 min at 100°C. These new acidic ionic liquids catalysts are expected to have a wide application in the conversion of cellulose into valuable chemicals. PMID:25439867

  13. Lignin enrichment and enzyme deactivation as the root cause of enzymatic hydrolysis slowdown of steam pretreated sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Joshua; Brienzo, Michel; García-Aparicio, María P; Görgens, Johann F

    2016-05-25

    The enzymatic hydrolysis (EH) rate normally decreases during the hydrolysis, leaving unhydrolyzed material as residue. This phenomenon occurs during the hydrolysis of both cellulose (avicel) and lignocellulosic material, in nature or even pretreated. The progression of EH of steam pretreated sugarcane bagasse was associated with an initial (fast), intermediate (slower) and recalcitrant (slowest) phases, at glucan to glucose conversion yields of 61.7, 81.6 and 86%, respectively. Even though the EH of avicel as a simpler material than steam pretreated sugarcane bagasse, EH slowdown was present. The less thermo-stable endo-xylanase lost 58% of initial enzyme activity, followed by β-glucosidase that lost 16%, culminating in FPase activity loss of 30% in the first 24hours. After 72hours of EH the total loss of FPase activity was 40% compared to the initial activity. Analysis of the solid residue from EH showed that lignin content, phenolic compounds and ash increased while glucan decreased as hydrolysis progressed. During the initial fast phase of EH, the total solid residue surface area consisted predominantly of internal surface area. Thereafter, in the intermediate and recalcitrant phases of EH, the ratio of external:internal surface area increased. The proposed fiber damage and decrease in internal surface area, probably by EH action, was visualized by scanning electron microscopy imagery. The higher lignin/glucan ratio as EH progressed and enzyme deactivation by thermo instability were the main effects observed, respectively to substrate and enzyme. PMID:26820122

  14. Stability of a Lipase Extracted from Seeds of Pachira aquatica in Commercial Detergents and Application Tests in Poultry Wastewater Pretreatment and Fat Particle Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Polizelli, Patrícia Peres; Facchini, Fernanda Dell Antonio; Bonilla-Rodriguez, Gustavo Orlando

    2013-01-01

    A protein extract containing a plant lipase from oleaginous seeds of Pachira aquatica was tested using soybean oil, wastewater from a poultry processing plant, and beef fat particles as substrate. The hydrolysis experiments were carried out at a temperature of 40°C, an incubation time of 90 minutes, and pH 8.0-9.0. The enzyme had the best stability at pH 9.0 and showed good stability in the alkaline range. It was found that P. aquatica lipase was stable in the presence of some commercial laundry detergent formulations, and it retained full activity up to 0.35% in hydrogen peroxide, despite losing activity at higher concentrations. Concerning wastewater, the lipase increased free fatty acids release by 7.4 times and promoted the hydrolysis of approximately 10% of the fats, suggesting that it could be included in a pretreatment stage, especially for vegetable oil degradation. PMID:24455209

  15. Stability of a Lipase Extracted from Seeds of Pachira aquatica in Commercial Detergents and Application Tests in Poultry Wastewater Pretreatment and Fat Particle Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Polizelli, Patrícia Peres; Facchini, Fernanda Dell Antonio

    2013-01-01

    A protein extract containing a plant lipase from oleaginous seeds of Pachira aquatica was tested using soybean oil, wastewater from a poultry processing plant, and beef fat particles as substrate. The hydrolysis experiments were carried out at a temperature of 40°C, an incubation time of 90 minutes, and pH 8.0-9.0. The enzyme had the best stability at pH 9.0 and showed good stability in the alkaline range. It was found that P. aquatica lipase was stable in the presence of some commercial laundry detergent formulations, and it retained full activity up to 0.35% in hydrogen peroxide, despite losing activity at higher concentrations. Concerning wastewater, the lipase increased free fatty acids release by 7.4 times and promoted the hydrolysis of approximately 10% of the fats, suggesting that it could be included in a pretreatment stage, especially for vegetable oil degradation. PMID:24455209

  16. Acid hydrolysis of sweet potato for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Studies were conducted to establish optimal conditions for the acid hydrolysis of sweet potato for maximal ethanol yield. The starch contents of two sweet potato cultivars (Georgia Red and TG-4), based on fresh weight, were 21.1 +/- 0.6% and 27.5 +/- 1.6%, respectively. The results of acid hydrolysis experiments showed the following: (1) both hydrolysis rate and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) concentration were a function of HCL concentration, temperature, and time; (2) the reducing sugars were rapidly formed with elevated concentrations of HCl and temperature, but also destroyed quickly; and (3) HMF concentration increased significantly with the concentration of HCl, temperature, and hydrolysis time. Maximum reducing sugar value of 84.2 DE and 0.056% HMF (based on wet weight) was achieved after heating 8% SPS for 15 min in 1N HCl at 110/sup 0/C. Degraded 8% SPS (1N HCl, 97/sup 0/C for 20 min or 110/sup 0/C for 10 min) was utilized as substrate for ethanol fermentation and 3.8% ethanol (v/v) was produced from 1400 mL fermented wort. This is equal to 41.6 g ethanol (200 proof) from 400 g of fresh sweet potato tuber (Georgia Red) or an ethanol yield potential of 431 gal of 200-proof ethanol/acre (from 500 bushel tubers/acre).

  17. Ethanol fermentation from Jerusalem artichoke powder using Saccharomyces cerevisiae KCCM50549 without pretreatment for inulin hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seok-Hwan; Ryu, Ji-Myoung; Lee, Hongweon; Jeon, Jae Heung; Sok, Dai-Eun; Choi, Eui-Sung

    2011-01-01

    A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, KCCM50549, was found to efficiently ferment the inulin-containing carbohydrates in Jerusalem artichoke without acidic or enzymatic pretreatment prior to fermentation. S. cerevisiae KCCM50549 could utilize almost completely the fructo-oligosaccharides present in Jerusalem artichoke (up to degree of polymerization (DP) of 15), in contrast to the other S. cerevisiae strain such as NCYC625 that fermented the fructo-oligosaccharides with DP of up to around six. Inulin-fermenting S. cerevisiae KCCM50549 produced c.a. 1.6 times more ethanol from Jerusalem artichoke compared with S. cerevisiae NCYC625. Direct ethanol fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke flour at 180 g/L without any supplements or pretreatments by S. cerevisiae KCCM50549 in a 5 L jar fermentor yielded 36.2 g/L of ethanol within 36 h. The conversion efficiency of inulin-type sugars to ethanol was 70% of the theoretical ethanol yield. PMID:20833540

  18. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Pretreated Sugarcane Straw: Kinetic Study and Semi-Mechanistic Modeling.

    PubMed

    Pratto, Bruna; de Souza, Renata Beraldo Alencar; Sousa, Ruy; da Cruz, Antonio Jose Gonçalves

    2016-04-01

    Although there are already commercial-scale productions of second generation (2G) ethanol, focusing efforts on process optimization can be of key importance to make the production cost-effective in large scale. In this scenario, mathematical models may be useful in design, scale-up, optimization, and control of bioreactors. For this reason, the aim of this work was to study the kinetics of the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose from sugarcane straw. Experiments using hydrothermally pretreated sugarcane (HPS) straw (195 °C, 10 min, 200 rpm) with and without alkaline delignification (4 % NaOH m/v, 30 min, 121 °C) were carried out in shake flasks (50 °C, pH 5.0, 200 rpm). Solid load was varied in a range of 0.8 to 10 % (m/v), in initial velocity and long-term assays. Enzyme concentration (Cellic®CTec2) was varied from 5 to 80 filter paper unit (FPU) gcellulose (-1). It was possible to fit Michaelis-Menten (MM), modified MM, with and without competitive inhibition by glucose, and Chrastil models. Chrastil model and modified MM with inhibition (both suitable for heterogeneous system, with high resistance to internal diffusion) showed more appropriate than pseudo-homogeneous MM model. The fitted models were able to identify key features of the hydrolysis process and can be very useful within the perspective of bioreactors engineering. PMID:26701144

  19. Bisulfite pretreatment changes the structure and properties of oil palm empty fruit bunch to improve enzymatic hydrolysis and bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Tan, Liping; Sun, Wan; Li, Xuezhi; Zhao, Jian; Qu, Yinbo; Choo, Yuen May; Loh, Soh Kheang

    2015-06-01

    Bisulfite pretreatment is a proven effective method for improving the enzymatic hydrolysis of empty fruit bunch (EFB) from oil palm for bioethanol production. In this study, we set out to determine the changes that occur in the structure and properties of EFB materials and fractions of hemicellulose and lignin during the bisulfite pretreatment process. The results showed that the crystallinity of cellulose in EFB increased after bisulfite pretreatment, whereas the EFB surface was damaged to various degrees. The orderly structure of EFB, which was maintained by hydrogen bonds, was destroyed by bisulfite pretreatment. Bisulfite pretreatment also hydrolyzed the glycosidic bonds of the xylan backbone of hemicellulose, thereby decreasing the molecular weight and shortening the xylan chains. The lignin fractions obtained from EFB and pretreated EFB were typically G-S lignin, and with low content of H units. Meanwhile, de-etherification occurred at the β-O-4 linkage, which was accompanied by polymerization and demethoxylation as a result of bisulfite pretreatment. The adsorption ability of cellulase differed for the various lignin fractions, and the water-soluble lignin fractions had higher adsorption capacity on cellulase than the milled wood lignin. In general, the changes in the structure and properties of EFB provided insight into the benefits of bisulfite pretreatment. PMID:25866127

  20. Carbon-based strong solid acid for cornstarch hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nata, Iryanti Fatyasari; Irawan, Chairul; Mardina, Primata; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2015-10-01

    Highly sulfonated carbonaceous spheres with diameter of 100-500 nm can be generated by hydrothermal carbonization of glucose in the presence of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid and acrylic acid at 180 °C for 4 h. The acidity of the prepared carbonaceous sphere C4-SO3H can reach 2.10 mmol/g. It was used as a solid acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of cornstarch. Total reducing sugar (TRS) concentration of 19.91 mg/mL could be obtained by hydrolyzing 20 mg/mL cornstarch at 150 °C for 6 h using C4-SO3H as solid acid catalyst. The solid acid catalyst demonstrated good stability that only 9% decrease in TRS concentration was observed after five repeat uses. The as-prepared carbon-based solid acid catalyst can be an environmentally benign replacement for homogeneous catalyst.

  1. Optimizing dilute-acid pretreatment of rapeseed straw for extraction of hemicellulose.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Tae-Su; Um, Byung-Hwan; Kim, Jun-Seok; Oh, Kyeong-Keun

    2010-05-01

    Biological conversion of biomass into fuels and chemicals requires hydrolysis of the polysaccharide fraction into monomeric sugars prior to fermentation. Hydrolysis can be performed enzymatically or with mineral acids. In this study, dilute sulfuric acid was used as a catalyst for the pretreatment of rapeseed straw. The purpose of this study is to optimize the pretreatment process in a 15-mL bomb tube reactor and investigate the effects of the acid concentration, temperature, and reaction time. These parameters influence hemicellulose removal and production of sugars (xylose, glucose, and arabinose) in the hydrolyzate as well as the formation of by-products (furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, and acetic acid). Statistical analysis was based on a model composition corresponding to a 3(3) orthogonal factorial design and employed the response surface methodology to optimize the pretreatment conditions, aiming to attain maximum xylan, mannan, and galactan (XMG) extraction from hemicellulose of rapeseed straw. The obtained optimum conditions were: H2SO4 concentration of 1.76% and temperature of 152.6 degrees C with a reaction time of 21 min. Under these optimal conditions, 85.5% of the total sugar was recovered after acid hydrolysis (78.9% XMG and 6.6% glucan). The hydrolyzate contained 1.60 g/L glucose, 0.61 g/L arabinose, 10.49 g/L xylose, mannose, and galactose, 0.39 g/L cellobiose, 0.94 g/L fructose, 0.02 g/L 1,6-anhydro-glucose, 1.17 g/L formic acid, 2.94 g/L acetic acid, 0.04 g/L levulinic acid, 0.04 g/L 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, and 0.98 g/L furfural. PMID:20087686

  2. Nitric acid catalyzed hydrolysis of SO3 in the formation of sulfuric acid: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Bo; Chang, Chun-Ran; Long, Zheng-Wen; Wang, Yi-Bo; Tan, Xing-Feng; Zhang, Wei-Jun

    2013-08-01

    The gas-phase hydrolysis of SO3 in the presence of one water molecule, two water molecules, and nitric acid is investigated utilizing high level quantum chemical methods and transition state theory. The calculated results demonstrate that nitric acid exerts a strong catalytic role in the hydrolysis of SO3 because the activated barrier of hydrolysis of SO3 with the assistance of nitric acid is reduced to about 3.7 kcal/mol, which is about 20 kcal/mol lower than that of the SO3 reaction with water relative to the respective pre-reactive complex.

  3. Effect of phosphoric acid pretreatment of corncobs on the fermentability of Clostridium beijerinckii TISTR 1461 for biobutanol production.

    PubMed

    Boonsombuti, Akarin; Luengnaruemitchai, Apanee; Wongkasemjit, Sujitra

    2015-01-01

    Corncobs pretreated with H2SO4, HNO3, and H3PO4 were compared to evaluate the fermentation ability of Clostridium beijerinckii TISTR 1461 to produce biobutanol via acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. It was found that the hydrolysate from H3PO4 pretreatment could be used as a substrate without any inhibitor removal methods. However, in terms of sugar yield, it gave the lowest total sugars in both pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize enzymatic hydrolysis of the pretreated corncobs. The optimized conditions reduced the consumption of enzymes and hydrolysis time to 7.68 FPU/g biomass and 63.88 hr, respectively, and yielded 51.82 g/L reducing sugars. The Celluclast 1.5 L and Novozyme 188 enzyme ratio were varied to maximize the hydrolyzed sugars. The ABE fermentation, using substrate from phosphoric acid pretreatment of corncobs, with 10 g/L glucose supplementation produced 11.64 g/L of total ABE, which was close to the control experiment using synthetic medium. This study showed that corncobs pretreated with phosphoric acid could potentially be used as a substrate without using a detoxification process. PMID:24678653

  4. Extraterrestrial material analysis: loss of amino acids during liquid-phase acid hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Arnaud; Brault, Amaury; Szopa, Cyril; Freissinet, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Searching for building blocks of life in extraterrestrial material is a way to learn more about how life could have appeared on Earth. With this aim, liquid-phase acid hydrolysis has been used, since at least 1970 , in order to extract amino acids and other organic molecules from extraterrestrial materials (e.g. meteorites, lunar fines) or Earth analogues (e.g. Atacama desert soil). This procedure involves drastic conditions such as heating samples in 6N HCl for 24 h, either under inert atmosphere/vacuum, or air. Analysis of the hydrolyzed part of the sample should give its total (free plus bound) amino acid content. The present work deals with the influence of the 6N HCl hydrolysis on amino acid degradation. Our experiments have been performed on a standard solution of 17 amino acids. After liquid-phase acid hydrolysis (6N HCl) under argon atmosphere (24 h at 100°C), the liquid phase was evaporated and the dry residue was derivatized with N-Methyl-N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) and dimethylformamide (DMF), followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. After comparison with derivatized amino acids from the standard solution, a significant reduction of the chromatographic peak areas was observed for most of the amino acids after liquid-phase acid hydrolysis. Furthermore, the same loss pattern was observed when the amino acids were exposed to cold 6N HCl for a short amount of time. The least affected amino acid, i.e. glycine, was found to be 73,93% percent less abundant compared to the non-hydrolyzed standard, while the most affected, i.e. histidine, was not found in the chromatograms after hydrolysis. Our experiments thereby indicate that liquid-phase acid hydrolysis, even under inert atmosphere, leads to a partial or total loss of all of the 17 amino acids present in the standard solution, and that a quick cold contact with 6N HCl is sufficient to lead to a loss of amino acids. Therefore, in the literature, the reported increase

  5. Alkaline/peracetic acid as a pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for ethanol fuel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Lincoln Cambraia

    Peracetic acid is a lignin oxidation pretreatment with low energy input by which biomass can be treated in a silo type system for improving enzymatic digestibility of lignocellulosic materials for ethanol production. Experimentally, ground hybrid poplar wood and sugar cane bagasse are placed in plastic bags and a peracetic acid solution is added to the biomass in different concentrations based on oven-dry biomass. The ratio of solution to biomass is 6:1; after initial mixing of the resulting paste, a seven-day storage period at about 20°C is used in this study. As a complementary method, a series of pre-pretreatments using stoichiometric amounts of sodium hydroxide and ammonium hydroxide based on 4-methyl-glucuronic acid and acetyl content in the biomass is been performed before addition of peracetic acid. The alkaline solutions are added to the biomass in a ratio of 14:1 solution to biomass; the slurry is mixed for 24 hours at ambient temperature. The above procedures give high xylan content substrates. Consequently, xylanase/beta-glucosidase combinations are more effective than cellulase preparations in hydrolyzing these materials. The pretreatment effectiveness is evaluated using standard enzymatic hydrolysis and simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation (SSCF) procedures. Hybrid poplar wood pretreated with 15 and 21% peracetic acid based on oven-dry weight of wood gives glucan conversion yields of 76.5 and 98.3%, respectively. Sugar cane bagasse pretreated with the same loadings gives corresponding yields of 85.9 and 93.1%. Raw wood and raw bagasse give corresponding yields of 6.8 and 28.8%, respectively. The combined 6% NaOH/15% peracetic acid pretreatments increase the glucan conversion yields from 76.5 to 100.0% for hybrid poplar wood and from 85.9 to 97.6% for sugar cane bagasse. Respective ethanol yields of 92.8 and 91.9% are obtained from 6% NaOH/15% peracetic acid pretreated materials using recombinant Zymomonas mobilis CP4/pZB5. Peracetic acid

  6. Hydrolysis of aceto-hydroxamic acid under UREX+ conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Alyapyshev, M.; Paulenova, A.; Tkac, P.; Cleveland, M.A.; Bruso, J.E.

    2007-07-01

    Aceto-hydroxamic acid (AHA) is used as a stripping agent In the UREX process. While extraction yields of uranium remain high upon addition of AHA, hexavalent plutonium and neptunium are rapidly reduced to the pentavalent state while the tetravalent species and removed from the product stream. However, under acidic conditions, aceto-hydroxamic acid undergoes hydrolytic degradation. In this study, the kinetics of the hydrolysis of aceto-hydroxamic acid in nitric and perchloric acid media was investigated at several temperatures. The decrease of the concentration of AHA was determined via its ferric complex using UV-Vis spectroscopy. The data obtained were analyzed using the method of initial rates. The data follow the pseudo-first order reaction model. Gamma irradiation of AHA/HNO{sub 3} solutions with 33 kGy/s caused two-fold faster degradation of AHA. The rate equation and thermodynamic data will be presented for the hydrolysis reaction with respect to the concentrations of aceto-hydroxamic acid, nitrate and hydronium ions, and radiation dose. (authors)

  7. An efficient and green pretreatment to stimulate short-chain fatty acids production from waste activated sludge anaerobic fermentation using free nitrous acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Jianwei; Wang, Dongbo; Yang, Qi; Xu, Qiuxiang; Deng, Yongchao; Yang, Weiqiang; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-02-01

    Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production from waste activated sludge (WAS) anaerobic fermentation is often limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and poor substrate availability, thus a long fermentation time is required. This paper reports a new pretreatment approach, i.e., using free nitrous acid (FNA) to pretreat sludge, for significantly enhanced SCFA production. Experimental results showed the highest SCFA production occurred at 1.8 mg FNA/L with time of day 6, which was 3.7-fold of the blank at fermentation time of day 12. Mechanism studies revealed that FNA pretreatment accelerated disruption of both extracellular polymeric substances and cell envelope. It was also found that FNA pretreatment benefited hydrolysis and acidification processes but inhibited the activities of methanogens, thereby promoting the yield of SCFA. In addition, the FNA pretreatment substantially stimulated the activities of key enzymes responsible for hydrolysis and acidification, which were consistent with the improvement of solubilization, hydrolysis and acidification of WAS anaerobic fermentation. PMID:26363316

  8. Characterization of pilot-scale dilute acid pretreatment performance using deacetylated corn stover

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising process technology for the deconstruction of low-lignin lignocellulosic biomass, capable of producing high yields of hemicellulosic sugars and enhancing enzymatic yields of glucose as part of a biomass-to-biofuels process. However, while it has been extensively studied, most work has historically been conducted at relatively high acid concentrations of 1 - 4% (weight/weight). Reducing the effective acid loading in pretreatment has the potential to reduce chemical costs both for pretreatment and subsequent neutralization. Additionally, if acid loadings are sufficiently low, capital requirements associated with reactor construction may be significantly reduced due to the relaxation of requirements for exotic alloys. Despite these benefits, past efforts have had difficulty obtaining high process yields at low acid loadings without supplementation of additional unit operations, such as mechanical refining. Results Recently, we optimized the dilute acid pretreatment of deacetylated corn stover at low acid loadings in a 1-ton per day horizontal pretreatment reactor. This effort included more than 25 pilot-scale pretreatment experiments executed at reactor temperatures ranging from 150 – 170°C, residence times of 10 – 20 minutes and hydrolyzer sulfuric acid concentrations between 0.15 – 0.30% (weight/weight). In addition to characterizing the process yields achieved across the reaction space, the optimization identified a pretreatment reaction condition that achieved total xylose yields from pretreatment of 73.5% ± 1.5% with greater than 97% xylan component balance closure across a series of five runs at the same condition. Feedstock reactivity at this reaction condition after bench-scale high solids enzymatic hydrolysis was 77%, prior to the inclusion of any additional conversion that may occur during subsequent fermentation. Conclusions This study effectively characterized a range of pretreatment reaction

  9. Fatty acid hydrolysis of acyl marinobactin siderophores by Marinobacter acylases.

    PubMed

    Kem, Michelle P; Naka, Hiroaki; Iinishi, Akira; Haygood, Margo G; Butler, Alison

    2015-01-27

    The marine bacteria Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 and Marinobacter nanhaiticus D15-8W produce a suite of acyl peptidic marinobactin siderophores to acquire iron under iron-limiting conditions. During late-log phase growth, the marinobactins are hydrolyzed to form the marinobactin headgroup with release of the corresponding fatty acid tail. The bntA gene, a homologue of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyoverdine acylase gene, pvdQ, was identified from Marinobacter sp. DS40M6. A bntA knockout mutant of Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 produced the suite of acyl marinobactins A-E, without the usual formation of the marinobactin headgroup. Another marinobactin-producing species, M. nanhaiticus D15-8W, is predicted to have two pvdQ homologues, mhtA and mhtB. MhtA and MhtB have 67% identical amino acid sequences. MhtA catalyzes hydrolysis of the apo-marinobactin siderophores as well as the quorum sensing signaling molecule, dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone. In contrast to hydrolysis of the suite of apo-marinobactins by MhtA, hydrolysis of the iron(III)-bound marinobactins was not observed. PMID:25588131

  10. Hydrolysis kinetics of lead silicate glass in acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Rafi Ali; Sadrnezhaad, Sayed Khatibuleslam; Raisali, Gholamreza; Hamidi, Amir

    2009-06-01

    Hydrolysis kinetics of the lead silicate glass (LSG) with 40 mol% PbO in 0.5 N HNO 3 aqueous acid solution was investigated. The surface morphology and the gel layer thickness were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) were used to determine the composition of the gel layer and the aqueous solution, respectively. The silicon content of the dissolution products was determined by using weight-loss data and compositions of the gel layer and the solution. The kinetic parameters were determined using the shrinking-core-model (SCM) for rate controlling step. The activation energy obtained for hydrolysis reaction was Qche = 56.07 kJ/mole. The diffusion coefficient of the Pb ions from the gel layer was determined by using its concentration in solution and in LSG. The shrinkage of the sample and the gel layer thickness during dissolution process were determined.

  11. Ammonia recycled percolation as a complementary pretreatment to the dilute-acid process

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhangwen, Lee, Y.Y.

    1997-12-31

    A two-stage dilute-acid percolation (DA) was investigated as a pre-treatment method for switchgrass. With use of extremely low acid (0.078 wt% sulfuric acid) under moderate temperature (145-170{degrees}C), hemicellulose in switchgrass was completely solubilized showing no sugar decomposition. The treated switchgrass contained about 70% glucan and 30% lignin. The high lignin content in the treated feedstock raises a concern that it may cause a high enzyme consumption because of irreversible adsorption of cellulose enzymes to lignin. This problem may be amplified in the SSF operation since it is usually run in fed-batch mode and the residual lignin is accumulated. The DA pretreatment was, therefore, combined with the ammonia recycled percolation (ARP) process that has been proven to be effective in delignification. The combined pretreatment essentially fractionated the switchgrass into three major components. The treated feedstock contained about 90% glucan and 10% lignin. The digestibility of these samples was consistently higher than that of DA treated samples. Further study on the interaction of cellulase with xylan and that with lignin has shown that the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose is inhibited by lignin as well as xylan. The external xylan was found to be a noncompetitive inhibitor to cellulose hydrolysis. The cellulose used in this study was proven to have the xylanase activity. 23 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Deammonification for digester supernatant pretreated with thermal hydrolysis: overcoming inhibition through process optimization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; De Clippeleir, Haydée; Su, Chunyang; Al-Omari, Ahmed; Wett, Bernhard; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Murthy, Sudhir

    2016-06-01

    The thermal hydrolysis process (THP) has been proven to be an excellent pretreatment step for an anaerobic digester (AD), increasing biogas yield and decreasing sludge disposal. The goal of this work was to optimize deammonification for efficient nitrogen removal despite the inhibition effects caused by the organics present in the THP-AD sludge filtrate (digestate). Two sequencing batch reactors were studied treating conventional digestate and THP-AD digestate, respectively. Improved process control based on higher dissolved oxygen set-point (1 mg O2/L) and longer aeration times could achieve successful treatment of THP-AD digestate. This increased set-point could overcome the inhibition effect on aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AerAOB), potentially caused by particulate and colloidal organics. Moreover, based on the mass balance, anoxic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) contribution to the total nitrogen removal decreased from 97 ± 1 % for conventional to 72 ± 5 % for THP-AD digestate treatment, but remained stable by selective AnAOB retention using a vibrating screen. Overall, similar total nitrogen removal rates of 520 ± 28 mg N/L/day at a loading rate of 600 mg N/L/day were achieved in the THP-AD reactor compared to the conventional digestate treatment operating at low dissolved oxygen (DO) (0.38 ± 0.10 mg O2/L). PMID:26893142

  13. Enhanced hydrolysis and methane yield by applying microaeration pretreatment to the anaerobic co-digestion of brown water and food waste.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jun Wei; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2013-04-01

    Microaeration has been used conventionally for the desulphurization of biogas, and recently it was shown to be an alternative pretreatment to enhance hydrolysis of the anaerobic digestion (AD) process. Previous studies on microaeration pretreatment were limited to the study of substrates with complex organic matter, while little has been reported on its effect on substrates with higher biodegradability such as brown water and food waste. Due to the lack of consistent microaeration intensities, previous studies were not comparable and thus inconclusive in proving the effectiveness of microaeration to the overall AD process. In this study, the role of microaeration pretreatment in the anaerobic co-digestion of brown water and food waste was evaluated in batch-tests. After a 4-day pretreatment with 37.5 mL-O2/L(R)-d added to the liquid phase of the reactor, the methane production of substrates were monitored in anaerobic conditions over the next 40 days. The added oxygen was consumed fully by facultative microorganisms and a reducing environment for organic matter degradation was maintained. Other than higher COD solubilization, microaeration pretreatment led to greater VFA accumulation and the conversion of other short chain fatty acids to acetate. This could be due to enhanced activities of hydrolytic and acidogenic bacteria and the degradation of slowly biodegradable compounds under microaerobic conditions. This study also found that the nature of inoculum influenced the effects of microaeration as a 21% and 10% increase in methane yield was observed when pretreatment was applied to inoculated substrates, and substrates without inoculum, respectively. PMID:23290270

  14. Phenols and lignin: Key players in reducing enzymatic hydrolysis yields of steam-pretreated biomass in presence of laccase.

    PubMed

    Oliva-Taravilla, Alfredo; Tomás-Pejó, Elia; Demuez, Marie; González-Fernández, Cristina; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2016-01-20

    Phenols are known as inhibitors for cellulases and fermentative microorganisms in bioethanol production processes. The addition of laccases removes the phenolic compounds and subsequently reduces the lag phase of the fermentative microorganism. However, the application of laccases diminishes glucose release during the enzymatic hydrolysis. In this study a model cellulosic substrate (Sigmacell) together with lignin extract, whole steam-pretreated wheat straw (slurry) and its water insoluble solid fraction (WIS) were subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis to evaluate the effects of laccase treatment in presence of lignin and phenols. The presence of laccase in enzymatic hydrolysis of Sigmacell with lignin extract reduced glucose yield by 37% compared with assays without laccase. Furthermore, this reduction was even more marked in presence of phenols (55% reduction). Interestingly, when hydrolyzing WIS, the addition of phenols coupled with laccase treatment did not show a reduction when compared with only laccase addition. This fact suggests the key role of lignin in the hydrolysis inhibition since in WIS the ratio cellulase per gram of lignin was much lower than in Sigmacell experiments. Finally, the lower cellobiose and xylose recoveries point out that phenolic oligomers formed by laccase oxidation play important roles in the inhibition of endoglucanases, cellobiohydrolases and xylanases. To conclude, the proportion of lignin and the composition of phenols are key players in the inhibition of cellulases when the enzymatic hydrolysis is combined with laccases detoxification. PMID:26684987

  15. Synergistic effect and application of xylanases as accessory enzymes to enhance the hydrolysis of pretreated bagasse.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Geisa A L; Takasugi, Yusaku; Jia, Lili; Mori, Yutaro; Noda, Shuhei; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ichinose, Hirofumi; Kamiya, Noriho

    2015-05-01

    Recently, the new trend in the second-generation ethanol industry is to use mild pretreatments, in order to reduce costs and to keep higher content of hemicellulose in the biomass. Nevertheless, a high enzyme dosage is still required in the conversion of (hemi)cellulose. The interaction between cellulases and xylanases seems to be an effective alternative to reduce enzyme loading in the saccharification process. At first, to evaluate the synergism of xylanases on bagasse degradation, we have produced two xylanases from glycoside hydrolase family 10 (GH10) and three xylanases from glycoside hydrolase family 11 (GH11), from two thermophilic organisms, Thermobifida fusca and Clostridium thermocellum, and one mesophilic organism, Streptomyces lividans. Peracetic acid (PAA) pretreated bagasse was used as substrate. The combination of XynZ-C (GH10, from C. thermocellum), and XlnB (GH11, from S. lividans) presented the highest degree of synergy after 6h (3.62). However, the combination of XynZ-C and Xyn11A (GH11, from T. fusca) resulted in the highest total yield of reducing sugars. To evaluate the synergism between xylanases and cellulases, commercial cellulase preparation from Trichoderma reesei was combined with the selected xylanases, XynZ-C and Xyn11A. About 2-fold increase was observed in the concentration of reducing sugars, when both xylanases, XynZ-C and Xyn11A, were added together with T. reesei cellulases in the reaction mixture. PMID:25837503

  16. Impact of dual temperature profile in dilute acid hydrolysis of spruce for ethanol production

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The two-step dilute acid hydrolysis (DAH) of softwood is costly in energy demands and capital costs. However, it has the advantage that hydrolysis and subsequent removal of hemicellulose-derived sugars can be carried out under conditions of low severity, resulting in a reduction in the level of sugar degradation products during the more severe subsequent steps of cellulose hydrolysis. In this paper, we discuss a single-step DAH method that incorporates a temperature profile at two levels. This profile should simulate the two-step process while removing its major disadvantage, that is, the washing step between the runs, which leads to increased energy demand. Results The experiments were conducted in a reactor with a controlled temperature profile. The total dry matter content of the hydrolysate was up to 21.1% w/w, corresponding to a content of 15.5% w/w of water insoluble solids. The highest measured glucose yield, (18.3 g glucose per 100 g dry raw material), was obtained after DAH cycles of 3 min at 209°C and 6 min at 211°C with 1% H2SO4, which resulted in a total of 26.3 g solubilized C6 sugars per 100 g dry raw material. To estimate the remaining sugar potential, enzymatic hydrolysis (EH) of the solid fraction was also performed. EH of the solid residue increased the total level of solubilized C6 sugars to a maximum of 35.5 g per 100 g dry raw material when DAH was performed as described above (3 min at 210°C and 2 min at 211°C with 1% H2SO4). Conclusion The dual-temperature DAH method did not yield decisively better results than the single-temperature, one-step DAH. When we compared the results with those of earlier studies, the hydrolysis performance was better than with the one-step DAH but not as well as that of the two-step, single-temperature DAH. Additional enzymatic hydrolysis resulted in lower levels of solubilized sugars compared with other studies on one-step DAH and two-step DAH followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. A two-step steam

  17. Dehydration and oxidation of cellulose hydrolysis products in acidic solution

    SciTech Connect

    Garves, K.

    1981-01-01

    The dehydration of cotton cellulose in aqueous solutions in the presence of Ac/sub 2/O, AcOH, HCl, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or HBr proceeded by hydrolysis to carbohydrates with acetate groups, followed by conversion to 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (I) and then, to levulinic acid (II) accompanied by humic acids. For the formation of I, HCl was a more efficient and selective catalyst than H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and the formation of II was promoted by high acid and H/sub 2/O concentrations in the medium. The addition of FeCl/sub 3/ to the dehydration mixture with HCl and continuous distillation led to the isolation of furfural.

  18. Amino Acid-β-Naphthylamide Hydrolysis by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Arylamidase

    PubMed Central

    Riley, P. S.; Behal, Francis J.

    1971-01-01

    The intracellular and constitutive arylamidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was purified 528-fold by salt fractionation, ion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and adsorption chromatography. This enzyme hydrolyzed basic and neutral N-terminal amino acid residues from amino-β-naphthylamides, dipeptide-β-naphthylamides, and a variety of polypeptides. Only those substrates having an l-amino acid with an unsubstituted α-amino group as the N-terminal residue were susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis. The molecular weight was estimated to be 71,000 daltons. The lowest Km values were associated with substrates having neutral or basic amino acid residues with large side chains with no substitution or branching on the β carbon atom. Images PMID:5001871

  19. Chemical evolution. XXI - The amino acids released on hydrolysis of HCN oligomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, J. P.; Wos, J. D.; Nooner, D. W.; Oro, J.

    1974-01-01

    Major amino acids released by hydrolysis of acidic and basic HCN oligomers are identified by chromatography as Gly, Asp, and diaminosuccinic acid. Smaller amounts of Ala, Ile and alpha-aminoisobutyric acid are also detected. The amino acids released did not change appreciably when the hydrolysis medium was changed from neutral to acidic or basic. The presence of both meso and d, l-diaminosuccinic acids was established by paper chromatography and on an amino acid analyzer.

  20. Ethanol production from sugars obtained during enzymatic hydrolysis of elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum, Schum.) pretreated by steam explosion.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Angélica Luisi; Menegol, Daiane; Pitarelo, Ana Paula; Fontana, Roselei Claudete; Zandoná Filho, Arion; Ramos, Luiz Pereira; Dillon, Aldo José Pinheiro; Camassola, Marli

    2015-09-01

    In this work, steam explosion was used a pretreatment method to improve the conversion of elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum) to cellulosic ethanol. This way, enzymatic hydrolysis of vaccum-drained and water-washed steam-treated substrates was carried out with Penicillium echinulatum enzymes while Saccharomyces cerevisiae CAT-1 was used for fermentation. After 48 h of hydrolysis, the highest yield of reducing sugars was obtained from vaccum-drained steam-treated substrates that were produced after 10 min at 200 °C (863.42 ± 62.52 mg/g). However, the highest glucose yield was derived from water-washed steam-treated substrates that were produced after 10 min at 190 °C (248.34 ± 6.27 mg/g) and 200 °C (246.00 ± 9.60 mg/g). Nevertheless, the highest ethanol production was obtained from water-washed steam-treated substrates that were produced after 6 min at 200 °C. These data revealed that water washing is a critical step for ethanol production from steam-treated elephant grass and that pretreatment generates a great deal of water soluble inhibitory compounds for hydrolysis and fermentation, which were partly characterized as part of this study. PMID:26038327

  1. Kinetic and Modeling Investigation to Provide Design Guidelines for the NREL Dilute-Acid Process Aimed at Total Hydrolysis/Fractionation of Lignocellulosic Biomass: July 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y. Y.; Iyer, P.; Xiang, Q.; Hayes, J.

    2004-08-01

    Following up on previous work, subcontractor investigated three aspects of using NREL ''pretreatment'' technology for total hydrolysis (cellulose as well as hemicellulose) of biomass. Whereas historic hydrolysis of biomass used either dilute acid or concentrated acid technology for hydrolysis of both hemicellulose and cellulose, NREL has been pursuing very dilute acid hydrolysis of hemicellulose followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. NREL's countercurrent shrinking-bed reactor design for hemicellulose hydrolysis (pretreatment) has, however, shown promise for total hydrolysis. For the first task, subcontractor developed a mathematical model of the countercurrent shrinking bed reactor operation and, using yellow poplar sawdust as a feedstock, analyzed the effect of: initial solid feeding rate, temperature, acid concentration, acid flow rate, Peclet number (a measure of backmixing in liquid flow), and bed shrinking. For the second task, subcontractor used laboratory trials, with yellow poplar sawdust and 0.07 wt% sulfuric acid at various temperatures, to verify the hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose (desired) and decomposition of glucose (undesired) and determine appropriate parameters for use in kinetic models. Unlike cellulose and hemicellulose, lignins, the third major component of biomass, are not carbohydrates that can be broken down into component sugars. They are, however, aromatic complex amorphous phenolic polymers that can likely be converted into low-molecular weight compounds suitable for production of fuels and chemicals. Oxidative degradation is one pathway for such conversion and hydrogen peroxide would be an attractive reagent for this, as it would leave no residuals. For the third task, subcontractor reacted lignin with hydrogen peroxide under various conditions and analyzed the resulting product mix.

  2. Enhancement of methane production in mesophilic anaerobic digestion of secondary sewage sludge by advanced thermal hydrolysis pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Abelleira-Pereira, Jose M; Pérez-Elvira, Sara I; Sánchez-Oneto, Jezabel; de la Cruz, Roberto; Portela, Juan R; Nebot, Enrique

    2015-03-15

    Studies on the development and evolution of anaerobic digestion (AD) pretreatments are nowadays becoming widespread, due to the outstanding benefits that these processes could entail in the management of sewage sludge. Production of sewage sludge in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is becoming an extremely important environmental issue. The work presented in this paper is a continuation of our previous studies with the aim of understanding and developing the advanced thermal hydrolysis (ATH) process. ATH is a novel AD pretreatment based on a thermal hydrolysis (TH) process plus hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) addition that takes advantage of a peroxidation/direct steam injection synergistic effect. The main goal of the present research was to compare the performance of TH and ATH, conducted at a wide range of operating conditions, as pretreatments of mesophilic AD with an emphasis on methane production enhancement as a key parameter and its connection with the sludge solubilization. Results showed that both TH and ATH patently improved methane production in subsequent mesophilic BMP (biochemical methane potential) tests in comparison with BMP control tests (raw secondary sewage sludge). Besides other interesting results and discussions, a promising result was obtained since ATH, operated at temperature (115 °C), pretreatment time (5 min) and pressure (1 bar) considerably below those typically used in TH (170 °C, 30 min, 8 bar), managed to enhance the methane production in subsequent mesophilic BMP tests [biodegradability factor (fB) = cumulative CH4production/cumulative CH4production (Control) = 1.51 ± 0.01] to quite similar levels than conventional TH pretreatment [fB = 1.52 ± 0.03]. PMID:25682559

  3. Stimulation of phospholipid hydrolysis and arachidonic acid mobilization in human uterine decidua cells by phorbol ester.

    PubMed Central

    Schrey, M P; Read, A M; Steer, P J

    1987-01-01

    Vasopressin and oxytocin both stimulated inositol phosphate accumulation in isolated uterine decidua cells. Pretreatment of cells with the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) prevented this agonist-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis. TPA (0.1 microM) alone had no effect on basal inositol phosphate accumulation, but stimulated phosphoinositide deacylation, as indicated by a 2-fold increase in lysophosphatidylinositol and glycerophosphoinositol. TPA also stimulated a dose-related release of arachidonic acid from decidua-cell phospholipid [phosphatidylcholine (PC) much greater than phosphatidylinositol (PI) greater than phosphatidylethanolamine]. The phorbol ester 4 beta-phorbol 12,13-diacetate (PDA) at 0.1 microM had no effect on arachidonic acid mobilization. The TPA-stimulated increase in arachidonic acid release was apparent by 2 1/2 min (116% of control), maximal after 20 min (283% of control), and remained around this value (306% of control) after 120 min incubation. TPA also stimulated significant increases in 1,2-diacylglycerol and monoacylglycerol production at 20 and 120 min. Although the temporal increases in arachidonic acid and monoacylglycerol accumulation in the presence of TPA continued up to 120 min, that of 1,2-diacylglycerol declined after 20 min. In decidua cells prelabelled with [3H]choline, TPA also stimulated a significant decrease in radiolabelled PC after 20 min, which was accompanied by an increased release of water-soluble metabolites into the medium. Most of the radioactivity in the extracellular pool was associated with choline, whereas the main cellular water-soluble metabolite was phosphorylcholine. TPA stimulated extracellular choline accumulation to 183% and 351% of basal release after 5 and 20 min respectively and cellular phosphorylcholine production to 136% of basal values after 20 min. These results are consistent with a model in which protein kinase C activation by TPA leads to arachidonic acid mobilization

  4. Enzymatic hydrolysis of chitin pretreated by rapid depressurization from supercritical 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane toward highly acetylated oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Villa-Lerma, Guadalupe; González-Márquez, Humberto; Gimeno, Miquel; Trombotto, Stéphane; David, Laurent; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Shirai, Keiko

    2016-06-01

    The hydrolysis of chitin treated under supercritical conditions was successfully carried out using chitinases obtained by an optimized fermentation of the fungus Lecanicillium lecanii. The biopolymer was subjected to a pretreatment based on suspension in supercritical 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (scR134a), which possesses a critical temperature and pressure of 101°C and 40bar, respectively, followed by rapid depressurization to atmospheric pressure and further fibrillation. This methodology was compared to control untreated chitins and chitin subjected to steam explosion showing improved production of reducing sugars (0.18mg/mL), enzymatic hydrolysis and high acetylation (FA of 0.45) in products with degrees of polymerization between 2 and 5. PMID:26970920

  5. Comparison of enzymatic reactivity of corn stover solids prepared by dilute acid, AFEX™, and ionic liquid pretreatments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pretreatment is essential to realize high product yields from biological conversion of naturally recalcitrant cellulosic biomass, with thermochemical pretreatments often favored for cost and performance. In this study, enzymatic digestion of solids from dilute sulfuric acid (DA), ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX™), and ionic liquid (IL) thermochemical pretreatments of corn stover were followed over time for the same range of total enzyme protein loadings to provide comparative data on glucose and xylose yields of monomers and oligomers from the pretreated solids. The composition of pretreated solids and enzyme adsorption on each substrate were also measured to determine. The extent glucose release could be related to these features. Results Corn stover solids from pretreatment by DA, AFEX, and IL were enzymatically digested over a range of low to moderate loadings of commercial cellulase, xylanase, and pectinase enzyme mixtures, the proportions of which had been previously optimized for each pretreatment. Avicel® cellulose, regenerated amorphous cellulose (RAC), and beechwood xylan were also subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis as controls. Yields of glucose and xylose and their oligomers were followed for times up to 120 hours, and enzyme adsorption was measured. IL pretreated corn stover displayed the highest initial glucose yields at all enzyme loadings and the highest final yield for a low enzyme loading of 3 mg protein/g glucan in the raw material. However, increasing the enzyme loading to 12 mg/g glucan or more resulted in DA pretreated corn stover attaining the highest longer-term glucose yields. Hydrolyzate from AFEX pretreated corn stover had the highest proportion of xylooligomers, while IL produced the most glucooligomers. However, the amounts of both oligomers dropped with increasing enzyme loadings and hydrolysis times. IL pretreated corn stover had the highest enzyme adsorption capacity. Conclusions Initial hydrolysis yields were highest

  6. Simulation of acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic residues to fermentable sugars for bioethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidiras, Dimitris

    2012-12-01

    The dilute acid hydrolysis of fir sawdust with sulfuric acid was undertaken in a batch reactor system (autoclave). The experimental data and reaction kinetic analysis indicate that this is a potential process for cellulose and hemicelluloses hydrolysis, due to a rapid hydrolysis reaction for acid concentration 0.045 N at 160-180°C. It was found that significant sugar degradation occurred at these conditions. The optimum conditions gave a yield of 38% total fermentable sugars. The kinetics of dilute acid hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloses (polysaccharides) were simulated using four pseudo-kinetic models. The reaction rate constants were calculated in each case.

  7. Biomass pretreatment affects Ustilago maydis in producing itaconic acid

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the last years, the biotechnological production of platform chemicals for fuel components has become a major focus of interest. Although ligno-cellulosic material is considered as suitable feedstock, the almost inevitable pretreatment of this recalcitrant material may interfere with the subsequent fermentation steps. In this study, the fungus Ustilago maydis was used to produce itaconic acid as platform chemical for the synthesis of potential biofuels such as 3-methyltetrahydrofuran. No studies, however, have investigated how pretreatment of ligno-cellulosic biomass precisely influences the subsequent fermentation by U. maydis. Thus, this current study aims to first characterize U. maydis in shake flasks and then to evaluate the influence of three exemplary pretreatment methods on the cultivation and itaconic acid production of this fungus. Cellulose enzymatically hydrolysed in seawater and salt-assisted organic-acid catalysed cellulose were investigated as substrates. Lastly, hydrolysed hemicellulose from fractionated beech wood was applied as substrate. Results U. maydis was characterized on shake flask level regarding its itaconic acid production on glucose. Nitrogen limitation was shown to be a crucial condition for the production of itaconic acid. For itaconic acid concentrations above 25 g/L, a significant product inhibition was observed. Performing experiments that simulated influences of possible pretreatment methods, U. maydis was only slightly affected by high osmolarities up to 3.5 osmol/L as well as of 0.1 M oxalic acid. The production of itaconic acid was achieved on pretreated cellulose in seawater and on the hydrolysed hemicellulosic fraction of pretreated beech wood. Conclusion The fungus U. maydis is a promising producer of itaconic acid, since it grows as single cells (yeast-like) in submerged cultivations and it is extremely robust in high osmotic media and real seawater. Moreover, U. maydis can grow on the hemicellulosic fraction

  8. Fungal pretreatment of non-sterile miscanthus for enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Vasco-Correa, Juliana; Ge, Xumeng; Li, Yebo

    2016-03-01

    Miscanthus was pretreated with the fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora under non-sterile conditions, using sterile miscanthus that had been previously colonized with the fungus as the inoculum. Inoculum ratios equal to or greater than 30% yielded a successful pretreatment, enhancing the enzymatic digestibility of miscanthus by 3- to 4-fold over that of raw miscanthus, which was comparable with the fungal pretreatment under sterile conditions. This enhanced digestibility was linearly correlated with lignin degradation. Although cellulose loss of up to 13% was observed for the successful non-sterile pretreatments, the final glucose yield was 3-4 times higher than that of raw miscanthus and comparable to that of the sterile pretreated miscanthus. A time course study showed that maximum glucose yield can be achieved with a pretreatment time of 21 days. PMID:26722811

  9. Robustness of two-step acid hydrolysis procedure for composition analysis of poplar.

    PubMed

    Bhagia, Samarthya; Nunez, Angelica; Wyman, Charles E; Kumar, Rajeev

    2016-09-01

    The NREL standard procedure for lignocellulosic biomass composition has two steps: primary hydrolysis in 72% wt sulfuric acid at 30°C for 1h followed by secondary hydrolysis of the slurry in 4wt% acid at 121°C for 1h. Although pointed out in the NREL procedure, the impact of particle size on composition has never been shown. In addition, the effects of primary hydrolysis time and separation of solids prior to secondary hydrolysis on composition have never been shown. Using poplar, it was found that particle sizes less than 0.250mm significantly lowered the glucan content and increased the Klason lignin but did not affect xylan, acetate, or acid soluble lignin contents. Composition was unaffected for primary hydrolysis time between 30 and 90min. Moreover, separating solids prior to secondary hydrolysis had negligible effect on composition suggesting that lignin and polysaccharides are completely separated in the primary hydrolysis stage. PMID:27282557

  10. Combination of enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol organosolv pretreatments: effect on lignin structures, delignification yields and cellulose-to-glucose conversion.

    PubMed

    Obama, Patrick; Ricochon, Guillaume; Muniglia, Lionel; Brosse, Nicolas

    2012-05-01

    Enzymatic pre-hydrolysis using the industrial enzymatic cocktail Cellulyve® was assessed as a first step in a pretreatment process of Miscanthus biomass involving an aqueous-ethanol organosolv treatment. (13)C and (31)P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and size exclusion chromatography were used to analyze the cellulose and lignin before and after treatment. It was demonstrated that despite a very low impact on the fibre structure (observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy) and composition (in terms of sugars and polyphenolics content), the enzymatic pre-treatment disrupted the lignocellulosic matrix to a considerable extend. This weakening permitted enhanced removal of lignin during organosolv pulping and increased hydrolysability of the residual cellulosic pulp for the production of monomeric glucose. Using this combined treatment, a delignification yield of 93% and an enzymatic cellulose-to-glucose conversion of 75% were obtained. PMID:22424922

  11. Progressive deconstruction of Arundo donax Linn. to fermentable sugars by acid catalyzed ionic liquid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    You, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Li-Ming; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Acid enhanced ionic liquid (IL) 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C4 mim]Cl) pretreatment has shown great potential for boosting the yield of sugars from biomass cost-effectively and environmental-friendly. Pretreatment with shorter processing time will promote the commercial viability. In this work, pretreatment of reduced Amberlyst catalysis time of 34 min was demonstrated to be the most effective among time-varying pretreatments, evidenced by partial removal of hemicellulose and cellulose crystal transformation of Arundo donax Linn. A higher fermentable sugar concentration of 10.42 g/L (2% substrate) was obtained after 72 h of saccharification than the others. Total processing time to reach 92% glucose yield was cut down to approximately 26 h. Progressive deconstruction of crop cell wall was occurred with increased catalysis time by gradual releasing of H3O(+) of Amberlyst. However, vast lignin re-deposited polymers on fibers could hinder further enzymatic hydrolysis. These discoveries provide new insights into a more economic pretreatment for bioethanol production. PMID:26363822

  12. Effect of pelleting on the recalcitrance and bioconversion of dilute-acid pretreated corn stover

    SciTech Connect

    Allison E Ray; Amber Hoover; Gary Gresham

    2012-07-01

    Background: Knowledge regarding the performance of densified biomass in biochemical processes is limited. The effects of densification on biochemical conversion are explored here. Methods: Pelleted corn stover samples were generated from bales that were milled to 6.35 mm. Low-solids acid pretreatment and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation were performed to evaluate pretreatment efficacy and ethanol yields achieved for pelleted and ground stover (6.35 mm and 2 mm) samples. Both pelleted and 6.35-mm ground stover were evaluated using a ZipperClave® reactor under high-solids, process-relevant conditions for multiple pretreatment severities (Ro), followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the washed, pretreated solids. Results: Monomeric xylose yields were significantly higher for pellets (approximately 60%) than for ground formats (approximately 38%). Pellets achieved approximately 84% of theoretical ethanol yield (TEY); ground stover formats had similar profiles, reaching approximately 68% TEY. Pelleting corn stover was not detrimental to pretreatment efficacy for both low- and high-solids conditions, and even enhanced ethanol yields.

  13. Ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation on empty palm fruit bunch fiber (EPFBF) for cellulosic ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ming J; Lau, Ming W; Gunawan, Christa; Dale, Bruce E

    2010-11-01

    Empty palm fruit bunch fiber (EPFBF), a readily available cellulosic biomass from palm processing facilities, is investigated as a potential carbohydrate source for cellulosic ethanol production. This feedstock was pretreated using ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) and enzymatically hydrolyzed. The best tested AFEX conditions were at 135 °C, 45 min retention time, water to dry biomass loading of 1:1 (weight ratio), and ammonia to dry biomass loading of 1:1 (weight ratio). The particle size of the pretreated biomass was reduced post-AFEX. The optimized enzyme formulation consists of Accellerase (84 μL/g biomass), Multifect Xylanase (31 μL/g biomass), and Multifect Pectinase (24 μL/g biomass). This mixture achieved close to 90% of the total maximum yield within 72 h of enzymatic hydrolysis. Fermentation on the water extract of this biomass affirms that nutrients solely from the pretreated EPFBF can support yeast growth for complete glucose fermentation. These results suggest that AFEX-treated EPFBF can be used for cellulosic biofuels production because biomass recalcitrance has been overcome without reducing the fermentability of the pretreated materials. PMID:20419480

  14. Effect of the Presence of Carbohydrates during Acid Hydrolysis upon the Subsequent Recovery Free Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, John; Presley, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Amino acid analysis is a classic biochemical technique which has been well characterized with pure protein samples. Much less is known about the effect of the presence other substances in hydrolyzed heterogeneous samples upon the final results. At the Molecular Structure Facility at UCDavis (MSF), we examined amino acid recovery following hydrolysis to determine if the presence of carbohydrates during hydrolysis influenced the recovery of the amino acids. The MSF works with a diverse sample set for different customers and have a keen interest if any of the many substances present in the sample can influence the final results. A typical sample is subjected to 6N HCl for 24hr at 110°C then brought back up in an acidic diluent to run on our dedicated Hitachi 8800 which utilizes ion-exchange chromatography with a post-column reaction with ninhydrin for quantification of each amino acid. We used this typical/routine hydrolysis in our experiments. One technique which is often employed to promote complete hydrolysis is to presoak the sample in dilute acid was also examined. Using various model proteins as well as varying percentages of carbohydrates we demonstrated that the presence of carbohydrates has little effect on the recovery of protein across a wide range of concentrations.

  15. Effect of cation-exchange pretreatment of aqueous soil extracts on the gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric determination of nerve agent hydrolysis products after tert.-butyldimethylsilylation.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, M; Tsunoda, N; Ohta, H; Tsuge, K; Takesako, H; Seto, Y

    1998-10-23

    The efficiency of pretreatment of aqueous soil extracts using a cation-exchange resin has been investigated by gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) determination of nerve agent hydrolysis products after tert.-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) derivatization. An aqueous solution containing methylphosphonic acid (MPA) and its monoalkyl esters, ethyl methylphosphonic acid, isopropyl methylphosphonic acid and pinacolyl methylphosphonic acid, was dried, and these phosphonic acids were derivatized with N-methyl-N-(tert.-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoro-acetamide and analyzed by GC-MS. The yields of TBDMS derivatives were significantly decreased by the addition of calcium and magnesium ions to an aqueous solution (approximately 0.5 mM) before derivatization. The extent of lowered yields was related to the hydrophilicity of phosphonic acids. MPA and its monoalkyl esters were spiked into soil samples (sand, alluvial soil and volcanic ash soil), extracted with distilled water, dried, silylated and applied to GC-MS. The yields of TBDMS derivatives of monoalkyl esters from soil samples were low (3-42%) and MPA derivative was scarcely detected (yield: < 0.7%). By desalting the aqueous soil extract by passage through a strong cation-exchange resin, the yields of TBDMS derivatives of monoalkyl esters were significantly improved (12-69%) and MPA derivative was detected (yield: 2-36%). The extent of improved yields was related to the concentrations of divalent metal cations in aqueous soil extracts. In combination with desalting by the cation-exchange resin, GC-MS after TBDMS derivatization enables detection of nerve agent hydrolysis products in soils at sub-ppm (0.2 microgram/g) concentrations. PMID:9818434

  16. Biological pretreatment of corn stover with white-rot fungus for enzymatic hydrolysis and bioethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pretreatment, as the first step towards conversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks to biofuels and/or chemicals remains one of the main barriers to commercial success. Typically, harsh methods are used to pretreat lignocellulosic biomass prior to its breakdown to sugars by enzymes, which also result ...

  17. Biological pretreatment of corn stover by Phlebia brevispora for enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis and efficient ethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pretreatment, as the first step towards conversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks to ethanol remains one of the main barriers to commercial success. Typically, harsh methods are used to pretreat lignocellulosic biomass prior to its breakdown to sugars by enzymes, which also result in fermentation in...

  18. Kinetic Study of Acid Hydrolysis of Rice Straw

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Nibedita; Aikat, Kaustav

    2013-01-01

    Rice straw is a renewable, cheap, and abundant waste in tropical countries. The pentose content of rice straw can be used as a substrate for many types of value-added products such as xylitol and biofuel. Dilute acid hydrolysis mainly releases pentose from rice straw. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of H2SO4 concentration and reaction time on the xylose production. The variation of the main product xylose with the reaction time was described by a kinetic model and kinetic parameters were calculated to describe the variation of the xylose production with time. The optimum yield (19.35 g/L) was obtained at 0.24 mol/L H2SO4 and 30 minutes. PMID:25969789

  19. Effects of Dilute Acid Pretreatment on Cellulose DP and the Relationship Between DP Reduction and Cellulose Digestibility

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Chen, X.; Tucker, M.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.

    2012-01-01

    The degree of polymerization(DP) of cellulose is considered to be one of the most important properties affecting the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Various pure cellulosic and biomass materials have been used in a study of the effect of dilute acid treatment on cellulose DP. A substantial reduction in DP was found for all pure cellulosic materials studied even at conditions that would be considered relatively mild for pretreatment. The effect of dilute acid pretreatment on cellulose DP in biomass samples was also investigated. Corn stover pretreated with dilute acid under the most optimal conditions contained cellulose with a DPw in the range of 1600{approx}3500, which is much higher than the level-off DP(DPw 150{approx}300) obtained with pure celluloses. The effect of DP reduction on the saccharification of celluloses was also studied. From this study it does not appear that cellulose DP is a main factor affecting cellulose saccharification.

  20. Steam-explosion pretreatment of wood: Effect of chip size, acid, moisture content and pressure drop.

    PubMed

    Brownell, H H; Yu, E K; Saddler, J N

    1986-06-01

    Material balances for pentosan, lignin, and hexosan, during steam-explosion pretreatment of aspenwood, showed almost quantitative recovery of cellulose in the water-insoluble fraction. Dilute acid impregnation resulted in more selective hydrolysis of pentosan relative to undesirable pyrolysis, and gave a more accessible substrate for enzymatic hydrolysis. Thermocouple probes, located inside simulated aspenwood chips heated in 240 degrees C-saturated steam, showed rapid heating of air-dry wood, whereas green or impregnated wood heated slowly. Small chips, 3.2 mm in the fiber direction, whether green or airdry gave approximately equal rates of pentosan destruction and solubilization, and similar yields of glucose and of total reducing sugars on enzymatic hydrolysis with Trichoderma harzianum. Partial pyrolysis, destroying one third of the pentosan of aspenwood at atmospheric pressure by dry steam at 276 degrees C, gave little increase in yield of reducing sugars on enzymatic hydrolysis. Treatment with saturated steam at 240 degrees C gave essentially the same yields of glucose and of total reducing sugars, and the same yields of butanediol and ethanol on fermentation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, whether or not 80% of the steam was bled off before explosion and even if the chips remained intact, showing that explosion was unnecessary. PMID:18555395

  1. Steam-explosion pretreatment of wood: effect of chip size, acid, moisture content and pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Brownell, H.H.; Yu, E.K.C.; Saddler, J.N.

    1986-06-01

    Material balances for pentosan, lignin, and hexosan, during steam-explosion pretreatment of aspenwood, showed almost quantitative recovery of cellulose in the water-insoluble fraction. Dilute acid impregnation resulted in more selective hydrolysis of pentosan relative to undesirable pyrolysis, and gave a more accessible substrate for enzymatic hydrolysis. Thermocouple probes, located inside simulated aspenwood chips heated in 240 degrees C-saturated steam, showed rapid heating of air-dry wood, whereas green or impregnated wood heated slowly. Small chips, 3.2 mm in the fiber direction, whether green or air dry gave approximately equal rates of pentosan destruction and solubilization, and similar yields of glucose and of total reducing sugars on enzmatic hydrolysis with Trichoderma harzianum. Partial pyrolysis, destroying one-third of the pentosan of aspenwood at atmospheric pressure by dry steam at 276 degrees C, gave little increase in yield of reducing sugars on enzymatic hydrolysis. Treatment with saturated steam at 240 degrees C gave essentially the same yields of butanediol and ethanol on fermentation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, whether or not 80% of the steam was bled off before explosion and even if the chips remained intact, showing that explosion was unnecessary. 17 references.

  2. A novel combined pretreatment of ball milling and microwave irradiation for enhancing enzymatic hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huadong; Li, Hongqiang; Luo, Hao; Xu, Jian

    2013-02-01

    Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was performed as a mode substrate to investigate its potential ability of bioconversion in a novel combined pretreatment of ball milling (BM) and/or microwave irradiation (MWI). The variation of structure characteristics of MCC before/after pretreatment were investigated, including crystallinity index (CrI), size of crystal (S(C)), specific surface area (SSA) and degree of polymerization (DP). Their correlation with the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis was differentiated by an optimized equation which indicated the rate of hydrolysis was much more sensitive to CrI than SSA and DP. To achieve the same or higher glucose yield of BM for 3h and 6h, BM for 1h with MWI for 20min could save 54.8% and 77.40% energy consumption, respectively. Moreover, chemicals were not required in this process. It is concluded that the combination of BM and short time MWI is an environment-friendly, economical and effective approach to treat biomass. PMID:23306114

  3. Solar assisted alkali pretreatment of garden biomass: Effects on lignocellulose degradation, enzymatic hydrolysis, crystallinity and ultra-structural changes in lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Gabhane, Jagdish; William, S P M Prince; Vaidya, Atul N; Das, Sera; Wate, Satish R

    2015-06-01

    A comprehensive study was carried out to assess the effectiveness of solar assisted alkali pretreatment (SAAP) on garden biomass (GB). The pretreatment efficiency was assessed based on lignocellulose degradation, conversion of cellulose into reducing sugars, changes in the ultra-structure and functional groups of lignocellulose and impact on the crystallinity of cellulose, etc. SAAP was found to be efficient for the removal of lignin and hemicellulose that facilitated enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. FTIR and XRD studies provided details on the effectiveness of SAAP on lignocellulosic moiety and crystallinity of cellulose. Scanning electron microscopic analysis showed ultra-structural disturbances in the microfibrils of GB as a result of pretreatment. The mass balance closer of 97.87% after pretreatment confirmed the reliability of SAAP pretreatment. Based on the results, it is concluded that SAAP is not only an efficient means of pretreatment but also economical as it involved no energy expenditure for heat generation during pretreatment. PMID:25816769

  4. Investigation of accessory hemicellulases and pectinases for polysaccharide hydrolysis of ionic liquid pretreated biomass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The polysaccharides, cellulose, hemicellulose, and other additional carbohydrate polymers of terrestrial biomass, comprise renewable feedstocks for carbon-based chemicals and fuels. Biomass pretreatment is required to overcome its recalcitrance to biochemical deconstruction to monomeric sugars for ...

  5. Integration of mild acid hydrolysis in γ-valerolactone/water system for enhancement of enzymatic saccharification from cotton stalk.

    PubMed

    Wu, Miao; Yan, Zhong Ya; Zhang, Xue Ming; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run Cang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, mild acid hydrolysis using γ-valerolactone (GVL)/water system integrated with enzymatic hydrolysis was carried out for the enhancement of enzymatic saccharification efficiency. The quantitative analysis of soluble carbohydrates and structural characterizations of solid residues were conducted. Results showed that the soluble carbohydrates in the water-phase were mainly composed of monomers and oligomers from xylose and glucose, while the contents of which were depended on the ratio of GVL to water. Moreover, the inhibitors were hardly detected due to the moderate pretreatment severity. Compared with the untreated feedstock, the yields of enzymatic hydrolysis from pretreated samples increased by two-fold with the mixture of 80/20 GVL/H2O. Combined with the amount of glucose (14.6%) dissolved in the water-phase, over 92.6% of glucose in cotton stalk was released and recovered. Based on the comprehensive analysis, treatment with GVL/H2O system provided us a more effective approach for sugar production from biomass. PMID:26476160

  6. Solar assisted alkali pretreatment of garden biomass: Effects on lignocellulose degradation, enzymatic hydrolysis, crystallinity and ultra-structural changes in lignocellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Gabhane, Jagdish; William, S.P.M. Prince; Vaidya, Atul N.; Das, Sera; Wate, Satish R.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • SAAP is an efficient and economic means of pretreatment. • SAAP was found to be efficient in lignin and hemicellulose removal. • SAAP enhanced the enzymatic hydrolysis. • FTIR, XRD and SEM provided vivid understanding about the mode of action of SAAP. • Mass balance closer of 98% for pretreated GB confirmed the reliability of SAAP. - Abstract: A comprehensive study was carried out to assess the effectiveness of solar assisted alkali pretreatment (SAAP) on garden biomass (GB). The pretreatment efficiency was assessed based on lignocellulose degradation, conversion of cellulose into reducing sugars, changes in the ultra-structure and functional groups of lignocellulose and impact on the crystallinity of cellulose, etc. SAAP was found to be efficient for the removal of lignin and hemicellulose that facilitated enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. FTIR and XRD studies provided details on the effectiveness of SAAP on lignocellulosic moiety and crystallinity of cellulose. Scanning electron microscopic analysis showed ultra-structural disturbances in the microfibrils of GB as a result of pretreatment. The mass balance closer of 97.87% after pretreatment confirmed the reliability of SAAP pretreatment. Based on the results, it is concluded that SAAP is not only an efficient means of pretreatment but also economical as it involved no energy expenditure for heat generation during pretreatment.

  7. Enzymatic saccharification and lactic acid production from banana pseudo-stem through optimized pretreatment at lowest catalyst concentration

    PubMed Central

    Idrees, Muhammad; Adnan, Ahmad; Malik, Farnaz; Qureshi, Fahim Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    This work estimates the potential of banana pseudo-stem with high cellulosic content 42.2-63 %, for the production of fermentable sugars for lactic acid production through statistically optimized pretreatment method. To evaluate the catalyzed pretreatment efficiency of banana pseudo stem based on the enzymatic digestibility, Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was employed for the optimization of pretreatment temperature and time using lowest concentrations of H2SO4, NaOH, NaOH catalyzed Na2S and Na2SO3 that seemed to be significant variables with P<0.05. High F and R2 values and low p-value for hydrolysis yield indicated the model predictability. The optimized condition for NaOH was determined to be conc. 1 %, temperature 130 oC for 2.6 hr; Na2S; conc. 1 %, temperature 130 oC for 2.29 hr; Na2SO3; conc. 1 %, temperature 130 oC for 2.41 hr and H2SO4; conc. 1 %, temperature 129.45 oC for 2.18 hr, produced 84.91 %, 85.23 %, 81.2 % and 76.02 % hydrolysis yield, respectively. Sulphuric acid provided 33+1 gL-1 reducing sugars in pretreatment step along with 38+0.5 gL-1 during enzymatic hydrolysis. Separate hydrolysis and fermentation of resulting sugars showed that the conversion of glucans into lactic acid reached 92 % of the theoretical yield of glucose. PMID:26966423

  8. Can Delignification Decrease Cellulose Digestibility in Acid Pretreated Corn Stover?

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizawa, C. I.; Jeoh, T.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.; Davis, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the improved digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover is at least partially due to the removal of xylan and the consequent increase in accessibility of the cellulose to cellobiohydrolase enzymes. We now report on the impact that lignin removal has on the accessibility and digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover. Samples of corn stover were subjected to dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment with and without simultaneous (partial) lignin removal. In addition, some samples were completely delignified after the pretreatment step using acidified sodium chlorite. The accessibility and digestibility of the samples were tested using a fluorescence-labeled cellobiohydrolase (Trichoderma reesei Cel7A) purified from a commercial cellulase preparation. Partial delignification of corn stover during dilute acid pretreatment was shown to improve cellulose digestibility by T. reesei Cel7A; however, decreasing the lignin content below 5% (g g{sup -1}) by treatment with acidified sodium chlorite resulted in a dramatic reduction in cellulose digestibility. Importantly, this effect was found to be enhanced in samples with lower xylan contents suggesting that the near complete removal of xylan and lignin may cause aggregation of the cellulose microfibrils resulting in decreased cellulase accessibility.

  9. Production of cellulosic ethanol from cotton processing residues after pretreatment with dilute sodium hydroxide and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Fockink, Douglas Henrique; Maceno, Marcelo Adriano Corrêa; Ramos, Luiz Pereira

    2015-01-01

    In this study, production of cellulosic ethanol from two cotton processing residues was investigated after pretreatment with dilute sodium hydroxide. Pretreatment performance was investigated using a 2(2) factorial design and the highest glucan conversion was achieved at the most severe alkaline conditions (0.4g NaOH g(-1) of dry biomass and 120°C), reaching 51.6% and 38.8% for cotton gin waste (CGW) and cotton gin dust (CGD), respectively. The susceptibility of pretreated substrates to enzymatic hydrolysis was also investigated and the best condition was achieved at the lowest total solids (5wt%) and the highest enzyme loading (85mg of Cellic CTec2 g(-1) of dry substrate). However, the highest concentration of fermentable sugars - 47.8 and 42.5gL(-1) for CGD and CGW, respectively - was obtained at 15wt% total solids using this same enzyme loading. Substrate hydrolysates had no inhibitory effects on the fermenting microorganism. PMID:25841187

  10. Breakdown of hierarchical architecture in cellulose during dilute acid pretreatments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Inouye, Hideyo; Yang, Lin; Himmel, Michael E.; Tucker, Melvin; Makowski, Lee

    2015-02-28

    Cellulose is an attractive candidate as a feedstock for sustainable bioenergy because of its global abundance. Pretreatment of biomass has significant influence on the chemical availability of cellulose locked in recalcitrant microfibrils. Optimizing pretreatment depends on an understanding of its impact on the microscale and nanoscale molecular architecture. X-ray scattering experiments have been performed on native and pre-treated maize stover and models of cellulose architecture have been derived from these data. Ultra small-angle, very small-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS, VSAXS and SAXS) probe three different levels of architectural scale. USAXS and SAXS have been used to study cellulose at two distinct length scales, modeling the fibrils as ~30 Å diameter rods packed into ~0.14 μm diameter bundles. VSAXS is sensitive to structural features at length scales between these two extremes. Detailed analysis of diffraction patterns from untreated and pretreated maize using cylindrical Guinier plots and the derivatives of these plots reveals the presence of substructures within the ~0.14 μm diameter bundles that correspond to grouping of cellulose approximately 30 nm in diameter. These sub-structures are resilient to dilute acid pretreatments but are sensitive to pretreatment when iron sulfate is added. Lastly, these results provide evidence of the hierarchical arrangement of cellulose at three length scales and the evolution of these arrangements during pre-treatments.

  11. Breakdown of hierarchical architecture in cellulose during dilute acid pretreatments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Inouye, Hideyo; Yang, Lin; Himmel, Michael E.; Tucker, Melvin; Makowski, Lee

    2015-02-28

    Cellulose can work as a feedstock for sustainable bioenergy because of its global abundance. Pretreatment of biomass has significant influence on the chemical availability of cellulose locked in recalcitrant microfibrils. Optimizing pretreatment depends on an understanding of its impact on the microscale and nanoscale molecular architecture. X-ray scattering experiments have been performed on native and pre-treated maize stover and models of cellulose architecture have been derived from these data. Ultra small-angle, very small-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS, VSAXS and SAXS) probe three different levels of architectural scale. USAXS and SAXS have been used to study cellulose at two distinct length scales, modeling the fibrils as ~30 Å diameter rods packed into ~0.14 μm diameter bundles. VSAXS is sensitive to structural features at length scales between these two extremes. Detailed analysis of diffraction patterns from untreated and pretreated maize using cylindrical Guinier plots and the derivatives of these plots reveals the presence of substructures within the ~0.14 μm diameter bundles that correspond to grouping of cellulose approximately 30 nm in diameter. These sub-structures are resilient to dilute acid pretreatments but are sensitive to pretreatment when iron sulfate is added. Our results provide evidence of the hierarchical arrangement of cellulose at three length scales and the evolution of these arrangements during pre-treatments.

  12. Value of furfural/ethanol coproduction from acid hydrolysis processes

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, S.; Calnon, M.; Feinberg, D.; Power, A.; Weiss, L.

    1983-08-01

    The benefits of two modifications in the acid hydrolysis of cellulosic feedstocks for the production of ethanol fuels were investigated: marketing of the by-product furfural and xylose fermentation. Preliminary analysis indicate that the furfural by-product furfural and xylose fermentation. Perliminary analyses indicate that the furfural by-product credit is more beneficial at a minimum net profit of $0.08/lb of furfural. For this credit to have a major impact on ethanol production costs, new markets for large quantities of furfural must be identified. Furfural can be an alternative feedstock for hydrocarbon-based commodity chemicals. The costs and profitabilities of producing five chemicals from furfurals as opposed to conventional hydrocarbon-based feedstocks were studied. The furfural processes for production of styrene and butadiene were found to be marginally competitive or not competitive. The furfural processes for adipic acid, maleic anhydride, and butanol could be competitive. Results of analysis by a computer model of the petrochemical industry indicate that with furfural markets additional to these three furfural processes, over 2.5 x 10/sup 9/ gal of ethanol could be marketed at about $1.00/gal. Converting the xylose stream to ethanol has about the same effect on the selling price of ethanol as the furfural credit. The greatest ethanol production will result from xylose fermentation, but the furfural credit offers large near-term profits and has a more diversified impact on reducing petroleum product demand. 6 figures, 17 tables.

  13. Comparison of Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Acid Hydrolysis of Sterol Glycosides from Foods Rich in Δ(7)-Sterols.

    PubMed

    Münger, Linda H; Jutzi, Sabrina; Lampi, Anna-Maija; Nyström, Laura

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we present the difference in sterol composition of extracted steryl glycosides (SG) hydrolyzed by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis. SG were analyzed from foods belonging to the plant families Cucurbitaceae (melon and pumpkin seeds) and Amaranthaceae (amaranth and beetroot), both of which are dominated by Δ(7)-sterols. Released sterols were quantified by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). All Δ(7)-sterols identified (Δ(7)-stigmastenyl, spinasteryl, Δ(7)-campesteryl, Δ(7)-avenasteryl, poriferasta-7,25-dienyl and poriferasta-7,22,25-trienyl glucoside) underwent isomerization under acidic conditions and high temperature. Sterols with an ethylidene or methylidene side chain were found to form multiple artifacts. The artifact sterols coeluted with residues of incompletely isomerized Δ(7)-sterols, or Δ(5)-sterols if present, and could be identified as Δ(8(14))-sterols on the basis of relative retention time, and their MS spectra as trimethylsilyl (TMS) and acetate derivatives. For instance, SG from melon were composed of 66% Δ(7)-stigmastenol when enzymatic hydrolysis was performed, whereas with acid hydrolysis only 8% of Δ(7)-stigmastenol was determined. The artifact of Δ(7)-stigmastenol coeluted with residual non-isomerized spinasterol, demonstrating the high risk of misinterpretation of compositional data obtained after acid hydrolysis. Therefore, the accurate composition of SG from foods containing sterols with a double bond at C-7 can only be obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis or by direct analysis of the intact SG. PMID:25757602

  14. Production of fermentable sugars from corn fiber using soaking in aqueous ammonia (saa) pretreatment and fermentation to succinic acid by Escherichia coli afp184

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conversion of corn fiber (CF), a by-product from the corn-to-ethanol conversion process, into fermentable sugar and succinic acid was investigated using soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) pretreatment followed by biological conversions including enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation using genetically ...

  15. Combined Dilute Acid and Solvent Based Pretreatment of Agricultural Wastes for Efficient Lignocellulosic Fractionation and Biofuels Production

    SciTech Connect

    Brodeur, G.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Wilson, C.; Telotte, J.; Collier, J.; Stickel, J.

    2013-01-01

    A true biorefinery for processing lignocellulosic biomass should achieve maximum utilization of all major constituents (cellulose, hemicellulose, & lignin) within the feedstock. In this work a combined pretreatment process of dilute acid (DA) and N-methyl morpholine N-oxide (NMMO) is described that allows for both fractionation and subsequent complete hydrolysis of the feedstocks (corn stover and sugarcane bagasse). During this multi-step processing, the dilute acid pretreatment solubilizes the majority (>90%) of the hemicellulosic fraction, while the NMMO treatment yields a cellulosic fraction that is completely digestible within 48 hours at low enzyme loadings. With both the cellulosic and hemicellulosic fractions being converted into separate, dissolved sugar fractions, the remaining portion is nearly pure lignin. When used independently, DA and NMMO pretreatments are only able to achieve ~80% and ~45% cellulosic conversion, respectively. Mass balance calculations along with experimental results are used to illustrate the feasibility of separation and recycling of NMMO.

  16. Breakdown of Cell Wall Nanostructure in Dilute Acid Pretreated Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Urban, Volker S; Heller, William T; McGaughey, Joseph; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Foston, Marcus B; Myles, Dean A A; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Evans, Barbara R

    2010-01-01

    The generation of bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass holds great promise for renewable and clean energy production. A better understanding of the complex mechanisms of lignocellulose breakdown during various pretreatment methods is needed to realize this potential in a cost and energy efficient way. Here, we use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to characterize morphological changes in switchgrass lignocellulose across molecular to sub-micron length scales resulting from the industrially-relevant dilute acid pretreatment method. Our results demonstrate that dilute acid pretreatment increases the cross-sectional radius of the crystalline cellulose fibril. This change is accompanied by removal of hemicellulose and the formation of Rg ~ 135 lignin aggregates. The structural signature of smooth cell wall surfaces is observed at length scales larger than 1000 , and it remains remarkably invariable during pretreatment. This study elucidates the interplay of the different biomolecular components in the break down process of switchgrass by dilute acid pretreatment. The results are important for the development of efficient strategies of biomass to biofuel conversion.

  17. Chemical characterization and hydrothermal pretreatment of Salicornia bigelovii straw for enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis and bioethanol potential.

    PubMed

    Cybulska, Iwona; Chaturvedi, Tanmay; Brudecki, Grzegorz P; Kádár, Zsófia; Meyer, Anne S; Baldwin, Robert M; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard

    2014-02-01

    Salicornia bigelovii straw was characterized and evaluated as a potential lignocellulosic bioethanol feedstock. S. bigelovii used in the study was grown in the United Arab Emirates using saltwater (40ppt) for irrigation. Salt removal was performed prior to pretreatment to protect the processing equipment and avoid inhibition of enzymes and yeast. Composition of the washed biomass was comparable to traditional lignocellulosic biomasses with relatively high glucan and xylan content (26 and 22g/100gDM, respectively) but with lower lignin content (7g/100gDM). The washed feedstock was subjected to hydrothermal pretreatment, producing highly digestible (up to 92% glucan-to-glucose conversion) and fermentable (up to 100% glucose-to-ethanol conversion) fiber fractions. Liquid fractions obtained in the pretreatment did not show inhibition towards Saccharomyces cerevisiae. No significant differences among the enzymatic convertibility and microbial fermentability of the fibers as well as low xylose recoveries suggest that lower severity pretreatment conditions could be exploited for S. bigelovii. PMID:24362358

  18. ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS AND FERMENTATION OF LIME PRETREATED WHEAT STRAW TO ETHANOL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat straw used in this study contained 44.24 +/- 0.28% cellulose and 25.23 +/- 0.11% hemicellulose. Lime pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification methods were evaluated for conversion of wheat straw cellulose and hemicellulose to fermentable sugars. The maximum yield of monomeric sugars from ...

  19. PRETREATMENT AND SUBSTRATE EVALUATION FOR THE ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF CELLULOSIC WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presented are initial studies aimed at determining the applicability of various pretreatment methods and existing cellulosic wastes to a process for the conversion of cellulose to glucose and other reducing sugars. In this process, a cellulase from a mutant of Trichoderma viride ...

  20. Ball milling pretreatment of oil palm biomass for enhancing enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Mohd Rafein; Fujimoto, Shinji; Hirata, Satoshi; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2014-08-01

    Oil palm biomass, namely empty fruit bunch and frond fiber, were pretreated using a planetary ball mill. Particle sizes and crystallinity index values of the oil palm biomass were significantly reduced with extended ball mill processing time. The treatment efficiency was evaluated by the generation of glucose, xylose, and total sugar conversion yields from the pretreatment process compared to the amount of sugars from raw materials. Glucose and xylose contents were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. An increasing trend in glucose and xylose yield as well as total sugar conversion yield was observed with decreasing particle size and crystallinity index. Oil palm frond fiber exhibited the best material yields using ball milling pretreatment with generated glucose, xylose, and total sugar conversion yields of 87.0, 81.6, and 85.4%, respectively. In contrast, oil palm empty fruit bunch afforded glucose and xylose of 70.0 and 82.3%, respectively. The results obtained in this study showed that ball mill-treated oil palm biomass is a suitable pretreatment method for high conversion of glucose and xylose. PMID:24908052

  1. Nonionic Surfactants and Noncatalytic Protein Treatment on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Pretreated Creeping Wild Ryegrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our previous research has shown that saline Creeping Wild Ryegrass (CWR), Leymus triticoides, has a great potential to be used for bioethanol production due to its high fermentable sugar yield, up to 85% cellulose conversion of pretreated CWR. However, the high cost of enzyme is still one of the ob...

  2. Influence of heat pre-treatment on BSA tryptic hydrolysis and peptide release.

    PubMed

    Arrutia, Fátima; Puente, Ángela; Riera, Francisco A; Menéndez, Carlos; González, Ulises A

    2016-07-01

    In contrast with other food proteins, such as β-lactoglobulin or caseins, intensely studied for bioactive peptide production, relatively little attention has been paid to serum albumin, the main blood protein, even though blood disposal is a severe problem for meat processors. In this study, serum albumin was hydrolysed with trypsin after several heat treatments and using different enzyme concentrations. The degree of hydrolysis reached and the peptide sequences released over time were evaluated. Large differences in enzyme-to-substrate ratios (1:50, 1:100 and 1:200) led to similar degree of hydrolysis values (31.92±1.43%, 31.08±3.09% and 26.21±0.71%), and did not alter the number of peptides released. However, thermal treatment enhanced significantly (p<0.05) both the degree of hydrolysis (up to 50.41±1.90%) and the number and amount of the majority of peptides obtained, all with potential bioactivity (28 peptides in the native hydrolysate, 39 in the thermally treated). PMID:26920264

  3. Pyrolytic characteristics of biomass acid hydrolysis residue rich in lignin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanqin; Wei, Zhiguo; Yin, Xiuli; Wu, Chuangzhi

    2012-01-01

    Pyrolytic characteristics of acid hydrolysis residue (AHR) of corncob and pinewood (CAHR, WAHR) were investigated using a thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a self-designed pyrolysis apparatus. Gasification reactivity of CAHR char was then examined using TGA and X-ray diffractometer. Result of TGA showed that thermal degradation curves of AHR descended smoothly along with temperature increasing from 150 °C to 850 °C, while a "sharp mass loss stage" for original biomass feedstock (OBF) was observed. Char yield from AHR (42.64-30.35 wt.%) was found to be much greater than that from OBF (26.4-19.15 wt.%). In addition, gasification reactivity of CAHR char was lower than that of corncob char, and there was big difference in micro-crystallite structure. It was also found that CAHR char reactivity decreased with pyrolysis temperature, but increased with pyrolysis heating rate and gasification temperature at 850-950 °C. Furthermore, CAHR char reactivity performed better under steam atmosphere than under CO2 atmosphere. PMID:22055106

  4. Research on the stability of heavy metals (Cu, Zn) in excess sludge with the pretreatment of thermal hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huimin; Li, Meng; Zhang, Lei; Sheng, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Thermal hydrolysis (TH) has been used to improve anaerobic digestion performance as well as the stability of heavy metals in sludge. Because the toxicity of heavy metals is closely related to both the concentration and the chemical speciation, more exhaustive studies on speciation distribution are urgently needed. This research aimed to investigate the effects of TH treatment (especially the time and temperature) on the concentration and stability of heavy metals in sludge, and to define the optimal TH conditions. The TH experiment indicated that the content of the stable form of Cu and Zn reached 83% and 47.4%, respectively, with TH at 210°C and 30 min. Compared with the raw sludge, the proportion of Cu and Zn increased by 11.88% and 7.3%, respectively. Results indicated that the heavy metals were combined with sludge in a more stable form with the pretreatment of TH, which improved the stability of heavy metals. PMID:26901733

  5. Redistribution of Xylan in Maize Cell Walls During Dilute Acid Pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Brunecky, R.; Vinzant, T. B.; Porter, S. E.; Donohoe, B. S.; Johnson, D. K.; Himmel, M. E.

    2009-04-15

    Developing processes for the conversion of biomass for use in transportation fuels production is becoming a critically important economic and engineering challenge. Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising technology for increasing the enzymatic digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass. However, a deeper understanding of the pretreatability of biomass is needed so that the rate of formation and yields of sugars can be increased. Xylan is an important hemicellulosic component of the plant cell wall and acts as a barrier to cellulose, essentially blocking cellulase action. To better understand xylan hydrolysis in corn stover, we have studied changes in the distribution of xylan caused by dilute acid pretreatment using correlative microscopy. A dramatic loss of xylan antibody signal from the center of the cell wall and an increase or retention of xylan at the plasma membrane interface and middle lamella of the cell were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). We also observed a reduction in xylan fluorescence signal by CLSM that is generally consistent with the decrease in xylan content measured experimentally in the bulk sample, however, the compartmentalization of this xylan retention was not anticipated.

  6. Breakdown of hierarchical architecture in cellulose during dilute acid pretreatments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Yan; Inouye, Hideyo; Yang, Lin; Himmel, Michael E.; Tucker, Melvin; Makowski, Lee

    2015-02-28

    Cellulose is an attractive candidate as a feedstock for sustainable bioenergy because of its global abundance. Pretreatment of biomass has significant influence on the chemical availability of cellulose locked in recalcitrant microfibrils. Optimizing pretreatment depends on an understanding of its impact on the microscale and nanoscale molecular architecture. X-ray scattering experiments have been performed on native and pre-treated maize stover and models of cellulose architecture have been derived from these data. Ultra small-angle, very small-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS, VSAXS and SAXS) probe three different levels of architectural scale. USAXS and SAXS have been used to study cellulose atmore » two distinct length scales, modeling the fibrils as ~30 Å diameter rods packed into ~0.14 μm diameter bundles. VSAXS is sensitive to structural features at length scales between these two extremes. Detailed analysis of diffraction patterns from untreated and pretreated maize using cylindrical Guinier plots and the derivatives of these plots reveals the presence of substructures within the ~0.14 μm diameter bundles that correspond to grouping of cellulose approximately 30 nm in diameter. These sub-structures are resilient to dilute acid pretreatments but are sensitive to pretreatment when iron sulfate is added. Lastly, these results provide evidence of the hierarchical arrangement of cellulose at three length scales and the evolution of these arrangements during pre-treatments.« less

  7. Comparison of enzymatic and acid hydrolysis of bound flavor compounds in model system and grapes.

    PubMed

    Dziadas, Mariusz; Jeleń, Henryk H

    2016-01-01

    Four synthesized terpenyl-ß-D-glycopyranosides (geranyl, neryl, citronellyl, myrtenyl) were subjected to enzymatic (AR 2000, pH 5.5) and acid (citric buffer, pH 2.5) hydrolysis. Decrease of glycosides was measured by HPLC and the volatiles released--by comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC × GC-ToF-MS). Enzymatic hydrolysis performed for 21 h yielded 100% degree of hydrolysis for all glycosides but citronellyl (97%). Degree of acid hydrolysis was highly dependent on type of aglycone and the conditions. The highest degree was achieved for geraniol, followed by citronellol and nerol. Myrtenylo-ß-D-glycopyranoside was the most resistant glycoside to hydrolysis. Acid hydrolysis degree was also related to temperature/time combination, the highest being for 100 °C and 2 h. In a result of enzymatic hydrolysis 85-91% of total peak areas was terpene aglycone, whereas for acid hydrolysis the area of released terpene aglycone did not exceed 1.3% of total peak area indicating almost complete decomposition/transformation of terpenyl aglycone. PMID:26212990

  8. Efficiency of pretreatment of aqueous samples using a macroporous strong anion-exchange resin on the determination of nerve gas hydrolysis products by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after tert.-butyldimethylsilylation.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, M; Tsuge, K; Seto, Y

    2000-09-01

    A pretreatment procedure, using a macroporous strong anion-exchange resin (MSA) has been established for the determination of nerve gas hydrolysis products by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after tert.-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) derivatization. Aqueous solutions of methylphosphonic acid (MPA) and three alkyl methylphosphonic acids (AMPAs) (ethyl, isopropyl and pinacolyl methylphosphonic acid), were retained on the MSA column, and then quantitatively eluted with 0.1 M hydrochloric acid. The neutralized column eluate was dried, and MPA and AMPAs were derivatized with N-methyl-N-(tert.-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide and analyzed by GC-MS. The column eluate was also analyzed in order to determine the exact hydrolysis product levels by capillary electrophoresis using borate and benzoate buffer (pH 6). The MSA pretreatment was examined for the clean-up of aqueous extracts of three types of soils and an aqueous solution containing 10% sucrose, which is regarded as model for a typical soft drink, after spiking with MPA and AMPAs. MPA and AMPAs were quantitatively recovered in the MSA eluate fraction from those samples, except for MPA from volcanic acid and alluvial soils. The yields of TBDMS derivatives were remarkably improved, compared with for which no pretreatment was used and also for those in which a strong cation-exchange resin was used. The achieved detection limits of MPA and AMPAs ranged from 0.12 to 0.18 microg/g of soil (S/N=3). The established MSA method was applied to the pretreatment of spiked sea water, two types of beverages, Pepsi Cola and canned coffee. Although the yields of TBDMS derivatives of MPA and AMPAs in sea water (in a range between 44 and 96%) and AMPAs in Pepsi Cola (in a range between 58 and 92%) were rather high, those for MPA in the Pepsi Cola (27%) and those for MPA and AMPAs in the canned coffee (in a range between 5 and 17%) were low. PMID:11043790

  9. Pretreatment of cane bagasse with alkaline hydrogen peroxide for enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and ethanol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Azzam, A.M. )

    1989-01-01

    Pretreatment of the agrocellulosic waste, cane bagasse with alkaline hydrogen peroxide greatly enhances its susceptibility to enzymatic cellulolysis and thus the ethanol production from it. Various process conditions have been studied to optimize the enzymate effectiveness. These conditions include the contact time, the hydrogen peroxide concentration and the pretreatment temperature. Results obtained show, that about 50% of lignin and most of hemicellulose content of can bagasse was solubilized, by 2% alkaline hydrogen peroxide at 30{sup 0}C within 8 h. The cellulose content was consequently increased from 42% in the original cane bagasse to 75% in the oxidized pulp. Saccharification of this pulp residue with cellulase from Trichorderma viride at 45{sup 0}C for 24 h, yielded glucose with 95% efficiency. The efficiency of ethanol production from the insoluble fraction with S. cervisiae was 90% compared to about 50% for untreated cane bagasse.

  10. A novel stepwise pretreatment on corn stalk by alkali deacetylation and liquid hot water for enhancing enzymatic hydrolysis and energy utilization efficiency.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Xu, Jian

    2016-06-01

    A novel stepwise pretreatment on corn stalk (CS) by alkali deacetylation combined with liquid hot water (LHW) was investigated to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis. After deacetylated treatment, strength of alkali deacetylation of CS was from 1.79% to 91.34% which was subsequently pretreated by LHW with severity from 3.27 to 4.27. It was found that higher strength of alkali deacetylation could reduce both the degradation of hemicellulose and inhibitors formation in liquid hot water pretreatment (LHWP). Enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency was confirmed to be affected by LHW pretreatment severity (PS) and strength of alkali treatment. This combined pretreatment of alkali deacetylation and LHW could not only increase glucose yield, but also enhance energy utilization efficiency. The maximum enzymatic hydrolysis of 87.55%±3.64 with the ratio of glucose yield to energy input at 50.39gglucosekJ(-1) was obtained when strength of alkali deacetylation at 84.96% with PS at 3.97 were used. PMID:26967334

  11. Effect of an acid filler on hydrolysis and biodegradation of poly-lactic acid (PLA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iozzino, Valentina; Speranza, Vito; Pantani, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    The use of biodegradable polymers is certainly an excellent strategy to solve many of the problems related to the disposal of the traditional polymers, whose accumulation in the environment is harmful and damaging. In order to optimize the use of biodegradable polymers, it is very important to understand and control the transformation processes, the structures and the morphologies resulting from the process conditions used to produce the articles and, not least, the biodegradation. The latter is strictly dependent on the just mentioned variables. The poly-lactic acid, PLA, is a biodegradable polymer. Many studies have been carried out on the degradation process of this polymer. In the course of this work we performed degradation tests on the PLA, with a specific D-isomer content, having amorphous structure, and in particular of biodegradation and hydrolysis. An acid chemical, fumaric acid, was added to PLA with the objective of controlling the rate of hydrolysis and of biodegradation. The hydrolysis process was followed, as function of time, by means of different techniques: pH variation, variation of weight of samples and variation of crystallinity degree and glass transition temperature using DSC analysis. The samples were also analyzed in terms of biodegradability by means of a homemade respirometer apparatus, in controlled composting conditions.

  12. Insights into the effect of dilute acid, hot water and alkaline pretreatment on cellulose accessible surface area and overall porosity of Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xianzhi; Wells, Tyrone; Sun, Qining; Huang, Fang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-06-19

    Pretreatment is known to render biomass more reactive to cellulase by altering the chemical compositions as well as physical structures of biomass. Simons stain technique along with mercury porosimetry were applied on the acid, neutral, and alkaline pretreated materials to measure the accessible surface area of cellulose and pore size distribution of Populus. Results indicated that acid pretreatment is much more effective than water and alkaline pretreatment in terms of cellulose accessibility increase. Further investigation suggests that lignin does not dictate cellulose accessibility to the extent that hemicellulose does, but it does restrict xylan accessibility which in turn controls the access of cellulase to cellulose. The most interesting finding is that severe acid pretreatment significantly decreases the average pore size, i.e., 90% average size decrease could be observed after 60 min dilute acid pretreatment at 160 °C; moreover, the nano-pore space formed between coated microfibrils is increased after pretreatment, especially for the acid pretreatment, suggesting this particular type of biomass porosity is probably the most fundamental barrier to effective enzymatic hydrolysis.

  13. Insights into the effect of dilute acid, hot water and alkaline pretreatment on cellulose accessible surface area and overall porosity of Populus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meng, Xianzhi; Wells, Tyrone; Sun, Qining; Huang, Fang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-06-19

    Pretreatment is known to render biomass more reactive to cellulase by altering the chemical compositions as well as physical structures of biomass. Simons stain technique along with mercury porosimetry were applied on the acid, neutral, and alkaline pretreated materials to measure the accessible surface area of cellulose and pore size distribution of Populus. Results indicated that acid pretreatment is much more effective than water and alkaline pretreatment in terms of cellulose accessibility increase. Further investigation suggests that lignin does not dictate cellulose accessibility to the extent that hemicellulose does, but it does restrict xylan accessibility which in turn controls themore » access of cellulase to cellulose. The most interesting finding is that severe acid pretreatment significantly decreases the average pore size, i.e., 90% average size decrease could be observed after 60 min dilute acid pretreatment at 160 °C; moreover, the nano-pore space formed between coated microfibrils is increased after pretreatment, especially for the acid pretreatment, suggesting this particular type of biomass porosity is probably the most fundamental barrier to effective enzymatic hydrolysis.« less

  14. Pretreatment methods for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaoyang; Huang, Fang

    2014-09-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass, such as wood, grass, agricultural, and forest residues, are potential resources for the production of bioethanol. The current biochemical process of converting biomass to bioethanol typically consists of three main steps: pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation. For this process, pretreatment is probably the most crucial step since it has a large impact on the efficiency of the overall bioconversion. The aim of pretreatment is to disrupt recalcitrant structures of cellulosic biomass to make cellulose more accessible to the enzymes that convert carbohydrate polymers into fermentable sugars. This paper reviews several leading acidic, neutral, and alkaline pretreatments technologies. Different pretreatment methods, including dilute acid pretreatment (DAP), steam explosion pretreatment (SEP), organosolv, liquid hot water (LHW), ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA), sodium hydroxide/lime pretreatments, and ozonolysis are intensively introduced and discussed. In this minireview, the key points are focused on the structural changes primarily in cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin during the above leading pretreatment technologies. PMID:24972651

  15. Origin of Glycine from Acid Hydrolysis of the β-Lactam Antibiotic A16886B

    PubMed Central

    Brannon, D. R.; Mabe, J. A.; Ellis, R.; Whitney, J. G.; Nagarajan, R.

    1972-01-01

    Structural analysis of two new β-lactam antibiotics, A16884A and A16886B, indicated that they, like cephalosporin C, were composed of modified valine and cysteine residues, and α-aminoadipic acid. However, acid hydrolysis of A16886B and A16884A produced three times as much glycine as did hydrolysis of cephalosporin C under the same conditions. Samples of A16886B-14C-6 and A16886B-14C-8 were prepared by the addition of cysteine-14C-3 and cystine-14C-1 to fermentations of Streptomyces clavuligerus. The specific activity of glycine obtained from hydrolysis of A16886B-14C-6 was considerably higher than that from hydrolysis of A16886B-14C-8. An explanation for the difference in amounts of glycine obtained from hydrolysis of these antibiotics is discussed. PMID:5045470

  16. Hydrolysis of tRNA(sup Phe) on Suspensions of Amino Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Kui; Orgel, Leslie E.

    2001-01-01

    RNA is adsorbed strongly on suspensions of many moderately soluble organic solids. In some cases, the hydrolysis of tRNA(sup Phe) is greatly accelerated by adsorption, and the major sites of hydrolysis are changed from those that are important in homogeneous solution. Here we show that the hydrolysis is greatly accelerated by suspensions of aspartic acid and beta-glutamic acid but not by suspensions of alpha-glutamic acid, asparagine, or glutamine. The non-enzymatic hydrolysis of RNA has been studied extensively, especially because of its relevance to the mechanisms of action of ribozymes and to biotechnology and therapy. Many ribonucleases, ribozymes, and non-biological catalysts function via acid-base catalysis of an intramolecular transesterification mechanism in which the 2'-OH group attacks the adjacent phosphate group. The pentacoordinated phosphorane intermediate may collapse back to starting material, or yield isomerized or cleaved products.

  17. Acid hydrolysis of cellulosic fibres: Comparison of bleached kraft pulp, dissolving pulps and cotton textile cellulose.

    PubMed

    Palme, Anna; Theliander, Hans; Brelid, Harald

    2016-01-20

    The behaviour of different cellulosic fibres during acid hydrolysis has been investigated and the levelling-off degree of polymerisation (LODP) has been determined. The study included a bleached kraft pulp (both never-dried and once-dried) and two dissolving pulps (once-dried). Additionally, cotton cellulose from new cotton sheets and sheets discarded after long-time use was studied. Experimental results from the investigation, together with results found in literature, imply that ultrastructural differences between different fibres affect their susceptibility towards acid hydrolysis. Drying of a bleached kraft pulp was found to enhance the rate of acid hydrolysis and also result in a decrease in LODP. This implies that the susceptibility of cellulosic fibres towards acid hydrolysis is affected by drying-induced stresses in the cellulose chains. In cotton cellulose, it was found that use and laundering gave a substantial loss in the degree of polymerisation (DP), but that the LODP was only marginally affected. PMID:26572472

  18. Controlling microbial contamination during hydrolysis of AFEX-pretreated corn stover and switchgrass: Effects on hydrolysate composition, microbial response and fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Serate, Jose; Xie, Dan; Pohlmann, Edward; Donald, Jr., Charles; Shabani, Mahboubeh; Hinchman, Li; Higbee, Alan; Mcgee, Mick; La Reau, Alex; Klinger, Grace E.; Li, Sheena; Myers, Chad L.; Boone, Charles; Bates, Donna M.; Cavalier, Dave; Eilert, Dustin; Oates, Lawrence G.; Sanford, Gregg; Sato, Trey K.; Dale, Bruce; Landick, Robert; Piotrowski, Jeff; Ong, Rebecca Garlock; Zhang, Yaoping

    2015-11-14

    Microbial conversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks into biofuels remains an attractive means to produce sustainable energy. It is essential to produce lignocellulosic hydrolysates in a consistent manner in order to study microbial performance in different feedstock hydrolysates. Because of the potential to introduce microbial contamination from the untreated biomass or at various points during the process, it can be difficult to control sterility during hydrolysate production. In this study, we compared hydrolysates produced from AFEX-pretreated corn stover and switchgrass using two different methods to control contamination: either by autoclaving the pretreated feedstocks prior to enzymatic hydrolysis, or by introducing antibiotics during the hydrolysis of non-autoclaved feedstocks. We then performed extensive chemical analysis, chemical genomics, and comparative fermentations to evaluate any differences between these two different methods used for producing corn stover and switchgrass hydrolysates. Autoclaving the pretreated feedstocks could eliminate the contamination for a variety of feedstocks, whereas the antibiotic gentamicin was unable to control contamination consistently during hydrolysis. Compared to the addition of gentamicin, autoclaving of biomass before hydrolysis had a minimal effect on mineral concentrations, and showed no significant effect on the two major sugars (glucose and xylose) found in these hydrolysates. However, autoclaving elevated the concentration of some furanic and phenolic compounds. Chemical genomics analyses using Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains indicated a high correlation between the AFEX-pretreated hydrolysates produced using these two methods within the same feedstock, indicating minimal differences between the autoclaving and antibiotic methods. Comparative fermentations with S. cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis also showed that autoclaving the AFEX-pretreated feedstocks had no significant effects on microbial performance in

  19. Controlling microbial contamination during hydrolysis of AFEX-pretreated corn stover and switchgrass: Effects on hydrolysate composition, microbial response and fermentation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Serate, Jose; Xie, Dan; Pohlmann, Edward; Donald, Jr., Charles; Shabani, Mahboubeh; Hinchman, Li; Higbee, Alan; Mcgee, Mick; La Reau, Alex; Klinger, Grace E.; et al

    2015-11-14

    Microbial conversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks into biofuels remains an attractive means to produce sustainable energy. It is essential to produce lignocellulosic hydrolysates in a consistent manner in order to study microbial performance in different feedstock hydrolysates. Because of the potential to introduce microbial contamination from the untreated biomass or at various points during the process, it can be difficult to control sterility during hydrolysate production. In this study, we compared hydrolysates produced from AFEX-pretreated corn stover and switchgrass using two different methods to control contamination: either by autoclaving the pretreated feedstocks prior to enzymatic hydrolysis, or by introducing antibiotics duringmore » the hydrolysis of non-autoclaved feedstocks. We then performed extensive chemical analysis, chemical genomics, and comparative fermentations to evaluate any differences between these two different methods used for producing corn stover and switchgrass hydrolysates. Autoclaving the pretreated feedstocks could eliminate the contamination for a variety of feedstocks, whereas the antibiotic gentamicin was unable to control contamination consistently during hydrolysis. Compared to the addition of gentamicin, autoclaving of biomass before hydrolysis had a minimal effect on mineral concentrations, and showed no significant effect on the two major sugars (glucose and xylose) found in these hydrolysates. However, autoclaving elevated the concentration of some furanic and phenolic compounds. Chemical genomics analyses using Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains indicated a high correlation between the AFEX-pretreated hydrolysates produced using these two methods within the same feedstock, indicating minimal differences between the autoclaving and antibiotic methods. Comparative fermentations with S. cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis also showed that autoclaving the AFEX-pretreated feedstocks had no significant effects on microbial

  20. An integrated process for the production of platform chemicals and diesel miscible fuels by acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and downstream upgrading of the acid hydrolysis residues with thermal and catalytic pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Girisuta, Buana; Kalogiannis, Konstantinos G; Dussan, Karla; Leahy, James J; Hayes, Michael H B; Stefanidis, Stylianos D; Michailof, Chrysa M; Lappas, Angelos A

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluates an integrated process for the production of platform chemicals and diesel miscible biofuels. An energy crop (Miscanthus) was treated hydrothermally to produce levulinic acid (LA). Temperatures ranging between 150 and 200 °C, sulfuric acid concentrations 1-5 wt.% and treatment times 1-12 h were applied to give different combined severity factors. Temperatures of 175 and 200 °C and acid concentration of 5 wt.% were found to be necessary to achieve good yield (17 wt.%) and selectivities of LA while treatment time did not have an effect. The acid hydrolysis residues were characterized for their elemental, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin contents, and then tested in a small-scale pyrolyzer using silica sand and a commercial ZSM-5 catalyst. Milder pretreatment yielded more oil (43 wt.%) and oil O(2) (37%) while harsher pretreatment and catalysis led to more coke production (up to 58 wt.%), less oil (12 wt.%) and less oil O(2) (18 wt.%). PMID:23073094

  1. Fermentation of dilute acid pretreated Populus by Clostridium thermocellum, Caldicellulosiruptor bescii, and Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yee, Kelsey L.; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D.; Thompson, Olivia A.; Elkins, James G.; Davison, Brian H.; Mielenz, Jonathan R.

    2015-07-25

    Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), which merges enzyme production, biomass hydrolysis, and fermentation into a single step, has the potential to become an efficient and economic strategy for the bioconversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks to transportation fuels or chemicals. In this study, we evaluated Clostridium thermocellum, Caldicellulosiruptor bescii, and Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis, three , thermophilic,cellulolytic, mixed-acid fermenting candidate CBP microorganisms, for their fermentation capabilities using dilute acid pretreated Populus as a model biomass feedstock. Under pH controlled, anaerobic fermentation conditions, each candidate successfully digested a minimum of 75% of the cellulose from dilute acid pretreated Populus, as indicated by an increase in planktonic cellsmore » and end-product metabolites and a concurrent decrease in glucan content. C. thermocellum, which employs a cellulosomal approach to biomass degradation, required 120 hours to achieve 75% cellulose utilization. In contrast, the non-cellulosomal, secreted hydrolytic enzyme system of the Caldicellulosiruptor sp. required 300 hours to achieve similar results. End-point fermentation conversions for C. thermocellum, C. bescii, and C. obsidiansis were determined to be 0.29, 0.34, and 0.38 grams of total metabolites per gram of loaded glucan, respectively. This data provide a starting point for future strain engineering efforts that can serve to improve the biomass fermentation capabilities of these three promising candidate CBP platforms.« less

  2. Comparative study of lignin characteristics from wheat straw obtained by soda-AQ and kraft pretreatment and effect on the following enzymatic hydrolysis process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haitao; Xie, Yimin; Zheng, Xing; Pu, Yunqiao; Huang, Fang; Meng, Xianzhi; Wu, Weibing; Ragauskas, Arthur; Yao, Lan

    2016-05-01

    To understand the structural changes of lignin after soda-AQ and kraft pretreatment, milled straw lignin, black liquor lignin and residual lignin extracted from wheat straw were characterized by FT-IR, UV, GPC and NMR. The results showed that the main lignin linkages were β-aryl ether substructures (β-O-4'), followed by phenylcoumaran (β-5') and resinol (β-β') substructures, while minor content of spirodienone (β-1'), dibenzodioxocin (5-5') and α,β-diaryl ether linkages were detected as well. After pretreatment, most lignin inter-units and lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC) linkages were degraded and dissolved in black liquor, with minor amount left in residual pretreated biomass. In addition, through quantitative (13)C and 2D-HSQC NMR spectral analysis, lignin and LCC were found to be more degraded after kraft pretreatment than soda-AQ pretreatment. Furthermore, the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis results showed that more cellulose in wheat straw was converted to glucose after kraft pretreatment, indicating that LCC linkages were important in the enzymatic hydrolysis process. PMID:26897415

  3. Kinetic studies on the acid hydrolysis of the methyl ketoside of unsubstituted and O-acetylated N-acetylneuraminic acid

    PubMed Central

    Neuberger, A.; Ratcliffe, Wendy A.

    1973-01-01

    The hydrolysis of the model compound 2-O-methyl-4,7,8,9-tetra-O-acetyl-N-acetyl-α-d-neuraminic acid and neuraminidase (Vibrio cholerae) closely resembled that of the O-acetylated sialic acid residues of rabbit Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein. This confirmed that O-acetylation was responsible for the unusually slow rate of acid hydrolysis of O-acetylated sialic acid residues observed in rabbit Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein and their resistance to hydrolysis by neuraminidase. The first-order rate constant of hydrolysis of 2-methyl-N-acetyl-α-d-neuraminic acid by 0.05m-H2SO4 was 56-fold greater than that of 2-O-methyl-4,7,8,9-tetra-O-acetyl-N-acetyl -α-d-neuraminic acid. Kinetic studies have shown that in the pH range 1.00–3.30, the observed rate of hydrolysis of 2-methyl-N-acetyl-α-d-neuraminic acid can be attributed to acid-catalysed hydrolysis of the negatively charged CO2− form of the methyl ketoside. PMID:4748825

  4. Steam explosion pretreatment of oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) using autocatalytic hydrolysis: A biorefinery approach.

    PubMed

    Medina, Jesus David Coral; Woiciechowski, Adenise; Zandona Filho, Arion; Nigam, Poonam Singh; Ramos, Luiz Pereira; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) are an attractive source of carbon for the production of biochemical products, therefore, the aim of this work is to analyze the effect of the steam explosion (SE) pretreatment under autocatalytic conditions on EFB using a full experimental design. Temperature and reaction time were the operational variables studied. The EFB treated at 195°C for 6 min showed an increase of 34.69% in glycan (mostly cellulose), and a reduction of 68.12% in hemicelluloses, with increased enzymatic digestibility to 33% producing 4.2 g L(-1) of glucose. Scanning electron micrographs of the steam treated EFB exhibited surface erosion and an increased fiber porosity. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed the solubilization of hemicellulose and modification of cellulose in treated EFB. PMID:26343575

  5. Dilute Sulfuric Acid Pretreatment of Agricultural and Agro-Industrial Residues for Ethanol Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Carlos; Alriksson, Björn; Sjöde, Anders; Nilvebrant, Nils-Olof; Jönsson, Leif J.

    The potential of dilute-acid prehydrolysis as a pretreatment method for sugarcane bagasse, rice hulls, peanut shells, and cassava stalks was investigated. The prehydrolysis was performed at 122°C during 20, 40, or 60 min using 2% H2SO4 at a solid-to-liquid ratio of 1∶10. Sugar formation increased with increasing reaction time. Xylose, glucose, arabinose, and galactose were detected in all of the prehydrolysates, whereas mannose was found only in the prehydrolysates of peanut shells and cassava stalks. The hemicelluloses of bagasse were hydrolyzed to a high-extent yielding concentrations of xylose and arabinose of 19.1 and 2.2 g/L, respectively, and a xylan conversion of more than 80%. High-glucose concentrations (26-33.5 g/L) were found in the prehydrolysates of rice hulls, probably because of hydrolysis of starch of grain remains in the hulls. Peanut shells and cassava stalks rendered low amounts of sugars on prehydrolysis, indicating that the conditions were not severe enough to hydrolyze the hemicelluloses in these materials quantitatively. All prehydrolysates were readily fermentable by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The dilute-acid prehydrolysis resulted in a 2.7-to 3.7-fold increase of the enzymatic convertibility of bagasse, but was not efficient for improving the enzymatic hydrolysis of peanut shells, cassava stalks, or rice hulls.

  6. Cassava starch maltodextrinization/monomerization through thermopressurized aqueous phosphoric acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Fontana, J D; Passos, M; Baron, M; Mendes, S V; Ramos, L P

    2001-01-01

    Kinetic conditions were established for the depolymerization of cassava starch for the production of maltodextrins and glucose syrups. Thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses corroborated that the proper H3PO4 strength and thermopressurization range (e.g., 142-170 degrees C; 2.8-6.8 atm) can be successfully explored for such hydrolytic purposes of native starch granules. Because phosphoric acid can be advantageously maintained in the hydrolysate and generates, after controlled neutralization with ammonia, the strategic nutrient triplet for industrial fermentations (C, P, N), this pretreatment strategy can be easily recognized as a recommended technology for hydrolysis and upgrading of starch and other plant polysaccharides. Compared to the classic catalysts, the mandatory desalting step (chloride removal by expensive anion-exchange resin or sulfate precipitation as the calcium-insoluble salt) can be avoided. Furthermore, properly diluted phosphoric acid is well known as an allowable additive in several popular soft drinks such as colas since its acidic feeling in the mouth is compatible and synergistic with both natural and artificial sweeteners. Glycosyrups from phosphorolyzed cassava starch have also been upgraded to high-value single-cell protein such as the pigmented yeast biomass of Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (Phaffia rhodozyma), whose astaxanthin (diketo-dihydroxy-beta-carotene) content may reach 0.5-1.0 mg/g of dry yeast cell. This can be used as an ideal complement for animal feeding as well as a natural staining for both fish farming (meat) and poultry (eggs). PMID:11963875

  7. Developmental Transition from Enzymatic to Acid Hydrolysis of Sucrose in Acid Limes (Citrus aurantifolia) 1

    PubMed Central

    Echeverria, Ed

    1990-01-01

    The sucrose breakdown mechanisms in juice sacs of acid lime (Citrus aurantifolia [Christm.] Swing.) were investigated throughout fruit development. All three enzymes of sucrose catabolism (sucrose synthase, acid, and alkaline invertase) are present during the initial stages. The activities of these enzymes declined rapidly and disappeared by stage 5 (80% development) but not before vacuolar pH had decreased to approximately 2.5. At this stage, sucrose breakdown occurs by acid hydrolysis. By attaining a vacuolar pH of 2.5 prior to enzyme disappearance, the cell maintains a continuous ability to break down sucrose throughout ontogeny. Thus, acid limes possess a unique and coordinated system for sucrose breakdown that involves both enzymatic and nonenzymatic pathways. PMID:16667241

  8. Enhanced xylose recovery from oil palm empty fruit bunch by efficient acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hooi Teng; Dykes, Gary A; Wu, Ta Yeong; Siow, Lee Fong

    2013-08-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) is abundantly available in Malaysia and it is a potential source of xylose for the production of high-value added products. This study aimed to optimize the hydrolysis of EFB using dilute sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and phosphoric acid (H3PO4) via response surface methodology for maximum xylose recovery. Hydrolysis was carried out in an autoclave. An optimum xylose yield of 91.2 % was obtained at 116 °C using 2.0 % (v/v) H2SO4, a solid/liquid ratio of 1:5 and a hydrolysis time of 20 min. A lower optimum xylose yield of 24.0 % was observed for dilute H3PO4 hydrolysis at 116 °C using 2.4 % (v/v) H3PO4, a solid/liquid ratio of 1:5 and a hydrolysis time of 20 min. The optimized hydrolysis conditions suggested that EFB hydrolysis by H2SO4 resulted in a higher xylose yield at a lower acid concentration as compared to H3PO4. PMID:23709290

  9. Chemical structures of corn stover and its residue after dilute acid prehydrolysis and enzymatic hydrolysis: Insight into factors limiting enzymatic hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advanced solid-state NMR techniques and wet chemical analyses were applied to investigate untreated corn stover (UCS) and its residues after dilute acid prehydrolysis (DAP) and enzymatic hydrolysis (RES) to provide evidence for the limitations to the effectiveness of enzyme hydrolysis. Advanced soli...

  10. Studying Cellulose Fiber Structure by SEM, XRD, NMR and Acid Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haibo; Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhang, Z. Conrad; Brown, Heather M.; Arey, Bruce W.; Holladay, John E.

    2007-03-21

    Cotton linters were partially hydrolyzed in dilute acid and the morphology of remaining macrofibrils studied with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) under various magnifications. The crystal region (microfibril bundles) in the macrofibrils was not altered by hydrolysis, and only amorphous cellulose was hydrolyzed and leached out from the macrofibrils. The diameter of microfibril bundles was 20-30 nm after the amorphous cellulose was removed by hydrolysis. XRD experiments confirm the unaltered diameter of the microfibrils after hydrolysis. The strong stability of these microfibril bundles in hydrolysis limits both the total sugar monomer yield and the size of nano particles or rods produced in hydrolysis. The large surface potential on the remaining microfibril bundles drives the agglomeration of macrofibrils.

  11. Optimization of acid hydrolysis from the hemicellulosic fraction of Eucalyptus grandis residue using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Canettieri, Eliana Vieira; de Moraes Rocha, George Jackson; de Carvalho, João Andrade; de Almeida e Silva, João Batista

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnological conversion of biomass into fuels and chemicals requires hydrolysis of the polysaccharide fraction into monomeric sugars. Hydrolysis can be performed enzymatically and with dilute or concentrate mineral acids. The present study used dilute sulfuric acid as a catalyst for hydrolysis of Eucalyptus grandis residue. The purpose of this paper was to optimize the hydrolysis process in a 1.4 l pilot-scale reactor and investigate the effects of the acid concentration, temperature and residue/acid solution ratio on the hemicellulose removal and consequently on the production of sugars (xylose, glucose and arabinose) as well as on the formation of by-products (furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and acetic acid). This study was based on a model composition corresponding to a 2(3) orthogonal factorial design and employed the response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize the hydrolysis conditions, aiming to attain maximum xylose extraction from hemicellulose of residue. The considered optimum conditions were: H(2)SO(4) concentration of 0.65%, temperature of 157 degrees C and residue/acid solution ratio of 1/8.6 with a reaction time of 20 min. Under these conditions, 79.6% of the total xylose was removed and the hydrolysate contained 1.65 g/l glucose, 13.65 g/l xylose, 1.55 g/l arabinose, 3.10 g/l acetic acid, 1.23 g/l furfural and 0.20 g/l 5-hydroxymethylfurfural. PMID:16473004

  12. Efficient hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride hydrolysis using silica sulfuric acid catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Joydev; Roy, Binayak; Sharma, Pratibha

    2015-02-01

    A heterogeneous acid catalyst, silica sulfuric acid, was prepared from silica gel (SiO2) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Addition of SO3H functional group to SiO2 has been confirmed through various characterization techniques. The effect of this heterogeneous acid catalyst on hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride hydrolysis reaction was studied for different ratios of catalyst to NaBH4 and at different temperatures. The catalyst exhibited high catalytic activity towards sodium borohydride hydrolysis reaction. The activation energy of the NaBH4 hydrolysis reaction in the presence of silica sulfuric acid was calculated to be the lowest (17 kJ mol-1) among reported heterogeneous catalysts till date.

  13. Aiming for the complete utilization of sugar-beet pulp: Examination of the effects of mild acid and hydrothermal pretreatment followed by enzymatic digestion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biomass use for the production of bioethanol or platform chemicals requires efficient breakdown of biomass to fermentable monosaccharides. Lignocellulosic feedstocks often require physicochemical pretreatment before enzymatic hydrolysis can begin. The optimal pretreatment can be different for different feedstocks, and should not lead to biomass destruction or formation of toxic products. Methods We examined the influence of six mild sulfuric acid or water pretreatments at different temperatures on the enzymatic degradability of sugar-beet pulp (SBP). Results We found that optimal pretreatment at 140°C of 15 minutes in water was able to solubilize 60% w/w of the total carbohydrates present, mainly pectins. More severe treatments led to the destruction of the solubilized sugars, and the subsequent production of the sugar-degradation products furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural, acetic acid and formic acid. The pretreated samples were successfully degraded enzymatically with an experimental cellulase preparation. Conclusions In this study, we found that pretreatment of SBP greatly facilitated the subsequent enzymatic degradation within economically feasible time ranges and enzyme levels. In addition, pretreatment of SBP can be useful to fractionate functional ingredients such as arabinans and pectins from cellulose. We found that the optimal combined severity factor to enhance the enzymatic degradation of SBP was between log R'0 = -2.0 and log R'0 = -1.5. The optimal pretreatment and enzyme treatment solubilized up to 80% of all sugars present in the SBP, including ≥90% of the cellulose. PMID:21627804

  14. Extraction of protein and amino acids from deoiled rice bran by subcritical water hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Sereewatthanawut, Issara; Prapintip, Surawit; Watchiraruji, Katemanee; Goto, Motonobu; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Shotipruk, Artiwan

    2008-02-01

    This study investigated the production of value-added protein and amino acids from deoiled rice bran by hydrolysis in subcritical water (SW) in the temperature range between 100 and 220 degrees C for 0-30 min. The results suggested that SW could effectively be used to hydrolyze deoiled rice bran to produce useful protein and amino acids. The amount of protein and amino acids produced are higher than those obtained by conventional alkali hydrolysis. The yields generally increased with increased temperature and hydrolysis time. However, thermal degradation of the product was observed when hydrolysis was carried out at higher temperature for extended period of time. The highest yield of protein and amino acids were 219 +/- 26 and 8.0 +/- 1.6 mg/g of dry bran, and were obtained at 200 degrees C at hydrolysis time of 30 min. Moreover, the product obtained at 200 degrees C after 30 min of hydrolysis exhibited high antioxidant activity and was shown to be suitable for use as culture medium for yeast growth. PMID:17320384

  15. Dilute-sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover in pilot-scale reactor: investigation of yields, kinetics, and enzymatic digestibilities of solids.

    PubMed

    Schell, Daniel J; Farmer, Jody; Newman, Millie; McMillan, James D

    2003-01-01

    Corn stover is a domestic feedstock that has potential to produce significant quantities of fuel ethanol and other bioenergy and biobased products. However, comprehensive yield and carbon mass balance information and validated kinetic models for dilute-sulfuric acid (H2SO4) pretreatment of corn stover have not been available. This has hindered the estimation of process economics and also limited the ability to perform technoeconomic modeling to guide research. To better characterize pretreatment and assess its kinetics, we pretreated corn stover in a continuous 1 t/d reactor. Corn stover was pretreated at 20% (w/w) solids concentration over a range of conditions encompassing residence times of 3-12 min, temperatures of 165- 195 degrees C, and H2SO4 concentrations of 0.5-1.4% (w/w). Xylan conversion yield and carbon mass balance data were collected at each run condition. Performance results were used to estimate kinetic model parameters assuming biphasic hemicellulose hydrolysis and a hydrolysis mechanism incorporating formation of intermediate xylo-oligomers. In addition, some of the pretreated solids were tested in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process to measure the reactivity of their cellulose component to enzymatic digestion by cellulase enzymes. Monomeric xylose yields of 69-71% and total xylose yields (monomers and oligomers) of 70-77% were achieved with performance level depending on pretreatment severity. Cellulose conversion yields in SSF of 80-87% were obtained for some of the most digestible pretreated solids. PMID:12721476

  16. Comparative Study of SPORL and Dilute Acid Pretreatments of Spruce for Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The performance of two pretreatment methods, Sulfite Pretreatment to Overcome Recalcitrance of Lignocellulose (SPORL) and Dilute Acid (DA), was compared in pretreating softwood (spruce) for fuel ethanol production under the same conditions of temperature (180°C), time (30 min), sulfuric acid loading...

  17. Hydrolysis of Sulfur Dioxide in Small Clusters of Sulfuric Acid: Mechanistic and Kinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Fang, Sheng; Wang, Zhixiu; Yi, Wencai; Tao, Fu-Ming; Liu, Jing-Yao

    2015-11-17

    The deposition and hydrolysis reaction of SO2 + H2O in small clusters of sulfuric acid and water are studied by theoretical calculations of the molecular clusters SO2-(H2SO4)n-(H2O)m (m = 1,2; n = 1,2). Sulfuric acid exhibits a dramatic catalytic effect on the hydrolysis reaction of SO2 as it lowers the energy barrier by over 20 kcal/mol. The reaction with monohydrated sulfuric acid (SO2 + H2O + H2SO4 - H2O) has the lowest energy barrier of 3.83 kcal/mol, in which the cluster H2SO4-(H2O)2 forms initially at the entrance channel. The energy barriers for the three hydrolysis reactions are in the order SO2 + (H2SO4)-H2O > SO2 + (H2SO4)2-H2O > SO2 + H2SO4-H2O. Furthermore, sulfurous acid is more strongly bonded to the hydrated sulfuric acid (or dimer) clusters than the corresponding reactant (monohydrated SO2). Consequently, sulfuric acid promotes the hydrolysis of SO2 both kinetically and thermodynamically. Kinetics simulations have been performed to study the importance of these reactions in the reduction of atmospheric SO2. The results will give a new insight on how the pre-existing aerosols catalyze the hydrolysis of SO2, leading to the formation and growth of new particles. PMID:26450714

  18. Specificity of hydrolysis of phytic acid by alkaline phytase from lily pollen.

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, L; Scott, J J; Murthy, P P

    1994-01-01

    Phytases are the primary enzymes responsible for the hydrolysis of phytic acid, myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate (I-1,2,3,4,5,6-P6). A number of phytases with varying specificities, properties, and localizations hydrolyze phytic acid present in cells. The specificity of hydrolysis of phytic acid by alkaline phytase from lily (Lilium longiflorum L.) pollen is described. Structures of the intermediate inositol phosphates and the final product were established by a variety of nuclear magnetic resonance techniques (1H-, 31P-, and 31P-1H-detected multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy, and total correlation spectroscopy). On the basis of the structures identified we have proposed a scheme of hydrolysis of phytic acid. Initial hydrolysis of the phosphate ester occurs at the D-5 position of phytic acid to yield the symmetrical I-1,2,3,4,6-P5. The two subsequent dephosphorylations occur adjacent to the D-5 hydroxyl group to yield I-1,2,3-P3 as the final product. Alkaline phytase differs from other phytases in the specificity of hydrolysis of phosphate esters on the inositol ring, its high substrate specificity for phytic acid, and biochemical properties such as susceptibility to activation by calcium and inhibition by fluoride. The physiological significance of alkaline phytase and the biological role of I-1,2,3-P3 remain to be identified. PMID:7846160

  19. Impact of Corn Stover Composition on Hemicellulose Conversion during Dilute Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Cellulose Digestibility of the Pretreated Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, N. D.; Farmer, J. D.; Schell, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed the impact of corn stover compositional variability on xylose conversion yields during dilute acid pretreatment and on enzymatic cellulose digestibility of the resulting pretreated solids. Seven compositionally-different stovers obtained from various locations throughout the United States were pretreated at three different conditions in triplicate in a pilot-scale continuous reactor. At the same pretreatment severity, a 2-fold increase in monomeric xylose yield and a 1.5-fold increase in enzymatic cellulose digestibility from their lowest values were found. Similar results were observed at the other pretreatment conditions. It was found that xylose conversion yields decreased with increasing acid neutralization capacity or soil content of the corn stover. Xylose yields also increased with increasing xylan content. No other significant correlations between corn stover's component concentrations and conversion yields were found.

  20. High-yield production of biosugars from Gracilaria verrucosa by acid and enzymatic hydrolysis processes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Won; Hong, Chae-Hwan; Jeon, Sung-Wan; Shin, Hyun-Jae

    2015-11-01

    Gracilaria verrucosa, the red alga, is a suitable feedstock for biosugar production. This study analyzes biosugar production by the hydrolysis of G. verrucosa conducted under various conditions (i.e., various acid concentrations, substrate concentrations, reaction times, and enzyme dosages). The acid hydrolysates of G. verrucosa yielded a total of 7.47g/L (37.4%) and 10.63g/L (21.26%) of reducing sugars under optimal small (30mL) and large laboratory-scale (1L) hydrolysis processes, respectively. Reducing sugar obtained from acid and enzymatic hydrolysates were 10% higher, with minimum by-products, than those reported in other studies. The mass balance for the small laboratory-scale process showed that the acid and enzymatic hydrolysates had a carbohydrate conversion of 57.2%. The mass balance approach to the entire hydrolysis process of red seaweed for biosugar production can be applied to other saccharification processes. PMID:26299978

  1. Preparation of κ-carra-oligosaccharides with microwave assisted acid hydrolysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangsheng; Zhao, Xia; Lv, Youjing; Li, Miaomiao; Yu, Guangli

    2015-04-01

    A rapid method of microwave assisted acid hydrolysis was established to prepare κ-carra-oligosaccharides. The optimal hydrolysis condition was determined by an orthogonal test. The degree of polymerization (DP) of oligosaccharides was detected by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Considering the results of HPTLC and PAGE, the optimum condition of microwave assisted acid hydrolysis was determined. The concentration of κ-carrageenan was 5 mg mL-1; the reaction solution was adjusted to pH 3 with diluted hydrochloric acid; the solution was hydrolyzed under microwave irradiation at 100 for 15 °C min. Oligosaccharides were separated by a Superdex 30 column (2.6 cm × 90 cm) using AKTA Purifier UPC100 and detected with an online refractive index detector. Each fraction was characterized by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The data showed that odd-numbered κ-carra-oligosaccharides with DP ranging from 3 to 21 could be obtained with this method, and the structures of the oligosaccharides were consistent with those obtained by traditional mild acid hydrolysis. The new method was more convenient, efficient and environment-friendly than traditional mild acid hydrolysis. Our results provided a useful reference for the preparation of oligosaccharides from other polysaccharides.

  2. Optimization of Sulfide/Sulfite Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass for Lactic Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Adnan, Ahmad; Qureshi, Fahim Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    Potential of sodium sulfide and sodium sulfite, in the presence of sodium hydroxide was investigated to pretreat the corncob (CC), bagasse (BG), water hyacinth and rice husk (RH) for maximum digestibility. Response Surface Methodology was employed for the optimization of pretreatment factors such as temperature, time and concentration of Na2S and Na2SO3, which had high coefficient of determination (R2) along with low probability value (P), indicating the reliable predictability of the model. At optimized conditions, Na2S and Na2SO3 remove up to 97% lignin, from WH and RH, along with removal of hemicellulose (up to 93%) during pretreatment providing maximum cellulose, while in BG and CC; 75.0% and 90.0% reduction in lignin and hemicellulose was observed. Saccharification efficiency of RH, WH, BG and CC after treatment with 1.0% Na2S at 130°C for 2.3–3.0 h was 79.40, 85.93, 87.70, and 88.43%, respectively. WH treated with Na2SO3 showed higher hydrolysis yield (86.34%) as compared to Na2S while other biomass substrates showed 2.0–3.0% less yield with Na2SO3. Resulting sugars were evaluated as substrate for lactic acid production, yielding 26.48, 25.36, 31.73, and 30.31 gL−1 of lactic acid with 76.0, 76.0, 86.0, and 83.0% conversion yield from CC, BG, WH, and RH hydrolyzate, respectively. PMID:24058918

  3. Optimization of sulfide/sulfite pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Idrees, Muhammad; Adnan, Ahmad; Qureshi, Fahim Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    Potential of sodium sulfide and sodium sulfite, in the presence of sodium hydroxide was investigated to pretreat the corncob (CC), bagasse (BG), water hyacinth and rice husk (RH) for maximum digestibility. Response Surface Methodology was employed for the optimization of pretreatment factors such as temperature, time and concentration of Na₂S and Na₂SO₃, which had high coefficient of determination (R²) along with low probability value (P), indicating the reliable predictability of the model. At optimized conditions, Na₂S and Na₂SO₃ remove up to 97% lignin, from WH and RH, along with removal of hemicellulose (up to 93%) during pretreatment providing maximum cellulose, while in BG and CC; 75.0% and 90.0% reduction in lignin and hemicellulose was observed. Saccharification efficiency of RH, WH, BG and CC after treatment with 1.0% Na₂S at 130°C for 2.3-3.0 h was 79.40, 85.93, 87.70, and 88.43%, respectively. WH treated with Na₂SO₃ showed higher hydrolysis yield (86.34%) as compared to Na₂S while other biomass substrates showed 2.0-3.0% less yield with Na₂SO₃. Resulting sugars were evaluated as substrate for lactic acid production, yielding 26.48, 25.36, 31.73, and 30.31 gL⁻¹ of lactic acid with 76.0, 76.0, 86.0, and 83.0% conversion yield from CC, BG, WH, and RH hydrolyzate, respectively. PMID:24058918

  4. Analysis of Phosphorus in Soil Humic Acid Fractions by Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Ultraviolet Irradiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Humic acid is an important soil component which influences chemical, biological, and physical soil properties. In this study, we investigated lability of phosphorus (P) in the mobile humic acid (MHA) and calcium humate (CaHA) fractions of four soils by orthophosphate-releasing enzymatic hydrolysis a...

  5. Combined heat treatment and acid hydrolysis of cassava grate waste (CGW) biomass for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Agu, R.C.; Amadife, A.E.; Ude, C.M.; Onyia, A.; Ogu, E.O.; Okafor, M.; Ezejiofor, E.

    1997-12-31

    The effect of combined heat treatment and acid hydrolysis (various concentrations) on cassava grate waste (CGW) biomass for ethanol production was investigated. At high concentrations of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (1--5 M), hydrolysis of the CGW biomass was achieved but with excessive charring or dehydration reaction. At lower acid concentrations, hydrolysis of CGW biomass was also achieved with 0.3--0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, while partial hydrolysis was obtained below 0.3 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (the lowest acid concentration that hydrolyzed CGW biomass) at 120 C and 1 atm pressure for 30 min. A 60% process efficiency was achieved with 0.3 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in hydrolyzing the cellulose and lignin materials present in the CGW biomass. High acid concentration is therefore not required for CGW biomass hydrolysis. The low acid concentration required for CGW biomass hydrolysis, as well as the minimal cost required for detoxification of CGW biomass because of low hydrogen cyanide content of CGW biomass would seem to make this process very economical. From three liters of the CGW biomass hydrolysate obtained from hydrolysis with 0.3M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, ethanol yield was 3.5 (v/v%) after yeast fermentation. However, although the process resulted in gainful utilization of CGW biomass, additional costs would be required to effectively dispose new by-products generated from CGW biomass processing.

  6. Summary of Findings from the Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation (CAFI): Corn Stover Pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Elander, R. T.; Dale, B. E.; Holtzapple, M.; Ladisch, M. R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Mitchinson, C.; Saddler, J. N.; Wyman, C. E.

    2009-01-01

    The Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation, with members from Auburn University, Dartmouth College, Michigan State University, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Purdue University, Texas A&M University, the University of British Columbia, and the University of California at Riverside, has developed comparative data on the conversion of corn stover to sugars by several leading pretreatment technologies. These technologies include ammonia fiber expansion pretreatment, ammonia recycle percolation pretreatment, dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment, flowthrough pretreatment (hot water or dilute acid), lime pretreatment, controlled pH hot water pretreatment, and sulfur dioxide steam explosion pretreatment. Over the course of two separate USDA- and DOE-funded projects, these pretreatment technologies were applied to two different corn stover batches, followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the remaining solids from each pretreatment technology using identical enzyme preparations, enzyme loadings, and enzymatic hydrolysis assays. Identical analytical methods and a consistent material balance methodology were employed to develop comparative sugar yield data for each pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Although there were differences in the profiles of sugar release, with the more acidic pretreatments releasing more xylose directly in the pretreatment step than the alkaline pretreatments, the overall glucose and xylose yields (monomers + oligomers) from combined pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis process steps were very similar for all of these leading pretreatment technologies. Some of the water-only and alkaline pretreatment technologies resulted in significant amounts of residual xylose oligomers still remaining after enzymatic hydrolysis that may require specialized enzyme preparations to fully convert xylose oligomers to monomers.

  7. Kinetics of hydrolysis of PET powder in nitric acid by a modified shrinking-core model

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Okayama, Nobuchika; Okuwaki, Akitsugu

    1998-02-01

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) powder from waste bottles was degraded at atmospheric pressure in 7--13 M nitric acid at 70--100 C for 72 h, to clarify the mechanism of a feed stock recycling process. Terephthalic acid (TPA) and ethylene glycol (EG) were produced by the acid-catalyzed heterogeneous hydrolysis of PET in nitric acid, and the resulting EG was simultaneously oxidized to oxalic acid. The kinetics of the hydrolysis of PET in nitric acid could be explained by a modified shrinking core model of chemical reaction control, in which the effective surface area is proportional to the degree of unreacted PET, affected by the deposition of the product TPA. The apparent rate constant was inversely proportional to particle size and to the concentration of the nitric acid. The activation energy of the reaction was 101.3 kJ/mol.

  8. Evaluation of hyper thermal acid hydrolysis of Kappaphycus alvarezii for enhanced bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Ra, Chae Hun; Nguyen, Trung Hau; Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Kim, Sung-Koo

    2016-06-01

    Hyper thermal (HT) acid hydrolysis of Kappaphycus alvarezii, a red seaweed, was optimized to 12% (w/v) seaweed slurry content, 180mM H2SO4 at 140°C for 5min. The maximum monosaccharide concentration of 38.3g/L and 66.7% conversion from total fermentable monosaccharides of 57.6g/L with 120gdw/L K. alvarezii slurry were obtained from HT acid hydrolysis and enzymatic saccharification. HT acid hydrolysis at a severity factor of 0.78 efficiently converted the carbohydrates of seaweed to monosaccharides and produced a low concentration of inhibitory compounds. The levels of ethanol production by separate hydrolysis and fermentation with non-adapted and adapted Kluyveromyces marxianus to high concentration of galactose were 6.1g/L with ethanol yield (YEtOH) of 0.19 at 84h and 16.0g/L with YEtOH of 0.42 at 72h, respectively. Development of the HT acid hydrolysis process and adapted yeast could enhance the overall ethanol fermentation yields of K. alvarezii seaweed. PMID:26950757

  9. Factors affecting the rate of hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid in lab-scale precipitate reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.; Marek, J.C.; Eibling, R.E.; Baich, M.A.

    1992-10-01

    Removing aromatic carbon from an aqueous slurry of cesium-137 and other alkali tetraphenylborates by acid hydrolysis will be an important step in preparing high-level radioactive waste for vitrification at the Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Kinetic data obtained in bench-scale precipitate hydrolysis reactors suggest changes in operating parameters to improve product quality in the future plant-scale radioactive operation. The rate-determining step is the removal of the fourth phenyl group, i.e. hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid. Efforts to maximize this rate have established the importance of several factors in the system, including the ratio of copper(II) catalyst to formic acid, the presence of nitrite ion, reactions of diphenylmercury, and the purge gas employed in the system.

  10. Factors affecting the rate of hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid in lab-scale precipitate reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.; Marek, J.C.; Eibling, R.E.; Baich, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Removing aromatic carbon from an aqueous slurry of cesium-137 and other alkali tetraphenylborates by acid hydrolysis will be an important step in preparing high-level radioactive waste for vitrification at the Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Kinetic data obtained in bench-scale precipitate hydrolysis reactors suggest changes in operating parameters to improve product quality in the future plant-scale radioactive operation. The rate-determining step is the removal of the fourth phenyl group, i.e. hydrolysis of phenylboronic acid. Efforts to maximize this rate have established the importance of several factors in the system, including the ratio of copper(II) catalyst to formic acid, the presence of nitrite ion, reactions of diphenylmercury, and the purge gas employed in the system.

  11. Efficient production of glucose by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis of cellulose hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Sun, Binzhe; Duan, Lian; Peng, Gege; Li, Xiaoxia; Xu, Aihua

    2015-09-01

    To improve the production of glucose from cellulose, a simple and effective route was developed. This process uses a combination of a step of cellulose dissolution in aqueous NaOH/urea solution and then regeneration with water, followed by an acid hydrolysis step under microwave irradiation. The method is effective to obtain glucose from α-cellulose, microcrystalline cellulose, filter paper, ramie fiber and absorbent cotton. Increased with the acid concentration the glucose yield from hydrogel hydrolysis increased from 0.42% to 44.6% at 160 °C for 10 min. Moreover, the ozone treatment of cellulose in NaOH/urea solution before regeneration significantly enhanced the hydrolysis efficiency with a glucose yield of 59.1%. It is believed that the chains in cellulose hydrogel are relatively free approached, making that the acids easily access the β-glycosidic bonds. PMID:26038330

  12. Contribution of acetic acid to the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass under abiotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Trzcinski, Antoine P; Stuckey, David C

    2015-06-01

    Acetic acid was used in abiotic experiments to adjust the solution pH and investigate its influence on the chemical hydrolysis of the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW). Soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) was used to measure the hydrolysis under oxidative conditions (positive oxidation-reduction potential values), and pH 4 allowed for 20% (±2%) of the COD added to be solubilized, whereas only 12% (±1%) was solubilized at pH7. Under reducing conditions (negative oxidation-reduction potential values) and pH 4, 32.3% (±3%) of the OFMSW was solubilized which shows that acidogenesis at pH 4 during the anaerobic digestion of solid waste can result in chemical hydrolysis. In comparison, bacterial hydrolysis resulted in 54% (±6%) solubilization. PMID:25794810

  13. Enhancement of sludge anaerobic biodegradability by combined microwave-H2O2 pretreatment in acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Eswari, Parvathy; Kavitha, S; Kaliappan, S; Yeom, Ick-Tae; Banu, J Rajesh

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to increase the sludge disintegration and reduce the cost of microwave (MW) pretreatment. Thermodynamic analysis of MW hydrolysis revealed the best fit with a first-order kinetic model at a specific energy of 18,600 kJ/kg total solids (TS). Combining H2O2 with MW resulted in a significant increment in solubilization from 30 to 50 % at 18,600 kJ/kg TS. The pH of H2O2-assisted MW-pretreated sludge (MW + H2O2) was in the alkaline range (pH 9-10), and it made the sludge unfavorable for subsequent anaerobic digestion and inhibits methane production. In order to nullify the alkaline effect caused by the MW + H2O2 combination, the addition of acid was considered for pH adjustment. H2O2-assisted MW-pretreated sludge in acidic conditions (MW + H2O2 + acid) showed a maximum methane production of 323 mL/g volatile solids (VS) than others during anaerobic biodegradability. A cost analysis of this study reveals that MW + H2O2 + acid was the most economical method with a net profit of 59.90 €/t of sludge. PMID:27026550

  14. Maximising biogas in anaerobic digestion by using engine waste heat for thermal hydrolysis pre-treatment of sludge.

    PubMed

    Pickworth, B; Adams, J; Panter, K; Solheim, O E

    2006-01-01

    Dublin's Ringsend WWTP was designed to serve a population of approximately 1.2 million p.e. with a sludge production of 37,000 dry tonnes per year after upgrading to full secondary treatment. Several technical solutions were put forward as part of a design, build, finance and operate (DBFO) competition, with the chosen solution being a proposal by Black and Veatch for a combination of sequencing batch reactor (SBR) technology and anaerobic digestion with Cambi thermal hydrolysis pre-treatment (THP). The THP plant was built by Cambi and handed over to B&V in 2002. The plant is now operated by Celtic Anglian Water. In September 2004 a test was carried out on the mass and energy balance of the plant following 2 years of operation and is detailed in this paper. The process enables digestion at very high dry solids feed and low hydraulic retention time. The plant was built with three digesters of 4250 m3 each and is fed with hydrolysed sludge at 11% DS. There are four no. 1 MW Jenbacher engines operating mainly on biogas. Each pair of engines is fitted with a waste heat boiler with a capacity of one tonne steam per hour. These boilers have sufficient capacity to provide 80% of the steam required for the THP, which in turn provides all the heat for the subsequent digestion in the form of hydrolysed feed. There are two main biogas boilers for top up steam and other uses of the biogas including thermal oxidation of concentrated odours. PMID:17087375

  15. Fatty acid specificity of hormone-sensitive lipase. Implication in the selective hydrolysis of triacylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Raclot, T; Holm, C; Langin, D

    2001-12-01

    The selective mobilization of fatty acids from white fat cells depends on their molecular structure, in particular the degree of unsaturation. The present study was designed to examine if the release of fatty acids by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in vitro i) is influenced by the amount of unsaturation, ii) depends on the temperature, and iii) could explain the selective pattern of fatty acid mobilization and notably the preferential mobilization of certain highly unsaturated fatty acids. Recombinant rat and human HSL were incubated with a lipid emulsion. The hydrolysis of 35 individual fatty acids, ranging in chain length from 12 to 24 carbon atoms and in unsaturation from 0 to 6 double bonds was measured. Fatty acid composition of in vitro released NEFA was compared with that of fat cell triacylglycerols (TAG), the ratio % NEFA/% TAG being defined as the relative hydrolysis. The relative hydrolysis of individual fatty acids differed widely, ranging from 0.44 (24:1n-9) to 1.49 (18:1n-7) with rat HSL, and from 0.38 (24:1n-9) to 1.67 (18:1n-7) with human HSL. No major difference was observed between rat and human HSL. The relative release was dependent on the number of double bonds according to chain length. The amount of fatty acid released by recombinant rat HSL was decreased but remained robust at 4 degrees C compared with 37 degrees C, and the relative hydrolysis of some individual fatty acids was affected. The relative hydrolysis of fatty acids moderately, weakly, and highly mobilized by adipose tissue in vivo was similar and close to unity in vitro. We conclude that i) the release of fatty acids by HSL is only slightly affected by their degree of unsaturation, ii) the ability of HSL to efficiently and selectively release fatty acids at low temperature could reflect a cold adaptability for poikilotherms or hibernators when endogenous lipids are needed, and iii) the selectivity of fatty acid hydrolysis by HSL does not fully account for the selective pattern of

  16. Influence of acid precursors on physicochemical properties of nanosized titania synthesized by thermal-hydrolysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Rajesh, B.; Sasirekha, N.R.; Chen, Y.-W.

    2008-03-04

    The influence of nature and concentration of acid species on surface morphology and physicochemical properties of titania particles synthesized by direct thermal hydrolysis of titanium tetrachloride was investigated. The acids used were hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and perchloric acid with a concentration of 3 M. Thermal hydrolysis of titanium tetrachloride in hydrochloric acid and perchloric acid with molar ratios of [H{sup +}]/[Ti{sup 4+}] = 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0, respectively, was used to study the effect of acid concentration. The synthesized materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and thermogravimetric analysis. Characterization of the samples by X-ray diffraction studies revealed the influence of acid species on the phase transformation of titania. Samples prepared by hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, and perchloric acid formed rutile phase with rhombus primary particles, while sulfuric acid resulted in anatase phase with flake-shaped primary particles. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering results confirmed the nanosized titania particles and the agglomeration of primary particles to form secondary particles in spherical shape. The particle size of titania prepared using perchloric acid was smaller than those prepared with other acid sources. A direct correlation between [H{sup +}]/[Ti{sup 4+}] ratio and particle size of titania was observed.

  17. Comparison of some new pretreatment methods for second generation bioethanol production from wheat straw and water hyacinth.

    PubMed

    Guragain, Yadhu Nath; De Coninck, Joelle; Husson, Florence; Durand, Alain; Rakshit, Sudip Kumar

    2011-03-01

    Pretreatment of lignocellulosic residues like water hyacinth (WH) and wheat straw (WS) using crude glycerol (CG) and ionic liquids (IL) pretreatment was evaluated and compared with conventional dilute acid pretreatment (DAT) in terms of enzymatic hydrolysis yield and fermentation yield of pretreated samples. In the case of WS, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate pretreatment was found to be the best method. The hydrolysis yields of glucose and total reducing sugars were 2.1 and 3.3 times respectively higher by IL pretreatment than DAT, while it was 1.4 and 1.9 times respectively higher with CG pretreatment. For WH sample, CG pretreatment was as effective as DAT and more effective than IL pretreatment regarding hydrolysis yield. The fermentation inhibition was not noticeable with both types of pretreatment methods and feedstocks. Besides, CG pretreatment was found as effective as pure glycerol pretreatment for both feedstocks. This opens up an attractive economic route for the utilization of CG. PMID:21273061

  18. Studies on the carbohydrate moiety of α1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) by using alkaline hydrolysis and deamination by nitrous acid

    PubMed Central

    Isemura, M.; Schmid, K.

    1971-01-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis followed by deamination with nitrous acid was applied for the first time to a glycoprotein, human plasma α1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid). This procedure, which specifically cleaves the glycosaminidic bonds, yielded well-defined oligosaccharides. The trisaccharides, which were obtained from the native protein, consisted of a sialic acid derivative, galactose and 2,5-anhydromannose. The linkage between galactose and 2,5-anhydromannose is most probably a (1→4)-glycosidic bond. A hitherto unknown linkage between N-acetylneuraminic acid and galactose was also established, namely a (2→2)-linkage. The three linkages between sialic acid and galactose described in this paper appear to be about equally resistant to mild acid hydrolysis. The disaccharide that was derived from the desialized glycoprotein consisted of galactose and 2,5-anhydromannose. Evidence was obtained for the presence of a new terminal sialyl→N-acetylglucosamine disaccharide accounting for approximately 1mol/mol of protein. The presence of this disaccharide may explain the relatively severe requirements for the complete acid hydrolysis of the sialyl residues. The present study indicates that alkaline hydrolysis followed by nitrous acid deamination in conjunction with gas–liquid chromatography will afford relatively rapid determination of the partial structure of the complex carbohydrate moiety of glycoproteins. PMID:5135244

  19. Fatty acid stimulation of membrane phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis by brain phosphatidylinositol phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, R F; Letcher, A J; Dawson, R M

    1979-01-01

    The hydrolysis of membrane-bound phosphatidylinositol in rat liver microsomal fraction by the soluble phosphatidylinositol phosphodiesterase from rat brain was markedly stimulated by oleic acid or arachidonic acid. The stimulation did not require added calcium, although it was abolished by EDTA. Lysophosphatidylcholine also totally suppressed the stimulation. A possible role for the fatty acid content of a membrane in controlling phosphatidylinositol turnover is suggested. PMID:220968

  20. Dilute acid/metal salt hydrolysis of lignocellulosics

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Quang A.; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2002-01-01

    A modified dilute acid method of hydrolyzing the cellulose and hemicellulose in lignocellulosic material under conditions to obtain higher overall fermentable sugar yields than is obtainable using dilute acid alone, comprising: impregnating a lignocellulosic feedstock with a mixture of an amount of aqueous solution of a dilute acid catalyst and a metal salt catalyst sufficient to provide higher overall fermentable sugar yields than is obtainable when hydrolyzing with dilute acid alone; loading the impregnated lignocellulosic feedstock into a reactor and heating for a sufficient period of time to hydrolyze substantially all of the hemicellulose and greater than 45% of the cellulose to water soluble sugars; and recovering the water soluble sugars.

  1. Acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of BMS-582664: degradation product identification and mechanism elucidation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang; Derbin, George; Miller, Scott; Badawy, Sherif; Hussain, Munir

    2012-09-01

    BMS-582664 is an investigational drug intended for cancer treatment through oral administration. The preformulation studies revealed two unexpected degradation products under acidic conditions by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Additional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry results suggested that these were cleavage (hydrolysis) products of a diaryl ether. To further understand the degradation mechanism, the reaction was carried out in (18) O-labeled water. The (18) O was found to be incorporated in only one of the two hydrolysis products. The results suggest that the corresponding α carbon in the heterocycle was unusually eletrophilic in acidic conditions probably because of the protonation of the neighboring nitrogen. This led to the selective attack by water and the consequent hydrolysis products. The study provides a new example of hydrolytic degradation of pharmaceutical compounds, and the reaction center is an aromatic heterocyclic carbon with an aryloxy substitution. PMID:22189636

  2. Selective hydrolysis of hemicellulose from wheat straw by a nanoscale solid acid catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chao; Wang, Chunming; Huang, Fan; Wang, Fengxue; Jia, Honghua; Zhou, Hua; Wei, Ping

    2015-10-20

    A nanoscale catalyst, solid acid SO4(2-)/Fe2O3 with both Lewis and Brønsted acidity was found to effectively hydrolyze hemicellulose while keeping cellulose and lignin inactive, and selective hydrolysis of hemicellulose from wheat straw by this catalyst was also confirmed. The factors that significantly affected hydrolysis process were investigated with response surface methodology, and the optimum conditions for time, temperature, and ratio of wheat straw to catalyst (w/w) were calculated to be 4.10h, 141.97°C, and 1.95:1, respectively. A maximum hemicellulose hydrolysis yield of 63.5% from wheat straw could be obtained under these conditions. In addition, the catalyst could be recycled six times with high activity remaining. PMID:26256198

  3. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose as the entry point into biorefinery schemes.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Roberto; Schüth, Ferdi

    2009-01-01

    Cellulose is a major source of glucose because it is readily available, renewable, and does not compete with the food supply. Hydrolysis of cellulose is experiencing a new research and development cycle in which this reaction is carried out over solid catalysts and coupled to other reactions for increased efficiency. Cellulose is typically not soluble in conventional solvents and very resistant to chemical and biological transformations. This Review focuses on aspects related to the hydrolysis of cellulose as this process is a significant entry point into the biorefinery scheme based on carbohydrates for the production of biofuels and biochemicals. Structural features of cellulose, conventional acid-catalyzed reactions, and the use of solid acid catalysts for hydrolysis are discussed. The longterm success of the biorefinery concept depends on the development of energetically efficient processes to convert cellulose directly or indirectly into biofuels and chemicals. PMID:19950346

  4. Vacuolar Acid Hydrolysis as a Physiological Mechanism for Sucrose Breakdown 1

    PubMed Central

    Echeverria, Ed; Burns, Jacqueline K.

    1989-01-01

    Sucrose breakdown in mature acidic `Persian' limes (Citrus aurantifolia [Christm.] Swing.) occurred at a rate of 30.6 picomoles per milliliter per day during 9 weeks storage at 15°C. Neither enzyme of sucrose catabolism (sucrose synthase or acid/alkaline invertase) was present in extracts of mature storage tissue. The average vacuolar pH, estimated by direct measurement of sap from isolated vacuoles and by the methylamine method, was about 2.0 to 2.2. In vitro acid hydrolysis of sucrose at physiological concentrations in a buffered solution (pH 2.2) occurred at identical rates as in matured limes. The results indicate that sucrose breakdown in stored mature acidic limes occurs by acid hydrolysis. PMID:16666803

  5. Thermal synthesis and hydrolysis of polyglyceric acid. [in orgin of life studying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1989-01-01

    Polyglyceric acid was synthesized by thermal condensation of glyceric acid at 80 C in the presence and absence of two mole percent of sulfuric acid catalyst. The acid catalyst accelerated the polymerization over 100-fold and made possible the synthesis of insoluble polymers of both L- and DL-glyceric acid by heating for less than 1 day. Racemization of L-glyceric acid yielded less than 1 percent D-glyceric acid in condensations carried out at 80 C with catalyst for 1 day and without catalyst for 12 days. The condensation of L-glyceric acid yielded an insoluble polymer much more readily than condensation of DL-glyceric acid. Studies of the hydrolysis of poly-DL-glyceric acid revealed that it was considerably more stable under mild acidic conditions compared to neutral pH. The relationship of this study to the origin of life is discussed.

  6. Effects of acid/alkaline pretreatment and gamma-ray irradiation on extracellular polymeric substances from sewage sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shuibo; Wu, Yuqi; Wang, Wentao; Wang, Jingsong; Luo, Zhiping; Li, Shiyou

    2014-04-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) influencing sludge characteristics, variations of extractable EPS from municipal sewage sludge by acid/alkaline pretreatment and gamma-ray irradiation were studied. The changes in constituents of EPS were analyzed by UV-vis spectra and SEM images. The effects of alkaline pretreatment and gamma-ray irradiation on the functional groups in EPS were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. Results showed that the extractable EPS increased clearly with increasing irradiation dose from 0 to 15 kGy. UV-vis spectra indicated that a new absorption band from 240 nm to 300 nm existed in all irradiated samples, apart from acid condition. The results of FTIR spectroscopic analysis indicated that, irradiation influenced major functional groups in EPS, such as protein and polysaccharide, and these effects were clearer under alkaline condition. SEM images provided that after alkaline hydrolysis, gamma-ray irradiation was more effective in resulting in the sludge flocs and cells broken, compared with acid pretreatment (pH 2.50).

  7. Pretreatment of solid carbonaceous material with dicarboxylic aromatic acids to prevent scale formation

    DOEpatents

    Brunson, Roy J.

    1982-01-01

    Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by pretreatment with a pretreating agent selected from the group consisting of phthalic acid, phthalic anhydride, pyromellitic acid and pyromellitic anhydride. The pretreatment is believed to convert the scale-forming components to the corresponding phthalate and/or pyromellitate prior to liquefaction. The pretreatment is accomplished at a total pressure within the range from about 1 to about 2 atmospheres. Temperature during pretreatment will generally be within the range from about 5.degree. to about 80.degree. C.

  8. Pretreating wheat straw by the concentrated phosphoric acid plus hydrogen peroxide (PHP): Investigations on pretreatment conditions and structure changes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Hu, Jinguang; Shen, Fei; Mei, Zili; Yang, Gang; Zhang, Yanzong; Hu, Yaodong; Zhang, Jing; Deng, Shihuai

    2016-01-01

    Wheat straw was pretreated by PHP (the concentrated H3PO4 plus H2O2) to clarify effects of temperature, time and H3PO4 proportion on hemicellulose removal, delignification, cellulose recovery and enzymatic digestibility. Overall, hemicellulose removal was intensified by PHP comparing to the concentrated H3PO4. Moreover, efficient delignification specially happened in PHP pretreatment. Hemicellulose removal and delignification by PHP positively responded to temperature and time. Increasing H3PO4 proportion in PHP can promote hemicellulose removal, however, decrease the delignification. Maximum hemicellulose removal and delignification were achieved at 100% and 83.7% by PHP. Enzymatic digestibility of PHP-pretreated wheat straw was greatly improved by increasing temperature, time and H3PO4 proportion, and complete hydrolysis can be achieved consequently. As temperature of 30-40°C, time of 2.0 h and H3PO4 proportion of 60% were employed, more than 92% cellulose was retained in the pretreated wheat straw, and 29.1-32.6g glucose can be harvested from 100g wheat straw. PMID:26264398

  9. Improved ethanol yield and reduced Minimum Ethanol Selling Price (MESP) by modifying low severity dilute acid pretreatment with deacetylation and mechanical refining: 1) Experimental

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Historically, acid pretreatment technology for the production of bio-ethanol from corn stover has required severe conditions to overcome biomass recalcitrance. However, the high usage of acid and steam at severe pretreatment conditions hinders the economic feasibility of the ethanol production from biomass. In addition, the amount of acetate and furfural produced during harsh pretreatment is in the range that strongly inhibits cell growth and impedes ethanol fermentation. The current work addresses these issues through pretreatment with lower acid concentrations and temperatures incorporated with deacetylation and mechanical refining. Results The results showed that deacetylation with 0.1 M NaOH before acid pretreatment improved the monomeric xylose yield in pretreatment by up to 20% while keeping the furfural yield under 2%. Deacetylation also improved the glucose yield by 10% and the xylose yield by 20% during low solids enzymatic hydrolysis. Mechanical refining using a PFI mill further improved sugar yields during both low- and high-solids enzymatic hydrolysis. Mechanical refining also allowed enzyme loadings to be reduced while maintaining high yields. Deacetylation and mechanical refining are shown to assist in achieving 90% cellulose yield in high-solids (20%) enzymatic hydrolysis. When fermentations were performed under pH control to evaluate the effect of deacetylation and mechanical refining on the ethanol yields, glucose and xylose utilizations over 90% and ethanol yields over 90% were achieved. Overall ethanol yields were calculated based on experimental results for the base case and modified cases. One modified case that integrated deacetylation, mechanical refining, and washing was estimated to produce 88 gallons of ethanol per ton of biomass. Conclusion The current work developed a novel bio-ethanol process that features pretreatment with lower acid concentrations and temperatures incorporated with deacetylation and mechanical refining. The

  10. Monitoring real-time enzymatic hydrolysis of Distillers Dried Grains with Solubles (DDGS) by dielectric spectroscopy following hydrothermal pre-treatment by steam explosion.

    PubMed

    Bryant, David N; Firth, Elliot; Kaderbhai, Naheed; Taylor, Stephen; Morris, Stephen M; Logan, Daniel; Garcia, Naroa; Ellis, Andrew; Martin, Steven M; Gallagher, Joe A

    2013-01-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy (DS) has been used to monitor the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass by measuring its dielectric state. However, it is unknown whether following steam explosion (SE) pre-treatment, lignocellulose would still maintain a dielectric state, and, if maintained, whether the dissipation during enzymatic hydrolysis could be monitored. Distillers Dried Grains with Solubles (DDGS), pre-treated by SE, was found to have a capacitance (C = 580 kHz) of approximately 24 pF cm(-1). Following addition of full-strength cellulolytic cocktail A (CC-A; R(2) = 0.97) and 1/3 strength cocktail B (CC-B; R(2) = 0.96), a natural logarithmic decay in capacitance was determined. Furthermore, the DS biomass probes quantified the initial linear rate of dissipation in capacitance during hydrolysis. The rate of CC-B was 34% that of CC-A. These data extend scope and utility of DS biomass probes for monitoring the enzymatic hydrolysis of SE-pre-treated lignocellulosic substrates in real-time. PMID:23228453

  11. Combined Effect of Free Nitrous Acid Pretreatment and Sodium Dodecylbenzene Sulfonate on Short-Chain Fatty Acid Production from Waste Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianwei; Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bingjie; Wang, Qilin; Wang, Dongbo; Yang, Qi; Sun, Yingjie; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Free nitrous acid (FNA) serving as a pretreatment is an effective approach to accelerate sludge disintegration. Also, sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), a type of surfactants, has been determined at significant levels in sewage sludge, which thereby affects the characteristics of sludge. Both FNA pretreatment and sludge SDBS levels can affect short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) generation from sludge anaerobic fermentation. To date, however, the combined effect of FNA pretreatment and SDBS presence on SCFA production as well as the corresponding mechanisms have never been documented. This work therefore aims to provide such support. Experimental results showed that the combination of FNA and SDBS treatment not only improved SCFA accumulation but also shortened the fermentation time. The maximal SCFA accumulation of 334.5 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/g volatile suspended solids (VSS) was achieved at 1.54 mg FNA/L treatment and 0.02 g/g dry sludge, which was respectively 1.79-fold and 1.41-fold of that from FNA treatment and sludge containing SDBS alone. Mechanism investigations revealed that the combined FNA pretreatment and SDBS accelerated solubilization, hydrolysis, and acidification steps but inhibited the methanogenesis. All those observations were in agreement with SCFA enhancement. PMID:26868898

  12. Combined Effect of Free Nitrous Acid Pretreatment and Sodium Dodecylbenzene Sulfonate on Short-Chain Fatty Acid Production from Waste Activated Sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianwei; Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bingjie; Wang, Qilin; Wang, Dongbo; Yang, Qi; Sun, Yingjie; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Free nitrous acid (FNA) serving as a pretreatment is an effective approach to accelerate sludge disintegration. Also, sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), a type of surfactants, has been determined at significant levels in sewage sludge, which thereby affects the characteristics of sludge. Both FNA pretreatment and sludge SDBS levels can affect short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) generation from sludge anaerobic fermentation. To date, however, the combined effect of FNA pretreatment and SDBS presence on SCFA production as well as the corresponding mechanisms have never been documented. This work therefore aims to provide such support. Experimental results showed that the combination of FNA and SDBS treatment not only improved SCFA accumulation but also shortened the fermentation time. The maximal SCFA accumulation of 334.5 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/g volatile suspended solids (VSS) was achieved at 1.54 mg FNA/L treatment and 0.02 g/g dry sludge, which was respectively 1.79-fold and 1.41-fold of that from FNA treatment and sludge containing SDBS alone. Mechanism investigations revealed that the combined FNA pretreatment and SDBS accelerated solubilization, hydrolysis, and acidification steps but inhibited the methanogenesis. All those observations were in agreement with SCFA enhancement. PMID:26868898

  13. Carboxypeptidase displaying differential velocity in hydrolysis of methotrexate, 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid, and leucovorin.

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, A M; Boldizsar, E; Hutchison, D J

    1978-01-01

    An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of folic acid and the antifolate methotrexate nearly 20 times more rapidly than the hydrolysis of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate was extraced from a gram-negative bacterium tentatively identified as a Flavobacterium sp. The enzyme was purified 500-fold and found to have a molecular weight of about 53,000. Apparently a metallo-enzyme, it is inhibited by citrate and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Ca2+, Co2+, Mg2+, and Zn2+ reverse inhibition by EDTA, whereas Ca2+ and Zn2+ are weak activators in the absence of EDTA. The enzymatic reaction releases the carboxy-terminal glutamyl moiety of derivatives of pteroyl-mono-L-glutamic acid. Substituents on N5 of the pteridine ring decrease the velocity of hydrolysis. Some non-specificity for the terminal amino acid is expressed. The strikingly different rates of hydrolysis of methotrexate and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate have stimulated interest in this enzyme for its potential clinical value in improving the therapeutic index of methotrexate. PMID:26657

  14. Catalytic conversion of carbohydrates to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural from the waste liquid of acid hydrolysis NCC.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yonghui; Liu, Pengtao; Liu, Zhong

    2016-05-20

    The principal goal of this work was to reuse the carbohydrates and recycle sulfuric acid in the waste liquid of acid hydrolysis nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC). Therefore, in this work, the optimizations of further hydrolysis of waste liquid of acid hydrolysis NCC and catalytic conversion of L4 to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) were studied. Sulfuric acid was separated by spiral wound diffusion dialysis (SWDD). The results revealed that cellulose can be hydrolyze to glucose absolutely under the condition of temperature 35 °C, 3 h, and sulfuric acid's concentration 62 wt%. And 78.3% sulfuric acid was recovered by SWDD. The yield of 5-HMF was highest in aqueous solution under the optimal condition was as follows, temperature 160 °C, 3 h, and sulfuric acid's concentration 12 wt%. Then the effect of biphasic solvent systems catalytic conversion and inorganic salt as additives were still examined. The results showed that both of them contributed to prepare 5-HMF. The yield and selectivity of 5-HMF was up to 21.0% and 31.4%, respectively. PMID:26917388

  15. Kinetics of acid hydrolysis of hardwood in a continuous plug flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kwarteng, I.K.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis was undertaken to investigate the kinetics of dilute acid catalyzed hydrolysis of hardwood in an isothermally operated continuous plug flow reactor at steady state. Sulphuric acid catalyst concentration ranged from 0.05 to 2.5 wt% and the reaction temperatures were between 160/sup 0/C and 265/sup 0/C. The residence time was limited to between 0.1 and 0.5 minutes while the wood slurry concentration varied from 5 wt% to 10 wt%. Kinetic models, as functions of the reaction conditions, were obtained for the hemicelluloses (xylan) to xylose, xylose to furfural, fufural decomposition, and cellulose (glucan) to glucose reactions. Numerical solutions (Runge-Kutta Methods) to a system of first order differential equations which provided a composite description of the kinetic model for furfural production from xylan were also presented. Furfural yields of up to 87% were verified. Xylose appearance from hardwood xylan could be modelled by a sequence of two irreversible consecutive first-order reactions. The proposed model, however, underestimated xylose yields at the conditions of quantitative yields (1 wt% 2 wt%, 0.25 minutes and 190/sup 0/C to 210/sup 0/C). For the cellulose to glucose reaction, a similar model with different parameters produced yields of up to 56% at 240/sup 0/C to 260/sup 0/C. Two approaches for the carbohydrate recovery and utilization in acid hydrolysis were proposed as follows. 1) Two-stage hydrolysis: in this mode, the first stage is at the conditions for maximum xylose recovery. This is then followed by a second-stage hydrolysis at higher temperatures for glucose recovery. 2) Single-stage hydrolysis: since the conditions for high furfural yields coincide with those for glucose, a single stage hydrolysis for their simultaneous recovery can also be achieved.

  16. Whole slurry fermentation of maleic acid-pretreated oil palm empty fruit bunches for ethanol production not necessitating a detoxification process.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Hoon; Kim, In Jung; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2014-04-01

    The yield of ethanol from oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) was increased on exploiting maleic acid pretreatment combined with fermentation of the pretreated whole slurry. The optimized conditions for pretreatment were to expose EFB to a high temperature (190 °C) with 1 % (w/v) maleic acid for a short time duration (3 min ramping to the set temperature with no holding) in a microwave digester. An enzymatic digestibility of 60.9 % (based on theoretical glucose yield) was exhibited using pretreated and washed EFB after 48 h of hydrolysis. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of the whole slurry of pretreated EFB for 48 h resulted in 61.3 % theoretical yield of ethanol based on the initial amount of glucan in untreated EFB. These results indicate that maleic acid is a suitable catalyst not requiring detoxification steps for whole slurry fermentation of EFB for ethanol production, thus improving the process economics. Also, the whole slurry fermentation can significantly increase the biomass utilization by converting sugar from both solid and liquid phases of the pretreated slurry. PMID:23982450

  17. Preparative production of colominic acid oligomers via a facile microwave hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Patane, Jonathan; Trapani, Vincent; Villavert, Janice; McReynolds, Katherine Dawn

    2009-01-01

    The hydrolysis of colominic acid via microwave irradiation was studied for the production of short chain oligomers with a degree of polymerization (DP) of 1–6. This method was compared to the traditional acid hydrolytic method for the production of preparative quantities of short colominic acid oligomers. The oligomers were purified by size exclusion chromatography and characterized by 1H NMR. Optimal conditions for producing the dimer were found to be 12 minutes at 10% power in a 1000 Watt domestic microwave. This method is advantageous over the traditional technique in that the hydrolysis can be completed in just a few minutes, rather than hours, it is reproducible, and yields large quantities of the desirable short chain oligomers of colominic acid. PMID:19281967

  18. Oxidation and hydrolysis of lactic acid in near-critical water

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.; Vallejo, D.; Gloyna, E.F.; Portela, J.R.

    1999-07-01

    Hydrothermal reactions (oxidation and hydrolysis) involving lactic acid (LA) were studied at temperatures ranging from 300 to 400 C and a nominal pressure of 27.6 MPa. Kinetic models were developed with respect to concentrations of LA and total organic carbon (TOC), respectively. On the basis of identified liquid and gaseous products, pathways for hydrothermal reactions involving lactic acid were proposed. Acetic acid and acetaldehyde were confirmed as the major liquid intermediates for oxidation and hydrolysis reactions, respectively. Carbon monoxide and methane were identified as the major gaseous byproducts from these reactions. These results demonstrate the potential of completely oxidizing, as well as converting, lactic acid into other organic products, in high-temperature water.

  19. The acid and enzymic hydrolysis of O-acetylated sialic acid residues from rabbit Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Neuberger, A.; Ratcliffe, Wendy A.

    1972-01-01

    Rabbit Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein and bovine submaxillary glycoprotein were both found to contain sialic acid residues which are released at a slow rate by the standard conditions of acid hydrolysis. These residues are also resistant to neuraminidases from Vibrio cholerae and Clostridium perfringens. This behaviour was attributed to the presence of O-acetylated sialic acid, since the removal of O-acetyl groups by mild alkaline treatment normalized the subsequent release of sialic acid from rabbit Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein by acid and by enzymic hydrolysis. Determination of the O-acetyl residues in rabbit Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein indicated that on average two hydroxyl groups of sialic acid are O-acetylated, and these were located on the polyhydroxy side-chain of sialic acid or on C-4 and C-8. These findings confirm the assumption that certain O-acetylated forms of sialic acid are not substrates for bacterial neuraminidases. Several explanations have been suggested to explain the effect of O-acetylation of the side-chain on the rate of acidcatalysed hydrolysis of sialic acid residues. PMID:4349114

  20. Structure and hydrolysis of p-(2-oxo-1-pyrrolidinyl)- benzenesulfonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kukalenko, S.S.; Frolov, S.I.; Lim, I.K.; Putsykina, E.B.; Vasil'ev, A.F.

    1987-11-20

    With the aid of vibrational and PMR spectra of p-(2-oso-1-pyrrolidinyl)benzenesulfonic acid it was shown that in the solid state it exists as an O-protonated dipolar ion in which the protonated amide cation and sulfonate ion are intermolecularly linked by a very strong hydrogen bond. In concentrated hydrochloric acid the dipolar ion is an intermediate link in the chain of processes in the hydrolysis of the amide bond of the lactam ring.

  1. Difference analysis of the enzymatic hydrolysis performance of acid-catalyzed steam-exploded corn stover before and after washing with water.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junjun; Shi, Linli; Zhang, Lingling; Xu, Yong; Yong, Qiang; Ouyang, Jia; Yu, Shiyuan

    2016-10-01

    The difference in the enzymatic hydrolysis yield of acid-catalyzed steam-exploded corn stover (ASC) before and after washing with water reached approximately 15 % under the same conditions. The reasons for the difference in the yield between ASC and washed ASC (wASC) were determined through the analysis of the composition of ASC prehydrolyzate and sugar concentration of enzymatic hydrolyzate. Salts produced by neutralization (CaSO4, Na2SO4, K2SO4, and (NH4)2SO4), sugars (polysaccharides, oligosaccharides, and monosaccharides), sugar-degradation products (weak acids and furans), and lignin-degradation products (ethyl acetate extracts and nine main lignin-degradation products) were back-added to wASC. Results showed that these products, except furans, exerted negative effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. According to the characteristics of acid-catalyzed steam explosion pretreatment, the five sugar-degradation products' mixture and salts [Na2SO4, (NH4)2SO4] showed minimal negative inhibition effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. By contrast, furans demonstrated a promotion effect. Moreover, soluble sugars, such as 13 g/L xylose (decreased by 6.38 %), 5 g/L cellobiose (5.36 %), 10 g/L glucose (3.67 %), as well as lignin-degradation products, and ethyl acetate extracts (4.87 %), exhibited evident inhibition effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. Therefore, removal of soluble sugars and lignin-degradation products could effectively promote the enzymatic hydrolysis performance. PMID:27277746

  2. Quantitation of Indoleacetic Acid Conjugates in Bean Seeds by Direct Tissue Hydrolysis 1

    PubMed Central

    Bialek, Krystyna; Cohen, Jerry D.

    1989-01-01

    Gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring-mass spectral analysis using [13C6]indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) as an internal standard provides an effective means for quantitation of IAA liberated during direct strong basic hydrolysis of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seed powder, provided that extra precautions are undertaken to exclude oxygen from the reaction vial. Direct seed powder hydrolysis revealed that the major portion of amide IAA conjugates in bean seeds are not extractable by aqueous acetone, the solvent used commonly for IAA conjugate extraction from seeds and other plant tissues. Strong basic hydrolysis of plant tissue can be used to provide new information on IAA content. Images Figure 1 PMID:16666783

  3. High Xylose Yields from Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Corn Stover Under Process-Relevant Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, N. D.; Nagle, N. J.; Tucker, M. P.; Elander, R. T.

    2009-01-01

    Pretreatment experiments were carried out to demonstrate high xylose yields at high solids loadings in two different batch pretreatment reactors under process-relevant conditions. Corn stover was pretreated with dilute sulfuric acid using a 4-l Steam Digester and a 4-l stirred ZipperClave{reg_sign} reactor. Solids were loaded at 45% dry matter (wt/wt) after sulfuric acid catalyst impregnation using nominal particle sizes of either 6 or 18 mm. Pretreatment was carried out at temperatures between 180 and 200 C at residence times of either 90 or 105 s. Results demonstrate an ability to achieve high xylose yields (>80%) over a range of pretreatment conditions, with performance showing little dependence on particle size or pretreatment reactor type. The high xylose yields are attributed to effective catalyst impregnation and rapid rates of heat transfer during pretreatment.

  4. Enzymatic pretreatment for preparing starch nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    LeCorre, Déborah; Vahanian, Elina; Dufresne, Alain; Bras, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Starch nanocrystals (SNCs) are crystalline platelets resulting from the acid hydrolysis of starch. A limiting factor for their more widespread use is their preparation duration. Therefore, this study investigates the possibility of developing an enzymatic pretreatment of starch to reduce the acid hydrolysis duration. A screening of three types of enzymes, namely, α-amylase, β-amylase, and glucoamylase, is proposed, and the latter was selected for a pretreatment. Compared with the regular kinetics of hydrolysis for preparing SNC, that of pretreated starch was much faster. The extent of hydrolysis normally reached in 24 h was obtained after only 6 h, and the regular final yield (15% after 5 days) was reached in 45 h. AFM and X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed that the obtained nanoparticles were indeed SNC. PMID:22133316

  5. Fundamental study on kinetics and transport phenomena in low water dilute acid total hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Auburn University

    2004-04-07

    The overall objective of this research is to delineate the process of the dilute-acid hydrolysis of biomass and seek better understanding of the reactions involving dilute-acid treatment of lignocellulosic biomass. Specifically the scope of the work entails the following two primary technical elements: Verification of the heterogeneous nature of the reaction mechanism in dilute-acid hydrolysis of cellulosic component of the biomass. Experimental investigation to identify the overall reaction pattern and the kinetic constants associated with dilute-acid hydrolysis of the cellulosic component of the agricultural residues.

  6. Prediction of acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials in batch and plug flow reactors.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Oscar Johnny; Gómez-García, Miguel Ángel; Fontalvo, Javier

    2013-08-01

    This study unifies contradictory conclusions reported in literature on acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials, using batch and plug flow reactors, regarding the influence of the initial liquid ratio of acid aqueous solution to solid lignocellulosic material on sugar yield and concentration. The proposed model takes into account the volume change of the reaction media during the hydrolysis process. An error lower than 8% was found between predictions, using a single set of kinetic parameters for several liquid to solid ratios, and reported experimental data for batch and plug flow reactors. For low liquid-solid ratios, the poor wetting and the acid neutralization, due to the ash presented in the solid, will both reduce the sugar yield. Also, this study shows that both reactors are basically equivalent in terms of the influence of the liquid to solid ratio on xylose and glucose yield. PMID:23770535

  7. Monomeric carbohydrates production from olive tree pruning biomass: modeling of dilute acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Juan G; Mateo, Soledad; Fonseca, Bruno G; Roberto, Inês C; Sánchez, Sebastián; Moya, Alberto J

    2013-12-01

    Statistical modeling and optimization of dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of olive tree pruning biomass has been performed using response surface methodology. Central composite rotatable design was applied to assess the effect of acid concentration, reaction time and temperature on efficiency and selectivity of hemicellulosic monomeric carbohydrates to d-xylose. Second-order polynomial model was fitted to experimental data to find the optimum reaction conditions by multiple regression analysis. The monomeric d-xylose recovery 85% (as predicted by the model) was achieved under optimized hydrolysis conditions (1.27% acid concentration, 96.5°C and 138 min), confirming the high validity of the developed model. The content of d-glucose (8.3%) and monosaccharide degradation products (0.1% furfural and 0.04% 5-hydroxymethylfurfural) provided a high quality subtract, ready for subsequent biochemical conversion to value-added products. PMID:24096282

  8. Fast hemicellulose quantification via a simple one-step acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiadi; Kumar, Rajeev; Wyman, Charles E

    2014-06-01

    As the second most common polysaccharides in nature, hemicellulose has received much attention in recent years for its importance in biomass conversion in terms of producing high yields of fermentable sugars and value-added products, as well as its role in reducing biomass recalcitrance. Therefore, a time and labor efficient method that specifically analyzes hemicellulose content would be valuable to facilitate the screening of biomass feedstocks. In this study, a one-step acid hydrolysis method was developed, which applied 4 wt% sulfuric acid at 121°C for 1 h to rapidly quantify XGM (xylan + galactan + mannan) contents in various types of lignocellulosic biomass and model hemicelluloses. This method gave statistically identical results in XGM contents compared to results from conventional two-step acid hydrolysis while significantly shortening analysis time. PMID:24343864

  9. Kinetics of acid hydrolysis and reactivity of some antibacterial hydrophilic iron(II) imino-complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaker, Ali Mohamed; Nassr, Lobna Abdel-Mohsen Ebaid; Adam, Mohamed Shaker Saied; Mohamed, Ibrahim Mohamed Abdelhalim

    2015-05-01

    Kinetic study of acid hydrolysis of some hydrophilic Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes with antibacterial properties was performed using spectrophotometry. The Schiff base ligands were derived from sodium 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde-5-sulfonate and glycine, L-alanine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine, DL-methionine, DL-serine, or L-phenylalanine. The reaction was studied in aqueous media under conditions of pseudo-first order kinetics. Moreover, the acid hydrolysis was studied at different temperatures and the activation parameters were calculated. The general rate equation was suggested as follows: rate = k obs [Complex], where k obs = k 2 [H+]. The evaluated rate constants and activation parameters are consistent with the hydrophilicity of the investigated complexes.

  10. Sequential acid-/alkali-pretreatment of empty palm fruit bunch fiber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seonghun; Park, Jang Min; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Chul Ho

    2012-04-01

    Pretreatment processes are key technologies for generating fermentable sugars based on lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, we developed a novel method for empty palm fruit bunch fiber (EPFBF) using sequential pretreatment with dilute acid and then alkali. Dilute sulfuric acid was used in the first step, which removed 90% of the hemicellulose and 32% of the lignin, but left most of the cellulose under the optimum pretreatment condition. Sodium hydroxide was then applied in the second step, which extracted lignin effectively with a 70% delignification yield, partially disrupting the ordered fibrils of the EPFBF and thus enhancing the enzyme digestibility of the cellulose. The sequentially pretreated biomass consisted of 82% cellulose, less than 1% hemicellulose, and 30% lignin content afterward. The pretreated biomasses morphologically revealed rough, porous, and irregularly ordered surfaces for enhancing enzyme digestibility. These results indicate that the sequentially acid/alkali-pretreated EPFBF could be broadly useful as a novel biomass. PMID:22306078

  11. Acid hydrolysis of crude tannins from infructescence of Platycarya strobilacea Sieb. et Zucc to produce ellagic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangliang; Wang, Yongmei; Xu, Man

    2014-01-01

    The infructescence of Platycarya strobilacea Sieb. et Zucc is a well-known traditional medicine in China, Japan and Korea. The infructescence of P. strobilacea Sieb. et Zucc is a rich source of ellagitannins that are composed of ellagic acid (EA) and gallic acid, linked to a sugar moiety. The aim of this study was to prepare EA by acid hydrolysis of crude tannins from the infructescence of P. strobilacea Sieb. et Zucc, and establish a new technological processing method for EA. The natural antioxidant EA was prepared by using the water extraction of infructescence of P. strobilacea Sieb. et Zucc, evaporation, condensation, acid hydrolysis and prepared by the process of crystallisation. The yield percentage of EA from crude EA was more than 20% and the purity of the product was more than 98%, as identified by using HPLC. The structure was identified on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and comparison with authentic compound. PMID:24911045

  12. Effects of acid-hydrolysis and hydroxypropylation on functional properties of sago starch.

    PubMed

    Fouladi, Elham; Mohammadi Nafchi, Abdorreza

    2014-07-01

    In this study, sago starch was hydrolyzed by 0.14M HCl for 6, 12, 18, and 24h, and then modified by propylene oxide at a concentration of 0-30% (v/w). The effects of hydrolysis and etherification on molecular weight distribution, physicochemical, rheological, and thermal properties of dually modified starch were estimated. Acid hydrolysis of starch decreased the molecular weight of starch especially amylopectin, but hydroxypropylation had no effect on the molecular weight distribution. The degree of Molar substitution (DS) of hydroxypropylated starch after acid hydrolysis ranged from 0.007 to 0.15. Dually modified starch with a DS higher than 0.1 was completely soluble in cold water at up to 25% concentration of the starch. This study shows that hydroxypropylation and hydrolysis have synergistic effects unlike individual modifications. Dually modified sago starch can be applied to dip-molding for food and pharmaceutical processing because of its high solubility and low tendency for retrogradation. PMID:24832983

  13. Surface Chemical Compositions and Dispersity of Starch Nanocrystals Formed by Sulfuric and Hydrochloric Acid Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Benxi; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Yaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Surface chemical compositions of starch nanocrystals (SNC) prepared using sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) hydrolysis were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and FT-IR. The results showed that carboxyl groups and sulfate esters were presented in SNC after hydrolysis with H2SO4, while no sulfate esters were detected in SNC during HCl-hydrolysis. TEM results showed that, compared to H2SO4-hydrolyzed sample, a wider size distribution of SNC prepared by HCl-hydrolysis were observed. Zeta-potentials were −23.1 and −5.02 mV for H2SO4- and HCl-hydrolyzed SNC suspensions at pH 6.5, respectively. Nevertheless, the zeta-potential values decreased to −32.3 and −10.2 mV as the dispersion pH was adjusted to 10.6. After placed 48 h at pH 10.6, zeta-potential increased to −24.1 mV for H2SO4-hydrolyzed SNC, while no change was detected for HCl-hydrolyzed one. The higher zeta-potential and relative small particle distribution of SNC caused more stable suspensions compared to HCl-hydrolyzed sample. PMID:24586246

  14. Conformational Footprint in Hydrolysis-Induced Nanofibrillation and Crystallization of Poly(lactic acid).

    PubMed

    Xu, Huan; Yang, Xi; Xie, Lan; Hakkarainen, Minna

    2016-03-14

    The origin of hydrolysis-induced nanofibrillation and crystallization, at the molecular level, was revealed by mapping the conformational ordering during long-term hydrolytic degradation of initially amorphous poly(lactic acid) (PLA), a representative model for degradable aliphatic polyesters generally displaying strong interplay between crystallization and hydrolytic erosion. The conformational regularization of chain segments was essentially the main driving force for the morphological evolution of PLA during hydrolytic degradation. For hydrolysis at 37 °C, no significant structural variations were observed due to the immobilization of "frozen" PLA chains. In contrast, conformational ordering in PLA was immediately triggered during hydrolysis at 60 °C and was responsible for the transition from random coils to disordered trans and, further, to quasi-crystalline nanospheres. On the surfaces, the head-by-head absorption and joining of neighboring nanospheres led to nanofibrillar assemblies following a "gluttonous snake"-like manner. The length and density of nanofibers formed were in close relation to the hydrolytic evolution, both of which showed a direct rise in the initial 60 days and then a gradual decline. In the interior, presumably the high surface energy of the nanospheres allowed for the preferential anchoring and packing of conformationally ordered chains into lamellae. In accordance with the well-established hypothesis, the amorphous regions were attacked prior to the erosion of crystalline entities, causing a rapid increase of crystallinity during the initial 30 days, followed by a gradual fall until 90 days. In addition to adequate illustration of hydrolysis-induced variations of crystallinity, our proposed model elucidates the formation of spherulitic nuclei featuring an extremely wide distribution of diameters ranging from several nanometers to over 5 μm, as well as the inferior resistance to hydrolysis observed for the primary nuclei. Our work

  15. Spore Cortex Hydrolysis Precedes Dipicolinic Acid Release during Clostridium difficile Spore Germination

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Michael B.; Allen, Charlotte A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial spore germination is a process whereby a dormant spore returns to active, vegetative growth, and this process has largely been studied in the model organism Bacillus subtilis. In B. subtilis, the initiation of germinant receptor-mediated spore germination is divided into two genetically separable stages. Stage I is characterized by the release of dipicolinic acid (DPA) from the spore core. Stage II is characterized by cortex degradation, and stage II is activated by the DPA released during stage I. Thus, DPA release precedes cortex hydrolysis during B. subtilis spore germination. Here, we investigated the timing of DPA release and cortex hydrolysis during Clostridium difficile spore germination and found that cortex hydrolysis precedes DPA release. Inactivation of either the bile acid germinant receptor, cspC, or the cortex hydrolase, sleC, prevented both cortex hydrolysis and DPA release. Because both cortex hydrolysis and DPA release during C. difficile spore germination are dependent on the presence of the germinant receptor and the cortex hydrolase, the release of DPA from the core may rely on the osmotic swelling of the core upon cortex hydrolysis. These results have implications for the hypothesized glycine receptor and suggest that the initiation of germinant receptor-mediated C. difficile spore germination proceeds through a novel germination pathway. IMPORTANCE Clostridium difficile infects antibiotic-treated hosts and spreads between hosts as a dormant spore. In a host, spores germinate to the vegetative form that produces the toxins necessary for disease. C. difficile spore germination is stimulated by certain bile acids and glycine. We recently identified the bile acid germinant receptor as the germination-specific, protease-like CspC. CspC is likely cortex localized, where it can transmit the bile acid signal to the cortex hydrolase, SleC. Due to the differences in location of CspC compared to the Bacillus subtilis germinant

  16. Redistribution of Lignin Caused by Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D. K.; Donohoe, B. S.; Katahira, R.; Tucker, M. P.; Vinzant, T. B.; Himmel, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Research conducted at NREL has shown that lignin undergoes a phase transition during thermochemical pretreatments conducted above its glass transition temperature. The lignin coalesces within the plant cell wall and appears as microscopic droplets on cell surfaces. It is clear that pretreatment causes significant changes in lignin distribution in pretreatments at all scales from small laboratory reactors to pilot scale reactors. A method for selectively extracting lignin droplets from the surfaces of pretreated cell walls has allowed us to characterize the chemical nature and molecular weight distribution of this fraction. The effect of lignin redistribution on the digestibility of pretreated solids has also been tested. It is clear that removal of the droplets increases the digestibility of pretreated corn stover. The improved digestibility could be due to decreased non-specific binding of enzymes to lignin in the droplets, or because the droplets no longer block access to cellulose.

  17. Utilizing acid pretreatment and electrospinning to improve biocompatibility of poly(glycolic acid) for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Boland, Eugene D; Telemeco, Todd A; Simpson, David G; Wnek, Gary E; Bowlin, Gary L

    2004-10-15

    Poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) has a long history as a bioresorbable polymer. Its biocompatibility is widely accepted, yet PGA is often rejected as a soft-tissue scaffold because of fibrous encapsulation. The goal of this study was to improve the soft-tissue biocompatibility of PGA by producing scaffolds composed of small-diameter fibers through electrospinning and subjecting these scaffolds to a concentrated hydrochloric acid (HCL) pretreatment. The theory is that small-diameter fibers will elicit a reduced immune response and HCl treatment will improve cellular interactions. Scaffolds were characterized in terms of fiber diameter and pore area via image-analysis software. Biocompatibility was assessed through a WST-1 cell-proliferation assay (in vitro) with the use of rat cardiac fibroblasts and rat intramuscular implantations (in vivo). Fibers produced ranged in diameter from 0.22 to 0.88 microm with pore areas from 1.84 to 13.22 microm(2). The untreated scaffold composed of 0.88-microm fibers was encapsulated in vivo and supported the lowest rates of cell proliferation. On the contrary, the acid pretreated scaffold with 0.22-microm fibers was incorporated into the surrounding tissue and exhibited proliferation rates that exceeded the control populations on tissue-culture plastic. In conclusion, this study has shown the ability to improve the biocompatibility of PGA through acid pretreatment of scaffolds comprised of submicron fiber diameters. PMID:15368238

  18. Hydrolysis of ketene catalyzed by formic acid: modification of reaction mechanism, energetics, and kinetics with organic acid catalysis.

    PubMed

    Louie, Matthew K; Francisco, Joseph S; Verdicchio, Marco; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Sinha, Amitabha

    2015-05-14

    The hydrolysis of ketene (H2C═C═O) to form acetic acid involving two water molecules and also separately in the presence of one to two water molecules and formic acid (FA) was investigated. Our results show that, while the currently accepted indirect mechanism, involving addition of water across the carbonyl C═O bond of ketene to form an ene-diol followed by tautomerization of the ene-diol to form acetic acid, is the preferred pathway when water alone is present, with formic acid as catalyst, addition of water across the ketene C═C double bond to directly produce acetic acid becomes the kinetically favored pathway for temperatures below 400 K. We find not only that the overall barrier for ketene hydrolysis involving one water molecule and formic acid (H2C2O + H2O + FA) is significantly lower than that involving two water molecules (H2C2O + 2H2O) but also that FA is able to reduce the barrier height for the direct path, involving addition of water across the C═C double bond, so that it is essentially identical with (6.4 kcal/mol) that for the indirect ene-diol formation path involving addition of water across the C═O bond. For the case of ketene hydrolysis involving two water molecules and formic acid (H2C2O + 2H2O + FA), the barrier for the direct addition of water across the C═C double bond is reduced even further and is 2.5 kcal/mol lower relative to the ene-diol path involving addition of water across the C═O bond. In fact, the hydrolysis barrier for the H2C2O + 2H2O + FA reaction through the direct path is sufficiently low (2.5 kcal/mol) for it to be an energetically accessible pathway for acetic acid formation under atmospheric conditions. Given the structural similarity between acetic and formic acid, our results also have potential implications for aqueous-phase chemistry. Thus, in an aqueous environment, even in the absence of formic acid, though the initial mechanism for ketene hydrolysis is expected to involve addition of water across the

  19. Structural changes of oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) after fungal and phosphoric acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Isroi; Ishola, Mofoluwake M; Millati, Ria; Syamsiah, Siti; Cahyanto, Muhammad N; Niklasson, Claes; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2012-01-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) was pretreated using white-rot fungus Pleurotus floridanus, phosphoric acid or their combination, and the results were evaluated based on the biomass components, and its structural and morphological changes. The carbohydrate losses after fungal, phosphoric acid, and fungal followed by phosphoric acid pretreatments were 7.89%, 35.65%, and 33.77%, respectively. The pretreatments changed the hydrogen bonds of cellulose and linkages between lignin and carbohydrate, which is associated with crystallinity of cellulose of OPEFB. Lateral Order Index (LOI) of OPEFB with no pretreatment, with fungal, phosphoric acid, and fungal followed by phosphoric acid pretreatments were 2.77, 1.42, 0.67, and 0.60, respectively. Phosphoric acid pretreatment showed morphological changes of OPEFB, indicated by the damage of fibre structure into smaller particle size. The fungal-, phosphoric acid-, and fungal followed by phosphoric acid pretreatments have improved the digestibility of OPEFB's cellulose by 4, 6.3, and 7.4 folds, respectively. PMID:23247371

  20. Nanocellulose prepared by acid hydrolysis of isolated cellulose from sugarcane bagasse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulandari, W. T.; Rochliadi, A.; Arcana, I. M.

    2016-02-01

    Cellulose in nanometer range or called by nano-cellulose has attracted much attention from researchers because of its unique properties. Nanocellulose can be obtained by acid hydrolysis of cellulose. The cellulose used in this study was isolated from sugarcane bagasse, and then it was hydrolyzed by 50% sulfuric acid at 40 °C for 10 minutes. Nanocellulose has been characterized by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), Particle Size Analyzer (PSA), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Analysis of FTIR showed that there were not a new bond which formed during the hydrolysis process. Based on the TEM analysis, nano-cellulose has a spherical morphology with an average diameter of 111 nm and a maximum distribution of 95.9 nm determined by PSA. The XRD analysis showed that the crystallinity degree of nano-cellulose was higher than cellulose in the amount of 76.01%.

  1. Effects of crystallinity on dilute acid hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulose ball-milling study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haibo; Kwak, Ja Hun; Wang, Yong; Franz, James A.; White, John M.; Holladay, Johnathan E.

    2005-12-23

    The dilute acid (0.05 M H2SO4) hydrolysis at 175°C of samples comprising varying fractions of crystalline (α-form) and amorphous cellulose was studied. The amorphous content, based on XRD and NMR, and then the product (glucose) yield, based on HPLC, increased by as much as a factor of three upon ball milling. These results are interpreted in terms of a model involving mechanical disruption of crystallinity by breaking hydrogen bonds in α-cellulose, opening up the structure and making more β-1,4 glycosidic bonds readily accessible to the dilute acid. In parallel with hydrolysis to form liquid phase products, there are reactions of amorphous cellulose that form solid degradation products.

  2. Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of mild alkali pre-treated rice straw at high-solid loadings using in-house cellulases in a bench scale system.

    PubMed

    Narra, Madhuri; Balasubramanian, Velmurugan; James, Jisha P

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, scale-up systems for cellulase production and enzymatic hydrolysis of pre-treated rice straw at high-solid loadings were designed, fabricated and tested in the laboratory. Cellulase production was carried out using tray fermentation at 45 °C by Aspergillus terreus in a temperature-controlled humidity chamber. Enzymatic hydrolysis studies were performed in a horizontal rotary drum reactor at 50 °C with 25 % (w/v) solid loading and 9 FPU g(-1) substrate enzyme load using in-house as well commercial cellulases. Highly concentrated fermentable sugars up to 20 % were obtained at 40 h with an increased saccharification efficiency of 76 % compared to laboratory findings (69.2 %). These findings demonstrate that we developed a simple and less energy intensive bench scale system for efficient high-solid saccharification. External supplementation of commercial β-glucosidase and hemicellulase ensured better hydrolysis and further increased the saccharification efficiency by 14.5 and 20 %, respectively. An attempt was also made to recover cellulolytic enzymes using ultrafiltration module and nearly 79-84 % of the cellulases and more than 90 % of the sugars were recovered from the saccharification mixture. PMID:26941245

  3. Hydrolysis of oxaliplatin-evaluation of the acid dissociation constant for the oxalato monodentate complex.

    PubMed

    Jerremalm, Elin; Eksborg, Staffan; Ehrsson, Hans

    2003-02-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis of the platinum anticancer drug oxaliplatin gives the oxalato monodentate complex and the dihydrated oxaliplatin complex in two consecutive steps. The acid dissociation constant for the oxalato monodentate intermediate was determined by a kinetic approach. The pK(a) value was estimated as 7.23. The monodentate intermediate is assumed to rapidly react with endogenous compounds, resulting in a continuous conversion of oxaliplatin via the monodentate form. PMID:12532393

  4. Inactivating effects of lignin-derived compounds released during lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment on the endo-glucanase catalyzed hydrolysis of carboxymethylcellulose: A study in continuous stirred ultrafiltration-membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Cantarella, Maria; Mucciante, Claudia; Cantarella, Laura

    2014-03-01

    This study focusses on the reversible/irreversible damage that selected phenolic compounds, released during steam-explosion pretreatment, mandatory for cellulose accessibility, causes on both stability and activity of a commercial cellulase (half-life=173h) during carboxymethyl-cellulose hydrolysis. Long-term experiments performed in continuous stirred UF-membrane bioreactors, operating at steady-state regime, in controlled operational conditions, allowed evaluating the inactivation-constant in the phenol presence (kd1) and after its removal (kd2) from the reactor feed. p-Hydroxybenzoic acid (1 and 2g L(-1)) are the extreme limits in the inactivating effect with enzyme half-lives 99.02 and 14.15h, respectively. The inactivation reversibility was assessed for vanillic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, syringaldehyde, p-coumaric acid, being kd1>kd2. p-Hydroxybenzaldehyde and protocatechuic acid irreversibly affected cellulase stability increasing its inactivation with kd2>kd1. p-Hydroxybenzaldehyde, 1g L(-1), syringaldehyde, and vanillin, at 2gL(-1), had similar kd1÷kd2. PMID:24486937

  5. A study of concentrated acid hydrolysis conversion of lignocellulosic materials to sugars using a co-rotating twin-screw reactor extruder and plug flow reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, William Scott

    Concerns about the ability of petroleum to continue supplying ever increasing global energy demands, at a price capable of generating continued economic growth, have spurred innovative research in the field of alternative energy. One alternative energy option that has the ability to provide long-term sustainable energy supplies for the global energy market is the conversion of lignocellulosic materials, via acid hydrolysis, to fermentable sugars for the production of fuel grade ethanol. This research demonstrates the ability of a co-rotating twin-screw reactor extruder and plug flow reactor to continuously convert lignocellulosic materials to fermentable sugars using high temperature concentrated acid hydrolysis. In addition to demonstrating continuous operation of the two-stage concentrated acid hydrolysis system, a number of design of experiments were conducted to model the twin-screw performance and maximize its ability to effectively solubilize lignocellulosic feedstocks in the high shear, elevated temperature, concentrated acid environment. These studies produced a base case twin-screw operating condition used to generate a standard extrudate composition for an extensive high temperature acid hydrolysis batch reactor kinetic modeling study. In this study a number of nonlinear and linear regression analyses were undertaken so that the concentration of less resistant cellulose, or the amount of solublilized extrudate cellulose, resistant cellulose, or non-solubilized extrudate cellulose, glucose, and decomposition products could be obtained as a function of time, temperature, and acid concentration. This study demonstrated that the theoretical cellulose conversion of 51% was limited by the amount of solubilized polysaccharides that could be produced in the twin-screw pretreatment. Further experimentation, showing twin-screw pretreatment lignocellulosic versatility, produced nearly identical results as the southern yellow pine sawdust experiments that were

  6. Neutral and acidic hydrolysis reactions of the third generation anticancer drug oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Maria Fatima A; Pavelka, Mateij; Alberto, Marta E; Russo, Nino

    2009-01-22

    The hydrolysis of oxaliplatin, a third generation anticancer drug, is expected to play an important role in the activation of this compound before it reaches DNA. The first and second hydrolysis corresponding to the addition of the first water molecule concomitant with the ring-opening, followed by addition of a second water and loss of the monodentate oxalato ligand, respectively, were studied combining density functional theory (DFT) with the conductor-like dielectric continuum model (CPCM) approach. The reaction was studied in neutral and acidic conditions, and all stationary points have been identified. The computed potential energy surfaces show that, for the neutral hydrolysis, the ring-opening reaction is the rate-limiting process, with an activation barrier of about 28 kcal/mol. For the acid degradation in water, according to experimental data, the reaction is expected to proceed in a faster biphasic process, and the rate-limiting process is the ligand detachment that occurs with a barriers of about 22 kcal/mol. According to the calculated results, we expect that the reaction is favored in acidic conditions and that the monoaquated complex should be the species reacting with DNA. PMID:19143575

  7. Hydrolysis of Indole-3-Acetic Acid Esters Exposed to Mild Alkaline Conditions 1

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, Bruce G.; Maher, Barbara R.; Cohen, Jerry D.

    1989-01-01

    Ester conjugates of indole-3-acetic acid are hydrolyzed easily in basic solutions; however, quantitative data have not been available on the relationship between pH and rate of hydrolysis of the known ester conjugates. The use of basic conditions during extraction or purification of IAA by several laboratories suggested that a more systematic analysis of this process was needed. In this report we present data indicating: (a) that measurable hydrolysis of IAA-glucose (from standard solutions) and IAA-esters (from maize kernel extracts) occurs with only a few hours of treatment at pH 9 or above; (b) that the lability of some ester conjugates is even greater than that of IAA-glucose; and (c) that ester hydrolysis of standard compounds, IAA-glucose and IAA-p-nitrophenol, occurs in the `three phase extraction system' proposed by Liu and Tillberg ([1983] Physiol Plant 57: 441-447). These data indicate that the potential for problems with inadvertent hydrolysis of ester conjugates of IAA exists even at moderate pH values and in the multiphase system where exposure to basic conditions was thought to be limited. PMID:16667049

  8. Rapid Online Non-Enzymatic Protein Digestion Combining Microwave Heating Acid Hydrolysis and Electrochemical Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Basile, Franco; Hauser, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    We report an online non-enzymatic method for site-specific digestion of proteins to yield peptides that are well suited for collision induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The method combines online microwave heating acid hydrolysis at aspartic acid and online electrochemical oxidation at tryptophan and tyrosine. The combined microwave/electrochemical (microwave/echem) digestion is reproducible and produces peptides with an average sequence length of 10 amino acids. This peptide length is similar to the average peptide length of 9 amino acids obtained by digestion of proteins with the enzyme trypsin. As a result, the peptides produced by this novel non-enzymatic digestion method, when analyzed by ESI-MS, produce protonated molecules with mostly +1 and +2 charge states. The combination of these two non-enzymatic methods overcomes shortcomings with each individual method in that: i) peptides generated by the microwave-hydrolysis method have an average amino acid length of 16 amino acids, and ii) the inability of the electrochemical-cleavage method to reproducibly digest proteins with molecular masses above 4 kDa. Preliminary results are presented on the application and utility of this rapid online digestion (total of 6 min digestion time) on a series of standard peptides and proteins as well as an E. coli protein extract. PMID:21138252

  9. A preliminary study of the hydrolysis of hydroxamic acid complexants in the presence of oxidising metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrieux, Fabrice P. L.; Boxall, Colin; May, Iain; Taylor, Robin J.

    2010-03-01

    Simple hydroxamic acids (XHAs) are salt free, organic compounds with affinities for cations such as Np4+, Pu4+ and Fe3+. As such they have been identified as suitable reagents for the separation of either Pu and/or Np from U in modified or single cycle Purex based solvent extraction processes designed to meet the emerging requirements of Advanced Fuel Cycles. Acid catalyzed hydrolysis of free XHAs is well known and may impact negatively on reprocessing applications. The hydrolysis of metal-bound XHAs within metal ion-XHA complexes is less understood. Using a model derived for the study of hydroxamic acid hydrolysis in the presence of non-oxidising metal ions (Np (IV) and Fe(III)), we review data pertaining to the hydrolysis of hydroxamic acids in the presence of the oxidising Pu4+ ion, under conditions where the influence of the redox processes may potentially be neglected.

  10. Evaluation of ultrasonic, acid, thermo-alkaline and enzymatic pre-treatments on anaerobic digestion of Ulva rigida for biogas production.

    PubMed

    Karray, Raida; Hamza, Manel; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Pre-treatment of macroalgae has received considerable research globally due to its influence on the technical, economic and environmental sustainability of algae biogas production. Some of the most promising pre-treatment methods require the application of chemicals, enzymatic, and mechanical. This study focused on these pre-treatments of Ulva rigida for biogas production. The evaluation of different pre-treatment in terms of reducing sugar yields demonstrates that 3.62, 2.88, 2.53 and 7.3g/L of reducing sugar was obtained in acid catalysis, thermoalkaline, ultrasonication and enzymatic pre-treatment, respectively. However in crude macroalgae only 0.6g/L of reducing sugar was given. After anaerobic digestion, the enzymatic hydrolysis was demonstrated the best biogas yield than other pre-treatment which reached 626.5mL/gCODint with 62.65% of biodegradability. The best demonstrated method which uses crude broth of Aspergillus niger showed an effective and environmentally friendly strategy for enhancing the biogas production yields after the anaerobic digestion. PMID:25855526

  11. Process for enzymatic hydrolysis of fatty acid triglycerides with oat caryopses

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, E.G.; Lee, I.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes the process for enzymatic hydrolysis of fatty acid triglycerides to obtain free fatty acids and glycerol. It comprises: increasing the water content of dehulled whole oat caryopses to a total water content of 17 to 44% the thus moistened caryopses having active oat lipase associated with the outer surfaces thereof; contacting the moistened whole caryopses with a liquid medium, continuing the contacting until at least 20% by volume of the triglyceride reactant has been hydrolyzed to free fatty acids and glycerol, most of the free fatty acids dissolving in the oil phase external to the caryopses and most of the glycerol being absorbed into the water within the caryopses; and separating the glycerol-containing caryopses from the fatty acid-containing oil phase.

  12. Morphological characteristics, oxidative stability and enzymic hydrolysis of amylose-fatty acid complexes.

    PubMed

    Marinopoulou, Anna; Papastergiadis, Efthimios; Raphaelides, Stylianos N; Kontominas, Michael G

    2016-05-01

    Complexes of amylose with fatty acids varying in carbon chain length and degree of unsaturation were prepared at 30, 50 or 70°C by dissolving amylose in 0.1N KOH and mixing with fatty acid potassium soap solution. The complexes were obtained in solid form as precipitates after neutralization. SEM microscopy revealed that the morphology of the complexes was that of ordered lamellae separated from amorphous regions whereas confocal laser scanning microscopy showed images of the topography of the guest molecules in the complex matrix. FTIR spectroscopy revealed that the absorption peak attributed to carbonyl group of free fatty acid was shifted when the fatty acid was in the form of amylose complex. Thermo-gravimetry showed that the unsaturated fatty acids were effectively protected from oxidation when they were complexed with amylose whereas enzymic hydrolysis experiments showed that the guest molecules were quantitatively released from the amylose complexes. PMID:26877002

  13. A combination of two lactic acid bacteria improves the hydrolysis of gliadin during wheat dough fermentation.

    PubMed

    Gerez, Carla Luciana; Dallagnol, Andrea; Rollán, Graciela; Font de Valdez, Graciela

    2012-12-01

    The evaluation of gliadin hydrolysis during dough fermentation by using two lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus plantarum CRL 775 and Pediococcus pentosaceus CRL 792, as pooled cell suspension (LAB) or cell free extract (CFE) was undertaken. The CFE pool produced a greater (121%) increase in amino acid concentration than the LAB pool (70-80%). These results were correlated with the decrease (76,100 and 64,300 ppm) in the gliadin concentration of doughs supplemented with CFE and LAB, respectively, compared to control doughs. The use of LAB peptidases seemed to be a viable technologic alternative to reduce the gliadin concentration in wheat dough without using living bacteria as starter. PMID:22986210

  14. Optimization of dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification of corn stover for efficient ethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising pretreatment technology for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuel ethanol. Corn stover (supplied by a local farmer) used in this study contained 37.0±0.4% cellulose, 31.3±0.6% hemicelluloses, and 17.8±0.2% lignin. Generation of fermentable sugars from ...

  15. Cellulosic bioethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) using hydrogen peroxide-acetic acid (HPAC) pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Song, Younho; Wi, Seung Gon; Kim, Ho Myeong; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2016-08-01

    Jerusalem artichoke (JA) is recognized as a suitable candidate biomass crop for bioethanol production because it has a rapid growth rate and high biomass productivity. In this study, hydrogen peroxide-acetic acid (HPAC) pretreatment was used to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis and to effectively remove the lignin of JA. With optimized enzyme doses, synergy was observed from the combination of three different enzymes (RUT-C30, pectinase, and xylanase) which provided a conversion rate was approximately 30% higher than the rate with from treatment with RUT-C30 alone. Fermentation of the JA hydrolyzates by Saccharomyces cerevisiae produced a fermentation yield of approximately 84%. Therefore, Jerusalem artichoke has potential as a bioenergy crop for bioethanol production. PMID:27115748

  16. Comparison of different mechanical refining technologies on the enzymatic digestibility of low severity acid pretreated corn stover.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaowen; Kuhn, Erik; Wang, Wei; Park, Sunkyu; Flanegan, Keith; Trass, Olev; Tenlep, Lisette; Tao, Ling; Tucker, Melvin

    2013-11-01

    The effect of mechanical refining on the enzymatic digestibility of pretreated corn stover (PCS) was investigated. Low severity, dilute sulfuric acid PCS was subjected to mechanical refining using a bench-scale food processor blender, a PFI mill, a 12-inch laboratory disk refiner, and a 25 mm co-rotating twin-screw extruder. Glucose yields from enzymatic hydrolysis were improved by 10-15% after blending and disk refining, while PFI refining and twin-screw extrusion showed a glucose yield improvement of 16-20%. A pilot scale refining test using a Szego mill was performed and showed approximately 10% improvements in biomass digestibility. This suggests the possibility to scale up a mechanical refining technique to obtain similar enzymatic digestibility glucose yield enhancement as achieved by PFI milling and extrusion technologies. Proposed mechanisms of each mechanical refining technology are presented and reasons for improvements in biomass digestibility are discussed in this paper. PMID:24001565

  17. Mechanism of Orlistat Hydrolysis by the Thioesterase of Human Fatty Acid Synthase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN), the sole protein capable of de novo synthesis of free fatty acids, is overexpressed in a wide variety of human cancers and is associated with poor prognosis and aggressiveness of these cancers. Orlistat, an FDA-approved drug for obesity treatment that inhibits pancreatic lipases in the GI tract, also inhibits the thioesterase (TE) of human FASN. The cocrystal structure of TE with orlistat shows a pseudo TE dimer containing two different forms of orlistat in the active site, an intermediate that is covalently bound to a serine residue (Ser2308) and a hydrolyzed and inactivated product. In this study, we attempted to understand the mechanism of TE-catalyzed orlistat hydrolysis by examining the role of the hexyl tail of the covalently bound orlistat in water activation for hydrolysis using molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the hexyl tail of the covalently bound orlistat undergoes a conformational transition, which is accompanied by destabilization of a hydrogen bond between a hydroxyl moiety of orlistat and the catalytic His2481 of TE that in turn leads to an increased hydrogen bonding between water molecules and His2481 and increased chance for water activation to hydrolyze the covalent bond between orlistat and Ser2308. Thus, the conformation of the hexyl tail of orlistat plays an important role in orlistat hydrolysis. Strategies that stabilize the hexyl tail may lead to the design of more potent irreversible inhibitors that target FASN and block TE activity with greater endurance. PMID:25309810

  18. Thermal and thermo-chemical pre-treatment of four waste residues and the effect on acetic acid production and methane synthesis.

    PubMed

    Strong, P J; Gapes, D J

    2012-09-01

    In this study four diverse solid waste substrates (coal, Kraft pulp solids, chicken feathers and chicken processing waste) were thermally pre-treated (70, 140 and 200 °C), under an inert (nitrogen) or oxidative (oxygen) atmosphere, and then anaerobically digested. Membrane inlet mass spectrometry during the thermal and thermo-chemical reactions was successfully used to establish oxygen and carbon dioxide gas fluxes and product formation (acetic acid). There was significant solids hydrolysis pre-treatment at 200 °C under an oxidative atmosphere, as indicated by a decrease in the volatile suspended solids and an increase in dissolved organic carbon. Greater concentrations of volatile fatty acids were produced under oxidative conditions at higher temperatures. The methane yield more than tripled for feathers after pre-treatment at 140 °C (under both atmospheres), but decreased after oxidative pre-treatment at 200 °C, due to the destruction of available carbon by the thermo-chemical reaction. Methane yield more than doubled for the Kraft pulp solids with the 200 °C pre-treatment under oxidative conditions. This study illustrated the power of wet oxidation for solids destruction and its potential to improve methane yields generated during anaerobic digestion. PMID:22609530

  19. Hydrolysis of sorghum straw using phosphoric acid: evaluation of furfural production.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Manuel; Oliva, Martha; Téllez-Luis, Simón J; Ramírez, José A

    2007-11-01

    Sorghum straw is a waste that has been studied scarcely. The main application is its use as raw material for xylose production. Xylose is a hemicellulosic sugar mainly used for its bioconversion toward xylitol. An alternative use could be its conversion toward furfural. The objective of this work was to study the furfural production by hydrolysis of sorghum straw with phosphoric acid at 134 degrees C. Several concentrations of H(3)PO(4) in the range 2-6% and reaction time (range 0-300 min) were evaluated. Kinetic parameters of mathematical models for predicting the concentration of xylose, glucose, arabinose, acetic acid and furfural in the hydrolysates were found. Optimal conditions for furfural production by acid hydrolysis were 6% H(3)PO(4) at 134 degrees C for 300 min, which yielded a solution with 13.7 g furfural/L, 4.0 g xylose/L, 2.9 g glucose/L, 1.1g arabinose/L and 1.2g acetic acid/L. The furfural yield of the process was 0.1336 g furfural/g initial dry matter was obtained. The results confirmed that sorghum straw can be used for furfural production when it is hydrolyzed using phosphoric acid. PMID:17145181

  20. Combined pretreatment using alkaline hydrothermal and ball milling to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis of oil palm mesocarp fiber.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Mohd Rafein; Hirata, Satoshi; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2014-10-01

    Hydrothermal pretreatment of oil palm mesocarp fiber was conducted in tube reactor at treatment severity ranges of log Ro = 3.66-4.83 and partial removal of hemicellulose with migration of lignin was obtained. Concerning maximal recovery of glucose and xylose, 1.5% NaOH was impregnated in the system and subsequent ball milling treatment was employed to improve the conversion yield. The effects of combined hydrothermal and ball milling pretreatments were evaluated by chemical composition changes by using FT-IR, WAXD and morphological alterations by SEM. The successful of pretreatments were assessed by the degree of enzymatic digestibility of treated samples. The highest xylose and glucose yields obtained were 63.2% and 97.3% respectively at cellulase loadings of 10 FPU/g-substrate which is the highest conversion from OPMF ever reported. PMID:25058299

  1. Alcohol fermentation of sweet potato. 1. Acid hydrolysis and factors involved

    SciTech Connect

    Azhar, A.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1981-04-01

    Factors affecting acid hydrolysis of sweet potato powder (SPP) to fermentable sugars were examined. These include HCl concentration, temperature, time, and levels of SPP. Maximum reducing sugar, reported as dextrose equivalent (DE), was detected after 24 min hydrolysis (1% SPP) in 0.034N HCl heated at 154 degrees celcius. These samples also had 3.43% hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) based on dry weight. A high level of HMF (9.2%) was detected in 1% SPP heated at 154 degrees C in 0.10N HCl for 18 min. The lowest concentration of HMF formed (1.8%), at maximal DE of 61%, was established in samples containing 5% SPP and heated at 154 degrees C in 0.034N HCl for 48 min. Aqueous extracts of uncured SPP, examined by HPLC, contained glucose, fructose and sucrose, butdegreaded SPP had only glucose and fructose. Products of degraded SPP, under appropriate conditions, could be used for alcohol fermentation. (Refs. 18).

  2. Characterisation of the products from pyrolysis of residues after acid hydrolysis of Miscanthus.

    PubMed

    Melligan, F; Dussan, K; Auccaise, R; Novotny, E H; Leahy, J J; Hayes, M H B; Kwapinski, W

    2012-03-01

    Platform chemicals such as furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural are major products formed during the acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass in second generation biorefining processes. Solid hydrolysis residues (HR) can amount to 50 wt.% of the starting biomass materials. Pyrolysis of the HRs gives rise to biochar, bio-liquids, and gases. Time and temperature were variables during the pyrolysis of HRs in a fixed bed tubular reactor, and both parameters have major influences on the amounts and properties of the products. Biochar, with potential for carbon sequestration and soil conditioning, composed about half of the HR pyrolysis product. The amounts (11-20 wt.%) and compositions (up to 77% of phenols in organic fraction) of the bio-liquids formed suggest that these have little value as fuels, but could be sources of phenols, and the gas can have application as a fuel. PMID:22281143

  3. Value of Coproduction of Ethanol and Furfural from Acid Hydrolysis Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, S.; Calnon, M.; Feinberg, D.; Power, A.; Weiss, L.

    1984-05-01

    In the acid hydrolysis of a cellulosic feedstock (wood, wood wastes, or crop residues), up to 3.65 lb of furfural may be coproduced with each gallon of ethanol for only the cost of recovering and purifying it. Each plant producing 50 x 106 gal/yr of ethanol would produce an amount of by-product furfural equal to the total current domestic production. Thus, the need arises for investigation into potentially suitable processes for deriving profitable end products from furfural and thus expanding the market. The objectives of this study were to determine the economic potential of five selected, large volume derivatives of furfural that could displace hydrocarbon-based chemicals, and the consequent value of furfural as a by-product to the cellulose hydrolysis process of ethanol production.

  4. Different roles of protein kinase C-beta and -delta in arachidonic acid cascade, superoxide formation and phosphoinositide hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Duyster, J; Schwende, H; Fitzke, E; Hidaka, H; Dieter, P

    1993-01-01

    In contrast with protein kinase C (PKC)-beta, PKC-delta is exclusively detectable in the membrane fraction of liver macrophages. After long-term treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) PKC-beta is depleted faster (within 3 h) than PKC-delta (> 7h). Simultaneously, pretreatment with PMA for 3 h inhibits the PMA- and zymosan-induced generation of superoxide and the PMA-induced formation of prostaglandin (PG) E2, whereas a preincubation of more than 7 h is required to affect the zymosan-induced release of PGE2 and inositol phosphates. These results support an involvement of PKC-beta in the PMA-induced activation of the arachidonic acid cascade and in superoxide formation and imply an involvement of PKC-delta in zymosan-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis and PGE2 formation. Two phorbol ester derivates, sapintoxin A (SAPA) and 12-deoxyphorbol 13-phenylacetate 20-acetate (DOPPA), which have been previously reported to activate preferentially PLC-beta but not PKC-delta in vitro [Ryves, Evans, Olivier, Parker and Evans (1992) FEBS Lett. 288, 5-9], induce the formation of PGE2 and superoxide, down-regulate PKC-delta and potentiate inositol phosphate formation in parallel SAPA, but not DOPPA, down-regulates PKC-beta and inhibits the PMA-induced formation of eicosanoids and superoxide. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:8389125

  5. Effects of pretreatment on the microbial community and l-lactic acid production in vinasse fermentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianguo; Wang, Qunhui; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Xiaohong; Ma, Hongzhi; Tushiro, Yukihiro

    2012-12-15

    Microwave-alkali and steam-alkali coupled pretreatments were carried out to improve the yield and optical purity of l-lactic acid produced using vinasse fermentation. Lactobacillus casei was inoculated into the system to initiate fermentation. Polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the microbial community during fermentation with and without the pretreatments. The original bacterial genus in vinasse was essentially inactivated, whereas L. casei became the dominant genus after 24h of fermentation. The system subjected to microwave-alkali coupled pretreatment released more reducing sugars and produced more lactic acid (up to 30.32g/L), which is twice that without pretreatment. In addition, the proportion of lactic acid in the organic acids also increased. The optical purity of the l-lactic acid produced under the microwave-alkali coupled pretreatment reached 91%, which is 2% higher than that under the steam-alkali coupled pretreatment and 7% higher than that under the control conditions. Therefore, the microwave-alkali coupled pretreatment is an effective method for the highly efficient bioconversion of vinasse into bioenergy. PMID:22959862

  6. A two-stage pretreatment process using dilute hydrochloric acid followed by Fenton oxidation to improve sugar recovery from corn stover.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenzhi; Liu, Qiyu; Ma, Qiaozhi; Zhang, Tingwei; Ma, Longlong; Jameel, Hasan; Chang, Hou-Min

    2016-11-01

    A two-stage pretreatment process is proposed in this research in order to improve sugar recovery from corn stover. In the proposed process, corn stover is hydrolyzed by dilute hydrochloric acid to recover xylose, which is followed by a Fenton reagent oxidation to remove lignin. 0.7wt% dilute hydrochloric acid is applied in the first stage pretreatment at 120°C for 40min, resulting in 81.0% xylose removal. Fenton reagent oxidation (1g/L FeSO4·7H2O and 30g/L H2O2) is performed at room temperature (about 20°C) for 12 has a second stage which resulted in 32.9% lignin removal. The glucose yield in the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis was 71.3% with a very low cellulase dosage (3FPU/g). This two-stage pretreatment is effective due to the hydrolysis of hemicelluloses in the first stage and the removal of lignin in the second stage, resulting in a very high sugar recovery with a low enzyme loading. PMID:27543312

  7. Efficacy of acidic pretreatment for the saccharification and fermentation of alginate from brown macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Damao; Yun, Eun Ju; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Do Hyoung; Seo, Nari; An, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jae-Han; Cheong, Nam Yong; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2016-06-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of acidic pretreatment in increasing the enzymatic digestibility of alginate from brown macroalgae. Pretreatment with 1 % (w/v) sulfuric acid at 120 °C for 30 min produced oligosaccharides, mannuronic acid, and guluronic acid. Enzymatic saccharification of pretreated alginate by alginate lyases produced 52.2 % of the theoretical maximal sugar yield, which was only 7.5 % higher than the sugar yield obtained with unpretreated alginate. Mass spectrometric analyses of products of the two reactions revealed that acidic pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification produced saturated monomers (i.e., mannuronic and guluronic acid) with saturated oligosaccharides and unsaturated monomers (i.e., 4-deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid; DEH), respectively. While DEH is further metabolized by microorganisms, mannuronic acid and guluronic acid are not metabolizable. Because of the poor efficacy in increasing enzymatic digestibility and owing to the formation of non-fermentable saturated monomers, acidic pretreatment cannot be recommended for enzymatic saccharification and fermentation of alginate. PMID:26923145

  8. Improving ethanol production from alfalfa stems via ambient-temperature acid pretreatment and washing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengfei; Weimer, Paul J; Hatfield, Ronald D; Runge, Troy M; Digman, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The concept of co-production of liquid fuel (ethanol) along with animal feed on farm was proposed, and the strategy of using ambient-temperature acid pretreatment, ensiling and washing to improve ethanol production from alfalfa stems was investigated. Alfalfa stems were separated and pretreated with sulfuric acid at ambient-temperature after harvest, and following ensiling, after which the ensiled stems were subjected to simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) for ethanol production. Ethanol yield was improved by ambient-temperature sulfuric acid pretreatment before ensiling, and by washing before SSF. It was theorized that the acid pretreatment at ambient temperature partially degraded hemicellulose, and altered cell wall structure, resulted in improved cellulose accessibility, whereas washing removed soluble ash in substrates which could inhibit the SSF. The pH of stored alfalfa stems can be used to predict the ethanol yield, with a correlation coefficient of +0.83 for washed alfalfa stems. PMID:25151072

  9. Excellent anti-corrosive pretreatment layer on iron substrate based on three-dimensional porous phytic acid/silane hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Lu, Ke; Xu, Lei; Xu, Hua; Lu, Haifeng; Gao, Feng; Hou, Shifeng; Ma, Houyi

    2016-01-01

    A novel, highly effective and environmentally friendly film-forming material, phytic acid (PA)/silane (denoted as PAS) hybrid with a three-dimensional (3D) network structure, was prepared through a condensation reaction of PA with methyltrihydroxysilane generated from the hydrolysis of methyltriethoxysilane (MTES). Two kinds of PAS-based pretreatment layers, namely NaBrO3-free and NaBrO3-doped PAS layers, were fabricated on iron substrates using the dip-coating method. SEM and AFM observations showed that the as-fabricated PAS-based layers possessed a 3D porous microstructure at the nanoscale and a rough surface morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopic characterization demonstrated that the above PAS layers bound to the iron surface via the -P-O- bond. Moreover, analyses of steady-state polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) data indicated that the corrosion rates of the iron substrates decreased considerably in the presence of the two PAS-based pretreatment layers. In particular, the NaBrO3-dosed PAS layer displayed the better corrosion resistance ability as well as maintaining the original microstructure and surface morphology. The PAS-based pretreatment layers are expected to act as substitutes for chromate and phosphate conversion layers and will find widespread application in the surface pretreatment of iron and steel materials due to the advantages of being environmentally friendly, the rapid film-forming process, and, especially, the nanoporous microstructure and rough surface morphology.A novel, highly effective and environmentally friendly film-forming material, phytic acid (PA)/silane (denoted as PAS) hybrid with a three-dimensional (3D) network structure, was prepared through a condensation reaction of PA with methyltrihydroxysilane generated from the hydrolysis of methyltriethoxysilane (MTES). Two kinds of PAS-based pretreatment layers, namely Na

  10. The mechanism of hydrothermal hydrolysis for glycyrrhizic acid into glycyrrhetinic acid and glycyrrhetinic acid 3-O-mono-β-D-glucuronide in subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rui; Li, Nan; Xu, Honggao; Xiang, Jun; Wang, Lei; Gao, Yanxiang

    2016-01-01

    To improve the bioactivity and sweetness properties of glycyrrhizic acid (GL), the hydrothermal hydrolysis of GL into glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) and glycyrrhetinic acid 3-O-mono-β-D-glucuronide (GAMG) in subcritical water was investigated. The effects of temperature, time and their interaction on the conversion ratios were analyzed and the reactions were elaborated with kinetics and thermodynamics. The results showed that GL hydrothermal hydrolysis was significantly (P < 0.05) affected by reaction time and temperature, as well as their interaction, and could be fitted into first-order kinetics. The thermodynamic analysis indicated that the hydrolysis of GL was endergonic and non-spontaneous. The hydrolytic pathways were composed of complex consecutive and parallel reactions. It was concluded that subcritical water may be a potential medium for producing GAMG and GA. PMID:26213056

  11. Enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis and Klason lignin removal of corn stover using photocatalyst-assisted ammonia pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Chang Geun; Wang, Chao; Yu, Chenxu; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2013-03-01

    Photocatalyst-assisted ammonia pretreatment was explored to improve lignin removal of the lignocellulosic biomass for effective sugar conversion. Corn stover was treated with 5.0-12.5 wt.% ammonium hydroxide, two different photocatalysts (TiO(2) and ZnO) in the presence of molecular oxygen in a batch reactor at 60 °C. Various solid-to-liquid ratios (1:20-1:50) were also tested. Ammonia pretreatment assisted by TiO(2)-catalyzed photo-degradation removed 70 % of Klason lignin under the optimum condition (12.5 % ammonium hydroxide, 60 °C, 24 h, solid/liquid=1:20, photocatalyst/biomass=1:10 with oxygen atmosphere). The enzymatic digestibilities of pretreated corn stover were 85 % for glucan and 75 % for xylan with NH(3)-TiO(2)-treated solid and 82 % for glucan and 77 % for xylan with NH(3)-ZnO-treated solid with 15 filter paper units/g-glucan of cellulase and 30 cellobiase units/g-glucan of β-glucosidase, a 2-13 % improvement over ammonia pretreatment alone. PMID:23329141

  12. Enzyme characterization for hydrolysis of AFEX and liquid hot-water pretreated distillers' grains and their conversion to ethanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), a co-product of corn ethanol production, was investigated as a feedstock for additional ethanol production. DDGS was pretreated with liquid hot water (LHW) and ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) processes. Cellulose was readily converted to glucose from bo...

  13. Phosphine and thiophene cyclopalladated complexes: hydrolysis reactions in strong acidic media.

    PubMed

    García, Begoña; Hoyuelos, Francisco J; Ibeas, Saturnino; Muñoz, María S; Navarro, Ana M; Peñacoba, Indalecio A; Leal, José M

    2010-12-01

    The mechanisms for the hydrolysis of organopalladium complexes [Pd(CNN)R]BF(4) (R=P(OPh)(3), PPh(3), and SC(4)H(8)) were investigated at 25 °C by using UV/Vis absorbance measurements in 10 % v/v ethanol/water mixtures containing different sulphuric acid concentrations in the 1.3-11.7 M range. In all cases, a biphasic behavior was observed with rate constants k(1obs), which corresponds to the initial step of the hydrolysis reaction, and k(2obs), where k(1obs)>k(2obs). The plots of k(1obs) and k(2obs) versus sulfuric acid concentration suggest a change in the reaction mechanism. The change with respect to the k(1obs) value corresponds to 35 %, 2 %, and 99 % of the protonated complexes for R=PPh(3), P(OPh)(3), and SC(4)H(8), respectively. Regarding k(2obs), the change occurred in all cases at about 6.5 M H(2)SO(4) and matched up with the results reported for the hydrolysis of the 2-acetylpyridinephenylhydrazone (CNN) ligand. By using the excess acidity method, the mechanisms were elucidated by carefully looking at the variation of k(i),(obs) (i=1,2) versus cH+. The rate-determining constants, k(0,A-1), k(0,A-2), and k(0,A-SE2) were evaluated in all cases. The R=P(OPh)(3) complex was most reactive due to its π-acid character, which favors the rupture of the trans nitrogen-palladium bond in the A-2 mechanism and also that of the pyridine nitrogen-palladium bond in the A-1 mechanism. The organometallic bond exerts no effect on the relative basicity of the complexes, which are strongly reliant on the substituent. PMID:21125574

  14. Elucidating the role of ferrous ion cocatalyst in enhancing dilute acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recently developed iron cocatalyst enhancement of dilute acid pretreatment of biomass is a promising approach for enhancing sugar release from recalcitrant lignocellulosic biomass. However, very little is known about the underlying mechanisms of this enhancement. In the current study, our aim was to identify several essential factors that contribute to ferrous ion-enhanced efficiency during dilute acid pretreatment of biomass and to initiate the investigation of the mechanisms that result in this enhancement. Results During dilute acid and ferrous ion cocatalyst pretreatments, we observed concomitant increases in solubilized sugars in the hydrolysate and reducing sugars in the (insoluble) biomass residues. We also observed enhancements in sugar release during subsequent enzymatic saccharification of iron cocatalyst-pretreated biomass. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy showed that major peaks representing the C-O-C and C-H bonds in cellulose are significantly attenuated by iron cocatalyst pretreatment. Imaging using Prussian blue staining indicated that Fe2+ ions associate with both cellulose/xylan and lignin in untreated as well as dilute acid/Fe2+ ion-pretreated corn stover samples. Analyses by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed structural details of biomass after dilute acid/Fe2+ ion pretreatment, in which delamination and fibrillation of the cell wall were observed. Conclusions By using this multimodal approach, we have revealed that (1) acid-ferrous ion-assisted pretreatment increases solubilization and enzymatic digestion of both cellulose and xylan to monomers and (2) this pretreatment likely targets multiple chemistries in plant cell wall polymer networks, including those represented by the C-O-C and C-H bonds in cellulose. PMID:22074910

  15. Elucidating the Role of Ferrous Ion Cocatalyst in Enhancing Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H.; Donohoe, B. S.; Vinzant, T. B.; Ciesielski, P. N.; Wang, W.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Zeng, Y.; Johnson, D. K.; Ding, S. Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Tucker, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Recently developed iron cocatalyst enhancement of dilute acid pretreatment of biomass is a promising approach for enhancing sugar release from recalcitrant lignocellulosic biomass. However, very little is known about the underlying mechanisms of this enhancement. In the current study, our aim was to identify several essential factors that contribute to ferrous ion-enhanced efficiency during dilute acid pretreatment of biomass and to initiate the investigation of the mechanisms that result in this enhancement. During dilute acid and ferrous ion cocatalyst pretreatments, we observed concomitant increases in solubilized sugars in the hydrolysate and reducing sugars in the (insoluble) biomass residues. We also observed enhancements in sugar release during subsequent enzymatic saccharification of iron cocatalyst-pretreated biomass. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy showed that major peaks representing the C-O-C and C-H bonds in cellulose are significantly attenuated by iron cocatalyst pretreatment. Imaging using Prussian blue staining indicated that Fe{sup 2+} ions associate with both cellulose/xylan and lignin in untreated as well as dilute acid/Fe{sup 2+} ion-pretreated corn stover samples. Analyses by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed structural details of biomass after dilute acid/Fe{sup 2+} ion pretreatment, in which delamination and fibrillation of the cell wall were observed. By using this multimodal approach, we have revealed that (1) acid-ferrous ion-assisted pretreatment increases solubilization and enzymatic digestion of both cellulose and xylan to monomers and (2) this pretreatment likely targets multiple chemistries in plant cell wall polymer networks, including those represented by the C-O-C and C-H bonds in cellulose.

  16. Heteropoly Acid/Nitrogen Functionalized Onion-like Carbon Hybrid Catalyst for Ester Hydrolysis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Qi, Wei; Guo, Xiaoling; Su, Dangsheng

    2016-02-18

    A novel heteropoly acid (HPA)/nitrogen functionalized onion-like carbon (NOLC) hybrid catalyst was synthesized through supramolecular (electrostatic and hydrogen bond) interactions between the two components. The chemical structure and acid strength of the HPA/NOLC hybrid have been fully characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, IR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, NH3 temperature-programmed desorption and acid-base titration measurements. The proposed method for the fabrication of the HPA/NOLC hybrid catalyst is a universal strategy for different types of HPAs to meet various requirements of acidic or redox catalysis. The hydrophobic environment of NOLC effectively prevents the deactivation of HPA in an aqueous system, and the combination of uniformly dispersed HPA clusters and the synergistic effect between NOLC and HPA significantly promotes its activity in ester hydrolysis reactions, which is higher than that of bare PWA as homogeneous catalyst. The kinetics of the hydrolysis reactions indicate that the aggregation status of the catalyst particles has great influence on the apparent activity. PMID:26606266

  17. Identification of amino acid thiohydantoins directly by thin-layer chromatography and indirectly by gas-liquid chromatography after hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, M; Darbre, A

    1975-01-01

    A method is described for the identification of amino acid thiohydantoins by two-dimensional t.l.c. An indirect method for the determination of amino acid thiohydantoins is described which, after hydrolysis, the corresponding amino acids are determined by g.l.c. PMID:1167153

  18. Excellent anti-corrosive pretreatment layer on iron substrate based on three-dimensional porous phytic acid/silane hybrid.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Lu, Ke; Xu, Lei; Xu, Hua; Lu, Haifeng; Gao, Feng; Hou, Shifeng; Ma, Houyi

    2016-01-21

    A novel, highly effective and environmentally friendly film-forming material, phytic acid (PA)/silane (denoted as PAS) hybrid with a three-dimensional (3D) network structure, was prepared through a condensation reaction of PA with methyltrihydroxysilane generated from the hydrolysis of methyltriethoxysilane (MTES). Two kinds of PAS-based pretreatment layers, namely NaBrO3-free and NaBrO3-doped PAS layers, were fabricated on iron substrates using the dip-coating method. SEM and AFM observations showed that the as-fabricated PAS-based layers possessed a 3D porous microstructure at the nanoscale and a rough surface morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopic characterization demonstrated that the above PAS layers bound to the iron surface via the -P-O- bond. Moreover, analyses of steady-state polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) data indicated that the corrosion rates of the iron substrates decreased considerably in the presence of the two PAS-based pretreatment layers. In particular, the NaBrO3-dosed PAS layer displayed the better corrosion resistance ability as well as maintaining the original microstructure and surface morphology. The PAS-based pretreatment layers are expected to act as substitutes for chromate and phosphate conversion layers and will find widespread application in the surface pretreatment of iron and steel materials due to the advantages of being environmentally friendly, the rapid film-forming process, and, especially, the nanoporous microstructure and rough surface morphology. PMID:26689810

  19. The effect of thermal hydrolysis pretreatment on the anaerobic degradation of nonylphenol and short-chain nonylphenol ethoxylates in digested biosolids.

    PubMed

    McNamara, P J; Wilson, C A; Wogen, M T; Murthy, S N; Novak, J T; Novak, P J

    2012-06-01

    The presence of micropollutants can be a concern for land application of biosolids. Of particular interest are nonylphenol diethoxylate (NP(2)EO), nonylphenol monoethoxylate (NP(1)EO), and nonylphenol (NP), collectively referred to as NPE, which accumulate in anaerobically digested biosolids and are subject to regulation based on the environmental risks associated with them. Because biosolids are a valuable nutrient resource, it is essential that we understand how various treatment processes impact the fate of NPE in biosolids. Thermal hydrolysis (TH) coupled with mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD) is an advanced digestion process that destroys pathogens in biosolids and increases methane yields and volatile solids destruction. We investigated the impact of thermal hydrolysis pretreatment on the subsequent biodegradation of NPE in digested biosolids. Biosolids were treated with TH, anaerobic digestion, and aerobic digestion in laboratory-scale reactors, and NPE were analyzed in the influent and effluent of the digesters. NP(2)EO and NP(1)EO have been observed to degrade to the more estrogenic NP under anaerobic conditions; therefore, changes in the ratio of NP:NPE were of interest. The increase in NP:NPE following MAD was 56%; the average increase of this ratio in four sets of TH-MAD samples, however, was only 24.6 ± 3.1%. In addition, TH experiments performed in pure water verified that, during TH, the high temperature and pressure alone did not directly destroy NPE; TH experiments with NP added to sludge also showed that NP was not destroyed by the high temperature and pressure of TH when in a more complex sludge matrix. The post-aerobic digestion phases removed NPE, regardless of whether TH pretreatment occurred. This research indicates that changes in biosolids processing can have impacts beyond just gas production and solids destruction. PMID:22494493

  20. Modulation of cellulase activity by charged lipid bilayers with different acyl chain properties for efficient hydrolysis of ionic liquid-pretreated cellulose.

    PubMed

    Mihono, Kai; Ohtsu, Takeshi; Ohtani, Mai; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Kamimura, Akio

    2016-10-01

    The stability of cellulase activity in the presence of ionic liquids (ILs) is critical for the enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble cellulose pretreated with ILs. In this work, cellulase was incorporated in the liposomes composed of negatively charged 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) and zwitterionic phosphatidylcholines (PCs) with different length and degree of unsaturation of the acyl chains. The liposomal cellulase-catalyzed reaction was performed at 45°C in the acetate buffer solution (pH 4.8) with 2.0g/L CC31 as cellulosic substrate. The crystallinity of CC31 was reduced by treating with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl) at 120°C for 30min. The liposomal cellulase continuously catalyzed hydrolysis of the pretreated CC31 for 48h producing glucose in the presence of 15wt% [Bmim]Cl. The charged lipid membranes were interactive with [Bmim](+), as elucidated by the [Bmim]Cl-induced alterations in fluorescence polarization of the membrane-embedded 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) molecules. The charged membranes offered the microenvironment where inhibitory effects of [Bmim]Cl on the cellulase activity was relieved. The maximum glucose productivity GP of 10.8 mmol-glucose/(hmol-lipid) was obtained at the reaction time of 48h with the cellulase incorporated in the liposomes ([lipid]=5.0mM) composed of 50mol% POPG and 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosohocholine (DLPC) with relatively short and saturated acyl chains. PMID:27318965

  1. Optimization of the Hydrolysis of Safflower Oil for the Production of Linoleic Acid, Used as Flavor Precursor

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Marya; Husson, Florence; Kermasha, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Commercial lipases, from porcine pancreas (PPL), Candida rugosa (CRL), and Thermomyces lanuginosus (Lipozyme TL IM), were investigated in terms of their efficiency for the hydrolysis of safflower oil (SO) for the liberation of free linoleic acid (LA), used as a flavor precursor. Although PPL, under the optimized conditions, showed a high degree of hydrolysis (91.6%), its low tolerance towards higher substrate concentrations could limit its use for SO hydrolysis. In comparison to the other investigated lipases, Lipozyme TL IM required higher amount of enzyme and an additional 3 h of reaction time to achieve its maximum degree of SO hydrolysis (90.2%). On the basis of the experimental findings, CRL was selected as the most appropriate biocatalyst, with 84.1% degree of hydrolysis. The chromatographic analyses showed that the CRL-hydrolyzed SO is composed mainly of free LA. PMID:26904663

  2. Effect of citric acid concentration and hydrolysis time on physicochemical properties of sweet potato starches.

    PubMed

    Surendra Babu, Ayenampudi; Parimalavalli, Ramanathan; Rudra, Shalini Gaur

    2015-09-01

    Physicochemical properties of citric acid treated sweet potato starches were investigated in the present study. Sweet potato starch was hydrolyzed using citric acid with different concentrations (1 and 5%) and time periods (1 and 11 h) at 45 °C and was denoted as citric acid treated starch (CTS1 to CTS4) based on their experimental conditions. The recovery yield of acid treated starches was above 85%. The CTS4 sample displayed the highest amylose (around 31%) and water holding capacity its melting temperature was 47.66 °C. The digestibility rate was slightly increased for 78.58% for the CTS3 and CTS4. The gel strength of acid modified starches ranged from 0.27 kg to 1.11 kg. RVA results of acid thinned starches confirmed a low viscosity profile. CTS3 starch illustrated lower enthalpy compared to all other modified starches. All starch samples exhibited a shear-thinning behavior. SEM analysis revealed that the extent of visible degradation was increased at higher hydrolysis time and acid concentration. The CTS3 satisfied the criteria required for starch to act as a fat mimetic. Overall results conveyed that the citric acid treatment of sweet potato starch with 5% acid concentration and 11h period was an ideal condition for the preparation of a fat replacer. PMID:26188303

  3. Effect of acid hydrolysis on regenerated kenaf core membrane produced using aqueous alkaline-urea systems.

    PubMed

    Padzil, Farah Nadia Mohammad; Zakaria, Sarani; Chia, Chin Hua; Jaafar, Sharifah Nabihah Syed; Kaco, Hatika; Gan, Sinyee; Ng, Peivun

    2015-06-25

    Bleached kenaf core pulps (BKC) were hydrolyzed in H2SO4 (0.5M) at different time (0min to 90min) at room temperature. After the hydrolysis process, the viscosity average molecular weight (Mŋ) for BKC sample has reduced from 14.5×10(4) to 2.55×10(4). The hydrolyzed BKC was then dissolved in NaOH:urea:water and in LiOH:urea:water mixed solvent at the ratio of 7:12:81 and 4.6:15:80.4, respectively. The increased in hydrolysis time has decreased Mŋ of cellulose leading to easy dissolution process. Higher porosity and transparency with lower crystallinity index (CrI) of regenerated membrane produced can be achieved as the Mŋ reduced. The properties of membrane were observed through FESEM, UV-vis spectrophotometer and XRD. This study has proven that acid hydrolysis has reduced the Mŋ of cellulose, thus, enhanced the properties of regenerated membrane produced with assisted by alkaline/urea system. PMID:25839807

  4. Glycosyl conformational and inductive effects on the acid catalysed hydrolysis of purine nucleosides.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, F; Niv, H

    1977-01-01

    The log kobs vs. pH profiles were determined in the intermediate acidity region for the glycosyl hydrolysis of guanosine and its 8-amino, 8-monomethylamino, 8-dimethylamino and 8-bromo derivatives. The decreased rate of the 8-amino and enhanced rate of the 8-bromo compound compared to guanosine support an A type mechanism: base protonation followed by glycosyl bond cleavage. All three 8-amino guanosines exhibited log kobs - pH profiles clearly showing that both mono and di-base protonated nucleosides undergo hydrolysis. The 700 fold rate acceleration of 8-N(CH3)-guanosine compared to 8-NHCH3-guanosine and the 110 fold rate acceleration of 8-N(CH3)2-adenosine compared to 8-NHCH3-adenosine could be unequivocally attributed to the fixed syn glycosyl conformation of both 8-dimethylamino compounds and relief of steric compression upon hydrolysis in these molecules. The lack of anomerization of all substrates during the course of the reaction supports an A rather than a Schiff-base mechanism. PMID:17100

  5. Housefly larvae hydrolysate: orthogonal optimization of hydrolysis, antioxidant activity, amino acid composition and functional properties

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antioxidant, one of the most important food additives, is widely used in food industry. At present, antioxidant is mostly produced by chemical synthesis, which would accumulate to be pathogenic. Therefore, a great interest has been developed to identify and use natural antioxidants. It was showed that there are a lot of antioxidative peptides in protein hydrolysates, possessing strong capacity of inhibiting peroxidation of macro-biomolecular and scavenging free redicals in vivo. Enzymatic hydrolysis used for preparation of antioxidative peptides is a new hot-spot in the field of natural antioxidants. It reacts under mild conditions, with accurate site-specific degradation, good repeatability and few damages to biological activity of protein. Substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis are usually plants and aqua-animals. Insects are also gaining attention because of their rich protein and resource. Antioxidative peptides are potential to be exploited as new natural antioxidant and functional food. There is a huge potential market in medical and cosmetic field as well. Result Protein hydrolysate with antioxidant activity was prepared from housefly larvae, by a two-step hydrolysis. Through orthogonal optimization of the hydrolysis conditions, the degree of hydrolysis was determined to be approximately 60%. Fractionated hydrolysate at 25 mg/mL, 2.5 mg/mL and 1 mg/mL exhibited approximately 50%, 60% and 50% of scavenging capacity on superoxide radicals, 1, 1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals and hydroxyl radicals, respectively. Hydrolysate did not exhibit substantial ion chelation. Using a linoneic peroxidation system, the inhibition activity of hydrolysate at 20 mg/mL was close to that of 20 μg/mL tertiary butylhydroquinone, suggesting a potential application of hydrolysate in the oil industry as an efficient antioxidant. The lyophilized hydrolysate presented almost 100% solubility at pH 3-pH 9, and maintained nearly 100% activity at pH 5-pH 8 at 0

  6. Effect of mechanical disruption on the effectiveness of three reactors used for dilute acid pretreatment of corn stover Part 1: chemical and physical substrate analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is considerable interest in the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to liquid fuels to provide substitutes for fossil fuels. Pretreatments, conducted to reduce biomass recalcitrance, usually remove at least some of the hemicellulose and/or lignin in cell walls. The hypothesis that led to this research was that reactor type could have a profound effect on the properties of pretreated materials and impact subsequent cellulose hydrolysis. Results Corn stover was dilute-acid pretreated using commercially relevant reactor types (ZipperClave® (ZC), Steam Gun (SG) and Horizontal Screw (HS)) under the same nominal conditions. Samples produced in the SG and HS achieved much higher cellulose digestibilities (88% and 95%, respectively), compared to the ZC sample (68%). Characterization, by chemical, physical, spectroscopic and electron microscopy methods, was used to gain an understanding of the effects causing the digestibility differences. Chemical differences were small; however, particle size differences appeared significant. Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectra indicated larger inter-fibrillar spacing or randomization of cellulose microfibrils in the HS sample. Simons’ staining indicated increased cellulose accessibility for the SG and HS samples. Electron microscopy showed that the SG and HS samples were more porous and fibrillated because of mechanical grinding and explosive depressurization occurring with these two reactors. These structural changes most likely permitted increased cellulose accessibility to enzymes, enhancing saccharification. Conclusions Dilute-acid pretreatment of corn stover using three different reactors under the same nominal conditions gave samples with very different digestibilities, although chemical differences in the pretreated substrates were small. The results of the physical and chemical analyses of the samples indicate that the explosive depressurization and mechanical grinding with these reactors increased

  7. Hydrolysis of Selected Tropical Plant Wastes Catalyzed by a Magnetic Carbonaceous Acid with Microwave.

    PubMed

    Su, Tong-Chao; Fang, Zhen; Zhang, Fan; Luo, Jia; Li, Xing-Kang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, magnetic carbonaceous acids were synthesized by pyrolysis of the homogeneous mixtures of glucose and magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles, and subsequent sulfonation. The synthesis conditions were optimized to obtain a catalyst with both high acid density (0.75 mmol g(-1)) and strong magnetism [magnetic saturation, Ms = 19.5 Am(2) kg(-1)]. The screened catalyst (C-SO3H/Fe3O4) was used to hydrolyze ball-milled cellulose in a microwave reactor with total reducing sugar (TRS) yield of 25.3% under the best conditions at 190 °C for 3.5 h. It was cycled for at least seven times with high catalyst recovery rate (92.8%), acid density (0.63 mmol g(-1)) and magnetism (Ms = 12.9 Am(2) kg(-1)), as well as high TRS yield (20.1%) from the hydrolysis of ball-milled cellulose. The catalyst was further successfully tested for the hydrolysis of tropical biomass with high TRS and glucose yields of 79.8% and 58.3% for bagasse, 47.2% and 35.6% for Jatropha hulls, as well as 54.4% and 35.8% for Plukenetia hulls. PMID:26648414

  8. Hydrolysis of Selected Tropical Plant Wastes Catalyzed by a Magnetic Carbonaceous Acid with Microwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Tong-Chao; Fang, Zhen; Zhang, Fan; Luo, Jia; Li, Xing-Kang

    2015-12-01

    In this study, magnetic carbonaceous acids were synthesized by pyrolysis of the homogeneous mixtures of glucose and magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles, and subsequent sulfonation. The synthesis conditions were optimized to obtain a catalyst with both high acid density (0.75 mmol g-1) and strong magnetism [magnetic saturation, Ms = 19.5 Am2 kg-1]. The screened catalyst (C-SO3H/Fe3O4) was used to hydrolyze ball-milled cellulose in a microwave reactor with total reducing sugar (TRS) yield of 25.3% under the best conditions at 190 °C for 3.5 h. It was cycled for at least seven times with high catalyst recovery rate (92.8%), acid density (0.63 mmol g-1) and magnetism (Ms = 12.9 Am2 kg-1), as well as high TRS yield (20.1%) from the hydrolysis of ball-milled cellulose. The catalyst was further successfully tested for the hydrolysis of tropical biomass with high TRS and glucose yields of 79.8% and 58.3% for bagasse, 47.2% and 35.6% for Jatropha hulls, as well as 54.4% and 35.8% for Plukenetia hulls.

  9. Hydrolysis of Selected Tropical Plant Wastes Catalyzed by a Magnetic Carbonaceous Acid with Microwave

    PubMed Central

    Su, Tong-Chao; Fang, Zhen; Zhang, Fan; Luo, Jia; Li, Xing-Kang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, magnetic carbonaceous acids were synthesized by pyrolysis of the homogeneous mixtures of glucose and magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles, and subsequent sulfonation. The synthesis conditions were optimized to obtain a catalyst with both high acid density (0.75 mmol g−1) and strong magnetism [magnetic saturation, Ms = 19.5 Am2 kg−1]. The screened catalyst (C-SO3H/Fe3O4) was used to hydrolyze ball-milled cellulose in a microwave reactor with total reducing sugar (TRS) yield of 25.3% under the best conditions at 190 °C for 3.5 h. It was cycled for at least seven times with high catalyst recovery rate (92.8%), acid density (0.63 mmol g−1) and magnetism (Ms = 12.9 Am2 kg−1), as well as high TRS yield (20.1%) from the hydrolysis of ball-milled cellulose. The catalyst was further successfully tested for the hydrolysis of tropical biomass with high TRS and glucose yields of 79.8% and 58.3% for bagasse, 47.2% and 35.6% for Jatropha hulls, as well as 54.4% and 35.8% for Plukenetia hulls. PMID:26648414

  10. Effect of acid concentration and pulp properties on hydrolysis reactions of mercerized sisal.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Talita M; Zambon, Márcia D; Frollini, Elisabete

    2013-03-01

    The influence of sulfuric acid concentration (H2SO4 5-25%, 100°C), crystallinity and fibers size on the hydrolysis reaction of sisal pulps were investigated, with the goal of evaluating both the liquor composition, as an important step in the production of bioethanol, and the residual non-hydrolyzed pulp, to determine its potential application as materials. Aliquots were withdrawn from the reaction media, and the liquor composition was analyzed by HPLC. The residual non-hydrolyzed pulps were characterized by SEM, their average molar mass and crystallinity index, and their size distribution was determined using a fiber analyzer. Sulfuric acid 25% led to the highest glucose content (approximately 10gL(-1)), and this acid concentration was chosen to evaluate the influence of both the fiber size and crystallinity of the starting pulp on hydrolysis. The results showed that fibers with higher length and lower crystallinity favored glucose production in approximately 12%, with respect to the highly crystalline shorter fibers. PMID:23465940

  11. Nitrification of archaeal ammonia oxidizers in acid soils is supported by hydrolysis of urea

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lu; Han, Wenyan; Zhang, Jinbo; Wu, Yucheng; Wang, Baozhan; Lin, Xiangui; Zhu, Jianguo; Cai, Zucong; Jia, Zhongjun

    2012-01-01

    The hydrolysis of urea as a source of ammonia has been proposed as a mechanism for the nitrification of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in acidic soil. The growth of Nitrososphaera viennensis on urea suggests that the ureolysis of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) might occur in natural environments. In this study, 15N isotope tracing indicates that ammonia oxidation occurred upon the addition of urea at a concentration similar to the in situ ammonium content of tea orchard soil (pH 3.75) and forest soil (pH 5.4) and was inhibited by acetylene. Nitrification activity was significantly stimulated by urea fertilization and coupled well with abundance changes in archaeal amoA genes in acidic soils. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes at whole microbial community level demonstrates the active growth of AOA in urea-amended soils. Molecular fingerprinting further shows that changes in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprint patterns of archaeal amoA genes are paralleled by nitrification activity changes. However, bacterial amoA and 16S rRNA genes of AOB were not detected. The results strongly suggest that archaeal ammonia oxidation is supported by hydrolysis of urea and that AOA, from the marine Group 1.1a-associated lineage, dominate nitrification in two acidic soils tested. PMID:22592820

  12. Ferulic acid: a key component in grass lignocellulose recalcitrance to hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Dyoni Matias; Finger-Teixeira, Aline; Rodrigues Mota, Thatiane; Salvador, Victor Hugo; Moreira-Vilar, Flávia Carolina; Correa Molinari, Hugo Bruno; Craig Mitchell, Rowan Andrew; Marchiosi, Rogério; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo; Dantas Dos Santos, Wanderley

    2015-12-01

    In the near future, grasses must provide most of the biomass for the production of renewable fuels. However, grass cell walls are characterized by a large quantity of hydroxycinnamic acids such as ferulic and p-coumaric acids, which are thought to reduce the biomass saccharification. Ferulic acid (FA) binds to lignin, polysaccharides and structural proteins of grass cell walls cross-linking these components. A controlled reduction of FA level or of FA cross-linkages in plants of industrial interest can improve the production of cellulosic ethanol. Here, we review the biosynthesis and roles of FA in cell wall architecture and in grass biomass recalcitrance to enzyme hydrolysis. PMID:25417596

  13. Preparation and evaluation of lignosulfonates as a dispersant for gypsum paste from acid hydrolysis lignin.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Yasuda, Seiichi

    2005-03-01

    In order to effectively utilize a by-product of the acid saccharification process of woody materials, the chemical conversion of guaiacyl sulfuric acid lignin (SAL), one of the acid hydrolysis lignins, into water-soluble sulfonated products with high dispersibitity was investigated. At first, SAL was phenolated (P-SAL) to enhance the solubility and reactivity. Lignosulfonates were prepared from P-SAL by three methods of hydroxymethylation followed by neutral sulfonation (two-step method), sulfomethylation (one-step method) and arylsulfonation. Surprisingly, all prepared lignosulfonates possessed 30 to 70% higher dispersibility for gypsum paste than the commercial lignosulfonate. Evaluation of the preparations for gypsum paste suggested that the higher molecular weights and sulfur contents of the preparations increased their dispersibility. PMID:15491828

  14. Comparison of Four Strong Acids on the Precipitation Potential of Gypsum in Brines During Distillation of Pretreated, Augmented Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muirhead, Dean

    2011-01-01

    Two batches of nominally pretreated and augmented urine were prepared with the baseline pretreatment formulation of sulfuric acid and chromium trioxide. The urine was augmented with inorganic salts and organic compounds in order to simulate a urinary ionic concentrations representing the upper 95 percentile on orbit. Three strong mineral acids: phosphoric, hydrochloric, and nitric acid, were substituted for the sulfuric acid for comparison to the baseline sulfuric acid pretreatment formulation. Three concentrations of oxidizer in the pretreatment formulation were also tested. Pretreated urine was distilled to 85% water recovery to determine the effect of each acid and its conjugate base on the precipitation of minerals during distillation. The brines were analyzed for calcium and sulfate ion, total, volatile, and fixed suspended solids. Test results verified that substitution of phosphoric, hydrochloric, or nitric acids for sulfuric acid would prevent the precipitation of gypsum up to 85% recovery from pretreated urine representing the upper 95 percentile calcium concentration on orbit.

  15. Whole slurry saccharification and fermentation of maleic acid-pretreated rice straw for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Hoon; Park, Hyun Min; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of whole slurry (pretreated lignocellulose) saccharification and fermentation for producing ethanol from maleic acid-pretreated rice straw. The optimized conditions for pretreatment were to treat rice straw at a high temperature (190 °C) with 1 % (w/v) maleic acid for a short duration (3 min ramping to 190 °C and 3 min holding at 190 °C). Enzymatic digestibility (based on theoretical glucose yield) of cellulose in the pretreated rice straw was 91.5 %. Whole slurry saccharification and fermentation of pretreated rice straw resulted in 83.2 % final yield of ethanol based on the initial quantity of glucan in untreated rice straw. These findings indicate that maleic acid pretreatment results in a high yield of ethanol from fermentation of whole slurry even without conditioning or detoxification of the slurry. Additionally, the separation of solids and liquid is not required; therefore, the economics of cellulosic ethanol fuel production are significantly improved. We also demonstrated whole slurry saccharification and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulose, which has rarely been reported. PMID:25930209

  16. Detoxification of Corncob Acid Hydrolysate with SAA Pretreatment and Xylitol Production by Immobilized Candida tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Li-Hong; Tang, Yong; Liu, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Xylitol fermentation production from corncob acid hydrolysate has become an attractive and promising process. However, corncob acid hydrolysate cannot be directly used as fermentation substrate owing to various inhibitors. In this work, soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) pretreatment was employed to reduce the inhibitors in acid hydrolysate. After detoxification, the corncob acid hydrolysate was fermented by immobilized Candida tropicalis cell to produce xylitol. Results revealed that SAA pretreatment showed high delignification and efficient removal of acetyl group compounds without effect on cellulose and xylan content. Acetic acid was completely removed, and the content of phenolic compounds was reduced by 80%. Furthermore, kinetic behaviors of xylitol production by immobilized C. tropicalis cell were elucidated from corncob acid hydrolysate detoxified with SAA pretreatment and two-step adsorption method, respectively. The immobilized C. tropicalis cell showed higher productivity efficiency using the corncob acid hydrolysate as fermentation substrate after detoxification with SAA pretreatment than by two-step adsorption method in the five successive batch fermentation rounds. After the fifth round fermentation, about 60 g xylitol/L fermentation substrate was obtained for SAA pretreatment detoxification, while about 30 g xylitol/L fermentation substrate was obtained for two-step adsorption detoxification. PMID:25133211

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of a hypermodified nucleoside wyosine and its 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Golankiewicz, B; Zielonacka-Lis, E; Folkman, W

    1985-01-01

    The rates of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of a hypermodified nucleoside, wyosine and its 5'-monophosphate were determined at various pH, temperature and buffer concentrations. The results show that despite distinct differences in structure and the glycosyl bond stability, the hydrolysis of wyosine proceeds via cleavage of the C-N bond by A-1 mechanism, analogously to simple nucleosides. Unlike majority of other monophosphates studied so far, wyosine 5'-monophosphate is not more stable than respective nucleoside. PMID:4000960

  18. Peptide sequencing by using a combination of partial acid hydrolysis and fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, F; Botta, M; Ceccarelli, S; Nicoletti, R

    1986-01-01

    To overcome the limit of the intensity of ions carrying sequence information in structural determinations of peptides by fast-atom-bombardment m.s., we have developed a method that consists in taking spectra of the peptide acid hydrolysates at different hydrolysis times. Peaks correspond to the oligomers arising from the peptide partial hydrolysis. The sequence can then be identified from the structurally overlapping fragments. PMID:2428356

  19. Extraction of cellulose nano-crystals from old corrugated container fiber using phosphoric acid and enzymatic hydrolysis followed by sonication.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanjun; Shen, Xiaochuang; Zhang, Junhua; Guo, Daliang; Kong, Fangong; Zhang, Nan

    2015-07-10

    Due to its amazing physicochemical properties and high environmental compatibility, cellulose nano-crystals (CNC) hold great promise for serving as a strategic platform for sustainable development. Now, there has been growing interest in the development of processes using waste or residual biomass as CNC source for addressing economic and environmental concerns. In the present work, a combined process involving phosphoric acid hydrolysis, enzymatic hydrolysis and sonication was proposed aiming to efficiently exact CNC from low-cost old corrugated container (OCC) pulp fiber. The effect of enzymatic hydrolysis on the yield and microstructure of resulting CNC was highlighted. Results showed that the enzymatic hydrolysis was effective in enhancing CNC yield after phosphoric acid hydrolysis. CNC was obtained with a yield of 23.98 wt% via the combined process with phosphoric acid concentration of 60 wt%, cellulase dosage of 2 mL (84 EGU) per 2g fiber and sonication intensity of 200 W. Moreover, the presence of enzymatic hydrolysis imparted the obtained CNC with improved dispersion, increased crystallinity and thermal stability. PMID:25857993

  20. Hydrolysis optimization and characterization study of preparing fatty acids from Jatropha curcas seed oil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fatty acids (FAs) are important as raw materials for the biotechnology industry. Existing methods of FAs production are based on chemical methods. In this study potassium hydroxide (KOH)-catalyzed reactions were utilized to hydrolysis Jatropha curcas seed oil. Results The parameters effect of ethanolic KOH concentration, reaction temperature, and reaction time to free fatty acid (FFA%) were investigated using D-Optimal Design. Characterization of the product has been studied using Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), gas chromatography (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The optimum conditions for maximum FFA% were achieved at 1.75M of ethanolic KOH concentration, 65°C of reaction temperature and 2.0 h of reaction time. Conclusions This study showed that ethanolic KOH concentration was significant variable for J. curcas seed oil hydrolysis. In a 18-point experimental design, FFA% of hydrolyzed J. curcas seed oil can be raised from 1.89% to 102.2%, which proved by FTIR and HPLC. PMID:22044685

  1. Ferrihydrite dissolution by pyridine-2,6-bis(monothiocarboxylic acid) and hydrolysis products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhungana, Suraj; Anthony, Charles R.; Hersman, Larry E.

    2007-12-01

    Pyridine-2,6-bis(monothiocarboxylate) (pdtc), a metabolic product of microorganisms, including Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas stutzeri was investigated for its ability of dissolve Fe(III)(hydr)oxides at pH 7.5. Concentration dependent dissolution of ferrihydrite under anaerobic environment showed saturation of the dissolution rate at the higher concentration of pdtc. The surface controlled ferrihydrite dissolution rate was determined to be 1.2 × 10 -6 mol m -2 h -1. Anaerobic dissolution of ferrihydrite by pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid or dipicolinic acid (dpa), a hydrolysis product of pdtc, was investigated to study the mechanism(s) involved in the pdtc facilitated ferrihydrite dissolution. These studies suggest that pdtc dissolved ferrihydrite using a reduction step, where dpa chelates the Fe reduced by a second hydrolysis product, H 2S. Dpa facilitated dissolution of ferrihydrite showed very small increase in the Fe dissolution when the concentration of external reductant, ascorbate, was doubled, suggesting the surface dynamics being dominated by the interactions between dpa and ferrihydrite. Greater than stoichiometric amounts of Fe were mobilized during dpa dissolution of ferrihydrite assisted by ascorbate and cysteine. This is attributed to the catalytic dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides by the in situ generated Fe(II) in the presence of a complex former, dpa.

  2. Quantitative solid state NMR analysis of residues from acid hydrolysis of loblolly pine wood.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Carsten; Marzialetti, Teresita; Hoskins, Travis J C; Valenzuela Olarte, Mariefel B; Agrawal, Pradeep K; Jones, Christopher W

    2009-10-01

    The composition of solid residues from hydrolysis reactions of loblolly pine wood with dilute mineral acids is analyzed by (13)C Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CP MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Using this method, the carbohydrate and lignin fractions are quantified in less than 3h as compared to over a day using wet chemical methods. In addition to the quantitative information, (13)C CP MAS NMR spectroscopy provides information on the formation of additional extractives and pseudo lignin from the carbohydrates. Being a non-destructive technique, NMR spectroscopy provides unambiguous evidence of the presence of side reactions and products, which is a clear advantage over the wet chemical analytical methods. Quantitative results from NMR spectroscopy and proximate analysis are compared for the residues from hydrolysis of loblolly pine wood under 13 different conditions; samples were treated either at 150 degrees C or 200 degrees C in the presence of various acids (HCl, H(2)SO(4), H(3)PO(4), HNO(3) and TFA) or water. The lignin content determined by both methods differed on averaged by 2.9 wt% resulting in a standard deviation of 3.5 wt%. It is shown that solid degradation products are formed from saccharide precursors under harsh reaction conditions. These degradation reactions limit the total possible yield of monosaccharides from any subsequent reaction. PMID:19477123

  3. Effect of acid hydrolysis and fungal biotreatment on agro-industrial wastes for obtainment of free sugars for bioethanol production

    PubMed Central

    El-Tayeb, T.S.; Abdelhafez, A.A.; Ali, S.H.; Ramadan, E.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate selected chemical and microbiological treatments for the conversion of certain local agro-industrial wastes (rice straw, corn stalks, sawdust, sugar beet waste and sugarcane bagasse) to ethanol. The chemical composition of these feedstocks was determined. Conversion of wastes to free sugars by acid hydrolysis varied from one treatment to another. In single-stage dilute acid hydrolysis, increasing acid concentration from 1 % (v/v) to 5 % (v/v) decreased the conversion percentage of almost all treated agro-industrial wastes. Lower conversion percentages for some treatments were obtained when increasing the residence time from 90 to 120 min. The two-stage dilute acid hydrolysis by phosphoric acid (1.0 % v/v) followed by sulphuric acid (1.0 % v/v) resulted in the highest conversion percentage (41.3 % w/w) on treated sugar beet waste. This treatment when neutralized, amended with some nutrients and inoculated with baker’s yeast, achieved the highest ethanol concentration (1.0 % v/v). Formation of furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) were functions of type of acid hydrolysis, acid concentration, residence time and feedstock type. The highest bioconversion of 5 % wastes (37.8 % w/w) was recorded on sugar beet waste by Trichoderma viride EMCC 107. This treatment when followed by baker’s yeast fermentation, 0.41 % (v/v) ethanol and 8.2 % (v/w) conversion coefficient were obtained. PMID:24031984

  4. Effect of acid hydrolysis and fungal biotreatment on agro-industrial wastes for obtainment of free sugars for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    El-Tayeb, T S; Abdelhafez, A A; Ali, S H; Ramadan, E M

    2012-10-01

    This study was designed to evaluate selected chemical and microbiological treatments for the conversion of certain local agro-industrial wastes (rice straw, corn stalks, sawdust, sugar beet waste and sugarcane bagasse) to ethanol. The chemical composition of these feedstocks was determined. Conversion of wastes to free sugars by acid hydrolysis varied from one treatment to another. In single-stage dilute acid hydrolysis, increasing acid concentration from 1 % (v/v) to 5 % (v/v) decreased the conversion percentage of almost all treated agro-industrial wastes. Lower conversion percentages for some treatments were obtained when increasing the residence time from 90 to 120 min. The two-stage dilute acid hydrolysis by phosphoric acid (1.0 % v/v) followed by sulphuric acid (1.0 % v/v) resulted in the highest conversion percentage (41.3 % w/w) on treated sugar beet waste. This treatment when neutralized, amended with some nutrients and inoculated with baker's yeast, achieved the highest ethanol concentration (1.0 % v/v). Formation of furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) were functions of type of acid hydrolysis, acid concentration, residence time and feedstock type. The highest bioconversion of 5 % wastes (37.8 % w/w) was recorded on sugar beet waste by Trichoderma viride EMCC 107. This treatment when followed by baker's yeast fermentation, 0.41 % (v/v) ethanol and 8.2 % (v/w) conversion coefficient were obtained. PMID:24031984

  5. Enzymatic hydrolysis of various pretreated lignocellulosic substrates and the fermentation of the liberated sugars to ethanol and butanediol

    SciTech Connect

    Saddler, J.N.; Mes-Hartree, M.; Yu, E.K.C.; Brownell, H.H.

    1983-01-01

    Aspen wood and wheat straw were pretreated by exposure to steam at elevated temperatures. Chemical analysis of the substrates revealed that steam explosion differentially decomposed the pentosan component while leaving the glucan portion relatively unchanged. The pretreated residues could be used as substrates for growth of Trichoderma reesei C30 and T. harzianum E58. The cellulase activities detected were in some cases three times as high as those found when Solka Floc was used as the substrate. Culture filtrates of T. harzianum E58 could efficiently hydrolyze the hemicellulose-rich water-soluble fractions. This material was fermented by Klebsiella pneumoniae with 0.4-0.5 g of 2,3-butanediol produced per gram of sugar utilized. Once the steam-exploded residues had been water and alkali extracted, the enzymatically hydrolyzed substrates were readily fermented by Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Zymononas mobilis with values as high as 2% (w/v) ethanol obtained from 5% steam-exploded wood fractions. 30 references, 2 figures, 8 tables.

  6. Theoretical study of the alkaline hydrolysis of an aza-β-lactam derivative of clavulanic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcías, Rafael C.; Coll, Miguel; Donoso, Josefa; Muñoz, Francisco

    2003-04-01

    DFT calculations based on the hybrid functional B3LYP/6-31+G * were used to study the alkaline hydrolysis of an aza-clavulanic acid, which results from the substitution of the carbon atom at position 6 in clavulanic acid by a nitrogen atom. The presence of the nitrogen atom endows the compound with special properties; in fact, once formed, the tetrahedral intermediate can evolve with cleavage of the N 4-C 7 or N 6-C 7 bond, which obviously leads to different reaction products. These differential bond cleavages may play a central role in the inactivation of β-lactamases, so the compound may be a powerful inactivator of these enzymes.

  7. Hydrolysis reaction of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. A kinetic and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Jorge Marcelo; Jorge, Nelly Lidia; Grand, André; Hernández-Laguna, Alfonso

    2015-10-01

    The degradation of the 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in aqueous solution is an hydrolysis reaction. Two products are identified: 2,4-dichlorophenol and glycolic acid. Reaction is investigated as a function of pH and temperature, and it is first-order kinetics and pH-dependent. Reaction is modeled in gas phase, where a proton catalyses the reaction. Critical points of PES are calculated at B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p), and aug-cc-pvqz//6-311++G(3df,2p) levels plus ZPE at 6-311++G(3df,2p) level. The activation barrier is 21.2 kcal/mol. Theoretical results agree with the experimental results. A second mechanism related with a Cl2Phsbnd Osbnd CH2sbnd COOH⋯H2O complex is found, but with a rate limiting step of 38.4 kcal/mol.

  8. Reversion and dehydration reactions of glucose during the dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The inaccessibility of all glycosidic bonds necessitates industrial conversion schemes which employ a dilute acid catalyst at high temperatures. Process conditions also promote further reactions of glucose via the reversion and dehydration pathways. Quantitative determination of the yields of the major reversion and dehydration products is important for understanding and predicting the amounts of these materials expected under envisioned industrial operating conditions. Microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) was hydrolyzed with sulfuric acid (0.0-1.25 wt.%), at high temperatures (160-250/sup 0/C), and at a 3:1 liquid-to-solid ratio. The hydrolysis was monitored by evaluating the amount of cellulose remaining and the yields of glucose, solid humin, levulinic acid, formic acid, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), and reversion products as a function of the aforementioned reaction conditions. Analysis of the reversion products required the development of a technique for the quantitation of trace carbohydrates in complex mixtures and led to the development of a reduction/permethylation gas chromatographic procedure. Cellulose hydrolysis followed pseudo-homogeneous first-order kinetics. Glucose yield was adequately described as consecutive first-order reactions. Anhydrosugars formed via reversion followed equilibrium reaction kinetics whereas the disaccharides did not. Total reversion product yields approached 10% at 250/sup 0/C. Quantitative determination of the major dehydration products provided important information concerning the destruction of glucose. HMF was produced in up to 12% yields based on the theoretical amount of glucose available, and furfural was detected in up to 5% yields. A carbon mass balance based on the determined product yields revealed that approximately 90% of all carbon was accounted for at maximum glucose yields.

  9. Accelerated hydrolysis method to estimate the amino acid content of wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) flour using microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kabaha, Khaled; Taralp, Alpay; Cakmak, Ismail; Ozturk, Levent

    2011-04-13

    The technique of microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis was applied to wholegrain wheat (Triticum durum Desf. cv. Balcali 2000) flour in order to speed the preparation of samples for analysis. The resultant hydrolysates were chromatographed and quantified in an automated amino acid analyzer. The effect of different hydrolysis temperatures, times and sample weights was examined using flour dispersed in 6 N HCl. Within the range of values tested, the highest amino acid recoveries were generally obtained by setting the hydrolysis parameters to 150 °C, 3 h and 200 mg sample weight. These conditions struck an optimal balance between liberating amino acid residues from the wheat matrix and limiting their subsequent degradation or transformation. Compared to the traditional 24 h reflux method, the hydrolysates were prepared in dramatically less time, yet afforded comparable ninhydrin color yields. Under optimal hydrolysis conditions, the total amino acid recovery corresponded to at least 85.1% of the total protein content, indicating the efficient extraction of amino acids from the flour matrix. The findings suggest that this microwave-assisted method can be used to rapidly profile the amino acids of numerous wheat grain samples, and can be extended to the grain analysis of other cereal crops. PMID:21375298

  10. Effect of hydrolysis conditions on hydrous TiO2 polymorphs precipitated from a titanyl sulfate and sulfuric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hao; Liang, Bin; Lü, Li; Wu, Pan; Li, Chun

    2012-07-01

    The relationship between hydrolysis conditions and hydrous titania polymorphs obtained in a titanyl sulfate and sulfuric acid solution was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The results revealed that the feeding rate of the titanyl sulfate stock solution, the concentration of sulfuric acid, and the seed dosage of rutile crystal could significantly affect the hydrolysis rate, thus influencing the titania crystal phase. Hydrous TiO2 in the form of rutile, anatase, or the mixture of both could be obtained in solutions of low titanium concentrations and 2.5wt% to 15wt% sulfuric acid at 100°C. When the hydrolysis rate of titanium expressed by TiO2 was more than or equal to 0.04 g/(L·min), the hydrolysate was almost phase-pure anatase, while the main phase state was rutile when the hydrolysis rate was less than or equal to 0.01 g/(L·min). With the hydrolysis rate between 0.02 and 0.03 g/(L·min), the hydrolysate contained almost equal magnitude of rutile and anatase. It seems that although rutile phase is thermodynamically stable in very acidic solutions, anatase is a kinetically stable phase.

  11. Effects of extrusion pretreatment parameters on sweet sorghum bagasse enzymatic hydrolysis and its subsequent conversion into bioethanol.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Olea, Erick; Pérez-Carrillo, Esther; Montoya-Chiw, Manuel; Serna-Saldívar, Sergio O

    2015-01-01

    Second-generation bioethanol production from sweet sorghum bagasse first extruded at different conditions and then treated with cell wall degrading enzymes and fermented with I. orientalis was determined. The twin extruder parameters tested were barrel temperature, screws speed, and feedstock moisture content using surface response methodology. The best extrusion conditions were 100°C, 200 rpm, and 30% conditioning moisture content. This nonchemical and continuous pretreatment did not generate inhibitory compounds. The extruded feedstocks were saccharified varying the biocatalysis time and solids loading. The best conditions were 20% solids loading and 72 h of enzymatic treatment. These particular conditions converted 70% of the total fibrous carbohydrates into total fermentable C5 and C6 sugars. The extruded enzymatically hydrolyzed sweet sorghum bagasse was fermented with the strain I. orientalis at 12% solids obtaining a yield of 198.1 mL of ethanol per kilogram of bagasse (dw). PMID:25866776

  12. Effects of Extrusion Pretreatment Parameters on Sweet Sorghum Bagasse Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Its Subsequent Conversion into Bioethanol

    PubMed Central

    Heredia-Olea, Erick; Pérez-Carrillo, Esther; Serna-Saldívar, Sergio O.

    2015-01-01

    Second-generation bioethanol production from sweet sorghum bagasse first extruded at different conditions and then treated with cell wall degrading enzymes and fermented with I. orientalis was determined. The twin extruder parameters tested were barrel temperature, screws speed, and feedstock moisture content using surface response methodology. The best extrusion conditions were 100°C, 200 rpm, and 30% conditioning moisture content. This nonchemical and continuous pretreatment did not generate inhibitory compounds. The extruded feedstocks were saccharified varying the biocatalysis time and solids loading. The best conditions were 20% solids loading and 72 h of enzymatic treatment. These particular conditions converted 70% of the total fibrous carbohydrates into total fermentable C5 and C6 sugars. The extruded enzymatically hydrolyzed sweet sorghum bagasse was fermented with the strain I. orientalis at 12% solids obtaining a yield of 198.1 mL of ethanol per kilogram of bagasse (dw). PMID:25866776

  13. The effect of harvest time, dry matter content and mechanical pretreatments on anaerobic digestion and enzymatic hydrolysis of miscanthus.

    PubMed

    Frydendal-Nielsen, Susanne; Hjorth, Maibritt; Baby, Sanmohan; Felby, Claus; Jørgensen, Uffe; Gislum, René

    2016-10-01

    Miscanthus x giganteus was harvested as both green and mature biomass and the dry matter content of the driest harvest was artificially decreased by adding water in two subsamples, giving a total of five dry matter contents. All five biomass types were mechanically pretreated by roller-milling, extrusion or grinding and accumulated methane production and enzymatically-accessible sugars were measured. Accumulated methane production was studied using sigmoid curves that allowed comparison among the treatments of the rate of the methane production and ultimate methane yield. The green biomass gave the highest methane yield and highest levels of enzymatically-accessible cellulose. The driest biomass gave the best effect from extrusion but with the highest energy consumption, whereas roller-milling was most efficient on wet biomass. The addition of water to the last harvest improved the effect of roller-milling and equalled extrusion of the samples in efficiency. PMID:27455125

  14. Alcohol fermentation of sweet potato - 1. Acid hydrolysis and factors involved

    SciTech Connect

    Azhar, A.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1981-04-01

    Factors affecting acid hydrolysis of sweet potato powder (SPP) to fermentable sugars were examined. These include HCl concentration, temperature, time, and levels of SPP. Maximum reducing sugar, reported as dextrose equivalent (DE), was detected after 24 min hydrolysis (1% SPP) in 0.034N HCl heated at 154/degree/C. These samples also had 3.43% hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) based on dry weight. A high level of HMF (9.2%) was detected in 1% SPP heated at 154/degree/C in 0.10N HCl for 18 min. The lowest concentration of HMF formed (1.8%), at maximal DE of 61%, was established in samples containing 5% SPP and heated at 154/degree/C in 0.034N HCl for 48 min. Aqueous extracts of uncured SPP, examined by High Performance Liquid Chromatography, contained glucose, fructose and sucrose, but degraded SPP had only glucose and fructose. Products of degraded SPP, Under appropriate conditions, could be used for alcohol fermentation. 18 refs.

  15. Enantioselective Hydrolysis of Amino Acid Esters Promoted by Bis(β-cyclodextrin) Copper Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shan-Shan; Zhao, Meng; Ke, Zhuo-Feng; Cheng, Bei-Chen; Su, Hua; Cao, Qian; Cao, Zhen-Kun; Wang, Jun; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-02-01

    It is challenging to create artificial catalysts that approach enzymes with regard to catalytic efficiency and selectivity. The enantioselective catalysis ranks the privileged characteristic of enzymatic transformations. Here, we report two pyridine-linked bis(β-cyclodextrin) (bisCD) copper(II) complexes that enantioselectively hydrolyse chiral esters. Hydrolytic kinetic resolution of three pairs of amino acid ester enantiomers (S1-S3) at neutral pH indicated that the “back-to-back” bisCD complex CuL1 favoured higher catalytic efficiency and more pronounced enantioselectivity than the “face-to-face” complex CuL2. The best enantioselectivity was observed for N-Boc-phenylalanine 4-nitrophenyl ester (S2) enantiomers promoted by CuL1, which exhibited an enantiomer selectivity of 15.7. We observed preferential hydrolysis of L-S2 by CuL1, even in racemic S2, through chiral high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We demonstrated that the enantioselective hydrolysis was related to the cooperative roles of the intramolecular flanking chiral CD cavities with the coordinated copper ion, according to the results of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), inhibition experiments, rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY), and theoretical calculations. Although the catalytic parameters lag behind the level of enzymatic transformation, this study confirms the cooperative effect of the first and second coordination spheres of artificial catalysts in enantioselectivity and provides hints that may guide future explorations of enzyme mimics.

  16. The shape and size distribution of crystalline nanoparticles prepared by acid hydrolysis of native cellulose.

    PubMed

    Elazzouzi-Hafraoui, Samira; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Heux, Laurent; Dubreuil, Frédéric; Rochas, Cyrille

    2008-01-01

    The shape and size distribution of crystalline nanoparticles resulting from the sulfuric acid hydrolysis of cellulose from cotton, Avicel, and tunicate were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS). Images of negatively stained and cryo-TEM specimens showed that the majority of cellulose particles were flat objects constituted by elementary crystallites whose lateral adhesion was resistant against hydrolysis and sonication treatments. Moreover, tunicin whiskers were described as twisted ribbons with an estimated pitch of 2.4-3.2 microm. Length and width distributions of all samples were generally well described by log-normal functions, with the exception of tunicin, which had less lateral aggregation. AFM observation confirmed that the thickness of the nanocrystals was almost constant for a given origin and corresponded to the crystallite size measured from peak broadening in WAXS spectra. Experimental SAXS profiles were numerically simulated, combining the dimensions and size distribution functions determined by the various techniques. PMID:18052127

  17. Enantioselective Hydrolysis of Amino Acid Esters Promoted by Bis(β-cyclodextrin) Copper Complexes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shan-Shan; Zhao, Meng; Ke, Zhuo-Feng; Cheng, Bei-Chen; Su, Hua; Cao, Qian; Cao, Zhen-Kun; Wang, Jun; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    It is challenging to create artificial catalysts that approach enzymes with regard to catalytic efficiency and selectivity. The enantioselective catalysis ranks the privileged characteristic of enzymatic transformations. Here, we report two pyridine-linked bis(β-cyclodextrin) (bisCD) copper(II) complexes that enantioselectively hydrolyse chiral esters. Hydrolytic kinetic resolution of three pairs of amino acid ester enantiomers (S1-S3) at neutral pH indicated that the "back-to-back" bisCD complex CuL(1) favoured higher catalytic efficiency and more pronounced enantioselectivity than the "face-to-face" complex CuL(2). The best enantioselectivity was observed for N-Boc-phenylalanine 4-nitrophenyl ester (S2) enantiomers promoted by CuL(1), which exhibited an enantiomer selectivity of 15.7. We observed preferential hydrolysis of L-S2 by CuL(1), even in racemic S2, through chiral high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We demonstrated that the enantioselective hydrolysis was related to the cooperative roles of the intramolecular flanking chiral CD cavities with the coordinated copper ion, according to the results of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), inhibition experiments, rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY), and theoretical calculations. Although the catalytic parameters lag behind the level of enzymatic transformation, this study confirms the cooperative effect of the first and second coordination spheres of artificial catalysts in enantioselectivity and provides hints that may guide future explorations of enzyme mimics. PMID:26916830

  18. Methane production from acid hydrolysates of Agave tequilana bagasse: evaluation of hydrolysis conditions and methane yield.

    PubMed

    Arreola-Vargas, Jorge; Ojeda-Castillo, Valeria; Snell-Castro, Raúl; Corona-González, Rosa Isela; Alatriste-Mondragón, Felipe; Méndez-Acosta, Hugo O

    2015-04-01

    Evaluation of diluted acid hydrolysis for sugar extraction from cooked and uncooked Agave tequilana bagasse and feasibility of using the hydrolysates as substrate for methane production, with and without nutrient addition, in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (AnSBR) were studied. Results showed that the hydrolysis over the cooked bagasse was more effective for sugar extraction at the studied conditions. Total sugars concentration in the cooked and uncooked bagasse hydrolysates were 27.9 g/L and 18.7 g/L, respectively. However, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural was detected in the cooked bagasse hydrolysate, and therefore, the uncooked bagasse hydrolysate was selected as substrate for methane production. Interestingly, results showed that the AnSBR operated without nutrient addition obtained a constant methane production (0.26 L CH4/g COD), whereas the AnSBR operated with nutrient addition presented a gradual methane suppression. Molecular analyses suggested that methane suppression in the experiment with nutrient addition was due to a negative effect over the archaeal/bacterial ratio. PMID:25647030

  19. Low-molecular-weight solutes released during mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Identification of ethanolamine triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Drewry, David T.; Gray, George W.; Wilkinson, Stephen G.

    1972-01-01

    A careful examination of the low-molecular-weight solutes released during mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (N.C.T.C. 1999) revealed the presence of ethanolamine triphosphate. During storage, the compound decomposed to give ethanolamine pyrophosphate, identified in a previous study (Drewry et al., 1971); PPi may be a further decomposition product. Evidence for the attachment of ethanolamine triphosphate to a polysaccharide fraction was obtained, but the possibility that some was attached to the lipid A moiety was not excluded. Basic compounds released during the hydrolysis of lipopolysaccharide included amino acids, polyamines and oligopeptides. PMID:4632171

  20. Effect of nitric acid on pretreatment and fermentation for enhancing ethanol production of rice straw.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ilgook; Lee, Bomi; Park, Ji-Yeon; Choi, Sun-A; Han, Jong-In

    2014-01-01

    In this study, nitric acid (HNO₃) was evaluated as an acid catalyst for rice straw pretreatment, and, after neutralization, as a sole nitrogen source for subsequent fermentation. Response surface methodology was used to obtain optimal pretreatment condition with respect to HNO₃ concentration (0.2-1.0%), temperature (120-160 °C) and reaction time (1-20 min). In a condition of 0.65% HNO₃, 158.8 °C and 5.86 min, a maximum xylose yield of 86.5% and an enzymatic digestibility of 83.0% were achieved. The sugar solution that contained nitrate derived from the acid catalyst supported the enhancement of ethanol yield by Pichia stipitis from 10.92 g/L to 14.50 g/L. The results clearly reveal that nitric acid could be used not only as a pretreatment catalyst, but also as a nitrogen source in the fermentation process for bioethanol production. It is anticipated that the HNO₃-based pretreatment can reduce financial burden on the cellulosic bioethanol industry by simplifying after-pretreatment-steps as well as providing a nitrogen source. PMID:24274544

  1. Enhancement of volatile fatty acids production from rice straw via anaerobic digestion with chemical pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Park, Gwon Woo; Kim, Ilgook; Jung, Kwonsu; Seo, Charles; Han, Jong-In; Chang, Ho Nam; Kim, Yeu-Chun

    2015-08-01

    Rice straw is one of the most abundant renewable biomass sources and was selected as the feedstock for the production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) from which microbial biodiesel can be produced. Two kinds of chemical pretreatments involving nitric acid and sodium hydroxide were investigated at 150 °C with 20 min of reaction time. The nitric acid pretreatment generated the most hemicellulose hydrolyzate, while significant reduction of the lignin occurred with sodium hydroxide pretreatment. Anaerobic digestion of 20 g/L rice straw yielded 6.00 and 7.09 g VFAs/L with 0.5% HNO3 and 2% NaOH, respectively. The VFAs yield with 2% NaOH was 0.35 g/g. PMID:25764527

  2. Characterization of lignin derived from water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatment of poplar wood at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Libing; Yan, Lishi; Wang, Zheming; Laskar, Dhrubojyoti D.; Swita, Marie S.; Cort, John R.; Yang, Bin

    2015-12-01

    In this study, flowthrough pretreatment of biomass has high potential to valorize lignin derivatives to high-value products, which is vital to enhance the economy of biorefinery plants. Comprehensive understanding of lignin behaviors and solubilization chemistry in aqueous pretreatment such as water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatment is of fundamental importance to achieve the goal of providing flexible platform for lignin utilization. In this study, the effects of flowthrough pretreatment conditions on lignin separation from poplar wood were reported as well as the characteristics of three sub-sets of lignin produced from the pretreatment, including residual lignin in pretreated solid residues (ReL), recovered insoluble lignin in pretreated liquid (RISL), and recovered soluble lignin in pretreatment liquid (RSL). Both the water-only and 0.05% (w/w) sulfuric acid pretreatments were performed at temperatures from 160 to 270°C on poplar wood in a flowthrough reactor system for 2-10 min. Results showed that water-only flowthrough pretreatment primarily removed syringyl (S units). Increased temperature and/or the addition of sulfuric acid enhanced the removal of guaiacyl (G units) compared to water-only pretreatments at lower temperatures, resulting in nearly complete removal of lignin from the biomass. Results also suggested that more RISL was recovered than ReL and RSL in both dilute acid and water-only flowthrough pretreatment at elevated temperatures. NMR spectra of the RISL revealed significant β-O-4 cleavage, α-β deoxygenation to form cinnamyl-like end groups, and slight β-5 repolymerization in both water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatments. In conclusion, elevated temperature and/or dilute acid greatly enhanced lignin removal to almost 100% by improving G unit removal besides S unit removal in flowthrough system. A new lignin chemistry transformation pathway was proposed and revealed the complexity of lignin structural change during

  3. Hydrolysis of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} on submicron sulfuric acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, M.; Stewart, D.J.; Baker, J.; Cox, R.A.

    2000-05-04

    The kinetics of reactive uptake of gaseous N{sub 2}O{sub 5} on submicron sulfuric acid aerosol particles has been investigated using a laminar flow reactor coupled with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) to characterize the aerosol. The particles were generated by homogeneous nucleation of SO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O mixtures. In the H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration range 26.3--64.5 wt {degree} the uptake coefficient was {gamma} = 0.033 {+-} 0.004, independent of acid strength. For an acid strength of 45 wt % {gamma} was found to decrease with increasing temperature over the range 263--298 K. From this, temperature dependence values of {minus}115 {+-} 30 kJ/mol and {minus}25.5 {+-} 8.4 J/K mol were determined for the changes in enthalpy and entropy of the uptake process, respectively. The results are consistent with a previous model of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} hydrolysis involving both a direct and an acid catalyzed mechanism, with uptake under the experimental conditions limited by mass accommodation.

  4. Determination of amino acids in two Polysiphonia species and study of enzymatic hydrolysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li-Xin; Fan, Xiao; Wei, Yu-Xi

    2002-09-01

    The total content of the rich amino acids in two common red algae, Polysiphonia urceolata and Polysiphonia japonica growing in the Qingdao seashore were determined. The algae powder was hydrolyzed by 6 mol/L HCl at 110°C for 48 h and determined by amino acid analyzer. The content was 25.35% and 24.16%, respectively, much higher than that of some other species. In addition, a nutritive liquid with abundant amino acids was prepared (by the enzymatic hydrolysis method using Polysiphonia urceolata) as raw material for a kind of health beverage. The dried seaweed was decolored by 0.25% KMnO4 and 0.5% active carbon, then enzymalized. In the selection of enzymalizing condition, the orthogonal experimental design was used. Four factors including kinds of enzyme, quantity of enzyme, temperature and time were studied at 3 levels. According to the orthogonal design results, we can choose an optimal condition: hydrolyzing at 45°C by neutral proteinase (0.25%, w/w) for 2h, adjusting pH to 8.5, then adding trypsin (0.25%, w/w) and hydrolyzing for 2 h. Finally the above solution was alkalized by NaOH and neutralized by casein. After the hydrolyzed liquid was filtered and concentrated, suitable additives were added. The final products contain rich amino acids.

  5. Evolution of the phase content of zirconia powders prepared by sol-gel acid hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas, P.C.; Martinez, J.A.; Caracoche, M.C.; Rodriguez, A.M.; Lopez Garcia, A.R.; Pavlik, R.S. Jr.; Klein, L.C.

    1998-01-01

    The evolution of the phase content in zirconia powders that have been prepared by sol-gel acid hydrolysis has been investigated using the perturbed-angular-correlation (PAC) technique and X-ray diffractometry. As a consequence of performing annealing treatments at increasing temperatures between room temperature and 1,000 C, the amorphous starting material transforms to the tetragonal form and then to the monoclinic form. The metastable tetragonal phase exhibits two hyperfine components, one of which describes very defective zirconium surroundings. The evolution of PAC relative fractions is in agreement with the diffraction results. The durability of the samples in sodium hydroxide seems to increase as the relative amount of the most-defective zirconium surroundings of the tetragonal form increases.

  6. Cellulose nanocrystals prepared via formic acid hydrolysis followed by TEMPO-mediated oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Xu, Wenyang; Kronlund, Dennis; Määttänen, Anni; Liu, Jun; Smått, Jan-Henrik; Peltonen, Jouko; Willför, Stefan; Mu, Xindong; Xu, Chunlin

    2015-11-20

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) as a renewable and biodegradable nanomaterial have wide application value. In this work, CNCs were extracted from bleached chemical pulp using two stages of isolation (i.e. formic acid (FA) hydrolysis and 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) mediated oxidation) under mild conditions. In the first stage, FA was used to remove hemicellulose, swell cellulose fibers, and release CNCs. The FA could be readily recovered and reused. In the second stage, the CNCs isolated by FA were further modified by TEMPO-mediated oxidation to increase the surface charge of CNCs. It was found that the modified CNCs with more ordered crystal structure and higher surface charge had better redispersibility and higher viscosity in aqueous phase. Therefore, the modified CNCs could be more effective when used as rheology modifier in the fields of water based coating, paint, food etc. PMID:26344319

  7. Steam gasification of acid-hydrolysis biomass CAHR for clean syngas production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanyi; Yao, Jingang; Yang, Huijun; Yan, Beibei; Chen, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Main characteristics of gaseous product from steam gasification of acid-hydrolysis biomass CAHR have been investigated experimentally. The comparison in terms of evolution of syngas flow rate, syngas quality and apparent thermal efficiency was made between steam gasification and pyrolysis in the lab-scale apparatus. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of temperature and steam to CAHR ratio on gas quality, syngas yield and energy conversion. The results showed that syngas and energy yield were better with gasification compared to pyrolysis under identical thermal conditions. Both high gasification temperature and introduction of proper steam led to higher gas quality, higher syngas yield and higher energy conversion efficiency. However, excessive steam reduced hydrogen yield and energy conversion efficiency. The optimal value of S/B was found to be 3.3. The maximum value of energy ratio was 0.855 at 800°C with the optimal S/B value. PMID:25553562

  8. Fuzzy logic feedback control for fed-batch enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chao; Voltan, Diego S; Keshwani, Deepak R; Meyer, George E; Kuhar, Pankaj S

    2016-06-01

    A fuzzy logic feedback control system was developed for process monitoring and feeding control in fed-batch enzymatic hydrolysis of a lignocellulosic biomass, dilute acid-pretreated corn stover. Digested glucose from hydrolysis reaction was assigned as input while doser feeding time and speed of pretreated biomass were responses from fuzzy logic control system. Membership functions for these three variables and rule-base were created based on batch hydrolysis data. The system response was first tested in LabVIEW environment then the performance was evaluated through real-time hydrolysis reaction. The feeding operations were determined timely by fuzzy logic control system and efficient responses were shown to plateau phases during hydrolysis. Feeding of proper amount of cellulose and maintaining solids content was well balanced. Fuzzy logic proved to be a robust and effective online feeding control tool for fed-batch enzymatic hydrolysis. PMID:26915095

  9. Evolved strains of Scheffersomyces stipitis achieving high ethanol productivity on acid- and base-pretreated biomass hydrolyzate at high solids loading

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Slininger, Patricia J.; Shea-Andersh, Maureen A.; Thompson, Stephanie R.; Dien, Bruce S.; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Balan, Venkatesh; da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Dale, Bruce E; Cotta, Michael A

    2015-04-09

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant, renewable feedstock useful for the production of fuel-grade ethanol via the processing steps of pretreatment, enzyme hydrolysis, and microbial fermentation. Traditional industrial yeasts do not ferment xylose and are not able to grow, survive, or ferment in concentrated hydrolyzates that contain enough sugar to support economical ethanol recovery since they are laden with toxic byproducts generated during pretreatment. Repetitive culturing in two types of concentrated hydrolyzates was applied along with ethanol challenged xylose-fed continuous culture to force targeted evolution of the native pentose fermenting yeast Scheffersomyces (Pichia) stipitis strain NRRL Y-7124 maintained in the ARSmore » Culture Collection, Peoria, IL. Isolates collected from various enriched populations were screened and ranked based on relative xylose uptake rate and ethanol yield. Ranking on hydrolyzates with and without nutritional supplementation was used to identify those isolates with best performance across diverse conditions. Robust S. stipitis strains adapted to perform very well in enzyme hydrolyzates of high solids loading ammonia fiber expansion-pretreated corn stover (18% weight per volume solids) and dilute sulfuric acid-pretreated switchgrass (20% w/v solids) were obtained. Improved features include reduced initial lag phase preceding growth, significantly enhanced fermentation rates, improved ethanol tolerance and yield, reduced diauxic lag during glucose-xylose transition, and ability to accumulate >40 g/L ethanol in <167 h when fermenting hydrolyzate at low initial cell density of 0.5 absorbance units and pH 5 to 6.« less

  10. Acidic 1,3-propanediaminetetraacetato lanthanides with luminescent and catalytic ester hydrolysis properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mao-Long; Shi, Yan-Ru; Yang, Yu-Chen; Zhou, Zhao-Hui

    2014-11-15

    In acidic solution, a serials of water-soluble coordination polymers (CPs) were isolated as zonal 1D-CPs 1,3-propanediaminetetraacetato lanthanides [Ln(1,3-H{sub 3}pdta)(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}]{sub n}·2Cl{sub n}·3nH{sub 2}O [Ln=La, 1; Ce, 2; Pr, 3; Nd, 4; Sm, 5] (1,3-H{sub 4}pdta=1,3-propanediaminetetraacetic acid, C{sub 11}H{sub 18}N{sub 2}O{sub 8}) in high yields. When 1 eq. mol potassium hydroxide was added to the solutions of 1D-CPs, respectively, two 1D-CPs [Ln(1,3-H{sub 2}pdta)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]{sub n}·Cl{sub n}·2nH{sub 2}O [Ln=Sm, 6; Gd, 7] were isolated at room temperature and seven 2D-CPs [Ln(1,3-H{sub 2}pdta)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n}·Cl{sub n}·2nH{sub 2}O [Ln=La, 8; Ce, 9; Pr, 10; Nd, 11; Sm, 12; Eu, 13; Gd, 14] were isolated at 70 °C. When the crystals of 1–4 were hydrothermally heated at 180 °C with 1–2 eq. mol potassium hydroxide, four 3D-CPs [Ln(1,3-Hpdta)]{sub n}·nH{sub 2}O [Ln=La, 15; Ce, 16; Pr, 17; Nd, 18] were obtained. The two 2D-CPs [Ln(1,3-Hpdta)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n}·4nH{sub 2}O (Sm, 19; Eu, 20) were isolated in similar reaction conditions. With the increments of pH value in the solution and reaction temperature, the structure becomes more complicated. 1–5 are soluble in water and 1 was traced by solution {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) NMR technique, the water-soluble lanthanides 1 and 5 show catalytic activity to ester hydrolysis reaction respectively, which indicate their important roles in the hydrolytic reaction. The europium complexes 13 and 20 show visible fluorescence at an excitation of 394 nm. The structure diversity is mainly caused by the variation of coordinated ligand in different pH values and lanthanide contraction effect. Acidic conditions are favorable for the isolations of lanthanide complexes in different structures and this may helpful to separate different lanthanides. The thermal stability investigations reveal that acidic condition is favorable to obtain the oxides at a lower temperature. - Graphical abstract: A series

  11. RAPESEED PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINE HYDROLYSIS TO PHOSPHATIDIC ACID USING PLANT EXTRACTS WITH PHOPSPHOLIPASE D.

    PubMed

    Pasker, Beata; Sosada, Marian; Fraś, Paweł; Boryczka, Monika; Górecki, Michał; Zych, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidic acid (PA) has a crucial role in cell membrane structure and function. For that reason it has a possible application in the treatment of some health disorders in humans, can be used as a natural and non toxic emulsifier and the component of drug carriers in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics as well as a component for synthesis of some new phospholipids. PA is short-lived in the cell and is difficult to extract directly from the biological material. PA may be easily prepared by hydrolysis of phospholipids, especially phosphatidylcholine (PC), using cabbage phospholipase D (PLD). Hydrolytic activity of purified by us PLD extracts from cabbage towards rapeseed phosphatidylcholine (RPC) was investigated. Hydrolysis was carried out in the biphasic system (water/diethyl ether) at pH 6,5 and temp 30°C. Influence of enzymatic extracts from three cabbage varieties, reaction time, Ca2+ concentration and enzyme extracts/PC ratio, on activity towards RPC resulting in rapeseed phosphatidic acid (RPA) formation were examined. Our study shows that the PLD extracts from savoy cabbage (PLDsc), white cabbage (PLDwc) and brussels sprouts (PLDbs) used in experiments exhibit hydrolytic activity towards RPC resulting in rapeseed RPA with different yield. The highest activity towards RPC shows PLD extract from PLDsc with the RPC conversion degree to RPA (90%) was observed at 120 mM Ca2+ concentration, reaction time 60 min and ratio of PLD extract to RPC 6 : 1 (w/w). Our study shows that purified by us PLDsc extracts exhibit hydrolytic activity towards RPC giving new RPA with satisfying conversion degree for use in pharmacy, cosmetics and as a standard in analytical chemistry. PMID:26642684

  12. Robust enzymatic hydrolysis of Formiline-pretreated oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) for efficient conversion of polysaccharide to sugars and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xingkai; Zhao, Xuebing; Zeng, Jing; Loh, Soh Kheang; Choo, Yuen May; Liu, Dehua

    2014-08-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) was pretreated by Formiline process to overcome biomass recalcitrance and obtain hemicellulosic syrup and lignin. Higher formic acid concentration led to more lignin removal but also higher degree of cellulose formylation. Cellulose digestibility could be well recovered after deformylation with a small amount of lime. After digested by enzyme loading of 15 FPU+10 CBU/g solid for 48 h, the polysaccharide conversion could be over 90%. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) results demonstrated that ethanol concentration reached 83.6 g/L with approximate 85% of theoretic yield when performed at an initial dry solid consistency of 20%. A mass balance showed that via Formiline pretreatment 0.166 kg of ethanol could be produced from 1 kg of dry EFB with co-production of 0.14 kg of high-purity lignin and 5.26 kg hemicellulosic syrup containing 2.8% xylose. Formiline pretreatment thus can be employed as an entry for biorefining of EFB. PMID:24956030

  13. A green and efficient technology for the degradation of cellulosic materials: structure changes and enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of natural cellulose pretreated by synergistic interaction of mechanical activation and metal salt.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjuan; Li, Qian; Su, Jianmei; Lin, Ye; Huang, Zuqiang; Lu, Yinghua; Sun, Guosong; Yang, Mei; Huang, Aimin; Hu, Huayu; Zhu, Yuanqin

    2015-02-01

    A new technology for the pretreatment of natural cellulose was developed, which combined mechanical activation (MA) and metal salt treatments in a stirring ball mill. Different valent metal nitrates were used to investigate the changes in degree of polymerization (DP) and crystallinity index (CrI) of cellulose after MA+metal salt (MAMS) pretreatment, and Al(NO3)3 showed better pretreatment effect than NaNO3 and Zn(NO3)2. The destruction of morphological structure of cellulose was mainly resulted from intense ball milling, and the comparative studies on the changes of DP and crystal structure of MA and MA+Al(NO3)3 pretreated cellulose samples showed a synergistic interaction of MA and Al(NO3)3 treatments with more effective changes of structural characteristics of MA+Al(NO3)3 pretreated cellulose and substantial increase of reducing sugar yield in enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. In addition, the results indicated that the presence of Al(NO3)3 had significant enhancement for the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. PMID:25490099

  14. Preparation, analysis and antioxidant evaluation of the controlled product of polysaccharide from Mactra veneriformis by mild acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling Chong; Wu, Hao; Ji, Jing; Xue, Feng; Liu, Rui

    2016-02-10

    The polysaccharides from Mactra veneriformis (MVPS) were degraded by controlled mild acid hydrolysis to produce active oligosaccharides. MVPS can easily be hydrolyzed by H2SO4 or HCl. The hydrolyzing process was investigated in acid addition and reaction time by evaluating the producing content of reducing sugar. Hydrolysis with 1M HCl to MVPS can generate a time-depended behavior that is mild and controllable. HPLC analysis monitored the change of oligosaccharides composition in hydrolyzing. Total nine oligosaccharides are recognizable in the HPLC profile, and their content showed a regular transformation in hydrolysis. Those nine ingredients were identified as glucooligosaccharides with DP from 1 to 7 by MS analysis. Antioxidant activities of the typical hydrolyzates as well as MVPs were further tested in assays of DPPH and hydroxyl radicals scavenging, and reducing power. It was found that HCl hydrolyzate exhibited stronger antioxidant effects than MVPS and H2SO4 hydrolyzate due to its higher content of oligosaccharides. PMID:26686183

  15. Bioethanol production from deacetylated yellow poplar pretreated with oxalic acid recovered through electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Chandan; Jeong, So-Yeon; Lee, Jae-Won

    2016-05-01

    Electrodialysis (ED) was used to develop a multistage oxalic acid recovery and pretreatment system to produce ethanol from deacetylated yellow poplar. Pretreatment of the biomass was performed at 150°C for 42 min using 0.16 M oxalic acid. The efficiency of oxalic acid recovery from the hydrolysate reached up to 92.32% in all the stages. Ethanol production and ethanol yield of ED-treated hydrolysate in each stage showed a uniform pattern ranging from 6.81 g/L to 7.21 g/L and 0.40 g/g to 0.43 g/g, respectively. The results showed that efficiency of ethanol production increased when deacetylated biomass and ED process was used. Ethanol yield from the pretreated biomass using simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) was in the range of 80.59-83.36% in all the stages. The structural characterization of the pretreated biomass at each stage was investigated and structural changes were not significantly different among the various pretreated biomass. PMID:26943934

  16. Treatment of olive mill wastewater by chemical processes: effect of acid cracking pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Hande Gursoy-Haksevenler, B; Arslan-Alaton, Idil

    2014-01-01

    The effect of acid cracking (pH 2.0; T 70 °C) and filtration as a pretreatment step on the chemical treatability of olive mill wastewater (chemical oxygen demand (COD) 150,000 m/L; total organic carbon (TOC) 36,000 mg/L; oil-grease 8,200 mg/L; total phenols 3,800 mg/L) was investigated. FeCl3 coagulation, Ca(OH)2 precipitation, electrocoagulation using stainless steel electrodes and the Fenton's reagent were applied as chemical treatment methods. Removal performances were examined in terms of COD, TOC, oil-grease, total phenols, colour, suspended solids and acute toxicity with the photobacterium Vibrio fischeri. Significant oil-grease (95%) and suspended solids (96%) accompanied with 58% COD, 43% TOC, 39% total phenols and 80% colour removals were obtained by acid cracking-filtration pretreatment. Among the investigated chemical treatment processes, electrocoagulation and the Fenton's reagent were found more effective after pretreatment, especially in terms of total phenols removal. Total phenols removal increased from 39 to 72% when pretreatment was applied, while no significant additional (≈10-15%) COD and TOC removals were obtained when acid cracking was coupled with chemical treatment. The acute toxicity of the original olive mill wastewater sample increased considerably after pretreatment from 75 to 89% (measured for the 10-fold diluted wastewater sample). An operating cost analysis was also performed for the selected chemical treatment processes. PMID:24718336

  17. Direct lactic acid fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke tuber extract using Lactobacillus paracasei without acidic or enzymatic inulin hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hwa-Young; Ryu, Hee-Kyoung; Park, Kyung-Min; Lee, Eun Gyo; Lee, Hongweon; Kim, Seon-Won; Choi, Eui-Sung

    2012-06-01

    Lactic acid fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke tuber was performed with strains of Lactobacillus paracasei without acidic or enzymatic inulin hydrolysis prior to fermentation. Some strains of L. paracasei, notably KCTC13090 and KCTC13169, could ferment hot-water extract of Jerusalem artichoke tuber more efficiently compared with other Lactobacillus spp. such as L. casei type strain KCTC3109. The L. paracasei strains could utilize almost completely the fructo-oligosaccharides present in Jerusalem artichoke. Inulin-fermenting L. paracasei strains produced c.a. six times more lactic acid compared with L. casei KCTC3109. Direct lactic fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke tuber extract at 111.6g/L of sugar content with a supplement of 5 g/L of yeast extract by L. paracasei KCTC13169 in a 5L jar fermentor produced 92.5 ce:hsp sp="0.25"/>g/L of lactic acid with 16.8 g/L fructose equivalent remained unutilized in 72 h. The conversion efficiency of inulin-type sugars to lactic acid was 98% of the theoretical yield. PMID:22516247

  18. Effect of gamma interferon on phospholipid hydrolysis and fatty acid incorporation in L929 cells infected with Rickettsia prowazekii.

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, H H; Day, L; Daugherty, R; Turco, J

    1993-01-01

    Treatment of Rickettsia prowazekii-infected L929 cells with gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) immediately after infection altered the lipid metabolism of the host cells as determined by measurement of phospholipid hydrolysis and oleic acid incorporation into phospholipids and neutral lipids. At 48 h postinfection, there was increased phospholipid hydrolysis in infected cultures relative to mock-infected cultures and a further increase in radiolabeled phospholipid hydrolysis in IFN-gamma-treated infected cultures. Oleic acid, the radiolabeled product of hydrolysis, was found in both the free fatty acid and neutral lipid fractions. None of the mock-infected cultures demonstrated increased hydrolysis of their radiolabeled phospholipids in response to treatment with IFN-gamma. Most of the radiolabeled oleic acid incorporated into cultures in the interval between 24 and 48 h after infection and IFN-gamma treatment was present in the phospholipid fraction. However, the neutral lipid fraction from the infected cultures that had been IFN-gamma treated was labeled to a greater extent than that from the untreated cultures. Thin-layer chromatographic analysis of the neutral lipid fractions from both the hydrolysis and incorporation experiments demonstrated that most of the radiolabel was in triglycerides. The infected cultures at 30 h were intact as assessed by the exclusion of trypan blue, but at 48 h postinfection in the IFN-gamma-treated infected cultures more than half of the cells were unable to exclude trypan blue. In no case did the mock-infected cells show substantial damage as a result of IFN-gamma treatment. PMID:8335370

  19. Effect of fungal and phosphoric acid pretreatment on ethanol production from oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB).

    PubMed

    Ishola, Mofoluwake M; Isroi; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2014-08-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB), a lignocellulosic residue of palm oil industries was examined for ethanol production. Milled OPEFB exposed to simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) with enzymes and Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted just in 14.5% ethanol yield compared to the theoretical yield. Therefore, chemical pretreatment with phosphoric acid, a biological pretreatment with white-rot fungus Pleurotus floridanus, and their combination were carried out on OPEFB prior to the SSF. Pretreatment with phosphoric acid, combination of both methods and just fungal pretreatment improved the digestibility of OPEFB by 24.0, 16.5 and 4.5 times, respectively. During the SSF, phosphoric acid pretreatment, combination of fungal and phosphoric acid pretreatment and just fungal pretreatment resulted in the highest 89.4%, 62.8% and 27.9% of the theoretical ethanol yield, respectively. However, the recovery of the OPEFB after the fungal pretreatment was 98.7%, which was higher than after phosphoric acid pretreatment (36.5%) and combined pretreatment (45.2%). PMID:24630370

  20. Structure of Human Acid Sphingomyelinase Reveals the Role of the Saposin Domain in Activating Substrate Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zi-Jian; Huang, Jingjing; Poda, Gennady; Pomès, Régis; Privé, Gilbert G

    2016-07-31

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal phosphodiesterase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide and phosphocholine. While other lysosomal sphingolipid hydrolases require a saposin activator protein for full activity, the ASM polypeptide incorporates a built-in N-terminal saposin domain and does not require an external activator protein. Here, we report the crystal structure of human ASM and describe the organization of the three main regions of the enzyme: the N-terminal saposin domain, the proline-rich connector, and the catalytic domain. The saposin domain is tightly associated along an edge of the large, bowl-shaped catalytic domain and adopts an open form that exposes a hydrophobic concave surface approximately 30Å from the catalytic center. The calculated electrostatic potential of the enzyme is electropositive at the acidic pH of the lysosome, consistent with the strict requirement for the presence of acidic lipids in target membranes. Docking studies indicate that sphingomyelin binds with the ceramide-phosphate group positioned at the binuclear zinc center and molecular dynamic simulations indicate that the intrinsic flexibility of the saposin domain is important for monomer-dimer exchange and for membrane interactions. Overall, ASM uses a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions to cause local disruptions of target bilayers in order to bring the lipid headgroup to the catalytic center in a membrane-bound reaction. PMID:27349982

  1. Effect of degree of hydrolysis of whey protein on in vivo plasma amino acid appearance in humans.

    PubMed

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Storm, Adam C; Klitgaard, Søren; Jørgensen, Henry; Bibby, Bo M; Serena, Anja; Vissing, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Whey protein is generally found to be faster digested and to promote faster and higher increases in plasma amino acid concentrations during the immediate ~60 min following protein ingestion compared to casein. The aim of the present study was to compare three different whey protein hydrolysates with varying degrees of hydrolysis (DH, % cleaved peptide bonds) to evaluate if the degree of whey protein hydrolysis influences the rate of amino acid plasma appearance in humans. A casein protein was included as reference. The three differentially hydrolysed whey proteins investigated were: High degree of hydrolysis (DH, DH = 48 %), Medium DH (DH = 27 %), and Low DH (DH = 23 %). The casein protein was intact. Additionally, since manufacturing of protein products may render some amino acids unavailable for utilisation in the body the digestibility and the biological value of all four protein fractions were evaluated in a rat study. A two-compartment model for the description of the postprandial plasma amino acid kinetics was applied to investigate the rate of postprandial total amino acid plasma appearance of the four protein products. The plasma amino acid appearance rates of the three whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) were all significantly higher than for the casein protein, however, the degree of hydrolysis of the WPH products did not influence plasma total amino acid appearance rate (estimates of DH and 95 % confidence intervals [CI] (mol L(-1) min(-1)): High DH 0.0585 [0.0454, 0.0754], Medium DH 0.0594 [0.0495, 0.0768], Low DH 0.0560 [0.0429, 0.0732], Casein 0.0194 [0.0129, 0.0291]). The four protein products were all highly digestible, while the biological value decreased with increasing degree of hydrolysis. In conclusion, the current study does not provide evidence that the degree of whey protein hydrolysis is a strong determinant for plasma amino acid appearance rate within the studied range of hydrolysis and protein dose. PMID:27065230

  2. High titer gluconic acid fermentation by Aspergillus niger from dry dilute acid pretreated corn stover without detoxification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongsen; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie

    2016-03-01

    This study reported a high titer gluconic acid fermentation using dry dilute acid pretreated corn stover (DDAP) hydrolysate without detoxification. The selected fermenting strain Aspergillus niger SIIM M276 was capable of inhibitor degradation thus no detoxification on pretreated corn stover was required. Parameters of gluconic acid fermentation in corn stover hydrolysate were optimized in flasks and in fermentors to achieve 76.67 g/L gluconic acid with overall yield of 94.91%. The sodium gluconate obtained from corn stover was used as additive for extending setting time of cement mortar and similar function was obtained with starch based sodium gluconate. This study provided the first high titer gluconic acid production from lignocellulosic feedstock with potential of industrial applications. PMID:26724553

  3. Activation Energies for an Enzyme-Catalyzed and Acid-Catalyzed Hydrolysis: An Introductory Interdisciplinary Experiment for Chemists and Biochemists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, K. R.; Meyers, M. B.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment in which students determine and compare the Arrhenius activation energies (Ea) for the hydrolysis of salicin. This reaction is subject to catalysis both by acid and by the enzyme emulsin (beta-d-glucoside glycohydrolase). (JN)

  4. Comparative data on effects of leading pretreatments and enzyme loadings and formulations on sugar

    SciTech Connect

    Wyman, Charles; Balan, Venkatech; Dale, Bruce E.; Elander, Richard; Falls, Matthew; Hames, Bonnie; Holtzapple, Mark; Ladisch, Michael R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Mosier, Nathan; Pallapolu, Venkata R.; Shi, Jian; Warner, Ryan E.

    2011-06-16

    Dilute sulfuric acid (DA), sulfur dioxide (SO2), liquid hot water (LHW), soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA), ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), and lime pretreatments were applied to Alamo, Dacotah, and Shawnee switchgrass. Application of the same analytical methods and material balance approaches facil-itated meaningful comparisons of glucose and xylose yields from combined pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Use of a common supply of cellulase, beta-glucosidase, and xylanase also eased comparisons. All pretreatments enhanced sugar recovery from pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis substantially compared to untreated switchgrass. Adding beta-glucosidase was effective early in enzy-matic hydrolysis while cellobiose levels were high but had limited effect on longer term yields at the enzyme loadings applied. Adding xylanase improved yields most for higher pH pretreatments where more xylan was left in the solids. Harvest time had more impact on performance than switchgrass variety, and microscopy showed changes in different features could impact performance by different pretreatments.

  5. Pretreatment of banana agricultural waste for bio-ethanol production: individual and interactive effects of acid and alkali pretreatments with autoclaving, microwave heating and ultrasonication.

    PubMed

    Gabhane, Jagdish; William, S P M Prince; Gadhe, Abhijit; Rath, Ritika; Vaidya, Atul Narayan; Wate, Satish

    2014-02-01

    Banana agricultural waste is one of the potential lignocellulosic substrates which are mostly un-utilized but sufficiently available in many parts of the world. In the present study, suitability of banana waste for biofuel production with respect to pretreatment and reducing sugar yield was assessed. The effectiveness of both acid and alkali pretreatments along with autoclaving, microwave heating and ultrasonication on different morphological parts of banana (BMPs) was studied. The data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and numerical point prediction tool of MINITAB RELEASE 14. Accordingly, the optimum cumulative conditions for maximum recovery of reducing sugar through acid pretreatment are: leaf (LF) as the substrate with 25 min of reaction time and 180°C of reaction temperature using microwave. Whereas, the optimum conditions for alkaline pretreatments are: pith (PH) as the substrate with 51 min of reaction time and 50°C of reaction temperature using ultrasonication (US). PMID:24268472

  6. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M.; Brown, Robert J.

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Lipoprotein hydrolysis products were produced by lipoprotein lipase. • Hydrolysis products lowers expression of macrophage cholesterol transporters. • Hydrolysis products reduces expression of select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products lowers cholesterol transporters and select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products reduces cholesterol efflux from macrophages. - Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  7. High temperature dilute phosphoric acid pretreatment of corn stover for furfural and ethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furfural was produced from corn stover by one stage pretreatment process using dilute H3PO4 and solid residues following furfural production were used for ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL- Y2034. A series of experiments were conducted at varied temperatures (140-200 oC) and acid ...

  8. Investigating the Properties and Hydrolysis Ability of Poly-Lactic Acid/Chitosan Nanocomposites Using Polycaprolactone.

    PubMed

    Trang, Nguyen Thi Thu; Chinhl, Nguyen Thuy; Thanh, Dinh Thi Mai; Hang, To Thi Xuan; Giang, Nguyen Vu; Hoang, Thai; Quan, Pham Minh; Giang, Le Duc; Thai, Nguyen Viet; Lawrence, Geoffrey

    2015-12-01

    Poly-lactic acid (PLA) has been widely applied in the medical field (in biomedicines such as medical capsules, surgical sutures and suture wounds) owing to its high biodegradability, good biocompatibility and ability to be dissolved in common solvents. Chitosan (CS) is an abundant polysaccharide and a cationic polyelectrolyte present in nature. In this study, the combination of PLA and CS has been used to form PLA/CS nanocomposites having the advantages of both the original components. To enhance the dispersibility and compatibility between PLA and CS in the PLA/CS nanocomposites, polycaprolactone (PCL) is added as a compatibilizer. The Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopies prove the existence of the interactions of PCL with PLA and CS. A more regular dispersion of CS of 200-400 nm particle size, is observed in the PLA matrix of the PLA/CS nanocomposites containing PCL, through the Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy images. The appearance of one glass transition temperature (T(g)) value of PLA/CS/PCL nanocomposites occuring between the T(g) values of PLA and CS in DSC diagrams confirms the improvement in the compatibility between PLA and CS, due to the presence of PCL. The TGA result shows that PCL plays an important role in enhancing the thermal stability of PLA/CS/PCL nanocomposites. The hydrolysis of PLA/CS/PCL nanocomposites in alkaline and phosphate buffer solutions was investigated. The obtained results show that the PLA/CS/PCL nanocomposites have slower hydrolysis ability than the PLA/CS composites. PMID:26682382

  9. Enantioselective Hydrolysis of Amino Acid Esters Promoted by Bis(β-cyclodextrin) Copper Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Shan-Shan; Zhao, Meng; Ke, Zhuo-Feng; Cheng, Bei-Chen; Su, Hua; Cao, Qian; Cao, Zhen-Kun; Wang, Jun; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    It is challenging to create artificial catalysts that approach enzymes with regard to catalytic efficiency and selectivity. The enantioselective catalysis ranks the privileged characteristic of enzymatic transformations. Here, we report two pyridine-linked bis(β-cyclodextrin) (bisCD) copper(II) complexes that enantioselectively hydrolyse chiral esters. Hydrolytic kinetic resolution of three pairs of amino acid ester enantiomers (S1–S3) at neutral pH indicated that the “back-to-back” bisCD complex CuL1 favoured higher catalytic efficiency and more pronounced enantioselectivity than the “face-to-face” complex CuL2. The best enantioselectivity was observed for N-Boc-phenylalanine 4-nitrophenyl ester (S2) enantiomers promoted by CuL1, which exhibited an enantiomer selectivity of 15.7. We observed preferential hydrolysis of L-S2 by CuL1, even in racemic S2, through chiral high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We demonstrated that the enantioselective hydrolysis was related to the cooperative roles of the intramolecular flanking chiral CD cavities with the coordinated copper ion, according to the results of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), inhibition experiments, rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY), and theoretical calculations. Although the catalytic parameters lag behind the level of enzymatic transformation, this study confirms the cooperative effect of the first and second coordination spheres of artificial catalysts in enantioselectivity and provides hints that may guide future explorations of enzyme mimics. PMID:26916830

  10. MTBE Hydrolysis in Dilute Aqueous Solution Using Heterogeneous Strong Acid Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rixey, W. G.

    2003-12-01

    The objective of this research has been the development of a potential in situ catalytic process for the hydrolysis of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) to tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) and methanol in ground water. Bench-scale batch reactor studies were conducted over a temperature range of 23 deg C to 50 deg C with several heterogeneous strong acid catalysts to obtain rates of hydrolysis of MTBE to TBA and methanol at dilute concentrations in water. Continuous flow experiments were then conducted to obtain kinetic data over a temperature range of 15 deg C to 50 deg C for various flow rates for the most active catalysts. It was found that the batch and continuous flow experiments yielded similar intrinsic kinetic rate constants when sorption of MTBE to the catalyst was accounted for. Additional fixed-bed experiments were conducted with deionized water and 0.005 M CaCl2 feed solutions containing 100 mg/L MTBE, respectively, to assess the deactivation of the catalyst, and deactivation was found to be controlled by ion exchange of H+ in the catalyst with Ca+2 in the feed. Our results indicate that, for low to moderate groundwater velocities and cation concentrations at ambient temperatures, an in situ reactive barrier process using the most active catalysts studied in this research could be a viable process in terms of both suitable conversion of MTBE and catalyst life. Although application to in situ remediation is emphasized, the results of this research are also applicable to ex-situ groundwater treatment.

  11. Acid pre-treatment method for in situ ore leaching

    DOEpatents

    Mallon, R.G.; Braun, R.L.

    1975-10-28

    An acid leaching method is described for the recovery of a desired element from a subterranean rubblized body of primary ore containing the element and also having associated therewith a carbonate mineral wherein the rubblized ore body is flooded with an aqueous acidic solution in order to release carbon dioxide from the associated carbonate mineral. After a substantial portion of the available carbon dioxide is released and removed from the ore body, as by venting to the atmosphere, an oxidizing gas is introduced into the flooded, rubblized ore to oxidize the ore and form an acid leach solution effective in the presence of the dissolved oxidizing gas to dissolve the ore and cause the desired element to go into solution. The leach solution is then circulated to the surface where the metal values are recovered therefrom.

  12. Optimization studies on acid hydrolysis of oil palm empty fruit bunch fiber for production of xylose.

    PubMed

    Rahman, S H A; Choudhury, J P; Ahmad, A L; Kamaruddin, A H

    2007-02-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunch fiber is a lignocellulosic waste from palm oil mills. It is a potential source of xylose which can be used as a raw material for production of xylitol, a high value product. The increasing interest on use of lignocellulosic waste for bioconversion to fuels and chemicals is justifiable as these materials are low cost, renewable and widespread sources of sugars. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of H(2)SO(4) concentration, reaction temperature and reaction time for production of xylose. Batch reactions were carried out under various reaction temperature, reaction time and acid concentrations and Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was followed to optimize the hydrolysis process in order to obtain high xylose yield. The optimum reaction temperature, reaction time and acid concentration found were 119 degrees C, 60 min and 2%, respectively. Under these conditions xylose yield and selectivity were found to be 91.27% and 17.97 g/g, respectively. PMID:16647852

  13. A simple procedure for preparing chitin oligomers through acetone precipitation after hydrolysis in concentrated hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Kazami, Nao; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Mizutani, Daisuke; Masuda, Tatsuhiko; Wakita, Satoshi; Oyama, Fumitaka; Kawakita, Masao; Sugahara, Yasusato

    2015-11-01

    Chitin oligomers are of interest because of their numerous biologically relevant properties. To prepare chitin oligomers containing 4-6 GlcNAc units [(GlcNAc)4-6], α- and β-chitin were hydrolyzed with concentrated hydrochloric acid at 40 °C. The reactant was mixed with acetone to recover the acetone-insoluble material, and (GlcNAc)4-6 was efficiently recovered after subsequent water extraction. Composition analysis using gel permeation chromatography and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry indicated that (GlcNAc)4-6 could be isolated from the acetone-insoluble material with recoveries of approximately 17% and 21% from the starting α-chitin and β-chitin, respectively. The acetone precipitation method is highly useful for recovering chitin oligomers from the acid hydrolysate of chitin. The changes in the molecular size and higher-order structure of chitin during the course of hydrolysis were also analyzed, and a model that explains the process of oligomer accumulation is proposed. PMID:26256353

  14. Formulation of enzyme blends to maximize the hydrolysis of alkaline peroxide pretreated alfalfa hay and barley straw by rumen enzymes and commercial cellulases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Efficient conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars requires the synergistic action of multiple enzymes; consequently enzyme mixtures must be properly formulated for effective hydrolysis. The nature of an optimal enzyme blends depends on the type of pretreatment employed as well the characteristics of the substrate. In this study, statistical experimental design was used to develop mixtures of recombinant glycosyl hydrolases from thermophilic and anaerobic fungi that enhanced the digestion of alkaline peroxide treated alfalfa hay and barley straw by mixed rumen enzymes as well as commercial cellulases (Accelerase 1500, A1500; Accelerase XC, AXC). Results Combinations of feruloyl and acetyl xylan esterases (FAE1a; AXE16A_ASPNG), endoglucanase GH7 (EGL7A_THITE) and polygalacturonase (PGA28A_ASPNG) with rumen enzymes improved straw digestion. Inclusion of pectinase (PGA28A_ASPNG), endoxylanase (XYN11A_THITE), feruloyl esterase (FAE1a) and β-glucosidase (E-BGLUC) with A1500 or endoglucanase GH7 (EGL7A_THITE) and β-xylosidase (E-BXSRB) with AXC increased glucose release from alfalfa hay. Glucose yield from straw was improved when FAE1a and endoglucanase GH7 (EGL7A_THITE) were added to A1500, while FAE1a and AXE16A_ASPNG enhanced the activity of AXC on straw. Xylose release from alfalfa hay was augmented by supplementing A1500 with E-BGLUC, or AXC with EGL7A_THITE and XYN11A_THITE. Adding arabinofuranosidase (ABF54B_ASPNG) and esterases (AXE16A_ASPNG; AXE16B_ASPNG) to A1500, or FAE1a and AXE16A_ASPNG to AXC enhanced xylose release from barley straw, a response confirmed in a scaled up assay. Conclusion The efficacy of commercial enzyme mixtures as well as mixed enzymes from the rumen was improved through formulation with synergetic recombinant enzymes. This approach reliably identified supplemental enzymes that enhanced sugar release from alkaline pretreated alfalfa hay and barley straw. PMID:24766728

  15. Effect of L-ascorbic acid pretreatment on cadmium toxicity in the male Fischer (F344/NCr) rat.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, N; Uno, H; Waalkes, M P

    1993-12-31

    Some studies have indicated that cadmium-induced lethality and selective injurious effects to specific tissues, such as testes or liver, can be prevented by pretreatment with the antioxidant L-ascorbic acid (ascorbic acid). However, the basis of this tolerance is unclear. We examined the effects of ascorbic acid pretreatment on cadmium toxicity in male Fischer (F344/NCr) rats. Cadmium treatment alone (25 mumol CdCl2/kg, s.c.) proved lethal, causing a 93% mortality within 72 h, but in rats pretreated with ascorbic acid (2 g/kg, s.c. 24, 12 and 1 h) cadmium-induced lethality was nearly prevented. Hepatic lesions, including hepatocellular necrosis, induced by cadmium were at least partially ameliorated by ascorbic acid pretreatment. Ascorbic acid pretreatment had no effect on cadmium-induced testicular lesions nor on cadmium content in testes, liver, kidney and urine. Ascorbic acid alone modestly increased hepatic metallothionein (MT), but not renal MT and had no effect on induction of hepatic or renal MT by cadmium. In contrast to liver and kidney, testicular cadmium-binding protein (TCBP) in rats exposed to cadmium alone decreased markedly. Moreover, the level of TCBP decreased unexpectedly in ascorbic acid pretreated rats as compared with control. These results indicate that ascorbic acid pretreatment decreases the toxicity of cadmium in the rat without markedly modifying its toxicokinetics or markedly stimulating MT synthesis. PMID:8303714

  16. Hydrolysis of olive mill waste to enhance rhamnolipids and surfactin production.

    PubMed

    Moya Ramírez, Ignacio; Altmajer Vaz, Deisi; Banat, Ibrahim M; Marchant, Roger; Jurado Alameda, Encarnación; García Román, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work was to demonstrate the effectiveness of hydrolysis pretreatment of olive mill (OMW) waste before use as a carbon source in biosurfactant production by fermentation. Three hydrolysis methods were assessed: enzymatic hydrolysis, acid pretreatment plus enzymatic hydrolysis, and acid hydrolysis. Fermentation was carried out using two bacterial species: Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus subtilis. Our results showed that the enzymatic hydrolysis was the best pretreatment, yielding up to 29.5 and 13.7mg/L of rhamnolipids and surfactins respectively. Glucose did not show significant differences in comparison to enzymatically hydrolysed OMW. At the best conditions found rhamnolipids and surfactins reached concentrations of 299 and 26.5mg/L; values considerably higher than those obtained with non-hydrolysed OMW. In addition, enzymatic pretreatment seemed to partially reduce the inhibitory effects of OMW on surfactin production. Therefore, enzymatic hydrolysis proved to effectively increase the productivity of these biosurfactants using OMW as the sole carbon source. PMID:26796482

  17. Conversion of levulinic acid into γ-valerolactone using Fe3(CO)12: mimicking a biorefinery setting by exploiting crude liquors from biomass acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Metzker, Gustavo; Burtoloso, Antonio C B

    2015-09-28

    The conversion of biomass-derived levulinic acid (LA) into gamma-valerolactone (GVL) using formic acid (FA) and Fe3(CO)12 as the catalyst precursor was achieved in 92% yield. To mimic a biorefinery setting, crude liquor (containing 20% LA) from the acid hydrolysis of sugarcane biomass in a pilot plant facility was directly converted into GVL in good yield (50%), without the need for isolating LA. PMID:26258183

  18. [Determination of docosahexaenoic acid in milk powder by gas chromatography using acid hydrolysis].

    PubMed

    Shao, Shiping; Xiang, Dapeng; Li, Shuang; Xi, Xinglin; Chen, Wenrui

    2015-11-01

    A method to determine docosahexenoic acid (DHA) in milk powder by gas chromatography was established. The milk powder samples were hydrolyzed with hydrochloric acid, extracted to get total fatty acids by Soxhlet extractor, then esterified with potassium hydroxide methanol solution to form methyl esters, and treated with sodium hydrogen sulfate. The optimal experiment conditions were obtained from orthogonal experiment L9(3(3)) which performed with three factors and three levels, and it requires the reaction performed with 1 mol/L potassium hydroxide solution at 25 degrees C for 5 min. The derivative treated with sodium hydrogen sulfate was separated on a column of SP-2560 (100 m x 0.25 mm x 0.20 μm), and determined in 55 min by temperature programming-gas chromatography. Good linearity was obtained in the range 5.0-300 mg/L with the correlation coefficient of 0.999 9. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 3.4%, 1.2% and 1.1% for the seven repeated experiments of 10, 50 and 100 mg/L of DHA, respectively. The limit of detection was 2 mg/kg, and the recoveries of DHA were in the range of 90.4%-93.5%. The results are satisfactory through the tests of practical samples. PMID:26939370

  19. Pretreatment of corn stover for sugar production using a two-stage dilute acid followed by wet-milling pretreatment process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiyu; Li, Wenzhi; Ma, Qiaozhi; An, Shengxin; Li, Minghao; Jameel, Hasan; Chang, Hou-Min

    2016-07-01

    A two-stage process was evaluated to increase sugar recovery. Firstly, corn stover was treated with dilute hydrochloric acid to recover the xylose, and then the residue was subjected to a wet-milling pretreatment. Dilute hydrochloric acid showed a high xylose recovery during the first stage. The optimal condition was 120°C and 40min for 0.7wt% dilute hydrochloric acid pretreatment followed by wet-milling pretreatment for 15min. The xylose and glucose yield were 81.0% and 64.0%, respectively, with a cellulase dosage at 3FPU/g of substrate. This two-stage process was effective on account of the removal of hemicelluloses in the first stage and the delamination of cell wall in the second stage, increasing the possibility of adsorption of cellulose to enzymes, and resulting in a high sugar recovery with a very low enzyme loading. PMID:27035475

  20. Augmented digestion of lignocellulose by steam explosion, acid and alkaline pretreatment methods: a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Joginder; Suhag, Meenakshi; Dhaka, Anil

    2015-03-01

    Lignocellulosic materials can be explored as one of the sustainable substrates for bioethanol production through microbial intervention as they are abundant, cheap and renewable. But at the same time, their recalcitrant structure makes the conversion process more cumbersome owing to their chemical composition which adversely affects the efficiency of bioethanol production. Therefore, the technical approaches to overcome recalcitrance of biomass feedstock has been developed to remove the barriers with the help of pretreatment methods which make cellulose more accessible to the hydrolytic enzymes, secreted by the microorganisms, for its conversion to glucose. Pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass in cost effective manner is a major challenge to bioethanol technology research and development. Hence, in this review, we have discussed various aspects of three commonly used pretreatment methods, viz., steam explosion, acid and alkaline, applied on various lignocellulosic biomasses to augment their digestibility alongwith the challenges associated with their processing. PMID:25498680

  1. Enhanced bioethanol production from yellow poplar by deacetylation and oxalic acid pretreatment without detoxification.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Chandan; Lee, Hong-Joo; Lee, Jae-Won

    2015-02-01

    In order to produce ethanol from yellow poplar, deacetylation was performed using sodium hydroxide (NaOH). Optimal deacetylation conditions were determined by a response surface methodology. The highest acetic acid concentration obtained was 7.06 g/L when deacetylation was performed at 60 °C for 80 min with 0.8% NaOH. Acetic acid was recovered by electrodialysis from the deacetylated hydrolysate. The oxalic acid pretreatment of deacetylated biomass was carried out and the hydrolysate directly used for ethanol production without detoxification. Ethanol yields ranged from 0.34 to 0.47 g/g and the highest ethanol yield was obtained when pretreatment was carried out at 150 °C with 50 mM oxalic acid. The highest ethanol concentration obtained from pretreated biomass was 27.21 g/L at 170 °C, using a 50 mM of oxalic acid for the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Overall, 20.31 g of ethanol was obtained by hydrolysate and SSF from 100 g of deacetylated yellow poplar. PMID:25205056

  2. Docosahexaenoic acid pretreatment confers protection and functional improvements after acute spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Johnny D; Cordero, Kathia; Baldeosingh, Keisha; Torrado, Aranza I; Walker, Robert L; Miranda, Jorge D; Leon, Marino De

    2012-02-10

    Currently, few interventions have been shown to successfully limit the progression of secondary damage events associated with the acute phase of spinal cord injury (SCI). Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6 n-3) is neuroprotective when administered following SCI, but its potential as a pretreatment modality has not been addressed. This study used a novel DHA pretreatment experimental paradigm that targets acute cellular and molecular events during the first week after SCI in rats. We found that DHA pretreatment reduced functional deficits during the acute phase of injury, as shown by significant improvements in Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scores, and the detection of transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials (tcMMEPs) compared to vehicle-pretreated animals. We demonstrated that, at 7 days post-injury, DHA pretreatment significantly increased the percentage of white matter sparing, and resulted in axonal preservation, compared to the vehicle injections. We found a significant increase in the survival of NG2+, APC+, and NeuN+ cells in the ventrolateral funiculus (VLF), dorsal corticospinal tract (dCST), and ventral horns, respectively. Interestingly, these DHA protective effects were observed despite the lack of inhibition of inflammatory markers for monocytes/macrophages and astrocytes, ED1/OX42 and GFAP, respectively. DHA pretreatment induced levels of Akt and cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) mRNA and protein. This study shows for the first time that DHA pretreatment ameliorates functional deficits, and increases tissue sparing and precursor cell survival. Further, our data suggest that DHA-mediated activation of pro-survival/anti-apoptotic pathways may be independent of its anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:21970623

  3. Docosahexaenoic Acid Pretreatment Confers Protection and Functional Improvements after Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Johnny D.; Cordero, Kathia; Baldeosingh, Keisha; Torrado, Aranza I.; Walker, Robert L.; Miranda, Jorge D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Currently, few interventions have been shown to successfully limit the progression of secondary damage events associated with the acute phase of spinal cord injury (SCI). Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6 n-3) is neuroprotective when administered following SCI, but its potential as a pretreatment modality has not been addressed. This study used a novel DHA pretreatment experimental paradigm that targets acute cellular and molecular events during the first week after SCI in rats. We found that DHA pretreatment reduced functional deficits during the acute phase of injury, as shown by significant improvements in Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scores, and the detection of transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials (tcMMEPs) compared to vehicle-pretreated animals. We demonstrated that, at 7 days post-injury, DHA pretreatment significantly increased the percentage of white matter sparing, and resulted in axonal preservation, compared to the vehicle injections. We found a significant increase in the survival of NG2+, APC+, and NeuN+ cells in the ventrolateral funiculus (VLF), dorsal corticospinal tract (dCST), and ventral horns, respectively. Interestingly, these DHA protective effects were observed despite the lack of inhibition of inflammatory markers for monocytes/macrophages and astrocytes, ED1/OX42 and GFAP, respectively. DHA pretreatment induced levels of Akt and cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) mRNA and protein. This study shows for the first time that DHA pretreatment ameliorates functional deficits, and increases tissue sparing and precursor cell survival. Further, our data suggest that DHA-mediated activation of pro-survival/anti-apoptotic pathways may be independent of its anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:21970623

  4. The Effects of Thermal Pretreatment on Leaching of Yunnan Ilmenite with Hydrochloric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Song-Li; Xiang, Jun-Yi

    2016-04-01

    The effects of thermal pretreatment on the leaching of Yunnan ilmenite ores were investigated from two aspects: the dissolution of iron and titanium, and the proportion of fine precipitations. The results indicate that high-temperature reduction or oxidization produces phase and structure transformations on ilmenite that facilitate the dissolution of iron, reduce the dissolution of titanium, and facilitate the hydrolysis of dissolved titanium. The results further indicate that oxidation at temperatures ranging from 1023 K (750 °C) to 1273 K (1000 °C) can significantly decrease the proportion of fine products. It is believed that the structure of oxidized ilmenite played an important role in minimizing the proportion of fine materials.

  5. Selection of suitable mineral acid and its concentration for biphasic dilute acid hydrolysis of the sodium dithionite delignified Prosopis juliflora to hydrolyze maximum holocellulose.

    PubMed

    Naseeruddin, Shaik; Desai, Suseelendra; Venkateswar Rao, L

    2016-02-01

    Two grams of delignified substrate at 10% (w/v) level was subjected to biphasic dilute acid hydrolysis using phosphoric acid, hydrochloric acid and sulfuric acid separately at 110 °C for 10 min in phase-I and 121 °C for 15 min in phase-II. Combinations of acid concentrations in two phases were varied for maximum holocellulose hydrolysis with release of fewer inhibitors, to select the suitable acid and its concentration. Among three acids, sulfuric acid in combination of 1 & 2% (v/v) hydrolyzed maximum holocellulose of 25.44±0.44% releasing 0.51±0.02 g/L of phenolics and 0.12±0.002 g/L of furans, respectively. Further, hydrolysis of delignified substrate using selected acid by varying reaction time and temperature hydrolyzed 55.58±1.78% of holocellulose releasing 2.11±0.07 g/L and 1.37±0.03 g/L of phenolics and furans, respectively at conditions of 110 °C for 45 min in phase-I & 121 °C for 60 min in phase-II. PMID:26716889

  6. Thermo-chemical pretreatment of rice straw for further processing for levulinic acid production.

    PubMed

    Elumalai, Sasikumar; Agarwal, Bhumica; Sangwan, Rajender S

    2016-10-01

    A variety of pretreatment protocols for rice straw fiber reconstruction were evaluated under mild conditions (upto 0.2%wt. and 121°C) with the object of improving polymer susceptibility to chemical attack while preserving carbohydrate sugars for levulinic acid (LA) production. Each of the protocols tested significantly enhanced pretreatment recoveries of carbohydrate sugars and lignin, and a NaOH protocol showed the most promise, with enhanced carbohydrate preservation (upto 20% relative to the other protocols) and more effective lignin dissolution (upto 60%). Consequently, post-pretreatment fibers were evaluated for LA preparation using an existing co-solvent system consisting of HCl and THF, in addition supplementation of DMSO was attempted, in order to improve final product recovery. In contrast to pretreatment response, H2SO4 protocol fibers yielded highest LA conc. (21%wt. with 36% carbohydrate conversion efficiency) under the modest reaction conditions. Apparent spectroscopic analysis witnessed for fiber destruction and delocalization of inherent constituents during pretreatment protocols. PMID:27371796

  7. Enhancement of biomass conversion in catalytic fast pyrolysis by microwave-assisted formic acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yu; Li, Guangyu; Li, Xiangyu; Zhu, Ning; Xiao, Bo; Li, Jian; Wang, Yujue

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated microwave-assisted formic acid (MW-FA) pretreatment as a possible way to improve aromatic production from catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) of lignocellulosic biomass. Results showed that short duration of MW-FA pretreatment (5-10min) could effectively disrupt the recalcitrant structure of beech wood and selectively remove its hemicellulose and lignin components. This increased the accessibility of cellulose component of biomass to subsequent thermal conversion in CFP. Consequently, the MW-FA pretreated beech wood produced 14.0-28.3% higher yields (26.4-29.8C%) for valuable aromatic products in CFP than the untreated control (23.2C%). In addition, the yields of undesired solid residue (char/coke) decreased from 33.1C% for the untreated control to 28.6-29.8C% for the MW-FA pretreated samples. These results demonstrate that MW-FA pretreatment can provide an effective way to improve the product distribution from CFP of lignocellulose. PMID:27176672

  8. Improving production of volatile fatty acids from food waste fermentation by hydrothermal pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Wang, Kun; Yang, Yuqiang; Shen, Dongsheng; Wang, Meizhen; Mo, Han

    2014-11-01

    Food waste (FW) was pretreated by a hydrothermal method and then fermented for volatile fatty acid (VFAs) production. The soluble substance in FW increased after hydrothermal pretreatment (⩽200 °C). Higher hydrothermal temperature would lead to mineralization of the organic compounds. The optimal temperature for organic dissolution was 180 °C, at which FW dissolved 42.5% more soluble chemical oxygen demand than the control. VFA production from pretreated FW fermentation was significantly enhanced compared with the control. The optimal hydrothermal temperature was 160 °C with a VFA yield of 0.908 g/g VSremoval. Butyrate and acetate were the prevalent VFAs followed by propionate and valerate. FW fermentation was inhibited after 200 °C pretreatment. The VFAs were extracted from the fermentation broth by liquid-liquid extraction. The VFA recovery was 50-70%. Thus, 0.294-0.411 g VFAs could be obtained per gram of hydrothermally pretreated FW (in dry weight) by this method. PMID:25218204

  9. A potentiometric study of the hydrolysis of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid to 150{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.A.; Nguyen-Trung, Chinh

    1995-02-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate anions, EDTA{sup 4-}, were titrated in a hydrogen-electrode concentration cell with an acidic titrant from 0 to 150{degrees}C at 25{degrees}C intervals. These titrations were carried out in the presence of 0. 1, 0.2, and 1.0 mol{center_dot}kg{sup -1} with the supporting electrolytes, sodium chloride, NaCl, and 1.0 mol{center_dot}kg{sup -1} tetramethylammonium trifluoromethylsulfonate, (CH{sub 3}){sub 4}N(F{sub 3}CSO{sub 3}) {l_brace}TMATFMS{r_brace} in order to assess the effect of both cation complexation by EDTA{sup 4-} and anion activity coefficient variations. The resulting hydrolysis quotients are discussed with reference to applications in boiler and heat exchanger chemical cleaning, as well as chemical and nuclear waste containment. Some recent diverse uses of this emf technique that also pertain to these applications will be mentioned briefly, e.g., surface absorption - zero-point-of-charge - measurements to high temperatures and in situ pH measurements in solubility and kinetic experiments.

  10. Valorisation of food waste via fungal hydrolysis and lactic acid fermentation with Lactobacillus casei Shirota.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Tsz Him; Hu, Yunzi; Lin, Carol Sze Ki

    2016-10-01

    Food waste recycling via fungal hydrolysis and lactic acid (LA) fermentation has been investigated. Hydrolysates derived from mixed food waste and bakery waste were rich in glucose (80.0-100.2gL(-1)), fructose (7.6gL(-1)) and free amino nitrogen (947-1081mgL(-1)). In the fermentation with Lactobacillus casei Shirota, 94.0gL(-1) and 82.6gL(-1) of LA were produced with productivity of 2.61gL(-1)h(-1) and 2.50gL(-1)h(-1) for mixed food waste and bakery waste hydrolysate, respectively. The yield was 0.94gg(-1) for both hydrolysates. Similar results were obtained using food waste powder hydrolysate, in which 90.1gL(-1) of LA was produced with a yield and productivity of 0.92gg(-1) and 2.50gL(-1)h(-1). The results demonstrate the feasibility of an efficient bioconversion of food waste to LA and a decentralized approach of food waste recycling in urban area. PMID:26873283

  11. Comparative theoretical studies of the phosphomonoester hydrolysis mechanism by purple acid phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Retegan, M; Milet, A; Jamet, H

    2010-07-01

    We present here the first ONIOM (our own n-layered integrated molecular orbital + molecular mechanics method) studies of a purple acid phosphatase enzyme. Our study focused on the structures of the red kidney bean PAP (kbPAP) complexed with phosphate and with phenyl phosphate and on the mechanism of the phenyl phosphate hydrolysis by the enzyme. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were also performed using models of different sizes for comparison purpose. Results show that the inclusion of three histidine residues, His202, His295, and His296, with their protein surrounding, is crucial to properly describe the coordination of the substrates. They induce a conformation with the substrate closer to the nucleophilic mu-hydroxyde bridge. In the mechanistic study, a transition state is stabilized by a strong hydrogen bond between His202 and the leaving group of the substrate. Consequently, a smaller value for the activation energy barrier is obtained from DFT calculations including this histidine to the same calculations without this histidine. Using the ONIOM method, this activation energy barrier is even more reduced. So the mechanism, which considers the hydroxo group bridging the two metal ions as nucleophile, becomes really convincing, contrary to the results obtained with a small model at the DFT level. PMID:20550096

  12. Hydrolysis of phosphodiesters by diiron complexes: design of nonequivalent iron sites in purple acid phosphatase models.

    PubMed

    Verge, François; Lebrun, Colette; Fontecave, Marc; Ménage, Stéphane

    2003-01-27

    New mu-oxo-diferric complexes have been designed for hydrolysis of phosphodiesters. To mimic the diiron active site of purple acid phosphatase, a combinatorial method has been used to select complexes containing two distinct iron coordination spheres. The introduction of a bidentate ligand, a substituted phenanthroline (L) into complex 1, [Fe2O(bipy)4(OH2)2](NO3)4, generates in solution the complex [Fe2O(bipy)3(L)(OH2)2](NO3)4 as shown by ESI/MS and 1H NMR studies. The latter complex was found to be 20-fold more active than complex 1. On the basis of kinetic studies, we demonstrated that the complex [Fe2O(bipy)3(L)(OH)(OH2)](NO3)3 was the active species and the reaction proceeded through the formation of a ternary complex in which one iron binds a hydroxide and the second, the substrate. At nonsaturating concentrations of the substrate, the increased activity with increased methyl substituents in L was due to an increased affinity of the complex for the substrate. The activity of [Fe2O(bipy)3(33'44'Me2-Phen)(OH2)2](NO3)4 [33'44'Me2Phen = 3,3',4,4'-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline] was found to be comparable to that reported for Co(III) or Ce(IV) complexes. PMID:12693232

  13. Investigation of the complex reaction coordinate of acid catalyzed amide hydrolysis from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, Dirk

    2004-05-01

    The rate-determining step of acid catalyzed peptide hydrolysis is the nucleophilic attack of a water molecule to the carbon atom of the amide group. Therein the addition of the hydroxyl group to the amide carbon atom involves the association of a water molecule transferring one of its protons to an adjacent water molecule. The protonation of the amide nitrogen atom follows as a separate reaction step. Since the nucleophilic attack involves the breaking and formation of several bonds, the underlying reaction coordinate is rather complex. We investigate this reaction step from path sampling Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. This approach does not require the predefinition of reaction coordinates and is thus particularly suited for investigating reaction mechanisms. From our simulations the most relevant components of the reaction coordinate are elaborated. Though the C⋯O distance of the oxygen atom of the water molecule performing the nucleophilic attack and the corresponding amide carbon atom is a descriptor of the reaction progress, a complete picture of the reaction coordinate must include all three molecules taking part in the reaction. Moreover, the proton transfer is found to depend on favorable solvent configurations. Thus, also the arrangement of non-reacting, i.e. solvent water molecules needs to be considered in the reaction coordinate.

  14. beta-Lactamase-catalyzed hydrolysis of acyclic depsipeptides and acyl transfer to specific amino acid acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, R F; Govardhan, C P

    1984-01-01

    beta-Lactamases from all three classes, A, B, and C, catalyze the hydrolysis of specific acyclic depsipeptide (PhCH2CONHCR1R2CO2CHR3CO2H) analogs of acyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine peptides. The depsipeptides investigated, which are chemically as reactive toward nucleophiles as penicillins, are in general poor substrates, although differences between the classes of beta-lactamases have been observed: the order of effectiveness seems to be C greater than B greater than A. Certain class A and C beta-lactamases also catalyze phenylacetylglycyl transfer between phenylacetylglycyl depsipeptides and specific amino acid acceptors, a type of reaction hitherto identified more closely with D-alanyl-D-alanine transpeptidases than with beta-lactamases. Preliminary indications of an acyl-enzyme intermediate in these reactions have been obtained. These results support the suggestion [Tipper, D.J. and Strominger, J.L. (1965) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 54, 1133-1141] that beta-lactamases are evolutionary descendants of bacterial cell wall D-alanyl-D-alanine transpeptidases. PMID:6424114

  15. Large scale purification of puerarin from Puerariae Lobatae Radix through resins adsorption and acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hai-Dong; Zhang, Qing-Feng; Chen, Ji-Guang; Shangguang, Xin-Cheng; Guo, Yu-Xian

    2015-02-01

    Puerarin is the major isoflavone of Puerariae Lobatae Radix. A method for large scale purification of puerarin was developed through resins adsorption and acid hydrolysis. The adsorption properties of six macroporous resins (D101, S-8, H103, X-5, HPD600, AB-8) were compared through the adsorption kinetics and equilibrium adsorption isotherms. Results showed that H103 resin had the best adsorption rate and capacity. The mass transfer zone motion model was further used for analyzing the fixed bed adsorption of H103 resin. Its length of mass transfer zone with 2mg/ml of puerarin in water and 10% ethanol at flow rate of 10ml/min were 41.6 and 47.5cm, while the equilibrium adsorption capacity was 165.03 and 102.88mg/g, respectively. By using 75% ethanol, puerarin could be well desorbed from the resin with recovery of 97.4%. Subsequently, H103 resin was successfully used for puerarin purification from Puerariae Lobatae Radix. The content of total isoflavones and puerarin in the resin adsorption product were 69.25% and 41.78%, respectively, which were about three times increased compared to the crude extract. Then, the product was hydrolyzed by 2.5M HCl at 90°C for 1h. Puerarin with purity of 90% and a byproduct daidzein with purity of 78% were obtained. PMID:25553536

  16. Lactic acid based PEU/HA and PEU/BCP composites: Dynamic mechanical characterization of hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Rich, Jaana; Tuominen, Jukka; Kylmä, Janne; Seppälä, Jukka; Nazhat, Showan N; Tanner, K Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid based poly(ester-urethane) (PEU-BDI) and its composites with 20 and 40 vol.% bioceramic filler were characterized prior to their use as biocompatible and bioabsorbable artificial bone materials. Morphological, dynamic mechanical properties, and degradation of these either hydroxyapatite or biphasic calcium phosphate containing composites were determined. Addition of particulate bioactive filler increased the composite stiffness and the glass transition temperature, indicating strong interactions between the filler and matrix. Materials were sterilized by gamma-irradiation, which reduced the average molecular weights by 30-40%. However, dynamic mechanical properties were not significantly affected by irradiation. Specimens were immersed in 0.85 w/v saline at 37 degrees C for 5 weeks, and changes in molecular weights, mass, water absorption, and dynamic mechanical properties were recorded. All the composite materials showed promising dynamic mechanical performance over the 5 weeks of hydrolysis. Average molecular weights of PEU-BDI and its composites did not change substantially during the test period. PEU-BDI retained its modulus values relatively well, and although the moduli of the composite materials were much higher, especially at high filler content, they exhibited faster loss of mechanical integrity. PMID:12115768

  17. Structural Transformation of Isolated Poplar and Switchgrass Lignins from Dilute Acid Pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Qining; Pu, Yunqiao; Meng, Xianzhi; Wells, Tyrone; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-08-27

    A key step in conversion of cellulosic biomass into sustainable fuels and chemicals is thermochemical pretreatment to reduce plant cell wall recalcitrance. Obtaining an improved understanding of the fundamental chemistry of lignin, the most recalcitrant component of biomass, during pretreatment is critical to the continued development of renewable biofuel production. To examine the intrinsic chemistry of lignin during dilute acid pretreatment (DAP), lignin was isolated from poplar and switchgrass using a cellulolytic enzyme system and then treated under DAP conditions. These results highlight that lignin is subjected to depolymerization reactions within the first 2 min of dilute acid pretreatment and these changes are accompanied by increased generation of aliphatic and phenolic hydroxyl groups of lignin. This is followed by a competing set of depolymerization and repolymerization reactions that lead to a decrease in the content of guaiacyl lignin units and an increase in condensed lignin units as the reaction residence time is extended beyond 5 min. Finally, we showed that a detailed comparison of changes in functional groups and molecular weights of cellulolytic enzyme lignins with different structural parameters, related to the recalcitrant properties of lignin, could be successfully altered during DAP conditions.

  18. Impact of recycling stillage on conversion of dilute sulfuric acid pretreated corn stover to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Mohagheghi, Ali; Schell, Daniel J

    2010-04-01

    Both the current corn starch to ethanol industry and the emerging lignocellulosic biofuels industry view recycling of spent fermentation broth or stillage as a method to reduce fresh water use. The objective of this study was to understand the impact of recycling stillage on conversion of corn stover to ethanol. Sugars in a dilute-acid pretreated corn stover hydrolysate were fermented to ethanol by the glucose-xylose fermenting bacteria Zymomonas mobilis 8b. Three serial fermentations were performed at two different initial sugar concentrations using either 10% or 25% of the stillage as makeup water for the next fermentation in the series. Serial fermentations were performed to achieve near steady state concentration of inhibitors and other compounds in the corn stover hydrolysate. Little impact on ethanol yields was seen at sugar concentrations equivalent to pretreated corn stover slurry at 15% (w/w) with 10% recycle of the stillage. However, ethanol yields became progressively poorer as the sugar concentration increased and fraction of the stillage recycled increased. At an equivalent corn stover slurry concentration of 20% with 25% recycled stillage the ethanol yield was only 5%. For this microorganism with dilute-acid pretreated corn stover, recycling a large fraction of the stillage had a significant negative impact on fermentation performance. Although this finding is of concern for biochemical-based lignocellulose conversion processes, other microorganism/pretreatment technology combinations will likely perform differently. PMID:19998277

  19. Degradation of carbohydrates during dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment can interfere with lignin measurements in solid residues.

    PubMed

    Katahira, Rui; Sluiter, Justin B; Schell, Daniel J; Davis, Mark F

    2013-04-01

    The lignin content measured after dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover indicates more lignin than could be accounted for on the basis of the untreated corn stover lignin content. This phenomenon was investigated using a combination of (13)C cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and lignin removal using acid chlorite bleaching. Only minimal contamination with carbohydrates and proteins was observed in the pretreated corn stover. Incorporating degradation products from sugars was also investigated using (13)C-labeled sugars. The results indicate that sugar degradation products are present in the pretreatment residue and may be intimately associated with the lignin. Studies comparing whole corn stover (CS) to extractives-free corn stover [CS(Ext)] clearly demonstrated that extractives are a key contributor to the high-lignin mass balance closure (MBC). Sugars and other low molecular weight compounds present in plant extractives polymerize and form solids during pretreatment, resulting in apparent Klason lignin measurements that are biased high. PMID:23428141

  20. Structural Transformation of Isolated Poplar and Switchgrass Lignins from Dilute Acid Pretreatment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Qining; Pu, Yunqiao; Meng, Xianzhi; Wells, Tyrone; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-08-27

    A key step in conversion of cellulosic biomass into sustainable fuels and chemicals is thermochemical pretreatment to reduce plant cell wall recalcitrance. Obtaining an improved understanding of the fundamental chemistry of lignin, the most recalcitrant component of biomass, during pretreatment is critical to the continued development of renewable biofuel production. To examine the intrinsic chemistry of lignin during dilute acid pretreatment (DAP), lignin was isolated from poplar and switchgrass using a cellulolytic enzyme system and then treated under DAP conditions. These results highlight that lignin is subjected to depolymerization reactions within the first 2 min of dilute acid pretreatment andmore » these changes are accompanied by increased generation of aliphatic and phenolic hydroxyl groups of lignin. This is followed by a competing set of depolymerization and repolymerization reactions that lead to a decrease in the content of guaiacyl lignin units and an increase in condensed lignin units as the reaction residence time is extended beyond 5 min. Finally, we showed that a detailed comparison of changes in functional groups and molecular weights of cellulolytic enzyme lignins with different structural parameters, related to the recalcitrant properties of lignin, could be successfully altered during DAP conditions.« less