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Sample records for acid hydrolysis pretreatment

  1. Partial acid hydrolysis of poplar wood as a pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Knappert, D.; Grethlein, H.; Converse, A.

    1981-01-01

    Partial acid hydrolysis was studied as a pretreatment to enhance glucose yields from enzymatic hydrolysis of poplar. The pretreatments were carried out in a continuous flow reactor at temperatures ranging from 162 to 222/sup 0/C, acid concentrations ranging from 0 to 1.5%, and treatment times from 3.6 to 12.7 s. The pretreated slurries were hydrolyzed with Trichoderma reesei C30 cellulase at 50/sup 0/C and a pH of 4.8 for 48 h. Increased yields of glucose were achieved when poplar was pretreated at temperatures higher than 180/sup 0/C. By increasing the cellobiase activity of the cellulase with the addition of NOVO cellobiase, in some cases 100% of the potential glucose content of the substrate was converted to glucose after only 24 h of enzymatic hydrolysis.

  2. Investigating Mass Transport Limitations on Xylan Hydrolysis During Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Ashutosh; Pilath, Heid M.; Parent, Yves; Chatterjee, Siddharth G.; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Yarbrough, John M.; Himmel, Michael E.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Johnson, David K.

    2014-04-28

    Mass transport limitations could be an impediment to achieving high sugar yields during biomass pretreatment and thus be a critical factor in the economics of biofuels production. The objective of this work was to study the mass transfer restrictions imposed by the structure of biomass on the hydrolysis of xylan during dilute acid pretreatment of biomass. Mass transfer effects were studied by pretreating poplar wood at particle sizes ranging from 10 micrometers to 10 mm. This work showed a significant reduction in the rate of xylan hydrolysis in poplar when compared to the intrinsic rate of hydrolysis for isolated xylan that is possible in the absence of mass transfer. In poplar samples we observed no significant difference in the rates of xylan hydrolysis over more than two orders of magnitude in particle size. It appears that no additional mass transport restrictions are introduced by increasing particle size from 10 micrometers to 10 mm. This work suggests that the rates of xylan hydrolysis in biomass particles are limited primarily by the diffusion of hydrolysis products out of plant cell walls. A mathematical description is presented to describe the kinetics of xylan hydrolysis that includes transport of the hydrolysis products through biomass into the bulk solution. The modeling results show that the effective diffusion coefficient of the hydrolysis products in the cell wall is several orders of magnitude smaller than typical values in other applications signifying the role of plant cell walls in offering resistance to diffusion of the hydrolysis products.

  3. Ultrasonic pretreatment and acid hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse for succinic acid production using Actinobacillus succinogenes.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yong-lan; Dai, Wen-yu; Xu, Rong; Zhang, Jiu-hua; Chen, Ke-quan; Jiang, Min; Wei, Ping; Ouyang, Ping-kai

    2013-11-01

    Immense interest has been devoted to the production of bulk chemicals from lignocellulose biomass. Diluted sulfuric acid treatment is currently one of the main pretreatment methods. However, the low total sugar concentration obtained via such pretreatment limits industrial fermentation systems that use lignocellulosic hydrolysate. Sugarcane bagasse hemicellulose hydrolysate is used as the carbon and nitrogen sources to achieve a green and economical production of succinic acid in this study. Sugarcane bagasse was ultrasonically pretreated for 40 min, with 43.9 g/L total sugar obtained after dilute acid hydrolysis. The total sugar concentration increased by 29.5 %. In a 3-L fermentor, using 30 g/L non-detoxified total sugar as the carbon source, succinic acid production increased to 23.7 g/L with a succinic acid yield of 79.0 % and a productivity of 0.99 g/L/h, and 60 % yeast extract in the medium could be reduced. Compared with the detoxified sugar preparation method, succinic acid production and yield were improved by 20.9 and 20.2 %, respectively. PMID:23649828

  4. The effect of acid hydrolysis pretreatment on crystallinity and solubility of kenaf cellulose membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, Anis Syuhada Mohd; Zakaria, Sarani; Chia, Chin Hua; Jaafar, Sharifah Nabihah Syed; Padzil, Farah Nadia Mohammad

    2015-09-01

    Cellulose was extracted from kenaf core pulp (KCP) by series of bleaching steps in the sequence (DEED) where D and E are referred as acid and alkali treatment. The bleached kenaf pulp (BKCP) is then pretreated with acid hydrolysis at room temperature for 1 and 3 h respectively. The pretreated cellulose is dissolved in lithium hydroxide/urea (LiOH/urea) and cellulose solution produced was immersed in distilled water bath. BKCP without treatment was also conducted for comparison purpose. The effects of acid hydrolysis pretreatment on solubility and crystallinity are investigated. Higher solubility of cellulose solution is achieved for treated samples. Cellulose II formation and crystallinity index of the cellulose membrane were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  5. The effect of acid hydrolysis pretreatment on crystallinity and solubility of kenaf cellulose membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Saidi, Anis Syuhada Mohd; Zakaria, Sarani; Chia, Chin Hua; Jaafar, Sharifah Nabihah Syed; Padzil, Farah Nadia Mohammad

    2015-09-25

    Cellulose was extracted from kenaf core pulp (KCP) by series of bleaching steps in the sequence (DEED) where D and E are referred as acid and alkali treatment. The bleached kenaf pulp (BKCP) is then pretreated with acid hydrolysis at room temperature for 1 and 3 h respectively. The pretreated cellulose is dissolved in lithium hydroxide/urea (LiOH/urea) and cellulose solution produced was immersed in distilled water bath. BKCP without treatment was also conducted for comparison purpose. The effects of acid hydrolysis pretreatment on solubility and crystallinity are investigated. Higher solubility of cellulose solution is achieved for treated samples. Cellulose II formation and crystallinity index of the cellulose membrane were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD)

  6. Phosphoric acid pretreatment of Achyranthes aspera and Sida acuta weed biomass to improve enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Siripong, Premjet; Duangporn, Premjet; Takata, Eri; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Achyranthes aspera and Sida acuta, two types of weed biomass are abundant and waste in Thailand. We focus on them as novel feedstock for bio-ethanol production because they contain high-cellulose content (45.9% and 46.9%, respectively) and unutilized material. Phosphoric acid (70%, 75%, and 80%) was employed for the pretreatment to improve by enzymatic hydrolysis. The pretreatment process removed most of the xylan and a part of the lignin from the weeds, while most of the glucan remained. The cellulose conversion to glucose was greater for pretreated A. aspera (86.2 ± 0.3%) than that of the pretreated S. acuta (82.2 ± 1.1%). Thus, the removal of hemicellulose significantly affected the efficiency of the enzymatic hydrolysis. The scanning electron microscopy images showed the exposed fibrous cellulose on the cell wall surface, and this substantial change of the surface structure contributed to improving the enzyme accessibility.

  7. Powerful peracetic acid-ionic liquid pretreatment process for the efficient chemical hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Uju; Goto, Masahiro; Kamiya, Noriho

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to design a new method for the efficient saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass (LB) using a combination of peracetic acid (PAA) pretreatment with ionic liquid (IL)-HCl hydrolysis. The pretreatment of LBs with PAA disrupted the lignin fractions, enhanced the dissolution of LB and led to a significant increase in the initial rate of the IL-HCl hydrolysis. The pretreatment of Bagasse with PAA prior to its 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim][Cl])-HCl hydrolysis, led to an improvement in the cellulose conversion from 20% to 70% in 1.5h. Interestingly, the 1-buthyl-3-methylpyridium chloride ([Bmpy][Cl])-HCl hydrolysis of Bagasse gave a cellulose conversion greater than 80%, with or without the PAA pretreatment. For LB derived from seaweed waste, the cellulose conversion reached 98% in 1h. The strong hydrolysis power of [Bmpy][Cl] was attributed to its ability to transform cellulose I to II, and lowering the degree of polymerization of cellulose. PMID:27174616

  8. Dilute oxalic acid pretreatment for high total sugar recovery in pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Qing, Qing; Huang, Meizi; He, Yucai; Wang, Liqun; Zhang, Yue

    2015-12-01

    Oxalic acid was evaluated as an alternative reagent to mineral inorganic acid in pretreatment of corncob to achieve high xylose yield in addition to highly digestible solid residue. A quadratic polynomial model of xylose formation was developed for optimization of pretreatment process by the response surface methodology based on the impact factors of pretreatment temperature, reaction time, acid concentration, and solid-to-liquid ratio. The highest xylose yield was 94.3 % that was obtained under the pretreatment condition of 140 °C for 40 min with 0.5 wt% oxalic acid at a solid loading of 7.5 %. Under these conditions, the xylose yield results of verification experiments were very close to the model prediction, which indicated that the model was applicable. The solid residue generated under this condition also demonstrated a satisfactory enzymatic digestibility and fermentability. PMID:26494137

  9. Acid and enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated cellulosic materials as an analytical tool

    SciTech Connect

    Ladisch, C.M.; Chiasson, C.M.; Tsao, G.T.

    1982-07-01

    A rapid and accurate procedure for the quantitative analysis of cellulose in textiles based on acid and enzymatic hydrolysis was investigated. Total hydrolysis was achieved by a two-step procedure: the cellulose in the sample was first dissolved in cadoxen and then reprecipitated. The material, thus pretreated, was then hydrolyzed with acid or enzyme catalytic agents. Hydrolysis products were detected and quantified by colorimetric, enzymic, and liquid chromatographic methods of analysis. Samples examined included cotton, rayon, Avicel, CF-11, and cotton/polyester blends. The specificity of the enzyme hydrolysis method allowed analysis of raw cotton without prior purification. Results of the analyses were compared to those obtained by existing methods of analysis.

  10. EFFECT OF ANATOMICAL FRACTIONATION ON THE ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF ACID AND ALKALINE PRETREATED CORN STOVER

    SciTech Connect

    K. B. Duguid; M. D. Montross; C. W. Radtke; C. L. Crofcheck; L. M. Wendt; S. A. Shearer

    2009-11-01

    Due to concerns with biomass collection systems and soil sustainability there are opportunities to investigate the optimal plant fractions to collect for conversion. An ideal feedstock would require low severity pretreatment to release a maximum amount of sugar during enzymatic hydrolysis. Corn stover fractions were separated by hand and analyzed for glucan, xylan, acid soluble lignin, acid insoluble lignin, and ash composition. The stover fractions were also pretreated with either 0, 0.4, or 0.8% NaOH for 2 hours at room temperature, washed, autoclaved and saccharified. In addition, acid pretreated samples underwent simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to ethanol. In general, the two pretreatments produced similar trends with cobs, husks, and leaves responding best to the pretreatments, the tops of stalks responding slightly less, and the bottom of the stalks responding the least. For example, corn husks pretreated with 0.8% NaOH released over 90% (standard error of 3.8%) of the available glucan, while only 45% (standard error of 1.1%) of the glucan was produced from identically treated stalk bottoms. Estimates of the theoretical ethanol yield using acid pretreatment followed by SSF were 65% (standard error of 15.9%) for husks and 29% (standard error of 1.8%) for stalk bottoms. This suggests that integration of biomass collection systems to remove sustainable feedstocks could be integrated with the processes within a biorefinery to minimize overall ethanol production costs.

  11. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of dilute acid pretreated cornstalk to biohydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, C. M.; Fan, Y. T.; Hou, H. W.

    2010-03-01

    The coupling method of acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of cornstalk for hydrogen production was investigated in this study. Experimental results showed that temperature, pH and enzyme loading all had an individual significant influence on soluble sugar yield and Ps. The optimum condition for soluble sugar was close to that for Ps. The maximum hydrogen yield from cornstalk by anaerobic mixed microflora was 209.8 ml/g-TVS on the optimum enzymatic hydrolysis condition which was 52 °C of temperature, pH4.8 and 9.4 IU/g of enzyme loading.

  12. Kinetic study of enzymatic hydrolysis of acid-pretreated coconut coir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatmawati, Akbarningrum; Agustriyanto, Rudy

    2015-12-01

    Biomass waste utilization for biofuel production such as bioethanol, has become more prominent currently. Coconut coir is one of lignocellulosic food wastes, which is abundant in Indonesia. Bioethanol production from such materials consists of more than one step. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis is crucial steps to produce sugar which can then be fermented into bioethanol. In this research, ground coconut coir was pretreated using dilute sulfuric acid at 121°C. This pretreatment had increased the cellulose content and decreased the lignin content of coconut coir. The pretreated coconut coir was hydrolyzed using a mix of two commercial cellulase enzymes at pH of 4.8 and temperature of 50°C. The enzymatic hydrolysis was conducted at several initial coconut coir slurry concentrations (0.1-2 g/100 mL) and reaction times (2-72 hours). The reducing sugar concentration profiles had been produced and can be used to obtain reaction rates. The highest reducing sugar concentration obtained was 1,152.567 mg/L, which was produced at initial slurry concentration of 2 g/100 mL and 72 hours reaction time. In this paper, the reducing sugar concentrations were empirically modeled as a function of reaction time using power equations. Michaelis-Menten kinetic model for enzymatic hydrolysis reaction is adopted. The kinetic parameters of that model for sulfuric acid-pretreated coconut coir enzymatic hydrolysis had been obtained which are Vm of 3.587×104 mg/L.h, and KM of 130.6 mg/L.

  13. Modeling Sucrose Hydrolysis in Dilute Sulfuric Acid Solutions at Pretreatment Conditions for Lignocellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, S.; Wickramasinghe, R.; Nagle, N. J.; Schell, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    Agricultural and herbaceous feedstocks may contain appreciable levels of sucrose. The goal of this study was to evaluate the survivability of sucrose and its hydrolysis products, fructose and glucose, during dilute sulfuric acid processing at conditions typically used to pretreat lignocellulose biomass. Solutions containing 25 g/l sucrose with 0.1-2.0% (w/w) sulfuric acid concentrations were treated at temperatures of 160-200 C for 3-12 min. Sucrose was observed to completely hydrolyze at all treatment conditions. However, appreciable concentrations of fructose and glucose were detected and glucose was found to be significantly more stable than fructose. Different mathematical approaches were used to fit the kinetic parameters for acid-catalyzed thermal degradation of these sugars. Since both sugars may survive dilute acid pretreatment, they could provide an additional carbon source for production of ethanol and other bio-based products.

  14. Alkaline pretreatment methods followed by acid hydrolysis of Saccharum spontaneum for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Gaurav; Singh, Lalit Kumar; Ghosh, Sanjoy

    2012-11-01

    Different alkaline pretreatment methods (NaOH, NaOH+10% urea and aqueous ammonia) were optimized for maximum delignification of Saccharum spontaneum at 30°C. Maximum delignification were obtained as 47.8%, 51% and 48% from NaOH (7% NaOH, 48h, and 10% biomass loading), NaOH+urea (7% NaOH+10% urea, 48 h and 10% biomass loading) and 30% ammonia (40 days and 10% biomass loading) respectively. H(2)SO(4) 60% (v/v), 10% biomass loading at 30°C for 4h, were optimized conditions to solubilize the cellulose and hemicellulose from solid residue obtained after different optimized alkaline pretreatments. Slurry thus obtained was diluted to obtain final acid concentration of 10% (v/v) for real hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose at 100°C for 1h. Among all pretreatment methods applied, the best result 0.58 g (85%) reducing sugars/g of initial biomass after acid hydrolysis was obtained from aqueous ammonia pretreated biomass. Scheffersomyces stipitis CBS6054 was used to ferment the hydrolysate; ethanol yield (Y(p/s)) and productivity (r(p)) were found to be 0.35 g/g and 0.22 g/L/h respectively.

  15. Fuel ethanol production from corn stover under optimized dilute phosphoric acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethanol is a renewable oxygenated fuel. Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising pretreatment technology for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuel ethanol. Generation of fermentable sugars from corn stover involves pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification. Pretreatment is crucial as nat...

  16. Sulfuric Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Photoperiod Sensitvie Sorghum for Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect

    F Xu; Y Shi; X Wu

    2011-12-31

    Photoperiod sensitive (PS) sorghum, with high soluble sugar content, high mass yield and high drought tolerance in dryland environments, has great potential for bioethanol production. The effect of diluted sulfuric acid pretreatment on enzymatic hydrolysis was investigated. Hydrolysis efficiency increased from 78.9 to 94.4% as the acid concentration increased from 0.5 to 1.5%. However, the highest total glucose yield (80.3%) occurred at the 1.0% acid condition because of the significant cellulose degradation at the 1.5% concentration. Synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction was used to study changes of the degree of crystallinity. With comparison of cellulosic crystallinity and adjusted cellulosic crystallinity, the crystalline cellulose decreased after low acidic concentration (0.5%) applied, but did not change significantly, as the acid concentration increased. Scanning electron microscopy was also employed to understand how the morphological structure of PS sorghum changed after pretreatment. Under current processing conditions, the total ethanol yield is 74.5% (about 0.2 g ethanol from 1 g PS sorghum). A detail mass balance was also provided.

  17. Effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment on low temperature acid hydrolysis of oil palm empty fruit bunch.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Robiah; Salleh, Shanti Faridah; Abdullah, Nurhafizah; Biak, Dyg Radiah Awg

    2010-12-01

    Various pre-treatment techniques change the physical and chemical structure of the lignocellulosic biomass and improve hydrolysis rates. The effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment on oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fibre prior to acid hydrolysis has been evaluated. The main objective of this study was to determine if ultrasonic pre-treatment could function as a pre-treatment method for the acid hydrolysis of OPEFB fibre at a low temperature and pressure. Hydrolysis at a low temperature was studied using 2% sulphuric acid; 1:25 solid liquid ratio and 100 degrees C operating temperature. A maximum xylose yield of 58% was achieved when the OPEFB fibre was ultrasonicated at 90% amplitude for 45min. In the absence of ultrasonic pre-treatment only 22% of xylose was obtained. However, no substantial increase of xylose formation was observed for acid hydrolysis at higher temperatures of 120 and 140 degrees C on ultrasonicated OPEFB fibre. The samples were then analysed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to describe the morphological changes of the OPEFB fibre. The SEM observations show interesting morphological changes within the OPEFB fibre for different acid hydrolysis conditions. PMID:20719502

  18. Solid acid catalysts pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of macroalgae cellulosic residue for the production of bioethanol.

    PubMed

    Tan, Inn Shi; Lee, Keat Teong

    2015-06-25

    The aim of this study is to investigate the technical feasibility of converting macroalgae cellulosic residue (MCR) into bioethanol. An attempt was made to present a novel, environmental friendly and economical pretreatment process that enhances enzymatic conversion of MCR to sugars using Dowex (TM) Dr-G8 as catalyst. The optimum yield of glucose reached 99.8% under the optimal condition for solid acid pretreatment (10%, w/v biomass loading, 4%, w/v catalyst loading, 30min, 120°C) followed by enzymatic hydrolysis (45FPU/g of cellulase, 52CBU/g of β-glucosidase, 50°C, pH 4.8, 30h). The yield of sugar obtained was found more superior than conventional pretreatment process using H2SO4 and NaOH. Biomass loading for the subsequent simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of the pretreated MCR was then optimized, giving an optimum bioethanol yield of 81.5%. The catalyst was separated and reused for six times, with only a slight drop in glucose yield.

  19. Solid acid catalysts pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of macroalgae cellulosic residue for the production of bioethanol.

    PubMed

    Tan, Inn Shi; Lee, Keat Teong

    2015-06-25

    The aim of this study is to investigate the technical feasibility of converting macroalgae cellulosic residue (MCR) into bioethanol. An attempt was made to present a novel, environmental friendly and economical pretreatment process that enhances enzymatic conversion of MCR to sugars using Dowex (TM) Dr-G8 as catalyst. The optimum yield of glucose reached 99.8% under the optimal condition for solid acid pretreatment (10%, w/v biomass loading, 4%, w/v catalyst loading, 30min, 120°C) followed by enzymatic hydrolysis (45FPU/g of cellulase, 52CBU/g of β-glucosidase, 50°C, pH 4.8, 30h). The yield of sugar obtained was found more superior than conventional pretreatment process using H2SO4 and NaOH. Biomass loading for the subsequent simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of the pretreated MCR was then optimized, giving an optimum bioethanol yield of 81.5%. The catalyst was separated and reused for six times, with only a slight drop in glucose yield. PMID:25839825

  20. Structural features of dilute acid, steam exploded, and alkali pretreated mustard stalk and their impact on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Manali; Raj, Tirath; Vijayaraj, M; Chopra, Anju; Gupta, Ravi P; Tuli, Deepak K; Kumar, Ravindra

    2015-06-25

    To overcome the recalcitrant nature of biomass several pretreatment methodologies have been explored to make it amenable to enzymatic hydrolysis. These methodologies alter cell wall structure primarily by removing/altering hemicelluloses and lignin. In this work, alkali, dilute acid, steam explosion pretreatment are systematically studied for mustard stalk. To assess the structural variability after pretreatment, chemical analysis, surface area, crystallinity index, accessibility of cellulose, FT-IR and thermal analysis are conducted. Although the extent of enzymatic hydrolysis varies upon the methodologies used, nevertheless, cellulose conversion increases from <10% to 81% after pretreatment. Glucose yield at 2 and 72h are well correlated with surface area and maximum adsorption capacity. However, no such relationship is observed for xylose yield. Mass balance of the process is also studied. Dilute acid pretreatment is the best methodology in terms of maximum sugar yield at lower enzyme loading. PMID:25839820

  1. Structural features of dilute acid, steam exploded, and alkali pretreated mustard stalk and their impact on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Manali; Raj, Tirath; Vijayaraj, M; Chopra, Anju; Gupta, Ravi P; Tuli, Deepak K; Kumar, Ravindra

    2015-06-25

    To overcome the recalcitrant nature of biomass several pretreatment methodologies have been explored to make it amenable to enzymatic hydrolysis. These methodologies alter cell wall structure primarily by removing/altering hemicelluloses and lignin. In this work, alkali, dilute acid, steam explosion pretreatment are systematically studied for mustard stalk. To assess the structural variability after pretreatment, chemical analysis, surface area, crystallinity index, accessibility of cellulose, FT-IR and thermal analysis are conducted. Although the extent of enzymatic hydrolysis varies upon the methodologies used, nevertheless, cellulose conversion increases from <10% to 81% after pretreatment. Glucose yield at 2 and 72h are well correlated with surface area and maximum adsorption capacity. However, no such relationship is observed for xylose yield. Mass balance of the process is also studied. Dilute acid pretreatment is the best methodology in terms of maximum sugar yield at lower enzyme loading.

  2. A novel diffusion-biphasic hydrolysis coupled kinetic model for dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longjian; Zhang, Haiyan; Li, Junbao; Lu, Minsheng; Guo, Xiaomiao; Han, Lujia

    2015-02-01

    Kinetic experiments on the dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover were performed. A high xylan removal and a low inhibitor concentration were achieved by acid pretreatment. A novel diffusion-hydrolysis coupled kinetic model was proposed. The contribution to the xylose yield was analyzed by the kinetic model. Compared with the inhibitor furfural negatively affecting xylose yield, the fast and slow-hydrolyzing xylan significantly contributed to the xylose yield, however, their dominant roles were dependent on reaction temperature and time. The impact of particle size and acid concentration on the xylose yield were also investigated. The diffusion process may significantly influence the hydrolysis of large particles. Increasing the acid concentration from 0.15 M to 0.30 M significantly improved the xylose yield, whereas the extent of improvement decreased to near-quantitative when further increasing acid loading. These findings shed some light on the mechanism for dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of corn stover.

  3. Lignin hydrolysis and phosphorylation mechanism during phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wu; Wu, Lingnan; Zheng, Zongming; Dong, Changqing; Yang, Yongping

    2014-12-18

    The study focused on the structural sensitivity of lignin during the phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment process and the resulting hydrolysis and phosphorylation reaction mechanisms using density functional theory calculations. The chemical stabilities of the seven most common linkages (β-O-4, β-β, 4-O-5, β-1, 5-5, α-O-4, and β-5) of lignin in H3PO4, CH3COCH3, and H2O solutions were detected, which shows that α-O-4 linkage and β-O-4 linkage tend to break during the phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment process. Then α-O-4 phosphorylation and β-O-4 phosphorylation follow a two-step reaction mechanism in the acid treatment step, respectively. However, since phosphorylation of α-O-4 is more energetically accessible than phosphorylation of β-O-4 in phosphoric acid, the phosphorylation of α-O-4 could be controllably realized under certain operational conditions, which could tune the electron and hole transfer on the right side of β-O-4 in the H2PO4- functionalized lignin. The results provide a fundamental understanding for process-controlled modification of lignin and the potential novel applications in lignin-based imprinted polymers, sensors, and molecular devices.

  4. Strategies to achieve high-solids enzymatic hydrolysis of dilute-acid pretreated corn stover.

    PubMed

    Geng, Wenhui; Jin, Yongcan; Jameel, Hasan; Park, Sunkyu

    2015-01-01

    Three strategies were presented to achieve high solids loading while maximizing carbohydrate conversion, which are fed-batch, splitting/thickening, and clarifier processes. Enzymatic hydrolysis was performed at water insoluble solids (WIS) of 15% using washed dilute-acid pretreated corn stover. The carbohydrate concentration increased from 31.8 to 99.3g/L when the insoluble solids content increased from 5% to 15% WIS, while the final carbohydrate conversion was decreased from 78.4% to 73.2%. For the fed-batch process, a carbohydrate conversion efficiency of 76.8% was achieved when solid was split into 60:20:20 ratio, with all enzymes added first. For the splitting/thickening process, a carbohydrate conversion of 76.5% was realized when the filtrate was recycled to simulate a steady-state process. Lastly, the clarifier process was evaluated and the highest carbohydrate conversion of 81.4% was achieved. All of these results suggests the possibility of enzymatic hydrolysis at high solids to make the overall conversion cost-competitive.

  5. Economic impact of total solids loading on enzymatic hydrolysis of dilute acid pretreated corn stover.

    PubMed

    Humbird, David; Mohagheghi, Ali; Dowe, Nancy; Schell, Daniel J

    2010-01-01

    In process integration studies of the biomass-to-ethanol conversion process, it is necessary to understand how cellulose conversion yields vary as a function of solids and enzyme loading and other key operating variables. The impact of solids loading on enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis of dilute acid pretreated corn stover slurry was determined using an experimental response surface design methodology. From the experimental work, an empirical correlation was obtained that expresses monomeric glucose yield from enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis as a function of solids loading, enzyme loading, and temperature. This correlation was used in a technoeconomic model to study the impact of solids loading on ethanol production economics. The empirical correlation was used to provide a more realistic assessment of process cost by accounting for changes in cellulose conversion yields at different solids and enzyme loadings as well as enzyme cost. As long as enzymatic cellulose conversion drops off at higher total solids loading (due to end-product inhibition or other factors), there is an optimum value for the total solids loading that minimizes the ethanol production cost. The optimum total solids loading shifts to higher values as enzyme cost decreases.

  6. Preparation of highly charged cellulose nanofibrils using high-pressure homogenization coupled with strong acid hydrolysis pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Tian, Cuihua; Yi, Jianan; Wu, Yiqiang; Wu, Qinglin; Qing, Yan; Wang, Lijun

    2016-01-20

    Cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) are attracting much attention for the advantages of excellent mechanical strength, good optical transparency, and high surface area. An eco-friendly and energy-saving method was created in this work to produce highly negative charged CNFs using high-pressure mechanical defibrillation coupled with strong acid hydrolysis pretreatments. The morphological development, zeta potential, crystal structure, chemical composition and thermal degradation behavior of the resultant materials were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), zeta potential analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). These CNFs were fully separated, surface-charged, and highly entangled. They showed a large fiber aspect ratio compared to traditional cellulose nanocrystrals that are produced by strong acid hydrolysis. Compared to hydrochloric acid hydrolysis, the CNFs produced by sulfuric acid pretreatments were completely defibrillated and presented stable suspensions (or gels) even at low fiber content. On the other hand, CNFs pretreated by hydrochloric acid hydrolysis trended to aggregate because of the absence of surface charge. The crystallinity index (CI) of CNFs decreased because of mechanical defibrillation, and then increased dramatically with increased sulfuric acid concentration and reaction time. FTIR analysis showed that the C-O-SO3 group was introduced on the surfaces of CNFs during sulfuric acid hydrolysis. These sulfate groups accelerated the thermal degradation of CNFs, which occurred at lower temperature than wood pulp, indicating that the thermal stability of sulfuric acid hydrolyzed CNFs was decreased. The temperature of the maximum decomposition rate (Tmax) and the maximum weight-loss rates (MWLRmax) were much lower than for wood pulp because of the retardant effect of sulfuric acid during the combustion of CNFs. By contrast, the CNFs treated with hydrochloric acid

  7. Potential of phosphoric acid-catalyzed pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis for biosugar production from Gracilaria verrucosa.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh-Min; Kim, Sung-Koo; Jeong, Gwi-Taek

    2016-07-01

    This study combined phosphoric acid-catalyzed pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis to produce biosugars from Gracilaria verrucosa as a potential renewable resource for bioenergy applications. We optimized phosphoric acid-catalyzed pretreatment conditions to 1:10 solid-to-liquid ratio, 1.5 % phosphoric acid, 140 °C, and 60 min reaction time, producing a 32.52 ± 0.06 % total reducing sugar (TRS) yield. By subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis, a 68.61 ± 0.90 % TRS yield was achieved. These results demonstrate the potential of phosphoric acid to produce biosugars for biofuel and biochemical production applications. PMID:27003825

  8. Potential of phosphoric acid-catalyzed pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis for biosugar production from Gracilaria verrucosa.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh-Min; Kim, Sung-Koo; Jeong, Gwi-Taek

    2016-07-01

    This study combined phosphoric acid-catalyzed pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis to produce biosugars from Gracilaria verrucosa as a potential renewable resource for bioenergy applications. We optimized phosphoric acid-catalyzed pretreatment conditions to 1:10 solid-to-liquid ratio, 1.5 % phosphoric acid, 140 °C, and 60 min reaction time, producing a 32.52 ± 0.06 % total reducing sugar (TRS) yield. By subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis, a 68.61 ± 0.90 % TRS yield was achieved. These results demonstrate the potential of phosphoric acid to produce biosugars for biofuel and biochemical production applications.

  9. Improving enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover pretreated by ethylene glycol-perchloric acid-water mixture.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Cai; Liu, Feng; Gong, Lei; Lu, Ting; Ding, Yun; Zhang, Dan-Ping; Qing, Qing; Zhang, Yue

    2015-02-01

    To improve the enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass, a mixture of ethylene glycol-HClO4-water (88.8:1.2:10, w/w/w) was used for pretreating corn stover in this study. After the optimization in oil-bath system, the optimum pretreatment temperature and time were 130 °C and 30 min, respectively. After the saccharification of 10 g/L pretreated corn stover for 48 h, the saccharification rate was obtained in the yield of 77.4 %. To decrease pretreatment temperature and shorten pretreatment time, ethylene glycol-HClO4-water (88.8:1.2:10, w/w/w) media under microwave irradiation was employed to pretreat corn stover effectively at 100 °C and 200 W for 5 min. Finally, the recovered hydrolyzates containing glucose obtained from the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated corn stovers could be fermented into ethanol efficiently. These results would be helpful for developing a cost-effective pretreatment combined with enzymatic saccharification of cellulosic materials for the production of lignocellulosic ethanol.

  10. Response surface optimization of corn stover pretreatment using dilute phosphoric acid for enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Avci, Ayse; Saha, Badal C; Dien, Bruce S; Kennedy, Gregory J; Cotta, Michael A

    2013-02-01

    Dilute H(3)PO(4) (0.0-2.0%, v/v) was used to pretreat corn stover (10%, w/w) for conversion to ethanol. Pretreatment conditions were optimized for temperature, acid loading, and time using central composite design. Optimal pretreatment conditions were chosen to promote sugar yields following enzymatic digestion while minimizing formation of furans, which are potent inhibitors of fermentation. The maximum glucose yield (85%) was obtained after enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover pretreated with 0.5% (v/v) acid at 180°C for 15min while highest yield for xylose (91.4%) was observed from corn stover pretreated with 1% (v/v) acid at 160°C for 10min. About 26.4±0.1g ethanol was produced per L by recombinant Escherichia coli strain FBR5 from 55.1±1.0g sugars generated from enzymatically hydrolyzed corn stover (10%, w/w) pretreated under a balanced optimized condition (161.81°C, 0.78% acid, 9.78min) where only 0.4±0.0g furfural and 0.1±0.0 hydroxylmethyl furfural were produced.

  11. Physicochemical pretreatments and hydrolysis of furfural residues via carbon-based sulfonated solid acid.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bao Jun; Sun, Yuan; Lin, Ke Ying; Li, Bing; Liu, Wan Yi

    2014-03-01

    Potential commercial physicochemical pretreatment methods, NaOH/microwave and NaOH/ultrasound were developed, and the carbon-based sulfonated solid acid catalysts were prepared for furfural residues conversion into reducing sugars. After the two optimum pretreatments, both the content of cellulose increased (74.03%, 72.28%, respectively) and the content of hemicellulose (94.11%, 94.17% of removal rate, respectively) and lignin (91.75%, 92.09% of removal rate, respectively) decreased in furfural residues. The reducing sugar yields of furfural residues with the two physicochemical pretreatments on coal tar-based solid acid reached 33.94% and 33.13%, respectively, higher than that pretreated via NaOH alone (27%) and comparable to that pretreated via NaOH/H2O2 (35.67%). The XRD patterns, IR spectra and SEM images show microwave and ultrasound improve the pretreatment effect. The results demonstrate the carbon-based sulfonated solid acids and the physicochemical pretreatments are green, effective, low-cost for furfural residues conversion.

  12. Effect of high dry solids loading on enzymatic hydrolysis of acid bisulfite pretreated Eastern redcedar.

    PubMed

    Ramachandriya, Karthikeyan D; Wilkins, Mark; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Dunford, Nurhan T; Hiziroglu, Salim

    2013-11-01

    This study investigates hydrolysis of cellulose from Eastern redcedar to glucose at high solids loading. Enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated redcedar was performed with 0.5 ml Accelerase® 1500/g glucan (46 FPU/g glucan) using dry solids loading from 2% to 20% (w/w). Rheological challenges observed at high solids loading were overcome by adding stainless steel balls to shake flask reactors. The highest glucose concentration, 126 g/L (84% glucan-to-glucose yield), was obtained using 20% solids loading with stainless steel balls as a mixing aid. This enzymatic hydrolyzate was fermented into ethanol using Saccharomyces cerevisiae D5A to produce 52 g/L of ethanol (corresponding to 166 L/dry Mg of redcedar). Reducing enzyme dosage at 16% solids loading from 46 to 11.5 FPU/g glucan reduced glucan-to-glucose yields. This study has demonstrated the possibility of extracting sugars from the invasive species of Eastern redcedar with high solid loadings and their conversion into ethanol.

  13. Black liquor-derived carbonaceous solid acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of pretreated rice straw in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chenxi; Zhu, Linfeng; Shen, Feng; Qi, Xinhua

    2016-11-01

    Lignin-containing black liquor from pretreatment of rice straw by KOH aqueous solution was applied to prepare a carbonaceous solid acid catalyst, in which KOH played dual roles of extracting lignin from rice straw and developing porosity of the carbon material as an activation agent. The synthesized black liquor-derived carbon material was applied in catalytic hydrolysis of the residue solid from the pretreatment of rice straw, which was mainly composed of cellulose and hemicellulose, and showed excellent activity for the production of total reducing sugars (TRS) in ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride. The highest TRS yield of 63.4% was achieved at 140°C for 120min, which was much higher than that obtained from crude rice straw under the same reaction conditions (36.6% TRS yield). Overall, this study provides a renewable strategy for the utilization of all components of lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:27599625

  14. Comparison of microbial inhibition and enzymatic hydrolysis rates of liquid and solid fractions produced from pretreatment of biomass with carbonic acid and liquid hot water.

    PubMed

    Yourchisin, Damon M; Van Walsum, G Peter

    2004-01-01

    This research quantified the enzymatic digestibility of the solid component and the microbial inhibition of the liquid component of pretreated aspen wood and corn stover hydrolysates. Products of liquid hot water and carbonic acid pretreatment were compared. Pretreatment temperatures tested ranged from 180 to 220 degrees C, and reaction times were varied between 4 and 64 min. Both microbial inhibition rates and enzymatic hydrolysis rates showed no difference between pretreatments containing carbonic acid and those not containing no carbonic acid. Microbial inhibition increased as the reaction severity increased, but only above a midpoint severity parameter of 200 degrees C for 16 min. Both the rates and yields of enzymatic hydrolysis displayed an increase from the lowest tested reaction severity to the highest tested reaction severity.

  15. Microwave Pretreatment For Hydrolysis Of Cellulose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; George, Clifford E.; Lightsey, George R.

    1993-01-01

    Microwave pretreatment enhances enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic wastes into soluble saccharides used as feedstocks for foods, fuels, and other products. Low consumption of energy, high yield, and low risk of proposed hydrolysis process incorporating microwave pretreatment makes process viable alternative to composting.

  16. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated cashew apple bagasse with alkali and diluted sulfuric Acid for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Maria Valderez Ponte; Rodrigues, Tigressa Helena Soares; de Macedo, Gorete Ribeiro; Gonçalves, Luciana R B

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this work was to optimize the enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulose fraction of cashew apple bagasse (CAB) after diluted acid (CAB-H) and alkali pretreatment (CAB-OH), and to evaluate its fermentation to ethanol using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Glucose conversion of 82 +/- 2 mg/g CAB-H and 730 +/- 20 mg/g CAB-OH was obtained when 2% (w/v) of solid and 30 FPU/g bagasse was used during hydrolysis at 45 degrees C, 2-fold higher than when using 15 FPU/g bagasse, 44 +/- 2 mg/g CAB-H, and 450 +/- 50 mg/g CAB-OH, respectively. Ethanol concentration and productivity, achieved after 6 h of fermentation, were 20.0 +/- 0.2 g L(-1) and 3.33 g L(-1) h(-1), respectively, when using CAB-OH hydrolyzate (initial glucose concentration of 52.4 g L(-1)). For CAB-H hydrolyzate (initial glucose concentration of 17.4 g L(-1)), ethanol concentration and productivity were 8.2 +/- 0.1 g L(-1) and 2.7 g L(-1) h(-1) in 3 h, respectively. Hydrolyzates fermentation resulted in an ethanol yield of 0.38 and 0.47 g/g glucose with pretreated CAB-OH and CAB-H, respectively. Ethanol concentration and productivity, obtained using CAB-OH hydrolyzate, were close to the values obtained in the conventional ethanol fermentation of cashew apple juice or sugar cane juice.

  17. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corredor, Deisy Y.

    The performance of soybean hulls and forage sorghum as feedstocks for ethanol production was studied. The main goal of this research was to increase fermentable sugars' yield through high-efficiency pretreatment technology. Soybean hulls are a potential feedstock for production of bio-ethanol due to their high carbohydrate content (≈50%) of nearly 37% cellulose. Soybean hulls could be the ideal feedstock for fuel ethanol production, because they are abundant and require no special harvesting and additional transportation costs as they are already in the plant. Dilute acid and modified steam-explosion were used as pretreatment technologies to increase fermentable sugars yields. Effects of reaction time, temperature, acid concentration and type of acid on hydrolysis of hemicellulose in soybean hulls and total sugar yields were studied. Optimum pretreatment parameters and enzymatic hydrolysis conditions for converting soybean hulls into fermentable sugars were identified. The combination of acid (H2SO4, 2% w/v) and steam (140°C, 30 min) efficiently solubilized the hemicellulose, giving a pentose yield of 96%. Sorghum is a tropical grass grown primarily in semiarid and dry parts of the world, especially in areas too dry for corn. The production of sorghum results in about 30 million tons of byproducts mainly composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Forage sorghum such as brown midrib (BMR) sorghum for ethanol production has generated much interest since this trait is characterized genetically by lower lignin concentrations in the plant compared with conventional types. Three varieties of forage sorghum and one variety of regular sorghum were characterized and evaluated as feedstock for fermentable sugar production. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-Ray diffraction were used to determine changes in structure and chemical composition of forage sorghum before and after pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis

  18. Response surface optimization of corn stover pretreatment using dilute phosphoric acid for enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dilute H3PO4 (0.0 - 2.0%, v/v) was used to pretreat corn stover (10%, w/w) for conversion to ethanol. Pretreatment conditions were optimized for temperature, acid loading, and time using a central composite design. Optimal pretreatment conditions were chosen to promote sugar yields following enzym...

  19. Structural modifications of lignocellulosics by pretreatments to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gharpuray, M.M.; Lee, Y.F.; Fan, L.T.

    1983-01-01

    In this work an evaluation was made of a wide variety of single and multiple pretreatment methods for enhancing the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw. A multiple pretreatment consisted of a physical pretreatment followed by a chemical pretreatment. The structural features of wheat straw, including the specific surface area, crystallinity index, and lignin content, were measured to understand the mechanism of the enhancement in the hyrolysis rate upon pretreatment. It has been found that, in general, multiple pretreatments were not promising, since the hydrolysis rates rarely exceeded those achieved by single pretreatments. Ball-milling pretreatment was found to be effective in increasing the specific surface area and decreasing the crystallinity index. Treatment with ethylene glycol was highly effective in increasing the specific surface area, in addition to a high degree of delignification. Peracetic acid pretreatment was highly effective in delignifying substrate. Among multiple pretreatments, those involving peracetic acid treatment generally had lower crystallinity indices and lignin content values. The relationship between the hydrolysis rate and the set of structural features indicated that an increase in surface area and a decrease in the crystallinity and lignin content enhance the hydrolysis; the specific surface area is the most influential of the structural features, followed by the lignin content. (Refs. 23).

  20. Isolation and structural characterization of sugarcane bagasse lignin after dilute phosphoric acid plus steam explosion pretreatment and its effect on cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jijiao; Tong, Zhaohui; Wang, Letian; Zhu, J Y; Ingram, Lonnie

    2014-02-01

    The structure of lignin after dilute phosphoric acid plus steam explosion pretreatment process of sugarcane bagasse in a pilot scale and the effect of the lignin extracted by ethanol on subsequent cellulose hydrolysis were investigated. The lignin structural changes caused by pretreatment were identified using advanced nondestructive techniques such as gel permeation chromatography (GPC), quantitative (13)C, and 2-D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The structural analysis revealed that ethanol extractable lignin preserved basic lignin structure, but had relatively lower amount of β-O-4 linkages, syringyl/guaiacyl units ratio (S/G), p-coumarate/ferulate ratio, and other ending structures. The results also indicated that approximately 8% of mass weight was extracted by pure ethanol. The bagasse after ethanol extraction had an approximate 22% higher glucose yield after enzyme hydrolysis compared to pretreated bagasse without extraction.

  1. Pretreatment of Dried Distiller Grains with Solubles by Soaking in Aqueous Ammonia and Subsequent Enzymatic/Dilute Acid Hydrolysis to Produce Fermentable Sugars.

    PubMed

    Nghiem, Nhuan P; Montanti, Justin; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2016-05-01

    Dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), a co-product of corn ethanol production in the dry-grind process, was pretreated by soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) using a 15 % w/w NH4OH solution at a solid/liquid ratio of 1:10. The effect of pretreatment on subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis was studied at two temperatures (40 and 60 °C) and four reaction times (6, 12, 24, and 48 h). Highest glucose yield of 91 % theoretical was obtained for the DDGS pretreated at 60 °C and 24 h. The solubilized hemicellulose in the liquid fraction was further hydrolyzed with dilute H2SO4 to generate fermentable monomeric sugars. The conditions of acid hydrolysis included 1 and 4 wt% acid, 60 and 120 °C, and 0.5 and 1 h. Highest yields of xylose and arabinose were obtained at 4 wt% acid, 120 °C, and 1 h. The fermentability of the hydrolysate obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of the SAA-pretreated DDGS was demonstrated in ethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The fermentability of the hydrolysate obtained by consecutive enzymatic and dilute acid hydrolysis was demonstrated using a succinic acid-producing microorganism, strain Escherichia coli AFP184. Under the fermentation conditions, complete utilization of glucose and arabinose was observed, whereas only 47 % of xylose was used. The succinic acid yield was 0.60 g/g total sugar consumed. PMID:26797927

  2. Acid-catalyzed steam pretreatment of lodgepole pine and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ewanick, Shannon M; Bura, Renata; Saddler, John N

    2007-11-01

    Utilization of ethanol produced from biomass has the potential to offset the use of gasoline and reduce CO(2) emissions. This could reduce the effects of global warming, one of which is the current outbreak of epidemic proportions of the mountain pine beetle (MPB) in British Columbia (BC), Canada. The result of this is increasing volumes of dead lodgepole pine with increasingly limited commercial uses. Bioconversion of lodgepole pine to ethanol using SO(2)-catalyzed steam explosion was investigated. The optimum pretreatment condition for this feedstock was determined to be 200 degrees C, 5 min, and 4% SO(2) (w/w). Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of this material provided an overall ethanol yield of 77% of the theoretical yield from raw material based on starting glucan, mannan, and galactan, which corresponds to 244 g ethanol/kg raw material within 30 h. Three conditions representing low (L), medium (M), and high (H) severity were also applied to healthy lodgepole pine. Although the M severity conditions of 200 degrees C, 5 min, and 4% SO(2) were sufficiently robust to pretreat healthy wood, the substrate produced from beetle-killed (BK) wood provided consistently higher ethanol yields after SSF than the other substrates tested. BK lodgepole pine appears to be an excellent candidate for efficient and productive bioconversion to ethanol.

  3. Pretreating lignocellulosic biomass by the concentrated phosphoric acid plus hydrogen peroxide (PHP) for enzymatic hydrolysis: evaluating the pretreatment flexibility on feedstocks and particle sizes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Zhanghong; Shen, Fei; Hu, Jinguang; Sun, Fubao; Lin, Lili; Yang, Gang; Zhang, Yanzong; Deng, Shihuai

    2014-08-01

    In order to seek a high-efficient pretreatment path for converting lignocellulosic feedstocks to fermentable sugars by enzymatic hydrolysis, the concentrated H₃PO₄ plus H₂O₂ (PHP) was attempted to pretreat different lignocellulosic biomass for evaluating the pretreatment flexibility on feedstocks. Meanwhile, the responses of pretreatment to particle sizes were also evaluated. When the PHP-pretreatment was employed (final H₂O₂ and H₃PO₄ concentration of 1.77% and 80.0%), 71-96% lignin and more than 95% hemicellulose in various feedstocks (agricultural residues, hardwood, softwood, bamboo, and their mixture, and garden wastes mixture) can be removed. Consequently, more than 90% glucose conversion was uniformly achieved indicating PHP greatly improved the pretreatment flexibility to different feedstocks. Moreover, when wheat straw and oak chips were PHP-pretreated with different sizes, the average glucose conversion reached 94.9% and 100% with lower coefficient of variation (7.9% and 0.0%), which implied PHP-pretreatment can significantly weaken the negative effects of feedstock sizes on subsequent conversion.

  4. Effects of dilute acid pretreatment conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis monomer and oligomer sugar yields for aspen, balsam, and switchgrass.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jill R; Morinelly, Juan E; Gossen, Kelsey R; Brodeur-Campbell, Michael J; Shonnard, David R

    2010-04-01

    The effects of dilute acid hydrolysis conditions were investigated on total sugar (glucose and xylose) yields after enzymatic hydrolysis with additional analyses on glucose and xylose monomer and oligomer yields from the individual hydrolysis steps for aspen (a hardwood), balsam (a softwood), and switchgrass (a herbaceous energy crop). The results of this study, in the form of measured versus theoretical yields and a severity analysis, show that for aspen and balsam, high dilute acid hydrolysis xylose yields were obtainable at all acid concentrations (0.25-0.75 wt.%) and temperatures (150-175 degrees C) studied as long as reaction time was optimized. Switchgrass shows a relatively stronger dependence on dilute acid hydrolysis acid concentration due to its higher neutralizing mineral content. Maximum total sugar (xylose and glucose; monomer plus oligomer) yields post-enzymatic hydrolysis for aspen, balsam, and switchgrass, were 88.3%, 21.2%, and 97.6%, respectively. In general, highest yields of total sugars (xylose and glucose; monomer plus oligomer) were achieved at combined severity parameter values (log CS) between 2.20 and 2.40 for the biomass species studied.

  5. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose to yield glucose

    DOEpatents

    Tsao, George T.; Ladisch, Michael R.; Bose, Arindam

    1979-01-01

    A process to yield glucose from cellulose through acid hydrolysis. Cellulose is recovered from cellulosic materials, preferably by pretreating the cellulosic materials by dissolving the cellulosic materials in Cadoxen or a chelating metal caustic swelling solvent and then precipitating the cellulose therefrom. Hydrolysis is accomplished using an acid, preferably dilute sulfuric acid, and the glucose is yielded substantially without side products. Lignin may be removed either before or after hydrolysis.

  6. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose pretreated with zinc chloride and hydrochloric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.F.; Gong, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    Microcrystalline cellulose, Avicel, was dissolved in a concentrated solution of ZnCl/sub 2/ and 0.5% hydrochloric acid followed by heating at 145/sup 0/C for 6 min. after cooling, cellulose in its amorphous form was precipitated by the addition of acetone. The resulting cellulose was hydrolyzed by cellulase derived from Trichoderma viride. At concentrations of 20% cellulose and 1% cellulase, cellulose was hydrolyzed completely for form a solution of 19% glucose and 1% cellobiose within 72 h of incubation. 1 figure, 5 tables.

  7. Fungal cellulase/xylanase production and corresponding hydrolysis using pretreated corn stover as substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Wang, Xiaoqing; Ruan, Zhenhua; Liu, Ying; Niu, Xiaorui; Yue, Zhengbo; Li, Zhimin; Liao, Wei; Liu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Three pretreated corn stover (ammonia fiber expansion, dilute acid, and dilute alkali) were used as carbon source to culture Trichoderma reesei Rut C-30 for cellulase and xylanase production. The results indicated that the cultures on ammonia fiber expansion and alkali pretreated corn stover had better enzyme production than the acid pretreated ones. The consequent enzymatic hydrolysis was performed applying fungal enzymes on pretreated corn stover samples. Tukey's statistical comparisons exhibited that there were significant differences on enzymatic hydrolysis among different combination of fungal enzymes and pretreated corn stover. The higher sugar yields were achieved by the enzymatic hydrolysis of dilute alkali pretreated corn stover.

  8. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and various pretreated wood fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Saddler, J.N.; Brownell, H.H.; Clermont, L.P.; Levitin, N.

    1982-06-01

    Three strains of Trichoderma-Trichoderma reesei C30, Trichoderma reesei QM9414, and Trichoderma species E58-were used to study the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated wood substrates. Each of the culture filtrates was incubated with a variety of commercially prepared cellulose substrates and pretreated wood substrates. Solka floc was the most easily degraded commercial cellulose. The enzyme accessibility of steam-exploded samples which has been alkali extracted and then stored wet decreased with the duration of the steam treatment. Air drying reduced the extent of hydrolysis of all the samples but had a greater effect on the samples which had previously shown the greatest hydrolysis. Mild pulping using 2% chlorite increased the enzymatic hydrolysis of all the samples. Steam explosion was shown to be an excellent pretreatment method for aspen wood and was much superior to dilute nitric acid pretreatment. The results indicate that the distribution of the lignin as well as the surface area of the cellulosic substrate are important features in enzymatic hydrolysis. (Refs 17).

  9. Optimization of hydrolysis and volatile fatty acids production from sugarcane filter cake: Effects of urea supplementation and sodium hydroxide pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Janke, Leandro; Leite, Athaydes; Batista, Karla; Weinrich, Sören; Sträuber, Heike; Nikolausz, Marcell; Nelles, Michael; Stinner, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Different methods for optimization the anaerobic digestion (AD) of sugarcane filter cake (FC) with a special focus on volatile fatty acids (VFA) production were studied. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) pretreatment at different concentrations was investigated in batch experiments and the cumulative methane yields fitted to a dual-pool two-step model to provide an initial assessment on AD. The effects of nitrogen supplementation in form of urea and NaOH pretreatment for improved VFA production were evaluated in a semi-continuously operated reactor as well. The results indicated that higher NaOH concentrations during pretreatment accelerated the AD process and increased methane production in batch experiments. Nitrogen supplementation resulted in a VFA loss due to methane formation by buffering the pH value at nearly neutral conditions (∼ 6.7). However, the alkaline pretreatment with 6g NaOH/100g FCFM improved both the COD solubilization and the VFA yield by 37%, mainly consisted by n-butyric and acetic acids.

  10. Fermentative l-lactic acid production from pretreated whole slurry of oil palm trunk treated by hydrothermolysis and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Eom, In-Yong; Oh, Young-Hoon; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Yu, Ju-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    A simple and cost-effective biochemical conversion process consisting of hydrothermal treatment, enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated whole slurry (PWS) was developed for producing l-lactic acid (L-LA) from oil palm trunk (OPT). When OPT was hydrothermally treated at optimal condition capable of achieving maximum yield of hemicellulosic sugars after enzymatic hydrolysis, the enzymatic digestibility of the PWS afforded a yield of 81.4% of the theoretical glucose yield (TGY). However, glucose yield from washed pretreated solid (WPS) was only 43.5% of TGY. The use of two hydrolysates from PWS and WPS for fermentation by Lactobacillus paracasei engineered to selectively produce L-LA afforded yields of 89.5% and 45.8% of the theoretical LA yield (TLY), respectively. This study confirmed the inevitable extensive sugar loss during washing of pretreated slurry due to loss of soluble starch. Alternatively, the proposed design process is considered suitable for converting OPT to L-LA without such starch loss.

  11. Comparative Study of Corn Stover Pretreated by Dilute Acid and Cellulose Solvent-Based Lignocellulose Fractionation: Enzymatic Hydrolysis, Supramolecular Structure, and Substrate Accessibility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z.; Sathitsuksanoh, N.; Vinzant, T.; Schell, D. J.; McMillian, J. D.; Zhang, Y. H. P.

    2009-07-01

    Liberation of fermentable sugars from recalcitrant biomass is among the most costly steps for emerging cellulosic ethanol production. Here we compared two pretreatment methods (dilute acid, DA, and cellulose solvent and organic solvent lignocellulose fractionation, COSLIF) for corn stover. At a high cellulase loading [15 filter paper units (FPUs) or 12.3 mg cellulase per gram of glucan], glucan digestibilities of the corn stover pretreated by DA and COSLIF were 84% at hour 72 and 97% at hour 24, respectively. At a low cellulase loading (5 FPUs per gram of glucan), digestibility remained as high as 93% at hour 24 for the COSLIF-pretreated corn stover but reached only {approx}60% for the DA-pretreated biomass. Quantitative determinations of total substrate accessibility to cellulase (TSAC), cellulose accessibility to cellulase (CAC), and non-cellulose accessibility to cellulase (NCAC) based on adsorption of a non-hydrolytic recombinant protein TGC were measured for the first time. The COSLIF-pretreated corn stover had a CAC of 11.57 m{sup 2}/g, nearly twice that of the DA-pretreated biomass (5.89 m{sup 2}/g). These results, along with scanning electron microscopy images showing dramatic structural differences between the DA- and COSLIF-pretreated samples, suggest that COSLIF treatment disrupts microfibrillar structures within biomass while DA treatment mainly removes hemicellulose. Under the tested conditions COSLIF treatment breaks down lignocellulose structure more extensively than DA treatment, producing a more enzymatically reactive material with a higher CAC accompanied by faster hydrolysis rates and higher enzymatic digestibility.

  12. Comparative study of corn stover pretreated by dilute acid and cellulose solvent-based lignocellulose fractionation: Enzymatic hydrolysis, supramolecular structure, and substrate accessibility.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiguang; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Vinzant, Todd; Schell, Daniel J; McMillan, James D; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2009-07-01

    Liberation of fermentable sugars from recalcitrant biomass is among the most costly steps for emerging cellulosic ethanol production. Here we compared two pretreatment methods (dilute acid, DA, and cellulose solvent and organic solvent lignocellulose fractionation, COSLIF) for corn stover. At a high cellulase loading [15 filter paper units (FPUs) or 12.3 mg cellulase per gram of glucan], glucan digestibilities of the corn stover pretreated by DA and COSLIF were 84% at hour 72 and 97% at hour 24, respectively. At a low cellulase loading (5 FPUs per gram of glucan), digestibility remained as high as 93% at hour 24 for the COSLIF-pretreated corn stover but reached only approximately 60% for the DA-pretreated biomass. Quantitative determinations of total substrate accessibility to cellulase (TSAC), cellulose accessibility to cellulase (CAC), and non-cellulose accessibility to cellulase (NCAC) based on adsorption of a non-hydrolytic recombinant protein TGC were measured for the first time. The COSLIF-pretreated corn stover had a CAC of 11.57 m(2)/g, nearly twice that of the DA-pretreated biomass (5.89 m(2)/g). These results, along with scanning electron microscopy images showing dramatic structural differences between the DA- and COSLIF-pretreated samples, suggest that COSLIF treatment disrupts microfibrillar structures within biomass while DA treatment mainly removes hemicellulose. Under the tested conditions COSLIF treatment breaks down lignocellulose structure more extensively than DA treatment, producing a more enzymatically reactive material with a higher CAC accompanied by faster hydrolysis rates and higher enzymatic digestibility.

  13. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, H.

    1980-12-01

    One of the alternatives to increase world production of etha nol is by the hydrolysis of cellulose content of agricultural residues. Studies have been made on the types of hydrolysis: enzimatic and acid. Data obtained from the sulphuric acid hydrolysis of cellulose showed that this process proceed in two steps, with a yield of approximately 95% glucose. Because of increases in cost of alternatives resources, the high demand of the product and the more economic production of ethanol from cellulose materials, it is certain that this technology will be implemented in the future. At the same time further studies on the disposal and reuse of the by-products of this production must be undertaken.

  14. Pretreatment of dried distillers grains with solubles by soaking in aqueous ammonia and subsequent enzymatic/dilute acid hydrolysis to produce fermentable sugars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), a co-product of corn ethanol production in the dry-grind process, was pretreated by soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) using a 15% w/w NH4OH solution at a solid:liquid ratio of 1:10. The effect of pretreatment on subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis was studied...

  15. Carbonic Acid Pretreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    G. Peter van Walsum; Kemantha Jayawardhana; Damon Yourchisin; Robert McWilliams; Vanessa Castleberry

    2003-05-31

    This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. 1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO2/H2O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. 2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. 3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. 4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. 5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic

  16. Biological pretreatment of corn stover with ligninolytic enzyme for high efficient enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Qin; Xie, Hui; Chen, Wei; Wang, En-Tao; Du, Feng-Guang; Song, An-Dong

    2013-09-01

    Aiming at increasing the efficiency of transferring corn stover into sugars, a biological pretreatment was developed and investigated in this study. The protocol was characterized by the pretreatment with crude ligninolytic enzymes from Phanerochete chrysosporium and Coridus versicolor to break the lignin structure in corn stover, followed by a washing procedure to eliminate the inhibition of ligninolytic enzyme on cellulase. By a 2 d-pretreatment, sugar yield from corn stover hydrolysis could be increased by 50.2% (up to 323 mg/g) compared with that of the control. X-ray diffractometry and FT-IR analysis revealed that biological pretreatment could partially remove the lignin of corn stover, and consequently enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency of cellulose and hemeicellulose. In addition, the amount of microbial inhibitors, such as acetic acid and furfural, were much lower in biological pretreatment than that in acid pretreatment. This study provided a promising pretreatment method for biotransformation of corn stovers.

  17. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Grohmann, K.; Bothast, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    Corn fiber is a co-product of the corn wet milling industry which is usually marketed as a low value animal feed ingredient. Approximately 1.2 x 10{sup 6} dry tons of this material are produced annually in the United States. The fiber is composed of kernel cell wall fractions and a residual starch which can all be potentially hydrolyzed to a mixture of glucose, xylose, arabinose and galactose. We have investigated a sequential saccharification of polysaccharides in corn fiber by a treatment with dilute sulfuric acid at 100 to 160{degrees}C followed by partial neutralization and enzymatic hydrolysis with mixed cellulose and amyloglucosidase enzymes at 45{degrees}C. The sequential treatment achieved a high (approximately 85%) conversion of all polysaccharides in the corn fiber to monomeric sugars, which were in most cases fermentable to ethanol by the recombinant bacterium Escherichia coli KOll.

  18. Effects of thermo-chemical pre-treatment on anaerobic biodegradability and hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, T V; Bos, G J Klaasse; Zeeman, G; Sanders, J P M; van Lier, J B

    2009-05-01

    The effects of different thermo-chemical pre-treatment methods were determined on the biodegradability and hydrolysis rate of lignocellulosic biomass. Three plant species, hay, straw and bracken were thermo-chemically pre-treated with calcium hydroxide, ammonium carbonate and maleic acid. After pre-treatment, the plant material was anaerobically digested in batch bottles under mesophilic conditions for 40 days. From the pre-treatment and subsequent anaerobic digestion experiments, it was concluded that when the lignin content of the plant material is high, thermo-chemical pre-treatments have a positive effect on the biodegradability of the substrate. Calcium hydroxide pre-treatment improves the biodegradability of lignocellulosic biomass, especially for high lignin content substrates, like bracken. Maleic acid generates the highest percentage of dissolved COD during pre-treatment. Ammonium pre-treatment only showed a clear effect on biodegradability for straw. PMID:19144515

  19. Dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover for enzymatic hydrolysis and efficient ethanol production by recombinant Escherichia coli FBR5 without detoxification.

    PubMed

    Avci, Ayse; Saha, Badal C; Kennedy, Gregory J; Cotta, Michael A

    2013-08-01

    A pretreatment strategy for dilute H2SO4 pretreatment of corn stover was developed for the purpose of reducing the generation of inhibitory substances during pretreatment so that a detoxification step is not required prior to fermentation while maximizing sugar yield. The optimal conditions for pretreatment of corn stover (10%, w/v) were: 0.75% H2SO4, 160°C, and 0-5 min holding time. The conditions were chosen based on maximum glucose release after enzymatic hydrolysis, minimum loss of pentose sugars and minimum formation of sugar degradation products such as furfural and hydroxymethyl furfural. The pretreated corn stover after enzymatic saccharification generated 63.2 ± 2.2 and 63.7 ± 2.3 g total sugars per L at 0 and 5 min holding time, respectively. Furfural production was 0.45 ± 0.1 and 0.87 ± 0.4 g/L, respectively. The recombinant Escherichia coli strain FBR5 efficiently fermented non-detoxified corn stover hydrolyzate if the furfural content is <0.5 g/L.

  20. Pretreatment of rice straw by a hot-compressed water process for enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guoce; Yano, Shinichi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Seiichi; Endo, Takashi; Sawayama, Shigeki

    2010-01-01

    Hot-compressed water (HCW) is among several cost-effective pretreatment processes of lignocellulosic biomass for enzymatic hydrolysis. The present work investigated the characteristics of HCW pretreatment of rice straw including sugar production and inhibitor formation in the liquid fraction and enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated material. Pretreatment was carried out at a temperature ranging from 140 to 240 degrees C for 10 or 30 min. Soluble oligosaccharides were found to constitute almost all the components of total sugars in the liquid fraction. The maximal production of total glucose at 180 degrees C and below accounted for 4.4-4.9% of glucan in raw material. Total xylose production peaked at 180 degrees C, accounting for 43.3% of xylan in raw material for 10-min pretreatment and 29.8% for 30-min pretreatment. The production of acetic acid increased at higher temperatures and longer treatment time, indicating more significant disruption of lignocellulosic structure, and furfural production achieved the maximum (2.8 mg/ml) at 200 degrees C for both 10-min and 30-min processes. The glucose yield by enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated rice straw was no less than 85% at 180 degrees C and above for 30-min pretreatment and at 200 degrees C and above for 10-min pretreatment. Considering sugar recovery, inhibitor formation, and process severity, it is recommended that a temperature of 180 degrees C for a time of 30 min can be the most efficient process for HCW pretreatment of rice straw.

  1. Acid-functionalized nanoparticles for biomass hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena Duque, Leidy Eugenia

    Cellulosic ethanol is a renewable source of energy. Lignocellulosic biomass is a complex material composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Biomass pretreatment is a required step to make sugar polymers liable to hydrolysis. Mineral acids are commonly used for biomass pretreatment. Using acid catalysts that can be recovered and reused could make the process economically more attractive. The overall goal of this dissertation is the development of a recyclable nanocatalyst for the hydrolysis of biomass sugars. Cobalt iron oxide nanoparticles (CoFe2O4) were synthesized to provide a magnetic core that could be separated from reaction using a magnetic field and modified to carry acid functional groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the crystal structure was that of cobalt spinel ferrite. CoFe2O4 were covered with silica which served as linker for the acid functions. Silica-coated nanoparticles were functionalized with three different acid functions: perfluoropropyl-sulfonic acid, carboxylic acid, and propyl-sulfonic acid. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images were analyzed to obtain particle size distributions of the nanoparticles. Total carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur were quantified using an elemental analyzer. Fourier transform infra-red spectra confirmed the presence of sulfonic and carboxylic acid functions and ion-exchange titrations accounted for the total amount of catalytic acid sites per nanoparticle mass. These nanoparticles were evaluated for their performance to hydrolyze the beta-1,4 glycosidic bond of the cellobiose molecule. Propyl-sulfonic (PS) and perfluoropropyl-sulfonic (PFS) acid functionalized nanoparticles catalyzed the hydrolysis of cellobiose significantly better than the control. PS and PFS were also evaluated for their capacity to solubilize wheat straw hemicelluloses and performed better than the control. Although PFS nanoparticles were stronger acid catalysts, the acid functions leached out of the nanoparticle during

  2. Effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Particle size reduction is a crucial factor in transportation logistics as well as cellulosic conversion. The effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus x giganteus was determined. Miscanthus was ground using a hammer mill equipped with screens having 0.08, 2.0 or 6.0...

  3. Enzymatic saccharification of pretreated wheat straw: comparison of solids-recycling, sequential hydrolysis and batch hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Pihlajaniemi, Ville; Sipponen, Satu; Sipponen, Mika H; Pastinen, Ossi; Laakso, Simo

    2014-02-01

    In the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose materials, the recycling of the solid residue has previously been considered within the context of enzyme recycling. In this study, a steady state investigation of a solids-recycling process was made with pretreated wheat straw and compared to sequential and batch hydrolysis at constant reaction times, substrate feed and liquid and enzyme consumption. Compared to batch hydrolysis, the recycling and sequential processes showed roughly equal hydrolysis yields, while the volumetric productivity was significantly increased. In the 72h process the improvement was 90% due to an increased reaction consistency, while the solids feed was 16% of the total process constituents. The improvement resulted primarily from product removal, which was equally efficient in solids-recycling and sequential hydrolysis processes. No evidence of accumulation of enzymes beyond the accumulation of the substrate was found in recycling. A mathematical model of solids-recycling was constructed, based on a geometrical series.

  4. Physicochemical structural changes of poplar and switchgrass during biomass pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis

    DOE PAGES

    Meng, Xianzhi; Sun, Qining; Kosa, Matyas; Huang, Fang; Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-07-27

    Converting lignocellulosics to simple sugars for second generation bioethanol is complicated due to biomass recalcitrance, and it requires a pretreatment stage prior to enzymatic hydrolysis. In this study, native, pretreated (acid and alkaline) and partially hydrolyzed poplar and switchgrass were characterized by using Simons’ staining for cellulose accessibility, GPC for degree of polymerization (DP), and FTIR for chemical structure of plant cell wall. The susceptibility of the pretreated biomass to enzymatic hydrolysis could not be easily predicted from differences in cellulose DP and accessibility. During hydrolysis, the most significant DP reduction occurred at the very beginning of hydrolysis, and themore » DP began to decrease at a significantly slower rate after this initial period, suggesting an existence of a synergistic action of endo- and exoglucanases that contribute to the occurrence of a “peeling off” mechanism. Cellulose accessibility was found to be increased at the beginning of hydrolysis, after reaching a maximum value then started to decrease. In conclusion, the fresh enzyme restart hydrolysis experiment along with the accessibility data indicated that the factors associated with the nature of enzyme such as irreversible nonspecific binding of cellulases by lignin and steric hindrance of enzymes should be responsible for the gradual slowing down of the reaction rate.« less

  5. Comparison of different pretreatment strategies for enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat and barley straw.

    PubMed

    Rosgaard, Lisa; Pedersen, Sven; Meyer, Anne S

    2007-12-01

    In biomass-to-ethanol processes a physico-chemical pretreatment of the lignocellulosic biomass is a critical requirement for enhancing the accessibility of the cellulose substrate to enzymatic attack. This report evaluates the efficacy on barley and wheat straw of three different pretreatment procedures: acid or water impregnation followed by steam explosion versus hot water extraction. The pretreatments were compared after enzyme treatment using a cellulase enzyme system, Celluclast 1.5 L from Trichoderma reesei, and a beta-glucosidase, Novozyme 188 from Aspergillus niger. Barley straw generally produced higher glucose concentrations after enzymatic hydrolysis than wheat straw. Acid or water impregnation followed by steam explosion of barley straw was the best pretreatment in terms of resulting glucose concentration in the liquid hydrolysate after enzymatic hydrolysis. When the glucose concentrations obtained after enzymatic hydrolyses were related to the potential glucose present in the pretreated residues, the highest yield, approximately 48% (g g-1), was obtained with hot water extraction pretreatment of barley straw; this pretreatment also produced highest yields for wheat straw, producing a glucose yield of approximately 39% (g g-1). Addition of extra enzyme (Celluclast 1.5 L+Novozyme 188) during enzymatic hydrolysis resulted in the highest total glucose concentrations from barley straw, 32-39 g L-1, but the relative increases in glucose yields were higher on wheat straw than on barley straw. Maldi-TOF MS analyses of supernatants of pretreated barley and wheat straw samples subjected to acid and water impregnation, respectively, and steam explosion, revealed that the water impregnated + steam-exploded samples gave a wider range of pentose oligomers than the corresponding acid-impregnated samples.

  6. Pretreatment for cellulose hydrolysis by carbon dioxide explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y.; Lin, H.M.; Tsao, G.T.

    1998-11-01

    Cellulosic materials were treated with supercritical carbon dioxide to increase the reactivity of cellulose, thereby to enhance the rate and the extent of cellulose hydrolysis. In this pretreatment process, the cellulosic materials such as Avicel, recycled paper mix, sugarcane bagasse and the repulping waste of recycled paper are placed in a reactor under pressurized carbon dioxide at 35 C for a controlled time period. Upon an explosive release of the carbon dioxide pressure, the disruption of the cellulosic structure increases the accessible surface area of the cellulosic substrate to enzymatic hydrolysis. Results indicate that supercritical carbon dioxide is effective for pretreatment of cellulose. An increase in pressure facilitates the faster penetration of carbon dioxide molecules into the crystalline structures, thus more glucose is produced from cellulosic materials after the explosion as compared to those without the pretreatment. This explosion pretreatment enhances the rate of cellulosic material hydrolysis as well as increases glucose yield by as much as 50%. Results from the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation tests also show the increase in the available carbon source from the cellulosic materials for fermentation to produce ethanol. As an alternative method, this supercritical carbon dioxide explosion has a possibility to reduce expense compared with ammonia explosion, and since it is operated at the low temperature, it will not cause degradation of sugars such as those treated with steam explosion due to the high-temperature involved.

  7. NREL 2012 Achievement of Ethanol Cost Targets: Biochemical Ethanol Fermentation via Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, L.; Schell, D.; Davis, R.; Tan, E.; Elander, R.; Bratis, A.

    2014-04-01

    For the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office, the annual State of Technology (SOT) assessment is an essential activity for quantifying the benefits of biochemical platform research. This assessment has historically allowed the impact of research progress achieved through targeted Bioenergy Technologies Office funding to be quantified in terms of economic improvements within the context of a fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production process. As such, progress toward the ultimate 2012 goal of demonstrating cost-competitive cellulosic ethanol technology can be tracked. With an assumed feedstock cost for corn stover of $58.50/ton this target has historically been set at $1.41/gal ethanol for conversion costs only (exclusive of feedstock) and $2.15/gal total production cost (inclusive of feedstock) or minimum ethanol selling price (MESP). This year, fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production data generated by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers in their Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) successfully demonstrated performance commensurate with both the FY 2012 SOT MESP target of $2.15/gal (2007$, $58.50/ton feedstock cost) and the conversion target of $1.41/gal through core research and process improvements in pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation.

  8. Effects of the pretreatment method on high solids enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation of the cellulosic fraction of sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Martins, Luiza Helena da Silva; Rabelo, Sarita Cândida; da Costa, Aline Carvalho

    2015-09-01

    This work evaluated ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse at high solids loadings in the pretreatment (20-40% w/v) and hydrolysis (10-20% w/v) stages. The best conditions for diluted sulfuric acid, AHP and Ox-B pretreatments were determined and mass balances including pretreatment, hydrolysis and fermentation were calculated. From a technical point of view, the best pretreatment was AHP, which enabled the production of glucose concentrations near 8% with high productivity (3.27 g/Lh), as well as ethanol production from 100.9 to 135.4 kg ethanol/ton raw bagasse. However, reagent consumption for acid pretreatment was much lower. Furthermore, for processes that use pentoses and hexoses separately, this pretreatment produces the most desirable pentoses liquor, with higher xylose concentration in the monomeric form.

  9. Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect

    Humbird, D.; Davis, R.; Tao, L.; Kinchin, C.; Hsu, D.; Aden, A.; Schoen, P.; Lukas, J.; Olthof, B.; Worley, M.; Sexton, D.; Dudgeon, D.

    2011-03-01

    This report describes one potential biochemical ethanol conversion process, conceptually based upon core conversion and process integration research at NREL. The overarching process design converts corn stover to ethanol by dilute-acid pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, and co-fermentation. Building on design reports published in 2002 and 1999, NREL, together with the subcontractor Harris Group Inc., performed a complete review of the process design and economic model for the biomass-to-ethanol process. This update reflects NREL's current vision of the biochemical ethanol process and includes the latest research in the conversion areas (pretreatment, conditioning, saccharification, and fermentation), optimizations in product recovery, and our latest understanding of the ethanol plant's back end (wastewater and utilities). The conceptual design presented here reports ethanol production economics as determined by 2012 conversion targets and 'nth-plant' project costs and financing. For the biorefinery described here, processing 2,205 dry ton/day at 76% theoretical ethanol yield (79 gal/dry ton), the ethanol selling price is $2.15/gal in 2007$.

  10. Dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover for enzymatic hydrolysis and efficient ethanol production by recombinant Escherichia coli FBR5 without detoxification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A pretreatment strategy for dilute H2SO4 pretreatment of corn stover was developed for the purpose of reducing the generation of inhibitory substances during pretreatment so that a detoxification step is not required prior to fermentation while maximizing the sugar yield. We have optimized dilute su...

  11. Surfactant-assisted pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of spent mushroom compost for the production of sugars.

    PubMed

    Kapu, N U S; Manning, M; Hurley, T B; Voigt, J; Cosgrove, D J; Romaine, C P

    2012-06-01

    Spent mushroom compost (SMC), a byproduct of commercial mushroom cultivation, poses serious environmental problems that have hampered the growth of this important agro-industry. In an effort to develop new applications for SMC, we explored its use as a feedstock for bioethanol production. SMC constitutes approximately 30%w/w polysaccharides, 66% of which is glucan. Following dilute-acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis, both in the presence of PEG 6000, 97% of glucan and 44% of xylan in SMC were converted into the corresponding monosaccharides. Incorporation of PEG 6000 reduced the cellulase requirement by 77%. Zwittergent 3-12 and 3-14 also significantly increased the efficacy of acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. The use of SMC in bioethanol production represents a potential mitigation solution for the critical environmental issues associated with the stockpiling of the major byproduct of the mushroom industry.

  12. Combination of biological pretreatment with liquid hot water pretreatment to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis of Populus tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yuan, Tongqi; Wang, Kun; Cui, Baokai; Dai, Yucheng

    2012-03-01

    A novel stepwise pretreatment of combination of fungal treatment with liquid hot water (LHW) treatment was conducted to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis of Populus tomentosa. The results showed that lignin and cellulose increased with the elevating temperature, while significant amount of hemicellulose was degraded during the LHW pretreatment. A highest hemicellulose removal of 92.33% was observed by combination of Lenzites betulina C5617 with LHW treatment at 200°C, which was almost 2 times higher than that of sole LHW treatment at the same level. Saccharification of poplar co-treated with L. betulina C5617 and LHW at 200°C resulted in a 2.66-fold increase of glucose yield than that of sole LHW treatment, and an increase (2.25-fold) of glucose yield was obtained by the combination of Trametes ochracea C6888 with LHW. The combination pretreatment performed well at accelerating the enzymatic hydrolysis of poplar wood.

  13. Effect of liquid hot water pretreatment severity on properties of hardwood lignin and enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ja Kyong; Kim, Youngmi; Ximenes, Eduardo; Ladisch, Michael R

    2015-02-01

    Lignin, one of the major components of lignocellulosic biomass, plays an inhibitory role on the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. This work examines the role of lignin in pretreated hardwood, where extents of cellulose hydrolysis decrease, rather than increase with increasing severity of liquid hot water pretreatment. Hardwood pretreated with liquid hot water at severities ranging from log Ro  = 8.25 to 12.51 resulted in 80-90% recovery of the initial lignin in the residual solids. The ratio of acid insoluble lignin (AIL) to acid soluble lignin (ASL) increased and the formation of spherical lignin droplets on the cell wall surface was observed as previously reported in the literature. When lignins were isolated from hardwoods pretreated at increasing severities and characterized based on glass transition temperature (Tg ), the Tg of isolated lignins was found to increase from 171 to 180°C as the severity increased from log Ro  = 10.44 to 12.51. The increase in Tg suggested that the condensation reactions of lignin molecules occurred during pretreatment and altered the lignin structure. The contribution of the changes in lignin properties to enzymatic hydrolysis were examined by carrying out Avicel hydrolysis in the presence of isolated lignins. Lignins derived from more severely pretreated hardwoods had higher Tg values and showed more pronounced inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis.

  14. Acid Hydrolysis of Trioxalatocobaltate (III) Ion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggans, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an investigation involving acid hydrolysis and using both volumetric and kinetic techniques. Presents examples of the determination of the rate constant and its variation with temperature. (GS)

  15. Optimization of thermo-chemical pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of kitchen wastes.

    PubMed

    Vavouraki, Aikaterini I; Volioti, Vassiliki; Kornaros, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    The use of abundant waste materials with high carbohydrate content may contribute substantially to reduction of biofuels production cost. The present study aimed at optimizing the combined effect of thermo-chemical pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of kitchen wastes (KW) for maximizing the production of fermentable soluble sugars. To this end, acid pretreatment of KW samples was performed with hydrochloric acid (0-3% HCl) at 30-100 °C for 0-120 min treatment time. Alternatively, alkaline pretreatment of KW samples was performed with potassium hydroxide solution (0-11%) at constant temperature and time (0 °C and 20 min, respectively). KOH pretreatment at such conditions targets to degrade the resistant starch of KW samples. Both acid and alkaline pretreatments were followed by addition of variable levels of enzyme dosage (0-3.6% v/v α-amylase and 0-3.2% v/v amyloglucosidase-AMG) at constant pH, temperature and time (pH = 5, T = 50 °C and t = 30 min, respectively). Based on our results, glucose concentration increased by ~300% after pretreatment with either acid or KOH in combination with enzymatic hydrolysis (2% HCl, 85 °C, 80 min, 0.1% α-amylase, AMG, and 1% KOH, 0 °C, 20 min, 1.1% α-amylase, 0.4% AMG) compared to raw (untreated) KW. Estimating the different YG yields at KW loading of 5%, an increase of 192% and 121% for total soluble monosugars and total soluble sugars, respectively, was succeeded compared to untreated KW. The effect of solids loading on the obtained sugar yields using the optimum conditions for thermo-chemical pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis was also tested resulting to 27.5% increase of the soluble glucose yield when half of the solids loading (2.5%) was used. A decrease of total soluble sugars yield by 32.2% was observed when solely acid hydrolysis at optimum conditions from our previous study was applied at 30% solids loading.

  16. Effect of four pretreatments on enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation of wheat straw. Influence of inhibitors and washing.

    PubMed

    Toquero, Cristina; Bolado, Silvia

    2014-04-01

    Pretreatment is essential in the production of alcohol from lignocellulosic material. In order to increase enzymatic sugar release and bioethanol production, thermal, dilute acid, dilute basic and alkaline peroxide pretreatments were applied to wheat straw. Compositional changes in pretreated solid fractions and sugars and possible inhibitory compounds released in liquid fractions were analysed. SEM analysis showed structural changes after pretreatments. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation by Pichia stipitis of unwashed and washed samples from each pretreatment were performed so as to compare sugar and ethanol yields. The effect of the main inhibitors found in hydrolysates (formic acid, acetic acid, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and furfural) was first studied through ethanol fermentations of model media and then compared to real hydrolysates. Hydrolysates of washed alkaline peroxide pretreated biomass provided the highest sugar concentrations, 31.82g/L glucose, and 13.75g/L xylose, their fermentation yielding promising results, with ethanol concentrations reaching 17.37g/L.

  17. Structural changes of corn stover lignin during acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Moxley, Geoffrey; Gaspar, Armindo Ribeiro; Higgins, Don; Xu, Hui

    2012-09-01

    In this study, raw corn stover was subjected to dilute acid pretreatments over a range of severities under conditions similar to those identified by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in their techno-economic analysis of biochemical conversion of corn stover to ethanol. The pretreated corn stover then underwent enzymatic hydrolysis with yields above 70 % at moderate enzyme loading conditions. The enzyme exhausted lignin residues were characterized by ³¹P NMR spectroscopy and functional moieties quantified and correlated to enzymatic hydrolysis yields. Results from this study indicated that both xylan solubilization and lignin degradation are important for improving the enzyme accessibility and digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover. At lower pretreatment temperatures, there is a good correlation between xylan solubilization and cellulose accessibility. At higher pretreatment temperatures, lignin degradation correlated better with cellulose accessibility, represented by the increase in phenolic groups. During acid pretreatment, the ratio of syringyl/guaiacyl functional groups also gradually changed from less than 1 to greater than 1 with the increase in pretreatment temperature. This implies that more syringyl units are released from lignin depolymerization of aryl ether linkages than guaiacyl units. The condensed phenolic units are also correlated with the increase in pretreatment temperature up to 180 °C, beyond which point condensation reactions may overtake the hydrolysis of aryl ether linkages as the dominant reactions of lignin, thus leading to decreased cellulose accessibility.

  18. Improved enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw by combined use of gamma ray and dilute acid for bioethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun Hong, Sung; Taek Lee, Jae; Lee, Sungbeom; Gon Wi, Seung; Ju Cho, Eun; Singh, Sudhir; Sik Lee, Seung; Yeoup Chung, Byung

    2014-01-01

    Pretreating wheat straw with a combination of dilute acid and gamma irradiation was performed in an attempt to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis for bioethanol production. The glucose yield was significantly affected by combined pretreatment (3% sulfuric acid-gamma irradiation), compared with untreated wheat straw and individual pretreatment. The increasing enzymatic hydrolysis after combined pretreatment is resulting from decrease in crystallinity of cellulose, loss of hemicelluloses, and removal or modification of lignin. Therefore, combined pretreatment is one of the most effective methods for enhancing the enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw biomass.

  19. Simultaneous pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of forage biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Henk, L.; Linden, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    Sweet sorghum is an attractive fermentation feedstock because as much as 40% of the dry weight consists of readily femented sugars such as sucrose, glucose and frutose. Cellulose and hemicellulose comprise another 50%. However, if this material is to be used a year-round feedstock for ethanol production, a stable method of storage must be developed to maintain the sugar content. A modified version of the traditional ensiling process is made effective by the addition of cellulolytic/hemicellulolytic enzymes and lactic acid bacteria to freshly chopped sweet sorghum prior to the production of silage. In situ hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose occurs concurrently with the acidic ensiling fementation. By hydolyzing the acetyl groups using acetyl xylan esterase and 3-0-methyl glucuronyl side chains using pectinase from hemicellulose, cellulose becomes accessible to hydrolysis by cellulase, both during in situ ensiling with enzymes and in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to ethanol.

  20. Production of bio-ethanol from pretreated agricultural byproduct using enzymatic hydrolysis and simultaneous saccharification.

    PubMed

    Gomathi, D; Muthulakshmi, C; Kumar, D Guru; Ravikumar, G; Kalaiselvi, M; Uma, C

    2012-01-01

    Global warming alerts and threats are on the rise due to the utilization of fossil fuels. Alternative fuel sources like bio-ethanol and biodiesel are being produced to combat against these threats. Bio-ethanol can be produced from a range of substrate. The present study is aimed at the Production of bioethanol from pretreated agricultural substrate using enzymatic hydrolysis and simultaneous saccharification with the addition of purified fungal enzyme. Most cellulosic biomass is not fermentable without appropriate pretreatment methods and so dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment was applied to make the cellulose contained in the waste susceptible to endoglucanase enzyme. A range of acid pretreatment of wheat bran was made in which the sample that was pretreated with 1% dilute sulfuric acid gave maximum yield of ethanol in both methods such as 5.83 g L(-1) and 5.27 g L(-1), respectively. Ethanol produced from renewable and cheap agricultural products (wheat bran) provides reduction in green house gas emission, carbon monoxide, sulfur, and helps to eliminate smog from the environment. PMID:22693831

  1. Production of bio-ethanol from pretreated agricultural byproduct using enzymatic hydrolysis and simultaneous saccharification.

    PubMed

    Gomathi, D; Muthulakshmi, C; Kumar, D Guru; Ravikumar, G; Kalaiselvi, M; Uma, C

    2012-01-01

    Global warming alerts and threats are on the rise due to the utilization of fossil fuels. Alternative fuel sources like bio-ethanol and biodiesel are being produced to combat against these threats. Bio-ethanol can be produced from a range of substrate. The present study is aimed at the Production of bioethanol from pretreated agricultural substrate using enzymatic hydrolysis and simultaneous saccharification with the addition of purified fungal enzyme. Most cellulosic biomass is not fermentable without appropriate pretreatment methods and so dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment was applied to make the cellulose contained in the waste susceptible to endoglucanase enzyme. A range of acid pretreatment of wheat bran was made in which the sample that was pretreated with 1% dilute sulfuric acid gave maximum yield of ethanol in both methods such as 5.83 g L(-1) and 5.27 g L(-1), respectively. Ethanol produced from renewable and cheap agricultural products (wheat bran) provides reduction in green house gas emission, carbon monoxide, sulfur, and helps to eliminate smog from the environment.

  2. Effect of thermal hydrolysis pre-treatment on anaerobic digestion of municipal biowaste: a pilot scale study in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yingjun; Takaoka, Masaki; Wang, Wei; Liu, Xiao; Oshita, Kazuyuki

    2013-07-01

    Co-digestion of wasted sewage sludge, restaurant kitchen waste, and fruit-vegetable waste was carried out in a pilot plant with thermal hydrolysis pre-treatment. Steam was used as heat source for thermal hydrolysis. It was found 38.3% of volatile suspended solids were dissolved after thermal hydrolysis, with digestibility increased by 115%. These results were more significant than those from lab studies using electricity as heat source due to more uniform heating. Anaerobic digesters were then operated under organic loading rates of about 1.5 and 3 kg VS/(m³ d). Little difference was found for digesters with and without thermal pre-treatment in biogas production and volatile solids removal. However, when looking into the digestion process, it was found digestion rate was almost doubled after thermal hydrolysis. Digester was also more stable with thermal hydrolysis pre-treatment. Less volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were accumulated and the VFAs/alkalinity ratio was also lower. Batch experiments showed the lag phase can be eliminated by thermal pre-treatment, implying the advantage could be more significant under a shorter hydraulic retention time. Moreover, it was estimated energy cost for thermal hydrolysis can be partly balanced by decreasing viscosity and improving dewaterability of the digestate.

  3. Comparison of separate hydrolysis and fermentation versus simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of pretreated wheat straw to ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y- 2034 from wheat straw (WS) by separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) was studied. The yield of glucose from dilute acid pretreated WS (86 g L-1) after enzymatic saccharification was 2...

  4. Kinetic and process studies on free and solid acid catalyzed hydrolysis of biomass substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Abasaeed, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) was tested as a catalyst for cellulose hydrolysis. Eighty percent conversion of cellulose into glucose was obtained with concentrated TFA. The kinetics of TFA catalyzed cellulose hydrolysis was investigated. The reaction was found to follow first order kinetics for both hydrolysis and decomposition. The kinetic parameters were determined from experimental data covering conditions of 160-180 C, 10-30% acid, and 1:2 solid to liquid ratio. The hydrolysis reaction was found to be more sensitive to temperature than the decomposition reaction. Use of TFA was further investigated as a pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. A two-fold increase in sugar yields was obtained for TFA pretreated samples in comparison to untreated ones. The kinetics of hydrolysis of prehydrolyzed wood by sulfuric acid was investigated. The substrate was first treated with 0.75% acid at 184 C for 4 minutes to remove hemicellulose. The kinetic parameters were determined in the range of 198-215 C and 1-3% acid. A heterogeneous kinetic model was developed to study the effect of particle size on acid hydrolysis of cellulose. It was found that as the chip size increases, maximum glucose yield decreases and reaction time at which maximum yield occurs increases. Acidic zeolites (LZ-M-8) were investigated as catalysts for hydrolysis reaction of inulin into fructose. The hydrolysis reaction was found to follow first order kinetics. Products containing 96 and 75% fructose were obtained upon hydrolysis respectively from inulin and extract.

  5. Effects of different pretreatment methods on chemical composition of sugarcane bagasse and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yueshu; Xu, Jingliang; Zhang, Yu; Yu, Qiang; Yuan, Zhenhong; Liu, Yunyun

    2013-09-01

    Different pretreatment processes, including liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) pretreatment, and their combinative pretreatments, were conducted to improve the enzymatic digestibility and sugar recovery from sugarcane bagasse (SCB). LHW pretreatment solubilized over 82% of xylan and 42% of lignin, after which the SCB presented the poorest enzymatic digestibility. NaOH pretreatment could remove 78% of lignin and retain most of glucan. For combinative pretreatments, the sequence of two procedures had a significant effect on the chemical composition, substrate characteristic and the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis process. LHW-NaOH pretreatment could solubilize over 92% of xylan and remove 76% of lignin, and the highest total sugar recovery of 73% was achieved after 72 h enzymatic hydrolysis. While NaOH-LHW pretreatment, which could remove nearly 84% of lignin, but only solubilize 71% of xylan, showed the highest enzymatic digestibility. The pretreatment efficiency was: NaOH-LHW>NaOH>LHW-NaOH>LHW.

  6. Enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis of sugar cane bagasse by steam explosion pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kling, S.H.; Neto, C.C.; Ferrara, M.A.; Torres, J.C.R.; Magalhaes, D.B.; Ryu, D.D.Y.

    1987-01-01

    In this study, the possibility of applying a steam explosion pretreatment process to sugarcane bagasse was investigated, and the effectiveness of the pretreatment in terms of hemicellulose solubilization and enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis was determined. The steam requirement for the pretreatment was also investigated at the pilot-plant scale, and these results are presented.

  7. Biological pretreatment of corn stover with white-rot fungus for improved enzymatic hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass by white-rot fungus can represent a low-cost and eco-friendly alternative to harsh physical, chemical or physico-chemical pretreatment methods to facilitate enzymatic hydrolysis. However, fungal pretreatment can cause carbohydrate loss and it is, th...

  8. Effect of pretreatment methods on the synergism of cellulase and xylanase during the hydrolysis of bagasse.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lili; Gonçalves, Geisa A L; Takasugi, Yusaku; Mori, Yutaro; Noda, Shuhei; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ichinose, Hirofumi; Kamiya, Noriho

    2015-06-01

    The effect of pretreatment with peracetic acid (PAA) or an ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, [Emim][OAc]) on the synergism between endoglucanase and endoxylanase in the hydrolysis of bagasse was investigated. An endoglucanase, Cel6A, with a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) and two endoxylanases, XynZ-C without a CBM and Xyn11A with an intrinsic xylan/cellulose binding module (XBM), were selected. The hemicellulose content, especially arabinan, and the cellulose crystallinity of bagasse were found to affect the cellulase-xylanase synergism. More specifically, higher synergism (above 3.4) was observed for glucan conversion, at low levels of arabinan (0.9%), during the hydrolysis of PAA pretreated bagasse. In contrast, [Emim][OAc] pretreated bagasse, showed lower cellulose crystallinity and achieved higher synergism (over 1.9) for xylan conversion. Ultimately, the combination of Cel6A and Xyn11A resulted in higher synergism for glucan conversion than the combination of Cel6A with XynZ-C, indicating the importance of the molecular architecture of enzymes for metabolic synergism. PMID:25768418

  9. Screw extrude steam explosion: a promising pretreatment of corn stover to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingwen; Zhang, Wengui; Zhang, Hongman; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Huang, He

    2014-06-01

    A screw extrude steam explosion (SESE) apparatus was designed and introduced to pretreat corn stover continuously for its following enzymatic hydrolysis. SESE parameters temperature (100, 120, 150°C) and residence time (1, 2, 3min) were investigated. The enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover pretreated by SESE and steam explosion (SE) process was carried out and analyzed systematically. A serial of analysis methods were established, and the corn stover before/after the pretreatment were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Thermal Gravity/Derivative Thermal Gravity Analysis (TG/DTG). After treated by SESE pretreatment at the optimum condition (150°C, 2min), the pretreated corn stover exhibited highest enzymatic hydrolysis yield (89%), and rare fermentation inhibitors formed. Characterization results indicated that the highest yield could be attributed to the effective removal of lignin/hemicellulose and destruction of cellulose structure by SESE pretreatment.

  10. Obtaining fermentable sugars by dilute acid hydrolysis of hemicellulose and fast pyrolysis of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liqun; Zheng, Anqing; Zhao, Zengli; He, Fang; Li, Haibin; Liu, Weiguo

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to get fermentable sugars by dilute acid hydrolysis of hemicellulose and fast pyrolysis of cellulose from sugarcane bagasse. Hemicellulose could be easily hydrolyzed by dilute acid as sugars. The remained solid residue of acid hydrolysis was utilized to get levoglucosan by fast pyrolysis economically. Levoglucosan yield from crystalline cellulose could be as high as 61.47%. Dilute acid hydrolysis was also a promising pretreatment for levoglucosan production from lignocellulose. The dilute acid pretreated sugarcane bagasse resulted in higher levoglucosan yield (40.50%) in fast pyrolysis by micropyrolyzer, which was more effective than water washed (29.10%) and un-pretreated (12.84%). It was mainly ascribed to the effective removal of alkali and alkaline earth metals and the accumulation of crystalline cellulose. This strategy seems a promising route to achieve inexpensive fermentable sugars from lignocellulose for biorefinery. PMID:25690683

  11. Obtaining fermentable sugars by dilute acid hydrolysis of hemicellulose and fast pyrolysis of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liqun; Zheng, Anqing; Zhao, Zengli; He, Fang; Li, Haibin; Liu, Weiguo

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to get fermentable sugars by dilute acid hydrolysis of hemicellulose and fast pyrolysis of cellulose from sugarcane bagasse. Hemicellulose could be easily hydrolyzed by dilute acid as sugars. The remained solid residue of acid hydrolysis was utilized to get levoglucosan by fast pyrolysis economically. Levoglucosan yield from crystalline cellulose could be as high as 61.47%. Dilute acid hydrolysis was also a promising pretreatment for levoglucosan production from lignocellulose. The dilute acid pretreated sugarcane bagasse resulted in higher levoglucosan yield (40.50%) in fast pyrolysis by micropyrolyzer, which was more effective than water washed (29.10%) and un-pretreated (12.84%). It was mainly ascribed to the effective removal of alkali and alkaline earth metals and the accumulation of crystalline cellulose. This strategy seems a promising route to achieve inexpensive fermentable sugars from lignocellulose for biorefinery.

  12. Utilization of waste cellulose. VI. Pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials with sodium hypochlorite and enzymatic hydrolysis by Trichoderma viride

    SciTech Connect

    David, C.; Fornasier, R.; Thiry, P.

    1985-10-01

    A pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials with sodium hypochlorite-hypochlorous acid at controlled pH (between 7 and 9) considerably increases the accessibility of the cellulosic part of the substrate to chemical and biochemical reactants. As a consequence, the yield and rate of the enzymatic hydrolysis to glucose is largely increased. Wheat straw and spruce sawdust have been investigated. The increase in accessibility is assigned to degradation and (or) detachment of the lignin network. The loss in cellulose and hemicellulose is not important, lignin being preferentially degraded under carefully controlled pH conditions. When applied to pure cellulose, the pretreatment decreases the yield of enzymatic hydrolysis; in the absence of lignin, oxidation of the anhydroglucose units is important and results in the inhibition of the enzymatic hydrolysis. 12 references.

  13. Hydrolysis of organosolv wheat pulp in formic acid at high temperature for glucose production.

    PubMed

    Kupiainen, Laura; Ahola, Juha; Tanskanen, Juha

    2012-07-01

    Organosolv methods can be used to delignify lignocellulosic crop residues for pulp production or to pretreat them prior to enzymatic hydrolysis for bioethanol production. In this study, organic solvent was used as an acidic hydrolysis catalyst to produce glucose. Hydrolysis experiments were carried out in 5-20% formic acid at 180-220 °C. Wheat straw pulp delignified with a formicodeli™ method was used as a raw material. It was found that glucose yields from pulp are significantly higher than yields from microcrystalline cellulose, a model component for cellulose hydrolysis. The results indicate that cellulose hydrolysis of real fibers takes place more selectively to glucose than hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose particles does. The effect of the particle size on pulp hydrolysis was investigated, the crystallinity of hydrolyzed pulp was measured by XRD analysis, and the product distribution and its influence on the process was discussed. PMID:22609651

  14. Kinetic modeling of enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated kitchen wastes for enhancing bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Cekmecelioglu, Deniz; Uncu, Oya N

    2013-03-01

    It is well known that use of low cost and abundant waste materials in microbial fermentations can reduce product costs. Kitchen wastes disposed of in large amounts from cafeterias, restaurants, dining halls, food processing plants, and household kitchens contain high amounts of carbohydrate components such as glucose, starch, and cellulose. Efficient utilization of these sugars is another opportunity to reduce ethanol costs. In this study, the effect of pretreatment methods (hot water, acid solutions, and a control) on enzymatic hydrolysis of kitchen wastes was evaluated using a kinetic modeling approach. Fermentation experiments conducted with and without traditional fermentation nutrients were assessed at constant conditions of pH 4.5 and temperature of 30°C for 48h using commercial dry baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The control, which involved no treatment, and hot water treated samples gave close glucose concentrations after 6h. The highest and lowest rates of glucose production were found as 0.644 and 0.128 (h(-1)) for the control (or no-pretreated (NPT)) and 1% acid solutions, respectively. The fermentation results indicated that final ethanol concentrations are not significantly improved by adding nutrients (17.2-23.3g/L). Thus, it was concluded that product cost can be lowered to a large extent if (1) kitchen wastes are used as a substrate, (2) no fermentation nutrient is used, and (3) hydrolysis time is applied for about 6h. Further optimization study is needed to increase the yield to higher levels.

  15. Kinetic modeling of enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated kitchen wastes for enhancing bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Cekmecelioglu, Deniz; Uncu, Oya N

    2013-03-01

    It is well known that use of low cost and abundant waste materials in microbial fermentations can reduce product costs. Kitchen wastes disposed of in large amounts from cafeterias, restaurants, dining halls, food processing plants, and household kitchens contain high amounts of carbohydrate components such as glucose, starch, and cellulose. Efficient utilization of these sugars is another opportunity to reduce ethanol costs. In this study, the effect of pretreatment methods (hot water, acid solutions, and a control) on enzymatic hydrolysis of kitchen wastes was evaluated using a kinetic modeling approach. Fermentation experiments conducted with and without traditional fermentation nutrients were assessed at constant conditions of pH 4.5 and temperature of 30°C for 48h using commercial dry baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The control, which involved no treatment, and hot water treated samples gave close glucose concentrations after 6h. The highest and lowest rates of glucose production were found as 0.644 and 0.128 (h(-1)) for the control (or no-pretreated (NPT)) and 1% acid solutions, respectively. The fermentation results indicated that final ethanol concentrations are not significantly improved by adding nutrients (17.2-23.3g/L). Thus, it was concluded that product cost can be lowered to a large extent if (1) kitchen wastes are used as a substrate, (2) no fermentation nutrient is used, and (3) hydrolysis time is applied for about 6h. Further optimization study is needed to increase the yield to higher levels. PMID:22959156

  16. Critical cellulase and hemicellulase activities for hydrolysis of ionic liquid pretreated biomass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Critical cellulase and hemicellulase activities are identified for hydrolysis of ionic liquid (IL) pretreated poplar and switchgrass; hemicellulase rich substrates with amorphous cellulose. Enzymes from Aspergillus nidulans were expressed and purified: an endoglucanase (EG) a cellobiohydrolase (CBH)...

  17. Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of rapeseed straw by popping pretreatment for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Wi, Seung Gon; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Lee, Yoon Gyo; Yang, Duck Joo; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to find a pretreatment process that enhances enzymatic conversion of biomass to sugars. Rapeseed straw was pretreated by two processes: a wet process involving wet milling plus a popping treatment, and a dry process involving popping plus dry milling. The effects of the pretreatments were studied both in terms of structural and compositional changes and change in susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis. After application of the wet and dry processes, the amounts of cellulose and xylose in the straw were 37-38% and 14-15%, respectively, compared to 31% and 12% in untreated counterparts. In enzymatic hydrolysis performance, the wet process presented the best glucose yield, with a 93.1% conversion, while the dry process yielded 69.6%, and the un-pretreated process yielded <20%. Electron microscopic studies of the straw also showed a relative increase in susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis with pretreatment.

  18. Enhanced enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis by subcritical carbon dioxide pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongdan; Wu, Shubin

    2014-04-01

    Most biomass pretreatment processes for sugar production are run at low-solid concentration (<10 wt.%). Subcritical carbon dioxide (CO2) could provide a more sustainable pretreatment medium while using relative high-solid contents (15 wt.%). The effects of subcritical CO2 pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse to the solid and glucan recoveries at different pretreatment conditions were investigated. Subsequently, enzymatic hydrolysis at different hydrolysis time was applied to obtain maximal glucose yield, which can be used for ethanol fermentation. The maximum glucose yield in enzyme hydrolyzate reached 38.5 g based on 100g raw material after 72 h of enzymatic hydrolysis, representing 93.0% glucose in sugarcane bagasse. The enhanced digestibilities of subcritical CO2 pretreated sugarcane bagasse were due to the removal of hemicellulose, which were confirmed by XRD, FTIR, SEM, and TGA analyses.

  19. Optimization of dilute acid hydrolysis of Enteromorpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Dawei; Liu, Haiyan; Li, Fuchao; Jiang, Peng; Qin, Song

    2011-11-01

    Acid hydrolysis is a simple and direct way to hydrolyze polysaccharides in biomass into fermentable sugars. To produce fermentable sugars effectively and economically for fuel ethanol, we have investigated the hydrolysis of Enteromorpha using acids that are typically used to hydrolyze biomass: H2SO4, HCl, H3PO4 and C4H4O4 (maleic acid). 5%(w/w) Enteromorpha biomass was treated for different times (30, 60, and 90 min) and with different acid concentrations (0.6, 1.0, 1.4, 1.8, and 2.2%, w/w) at 121°C. H2SO4 was the most effective acid in this experiment. We then analyzed the hydrolysis process in H2SO4 in detail using high performance liquid chromatography. At a sulfuric acid concentration of 1.8% and treatment time of 60 min, the yield of ethanol fermentable sugars (glucose and xylose) was high, (230.5 mg/g dry biomass, comprising 175.2 mg/g glucose and 55.3 mg/g xylose), with 48.6% of total reducing sugars being ethanol fermentable. Therefore, Enteromorpha could be a good candidate for production of fuel ethanol. In future work, the effects of temperature and biomass concentration on hydrolysis, and also the fermentation of the hydrolysates to ethanol fuel should be focused on.

  20. Dilute Acid and Autohydrolysis Pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    Exposure of cellulosic biomass to temperatures of about 120-210°C can remove most of the hemicellulose and produce cellulose-rich solids from which high glucose yields are possible with cellulase enzymes. Furthermore, the use of dilute sulfuric acid in this pretreatment operation can increase recovery of hemicellulose sugars substantially to about 85-95% of the maximum possible versus only about 65% if no acid is employed. The use of small-diameter tubes makes it possible to employ high solids concentrations similar to those preferred for commercial operations, with rapid heat-up, good temperature control, and accurate closure of material balances. Mixed reactors can be employed to pretreat larger amounts of biomass than possible in such small-diameter tubes, but solids concentrations are limited to about 15% or less to provide uniform temperatures. Pretreatment of large amounts of biomass at high solids concentrations is best carried out using direct steam injection and rapid pressure release, but closure of material balances in such “steam gun” devices is more difficult. Although flow of water alone or containing dilute acid is not practical commercially, such flow-through configurations provide valuable insight into biomass deconstruction kinetics not possible in the batch tubes, mixed reactors, or steam gun systems.

  1. Effect of Varying Acid Hydrolysis Condition in Gracilaria Sp. Fermentation Using Sasad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansuit, H.; Samsuri, M. D. C.; Sipaut, C. S.; Yee, C. F.; Yasir, S. M.; Mansa, R.

    2015-04-01

    Macroalgae or seaweed is being considered as promising feedstock for bioalcohol production due to high polysaccharides content. Polysaccharides can be converted into fermentable sugar through acid hydrolysis pre-treatment. In this study, the potential of using carbohydrate-rich macroalgae, Gracilaria sp. as feedstock for bioalcohol production via various acid hydrolysis conditions prior to the fermentation process was investigated and evaluated. The seaweed used in this research was from the red algae group, using species of Gracilaria sp. which was collected from Sg. Petani Kedah, Malaysia. Pre-treatment of substrate was done using H2SO4 and HCl with molarity ranging from 0.2M to 0.8M. The pretreatment time were varied in the range of 15 to 30 minutes. Fermentation was conducted using Sasad, a local Sabahan fermentation agent as a starter culture. Alcohol extraction was done using a distillation unit. Reducing sugar analysis was done by Benedict test method. Alcohol content analysis was done using specific gravity test. After hydrolysis, it was found out that acid hydrolysis at 0.2M H2SO4 and pre-treated for 20 minutes at 121°C has shown the highest reducing sugar content which has yield (10.06 mg/g) of reducing sugar. It was followed by other samples hydrolysis using 0.4M HCl with 30 minutes pre-treatment and 0.2M H2SO4, 15 minutes pre-treatment with yield of 8.06 mg/g and 5.75 mg/g reducing sugar content respectively. In conclusion, acid hydrolysis of Gracilaria sp. can produce higher reducing sugar yield and thus it can further enhance the bioalcohol production yield. Hence, acid hydrolysis of Gracilaria sp. should be studied more as it is an important step in the bioalcohol production and upscaling process.

  2. The effect of varying organosolv pretreatment chemicals on the physicochemical properties and cellulolytic hydrolysis of mountain pine beetle-killed lodgepole pine.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Luis F; Chandra, Richard P; Saddler, Jack N

    2010-05-01

    Mountain pine beetle-killed lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) chips were pretreated using the organosolv process, and their ease of subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis was assessed. The effect of varying pretreatment chemicals and solvents on the substrate's physicochemical characteristics was also investigated. The chemicals employed were MgCl2, H2SO4, SO2, and NaOH, and the solvents were ethanol and butanol. It was apparent that the different pretreatments resulted in variations in both the chemical composition of the solid and liquid fractions as well in the extent of cellulolytic hydrolysis (ranging from 21% to 82% hydrolysis after 12 h). Pretreatment under acidic conditions resulted in substrates that were readily hydrolyzed despite the apparent contradiction that pretreatment under alkaline conditions resulted in increased delignification (approximately 7% and 10% residual lignin for alkaline conditions versus 17% to 19% for acidic conditions). Acidic pretreatments also resulted in lower cellulose degree of polymerization, shorter fiber lengths, and increased substrate porosity. The substrates generated when butanol/water mixtures were used as the pretreatment solvent were also hydrolyzed more readily than those generated with ethanol/water. This was likely due to the limited miscibility of the solvents resulting in an increased concentration of pretreatment chemicals in the aqueous layer and thus a higher pretreatment severity.

  3. Impacts of microalgae pre-treatments for improved anaerobic digestion: thermal treatment, thermal hydrolysis, ultrasound and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Ometto, Francesco; Quiroga, Gerardo; Pšenička, Pavel; Whitton, Rachel; Jefferson, Bruce; Villa, Raffaella

    2014-11-15

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of microalgae is primarily inhibited by the chemical composition of their cell walls containing biopolymers able to resist bacterial degradation. Adoption of pre-treatments such as thermal, thermal hydrolysis, ultrasound and enzymatic hydrolysis have the potential to remove these inhibitory compounds and enhance biogas yields by degrading the cell wall, and releasing the intracellular algogenic organic matter (AOM). This work investigated the effect of four pre-treatments on three microalgae species, and their impact on the quantity of soluble biomass released in the media and thus on the digestion process yields. The analysis of the composition of the soluble COD released and of the TEM images of the cells showed two main degradation actions associated with the processes: (1) cell wall damage with the release of intracellular AOM (thermal, thermal hydrolysis and ultrasound) and (2) degradation of the cell wall constituents with the release of intracellular AOM and the solubilisation of the cell wall biopolymers (enzymatic hydrolysis). As a result of this, enzymatic hydrolysis showed the greatest biogas yield increments (>270%) followed by thermal hydrolysis (60-100%) and ultrasounds (30-60%).

  4. Combined steam pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of starch-free wheat fibers.

    PubMed

    Palmarola-Adrados, Beatriz; Galbe, Mats; Zacchi, Guido

    2004-01-01

    Steam treatment of an industrial process stream, denoted starch-free wheat fiber, was investigated to improve the formation of monomeric sugars in subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis for further bioconversion into ethanol. The solid fraction in the process stream, derived from a combined starch and ethanol factory, was rich in arabinose (21.1%), xylose (30.1%), and glucose (18.6%), in the form of polysaccharides. Various conditions of steam pretreatment (170-220 degrees C for 5-30 min) were evaluated, and their effect was assessed by enzymatic hydrolysis with 2 g of Celluclast + Ultraflo mixture/100 g of starch-free fiber (SFF) slurry at 5% dry matter (DM). The highest overall sugar yield for the combined steam pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis, 52 g/100 g of DM of SFF, corresponding to 74% of the theoretical, was achieved with pretreatment at 190 degrees C for 10 min followed by enzymatic hydrolysis.

  5. Simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation of peracetic acid-pretreated biomass.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, L C; Linden, J C; Schroeder, H A

    2000-01-01

    Previous work in our laboratories has demonstrated the effectiveness of peracetic acid for improving enzymatic digestibility of lignocellulosic materials. The use of dilute alkali solutions as a pre-pretreatment prior to peracetic acid lignin oxidation increased carbohydrate hydrolysis yields in a synergistic as opposed to additive manner. Deacetylation of xylan is easily achieved using dilute alkali solutions under mild conditions. In this article, we evaluate the effectiveness of peracetic acid combined with an alkaline pre-pretreatment through simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation (SSCF) of pretreated hybrid poplar wood and sugar cane bagasse. Respective ethanol yields of 92.8 and 91.9% of theoretical are achieved using 6% NaOH/15% peracetic acid-pretreated substrates and recombinant Zymomonas mobilis CP4/pZB5. Reduction of acetyl groups of the lignocellulosic materials is demonstrated following alkaline pre-pretreatments. Such processing may be helpful in reducing peracetic acid requirements. The influence of deacetylation is more significant in combined pretreatments using lower peracetic acid loadings.

  6. Thermochemical pretreatments for enhancing succinic acid production from industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Ingólfur B; Kuglarz, Mariusz; Karakashev, Dimitar; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an efficient thermochemical method for treatment of industrial hemp biomass, in order to increase its bioconversion to succinic acid. Industrial hemp was subjected to various thermochemical pretreatments using 0-3% H2SO4, NaOH or H2O2 at 121-180°C prior to enzymatic hydrolysis. The influence of the different pretreatments on hydrolysis and succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z was investigated in batch mode, using anaerobic bottles and bioreactors. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of hemp material pretreated with 3% H2O2 resulted in the highest overall sugar yield (73.5%), maximum succinic acid titer (21.9 g L(-1)), as well as the highest succinic acid yield (83%). Results obtained clearly demonstrated the impact of different pretreatments on the bioconversion efficiency of industrial hemp into succinic acid.

  7. Dilute acid pretreatment of rapeseed straw for fermentable sugar generation.

    PubMed

    Castro, Eulogio; Díaz, Manuel J; Cara, Cristóbal; Ruiz, Encarnación; Romero, Inmaculada; Moya, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the main pretreatment variables on fermentable sugar generation from rapeseed straw is studied using an experimental design approach. Low and high levels for pretreatment temperature (140-200 °C), process time (0-20 min) and concentration of sulfuric acid (0.5-2% w/v) were selected according to previous results. Glucose and xylose composition, as well as sugar degradation, were monitored and adjusted to a quadratic model. Non-sugar components of the hydrolysates were also determined. Enzymatic hydrolysis yields were used for assessing pretreatment performance. Optimization based on the mathematical model show that total conversion of cellulose from pretreated solids can be achieved at pretreatment conditions of 200 °C for 27 min and 0.40% free acid concentration. If optimization criteria were based on maximization of hemicellulosic sugars recovery in the hydrolysate along with cellulose preservation in the pretreated solids, milder pretreatment conditions of 144 °C, 6 min and 2% free acid concentration should be used.

  8. Liquid hot water pretreatment of multi feedstocks and enzymatic hydrolysis of solids obtained thereof.

    PubMed

    Michelin, Michele; Teixeira, José António

    2016-09-01

    Agricultural feedstocks (brewers' spent grain - BSG, corncob - CC, corn husk - CH, wheat straw - WS and Luffa sponge - LS) were pretreated by liquid hot water (LHW) in order to increase cellulose recovery and enzymatic saccharification. LHW-pretreatment resulted in hemicellulose solubilization, and solids enriched in cellulose. Chemical analysis showed different susceptibilities of the feedstocks to LHW-pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Pretreated feedstocks presented higher crystallinity (determined through X-ray diffraction) and thermal stability (determined through thermogravimetric analysis) than untreated feedstocks. SEM images confirmed the effect of LHW-pretreatment on structural changes. Moreover, enzymatic hydrolysis and cellulose conversion to glucose (CCG) were improved for pretreated feedstocks, with exception of LS. CCG (in relation to glucose potential on solids) followed the order: BSG>CH>WS>CC>LS. LHW-pretreatment showed to be a good technology to pretreat multi feedstocks and for improving the enzymatic hydrolysis of recalcitrant agricultural feedstocks to sugars, which can be further converted to ethanol-fuel and other value-added chemicals. PMID:27318165

  9. Biological Pretreatment of Rubberwood with Ceriporiopsis subvermispora for Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Bioethanol Production

    PubMed Central

    Nazarpour, Forough; Abdullah, Dzulkefly Kuang; Abdullah, Norhafizah; Motedayen, Nazila; Zamiri, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Rubberwood (Hevea brasiliensis), a potential raw material for bioethanol production due to its high cellulose content, was used as a novel feedstock for enzymatic hydrolysis and bioethanol production using biological pretreatment. To improve ethanol production, rubberwood was pretreated with white rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora to increase fermentation efficiency. The effects of particle size of rubberwood (1 mm, 0.5 mm, and 0.25 mm) and pretreatment time on the biological pretreatment were first determined by chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction and their best condition obtained with 1 mm particle size and 90 days pretreatment. Further morphological study on rubberwood with 1 mm particle size pretreated by fungus was performed by FT-IR spectra analysis and SEM observation and the result indicated the ability of this fungus for pretreatment. A study on enzymatic hydrolysis resulted in an increased sugar yield of 27.67% as compared with untreated rubberwood (2.88%). The maximum ethanol concentration and yield were 17.9 g/L and 53% yield, respectively, after 120 hours. The results obtained demonstrate that rubberwood pretreated by C. subvermispora can be used as an alternative material for the enzymatic hydrolysis and bioethanol production. PMID:24167813

  10. [Effect of Residual Hydrogen Peroxide on Hydrolysis Acidification of Sludge Pretreated by Microwave -H2O2-Alkaline Process].

    PubMed

    Jia, Rui-lai; Liu, Ji-bao; Wei, Yuan-song; Cai, Xing

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have found that in the hydrolysis acidification process, sludge after microwave -H2O2-alkaline (MW-H2O2-OH, pH = 10) pretreatment had an acid production lag due to the residual hydrogen peroxide. In this study, effects of residual hydrogen peroxide after MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10 or pH = 11) pretreatment on the sludge hydrolysis acidification were investigated through batch experiments. Our results showed that catalase had a higher catalytic efficiency than manganese dioxide for hydrogen peroxide, which could completely degraded hydrogen peroxide within 10 min. During the 8 d of hydrolysis acidification time, both SCOD concentrations and the total VFAs concentrations of four groups were firstly increased and then decreased. The optimized hydrolysis times were 0.5 d for four groups, and the optimized hydrolysis acidification times were 3 d for MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) group, MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) + catalase group and MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 11) + catalase group. The optimized hydrolysis acidification time for MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 11) group was 4 d. Residual hydrogen peroxide inhibited acid production for sludge after MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) pretreatment, resulting in a lag in acidification stage. Compared with MW-H2O2-OH ( pH = 10) pretreatment, MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 11 ) pretreatment released more SCOD by 19.29% and more organic matters, which resulted in the increase of total VFAs production significantly by 84.80% at 5 d of hydrolysis acidification time and MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 11) group could shorten the lag time slightly. Dosing catalase (100 mg x -L(-1)) after the MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10 or pH = 11) pretreatment not only significantly shortened the lag time (0.5 d) in acidification stage, but also produced more total VFAs by 23.61% and 50.12% in the MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) + catalase group and MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 11) + catalase group, compared with MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) group at 3d of hydrolysis acidification time. For MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) group, MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) + catalase group and

  11. Development of a combined pretreatment and hydrolysis strategy of rice straw for the production of bioethanol and biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, Raveendran; Kuttiraja, Mathiyazhakan; Prabisha, Thunoli Payyanvalappil; Binod, Parameswaran; Sukumaran, Rajeev K; Pandey, Ashok

    2016-09-01

    The present study highlights the development of a combined pretreatment and hydrolysis strategy of rice straw for the production of bioethanol and biopolymer (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate). Maximum reducing sugar yield was 0.374g/g. The hydrolyzate is devoid of major fermentation inhibitors like furfural and organic acids and can be used for fermentation without any detoxification. Fermentation of the non-detoxified hydrolyzate with Saccharomyces cerevisiae yielded 1.48% of ethanol with a fermentation efficiency of 61.25% and with Comamonas sp. yielded 35.86% of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate without any nutrient supplementation. Characterization of native, control as well as the residue left out after combined pretreatment and hydrolysis of RS by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction showed difference. Compositional analysis revealed that the residue contains lignin and hemicellulose as the major component indicating that major portion of cellulose were hydrolyzed in this strategy. PMID:26949053

  12. Ethanol production from industrial hemp: effect of combined dilute acid/steam pretreatment and economic aspects.

    PubMed

    Kuglarz, Mariusz; Gunnarsson, Ingólfur B; Svensson, Sven-Erik; Prade, Thomas; Johansson, Eva; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, combined steam (140-180°C) and dilute-acid pre-hydrolysis (0.0-2.0%) were applied to industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.), as pretreatment for lignocellulosic bioethanol production. The influence of the pretreatment conditions and cultivation type on the hydrolysis and ethanol yields was also evaluated. Pretreatment with 1% sulfuric acid at 180°C resulted in the highest glucose yield (73-74%) and ethanol yield of 75-79% (0.38-0.40 g-ethanol/g-glucose). Taking into account the costs of biomass processing, from field to ethanol facility storage, the field-dried hemp pretreated at the optimal conditions showed positive economic results. The type of hemp cultivation (organic or conventional) did not influence significantly the effectiveness of the pretreatment as well as subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation. PMID:24821202

  13. Ethanol production from industrial hemp: effect of combined dilute acid/steam pretreatment and economic aspects.

    PubMed

    Kuglarz, Mariusz; Gunnarsson, Ingólfur B; Svensson, Sven-Erik; Prade, Thomas; Johansson, Eva; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, combined steam (140-180°C) and dilute-acid pre-hydrolysis (0.0-2.0%) were applied to industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.), as pretreatment for lignocellulosic bioethanol production. The influence of the pretreatment conditions and cultivation type on the hydrolysis and ethanol yields was also evaluated. Pretreatment with 1% sulfuric acid at 180°C resulted in the highest glucose yield (73-74%) and ethanol yield of 75-79% (0.38-0.40 g-ethanol/g-glucose). Taking into account the costs of biomass processing, from field to ethanol facility storage, the field-dried hemp pretreated at the optimal conditions showed positive economic results. The type of hemp cultivation (organic or conventional) did not influence significantly the effectiveness of the pretreatment as well as subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation.

  14. Xylan hydrolysis in Populus trichocarpa × P. deltoides and model substrates during hydrothermal pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Trajano, Heather L; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Tomkins, Bruce A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Hahn, Michael G; Van Berkel, Gary J; Wyman, Charles E

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies defined easy and difficult to hydrolyze fractions of hemicellulose that may result from bonds among cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. To understand how such bonds affect hydrolysis, Populus trichocarpa × Populus deltoides, holocellulose isolated from P. trichocarpa × P. deltoides and birchwood xylan were subjected to hydrothermal flow-through pretreatment. Samples were characterized by glycome profiling, HPLC, and UPLC-MS. Glycome profiling revealed steady fragmentation and removal of glycans from solids during hydrolysis. The extent of polysaccharide fragmentation, hydrolysis rate, and total xylose yield were lowest for P. trichocarpa × P. deltoides and greatest for birchwood xylan. Comparison of results from P. trichocarpa × P. deltoides and holocellulose suggested that lignin-carbohydrate complexes reduce hydrolysis rates and limit release of large xylooligomers. Smaller differences between results with holocellulose and birchwood xylan suggest xylan-cellulose hydrogen bonds limited hydrolysis, but to a lesser extent. These findings imply cell wall structure strongly influences hydrolysis.

  15. Cell-wall properties contributing to improved deconstruction by alkaline pre-treatment and enzymatic hydrolysis in diverse maize (Zea mays L.) lines

    PubMed Central

    Li, Muyang; Heckwolf, Marlies; Crowe, Jacob D.; Williams, Daniel L.; Magee, Timothy D.; Kaeppler, Shawn M.; de Leon, Natalia; Hodge, David B.

    2015-01-01

    A maize (Zea mays L. subsp. mays) diversity panel consisting of 26 maize lines exhibiting a wide range of cell-wall properties and responses to hydrolysis by cellulolytic enzymes was employed to investigate the relationship between cell-wall properties, cell-wall responses to mild NaOH pre-treatment, and enzymatic hydrolysis yields. Enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulose in the untreated maize was found to be positively correlated with the water retention value, which is a measure of cell-wall susceptibility to swelling. It was also positively correlated with the lignin syringyl/guaiacyl ratio and negatively correlated with the initial cell-wall lignin, xylan, acetate, and p-coumaric acid (pCA) content, as well as pCA released from the cell wall by pre-treatment. The hydrolysis yield following pre-treatment exhibited statistically significant negative correlations to the lignin content after pre-treatment and positive correlations to the solubilized ferulic acid and pCA. Several unanticipated results were observed, including a positive correlation between initial lignin and acetate content, lack of correlation between acetate content and initial xylan content, and negative correlation between each of these three variables to the hydrolysis yields for untreated maize. Another surprising result was that pCA release was negatively correlated with hydrolysis yields for untreated maize and, along with ferulic acid release, was positively correlated with the pre-treated maize hydrolysis yields. This indicates that these properties that may negatively contribute to the recalcitrance in untreated cell walls may positively contribute to their deconstruction by alkaline pre-treatment. PMID:25871649

  16. Cell-wall properties contributing to improved deconstruction by alkaline pre-treatment and enzymatic hydrolysis in diverse maize (Zea mays L.) lines.

    PubMed

    Li, Muyang; Heckwolf, Marlies; Crowe, Jacob D; Williams, Daniel L; Magee, Timothy D; Kaeppler, Shawn M; de Leon, Natalia; Hodge, David B

    2015-07-01

    A maize (Zea mays L. subsp. mays) diversity panel consisting of 26 maize lines exhibiting a wide range of cell-wall properties and responses to hydrolysis by cellulolytic enzymes was employed to investigate the relationship between cell-wall properties, cell-wall responses to mild NaOH pre-treatment, and enzymatic hydrolysis yields. Enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulose in the untreated maize was found to be positively correlated with the water retention value, which is a measure of cell-wall susceptibility to swelling. It was also positively correlated with the lignin syringyl/guaiacyl ratio and negatively correlated with the initial cell-wall lignin, xylan, acetate, and p-coumaric acid (pCA) content, as well as pCA released from the cell wall by pre-treatment. The hydrolysis yield following pre-treatment exhibited statistically significant negative correlations to the lignin content after pre-treatment and positive correlations to the solubilized ferulic acid and pCA. Several unanticipated results were observed, including a positive correlation between initial lignin and acetate content, lack of correlation between acetate content and initial xylan content, and negative correlation between each of these three variables to the hydrolysis yields for untreated maize. Another surprising result was that pCA release was negatively correlated with hydrolysis yields for untreated maize and, along with ferulic acid release, was positively correlated with the pre-treated maize hydrolysis yields. This indicates that these properties that may negatively contribute to the recalcitrance in untreated cell walls may positively contribute to their deconstruction by alkaline pre-treatment.

  17. Improved enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass through pretreatment with plasma electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Chen, Li; Zhang, Jian; Yan, Zongcheng

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive research on plasma electrolysis as pretreatment method for water hyacinth (WH) was performed based on lignin content, crystalline structure, surface property, and enzymatic hydrolysis. A large number of active particles, such as HO and H2O2, generated by plasma electrolysis could decompose the lignin of the biomass samples and reduce the crystalline index. An efficient pretreatment process made use of WH pretreated at a load of 48 wt% (0.15-0.18 mm) in FeCl3 solution for 30 min at 450 V. After the pretreatment, the sugar yield of WH was increased by 126.5% as compared with unpretreated samples. PMID:25205055

  18. Effect of pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis on the physical-chemical composition and morphologic structure of sugarcane bagasse and sugarcane straw.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Marcia Maria de Souza; Perrone, Olavo Micali; Nunes, Christiane da Costa Carreira; Taboga, Sebastião; Boscolo, Maurício; da Silva, Roberto; Gomes, Eleni

    2016-11-01

    The present work aimed to study the effect of the pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse and straw with microwave irradiation in aqueous and acid glycerol solutions on their chemical composition, fiber structure and the efficiency of subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that the pretreatment acted mainly on the lignin and hemicellulose fractions of the bagasse, whereas, in the straw, lesser structural and chemical changes were observed. The images from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that treating bagasse and straw with acid glycerol solution loosened the cell walls and there was a breakdown in the pit membrane. The treated material was submitted to hydrolysis for 72h and higher yields of reducing sugars were observed compared to the untreated material (250.9mg/g from straw and 197.4mg/g from bagasse). TEM images after hydrolysis confirmed the possible points of access of the enzymes to the secondary cell wall region of the pretreated biomass. PMID:27578061

  19. Non-ionic Surfactants and Non-Catalytic Protein Treatment on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Pretreated Creeping Wild Ryegrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Pan, Zhongli; Zhang, Ruihong; Wang, Donghai; Jenkins, Bryan

    Our previous research has shown that saline Creeping Wild Ryegrass (CWR), Leymus triticoides, has a great potential to be used for bioethanol production because of its high fermentable sugar yield, up to 85% cellulose conversion of pretreated CWR. However, the high cost of enzyme is still one of the obstacles making large-scale lignocellulosic bioethanol production economically difficult. It is desirable to use reduced enzyme loading to produce fermentable sugars with high yield and low cost. To reduce the enzyme loading, the effect of addition of non-ionic surfactants and non-catalytic protein on the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated CWR was investigated in this study. Tween 20, Tween 80, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were used as additives to improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of dilute sulfuric-acid-pretreated CWR. Under the loading of 0.1 g additives/g dry solid, Tween 20 was the most effective additive, followed by Tween 80 and BSA. With the addition of Tween 20 mixed with cellulase loading of 15 FPU/g cellulose, the cellulose conversion increased 14% (from 75 to 89%), which was similar to that with cellulase loading of 30 FPU/g cellulose and without additive addition. The results of cellulase and BSA adsorption on the Avicel PH101, pretreated CWR, and lignaceous residue of pretreated CWR support the theory that the primary mechanism behind the additives is prevention of non-productive adsorption of enzymes on lignaceous material of pretreated CWR. The addition of additives could be a promising technology to improve the enzymatic hydrolysis by reducing the enzyme activity loss caused by non-productive adsorption.

  20. Evaluation of pretreatment with Pleurotus ostreatus for enzymatic hydrolysis of rice straw.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Daisuke; Sakai, Kenji; Hoshino, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2005-12-01

    The effects of biological pretreatment of rice straw using four white-rot fungi (Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Trametes versicolor, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, and Pleurotus ostreatus) were evaluated on the basis of quantitative and structural changes in the components of the pretreated rice straw as well as susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis. Of these white-rot fungi, P. ostreatus selectively degraded the lignin fraction of rice straw rather than the holocellulose component. When rice straw (water content of 60%) was pretreated with P. ostreatus for 60 d, the total weight loss and the degree of Klason lignin degraded were 25% and 41%, respectively. After the pretreatment, the residual amounts of cellulose and hemicellulose were 83% and 52% of those in untreated rice straw, respectively. By enzymatic hydrolysis with a commercial cellulase preparation for 48 h, 52% holocellulose and 44% cellulose in the pretreated rice straw were solubilized. The net sugar yields based on the amounts of holocellulose and cellulose of untreated rice straw were 33% for total soluble sugar from holocellulose and 32% for glucose from cellulose. The SEM observations showed that the increase in susceptibility of rice straw to enzymatic hydrolysis by pretreatment with P. ostreatus is caused by partial degradation of the lignin seal. When the content of Klason lignin was less than 15% of the total weight of the pretreated straw, enhanced degrees of enzymatic solubilization of holocellulose and cellulose fractions were observed as the content of Klason lignin decreased.

  1. [Effects of hot-NaOH pretreatment on Jerusalem artichoke stalk composition and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Qiu, Jingwen; Li, Yang; Shen, Fei

    2015-10-01

    In order to explore the possibility of Jerusalem artichoke stalk for bioenergy conversion, we analyzed the main composition of whole stalk, pitch, and core of the stalk. Meanwhile, these parts were pretreated with different NaOH concentrations at 121 degrees C. Afterwards, enzymatic hydrolysis was performed to evaluate the pretreatment efficiency. Jerusalem artichoke stalk was characterized by relatively high lignin content (32.0%) compared with traditional crop stalks. The total carbohydrate content was close to that of crop stalks, but with higher cellulose content (40.5%) and lower hemicellulose (19.6%) than those of traditional crop stalks. After pretreatment, the lignin content in the whole stalk, pitch, and core decreased by 13.1%-13.4%, 8.3%-13.5%, and 19.9%-27.2%, respectively, compared with the unpretreated substrates. The hemicellulose content in the whole stalk, pitch, and core decreased 87.8%-96.9%, 87.6%-95.0%, and 74.0%-90.2%, respectively. Correspondingly, the cellulose content in the pretreated whole stalk, pitch, and core increased by 56.5%-60.2%, 52.2%-55.4%, and 62.7%-73.2%, respectively. Moreover, increase of NaOH concentration for pretreatment could improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of the whole stalk and pitch by 2.3-2.6 folds and 10.3-18.5 folds, respectively. The hydrolysis of pretreated stalk core decreased significantly as 2.0 mol/L NaOH was employed, although the increased NaOH concentration can also improve its hydrolysis performance. Based on these results, hot-NaOH can be regarded as an option for Jerusalem artichoke stalk pretreatment. Increasing NaOH concentration was beneficial to hemicellulose and lignin removal, and consequently improved sugar conversion. However, the potential decrease of sugar conversion of the pretreated core by higher NaOH concentration suggested further optimization on the pretreatment conditions should be performed. PMID:26964335

  2. Comparison of cell wall polysaccharide hydrolysis by a dilute acid/enzymatic saccharification process and rumen microorganisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluation of biomass crops for breeding or pricing purposes requires an assay that predicts performance of biomass in the bioenergy conversion process. Cell wall polysaccharide hydrolysis by dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment at 121 degrees C followed by cellulase hydrolysis for 72 h (CONV) and in v...

  3. Hydrolysis of Ammonia-pretreated Sugar Cane Bagasse with Cellulase, β-Glucosidase, and Hemicellulase Preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, Bernard A.; Day, Donal F.

    Sugar cane bagasse consists of hemicellulose (24%) and cellulose (38%), and bioconversion of both fractions to ethanol should be considered for a viable process. We have evaluated the hydrolysis of pretreated bagasse with combinations of cellulase, β-glucosidase, and hemicellulase. Ground bagasse was pretreated either by the AFEX process (2NH3: 1 biomass, 100 °C, 30 min) or with NH4OH (0.5 g NH4OH of a 28% [v/v] per gram dry biomass; 160 °C, 60 min), and composition analysis showed that the glucan and xylan fractions remained largely intact. The enzyme activities of four commercial xylanase preparations and supernatants of four laboratory-grown fungi were determined and evaluated for their ability to boost xylan hydrolysis when added to cellulase and β-glucosidase (10 filter paper units [FPU]: 20 cellobiase units [CBU]/g glucan). At 1% glucan loading, the commercial enzyme preparations (added at 10% or 50% levels of total protein in the enzyme preparations) boosted xylan and glucan hydrolysis in both pretreated bagasse samples. Xylanase addition at 10% protein level also improved hydrolysis of xylan and glucan fractions up to 10% glucan loading (28% solids loading). Significant xylanase activity in enzyme cocktails appears to be required for improving hydrolysis of both glucan and xylan fractions of ammonia pretreated sugar cane bagasse.

  4. Enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated waste paper--source of raw material for production of liquid biofuels.

    PubMed

    Brummer, Vladimir; Jurena, Tomas; Hlavacek, Viliam; Omelkova, Jirina; Bebar, Ladislav; Gabriel, Petr; Stehlik, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of waste paper is becoming a perspective way to obtain raw material for production of liquid biofuels. Reducing sugars solutions that arise from the process of saccharification are a precursors for following or simultaneous fermentation to ethanol. Different types of waste paper were evaluated, in terms of composition and usability, in order to select the appropriate type of the waste paper for the enzymatic hydrolysis process. Novozymes® enzymes NS50013 and NS50010 were used in a laboratory scale trials. Technological conditions, which seem to be the most suitable for hydrolysis after testing on cellulose pulp and filter paper, were applied to hydrolysis of widely available waste papers - offset paper, cardboard, recycled paper in two qualities, matte MYsol offset paper and for comparison again on model materials. The highest yields were achieved for the cardboard, which was further tested using various pretreatment combinations in purpose of increasing the hydrolysis yields.

  5. Optimization of the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of wheat straw

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In this study, the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of wheat straw is optimized, using pretreatment time, temperature and maleic acid concentration as design variables. A central composite design was applied to the experimental set up. The response factors used in this study are: (1) glucose benefits from improved enzymatic digestibility of wheat straw solids; (2) xylose benefits from the solubilization of xylan to the liquid phase during the pretreatment; (3) maleic acid replenishment costs; (4) neutralization costs of pretreated material; (5) costs due to furfural production; and (6) heating costs of the input materials. For each response factor, experimental data were fitted mathematically. After data translation to €/Mg dry straw, determining the relative contribution of each response factor, an economic optimization was calculated within the limits of the design variables. Results When costs are disregarded, an almost complete glucan conversion to glucose can be reached (90% from solids, 7%-10% in liquid), after enzymatic hydrolysis. During the pretreatment, up to 90% of all xylan is converted to monomeric xylose. Taking cost factors into account, the optimal process conditions are: 50 min at 170°C, with 46 mM maleic acid, resulting in a yield of 65 €/Mg (megagram = metric ton) dry straw, consisting of 68 €/Mg glucose benefits (from solids: 85% of all glucan), 17 €/Mg xylose benefits (from liquid: 80% of all xylan), 17 €/Mg maleic acid costs, 2.0 €/Mg heating costs and 0.68 €/Mg NaOH costs. In all but the most severe of the studied conditions, furfural formation was so limited that associated costs are considered negligible. Conclusions After the dilute maleic acid pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis, almost complete conversion of wheat straw glucan and xylan is possible. Taking maleic acid replenishment, heating, neutralization and furfural formation into account, the optimum in the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of

  6. Steam pretreatment of spruce forest residues: optimal conditions for biogas production and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Janzon, Ron; Schütt, Fokko; Oldenburg, Saskia; Fischer, Elmar; Körner, Ina; Saake, Bodo

    2014-01-16

    Steam refining of non-debarked spruce forest residues was investigated as pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis as well as for biogas production. Pretreatment conditions were varied in the range of 190-220 °C, 5-10 min and 0-3.7% SO₂ according to a statistical design. For both applications highest product yields were predicted at 220 °C and 2.4% SO₂, whereas the reaction time had only a minor influence. The conformity of the model results allows the conclusion that enzymatic hydrolysis is a suitable test method to evaluate the degradability of lignocellulosic biomass in the biogas process. In control experiments under optimal conditions the results of the model were verified. The yield of total monomeric carbohydrates after enzymatic hydrolysis was equivalent to 55% of all theoretically available polysaccharides. The corresponding biogas yield from the pretreated wood amounted to 304 mL/gODM. Furthermore, furans produced under optimal process conditions showed no inhibitory effect on biogas production. It can be concluded that steam refining opens the structure of wood, thus improving the enzymatic hydrolysis of the polysaccharides to fermentable monomeric sugars and subsequently enabling a higher and faster production of biogas. Anaerobic fermentation of pretreated wood is a serious alternative to alcoholic fermentation especially when low quality wood grades and residues are used. Anaerobic digestion should be further investigated in order to diversify the biorefinery options for lignocellulosic materials.

  7. High solids enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic materials with a powerful stirrer concept.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Daniel; Michael, Buchmann; Hirth, Thomas; Rupp, Steffen; Zibek, Susanne

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we present a powerful stirred tank reactor system that can efficiently hydrolyse lignocellulosic material at high solid content to produce hydrolysates with glucose concentration > 100 g/kg. As lignocellulosic substrates alkaline-pretreated wheat straw and organosolv-pretreated beech wood were used. The developed vertical reactor was equipped with a segmented helical stirrer, which was specially designed for high biomass hydrolysis. The stirrer was characterised according to mixing behaviour and power input. To minimise the cellulase dosage, a response surface plan was used. With the empirical relationship between glucose yield, cellulase loading and solid content, the minimal cellulase dosage was calculated to reach at least 70% yield at high glucose and high substrate concentrations within 48 h. The optimisation resulted in a minimal enzyme dosage of 30 FPU/g dry matter (DM) for the hydrolysis of wheat straw and 20 FPU/g DM for the hydrolysis of beech wood. By transferring the hydrolysis reaction from shaking flasks to the stirred tank reactor, the glucose yields could be increased. Using the developed stirred tank reactor system, alkaline-pretreated wheat straw could be converted to 110 g/kg glucose (76%) at a solid content of 20% (w/w) after 48 h. Organosolv-pretreated beech wood could be efficiently hydrolysed even at 30% (w/w) DM, giving 150 g/kg glucose (72%). PMID:24242162

  8. Microbial pretreatment of corn stover with Ceriporiopsis subvermispora for enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Wan, Caixia; Li, Yebo

    2010-08-01

    The feasibility of concurrent wet storage and microbial pretreatment of corn stover with Ceriporiopsis subvermispora for ethanol production was investigated in this study. The effects of particle size (5-15 mm), moisture content (45-85%), pretreatment time (18-35 d), and temperature (4-37 degrees C) on lignin degradation and enzymatic hydrolysis yield were studied. The results showed that C. subvermispora selectively degraded lignin up to 31.59% with a limited cellulose loss of less than 6% during an 18-d pretreatment. When 5mm corn stover was pretreated at 28 degrees C with 75% moisture content, overall glucose yields of 57.67%, 62.21%, and 66.61% were obtained with 18-, 28-, and 35-d microbial pretreated corn stover, respectively. For the above conditions, the highest overall ethanol yield of 57.80% was obtained with 35-d-pretreated corn stover. Enzymatic hydrolysis yield was highly related to the lignin removal during microbial pretreatment.

  9. Analysis of by-product formation and sugar monomerization in sugarcane bagasse pretreated at pilot plant scale: differences between autohydrolysis, alkaline and acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    van der Pol, Edwin; Bakker, Rob; van Zeeland, Alniek; Sanchez Garcia, David; Punt, Arjen; Eggink, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is an interesting feedstock for the biobased economy since a large fraction is polymerized sugars. Autohydrolysis, alkaline and acid pretreatment conditions combined with enzyme hydrolysis were used on lignocellulose rich bagasse to acquire monomeric. By-products found after pretreatment included acetic, glycolic and coumaric acid in concentrations up to 40, 21 and 2.5 g/kg dry weight bagasse respectively. Alkaline pretreated material contained up to 45 g/kg bagasse DW of sodium. Acid and autohydrolysis pretreatment results in a furan formation of 14 g/kg and 25 g/kg DW bagasse respectively. Enzyme monomerization efficiencies of pretreated solid material after 72 h were 81% for acid pretreatment, 77% for autohydrolysis and 57% for alkaline pretreatment. Solid material was washed with superheated water to decrease the amount of by-products. Washing decreased organic acid, phenol and furan concentrations in solid material by at least 60%, without a major sugar loss.

  10. Improving bioethanol production from olive pruning biomass by deacetylation step prior acid hydrolysis and fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    Moya, Alberto J; Peinado, Silvia; Mateo, Soledad; Fonseca, Bruno G; Sánchez, Sebastián

    2016-11-01

    In order to produce bioethanol from olive tree pruning biomass, deacetylation was performed employing sodium hydroxide. Optimal conditions were determined using experimental design techniques. The highest acetic acid removal (3.8g/dm(3)), obtained by response surface methodology, was at optimum pretreatment conditions of temperature 60°C, 0.8% NaOH and residence time 60min. After oxalic acid hydrolysis of pretreated biomass, the hydrolysates were directly used for ethanol production without further detoxification process. Ethanol yields ranged from 0.19 to 0.45g/g, reaching the maximum yield value when pretreatment was carried out at 130°C with 100mM oxalic acid, involving a combined severity factor (CSF) of 1.05. The highest ethanol concentration obtained from pretreated biomass was 6.2g/dm(3) at 150°C, using 75mM of oxalic acid (CSF=1.53). PMID:27579798

  11. Improving bioethanol production from olive pruning biomass by deacetylation step prior acid hydrolysis and fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    Moya, Alberto J; Peinado, Silvia; Mateo, Soledad; Fonseca, Bruno G; Sánchez, Sebastián

    2016-11-01

    In order to produce bioethanol from olive tree pruning biomass, deacetylation was performed employing sodium hydroxide. Optimal conditions were determined using experimental design techniques. The highest acetic acid removal (3.8g/dm(3)), obtained by response surface methodology, was at optimum pretreatment conditions of temperature 60°C, 0.8% NaOH and residence time 60min. After oxalic acid hydrolysis of pretreated biomass, the hydrolysates were directly used for ethanol production without further detoxification process. Ethanol yields ranged from 0.19 to 0.45g/g, reaching the maximum yield value when pretreatment was carried out at 130°C with 100mM oxalic acid, involving a combined severity factor (CSF) of 1.05. The highest ethanol concentration obtained from pretreated biomass was 6.2g/dm(3) at 150°C, using 75mM of oxalic acid (CSF=1.53).

  12. Effect of pre-treatments on hydrolysis and methane production potentials of by-products from meat-processing industry.

    PubMed

    Luste, Sami; Luostarinen, Sari; Sillanpää, Mika

    2009-05-15

    In this study, the effect of five pre-treatments (thermal, ultrasound, acid, base and bacterial product) on hydrolysis and methane production potentials of four by-products from meat-processing industry was studied. The bacterial product Liquid Certizyme 5 increased soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODsol) of digestive tract content and drumsieve waste the most as compared to untreated material (62 and 96%, respectively), while ultrasound was the most effective to increase CODsol with dissolved air flotation (DAF) sludge (88%) and grease trap sludge (188%). In batch experiments, thermal treatment increased methane production potential of drumsieve waste, acid of grease trap sludge and all pre-treatments of DAF sludge. However, with all other pre-treatments, methane production potential was decreased compared to untreated materials, apparently due to inhibition by hydrolysis products and/or possible re-crystallization of some compounds. Methane production potentials from the untreated materials were as follows: digestive tract content 400+/-50m(3)CH(4)/t volatile solids (VS)(added), drumsieve waste 230+/-20m(3)CH(4)/tVS(added), DAF sludge 340+/-17m(3)CH(4)/tVS(added) and grease trap sludge 900+/-44m(3)CH(4)/tVS(added).

  13. Microalgae pretreatment with liquid hot water to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Tao; Li, Xiekun; Xiao, Shiyuan; Guo, Ying; Zhou, Weizheng; Xu, Jingliang; Yuan, Zhenhong

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, microalgae are being considered as promising raw material for bioethanol production. In this work, three process variables during liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment prior to enzymatic hydrolysis by response surface methodology on Scenedesmus sp. WZKMT were investigated to enhance glucose recovery. Results indicated that the order of significance for three parameters was temperature>solid-to-liquid ratio>time. The optimal condition was 1:13 (w/v), 147°C and 40min. The concentration and recovery of glucose under this condition were 14.223g·L(-1) and 89.32%, respectively, which were up to 5-fold higher than the samples without LHW pretreatment. In addition, the surface morphologies of microalgae cells before and after LHW pretreatment were also verified using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). LHW pretreatment can greatly enhance the enzymatic efficiency, and can be regarded as an ideal pretreatment method for glucose recovery from microalgae.

  14. Microalgae pretreatment with liquid hot water to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Tao; Li, Xiekun; Xiao, Shiyuan; Guo, Ying; Zhou, Weizheng; Xu, Jingliang; Yuan, Zhenhong

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, microalgae are being considered as promising raw material for bioethanol production. In this work, three process variables during liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment prior to enzymatic hydrolysis by response surface methodology on Scenedesmus sp. WZKMT were investigated to enhance glucose recovery. Results indicated that the order of significance for three parameters was temperature>solid-to-liquid ratio>time. The optimal condition was 1:13 (w/v), 147°C and 40min. The concentration and recovery of glucose under this condition were 14.223g·L(-1) and 89.32%, respectively, which were up to 5-fold higher than the samples without LHW pretreatment. In addition, the surface morphologies of microalgae cells before and after LHW pretreatment were also verified using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). LHW pretreatment can greatly enhance the enzymatic efficiency, and can be regarded as an ideal pretreatment method for glucose recovery from microalgae. PMID:27614155

  15. Subcritical CO2 pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse and its enzymatic hydrolysis for sugar production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongdan; Wu, Shubin

    2013-12-01

    The present work investigated the effects of subcritical CO2 pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse at different CO2 pressure, pretreatment time, and temperature with relative high-solid concentration (15% w/v) to the composition of prehydrolyzate and the enzymatic hydrolysis. The results indicated that the maximum xylose yields in prehydrolyzate liquid were 15.78 g (combined 3.16 g xylose and 12.62 g xylo-oligosaccharides per 100g raw material). Due to the effective removal of hemicellulose, the maximum glucose yield in enzyme hydrolyzate reached 37.99 g per 100g raw material, representing 91.87% of glucose in the sugarcane bagasse. The maximal total sugars yield (combined xylose and glucose both in prehydrolyzate and enzymatic hydrolyzate) were 52.95 g based on 100g raw material. These results indicated that subcritical CO2 pretreatment can effectively improve the enzymatic hydrolysis, so it could be successfully applied to sugarcane bagasse.

  16. Comparing the performance of Miscanthus x giganteus and wheat straw biomass in sulfuric acid based pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Kärcher, M A; Iqbal, Y; Lewandowski, I; Senn, T

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess and compare the suitability of Miscanthus x giganteus and wheat straw biomass in dilute acid catalyzed pretreatment. Miscanthus and wheat straw were treated in a dilute sulfuric acid/steam explosion pretreatment. As a result of combining dilute sulfuric acid- and steam explosion pretreatment the hemicellulose hydrolysis yields (96% in wheat straw and 90% in miscanthus) in both substrates were higher than reported in literature. The combined severity factor (=CSF) for optimal hemicellulose hydrolysis was 1.9 and 1.5 in for miscanthus and wheat straw respectively. Because of the higher CSF value more furfural, furfuryl alcohol, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and acetic acid was formed in miscanthus than in wheat straw pretreatment.

  17. High temperature aqueous ammonia pretreatment and post-washing enhance the high solids enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lei; Liu, Zhi-Hua; Jin, Mingjie; Li, Bing-Zhi; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2013-10-01

    Aqueous ammonia pretreatment was optimized and the limiting factors in high solids enzymatic hydrolysis were assessed. The recommended pretreatment condition to achieve high enzymatic yield was: 180 °C, 20% (w/w) ammonia, 30 min, and 20% solids content. FT-IR and GC-MS results indicated that most of the lignin was degraded to soluble fragments after pretreatment. The pretreated solids after post-washing showed higher enzymatic digestibility at high solids loading than that without washing. The washed solids required lower cellulase and xylanase dosage than unwashed solids to achieve high sugar yield. Enzymatic conversions were declined with the increased solids loading of pretreated solids, pretreated-washed solids, and filter papers. The results indicated that solids loading in enzymatic hydrolysis was an important factor affecting sugar yield. The increasing concentration of glucose and ligno-phenolics mainly inhibited the enzymatic hydrolysis of aqueous ammonia pretreated corn stover.

  18. Sequential dilute acid and alkali pretreatment of corn stover: sugar recovery efficiency and structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Won; Kim, Ji Young; Jang, Hyun Min; Lee, Min Woo; Park, Jong Moon

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore the feasibility of applying sequential dilute acid and alkali pretreatment into the hydrolysis of corn stover and to elucidate the effects of structural changes in the biomass on its enzymatic digestibility. H2SO4 used in the first step selectively hydrolyzed 74.6-77.3% of xylan and NaOH used in the second step removed 85.9-89.4% of lignin, from the raw corn stover. Compared to single dilute acid pretreatment, the proposed combined pretreatment minimized the generation of byproducts such as acetic acid, furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural in the hydrolysates, and enhanced the enzymatic hydrolysis of the solid residue. The changes in the structural features (porosity, morphology, and crystallinity) of the solid residue were strongly correlated with the enhancement of enzymatic digestibility. The overall glucose and xylose yields finally obtained after enzymatic hydrolysis reached 89.1-97.9% and 71.0-75.9%, respectively.

  19. Topochemical pretreatment of wood biomass to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis of polysaccharides to sugars.

    PubMed

    Mou, Hong-Yan; Orblin, Elina; Kruus, Kristiina; Fardim, Pedro

    2013-08-01

    The surface chemistry of milled birch and pine wood pretreated by ionic liquid, hydrothermal and hydrotropic methods, followed by enzymatic hydrolysis was studied in this work. Surface coverage by lignin was measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to describe the surface chemical composition after pretreatment in detail, and the morphology after pretreatment was investigated by FE-SEM. Ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride) pretreatment at room temperature made the samples swell but did not dissolve the wood. Comparing the surface coverage by lignin, both in the case of birch and pine wood, hydrotropic worked best to remove the lignin hampering enzymatic hydrolysis. ToF-SIMS supported this finding, and showed that in birch, the carbohydrates were degraded more than in pine after hydrotropic pretreatment. The glucose yield of birch was improved by hydrotropic pretreatment from 5.1% to 83.9%, more significantly than in case of pine. PMID:23774220

  20. The pretreatment of corn stover with Gloeophyllum trabeum KU-41 for enzymatic hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pretreatment is an essential step in the enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass for bio-ethanol production. The dominant concern in this step is how to decrease the high cost of pretreatment while achieving a high sugar yield. Fungal pretreatment of biomass was previously reported to be effective, with the advantage of having a low energy requirement and requiring no application of additional chemicals. In this work, Gloeophyllum trabeum KU-41 was chosen for corn stover pretreatment through screening with 40 strains of wood-rot fungi. The objective of the current work is to find out which characteristics of corn stover pretreated with G. trabeum KU-41 determine the pretreatment method to be successful and worthwhile to apply. This will be done by determining the lignin content, structural carbohydrate, cellulose crystallinity, initial adsorption capacity of cellulase and specific surface area of pretreated corn stover. Results The content of xylan in pretreated corn stover was decreased by 43% in comparison to the untreated corn stover. The initial cellulase adsorption capacity and the specific surface area of corn stover pretreated with G. trabeum were increased by 7.0- and 2.5-fold, respectively. Also there was little increase in the cellulose crystallinity of pretreated corn stover. Conclusion G. trabeum has an efficient degradation system, and the results indicated that the conversion of cellulose to glucose increases as the accessibility of cellulose increases due to the partial removal of xylan and the structure breakage of the cell wall. This pretreatment method can be further explored as an alternative to the thermochemical pretreatment method. PMID:22559172

  1. Methane production from rice straw pretreated by a mixture of acetic-propionic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rui; Zhang, Zhenya; Zhang, Ruiqin; Li, Miao; Lei, Zhongfang; Utsumi, Motoo; Sugiura, Norio

    2010-02-01

    Rice straw was treated with a mixed solution of acetic acid and propionic acid to enhance its biodegradability. The effect of acid concentration, pretreatment time, and the ratio of solid to liquid on the delignification performance of rice straw were investigated. It was found that the optimal conditions for hydrolysis were 0.75 mol/L acid concentration, 2h pretreatment time and 1:20 solid to liquid ratio. Batch methane fermentation of untreated rice straw, pretreated rice straw, and the hydrolysates (the liquid fraction) of pretreatment were conducted at 35 degrees C for 30 days, and the results indicated that methane production of rice straw can be enhanced by dilute organic acid pretreatment. Moreover, most of the acid in hydrolysates can also be converted into methane gas.

  2. Two-stage dilute-acid and organic-solvent lignocellulosic pretreatment for enhanced bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Brodeur, G; Telotte, J; Stickel, J J; Ramakrishnan, S

    2016-11-01

    A two stage pretreatment approach for biomass is developed in the current work in which dilute acid (DA) pretreatment is followed by a solvent based pretreatment (N-methyl morpholine N oxide - NMMO). When the combined pretreatment (DAWNT) is applied to sugarcane bagasse and corn stover, the rates of hydrolysis and overall yields (>90%) are seen to dramatically improve and under certain conditions 48h can be taken off the time of hydrolysis with the additional NMMO step to reach similar conversions. DAWNT shows a 2-fold increase in characteristic rates and also fractionates different components of biomass - DA treatment removes the hemicellulose while the remaining cellulose is broken down by enzymatic hydrolysis after NMMO treatment to simple sugars. The remaining residual solid is high purity lignin. Future work will focus on developing a full scale economic analysis of DAWNT for use in biomass fractionation. PMID:27631703

  3. Two-stage dilute-acid and organic-solvent lignocellulosic pretreatment for enhanced bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Brodeur, G; Telotte, J; Stickel, J J; Ramakrishnan, S

    2016-11-01

    A two stage pretreatment approach for biomass is developed in the current work in which dilute acid (DA) pretreatment is followed by a solvent based pretreatment (N-methyl morpholine N oxide - NMMO). When the combined pretreatment (DAWNT) is applied to sugarcane bagasse and corn stover, the rates of hydrolysis and overall yields (>90%) are seen to dramatically improve and under certain conditions 48h can be taken off the time of hydrolysis with the additional NMMO step to reach similar conversions. DAWNT shows a 2-fold increase in characteristic rates and also fractionates different components of biomass - DA treatment removes the hemicellulose while the remaining cellulose is broken down by enzymatic hydrolysis after NMMO treatment to simple sugars. The remaining residual solid is high purity lignin. Future work will focus on developing a full scale economic analysis of DAWNT for use in biomass fractionation.

  4. Pretreatment of Sugar Beet Pulp with Dilute Sulfurous Acid is Effective for Multipurpose Usage of Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Kharina, M; Emelyanov, V; Mokshina, N; Ibragimova, N; Gorshkova, T

    2016-05-01

    Sulfurous acid was used for pretreatment of sugar beet pulp (SBP) in order to achieve high efficiency of both extraction of carbohydrates and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of the remaining solids. The main advantage of sulfurous acid usage as pretreatment agent is the possibility of its regeneration. Application of sulfurous acid as hydrolyzing agent in relatively low concentrations (0.6-1.0 %) during a short period of time (10-20 min) and low solid to liquid ratio (1:3, 1:6) allowed effective extraction of carbohydrates from SBP and provided positive effect on subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest obtained concentration of reducing substances (RS) in hydrolysates was 8.5 %; up to 33.6 % of all carbohydrates present in SBP could be extracted. The major obtained monosaccharides were arabinose and glucose (9.4 and 7.3 g/l, respectively). Pretreatment of SBP with sulfurous acid increased 4.6 times the yield of glucose during subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of remaining solids with cellulase cocktail, as compared to the untreated SBP. Total yield of glucose during SBP pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis amounted to 89.4 % of the theoretical yield. The approach can be applied directly to the wet SBP. Hydrolysis of sugar beet pulp with sulfurous acid is recommended for obtaining of individual monosaccharides, as well as nutritional media. PMID:26821256

  5. Pretreatment of Sugar Beet Pulp with Dilute Sulfurous Acid is Effective for Multipurpose Usage of Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Kharina, M; Emelyanov, V; Mokshina, N; Ibragimova, N; Gorshkova, T

    2016-05-01

    Sulfurous acid was used for pretreatment of sugar beet pulp (SBP) in order to achieve high efficiency of both extraction of carbohydrates and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of the remaining solids. The main advantage of sulfurous acid usage as pretreatment agent is the possibility of its regeneration. Application of sulfurous acid as hydrolyzing agent in relatively low concentrations (0.6-1.0 %) during a short period of time (10-20 min) and low solid to liquid ratio (1:3, 1:6) allowed effective extraction of carbohydrates from SBP and provided positive effect on subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest obtained concentration of reducing substances (RS) in hydrolysates was 8.5 %; up to 33.6 % of all carbohydrates present in SBP could be extracted. The major obtained monosaccharides were arabinose and glucose (9.4 and 7.3 g/l, respectively). Pretreatment of SBP with sulfurous acid increased 4.6 times the yield of glucose during subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of remaining solids with cellulase cocktail, as compared to the untreated SBP. Total yield of glucose during SBP pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis amounted to 89.4 % of the theoretical yield. The approach can be applied directly to the wet SBP. Hydrolysis of sugar beet pulp with sulfurous acid is recommended for obtaining of individual monosaccharides, as well as nutritional media.

  6. The enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated pulp fibers predominantly involves “peeling/erosion” modes of action

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is still considerable debate regarding the actual mechanism by which a “cellulase mixture” deconstructs cellulosic materials, with accessibility to the substrate at the microscopic level being one of the major restrictions that limits fast, complete cellulose hydrolysis. In the work reported here we tried to determine the predominant mode of action, at the fiber level, of how a cellulase mixture deconstructs pretreated softwood and hardwood pulp fibers. Quantitative changes in the pulp fibers derived from different pretreated biomass substrates were monitored throughout the course of enzymatic hydrolysis to see if the dominant mechanisms involved either the fragmentation/cutting of longer fibers to shorter fibers or their “peeling/delamination/erosion,” or if both cutting and peeling mechanisms occurred simultaneously. Results Regardless of the source of biomass, the type of pretreatment and the chemical composition of the substrate, under typical hydrolysis conditions (50°C, pH 4.8, mixing) longer pulp fibers (fiber length >200 μm) were rapidly broken down until a relatively constant fiber length of 130 to 160 μm was reached. In contrast, shorter fibers with an initial average fiber length of 130 to 160 μm showed no significant change in length despite their substantial hydrolysis. The fragmentation/cutting mode of deconstruction was only observed on longer fibers at early stages of hydrolysis. Although the fiber fragmentation mode of deconstruction was not greatly influenced by enzyme loading, it was significantly inhibited by glucose and was mainly observed during initial mixing of the enzyme and substrate. In contrast, significant changes in the fiber width occurred throughout the course of hydrolysis for all of the substrates, suggesting that fiber width may limit the rate and extent of cellulose hydrolysis. Conclusion It appears that, at the fiber level, pretreated pulp fibers are hydrolyzed through a two-step mode of action

  7. Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of poplar bark by combined use of gamma ray and dilute acid for bioethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Lee, Jae Taek; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Kim, Ung-Jin; Bae, Hyeun-Jong; Gon Wi, Seung; Cho, Jae-Young

    2012-08-01

    Pretreatment of poplar bark with a combination of sulfuric acid (3%, w/w, H2SO4) and gamma irradiation (0-1000 kGy) was performed in an attempt to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis for bioethanol production. The yields of reducing sugar were slightly increased with an increasing irradiation dose, ranging from 35.4% to 51.5%, with a 56.1% reducing sugar yield observed after dilute acid pretreatment. These results clearly showed that soluble sugars were released faster and to a greater extent in dilute acid-pretreated poplar bark than in gamma irradiation-pretreated bark. When combined pretreatment was carried out, a drastic increase in reducing sugar yield (83.1%) was found compared with individual pretreatment, indicating the possibility of increasing the convertibility of poplar bark following combined pretreatment. These findings are likely associated with cellulose crystallinity, lignin modification, and removal of hemicelluloses.

  8. The effect of dilute acid pre-treatment process in bioethanol production from durian (Durio zibethinus) seeds waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazali, K. A.; Salleh, S. F.; Riayatsyah, T. M. I.; Aditiya, H. B.; Mahlia, T. M. I.

    2016-03-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is one of the promising feedstocks for bioethanol production. The process starts from pre-treatment, hydrolysis, fermentation, distillation and finally obtaining the final product, ethanol. The efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass depends heavily on the effectiveness of the pre-treatment step which main function is to break the lignin structure of the biomass. This work aims to investigate the effects of dilute acid pre-treatment on the enzymatic hydrolysis of durian seeds waste to glucose and the subsequent bioethanol fermentation process. The yield of glucose from dilute acid pre-treated sample using 0.6% H2SO4 and 5% substrate concentration shows significant value of 23.4951 g/L. Combination of dilute acid pre-treatment and enzymatic hydrolysis using 150U of enzyme able to yield 50.0944 g/L of glucose content higher compared to normal pre-treated sample of 8.1093 g/L. Dilute acid pre-treatment sample also shows stable and efficient yeast activity during fermentation process with lowest glucose content at 2.9636 g/L compared to 14.7583g/L for normal pre-treated sample. Based on the result, it can be concluded that dilute acid pre-treatment increase the yield of ethanol from bioethanol production process.

  9. Pretreatment of garden biomass by alkali-assisted ultrasonication: effects on enzymatic hydrolysis and ultrastructural changes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation aims at studying the effectiveness of alkali-assisted ultrasonication on pretreatment of garden biomass (GB). Dry and powdered GB suspended in 1% NaOH was ultrasonicated for 15, 30 and 60 minutes at a frequency of 25 KHZ. The mode of action and effectiveness of alkali-assisted ultrasonication on GB was established through microscopic, scanning electron microscopic and X-ray diffraction studies. A perusal of results showed that alkali-assisted ultrasonication led to fibrillation of GB which ultimately facilitated enzymatic hydrolysis. The results also indicated that alkali-assisted ultrasonication is an efficient means of pretreatment of GB at moderate (45-50°C) working temperature and low (1%) concentration of alkali. The yield of reducing sugar after enzymatic hydrolysis increased almost six times as compared to control due to alkali-assisted ultrasonication. PMID:24843790

  10. Enhancing the enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover by an integrated wet-milling and alkali pretreatment.

    PubMed

    He, Xun; Miao, Yelian; Jiang, Xuejian; Xu, Zidong; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2010-04-01

    An integrated wet-milling and alkali pretreatment was applied to corn stover prior to enzymatic hydrolysis. The effects of NaOH concentration in the pretreatment on crystalline structure, chemical composition, and reducing-sugar yield of corn stover were investigated, and the mechanism of increasing reducing-sugar yield by the pretreatment was discussed. The experimental results showed that the crystalline structure of corn stover was disrupted, and lignin was removed, while cellulose and hemicellulose were retained in corn stover by the pretreatment with 1% NaOH in 1 h. The reducing-sugar yield from the pretreated corn stovers increased from 20.2% to 46.7% when the NaOH concentration increased from 0% to 1%. The 1% NaOH pretreated corn stover had a holocellulose conversion of 55.1%. The increase in reducing-sugar yield was related to the crystalline structure disruption and delignification of corn stover. It was clarified that the pretreatment significantly enhanced the conversion of cellulose and hemicellulose in the corn stover to sugars.

  11. Enhanced functional properties of tannic acid after thermal hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal hydrolysis processing of fresh tannic acid was carried out in a closed reactor at four different temperatures (65, 100, 150 and 200°C). Pressures reached in the system were 1.3 and 4.8 MPa at 150 and 200°C, respectively. Hydrolysis products (gallic acid and pyrogallol) were separated and qua...

  12. Saccharification of microalgae biomass obtained from wastewater treatment by enzymatic hydrolysis. Effect of alkaline-peroxide pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Martín Juárez, Judit; Lorenzo Hernando, Ana; Muñoz Torre, Raúl; Blanco Lanza, Saúl; Bolado Rodríguez, Silvia

    2016-10-01

    An enzymatic method for the carbohydrate hydrolysis of different microalgae biomass cultivated in domestic (DWB) and pig manure (PMWB) wastewaters, at different storage conditions (fresh, freeze-dried and reconstituted), was evaluated. The DWB provided sugars yields between 40 and 63%, although low xylose yields (< 23.5%). Approximately 2% of this biomass was converted to byproducts as succinic, acetic and formic acids. For PMWB, a high fraction of the sugars (up to 87%) was extracted, but mainly converted into acetic, butyric and formic acids, which was attributed to the bacterial action. In addition, the performance of an alkaline-peroxide pretreatment, conducted for 1h, 50°C and H2O2 concentrations from 1 to 7.5% (w/w), was essayed. The hydrolysis of pretreated microalgae supported a wide range of sugars extraction for DWB (55-90%), and 100% for PMWB. Nevertheless, a large fraction of these sugars (∼30% for DWB and 100% for PMWB) was transformed to byproducts. PMID:27372005

  13. Saccharification of microalgae biomass obtained from wastewater treatment by enzymatic hydrolysis. Effect of alkaline-peroxide pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Martín Juárez, Judit; Lorenzo Hernando, Ana; Muñoz Torre, Raúl; Blanco Lanza, Saúl; Bolado Rodríguez, Silvia

    2016-10-01

    An enzymatic method for the carbohydrate hydrolysis of different microalgae biomass cultivated in domestic (DWB) and pig manure (PMWB) wastewaters, at different storage conditions (fresh, freeze-dried and reconstituted), was evaluated. The DWB provided sugars yields between 40 and 63%, although low xylose yields (< 23.5%). Approximately 2% of this biomass was converted to byproducts as succinic, acetic and formic acids. For PMWB, a high fraction of the sugars (up to 87%) was extracted, but mainly converted into acetic, butyric and formic acids, which was attributed to the bacterial action. In addition, the performance of an alkaline-peroxide pretreatment, conducted for 1h, 50°C and H2O2 concentrations from 1 to 7.5% (w/w), was essayed. The hydrolysis of pretreated microalgae supported a wide range of sugars extraction for DWB (55-90%), and 100% for PMWB. Nevertheless, a large fraction of these sugars (∼30% for DWB and 100% for PMWB) was transformed to byproducts.

  14. A Kinetic Study of DDGS Hemicellulose Acid Hydrolysis and NMR Characterization of DDGS Hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanchi; Liu, Shijie

    2015-09-01

    Liquid hot water (LHW) extraction was used as a pretreatment method to separate the hemicellulose fraction from dried distiller's grain with solubles (DDGS) into liquid phase. Acid hydrolysis using 3.264 % w/w sulfuric acid at 130 °C was performed to convert polysaccharides in LHW extract to monosaccharides. The structure characterization of DDGS in anomeric carbon region based on proton NMR and heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) during acid hydrolysis was studied in this work. It reveals that the sugar units in DDGS hemicelluloses are constructed with (1-4)-β-D-xylopyranose and α-L-arabinofuranosyl residues. A kinetic model is included to explain the changing concentration of monomer, oligomer, and sugar units. The model was further tested based on the changing concentration of five carbon sugar units during hydrolysis. PMID:26198022

  15. Step enzymatic hydrolysis of sodium hydroxide-pretreated Chinese liquor distillers' grains for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue-Hong; Wu, Zheng-Yun; Yang, Jian; Yuan, Yu-Ju; Zhang, Wen-Xue

    2014-01-01

    Distillers' grains are a co-product of ethanol production. In China, only a small portion of distillers' grains have been used to feed the livestock because the amount was so huge. Nowadays, it has been reported that the distillers' grains have the potential for fuel ethanol production because they are composed of lignocelluloses and residual starch. In order to effectively convert distillers' grains to fuel ethanol and other valuable production, sodium hydroxide pretreatment, step-by-step enzymatic hydrolysis, and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) were investigated. The residual starch was first recycled from wet distillers' grains (WDG) with glucoamylase to obtain glucose-rich liquid. The total sugar concentration was 21.3 g/L, and 111.9% theoretical starch was hydrolyzed. Then the removed-starch dry distillers' grains (RDDG) were pretreated with NaOH under optimal conditions and the pretreated dry distillers' grains (PDDG) were used for xylanase hydrolysis. The xylose concentration was 19.4 g/L and 68.6% theoretical xylose was hydrolyzed. The cellulose-enriched dry distillers' grains (CDDG) obtained from xylanase hydrolysis were used in SSF for ethanol production. The ethanol concentration was 42.1 g/L and the ethanol productivity was 28.7 g/100 g CDDG. After the experiment, approximately 80.6% of the fermentable sugars in WDG was converted to ethanol.

  16. Step enzymatic hydrolysis of sodium hydroxide-pretreated Chinese liquor distillers' grains for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue-Hong; Wu, Zheng-Yun; Yang, Jian; Yuan, Yu-Ju; Zhang, Wen-Xue

    2014-01-01

    Distillers' grains are a co-product of ethanol production. In China, only a small portion of distillers' grains have been used to feed the livestock because the amount was so huge. Nowadays, it has been reported that the distillers' grains have the potential for fuel ethanol production because they are composed of lignocelluloses and residual starch. In order to effectively convert distillers' grains to fuel ethanol and other valuable production, sodium hydroxide pretreatment, step-by-step enzymatic hydrolysis, and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) were investigated. The residual starch was first recycled from wet distillers' grains (WDG) with glucoamylase to obtain glucose-rich liquid. The total sugar concentration was 21.3 g/L, and 111.9% theoretical starch was hydrolyzed. Then the removed-starch dry distillers' grains (RDDG) were pretreated with NaOH under optimal conditions and the pretreated dry distillers' grains (PDDG) were used for xylanase hydrolysis. The xylose concentration was 19.4 g/L and 68.6% theoretical xylose was hydrolyzed. The cellulose-enriched dry distillers' grains (CDDG) obtained from xylanase hydrolysis were used in SSF for ethanol production. The ethanol concentration was 42.1 g/L and the ethanol productivity was 28.7 g/100 g CDDG. After the experiment, approximately 80.6% of the fermentable sugars in WDG was converted to ethanol. PMID:24397718

  17. Ethanol production from cashew apple bagasse: improvement of enzymatic hydrolysis by microwave-assisted alkali pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Tigressa Helena Soares; Rocha, Maria Valderez Ponte; de Macedo, Gorete Ribeiro; Gonçalves, Luciana R B

    2011-07-01

    In this work, the potential of microwave-assisted alkali pretreatment in order to improve the rupture of the recalcitrant structures of the cashew able bagasse (CAB), lignocellulosic by-product in Brazil with no commercial value, is obtained from cashew apple process to juice production, was studied. First, biomass composition of CAB was determined, and the percentage of glucan and lignin was 20.54 ± 0.70% and 33.80 ± 1.30%, respectively. CAB content in terms of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin, 19.21 ± 0.35%, 12.05 ± 0.37%, and 38.11 ± 0.08%, respectively, was also determined. Results showed that, after enzymatic hydrolysis, alkali concentration exerted influence on glucose formation, after pretreatment with 0.2 and 1.0 mo L(-1) of NaOH (372 ± 12 and 355 ± 37 mg g(glucan)(-1) ) when 2% (w/v) of cashew apple bagasse pretreated by microwave-assisted alkali pretreatment (CAB-M) was used. On the other hand, pretreatment time (15-30 min) and microwave power (600-900 W) exerted no significant effect on hydrolysis. On enzymatic hydrolysis step, improvement on solid percentage (16% w/v) and enzyme load (30 FPU g (CAB-M) (-1) ) increased glucose concentration to 15 g L(-1). The fermentation of the hydrolyzate by Saccharomyces cerevesiae resulted in ethanol concentration and productivity of 5.6 g L(-1) and 1.41 g L(-1) h(-1), respectively.

  18. [Enhancement of anaerobic digestion of excess sludge by acid-alkali pretreatment].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Guang-Huan; Zhou, Xing-Qiu; Wu, Jian-Dong

    2012-06-01

    In order to enhance the efficiency of anaerobic digestion of excess sludge, acid-alkali pretreatment method was studied. Three different pretreatment methods (alkali alone,acid-alkali, alkali-acid) were compared to investigate their impacts on hydrolysis and acidification of activated sludge. In addition, their influences on methane-producing in subsequent anaerobic digestion process were also studied. The results showed that the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) of alkaline treatment alone was about 16% higher than the combining of acid and alkali treatment, SCOD concentration increased to 5406.1 mg x L(-1) after 8 d pretreatment. After treated by acid (pH 4.0, 4 d) and alkali (pH 10.0, 4 d), the acetic acid production and its content in short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were higher than other pretreatment methods. And the acetic acid production (as COD/VSS) could reach 74.4 mg x g(-1), accounting for 60.5% of SCFAs. After acid-alkali pretreatment, the C: N ratio of the sludge mixed liquor was about 25, and the C: P ratio was between 35-40, which was more favorable than C: N and C: P ratio of alkali alone and alkali-acid to subsequent anaerobic digestion. The control experiments showed that, after acid-alkali pretreatment, anaerobic digestion cumulative methane yield (CH4/VSS(in)) reached to 136.1 mL x g(-1) at 15 d, which was about 2.5-, 1.6-, and 1.7-fold of the blank (unpretreated), alkali alone pretreatment and alkali-acid pretreatment, respectively. After acid-alkali pretreatment for 8 d and anaerobic digestion for 15 d, the removal efficiency of VSS was about 60.9%, and the sludge reduction effect was better than other pretreatments. It is obvious that the acid-alkali pretreatment method was more favorable to anaerobic digestion and sludge reduction.

  19. Effect of alkali pretreatment on the structural properties and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn cob.

    PubMed

    Sahare, Padmavati; Singh, Rajkumar; Laxman, R Seeta; Rao, Mala

    2012-12-01

    An effective alkali pretreatment which affects the structural properties of cellulose (corn cob) has been studied. The pretreatment of corn cob was carried out with different combinations of alkali at varying temperatures. The most effective pretreatment of corn cob was achieved with 1 % alkali at 50 °C in 4 h. The crystallinity index (CrI) and specific surface area (SSA) of untreated corn cob was 39 % and 0.52 m(2)/g wherein after alkali pretreatment CrI decreased to 15 % and SSA increased to 3.32 m(2)/g. The fungal organism was identified as Penicillium pinophilum on the basis of ITS sequence. At 5 % substrate concentration using a complete cellulase from Penicillium pinophilum the hydrolysis of untreated corn cob with 5, 10 and 20 FPU/g enzyme loadings were 11 %, 13 % and 16 %, whereas after alkali treatment the hydrolysis increased to 78 %, 90 % and 100 %, respectively. Further hydrolytic potential of commercial cellulases viz. Accellerase™ 1,000, Palkofeel-30 and Palkocel-40 were investigated under similar conditions. PMID:22983744

  20. Responses of biomass briquetting and pelleting to water-involved pretreatments and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Li, Xiaotong; Shen, Fei; Wang, Zhanghong; Yang, Gang; Lin, Lili; Zhang, Yanzong; Zeng, Yongmei; Deng, Shihuai

    2014-01-01

    Although lignocellulosic biomass has been extensively regarded as the most important resource for bioethanol, the wide application was seriously restricted by the high transportation cost of biomass. Currently, biomass densification is regarded as an acceptable solution to this issue. Herein, briquettes, pellets and their corresponding undensified biomass were pretreated by diluted-NaOH and hydrothermal method to investigate the responses of biomass densification to these typical water-involved pretreatments and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. The densified biomass auto-swelling was initially investigated before pretreatment. Results indicated pellets could be totally auto-swollen in an hour, while it took about 24 h for briquettes. When diluted-NaOH pretreatment was performed, biomass briquetting and pelleting improved sugar conversion rate by 20.1% and 5.5% comparing with their corresponding undensified biomass. Pelleting improved sugar conversion rate by 7.0% after hydrothermal pretreatment comparing with the undensified biomass. However, briquetting disturbed hydrothermal pretreatment resulting in the decrease of sugar conversion rate by 15.0%.

  1. Rapid near infrared spectroscopy for prediction of enzymatic hydrolysis of corn bran after various pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Baum, Andreas; Agger, Jane; Meyer, Anne S; Egebo, Max; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard

    2012-02-15

    Efficient generation of a fermentable hydrolysate is a primary requirement in the utilization of fibrous plant biomass as feedstocks in bioethanol processes. The first biomass conversion step usually involves a hydrothermal pretreatment before enzymatic hydrolysis. The purpose of the pretreatment step is to increase the responsivity of the substrate to enzymatic attack and the type of pretreatment affects the enzymatic conversion efficiency. Destarched corn bran is a fibrous, heteroxylan-rich side-stream from the starch industry which may be used as a feedstock for bioethanol production or as a source of xylose for other purposes. In the present study we demonstrate the use of diffuse reflectance near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) as a rapid and non-destructive analytical tool for evaluation of pretreatment effects on destarched corn bran. NIR was used to achieve classification between 43 differently pretreated corn bran samples using principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchal clustering algorithms. Quantification of the enzymatically released monosaccharides by HPLC was used to design multivariate calibration models (biPLS) on the NIR spectra. The models could predict the enzymatic release of different levels of arabinose, xylose and glucose from all the differently pretreated destarched corn bran samples. The present study also demonstrates a generic, non-destructive solution to determine the enzymatic monosaccharide release from polymers in biomass side-streams, thereby potentially replacing the cumbersome HPLC analysis.

  2. Effects of substrate loading on enzymatic hydrolysis and viscosity of pretreated barley straw.

    PubMed

    Rosgaard, Lisa; Andric, Pavle; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Pedersen, Sven; Meyer, Anne S

    2007-10-01

    In this study, the applicability of a "fed-batch" strategy, that is, sequential loading of substrate or substrate plus enzymes during enzymatic hydrolysis was evaluated for hydrolysis of steam-pretreated barley straw. The specific aims were to achieve hydrolysis of high substrate levels, low viscosity during hydrolysis, and high glucose concentrations. An enzyme system comprising Celluclast and Novozyme 188, a commercial cellulase product derived from Trichoderma reesei and a beta-glucosidase derived from Aspergillus niger, respectively, was used for the enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest final glucose concentration, 78 g/l, after 72 h of reaction, was obtained with an initial, full substrate loading of 15% dry matter weight/weight (w/w DM). Conversely, the glucose yields, in grams per gram of DM, were highest at lower substrate concentrations, with the highest glucose yield being 0.53 g/g DM for the reaction with a substrate loading of 5% w/w DM after 72 h. The reactions subjected to gradual loading of substrate or substrate plus enzymes to increase the substrate levels from 5 to 15% w/w DM, consistently provided lower concentrations of glucose after 72 h of reaction; however, the initial rates of conversion varied in the different reactions. Rapid cellulose degradation was accompanied by rapid decreases in viscosity before addition of extra substrate, but when extra substrate or substrate plus enzymes were added, the viscosities of the slurries increased and the hydrolytic efficiencies decreased temporarily.

  3. Helically agitated mixing in dry dilute acid pretreatment enhances the bioconversion of corn stover into ethanol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dry dilute acid pretreatment at extremely high solids loading of lignocellulose materials demonstrated promising advantages of no waste water generation, less sugar loss, and low steam consumption while maintaining high hydrolysis yield. However, the routine pretreatment reactor without mixing apparatus was found not suitable for dry pretreatment operation because of poor mixing and mass transfer. In this study, helically agitated mixing was introduced into the dry dilute acid pretreatment of corn stover and its effect on pretreatment efficiency, inhibitor generation, sugar production, and bioconversion efficiency through simultaneous saccharification and ethanol fermentation (SSF) were evaluated. Results The overall cellulose conversion taking account of cellulose loss in pretreatment was used to evaluate the efficiency of pretreatment. The two-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model on dry pretreatment was established and applied to analyze the mixing mechanism. The results showed that the pretreatment efficiency was significantly improved and the inhibitor generation was reduced by the helically agitated mixing, compared to the dry pretreatment without mixing: the ethanol titer and yield from cellulose in the SSF reached 56.20 g/L and 69.43% at the 30% solids loading and 15 FPU/DM cellulase dosage, respectively, corresponding to a 26.5% increase in ethanol titer and 17.2% increase in ethanol yield at the same fermentation conditions. Conclusions The advantage of helically agitated mixing may provide a prototype of dry dilute acid pretreatment processing for future commercial-scale production of cellulosic ethanol. PMID:24387051

  4. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose pretreated with ionic liquids and N-methyl Morpholine N-Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau Li, Elizabeth

    The effect of N-methyl Morpholine N-Oxide (NMMO), 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium acetate ([Emim]Ac) and 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium diethyl phosphate ([Emim]DEP) on pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of dissolving pulp was studied. X-ray diffraction measurements of regenerated cellulose from these solvents showed that solvent pretreatment reduces the crystallinity of cellulose. However, crystallinity might not be a major factor affecting the in-situ enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in these solvents. Although regenerated cellulose from [Emim]DEP showed the lowest crystallinity index (˜15%), in-situ enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose dissolved in NMMO showed the highest cellulose conversion (68% compared to 65% for [Emim]Ac and 37% for [Emim]DEP at enzyme loading of 122 FPU/g). Moreover, results showed that enzymes could tolerate up to NMMO concentration of 100 g/L and still yield full conversion of cellulose. Since it is not necessary to remove all the NMMO, less amount of water will be required for the washing step and thus the process will be more economical. The HCH-1 model was used in an attempt to model the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in NMMO. With the incorporation of NMMO inhibition and a factor to account for unreacted cellulose, the model was able to correlate the experimental data of the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose (6.68 g/L) at various NMMO concentrations (0, 50, 100, 150 and 250 g/L). However, the experimental results also suggest that NMMO might be deactivating the enzymes rather than inhibiting them. More studies need to be done at varying cellulose, NMMO and enzyme concentrations to find the exact nature of this deactivation of NMMO.

  5. Pretreatment of microcrystalline cellulose in organic electrolyte solutions for enzymatic hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that the crystalline structure of cellulose is negatively correlated with enzymatic digestibility, therefore, pretreatment is required to break down the highly ordered crystalline structure in cellulose, and to increase the porosity of its surface. In the present study, an organic electrolyte solution (OES) composed of an ionic liquid (1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([AMIM]Cl)) and an organic solvent (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) was prepared, and used to pretreat microcrystalline cellulose for subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis; to our knowledge, this is the first time that this method has been used. Results Microcrystalline cellulose (5 wt%) rapidly dispersed and then completely dissolved in an OES with a molar fraction of [AMIM]Cl per OES (χ [AMIM]Cl) of greater than or equal to 0.2 at 110°C within 10 minutes. The cellulose was regenerated from the OES by precipitation with hot water, and enzymatically hydrolyzed. As the χ [AMIM]Cl of the OES increased from 0.1 to 0.9, both the hydrolysis yield and initial hydrolysis rate of the regenerated cellulose also increased gradually. After treatment using OES with χ [AMIM]Cl of 0.7, the glucose yield (54.1%) was 7.2 times that of untreated cellulose. This promotion of hydrolysis yield was mainly due to the decrease in the degree of crystallinity (that is, the crystallinity index of cellulose I). Conclusions An OES of [AMIM]Cl and DMSO with χ [AMIM]Cl of 0.7 was chosen for cellulose pretreatment because it dissolved cellulose rapidly to achieve a high glucose yield (54.1%), which was only slightly lower than the value (59.6%) obtained using pure [AMIM]Cl. OES pretreatment is a cost-effective and environmentally friendly technique for hydrolysis, because it 1) uses the less expensive OES instead of pure ionic liquids, 2) shortens dissolution time, 3) requires lower energy for stirring and transporting, and 4) is recyclable. PMID:22099703

  6. A novel sono-assisted acid pretreatment of chili post harvest residue for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, Raveendran; Binod, Parameswaran; Pandey, Ashok

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a sono-assisted acid pretreatment strategy for the effective removal of lignin and hemicelluloses and to improve the sugar yield from chili post harvest residue. Operational parameters that affect the pretreatment efficiency were studied and optimized. Inhibitor analysis of the hydrolyzate revealed that major fermentation inhibitors like furfural, hydroxymethyl furfural and organic acids like citric acid, succinic acid and propionic acid were absent. Changes in structural properties of the biomass were studied in relation to the pretreatment process using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis, and the changes in chemical composition was also monitored. The biomass pretreated with the optimized novel method yielded 0.465g/g of reducing sugars on enzymatic hydrolysis. Fermentation of the non-detoxified hydrolysate yielded 2.14% of bioethanol with a fermentation efficiency of 71.03%. PMID:26949055

  7. Effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on kinetics of gelatin hydrolysis by collagenase and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Long; Zeng, Wei-Cai; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Liao, Xue-Pin; Shi, Bi

    2016-03-01

    Gelatin is a mixture of soluble proteins prepared by partial hydrolysis of native collagen. Gelatin can be enzymatically hydrolyzed to produce bioactive hydrolysates. However, the preparation of gelatin peptide with expected activity is usually a time-consuming process. The production efficiency of gelatin hydrolysates needs to be improved. In present work, effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on kinetic parameters of gelatin hydrolysis by collagenase was investigated based on an established kinetic model. With ultrasonic pretreatment, reaction rate constant and enzyme inactivation constant were increased by 27.5% and 27.8%, respectively. Meanwhile, hydrolysis activation energy and enzyme inactivation energy were reduced by 36.3% and 43.0%, respectively. In order to explore its possible mechanism, influence of sonication on structural properties of gelatin was determined using atomic force microscopy, particle size analyzer, fluorescence spectroscopy, protein solubility test and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide was used as a positive control for potential sonochemical effect. It was found that reduction of gelatin particle size was mainly caused by physical effect of ultrasound. Increased solubility and variation in β-sheet and random coil elements of gelatin were due to sonochemical effect. Both physical and chemical effects of sonication contributed to the change in α-helix and β-turn structures. The current results suggest that ultrasound can be potentially applied to stimulate the production efficiency of gelatin peptides, mainly due to its effects on modification of protein structures.

  8. Effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on kinetics of gelatin hydrolysis by collagenase and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Long; Zeng, Wei-Cai; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Liao, Xue-Pin; Shi, Bi

    2016-03-01

    Gelatin is a mixture of soluble proteins prepared by partial hydrolysis of native collagen. Gelatin can be enzymatically hydrolyzed to produce bioactive hydrolysates. However, the preparation of gelatin peptide with expected activity is usually a time-consuming process. The production efficiency of gelatin hydrolysates needs to be improved. In present work, effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on kinetic parameters of gelatin hydrolysis by collagenase was investigated based on an established kinetic model. With ultrasonic pretreatment, reaction rate constant and enzyme inactivation constant were increased by 27.5% and 27.8%, respectively. Meanwhile, hydrolysis activation energy and enzyme inactivation energy were reduced by 36.3% and 43.0%, respectively. In order to explore its possible mechanism, influence of sonication on structural properties of gelatin was determined using atomic force microscopy, particle size analyzer, fluorescence spectroscopy, protein solubility test and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide was used as a positive control for potential sonochemical effect. It was found that reduction of gelatin particle size was mainly caused by physical effect of ultrasound. Increased solubility and variation in β-sheet and random coil elements of gelatin were due to sonochemical effect. Both physical and chemical effects of sonication contributed to the change in α-helix and β-turn structures. The current results suggest that ultrasound can be potentially applied to stimulate the production efficiency of gelatin peptides, mainly due to its effects on modification of protein structures. PMID:26558996

  9. Structural Changes of Lignin after Liquid Hot Water Pretreatment and Its Effect on the Enzymatic Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Zhuang, Xinshu; Yuan, Zhenhong; Qi, Wei; Yu, Qiang; Wang, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    During liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment, lignin is mostly retained in the pretreated biomass, and the changes in the chemical and structural characteristics of lignin should probably refer to re-/depolymerization, solubilization, or glass transition. The residual lignin could influence the effective enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. The pure lignin was used to evaluate the effect of LHW process on its structural and chemical features. The surface morphology of LHW-treated lignin observed with the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was more porous and irregular than that of untreated lignin. Compared to the untreated lignin, the surface area, total pore volume, and average pore size of LHW-treated lignin tested with the Brunner-Emmet-Teller (BET) measurement were increased. FTIR analysis showed that the chemical structure of lignin was broken down in the LHW process. Additionally, the impact of untreated and treated lignin on the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was also explored. The LHW-treated lignin had little impact on the cellulase adsorption and enzyme activities and somehow could improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. PMID:27563678

  10. Structural Changes of Lignin after Liquid Hot Water Pretreatment and Its Effect on the Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xinshu; Qi, Wei; Yu, Qiang; Wang, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    During liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment, lignin is mostly retained in the pretreated biomass, and the changes in the chemical and structural characteristics of lignin should probably refer to re-/depolymerization, solubilization, or glass transition. The residual lignin could influence the effective enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. The pure lignin was used to evaluate the effect of LHW process on its structural and chemical features. The surface morphology of LHW-treated lignin observed with the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was more porous and irregular than that of untreated lignin. Compared to the untreated lignin, the surface area, total pore volume, and average pore size of LHW-treated lignin tested with the Brunner-Emmet-Teller (BET) measurement were increased. FTIR analysis showed that the chemical structure of lignin was broken down in the LHW process. Additionally, the impact of untreated and treated lignin on the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was also explored. The LHW-treated lignin had little impact on the cellulase adsorption and enzyme activities and somehow could improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. PMID:27563678

  11. Enhancing the hydrolysis and methane production potential of mixed food waste by an effective enzymatic pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Esra Uçkun; Trzcinski, Antoine P; Liu, Yu

    2015-05-01

    In this study, a fungal mash rich in hydrolytic enzymes was produced by solid state fermentation (SSF) of waste cake in a simple and efficient manner and was further applied for high-efficiency hydrolysis of mixed food wastes (FW). The enzymatic pretreatment of FW with this fungal mash resulted in 89.1 g/L glucose, 2.4 g/L free amino nitrogen, 165 g/L soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) and 64% reduction in volatile solids within 24h. The biomethane yield and production rate from FW pretreated with the fungal mash were found to be respectively about 2.3 and 3.5-times higher than without pretreatment. After anaerobic digestion of pretreated FW, a volatile solids removal of 80.4±3.5% was achieved. The pretreatment of mixed FW with the fungal mash produced in this study is a promising option for enhancing anaerobic digestion of FW in terms of energy recovery and volume reduction.

  12. A novel surfactant-assisted ionic liquid pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse for enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Nasirpour, N; Mousavi, S M; Shojaosadati, S A

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated a novel pretreatment method, as an essential step, for production of second generation bioethanol from sugarcane bagasse (SCB). Effect of tween 80 (TW) and polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG) on SCB pretreatment was assessed using 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ([BMIM]Cl) as an ionic liquid (IL). Different concentrations of TW and PEG were used to determine the optimum concentration of surfactant for the highest percentage of cellulose conversion. TW and PEG increased lignin removal by 12.5% over the IL-only pretreated sample. The 3% (w/w) PEG showed a significant increase in enzymatic digestibility with an efficiency of 96.2% after 12h of hydrolysis; this was 23% higher than the efficiency of SCB pretreated with IL. The increase in digestibility of surfactant assisted IL pretreatment method can be attributed to the decrease in cellulose crystallinity, changes in the cellulose lattice, and delignification; which was confirmed by FT-IR, XRD and FE-SEM analysis.

  13. Effects of a steam explosion pretreatment on sugar production by enzymatic hydrolysis and structural properties of reed straw.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiulong; Su, Xiaojun; Tan, Lin; Liu, Xianghua; Wu, Anjun; Su, Dingding; Tian, Kaizhong; Xiong, Xingyao

    2013-01-01

    Reed lignocellulose was subjected to a steam explosion pretreatment to obtain a high conversion rate of sugar after subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis using a commercial cellulase mixture. Under conditions of differing temperature (200 °C, 220 °C and 240 °C) and residence time (2, 5, and 8 min), the effect of the pretreatment on the sugar yield from enzymatic hydrolysis was studied. The highest respective reducing sugar and glucose yields were 36.14% and 15.35% after 60-h enzymatic hydrolysis of reed straw that had been pretreated with a steam explosion at 220 °C for 5 min. Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used in this study to comprehensively investigate the steam explosion-induced changes in the organizational structure and morphological properties of reed straw to analyze the reason for the increased sugar yield from enzymatic hydrolysis after the steam explosion.

  14. An efficient process for the saccharification of wood chips by combined ionic liquid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Viell, Jörn; Wulfhorst, Helene; Schmidt, Thomas; Commandeur, Ulrich; Fischer, Rainer; Spiess, Antje; Marquardt, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    A process concept combining pretreatment of wood in ionic liquids and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis to sugars is herein investigated to identify operating conditions which allow for (i) the processing of larger wood chips of 10 mm length, (ii) low temperature, (iii) high sugar yield, and (iv) short processing time. A careful quantitative study of the interaction of pretreatment and hydrolysis reveals that hydrolysis is most effective if beech chips are first disintegrated in [EMIM][Ac] at 115 °C for 1.5 h. The cellulose conversion varies between 70.5 wt% and 90.2wt% for hydrolysis times between 5 h and 72 h. A complete recovery of cellulose and xylan resulting in a total saccharification of 65 wt% of the wood chips could be demonstrated. It is shown that short pretreatment times are required to enable high sugar yield as well as to limit product degradation.

  15. [Application of Micro-aerobic Hydrolysis Acidification in the Pretreatment of Petrochemical Wastewater].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chen; Wu, Chang-yong; Zhou, Yue-xi; Fu, Xiao-yong; Chen, Xue-min; Qiu, Yan-bo; Wu, Xiao-feng

    2015-10-01

    Micro-aerobic hydrolysis acidification technology was applied in the reconstruction of ananaerobic hydrolysis acidification tank in a north petrochemical wastewater treatment plant. After put into operation, the monitoring results showed that the average removal rate of COD was 11.7% when influent COD was 490.3-673.2 mg x L(-1), hydraulic retention time (HRT) was 24 and the dissolved oxygen (DO) was 0.2-0.35 mg x L(-1). In addition, the BOD5/COD value was increased by 12.4%, the UV254 removal rate reached 11.2%, and the VFA concentration was increased by 23.0%. The relative molecular weight distribution (MWD) results showed that the small molecule organic matter (< 1 x 10(3)) percentage was increased from 59.5% to 82.1% and the high molecular organic matter ( > 100 x 10(3)) percentage was decreased from 31.8% to 14.0% after micro-aerobic hydrolysis acidification. The aerobic biodegradation batch test showed that the degradation of petrochemical wastewater was significantly improved by the pretreatment of micro-aerobic hydrolysis acidification. The COD of influent can be degraded to 102.2 mg x L(-1) by 48h aerobic treatment while the micro-aerobic hydrolysis acidification effluent COD can be degraded to 71.5 mg x L(-1) on the same condition. The effluent sulfate concentration of micro-aerobic hydrolysis acidification tank [(930.7 ± 60.1) mg x L(-1)] was higher than that of the influent [(854.3 ± 41.5) mg x L(-1)], indicating that sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) was inhibited. The toxic and malodorous gases generation was reduced with the improvement of environment.

  16. Increase in ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse based on combined pretreatments and fed-batch enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wanderley, Maria Carolina de Albuquerque; Martín, Carlos; Rocha, George Jackson de Moraes; Gouveia, Ester Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated sugarcane bagasse was performed to investigate the production of ethanol. The sugarcane bagasse was pretreated in a process combining steam explosion and alkaline delignification. The lignin content decreased to 83%. Fed-batch enzymatic hydrolyses was initiated with 8% (w/v) solids loading, and 10 FPU/g cellulose. Then, 1% solids were fed at 12, 24 or 48 h intervals. After 120 h, the hydrolysates were fermented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFPEDA 1238, and a fourfold increase in ethanol production was reached when fed-batch hydrolysis with a 12-h addition period was used for the steam pretreated and delignified bagasse.

  17. Cellulose accessibility limits the effectiveness of minimum cellulase loading on the efficient hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic substrates.

    PubMed

    Arantes, Valdeir; Saddler, Jack N

    2011-01-01

    A range of lignocellulosic feedstocks (including agricultural, softwood and hardwood substrates) were pretreated with either sulfur dioxide-catalyzed steam or an ethanol organosolv procedure to try to establish a reliable assessment of the factors governing the minimum protein loading that could be used to achieve efficient hydrolysis. A statistical design approach was first used to define what might constitute the minimum protein loading (cellulases and β-glucosidase) that could be used to achieve efficient saccharification (defined as at least 70% glucan conversion) of the pretreated substrates after 72 hours of hydrolysis. The likely substrate factors that limit cellulose availability/accessibility were assessed, and then compared with the optimized minimum amounts of protein used to obtain effective hydrolysis. The optimized minimum protein loadings to achieve efficient hydrolysis of seven pretreated substrates ranged between 18 and 63 mg protein per gram of glucan. Within the similarly pretreated group of lignocellulosic feedstocks, the agricultural residues (corn stover and corn fiber) required significantly lower protein loadings to achieve efficient hydrolysis than did the pretreated woody biomass (poplar, douglas fir and lodgepole pine). Regardless of the substantial differences in the source, structure and chemical composition of the feedstocks, and the difference in the pretreatment technology used, the protein loading required to achieve efficient hydrolysis of lignocellulosic substrates was strongly dependent on the accessibility of the cellulosic component of each of the substrates. We found that cellulose-rich substrates with highly accessible cellulose, as assessed by the Simons' stain method, required a lower protein loading per gram of glucan to obtain efficient hydrolysis compared with substrates containing less accessible cellulose. These results suggest that the rate-limiting step during hydrolysis is not the catalytic cleavage of the

  18. Changes on structural properties of biomass pretreated by combined deacetylation with liquid hot water and its effect on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Chang, Senlin; Qu, Yongshui; Zhang, Zhiguo; Xu, Jian

    2016-11-01

    A novel combined pretreatment of deacetylation and liquid hot water (LHW) was invented which has been proved to be effective in increasing enzymatic hydrolysis yield of biomass. In order to further understand the effect of this new pretreatment process on biomass, the variation on structural properties including cellulose crystallinity index (CrI), specific surface area (SSA) and degree of polymerization (DP) before/after pretreatment and how these properties affected the enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass were explored. The improvement of pretreatment severity (PS) could increase CrI, SSA and reduce DP. Whereas the enhancement of degree of deacetylation could decrease SSA and DP. An optimal formula (E12Y=0.347(100-CrI)(-0.375)×(SSA)(0.203)×(1700-DP)(0.281)) was achieved to express the correlation between structural properties and enzymatic hydrolysis after 12h. The enzymatic yield was more sensitive to CrI than to SSA and DP.

  19. Improvement of enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production from corn stalk by alkali and N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ling-Yan; Ma, Yu-Long; Ma, Xiao-Xia; Lv, Jun-Min

    2016-07-01

    A combinative technology of alkali and N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMMO) was used to pretreat corn stalk (CS) for improving the efficiencies of subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation. The results showed that this strategy could not only remove hemicellulose and lignin but also decrease the crystallinity of cellulose. About 98.0% of enzymatic hydrolysis yield was obtained from the pretreated CS as compared with 46.9% from the untreated sample. The yield for corresponding ethanol yield was 64.6% while untreated CS was only 18.8%. Besides, xylose yield obtained from the untreated CS was only 11.1%, while this value was 93.8% for alkali with NMMO pretreated sample. These results suggest that a combination of alkali with 50% (wt/wt) NMMO solution may be a promising alternative for pretreatment of lignocellulose, which can increase the productions of subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation. PMID:27078206

  20. ESTIMATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACID ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate hydrolysis rate constants for carboxylic acid esters from molecular structure. The energy differences between the initial state and the transition state for a molecule of interest are factored into internal and external...

  1. Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate pretreatment of eucalyptus wood for enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Long; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Endo, Takashi

    2013-07-01

    Ground eucalyptus wood was pretreated with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([EMIM]OAc)-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solutions with different mixing ratios under various conditions. The changes in the composition and structure of the biomass were investigated; and the enzymatic hydrolysis performance of the pretreated biomass was evaluated. [EMIM]OAc-DMSO pretreatment had a relatively mild effect on the composition of the biomass, but excessively high pretreatment temperatures led to massive loss of xylan after pretreatment. The enzymatic digestibility of the biomass was significantly improved with increased pretreatment temperature. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the disruption of cellulose crystal structure by [EMIM]OAc at a sufficiently high temperature was primarily responsible for the remarkable improvement in the digestibility. Appropriate addition of DMSO could help minimize the consumption of [EMIM]OAc without impairing the performance of the ionic liquid, and contribute to the improvement in pretreatment efficiency due to the viscosity reduction effect on the pretreatment liquor. PMID:23685645

  2. Enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw by gamma irradiation-alkaline pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yanan; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-06-01

    Pretreatment of wheat straw with gamma irradiation and NaOH was performed to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw for production of reducing sugar. The results showed that the irradiation of wheat straw at 50 kGy decreased the yield of reducing sugar, however, the reducing sugar yield increased with increasing dose from 50 kGy to 400 kGy. The irradiation of wheat straw at 100 kGy can significantly decrease NaOH consumption and treatment time. The reducing sugar yield could reach 72.67% after irradiation at 100 kGy and 2% NaOH treatment for 1 h. The combined pretreatment of wheat straw by gamma radiation and NaOH immersion can increase the solubilization of hemicellulose and lignin as well as the accessible surface area for enzyme molecules.

  3. A laboratory-scale pretreatment and hydrolysis assay for determination of reactivity in cellulosic biomass feedstocks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The rapid determination of the release of structural sugars from biomass feedstocks is an important enabling technology for the development of cellulosic biofuels. An assay that is used to determine sugar release for large numbers of samples must be robust, rapid, and easy to perform, and must use modest amounts of the samples to be tested. In this work we present a laboratory-scale combined pretreatment and saccharification assay that can be used as a biomass feedstock screening tool. The assay uses a commercially available automated solvent extraction system for pretreatment followed by a small-scale enzymatic hydrolysis step. The assay allows multiple samples to be screened simultaneously, and uses only ~3 g of biomass per sample. If the composition of the biomass sample is known, the results of the assay can be expressed as reactivity (fraction of structural carbohydrate present in the biomass sample released as monomeric sugars). Results We first present pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis experiments on a set of representative biomass feedstock samples (corn stover, poplar, sorghum, switchgrass) in order to put the assay in context, and then show the results of the assay applied to approximately 150 different feedstock samples covering 5 different materials. From the compositional analysis data we identify a positive correlation between lignin and structural carbohydrates, and from the reactivity data we identify a negative correlation between both carbohydrate and lignin content and total reactivity. The negative correlation between lignin content and total reactivity suggests that lignin may interfere with sugar release, or that more mature samples (with higher structural sugars) may have more recalcitrant lignin. Conclusions The assay presented in this work provides a robust and straightforward method to measure the sugar release after pretreatment and saccharification that can be used as a biomass feedstock screening tool. We demonstrated

  4. Electron beam pretreatment of switchgrass to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis to produce sugars for biofuels.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Smith; Bergey, N Scott; Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Stipanovic, Arthur; Driscoll, Mark

    2014-01-16

    Conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to value added products such as ethanol and other platform chemicals is enhanced by pretreatment, which reduces the crystallinity and molecular weight of cell wall polymers, thus increasing the available reaction sites. In this study, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) was pretreated with high energy electron beam (EB) irradiation to reduce its recalcitrance and achieve higher sugar conversion rates during treatment with cellulases and β-glucosidase. Conversion rates to sugars were compared before and after hot water (HW) extraction of EB-treated and control samples of switchgrass. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was employed to determine peak degradation temperature of these EB-treated biomass samples before and after HW extraction, and near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) was used as a rapid technique to determine cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin contents in the samples. TGA data confirm previously reported results that EB pretreatment reduces the molecular weight and crystallinity of cellulose and hemicellulose. This leaves hemicellulose more amenable to HW extraction and creates more cellulase-accessible sites, as shown by NIR and glucose yield data, respectively. Hemicellulose content was reduced from 30.2 to 16.9% after HW extraction and 1000 kGy EB treatment, and ultimate glucose yield after cellulase hydrolysis increased more than 4-fold. This study provides evidence that when EB pretreatment is utilized in combination with HW extraction, higher conversion rates and yields of glucose can be obtained from the cellulosic fraction of switchgrass. PMID:24188854

  5. Fermentable sugar release from Jatropha seed cakes following lime pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yanna; Siddaramu, Thara; Yesuf, Jemil; Sarkany, Nicolas

    2010-08-01

    Composition change of Jatropha seed cake samples was evaluated upon lime pretreatment at 100 degrees C with different parameters. With a lime dose of 0.2 g and a water content of 10 ml per gram of cake and a treatment period of 1 h, 38.2+/-0.6% of lignin was removed. However, 65+/-16% of hemicellulose was also lost under this condition. For all the treatments tested, cellulose content was not affected by lime supplementation. Through further examining total reducing sugar (TRS) release by enzymatic hydrolysis after lime pretreatment, we have found that 0.1 g of lime and 9 ml of water per gram of cake and 3 h pretreatment produced the maximal 68.9% conversion of cellulose. Without lime pretreatment, the highest cellulose conversion was 33.3%. One microalgal species, Schizochytrium limacinum SR21 was able to grow on the hydrolyzates and generate a biomass density of 3.2 g/l in 4 days.

  6. Sweet sorghum as feedstock for ethanol production: enzymatic hydrolysis of steam-pretreated bagasse.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Bálint; Réczey, Jutka; Somorai, Zsolt; Kádár, Zsófia; Dienes, Dóra; Réczey, Kati

    2009-05-01

    Sweet sorghum is an attractive feedstock for ethanol production. The juice extracted from the fresh stem is composed of sucrose, glucose, and fructose and can therefore be readily fermented to alcohol. The solid fraction left behind, the so-called bagasse, is a lignocellulosic residue which can also be processed to ethanol. The objective of our work was to test sweet sorghum, the whole crop, as a potential raw material of ethanol production, i.e., both the extracted sugar juice and the residual bagasse were tested. The juice was investigated at different harvesting dates for sugar content. Fermentability of juices extracted from the stem with and without leaves was compared. Sweet sorghum bagasse was steam-pretreated using various pretreatment conditions (temperatures and residence times). Efficiency of pretreatments was characterized by the degree of cellulose hydrolysis of the whole pretreated slurry and the separated fiber fraction. Two settings of the studied conditions (190 degrees C, 10 min and 200 degrees C, 5 min) were found to be efficient to reach conversion of 85-90%.

  7. Electron beam pretreatment of switchgrass to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis to produce sugars for biofuels.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Smith; Bergey, N Scott; Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Stipanovic, Arthur; Driscoll, Mark

    2014-01-16

    Conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to value added products such as ethanol and other platform chemicals is enhanced by pretreatment, which reduces the crystallinity and molecular weight of cell wall polymers, thus increasing the available reaction sites. In this study, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) was pretreated with high energy electron beam (EB) irradiation to reduce its recalcitrance and achieve higher sugar conversion rates during treatment with cellulases and β-glucosidase. Conversion rates to sugars were compared before and after hot water (HW) extraction of EB-treated and control samples of switchgrass. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was employed to determine peak degradation temperature of these EB-treated biomass samples before and after HW extraction, and near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) was used as a rapid technique to determine cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin contents in the samples. TGA data confirm previously reported results that EB pretreatment reduces the molecular weight and crystallinity of cellulose and hemicellulose. This leaves hemicellulose more amenable to HW extraction and creates more cellulase-accessible sites, as shown by NIR and glucose yield data, respectively. Hemicellulose content was reduced from 30.2 to 16.9% after HW extraction and 1000 kGy EB treatment, and ultimate glucose yield after cellulase hydrolysis increased more than 4-fold. This study provides evidence that when EB pretreatment is utilized in combination with HW extraction, higher conversion rates and yields of glucose can be obtained from the cellulosic fraction of switchgrass.

  8. The promoting effects of manganese on biological pretreatment with Irpex lacteus and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover.

    PubMed

    Song, Lili; Ma, Fuying; Zeng, Yelin; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yu, Hongbo

    2013-05-01

    The effect of metal ions on biological pretreatment was evaluated for improving subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Results showed that the efficiency of fungal pretreatment was greatly improved with manganese supplement in biomass. After enzymatic hydrolysis of 28-d pretreated corn stover, maximum glucose yield was 308.98 mg/g corn stover with manganese supplement, which increased by 61.39% as compared to the conventional fungal pretreatment. Furthermore, manganese also enhanced the production of ethanol, corresponding to a high ethanol conversion (83.39%). Manganese greatly improved the delignification of Irpex lacteus specially. Correspondingly, the efficiency of saccharification and fermentation was closely related to the removal of lignin. This study showed a promising effect of manganese on fungal pretreatment and the production of biofuels.

  9. Ultrasonic enhance acid hydrolysis selectivity of cellulose with HCl-FeCl3 as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinbao; Zhang, Xiangrong; Zhang, Meiyun; Xiu, Huijuan; He, Hang

    2015-03-01

    The effect of ultrasonic pretreatment coupled with HCl-FeCl3 catalyst was evaluated to hydrolyze cellulose amorphous regions. The ultrasonic pretreatment leads to cavitation that affects the morphology and microstructure of fibers, enhancing the accessibility of chemical reagent to the loosened amorphous regions of cellulose. In this work, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to identify characteristic absorption bands of the constituents and the crystallinity was evaluated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The results indicated that appropriate ultrasonic pretreatment assisted with FeCl3 can enhance the acid hydrolysis of amorphous regions of cellulose, thus improving the crystallinity of the remaining hydrocellulose. It was observed that sonication samples that were pretreated for 300 W and 20 min followed by acid hydrolysis had maximum of 78.9% crystallinity. The crystallinity was 9.2% higher than samples that were not subjected to ultrasound. In addition, the average fines length decreased from 49 μm to 37 μm. PMID:25498717

  10. Enzymatic hydrolysis of beer brewers' spent grain and the influence of pretreatments

    SciTech Connect

    Beldman, G.; Hennekam, J.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    1987-01-01

    The enzymatic saccharification of plant material has been shown to be of interest in various fields, such as the production of fruit juices and the utilization of biomass. A combination of cellulase, pectinase, and hemicellulases is usually used because of the chemical composition of the matrix of plant cell walls. For apples, beet pulp, and potato fiber, almost a complete hydrolysis of polysaccharides is obtained by combining cellulase and pectinase. For nonparenchymatic tissue, the situation is somewhat different: pectin is a minor component and the hemicellulose content is much higher. Enzyme action is restricted by the lignin barrier and by the high crystallinity of cellulose in this material. For such materials, mechanical, thermal, or chemical pretreatments are necessary to achieve efficient hydrolysis. This communication describes various enzymatic treatments and chemical and physical pretreatment, using brewers' spent grain as substrate. Spent grain is the residue of malt and grain which remains in the mash-kettle after the liquefied and saccharified starch has been removed by filtration. (Refs. 15).

  11. Ammonia fiber expansion pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis on two different growth stages of reed canarygrass.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Tamika C; Alizadeh, Hasan; Teymouri, Farzaneh; Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E

    2007-04-01

    Plant materials from the vegetative growth stage of reed canarygrass and the seed stage of reed canarygrass are pretreated by ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) and enzymatically hydrolyzed using 15 filter paper units (FPU) cellulase/g glucan to evaluate glucose and xylose yields. Percent conversions of glucose and xylose, effects of temperature and ammonia loading, and hydrolysis profiles are analyzed to determine the most effective AFEX treatment condition for each of the selected materials. The controls used in this study were untreated samples of each biomass material. All pretreatment conditions tested enhanced enzyme digestibility and improved sugar conversions for reed canarygrass compared with their untreated counterparts. Based on 168 h hydrolysis results using 15 FPU Spezyme CP cellulase/g glucan the most effective AFEX treatment conditions were determined as: vegetative growth stage of reed canarygrass--100 degrees C, 60% moisture content, 1.2:1 kg ammonia/kg of dry matter (86% glucose and 78% xylose) and seed stage of reed canarygrass--100 degrees C, 60% moisture content, 0.8:1 kg ammonia/kg of dry matter (89% glucose and 81% xylose). Supplementation by commercial Multifect 720 xylanase along with cellulase further increased both glucose and xylose yields by 10-12% at the most effective AFEX conditions. PMID:18478404

  12. Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production from cashew apple bagasse pretreated with alkaline hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Jessyca Aline; Marques, José Edvan; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha Barros; Rocha, Maria Valderez Ponte

    2015-03-01

    The effect of combinations and ratios between different enzymes has been investigated in order to assess the optimal conditions for hydrolysis of cashew apple bagasse pretreated with alkaline hydrogen peroxide (the solids named CAB-AHP). The separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) processes were evaluated in the ethanol production. The enzymatic hydrolysis conducted with cellulase complex and β-glucosidase in a ratio of 0.61:0.39, enzyme loading of 30FPU/g(CAB-AHP) and 66CBU/g(CAB-AHP), respectively, using 4% cellulose from CAB-AHP, turned out to be the most effective conditions, with glucose and xylose yields of 511.68 mg/g(CAB-AHP) and 237.8 mg/g(CAB-AHP), respectively. Fermentation of the pure hydrolysate by Kluyveromyces marxianus ATCC 36907 led to an ethanol yield of 61.8kg/ton(CAB), corresponding to 15 g/L ethanol and productivity of 3.75 g/( Lh). The ethanol production obtained for SSF process using K. marxianus ATCC 36907 was 18 g/L corresponding to 80% yield and 74.2kg/ton(CAB).

  13. Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production from cashew apple bagasse pretreated with alkaline hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Jessyca Aline; Marques, José Edvan; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha Barros; Rocha, Maria Valderez Ponte

    2015-03-01

    The effect of combinations and ratios between different enzymes has been investigated in order to assess the optimal conditions for hydrolysis of cashew apple bagasse pretreated with alkaline hydrogen peroxide (the solids named CAB-AHP). The separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) processes were evaluated in the ethanol production. The enzymatic hydrolysis conducted with cellulase complex and β-glucosidase in a ratio of 0.61:0.39, enzyme loading of 30FPU/g(CAB-AHP) and 66CBU/g(CAB-AHP), respectively, using 4% cellulose from CAB-AHP, turned out to be the most effective conditions, with glucose and xylose yields of 511.68 mg/g(CAB-AHP) and 237.8 mg/g(CAB-AHP), respectively. Fermentation of the pure hydrolysate by Kluyveromyces marxianus ATCC 36907 led to an ethanol yield of 61.8kg/ton(CAB), corresponding to 15 g/L ethanol and productivity of 3.75 g/( Lh). The ethanol production obtained for SSF process using K. marxianus ATCC 36907 was 18 g/L corresponding to 80% yield and 74.2kg/ton(CAB). PMID:25545094

  14. Improving hydrolysis acidification by limited aeration in the pretreatment of petrochemical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changyong; Zhou, Yuexi; Wang, Peichao; Guo, Shujun

    2015-10-01

    Petrochemical wastewater was pretreated by hydrolysis acidification to improve the biodegradation and treatability on limited aeration conditions. The results showed limited aeration with DO from 0.2 to 0.3mg/L (average ORP was -210 mV) was the best condition. The BOD5/COD of influent was 0.23, and it increased to 0.43 on this condition. Limited aeration can obviously reduce the reduction of SO4(2-), reducing the generation of toxic gas H2S, and almost no H2S can be detected in the off-gas. The sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) diversity and abundance on limited aeration condition was obviously inhibited. Limited aeration condition was benefit for the removal of benzene ring organics, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX), improving the toxicity and treatability of the wastewater. Based on the experiment results, an anaerobic hydrolysis acidification tank (100,000 m(3)) has been transformed into limited aeration hydrolysis acidification tank and it runs well.

  15. Scale-up and evaluation of high solid ionic liquid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of switchgrass

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment is receiving significant attention as a potential process that enables fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass and produces high yields of fermentable sugars suitable for the production of renewable fuels. However, successful optimization and scale up of IL pretreatment involves challenges, such as high solids loading, biomass handling and transfer, washing of pretreated solids and formation of inhibitors, which are not addressed during the development stages at the small scale in a laboratory environment. As a first in the research community, the Joint BioEnergy Institute, in collaboration with the Advanced Biofuels Process Demonstration Unit, a Department of Energy funded facility that supports academic and industrial entities in scaling their novel biofuels enabling technologies, have performed benchmark studies to identify key challenges associated with IL pretreatment using 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate and subsequent enzymatic saccharification beyond bench scale. Results Using switchgrass as the model feedstock, we have successfully executed 600-fold, relative to the bench scale (6 L vs 0.01 L), scale-up of IL pretreatment at 15% (w/w) biomass loading. Results show that IL pretreatment at 15% biomass generates a product containing 87.5% of glucan, 42.6% of xylan and only 22.8% of lignin relative to the starting material. The pretreated biomass is efficiently converted into monosaccharides during subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis at 10% loading over a 150-fold scale of operations (1.5 L vs 0.01 L) with 99.8% fermentable sugar conversion. The yield of glucose and xylose in the liquid streams were 94.8% and 62.2%, respectively, and the hydrolysate generated contains high titers of fermentable sugars (62.1 g/L of glucose and 5.4 g/L cellobiose). The overall glucan and xylan balance from pretreatment and saccharification were 95.0% and 77.1%, respectively. Enzymatic inhibition by [C2mim][OAc] at high solids

  16. Efficient sugar release by acetic acid ethanol-based organosolv pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongdan; Wu, Shubin

    2014-12-01

    Acetic acid ethanol-based organosolv pretreatment of sugar cane bagasse was performed to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis. The effect of different parameters (including temperature, reaction time, solvent concentration, and acid catalyst dose) on pretreatment prehydrolyzate and subsequent enzymatic digestibility was determined. During the pretreatment process, 11.83 g of xylose based on 100 g of raw material could be obtained. After the ethanol-based pretreatment, the enzymatic hydrolysis was enhanced and the highest glucose yield of 40.99 g based on 100 g of raw material could be obtained, representing 93.8% of glucose in sugar cane bagasse. The maximum total sugar yields occurred at 190 °C, 45 min, 60:40 ethanol/water, and 5% dosage of acetic acid, reaching 58.36 g (including 17.69 g of xylose and 40.67 g of glucose) based on 100 g of raw material, representing 85.4% of total sugars in raw material. Furthermore, characterization of the pretreated sugar cane bagasse using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analyses were also developed. The results suggested that ethanol-based organosolv pretreatment could enhance enzymatic digestibilities because of the delignification and removal of xylan.

  17. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. II. ACID AND GENERAL BASE CATALYZED HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate acid and neutral hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition states of a ...

  18. Optimization of ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of Miscanthus x giganteus to fermentable sugars.

    PubMed

    Murnen, Hannah K; Balan, Venkatesh; Chundawat, Shishir P S; Bals, Bryan; Sousa, Leonardo da Costa; Dale, Bruce E

    2007-01-01

    Miscanthus x giganteus is a tall perennial grass whose suitability as an energy crop is presently being appraised. There is very little information on the effect of pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification of Miscanthus to produce fermentable sugars. This paper reports sugar yields during enzymatic hydrolysis from ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) pretreated Miscanthus. Pretreatment conditions including temperature, moisture, ammonia loading, residence time, and enzyme loadings are varied to maximize hydrolysis yields. In addition, further treatments such as soaking the biomass prior to AFEX as well as washing the pretreated material were also attempted to improve sugar yields. The optimal AFEX conditions determined were 160 degrees C, 2:1 (w/w) ammonia to biomass loading, 233% moisture (dry weight basis), and 5 min reaction time for water-soaked Miscanthus. Approximately 96% glucan and 81% xylan conversions were achieved after 168 h enzymatic hydrolysis at 1% glucan loading using 15 FPU/(g of glucan) of cellulase and 64 p-NPGU/(g of glucan) of beta-glucosidase along with xylanase and tween-80 supplementation. A mass balance for the AFEX pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis process is presented.

  19. Impacts of Deacetylation Prior to Dilute Acid Pretreatment on the Bioethanol Process

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Shekiro, J.; Franden, M. A.; Wang, W.; Johnson, D. K.; Zhang, M.; Kuhn, E.; Tucker, M. P.

    2011-12-01

    Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising pretreatment technology for the biochemical production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. During dilute acid pretreatment, xylan depolymerizes to form soluble xylose monomers and oligomers. Because the xylan found in nature is highly acetylated, the formation of xylose monomers requires two steps: (1) cleavage of the xylosidic bonds, and (2) cleavage of covalently bonded acetyl ester groups. Results: In this study, we show that the latter may be the rate limiting step for xylose monomer formation. Furthermore, acetyl groups are also found to be a cause of biomass recalcitrance and hydrolyzate toxicity. While the removal of acetyl groups from native corn stover by alkaline de-esterification prior to pretreatment improves overall process yields, the exact impact is highly dependent on the corn stover variety in use. Xylose monomer yields in pretreatment generally increases by greater than 10%. Compared to pretreated corn stover controls, the deacetylated corn stover feedstock is approximately 20% more digestible after pretreatment. Finally, by lowering hydrolyzate toxicity, xylose utilization and ethanol yields are further improved during fermentation by roughly 10% and 7%, respectively. In this study, several varieties of corn stover lots were investigated to test the robustness of the deacetylation-pretreatment-saccharification-fermentation process. Conclusions: Deacetylation shows significant improvement on glucose and xylose yields during pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis, but it also reduces hydrolyzate toxicity during fermentation, thereby improving ethanol yields and titer. The magnitude of effect is dependent on the selected corn stover variety, with several varieties achieving improvements of greater than 10% xylose yield in pretreatment, 20% glucose yield in low solids enzymatic hydrolysis and 7% overall ethanol yield.

  20. Hydrolysis of biomass using a reusable solid carbon acid catalyst and fermentation of the catalytic hydrolysate to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Mandavi; Meena, S; Navatha, S; Prasanna Rani, K N; Pandey, Ashok; Sukumaran, Rajeev Kumar; Prasad, R B N; Prabhavathi Devi, B L A

    2015-01-01

    Solid acid catalysts can hydrolyze cellulose with lower reaction times and are easy to recover and reuse. A glycerol based carbon acid catalyst developed at CSIR-IICT performed well in acid catalysis reactions and hence this study was undertaken to evaluate the catalyst for hydrolysis of biomass (alkali pretreated or native rice straw). The catalyst could release 262 mg/g total reducing sugars (TRS) in 4h at 140 °C from alkali pretreated rice straw, and more importantly it released 147 mg/g TRS from native biomass. Reusability of the catalyst was also demonstrated. Catalytic hydrolysate was used as sugar source for fermentation to produce ethanol. Results indicate the solid acid catalyst as an interesting option for biomass hydrolysis.

  1. Free nitrous acid (FNA)-based pretreatment enhances methane production from waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qilin; Ye, Liu; Jiang, Guangming; Jensen, Paul D; Batstone, Damien J; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2013-10-15

    Anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) is currently enjoying renewed interest due to the potential for methane production. However, methane production is often limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor methane potential of WAS. This study presents a novel pretreatment strategy based on free nitrous acid (FNA or HNO2) to enhance methane production from WAS. Pretreatment of WAS for 24 h at FNA concentrations up to 2.13 mg N/L substantially enhanced WAS solubilization, with the highest solubilization (0.16 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/mg volatile solids (VS), at 2.13 mg HNO2-N/L) being six times that without FNA pretreatment (0.025 mg COD/mg VS, at 0 mg HNO2-N/L). Biochemical methane potential tests demonstrated methane production increased with increased FNA concentration used in the pretreatment step. Model-based analysis indicated FNA pretreatment improved both hydrolysis rate and methane potential, with the highest improvement being approximately 50% (from 0.16 to 0.25 d(-1)) and 27% (from 201 to 255 L CH4/kg VS added), respectively, achieved at 1.78-2.13 mg HNO2-N/L. Further analysis indicated that increased hydrolysis rate and methane potential were related to an increase in rapidly biodegradable substrates, which increased with increased FNA dose, while the slowly biodegradable substrates remained relatively static.

  2. Optimizing ethanol and methane production from steam-pretreated, phosphoric acid-impregnated corn stover.

    PubMed

    Bondesson, Pia-Maria; Dupuy, Aurélie; Galbe, Mats; Zacchi, Guido

    2015-02-01

    Pretreatment is of vital importance in the production of ethanol and methane from agricultural residues. In this study, the effects of steam pretreatment with phosphoric acid on enzymatic hydrolysis (EH), simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF), anaerobic digestion (AD) and the total energy output at three different temperatures were investigated. The effect of separating the solids for SSF and the liquid for AD was also studied and compared with using the whole slurry first in SSF and then in AD. Furthermore, the phosphoric acid was compared to previous studies using sulphuric acid or no catalyst. Using phosphoric acid resulted in higher yields than when no catalyst was used. However, compared with sulphuric acid, an improved yield was only seen with phosphoric acid in the case of EH. The higher pretreatment temperatures (200 and 210 °C) resulted in the highest yields after EH and SSF, while the highest methane yield was obtained with the lower pretreatment temperature (190 °C). The highest yield in terms of total energy recovery (78 %) was obtained after pretreatment at 190 °C, but a pretreatment temperature of 200 °C is, however, the best alternative since fewer steps are required (whole slurry in SSF and then in AD) and high product yields were obtained (76 %).

  3. Improved Sugar Production by Optimizing Planetary Mill Pretreatment and Enzyme Hydrolysis Process

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jeong Heo; Lee, Siseon; Lee, Jae-Won; Hong, Youn-Woo; Chang, Jeong Ho; Sung, Daekyung; Kim, Sung Hyun; Sang, Byoung-In; Mitchell, Robert J.; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an optimization of planetary mill pretreatment and saccharification processes for improving biosugar production. Pitch pine (Pinus rigida) wood sawdust waste was used as biomass feedstock and the process parameters optimized in this study were the buffering media, the milling time, the enzyme quantity, and the incubation time. Glucose yields were improved when acetate buffer was used rather than citrate buffer. Initially, with each process variable tests, the optimal values were 100 minutes of milling, an enzyme concentration of 16 FPU/g-biomass, and a 12-hour enzymatic hydrolysis. Typically, interactions between these experimental conditions and their effects on glucose production were next investigated using RSM. Glucose yields from the Pinus rigida waste exceeded 80% with several of the conditions tested, demonstrating that milling can be used to obtain high levels of glucose bioconversion from woody biomass for biorefinery purposes. PMID:26539475

  4. Improved Sugar Production by Optimizing Planetary Mill Pretreatment and Enzyme Hydrolysis Process.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jeong Heo; Lee, Siseon; Lee, Jae-Won; Hong, Youn-Woo; Chang, Jeong Ho; Sung, Daekyung; Kim, Sung Hyun; Sang, Byoung-In; Mitchell, Robert J; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an optimization of planetary mill pretreatment and saccharification processes for improving biosugar production. Pitch pine (Pinus rigida) wood sawdust waste was used as biomass feedstock and the process parameters optimized in this study were the buffering media, the milling time, the enzyme quantity, and the incubation time. Glucose yields were improved when acetate buffer was used rather than citrate buffer. Initially, with each process variable tests, the optimal values were 100 minutes of milling, an enzyme concentration of 16 FPU/g-biomass, and a 12-hour enzymatic hydrolysis. Typically, interactions between these experimental conditions and their effects on glucose production were next investigated using RSM. Glucose yields from the Pinus rigida waste exceeded 80% with several of the conditions tested, demonstrating that milling can be used to obtain high levels of glucose bioconversion from woody biomass for biorefinery purposes. PMID:26539475

  5. High-solids anaerobic digestion of municipal sludge pretreated by thermal hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Jolis, Domènec

    2008-07-01

    High-solids anaerobic digestion can consistently achieve 55 to 60% volatile solids destruction after thermal hydrolysis pretreatment, which reduces its viscosity and increases the fraction of soluble organic matter. For feed sludge with total solids concentrations between 6.8 and 8.2%, the process is stable at hydraulic retention times of 9 to 12 days, significantly increasing the treatment capacity of existing digesters or, in treatment plants without spare capacity, helping to postpone, reduce, or even avoid costly infrastructure investments. Process stability is related to the high concentration of soluble organic matter in the digesters. High-solids temperature-phased digestion appears to be superior to high-solids mesophilic digestion, with respect to process flexibility and stability, biosolids stabilization, and biogas generation, although ammonia inhibition may have occurred. Implementation of high-solids digestion could significantly reduce operation and maintenance costs of solids-handling operations. PMID:18710149

  6. Validation of lignocellulosic biomass carbohydrates determination via acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengfei; Runge, Troy M

    2014-11-01

    This work studied the two-step acid hydrolysis for determining carbohydrates in lignocellulosic biomass. Estimation of sugar loss based on acid hydrolyzed sugar standards or analysis of sugar derivatives was investigated. Four model substrates (starch, holocellulose, filter paper and cotton) and three levels of acid/material ratios (7.8, 10.3 and 15.4, v/w) were studied to demonstrate the range of test artifacts. The method for carbohydrates estimation based on acid hydrolyzed sugar standards having the most satisfactory carbohydrate recovery and relative standard deviation. Raw material and the acid/material ratio both had significant effect on carbohydrate hydrolysis, suggesting the acid to have impacts beyond a catalyst in the hydrolysis. Following optimal procedures, we were able to reach a carbohydrate recovery of 96% with a relative standard deviation less than 3%. The carbohydrates recovery lower than 100% was likely due to the incomplete hydrolysis of substrates, which was supported by scanning electron microscope (SEM) images.

  7. A comparative study of ethanol production using dilute acid, ionic liquid and AFEX™ pretreated corn stover

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In a biorefinery producing cellulosic biofuels, biomass pretreatment will significantly influence the efficacy of enzymatic hydrolysis and microbial fermentation. Comparison of different biomass pretreatment techniques by studying the impact of pretreatment on downstream operations at industrially relevant conditions and performing comprehensive mass balances will help focus attention on necessary process improvements, and thereby help reduce the cost of biofuel production. Results An on-going collaboration between the three US Department of Energy (DOE) funded bioenergy research centers (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) and BioEnergy Science Center (BESC)) has given us a unique opportunity to compare the performance of three pretreatment processes, notably dilute acid (DA), ionic liquid (IL) and ammonia fiber expansion (AFEXTM), using the same source of corn stover. Separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) was carried out using various combinations of commercially available enzymes and engineered yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A) strain. The optimal commercial enzyme combination (Ctec2: Htec2: Multifect Pectinase, percentage total protein loading basis) was evaluated for each pretreatment with a microplate-based assay using milled pretreated solids at 0.2% glucan loading and 15 mg total protein loading/g of glucan. The best enzyme combinations were 67:33:0 for DA, 39:33:28 for IL and 67:17:17 for AFEX. The amounts of sugar (kg) (glucose: xylose: total gluco- and xylo-oligomers) per 100 kg of untreated corn stover produced after 72 hours of 6% glucan loading enzymatic hydrolysis were: DA (25:2:2), IL (31:15:2) and AFEX (26:13:7). Additionally, the amounts of ethanol (kg) produced per 100 kg of untreated corn stover and the respective ethanol metabolic yield (%) achieved with exogenous nutrient supplemented fermentations were: DA (14.0, 92.0%), IL (21.2, 93.0%) and AFEX (20.5, 95.0%), respectively

  8. Optimization of wastewater microalgae saccharification using dilute acid hydrolysis for acetone, butanol, and ethanol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Yessica; Ellis, Joshua T.; Miller, Charles D.; Sims, Ronald C.

    2015-02-01

    Exploring and developing sustainable and efficient technologies for biofuel production are crucial for averting global consequences associated with fuel shortages and climate change. Optimization of sugar liberation from wastewater algae through acid hydrolysis was determined for subsequent fermentation to acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) by Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4. Acid concentration, retention time, and temperature were evaluated to determine optimal hydrolysis conditions by assessing the sugar and ABE yield as well as the associated costs. Sulfuric acid concentrations ranging from 0-1.5 M, retention times of 40-120 min, and temperatures from 23°C- 90°C were combined to form a full factorial experiment. Acid hydrolysis pretreatment of 10% dried wastewater microalgae using 1.0 M sulfuric acid for 120 min at 80-90°C was found to be the optimal parameters, with a sugar yield of 166.1 g for kg of dry algae, concentrations of 5.23 g/L of total ABE, and 3.74 g/L of butanol at a rate of USD $12.83 per kg of butanol.

  9. Ethanol production from cotton gin trash using optimised dilute acid pretreatment and whole slurry fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, S; Vancov, T; Palmer, J; Morris, S

    2014-12-01

    Cotton ginning trash (CGT) collected from Australian cotton gins was evaluated for bioethanol production. CGT composition varied between ginning operations and contained high levels of extractives (26-28%), acid-insoluble material (17-22%) and holocellulose (42-50%). Pretreatment conditions of time (4-20 min), temperature (160-220 °C) and sulfuric acid concentration (0-2%) were optimised using a central composite design. Response surface modelling revealed that CGT fibre pretreated at 180 °C in 0.8% H2SO4 for 12 min was optimal for maximising enzymatic glucose recoveries and achieved yields of 89% theoretical, whilst the total accumulated levels of furans and acetic acid remained relatively low at <1 and 2 g/L respectively. Response surface modelling also estimated maximum xylose recovery in pretreated liquors (87% theoretical) under the set conditions of 150 °C in 1.9% H2SO4 for 23.8 min. Yeast fermentations yielded high ethanol titres of 85%, 88% and 70% theoretical from glucose generated from: (a) enzymatic hydrolysis of washed pretreated fibres, (b) enzymatic hydrolysis of whole pretreated slurries and (c) simultaneous saccharification fermentations, respectively. PMID:25280112

  10. Ethanol production from cotton gin trash using optimised dilute acid pretreatment and whole slurry fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, S; Vancov, T; Palmer, J; Morris, S

    2014-12-01

    Cotton ginning trash (CGT) collected from Australian cotton gins was evaluated for bioethanol production. CGT composition varied between ginning operations and contained high levels of extractives (26-28%), acid-insoluble material (17-22%) and holocellulose (42-50%). Pretreatment conditions of time (4-20 min), temperature (160-220 °C) and sulfuric acid concentration (0-2%) were optimised using a central composite design. Response surface modelling revealed that CGT fibre pretreated at 180 °C in 0.8% H2SO4 for 12 min was optimal for maximising enzymatic glucose recoveries and achieved yields of 89% theoretical, whilst the total accumulated levels of furans and acetic acid remained relatively low at <1 and 2 g/L respectively. Response surface modelling also estimated maximum xylose recovery in pretreated liquors (87% theoretical) under the set conditions of 150 °C in 1.9% H2SO4 for 23.8 min. Yeast fermentations yielded high ethanol titres of 85%, 88% and 70% theoretical from glucose generated from: (a) enzymatic hydrolysis of washed pretreated fibres, (b) enzymatic hydrolysis of whole pretreated slurries and (c) simultaneous saccharification fermentations, respectively.

  11. Effect of thermal hydrolysis and ultrasounds pretreatments on foaming in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, N; Cano, R; Fdz-Polanco, F

    2014-10-01

    Foam appears regularly in anaerobic digesters producing operational and safety problems. In this research, based on the operational observation at semi-industrial pilot scale where sludge pretreatment mitigated foaming in anaerobic digesters, this study aimed at evaluating any potential relationship between foaming tools applied to activated sludge at lab-scale (foam potential, foam stability and Microthrix parvicella abundance) and the experimental behavior observed in pilot scale and full-scale anaerobic digesters. The potential of thermal hydrolysis and ultrasounds for reducing foaming capacity was also evaluated. Filamentous bacteria abundance was directly linked to foaming capacity in anaerobic processes. A maximum reduction of M.parvicella abundance (from 5 to 2) was reached using thermal hydrolysis with steam explosion at 170°C and ultrasounds at 66.7kWh/m(3), showing both good anti-foaming properties. On the other hand, foam potential and stability determinations showed a lack of consistency with the bacteria abundance results and experimental evidences.

  12. Improvement of the enzymatic hydrolysis of furfural residues by pretreatment with combined green liquor and ethanol organosolv.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hailong; Xing, Yang; Lei, Fuhou; Liu, Zhiping; Liu, Zuguang; Jiang, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Furfural residues (FRs) were pretreated with ethanol and a green liquor (GL) catalyst to produce fermentable sugar. Anthraquinone (AQ) was used as an auxiliary reagent to improve delignification and reduce cellulose decomposition. The results showed that 42.7% of lignin was removed and 96.5% of cellulose was recovered from substrates pretreated with 1.0 mL GL/g of dry substrate and 0.4% (w/w) AQ at 140°C for 1h. Compared with raw material, ethanol-GL pretreatment of FRs increased the glucose yield from 69.0% to 85.9% after 96 h hydrolysis with 18 FPU/g-cellulose for cellulase, 27 CBU/g-cellulose for β-glucosidase. The Brauner-Emmett-Teller surface area was reduced during pretreatment, which did not inhibit the enzymatic hydrolysis. Owing to the reduced surface area, the unproductive binding of cellulase to lignin was decreased, thus improving the enzymatic hydrolysis. The degree of polymerization of cellulose from FRs was too low to be a key factor for improving enzymatic hydrolysis.

  13. Rapid selection and identification of Miscanthus genotypes with enhanced glucan and xylan yields from hydrothermal pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Because many Miscanthus genotypes can be cultivated with relatively high productivity and carbohydrate content, Miscanthus has great potential as an energy crop that can support large scale biological production of biofuels. Results In this study, batch hydrothermal pretreatment at 180°C for 35 min followed by enzymatic hydrolysis was shown to give the highest total sugar yields for Miscanthus x giganteus cv. Illinois planted in Illinois. High throughput pretreatment at 180°C for 35 min and 17.5 min followed by co-hydrolysis in a multi-well batch reactor identified two varieties out of 80 that had significantly higher sugar yields from pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis than others. The differences in performance were then related to compositions of the 80 varieties to provide insights into desirable traits for Miscanthus that enhance sugar yields. Conclusions High throughput pretreatment and co-hydrolysis (HTPH) rapidly identified promising genotypes from a wide range of Miscanthus genotypes, including hybrids of Miscanthus sacchariflorus/M. sinensis and Miscanthus lutarioriparius, differentiating the more commercially promising species from the rest. The total glucan plus xylan content in Miscanthus appeared to influence both mass and theoretical yields, while lignin and ash contents did not have a predictable influence on performance. PMID:22863302

  14. Optimization of Alkaline and Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Agave Bagasse by Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Ávila-Lara, Abimael I.; Camberos-Flores, Jesus N.; Mendoza-Pérez, Jorge A.; Messina-Fernández, Sarah R.; Saldaña-Duran, Claudia E.; Jimenez-Ruiz, Edgar I.; Sánchez-Herrera, Leticia M.; Pérez-Pimienta, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of lignocellulosic materials for the production of value-added chemicals or biofuels generally requires a pretreatment process to overcome the recalcitrance of the plant biomass for further enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation stages. Two of the most employed pretreatment processes are the ones that used dilute acid (DA) and alkaline (AL) catalyst providing specific effects on the physicochemical structure of the biomass, such as high xylan and lignin removal for DA and AL, respectively. Another important effect that need to be studied is the use of a high solids pretreatment (≥15%) since offers many advantaged over lower solids loadings, including increased sugar and ethanol concentrations (in combination with a high solids saccharification), which will be reflected in lower capital costs; however, this data is currently limited. In this study, several variables, such as catalyst loading, retention time, and solids loading, were studied using response surface methodology (RSM) based on a factorial central composite design of DA and AL pretreatment on agave bagasse using a range of solids from 3 to 30% (w/w) to obtain optimal process conditions for each pretreatment. Subsequently enzymatic hydrolysis was performed using Novozymes Cellic CTec2 and HTec2 presented as total reducing sugar (TRS) yield. Pretreated biomass was characterized by wet-chemistry techniques and selected samples were analyzed by calorimetric techniques, and scanning electron/confocal fluorescent microscopy. RSM was also used to optimize the pretreatment conditions for maximum TRS yield. The optimum conditions were determined for AL pretreatment: 1.87% NaOH concentration, 50.3 min and 13.1% solids loading, whereas DA pretreatment: 2.1% acid concentration, 33.8 min and 8.5% solids loading. PMID:26442260

  15. Optimization of Alkaline and Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Agave Bagasse by Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Ávila-Lara, Abimael I; Camberos-Flores, Jesus N; Mendoza-Pérez, Jorge A; Messina-Fernández, Sarah R; Saldaña-Duran, Claudia E; Jimenez-Ruiz, Edgar I; Sánchez-Herrera, Leticia M; Pérez-Pimienta, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of lignocellulosic materials for the production of value-added chemicals or biofuels generally requires a pretreatment process to overcome the recalcitrance of the plant biomass for further enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation stages. Two of the most employed pretreatment processes are the ones that used dilute acid (DA) and alkaline (AL) catalyst providing specific effects on the physicochemical structure of the biomass, such as high xylan and lignin removal for DA and AL, respectively. Another important effect that need to be studied is the use of a high solids pretreatment (≥15%) since offers many advantaged over lower solids loadings, including increased sugar and ethanol concentrations (in combination with a high solids saccharification), which will be reflected in lower capital costs; however, this data is currently limited. In this study, several variables, such as catalyst loading, retention time, and solids loading, were studied using response surface methodology (RSM) based on a factorial central composite design of DA and AL pretreatment on agave bagasse using a range of solids from 3 to 30% (w/w) to obtain optimal process conditions for each pretreatment. Subsequently enzymatic hydrolysis was performed using Novozymes Cellic CTec2 and HTec2 presented as total reducing sugar (TRS) yield. Pretreated biomass was characterized by wet-chemistry techniques and selected samples were analyzed by calorimetric techniques, and scanning electron/confocal fluorescent microscopy. RSM was also used to optimize the pretreatment conditions for maximum TRS yield. The optimum conditions were determined for AL pretreatment: 1.87% NaOH concentration, 50.3 min and 13.1% solids loading, whereas DA pretreatment: 2.1% acid concentration, 33.8 min and 8.5% solids loading.

  16. Optimization of Alkaline and Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Agave Bagasse by Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Ávila-Lara, Abimael I; Camberos-Flores, Jesus N; Mendoza-Pérez, Jorge A; Messina-Fernández, Sarah R; Saldaña-Duran, Claudia E; Jimenez-Ruiz, Edgar I; Sánchez-Herrera, Leticia M; Pérez-Pimienta, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of lignocellulosic materials for the production of value-added chemicals or biofuels generally requires a pretreatment process to overcome the recalcitrance of the plant biomass for further enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation stages. Two of the most employed pretreatment processes are the ones that used dilute acid (DA) and alkaline (AL) catalyst providing specific effects on the physicochemical structure of the biomass, such as high xylan and lignin removal for DA and AL, respectively. Another important effect that need to be studied is the use of a high solids pretreatment (≥15%) since offers many advantaged over lower solids loadings, including increased sugar and ethanol concentrations (in combination with a high solids saccharification), which will be reflected in lower capital costs; however, this data is currently limited. In this study, several variables, such as catalyst loading, retention time, and solids loading, were studied using response surface methodology (RSM) based on a factorial central composite design of DA and AL pretreatment on agave bagasse using a range of solids from 3 to 30% (w/w) to obtain optimal process conditions for each pretreatment. Subsequently enzymatic hydrolysis was performed using Novozymes Cellic CTec2 and HTec2 presented as total reducing sugar (TRS) yield. Pretreated biomass was characterized by wet-chemistry techniques and selected samples were analyzed by calorimetric techniques, and scanning electron/confocal fluorescent microscopy. RSM was also used to optimize the pretreatment conditions for maximum TRS yield. The optimum conditions were determined for AL pretreatment: 1.87% NaOH concentration, 50.3 min and 13.1% solids loading, whereas DA pretreatment: 2.1% acid concentration, 33.8 min and 8.5% solids loading. PMID:26442260

  17. Acid hydrolysis of Jerusalem artichoke for ethanol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1986-01-01

    An excellent substrate for ethanol production is the Jerusalem artichoke (JA) tuber (Helianthus tuberosus). This crop contains a high level of inulin that can be hydrolyzed mainly to D-fructose and has several distinct advantages as an energy source compared to others. The potential ethanol yield of ca. 4678 L/ha on good agricultural land is equivalent to that obtained from sugar beets and twice that of corn. When JA is to be used for ethanol fermentation by conventional yeast, it is first converted to fermentable sugars by enzymes or acids although various strains of yeast were used for the direct fermentation of JA extracts. Fleming and GrootWassink compared various acids (hydrochloric, sulfuric, citric, and phosphoric) and strong cation exchange resin for their effectiveness on inulin hydrolysis and reported that no differences were noted among the acids or resin in their influence on inulin hydrolysis. Undesirable side reactions were noted during acid hydrolysis leading to the formation of HMF and 2-(2-hydroxy acetyl) furan. The HMF at a level of 0.1% is known to inhibit growth and ethanol fermentation by yeast. In this study the authors established optimal conditions for complete acid-hydrolysis of JA with minimum side reactions and maximum sugar-ethanol production. A material balance for the ethanol production was also determined.

  18. Role of bifidobacteria in the hydrolysis of chlorogenic acid

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Stefano; Anighoro, Andrew; Quartieri, Andrea; Amaretti, Alberto; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Rastelli, Giulio; Rossi, Maddalena

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the capability of potentially probiotic bifidobacteria to hydrolyze chlorogenic acid into caffeic acid (CA), and to recognize the enzymes involved in this reaction. Bifidobacterium strains belonging to eight species occurring in the human gut were screened. The hydrolysis seemed peculiar of Bifidobacterium animalis, whereas the other species failed to release CA. Intracellular feruloyl esterase activity capable of hydrolyzing chlorogenic acid was detected only in B. animalis. In silico research among bifidobacteria esterases identified Balat_0669 as the cytosolic enzyme likely responsible of CA release in B. animalis. Comparative modeling of Balat_0669 and molecular docking studies support its role in chlorogenic acid hydrolysis. Expression, purification, and functional characterization of Balat_0669 in Escherichia coli were obtained as further validation. A possible role of B. animalis in the activation of hydroxycinnamic acids was demonstrated and new perspectives were opened in the development of new probiotics, specifically selected for the enhanced bioconversion of phytochemicals into bioactive compounds. PMID:25515139

  19. Changes in plant cell-wall structure of corn stover due to hot compressed water pretreatment and enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Yang, Maohua; Wang, Caixia; Liu, Jianfei; Xing, Jianmin

    2014-08-01

    Corn stover is a potential feedstock for biofuel production. This work investigated physical and chemical changes in plant cell-wall structure of corn stover due to hot compressed water (HCW) pretreatment at 170-190 °C in a tube reactor. Chemical composition analysis showed the soluble hemicellulose content increased with pretreatment temperature, whereas the hemicellulose content decreased from 29 to 7 % in pretreated solids. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the parenchyma-type second cell-wall structure of the plant was almost completely removed at 185 °C, and the sclerenchyma-type second cell wall was greatly damaged upon addition of 5 mmol/L ammonium sulfate during HCW pretreatment. These changes favored accessibility for enzymatic action. Enzyme saccharification of solids by optimized pretreatment with HCW at 185 °C resulted in an enzymatic hydrolysis yield of 87 %, an enhancement of 77 % compared to the yield from untreated corn stover.

  20. Ethanol production with dilute acid hydrolysis using partially dried lignocellulosics

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Quang A.; Keller, Fred A.; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2003-12-09

    A process of converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol, comprising hydrolyzing lignocellulosic materials by subjecting dried lignocellulosic material in a reactor to a catalyst comprised of a dilute solution of a strong acid and a metal salt to lower the activation energy (i.e., the temperature) of cellulose hydrolysis and ultimately obtain higher sugar yields.

  1. Combined alkali and acid pretreatment of spent mushroom substrate for reducing sugar and biofertilizer production.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-Ji; Liu, Jia-Heng; Sun, Li-Fan; Hu, Zong-Fu; Qiao, Jian-Jun

    2013-05-01

    Spent mushroom substrate (SMS) was pretreated with alkaline reagents including potassium hydroxide, lime and ammonia to enhance enzymatic saccharification. Under the best pretreatment conditions (1M KOH, 80 °C, 90 min; 1M lime, 80 °C, 120 min; 10 M ammonia, 70 °C, 120 min), the total reducing sugar (TRS) yield reached 258.6, 204.2 and 251.2 mg/g raw SMS, which were respectively 6.15, 4.86, and 5.98 times of untreated SMS. The effects of pretreatment by above alkaline reagents and sulfuric acid on the composition and structure of SMS were evaluated to provide comparative performance data. A new process, combined alkali and acid (CAA) pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis, was innovatively proposed to improve the cost-effectiveness and avoid environmental problems. The SMS residue after CAA pretreatment-enzymatic hydrolysis process was converted to biofertilizer with Pichia farinose FL7 and a cell density of 3.0×10(8) cfu/g in biomass was attained.

  2. Automated protein hydrolysis delivering sample to a solid acid catalyst for amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Akiko; Dohmae, Naoshi

    2010-11-01

    In this study, we developed an automatic protein hydrolysis system using strong cation-exchange resins as solid acid catalysts. Examining several kinds of inorganic solid acids and cation-exchange resins, we found that a few cation-exchange resins worked as acid catalysts for protein hydrolysis when heated in the presence of water. The most efficient resin yielded amounts of amino acids that were over 70% of those recovered after conventional hydrolysis with hydrochloric acid and resulted in amino acid compositions matching the theoretical values. The solid-acid hydrolysis was automated by packing the resin into columns, combining the columns with a high-performance liquid chromatography system, and heating them. The amino acids that constitute a protein can thereby be determined, minimizing contamination from the environment.

  3. Influence of surfactant-free ionic liquid microemulsions pretreatment on the composition, structure and enzymatic hydrolysis of water hyacinth.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fan; Chen, Li; Wang, Aili; Yan, Zongcheng

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the pretreatment performance of surfactant-free ionic liquid microemulsions (ILMs) on water hyacinth. Pretreatment effects were evaluated in terms of lignocellulosic composition, structure and enzymatic hydrolysis. Analysis of the regenerated water hyacinth indicated that the content of the lignocellulosic composition changed, and the surface became more porous. After being pretreated with ILM(a) (mass ratio of toluene: ethanol: 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([Emim]Ac)=0.35:0.3:0.35) at 70°C for 12h, the maximum delignification of 63.6% was observed. The cellulose of the water hyacinth was well protected and retained during the pretreatment process. After being enzymatically hydrolyzed for 48 h, the reducing sugar yield of the water hyacinth pretreated with ILM(a) at 70°C for 6 h was 563.7 mg/g, and its hydrolysis yield (86.1%) was nearly four and a half times of that of the untreated one (20.2%). In conclusion, the designed surfactant-free ILMs exhibit promising potential application in biomass pretreatment. PMID:26913644

  4. Enhanced hydrolysis and methane yield by applying microaeration pretreatment to the anaerobic co-digestion of brown water and food waste

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Jun Wei; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Microaeration pretreatment was effective for brown water and food waste mixture. ► The added oxygen was consumed fully by facultative microorganisms. ► Enhanced solubilization, acidification and breakdown of SCFAs to acetate. ► Microaeration pretreatment improved methane yield by 10–21%. ► Nature of inoculum influenced the effects of microaeration. - Abstract: Microaeration has been used conventionally for the desulphurization of biogas, and recently it was shown to be an alternative pretreatment to enhance hydrolysis of the anaerobic digestion (AD) process. Previous studies on microaeration pretreatment were limited to the study of substrates with complex organic matter, while little has been reported on its effect on substrates with higher biodegradability such as brown water and food waste. Due to the lack of consistent microaeration intensities, previous studies were not comparable and thus inconclusive in proving the effectiveness of microaeration to the overall AD process. In this study, the role of microaeration pretreatment in the anaerobic co-digestion of brown water and food waste was evaluated in batch-tests. After a 4-day pretreatment with 37.5 mL-O{sub 2}/L{sub R}-d added to the liquid phase of the reactor, the methane production of substrates were monitored in anaerobic conditions over the next 40 days. The added oxygen was consumed fully by facultative microorganisms and a reducing environment for organic matter degradation was maintained. Other than higher COD solubilization, microaeration pretreatment led to greater VFA accumulation and the conversion of other short chain fatty acids to acetate. This could be due to enhanced activities of hydrolytic and acidogenic bacteria and the degradation of slowly biodegradable compounds under microaerobic conditions. This study also found that the nature of inoculum influenced the effects of microaeration as a 21% and 10% increase in methane yield was observed when pretreatment was

  5. Carbon-based strong solid acid for cornstarch hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nata, Iryanti Fatyasari; Irawan, Chairul; Mardina, Primata; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2015-10-15

    Highly sulfonated carbonaceous spheres with diameter of 100–500 nm can be generated by hydrothermal carbonization of glucose in the presence of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid and acrylic acid at 180 °C for 4 h. The acidity of the prepared carbonaceous sphere C4-SO{sub 3}H can reach 2.10 mmol/g. It was used as a solid acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of cornstarch. Total reducing sugar (TRS) concentration of 19.91 mg/mL could be obtained by hydrolyzing 20 mg/mL cornstarch at 150 °C for 6 h using C4-SO{sub 3}H as solid acid catalyst. The solid acid catalyst demonstrated good stability that only 9% decrease in TRS concentration was observed after five repeat uses. The as-prepared carbon-based solid acid catalyst can be an environmentally benign replacement for homogeneous catalyst. - Highlights: • Carbon solid acid was successfully prepared by one-step hydrothermal carbonization. • The acrylic acid as monomer was effectively reduce the diameter size of particle. • The solid acid catalyst show good catalytic performance of starch hydrolysis. • The solid acid catalyst is not significantly deteriorated after repeated use.

  6. Enhancement of hydrolysis of Chlorella vulgaris by hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Charnho; Lee, Ja Hyun; Yang, Xiaoguang; Yoo, Hah Young; Lee, Ju Hun; Lee, Soo Kweon; Kim, Seung Wook

    2016-06-01

    Chlorella vulgaris is considered as one of the potential sources of biomass for bio-based products because it consists of large amounts of carbohydrates. In this study, hydrothermal acid hydrolysis with five different acids (hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, peracetic acid, phosphoric acid, and sulfuric acid) was carried out to produce fermentable sugars (glucose, galactose). The hydrothermal acid hydrolysis by hydrochloric acid showed the highest sugar production. C. vulgaris was hydrolyzed with various concentrations of hydrochloric acid [0.5-10 % (w/w)] and microalgal biomass [20-140 g/L (w/v)] at 121 °C for 20 min. Among the concentrations examined, 2 % hydrochloric acid with 100 g/L biomass yielded the highest conversion of carbohydrates (92.5 %) into reducing sugars. The hydrolysate thus produced from C. vulgaris was fermented using the yeast Brettanomyces custersii H1-603 and obtained bioethanol yield of 0.37 g/g of algal sugars. PMID:26899601

  7. A NaBH₄ Coupled Ninhydrin-Based Assay for the Quantification of Protein/Enzymes During the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Pretreated Lignocellulosic Biomass.

    PubMed

    Mok, Yiu Ki; Arantes, Valdeir; Saddler, Jack N

    2015-07-01

    Accurate protein quantification is necessary in many of the steps during the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass, from the fundamental determination of enzyme kinetics to techno-economic assessments, such as the use of enzyme recycling strategies, evaluation of enzyme costs, and the optimization of various process steps. In the work described here, a modified, more rapid ninhydrin-based protein quantification assay was developed to better quantify enzyme levels in the presence of lignocellulosic biomass derived compounds. The addition of sodium borohydride followed by acid hydrolysis at 130 °C greatly reduced interference from monosaccharides and oligosaccharides and decreased the assay time 6-fold. The modified ninhydrin assay was shown to be more accurate as compared to various traditional colorimetric protein assays when commercial cellulase enzyme mixtures were quantified under typical pretreated lignocellulosic biomass enzymatic hydrolysis conditions. The relatively short assay time and microplate-reading capability of the modified assay indicated that the method could likely be used for high-throughput protein determination. PMID:25987134

  8. Stability of a Lipase Extracted from Seeds of Pachira aquatica in Commercial Detergents and Application Tests in Poultry Wastewater Pretreatment and Fat Particle Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Polizelli, Patrícia Peres; Facchini, Fernanda Dell Antonio

    2013-01-01

    A protein extract containing a plant lipase from oleaginous seeds of Pachira aquatica was tested using soybean oil, wastewater from a poultry processing plant, and beef fat particles as substrate. The hydrolysis experiments were carried out at a temperature of 40°C, an incubation time of 90 minutes, and pH 8.0-9.0. The enzyme had the best stability at pH 9.0 and showed good stability in the alkaline range. It was found that P. aquatica lipase was stable in the presence of some commercial laundry detergent formulations, and it retained full activity up to 0.35% in hydrogen peroxide, despite losing activity at higher concentrations. Concerning wastewater, the lipase increased free fatty acids release by 7.4 times and promoted the hydrolysis of approximately 10% of the fats, suggesting that it could be included in a pretreatment stage, especially for vegetable oil degradation. PMID:24455209

  9. Stability of a Lipase Extracted from Seeds of Pachira aquatica in Commercial Detergents and Application Tests in Poultry Wastewater Pretreatment and Fat Particle Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Polizelli, Patrícia Peres; Facchini, Fernanda Dell Antonio; Bonilla-Rodriguez, Gustavo Orlando

    2013-01-01

    A protein extract containing a plant lipase from oleaginous seeds of Pachira aquatica was tested using soybean oil, wastewater from a poultry processing plant, and beef fat particles as substrate. The hydrolysis experiments were carried out at a temperature of 40°C, an incubation time of 90 minutes, and pH 8.0-9.0. The enzyme had the best stability at pH 9.0 and showed good stability in the alkaline range. It was found that P. aquatica lipase was stable in the presence of some commercial laundry detergent formulations, and it retained full activity up to 0.35% in hydrogen peroxide, despite losing activity at higher concentrations. Concerning wastewater, the lipase increased free fatty acids release by 7.4 times and promoted the hydrolysis of approximately 10% of the fats, suggesting that it could be included in a pretreatment stage, especially for vegetable oil degradation. PMID:24455209

  10. High glucose recovery from direct enzymatic hydrolysis of bisulfite-pretreatment on non-detoxified furfural residues.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yang; Bu, Lingxi; Sun, Dafeng; Liu, Zhiping; Liu, Shijie; Jiang, Jianxin

    2015-10-01

    This study reports four schemes to pretreat wet furfural residues (FRs) with sodium bisulfite for production of fermentable sugar. The results showed that non-detoxified FRs (pH 2-3) had great potential to lower the cost of bioconversion. The optimal process was that unwashed FRs were first pretreated with bisulfite, and the whole slurry was then directly used for enzymatic hydrolysis. A maximum glucose yield of 99.4% was achieved from substrates pretreated with 0.1 g NaHSO3/g dry substrate (DS), at a relatively low temperature of 100 °C for 3 h. Compared with raw material, enzymatic hydrolysis at a high-solid of 16.5% (w/w) specifically showed more excellent performance with bisulfite treated FRs. Direct bisulfite pretreatment improved the accessibility of substrates and the total glucose recovery. Lignosulfonate in the non-detoxified slurry decreased the non-productive adsorption of cellulase on the substrate, thus improving enzymatic hydrolysis.

  11. High glucose recovery from direct enzymatic hydrolysis of bisulfite-pretreatment on non-detoxified furfural residues.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yang; Bu, Lingxi; Sun, Dafeng; Liu, Zhiping; Liu, Shijie; Jiang, Jianxin

    2015-10-01

    This study reports four schemes to pretreat wet furfural residues (FRs) with sodium bisulfite for production of fermentable sugar. The results showed that non-detoxified FRs (pH 2-3) had great potential to lower the cost of bioconversion. The optimal process was that unwashed FRs were first pretreated with bisulfite, and the whole slurry was then directly used for enzymatic hydrolysis. A maximum glucose yield of 99.4% was achieved from substrates pretreated with 0.1 g NaHSO3/g dry substrate (DS), at a relatively low temperature of 100 °C for 3 h. Compared with raw material, enzymatic hydrolysis at a high-solid of 16.5% (w/w) specifically showed more excellent performance with bisulfite treated FRs. Direct bisulfite pretreatment improved the accessibility of substrates and the total glucose recovery. Lignosulfonate in the non-detoxified slurry decreased the non-productive adsorption of cellulase on the substrate, thus improving enzymatic hydrolysis. PMID:26150072

  12. Changes on structural properties of biomass pretreated by combined deacetylation with liquid hot water and its effect on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Chang, Senlin; Qu, Yongshui; Zhang, Zhiguo; Xu, Jian

    2016-11-01

    A novel combined pretreatment of deacetylation and liquid hot water (LHW) was invented which has been proved to be effective in increasing enzymatic hydrolysis yield of biomass. In order to further understand the effect of this new pretreatment process on biomass, the variation on structural properties including cellulose crystallinity index (CrI), specific surface area (SSA) and degree of polymerization (DP) before/after pretreatment and how these properties affected the enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass were explored. The improvement of pretreatment severity (PS) could increase CrI, SSA and reduce DP. Whereas the enhancement of degree of deacetylation could decrease SSA and DP. An optimal formula (E12Y=0.347(100-CrI)(-0.375)×(SSA)(0.203)×(1700-DP)(0.281)) was achieved to express the correlation between structural properties and enzymatic hydrolysis after 12h. The enzymatic yield was more sensitive to CrI than to SSA and DP. PMID:27611028

  13. Hydrolysis of cellulose catalyzed by novel acidic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Kelei; Du, Quanzhou; Bai, Guangyue; Wang, Congyue; Chen, Yujuan; Wang, Jianji

    2015-01-22

    The conversion of cellulosic biomass directly into valuable chemicals becomes a hot subject. Six novel acidic ionic liquids (ILs) based on 2-phenyl-2-imidazoline were synthesized and characterized by UV-VIS, TGA, and NMR. The novel acidic ionic liquids were investigated as catalysts for the hydrolysis of cellulose in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl). The acidic ionic liquids with anions HSO4(-) and Cl(-) showed better catalytic performance for the hydrolysis of cellulose than those with H2PO4(-). The temperature and dosage of water affect significantly the yield of total reducing sugar (TRS). When the hydrolysis of cellulose was catalyzed by 1-propyl sulfonic acid-2-phenyl imidazoline hydrogensulfate (IL-1) and the dosage of water was 0.2g, the TRS yield was up to 85.1% within 60 min at 100°C. These new acidic ionic liquids catalysts are expected to have a wide application in the conversion of cellulose into valuable chemicals. PMID:25439867

  14. Bisulfite pretreatment changes the structure and properties of oil palm empty fruit bunch to improve enzymatic hydrolysis and bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Tan, Liping; Sun, Wan; Li, Xuezhi; Zhao, Jian; Qu, Yinbo; Choo, Yuen May; Loh, Soh Kheang

    2015-06-01

    Bisulfite pretreatment is a proven effective method for improving the enzymatic hydrolysis of empty fruit bunch (EFB) from oil palm for bioethanol production. In this study, we set out to determine the changes that occur in the structure and properties of EFB materials and fractions of hemicellulose and lignin during the bisulfite pretreatment process. The results showed that the crystallinity of cellulose in EFB increased after bisulfite pretreatment, whereas the EFB surface was damaged to various degrees. The orderly structure of EFB, which was maintained by hydrogen bonds, was destroyed by bisulfite pretreatment. Bisulfite pretreatment also hydrolyzed the glycosidic bonds of the xylan backbone of hemicellulose, thereby decreasing the molecular weight and shortening the xylan chains. The lignin fractions obtained from EFB and pretreated EFB were typically G-S lignin, and with low content of H units. Meanwhile, de-etherification occurred at the β-O-4 linkage, which was accompanied by polymerization and demethoxylation as a result of bisulfite pretreatment. The adsorption ability of cellulase differed for the various lignin fractions, and the water-soluble lignin fractions had higher adsorption capacity on cellulase than the milled wood lignin. In general, the changes in the structure and properties of EFB provided insight into the benefits of bisulfite pretreatment.

  15. Supplementation with xylanase and β-xylosidase to reduce xylo-oligomer and xylan inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and pretreated corn stover

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hemicellulose is often credited with being one of the important physical barriers to enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose, and acts by blocking enzyme access to the cellulose surface. In addition, our recent research has suggested that hemicelluloses, particularly in the form of xylan and its oligomers, can more strongly inhibit cellulase activity than do glucose and cellobiose. Removal of hemicelluloses or elimination of their negative effects can therefore become especially pivotal to achieving higher cellulose conversion with lower enzyme doses. Results In this study, cellulase was supplemented with xylanase and β-xylosidase to boost conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose in pretreated biomass through conversion of xylan and xylo-oligomers to the less inhibitory xylose. Although addition of xylanase and β-xylosidase did not necessarily enhance Avicel hydrolysis, glucan conversions increased by 27% and 8% for corn stover pretreated with ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) and dilute acid, respectively. In addition, adding hemicellulase several hours before adding cellulase was more beneficial than later addition, possibly as a result of a higher adsorption affinity of cellulase and xylanase to xylan than glucan. Conclusions This key finding elucidates a possible mechanism for cellulase inhibition by xylan and xylo-oligomers and emphasizes the need to optimize the enzyme formulation for each pretreated substrate. More research is needed to identify advanced enzyme systems designed to hydrolyze different substrates with maximum overall enzyme efficacy. PMID:21702938

  16. Acid hydrolysis of sweet potato for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Studies were conducted to establish optimal conditions for the acid hydrolysis of sweet potato for maximal ethanol yield. The starch contents of two sweet potato cultivars (Georgia Red and TG-4), based on fresh weight, were 21.1 +/- 0.6% and 27.5 +/- 1.6%, respectively. The results of acid hydrolysis experiments showed the following: (1) both hydrolysis rate and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) concentration were a function of HCL concentration, temperature, and time; (2) the reducing sugars were rapidly formed with elevated concentrations of HCl and temperature, but also destroyed quickly; and (3) HMF concentration increased significantly with the concentration of HCl, temperature, and hydrolysis time. Maximum reducing sugar value of 84.2 DE and 0.056% HMF (based on wet weight) was achieved after heating 8% SPS for 15 min in 1N HCl at 110/sup 0/C. Degraded 8% SPS (1N HCl, 97/sup 0/C for 20 min or 110/sup 0/C for 10 min) was utilized as substrate for ethanol fermentation and 3.8% ethanol (v/v) was produced from 1400 mL fermented wort. This is equal to 41.6 g ethanol (200 proof) from 400 g of fresh sweet potato tuber (Georgia Red) or an ethanol yield potential of 431 gal of 200-proof ethanol/acre (from 500 bushel tubers/acre).

  17. Optimizing dilute-acid pretreatment of rapeseed straw for extraction of hemicellulose.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Tae-Su; Um, Byung-Hwan; Kim, Jun-Seok; Oh, Kyeong-Keun

    2010-05-01

    Biological conversion of biomass into fuels and chemicals requires hydrolysis of the polysaccharide fraction into monomeric sugars prior to fermentation. Hydrolysis can be performed enzymatically or with mineral acids. In this study, dilute sulfuric acid was used as a catalyst for the pretreatment of rapeseed straw. The purpose of this study is to optimize the pretreatment process in a 15-mL bomb tube reactor and investigate the effects of the acid concentration, temperature, and reaction time. These parameters influence hemicellulose removal and production of sugars (xylose, glucose, and arabinose) in the hydrolyzate as well as the formation of by-products (furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, and acetic acid). Statistical analysis was based on a model composition corresponding to a 3(3) orthogonal factorial design and employed the response surface methodology to optimize the pretreatment conditions, aiming to attain maximum xylan, mannan, and galactan (XMG) extraction from hemicellulose of rapeseed straw. The obtained optimum conditions were: H2SO4 concentration of 1.76% and temperature of 152.6 degrees C with a reaction time of 21 min. Under these optimal conditions, 85.5% of the total sugar was recovered after acid hydrolysis (78.9% XMG and 6.6% glucan). The hydrolyzate contained 1.60 g/L glucose, 0.61 g/L arabinose, 10.49 g/L xylose, mannose, and galactose, 0.39 g/L cellobiose, 0.94 g/L fructose, 0.02 g/L 1,6-anhydro-glucose, 1.17 g/L formic acid, 2.94 g/L acetic acid, 0.04 g/L levulinic acid, 0.04 g/L 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, and 0.98 g/L furfural.

  18. Optimizing dilute-acid pretreatment of rapeseed straw for extraction of hemicellulose.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Tae-Su; Um, Byung-Hwan; Kim, Jun-Seok; Oh, Kyeong-Keun

    2010-05-01

    Biological conversion of biomass into fuels and chemicals requires hydrolysis of the polysaccharide fraction into monomeric sugars prior to fermentation. Hydrolysis can be performed enzymatically or with mineral acids. In this study, dilute sulfuric acid was used as a catalyst for the pretreatment of rapeseed straw. The purpose of this study is to optimize the pretreatment process in a 15-mL bomb tube reactor and investigate the effects of the acid concentration, temperature, and reaction time. These parameters influence hemicellulose removal and production of sugars (xylose, glucose, and arabinose) in the hydrolyzate as well as the formation of by-products (furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, and acetic acid). Statistical analysis was based on a model composition corresponding to a 3(3) orthogonal factorial design and employed the response surface methodology to optimize the pretreatment conditions, aiming to attain maximum xylan, mannan, and galactan (XMG) extraction from hemicellulose of rapeseed straw. The obtained optimum conditions were: H2SO4 concentration of 1.76% and temperature of 152.6 degrees C with a reaction time of 21 min. Under these optimal conditions, 85.5% of the total sugar was recovered after acid hydrolysis (78.9% XMG and 6.6% glucan). The hydrolyzate contained 1.60 g/L glucose, 0.61 g/L arabinose, 10.49 g/L xylose, mannose, and galactose, 0.39 g/L cellobiose, 0.94 g/L fructose, 0.02 g/L 1,6-anhydro-glucose, 1.17 g/L formic acid, 2.94 g/L acetic acid, 0.04 g/L levulinic acid, 0.04 g/L 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, and 0.98 g/L furfural. PMID:20087686

  19. Carbon-based strong solid acid for cornstarch hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nata, Iryanti Fatyasari; Irawan, Chairul; Mardina, Primata; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2015-10-01

    Highly sulfonated carbonaceous spheres with diameter of 100-500 nm can be generated by hydrothermal carbonization of glucose in the presence of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid and acrylic acid at 180 °C for 4 h. The acidity of the prepared carbonaceous sphere C4-SO3H can reach 2.10 mmol/g. It was used as a solid acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of cornstarch. Total reducing sugar (TRS) concentration of 19.91 mg/mL could be obtained by hydrolyzing 20 mg/mL cornstarch at 150 °C for 6 h using C4-SO3H as solid acid catalyst. The solid acid catalyst demonstrated good stability that only 9% decrease in TRS concentration was observed after five repeat uses. The as-prepared carbon-based solid acid catalyst can be an environmentally benign replacement for homogeneous catalyst.

  20. Alkaline/peracetic acid as a pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for ethanol fuel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Lincoln Cambraia

    Peracetic acid is a lignin oxidation pretreatment with low energy input by which biomass can be treated in a silo type system for improving enzymatic digestibility of lignocellulosic materials for ethanol production. Experimentally, ground hybrid poplar wood and sugar cane bagasse are placed in plastic bags and a peracetic acid solution is added to the biomass in different concentrations based on oven-dry biomass. The ratio of solution to biomass is 6:1; after initial mixing of the resulting paste, a seven-day storage period at about 20°C is used in this study. As a complementary method, a series of pre-pretreatments using stoichiometric amounts of sodium hydroxide and ammonium hydroxide based on 4-methyl-glucuronic acid and acetyl content in the biomass is been performed before addition of peracetic acid. The alkaline solutions are added to the biomass in a ratio of 14:1 solution to biomass; the slurry is mixed for 24 hours at ambient temperature. The above procedures give high xylan content substrates. Consequently, xylanase/beta-glucosidase combinations are more effective than cellulase preparations in hydrolyzing these materials. The pretreatment effectiveness is evaluated using standard enzymatic hydrolysis and simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation (SSCF) procedures. Hybrid poplar wood pretreated with 15 and 21% peracetic acid based on oven-dry weight of wood gives glucan conversion yields of 76.5 and 98.3%, respectively. Sugar cane bagasse pretreated with the same loadings gives corresponding yields of 85.9 and 93.1%. Raw wood and raw bagasse give corresponding yields of 6.8 and 28.8%, respectively. The combined 6% NaOH/15% peracetic acid pretreatments increase the glucan conversion yields from 76.5 to 100.0% for hybrid poplar wood and from 85.9 to 97.6% for sugar cane bagasse. Respective ethanol yields of 92.8 and 91.9% are obtained from 6% NaOH/15% peracetic acid pretreated materials using recombinant Zymomonas mobilis CP4/pZB5. Peracetic acid

  1. Extraterrestrial material analysis: loss of amino acids during liquid-phase acid hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Arnaud; Brault, Amaury; Szopa, Cyril; Freissinet, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Searching for building blocks of life in extraterrestrial material is a way to learn more about how life could have appeared on Earth. With this aim, liquid-phase acid hydrolysis has been used, since at least 1970 , in order to extract amino acids and other organic molecules from extraterrestrial materials (e.g. meteorites, lunar fines) or Earth analogues (e.g. Atacama desert soil). This procedure involves drastic conditions such as heating samples in 6N HCl for 24 h, either under inert atmosphere/vacuum, or air. Analysis of the hydrolyzed part of the sample should give its total (free plus bound) amino acid content. The present work deals with the influence of the 6N HCl hydrolysis on amino acid degradation. Our experiments have been performed on a standard solution of 17 amino acids. After liquid-phase acid hydrolysis (6N HCl) under argon atmosphere (24 h at 100°C), the liquid phase was evaporated and the dry residue was derivatized with N-Methyl-N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) and dimethylformamide (DMF), followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. After comparison with derivatized amino acids from the standard solution, a significant reduction of the chromatographic peak areas was observed for most of the amino acids after liquid-phase acid hydrolysis. Furthermore, the same loss pattern was observed when the amino acids were exposed to cold 6N HCl for a short amount of time. The least affected amino acid, i.e. glycine, was found to be 73,93% percent less abundant compared to the non-hydrolyzed standard, while the most affected, i.e. histidine, was not found in the chromatograms after hydrolysis. Our experiments thereby indicate that liquid-phase acid hydrolysis, even under inert atmosphere, leads to a partial or total loss of all of the 17 amino acids present in the standard solution, and that a quick cold contact with 6N HCl is sufficient to lead to a loss of amino acids. Therefore, in the literature, the reported increase

  2. An efficient and green pretreatment to stimulate short-chain fatty acids production from waste activated sludge anaerobic fermentation using free nitrous acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Jianwei; Wang, Dongbo; Yang, Qi; Xu, Qiuxiang; Deng, Yongchao; Yang, Weiqiang; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-02-01

    Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production from waste activated sludge (WAS) anaerobic fermentation is often limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and poor substrate availability, thus a long fermentation time is required. This paper reports a new pretreatment approach, i.e., using free nitrous acid (FNA) to pretreat sludge, for significantly enhanced SCFA production. Experimental results showed the highest SCFA production occurred at 1.8 mg FNA/L with time of day 6, which was 3.7-fold of the blank at fermentation time of day 12. Mechanism studies revealed that FNA pretreatment accelerated disruption of both extracellular polymeric substances and cell envelope. It was also found that FNA pretreatment benefited hydrolysis and acidification processes but inhibited the activities of methanogens, thereby promoting the yield of SCFA. In addition, the FNA pretreatment substantially stimulated the activities of key enzymes responsible for hydrolysis and acidification, which were consistent with the improvement of solubilization, hydrolysis and acidification of WAS anaerobic fermentation.

  3. Characterization of pilot-scale dilute acid pretreatment performance using deacetylated corn stover

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising process technology for the deconstruction of low-lignin lignocellulosic biomass, capable of producing high yields of hemicellulosic sugars and enhancing enzymatic yields of glucose as part of a biomass-to-biofuels process. However, while it has been extensively studied, most work has historically been conducted at relatively high acid concentrations of 1 - 4% (weight/weight). Reducing the effective acid loading in pretreatment has the potential to reduce chemical costs both for pretreatment and subsequent neutralization. Additionally, if acid loadings are sufficiently low, capital requirements associated with reactor construction may be significantly reduced due to the relaxation of requirements for exotic alloys. Despite these benefits, past efforts have had difficulty obtaining high process yields at low acid loadings without supplementation of additional unit operations, such as mechanical refining. Results Recently, we optimized the dilute acid pretreatment of deacetylated corn stover at low acid loadings in a 1-ton per day horizontal pretreatment reactor. This effort included more than 25 pilot-scale pretreatment experiments executed at reactor temperatures ranging from 150 – 170°C, residence times of 10 – 20 minutes and hydrolyzer sulfuric acid concentrations between 0.15 – 0.30% (weight/weight). In addition to characterizing the process yields achieved across the reaction space, the optimization identified a pretreatment reaction condition that achieved total xylose yields from pretreatment of 73.5% ± 1.5% with greater than 97% xylan component balance closure across a series of five runs at the same condition. Feedstock reactivity at this reaction condition after bench-scale high solids enzymatic hydrolysis was 77%, prior to the inclusion of any additional conversion that may occur during subsequent fermentation. Conclusions This study effectively characterized a range of pretreatment reaction

  4. Hydrolysis of aceto-hydroxamic acid under UREX+ conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Alyapyshev, M.; Paulenova, A.; Tkac, P.; Cleveland, M.A.; Bruso, J.E.

    2007-07-01

    Aceto-hydroxamic acid (AHA) is used as a stripping agent In the UREX process. While extraction yields of uranium remain high upon addition of AHA, hexavalent plutonium and neptunium are rapidly reduced to the pentavalent state while the tetravalent species and removed from the product stream. However, under acidic conditions, aceto-hydroxamic acid undergoes hydrolytic degradation. In this study, the kinetics of the hydrolysis of aceto-hydroxamic acid in nitric and perchloric acid media was investigated at several temperatures. The decrease of the concentration of AHA was determined via its ferric complex using UV-Vis spectroscopy. The data obtained were analyzed using the method of initial rates. The data follow the pseudo-first order reaction model. Gamma irradiation of AHA/HNO{sub 3} solutions with 33 kGy/s caused two-fold faster degradation of AHA. The rate equation and thermodynamic data will be presented for the hydrolysis reaction with respect to the concentrations of aceto-hydroxamic acid, nitrate and hydronium ions, and radiation dose. (authors)

  5. Fatty acid hydrolysis of acyl marinobactin siderophores by Marinobacter acylases.

    PubMed

    Kem, Michelle P; Naka, Hiroaki; Iinishi, Akira; Haygood, Margo G; Butler, Alison

    2015-01-27

    The marine bacteria Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 and Marinobacter nanhaiticus D15-8W produce a suite of acyl peptidic marinobactin siderophores to acquire iron under iron-limiting conditions. During late-log phase growth, the marinobactins are hydrolyzed to form the marinobactin headgroup with release of the corresponding fatty acid tail. The bntA gene, a homologue of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyoverdine acylase gene, pvdQ, was identified from Marinobacter sp. DS40M6. A bntA knockout mutant of Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 produced the suite of acyl marinobactins A-E, without the usual formation of the marinobactin headgroup. Another marinobactin-producing species, M. nanhaiticus D15-8W, is predicted to have two pvdQ homologues, mhtA and mhtB. MhtA and MhtB have 67% identical amino acid sequences. MhtA catalyzes hydrolysis of the apo-marinobactin siderophores as well as the quorum sensing signaling molecule, dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone. In contrast to hydrolysis of the suite of apo-marinobactins by MhtA, hydrolysis of the iron(III)-bound marinobactins was not observed. PMID:25588131

  6. Ionic liquid pretreatment to increase succinic acid production from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caixia; Yan, Daojiang; Li, Qiang; Sun, Wei; Xing, Jianmin

    2014-11-01

    In this study, pinewood and corn stover pretreated with the ionic liquid (IL) 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (AmimCl) were used as a feedstock for succinic acid production. Results reveal that 5% (v/v) AmimCl inhibited bacterial growth, whereas 0.01% (v/v) AmimCl inhibited succinic acid production. AmimCl was effective in extracting cellulose from pinewood and in degrading pinewood into a uniform pulp, as revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of pinewood extract reached 72.16%. The combinations of AmimCl pretreatment with steam explosion or with hot compressed water were effective in treating corn stover, whereas AmimCl treatment alone did not result in a significant improvement. Pinewood extract produced 20.7g/L succinic acid with an average yield of 0.37g per gram of biomass. Workflow calculations indicated pine wood pretreated with IL has a theoretical yield of succinic acid of 57.1%. IL pretreatment led to increase in succinic acid yields.

  7. Enhanced hydrolysis and methane yield by applying microaeration pretreatment to the anaerobic co-digestion of brown water and food waste.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jun Wei; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2013-04-01

    Microaeration has been used conventionally for the desulphurization of biogas, and recently it was shown to be an alternative pretreatment to enhance hydrolysis of the anaerobic digestion (AD) process. Previous studies on microaeration pretreatment were limited to the study of substrates with complex organic matter, while little has been reported on its effect on substrates with higher biodegradability such as brown water and food waste. Due to the lack of consistent microaeration intensities, previous studies were not comparable and thus inconclusive in proving the effectiveness of microaeration to the overall AD process. In this study, the role of microaeration pretreatment in the anaerobic co-digestion of brown water and food waste was evaluated in batch-tests. After a 4-day pretreatment with 37.5 mL-O2/L(R)-d added to the liquid phase of the reactor, the methane production of substrates were monitored in anaerobic conditions over the next 40 days. The added oxygen was consumed fully by facultative microorganisms and a reducing environment for organic matter degradation was maintained. Other than higher COD solubilization, microaeration pretreatment led to greater VFA accumulation and the conversion of other short chain fatty acids to acetate. This could be due to enhanced activities of hydrolytic and acidogenic bacteria and the degradation of slowly biodegradable compounds under microaerobic conditions. This study also found that the nature of inoculum influenced the effects of microaeration as a 21% and 10% increase in methane yield was observed when pretreatment was applied to inoculated substrates, and substrates without inoculum, respectively.

  8. Phenols and lignin: Key players in reducing enzymatic hydrolysis yields of steam-pretreated biomass in presence of laccase.

    PubMed

    Oliva-Taravilla, Alfredo; Tomás-Pejó, Elia; Demuez, Marie; González-Fernández, Cristina; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2016-01-20

    Phenols are known as inhibitors for cellulases and fermentative microorganisms in bioethanol production processes. The addition of laccases removes the phenolic compounds and subsequently reduces the lag phase of the fermentative microorganism. However, the application of laccases diminishes glucose release during the enzymatic hydrolysis. In this study a model cellulosic substrate (Sigmacell) together with lignin extract, whole steam-pretreated wheat straw (slurry) and its water insoluble solid fraction (WIS) were subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis to evaluate the effects of laccase treatment in presence of lignin and phenols. The presence of laccase in enzymatic hydrolysis of Sigmacell with lignin extract reduced glucose yield by 37% compared with assays without laccase. Furthermore, this reduction was even more marked in presence of phenols (55% reduction). Interestingly, when hydrolyzing WIS, the addition of phenols coupled with laccase treatment did not show a reduction when compared with only laccase addition. This fact suggests the key role of lignin in the hydrolysis inhibition since in WIS the ratio cellulase per gram of lignin was much lower than in Sigmacell experiments. Finally, the lower cellobiose and xylose recoveries point out that phenolic oligomers formed by laccase oxidation play important roles in the inhibition of endoglucanases, cellobiohydrolases and xylanases. To conclude, the proportion of lignin and the composition of phenols are key players in the inhibition of cellulases when the enzymatic hydrolysis is combined with laccases detoxification. PMID:26684987

  9. Synergistic effect and application of xylanases as accessory enzymes to enhance the hydrolysis of pretreated bagasse.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Geisa A L; Takasugi, Yusaku; Jia, Lili; Mori, Yutaro; Noda, Shuhei; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ichinose, Hirofumi; Kamiya, Noriho

    2015-05-01

    Recently, the new trend in the second-generation ethanol industry is to use mild pretreatments, in order to reduce costs and to keep higher content of hemicellulose in the biomass. Nevertheless, a high enzyme dosage is still required in the conversion of (hemi)cellulose. The interaction between cellulases and xylanases seems to be an effective alternative to reduce enzyme loading in the saccharification process. At first, to evaluate the synergism of xylanases on bagasse degradation, we have produced two xylanases from glycoside hydrolase family 10 (GH10) and three xylanases from glycoside hydrolase family 11 (GH11), from two thermophilic organisms, Thermobifida fusca and Clostridium thermocellum, and one mesophilic organism, Streptomyces lividans. Peracetic acid (PAA) pretreated bagasse was used as substrate. The combination of XynZ-C (GH10, from C. thermocellum), and XlnB (GH11, from S. lividans) presented the highest degree of synergy after 6h (3.62). However, the combination of XynZ-C and Xyn11A (GH11, from T. fusca) resulted in the highest total yield of reducing sugars. To evaluate the synergism between xylanases and cellulases, commercial cellulase preparation from Trichoderma reesei was combined with the selected xylanases, XynZ-C and Xyn11A. About 2-fold increase was observed in the concentration of reducing sugars, when both xylanases, XynZ-C and Xyn11A, were added together with T. reesei cellulases in the reaction mixture. PMID:25837503

  10. Synergistic effect and application of xylanases as accessory enzymes to enhance the hydrolysis of pretreated bagasse.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Geisa A L; Takasugi, Yusaku; Jia, Lili; Mori, Yutaro; Noda, Shuhei; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ichinose, Hirofumi; Kamiya, Noriho

    2015-05-01

    Recently, the new trend in the second-generation ethanol industry is to use mild pretreatments, in order to reduce costs and to keep higher content of hemicellulose in the biomass. Nevertheless, a high enzyme dosage is still required in the conversion of (hemi)cellulose. The interaction between cellulases and xylanases seems to be an effective alternative to reduce enzyme loading in the saccharification process. At first, to evaluate the synergism of xylanases on bagasse degradation, we have produced two xylanases from glycoside hydrolase family 10 (GH10) and three xylanases from glycoside hydrolase family 11 (GH11), from two thermophilic organisms, Thermobifida fusca and Clostridium thermocellum, and one mesophilic organism, Streptomyces lividans. Peracetic acid (PAA) pretreated bagasse was used as substrate. The combination of XynZ-C (GH10, from C. thermocellum), and XlnB (GH11, from S. lividans) presented the highest degree of synergy after 6h (3.62). However, the combination of XynZ-C and Xyn11A (GH11, from T. fusca) resulted in the highest total yield of reducing sugars. To evaluate the synergism between xylanases and cellulases, commercial cellulase preparation from Trichoderma reesei was combined with the selected xylanases, XynZ-C and Xyn11A. About 2-fold increase was observed in the concentration of reducing sugars, when both xylanases, XynZ-C and Xyn11A, were added together with T. reesei cellulases in the reaction mixture.

  11. Synergistic benefits of ionic liquid and alkaline pretreatments of poplar wood. Part 1: effect of integrated pretreatment on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Tong-Qi; Wang, Wei; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2013-09-01

    An environmentally friendly pretreatment process was developed to fractionate hemicelluloses and lignin from poplar wood by ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment coupled with mild alkaline extraction. Hemicellulosic and lignin fractions were obtained in high yields, amounting to 59.3% and 74.4%, respectively, which can served as raw materials for production of value-added products. The yield of glucose for the integrated pretreated poplar wood was 99.2%, while it was just 19.2% for the untreated material. The synergistic benefits of the removal of lignin and hemicelluloses, the increase of the cellulose surface area, and the conversion of cellulose fibers from the cellulose I to the cellulose II crystal phase resulted in the high glucose yield for the integrated pretreated substrate. Therefore, the IL based biorefining strategy proposed can integrate biofuels production into a biorefinery scheme in which the major components of poplar wood can be converted into value-added products.

  12. Enhanced sugar production from pretreated barley straw by additive xylanase and surfactants in enzymatic hydrolysis for acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Zhang, Junhua; Kuittinen, Suvi; Vepsäläinen, Jouko; Soininen, Pasi; Keinänen, Markku; Pappinen, Ari

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to improve enzymatic sugar production from dilute sulfuric acid-pretreated barley straw for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. The effects of additive xylanase and surfactants (polyethylene glycol [PEG] and Tween) in an enzymatic reaction system on straw hydrolysis yields were investigated. By combined application of 2g/100g dry-matter (DM) xylanase and PEG 4000, the glucose yield was increased from 53.2% to 86.9% and the xylose yield was increased from 36.2% to 70.2%, which were considerably higher than results obtained with xylanase or surfactant alone. The ABE fermentation of enzymatic hydrolysate produced 10.8 g/L ABE, in which 7.9 g/L was butanol. The enhanced sugar production increased the ABE yield from 93.8 to 135.0 g/kg pretreated straw. The combined application of xylanase and surfactants has a large potential to improve sugar production from barley straw pretreated with a mild acid and that the hydrolysate showed good fermentability in ABE production.

  13. Dilute-acid hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse at varying conditions.

    PubMed

    Neureiter, Markus; Danner, Herbert; Thomasser, Christiane; Saidi, Bamusi; Braun, Rudolf

    2002-01-01

    Sugarcane bagasse, a byproduct of the cane sugar industry, is an abundant source of hemicellulose that could be hydrolyzed to yield a fermentation feedstock for the production of fuel ethanol and chemicals. The effects of sulfuric acid concentration, temperature, time, and dry matter concentration on hemicellulose hydrolysis were studied with a 20-L batch hydrolysis reactor using a statistical experimental design. Even at less severe conditions considerable amounts (>29%) of the hemicellulose fraction could be extracted. The percentage of soluble oligosaccharides becomes very low in experiments with high yields in monosaccharides, which indicates that the cellulose fraction is only slightly affected. For the sugar yields, acid concentration appears to be the most important parameter, while for the formation of sugar degradation products, temperature shows the highest impact. It could be demonstrated that the dry matter concentration in the reaction slurry has a negative effect on the xylose yield that can be compensated by higher concentrations of sulfuric acid owing to a positive interaction between acid concentration and dry matter contents.

  14. Industrial-scale steam explosion pretreatment of sugarcane straw for enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose for production of second generation ethanol and value-added products.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Fernando M V; Pinheiro, Irapuan O; Souto-Maior, Ana M; Martin, Carlos; Gonçalves, Adilson R; Rocha, George J M

    2013-02-01

    Steam explosion at 180, 190 and 200°C for 15min was applied to sugarcane straw in an industrial sugar/ethanol reactor (2.5m(3)). The pretreated straw was delignificated by sodium hydroxide and hydrolyzed with cellulases, or submitted directly to enzymatic hydrolysis after the pretreatment. The pretreatments led to remarkable hemicellulose solubilization, with the maximum (92.7%) for pretreatment performed at 200°C. Alkaline treatment of the pretreated materials led to lignin solubilization of 86.7% at 180°C, and only to 81.3% in the material pretreated at 200°C. All pretreatment conditions led to high hydrolysis conversion of cellulose, with the maximum (80.0%) achieved at 200°C. Delignification increase the enzymatic conversion (from 58.8% in the cellulignin to 85.1% in the delignificated pulp) of the material pretreated at 180°C, but for the material pretreated at 190°C, the improvement was less remarkable, while for the pretreated at 200°C the hydrolysis conversion decreased after the alkaline treatment.

  15. [Transformation characteristics of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur during thermal hydrolysis pretreatment of sludge with high solid content].

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Yang; Han, Yun; Cheng, Yao; Peng, Dang-Cong; Li, Yu-You

    2015-03-01

    The transformation characteristics of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur in dewatering sludge from municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) were investigated after thermal hydrolysis pretreatment at 165 degress C for 50 min. The results showed that the hydrolysis efficiency of VSS could reach as high as 43.35%, 54.36% of protein and 65.12% of carbohydrate were transferred to dissolved organics, respectively, and the main component of dissolved organic matter in hydrolysate was dissolved protein (52.18% ), 54.23% of insoluble organic nitrogen was turned into dissolved nitrogen and 22.13% of dissolved nitrogen in hydrolysate was converted to ammonia. The transformation rate of insoluble phosphorus was 30.52%. Dissolved phosphorus was mostly transformed to phosphate (79.84%) as phosphorus-accumulating bacteria cells were crushed. 50.03% of insoluble organic sulfur was hydrolyzed, and little change was detected in sulfide (0.50%). The analysis results of the organic compounds transformation are valuable for treatment of the thermal hydrolysis pretreated sludge with high solid content.

  16. Ethanol production from sugars obtained during enzymatic hydrolysis of elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum, Schum.) pretreated by steam explosion.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Angélica Luisi; Menegol, Daiane; Pitarelo, Ana Paula; Fontana, Roselei Claudete; Zandoná Filho, Arion; Ramos, Luiz Pereira; Dillon, Aldo José Pinheiro; Camassola, Marli

    2015-09-01

    In this work, steam explosion was used a pretreatment method to improve the conversion of elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum) to cellulosic ethanol. This way, enzymatic hydrolysis of vaccum-drained and water-washed steam-treated substrates was carried out with Penicillium echinulatum enzymes while Saccharomyces cerevisiae CAT-1 was used for fermentation. After 48 h of hydrolysis, the highest yield of reducing sugars was obtained from vaccum-drained steam-treated substrates that were produced after 10 min at 200 °C (863.42 ± 62.52 mg/g). However, the highest glucose yield was derived from water-washed steam-treated substrates that were produced after 10 min at 190 °C (248.34 ± 6.27 mg/g) and 200 °C (246.00 ± 9.60 mg/g). Nevertheless, the highest ethanol production was obtained from water-washed steam-treated substrates that were produced after 6 min at 200 °C. These data revealed that water washing is a critical step for ethanol production from steam-treated elephant grass and that pretreatment generates a great deal of water soluble inhibitory compounds for hydrolysis and fermentation, which were partly characterized as part of this study.

  17. Investigation of the pellets produced from sugarcane bagasse during liquid hot water pretreatment and their impact on the enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Zhuang, Xinshu; Yuan, Zhenhong; Yu, Qiang; Qi, Wei

    2015-08-01

    In the process of liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment, there are numbers of pellets formed on the lignocellulosic surface. The characteristics and effect of pellets on the enzymatic hydrolysis of LHW-treated sugarcane bagasse (SCB) were investigated. After SCB was treated with LHW at 180°C, the pellets deposited on the surface of solid residues were extracted gently with 1% sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. They were composed of 81.0% lignin, 7.0% glucan, and 3.2% xylan. The LHW pretreatment solution (PS) was sprayed to the filter paper, and the pellets were observed on its surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) data showed that lignin was also the main component of the PS pellets. The effect of the pellets on enzymatic hydrolysis was chiefly attributed to the steric hindrance, not the cellulase adsorption. The structural characteristics of LHW-treated SCB might play a more important role in influencing the enzymatic hydrolysis than the pellets.

  18. Chemical evolution. XXI - The amino acids released on hydrolysis of HCN oligomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, J. P.; Wos, J. D.; Nooner, D. W.; Oro, J.

    1974-01-01

    Major amino acids released by hydrolysis of acidic and basic HCN oligomers are identified by chromatography as Gly, Asp, and diaminosuccinic acid. Smaller amounts of Ala, Ile and alpha-aminoisobutyric acid are also detected. The amino acids released did not change appreciably when the hydrolysis medium was changed from neutral to acidic or basic. The presence of both meso and d, l-diaminosuccinic acids was established by paper chromatography and on an amino acid analyzer.

  19. Evaluation of ammonia fibre expansion (AFEX) pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis of switchgrass harvested in different seasons and locations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background When producing biofuels from dedicated feedstock, agronomic factors such as harvest time and location can impact the downstream production. Thus, this paper studies the effectiveness of ammonia fibre expansion (AFEX) pretreatment on two harvest times (July and October) and ecotypes/locations (Cave-in-Rock (CIR) harvested in Michigan and Alamo harvested in Alabama) for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). Results Both harvest date and ecotype/location determine the pretreatment conditions that produce maximum sugar yields. There was a high degree of correlation between glucose and xylose released regardless of the harvest, pretreatment conditions, or enzyme formulation. Enzyme formulation that produced maximum sugar yields was the same across all harvests except for the CIR October harvest. The least mature sample, the July harvest of CIR switchgrass, released the most sugars (520 g/kg biomass) during enzymatic hydrolysis while requiring the least severe pretreatment conditions. In contrast, the most mature harvest released the least amount of sugars (410 g/kg biomass). All hydrolysates were highly fermentable, although xylose utilisation in the July CIR hydrolysate was poor. Conclusions Each harvest type and location responded differently to AFEX pretreatment, although all harvests successfully produced fermentable sugars. Thus, it is necessary to consider an integrated approach between agricultural production and biochemical processing in order to insure optimal productivity. PMID:20047650

  20. Enhancement of methane production in mesophilic anaerobic digestion of secondary sewage sludge by advanced thermal hydrolysis pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Abelleira-Pereira, Jose M; Pérez-Elvira, Sara I; Sánchez-Oneto, Jezabel; de la Cruz, Roberto; Portela, Juan R; Nebot, Enrique

    2015-03-15

    Studies on the development and evolution of anaerobic digestion (AD) pretreatments are nowadays becoming widespread, due to the outstanding benefits that these processes could entail in the management of sewage sludge. Production of sewage sludge in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is becoming an extremely important environmental issue. The work presented in this paper is a continuation of our previous studies with the aim of understanding and developing the advanced thermal hydrolysis (ATH) process. ATH is a novel AD pretreatment based on a thermal hydrolysis (TH) process plus hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) addition that takes advantage of a peroxidation/direct steam injection synergistic effect. The main goal of the present research was to compare the performance of TH and ATH, conducted at a wide range of operating conditions, as pretreatments of mesophilic AD with an emphasis on methane production enhancement as a key parameter and its connection with the sludge solubilization. Results showed that both TH and ATH patently improved methane production in subsequent mesophilic BMP (biochemical methane potential) tests in comparison with BMP control tests (raw secondary sewage sludge). Besides other interesting results and discussions, a promising result was obtained since ATH, operated at temperature (115 °C), pretreatment time (5 min) and pressure (1 bar) considerably below those typically used in TH (170 °C, 30 min, 8 bar), managed to enhance the methane production in subsequent mesophilic BMP tests [biodegradability factor (fB) = cumulative CH4production/cumulative CH4production (Control) = 1.51 ± 0.01] to quite similar levels than conventional TH pretreatment [fB = 1.52 ± 0.03].

  1. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of acid-pretreated rapeseed meal for succinic acid production using Actinobacillus succinogenes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kequan; Zhang, Han; Miao, Yelian; Wei, Ping; Chen, Jieyu

    2011-04-01

    Rapeseed meal was evaluated for succinic acid production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation using Actinobacillus succinogenes ATCC 55618. Diluted sulfuric acid pretreatment and subsequent hydrolysis with pectinase was used to release sugars from rapeseed meal. The effects of culture pH, pectinase loading and yeast extract concentration on succinic acid production were investigated. When simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of diluted acid pretreated rapeseed meal with a dry matter content of 12.5% (w/v) was performed at pH 6.4 and a pectinase loading of 2% (w/w, on dry matter) without supplementation of yeast extract, a succinic acid concentration of 15.5 g/L was obtained at a yield of 12.4 g/100g dry matter. Fed-batch simultaneous saccharification and fermentation was carried out with supplementation of concentrated pretreated rapeseed meal and pectinase at 18 and 28 h to yield a final dry matter content of 20.5% and pectinase loading of 2%, with the succinic acid concentration enhanced to 23.4 g/L at a yield of 11.5 g/100g dry matter and a productivity of 0.33 g/(Lh). This study suggests that rapeseed meal may be an alternative substrate for the efficient production of succinic acid by A. succinogenes without requiring nitrogen source supplementation.

  2. Kinetic and Modeling Investigation to Provide Design Guidelines for the NREL Dilute-Acid Process Aimed at Total Hydrolysis/Fractionation of Lignocellulosic Biomass: July 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y. Y.; Iyer, P.; Xiang, Q.; Hayes, J.

    2004-08-01

    Following up on previous work, subcontractor investigated three aspects of using NREL ''pretreatment'' technology for total hydrolysis (cellulose as well as hemicellulose) of biomass. Whereas historic hydrolysis of biomass used either dilute acid or concentrated acid technology for hydrolysis of both hemicellulose and cellulose, NREL has been pursuing very dilute acid hydrolysis of hemicellulose followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. NREL's countercurrent shrinking-bed reactor design for hemicellulose hydrolysis (pretreatment) has, however, shown promise for total hydrolysis. For the first task, subcontractor developed a mathematical model of the countercurrent shrinking bed reactor operation and, using yellow poplar sawdust as a feedstock, analyzed the effect of: initial solid feeding rate, temperature, acid concentration, acid flow rate, Peclet number (a measure of backmixing in liquid flow), and bed shrinking. For the second task, subcontractor used laboratory trials, with yellow poplar sawdust and 0.07 wt% sulfuric acid at various temperatures, to verify the hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose (desired) and decomposition of glucose (undesired) and determine appropriate parameters for use in kinetic models. Unlike cellulose and hemicellulose, lignins, the third major component of biomass, are not carbohydrates that can be broken down into component sugars. They are, however, aromatic complex amorphous phenolic polymers that can likely be converted into low-molecular weight compounds suitable for production of fuels and chemicals. Oxidative degradation is one pathway for such conversion and hydrogen peroxide would be an attractive reagent for this, as it would leave no residuals. For the third task, subcontractor reacted lignin with hydrogen peroxide under various conditions and analyzed the resulting product mix.

  3. Enzymatic hydrolysis of chitin pretreated by rapid depressurization from supercritical 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane toward highly acetylated oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Villa-Lerma, Guadalupe; González-Márquez, Humberto; Gimeno, Miquel; Trombotto, Stéphane; David, Laurent; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Shirai, Keiko

    2016-06-01

    The hydrolysis of chitin treated under supercritical conditions was successfully carried out using chitinases obtained by an optimized fermentation of the fungus Lecanicillium lecanii. The biopolymer was subjected to a pretreatment based on suspension in supercritical 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (scR134a), which possesses a critical temperature and pressure of 101°C and 40bar, respectively, followed by rapid depressurization to atmospheric pressure and further fibrillation. This methodology was compared to control untreated chitins and chitin subjected to steam explosion showing improved production of reducing sugars (0.18mg/mL), enzymatic hydrolysis and high acetylation (FA of 0.45) in products with degrees of polymerization between 2 and 5.

  4. Comparison of enzymatic reactivity of corn stover solids prepared by dilute acid, AFEX™, and ionic liquid pretreatments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pretreatment is essential to realize high product yields from biological conversion of naturally recalcitrant cellulosic biomass, with thermochemical pretreatments often favored for cost and performance. In this study, enzymatic digestion of solids from dilute sulfuric acid (DA), ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX™), and ionic liquid (IL) thermochemical pretreatments of corn stover were followed over time for the same range of total enzyme protein loadings to provide comparative data on glucose and xylose yields of monomers and oligomers from the pretreated solids. The composition of pretreated solids and enzyme adsorption on each substrate were also measured to determine. The extent glucose release could be related to these features. Results Corn stover solids from pretreatment by DA, AFEX, and IL were enzymatically digested over a range of low to moderate loadings of commercial cellulase, xylanase, and pectinase enzyme mixtures, the proportions of which had been previously optimized for each pretreatment. Avicel® cellulose, regenerated amorphous cellulose (RAC), and beechwood xylan were also subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis as controls. Yields of glucose and xylose and their oligomers were followed for times up to 120 hours, and enzyme adsorption was measured. IL pretreated corn stover displayed the highest initial glucose yields at all enzyme loadings and the highest final yield for a low enzyme loading of 3 mg protein/g glucan in the raw material. However, increasing the enzyme loading to 12 mg/g glucan or more resulted in DA pretreated corn stover attaining the highest longer-term glucose yields. Hydrolyzate from AFEX pretreated corn stover had the highest proportion of xylooligomers, while IL produced the most glucooligomers. However, the amounts of both oligomers dropped with increasing enzyme loadings and hydrolysis times. IL pretreated corn stover had the highest enzyme adsorption capacity. Conclusions Initial hydrolysis yields were highest

  5. Zip nucleic acids are potent hydrolysis probes for quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Clément; Moreau, Valérie; Deglane, Gaëlle; Voirin, Emilie; Erbacher, Patrick; Lenne-Samuel, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Zip nucleic acids (ZNAs) are oligonucleotides conjugated with cationic spermine units that increase affinity for their target. ZNAs were recently shown to enable specific and sensitive reactions when used as primers for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse-transcription. Here, we report their use as quantitative PCR hydrolysis probes. Ultraviolet duplex melting data demonstrate that attachment of cationic residues to the 3′ end of an oligonucleotide does not alter its ability to discriminate nucleotides nor the destabilization pattern relative to mismatch location in the oligonucleotide sequence. The stability increase provided by the cationic charges allows the use of short dual-labeled probes that significantly improve single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping. Longer ZNA probes were shown to display reduced background fluorescence, therefore, generating greater sensitivity and signal level as compared to standard probes. ZNA probes thus provide broad flexibility in assay design and also represent an effective alternative to minor groove binder- and locked nucleic-acid-containing probes. PMID:20071749

  6. Mechanism of the positive effect of poly(ethylene glycol) addition in enzymatic hydrolysis of steam pretreated lignocelluloses.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Bálint; Szilágyi, Mátyás; Sebestyén, Zoltán; Perazzini, Raffaella; Dienes, Dóra; Jakab, Emma; Crestini, Claudia; Réczey, Kati

    2011-11-01

    The efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulses can be increased by addition of surfactants and polymers, such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The effect of PEG addition on the cellulase adsorption was tested on various steam pretreated lignocellulose substrates (spruce, willow, hemp, corn stover, wheat straw, sweet sorghum bagasse). A positive effect of PEG addition was observed, as protein adsorption has decreased and free enzyme activities (FP, β-glucosidase) have increased due to the additive. However, the degree of enhancement differed among the substrates, being highest on steam pretreated spruce. Results of lignin analysis (pyrolysis-GC/MS, (31)P NMR) suggest that the effect of PEG addition is in connection with the amount of unsubstituted phenolic hydroxyl groups of lignin in the substrate. Adsorption experiments using two commercial enzyme preparations, Celluclast 1.5L (Trichoderma reesei cellulase) and Novozym 188 (Aspergillus niger β-glucosidase) suggested that enzyme origins affected on the adsorptivity of β-glucosidases.

  7. Biomass pretreatment affects Ustilago maydis in producing itaconic acid

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the last years, the biotechnological production of platform chemicals for fuel components has become a major focus of interest. Although ligno-cellulosic material is considered as suitable feedstock, the almost inevitable pretreatment of this recalcitrant material may interfere with the subsequent fermentation steps. In this study, the fungus Ustilago maydis was used to produce itaconic acid as platform chemical for the synthesis of potential biofuels such as 3-methyltetrahydrofuran. No studies, however, have investigated how pretreatment of ligno-cellulosic biomass precisely influences the subsequent fermentation by U. maydis. Thus, this current study aims to first characterize U. maydis in shake flasks and then to evaluate the influence of three exemplary pretreatment methods on the cultivation and itaconic acid production of this fungus. Cellulose enzymatically hydrolysed in seawater and salt-assisted organic-acid catalysed cellulose were investigated as substrates. Lastly, hydrolysed hemicellulose from fractionated beech wood was applied as substrate. Results U. maydis was characterized on shake flask level regarding its itaconic acid production on glucose. Nitrogen limitation was shown to be a crucial condition for the production of itaconic acid. For itaconic acid concentrations above 25 g/L, a significant product inhibition was observed. Performing experiments that simulated influences of possible pretreatment methods, U. maydis was only slightly affected by high osmolarities up to 3.5 osmol/L as well as of 0.1 M oxalic acid. The production of itaconic acid was achieved on pretreated cellulose in seawater and on the hydrolysed hemicellulosic fraction of pretreated beech wood. Conclusion The fungus U. maydis is a promising producer of itaconic acid, since it grows as single cells (yeast-like) in submerged cultivations and it is extremely robust in high osmotic media and real seawater. Moreover, U. maydis can grow on the hemicellulosic fraction

  8. Comparison between liquid and solid acids catalysts on reducing sugars conversion from furfural residues via pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Lin, Keying; Ma, Baojun; Sun, Yuan; Liu, Wanyi

    2014-09-01

    Liquid sulphuric acid is adopted and compared with carbon-based sulfonated solid acids (coal tar-based and active carbon-based) for furfural residues conversion into reducing sugars. The optimum hydrolysis conditions of liquid acid are at 4% of sulphuric acid, 25:1 of liquid and solid ratio, 175°C of reaction temperature and 120 min of reaction time. The reducing sugar yields are reached over 60% on liquid acid via NaOH/H2O2, NaOH/microwave and NaOH/ultrasonic pretreatments, whereas only over 30% on solid acids. The TOFs (turnover number frequency) via NaOH/H2O2 pretreatments are 0.093, 0.020 and 0.023 h(-1) for liquid sulphuric acid, coal tar-based and active carbon-based solid acids catalysts, respectively. Considering the efficiency, cost and environment factors, the liquid and solid acids have their own advantages of potential commercial application values.

  9. Robustness of two-step acid hydrolysis procedure for composition analysis of poplar.

    PubMed

    Bhagia, Samarthya; Nunez, Angelica; Wyman, Charles E; Kumar, Rajeev

    2016-09-01

    The NREL standard procedure for lignocellulosic biomass composition has two steps: primary hydrolysis in 72% wt sulfuric acid at 30°C for 1h followed by secondary hydrolysis of the slurry in 4wt% acid at 121°C for 1h. Although pointed out in the NREL procedure, the impact of particle size on composition has never been shown. In addition, the effects of primary hydrolysis time and separation of solids prior to secondary hydrolysis on composition have never been shown. Using poplar, it was found that particle sizes less than 0.250mm significantly lowered the glucan content and increased the Klason lignin but did not affect xylan, acetate, or acid soluble lignin contents. Composition was unaffected for primary hydrolysis time between 30 and 90min. Moreover, separating solids prior to secondary hydrolysis had negligible effect on composition suggesting that lignin and polysaccharides are completely separated in the primary hydrolysis stage. PMID:27282557

  10. Simulation of acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic residues to fermentable sugars for bioethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidiras, Dimitris

    2012-12-01

    The dilute acid hydrolysis of fir sawdust with sulfuric acid was undertaken in a batch reactor system (autoclave). The experimental data and reaction kinetic analysis indicate that this is a potential process for cellulose and hemicelluloses hydrolysis, due to a rapid hydrolysis reaction for acid concentration 0.045 N at 160-180°C. It was found that significant sugar degradation occurred at these conditions. The optimum conditions gave a yield of 38% total fermentable sugars. The kinetics of dilute acid hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloses (polysaccharides) were simulated using four pseudo-kinetic models. The reaction rate constants were calculated in each case.

  11. Effect of pelleting on the recalcitrance and bioconversion of dilute-acid pretreated corn stover

    SciTech Connect

    Allison E Ray; Amber Hoover; Gary Gresham

    2012-07-01

    Background: Knowledge regarding the performance of densified biomass in biochemical processes is limited. The effects of densification on biochemical conversion are explored here. Methods: Pelleted corn stover samples were generated from bales that were milled to 6.35 mm. Low-solids acid pretreatment and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation were performed to evaluate pretreatment efficacy and ethanol yields achieved for pelleted and ground stover (6.35 mm and 2 mm) samples. Both pelleted and 6.35-mm ground stover were evaluated using a ZipperClave® reactor under high-solids, process-relevant conditions for multiple pretreatment severities (Ro), followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the washed, pretreated solids. Results: Monomeric xylose yields were significantly higher for pellets (approximately 60%) than for ground formats (approximately 38%). Pellets achieved approximately 84% of theoretical ethanol yield (TEY); ground stover formats had similar profiles, reaching approximately 68% TEY. Pelleting corn stover was not detrimental to pretreatment efficacy for both low- and high-solids conditions, and even enhanced ethanol yields.

  12. Optimization of thermal-dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment for enhancement of methane production from cassava residues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghua; Tang, Lei; Zhang, Jianhua; Mao, Zhonggui; Jiang, Li

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the pretreatment of cassava residues by thermal-dilute sulfuric acid (TDSA) hydrolysis was investigated by means of a statistically designed set of experiments. A three-factor central composite design (CCD) was employed to identify the optimum pretreatment condition of cassava residues for methane production. The individual and interactive effects of temperature, H(2)SO(4) concentration and reaction time on increase of methane yield (IMY) were evaluated by applying response surface methodology (RSM). After optimization, the resulting optimum pretreatment condition was 157.84°C, utilizing 2.99% (w/w TS) H(2)SO(4) for 20.15 min, where the maximum methane yield (248 mL/g VS) was 56.96% higher than the control (158 mL/g VS), which was very close to the predict value 56.53%. These results indicate the model obtained through RSM analysis is suit to predict the optimum pretreatment condition and there is great potential of using TDSA pretreatment of cassava residues to enhance methane yield.

  13. Kinetic characterization for dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of timber varieties and switchgrass.

    PubMed

    Yat, Shu Chiang; Berger, Alan; Shonnard, David R

    2008-06-01

    Hydrolysis of four timber species (aspen, balsam fir, basswood, and red maple) and switchgrass was studied using dilute sulfuric acid at 50 g dry biomass/L under similar conditions previously described as acid pretreatment. The primary goal was to obtain detailed kinetic data of xylose formation and degradation from a match between a first order reaction model and the experimental data at various final reactor temperatures (160-190 degrees C), sulfuric acid concentrations (0.25-1.0% w/v), and particle sizes (28-10/20 mesh) in a glass-lined 1L well-mixed batch reactor. Reaction rates for the generation of xylose from hemicellulose and the generation of furfural from xylose were strongly dependent on both temperature and acid concentration. However, no effect was observed for the particle sizes studied. Oligomer sugars, representing incomplete products of hydrolysis, were observed early in the reaction period for all sugars (xylose, glucose, arabinose, mannose, and galactose), but were reduced to low concentrations at later times (higher hemicellulose conversions). Maximum yields for xylose ranged from 70% (balsam) to 94% (switchgrass), for glucose from 10.6% to 13.6%, and for other minor sugars from 8.6% to 58.9%. Xylose formation activation energies and the pre-exponential factors for the timber species and switchgrass were in a range of 49-180 kJ/mol and from 7.5 x 10(4) to 2.6 x 10(20)min(-1), respectively. In addition, for xylose degradation, the activation energies and the pre-exponential factors ranged from 130 to 170 kJ/mol and from 6.8 x 10(13) to 3.7 x 10(17)min(-1), respectively. There was a near linear dependence on acid concentration observed for xylose degradation. Our results suggest that mixtures of biomass species may be processed together and still achieve high yields for all species. PMID:17904838

  14. Recycle of enzymes and substrate following enzymatic hydrolysis of steam-pretreated aspenwood.

    PubMed

    Mes-Hartree, M; Hogan, C M; Saddler, J N

    1987-09-01

    The commercial production of chemicals and fuels from lignocellulosic residues by enzymatic means still requires considerable research on both the technical and economic aspects. Two technical problems that have been identified as requiring further research are the recycle of the enzymes used in hydrolysis and the reuse of the re calcitrant cellulose remaining after incomplete hydrolysis. Enzyme recycle is required to lower the cost of the enzymes, while the reuse of the spent cellulose will lower the feedstock cost. The conversion process studied was a combined enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation (CHF) procedure that utilized the cellulolytic enzymes derived from the fungus Trichoderma harzianum E58 and the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The rate and extent of hydrolysis and ethanol production was monitored as was the activity and hydrolytic potential of the enzymes remaining in the filtrate after the hydrolysis period. When a commercial cellulose was used as the substrate for a routine 2-day CHF process, 60% of the original treated, water-extracted aspenwood was used as the substrate, only 13% of the original filter paper activity was detected after a similar procedure. The combination of 60% spent enzymes with 40% fresh enzymes resulted in the production of 30% less reducing sugars than the original enzyme mixture. Since 100% hydrolysis of the cellulose portion is seldom accomplished in an enzymatic hydrolysis pro cess, the residual cellulose was used as a substrate for the growth of T. harzianum E58 and production of celulolytic enzymes. The residue remaining after the CHF process was used as a substrate for the production of the cellulolytic enzymes. The production of enzymes from the residue of the Solka Floc hydrolysis was greater than the production of enzymes from the original Solka Floc.

  15. Biological pretreatment of corn stover with white-rot fungus for enzymatic hydrolysis and bioethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pretreatment, as the first step towards conversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks to biofuels and/or chemicals remains one of the main barriers to commercial success. Typically, harsh methods are used to pretreat lignocellulosic biomass prior to its breakdown to sugars by enzymes, which also result ...

  16. Effect of cation-exchange pretreatment of aqueous soil extracts on the gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric determination of nerve agent hydrolysis products after tert.-butyldimethylsilylation.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, M; Tsunoda, N; Ohta, H; Tsuge, K; Takesako, H; Seto, Y

    1998-10-23

    The efficiency of pretreatment of aqueous soil extracts using a cation-exchange resin has been investigated by gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) determination of nerve agent hydrolysis products after tert.-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) derivatization. An aqueous solution containing methylphosphonic acid (MPA) and its monoalkyl esters, ethyl methylphosphonic acid, isopropyl methylphosphonic acid and pinacolyl methylphosphonic acid, was dried, and these phosphonic acids were derivatized with N-methyl-N-(tert.-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoro-acetamide and analyzed by GC-MS. The yields of TBDMS derivatives were significantly decreased by the addition of calcium and magnesium ions to an aqueous solution (approximately 0.5 mM) before derivatization. The extent of lowered yields was related to the hydrophilicity of phosphonic acids. MPA and its monoalkyl esters were spiked into soil samples (sand, alluvial soil and volcanic ash soil), extracted with distilled water, dried, silylated and applied to GC-MS. The yields of TBDMS derivatives of monoalkyl esters from soil samples were low (3-42%) and MPA derivative was scarcely detected (yield: < 0.7%). By desalting the aqueous soil extract by passage through a strong cation-exchange resin, the yields of TBDMS derivatives of monoalkyl esters were significantly improved (12-69%) and MPA derivative was detected (yield: 2-36%). The extent of improved yields was related to the concentrations of divalent metal cations in aqueous soil extracts. In combination with desalting by the cation-exchange resin, GC-MS after TBDMS derivatization enables detection of nerve agent hydrolysis products in soils at sub-ppm (0.2 microgram/g) concentrations. PMID:9818434

  17. Effect of acid hydrolysis on starch structure and functionality: a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Copeland, Les

    2015-01-01

    Acid hydrolysis is an important chemical modification that can significantly change the structural and functional properties of starch without disrupting its granular morphology. A deep understanding of the effect of acid hydrolysis on starch structure and functionality is of great importance for starch scientific research and its industrial applications. During acid hydrolysis, amorphous regions are hydrolyzed preferentially, which enhances the crystallinity and double helical content of acid hydrolyzed starch. This review discusses current understanding of the effect of acid hydrolysis on starch structure and functionality. The effects of acid hydrolysis on amylose content, chain length distribution of amylopectin molecules, molecular and crystalline organization (including lamellar structure) and granular morphology are considered. Functional properties discussed include swelling power, gelatinization, retrogradation, pasting, gel texture, and in vitro enzyme digestibility. The paper also highlights some promising applications of acid hydrolyzed starch (starch nanocrystals) in the preparation of biodegradable nanocomposites, bio-hydrogen, and slowly digestible starch-based healthy foods.

  18. Effects of Dilute Acid Pretreatment on Cellulose DP and the Relationship Between DP Reduction and Cellulose Digestibility

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Chen, X.; Tucker, M.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.

    2012-01-01

    The degree of polymerization(DP) of cellulose is considered to be one of the most important properties affecting the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Various pure cellulosic and biomass materials have been used in a study of the effect of dilute acid treatment on cellulose DP. A substantial reduction in DP was found for all pure cellulosic materials studied even at conditions that would be considered relatively mild for pretreatment. The effect of dilute acid pretreatment on cellulose DP in biomass samples was also investigated. Corn stover pretreated with dilute acid under the most optimal conditions contained cellulose with a DPw in the range of 1600{approx}3500, which is much higher than the level-off DP(DPw 150{approx}300) obtained with pure celluloses. The effect of DP reduction on the saccharification of celluloses was also studied. From this study it does not appear that cellulose DP is a main factor affecting cellulose saccharification.

  19. Solar assisted alkali pretreatment of garden biomass: Effects on lignocellulose degradation, enzymatic hydrolysis, crystallinity and ultra-structural changes in lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Gabhane, Jagdish; William, S P M Prince; Vaidya, Atul N; Das, Sera; Wate, Satish R

    2015-06-01

    A comprehensive study was carried out to assess the effectiveness of solar assisted alkali pretreatment (SAAP) on garden biomass (GB). The pretreatment efficiency was assessed based on lignocellulose degradation, conversion of cellulose into reducing sugars, changes in the ultra-structure and functional groups of lignocellulose and impact on the crystallinity of cellulose, etc. SAAP was found to be efficient for the removal of lignin and hemicellulose that facilitated enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. FTIR and XRD studies provided details on the effectiveness of SAAP on lignocellulosic moiety and crystallinity of cellulose. Scanning electron microscopic analysis showed ultra-structural disturbances in the microfibrils of GB as a result of pretreatment. The mass balance closer of 97.87% after pretreatment confirmed the reliability of SAAP pretreatment. Based on the results, it is concluded that SAAP is not only an efficient means of pretreatment but also economical as it involved no energy expenditure for heat generation during pretreatment.

  20. Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Simultaneous Extraction for Preparation of Genipin from Bark of Eucommia ulmoides after Ultrasound, Microwave Pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Lili; Guo, Yupin; Zhao, Lianfei; Zu, Yuangang; Gu, Huiyan; Yang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    A continuous process based on the combination of ultrasounds and/or microwaves pretreatments followed by enzymatic hydrolysis and simultaneous extraction (EHSE) has been proposed to recover genipin from Eucommia ulmoides bark. At first, in the pretreatment step, the mixture of 1.0 g dried bark powder and 10 mL deionized water were irradiated by microwave under 500 W for 10 min. Then, in hydrolysis step, the optimal conditions were as follows: 0.5 mg/mL of cellulase concentration, 4.0 pH of enzyme solution, 24 h of incubation time and 40 °C of incubation temperature. After incubation, 10 mL ethanol was added to extract genipin for 30 min by ultrasound. After EHSE treatment, the yield of genipin could reach 1.71 μmol/g. Moreover, scanning electron micrographs illustrated that severe structural disruption of plant was obtained by EHSE. The results indicated that the EHSE method provided a good alternative for the preparation of genipin from Eucommia ulmoides bark as well as other herbs.

  1. A novel combined pretreatment of ball milling and microwave irradiation for enhancing enzymatic hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huadong; Li, Hongqiang; Luo, Hao; Xu, Jian

    2013-02-01

    Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was performed as a mode substrate to investigate its potential ability of bioconversion in a novel combined pretreatment of ball milling (BM) and/or microwave irradiation (MWI). The variation of structure characteristics of MCC before/after pretreatment were investigated, including crystallinity index (CrI), size of crystal (S(C)), specific surface area (SSA) and degree of polymerization (DP). Their correlation with the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis was differentiated by an optimized equation which indicated the rate of hydrolysis was much more sensitive to CrI than SSA and DP. To achieve the same or higher glucose yield of BM for 3h and 6h, BM for 1h with MWI for 20min could save 54.8% and 77.40% energy consumption, respectively. Moreover, chemicals were not required in this process. It is concluded that the combination of BM and short time MWI is an environment-friendly, economical and effective approach to treat biomass. PMID:23306114

  2. Combined deacetylation and PFI refining pretreatment of corn cob for the improvement of a two-stage enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuedong; Mu, Xindong; Wang, Haisong; Li, Bin; Peng, Hui

    2014-05-21

    A combined deacetylation and PFI refining pretreatment was applied to corn cob for the improvement of a two-stage enzymatic hydrolysis. In stage 1, the pretreated corn cob was first hydrolyzed by xylanase to produce xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS). In stage 2, the solid residue isolated from stage 1 was further hydrolyzed by cellulase and β-glucosidase. NaOH, Na2CO3, and Ca(OH)2 were tested to remove acetyl groups in the process of deacetylation, and it was found that Ca(OH)2 could be the most suitable alkali for deacetylation in this work. After deacetylation using 0.8 mmol of Ca(OH)2/g of substrate and PFI refining, 50.5% xylan in the raw material could be hydrolyzed into XOS. The corresponding xylan yield of stage 1, the glucan yield of stage 2, and the total sugar yield (all sugars released in the hydrolyzate) after the two-stage enzymatic hydrolysis were 0.306, 0.305, and 0.661 g/g of corn cob, respectively. PMID:24810587

  3. Catalytic hydrothermal pretreatment of corncob into xylose and furfural via solid acid catalyst.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiling; Deng, Aojie; Ren, Junli; Liu, Changyu; Lu, Qi; Zhong, Linjie; Peng, Feng; Sun, Runcang

    2014-04-01

    Selectively catalytic hydrothermal pretreatment of corncob into xylose and furfural has been developed in this work using solid acid catalyst (SO4(2-)/TiO2-ZrO2/La(3+)). The effects of corncob-to-water ratio, reaction temperature and residence time on the performance of catalytic hydrothermal pretreatment were investigated. Results showed that the solid residues contained mainly lignin and cellulose, which was indicative of the efficient removal of hemicelluloses from corncob by hydrothermal method. The prepared catalyst with high thermal stability and strong acid sites originated from the acid functional groups was confirmed to contribute to the hydrolysis of polysaccharides into monosaccharides followed by dehydration into furfural. Highest furfural yield (6.18 g/100g) could be obtained at 180°C for 120 min with 6.80 g/100g xylose yield when the corncob/water ratio of was 10:100. Therefore, selectively catalytic hydrothermal pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass into important platform chemicals by solid acids is considered to be a potential treatment for biodiesel and chemical production.

  4. Steam-explosion pretreatment of wood: effect of chip size, acid, moisture content and pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Brownell, H.H.; Yu, E.K.C.; Saddler, J.N.

    1986-06-01

    Material balances for pentosan, lignin, and hexosan, during steam-explosion pretreatment of aspenwood, showed almost quantitative recovery of cellulose in the water-insoluble fraction. Dilute acid impregnation resulted in more selective hydrolysis of pentosan relative to undesirable pyrolysis, and gave a more accessible substrate for enzymatic hydrolysis. Thermocouple probes, located inside simulated aspenwood chips heated in 240 degrees C-saturated steam, showed rapid heating of air-dry wood, whereas green or impregnated wood heated slowly. Small chips, 3.2 mm in the fiber direction, whether green or air dry gave approximately equal rates of pentosan destruction and solubilization, and similar yields of glucose and of total reducing sugars on enzmatic hydrolysis with Trichoderma harzianum. Partial pyrolysis, destroying one-third of the pentosan of aspenwood at atmospheric pressure by dry steam at 276 degrees C, gave little increase in yield of reducing sugars on enzymatic hydrolysis. Treatment with saturated steam at 240 degrees C gave essentially the same yields of butanediol and ethanol on fermentation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, whether or not 80% of the steam was bled off before explosion and even if the chips remained intact, showing that explosion was unnecessary. 17 references.

  5. Lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment using AFEX.

    PubMed

    Balan, Venkatesh; Bals, Bryan; Chundawat, Shishir P S; Marshall, Derek; Dale, Bruce E

    2009-01-01

    Although cellulose is the most abundant organic molecule, its susceptibility to hydrolysis is restricted due to the rigid lignin and hemicellulose protection surrounding the cellulose micro fibrils. Therefore, an effective pretreatment is necessary to liberate the cellulose from the lignin-hemicellulose seal and also reduce cellulosic crystallinity. Some of the available pretreatment techniques include acid hydrolysis, steam explosion, ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), alkaline wet oxidation, and hot water pretreatment. Besides reducing lignocellulosic recalcitrance, an ideal pretreatment must also minimize formation of degradation products that inhibit subsequent hydrolysis and fermentation. AFEX is an important pretreatment technology that utilizes both physical (high temperature and pressure) and chemical (ammonia) processes to achieve effective pretreatment. Besides increasing the surface accessibility for hydrolysis, AFEX promotes cellulose decrystallization and partial hemicellulose depolymerization and reduces the lignin recalcitrance in the treated biomass. Theoretical glucose yield upon optimal enzymatic hydrolysis on AFEX-treated corn stover is approximately 98%. Furthermore, AFEX offers several unique advantages over other pretreatments, which include near complete recovery of the pretreatment chemical (ammonia), nutrient addition for microbial growth through the remaining ammonia on pretreated biomass, and not requiring a washing step during the process which facilitates high solid loading hydrolysis. This chapter provides a detailed practical procedure to perform AFEX, design the reactor, determine the mass balances, and conduct the process safely.

  6. Use of cellobiohydrolase-free cellulase blends for the hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose and sugarcane bagasse pretreated by either ball milling or ionic liquid [Emim][Ac].

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Ricardo Sposina Sobral; da Silva, Ayla Sant'Ana; Kim, Han-Woo; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Endo, Takashi; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Bon, Elba P S

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the requirement of cellobiohydrolases (CBH) for saccharification of microcrystalline cellulose and sugarcane bagasse pretreated either by ball milling (BM) or by ionic liquid (IL) [Emim][Ac]. Hydrolysis was done using CBH-free blends of Pyrococcus horikoshii endoglucanase (EG) plus Pyrococcus furiosus β-glucosidase (EGPh/BGPf) or Optimash™ BG while Acremonium Cellulase was used as control. IL-pretreated substrates were hydrolyzed more effectively by CBH-free enzymes than were the BM-pretreated substrates. IL-treatment decreased the crystallinity and increased the specific surface area (SSA), whereas BM-treatment decreased the crystallinity without increasing the SSA. The hydrolysis of IL-treated cellulose by EGPh/BGPf showed a saccharification rate of 3.92 g/Lh and a glucose yield of 81% within 9h. These results indicate the efficiency of CBH-free enzymes for the hydrolysis of IL-treated substrates.

  7. Hydrolysis and volatile fatty acids accumulation of waste activated sludge enhanced by the combined use of nitrite and alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Liu, Congcong; Sun, Xiuyun; Sun, Yinglu; Li, Rui; Li, Jiansheng; Shen, Jinyou; Han, Weiqing; Liu, Xiaodong; Wang, Lianjun

    2015-12-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production from anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) is often limited by the slow hydrolysis and/or poor substrate availability. Increased attention has been given to enhance the hydrolysis and acidification of WAS recently. This study presented an efficient and green strategy based on the combined use of nitrite pretreatment and alkaline pH to stimulate hydrolysis and VFA accumulation from WAS. Results showed that both proteins and polysaccharides increased in the presence of nitrite, indicating the enhancement of sludge solubilization and hydrolysis processes. Mechanism investigations showed that nitrite pretreatment could disintegrate the sludge particle and disperse extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Then, anaerobic digestion tests demonstrated VFA production increased with nitrite treatment. The maximal VFA accumulation was achieved with 0.1 g N/L nitrite dosage and pH 10.0 at a sludge retention time (SRT) of 7 days, which was much higher VFA production in comparison with the blank, sole nitrite pretreatment, or sole pH 10. The potential analysis suggested that the combined nitrite pretreatment and alkaline pH is capable of enhancing WAS digestion with a great benefit for biological nutrient removal (BNR).

  8. Investigation of accessory hemicellulases and pectinases for polysaccharide hydrolysis of ionic liquid pretreated biomass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The polysaccharides, cellulose, hemicellulose, and other additional carbohydrate polymers of terrestrial biomass, comprise renewable feedstocks for carbon-based chemicals and fuels. Biomass pretreatment is required to overcome its recalcitrance to biochemical deconstruction to monomeric sugars for ...

  9. Solar assisted alkali pretreatment of garden biomass: Effects on lignocellulose degradation, enzymatic hydrolysis, crystallinity and ultra-structural changes in lignocellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Gabhane, Jagdish; William, S.P.M. Prince; Vaidya, Atul N.; Das, Sera; Wate, Satish R.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • SAAP is an efficient and economic means of pretreatment. • SAAP was found to be efficient in lignin and hemicellulose removal. • SAAP enhanced the enzymatic hydrolysis. • FTIR, XRD and SEM provided vivid understanding about the mode of action of SAAP. • Mass balance closer of 98% for pretreated GB confirmed the reliability of SAAP. - Abstract: A comprehensive study was carried out to assess the effectiveness of solar assisted alkali pretreatment (SAAP) on garden biomass (GB). The pretreatment efficiency was assessed based on lignocellulose degradation, conversion of cellulose into reducing sugars, changes in the ultra-structure and functional groups of lignocellulose and impact on the crystallinity of cellulose, etc. SAAP was found to be efficient for the removal of lignin and hemicellulose that facilitated enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. FTIR and XRD studies provided details on the effectiveness of SAAP on lignocellulosic moiety and crystallinity of cellulose. Scanning electron microscopic analysis showed ultra-structural disturbances in the microfibrils of GB as a result of pretreatment. The mass balance closer of 97.87% after pretreatment confirmed the reliability of SAAP pretreatment. Based on the results, it is concluded that SAAP is not only an efficient means of pretreatment but also economical as it involved no energy expenditure for heat generation during pretreatment.

  10. Saccharification of wheat-straw cellulose by enzymatic hydrolysis following fermentative and chemical pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Detroy, R.W.; Lindenfelser, L.A.; St. Julian, G. Jr.; Orton, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    In our investigations, wheat straw fermentations were conducted using the edible, white-rot fungus commonly known as the oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. ex Fr.) Kummer, as fermentation organism. Fermented substrates were evaluated for degree of lignin and cellulose degradation and saccharification. In addition, since our primary objective in the P. ostreatus fermentation was to increase the amount of availabile cellulose in straw for further fermentation, cellulose hydrolysis rates were determined. Cellulose conversion to fermentable sugar was also determined on chemically modified straws by subjecting them to enzymatic hydrolysis. Progress and extent of delignification was follwed also by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and structural changes were determined in treated-straw substrates.

  11. Pulp properties resulting from different pretreatments of wheat straw and their influence on enzymatic hydrolysis rate.

    PubMed

    Rossberg, Christine; Steffien, Doreen; Bremer, Martina; Koenig, Swetlana; Carvalheiro, Florbela; Duarte, Luís C; Moniz, Patrícia; Hoernicke, Max; Bertau, Martin; Fischer, Steffen

    2014-10-01

    Wheat straw was subjected to three different processes prior to saccharification, namely alkaline pulping, natural pulping and autohydrolysis, in order to study their effect on the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis. Parameters like medium concentration, temperature and time have been varied in order to optimize each method. Milling the raw material to a length of 4mm beforehand showed the best cost-value-ratio compared to other grinding methods studied. Before saccharification the pulp can be stored in dried form, leading to a high yield of glucose. Furthermore the relation of pulp properties (i.e. intrinsic viscosity, Klason-lignin and hemicelluloses content, crystallinity, morphology) to cellulose hydrolysis is discussed.

  12. Effect of ionic liquid pretreatment on the chemical composition, structure and enzymatic hydrolysis of energy cane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zenghui; Aita, Giovanna M; Walker, Michelle S

    2012-08-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are promising solvents for the pretreatment of lignocellulose as they are thermally stable, environmentally friendly, recyclable, and have low volatility. This study evaluated the effect of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([EMIM][OAc]) for the pretreatment of energy cane bagasse in terms of biomass composition, structural changes and enzymatic digestibility. Energy cane bagasse was pretreated with [EMIM][OAc] (5% (w/w)) at 120 °C for 30 min followed by hydrolysis with commercially available enzymes, Spezyme CP and Novozyme 188. IL-treated energy cane bagasse resulted in significant lignin removal (32.0%) with slight glucan and xylan losses (8.8% and 14.0%, respectively), and exhibited a much higher enzymatic digestibility (87.0% and 64.3%) than untreated (5.5% and 2.8%) or water-treated (4.0% and 2.1%) energy cane bagasse in terms of both cellulose and hemicellulose digestibilities, respectively. The enhanced digestibilities of IL-treated biomass can be attributed to delignification and reduction of cellulose crystallinity as confirmed by FTIR and XRD analyses.

  13. Production of cellulosic ethanol from cotton processing residues after pretreatment with dilute sodium hydroxide and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Fockink, Douglas Henrique; Maceno, Marcelo Adriano Corrêa; Ramos, Luiz Pereira

    2015-01-01

    In this study, production of cellulosic ethanol from two cotton processing residues was investigated after pretreatment with dilute sodium hydroxide. Pretreatment performance was investigated using a 2(2) factorial design and the highest glucan conversion was achieved at the most severe alkaline conditions (0.4g NaOH g(-1) of dry biomass and 120°C), reaching 51.6% and 38.8% for cotton gin waste (CGW) and cotton gin dust (CGD), respectively. The susceptibility of pretreated substrates to enzymatic hydrolysis was also investigated and the best condition was achieved at the lowest total solids (5wt%) and the highest enzyme loading (85mg of Cellic CTec2 g(-1) of dry substrate). However, the highest concentration of fermentable sugars - 47.8 and 42.5gL(-1) for CGD and CGW, respectively - was obtained at 15wt% total solids using this same enzyme loading. Substrate hydrolysates had no inhibitory effects on the fermenting microorganism.

  14. Bioconversion of dilute-acid pretreated sorghum bagasse to ethanol by Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Dogaris, Ioannis; Gkounta, Olga; Mamma, Diomi; Kekos, Dimitris

    2012-07-01

    Bioethanol production from sweet sorghum bagasse (SB), the lignocellulosic solid residue obtained after extraction of sugars from sorghum stalks, can further improve the energy yield of the crop. The aim of the present work was to evaluate a cost-efficient bioconversion of SB to ethanol at high solids loadings (16 % at pretreatment and 8 % at fermentation), low cellulase activities (1-7 FPU/g SB) and co-fermentation of hexoses and pentoses. The fungus Neurospora crassa DSM 1129 was used, which exhibits both depolymerase and co-fermentative ability, as well as mixed cultures with Saccharomyces cerevisiae 2541. A dilute-acid pretreatment (sulfuric acid 2 g/100 g SB; 210 °C; 10 min) was implemented, with high hemicellulose decomposition and low inhibitor formation. The bioconversion efficiency of N. crassa was superior to S. cerevisiae, while their mixed cultures had negative effect on ethanol production. Supplementing the in situ produced N. crassa cellulolytic system (1.0 FPU/g SB) with commercial cellulase and β-glucosidase mixture at low activity (6.0 FPU/g SB) increased ethanol production to 27.6 g/l or 84.7 % of theoretical yield (based on SB cellulose and hemicellulose sugar content). The combined dilute-acid pretreatment and bioconversion led to maximum cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysis 73.3 % and 89.6 %, respectively. PMID:22573272

  15. Can Delignification Decrease Cellulose Digestibility in Acid Pretreated Corn Stover?

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizawa, C. I.; Jeoh, T.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.; Davis, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the improved digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover is at least partially due to the removal of xylan and the consequent increase in accessibility of the cellulose to cellobiohydrolase enzymes. We now report on the impact that lignin removal has on the accessibility and digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover. Samples of corn stover were subjected to dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment with and without simultaneous (partial) lignin removal. In addition, some samples were completely delignified after the pretreatment step using acidified sodium chlorite. The accessibility and digestibility of the samples were tested using a fluorescence-labeled cellobiohydrolase (Trichoderma reesei Cel7A) purified from a commercial cellulase preparation. Partial delignification of corn stover during dilute acid pretreatment was shown to improve cellulose digestibility by T. reesei Cel7A; however, decreasing the lignin content below 5% (g g{sup -1}) by treatment with acidified sodium chlorite resulted in a dramatic reduction in cellulose digestibility. Importantly, this effect was found to be enhanced in samples with lower xylan contents suggesting that the near complete removal of xylan and lignin may cause aggregation of the cellulose microfibrils resulting in decreased cellulase accessibility.

  16. Breakdown of hierarchical architecture in cellulose during dilute acid pretreatments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Inouye, Hideyo; Yang, Lin; Himmel, Michael E.; Tucker, Melvin; Makowski, Lee

    2015-02-28

    Cellulose can work as a feedstock for sustainable bioenergy because of its global abundance. Pretreatment of biomass has significant influence on the chemical availability of cellulose locked in recalcitrant microfibrils. Optimizing pretreatment depends on an understanding of its impact on the microscale and nanoscale molecular architecture. X-ray scattering experiments have been performed on native and pre-treated maize stover and models of cellulose architecture have been derived from these data. Ultra small-angle, very small-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS, VSAXS and SAXS) probe three different levels of architectural scale. USAXS and SAXS have been used to study cellulose at two distinct length scales, modeling the fibrils as ~30 Å diameter rods packed into ~0.14 μm diameter bundles. VSAXS is sensitive to structural features at length scales between these two extremes. Detailed analysis of diffraction patterns from untreated and pretreated maize using cylindrical Guinier plots and the derivatives of these plots reveals the presence of substructures within the ~0.14 μm diameter bundles that correspond to grouping of cellulose approximately 30 nm in diameter. These sub-structures are resilient to dilute acid pretreatments but are sensitive to pretreatment when iron sulfate is added. Our results provide evidence of the hierarchical arrangement of cellulose at three length scales and the evolution of these arrangements during pre-treatments.

  17. Breakdown of hierarchical architecture in cellulose during dilute acid pretreatments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Inouye, Hideyo; Yang, Lin; Himmel, Michael E.; Tucker, Melvin; Makowski, Lee

    2015-02-28

    Cellulose is an attractive candidate as a feedstock for sustainable bioenergy because of its global abundance. Pretreatment of biomass has significant influence on the chemical availability of cellulose locked in recalcitrant microfibrils. Optimizing pretreatment depends on an understanding of its impact on the microscale and nanoscale molecular architecture. X-ray scattering experiments have been performed on native and pre-treated maize stover and models of cellulose architecture have been derived from these data. Ultra small-angle, very small-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS, VSAXS and SAXS) probe three different levels of architectural scale. USAXS and SAXS have been used to study cellulose at two distinct length scales, modeling the fibrils as ~30 Å diameter rods packed into ~0.14 μm diameter bundles. VSAXS is sensitive to structural features at length scales between these two extremes. Detailed analysis of diffraction patterns from untreated and pretreated maize using cylindrical Guinier plots and the derivatives of these plots reveals the presence of substructures within the ~0.14 μm diameter bundles that correspond to grouping of cellulose approximately 30 nm in diameter. These sub-structures are resilient to dilute acid pretreatments but are sensitive to pretreatment when iron sulfate is added. Lastly, these results provide evidence of the hierarchical arrangement of cellulose at three length scales and the evolution of these arrangements during pre-treatments.

  18. Production of fermentable sugars from corn fiber using soaking in aqueous ammonia (saa) pretreatment and fermentation to succinic acid by Escherichia coli afp184

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conversion of corn fiber (CF), a by-product from the corn-to-ethanol conversion process, into fermentable sugar and succinic acid was investigated using soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) pretreatment followed by biological conversions including enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation using genetically ...

  19. Comparison of Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Acid Hydrolysis of Sterol Glycosides from Foods Rich in Δ(7)-Sterols.

    PubMed

    Münger, Linda H; Jutzi, Sabrina; Lampi, Anna-Maija; Nyström, Laura

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we present the difference in sterol composition of extracted steryl glycosides (SG) hydrolyzed by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis. SG were analyzed from foods belonging to the plant families Cucurbitaceae (melon and pumpkin seeds) and Amaranthaceae (amaranth and beetroot), both of which are dominated by Δ(7)-sterols. Released sterols were quantified by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). All Δ(7)-sterols identified (Δ(7)-stigmastenyl, spinasteryl, Δ(7)-campesteryl, Δ(7)-avenasteryl, poriferasta-7,25-dienyl and poriferasta-7,22,25-trienyl glucoside) underwent isomerization under acidic conditions and high temperature. Sterols with an ethylidene or methylidene side chain were found to form multiple artifacts. The artifact sterols coeluted with residues of incompletely isomerized Δ(7)-sterols, or Δ(5)-sterols if present, and could be identified as Δ(8(14))-sterols on the basis of relative retention time, and their MS spectra as trimethylsilyl (TMS) and acetate derivatives. For instance, SG from melon were composed of 66% Δ(7)-stigmastenol when enzymatic hydrolysis was performed, whereas with acid hydrolysis only 8% of Δ(7)-stigmastenol was determined. The artifact of Δ(7)-stigmastenol coeluted with residual non-isomerized spinasterol, demonstrating the high risk of misinterpretation of compositional data obtained after acid hydrolysis. Therefore, the accurate composition of SG from foods containing sterols with a double bond at C-7 can only be obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis or by direct analysis of the intact SG.

  20. Combined Dilute Acid and Solvent Based Pretreatment of Agricultural Wastes for Efficient Lignocellulosic Fractionation and Biofuels Production

    SciTech Connect

    Brodeur, G.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Wilson, C.; Telotte, J.; Collier, J.; Stickel, J.

    2013-01-01

    A true biorefinery for processing lignocellulosic biomass should achieve maximum utilization of all major constituents (cellulose, hemicellulose, & lignin) within the feedstock. In this work a combined pretreatment process of dilute acid (DA) and N-methyl morpholine N-oxide (NMMO) is described that allows for both fractionation and subsequent complete hydrolysis of the feedstocks (corn stover and sugarcane bagasse). During this multi-step processing, the dilute acid pretreatment solubilizes the majority (>90%) of the hemicellulosic fraction, while the NMMO treatment yields a cellulosic fraction that is completely digestible within 48 hours at low enzyme loadings. With both the cellulosic and hemicellulosic fractions being converted into separate, dissolved sugar fractions, the remaining portion is nearly pure lignin. When used independently, DA and NMMO pretreatments are only able to achieve ~80% and ~45% cellulosic conversion, respectively. Mass balance calculations along with experimental results are used to illustrate the feasibility of separation and recycling of NMMO.

  1. Breakdown of Cell Wall Nanostructure in Dilute Acid Pretreated Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Urban, Volker S; Heller, William T; McGaughey, Joseph; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Foston, Marcus B; Myles, Dean A A; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Evans, Barbara R

    2010-01-01

    The generation of bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass holds great promise for renewable and clean energy production. A better understanding of the complex mechanisms of lignocellulose breakdown during various pretreatment methods is needed to realize this potential in a cost and energy efficient way. Here, we use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to characterize morphological changes in switchgrass lignocellulose across molecular to sub-micron length scales resulting from the industrially-relevant dilute acid pretreatment method. Our results demonstrate that dilute acid pretreatment increases the cross-sectional radius of the crystalline cellulose fibril. This change is accompanied by removal of hemicellulose and the formation of Rg ~ 135 lignin aggregates. The structural signature of smooth cell wall surfaces is observed at length scales larger than 1000 , and it remains remarkably invariable during pretreatment. This study elucidates the interplay of the different biomolecular components in the break down process of switchgrass by dilute acid pretreatment. The results are important for the development of efficient strategies of biomass to biofuel conversion.

  2. Research on the stability of heavy metals (Cu, Zn) in excess sludge with the pretreatment of thermal hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huimin; Li, Meng; Zhang, Lei; Sheng, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Thermal hydrolysis (TH) has been used to improve anaerobic digestion performance as well as the stability of heavy metals in sludge. Because the toxicity of heavy metals is closely related to both the concentration and the chemical speciation, more exhaustive studies on speciation distribution are urgently needed. This research aimed to investigate the effects of TH treatment (especially the time and temperature) on the concentration and stability of heavy metals in sludge, and to define the optimal TH conditions. The TH experiment indicated that the content of the stable form of Cu and Zn reached 83% and 47.4%, respectively, with TH at 210°C and 30 min. Compared with the raw sludge, the proportion of Cu and Zn increased by 11.88% and 7.3%, respectively. Results indicated that the heavy metals were combined with sludge in a more stable form with the pretreatment of TH, which improved the stability of heavy metals. PMID:26901733

  3. Redistribution of Xylan in Maize Cell Walls During Dilute Acid Pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Brunecky, R.; Vinzant, T. B.; Porter, S. E.; Donohoe, B. S.; Johnson, D. K.; Himmel, M. E.

    2009-04-15

    Developing processes for the conversion of biomass for use in transportation fuels production is becoming a critically important economic and engineering challenge. Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising technology for increasing the enzymatic digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass. However, a deeper understanding of the pretreatability of biomass is needed so that the rate of formation and yields of sugars can be increased. Xylan is an important hemicellulosic component of the plant cell wall and acts as a barrier to cellulose, essentially blocking cellulase action. To better understand xylan hydrolysis in corn stover, we have studied changes in the distribution of xylan caused by dilute acid pretreatment using correlative microscopy. A dramatic loss of xylan antibody signal from the center of the cell wall and an increase or retention of xylan at the plasma membrane interface and middle lamella of the cell were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). We also observed a reduction in xylan fluorescence signal by CLSM that is generally consistent with the decrease in xylan content measured experimentally in the bulk sample, however, the compartmentalization of this xylan retention was not anticipated.

  4. Breakdown of hierarchical architecture in cellulose during dilute acid pretreatments

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Yan; Inouye, Hideyo; Yang, Lin; Himmel, Michael E.; Tucker, Melvin; Makowski, Lee

    2015-02-28

    Cellulose is an attractive candidate as a feedstock for sustainable bioenergy because of its global abundance. Pretreatment of biomass has significant influence on the chemical availability of cellulose locked in recalcitrant microfibrils. Optimizing pretreatment depends on an understanding of its impact on the microscale and nanoscale molecular architecture. X-ray scattering experiments have been performed on native and pre-treated maize stover and models of cellulose architecture have been derived from these data. Ultra small-angle, very small-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS, VSAXS and SAXS) probe three different levels of architectural scale. USAXS and SAXS have been used to study cellulose atmore » two distinct length scales, modeling the fibrils as ~30 Å diameter rods packed into ~0.14 μm diameter bundles. VSAXS is sensitive to structural features at length scales between these two extremes. Detailed analysis of diffraction patterns from untreated and pretreated maize using cylindrical Guinier plots and the derivatives of these plots reveals the presence of substructures within the ~0.14 μm diameter bundles that correspond to grouping of cellulose approximately 30 nm in diameter. These sub-structures are resilient to dilute acid pretreatments but are sensitive to pretreatment when iron sulfate is added. Lastly, these results provide evidence of the hierarchical arrangement of cellulose at three length scales and the evolution of these arrangements during pre-treatments.« less

  5. Effects of glycerol on enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production using sugarcane bagasse pretreated by acidified glycerol solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhanying; Wong, Heng H; Albertson, Peter L; Harrison, Mark D; Doherty, William O S; O'Hara, Ian M

    2015-09-01

    In this study, for the first time the effects of glycerol on enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation were investigated. Enzymatic hydrolysis was inhibited slightly with 2.0 wt% glycerol, leading to reduction in glucan digestibility from 84.9% without glycerol to 82.9% (72 h). With 5.0 wt% and 10.0 wt% glycerol, glucan digestibility was reduced by 4.5% and 11.0%, respectively. However, glycerol did not irreversibly inhibit cellulase enzymes. Ethanol fermentation was not affected by glycerol up to 5.0 wt%, but was inhibited slightly at 10.0 wt% glycerol, resulting in reduction in ethanol yield from 86.0% in the absence of glycerol to 83.7% (20 h). Based on the results of laboratory and pilot-scale experiments, it was estimated that 0.142 kg ethanol can be produced from 1.0 kg dry bagasse (a glucan content of 38.0%) after pretreatment with acidified glycerol solution. PMID:26056778

  6. Effects of glycerol on enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production using sugarcane bagasse pretreated by acidified glycerol solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhanying; Wong, Heng H; Albertson, Peter L; Harrison, Mark D; Doherty, William O S; O'Hara, Ian M

    2015-09-01

    In this study, for the first time the effects of glycerol on enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation were investigated. Enzymatic hydrolysis was inhibited slightly with 2.0 wt% glycerol, leading to reduction in glucan digestibility from 84.9% without glycerol to 82.9% (72 h). With 5.0 wt% and 10.0 wt% glycerol, glucan digestibility was reduced by 4.5% and 11.0%, respectively. However, glycerol did not irreversibly inhibit cellulase enzymes. Ethanol fermentation was not affected by glycerol up to 5.0 wt%, but was inhibited slightly at 10.0 wt% glycerol, resulting in reduction in ethanol yield from 86.0% in the absence of glycerol to 83.7% (20 h). Based on the results of laboratory and pilot-scale experiments, it was estimated that 0.142 kg ethanol can be produced from 1.0 kg dry bagasse (a glucan content of 38.0%) after pretreatment with acidified glycerol solution.

  7. Efficiency of pretreatment of aqueous samples using a macroporous strong anion-exchange resin on the determination of nerve gas hydrolysis products by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after tert.-butyldimethylsilylation.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, M; Tsuge, K; Seto, Y

    2000-09-01

    A pretreatment procedure, using a macroporous strong anion-exchange resin (MSA) has been established for the determination of nerve gas hydrolysis products by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after tert.-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) derivatization. Aqueous solutions of methylphosphonic acid (MPA) and three alkyl methylphosphonic acids (AMPAs) (ethyl, isopropyl and pinacolyl methylphosphonic acid), were retained on the MSA column, and then quantitatively eluted with 0.1 M hydrochloric acid. The neutralized column eluate was dried, and MPA and AMPAs were derivatized with N-methyl-N-(tert.-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide and analyzed by GC-MS. The column eluate was also analyzed in order to determine the exact hydrolysis product levels by capillary electrophoresis using borate and benzoate buffer (pH 6). The MSA pretreatment was examined for the clean-up of aqueous extracts of three types of soils and an aqueous solution containing 10% sucrose, which is regarded as model for a typical soft drink, after spiking with MPA and AMPAs. MPA and AMPAs were quantitatively recovered in the MSA eluate fraction from those samples, except for MPA from volcanic acid and alluvial soils. The yields of TBDMS derivatives were remarkably improved, compared with for which no pretreatment was used and also for those in which a strong cation-exchange resin was used. The achieved detection limits of MPA and AMPAs ranged from 0.12 to 0.18 microg/g of soil (S/N=3). The established MSA method was applied to the pretreatment of spiked sea water, two types of beverages, Pepsi Cola and canned coffee. Although the yields of TBDMS derivatives of MPA and AMPAs in sea water (in a range between 44 and 96%) and AMPAs in Pepsi Cola (in a range between 58 and 92%) were rather high, those for MPA in the Pepsi Cola (27%) and those for MPA and AMPAs in the canned coffee (in a range between 5 and 17%) were low.

  8. Efficiency of pretreatment of aqueous samples using a macroporous strong anion-exchange resin on the determination of nerve gas hydrolysis products by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after tert.-butyldimethylsilylation.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, M; Tsuge, K; Seto, Y

    2000-09-01

    A pretreatment procedure, using a macroporous strong anion-exchange resin (MSA) has been established for the determination of nerve gas hydrolysis products by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after tert.-butyldimethylsilyl (TBDMS) derivatization. Aqueous solutions of methylphosphonic acid (MPA) and three alkyl methylphosphonic acids (AMPAs) (ethyl, isopropyl and pinacolyl methylphosphonic acid), were retained on the MSA column, and then quantitatively eluted with 0.1 M hydrochloric acid. The neutralized column eluate was dried, and MPA and AMPAs were derivatized with N-methyl-N-(tert.-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide and analyzed by GC-MS. The column eluate was also analyzed in order to determine the exact hydrolysis product levels by capillary electrophoresis using borate and benzoate buffer (pH 6). The MSA pretreatment was examined for the clean-up of aqueous extracts of three types of soils and an aqueous solution containing 10% sucrose, which is regarded as model for a typical soft drink, after spiking with MPA and AMPAs. MPA and AMPAs were quantitatively recovered in the MSA eluate fraction from those samples, except for MPA from volcanic acid and alluvial soils. The yields of TBDMS derivatives were remarkably improved, compared with for which no pretreatment was used and also for those in which a strong cation-exchange resin was used. The achieved detection limits of MPA and AMPAs ranged from 0.12 to 0.18 microg/g of soil (S/N=3). The established MSA method was applied to the pretreatment of spiked sea water, two types of beverages, Pepsi Cola and canned coffee. Although the yields of TBDMS derivatives of MPA and AMPAs in sea water (in a range between 44 and 96%) and AMPAs in Pepsi Cola (in a range between 58 and 92%) were rather high, those for MPA in the Pepsi Cola (27%) and those for MPA and AMPAs in the canned coffee (in a range between 5 and 17%) were low. PMID:11043790

  9. Optimization of fermentable sugar production from rape straw through hydrothermal acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Tae Su; Oh, Kyeong Keun

    2011-10-01

    Operational conditions for the hydrolysis of rape straw were optimized using the combined severity index (CS), which combines the effects of time, temperature, and acid concentration into a single parameter. The sugar recovery yield was 77.8% of the theoretical yield at a value of CS=1.3. A maximum concentration of xylose of 7.22 g/L was obtained when the straw was treated for 10 min at a low reaction temperature (150 °C) and high acid concentration (pH 1.17). The pentose-rich hydrolyzate exhibited a low concentration of fermentation-inhibiting compounds. The concept of CS can be conveniently and effectively applied for optimization of pretreatments.

  10. Pretreatment of cane bagasse with alkaline hydrogen peroxide for enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and ethanol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Azzam, A.M. )

    1989-01-01

    Pretreatment of the agrocellulosic waste, cane bagasse with alkaline hydrogen peroxide greatly enhances its susceptibility to enzymatic cellulolysis and thus the ethanol production from it. Various process conditions have been studied to optimize the enzymate effectiveness. These conditions include the contact time, the hydrogen peroxide concentration and the pretreatment temperature. Results obtained show, that about 50% of lignin and most of hemicellulose content of can bagasse was solubilized, by 2% alkaline hydrogen peroxide at 30{sup 0}C within 8 h. The cellulose content was consequently increased from 42% in the original cane bagasse to 75% in the oxidized pulp. Saccharification of this pulp residue with cellulase from Trichorderma viride at 45{sup 0}C for 24 h, yielded glucose with 95% efficiency. The efficiency of ethanol production from the insoluble fraction with S. cervisiae was 90% compared to about 50% for untreated cane bagasse.

  11. Comparison of enzymatic and acid hydrolysis of bound flavor compounds in model system and grapes.

    PubMed

    Dziadas, Mariusz; Jeleń, Henryk H

    2016-01-01

    Four synthesized terpenyl-ß-D-glycopyranosides (geranyl, neryl, citronellyl, myrtenyl) were subjected to enzymatic (AR 2000, pH 5.5) and acid (citric buffer, pH 2.5) hydrolysis. Decrease of glycosides was measured by HPLC and the volatiles released--by comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC × GC-ToF-MS). Enzymatic hydrolysis performed for 21 h yielded 100% degree of hydrolysis for all glycosides but citronellyl (97%). Degree of acid hydrolysis was highly dependent on type of aglycone and the conditions. The highest degree was achieved for geraniol, followed by citronellol and nerol. Myrtenylo-ß-D-glycopyranoside was the most resistant glycoside to hydrolysis. Acid hydrolysis degree was also related to temperature/time combination, the highest being for 100 °C and 2 h. In a result of enzymatic hydrolysis 85-91% of total peak areas was terpene aglycone, whereas for acid hydrolysis the area of released terpene aglycone did not exceed 1.3% of total peak area indicating almost complete decomposition/transformation of terpenyl aglycone.

  12. A novel stepwise pretreatment on corn stalk by alkali deacetylation and liquid hot water for enhancing enzymatic hydrolysis and energy utilization efficiency.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Xu, Jian

    2016-06-01

    A novel stepwise pretreatment on corn stalk (CS) by alkali deacetylation combined with liquid hot water (LHW) was investigated to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis. After deacetylated treatment, strength of alkali deacetylation of CS was from 1.79% to 91.34% which was subsequently pretreated by LHW with severity from 3.27 to 4.27. It was found that higher strength of alkali deacetylation could reduce both the degradation of hemicellulose and inhibitors formation in liquid hot water pretreatment (LHWP). Enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency was confirmed to be affected by LHW pretreatment severity (PS) and strength of alkali treatment. This combined pretreatment of alkali deacetylation and LHW could not only increase glucose yield, but also enhance energy utilization efficiency. The maximum enzymatic hydrolysis of 87.55%±3.64 with the ratio of glucose yield to energy input at 50.39gglucosekJ(-1) was obtained when strength of alkali deacetylation at 84.96% with PS at 3.97 were used.

  13. Thermal hydrolysis (TDH) as a pretreatment method for the digestion of organic waste.

    PubMed

    Schieder, D; Schneider, R; Bischof, F

    2000-01-01

    The recycling concept under consideration is based on the process of Thermal Hydrolysis (TDH) followed by an anaerobic digestion. By increasing pressure and temperature the organic part of the waste is split up in a first step into short-chain fragments that are biologically well suited for microorganisms. The following fermentation runs much faster and more complete than in conventional digestion processes and the biogas yield is increased. Left is just a small amount of a solid residue that can be easily dewatered and utilized as surrogate fuel for incineration or as compost additive. The thermal hydrolysis process allows a complete energy recovery from organic waste. During the total procedure more energy sources are produced than are needed for running the plant. The procedure is especially suited for wet organic waste and biosolids that are difficult to compost, such as food scraps, biological waste from compact residential areas and sewage sludge. As a complete disinfection is granted due to the process temperatures the procedure is also suited for carcasses.

  14. Pretreatment methods for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaoyang; Huang, Fang

    2014-09-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass, such as wood, grass, agricultural, and forest residues, are potential resources for the production of bioethanol. The current biochemical process of converting biomass to bioethanol typically consists of three main steps: pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation. For this process, pretreatment is probably the most crucial step since it has a large impact on the efficiency of the overall bioconversion. The aim of pretreatment is to disrupt recalcitrant structures of cellulosic biomass to make cellulose more accessible to the enzymes that convert carbohydrate polymers into fermentable sugars. This paper reviews several leading acidic, neutral, and alkaline pretreatments technologies. Different pretreatment methods, including dilute acid pretreatment (DAP), steam explosion pretreatment (SEP), organosolv, liquid hot water (LHW), ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA), sodium hydroxide/lime pretreatments, and ozonolysis are intensively introduced and discussed. In this minireview, the key points are focused on the structural changes primarily in cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin during the above leading pretreatment technologies.

  15. Modeling of carbonic acid pretreatment process using ASPEN-Plus.

    PubMed

    Jayawardhana, Kemantha; Van Walsum, G Peter

    2004-01-01

    ASPEN-Plus process modeling software is used to model carbonic acid pretreatment of biomass. ASPEN-Plus was used because of the thorough treatment of thermodynamic interactions and its status as a widely accepted process simulator. Because most of the physical property data for many of the key components used in the simulation of pretreatment processes are not available in the standard ASPEN-Plus property databases, values from an in-house database (INHSPCD) developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory were used. The standard non-random-two-liquid (NRTL) or renon route was used as the main property method because of the need to distill ethanol and to handle dissolved gases. The pretreatment reactor was modeled as a "black box" stoichiometric reactor owing to the unavailability of reaction kinetics. The ASPEN-Plus model was used to calculate the process equipment costs, power requirements, and heating and cooling loads. Equipment costs were derived from published modeling studies. Wall thickness calculations were used to predict construction costs for the high-pressure pretreatment reactor. Published laboratory data were used to determine a suitable severity range for the operation of the carbonic acid reactor. The results indicate that combined capital and operating costs of the carbonic acid system are slightly higher than an H2SO4-based system and highly sensitive to reactor pressure and solids concentration.

  16. Insights into the effect of dilute acid, hot water and alkaline pretreatment on cellulose accessible surface area and overall porosity of Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xianzhi; Wells, Tyrone; Sun, Qining; Huang, Fang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-06-19

    Pretreatment is known to render biomass more reactive to cellulase by altering the chemical compositions as well as physical structures of biomass. Simons stain technique along with mercury porosimetry were applied on the acid, neutral, and alkaline pretreated materials to measure the accessible surface area of cellulose and pore size distribution of Populus. Results indicated that acid pretreatment is much more effective than water and alkaline pretreatment in terms of cellulose accessibility increase. Further investigation suggests that lignin does not dictate cellulose accessibility to the extent that hemicellulose does, but it does restrict xylan accessibility which in turn controls the access of cellulase to cellulose. The most interesting finding is that severe acid pretreatment significantly decreases the average pore size, i.e., 90% average size decrease could be observed after 60 min dilute acid pretreatment at 160 °C; moreover, the nano-pore space formed between coated microfibrils is increased after pretreatment, especially for the acid pretreatment, suggesting this particular type of biomass porosity is probably the most fundamental barrier to effective enzymatic hydrolysis.

  17. Insights into the effect of dilute acid, hot water and alkaline pretreatment on cellulose accessible surface area and overall porosity of Populus

    DOE PAGES

    Meng, Xianzhi; Wells, Tyrone; Sun, Qining; Huang, Fang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-06-19

    Pretreatment is known to render biomass more reactive to cellulase by altering the chemical compositions as well as physical structures of biomass. Simons stain technique along with mercury porosimetry were applied on the acid, neutral, and alkaline pretreated materials to measure the accessible surface area of cellulose and pore size distribution of Populus. Results indicated that acid pretreatment is much more effective than water and alkaline pretreatment in terms of cellulose accessibility increase. Further investigation suggests that lignin does not dictate cellulose accessibility to the extent that hemicellulose does, but it does restrict xylan accessibility which in turn controls themore » access of cellulase to cellulose. The most interesting finding is that severe acid pretreatment significantly decreases the average pore size, i.e., 90% average size decrease could be observed after 60 min dilute acid pretreatment at 160 °C; moreover, the nano-pore space formed between coated microfibrils is increased after pretreatment, especially for the acid pretreatment, suggesting this particular type of biomass porosity is probably the most fundamental barrier to effective enzymatic hydrolysis.« less

  18. Phenyllactic acid production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of pretreated sorghum bagasse.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Hideo; Teramura, Hiroshi; Uematsu, Kouji; Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Hirano, Ko; Sazuka, Takashi; Kitano, Hidemi; Tsuge, Yota; Kahar, Prihardi; Niimi-Nakamura, Satoko; Oinuma, Ken-ichi; Takaya, Naoki; Kasuga, Shigemitsu; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-04-01

    Dilute acid-pretreated sorghum bagasse, which was predominantly composed of glucan (59%) and xylose (7.2%), was used as a lignocellulosic feedstock for d-phenyllactic acid (PhLA) production by a recombinant Escherichia coli strain expressing phenylpyruvate reductase from Wickerhamia fluorescens. During fermentation with enzymatic hydrolysate of sorghum bagasse as a carbon source, the PhLA yield was reduced by 35% compared to filter paper hydrolysate, and metabolomics analysis revealed that NAD(P)H regeneration and intracellular levels of erythrose-4-phosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate for PhLA biosynthesis markedly reduced. Compared to separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) with sorghum bagasse hydrolysate, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of sorghum bagasse under glucose limitation conditions yielded 4.8-fold more PhLA with less accumulation of eluted components, including p-coumaric acid and aldehydes, which inhibited PhLA fermentation. These results suggest that gradual enzymatic hydrolysis during SSF enhances PhLA production under glucose limitation and reduces the accumulation of fermentation inhibitors, collectively leading to increased PhLA yield.

  19. Controlling microbial contamination during hydrolysis of AFEX-pretreated corn stover and switchgrass: Effects on hydrolysate composition, microbial response and fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Serate, Jose; Xie, Dan; Pohlmann, Edward; Donald, Jr., Charles; Shabani, Mahboubeh; Hinchman, Li; Higbee, Alan; Mcgee, Mick; La Reau, Alex; Klinger, Grace E.; Li, Sheena; Myers, Chad L.; Boone, Charles; Bates, Donna M.; Cavalier, Dave; Eilert, Dustin; Oates, Lawrence G.; Sanford, Gregg; Sato, Trey K.; Dale, Bruce; Landick, Robert; Piotrowski, Jeff; Ong, Rebecca Garlock; Zhang, Yaoping

    2015-11-14

    Microbial conversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks into biofuels remains an attractive means to produce sustainable energy. It is essential to produce lignocellulosic hydrolysates in a consistent manner in order to study microbial performance in different feedstock hydrolysates. Because of the potential to introduce microbial contamination from the untreated biomass or at various points during the process, it can be difficult to control sterility during hydrolysate production. In this study, we compared hydrolysates produced from AFEX-pretreated corn stover and switchgrass using two different methods to control contamination: either by autoclaving the pretreated feedstocks prior to enzymatic hydrolysis, or by introducing antibiotics during the hydrolysis of non-autoclaved feedstocks. We then performed extensive chemical analysis, chemical genomics, and comparative fermentations to evaluate any differences between these two different methods used for producing corn stover and switchgrass hydrolysates. Autoclaving the pretreated feedstocks could eliminate the contamination for a variety of feedstocks, whereas the antibiotic gentamicin was unable to control contamination consistently during hydrolysis. Compared to the addition of gentamicin, autoclaving of biomass before hydrolysis had a minimal effect on mineral concentrations, and showed no significant effect on the two major sugars (glucose and xylose) found in these hydrolysates. However, autoclaving elevated the concentration of some furanic and phenolic compounds. Chemical genomics analyses using Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains indicated a high correlation between the AFEX-pretreated hydrolysates produced using these two methods within the same feedstock, indicating minimal differences between the autoclaving and antibiotic methods. Comparative fermentations with S. cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis also showed that autoclaving the AFEX-pretreated feedstocks had no significant effects on microbial performance in

  20. Controlling microbial contamination during hydrolysis of AFEX-pretreated corn stover and switchgrass: Effects on hydrolysate composition, microbial response and fermentation

    DOE PAGES

    Serate, Jose; Xie, Dan; Pohlmann, Edward; Donald, Jr., Charles; Shabani, Mahboubeh; Hinchman, Li; Higbee, Alan; Mcgee, Mick; La Reau, Alex; Klinger, Grace E.; et al

    2015-11-14

    Microbial conversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks into biofuels remains an attractive means to produce sustainable energy. It is essential to produce lignocellulosic hydrolysates in a consistent manner in order to study microbial performance in different feedstock hydrolysates. Because of the potential to introduce microbial contamination from the untreated biomass or at various points during the process, it can be difficult to control sterility during hydrolysate production. In this study, we compared hydrolysates produced from AFEX-pretreated corn stover and switchgrass using two different methods to control contamination: either by autoclaving the pretreated feedstocks prior to enzymatic hydrolysis, or by introducing antibiotics duringmore » the hydrolysis of non-autoclaved feedstocks. We then performed extensive chemical analysis, chemical genomics, and comparative fermentations to evaluate any differences between these two different methods used for producing corn stover and switchgrass hydrolysates. Autoclaving the pretreated feedstocks could eliminate the contamination for a variety of feedstocks, whereas the antibiotic gentamicin was unable to control contamination consistently during hydrolysis. Compared to the addition of gentamicin, autoclaving of biomass before hydrolysis had a minimal effect on mineral concentrations, and showed no significant effect on the two major sugars (glucose and xylose) found in these hydrolysates. However, autoclaving elevated the concentration of some furanic and phenolic compounds. Chemical genomics analyses using Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains indicated a high correlation between the AFEX-pretreated hydrolysates produced using these two methods within the same feedstock, indicating minimal differences between the autoclaving and antibiotic methods. Comparative fermentations with S. cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis also showed that autoclaving the AFEX-pretreated feedstocks had no significant effects on microbial

  1. Effect of an acid filler on hydrolysis and biodegradation of poly-lactic acid (PLA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iozzino, Valentina; Speranza, Vito; Pantani, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    The use of biodegradable polymers is certainly an excellent strategy to solve many of the problems related to the disposal of the traditional polymers, whose accumulation in the environment is harmful and damaging. In order to optimize the use of biodegradable polymers, it is very important to understand and control the transformation processes, the structures and the morphologies resulting from the process conditions used to produce the articles and, not least, the biodegradation. The latter is strictly dependent on the just mentioned variables. The poly-lactic acid, PLA, is a biodegradable polymer. Many studies have been carried out on the degradation process of this polymer. In the course of this work we performed degradation tests on the PLA, with a specific D-isomer content, having amorphous structure, and in particular of biodegradation and hydrolysis. An acid chemical, fumaric acid, was added to PLA with the objective of controlling the rate of hydrolysis and of biodegradation. The hydrolysis process was followed, as function of time, by means of different techniques: pH variation, variation of weight of samples and variation of crystallinity degree and glass transition temperature using DSC analysis. The samples were also analyzed in terms of biodegradability by means of a homemade respirometer apparatus, in controlled composting conditions.

  2. A process economic approach to develop a dilute-acid cellulose hydrolysis process to produce ethanol from biomass.

    PubMed

    Nagle, N; Ibsen, K; Jennings, E

    1999-01-01

    Successful deployment of a bioethanol process depends on the integration of technologies that can be economically commercialized. Pretreatment and fermentation operations of the traditional enzymatic bioethanol-production process constitute the largest portion of the capital and operating costs. Cost reduction in these areas, through improved reactions and reduced capital, will improve the economic feasibility of a large-scale plant. A technoeconomic model was developed using the ASPEN Plus modeling software package. This model included a two-stage pretreatment operation with a co-current first stage and countercurrent second stage, a lignin adsorption unit, and a cofermentation unit. Data from kinetic modeling of the pretreatment reactions, verified by bench-scale experiments, were used to create the ASPEN Plus base model. Results from the initial pretreatment and fermentation yields of the two-stage system correlated well to the performance targets established by the model. The ASPEN Plus model determined mass and energy-balance information, which was supplied to an economic module to determine the required selling price of the ethanol. Several pretreatment process variables such as glucose yield, liquid: solid ratio, additional pretreatment stages, and lignin adsorption were varied to determine which parameters had the greatest effect on the process economics. Optimized values for these key variables became target values for the bench-scale research, either to achieve or identify as potential obstacles in the future commercialization process. Results from this modeling and experimentation sequence have led to the design of an advanced two-stage engineering- scale reactor for a dilute-acid hydrolysis process.

  3. Effects of NIPAm polymer additives on the enzymatic hydrolysis of Avicel and pretreated Miscanthus.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Katherine J; Francis, Matthew B

    2014-09-01

    There is currently much interest in the economic use of cellulosic biomass as a source of renewable fuels. This process typically involves the enzymatic hydrolysis of plant matter to afford soluble sugars for subsequent fermentation steps. The cost of cellulase enzymes presents a critical barrier to the commercialization of these processes. In this work, we demonstrate that a new family of polymer additives based on NIPAm can increase enzyme performance substantially. When applied to an industrially relevant combination of enzymes and lignin-containing biomass, polymer additives allow a 60% reduction in enzyme loading to achieve the same level of saccharification. Evidence presented herein suggests that these polymers function through multiple mechanisms, including (1) preventing enzyme denaturation through shear and interfacial interactions, (2) preventing non-productive adsorption to lignin, and (3) altering the cellulose structure. An advantage of these polymers over other additives is their thermoresponsive behavior, enabling their recovery and reuse. PMID:24729018

  4. Impact of α-amylase combined with hydrochloric acid hydrolysis on structure and digestion of waxy rice starch.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Zhu, Yanqiao; Jiao, Aiquan; Zhao, Jianwei; Chen, Xiaoming; Wei, Benxi; Hu, Xiuting; Wu, Chunsen; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Yaoqi

    2013-04-01

    The structure and in vitro digestibility of native waxy rice starch by the combined hydrolysis of α-amylase and hydrochloric acid were investigated in this study. The combined hydrolysis technique generated higher hydrolysis rate and extent than the enzymatic hydrolysis. The granular appearance and chromatograph profile demonstrated that α-amylase and hydrochloric acid exhibited different patterns of hydrolysis. The rise in the ratio of absorbance 1047/1022cm(-1), the melting temperature range (Tc-To), and the melting enthalpy (ΔH) were observed during the combined hydrolysis. These results suggest that α-amylase simultaneously cleaves the amorphous and crystalline regions, whereas the amorphous regions of starch granules are preferentially hydrolyzed during the acid hydrolysis. Furthermore, the combined hydrolysis increased rapidly digestible starch (RDS) while decreased slowly digestible starch (SDS) and resistant starch (RS), indicating that the hydrolysis mode affected the digestion property of native waxy rice starch.

  5. Acid hydrolysis of cellulosic fibres: Comparison of bleached kraft pulp, dissolving pulps and cotton textile cellulose.

    PubMed

    Palme, Anna; Theliander, Hans; Brelid, Harald

    2016-01-20

    The behaviour of different cellulosic fibres during acid hydrolysis has been investigated and the levelling-off degree of polymerisation (LODP) has been determined. The study included a bleached kraft pulp (both never-dried and once-dried) and two dissolving pulps (once-dried). Additionally, cotton cellulose from new cotton sheets and sheets discarded after long-time use was studied. Experimental results from the investigation, together with results found in literature, imply that ultrastructural differences between different fibres affect their susceptibility towards acid hydrolysis. Drying of a bleached kraft pulp was found to enhance the rate of acid hydrolysis and also result in a decrease in LODP. This implies that the susceptibility of cellulosic fibres towards acid hydrolysis is affected by drying-induced stresses in the cellulose chains. In cotton cellulose, it was found that use and laundering gave a substantial loss in the degree of polymerisation (DP), but that the LODP was only marginally affected.

  6. Hydrolysis of tRNA(sup Phe) on Suspensions of Amino Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Kui; Orgel, Leslie E.

    2001-01-01

    RNA is adsorbed strongly on suspensions of many moderately soluble organic solids. In some cases, the hydrolysis of tRNA(sup Phe) is greatly accelerated by adsorption, and the major sites of hydrolysis are changed from those that are important in homogeneous solution. Here we show that the hydrolysis is greatly accelerated by suspensions of aspartic acid and beta-glutamic acid but not by suspensions of alpha-glutamic acid, asparagine, or glutamine. The non-enzymatic hydrolysis of RNA has been studied extensively, especially because of its relevance to the mechanisms of action of ribozymes and to biotechnology and therapy. Many ribonucleases, ribozymes, and non-biological catalysts function via acid-base catalysis of an intramolecular transesterification mechanism in which the 2'-OH group attacks the adjacent phosphate group. The pentacoordinated phosphorane intermediate may collapse back to starting material, or yield isomerized or cleaved products.

  7. Fermentation of dilute acid pretreated Populus by Clostridium thermocellum, Caldicellulosiruptor bescii, and Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis

    DOE PAGES

    Yee, Kelsey L.; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D.; Thompson, Olivia A.; Elkins, James G.; Davison, Brian H.; Mielenz, Jonathan R.

    2015-07-25

    Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), which merges enzyme production, biomass hydrolysis, and fermentation into a single step, has the potential to become an efficient and economic strategy for the bioconversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks to transportation fuels or chemicals. In this study, we evaluated Clostridium thermocellum, Caldicellulosiruptor bescii, and Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis, three , thermophilic,cellulolytic, mixed-acid fermenting candidate CBP microorganisms, for their fermentation capabilities using dilute acid pretreated Populus as a model biomass feedstock. Under pH controlled, anaerobic fermentation conditions, each candidate successfully digested a minimum of 75% of the cellulose from dilute acid pretreated Populus, as indicated by an increase in planktonic cellsmore » and end-product metabolites and a concurrent decrease in glucan content. C. thermocellum, which employs a cellulosomal approach to biomass degradation, required 120 hours to achieve 75% cellulose utilization. In contrast, the non-cellulosomal, secreted hydrolytic enzyme system of the Caldicellulosiruptor sp. required 300 hours to achieve similar results. End-point fermentation conversions for C. thermocellum, C. bescii, and C. obsidiansis were determined to be 0.29, 0.34, and 0.38 grams of total metabolites per gram of loaded glucan, respectively. This data provide a starting point for future strain engineering efforts that can serve to improve the biomass fermentation capabilities of these three promising candidate CBP platforms.« less

  8. Comparative study of lignin characteristics from wheat straw obtained by soda-AQ and kraft pretreatment and effect on the following enzymatic hydrolysis process

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Haitao; Xie, Yimin; Zheng, Xing; Pu, Yunqiao; Huang, Fang; Meng, Xianzhi; Wu, Weibing; Ragauskas, Arthur; Yao, Lan

    2016-02-18

    With this study, to understand the structural changes of lignin after soda-AQ and kraft pretreatment, milled straw lignin, black liquor lignin and residual lignin extracted from wheat straw were characterized by FT-IR, UV, GPC and NMR. The results showed that the main lignin linkages were β-aryl ether substructures (β-O-4'), followed by phenylcoumaran (β-5') and resinol (β-β') substructures, while minor content of spirodienone (β-1'), dibenzodioxocin (5-5') and α,β-diaryl ether linkages were detected as well. After pretreatment, most lignin inter-units and lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC) linkages were degraded and dissolved in black liquor, with minor amount left in residual pretreated biomass. In addition,more » through quantitative 13C and 2D-HSQC NMR spectral analysis, lignin and LCC were found to be more degraded after kraft pretreatment than soda-AQ pretreatment. Furthermore, the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis results showed that more cellulose in wheat straw was converted to glucose after kraft pretreatment, indicating that LCC linkages were important in the enzymatic hydrolysis process.« less

  9. Comparative study of lignin characteristics from wheat straw obtained by soda-AQ and kraft pretreatment and effect on the following enzymatic hydrolysis process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haitao; Xie, Yimin; Zheng, Xing; Pu, Yunqiao; Huang, Fang; Meng, Xianzhi; Wu, Weibing; Ragauskas, Arthur; Yao, Lan

    2016-05-01

    To understand the structural changes of lignin after soda-AQ and kraft pretreatment, milled straw lignin, black liquor lignin and residual lignin extracted from wheat straw were characterized by FT-IR, UV, GPC and NMR. The results showed that the main lignin linkages were β-aryl ether substructures (β-O-4'), followed by phenylcoumaran (β-5') and resinol (β-β') substructures, while minor content of spirodienone (β-1'), dibenzodioxocin (5-5') and α,β-diaryl ether linkages were detected as well. After pretreatment, most lignin inter-units and lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC) linkages were degraded and dissolved in black liquor, with minor amount left in residual pretreated biomass. In addition, through quantitative (13)C and 2D-HSQC NMR spectral analysis, lignin and LCC were found to be more degraded after kraft pretreatment than soda-AQ pretreatment. Furthermore, the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis results showed that more cellulose in wheat straw was converted to glucose after kraft pretreatment, indicating that LCC linkages were important in the enzymatic hydrolysis process.

  10. An integrated process for the production of platform chemicals and diesel miscible fuels by acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and downstream upgrading of the acid hydrolysis residues with thermal and catalytic pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Girisuta, Buana; Kalogiannis, Konstantinos G; Dussan, Karla; Leahy, James J; Hayes, Michael H B; Stefanidis, Stylianos D; Michailof, Chrysa M; Lappas, Angelos A

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluates an integrated process for the production of platform chemicals and diesel miscible biofuels. An energy crop (Miscanthus) was treated hydrothermally to produce levulinic acid (LA). Temperatures ranging between 150 and 200 °C, sulfuric acid concentrations 1-5 wt.% and treatment times 1-12 h were applied to give different combined severity factors. Temperatures of 175 and 200 °C and acid concentration of 5 wt.% were found to be necessary to achieve good yield (17 wt.%) and selectivities of LA while treatment time did not have an effect. The acid hydrolysis residues were characterized for their elemental, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin contents, and then tested in a small-scale pyrolyzer using silica sand and a commercial ZSM-5 catalyst. Milder pretreatment yielded more oil (43 wt.%) and oil O(2) (37%) while harsher pretreatment and catalysis led to more coke production (up to 58 wt.%), less oil (12 wt.%) and less oil O(2) (18 wt.%).

  11. On the Brønsted acid-catalyzed homogeneous hydrolysis of furans.

    PubMed

    Nikbin, Nima; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2013-11-01

    Furan affairs: Electronic structure calculations of the homogeneous Brønsted acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of 2,5-dimethylfuran show that proton transfer to the β-position is rate-limiting and provides support that the hydrolysis follows general acid catalysis. By means of projected Fukui indices, we show this to be the case for unsubstituted, 2-, and 2,5-substituted furans with electron-donating groups.

  12. Steam explosion pretreatment of oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) using autocatalytic hydrolysis: A biorefinery approach.

    PubMed

    Medina, Jesus David Coral; Woiciechowski, Adenise; Zandona Filho, Arion; Nigam, Poonam Singh; Ramos, Luiz Pereira; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) are an attractive source of carbon for the production of biochemical products, therefore, the aim of this work is to analyze the effect of the steam explosion (SE) pretreatment under autocatalytic conditions on EFB using a full experimental design. Temperature and reaction time were the operational variables studied. The EFB treated at 195°C for 6 min showed an increase of 34.69% in glycan (mostly cellulose), and a reduction of 68.12% in hemicelluloses, with increased enzymatic digestibility to 33% producing 4.2 g L(-1) of glucose. Scanning electron micrographs of the steam treated EFB exhibited surface erosion and an increased fiber porosity. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed the solubilization of hemicellulose and modification of cellulose in treated EFB.

  13. Enzyme hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation of dilute ammonia pretreated energy cane.

    PubMed

    Aita, G A; Salvi, D A; Walker, M S

    2011-03-01

    This study is the first one ever to report on the use of high fiber sugarcane (a.k.a. energy cane) bagasse as feedstock for the production of cellulosic ethanol. Energy cane bagasse was pretreated with ammonium hydroxide (28% v/v solution), and water at a ratio of 1:0.5:8 at 160°C for 1h under 0.9-1.1 MPa. Approximately, 55% lignin, 30% hemicellulose, 9% cellulose, and 6% other (e.g., ash, proteins) were removed during the process. The maximum glucan conversion of dilute ammonia treated energy cane bagasse by cellulases was 87% with an ethanol yield (glucose only) of 23 g ethanol/100g dry biomass. The enzymatic digestibility was related to the removal of lignin and hemicellulose, perhaps due to increased surface area and porosity resulting in the deformation and swelling of exposed fibers as shown in the SEM pictures.

  14. Dilute Sulfuric Acid Pretreatment of Agricultural and Agro-Industrial Residues for Ethanol Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Carlos; Alriksson, Björn; Sjöde, Anders; Nilvebrant, Nils-Olof; Jönsson, Leif J.

    The potential of dilute-acid prehydrolysis as a pretreatment method for sugarcane bagasse, rice hulls, peanut shells, and cassava stalks was investigated. The prehydrolysis was performed at 122°C during 20, 40, or 60 min using 2% H2SO4 at a solid-to-liquid ratio of 1∶10. Sugar formation increased with increasing reaction time. Xylose, glucose, arabinose, and galactose were detected in all of the prehydrolysates, whereas mannose was found only in the prehydrolysates of peanut shells and cassava stalks. The hemicelluloses of bagasse were hydrolyzed to a high-extent yielding concentrations of xylose and arabinose of 19.1 and 2.2 g/L, respectively, and a xylan conversion of more than 80%. High-glucose concentrations (26-33.5 g/L) were found in the prehydrolysates of rice hulls, probably because of hydrolysis of starch of grain remains in the hulls. Peanut shells and cassava stalks rendered low amounts of sugars on prehydrolysis, indicating that the conditions were not severe enough to hydrolyze the hemicelluloses in these materials quantitatively. All prehydrolysates were readily fermentable by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The dilute-acid prehydrolysis resulted in a 2.7-to 3.7-fold increase of the enzymatic convertibility of bagasse, but was not efficient for improving the enzymatic hydrolysis of peanut shells, cassava stalks, or rice hulls.

  15. Enhancing methane production from waste activated sludge using combined free nitrous acid and heat pre-treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qilin; Jiang, Guangming; Ye, Liu; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2014-10-15

    Methane production from anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) is often limited by the slow degradation and poor substrate availability of WAS. Our previous study revealed that WAS pre-treatment using free nitrous acid (FNA, i.e. HNO2) is an economically feasible and environmentally friendly method for promoting methane production. In order to further improve methane production from WAS, this study presents a novel strategy based on combined FNA and heat pre-treatment. WAS from a full-scale plant was treated for 24 h with FNA alone (0.52-1.43 mg N/L at 25 °C), heat alone (35, 55 and 70 °C), and FNA (0.52-1.11 mg N/L) combined with heat (35, 55 and 70 °C). The pre-treated WAS was then used for biochemical methane potential tests. Compared to the control (no FNA or heat pre-treatment of WAS), biochemical methane potential of the pre-treated WAS was increased by 12-16%, 0-6%, 17-26%, respectively; hydrolysis rate was improved by 15-25%, 10-25%, 20-25%, respectively, for the three types of pre-treatment. Heat pre-treatment at 55 and 70 °C, independent of the presence or absence of FNA, achieved approximately 4.5 log inactivation of pathogens (in comparison to ∼1 log inactivation with FNA treatment alone), thus capable of producing Class A biosolids. The combined FNA and heat pre-treatment is an economically and environmentally attractive technology for the pre-treatment of WAS prior to anaerobic digestion, particularly considering that both FNA and heat can be produced as by-products of anaerobic sludge digestion.

  16. Cassava starch maltodextrinization/monomerization through thermopressurized aqueous phosphoric acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Fontana, J D; Passos, M; Baron, M; Mendes, S V; Ramos, L P

    2001-01-01

    Kinetic conditions were established for the depolymerization of cassava starch for the production of maltodextrins and glucose syrups. Thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses corroborated that the proper H3PO4 strength and thermopressurization range (e.g., 142-170 degrees C; 2.8-6.8 atm) can be successfully explored for such hydrolytic purposes of native starch granules. Because phosphoric acid can be advantageously maintained in the hydrolysate and generates, after controlled neutralization with ammonia, the strategic nutrient triplet for industrial fermentations (C, P, N), this pretreatment strategy can be easily recognized as a recommended technology for hydrolysis and upgrading of starch and other plant polysaccharides. Compared to the classic catalysts, the mandatory desalting step (chloride removal by expensive anion-exchange resin or sulfate precipitation as the calcium-insoluble salt) can be avoided. Furthermore, properly diluted phosphoric acid is well known as an allowable additive in several popular soft drinks such as colas since its acidic feeling in the mouth is compatible and synergistic with both natural and artificial sweeteners. Glycosyrups from phosphorolyzed cassava starch have also been upgraded to high-value single-cell protein such as the pigmented yeast biomass of Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (Phaffia rhodozyma), whose astaxanthin (diketo-dihydroxy-beta-carotene) content may reach 0.5-1.0 mg/g of dry yeast cell. This can be used as an ideal complement for animal feeding as well as a natural staining for both fish farming (meat) and poultry (eggs). PMID:11963875

  17. Modeling the hydrolysis of perfluorinated compounds containing carboxylic and phosphoric acid ester functions and sulfonamide groups.

    PubMed

    Rayne, Sierra; Forest, Kaya

    2010-01-01

    Temperature-dependent rate constants were estimated for the acid- and base-catalyzed and neutral hydrolysis reactions of perfluorinated telomer acrylates (FTAcrs) and phosphate esters (FTPEs), and the S(N)1 and S(N)2 hydrolysis reactions of fluorotelomer iodides (FTIs). Under some environmental conditions, hydrolysis of monomeric FTAcrs could be rapid (half-lives of several years in marine systems and as low as several days in some landfills) and represent a dominant portion of their overall degradation. Abiotic hydrolysis of monomeric FTAcrs may be a significant contributor to current environmental loadings of fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs). Polymeric FTAcrs are expected to be hydrolyzed more slowly, with estimated half-lives in soil and natural waters ranging between several centuries to several millenia absent additional surface area limitations on reactivity. Poor agreement was found between the limited experimental data on FTPE hydrolysis and computational estimates, requiring more detailed experimental data before any further modeling can occur on these compounds or their perfluoroalkyl sulfonamidoethanol phosphate ester (PFSamPE) analogs. FTIs are expected to have hydrolytic half-lives of about 130 days in most natural waters, suggesting they may be contributing to substantial FTOH and PFCA inputs in aquatic systems. Perfluoroalkyl sulfonamides (PFSams) appear unlikely to undergo abiotic hydrolysis at the S-N, C-S, or N-C linkages under environmentally relevant conditions, although potentially facile S-N hydrolysis via intramolecular catalysis by ethanol and acetic acid amide substituents warrants further investigation. PMID:20390888

  18. Studying Cellulose Fiber Structure by SEM, XRD, NMR and Acid Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haibo; Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhang, Z. Conrad; Brown, Heather M.; Arey, Bruce W.; Holladay, John E.

    2007-03-21

    Cotton linters were partially hydrolyzed in dilute acid and the morphology of remaining macrofibrils studied with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) under various magnifications. The crystal region (microfibril bundles) in the macrofibrils was not altered by hydrolysis, and only amorphous cellulose was hydrolyzed and leached out from the macrofibrils. The diameter of microfibril bundles was 20-30 nm after the amorphous cellulose was removed by hydrolysis. XRD experiments confirm the unaltered diameter of the microfibrils after hydrolysis. The strong stability of these microfibril bundles in hydrolysis limits both the total sugar monomer yield and the size of nano particles or rods produced in hydrolysis. The large surface potential on the remaining microfibril bundles drives the agglomeration of macrofibrils.

  19. [Pretreatment and resource utilization of industrial effluent with benzoic acid].

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Wang, Sheng; Mei, Fan; Lin, Yi; Dai, You-yuan

    2004-07-01

    Extraction equilibrium of benzoic acid were studied using 20%, 30% and 50% tributyl phosphate (TBP) in kerosene, 1-octanol and toluene as the extractants, to investigate the efficient method of recovering benzoic and acetic acid in the industrial effluent and meeting the requirement of the terminal wastewater treatment. The CODCr value in residual phase and the recovery of benzoic acid in various extractants were measured. The results showed that the recovery of benzoic acid was closed to 100% with 50% TBP/kerosene system, and depended on the polarity of extractant for pure solvent system. The recovery with 1-octanol was equivalent to the one with 30% TBP. The CODCr value in the residual phase depended on the CODCr value from benzoic acid and the solubility of extractant, which does not depend on the benzoic acid concentration in the residue phase apparently, and shown 50% TBP approximately equal to 30% TBP > 1-octanol > 20% TBP > toluene. Meanwhile, the profitable diagram of pretreatment of industrial effluent with benzoic acid was suggested, i.e. firstly, extract benzoic acid with toluene and return the toluene to the benzoic acid reactor, then, extract acetic acid with trialkylphosphine oxide and back-extract the acetic acid with CaO or MgO to produce calcium magnesium acetate.

  20. [Pretreatment and resource utilization of industrial effluent with benzoic acid].

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Wang, Sheng; Mei, Fan; Lin, Yi; Dai, You-yuan

    2004-07-01

    Extraction equilibrium of benzoic acid were studied using 20%, 30% and 50% tributyl phosphate (TBP) in kerosene, 1-octanol and toluene as the extractants, to investigate the efficient method of recovering benzoic and acetic acid in the industrial effluent and meeting the requirement of the terminal wastewater treatment. The CODCr value in residual phase and the recovery of benzoic acid in various extractants were measured. The results showed that the recovery of benzoic acid was closed to 100% with 50% TBP/kerosene system, and depended on the polarity of extractant for pure solvent system. The recovery with 1-octanol was equivalent to the one with 30% TBP. The CODCr value in the residual phase depended on the CODCr value from benzoic acid and the solubility of extractant, which does not depend on the benzoic acid concentration in the residue phase apparently, and shown 50% TBP approximately equal to 30% TBP > 1-octanol > 20% TBP > toluene. Meanwhile, the profitable diagram of pretreatment of industrial effluent with benzoic acid was suggested, i.e. firstly, extract benzoic acid with toluene and return the toluene to the benzoic acid reactor, then, extract acetic acid with trialkylphosphine oxide and back-extract the acetic acid with CaO or MgO to produce calcium magnesium acetate. PMID:15515941

  1. Aiming for the complete utilization of sugar-beet pulp: Examination of the effects of mild acid and hydrothermal pretreatment followed by enzymatic digestion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biomass use for the production of bioethanol or platform chemicals requires efficient breakdown of biomass to fermentable monosaccharides. Lignocellulosic feedstocks often require physicochemical pretreatment before enzymatic hydrolysis can begin. The optimal pretreatment can be different for different feedstocks, and should not lead to biomass destruction or formation of toxic products. Methods We examined the influence of six mild sulfuric acid or water pretreatments at different temperatures on the enzymatic degradability of sugar-beet pulp (SBP). Results We found that optimal pretreatment at 140°C of 15 minutes in water was able to solubilize 60% w/w of the total carbohydrates present, mainly pectins. More severe treatments led to the destruction of the solubilized sugars, and the subsequent production of the sugar-degradation products furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural, acetic acid and formic acid. The pretreated samples were successfully degraded enzymatically with an experimental cellulase preparation. Conclusions In this study, we found that pretreatment of SBP greatly facilitated the subsequent enzymatic degradation within economically feasible time ranges and enzyme levels. In addition, pretreatment of SBP can be useful to fractionate functional ingredients such as arabinans and pectins from cellulose. We found that the optimal combined severity factor to enhance the enzymatic degradation of SBP was between log R'0 = -2.0 and log R'0 = -1.5. The optimal pretreatment and enzyme treatment solubilized up to 80% of all sugars present in the SBP, including ≥90% of the cellulose. PMID:21627804

  2. Production of H(2) from cellulose by rumen microorganisms: effects of inocula pre-treatment and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Ratti, Regiane Priscila; Botta, Lívia Silva; Sakamoto, Isabel Kimiko; Silva, Edson Luiz; Varesche, Maria Bernadete Amâncio

    2014-03-01

    H2 production from cellulose, using rumen fluid as the inoculum, has been investigated in batch experiments. Methanogenic archaea were inhibited by acid pre-treatment, which also inhibited cellulolytic microorganisms, and in consequence, the conversion of cellulose to H2. Positive results were observed only with the addition of cellulase. H2 yields were 18.5 and 9.6 mmol H2 g cellulose(-1) for reactors with 2 and 4 g cellulose l(-1) and cellulase, respectively. H2 was primarily generated by the butyric acid pathway and this was followed by formation of acetic acid, ethanol and n-butanol. In reactors using 4 g cellulose l(-1) and cellulase, the accumulation of alcohols negatively affected the H2 yield, which changed the fermentation pathways to solventogenesis. PCR-DGGE analysis showed changes in the microbial communities. The phylogenetic affiliations of the bands of DGGE were 99 % similar to Clostridium sp.

  3. Dilute-sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover in pilot-scale reactor: investigation of yields, kinetics, and enzymatic digestibilities of solids.

    PubMed

    Schell, Daniel J; Farmer, Jody; Newman, Millie; McMillan, James D

    2003-01-01

    Corn stover is a domestic feedstock that has potential to produce significant quantities of fuel ethanol and other bioenergy and biobased products. However, comprehensive yield and carbon mass balance information and validated kinetic models for dilute-sulfuric acid (H2SO4) pretreatment of corn stover have not been available. This has hindered the estimation of process economics and also limited the ability to perform technoeconomic modeling to guide research. To better characterize pretreatment and assess its kinetics, we pretreated corn stover in a continuous 1 t/d reactor. Corn stover was pretreated at 20% (w/w) solids concentration over a range of conditions encompassing residence times of 3-12 min, temperatures of 165- 195 degrees C, and H2SO4 concentrations of 0.5-1.4% (w/w). Xylan conversion yield and carbon mass balance data were collected at each run condition. Performance results were used to estimate kinetic model parameters assuming biphasic hemicellulose hydrolysis and a hydrolysis mechanism incorporating formation of intermediate xylo-oligomers. In addition, some of the pretreated solids were tested in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process to measure the reactivity of their cellulose component to enzymatic digestion by cellulase enzymes. Monomeric xylose yields of 69-71% and total xylose yields (monomers and oligomers) of 70-77% were achieved with performance level depending on pretreatment severity. Cellulose conversion yields in SSF of 80-87% were obtained for some of the most digestible pretreated solids.

  4. Comparative Study of SPORL and Dilute Acid Pretreatments of Spruce for Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The performance of two pretreatment methods, Sulfite Pretreatment to Overcome Recalcitrance of Lignocellulose (SPORL) and Dilute Acid (DA), was compared in pretreating softwood (spruce) for fuel ethanol production under the same conditions of temperature (180°C), time (30 min), sulfuric acid loading...

  5. Highly acidic mesostructured aluminosilicates assembled from surfactant-mediated zeolite hydrolysis products.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Yu; Pinnavaia, Thomas J

    2006-03-16

    The surfactant-mediated hydrolysis of ZSM-5 zeolite affords five-membered ring subunits that can be readily incorporated into the framework walls of a hexagonal mesostructured aluminosilicate, denoted MSU-Z. The five-membered ring subunits, which are identifiable by infrared spectroscopy, impart unprecedented acidity to the mesostructure, as judged by cumene cracking activity at 300 degrees C. Most notably, MSU-Z aluminosilicate made through the base hydrolysis of ZSM-5 in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium ions exhibits a cumene conversion of 73%, which is 6.7-fold higher than the conversion provided by a conventional MCM-41. This approach to stabilizing zeolitic subunits through surfactant-mediated hydrolysis of zeolites appears to be general. The hydrolysis of USY zeolite under analogous hydrolytic conditions also affords zeolitic fragments that boost the acidity of the mesostructure in comparison to equivalent compositions prepared from conventional aluminosilicate precursors.

  6. Hydrolysis of Sulfur Dioxide in Small Clusters of Sulfuric Acid: Mechanistic and Kinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Fang, Sheng; Wang, Zhixiu; Yi, Wencai; Tao, Fu-Ming; Liu, Jing-Yao

    2015-11-17

    The deposition and hydrolysis reaction of SO2 + H2O in small clusters of sulfuric acid and water are studied by theoretical calculations of the molecular clusters SO2-(H2SO4)n-(H2O)m (m = 1,2; n = 1,2). Sulfuric acid exhibits a dramatic catalytic effect on the hydrolysis reaction of SO2 as it lowers the energy barrier by over 20 kcal/mol. The reaction with monohydrated sulfuric acid (SO2 + H2O + H2SO4 - H2O) has the lowest energy barrier of 3.83 kcal/mol, in which the cluster H2SO4-(H2O)2 forms initially at the entrance channel. The energy barriers for the three hydrolysis reactions are in the order SO2 + (H2SO4)-H2O > SO2 + (H2SO4)2-H2O > SO2 + H2SO4-H2O. Furthermore, sulfurous acid is more strongly bonded to the hydrated sulfuric acid (or dimer) clusters than the corresponding reactant (monohydrated SO2). Consequently, sulfuric acid promotes the hydrolysis of SO2 both kinetically and thermodynamically. Kinetics simulations have been performed to study the importance of these reactions in the reduction of atmospheric SO2. The results will give a new insight on how the pre-existing aerosols catalyze the hydrolysis of SO2, leading to the formation and growth of new particles.

  7. Optimization of sulfide/sulfite pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Idrees, Muhammad; Adnan, Ahmad; Qureshi, Fahim Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    Potential of sodium sulfide and sodium sulfite, in the presence of sodium hydroxide was investigated to pretreat the corncob (CC), bagasse (BG), water hyacinth and rice husk (RH) for maximum digestibility. Response Surface Methodology was employed for the optimization of pretreatment factors such as temperature, time and concentration of Na₂S and Na₂SO₃, which had high coefficient of determination (R²) along with low probability value (P), indicating the reliable predictability of the model. At optimized conditions, Na₂S and Na₂SO₃ remove up to 97% lignin, from WH and RH, along with removal of hemicellulose (up to 93%) during pretreatment providing maximum cellulose, while in BG and CC; 75.0% and 90.0% reduction in lignin and hemicellulose was observed. Saccharification efficiency of RH, WH, BG and CC after treatment with 1.0% Na₂S at 130°C for 2.3-3.0 h was 79.40, 85.93, 87.70, and 88.43%, respectively. WH treated with Na₂SO₃ showed higher hydrolysis yield (86.34%) as compared to Na₂S while other biomass substrates showed 2.0-3.0% less yield with Na₂SO₃. Resulting sugars were evaluated as substrate for lactic acid production, yielding 26.48, 25.36, 31.73, and 30.31 gL⁻¹ of lactic acid with 76.0, 76.0, 86.0, and 83.0% conversion yield from CC, BG, WH, and RH hydrolyzate, respectively. PMID:24058918

  8. Optimization of Sulfide/Sulfite Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass for Lactic Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Adnan, Ahmad; Qureshi, Fahim Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    Potential of sodium sulfide and sodium sulfite, in the presence of sodium hydroxide was investigated to pretreat the corncob (CC), bagasse (BG), water hyacinth and rice husk (RH) for maximum digestibility. Response Surface Methodology was employed for the optimization of pretreatment factors such as temperature, time and concentration of Na2S and Na2SO3, which had high coefficient of determination (R2) along with low probability value (P), indicating the reliable predictability of the model. At optimized conditions, Na2S and Na2SO3 remove up to 97% lignin, from WH and RH, along with removal of hemicellulose (up to 93%) during pretreatment providing maximum cellulose, while in BG and CC; 75.0% and 90.0% reduction in lignin and hemicellulose was observed. Saccharification efficiency of RH, WH, BG and CC after treatment with 1.0% Na2S at 130°C for 2.3–3.0 h was 79.40, 85.93, 87.70, and 88.43%, respectively. WH treated with Na2SO3 showed higher hydrolysis yield (86.34%) as compared to Na2S while other biomass substrates showed 2.0–3.0% less yield with Na2SO3. Resulting sugars were evaluated as substrate for lactic acid production, yielding 26.48, 25.36, 31.73, and 30.31 gL−1 of lactic acid with 76.0, 76.0, 86.0, and 83.0% conversion yield from CC, BG, WH, and RH hydrolyzate, respectively. PMID:24058918

  9. Effect of defatting on acid hydrolysis rate of maize starch with different amylose contents.

    PubMed

    Wei, Benxi; Hu, Xiuting; Zhang, Bao; Li, Hongyan; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Yaoqi

    2013-11-01

    The effect of defatting on the physiochemical properties and the acid hydrolysis rate of maize starch with different amylose contents was evaluated in this study. The increase in the number of pores and the stripping of starch surface layers were observed after defatting by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction spectrum showed that the peaks attributing to the amylose-lipid complex disappeared. The relative crystallinity increased by 19% for high-amylose maize starch (HMS) on defatting, while the other tested starches virtually unchanged. Differential scanning calorimetry study indicated an increase in the thermal stability for the defatted starches. Compared with native waxy maize starch, the acid hydrolysis rate of the defatted one increased by 6% after 10 days. For normal maize starch (NMS) and HMS, the higher rate of hydrolysis was observed during the first 5 days. Thereafter, the hydrolysis rate was lower than that of their native counterpart. The increase in susceptibility to acid hydrolysis (in the first 5 days) was mainly attributed to the defective and porous structures formed during defatting process, while the decrease of hydrolysis rate for NMS and HMS samples (after the first 5 days) probably resulted from the increase in the relative crystallinity.

  10. High-yield production of biosugars from Gracilaria verrucosa by acid and enzymatic hydrolysis processes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Won; Hong, Chae-Hwan; Jeon, Sung-Wan; Shin, Hyun-Jae

    2015-11-01

    Gracilaria verrucosa, the red alga, is a suitable feedstock for biosugar production. This study analyzes biosugar production by the hydrolysis of G. verrucosa conducted under various conditions (i.e., various acid concentrations, substrate concentrations, reaction times, and enzyme dosages). The acid hydrolysates of G. verrucosa yielded a total of 7.47g/L (37.4%) and 10.63g/L (21.26%) of reducing sugars under optimal small (30mL) and large laboratory-scale (1L) hydrolysis processes, respectively. Reducing sugar obtained from acid and enzymatic hydrolysates were 10% higher, with minimum by-products, than those reported in other studies. The mass balance for the small laboratory-scale process showed that the acid and enzymatic hydrolysates had a carbohydrate conversion of 57.2%. The mass balance approach to the entire hydrolysis process of red seaweed for biosugar production can be applied to other saccharification processes.

  11. Oleaginous fungal lipid fermentation on combined acid- and alkali-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate for advanced biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Zhenhua; Zanotti, Michael; Archer, Steven; Liao, Wei; Liu, Yan

    2014-07-01

    A combined hydrolysis process, which first mixed dilute acid- and alkali-pretreated corn stover at a 1:1 (w/w) ratio, directly followed by enzymatic saccharification without pH adjustment, has been developed in this study in order to minimize the need of neutralization, detoxification, and washing during the process of lignocellulosic biofuel production. The oleaginous fungus Mortierella isabellina was selected and applied to the combined hydrolysate as well as a synthetic medium to compare fungal lipid accumulation and biodiesel production in both shake flask and 7.5L fermentor. Fungal cultivation on combined hydrolysate exhibited comparable cell mass and lipid yield with those from synthetic medium, indicating that the integration of combined hydrolysis with oleaginous fungal lipid fermentation has great potential to improve performance of advanced lignocellulosic biofuel production.

  12. Preparation of κ-carra-oligosaccharides with microwave assisted acid hydrolysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangsheng; Zhao, Xia; Lv, Youjing; Li, Miaomiao; Yu, Guangli

    2015-04-01

    A rapid method of microwave assisted acid hydrolysis was established to prepare κ-carra-oligosaccharides. The optimal hydrolysis condition was determined by an orthogonal test. The degree of polymerization (DP) of oligosaccharides was detected by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Considering the results of HPTLC and PAGE, the optimum condition of microwave assisted acid hydrolysis was determined. The concentration of κ-carrageenan was 5 mg mL-1; the reaction solution was adjusted to pH 3 with diluted hydrochloric acid; the solution was hydrolyzed under microwave irradiation at 100 for 15 °C min. Oligosaccharides were separated by a Superdex 30 column (2.6 cm × 90 cm) using AKTA Purifier UPC100 and detected with an online refractive index detector. Each fraction was characterized by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The data showed that odd-numbered κ-carra-oligosaccharides with DP ranging from 3 to 21 could be obtained with this method, and the structures of the oligosaccharides were consistent with those obtained by traditional mild acid hydrolysis. The new method was more convenient, efficient and environment-friendly than traditional mild acid hydrolysis. Our results provided a useful reference for the preparation of oligosaccharides from other polysaccharides.

  13. Microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis to produce xylooligosaccharides from sugarcane bagasse hemicelluloses.

    PubMed

    Bian, Jing; Peng, Pai; Peng, Feng; Xiao, Xiao; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2014-08-01

    Hemicelluloses from sugarcane bagasse were subjected to microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis at mild temperature to produce xylooligosaccharides (XOS). The hydrolysis was performed with dilute H2SO4 at 90°C and the influence of acid concentration (0.1-0.3M) and reaction time (20-40min) on the XOS production was ascertained with response surface methodology based on central composite design. The fitted models of XOS and xylose yields were in good agreement with the experimental results. Compared to hydrolysis time, acid concentration was a more significant coefficient in the production of XOS. A well-defined degree of polymerisation of XOS and the monomer in the hydrolysates were quantified. No sugar-degraded byproduct was detected. The maximum XOS yield of 290.2mgg(-1) was achieved by hydrolysis with 0.24M H2SO4 for 31min. The results indicated that the yields of xylose and the byproducts can be controlled by the acid concentration and reaction time in microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis.

  14. Combined heat treatment and acid hydrolysis of cassava grate waste (CGW) biomass for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Agu, R.C.; Amadife, A.E.; Ude, C.M.; Onyia, A.; Ogu, E.O.; Okafor, M.; Ezejiofor, E.

    1997-12-31

    The effect of combined heat treatment and acid hydrolysis (various concentrations) on cassava grate waste (CGW) biomass for ethanol production was investigated. At high concentrations of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (1--5 M), hydrolysis of the CGW biomass was achieved but with excessive charring or dehydration reaction. At lower acid concentrations, hydrolysis of CGW biomass was also achieved with 0.3--0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, while partial hydrolysis was obtained below 0.3 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (the lowest acid concentration that hydrolyzed CGW biomass) at 120 C and 1 atm pressure for 30 min. A 60% process efficiency was achieved with 0.3 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in hydrolyzing the cellulose and lignin materials present in the CGW biomass. High acid concentration is therefore not required for CGW biomass hydrolysis. The low acid concentration required for CGW biomass hydrolysis, as well as the minimal cost required for detoxification of CGW biomass because of low hydrogen cyanide content of CGW biomass would seem to make this process very economical. From three liters of the CGW biomass hydrolysate obtained from hydrolysis with 0.3M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, ethanol yield was 3.5 (v/v%) after yeast fermentation. However, although the process resulted in gainful utilization of CGW biomass, additional costs would be required to effectively dispose new by-products generated from CGW biomass processing.

  15. Pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse with NH4OH-H2O2 and ionic liquid for efficient hydrolysis and bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhisheng; Zhu, Mingjun; Wu, Zhenqiang

    2012-09-01

    An efficient pretreatment method using NH(4)OH-H(2)O(2) and ionic liquid (IL) was developed for the recovery of cellulose from sugarcane bagasse (SCB). The regenerated SCB from the combined pretreatment exhibited significantly enhanced enzymatic digestibility with an efficiency of 91.4% after 12h of hydrolysis, which was 64% higher than the efficiency observed for the regenerated SCB after the individual NH(4)OH-H(2)O(2) pretreatment. 1-Allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Amim]Cl) dissolved the cellulose from the NH(4)OH-H(2)O(2)-pretreated SCB, and the crystallinity index (CrI) detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD) was reduced by 42%. The recycled and fresh [Amim]Cl demonstrated the same performance on the pretreatment of SCB for the enhancement of enzymatic digestibility. The regenerated SCB was subsequently used in simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SScF) for bioethanol production by cellulase and yeast. The pretreatment did not have a negative effect on bioethanol fermentation, and an ethanol yield of 0.42 g/g was achieved with a corresponding fermentation efficiency of 94.5%. PMID:22728201

  16. Maximising biogas in anaerobic digestion by using engine waste heat for thermal hydrolysis pre-treatment of sludge.

    PubMed

    Pickworth, B; Adams, J; Panter, K; Solheim, O E

    2006-01-01

    Dublin's Ringsend WWTP was designed to serve a population of approximately 1.2 million p.e. with a sludge production of 37,000 dry tonnes per year after upgrading to full secondary treatment. Several technical solutions were put forward as part of a design, build, finance and operate (DBFO) competition, with the chosen solution being a proposal by Black and Veatch for a combination of sequencing batch reactor (SBR) technology and anaerobic digestion with Cambi thermal hydrolysis pre-treatment (THP). The THP plant was built by Cambi and handed over to B&V in 2002. The plant is now operated by Celtic Anglian Water. In September 2004 a test was carried out on the mass and energy balance of the plant following 2 years of operation and is detailed in this paper. The process enables digestion at very high dry solids feed and low hydraulic retention time. The plant was built with three digesters of 4250 m3 each and is fed with hydrolysed sludge at 11% DS. There are four no. 1 MW Jenbacher engines operating mainly on biogas. Each pair of engines is fitted with a waste heat boiler with a capacity of one tonne steam per hour. These boilers have sufficient capacity to provide 80% of the steam required for the THP, which in turn provides all the heat for the subsequent digestion in the form of hydrolysed feed. There are two main biogas boilers for top up steam and other uses of the biogas including thermal oxidation of concentrated odours. PMID:17087375

  17. Maximising biogas in anaerobic digestion by using engine waste heat for thermal hydrolysis pre-treatment of sludge.

    PubMed

    Pickworth, B; Adams, J; Panter, K; Solheim, O E

    2006-01-01

    Dublin's Ringsend WWTP was designed to serve a population of approximately 1.2 million p.e. with a sludge production of 37,000 dry tonnes per year after upgrading to full secondary treatment. Several technical solutions were put forward as part of a design, build, finance and operate (DBFO) competition, with the chosen solution being a proposal by Black and Veatch for a combination of sequencing batch reactor (SBR) technology and anaerobic digestion with Cambi thermal hydrolysis pre-treatment (THP). The THP plant was built by Cambi and handed over to B&V in 2002. The plant is now operated by Celtic Anglian Water. In September 2004 a test was carried out on the mass and energy balance of the plant following 2 years of operation and is detailed in this paper. The process enables digestion at very high dry solids feed and low hydraulic retention time. The plant was built with three digesters of 4250 m3 each and is fed with hydrolysed sludge at 11% DS. There are four no. 1 MW Jenbacher engines operating mainly on biogas. Each pair of engines is fitted with a waste heat boiler with a capacity of one tonne steam per hour. These boilers have sufficient capacity to provide 80% of the steam required for the THP, which in turn provides all the heat for the subsequent digestion in the form of hydrolysed feed. There are two main biogas boilers for top up steam and other uses of the biogas including thermal oxidation of concentrated odours.

  18. Comparison of some new pretreatment methods for second generation bioethanol production from wheat straw and water hyacinth.

    PubMed

    Guragain, Yadhu Nath; De Coninck, Joelle; Husson, Florence; Durand, Alain; Rakshit, Sudip Kumar

    2011-03-01

    Pretreatment of lignocellulosic residues like water hyacinth (WH) and wheat straw (WS) using crude glycerol (CG) and ionic liquids (IL) pretreatment was evaluated and compared with conventional dilute acid pretreatment (DAT) in terms of enzymatic hydrolysis yield and fermentation yield of pretreated samples. In the case of WS, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate pretreatment was found to be the best method. The hydrolysis yields of glucose and total reducing sugars were 2.1 and 3.3 times respectively higher by IL pretreatment than DAT, while it was 1.4 and 1.9 times respectively higher with CG pretreatment. For WH sample, CG pretreatment was as effective as DAT and more effective than IL pretreatment regarding hydrolysis yield. The fermentation inhibition was not noticeable with both types of pretreatment methods and feedstocks. Besides, CG pretreatment was found as effective as pure glycerol pretreatment for both feedstocks. This opens up an attractive economic route for the utilization of CG. PMID:21273061

  19. Amino acid composition determined using multiple hydrolysis times for three goat milk formulations.

    PubMed

    Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J; Lowry, Dianne; Prosser, Colin G

    2008-01-01

    The amino acid composition of goat milk formulations with varying protein and carbohydrate concentrations were determined. Proteins in goat milk infant formula, goat milk growing-up formula and goat whole milk powder were hydrolysed using multiple hydrolysis time intervals. A least-squares non-linear regression model was used to predict the free and protein bound amino acid concentrations. The amino acid composition of goat infant formula was compared with human milk reference values. There was good agreement between the multiple hydrolysis and single 24-h hydrolysis methods for approximately one-half of the amino acids. Tryptophan, aspartic acid, threonine, tyrosine, isoleucine, valine, serine and alanine contents were underestimated by 10.6, 5.6, 5.6, 4.7, 4.4, 3.7, 3.7 and 3.6%, respectively, by the single 24-h hydrolysis. The study provides accurate reference data on the amino acid composition of goat milk powders. Goat milk infant formula has amino acids in amounts similar to human milk reference values, when expressed on a per-energy basis.

  20. Evaluation of hyper thermal acid hydrolysis of Kappaphycus alvarezii for enhanced bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Ra, Chae Hun; Nguyen, Trung Hau; Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Kim, Sung-Koo

    2016-06-01

    Hyper thermal (HT) acid hydrolysis of Kappaphycus alvarezii, a red seaweed, was optimized to 12% (w/v) seaweed slurry content, 180mM H2SO4 at 140°C for 5min. The maximum monosaccharide concentration of 38.3g/L and 66.7% conversion from total fermentable monosaccharides of 57.6g/L with 120gdw/L K. alvarezii slurry were obtained from HT acid hydrolysis and enzymatic saccharification. HT acid hydrolysis at a severity factor of 0.78 efficiently converted the carbohydrates of seaweed to monosaccharides and produced a low concentration of inhibitory compounds. The levels of ethanol production by separate hydrolysis and fermentation with non-adapted and adapted Kluyveromyces marxianus to high concentration of galactose were 6.1g/L with ethanol yield (YEtOH) of 0.19 at 84h and 16.0g/L with YEtOH of 0.42 at 72h, respectively. Development of the HT acid hydrolysis process and adapted yeast could enhance the overall ethanol fermentation yields of K. alvarezii seaweed. PMID:26950757

  1. Enhancement of sludge anaerobic biodegradability by combined microwave-H2O2 pretreatment in acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Eswari, Parvathy; Kavitha, S; Kaliappan, S; Yeom, Ick-Tae; Banu, J Rajesh

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to increase the sludge disintegration and reduce the cost of microwave (MW) pretreatment. Thermodynamic analysis of MW hydrolysis revealed the best fit with a first-order kinetic model at a specific energy of 18,600 kJ/kg total solids (TS). Combining H2O2 with MW resulted in a significant increment in solubilization from 30 to 50 % at 18,600 kJ/kg TS. The pH of H2O2-assisted MW-pretreated sludge (MW + H2O2) was in the alkaline range (pH 9-10), and it made the sludge unfavorable for subsequent anaerobic digestion and inhibits methane production. In order to nullify the alkaline effect caused by the MW + H2O2 combination, the addition of acid was considered for pH adjustment. H2O2-assisted MW-pretreated sludge in acidic conditions (MW + H2O2 + acid) showed a maximum methane production of 323 mL/g volatile solids (VS) than others during anaerobic biodegradability. A cost analysis of this study reveals that MW + H2O2 + acid was the most economical method with a net profit of 59.90 €/t of sludge.

  2. Efficient production of glucose by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis of cellulose hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Sun, Binzhe; Duan, Lian; Peng, Gege; Li, Xiaoxia; Xu, Aihua

    2015-09-01

    To improve the production of glucose from cellulose, a simple and effective route was developed. This process uses a combination of a step of cellulose dissolution in aqueous NaOH/urea solution and then regeneration with water, followed by an acid hydrolysis step under microwave irradiation. The method is effective to obtain glucose from α-cellulose, microcrystalline cellulose, filter paper, ramie fiber and absorbent cotton. Increased with the acid concentration the glucose yield from hydrogel hydrolysis increased from 0.42% to 44.6% at 160 °C for 10 min. Moreover, the ozone treatment of cellulose in NaOH/urea solution before regeneration significantly enhanced the hydrolysis efficiency with a glucose yield of 59.1%. It is believed that the chains in cellulose hydrogel are relatively free approached, making that the acids easily access the β-glycosidic bonds.

  3. Contribution of acetic acid to the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass under abiotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Trzcinski, Antoine P; Stuckey, David C

    2015-06-01

    Acetic acid was used in abiotic experiments to adjust the solution pH and investigate its influence on the chemical hydrolysis of the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW). Soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) was used to measure the hydrolysis under oxidative conditions (positive oxidation-reduction potential values), and pH 4 allowed for 20% (±2%) of the COD added to be solubilized, whereas only 12% (±1%) was solubilized at pH7. Under reducing conditions (negative oxidation-reduction potential values) and pH 4, 32.3% (±3%) of the OFMSW was solubilized which shows that acidogenesis at pH 4 during the anaerobic digestion of solid waste can result in chemical hydrolysis. In comparison, bacterial hydrolysis resulted in 54% (±6%) solubilization.

  4. Acid hydrolysis of native corn starch: morphology, crystallinity, rheological and thermal properties.

    PubMed

    Utrilla-Coello, R G; Hernández-Jaimes, C; Carrillo-Navas, H; González, F; Rodríguez, E; Bello-Pérez, L A; Vernon-Carter, E J; Alvarez-Ramirez, J

    2014-03-15

    The acid hydrolysis of native corn starch at 35 °C was monitored during 15 days. After this time, the residual solids were about 37.0 ± 3.0%. First-order kinetics described the hydrolysis data, giving a constant rate of kH = 0.18 ± 0.012 days(-1). Amylose content presented a sharp decrement of about 85% and X-ray diffraction results indicated a gradual increase in crystallinity during the first 3 days. SEM micrographs showed that hydrolysis disrupted granule morphology from an initial regular shape to increasingly irregular shapes. Fractal analysis of SEM images revealed an increase in surface roughness. Fast changes in the thermal effects were caused by molecular rearrangements after fast hydrolysis of amylose in the amorphous regions in the first day. Steady shear rate and oscillatory tests showed a sharp decrease of the apparent viscosity and an increase of the damping factor (tan(δ)) caused by amylose degradation.

  5. Acid hydrolysis of Curcuma longa residue for ethanol and lactic acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong Mai; Nguyen, Thanh Ngoc; Choi, Gyung Ja; Choi, Yong Ho; Jang, Kyoung Soo; Park, Youn-Je; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the acid hydrolysis of Curcuma longa waste, to obtain the hydrolysate containing lactic acid and ethanol fermentative sugars. A central composite design for describing regression equations of variables was used. The selected optimum condition was 4.91% sulphuric acid, 122.68°C and 50 min using the desirability function under the following conditions: the maximum reducing sugar (RS) yield is within the limited range of the 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and furfural concentrations. Under the condition, the obtained solution contained 144 g RS/L, 0.79 g furfural/L and 2.59 g HMF/L and was directly fermented without a detoxification step. The maximum product concentration, average productivity, RS conversion and product yield were 115.36 g/L, 2.88 g/L/h, 89.43% and 64% for L-lactic acid; 113.92 g/L, 2.59 g/L/h, 88.31% and 63.29% for D-lactic acid; and 55.03 g/L, 1.38 g/L/h, 42.66 and 30.57%, respectively, for ethanol using a 7-L jar fermenter.

  6. Acid hydrolysis of Curcuma longa residue for ethanol and lactic acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong Mai; Nguyen, Thanh Ngoc; Choi, Gyung Ja; Choi, Yong Ho; Jang, Kyoung Soo; Park, Youn-Je; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the acid hydrolysis of Curcuma longa waste, to obtain the hydrolysate containing lactic acid and ethanol fermentative sugars. A central composite design for describing regression equations of variables was used. The selected optimum condition was 4.91% sulphuric acid, 122.68°C and 50 min using the desirability function under the following conditions: the maximum reducing sugar (RS) yield is within the limited range of the 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and furfural concentrations. Under the condition, the obtained solution contained 144 g RS/L, 0.79 g furfural/L and 2.59 g HMF/L and was directly fermented without a detoxification step. The maximum product concentration, average productivity, RS conversion and product yield were 115.36 g/L, 2.88 g/L/h, 89.43% and 64% for L-lactic acid; 113.92 g/L, 2.59 g/L/h, 88.31% and 63.29% for D-lactic acid; and 55.03 g/L, 1.38 g/L/h, 42.66 and 30.57%, respectively, for ethanol using a 7-L jar fermenter. PMID:24240182

  7. Fatty acid specificity of hormone-sensitive lipase. Implication in the selective hydrolysis of triacylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Raclot, T; Holm, C; Langin, D

    2001-12-01

    The selective mobilization of fatty acids from white fat cells depends on their molecular structure, in particular the degree of unsaturation. The present study was designed to examine if the release of fatty acids by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in vitro i) is influenced by the amount of unsaturation, ii) depends on the temperature, and iii) could explain the selective pattern of fatty acid mobilization and notably the preferential mobilization of certain highly unsaturated fatty acids. Recombinant rat and human HSL were incubated with a lipid emulsion. The hydrolysis of 35 individual fatty acids, ranging in chain length from 12 to 24 carbon atoms and in unsaturation from 0 to 6 double bonds was measured. Fatty acid composition of in vitro released NEFA was compared with that of fat cell triacylglycerols (TAG), the ratio % NEFA/% TAG being defined as the relative hydrolysis. The relative hydrolysis of individual fatty acids differed widely, ranging from 0.44 (24:1n-9) to 1.49 (18:1n-7) with rat HSL, and from 0.38 (24:1n-9) to 1.67 (18:1n-7) with human HSL. No major difference was observed between rat and human HSL. The relative release was dependent on the number of double bonds according to chain length. The amount of fatty acid released by recombinant rat HSL was decreased but remained robust at 4 degrees C compared with 37 degrees C, and the relative hydrolysis of some individual fatty acids was affected. The relative hydrolysis of fatty acids moderately, weakly, and highly mobilized by adipose tissue in vivo was similar and close to unity in vitro. We conclude that i) the release of fatty acids by HSL is only slightly affected by their degree of unsaturation, ii) the ability of HSL to efficiently and selectively release fatty acids at low temperature could reflect a cold adaptability for poikilotherms or hibernators when endogenous lipids are needed, and iii) the selectivity of fatty acid hydrolysis by HSL does not fully account for the selective pattern of

  8. Influence of acid precursors on physicochemical properties of nanosized titania synthesized by thermal-hydrolysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Rajesh, B.; Sasirekha, N.R.; Chen, Y.-W.

    2008-03-04

    The influence of nature and concentration of acid species on surface morphology and physicochemical properties of titania particles synthesized by direct thermal hydrolysis of titanium tetrachloride was investigated. The acids used were hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and perchloric acid with a concentration of 3 M. Thermal hydrolysis of titanium tetrachloride in hydrochloric acid and perchloric acid with molar ratios of [H{sup +}]/[Ti{sup 4+}] = 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0, respectively, was used to study the effect of acid concentration. The synthesized materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and thermogravimetric analysis. Characterization of the samples by X-ray diffraction studies revealed the influence of acid species on the phase transformation of titania. Samples prepared by hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, and perchloric acid formed rutile phase with rhombus primary particles, while sulfuric acid resulted in anatase phase with flake-shaped primary particles. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering results confirmed the nanosized titania particles and the agglomeration of primary particles to form secondary particles in spherical shape. The particle size of titania prepared using perchloric acid was smaller than those prepared with other acid sources. A direct correlation between [H{sup +}]/[Ti{sup 4+}] ratio and particle size of titania was observed.

  9. Pretreating wheat straw by the concentrated phosphoric acid plus hydrogen peroxide (PHP): Investigations on pretreatment conditions and structure changes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Hu, Jinguang; Shen, Fei; Mei, Zili; Yang, Gang; Zhang, Yanzong; Hu, Yaodong; Zhang, Jing; Deng, Shihuai

    2016-01-01

    Wheat straw was pretreated by PHP (the concentrated H3PO4 plus H2O2) to clarify effects of temperature, time and H3PO4 proportion on hemicellulose removal, delignification, cellulose recovery and enzymatic digestibility. Overall, hemicellulose removal was intensified by PHP comparing to the concentrated H3PO4. Moreover, efficient delignification specially happened in PHP pretreatment. Hemicellulose removal and delignification by PHP positively responded to temperature and time. Increasing H3PO4 proportion in PHP can promote hemicellulose removal, however, decrease the delignification. Maximum hemicellulose removal and delignification were achieved at 100% and 83.7% by PHP. Enzymatic digestibility of PHP-pretreated wheat straw was greatly improved by increasing temperature, time and H3PO4 proportion, and complete hydrolysis can be achieved consequently. As temperature of 30-40°C, time of 2.0 h and H3PO4 proportion of 60% were employed, more than 92% cellulose was retained in the pretreated wheat straw, and 29.1-32.6g glucose can be harvested from 100g wheat straw.

  10. Pretreating wheat straw by the concentrated phosphoric acid plus hydrogen peroxide (PHP): Investigations on pretreatment conditions and structure changes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Hu, Jinguang; Shen, Fei; Mei, Zili; Yang, Gang; Zhang, Yanzong; Hu, Yaodong; Zhang, Jing; Deng, Shihuai

    2016-01-01

    Wheat straw was pretreated by PHP (the concentrated H3PO4 plus H2O2) to clarify effects of temperature, time and H3PO4 proportion on hemicellulose removal, delignification, cellulose recovery and enzymatic digestibility. Overall, hemicellulose removal was intensified by PHP comparing to the concentrated H3PO4. Moreover, efficient delignification specially happened in PHP pretreatment. Hemicellulose removal and delignification by PHP positively responded to temperature and time. Increasing H3PO4 proportion in PHP can promote hemicellulose removal, however, decrease the delignification. Maximum hemicellulose removal and delignification were achieved at 100% and 83.7% by PHP. Enzymatic digestibility of PHP-pretreated wheat straw was greatly improved by increasing temperature, time and H3PO4 proportion, and complete hydrolysis can be achieved consequently. As temperature of 30-40°C, time of 2.0 h and H3PO4 proportion of 60% were employed, more than 92% cellulose was retained in the pretreated wheat straw, and 29.1-32.6g glucose can be harvested from 100g wheat straw. PMID:26264398

  11. Production of fuel ethanol from bamboo by concentrated sulfuric acid hydrolysis followed by continuous ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhao-Yong; Tang, Yue-Qin; Iwanaga, Tomohiro; Sho, Tomohiro; Kida, Kenji

    2011-12-01

    An efficient process for the production of fuel ethanol from bamboo that consisted of hydrolysis with concentrated sulfuric acid, removal of color compounds, separation of acid and sugar, hydrolysis of oligosaccharides and subsequent continuous ethanol fermentation was developed. The highest sugar recovery efficiency was 81.6% when concentrated sulfuric acid hydrolysis was carried out under the optimum conditions. Continuous separation of acid from the saccharified liquid after removal of color compounds with activated carbon was conducted using an improved simulated moving bed (ISMB) system, and 98.4% of sugar and 90.5% of acid were recovered. After oligosaccharide hydrolysis and pH adjustment, the unsterilized saccharified liquid was subjected to continuous ethanol fermentation using Saccharomycescerevisiae strain KF-7. The ethanol concentration, the fermentation yield based on glucose and the ethanol productivity were approximately 27.2 g/l, 92.0% and 8.2 g/l/h, respectively. These results suggest that the process is effective for production of fuel ethanol from bamboo.

  12. Optimization of chip size and moisture content to obtain high, combined sugar recovery after sulfur dioxide-catalyzed steam pretreatment of softwood and enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulosic component.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Colin; Arantes, Valdeir; Saddler, Jack

    2015-01-01

    The influence of chip size and moisture content on the combined sugar recovery after steam pretreatment of lodgepole pine and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulosic component were investigated using response surface methodology. Chip size had little influence on sugar recovery after both steam pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. In contrast, the moisture of the chips greatly influenced the relative severity of steam pretreatment and, as a result, the combined sugar recovery from the hemicellulosic and cellulosic fractions. Irrespective of chip size and the pretreatment temperature, time, and SO2 loading that were used, the relative severity of pretreatment was highest at a moisture of 30-40w/w%. However, the predictive model indicated that an elevated moisture content of roughly 50w/w% (about the moisture content of a standard softwood mill chip) would result in the highest, combined sugar recovery (80%) over the widest range of steam pretreatment conditions.

  13. Selective hydrolysis of hemicellulose from wheat straw by a nanoscale solid acid catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chao; Wang, Chunming; Huang, Fan; Wang, Fengxue; Jia, Honghua; Zhou, Hua; Wei, Ping

    2015-10-20

    A nanoscale catalyst, solid acid SO4(2-)/Fe2O3 with both Lewis and Brønsted acidity was found to effectively hydrolyze hemicellulose while keeping cellulose and lignin inactive, and selective hydrolysis of hemicellulose from wheat straw by this catalyst was also confirmed. The factors that significantly affected hydrolysis process were investigated with response surface methodology, and the optimum conditions for time, temperature, and ratio of wheat straw to catalyst (w/w) were calculated to be 4.10h, 141.97°C, and 1.95:1, respectively. A maximum hemicellulose hydrolysis yield of 63.5% from wheat straw could be obtained under these conditions. In addition, the catalyst could be recycled six times with high activity remaining.

  14. Acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of BMS-582664: degradation product identification and mechanism elucidation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang; Derbin, George; Miller, Scott; Badawy, Sherif; Hussain, Munir

    2012-09-01

    BMS-582664 is an investigational drug intended for cancer treatment through oral administration. The preformulation studies revealed two unexpected degradation products under acidic conditions by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Additional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry results suggested that these were cleavage (hydrolysis) products of a diaryl ether. To further understand the degradation mechanism, the reaction was carried out in (18) O-labeled water. The (18) O was found to be incorporated in only one of the two hydrolysis products. The results suggest that the corresponding α carbon in the heterocycle was unusually eletrophilic in acidic conditions probably because of the protonation of the neighboring nitrogen. This led to the selective attack by water and the consequent hydrolysis products. The study provides a new example of hydrolytic degradation of pharmaceutical compounds, and the reaction center is an aromatic heterocyclic carbon with an aryloxy substitution. PMID:22189636

  15. Improved ethanol yield and reduced Minimum Ethanol Selling Price (MESP) by modifying low severity dilute acid pretreatment with deacetylation and mechanical refining: 1) Experimental

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Historically, acid pretreatment technology for the production of bio-ethanol from corn stover has required severe conditions to overcome biomass recalcitrance. However, the high usage of acid and steam at severe pretreatment conditions hinders the economic feasibility of the ethanol production from biomass. In addition, the amount of acetate and furfural produced during harsh pretreatment is in the range that strongly inhibits cell growth and impedes ethanol fermentation. The current work addresses these issues through pretreatment with lower acid concentrations and temperatures incorporated with deacetylation and mechanical refining. Results The results showed that deacetylation with 0.1 M NaOH before acid pretreatment improved the monomeric xylose yield in pretreatment by up to 20% while keeping the furfural yield under 2%. Deacetylation also improved the glucose yield by 10% and the xylose yield by 20% during low solids enzymatic hydrolysis. Mechanical refining using a PFI mill further improved sugar yields during both low- and high-solids enzymatic hydrolysis. Mechanical refining also allowed enzyme loadings to be reduced while maintaining high yields. Deacetylation and mechanical refining are shown to assist in achieving 90% cellulose yield in high-solids (20%) enzymatic hydrolysis. When fermentations were performed under pH control to evaluate the effect of deacetylation and mechanical refining on the ethanol yields, glucose and xylose utilizations over 90% and ethanol yields over 90% were achieved. Overall ethanol yields were calculated based on experimental results for the base case and modified cases. One modified case that integrated deacetylation, mechanical refining, and washing was estimated to produce 88 gallons of ethanol per ton of biomass. Conclusion The current work developed a novel bio-ethanol process that features pretreatment with lower acid concentrations and temperatures incorporated with deacetylation and mechanical refining. The

  16. Pretreatment of solid carbonaceous material with dicarboxylic aromatic acids to prevent scale formation

    DOEpatents

    Brunson, Roy J.

    1982-01-01

    Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by pretreatment with a pretreating agent selected from the group consisting of phthalic acid, phthalic anhydride, pyromellitic acid and pyromellitic anhydride. The pretreatment is believed to convert the scale-forming components to the corresponding phthalate and/or pyromellitate prior to liquefaction. The pretreatment is accomplished at a total pressure within the range from about 1 to about 2 atmospheres. Temperature during pretreatment will generally be within the range from about 5.degree. to about 80.degree. C.

  17. Dilute acid/metal salt hydrolysis of lignocellulosics

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Quang A.; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2002-01-01

    A modified dilute acid method of hydrolyzing the cellulose and hemicellulose in lignocellulosic material under conditions to obtain higher overall fermentable sugar yields than is obtainable using dilute acid alone, comprising: impregnating a lignocellulosic feedstock with a mixture of an amount of aqueous solution of a dilute acid catalyst and a metal salt catalyst sufficient to provide higher overall fermentable sugar yields than is obtainable when hydrolyzing with dilute acid alone; loading the impregnated lignocellulosic feedstock into a reactor and heating for a sufficient period of time to hydrolyze substantially all of the hemicellulose and greater than 45% of the cellulose to water soluble sugars; and recovering the water soluble sugars.

  18. Combined Effect of Free Nitrous Acid Pretreatment and Sodium Dodecylbenzene Sulfonate on Short-Chain Fatty Acid Production from Waste Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianwei; Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bingjie; Wang, Qilin; Wang, Dongbo; Yang, Qi; Sun, Yingjie; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Free nitrous acid (FNA) serving as a pretreatment is an effective approach to accelerate sludge disintegration. Also, sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), a type of surfactants, has been determined at significant levels in sewage sludge, which thereby affects the characteristics of sludge. Both FNA pretreatment and sludge SDBS levels can affect short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) generation from sludge anaerobic fermentation. To date, however, the combined effect of FNA pretreatment and SDBS presence on SCFA production as well as the corresponding mechanisms have never been documented. This work therefore aims to provide such support. Experimental results showed that the combination of FNA and SDBS treatment not only improved SCFA accumulation but also shortened the fermentation time. The maximal SCFA accumulation of 334.5 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/g volatile suspended solids (VSS) was achieved at 1.54 mg FNA/L treatment and 0.02 g/g dry sludge, which was respectively 1.79-fold and 1.41-fold of that from FNA treatment and sludge containing SDBS alone. Mechanism investigations revealed that the combined FNA pretreatment and SDBS accelerated solubilization, hydrolysis, and acidification steps but inhibited the methanogenesis. All those observations were in agreement with SCFA enhancement. PMID:26868898

  19. Thermal synthesis and hydrolysis of polyglyceric acid. [in orgin of life studying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1989-01-01

    Polyglyceric acid was synthesized by thermal condensation of glyceric acid at 80 C in the presence and absence of two mole percent of sulfuric acid catalyst. The acid catalyst accelerated the polymerization over 100-fold and made possible the synthesis of insoluble polymers of both L- and DL-glyceric acid by heating for less than 1 day. Racemization of L-glyceric acid yielded less than 1 percent D-glyceric acid in condensations carried out at 80 C with catalyst for 1 day and without catalyst for 12 days. The condensation of L-glyceric acid yielded an insoluble polymer much more readily than condensation of DL-glyceric acid. Studies of the hydrolysis of poly-DL-glyceric acid revealed that it was considerably more stable under mild acidic conditions compared to neutral pH. The relationship of this study to the origin of life is discussed.

  20. Reduction in environmental impact of sulfuric acid hydrolysis of bamboo for production of fuel ethanol.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhao-Yong; Tang, Yue-Qin; Morimura, Shigeru; Kida, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Fuel ethanol can be produced from bamboo by concentrated sulfuric acid hydrolysis followed by continuous ethanol fermentation. To reduce the environmental impact of this process, treatment of the stillage, reuse of the sulfuric acid and reduction of the process water used were studied. The total organic carbon (TOC) concentration of stillage decreased from 29,688 to 269 mg/l by thermophilic methane fermentation followed by aerobic treatment. Washing the solid residue from acid hydrolysis with effluent from the biological treatment increased the sugar recovery from 69.3% to 79.3%. Sulfuric acid recovered during the acid-sugar separation process was condensed and reused for hydrolysis, resulting in a sugar recovery efficiency of 76.8%, compared to 80.1% when fresh sulfuric acid was used. After acetate removal, the condensate could be reused as elution water in the acid-sugar separation process. As much as 86.3% of the process water and 77.6% of the sulfuric acid could be recycled.

  1. Optimization of dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment to maximize combined sugar yield from sugarcane bagasse for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Y; Cheng, H; Görgens, J F

    2014-01-01

    Increasing fermentable sugar yields per gram of biomass depends strongly on optimal selection of varieties and optimization of pretreatment conditions. In this study, dilute acid pretreatment of bagasse from six varieties of sugarcane was investigated in connection with enzymatic hydrolysis for maximum combined sugar yield (CSY). The CSY from the varieties were also compared with the results from industrial bagasse. The results revealed considerable differences in CSY between the varieties. Up to 22.7 % differences in CSY at the optimal conditions was observed. The combined sugar yield difference between the best performing variety and the industrial bagasse was 34.1 %. High ratio of carbohydrates to lignin and low ash content favored the release of sugar from the substrates. At mild pretreatment conditions, the differences in bioconversion efficiency between varieties were greater than at severe condition. This observation suggests that under less severe conditions the glucose recovery was largely determined by chemical composition of biomass. The results from this study support the possibility of increasing sugar yields or improving the conversion efficiency when pretreatment optimization is performed on varieties with improved properties.

  2. Enzymatic saccharification coupling with polyester recovery from cotton-based waste textiles by phosphoric acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fei; Xiao, Wenxiong; Lin, Lili; Yang, Gang; Zhang, Yanzong; Deng, Shihuai

    2013-02-01

    In order to recycle the cotton-based waste textiles, a novel process was designed for pretreating waste textiles with phosphoric acid to recover polyester and fermentable sugar. The effects of pretreatment conditions including, phosphoric acid concentration, pretreatment temperature, time, and ratio of textiles and phosphoric acid were thoroughly investigated. Results indicated the mentioned four factors had significant influences on sugar and polyester recovery. Almost complete polyester recovery was achieved by enhancing phosphoric acid concentration, temperature and pretreatment time or reducing the ratio of textiles and phosphoric acid. However, these behaviors decreased the sugar recovery seriously. 100% polyester recovery with a maximum sugar recovery of 79.2% was achieved at the optimized conditions (85% phosphoric acid, 50°C, 7h, and the ratio of 1:15). According to the technical and cost-benefit analysis, it was technically feasible and potentially profitable to recover polyester and sugar from waste textiles by phosphoric acid pretreatment.

  3. Catalytic conversion of carbohydrates to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural from the waste liquid of acid hydrolysis NCC.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yonghui; Liu, Pengtao; Liu, Zhong

    2016-05-20

    The principal goal of this work was to reuse the carbohydrates and recycle sulfuric acid in the waste liquid of acid hydrolysis nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC). Therefore, in this work, the optimizations of further hydrolysis of waste liquid of acid hydrolysis NCC and catalytic conversion of L4 to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) were studied. Sulfuric acid was separated by spiral wound diffusion dialysis (SWDD). The results revealed that cellulose can be hydrolyze to glucose absolutely under the condition of temperature 35 °C, 3 h, and sulfuric acid's concentration 62 wt%. And 78.3% sulfuric acid was recovered by SWDD. The yield of 5-HMF was highest in aqueous solution under the optimal condition was as follows, temperature 160 °C, 3 h, and sulfuric acid's concentration 12 wt%. Then the effect of biphasic solvent systems catalytic conversion and inorganic salt as additives were still examined. The results showed that both of them contributed to prepare 5-HMF. The yield and selectivity of 5-HMF was up to 21.0% and 31.4%, respectively.

  4. Oxidation and hydrolysis of lactic acid in near-critical water

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.; Vallejo, D.; Gloyna, E.F.; Portela, J.R.

    1999-07-01

    Hydrothermal reactions (oxidation and hydrolysis) involving lactic acid (LA) were studied at temperatures ranging from 300 to 400 C and a nominal pressure of 27.6 MPa. Kinetic models were developed with respect to concentrations of LA and total organic carbon (TOC), respectively. On the basis of identified liquid and gaseous products, pathways for hydrothermal reactions involving lactic acid were proposed. Acetic acid and acetaldehyde were confirmed as the major liquid intermediates for oxidation and hydrolysis reactions, respectively. Carbon monoxide and methane were identified as the major gaseous byproducts from these reactions. These results demonstrate the potential of completely oxidizing, as well as converting, lactic acid into other organic products, in high-temperature water.

  5. Difference analysis of the enzymatic hydrolysis performance of acid-catalyzed steam-exploded corn stover before and after washing with water.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junjun; Shi, Linli; Zhang, Lingling; Xu, Yong; Yong, Qiang; Ouyang, Jia; Yu, Shiyuan

    2016-10-01

    The difference in the enzymatic hydrolysis yield of acid-catalyzed steam-exploded corn stover (ASC) before and after washing with water reached approximately 15 % under the same conditions. The reasons for the difference in the yield between ASC and washed ASC (wASC) were determined through the analysis of the composition of ASC prehydrolyzate and sugar concentration of enzymatic hydrolyzate. Salts produced by neutralization (CaSO4, Na2SO4, K2SO4, and (NH4)2SO4), sugars (polysaccharides, oligosaccharides, and monosaccharides), sugar-degradation products (weak acids and furans), and lignin-degradation products (ethyl acetate extracts and nine main lignin-degradation products) were back-added to wASC. Results showed that these products, except furans, exerted negative effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. According to the characteristics of acid-catalyzed steam explosion pretreatment, the five sugar-degradation products' mixture and salts [Na2SO4, (NH4)2SO4] showed minimal negative inhibition effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. By contrast, furans demonstrated a promotion effect. Moreover, soluble sugars, such as 13 g/L xylose (decreased by 6.38 %), 5 g/L cellobiose (5.36 %), 10 g/L glucose (3.67 %), as well as lignin-degradation products, and ethyl acetate extracts (4.87 %), exhibited evident inhibition effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. Therefore, removal of soluble sugars and lignin-degradation products could effectively promote the enzymatic hydrolysis performance. PMID:27277746

  6. Difference analysis of the enzymatic hydrolysis performance of acid-catalyzed steam-exploded corn stover before and after washing with water.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junjun; Shi, Linli; Zhang, Lingling; Xu, Yong; Yong, Qiang; Ouyang, Jia; Yu, Shiyuan

    2016-10-01

    The difference in the enzymatic hydrolysis yield of acid-catalyzed steam-exploded corn stover (ASC) before and after washing with water reached approximately 15 % under the same conditions. The reasons for the difference in the yield between ASC and washed ASC (wASC) were determined through the analysis of the composition of ASC prehydrolyzate and sugar concentration of enzymatic hydrolyzate. Salts produced by neutralization (CaSO4, Na2SO4, K2SO4, and (NH4)2SO4), sugars (polysaccharides, oligosaccharides, and monosaccharides), sugar-degradation products (weak acids and furans), and lignin-degradation products (ethyl acetate extracts and nine main lignin-degradation products) were back-added to wASC. Results showed that these products, except furans, exerted negative effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. According to the characteristics of acid-catalyzed steam explosion pretreatment, the five sugar-degradation products' mixture and salts [Na2SO4, (NH4)2SO4] showed minimal negative inhibition effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. By contrast, furans demonstrated a promotion effect. Moreover, soluble sugars, such as 13 g/L xylose (decreased by 6.38 %), 5 g/L cellobiose (5.36 %), 10 g/L glucose (3.67 %), as well as lignin-degradation products, and ethyl acetate extracts (4.87 %), exhibited evident inhibition effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. Therefore, removal of soluble sugars and lignin-degradation products could effectively promote the enzymatic hydrolysis performance.

  7. Structure and hydrolysis of p-(2-oxo-1-pyrrolidinyl)- benzenesulfonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kukalenko, S.S.; Frolov, S.I.; Lim, I.K.; Putsykina, E.B.; Vasil'ev, A.F.

    1987-11-20

    With the aid of vibrational and PMR spectra of p-(2-oso-1-pyrrolidinyl)benzenesulfonic acid it was shown that in the solid state it exists as an O-protonated dipolar ion in which the protonated amide cation and sulfonate ion are intermolecularly linked by a very strong hydrogen bond. In concentrated hydrochloric acid the dipolar ion is an intermediate link in the chain of processes in the hydrolysis of the amide bond of the lactam ring.

  8. Dry dilute acid pretreatment by co-currently feeding of corn stover feedstock and dilute acid solution without impregnation.

    PubMed

    He, Yanqing; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie

    2014-04-01

    Impregnation of lignocellulose materials with dilute acid solution is a routine operation in conventional dilute acid pretreatment. The dry dilute acid pretreatment (DDAP) at high solids content up to 70% is naturally considered to require longer impregnation time. In this study, a co-currently feeding operation of corn stover and dilute sulfuric acid solution without any impregnation was tested for DDAP. The DDAP pretreated corn stover without impregnation is found to be essentially no difference in pretreatment efficiency compared to those with impregnation in the helically agitated reactor. The yield from cellulose to ethanol in SSF again shows no obvious difference between the DDAP pretreated corn stover with and without impregnation. This study suggests that impregnation in DDAP was not necessary under the helical agitation mixing. The results provided a useful way of cost reduction and process simplification in pretreatment. PMID:24630497

  9. Dry dilute acid pretreatment by co-currently feeding of corn stover feedstock and dilute acid solution without impregnation.

    PubMed

    He, Yanqing; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie

    2014-04-01

    Impregnation of lignocellulose materials with dilute acid solution is a routine operation in conventional dilute acid pretreatment. The dry dilute acid pretreatment (DDAP) at high solids content up to 70% is naturally considered to require longer impregnation time. In this study, a co-currently feeding operation of corn stover and dilute sulfuric acid solution without any impregnation was tested for DDAP. The DDAP pretreated corn stover without impregnation is found to be essentially no difference in pretreatment efficiency compared to those with impregnation in the helically agitated reactor. The yield from cellulose to ethanol in SSF again shows no obvious difference between the DDAP pretreated corn stover with and without impregnation. This study suggests that impregnation in DDAP was not necessary under the helical agitation mixing. The results provided a useful way of cost reduction and process simplification in pretreatment.

  10. Acid hydrolysis of native and annealed starches and branch-structure of their Naegeli dextrins.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Yuta; Wang, Ya-Jane

    2003-11-21

    Eight commercial starches, including common corn, waxy corn, wheat, tapioca, potato, Hylon V, Hylon VII, and mung bean starch, were annealed by a multiple-step process, and their gelatinization characteristics were determined. Annealed starches had higher gelatinization temperatures, reduced gelatinization ranges, and increased gelatinization enthalpies than their native starches. The annealed starches with the highest gelatinization enthalpies were subjected to acid hydrolysis with 15.3% H2SO4, and Naegeli dextrins were prepared after 10 days' hydrolysis. Annealing increased the acid susceptibility of native starches in the first (rapid) and the second (slow) phases with potato starch showing the greatest and high amylose starches showing the least changes. Starches with a larger shift in onset gelatinization temperature also displayed a greater percent hydrolysis. The increase in susceptibility to acid hydrolysis was proposed to result from defective and porous structures that resulted after annealing. Although annealing perfected the crystalline structure, it also produced void space, which led to porous structures and possible starch granule defects. The molecular size distribution and chain length distribution of Naegeli dextrins of annealed and native starches were analyzed. The reorganization of the starch molecule during annealing occurred mainly within the crystalline lamellae. Imperfect double helices in the crystalline lamellae improved after annealing, and the branch linkages at the imperfect double helices became protected by the improved crystalline structure. Therefore, more long chains were observed in the Naegeli dextrins of annealed starches than in native starches.

  11. Excess sludge reduction using pilot-scale lysis-cryptic growth system integrated ultrasonic/alkaline disintegration and hydrolysis/acidogenesis pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huaji; Zhang, Shuting; Lu, Xuebin; Xi, Bo; Guo, Xingli; Wang, Han; Duan, Jingxiao

    2012-07-01

    A pilot-scale lysis-cryptic growth system was built and operated continuously for excess sludge reduction. Combined ultrasonic/alkaline disintegration and hydrolysis/acidogenesis were integrated into its sludge pretreatment system. Continuous operation showed that the observed biomass yield and the sludge reduction efficiency of the lysis-cryptic growth system were 0.27 kg VSS/kg COD consumed and 56.5%, respectively. The water quality of its effluent was satisfactory. The sludge pretreatment system performed well and its TCOD removal efficiency was 7.9% which contributed a sludge reduction efficiency of 2.1%. The SCOD, VFA, TN, NH(4)(+)-N, TP and pH in the supernatant of pretreated sludge were 1790 mg/L, 1530 mg COD/L, 261.1mg/L, 114.0mg/L, 93.1mg/L and 8.69, respectively. The total operation cost of the lysis-cryptic growth system was $ 0.186/m(3) wastewater, which was 11.4% less than that of conventional activated sludge (CAS) system without excess sludge pretreatment.

  12. Fundamental study on kinetics and transport phenomena in low water dilute acid total hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Auburn University

    2004-04-07

    The overall objective of this research is to delineate the process of the dilute-acid hydrolysis of biomass and seek better understanding of the reactions involving dilute-acid treatment of lignocellulosic biomass. Specifically the scope of the work entails the following two primary technical elements: Verification of the heterogeneous nature of the reaction mechanism in dilute-acid hydrolysis of cellulosic component of the biomass. Experimental investigation to identify the overall reaction pattern and the kinetic constants associated with dilute-acid hydrolysis of the cellulosic component of the agricultural residues.

  13. Caffeic acid treatment alters the extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis in platelets and lymphocytes of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Javed; Spanevello, Roselia Maria; Pimentel, Victor Camera; Gutierres, Jessié; Thomé, Gustavo; Cardoso, Andreia; Zanini, Daniela; Martins, Caroline; Palma, Heloisa Einloft; Bagatini, Margarete Dulce; Baldissarelli, Jucimara; Schmatz, Roberta; Leal, Cláudio Alberto Martins; da Costa, Pauline; Morsch, Vera Maria; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of caffeic acid on ectonucleotidase activities such as NTPDase (nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase), Ecto-NPP (nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase), 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) in platelets and lymphocytes of rats, as well as in the profile of platelet aggregation. Animals were divided into five groups: I (control); II (oil); III (caffeic acid 10 mg/kg); IV (caffeic acid 50 mg/kg); and V (caffeic acid 100 mg/kg). Animals were treated with caffeic acid diluted in oil for 30 days. In platelets, caffeic acid decreased the ATP hydrolysis and increased ADP hydrolysis in groups III, IV and V when compared to control (P<0.05). The 5'-nucleotidase activity was decreased, while E-NPP and ADA activities were increased in platelets of rats of groups III, IV and V (P<0.05). Caffeic acid reduced significantly the platelet aggregation in the animals of groups III, IV and V in relation to group I (P<0.05). In lymphocytes, the NTPDase and ADA activities were increased in all groups treated with caffeic acid when compared to control (P<0.05). These findings demonstrated that the enzymes were altered in tissues by caffeic acid and this compound decreased the platelet aggregation suggesting that caffeic acid should be considered a potentially therapeutic agent in disorders related to the purinergic system.

  14. Monomeric carbohydrates production from olive tree pruning biomass: modeling of dilute acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Juan G; Mateo, Soledad; Fonseca, Bruno G; Roberto, Inês C; Sánchez, Sebastián; Moya, Alberto J

    2013-12-01

    Statistical modeling and optimization of dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of olive tree pruning biomass has been performed using response surface methodology. Central composite rotatable design was applied to assess the effect of acid concentration, reaction time and temperature on efficiency and selectivity of hemicellulosic monomeric carbohydrates to d-xylose. Second-order polynomial model was fitted to experimental data to find the optimum reaction conditions by multiple regression analysis. The monomeric d-xylose recovery 85% (as predicted by the model) was achieved under optimized hydrolysis conditions (1.27% acid concentration, 96.5°C and 138 min), confirming the high validity of the developed model. The content of d-glucose (8.3%) and monosaccharide degradation products (0.1% furfural and 0.04% 5-hydroxymethylfurfural) provided a high quality subtract, ready for subsequent biochemical conversion to value-added products.

  15. Prediction of acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials in batch and plug flow reactors.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Oscar Johnny; Gómez-García, Miguel Ángel; Fontalvo, Javier

    2013-08-01

    This study unifies contradictory conclusions reported in literature on acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials, using batch and plug flow reactors, regarding the influence of the initial liquid ratio of acid aqueous solution to solid lignocellulosic material on sugar yield and concentration. The proposed model takes into account the volume change of the reaction media during the hydrolysis process. An error lower than 8% was found between predictions, using a single set of kinetic parameters for several liquid to solid ratios, and reported experimental data for batch and plug flow reactors. For low liquid-solid ratios, the poor wetting and the acid neutralization, due to the ash presented in the solid, will both reduce the sugar yield. Also, this study shows that both reactors are basically equivalent in terms of the influence of the liquid to solid ratio on xylose and glucose yield.

  16. Monomeric carbohydrates production from olive tree pruning biomass: modeling of dilute acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Juan G; Mateo, Soledad; Fonseca, Bruno G; Roberto, Inês C; Sánchez, Sebastián; Moya, Alberto J

    2013-12-01

    Statistical modeling and optimization of dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of olive tree pruning biomass has been performed using response surface methodology. Central composite rotatable design was applied to assess the effect of acid concentration, reaction time and temperature on efficiency and selectivity of hemicellulosic monomeric carbohydrates to d-xylose. Second-order polynomial model was fitted to experimental data to find the optimum reaction conditions by multiple regression analysis. The monomeric d-xylose recovery 85% (as predicted by the model) was achieved under optimized hydrolysis conditions (1.27% acid concentration, 96.5°C and 138 min), confirming the high validity of the developed model. The content of d-glucose (8.3%) and monosaccharide degradation products (0.1% furfural and 0.04% 5-hydroxymethylfurfural) provided a high quality subtract, ready for subsequent biochemical conversion to value-added products. PMID:24096282

  17. Prediction of acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials in batch and plug flow reactors.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Oscar Johnny; Gómez-García, Miguel Ángel; Fontalvo, Javier

    2013-08-01

    This study unifies contradictory conclusions reported in literature on acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials, using batch and plug flow reactors, regarding the influence of the initial liquid ratio of acid aqueous solution to solid lignocellulosic material on sugar yield and concentration. The proposed model takes into account the volume change of the reaction media during the hydrolysis process. An error lower than 8% was found between predictions, using a single set of kinetic parameters for several liquid to solid ratios, and reported experimental data for batch and plug flow reactors. For low liquid-solid ratios, the poor wetting and the acid neutralization, due to the ash presented in the solid, will both reduce the sugar yield. Also, this study shows that both reactors are basically equivalent in terms of the influence of the liquid to solid ratio on xylose and glucose yield. PMID:23770535

  18. Kinetics of acid hydrolysis and reactivity of some antibacterial hydrophilic iron(II) imino-complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaker, Ali Mohamed; Nassr, Lobna Abdel-Mohsen Ebaid; Adam, Mohamed Shaker Saied; Mohamed, Ibrahim Mohamed Abdelhalim

    2015-05-01

    Kinetic study of acid hydrolysis of some hydrophilic Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes with antibacterial properties was performed using spectrophotometry. The Schiff base ligands were derived from sodium 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde-5-sulfonate and glycine, L-alanine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine, DL-methionine, DL-serine, or L-phenylalanine. The reaction was studied in aqueous media under conditions of pseudo-first order kinetics. Moreover, the acid hydrolysis was studied at different temperatures and the activation parameters were calculated. The general rate equation was suggested as follows: rate = k obs [Complex], where k obs = k 2 [H+]. The evaluated rate constants and activation parameters are consistent with the hydrophilicity of the investigated complexes.

  19. Hexafluorozirconic Acid Based Surface Pretreatments: Characterization and Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikari, Saikat; Unocic, Kinga A; Zhai, Yumei; Frankel, Gerald; Zimmerman, John; Fristad, W

    2010-01-01

    A new phosphate-free pretreatment from Henkel Corp. named TecTalis , was investigated. The treatment bath is composed of dilute hexafluorozirconic acid with small quantities of non-hazardous components containing Si and Cu. The performance of treated steel was compared to samples treated in a phosphate conversion coating bath, in simple hexafluorozirconic acid and in TecTalis without the addition of the Cu containing component. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the coating surface morphology, structure and composition. A Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) was used for studying film growth kinetics on thin films of pure Fe, Al and Zn. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was performed on treated and painted steel for studying long-term corrosion performance of the coatings. The phosphate-free coating provided long-term corrosion performance comparable to that of phosphate conversion coatings. The coatings uniformly cover the surface in the form of 10-20 nm sized nodules and clusters of these features up to 500 nm in size. The coatings are usually about 20-30 nm thick and are mostly composed of Zr and O with enrichment of copper at randomly distributed locations and clusters.

  20. [Structural characterization of Astragalus polysaccharides using partial acid hydrolysis-hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liang, Tu; Fu, Qing; Xin, Huaxia; Li, Fangbing; Jin, Yu; Liang, Xinmiao

    2014-12-01

    Water-soluble polysaccharides from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) have properties of broad-spectrum treatment and low toxicity, making them as important components in natural medicines and health products. In order to solve the problem of polysaccharides characterization caused by their complex structures, a "bottom-up" approach was developed to complete the characterization of polysaccharides from Astragalus. Firstly, Astragalus pieces were extracted with hot water and then were precipitated by ethanol to obtain Astragalus polysaccharides. Secondly, a partial acid hydrolysis method was carried out and the effects of time, acid concentration and temperature on hydrolysis were investigated. The degree of hydrolysis increased along with the increase of hydrolysis time and acid concentration. The temperature played a great role in the hydrolysis process. No hydrolysis of the polysaccharides occurred at low temperature, while the polysaccharides were almost hydrolyzed to monosaccharide at high temperature. Under the optimum hydrolysis conditions (4 h, 1.5 mol/L trifluoroacetic acid, and 80 °C), Astragalus polysaccharides were hydrolyzed to characteristic oligosaccharide fragments. At last, a hydrophilic liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method was used for the separation and structural characterization of the polysaccharide hydrolysates. The results showed that the resulting polysaccharides were mainly 1--> 4 linear glucan, and gluco-oligosaccharides with the degrees of polymerization (DP) of 4 - 11 were obtained after partial acid hydrolysis. The significance of this study is that it is the guidance for the characterization of other TCM polysaccharides.

  1. Acid hydrolysis of crude tannins from infructescence of Platycarya strobilacea Sieb. et Zucc to produce ellagic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangliang; Wang, Yongmei; Xu, Man

    2014-01-01

    The infructescence of Platycarya strobilacea Sieb. et Zucc is a well-known traditional medicine in China, Japan and Korea. The infructescence of P. strobilacea Sieb. et Zucc is a rich source of ellagitannins that are composed of ellagic acid (EA) and gallic acid, linked to a sugar moiety. The aim of this study was to prepare EA by acid hydrolysis of crude tannins from the infructescence of P. strobilacea Sieb. et Zucc, and establish a new technological processing method for EA. The natural antioxidant EA was prepared by using the water extraction of infructescence of P. strobilacea Sieb. et Zucc, evaporation, condensation, acid hydrolysis and prepared by the process of crystallisation. The yield percentage of EA from crude EA was more than 20% and the purity of the product was more than 98%, as identified by using HPLC. The structure was identified on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and comparison with authentic compound.

  2. Surface Chemical Compositions and Dispersity of Starch Nanocrystals Formed by Sulfuric and Hydrochloric Acid Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Benxi; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Yaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Surface chemical compositions of starch nanocrystals (SNC) prepared using sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) hydrolysis were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and FT-IR. The results showed that carboxyl groups and sulfate esters were presented in SNC after hydrolysis with H2SO4, while no sulfate esters were detected in SNC during HCl-hydrolysis. TEM results showed that, compared to H2SO4-hydrolyzed sample, a wider size distribution of SNC prepared by HCl-hydrolysis were observed. Zeta-potentials were −23.1 and −5.02 mV for H2SO4- and HCl-hydrolyzed SNC suspensions at pH 6.5, respectively. Nevertheless, the zeta-potential values decreased to −32.3 and −10.2 mV as the dispersion pH was adjusted to 10.6. After placed 48 h at pH 10.6, zeta-potential increased to −24.1 mV for H2SO4-hydrolyzed SNC, while no change was detected for HCl-hydrolyzed one. The higher zeta-potential and relative small particle distribution of SNC caused more stable suspensions compared to HCl-hydrolyzed sample. PMID:24586246

  3. Surface chemical compositions and dispersity of starch nanocrystals formed by sulfuric and hydrochloric acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Benxi; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Yaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Surface chemical compositions of starch nanocrystals (SNC) prepared using sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) hydrolysis were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and FT-IR. The results showed that carboxyl groups and sulfate esters were presented in SNC after hydrolysis with H2SO4, while no sulfate esters were detected in SNC during HCl-hydrolysis. TEM results showed that, compared to H2SO4-hydrolyzed sample, a wider size distribution of SNC prepared by HCl-hydrolysis were observed. Zeta-potentials were -23.1 and -5.02 mV for H2SO4- and HCl-hydrolyzed SNC suspensions at pH 6.5, respectively. Nevertheless, the zeta-potential values decreased to -32.3 and -10.2 mV as the dispersion pH was adjusted to 10.6. After placed 48 h at pH 10.6, zeta-potential increased to -24.1 mV for H2SO4-hydrolyzed SNC, while no change was detected for HCl-hydrolyzed one. The higher zeta-potential and relative small particle distribution of SNC caused more stable suspensions compared to HCl-hydrolyzed sample.

  4. Effects of acid-hydrolysis and hydroxypropylation on functional properties of sago starch.

    PubMed

    Fouladi, Elham; Mohammadi Nafchi, Abdorreza

    2014-07-01

    In this study, sago starch was hydrolyzed by 0.14M HCl for 6, 12, 18, and 24h, and then modified by propylene oxide at a concentration of 0-30% (v/w). The effects of hydrolysis and etherification on molecular weight distribution, physicochemical, rheological, and thermal properties of dually modified starch were estimated. Acid hydrolysis of starch decreased the molecular weight of starch especially amylopectin, but hydroxypropylation had no effect on the molecular weight distribution. The degree of Molar substitution (DS) of hydroxypropylated starch after acid hydrolysis ranged from 0.007 to 0.15. Dually modified starch with a DS higher than 0.1 was completely soluble in cold water at up to 25% concentration of the starch. This study shows that hydroxypropylation and hydrolysis have synergistic effects unlike individual modifications. Dually modified sago starch can be applied to dip-molding for food and pharmaceutical processing because of its high solubility and low tendency for retrogradation.

  5. Asparagus stem as a new lignocellulosic biomass feedstock for anaerobic digestion: increasing hydrolysis rate, methane production and biodegradability by alkaline pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohua; Gu, Yu; Zhou, Xuefei; Zhang, Yalei

    2014-07-01

    Recently, anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass for methane production has attracted considerable attention. However, there is little information regarding methane production from asparagus stem, a typical lignocellulosic biomass, by anaerobic digestion. In this study, alkaline pretreatment of asparagus stem was investigated for its ability to increase hydrolysis rate and methane production and to improve biodegradability (BD). The hydrolysis rate increased with increasing NaOH dose, due to higher removal rates of lignin and hemicelluloses. However, the optimal NaOH dose was 6% (w/w) according to the specific methane production (SMP). Under this condition, the SMP and the technical digestion time of the NaOH-treated asparagus stem were 242.3 mL/g VS and 18 days, which were 38.4% higher and 51.4% shorter than those of the untreated sample, respectively. The BD was improved from 40.1% to 55.4%. These results indicate that alkaline pretreatment could be an efficient method for increasing methane production from asparagus stem.

  6. Non-ionic surfactants do not consistently improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of pure cellulose.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Chen, Hongmei; Qi, Feng; Zhao, Xuebing; Liu, Dehua

    2015-04-01

    Non-ionic surfactants have been frequently reported to improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass and pure cellulose. However, how the hydrolysis condition, substrate structure and cellulase formulation affect the beneficial action of surfactants has not been well elucidated. In this work, it was found that the enzymatic hydrolysis of pure cellulose was not consistently improved by surfactants. Contrarily, high surfactant concentration, e.g. 5 g/L, which greatly improved the hydrolysis of dilute acid pretreated substrates, actually showed notable inhibition to pure cellulose conversion in the late phase of hydrolysis. Under an optimal hydrolysis condition, the improvement by surfactant was limited, but under harsh conditions surfactant indeed could enhance cellulose conversion. It was proposed that non-ionic surfactants could interact with substrates and cellulases to impact the adsorption behaviors of cellulases. Therefore, the beneficial action of surfactants on pure cellulose hydrolysis is influenced by hydrolysis condition, cellulose structural features and cellulase formulation.

  7. Redistribution of Lignin Caused by Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D. K.; Donohoe, B. S.; Katahira, R.; Tucker, M. P.; Vinzant, T. B.; Himmel, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Research conducted at NREL has shown that lignin undergoes a phase transition during thermochemical pretreatments conducted above its glass transition temperature. The lignin coalesces within the plant cell wall and appears as microscopic droplets on cell surfaces. It is clear that pretreatment causes significant changes in lignin distribution in pretreatments at all scales from small laboratory reactors to pilot scale reactors. A method for selectively extracting lignin droplets from the surfaces of pretreated cell walls has allowed us to characterize the chemical nature and molecular weight distribution of this fraction. The effect of lignin redistribution on the digestibility of pretreated solids has also been tested. It is clear that removal of the droplets increases the digestibility of pretreated corn stover. The improved digestibility could be due to decreased non-specific binding of enzymes to lignin in the droplets, or because the droplets no longer block access to cellulose.

  8. Supercritical carbon dioxide combined with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate and ethanol for the pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Marcos Henrique Luciano; Vanelli, Bruno Angelo; Corazza, Marcos Lucio; Ramos, Luiz Pereira

    2015-09-01

    The use of green solvents for the partial delignification of milled sugarcane bagasse (1mm particle size) and for the enhancement of its susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis was demonstrated. The experiments were carried out for 2h using 40 g of supercritical carbon dioxide combined with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate and 15.8 g of ethanol. The effects of temperature (110-180 °C), pressure (195-250 bar) and IL-to-bagasse mass ratio (0:1-1:1) were investigated through a factorial design in which the response variables were the extent of delignification and both anhydroglucose and anhydroxylose contents in the pretreated materials. The highest delignification degree (41%) led to the best substrate for hydrolysis, giving a 70.7 wt% glucose yield after 12h using 5 wt% and Cellic CTec2® (Novozymes) at 10 mg g(-1) total solids. Hence, excellent substrates for hydrolysis were produced with a minimal IL requirement, which could be recovered by ethanol washing for its downstream processing and reuse. PMID:26056781

  9. Supercritical carbon dioxide combined with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate and ethanol for the pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Marcos Henrique Luciano; Vanelli, Bruno Angelo; Corazza, Marcos Lucio; Ramos, Luiz Pereira

    2015-09-01

    The use of green solvents for the partial delignification of milled sugarcane bagasse (1mm particle size) and for the enhancement of its susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis was demonstrated. The experiments were carried out for 2h using 40 g of supercritical carbon dioxide combined with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate and 15.8 g of ethanol. The effects of temperature (110-180 °C), pressure (195-250 bar) and IL-to-bagasse mass ratio (0:1-1:1) were investigated through a factorial design in which the response variables were the extent of delignification and both anhydroglucose and anhydroxylose contents in the pretreated materials. The highest delignification degree (41%) led to the best substrate for hydrolysis, giving a 70.7 wt% glucose yield after 12h using 5 wt% and Cellic CTec2® (Novozymes) at 10 mg g(-1) total solids. Hence, excellent substrates for hydrolysis were produced with a minimal IL requirement, which could be recovered by ethanol washing for its downstream processing and reuse.

  10. Free nitrous acid serving as a pretreatment method for alkaline fermentation to enhance short-chain fatty acid production from waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianwei; Wang, Dongbo; Li, Xiaoming; Yang, Qi; Chen, Hongbo; Zhong, Yu; Zeng, Guangming

    2015-07-01

    Alkaline condition (especially pH 10) has been demonstrated to be a promising method for short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production from waste activated sludge anaerobic fermentation, because it can effectively inhibit the activities of methanogens. However, due to the limit of sludge solubilization rate, long fermentation time is required but SCFA yield is still limited. This paper reports a new pretreatment method for alkaline fermentation, i.e., using free nitrous acid (FNA) to pretreat sludge for 2 d, by which the fermentation time is remarkably shortened and meanwhile the SCFA production is significantly enhanced. Experimental results showed the highest SCFA production of 370.1 mg COD/g VSS (volatile suspended solids) was achieved at 1.54 mg FNA/L pretreatment integration with 2 d of pH 10 fermentation, which was 4.7- and 1.5-fold of that in the blank (uncontrolled) and sole pH 10 systems, respectively. The total time of this integration system was only 4 d, whereas the corresponding time was 15 d in the blank and 8 d in the sole pH 10 systems. The mechanism study showed that compared with pH 10, FNA pretreatment accelerated disruption of both extracellular polymeric substances and cell envelope. After FNA pretreatment, pH 10 treatment (1 d) caused 38.0% higher substrate solubilization than the sole FNA, which indicated that FNA integration with pH 10 could cause positive synergy on sludge solubilization. It was also observed that this integration method benefited hydrolysis and acidification processes. Therefore, more SCFA was produced, but less fermentation time was required in the integrated system.

  11. Dilute acid hydrolysis of wheat straw hemicellulose at moderate temperature: a simplified kinetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, G.; Lopez-Santin, J.; Caminal, G.; Sola, C.

    1986-02-01

    Wheat straw has been hydrolized with sulfuric acid at 34 and 90 degrees C. The treatment at 90 degrees C yields complete solubilization of hemicellulose to xylose and arabinose without significant amounts of furfural. The influence of acid concentration was studied and the kinetics of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis has been modeled suggesting a two-consecutive reactions mechanism. This model is useful to explain the different behavior of the concentration of the two main sugars produced. The enhanced cellulose accessibility to enzymatic attack is also reported. 26 references.

  12. Structural changes of oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) after fungal and phosphoric acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Isroi; Ishola, Mofoluwake M; Millati, Ria; Syamsiah, Siti; Cahyanto, Muhammad N; Niklasson, Claes; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2012-01-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) was pretreated using white-rot fungus Pleurotus floridanus, phosphoric acid or their combination, and the results were evaluated based on the biomass components, and its structural and morphological changes. The carbohydrate losses after fungal, phosphoric acid, and fungal followed by phosphoric acid pretreatments were 7.89%, 35.65%, and 33.77%, respectively. The pretreatments changed the hydrogen bonds of cellulose and linkages between lignin and carbohydrate, which is associated with crystallinity of cellulose of OPEFB. Lateral Order Index (LOI) of OPEFB with no pretreatment, with fungal, phosphoric acid, and fungal followed by phosphoric acid pretreatments were 2.77, 1.42, 0.67, and 0.60, respectively. Phosphoric acid pretreatment showed morphological changes of OPEFB, indicated by the damage of fibre structure into smaller particle size. The fungal-, phosphoric acid-, and fungal followed by phosphoric acid pretreatments have improved the digestibility of OPEFB's cellulose by 4, 6.3, and 7.4 folds, respectively. PMID:23247371

  13. Inactivating effects of lignin-derived compounds released during lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment on the endo-glucanase catalyzed hydrolysis of carboxymethylcellulose: A study in continuous stirred ultrafiltration-membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Cantarella, Maria; Mucciante, Claudia; Cantarella, Laura

    2014-03-01

    This study focusses on the reversible/irreversible damage that selected phenolic compounds, released during steam-explosion pretreatment, mandatory for cellulose accessibility, causes on both stability and activity of a commercial cellulase (half-life=173h) during carboxymethyl-cellulose hydrolysis. Long-term experiments performed in continuous stirred UF-membrane bioreactors, operating at steady-state regime, in controlled operational conditions, allowed evaluating the inactivation-constant in the phenol presence (kd1) and after its removal (kd2) from the reactor feed. p-Hydroxybenzoic acid (1 and 2g L(-1)) are the extreme limits in the inactivating effect with enzyme half-lives 99.02 and 14.15h, respectively. The inactivation reversibility was assessed for vanillic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, syringaldehyde, p-coumaric acid, being kd1>kd2. p-Hydroxybenzaldehyde and protocatechuic acid irreversibly affected cellulase stability increasing its inactivation with kd2>kd1. p-Hydroxybenzaldehyde, 1g L(-1), syringaldehyde, and vanillin, at 2gL(-1), had similar kd1÷kd2. PMID:24486937

  14. Inactivating effects of lignin-derived compounds released during lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment on the endo-glucanase catalyzed hydrolysis of carboxymethylcellulose: A study in continuous stirred ultrafiltration-membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Cantarella, Maria; Mucciante, Claudia; Cantarella, Laura

    2014-03-01

    This study focusses on the reversible/irreversible damage that selected phenolic compounds, released during steam-explosion pretreatment, mandatory for cellulose accessibility, causes on both stability and activity of a commercial cellulase (half-life=173h) during carboxymethyl-cellulose hydrolysis. Long-term experiments performed in continuous stirred UF-membrane bioreactors, operating at steady-state regime, in controlled operational conditions, allowed evaluating the inactivation-constant in the phenol presence (kd1) and after its removal (kd2) from the reactor feed. p-Hydroxybenzoic acid (1 and 2g L(-1)) are the extreme limits in the inactivating effect with enzyme half-lives 99.02 and 14.15h, respectively. The inactivation reversibility was assessed for vanillic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, syringaldehyde, p-coumaric acid, being kd1>kd2. p-Hydroxybenzaldehyde and protocatechuic acid irreversibly affected cellulase stability increasing its inactivation with kd2>kd1. p-Hydroxybenzaldehyde, 1g L(-1), syringaldehyde, and vanillin, at 2gL(-1), had similar kd1÷kd2.

  15. Nanocellulose prepared by acid hydrolysis of isolated cellulose from sugarcane bagasse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulandari, W. T.; Rochliadi, A.; Arcana, I. M.

    2016-02-01

    Cellulose in nanometer range or called by nano-cellulose has attracted much attention from researchers because of its unique properties. Nanocellulose can be obtained by acid hydrolysis of cellulose. The cellulose used in this study was isolated from sugarcane bagasse, and then it was hydrolyzed by 50% sulfuric acid at 40 °C for 10 minutes. Nanocellulose has been characterized by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), Particle Size Analyzer (PSA), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Analysis of FTIR showed that there were not a new bond which formed during the hydrolysis process. Based on the TEM analysis, nano-cellulose has a spherical morphology with an average diameter of 111 nm and a maximum distribution of 95.9 nm determined by PSA. The XRD analysis showed that the crystallinity degree of nano-cellulose was higher than cellulose in the amount of 76.01%.

  16. A study of concentrated acid hydrolysis conversion of lignocellulosic materials to sugars using a co-rotating twin-screw reactor extruder and plug flow reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, William Scott

    Concerns about the ability of petroleum to continue supplying ever increasing global energy demands, at a price capable of generating continued economic growth, have spurred innovative research in the field of alternative energy. One alternative energy option that has the ability to provide long-term sustainable energy supplies for the global energy market is the conversion of lignocellulosic materials, via acid hydrolysis, to fermentable sugars for the production of fuel grade ethanol. This research demonstrates the ability of a co-rotating twin-screw reactor extruder and plug flow reactor to continuously convert lignocellulosic materials to fermentable sugars using high temperature concentrated acid hydrolysis. In addition to demonstrating continuous operation of the two-stage concentrated acid hydrolysis system, a number of design of experiments were conducted to model the twin-screw performance and maximize its ability to effectively solubilize lignocellulosic feedstocks in the high shear, elevated temperature, concentrated acid environment. These studies produced a base case twin-screw operating condition used to generate a standard extrudate composition for an extensive high temperature acid hydrolysis batch reactor kinetic modeling study. In this study a number of nonlinear and linear regression analyses were undertaken so that the concentration of less resistant cellulose, or the amount of solublilized extrudate cellulose, resistant cellulose, or non-solubilized extrudate cellulose, glucose, and decomposition products could be obtained as a function of time, temperature, and acid concentration. This study demonstrated that the theoretical cellulose conversion of 51% was limited by the amount of solubilized polysaccharides that could be produced in the twin-screw pretreatment. Further experimentation, showing twin-screw pretreatment lignocellulosic versatility, produced nearly identical results as the southern yellow pine sawdust experiments that were

  17. Comparison of microwave oven and convection oven for acid hydrolysis of dietary fiber polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Li, B W

    1998-01-01

    Hydrolysis of dietary fiber polysaccharides (DFP) is an integral part of any enzymatic-chemical method for dietary fiber analysis. Residues obtained after enzyme treatments of fiber-containing foods are usually suspended in 12 M sulfuric acid and kept at or slightly above ambient temperature for at least 1 h, and then the mixtures are diluted with deionized water to a final concentration of 1 M or 2 M acid, followed by heating at 100 degrees C in a water bath or convection oven for 1 or 2 h. Under these hydrolytic conditions, some degradation of the released monosaccharides generally takes place over the duration of hydrolysis. We investigated the feasibility of using microwave energy as a heat source to reduce time and minimize degradation. Preliminary tests were done on the well-characterized soy polysaccharide Fibrim. With a microwave digestion system equipped with temperature and pressure monitors and control lines, optimum settings of power (5%, 75%), time (up to 3 min and 30 s), temperature (35 degrees-55 degrees C), and pressure (45-65 psi) were determined for different foods depending on the residue weight and volume of acid. Results were comparable for microwave oven and convection oven hydrolysis of DFP from 5 foods with good correlations for neutral sugar values; r2 = 0.997 for arabinose, 0.925 for galactose, 0.981 for glucose, 0.969 for mannose, and 0.990 for xylose.

  18. Preparation of crystalline starch nanoparticles using cold acid hydrolysis and ultrasonication.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Young; Park, Dong June; Kim, Jong-Yea; Lim, Seung-Taik

    2013-10-15

    Waxy maize starch in an aqueous sulfuric acid solution (3.16 M, 14.7% solids) was hydrolyzed for 2-6 days, either isothermally at 40 °C or 4 °C, or at cycled temperatures of 4 and 40 °C (1 day each). The starch hydrolyzates were recovered as precipitates after centrifuging the dispersion (10,000 rpm, 10 min). The yield of starch hydrolyzates depended on the hydrolysis temperature and time, which varied from 6.8% to 78%. The starch hydrolyzed at 40 °C or 4/40 °C exhibited increased crystallinity determined by X-ray diffraction analysis, but melted in broader temperature range (from 60 °C to 110 °C). However, the starch hydrolyzed at 4 °C displayed the crystallinity and melting endotherm similar to those of native starch. The starch hydrolyzates recovered by centrifugation were re-dispersed in water (15% solids), and the dispersion was treated by an ultrasonic treatment (60% amplitude, 3min). The ultrasonication effectively fragmented the starch hydrolyzates to nanoparticles. The hydrolyzates obtained after 6 days of hydrolysis were more resistant to the ultrasonication than those after 2 or 4 days, regardless of hydrolysis temperatures. The starch nanoparticles could be prepared with high yield (78%) and crystallinity by 4 °C hydrolysis for 6 days followed by ultrasonication. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the starch nanoparticles had globular shapes with diameters ranging from 50 to 90 nm.

  19. Acid hydrolysis of native corn starch: morphology, crystallinity, rheological and thermal properties.

    PubMed

    Utrilla-Coello, R G; Hernández-Jaimes, C; Carrillo-Navas, H; González, F; Rodríguez, E; Bello-Pérez, L A; Vernon-Carter, E J; Alvarez-Ramirez, J

    2014-03-15

    The acid hydrolysis of native corn starch at 35 °C was monitored during 15 days. After this time, the residual solids were about 37.0 ± 3.0%. First-order kinetics described the hydrolysis data, giving a constant rate of kH = 0.18 ± 0.012 days(-1). Amylose content presented a sharp decrement of about 85% and X-ray diffraction results indicated a gradual increase in crystallinity during the first 3 days. SEM micrographs showed that hydrolysis disrupted granule morphology from an initial regular shape to increasingly irregular shapes. Fractal analysis of SEM images revealed an increase in surface roughness. Fast changes in the thermal effects were caused by molecular rearrangements after fast hydrolysis of amylose in the amorphous regions in the first day. Steady shear rate and oscillatory tests showed a sharp decrease of the apparent viscosity and an increase of the damping factor (tan(δ)) caused by amylose degradation. PMID:24528771

  20. Customized optimization of cellulase mixtures for differently pretreated rice straw.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Jung; Jung, Ju Yeon; Lee, Hee Jin; Park, Hyong Seok; Jung, Young Hoon; Park, Kyungmoon; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-05-01

    Lignocellulose contains a large amount of cellulose but is recalcitrant to enzymatic hydrolysis, which yields sugars for fuels or chemicals. Various pretreatment methods are used to improve the enzymatic digestibility of cellulose in lignocellulose. Depending on the lignocellulose types and pretreatment methods, biomass compositions and physical properties significantly vary. Therefore, customized enzyme mixtures have to be employed for the efficient hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulose. Here, using three recombinant model enzymes consisting of endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, and xylanase with a fixed amount of β-glucosidase, the optimal formulation of enzyme mixtures was designed for two differently pretreated rice straws (acid-pretreated or alkali-pretreated rice straw) by the mixture design methodology. As a result, different optimal compositions for the enzyme mixtures were employed depending on the type of pretreatment of rice straw. These results suggest that customized enzyme mixtures for pretreated lignocellulosic biomass are necessary to obtain increased sugar yields and should be considered in the industrial utilization of lignocellulose. PMID:25547288

  1. Evaluation of ultrasonic, acid, thermo-alkaline and enzymatic pre-treatments on anaerobic digestion of Ulva rigida for biogas production.

    PubMed

    Karray, Raida; Hamza, Manel; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Pre-treatment of macroalgae has received considerable research globally due to its influence on the technical, economic and environmental sustainability of algae biogas production. Some of the most promising pre-treatment methods require the application of chemicals, enzymatic, and mechanical. This study focused on these pre-treatments of Ulva rigida for biogas production. The evaluation of different pre-treatment in terms of reducing sugar yields demonstrates that 3.62, 2.88, 2.53 and 7.3g/L of reducing sugar was obtained in acid catalysis, thermoalkaline, ultrasonication and enzymatic pre-treatment, respectively. However in crude macroalgae only 0.6g/L of reducing sugar was given. After anaerobic digestion, the enzymatic hydrolysis was demonstrated the best biogas yield than other pre-treatment which reached 626.5mL/gCODint with 62.65% of biodegradability. The best demonstrated method which uses crude broth of Aspergillus niger showed an effective and environmentally friendly strategy for enhancing the biogas production yields after the anaerobic digestion.

  2. Evaluation of ultrasonic, acid, thermo-alkaline and enzymatic pre-treatments on anaerobic digestion of Ulva rigida for biogas production.

    PubMed

    Karray, Raida; Hamza, Manel; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Pre-treatment of macroalgae has received considerable research globally due to its influence on the technical, economic and environmental sustainability of algae biogas production. Some of the most promising pre-treatment methods require the application of chemicals, enzymatic, and mechanical. This study focused on these pre-treatments of Ulva rigida for biogas production. The evaluation of different pre-treatment in terms of reducing sugar yields demonstrates that 3.62, 2.88, 2.53 and 7.3g/L of reducing sugar was obtained in acid catalysis, thermoalkaline, ultrasonication and enzymatic pre-treatment, respectively. However in crude macroalgae only 0.6g/L of reducing sugar was given. After anaerobic digestion, the enzymatic hydrolysis was demonstrated the best biogas yield than other pre-treatment which reached 626.5mL/gCODint with 62.65% of biodegradability. The best demonstrated method which uses crude broth of Aspergillus niger showed an effective and environmentally friendly strategy for enhancing the biogas production yields after the anaerobic digestion. PMID:25855526

  3. Effect of thermochemical pretreatment on sewage sludge and its impact on carboxylic acids production.

    PubMed

    Rughoonundun, Hema; Granda, Cesar; Mohee, Romeela; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential of converting sewage sludge into a useful product, namely carboxylic acids. To potentially enhance acid yields, the effect of pretreatment using 0.3 g lime/g dry biomass and water at 100 degrees C for 10-240 min was studied. The pretreated sludges were anaerobically fermented to mixed-acids using a mixed culture of microorganisms; methanogens were suppressed using iodoform. Batch fermentations were performed at 55 degrees C using ammonium bicarbonate buffer. The first batch experiments compared treated and untreated sludge as the only substrate. The second batch experiments used a mixture of sludge plus lime-treated bagasse (20:80 by weight). Analysis of liquor shows that the pretreatment were effective in solubilizing constituent compounds of sewage sludge. Nitrogen content and carboxylic acids increased with increasing pretreatment time. However, the soluble sugars peaked at 60 min, and then decreased with longer pretreatment time, showing that the solubilised sugars were undergoing intermolecular reactions, such as Maillard reactions. Fermentation experiments were a good indicator of the biodegradability of the pretreated sludges. Results clearly showed that lime-treating sludge, using even the minimum pretreatment time (10 min), negatively impacted acid production. The likely causes of this observation are attributed to the production of recalcitrant complexes and toxic compounds. Batch fermentation of untreated sludge yielded 0.34 g total acids/g VS fed, whereas sludge with 240-min lime pretreatment yielded only 0.20 g total acids/g VS fed. Co-fermentation of untreated sludge with pretreated bagasse gave a yield of 0.23 g total acids/g VS fed.

  4. Cellulosic bioethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) using hydrogen peroxide-acetic acid (HPAC) pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Song, Younho; Wi, Seung Gon; Kim, Ho Myeong; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2016-08-01

    Jerusalem artichoke (JA) is recognized as a suitable candidate biomass crop for bioethanol production because it has a rapid growth rate and high biomass productivity. In this study, hydrogen peroxide-acetic acid (HPAC) pretreatment was used to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis and to effectively remove the lignin of JA. With optimized enzyme doses, synergy was observed from the combination of three different enzymes (RUT-C30, pectinase, and xylanase) which provided a conversion rate was approximately 30% higher than the rate with from treatment with RUT-C30 alone. Fermentation of the JA hydrolyzates by Saccharomyces cerevisiae produced a fermentation yield of approximately 84%. Therefore, Jerusalem artichoke has potential as a bioenergy crop for bioethanol production. PMID:27115748

  5. Fundamental study of the mechanism and kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis by acids and enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, C. S.; Chang, M.

    1981-02-01

    There are three basic enzymes e.g., endoglucanase (C/sub x/), exoglucanase (C1) and cellobiase comprising the majority of extracellular cellulase enzymes produced by the cellulolytic mycelial fungi, Trichoderma reesei, and other cellulolytic microorganisms. The kinetics of cellobiase were developed on the basis of applying the pseudo-steady state assumption to hydrolyze cellobiose to glucose. The results indicated that cellobiase was bjected to end-product inhibition by glucose. The kinetic modeling of exoglucanase (C1) with respect to cellodextrins was studied. Both glucose and cellobiose were found to be inhibitors of this enzyme with cellobiose being a stronger inhibitor than glucose. Similarly, endoglucanase (C/sub x) is subject to end-product inhibition by glucose. Crystallinity of the cellulose affects the rate of hydrolysis by cellulases. Hence, the changes in crystallinity of cellulose in relation to chemical pretreatment and enzyme hydrolysis was compared. The study of cellulase biosynthesis resulted in the conclusion that exo-and endo-glucanases are coinduced while cellobiase is synthesized independent of the other two enzymes.

  6. Thermal and thermo-chemical pre-treatment of four waste residues and the effect on acetic acid production and methane synthesis.

    PubMed

    Strong, P J; Gapes, D J

    2012-09-01

    In this study four diverse solid waste substrates (coal, Kraft pulp solids, chicken feathers and chicken processing waste) were thermally pre-treated (70, 140 and 200 °C), under an inert (nitrogen) or oxidative (oxygen) atmosphere, and then anaerobically digested. Membrane inlet mass spectrometry during the thermal and thermo-chemical reactions was successfully used to establish oxygen and carbon dioxide gas fluxes and product formation (acetic acid). There was significant solids hydrolysis pre-treatment at 200 °C under an oxidative atmosphere, as indicated by a decrease in the volatile suspended solids and an increase in dissolved organic carbon. Greater concentrations of volatile fatty acids were produced under oxidative conditions at higher temperatures. The methane yield more than tripled for feathers after pre-treatment at 140 °C (under both atmospheres), but decreased after oxidative pre-treatment at 200 °C, due to the destruction of available carbon by the thermo-chemical reaction. Methane yield more than doubled for the Kraft pulp solids with the 200 °C pre-treatment under oxidative conditions. This study illustrated the power of wet oxidation for solids destruction and its potential to improve methane yields generated during anaerobic digestion. PMID:22609530

  7. Pretreatment of corn stover with diluted acetic acid for enhancement of acidogenic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu; Wang, Lijuan; Lu, Xuebin; Zhang, Shuting

    2014-04-01

    A Box-Behnken design of response surface method was used to optimize acetic acid-catalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment of corn stover, in respect to acid concentration (0.05-0.25%), treatment time (5-15 min) and reaction temperature (180-210°C). Acidogenic fermentations with different initial pH and hydrolyzates were also measured to evaluate the optimal pretreatment conditions for maximizing acid production. The results showed that pretreatment with 0.25% acetic acid at 191°C for 7.74 min was found to be the most optimal condition for pretreatment of corn stover under which the production of acids can reach the highest level. Acidogenic fermentation with the hydrolyzate of pretreatment at the optimal condition at the initial pH=5 was shown to be butyric acid type fermentation, producing 21.84 g acetic acid, 7.246 g propionic acid, 9.170 butyric acid and 1.035 g isovaleric acid from 100g of corn stover in 900 g of water containing 2.25 g acetic acid.

  8. Morphological characteristics, oxidative stability and enzymic hydrolysis of amylose-fatty acid complexes.

    PubMed

    Marinopoulou, Anna; Papastergiadis, Efthimios; Raphaelides, Stylianos N; Kontominas, Michael G

    2016-05-01

    Complexes of amylose with fatty acids varying in carbon chain length and degree of unsaturation were prepared at 30, 50 or 70°C by dissolving amylose in 0.1N KOH and mixing with fatty acid potassium soap solution. The complexes were obtained in solid form as precipitates after neutralization. SEM microscopy revealed that the morphology of the complexes was that of ordered lamellae separated from amorphous regions whereas confocal laser scanning microscopy showed images of the topography of the guest molecules in the complex matrix. FTIR spectroscopy revealed that the absorption peak attributed to carbonyl group of free fatty acid was shifted when the fatty acid was in the form of amylose complex. Thermo-gravimetry showed that the unsaturated fatty acids were effectively protected from oxidation when they were complexed with amylose whereas enzymic hydrolysis experiments showed that the guest molecules were quantitatively released from the amylose complexes. PMID:26877002

  9. Morphological characteristics, oxidative stability and enzymic hydrolysis of amylose-fatty acid complexes.

    PubMed

    Marinopoulou, Anna; Papastergiadis, Efthimios; Raphaelides, Stylianos N; Kontominas, Michael G

    2016-05-01

    Complexes of amylose with fatty acids varying in carbon chain length and degree of unsaturation were prepared at 30, 50 or 70°C by dissolving amylose in 0.1N KOH and mixing with fatty acid potassium soap solution. The complexes were obtained in solid form as precipitates after neutralization. SEM microscopy revealed that the morphology of the complexes was that of ordered lamellae separated from amorphous regions whereas confocal laser scanning microscopy showed images of the topography of the guest molecules in the complex matrix. FTIR spectroscopy revealed that the absorption peak attributed to carbonyl group of free fatty acid was shifted when the fatty acid was in the form of amylose complex. Thermo-gravimetry showed that the unsaturated fatty acids were effectively protected from oxidation when they were complexed with amylose whereas enzymic hydrolysis experiments showed that the guest molecules were quantitatively released from the amylose complexes.

  10. Process for enzymatic hydrolysis of fatty acid triglycerides with oat caryopses

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, E.G.; Lee, I.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes the process for enzymatic hydrolysis of fatty acid triglycerides to obtain free fatty acids and glycerol. It comprises: increasing the water content of dehulled whole oat caryopses to a total water content of 17 to 44% the thus moistened caryopses having active oat lipase associated with the outer surfaces thereof; contacting the moistened whole caryopses with a liquid medium, continuing the contacting until at least 20% by volume of the triglyceride reactant has been hydrolyzed to free fatty acids and glycerol, most of the free fatty acids dissolving in the oil phase external to the caryopses and most of the glycerol being absorbed into the water within the caryopses; and separating the glycerol-containing caryopses from the fatty acid-containing oil phase.

  11. Polylactide stereocomplexation leads to higher hydrolytic stability but more acidic hydrolysis product pattern.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Sofia Regnell; Hakkarainen, Minna; Inkinen, Saara; Södergård, Anders; Albertsson, Ann-Christine

    2010-04-12

    Poly-l-lactide/poly-d-lactide (PLLA/PDLA) stereocomplex had much higher hydrolytic stability compared to plain PLLA, but at the same time shorter and more acidic degradation products were formed. Both materials were subjected to hydrolytic degradation in water and in phosphate buffer at 37 and 60 degrees C, and the degradation processes were monitored by following mass loss, water uptake, thermal properties, surface changes, and pH of the aging medium. The degradation product patterns were determined by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The high crystallinity and strong secondary interactions in the stereocomplex prevented water uptake and resulted in lower mass loss and degradation rate. However, somewhat surprisingly, the pH of the aging medium decreased much faster in the case of PLLA/PDLA stereocomplex. In accordance, the ESI-MS results showed that hydrolysis of PLLA/PDLA resulted in shorter and more acidic degradation products. This could be explained by the increased intermolecular crystallization due to stereocomplexation, which results in an increased number of tie chains. Because mainly these short tie chains are susceptible to hydrolysis this leads to formation of shorter oligomers compared to hydrolysis of regular PLLA.

  12. A two-stage pretreatment process using dilute hydrochloric acid followed by Fenton oxidation to improve sugar recovery from corn stover.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenzhi; Liu, Qiyu; Ma, Qiaozhi; Zhang, Tingwei; Ma, Longlong; Jameel, Hasan; Chang, Hou-Min

    2016-11-01

    A two-stage pretreatment process is proposed in this research in order to improve sugar recovery from corn stover. In the proposed process, corn stover is hydrolyzed by dilute hydrochloric acid to recover xylose, which is followed by a Fenton reagent oxidation to remove lignin. 0.7wt% dilute hydrochloric acid is applied in the first stage pretreatment at 120°C for 40min, resulting in 81.0% xylose removal. Fenton reagent oxidation (1g/L FeSO4·7H2O and 30g/L H2O2) is performed at room temperature (about 20°C) for 12 has a second stage which resulted in 32.9% lignin removal. The glucose yield in the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis was 71.3% with a very low cellulase dosage (3FPU/g). This two-stage pretreatment is effective due to the hydrolysis of hemicelluloses in the first stage and the removal of lignin in the second stage, resulting in a very high sugar recovery with a low enzyme loading. PMID:27543312

  13. Effects of pretreatment on the microbial community and l-lactic acid production in vinasse fermentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianguo; Wang, Qunhui; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Xiaohong; Ma, Hongzhi; Tushiro, Yukihiro

    2012-12-15

    Microwave-alkali and steam-alkali coupled pretreatments were carried out to improve the yield and optical purity of l-lactic acid produced using vinasse fermentation. Lactobacillus casei was inoculated into the system to initiate fermentation. Polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the microbial community during fermentation with and without the pretreatments. The original bacterial genus in vinasse was essentially inactivated, whereas L. casei became the dominant genus after 24h of fermentation. The system subjected to microwave-alkali coupled pretreatment released more reducing sugars and produced more lactic acid (up to 30.32g/L), which is twice that without pretreatment. In addition, the proportion of lactic acid in the organic acids also increased. The optical purity of the l-lactic acid produced under the microwave-alkali coupled pretreatment reached 91%, which is 2% higher than that under the steam-alkali coupled pretreatment and 7% higher than that under the control conditions. Therefore, the microwave-alkali coupled pretreatment is an effective method for the highly efficient bioconversion of vinasse into bioenergy. PMID:22959862

  14. Plantain starch granules morphology, crystallinity, structure transition, and size evolution upon acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Jaimes, C; Bello-Pérez, L A; Vernon-Carter, E J; Alvarez-Ramirez, J

    2013-06-01

    Plantain native starch was hydrolysed with sulphuric acid for twenty days. Hydrolysis kinetics was described by a logistic function, with a zero-order rate during the first seven days, followed by a slower kinetics dynamics at longer times. X-ray diffraction results revealed a that gradual increase in crystallinity occurred during the first seven days, followed by a decrease to values similar to those found in the native starch. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis suggested a sharp structure transition by the seventh day probably due to a molecular rearrangement of the starch blocklets and inhomogeneous erosion of the amorphous regions and semi crystalline lamellae. Scanning electron micrographs showed that starch granules morphology was continually degraded from an initial oval-like shape to irregular shapes due to aggregation effects. Granule size distribution broadened as hydrolysis time proceeded probably due to fragmentation and agglomeration phenomena of the hydrolysed starch granules.

  15. Value of Coproduction of Ethanol and Furfural from Acid Hydrolysis Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, S.; Calnon, M.; Feinberg, D.; Power, A.; Weiss, L.

    1984-05-01

    In the acid hydrolysis of a cellulosic feedstock (wood, wood wastes, or crop residues), up to 3.65 lb of furfural may be coproduced with each gallon of ethanol for only the cost of recovering and purifying it. Each plant producing 50 x 106 gal/yr of ethanol would produce an amount of by-product furfural equal to the total current domestic production. Thus, the need arises for investigation into potentially suitable processes for deriving profitable end products from furfural and thus expanding the market. The objectives of this study were to determine the economic potential of five selected, large volume derivatives of furfural that could displace hydrocarbon-based chemicals, and the consequent value of furfural as a by-product to the cellulose hydrolysis process of ethanol production.

  16. Alcohol fermentation of sweet potato. 1. Acid hydrolysis and factors involved

    SciTech Connect

    Azhar, A.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1981-04-01

    Factors affecting acid hydrolysis of sweet potato powder (SPP) to fermentable sugars were examined. These include HCl concentration, temperature, time, and levels of SPP. Maximum reducing sugar, reported as dextrose equivalent (DE), was detected after 24 min hydrolysis (1% SPP) in 0.034N HCl heated at 154 degrees celcius. These samples also had 3.43% hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) based on dry weight. A high level of HMF (9.2%) was detected in 1% SPP heated at 154 degrees C in 0.10N HCl for 18 min. The lowest concentration of HMF formed (1.8%), at maximal DE of 61%, was established in samples containing 5% SPP and heated at 154 degrees C in 0.034N HCl for 48 min. Aqueous extracts of uncured SPP, examined by HPLC, contained glucose, fructose and sucrose, butdegreaded SPP had only glucose and fructose. Products of degraded SPP, under appropriate conditions, could be used for alcohol fermentation. (Refs. 18).

  17. Characterisation of the products from pyrolysis of residues after acid hydrolysis of Miscanthus.

    PubMed

    Melligan, F; Dussan, K; Auccaise, R; Novotny, E H; Leahy, J J; Hayes, M H B; Kwapinski, W

    2012-03-01

    Platform chemicals such as furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural are major products formed during the acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass in second generation biorefining processes. Solid hydrolysis residues (HR) can amount to 50 wt.% of the starting biomass materials. Pyrolysis of the HRs gives rise to biochar, bio-liquids, and gases. Time and temperature were variables during the pyrolysis of HRs in a fixed bed tubular reactor, and both parameters have major influences on the amounts and properties of the products. Biochar, with potential for carbon sequestration and soil conditioning, composed about half of the HR pyrolysis product. The amounts (11-20 wt.%) and compositions (up to 77% of phenols in organic fraction) of the bio-liquids formed suggest that these have little value as fuels, but could be sources of phenols, and the gas can have application as a fuel. PMID:22281143

  18. A novel prodrug of salicylic acid, salicylic acid-glycylglycine conjugate, utilizing the hydrolysis in rabbit intestinal microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, J; Asai, K; Nishida, K; Sasaki, H

    1992-09-01

    The hydrolysis of salicylic acid-glycylglycine conjugate (salicyl-glycylglycine) following oral, intravenous, intracaecal and rectal administration (434, 72, 36 and 36 mumol kg-1, respectively: equivalent to salicylic acid) was examined in rabbits to develop a novel prodrug of salicylic acid. Salicylic acid was detected in the blood 2 h after oral administration of salicyl-glycylglycine and it reached a maximum level (55.6 micrograms mL-1) at 15 h, whereas a small amount of salicyl-glycylglycine was found in the blood. In contrast, unchanged salicyl-glycylglycine was found mainly in the blood following its intravenous administration, suggesting the involvement of presystemic deconjugation in the hydrolysis of salicyl-glycylglycine. Immediate and very extensive salicyclic acid formation in the caecum was observed following intracaecal administration of salicyl-glycylglycine, suggesting that the intestinal microorganisms were responsible for the biotransformation of this compound. In-vitro incubation of salicyl-glycylglycine with caecal content showed that salicyl-glycylglycine was hydrolysed efficiently in the caecum. Consequently, the blood concentration of salicylic acid was prolonged extensively following rectal administration of salicyl-glycylglycine, indicating the usefulness of salicyl-glycylglycine as a prodrug of salicylic acid.

  19. Excellent anti-corrosive pretreatment layer on iron substrate based on three-dimensional porous phytic acid/silane hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Lu, Ke; Xu, Lei; Xu, Hua; Lu, Haifeng; Gao, Feng; Hou, Shifeng; Ma, Houyi

    2016-01-01

    A novel, highly effective and environmentally friendly film-forming material, phytic acid (PA)/silane (denoted as PAS) hybrid with a three-dimensional (3D) network structure, was prepared through a condensation reaction of PA with methyltrihydroxysilane generated from the hydrolysis of methyltriethoxysilane (MTES). Two kinds of PAS-based pretreatment layers, namely NaBrO3-free and NaBrO3-doped PAS layers, were fabricated on iron substrates using the dip-coating method. SEM and AFM observations showed that the as-fabricated PAS-based layers possessed a 3D porous microstructure at the nanoscale and a rough surface morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopic characterization demonstrated that the above PAS layers bound to the iron surface via the -P-O- bond. Moreover, analyses of steady-state polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) data indicated that the corrosion rates of the iron substrates decreased considerably in the presence of the two PAS-based pretreatment layers. In particular, the NaBrO3-dosed PAS layer displayed the better corrosion resistance ability as well as maintaining the original microstructure and surface morphology. The PAS-based pretreatment layers are expected to act as substitutes for chromate and phosphate conversion layers and will find widespread application in the surface pretreatment of iron and steel materials due to the advantages of being environmentally friendly, the rapid film-forming process, and, especially, the nanoporous microstructure and rough surface morphology.A novel, highly effective and environmentally friendly film-forming material, phytic acid (PA)/silane (denoted as PAS) hybrid with a three-dimensional (3D) network structure, was prepared through a condensation reaction of PA with methyltrihydroxysilane generated from the hydrolysis of methyltriethoxysilane (MTES). Two kinds of PAS-based pretreatment layers, namely Na

  20. Enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis and Klason lignin removal of corn stover using photocatalyst-assisted ammonia pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Chang Geun; Wang, Chao; Yu, Chenxu; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2013-03-01

    Photocatalyst-assisted ammonia pretreatment was explored to improve lignin removal of the lignocellulosic biomass for effective sugar conversion. Corn stover was treated with 5.0-12.5 wt.% ammonium hydroxide, two different photocatalysts (TiO(2) and ZnO) in the presence of molecular oxygen in a batch reactor at 60 °C. Various solid-to-liquid ratios (1:20-1:50) were also tested. Ammonia pretreatment assisted by TiO(2)-catalyzed photo-degradation removed 70 % of Klason lignin under the optimum condition (12.5 % ammonium hydroxide, 60 °C, 24 h, solid/liquid=1:20, photocatalyst/biomass=1:10 with oxygen atmosphere). The enzymatic digestibilities of pretreated corn stover were 85 % for glucan and 75 % for xylan with NH(3)-TiO(2)-treated solid and 82 % for glucan and 77 % for xylan with NH(3)-ZnO-treated solid with 15 filter paper units/g-glucan of cellulase and 30 cellobiase units/g-glucan of β-glucosidase, a 2-13 % improvement over ammonia pretreatment alone. PMID:23329141

  1. Improving ethanol production from alfalfa stems via ambient-temperature acid pretreatment and washing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengfei; Weimer, Paul J; Hatfield, Ronald D; Runge, Troy M; Digman, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The concept of co-production of liquid fuel (ethanol) along with animal feed on farm was proposed, and the strategy of using ambient-temperature acid pretreatment, ensiling and washing to improve ethanol production from alfalfa stems was investigated. Alfalfa stems were separated and pretreated with sulfuric acid at ambient-temperature after harvest, and following ensiling, after which the ensiled stems were subjected to simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) for ethanol production. Ethanol yield was improved by ambient-temperature sulfuric acid pretreatment before ensiling, and by washing before SSF. It was theorized that the acid pretreatment at ambient temperature partially degraded hemicellulose, and altered cell wall structure, resulted in improved cellulose accessibility, whereas washing removed soluble ash in substrates which could inhibit the SSF. The pH of stored alfalfa stems can be used to predict the ethanol yield, with a correlation coefficient of +0.83 for washed alfalfa stems.

  2. Elucidating the role of ferrous ion cocatalyst in enhancing dilute acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recently developed iron cocatalyst enhancement of dilute acid pretreatment of biomass is a promising approach for enhancing sugar release from recalcitrant lignocellulosic biomass. However, very little is known about the underlying mechanisms of this enhancement. In the current study, our aim was to identify several essential factors that contribute to ferrous ion-enhanced efficiency during dilute acid pretreatment of biomass and to initiate the investigation of the mechanisms that result in this enhancement. Results During dilute acid and ferrous ion cocatalyst pretreatments, we observed concomitant increases in solubilized sugars in the hydrolysate and reducing sugars in the (insoluble) biomass residues. We also observed enhancements in sugar release during subsequent enzymatic saccharification of iron cocatalyst-pretreated biomass. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy showed that major peaks representing the C-O-C and C-H bonds in cellulose are significantly attenuated by iron cocatalyst pretreatment. Imaging using Prussian blue staining indicated that Fe2+ ions associate with both cellulose/xylan and lignin in untreated as well as dilute acid/Fe2+ ion-pretreated corn stover samples. Analyses by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed structural details of biomass after dilute acid/Fe2+ ion pretreatment, in which delamination and fibrillation of the cell wall were observed. Conclusions By using this multimodal approach, we have revealed that (1) acid-ferrous ion-assisted pretreatment increases solubilization and enzymatic digestion of both cellulose and xylan to monomers and (2) this pretreatment likely targets multiple chemistries in plant cell wall polymer networks, including those represented by the C-O-C and C-H bonds in cellulose. PMID:22074910

  3. Elucidating the Role of Ferrous Ion Cocatalyst in Enhancing Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H.; Donohoe, B. S.; Vinzant, T. B.; Ciesielski, P. N.; Wang, W.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Zeng, Y.; Johnson, D. K.; Ding, S. Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Tucker, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Recently developed iron cocatalyst enhancement of dilute acid pretreatment of biomass is a promising approach for enhancing sugar release from recalcitrant lignocellulosic biomass. However, very little is known about the underlying mechanisms of this enhancement. In the current study, our aim was to identify several essential factors that contribute to ferrous ion-enhanced efficiency during dilute acid pretreatment of biomass and to initiate the investigation of the mechanisms that result in this enhancement. During dilute acid and ferrous ion cocatalyst pretreatments, we observed concomitant increases in solubilized sugars in the hydrolysate and reducing sugars in the (insoluble) biomass residues. We also observed enhancements in sugar release during subsequent enzymatic saccharification of iron cocatalyst-pretreated biomass. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy showed that major peaks representing the C-O-C and C-H bonds in cellulose are significantly attenuated by iron cocatalyst pretreatment. Imaging using Prussian blue staining indicated that Fe{sup 2+} ions associate with both cellulose/xylan and lignin in untreated as well as dilute acid/Fe{sup 2+} ion-pretreated corn stover samples. Analyses by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed structural details of biomass after dilute acid/Fe{sup 2+} ion pretreatment, in which delamination and fibrillation of the cell wall were observed. By using this multimodal approach, we have revealed that (1) acid-ferrous ion-assisted pretreatment increases solubilization and enzymatic digestion of both cellulose and xylan to monomers and (2) this pretreatment likely targets multiple chemistries in plant cell wall polymer networks, including those represented by the C-O-C and C-H bonds in cellulose.

  4. Modulation of cellulase activity by charged lipid bilayers with different acyl chain properties for efficient hydrolysis of ionic liquid-pretreated cellulose.

    PubMed

    Mihono, Kai; Ohtsu, Takeshi; Ohtani, Mai; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Kamimura, Akio

    2016-10-01

    The stability of cellulase activity in the presence of ionic liquids (ILs) is critical for the enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble cellulose pretreated with ILs. In this work, cellulase was incorporated in the liposomes composed of negatively charged 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) and zwitterionic phosphatidylcholines (PCs) with different length and degree of unsaturation of the acyl chains. The liposomal cellulase-catalyzed reaction was performed at 45°C in the acetate buffer solution (pH 4.8) with 2.0g/L CC31 as cellulosic substrate. The crystallinity of CC31 was reduced by treating with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl) at 120°C for 30min. The liposomal cellulase continuously catalyzed hydrolysis of the pretreated CC31 for 48h producing glucose in the presence of 15wt% [Bmim]Cl. The charged lipid membranes were interactive with [Bmim](+), as elucidated by the [Bmim]Cl-induced alterations in fluorescence polarization of the membrane-embedded 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) molecules. The charged membranes offered the microenvironment where inhibitory effects of [Bmim]Cl on the cellulase activity was relieved. The maximum glucose productivity GP of 10.8 mmol-glucose/(hmol-lipid) was obtained at the reaction time of 48h with the cellulase incorporated in the liposomes ([lipid]=5.0mM) composed of 50mol% POPG and 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosohocholine (DLPC) with relatively short and saturated acyl chains. PMID:27318965

  5. The effect of thermal hydrolysis pretreatment on the anaerobic degradation of nonylphenol and short-chain nonylphenol ethoxylates in digested biosolids.

    PubMed

    McNamara, P J; Wilson, C A; Wogen, M T; Murthy, S N; Novak, J T; Novak, P J

    2012-06-01

    The presence of micropollutants can be a concern for land application of biosolids. Of particular interest are nonylphenol diethoxylate (NP(2)EO), nonylphenol monoethoxylate (NP(1)EO), and nonylphenol (NP), collectively referred to as NPE, which accumulate in anaerobically digested biosolids and are subject to regulation based on the environmental risks associated with them. Because biosolids are a valuable nutrient resource, it is essential that we understand how various treatment processes impact the fate of NPE in biosolids. Thermal hydrolysis (TH) coupled with mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD) is an advanced digestion process that destroys pathogens in biosolids and increases methane yields and volatile solids destruction. We investigated the impact of thermal hydrolysis pretreatment on the subsequent biodegradation of NPE in digested biosolids. Biosolids were treated with TH, anaerobic digestion, and aerobic digestion in laboratory-scale reactors, and NPE were analyzed in the influent and effluent of the digesters. NP(2)EO and NP(1)EO have been observed to degrade to the more estrogenic NP under anaerobic conditions; therefore, changes in the ratio of NP:NPE were of interest. The increase in NP:NPE following MAD was 56%; the average increase of this ratio in four sets of TH-MAD samples, however, was only 24.6 ± 3.1%. In addition, TH experiments performed in pure water verified that, during TH, the high temperature and pressure alone did not directly destroy NPE; TH experiments with NP added to sludge also showed that NP was not destroyed by the high temperature and pressure of TH when in a more complex sludge matrix. The post-aerobic digestion phases removed NPE, regardless of whether TH pretreatment occurred. This research indicates that changes in biosolids processing can have impacts beyond just gas production and solids destruction. PMID:22494493

  6. Excellent anti-corrosive pretreatment layer on iron substrate based on three-dimensional porous phytic acid/silane hybrid.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Lu, Ke; Xu, Lei; Xu, Hua; Lu, Haifeng; Gao, Feng; Hou, Shifeng; Ma, Houyi

    2016-01-21

    A novel, highly effective and environmentally friendly film-forming material, phytic acid (PA)/silane (denoted as PAS) hybrid with a three-dimensional (3D) network structure, was prepared through a condensation reaction of PA with methyltrihydroxysilane generated from the hydrolysis of methyltriethoxysilane (MTES). Two kinds of PAS-based pretreatment layers, namely NaBrO3-free and NaBrO3-doped PAS layers, were fabricated on iron substrates using the dip-coating method. SEM and AFM observations showed that the as-fabricated PAS-based layers possessed a 3D porous microstructure at the nanoscale and a rough surface morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopic characterization demonstrated that the above PAS layers bound to the iron surface via the -P-O- bond. Moreover, analyses of steady-state polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) data indicated that the corrosion rates of the iron substrates decreased considerably in the presence of the two PAS-based pretreatment layers. In particular, the NaBrO3-dosed PAS layer displayed the better corrosion resistance ability as well as maintaining the original microstructure and surface morphology. The PAS-based pretreatment layers are expected to act as substitutes for chromate and phosphate conversion layers and will find widespread application in the surface pretreatment of iron and steel materials due to the advantages of being environmentally friendly, the rapid film-forming process, and, especially, the nanoporous microstructure and rough surface morphology. PMID:26689810

  7. Excellent anti-corrosive pretreatment layer on iron substrate based on three-dimensional porous phytic acid/silane hybrid.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Lu, Ke; Xu, Lei; Xu, Hua; Lu, Haifeng; Gao, Feng; Hou, Shifeng; Ma, Houyi

    2016-01-21

    A novel, highly effective and environmentally friendly film-forming material, phytic acid (PA)/silane (denoted as PAS) hybrid with a three-dimensional (3D) network structure, was prepared through a condensation reaction of PA with methyltrihydroxysilane generated from the hydrolysis of methyltriethoxysilane (MTES). Two kinds of PAS-based pretreatment layers, namely NaBrO3-free and NaBrO3-doped PAS layers, were fabricated on iron substrates using the dip-coating method. SEM and AFM observations showed that the as-fabricated PAS-based layers possessed a 3D porous microstructure at the nanoscale and a rough surface morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopic characterization demonstrated that the above PAS layers bound to the iron surface via the -P-O- bond. Moreover, analyses of steady-state polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) data indicated that the corrosion rates of the iron substrates decreased considerably in the presence of the two PAS-based pretreatment layers. In particular, the NaBrO3-dosed PAS layer displayed the better corrosion resistance ability as well as maintaining the original microstructure and surface morphology. The PAS-based pretreatment layers are expected to act as substitutes for chromate and phosphate conversion layers and will find widespread application in the surface pretreatment of iron and steel materials due to the advantages of being environmentally friendly, the rapid film-forming process, and, especially, the nanoporous microstructure and rough surface morphology.

  8. The mechanism of hydrothermal hydrolysis for glycyrrhizic acid into glycyrrhetinic acid and glycyrrhetinic acid 3-O-mono-β-D-glucuronide in subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rui; Li, Nan; Xu, Honggao; Xiang, Jun; Wang, Lei; Gao, Yanxiang

    2016-01-01

    To improve the bioactivity and sweetness properties of glycyrrhizic acid (GL), the hydrothermal hydrolysis of GL into glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) and glycyrrhetinic acid 3-O-mono-β-D-glucuronide (GAMG) in subcritical water was investigated. The effects of temperature, time and their interaction on the conversion ratios were analyzed and the reactions were elaborated with kinetics and thermodynamics. The results showed that GL hydrothermal hydrolysis was significantly (P < 0.05) affected by reaction time and temperature, as well as their interaction, and could be fitted into first-order kinetics. The thermodynamic analysis indicated that the hydrolysis of GL was endergonic and non-spontaneous. The hydrolytic pathways were composed of complex consecutive and parallel reactions. It was concluded that subcritical water may be a potential medium for producing GAMG and GA.

  9. Elucidating the structure of cyclotides by partial acid hydrolysis and LC-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Sze, Siu Kwan; Wang, Wei; Meng, Wei; Yuan, Randong; Guo, Tiannan; Zhu, Yi; Tam, James P

    2009-02-01

    We describe here a rapid method to determine the cyclic structure and disulfide linkages of highly stable cyclotides via a combination of flash partial acid hydrolysis, LC-MS/MS, and computational tools. Briefly, a mixture of closely related cyclotides, kalata B1 and varv A purified from Viola yedoensis was partially hydrolyzed in 2 M HCl for 5 min by microwave-assisted hydrolysis or for 30 min in an autoclave oven (121 degrees C and 15 psi). The partially hydrolyzed peptide mixture was then subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis, with the disulfide linked-peptides fragmented by collision activated dissociation (CAD). A computer program written in-house (available for download at http://proteomics.sbs.ntu.edu.sg/cyclotide_SS ) was used for interpreting LC-MS/MS spectra and assigning the disulfide bonds. Time-point analysis of single-disulfide fragments revealed that nonrandom acid catalyzed fragmentation mostly occurred at the turns which are solvent-exposed and often contain side chain functionalized amino acids such as Asx/Glx and Ser/Thr. In particular, the most susceptible bond for acid hydrolysis in kalata B1 and varv A was found to be the highly conserved N25-G26 which is also the head-to-tail ligation site of the linear precursor proteins, indicating that formation of the three disulfide bonds might precede cyclic structure closure by N25-G26 ligation. This observation is consistent with the recent report that the N25-G26 bond formation is the last step in the cyclotide biosynthetic pathway. The process demonstrated here can potentially be a high throughput method that is generally applicable to determine disulfide bonds of other relatively low-abundance cyclotides.

  10. Heteropoly Acid/Nitrogen Functionalized Onion-like Carbon Hybrid Catalyst for Ester Hydrolysis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Qi, Wei; Guo, Xiaoling; Su, Dangsheng

    2016-02-18

    A novel heteropoly acid (HPA)/nitrogen functionalized onion-like carbon (NOLC) hybrid catalyst was synthesized through supramolecular (electrostatic and hydrogen bond) interactions between the two components. The chemical structure and acid strength of the HPA/NOLC hybrid have been fully characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, IR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, NH3 temperature-programmed desorption and acid-base titration measurements. The proposed method for the fabrication of the HPA/NOLC hybrid catalyst is a universal strategy for different types of HPAs to meet various requirements of acidic or redox catalysis. The hydrophobic environment of NOLC effectively prevents the deactivation of HPA in an aqueous system, and the combination of uniformly dispersed HPA clusters and the synergistic effect between NOLC and HPA significantly promotes its activity in ester hydrolysis reactions, which is higher than that of bare PWA as homogeneous catalyst. The kinetics of the hydrolysis reactions indicate that the aggregation status of the catalyst particles has great influence on the apparent activity. PMID:26606266

  11. Heteropoly Acid/Nitrogen Functionalized Onion-like Carbon Hybrid Catalyst for Ester Hydrolysis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Qi, Wei; Guo, Xiaoling; Su, Dangsheng

    2016-02-18

    A novel heteropoly acid (HPA)/nitrogen functionalized onion-like carbon (NOLC) hybrid catalyst was synthesized through supramolecular (electrostatic and hydrogen bond) interactions between the two components. The chemical structure and acid strength of the HPA/NOLC hybrid have been fully characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, IR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, NH3 temperature-programmed desorption and acid-base titration measurements. The proposed method for the fabrication of the HPA/NOLC hybrid catalyst is a universal strategy for different types of HPAs to meet various requirements of acidic or redox catalysis. The hydrophobic environment of NOLC effectively prevents the deactivation of HPA in an aqueous system, and the combination of uniformly dispersed HPA clusters and the synergistic effect between NOLC and HPA significantly promotes its activity in ester hydrolysis reactions, which is higher than that of bare PWA as homogeneous catalyst. The kinetics of the hydrolysis reactions indicate that the aggregation status of the catalyst particles has great influence on the apparent activity.

  12. Optimization of the Hydrolysis of Safflower Oil for the Production of Linoleic Acid, Used as Flavor Precursor

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Marya; Husson, Florence; Kermasha, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Commercial lipases, from porcine pancreas (PPL), Candida rugosa (CRL), and Thermomyces lanuginosus (Lipozyme TL IM), were investigated in terms of their efficiency for the hydrolysis of safflower oil (SO) for the liberation of free linoleic acid (LA), used as a flavor precursor. Although PPL, under the optimized conditions, showed a high degree of hydrolysis (91.6%), its low tolerance towards higher substrate concentrations could limit its use for SO hydrolysis. In comparison to the other investigated lipases, Lipozyme TL IM required higher amount of enzyme and an additional 3 h of reaction time to achieve its maximum degree of SO hydrolysis (90.2%). On the basis of the experimental findings, CRL was selected as the most appropriate biocatalyst, with 84.1% degree of hydrolysis. The chromatographic analyses showed that the CRL-hydrolyzed SO is composed mainly of free LA. PMID:26904663

  13. Optimization of the Hydrolysis of Safflower Oil for the Production of Linoleic Acid, Used as Flavor Precursor.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Marya; Husson, Florence; Kermasha, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Commercial lipases, from porcine pancreas (PPL), Candida rugosa (CRL), and Thermomyces lanuginosus (Lipozyme TL IM), were investigated in terms of their efficiency for the hydrolysis of safflower oil (SO) for the liberation of free linoleic acid (LA), used as a flavor precursor. Although PPL, under the optimized conditions, showed a high degree of hydrolysis (91.6%), its low tolerance towards higher substrate concentrations could limit its use for SO hydrolysis. In comparison to the other investigated lipases, Lipozyme TL IM required higher amount of enzyme and an additional 3 h of reaction time to achieve its maximum degree of SO hydrolysis (90.2%). On the basis of the experimental findings, CRL was selected as the most appropriate biocatalyst, with 84.1% degree of hydrolysis. The chromatographic analyses showed that the CRL-hydrolyzed SO is composed mainly of free LA. PMID:26904663

  14. Effect of citric acid concentration and hydrolysis time on physicochemical properties of sweet potato starches.

    PubMed

    Surendra Babu, Ayenampudi; Parimalavalli, Ramanathan; Rudra, Shalini Gaur

    2015-09-01

    Physicochemical properties of citric acid treated sweet potato starches were investigated in the present study. Sweet potato starch was hydrolyzed using citric acid with different concentrations (1 and 5%) and time periods (1 and 11 h) at 45 °C and was denoted as citric acid treated starch (CTS1 to CTS4) based on their experimental conditions. The recovery yield of acid treated starches was above 85%. The CTS4 sample displayed the highest amylose (around 31%) and water holding capacity its melting temperature was 47.66 °C. The digestibility rate was slightly increased for 78.58% for the CTS3 and CTS4. The gel strength of acid modified starches ranged from 0.27 kg to 1.11 kg. RVA results of acid thinned starches confirmed a low viscosity profile. CTS3 starch illustrated lower enthalpy compared to all other modified starches. All starch samples exhibited a shear-thinning behavior. SEM analysis revealed that the extent of visible degradation was increased at higher hydrolysis time and acid concentration. The CTS3 satisfied the criteria required for starch to act as a fat mimetic. Overall results conveyed that the citric acid treatment of sweet potato starch with 5% acid concentration and 11h period was an ideal condition for the preparation of a fat replacer.

  15. Glycosyl conformational and inductive effects on the acid catalysed hydrolysis of purine nucleosides.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, F; Niv, H

    1977-01-01

    The log kobs vs. pH profiles were determined in the intermediate acidity region for the glycosyl hydrolysis of guanosine and its 8-amino, 8-monomethylamino, 8-dimethylamino and 8-bromo derivatives. The decreased rate of the 8-amino and enhanced rate of the 8-bromo compound compared to guanosine support an A type mechanism: base protonation followed by glycosyl bond cleavage. All three 8-amino guanosines exhibited log kobs - pH profiles clearly showing that both mono and di-base protonated nucleosides undergo hydrolysis. The 700 fold rate acceleration of 8-N(CH3)-guanosine compared to 8-NHCH3-guanosine and the 110 fold rate acceleration of 8-N(CH3)2-adenosine compared to 8-NHCH3-adenosine could be unequivocally attributed to the fixed syn glycosyl conformation of both 8-dimethylamino compounds and relief of steric compression upon hydrolysis in these molecules. The lack of anomerization of all substrates during the course of the reaction supports an A rather than a Schiff-base mechanism. PMID:17100

  16. Effect of mechanical disruption on the effectiveness of three reactors used for dilute acid pretreatment of corn stover Part 1: chemical and physical substrate analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is considerable interest in the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to liquid fuels to provide substitutes for fossil fuels. Pretreatments, conducted to reduce biomass recalcitrance, usually remove at least some of the hemicellulose and/or lignin in cell walls. The hypothesis that led to this research was that reactor type could have a profound effect on the properties of pretreated materials and impact subsequent cellulose hydrolysis. Results Corn stover was dilute-acid pretreated using commercially relevant reactor types (ZipperClave® (ZC), Steam Gun (SG) and Horizontal Screw (HS)) under the same nominal conditions. Samples produced in the SG and HS achieved much higher cellulose digestibilities (88% and 95%, respectively), compared to the ZC sample (68%). Characterization, by chemical, physical, spectroscopic and electron microscopy methods, was used to gain an understanding of the effects causing the digestibility differences. Chemical differences were small; however, particle size differences appeared significant. Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectra indicated larger inter-fibrillar spacing or randomization of cellulose microfibrils in the HS sample. Simons’ staining indicated increased cellulose accessibility for the SG and HS samples. Electron microscopy showed that the SG and HS samples were more porous and fibrillated because of mechanical grinding and explosive depressurization occurring with these two reactors. These structural changes most likely permitted increased cellulose accessibility to enzymes, enhancing saccharification. Conclusions Dilute-acid pretreatment of corn stover using three different reactors under the same nominal conditions gave samples with very different digestibilities, although chemical differences in the pretreated substrates were small. The results of the physical and chemical analyses of the samples indicate that the explosive depressurization and mechanical grinding with these reactors increased

  17. Enhancement of waste activated sludge anaerobic digestion by a novel chemical free acid/alkaline pretreatment using electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Charles, W; Ng, B; Cord-Ruwisch, R; Cheng, L; Ho, G; Kayaalp, A

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) is relatively poor due to hydrolysis limitations. Acid and alkaline pretreatments are effective in enhancing hydrolysis leading to higher methane yields. However, chemical costs often prohibit full-scale application. In this study, 12 V two-chamber electrolysis using an anion exchange membrane alters sludge pH without chemical dosing. pH dropped from 6.9 to 2.5 in the anode chamber and increased to 10.1 in the cathode chamber within 15 h. The volatile suspended solids solubilisation of WAS was 31.1% in the anode chamber and 34.0% in the cathode chamber. As a result, dissolved chemical oxygen demand increased from 164 to 1,787 mg/L and 1,256 mg/L in the anode and cathode chambers, respectively. Remixing of sludge from the two chambers brought the pH back to 6.5, hence no chemical neutralisation was required prior to anaerobic digestion. Methane yield during anaerobic digestion at 20 d retention time was 31% higher than that of untreated sludge. An energy balance assessment indicated that the non-optimised process could approximately recover the energy (electricity) expended in the electrolysis process. With suitable optimisation of treatment time and voltages, significant energy savings would be expected in addition to the benefit of decreased sludge volume.

  18. Housefly larvae hydrolysate: orthogonal optimization of hydrolysis, antioxidant activity, amino acid composition and functional properties

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antioxidant, one of the most important food additives, is widely used in food industry. At present, antioxidant is mostly produced by chemical synthesis, which would accumulate to be pathogenic. Therefore, a great interest has been developed to identify and use natural antioxidants. It was showed that there are a lot of antioxidative peptides in protein hydrolysates, possessing strong capacity of inhibiting peroxidation of macro-biomolecular and scavenging free redicals in vivo. Enzymatic hydrolysis used for preparation of antioxidative peptides is a new hot-spot in the field of natural antioxidants. It reacts under mild conditions, with accurate site-specific degradation, good repeatability and few damages to biological activity of protein. Substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis are usually plants and aqua-animals. Insects are also gaining attention because of their rich protein and resource. Antioxidative peptides are potential to be exploited as new natural antioxidant and functional food. There is a huge potential market in medical and cosmetic field as well. Result Protein hydrolysate with antioxidant activity was prepared from housefly larvae, by a two-step hydrolysis. Through orthogonal optimization of the hydrolysis conditions, the degree of hydrolysis was determined to be approximately 60%. Fractionated hydrolysate at 25 mg/mL, 2.5 mg/mL and 1 mg/mL exhibited approximately 50%, 60% and 50% of scavenging capacity on superoxide radicals, 1, 1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals and hydroxyl radicals, respectively. Hydrolysate did not exhibit substantial ion chelation. Using a linoneic peroxidation system, the inhibition activity of hydrolysate at 20 mg/mL was close to that of 20 μg/mL tertiary butylhydroquinone, suggesting a potential application of hydrolysate in the oil industry as an efficient antioxidant. The lyophilized hydrolysate presented almost 100% solubility at pH 3-pH 9, and maintained nearly 100% activity at pH 5-pH 8 at 0

  19. Microwave-assisted acid and base hydrolysis of intact proteins containing disulfide bonds for protein sequence analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reiz, Bela; Li, Liang

    2010-09-01

    Controlled hydrolysis of proteins to generate peptide ladders combined with mass spectrometric analysis of the resultant peptides can be used for protein sequencing. In this paper, two methods of improving the microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis process are described to enable rapid sequencing of proteins containing disulfide bonds and increase sequence coverage, respectively. It was demonstrated that proteins containing disulfide bonds could be sequenced by MS analysis by first performing hydrolysis for less than 2 min, followed by 1 h of reduction to release the peptides originally linked by disulfide bonds. It was shown that a strong base could be used as a catalyst for microwave-assisted protein hydrolysis, producing complementary sequence information to that generated by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. However, using either acid or base hydrolysis, amide bond breakages in small regions of the polypeptide chains of the model proteins (e.g., cytochrome c and lysozyme) were not detected. Dynamic light scattering measurement of the proteins solubilized in an acid or base indicated that protein-protein interaction or aggregation was not the cause of the failure to hydrolyze certain amide bonds. It was speculated that there were some unknown local structures that might play a role in preventing an acid or base from reacting with the peptide bonds therein.

  20. Comparison of Four Strong Acids on the Precipitation Potential of Gypsum in Brines During Distillation of Pretreated, Augmented Urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muirhead, Dean

    2011-01-01

    Two batches of nominally pretreated and augmented urine were prepared with the baseline pretreatment formulation of sulfuric acid and chromium trioxide. The urine was augmented with inorganic salts and organic compounds in order to simulate a urinary ionic concentrations representing the upper 95 percentile on orbit. Three strong mineral acids: phosphoric, hydrochloric, and nitric acid, were substituted for the sulfuric acid for comparison to the baseline sulfuric acid pretreatment formulation. Three concentrations of oxidizer in the pretreatment formulation were also tested. Pretreated urine was distilled to 85% water recovery to determine the effect of each acid and its conjugate base on the precipitation of minerals during distillation. The brines were analyzed for calcium and sulfate ion, total, volatile, and fixed suspended solids. Test results verified that substitution of phosphoric, hydrochloric, or nitric acids for sulfuric acid would prevent the precipitation of gypsum up to 85% recovery from pretreated urine representing the upper 95 percentile calcium concentration on orbit.

  1. Whole slurry saccharification and fermentation of maleic acid-pretreated rice straw for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Hoon; Park, Hyun Min; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of whole slurry (pretreated lignocellulose) saccharification and fermentation for producing ethanol from maleic acid-pretreated rice straw. The optimized conditions for pretreatment were to treat rice straw at a high temperature (190 °C) with 1 % (w/v) maleic acid for a short duration (3 min ramping to 190 °C and 3 min holding at 190 °C). Enzymatic digestibility (based on theoretical glucose yield) of cellulose in the pretreated rice straw was 91.5 %. Whole slurry saccharification and fermentation of pretreated rice straw resulted in 83.2 % final yield of ethanol based on the initial quantity of glucan in untreated rice straw. These findings indicate that maleic acid pretreatment results in a high yield of ethanol from fermentation of whole slurry even without conditioning or detoxification of the slurry. Additionally, the separation of solids and liquid is not required; therefore, the economics of cellulosic ethanol fuel production are significantly improved. We also demonstrated whole slurry saccharification and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulose, which has rarely been reported.

  2. Hydrolysis of Selected Tropical Plant Wastes Catalyzed by a Magnetic Carbonaceous Acid with Microwave.

    PubMed

    Su, Tong-Chao; Fang, Zhen; Zhang, Fan; Luo, Jia; Li, Xing-Kang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, magnetic carbonaceous acids were synthesized by pyrolysis of the homogeneous mixtures of glucose and magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles, and subsequent sulfonation. The synthesis conditions were optimized to obtain a catalyst with both high acid density (0.75 mmol g(-1)) and strong magnetism [magnetic saturation, Ms = 19.5 Am(2) kg(-1)]. The screened catalyst (C-SO3H/Fe3O4) was used to hydrolyze ball-milled cellulose in a microwave reactor with total reducing sugar (TRS) yield of 25.3% under the best conditions at 190 °C for 3.5 h. It was cycled for at least seven times with high catalyst recovery rate (92.8%), acid density (0.63 mmol g(-1)) and magnetism (Ms = 12.9 Am(2) kg(-1)), as well as high TRS yield (20.1%) from the hydrolysis of ball-milled cellulose. The catalyst was further successfully tested for the hydrolysis of tropical biomass with high TRS and glucose yields of 79.8% and 58.3% for bagasse, 47.2% and 35.6% for Jatropha hulls, as well as 54.4% and 35.8% for Plukenetia hulls. PMID:26648414

  3. Production of xylose from Meranti wood sawdust by dilute acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Rafiqul, I S M; Sakinah, A M M; Karim, M R

    2014-09-01

    Xylitol production by bioconversion of xylose can be economically interesting if the raw material can be recovered from a cheap lignocellulosic biomass (LCB). Meranti wood sawdust (MWS) is a renewable and low-cost LCB that can be used as a promising and economic source of xylose, a starting raw material for the manufacture of several specialty chemicals, especially xylitol. This study aimed to optimize the hydrolysis process of MWS and to determine the influence of temperature, H2SO4 concentration, and residence time on xylose release and on by-product formation (glucose, arabinose, acetic acid, furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), and lignin degradation products (LDPs)). Batch hydrolysis was conducted under various operating conditions, and response surface methodology was adopted to achieve the highest xylose yield. Xylose production was highly affected by temperature, acid concentration, and residence time. The optimum temperature, acid concentration, and time were determined to be 124 °C, 3.26 %, and 80 min, respectively. Under these optimum conditions, xylose yield and selectivity were attained at 90.6 % and 4.05 g/g, respectively.

  4. Effect of acid concentration and pulp properties on hydrolysis reactions of mercerized sisal.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Talita M; Zambon, Márcia D; Frollini, Elisabete

    2013-03-01

    The influence of sulfuric acid concentration (H2SO4 5-25%, 100°C), crystallinity and fibers size on the hydrolysis reaction of sisal pulps were investigated, with the goal of evaluating both the liquor composition, as an important step in the production of bioethanol, and the residual non-hydrolyzed pulp, to determine its potential application as materials. Aliquots were withdrawn from the reaction media, and the liquor composition was analyzed by HPLC. The residual non-hydrolyzed pulps were characterized by SEM, their average molar mass and crystallinity index, and their size distribution was determined using a fiber analyzer. Sulfuric acid 25% led to the highest glucose content (approximately 10gL(-1)), and this acid concentration was chosen to evaluate the influence of both the fiber size and crystallinity of the starting pulp on hydrolysis. The results showed that fibers with higher length and lower crystallinity favored glucose production in approximately 12%, with respect to the highly crystalline shorter fibers. PMID:23465940

  5. Hydrolysis of Selected Tropical Plant Wastes Catalyzed by a Magnetic Carbonaceous Acid with Microwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Tong-Chao; Fang, Zhen; Zhang, Fan; Luo, Jia; Li, Xing-Kang

    2015-12-01

    In this study, magnetic carbonaceous acids were synthesized by pyrolysis of the homogeneous mixtures of glucose and magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles, and subsequent sulfonation. The synthesis conditions were optimized to obtain a catalyst with both high acid density (0.75 mmol g-1) and strong magnetism [magnetic saturation, Ms = 19.5 Am2 kg-1]. The screened catalyst (C-SO3H/Fe3O4) was used to hydrolyze ball-milled cellulose in a microwave reactor with total reducing sugar (TRS) yield of 25.3% under the best conditions at 190 °C for 3.5 h. It was cycled for at least seven times with high catalyst recovery rate (92.8%), acid density (0.63 mmol g-1) and magnetism (Ms = 12.9 Am2 kg-1), as well as high TRS yield (20.1%) from the hydrolysis of ball-milled cellulose. The catalyst was further successfully tested for the hydrolysis of tropical biomass with high TRS and glucose yields of 79.8% and 58.3% for bagasse, 47.2% and 35.6% for Jatropha hulls, as well as 54.4% and 35.8% for Plukenetia hulls.

  6. Hydrolysis of Selected Tropical Plant Wastes Catalyzed by a Magnetic Carbonaceous Acid with Microwave

    PubMed Central

    Su, Tong-Chao; Fang, Zhen; Zhang, Fan; Luo, Jia; Li, Xing-Kang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, magnetic carbonaceous acids were synthesized by pyrolysis of the homogeneous mixtures of glucose and magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles, and subsequent sulfonation. The synthesis conditions were optimized to obtain a catalyst with both high acid density (0.75 mmol g−1) and strong magnetism [magnetic saturation, Ms = 19.5 Am2 kg−1]. The screened catalyst (C-SO3H/Fe3O4) was used to hydrolyze ball-milled cellulose in a microwave reactor with total reducing sugar (TRS) yield of 25.3% under the best conditions at 190 °C for 3.5 h. It was cycled for at least seven times with high catalyst recovery rate (92.8%), acid density (0.63 mmol g−1) and magnetism (Ms = 12.9 Am2 kg−1), as well as high TRS yield (20.1%) from the hydrolysis of ball-milled cellulose. The catalyst was further successfully tested for the hydrolysis of tropical biomass with high TRS and glucose yields of 79.8% and 58.3% for bagasse, 47.2% and 35.6% for Jatropha hulls, as well as 54.4% and 35.8% for Plukenetia hulls. PMID:26648414

  7. Preparation and evaluation of lignosulfonates as a dispersant for gypsum paste from acid hydrolysis lignin.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Yasuda, Seiichi

    2005-03-01

    In order to effectively utilize a by-product of the acid saccharification process of woody materials, the chemical conversion of guaiacyl sulfuric acid lignin (SAL), one of the acid hydrolysis lignins, into water-soluble sulfonated products with high dispersibitity was investigated. At first, SAL was phenolated (P-SAL) to enhance the solubility and reactivity. Lignosulfonates were prepared from P-SAL by three methods of hydroxymethylation followed by neutral sulfonation (two-step method), sulfomethylation (one-step method) and arylsulfonation. Surprisingly, all prepared lignosulfonates possessed 30 to 70% higher dispersibility for gypsum paste than the commercial lignosulfonate. Evaluation of the preparations for gypsum paste suggested that the higher molecular weights and sulfur contents of the preparations increased their dispersibility. PMID:15491828

  8. Preparation and evaluation of lignosulfonates as a dispersant for gypsum paste from acid hydrolysis lignin.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Yasuda, Seiichi

    2005-03-01

    In order to effectively utilize a by-product of the acid saccharification process of woody materials, the chemical conversion of guaiacyl sulfuric acid lignin (SAL), one of the acid hydrolysis lignins, into water-soluble sulfonated products with high dispersibitity was investigated. At first, SAL was phenolated (P-SAL) to enhance the solubility and reactivity. Lignosulfonates were prepared from P-SAL by three methods of hydroxymethylation followed by neutral sulfonation (two-step method), sulfomethylation (one-step method) and arylsulfonation. Surprisingly, all prepared lignosulfonates possessed 30 to 70% higher dispersibility for gypsum paste than the commercial lignosulfonate. Evaluation of the preparations for gypsum paste suggested that the higher molecular weights and sulfur contents of the preparations increased their dispersibility.

  9. Detoxification of corncob acid hydrolysate with SAA pretreatment and xylitol production by immobilized Candida tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Li-Hong; Tang, Yong; Liu, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Xylitol fermentation production from corncob acid hydrolysate has become an attractive and promising process. However, corncob acid hydrolysate cannot be directly used as fermentation substrate owing to various inhibitors. In this work, soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) pretreatment was employed to reduce the inhibitors in acid hydrolysate. After detoxification, the corncob acid hydrolysate was fermented by immobilized Candida tropicalis cell to produce xylitol. Results revealed that SAA pretreatment showed high delignification and efficient removal of acetyl group compounds without effect on cellulose and xylan content. Acetic acid was completely removed, and the content of phenolic compounds was reduced by 80%. Furthermore, kinetic behaviors of xylitol production by immobilized C. tropicalis cell were elucidated from corncob acid hydrolysate detoxified with SAA pretreatment and two-step adsorption method, respectively. The immobilized C. tropicalis cell showed higher productivity efficiency using the corncob acid hydrolysate as fermentation substrate after detoxification with SAA pretreatment than by two-step adsorption method in the five successive batch fermentation rounds. After the fifth round fermentation, about 60 g xylitol/L fermentation substrate was obtained for SAA pretreatment detoxification, while about 30 g xylitol/L fermentation substrate was obtained for two-step adsorption detoxification.

  10. Optimizing cellulase usage for improved mixing and rheological properties of acid-pretreated sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Claudia C; Peterson, James J; Mullinnix, Michael T; Svoronos, Spyros A; Shanmugam, K T; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2010-12-01

    Consolidation of bioprocessing steps with lignocellulose is limited by hydrolysate toxicity, the fibrous nature of suspensions, and low activity of cellulase enzymes. Combinations of enzyme dose and treatment conditions improved the flow properties and pumping of acid-pretreated sugarcane bagasse slurries (10% dry weight). Low levels of cellulase enzyme (0.1 and 0.5 FPU/g dry weight acid-pretreated bagasse) were found to reduce viscosities by 77-95% after 6 h, solubilizing 3.5% of the bagasse dry weight. Flow of slurries through small funnels was a useful predictor of success with centrifugal and diaphragm pumps. Equations were derived that describe viscosity and solubilized carbohydrates as a function of time and cellulase dosage. Blending of acid-pretreated bagasse (10% dry weight) with suspensions of acid-pretreated bagasse (10% dry weight) that had been previously digested with cellulase enzymes (low viscosity) did not increase viscosity in a linear fashion. Viscosity of these mixtures remained relatively constant until a threshold level of new fiber was reached, followed by a rapid increase with further additions. Up to 35% fresh acid-pretreated bagasse could be blended with enzyme-digested fiber (5.0 FPU/g dry weight acid-pretreated fiber; 6 h) with only a modest increase in viscosity. The smooth surfaces of enzyme-treated fiber are proposed to hinder the frequency and extent of interactions between fibrils of fresh fiber particles (acid-pretreated) until a threshold concentration is achieved, after which fiber interactions and viscosity increase dramatically. These results were used to model the viscosity in an ideal continuous stirred tank reactor (liquefaction) as a function of residence time and enzyme dosage.

  11. Effect of a milling pre-treatment on the enzymatic hydrolysis of carbohydrates in brewer's spent grain.

    PubMed

    Niemi, Piritta; Faulds, Craig B; Sibakov, Juhani; Holopainen, Ulla; Poutanen, Kaisa; Buchert, Johanna

    2012-07-01

    Millions of tonnes of brewer's spent grain (BSG) are annually produced worldwide as a by-product of the brewing industry. BSG has the potential to be a valuable source of food, chemicals and energy if cost-efficient fractionation methods can be developed. A 2-fold improvement in carbohydrate solubilisation could be achieved through the introduction of a milling step prior to enzymatic hydrolysis. Course and fine milled fractions were characterized by particle size distribution and light microscopy. Fine milling decreased particle size down to the micron level and this in turn improved the carbohydrate solubility yield by a multi-enzyme mixture from 23% up to 45%. Carbohydrate solubilisation could be further increased through the supplementation of this enzyme preparation with additional cellulases. The physical degradation caused by the milling also liberated soluble carbohydrates without the requirement of any enzymatic treatment.

  12. Extraction of cellulose nano-crystals from old corrugated container fiber using phosphoric acid and enzymatic hydrolysis followed by sonication.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanjun; Shen, Xiaochuang; Zhang, Junhua; Guo, Daliang; Kong, Fangong; Zhang, Nan

    2015-07-10

    Due to its amazing physicochemical properties and high environmental compatibility, cellulose nano-crystals (CNC) hold great promise for serving as a strategic platform for sustainable development. Now, there has been growing interest in the development of processes using waste or residual biomass as CNC source for addressing economic and environmental concerns. In the present work, a combined process involving phosphoric acid hydrolysis, enzymatic hydrolysis and sonication was proposed aiming to efficiently exact CNC from low-cost old corrugated container (OCC) pulp fiber. The effect of enzymatic hydrolysis on the yield and microstructure of resulting CNC was highlighted. Results showed that the enzymatic hydrolysis was effective in enhancing CNC yield after phosphoric acid hydrolysis. CNC was obtained with a yield of 23.98 wt% via the combined process with phosphoric acid concentration of 60 wt%, cellulase dosage of 2 mL (84 EGU) per 2g fiber and sonication intensity of 200 W. Moreover, the presence of enzymatic hydrolysis imparted the obtained CNC with improved dispersion, increased crystallinity and thermal stability.

  13. Enzymatic hydrolysis of various pretreated lignocellulosic substrates and the fermentation of the liberated sugars to ethanol and butanediol

    SciTech Connect

    Saddler, J.N.; Mes-Hartree, M.; Yu, E.K.C.; Brownell, H.H.

    1983-01-01

    Aspen wood and wheat straw were pretreated by exposure to steam at elevated temperatures. Chemical analysis of the substrates revealed that steam explosion differentially decomposed the pentosan component while leaving the glucan portion relatively unchanged. The pretreated residues could be used as substrates for growth of Trichoderma reesei C30 and T. harzianum E58. The cellulase activities detected were in some cases three times as high as those found when Solka Floc was used as the substrate. Culture filtrates of T. harzianum E58 could efficiently hydrolyze the hemicellulose-rich water-soluble fractions. This material was fermented by Klebsiella pneumoniae with 0.4-0.5 g of 2,3-butanediol produced per gram of sugar utilized. Once the steam-exploded residues had been water and alkali extracted, the enzymatically hydrolyzed substrates were readily fermented by Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Zymononas mobilis with values as high as 2% (w/v) ethanol obtained from 5% steam-exploded wood fractions. 30 references, 2 figures, 8 tables.

  14. Hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose using functionalized Bronsted acidic ionic liquids - A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Firdaus; Patra, Tanmoy; Upadhyayula, Sreedevi

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose conversion to platform chemicals is required to meet the demands of increasing population and modernization of the world. Hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose was studied with SO3H, COOH and OH functionalized imidazole based ionic liquid using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride [BMIM]Cl as a solvent. The influence of temperature, time, acidity of ionic liquids and catalyst loading was studied on hydrolysis reaction. The maximum %TRS yield 85%, was obtained at 100°C and 90min with 0.2g of SO3H functionalized ionic liquid. UV-vis spectroscopy using 4-nitro aniline as an indicator was performed to find out the Hammett function of ionic liquid and acidity trends are as follows: SO3H>COOH>OH. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to optimize the ionic liquid and their conjugate bases at B3LYP 6-311G++ (d, p) level using Gaussian 09 program. Theoretical findings are in agreement with the experimental results.

  15. Synthesis, hydrolysis, and skin retention of amino acid esters of alpha-tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Marra, Fabio; Ostacolo, Carmine; Laneri, Sonia; Bernardi, Antonietta; Sacchi, Antonia; Padula, Cristina; Nicoli, Sara; Santi, Patrizia

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work was to synthesize new pro-vitamins of alpha-tocopherol (VE) able to release another moiety such as an amino acid, in order to obtain a combined antioxidant and moisturizing effect upon topical application. The new derivatives were characterized and tested for sensitivity to chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis. Lipophilicity was estimated using Log capacity factor and skin retention was determined in vitro, using rabbit ear skin as barrier. Five molecules were synthesized using L-proline, L-serine, L-tyrosine, L-asparagine, and L-citrulline as amino acidic moiety. All pro-vitamins showed similar or lower lipophilicity than alpha-tocopheryl acetate (VEAc), taken as reference, and similar stability in aqueous solutions. All pro-vitamins showed to be sensitive to enzymatic hydrolysis. None of the pro-vitamins crossed the skin in significant amounts, whereas they accumulated into the skin, in both the dermis and the epidermis. They are more hydrophilic and more water-soluble than the currently used acetate.

  16. Assessment on proximate composition, dietary fiber, phytic acid and protein hydrolysis of germinated Ecuatorian brown rice.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, Patricio J; Martínez-Villaluenga, Cristina; Amigo, Lourdes; Frias, Juana

    2014-09-01

    Germinated brown rice (GBR) is considered healthier than brown rice (BR) but its nutritive value has been hardly studied. Since nutritive quality of GBR depends on genetic diversity and germination conditions, six Ecuadorian BR varieties were germinated at 28 and 34 ºC for 48 and 96 h in darkness and proximate composition, dietary fiber fractions, phytic acid content as well as degree of protein hydrolysis and peptide content were studied. Protein, lipids, ash and available carbohydrate ranged 7.3-10.4%, 2.0-4.0%, 0.8-1.5% and 71.6 to 84.0%, respectively, in GBR seedlings. Total dietary fiber increased during germination (6.1-13.6%), with a large proportion of insoluble fraction, while phytic acid was reduced noticeably. In general, protein hydrolysis occurred during germination was more accused at 28 ºC for 48 h. These results suggest that GBR can be consumed directly as nutritive staple food for a large population worldwide contributing to their nutritional requirements.

  17. Hydrolysis optimization and characterization study of preparing fatty acids from Jatropha curcas seed oil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fatty acids (FAs) are important as raw materials for the biotechnology industry. Existing methods of FAs production are based on chemical methods. In this study potassium hydroxide (KOH)-catalyzed reactions were utilized to hydrolysis Jatropha curcas seed oil. Results The parameters effect of ethanolic KOH concentration, reaction temperature, and reaction time to free fatty acid (FFA%) were investigated using D-Optimal Design. Characterization of the product has been studied using Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), gas chromatography (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The optimum conditions for maximum FFA% were achieved at 1.75M of ethanolic KOH concentration, 65°C of reaction temperature and 2.0 h of reaction time. Conclusions This study showed that ethanolic KOH concentration was significant variable for J. curcas seed oil hydrolysis. In a 18-point experimental design, FFA% of hydrolyzed J. curcas seed oil can be raised from 1.89% to 102.2%, which proved by FTIR and HPLC. PMID:22044685

  18. Ferrihydrite dissolution by pyridine-2,6-bis(monothiocarboxylic acid) and hydrolysis products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhungana, Suraj; Anthony, Charles R.; Hersman, Larry E.

    2007-12-01

    Pyridine-2,6-bis(monothiocarboxylate) (pdtc), a metabolic product of microorganisms, including Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas stutzeri was investigated for its ability of dissolve Fe(III)(hydr)oxides at pH 7.5. Concentration dependent dissolution of ferrihydrite under anaerobic environment showed saturation of the dissolution rate at the higher concentration of pdtc. The surface controlled ferrihydrite dissolution rate was determined to be 1.2 × 10 -6 mol m -2 h -1. Anaerobic dissolution of ferrihydrite by pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid or dipicolinic acid (dpa), a hydrolysis product of pdtc, was investigated to study the mechanism(s) involved in the pdtc facilitated ferrihydrite dissolution. These studies suggest that pdtc dissolved ferrihydrite using a reduction step, where dpa chelates the Fe reduced by a second hydrolysis product, H 2S. Dpa facilitated dissolution of ferrihydrite showed very small increase in the Fe dissolution when the concentration of external reductant, ascorbate, was doubled, suggesting the surface dynamics being dominated by the interactions between dpa and ferrihydrite. Greater than stoichiometric amounts of Fe were mobilized during dpa dissolution of ferrihydrite assisted by ascorbate and cysteine. This is attributed to the catalytic dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides by the in situ generated Fe(II) in the presence of a complex former, dpa.

  19. Effect of acid hydrolysis and fungal biotreatment on agro-industrial wastes for obtainment of free sugars for bioethanol production

    PubMed Central

    El-Tayeb, T.S.; Abdelhafez, A.A.; Ali, S.H.; Ramadan, E.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate selected chemical and microbiological treatments for the conversion of certain local agro-industrial wastes (rice straw, corn stalks, sawdust, sugar beet waste and sugarcane bagasse) to ethanol. The chemical composition of these feedstocks was determined. Conversion of wastes to free sugars by acid hydrolysis varied from one treatment to another. In single-stage dilute acid hydrolysis, increasing acid concentration from 1 % (v/v) to 5 % (v/v) decreased the conversion percentage of almost all treated agro-industrial wastes. Lower conversion percentages for some treatments were obtained when increasing the residence time from 90 to 120 min. The two-stage dilute acid hydrolysis by phosphoric acid (1.0 % v/v) followed by sulphuric acid (1.0 % v/v) resulted in the highest conversion percentage (41.3 % w/w) on treated sugar beet waste. This treatment when neutralized, amended with some nutrients and inoculated with baker’s yeast, achieved the highest ethanol concentration (1.0 % v/v). Formation of furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) were functions of type of acid hydrolysis, acid concentration, residence time and feedstock type. The highest bioconversion of 5 % wastes (37.8 % w/w) was recorded on sugar beet waste by Trichoderma viride EMCC 107. This treatment when followed by baker’s yeast fermentation, 0.41 % (v/v) ethanol and 8.2 % (v/w) conversion coefficient were obtained. PMID:24031984

  20. Effect of acid hydrolysis and fungal biotreatment on agro-industrial wastes for obtainment of free sugars for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    El-Tayeb, T S; Abdelhafez, A A; Ali, S H; Ramadan, E M

    2012-10-01

    This study was designed to evaluate selected chemical and microbiological treatments for the conversion of certain local agro-industrial wastes (rice straw, corn stalks, sawdust, sugar beet waste and sugarcane bagasse) to ethanol. The chemical composition of these feedstocks was determined. Conversion of wastes to free sugars by acid hydrolysis varied from one treatment to another. In single-stage dilute acid hydrolysis, increasing acid concentration from 1 % (v/v) to 5 % (v/v) decreased the conversion percentage of almost all treated agro-industrial wastes. Lower conversion percentages for some treatments were obtained when increasing the residence time from 90 to 120 min. The two-stage dilute acid hydrolysis by phosphoric acid (1.0 % v/v) followed by sulphuric acid (1.0 % v/v) resulted in the highest conversion percentage (41.3 % w/w) on treated sugar beet waste. This treatment when neutralized, amended with some nutrients and inoculated with baker's yeast, achieved the highest ethanol concentration (1.0 % v/v). Formation of furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) were functions of type of acid hydrolysis, acid concentration, residence time and feedstock type. The highest bioconversion of 5 % wastes (37.8 % w/w) was recorded on sugar beet waste by Trichoderma viride EMCC 107. This treatment when followed by baker's yeast fermentation, 0.41 % (v/v) ethanol and 8.2 % (v/w) conversion coefficient were obtained. PMID:24031984

  1. Theoretical study of the alkaline hydrolysis of an aza-β-lactam derivative of clavulanic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcías, Rafael C.; Coll, Miguel; Donoso, Josefa; Muñoz, Francisco

    2003-04-01

    DFT calculations based on the hybrid functional B3LYP/6-31+G * were used to study the alkaline hydrolysis of an aza-clavulanic acid, which results from the substitution of the carbon atom at position 6 in clavulanic acid by a nitrogen atom. The presence of the nitrogen atom endows the compound with special properties; in fact, once formed, the tetrahedral intermediate can evolve with cleavage of the N 4-C 7 or N 6-C 7 bond, which obviously leads to different reaction products. These differential bond cleavages may play a central role in the inactivation of β-lactamases, so the compound may be a powerful inactivator of these enzymes.

  2. The effect of harvest time, dry matter content and mechanical pretreatments on anaerobic digestion and enzymatic hydrolysis of miscanthus.

    PubMed

    Frydendal-Nielsen, Susanne; Hjorth, Maibritt; Baby, Sanmohan; Felby, Claus; Jørgensen, Uffe; Gislum, René

    2016-10-01

    Miscanthus x giganteus was harvested as both green and mature biomass and the dry matter content of the driest harvest was artificially decreased by adding water in two subsamples, giving a total of five dry matter contents. All five biomass types were mechanically pretreated by roller-milling, extrusion or grinding and accumulated methane production and enzymatically-accessible sugars were measured. Accumulated methane production was studied using sigmoid curves that allowed comparison among the treatments of the rate of the methane production and ultimate methane yield. The green biomass gave the highest methane yield and highest levels of enzymatically-accessible cellulose. The driest biomass gave the best effect from extrusion but with the highest energy consumption, whereas roller-milling was most efficient on wet biomass. The addition of water to the last harvest improved the effect of roller-milling and equalled extrusion of the samples in efficiency. PMID:27455125

  3. Effects of Extrusion Pretreatment Parameters on Sweet Sorghum Bagasse Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Its Subsequent Conversion into Bioethanol

    PubMed Central

    Heredia-Olea, Erick; Pérez-Carrillo, Esther; Serna-Saldívar, Sergio O.

    2015-01-01

    Second-generation bioethanol production from sweet sorghum bagasse first extruded at different conditions and then treated with cell wall degrading enzymes and fermented with I. orientalis was determined. The twin extruder parameters tested were barrel temperature, screws speed, and feedstock moisture content using surface response methodology. The best extrusion conditions were 100°C, 200 rpm, and 30% conditioning moisture content. This nonchemical and continuous pretreatment did not generate inhibitory compounds. The extruded feedstocks were saccharified varying the biocatalysis time and solids loading. The best conditions were 20% solids loading and 72 h of enzymatic treatment. These particular conditions converted 70% of the total fibrous carbohydrates into total fermentable C5 and C6 sugars. The extruded enzymatically hydrolyzed sweet sorghum bagasse was fermented with the strain I. orientalis at 12% solids obtaining a yield of 198.1 mL of ethanol per kilogram of bagasse (dw). PMID:25866776

  4. Ethanol production from residual wood chips of cellulose industry: acid pretreatment investigation, hemicellulosic hydrolysate fermentation, and remaining solid fraction fermentation by SSF process.

    PubMed

    Silva, Neumara Luci Conceição; Betancur, Gabriel Jaime Vargas; Vasquez, Mariana Peñuela; Gomes, Edelvio de Barros; Pereira, Nei

    2011-04-01

    Current research indicates the ethanol fuel production from lignocellulosic materials, such as residual wood chips from the cellulose industry, as new emerging technology. This work aimed at evaluating the ethanol production from hemicellulose of eucalyptus chips by diluted acid pretreatment and the subsequent fermentation of the generated hydrolysate by a flocculating strain of Pichia stipitis. The remaining solid fraction generated after pretreatment was subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis, which was carried out simultaneously with glucose fermentation [saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process] using a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The acid pretreatment was evaluated using a central composite design for sulfuric acid concentration (1.0-4.0 v/v) and solid to liquid ratio (1:2-1:4, grams to milliliter) as independent variables. A maximum xylose concentration of 50 g/L was obtained in the hemicellulosic hydrolysate. The fermentation of hemicellulosic hydrolysate and the SSF process were performed in bioreactors and the final ethanol concentrations of 15.3 g/L and 28.7 g/L were obtained, respectively.

  5. Characterization of lignin derived from water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatment of poplar wood at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Libing; Yan, Lishi; Wang, Zheming; Laskar, Dhrubojyoti D.; Swita, Marie S.; Cort, John R.; Yang, Bin

    2015-12-01

    In this study, flowthrough pretreatment of biomass has high potential to valorize lignin derivatives to high-value products, which is vital to enhance the economy of biorefinery plants. Comprehensive understanding of lignin behaviors and solubilization chemistry in aqueous pretreatment such as water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatment is of fundamental importance to achieve the goal of providing flexible platform for lignin utilization. In this study, the effects of flowthrough pretreatment conditions on lignin separation from poplar wood were reported as well as the characteristics of three sub-sets of lignin produced from the pretreatment, including residual lignin in pretreated solid residues (ReL), recovered insoluble lignin in pretreated liquid (RISL), and recovered soluble lignin in pretreatment liquid (RSL). Both the water-only and 0.05% (w/w) sulfuric acid pretreatments were performed at temperatures from 160 to 270°C on poplar wood in a flowthrough reactor system for 2-10 min. Results showed that water-only flowthrough pretreatment primarily removed syringyl (S units). Increased temperature and/or the addition of sulfuric acid enhanced the removal of guaiacyl (G units) compared to water-only pretreatments at lower temperatures, resulting in nearly complete removal of lignin from the biomass. Results also suggested that more RISL was recovered than ReL and RSL in both dilute acid and water-only flowthrough pretreatment at elevated temperatures. NMR spectra of the RISL revealed significant β-O-4 cleavage, α-β deoxygenation to form cinnamyl-like end groups, and slight β-5 repolymerization in both water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatments. In conclusion, elevated temperature and/or dilute acid greatly enhanced lignin removal to almost 100% by improving G unit removal besides S unit removal in flowthrough system. A new lignin chemistry transformation pathway was proposed and revealed the complexity of lignin structural change during

  6. Clay ingestion enhances intestinal triacylglycerol hydrolysis and non-esterified fatty acid absorption.

    PubMed

    Habold, Caroline; Reichardt, François; Le Maho, Yvon; Angel, Fabielle; Liewig, Nicole; Lignot, Jean-Hervé; Oudart, Hugues

    2009-07-01

    Consumption by animals and humans of earthy materials such as clay is often related to gut pathologies. Our aim was to determine the impact of kaolinite ingestion on glucose and NEFA transport through the intestinal mucosa. The expression of hexose transporters (Na/glucose co-transporter 1 (SGLT1), GLUT2, GLUT5) and of proteins involved in NEFA absorption (fatty acid transporter/cluster of differentiation 36 (FAT/CD36), fatty acid transport protein 4 (FATP4) and liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP)) was measured (1) in rats whose jejunum was perfused with a solution of kaolinite, and (2) in rats who ate spontaneously kaolinite pellets during 7 and 28 d. Also, we determined TAG and glucose absorption in the kaolinite-perfused group, and pancreatic lipase activity, gastric emptying and intestinal transit in rats orally administered with kaolinite. Glucose absorption was not affected by kaolinite perfusion or ingestion. However, kaolinite induced a significant increase in intestinal TAG hydrolysis and NEFA absorption. The cytoplasmic expression of L-FABP and FATP4 also increased due to kaolinite ingestion. NEFA may enter the enterocytes via endocytosis mainly since expression of NEFA transporters in the brush-border membrane was not affected by kaolinite. After uptake, rapid binding of NEFA by L-FABP and FATP4 could act as an intracellular NEFA buffer to prevent NEFA efflux. Increased TAG hydrolysis and NEFA absorption may be due to the adsorption properties of clay and also because kaolinite ingestion caused a slowing down of gastric emptying and intestinal transit.

  7. Alcohol fermentation of sweet potato - 1. Acid hydrolysis and factors involved

    SciTech Connect

    Azhar, A.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1981-04-01

    Factors affecting acid hydrolysis of sweet potato powder (SPP) to fermentable sugars were examined. These include HCl concentration, temperature, time, and levels of SPP. Maximum reducing sugar, reported as dextrose equivalent (DE), was detected after 24 min hydrolysis (1% SPP) in 0.034N HCl heated at 154/degree/C. These samples also had 3.43% hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) based on dry weight. A high level of HMF (9.2%) was detected in 1% SPP heated at 154/degree/C in 0.10N HCl for 18 min. The lowest concentration of HMF formed (1.8%), at maximal DE of 61%, was established in samples containing 5% SPP and heated at 154/degree/C in 0.034N HCl for 48 min. Aqueous extracts of uncured SPP, examined by High Performance Liquid Chromatography, contained glucose, fructose and sucrose, but degraded SPP had only glucose and fructose. Products of degraded SPP, Under appropriate conditions, could be used for alcohol fermentation. 18 refs.

  8. Enantioselective Hydrolysis of Amino Acid Esters Promoted by Bis(β-cyclodextrin) Copper Complexes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shan-Shan; Zhao, Meng; Ke, Zhuo-Feng; Cheng, Bei-Chen; Su, Hua; Cao, Qian; Cao, Zhen-Kun; Wang, Jun; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-02-26

    It is challenging to create artificial catalysts that approach enzymes with regard to catalytic efficiency and selectivity. The enantioselective catalysis ranks the privileged characteristic of enzymatic transformations. Here, we report two pyridine-linked bis(β-cyclodextrin) (bisCD) copper(II) complexes that enantioselectively hydrolyse chiral esters. Hydrolytic kinetic resolution of three pairs of amino acid ester enantiomers (S1-S3) at neutral pH indicated that the "back-to-back" bisCD complex CuL(1) favoured higher catalytic efficiency and more pronounced enantioselectivity than the "face-to-face" complex CuL(2). The best enantioselectivity was observed for N-Boc-phenylalanine 4-nitrophenyl ester (S2) enantiomers promoted by CuL(1), which exhibited an enantiomer selectivity of 15.7. We observed preferential hydrolysis of L-S2 by CuL(1), even in racemic S2, through chiral high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We demonstrated that the enantioselective hydrolysis was related to the cooperative roles of the intramolecular flanking chiral CD cavities with the coordinated copper ion, according to the results of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), inhibition experiments, rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY), and theoretical calculations. Although the catalytic parameters lag behind the level of enzymatic transformation, this study confirms the cooperative effect of the first and second coordination spheres of artificial catalysts in enantioselectivity and provides hints that may guide future explorations of enzyme mimics.

  9. Methane production from acid hydrolysates of Agave tequilana bagasse: evaluation of hydrolysis conditions and methane yield.

    PubMed

    Arreola-Vargas, Jorge; Ojeda-Castillo, Valeria; Snell-Castro, Raúl; Corona-González, Rosa Isela; Alatriste-Mondragón, Felipe; Méndez-Acosta, Hugo O

    2015-04-01

    Evaluation of diluted acid hydrolysis for sugar extraction from cooked and uncooked Agave tequilana bagasse and feasibility of using the hydrolysates as substrate for methane production, with and without nutrient addition, in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (AnSBR) were studied. Results showed that the hydrolysis over the cooked bagasse was more effective for sugar extraction at the studied conditions. Total sugars concentration in the cooked and uncooked bagasse hydrolysates were 27.9 g/L and 18.7 g/L, respectively. However, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural was detected in the cooked bagasse hydrolysate, and therefore, the uncooked bagasse hydrolysate was selected as substrate for methane production. Interestingly, results showed that the AnSBR operated without nutrient addition obtained a constant methane production (0.26 L CH4/g COD), whereas the AnSBR operated with nutrient addition presented a gradual methane suppression. Molecular analyses suggested that methane suppression in the experiment with nutrient addition was due to a negative effect over the archaeal/bacterial ratio. PMID:25647030

  10. Effect of D-amino acid substitutions on Ni(II)-assisted peptide bond hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Ariani, Hanieh H; Polkowska-Nowakowska, Agnieszka; Bal, Wojciech

    2013-03-01

    Previously we demonstrated the sequence-specific hydrolysis of the R1-(Ser/Thr)-peptide bond in Ni(II) complexes of peptides with a general R1-(Ser/Thr)-Xaa-His-Zaa-R2 sequence (R1 and R2 being any sequences) (Kopera, E.; Krezel, A.; Protas, A. M.; Belczyk, A.; Bonna, A.; Wyslouch-Cieszynska, A.; Poznanski, J.; Bal, W. Inorg. Chem. 2010, 49, 6636). In order to refine our understanding of the mechanism of this reaction and to find ways to accelerate it, we undertook a systematic study of effects of d-amino acid substitutions in the template Ac-Gly-Ala-Ser-Arg-His-Trp-Lys-Phe-Leu-NH2 peptide on the hydrolysis rate constants. We found that all stereochemical alterations made around the Ni(II) chelate plane resulted in the decrease of the reaction rate. However, the Ni(II) coordination, a prerequisite to the reaction, was not compromised by these substitutions. We demonstrated that the reaction is only possible when either the side chain of the crucial Ser (or Thr) residue is on the same part of the chelate plane as the next residue in the sequence (Arg), or the side chain of the residue following His (Trp) resides on the opposite side of the plane. The rate of reaction is the fastest when both these conditions are fulfilled. Another novel effect is the strong dependence of the rate of the acyl shift step on the character of the leaving group. PMID:23427909

  11. Methane production from acid hydrolysates of Agave tequilana bagasse: evaluation of hydrolysis conditions and methane yield.

    PubMed

    Arreola-Vargas, Jorge; Ojeda-Castillo, Valeria; Snell-Castro, Raúl; Corona-González, Rosa Isela; Alatriste-Mondragón, Felipe; Méndez-Acosta, Hugo O

    2015-04-01

    Evaluation of diluted acid hydrolysis for sugar extraction from cooked and uncooked Agave tequilana bagasse and feasibility of using the hydrolysates as substrate for methane production, with and without nutrient addition, in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (AnSBR) were studied. Results showed that the hydrolysis over the cooked bagasse was more effective for sugar extraction at the studied conditions. Total sugars concentration in the cooked and uncooked bagasse hydrolysates were 27.9 g/L and 18.7 g/L, respectively. However, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural was detected in the cooked bagasse hydrolysate, and therefore, the uncooked bagasse hydrolysate was selected as substrate for methane production. Interestingly, results showed that the AnSBR operated without nutrient addition obtained a constant methane production (0.26 L CH4/g COD), whereas the AnSBR operated with nutrient addition presented a gradual methane suppression. Molecular analyses suggested that methane suppression in the experiment with nutrient addition was due to a negative effect over the archaeal/bacterial ratio.

  12. Enantioselective Hydrolysis of Amino Acid Esters Promoted by Bis(β-cyclodextrin) Copper Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shan-Shan; Zhao, Meng; Ke, Zhuo-Feng; Cheng, Bei-Chen; Su, Hua; Cao, Qian; Cao, Zhen-Kun; Wang, Jun; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-02-01

    It is challenging to create artificial catalysts that approach enzymes with regard to catalytic efficiency and selectivity. The enantioselective catalysis ranks the privileged characteristic of enzymatic transformations. Here, we report two pyridine-linked bis(β-cyclodextrin) (bisCD) copper(II) complexes that enantioselectively hydrolyse chiral esters. Hydrolytic kinetic resolution of three pairs of amino acid ester enantiomers (S1–S3) at neutral pH indicated that the “back-to-back” bisCD complex CuL1 favoured higher catalytic efficiency and more pronounced enantioselectivity than the “face-to-face” complex CuL2. The best enantioselectivity was observed for N-Boc-phenylalanine 4-nitrophenyl ester (S2) enantiomers promoted by CuL1, which exhibited an enantiomer selectivity of 15.7. We observed preferential hydrolysis of L-S2 by CuL1, even in racemic S2, through chiral high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We demonstrated that the enantioselective hydrolysis was related to the cooperative roles of the intramolecular flanking chiral CD cavities with the coordinated copper ion, according to the results of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), inhibition experiments, rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY), and theoretical calculations. Although the catalytic parameters lag behind the level of enzymatic transformation, this study confirms the cooperative effect of the first and second coordination spheres of artificial catalysts in enantioselectivity and provides hints that may guide future explorations of enzyme mimics.

  13. Enantioselective Hydrolysis of Amino Acid Esters Promoted by Bis(β-cyclodextrin) Copper Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shan-Shan; Zhao, Meng; Ke, Zhuo-Feng; Cheng, Bei-Chen; Su, Hua; Cao, Qian; Cao, Zhen-Kun; Wang, Jun; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-02-01

    It is challenging to create artificial catalysts that approach enzymes with regard to catalytic efficiency and selectivity. The enantioselective catalysis ranks the privileged characteristic of enzymatic transformations. Here, we report two pyridine-linked bis(β-cyclodextrin) (bisCD) copper(II) complexes that enantioselectively hydrolyse chiral esters. Hydrolytic kinetic resolution of three pairs of amino acid ester enantiomers (S1-S3) at neutral pH indicated that the “back-to-back” bisCD complex CuL1 favoured higher catalytic efficiency and more pronounced enantioselectivity than the “face-to-face” complex CuL2. The best enantioselectivity was observed for N-Boc-phenylalanine 4-nitrophenyl ester (S2) enantiomers promoted by CuL1, which exhibited an enantiomer selectivity of 15.7. We observed preferential hydrolysis of L-S2 by CuL1, even in racemic S2, through chiral high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We demonstrated that the enantioselective hydrolysis was related to the cooperative roles of the intramolecular flanking chiral CD cavities with the coordinated copper ion, according to the results of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), inhibition experiments, rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY), and theoretical calculations. Although the catalytic parameters lag behind the level of enzymatic transformation, this study confirms the cooperative effect of the first and second coordination spheres of artificial catalysts in enantioselectivity and provides hints that may guide future explorations of enzyme mimics.

  14. Enantioselective Hydrolysis of Amino Acid Esters Promoted by Bis(β-cyclodextrin) Copper Complexes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shan-Shan; Zhao, Meng; Ke, Zhuo-Feng; Cheng, Bei-Chen; Su, Hua; Cao, Qian; Cao, Zhen-Kun; Wang, Jun; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    It is challenging to create artificial catalysts that approach enzymes with regard to catalytic efficiency and selectivity. The enantioselective catalysis ranks the privileged characteristic of enzymatic transformations. Here, we report two pyridine-linked bis(β-cyclodextrin) (bisCD) copper(II) complexes that enantioselectively hydrolyse chiral esters. Hydrolytic kinetic resolution of three pairs of amino acid ester enantiomers (S1-S3) at neutral pH indicated that the "back-to-back" bisCD complex CuL(1) favoured higher catalytic efficiency and more pronounced enantioselectivity than the "face-to-face" complex CuL(2). The best enantioselectivity was observed for N-Boc-phenylalanine 4-nitrophenyl ester (S2) enantiomers promoted by CuL(1), which exhibited an enantiomer selectivity of 15.7. We observed preferential hydrolysis of L-S2 by CuL(1), even in racemic S2, through chiral high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We demonstrated that the enantioselective hydrolysis was related to the cooperative roles of the intramolecular flanking chiral CD cavities with the coordinated copper ion, according to the results of electros