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Sample records for acid igneous rocks

  1. Silicon Isotope Fractionation During Acid Water-Igneous Rock Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Boorn, S. H.; van Bergen, M. J.; Vroon, P. Z.

    2007-12-01

    Silica enrichment by metasomatic/hydrothermal alteration is a widespread phenomenon in crustal environments where acid fluids interact with silicate rocks. High-sulfidation epithermal ore deposits and acid-leached residues at hot-spring settings are among the best known examples. Acid alteration acting on basalts has also been invoked to explain the relatively high silica contents of the surface of Mars. We have analyzed basaltic-andesitic lavas from the Kawah Ijen volcanic complex (East Java, Indonesia) that were altered by interaction with highly acid (pH~1) sulfate-chloride water of its crater lake and seepage stream. Quantitative removal of major elements during this interaction has led to relative increase in SiO2 contents. Our silicon isotope data, obtained by HR-MC-ICPMS and reported relative to the NIST RM8546 (=NBS28) standard, show a systematic increase in &δ&&30Si from -0.2‰ (±0.3, 2sd) for unaltered andesites and basalts to +1.5‰ (±0.3, 2sd) for the most altered/silicified rocks. These results demonstrate that silicification induced by pervasive acid alteration is accompanied by significant Si isotope fractionation, so that alterered products become isotopically heavier than the precursor rocks. Despite the observed enrichment in SiO2, the rocks have experienced an overall net loss of silicon upon alteration, if Nb is considered as perfectly immobile. The observed &δ&&30Si values of the alteration products appeared to correlate well with the inferred amounts of silicon loss. These findings would suggest that &28Si is preferentially leached during water-rock interaction, implying that dissolved silica in the ambient lake and stream water is isotopically light. However, layered opaline lake sediments, that are believed to represent precipitates from the silica-saturated water show a conspicuous &30Si-enrichment (+1.2 ± 0.2‰). Because anorganic precipitation is known to discriminate against the heavy isotope (e.g. Basile- Doelsch et al., 2006

  2. Petrology of the igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, I. S.

    1987-01-01

    Papers published during the 1983-1986 period on the petrology and geochemistry of igneous rocks are discussed, with emphasis on tectonic environment. Consideration is given to oceanic rocks, subdivided into divergent margin suites (mid-ocean ridge basalts, ridge-related seamounts, and back-arc basin basalts) and intraplate suites (oceanic island basalts and nonridge seamounts), and to igneous rocks formed at convergent margins (island arc and continental arc suites), subdivided into volcanic associations and plutonic associations. Other rock groups discussed include continental flood basalts, layered mafic intrusions, continental alkalic associations, komatiites, ophiolites, ash-flow tuffs, anorthosites, and mantle xenoliths.

  3. Ionium dating of igneous rocks.

    PubMed

    Kigoshi, K

    1967-05-19

    Local fractionation of uranium and thorium, between minerals within a sample of igneous rock at the time of crystallization, makes it possible to date its solidification by use of ionium and uranium. Results on samples of granite, pumice, and lava suggest that this method of dating is reliable.

  4. Mineral Detector for Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, S. T.; Hart, S. D.; Gulick, V. C.

    2010-12-01

    We present a Raman spectral analysis tool that uses machine learning algorithms to classify pure minerals in igneous rocks. Experiments show greater than 90% accuracy classifying a test set of pure minerals against a database of similar reference minerals using an artificial neural network. Efforts are currently underway to improve this tool for use as a mineral detector in rock samples, an important milestone toward autonomously classifying rocks based on spectral, and previous imaging work. Although pure mineral classification has been widely successful, applying the same methods to rocks is difficult because the spectra may represent a combination of multiple, and often competing, mineral signatures. In such cases some minerals may appear with more intensity than others resulting in masking of weaker minerals. Furthermore, with our particular spectrometer (852 nm excitation, ~50 micron spot size), minerals such as potassium feldspar fluoresce, both obscuring its characteristic Raman features and suppressing those of weaker minerals. For example, plagioclase and quartz, two key minerals for determining the composition of igneous rocks, are often hidden by minerals such as potassium feldspar and pyroxene, and are consequently underrepresented in the spectral analysis. These technicalities tend to skew the perceived composition of a rock from its actual composition. Despite these obstacles, an experiment involving a training set of 26 minerals (plagioclase, potassium feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, quartz) and a test set of 57 igneous rocks (basalt, gabbro, andesite, diorite, dacite, granodiorite, rhyolite, granite) shows that generalizations derived from their spectral data are consistent with expected trends: as rock composition goes from felsic to mafic there is a marked increase in the detection of minerals such as plagioclase and pyroxene along with a decrease in the detection of minerals such as quartz and potassium feldspar. The results suggest that phaneritic

  5. Microscopic tubes in igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, D.; Simmons, G.

    1977-01-01

    Microscopic tubes have been observed in several igneous rocks and may be quite common. They occur in single crystals and have either elliptical or circular cross-sections 1 to 5 microns in diameter and are ten to hundreds of microns long. Microtubes may be hollow or partially or completely filled with another phase, but are distinct from acicular crystals of accessory minerals such as rutile. Microtubes can form by at least three processes: (1) the partial annealing of microcracks, (2) the natural etching of dislocations, or (3) the primary inclusion of fluid material during crystal growth.

  6. Kinetics of crystallization of igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The geochemistry of igneous rocks is discussed, with the primary objectives of bringing together the theories underlying the kinetics of crystallization of igneous rocks and illustrating the use of these theories in understanding experimental and observational data. The primary purpose of the chapter is to introduce current thinking about the kinetics of igneous rocks and to provide a basis for understanding other work. A basic assumption made in the discussion is that the rate of any chemical reaction, including the crystallization of igneous rocks, is zero at equilibrium and proceeds at a finite rate only at a finite deviation from equilibrium. As such, an understanding of the processes operating in igneous rocks requires an understanding of how deviation from equilibrium affects the rates and mechanisms of the processes occurring during crystallization. These processes are detailed, with special emphasis given to nucleation and crystal growth. (JMT)

  7. Spirit Discovers New Class of Igneous Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    During the past two-and-a-half years of traversing the central part of Gusev Crater, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has analyzed the brushed and ground-into surfaces of multiple rocks using the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, which measures the abundance of major chemical elements. In the process, Spirit has documented the first example of a particular kind of volcanic region on Mars known as an alkaline igneous province. The word alkaline refers to the abundance of sodium and potassium, two major rock-forming elements from the alkali metals on the left-hand side of the periodic table.

    All of the relatively unaltered rocks -- those least changed by wind, water, freezing, or other weathering agents -- examined by Spirit have been igneous, meaning that they crystallized from molten magmas. One way geologists classify igneous rocks is by looking at the amount of potassium and sodium relative to the amount of silica, the most abundant rock-forming mineral on Earth. In the case of volcanic rocks, the amount of silica present gives scientists clues to the kind of volcanism that occurred, while the amounts of potassium and sodium provide clues about the history of the rock. Rocks with more silica tend to erupt explosively. Higher contents of potassium and sodium, as seen in alkaline rocks like those at Gusev, may indicate partial melting of magma at higher pressure, that is, deeper in the Martian mantle. The abundance of potassium and sodium determines the kinds of minerals that make up igneous rocks. If igneous rocks have enough silica, potassium and sodium always bond with the silica to form certain minerals.

    The Gusev rocks define a new chemical category not previously seen on Mars, as shown in this diagram plotting alkalis versus silica, compiled by University of Tennessee geologist Harry McSween. The abbreviations 'Na2O' and 'K2O' refer to oxides of sodium and potassium. The abbreviation 'SiO2' refers to silica. The abbreviation 'wt

  8. Uranium in NIMROC standard igneous rock samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, M. W.; Herndon, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for analysis of the uranium in multiple samples of each of six igneous-rock standards (dunite, granite, lujavrite, norite, pyroxenite, and syenite) prepared as geochemical reference standards for elemental and isotopic compositions. Powdered rock samples were examined by measuring delayed neutron emission after irradiation with a flux of the order of 10 to the 13th power neutrons/sq cm per sec in a nuclear reactor. The measurements are shown to compare quite favorably with previous uranium determinations for other standard rock samples.

  9. Igneous rocks from Apollo 16 rake samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowty, E.; Keil, K.; Prinz, M.

    1974-01-01

    Results are reported for a study of seven holocrystalline feldspathic rocks (including a spinel troctolite and six melt rocks) and one mare basalt clast from the Apollo-16 rake samples. The composition and grain structure of each rock is described in detail. Only the spinel troctolite is considered a good candidate for a primary igneous cumulate formed during the original differentiation of the lunar crust. It is shown that the melt rocks probably resulted from shock melting followed by rapid crystallization of heterogeneous highland material and that compositional variations are probably due to mixing of various amounts of heterogeneous cumulates and KREEP components. It is suggested that the mare basalt clast may have been derived from Mare Fecunditatis, although the nearest mare to the Apollo-16 site is Nectaris.

  10. Acid neutralizing capacity and leachate results for igneous rocks, with associated carbon contents of derived soils, Animas River AML site, Silverton, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Douglas B.; Stanton, Mark R.; Choate, LaDonna M.; Burchell,

    2009-01-01

    Mine planning efforts have historically overlooked the possible acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) that local igneous rocks can provide to help neutralize acidmine drainage. As a result, limestone has been traditionally hauled to mine sites for use in neutralizing acid drainage. Local igneous rocks, when used as part of mine life-cycle planning and acid mitigation strategy, may reduce the need to transport limestone to mine sites because these rocks can contain acid neutralizing minerals. Igneous hydrothermal events often introduce moderately altered mineral assemblages peripheral to more intensely altered rocks that host metal-bearing veins and ore bodies. These less altered rocks can contain ANC minerals (calcite-chlorite-epidote) and are referred to as a propylitic assemblage. In addition, the carbon contents of soils in areas of new mining or those areas undergoing restoration have been historically unknown. Soil organic carbon is an important constituent to characterize as a soil recovery benchmark that can be referred to during mine cycle planning and restoration.
    This study addresses the mineralogy, ANC, and leachate chemistry of propylitic volcanic rocks that host polymetallic mineralization in the Animas River watershed near the historical Silverton, Colorado, mining area. Acid titration tests on volcanic rocks containing calcite (2 – 20 wt %) and chlorite (6 – 25 wt %), have ANC ranging from 4 – 146 kg/ton CaCO3 equivalence. Results from a 6-month duration, kinetic reaction vessel test containing layered pyritic mine waste and underlying ANC volcanic rock (saturated with deionized water) indicate that acid generating mine waste (pH 2.4) has not overwhelmed the ANC of propylitic volcanic rocks (pH 5.8). Sequential leachate laboratory experiments evaluated the concentration of metals liberated during leaching. Leachate concentrations of Cu-Zn-As-Pb for ANC volcanic rock are one-to-three orders of magnitude lower when compared to leached

  11. Introduction to the Apollo collections. Part 1: Lunar igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, P. E.; Warner, J. L.; Simonds, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    The basic petrographic, chemical, and age data is presented for a representative suite of igneous rocks gathered during the six Apollo missions. Tables are given for 69 samples: 32 igneous rocks and 37 impactites (breccias). A description is given of 26 basalts, four plutonic rocks, and two pyroclastic samples. The textural-mineralogic name assigned each sample is included.

  12. Automated igneous rock identifiers for Mars Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, V. C.; Morris, R. L.; Gazis, P.; Bishop, J. L.; Alena, R.; Hart, S. D.; Horton, A.

    2003-04-01

    A key task for human or robotic explorers on the surface of Mars is choosing which particular rock or mineral samples should be selected for more intensive study. The usual challenges of such a task are compounded by the lack of sensory input available to a suited astronaut or the limited downlink bandwidth available to a rover. Additional challenges facing a human mission include limited surface time and the similarities in appearance of important minerals (e.g. carbonates, silicates, salts). Yet the choice of which sample to collect is critical. To address this challenge we are developing science analysis algorithms to interface with a Geologist's Field Assistant (GFA) device that will allow robotic or human remote explorers to better sense and explore their surroundings during limited surface excursions [1]. We aim for our algorithms to interpret spectral and imaging data obtained by various sensors. Our algorithms, for example, will identify key minerals, rocks, and sediments from mid-IR, Raman, and visible/near-IR spectra as well as from high-resolution and microscopic images to help interpret data and to provide high-level advice to the remote explorer. A top-level system will consider multiple inputs from raw sensor data output by imagers and spectrometers (visible/near-IR, mid-IR, and Raman) as well as human opinion to identify rock and mineral samples. Our prototype image analysis system identifies some igneous rocks from texture and color information. Spectral analysis algorithms have also been developed that successfully identify quartz, silica polymorphs, calcite, pyroxene, and jarosite from both visible/near-IR and mid-IR spectra. We have also developed spectral recognizers that identify high-iron pyroxenes and iron-bearing minerals using visible/near-IR spectra only. We are building a combined image and spectral database of rocks and minerals with which to continue development of our algorithms. Future plans include developing algorithms to identify

  13. Charge Generation and Propagation in Igneous Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann

    2000-01-01

    Resistivity changes, ground potentials, electromagnetic (EM) and luminous signals prior to or during earthquakes have been reported, in addition to ground uplift and tilt, and to changes in the seismic wave propagation parameters. However, no physical model exists that ties these diverse phenomena together. Through time-resolved impacts experiments it has been observed that, when igneous rocks (gabbro, diorite, granite) are impacted at low velocities (approx. 100 m/sec), highly mobile electronic charge carriers are generated, spreading from a small volume near the impact point, causing electric potentials, EM and light emission. The rock becomes momentarily conductive. When impacted at higher velocities (approx. 1.5 km/sec), the propagation of the P and S waves is registered through the transient piezoelectric response of quartz. At the same time, the rock volume is filled with mobile charge carriers, and a positive surface potential is registered. During the next 1-2 msec the surface potential oscillates, due to electron injection from ground. These observations are consistent with positive holes, e.g. defect electrons in the O(2-) sublattice, that can travel via the O 2p-dominated valence band of the silicate minerals at the speed of a phonon-mediated charge transfer. Before activation, the positive hole charge carriers lay dormant in form of positive hole pairs, PHP, electrically inactive, chemically equivalent to peroxy links in the structures of constituent minerals. PHPs are introduced by way of hydroxyl (O3Si-OH) incorporated into nominally anhydrous minerals when they crystallize in water-laden environments. Given that sound waves of even relatively low intensity appear to cause PHPs dissociation, thus generating mobile positive holes, it is proposed that microfracturing during rock deformation cause PHP dissociation. Depending on where and how much the rock volume is stressed, the positive holes are expected to form fluctuating charge clouds in the

  14. On the weathering of Martian igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreibus, G.; Waenke, H.

    1992-01-01

    Besides the young crystallization age, one of the first arguments for the martian origin of shergottite, nakhlite, and chassignite (SNC) meteorites came from the chemical similarity of the meteorite Shergotty and the martian soil as measured by Viking XRF analyses. In the meantime, the discovery of trapped rare gas and nitrogen components with element and isotope ratios closely matching the highly characteristic ratios of the Mars atmosphere in the shock glasses of shergottite EETA79001 was further striking evidence that the SNC's are martian surface rocks. The martian soil composition as derived from the Viking mission, with its extremely high S and Cl concentrations, was interpreted as weathering products of mafic igneous rocks. The low SiO2 content and the low abundance of K and other trace elements in the martian soils point to a mafic crust with a considerably smaller degree of fractionation compared to the terrestrial crust. However, the chemical evolution of the martian regolith and soil in respect to surface reaction with the planetary atmosphere or hydrosphere is poorly understood. A critical point in this respect is that the geochemical evidence as derived from the SNC meteorites suggests that Mars is a very dry planet that should have lost almost all its initially large water inventory during its accretion.

  15. High crystallization temperatures indicated for igneous rocks from tranquillity base.

    PubMed

    Skinner, B J

    1970-01-30

    Complex intergrowths of troilite (FeS) and iron in the igneous rocks from Tranquillity Base contain 8.4 percent native iron by volume. The intergrowths were derived from an initially homogeneous sulfide liquid that separated immiscibly from the magma at 1140 degrees C or above. Textures show that the sulfide liquid formed late in the crystallization and cooling history of the igneous rocks and after the major ilmenite and pyroxene had formed.

  16. Mg Isotopes of USGS Igneous Rock Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Glessner, J. J.; Lundstrom, C. C.

    2008-12-01

    Magnesium has three stable isotopes, 24Mg, 25Mg, and 26Mg with abundances of 78.99%, 10.00%, and 11.01%, respectively. It is one of the most abundant elements in the crust and mantle. As advancements of analytical techniques using MC-ICP-MS have dramatically advanced our ability to measure isotope ratios of Mg with greater precision, Mg isotopes can now be applied to study a variety of fundamental geological processes, such as continental crust weathering, chemical diffusion, and chondrule formation. Therefore the need for well characterized Mg isotope ratios for geological materials is increasingly important. Routine measurement of readily-available USGS rock standards is a viable way for inter-lab comparison to show the quality of data. However, the Mg isotope data for USGS standards reported in the literature are limited and inconsistent. USGS standards reported by different MC-ICP-MS labs have a range of Mg isotopic data outside of the normal external error of 0.1‰ (2σ). Mg isotopes of USGS igneous rock standards (dunite, DTS-1; basalts, BCR-1, BCR-2, BHVO-1; and andesite, AGV-1) were measured by a sample-standard bracketing method using a low resolution MC-ICP- MS (Nu-Plasma HR). The method has a large tolerance of matrix bias with Na/Mg and Al/Mg > 100% only changing the δ26Mg by less than 0.1‰. Dilution effects do not cause significant error (< 0.1‰) until the concentration difference between standard and sample is greater than 25%. The isobaric interference of CN+ on 26Mg was avoided by measuring Mg signal on the low mass shoulder. Only purified samples with excellent yields (>99.5%) and acceptable concentrations of matrix (mainly Na, Al, Ca, and Fe) are included in these results. Duplicate analyses of independently processed standards yielded the following results (δ26MgDSM-3 (‰)): BCR-2 (-0.306±0.144, - 0.290±0.116, -0.283±0.048, -0.288±0.057), BCR-1 (-0.399±0.079, -0.346±0.046), AGV-1 (-0.295±0.110, -0.307±0.086, -0.339±0.068), BHVO-1

  17. Sudbury Igneous Complex: Impact melt or igneous rock? Implications for lunar magmatism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Marc D.

    1992-01-01

    The recent suggestion that the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC) is a fractionated impact melt may have profound implications for understanding the lunar crust and the magmatic history of the Moon. A cornerstone of much current thought on the Moon is that the development of the lunar crust can be traced through the lineage of 'pristine' igneous rocks. However, if rocks closely resembling those from layered igneous intrusions can be produced by differentiation of a large impact melt sheet, then much of what is thought to be known about the Moon may be called into question. This paper presents a brief evaluation of the SIC as a differentiated impact melt vs. endogenous igneous magma and possible implications for the magmatic history of the lunar crust.

  18. Theoretical petrology. [of igneous and metamorphic rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolper, E.

    1979-01-01

    In the present paper, some areas of growing interest in the American efforts in petrology during the 1975-1978 quadrennium are reviewed. In igneous petrology, studies of structures and thermodynamic properties of silicate melts and of kinetics of igneous processes are in a period of rapid growth. Plate tectonic concepts have had (and will no doubt continue to have) an important influence by focusing interest on specific problems and by providing a framework for the understanding of petrogenesis. An understanding of mantle processes and evolution through the integration of petrological, geophysical, and geochemical constraints has been developed over the past 20 years, and will undoubtedly provide direction for future petrological studies.

  19. Net Acid Production, Acid Neutralizing Capacity, and Associated Mineralogical and Geochemical Characteristics of Animas River Watershed Igneous Rocks Near Silverton, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Douglas B.; Choate, LaDonna; Stanton, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents results from laboratory and field studies involving the net acid production (NAP), acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), and magnetic mineralogy of 27 samples collected in altered volcanic terrain in the upper Animas River watershed near Silverton, Colo., during the summer of 2005. Sampling focused mainly on the volumetrically important, Tertiary-age volcanic and plutonic rocks that host base- and precious-metal mineralization in the study area. These rocks were analyzed to determine their potential for neutralization of acid-rock drainage. Rocks in the study area have been subjected to a regional propylitic alteration event, which introduced calcite, chlorite (clinochlore), and epidote that have varying amounts and rates of acid neutralizing capacity (ANC). Locally, hydrothermal alteration has consumed any ANC and introduced minerals, mainly pyrite, that have a high net acid production (NAP). Laboratory studies included hydrogen pyroxide (H2O2) acid digestion and subsequent sodium hydroxide (NaOH) titration to determine NAP, and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) acid titration experiments to determine ANC. In addition to these environmental rock-property determinations, mineralogical, chemical, and petrographic characteristics of each sample were determined through semiquantitative X-ray diffractometry (Rietveld method), optical mineralogy, wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence, total carbon-carbonate, and inductively coupled plasma?mass spectrometric analysis. An ANC ranking was assigned to rock samples based on calculated ANC quantity in kilograms/ton (kg/t) calcium carbonate equivalent and ratios of ANC to NAP. Results show that talus near the southeast Silverton caldera margin, composed of andesite clasts of the Burns Member of the Silverton Volcanics, has the highest ANC (>100 kg/t calcium carbonate equivalent) with little to no NAP. The other units found to have moderate to high ANC include (a) andesite lavas and volcaniclastic rocks of the San Juan

  20. Uranium and other element analyses of igneous rocks of Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, K.F.

    1982-05-01

    Seventy-six samples of igneous rocks representing a variety of rock types and locations in Arkansas were analyzed by neutron activation analysis for the elements U, Th, Na, Al, Sc, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, La, Ce, Sm, Eu, Dy, Yb, Lu, and Hf. Samples were collected from the major igneous intrusions at Granite Mountain, Bauxite, Magnet Cove, Potash Sulfur Springs, and Murfreesboro, representing various syenites, lamprophyres, carbonatite, kimberlite, and periodotite. To make the data available for public use without further delay, this report is being issued without the normal technical and copy editing.

  1. Winter Ice and Snow as Models of Igneous Rock Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romey, William D.

    1983-01-01

    Examines some features of ice and snow that offer teachers and researchers help in understanding many aspects of igneous processes and configurations. Careful observation of such processes as melting, decay, evolution, and snow accumulation provide important clues to understanding processes by which many kinds of rocks form. (Author/JN)

  2. Log evaluation of oil-bearing igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Khatchikian, A.

    1983-12-01

    The evaluation of porosity, water saturation and clay content of oilbearing igneous rocks with well logs is difficult due to the mineralogical complexity of this type of rocks. The log responses to rhyolite and rhyolite tuff; andesite, dacite and zeolite tuff; diabase and basalt have been studied from examples in western Argentina and compared with values observed in other countries. Several field examples show how these log responses can be used in a complex lithology program to make a complete evaluation.

  3. Lunar igneous rocks and the nature of the lunar interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, J. F.; Walker, D.

    1974-01-01

    Lunar igneous rocks are interpreted, which can give useful information about mineral assemblages and mineral chemistry as a function of depth in the lunar interior. Terra rocks, though intensely brecciated, reveal, in their chemistry, evidence for a magmatic history. Partial melting of feldspathic lunar crustal material occurred in the interval 4.6 to 3.9 gy. Melting of ilmenite-bearing cumulates at depths near 100 km produced parent magmas for Apollo 11 and 17 titaniferous mare basalts in the interval 3.8 to 3.6 gy. Melting of ilmenite-free olivine pyroxenites at depths greater than 200 km produced low-titanium mare basalts in the interval 3.4 to 3.1 gy. No younger igneous rocks have yet been recognized among the lunar samples and present-day melting seems to be limited to depths greater than 1000 km.

  4. Lunar igneous rocks and the nature of the lunar interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, J. F.; Walker, D.

    1977-01-01

    Lunar igneous rocks, properly interpreted, can give useful information about mineral assemblages and mineral chemistry as a function of depth in the lunar interior. Though intensely brecciated, terra rocks reveal, in their chemistry, evidence for a magmatic history. Partial melting of feldspathic lunar crustal material occurred in the interval 4.6 to 3.9 Gy. Melting of ilmenite-bearing cumulates at depths near 100 km produced parent magmas for Apollo 11 and 17 titaniferous mare basalts in the interval 3.8 to 3.6 Gy. Melting of ilmenite-free olivine pyroxenites (also cumulates?) at depths greater than 200 km produced low-titanium mare basalts in the interval 3.4 to 3.1 Gy. No younger igneous rocks have yet been recognized among the lunar samples and present-day melting seems to be limited to depths greater than 1000 km.

  5. Magnetostriction and palæomagnetism of igneous rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, John W.; Buddington, A.F.; Balsley, J.R.

    1959-01-01

    IN a recent communication, Stott and Stacey1 report on a “crucial experiment” from which they conclude: “This excellent agreement between the dip and the directions of artificial thermoremanent magnetization of the stressed and unstressed rocks indicates that large systematic errors due to magnetostriction are most improbable in igneous rocks of types normally used for palæomagnetic work”. This experiment was intended to test the proposals2 and measurements3 bearing on the role of magnetostriction in rock magnetism. We present here our reasons for believing that the experiment was not crucial and that the conclusion is not justified.

  6. Charge Generation and Propagation in Igneous Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann

    2002-01-01

    Various electrical phenomena have been reported prior to or concurrent with earthquakes such as resistivity changes, ground potentials, electromagnetic (EM), and luminous signals. Doubts have been raised as to whether some of these phenomena are real and indeed precursory. One of the reasons for uncertainty is that, despite decades of intense work, there is still no physically coherent model. Using low- to medium-velocity impacts to measure electrical signals with microsecond time resolution, it has now been observed that when dry gabbro and diorite cores are impacted at relatively low velocities, approximately 100 m/s, highly mobile charge carriers are generated in a small volume near the impact point. They spread through the rocks, causing electric potentials exceeding +400 mV, EM, and light emission. As the charge cloud spreads, the rock becomes momentarily conductive. When a dry granite block is impacted at higher velocity, approximately 1.5 km/s, the propagation of the P and S waves is registered through the transient piezoelectric response of quartz. After the sound waves have passed, the surface of the granite block becomes positively charged, suggesting the same charge carriers as observed during the low-velocity impact experiments, expanding from within the bulk. During the next 2-3 ms the surface potential oscillates, indicating pulses of electrons injected from ground and contact electrodes. The observations are consistent with positive holes, e.g., defect electrons in the O(2-) sublattice, traveling via the O 2p-dominated valence band of the silicate minerals. Before activation, the positive holes lay dormant in the form of electrically inactive positive hole pairs (PHP), chemically equivalent to peroxy links, O3X/OO\\XO3, with X=Si(4+), Al(3+), etc. PHPs are introduced into the minerals by way of hydroxyl,O3X-OH, which all nominally anhydrous minerals incorporate when crystallizing in H2O-laden environments. The fact that positive holes can be

  7. Igneous Rocks of the Indian Ocean Floor.

    PubMed

    Engel, C G; Fischer, R L; Engel, A E

    1965-10-29

    Four dredge hauls from near the crest and from the eastern flank of the seismically active Mid-Indian Ocean Ridge at 23 degrees to 24 degrees S, at depths of 3700 to 4300 meters, produced only low-potassium tholeiitic basalt similar in chemical and mineralogic composition to basalts characteristic of ridges and rises in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. A fifth haul, from a depth of 4000 meters on the lower flank of a seamount on the ocean side of the Indonesian Trench, recovered tholeiitic basalt with higher concentrations of K and Ti and slightly lower amounts of Si and Ca than the typical-oceanic tholeiite of the ridge. The last sample is vesicular, suggesting depression of the area since the basalt was emplaced. Many of the rocks dredged are variously decomposed and hydrated, but there is no evidence of important chemical modification toward conversion of the lava flows to spilite during extrusion or solidification.

  8. Igneous rocks of the Indian ocean floor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, C.G.; Fischer, R.L.; Engel, A.E.J.

    1965-01-01

    Four dredge hauls from near the crest and from the eastern flank of the seismically active Mid-Indian Ocean Ridge at 23?? to 24??S, at depths of 3700 to 4300 meters, produced only low-potassium tholeiitic basalt similar in chemical and mineralogic composition to basalts characteristic of ridges and rises in the Atlantic and Pacific oceansA fifth haul, from a depth of 4000 meters on the lower flank of a seamount on the ocean side of the Indonesian Trench, recovered tholeiitic basalt with higher concentrations of K and Ti and slightly lower amounts of Si and Ca than the typical oceanic tholeiite of the ridgeThe last sample is vesicular, suggesting depression of the area since the basalt was emplacedMany of the rocks dredged are variously decomposed and hydrated, but there is no evidence of important chemical modification toward conversion of the lava flows to spilite during extrusion or solidification.

  9. Self-glazing ceramic tiles based on acidic igneous glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Merkin, A.P.; Nanazashvili, V.I.

    1988-07-01

    A technology was derived to produce self-glazing ceramic tiles based on single-component systems of acidic igneous (volcanic) glasses. A weakly alkaline solution of NaOH or KOH was used as the sealing water to activate the sintering process. Tests conducted on the self-glazing ceramic tiles showed that their water absorption amounts to 2.5-8%, linear shrinkage is 3.2-7%, and frost resistance amounts to 35-70 cycles. The application of acidic igneous glasses as the main raw material for the production of ceramic facing tiles made it possible to widen the raw material base and simplify the technology for fabricating ceramic facing tiles at lower cost. The use of waste products when processing perlite-bearing rocks, when carrying out mining and cutting of tuffs, slags, and tuff breccia for recovering cut materials was recommended.

  10. Igneous rocks of the East Pacific Rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, A.E.J.; Engel, C.G.

    1964-01-01

    The apical parts of large volcanoes along the East Pacific Rise (islands and seamounts) are encrusted with rocks of the alkali volcanic suite (alkali basalt, andesine- and oligoclase-andesite, and trachyte). In contrast, the more submerged parts of the Rise are largely composed of a tholeiitic basalt which has low concentrations of K, P, U, Th, Pb, and Ti. This tholeiitic basalt is either the predominant or the only magma generated in the earth's mantle under oceanic ridges and rises. It is at least 1000-fold more abundant than the alkali suite, which is probably derived from tholeiitic basalt by magmatic differentiation in and immediately below the larger volcanoes. Distinction of oceanic tholeiites from almost all continental tholeiites is possible on the simple basis of total potassium content, with the discontinuity at 0.3 to 0.5 percent K2O by weight. Oceanic tholeiites also are readily distinguished from some 19 out of 20 basalts of oceanic islands and seamount cappings by having less than 0.3 percent K2O by weight and more than 48 percent SiO2. Deep drilling into oceanic volcanoes should, however, core basalts transitional between the oceanic tholeiites and the presumed derivative alkali basalts.The composition of the oceanic tholeiites suggests that the mantle under the East Pacific Rise contains less than 0.10 percent potassium oxide by weight; 0.1 part per million of uranium and 0.4 part of thorium; a potassium:rubidium ratio of about 1200 and a potassium: uranium ratio of about 104.

  11. Determination of ultra-micro amounts of sulfur in igneous rocks by spectrofluorimetry using 2-(o-hydroxyphenyl) benzoxazole derivatization and tin(II)-strong phosphoric acid-assisted reduction.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y D; Namgung, S W; Yoshida, M; Malik, A

    2000-02-01

    A new and very sensitive method was developed for the determination of ultra-micro amounts of sulfur in igneous rock samples. The sulfur compounds in an igneous rock sample are reduced and released in the form of hydrogen sulfide by heating with a tin(II)-strong phosphoric acid (SPA) reagent. The liberated hydrogen sulfide is carried by a flow of nitrogen into a copper(II) absorbing solution to obtain a precipitate of copper(II) sulfide. The remaining copper(II) ion forms a chelate with 2-(o-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HPB) and quenches the fluorescence of HPB. The amount of sulfide is determined by measuring the HPB fluorescence intensity. The optimum reaction conditions were stoichiometrically investigated. By the present method using 0.1-0.2 g of rock sample, ultramicro amounts of sulfur (0.1-12.8 mug) could be quantitatively separated, collected, and determined with a relative standard deviation of 1.37% for a sample containing 5.7 mug of sulfur (95% confidence level). PMID:18967860

  12. Determination of ultra-micro amounts of sulfur in igneous rocks by spectrofluorimetry using 2-(o-hydroxyphenyl) benzoxazole derivatization and tin(II)-strong phosphoric acid-assisted reduction.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y D; Namgung, S W; Yoshida, M; Malik, A

    2000-02-01

    A new and very sensitive method was developed for the determination of ultra-micro amounts of sulfur in igneous rock samples. The sulfur compounds in an igneous rock sample are reduced and released in the form of hydrogen sulfide by heating with a tin(II)-strong phosphoric acid (SPA) reagent. The liberated hydrogen sulfide is carried by a flow of nitrogen into a copper(II) absorbing solution to obtain a precipitate of copper(II) sulfide. The remaining copper(II) ion forms a chelate with 2-(o-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HPB) and quenches the fluorescence of HPB. The amount of sulfide is determined by measuring the HPB fluorescence intensity. The optimum reaction conditions were stoichiometrically investigated. By the present method using 0.1-0.2 g of rock sample, ultramicro amounts of sulfur (0.1-12.8 mug) could be quantitatively separated, collected, and determined with a relative standard deviation of 1.37% for a sample containing 5.7 mug of sulfur (95% confidence level).

  13. Mafic and felsic igneous rocks at Gale crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, Violaine; Cousin, Agnès; Mangold, Nicolas; Toplis, Michael; Fabre, Cécile; Forni, Olivier; Payré, Valérie; Gasnault, Olivier; Ollila, Anne; Rapin, William; Fisk, Martin; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Wiens, Roger; Maurice, Sylvestre; Lasue, Jérémie; Newsom, Horton; Lanza, Nina

    2015-04-01

    The Curiosity rover landed at Gale, an early Hesperian age crater formed within Noachian terrains on Mars. The rover encountered a great variety of igneous rocks to the west of the Yellow Knife Bay sedimentary unit (from sol 13 to 800) which are float rocks or clasts in conglomerates. Textural and compositional analyses using MastCam and ChemCam Remote micro Imager (RMI) and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) with a ˜300-500 µm laser spot lead to the recognition of 53 massive (non layered) igneous targets, both intrusive and effusive, ranging from mafic rocks where feldspars form less than 50% of the rock to felsic samples where feldspar is the dominant mineral. From morphology, color, grain size, patina and chemistry, at least 5 different groups of rocks have been identified: (1) a basaltic class with shiny aspect, conchoidal frature, no visible grains (less than 0.2mm) in a dark matrix with a few mm sized light-toned crystals (21 targets) (2) a porphyritic trachyandesite class with light-toned, bladed and polygonal crystals 1-20 mm in length set in a dark gray mesostasis (11 targets); (3) light toned trachytes with no visible grains sometimes vesiculated or forming flat targets (6 targets); (4) microgabbro-norite (grain size < 1mm) and gabbro-norite (grain size >1 mm) showing dark and light toned crystals in similar proportion ( 8 targets); (5) light-toned diorite/granodiorite showing coarse granular (>4 mm) texture either pristine or blocky, strongly weathered rocks (9 rock targets). Overall, these rocks comprise 2 distinct geochemical series: (i) an alkali-suite: basanite, gabbro trachy-andesite and trachyte) including porphyritic and aphyric members; (ii) quartz-normative intrusives close to granodioritic composition. The former looks like felsic clasts recently described in two SNC meteorites (NWA 7034 and 7533), the first Noachian breccia sampling the martian regolith. It is geochemically consistent with differentiation of liquids produced by low

  14. Lithium Isotope Systematics of Rift-related Alkaline Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halama, R.; McDonough, W. F.; Rudnick, R. L.; Trumbull, R.; Klaudius, J.; Keller, J.; Taubald, H.

    2006-05-01

    Intracontinental alkaline igneous rocks from the Proterozoic Gardar Province (Greenland), the Cretaceous Damaraland Province (Namibia), the Tertiary Kaiserstuhl complex (Germany) and from the Holocene volcano Oldoinyo Lengai (Tanzania) were analyzed to characterize Li isotopic compositions of their mantle sources and to determine the processes affecting δ7Li in alkaline igneous rocks. The inferred mantle Li isotope signatures of the primitive alkaline rocks (δ7Li = +1 to +7) are similar to those of present- day MORB, OIB and carbonatites, and appear to be relatively constant in time and space. Gabbros from the Gardar Province define a relatively small field of Li isotope compositions (δ7Li = +4 to +7). Mineral separates (clinopyroxene, plagioclase) mostly overlap with the whole-rock values, which we interpret to reflect the δ7Li of the mantle sources of the gabbros. Mantle-like δ7Li values are also observed for primitive alkaline rocks from the other regions. Li isotope compositions in more differentiated rocks (syenites, phonolites and rhyolites) are highly variable (+11 to -22 per mil) and reflect a diversity of evolutionary processes that may vary from complex to complex. δ7Li values vary independently of Sr and Nd isotope values and indices of differentiation (e.g. MgO content) or weathering (e.g. LOI). Consistently light δ7Li values (+2 to -22) occur in Gardar syenites associated with a carbonatite. These may be explained by weathering and sub-solidus alteration, as indicated by petrographic observations. Alternatively, fluid-assisted diffusion processes, related to a fenitizing fluid from the carbonatite, may have led to extreme Li isotope fractionation. Whole-rock oxygen isotope analyses will be carried out to evaluate interaction with meteoric water, which would be reflected in a decrease in δ18O compared to magmatic values. The heaviest Li isotopic composition (+11 per mil) was obtained for a rhyolite, probably related to the presence of quartz

  15. Natural radioactivity and radon exhalation rate in Brazilian igneous rocks.

    PubMed

    Moura, C L; Artur, A C; Bonotto, D M; Guedes, S; Martinelli, C D

    2011-07-01

    This paper reports the natural radioactivity of Brazilian igneous rocks that are used as dimension stones, following the trend of other studies on the evaluation of the risks to the human health caused by the rocks radioactivity as a consequence of their use as cover indoors. Gamma-ray spectrometry has been utilized to determine the (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th activity concentrations in 14 rock types collected at different quarries. The following activity concentration range was found: 12.18-251.90 Bq/kg for (226)Ra, 9.55-347.47 Bq/kg for (232)Th and 407.5-1615.0 Bq/kg for (40)K. Such data were used to estimate Ra(eq), H(ex) and I(γ), which were compared with the threshold limit values recommended in literature. They have been exceeded for Ra(eq) and H(ex) in five samples, where the highest indices corresponded to a rock that suffered a process of ductile-brittle deformation that caused it a microbrecciated shape. The exhalation rate of Rn and daughters has also been determined in slabs consisting of rock pieces ~10 cm-long, 5 cm-wide and 3 cm-thick. It ranged from 0.24 to 3.93 Bq/m(2)/h and exhibited significant correlation with eU (=(226)Ra), as expected. The results indicated that most of the studied rocks did not present risk to human health and may be used indoors, even with low ventilation. On the other hand, igneous rocks that yielded indices above the threshold limit values recommended in literature may be used outdoors without any restriction or indoors with ample ventilation. PMID:21459585

  16. Natural radioactivity and radon exhalation rate in Brazilian igneous rocks.

    PubMed

    Moura, C L; Artur, A C; Bonotto, D M; Guedes, S; Martinelli, C D

    2011-07-01

    This paper reports the natural radioactivity of Brazilian igneous rocks that are used as dimension stones, following the trend of other studies on the evaluation of the risks to the human health caused by the rocks radioactivity as a consequence of their use as cover indoors. Gamma-ray spectrometry has been utilized to determine the (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th activity concentrations in 14 rock types collected at different quarries. The following activity concentration range was found: 12.18-251.90 Bq/kg for (226)Ra, 9.55-347.47 Bq/kg for (232)Th and 407.5-1615.0 Bq/kg for (40)K. Such data were used to estimate Ra(eq), H(ex) and I(γ), which were compared with the threshold limit values recommended in literature. They have been exceeded for Ra(eq) and H(ex) in five samples, where the highest indices corresponded to a rock that suffered a process of ductile-brittle deformation that caused it a microbrecciated shape. The exhalation rate of Rn and daughters has also been determined in slabs consisting of rock pieces ~10 cm-long, 5 cm-wide and 3 cm-thick. It ranged from 0.24 to 3.93 Bq/m(2)/h and exhibited significant correlation with eU (=(226)Ra), as expected. The results indicated that most of the studied rocks did not present risk to human health and may be used indoors, even with low ventilation. On the other hand, igneous rocks that yielded indices above the threshold limit values recommended in literature may be used outdoors without any restriction or indoors with ample ventilation.

  17. Calcium isotopes in igneous rocks and the origin of granite

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.D.; DePaolo, D.J. )

    1989-04-01

    The K-Ca radioactive parent-daughter system provides a tool for tracing the origins of igneous rocks. It is complementary to other isotopic systems because as stoichiometric constituents of major minerals, the concentrations of K and Ca, and the K/Ca ratio in rocks, are simply related to mineralogy. In this paper the authors report the first high-precision calcium isotopic analyses of continental granitic rocks, island arc rocks, and mid-ocean ridge basalts. These data show that mid-ocean ridge basalts have the low {sup 40}Ca/{sup 42}Ca ratios expected for the Earth's mantle, but that island arc rocks have slightly higher {sup 40}Ca/{sup 42}Co ratios indicative of crustal calcium in their magma sources. Many granitic rocks have high initial {sup 40}Ca/{sup 42}Ca ratios, and in conjunction with independent evidence for the age of the crustal sources, these ratios provide constraints on the K/Ca ratios, and in turn on the silica contents and residual mineralogy, of the deep crustal magma sources.

  18. Evolution of the martian mantle as recorded by igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balta, J. B.; McSween, H. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Martian igneous rocks provide our best window into the current state of the martian mantle and its evolution after accretion and differentiation. Currently, those rocks have been examined in situ by rovers, characterized in general from orbiting spacecraft, and analyzed in terrestrial laboratories when found as meteorites. However, these data have the potential to bias our understanding of martian magmatism, as most of the available meteorites and rover-analyzed rocks come from the Amazonian (<2 Ga) and Hesperian (~3.65 Ga) periods respectively, while igneous rocks from the Noachian (>3.8 Ga) have only been examined by orbiters and as the unique meteorite ALH 84001. After initial differentiation, the main planetary-scale changes in the structure of Mars which impact igneous compositions are cooling of the planet and thickening of the crust with time. As the shergottite meteorites give ages <500 Ma1, they might be expected to represent thick-crust, recent volcanism. Using spacecraft measurements of volcanic compositions and whole rock compositions of meteorites, we demonstrate that the shergottite meteorites do not match the composition of the igneous rocks composing the young volcanoes on Mars, particularly in their silica content, and no crystallization or crustal contamination trend reproduces the volcanoes from a shergottite-like parent magma. However, we show that the shergottite magmas do resemble older martian rocks in composition and mineralogy. The Noachian-aged meteorite ALH 84001 has similar radiogenic-element signatures to the shergottites and may derive from a similar mantle source despite the age difference2. Thus, shergottite-like magmas may represent melting of mantle sources that were much more abundant early in martian history. We propose that the shergottites represent the melting products of an originally-hydrous martian mantle, containing at least several hundred ppm H2O. Dissolved water can increase the silica content of magmas and thus

  19. Thermal diffusivity of igneous rocks at elevated pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, W.B.; Mirkovich, V.V.; Heard, H.C.

    1987-10-10

    Thermal diffusivity measurements of seven igneous rocks were made to temperatures of 400 /sup 0/C and pressures of 200 MPa. The measuring method was based on the concept of cylindrical symmetry and periodic heat pulses. The seven rocks measured were Westerly (Rhode Island) granite, Climax Stock (Nevada) quartz monzonite, Pomona (Washington) basalt, Atikokan (Ontario, Canada) granite, Creighton (Ontario, Canada) gabbro, East Bull Lake (Ontario, Canada) gabbro, and Stripa (Sweden) granite. The diffusivity of all the rocks showed a positive linear dependence on inverse temperature and, excluding the East Bull Lake gabbro, showed a linear dependence on quartz content. (Quartz content varied from 0 to 31% by volume.) Diffusivity in all cases rose or remained steady with increasing confining pressure. The pressure effect was strongest at lowest pressures and vanished by levels between 10 and 100 MPa, depending on rock type. The pressure effect (measured as a percentage change in diffusivity) is stronger in the four rocks of granite composition than in the three of basaltic composition. Our results agree well with existing thermal diffusivity measurements at atmospheric pressure.

  20. Geochemical and modal data for igneous rocks associated with epithermal mineral deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this report are to (1) present available geochemical and modal data for igneous rocks associated with epithermal mineral deposits and (2) to make those data widely and readily available for subsequent, more in-depth consideration and interpretation. Epithermal precious and base-metal deposits are commonly associated with subduction-related calc-alkaline to alkaline arc magmatism as well as back-arc continental rift magmatism. These deposits form in association with compositionally diverse extrusive and intrusive igneous rocks. Temperature and depth regimes prevailing during deposit formation are highly variable. The deposits form from hydrothermal fluids that range from acidic to near-neutral pH, and they occur in a variety of structural settings. The disparate temperature, pressure, fluid chemistry, and structural controls have resulted in deposits with wide ranging characteristics. Economic geologists have employed these characteristics to develop classification schemes for epithermal deposits and to constrain the important genetic processes responsible for their formation.

  1. Thermal conductivity anisotropy of metasedimentary and igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Michael G.; Chapman, David S.; van Wagoner, Thomas M.; Armstrong, Phillip A.

    2007-05-01

    Thermal conductivity anisotropy was determined for three sets of metasedimentary and igneous rocks from central Utah, USA. Most conductivity measurements were made in transient mode with a half-space, line source instrument oriented in two orthogonal directions on a flat face cut perpendicular to bedding. One orientation of the probe yields thermal conductivity parallel to bedding (kpar) directly, the other orientation of the probe measures a product of conductivities parallel and perpendicular to bedding from which the perpendicular conductivity (kperp) is calculated. Some direct measurements of kpar and kperp were made on oriented cylindrical discs using a conventional divided bar device in steady state mode. Anisotropy is defined as kpar/kperp. Precambrian argillites from Big Cottonwood Canyon have anisotropy values from 0.8 to 2.1 with corresponding conductivity perpendicular to bedding of 2.0 to 6.2 W m-1 K-1. Anisotropy values for Price Canyon sedimentary samples are less than 1.2 with a mean of 1.04 although thermal conductivity perpendicular to bedding for the samples varied from 1.3 to 5.0 W m-1 K-1. The granitic rocks were found to be essentially isotropic with thermal conductivity perpendicular to bedding having a range of 2.2 to 3.2 W m-1 K-1 and a mean of 2.68 W m-1 K-1. The results confirm the observation by Deming [1994] that anisotropy is negligible for rocks having kperp greater than 4.0 W m-1 K-1 and generally increases for low conductivity metamorphic and clay-rich rocks. There is little evidence, however, for his suggestion that thermal conductivity anisotropy of all rocks increases systematically to about 2.5 for low thermal conductivity rocks.

  2. Complete Analytical Data for Samples of Jurassic Igneous Rocks in the Bald Mountain Mining District, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents all petrographic, major oxide, and trace element data for a set of 109 samples collected during an investigation of Jurassic igneous rocks in the Bald Mountain mining district, Nevada. Igneous rocks in the district include the Bald Mountain stock, quartz-feldspar porphyry dikes, basaltic andesite dikes, aplite sills, and rare lamprophyre dikes. These rocks, although variably altered near intrusion-related mineral deposits, are fresh in many parts of the district. Igneous rocks in the district are hosted by Paleozoic sedimentary rocks.

  3. Primary igneous rocks on Mars: Composition and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Robert B.; Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The present knowledge of the crustal composition of Mars is synthesized and implications discussed for in-situ resource utilization. Sources of information include remote sensing observations, Viking XRF chemical measurements, and characteristics of the SNC meteorites (which most researchers now believe originated on Mars). There are a number of lines of evidence that abundant ferrous-iron rich igneous crustal rocks (and derivative soils) are available at or very near the current Martian surface at many locations on the planet. Most of these exposures show spectroscopic evidence for abundant pyroxene, consistent with basaltic compositions. The SNC meteorites, which have basaltic compositions, were also studied extensively. Interpretations of Mars crustal chemistry and mineralogy (petrology) based on these various sources are reviewed, and their consistencies and differences are discussed.

  4. Major and trace elements in igneous rocks from Apollo 15.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmke, P. A.; Blanchard, D. P.; Haskin, L. A.; Telander, K.; Weiss, C.; Jacobs, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    The concentrations of major and trace elements have been determined in igneous rocks from Apollo 15. All materials analyzed have typical depletions of Eu except for minerals separated from sample 15085. Four samples have concentrations of trace elements that are similar to those of KREEP. The samples of mare basalt from Apollo 15 have higher concentrations of FeO, MgO, Mn, and Cr and lower concentrations of CaO, Na2O, K2O, and rare-earth elements (REE) as compared to the samples of mare basalt from Apollos 11, 12, and 14. The samples can be divided into two groups on the basis of their normative compositions. One group is quartz normative and has low concentrations of FeO while the other is olivine normative and has high concentrations of FeO. The trace element data indicate that the samples of olivine normative basalt could be from different portions of a single lava flow.

  5. The "Key" Method of Identifying Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks in Introductory Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eves, Robert Leo; Davis, Larry Eugene

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that identification keys provide an orderly strategy for the identification of igneous and metamorphic rocks in an introductory geology course. Explains the format employed in the system and includes the actual key guides for both igneous and metamorphic rocks. (ML)

  6. Germanium isotopic variations in igneous rocks and marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouxel, Olivier; Galy, Albert; Elderfield, Henry

    2006-07-01

    A new technique for the precise and accurate determination of Ge stable isotope compositions has been developed and applied to silicate rocks and biogenic opal. The analyses were performed using a continuous flow hydride generation system coupled to a MC-ICPMS. Samples have been purified through anion- and cation-exchange resins to separate Ge from matrix elements and eliminate potential isobaric interferences. Variations of 74Ge/ 70Ge ratios are expressed as δ74Ge values relative to our internal standard and the long-term external reproducibility of the data is better than 0.2‰ for sample size as low as 15 ng of Ge. Data are presented for igneous and sedimentary rocks, and the overall variation is 2.4‰ in δ74Ge, representing 12 times the uncertainty of the measurements and demonstrating that the terrestrial isotopic composition of Ge is not unique. Co-variations of 74Ge/ 70Ge, 73Ge/ 70Ge and 72Ge/ 70Ge ratios follow a mass-dependent behaviour and imply natural isotopic fractionation of Ge by physicochemical processes. The range of δ74Ge in igneous rocks is only 0.25‰ without systematic differences among continental crust, oceanic crust or mantle material. On this basis, a Bulk Silicate Earth reservoir with a δ74Ge of 1.3 ± 0.2‰ can be defined. In contrast, modern biogenic opal such as marine sponges and authigenic glauconite displayed higher δ74Ge values between 2.0‰ and 3.0‰. This suggests that biogenic opal may be significantly enriched in light isotopes with respect to seawater and places a lower bound on the δ74Ge of the seawater to +3.0‰.This suggests that seawater is isotopically heavy relative to Bulk Silicate Earth and that biogenic opal may be significantly fractionated with respect to seawater. Deep-sea sediments are within the range of the Bulk Silicate Earth while Mesozoic deep-sea cherts (opal and quartz) have δ74Ge values ranging from 0.7‰ to 2.0‰. The variable values of the cherts cannot be explained by binary mixing

  7. The nakhlite meteorites: Augite-rich igneous rocks from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    2005-01-01

    The seven nakhlite meteorites are augite-rich igneous rocks that formed in flows or shallow intrusions of basaltic magma on Mars. They consist of euhedral to subhedral crystals of augite and olivine (to 1 cm long) in fine-grained mesostases. The augite crystals have homogeneous cores of Mg' = 63% and rims that are normally zoned to iron enrichment. The core-rim zoning is cut by iron-enriched zones along fractures and is replaced locally by ferroan low-Ca pyroxene. The core compositions of the olivines vary inversely with the steepness of their rim zoning - sharp rim zoning goes with the most magnesian cores (Mg' = 42%), homogeneous olivines are the most ferroan. The olivine and augite crystals contain multiphase inclusions representing trapped magma. Among the olivine and augite crystals is mesostasis, composed principally of plagioclase and/or glass, with euhedra of titanomagnetite and many minor minerals. Olivine and mesostasis glass are partially replaced by veinlets and patches of iddingsite, a mixture of smectite clays, iron oxy-hydroxides and carbonate minerals. In the mesostasis are rare patches of a salt alteration assemblage: halite, siderite, and anhydrite/ gypsum. The nakhlites are little shocked, but have been affected chemically and biologically by their residence on Earth. Differences among the chemical compositions of the nakhlites can be ascribed mostly to different proportions of augite, olivine, and mesostasis. Compared to common basalts, they are rich in Ca, strongly depleted in Al, and enriched in magmaphile (incompatible) elements, including the LREE. Nakhlites contain little pre-terrestrial organic matter. Oxygen isotope ratios are not terrestrial, and are different in anhydrous silicates and in iddingsite. The alteration assemblages all have heavy oxygen and heavy carbon, while D/H values are extreme and scattered. Igneous sulfur had a solar-system isotopic ratio, but in most minerals was altered to higher and lower values. High precision

  8. Pristine Igneous Rocks and the Early Differentiation of Planetary Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Paul H.

    1998-01-01

    Our studies are highly interdisciplinary, but are focused on the processes and products of early planetary and asteroidal differentiation, especially the genesis of the ancient lunar crust. Most of the accessible lunar crust consists of materials hybridized by impact-mixing. Rare pristine (unmixed) samples reflect the original genetic diversity of the early crust. We studied the relative importance of internally generated melt (including the putative magma ocean) versus large impact melts in early lunar magmatism, through both sample analysis and physical modeling. Other topics under investigation included: lunar and SNC (martian?) meteorites; igneous meteorites in general; impact breccias, especially metal-rich Apollo samples and polymict eucrites; effects of regolith/megaregolith insulation on thermal evolution and geochronology; and planetary bulk compositions and origins. We investigated the theoretical petrology of impact melts, especially those formed in large masses, such as the unejected parts of the melts of the largest lunar and terrestrial impact basins. We developed constraints on several key effects that variations in melting/displacement ratio (a strong function of both crater size and planetary g) have on impact melt petrology. Modeling results indicate that the impact melt-derived rock in the sampled, megaregolith part of the Moon is probably material that was ejected from deeper average levels than the non-impact-melted material (fragmental breccias and unbrecciated pristine rocks). In the largest lunar impacts, most of the impact melt is of mantle origin and avoids ejection from the crater, while most of the crust, and virtually all of the impact-melted crust, in the area of the crater is ejected. We investigated numerous extraordinary meteorites and Apollo rocks, emphasizing pristine rocks, siderophile and volatile trace elements, and the identification of primary partial melts, as opposed to partial cumulates. Apollo 15 sample 15434,28 is an

  9. Determination and distribution of diesel components in igneous rock surrounding underground diesel storage facilities in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Loren, A; Hallbeck, L; Pedersen, K; Abrahamsson, K

    2001-01-15

    In Sweden, a preliminary investigation of the contamination situation of igneous rock surrounding underground storage facilities of diesel showed that the situation was severe. The diesel was believed to have penetrated into the rock as far as 50 m from the walls of the vaults. Consequently, the risk for contamination of groundwater and recipients could not be neglected. To be able to assess the fate of diesel components in rock, both a suitable drilling method and a method for the determination of a wide range of diesel components were needed. The analytical method presented made it possible to quantify a number of hydrocarbons in rock samples collected with triple-tube core drilling. The samples were dissolved in hydrofluoric acid (HF) with hexane in Teflon centrifuge tubes. After digestion of the rock, extraction of the analytes with hexane was performed. Determination of the individual hydrocarbons present was done with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The method was used to study the environmental impact of the underground storage of diesel. The drilling method enabled sampling without contamination risks. Our data show that the major transport of diesel components in rock occurs through fracture systems and that diffusion of diesel through the rock is of minor importance. The results have drastically changed the view of the contamination situation of diesel in the vicinity of storage facilities in hard rock in Sweden.

  10. Magmas and magmatic rocks: An introduction to igneous petrology

    SciTech Connect

    Middlemost, E.A.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book melds traditional igneous petrology with the emerging science of planetary petrology to provide an account of current ideas on active magmatic and volcanic processes, drawing examples from all igneous provinces of the world as well as from the moon and planets. It reviews the history and development of concepts fundamental to modern igneous petrology and includes indepth sections on magmas, magnetic differentiation and volcanology.

  11. Crystal Size Distributions in Igneous rocks: Where are we now?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, M.

    2003-12-01

    in either slope of intercept is significant and can be related to other parameters. Concave down CSDs, with no small crystals, are commonly encountered in porphyritic, oikocrystic and plutonic rocks. This texture may be produced by textural coarsening (Ostwald ripening, annealing): this occurs when the magma is maintained close to the mineral liquidus. In this situation the nucleation rate is zero, but growth rates are significant. The classic LSW model is not the only solution possible: more modern solutions, such as Communicating Neighbours may be more appropriate. Variable degrees of textural coarsening will produce CSDs that appear to rotate about a single point. This again reflects closure. Concave up CSDs with no lower size limit are very common. They do not generally have a lognormal or fractal size distribution. They can be produced by mixing of two or more magmas, or crystallisation under several different conditions of undercooling. They can also result from alternations of nucleation and growth followed by textural coarsening. Crystal accumulation and fraction should modify existing CSDs in a predictable manner. An exact solution to this problem has not yet been developed, but simplistic models suggest that CSDs should rotate upwards about the size origin for accumulation and downwards for fractionation. However, clear evidence for such effects has not yet been observed, even in well-layered rocks. There are many igneous systems still to be explored using CSDs. An exiting new domain may be the application of CSDs in experimental petrology.

  12. Rb-Sr age of lunar igneous rocks 62295 and 14310

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, R. K.; Lee-Hu, C.-N.; Wetherill, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements of Rb-Sr ages of crystallization performed on igneous lunar highland rocks 62295 and 14310 are reported. Lunar sample 62295 is a mesostasis-rich spinel-troctolite very-high-alumina basalt exhibiting a variable igneous structure. Sample 14310 is a feldspathic KREEP-rich basalt. The determined ages probably date the cooling of shock melts.

  13. Igneous rock from Severnyi Kolchim (H3) chondrite: Nebular origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazarov, M. A.; Brandstaetter, F.; Kurat, G.

    1993-01-01

    The discovery of lithic fragments with compositions and textures similar to igneous differentiates in unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOC's) and carbonaceous chondrites (CC's) has been interpreted as to suggest that planetary bodies existed before chondrites were formed. As a consequence, chondrites (except, perhaps CI chondrites) cannot be considered primitive assemblages of unprocessed nebular matter. We report about our study of an igneous clast from the Severnyi Kolchim (H3) chondrite. The results of the study are incompatible with an igneous origin of the clast but are in favor of a nebular origin similar to that of chondrules.

  14. Rock property measurements and analysis of selected igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks from worldwide localities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Gordon R.

    1983-01-01

    Dry bulk density and grain density measurements were made on 182 samples of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks from various world-wide localities. Total porosity values and both water-accessible and helium-accessible porosities were calculated from the density data. Magnetic susceptibility measurements were made on the solid samples and permeability and streaming potentials were concurrently measured on most samples. Dry bulk densities obtained using two methods of volume determination, namely direct measurement and Archlmedes principle, were nearly equivalent for most samples. Grain densities obtained on powdered samples were typically greater than grain densities obtained on solid samples, but differences were usually small. Sedimentary rocks had the highest percentage of occluded porosity per rock volume whereas metamorphic rocks had the highest percentage of occluded porosity per total porosity. There was no apparent direct relationship between permeability and streaming potential for most samples, although there were indications of such a relationship in the rock group consisting of granites, aplites, and syenites. Most rock types or groups of similar rock types of low permeability had, when averaged, comparable levels of streaming potential per unit of permeability. Three calcite samples had negative streaming potentials.

  15. Ca Isotopic Ratios in Igneous Rocks: Some Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Farkas, J.; Jacobsen, S. B.

    2009-12-01

    Calcium (Ca) is the 5th most abundant element on the Earth, and it is an important geochemical and cosmochemical tracer. It has six isotopes and only H and He have a larger percentage mass difference (Δm/m) between the heaviest and the lightest isotopes. Systematic Ca isotopic studies have mostly focused on low-temperature geochemical processes, and most Ca isotopic analyses have been applied on modern and ancient marine carbonates and sulphates, documenting large and systematic isotopic variations, which were used to infer the chemical evolution of seawater. Detailed work on igneous rocks is very limited. Here we show two examples of how stable Ca isotopic ratios can be a useful geochemical tool in understanding igneous processes. Ca isotopic fractionation between coexisting clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene from mantle peridotites: We report Ca isotopic ratios on co-existing clino- and ortho-pyroxenes from Kilbourne Hole and San Carlos mantle peridotites. The 44Ca/40Ca in orthopyroxenes is ~0.5 per mil heavier than that in co-existing clinopyroxenes. Combined with published Ca isotopic data on low-temperature Ca-bearing minerals (calcite, aragonite and barite), we show that the fractionation of Ca isotopes between Ca-bearing minerals (at both low-temperature and high-temperature) is primarily controlled by the strength of Ca-O bond in the minerals. The mineral with shorter (i.e., stronger) Ca-O bond yields heavier Ca isotopic ratio. Using our measured 44Ca/40Ca in mantle pyroxenes and the relative proportions of major Ca-bearing minerals in the upper mantle, the estimated 44Ca/40Ca of the upper mantle is 1.1 per mil heavier relative to the NIST 915a, ~0.1 to 0.2 per mil higher than basalts. Ca isotopic variation in Hawaiian shield lavas: Large geochemical and isotopic variations have been observed in lavas forming the large tholeiitic shields of Hawaiian volcanoes, with lavas from the surface of the Koolau volcano (Makapuu-stage) defining one compositional and

  16. [High Precision Identification of Igneous Rock Lithology by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Wei-gang; Yan, Zhi-quan

    2015-09-01

    In the field of petroleum exploration, lithology identification of finely cuttings sample, especially high precision identification of igneous rock with similar property, has become one of the geological problems. In order to solve this problem, a new method is proposed based on element analysis of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Total Alkali versus Silica (TAS) diagram. Using independent LIBS system, factors influencing spectral signal, such as pulse energy, acquisition time delay, spectrum acquisition method and pre-ablation are researched through contrast experiments systematically. The best analysis conditions of igneous rock are determined: pulse energy is 50 mJ, acquisition time delay is 2 μs, the analysis result is integral average of 20 different points of sample's surface, and pre-ablation has been proved not suitable for igneous rock sample by experiment. The repeatability of spectral data is improved effectively. Characteristic lines of 7 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Fe) commonly used for lithology identification of igneous rock are determined, and igneous rock samples of different lithology are analyzed and compared. Calibration curves of Na, K, Si are generated by using national standard series of rock samples, and all the linearly dependent coefficients are greater than 0.9. The accuracy of quantitative analysis is investigated by national standard samples. Element content of igneous rock is analyzed quantitatively by calibration curve, and its lithology is identified accurately by the method of TAS diagram, whose accuracy rate is 90.7%. The study indicates that LIBS can effectively achieve the high precision identification of the lithology of igneous rock.

  17. [High Precision Identification of Igneous Rock Lithology by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Wei-gang; Yan, Zhi-quan

    2015-09-01

    In the field of petroleum exploration, lithology identification of finely cuttings sample, especially high precision identification of igneous rock with similar property, has become one of the geological problems. In order to solve this problem, a new method is proposed based on element analysis of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Total Alkali versus Silica (TAS) diagram. Using independent LIBS system, factors influencing spectral signal, such as pulse energy, acquisition time delay, spectrum acquisition method and pre-ablation are researched through contrast experiments systematically. The best analysis conditions of igneous rock are determined: pulse energy is 50 mJ, acquisition time delay is 2 μs, the analysis result is integral average of 20 different points of sample's surface, and pre-ablation has been proved not suitable for igneous rock sample by experiment. The repeatability of spectral data is improved effectively. Characteristic lines of 7 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Fe) commonly used for lithology identification of igneous rock are determined, and igneous rock samples of different lithology are analyzed and compared. Calibration curves of Na, K, Si are generated by using national standard series of rock samples, and all the linearly dependent coefficients are greater than 0.9. The accuracy of quantitative analysis is investigated by national standard samples. Element content of igneous rock is analyzed quantitatively by calibration curve, and its lithology is identified accurately by the method of TAS diagram, whose accuracy rate is 90.7%. The study indicates that LIBS can effectively achieve the high precision identification of the lithology of igneous rock. PMID:26669148

  18. Heat production rate from radioactive elements in igneous and metamorphic rocks in Eastern Desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abbady, Adel G E; El-Arabi, A M; Abbady, A

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive heat-production data of Igneous and Metamorphic outcrops in the Eastern Desert are presented. Samples were analysed using a low level gamma-ray spectrometer (HPGe) in the laboratory. A total of 205 rock samples were investigated, covering all major rock types of the area. The heat-production rate of igneous rocks ranges from 0.11 (basalt) to 9.53 microWm(-3) (granite). In metamorphic rocks it varies from 0.28 (serpentinite ) to 0.91 microWm(-3) (metagabbro). The contribution due to U is about 51%, as that from Th is 31% and 18% from K. The corresponding values in igneous rocks are 76%, 19% and 5%, respectively. The calculated values showed good agreement with global values except in some areas containing granites. PMID:16120480

  19. Heat production rate from radioactive elements in igneous and metamorphic rocks in Eastern Desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abbady, Adel G E; El-Arabi, A M; Abbady, A

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive heat-production data of Igneous and Metamorphic outcrops in the Eastern Desert are presented. Samples were analysed using a low level gamma-ray spectrometer (HPGe) in the laboratory. A total of 205 rock samples were investigated, covering all major rock types of the area. The heat-production rate of igneous rocks ranges from 0.11 (basalt) to 9.53 microWm(-3) (granite). In metamorphic rocks it varies from 0.28 (serpentinite ) to 0.91 microWm(-3) (metagabbro). The contribution due to U is about 51%, as that from Th is 31% and 18% from K. The corresponding values in igneous rocks are 76%, 19% and 5%, respectively. The calculated values showed good agreement with global values except in some areas containing granites.

  20. Hydrocarbon occurrences in igneous and metamorphic rocks: Plays of the 1990s

    SciTech Connect

    Harrelson, D.W.

    1989-09-01

    A review of available geologic literature has indicated numerous references detailing the occurrences of hydrocarbon in igneous and metamorphic rocks. Notable among these references is a paper by Chung-Hsiang P'an and a group of papers edited by Sidney Powers. Collectively, these papers conclude a biogenic source for hydrocarbons, most of which occur in (1) weathered igneous and metamorphic reservoir rocks that are higher than the source rocks (e.g., Amarillo field) or (2) igneous and metamorphic rocks that exert structural or stratigraphic control on the reservoir or source rocks (e.g., Jackson dome and the Wiggins anticline-Hancock ridge). It should be noted that a new twist on the abiogenic origin of some inert hydrocarbon gases (i.e., helium and nitrogen) proposes a degassing of igneous and metamorphic rocks from sources in the underlying mantle. Recent european super-deep tests (e.g., the Siljan Ring and the Kola SG-3 testholes) have attempted, with mixed results, to verify this theory. Drilling for these deep igneous and metamorphic prospects today is considered at or below economic basement or worse - a rank wildcat. However, these plays should become increasingly commercial in the 1990s as deeper drilling technology progresses, the current oil glut is eliminated, and more exotic deep gas prospects become accepted.

  1. Geochemistry of Sarvabad basic igneous rocks from northern Sanandaj - Sirjan Magmatic Arc, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, H.; Ghorbani, M.; Azizi, H.

    2009-12-01

    Sanandaj - Sirjan Magmatic Arc (SSMA) as a segment of Alpine -Himalayan magmatic belt embrace a wide spectrum of igneous rocks, both volcanic and plutonic, from basic to felsic compositions. The igneous rocks which are mainly calc-alkaline are attributed to the subduction of Neotethyan oceanic slab beneath central Iranian plate in Mesozoic time (Berberian and Berberian, 1981; Omrani et al., 2008). In the present study the focus is made on the geochemistry and petrography of igneous rocks from northwestern end of the SSMA, in Sarvabad area, in order to elucidate their geodynamic setting. A set of 30 rock samples were analyzed for major and selected trace elements. Mafic igneous bodies from northern SSMA are regarded as post - collisional plutonic bodies of Eocene - Oligocene age (Ghasemi and Talbot, 2006). Azizi and Moinevaziri (2009) considered the igneous rocks from the northern SSMA, at Sonqor - Baneh area, as the products of subduction that continued to the Paleogene time. Investigations carried out in the course of present study demonstrate that the Sarvabad basic igneous rocks, shown on the magmatic map of Iran (Emami et al., 1993) as gabbroic plutons, are composed of volcanic, subvolcanic and plutonic rocks of basic composition. The silica and Mg number of the rocks vary in the ranges 49-52 wt. % and 54-68, respectively. The volcanic rocks are vitrophyric to porphyritic with some plagioclase, olivine and clinopyroxene microphenocrysts. In the subvolcanic and plutonic bodies, plagioclase, clinopyroxene and some amphibole and Fe-Ti oxides are the major constituents. These igneous rocks indicate tholeitic affinity and cover the typical mantle array on a Zr/Nb vs. Y/Nb plot. Occurrences of a few ultramafic bodies found as metric - size isolated lenses in the basic igneous rocks highlight the spatial characteristic of these rocks; the existence of an ophiolitic rock assemblage nearby. Located toward the southwest of Sarvabad basic igneous rocks, is a Cretaceous

  2. Distribution of Igneous Rocks in Medina and Uvalde Counties, Texas, as Inferred from Aeromagnetic Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, David V.; McDougal, Robert R.; Smith, Bruce D.; Blome, Charles D.

    2008-01-01

    A high-resolution aeromagnetic survey was flown in 2001 over Medina and Uvalde Counties, Texas, as part of a multi-disciplinary investigation of the geohydrologic framework of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas. The objective of the survey was to assist in mapping structural features that influence aquifer recharge and ground-water flow. The survey revealed hundreds of magnetic anomalies associated with igneous rocks that had previously been unmapped. This report presents an interpretation of the outcrops and subcrops of igneous rocks, based upon procedures of matched-filtering and potential field modeling.

  3. Classification Scheme for Diverse Sedimentary and Igneous Rocks Encountered by MSL in Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Mangold, N.; Fisk, M.; Forni, O.; McLennan, S.; Ming, D. W.; Sumner, D.; Sautter, V.; Williams, A. J.; Gellert, R.

    2015-01-01

    The Curiosity Rover landed in a lithologically and geochemically diverse region of Mars. We present a recommended rock classification framework based on terrestrial schemes, and adapted for the imaging and analytical capabilities of MSL as well as for rock types distinctive to Mars (e.g., high Fe sediments). After interpreting rock origin from textures, i.e., sedimentary (clastic, bedded), igneous (porphyritic, glassy), or unknown, the overall classification procedure (Fig 1) involves: (1) the characterization of rock type according to grain size and texture; (2) the assignment of geochemical modifiers according to Figs 3 and 4; and if applicable, in depth study of (3) mineralogy and (4) geologic/stratigraphic context. Sedimentary rock types are assigned by measuring grains in the best available resolution image (Table 1) and classifying according to the coarsest resolvable grains as conglomerate/breccia, (coarse, medium, or fine) sandstone, silt-stone, or mudstone. If grains are not resolvable in MAHLI images, grains in the rock are assumed to be silt sized or smaller than surface dust particles. Rocks with low color contrast contrast between grains (e.g., Dismal Lakes, sol 304) are classified according to minimum size of apparent grains from surface roughness or shadows outlining apparent grains. Igneous rocks are described as intrusive or extrusive depending on crystal size and fabric. Igneous textures may be described as granular, porphyritic, phaneritic, aphyric, or glassy depending on crystal size. Further descriptors may include terms such as vesicular or cumulate textures.

  4. Middle Jurassic to early Cretaceous igneous rocks along eastern North American continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Jansa, L.F.; Pe-Piper, G.

    1988-03-01

    Late Middle Jurassic and Early Cretaceous mafic dikes, sills, flows, and local volcaniclastic sediments are intercalated within continental shelf sediments from the Baltimore Canyon Trough northward to the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. The igneous rocks on the eastern North American margin are mainly alkali basalts of intraplate affinity. The late Middle Jurassic igneous activity was of short duration, at about 140 Ma, and was restricted to Georges Bank where it led to construction of several volcanic cones. The main period of igneous activity was concentrated at about 120 Ma in the Aptian/Berremian. The activity consists of dike swarms in Baltimore Canyon, occasional dikes on the Scotian Shelf, and the growth of stratovolcanoes on the Scotian Shelf and Grand Banks. Younger dikes (approx. 95 Ma) also are present on the Grand Banks. With regard to oil exploration on the continental margin, care must be taken to properly identify igneous and volcaniclastic rocks on mechanical logs, drill cuttings, and cores. Reflection seismic profiles can be used to map the areal extent of sills, flows, and low-angle dikes, which commonly show distinctive seismic responses. However, steeply dipping dikes generally produce little, if any, seismic response. Isotopic-age determinations of igneous rocks, combined with biostratigraphic-age determinations of adjacent strata, are invaluable for stratigraphic correlation, establishing chronology of seismic sequences, and analysis of basin sedimentation and tectonic history. 9 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Siderophile and volatile trace elements in 72255 and 72275. [meteoritic and igneous composition of lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. W.; Ganapathy, R.; Higuchi, H.; Anders, E.

    1974-01-01

    Of six samples from boulder 1 at Station 2, four contain a unique meteoritic component, which is attributed to the Crisium projectile. The other two samples are meteorite free, igneous rocks: an unusual, alkali- and Ge-rich pigeonitic basalt, and an alkali-poor norite of unexceptional trace element chemistry.

  6. Spectral emission measurement of igneous rocks using a spectroradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunton, W. D.

    1970-01-01

    Spectroradiometer is used for either close or remote identification of rocks not heated to high temperatures. Instrument yields reproducible data spectra with excellent signal-to-noise ratios and readily identifiable spectral details, including differences in subclasses.

  7. Pristine Igneous Rocks and the Early Differentiation of Planetary Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Paul H.

    2005-01-01

    Our studies are highly interdisciplinary, but are focused on the processes and products of early planetary and asteroidal differentiation, especially the genesis of the ancient lunar crust. The compositional diversity that we explore is the residue of process diversity, which has strong relevance for comparative planetology. Most of the accessible lunar crust consists of materials hybridized by impact-mixing. Our lunar research concentrates on the rare pristine (unmixed) samples that reflect the original genetic diversity of the early crust. Among HED basalts (eucrites and clasts in howardites), we distinguish as pristine the small minority that escaped the pervasive thermal metamorphism of the parent asteroid's crust. We have found a correlation between metamorphically pristine HED basalts and the similarly small minority of compositionally evolved "Stannern trend" samples, which are enriched in incompatible elements and titanium compared to main group eucrites, and yet have relatively high mg ratios. Other topics under investigation included: lunar and SNC (martian?) meteorites; igneous meteorites in general; impact breccias, especially metal-rich Apollo samples and polymict eucrites; siderophile compositions of the lunar and martian mantles; and planetary bulk compositions and origins.

  8. Igneous rocks of Arctic Ocean deep sea ridges: new data on petrology, geochemistry and geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Oleg; Morozov, Andrey; Shokalsky, Sergey; Sobolev, Nikolay; Kashubin, Sergey; Shevchenko, Sergey; Sergeev, Sergey; Belyatsky, Boris; Shatov, Vitaly; Petrov, Eugeny

    2015-04-01

    The aggregate results of studies of igneous rocks, collected from the central part of the Arctic Ocean during scientific marine expeditions «Arctic-2000, 2005, 2007 and 2012» are presented and discussed in the frame of modern understanding of High Polar Arctic tectonic constraint. Petrological, geochemical and isotope-geochronological studies of more than 500 samples have shown that the sedimentary rocks are of dominated population among the rock fragments dredged from deep-sea bottom, and represented by metamorphosed dolomite and quartz sandstone, limestone, sometimes with the Devonian - Permian fauna. Igneous rocks are 10-15% only (Archean and Paleoproterozoic gneissouse granites and gabbro, Neoproterozoic dolerite) and metamorphic rocks (green shales, metabasites, gneisses). Apparently, these rocks are part of the acoustic basement underlying the Late Mesozoic - Cenozoic layered loose sediments. In addition to the dredged fragments of the ancient mafic rocks, some samples were taken as a core during deep-water drilling in the northern and southern slopes of the Mendeleev Ridge and represented by trachybasalts, marking the border of Late-Cenozoic deposit cover and acoustic basement and quite similar in composition to those of Early-Late Cretaceous basalts form northward of the Chukchi Plateau seamounts, Alpha Ridge, Franz Josef Land, De Long islands and other parts of the large igneous province of the High Arctic (HALIP). Video-filming of Mendeleev Ridge escarps proofs the existing of rock outcrops and supports local origin of most of the rock fragments found in the sampling areas. Thus the continental type of the earth's crust of the Central Arctic Ridges basement is based on all obtained results of our study of sea-bottom excavated rock material.

  9. Thermal Conductivity Anisotropy of Metasedimentary and Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, M. G.; Chapman, D. S.; van Wagoner, T. M.; Armstrong, P. A.

    2005-12-01

    Thermal conductivity anisotropy was determined for two sets of rocks: a series of sandstones, mudstones, and limey shales of Cretaceous age from Price Canyon, Utah, and metasedimentary argillites and quartzites of Precambrian age from the Big Cottonwood Formation in north central Utah. Additional anisotropy measurements were made on granitic rocks from two Tertiary plutons in Little Cottonwood Canyon, north central Utah. Most conductivity measurements were made in transient mode with a half-space, line-source instrument oriented in two orthogonal directions on a flat face cut perpendicular to bedding. One orientation of the probe yields thermal conductivity parallel to bedding (kmax) directly, the other orientation of the probe measures a product of conductivities parallel and perpendicular to bedding from which the perpendicular conductivity (kperp) is calculated. Some direct measurements of kmax and kperp were made on oriented cylindrical discs using a conventional divided bar device in steady-state mode. Anisotropy is defined as kmax/kperp. The Precambrian argillites from Big Cottonwood Canyon have anisotropy values from 0.8 to 2.1 with corresponding conductivity perpendicular to bedding of 2.0 to 6.2 W m-1 K-1. Anisotropy values for the Price Canyon samples are less than 1.2 with a mean of 1.04 although thermal conductivity perpendicular to bedding for the samples varied from 1.3 to 5.0 W m-1 K-1. The granitic rocks were found to be essentially isotropic with thermal conductivity perpendicular to bedding having a range of 2.2 to 3.2 W m-1 K-1 and a mean of 2.68 W m-1 K-1. The results confirm the observation by Deming (1994) that anisotropy is negligible for rocks having kperp greater than 4.0 W m-1 K-1 and generally increases for low conductivity metamorphic and clay-rich rocks. There is little evidence, however, for his suggestion that thermal conductivity anisotropy of all rocks increases systematically to about 2.5 for low thermal conductivity rocks.

  10. The Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility of Igneous Rocks: Lessons From Obsidians and Pyroclastic Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canon-Tapia, E.

    2013-05-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of igneous rocks differs from that of other lithologies in several aspects that are related to their characteristics of emplacement history. Nevertheless, within the group of igneous rocks there are also differences on emplacement mechanisms that can lead to specific and distinctive AMS signatures. In this work, a review of the most important emplacement regimes is made, paying special attention to the extreme conditions represented by obsidians and pyroclastic deposits. These two extreme emplacement regimes are controlled mainly by the viscosity of the fluid phase, but the differences in AMS signatures also includes other differences in the nature of the ferromagnetic grains that are present in the rocks during emplacement. For example, the results of this work indicate that the AMS can be associated to a population of ferromagnetic minerals of a submicroscopic size, despite of which it can be very well defined and yield large degrees of anisotropy. It is suggested that the AMS associated to such population of small grains might indeed be the origin of the AMS of other igneous rocks that have an optically observable fraction of mineral grains, although until present it had been overlooked in most instances. As it had been suggested before, use of tests designed to identify the contribution of a superparamagnetic fraction (SP) in the magnetic properties of a rock can help us to identify the presence of such a SP-related AMS in other cases.

  11. Termination time of peak decratonization in North China: Geochemical evidence from mafic igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Li-Qun; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Zhao, Zi-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Geophysical and petrological data indicate destruction of the cratonic lithosphere in North China in the Mesozoic, resulting in replacement of the ancient subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) by the juvenile SCLM. However, it remains to be answered when the craton destruction would have been terminated in the Mesozoic. This question is resolved by studying the two types of mafic igneous rocks with contrasting geochemical compositions from North China. The first type of mafic igneous rock shows arc-like trace element distribution patterns and enriched radiogenic Sr-Nd isotope compositions, with emplacement ages spanning from the Triassic to Early Cretaceous. The mafic magmatism is absent in a period from ~ 200 Ma to ~ 135 Ma, recording the thinning of cratonic lithosphere due to the westward flat subduction of the Paleo-Pacific slab beneath the North China Craton. In contrast, the second type of mafic igneous rocks exhibits oceanic island basalts (OIB)-like trace element distribution patterns and relatively depleted radiogenic Sr-Nd isotope compositions, with emplacement ages spanning from the Early Cretaceous to Cenozoic. Zircon U-Pb dating yields an age of ~ 121 Ma for the geochemical transformation between the two types of mafic igneous rocks. This age marks a dramatic demarcation in the composition of their mantle sources. As such, the nature of mantle lithosphere in North China was changed from the ancient SCLM to the juvenile SCLM at ~ 121 Ma. Thus, this age not only signifies the tectonic transition from the enriched mantle to the depleted mantle in the Early Cretaceous, but also dates the termination of peak decratonization in North China. Therefore, the craton destruction in the Early Cretaceous is temporally and spatially associated with the dramatic changes in the geochemical composition of mantle lithosphere.

  12. Lead isotope systematics of some igneous rocks from the Egyptian Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, J. G.; Dixon, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    Lead isotope data on whole-rock samples and two feldspar separates for a variety of Pan-African (late Precambrian) igneous rocks for the Egyptian Shield are presented. It is pointed out that the eastern desert of Egypt is a Late Precambrian shield characterized by the widespread occurrence of granitic plutons. The lead isotope ratios may be used to delineate boundaries between Late Precambrian oceanic and continental environments in northeastern Africa. The samples belong to three groups. These groups are related to a younger plutonic sequence of granites and adamellites, a plutonic group consisting of older tonalites to granodiorites, and the Dokhan volcanic suite.

  13. Distinct Igneous APXS Rock Compositions on Mars from Pathfinder, MER and MSL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellert, Ralf; Arvidson, Raymond; Clark, Benton, III; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Squyres, Steven W.; Yen, Albert S.

    2015-01-01

    The alpha particle x-ray spectrometer (APXS) on all four Mars Rovers returned geochemical data from about 1000 rocks and soils along the combined traverses of over 50 kilometers. Here we discuss rocks likely of igneous origin, which might represent source materials for the soils and sediments identified along the traverses. Adirondack-type basalts, abundant in the plains of Gusev Crater, are primitive, olivine bearing basalts. They resemble in composition the basaltic soils encountered at all landing sites, except the ubiquitous elevated S, Cl and Zn in soils. They have been postulated to represent closely the average Martian crust composition. The recently identified new Martian meteorite Black Beauty has similar overall geochemical composition, very distinct from the earlier established SNC meteorites. The rim of the Noachian crater Endeavour, predating the sulfate-bearing Burns formation at Meridiani Planum, also resembles closely the composition of Adirondack basalts. At Gale Crater, the MSL Curiosity rover identified a felsic rock type exemplified by the mugearitic float rock JakeM, which is widespread along the traverse at Gale. While a surprise at that time, possibly related more evolved, alkaline rocks had been previously identified on Mars. Spirit encountered the Wishstone rocks in the Columbia Hills with approx. 6% Na2O+K2O, 15 % Al2O3 and low 12% FeO. Pathfinder rocks with elevated K and Na and >50% SiO2 were postulated to be andesitic. Recently Opportunity encountered the rock JeanBaptisteCharbonneau with >15% Al2O3, >50% SiO2 and approx. 10% FeO. A common characteristic all these rocks is the very low abundance of Cr, Ni and Zn, and an Fe/Mn ratio of about 50, indicating an unaltered Fe mineralogy. Beside these likely igneous rock types, which occurred always in several rocks, a few unique rocks were encountered, e.g. Bounce Rock, a pyroxene-bearing ejecta rock fragment resembling the Shergottite EETA 79001B meteorite. The APXS data can be used to

  14. Postcollisional mafic igneous rocks record crust-mantle interaction during continental deep subduction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zi-Fu; Dai, Li-Qun; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2013-01-01

    Findings of coesite and microdiamond in metamorphic rocks of supracrustal protolith led to the recognition of continental subduction to mantle depths. The crust-mantle interaction is expected to take place during subduction of the continental crust beneath the subcontinental lithospheric mantle wedge. This is recorded by postcollisional mafic igneous rocks in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt and its adjacent continental margin in the North China Block. These rocks exhibit the geochemical inheritance of whole-rock trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes as well as zircon U-Pb ages and Hf-O isotopes from felsic melts derived from the subducted continental crust. Reaction of such melts with the overlying wedge peridotite would transfer the crustal signatures to the mantle sources for postcollisional mafic magmatism. Therefore, postcollisonal mafic igneous rocks above continental subduction zones are an analog to arc volcanics above oceanic subduction zones, providing an additional laboratory for the study of crust-mantle interaction at convergent plate margins. PMID:24301173

  15. Geochemical Database for Igneous Rocks of the Ancestral Cascades Arc - Southern Segment, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.; John, David A.; Putirka, Keith; Cousens, Brian L.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic rocks that form the southern segment of the Cascades magmatic arc are an important manifestation of Cenozoic subduction and associated magmatism in western North America. Until recently, these rocks had been little studied and no systematic compilation of existing composition data had been assembled. This report is a compilation of all available chemical data for igneous rocks that constitute the southern segment of the ancestral Cascades magmatic arc and complement a previously completed companion compilation that pertains to rocks that constitute the northern segment of the arc. Data for more than 2,000 samples from a diversity of sources were identified and incorporated in the database. The association between these igneous rocks and spatially and temporally associated mineral deposits is well established and suggests a probable genetic relationship. The ultimate goal of the related research is an evaluation of the time-space-compositional evolution of magmatism associated with the southern Cascades arc segment and identification of genetic associations between magmatism and mineral deposits in this region.

  16. K/Na ratio of Cenozoic igneous rocks of the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.

    1962-01-01

    The potassium and sodium content of chemically analysed Cenozoic igneous rocks from about 150 areas of the western United States has been examined. For each area a plot of the molecular proportion K2O (K2O + Na2O) [Niggli's k-value] is shown, and the projected k-value determined at 50 and 60 weight per cent SiO2. The k-values are plotted and contoured on maps of the western United States. These maps show that potassium is least abundant relative to total alkali (when rocks of the same SiO2 content are compared) in a zone along the Pacific Coast, becomes more abundant eastward, and is highest in the Colorado Plateau and Northern Rocky Mountains. These k-value variations can be related to regional variations in the abundance of certain trace elements and of different types of older granitic rocks, and to Bouguer gravity maps. This correspondence indicates that the alkali ratio of Cenozoic igneous rocks is closely related to the character of the crust where the rocks are formed. ?? 1962.

  17. Postcollisional mafic igneous rocks record crust-mantle interaction during continental deep subduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zi-Fu; Dai, Li-Qun; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2013-01-01

    Findings of coesite and microdiamond in metamorphic rocks of supracrustal protolith led to the recognition of continental subduction to mantle depths. The crust-mantle interaction is expected to take place during subduction of the continental crust beneath the subcontinental lithospheric mantle wedge. This is recorded by postcollisional mafic igneous rocks in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt and its adjacent continental margin in the North China Block. These rocks exhibit the geochemical inheritance of whole-rock trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes as well as zircon U-Pb ages and Hf-O isotopes from felsic melts derived from the subducted continental crust. Reaction of such melts with the overlying wedge peridotite would transfer the crustal signatures to the mantle sources for postcollisional mafic magmatism. Therefore, postcollisonal mafic igneous rocks above continental subduction zones are an analog to arc volcanics above oceanic subduction zones, providing an additional laboratory for the study of crust-mantle interaction at convergent plate margins. PMID:24301173

  18. Postcollisional mafic igneous rocks record crust-mantle interaction during continental deep subduction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zi-Fu; Dai, Li-Qun; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2013-12-04

    Findings of coesite and microdiamond in metamorphic rocks of supracrustal protolith led to the recognition of continental subduction to mantle depths. The crust-mantle interaction is expected to take place during subduction of the continental crust beneath the subcontinental lithospheric mantle wedge. This is recorded by postcollisional mafic igneous rocks in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt and its adjacent continental margin in the North China Block. These rocks exhibit the geochemical inheritance of whole-rock trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes as well as zircon U-Pb ages and Hf-O isotopes from felsic melts derived from the subducted continental crust. Reaction of such melts with the overlying wedge peridotite would transfer the crustal signatures to the mantle sources for postcollisional mafic magmatism. Therefore, postcollisonal mafic igneous rocks above continental subduction zones are an analog to arc volcanics above oceanic subduction zones, providing an additional laboratory for the study of crust-mantle interaction at convergent plate margins.

  19. A physical basis for remote rock mapping of igneous rocks using spectral variations in thermal infrared emittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, L. S.; Labovitz, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Results of a theoretical investigation of the relation between spectral features in the 8-12 micrometer region and rock type are presented. Data on compositions of a suite of rocks and measurements of their spectral intensities in 8.2-10.9 and 9.4-12.1 micrometer bands published by Vincent (1973) were subjected to various quantitative procedures. There was no consistent direct relationship between rock group names and the relative spectral intensities. However, there is such a relationship between the Thornton-Tuttle (1960) Differentiation Index and the relative spectral intensities. This relationship is explicable on the basis of the change in average Si-O bond length which is a function of the degree of polymerization of the SiO4 tetrahedra of the silicate minerals in the igneous rocks.

  20. Microbial populations and activities in the rhizoplane of rock-weathering desert plants. I. Root colonization and weathering of igneous rocks.

    PubMed

    Puente, M E; Bashan, Y; Li, C Y; Lebsky, V K

    2004-09-01

    Dense layers of bacteria and fungi in the rhizoplane of three species of cactus (Pachycereus pringlei, Stenocereus thurberi, Opuntia cholla) and a wild fig tree (Ficus palmeri) growing in rocks devoid of soil were revealed by bright-field and fluorescence microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. These desert plants are responsible for rock weathering in an ancient lava flow at La Purisima-San Isidro and in sedimentary rock in the Sierra de La Paz, both in Baja California Sur, Mexico. The dominant bacterial groups colonizing the rhizoplane were fluorescent pseudomonads and bacilli. Seven of these bacterial species were identified by the 16S rRNA molecular method. Unidentified fungal and actimomycete species were also present. Some of the root-colonizing microorganisms fixed in vitro N(2), produced volatile and non-volatile organic acids that subsequently reduced the pH of the rock medium in which the bacteria grew, and significantly dissolved insoluble phosphates, extrusive igneous rock, marble, and limestone. The bacteria were able to release significant amounts of useful minerals, such as P, K, Mg, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn from the rocks and were thermo-tolerant, halo-tolerant, and drought-tolerant. The microbial community survived in the rhizoplane of cacti during the annual 10-month dry season. This study indicates that rhizoplane bacteria on cacti roots in rock may be involved in chemical weathering in hot, subtropical deserts.

  1. Microbial populations and activities in the rhizoplane of rock-weathering desert plants. I. Root colonization and weathering of igneous rocks.

    PubMed

    Puente, M E; Bashan, Y; Li, C Y; Lebsky, V K

    2004-09-01

    Dense layers of bacteria and fungi in the rhizoplane of three species of cactus (Pachycereus pringlei, Stenocereus thurberi, Opuntia cholla) and a wild fig tree (Ficus palmeri) growing in rocks devoid of soil were revealed by bright-field and fluorescence microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. These desert plants are responsible for rock weathering in an ancient lava flow at La Purisima-San Isidro and in sedimentary rock in the Sierra de La Paz, both in Baja California Sur, Mexico. The dominant bacterial groups colonizing the rhizoplane were fluorescent pseudomonads and bacilli. Seven of these bacterial species were identified by the 16S rRNA molecular method. Unidentified fungal and actimomycete species were also present. Some of the root-colonizing microorganisms fixed in vitro N(2), produced volatile and non-volatile organic acids that subsequently reduced the pH of the rock medium in which the bacteria grew, and significantly dissolved insoluble phosphates, extrusive igneous rock, marble, and limestone. The bacteria were able to release significant amounts of useful minerals, such as P, K, Mg, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn from the rocks and were thermo-tolerant, halo-tolerant, and drought-tolerant. The microbial community survived in the rhizoplane of cacti during the annual 10-month dry season. This study indicates that rhizoplane bacteria on cacti roots in rock may be involved in chemical weathering in hot, subtropical deserts. PMID:15375735

  2. Diverse, Alkali-Rich Igneous and Volcaniclastic Rocks Reflect a Metasomatised Mantle Beneath Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Baker, M. B.; Berger, J. A.; Fisk, M. R.; Gellert, R.; McLennan, S. M.; Newcombe, M. E.; Stolper, E. M.; Thompson, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Although Curiosity landed in a sedimentary setting, geochemical compositions determined by Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and ChemCam suggest that major element concentrations of some rocks were little modified by chemical weathering, and in these cases, the bulk (>70%) of the crystalline components determined by ChemMin are igneous. Gale rocks can therefore largely preserve the composition of their igneous protoliths and provide insight into the crystalline basement exposed in the north crater rim. Four end-member compositions are recognized on the basis of APXS analyses. (1) The diverse, evolved Jake M class (n=12) of inferred igneous origin includes float blocks and cobbles. Jake M rocks are phonotephritic/mugearitic to trachyandesitic and characterized by low MgO contents (3.0-5.7 wt%) and high Al and alkalis, particularly Na2O (up to 7.35 wt%). (2) The Bathurst class of siltstones to coarse sandstones (n=13) occurs as dark-toned float and bedded outcrop and is basaltic to trachybasaltic, ranging to high K2O (up to 3.8 wt%). Alteration of the protolith(s) or during diagenesis may have affected this class. (3) The Darwin class of conglomerates to coarse sandstones (n=10) has high Na and Al, likely reflecting a sodic plagioclase-rich mineralogy, but with higher Fe than Jake M class (13.0-17.1 vs. 6.0-12.5 wt%). (4) The low alkali "normal" Mars basaltic composition is typified by the Portage soils (n=6) and the John Klein class (n=13; includes the Sheepbed mudstone). Some degree of mixing and/or contamination with this low alkali basaltic compositon has affected all APXS analyses. Overall, Gale rocks are strongly enriched in total alkalis (at the same MgO) relative to basaltic shergottites and many have higher K2O than igneous rocks analyzed by Spirit and Opportunity, suggesting that the mantle beneath Gale is alkali-rich (likely as a result of a metasomatic event) and that alkalis are heterogeneously distributed in the planet's interior.

  3. Thermal-infrared spectra and chemical analyses of twenty-six igneous rock samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vincent, R.K.; Rowan, L.C.; Gillespie, R.E.; Knapp, C.

    1975-01-01

    Emittance spectra in the 7.5 ??m to 14 ??m wavelength region and chemical compositions of 26 igneous rocks are reported. Experimental measurements on the rocks were made under simulated daytime field conditions. Some surface silicate contaminants, such as clayey silt, significantly altered the spectral emittance of a fresh sample, whereas, for these samples, hydrous and anhydrous ferric oxide weathering products did not mask important silicate spectral information. In the 11.75 ??m to 13.75 ??m wavelength region, the mean emittance of all the silicate samples was 0.956 ?? 0.008, except for periodtite, which had an average emittance of 0.895. This region of uniform emittance should be useful in remote sensing experiments for the separation of the effects of temperature and chemical composition on the spectral emittance of silicate rocks. ?? 1976.

  4. Timescales and mechanisms of plume-lithosphere interactions: 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology and geochemistry of alkaline igneous rocks from the Paraná-Etendeka large igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. A.; Thompson, R. N.; Day, J. A.

    2006-11-01

    We have determined high-precision 40Ar/ 39Ar ages for alkaline igneous rocks from the western margin of the Early-Cretaceous Paraná-Etendeka large igneous province (Paraguay). These show that small-fraction melt generation occurred beneath the region in two phases; at 145 Ma and 127.5 Ma, i.e. before and at the end of the 139-127.5 Ma Paraná-Etendeka flood-basalt eruptions. Previously published 40Ar/ 39Ar ages for alkaline igneous rocks on the proto-Atlantic coastal margins range from 134 to 128 Ma and indicate that small-fraction melt generation in the east of the province was either synchronous or slightly later than the main pulse of tholeiitic volcanism (between 134 and 132 Ma). Our new 40Ar/ 39Ar phlogopite ages confirm that: (i) the earliest melts associated with the initial impact of the Tristan plume were generated in the west of the Paraná-Etendeka large igneous province and (ii) igneous activity was long lived and immediately predates continental break-up. The Early-Cretaceous Paraguayan alkaline magmas are silica-undersaturated, enriched in incompatible-trace elements, have very-low initial ɛNd values and probably represent melts of phlogopite-bearing, carbonate-metasomatised peridotite in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Our simple one-dimensional, conductive-heating models suggest that the early-phase (145 Ma) alkaline magmas were emplaced on the margins of the Rio de La Plata craton at the time of sublithospheric impact of the proto-Tristan plume. The late phase (127.5 Ma) of Paraguayan alkaline magmatism is concentrated in an intra-cratonic rift zone and melt generation appears to have been triggered by lithospheric extension, perhaps facilitated by conductive heating and thermal weakening associated with the upwelling Tristan plume. The location and timing of both alkaline and tholeiitic melt generation in the Paraná-Etendeka province appear to have been significantly influenced by the non-uniform composition and thickness of the South

  5. Sulfur isotope evidence for penetration of MVT fluids into igneous basement rocks, southeast Missouri, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, K. L.; Burstein, I. B.; Hagni, R. D.; Vierrether, C. B.; Grant, S. K.; Hennigh, Q. T.; Bradley, M. F.; Brandom, R. T.

    1995-08-01

    Previous studies of galena and sphalerite from Paleozoic MVT deposits in the Viburnum Trend, southeast Missouri documented large variations in δ34S values throughout the ore-forming event. The present study of Cu-Fe-sulfides reveals a similar δ34S variation that reflects two end-member sulfur reservoirs whose relative importance varied both temporally and spatially. More 34S-enriched sulfides (δ34S approaching 25‰) indicate introduction of sulfur from basinal sedimentary sources, whereas more 32S-enriched sulfides (δ34S < 5‰) may reflect fluids moving through underlying granitic basement. Two areas containing Precambrian, igneous-hosted FeCu mineralization in southeast Missouri (West and Central Domes of Boss-Bixby) were investigated to elucidate their relationship to Cu-rich MVT orebodies hosted nearby within the overlying Cambrian Bonneterre Dolomite. Mineralization at Boss-Bixby is composed of an early phase of iron oxide deposition followed by Cu-Fe-sulfides. The Central Dome is faulted and its mineralization is more fracture-controlled than the typically podiform ores of the West Dome. The δ34S values of West Dome sulfides are 0.9 to 6.5‰ and pyrite-chalcopyrite indicate a temperature of 525° ± 50 °C. These data indicate an igneous source of sulfur during Precambrian ore deposition. In contrast, δ34S values of Central Dome sulfides are 9.4 to 20.0‰ and pyrite-chalcopyrite indicate temperatures of 275° ± 50 °C. Similar δ34S values are obtained for chalcopyrite from the overlying MVT deposits. We speculate that deeply circulating, basin-derived MVT fluids mobilized sulfur and copper from the underlying igneous basement and redeposited them in overlying Curich MVT orebodies, as well as overprinting earlier Precambrian sulfides of the Central Dome with a later, Paleozoic MVT sulfur isotope signature. Many models for MVT fluid circulation in the Midcontinent region of North America assume that igneous basement rocks are an impermeable boundary

  6. Stable Isotope Constraints on the Ocean from Hydrothermally-altered Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, R. T.

    2007-12-01

    The 18O/16O ratio of the ocean provides an important constraint on the global geochemical cycles in the Precambrian Earth. The oxygen isotope ratio of the ocean is most likely buffered near its present day value as long as plate tectonics is operative. A quasi-steady state value for oxygen isotopes is reached on a 100 Myr timescale after the onset of plate tectonics. Hydrothermally-altered igneous rocks constrain the oxygen and hydrogen isotope value of the hydrosphere back through time. Whereas, the oxygen isotope composition of seawater owes its value to the competition between low temperature chemical weathering and mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal exchange, there is no such process for hydrogen isotopes. Changes in the oxygen isotope ratio of seawater should be reflected in hydrothermally altered rocks by the presence of low or high 18O exchanged igneous rocks with normal δD values. The distribution of D and 18O in hydrothermally rocks is used to infer the position of the meteoric water line back through time. Results from the Phanerozoic, the Proterozoic, and the Archean fail to confirm the hypothesis that the global oceans were ever strongly 18O-depleted. The meteoric water line is anchored to the isotopic composition of seawater, the isotope standard for both oxygen and hydrogen isotopes. The ability to use sedimentary rocks or other proxies for climate depend upon the variation in the stable isotopic composition of seawater. Thus far, the hydrothermal record does not support the existence of low 18O oceans. This suggests that low 18O values observed in carbonates and cherts result from either precipitation from oceans with higher temperature or from bodies of water isolated from the open ocean.

  7. Spectral characterization of igneous rocks in the 8- to 12-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Louis S.; Salisbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper investigates the crystal-chemistry basis for the variation in spectral behavior of ingneous rocks, with the purpose of developing relationships useful for applications in the lithologic characterization of terrestrial and extraterrestrial surfaces. A new parameter is proposed for characterizing general rock and mineral type. The parameter, SCFM, defined as the ratio SiO2/(SiO2 + CaO + FeO + MgO), reflects the degree of depolymerization of the silica tetrahedra in both fine-grained and coarse-grained igneous rocks, and is a good descriptor of the composition of these rocks. Using spectra obtained in the laboratory on coarse-particulate mineral and solid-rock samples, the SCFM parameter was used to assess the effects of variations in the rock composition on the location, number, and width of spectral bands. A regression analysis of bands varying in width from 0.2 micron to 1.4 microns versus the SCFM value resulted in correlation coefficients ranging from 0.88 to 0.97.

  8. Potassic igneous rocks from the vicinity of epithermal gold mineralization, Lihir Island, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Daniel; Franz, Leander; Herzig, Peter M.; Hunt, Steve

    2001-06-01

    Many world-class porphyry copper-gold and epithermal gold deposits worldwide are hosted by volatile-rich and oxidized alkaline rocks. This study investigates potassic igneous rocks from the vicinity of epithermal gold mineralization at Lihir Island, Papua New Guinea. The island consists of five Pliocene-Pleistocene stratovolcanoes, one of which hosts Ladolam, one of the largest epithermal gold deposits discovered to date. Petrographically, the rocks range from porphyritic trachybasalts, trachyandesites and latites to rare phonolites and olivine-clinopyroxene cumulates. In some places, these rocks are cut by monzodiorite stocks. According to Al-in-hornblende barometry, the main crystallization of these rocks occurred close to the surface. Titanium-in-hornblende thermometry as well as olivine-spinel geothermometry and oxygen barometry indicate temperatures of 787-965°C at elevated oxygen fugacities ( fO 2) of 1.4-4.8 log units above that of the FMQ buffer. Although previous studies have suggested high fO 2 of alkaline rocks associated with copper-gold mineralization based on abundant primary magnetite contents, this is the first direct determination of the fO 2 of such rocks. High fO 2 of parental melts commonly delays the early crystallization of magmatic sulphides; this is important because metals such as Au and Cu preferentially partition into sulphide phases resulting in their depletion in the melt during increasing fractionation. Geochemically, the rocks range from primitive to relatively evolved compositions, as reflected by their SiO 2 (45.8-55.0 wt.%) and MgO (1.4-15.3 wt.%) contents and variable concentrations of mantle-compatible elements (130-328 ppm V, 1-186 ppm Ni). Their high K 2O content (up to 4.7 wt.%), high average K 2O/Na 2O ratios (0.8) and high average Ce/Yb ratios (14) are typical of high-K igneous rocks transitional to shoshonites. Although these rocks formed by decompression melting related to back-arc rifting in the Manus Basin, the high

  9. Postcollisional mafic igneous rocks record recycling of noble gases by deep subduction of the continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Li-Qun; Zheng, Yong-Fei; He, Huai-Yu; Zhao, Zi-Fu

    2016-05-01

    Recycling of noble gases from crustal rocks into the mantle is indicated not only by oceanic basalts and mantle xenoliths, but also by ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks in collisional orogens. It is intriguing whether noble gases in continental crust were recycled into the mantle by deep subduction of the continental crust to mantle depths. Here we firstly report the He, Ne and Ar isotopic compositions of pyroxene from postcollisional mafic igneous rocks in the Dabie orogen, China. The results show that the pyroxene separates from the mafic rocks have low 3He/4He ratios of 0.002 to 1.8 Ra and air-like Ne isotope compositions. Furthermore, the pyroxene exhibits low 40Ar/36Ar ratios of 393.6 to 1599.8, close to those of the air. In combination with whole-rock geochemistry it is found that pyroxene 3He/4He ratios are correlated with whole-rock (La/Yb)N and Sr/Y ratios, εNd(t) values and MgO contents. These observations demonstrate the mass transfer from the deeply subducted continental crust to the overlying mantle wedge, recording the source mixing between the crust-derived melt and the mantle peridotite in the continental subduction zone. A direct addition of the crustal He via crust-derived melt to the mantle leads to the extremely low 3He/4He ratios in the orogenic lithospheric mantle, and the dissolved atmospheric Ar and Ne in the subducted supracrustal rocks results in the air-like Ar and Ne isotope ratios. Therefore, the noble gas isotopic signatures of supracrustal rocks were carried into the mantle by the continental deep subduction to subarc depths and then transferred to the postcollisional mafic igneous rocks via the melt-peridotite reaction at the slab-mantle interface in a continental subduction channel. Our finding firstly establishes the slab-mantle interaction model for recycling of supracrustal noble gases in the continental subduction zone.

  10. Magnetic petrofabric of igneous rocks: Lessons from pyroclastic density current deposits and obsidians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañón-Tapia, E.; Mendoza-Borunda, R.

    2014-12-01

    Measurement of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of igneous rocks can provide clues concerning their mechanism of formation and in particular are very helpful as flow direction indicators. Unlike other igneous rocks, however, pyroclastic density current deposits (PDCDs) present a challenge in the interpretation of AMS measurements due to the complexity of their mechanism of emplacement. In this paper we review the most common assumptions made in the interpretation of the AMS of PDCD, taking advantage of key lessons obtained from obsidians. Despite the complexities on the mechanism of formation of PDCDs, it is shown that a key element for the fruitful interpretation of AMS is to give proper attention to the various components likely to be involved in controlling their general petrofabric. The anisotropies of ferromagnetic crystals (whether as free phases or embedded within clasts or shards), and those of paramagnetic minerals (mainly ferrosilicates) need to be taken into consideration when interpreting the AMS measurements of PDCDs. Variations of the deposition regime both as a function of position and of time also need to be considered on the interpretations. Nevertheless, if a suitable sampling strategy is adopted, the potential of the AMS method as a petrofabric indicator is maximized.

  11. The Basal Onaping Intrusion in the North Range: Roof rocks of the Sudbury Igneous Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Denise; Osinski, Gordon R.; Grieve, Richard A. F.; Brillinger, Derek T. M.

    2015-09-01

    The 1.85 Ga Sudbury impact structure is one of the largest impact structures on Earth. Igneous bodies—the so-called "Basal Onaping Intrusion"—occur at the contact between the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC) and the overlying Onaping Formation and occupy ~50% of this contact zone. The Basal Onaping Intrusion is presently considered part of the Onaping Formation, which is a complex series of breccias. Here, we present petrological and geochemical data from two drill cores and field data from the North Range of the Sudbury structure, which suggests that the Basal Onaping Intrusion is not part of the Onaping Formation. Our observations indicate that the Basal Onaping Intrusion crystallized from a melt and has a groundmass comprising a skeletal intergrowth of feldspar and quartz that points to simultaneous cooling of both components. Increasing grain size and decreasing amounts of clasts with increasing depth are general features of roof rocks of coherent impact melt rocks at other impact structures and the Basal Onaping Intrusion. Planar deformation features within quartz clasts of the Basal Onaping Intrusion are indicators for shock metamorphism and, together with the melt matrix, point to the Basal Onaping Intrusion as being an impact melt rock, by definition. Importantly, the contact between Granophyre of the SIC and Basal Onaping Intrusion is transitional and we suggest that the Basal Onaping Intrusion is what remains of the roof rocks of the SIC and, thus, is a unit of the SIC and not the Onaping Formation. We suggest henceforth that this unit be referred to as the "Upper Contact Unit" of the SIC.

  12. Felsic Igneous Rocks at Gale Crater : a Comparison with Lithic Clasts in NWA 7533

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, V.; Wiens, R. C.; Toplis, M. J.; Cousin, A.; Forni, O.; Fabre, C.

    2014-12-01

    Curiosity rover landed at Gale, an early Hesperian age crater formed within Noachian rocks. In Hummocky plain, more than half of the igneous floats rocks are highly alkaline rocks (Stolper et al. doi: 101126/science.12239463, Schmidt et al. doi: 10.1002/2013JE004481) and feldspar-bearing rocks (Sautter et al. doi: 10.1002/2013JE00447). ChemCam observations at sub-millimeter scale show that these samples contain a significant feldspar component, either associated with LCP in gabbroic texture or with augite in effusive rocks defining an alkaline K-feldspar-bearing suite: basanite, trachy-andesite with porphyritic texture and syenitic rock with apahnitic texture. This series likely resulted from differentiation of liquids produced by low degrees of partial melting of primitive mantle. These rocks are float rocks or occurred as clast in conglomerate suggesting a provenance from Gale crater rim. NWA 7533 is the first Noachian breccia sampling the southern hemisphere Martian regolith. It is a polymict breccia with leucocratic clasts including zircon with 4.4 Ga ages Humayun et al., doi :10.1038/nature). The alkali basaltic evolved clasts contain two feldspars (alkali and plagioclase) and modal recombination gives a basaltic trachy-andesite, gabbroic, trachy-andesite and mugearite clast (Agee et al. doi: 10.1126/science. 1228858). Noritic clasts contain andesine, LCP, and Cr-magnetite. The monzonitic/mugearitic-evolved clasts are composed of alkali feldspar, plagioclase, augite, Ti-Magnetite, Cl-apatite and zircon. These clasts would represent products of Martian crust emplaced at 4.5 Ga and re-melted at 4.4 Ga (Humayun et al., doi :10.1038/nature). The leucocratic clasts of the Noachian SNC breccia will be compared with evolved lithology encountered at Gale crater and products of Noachian magmatism will be discussed.

  13. Occurrences of igneous rocks in the Adriatic Sea: a possible indicator of the Paleozoic supercontinent disintegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrna Prašek, Marko; Petrinec, Zorica; Balen, Dražen

    2014-05-01

    Islands of the Adriatic Sea are part of the Mesozoic Adriatic Dinaridic Carbonate Platform (ADCP) and so are mostly comprised of limestones. Occurrences of igneous rocks inside ADCP are in general extremely rare, with the exception of two small islands, Jabuka and Brusnik, which are completely igneous in origin. Small outcrops of igneous rocks can also be found on the island of Vis. Samples used in this research where gathered on a diving expedition of the islands Jabuka and Brusnik and a previously unknown and unexplored underwater (14-25 m b.s.l.) locality - Brusnik Shoal. Samples are mostly hypidiomorphic holocrystalline medium-grained rocks with a massive, locally ophitic texture. Mineral composition is dominated by clinopyroxene and weakly zoned polysynthetic twins of plagioclase. Subordinate are secondary aggregates of amphibole (uralite), chlorite, sericite, biotite, apatite and fine-grained opâque minerals while microfissures are filled with non-oriented needles of prehnite and calcite. Petrographically, all samples are determined as gabbro to gabbro-diorite. Major and trace element signature, characterized by low content of MgO (2.43-5.01 wt. %), low magnesium number (34-53), low content of Ni and Cr (6-12 and 6-61 ppm, respectively) is typical for calc-alkaline to tholeiitic gabbros and shows that the parental magma was not primitive by nature. Trace element patterns, high LILE/HSFE and chondrite-normalized LREE/HREE ratios (LaN/YbN: 3.27 - 5.26), Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu*: 0.75 - 0.93), low Nb (2.2 - 3.8 ppm) and high Pb (2 - 18 ppm), together with elevated P, Zr, Ti, U, Th, K concentrations studied in this research point to an active marginal setting with significant contribution from the recycled continental crust. Observed geochemical characteristics point to a single igneous event that led to the formation of all studied samples. At the same time, different degrees of crustal contamination, fractionation of pyroxene and plagioclase and/or development of

  14. Application of spatially weighted Technology for mapping intermediate and felsic igneous rocks in Fujian Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daojun

    2016-04-01

    Magmatic activity is of great significance to mineralization not only for heat and fluid it provides, but also for parts of material source it brings. Due to the cover of soil and vegetation and its spatial nonuniformity detected singals from the ground's surface may be weak and of spatial variability, and this brings serious challenges to mineral exploration in these areas. Two models based on spatially weighted technology, i.e., local singularity analysis (LSA) and spatially weighted logistic regression (SWLR) are applied in this study to deal with this challenge. Coverage cannot block the migration of geochemical elements, it is possible that the geochemical features of soil above concealed rocks can be different from surrounding environment, although this kind of differences are weak; coverage may also weaken the surface expression of geophysical fields. LSA is sensitive to weak changes in density or energy, which makes it effective to map the distribution of concealed igneous rock based on geochemical and geophysical properties. Data integration can produce better classification results than any single data analysis, but spatial variability of spatial variables caused by non-stationary coverage can greatly affect the results since sometimes it is hard to establish a global model. In this paper, SWLR is used to integrate all spatial layers extracted from both geochemical and geophysical data, and the iron polymetallic metallogenic belt in sours-west of Fujian Province is used as s study case. It is found that LSA technique effectively extracts different sources of geologic anomalies; and the spatial distribution of intermediate and felsic igneous rocks delineated by SWLR shows higher accuracy compared with the result obtained via global model.

  15. Contrasting methods of fracture trend characterization in crystalline metamorphic and igneous rocks of the Windham quadrangle, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, G.J.; Clark, S.F.

    2000-01-01

    The bedrock of the Windham quadrangle in southeastern New Hampshire consists of deformed early Palaeozoic crystalline metamorphic and intrusive igneous rocks intruded by Mesozoic igneous dikes. Generally, less common northeast striking, steeply dipping fractures developed sub-parallel to the pre-existing tectonic foliation in the Palaeozoic rocks. Mesozoic lamprophyre and diabase dikes intruded along the northeast trending fractures, utilizing the pre-existing anisotropy in the crystalline rocks. Northwest striking, steeply dipping systematic joints and joint sets are the most prominent fractures in the area and, at least in part, post-date the Mesozoic dikes. Sub-horizontal sheeting joints occur in all rock types. Locally, the coincidence of the sub-horizontal fractures with a sub-horizontal Paleozoic cleavage suggests that some of the sheeting fractures utilized the pre-existing ductile anisotropy during unloading. Generally, the metasedimentary rocks show a less complex pattern of fracturing than the intrusive rocks suggesting that rock type is a controlling factor. Metasedimentary rocks in the biotite zone and well-foliated igneous rocks show a greater tendency to fracture along pre-existing bedding and foliation surfaces than metasedimentary rocks in the garnet zone and poorly foliated igneous rocks. A comparison of mapped fracture data and station fracture data indicates that either mapped data or station data can be used to identify regional fracture trends. Local fracture trends can not be identified by limited measurements at a few fracture stations, however, because they do not address spatial variability. Some fracture trends may be scale-dependant because they may be either unique to a local area or present only at regional scales.

  16. Magmatic origin of alkaline meta-igneous rocks from Chamberlindalen, SW Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goluchowska, Karolina; Barker, Abigail; Manecki, Maciej; Czerny, Jerzy; Majka, Jaroslaw

    2014-05-01

    This study focuses on the late Neoproterozoic meta-igneous rocks of SW Svalbard to determine their magmatic evolution, conditions of magma storage and origin. The samples from the Chamberlindalen area form an alkaline igneous suite, from which thin dikes and intrusive bodies have been collected. The rocks in question intrude Late Neoproterozoic metasediments and are surrounded by occurrences of Neoproterozoic metabasalts in contrast to highly alkaline the Chamberlindalen intrusions. The rocks from Chamberlindalen are divided into two groups based on their geochemistry, mineralogy and field relationships. The dikes, classify as minettes, belonging to the lamprophyre group and contain mainly euhedral, elongated phlogopite and additionally clinopyroxene and feldspar. The rest of the samples are highly magnesian and are classified as alkali gabbro. The alkali gabbros contain primary magmatic minerals such as clinopyroxene, calcic amphibole and mica in different proportions. The alkali gabbros are enriched in LREE and HFSE and depleted in P, K and HREE. The minette dikes are always more enriched in HFSE and REE in comparison to the alkali gabbros. The mineral chemistry of the alkali gabbros reveals that pyroxenes are represented by diopside with Wo46-51 En35-46 Fs6-14, and calcic amphibole by kaersutite. The Mg# number for diopside is from 72 - 88, whereas for kaersutite Mg# number is 51 - 74. Thermobarometry calculations for diopside and kaersutite have been performed. In the alkali gabbros from Chamberlindalen, diopside crystallized between 0.7 - 8 kbar and 1152 - 1233°C. Results for kaersutite reveal that they crystallized between 5 - 17 kbar and 1043 - 1215°C. For diopside the main crystallization was between 10 and 38 km, whereas for kaersutite, the main crystallization was between 30 and 50 km. Clinopyroxene and minor kaersutite also show a zone of crystallization at 2 to 10 km. This reflects a main crystallization zone at 10 - 50 km throughout the continental

  17. Broadband alternating current magnetic susceptibility: Method and application to the characterization of magnetic particles in igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, K.

    2012-12-01

    Low-field alternating current magnetic susceptibility (MS) is among the most commonly used magnetic property, not only in rock and mineral magnetism but also in environmental magnetism studies. This study proposes a new rock magnetic method, Frequency Spectrum of MS (FSM), based on the measurement of the real component of MS over a wide range of frequency (100 Hz to 500 kHz) and the measurement of the imaginary component at high frequencies in the order of 10-102 kHz. This study presents the FSM results at room and low temperatures obtained from a variety of igneous rocks with SP to SD grain sizes, including acidic to basic volcanic rocks in Japan and a basalt in Hawaii. The FSMs from the andesite samples at room temperature unexceptionally show small but anomalous increase, as much as 5%, over a specific frequency interval between 10 kHz and 120 kHz. In contrast, FSMs of basalts from Oshima and Hawaii show no such peak, a typical pattern indicating the presence of SP grain ensembles. The anomalous FSM from the andesites suggests a new rock and mineral magnetic behavior indicating either magnetic resonance or magnetic relaxation. Considering the anomalous FSM patterns and their variations at low temperatures, it is suggested that the hypothetical resonance could be relevant to some magnetoelastic phenomenon, in which magnetic energy could be dissipated through a long-range, magnetostructural coupling, most likely, magnetostriction. The fact that the annealed andesite samples showed less developed FSM anomaly strongly supports this hypothesis, because annealing generally lowers the internal stress leading to the reduction of resistance in a forced oscillation system. Analyses of the low temperature results confirm magnetic relaxation phenomena taking place at low temperatures, and consequently support the above interpretation.

  18. In Situ Measurements of Natural Radioactivity in Selected Igneous Rocks of the Opava Mountain Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dżaluk, Agnieszka; Malczewski, Dariusz; Żaba, Jerzy; Dziurowicz, Maria

    2014-09-01

    In situ gamma-ray measurements of four igneous rocks were taken in the Opava Mountains (Eastern Sudetes, Poland). The activity of naturally occurring radionuclides was measured using a portable GX3020 gamma-ray spectrometry workstation. The activity concentrations of 40K varied from 914 ± 17 Bqkg-1 (gneiss, Kamienna Góra) to 2019 ± 37 Bqkg-1 (weathered granite, Sławniowice), while those of 232Th from 7.5 ± 0.6 Bqkg-1 (weathered granite, Sławniowice) to 68 ± 0.9 Bqkg-1 (migmatitic gneiss, Nadziejów). The activities associated with 238U decay series ranged from 10 ± 0.4 Bqkg-1 (weathered granite, Sławniowice) to 62 ± 1.6 Bqkg-1 (gneiss, Kamienna Góra). The results will be used in compiling Radiological Atlas of the Sudetes

  19. Evolution of KREEP - Further petrologic evidence. [igneous rocks from Apollo 15 site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, M. L.; Hollister, L. S.

    1977-01-01

    It is hypothesized that KREEP samples from the Apollo 15 site are igneous. To support the hypothesis, comparisons are made with other crystalline KREEP samples, especially 14310. It is noted that the low siderophile element content and lack of high pressure phenocrysts in the Apollo 15 KREEP may be indications of a slower rise of KREEP melt to the surface, when contrasted with sample 14310. Gravitational separation of Fe-Ni metal is proposed as a mechanism to account for the depletion of siderophile elements relative to the Si-rich component. It is further suggested that KREEP may be the parent of Apollo 12 and 15 basalts, as well as of granitic rocks, due to the liquid immiscibility occurring during the KREEP melt crystallization, and the subsequent independent evolution of the components.

  20. Age and composition of igneous rocks, Edna Mountain quadrangle, Humboldt County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, Ralph L.; Silberman, Miles L.; Marsh, S.P.

    1978-01-01

    Six pulses of igneous activity ranging in age from Jurassic to Pliocene have been identified in the Edna Mountain quadrangle, Humboldt County, Nev. Porphyritic syenite am! quartz monzonite of Jurassic age (146-164 million years) at Buffalo Mountain are highly potassic through a wide range in SiO2 content from olivine-bearing syenite to quartz-rich monzonite, and their composition contrasts sharply with plutons elsewhere in north-central Nevada. Granodiorite and quartz monzonite plutons of Cretaceous age (88- 106 m.y.) are chemically and mineralogically similar to other calc-alkaline plutons in north-central Nevada. Four episodes of Tertiary volcanism include rhyolite ashflow tuffs and slightly younger andesitic basalt flows and tuffs of Oligocene age, rhyolite vitrophyre of late Miocene age, and olivine basalt flows of Pliocene age. Their age and mineralogical and chemical compositions are similar to other Tertiary volcanic rocks in north-central Nevada.

  1. Rb-Sr ages of igneous rocks from the Apollo 14 mission and the age of the Fra Mauro formation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1971-01-01

    Internal Rb-Sr isochrons were determined on four basaltic rocks and on a basaltic clast from a breccia from the Fra Mauro landing site. An internal isochron was determined for rock 12004 and yielded a value in agreement with previous results for basaltic rocks from the Apollo 12 site. The crystallization ages for Apollo 14 basalts are only 0.2 to 0.3 AE older than were found for mare basalts from the Sea of Tranquility. Assuming these leucocratic igneous rocks to be representative of the Fra Mauro site, it follows that there were major igneous processes active in these regions, and presumably throughout the highlands, at times only slightly preceding the periods at which the maria were last flooded.

  2. Relative contribution of Precambrian metamorphic rocks and Cretaceous-Tertiary igneous rocks to Oligocene and Holocene fluvial sands and the unroofing of a magmatic arc

    SciTech Connect

    Molinaroli, E.; Basu, A. )

    1991-03-01

    Oligocene and Holocene fluvial sands were deposited in small extensional basins in a magmatic arc in southwestern Montana under relatively humid and semi-arid conditions, respectively. The source rocks are roof-pendants and thrust-slices of Precambrian metamorphic rocks (PCM) and Cretaceous-Tertiary igneous rocks (KTI) that make up the arc. The authors have surveyed 143,607 heavy mineral grains (HMGs) in polished thin sections of 55 samples collected from adjacent but discrete geomorphologic units. In the Holocene sands, of 5440 HMGs 519 are garnets and of 97,667 HMGs 395 are zircons. In the Oligocene sandstones, of 6397 HMGs 998 are garnets, and of 45,940 HMGs 331 are zircons. Garnets are absent in the igneous rocks and zircons are extremely rare in the metamorphic rocks. Garnets ar estimated to be about 100 times as abundant in the metamorphic rocks as the zircons are in the igneous rocks. Mass balance calculations show that the proportion of PCM/(PCM+KTI) ranges from 0 to 21% in Oligocene sandstones, and from 3 to 76% in Holocene sands in different local units. However, the overall PCM/(PCM+KTI) proportions in the Holocene and the Oligocene sands in southwestern Montana are 19% and 18%, respectively. This suggests that the roof pendants, thrust slices, and magmatic arc rocks have been unroofed in constant proportions since the Oligocene although locally the proportions have been different.

  3. Prospecting for Diverse Igneous Rock Types on Mars: Pixl on "black Beauty" Nwa 7533

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Flannery, D.; Allwood, A.; Thompson, D. R.; Hodyss, R. P.; Clark, B. C.; Elam, W. T.; Hurowitz, J.

    2015-12-01

    In order to understand the evolution of the Martian crust and mantle, we need to acquire and analyze samples of igneous rocks other than the basaltic and ultramafic lithologies represented by the majority of Martian meteorites. Recent results from the Curiosity Rover demonstrate that diverse rock types exist in some Martian sedimentary environments in the form of conglomerate components or float, some of which shed light on the nature of early Martian crust (e.g., Sautter et al., 2015). We are developing investigation strategies for the in-situ instruments that will be flown on the Mars 2020 rover. These instruments will be used to inform the sampling campaigns required for future sample return missions. To achieve this, we applied PIXL (Planetary Instrument for X-ray Lithochemistry), an instrument for the Mars 2020 rover mission, to the meteorite NWA 7533. This meteorite is a pairing of NWA 7034, known informally as "Black Beauty", a new type of Martian meteorite that is broadly similar to the average composition of the Martian crust. This type of meteorite is essentially a 'conglomerate', with many diverse rock types, including mafic, feldspathic, and exotic rock fragments such as feldspar-ilmenite-phosphate clasts, as observed using higher-spatial resolution and higher sensitivity laboratory instruments (e.g., Agee et al., 2013; Humayun et al., 2014; Santos et al., 2015). Using PIXL, we analyzed a mm-scale cut and polished surface and applied algorithms developed by the PIXL team to semi-autonomously define and group regions containing similar lithological components (Thompson et al., 2015). PIXL data rapidly reveal distinctive zircon-bearing lithologies and feldspar-ilmenite-phosphate clasts similar to the detailed petrographic and mineralogical observations. Results suggest that PIXL readily identifies lithologies with minerals and elements (e.g., Rb and Sr) that are important for geochronology studies.

  4. Porosity and surface area evolution during weathering of two igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis; Cole, David; Rother, Gernot; Jin, Lixin; Buss, Heather; Brantley, S. L.

    2013-01-01

    During weathering, rocks release nutrients and storewater vital for growth ofmicrobial and plant life. Thus, the growth of porosity as weathering advances into bedrock is a life-sustaining process for terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we use small-angle and ultra small-angle neutron scattering to show how porosity develops during initial weathering under tropical conditions of two igneous rock compositions, basaltic andesite and quartz diorite. The quartz diorite weathers spheroidally while the basaltic andesite does not. The weathering advance rates of the two systems also differ, perhaps due to this difference in mechanism, from 0.24 to 100 mm kyr1, respectively. The scattering data document how surfaces inside the feldspar-dominated rocks change as weathering advances into the protolith. In the unaltered rocks, neutrons scatter fromtwo types of featureswhose dimensions vary from6 nmto 40 lm: pores and bumps on pore grain surfaces. These features result in scattering data for both unaltered rocks that document multi-fractal behavior: scattering is best described by amass fractal dimension (Dm) and a surface fractal dimension (Ds) for features of length scales greater than and less than 1 lm, respectively. In the basaltic andesite, Dm is approximately 2.9 and Ds is approximately 2.7. The mechanism of solute transport during weathering of this rock is diffusion. Porosity and surface area increase from 1.5%to 8.5%and 3 to 23 m2 g1 respectively in a relatively consistent trend across themm-thick plagioclase reaction front. Across this front, both fractal dimensions decrease, consistentwith development of amoremonodisperse pore networkwith smoother pore surfaces. Both changes are consistent largely with increasing connectivity of pores without significant surface roughening, as expected for transport-limited weathering. In contrast, porosity and surface area increase from 1.3% to 9.5% and 1.5 to 13 m2 g1 respectively across a many cm-thick reaction front in the

  5. Porosity and surface area evolution during weathering of two igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Cole, David R.; Rother, Gernot; Jin, Lixin; Buss, Heather L.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2013-05-01

    During weathering, rocks release nutrients and store water vital for growth of microbial and plant life. Thus, the growth of porosity as weathering advances into bedrock is a life-sustaining process for terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we use small-angle and ultra small-angle neutron scattering to show how porosity develops during initial weathering under tropical conditions of two igneous rock compositions, basaltic andesite and quartz diorite. The quartz diorite weathers spheroidally while the basaltic andesite does not. The weathering advance rates of the two systems also differ, perhaps due to this difference in mechanism, from 0.24 to 100 mm kyr-1, respectively. The scattering data document how surfaces inside the feldspar-dominated rocks change as weathering advances into the protolith. In the unaltered rocks, neutrons scatter from two types of features whose dimensions vary from 6 nm to 40 μm: pores and bumps on pore-grain surfaces. These features result in scattering data for both unaltered rocks that document multi-fractal behavior: scattering is best described by a mass fractal dimension (Dm) and a surface fractal dimension (Ds) for features of length scales greater than and less than ˜1 μm, respectively. In the basaltic andesite, Dm is approximately 2.9 and Ds is approximately 2.7. The mechanism of solute transport during weathering of this rock is diffusion. Porosity and surface area increase from ˜1.5% to 8.5% and 3 to 23 m2 g-1 respectively in a relatively consistent trend across the mm-thick plagioclase reaction front. Across this front, both fractal dimensions decrease, consistent with development of a more monodisperse pore network with smoother pore surfaces. Both changes are consistent largely with increasing connectivity of pores without significant surface roughening, as expected for transport-limited weathering. In contrast, porosity and surface area increase from 1.3% to 9.5% and 1.5 to 13 m2 g-1 respectively across a many cm-thick reaction

  6. U-Pb zircon geochronology and evolution of some Adirondack meta-igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclelland, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    An update was presented of the recent U-Pb isotope geochronology and models for evolution of some of the meta-igneous rocks of the Adirondacks, New York. Uranium-lead zircon data from charnockites and mangerites and on baddeleyite from anorthosite suggest that the emplacement of these rocks into a stable crust took place in the range 1160 to 1130 Ma. Granulite facies metamorphism was approximately 1050 Ma as indicated by metamorphic zircon and sphene ages of the anorthosite and by development of magmatitic alaskitic gneiss. The concentric isotherms that are observed in this area are due to later doming. However, an older contact metamorphic aureole associated with anorthosite intrusion is observed where wollastonite develops in metacarbonates. Zenoliths found in the anorthosite indicate a metamorphic event prior to anorthosite emplacement. The most probable mechanism for anorthosite genesis is thought to be ponding of gabbroic magmas at the Moho. The emplacement of the anorogenic anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite suite was apparently bracketed by compressional orogenies.

  7. Radioactive occurrences in veins and igneous and metamorphic rocks of New Mexico with annotated bibliography. [Over 600 citations

    SciTech Connect

    McLemore, V. T.

    1982-01-01

    From an extensive literature search and field examination of 96 nonsandstone radioactive occurrences, the author compiled an annotated bibliography of over 600 citations and a list of 327 radioactive occurrences in veins and igneous and metamorphic rocks of New Mexico. The citations are indexed by individual radioactive occurrence, geographic area, county, fluorspar deposits and occurrences, geochemical analyses, and geologic maps. In addition, the geology, mineralization, and uranium and thorium potential of 41 geographic areas in New Mexico containing known radioactive occurrences in veins and igneous and metamorphic rocks or that contain host rocks considered favorable for uranium or thorium mineralization are summarized. A list of aerial-radiometric, magnetic, hydrogeochemical, and stream-sediment survey reports is included.

  8. Thermal infrared (2.5-13.5-micron) spectroscopic remote sensing of igneous rock types on particulate planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, John W.; Walter, Louis S.

    1989-01-01

    The compositional significance of outstanding spectral features in the reflectance spectra of particulate igneous rocks was investigated by analyzing directional reflectance spectra, obtained with an FTIR spectrophotometer at 2.17-13.5 microns, of a suite of well-characterized igneous rocks ground to fine particle size. It was found that, using spectral features associated with the principal Christiansen frequency and with a region of relative transparency between the Si-O stretching and bending bands, it is possible to identify general rock type using the Walter and Salisbury (1989) SCFM chemical index, SCFM, defined as SCFM = SiO2/(SiO2 + CaO + FeO + MgO). It is emphasized, however, that the appearance and the wavelength of these features may be affected by environmental factors.

  9. Thermobarometric studies on the Levack Gneisses: Footwall rocks to the Sudbury Igneous Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, R. S.; Peredery, W.; Sweeny, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Granulite and amphibolite facies gneisses and migmatites of the Levack Gneiss Complex occupy a zone up to 8 km wide around the northern part of the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC). Orthopyroxene- and garnet-bearing tonalitic and semipelitic assemblages of granulite facies grade occur within 3 km of the SIC together with lenses of mafic and pyroxenitic rock compositions normally represented by an amphibole +/- cpx-rich assemblage; amphibolite facies assemblages dominate elsewhere in this terrain. These 2.711-Ga gneisses were introduced by (1) the Cartier Granite Batholith during late Archaean to early Proterozoic time and (2) the SIC, at 1.85 Ga, which produced a contact aureole 1-1.5 km wide in which pyroxene hornfelses are common within 200-300 m of the contact. A suite of 12 samples including both the opx-gt and amphibole-rich rock compositions have been studied. Garnets in the semipelitic gneisses are variably replaced by a plg-bio assemblage. Thermobarometric calculations using a variety of barometers and thermometers reported in the literature suggest that the granulite facies assemblages formed at depths in the 21-28 km range (6-8 kbar). Textures and mineral chemistry in the garnet-bearing semipelitic rocks indicate that this terrain underwent a second metamorphic event during uplift to depth in the 5-11 km range (2-3 kbar) and at temperatures as low as 500-550 C. This latter event is distinct from thermal recrystallization caused by the emplacement of the SIC; it probably represents metamorphism attributable to intrusion of the Cartier Granite Batholith. These data allow two interpretations for the crustal uplift of the Levack Gneisses: (1) The gneisses were tectonically uplifted prior to the Sudbury Event (due to intrusion of the Cartier Batholith); or (2) the gneisses were raised to epizonal levels as a result of meteorite impact at 1.85 Ga.

  10. Establishment of an empirical correlation for estimating the thermal conductivity of igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A.; Contreras, E. ); Viggiano, J.C. )

    1989-09-01

    A correlation to predict the thermal conductivity of andesitic igneous rocks is developed from measured data on drill cores from wells from the Los Azufres geothermal field, Mexico. The correlation was developed from density, porosity, and thermal conductivity. Seventeen determinations were made on drill cores extracted at varying depths from 12 wells. Thermal conductivity varied from 1.05 to 2.34 W {center dot} m{sup {minus}1} {center dot} K{sup {minus}1}, while bulk density varied from 2,050 to 2,740 kg {center dot} m{sup {minus}3} and grain density varied from 2,610 to 2,940 kg {center dot} m{sup {minus}3}. Total porosity varied from 1.9 to 24.7%. Two polynomial regressions, one linear and one quadratic, were tested on the thermal conductivity-times-bulk density product, with total porosity as the independent variable. The correlation coefficients and residual mean square deviations were 0.83 and 0.00491 for the linear fit and 0.87 and 0.00425 for the quadratic model, respectively. For porosities up to about 18%, both models showed very close predictions, but for larger values, the quadratic model appeared to be better and it is recommended for the porosity range from 0 to 25%. Furthermore, density and porosity may be determined from drill cuttings, which are more readily available than cores.

  11. Igneous petrogenesis and tectonic setting of granitic rocks from the eastern Blue Ridge, Alabama Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, M.S. . Geology Dept.); Allison, D.T. . Geology Dept.); Tull, J.F. . Geology Dept.); Bieler, D.B. . Geology Dept.)

    1994-03-01

    A span of 150 my of orogenic activity is recorded within the granitic rocks of the eastern Blue Ridge of Alabama (EBR). Four discrete episodes of plutonism can be differentiated, each event exhibiting distinct field relations and geochemical signatures. (1) Penobscotian stage: this initial stage of plutonic activity is represented by the Elkahatchee Quartz Diorite (EQD), a premetamorphic (495 Ma) batholith and the largest intrusive complex (880 km[sup 2]) exposed in the Blue Ridge. Calc-alkaline I-type tonalite-granodiorite are the principal lithologies, with subordinate cumulate hbl-bt diorite, metadacite, granite and trondhjemite. The parental tonalitic magmas are interpreted to have been derived from a subducted MORB source under eclogite to get amphibolite conditions. (2) Taconic stage: the Kowaliga augen gneiss (KAG) and the Zana granite gneiss (ZG) are 460 Ma granitic bodies that reside in the SE extremity and structurally highest portion of the EBR. Both of these bodies are pre-metamorphic with strongly elongate sill- and pod-like shapes concordant with S[sub 1] foliation. Granite and granodiorite comprise the bulk of the KAG. (3) Acadian stage: Rockford Granite (RG), Bluff springs Granite (BSG, 366 Ma), and Almond Trondhjemite represent a suite of pre- to syn-metamorphic granitic intrusions. (4) late-Acadian stage: The Blakes Ferry pluton (BFP) is a post-kinematic pluton displaying spectacular by schlieren igneous flow structures, but no metamorphic fabric. The pluton's age can be bracketed between a 366 Ma age on the BSG and a 324 Ma K-Ar muscovite age on the BFP. BFP's petrogenesis has involved partial melting a MORB source followed by assimilation of metasedimentary host rock.

  12. Flexure and faulting of sedimentary host rocks during growth of igneous domes, Henry Mountains, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, M.D.; Pollard, D.D.

    1990-01-01

    A sequence of sedimentary rocks about 4 km thick was bent, stretched and uplifted during the growth of three igneous domes in the southern Henry Mountains. Mount Holmes, Mount Ellsworth and Mount Hillers are all about 12 km in diameter, but the amplitudes of their domes are about 1.2, 1.85 and 3.0 km, respectively. These mountains record successive stages in the inflation of near-surface diorite intrusions that are probably laccolithic in origin. The host rocks deformed along networks of outcrop-scale faults, or deformation bands, marked by crushed grains, consolidation of the porous sandstone and small displacements of sedimentary beds. Zones of deformation bands oriented parallel to the beds and formation contacts subdivided the overburden into thin mechanical layers that slipped over one another during doming. Measurements of outcrop-scale fault populations at the three mountains reveal a network of faults that strikes at high angles to sedimentary beds which themselves strike tangentially about the domes. These faults have normal and reverse components of slip that accommodated bending and stretching strains within the strata. An early stage of this deformation is displayed at Mount Holmes, where states of stress computed from three fault samples correlate with the theoretical distribution of stresses resulting from bending of thin, circular, elastic plates. Field observations and analysis of frictional driving stresses acting on horizontal planes above an opening-mode dislocation, as well as the paleostress analysis of faulting, indicate that bedding-plane slip and layer flexure were important components of the early deformation. As the amplitude of doming increased, radial and circumferential stretching of the strata and rotation of the older faults in the steepening limbs of the domes increased the complexity of the fault patterns. Steeply-dipping, map-scale faults with dip-slip displacements indicate a late-stage jostling of major blocks over the central

  13. Methylomonas scandinavica sp. nov., a new methanotrophic psychrotrophic bacterium isolated from deep igneous rock ground water of Sweden.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnaya, M G; Khmelenina, V N; Kotelnikova, S; Holmquist, L; Pedersen, K; Trotsenko, Y A

    1999-12-01

    Methane-utilizing bacteria were enriched from deep igneous rock environments and affiliated by amplification of functional and phylogenetic gene probes. Type I methanotrophs belonging to the genera Methylomonas and Methylobacter dominated in enrichment cultures from depths below 400 m. A pure culture of an obligate methanotroph (strain SR5) was isolated and characterized. Pink-pigmented motile rods of the new isolate contained intracytoplasmic membranes as stacks of vesicles, assimilated methane via the ribulose monophosphate pathway and had an incomplete tricarboxylic acid cycle. Phosphatidyl glycerol, methylene ubiquinone and cytochrome c552 were prevailing. The DNA G+C content is 53.3 mol %. Strain SR5 grew at temperatures between 5 and 30 degrees C with optimum at 15 degrees C, close to its in situ temperature. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene, whole cell protein, enzymatic and physiological analyses of strain SR-5 revealed significant differences compared to the other representatives of Type I methanotrophs. Based on pheno- and genotypic characteristics we propose to refer the strain SR5 as to a new species, Methylomonas scandinavica.

  14. PHASS99: A software program for retrieving and decoding the radiometric ages of igneous rocks from the international database IGBADAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mishwat, Ali T.

    2016-05-01

    PHASS99 is a FORTRAN program designed to retrieve and decode radiometric and other physical age information of igneous rocks contained in the international database IGBADAT (Igneous Base Data File). In the database, ages are stored in a proprietary format using mnemonic representations. The program can handle up to 99 ages in an igneous rock specimen and caters to forty radiometric age systems. The radiometric age alphanumeric strings assigned to each specimen description in the database consist of four components: the numeric age and its exponential modifier, a four-character mnemonic method identification, a two-character mnemonic name of analysed material, and the reference number in the rock group bibliography vector. For each specimen, the program searches for radiometric age strings, extracts them, parses them, decodes the different age components, and converts them to high-level English equivalents. IGBADAT and similarly-structured files are used for input. The output includes three files: a flat raw ASCII text file containing retrieved radiometric age information, a generic spreadsheet-compatible file for data import to spreadsheets, and an error file. PHASS99 builds on the old program TSTPHA (Test Physical Age) decoder program and expands greatly its capabilities. PHASS99 is simple, user friendly, fast, efficient, and does not require users to have knowledge of programing.

  15. End-to-End Models for Effects of System Noise on LIMS Analysis of Igneous Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Clegg, Samuel M; Bender, Steven; Wiens, R. C.; Carmosino, Marco L; Speicher, Elly A; Dyar, M. D.

    2010-12-23

    The ChemCam instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory will be the first extraterrestial deployment of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (UBS) for remote geochemical analysis. LIBS instruments are also being proposed for future NASA missions. In quantitative LIBS applications using multivariate analysis techniques, it is essential to understand the effects of key instrument parameters and their variability on the elemental predictions. Baseline experiments were run on a laboratory instrument in conditions reproducing ChemCam performance on Mars. These experiments employed Nd:YAG laser producing 17 mJ/pulse on target and an with a 200 {micro}m FWHM spot size on the surface of a sample. The emission is collected by a telescope, imaged on a fiber optic and then interfaced to a demultiplexer capable of >40% transmission into each spectrometer. We report here on an integrated end-to-end system performance model that simulates the effects of output signal degradation that might result from the input signal chain and the impact on multivariate model predictions. There are two approaches to modifying signal to noise (SNR): degrade the signal and/or increase the noise. Ishibashi used a much smaller data set to show that the addition of noise had significant impact while degradation of spectral resolution had much less impact on accuracy and precision. Here, we specifically focus on aspects of remote LIBS instrument performance as they relate to various types of signal degradation. To assess the sensitivity of LIBS analysis to signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution, the signal in each spectrum from a suite of 50 laboratory spectra of igneous rocks was variably degraded by increasing the peak widths (simulating misalignment) and decreasing the spectral amplitude (simulating decreases in SNR).

  16. Source and magma mixing processes in continental subduction factory: Geochemical evidence from postcollisional mafic igneous rocks in the Dabie orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Li-Qun; Zhao, Zi-Fu; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Zhang, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Postcollisional mafic igneous rocks commonly exhibit petrological and geochemical heterogeneities, but their origin still remains enigmatic. While source mixing is substantial due to the crust-mantle interaction during continental collision, magma mixing is also significant during postcollisional magmatism. The two processes are illustrated by Early Cretaceous mafic igneous rocks in the Dabie orogen. These mafic rocks show arc-like trace element distribution patterns and enriched Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions, indicating their origination from enriched mantle sources. They have variable whole-rock ɛNd(t) values of -17.6 to -5.2 and zircon ɛHf(t) values of -29.0 to -7.7, pointing to source heterogeneities. Such whole-rock geochemical features are interpreted by the source mixing through melt-peridotite reaction in the continental subduction channel. Clinopyroxene and plagioclase megacrystals show complex textural and compositional variations, recording three stages of mineral crystallization during magma evolution. Cpx-1 core has low Cr and Ni but high Ba, Rb and K, indicating its crystallization from a mafic melt (Melt 1) derived from partial melting of hydrous peridotite rich in phlogopite. Cpx-1 mantle and Cpx-2 exhibit significantly high Cr, Ni and Al2O3 but low Rb and Ba, suggesting their crystallization from pyroxenite-derived mafic melt (Melt 2). Whole-rock initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of gabbro lies between those of Pl-1core (crystallized from Melt 1) and Pl-1 mantle and Pl-2 core (crystallized from Melt 2), providing isotopic evidence for magma mixing between Melt 1 and Melt 2. Taken together, a heterogeneously enriched mantle source would be generated by the source mixing due to reaction of the overlying subcontinental lithospheric mantle wedge peridotite with felsic melts derived from partial melting of different rocks of the deeply subducted continental crust during the continental collision. The magma mixing would occur between mafic melts that were

  17. Variations in the Pb isotope composition in polyformational magmatic rocks of the Ketkap-Yuna igneous province of the Aldan Shield: Evidence for mantle-crust interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polin, V. F.; Dril, S. I.; Khanchuk, A. I.; Velivetskaya, T. A.; Vladimirova, T. A.; Il'ina, N. N.

    2016-06-01

    The Pb isotope composition of polyformational Mesozoic igneous rocks of the Ketkap-Yuna igneous province (KYIP) and lower crustal metamorphic rocks of the Batomga granite-greenstone area (the complex of the KYIP basement) of the Aldan Shield was studied for the first time. Based on the data obtained, several types of material sources participating in petrogenetic processes were distinguished. The mantle source identified as PREMA is registered in most of the igneous formations and predominates in mafic alkaline rocks. According to the isotope characteristics, the upper crustal source corresponds to a source of the "Orogen" type by the model of "plumbotectonics" or to the average composition of the continental crust by the Stacey-Kramers model. The lower crust is the third material source; however, the type of lower crustal protolith involved in the igneous process is still not defined, which makes difficult to estimate its role in the petrogenetic processes.

  18. Distribution and origin of igneous rocks from the landward slopes of the Mariana Trench: Implications for its structure and evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, S.H.

    1983-09-10

    The landward slope of the Mariana Trench is composed largely of igneous rocks. Serpentinites and serpentinized ultramafic rocks occur at nearly all structural levels on the slope from depths of 8000 to 1200 m. Seamountlike features on the trench slope break are the surface expression of serpentinite diapirs. Cumulate and massive gabbros are found; several varieties of volcanic rocks are common including boninites, altered and metamorphosed basalts, andesites, and dacites. The chemical characteristics of the volcanic rocks indicate that nearly all are products of island arc volcanism. Together with the gabbros, these volcanic rocks represent what is probably a late Eocene arc complex. These rocks were probably the first volcanic products to result from the subduction of the Pacific plate beneath the Phillippine Sea plate; their exposure on the trench slope today implies a significant amount of tectonic erosion of the landward slope since Eocene time. Most of this removal of material appears to have occurred during the early stages of subduction. There are isolated occurrences on the landward slope of rock assemblages including alkalic basalts, chert, hyaloclastites, upper Cretaceous siliceous sediments, and shallow water limestones. These assemblages are very similar to rocks dredged from seamounts on the offshore flank of the trench, and their presence on the landward slope suggests that since the cessation of vigorous tectonic erosion, there has been episodic accretion of seamount fragments to the landward slope.

  19. Middle Jurassic oceanic island igneous rocks of the Raohe accretionary complex, northeastern China: Petrogenesis and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Hui; Ge, Wen-Chun; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Yan-Long; Bi, Jun-Hui; Tian, De-Xin; Xu, Wen-Liang

    2015-11-01

    Whole-rock major and trace element, and Sr, Nd, and Hf isotopic data, together with zircon U-Pb ages and in situ zircon Hf isotopes, are reported for Middle Jurassic igneous rocks of the Raohe accretionary complex, northeastern China, to investigate their petrogenesis and tectonic implications. The igneous rocks consist of pillow basalt, pyroxenite, gabbro, plagioclasite, and plagiogranite. The zircons from one plagioclasite and one plagiogranite are euhedral-subhedral and display fine-scale oscillatory growth zoning, indicating a magmatic origin. Zircon U-Pb dating gives an emplacement age of 169-167 Ma. The basalts are associated with late Paleozoic to middle Mesozoic sediments typical of ocean plate stratigraphy; i.e., limestone, bedded chert, and siliceous shale. The basalts, which show geochemical features similar to those of oceanic island basalts (OIBs), are enriched in TiO2, light rare earth elements (LREEs) (average: La/Smn = 2.12), and Nb (average: Zr/Nb = 12.24), and are characterized by positive Nb anomalies (averages: Nb/Thpm = 1.46, Nb/Lapm = 1.31). The rocks are depleted in heavy rare earth elements (HREEs) (average: Gd/Ybn = 2.03) and exhibit high εNd(t) (+8.2 to +8.3) and εHf(t) (+9.0 to +9.1) values. The geochemical features indicate the Jurassic OIB-like basalts were derived by a low degree of partial melting (<5%) of peridotite in the garnet stability field. The intermediate-mafic intrusive rocks show typical OIB affinities and are geochemically similar to the basalts. Most of the intermediate-mafic intrusive rocks are enriched in LREEs and Nb, depleted in HREEs, and show low Zr/Nb ratios and high εNd(t) (+7.2 to +8.2) and εHf(t) (+8.8 to +10.3) values, indicating they were derived from a common source and are the products of fractional crystallization of the OIB-like basalts. All of the igneous rocks are likely fragments of oceanic islands/seamounts. The identification of OIB-like basalts and associated intermediate-mafic intrusive rocks

  20. An introduction to the application of X-ray microtomography to the three-dimensional study of igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.R.; Mancini, L.; Polacci, M.; Higgins, M.D.; Gualda, G.A.R.; Hill, R.J.; Rivers, M.L.

    2012-10-25

    Imaging rocks in three-dimensions through X-ray microtomography enables routine visualization of structures in samples, which can be spatially resolved down to the sub-micron scale. Although X-ray tomography has been applied in biomedical research and clinical settings for decades, it has only recently been applied to studies of rocks, and few geoscientists realize its value and potential. This contribution provides an introduction to the principles and techniques of X-ray microtomography to the study of igneous rock textures as well as reviewing the current state of the art. We hope that this short review will encourage more geoscientists to apply X-ray microtomography in their research and that this will lead to new insights into the processes that occur in magmatic (as well as other geological) systems.

  1. Chemical weathering on Mars - Thermodynamic stabilities of primary minerals /and their alteration products/ from mafic igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Chemical weathering on Mars is examined theoretically from the standpoint of thermodynamic equilibrium between primary rock-forming minerals and the atmospheric gases O2, H2O, and CO2. The primary minerals considered are those common to mafic igneous rocks and include olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase, magnetite, troilite, pyrrhotite, and apatite. The importance of kinetics and reaction mechanisms in controlling possible weathering processes on Mars is discussed within the limits of currently available data, and the possible influence of liquid water on Martian weathering processes is evaluated where appropriate. For gas-solid weathering of mafic igneous rocks at the Martian surface, it is concluded that upon attainment of thermodynamic equilibrium: (1) oxides and carbonates should dominate the mineral assemblage of weathering products; (2) hematite rather than goethite should be the stable mineral form of Fe (III); (3) FeSO4 or FeSO4.H2O could be the stable weathering product of iron sulfides in the absence of liquid water; and (4) kaolinite is apparently the only clay mineral that should be thermodynamically stable over all ranges of temperature and water-vapor abundance at the Martian surface.

  2. Geology and porphyry copper-type alteration-mineralization of igneous rocks at the Christmas Mine, Gila County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koski, Randolph A.

    1979-01-01

    The Christmas copper deposit, located in southern Gila County, Arizona, is part of the major porphyry copper province of southwestern North America. Although Christmas is known for skarn deposits in Paleozoic carbonate rocks, ore-grade porphyry-type copper mineralization also occurs in a composite granodioritic intrusive complex and adjacent mafic volcanic country rocks. This study considers the nature, distribution, and genesis of alteration-mineralization in the igneous rock environment at Christmas. At the southeast end of the Dripping Spring Mountains, the Pennsylvanian Naco Limestone is unconformably overlain by the Cretaceous Williamson Canyon Volcanics, a westward-thinning sequence of basaltic volcanic breccia and lava flows, and subordinate clastic sedimentary rocks. Paleozoic and Mesozoic strata are intruded by Laramide-age dikes, sills, and small stocks of hornblende andesite porphyry and hornblende rhyodacite porphyry, and the mineralized Christmas intrusive complex. Rocks of the elongate Christmas stock, intruded along an east-northeast-trending fracture zone, are grouped into early, veined quartz diorite (Dark Phase), biotite granodiorite porphyry (Light Phase), and granodiorite; and late, unveined dacite porphyry and granodiorite porphyry. Biotite rhyodacite porphyry dikes extending east and west from the vicinity of the stock are probably coeval with biotite granodiorite porphyry. Accumulated normal displacement of approximately 1 km along the northwest-trending Christmas-Joker fault system has juxtaposed contrasting levels (lower, intrusive-carbonate rock environment and upper, intrusive-volcanic rock environment) within the porphyry copper system. K-Ar age determinations and whole-rock chemical analyses of the major intrusive rock types indicate that Laramide calc-alkaline magmatism and ore deposition at Christmas evolved over an extended period from within the Late Cretaceous (~75-80 m.y. ago) to early Paleocene (~63-61 m.y. ago). The sequence of

  3. Geodynamic setting and geochemical signatures of Cambrian?Ordovician rift-related igneous rocks (Ossa-Morena Zone, SW Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-García, T.; Bellido, F.; Quesada, C.

    2003-04-01

    An important rifting event, accompanied by massive igneous activity, is recorded in the Ossa-Morena Zone of the SW Iberian Massif (European Variscan Orogen). It likely culminated in the formation of a new oceanic basin (Rheic ocean?), remnants of which appear presently accreted at the southern margin of the Ossa-Morena Zone. Rifting propagated diachronously across the zone from the Early Cambrian to the Late Ordovician, but by Early Ordovician time, the existence of a significant tract of new ocean is evidenced by a breakup unconformity. Although early stages of rifting were not accompanied by mantle-derived igneous activity, a pronounced increase of the geothermal gradient is indicated by partial melting of metasedimentary protoliths in the upper and middle crust, and by coeval core-complex formation. Geochemistry of the main volume of igneous rocks, emplaced some million years later during more mature stages of rifting, suggests an origin in a variably enriched asthenospheric source, similar to that of many OIB, from which subsequent petrogenetic processes produced a wide range of compositions, from basalt to rhyolite. A tectonic model involving collision with, and subsequent overriding of, a MOR is proposed to account for the overall evolution, a present-day analogue for which lies in the overriding of the East Pacific Rise by North America and the rifting of Baja California.

  4. Multistage amphiboles from the Galinge iron skarn deposit in Qiman Tagh, western China: evidence of igneous rocks replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, M.; Feng, C.-Y.; Zhu, Y.-F.; Mao, J.-W.; Zhao, Y.-M.; Li, D.-X.

    2016-08-01

    Amphiboles from the Galinge skarn deposit, the largest iron (Fe) polymetallic skarn deposit in the Qiman Tagh metallogenic belt (western China), were formed by multistage fluid-rock interactions. Mineral analysis of the various amphiboles suggest that they were formed by the replacement of mafic to intermediate igneous rocks. The two alteration phases have formed three generations of compositionally distinct amphiboles: Amp-I: Ferro-edenitic hornblende (FE); Amp-II: Deep bluish-green magnesian-hastingsite (MH); Amp-III: Light greenish-beige ferro-actinolite (FA). The Amp-I preserves the primary igneous amphibole composition, and was subsequently replaced by Amp-II. The amphibole Cl content markedly increases from the FE (0.176 - 0.582 wt.%) to the MH (0.894 - 3.161 wt.%), and abruptly drops in the FA (0.017 - 0.039 wt.%). The Cl-rich MH contains the lowest concentration of Si [5.64 - 6.28 atoms per formula unit (apfu)], and the highest (K + Na) values (0.72 - 1.06 apfu) in the amphibole A-site with a high K/(K + Na) of 0.491 to 0.429. Both Mg and Fe contents of the MH and FA vary widely, possibly due to the interactions of magma-derived hydrothermal fluids with the basaltic / andesitic host rocks. Formation of the Cl-rich MH may have been associated with the early high-temperature and high-saline hydrothermal fluids, meanwhile the Cl-poor FA may have formed from later low-temperature and low-saline hydrothermal fluids. The MH plays an important role for consuming Cl carried by hydrothermal fluids. The Cl-rich fluids may have mobilized some elements, such as Fe, Al, Mg, Ca and Ti from the host rocks. Considerable amounts of Ti, Al, Mg and Fe were incorporated into the sphene and Fe-Ti oxides that coexist with the MH.

  5. Feldspar-Bearing Igneous Rocks at Gale: A ChemCam Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, V.; Fabre, C.; Toplis, M.; Wiens, R. C.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; Mangold, N.

    2014-09-01

    We present the first in situ evidences of feldspar-rich rocks ranging from granodioritic and alkalin effusive rocks (trachy basalts and syenitic liquids). Implication for primitive noachain crust will be discussed.

  6. Isotopic ages for alkaline igneous rocks, including a 26 Ma ignimbrite, from the Peshawar plain of northern Pakistan and their tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Irshad; Khan, Shuhab; Lapen, Thomas; Burke, Kevin; Jehan, Noor

    2013-01-01

    New isotopic ages on zircons from rocks of the Peshawar Plain Alkaline Igneous Province (PPAIP) reveal for the first time the occurrence of ignimbritic Cenozoic (Oligocene) volcanism in the Himalaya at 26.7 ± 0.8 Ma. Other new ages confirm that PPAIP rift-related igneous activity was Permian and lasted from ˜290 Ma to ˜250 Ma. Although PPAIP rocks are petrologically and geochemically typical of rifts and have been suggested to be linked to rifting on the Pangea continental margin at the initiation of the Neotethys Ocean, there are no documented rift-related structures mapped in Permian rocks of the Peshawar Plain. We suggest that Permian rift-related structures have been dismembered and/or reactivated during shortening associated with India-Asia collision. Shortening in the area between the Main Mantle Thrust (MMT) and the Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) may be indicative of the subsurface northern extension of the Salt Range evaporites. Late Cenozoic sedimentary rocks of the Peshawar Plain deposited during and after Himalayan thrusting occupy a piggy-back basin on top of the thrust belt. Those sedimentary rocks have buried surviving evidence of Permian rift-related structures. Igneous rocks of the PPAIP have been both metamorphosed and deformed during the Himalayan collision and Cenozoic igneous activity, apart from the newly recognized Gohati volcanism, has involved only the intrusion of small cross-cutting granitic bodies concentrated in areas such as Malakand that are close to the MMT. Measurements on Chingalai Gneiss zircons have confirmed the occurrence of 816 ± 70 Ma aged rocks in the Precambrian basement of the Peshawar Plain that are comparable in age to rocks in the Malani igneous province of the Rajasthan platform ˜1000 km to the south.

  7. The Kenna ureilite - An ultramafic rock with evidence for igneous, metamorphic, and shock origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkley, J. L.; Brown, H. G.; Keil, K.; Carter, N. L.; Mercier, J.-C. C.; Huss, G.

    1976-01-01

    Ureilites are a rare group of achondrites. They are composed mainly of olivine and pigeonite in a matrix of carbonaceous material, including graphite, lonsdaleite, diamond, and metal. In most respects Kenna is a typical ureilite with the requisite mineralogical and chemical properties of the group. Differences of the Kenna ureilite from previously studied ureilites are related to a greater density, the occurrence of exceedingly minute quantities of feldspar, and a very strong elongation lineation of the silicate minerals. A description is presented of a study which indicates a complex history for Kenna, including igneous, mild metamorphic, and shock processes.

  8. The influence of igneous intrusions on the peak temperatures of host rocks: Finite-time emplacement, evaporation, dehydration, and decarbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dayong; Song, Yongchen; Liu, Yu; Zhao, Minglong; Qi, Tian; Liu, Weiguo

    2012-01-01

    Using a 13-m-thick basic sill and its limestone host rocks of the Permian Irati Formation from the Parana Basin, South America, as an example, this paper presents a numerical investigation based on heat conduction models on the effect of the emplacement mechanism of igneous intrusions, pore-water evaporation, and dehydration and decarbonation of host rocks on the peak temperature ( Tpeak) of host rocks. Our results demonstrate that: (1) the finite-time intrusion mechanism of magma can lower the predicted Tpeak of host rocks by up to 100 °C relative to the instantaneous intrusion mechanism, and although pore-water evaporation together with dehydration and decarbonation reactions can also depress the thermal effect of the sill on its host rocks, the maximum effect of these mechanisms on Tpeak only reaches approximately 50 °C. (2) The effect of pore-water evaporation on Tpeak is obviously greater than that of the dehydration and decarbonation reactions: the former can cause a maximum deviation of 40 °C in the predicted Tpeak, whereas the deviation due to the latter is less than 20 °C. Further, the effect of the dehydration and decarbonation reactions on Tpeak is less than 10 °C if pore-water evaporation is allowed simultaneously in the models and can hence be ignored in thermal modeling. (3) The finite-time intrusion mechanism of magma probably represents the natural condition of the sill. Pore-water evaporation and dehydration and decarbonation of host rocks are also likely to play important roles in lowering the thermal effect of the sill.

  9. Thermal neutron absorption cross sections for igneous rocks: Newberry Caldera, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Lysne, P.

    1990-01-01

    The thermal neutron absorption cross sections of geologic materials are of first-order importance to the interpretation of pulsed neutron porosity logs and of second-order importance to the interpretation of steady-state porosity logs using dual detectors. Even in the latter case, uncertainties in log response can be excessive whenever formations are encountered that possess absorption properties appreciably greater than the limestones used in most tool calibrations. These effects are of importance to logging operations directed at geothermal applications where formation vary from igneous to sedimentary and which may contain solution-deposited minerals with very large cross-section values. Most measurements of cross-section values for geologic materials have been made for hydrocarbon production applications. Hence, the specimen materials are sedimentary and clean in the sense that they are not altered by geothermal fluids. This investigation was undertaken to measure cross-section values from a sequence of igneous materials obtained from a single hole drilled in an active hydrothermal system. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Rates and processes of crystal growth in the system anorthite-albite. [magmatic liquids in igneous rock formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, R. J.; Klein, L.; Uhlmann, D. R.; Hays, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The growth rates and interface morphologies of crystals of synthetic compositions in the anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8)-albite (NaAlSi3O8) plagioclase feldspar system are measured in an investigation of the crystallization of igneous rocks. Mixed plagioclase glasses with compositions of 75% and 50% anorthite were observed using the microscope heating technique as they crystallized at temperatures near the liquidus, and 75%, 50% and 20% anorthite crystals were treated by resistance heating and observed at greater degrees of undercooling. Growth rates were found to be independent of time and to decrease with increasing albite content, ranging from 0.5 to 2 x 10 to the -5th cm/min. The crystal morphologies for all compositions are faceted near the liquidus and become progressively skeletal, dendritic and fibrillar with increasing undercooling.

  11. Geochemistry of igneous rocks from the Crazy Mountains, Montana, and tectonic models for the Montana Alkalic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DudáS, Francis Ö.

    1991-07-01

    Tectonic models have postulated that subduction of a flat-lying oceanic plate was intimately linked with mid-Eocene magmatism in the northwestern United States and have assumed that this linkage is expressed in the geochemical characteristics of igneous rocks. Geochemical data from the Crazy Mountains in south central Montana can be interpreted as indicating the presence of a subduction-related chemical component. Because radiogenic isotopic data for these rocks restrict the major chemical events in their mantle source to the Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary (50-100 Ma) and the mid-Proterozoic (1.6-1.8 Ga), subduction during one or both of these periods is the most plausible explanation for the origin of the arc-like geochemical features. Assessment of geologic and tectonic constraints, however, indicates that Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary subduction cannot explain the regional distribution, the contemporaneity, and the compositional range of the Eocene igneous rocks. The Eocene magmatic event does not show interpretable age progressions, as most subduction-related models suggest. There is considerable geographic overlap in the chemical characteristics of the Eocene igneous rocks, so that chemical zoning cannot be demonstrated south of the U.S.-Canada border. The zone of igneous activity was diffuse and discontinuous, unlike most subduction-related magmatic arcs. The presence of thick lithospheric mantle beneath the Archean Wyoming craton presents difficulties for models that involve subduction of a flat-lying slab. The lithospheric mantle probably controlled the depth of subduction and probably forced the slab to depths greater than those of plausible source regions for subalkalic, mantle-derived basalts. Flat slab subduction models cannot account for the thermal inputs required for extensive magmatism. Subduction-related models fail to explain the CO2-rich character of alkalic magmatism in central Montana. The arc-like geochemical patterns in the Crazy Mountains

  12. Determination of lead in igneous rocks by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry at an HMDE.

    PubMed

    Calderoni, G

    1981-01-01

    A versatile and sensitive voltammetric method has been used for the determination of lead in seven USGS standard rocks and in two CRPG (Centre des Recherches Pétrografiques et Géochimiques, Nancy) standard rocks. The results, showing satisfactory precision and accuracy, are discussed with respect to the sample treatment and the voltammetric method.

  13. Field Observation of Joint Structures in Various Types of Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Shingo; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2006-05-01

    In this study, field observations of natural fracture network systems in some intrusive and extrusive rocks were undertaken, to clarify the fracturing mechanism in the rocks. Shallow intrusives, whose depth of emplacement was less than several hundred metres, include the Momo-iwa Dacite dome on Rebun Island (Hokkaido), and Jodogahama Rhyolite in Iwate prefecture. Extrusive complexes studied include the Tojinbo Andesite and Ojima Rhyodacite in Fukui prefecture. Rocks of `granitic' composition were collected from the Takidani (Japan Alps) and Hijiori (Yamagata prefecture) plutons. The joint structure in Hijiori Granite was evaluated by analysis of core samples extracted from the HDR-3 geothermal production well. Based on detailed field observation, joint structures related to thermal contraction of a rock mass could be classified according to their inferred depth of formation. Joints from a near surface setting, such as shallow intrusive rocks and extrusives, tend to form pentagonal — hexagonal columnar structures (for a variety of rock types), whilst granitic rocks (from a deeper setting) typically exhibit a parallelepiped structure. The apparent differences in joint form are inferred to be dependent on the confining pressure, which acts on joint generation and propagation. In cases of non-confining pressure, such as the near-surface (shallow intrusive/extrusive) setting, joint networks typically form a columnar structure. On the contrary, confining pressure is considerably greater for deeper rock masses, and these form a parallelepiped joint structure.

  14. Igneous phenocrystic origin of K-feldspar megacrysts in granitic rocks from the Sierra Nevada batholith

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Sisson, T.W.

    2008-01-01

    Study of four K-feldspar megacrystic granitic plutons and related dikes in the Sierra Nevada composite batholith indicates that the megacrysts are phenocrysts that grew in contact with granitic melt. Growth to megacrystic sizes was due to repeated replenishment of the magma bodies by fresh granitic melt that maintained temperatures above the solidus for extended time periods and that provided components necessary for K-feldspar growth. These intrusions cooled 89-83 Ma, are the youngest in the range, and represent the culminating magmatic phase of the Sierra Nevada batholith. They are the granodiorite of Topaz Lake, the Cathedral Peak Granodiorite, the Mono Creek Granite, the Whitney Granodiorite, the Johnson Granite Porphyry, and the Golden Bear Dike. Megacrysts in these igneous bodies attain 4-10 cm in length. All have sawtooth oscillatory zoning marked by varying concentration of BaO ranging generally from 3.5 to 0.5 wt%. Some of the more pronounced zones begin with resorption and channeling of the underlying zone. Layers of mineral inclusions, principally plagioclase, but also biotite, quartz, hornblende, titanite, and accessory minerals, are parallel to the BaO-delineated zones, are sorted by size along the boundaries, and have their long axes preferentially aligned parallel to the boundaries. These features indicate that the K-feldspar megacrysts grew while surrounded by melt, allowing the inclusion minerals to periodically attach themselves to the faces of the growing crystals. The temperature of growth of titanite included within the K-feldspar megacrysts is estimated by use of a Zr-in-titanite geothermometer. Megacryst-hosted titanite grains all yield temperatures typical of felsic magmas, mainly 735-760 ??C. Titanite grains in the granodiorite hosts marginal to the megacrysts range to lower growth temperatures, in some instances into the subsolidus. The limited range and igneous values of growth temperatures for megacryst-hosted titanite grains support the

  15. Distribution of chemical elements in calc-alkaline igneous rocks, soils, sediments and tailings deposits in northern central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyarzún, Jorge; Oyarzun, Roberto; Lillo, Javier; Higueras, Pablo; Maturana, Hugo; Oyarzún, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    This study follows the paths of 32 chemical elements in the arid to semi-arid realm of the western Andes, between 27° and 33° S, a region hosting important ore deposits and mining operations. The study encompasses igneous rocks, soils, river and stream sediments, and tailings deposits. The chemical elements have been grouped according to the Goldschmidt classification, and their concentrations in each compartment are confronted with their expected contents for different rock types based on geochemical affinities and the geologic and metallogenic setting. Also, the element behavior during rock weathering and fluvial transport is here interpreted in terms of the ionic potentials and solubility products. The results highlight the similarity between the chemical composition of the andesites and that of the average Continental Crust, except for the higher V and Mn contents of the former, and their depletion in Mg, Ni, and Cr. The geochemical behavior of the elements in the different compartments (rocks, soils, sediments and tailings) is highly consistent with the mobility expected from their ionic potentials, their sulfates and carbonates solubility products, and their affinities for Fe and Mn hydroxides. From an environmental perspective, the low solubility of Cu, Zn, and Pb due to climatic, chemical, and mineralogical factors reduces the pollution risks related to their high to extremely high contents in source materials (e.g., rocks, altered zones, tailings). Besides, the complex oxyanions of arsenic get bound by colloidal particles of Fe-hydroxides and oxyhydroxides (e.g., goethite), thus becoming incorporated to the fine sediment fraction in the stream sediments.

  16. Extensional tectonics during the igneous emplacement of the mafic-ultramafic rocks of the Barberton greenstone belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewit, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The simatic rocks (Onverwacht Group) of the Barberton greenstone belt are part of the Jamestown ophiolite complex. This ophiolite, together with its thick sedimentary cover occupies a complex thrust belt. Field studies have identified two types of early faults which are entirely confined to the simatic rocks and are deformed by the later thrusts and associated folds. The first type of fault (F1a) is regional and always occurs in the simatic rocks along and parallel to the lower contacts of the ophiolite-related cherts (Middle Marker and equivalent layers). These fault zones have previously been referred to both as flaser-banded gneisses and as weathering horizons. In general the zones range between 1-30m in thickness. Displacements along these zones are difficult to estimate, but may be in the order of 1-100 km. The structures indicate that the faults formed close to horizontal, during extensional shear and were therefore low angle normal faults. F1a zones overlap in age with the formation of the ophiolite complex. The second type of faults (F1b) are vertical brittle-ductile shear zones, which crosscut the complex at variable angles and cannot always be traced from plutonic to overlying extrusive (pillowed) simatic rocks. F1b zones are also apparently of penecontemporaneous origin with the intrusive-extrusive igneous processs. F1b zones may either represent transform fault-type activity or represent root zones (steepened extensions) of F1a zones. Both fault types indicate extensive deformation in the rocks of the greenstone belt prior to compressional overthrust tectonics.

  17. Venus - Chemical weathering of igneous rocks and buffering of atmospheric composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozette, S.; Lewis, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Data from the Pioneer Venus radar mapper, combined with measurements of wind velocity and atmospheric composition, suggest that surface erosion on Venus varies with altitude. Calcium- and magnesium-rich weathering products are produced at high altitudes by gas-solid reactions with igneous minerals, then removed into the hotter lowlands by surface winds. These fine-grained weathering products may then rereact with the lower atmosphere and buffer the composition of the observed gases carbon dioxide, water vapor, sulfur dioxide, and hydrogen fluoride in some regions of the surface. This process is a plausible mechanism for the establishment in the lowlands of a calcium-rich mineral assemblage, which had previously been found necessary for the buffering of these species.

  18. Venus: chemical weathering of igneous rocks and buffering of atmospheric composition.

    PubMed

    Nozette, S; Lewis, J S

    1982-04-01

    Data from the Pioneer Venus radar mapper, combined with measurements of wind velocity and atmospheric composition, suggest that surface erosion on Venus varies with altitude. Calcium- and magnesium-rich weathering products are produced at high altitudes by gas-solid reactions with igneous minerals, then removed into the hotter lowlands by surface winds. These fine-grained weathering products may then rereact with the lower atmosphere and buffer the composition of the observed gases carbon dioxide, water vapor, sulfur dioxide, and hydrogen fluoride in some regions of the surface. This process is a plausible mechanism for the establishment in the lowlands of a calcium-rich mineral assemblage, which had previously been found necessary for the buffering of these species.

  19. Tectonic implications of Paleozoic and Mesozoic igneous rocks in subsurface of peninsular Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, P.A.; Porch, J.W.

    1983-09-01

    The extensive Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary sequences of peninsular Florida rest unconformably upon a basement of dominantly volcanic rocks. Major and trace element analyses of samples from six deep oil test wells in north-central and south-central pensinsular Florida suggest the existence of two distinct volcanic provinces. The northern province contains calc-alkalic andesitic to rhyolitic rocks similar to those found along modern convergent (ocean-continent) plate boundaries. The southern province is apparently a bimodal suite of basaltic and rhyolitic rocks. These rocks exhibit certain geochemical features which suggest they were generated in a continental rifting environment associated with a mantle plume. Available age data indicate the northern volcanic province is at least early Paleozoic in age, whereas the volcanism in the south occurred during early Mesozoic.

  20. Oxidative mobilization of cerium and uranium and enhanced release of "immobile" high field strength elements from igneous rocks in the presence of the biogenic siderophore desferrioxamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Dennis; Kopf, Sebastian; Bau, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Polyvalent trace elements such as the high field strength elements (HFSE) are commonly considered rather immobile during low-temperature water-rock interaction. Hence, they have become diagnostic tools that are widely applied in geochemical studies. We present results of batch leaching experiments focused on the mobilization of certain HFSE (Y, Zr, Hf, Th, U and rare earth elements) from mafic, intermediate and felsic igneous rocks in the presence and absence, respectively, of the siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB). Our data show that DFOB strongly enhances the mobility of these trace elements during low-temperature water-rock interaction. The presence of DFOB produces two distinct features in the Rare Earths and Yttrium (REY) patterns of leaching solutions, regardless of the mineralogical and chemical composition or the texture of the rock type studied. Bulk rock-normalized REY patterns of leaching solutions with DFOB show (i) a very distinct positive Ce anomaly and (ii) depletion of La and other light REY relative to the middle REY, with a concave downward pattern between La and Sm. These features are not observed in experiments with hydrochloric acid, acetic acid or deionized water. In DFOB-bearing leaching solutions Ce and U are decoupled from and selectively enriched relative to light REY and Th, respectively, due to oxidation to Ce(IV) and U(VI). Oxidation of Ce3+ and U4+ is promoted by the significantly higher stability of the Ce(IV) and U(VI) DFOB complexes as compared to the Ce(III) and U(IV) DFOB complexes. This is similar to the relationship between the Ce(IV)- and Ce(III)-pentacarbonate complexes that cause positive Ce anomalies in alkaline lakes. However, while formation of Ce(IV) carbonate complexes is confined to alkaline environments, Ce(IV) DFOB complexes may produce positive Ce anomalies even in mildly acidic and near-neutral natural waters. Siderophore-promoted dissolution processes also significantly enhance mobility of other 'immobile' HFSE

  1. Extra-terrestrial igneous granites and related rocks: A review of their occurrence and petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Bernard

    2012-11-01

    The telluric planets and the asteroid belt display the same internal structure with a metallic inner core and a silicate outer shell. Experimental data and petrological evidence in silicate systems show that granite can be produced by extreme igneous differentiation through various types of igneous processes. On Moon, 4.4-3.9 Ga granite clasts display dry mineral assemblages. They correspond to at least 8 discrete intrusive events. Large K/Ca enrichment and low REE abundances in granite relative to KREEP are consistent with silicate liquid immiscibility, a process observed in melt inclusions within olivine of lunar basalts and in lunar meteorites. Steep-sided domes identified by remote sensing can represent intrusive or extrusive felsic formations. On Mars, black-and-white rhythmic layers observed on the Tharsis rise along the flanks of the peripheral scarps of the Tharsis Montes giant volcanoes suggest the possible eruption of felsic pyroclastites. Though no true granites were found so far in the Martian SNC meteorites, felsic glasses and mesostases were identified and a component close to terrestrial continental (granitic) crust is inferred from trace element and isotope systematics. Venus has suffered extensive volcanic resurfacing, whereas folded and faulted areas resemble terrestrial continents. Near large shield volcanoes, with dominant basaltic compositions, steep-sided domes have been interpreted as non-degassed silicic extrusions. The hypothesis of a granitic component is "tantalising". Extra-terrestrial granite is frequently found as clasts and mesostases in asteroidal meteorites. Porphyritic textures, with alkali feldspar crystals up to several centimetres in size, were observed in silicate enclaves within iron meteorites. In the chondrite clan, polymict breccias can contain granitic clasts, whose provenance is debated. One clast from the Adzhi-Bogdo meteorite yields a 4.53 ± 0.03 Ga Pb-Pb age, making it the oldest known granite in the solar system. The

  2. Thermal evolution of igneous rocks of the Upper Rhine Graben area and their relation to tectonic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, K.; Rahn, M.; Keller, J.

    2003-04-01

    The Upper Rhine Graben (URG) extends over a distance of 300 km from Basel (Switzerland) to Frankfurt (Germany) with an average width of 30--40 km. It is the central segment of the European Cenozoic rift system. The occurrence of Middle Eocene lake deposits is attributed to initial rifting. The main rifting phase started at the end of the Eocene and was followed by prominent uplift in the southern URG area in Miocene time (Schumacher, 2002). The igneous products in the investigated area are mainly primitive, mantle-derived alkaline basaltic rocks, occurring, in most cases, as dikes. The majority of the volcanics are found on the eastern graben shoulder with a concentration in the Freiburg area and the highest frequency in the northern part. No dikes are observed along the main border faults. Previously published K/Ar total rock age data were interpreted as intrusion ages (for review see Keller et al., 2002) and suggest a first activity peak in the Upper Cretaceous, a maximum in Eocene time and a further pronounced peak in the Miocene. This age range doubles the length of the assumed period of graben formation. Apatite fission track dating was applied to selected dikes and nearby country rocks. The temporal relation between volcanic events and the URG shoulder uplift was constrained by comparison of the fission track data of the dikes and country rocks. Important differences in respect to this relation exist among the different rift shoulder segments (Black Forest, Vosges, Palatinate Forest and Odins Forest). References: Keller, J., Kraml, M. &Henjes-Kunst, F. (2002): Schweiz. Mineral. Petrogr. Mitt. 82, 121-130. Schumacher, M.E. (2002): Tectonics, 21: 1-17.

  3. Petrographic, mineralogic, and x-ray fluorescence analysis of lunar igneous-type rocks and spherules.

    PubMed

    Brown, G M; Emeleus, C H; Holland, J G; Phillips, R

    1970-01-30

    Three lunar rocks show almost identical mineralogy but grain sizes that vary from basaltic to gabbroic. Clinopyroxene is zoned from augite to subcalcic ferroaugite compositions and is accompanied by decrease in Cr, Al, and Ti. Plagioclase is zoned from 93 to 78 percent anorthite. Olivine (68 percent forsterite) is present in one rock and apatite is rare. Cristobalite, ilmenite with Ti-rich lamellae, ulvöspinel (often Cr-rich), troilite, and kamacite are low in trace elements. Glassy spherules are of basaltic or feldspathic (92 percent anorthite) composition but contain abundant iron spheres of taenite composition (13 percent Ni). Four rock analyses by x-ray fluorescence show affinity with terrestrial basalts but with anomalous amounts of Ti, Na, Cr, Zr, Y, Rb, Nb, Ni, Cu, and Zn.

  4. Magnetic Properties and the Classification of Igneous Rocks: A Case Study of the Old Andesites from Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijaksana, S.; Ngkoimani, L. O.; Abdullah, C. I.; The, H. L.

    2005-12-01

    While conducting paleomagnetic and geochronological studies of the Old Andesites from Java, Indonesia, we found that magnetic parameters correlate well with certain geochemical parameters. The term Old Andesites is referred to the products of subduction zones underneath Sumatera, Java, and the Lesser Sunda Islands. Samples used in this study were taken mainly from sites that are distributed in Central and East Java. According the existing literature, the samples are referred to as andesitic lavas and intrusions. K-Ar dating by us and previous workers show that the sites are Miocene to Late Cretaceous in age. We tried to correlate rock magnetic parameters (natural remanent intensity, saturation remanence, DC susceptibility and anhysteretic susceptibility) with chemical compositions, i.e., content of SiO2, TiO2, Fe2O3, MgO and Al2O3. We found that SiO2 and MgO contents correlate well with the magnetic parameters. As SiO2 increases, saturation remanence and anhysteretic susceptibility increases but natural remanent intensity and DC susceptibility decreases. Meanwhile, as MgO increases, natural remanent intensity and DC susceptibility increases but saturation remanence and anhysteretic susceptibility decreases. Other mineral contents, however, correlate only partially with the magnetic parameters. These correlations between geochemical parameters and magnetic parameters facilitate the possibility of using magnetic parameters in classifying igneous rocks.

  5. Evolving subduction zones in the Western United States, as interpreted from igneous rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Prostka, H.J.; Christiansen, R.L.

    1971-01-01

    Variations in the ratio of K2O to SiO4 in andesitic rocks suggest early and middle Cenozoic subduction beneath the western United States along two subparallel imbricate zones dipping about 20 degrees eastward. The western zone emerged at the continental margin, but the eastern zone was entirely beneath the continental plate. Mesozoic subduction apparently occurred along a single steeper zone.

  6. Evolving subduction zones in the Western United States, as interpreted from igneous rocks.

    PubMed

    Lipman, P W; Prostka, H J; Christiansen, R L

    1971-11-19

    Variations in the ratio of K(2)O to SiO(2) in andesitic rocks suggest early and middle Cenozoic subduction beneath the western United States along two subparallel imbricate zones dipping about 20 degrees eastward. The western zone emerged at the continental margin, but the eastern zone was entirely beneath the continental plate. Mesozoic subduction apparently occurred along a single steeper zone.

  7. Alkaline igneous rocks of Magnet Cove, Arkansas: Mineralogy and geochemistry of syenites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flohr, M.J.K.; Ross, M.

    1990-01-01

    Syenites from the Magnet Cove alkaline igneous complex form a diverse mineralogical and geochemical suite. Compositional zoning in primary and late-stage minerals indicates complex, multi-stage crystallization and replacement histories. Residual magmatic fluids, rich in F, Cl, CO2 and H2O, reacted with primary minerals to form complex intergrowths of minerals such as rinkite, fluorite, V-bearing magnetite, F-bearing garnet and aegirine. Abundant sodalite and natrolite formed in pegmatitic segregations within nepheline syenite where Cl- and Na-rich fluids were trapped. During autometasomatism compatible elements such as Mn, Ti, V and Zr were redistributed on a local scale and concentrated in late-stage minerals. Early crystallization of apatite and perovskite controlled the compatible behavior of P and Ti, respectively. The formation of melanite garnet also affected the behaviour of Ti, as well as Zr, Hf and the heavy rare-earth elements. Pseudoleucite syenite and garnet-nepheline syenite differentiated along separate trends, but the two groups are related to the same parental magma by early fractionation of leucite, the presumed precursor of intergrowths of K-feldspar and nepheline. The Diamond Jo nepheline syenite group defines a different differentiation trend. Sphene-nepheline syenite, alkali syenite and several miscellaneous nepheline syenites do not consistently plot with the other syenite groups or each other on element and oxide variation diagrams, indicating that they were derived from still other parental syenite magmas. Mineral assemblages indicate that relatively high f{hook};O2, at or above the fayalite-magnetite-quartz buffer, prevailed throughout the crystallization history of the syenites. ?? 1990.

  8. Compositional variation in the chevkinite group: New data from igneous and metamorphic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macdonald, R.; Belkin, H.E.; Wall, F.; Baginski, B.

    2009-01-01

    Electron microprobe analyses are presented of chevkinite-group minerals from Canada, USA, Guatemala, Norway, Scotland, Italy and India. The host rocks are metacarbonates, alkaline and subalkaline granitoids, quartz-bearing pegmatites, carbonatite and an inferred K-rich tuff. The analyses extend slightly the range of compositions in the chevkinite group, e.g. the most MgO-rich phases yet recorded, and we report two further examples where La is the dominant cation in the A site. Patchilyzoned crystals from Virginia and Guatemala contain both perrierite and chevkinite compositions. The new and published analyses are used to review compositional variation in minerals of the perrierite subgroup, which can form in a wide range of host rock compositions and over a substantial pressure-temperature range. The dominant substitutions in the various cation sites and a generalized substitution scheme are described. ?? 2009 The Mineralogical Society.

  9. Remagnetization of igneous rocks in Gupis area of Kohistan arc, northern Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, M. N.; Fujiwara, Y.; Paudel, L. P.

    2001-05-01

    The Kohistan arc was formed due to subduction of neo-Tethyan oceanic crust beneath Asia. The arc is comprised of volcanic, plutonic and sedimentary rocks of Mesozoic to Tertiary age, formed prior and after the suturing of the Indian and Asian continents. Paleomagnetic investigations have been carried out on Paleocene volcanic and plutonic rocks exposed in the northern part of the arc. A total of 110 samples from 16 sites were drilled. According to rock-magnetic studies the main magnetic carrier is magnetite. Optical microscopy study reveals that low-grade metamorphism have effected all rocks. Magnetite is found as both a primary magmatic mineral and secondary alteration product in all samples. Samples of volcanics yield post tilting characteristic remanent magnetizations (ChRM). The in situ mean direction of the ChRMs of the intrusives is similar to the in situ mean direction of volcanics. The presence of secondary magnetite in plutons, the similarity of in situ mean ChRM of plutons with that of post-tilting ChRMs of similar age volcanics and dissimilarity of the mean ChRM of plutons from expected directions at the time of formation of plutons support a secondary origin for the ChRM of plutons. As the ChRM directions of the volcanics and intrusives are the same, it implies that both ChRMs were acquired during the same remagnetization event. Comparing the mean paleolatitude (25 ± 6°N) from Gupis area with those from Indian APWP and considering the fact that there was prevailing heating event in Lower Tertiary in the area, the acquisition age of this secondary remanent magnetization can be bracketed between 50 and 35 Ma.

  10. Thermal conductivity of lunar and terrestrial igneous rocks in their melting range.

    PubMed

    Murase, T; McBirney, A R

    1970-10-01

    The thermal conductivity of a synthetic lunar rock in its melting range is about half that of a terrestrial basalt. The low conductivity and increased efficiency of insulating crusts on lunar lavas will enable flows to cover great distances without being quenched by high radiant heat losses from the surface. For a given rate of heat production, the thermal gradient of the moon would be significantly steeper than that of the earth.

  11. Complex igneous processes and the formation of the primitive lunar crustal rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, J.; Boudreau, A. E.

    1979-01-01

    Crystallization of a magma ocean with initial chondritic Ca/Al and REE ratios such as proposed by Taylor and Bence (TB, 1975), is capable of producing the suite of primitive crustal rocks if the magma ocean underwent locally extensive assimilation and mixing in its upper layers as preliminary steps in formation of an anorthositic crust. Lunar anorthosites were the earliest permanent crustal rocks to form the result of multiple cycles of suspension and assimilation of plagioclase in liquids fractionating olivine and pyroxene. There may be two series of Mg-rich cumulate rocks: one which developed as a result of the equilibration of anorthositic crust with the magma ocean; the other which formed in the later stages of the magma ocean during an epoch of magma mixing and ilmenite crystallization. This second series may be related to KREEP genesis. It is noted that crystallization of the magma ocean had two components: a low pressure component which produced a highly fractionated and heterogeneous crust growing downward and a high pressure component which filled in the ocean from the bottom up, mostly with olivine and low-Ca pyroxene.

  12. Prolonged KREEP magmatism on the Moon indicated by the youngest dated lunar igneous rock.

    PubMed

    Borg, Lars E; Shearer, Charles K; Asmerom, Yemane; Papike, James J

    2004-11-11

    Primordial solidification of the Moon (or its uppermost layer) resulted in the formation of a variety of rock types that subsequently melted and mixed to produce the compositional diversity observed in the lunar sample suite. The initial rocks to crystallize from this Moon-wide molten layer (the magma ocean) contained olivine and pyroxene and were compositionally less evolved than the plagioclase-rich rocks that followed. The last stage of crystallization, representing the last few per cent of the magma ocean, produced materials that are strongly enriched in incompatible elements including potassium (K), the rare earth elements (REE) and phosphorus (P)--termed KREEP. The decay of radioactive elements in KREEP, such as uranium and thorium, is generally thought to provide the thermal energy necessary for more recent lunar magmatism. The ages of KREEP-rich samples are, however, confined to the earliest periods of lunar magmatism between 3.8 and 4.6 billion years (Gyr) ago, providing no physical evidence that KREEP is directly involved in more recent lunar magmatism. But here we present evidence that KREEP magmatism extended for an additional 1 Gyr, based on analyses of the youngest dated lunar sample. PMID:15538366

  13. Prolonged KREEP magmatism on the Moon indicated by the youngest dated lunar igneous rock.

    PubMed

    Borg, Lars E; Shearer, Charles K; Asmerom, Yemane; Papike, James J

    2004-11-11

    Primordial solidification of the Moon (or its uppermost layer) resulted in the formation of a variety of rock types that subsequently melted and mixed to produce the compositional diversity observed in the lunar sample suite. The initial rocks to crystallize from this Moon-wide molten layer (the magma ocean) contained olivine and pyroxene and were compositionally less evolved than the plagioclase-rich rocks that followed. The last stage of crystallization, representing the last few per cent of the magma ocean, produced materials that are strongly enriched in incompatible elements including potassium (K), the rare earth elements (REE) and phosphorus (P)--termed KREEP. The decay of radioactive elements in KREEP, such as uranium and thorium, is generally thought to provide the thermal energy necessary for more recent lunar magmatism. The ages of KREEP-rich samples are, however, confined to the earliest periods of lunar magmatism between 3.8 and 4.6 billion years (Gyr) ago, providing no physical evidence that KREEP is directly involved in more recent lunar magmatism. But here we present evidence that KREEP magmatism extended for an additional 1 Gyr, based on analyses of the youngest dated lunar sample.

  14. Geochemistry of igneous rocks from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, northern Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzig, C. T.

    1990-08-01

    Fractional crystallization of basaltic magma, derived from an oceanic affinity source region present beneath the Salton Trough and emplaced into a pull-apart basin of this continental rift regime, produced a tholeiitic suite of hypabyssal rocks consisting of basalt, andesite and dacite within the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, located in northern Baja California, Mexico. Higher light-rare-earth-element abundances for a basalt from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field in comparison to basalts from the Gulf of California and the East Pacific Rise suggest partial assimilation of crustal materials into the parental magmas generated beneath the Salton Trough. The crustal contaminant may be present near the surface today in the form of granitoids of the Peninsular Ranges batholith, at deeper levels as hydrothermally altered materials near the base of the Salton Trough, or may be a relict feature of Tertiary subduction contained within the upper mantle beneath the Salton Trough. The Sr isotopic compositions of dacites from the nearby Cerro Prieto volcano range from 0.7029 to 0.7036, indicating an oceanic affinity source for these rocks. The suite of hypabyssal rocks of tholeiitic affinity present within the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, related by fractional crystallization, link the dacite volcano of Cerro Prieto to gabbroic plutons inferred to exist beneath the Cerro Prieto geothermal field.

  15. Primary colonization and breakdown of igneous rocks by endemic, succulent elephant trees (Pachycormus discolor) of the deserts in Baja California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bashan, Yoav; Vierheilig, Horst; Salazar, Bernardo G; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2006-07-01

    Trees growing in rocks without soil are uncommon. In two arid regions in Baja California, Mexico, field surveys found large numbers of rock-colonizing elephant trees (Pachycormus discolor (Benth.) Coville ex Standl. (Mexican name: copalquin) growing in igneous rocks (granite and basalt) as primary colonizers without the benefit of soil or with a very small amount of soil generated by their own growth. Many adult trees broke large granite boulders and were capable of wedging, growing in, and colonizing rocks and cliffs made of ancient lava flows. This is the first record of a tree species, apart from the previously recorded cacti, capable of primary colonization of rocks and rock rubble in hot deserts. PMID:16583239

  16. Primary colonization and breakdown of igneous rocks by endemic, succulent elephant trees (Pachycormus discolor) of the deserts in Baja California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bashan, Yoav; Vierheilig, Horst; Salazar, Bernardo G; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2006-07-01

    Trees growing in rocks without soil are uncommon. In two arid regions in Baja California, Mexico, field surveys found large numbers of rock-colonizing elephant trees (Pachycormus discolor (Benth.) Coville ex Standl. (Mexican name: copalquin) growing in igneous rocks (granite and basalt) as primary colonizers without the benefit of soil or with a very small amount of soil generated by their own growth. Many adult trees broke large granite boulders and were capable of wedging, growing in, and colonizing rocks and cliffs made of ancient lava flows. This is the first record of a tree species, apart from the previously recorded cacti, capable of primary colonization of rocks and rock rubble in hot deserts.

  17. Spectral reflectance of carbonatites and related alkalic igneous rocks: selected samples from four North American localities.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowan, L.C.; Kingston, M.J.; Crowley, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory spectra in the 0.4-2.5 mu m wavelength range are reported and discussed for 1 cm2 samples of carbonatites and associated rocks from Mountain Pass, California; Oka, Quebec; Iron Hill, Colorado; and Gem Park, Colorado. The carbonatites showed carbonate, iron, and - locally - REE absorption bands. Reflectance measurements are notably sensitive to inherent compositional variations and to the effects of weathering and iron staining, but are useful for detecting high REE contents, and possibly in remote sensing applications, for detecting carbonatite bodies.-G.J.N.

  18. Geochemistry of oceanic igneous rocks - Ridges, islands, and arcs - With emphasis on manganese, scandium, and vanadium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doe, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    A database on a number of elements in oceanic volcanic rocks is presented, including the principal major-element oxides - SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3(T), MnO, MgO, CaO, Na2O, K2O, and P2O5 (where T refers to total iron) - and the trace elements - Ba, Ce, Cr, Cu, Ni, Sc, Sr, V, Pb (mainly by isotope dilution), Yb, Zn, and Zr. Interpretations are given for transition metals, with emphasis on Mn, Sc, and V, in order to determine the concentration of the elements in primitive melts and assess their trends in magmatic differentiation. Transition metals are not enriched in plagioclase, so all are incompatible with pure plagioclase removal - that is, they become enriched in the melt. Both Cr and Ni are known to be highly compatible with olivine separation - i.e., they are depleted in the melt early in differentiation. Also, Sc is compatible with clinopyroxene (Cpx) removal from the melt and is depleted by separation of Cpx. Copper does not fit well in any of the principal silicates, but Cu, like Ni, is greatly enriched in sulfides that may remain in the source or separate from the magma. Decreasing Ni abundances and increasing Cu contents during differentiation are a sign of olivine separation. In the analysis presented herein, V - in the absence of Cpx separation - is found to behave remarkably like the moderately incompatible element Zn, and these two elements add to the list of element pairs of similar incompatibility whose ratios are insensitive to differentiation and to submarine weathering as well. Both are enhanced in titanomagnetite, so both would he compatible during titanomagnetite separation. When Cpx separates, however, V becomes compatible like Sc, but Zn remains incompatible. Thus, decreasing V (and Sc) contents and increasing Zn contents during differentiation are a sign of Cpx separation. Manganese often behaves much like Zn and therefore is moderately incompatible, but Mn is less compatible than Zn and V in titanomagnetite. Thus, decreasing Zn and V with

  19. A detailed paleomagnetic investigation of Cretaceous igneous rocks: New contributions from Colombia and Paraguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapper, Lisa; Calvo-Rathert, Manuel; Cejudo Ruiz, Ruben; Sanchez Bettucci, Leda; Irurzun, Alicia; Carrancho, Ángel; Gogichaishvili, Avto; Morales, Juan; Sinito, Ana; Mejia, Victoria; Nivia Guevara, Alvaro

    2016-04-01

    We present rock magnetic results, paleodirections and -intensities from Cretaceous samples from two locations from South America. On the one hand we report paleomagnetic results from the Western Cordillera of Colombia from 15 sites north of Cali. These volcanic rock samples were related to age determinations from close localities of 92.5 ± 1.1 Ma on average, occuring during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (CNS). On the other hand we show results from an alkaline dike swarm in the Asunción Rift, Eastern Paraguay. Previous investigations suggest that these dikes extruded in a rather short period of 126-127 Ma, during normal and reversed polarity field configuration, right before the onset of the CNS. Rock magnetic measurements of both sites show that the main magnetic component is a low-coercivity mineral, e.g., (titanium)magnetite, with a large range of grain sizes from multi- to single domain, or mixtures of several grain sizes in a sample. For the Colombian site we obtained an average Virtual Geomagnetic Pole (VGP), whose latitude compares well with those for South and North America of Besse and Courtillot (2002) with a similar age. For the determination of the Virtual Dipole Moments (VDMs) the Thellier-Coe method did not give successful results, probably due to minerals in the range of multidomain grain size. Therefore, we applied the multispecimen protocol on ten specimens. Six successful determinations produced an average VDM of 2.3 x 10‑22 Am2. This value is rather low, but in good agreement with other data from the same time period. Directional investigation of the Eastern Paraguayan dike swarm show highly clustered promising results with six out of 22 sites having an α95 ≤ 10.0° . Most of these sites show a reversed polarity; however, one intermediate polarity site has a very reliable direction as well. This and the occurrence of normal polarity sites suggest that the dikes may have not appeared at the same time but rather during the transition from

  20. A detailed paleomagnetic investigation of Cretaceous igneous rocks: New contributions from Colombia and Paraguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapper, Lisa; Calvo-Rathert, Manuel; Cejudo Ruiz, Ruben; Sanchez Bettucci, Leda; Irurzun, Alicia; Carrancho, Ángel; Gogichaishvili, Avto; Morales, Juan; Sinito, Ana; Mejia, Victoria; Nivia Guevara, Alvaro

    2016-04-01

    We present rock magnetic results, paleodirections and -intensities from Cretaceous samples from two locations from South America. On the one hand we report paleomagnetic results from the Western Cordillera of Colombia from 15 sites north of Cali. These volcanic rock samples were related to age determinations from close localities of 92.5 ± 1.1 Ma on average, occuring during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (CNS). On the other hand we show results from an alkaline dike swarm in the Asunción Rift, Eastern Paraguay. Previous investigations suggest that these dikes extruded in a rather short period of 126-127 Ma, during normal and reversed polarity field configuration, right before the onset of the CNS. Rock magnetic measurements of both sites show that the main magnetic component is a low-coercivity mineral, e.g., (titanium)magnetite, with a large range of grain sizes from multi- to single domain, or mixtures of several grain sizes in a sample. For the Colombian site we obtained an average Virtual Geomagnetic Pole (VGP), whose latitude compares well with those for South and North America of Besse and Courtillot (2002) with a similar age. For the determination of the Virtual Dipole Moments (VDMs) the Thellier-Coe method did not give successful results, probably due to minerals in the range of multidomain grain size. Therefore, we applied the multispecimen protocol on ten specimens. Six successful determinations produced an average VDM of 2.3 x 10-22 Am2. This value is rather low, but in good agreement with other data from the same time period. Directional investigation of the Eastern Paraguayan dike swarm show highly clustered promising results with six out of 22 sites having an α95 ≤ 10.0° . Most of these sites show a reversed polarity; however, one intermediate polarity site has a very reliable direction as well. This and the occurrence of normal polarity sites suggest that the dikes may have not appeared at the same time but rather during the transition from

  1. Lead isotope compositions of Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous rocks and sulfide minerals in Arizona: Implications for the sources of plutons and metals in porphyry copper deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouse, R.M.; Ruiz, J.; Titley, S.R.; Tosdal, R.M.; Wooden, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Porphyry copper deposits in Arizona are genetically associated with Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous complexes that consist of older intermediate volcanic rocks and younger intermediate to felsic intrusions. The igneous complexes and their associated porphyry copper deposits were emplaced into an Early Proterozoic basement characterized by different rocks, geologic histories, and isotopic compositions. Lead isotope compositions of the Proterozoic basement rocks define, from northwest to southeast, the Mojave, central Arizona, and southeastern Arizona provinces. Porphyry copper deposits are present in each Pb isotope province. Lead isotope compositions of Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary plutons, together with those of sulfide minerals in porphyry copper deposits and of Proterozoic country rocks, place important constraints on genesis of the magmatic suites and the porphyry copper deposits themselves. The range of age-corrected Pb isotope compositions of plutons in 12 Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous complexes is 206Pb/204Pb = 17.34 to 22.66, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.43 to 15.96, and 208Pb/204Pb = 37.19 to 40.33. These Pb isotope compositions and calculated model Th/U are similar to those of the Proterozoic rocks in which the plutons were emplaced, thereby indicating that Pb in the younger rocks and ore deposits was inherited from the basement rocks and their sources. No Pb isotope differences distinguish Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous complexes that contain large economic porphyry copper deposits from less rich or smaller deposits that have not been considered economic for mining. Lead isotope compositions of Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary plutons and sulfide minerals from 30 metallic mineral districts, furthermore, require that the southeastern Arizona Pb province be divided into two subprovinces. The northern subprovince has generally lower 206Pb/204Pb and higher model Th/U, and the southern subprovince has higher 206Pb/204Pb and

  2. Crystallization studies of lunar igneous rocks: crystal structure of synthetic armalcolite.

    PubMed

    Lind, M D; Housley, R M

    1972-02-01

    Crystals of armalcolite, Mg(0.5)Fe(0.5)Ti(2)O(5), up to several millimeters in length have been grown from a glass initially having the composition of lunar rock 10017. A single-crystal x-ray study has confirmed that the crystals are isomorphous with pseudobrookite and has shown that the cations are strongly ordered, with the Ti(4+) ions occupying the 8f sites and the Fe(2+) and Mg(2+) ions randomly distributed over the 4c sites. An examination of karrooite, MgTi(2)O(5), has revealed a similar distribution of Mg(2+) and Ti(4+) ions. A reexamination of earlier x-ray and Mössbauer data for pseudobrookite, Fe(2)TiO(5), has shown that it is more consistent with this type of ordering than with the inverse structure that has been generally assumed.

  3. Zinc, copper, and lead geochemistry of oceanic igneous rocks - ridges, islands, and arcs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doe, B.R.

    1995-01-01

    Variations in the abundances of Zn, Cu, and Pb are found to be useful in identifying tectonic regimes and separating ocean-island basalts into enriched- and depleted-source categories. The average Zn, Cu, and Pb contents of normal mid-ocean ridge basalts (N-MORB) are 84, 70, and 0.35 ppm, respectively. Differences in average Zn contents for various ridges reflect more the varying degrees of differentiation than variations of Zn content in the source rocks. At a Mg# of 70, or Mg#70, which is taken to represent primitive MORB, many MORB sequences converge at a Zn content of 58??6 ppm, which is close to the value for primitive mantle (50 ppm) and ordinary chondrites (~55 ppm). -from Author

  4. Weathering of Igneous, Metamorphic, and Sedimentary Rocks in a Semi-arid Climate - An Engineering Application of Petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, W. J.; Wendlandt, R. F.

    2003-12-01

    Over the last 10 years, analytical methods have been introduced to students in CSM's undergraduate geological engineering program through a multi-year and multi-course approach. Beginning with principles and simple applications of XRD and SEM in sophomore Mineralogy and building on these skills in subsequent junior and senior year courses, geological engineers acquire proficiency in analytical methods. Essential workplace skills are thus acquired without adding an extra course in the undergraduate program. The following exercise is completed by juniors in an integrated Ig.-Met.-Sed. petrology course. The identification of clay mineral assemblages in soils provides a unique opportunity to demonstrate how basic principles of petrology and geochemistry are applied to engineering design criteria in construction site preparation. Specifically, the problem investigates the conditions leading to the formation of smectite in soils and the resulting construction risk due to soil expansion. Students examine soils developed on igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks near Denver, Colorado. The field locations are areas of suburban growth and several have expansive soil problems. The 2-week exercise includes sample collection, description, and preparation, determining clay mineralogy by XRD, and measurement of Atterberg Plasticity Indices. Teaching materials may be found at: http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/petrology03/. This exercise accomplishes three objectives: First, skills in XRD analysis are developed by introducing students to concepts of particle size separation, particle orientation, and sequential analysis steps which are standard practices in clay characterization. Second, lecture material on the geochemistry of weathering of different rock types is reinforced. Students interpret the origin of clay mineral assemblages developed in soils derived from Precambrian gneisses, lower Paleozoic feldspathic sandstones, upper Paleozoic marine shales, and Tertiary

  5. Epithermal neutron activation, radiometric, correlation and principal component analysis applied to the distribution of major and trace elements in some igneous and metamorphic rocks from Romania.

    PubMed

    Cristache, C I; Duliu, O G; Culicov, O A; Frontasyeva, M V; Ricman, C; Toma, M

    2009-05-01

    Six major (Na, Al, K, Ca, Ti, Fe) and 28 trace (Sc, Cr, V, Mn, Co, Zn, Cu, As, Br, Sr, Rb, Zr, Mo, Sn, Sb, Ba, Cs, La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Sm, Tb, Hf, Ta, W, Th and U) elements were determined by epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) in nine Meridional Carpathian and Macin Mountains samples of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Correlation and principal factor analysis were used to interpret data while natural radionuclides radiometry shows a good correlation with ENAA results.

  6. Crystallization from a vapor phase in igneous rocks -- A conceptual model

    SciTech Connect

    Kleck, W.D. )

    1993-04-01

    Euhedral, late-stage crystals in pocket pegmatite and in vesicles of volcanic rocks are commonly cited as examples of crystallization from a vapor phase. If, however, crystallization takes place only from the cavity forming vapor, that vapor cannot contain sufficient material for the formation of the observed crystals. The approximate amount of H[sub 2]O vapor and percentage of dissolved silicate matter (1) for shallow pocket pegmatite is 0.5 g/cm[sup 3] and 0.3 percent; (2) for vesicles is 0.002 g/cm[sup 3] and [much lt]1 percent. These values show that the silicate matter dissolved in the vapor is insufficient for the formation of the observed crystals. No (or little) recharge of the vapor is an unstated assumption in most discussions of enclosed cavities. This, however, is not quite correct. For a simplified system, four phases will exist in equilibrium: (1) mineral grains growing from liquid, (2) late-stage, H[sub 2]O-enriched, silicate liquid, (3) vapor, (4) crystals growing from vapor. The total system (for transferal of silicate matter) is given. Little silicate matter is dissolved in the vapor at any one time, but it is replenished as the crystals grow. The vapor becomes a continuously resupplied reservoir of dissolved silicate matter; crystallization from the vapor continues until the silicate liquid is depleted.

  7. Anomalous radionuclide content of three altered igneous dikes at Little Rock, Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, J.B. ); Martin, R.C.; Ledger, E.B. )

    1993-02-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy shows anomalous radionuclide contents for two altered alkalic dikes in Little Rock, Arkansas, while a third dike shows normal values. These Cretaceous dikes, locally termed phonolites, are pervasively altered to kaolinite. Samples from the contacts of the two anomalous dikes with the Big Fork Chert show average uranium values of 40 ppm and average thorium values of 22.7 ppm. Samples from the center of the dikes have average values of 30.3 ppm U and 23.1 ppm Th. A third altered dike has average radionuclide values of 11.6 ppm U and 12.8 ppm Th. Leaching experiments with 1N H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] removed only 40% of the uranium while H[sub 2]O removed 12%. The anomalous radionuclide values are due to phases high in uranium located in the volcanic glasses and possible rare earth minerals of the original phonolite. Alteration of the dikes occurred during the Tertiary as warm, tropical groundwaters decomposed the feldspars, feldspathoids, micas, and volcanic glass.

  8. VNIR spectroscopy of rock forming minerals mixtures: a tool to interpret planetary igneous compositions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carli, C.; Serventi, G.; Ciarniello, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Sgavetti, M.

    Visible and Near Infrared (VNIR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique to investigate and map the mineralogical composition of a Solar System body. Laboratory activities, measuring and analyzing minerals and their mixtures, rock powders and slabs, varying the particle and grain sizes, permit to improve the confidence on the spectra.s interpretation. Here we summarized a set of activity on spectral mixtures between plagioclases and mafic materials at 63 125 and 125 250 mu m: illustrating the spectral variations due to the different intensity of the plagioclase absorption varying it Fe2+ content once mixed with orthopyroxene - clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene - olivine poor and - olivine rich materials (Serventi et al., 2013); an IMSA (Hapke, 1993) application to retrieve the endmember.s optical constants and to model the relative mineral abundances in intimate mixtures (Ciarniello et al., 2011) highlighting the influence of the mineral distribu- tions (Carli et al., 2014); a spectra deconvolution with Modified Gaussians (MGM, Sunshine et al., 1990) to define spectral parameters (Band Center, Depth and Width) trends respect to the mineralogical composition of endmembers (mineral chemis- try) and mixtures (mineral abundances). Also discussing the influence of the sizes (Serventi et al., 2015).

  9. Geochemistry of igneous rocks associated with ultramafic-mafic-hosted Cu (Co, Ni, Au) VMS deposits from the Main Uralian Fault (Southern Urals, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimis, Paolo; Omenetto, Paolo; Buschmann, Bernd; Jonas, Peter; Simonov, Vladimir A.

    2010-11-01

    Ultramafic-mafic- and ultramafic-hosted Cu (Co, Ni, Au) volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits from ophiolite complexes of the Main Uralian Fault, Southern Urals, are associated with island arc-type igneous rocks. Trace element analyses show that these rocks are geochemically analogous to Early Devonian boninitic and island arc tholeiitic rocks found at the base of the adjacent Magnitogorsk volcanic arc system, while they are distinguished both from earlier, pre-subduction volcanic rocks and from later volcanic products that were erupted in progressively more internal arc settings. The correlation between the sulfide host-rocks and the earliest volcanic units of the Magnitogorsk arc suggests a connection between VMS formation and infant subduction-driven intraoceanic magmatism.

  10. Effect of bulk chemistry in the spectral variability of igneous rocks in VIS-NIR region: Implications to remote compositional mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Archana M.; Mathew, George

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, a range of igneous rocks with weight percentage of silica ranging from 45% to 70% were used to generate reflectance spectra in the VIS-NIR region. The laboratory generated reflectance spectra of these rocks were used to study the effect of chemical composition and mineralogy on the spectral properties. The characteristic spectral features were evaluated based on the mineralogical and chemical characteristics of the rocks. The main spectral features in the VIS-NIR region are the 0.7 μm absorption band due to the inter valance charge transfer between Fe2+ and Fe3+ termed as Band F, the 1 μm broad absorption band from Fe2+ at the octahedral sites in pyroxene termed as Band I, the 1.9 μm and 2.3 μm narrow absorption bands due to H2O or OH functional group in hydrated minerals. The 2 μm absorption feature (Band II; Cloutis and Gaffey, 1991) is observed as a weak feature in all the mafic rocks. The analysis of Band I with the bulk chemistry and mineralogy, we observed a positive correlation to the bulk Ca abundance. Rocks with high bulk calcic content exemplify Band I as a prominent spectral feature towards longer wavelength. Consequently, basalt, gabbro and anorthositic rocks show Band I as a strong feature. However, rocks with low bulk Calcic content show Band I as weak absorption feature observed towards shorter wavelength. Thus, igneous rocks of alkaline affinity have subdued Band I feature that appears towards shorter wavelength. The analysis of Band F with the bulk chemistry and mineralogy showed a positive correlation to the bulk Fe abundance. The results of the present study have implications towards remote compositional mapping and lithological discrimination for Planetary Studies.

  11. Geochemistry of primary-carbonate bearing K-rich igneous rocks in the Awulale Mountains, western Tianshan: Implications for carbon-recycling in subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wu-Bin; Niu, He-Cai; Shan, Qiang; Chen, Hua-Yong; Hollings, Pete; Li, Ning-Bo; Yan, Shuang; Zartman, Robert E.

    2014-10-01

    Arc magmatism plays an important role in the recycling of subducted carbon and returning it to the surface. However, the transfer mechanisms of carbon are poorly understood. In this study, the contribution of subducted carbonate-rich sediments to the genesis of the carbonate-bearing K-rich igneous rocks from western Tianshan was investigated. Four key triggers are involved, including sediments subduction, slab decarbonation, partial melting and magma segregation. The globular carbonate ocelli show C-O isotope signatures intermediate between oceanic sediments and mantle, suggesting that the carbon of the primary carbonate ocelli was derived from recycled subducted sediments in the mantle. Decarbonation of the subducted slab is regarded as the primary agent to carbonize the mantle wedge. Geochemical features indicate that the carbonate ocelli are primary, and that the parental K- and carbon-rich mafic alkaline magma was derived from partial melting of carbonated mantle wedge veined with phlogopite. Major and trace element compositions indicate that globular carbonate ocelli hosted in the Bugula K-rich igneous rocks are calcio-carbonate and formed primarily by segregation of the differentiated CO2-rich alkaline magma after crystallization fractionation. The K-rich alkaline magma, which formed from partial melting of metasomatized (i.e., phlogopite bearing) mantle wedge in the sub-arc region, is a favorable agent to transport subducted carbon back to the Earth's surface during carbon recycling in subduction zones, because of the high CO2 solubility in alkaline mafic magma. We therefore propose a model for the petrogenesis of the carbonate-bearing K-rich igneous rocks in western Tianshan, which are significant for revealing the mechanism of carbon recycling in subduction zones.

  12. Epithermal neutron activation, radiometric, correlation and principal component analysis applied to the distribution of major and trace elements in some igneous and metamorphic rocks from Romania.

    PubMed

    Cristache, C I; Duliu, O G; Culicov, O A; Frontasyeva, M V; Ricman, C; Toma, M

    2009-05-01

    Six major (Na, Al, K, Ca, Ti, Fe) and 28 trace (Sc, Cr, V, Mn, Co, Zn, Cu, As, Br, Sr, Rb, Zr, Mo, Sn, Sb, Ba, Cs, La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Sm, Tb, Hf, Ta, W, Th and U) elements were determined by epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) in nine Meridional Carpathian and Macin Mountains samples of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Correlation and principal factor analysis were used to interpret data while natural radionuclides radiometry shows a good correlation with ENAA results. PMID:19231213

  13. Subduction history of the Paleo-Pacific plate beneath the Eurasian continent: Evidence from Mesozoic igneous rocks and accretionary complex in NE Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Mesozoic magmatisms in NE China can be subdivided into seven stages, i.e., Late Triassic, Early Jurassic, Middle Jurassic, Late Jurassic, early Early Cretaceous, late Early Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous. Late Triassic magmatisms consist of calc-alkaline igneous rocks in the Erguna Massif, and bimodal igneous rocks in eastern margin of Eurasian continent. The former reveals southward subduction of the Mongol-Okhotsk oceanic plate, the latter reveals an extensional environment (Xu et al., 2013). Early Jurassic magmatisms are composed of calc-alkaline igneous rocks in the eastern margin of the Eurasian continent and the Erguna Massif, revealing westward subduction of the Paleo-pacific plate and southward subduction of the Mongol-Okhotsk oceanic plate (Tang et al., 2015), respectively. Middle Jurassic magmatism only occur in the Great Xing'an Range and the northern margin of the NCC, and consists of adakitic rocks that formed in crustal thickening, reflecting the closure of the Mongol-Okhotsk ocean (Li et al., 2015). Late Jurassic and early Early Cretaceous magmatisms only occur to the west of the Songliao Basin, and consist of trackyandesite and A-type of rhyolites, revealing an extensional environment related to delamination of thickened crust. The late Early Cretaceous magmatisms are widespread in NE China, and consist of calc-alkaline volcanics in eastern margin and bimodal volcanics in intracontinent, revealing westward subduction of the Paleo-pacific plate. Late Cretaceous magmatisms mainly occur to the east of the Songliao Basin, and consist of calc-alkaline volcanics in eastern margin and alkaline basalts in intracontinent (Xu et al., 2013), revealing westward subduction of the Paleo-pacific plate. The Heilongjiang complex with Early Jurassic deformation, together with Jurassic Khabarovsk complex in Russia Far East and Mino-Tamba complex in Japan, reveal Early Jurassic accretionary history. Additionally, the Raohe complex with the age of ca. 169 Ma was

  14. The isotopic composition of lead in potassium feldspars from some 1.0-b.y. old North American igneous rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zartman, R.E.; Wasserburg, G.J.

    1969-01-01

    The isotopic composition of lead and the uranium, thorium and lead concentrations in potassium feldspars are determined for more than 30 1.0-b.y. old North American igneous rocks. Samples representing a broad spectrum in petrographic type and mode of occurrence were chosen; an effort was made to include only rocks having well-documented ages from 950 to 1140 m.y. and showing minimal evidence of subsequent metamorphism. Most samples, including those from extensive terranes of contemporaneous age, have limited lead isotope variations ( Pb206 Pb204 = 16.74-17.38; Pb207 Pb204 = 15.39-15.59; Pb208 Pb204 = 36.38-37.10), which yield model ages close to the radiometric ages. Granite, pegmatite, and rhyolite from within the Grenville province of Canada and age-equivalent rocks of New York, Virginia, Texas, and Colorado and granophyric units associated with the Duluth Gabbro Complex of Minnesota are among the materials yielding this main isotopic spectrum. Several samples were encountered which had isotopic compositions very different from the above group. Lead showing a marked deficiency in radiogenic isotopes was found in two granitic bodies associated with older Labrador Trough rocks from Quebec, in a rapakivi granite from southern Nevada, and in a small granite stock from Mellen, Wisconsin. These occurrences all involve small intrusions of granite which lie near considerably older areas of basement rock. Model ages calculated from the Pb206 Pb204 ratio are older than the age of the intrusions and approach the age of the host basement rock. Several possible interpretations are offered to explain the isotopic behavior encountered in this study. In particular, a "vertically differentiated crust" model is proposed which will account for both the main spectrum and the anomalous lead. The significance of lead isotopic studies in understanding crustal structure in continental regions is discussed. ?? 1969.

  15. Mineral texture based seismic properties of meta-sedimentary and meta-igneous rocks in the orogenic wedge of the Central Scandinavian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almqvist, B. S. G.; Czaplinska, D.; Piazolo, S.

    2015-12-01

    Progress in seismic methods offers the possibility to visualize in ever greater detail the structure and composition of middle to lower continental crust. Ideally, the seismic parameters, including compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave velocities, anisotropy and Vp/Vs-ratio, allow the inference of detailed and quantitative information on the deformation conditions, chemical composition, temperature and the amount and geometry of fluids and melts in the crust. However, such inferences regarding the crust should be calibrated with known mineral and rock physical properties. Seismic properties calculated from the crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) and laboratory measurements on representative core material allow us to quantify the interpretations from seismic data. The challenge of such calibrations lies in the non-unique interpretation of seismic data. A large catalogue of physical rock properties is therefore useful, with as many constraining geophysical parameters as possible (including anisotropy and Vp/Vs ratio). We present new CPO data and modelled seismic properties for amphibolite and greenschist grade rocks representing the orogenic wedge in the Central Scandinavian Caledonides. Samples were collected from outcrops in the field and from a 2.5 km long drill core, which penetrated an amphibolite-grade allochthonous unit composed of meta-sedimentary and meta-igneous rocks, as well as mica and chlorite-rich mylonites. The textural data was acquired using large area electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) maps, and the chemical composition of minerals obtained by energy dispersive x-ray (EDS). Based on the texture data, we compare and evaluate some of the existing methods to calculate texture-based seismic properties of rocks. The suite of samples consists of weakly anisotropic rocks such as felsic gneiss and calc-silicates, and more anisotropic amphibolite, metagabbro, mica-schist. The newly acquired dataset provides a range of seismic properties that

  16. Middle Miocene nepheline-bearing mafic and evolved alkaline igneous rocks at House Mountain, Arizona Transition Zone, north-central Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Wittke, J.; Holm, R.F.; Ranney, W.D.R. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The Middle Miocene House Mountain shield volcano is located on the northern margin of the Arizona Transition Zone, about 7 km SW of Sedona, AZ. Deep erosion has exposed internal structural and stratigraphic relationships of the volcano. Mapping documents two igneous suites: (1) alkali basalt to trachyte and alkali-feldspar syenite, and (2) olivine melanephelinite, nepheline monzodiorite, nepheline monzosyenite and nepheline syenite. The rocks of the first suite occur as dikes and flows, which, with a thick pyroclastic section, are the principal units of the volcano. The melanephelinite is nonvesicular and intruded as a large irregular dike and several smaller dikes. The nepheline-bearing syenitic rocks, which are phaneritic with nepheline and clinopyroxene crystals up to 1 cm in diameter, occur as pods and sheets within the melanephelinite. Also within the melanephelinite are wispy leucocratic segregations, syenitic fracture-fillings, and ocelli. The largest phaneritic sheet is [approx]18 m thick; it displays crude subhorizontal compositional banding and vuggy surfaces. The latter indicate that the magmas were fluid-rich. Compositions intermediate between the melanephelinite and syenitic rocks have not been found. Although the syenitic rocks are coarse-grained, mapping indicates the they are near the summit of the volcano and were probably emplaced at a depth of less than 1 km, possibly of only a few hundred meters. The field relationships of the phaneritic rocks can be explained by ascent and coalescence of immiscible syenitic liquids within the melanephelinite dike. Calculated density contrasts between melanephelinite and syenitic liquids exceed 0.2 g/cm[sup 3].

  17. Primary uranium sources for sedimentary-hosted uranium deposits in NE China: insight from basement igneous rocks of the Erlian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnetti, Christophe; Cuney, Michel; Bourlange, Sylvain; Deloule, Etienne; Poujol, Marc; Liu, Xiaodong; Peng, Yunbiao; Yang, Jianxing

    2016-05-01

    Carboniferous-Permian, Triassic and Jurassic igneous basement rocks around the Erlian Basin in northeast China have been investigated through detailed mineralogical, whole-rock geochemistry, geochronological data and Sm-Nd isotope studies. Carboniferous-Permian biotite granites and volcanic rocks belong to a calc-alkaline association and were emplaced during the Late Carboniferous-Early Permian (313 ± 1-286 ± 2 Ma). These rocks are characterised by positive ɛNd(t) (3.3-5.3) and fairly young T DM model ages (485-726 Ma), suggesting a dominant derivation from partial melting of earlier emplaced juvenile source rocks. Triassic biotite granites belong to a high-K calc-alkaline association and were emplaced during the Middle Triassic (243 ± 3-233 ± 2 Ma). Their negative ɛNd(t) (-2 to -0.1) and higher T DM model ages (703-893 Ma) suggest a contribution from Precambrian crust during the magma generation processes, leading to a strong enrichment in K and incompatible elements such as Th and U. Highly fractionated magmas crystallised in U-rich biotite (up to 21 ppm U) and two-mica granites. In biotite granite, the major U-bearing minerals are uranothorite and allanite. They are strongly metamict and the major part of their uranium (90 %) has been released from the mineral structure and was available for leaching. Mass balance calculations show that the Triassic biotite granites may have, at least, liberated ˜14,000 t U/km3 and thus correspond to a major primary uranium source for the U deposits hosted in the Erlian Basin.

  18. Volcanological and geochemical studies of Cambrian rift-related igneous rocks in the Western Arbuckle Mountains, southern Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschberger, Amy Michelle

    The Carlton Rhyolite Group formed within a major Cambrian rift in southern Oklahoma. The rhyolites are exposed in the Wichita Mountains of southwestern Oklahoma and in the East and West Timbered Hills in the Arbuckle Mountains. My project is the first modern study of the Arbuckle rhyolites. Two thick rhyolite flows are present in the East Timbered Hills and are separated by a lacustrine volcaniclastic sequence. The nearest basement well shows a similar series of rhyolite lavas, but correlation between units in the two areas is not possible. Studies of an igneous breccia in the West Timbered Hills show it to represent a basaltic phreatomagmatic vent complex. The Arbuckle rhyolites have similar A-type geochemical compositions to those in the Wichitas and are divided into four distinct trace element groups. Late diabases in the Arbuckles show geochemical affinities to within-plate tholeiitic to alkaline basalts, similar to those documented in the Wichitas.

  19. Multifractal magnetic susceptibility distribution models of hydrothermally altered rocks in the Needle Creek Igneous Center of the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility was measured for 700 samples of drill core from thirteen drill holes in the porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit of the Stinkingwater mining district in the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming. The magnetic susceptibility measurements, chemical analyses, and alteration class provided a database for study of magnetic susceptibility in these altered rocks. The distribution of the magnetic susceptibilities for all samples is multi-modal, with overlapping peaked distributions for samples in the propylitic and phyllic alteration class, a tail of higher susceptibilities for potassic alteration, and an approximately uniform distribution over a narrow range at the highest susceptibilities for unaltered rocks. Samples from all alteration and mineralization classes show susceptibilities across a wide range of values. Samples with secondary (supergene) alteration due to oxidation or enrichment show lower susceptibilities than primary (hypogene) alteration rock. Observed magnetic susceptibility variations and the monolithological character of the host rock suggest that the variations are due to varying degrees of alteration of blocks of rock between fractures that conducted hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of rock from the fractures inward progressively reduces the bulk magnetic susceptibility of the rock. The model introduced in this paper consists of a simulation of the fracture pattern and a simulation of the alteration of the rock between fractures. A multifractal model generated from multiplicative cascades with unequal ratios produces distributions statistically similar to the observed distributions. The reduction in susceptibility in the altered rocks was modelled as a diffusion process operating on the fracture distribution support. The average magnetic susceptibility was then computed for each block. For the purpose of comparing the model results with observation, the simulated magnetic susceptibilities were then averaged over the same interval as the

  20. On the age of the Onverwacht Group, Swaziland sequence, South Africa. [radioactive dating of stratified igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, B.-M.; Shih, C.-Y.

    1974-01-01

    Some rocks of the Onverwacht Group, South Africa, have been analyzed for Rb and Sr concentrations and Sr isotopic composition. These rocks include volcanic rocks, layered ultramafic differentiates and cherty sediments. Whole rock data indicate that the Rb-Sr isotopic systems in many samples were open and yield no reasonable isochron relationships. However, the data of mineral separates from a basaltic komatiite define a good isochron of 3.50 (plus or minus .2) b.y. with an initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio of 0.70048 plus or minus 5. The orthodox interpretation of this age is the time of the low grade metamorphism. It is reasonable to assume that the age of 3.50 b.y. might also represent the time of initial Onverwacht volcanism and deposition. The initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio obtained above is important to an understanding of the Sr isotopic composition of the Archean upper mantle.

  1. Evaluation of petrogenetic models for intermediate and silicic plutonic rocks from the Sierra de Valle Fértil-La Huerta, Argentina: Petrologic constraints on the origin of igneous rocks in the Ordovician Famatinian-Puna paleoarc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otamendi, J. E.; Pinotti, L. P.; Basei, M. A. S.; Tibaldi, A. M.

    2010-11-01

    The whole Valle Fértil-La Huerta section appears as a calc-alkaline plutonic suite typical of a destructive plate margin. New Sr and Nd isotopic whole-rock data and published whole-rock geochemistry suggest that the less-evolved intermediate (dioritic) rocks can be derived by magmatic differentiation, mainly by hornblende + plagioclase ± Fe-Ti oxide fractional crystallization, from mafic (gabbroic) igneous precursors. Closed-system differentiation, however, cannot produce the typical intermediate (tonalitic) and silicic (granodioritic) plutonic rocks, which requires a preponderant contribution of crustal components. Intermediate and silicic plutonic rocks from Valle Fértil-La Huerta section have formed in a plate subduction setting where the thermal and material input of mantle-derived magmas promoted fusion of fertile metasedimentary rocks and favored mixing of gabbroic or dioritic magmas with crustal granitic melts. Magma mixing is observable in the field and evident in variations of chemical elemental parameters and isotopic ratios, revealing that hybridization coupled with fractionation of magmas took place in the crust. Consideration of the whole-rock geochemical and isotopic data in the context of the Famatinian-Puna magmatic belt as a whole demonstrates that the petrologic model postulated for the Sierra Valle Fértil - La Huerta section has the potential to explain the generation of plutonic and volcanic rocks across the Early Ordovician paleoarc from central and northwestern Argentina. As the petrologic model does not require the intervention of old Precambrian continental crust, the nature of the basement on which thick accretionary turbiditic sequences were deposited remains a puzzling aspect. Discussion in this paper provides insights into the nature of magmatic source rocks and mechanisms of magma generation in Cordilleran-type volcano-plutonic arcs of destructive plate margins.

  2. Geochemical diversity in first rocks examined by the Curiosity Rover in Gale Crater: Evidence for and significance of an alkali and volatile-rich igneous source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Campbell, J. L.; Gellert, R.; Perrett, G. M.; Treiman, A. H.; Blaney, D. L.; Olilla, A.; Calef, F. J.; Edgar, L.; Elliott, B. E.; Grotzinger, J.; Hurowitz, J.; King, P. L.; Minitti, M. E.; Sautter, V.; Stack, K.; Berger, J. A.; Bridges, J. C.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Forni, O.; Leshin, L. A.; Lewis, K. W.; McLennan, S. M.; Ming, D. W.; Newsom, H.; Pradler, I.; Squyres, S. W.; Stolper, E. M.; Thompson, L.; VanBommel, S.; Wiens, R. C.

    2014-01-01

    first four rocks examined by the Mars Science Laboratory Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer indicate that Curiosity landed in a lithologically diverse region of Mars. These rocks, collectively dubbed the Bradbury assemblage, were studied along an eastward traverse (sols 46-102). Compositions range from Na- and Al-rich mugearite Jake_Matijevic to Fe-, Mg-, and Zn-rich alkali-rich basalt/hawaiite Bathurst_Inlet and span nearly the entire range in FeO* and MnO of the data sets from previous Martian missions and Martian meteorites. The Bradbury assemblage is also enriched in K and moderately volatile metals (Zn and Ge). These elements do not correlate with Cl or S, suggesting that they are associated with the rocks themselves and not with salt-rich coatings. Three out of the four Bradbury rocks plot along a line in elemental variation diagrams, suggesting mixing between Al-rich and Fe-rich components. ChemCam analyses give insight to their degree of chemical heterogeneity and grain size. Variations in trace elements detected by ChemCam suggest chemical weathering (Li) and concentration in mineral phases (e.g., Rb and Sr in feldspars). We interpret the Bradbury assemblage to be broadly volcanic and/or volcaniclastic, derived either from near the Gale crater rim and transported by the Peace Vallis fan network, or from a local volcanic source within Gale Crater. High Fe and Fe/Mn in Et_Then likely reflect secondary precipitation of Fe3+ oxides as a cement or rind. The K-rich signature of the Bradbury assemblage, if igneous in origin, may have formed by small degrees of partial melting of metasomatized mantle.

  3. Nature and Significance of Igneous Rocks Cored in the State 2-14 Research Borehole: Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzig, Charles T.; Elders, Wilfred A.

    1988-11-01

    The State 2-14 research borehole of the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project penetrated 3.22 km of Pleistocene to Recent sedimentary rocks in the Salton Sea geothermal system, located in the Salton Trough of southern California and northern Baja California, Mexico. In addition, three intervals of igneous rocks were recovered; a silicic tuff and two sills of altered diabase. The chemical composition of the silicic tuff at 1704 m depth suggests that it is correlative with the Durmid Hill tuff, cropping out 25 km NW of the geothermal system. In turn, both of these tuffs may be deposits of the Bishop Tuff, erupted from the Long Valley caldera of central California at 0.7 Ma. The diabases are similar to basaltic xenoliths found in the nearby Salton Buttes rhyolite domes. These diabase are interpreted as hypabyssal intrusions resulting from magmatism due to rifting of the Salton Trough as part of the East Pacific Rise/Gulf of California transtensional system. The sills apparently intruded an already developed geo-thermal system and were in turn altered by it.

  4. Preliminary AMS Study in Cretaceous Igneous Rocks of Valle Chico Complex, Uruguay: Statistical Determination of Magnetic Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcelona, H.; Mena, M.; Sanchez-Bettucci, L.

    2009-05-01

    The Valle Chico Complex, at southeast Uruguay, is related Paraná-Etendeka Province. The study involved basaltic lavas, quarz-syenites, and rhyolitic and trachytic dikes. Samples were taken from 18 sites and the AMS of 250 specimens was analyzed. The AMS is modeled by a second order tensor K and it graphical representation is a symmetric ellipsoid. The axes relations determine parameters which describe different properties like shape, lineation, and foliation, degree of anisotropy and bulk magnetic susceptibility. Under this perspective, one lava, dike, or igneous body can be considered a mosaic of magnetic susceptibility domains (MSD). The DSM is an area with specific degree of homogeneity in the distribution of parameters values and cinematic conditions. An average tensor would weigh only one MSD, but if the site is a mosaic, subsets of specimens with similar parameters can be created. Hypothesis tests can be used to establish parameter similarities. It would be suitable considered as a MSD the subsets with statistically significant differences in at least one of its means parameters, and therefore, be treated independently. Once defined the MSDs the tensor analysis continues. The basalt-andesitic lavas present MSD with an NNW magnetic foliation, dipping 10. The K1 are sub-horizontal, oriented E-W and reprsent the magmatic flow direction. The quartz-syenites show a variable magnetic fabric or prolate ellipsoids mayor axes dispose parallel to the flow direction (10 to the SSE). Deformed syenites show N300/11 magnetic foliation, consistent with the trend of fractures. The K1 is subvertical. The MSD defined in rhyolitic dikes have magnetic foliations consistent with the structural trend. The trachytic dikes show an important indetermination in the magnetic response. However, a 62/N90 magnetic lineation was defined. The MSDs obtained are consistent with the geological structures and contribute to the knowledge of the tectonic, magmatic and kinematic events.

  5. Single Variable and Multivariate Analysis of Remote Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectra for Prediction of Rb, Sr, Cr, Ba, and V in Igneous Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Clegg, Samuel M; Wiens, Roger C.; Speicher, Elly A; Dyar, Melinda D; Carmosino, Marco L

    2010-12-23

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) will be employed by the ChemCam instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity to obtain UV, VIS, and VNIR atomic emission spectra of surface rocks and soils. LIBS quantitative analysis is complicated by chemical matrix effects related to abundances of neutral and ionized species in the resultant plasma, collisional interactions within plasma, laser-to-sample coupling efficiency, and self-absorption. Atmospheric composition and pressure also influence the intensity of LIBS plasma. These chemical matrix effects influence the ratio of intensity or area of a given emission line to the abundance of the element producing that line. To compensate for these complications, multivariate techniques, specifically partial least-squares regression (PLS), have been utilized to predict major element compositions (>1 wt.% oxide) of rocks, PLS methods regress one or multiple response variables (elemental concentrations) against multiple explanatory variables (intensity at each pixel of the spectrometers). Because PLS utilizes all available explanatory variable and eliminates multicollinearity, it generally performs better than univariate methods for prediction of major elements. However, peaks arising from emissions from trace elements may be masked by peaks of higher intensities from major elements. Thus in PLS regression, wherein a correlation coefficient is determined for each elemental concentration at each spectrometer pixel, trace elements may show high correlation with more intense lines resulting from optical emissions of other elements. This could result in error in predictions of trace element concentrations. Here, results of simple linear regression (SLR) and multivariate PLS-2 regression for determination of trace Rb, Sr, Cr, Ba, and V in igneous rock samples are compared. This study focuses on comparisons using only line intensities rather than peak areas to highlight differences between SLR and PLS.

  6. The Late Cretaceous igneous rocks of Romania (Apuseni Mountains and Banat): the possible role of amphibole versus plagioclase deep fractionation in two different crustal terranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Auwera, Jacqueline; Berza, Tudor; Gesels, Julie; Dupont, Alain

    2016-04-01

    We provide new whole-rock major and trace elements as well as 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd isotopic data of a suite of samples collected in the Late Cretaceous volcanic and plutonic bodies of the Apuseni Mts. (Romania) that belong to the Banatitic Magmatic and Metallogenic Belt, also called the Apuseni-Banat-Timok-Srednogorie belt. The samples define a medium- to high-K calc-alkaline differentiation trend that can be predicted by a three-step fractional crystallization process which probably took place in upper crustal magma chambers. Published experimental data indicate that the parent magma (Mg# = 0.47) of the Apuseni Mts. trend could have been produced by the lower crustal differentiation of a primary (in equilibrium with a mantle source) magma. The Late Cretaceous magmatic rocks of the Apuseni Mts. and Banat display overlapping major and trace element trends except that Sr is slightly lower and Ga is higher in the Apuseni Mts. parent magma. This difference can be accounted for by fractionating plagioclase-bearing (Apuseni Mts.) or amphibole-bearing (Banat) cumulates during the lower crustal differentiation of the primary magma to the composition of the parent magma of both trends. This, together with results obtained on the Late Cretaceous igneous rocks from the Timok area in Eastern Serbia, further suggests variation of the water content of the primary magma along and across the belt. The Apuseni Mts. versus the Banat samples display different isotopic compositions that likely resulted from the assimilation of two distinct crustal contaminants, in agreement with their emplacement in two separate mega-units of Alpine Europe.

  7. Tectonic setting of basic igneous and metaigneous rocks of Borborema Province, Brazil using multi-dimensional geochemical discrimination diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sanjeet K.; Oliveira, Elson P.

    2015-03-01

    Fifteen multi-dimensional diagrams for basic and ultrabasic rocks, based on log-ratio transformations, were used to infer tectonic setting for eight case studies of Borborema Province, NE Brazil. The applications of these diagrams indicated the following results: (1) a mid-ocean ridge setting for Forquilha eclogites (Central Ceará domain) during the Mesoproterozoic; (2) an oceanic plateau setting for Algodões amphibolites (Central Ceará domain) during the Paleoproterozoic; (3) an island arc setting for Brejo Seco amphibolites (Riacho do Pontal belt) during the Proterozoic; (4) an island arc to mid-ocean ridge setting for greenschists of the Monte Orebe Complex (Riacho do Pontal belt) during the Neoproterozoic; (5) within-plate (continental) setting for Vaza Barris domain mafic rocks (Sergipano belt) during the Neoproterozoic; (6) a less precise arc to continental rift for the Gentileza unit metadiorite/gabbro (Sergipano belt) during the Neoproterozoic; (7) an island arc setting for the Novo Gosto unit metabasalts (Sergipano belt) during Neoproterozoic; (8) continental rift setting for Rio Grande do Norte basic rocks during Miocene.

  8. Testing the Mojave-Sonora megashear hypothesis: Evidence from Paleoproterozoic igneous rocks and deformed Mesozoic strata in Sonora, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amato, J.M.; Lawton, T.F.; Mauel, D.J.; Leggett, W.J.; Gonzalez-Leon, C. M.; Farmer, G.L.; Wooden, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    U-Pb ages and Nd isotope values of Proterozoic rocks in Sonora, Mexico, indicate the presence of Caborca-type basement, predicted to lie only south of the Mojave-Sonora mega-shear, 40 km north of the postulated megashear. Granitoids have U-Pb zircon ages of 1763-1737 Ma and 1076 Ma, with ??Nd(t) values from +1.4 to -4.3, typical of the Caborca block. Lower Jurassic strata near the Proterozoic rocks contain large granitic clasts with U-Pb ages and ??Nd(t) values indistinguishable from those of Caborcan basement. Caborca-type basement was thus present at this location north of the megashear by 190 Ma, the depositional age of the Jurassic strata. The Proterozoic rocks are interpreted as parautochthonous, exhumed and juxtaposed against the Mesozoic section by a reverse fault that formed a footwall shortcut across a Jurassic normal fault. Geochronology, isotope geochemistry, and structural geology are therefore inconsistent with Late Jurassic megashear displacement and require either that no major transcurrent structure is present in Sonora or that strike-slip displacement occurred prior to Early Jurassic time. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  9. Petrological, geochemical, and stable isotope constraints on the genesis of the Miocene igneous rocks of Chetaibi and Cap de Fer (NE Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laouar, R.; Boyce, A. J.; Arafa, M.; Ouabadi, A.; Fallick, A. E.

    2005-06-01

    Miocene igneous rocks (diorites, andesites, dacites, rhyolites and microgranites) of Chetaibi and Cap de Fer massif, NE Algeria, are high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic rocks. Fresh diorites have δ 34S and δ 18O values ranging between -2.5‰ and +5.9‰, +6.5‰ and +6.7‰ respectively, indicating a mantle origin. The relatively low δ 34S values (-5.4‰ to -12.2‰) and high δ 18O (+8.3‰ to +9.0‰) of altered diorites indicate the input of a crustal component to the initial magma. The microgranites' I-type signature is indicated by the geochemical data and the δ 34S and δ 18O values of -1.2‰ and -3.6‰, and +7.8‰ to +10.4‰ respectively. The andesites show a large variation of δ 34S, between -33.2‰ and +25.7‰. Massive andesites with δ 34S between +6.8‰ and +7.6‰ preserve a 34S-enriched mantle signature. The δ 34S of the lava flows between +25.7‰ and +25.8‰ are attributed to open system magma degassing, whereas the low δ 34S of two andesitic dyke samples (-13.7‰ and -33.2‰) strongly suggest a crustal sulphur input. High δ 18O (+9.2‰ to +15.7‰) of andesites indicate post-magmatic alteration (mainly silicification); the flyschs with δ 18O between of +13.3‰ and +21.7‰ are most likely the contaminant. Quartz veins within the andesites gave a δ 18O value of +23.0‰ while silica-filling vesicles yielded a value of +13.8‰. Initial Sr-isotope data are rather high for all the rocks (diorites: 0.707-0.708, andesites: 0.707-0.710, and microgranites and rhyolites: 0.717-0.719), and because geochemical and stable isotope data do not indicate a substantial amount of crustal assimilation, an extensive enrichment of the mantle source by subducted sediments is called for. A metasomatized-mantle source, characterized by high radiogenic Sr and relatively high δ 18O, has also been indicated for the genesis of similar Tertiary igneous rocks in the Western Mediterranean basin, e.g. the Volcanic Province of southeasten Spain [Benito, R

  10. Platinum group elements geochemistry of ultramafic and associated rocks from Pindar in Madawara Igneous Complex, Bundelkhand massif, central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaram, V.; Singh, S. P.; Satyanarayanan, M.; Anjaiah, K. V.

    2013-02-01

    Ultramafic rocks comprising dunite, harzburgite, lherzolite, olivine webserite and websterite occur as intrusives in the form of small hillocks at Pindar into the granite-gneisses of Bundelkhand Gneissic Complex (BnGC). The peridotites are dominated by olivine cumulates where chromite and precious metal-bearing sulphides crystallized along with pyroxenes, subsequent to crystallization of olivine into the interstitial spaces of cumulates during cooling. Ultramafic rocks of Pindar are characterized by high MgO (up to 46.0 wt%) and FeO (up to 5.8 wt%); low SiO2 (40.8 to 48.0 wt%), TiO2 (0.2 to 0.5 wt%), Al2O3 (~3.2 wt% av.), CaO (~2.7 wt% av.) and Cu (11 to 73 μg/g). Cr and Ni values range from 2297 to 3150 μg/g and 2434 to 2767 μg/g, respectively. Distribution of Ir (up to 20 ng/g), Ru (27 to 90 ng/g), Rh (3 to 14 ng/g), Pt (18 to 72 ng/g), Pd (10 to 27 ng/g) and Au (22 to 57 ng/g) indicate platinum group element (PGE) and associated gold mineralization in these ultramafic rocks. A mineral phase representing sperrylite (PtAs2) was also identified within the sulphides in scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) studies. The primitive mantle-normalized siderophile elements pattern shows platinum group element PGE (PPGE) enrichment (Rh, Pt, Pd). Discrimination diagrams of Pd/Ir vs. Ni/Cu, Pd/Pt vs. Ni/Cu, Cu/Pd vs. Pd, and Cu vs. Pd for the peridotites of Pindar attribute to affinity towards komatiite magma, derived from high degree of partial melting of prolonged depleted mantle, and the sulphur saturation condition incurred during the crystallization of chromite which was favourable for PGE mineralization.

  11. Deciphering igneous and metamorphic events in high-grade rocks of the Wilmington complex, Delaware: Morphology, cathodoluminescence and backscattered electron zoning, and SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology of zircon and monazite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, J.N.; Schenck, W.S.; Plank, M.O.; Srogi, L.A.; Fanning, C.M.; Kamo, S.L.; Bosbyshell, H.

    2006-01-01

    High-grade rocks of the Wilmington Complex, northern Delaware and adjacent Maryland and Pennsylvania, contain morphologically complex zircons that formed through both igneous and metamorphic processes during the development of an island-arc complex and suturing of the arc to Laurentia. The arc complex has been divided into several members, the protoliths of which include both intrusive and extrusive rocks. Metasedimentary rocks are interlayered with the complex and are believed to be the infrastructure upon which the arc was built. In the Wilmingto n Complex rocks, both igneous and metamorphic zircons occur as elongate and equant forms. Chemical zoning, shown by cathodoluminescence (CL), includes both concentric, oscillatory patterns, indicative of igneous origin, and patchwork and sector patterns, suggestive of metamorphic growth. Metamorphic monazites are chemically homogeneous, or show oscillatory or spotted chemical zoning in backscattered electron images. U-Pb geochronology by sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) was used to date complexly zoned zircon and monazite. All but one member of the Wilmington Complex crystallized in the Ordovician between ca. 475 and 485 Ma; these rocks were intruded by a suite of gabbro-to-granite plutonic rocks at 434 ?? Ma. Detrital zircons in metavolcanic and metasedimentary units were derived predominantly from 0.9 to 1.4 Ga (Grenvillian) basement, presumably of Laurentian origin. Amphibolite to granulite facies metamorphism of the Wilmington Complex, recorded by ages of metamorphic zircon (428 ?? 4 and 432 ?? 6 Ma) and monazite (429 ?? 2 and 426 ?? 3 Ma), occurred contemporaneously with emplacement of the younger plutonic rocks. On the basis of varying CL zoning patterns and external morphologies, metamorphic zircons formed by different processes (presumably controlled by rock chemistry) at slightly different times and temperatures during prograde metamorphism. In addition, at least three other thermal episodes are

  12. Late Paleozoic final closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean in the eastern part of the Xing-Meng Orogenic Belt: Constrains from Carboniferous-Permian (meta-) sedimentary strata and (meta-) igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dapeng; Jin, Ye; Hou, Kejun; Chen, Yuelong; Lu, Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Zircon U-Pb dating and whole-rock geochemical data for Carboniferous-Permian (meta-) sedimentary sequences, igneous rocks, and Precambrian amphibolite in the eastern Xing-Meng Orogenic Belt (XMOB) were used to constrain the final stage evolution and the position of closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean (PAO). Detrital zircons from Late Paleozoic strata range in age from Archean to Late Paleozoic, with major age groups at ~ 1.0-0.7 Ga and ~ 0.5-0.25 Ga in the northern part and at ~ 2.7-2.5 Ga, ~ 2.1-1.8 Ga, and ~ 0.5-0.25 Ga in the southern part of the XMOB. Striking changes in zircon age distribution patterns indicate inputs to these strata were separated by the Paleo-Asian Ocean (PAO) in the Late Paleozoic. The PAO closed along the Solonker-Linxi suture. The Late Paleozoic formation ages (~ 346 Ma, ~ 303 Ma, and ~ 269 Ma) of the igneous rocks with arc-like geochemical features south to the PAO, together with previously published data on the regional igneous rocks and ophiolites, indicate double-side subduction of the PAO in the Late Paleozoic.

  13. Geochronology, geochemistry, and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes of the early Paleozoic igneous rocks in the Duobaoshan area, NE China, and their geological significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guang; Chen, Yuchuan; Sun, Fengyue; Liu, Jun; Wang, Guorui; Xu, Bei

    2015-01-01

    The Duobaoshan area of northwestern Heilongjiang Province is the most important copper resource concentration region in NE China. To date, the Duobaoshan superlarge Cu-Mo deposit and the Tongshan large Cu-Mo deposit have been discovered in the Duobaoshan area. Both the deposits are hosted by granodiorites and volcanic rocks. Zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating indicates that these granodiorites emplaced approximately 479 Ma ago and that those volcanic rocks erupted between 447 and 450 Ma. The early Ordovicain granodiorites belong to the high-K to medium-K calc-alkaline series and are characterized by high Al2O3 and Sr contents, low Yb and Y contents, and relatively low Mg# values and Na2O/K2O ratios, with positive Eu or slight negative Eu anomalies (averaging 1.18). All of these geochemical characters are similar to those of the adakites generated by partial melting of a thickened lower crust in the world. Moreover, the granodiorites have low initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (varying from 0.703474 to 0.704436), very high zircon εHf(t) and whole-rock εNd(t) values (varying from 13.0 to 16.8 and 5.27 to 5.46, respectively), and young zircon Hf and whole-rock Nd single-stage and two-stage model ages. Taking these geochemical characteristics and Sr-Nd-Hf isotope compositions together, we suggest that the early Ordovician granodiorites in the Duobaoshan area occurred in a post-collision environment and were formed by partial melting of a juvenile thickened lower crust dominated by depleted mantle-derived material. These late Ordovician volcanic rocks, which are composed of basalt, basaltic andesite, and andesite, belong to the tholeiitic or calc-alkaline series. They are generally enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs) and depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs; e.g., Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf, P, and Ti), consistent with the geochemistry of igneous rocks from island arcs or active continental margins. Compared with the early Ordovician granodiorites, these volcanic rocks

  14. Age and tectonic setting of subsurface plutonic rocks in south Alabama: Implications for igneous activity along the Alleghanian suture

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, G.M. ); Steltenpohl, M.G. . Dept. of Geology); Heatherington, A.L. . Dept. of Geology); Kunk, M.J. ); Defant, M.S. . Dept. of Geology); Salpas, P.A. )

    1994-03-01

    The proposed Alleghanian suture between ancestral North America and Suwannee terrane Gondwana crust trends east-west beneath coastal plain sediments from South Carolina to Alabama. Three distinct intrusive suites in south Alabama have been examined to determine their possible relationships with the suture. The first suite consists of rhyolite, andesite, andesitic breccia, and granodiorite and forms the stratigraphic base of the Suwannee terrane. Calc-alkaline metaluminous granodiorite yields a whole-rock depleted mantle Nd model age of 1,023 Ma, a U-Pb zircon crystallization age of 625 Ma, and a [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar cooling age (ca. 500 C) of ca. 612 Ma. The second suite comprises felsic granophyre, pyroxenite, and diabase. Metaluminous granophyre follows a calc-alkaline trend with pyroxenite. Trace element ratios (Ta/Yb and Rb/Yb+Ta) indicate a volcanic or syn-collisional arc environment. Biotite separates from granodiorite yield a [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar cooling age (ca. 300 C) of ca. 329 Ma. Pyroxenite and granophyre Nd model ages are 1,062 and 1,090 Ma, respectively. The third suite comprises high-iron quartz-normative tholeiitic diabase, gabbro, and basalt. These rocks have Ta/Yb and Rb/Yb+Ta ratios similar to within plate magmas, and are correlated with the Lower Jurassic North American diabase suite because of geochemical similarities and intrusive contacts with the Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic Newark Group.

  15. Igneous to metamorphic evolution of mafic rocks from a fossile ocean-continent transition (External Liguride ophiolites, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanini, A.; Tribuzio, R.

    2003-04-01

    Remnants of the ocean-continent transition between the Jurassic Ligurian Tethys and the Adria margin are preserved in the External Liguride units (EL) of the Northern Apennine. The EL ophiolites crop out as gravity slide blocks within Late Cretaceous sedimentary mèlanges and sometimes preserve evidence of primary relations with continental crust rocks. These ophiolites mainly consist of subcontinental mantle ultramafics and basaltic rocks. The latter crop out as (i) massive and pillow lavas, locally erupted over slices of Variscan granitoids and covered by radiolarian cherts, (ii) dykes crosscutting mantle peridotites. The basaltic rocks display nearly flat REE pattern and initial eNd of +7.7 to +10.2. These geochemical features can be related to low degree of melting of a depleted asthenospheric mantle in the spinel stability field. The ophiolitic gabbros are rare and occur as small bodies intruding mantle lherzolites or as decametric to hectometric slide-blocks. The latter are crosscut by discordant microgabbro bodies and doleritic dykes. The gabbroic sequence mostly consists of troctolites, olivine-bearing gabbros and Fe-Ti oxide-bearing diorites. Trace element and Nd isotope compositions are consistent with crystallization from N-MORB liquids. Metamorphic evolution started with syn-kinematic crystallization of neoblastic clinopyroxene + plagioclase ± titanian pargasite ± ilmenite ± spinel along granulite-facies ductile shear zones (˜850^oC), followed by widespread development of subgreenschist metamorphic assemblages under static conditions. One of the gabbroic bodies is covered by radiolarian cherts, thus testifying exhumation to ocean-floor, and show an intermediate metamorphic stage under amphibolite-facies conditions (T ˜650^oC). This stage is mainly testified by syn-kinematic growth of plagioclase and Mg-hornblende (± ilmenite) in ductile shear zones, and was accompanied by infiltration of aqueous fluids, probably seawater-derived. The onset of

  16. Low Ni olivine in silica-undersaturated ultrapotassic igneous rocks as evidence for carbonate metasomatism in the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammannati, Edoardo; Jacob, Dorrit E.; Avanzinelli, Riccardo; Foley, Stephen F.; Conticelli, Sandro

    2016-06-01

    Subduction drags a large amount of CO2 into the Earth's interior, which is partly returned to the atmosphere by arc volcanism. Processes involved in the recycling of subducted carbon within the upper mantle are mainly related to mineralogical transformation. Subducted CO2 may dramatically affect the equilibria among peridotitic minerals (olivine vs. pyroxenes) changing their stability fields and hence their modal abundances. This process is accompanied by a subduction-induced change in the budget of some incompatible trace and major elements (e.g., K, Ca, HFSE), whereas it has a minimal effect on the mass balance of compatible elements (e.g., Ni). We report trace elements in olivine in subduction-related mafic alkaline ultrapotassic rocks from Italy, which are used as a proxy to define mantle wedge mineralogy and metasomatic processes. Minor element concentrations, and in particular the high Li and low Ti of all the olivines, confirm a major role for recycled sediment in the generation of Italian ultrapotassic magmas. The distinct contents of Ni, Mn, and Ca in olivine reflect the bimodal character of silica-rich and silica-poor ultrapotassic Italian rocks and constrain two distinct mineralogical reactions between metasomatic agents and peridotite. Olivine chemistry from silica-saturated rocks reflects the reaction of silicate melts with the ambient mantle, with consequent consumption of olivine in favour of orthopyroxene. In contrast, the low-Ni, high-Mn/Fe of olivine crystallised from silica-undersaturated leucitites require a mantle source enriched in olivine (and clinopyroxene) compared to orthopyroxene, as a result of the interaction between the ambient peridotitic mantle and CaCO3-rich metasomatic agents. The change from silica-oversaturated lamproites to silica-undersaturated leucitites and thus the difference in the olivine composition is due to a change in composition of the subducting sediment from pelitic to carbonate-rich. The results of this study

  17. Chemical data and variation diagrams of igneous rocks from the Timber Mountain-Oasis Valley Caldera Complex, southern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinlivan, W.D.; Byers, F.M.

    1977-01-01

    Silica variation diagrams presented here are based on 162 chemical analyses of tuffs, lavas, and intrusives, representative of volcanic centers of the Timber Mountain-Oasis Valley caldera complex and cogenetic rocks of the Silent Canyon ca1dera. Most of the volcanic units sampled are shown on the U.S. Geological Survey geologic map of the Timber Mountain caldera area (I-891) and are described in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 919. Early effusives of the complex, although slightly altered, are probably chemically, and petrographically, more like the calc-alkalic Fraction Tuff (Miocene) of the northern Nellis Air Force Base Bombing and Gunnery Range to the north, whereas effusives of later Miocene age, such as the Paintbrush and Timber Mountain Tuffs, are alkali-calcic.

  18. Stable isotope studies of metasomatic Ca-Fe-Al-Si skarns and associated metamorphic and igneous rocks, Osgood Mountains, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, B.E.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Garnet-pyroxene skarns were formed 90 m.y. B.P. in the Osgood Mountains at or near contacts of grandiorite with calcareous rocks of the Cambrian Preble Formation. The metasomatic replacement followed contact metamorphic recrystallization of the Preble. The sources, temperature, and variation in H2O/CO2 ratios of the metasomatic fluid are interpreted from 269 analyses of oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur isotopes in whole rocks, minerals and inclusion fluids. Skarns formed in three mineralogical stages. Oxygen isotope data indicate that temperatures during the crystallization of garnet, pyroxene and wollastonite (Stage I) were least 550 ?? C, and that the metasomatic fluid had an {Mathematical expression} ??? 0.035 in the massive skarns, and ??? 0.12 in vein skarns up to 3 cm thick. Pore fluids in isotopic equilibrium with garnet in calc-silicate metamorphic rocks, on the other hand, had {Mathematical expression} ??? 0.15. The metasomatic fluids of Stage I were derived primarily from the crystallizing magma. The isotopic composition of magmatic water was ??18O =+9.0, ??D= -30 to -45. Oxygen isotope temperatures of greater than 620 ?? C were determined for the granodiorite. Isotopic and chemical equilibria between mineral surfaces and the metasomatic fluid were approached simultaneously in parts of the skarn several meters or more apart, while isotopic and chemical disequilibria (i.e. zoning) have been preserved between 20 to 40 ??m-thick zones in grandite garnet. More Fe-, or andradite-rich garnet crystallized in more H2O-rich C-O-H fluids ( {Mathematical expression} ??? 0.01) than present with grossularite-rich garnet ( {Mathematical expression}??? 0.035). Stage II was marked by the replacement of garnet and pyroxene by quartz, amphibole, plagioclase, epidote, magnetite, and calcite. Many of the replacement reactions took place over a relatively narrow range in temperature (480-550 ?? C), as indicated by 18O fractionations between quartz and amphibole. Meteoric

  19. Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions of the lower crust beneath northern Tarim: insights from igneous rocks in the Kuluketage area, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Wei, Xun; Xu, Yi-Gang; Long, Xiao-Ping; Shi, Xue-Fa; Zhao, Jian-Xin; Feng, Yue-Xing

    2016-09-01

    The composition of lower crust of the Tarim Craton in NW China is essential to understand the petrogenesis of the ~290-275 Ma Tarim basalts and associated intermediate-felsic rocks. However, it remains poorly constrained because extremely sparse granulite terrains or granulite xenoliths have been found in the Tarim Craton. New trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data are reported for the Neoarchean and Neoproterozoic igneous rocks widely distributed in the northern margin of the Tarim Craton. The Neoarchean granitic gneisses show fractionated REE (rare earth element) patterns [(La/Yb) N = 12-58, YbN = 10.6-36] with pronounced negative Nb-Ta and Ti anomalies. These features, together with negative ɛNdi (-0.7 to -3.2) suggest that they were derived from melting of mafic lower crust. The Neoproterozoic biotite granodiorites are strongly depleted in HREE with (La/Yb) N up to 55. They are characterized by high Sr (671-789 ppm) but very low Y (7.10-8.06 ppm) and Yb contents (0.47-0.58 ppm), showing typical features of adakitic rocks. The samples with different SiO2 contents display identical 87Sr/86Sri (0.7101-0.7103), ɛNdi (-14.1 to -15.7) and Pb isotopes (208Pb/204Pbi = 36.94-37.07). These features together with arc-like trace element patterns suggest that they were derived from melting of thickened lower crust. In comparison, the Neoproterozoic hornblende-biotite granodiorites have similar trace element compositions except for weaker depletion in HREE and have lower 87Sr/86Sri (0.7078) and initial Pb isotopes, and higher ɛNdi (-12.3 to -12.7). This suggests that they were formed by melting of old lower continental crust at a shallower depth than the biotite granodiorites. These rocks were derived from the lower crust, thus providing valuable information on the nature of the lower crust beneath northern Tarim. Combined with published data, the 87Sr/86Sri, ɛNdi, 206Pb/204Pbi and ɛHfi of the northern Tarim lower crust ranges from 0.7055 to 0.7103, from -12 to -17

  20. Talking Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Dale; Corley, Brenda

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the ways that rocks can be used to enhance children's creativity and their interest in science. Suggests the creation of a dramatic production involving rocks. Includes basic information on sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks. (TW)

  1. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of hypabyssal igneous rocks in the Maranon Basin of Peru - A record of thermal history, structure, and alteration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prueher, L.M.; Erlich, R.; Snee, L.W.

    2005-01-01

    Hypabyssal andesites and dacites from the Balsapuerto Dome in the Mara?on Basin of Peru record the thermal, tectonic, and alteration history of the area. The Mara?on Basin is one of 19 sub-Andean foreland basins. The hypabyssal rocks in the Balsapuerto Dome are one of four known occurrences of subvolcanic rocks along the deformation front in Peru. This dome is a potential petroleum structural trap. Petroleum seeps near the dome indicate that a source for the petroleum is present, but the extent and amount of petroleum development is unknown. The Balsapuerto hypabyssal rocks are plagioclase-, hornblende-, pyroxene-phyric andesites to dacites. Some parts of the dome are pervasively altered to a hydrothermal assemblage of quartz-sericite-pyrite. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology shows that thermal activity related to emplacement of these subvolcanic rocks took place between 12-10 Ma, subsequent to the major periods of Andean folding and faulting, previously assumed to have occurred about 9 Ma. Eleven argon mineral age-spectrum analyses were completed. Argon apparent ages on amphibole range from 12.7 to 11.6 Ma, and the age spectra are simple, which indicates that the ages are very close to emplacement ages. Potassium feldspar yields an argon age spectrum ranging in age from 12.5 to 11.4 Ma, reflecting the period during which the potassium feldspar closed to argon diffusion between the temperature range of 350?C to about 150?C; thus the potassium feldspar age spectrum reflects a cooling profile throughout this temperature range. This age range is consistent with ages of emplacement for the entire igneous complex indicating that an increased thermal state existed in the area for at least 1.0 m.y. Combined with the coexisting hornblende age, this rock cooled from ~580?C to ~150?C in ~1.2 m.y. resulting in an average cooling rate of 358?C /m.y. White mica, or sericite, formed as a later alteration phase associated with quartz- sericite- pyrite and propylitic alteration in some

  2. Acid-neutralizing potential of minerals in intrusive rocks of the Boulder batholith in northern Jefferson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Desborough, George A.; Briggs, Paul H.; Mazza, Nilah; Driscoll, Rhonda

    1998-01-01

    Experimental studies show that fresh granitic rocks of the Boulder batholith in the Boulder River headwaters near Basin, Montana have significant acid-neutralizing potential and are capable of neutralizing acidic water derived from metal-mining related wastes or mine workings. Laboratory studies show that in addition to the acidneutralizing potential (ANP) of minor amounts of calcite in these rocks, biotite, tremolite, and feldspars will contribute significantly to long-term ANP. We produced 0.45 micrometer-filtered acidic (pH = 2.95) leachate for use in these ANP experiments by exposing metal-mining related wastes to deionized water in a waste:leachate ratio of 1:20. We then exposed these leachates to finely-ground and sized fractions of batholith rocks, and some of their mineral fractions for extended and repeated periods, for which results are reported here. The intent was to understand what reactions of metal-rich acidic water and fresh igneous rocks would produce. The reactions between the acidic leachates and the bulk rocks and mineral fractions are complex. Factors such as precipitation of phases like Fe-hydroxides and Alhydroxides and the balance between dissolved cations and anions that are sulfate dominated complicate analysis of the results. Research by others of acid neutralization by biotite and tremolite attributed a rise in pH to proton (H+) adsorption in sites vacated by K, Mg, and Ca. Destruction of the silicate framework and liberation of associated structural hydroxyl ions may contribute to ANP. Studies by others have indicated that the conversion of biotite to a vermiculite-type structure by removal of K at a pH of 4 consumes about six protons for every mole of biotite, but at a pH of 3 there is pronounced dissolution of the tetrahedral lattice. The ANP of fresh granitic rocks is much higher than anticipated. The three bulk Boulder igneous rock samples studied have minimum ANP equivalent to about 10-14 weight percent calcite. This ANP is in

  3. Chemical composition of igneous rocks expressed by means of diagrams, with reference to rock classification on a quantitative chemico-mineralogical basis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iddings, J.P.

    1903-01-01

    The value of graphical methods for expressing relative quantities has been well established in all kinds of statistical exposition and discussion. Their use in conveying definite conceptions of relative quantities of chemical and mineral components of rocks is becoming more and more frequent, and the value of the results in some cases can not be overestimated. This is especially true when a series or group of rocks is being considered. The intricate variations in the amounts of numerous mineral components, or of chemical components, baffle most attempts to comprehend their interrelationships by simple contemplation or by study of the numbers in which they may be expressed. Many facts and relations are overlooked which arc readily observed when diagrams are used to represent numerical figures. Moreover, visual memory is sufficiently developed in most persons to enable them to carry in mind simple geometrical forms, where it does not permit them to recollect manifold assemblages of oft-repeated numbers. Mental impressions of simple diagrams are, therefore, more definite and lasting and enable the student to store up a much greater amount of quantitative data than he could otherwise acquire.

  4. Carbonate- and silicate-rich globules in the kimberlitic rocks of northwestern Tarim large igneous province, NW China: Evidence for carbonated mantle source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhiguo; Zhang, Zhaochong; Santosh, M.; Hou, Tong; Zhang, Dongyang

    2014-12-01

    We report carbonate- and silicate-rich globules and andradite from the Wajilitage kimberlitic rocks in the northwestern Tarim large igneous province, NW China. The carbonate-rich globules vary in size from 1 to 3 mm, and most have ellipsoidal or round shape, and are composed of nearly pure calcite. The silicate-rich globules are elliptical to round in shape and are typically larger than the carbonate-rich globules ranging from 2 to several centimeters in diameter. They are characterized by clear reaction rims and contain several silicate minerals such as garnet, diopside and phlogopite. The silicate-rich globules, reported here for the first time, are suggested to be related to the origin of andradite within the kimberlitic rocks. Our results show that calcite in the carbonate-rich globules has a high XCa (>0.97) and is characterized by extremely high concentrations of the total rare earth elements (up to 1500 ppm), enrichment in Sr (8521-10,645 ppm) and LREE, and remarkable depletion in Nd, Ta, Zr, Hf and Ti. The calcite in the silicate-rich globules is geochemically similar to those in the carbonate-rich globules except the lower trace element contents. Garnet is dominantly andradite (And59.56-92.32Grs5.67-36.03Pyr0.36-4.61Spe0-0.33) and is enriched in light rare earth elements (LREEs) and relatively depleted in Rb, Ba, Th, Pb, Sr, Zr and Hf. Phlogopite in the silicate-rich globules has a high Mg# ranging from 0.93 to 0.97. The composition of the diopside is Wo45.82-51.39En39.81-49.09Fs0.88-0.95 with a high Mg# ranging from 0.88 to 0.95. Diopside in the silicate-rich globules has low total rare earth element (REE) contents (14-31 ppm) and shows middle REE- (Eu to Gd), slight light REE- and heavy REE-enrichment with elevated Zr, Hf and Sr contents and a negative Nb anomaly in the normalized diagram. The matrix of the kimberlitic rocks are silica undersaturated (27.92-29.31 wt.% SiO2) with low Al2O3 (4.51-5.15 wt.%) and high CaO (17.29-17.77 wt.%) contents. The

  5. Lignor process for acidic rock drainage treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, J M; Walsh, T

    2004-09-01

    The process using lignosulfonates for acidic rock drainage (ARD) treatment is referred to as the Lignor process. Lignosulfonates are waste by-products produced in the sulfite pulping process. The present study has shown lignosulfonates are able to protect lime from developing an external surface coating, and hence to favor its dissociation. Further, the addition of lignosulfonates to ARD solutions increased the dotting and settling rate of the formed sludge. The capability of lignosulfonates to form stable metal-lignin complexes makes them very useful in retaining metal ions and thus improving the long-term stability of the sludge against leaching. The Lignor process involves metal sorption with lignosulfonates, ARD neutralization by lime to about pH 7, pH adjustment with caustic soda to 9.4 - 9.6, air oxidation to lower the pH to a desired level, and addition of a minimum amount of FeCl3 for further removal of dissolved metals. The Lignor process removes all concerned metals (especially Al and Mn) from the ARD of the Britannia Mine (located at Britannia Beach, British Columbia, Canada) to a level lower than the limits of the B.C. Regulations. Compared with the high-density sludge (HDS) process, the Lignor process has many advantages, such as considerable savings in lime consumption, greatly reduced sludge volume, and improved sludge stability. PMID:15515269

  6. Acid rock drainage and climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, D.K.

    2009-01-01

    Rainfall events cause both increases and decreases in acid and metals concentrations and their loadings from mine wastes, and unmined mineralized areas, into receiving streams based on data from 3 mines sites in the United States and other sites outside the US. Gradual increases in concentrations occur during long dry spells and sudden large increases are observed during the rising limb of the discharge following dry spells (first flush). By the time the discharge peak has occurred, concentrations are usually decreased, often to levels below those of pre-storm conditions and then they slowly rise again during the next dry spell. These dynamic changes in concentrations and loadings are related to the dissolution of soluble salts and the flushing out of waters that were concentrated by evaporation. The underlying processes, pyrite oxidation and host rock dissolution, do not end until the pyrite is fully weathered, which can take hundreds to thousands of years. These observations can be generalized to predict future conditions caused by droughts related to El Ni??o and climate change associated with global warming. Already, the time period for dry summers is lengthening in the western US and rainstorms are further apart and more intense when they happen. Consequently, flushing of inactive or active mine sites and mineralized but unmined sites will cause larger sudden increases in concentrations that will be an ever increasing danger to aquatic life with climate change. Higher average concentrations will be observed during longer low-flow periods. Remediation efforts will have to increase the capacity of engineered designs to deal with more extreme conditions, not average conditions of previous years.

  7. Partitioning of lanthanides and Y between immiscible silicate and fluoride melts, fluorite and cryolite and the origin of the lanthanide tetrad effect in igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, Ilya V.; Dorfman, Alexander M.; Kamenetsky, Maya; Dulski, Peter; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2005-06-01

    us to study fluorite-melt and cryolite-melt REE partitioning. REE concentrations in fluorite are high and comparable to those in the fluoride melt. However, fluorite-melt partition coefficients appear to depend mostly on ionic radii and show neither significant tetrad anomalies, nor differences in Y and Ho partitioning. In contrast, REE concentrations in cryolite are low (˜5-10 times lower than in the silicate melt), and cryolite-melt REE partitioning shows very strong tetrad and Y-Ho anomalies. Our results imply that Y-Ho and lanthanide tetrad anomalies are likely to be caused mainly by aluminofluoride complexes, and the tetrad REE patterns in natural igneous rocks can result from fractionation of F-rich magmatic fluids.

  8. A multi-isotope approach to understanding the evolution of Cenozoic magmatism in the northeastern Basin and Range: Results from igneous rocks in the Albion-Raft River-Grouse Creek metamorphic core complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinou, A.; Strickland, A.; Miller, E. L.

    2012-12-01

    Deep crustal rocks exposed by extensional processes in metamorphic core complexes provide a unique opportunity to address the magmatic and isotopic evolution of the crust and assess the relative crust versus mantle contributions in Cenozoic igneous rocks exposed in the complexes. The Albion-Raft River-Grouse Creek metamorphic core complex exposes mid-crustal rocks that resided at depths of ~15-20 km before the onset of Cenozoic extension. Three major Cenozoic magmatic events are represented in the complex and have been studied using multiple isotopic systems (whole rock Sr and Nd coupled with the Oxygen isotopes in zircon). These three major events are: (1) 42-31 Ma intrusion of a composite plutonic complex of calc-alkaline composition that intrudes both upper crustal rocks (~5-10 km depth) and deeper rocks. (2) A 32-25 Ma plutonic complex, with evolved calc-alkaline composition that intruded in the middle crust (~12-15 km depth), and (3) A 10-8 Ma bimodal (basalt-rhyolite) suite of volcanic rocks that contain high-T anhydrous mineral assemblages erupted across the complex. The pre-extensional crust consisted of an upper crust composed primarily of Neoproterozoic through Triassic metasedimentary rocks (schist and quartzite at its base and limestone at its top). The middle crust consists of late Archean orthogneiss with evolved composition (metamorphosed peraluminous granite) with average 87Sr/86Sr40~0.800, ɛNd40~ -43.4 and δ18Ozirc ~5.7‰. The lower crust is inferred to have been composed of Precambrian intermediate composition igneous rocks with average 87Sr/86Sr40~0.750, ɛNd40~ -37.5 and δ18Ozirc ~5.9‰, and Precambrian mafic rocks with average 87Sr/86Sr40~0.717, ɛNd40~ -25 and δ18Ozirc ~7.0‰. Existing and new data indicate that the 42-31 Ma upper crustal plutonic complex ranges in isotopic composition from 87Sr/86Sri=0.709-0.712, ɛNdi=-15 to -25 and δ18Ozirc 4.7-6.5‰. The composition of the 32-25 Ma middle crustal plutonic complex ranges from 87Sr

  9. Fifteen new discriminant-function-based multi-dimensional robust diagrams for acid rocks and their application to Precambrian rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Surendra P.; Pandarinath, Kailasa; Verma, Sanjeet K.; Agrawal, Salil

    2013-05-01

    For the discrimination of four tectonic settings of island arc, continental arc, within-plate (continental rift and ocean island together), and collision, we present three sets of new diagrams obtained from linear discriminant analysis of natural logarithm transformed ratios of major elements, immobile major and trace elements, and immobile trace elements in acid magmas. The use of discordant outlier-free samples prior to linear discriminant analysis had improved the success rates by about 3% on the average. Success rates of these new diagrams were acceptably high (about 69% to 97% for the first set, about 69% to 99% for the second set, and about 60% to 96% for the third set). Testing of these diagrams for acid rock samples (not used for constructing them) from known tectonic settings confirmed their overall good performance. Application of these new diagrams to Precambrian case studies provided the following generally consistent results: a continental arc setting for the Caribou greenstone belt (Canada) at about 3000 Ma, São Francisco craton (Brazil) at about 3085-2983 Ma, Penakacherla greenstone terrane (Dharwar craton, India) at about 2700 Ma, and Adola (Ethiopia) at about 885-765 Ma; a transitional continental arc to collision setting for the Rio Maria terrane (Brazil) at about 2870 Ma and Eastern felsic volcanic terrain (India) at about 2700 Ma; a collision setting for the Kolar suture zone (India) at about 2610 Ma and Korpo area (Finland) at about 1852 Ma; and a within-plate (likely a continental rift) setting for Malani igneous suite (India) at about 745-700 Ma. These applications suggest utility of the new discrimination diagrams for all four tectonic settings. In fact, all three sets of diagrams were shown to be robust against post-emplacement compositional changes caused by analytical errors, element mobility related to low or high temperature alteration, or Fe-oxidation caused by weathering.

  10. PASSIVE TREATMENT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE FROM A SUBSURFACE MINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acidic, metal-contaminated drainages are a critical problem facing many areas of the world. Acid rock drainage results when metal sulfide minerals, particularly pyrite, are oxidized by exposure to oxygen and water. The deleterious effects of these drainages on receiving streams a...

  11. Igneous Graphite in Enstatite Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    1997-01-01

    Igneous graphite. a rare constituent in terrestrial mafic and ultramafic rocks. occurs in three EH and one EL enstatite chondrite impact-melt breccias as 2-150 Ilm long euhedrallaths. some with pyramidal terminations. In contrast. graphite in most enstatite chondrites exsolved from metallic Fe-Ni as polygonal. rounded or irregular aggregates. Literature data for five EH chondrites on C combusting at high temperatures show that Abee contains the most homogeneous C isotopes (i.e. delta(sup 13)C = -8.1+/-2.1%); in addition. Abee's mean delta(sup l3)C value is the same as the average high-temperature C value for the set of five EH chondrites. This suggests that Abee scavenged C from a plurality of sources on its parent body and homogenized the C during a large-scale melting event. Whereas igneous graphite in terrestrial rocks typically forms at relatively high pressure and only moderately low oxygen fugacity (e.g., approx. 5 kbar. logfO2, approx. -10 at 1200 C ). igneous graphite in asteroidal meteorites formed at much lower pressures and oxygen fugacities.

  12. Zircon U-Pb dating, geochemistry and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopes of the Wajilitag alkali mafic dikes, and associated diorite and syenitic rocks: Implications for magmatic evolution of the Tarim large igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Si-Yuan; Li, Zi-Long; Song, Biao; Ernst, Richard E.; Li, Yin-Qi; Ren, Zhong-Yuan; Yang, Shu-Feng; Chen, Han-Lin; Xu, Yi-Gang; Song, Xie-Yan

    2015-01-01

    The Early Permian Tarim large igneous province (Tarim LIP) consists mainly of basaltic lavas, mafic-ultramafic intrusions including dikes and, syenite bodies in the Tarim Basin, NW China. A major unit of the Tarim LIP, the Wajilitag intrusive complex, consists of olivine pyroxenite, clinopyroxenite and gabbro units (from bottom to top), diorite and syenite rocks occurred in the upper part of the complex and alkali mafic dikes intrude the clinopyroxenite phase. Here we report the zircon U-Pb age and Hf isotopes, geochemical characteristics and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data of the alkali mafic dikes, and diorite, aegirine-nepheline syenite and syenite porphyry units in the Wajilitag intrusive complex. Zircons from the diorite and alkali mafic rocks yield concordant crystallization ages of 275.2 ± 1.2 Ma and 281.4 ± 1.7 Ma, respectively. The diorite and syenitic rocks in Wajilitag area have a narrow range of SiO2 contents (51.9-57.3 wt.%), and are enriched in total alkalis (Na2O + K2O = 8.3-14.3 wt.%), among which the aegirine-nepheline syenite and syenite porphyry have the geochemical affinity of A-type granites. The alkali mafic rocks and syenitic rocks have high Al2O3 (19.4-21.1 wt.%), Zr, Hf, Ba contents, total rare earth element abundances and LREE/HREE ratios and low Mg# value, K, P and Ti contents. Diorites have lower Al2O3 contents, total REE abundances and LREE/HREE ratios and higher Mg# values than the alkali mafic rocks and syenitic rocks. The diorites and syenitic rocks have low initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7034-0.7046), and high εNd(t) values (0.1-4.1) and zircon εHf(t) values (- 0.9-4.4). All the diorites and syenitic rocks show the 206Pb/204Pb ratios ranging of 18.0-19.5, 207Pb/204Pb of 15.4-15.6 and 208Pb/204Pb of 38.0-39.9. Sr-Nd isotopic ratios indicate a FOZO-like mantle source for the diorite and syenitic rocks, similar to that of the mafic-ultramafic rocks in the Wajilitag complex. In contrast, zircon Hf isotopes of basalt and syenite elsewhere in the

  13. Early-Middle Paleozoic subduction-collision history of the south-eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt: Evidence from igneous and metasedimentary rocks of central Jilin Province, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Fu-Ping; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Cao, Hua-Hua; Xu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Zi-Jin; Wang, Feng; Yang, Chuan

    2016-09-01

    To constrain the Early-Middle Paleozoic tectonic evolution of the south-eastern segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), we undertook zircon U-Pb dating and analyzed major and trace elements and zircon Hf isotope compositions of Late Cambrian to Middle Devonian igneous and metasedimentary rocks in central Jilin Province, NE China. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating indicates that the Early-Middle Paleozoic magmatism in central Jilin Province can be divided into four episodes: Late Cambrian (ca. 493 Ma), Middle Ordovician (ca. 467 Ma), Late Ordovician-Early Silurian (ca. 443 Ma), and Late Silurian-Middle Devonian (425-396 Ma). The progression from subduction initiation to maturity is recorded by Late Cambrian low-K tholeiitic meta-diabase, Middle Ordovician medium-K calc-alkaline pyroxene andesite, and Late Ordovician to Early Silurian low-K tonalite, which all have subduction-related characteristics and formed in an evolving supra-subduction zone setting. Late Silurian to Middle Devonian calc-alkaline igneous rocks, with the lithological association of granodiorite, monzogranite, rhyolite, dacite, and trachydacite, show progressively increasing K2O contents from medium K to shoshonite series. Furthermore, the Early-Middle Devonian monzogranites are characterized by high K2O, Sr/Y, and [La/Yb]N values, indicating they were generated by the melting of thickened lower crust. These results suggest a transition from subduction to post-orogenic setting during the Late Silurian-Middle Devonian. Our interpretation is supported by the maximum age of molasse deposition in the Zhangjiatun member of the Xibiehe Formation. Overall, we suggest that Late Cambrian tholeiitic meta-diabase, Middle Ordovician pyroxene andesite, and Late Ordovician-Early Silurian tonalite formed above the northward-subducting and simultaneously seaward-retreating of Paleo-Asian Ocean plate. Subsequently, the northern arc collided with the North China Craton and post-orogenic extension occurred

  14. Polymerization on the rocks: beta-amino acids and arginine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the accumulation of long oligomers of beta-amino acids on the surface of minerals using the 'polymerization on the rocks' protocol. We find that long oligopeptides of beta-glutamic acid which cannot be formed in homogeneous aqueous solution are accumulated efficiently on the surface of hydroxylapatite using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as condensing agent. The EDAC-induced oligomerization of aspartic acid on hydroxylapatite proceeds even more efficiently. Hydroxylapatite can also facilitate the ligation of the tripeptide (glu)3. The 'polymerization on the rocks' scenario is not restricted to negatively-charged amino acids. Oligoarginines are accumulated on the surface of illite using carbonyldiimidizole (CDI) as condensing agent. We find that FeS2 catalyzes the CDI-induced oligomerization of arginine, although it does not adsorb oligoarginines. These results are relevant to the formation of polypeptides on the primitive earth.

  15. Evolution of the Mazatzal province and the timing of the Mazatzal orogeny: Insights from U-Pb geochronology and geochemistry of igneous and metasedimentary rocks in southern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amato, J.M.; Boullion, A.O.; Serna, A.M.; Sanders, A.E.; Farmer, G.L.; Gehrels, G.E.; Wooden, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    New U-Pb zircon ages, geochemistry, and Nd isotopic data are presented from three localities in the Paleoproterozoic Mazatzal province of southern New Mexico, United States. These data help in understanding the source regions and tectonic setting of magmatism from 1680 to 1620 Ma, the timing of the Mazatzal orogeny, the nature of postorogenic maginatism, Proterozoic plate tectonics, and provide a link between Mazatzal subblocks in Arizona and northern New Mexico. The data indicate a period from 1680 to 1650 Ma in which juvenile felsic granitoids were formed, and a later event between 1646 and 1633 Ma, when these rocks were deformed together with sedimentary rocks. No evidence of pre-1680 Ma rocks or inherited zircons was observed. The igneous rocks have ENd(t) from -1.2 to +4.3 with most between +2 and +4, suggesting a mantle source or derivation from similar-aged crust. Nd isotope and trace element concentrations are consistent with models for typical are magmatism. Detrital zircon ages from metasedimentary rocks indicate that sedimentation occurred until at least 1646 Ma. Both local and Yavapai province sources contributed to the detritus. All of the samples older than ca. 1650 Ma are deformed, whereas undeformed porphyroblasts were found in the contact aureole of a previously dated 1633 Ma gabbro. Regionally, the Mlazatzal orogeny occurred mainly between 1654 and 1643 Ma, during final accretion of a series of island arcs and intervening basins that may have amalgamated offshore. Rhyolite magmatism in the southern Mazatzal province was coeval with gabbro intrusions at 1633 Ma and this bimodal magmatism may have been related to extensional processes following arc accretion. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  16. Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopic compositions of a suite of Large Archean, igneous rocks, eastern Beartooth Mountains - Implications for crust-mantle evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, J. L.; Mueller, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Compositionally diverse Late Archean rocks (2.74-2.79 Ga old) from the eastern Beartooth Mountains (Montana and Wyoming) were studied and shown to have the same initial Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopic ratios. Lead and Sr initial ratios are higher and Nd initial values lower than predicted for rocks derived from model mantle sources and strongly indicate the involvement of an older crustal reservoir in the genesis of these rocks. A model involving subduction of continental detritus and contamination of the overlying mantle is suggested.

  17. Zircon U-Pb age and Sr-Nd-Hf-O isotope geochemistry of the Paleocene-Eocene igneous rocks in western Gangdese: Evidence for the timing of Neo-Tethyan slab breakoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Richards, Jeremy P.; Hou, Zeng-qian; An, Fang; Creaser, Robert A.

    2015-05-01

    Northward Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere subduction beneath southern Tibet in the Mesozoic-Early Cenozoic produced continental arc magmas in the ~ 1600 km-long Gangdese belt. The most voluminous magmatism occurred in the Paleocene-Eocene, and is characterized by extensive I-type calc-alkaline to high-K calc-alkaline Linzizong volcanic rocks, and coeval plutons. These rocks have been extensively studied in the eastern Gangdese belt (east of ∼ 89°E), but few data exist from the western Gangdese belt. New data for eleven samples of these rocks, combined with existing data from the literature, show that they are similar to the eastern Gangdese belt rocks, with relative depletions in Nb, Ta, P, and Ti, and enrichments in Rb, Ba, Th, U, K, Pb, Zr, and Hf on a primitive mantle-normalized trace element diagrams, typical of continental arc-related igneous rocks. However, compared to the east, western Gangdese igneous rocks range to higher K2O contents (up to 6.1 wt.%), higher (87Sr/86Sr)i ratios (up to 0.7151), and lower εNdi values (down to - 8.1), suggesting that an evolved crustal source was involved in arc magmatism. The Gangdese arc magmatism lasted to ~ 80 Ma, and has a gap or quiescent period afterwards. Starting at ~ 69 Ma, the arc magmatism initiated and shifted southward from ~ 30.5°N to ~ 29.5°N in southern Tibet with an abrupt change of India-Asia convergence rate. The magmas through the whole Gangdese belt at ~ 69-53 Ma are characterized by intermediate εNdi values (- 0.6 to + 4.0), positive εHfi values (+ 3.8 to + 7.1), intermediate δ18O values (+ 5.0‰ to + 6.5‰), and low Th/Y and La/Yb ratios (< 20). These magmas were likely derived from the mantle with crustal contamination by MASH process in response to Neo-Tethyan slab rollback as proposed by previous studies. The Sr-Nd-Hf-O isotopic compositions of Linzizong volcanic rocks and coeval intrusions are relatively homogeneous during ~ 69-53 Ma, but show a wide range at ~ 53-50 Ma. Zircon

  18. Sulfur Reduction in Acid Rock Drainage Environments.

    PubMed

    Florentino, Anna P; Weijma, Jan; Stams, Alfons J M; Sánchez-Andrea, Irene

    2015-10-01

    Microbiological suitability of acidophilic sulfur reduction for metal recovery was explored by enriching sulfur reducers from acidic sediments at low pH (from 2 to 5) with hydrogen, glycerol, methanol and acetate as electron donors at 30 °C. The highest levels of sulfide in the enrichments were detected at pH 3 with hydrogen and pH 4 with acetate. Cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene showed dominance of the deltaproteobacterial sulfur-reducing genus Desulfurella in all the enrichments and subsequently an acidophilic strain (TR1) was isolated. Strain TR1 grew at a broad range of pH (3-7) and temperature (20-50 °C) and showed good metal tolerance (Pb(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+)), especially for Ni(2+) and Pb(2+), with maximal tolerated concentrations of 0.09 and 0.03 mM, respectively. Different sources of sulfur were tested in the enrichments, from which biosulfur showed fastest growth (doubling time of 1.9 days), followed by colloidal, chemical and sublimated sulfur (doubling times of 2.2, 2.5, and 3.6 days, respectively). Strain TR1's physiological traits make it a good candidate to cope with low pH and high metal concentration in biotechnological processes for treatment of metal-laden acidic streams at low and moderately high temperature.

  19. Three-dimensional distribution of igneous rocks near the Pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit in southwestern Alaska: constraints from regional-scale aeromagnetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Eric D.; Zhou, Wei; Li, Yaoguo; Hitzman, Murray W.; Monecke, Thomas; Lang, James R.; Kelley, Karen D.

    2014-01-01

    Aeromagnetic data helped us to understand the 3D distribution of plutonic rocks near the Pebble porphyry copper deposit in southwestern Alaska, USA. Magnetic susceptibility measurements showed that rocks in the Pebble district are more magnetic than rocks of comparable compositions in the Pike Creek–Stuyahok Hills volcano-plutonic complex. The reduced-to-pole transformation of the aeromagnetic data demonstrated that the older rocks in the Pebble district produce strong magnetic anomaly highs. The tilt derivative transformation highlighted northeast-trending lineaments attributed to Tertiary volcanic rocks. Multiscale edge detection delineated near-surface magnetic sources that are mostly outward dipping and coalesce at depth in the Pebble district. The total horizontal gradient of the 10-km upward-continued magnetic data showed an oval, deep magnetic contact along which porphyry deposits occur. Forward and inverse magnetic modeling showed that the magnetic rocks in the Pebble district extend to depths greater than 9 km. Magnetic inversion was constrained by a near-surface, 3D geologic model that is attributed with measured magnetic susceptibilities from various rock types in the region. The inversion results indicated that several near-surface magnetic sources with moderate susceptibilities converge with depth into magnetic bodies with higher susceptibilities. This deep magnetic source appeared to rise toward the surface in several areas. An isosurface value of 0.02 SI was used to depict the magnetic contact between outcropping granodiorite and nonmagnetic sedimentary host rocks. The contact was shown to be outward dipping. At depths around 5 km, nearly the entire model exceeded the isosurface value indicating the limits of nonmagnetic host material. The inversion results showed the presence of a relatively deep, northeast-trending magnetic low that parallels lineaments mapped by the tilt derivative. This deep low represents a strand of the Lake Clark fault.

  20. In situ location and U-Pb dating of small zircon grains in igneous rocks using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sack, Patrick J.; Berry, Ron F.; Meffre, Sebastien; Falloon, Trevor J.; Gemmell, J. Bruce; Friedman, Richard M.

    2011-05-01

    A new U-Pb zircon dating protocol for small (10-50 μm) zircons has been developed using an automated searching method to locate zircon grains in a polished rock mount. The scanning electron microscope-energy-dispersive X ray spectrum-based automated searching method can routinely find in situ zircon grains larger than 5 μm across. A selection of these grains was ablated using a 10 μm laser spot and analyzed in an inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-QMS). The technique has lower precision (˜6% uncertainty at 95% confidence on individual spot analyses) than typical laser ablation ICP-MS (˜2%), secondary ion mass spectrometry (<1%), and isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (˜0.4%) methods. However, it is accurate and has been used successfully on fine-grained lithologies, including mafic rocks from island arcs, ocean basins, and ophiolites, which have traditionally been considered devoid of dateable zircons. This technique is particularly well suited for medium- to fine-grained mafic volcanic rocks where zircon separation is challenging and can also be used to date rocks where only small amounts of sample are available (clasts, xenoliths, dredge rocks). The most significant problem with dating small in situ zircon grains is Pb loss. In our study, many of the small zircons analyzed have high U contents, and the isotopic compositions of these grains are consistent with Pb loss resulting from internal α radiation damage. This problem is not significant in very young rocks and can be minimized in older rocks by avoiding high-U zircon grains.

  1. Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopic compositions of a suite of Late Archean, igneous rocks, eastern Beartooth Mountains: implications for crust-mantle evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wooden, J.L.; Mueller, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    A series of compositionally diverse, Late Archean rocks (2.74-2.79 Ga old) from the eastern Beartooth Mountains, Montana and Wyoming, U.S.A., have the same initial Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopic ratios. Lead and Sr initial ratios are higher and Nd initial ratios lower than would be expected for rocks derived from model mantle sources and strongly indicate the involvement of an older crustal reservoir in the genesis of these rocks. Crustal contamination during emplacement can be ruled out for a variety of reasons. Instead a model involving subduction of continental detritus and contamination of the overlying mantle as is often proposed for modern subduction environments is preferred. This contaminated mantle would have all the isotopic characteristics of mantle enriched by internal mantle metasomatism but would require no long-term growth or changes in parent to daughter element ratios. This contaminated mantle would make a good source for some of the Cenozoic mafic volcanics of the Columbia River, Snake River Plain, and Yellowstone volcanic fields that are proposed to come from ancient, enriched lithospheric mantle. The isotopic characteristics of the 2.70 Ga old Stillwater Complex are a perfect match for the proposed contaminated mantle which provides an alternative to crustal contamination during emplacement. The Pb isotopic characteristics of the Late Archean rocks of the eastern Beartooth Mountains are similar to those of other Late Archean rocks of the Wyoming Province and suggest that Early Archean, upper crustal rocks were common in this terrane. The isotopic signatures of Late Archean rocks in the Wyoming Province are distinctive from those of other Archean cratons in North America which are dominated by a MORB-like, Archean mantle source (Superior Province) and/or a long-term depleted crustal source (Greenland). ?? 1988.

  2. African dust phosphorus fertilizing the Amazon and the Atlantic Ocean is derived from marine sediments and igneous rocks - no indication for Bodélé diatomite contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Avner; Castido, Danilo; Pio, Casimero; Angert, Alon

    2013-04-01

    Dust eroded from West Africa is blown across the Atlantic Ocean towards the tropics and constitutes a major external source of phosphorus (P) to the Amazon and marine surface waters. It is usually assumed that the P concentration in dust is ~700 µg P g/dust based on the average concentrations in crust material. In addition, previous studies have claimed that diatomites from the Bodélé depression in Chad are a major source of P to the equatorial Atlantic Ocean and the Amazon. In this study we have utilized the oxygen isotopes in resin extractable inorganic phosphate (δ18OP) of dust particles to identify their P sources. The data presented here is from over 100 PM10 dust samples, collected during major dust events in October- April 2011 and 2012, as part of the CV-DUST project in Cape-Verde. This archipelago is located downwind of the Sahara and Sahel dust producing areas, and is thus well suited for collecting dust blown out from Africa. Air mass back trajectories computations show that the dust origin can be classified to 3 sectors: the north and west Saharan sector, south and central Saharan sector and the Sahel sector. Dust particles approaching from these 3 sectors shows distinct resin-P concentrations (in the range of 1160 µg P g/dust to 7260 µg P g/dust) and distinct δ18OP values which ranges from 7.2‰ to 21.7‰. Major elements concentrations also showed distinct pattern. Dust particles approaching from the north and west Saharan sector shows the lowest P concentrations and a δ18OP values of ~21‰ which are typical for P originating from marine sediments at the Sahara area. Dust particles from the south west Saharan sector are richest in P and have the lowest δ18OP values of 7.2‰ , which are typical for P originated from igneous source. Dust approaching from the Sahel sector shows mid-range P concentrations and δ18OP values of ~14‰ , and fall on isotopic mixing line (R2=0.91) between the dust samples with igneous and marine sedimentary

  3. Collecting Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Rachel M.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in rock collecting with a nontechnical introduction to the subject. Following a section examining the nature and formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks, the booklet gives suggestions for starting a rock collection and using…

  4. Chemical analyses of igneous rocks published from 1884 to 1900, with a critical discussion of the character and use of analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Washington, H.S.

    1903-01-01

    In the first two or three decades of the last century, when the study of rocks as such was being differentiated from that of minerals and of rock terranes that is, when the science of petrogaphy was in its infancy little attention was paid to their chemical features. It is true that a number had been analyzed, but these were for the most part rocks that were of such a character as to lead the investigator of those early days to consider them as minerals, as was the case with the first described Ihcrzolite and wehrlite. In contradistinction to the individually well-defined minerals, rocks were regarded as merely aggregates of minerals, in presumably fortuitous combinations, and lacking that definiteness or constancy of composition in one mass or in different masses which would justify their chemical study as a whole. As, however, they became more and more the subjects of special research, beginning with the earliest investigations of Cordiera, a knowledge of their chemical composition assumed gradually increasing interest. The great importance of this side of the study of rocks was first clearly recognized by Abich, who pointed out, as early as 1841, the, necessity of a knowledge of their chemical composition for the solution of such problems as their origin, mode of formation, and connection with the interior of the earth, as well as the value of a comparison of their analyses as a proper basis for their classification and nomenclature. To him, therefore, is due the credit, of introducing the chemical composition of rocks as a basis for their classification; though the good influence of this suggestion for their right understanding was largely nullified by the coincident use of the feldspars alone as one of the main factors of classification, an idea which has had a deplorably retarding influence on the development of systematic petrography for many years, and which, even at the present day, holds many systematists firmly in its grasp.

  5. Origins of Igneous Layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Bruce

    Anyone who has ever seen a photo of a layered intrusion, let alone visited one first hand, or even seen a thin section from one, cannot help but be impressed by the stunning record of crystal growth and deposition. Such bodies stand as majestic monuments of undeniable evidence that intricate magmatic processes exist, processes that couple crystallization, convection, and crystal sorting to form rocks so highly ordered and beautiful that they are a wonder to behold. These are the altars to which petrologists must carry their conceived petrologic processes for approval.Although significant in number, the best layered intrusions seem to be found almost always in remote places. Their names, Bushveld, Muskox, Kiglapait, Stillwater, Duke Island, Skaergaard, Rhum, ring through igneous petrology almost as historic military battles (Saratoga, Antietam, Bull Run, Manassas, Gettysburg) do through American history. People who have worked on such bodies are almost folk heros: Wager, Deer, Brown, Jackson, Hess, Irvine, McBirney, Morse; these names are petrologic household words. Yet with all this fanfare and reverence, layered instrusions are nearly thought of as period pieces, extreme examples of what can happen, but not generally what does. This is now all changing with the increasing realization that these bodies are perhaps highly representative of all magmatic bodies. They are simply more dynamically complete, containing more of the full range of interactions, and of course, exposing a more complete record. They are one end of a spectrum containing lava flows, lava lakes, large sills, plutons, and layered intrusions. This book uniquely covers this range with an abundance of first-hand field observations and a good dose of process conceptualization, magma physics, and crystal growth kinetics.

  6. Petrochemistry of igneous rocks of the California-Vetas mining district, Santander, Colombia: Implications for northern Andean tectonics and porphyry Cu (-Mo, Au) metallogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissig, Thomas; Mantilla Figueroa, Luis Carlos; Hart, Craig J. R.

    2014-07-01

    Porphyry Mo and Cu mineralization in the California-Vetas mining district is contemporaneous with 10.9 to 8.4 Ma granodiorite porphyry stocks and overprinted by Au-Ag mineralization of epithermal affinity. Mineralization is hosted by Grenvillian aged paragneisses (Bucaramanga Gneiss of the Santander Massif) and late Triassic to early Jurassic granitic rocks. All intrusive rocks are high-K calc-alkaline. Late Triassic to early Jurassic rocks include peraluminous granites with more than 70 wt.% SiO2 as well as metaluminous diorites, tonalites and granodiorites with SiO2 between 54.9 and 60.4 wt.%. Late Miocene rocks are weakly peraluminous granodiorite porphyries with SiO2 between 61 and 67 wt.% SiO2. Late Miocene rocks share some characteristics with adakite-like rocks which are widely associated with porphyry and epithermal style mineralization elsewhere in the Andes. They have high Ba (930 to 1500 ppm) and high Ba/La (28 to 50), high Sr (850 to 1100 ppm) and Sr/Y (48-78) and depleted middle rare earth elements (MREE) compared to the Mesozoic granites, which have 400 to 700 ppm Ba (Ba/La 14 to 25) and 80 to 150 ppm Sr (Sr/Y 2.5 to 14), and Mesozoic diorites and tonalites, which have ~ 900 to 1200 ppm Ba (Ba/La 20 to 32) and ~ 610 to 750 ppm Sr (Sr/Y 22 to 25). Miocene granodiorite porphyries, in contrast to Mesozoic intrusive rocks have only weak negative Eu anomalies. The Miocene rocks have 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7052 to 0.7067 and εNd of - 1.9 to - 5.4 and are significantly more isotopically primitive than all other rocks in the study area including the Mesozoic diorites to tonalites (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7082 and 0.7092; εNd = - 6.7 and - 7.2), granites (87Sr/86Sr = 0.730 (n = 2); εNd = - 8.2 and - 8.3) and Bucaramanga Gneiss (0.718 to 0.743; εNd = - 10.8 to - 14.1). Lead isotope data are broadly consistent with the Sr and Nd isotope data and the Miocene porphyries have the lowest 207Pb/204Pb ratios but overlap with the Mesozoic diorites to tonalites in their 206Pb

  7. Determination of major elements by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in igneous rocks from the same fused sample (110 mg)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amosova, Alena A.; Panteeva, Svetlana V.; Chubarov, Victor M.; Finkelshtein, Alexandr L.

    2016-08-01

    The fusion technique is proposed for simultaneous determination of 35 elements from the same sample. Only 110 mg of rock sample was used to obtain fused glasses for quantitative determination of 10 major elements by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis, 16 rare earth elements and some other trace elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis. Fusion was performed with 1.1 g of lithium metaborate and LiBr solution as the releasing agent in platinum crucible in electric furnace at 1100 °C. The certified reference materials of ultramafic, mafic, intermediate and felsic igneous rocks have been applied to obtain the calibration curves for rock-forming oxides (Na2O, MgO, Al2O3, SiO2, P2O5, K2O, CaO, TiO2, MnO, Fe2O3) and some trace elements (Ba, Sr, Zr) determination by X-ray fluorescence analysis. The repeatability does not exceed the allowable standard deviation for a wide range of concentrations. In the most cases the relative standard deviation was less than 5%. Obtained glasses were utilized for the further determination of rare earth (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) and some other (Ba, Sr, Zr, Rb, Cs, Y, Nb, Hf, Ta, Th and U) trace elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis with the same certified reference materials employed. The results could mostly be accepted as satisfactory. The proposed procedure essentially reduces the expenses in comparison with separate sample preparation for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and X-ray fluorescence analysis.

  8. Strength and ductility of room-dry and water-saturated igneous rocks at low pressures and temperatures to partial melting. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Higgs, N.G.; Lantz, J.R.; Bauer, S.J.

    1980-11-01

    Rock types that are likely candidates for drilling were tested. Reported herein are the short-time ultimate strengths and ductilities determined at temperatures of 25/sup 0/ to 1050/sup 0/C and a strain rate of 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/ of (a) room-dry Mt. Hood Andesite, Cuerbio Basalt, and Charcoal (St. Cloud Gray) Granodiorite at confining pressures of 0, 50, and 100 MPa, (b) water-saturated specimens of the same three rocks at zero effective pressure (both pore and confining pressures of 50 MPa), and (c) room-dry Newberry Rhyolite Obsidian at 0 and 50 MPa. These strengths are then compared with the stresses developed at the wall of a borehole in an elastic medium at the appropriate temperatures and mean pressures to assess the problem of borehole stability. (MHR)

  9. Lead-isotopic compositions of diverse igneous rocks and ore deposits from southwestern New Mexico and their implications for early Proterozoic crustal evolution in the western United States.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacey, J.S.; Hedlund, D.C.

    1983-01-01

    Basement rocks in this area are 1750 m.y. old and extend northward through Colorado to Utah. Galena data show that the fraction of older sialic lead in these rocks increases toward the the Archaean craton in Wyoming. The crust apparently developed southward from Wyoming in stages at 2400 m.y. ago or before, 2100 m.y. ago and 1750 m.y. ago. The Laramide alkali to calc-alkaline rocks and their associated porphyry Cu and massive replacement deposits have similar 206Pb/204Pb ratios and are the least radiogenic in the region; their 206Pb/204Pb ratios are all 18.0. Pb isotopes in this region offer some criteria for prospecting purposes. The 206Pb/204Pb values for the larger ore deposits related to Laramide activity are all <18.0, particularly for the larger ones. Within the mid- Tertiary group, the same criteria apply - i.e. the largest deposits have the lowest 206Pb/204Pb ratios. -L.C.H.

  10. Thermal infrared (2.5-13.5 μm) spectroscopic remote sensing of igneous rock types on particulate planetary surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salisbury, John W.; Walter, Louis S.

    1989-01-01

    Fundamental molecular vibration bands are significantly diminished by scattering. Thus such bands in spectra of fine particulate regoliths (i.e., dominated by <5-μm particles), or regoliths displaying a similar scale of porosity, are difficult to use for mineralogical or rock type identification. Consequently, other spectral features have been sought that may be more useful in spectroscopic remote sensing of composition. We find that mineralogical information is retained in overtones and combination tones of the fundamental molecular vibrations in the 3.0- to 7.0-μm region, but that relatively few minerals have a sufficiently distinctive band structure to be unambiguously identified with currently available techniques. More significantly, identification of general rock type, as defined by the SCFM chemical index (SCFM = SiO2/SiO2 + CaO + FeO + MgO), is possible using spectral features associated with the principal Christiansen frequency and with a region of relative transparency between the Si-O stretching and bending bands. However, environmental factors may affect the appearance and wavelengths of these features. Finally, prominent absorption bands may result from the presence of relatively small amounts of water, hydroxyl or carbonate, because absorption bands exhibited by these materials in the 2.7- to 4.0-μm region, where silicate spectra are otherwise featureless, increase strongly in spectral contrast with decreasing particle size. Such materials are thus detectable in very small amounts in a particulate regolith composed predominantly of silicate minerals.

  11. Predicting the Sources and Formation Mechanisms of Evolved Lunar Crust by Linking K/Ca Ratios of Lunar Granites to Analogous Terrestrial Igneous Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, R. D.; Simon, J. I.

    2012-01-01

    Although silicic rocks (i.e. granites and rhyolites) comprise a minor component of the sampled portion of the lunar crust, recent remote sensing studies [e.g., 1-4] indicate that several un-sampled regions of the Moon have significantly higher concentrations of silicic material (also high in [K], [U], and [Th]) than sampled regions. Within these areas are morphological features that are best explained by the existence of chemically evolved volcanic rocks. Observations of silicic domes [e.g., 1-5] suggest that sizable networks of silicic melt were present during crust formation. Isotopic data indicate that silicic melts were generated over a prolonged timespan from 4.3 to 3.9 Ga [e.g., 6-8]. The protracted age range and broad distribution of silicic rocks on the Moon indicate that their petrogenesis was an important mechanism for secondary crust formation. Understanding the origin and evolution of such silicic magmas is critical to determining the composition of the lunar crustal highlands and will help to distinguish between opposing ideas for the Moon's bulk composition and differentiation. The two main hypotheses for generating silicic melts on Earth are fractional crystallization or partial melting. On the Moon silicic melts are thought to have been generated during extreme fractional crystallization involving end-stage silicate liquid immiscibility (SLI) [e.g. 9, 10]. However, SLI cannot account for the production of significant volumes of silicic melt and its wide distribution, as reported by the remote global surveys [1, 2, 3]. In addition, experimental and natural products of SLI show that U and Th, which are abundant in the lunar granites and seen in the remote sensing data of the domes, are preferentially partitioned into the depolymerized ferrobasaltic magma and not the silicic portion [11, 12]. If SLI is not the mechanism that generated silicic magmas on the Moon then alternative processes such as fractional crystallization (only crystal

  12. Two Distinct Sets of Magma Sources in Cretaceous Rocks From Magnet Cove, Prairie Creek, and Other Igneous Centers of the Arkansas Alkaline Province, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, G. I.; Carlson, R. W.; Eby, G. N.

    2008-12-01

    Two distinct sets of magma sources from the Arkansas alkaline province (~106-89 Ma) are revealed by Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions of olivine lamproites vs. other alkalic rock types, including carbonatite, ijolite, lamprophyres, tephrite, malignite, jacupirangite, phonolite, trachyte, and latite. Isotopic compositions of diamond-bearing olivine lamproites from Prairie Creek and Dare Mine Knob point to Proterozoic lithosphere as an important source, and previous Re-Os isotopic data indicate derivation from subcontinental mantle lithosphere. Both sources were probably involved in lamproite generation. Magnet Cove carbonatites and other alkalic magmas were likely derived from an asthenospheric source. Lamproite samples are isotopically quite different from other rock types in Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic space. Although three lamproite samples from Prairie Creek have a large range of SiO2 contents (40-60 wt %), initial values of ɛNd (-10 to -13), 206Pb/204Pb (16.61-16.81), 207Pb/204Pb (15.34-15.36), and 208Pb/204Pb (36.57-36.76) are low and similar. Only 87Sr/86Sr(i) displays a wide range in the Prairie Creek lamproites (0.70627-0.70829). A fourth lamproite from Dare Mine Knob has the most negative ɛNd(i) of -19. Lamproite isotope values show a significant crustal component and isotopically overlap subalkalic rhyolites from the Black Hills (SD), which assimilated Proterozoic crust. Six samples of carbonatite, ijolite, and jacupirangite from Magnet Cove and Potash Sulphur Springs exhibit the most depleted Sr-Nd isotopic signatures of all samples. For these rock types, 87Sr/86Sr(i) is 0.70352 - 0.70396, and ɛNd(i) is +3.8 - +4.3. Eight other rock types have a narrow range of ɛNd(i) (+1.9 - +3.7), but a wide range of 87Sr/86Sr(i) (0.70424 - 0.70629). These 14 samples comprise a fairly tight cluster of Pb isotopic values: 206Pb/204Pb (18.22-19.23), 207Pb/204Pb (15.54-15.62), and 208Pb/204Pb (38.38-38.94), suggesting very little crustal assimilation. They are most similar to EM-2

  13. Xenoliths of mafic/ultramafic igneous rocks as carriers of information on lower crust beneath Złotoryja - Jawor volcanic complex (SW Poland).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dajek, Michał; Matusiak-Malek, Magdalena; Puziewicz, Jacek; Lipa, Danuta; Ntaflos, Theodors

    2016-04-01

    The Cenozoic alkaline volcanic rocks in Lower Silesia (SW Poland) are known for their mantle peridotite xenoliths. However, the mafic and ultramafic xenoliths with cumulative textures and of composition of olivine- or hornblende clinopyroxenite, clinopyroxenite, websterite, norite and gabbro occur in some of the lavas (6 sites) of the Złotoryja-Jawor volcanic complex. The xenoliths are anhydrous, only in Wilcza Góra minor amount of amphibole occurs. The Mg# of clinopyroxene varies from 0.54 (Ostrzyca Proboszczowicka clinopyroxenite) to 0.89 (Góra Świątek clinopyroxenite). Forsterite content in olivine varies from 64% (Winna Góra gabbro) to 86% (Wilcza Góra hornblende clinopyroxenite). Anortite content in plagioclase in nortite and gabbros is 33-56%. The Mg# in amphibole is 0.43 to 0.76. Clinopyroxene trace element composition is typically LREE enriched, but in Wilcza Góra norite and Mnisza Góra clinopyroxenite it is LREE-depleted. The calculated pressures of clinopyroxene crystallization (calculated by the algorithm of Nimis and Ulmer, 1998, CMP, 1998, 122-135, assuming all Fe to be 2+) is from 0.45 to 0.96 GPa pointing to crystallization of the pyroxenitic rocks in lower crust or at crust/mantle boundary. Theoretical melts in equilibrium with clinopyroxene enriched in LREE resemble the alkaline lavas from the area and we suggest they are cognate with host magmas. We explain variations in composition of mafic xenoliths from Wilcza Góra, Winna Góra and Grodziec to be a result of magma fractionation. Xenoliths containing clinopyroxene impoverished in LREE may represent lithologies inherited from Variscan oceanic crust. Megacrysts of clinopyroxene present in some of the localities cannot result from disintegration of mafic xenoliths This study was possible thanks to project NCN UMO-2014/15/B/ST10/00095 of Polish National Centre for Science.

  14. Spatial-temporal framework for the closure of the Junggar Ocean in central Asia: New SIMS zircon U-Pb ages of the ophiolitic mélange and collisional igneous rocks in the Zhifang area, East Junggar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xing-Wang; Jiang, Neng; Li, Xian-Hua; Wu, Chu; Qu, Xun; Zhou, Gang; Dong, Lian-Hui

    2015-11-01

    The closure time of the Junggar Ocean is one of the hottest topics surrounding the tectonic evolution of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). This paper reports SIMS zircon U-Pb ages of the ophiolitic mélange and collisional igneous rocks in the Zhifang area, East Junggar. Our new results reveal the following evidence: (1) the West Hill ophiolitic mélange in the Zhifang area contains segments of the 371 Ma MORB-type layered rocks and 363 Ma oceanic islands, which were intruded by the 348 Ma syn-collisional quartz diorites; (2) the ophiolitic mélange and 348 Ma syn-collisional quartz diorites are overlain by the 342 Ma andesitic tuffs; and (3) the 342 Ma andesitic tuffs and successive 332 Ma granodiorites-gabbro were formed at late-collisional setting, whereas the 314 Ma granitic porphyry at post-collisional setting. We suggest that the Junggar Ocean in the Zhifang area was opened before 371 Ma and 363 Ma, and possibly closed before 348 Ma. By combining the published U-Pb ages of the Mayile-Tangbale-Darbute-Kalamaili-Zhifang-Daheishan (MTDKZD) ophiolite belt, Early-Carboniferous volcanic rocks unconformably overlying the MTDKZD ophiolite belt, bimodal volcanic rocks and granitoids within and adjacent to the MTDKZD ophiolite belt, it is suggested that the Junggar Ocean was possibly opened scissors-like from the Neoproterozoic-Ordovician Mayile-Tangbale ocean eastwards through the Silurian-Devonian Darbute-Karamay ocean finally to the Devonian-Early-Carboniferous Kalamaili-Zhifang ocean, and closed scissors-like from the Zhifang-Kalamaili area in the eastern segment westwards to the Darbute-Karamay area in the western segment. Tectonic collage between the Yemaquan-Xiemisitai arc and Junggar block occurred at approximately 343-348 Ma. The Junggar orogenic belt went through late-collisional stage at 343-330 Ma, post-collisional period after 330 Ma, and post-collisional extensional regime after 320 Ma with an intensive stage at around 303 Ma.

  15. Our World: The Rock Cycle

    NASA Video Gallery

    Find out how rocks brought to Earth by the Apollo astronauts have helped NASA learn more about the rock cycle. Compare igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks found on Earth to three types of ro...

  16. Ureilites are not igneous differentiates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Robert N.; Mayeda, Toshiko K.

    1988-01-01

    Although most all meteorites are as old as the solar system (4.5 billion years), they can be subdivided into primitive and evolved groups, depending on the extent of their chemical and physical processing. Primitive meteorites, most of which are chondrites, are assemblages of dust and millimeter-sized pellets from the presolar nebula, which were not extensively heated and processed since their assembly. Thus they provide information about the conditions in the nebular cloud. Many of the evolved meteorites are achondrites, which are igneous rocks produced by melting on or within an asteroidal object known as the parent body. A major unsolved problem in solar system studies is identification of the source of heat which led to melting of the achondrites. The role of oxygen isotopes in establishing genetic relationships among meteorites is examined.

  17. Reduction of acid rock drainage using steel slag in cover systems over sulfide rock waste piles.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Rodrigo Pereira; Leite, Adilson do Lago; Borghetti Soares, Anderson

    2015-04-01

    The extraction of gold, coal, nickel, uranium, copper and other earth-moving activities almost always leads to environmental damage. In metal and coal extraction, exposure of sulfide minerals to the atmosphere leads to generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) and in underground mining to acid mine drainage (AMD) due to contamination of infiltrating groundwater. This study proposes to develop a reactive cover system that inhibits infiltration of oxygen and also releases alkalinity to increase the pH of generated ARD and attenuate metal contaminants at the same time. The reactive cover system is constructed using steel slag, a waste product generated from steel industries. This study shows that this type of cover system has the potential to reduce some of the adverse effects of sulfide mine waste disposal on land. Geochemical and geotechnical characterization tests were carried out. Different proportions of sulfide mine waste and steel slag were studied in leachate extraction tests. The best proportion was 33% of steel slag in dry weight. Other tests were conducted as follows: soil consolidation, saturated permeability and soil water characteristic curve. The cover system was numerically modeled through unsaturated flux analysis using Vadose/w. The solution proposed is an oxygen transport barrier that allows rain water percolation to treat the ARD in the waste rock pile. The results showed that the waste pile slope is an important factor and the cover system must have 5 m thickness to achieve an acceptable effectiveness. PMID:25750056

  18. Reduction of acid rock drainage using steel slag in cover systems over sulfide rock waste piles.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Rodrigo Pereira; Leite, Adilson do Lago; Borghetti Soares, Anderson

    2015-04-01

    The extraction of gold, coal, nickel, uranium, copper and other earth-moving activities almost always leads to environmental damage. In metal and coal extraction, exposure of sulfide minerals to the atmosphere leads to generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) and in underground mining to acid mine drainage (AMD) due to contamination of infiltrating groundwater. This study proposes to develop a reactive cover system that inhibits infiltration of oxygen and also releases alkalinity to increase the pH of generated ARD and attenuate metal contaminants at the same time. The reactive cover system is constructed using steel slag, a waste product generated from steel industries. This study shows that this type of cover system has the potential to reduce some of the adverse effects of sulfide mine waste disposal on land. Geochemical and geotechnical characterization tests were carried out. Different proportions of sulfide mine waste and steel slag were studied in leachate extraction tests. The best proportion was 33% of steel slag in dry weight. Other tests were conducted as follows: soil consolidation, saturated permeability and soil water characteristic curve. The cover system was numerically modeled through unsaturated flux analysis using Vadose/w. The solution proposed is an oxygen transport barrier that allows rain water percolation to treat the ARD in the waste rock pile. The results showed that the waste pile slope is an important factor and the cover system must have 5 m thickness to achieve an acceptable effectiveness.

  19. Igneous intrusions in coal-bearing sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, A.B.; Shishlov, S.B.

    1987-08-01

    Intrusions of various compositions, sizes, and shapes have been observed in 115 out of 620 coal basins or deposits on all the continents. They are mainly subvolcanic and hypabyssal, with depths of emplacement estimated as ranging from a few hundred meters to 6 km, but usually 3-4 km. Compositionally, 42% are basic, 31% intermediate, 23% acid, and 4% ultrabasic. Mafic (and related) rock types include dolerites, trachydolerites, gabbro-dolerites, gabbro-monzonites, monzonites, diabases, gabbrodiabases, and less often gabbros and basalts (subvolcanic bodies). These mafic intrusions occur in coal formations of various ages from Carboniferous through Neogene, but predominate in Paleozoic (47%) and Cenozoic beds (45%). They also occur in coal formations of all genetic types, apart from those on ancient stable platforms, where there are no signs of intrusive activity. The mafic intrusions are almost everywhere associated with comagmatic lavas and tuffs (mainly in the younger strata), and the coal beds themselves are to some extent enriched in pyroclastic material, particularly in the upper horizons. This paper gives a worldwide review of igneous intrusions in coal beds. 24 references.

  20. A numerical method for retrieving high oxygen isotope temperatures from plutonic igneous rocks: An example from the Laramie Anorthosite Complex, Wyoming, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Farquhar, J.; Chacko, T. . Dept. of Geology); Frost, B.R. )

    1992-01-01

    The Sybille Pit is a late-stage magnetite-ilmenite-plagioclase-bearing differentiate of the Laramie Anorthosite with a wide range of grain sizes and modal mineralogy. This variability makes Sybille an ideal locality in which to study the factors that affect isotopic thermometry in plutonic environments. The authors have developed a numerical model based on isotope exchange trajectories that retrieves close to magmatic temperatures for samples from Sybille. This method is based on the premise that hand sample-scale sub-systems close to exchange with each other at temperatures that exceed those of the constituent minerals. The temperature of hand-sample scale closure is retrieved by back calculating the isotope exchange trajectories to the temperature at which two samples with widely different model compositions are in isotopic equilibrium. Application of these methods to samples from Sybille provides promising results. Whereas conventional isotopic thermometry of individual samples yields a wide range of temperatures ([approximately]600 to > 1000 C) depending on the mineral-pair chosen, application of this numerical model to multiple samples yields temperatures of 1,070 [+-] 100 C which corresponds closely to the inferred solidus for these rocks.

  1. Bibliography for acid-rock drainage and selected acid-mine drainage issues related to acid-rock drainage from transportation activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Michael W.; Worland, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    Acid-rock drainage occurs through the interaction of rainfall on pyrite-bearing formations. When pyrite (FeS2) is exposed to oxygen and water in mine workings or roadcuts, the mineral decomposes and sulfur may react to form sulfuric acid, which often results in environmental problems and potential damage to the transportation infrastructure. The accelerated oxidation of pyrite and other sulfidic minerals generates low pH water with potentially high concentrations of trace metals. Much attention has been given to contamination arising from acid mine drainage, but studies related to acid-rock drainage from road construction are relatively limited. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Transportation, is conducting an investigation to evaluate the occurrence and processes controlling acid-rock drainage and contaminant transport from roadcuts in Tennessee. The basic components of acid-rock drainage resulting from transportation activities are described and a bibliography, organized by relevant categories (remediation, geochemical, microbial, biological impact, and secondary mineralization) is presented.

  2. Oxygen isotope exchange kinetics of mineral pairs in closed and open systems: Applications to problems of hydrothermal alteration of igneous rocks and Precambrian iron formations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregory, R.T.; Criss, R.E.; Taylor, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    The systematics of stable-isotope exchange between minerals and fluids are examined in the context of modal mineralogical variations and mass-balance considerations, both in closed and in open systems. On mineral-pair ??18O plots, samples from terranes that have exchanged with large amounts of fluid typically map out steep positively-sloped non-equilibrium arrays. Analytical models are derived to explain these effects; these models allow for different exchange rates between the various minerals and the external fluids, as well as different fluid fluxes. The steep arrays are adequately modelled by calculated isochron lines that involve the whole family of possible exchange trajectories. These isochrons have initially-steep near-vertical positive slopes that rotate toward a 45?? equilibrium slope as the exchange process proceeds to completion. The actual data-point array is thus analogous to the hand of an "isotopic clock" that measures the duration of the hydrothermal episode. The dimensionless ratio of the volumetric fluid flux to the kinetic rate parameter ( u k) determines the shape of each individual exchange trajectory. In a fluid-buffered system ( u k ??? 1), the solutions to the equations: (1) are independent of the mole fractions of the solid phases; (2) correspond to Taylor's open-system water/rock equation; and (3) yield straight-line isochrons that have slopes that approach 1 f, where f is the fraction reacted of the more sluggishly exchanging mineral. The isochrons for this simple exchange model are closely congruent with the isochrons calculated for all of the more complex models, thereby simplifying the application of theory to actual hydrothermal systems in nature. In all of the models an order of magnitude of time (in units of kt) separates steep non-equilibrium arrays (e.g., slope ??? 10) from arrays approaching an equilibrium slope of unity on a ??-?? diagram. Because we know the approximate lifetimes of many hydrothermal systems from geologic and

  3. Igneous Rocks of the East Pacific Rise: The alkali volcanic suite appear to be differentiated from a tholeiitic basalt extruded from the mantle.

    PubMed

    Engel, A E; Engel, C G

    1964-10-23

    The apical parts of large volcanoes along the East Pacific Rise (islands and seamounts) are encrusted with rocks of the alkali volcanic suite (alkali basalt, andesine- and oligoclase-andesite, and trachyte). In contrast, the more submerged parts of the Rise are largely composed of a tholeiitic basalt which has low concentrations of K, P, U, Th, Pb, and Ti. This tholeiitic basalt is either the predominant or the only magma generated in the earth's mantle under oceanic ridges and rises. It is at least 1000-fold more abundant than the alkali suite, which is probably derived from tholeiitic basalt by magmatic differentiation in and immediately below the larger volcanoes. Distinction of oceanic tholeiites from almost all continental tholeiites is possible on the simple basis of total potassium content, with the discontinuity at 0.3 to 0.5 percent K(2)O by weight. Oceanic tholeiites also are readily distinguished from some 19 out of 20 basalts of oceanic islands and seamount cappings by having less than 0.3 percent K(2)O by weight and more than 48 percent SiO(2). Deep drilling into oceanic volcanoes should, however, core basalts transitional between the oceanic tholeiites and the presumed derivative alkali basalts. The composition of the oceanic tholeiites suggests that the mantle under the East Pacific Rise contains less than 0.10 percent potassium oxide by weight; 0.1 part per million of uranium and 0.4 part of thorium; a potassium:rubidium ratio of about 1200 and a potassium: uranium ratio of about 10(4).

  4. Igneous Rocks of the East Pacific Rise: The alkali volcanic suite appear to be differentiated from a tholeiitic basalt extruded from the mantle.

    PubMed

    Engel, A E; Engel, C G

    1964-10-23

    The apical parts of large volcanoes along the East Pacific Rise (islands and seamounts) are encrusted with rocks of the alkali volcanic suite (alkali basalt, andesine- and oligoclase-andesite, and trachyte). In contrast, the more submerged parts of the Rise are largely composed of a tholeiitic basalt which has low concentrations of K, P, U, Th, Pb, and Ti. This tholeiitic basalt is either the predominant or the only magma generated in the earth's mantle under oceanic ridges and rises. It is at least 1000-fold more abundant than the alkali suite, which is probably derived from tholeiitic basalt by magmatic differentiation in and immediately below the larger volcanoes. Distinction of oceanic tholeiites from almost all continental tholeiites is possible on the simple basis of total potassium content, with the discontinuity at 0.3 to 0.5 percent K(2)O by weight. Oceanic tholeiites also are readily distinguished from some 19 out of 20 basalts of oceanic islands and seamount cappings by having less than 0.3 percent K(2)O by weight and more than 48 percent SiO(2). Deep drilling into oceanic volcanoes should, however, core basalts transitional between the oceanic tholeiites and the presumed derivative alkali basalts. The composition of the oceanic tholeiites suggests that the mantle under the East Pacific Rise contains less than 0.10 percent potassium oxide by weight; 0.1 part per million of uranium and 0.4 part of thorium; a potassium:rubidium ratio of about 1200 and a potassium: uranium ratio of about 10(4). PMID:17806796

  5. Effects of water-saturation on strength and ductility of three igneous rocks at effective pressures to 50 MPa and temperatures to partial melting

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, S.J.; Friedman, M.; Handin, J.

    1981-01-01

    Instantaneous-failure strengths and ductilities of water-saturated cylindrical specimens of Charcoal Granodiorite, Mount Hood Andesite, and Cuerbio Basalt are determined at a strain rate of 10{sup -4}s{sup -1} and at effective confining pressures (Pe) of 0 and 50 MPa and at temperatures to partial melting. The data indicate: (1) at Pe = 0 and 50 MPa (Pc and Pp of 50 MPa and of 100 and 50 MPa, respectively) the granodiorite does not water-weaken; (2) at these same Pe the more porous and finer-grained andesite begins to exhibit water-weakening at about 600/sup 0/C; (3) at Pe = 0 and 870-900{sup 0}C the andesite's wet strength averages 20 MPa compared to 100 MPa, dry; (4) at Pe = 50 MPa and 920{sup 0}C its wet strength is 45 MPa compared to 160 MPa dry; (5) at Pe = 0, the basalt appears to be water-weakened above 800{sup 0}C; (6) water-saturated specimens deformed at temperatures less than T{sub m} exhibit ultimate strengths at less than 2 percent shortening and then work-soften along faults; and (7) both dry and wet specimens deform primarily by brittle fracture. Extrapolations indicate: (1) crystalline rocks should be drillable because they remain brittle until partial melting occurs, and penetration rates should increase with temperature because there is a corresponding decrease in brittle fracture strength; (2) boreholes in ''water-filled'' holes will be stable to >10 km at temperatures 10 km; and (4) open boreholes in the andesite are apt to be much less stable, and at similar temperatures would fail at 2 to 5-km depth.

  6. Geochronology and geochemistry of early Paleozoic igneous rocks of the Lesser Xing'an Range, NE China: Implications for the tectonic evolution of the eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-wei; Xu, Wen-liang; Pei, Fu-ping; Wang, Feng; Guo, Peng

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents new zircon U-Pb, Hf isotope, and whole-rock major and trace element data for early Paleozoic igneous rocks of the Lesser Xing'an Range, NE China, in order to constrain the early Paleozoic tectonic evolution of the eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). Zircon U-Pb dating indicates that early Paleozoic magmatic events within the northern Songnen-Zhangguangcai Range Massif (SZM) can be subdivided into four stages: Middle Cambrian (~ 505 Ma), Late Cambrian (~ 490 Ma), Early-Middle Ordovician (~ 470 Ma), and Late Ordovician (460-450 Ma). The Middle Cambrian monzogranites are K-rich, weakly to strongly peraluminous, and characterized by pronounced heavy rare earth element (HREE) depletions, high Sr/Y ratios, low Y concentrations, low primary zircon εHf(t) values (- 6.79 to - 1.09), and ancient two-stage model (TDM2) ages (1901-1534 Ma). These results indicate derivation from partial melting of thickened ancient crustal materials that formed during the amalgamation of the northern SZM and the northern Jiamusi Massif (JM). The Late Cambrian monzonite, quartz monzonite, and monzogranite units are chemically similar to A-type granites, and contain zircons with εHf(t) values of - 2.59 to + 1.78 and TDM2 ages of 1625-1348 Ma. We infer that these rocks formed from primary magmas generated by partial melting of Mesoproterozoic accreted lower crustal materials in a post-collisional extensional environment. The Early-Middle Ordovician quartz monzodiorite, quartz monzonite, monzogranite, and rhyolite units are calc-alkaline, relatively enriched in light REEs (LREEs) and large ion lithophile elements (LILEs; e.g., Rb, Th, and U), depleted in HREEs and high field strength elements (HFSEs; e.g., Nb, Ta, and Ti), and contain zircons with εHf(t) values of - 7.33 to + 4.98, indicative of formation in an active continental margin setting. The Late Ordovician alkali-feldspar granite and rhyolite units have A-type granite affinities that suggest they formed in

  7. U-Pb Dating, whole rock and Sr-Nd-Pb-O isotope geochemistry of collisional magmatism in the CACC: Çiçekdaǧ igneous complex (ÇIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniz, Kiymet; Kagan Kadioglu, Yusuf; Stuart, Finlay; Ellam, Rob; Boyce, Adrian; Condon, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The closure of Neotethys induced from calcalkaline through alkaline magmatism within the Central Anatolia Crystalline Complex (CACC) during the late Cretaceous-early Paleogene. Timing of these magmatism is very important for understanding the magmato-tectonic evolution and the relation with the collision. Despite the genesis of felsic products are well understood, there is lack of petrogenetic explanation about especially alkaline mafic products. The relation between Neotethyan ophiolites and late alkaline dykes which haven't reported before is the most important undeclared gap. Çiçekdağ igneous complex (ÇIC) is one of the best area for explaining all of these problems within the CACC. In accordance with these purposes, we have carried out detailed petrographic, whole rock geochemical, Sr-Nd-Pb-O isotopic and geochronological (U/Pb and Ar/Ar) study of the rocks in the ÇIC in order to unravel the magmatic history of the CACC and thus constrain the tectonic history. The intrusive rocks of the ÇIC are differentiated into four main group as an ophiolites, calcalkaline series, alkaline series and late alkaline dykes. The felsic and mafic units intruded to the ophiolitic rocks. The calcalkaline series mostly composed of monzonites and monzodiorite porphyry whereas the alkaline series consist of syenites and feldspathoid-bearing gabbros. Variations in the major oxide compositions of both rock series can be attributed with fractionation of clinopyroxene, plagioclase, amphibole, apatite and iron titan oxide minerals. The high 87Sr/86Sr and low 143Nd/144Nd of both series are indicative of mantle sources with large continental crustal components. Feldspar and quartz oxygen isotope data from calcalkaline and alkaline series have a range of δ18O values 5.1-11.4o 8.3-9.2o and 7.7-14.1o 10.2-13.7o respectively and are compatible with the values for I-A-type granitoids. Both rock series represent the mixed (mantle-crustal) origin. The combination of all data suggest that

  8. Closure plan evaluation for risk of acid rock drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Dwire, D.L.; Krause, A.J.; Russell, L.J.

    1999-07-01

    Control of acid rock drainage (ARD) is a long-term issue for many mine sites and is often a primary objective of remediation efforts. Some sites continue to require monitoring and management of ARD long after mine operation has ceased and closure is complete. In New Zealand, an innovative and quantitative approach was applied to evaluate the expected risk of ARD after implementation of the closure plan for the Golden Cross Mine. In addition, this future risk was compared to current operating conditions to provide an estimate of the reduction in risk provided by the remediation activities. This approach was useful to both the mine proponent and the regulatory agencies in assessing the effectiveness of the existing closure plan and providing focus on the components of greatest risk. Mine components remaining on site after closure that could potentially generate ARD under various failure scenarios were identified and evaluated. These components included the tailings decant pond, waste rock, stockpiles, open pit mine and water treatment systems. For each component, a series of initiating events and failure scenarios were identified, and a decision tree methodology was utilized to estimate the probability of ARD generation for both current and closure conditions. Due to the implementation of closure plans designed to minimize or eliminate ARD through regarding, construction of engineered covers and water management designs, the risk of ARD generation will be significantly reduced over time.

  9. Acid-rock drainage at Skytop, Centre County, Pennsylvania, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Brady, Keith; Cravotta, Charles A.

    2005-01-01

    Recent construction for Interstate Highway 99 (I?99) exposed pyrite and associated Zn-Pb sulfide minerals beneath a >10-m thick gossan to oxidative weathering along a 40-60-m deep roadcut through a 270-m long section of the Ordovician Bald Eagle Formation at Skytop, near State College, Centre County, Pennsylvania. Nearby Zn-Pb deposits hosted in associated sandstone and limestone in Blair and Centre Counties were prospected in the past; however, these deposits generally were not viable as commercial mines. The pyritic sandstone from the roadcut was crushed and used locally as road base and fill for adjoining segments of I?99. Within months, acidic (pH1,000 mg/L), seep waters at the base of the cut contain >100 mg/L dissolved Zn and >1 mg/L As, Co, Cu, and Ni. Lead is relatively immobile (<10 ?g/L in seep waters). The salts sequester metals and acidity between rainfall events. Episodic salt dissolution then contributes pulses of contamination including acid to surface runoff and ground water. The Skytop experience highlights the need to understand dynamic interactions of mineralogy and hydrology in order to avoid potentially negative environmental impacts associated with excavation in sulfidic rocks.

  10. Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice

    This science unit is designed for limited- and non-English speaking students in a Chinese bilingual education program. The unit covers rock material, classification, characteristics of types of rocks, and rock cycles. It is written in Chinese and simple English. At the end of the unit there is a list of main terms in both English and Chinese, and…

  11. A Sustainable Approach for Acid Rock Drainage Treatment using Clinoptilolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. Y.; Xu, W.; Grace, J. R.

    2009-04-01

    Problems related to acid rock drainage (ARD) occur along many highways of British Columbia. The ARD problem at Pennask Creek along Highway 97C in the Thompson-Okanagan region is an ideal site for pilot study to investigate a possible remediation solution. The highway was opened in 1991. An ARD problem was identified in 1997. Both sides of Highway 97C are producing acidified runoff from both cut rock surface and a fractured ditch. This runoff eventually enters Pennask Creek, the largest spawning source of rainbow trout in British Columbia. The current remediation technique using limestone for ARD treatment appears to be unnecessarily expensive, to generate additional solid waste and to not be optimally effective. A soil mineral natural zeolite - clinoptilolite - which is inexpensive and locally available, has a high metal adsorption capacity and a significant buffering capacity. Moreover, the clinoptilolite materials could be back-flushed and reused on site. An earlier batch adsorption study from our laboratory demonstrated that clinoptilolite has a high adsorption capacity for Cu, Zn, Al, with adsorption concentrations 131, 158 and 215 mg/kg clinoptilolite, respectively, from ARD of pH 3.3. Removal of metals from the loaded clinoptilolite by back-flushing was found to depend on the pH, with an optimum pH range for extraction of 2.5 to 4.0 for a contact time of one hour. The rank of desorption effectiveness was EDTA > NaCl > NaNO3 > NaOAC > NaHCO3 > Na2CO3 > NaOH > Ca(OH)2. A novel process involving cyclic adsorption on clinoptilolite followed by regeneration of the sorbent by desorption is examined for the removal of heavy metals from acid rock drainage. Experimental results show that the adsorption of zinc and copper depends on the pH and on external mass transfer. Desorption is assisted by adding NaCl to the water. A slurry bubble column was able to significantly reduce the time required for both adsorption and desorption in batch tests. XRD analysis indicated

  12. Cosmogenic helium in a terrestrial igneous rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurz, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    New helium isotopic measurements on samples from the Kula formation of Haleakala volcano of Hawaii are presented that are best explained by an in situ cosmogenic origin for a significant fraction of the He-3. Results from crushing and stepwise heating experiments, and consideration of the exposure age of the sample at the surface and the cosmic ray fluxes strongly support this hypothesis. Although crustal cosmogenic helium has been proposed previously, this represents its first unambiguous identification in a terrestrial sample.

  13. SNC meteorites - Igneous rocks from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. A.; Ashwal, L. D.

    1982-01-01

    It is argued that SNC (shergottite, nakhlite, chassignite) meteorites are ejecta from Mars. The mineralogy and chemistry of these objects is discussed, including rare earth element content, potassium/uranium ratios, oxidation state, oxygen isotopes, ages and isotopic evolution, magnetism, shock and texture. The possibility of SNC's deriving from Mercury, Venus, earth, moon, or a eucrite parent body is argued against. Mercury is too volatile-poor and anhydrous, Venus's atmosphere too thick and hot and its gravitational field too large, earth's oxygen isotope content too different from that of SNC's, the moon too different isotopically and chemically, and the ages of eucrites too different. Models suggest that SNC's could have escaped from Mars's gravitational field, and their composition supports Martian origin. Statistically, they could have reached the earth within their measured shock ages. Objections to the hypothesis are also discussed.

  14. Organic Protomolecule Assembly in Igneous Minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann; Staple, Aaron; Scoville, John

    2001-01-01

    C-H stretching bands in the infrared spectrum of single crystals of nominally high purity, laboratory-grown MgO and of natural upper mantle olivine provide an "organic" signature that closely resembles the symmetrical and asymmetrical C-H stretching modes of aliphatic -CH2- units. The C-H stretching bands indicate that H20 and CO2, dissolved in the matrix of these minerals, converted to form H2 and chemically reduced C, which in turn formed C-H entities, probably through segregation into defects such as dislocations. Heating causes the C-H bonds to pyrolyze and the C-H stretching bands to disappear, but annealing at 70 C causes them to reappear within a few days or weeks. Modeling dislocations in MgO suggests that the segregation of C can lead to Cx chains, x less than or equal to 4, with the terminal C atoms anchored to the MgO matrix by bonding to two U. Allowing H2 to react with such Cx chains leads to [O2C(CH2)2CO2] or similar precipitates. It is suggested that such Cx-Hy-Oz entities represent protomolecules from which derive the short-chain carboxylic and dicarboxylic and of the medium-chain fatty acids that have been solvent-extracted from crushed MgO and olivine single crystals, respectively. Thus it appears that the hard, dense matrix of igneous minerals represents a medium in which protomolecular units can be assembled. During weathering of rocks the protomolecular units turn into complex organic molecules. These processes may have provided stereochemically constrained organics to the early Earth that were crucial to the emergence of Life.

  15. Organic protomolecule assembly in igneous minerals.

    PubMed

    Freund, F; Staple, A; Scoville, J

    2001-02-27

    CH stretching bands, nu(CH), in the infrared spectrum of single crystals of nominally high purity, of laboratory-grown MgO, and of natural upper mantle olivine, provide an "organic" signature that closely resembles the symmetrical and asymmetrical C--H stretching modes of aliphatic -CH(2) units. The nu(CH) bands indicate that H(2)O and CO(2), dissolved in the matrix of these minerals, converted to form H(2) and chemically reduced C, which in turn formed C--H entities, probably through segregation into defects such as dislocations. Heating causes the C--H bonds to pyrolyze and the nu(CH) bands to disappear, but annealing at 70 degrees C causes them to reappear within a few days or weeks. Modeling dislocations in MgO suggests that the segregation of C can lead to C(x) chains, x = 4, with the terminal C atoms anchored to the MgO matrix by bonding to two O(-). Allowing H(2) to react with such C(x) chains leads to [O(2)C(CH(2))(2)CO(2)] or similar precipitates. It is suggested that such C(x)--H(y)--O(z) entities represent protomolecules from which derive the short-chain carboxylic and dicarboxylic and the medium-chain fatty acids that have been solvent-extracted from crushed MgO and olivine single crystals, respectively. Thus, it appears that the hard, dense matrix of igneous minerals represents a medium in which protomolecular units can be assembled. During weathering of rocks, the protomolecular units turn into complex organic molecules. These processes may have provided stereochemically constrained organics to the early Earth that were crucial to the emergence of life.

  16. Is phosphorus predictably incompatible in igneous processes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, C. A.; Barnes, S.

    1984-01-01

    Siderophile element abundances are central to recent models for core formation in the Earth and Moon and the origin of the Moon. It is important to identify siderophile elements whose behavior in igneous processes is predictable, so that primary mantle abundances can be deduced by subtracting out the effects of igneous processes. Newsom's model for core formation in the Moon requires subchondritic P, and suggests that P was depleted due to volatility. Experiments were conducted to determine P olivine/liquid distribution coefficients. Preliminary results indicate that P can be compatible with olivine during rapid cooling, but is not during isothermal crystallization with long growth times, and tends to be expelled during annealing. It is therefore not likely that P is compatible under any widespread igneous conditions, and the incompatible behavior of P in lunar crustal rocks can be safety assumed. In addition, low fO2 is insufficient to cause P compatibility, so it is unlikely that P-rich silicates formed during the early evolution of the Earth or Moon. These results indicate that P is depleted in the Moon.

  17. Acid rock drainage and rock weathering in Antarctica: important sources for iron cycling in the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Dold, B; Gonzalez-Toril, E; Aguilera, A; Lopez-Pamo, E; Cisternas, M E; Bucchi, F; Amils, R

    2013-06-18

    Here we describe biogeochemical processes that lead to the generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) and rock weathering on the Antarctic landmass and describe why they are important sources of iron into the Antarctic Ocean. During three expeditions, 2009-2011, we examined three sites on the South Shetland Islands in Antarctica. Two of them displayed intensive sulfide mineralization and generated acidic (pH 3.2-4.5), iron-rich drainage waters (up to 1.78 mM Fe), which infiltrated as groundwater (as Fe(2+)) and as superficial runoff (as Fe(3+)) into the sea, the latter with the formation of schwertmannite in the sea-ice. The formation of ARD in the Antarctic was catalyzed by acid mine drainage microorganisms found in cold climates, including Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans and Thiobacillus plumbophilus. The dissolved iron (DFe) flux from rock weathering (nonmineralized control site) was calculated to be 0.45 × 10(9) g DFe yr(-1) for the nowadays 5468 km of ice-free Antarctic rock coastline which is of the same order of magnitude as glacial or aeolian input to the Southern Ocean. Additionally, the two ARD sites alone liberate 0.026 and 0.057 × 10(9) g DFe yr(-1) as point sources to the sea. The increased iron input correlates with increased phytoplankton production close to the source. This might even be enhanced in the future by a global warming scenario, and could be a process counterbalancing global warming. PMID:23682976

  18. Acid rock drainage and rock weathering in Antarctica: important sources for iron cycling in the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Dold, B; Gonzalez-Toril, E; Aguilera, A; Lopez-Pamo, E; Cisternas, M E; Bucchi, F; Amils, R

    2013-06-18

    Here we describe biogeochemical processes that lead to the generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) and rock weathering on the Antarctic landmass and describe why they are important sources of iron into the Antarctic Ocean. During three expeditions, 2009-2011, we examined three sites on the South Shetland Islands in Antarctica. Two of them displayed intensive sulfide mineralization and generated acidic (pH 3.2-4.5), iron-rich drainage waters (up to 1.78 mM Fe), which infiltrated as groundwater (as Fe(2+)) and as superficial runoff (as Fe(3+)) into the sea, the latter with the formation of schwertmannite in the sea-ice. The formation of ARD in the Antarctic was catalyzed by acid mine drainage microorganisms found in cold climates, including Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans and Thiobacillus plumbophilus. The dissolved iron (DFe) flux from rock weathering (nonmineralized control site) was calculated to be 0.45 × 10(9) g DFe yr(-1) for the nowadays 5468 km of ice-free Antarctic rock coastline which is of the same order of magnitude as glacial or aeolian input to the Southern Ocean. Additionally, the two ARD sites alone liberate 0.026 and 0.057 × 10(9) g DFe yr(-1) as point sources to the sea. The increased iron input correlates with increased phytoplankton production close to the source. This might even be enhanced in the future by a global warming scenario, and could be a process counterbalancing global warming.

  19. Teaching the Rock Cycle with Ease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bereki, Debra

    2000-01-01

    Describes a hands-on lesson for teaching high school students the concept of the rock cycle using sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks. Students use a rock cycle diagram to identify pairs of rocks. From the rock cycle, students explain on paper how their first rock became the second rock and vice versa. (PVD)

  20. Mixing-controlled uncertainty in long-term predictions of acid rock drainage from heterogeneous waste-rock piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedretti, D.; Beckie, R. D.; Mayer, K. U.

    2015-12-01

    The chemistry of drainage from waste-rock piles at mine sites is difficult to predict because of a number of uncertainties including heterogeneous reactive mineral content, distribution of minerals, weathering rates and physical flow properties. In this presentation, we examine the effects of mixing on drainage chemistry over timescales of 100s of years. We use a 1-D streamtube conceptualization of flow in waste rocks and multicomponent reactive transport modeling. We simplify the reactive system to consist of acid-producing sulfide minerals and acid-neutralizing carbonate minerals and secondary sulfate and iron oxide minerals. We create multiple realizations of waste-rock piles with distinct distributions of reactive minerals along each flow path and examine the uncertainty of drainage geochemistry through time. The limited mixing of streamtubes that is characteristic of the vertical unsaturated flow in many waste-rock piles, allows individual flowpaths to sustain acid or neutral conditions to the base of the pile, where the streamtubes mix. Consequently, mixing and the acidity/alkalinity balance of the streamtube waters, and not the overall acid- and base-producing mineral contents, control the instantaneous discharge chemistry. Our results show that the limited mixing implied by preferential flow and the heterogeneous distribution of mineral contents lead to large uncertainty in drainage chemistry over short and medium time scales. However, over longer timescales when one of either the acid-producing or neutralizing primary phases is depleted, the drainage chemistry becomes less controlled by mixing and in turn less uncertain. A correct understanding of the temporal variability of uncertainty is key to make informed long-term decisions in mining settings regarding the management of waste material.

  1. Volcanic rocks of the Mendeleev Ridge (Arctic Ocean) - evidences for existence of the large igneous provinces within Arctic region: on the data of the High Arctic Russian Expedition "Arctic-2012"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Sergey; Petrov, Oleg; Morozov, Andrey; Kremenetsky, Alexander; Gusev, Evgeny; Shevchenko, Sergey; Krymsky, Robert; Belyatsky, Boris; Antonov, Anton; Rodionov, Nikolay

    2013-04-01

    rocks and progressive magmas evolution during mixing of asthenospheric substances of the upwelling plume with the lithospheric component. Relatively high-radiogenic osmium isotope composition of the studied basalts (187Os/188Omeas=0.51525-1.07316) indicates the presence of significant share of the enriched lithospheric component in the source of basalt melts and the formation of this source at expense of relatively aged substances (model Re-Os ages from 600 to 1200 Ma). Age determination of the studied basalts effusions by argon-argon method is ongoing process but we have separated about 30 zircon grains mainly magmatic appearance (Th/U=0.6-2.0, long-prismatic grains without any visible signs of digestion and recrystallization, and overgrowths) from 4 samples and determined their U-Pb SHRIMP ages. Obtained age clusters indicate existence of old sialic basement underlying Mendeleev Ridge rocks (captured zircons with the ages of 2.7, 1.9, 1.6 and 0.8-1.2 Ga), which composition could be correlated with continental complexes of the Eurasia margins. At the same time, the finding of the volcanogenic zircons within the basalts with the ages of 127 and 260 Ma does not exclude the plausible existence on the studied territory of Polar Arctic of basalt effusions of two (or more) of igneous complexes corresponded with activities of mantle plumes - Cretaceous-Cenozoic (HALIP) and Triassic-Permian (resembling Siberian traps) ages

  2. Diverse Igneous Protolith Contributions to Sediments in Gale Crater: Variable Metasomatism of the Mars Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Thomas, A. P.; Thompson, L.; Gellert, R.

    2016-08-01

    Igneous float rocks and least altered basaltic sedimentary bedrock examined in Gale Crater provide insight to the petrogenesis of the crystalline basement and suggest the mantle source was alkali and Ni-enriched by an oxidizing metasomatic event.

  3. Amino acids and hydrocarbons approximately 3,800-Myr old in the Isua rocks, southwestern Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, B.; Engel, M. H.; Zumberge, J. E.; Ogino, H.; Chang, S. Y.

    1981-01-01

    Results of an analysis of amino acids and hydrocarbons found in the Isua banded iron formation, which contains the oldest known rocks on earth, are discussed. Similarities are pointed out between the relative amino acid abundances of the Isua rocks and those of lichens found on their surfaces, and a lack of substantial racemization indicated by the low D/L ratios in the 3800-million year old rock samples is noted. Experimental results showing the possibility of amino acid diffusion from lichens into the rocks are presented. Comparisons of the Isua rock amino acid D/L ratios with those reported for samples from other regions indicates that none of the Isua amino acids are older than a few tens of thousands to a few hundred thousand years. Analyses of the saturated hydrocarbons of the Isua samples reveals no odd carbon number preference, which may indicate antiquity, however laboratory experiments have shown that amino acids and aromatic and saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons could not have survived the metamorphic history of the Isua rocks. The evidence presented thus suggests that the amino acids and hydrocarbons found are not of the age of the sediments.

  4. Operational Lessons Leaned During bioreactor Demonstrations for Acid Rock Drainage Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) has emphasized the development of biologically-based treatment technologies for acid rock drainage (ARD). Progressively evolving technology demonstrations have resulted in significant advances in sulf...

  5. Operational Lessons Learned During Bioreactor Demonstrations for Acid Rock Drainage Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) has emphasized the development of biologically-based treatment technologies for acid rock drainage (ARD). Progressively evolving technology demonstrations have resulted in significant advances in sul...

  6. Testing the role of silicic acid and bioorganic materials in the formation of rock coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Vera M.; Philip, Ajish I.; Perry, Randall S.

    2004-11-01

    Silica, amino acids, and DNA were recently discovered in desert varnish. In this work we experimentally test the proposed role of silicic acid and bio-chemicals in the formation of desert varnish and other rock coatings. We have developed a protocol in which the rocks were treated with a mixture of silicic acid, sugars, amino acids, metals and clays, under the influence of heat and UV light. This protocol reflects the proposed mechanism of the polymerization of silicic acid with the biooganic materials, and the laboratory model for the natural conditions under which the desert varnish is formed. Our experiments produced coatings with a hardness and morphology that resemble the natural ones. These results provide a support for the role of silicic acid in the formation of rock coatings. Since the hard silica-based coatings preserve organic compounds in them, they may serve as a biosignature for life, here or possibly on Mars.

  7. Testing the Role of Silicic Acid and Bioorganic Materials in the Formation of Rock Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, Vera; Philip, Ajish I.; Perry, Randall S.

    2004-12-01

    Silica, amino acids, and DNA were recently discovered in desert varnish. In this work we experimentally test the proposed role of silicic acid and bio-chemicals in the formation of desert varnish and other rock coatings. We have developed a protocol in which hte rocks were treated with a mixture of silicic acid, sugars, amino acids, metals and clays, under the influence of heat and UV light. This protocol reflects the proposed mechanism of hte polymerization of silicic acid with the bioorganic materials, and the laboratory model for the natural conditions under which the desert varnish is formed. Our experiments produced coatings with a hardness and morphology that resemble the nature ones. These results provide a support for the role of silicic acid in the formation of rock coatings. Since the hard silica-based coatings preserve organic compounds in them, they may serve as a biosignature for life, here or possibly Mars.

  8. Mind Over Magma: The Story of Igneous Petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Don

    2004-01-01

    In the centuries that enquiring minds have studied and theorized about igneous rocks, much progress has been made, both in accumulating observations and in developing theories. Yet, writing a history of this progress is a daunting undertaking. The volume of the literature is vast and in multiple languages; the various lines of inquiry are diverse and complex; and the nomenclature is sometimes abstruse. On top of these challenges, many of its principal issues have yet to find a definitive consensus. With the exception of a few topical studies, historians of science have virtually avoided the subject. In Mind Over Magma: The Story of Igneous Petrology, Davis Young has taken on the challenge of writing a comprehensive survey of the study of igneous rocks, and the result has been a remarkable book of meticulous scholarship. Igneous petrology is a vast subject, and it is not obvious how best to organize its history. Young takes a topical approach, generally grouping together various studies by either the problem being investigated or the method of attack. These topics span the earliest times to the present, with an emphasis on recurring themes, such as the causes of magmatic diversity and the origins of the granitic rocks. The range of topics includes most of the subjects central to the field over its history. As much as is practical, topics are discussed in chronological order, and along the way, the reader is treated to biographical sketches of many of the key contributors. This organization proves effective in dealing with the multitude of concepts.

  9. Observations on lichens, granite rock outcrops and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Lichen sensitivity to the synergistic effects of acid rain and toxic metals in the Atlanta, Georgia area is discussed. The disappearance of lichens on Stone Mountain after the placement of a safety galvinized fence lead to the observations of possible acid rain effects on population dynamics of the lichen community.

  10. Progress report (1953) on the revision of Washington's Chemical analyses of igneous rocks (U.S.G.S. Prof. Paper 99), presented at the First International Symposium on Geochemistry, under the auspices of the International Union of Chemistry, in Zurich, August 11-13, 1953

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooker, Marjorie

    1954-01-01

    In October of last year, vhen I was here in Zurich, it was my privilege to talk with Professor Niggli about the revision of Washington's "Chemical analysis of igneous rocks" which the United States Geological Survey is undertaking. It was then that he suggested the possibility of a progress report at this meeting in order that information about the revision would be available to those who are most interested. At the time that I talked with Professor Niggli the place or this meeting had not bean decided, but I think he hoped that it would be in Zurich,, Today, we must proceed without him, but I am sure that you must feel, as I do, that he is here sn spirit and that he expects us to continue the work as he would have, - with enthusiasm, with strength, and with happiness.

  11. Martian Igneous Geochemistry: The Nature of the Martian Mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Peng, Z. X.; Herrin, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Mafic igneous rocks probe the interiors of their parent objects, reflecting the compositions and mineralogies of their source regions, and the magmatic processes that engendered them. Incompatible trace element contents of mafic igneous rocks are widely used to constrain the petrologic evolution of planets. We focus on incompatible element ratios of martian meteorites to constrain the petrologic evolution of Mars in the context of magma ocean/cumulate overturn models [1]. Most martian meteorites contain some cumulus grains, but regardless, their incompatible element ratios are close to those of their parent magmas. Martian meteorites form two main petrologic/ age groupings; a 1.3 Ga group composed of clinopyroxenites (nakhlites) and dunites (chassignites), and a <1 Ga group composed of basalts and lherzolites (shergottites).

  12. Conceptual models of the formation of acid-rock drainage at road cuts in Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Michael W.; Worland, Scott; Byl, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Pyrite and other minerals containing sulfur and trace metals occur in several rock formations throughout Middle and East Tennessee. Pyrite (FeS2) weathers in the presence of oxygen and water to form iron hydroxides and sulfuric acid. The weathering and interaction of the acid on the rocks and other minerals at road cuts can result in drainage with low pH (< 4) and high concentrations of trace metals. Acid-rock drainage can cause environmental problems and damage transportation infrastructure. The formation and remediation of acid-drainage from roads cuts has not been researched as thoroughly as acid-mine drainage. The U.S Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Transportation, is conducting an investigation to better understand the geologic, hydrologic, and biogeochemical factors that control acid formation at road cuts. Road cuts with the potential for acid-rock drainage were identifed and evaluated in Middle and East Tennessee. The pyrite-bearing formations evaluated were the Chattanooga Shale (Devonian black shale), the Fentress Formation (coal-bearing), and the Precambrian Anakeesta Formation and similar Precambrian rocks. Conceptual models of the formation and transport of acid-rock drainage (ARD) from road cuts were developed based on the results of a literature review, site reconnaissance, and the initial rock and water sampling. The formation of ARD requires a combination of hydrologic, geochemical, and microbial interactions which affect drainage from the site, acidity of the water, and trace metal concentrations. The basic modes of ARD formation from road cuts are; 1 - seeps and springs from pyrite-bearing formations and 2 - runoff over the face of a road cut in a pyrite-bearing formation. Depending on site conditions at road cuts, the basic modes of ARD formation can be altered and the additional modes of ARD formation are; 3 - runoff over and through piles of pyrite-bearing material, either from construction or breakdown

  13. 7th international conference on acid rock drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhisel, R.I.

    2006-07-01

    This meeting also serves as the 23rd annual meeting of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation. The papers discussed various aspects of acid mine drainage including its impact, sustainability issues, case studies, lessons learned, characterization, closure/land use issues, emerging technologies, forestry/ecology, abandoned mine lands, modelling, pit lakes/backfill, soils and overburden, and treatment.

  14. Magnetic properties, acid neutralization capacity, and net acid production of rocks in the Animas River Watershed Silverton, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCafferty, Anne E.; Yager, Douglas B.; Horton, Radley M.; Diehl, Sharon F.

    2006-01-01

    Federal land managers along with local stakeholders in the Upper Animas River watershed near Silverton, Colorado are actively designing and implementing mine waste remediation projects to mitigate the effects of acid mine drainage from several abandoned hard rock metal mines and mills. Local source rocks with high acid neutralization capacity (ANC) within the watershed are of interest to land managers for use in these remediation projects. A suite of representative samples was collected from propylitic to weakly sericitic-altered volcanic and plutonic rocks exposed in outcrops throughout the watershed. Acid-base accounting laboratory methods coupled with mineralogic and geochemical characterization provide insight into lithologies that have a range of ANC and net acid production (NAP). Petrophysical lab determinations of magnetic susceptibility converted to estimates for percent magnetite show correlation with the environmental properties of ANC and NAP for many of the lithologies. A goal of our study is to interpret watershed-scale airborne magnetic data for regional mapping of rocks that have varying degrees of ANC and NAP. Results of our preliminary work are presented here.

  15. Acid-base properties of bentonite rocks with different origins.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Noémi M; Kónya, József

    2006-03-01

    Five bentonite samples (35-47% montmorillonite) from a Sarmatian sediment series with bentonite sites around Sajóbábony (Hungary) is studied. Some of these samples were tuffogenic bentonite (sedimentary), the others were bentonitized tuff with volcano sedimentary origin. The acid-base properties of the edge sites were studied by potentiometric titrations and surface complexation modeling. It was found that the number and the ratio of silanol and aluminol sites as well as the intrinsic stability constants are different for the sedimentary bentonite and bentonitized tuff. The characteristic properties of the edges sites depend on the origins. The acid-base properties are compared to other commercial and standard bentonites.

  16. Ages of igneous and hydrothermal events in the Round Mountain and Manhattan gold districts, Nye County, Nevada.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shawe, D.R.; Marvin, R.F.; Andriessen, P.A.M.; Mehnert, H.H.; Merritt, V.M.

    1986-01-01

    Isotopic age determinations of rocks and minerals separated from them are applied to refining and correlating the geological history of igneous and mineralizing events in a part of the Basin and Range province. -G.J.N.

  17. Geochemistry at Gale from ChemCam: Implications for Martian Igneous and Sedimentary Processes and for Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Blaney, D. L.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Mangold, N.; Clegg, S.; Sautter, V.; Bridges, J.; Bridges, N.; Clark, B.; D'Uston, C.; Dyar, M. D.; Edgar, L.; Ehlmann, B.; Forni, O.; Fabre, C.; Gasnault, O.; Herkenhoff, K.; Johnson, J.; Leveille, R.; Newsom, H.; Vaniman, D.; Cousin, A.; Deflores, L.; Lanza, N.; Lasue, J.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Pinet, P.; Schroeder, S.; Rapin, W.; Fisk, M. R.; Melikechi, N.; Mezzacappa, A.; Le Deit, L.; Le Mouelic, S.; Nachon, M.; Gordon, S.; Toplis, M.; Jackson, R.; Williams, J.; Williams, A.

    2014-07-01

    Gale crater contains a diversity of igneous float rocks, clasts of which are found in conglomerates. Sandstones and mudstones do not reflect this local felsic material. Hydrogen, F, Li, major and trace elements yield new clues to Mars geologic history.

  18. COMPOST-FREE BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE, TECHNICAL EVALUATION BULLETIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, an evaluation of the compost-free bioreactor treatment of acid rock drainage (ARD) from the Aspen Seep was conducted at the Leviathan Mine Superfund site located in a remote, high altitude area of Alpine Co...

  19. COMPOST-FREE BIOREACTOR TREATMENT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE LEVIATHAN MINE, CALIFORNIA INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, an evaluation of the compost-free bioreactor treatment of acid rock drainage (ARD) from the Aspen Seep was conducted at the Leviathan Mine Superfund site located in a remote, high altitude area of Alpine Co...

  20. PHYSICAL SOLUTIONS FOR ACID ROCK DRAINAGE AT REMOTE SITES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program, Activity III, Project 42, Physical Solutions for Acid Rock Drainage at Remote Sites, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy. A...

  1. COMPOST-FREE BIOREACTOR TREATMENT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE - TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, an evaluation of the compost-free bioreactor treatment of acid rock drainage (ARD) from the Aspen Seep was conducted at the Leviathan Mine Superfund site located in a remote, high altitude area of Alpine Co...

  2. Aqueous Alteration of Mars-Analog Rocks Under an Acidic Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, M. A.; Moore, J. M.; Mellon, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    The wind-blown fines of Mars have high amounts of salts that are easily mobilized by water. We report on laboratory experiments that produce brines from the interaction of water with Mars-analog rocks and a simulated acidic Mars paleoatmosphere. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Northeast Atlantic Igneous Province volcanic margin development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mjelde, R.; Breivik, A. J.; Faleide, J. I.

    2009-04-01

    Early Eocene continental breakup in the NE Atlantic Volcanic Province (NAIP) was associated with voluminous extrusive and intrusive magmatism, and initial seafloor spreading produced anomalously thick oceanic crust. Recent publications based on crustal-scale wide-angle seismic data show that there is a positive correlation between igneous crustal thickness (H) and average P-wave velocity (Vp) on all investigated margins in the NAIP. Vp can be used as a proxy for crustal composition, which can be related to the mode of mantle melting. A positive H-Vp correlation indicates that excessive mantle melting the first few million years after breakup was driven by an initial increased temperature that cools off as seafloor spreading develops, consistent with a mantle plume model. Variations in mantle composition can explain excess magmatism, but will generate a negative H-Vp correlation. Active mantle convection may increase the flux of mantle rocks through the melting zone above the rate of passive corner flow, which can also produce excessive magmatism. This would produce little H-Vp correlation, and place the curve lower than the passive flow melting curve in the diagram. We have compiled earlier published results with our own analyses of published and unpublished data from different groups to look for systematic variations in the mantle melting mode along the NAIP margins. Earlier studies (Holbrook et al., 2002, White et al, 2008) on the southeast Greenland conjugate system, indicate that the thick igneous crust of the southern NAIP (SE Greenland ? Hatton Bank) was dominated by increased mantle temperature only, while magmatism closer to the southern side of and including the Greenland-Iceland-Færøy Ridge (GIFR) was created by combined temperature increase and active mantle convection. Recent publications (Breivik et al., 2008, White et al, 2008) north of the GIFR for the Norway Basin segment, indicate temperature dominated magmatism between the Jan Mayen Fracture

  4. Teaching Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology Through Guided Inquiry Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, N. J.

    2003-12-01

    Undergraduate Petrology at New Mexico State University (GEOL 399) has been taught using three, 5-6 week long projects in place of lectures, lab, and exams for the last six years. Reasons for changing from the traditional format include: 1) to move the focus from identification and memorization to petrologic thinking; 2) the need for undergraduate students to apply basic chemical, structural, and field concepts to igneous and metamorphic rocks; 3) student boredom in the traditional mode by the topic that has captivated my professional life, in spite of my best efforts to offer thrilling lectures, problems, and labs. The course has three guided inquiry projects: volcanic, plutonic, and pelitic dynamothermal. Two of the rock suites are investigated during field trips. Each project provides hand samples and thin sections; the igneous projects also include whole-rock major and trace element data. Students write a scientific paper that classifies and describes the rocks, describes the data (mineralogical and geochemical), and uses data to interpret parameters such as tectonic setting, igneous processes, relationship to phase diagrams, geologic history, metamorphic grade, metamorphic facies, and polymetamorphic history. Students use the text as a major resource for self-learning; mini-lectures on pertinent topics are presented when needed by the majority of students. Project scores include evaluation of small parts of the paper due each Friday and participation in peer review as well as the final report. I have found that petrology is much more fun, although more difficult, to teach using this method. It is challenging to be totally prepared for class because students are working at different speeds on different levels on different aspects of the project. Students enjoy the course, especially the opportunity to engage in scientific investigation and debate. A significant flaw in this course is that students see fewer rocks and have less experience in rock classification

  5. X-ray microtomography of hydrochloric acid propagation in carbonate rocks.

    PubMed

    Machado, A C; Oliveira, T J L; Cruz, F B; Lopes, R T; Lima, I

    2015-02-01

    Acid treatments are used in the oil and gas industry, to increase the permeability of the carbonate reservoirs by creating preferential channels, called wormholes. Channels formation is strongly influenced by acid type and injection rate. The aim of this study is to evaluate some characteristics of the microporous system of carbonate rocks, before and after acidizing. For that purpose X-ray high-resolution microtomography was used. The results show that this technique can be used as a reliable method to analyze microstructural characteristics of the wormholes.

  6. 3D seismic interpretation of subsurface eruptive centers in a Permian large igneous province, Tazhong Uplift, central Tarim Basin, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiangfeng; Zhu, Wenbin; Guan, Da; Zhu, Beibei; Yuan, Liansheng; Xiang, Xuemei; Su, Jinbao; He, Jingwen; Wu, Xinhui

    2015-12-01

    A 1445-km2 high-resolution 3D seismic reflection dataset is used to analyze the Permian large igneous province in the subsurface of the Tazhong area in the central Tarim Basin in northwestern China. Constrained by the synthetic seismograms of four wells, the top and base of the igneous rocks were identified in the seismic data. Seven large volcanic craters, each >10 km2 in area, have been discovered via the application of coherency and amplitude attributes. The thickness and volume of the igneous rocks were obtained by time-depth transformation. In the study area, all of the igneous rocks, with thicknesses from 120 to 1133 m, were formed by eruptions in the Early Permian. These events produced huge erupted volumes (178 km3) and multiple closely spaced volcanic edifices (<13 km). These features suggest that the study area may be the part of the eruptive center of the Permian igneous rocks in the Tarim Basin.

  7. On the Basic Principles of Igneous Petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    How and why Differentiation occurs has dominated Igneous Petrology since its beginning (~1880) even though many of the problems associated with it have been thoroughly solved. Rediscovery of the proverbial wheel with new techniques impedes progress. As soon as thin section petrography was combined with rock and mineral chemistry, rock diversity, compositional suites, and petrographic provinces all became obvious. The masterful 1902 CIPW norm in a real sense solved the chemical mystery of differentiation: rocks are related by the addition and subtraction of minerals in the anciently appreciated process of fractional crystallization. Yet few believed this, even after phase equilibria arrived. Assimilation, gas transfer, magma mixing, Soret diffusion, immiscibility, and other processes had strong adherents, even though by 1897 Becker conclusively showed the ineffectiveness of molecular diffusion in large-scale processes. The enormity of heat to molecular diffusion (today's Lewis no.) should have been convincing; but few paid attention. Bowen did, and he refined and restated the result; few still paid attention. And in spite of his truly masterful command of experiment and field relations in promoting fractional crystallization, Fenner and others fought him with odd arguments. The beauty of phase equilibria eventually dominated at the expense of knowing the physical side of differentiation. Bowen himself saw and struggled with the connection between physical and chemical processes. Progress has come from new concepts in heat transfer, kinetics, and slurry dynamics. The key approach is understanding the dynamic competition between spatial rates of solidification and all other processes. The lesson is clear: Scholarship and combined field, laboratory and technical expertise are critical to understanding magmatic processes. Magma is a limitlessly enchanting and challenging material wherein physical processes buttressed by chemistry govern.

  8. Lead in the Getchell-Turquoise ridge Carlin-type gold deposits from the perspective of potential igneous and sedimentary rock sources in Northern Nevada: Implications for fluid and metal sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tosdal, R.M.; Cline, J.S.; Fanning, C.M.; Wooden, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Lead isotope compositions of bulk mineral samples (fluorite, orpiment, and realgar) determined using conventional techniques and of ore-stage arsenian pyrite using the Sensitive High Resolution Ion-Microprobe (SHRIMP) in the Getchell and Turquoise Ridge Carlin-type gold deposits (Osgood Mountains) require contribution from two different Pb sources. One Pb source dominates the ore stage. It has a limited Pb isotope range characterized by 208Pb/206Pb values of 2.000 to 2.005 and 207Pb/206Pb values of 0.8031 to 0.8075, as recorded by 10-??m-diameter spot SHRIMP analyses of ore-stage arsenian pyrite. These values approximately correspond to 206Pb/204Pb of 19.3 to 19.6, 207Pb/204Pb of 15.65 to 15.75, and 208Pb/204Pb of 39.2 to 39.5. This Pb source is isotopically similar to that in average Neoproterozoic and Cambrian elastic rocks but not to any potential magmatic sources. Whether those clastic rocks provided Pb to the ore fluid cannot be unequivocally proven because their Pb isotope compositions over the same range as in ore-stage arsenian pyrite are similar to those of Ordovician to Devonian siliciclastic and calcareous rocks. The Pb source in the calcareous rocks most likely is largely detrital minerals, since that detritus was derived from the same sources as the detritus in the Neoproterozoic and Cambrian clastic rocks. The second Pb source is characterized by a large range of 206Pb/204Pb values (18-34) with a limited range of 208Pb/204Pb values (38.1-39.5), indicating low but variable Th/U and high and variable U/Pb values. The second Pb source dominates late and postore-stage minerals but is also found in preore sulfide minerals. These Pb isotope characteristics typify Ordovician to Devonian siliciclastic and calcareous rocks around the Carlin trend in northeast Nevada. Petrologically similar rocks host the Getchell and Turquoise Ridge deposits. Lead from the second source was either contributed from the host sedimentary rock sequences or brought into the

  9. An 40Ar/39Ar geochronology on a mid-Eocene igneous event on the Barton and Weaver peninsulas: Implications for the dynamic setting of the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Zheng, Xiang-Shen; Lee, Jong I. K.; Choe, Won Hie; Evans, Noreen; Zhu, Ri-Xiang

    2009-12-01

    The genesis of basaltic to andesitic lavas, mafic dikes, and granitoid plutons composing the subaerial cover on the Barton and Weaver peninsulas, Antarctica, is related to arc formation and subduction processes. Precise dating of these polar rocks using conventional 40Ar/39Ar techniques is compromised by the high degree of alteration (with loss on ignition as high as 8%). In order to minimize the alteration effects we have followed a sample preparation process that includes repeated acid leaching, acetone washing, and hand picking, followed by an overnight bake at 250°C. After this procedure, groundmass samples can yield accurate age plateaus consisting of 70%-100% of the total 39Ark released using high-resolution heating schedules. The different rock types studied on the Barton and Weaver peninsulas yielded almost coeval ages, suggesting a giant igneous event in the Weaver and Barton peninsulas at 44.5 Ma. A compilation of newly published ages indicate that this event took place throughout the whole South Shetland Islands, suggesting a dynamic incident occurred at this stage during the arc evolution history. We related this igneous event to a mantle delamination mechanism during Eocene times. The delamination process began at ˜52 Ma, and the resultant upwelling of asthenosphere baffled the subduction of Phoenix plate, causing an abrupt decrease in convergence rate. Then multiple magmatic sources were triggered, resulting in a culminating igneous activity during 50-40 Ma with a peak at ˜45 Ma along the archipelago. The delamination also caused the extension regime indicated by the dike swarm, plugs and sills all over the archipelago, and the uplift of Smith metamorphic complex and Livingston Island. Delamination process may have finished at some time during 40-30 Ma, leaving a weak igneous activity at that stage and thereafter. The convergence rate then recovered gradually, as indicated by the magnetic anomaly identifications. This model is supported by seismic

  10. Possible Biosphere-Lithosphere Interactions Preserved in Igneous Zircon and Implications for Hadean Earth.

    PubMed

    Trail, Dustin; Tailby, Nicholas D; Sochko, Maggie; Ackerson, Michael R

    2015-07-01

    Granitoids are silicic rocks that make up the majority of the continental crust, but different models arise for the origins of these rocks. One classification scheme defines different granitoid types on the basis of materials involved in the melting/crystallization process. In this end-member case, granitoids may be derived from melting of a preexisting igneous rock, while other granitoids, by contrast, are formed or influenced by melting of buried sedimentary material. In the latter case, assimilated sedimentary material altered by chemical processes occurring at the near surface of Earth-including biological activity-could influence magma chemical properties. Here, we apply a redox-sensitive calibration based on the incorporation of Ce into zircon crystals found in these two rock types, termed sedimentary-type (S-type) and igneous-type (I-type) granitoids. The ∼400 Ma Lachlan Fold Belt rocks of southeastern Australia were chosen for investigation here; these rocks have been a key target used to describe and explore granitoid genesis for close to 50 years. We observe that zircons found in S-type granitoids formed under more reducing conditions than those formed from I-type granitoids from the same terrain. This observation, while reflecting 9 granitoids and 289 analyses of zircons from a region where over 400 different plutons have been identified, is consistent with the incorporation of (reduced) organic matter in the former and highlights one possible manner in which life may modify the composition of igneous minerals. The chemical properties of rocks or igneous minerals may extend the search for ancient biological activity to the earliest period of known igneous activity, which dates back to ∼4.4 billion years ago. If organic matter was incorporated into Hadean sediments that were buried and melted, then these biological remnants could imprint a chemical signature within the subsequent melt and the resulting crystal assemblage, including zircon.

  11. Possible Biosphere-Lithosphere Interactions Preserved in Igneous Zircon and Implications for Hadean Earth.

    PubMed

    Trail, Dustin; Tailby, Nicholas D; Sochko, Maggie; Ackerson, Michael R

    2015-07-01

    Granitoids are silicic rocks that make up the majority of the continental crust, but different models arise for the origins of these rocks. One classification scheme defines different granitoid types on the basis of materials involved in the melting/crystallization process. In this end-member case, granitoids may be derived from melting of a preexisting igneous rock, while other granitoids, by contrast, are formed or influenced by melting of buried sedimentary material. In the latter case, assimilated sedimentary material altered by chemical processes occurring at the near surface of Earth-including biological activity-could influence magma chemical properties. Here, we apply a redox-sensitive calibration based on the incorporation of Ce into zircon crystals found in these two rock types, termed sedimentary-type (S-type) and igneous-type (I-type) granitoids. The ∼400 Ma Lachlan Fold Belt rocks of southeastern Australia were chosen for investigation here; these rocks have been a key target used to describe and explore granitoid genesis for close to 50 years. We observe that zircons found in S-type granitoids formed under more reducing conditions than those formed from I-type granitoids from the same terrain. This observation, while reflecting 9 granitoids and 289 analyses of zircons from a region where over 400 different plutons have been identified, is consistent with the incorporation of (reduced) organic matter in the former and highlights one possible manner in which life may modify the composition of igneous minerals. The chemical properties of rocks or igneous minerals may extend the search for ancient biological activity to the earliest period of known igneous activity, which dates back to ∼4.4 billion years ago. If organic matter was incorporated into Hadean sediments that were buried and melted, then these biological remnants could imprint a chemical signature within the subsequent melt and the resulting crystal assemblage, including zircon. PMID

  12. The Search for Igneous Materials at the Viking Landing Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Dale-Bannister, M.; Guinnes, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    The use of Viking Lander 6 channel (0.4 to 1.1 microns) images to identify igneous materials is discussed. Movies of synthetic image cubes demonstrate that there are a number of contrast reversals between soils and certain rocks. Typically, large, angular rocks are brighter than the surrounding soils in the shortest wavelengths, and much darker than the soils at longest wavelengths. These results, which seem difficult to explain solely on the basis of photometric effects related to local lighting and viewing, are consistent with the presence of Fe+2 bearing silicates at the rock surfaces, producing relatively moderate absorptions in the blue and green parts of the spectrum, but more significant absorptions near about 1.0 micrometer (e.g., Fe+2 bearing pyroxenes). The soils, on the other hand, have signatures consistent with strong Fe+3 related absorptions at shorter wavelengths (e.g., Fe+3 bearing oxides or hydroxides).

  13. Alpine-type sensu strictu(ophiolitic) peridotites: Refractory residues from partial melting or igneous sediments? A contribution to the discussion of the paper: "The origin of ultramafic and ultrabasic rocks" by P.J. Wyllie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thayer, T.P.

    1969-01-01

    Although Alpine peridotites and basaltic lavas are widely associated in eugeosynclines and oceanic areas, their genetic ties are obscure. Three major characteristics of olivine-rich Alpine peridotite and dunite-relict cumulus textures, aggregated masses of chromitite, and intimate association with magnesium-rich gabbro - cannot be explained by partial melting of garnet peridotite to form tholeiite. Association of magnesium-rich gabbro with the chromite-bearing and so-called high-temperature Alpine peridotites is believed to present problems that have not been considered by advocates of the partial-melting hypothesis. The chromite-bearing Alpine peridotites and related feldspathic rocks are believed to have formed near the top of the mantle by gravitational differentiation processes which are largely independent of the melting processes that produce basaltic magma at depths of 50 km or more. ?? 1969.

  14. Rho Kinase ROCK2 Mediates Acid-Induced NADPH Oxidase NOX5-S Expression in Human Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weibiao

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of the progression from Barrett’s esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) are not fully understood. We have shown that NOX5-S may be involved in this progression. However, how acid upregulates NOX5-S is not well known. We found that acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression was significantly decreased by the Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y27632 in BE mucosal biopsies and FLO-1 EA cells. In addition, acid treatment significantly increased the Rho kinase activity in FLO-1 cells. The acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production was significantly decreased by knockdown of Rho kinase ROCK2, but not by knockdown of ROCK1. Conversely, the overexpression of the constitutively active ROCK2, but not the constitutively active ROCK1, significantly enhanced the NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production. Moreover, the acid-induced increase in Rho kinase activity and in NOX5-S mRNA expression was blocked by the removal of calcium in both FLO-1 and OE33 cells. The calcium ionophore A23187 significantly increased the Rho kinase activity and NOX5-S mRNA expression. We conclude that acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production may depend on the activation of ROCK2, but not ROCK1, in EA cells. The acid-induced activation of Rho kinase may be mediated by the intracellular calcium increase. It is possible that persistent acid reflux present in BE patients may increase the intracellular calcium, activate ROCK2 and thereby upregulate NOX5-S. High levels of reactive oxygen species derived from NOX5-S may cause DNA damage and thereby contribute to the progression from BE to EA. PMID:26901778

  15. Igneous history of the aubrite parent asteroid - Evidence from the Norton County enstatite achondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okada, Akihiko; Keil, Klaus; Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Newsom, Horton

    1988-01-01

    Numerous specimens of the Norton County enstatite achondrite (aubrite) were studied by optical microscopy, electron microprobe, and neutron-activation analysis. Norton County is found to be a fragmental impact breccia, consisting of a clastic matrix made mostly of crushed enstatite, into which are embedded a variety of mineral and lithic clasts of both igneous and impact melt origin. The Norton County precursor materials were igneous rocks, mostly plutonic orthopyroxenites, not grains formed by condensation from the solar nebula. The Mg-silicate-rich aubrite parent body experienced extensive melting and igneous differentiation, causing formation of diverse lithologies including dunites, plutonic orthopyroxenites, plutonic pyroxenites, and plagioclase-silica rocks. The presence of impact melt breccias (the microporphyritic clasts and the diopside-plagioclase-silica clast) of still different compositions further attests to the lithologic diversity of the aubrite parent body.

  16. Recrystallized Impact Glasses of the Onaping Formation and the Sudbury Igneous Complex, Sudbury Structure, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, B. O.; Weiser, T.; Brockmeyer, P.

    1996-01-01

    The origin of the Sudbury Structure and of the associated heterolithic breccias of the Onaping Formation and the Sudbury Igneous Complex have been controversial. While an impact origin of the structure has gained wide acceptance over the last 15 years, the origin of the recrystallized Onaping Formation glasses and of the igneous complex is still being debated. Recently the interpretation of the breccias of the Onaping Formation as suevitic fall-back impact breccias has been challenged. The igneous complex is interpreted either as a differentiated impact melt sheet or as a combination of an upper impact melt represented by the granophyre, and a lower, impact-triggered magmatic body consisting of the norite-sublayer formations. The Onaping Formation contains glasses as fluidal and nonfluidal fragments of various shapes and sizes. They are recrystallized, and our research indicates that they are petrographically heterogeneous and span a wide range of chemical compositions. These characteristics are not known from glasses of volcanic deposits. This suggests an origin by shock vitrification, an interpretation consistent with their association with numerous and varied country rock clasts that exhibit microscopic shock metamorphic features. The recrystallized glass fragments represent individual solid-state and liquid-state vitrified rocks or relatively small melt pods. The basal member lies beneath the Gray and Black members of the Onaping Formation and, where not metamorphic, has an igneous matrix. Igneous-textured melt bodies occur in the upper two members and above the Basal Member. A comparison of the chemical compositions of recrystallized glasses and of the matrices of the Basal Member and the melt bodies with the components and the bulk composition of the igneous complex is inconclusive as to the origin of the igneous complex. Basal Member matrix and Melt Bodies, on average, are chemically similar to the granophyre of the Sudbury Igneous Complex, suggesting that

  17. Aerobic bacterial pyrite oxidation and acid rock drainage during the Great Oxidation Event.

    PubMed

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Lalonde, Stefan V; Planavsky, Noah J; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lyons, Timothy W; Mojzsis, Stephen J; Rouxel, Olivier J; Barley, Mark E; Rosìere, Carlos; Fralick, Phillip W; Kump, Lee R; Bekker, Andrey

    2011-10-20

    The enrichment of redox-sensitive trace metals in ancient marine sedimentary rocks has been used to determine the timing of the oxidation of the Earth's land surface. Chromium (Cr) is among the emerging proxies for tracking the effects of atmospheric oxygenation on continental weathering; this is because its supply to the oceans is dominated by terrestrial processes that can be recorded in the Cr isotope composition of Precambrian iron formations. However, the factors controlling past and present seawater Cr isotope composition are poorly understood. Here we provide an independent and complementary record of marine Cr supply, in the form of Cr concentrations and authigenic enrichment in iron-rich sedimentary rocks. Our data suggest that Cr was largely immobile on land until around 2.48 Gyr ago, but within the 160 Myr that followed--and synchronous with independent evidence for oxygenation associated with the Great Oxidation Event (see, for example, refs 4-6)--marked excursions in Cr content and Cr/Ti ratios indicate that Cr was solubilized at a scale unrivalled in history. As Cr isotope fractionations at that time were muted, Cr must have been mobilized predominantly in reduced, Cr(III), form. We demonstrate that only the oxidation of an abundant and previously stable crustal pyrite reservoir by aerobic-respiring, chemolithoautotrophic bacteria could have generated the degree of acidity required to solubilize Cr(III) from ultramafic source rocks and residual soils. This profound shift in weathering regimes beginning at 2.48 Gyr ago constitutes the earliest known geochemical evidence for acidophilic aerobes and the resulting acid rock drainage, and accounts for independent evidence of an increased supply of dissolved sulphate and sulphide-hosted trace elements to the oceans around that time. Our model adds to amassing evidence that the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary was marked by a substantial shift in terrestrial geochemistry and biology. PMID:22012395

  18. Aerobic bacterial pyrite oxidation and acid rock drainage during the Great Oxidation Event.

    PubMed

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Lalonde, Stefan V; Planavsky, Noah J; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lyons, Timothy W; Mojzsis, Stephen J; Rouxel, Olivier J; Barley, Mark E; Rosìere, Carlos; Fralick, Phillip W; Kump, Lee R; Bekker, Andrey

    2011-10-19

    The enrichment of redox-sensitive trace metals in ancient marine sedimentary rocks has been used to determine the timing of the oxidation of the Earth's land surface. Chromium (Cr) is among the emerging proxies for tracking the effects of atmospheric oxygenation on continental weathering; this is because its supply to the oceans is dominated by terrestrial processes that can be recorded in the Cr isotope composition of Precambrian iron formations. However, the factors controlling past and present seawater Cr isotope composition are poorly understood. Here we provide an independent and complementary record of marine Cr supply, in the form of Cr concentrations and authigenic enrichment in iron-rich sedimentary rocks. Our data suggest that Cr was largely immobile on land until around 2.48 Gyr ago, but within the 160 Myr that followed--and synchronous with independent evidence for oxygenation associated with the Great Oxidation Event (see, for example, refs 4-6)--marked excursions in Cr content and Cr/Ti ratios indicate that Cr was solubilized at a scale unrivalled in history. As Cr isotope fractionations at that time were muted, Cr must have been mobilized predominantly in reduced, Cr(III), form. We demonstrate that only the oxidation of an abundant and previously stable crustal pyrite reservoir by aerobic-respiring, chemolithoautotrophic bacteria could have generated the degree of acidity required to solubilize Cr(III) from ultramafic source rocks and residual soils. This profound shift in weathering regimes beginning at 2.48 Gyr ago constitutes the earliest known geochemical evidence for acidophilic aerobes and the resulting acid rock drainage, and accounts for independent evidence of an increased supply of dissolved sulphate and sulphide-hosted trace elements to the oceans around that time. Our model adds to amassing evidence that the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary was marked by a substantial shift in terrestrial geochemistry and biology.

  19. East Candor Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    24 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a thick, massive outcrop of light-toned rock exposed within eastern Candor Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system. Dark, windblown sand has banked against the lower outcrop slopes. Outcrops such as this in the Valles Marineris chasms have been known since Mariner 9 images were obtained in 1972. However, the debate as to whether these represent sedimentary or igneous rocks has not been settled within the Mars science community. In either case, they have the physical properties of sedimentary rock (that is, they are formed of fine-grained materials), but some igneous rocks made up of volcanic ash may also exhibit these properties. This image is located near 7.8oS, 65.3oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  20. Selenium in Hungary. The rock-soil-human system.

    PubMed

    Gondi, F; Pantó, G; Fehér, J; Bogye, G; Alfthan, G

    1992-12-01

    Selenium (Se) status of Hungarian rock-soil systems has been poorly investigated. The goal of this study was to get general information on the main features of Se geochemistry, and to have a brief look into the human Se status in Hungary, developing an appropriate method for a forthcoming systematic regional investigation. A multistage program was applied: 1. stream sediment sampling; 2. investigation of rock-soil profiles typical in Hungary; and 3. extraction of mobile Se fractions from soils. Human serum samples from apparently healthy blood donors residing in both urban and rural areas were collected from three districts in Hungary. It was concluded that Hungarian rock-soil systems, especially the acid igneous rocks and the widely distributed young sediments (loess and sand formations) with most of the agricultural activity, are low in Se, and the mean serum Se level of the blood samples were also low.

  1. On the neutralization of acid rock drainage by carbonate and silicate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherlock, E. J.; Lawrence, R. W.; Poulin, R.

    1995-02-01

    The net result of acid-generating and-neutralizing reactions within mining wastes is termed acid rock drainage (ARD). The oxidation of sulfide minerals is the major contributor to acid generation. Dissolution and alteration of various minerals can contribute to the neutralization of acid. Definitions of alkalinity, acidity, and buffer capacity are reviewed, and a detailed discussion of the dissolution and neutralizing capacity of carbonate and silicate minerals related to equilibium conditions, dissolution mechanism, and kinetics is provided. Factors that determine neutralization rate by carbonate and silicate minerals include: pH, PCO 2, equilibrium conditions, temperature, mineral composition and structure, redox conditions, and the presence of “foreign” ions. Similar factors affect sulfide oxidation. Comparison of rates shows sulfides react fastest, followed by carbonates and silicates. The differences in the reaction mechanisms and kinetics of neutralization have important implications in the prediction, control, and regulation of ARD. Current static and kinetic prediction methods upon which mine permitting, ARD control, and mine closure plans are based do not consider sample mineralogy or the kinetics of the acid-generating and-neutralizing reactions. Erroneous test interpretations and predictions can result. The importance of considering mineralogy for site-specific interpretation is highlighted. Uncertainty in prediction leads to difficulties for the mine operator in developing satisfactory and cost-effective control and remediation measures. Thus, the application of regulations and guidelines for waste management planning need to beflexible.

  2. Continental Basaltic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, G. L.

    2003-12-01

    During the past few decades, geochemical studies of continental basaltic rocks and their petrologic kin have become mainstays of studies of the continental lithosphere. These igneous rocks have taken on such an important role largely because the chemical and isotopic composition of continental basaltic rocks and their mantle (see Chapter 2.05) and crustal xenoliths (see Chapter 3.01) provide the best proxy record available to earth scientists for the chemical and physical evolution of the deep continental lithosphere and underlying mantle, areas that are otherwise resistant to direct study. Keeping this in mind, the primary goal of this chapter is to illustrate how geochemical data can be used both to assess the origin of these rocks and to study the evolution of the continental lithosphere.A complete overview of continental basaltic rocks will not be attempted here, because continental "basalts" come in too wide a range of compositions, and because of the sheer volume of geochemical data available for such rocks worldwide. The scope of the chapter is limited to a discussion of a select group of ultramafic to mafic composition "intraplate" continental igneous rocks consisting primarily of kimberlites, potassic and sodic alkali basalts, and continental flood basalts. Igneous rocks forming at active continental margins, such as convergent or transform plate margins, are important examples of continental magmatism but are not directly discussed here (convergent margin magmas are discussed in Chapters 2.11, 3.11, and 3.18). The geochemistry of intraplate igneous rocks of the ocean basins are covered in Chapters 2.04 and 3.16. Although basaltic magmatism has occurred throughout the Earths history, the majority of the examples presented here are from Mesozoic and Cenozoic volcanic fields due to the more complete preservation of younger continental mafic igneous rocks. While considerable effort has been expended in studying the chemical differentiation of mafic magmas

  3. Applicability Comparison of Methods for Acid Generation Assessment of Rock Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Chamteut; Ji, Sangwoo; Yim, Giljae; Cheong, Youngwook

    2014-05-01

    Minerals including various forms of sulfur could generate AMD (Acid Mine Drainage) or ARD (Acid Rock Drainage), which can have serious effects on the ecosystem and even on human when exposed to air and/or water. To minimize the hazards by acid drainage, it is necessary to assess in advance the acid generation possibility of rocks and estimate the amount of acid generation. Because of its relatively simple and effective experiment procedure, the method of combining the results of ABA (Acid Base Accounting) and NAG (Net Acid Generation) tests have been commonly used in determining acid drainage conditions. The simplicity and effectiveness of the above method however, are derived from massive assumptions of simplified chemical reactions and this often leads to results of classifying the samples as UC (Uncertain) which would then require additional experimental or field data to reclassify them properly. This paper therefore, attempts to find the reasons that cause samples to be classified as UC and suggest new series of experiments where samples can be reclassified appropriately. Study precedents on evaluating potential acid generation and neutralization capacity were reviewed and as a result three individual experiments were selected in the light of applicability and compatibility of minimizing unnecessary influence among other experiments. The proposed experiments include sulfur speciation, ABCC (Acid Buffering Characteristic Curve), and Modified NAG which are all improved versions of existing experiments of Total S, ANC (Acid Neutralizing Capacity), and NAG respectively. To assure the applicability of the experiments, 36 samples from 19 sites with diverse geologies, field properties, and weathering conditions were collected. The samples were then subject to existing experiments and as a result, 14 samples which either were classified as UC or could be used as a comparison group had been selected. Afterwards, the selected samples were used to conduct the suggested

  4. Chemical stability of acid rock drainage treatment sludge and implications for sludge management

    SciTech Connect

    Danny M. McDonald; John A. Webb; Jeff Taylor

    2006-03-15

    To assess the chemical stability of sludges generated by neutralizing acid rock drainage (ARD) with alkaline reagents, synthetic ARD was treated with hydrated lime (batch and high-density sludge process), limestone, and two proprietary reagents (KB-1 and Bauxsol). The amorphous metal hydroxide sludge produced was leached using deionized water, U.S. EPA methods (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure, synthetic precipitation leaching procedure), and the new strong acid leach test (SALT), which leaches the sludge with a series of sulfuric acid extractant solutions; the pH decreases by {approximately} 1 pH unit with each test, until the final pH is {approximately}2. Sludges precipitated by all reagents had very similar leachabilities except for KB-1 and Bauxsol, which released more aluminum. SALT showed that lowering the pH of the leaching solution mobilized more metals from the sludges. Iron, aluminum, copper, and zinc began to leach at pH 2.5-3, {approximately}4.5, {approximately}5.5, and 6-6.5, respectively. The leachability of ARD treatment sludges is determined by the final pH of the leachate. A higher neutralization potential (e.g., a greater content of unreacted neutralizing agent) makes sludges inherently more chemically stable. Thus, when ARD or any acidic metalliferous wastewater is treated, a choice must be made between efficient reagent use and resistance to acid attack. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Chemical stability of acid rock drainage treatment sludge and implications for sludge management.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Danny M; Webb, John A; Taylor, Jeff

    2006-03-15

    To assess the chemical stability of sludges generated by neutralizing acid rock drainage (ARD) with alkaline reagents, synthetic ARD was treated with hydrated lime (batch and high-density sludge process), limestone, and two proprietary reagents (KB-1 and Bauxsol). The amorphous metal hydroxide sludge produced was leached using deionized water, U.S. EPA methods (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure, synthetic precipitation leaching procedure), and the new strong acid leach test (SALT), which leaches the sludge with a series of sulfuric acid extractant solutions; the pH decreases by approximately 1 pH unit with each test, until the final pH is approximately 2. Sludges precipitated by all reagents had very similar leachabilities except for KB-1 and Bauxsol, which released more aluminum. SALT showed that lowering the pH of the leaching solution mobilized more metals from the sludges. Iron, aluminum, copper, and zinc began to leach at pH 2.5-3, approximately 4.5, approximately 5.5, and 6-6.5, respectively. The leachability of ARD treatment sludges is determined by the final pH of the leachate. A higher neutralization potential (e.g., a greater content of unreacted neutralizing agent) makes sludges inherently more chemically stable. Thus, when ARD or any acidic metalliferous wastewater is treated, a choice must be made between efficient reagent use and resistance to acid attack. PMID:16570625

  6. Impacts on water quality and biota from natural acid rock drainage in Colorado's Lake Creek watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bird, D.A.; Sares, Matthew A.; Policky, Greg A.; Schmidt, Travis S.; Church, Stanley E.

    2006-01-01

    Colorado's Lake Creek watershed hosts natural acid rock drainage that significantly impacts surface water, streambed sediment, and aquatic life. The source of the ARD is a group of iron-rich springs that emerge from intensely hydrothermally altered, unexploited, low-grade porphyry copper mineralization in the Grizzly Peak Caldera. Source water chemistry includes pH of 2.5 and dissolved metal concentrations of up to 277 mg/L aluminum, 498 mg/L iron, and 10 mg/L copper. From the hydrothermally altered area downstream for 27 kilometers to Twin Lakes Reservoir, metal concentrations in streambed sediment are elevated and the watershed experiences locally severe adverse impacts to aquatic life due to the acidic, metal-laden water. The water and sediment quality of Twin Lakes Reservoir is sufficiently improved that the reservoir supports a trout fishery, and remnants of upstream ARD are negligible.

  7. Immobilization and phytotoxicity of Pb in contaminated soil amended with γ-polyglutamic acid, phosphate rock, and γ-polyglutamic acid-activated phosphate rock.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Cai, Zhijian; Su, Xiaojuan; Fu, Qingling; Liu, Yonghong; Huang, Qiaoyun; Violante, Antonio; Hu, Hongqing

    2015-02-01

    Pot experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of γ-polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA), phosphate rock (PR), and γ-PGA-activated PR (γ-PGA-PR) on the immobilization and phytotoxicity of Pb in a contaminated soil. The proportion of residual Pb (Re-Pb) in soil was reduced by the addition of γ-PGA but was increased by the application of PR and γ-PGA-PR. The addition of γ-PGA in soil improved the accumulation of Pb in pak choi and decreased the growth of pak choi, suggesting the intensification of Pb phytotoxicity to pak choi. However, opposite effects of PR and γ-PGA-PR on the phytotoxicity of Pb to pak choi in soil were observed. Moreover, in the examined range, γ-PGA-PR activated by a higher amount of γ-PGA resulted in a greater proportion of Re-Pb in soil and weaker phytotoxicity of Pb to pak choi. The predominance of γ-PGA-PR in relieving the phytotoxicity of Pb was ascribed mainly to the increase of soil pH and available phosphate after the amendment, which could facilitate the precipitation of Pb in soil and provide pak choi with more phosphorus nutrient.

  8. An Investigation of the Acid Rock Drainage Generation from the Road Cut Slope in the Middle Part of South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, S.; Cheong, Y.; Yim, G.

    2006-05-01

    To examine the Acid Rock Drainage (ARD) generation from the road cut slope, a prediction study including Acid-Base Accounting (ABA) test and Net Acid Generation (NAG) test was performed for road cut rock samples (20 samples) at the new construction site of a highway in the middle part of South Korea. This slope is composed of slate and phyllite. It was a pit wall which was operated as a quarry which produced materials for roofing. pH1:2 and EC1:2 measurements were performed to evaluate free hydrogen ion contents and salts in samples. ABA test was performed to estimate the balance of the acid generating minerals (mainly pyrite) and the acid neutralizing minerals (mainly carbonates) in rock samples. Total sulfur was analyzed by sulfur analyzer, and then the maximum potential acidity (MPA, kg H2SO4/t) was calculated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was performed to identify the mineral composition of rock samples. Acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) test, after the Sobek et al. (1978), was performed to estimate the amount of acid originated from the oxidation of sulfide minerals. NAPP (Net Acid Producing Potential) was calculated by total sulfur (MPA) and ANC. NAG test was performed with grounded samples and 15 % hydrogen peroxide, and then NAG was analyzed by measuring pH (NAGpH) of the mixed solution. pH1:2 and EC1:2 ranged from 2.95 to 7.23 and 17.1 to 3070.0 ¥ìS/cm, respectively. MPA of samples was ranged from 0.0 to 79.9 kg H2SO4/t. From the XRD analysis pyrite was found at the most samples. In the sample from highly weathered dike, goethite was found. Results of the ANC tests indicated that the value of ANC reached up to 59.36 kg H2SO4/t. Rock samples could be classified as Potential Acid Forming rock (PAF) and Non- Acid Forming rock (NAF) by plotting NAPP versus NAGpH. In this study 17 samples were classified as PAF rock. It means that this slope would generate ARD when they reacted with rain. Two samples were grouped as NAF. By application this ARD prediction

  9. Incorporating Geochemical And Microbial Kinetics In Reactive Transport Models For Generation Of Acid Rock Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, B. J.; Rajaram, H.; Silverstein, J.

    2010-12-01

    Acid mine drainage, AMD, results from the oxidation of metal sulfide minerals (e.g. pyrite), producing ferrous iron and sulfuric acid. Acidophilic autotrophic bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans obtain energy by oxidizing ferrous iron back to ferric iron, using oxygen as the electron acceptor. Most existing models of AMD do not account for microbial kinetics or iron geochemistry rigorously. Instead they assume that oxygen limitation controls pyrite oxidation and thus focus on oxygen transport. These models have been successfully used for simulating conditions where oxygen availability is a limiting factor (e.g. source prevention by capping), but have not been shown to effectively model acid generation and effluent chemistry under a wider range of conditions. The key reactions, oxidation of pyrite and oxidation of ferrous iron, are both slow kinetic processes. Despite being extensively studied for the last thirty years, there is still not a consensus in the literature about the basic mechanisms, limiting factors or rate expressions for microbially enhanced oxidation of metal sulfides. An indirect leaching mechanism (chemical oxidation of pyrite by ferric iron to produce ferrous iron, with regeneration of ferric iron by microbial oxidation of ferrous iron) is used as the foundation of a conceptual model for microbially enhanced oxidation of pyrite. Using literature data, a rate expression for microbial consumption of ferrous iron is developed that accounts for oxygen, ferrous iron and pH limitation. Reaction rate expressions for oxidation of pyrite and chemical oxidation of ferrous iron are selected from the literature. A completely mixed stirred tank reactor (CSTR) model is implemented coupling the kinetic rate expressions, speciation calculations and flow. The model simulates generation of AMD and effluent chemistry that qualitatively agrees with column reactor and single rock experiments. A one dimensional reaction

  10. Pre-Elsonian mafic magmatism in the Nain Igneous Complex, Labrador: the bridges layered intrusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ashwal, L.D.; Wiebe, R.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Whitehouse, M.J.; Snyder, Diane

    1992-01-01

    Decades of work on the pristine, unmetamorphosed, and well exposed anorthositic, mafic and granitic rocks of the Nain igneous complex, Labrador, have led to the conclusion that all plutonic rocks in that area were emplaced in a short time intercal at about 1300 ?? 10 Ma). We report here new isotopic data for mafic intrusive rocks that appear to have crystallized several hundred Ma earlier than the bulk of the plutonic activity in the Nain complex. The Bridges layered intrusion (BLI) is a small (15-20 km2) lens of layered mafic rocks about 1.5 km thick, surrounded and intruded by anorthositic, leuconoritic and leucotroctolitic plutons in the middle of the coastal section of the Nain igneous complex. BLI shows very well developed magmatic structures, including channel scours, slump structures, and ubiquitous modally graded layering. Most rocks, however, show granular textures indicative of recrystallization, presumably caused by emplacement of younger anorthositic rocks. BLI contains cumulate rocks with slightly more primitive mineral compositions (An60-83, Fo66-71) than those of other mafic intrusions in the Nain igneous complex, including Kiglapait. SmNd isotopic data for 7 BLI whole-rocks ranging in composition between olivine melagabbro and olivine leucogabbro yield an age of 1667 ?? 75 Ma, which we interpret as the time of primary crystallization. The internal isotopic systematics of the BLI have been reset, probably by intrusion of adjacent anorthositic plutons. A SmNd mineral isochron (plag, whole-rock, mafics) for a BLI olivine melagabbro gives an age of 1283 ?? 22 Ma, equivalent within error of a mineral array (plag, whole-rock, opx, cpx) for an adjacent, igneous-textured, leuconorite vein (1266 ?? 152 Ma). The initial Nd ratio for BLI corresponds to ??{lunate}Nd = -3.18 ?? 0.44. Other whole-rock samples, however, some with vein-like alteration (Chlorite, serpentine, amphiboles), show ??{lunate}Nd values as low as -9.1, suggesting variable contamination by

  11. Voluminous silicic eruptions during late Permian Emeishan igneous province and link to climate cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianghai; Cawood, Peter A.; Du, Yuansheng

    2015-12-01

    Silicic eruptive units can constitute a substantive component in flood-basalts-dominated large igneous provinces, but usually constitute only a small proportion of the preserved volume due to poor preservation. Thus, their environmental impact can be underestimated or ignored. Establishing the original volume and potential climate-sensitive gas emissions of silicic eruptions is generally lacking for most large igneous provinces. We present a case study for the ˜260 Ma Emeishan province, where silicic volcanic rocks are a very minor component of the preserved rock archive due to extensive erosion during the Late Permian. Modal and geochemical data from Late Permian sandstones derived from the province suggest that silicic volcanic rocks constituted some ˜30% by volume of the total eroded Emeishan volcanic source rocks. This volume corresponds to > 3 ×104 km3 on the basis of two independent estimate methods. Detrital zircon trace element and Hf isotopic data require the silicic source rocks to be formed mainly by fractional crystallization from associated basaltic magmas. Based on experimental and theoretical calculations, these basalt-derived ˜104 km3 silicic eruptions released ˜1017 g sulfur gases into the higher atmosphere and contribute to the contemporaneous climate cooling at the Capitanian-Wuchiapingian transition (˜260 Ma). This study highlights the potentially important impact on climate of silicic eruptions associated with large igneous province volcanism.

  12. Paleozoic and Paleoproterozoic Zircon in Igneous Xenoliths Assimilated at Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, C. R.; Vazquez, J. A.; Wooden, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    Historically active Redoubt Volcano is a basalt-to-dacite cone constructed upon the Jurassic-early Tertiary Alaska-Aleutian Range batholith. New SHRIMP-RG U-Pb age and trace-element concentration results for zircons from gabbroic xenoliths and crystal-rich andesitic mush from a late Pleistocene pyroclastic deposit indicate that ~310 Ma and ~1865 Ma igneous rocks underlie Redoubt at depth. Two gabbros have sharply terminated prismatic zircons that yield ages of ~310 Ma. Zircons from a crystal mush sample are overwhelmingly ~1865 Ma and appear rounded due to incomplete dissolution. Binary plots of element concentrations or ratios show clustering of data for ~310-Ma grains and markedly coherent trends for ~1865-Ma grains; e.g., ~310-Ma grains have higher Eu/Eu* than most of the ~1865-Ma grains, the majority of which form a narrow band of decreasing Eu/Eu* with increasing Hf content which suggests that ~1865-Ma zircons come from igneous source rocks. It is very unlikely that detrital zircons from a metasedimentary rock would have this level of homogeneity in age and composition. One gabbro contains abundant ~1865 Ma igneous zircons, ~300-310 Ma fluid-precipitated zircons characterized by very low U and Th concentrations and Th/U ratios, and uncommon ~100 Ma zircons. We propose that (1) ~310 Ma gabbro xenoliths from Redoubt Volcano belong to the same family of plutons dated by Aleinikoff et al. (USGS Circular 1016, 1988) and Gardner et al. (Geology, 1988) located ≥500 km to the northeast in basement rocks of the Wrangellia and Alexander terranes and (2) ~1865 Ma zircons are inherited from igneous rock, potentially from a continental fragment that possibly correlates with the Fort Simpson terrane or Great Bear magmatic zone of the Wopmay Orogen of northwestern Laurentia. Possibly, elements of these Paleoproterozoic terranes intersected the Paleozoic North American continental margin where they may have formed a component of the basement to the Wrangellia

  13. Biochar enhances Aspergillus niger rock phosphate solubilization by increasing organic acid production and alleviating fluoride toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Gilberto de Oliveira; Zafra, David Lopez; Vassilev, Nikolay Bojkov; Silva, Ivo Ribeiro; Ribeiro, José Ivo; Costa, Maurício Dutra

    2014-05-01

    During fungal rock phosphate (RP) solubilization, a significant quantity of fluoride (F(-)) is released together with phosphorus (P), strongly inhibiting the process. In the present study, the effect of two F(-) adsorbents [activated alumina (Al2O3) and biochar] on RP solubilization by Aspergillus niger was examined. Al2O3 adsorbed part of the F(-) released but also adsorbed soluble P, which makes it inappropriate for microbial RP solubilization systems. In contrast, biochar adsorbed only F(-) while enhancing phosphate solubilization 3-fold, leading to the accumulation of up to 160 mg of P per liter. By comparing the values of F(-) measured in solution at the end of incubation and those from a predictive model, it was estimated that up to 19 mg of F(-) per liter can be removed from solution by biochar when added at 3 g liter(-1) to the culture medium. Thus, biochar acted as an F(-) sink during RP solubilization and led to an F(-) concentration in solution that was less inhibitory to the process. In the presence of biochar, A. niger produced larger amounts of citric, gluconic, and oxalic acids, whether RP was present or not. Our results show that biochar enhances RP solubilization through two interrelated processes: partial removal of the released F(-) and increased organic acid production. Given the importance of organic acids for P solubilization and that most of the RPs contain high concentrations of F(-), the proposed solubilization system offers an important technological improvement for the microbial production of soluble P fertilizers from RP.

  14. Environmental risk assessment of acid rock drainage under uncertainty: The probability bounds and PHREEQC approach.

    PubMed

    Betrie, Getnet D; Sadiq, Rehan; Nichol, Craig; Morin, Kevin A; Tesfamariam, Solomon

    2016-01-15

    Acid rock drainage (ARD) is a major environmental problem that poses significant environmental risks during and after mining activities. A new methodology for environmental risk assessment based on probability bounds and a geochemical speciation model (PHREEQC) is presented. The methodology provides conservative and non-conservative ways of estimating risk of heavy metals posed to selected endpoints probabilistically, while propagating data and parameter uncertainties throughout the risk assessment steps. The methodology is demonstrated at a minesite located in British Columbia, Canada. The result of the methodology for the case study minesite shows the fate-and-transport of heavy metals is well simulated in the mine environment. In addition, the results of risk characterization for the case study show that there is risk due to transport of heavy metals into the environment.

  15. Pristine Igneous Rocks and the Genesis of Early Planetary Crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Paul H.; Lindstrom, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Our studies are highly interdisciplinary, but are focused on the processes and products of early planetary and asteroidal differentiation, especially the genesis of the ancient lunar crust. The compositional diversity that we explore is the residue of process diversity, which has strong relevance for comparative planetology.

  16. Petrogenesis of Igneous-Textured Clasts in Martian Meteorite Northwest Africa 7034

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos, A. R.; Agee, C. B.; Humayun, M.; McCubbin, F. M.; Shearer, C. K.

    2016-01-01

    The martian meteorite Northwest Africa 7034 (and pairings) is a breccia that samples a variety of materials from the martian crust. Several previous studies have identified multiple types of igneous-textured clasts within the breccia [1-3], and these clasts have the potential to provide insight into the igneous evolution of Mars. One challenge presented by studying these small rock fragments is the lack of field context for this breccia (i.e., where on Mars it formed), so we do not know how many sources these small rock fragments are derived from or the exact formation his-tory of these sources (i.e., are the sources mantle de-rived melt or melts contaminated by a meteorite impactor on Mars). Our goal in this study is to examine specific igneous-textured clast groups to determine if they are petrogenetically related (i.e., from the same igneous source) and determine more information about their formation history, then use them to derive new insights about the igneous history of Mars. We will focus on the basalt clasts, FTP clasts (named due to their high concentration of iron, titanium, and phosphorous), and mineral fragments described by [1] (Fig. 1). We will examine these materials for evidence of impactor contamination (as proposed for some materials by [2]) or mantle melt derivation. We will also test the petrogenetic models proposed in [1], which are igneous processes that could have occurred regardless of where the melt parental to the clasts was formed. These models include 1) derivation of the FTP clasts from a basalt clast melt through silicate liquid immiscibility (SLI), 2) derivation of the FTP clasts from a basalt clast melt through fractional crystallization, and 3) a lack of petrogenetic relationship between these clast groups. The relationship between the clast groups and the mineral fragments will also be explored.

  17. In situ and experimental evidence for acidic weathering of rocks and soils on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurowitz, J. A.; McLennan, S. M.; Tosca, N. J.; Arvidson, R. E.; Michalski, J. R.; Ming, D. W.; Schröder, C.; Squyres, S. W.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental data for alteration of synthetic Martian basalts at pH = 0-1 indicate that chemical fractionations at low pH are vastly different from those observed during terrestrial weathering. Rock surface analyses from Gusev crater are well described by the relationships apparent from low-pH experimental alteration data. A model for rock surface alteration is developed, which indicates that a leached alteration zone is present on rock surfaces at Gusev. This zone is not chemically fractionated to a large degree from the underlying rock interior, indicating that the rock surface alteration process has occurred at low water to rock ratio. The geochemistry of natural rock surfaces analyzed by APXS is consistent with a mixture between adhering soil/dust and the leached alteration zone. The chemistry of rock surfaces analyzed after brushing with the RAT is largely representative of the leached alteration zone. The chemistry of rock surfaces analyzed after grinding with the RAT is largely representative of the interior of the rock, relatively unaffected by the alteration process occurring at the rock surface. Elemental measurements from the Spirit, Opportunity, Pathfinder, and Viking 1 landing sites indicate that soil chemistry from widely separated locations is consistent with the low-pH, low water to rock ratio alteration relationships developed for Gusev rocks. Soils are affected principally by mobility of Fe and Mg, consistent with alteration of olivine-bearing basalt and subsequent precipitation of Fe- and Mg-bearing secondary minerals as the primary control on soil geochemistry.

  18. Magmatic systems of large continental igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, Evgenii

    2014-05-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIPs) of the modern type are known from the middle Paleoproterozoic and have a great abundance in the Phanerozoic. The most researches considered their appearance with ascending of the mantle thermochemical superplumes which provided simultaneously eruption of the same type of lavas on the huge territories. Judging on presence among them different subprovinces, formation of concrete magmatic systems were linked with protuberances (secondary plumes) on the superplumes surfaces. We suggest that origin of such plumes was linked with local enrichment of upper part of the superplumes head beneath roofing by fluid components; it led to lowering of the plume material density and initiated ascending of the secondary plumes. As a result, their heads, where partial melting occurred, can reach the level of the upper crust as it follows from absence of lower-crustal rocks among xenoliths in basalts, although mantle xenoliths existed in them. Important feature of LIPs is presence of two major types of mafic lavas: (1) geochemical-enriched alkali Fe-Ti basalts and picrites, and (2) basalts of normal alkalinity (tholeiites) with different contents of TiO2. At that the first type of mafites are usually typical for lower parts of LIPs which initially developed as continental rifts, whereas the second type composed the upper part of the traps' cover. Magmatic systems of the LIPs are subdivided on three levels of different deep: (1) zones of magma generation, (2) areas of transitional magma chambers where large often layered intrusive bodies are formed, and (3) areas on surface where lava eruptions and subvolcanic intrusions occurred. All these levels are linked by feeder dykes. The least known element of the system is area of magma generation, and, especially, composition of melting substratum. Important information about it is contained in aforementioned mantle xenoliths in alkali basalts and basanites. They practically everywhere are represented by two

  19. Treatment of acid rock drainage using a sulfate-reducing bioreactor with zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, James A

    2016-05-01

    This study assessed the bioremediation of acid rock drainage (ARD) in flow-through columns testing zero-valent iron (ZVI) for the first time as the sole exogenous electron donor to drive sulfate-reducing bacteria in permeable reactive barriers. Columns containing ZVI, limestone or a mixture of both materials were inoculated with an anaerobic mixed culture and fed a synthetic ARD containing sulfuric acid and heavy metals (initially copper, and later also cadmium and lead). ZVI significantly enhanced sulfate reduction and the heavy metals were extensively removed (>99.7%). Solid-phase analyses showed that heavy metals were precipitated with biogenic sulfide in the columns packed with ZVI. Excess sulfide was sequestered by iron, preventing the discharge of dissolved sulfide. In the absence of ZVI, heavy metals were also significantly removed (>99.8%) due to precipitation with hydroxide and carbonate ions released from the limestone. Vertical-profiles of heavy metals in the columns packing, at the end of the experiment, demonstrated that the ZVI columns still had excess capacity to remove heavy metals, while the capacity of the limestone control column was approaching saturation. The ZVI provided conditions that enhanced sulfate reduction and generated alkalinity. Collectively, the results demonstrate an innovative passive ARD remediation process using ZVI as sole electron-donor. PMID:26808248

  20. Possible petrogenetic associations among igneous components in North Massif soils: Evidence in 2-4 mm soil particles from 76503

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolliff, Bradley L.; Bishop, Kaylynn M.; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    Studies of Apollo 17 highland igneous rocks and clasts in breccias from the North and South Massifs have described magnesian troctolite, norite, anorthositic gabbro, dunite, spinel cataclasites, and granulitic lithologies that may have noritic anothosite or anorthositic norite/gabbro as igneous precursors, and have speculated on possible petrogenetic relationships among these rock types. Mineral compositions and relative proportions of plagioclase and plagioclase-olivine particles in samples 76503 indicate that the precursor lithology of those particles were troctolitic anorthosite, not troctolite. Mineral and chemical compositions of more pyroxene-rich, magnesian breccias and granulites in 76503 indicate that their precursor lithology was anorthositic norite/gabbro. The combination of mineral compositions and whole-rock trace-element compositional trends supports a genetic relationship among these two groups as would result from differentiation of a single pluton. Although highland igneous lithologies in Apollo 17 materials have been described previously, the proportions of different igneous lithologies present in the massifs, their frequency of association, and how they are related are not well known. We consider the proportions of, and associations among, the igneous lithologies found in a North Massif soil, which may represent those of the North Massif or a major part of it.

  1. The role of igneous sills in shaping the Martian uplands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelms, D. E.; Baldwin, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Relations among geologic units and landforms suggest that igneous sills lie beneath much of the intercrater and intracrater terrain of the Martian uplands. The igneous rocks crop out along the upland-lowland front and in crater floors and other depressions that are low enough to intersect the sill's intrusion horizons. It is suggested that heat from the cooling sills melted some of the ice contained in overlying fragmental deposits, creating valley networks by subsurface flow of the meltwater. Terrains with undulatory, smooth surfaces and softened traces of valleys were created by more direct contact with the sills. Widespread subsidence following emplacement of the sills deformed both them and the nonvolcanic deposits that overlie them, accounting for the many structures that continue from ridged plains into the hilly uplands. Crater counts show that the deposit that became valleyed, softened, and ridged probably began to form (and to acquire interstitial ice) during or shortly after the Middle Noachian Epoch, and continued to form as late as the Early Hesperian Epoch. The upper layers of this deposit, many of the visible valleys, and the ridged plains and postulated sills all have similar Early Hesperian ages. Continued formation of valleys is indicated by their incision of fresh-appearing crater ejecta. The dependence of valley formation on internal processes implies that Mars did not necessarily have a dense early atmosphere or warm climate.

  2. Post-igneous redistribution of components in eucrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, W. C.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Martinez, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    In our analyses, we utilize a microdrilling technique that removes 40 to 100 micron diameter cores from mineral grains in thin sections analyzed by microprobe. The cores are then analyzed by INAA using the technique of Lindstrom. Three eucrites were selected for application of this analytical technique: monomict breccias Pasamonte and Stannern and unbrecciated EET90020. Pasamonte is among the most unequilibrated of the eucrites on the basis of zoning in pyroxenes and is considered to be an igneous rock not significantly affected by metamorphism. Stannern has igneous texture but its pyroxenes indicate some re-equilibration, although little, if any, recrystallization. EET90020 has a granulite texture and has been substantially recrystallized. Our sample of Pasamonte contains several clasts of different grain sizes ranging from glass to fine grained with diabasic texture containing lathy plagioclase, unexsolved pigeonite, and mesostasis. Cores were taken of the glass and from minerals and mesostases in six lithic clasts which normally allowed sampling of more than one phase per clast. Our sample of Stannern is also a breccia but with little difference in grain size between clasts and matrix. The plagioclase and pigeonite are blocky, twinned, and exsolved and coexist with a bit of mesostasis. Cores were taken of plagioclase and pigeonite with no attempt to distinguish separate clasts. EET90020 is a granular mixture of twinned plagioclase and pigeonite having rather uniform size and many triple junctions. Several cores were taken of both phases. Both clear and cloudy grains of plagioclase and pyroxene were sampled in all three eucrites.

  3. The role of igneous sills in shaping the Martian uplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelms, D. E.; Baldwin, R. J.

    Relations among geologic units and landforms suggest that igneous sills lie beneath much of the intercrater and intracrater terrain of the Martian uplands. The igneous rocks crop out along the upland-lowland front and in crater floors and other depressions that are low enough to intersect the sill's intrusion horizons. It is suggested that heat from the cooling sills melted some of the ice contained in overlying fragmental deposits, creating valley networks by subsurface flow of the meltwater. Terrains with undulatory, smooth surfaces and softened traces of valleys were created by more direct contact with the sills. Widespread subsidence following emplacement of the sills deformed both them and the nonvolcanic deposits that overlie them, accounting for the many structures that continue from ridged plains into the hilly uplands. Crater counts show that the deposit that became valleyed, softened, and ridged probably began to form (and to acquire interstitial ice) during or shortly after the Middle Noachian Epoch, and continued to form as late as the Early Hesperian Epoch. The upper layers of this deposit, many of the visible valleys, and the ridged plains and postulated sills all have similar Early Hesperian ages. Continued formation of valleys is indicated by their incision of fresh-appearing crater ejecta. The dependence of valley formation on internal processes implies that Mars did not necessarily have a dense early atmosphere or warm climate.

  4. Tectonic significance of Neoproterozoic magmatism of Nakora area, Malani igneous suite, Western Rajasthan, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naresh; Vallinayagam, G.

    2014-05-01

    Three magmatic phases are distinguished in the Neoproterozoic Nakora Ring Complex (NRC) of Malani Igneous Suite (MIS), namely (a) Extrusive (b) Intrusive and (c) Dyke phase. Magmatism at NRC initiated with minor amount of (basic) basalt flows and followed by the extensive/voluminous acid (rhyolites-trachytes) flows. The ripple marks are observed at the Dadawari area of NRC in tuffaceous rhyolite flow which suggests the aqueous condition of flows deposition. The emplacement of the magma appears to have been controlled by a well defined NE-SW tectonic lineament and cut by radial pattern of dykes. These NE-SW tectonic lineaments are the linear zones of crustal weakness and high heat flow. The spheroidal and rapakivi structures in the Nakora acid volcanics indicate the relationship between genetic link and magma mixing. Basalt-trachyte-rhyolite association suggests that the large amount of heat is supplied to the crust from the magma chamber before the eruption. The field (elliptical/ring structures), mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of Nakora granites attest an alkaline character in their evolution and consistent with within plate tectonic setting. The emplacement of these granites and associated volcanics is controlled by ring structures, a manifestation of plume activity and cauldron subsidence, an evidence of extensional tectonic environment. NRC granites are the product of partial melting of rocks similar to banded gneiss from Kolar Schist Belt of India. The present investigations suggest that the magmatic suites of NRC rocks are derived from a crustal source and the required heat supplied from a mantle plume.

  5. Application of multi-dimensional discrimination diagrams and probability calculations to Paleoproterozoic acid rocks from Brazilian cratons and provinces to infer tectonic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sanjeet K.; Oliveira, Elson P.

    2013-08-01

    In present work, we applied two sets of new multi-dimensional geochemical diagrams (Verma et al., 2013) obtained from linear discriminant analysis (LDA) of natural logarithm-transformed ratios of major elements and immobile major and trace elements in acid magmas to decipher plate tectonic settings and corresponding probability estimates for Paleoproterozoic rocks from Amazonian craton, São Francisco craton, São Luís craton, and Borborema province of Brazil. The robustness of LDA minimizes the effects of petrogenetic processes and maximizes the separation among the different tectonic groups. The probability based boundaries further provide a better objective statistical method in comparison to the commonly used subjective method of determining the boundaries by eye judgment. The use of readjusted major element data to 100% on an anhydrous basis from SINCLAS computer program, also helps to minimize the effects of post-emplacement compositional changes and analytical errors on these tectonic discrimination diagrams. Fifteen case studies of acid suites highlighted the application of these diagrams and probability calculations. The first case study on Jamon and Musa granites, Carajás area (Central Amazonian Province, Amazonian craton) shows a collision setting (previously thought anorogenic). A collision setting was clearly inferred for Bom Jardim granite, Xingú area (Central Amazonian Province, Amazonian craton) The third case study on Older São Jorge, Younger São Jorge and Maloquinha granites Tapajós area (Ventuari-Tapajós Province, Amazonian craton) indicated a within-plate setting (previously transitional between volcanic arc and within-plate). We also recognized a within-plate setting for the next three case studies on Aripuanã and Teles Pires granites (SW Amazonian craton), and Pitinga area granites (Mapuera Suite, NW Amazonian craton), which were all previously suggested to have been emplaced in post-collision to within-plate settings. The seventh case

  6. Did North Atlantic Igneous Province igneous sills trigger or maintain Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum global warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Karina; Jones, Stephen M.; Schofield, Nick; Clayton, Geoff

    2010-05-01

    Igneous sills of the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP) were intruded into organic-rich sediments, generating methane and carbon dioxide by thermal maturation. These greenhouse gases escaped to the ocean and atmosphere through hydrothermal vents above the sills that have been observed on seismic reflection data and by drilling. It has been suggested that the NAIP sills provided a significant component of the greenhouse gases that forced warming during the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). Here we consider whether methane released by NAIP sills could have triggered, as well as maintained, the PETM warming. Warming resulting from the PETM trigger began a few thousand years before the major upheaval in the carbon cycle that was associated with the PETM itself. Recent organic geochemical investigations have suggested that methane was involved in the trigger. Since the lifetime of methane in the atmosphere was approximately one decade during the Paleocene, the triggering methane pulse probably contained on the order of 100 Gt or more of carbon and was probably released in a period of c. 10 years or less. We use recent field observations of fluidized country rocks around sills to speculate on a model for sill emplacement, greenhouse gas generation and escape. The observation of fluidized sediments associated with lobe and finger structures along inward-dipping sections of many sills suggests that these sill rims propagated laterally by fluidizing a restricted volume of country rock, allowing the magma to advance into the fluidized region as a viscous fingering front. At this stage, the fluidized region was not connected to the surface by a conduit, so greenhouse gases could not escape rapidly. Eventually, as the sill rim propagated laterally and upward, a hydrothermal conduit was initiated and propagated rapidly upward to the surface. This model, based on field observations implies that the gases which initially escaped up the hydrothermal conduit were

  7. In-Situ and Experimental Evidence for Acidic Weathering of Rocks and Soils on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurowitz, J. A.; McLennan, S. M.; Tosca, N. J.; Arvidson, R. E.; Michalski, J. R.; Ming, D.; Schroeder, C.; Squyres, S. W.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental data for alteration of synthetic Martian basalts at pH=0-1 indicate that chemical fractionations at low pH are vastly different from those observed during terrestrial weathering. Rock analyses from Gusev crater are well described by the relationships apparent from low pH experimental alteration data. A model for rock surface alteration is developed which indicates that a leached alteration zone is present on rock surfaces at Gusev. This zone is not chemically fractionated to a large degree from the underlying rock interior, indicating that the rock surface alteration process has occurred at low fluid-to-rock ratio. The geochemistry of natural rock surfaces analyzed by APXS is consistent with a mixture between adhering soil/dust and the leached alteration zone. The chemistry of rock surfaces analyzed after brushing with the RAT is largely representative of the leached alteration zone. The chemistry of rock surfaces analyzed after grinding with the RAT is largely representative of the interior of the rock, relatively unaffected by the alteration process occurring at the rock surface. Elemental measurements from the Spirit, Opportunity, Pathfinder and Viking 1 landing sites indicate that soil chemistry from widely separated locations is consistent with the low-pH, low fluid to rock ratio alteration relationships developed for Gusev rocks. Soils are affected principally by mobility of FeO and MgO, consistent with alteration of olivine-bearing basalt and subsequent precipitation of FeO and MgO bearing secondary minerals as the primary control on soil geochemistry.

  8. Lunar highland rock types: Their implications for impact induced fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, W. C.; Warner, J. L.; Simonds, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    The first step in a petrologic study must be a classification based on observed textures and mineralogy. Lunar rocks, may be classified into three major groups: (1) coarse-grained igneous rocks, (2) fine-grained igneous rocks and (3) breccias. Group 1 is interpreted as primitive lunar crustal rocks that display various degrees of crushing and/or annealing. Group 2 is interpreted as volcanic rocks. Group 3 is interpreted as resulting from impacts on the lunar surface and is subdivided on the basis of matrix textures into fragmental breccias, crystalline breccias that have been annealed, and crystalline breccias with igneous matrices. A synthesis of the relevant data concerning lunar highlands polymict breccias from the fields of petrography, chemistry, photogeology, and impact studies compels the prediction that the breccias should have homogeneous matrices from rock to rock within regions of the highlands of limited size where impact mixing has been efficient and extensive.

  9. Oil sands thickened froth treatment tailings exhibit acid rock drainage potential during evaporative drying.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Petr; Kuznetsova, Alsu; Foght, Julia M; Siddique, Tariq

    2015-02-01

    Bitumen extraction from oil sands ores after surface mining produces different tailings waste streams: 'froth treatment tailings' are enriched in pyrite relative to other streams. Tailings treatment can include addition of organic polymers to produce thickened tailings (TT). TT may be further de-watered by deposition into geotechnical cells for evaporative drying to increase shear strength prior to reclamation. To examine the acid rock drainage (ARD) potential of TT, we performed predictive analyses and laboratory experiments on material from field trials of two types of thickened froth treatment tailings (TT1 and TT2). Acid-base accounting (ABA) of initial samples showed that both TT1 and TT2 initially had net acid-producing potential, with ABA values of -141 and -230 t CaCO₃ equiv. 1000 t(-1) of TT, respectively. In long-term kinetic experiments, duplicate ~2-kg samples of TT were incubated in shallow trays and intermittently irrigated under air flow for 459 days to simulate evaporative field drying. Leachates collected from both TT samples initially had pH~6.8 that began decreasing after ~50 days (TT2) or ~250 days (TT1), stabilizing at pH~2. Correspondingly, the redox potential of leachates increased from 100-200 mV to 500-580 mV and electrical conductivity increased from 2-5 dS m(-1) to 26 dS m(-1), indicating dissolution of minerals during ARD. The rapid onset and prolonged ARD observed with TT2 is attributed to its greater pyrite (13.4%) and lower carbonate (1.4%) contents versus the slower onset of ARD in TT1 (initially 6.0% pyrite and 2.5% carbonates). 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis revealed rapid shift in microbial community when conditions became strongly acidic (pH~2) favoring the enrichment of Acidithiobacillus and Sulfobacillus bacteria in TT. This is the first report showing ARD potential of TT and the results have significant implications for effective management of pyrite-enriched oil sands tailings streams/deposits. PMID:25306090

  10. Oil sands thickened froth treatment tailings exhibit acid rock drainage potential during evaporative drying.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Petr; Kuznetsova, Alsu; Foght, Julia M; Siddique, Tariq

    2015-02-01

    Bitumen extraction from oil sands ores after surface mining produces different tailings waste streams: 'froth treatment tailings' are enriched in pyrite relative to other streams. Tailings treatment can include addition of organic polymers to produce thickened tailings (TT). TT may be further de-watered by deposition into geotechnical cells for evaporative drying to increase shear strength prior to reclamation. To examine the acid rock drainage (ARD) potential of TT, we performed predictive analyses and laboratory experiments on material from field trials of two types of thickened froth treatment tailings (TT1 and TT2). Acid-base accounting (ABA) of initial samples showed that both TT1 and TT2 initially had net acid-producing potential, with ABA values of -141 and -230 t CaCO₃ equiv. 1000 t(-1) of TT, respectively. In long-term kinetic experiments, duplicate ~2-kg samples of TT were incubated in shallow trays and intermittently irrigated under air flow for 459 days to simulate evaporative field drying. Leachates collected from both TT samples initially had pH~6.8 that began decreasing after ~50 days (TT2) or ~250 days (TT1), stabilizing at pH~2. Correspondingly, the redox potential of leachates increased from 100-200 mV to 500-580 mV and electrical conductivity increased from 2-5 dS m(-1) to 26 dS m(-1), indicating dissolution of minerals during ARD. The rapid onset and prolonged ARD observed with TT2 is attributed to its greater pyrite (13.4%) and lower carbonate (1.4%) contents versus the slower onset of ARD in TT1 (initially 6.0% pyrite and 2.5% carbonates). 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis revealed rapid shift in microbial community when conditions became strongly acidic (pH~2) favoring the enrichment of Acidithiobacillus and Sulfobacillus bacteria in TT. This is the first report showing ARD potential of TT and the results have significant implications for effective management of pyrite-enriched oil sands tailings streams/deposits.

  11. Reclamation of acidic, denuded copper basin land: Revegetation performance of phosphate rock vs other nutrient sources

    SciTech Connect

    Soileau, J.M.; Sikora, F.J.; Maddox, J.J.; Kelsoe, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    Open pit smelting of Copper ore about 100 years ago resulted in approximately 9,300 ha of severely eroded, very acidic (pH 4.0 to 5.0) soils at Copper Basin, Tennessee. Along with other essential nutrients, phosphorus (P) amendments are critical for long-term productivity and sustainability of vegetation on this depleted soil. A field study was conducted (1992-1995) to compare revegetation from surface-applied North Carolina phosphate rock (PR) and triple superphosphate (TSP) at 20, 59, and 295 kg P ha{sup -1}, and to determine benefits of starter NPK tree tablets. The experimental design consisted of 7.3 x 9.1 m replicated plots, each planted to 20 loblolly pine seedlings and aerially seeded with a mixture of grasses and legumes. Tree survivability was high from all treatments. Through the third year, tree height and diameter increased with increasing P to 59 kg P ha without fertilizer tablets. There were no pine growth differences between PR and TSP. Weeping lovegrass has been the dominant cover crop through 1995, with increased stimulation to tree tablets and surface P. Tall fescue (KY 31), sericea lespedeza, and black locust responded more to PR than to TSP. Surface soil pH increased, and 0.01 M SrCl{sub 2} extractable Al decreased, with increasing rate of PR. For future loblolly pine plantings in the Copper Basin, this study suggests there is no benefit to applying both tree tablets and surface P at rates above 59 kg P ha{sup -1}. For reclaiming land with high acidity and low P fertility, PR has significant benefits. In reclaiming steep, gullied land, there is great potential for aerial application of PR and/or pelletized liming agents.

  12. Trace metal mobilization from oil sands froth treatment thickened tailings exhibiting acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Alsu; Kuznetsov, Petr; Foght, Julia M; Siddique, Tariq

    2016-11-15

    Froth treatment thickened tailings (TT) are a waste product of bitumen extraction from surface-mined oil sands ores. When incubated in a laboratory under simulated moist oxic environmental conditions for ~450d, two different types of TT (TT1 and TT2) exhibited the potential to generate acid rock drainage (ARD) by producing acid leachate after 250 and 50d, respectively. We report here the release of toxic metals from TT via ARD, which could pose an environmental threat if oil sands TT deposits are not properly managed. Trace metal concentrations in leachate samples collected periodically revealed that Mn and Sr were released immediately even before the onset of ARD. Spikes in Co and Ni concentrations were observed both pre-ARD and during active ARD, particularly in TT1. For most elements measured (Fe, Cr, V, As, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, and Se), leaching was associated with ARD production. Though equivalent acidification (pH2) was achieved in leachate from both TT types, greater metal release was observed from TT2 where concentrations reached 10,000ppb for Ni, 5000ppb for Co, 3000ppb for As, 2000ppb for V, and 1000ppb for Cr. Generally, metal concentrations decreased in leachate with time during ARD and became negligible by the end of incubation (~450d) despite appreciable metals remaining in the leached TT. These results suggest that using TT for land reclamation purposes or surface deposition for volume reduction may unfavorably impact the environment, and warrants application of appropriate strategies for management of pyrite-enriched oil sands tailings streams. PMID:27443453

  13. Trace metal mobilization from oil sands froth treatment thickened tailings exhibiting acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Alsu; Kuznetsov, Petr; Foght, Julia M; Siddique, Tariq

    2016-11-15

    Froth treatment thickened tailings (TT) are a waste product of bitumen extraction from surface-mined oil sands ores. When incubated in a laboratory under simulated moist oxic environmental conditions for ~450d, two different types of TT (TT1 and TT2) exhibited the potential to generate acid rock drainage (ARD) by producing acid leachate after 250 and 50d, respectively. We report here the release of toxic metals from TT via ARD, which could pose an environmental threat if oil sands TT deposits are not properly managed. Trace metal concentrations in leachate samples collected periodically revealed that Mn and Sr were released immediately even before the onset of ARD. Spikes in Co and Ni concentrations were observed both pre-ARD and during active ARD, particularly in TT1. For most elements measured (Fe, Cr, V, As, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, and Se), leaching was associated with ARD production. Though equivalent acidification (pH2) was achieved in leachate from both TT types, greater metal release was observed from TT2 where concentrations reached 10,000ppb for Ni, 5000ppb for Co, 3000ppb for As, 2000ppb for V, and 1000ppb for Cr. Generally, metal concentrations decreased in leachate with time during ARD and became negligible by the end of incubation (~450d) despite appreciable metals remaining in the leached TT. These results suggest that using TT for land reclamation purposes or surface deposition for volume reduction may unfavorably impact the environment, and warrants application of appropriate strategies for management of pyrite-enriched oil sands tailings streams.

  14. Mechanism of lead immobilization by oxalic acid-activated phosphate rocks.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guanjie; Liu, Yonghong; Huang, Li; Fu, Qingling; Deng, Youjun; Hu, Hongqing

    2012-01-01

    Lead (Pb) chemical fixation is an important environmental aspect for human health. Phosphate rocks (PRs) were utilized as an adsorbent to remove Pb from aqueous solution. Raw PRs and oxalic acid-activated PRs (APRs) were used to investigate the effect of chemical modification on the Pb-binding capacity in the pH range 2.0-5.0. The Pb adsorption rate of all treatments above pH 3.0 reached 90%. The Pb binding on PRs and APRs was pH-independent, except at pH 2.0 in activated treatments. The X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed that the raw PRs formed cerussite after reacting with the Pb solution, whereas the APRs formed pyromorphite. The Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy analysis indicated that carbonate (CO3(2-)) in raw PRs and phosphate (PO4(3)) groups in APRs played an important role in the Pb-binding process. After adsorption, anomalous block-shaped particles were observed by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data further indicated that both chemical and physical reactions occurred during the adsorption process according to the binding energy. Because of lower solubility of pyromorphite compared to cerussite, the APRs are more effective in immobilizing Pb than that of PRs.

  15. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-01

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H2SO4 and Cu(2+). Sulfate, sulfide, Cu(2+) and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7mg SO4(2-) d(-1)) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu(2+) removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu(2+) was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry.

  16. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-01

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H2SO4 and Cu(2+). Sulfate, sulfide, Cu(2+) and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7mg SO4(2-) d(-1)) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu(2+) removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu(2+) was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry. PMID:27318730

  17. Biofilm hydrous manganese oxyhydroxides and metal dynamics in acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Haack, Elizabeth; Warren, Lesley A

    2003-09-15

    Biofilms in shallow, tailings-associated acid rock drainage (ARD) accumulated metals from May to September, indicating scavenging is stable within these biological solids over seasonal time frames. Results indicate a doubling (Mn, Cr) to over a 6-fold increase (Ni, Co) in biofilm metal concentrations. Biofilm oxygen and pH gradients measured over diel time scales with microelectrodes were observed to be both spatially and temporally variable, indicating that biofilms are highly dynamic geochemical environments. Biofilm metal retention and affinities were element specific indicating different processes control their sequestration. Metals were specifically scavenged by the organic constituents of the biofilm itself (Ni, Co) and associated biominerals of amorphous Mn oxyhydroxides (HMO; Ni, Co, and Cr). Results are consistent with sorption and coprecipitation processes controlling Ni and Co biofilm association, while Cr dynamics appear linked to those of Mn through redox processes. Biofilm HMO concentrations increased seasonally but showed significant diel fluctuations, indicating that both formation and dissolution processes occurred over rapid time scales in these biofilms. Biofilm HMO concentrations increased nocturnally but decreased during daylight hours to late afternoon minima. Under the geochemical conditions of the streams, observed HMO formation rates can only be explained by microbial catalysis. These results are the first to quantitatively examine microbial biofilm metal dynamics using microscale, geochemical techniques at both diel and seasonal time scales. They provide strong evidence for the significant role that microbial activity can play in metal geochemistry in natural environments. PMID:14524446

  18. Acid Fluid-Rock Interactions with Shales Comprising Unconventional Hydrocarbon Reservoirs and with Shale Capping Carbon Storage Reservoirs: Experimental Insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaszuba, J. P.; Bratcher, J.; Marcon, V.; Herz-Thyhsen, R.

    2015-12-01

    Injection of HCl is often a first stage in the hydraulic fracturing process. These acidic fluids react with marls or shales in unconventional reservoirs, reactions generally comparable to reaction between shale caprocks and acidic, carbonated formation waters in a carbon storage reservoir. Hydrothermal experiments examine acid fluid-rock interaction with 1) an unconventional shale reservoir and 2) a model shale capping a carbon storage reservoir. In the former, unconventional reservoir rock and hydraulic fracturing fluid possessing a range of ionic strengths (I = 0.01, 0.15) and initial pH values (2.5 and 7.3) reacted at 115°C and 35 MPa for 28 days. In the latter, a model carbon storage reservoir (Fe-rich dolomite), shale caprock (illite), and shale-reservoir mixture each reacted with formation water (I = 0.1 and pH 6.3) at 160°C and 25 MPa for ~15 days. These three experiments were subsequently injected with sufficient CO2 to maintain CO2 saturation in the water and allowed to react for ~40 additional days. Acidic frac fluid was rapidly buffered (from pH 2.5 to 6.2 after 38 hrs) by reaction with reservoir rock whereas the pH of near-neutral frac fluid decreased (from 7.3 to 6.9) after 47 hrs. Carbonate dissolution released Ca and Sr into solution and feldspar dissolution released SiO2 and Li; the extent of reaction was greater in the experiment containing acidic frac fluid. All three carbon storage experiments displayed a similar pH decrease of 1.5 units after the addition of CO2. The pH remained low for the duration of the experiments because the immiscible supercritical CO2 phase provided an infinite reservoir of carbonic acid that could not be consumed by reaction with the rock. In all three experiments, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn and SO4 increase with injection, but slowly decline through termination of the experiments. This trend suggests initial dissolution followed by re-precipitation of carbonates, which can be seen in modeling and SEM results. New clay minerals

  19. Radiological, chemical and morphological characterizations of phosphate rock and phosphogypsum from phosphoric acid factories in SW Spain.

    PubMed

    Rentería-Villalobos, Marusia; Vioque, Ignacio; Mantero, Juan; Manjón, Guillermo

    2010-09-15

    In this work, radiological, chemical, and also morphological characterization was performed in phosphate rock and phosphogypsum samples, in order to understand the behavior of toxic elements. Characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), gamma spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX). Our results show that the phosphate rock was mainly composed of fluorapatite, calcite, perovskite, quartz, magnetite, pyrite and kaolinite, whereas phosphogypsum only exhibited dihydrated calcium sulfate. The activity concentration of U-series radioisotopes in phosphate rock was around 1640 Bq/kg. (226)Ra and (210)Pb tend to be distributed into phosphogypsum by up to 80%, whereas the fraction of U-isotopes is 10%. The most abundant trace elements in phosphate rock were Sr, Cr, V, Zn, Y, Ni and Ba. Some elements, such as Ba, Cd, Cu, La, Pb, Se, Sr, Th and Y, were enriched in the phosphogypsum. This enrichment may be attributed to an additional input associated to the sulfuric acid used for the phosphoric acid production. Furthermore, results from SEM-EDX demonstrated that toxic elements are not distributed homogeneously into phosphogypsum. Most of these elements are concentrated in particles <20 microm of high porosity, and could be easily mobilized by leaching and/or erosion.

  20. Radiological, chemical and morphological characterizations of phosphate rock and phosphogypsum from phosphoric acid factories in SW Spain.

    PubMed

    Rentería-Villalobos, Marusia; Vioque, Ignacio; Mantero, Juan; Manjón, Guillermo

    2010-09-15

    In this work, radiological, chemical, and also morphological characterization was performed in phosphate rock and phosphogypsum samples, in order to understand the behavior of toxic elements. Characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), gamma spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX). Our results show that the phosphate rock was mainly composed of fluorapatite, calcite, perovskite, quartz, magnetite, pyrite and kaolinite, whereas phosphogypsum only exhibited dihydrated calcium sulfate. The activity concentration of U-series radioisotopes in phosphate rock was around 1640 Bq/kg. (226)Ra and (210)Pb tend to be distributed into phosphogypsum by up to 80%, whereas the fraction of U-isotopes is 10%. The most abundant trace elements in phosphate rock were Sr, Cr, V, Zn, Y, Ni and Ba. Some elements, such as Ba, Cd, Cu, La, Pb, Se, Sr, Th and Y, were enriched in the phosphogypsum. This enrichment may be attributed to an additional input associated to the sulfuric acid used for the phosphoric acid production. Furthermore, results from SEM-EDX demonstrated that toxic elements are not distributed homogeneously into phosphogypsum. Most of these elements are concentrated in particles <20 microm of high porosity, and could be easily mobilized by leaching and/or erosion. PMID:20537794

  1. UThPb age of Apollo 12 rock 12013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatsumoto, M.

    1970-01-01

    A UThPb isotopic study of three chips from lunar rock 12013 indicates that parental material of the intrusion breccia formed quite early in the moon's history, possibly 3.9 to 4.3 by ago. The UThPb characteristics of the rock are distinctly different from those of other Apollo 12 igneous rocks and suggest a different origin. ?? 1970.

  2. Attached and Unattached Bacterial Communities in a 120-Meter Corehole in an Acidic, Crystalline Rock Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, R. Michael; Roberto, Francisco F.; Earley, Drummond; Bruhn, Debby F.; Brink, Susan E.; O'Connell, Sean P.; Delwiche, Mark E.; Colwell, Frederick S.

    2001-01-01

    The bacteria colonizing geologic core sections (attached) were contrasted with those found suspended in the groundwater (unattached) by examining the microbiology of 16 depth-paired core and groundwater samples using a suite of culture-independent and culture-dependent analyses. One hundred twenty-two meters was continuously cored from a buried chalcopyrite ore hosted in a biotite-quartz-monzonite porphyry at the Mineral Park Mine near Kingman, Ariz. Every fourth 1.5-m core was acquired using microbiologically defensible methods, and these core sections were aseptically processed for characterization of the attached bacteria. Groundwater samples containing unattached bacteria were collected from the uncased corehole at depth intervals corresponding to the individual cores using an inflatable straddle packer sampler. The groundwater was acidic (pH 2.8 to 5.0), with low levels of dissolved oxygen and high concentrations of sulfate and metals, including ferrous iron. Total numbers of attached cells were less than 105 cells g of core material−1 while unattached cells numbered about 105 cells ml of groundwater−1. Attached and unattached acidophilic heterotrophs were observed throughout the depth profile. In contrast, acidophilic chemolithotrophs were not found attached to the rock but were commonly observed in the groundwater. Attached communities were composed of low numbers (<40 CFU g−1) of neutrophilic heterotrophs that exhibited a high degree of morphologic diversity, while unattached communities contained higher numbers (ca. 103 CFU ml−1) of neutrophilic heterotrophs of limited diversity. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were restricted to the deepest samples of both core and groundwater. 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis of attached, acidophilic isolates indicated that organisms closely related to heterotrophic, acidophilic mesophiles such as Acidiphilium organovorum and, surprisingly, to the moderately thermophilic Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius were present

  3. Manifestation of Preferential Flow and Nitrate Transport in Central European Soils on Acid Crystalline Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolezal, F.; Cislerova, M.; Vogel, T.; Zavadil, J.; Vacek, J.; Kvitek, T.; Prazak, P.; Nechvatal, M.; Bayer, T.

    2006-12-01

    Large areas of Central Europe are occupied by highlands and peneplains of medium altitudes, built by acid crystalline rocks. The soils overlying them are typically of medium textures. They are neither markedly water- repellent nor greatly swelling and shrinking. These landscapes are characterized by high vulnerability of water bodies, both surface and subsurface. The existing methodologies of vulnerability assessment regard the heavier among these soils as little vulnerable to diffuse pollution, while in reality they may be virtually equally vulnerable, because of the short-circuiting effect of preferential flow and transport. Our experiment site was Valeèov (49° 38' 40" N, 14° 30' 25" E, 461 m a.s.l.) in the Bohemo-Moravian highland, with average annual precipitation 660 mm and average annual air temperature 7.2 ° C. The field trials, starting from 2001, were focused on growing potato under different conditions. Soil moisture content was measured by Theta- probe capacitance sensors, soil water suction by Watermark sensors and tensiometers. Nitrate leaching was monitored by soil solution sampling with ceramic suction cups and zero-tension lysimeters. The hydraulic conductivity of the soil was measured on small cores and by suction and pressure infiltrometers. The following preferential flow manifestations are analyzed and quantified: a) the spatial variability of soil moisture content and suction after rainstorms, b) the spatial and temporal variability of soil's hydraulic conductivity and its dependence on soil moisture content, c) the spatial variability of percolation volumes in parallel lysimeters, d) the variability of nitrate concentrations in the lysimeter leachate, e) the apparent absence of correlation between leachate volumes and leachate concentrations in lysimeters, f) the lower mean and higher variance of leachate concentrations in lysimeters, in comparison with those in suction cups.

  4. 8,9-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid analog protects pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from apoptosis via ROCK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Shanshan; Liu, Shulin; Ma, Cui; Li, Weiyang; Falck, J.R.; Manthati, Vijay L.; Reddy, D. Sudarshan; Medhora, Meetha; Jacobs, Elizabeth R.; Zhu, Daling

    2010-08-15

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) catalyzed by cytochrome P450 (CYP), have many essential biologic roles in the cardiovascular system including inhibition of apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. In the present study, we tested the potential of 8,9-EET and derivatives to protect pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from starvation induced apoptosis. We found 8,9-epoxy-eicos-11(Z)-enoic acid (8,9-EET analog (214)), but not 8,9-EET, increased cell viability, decreased activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, and decreased TUNEL-positive cells or nuclear condensation induced by serum deprivation (SD) in PASMCs. These effects were reversed after blocking the Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway with Y-27632 or HA-1077. Therefore, 8,9-EET analog (214) protects PASMC from serum deprivation-induced apoptosis, mediated at least in part via the ROCK pathway. Serum deprivation of PASMCs resulted in mitochondrial membrane depolarization, decreased expression of Bcl-2 and enhanced expression of Bax, all effects were reversed by 8,9-EET analog (214) in a ROCK dependent manner. Because 8,9-EET and not the 8,9-EET analog (214) protects pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs), these observations suggest the potential to differentially promote apoptosis or survival with 8,9-EET or analogs in pulmonary arteries.

  5. Geologic and mineralogic controls on acid and metal-rich rock drainage in an alpine watershed, Handcart Gulch, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bove, Dana J.; Caine, Jonathan S.; Lowers, Heather

    2012-01-01

    The surface and subsurface geology, hydrothermal alteration, and mineralogy of the Handcart Gulch area was studied using map and drill core data as part of a multidisciplinary approach to understand the hydrology and affects of geology on acid-rock drainage in a mineralized alpine watershed. Handcart Gulch was the locus of intense hydrothermal alteration that affected an area of nearly 3 square kilometers. Hydrothermal alteration and accompanied weak mineralization are spatially and genetically associated with small dacite to low-silica rhyolite stocks and plugs emplaced about 37-36 Ma. Felsic lithologies are commonly altered to a quartz-sericite-pyrite mineral assemblage at the surface, but alteration is more variable in the subsurface, ranging from quartz-sericite-pyrite-dominant in upper core sections to a propylitic variant that is more typical in deeper drill core intervals. Late-stage, hydrothermal argillic alteration [kaolinite and(or) smectite] was superimposed over earlier-formed alteration assemblages in the felsic rocks. Smectite in this late stage assemblage is mostly neoformed resulting from dissolution of chlorite, plagioclase, and minor illite in more weakly altered rocks. Hydrothermally altered amphibolites are characterized by biotitic alteration of amphibole, and subsequent alteration of both primary and secondary biotite to chlorite. Whereas pyrite is present both as disseminations and in small veinlets in the felsic lithologies, it is mostly restricted to small veinlets in the amphibolites. Base-metal sulfides including molybdenite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and galena are present in minor to trace amounts in the altered rocks. However, geologic data in conjunction with water geochemical studies indicate that copper mineralization may be present in unknown abundance in two distinct areas. The altered rocks contain an average of 8 weight percent fine pyrite that is largely devoid of metals in the crystal structure, which can be a significant

  6. Geochemical characterization of acid mine drainage from a waste rock pile, Mine Doyon, Québec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sracek, O.; Choquette, M.; Gélinas, P.; Lefebvre, R.; Nicholson, R. V.

    2004-03-01

    Water quality in the unsaturated and saturated zones of a waste rock pile containing sulphides was investigated. The main objectives of the project were (1) the evaluation of geochemical trends including the acid mine drainage (AMD)-buffering mechanism and the role of secondary minerals, and (2) the investigation of the use of stable isotopes for the interpretation of physical and geochemical processes in waste rock. Pore water in unsaturated zone was sampled from suction lysimeters and with piezometers in underlying saturated rocks. The investigation revealed strong temporal (dry period vs. recharge period), and spatial (slope vs. central region of pile) variability in the formation of acid mine drainage. The main secondary minerals observed were gypsum and jarosite. There was a higher concentration of gypsum in solid phase at Site TBT than at Site 6, suggesting that part of the gypsum formed at Site 6 in the early stage of AMD has been already dissolved. Formation of secondary minerals contributed to the formation of AMD by opening of foliation planes in waste rock, thus increasing the access of oxidants like O 2 and Fe 3+ to previously encapsulated pyrite. The behavior of several dissolved species such as Mg, Al, and Fe 2+ can be considered as conservative in the leachate. Stable isotopes, deuterium and 18O, indicated internal evaporation within the pile, and were used to trace recharge pulses from snowmelt. Isotope trends for 34S and 18O(SO 4) indicated a lack of sulfate reduction and zones of active oxidation of pyrite, respectively. Results of numerical modeling of pyrite oxidation and gas and water transport were consistent with geochemical and isotopic trends and confirmed zones of high evaporation rate within the rock pile close to the slope. The results indicate that physical and chemical processes within the pile are strongly coupled and cannot be considered separately when oxidation rates are high and influence gas transport as a result of heat

  7. Geochemical characterization of acid mine drainage from a waste rock pile, Mine Doyon, Québec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Sracek, O; Choquette, M; Gélinas, P; Lefebvre, R; Nicholson, R V

    2004-03-01

    Water quality in the unsaturated and saturated zones of a waste rock pile containing sulphides was investigated. The main objectives of the project were (1) the evaluation of geochemical trends including the acid mine drainage (AMD)-buffering mechanism and the role of secondary minerals, and (2) the investigation of the use of stable isotopes for the interpretation of physical and geochemical processes in waste rock. Pore water in unsaturated zone was sampled from suction lysimeters and with piezometers in underlying saturated rocks. The investigation revealed strong temporal (dry period vs. recharge period), and spatial (slope vs. central region of pile) variability in the formation of acid mine drainage. The main secondary minerals observed were gypsum and jarosite. There was a higher concentration of gypsum in solid phase at Site TBT than at Site 6, suggesting that part of the gypsum formed at Site 6 in the early stage of AMD has been already dissolved. Formation of secondary minerals contributed to the formation of AMD by opening of foliation planes in waste rock, thus increasing the access of oxidants like O2 and Fe3+ to previously encapsulated pyrite. The behavior of several dissolved species such as Mg, Al, and Fe2+ can be considered as conservative in the leachate. Stable isotopes, deuterium and 18O, indicated internal evaporation within the pile, and were used to trace recharge pulses from snowmelt. Isotope trends for 34S and 18O(SO4) indicated a lack of sulfate reduction and zones of active oxidation of pyrite, respectively. Results of numerical modeling of pyrite oxidation and gas and water transport were consistent with geochemical and isotopic trends and confirmed zones of high evaporation rate within the rock pile close to the slope. The results indicate that physical and chemical processes within the pile are strongly coupled and cannot be considered separately when oxidation rates are high and influence gas transport as a result of heat generation

  8. Phosphate Stability in Diagenetic Fluids Constrains the Acidic Alteration Model for Lower Mt. Sharp Sedimentary Rocks in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, J. A.; Schmidt, M. E.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Gellert, R.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; VanBommel, S. J.; McAdam, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars rover Curiosity has encountered silica-enriched bedrock (as strata and as veins and associated halos of alteration) in the largely basaltic Murray Fm. of Mt. Sharp in Gale Crater. Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) investigations of the Murray Fm. revealed decreasing Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, and Al, and higher S, as silica increased (Fig. 1). A positive correlation between SiO2 and TiO2 (up to 74.4 and 1.7 wt %, respectively) suggests that these two insoluble elements were retained while acidic fluids leached more soluble elements. Other evidence also supports a silica-retaining, acidic alteration model for the Murray Fm., including low trace element abundances consistent with leaching, and the presence of opaline silica and jarosite determined by CheMin. Phosphate stability is a key component of this model because PO4 3- is typically soluble in acidic water and is likely a mobile ion in diagenetic fluids (pH less than 5). However, the Murray rocks are not leached of P; they have variable P2O5 (Fig. 1) ranging from average Mars (0.9 wt%) up to the highest values in Gale Crater (2.5 wt%). Here we evaluate APXS measurements of Murray Fm. bedrock and veins with respect to phosphate stability in acidic fluids as a test of the acidic alteration model for the Lower Mt. Sharp rocks.

  9. Classification of mafic clasts from mesosiderites: Implications for endogenous igneous processes

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, A.E. ); Mittlefehldt, D.W. )

    1992-02-01

    The authors have analyzed thirteen igneous pebbles from the Vaca Muerta, EET87500, and Bondoc mesosiderites by electron microprobe and instrumental neutron activation and combined these data with literature data for forty-three analyzed mesosiderite clasts. They classify these well-characterized clasts into the following five principal groups: (1) Polygenic and monogenic cumulates (39%) are coarse-grained gabbros that are highly depleted in incompatible elements (relative to H chondrites); they formed at moderate depth either as residues of low-degree partial melting of pre-existing cumulate eucrites or as cumulates from parent melts similar to cumulate eucrites. (2) Polygenic basalts (30%) are finer-grained rocks with positive europium anomalies, La/Lu ratios < 1, and lower rare earth element abundances than basaltic eucrites. It seems likely that these rocks were formed near their parent body surface by remelting mixtures of major amounts of basaltic eucrites and lesser amounts of cumulate eucrites. (3) Quench-textured rocks comprise two compositional groups, (a) those which resemble basaltic eucrites (5%), and (b) those which resemble cumulate eucrites (2%). The quench-textured rocks are probably monogenic; they formed most likely when small-scale impacts at their parent body surface totally melted small amounts of basaltic or cumulate eucrite material. (4) Monogenic basalts (11%) resemble basaltic eucrites and formed by endogenous igneous processes on the mesosiderite parent body (MPB). (5) Ultramafic rocks are cumulates consisting mainly of large crystals of orthopyroxene (9%) or olivine (4%). Orthopyroxenite clasts closely resemble diogenites and were formed most likely by endogenous igneous processes.

  10. Opaque rock fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Abhijit, B.; Molinaroli, E.; Olsen, J.

    1987-05-01

    The authors describe a new, rare, but petrogenetically significant variety of rock fragments from Holocene detrital sediments. Approximately 50% of the opaque heavy mineral concentrates from Holocene siliciclastic sands are polymineralic-Fe-Ti oxide particles, i.e., they are opaque rock fragments. About 40% to 70% of these rock fragments show intergrowth of hm + il, mt + il, and mt + hm +/- il. Modal analysis of 23,282 opaque particles in 117 polished thin sections of granitic and metamorphic parent rocks and their daughter sands from semi-arid and humid climates show the following relative abundances. The data show that opaque rock fragments are more common in sands from igneous source rocks and that hm + il fragments are more durable. They assume that equilibrium conditions existed in parent rocks during the growth of these paired minerals, and that the Ti/Fe ratio did not change during oxidation of mt to hm. Geothermometric determinations using electron probe microanalysis of opaque rock fragments in sand samples from Lake Erie and the Adriatic Sea suggest that these rock fragments may have equilibrated at approximately 900/sup 0/ and 525/sup 0/C, respectively.

  11. Igpet software for modeling igneous processes: examples of application using the open educational version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Michael J.; Gazel, Esteban

    2016-09-01

    We provide here an open version of Igpet software, called t-Igpet to emphasize its application for teaching and research in forward modeling of igneous geochemistry. There are three programs, a norm utility, a petrologic mixing program using least squares and Igpet, a graphics program that includes many forms of numerical modeling. Igpet is a multifaceted tool that provides the following basic capabilities: igneous rock identification using the IUGS (International Union of Geological Sciences) classification and several supplementary diagrams; tectonic discrimination diagrams; pseudo-quaternary projections; least squares fitting of lines, polynomials and hyperbolae; magma mixing using two endmembers, histograms, x-y plots, ternary plots and spider-diagrams. The advanced capabilities of Igpet are multi-element mixing and magma evolution modeling. Mixing models are particularly useful for understanding the isotopic variations in rock suites that evolved by mixing different sources. The important melting models include, batch melting, fractional melting and aggregated fractional melting. Crystallization models include equilibrium and fractional crystallization and AFC (assimilation and fractional crystallization). Theses, reports and proposals concerning igneous petrology are improved by numerical modeling. For reviewed publications some elements of modeling are practically a requirement. Our intention in providing this software is to facilitate improved communication and lower entry barriers to research, especially for students.

  12. Evolution and timing of tectonic events in the Arabia-Eurasia convergence zone as inferred from igneous geochemistry from the EarthChem database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieu, W. K.; Stern, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    The timing of tectonic events in the Anatolia-Iranian region can be inferred from analysis of igneous rocks. Magmatic activities in the region are generally associated with the convergence of the African-Arabian and Eurasian plates and the subduction of the Neotethys Ocean. Ancillary processes such as subduction of continental crust, delamination of upper plate lithosphere or lower crust, or asthenospheric decompression accompanying post-collisional relaxation also contribute to the composition of igneous rocks. Here we use geochemical data gathered from the EarthChem database to assess broad chemical implications of Cenozoic tectonic activities of the convergence region. We search for geochemical signal of the timing of first contact of the subducting Arabian and overriding Eurasian continental crust. Of particular interest is how igneous rock compositions vary during the transition from pre- to post-contact of the continental crusts. Also, is there a geographic variation along the convergence zone during this tectonic transition? We generate maps and geochemical plots for four different epochs and two different regions since Cenozoic time: Iran and Anatolia in the Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene and Plio-Quaternary. This board, region-scaled analysis of major and trace element patterns suggests the following tectonic events: Subduction-related medium K calc-alkaline igneous rocks reflect Eocene subduction of the Neo-Tethys oceanic lithosphere. Oligocene igneous rocks are characterized by K2O-SiO2 trends scattering to higher silica and alkaline content, which may reflect subduction of stretched continental margin lithosphere and sediments. A bimodal pattern of potash-silica trends during Miocene time may mark the transition from subduction-related to intra-plate magmatism, perhaps signaling contact between the continental crust of Arabia-Africa with Eurasia. Pliocene and younger igneous rocks show an intra-plate and ocean island basalt trend, as the region's activities

  13. The Rho/ROCK pathway for lysophosphatidic acid-induced proteolytic enzyme expression and ovarian cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Jeong, K J; Park, S Y; Cho, K H; Sohn, J S; Lee, J; Kim, Y K; Kang, J; Park, C G; Han, J W; Lee, H Y

    2012-09-27

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a biolipid that has diverse biological activities implicated in ovarian cancer initiation and progression. Previous studies have shown the critical role of the Rho/Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) pathway in LPA-induced ovarian cancer progression. However, detailed underlying mechanism by which the Rho/ROCK pathway induces ovarian cancer cell invasion is still incompletely understood. In the present study, we observed that the Rho/ROCK pathway is implicated in the production of proteolytic enzymes, leading to LPA-induced ovarian cancer cell invasion. LPA induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 expression in CAOV-3 and PA-1 cells and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expression in SKOV-3 cells. LPA-induced proteolytic enzyme expression was required for the invasion of ovarian cancer cells expressing corresponding enzymes. Pretreatment of cells with a pharmacological inhibitor of Rho/ROCK (Y-27632) or overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of Rho (Rho N19) profoundly inhibited LPA-induced proteolytic enzyme expression as well as the invasive potential of ovarian cancer cells. In addition, transfection with dominant-negative Ras (Ras N17) significantly inhibited LPA-induced Rho activation as well as MMP-9 and uPA expression. Consistently, Y-27632 reduced LPA-induced nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation that is critical for proteolytic enzyme expression and cellular invasion. Collectively, we demonstrate a mechanism by which LPA promotes ovarian cancer progression through coordinate activation of a Ras/Rho/ROCK/NF-κB signaling pathway and the proteolytic enzyme secretion, providing novel biomarkers and promising therapeutic targets for ovarian cancer cell progression.

  14. Magma storage of an alkali ultramafic igneous suite from Chamberlindalen, SW Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gołuchowska, Karolina; Barker, Abigail K.; Czerny, Jerzy; Majka, Jarosław; Manecki, Maciej; Farajewicz, Milena; Dwornik, Maciej

    2016-10-01

    An alkali mafic-ultramafic igneous suite of composite intrusions, lenses and associated greenstones are hosted by Neoproterozoic metasedimentary sequences in Chamberlindalen, Southwest Svalbard. This study focuses on the alkali igneous suite of Chamberlindalen with a view to determining the conditions of magma storage. The rocks from Chamberlindalen display cumulate textures, are highly magnesian and are classified as alkaline by the occurrence of kaersutite. They have textures that indicate cocrystallization of primary magmatic minerals such as diopside, kaersutite-ferrokaersutite and biotite-phlogopite in different proportions. The historic magma plumbing system for the alkaline cumulates has been reconstructed by thermobarometry. Diopside and kaersutite crystallization in the alkaline cumulates show a dominant level of magma storage between 30 and 50 km in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle.

  15. Rock specific hydraulic fracturing and matrix acidizing to enhance a geothermal system — Concepts and field results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Günter; Blöcher, Guido; Reinicke, Andreas; Brandt, Wulf

    2011-04-01

    Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) are engineered reservoirs developed to extract economic amounts of heat from low permeability and/or porosity geothermal resources. To enhance the productivity of reservoirs, a site specific concept is necessary to actively make reservoir conditions profitable using specially adjusted stimulation treatments, such as multi fracture concepts and site specific well path design. The results of previously performed stimulation treatments in the geothermal research well GtGrSk4/05 at Groß Schönebeck, Germany are presented. The reservoir is located at a 4100-4300 m depth within the Lower Permian of the NE German Basin with a bottom-hole temperature of 150 °C. The reservoir rock is classified by two lithological units from bottom to top: volcanic rocks (andesitic rocks) and siliciclastics ranging from conglomerates to fine-grained sandstones (fluvial sediments). The stimulation treatments included multiple hydraulic stimulations and an acid treatment. In order to initiate a cross-flow from the sandstone layer, the hydraulic stimulations were performed in different depth sections (two in the sandstone section and one in the underlying volcanic section). In low permeability volcanic rocks, a cyclic hydraulic fracturing treatment was performed over 6 days in conjunction with adding quartz in low concentrations to maintain a sustainable fracture performance. Flow rates of up to 150 l/s were realized, and a total of 13,170 m 3 of water was injected. A hydraulic connection to the sandstone layer was successfully achieved in this way. However, monitoring of the water level in the offsetting well EGrSk3/90, which is 475 m apart at the final depth, showed a very rapid water level increase due to the stimulation treatment. This can be explained by a connected fault zone within the volcanic rocks. Two gel-proppant treatments were performed in the slightly higher permeability sandstones to obtain long-term access to the reservoir rocks. During each

  16. Cosmogenic 3He in igneous and fossil tooth enamel fluorapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, K. A.; Cerling, T. E.; Fitzgerald, P. G.

    2001-02-01

    Igneous fluorapatite samples from a suite of six granitic rocks from the Transantarctic Mountains have high 3He concentrations (to 5×10 9 atoms g -1) and high 3He/ 4He ratios (to 9×10 -7). These values are far higher than those found in several hundred igneous apatites from elsewhere around the world and are higher than can be attributed to nuclear reactions on 6Li. This 3He is almost certainly derived from cosmic ray reactions in rocks with high exposure ages at high latitude and elevation. Several samples of fossil tooth enamel fluorapatite from the Turkana Basin of Kenya are similarly rich in 3He, with up to 1×10 7 atoms 3He g -1 and 3He/ 4He ratios up to 4×10 -6. Again, this 3He is most logically attributed to cosmic ray reactions. Provided that cosmogenic 3He, like radiogenic 4He, is quantitatively retained in fluorapatite under Earth surface conditions, routine 3He exposure dating of this common phase may be possible. Based on its chemical composition, the 3He production rate in fluorapatite is about 100 atoms g -1 yr -1 at sea level and high latitude. Using this rate the apatites from the Transantarctic Mountains have apparent exposure ages of 0.5-6.2 Myr, in agreement with values elsewhere in the range. The fossil tooth enamel samples have apparent exposure ages ranging from a few up to 130 kyr. Such high exposure ages suggest some of these fossils may be lag deposits with a very long residence time at or near the Earth's surface. 3He exposure ages can provide insights to the depositional and reworking history of enamel-bearing fossils. At present the major limitations to 3He exposure dating of fluorapatite are purification of sufficient amounts of material and measurement of small amounts of 3He in the presence of large quantities of 4He. In addition, further work is necessary to establish the nucleogenic 3He background in fluorapatite.

  17. Reactivity of Hontomín carbonate rocks to acidic solution injection: reactive "push-pull" tracer tests results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gaspari, Francesca; Cabeza, Yoar; Luquot, Linda; Rötting, Tobias; Saaltink, Maarten W.; Carrera, Jesus

    2014-05-01

    Several field tests will be carried out in order to characterize the reservoir for CO2 injection in Hontomín (Burgos, Spain) as part of the Compostilla project of "Fundación Ciudad de la Energía" (CIUDEN). Once injected, the dissolution of the CO2 in the resident brine will increase the acidity of the water and lead to the dissolution of the rocks, constituted mainly by carbonates. This mechanism will cause changes in the aquifer properties such as porosity and permeability. To reproduce the effect of the CO2 injection, a reactive solution with 2% of acetic acid is going to be injected in the reservoir and extracted from the same well (reactive "push-pull" tracer tests) to identify and quantify the geochemical reactions occurring into the aquifer. The reactivity of the rock will allow us also to evaluate the changes of its properties. Previously, theoretical calculations of Damkhöler numbers were done to determine the acid concentrations and injection flow rates needed to generate ramified-wormholes patterns, during theses "push-pull" experiments. The aim of this work is to present the results and a preliminary interpretation of the field tests.

  18. Solution of rocks and refractory minerals by acids at high temperatures and pressures. Determination of silica after decomposition with hydrofluoric acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, I.; Rowe, J.J.

    1965-01-01

    A modified Morey bomb was designed which contains a removable nichromecased 3.5-ml platinium crucible. This bomb is particularly useful for decompositions of refractory samples for micro- and semimicro-analysis. Temperatures of 400-450?? and pressures estimated as great as 6000 p.s.i. were maintained in the bomb for periods as long as 24 h. Complete decompositions of rocks, garnet, beryl, chrysoberyl, phenacite, sapphirine, and kyanite were obtained with hydrofluoric acid or a mixture of hydrofluoric and sulfuric acids; the decomposition of chrome refractory was made with hydrochloric acid. Aluminum-rich samples formed difficultly soluble aluminum fluoride precipitates. Because no volatilization losses occur, silica can be determined on sample solutions by a molybdenum-blue procedure using aluminum(III) to complex interfering fluoride. ?? 1965.

  19. Multiphase transfer processes in waste rock piles producing acid mine drainage 1: Conceptual model and system characterization.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, R; Hockley, D; Smolensky, J; Gélinas, P

    2001-11-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) results from the oxidation of sulfides, mainly pyrite, present in mine wastes, either mill tailings or waste rock. This is the first of two papers describing the coupled physical processes taking place in waste rock piles undergoing AMD production. Since the oxidation of pyrite involves the consumption of oxygen and the production of heat, the oxidation process initiates coupled processes of gas transfer by diffusion and convection as well as heat transfer. These processes influence the supply of oxygen that is required to sustain the oxidation process. This first paper describes a general conceptual model of the interaction of these coupled transfer processes. This general conceptual model is illustrated by the physicochemical conditions observed at two large sites where extensive characterization programs revealed widely different properties. The South Dump of the Doyon mine in Canada is permeable and has a high pyrite oxidation rate leading to high temperatures (over 65 degrees C), thus making temperature-driven air convection the main oxygen supply mechanism. The Nordhalde of the Ronnenberg mining district in Germany contains lower permeability material which is less reactive, thus leading to a more balanced contribution of gaseous diffusion and convection as oxygen supply mechanisms. The field characterization and monitoring data at these sites were thoroughly analyzed to yield two coherent sets of representative physical properties. These properties are used in the second paper as a basis for applications of numerical simulation in AMD-producing waste rock piles. PMID:11695739

  20. A field and laboratory investigation of acid effects on largemouth bass, rock bass, black crappie, and yellow perch

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, J.G.; McCormick, J.H. ); Swenson, W.A. ); Simonson, T.D. ); Jensen, K.M. )

    1992-09-01

    One-half of Little Rock Lake, a small seepage lake in north-central Wisconsin, was gradually acidified by additions of sulfuric acid between August 1983 and November 1990. The ambient pH (6.1) of the lake was reduced at successive 2-year intervals to pH 5.6, 5.1, and 4.7. Responses of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, rock bass Ambloplites rupestris, black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus, and yellow perch Perca flavescens populations to the pH reductions were recorded and compared to the responses of these species during in situ bioassays and laboratory toxicity tests on embryos and larvae. Laboratory results obtained for largemouth bass and rock bass underestimated, black crappie results overestimated, and yellow perch results were similar to effects observed in field studies. In situ bioassays predicted field responses better than did laboratory toxicity tests. Laboratory results showed that monomeric Al concentrations of approximately 50 [mu]g/L, which were comparable to Al concentrations in the acidified half of the lake, altered low-pH toxicity. Reduced recruitment was observed in field populations at higher pH than that at which adult mortality was observed. The results indicate that laboratory toxicity tests with early life stages may not accurately predict field population responses and that results from laboratory tests should be field-validated whenever possible. 42 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Field and laboratory investigation of acid effects on largemouth bass, rock bass, black crappie, and yellow perch

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, J.G.; Swenson, W.A.; McCormick, J.H.; Simonson, T.D.; Jensen, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    One-half of Little Rock Lake, a small seepage lake in north-central Wisconsin, was gradually acidified by additions of sulfuric acid between August 1983 and November 1990. The ambient pH (6.1) of the lake was reduced at successive 2-year intervals to pH 5.6, 5.1, and 4.7. Responses of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, rock bass Ambloplites rupestris, black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus, and yellow perch Perca flavescens populations to the pH reductions were recorded and compared to the responses of these species during in situ bioassays and laboratory toxicity tests on embryos and larvae. Laboratory results obtained for largemouth bass and rock bass underestimated, black crappie results overestimated, and yellow perch results were similar to effects observed in field studies. In situ bioassays predicted field responses better than did laboratory toxicity tests. Laboratory results showed that monomeric Al concentrations of approximately 50 microgram/l, which were comparable to Al concentrations in the acidified half of the lake, altered low-pH toxicity. Reduced recruitment was observed in field populations at higher pH than that at which adult mortality was observed. The results indicate that laboratory toxicity tests with early life stages may not accurately predict field population responses and that results from laboratory tests should be field-validated whenever possible.

  2. Agronomic effectiveness of biofertilizers with phosphate rock, sulphur and Acidithiobacillus for yam bean grown on a Brazilian tableland acidic soil.

    PubMed

    Stamford, N P; Santos, P R; Santos, C E S; Freitas, A D S; Dias, S H L; Lira, M A

    2007-04-01

    Phosphate rocks have low available P and soluble P fertilizers have been preferably used in plant crop production, although economic and effective P sources are needed. Experiments were carried out on a Brazilian Typic Fragiudult soil with low available P to evaluate the agronomic effectiveness of phosphate rock (PR) compared with soluble phosphate fertilizer. Yam bean (Pachyrhizus erosus) inoculated with rhizobia (strains NFB 747 and NFB 748) or not inoculated was the test crop. Biofertilizers were produced in field furrows by mixing phosphate rock (PR) and sulphur inoculated with Acidithiobacillus (S+Ac) in different rates (50, 100, 150 and 200 g S kg(-1) PR), with 60 days of incubation. Treatments were carried out with PR; biofertilizers B(50), B(100), B(150), B(200); triple super phosphate (TSP); B(200) without Acidithiobacillus and a control treatment without P application (P(0)). TSP and biofertilizers plus S inoculated with Acidithiobacillus increased plant growth. Soil acidity and available P increased when biofertilizers B(150) and B(200) were applied. We conclude that biofertilizers may be used as P source; however, long term use will reduce soil pH and potentially reduce crop growth. PMID:16815009

  3. Polymerization on the rocks: negatively-charged alpha-amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, A. R. Jr; Bohler, C.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Oligomers of the negatively-charged amino acids, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and O-phospho-L-serine are adsorbed by hydroxylapatite and illite with affinities that increase with oligomer length. In the case of oligo-glutamic acids adsorbed on hydroxylapatite, addition of an extra residue results in an approximately four-fold increase in the strength of adsorption. Oligomers much longer than the 7-mer are retained tenaciously by the mineral. Repeated incubation of short oligo-glutamic acids adsorbed on hydroxylapatite or illite with activated monomer leads to the accumulation of oligomers at least 45 units long. The corresponding reactions of aspartic acid and O-phospho-L-serine on hydroxylapatite are less effective in generating long oligomers, while illite fails to accumulate substantial amounts of long oligomers of aspartic acid or of O-phospho-L-serine.

  4. Stabile Chlorine Isotope Study of Martian Shergottites and Nakhlites; Whole Rock and Acid Leachates and Residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2011-01-01

    We have established a precise analytical technique for stable chlorine isotope measurements of tiny planetary materials by TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) [1], for which the results are basically consistent with the IRMS tech-nique (gas source mass spectrometry) [2,3,4]. We present here results for Martian shergottites and nakhlites; whole rocks, HNO3-leachates and residues, and discuss the chlorine isotope evolution of planetary Mars.

  5. Extent and bioavailability of trace metal contamination due to acid rock drainage in Pennask Creek, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, L. D.; Li, L. Y.; Hall, K. J.

    2010-05-01

    Pennask Creek is one of the most important rainbow trout producing streams in British Columbia (BC). Much of the Pennask Creek watershed is located within a BC Parks Protected Area, which was set aside to protect the spawning and rearing habitat of this wild rainbow trout population. Construction of Highway 97C, which bisects the Pennask Creek watershed, resulted in the exposure of a highly pyritic rock formation, which began releasing acid rock drainage and causing metals to be leached into Highway Creek, a tributary of Pennask Creek. Previous studies commissioned by the BC Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure indicate that Highway Creek yields fewer invertebrates and elevated levels of some metals in the water when compared with downstream sites in Pennask Creek. This study examines the impacts of this acid rock drainage and metal leaching by determining the extent of trace metal contamination in the water and sediments of the Pennask Creek watershed and determining the bioavailability of these trace metals. Preliminary results indicate concentrations of Al, Cu, and Zn in the water as well as levels of total As, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Zn in the sediments that are above the BC Water and Sediment Quality Guidelines for the Protection of Aquatic Life. The highest level of trace metal contamination is found in Highway Creek, downstream of Highway 97C, with concentrations generally returning to near background levels downstream of the confluence with Pennask Creek. Levels of Cu in the water and Zn in the sediments appear to be of greatest concern in areas furthest from the highway.

  6. Rapid magma emplacement in the Karoo Large Igneous Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensen, Henrik; Corfu, Fernando; Polteau, Stéphane; Hammer, Øyvind; Planke, Sverre

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the dynamics of continental Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) relies on precise dating of basaltic rocks. LIP research has traditionally focused on dating lavas, often neglecting the volumetrically important sill intrusions in underlying sedimentary basins. Here we present U-Pb zircon (and baddeleyite) ages for fourteen new samples of Karoo LIP sills and dykes spaced by as much as 1100 km across the half million square kilometer Karoo Basin. The samples yield remarkably coherent ages ranging from 183.0 ± 0.5 to 182.3 ± 0.6 myr. Probability modeling indicates that basin scale emplacement took place within an interval of about 0.47 myrs (less than 0.90 myrs with 95% confidence), and could even have represented a single magma emplacement event. Combining the new ages with the estimated volume of sills in the Karoo Basin gives an emplacement rate of 0.78 km3/yr, which is higher than previous estimates. Upper crustal magma storage may account for these high rates. The results challenge the view that melt emplacement in a sedimentary basin is a prolonged process, support a scenario of pulsating catastrophic events within a narrow time frame, and strengthens the hypothesis linking LIPs and sill emplacement to global environmental crises.

  7. Shallow drilling investigation of contact relationships in the Wichita Mountains igneous province

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, M.C.; Hogan, J.P. . School of Geology and Geophysics); Luza, K. )

    1993-02-01

    Within the Wichita Mountains Igneous Province, a variety of mineralogically, texturally and compositionally diverse hybrid rock types (i.e. gabbro-diorites, monzonites and granodiorites) crop out at gabbro-grants contacts. Possible coeval sedimentary rocks associated with crustal rifting are restricted to a few scattered, isolated exposures of a mineralogically variable group of meta-quartzites (Meers Quartzite). Typically these outcrops of meta-quartzite are of limited areal extent and are surrounded by either gabbro, granite, rhyolite or a combination of these rock types. However, the origin of both the hybrid rock types and the Meers Quartzite remains enigmatic because outcrops containing complete and clear contact relationships are extremely rare. At present, direct testing of models is difficult as complete exposure of contacts between these units is extremely rare due to deposition of younger sedimentary units and severe degradation by weathering. Poor condition of existing samples has hampered geochemical and other petrologic methods in evaluating models. Four potential drilling sites have been selected where critical contacts between major geologic units are interpreted to be present in the shallow subsurface (<300 ft.). Objectives of drilling are (1) direct observation of contacts between rock units by retrieval of a complete core sample from the drill hole, (2) retrieval of freshest possible rock material for petrographic and geochemical analysis and (3) retrieval of a complete transect beginning in Mount Scott Granite or Meers Quartzite across the hybrid rock zone and into the substrate gabbro to document variations associated with the transition.

  8. Assessing the volcanic styles of the North Atlantic Igneous Province and their potential implications for the PETM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerram, Dougal; Reynolds, Peter; Jones, Morgan; Svensen, Henrik; Planke, Sverre; Millett, John; Galland, Olivier; Angkasa, Syahreza; Schofield, Nick; Howell, John

    2016-04-01

    In order to understand the role that large igneous provinces play in changing climatic conditions, it is important to constrain the different styles of volcanism and their volumes, both temporally and spatially. Regional variations in palaeo-environment as well as different volcanic materials (basic-acidic) can all have effects on the eruption styles, and determine whether eruptions effectively release gases into the atmosphere and hydrosphere. The North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP) covers a vast area as well as a significant time span, having formed at 60-55 Ma. Importantly, its' formation is implicated in the climatic perturbations at the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). The products of volcanism in the NAIP range from lava flows and hyaloclastites to more explosive tephra forming eruptions from both basaltic and more evolved eruptions. The explosive end member styles of both mafic and felsic volcanism also produce ash beds in the rock record at key times. Hydrothermal vent structures which are predominantly related with the emplacement of large (>1000 km3) intrusions into the subvolcanic basins in the NAIP are another style of eruption, where climate-forcing gases can be transferred into the atmosphere and hydrosphere. In this case, the types and volumes of gas produced by intrusions is heavily dependent on the host-rock sediment properties that they intrude through. The distribution of vent structures can be shown to be widespread on both the Norwegian and the Greenland margins of the NAIP. In this overview we assess the main eruption styles, deposits and their distribution within the NAIP using mapped examples from offshore seismic data as well as outcrop analogues, highlighting the variability of these structures and their deposits. As the availability of 3D data from offshore and onshore increases, the full nature of the volcanic stratigraphy from the subvolcanic intrusive complexes, through the main eruption cycles into the piercing vent

  9. Petrology of the Betulia Igneous Complex, Cauca, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Rodriguez, Javier

    2014-12-01

    The Betulia Igneous Complex (BIC) is a group of Late-Miocene (11.8 ± 0.2 Ma) hypabyssal intrusions of intermediate to felsic composition located in the SW of the Colombian Andes. These bodies have a calc-alkaline tendency and are related to the subduction of the Nazca plate under the South American plate. Diorites, quartz diorites and tonalities have porphyritic and phaneritic textures and are composed of plagioclase, amphibole, quartz, biotite, and orthoclase. Plagioclase is mainly of andesine-type and the amphiboles were classified mainly as magnesiohornblendes, actinolites, and tschermakites. BIC rocks have a narrow range of SiO2 content (59-67wt%) and exhibit an enrichment of LILE and LREE relative to HFSE and HREE, respectively. These features are attributed to enrichment of LILE from the source and retention of HFSE (mainly Nb, Ta, and Ti) by refractory phases within the same source. The depletion of HREE is explained by fractionation of mineral phases that have a high partition coefficients for these elements, especially amphiboles, the major mafic phase in the rocks. Nevertheless, the fractionation of garnet in early stages of crystallization is not unlikely. Probably all BIC units were generated by the same magma chamber or at least by the same petrologic mechanism as shown by the similar patterns in spider and REE diagrams; fractional crystallization and differentiation processes controlled the final composition of the rocks, and crystallization stages determined the texture. Isotopic compositions of BIC rocks (87Sr/86Sr: 0.70435-0.70511; 143Nd/144Nd: 0.51258-0.51280; 206Pb/204Pb: 19.13-19.31; 207Pb/204Pb: 15.67-15.76; 208Pb/204Pb: 38.93-39.20) indicate a source derived from the mantle with crustal contamination. The model proposed for the BIC consists of fluids from the dehydration of the subducted slab (Nazca plate) and subducted sediments that generated partial melting of the mantle wedge. These basaltic melts ascended to the mantle-crust boundary

  10. Large igneous provinces and mass extinctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wignall, P. B.

    2001-03-01

    Comparing the timing of mass extinctions with the formation age of large igneous provinces reveals a close correspondence in five cases, but previous claims that all such provinces coincide with extinction events are unduly optimistic. The best correlation occurs for four consecutive mid-Phanerozoic examples, namely the end-Guadalupian extinction/Emeishan flood basalts, the end-Permian extinction/Siberian Traps, the end-Triassic extinction/central Atlantic volcanism and the early Toarcian extinction/Karoo Traps. Curiously, the onset of eruptions slightly post-dates the main phase of extinctions in these examples. Of the seven post-Karoo provinces, only the Deccan Traps coincide with a mass extinction, but in this case, the nature of the biotic crisis is best reconciled with the effects of a major bolide impact. Intraoceanic volcanism may also be implicated in a relatively minor end-Cenomanian extinction crisis, although once again the main phase of volcanism occurs after the crisis. The link between large igneous province formation and extinctions remains enigmatic; volume of extrusives and extinction intensity are unrelated and neither is there any apparent relationship with the rapidity of province formation. Violence of eruptions (proportions of pyroclastics) also appears unimportant. Six out of 11 provinces coincide with episodes of global warming and marine anoxia/dysoxia, a relationship that suggests that volcanic CO 2 emissions may have an important effect on global climate. Conversely, there is little, if any, geological evidence for cooling associated with continental flood basalt eruptions suggesting little long-term impact of SO 2 emissions. Large carbon isotope excursions are associated with some extinction events and intervals of flood basalt eruption but these are too great to be accounted for by the release of volcanic CO 2 alone. Thus, voluminous volcanism may in some circumstances trigger calamitous global environmental changes (runaway greenhouses

  11. Lipid, fatty acid and protein content of late larval to early juvenile stages of the western rock lobster, Panulirus cygnus.

    PubMed

    Limbourn, Andrew J; Nichols, Peter D

    2009-03-01

    Lipid, fatty acid and protein content were determined individually on 7 phyllosomata, 69 clear pueruli, 286 pre-moult pueruli, and 86 juvenile western rock lobster (WRL) collected from four locations between the settlement seasons 2000 to 2006 to evaluate compositional changes during the non-feeding puerulus stage. Only the lipid content, particularly the phospholipids, decreased significantly with development. Protein declined sharply following moult to the juvenile. PL comprised between 86-94% of total lipid in all animals, and declined most between phyllosomata and clear pueruli (238.5 to 121.4 mg g(-1) DW) (p<0.001). Triacylglycerols were the only lipid to increase in absolute amounts with development, but declined 53% on average following moult to juvenile. This increase in TAG is likely due to the conversion of phospholipids to triacylglycerols. Monounsaturated fatty acids were the main energy form utilised during benthic development while polyunsaturated fatty acids showed a high degree of sparing. The n-3:n-6 fatty acid ratio of juveniles indicates that they may be approaching critically low levels of stored lipid energy reserves. Both protein, and lipid, declined sharply from the final puerulus phase to the juvenile confirming that a high energetic demand is required to fuel the moulting process.

  12. U-Pb age and Hf isotopes of zircon from basaltic andesite and geochemical fingerprinting of the associated picrites in the Emeishan large igneous province, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qingyan; Li, Chusi; Zhang, Mingjie; Lin, Yao

    2015-02-01

    The ages of many picrites associated with Permian flood basalts in the Emeishan large igneous province, SW China have been debated for a long time. Some researchers believe that these picrites are co-magmatic with the flood basalts whereas others believe that they are Triassic picritic porphyrites or Cenozoic olivine-rich dikes. We report a U-Pb age of 256.2 ± 1.4 Ma for the youngest zircon grains from the Binchuan volcanic sequence which contains the disputed picrites. This age is within the range of values reported for the intrusive and extrusive rocks of the Emeishan large igneous province. The ɛHf values (-0.3 to 6.6) of the youngest zircon crystals from the Binchuan volcanic sequence are similar to those (-5 to 10) of co-magmatic zircon crystals from the intrusive rocks of the Emeishan large igneous province. Our new data confirm that the Binchuan volcanic sequence is an integral part of the Emeishan large igneous province. The disputed and undisputed picrites in Sichuan and Yunnan have similar olivine Fo-Ni-Mn compositions and whole-rock incompatible trace element ratios such as Th/Nb and Ti/Dy. This, together with their spatially close association with the Emeishan flood basalts, indicates that the disputed picrites also belong to the Emeishan large igneous province. The confusing Cenozoic olivine-rich dikes in the region can be distinguished from the picrites of the Emeishan large igneous province by their different olivine Fo-Ni-Mn compositions and whole-rock incompatible trace element ratios such as Th/Nb and Ti/Dy. The results from this study vindicate the use of the previously-disputed picrites as evidences for Permian mantle plume activity in SW China.

  13. Procedures for Identifying Rocks with Similar Features.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, William E.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide college level physical geography and geology teachers with practical and simple techniques to help students classify and understand igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Essential equipment is also discussed, and recommended readings are listed. (RM)

  14. The Central-Western Mediterranean: Anomalous igneous activity in an anomalous collisional tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustrino, Michele; Duggen, Svend; Rosenberg, Claudio L.

    2011-01-01

    The central-western Mediterranean area is a key region for understanding the complex interaction between igneous activity and tectonics. In this review, the specific geochemical character of several 'subduction-related' Cenozoic igneous provinces are described with a view to identifying the processes responsible for the modifications of their sources. Different petrogenetic models are reviewed in the light of competing geological and geodynamic scenarios proposed in the literature. Plutonic rocks occur almost exclusively in the Eocene-Oligocene Periadriatic Province of the Alps while relatively minor plutonic bodies (mostly Miocene in age) crop out in N Morocco, S Spain and N Algeria. Igneous activity is otherwise confined to lava flows and dykes accompanied by relatively greater volumes of pyroclastic (often ignimbritic) products. Overall, the igneous activity spanned a wide temporal range, from middle Eocene (such as the Periadriatic Province) to the present (as in the Neapolitan of southern Italy). The magmatic products are mostly SiO 2-oversaturated, showing calcalkaline to high-K calcalcaline affinity, except in some areas (as in peninsular Italy) where potassic to ultrapotassic compositions prevail. The ultrapotassic magmas (which include leucitites to leucite-phonolites) are dominantly SiO 2-undersaturated, although rare, SiO 2-saturated (i.e., leucite-free lamproites) appear over much of this region, examples being in the Betics (southeast Spain), the northwest Alps, northeast Corsica (France), Tuscany (northwest Italy), southeast Tyrrhenian Sea (Cornacya Seamount) and possibly in the Tell region (northeast Algeria). Excepted for the Alpine case, subduction-related igneous activity is strictly linked to the formation of the Mediterranean Sea. This Sea, at least in its central and western sectors, is made up of several young (< 30 Ma) V-shaped back-arc basins plus several dispersed continental fragments, originally in crustal continuity with the European

  15. Large igneous provinces linked to supercontinent assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Santosh, M.; Luo, Zhaohua; Hao, Jinhua

    2015-04-01

    Models for the disruption of supercontinents have considered mantle plumes as potential triggers for continental extension and the formation of large igneous provinces (LIPs). An alternative hypothesis of top-down tectonics links large volcanic eruptions to lithospheric delamination. Here we argue that the formation of several LIPs in Tarim, Yangtze, Lhasa and other terranes on the Eurasian continent was coeval with the assembly of the Pangean supercontinent, in the absence of plumes rising up from the mantle transition zone or super-plumes from the core-mantle boundary. The formation of these LIPs was accompanied by subduction and convergence of continents and micro-continents, with no obvious relation to major continental rifting or mantle plume activity. Our model correlates LIPs with lithospheric extension caused by asthenospheric flow triggered by multiple convergent systems associated with supercontinent formation.

  16. Petrology of metamorphic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Suk, M.

    1983-01-01

    ''Petrology of Metamorphic Rocks'' reviews Central European opinions about the origin and formation of metamorphic rocks and their genetic systems, confronting the works of such distinguished European scientists as Rosenbusch, Becke, Niggli, Sander, Eskola, Barth and others with present-day knowledge and the results of Soviet and American investigations. The initial chapters discuss the processes that give rise to metamorphic rocks, and the main differences between regional metamorphism and other types of alterations, the emphasis being laid on the material characteristic of the processes of metamorphism, metasomatism and ultrametamorphism. Further chapters give a brief characterization of research methods, together with a detailed genetic classification based on the division of primary rocks into igneous rocks, sediments and ore materials. The effects of metamorphic alterations and those of the properties of the primary rocks are analyzed on the basis of examples taken chiefly from the Bohemian Massif, the West Carpathians, other parts of the European Variscides, from the crystalline Scandinavian Shelf in Norway and Finland, and from the Alps. Typical examples are documented by a number of charts, photographs and petrographical - particularly petrochemical - data.

  17. Rocks, soils, and water quality. Relationships and implications for effects of acid precipitation on surface water in the northeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, E.; Thode, H.C. Jr.; Protas, A.

    1981-05-01

    Distribution of rocks and soils in Northeast counties were investigated for the degree to which they influence pH and alkalinity in surface waters. Using 283 counties, path analysis resulted in two models of equivalent explanatory power. Each model indicated the importance of both rocks and soils as determinants of pH and alkalinity in surface waters, and as important factors in the sensitivity of natural waters to acidification from acid precipitation. Previous studies have emphasized the importance of bedrock geology, at the expense of knowledge about soils, in an understanding of waters sensitive to the effects of acid precipitation. Our regional analysis found that rocks were contributors to the buffering capacity of surface water; however, the presence of a large percentage of alfisol soils better indicates locations of waters with higher levels of alkalinity, and thus of greater resistance to effects of acid rain.

  18. Experimental Acid Weathering of Fe-Bearing Mars Analog Minerals and Rocks: Implications for Aqueous Origin of Hematite-Bearing Sediments in Meridiani Planum, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Koster, A. M.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    A working hypothesis for Meridiani evaporite formation involves the evaporation of fluids derived from acid weathering of Martian basalts and subsequent diagenesis [1, 2]. However, there are no reported experimental studies for the formation of jarosite and gray hematite (spherules), which are characteristic of Meridiani rocks from Mars analog precursor minerals. A terrestrial analog for hematite spherule formation from basaltic rocks under acidic hydrothermal conditions has been reported [3], and we have previously shown that the hematite spherules and jarosite can be synthetically produced in the laboratory using Fe3+ -bearing sulfate brines under hydrothermal conditions [4]. Here we expand and extend these studies by reacting Mars analog minerals with sulfuric acid to form Meridiani-like rock-mineral compositions. The objective of this study is to provide environmental constraints on past aqueous weathering of basaltic materials on Mars.

  19. Geology is the Key to Explain Igneous Activity in the Mediterranean Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustrino, M.

    2014-12-01

    Igneous activity in tectonically complex areas can be interpreted in many different ways, producing completely different petrogenetic models. Processes such as oceanic and continental subduction, lithospheric delamination, changes in subduction polarity, slab break-off and mantle plumes have all been advocated as causes for changes in plate boundaries and magma production, including rate and temporal distribution, in the circum-Mediterranean area. This region thus provides a natural laboratory to investigate a range of geodynamic and magmatic processes. Although many petrologic and tectonic models have been proposed, a number of highly controversial questions still remain. No consensus has yet been reached about the capacity of plate-tectonic processes to explain the origin and style of the magmatism. Similarly, there is still not consensus on the ability of geochemical and petrological arguments to reveal the geodynamic evolution of the area. The wide range of chemical and mineralogical magma compositions produced within and around the Mediterranean, from carbonatites to strongly silica-undersaturated silico-carbonatites and melilitites to strongly silica-oversaturated rhyolites, complicate models and usually require a large number of unconstrained assumptions. Can the calcalkaline-sodic alkaline transition be related to any common petrogenetic point? Is igneous activity plate-tectonic- (top-down) or deep-mantle-controlled (bottom-up)? Do the rare carbonatites and carbonate-rich igneous rocks derive from the deep mantle or a normal, CO2-bearing upper mantle? Do ultrapotassic compositions require continental subduction? Understanding chemically complex magmas emplaced in tectonically complex areas require open minds, and avoiding dogma and assumptions. Studying the geology and shallow dynamics, not speculating about the deep lower mantle, is the key to understanding the igneous activity.

  20. Number of Waste Package Hit by Igneous Intrusion

    SciTech Connect

    M. Wallace

    2004-10-13

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to document calculations of the number of waste packages that could be damaged in a potential future igneous event through a repository at Yucca Mountain. The analyses include disruption from an intrusive igneous event and from an extrusive volcanic event. This analysis supports the evaluation of the potential consequences of future igneous activity as part of the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Igneous activity is a disruptive event that is included in the TSPA-LA analyses. Two igneous activity scenarios are considered: (1) The igneous intrusion groundwater release scenario (also called the igneous intrusion scenario) considers the in situ damage to waste packages or failure of waste packages that occurs if they are engulfed or otherwise affected by magma as a result of an igneous intrusion. (2) The volcanic eruption scenario depicts the direct release of radioactive waste due to an intrusion that intersects the repository followed by a volcanic eruption at the surface. An igneous intrusion is defined as the ascent of a basaltic dike or dike system (i.e., a set or swarm of multiple dikes comprising a single intrusive event) to repository level, where it intersects drifts. Magma that does reach the surface from igneous activity is an eruption (or extrusive activity) (Jackson 1997 [DIRS 109119], pp. 224, 333). The objective of this analysis is to develop a probabilistic measure of the number of waste packages that could be affected by each of the two scenarios.

  1. Relationship of pegmatites to U-Th mineralization in Precambrian crystalline rocks near Easton, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, C.C.; Malinconico, L.L. Jr. . Dept. of Geology); Tepper, J.H. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that high radon levels in the Easton area are not simply confined to the igneous crystalline rocks of the Reading Prong. Since the radon is the result of the decay of uranium/thorium bearing minerals, the question then is where are these minerals hosted. Two hypotheses have been proposed for the origin of this mineralization: (1) derivation from an acidic magma during a hydrothermal stage of pegmatite intrusion, or (2) synsedimentary deposition in reducing, oceanic waters with subsequent crystallization of uraninite during metamorphism. The goal of the present study is to determine which process(es) were responsible for the mineralization and to determine where the uranium and thorium are hosted in the Precambrian rocks in the Easton area. Gamma surveys at three locations have demonstrated high radioactivity levels associated with the pegmatites (8,000--750,000 C/min.). Despite the fact that the host rocks and surrounding Paleozoic carbonates have been shown to have high levels of radon, the authors have measured significantly lower radioactivity levels (3,000--8,000 C/min.) in these rocks. The radioactivity levels tend to be high a very short distance into the host and then decrease very rapidly away from the pegmatites. The migmatitic regions in the Byram gneiss (20,000--60,000 C/min.) are considerably higher than the rest of the gneiss (8,000--12,000 C/min.) suggesting remobilization of U-Th during partial melting. These data tend to support the hypothesis that most of the radon is derived from the decay of elements concentrated in the igneous rocks, which subsequently migrated into the host rocks.

  2. Origin of saline, neutral-pH, reduced epithermal waters by reaction of acidic magmatic gas condensates with wall rock

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, M.H. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Fluid inclusions in quartz and sphalerite of epithermal veins containing galena, sphalerite and chalcopyrite with silver sulfides and electrum commonly have salinities of 2 to 10 weight percent NaCl equivalent. Examples include Bohemia, OR, Comstock, NV, and Creede, CO. Salinities in such base metal-rich systems are apparently greater than those in gold-adularia, base metal-poor systems such as Sleeper, NV, Republic, WA, and Hishikare, Kyushu. Saline epithermal fluids are commonly assumed to have been derived from saline magmatic brines, from local host formations, as has been suggested for Creede, or from evaporative concentration (boiling) of more dilute meteoric ground water. Another possibility, which may be the most common origin, is reaction of wall rocks with magmatic gas condensates rich in HCl and sulfuric acid. A mixture of one part Augustine Volcanic gas condensate in 10 parts cold ground water has a pH of 0.7 and the dominant cation is H[sup +] by a factor of 10[sup 4]. Calculated reaction of this condensate mixture with andesite at 300 C to a water/rock ratio (w/r) of 4.6 yields an NaCl-dominated fluid with a total salinity of 2.1 wt %. and pH 3.7. Further reaction, to w/r 0.14 yields a fluid salinity of 2.6 wt % and pH of 5.7; this fluid is in equilibrium with a propylitic alteration assemblage. Aqueous sulfide accumulates during the rock reaction as sulfate is reduced to sulfide when ferrous iron is oxidized to ferric iron. Sulfide concentration in the latter fluid is 32 ppm, far exceeding sulfate concentration. In the overall reaction, hydrogen ion is exchanged for base cations (including base metals) and sulfate is reduced to sulfide.

  3. Patterns and origin of igneous activity around the Tanzanian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, S. F.; Link, K.; Tiberindwa, J. V.; Barifaijo, E.

    2012-01-01

    Tertiary and later igneous activity is common on and around the Tanzanian craton, with primitive magma compositions ranging from kimberlites and varieties of picrites through nephelinites, basanites and alkali basalts. This review focuses on elucidating the conditions of origin of the melts, addressing the question of the state and involvement of the Tanzanian cratonic lithosphere in magma genesis. The Tanzanian craton is anomalous with a surface elevation of >1100 m reflecting buoyancy supported by a subcratonic plume whose effects are seen in the volcanics of both western and eastern rift branches. Magmatism on the craton and at its edge has high K/Na and primitive melts show fractionation dominated by olivine. Slightly further from the craton pyroxene fractionation dominates and K/Na ratios in the magmas are lower. Off-craton melts are nephelinites, basanites and alkali basalts with low K/Na. Potassium enrichment in the melts correlates with the occurrence of phlogopite in mantle-derived xenoliths, and also with carbonate in the magmas. This is attributed to melting at >140 km depths of mixed source regions containing phlogopite pyroxenite and peridotite, whereby the carbonate is derived from oxidation of diamonds concentrated near the base of the cratonic lithosphere. Mixed source regions are required by arrays of radiogenic isotopes such as Os and Sr in the volcanic rocks. The temporal progression of lamproites to phlogopite + carbonate-rich rocks to melilitites, nephelinites and alkali basalts seen during the erosion of the North Atlantic craton are seen around the Tanzanian craton as the coeval occurrence kimberlites, kamafugites and related rocks, nephelinites and alkali basalts showing spatial instead of temporal variation. This is due to the different stages of development of rifting around the craton: in northwestern Uganda and northern Tanzania, K-rich volcanism occurs at the craton edge, whereas nephelinites, basanites and alkali basalts occur where

  4. Anti-cancer effect of ursolic acid activates apoptosis through ROCK/PTEN mediated mitochondrial translocation of cofilin-1 in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Wen-Tao; Yu, Da-Peng; Wang, Xin-Sheng; Wang, Pei-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Ursolic acid is a type of pentacyclic triterpene compound with multiple pharmacological activities including cancer resistance, protection from liver injury, antisepsis, anti-inflammation and antiviral activity. The present study aimed to investigate the anticancer effect of ursolic acid. Ursolic acid activates cell apoptosis and its pro-apoptotic mechanism remains to be fully elucidated. Cell Counting kit-8 assays, flow cytometric analysis and analysis of caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity were used to estimate the anticancer effect of ursolic acid on DU145 prostate cancer cells. The protein expression of cytochrome c, rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and cofilin-1 were examined using western blot analysis. In the present study, ursolic acid significantly suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis, as well as increasing caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities of DU145 cells. Furthermore, cytoplasmic and mitochondrial cytochrome c protein expression was significantly activated and suppressed, respectively, by ursolic acid. Ursolic acid significantly suppressed the ROCK/PTEN signaling pathway and inhibited cofilin-1 protein expression in DU145 cells. The results of the present study indicate that the anticancer effect of ursolic acid activates cell apoptosis through ROCK/PTEN mediated mitochondrial translocation of cofilin-1 in prostate cancer.

  5. Anti-cancer effect of ursolic acid activates apoptosis through ROCK/PTEN mediated mitochondrial translocation of cofilin-1 in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Wen-Tao; Yu, Da-Peng; Wang, Xin-Sheng; Wang, Pei-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Ursolic acid is a type of pentacyclic triterpene compound with multiple pharmacological activities including cancer resistance, protection from liver injury, antisepsis, anti-inflammation and antiviral activity. The present study aimed to investigate the anticancer effect of ursolic acid. Ursolic acid activates cell apoptosis and its pro-apoptotic mechanism remains to be fully elucidated. Cell Counting kit-8 assays, flow cytometric analysis and analysis of caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity were used to estimate the anticancer effect of ursolic acid on DU145 prostate cancer cells. The protein expression of cytochrome c, rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and cofilin-1 were examined using western blot analysis. In the present study, ursolic acid significantly suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis, as well as increasing caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities of DU145 cells. Furthermore, cytoplasmic and mitochondrial cytochrome c protein expression was significantly activated and suppressed, respectively, by ursolic acid. Ursolic acid significantly suppressed the ROCK/PTEN signaling pathway and inhibited cofilin-1 protein expression in DU145 cells. The results of the present study indicate that the anticancer effect of ursolic acid activates cell apoptosis through ROCK/PTEN mediated mitochondrial translocation of cofilin-1 in prostate cancer. PMID:27698874

  6. Comparison of hot hydroxylamine hydrochloride and oxalic acid leaching of stream sediment and coated rock samples as anomaly enhancement techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filipek, L.H.; Chao, T.T.; Theobald, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    A hot hydroxylamine hydrochloride (H-Hxl) extraction in 25% acetic acid is compared with the commonly used oxalic acid extraction as a method of anomaly enhancement for Cu and Zn in samples from two very different metal deposits and climatic environments. Results obtained on minus-80-mesh stream sediments from an area near the Magruder massive sulfide deposit in Lincoln County, Georgia, where the climate is humid subtropical, indicate that H-Hxl enhances the anomaly for Cu by a factor of 2 and for Zn by a factor of 1.5, compared to the oxalic method. Analyses of Fe oxide-coated rock samples from outcrops overlying the North Silver Bell porphyry copper deposit near Tucson, Arizona, where the climate is semi-arid to arid, indicate that both techniques effectively outline the zones of hydrothermal alteration. The H-Hxl extraction can also perform well in high-carbonate or high-clay environments, where other workers have suggested that oxalic acid is not very effective. Therefore, the H-Hxl method is recommended for general exploration use. ?? 1982.

  7. C3 Photosynthesis and Crassulacean Acid Metabolism in a Kansas Rock Outcrop Succulent, Talinum calycinum Engelm. (Portulacaceae) 1

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Craig E.; Zee, Aaron Klaas

    1983-01-01

    The potential for Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) was investigated in the sandstone outcrop succulent Talinum calycinum in central Kansas. Field studies revealed CAM-like diurnal acid fluctuations in these plants. These fluctuations persisted under all moisture and temperature regimes in the laboratory. Despite this CAM-like acid metabolism, simultaneous gravimetric determinations of day- and nighttime transpiration rates indicated the presence of a C3 gas exchange pattern. Subsequent analyses of diurnal CO2 and H2O exchange patterns under well-watered conditions and after 3, 5, and 7 days of drought confirmed these findings, though low rates of nocturnal CO2 uptake were observed on the fifth night after continuous drought. Finally, the δ13C/12C value of this succulent, −27.8‰, emphasizes the insignificance of any nocturnal CO2 uptake in the lifelong accumulation of carbon in this species. Thus, it is proposed that T. calycinum is a C3 plant with some CAM characteristics, including the ability to re-fix respiratory CO2 at night under all moisture regimes, potentially resulting in a conservation of carbon, and occasionally to fix atmospheric CO2 at night. These findings may prove to be common among rock outcrop succulents. PMID:16663289

  8. C(3) Photosynthesis and Crassulacean Acid Metabolism in a Kansas Rock Outcrop Succulent, Talinum calycinum Engelm. (Portulacaceae).

    PubMed

    Martin, C E; Zee, A K

    1983-11-01

    The potential for Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) was investigated in the sandstone outcrop succulent Talinum calycinum in central Kansas. Field studies revealed CAM-like diurnal acid fluctuations in these plants. These fluctuations persisted under all moisture and temperature regimes in the laboratory. Despite this CAM-like acid metabolism, simultaneous gravimetric determinations of day- and nighttime transpiration rates indicated the presence of a C(3) gas exchange pattern. Subsequent analyses of diurnal CO(2) and H(2)O exchange patterns under well-watered conditions and after 3, 5, and 7 days of drought confirmed these findings, though low rates of nocturnal CO(2) uptake were observed on the fifth night after continuous drought. Finally, the delta(13)C/(12)C value of this succulent, -27.8 per thousand, emphasizes the insignificance of any nocturnal CO(2) uptake in the lifelong accumulation of carbon in this species. Thus, it is proposed that T. calycinum is a C(3) plant with some CAM characteristics, including the ability to re-fix respiratory CO(2) at night under all moisture regimes, potentially resulting in a conservation of carbon, and occasionally to fix atmospheric CO(2) at night. These findings may prove to be common among rock outcrop succulents.

  9. Oxalic-acid leaching of rock, soil, and stream-sediment samples as an anomaly-accentuated technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alminas, Henry V.; Mosier, Elwin L.

    1976-01-01

    In many instances total-rock and sieved-soil and stream-sediment samples lack the sensitivity and contrast required for reconnaissance exploration and necessary in the search for blind ore deposits. Heavy-mineral concentrates incorporate the required sensitivity and contrast but are overly expensive for two reasons: time-consuming sample preparation is required to obtain them, and they cannot be easily derived from all bulk-sample types. Trace-metal-content comparisons of the oxalic-acid-leachable portions with heavy-mineral concentrates show that the leachates are equal to the heavy-mineral concentrates in sensitivity and contrast. Simplicity of preparation and the resultant cost savings are additional advantages of this proposed method.

  10. Effects of acid rock drainage on stocked rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): an in-situ, caged fish experiment.

    PubMed

    Todd, Andrew S; McKnight, Diane M; Jaros, Chris L; Marchitto, Thomas M

    2007-07-01

    In-situ caged rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) studies reveal significant fish toxicity and fish stress in a river impacted by headwater acid rock drainage (ARD). Stocked trout survival and aqueous water chemistry were monitored for 10 days at 3 study sites in the Snake River watershed, Colorado, U.S.A. Trout mortality was positively correlated with concentrations of metals calculated to be approaching or exceeding conservative toxicity thresholds (Zn, Mn, Cu, Cd). Significant metal accumulation on the gills of fish stocked at ARD impacted study sites support an association between elevated metals and fish mortality. Observations of feeding behavior and significant differences in fish relative weights between study site and feeding treatment indicate feeding and metals-related fish stress. Together, these results demonstrate the utility of in-situ exposure studies for stream stakeholders in quantifying the relative role of aqueous contaminant exposures in limiting stocked fish survival.

  11. Effects of acid rock drainage on stocked rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): an in-situ, caged fish experiment.

    PubMed

    Todd, Andrew S; McKnight, Diane M; Jaros, Chris L; Marchitto, Thomas M

    2007-07-01

    In-situ caged rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) studies reveal significant fish toxicity and fish stress in a river impacted by headwater acid rock drainage (ARD). Stocked trout survival and aqueous water chemistry were monitored for 10 days at 3 study sites in the Snake River watershed, Colorado, U.S.A. Trout mortality was positively correlated with concentrations of metals calculated to be approaching or exceeding conservative toxicity thresholds (Zn, Mn, Cu, Cd). Significant metal accumulation on the gills of fish stocked at ARD impacted study sites support an association between elevated metals and fish mortality. Observations of feeding behavior and significant differences in fish relative weights between study site and feeding treatment indicate feeding and metals-related fish stress. Together, these results demonstrate the utility of in-situ exposure studies for stream stakeholders in quantifying the relative role of aqueous contaminant exposures in limiting stocked fish survival. PMID:17180429

  12. A direct in situ fingerprinting method for acid rock drainage using voltammetric techniques with a single renewable gold microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Nuzzio, Donald B; Zettler, Erik R; Aguilera, Angeles; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A

    2011-04-15

    Electrochemistry allows for rapid identification of multiple metals and other chemical complexes common in acid rock drainage (ARD) systems. Voltammetric scans using a single gold microelectrode of water samples from geochemically distinct areas of the Río Tinto (RT) in southwestern Spain were clearly recognizable in the field and in samples stored at room temperature for over 6 months. Major voltammetric peaks of iron(III) and copper(II) were identified on a single constantly renewable gold microelectrode. Confirmation of these peaks was performed by spiking with standard metal solutions in the laboratory. This voltammetric technique is a rapid, direct and inexpensive in situ method for identification of water sources and their chemical characteristics, as well as an economical way to monitor environmental changes and remediation efforts.

  13. Diverse sources for igneous blocks in Franciscan melanges, California Coast Ranges

    SciTech Connect

    MacPherson, G.J. ); Phipps, S.P. ); Grossman, J.N. )

    1990-11-01

    Igneous blocks in Franciscan melanges are of three chemical-petrologic types: (1) tholeiitic basalts of both arc and spreading center origin, with depletions in light relative to heavy rare-earth elements, 3% > TiO{sub 2} > 1%, high Y/Zr and Y/Ti ratios, and relict augites that generally have low Al and Ti and well-defined iron-enrichment trends; (2) basalts of probable seamount origin with marked enrichments in light relative to heavy rare-earth elements, 5% > TiO{sub 2} > 1%, lower Y/Zr and Y/Ti than (1), and Ti-Al-rich augites showing little if any iron-enrichment trends; and (3) hypabyssal intrusives having SiO{sub 2} > 52%, TiO{sub 2} < 1%, flat or only slightly fractionated rare-earth-abundance patterns, and diopsidic augites that are very low in Ti and Al and show no iron-enrichment trends. All of the blocks are metamorphosed; most are undeformed pumpellyite-bearing greenstones, and a few contain sodic amphibole {plus minus} lawsonite {plus minus} sodic pyroxene. The melanges are probably olistostromal in origin, deriving their igneous block detritus both from the downgoing Pacific plate (ocean floor basalts and seamounts) and from the hanging wall of the Franciscan trench (basalts and arc-related silic intrusive rocks). The silicic intrusive rocks and some of the basalts are eroded fragments of the fore-arc crust that ultimately become the Coast Range Ophiolite. These fragments were incorporated into the Franciscan trench fill and subducted. Results suggest that the igneous blocks in ophiolitic melanges provide important information about melange formation and about the tectonics and paleogeography of the regions in which the melanges are found.

  14. Comparing phosphorus mobilization strategies using Aspergillus niger for the mineral dissolution of three phosphate rocks.

    PubMed

    Schneider, K D; van Straaten, P; de Orduña, R Mira; Glasauer, S; Trevors, J; Fallow, D; Smith, P S

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorus deficiencies are limiting crop production in agricultural soils worldwide. Locally available sources of raw phosphate rock (PR) are being recognized for their potential role in soil fertility improvement. Phosphorus bioavailability is essential for the efficiency of PRs and can be increased by acid treatments. The utilization of organic acid producing micro-organisms, notably Aspergillus niger, presents a sustainable alternative to the use of strong inorganic acids, but acid production of A. niger strongly depends on the mineral content of the growth media. This study compared the phosphorus mobilization efficiency of two biological treatments, namely addition of acidic cell-free supernatants from A. niger cultivations to PRs and the direct cultivation of A. niger with PRs. The results show that addition of PR to cultivations leads to significant differences in the profile of organic acids produced by A. niger. Additions of PR, especially igneous rocks containing high amounts of iron and manganese, lead to reduced citric acid concentrations. In spite of these differences, phosphorus mobilization was similar between treatments, suggesting that the simpler direct cultivation method was not inferior. In addition to citric acid, it is suggested that oxalic acid contributes to PR solubilization in direct cultivations with A. niger, which would benefit farmers in developing countries where conventional fertilizers are not adequately accessible. PMID:19709342

  15. Comparing phosphorus mobilization strategies using Aspergillus niger for the mineral dissolution of three phosphate rocks.

    PubMed

    Schneider, K D; van Straaten, P; de Orduña, R Mira; Glasauer, S; Trevors, J; Fallow, D; Smith, P S

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorus deficiencies are limiting crop production in agricultural soils worldwide. Locally available sources of raw phosphate rock (PR) are being recognized for their potential role in soil fertility improvement. Phosphorus bioavailability is essential for the efficiency of PRs and can be increased by acid treatments. The utilization of organic acid producing micro-organisms, notably Aspergillus niger, presents a sustainable alternative to the use of strong inorganic acids, but acid production of A. niger strongly depends on the mineral content of the growth media. This study compared the phosphorus mobilization efficiency of two biological treatments, namely addition of acidic cell-free supernatants from A. niger cultivations to PRs and the direct cultivation of A. niger with PRs. The results show that addition of PR to cultivations leads to significant differences in the profile of organic acids produced by A. niger. Additions of PR, especially igneous rocks containing high amounts of iron and manganese, lead to reduced citric acid concentrations. In spite of these differences, phosphorus mobilization was similar between treatments, suggesting that the simpler direct cultivation method was not inferior. In addition to citric acid, it is suggested that oxalic acid contributes to PR solubilization in direct cultivations with A. niger, which would benefit farmers in developing countries where conventional fertilizers are not adequately accessible.

  16. From Rocks to Cement. What We Make. Science and Technology Education in Philippine Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philippines Univ., Quezon City. Science Education Center.

    This module deals with the materials used in making concrete hollow blocks. Topics discussed include: (1) igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks; (2) weathering (the process of breaking down rocks) and its effects on rocks; (3) cement; (4) stages in the manufacturing of Portland cement; and (5) the transformation of cement into concrete…

  17. Classification of mafic clasts from mesosiderites - Implications for endogenous igneous processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from an analysis of 13 igneous pebbles from the Vaca Muerta, EET87500, and Bondoc mesosiderites, using electron microprobe and instrumental neutron activation techniques. These data, combined with literature data on compositions of 43 mesosiderite clasts were used to compile a classification scheme for the various types of mafic silicate clasts that occur in mesosiderites. These clasts were classified into five principal groups: (1) polygenic and monogenic cumulates (30 percent); (2) polygenic basalts (30 percent); (3) quench-textured rocks, comprising two compositional subgroups (those which resemble basaltic eucrites (5 percent), and those which resemble cumulate eucrites (2 percent)); (4) monogenic basalts (11 percent); and (5) ultramafic rocks, consisting mainly of large crystals of orthopyroxene (9 percent) or olivine (4 percent). The conditions under which these clasts were formed are discussed.

  18. Phosphorus leaching in an acid tropical soil "recapitalized" with phosphate rock and triple superphosphate.

    PubMed

    Gikonyo, Esther W; Zaharah, Abdul R; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Anuar, Rahim A

    2010-01-01

    With high rates of phosphorus applied to increase "capital P" as a stock for plant uptake over several years, the question of P leaching is inevitable. We conducted an intact soil column experiment in the field to evaluate P leached from soils treated with triple superphosphate (TSP) and Gafsa phosphate rock (GPR) at 300, 600, and 900 kg P ha-1 with and without integration of cattle manure. The lysimeters, made from PVC tubes of 30-cm length, were inserted into the soil up to the 25-cm depth. The tubes were fitted with a resin bag containing a mixture of cation and anion exchange resin (50:50) at the lower end of the tube inserted into the soil. The tubes, arranged in a completely randomized design, were sampled randomly at 10-week intervals for 12 months. Phosphorus extractable from the top- and subsoil at the end of experiment and leached P were determined. More P was leached out from TSP (threefold) compared to GPR, and the amount of P leached increased with increasing rates of P fertilizer applied. Application of manure intensified the amounts of P leached from TSP, particularly at the 6-month sampling time. There was hardly any substantial P leached from the soil treated with GPR. Thus, for effective and efficient long-term P fertilizer management strategies, choosing the right P fertilizer source and monitoring P losses through leaching has to be done for enhanced fertilizer use efficiency and thus reducing P pollution of ground waters. PMID:20694445

  19. Deep structure of the Mount Amram igneous complex, interpretation of magnetic and gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirman, Boris; Rybakov, Michael; Beyth, Michael; Mushkin, Amit; Ginat, Hanan

    2015-03-01

    The Mt Amram igneous complex (AIC) represents northern tip of the Neoproterozoic Arabian Nubian Shield (ANS). For the first time the AIC deep structure was studied using the gravity, aero and ground magnetic, magnetic susceptibility and density measurements and geological data. Analysing all available data at the Amram area we concluded what only monzonite body can be reason for gravity high and coinciding reduced to pole (RTP) maximum. Geological knowledge allowed suggesting its intrusive character and compact body form. Cluster of inverse solutions (Werner deconvolution) localized this body as initial model for forward modelling. Further iterations (23/4-D forward modelling) clarified the monzonite geometry and properties; the modelling allowed also to investigate the non-uniqueness and estimate also the confident intervals for final solution. The research consists three interconnected stages. At the detailed scale, ground magnetic data suggested three magmatic blocks of few hundred meters shifted dextral about 100 m along the Zefunut fault. Estimated accuracy for geometry of the magnetic bodies is a few tens metres. At the middle scale, quantitative gravity and magnetic interpretations provide model of the monzonite body, which is an order of magnitude more than the volume of the felsic rhyolites and granite rocks. Boundary of the whole monzonite body was estimated with accuracy as a hundred meters. As a result we suggest that the parent magma for the AIC is the monzonite, similar to the model suggested for the Timna Igneous Complex 12 km north of the AIC. The model developed can be applied to evaluate the subsurface volumes of the mafic magmatic rocks in adjacent locations. At the regional scale for exposed the Sinai and Arab Saudi Precambrian crystalline shield our approach allows to understand the apparent contradiction between geological predominantly granite composition (low magnetic rocks) and magnetic data. The aeromagnetic data show number strong

  20. Evaluation of and new completion recommendations for a fractured, crystalline, igneous reservoir, Texas Panhandle

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, B.A.; Manwaring, M.S. )

    1987-02-01

    In the Panhandle field of Texas, the lowest stratigraphic producing formation is a crystalline basement rock. The igneous rock is productive when it is naturally fractured sufficiently to hold hydrocarbons trapped in the same structure as the expansive Panhandle field. Research work to understand the crystalline reservoir better focused on the fracturing, mineralogy, and production potential of the basement interval. This trap is a true fractured reservoir; it has no more than 1% primary porosity in the nonfractured rock. The mineralogy of the host rock and fracture-filling minerals was established from drill and core samples. The host rock is a complex of granodiorite, dacite, and gabbroic diorite. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and optical work confirmed the occurrence of at least 12 secondary fracture-fill minerals. Fluid inclusion analysis established formation temperatures for many of the minerals and allowed postulation of a detailed sequence of formation. The character of the fracture in differing host petrologies and the occurrence of clay minerals coating fracture surfaces were deemed to be critical factors in hydrocarbon production. New and specific enhancement treatments were designed for the subject reservoir, and these recommendations were used in a test well. Results from the test were favorable and appear to confirm the ideas formed from this work. The new recommended treatments are less expensive than current practices and indicate potential for greater ultimate recoveries of oil.

  1. Characterization of Arctic Highly Magnetic Domains - the Geophysical Expression of Inferred Large Igneous Province(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltus, R. W.; Oakey, G.; Miller, E. L.; Jackson, R.

    2012-12-01

    the broader Arctic region, the term High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP) refers to (now) scattered parts of a major plume-type basaltic eruption, many of which also show as magnetic highs on the current data compilation. Rocks that contribute to this province have been mapped in Arctic Canada, Greenland, Svalbard, Franz Josef Land and the DeLong Islands. Most HALIP volcanic rocks do not have reliable reported radiometric ages but seem to indicate two pulses of magmatism of around 130-120 Ma and 90-80 Ma. There are many fundamental open questions regarding the evolution of the Arctic, particularly for the opening and development of the Amerasian side. The mafic igneous rocks and their roots that make up large igneous provinces are a good target for regional magnetic interpretation. Our goal is to use a data-driven approach to characterize the geometries and volumes these features as the expression of major mafic (basaltic) elements to aid in tectonic reconstruction and understanding.

  2. Metasedimentary and igneous xenoliths from Tallante (Betic Cordillera, Spain): Inferences on crust-mantle interactions and clues for post-collisional volcanism magma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Gianluca; Braga, Roberto; Langone, Antonio; Natali, Claudio; Tiepolo, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    The deep seated xenolith association exhumed in the Pliocenic volcano of Tallante (Betic Cordillera, Spain) includes protogranular mantle peridotites, felsic (metasedimentary) crustal rocks, as well as cumulus igneous rocks such as norites and amphibole (± phlogopite)-clinopyroxenites. The whole xenolith suite equilibrated at the same pressure (0.7-0.9 GPa) representing the local crust-mantle boundary (MOHO) characterized by extreme lithological heterogeneity. This heterogeneity resulted from orogenic processes that induced the juxtaposition of crustal rocks (variably depleted in fusible components) within mantle domains including metasomes, as it is commonly observed in orogenic mantle massifs of the Mediterranean area. In this contribution, we report new mineral compositions of igneous parageneses recorded in these xenoliths, and we present Sr-Nd isotope data on both igneous and metasedimentary xenoliths that integrate those from the literature. Sr-Nd isotopes coherently indicate a restitic character of the metasedimentary xenoliths, which according to model ages were affected by partial melting in Paleozoic times. Sr-Nd isotopic errorchrons on the igneous xenoliths, on the other hand, qualitatively indicate Tertiary ages, which are corroborated by U-Pb zircon datings of one norite xenolith and two composite xenoliths having zircon-bearing norite veinlets. The new data are discussed proposing that MOHO lithologies of Tallante could provide significant source compositions for the genesis of the Neogene volcanics of the Betic area, which included calcalkaline lavas as well as more potassic products such as lamproites.

  3. Igneous mineralogy at Bradbury Rise: The first ChemCam campaign at Gale crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, V.; Fabre, C.; Forni, O.; Toplis, M. J.; Cousin, A.; Ollila, A. M.; Meslin, P. Y.; Maurice, S.; Wiens, R. C.; Baratoux, D.; Mangold, N.; Le Mouélic, S.; Gasnault, O.; Berger, G.; Lasue, J.; Anderson, R. A.; Lewin, E.; Schmidt, M.; Dyar, D.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Bridges, J.; Clark, B.; Pinet, P.

    2014-01-01

    and compositional analyses using Chemistry Camera (ChemCam) remote microimager and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) have been performed on five float rocks and coarse gravels along the first 100 m of the Curiosity traverse at Bradbury Rise. ChemCam, the first LIBS instrument sent to another planet, offers the opportunity to assess mineralogic diversity at grain-size scales (~ 100 µm) and, from this, lithologic diversity. Depth profiling indicates that targets are relatively free of surface coatings. One type of igneous rock is volcanic and includes both aphanitic (Coronation) and porphyritic (Mara) samples. The porphyritic sample shows dark grains that are likely pyroxene megacrysts in a fine-grained mesostasis containing andesine needles. Both types have magnesium-poor basaltic compositions and in this respect are similar to the evolved Jake Matijevic rock analyzed further along the Curiosity traverse both with Alpha-Particle X-ray Spectrometer and ChemCam instruments. The second rock type encountered is a coarse-grained intrusive rock (Thor Lake) showing equigranular texture with millimeter size crystals of feldspars and Fe-Ti oxides. Such a rock is not unique at Gale as the surrounding coarse gravels (such as Beaulieu) and the conglomerate Link are dominated by feldspathic (andesine-bytownite) clasts. Finally, alkali feldspar compositions associated with a silica polymorph have been analyzed in fractured filling material of Preble rock and in Stark, a putative pumice or an impact melt. These observations document magmatic diversity at Gale and describe the first fragments of feldspar-rich lithologies (possibly an anorthosite) that may be ancient crust transported from the crater rim and now forming float rocks, coarse gravel, or conglomerate clasts.

  4. Insights into Igneous Geochemistry from Trace Element Partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.; Hanson, B. Z.

    2001-01-01

    Partitioning of trivalent elements into olivine are used to explore basic issues relevant to igneous geochemistry, such as Henry's law. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Breakup magmatism style on the North Atlantic Igneous Province: insight from Mid-Norwegian volcanic margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour Abdelmalak, Mohamed; Faleide, Jan Inge; Planke, Sverre; Theissen-Krah, Sonja; Zastrozhnov, Dmitrii; Breivik, Asbjørn Johan; Gernigon, Laurent; Myklebust, Reidun

    2014-05-01

    The distribution of breakup-related igneous rocks on rifted margins provide important constraints on the magmatic processes during continental extension and lithosphere separation which lead to a better understanding of the melt supply from the upper mantle and the relationship between tectonic setting and volcanism. The results can lead to a better understanding of the processes forming volcanic margins and thermal evolution of associated prospective basins. We present a revised mapping of the breakup-related igneous rocks in the NE Atlantic area, which are mainly based on the Mid-Norwegian (case example) margin. We divided the breakup related igneous rocks into (1) extrusive complexes, (2) shallow intrusive complexes (sills/dykes) and (3) deep intrusive complexes (Lower Crustal Body: LCB). The extrusive complex has been mapped using the seismic volcanostratigraphic method. Several distinct volcanic seismic facies units have been identified. The top basalt reflection is easily identified because of the high impedance contrast between the sedimentary and volcanic rocks resulting in a major reflector. The basal sequence boundary is frequently difficult to identify but it lies usually over the intruded sedimentary basin. Then the base is usually picked above the shallow sill intrusions identified on seismic profile. The mapping of the top and the base of the basaltic sequences allows us to determine the basalt thickness and estimate the volume of the magma production on the Mid- Norwegian margin. The thicker part of the basalt corresponds to the seaward dipping reflector (SDR). The magma feeder system, mainly formed by dyke and sill intrusions, represents the shallow intrusive complex. Deeper interconnected high-velocity sills are also mappable in the margin. Interconnected sill complexes can define continuous magma network >10 km in vertical ascent. The large-scale sill complexes, in addition to dyke swarm intrusions, represent a mode of vertical long-range magma

  6. Total copper content and its distribution in acid vineyards soils developed from granitic rocks.

    PubMed

    Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Queijeiro, José Manuel G; Blanco-Ward, Daniel; Alvarez-Olleros, Cristalina; Martínez-Cortizas, Antonio; García-Rodeja, Eduardo

    2007-05-25

    Total and extractable (5 extractants) Cu concentrations were determined in thirteen acid vineyards soils. Mean total copper concentration was 259 mg kg(-1) and most of the soil samples (87%) were above the upper limit allowed by the European Union for this element in soils. The largest Cu fraction was found to be that bound to soil organic matter, which accounted for 49% of the total Cu. None of the Cu fractions showed significant differences with depth. Nevertheless, bioavailable Cu (extracted in Na(2)-EDTA) was found to show a strong correlation with Cu bound to soil organic matter, which may indicate that Na(2)-EDTA is able to extract part of the organically bound Cu, resulting in an overestimation of bioavailable Cu. However, practices associated to soil use change and management affecting the stability of Cu organic complexes could induce an increase in bioavailable Cu levels in these soils.

  7. Domain-level rocking motion within a polymerase that translocates on single-stranded nucleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huiyung; Li, Changzheng; Zhou, Sufeng; Poulos, Thomas L.; Gershon, Paul David

    2013-04-01

    An X-ray crystallographic structure is described for unliganded Vaccinia virus poly(A) polymerase monomer (VP55), showing the first domain-level structural isoforms among either VP55, it’s processivity factor VP39, or the VP55-VP39 heterodimer. The occurrence of domain-level motion specifically in monomeric VP55 is consistent with the finding that the monomeric protein undergoes saltatory translocation whereas the heterodimer does not. Vaccinia virus poly(A) polymerase (VP55) is the only known polymerase that can translocate independently with respect to single-stranded nucleic acid (ssNA). Previously, its structure has only been solved in the context of the VP39 processivity factor. Here, a crystal structure of unliganded monomeric VP55 has been solved to 2.86 Å resolution, showing the first backbone structural isoforms among either VP55 or its processivity factor (VP39). Backbone differences between the two molecules of VP55 in the asymmetric unit indicated that unliganded monomeric VP55 can undergo a ‘rocking’ motion of the N-terminal domain with respect to the other two domains, which may be ‘rigidified’ upon VP39 docking. This observation is consistent with previously demonstrated experimental molecular dynamics of the monomer during translocation with respect to nucleic acid and with different mechanisms of translocation in the presence and absence of processivity factor VP39. Side-chain conformational changes in the absence of ligand were observed at a key primer contact site and at the catalytic center of VP55. The current structure completes the trio of possible structural forms for VP55 and VP39, namely the VP39 monomer, the VP39–VP55 heterodimer and the VP55 monomer.

  8. Some Environmental Consequences of Large Igneous Provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, M. F.

    2009-12-01

    The formation of large igneous provinces (LIPs)—continental flood basalts, ‘volcanic’ margins, and oceanic plateaus—may impact the atmosphere, oceans, and biosphere by rapidly releasing huge amounts of particulates, magmatic volatiles (CO2, SO2, Cl, F, etc.), and potentially volatiles (CO2, CH4, SO2, etc.) from intruded sediments (e.g., carbonates, organic-rich shales, evaporites). A key factor affecting the magnitude of volatile release is whether eruptions are subaerial or marine; hydrostatic pressure inhibits vesiculation and degassing of relatively soluble volatile components (H2O, S, Cl, F) in deep water submarine eruptions, although low solubility components (CO2, noble gases) are mostly degassed even at abyssal depths. Directly or indirectly, such injections may cause changes in the atmosphere/ocean system that can lead to perturbations of atmosphere/ocean chemistry, circulation, ecology, and biological productivity. These changes can be global in extent, particularly if environmental conditions were at or near a threshold state or tipping point. LIPs may have been responsible for some of the most dramatic and rapid changes in the global environment. For example, between ~145 and ~50 Ma, the global ocean was characterized by chemical and isotopic variations (especially in C and Sr isotope ratios, trace metal concentrations, and biocalcification), relatively high temperatures, high relative sea level, episodic deposition of black shales (oceanic anoxic events), high production of hydrocarbons, mass extinctions of marine organisms, and radiations of marine flora and fauna. Temporal correlations between the intense pulses of igneous activity associated with LIP formation and environmental changes suggest more than pure coincidence. The 1783-84 eruption of Laki on Iceland provides the only historical record of the type of volcanism that constructs transient LIPs. Although Laki produced a basaltic lava flow representing only ~1% of the volume of a typical

  9. Igneous geology of the Carlin trend, Nevada: The importance of Eocene magmatism in gold mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressel, Michael Walter, Jr.

    Igneous rocks of five ages are present in the Carlin trend, Nevada, and include: (1) Paleozoic basalt of the Roberts Mountains allochthon, (2) the Jurassic (˜158 Ma) Goldstrike intrusive complex, which includes the Goldstrike diorite laccolith and abundant dikes and sills, (3) a Cretaceous (112 Ma) granite stock, (4) lavas and intrusions of the Emigrant Pass volcanic field and widespread epizonal plugs and dikes of Eocene (˜40-36 Ma) age that range from rhyolite through basalt, and (5) Miocene (15 Ma) rhyolite lava and tuff. Jurassic and Eocene igneous rocks are by far the most important volumetrically and are spatially associated with nearly all ore deposits of the Carlin trend. This study focuses on the field relations, isotopic dating, and geochemistry of Eocene dikes that intrude sedimentary rocks in many deposits of the Carlin trend, because they are the youngest pre-mineral rocks and have simpler alteration histories than other host rocks. In the Beast, Genesis, Deep Star, Betze-Post, Rodeo-Goldbug, Meikle-Griffin, and Dee-Storm deposits, Eocene dikes are altered, commonly mineralized, and locally constitute ore. Gold-bearing dikes and sedimentary rocks have similar ore mineralogy, including arsenian pyrite, marcasite, and arsenopyrite, with late barite and stibnite. At Beast, as much as half the ore is hosted in a 37.3 Ma rhyolite dike. Post-gold alunite is ˜18.6 Ma. At Meikle and Griffin, porphyritic dacite dikes yield concordant U/Pb zircon and 40Ar/39Ar biotite emplacement ages of ˜39.2 Ma, and illite from the same QSP-altered dacite, with as much 9 ppm Au, yields similar, although imprecise 40Ar/39Ar ages. Thus, gold mineralization at these deposits closely followed emplacement of Eocene dikes. Carlin-type gold deposits in northeastern Nevada have been variously interpreted as partly syngenetic with Paleozoic carbonate rocks, products of Mesozoic contraction and metamorphism with or without significant magmatism, and of Tertiary age and related or

  10. Regional mapping of hydrothermally altered igneous rocks along the Urumieh-Dokhtar, Chagai, and Alborz Belts of western Asia using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data and Interactive Data Language (IDL) logical operators: a tool for porphyry copper exploration and assessment: Chapter O in Global mineral resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mars, John L.; Zientek, M.L.; Hammarstrom, J.M.; Johnson, K.M.; Pierce, F.W.

    2014-01-01

    The ASTER alteration map and corresponding geologic maps were used to select circular to elliptical patterns of argillic- and phyllic-altered volcanic and intrusive rocks as potential porphyry copper sites. One hundred and seventy eight potential porphyry copper sites were mapped along the UDVB, and 23 sites were mapped along the CVB. The potential sites were selected to assist in further exploration and assessments of undiscovered porphyry copper deposits.

  11. Lunar rock compositions and some interpretations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, A.E.J.; Engel, C.G.

    1970-01-01

    Samples of igneous "gabbro," "basalt," and lunar regolith have compositions fundamentally different from all meteorites and terrestrial basalts. The lunar rocks are anhydrous and without ferric iron. Amounts of titanium as high as 7 weight percent suggest either extreme fractionation of lunar rocks or an unexpected solar abundance of titanium. The differences in compositions of the known, more "primitive" rocks in the planetary system indicate the complexities inherent in defining the solar abundances of elements and the initial compositions of the earth and moon.

  12. Lunar rock compositions and some interpretations.

    PubMed

    Engel, A E; Engel, C G

    1970-01-30

    Samples of igneous "gabbro," "basalt," and lunar regolith have compositions fundamentally different from all meteorites and terrestrial basalts. The lunar rocks are anhydrous and without ferric iron. Amounts of titanium as high as 7 weight percent suggest either extreme fractionation of lunar rocks or an unexpected solar abundance of titanium. The differences in compositions of the known, more "primitive" rocks in the planetary system indicate the complexities inherent in defining the solar abundances of elemizents and the initial compositions of the earth and moon.

  13. Lunar rock compositions and some interpretations.

    PubMed

    Engel, A E; Engel, C G

    1970-01-30

    Samples of igneous "gabbro," "basalt," and lunar regolith have compositions fundamentally different from all meteorites and terrestrial basalts. The lunar rocks are anhydrous and without ferric iron. Amounts of titanium as high as 7 weight percent suggest either extreme fractionation of lunar rocks or an unexpected solar abundance of titanium. The differences in compositions of the known, more "primitive" rocks in the planetary system indicate the complexities inherent in defining the solar abundances of elemizents and the initial compositions of the earth and moon. PMID:17781481

  14. Selective Precipitation of Thorium lodate from a Tartaric Acid-Hydrogen Peroxide Medium Application to Rapid Spectrophotometric Determination of Thorium in Silicate Rocks and in Ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimaldi, F.S.

    1957-01-01

    This paper presents a selective iodate separation of thorium from nitric acid medium containing d-tartaric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is prevented by the use of 8quinolinol. A few micrograms of thorium are separated sufficiently clean from 30 mg. of such oxides as cerium, zirconium, titanium, niobium, tantalum, scandium, or iron with one iodate precipitation to allow an accurate determination of thorium with the thoronmesotartaric acid spectrophotometric method. The method is successful for the determination of 0.001% or more of thorium dioxide in silicate rocks and for 0.01% or more in black sand, monazite, thorite, thorianite, eschynite, euxenite, and zircon.

  15. Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 Containing an Artificial Oxalate Operon and Vitreoscilla Hemoglobin Secretes Oxalic Acid and Solubilizes Rock Phosphate in Acidic Alfisols

    PubMed Central

    Archana, G.; Naresh Kumar, G.

    2014-01-01

    Oxalate secretion was achieved in Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 by incorporation of genes encoding Aspergillus niger oxaloacetate acetyl hydrolase (oah), Fomitopsis plaustris oxalate transporter (FpOAR) and Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (vgb) in various combinations. Pf (pKCN2) transformant containing oah alone accumulated 19 mM oxalic acid intracellularly but secreted 1.2 mM. However, in the presence of an artificial oxalate operon containing oah and FpOAR genes in plasmid pKCN4, Pf (pKCN4) secreted 13.6 mM oxalate in the medium while 3.6 mM remained inside. This transformant solubilized 509 μM of phosphorus from rock phosphate in alfisol which is 4.5 fold higher than the Pf (pKCN2) transformant. Genomic integrants of P. fluorescens (Pf int1 and Pf int2) containing artificial oxalate operon (plac-FpOAR-oah) and artificial oxalate gene cluster (plac-FpOAR-oah, vgb, egfp) secreted 4.8 mM and 5.4 mM oxalic acid, released 329 μM and 351 μM P, respectively, in alfisol. The integrants showed enhanced root colonization, improved growth and increased P content of Vigna radiata plants. This study demonstrates oxalic acid secretion in P. fluorescens by incorporation of an artificial operon constituted of genes for oxalate synthesis and transport, which imparts mineral phosphate solubilizing ability to the organism leading to enhanced growth and P content of V. radiata in alfisol soil. PMID:24705024

  16. Aluminum in hornblende: an empirical igneous geobarometer.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammarstrom, J.M.; Zen, E.

    1986-01-01

    Electron-microprobe analyses of hornblendes from five calc-alkaline plutonic complexes representing low- and high-pressure regimes define a tightly clustered linear trend in terms of total Al (AlT) and tetrahedral Al (Aliv) contents. Data collated from the literature on calcic amphiboles from other plutonic complexes and from phase equilibrium experiments using natural rocks or synthetic analogue compositions show a similar AlT-Aliv trend and systematic pressure effects.-J.A.Z.

  17. Abraded Target on Rock 'Champagne' in Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this microscopic image of a target called 'Bubbles' on a rock called 'Champagne' after using its rock abrasion tool to grind a hole through the rock's outer surface. The circular area where the rock's interior is exposed is about 5 centimeters (2 inches) across. This rock is different from rocks out on the plains of Gusev Crater but is similar to other rocks in this area of the 'Columbia Hills' in that it rich in phosphorus. Plagioclase, a mineral commonly found in igneous rocks, is also present in these rocks, according to analysis with Spirit's miniature thermal emission spectrometer. By using the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer to collect data for multiple martian days, or sols, scientists are also beginning to get measurements of trace elements in the rocks. Spirit took the images that are combined into this mosaic on sol 358 (Jan. 3, 2005).

  18. Treatment and prevention of ARD using silica micro encapsulation[Acid Rock Drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, P.; Rybock, J.; Wheaton, A.

    1999-07-01

    In response to the known drawbacks of liming and the ever-increasing regulatory demands on the mining industry, KEECO has developed a silica micro encapsulation (SME) process. SME is a cost-effective, high performance reagent that is utilized in conjunction with simple chemical delivery systems. By encapsulating metals in a silica matrix formation and rapidly precipitating them into a sand-like sludge, it offers all the advantages of liming without the negative drawbacks. Utilizing an injection technique via a high shear mixing device, a slurry form of the SME product called KB-1{trademark} was applied to ARD at the Bunker Hill Mine in Idaho and to ARD pumped from collection ponds at a remote mine site in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Flow rates at both sites ranged form 500 to 800 gallons per minute. Treated water from the Bunker Hill Mine operation achieved the site's NPDES criteria for all evaluated metals and US Drinking Water quality for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead and zinc with a dosage rate of 1.34 grams KB-1{trademark} per liter. Treated water from the Sierra Nevada project focused on the control of aluminum, arsenic, copper, iron and nickel. All water samples displayed a >99.5% reduction in these metals, as well as an 84%--87% reduction in the concentration of sulfate. Testing on sludge generated form both operations achieved TCLP Action Limits. The SME process is currently under evaluation as a means to coat the pyrite surfaces of newly generated mine tailings to prevent oxidation and future acid generation.

  19. Intrusive rocks viewed from fitness landscape diagrams: Evolution and immiscibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneresse, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    We introduce the hard-soft acid-base concepts to magma evolution. Those concepts and their derived chemical parameters provide a new insight into mantle- and continental-derived magmas. Hence magma evolution represents a free suite of chemical reactions, thus showing natural chemical trends. They should be controlled by the principles of maximum hardness and minimum electrophilicity that rule chemical reactions. When plotting into a fitness landscape diagram, rocks suites define two major tendencies. Mantle-derived rocks present all character of an closed chemical system. Conversely, rocks contaminated within the continental crust define two other trends, depending on whether they have affinities toward a silica pole or an alkaline one. They both show the character of an open chemical system. When plotting major igneous minerals onto that diagram shows the importance of olivine, silica and alkali-bearing oxides. It points to the development of immiscibility, depending on the path along which magmas evolve. It thus provides explanation to experimentally observed immiscibility.

  20. Igneous and Sedimentary Compositions from Four Landing Sites on Mars from the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellert, R.; Arvidson, R. E.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Morris, R. W.; Squyres, S. W.; VanBommel, S.; Yen, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    The APXS - supported and promoted strongly by Heinrich Waenke - on all four Mars Rovers has returned compositional data from about 1000 rocks and soil targets along the combined traverses of over 60 kilometers. Providing precise and accurate bulk chemistry with typically 16 quantified elements, the APXS is a powerful and versatile tool that when combined with the ability to traverse to key rocks and soils has provided critical information needed to understand the geologic evolution of Mars. APXS data allow comparisons among landing sites, provide ground truth for orbiters and connections back to SNC meteorites. The soils and dust are basaltic in character and represent the average Mars composition similar to Adirondack basalts from Gusev crater but with unambiguous elevated and correlated S, Cl and Zn contents. At all four landing sites the APXS found several rocks with a felsic composition. The similarity is best assessed in a logarithmic ratio plot of rock normalized to the average soil composition (Fig.1). High alkaline, Al, and low Mg, Fe, low S, Cl and Ni, Zn as well as an Fe/Mn ratio of approximately 50 indicate a likely unaltered and igneous origin. Sediments, e.g. the Burns formation, with approximately 25 wt% SO3 at Meridiani Planum have been documented over 10s of kilometers (Fig. 2). This formation is compositionally homogeneous, but showing the removal of MgSO4 and a threefold increase in Cl downhill in 2 craters. The degraded rim of the Noachian crater Endeavour resembles average Mars crust, with local Ca, Mg and Fe sulfate alteration and elevated Mn, some felsic rocks, and high Al, Si and low Fe rocks, possibly indicating clays. Unusual soils at Gusev crater in the area surrounding Home Plate include some very rich in ferric sulfate salts (up to 35 wt% SO3) and some with 90% wt% SiO2, possibly indicating fumerolic activities. Rocks in the Columbia Hills show significant signs of alteration including elevated S, Cl and Br in the abraded interior. At

  1. Zinc isotope investigation of surface and pore waters in a mountain watershed impacted by acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Suzan; Borrok, David M; Wanty, Richard B; Balistrieri, Laurie S

    2012-03-15

    The pollution of natural waters with metals derived from the oxidation of sulfide minerals like pyrite is a global environmental problem. However, the metal loading pathways and transport mechanisms associated with acid rock drainage reactions are often difficult to characterize using bulk chemical data alone. In this study, we evaluated the use of zinc (Zn) isotopes to complement traditional geochemical tools in the investigation of contaminated waters at the former Waldorf mining site in the Rocky Mountains, Colorado, U.S.A. Geochemical signatures and statistical analysis helped in identifying two primary metal loading pathways at the Waldorf site. The first was characterized by a circumneutral pH, high alkalinity, and high Zn/Cd ratios. The second was characterized by acidic pHs and low Zn/Cd ratios. Zinc isotope signatures in surface water samples collected across the site were remarkably similar (the δ(66)Zn, relative to JMC 3-0749-L, for most samples ranged from 0.20 to 0.30‰±0.09‰ 2σ). This probably suggests that the ultimate source of Zn is consistent across the Waldorf site, regardless of the metal loading pathway. The δ(66)Zn of pore water samples collected within a nearby metal-impacted wetland area, however, were more variable, ranging from 0.20 to 0.80‰±0.09‰ 2σ. Here the Zn isotopes seemed to reflect differences in groundwater flow pathways. However, a host of secondary processes might also have impacted Zn isotopes, including adsorption of Zn onto soil components, complexation of Zn with dissolved organic matter, uptake of Zn into plants, and the precipitation of Zn during the formation of reduced sulfur species. Zinc isotope analysis proved useful in this study; however, the utility of this isotopic tool would improve considerably with the addition of a comprehensive experimental foundation for interpreting the complex isotopic relationships found in soil pore waters. PMID:22326318

  2. Microbacter margulisiae gen. nov., sp. nov., a propionigenic bacterium isolated from sediments of an acid rock drainage pond.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene; Sanz, Jose Luis; Stams, Alfons J M

    2014-12-01

    A novel anaerobic propionigenic bacterium, strain ADRI(T), was isolated from sediment of an acid rock drainage environment (Tinto River, Spain). Cells were small (0.4-0.6×1-1.7 µm), non-motile and non-spore-forming rods. Cells possessed a Gram-negative cell-wall structure and were vancomycin-resistant. Strain ADRI(T) utilized yeast extract and various sugars as substrates and formed propionate, lactate and acetate as major fermentation products. The optimum growth temperature was 30 °C and the optimum pH for growth was pH 6.5, but strain ADRI(T) was able to grow at a pH as low as 3.0. Oxidase, indole formation, and urease and catalase activities were negative. Aesculin and gelatin were hydrolysed. The predominant cellular fatty acids of strain ADRI(T) were anteiso-C15 : 0 (30.3 %), iso-C15 : 0 (29.2 %) and iso-C17 : 0 3-OH (14.9 %). Major menaquinones were MK-8 (52 %) and MK-9 (48 %). The genomic DNA G+C content was 39.9 mol%. Phylogenetically, strain ADRI(T) was affiliated to the family Porphyromonadaceae of the phylum Bacteroidetes. The most closely related cultured species were Paludibacter propionicigenes with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 87.5 % and several species of the genus Dysgonomonas (similarities of 83.5-85.4 % to the type strains). Based on the distinctive ecological, phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics of strain ADRI(T), a novel genus and species, Microbacter margulisiae gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is ADRI(T) ( = JCM 19374(T) = DSM 27471(T)).

  3. Zinc isotope investigation of surface and pore waters in a mountain watershed impacted by acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Suzan; Borrok, David M; Wanty, Richard B; Balistrieri, Laurie S

    2012-03-15

    The pollution of natural waters with metals derived from the oxidation of sulfide minerals like pyrite is a global environmental problem. However, the metal loading pathways and transport mechanisms associated with acid rock drainage reactions are often difficult to characterize using bulk chemical data alone. In this study, we evaluated the use of zinc (Zn) isotopes to complement traditional geochemical tools in the investigation of contaminated waters at the former Waldorf mining site in the Rocky Mountains, Colorado, U.S.A. Geochemical signatures and statistical analysis helped in identifying two primary metal loading pathways at the Waldorf site. The first was characterized by a circumneutral pH, high alkalinity, and high Zn/Cd ratios. The second was characterized by acidic pHs and low Zn/Cd ratios. Zinc isotope signatures in surface water samples collected across the site were remarkably similar (the δ(66)Zn, relative to JMC 3-0749-L, for most samples ranged from 0.20 to 0.30‰±0.09‰ 2σ). This probably suggests that the ultimate source of Zn is consistent across the Waldorf site, regardless of the metal loading pathway. The δ(66)Zn of pore water samples collected within a nearby metal-impacted wetland area, however, were more variable, ranging from 0.20 to 0.80‰±0.09‰ 2σ. Here the Zn isotopes seemed to reflect differences in groundwater flow pathways. However, a host of secondary processes might also have impacted Zn isotopes, including adsorption of Zn onto soil components, complexation of Zn with dissolved organic matter, uptake of Zn into plants, and the precipitation of Zn during the formation of reduced sulfur species. Zinc isotope analysis proved useful in this study; however, the utility of this isotopic tool would improve considerably with the addition of a comprehensive experimental foundation for interpreting the complex isotopic relationships found in soil pore waters.

  4. Geochemistry and geotectonic setting of Late Proterozoic Katangan basic rocks from Kibambale in central Shaba (Zaire)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampunzu, A. B.; Kanika, M.; Kapenda, D.; Tshimanga, K.

    1993-12-01

    The Late Proterozoic Katangan basic rocks (dolerites and basalts) outcropping at Kibambale in central Shaba (Zaire) are classified as extension-related tholeiites. The concentrations of immobile major and trace elements resemble those encountered in Phanerozoic enriched oceanic ridge basalts (E-MORB) emplaced in incipient oceanic rifts such as Red Sea and Tadjura Gulf troughs. This conclusion is also sustained by: elemental ratios which are MORB-like; multielement chondrite- and MORB-normalized patterns; sedimentological data, especially the shallow water conditions which prevailed during the deposition of lower Kundelungu tillite in which these basic rocks are interstratified; and the geological and structural framework, notably the emplacement of these igneous rocks in a basin not distant from the Kibaran continental land mass. In this area the geological units containing the igneous rocks are not affected by significant tangential tectonism and so the present structural relationships are relatively undisturbed compared with those which prevailed during the emplacement of the igneous rocks.

  5. Paleomagnetism of large igneous provinces: case-study from West Greenland, North Atlantic igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riisager, Janna; Riisager, Peter; Pedersen, Asger Ken

    2003-09-01

    We present new paleomagnetic and multi-model stereo photogrammetry data from lava sequences in the West Greenland part of the North Atlantic igneous province (NAIP). The joint analyses of paleomagnetic and photogrammetric data yield a well-defined paleomagnetic pole located at Lat=73.6°N, Long=160.5°E ( N=44, α95=6.2°, K=13.1; age ˜61-55 Ma), which is statistically indistinguishable from a pole recently obtained for the Eurasian part of the NAIP on Faroe Islands [Riisager et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 201 (2002) 261-276]. Combining the two datasets we obtain a joint NAIP paleomagnetic pole in Greenland coordinates: Lat=71.1°N, Long=161.1°E ( N=87, α95=4.3°, K=13.6; age ˜61-54 Ma). The results presented here represent the first study in which photogrammetry profiles were photographed at the exact same locations where paleomagnetic fieldwork was carried out, and a direct flow-to-flow comparison of the two datasets is possible. Photogrammetry is shown to be particularly useful because of (i) highly precise dip/strike measurements and (ii) detailed 'field observations' that can be made in the laboratory. Highly precise determination of the structural attitude of well-exposed Kanisut Mb lava sequences demonstrates that their apparently reliable in-field dip/strike measurements typically are up to ˜6° wrong. Erroneous dip/strike readings are particularly problematic as they offset paleomagnetic poles without affecting their confidence limits. Perhaps more important for large igneous provinces is the recognition of a variable temporal relationship between consecutive lava flows. We demonstrate how correct interpretation of paleosecular variation, facilitated by the detailed photogrammetry analysis, is crucial for the rapidly emplaced Vaigat Formation lavas. Inaccurate tectonic correction, non-averaged paleosecular variation and unrecognized excursional directions may, perhaps, explain why coeval paleomagnetic poles from large igneous provinces are often

  6. Ocean anoxia and large igneous provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhl, Micha; Bjerrum, Christian J.; Canfield, Donald E.; Korte, Christoph; Stemmerik, Lars; Frei, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Earth's history is marked by multiple events of ocean anoxia developing along continental margins and potentially into the open ocean realm. These events often coincide with the emplacement of large igneous provinces (LIPs) on continents, major perturbations of global geochemical cycles and marine (mass) extinction. The geographic and temporal extend and the intensity (ferruginous vs. euxinic) of anoxic conditions is often, however, poorly constraint. This complicates understanding of close coupling between Earth's physical, chemical and biological processes. We studied ocean redox change over two major mass extinction events in Earth history, the Permian-Triassic (at ~252 Ma) and Triassic-Jurassic (at ~201.3 Ma) mass extinctions. Both extinction events are marked by a major perturbation of the global exogenic carbon cycle (and associated major negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE)), likely initiated by carbon outgassing of the Siberian Traps and the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), respectively. We compare Permian-Triassic and Triassic-Jurassic ocean redox change along continental margins in different geographic regions (Permian-Triassic: Greenland, Svalbard, Iran; Triassic-Jurassic: UK, Austria) and discuss its role in marine mass extinction. We show strongly enhanced sedimentary redox-sensitive trace element concentrations (e.g. Mo) during both events. However, increased Permian-Triassic values are in all localities distinctly delayed relative to the associated negative CIE. Triassic-Jurassic values are only delayed in the oceanographically restricted western Germanic basin (UK) while increased Mo-values in the north-western Tethys Ocean (Austria) directly match the onset of the associated negative CIE. Speciation of iron [giving (Fe-HR/ Fe-T) and (Fe(Py)/ Fe-HR)] in the Triassic-Jurassic western Germanic basin (UK) however shows close coupling between the onset of the global carbon cycle perturbation and a shift to anoxic and even euxinic conditions

  7. U.S. Geological Survey research in Handcart Gulch, Colorado—An alpine watershed with natural acid-rock drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manning, Andrew H.; Caine, Jonathan Saul; Verplanck, Philip L.; Bove, Dana J.; Kahn, Katherine G.

    2009-01-01

    Handcart Gulch is an alpine watershed along the Continental Divide in the Colorado Rocky Mountain Front Range. It contains an unmined mineral deposit typical of many hydrothermal mineral deposits in the intermountain west, composed primarily of pyrite with trace metals including copper and molybdenum. Springs and the trunk stream have a natural pH value of 3 to 4. The U.S. Geological Survey began integrated research activities at the site in 2003 with the objective of better understanding geologic, geochemical, and hydrologic controls on naturally occurring acid-rock drainage in alpine watersheds. Characterizing the role of groundwater was of particular interest because mountain watersheds containing metallic mineral deposits are often underlain by complexly deformed crystalline rocks in which groundwater flow is poorly understood. Site infrastructure currently includes 4 deep monitoring wells high in the watershed (300– 1,200 ft deep), 4 bedrock (100–170 ft deep) and 5 shallow (10–30 ft deep) monitoring wells along the trunk stream, a stream gage, and a meteorological station. Work to date at the site includes: geologic mapping and structural analysis; surface sample and drill core mineralogic characterization; geophysical borehole logging; aquifer testing; monitoring of groundwater hydraulic heads and streamflows; a stream tracer dilution study; repeated sampling of surface and groundwater for geochemical analyses, including major and trace elements, several isotopes, and groundwater age dating; and construction of groundwater flow models. The unique dataset collected at Handcart Gulch has yielded several important findings about bedrock groundwater flow at the site. Most importantly, we find that bedrock bulk permeability is nontrivial and that bedrock groundwater apparently constitutes a substantial fraction of the hydrologic budget. This means that bedrock groundwater commonly may be an underappreciated component of the hydrologic system in studies of

  8. Optimization of the Acetic Acid method for microfossil extraction from lithified carbonate rocks: Examples from the Jurassic and Miocene of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Septriandi; Malik, Muhammad; Kaminski, Michael; Babalola, Lamidi

    2016-04-01

    We report the first ever use of the acetic acid processing method for the extraction of microfossils from indurated limestones in Saudi Arabia. Two different limestone samples from Middle Jurassic and Middle Miocene formation in Saudi Arabia were tested under different concentrations of acid from 50% to 100% and with processing times from 2 hours to 10 hours, in an attempt to optimize the processing methodology. The recovery of acid residues shows a similar trend for both Jurassic and Miocene samples. The weight percentage of residue particle size > 1 mm decreases as acid concentration increases, especially in the 50 to 80% acid concentration range, and the weight percentage of the smallest size particles >0.063 mm increases as acid concentration increases. The small fraction of residue between 0.50 - 0.063 mm was split into 3 g subsamples and picked for microfossils in order to assess their preservation. All concentrations of acetic acid tested show promising results for both the Jurassic Dhruma and Miocene Dam formation carbonates. Higher acid concentrations with longer reaction times yield better recovery than higher concentrations with less reaction time. Based on our experiment, we recommended a 60% concentration of acetic acid to be the optimal concentration for use on routine micropaleontological samples of Saudi Arabian carbonate rocks. By lowering the concentration of acetic acid from 80% to 60%, the consumption of acid is reduced without compromising the recovery of microfossils, and the sample can be processed in a more environmentally friendly manner.

  9. Origins of large igneous provinces: Thermal or chemical? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenaga, J.

    2010-12-01

    Large igneous provinces such as continental flood basalts and oceanic plateaus are commonly believed to be caused by massive thermal anomalies in the mantle, or more specifically, mantle plume heads possibly rising from the core-mantle boundary. The existence of such plume heads is more elusive than that of mantle plumes, because there is no currently ongoing formation of continental flood basalt or oceanic plateau, so potential evidence for plume heads must come from the detailed analysis of their fossil traces, i.e., their melting products represented as igneous crust. Compared to petrological and geochemical inference based on surface lavas, seismological studies on large igneous provinces have the advantage of probing the entire crustal section, thereby providing potentially more robust constraints on primary melt composition and the nature of the source mantle. In this talk, I will review the debates over the North Atlantic igneous province, which includes the Iceland hotspot, as well as discuss the prospects of studying oceanic plateaus for providing key information to resolve the origins of large igneous provinces.

  10. Magnetostratigraphy of the Etendeka Large Igneous Province, Namibia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, S. C.; Muxworthy, A. R.; Mac Niocaill, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Paraná - Etendeka large igneous province (≈ 135 Ma) has not been linked to a known mass extinction event, despite large igneous provinces being postulated as a cause. The reason why some large igneous provinces appear the cause of huge fluctuations in the global biosphere, an example being the link between Siberian trap volcanism and the Permo-Triassic boundary, while others seem to have only a minor effect is still debated. Establishing detailed histories of these large igneous provinces is important for understanding why such variations in effect may occur. Why does the volume of the province not reflect the magnitude of the effects seen? During the early Cretaceous, reversals of Earth's magnetic field were more frequent than at other times in Earth's history. Magnetostratigraphy is therefore a tool capable of providing high resolution constraints on the history and duration of the Paraná - Etendeka large igneous province volcanism. Detailed sampling of the Etendeka volcanic stratigraphy, followed by progressive demagnetisation of 893 specimens, yields 70 individual polarities gained from throughout the central volcanic succession. Correlation of the individual sections sampled reveals a minimum of 16 separate polarities are recorded. Subsequent links to the geomagnetic polarity timescale suggest a minimum province duration of > 1 Myrs, with no obvious period of short, high volume volcanism as is often suggested. A protracted duration (>1Myr) may therefore provide the reason why at least the Paraná - Etendeka appears to have no associated extinction event.

  11. Intraterrestrial life in igneous ocean crust: advances, technologies, and the future (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, K. J.; Wheat, C. G.

    2010-12-01

    The “next frontier” of scientific investigation in the deep sub-seafloor microbial biosphere lies in a realm that has been a completely unexplored until just the past decade: the igneous oceanic crust. Problems that have hampered exploration of the “hard rock” marine deep biosphere have revolved around sample access (hard rock drilling is technologically complex), contamination (a major hurdle), momentum (why take on this challenge when the relatively “easier” marine muds also have been a frontier) and suspicion that microbes in more readily accessed using (simpler) non-drilling technologies - like vents - are truly are endemic of subsurface clades/activities. Since the late 1990’s, however, technologies and resultant studies on microbes in the igneous ocean crust deep biosphere have risen sharply, and offer a new and distinct view on this biome. Moreover, microbiologists are now taking leading roles in technological developments that are critically required to address this biosphere - interfacing and collaborating closely with engineers, genomic biologists, geologists, seismologists, and geochemists to accomplish logistically complex and long-term studies that bring observatory research to this deep realm. The future of this field for the least decade is rich - opportunities abound for microbiologists to play new roles in how we study microbiology in the deep subsurface in an oceanographic and Earth system science perspective.

  12. The role of igneous and metamorphic processes in triggering mass extinctions and Earth crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensen, Henrik; Planke, Sverre; Polozov, Alexander G.; Jerram, Dougal; Jones, Morgan T.

    2016-04-01

    Mass extinctions and transient climate events commonly coincide in time with the formation of Large igneous provinces (LIPs). The end-Permian event coincides with the Siberian Traps, the end-Triassic with the Central Atlantic Magmatic Event (CAMP), the Toarcian with the Karoo LIP, and the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) with the North Atlantic Igneous Province. Although the temporal relationship between volcanism and the environmental crises has been known for decades, the geological processes linking LIPs to these environmental events are strongly debated: Explosive LIP volcanism should lead to short term cooling (not long term warming), mantle CO2 is too 13C-enriched to explain negative 13C carbon isotope excursions from sedimentary sequences, the LIP volcanism is poorly dated and apparently lasts much longer that the associated environmental events, large portions of the LIPs remain poorly explored, especially the sub-volcanic parts where sills and dikes are emplaced in sedimentary host rocks, and thus gas flux estimates from contact aureoles around sill intrusions are often poorly constrained. In this presentation, we discuss the status of LIP research with an emphasis on the sub volcanic processes. We show that potential for degassing of greenhouse gases, aerosols, and ozone destructive gases is substantial and can likely explain the triggering of both climatic events and mass extinctions.

  13. Diel cycling of zinc in a stream impacted by acid rock drainage: Initial results from a new in situ Zn analyzer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapin, T.P.; Nimick, D.A.; Gammons, C.H.; Wanty, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that many trace metals undergo dramatic diel (24-h) cycles in near neutral pH streams with metal concentrations reproducibly changing up to 500% during the diel period (Nimick et al., 2003). To examine diel zinc cycles in streams affected by acid rock drainage, we have developed a novel instrument, the Zn-DigiScan, to continuously monitor in situ zinc concentrations in near real-time. Initial results from a 3-day deployment at Fisher Creek, Montana have demonstrated the ability of the Zn-DigiScan to record diel Zn cycling at levels below 100 ??g/l. Longer deployments of this instrument could be used to examine the effects of episodic events such as rainstorms and snowmelt pulses on zinc loading in streams affected by acid rock drainage. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006.

  14. Origin of igneous meteorites and differentiated asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E.; Goldstein, J.; Asphaug, E.; Bottke, W.; Moskovitz, N.; Keil, K.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Igneously formed meteorites and asteroids provide major challenges to our understanding of the formation and evolution of the asteroid belt. The numbers and types of differentiated meteorites and non-chondritic asteroids appear to be incompatible with an origin by fragmentation of numerous Vesta-like bodies by hypervelocity impacts in the asteroid belt over 4 Gyr. We lack asteroids and achondrites from the olivine-rich mantles of the parent bodies of the 12 groups of iron meteorites and the ˜70 ungrouped irons, the 2 groups of pallasites and the 4--6 ungrouped pallasites. We lack mantle and core samples from the parent asteroids of the basaltic achondrites that do not come from Vesta, viz., angrites and the ungrouped eucrites like NWA 011 and Ibitira. How could core samples have been extracted from numerous differentiated bodies when Vesta's basaltic crust was preserved? Where is the missing Psyche family of differentiated asteroids including the complementary mantle and crustal asteroids [1]? Why are meteorites derived from far more differentiated parent bodies than chondritic parent bodies even though C and S class chondritic asteroids dominate the asteroid belt? New paradigm. Our studies of meteorites, impact modeling, and dynamical studies suggest a new paradigm in which differentiated asteroids accreted at 1--2 au less than 2 Myr after CAI formation [2]. They were rapidly melted by 26Al and disrupted by hit-and-run impacts [3] while still molten or semi-molten when planetary embryos were accreting. Metallic Fe-Ni bodies derived from core material cooled rapidly with little or no silicate insulation less than 4 Myr after CAI formation [4]. Fragments of differentiated planetesimals were subsequently tossed into the asteroid belt. Meteorite evidence for early disruption of differentiated asteroids. If iron meteorites were samples of Fe-Ni cores of bodies that cooled slowly inside silicate mantles over ˜50--100 Myr, irons from each core would have

  15. Performance of an open limestone channel for treating a stream affected by acid rock drainage (León, Spain).

    PubMed

    Santofimia, Esther; López-Pamo, Enrique

    2016-07-01

    The generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) was observed after the oxidation dissolution of pyrite-rich black shales, which were excavated during the construction of a highway in León (Spain). ARDs are characterized by the presence of high concentrations of sulfate and metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Co, Ni, Th, and U) that affect the La Silva stream. Dissolved element concentrations showed values between one and four orders of magnitude higher than those of natural waters of this area. A passive treatment system was constructed; the aim of which was to improve the quality of the water of the stream. This work provides a hydrochemical characterization of the La Silva stream after its transit through the different elements that constitute the passive treatment system (open limestone channel (OLC), small ponds, and a wetland), during its first year of operation. The passive treatment system has two sections separated by a tunnel 230 m long. The first section, which stretches between the highway and the tunnel entrance, is an OLC 350 m long with a slope of 16 %. The second section, which stretches from the tunnel exit to the end wetland, has a length of 700 m and a slope of 6 %; it is in this section where six small ponds are located. In the first section of this passive treatment system, the OLC was effectively increasing the pH from 3 to 4-4.5 and eliminating all of the dissolved Fe and the partially dissolved Al. These elements, after hydrolysis at a pH 3-3.5 and 4-4.5, respectively, had precipitated as schwertmannite and hydrobasaluminite, while other dissolved metals were removed totally or partially for adsorption by the precipitates and/or by coprecipitation. The second section receives different inputs of water such as ARDs and natural waters. After exiting the treatment system, the stream is buffered by Al at a pH of 4-4.3, showing high Al concentrations (19-101 mg/L) but with a complete removal of dissolved Fe. Unfortunately, the outflow shows similar or

  16. Performance of an open limestone channel for treating a stream affected by acid rock drainage (León, Spain).

    PubMed

    Santofimia, Esther; López-Pamo, Enrique

    2016-07-01

    The generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) was observed after the oxidation dissolution of pyrite-rich black shales, which were excavated during the construction of a highway in León (Spain). ARDs are characterized by the presence of high concentrations of sulfate and metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Co, Ni, Th, and U) that affect the La Silva stream. Dissolved element concentrations showed values between one and four orders of magnitude higher than those of natural waters of this area. A passive treatment system was constructed; the aim of which was to improve the quality of the water of the stream. This work provides a hydrochemical characterization of the La Silva stream after its transit through the different elements that constitute the passive treatment system (open limestone channel (OLC), small ponds, and a wetland), during its first year of operation. The passive treatment system has two sections separated by a tunnel 230 m long. The first section, which stretches between the highway and the tunnel entrance, is an OLC 350 m long with a slope of 16 %. The second section, which stretches from the tunnel exit to the end wetland, has a length of 700 m and a slope of 6 %; it is in this section where six small ponds are located. In the first section of this passive treatment system, the OLC was effectively increasing the pH from 3 to 4-4.5 and eliminating all of the dissolved Fe and the partially dissolved Al. These elements, after hydrolysis at a pH 3-3.5 and 4-4.5, respectively, had precipitated as schwertmannite and hydrobasaluminite, while other dissolved metals were removed totally or partially for adsorption by the precipitates and/or by coprecipitation. The second section receives different inputs of water such as ARDs and natural waters. After exiting the treatment system, the stream is buffered by Al at a pH of 4-4.3, showing high Al concentrations (19-101 mg/L) but with a complete removal of dissolved Fe. Unfortunately, the outflow shows similar or

  17. A discussion of isotopic systematics and mineral zoning in the shergottites - Evidence for a 180 m.y. igneous crystallization age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The chronologies of the Shergotty, Zagami, ALHA 77005, and EETA 79001 meteorites were reexamined on the basis of shergottites' petrography and mineral chemistry data. Among the various isochrons, the concordant Rb-Sr (about 180 Myr) and U-Th-Pb (about 190 Myr) internal isochrons are interpreted as representing the time of igneous crystallization, while the Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and Pb-Pb whole-rock isochrons are interpreted as mixing lines, and are reasonably attributed to igneous processes such as wall-rock assimilation and magma mixing. If the approximated age of less than 200 Myr is correct, the shergottites represent the youngest known extraterrestrial basalts. This conclusion supports the hypothesis that the SNC meteorites are samples of Mars.

  18. The Oldest Moon Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, M.

    2004-04-01

    Anorthosites, rocks composed almost entirely of plagioclase feldspar, are the oldest rocks on the Moon. They appear to have formed when feldspar crystallized and floated to the top of a global magma ocean that surrounded the Moon soon after it formed. Not all ages determined for anorthosites, however, are as old as we expected--one appeared to be only 4.29 billion years old. While 4.29 billion years sounds very ancient, a magma ocean ought to have solidified well within 100 million years of lunar origin about 4.55 billion years ago. One possibility is that the young ages reflect impact events, not the original time of igneous crystallization. My colleagues Lars Borg (University of New Mexico) and Larry Nyquist and Don Bogard (Johnson Space Center) and I studied an anorthosite (rock 67215) relatively rich in pyroxene, allowing us to determine a precise crystallization age of 4.40 billion years. But even that age might have been affected by the subsequent shock heating event that reset the low-temperature components in this rock about 500 million years after it formed. By examining data for all of the previously dated lunar anorthosites, we were able to show that plagioclase feldspar is more prone to shock damage than are the pyroxenes in these rocks, so we plotted only the pyroxene data for four different anorthosites on a samarium-neodymium isochron diagram. These data fall on a well-defined line indicating a crystallization age for the anorthosites of 4.46 billion years, consistent with very early, widespread melting of the Moon. Other data for 67215 show that it comes from a relatively shallow depth in the crust, giving us clues to the structure of the lunar crust. Studies like this one are filling in the picture of how the initial crust of the Moon formed, which in turn sheds light on the formation of the terrestrial planets.

  19. Hot dry rock geothermal prospects, 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, F.; Laughlin, A. W.; Aldrich, J.; Ander, M. E.; Arney, B. H.; Decker, E.; Gardner, J.; Heiken, G.; Kron, A. J.; Ladelfe, C. M.

    Sites within the USA as candidates for development of a second hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal system were assessed. Potential sites examined fall broadly into three categories according to the nature of their thermal anomalies: (1) quaternary magmahydrothermal (volcanic or igneous) systems; (2) regional thermal anomalies of tectonic origin; and (3) prequaternary plutonic and metamorphic complexes. Sites with both electrical generation and direct use potential were considered however, efforts were concentrated on electrical sites.

  20. Early Archaean rocks of Sarmatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumlyanskyy, Leonid; Claesson, Stefan; Bibikova, Elena; Billström, Kjell

    2013-04-01

    Sarmatia, one of the three main crustal segments of the Precambrian East-European platform, comprises the Ukrainian shield and the Voronezh crystalline massif which are separated by the Late Palaeozoic Dnieper-Donets Depression. It is composed of a collage of terrains that were formed during over 2 billion years, from c. 3.8 to c. 1.7 Ga; some of these terrains can be traced across the Dnieper-Donets Depression. Geochronological and isotope-geochemical investigations have shown that significant portions of Sarmatia were formed already in the Early Archaean. In the Ukrainian shield Early Archaean rocks are known from the Dniester-Bug and Azov domains. Enderbites of the Dniester-Bug Series, which occur intercalated with mafic and ultramafic rocks, contain zircons as old as 3.75-3.78 Ga (Claesson et al., 2006; 2012) while initial Hf isotope ratios indicate derivation from mildly depleted sources. In the Azov domain the oldest rocks known belong to the Novopavlivka complex, which includes orthogneisses, enderbites, migmatites and related granites with up to 1 m thick enclaves of pyroxenite and peridotite, amphibolites, and schists. Zircons separated from two pyroxenite samples have yielded ages of 3633 ± 16 and 3640 ± 11 Ma, while zircons from enderbite gave 3609 ± 5 Ma (Bibikova and Williams, 1990). Zircons extracted from metasediments of the Soroki and Fedorivka greenstone belts, Azov domain, have yielded ages up to 3785 Ma (Bibikova et al, 2010) and ɛHf values of -1.6 to 1.8 for the oldest zircons. Finally, recent multigrain U-Pb dating of heavily deformed tonalitic gneisses of the Verkhnyotokmakska Stratum, Azov Domain, has given an age of 3560 ± 70 Ma (Scherbak et al., 2011). The oldest rocks of the Voronezh crystalline massif belong to the Oboyan Complex which is composed of mafic igneous rocks and sediments metamorphosed into amphibolites and gneisses. Most probably, this complex includes rocks of different ages and origins. Individual igneous zircons from

  1. Calcic myrmekite in anorthositic and gabbroic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffries, C.M.; Dymek, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Myrmekite is a common feature of granitic plutonic rocks and quartzo-feldspathic gneisses, but it is rarely reported in anorthositic and gabbroic rocks. The authors have identified myrmekitic intergrowths of quartz and calcic plagioclase in a variety of plagioclase-rich cumulate rocks, including samples from a number of massif anorthosites and layered igneous intrusions. It appears that calcic myrmekite has been frequently overlooked, and is a common accessory feature in these rock types. Chemical and textural characteristics of myrmekite in the St-Urbain massif anorthosite (Quebec) and the Bushveld Igneous Complex (South Africa) have several features in common, but this myrmekite appears to be fundamentally different from that described by most previous investigators. Whereas myrmekite typically consists of a vermicular intergrowth of sodic plagioclase and quartz that occurs adjacent to alkali feldspar, the intergrowths in these rocks contain highly calcic plagioclase and lack the intervening alkali feldspar. In addition, the plagioclase in the myrmekite is more calcic than that in the surrounding rock. The boundary between the myrmekite and the host material is generally extremely sharp, although reverse zoning of host plagioclase may obscure the contact in some cases. The textural and chemical evidence is consistent with a replacement origin for these intergrowths; the proportion of quartz in the myrmekite is in close agreement with the predicted amount of silica that is generated by the theoretical replacement reaction. It appears that water played a key role in the replacement process.

  2. Influence of the Trojan Nickel Mine on surface water quality, Mazowe valley, Zimbabwe: Runoff chemistry and acid generation potential of waste rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupankwa, Keretia; Love, David; Mapani, Benjamin; Mseka, Stephen; Meck, Maideyi

    The impacts of mining on the environment depend on the nature of the ore body, the type of mining and the size of operation. The focus of this study is on Trojan Nickel Mine which is located 90 km north of Harare, Zimbabwe. It produces nickel from iron, iron-nickel and copper-nickel sulphides and disposes of waste rock in a rock dump. Surface water samples were taken at 11 points selected from a stream which drains the rock dump, a stream carrying underground water and the river into which these streams discharge. Samples were analysed for metals using atomic absorption spectrometry, for sulphates by gravitation and for carbonates and bicarbonates by back titration. Ninteen rock samples were collected from the dump and static tests were performed using the Sobek acid base accounting method. The results show that near neutral runoff (pH 7.0-8.5) with high concentrations of sulphate (over 100 mg/L) and some metals (Pb > 1.0 mg/L and Ni > 0.2 mg/L) emanates from the dump. This suggests that acid mine drainage is buffered in the dump (probably by carbonates). This is supported by the static tests, which show that the fine fraction of dump material neutralises acid. Runoff from the dump flows into a pond. Concentrations of sulphates and metals decrease after the dump runoff enters the pond, but sufficient remains to increase levels of calcium, sulphate, bicarbonate, iron and lead in the Pote River. The drop in concentrations at the pond indicates that the settling process has a positive effect on water quality. This could be enhanced by treating the pond water to raise pH, thus precipitating out metals and decreasing their concentrations in water draining from the pond.

  3. Apollo 16 rocks - Petrology and classification.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilshire, H. G.; Stuart-Alexander, D. E.; Jackson, E. D.

    1973-01-01

    The Apollo 16 rocks are classified in three broad intergradational groups: (1) crystalline rocks, subdivided into igneous rocks and metaclastic rocks, (2) glass, and (3) breccias, which are subdivided into five groups on the basis of clast and matrix colors. Most of the rocks were derived by impact brecciation of an anorthosite-norite suite but may represent ejecta from more than one major basin. First-cycle breccias are believed to have consisted of clasts of crushed anorthosite-norite in a fine-grained partly fused matrix with a chemical composition similar to that of the clasts. Most of the other recognized breccia types could have been produced by rebrecciation of first-cycle breccias.

  4. Intraplate magmatism related to opening of the southern Iapetus Ocean: Cambrian Wichita igneous province in the Southern Oklahoma rift zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Richard E.; Puckett, Robert E.; Keller, G. Randy; Brueseke, Matthew E.; Bulen, Casey L.; Mertzman, Stanley A.; Finegan, Shane A.; McCleery, David A.

    2013-08-01

    Southern Oklahoma and adjacent parts of Texas contain an extensive igneous province emplaced during Early Cambrian rifting within the Southern Oklahoma rift zone. The rift zone was initiated in association with the opening of the southern Iapetus Ocean during Rodinia supercontinent breakup and later became the site of a series of linked uplifts and basins as a result of late Paleozoic inversion. Igneous rocks within the rift are referred to as the Wichita province and are present mostly in the subsurface, although critical exposures occur in the Wichita and Arbuckle Mountains in southwestern and southern Oklahoma. Wells drilled into basement in the region provide a wealth of information on the distribution and relations of the major igneous units in the upper crust, and geophysical data provide important constraints on deeper levels of the rift zone. The upper parts of the igneous rift fill comprise the Carlton Rhyolite Group, which has an estimated subsurface areal extent of ~ 40,000 km2, and the related Wichita sheet granites, which intrude the lower parts of the rhyolite succession. These rocks have A-type characteristics and were emplaced after intrusion, tilting and uplift of a large tholeiitic layered mafic complex; smaller bodies of gabbro also intruded the layered complex after it was tilted. U-Pb zircon and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology indicates the felsic rocks and at least some of the mafic units were emplaced in a relatively narrow time frame at ~ 539-530 Ma. Basalts and intermediate lavas are present only in the subsurface. Our new work shows these lavas to have tholeiitic to mildly alkaline compositions and to be more extensive than previously realized, forming thick successions that both underlie and are intercalated with the rhyolites. Diabase dikes were intruded into older crust during initial opening of the rift, and a suite of late diabase intrusions also cuts the rhyolites and granites, indicating that mafic magma was supplied to the rift throughout

  5. Building the EarthChem System for Advanced Data Management in Igneous Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, K.; Walker, J. D.; Carlson, R. W.; Hofmann, A. W.; Sarbas, B.

    2004-12-01

    Several mature databases of geochemical analyses for igneous rocks are now available over the Internet. The existence of these databases has revolutionized access to data for researchers and students allowing them to extract data sets customized to their specific problem from global data compilations with their desktop computer within a few minutes. Three of the database efforts - PetDB, GEOROC, and NAVDAT - have initiated a collaborative effort called EarthChem to create better and more advanced and integrated data management for igneous geochemistry. The EarthChem web site (http://www.earthchem.org/) serves as a portal to the three databases and information related to EarthChem activities. EarthChem participants agreed to establish a dialog to minimize duplication of effort and share useful tools and approaches. To initiate this dialog, a workshop was run by EarthChem in October, 2003 to discuss cyberinfrastructure needs in igneous geochemistry (workshop report available at the EarthChem site). EarthChem ran an information booth with database and visualization demonstrations at the Fall 2003 AGU meeting (and will have one in 2004) and participated in the May 2003 GERM meeting in Lyon, France where we provided the newly established Publishers' Round Table a list of minimum standards of data reporting to ease the assimilation of data into the databases. Aspects of these suggestions already have been incorporated into new data policies at Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta and Chemical Geology (Goldstein et al. 2004), and are under study by the Geological Society of America. EarthChem presented its objectives and activities to the Solid Earth Sciences community at the Annual GSA Meeting 2003 (Lehnert et al, 2003). Future plans for EarthChem include expanding the types and amounts of data available from a single portal, giving researchers, faculty, students, and the general public the ability to search, visualize, and download geochemical and geochronological data for a

  6. Rocks Are Boring--Aren't They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lievesley, Tara

    2014-01-01

    The new English Curriculum requiring not only the study of sedimentary and igneous rocks but also understanding of fossil formation, is a great opportunity to make this one of the most exciting units any science teacher can present. When an animal or plant dies, it "disappears" completely as it is degraded by a range of organisms. It may…

  7. The Paleoproterozoic Singo granite in south-central Uganda revealed as a nested igneous ring complex using geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsalam, Mohamed G.; Katumwehe, Andrew B.; Atekwana, Estella A.; Le Pera, Alan K.; Achang, Mercy

    2016-04-01

    We used high-resolution airborne magnetic and radiometric data and satellite gravity data to investigate the form of occurrence of the Paleoproterozoic Singo granite in west-central Uganda. This granitic body covers an area of ∼700 km2, intrudes Paleoproterozoic crystalline rocks and overlain by Paleoproterozoic-Mesoproterozoic sedimentary rocks, both of which belong to the Rwenzori terrane, and it is host to hydrothermally-formed economic minerals such as gold and tungsten. Our analysis provided unprecedented geometrical details of the granitic body and revealed the following: (1) the margins of the Singo granite are characterized by a higher magnetic signature compared to the interior of the granitic body as well as the surroundings. These anomalies are apparent in both the total magnetic field and horizontal derivative images and define eight overlapping ring features. (2) the depth continuation of these magnetic anomalies define outward but steeply-dipping features as indicated by the tilt images extracted from the airborne magnetic data. This is further supported by forward modeling of the magnetic and gravity data. (3) the Singo granite is characterized by relatively high and evenly-distributed equivalent concentration of Uranium (eU) and Thorium (eTh) compared to the surroundings and this is apparent in the Potassium (K)-eTh-eU radiometric ternary image. (4) the granitic body is defined by a gravity low anomaly that persisted to a depth of three km as shown by the Bouguer anomaly image and its five km upward continuation. We used these observations to identify this granitic body as a nested igneous ring complex and we refer to it as the Singo Igneous Ring Complex (SIRC). We further interpreted the eight ring structures as individual igneous ring complexes aligned in an E-W and NE-SW direction and these were developed due to repeated calderas collapse. Additionally, we interpreted the ring-shaped magnetic anomalies as due to hydrothermally-altered margins

  8. Experiments and Spectral Studies of Martian Volcanic Rocks: Implications for the Origin of Pathfinder Rocks and Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, Malcolm J.; Mustard, Jack; Weitz, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    The composition and spectral properties of the Mars Pathfinder rocks and soils together with the identification of basaltic and andesitic Mars terrains based on Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data raised interesting questions regarding the nature and origin of Mars surface rocks. We have investigated the following questions: (1) are the Pathfinder rocks igneous and is it possible these rocks could have formed by known igneous processes, such as equilibrium or fractional crystallization, operating within SNC magmas known to exist on Mars? If it is possible, what P (depth) and PH2O conditions are required? (2) whether TES-based interpretations of plagioclase-rich basalt and andesitic terrains in the south and north regions of Mars respectively are unique. Are the surface compositions of these regions plagioclase-rich, possibly indicating the presence of old AI-rich crust of Mars, or are the spectra being affected by something like surface weathering processes that might determine the spectral pyroxene to plagioclase ratio?

  9. Igneous fractionation and subsolidus equilibration of diogenite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Diogenites are coarse-grained orthopyroxenite breccias of remarkably uniform major element composition. Most diogenites contain homogeneous pyroxene fragments up to 5 cm across of Wo2En74Fs24 composition. Common minor constituents are chromite, olivine, trolite and metal, while silica, plagioclase, merrillite and diopside are trace phases. Diogenites are generally believed to be cumulates from the eucrite parent body, although their relationship with eucrites remains obscure. It has been suggested that some diogenites are residues after partial melting. I have performed EMPA and INAA for major, minor and trace elements on most diogenites, concentrating on coarse-grained mineral and lithic clasts in order to elucidate their igneous formation and subsequent metamorphic history. Major element compositions of diogenites are decoupled from minor and trace element compositions; the latter record an igneous fractionation sequence that is not preserved in the former. Low equilibration temperatures indicate that major element diffusion continued long after crystallization. Diffusion coefficients for trivalent and tetravalent elements in pyroxene are lower than those of divalent elements. Therefore, major element compositions of diogenites may represent means of unknown portions of a cumulate homogenized by diffusion, while minor and trace elements still yield information on their igneous history. The scale of major element equilibration is unknown, but is likely to be on the order of a few cm. Therefore, the diogenite precursors may have consisted largely of cm-sized, igneously zoned orthopyroxene grains, which were subsequently annealed during slow cooling, obliterating major element zoning but preserving minor and trace incompatible element zoning.

  10. The Formation of Igneous CAIs and Chondrules by Impacts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Harold C., Jr.; Love, Stanley G.

    2001-01-01

    Numerous challenges exist with forming the igneous spheres found within chondrites via collision events in the early solar nebula. We explore these challenges and discuss potential methods to overcome them. Collision models should be received cautiously. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Brushed Target on Rock 'Champagne' in Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this microscopic image of a target called 'Bubbles' on a rock called 'Champagne' after using its rock abrasion tool to brush away a coating of dust. The circular brushed area is about 5 centimeters (2 inches) across. This rock is different from rocks out on the plains of Gusev Crater but is similar to other rocks in this area of the 'Columbia Hills' in that it has higher levels of phosphorus. Plagioclase, a mineral commonly found in igneous rocks, is also present in these rocks, according to analysis with the minature thermal emission spectrometer. By using the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer to collect data over multiple martian days, or sols, scientists are also beginning to get measurements of trace elements in these rocks. Spirit took the images that are combined into this mosaic on sol 354 (Dec. 30, 2004).

  12. Significant Enrichment of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFAs) in the Lipids Extracted by Supercritical CO2 from the Livers of Australian Rock Lobsters (Jasus edwardsii).

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trung T; Zhang, Wei; Barber, Andrew R; Su, Peng; He, Shan

    2015-05-13

    Australian rock lobster (Jasus edwardsii) liver contains approximately 24.3% (w/w) lipids, which can contain a high amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). However, this material has been found to be contaminated with arsenic (240 mg/kg) and cadmium (8 mg/kg). The high level of contaminants in the raw material and the large amount of PUFAs in the lipids prove a significant challenge in the extraction of high-quality lipids from this byproduct by conventional methods. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) extraction is a highly promising technology for lipid extraction with advantages including low contamination and low oxidation. The technique was optimized to achieve nearly 94% extraction of lipids relative to conventional Soxhlet extraction in Australian rock lobster liver at conditions of 35 MPa and 50 °C for 4 h. The extracted lipids are significantly enriched in PUFAs at 31.3% of total lipids, 4 times higher than those in the lipids recovered by Soxhlet extraction (7.8%). Specifically, the concentrations of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in SC-CO2 extraction are 7 times higher than those obtained by Soxhlet extraction. Moreover, very small amounts of toxic heavy metals such as lead (Pb), arsenic (As), mercury (Hg), and cadmium (Cd) were detected in the SC-CO2-extracted lipids, 0.5-27 times lower than those in the Soxhlet-extracted lipids, which are 40-200 times lower than the regulatory limit maximum values. The low levels of contaminants and the high proportion of PUFAs (dominated by DHA and EPA) found in the SC-CO2-extracted lipids from Australian rock lobster liver suggest that the material could potentially be used as a valuable source of essential fatty acids for human consumption. PMID:25905456

  13. Igneous Petrogenesis of Tequila Volcano, Western Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Duarte, A.; Gómez-Tuena, A.; Díaz-Bravo, B.

    2011-12-01

    Tequila volcano belongs to a Quaternary volcanic chain that runs in parallel to the Middle American Trench, but that have been constructed within the so-called Tepic-Zacoalco rift: an extensional tectonic structure that has been active for the past 3.5 Ma. This unusual tectonic setting, and the existence of a high-resolution stratigraphy for the Tequila Volcanic Field (Lewis-Kenedi, 2005, Bull Volcanol), provide an excellent opportunity to study andesite petrogenesis. New comprehensive geochemical data allow the recognition of at least four different magmatic series around Tequila: 1) The Santa Rosa intraplate basalts (1.0 - 0.2 Ma), a volcanic plateau constructed along the Santiago River Fault north of Tequila volcano. These Na-alkaline basalts are olivine-phyric, have negligible subduction signatures (Ba/Nb= 11.75 - 49.36), and display Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions that correlate with fractionation indexes, probably indicating melt-crust interactions. 2) A group of vitreous domes and flows of dacitic to rhyolitic compositions, mostly contemporaneous to the Santa Rosa basalts, that were emplaced on the periphery of Tequila volcano. These rocks can have very low Sr and Eu contents but their isotopic compositions are remarkably constant and similar to the Santa Rosa basalts, probably indicating a genetic link through low pressure fractionation in the stability field of plagioclase. 3) The main edifice of Tequila volcano (~0.2 Ma) is made of two pyroxene andesites and dacites with strong subduction signatures (Ba/Nb= 53-112), that inversely correlate with MgO contents, but that follow a diverging evolutionary trend as the rest of the sequences. The isotopic compositions of Tequila main edifice can extend to slightly more enriched values, but do not correlate with fractionation indexes, thus indicating provenance from a different source. 4) The youngest activity on Tequila volcano (~0.09 Ma) is represented by amphibole bearing andesites that erupted through the

  14. Pollack Crater's White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    has a higher spatial resolution that enables CRISM to see smaller exposures of these minerals, if they occur. If White Rock is an evaporative lacustrine or lake deposit, CRISM has the best chance of detecting telltale mineralogical signatures. The images above reveal what CRISM found.

    The top panel in the montage above shows the location of the CRISM image on a mosaic of Pollack Crater taken by the Mars Odyssey spacecraft's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS). White Rock actually appears dark in the THEMIS mosaic due to a low daytime temperature, because its light color leads to less heating by the Sun. The middle-left image is an infrared, false color image that reveals White Rock's reddish hue. The middle-right image shows the signatures of different minerals that are present. CRISM found that White Rock is composed of accumulated dust perhaps with some fine-grained olivine (an igneous mineral), surrounded by basaltic sand containing olivine and dark-colored pyroxene. The lower two images were constructed by draping CRISM images over topography and exaggerating the vertical scale to better illustrate White Rock's topography. White Rock still appears not to contain evaporite, but instead to be composed of accumulated dust and sand.

    CRISM is one of six science instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Led by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md., the CRISM team includes expertise from universities, government agencies and small businesses in the United States and abroad. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and the Mars Science Laboratory for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the orbiter.

  15. Igneous composition vaiations determined by ChemCam along Curiosity's traverse from Bradbury to Rocknest area at Gale crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, Violaine; MSL Science Team

    2013-04-01

    Since landing in Gale Crater (-4.59, 137,44°) the rover Curiosity, has driven during the first 90 sols, 420 meter east descending ∼ 20m from the Bradbury Landing site towards Glenelg. From sols 13 on, the ChemCam instrument suite performed compositional and imaging analyses of rocks and soils along the route. Each Chem- Cam LIBS observations covers a spot between 350 and 550 μm dia thus individual observations generally do not represent the whole rock composition but rather represent individual grains or a mixture thereof. Most of observations consist of a linear 5-point raster or a 3 x 3 grid. All major elements were regularly reported together with minor and trace elements. During the traverse, two distinct zones have been characterized: Zone I, from sol 0 to sol 47 (i.e. 280 meter traverse), belongs to the Humocky terrains supposed to be a part of the alluvial fan below Peace Vallis, which descends from the crater rim to the Northwest. It is defined by abundant gravels and igneous float rocks and isolated conglomerate outcrops. Rock textures indicate a high ratio of intrusive over extrusive: plutonic rocks vary from homogenous grain size either coarse (1-3mm grains Mara) or fine grained (less than 300 m Coronation) to variable grain size within a given rock (Jake-M). Some contain abundant laths of whitish minerals. ChemCam analyses are Si-rich (up to 60% wt.% or more) together with high Al (more than 15%) and high alkali (Na > K) in a range expected for alkali feldspar compositions. The lowest Si content correlates with low Al and high Fe consistent with ferromagnesian composition. The highest Si content (Stark a white vesicular rock) could indicate the presence of quartz. Clasts analyzed in one conglomerate (Link) had a range of compositions dominated by feldspathic material consistent with loose pebbles in the area and igneous porphyroblast. Beyond Anton soil (sol48), Curiosity entered zone II, transitional to a more distal unit with respect to the fan

  16. Supercontinents, Plate Tectonics, Large Igneous Provinces and Deep Mantle Heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torsvik, T. H.; Steinberger, B.; Burke, K.; Smethurst, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    The formation and break-up of supercontinents is a spectacular demonstration of the Earth's dynamic nature. Pangea, the best-documented supercontinent, formed at the end of the Palaeozoic era (320 Ma) and its dispersal, starting in the Early Jurassic (190 Ma), was preceded by and associated with widespread volcanic activity, much of which produced Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs), but whether any of the heat or material involved in the generation of LIP rocks comes from greater depths has remained controversial. Two antipodal Large Low Shear wave Velocity Provinces with centre of mass somewhat south of the equator (African and Pacific LLSVPs), isolated within the faster parts of the deep mantle dominate all global shear- wave tomography models. We have tested eight global models and two D" models: They all show that deep- plume sourced hotspots and most reconstructed LIPs for the last 300 million years project radially downwards to the core-mantle-boundary near the edges of the LLSVPs showing that the plumes that made those hotspots and LIPS came only from those plume generation zones. This is a robust result because it is observed in multiple reference frames, i.e. fixed/moving hotspot and palaeomagnetic frames, and in the latter case whether the effect of True Polar Wander (TPW) is considered or not. Our observations show that the LLSVPs must have remained essentially stable in their present position for the last 300 million years. LIPs have erupted since the Archean and may all have been derived from the margins of LLSVPs but whether the African and Pacific LLSVPs have remained the same throughout Earth's history is less certain although analogous structures on Mars do indicate long-term stability on that planet. Deep mantle heterogeneities and the geoid have remained very stable for the last 300 million years, and the possibility is therefore open for speculating on links to Pangea assembly. In a numerical model, Zhong et al. (2007, EPSL) argued that Pangea

  17. Kilbuck terrane: Oldest known rocks in Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Box, S.E. ); Moll-Stalcup, E.J.; Wooden, J.L. ); Bradshaw, J.Y. )

    1990-12-01

    The Kilbuck terrane in southwestern Alaska is a narrow, thin crustal sliver or flake of amphibolite facies orthogneiss. The igneous protolith of this gneiss was a suite of subduction-related plutonic rocks. U-Pb data on zircons from trondhjemitic and granitic samples yield upper-intercept (igneous) ages of 2,070 {plus minus}16 and 2,040 {plus minus}74 Ma, respectively. Nd isotope data from these rocks suggest that a diorite-tonalite-trondhjemite suite ({epsilon}{sub Nd}(T) = +2.1 to +2.7; T is time of crystallization) evolved from partial melts of depleted mantle with no discernible contamination by older crust, whereas a coeval granitic pluton ({epsilon}{sub Nd}(T) = {minus}5.7) contains a significant component derived from Archean crust. Orthogneisses with similar age and Nd isotope characteristics are found in the Idono complex 250 km to the north. Early Proterozoic rocks are unknown elsewhere in Alaska. However, Phanerozoic plutons cutting several continental terranes in Alaska (southern Brooks Range and Ruby, Seward, and Yukon-Tanana terranes) have Nd isotope compositions indicative of Early Proterozoic (or older) crustal components that could be correlative with rocks of the Kilbuck terrane. Rocks with similar igneous ages in cratonal North America are rare, and those few that are known have Nd isotope compositions distinct from those of the Kilbuck terrane. Conversely, provinces with Nd model ages of 2.0-2.1 Ga are characterized by extensive 1.8 Ga or younger plutonism, which is unknown in the Kilbuck terrane. At present the case for a North American parentage of the Kilbuck terrane is not compelling. The possibility that the Kilbuck terrane was displaced from provinces of similar age in other cratons (e.g., Australian, Baltic, Guiana, and west African shields), or from the poorly dated Siberian craton, cannot be excluded.

  18. A chemical model for lunar non-mare rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, N. J.; Rhodes, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Nearly all rocks returned from the moon are readily divided into three broad categories on the basis of their chemical compositions: (1) mare basalts, (2) non-mare rocks of basaltic composition (KREEP, VHA), and (3) anorthositic rocks. Only mare basalts may unambiguously be considered to have original igneous textures and are widely understood to have an igneous origin. Nearly all other lunar rocks have lost their original textures during metamorphic and impact processes. For these rocks one must work primarily with chemical data in order to recognize and define rock groups and their possible modes of origin. Non-mare rocks of basaltic composition have chemical compositions consistent with an origin by partial melting of the lunar interior. The simplest origin for rocks of anorthositic chemical composition is the crystallization and removal of ferromagnesian minerals. It is proposed that the rock groups of anorthositic and non-mare basaltic chemical composition could have been generated from a single series of original, but not necessarily primitive, lunar materials.

  19. A chemical model for lunar non-mare rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, N. J.; Rhodes, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Nearly all rocks returned from the moon are readily divided into three broad categories on the basis of their chemical compositions: (1) mare basalts, (2) non-mare rocks of basaltic composition (KREEP, VHA), and (3) anorthositic rocks. Only mare basalts may unambiguously be considered to have original igneous textures and are widely understood to have an igneous origin. Nearly all other lunar rocks have lost their original textures during metamorphic and impact processes. It is shown that for these rocks one must work primarily with chemical data in order to recognize and define rock groups and their possible modes of origin. Non-mare rocks of basaltic composition have chemical compositions consistent with an origin by partial melting of the lunar interior. The simplest origin for rocks of anorthositic chemical composition is the crystallization and removal of ferromagnesian minerals. It is proposed that the rock groups of anorthositic and non-mare basaltic chemical composition could have been generated from a single series of original but not necessarily primitive lunar materials.

  20. Petrological modeling of basaltic rocks from Venus: A case for the presence of silicic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, J. Gregory

    2013-06-01

    presence of highly evolved igneous rocks on Venus is a controversial issue. The formations of highland terranes and pancake domes are the two principal tectonic and volcanic features which argue in favor of the presence of silicic igneous rocks; however, the lack of water on Venus casts doubt on whether or not granites and rhyolites can form. Data returned to Earth from the Venera 13 and 14 landers show that the surface of Venus is composed of basaltic rocks similar in composition to those found on Earth. Here it is shown that anhydrous and hydrous fractional crystallization modeling using the Venera 13 and 14 data as starting materials can produce compositions similar to terrestrial phonolites and rhyolites. It is suggested that at shallow crustal levels (i.e., ≤ 0.1 GPa), mafic magmas can differentiate into silicic magmas resembling phonolites or rhyolites which may or may not erupt. Furthermore, the hydrous equilibrium partial melting models can produce rocks similar to terrestrial andesites and rhyolites, whereas anhydrous models suggest that there may be a uniquely Venusian type of silicic rock. The silicic rocks, if present, could act as "continental nucleation" sites and/or their presence may facilitate preferential sites of shearing and deformation of the Venusian crust.

  1. Petrological modeling of basaltic rocks from Venus: a case for the presence of silicic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, J. G.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of highly evolved igneous rocks on Venus is debated. The formation of highland terranes and pancake domes are the two principle tectonic and volcanic features which argue in favor of the presence of silicic igneous rocks; however, the lack of water on Venus casts doubt on whether or not granites and rhyolites can form. Data returned to Earth from the Venera 13 and 14 landers show that the surface of Venus is comprised of basaltic rocks similar in composition to those found on Earth. Here is it shown that anhydrous and hydrous fractional crystallization modeling using the Venera 13 and 14 data as starting materials can produce compositions similar to terrestrial phonolites and rhyolites. It is suggested that at shallow crustal levels (i.e. ≤ 0.1 GPa) mafic magmas can differentiate into silicic magmas resembling phonolites or rhyolites which may or may not erupt. Furthermore, the hydrous equilibrium partial melting models can produce rocks similar to terrestrial andesites and rhyolites whereas anhydrous models suggest there may be a uniquely Venusian type of silicic rock. The silicic rocks, if present, could act as ';continental nucleation' sites and/or their presence may facilitate preferential sites of shearing and deformation of the Venusian crust.

  2. Late Permian-Early Triassic igneous activity in the Attic Cycladic Belt (Attica): New geochronological data and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liati, Anthi; Skarpelis, Nikolaos; Fanning, C. Mark

    2013-06-01

    Igneous rocks of the Attic Cycladic Belt (ACB) formed prior to the Alpine orogeny have received relatively little attention, especially regarding their crystallisation age. New U-Pb SHRIMP zircon data from mylonitised metagranitoid rocks within metapelites and metabasites of the Pentelikon mountain, lower tectonic unit (LTU) of Attica, in combination with internal zircon characteristics reveal the following: the metagranitoid precursor was very likely an I-type pluton crystallising in two successive stages, at 255 ± 3 Ma and 246 ± 2 Ma (weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages; error at 95% c.l.). These age results are respectively marginally older than and within uncertainty of the 240 ± 4 Ma protolith age reported for metagranitoids of the same unit in the area of Lavrion, Attica. They are in line with the protolith ages of several meta-igneous rocks within the Cycladic Blueschist Unit of Aegean islands. One core zircon domain and one single zircon grain yielded 206Pb/238U ages of 311 ± 3 Ma and 318 ± 4 Ma (1σ errors), providing evidence for inheritance from a previous Hercynian event. The new data, whilst interpreted to favour a rift-related geotectonic setting of f