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Sample records for acid induced lipid

  1. Amino acid- and lipid-induced insulin resistance in rat heart: molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Terruzzi, Ileana; Allibardi, Sonia; Bendinelli, Paola; Maroni, Paola; Piccoletti, Roberta; Vesco, Flavio; Samaja, Michele; Luzi, Livio

    2002-04-25

    Lipids compete with glucose for utilization by the myocardium. Amino acids are an important energetic substrate in the heart but it is unknown whether they reduce glucose disposal. The molecular mechanisms by which lipids and amino acids impair insulin-mediated glucose disposal in the myocardium are unknown. We evaluated the effect of lipids and amino acids on the insulin stimulated glucose uptake in the isolated rat heart and explored the involved target proteins. The hearts were perfused with 16 mM glucose alone or with 6% lipid or 10% amino acid solutions at the rate of 15 ml/min. After 1 h of perfusion (basal period), insulin (240 nmol/l) was added and maintained for an additional hour. Both lipids and amino acids blocked the insulin effect on glucose uptake (P<0.01) and reduced the activity of the IRSs/PI 3-kinase/Akt/GSK3 axis leading to the activation of glucose transport and glycogen synthesis. Amino acids, but not lipids, increased the activity of the p70 S6 kinase leading to the stimulation of protein synthesis. Amino acids induce myocardial insulin resistance recruiting the same molecular mechanisms as lipids. Amino acids retain an insulin-like stimulatory effect on p70 S6 kinase, which is independent from the PI 3-Kinase downstream effectors.

  2. Protective effect of phytic acid hydrolysis products on iron-induced lipid peroxidation of liposomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, S; Kuwata, G; Imai, M; Nagao, A; Terao, J

    2000-12-01

    Beneficial effects of dietary phytic acid (myo-inositol hexaphosphate; IP6) have often been explained by its strong iron ion-chelating ability, which possibly suppresses iron ion-induced oxidative damage in the gastrointestinal tract. Because phytic acid is hydrolyzed during digestion, this work aimed to know whether its hydrolysis products (IP2, IP3, IP4, and IP5) could still prevent iron ion-induced lipid peroxidation. Studies using liposomal membranes demonstrated that hydrolysis products containing three or more phosphate groups are able to inhibit iron ion-induced lipid peroxidation although their effectiveness decreased with dephosphorylation. Similarly, they also prevented iron ion-induced decomposition of phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide. These results demonstrate that intermediate products of phytic acid hydrolysis still possess iron ion-chelating ability, and thus they can probably prevent iron ion-induced lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  3. Dietary linoleic acid-induced alterations in pro- and anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Amit; Majchrzak-Hong, Sharon F; Yang, Jun; Blanchard, Helene; Zamora, Daisy; Loewke, James D; Rapoport, Stanley I; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Davis, John M; Hammock, Bruce D; Taha, Ameer Y

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic idiopathic pain syndromes are major causes of personal suffering, disability, and societal expense. Dietary n-6 linoleic acid has increased markedly in modern industrialized populations over the past century. These high amounts of linoleic acid could hypothetically predispose to physical pain by increasing the production of pro-nociceptive linoleic acid-derived lipid autacoids and by interfering with the production of anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids derived from n-3 fatty acids. Here, we used a rat model to determine the effect of increasing dietary linoleic acid as a controlled variable for 15 weeks on nociceptive lipid autacoids and their precursor n-6 and n-3 fatty acids in tissues associated with idiopathic pain syndromes. Results Increasing dietary linoleic acid markedly increased the abundance of linoleic acid and its pro-nociceptive derivatives and reduced the abundance of n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid and their anti-nociceptive monoepoxide derivatives. Diet-induced changes occurred in a tissue-specific manner, with marked alterations of nociceptive lipid autacoids in both peripheral and central tissues, and the most pronounced changes in their fatty acid precursors in peripheral tissues. Conclusions The present findings provide biochemical support for the hypothesis that the high linoleic acid content of modern industrialized diets may create a biochemical susceptibility to develop chronic pain. Dietary linoleic acid lowering should be further investigated as part of an integrative strategy for the prevention and management of idiopathic pain syndromes. PMID:27030719

  4. Sasa quelpaertensis and p-coumaric acid attenuate oleic acid-induced lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kang, Seong-Il; Shin, Hye-Sun; Yoon, Seon-A; Kang, Seung-Woo; Ko, Hee-Chul; Kim, Se-Jae

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of Jeju dwarf bamboo (Sasa quelpaertensis Nakai) extract (JBE) and p-coumaric acid (CA) on oleic acid (OA)-induced lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells. JBE and CA increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and the expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1a (CPT1a) in OA-treated HepG2 cells. Additionally, these compounds decreased sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and OA-induced lipid accumulation, suggesting that JBE and CA modulate lipid metabolism in HepG2 cells via the AMPK activation pathway.

  5. Lipid Rafts Promote trans Fatty Acid-Induced Inflammation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yao; Liu, Benxin; Deng, Zeyuan; Fan, Yawei; Li, Jing; Li, Hongyan

    2017-01-01

    The effects of two fatty acids, oleic acid (OLA) and elaidic acid (ELA) on normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and non-rafts HUVEC were investigated in this study. The expression levels of inflammatory cytokines (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and IL-6) were analyzed. Western blot was used to analyze the expression levels of inflammation-related proteins (NF-κB, ERK1/2) and toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The results showed that the levels of nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 were significantly decreased only in non-lipid rafts cells pretreated with trans fatty acid (TFA). The expression of TLR4 in the ELA-treated normal cells was higher than that in non-lipid rafts HUVEC. When the lipid rafts was destroyed by methyl-β-cyclodextrin, the levels of nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65, phosphorylated ERK1/2 and TLR4 were decreased significantly. Therefore, lipid rafts may be involved in TFA induced-inflammation in HUVEC through blocking the inflammatory signal pathway. Lipid rafts might be a platform for specific receptors such as TLR4 for TFA to activate the pro-inflammation on cell membranes.

  6. Rutin inhibits oleic acid induced lipid accumulation via reducing lipogenesis and oxidative stress in hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Lin, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Hsueh-Chun; Yang, Mon-Yuan; Jou, Ming-Jia; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2011-03-01

    Excessive lipid accumulation within liver has been proposed to cause obesity, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and fatty liver disease. Rutin, a common dietary flavonoid that is consumed in fruits, vegetables, and plant-derived beverages, has various biological functions, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects. However, a hypolipidemic effect of rutin on fatty liver disease has not been reported. In this study, we examined the effect of rutin on reducing lipid accumulation in hepatic cells. Hepatocytes were treated with oleic acid (OA) containing with or without rutin to observe the lipid accumulation by Nile red stain. The result showed rutin suppressed OA-induced lipid accumulation and increased adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in hepatocytes. The expression of critical molecule involved in lipid synthesis, sterol regulatory element binding proteins-1 (SREBP-1), was attenuated in rutin-treated cells. Moreover, long-term incubation of rutin inhibited the transcriptions of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (HMGCR), glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-coenzyme carboxylase (ACC). Besides, we also found out the antioxidative effect of rutin by increasing the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α and antioxidative enzymes. Taken together, our findings suggest rutin could attenuate lipid accumulation by decreasing lipogenesis and oxidative stress in hepatocyte.

  7. Perfluorononanoic acid disturbed the metabolism of lipid in the liver of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xuemei; Gao, Guizhen; Zhang, Xingtao; Wang, Haichao

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on the liver toxicity of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are focused on healthy individuals, whereas the effects of PFCs on individuals with diabetes mellitus have not been fully characterized. This study aimed to investigate the acute exposure of perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) on the metabolism of lipid in the liver of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Male diabetic rats were orally dosed by gavage for 7 days with 0, 0.2, 1 and 5 mg/kg/day PFNA. The contents of lipid, the activities of enzyme, the expressions of protein in the liver and the serum parameters were detected. The results indicate that dose-dependent accumulation of triglyceride and total cholesterol occurred in the livers of diabetic rats after PFNA treatment. PFNA increased the activities of lipid synthetase, fatty acid synthease, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and decreased the activity of lipolytic enzyme, hepatic lipase, in the liver of diabetic rats. The changes of the isocitrate dehydrogenase, malicenzyme and lipoprotein lipase were not obvious. The expressions of protein related to lipid homeostasis, liver X receptor α and apolipoprotein E, were decreased after PFNA administration. Exposure to PFNA also increased the activity of serum alanine aminotransferase in diabetic rats. In conclusion, this study discloses that exposure to PFNA impacts on enzymes and proteins related to liver lipid metabolism and lead to obvious accumulation of lipid in the liver of diabetic rats, which may be responsible for hepatotoxicity of this compound in individuals with diabetes mellitus.

  8. Ferulic acid improves lipid and glucose homeostasis in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Naowaboot, Jarinyaporn; Piyabhan, Pritsana; Munkong, Narongsuk; Parklak, Wason; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan

    2016-02-01

    Ferulic acid (FA) is a plant phenolic acid that has several pharmacological effects including antihyperglycaemic activity. Thus, the objective of this study is to investigate the effect of FA on glucose and lipid metabolism in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) mice were fed a HFD (45 kcal% fat) for 16 weeks. At the ninth week of induction, the obese mice were orally administered with daily FA doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg for the next eight weeks. The results show that FA significantly reduced the elevated blood glucose and serum leptin levels, lowered the insulin resistance, and increased the serum adiponectin level. Moreover, serum lipid level, and liver cholesterol and triglyceride accumulations were also reduced. The histological examination showed clear evidence of a decrease in the lipid droplets in liver tissues and smaller size of fat cells in the adipose tissue in the obese mice treated with FA. Interestingly, FA reduced the expression of hepatic lipogenic genes such as sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). It could also up-regulate hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (CPT1a) gene and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) proteins. The FA treatment was also found to suppress the protein expressions of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). In conclusion, the findings of this study demonstrate that FA improves the glucose and lipid homeostasis in HFD-induced obese mice probably via modulating the expression of lipogenic and gluconeogenic genes in liver tissues.

  9. Palmitic acid induces central leptin resistance and impairs hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism in male mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Licai; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Wu, Yizhen; Wang, Hongqin; Camer, Danielle; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2015-05-01

    The consumption of diets rich in saturated fat largely contributes to the development of obesity in modern societies. A diet high in saturated fats can induce inflammation and impair leptin signaling in the hypothalamus. However, the role of saturated fatty acids on hypothalamic leptin signaling, and hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism remains largely undiscovered. In this study, we investigated the effects of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of a saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid (PA, C16:0), on central leptin sensitivity, hypothalamic leptin signaling, inflammatory molecules and hepatic energy metabolism in C57BL/6J male mice. We found that the icv administration of PA led to central leptin resistance, evidenced by the inhibition of central leptin's suppression of food intake. Central leptin resistance was concomitant with impaired hypothalamic leptin signaling (JAK2-STAT3, PKB/Akt-FOXO1) and a pro-inflammatory response (TNF-α, IL1-β, IL-6 and pIκBa) in the mediobasal hypothalamus and paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei. Furthermore, the pre-administration of icv PA blunted the effect of leptin-induced decreases in mRNA expression related to gluconeogenesis (G6Pase and PEPCK), glucose transportation (GLUT2) and lipogenesis (FAS and SCD1) in the liver of mice. Therefore, elevated central PA concentrations can induce pro-inflammatory responses and leptin resistance, which are associated with disorders of energy homeostasis in the liver as a result of diet-induced obesity.

  10. Investigation of heat induced reactions between lipid oxidation products and amino acids in lipid rich model systems and hazelnuts.

    PubMed

    Karademir, Yeşim; Göncüoğlu, Neslihan; Gökmen, Vural

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the contribution of lipid oxidation to non-enzymatic browning reactions in lipid rich model and actual food systems. Hazelnut oil and model reaction mixtures consisting of different amino acids were heated under certain conditions to determine possible lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reaction products. In model systems, the Schiff base of 2,4-decadienal, its decarboxylated form, and reaction products formed after hydrolytic cleavage of the Schiff base or decarboxylated form were identified by high resolution mass spectrometry. No furosine was detected in hazelnuts after roasting at 160 °C while the concentration of free amino acids significantly decreased. 2,4-Decadienal reacted effectively with all amino acids studied through a Maillard type carbonyl-amine condensation pathway. (2E,4E)-Deca-2,4-dien-1-amine was identified as a typical reaction product in model systems and roasted hazelnuts. In lipid-rich foods like hazelnuts, lipid-derived carbonyls might be responsible for potential modifications of free and protein bound amino acids during heating.

  11. Differential molecular regulation of bile acid homeostasis by soy lipid induced phytosterolemia and fish oil lipid emulsions in TPN-fed preterm pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prolonged total parenteral nutrition (PN) may lead to cholestasis and liver disease (PNALD). The soybean oil-based lipid emulsion (Intralipid) and its constituent phytosterols have been implicated in PNALD. Phytosterols may induce cholestasis by antagonism of the nuclear bile-acid receptor, FXR, lea...

  12. Protective effect of propofol against kainic acid-induced lipid peroxidation in mouse brain homogenates: comparison with trolox and melatonin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung; Jang, Young-Ho; Lee, Seong-Ryong

    2005-07-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of propofol with that of trolox and melatonin for reduction of lipid peroxidation in vitro. Lipid peroxidation was induced by addition of kainic acid (KA; 10 mM), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; 10 mM), or ferrous ammonium sulfate (5 microM) to mouse brain homogenate, and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS) were used as a marker of lipid peroxidation. Propofol, trolox, and melatonin reduced KA-, H2O2-, and ferrous ammonium sulfate-induced lipid peroxidation in a concentration-dependent manner. In reducing KA-induced lipid peroxidation, 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of antioxidants were as follows: propofol (11.33 mM), trolox (4.00 mM), and melatonin (9.72 mM). In reducing H2O2-induced lipid peroxidation, IC50 values of antioxidants were as follows: propofol (56.86 mM), trolox (33.34 mM), and melatonin (26.63 mM). In reducing ferrous ion-induced lipid peroxidation, IC50 values of antioxidants were as follows: propofol (49.57 mM), trolox (60.35 mM), and melatonin (22.02 mM). Under the in vitro conditions of this experiment, propofol was an excellent and a very potent antioxidant in inhibiting KA-, H2O2-, and ferrous ion-induced lipid peroxidation in mouse brain homogenates. We conclude that the antioxidant properties of propofol at clinically relevant anesthetic concentrations may have a neuroprotective effect.

  13. NADPH- and linoleic acid hydroperoxide-induced lipid peroxidation and destruction of cytochrome P-450 in hepatic microsomes.

    PubMed

    Iba, M M; Mannering, G J

    1987-05-01

    Temporal aspects of the effects of inhibitors on hepatic cytochrome P-450 destruction and lipid peroxidation induced by NADPH and linoleic acid hydroperoxide (LAHP) were compared. In the absence of added Fe2+, NADPH-induced lipid peroxidation in hepatic microsomes exhibited a slow phase followed by a fast phase. The addition of Fe2+ eliminated the slow phase, thus demonstrating that iron is a rate-limiting component in the reaction. EDTA, which complexes iron, and p-chloromercurobenzoate (pCMB), which inhibits NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase, inhibited both phases of the reaction. Catalase as well as scavengers of hydroxyl radical, inhibited NADPH-induced lipid peroxidation almost completely. GSH also inhibited the NADPH-dependent reaction but only when added at the beginning of the reaction. In contrast with NADPH-dependent lipid peroxidation, the autocatalytic reaction induced by LAHP was not biphasic, NADPH-dependent or iron-dependent, nor was it inhibited by hydroxyl radical scavengers, catalase or GSH. A synergistic effect on lipid peroxidation was observed when both NADPH and LAHP were added to microsomes. It is concluded that both the fast and slow phases of NADPH-dependent microsomal lipid peroxidation are catalyzed enzymatically and are dependent upon Fe2+, whereas LAHP-dependent lipid peroxidation is autocatalytic. Since the fast phase of enzymatic lipid peroxidation occurred during the fast phase of destruction of cytochrome P-450, it is postulated that iron made available from cytochrome P-450 is sufficient to promote optimal lipid peroxidation. Since catalase and hydroxyl radical scavengers inhibited NADPH-dependent but not LAHP-dependent lipid peroxidation, it is concluded that the hydroxyl radical derived from H2O2 is the initiating active-oxygen species in the enzymatic reaction but not in the autocatalytic reaction.

  14. Reversible Nuclear-Lipid-Droplet Morphology Induced by Oleic Acid: A Link to Cellular-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lagrutta, Lucía C.; Montero-Villegas, Sandra; Layerenza, Juan P.; Sisti, Martín S.; García de Bravo, Margarita M.

    2017-01-01

    Neutral lipids—involved in many cellular processes—are stored as lipid droplets (LD), those mainly cytosolic (cLD) along with a small nuclear population (nLD). nLD could be involved in nuclear-lipid homeostasis serving as an endonuclear buffering system that would provide or incorporate lipids and proteins involved in signalling pathways as transcription factors and as enzymes of lipid metabolism and nuclear processes. Our aim was to determine if nLD constituted a dynamic domain. Oleic-acid (OA) added to rat hepatocytes or HepG2 cells in culture produced cellular-phenotypic LD modifications: increases in TAG, CE, C, and PL content and in cLD and nLD numbers and sizes. LD increments were reversed on exclusion of OA and were prevented by inhibition of acyl-CoA synthetase (with Triacsin C) and thus lipid biosynthesis. Under all conditions, nLD corresponded to a small population (2–10%) of total cellular LD. The anabolism triggered by OA, involving morphologic and size changes within the cLD and nLD populations, was reversed by a net balance of catabolism, upon eliminating OA. These catabolic processes included lipolysis and the mobilization of hydrolyzed FA from the LD to cytosolic-oxidation sites. These results would imply that nLD are actively involved in nuclear processes that include lipids. In conclusion, nLD are a dynamic nuclear domain since they are modified by OA through a reversible mechanism in combination with cLD; this process involves acyl-CoA-synthetase activity; ongoing TAG, CE, and PL biosynthesis. Thus, liver nLD and cLD are both dynamic cellular organelles. PMID:28125673

  15. Acanthoic Acid Can Partially Prevent Alcohol Exposure-Induced Liver Lipid Deposition and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yao, You-Li; Han, Xin; Li, Zhi-Man; Lian, Li-Hua; Nan, Ji-Xing; Wu, Yan-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The present study aims to detect the effect of acanthoic acid (AA) on alcohol exposure-induced liver lipid deposition and inflammation, and to explore the mechanisms. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with single dose of AA (20 and 40 mg/kg) by oral gavage or equal volume of saline, and then exposed to three doses of ethanol (5 g/kg body weight, 25%, w/v) by gavage within 24 h. The mice were sacrificed at 6 h after the last ethanol dosing. Serum and hepatic indexes were detected by western blot, RT-PCR, and histopathological assay. AML-12 cells were pretreated with AA (5, 10, 20 μM), or AICAR (500 μM), GW3965 (1 μM), SRT1720 (6 μM), Nicotinamide (20 mM) for 2 h, respectively, and then following treated with EtOH (200 mM) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (10 ng/ml) for additional 48 h. Cell protein and mRNA were collected for western blot and RT-PCR. Cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) release were detected by ELISA assay. Results: It was found that AA significantly decreased acute ethanol-induced increasing of the serum ALT/AST, LDH, ALP levels, and hepatic and serum triglyceride levels, and reduced fat droplets accumulation in mice liver. AA significantly suppressed the levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1), cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1), IL-1β, and caspase-1 induced by ethanol. Furthermore, a significant decline of sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and liver X receptors (LXRs) levels was observed in EtOH group, compared with normal group mice. And AA pretreatment increased the Sirt1 and LXRs levels, and also ameliorated phosphorylation of liver kinase B-1 (LKB-1), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC) proteins, compared with EtOH group. However, the levels of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor -α or -γ (PPAR-α or PPAR-γ) induced by acute ethanol were reversed by AA. In EtOH/LPS cultivated AML-12 cells, AA decreased IL-1β and TNF-α levels, lipid

  16. Acanthoic Acid Can Partially Prevent Alcohol Exposure-Induced Liver Lipid Deposition and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, You-Li; Han, Xin; Li, Zhi-Man; Lian, Li-Hua; Nan, Ji-Xing; Wu, Yan-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The present study aims to detect the effect of acanthoic acid (AA) on alcohol exposure-induced liver lipid deposition and inflammation, and to explore the mechanisms. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with single dose of AA (20 and 40 mg/kg) by oral gavage or equal volume of saline, and then exposed to three doses of ethanol (5 g/kg body weight, 25%, w/v) by gavage within 24 h. The mice were sacrificed at 6 h after the last ethanol dosing. Serum and hepatic indexes were detected by western blot, RT-PCR, and histopathological assay. AML-12 cells were pretreated with AA (5, 10, 20 μM), or AICAR (500 μM), GW3965 (1 μM), SRT1720 (6 μM), Nicotinamide (20 mM) for 2 h, respectively, and then following treated with EtOH (200 mM) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (10 ng/ml) for additional 48 h. Cell protein and mRNA were collected for western blot and RT-PCR. Cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) release were detected by ELISA assay. Results: It was found that AA significantly decreased acute ethanol-induced increasing of the serum ALT/AST, LDH, ALP levels, and hepatic and serum triglyceride levels, and reduced fat droplets accumulation in mice liver. AA significantly suppressed the levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1), cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1), IL-1β, and caspase-1 induced by ethanol. Furthermore, a significant decline of sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and liver X receptors (LXRs) levels was observed in EtOH group, compared with normal group mice. And AA pretreatment increased the Sirt1 and LXRs levels, and also ameliorated phosphorylation of liver kinase B-1 (LKB-1), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC) proteins, compared with EtOH group. However, the levels of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor -α or -γ (PPAR-α or PPAR-γ) induced by acute ethanol were reversed by AA. In EtOH/LPS cultivated AML-12 cells, AA decreased IL-1β and TNF-α levels, lipid

  17. β2-Microglobulin Amyloid Fibril-Induced Membrane Disruption Is Enhanced by Endosomal Lipids and Acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, Sophia C.; Sheynis, Tania; Thompson, Rebecca; Tipping, Kevin W.; Xue, Wei-Feng; Ranson, Neil A.; Beales, Paul A.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2014-01-01

    Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of amyloidoses are not well understood, the interaction between amyloid proteins and cell membranes is thought to play a role in several amyloid diseases. Amyloid fibrils of β2-microglobulin (β2m), associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA), have been shown to cause disruption of anionic lipid bilayers in vitro. However, the effect of lipid composition and the chemical environment in which β2m-lipid interactions occur have not been investigated previously. Here we examine membrane damage resulting from the interaction of β2m monomers and fibrils with lipid bilayers. Using dye release, tryptophan fluorescence quenching and fluorescence confocal microscopy assays we investigate the effect of anionic lipid composition and pH on the susceptibility of liposomes to fibril-induced membrane damage. We show that β2m fibril-induced membrane disruption is modulated by anionic lipid composition and is enhanced by acidic pH. Most strikingly, the greatest degree of membrane disruption is observed for liposomes containing bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) at acidic pH, conditions likely to reflect those encountered in the endocytic pathway. The results suggest that the interaction between β2m fibrils and membranes of endosomal origin may play a role in the molecular mechanism of β2m amyloid-associated osteoarticular tissue destruction in DRA. PMID:25100247

  18. Lipid dynamics in yeast under haem-induced unsaturated fatty acid and/or sterol depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Thierry; Régnacq, Matthieu; Alimardani, Parissa; Moreau-Vauzelle, Carole; Bergès, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, UFA (unsaturated fatty acids) and ergosterol syntheses are aerobic processes that require haem. We took advantage of a strain affected in haem synthesis ( hem1 Delta) to starve specifically for one or the other of these essential lipids in order to examine the consequences on the overall lipid composition. Our results demonstrate that reserve lipids (i.e. triacylglycerols and steryl esters) are depleted independently of haem availability and that their UFA and sterol content is not crucial to sustain residual growth under lipid depletion. In parallel to UFA starvation, a net accumulation of SFA (saturated fatty acids) is observed as a consequence of haem biosynthesis preclusion. Interestingly, the excess SFA are not mainly stored within triacylglycerols and steryl esters but rather within specific phospholipid species, with a marked preference for PtdIns. This results in an increase in the cellular PtdIns content. However, neutral lipid homoeostasis is perturbed under haem starvation. The contribution of two lipid particle-associated proteins (namely Tgl1p and Dga1p) to this process is described. PMID:14640980

  19. Gallic Acid Ameliorated Impaired Glucose and Lipid Homeostasis in High Fat Diet-Induced NAFLD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jung; Huo, Teh-Ia; Cheng, Hao-Yuan; Tsai, Jen-Chieh; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Qin, Xue-Mei; Hsieh, Ming-Tsuen; Pao, Li-Heng; Peng, Wen-Huang

    2014-01-01

    Gallic acid (GA), a naturally abundant plant phenolic compound in vegetables and fruits, has been shown to have potent anti-oxidative and anti-obesity activity. However, the effects of GA on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the beneficial effects of GA administration on nutritional hepatosteatosis model by a more “holistic view” approach, namely 1H NMR-based metabolomics, in order to prove efficacy and to obtain information that might lead to a better understanding of the mode of action of GA. Male C57BL/6 mice were placed for 16 weeks on either a normal chow diet, a high fat diet (HFD, 60%), or a high fat diet supplemented with GA (50 and 100 mg/kg/day, orally). Liver histopathology and serum biochemical examinations indicated that the daily administration of GA protects against hepatic steatosis, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, and insulin resistance among the HFD-induced NAFLD mice. In addition, partial least squares discriminant analysis scores plots demonstrated that the cluster of HFD fed mice is clearly separated from the normal group mice plots, indicating that the metabolic characteristics of these two groups are distinctively different. Specifically, the GA-treated mice are located closer to the normal group of mice, indicating that the HFD-induced disturbances to the metabolic profile were partially reversed by GA treatment. Our results show that the hepatoprotective effect of GA occurs in part through a reversing of the HFD caused disturbances to a range of metabolic pathways, including lipid metabolism, glucose metabolism (glycolysis and gluconeogenesis), amino acids metabolism, choline metabolism and gut-microbiota-associated metabolism. Taken together, this study suggested that a 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach is a useful platform for natural product functional evaluation. The selected metabolites are potentially useful as preventive action biomarkers and could also be used to help

  20. Wine lees modulate lipid metabolism and induce fatty acid remodelling in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Caro, M; Sansone, A; Amezaga, J; Navarro, V; Ferreri, C; Tueros, I

    2017-03-21

    This study investigates the ability of a polyphenolic extract obtained from a wine lees by-product to modulate zebrafish lipid metabolism. Lees from a Spanish winery were collected and the polyphenolic extract was chemically characterised in terms of antioxidant capacity, total phenolic content and the individual main phenolic compounds. The effects of the extract on lipid metabolism were evaluated using a zebrafish animal model. Lees are rich in polyphenols (42.33 mg gallic acid equivalent per g dry matter) with high antioxidant capacity (56.04 mg Trolox equivalent per g dry matter), rutin and quercetin being their main identified polyphenols. The biological effects of lees extract included (i) a reduction in zebrafish embryos' fat reserve (40%), (ii) changes in the expression of lipid metabolism key genes, (iii) remodelling of the fatty acid content in phospholipid and triglyceride fractions of zebrafish embryos and (iv) reduction in the trans fatty acid content. On the whole, wine lees polyphenolic extract was effective at modulating zebrafish lipid metabolism evidencing remodelling effects and antioxidant properties that can be further developed for food innovation.

  1. Visible Light-Induced Lipid Peroxidation of Unsaturated Fatty Acids in the Retina and the Inhibitory Effects of Blueberry Polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixiang; Zhang, Di; Hu, Jimei; Liu, Guangming; Chen, Jun; Sun, Lechang; Jiang, Zedong; Zhang, Xichun; Chen, Qingchou; Ji, Baoping

    2015-10-28

    The lipid peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) in the retina not only threatens visual cells but also affects the physiological health of the retina. In this work, the potential damages caused by daily visible light exposure on retinal UFAs were evaluated via a simulated in vitro model. At the same time, the benefits of dietary supplementation of blueberries to the eyes were also assessed. After prolonged light exposure, lipid peroxidation occurred for both docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids (DHA and AA, respectively). The oxidized UFAs presented obvious cytotoxicity and significantly inhibited cell growth in retinal pigment epithelium cells. Among the different blueberry polyphenol fractions, the flavonoid-rich fraction, in which quercetin was discovered as the main component, was considerably better in preventing visible light-induced DHA lipid peroxidation than the anthocyanin- and phenolic acid-rich fractions. Then the retinal protective activity of blueberry polyphenols against light-induced retinal injury was confirmed in vivo. On the basis of the above results, inhibiting lipid peroxidation of UFAs in the retina is proposed to be another important function mechanism for antioxidants to nourish eyes.

  2. Radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in whole grain of rye, wheat and rice: Effects on linoleic and linolenic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaca, C. E.; Harms-Ringdahl, M.

    Changes in the fatty acid composition in lipids after γ-irradation of whole grain of wheat, rye and rice were examined. The radiosensitivity of linoleic acid (18:2) and linolenic acid (18:3) was studied up to a dose of 63 kGy in seeds with different water content and after a post-irradiation storage time of 2 months. At doses in the range recommended for grain desinfestation, i.e. 0.1-1.0 kGy, no detectable degradation of 18:2 and 18:3 was found, but at the highest dose applied, 63 kGy, a degradation in the range from a few percent up to 40% was observed. Under extreme conditions, i.e. pre- and post-irradation treatment with oxygen, or when the flour prepared from the seeds was mixed with water and heated before the extraction of the lipids, a more pronounced degradation of the unsaturated fatty acids was noticed. Lipid peroxidation induced by γ-irradation was estimated using the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) method. High yields of the TBA-reactive material were formed in the three types of grain investigated corresponding to G-values in the range of 12-18. The influence on peroxidation yields of the water content of the seeds was studied in wheat. The origin of the TBA-reactive material formed in the seeds is not yet known, but could only to a minor extent be due to fatty acid peroxidation.

  3. Glycyrrhizic acid improved lipoprotein lipase expression, insulin sensitivity, serum lipid and lipid deposition in high-fat diet-induced obese rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The metabolic syndrome, known also as the insulin resistance syndrome, refers to the clustering of several risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Dyslipidaemia is a hallmark of the syndrome and is associated with a whole body reduction in the activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), an enzyme under the regulation of the class of nuclear receptors known as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR). Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), a triterpenoid saponin, is the primary bioactive constituent of the roots of the shrub Glycyrrhiza glabra. Studies have indicated that triterpenoids could act as PPAR agonists and GA is therefore postulated to restore LPL expression in the insulin resistant state. Results Oral administration of 100 mg/kg of GA to high-fat diet-induced obese rats for 28 days led to significant reduction in blood glucose concentration and improvement in insulin sensitivity as indicated by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (p < 0.05). LPL expression was up-regulated in the kidney, heart, quadriceps femoris, abdominal muscle and the visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues but down-regulated in the liver - a condition in reverse to that seen in high-fat diet-induced obese rats without GA. With regard to lipid metabolism, GA administration led to significant hypotriglyceridemic and HDL-raising effects (p < 0.05), with a consistent reduction in serum free fatty acid, total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol and significant decrease in tissue lipid deposition across all studied tissue (p < 0.01). Conclusion In conclusion, GA may be a potential compound in improving dyslipidaemia by selectively inducing LPL expression in non-hepatic tissues. Such up-regulation was accompanied by a GA-mediated improvement in insulin sensitivity, which may be associated with a decrease in tissue lipid deposition. The HDL-raising effect of GA suggests the antiatherosclerotic properties of GA. PMID:20670429

  4. Stearic acid-induced cardiac lipotoxicity is independent of cellular lipid and is mitigated by the fatty acids oleic and capric acid but not by the PPAR agonist troglitazone.

    PubMed

    Rabkin, Simon W; Lodhia, Parth; Lodha, Parth

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the potential of stearic acid to induce cardiomyocyte cell death and the hypothesis that the amount of cellular lipid is a determinant of cell death. In cardiomyocytes from embryonic chick heart, stearic acid (SA) produced a significant (P < 0.001) concentration-dependent increase in cell death with an ED(50) of 71 microM. In contrast, capric (C10:0) or oleic acid (OA; C18:1), at < 200 microM, did not alter cell viability. Stearic acid-induced cell death was significantly reduced by OA and to a lesser extent by capric acid. Neither OA nor capric acid altered cell death produced by potassium cyanide and deoxyglucose. Stearic acid (100 microM) induced a significant (P < 0.05) twofold increase in cellular lipid as assessed by Nile blue and Sudan Black staining. A role for cellular lipid in cardiomyocyte death was excluded because OA increased cellular lipid, at concentrations that did not induce cell death; OA did not alter SA-induced cellular fat stores but reduced cell death; and the PPARgamma; agonist troglitazone at concentrations that reduced cellular lipid content did not alter cell death. High concentrations of troglitazone, however, induced cell death. In summary, SA is a potent inducer of cardiac cell death and intracellular lipid accumulation. The amount of intracellular lipid, however, is not a determinant of cardiomyocyte cell death. Troglitazone has potential cardiotoxicity at high doses but, at lower concentrations, does not prevent cardiac lipotoxicity, which can be completely prevented by low concentrations of oleic acid.

  5. Swertiamarin ameliorates oleic acid induced lipid accumulation and oxidative stress by attenuating gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis in hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Tushar P; Rawal, Komal; Soni, Sanket; Gupta, Sarita

    2016-10-01

    Swertiamarin, a bitter secoiridoid glycoside, is an antidiabetic drug with lipid lowering activity meliorates insulin resistance in Type 2 Diabetes condition. Therefore, the study was designed to explore the antioxidant and hypolipidemic activity of swertiamarin in ameliorating NAFLD caused due to hepatic lipid accumulation, inflammation and insulin resistance. Steatosis was induced in HepG2 cells by supplementing 1mM oleic acid (OA) for 24h which was marked by significant accumulation of lipid droplets. This was determined by Oil Red O (ORO) staining and triglyceride accumulation. Swertiamarin (25μg/ml) decreased triglyceride content by 2 folds and effectively reduced LDH release (50%) activity by protecting membrane integrity thus, preventing apoptosis evidenced by reduced cleavage of Caspase 3 and PARP1. We observed that swertiamarin significantly increased the expressions of major insulin signaling proteins like Insulin receptor (IR), PI(3)K, pAkt with concomitant reduction in p307 IRS-1. AMPK was activated by swertiamarin action, thus restoring insulin sensitivity in hepatocytes. In addition, qPCR results confirmed OA up-regulated Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein (SREBP)-1c and fatty acid synthase (FAS), resulting in increased fatty acid synthesis. Swertiamarin effectively modulated PPAR-α, a major potential regulator of carbohydrate metabolism which, in turn, decreased the levels of the gluconeogenic enzyme PEPCK, further restricting hepatic glucose production and fatty acid synthesis. Cumulatively, swertiamarin targets potential metabolic regulators AMPK and PPAR-α, through which it regulates hepatic glycemic burden, fat accumulation, insulin resistance and ROS in hepatic steatosis which emphasizes clinical significance of swertiamarin in regulating metabolism and as a suitable candidate for treating NAFLD.

  6. Potential cytoprotection: antioxidant defence by caffeic acid phenethyl ester against free radical-induced damage of lipids, DNA, and proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Chen, Lixiang; Wu, Weimin; Long, Yuan; Wang, Rui

    2008-05-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to be a major cause of cellular injuries in a variety of chronic health problems, such as carcinogenesis and neurodegenerative disorders. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), derived from the propolis of honeybee hives, possesses a variety of biological and pharmacological properties including antioxidant and anticancer activity. In the present study, we focused on the diverse antioxidative functionalities of CAPE and its related polyphenolic acid esters on cellular macromolecules in vitro. The effects on human erythrocyte membrane ghost lipid peroxidation, plasmid pBR322 DNA, and protein damage initiated by the water-soluble initiator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) were monitored by formation of hydroperoxides and by DNA nicking assay, single-cell alkaline electrophoresis, and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Our results showed that CAPE and its related polyphenolic acid esters elicited remarkable inhibitory effects on erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation, cellular DNA strand breakage, and protein fragmentation. The results suggest that CAPE is a potent exogenous cytoprotective and antigenotoxic agent against cell oxidative damage that could be used as a template for designing novel drugs to combat diseases induced by oxidative stress components, such as various types of cancer.

  7. Lipid-induced insulin resistance mediated by the proinflammatory receptor TLR4 requires saturated fatty acid-induced ceramide biosynthesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Holland, William L; Bikman, Benjamin T; Wang, Li-Ping; Yuguang, Guan; Sargent, Katherine M; Bulchand, Sarada; Knotts, Trina A; Shui, Guanghou; Clegg, Deborah J; Wenk, Markus R; Pagliassotti, Michael J; Scherer, Philipp E; Summers, Scott A

    2011-05-01

    Obesity is associated with an enhanced inflammatory response that exacerbates insulin resistance and contributes to diabetes, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular disease. One mechanism accounting for the increased inflammation associated with obesity is activation of the innate immune signaling pathway triggered by TLR4 recognition of saturated fatty acids, an event that is essential for lipid-induced insulin resistance. Using in vitro and in vivo systems to model lipid induction of TLR4-dependent inflammatory events in rodents, we show here that TLR4 is an upstream signaling component required for saturated fatty acid-induced ceramide biosynthesis. This increase in ceramide production was associated with the upregulation of genes driving ceramide biosynthesis, an event dependent of the activity of the proinflammatory kinase IKKβ. Importantly, increased ceramide production was not required for TLR4-dependent induction of inflammatory cytokines, but it was essential for TLR4-dependent insulin resistance. These findings suggest that sphingolipids such as ceramide might be key components of the signaling networks that link lipid-induced inflammatory pathways to the antagonism of insulin action that contributes to diabetes.

  8. A moderate change in temperature induces changes in fatty acid composition of storage and membrane lipids in a soil arthropod.

    PubMed

    van Dooremalen, Coby; Ellers, Jacintha

    2010-02-01

    A moderate change in ambient temperature can lead to vital physiological and biochemical adjustments in ectotherms, one of which is a change in fatty acid composition. When temperature decreases, the composition of membrane lipids (phospholipid fatty acids) is expected to become more unsaturated to be able to maintain homeoviscosity. Although different in function, storage lipids (triacylglycerol fatty acids) are expected to respond to temperature changes in a similar way. Age-specific differences, however, could influence this temperature response between different life stages. Here, we investigate if fatty acid composition of membrane and storage lipids responds similarly to temperature changes for two different life stages of Orchesella cincta. Juveniles and adults were cold acclimated (15 degrees C-->5 degrees C) for 28 days and then re-acclimated (5 degrees C-->15 degrees C) for another 28 days. We found adult membranes had a more unsaturated fatty acid composition than juveniles. Membrane lipids became more unsaturated during cold acclimation, and a reversed response occurred during warm acclimation. Membrane lipids, however, showed no warm acclimation, possibly due to the moderate temperature change. The ability to adjust storage lipid composition to moderate changes in ambient temperature may be an underestimated fitness component of temperature adaptation because fluidity of storage lipids permits accessibility of enzymes to energy reserves.

  9. Conserved valproic-acid-induced lipid droplet formation in Dictyostelium and human hepatocytes identifies structurally active compounds.

    PubMed

    Elphick, Lucy M; Pawolleck, Nadine; Guschina, Irina A; Chaieb, Leila; Eikel, Daniel; Nau, Heinz; Harwood, John L; Plant, Nick J; Williams, Robin S B

    2012-03-01

    Lipid droplet formation and subsequent steatosis (the abnormal retention of lipids within a cell) has been reported to contribute to hepatotoxicity and is an adverse effect of many pharmacological agents including the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA). In this study, we have developed a simple model system (Dictyostelium discoideum) to investigate the effects of VPA and related compounds in lipid droplet formation. In mammalian hepatocytes, VPA increases lipid droplet accumulation over a 24-hour period, giving rise to liver cell damage, and we show a similar effect in Dictyostelium following 30 minutes of VPA treatment. Using (3)H-labelled polyunsaturated (arachidonic) or saturated (palmitic) fatty acids, we shown that VPA treatment of Dictyostelium gives rise to an increased accumulation of both types of fatty acids in phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and non-polar lipids in this time period, with a similar trend observed in human hepatocytes (Huh7 cells) labelled with [(3)H]arachidonic acid. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of β-oxidation in Dictyostelium phenocopies fatty acid accumulation, in agreement with data reported in mammalian systems. Using Dictyostelium, we then screened a range of VPA-related compounds to identify those with high and low lipid-accumulation potential, and validated these activities for effects on lipid droplet formation by using human hepatocytes. Structure-activity relationships for these VPA-related compounds suggest that lipid accumulation is independent of VPA-catalysed teratogenicity and inositol depletion. These results suggest that Dictyostelium could provide both a novel model system for the analysis of lipid droplet formation in human hepatocytes and a rapid method for identifying VPA-related compounds that show liver toxicology.

  10. Phytic acid inhibits lipid peroxidation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zajdel, Alicja; Wilczok, Adam; Węglarz, Ludmiła; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10-20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products.

  11. Phytic Acid Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Węglarz, Ludmiła; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10–20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products. PMID:24260736

  12. Light-Induced Changes in Fatty Acid Profiles of Specific Lipid Classes in Several Freshwater Phytoplankton Species

    PubMed Central

    Wacker, Alexander; Piepho, Maike; Harwood, John L.; Guschina, Irina A.; Arts, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    We tested the influence of two light intensities [40 and 300 μmol PAR / (m2s)] on the fatty acid composition of three distinct lipid classes in four freshwater phytoplankton species. We chose species of different taxonomic classes in order to detect potentially similar reaction characteristics that might also be present in natural phytoplankton communities. From samples of the bacillariophyte Asterionella formosa, the chrysophyte Chromulina sp., the cryptophyte Cryptomonas ovata and the zygnematophyte Cosmarium botrytis we first separated glycolipids (monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, digalactosyldiacylglycerol, and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol), phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylserine) as well as non-polar lipids (triacylglycerols), before analyzing the fatty acid composition of each lipid class. High variation in the fatty acid composition existed among different species. Individual fatty acid compositions differed in their reaction to changing light intensities in the four species. Although no generalizations could be made for species across taxonomic classes, individual species showed clear but small responses in their ecologically-relevant omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in terms of proportions and of per tissue carbon quotas. Knowledge on how lipids like fatty acids change with environmental or culture conditions is of great interest in ecological food web studies, aquaculture, and biotechnology, since algal lipids are the most important sources of omega-3 long-chain PUFA for aquatic and terrestrial consumers, including humans. PMID:27014290

  13. N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids are Selective Targets of Ethanol Withdrawal-Induced Lipid Peroxidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethanol withdrawal is a potentially life-threatening neurological syndrome owing to decreased GABA transmission and increased glutamatergic transmission resulting in a pro-excitotoxic state. Previous data indicate that ethanol withdrawal may increase CNS lipid peroxidation particularly to the n-3 fa...

  14. Fatty Acid Oxidation and Calcium Homeostasis are Involved in the Rescue of Bupivacaine Induced Cardiotoxicity by Lipid Emulsion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Partownavid, Parisa; Umar, Soban; Li, Jingyuan; Rahman, Siamak; Eghbali, Mansoureh

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Lipid Emulsion (LE) has been shown to be effective in resuscitating bupivacaine-induced cardiac arrest but its mechanism of action is not clear. Here we investigated whether fatty acid oxidation is required for rescue of bupivacaine induced cardiotoxicity by LE in rats. We also compared the mitochondrial function and calcium threshold for triggering of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening in bupivacaine-induced cardiac arrest before and after resuscitation with LE. DESIGN Prospective, randomized, animal study. SETTING University Research Laboratory. SUBJECTS Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. INTERVENTIONS Asystole was achieved with a single dose of bupivacaine (10mg/kg over 20seconds, i.v.) and 20% LE infusion (5ml/kg bolus, and 0.5ml/kg/min maintenance) with cardiac massage started immediately. The rats in CVT group were pretreated with a single dose of fatty acid oxidation inhibitor CVT (0.5, 0.25, 0.125 or 0.0625mg/kg bolus i.v.) 5min prior to inducing asystole by bupivacaine overdose. Heart rate (HR), ejection fraction (EF), fractional shortening (FS), the threshold for opening of mPTP, oxygen consumption and membrane potential were measured. The values are Mean±SEM. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Administration of bupivacaine resulted in asystole. ILP infusion improved the cardiac function gradually as the EF was fully recovered within 5min (EF=64±4% and FS=36±3%, n=6) and heart rate increased to 239±9 beats/min (71% recovery, n=6) within 10min. LE was only able to rescue rats pretreated with low dose of CVT (0.0625mg/kg) (HR=~181±11 beats/min at 10 min, recovery of 56%; EF=50±1%; FS=26±0.6% at 5min, n=3) but was unable to resuscitate rats pretreated with higher doses of CVT (0.5, 0.25 or 0.125mg/kg). The calcium retention capacity in response to Ca2+ overload was significantly higher in cardiac mitochondria isolated from rats resuscitated with 20% LE compared to the group that did not receive ILP after bupivacaine

  15. Protective effect of ferulic acid on gamma-radiation-induced micronuclei, dicentric aberration and lipid peroxidation in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, N Rajendra; Srinivasan, M; Pugalendi, K V; Menon, Venugopal P

    2006-02-28

    In this study we examined radioprotective effect of ferulic acid (FA) on gamma radiation-induced dicentric aberration and lipid peroxidation with reference to alterations in cellular antioxidant status in cultured lymphocytes. To establish most effective protective support we used three different concentrations of FA (1, 5 and 10 microg/ml) and three different doses of gamma-radiation (1, 2 and 4 Gy). Treatment of lymphocytes with FA alone (at 10 microg/ml) gave no significant change in micronuclei (MN), dicentric aberration (DC), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) or glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities when compared with normal lymphocytes; irradiation at 1, 2 and 4 Gy increased the MN and DC frequencies in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with FA for 30 min before radiation exposure resulted in a significant decline of MN and DC yields as FA concentration increased. Compared to 1 Gy exposure alone, the extent to which FA (1 microg/ml) reduced the MN and DC yields was 75% and 50%, respectively. With 4 Gy irradiation, FA (10 microg/ml) decreased 45% MN and 25% DC frequencies. FA-pretreated lymphocytes (1, 5 and 10 microg/ml) showed progressively decreased TBARS levels after irradiation. Irradiation (1, 2 and 4 Gy) significantly decreased GSH levels, SOD, CAT and GPx activities in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with 10 microg/ml of FA significantly (p<0.05) prevented the decreases in the radiation-induced GSH, SOD, CAT and GPx activities. These findings suggest potential use and benefit of FA as a radioprotector.

  16. Fish oil omega-3 fatty acids partially prevent lipid-induced insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle without limiting acylcarnitine accumulation.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Francis B; Mendis, Buddhike; Shannon, Chris E; Cooper, Scott; Ortori, Catharine A; Barrett, David A; Mansell, Peter; Tsintzas, Kostas

    2014-09-01

    Acylcarnitine accumulation in skeletal muscle and plasma has been observed in numerous models of mitochondrial lipid overload and insulin resistance. Fish oil n3PUFA (omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids) are thought to protect against lipid-induced insulin resistance. The present study tested the hypothesis that the addition of n3PUFA to an intravenous lipid emulsion would limit muscle acylcarnitine accumulation and reduce the inhibitory effect of lipid overload on insulin action. On three occasions, six healthy young men underwent a 6-h euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp accompanied by intravenous infusion of saline (Control), 10% Intralipid® [n6PUFA (omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids)] or 10% Intralipid®+10% Omegaven® (2:1; n3PUFA). The decline in insulin-stimulated whole-body glucose infusion rate, muscle PDCa (pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activation) and glycogen storage associated with n6PUFA compared with Control was prevented with n3PUFA. Muscle acetyl-CoA accumulation was greater following n6PUFA compared with Control and n3PUFA, suggesting that mitochondrial lipid overload was responsible for the lower insulin action observed. Despite these favourable metabolic effects of n3PUFA, accumulation of total muscle acylcarnitine was not attenuated when compared with n6PUFA. These findings demonstrate that n3PUFA exert beneficial effects on insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glucose storage and oxidation independently of total acylcarnitine accumulation, which does not always reflect mitochondrial lipid overload.

  17. Preventive effects of p-coumaric acid on cardiac hypertrophy and alterations in electrocardiogram, lipids, and lipoproteins in experimentally induced myocardial infarcted rats.

    PubMed

    Roy, Abhro Jyoti; Stanely Mainzen Prince, P

    2013-10-01

    The present study evaluated the preventive effects of p-coumaric acid on cardiac hypertrophy and alterations in electrocardiogram, lipids, and lipoproteins in experimentally induced myocardial infarcted rats. Rats were pretreated with p-coumaric acid (8 mg/kg body weight) daily for a period of 7 days and then injected with isoproterenol (100mg/kg body weight) on 8th and 9th day to induce myocardial infarction. Myocardial infarction induced by isoproterenol was indicated by increased level of cardiac sensitive marker and elevated ST-segments in the electrocardiogram. Also, the levels/concentrations of serum and heart cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids were increased in myocardial infarcted rats. Isoproterenol also increased the levels of serum low density and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol and decreased the levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol. It also enhanced the activity of liver 3-hydroxy-3 methyl glutaryl-Coenzyme-A reductase. p-Coumaric acid pretreatment revealed preventive effects on all the biochemical parameters and electrocardiogram studied in myocardial infarcted rats. The in vitro study confirmed the free radical scavenging property of p-coumaric acid. Thus, p-coumaric acid prevented cardiac hypertrophy and alterations in lipids, lipoproteins, and electrocardiogram, by virtue of its antihypertrophic, antilipidemic, and free radical scavenging effects in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats.

  18. Protective effect of S-allylcysteine on 3-nitropropionic acid-induced lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial dysfunction in rat brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; González-Cortés, Carolina; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Maldonado, Perla D; Andrés-Martínez, Leticia; Santamaría, Abel

    2006-01-30

    3-Nitropropionic acid is a neurotoxin that irreversibly inhibits succinate dehydrogenase, a relevant enzyme constituting the complex II of the respiratory chain during mitochondrial electron transport. 3-Nitropropionic acid is known to produce oxidative/nitrosative stress and evokes an experimental model of Huntington's disease. In this work we evaluated the effects of the antioxidant compound and major organosulfur garlic derivative, S-allylcysteine, on lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by 3-nitropropionic acid in synaptosomal fractions from rat brain. 3-Nitropropionic acid, at concentrations ranging 0.75-2.5 mM, produced enhanced levels of lipid peroxidation, while increasing concentrations of S-allylcysteine (0.1-2 mM) decreased the peroxidative action of 3-nitropropionic acid (1 mM) in synaptosomal fractions in a concentration-dependent manner. S-Allylcysteine (0.75 mM) also prevented the 3-nitropropionic acid (1mM)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings suggest that the protective actions that S-allylcysteine exert on the in vitro neurotoxicity induced by 3-nitropropionic acid are mediated by its antioxidant properties.

  19. High-fat diet from perilla oil induces insulin resistance despite lower serum lipids and increases hepatic fatty acid oxidation in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of a high-fat diet from perilla oil on serum lipids, hepatic lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Methods Male Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were fed either a control (CT) diet or a diet high in perilla oil (HP). After 16 weeks of feeding, the serum lipids were measured, and the gene expressions involved in hepatic fatty acid oxidation and synthesis were determined. In addition, hepatic fat deposition was detected, and insulin sensitivity was evaluated by means of euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Results Compared with the rats in the CT group, the HP-feeding significantly decreased the levels of triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TCH) and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c). HP-feeding did not change the levels of LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c), free fatty acid (FFA), intrahepatic lipids or body weight. Moreover, the HP-feeding dramatically increased the mRNA expressions of fatty acid oxidation markers (PPAR-alpha, CPT1A) and fatty acid synthesis markers (SREBP-1, FASN and ACC) in the liver. The HP-feeding induced increased protein levels of CPT1A, while reducing the protein levels of FASN and ACC in the liver. However, the glucose infusion rate significantly increased in the HP group compared with the CT group. Conclusions Our data show that, in rats, excessive perilla oil intake may significantly lower serum lipids, strengthen hepatic fatty acid oxidation, and inhibit hepatic fatty acid synthesis, but at the same time may also lead to insulin resistance. PMID:24422660

  20. [Lipid synthesis by an acidic acid tolerant Rhodotorula glutinis].

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhangnan; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an; Wang, Gehua

    2016-03-01

    Acetic acid, as a main by-product generated in the pretreatment process of lignocellulose hydrolysis, significantly affects cell growth and lipid synthesis of oleaginous microorganisms. Therefore, we studied the tolerance of Rhodotorula glutinis to acetic acid and its lipid synthesis from substrate containing acetic acid. In the mixed sugar medium containing 6 g/L glucose and 44 g/L xylose, and supplemented with acetic acid, the cell growth was not:inhibited when the acetic acid concentration was below 10 g/L. Compared with the control, the biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of R. glutinis increased 21.5%, 171% and 122% respectively when acetic acid concentration was 10 g/L. Furthermore, R. glutinis could accumulate lipid with acetate as the sole carbon source. Lipid concentration and lipid yield reached 3.20 g/L and 13% respectively with the initial acetic acid concentration of 25 g/L. The lipid composition was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The main composition of lipid produced with acetic acid was palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, including 40.9% saturated fatty acids and 59.1% unsaturated fatty acids. The lipid composition was similar to that of plant oil, indicating that lipid from oleaginous yeast R. glutinis had potential as the feedstock of biodiesel production. These results demonstrated that a certain concentration of acetic acid need not to be removed in the detoxification process when using lignocelluloses hydrolysate to produce microbial lipid by R. glutinis.

  1. Low-ω3 Fatty Acid and Soy Protein Attenuate Alcohol-Induced Fatty Liver and Injury by Regulating the Opposing Lipid Oxidation and Lipogenic Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Gordillo, Karina; Shah, Ruchi; Varatharajalu, Ravi; Garige, Mamatha; Leckey, Leslie C.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic ethanol-induced downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC1α) and upregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-beta (PGC1β) affect hepatic lipid oxidation and lipogenesis, respectively, leading to fatty liver injury. Low-ω3 fatty acid (Low-ω3FA) that primarily regulates PGC1α and soy protein (SP) that seems to have its major regulatory effect on PGC1β were evaluated for their protective effects against ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis in rats fed with Lieber-deCarli control or ethanol liquid diets with high or low ω3FA fish oil and soy protein. Low-ω3FA and SP opposed the actions of chronic ethanol by reducing serum and liver lipids with concomitant decreased fatty liver. They also prevented the downregulation of hepatic Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and PGC1α and their target fatty acid oxidation pathway genes and attenuated the upregulation of hepatic PGC1β and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c) and their target lipogenic pathway genes via the phosphorylation of 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Thus, these two novel modulators attenuate ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis and consequent liver injury potentially by regulating the two opposing lipid oxidation and lipogenic pathways. PMID:28074114

  2. Low-ω3 Fatty Acid and Soy Protein Attenuate Alcohol-Induced Fatty Liver and Injury by Regulating the Opposing Lipid Oxidation and Lipogenic Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Gordillo, Karina; Shah, Ruchi; Varatharajalu, Ravi; Garige, Mamatha; Leckey, Leslie C; Lakshman, M Raj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic ethanol-induced downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC1α) and upregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-beta (PGC1β) affect hepatic lipid oxidation and lipogenesis, respectively, leading to fatty liver injury. Low-ω3 fatty acid (Low-ω3FA) that primarily regulates PGC1α and soy protein (SP) that seems to have its major regulatory effect on PGC1β were evaluated for their protective effects against ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis in rats fed with Lieber-deCarli control or ethanol liquid diets with high or low ω3FA fish oil and soy protein. Low-ω3FA and SP opposed the actions of chronic ethanol by reducing serum and liver lipids with concomitant decreased fatty liver. They also prevented the downregulation of hepatic Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and PGC1α and their target fatty acid oxidation pathway genes and attenuated the upregulation of hepatic PGC1β and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c) and their target lipogenic pathway genes via the phosphorylation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Thus, these two novel modulators attenuate ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis and consequent liver injury potentially by regulating the two opposing lipid oxidation and lipogenic pathways.

  3. Adipocyte Fatty Acid Binding Protein Potentiates Toxic Lipids-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Macrophages via Inhibition of Janus Kinase 2-dependent Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Hoo, Ruby L. C.; Shu, Lingling; Cheng, Kenneth K. Y.; Wu, Xiaoping; Liao, Boya; Wu, Donghai; Zhou, Zhiguang; Xu, Aimin

    2017-01-01

    Lipotoxicity is implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity-related inflammatory complications by promoting macrophage infiltration and activation. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) play key roles in obesity and mediate inflammatory activity through similar signaling pathways. However, little is known about their interplay in lipid-induced inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that prolonged treatment of palmitic acid (PA) increased ER stress and expression of A-FABP, which was accompanied by reduced autophagic flux in macrophages. Over-expression of A-FABP impaired PA-induced autophagy associating with enhanced ER stress and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, while genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of A-FABP reversed the conditions. PA-induced expression of autophagy-related protein (Atg)7 was attenuated in A-FABP over-expressed macrophages, but was elevated in A-FABP-deficient macrophages. Mechanistically, A-FABP potentiated the effects of PA by inhibition of Janus Kinase (JAK)2 activity, thus diminished PA-induced Atg7 expression contributing to impaired autophagy and further augmentation of ER stress. These findings suggest that A-FABP acts as autophagy inhibitor to instigate toxic lipids-induced ER stress through inhibition of JAK2-dependent autophagy, which in turn triggers inflammatory responses in macrophages. A-FABP-JAK2 axis may represent an important pathological pathway contributing to obesity-related inflammatory diseases. PMID:28094778

  4. Introduction to fatty acids and lipids.

    PubMed

    Burdge, Graham C; Calder, Philip C

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the structure, function and metabolism of fatty acids and lipids that are of particular importance in the context of parenteral nutrition. Lipids are a heterogeneous group of molecules that share the common property of hydrophobicity. Lipids range in structure from simple short hydrocarbon chains to more complex molecules, including triacylglycerols, phospholipids and sterols and their esters. Lipids within each class may differ structurally. Fatty acids are common components of complex lipids, and these differ according to chain length and the presence, number and position of double bonds in the hydrocarbon chain. Structural variation among complex lipids and among fatty acids gives rise to functional differences that result in different impacts upon metabolism and upon cell and tissue responses. Fatty acids and complex lipids exhibit a variety of structural variations that influence their metabolism and their functional effects.

  5. Oleic acid inhibits lung Na/K-ATPase in mice and induces injury with lipid body formation in leukocytes and eicosanoid production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can emerge from certain pathologies, such as sepsis, fat embolism and leptospirosis, in which the levels of unesterified fatty acids are increased in the patient’s plasma. ARDS is characterized by edema formation, and edema resolution occurs mainly due to the pneumocyte Na/K-ATPase activity. As previously described, increased oleic acid (OA) plasma concentrations induce lung injury by interfering with sodium transport. The first aim of this study was to develop a radioactivity-free assay to detect Na,K-ATPase activity ex vivo using a model of OA-induced lung injury in mice. We also investigated the relationship between Na/K-ATPase inhibition and OA-induced lung injury using ouabain-induced lung injury as a comparison, because of the well-described effect of ouabain as a Na/K-ATPase inhibitor. Methods We developed a Na/K-ATPase assay based on the capture of non-radioactive Rb+ ions by mice lung tissue in the absence or presence of ouabain, a specific Na/K-ATPase inhibitor. Rb+ incorporation into the lung was measured by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) after lung tissue mineralization. Na/K-ATPase activity was considered as the difference between Rb+ incorporation in the absence and in the presence of ouabain. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected for lung injury assessment. For this assessment, cell counting, lipid body enumeration and lipid mediator concentrations were measured. Histological analyses were used to determinate lung pathology. Whole body plethysmographic analysis was performed to assay lung function. Results The lung Na/K-ATPase activity of mice was completely inhibited by an OA dose of 10 μmol, an effect also obtained with 10-3 μmol of ouabain, as demonstrated by the decreased Rb+ incorporation in the lungs. The same OA dose induced lung edema and inflammation with cell influx, lipid body formation, and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2

  6. Lipids, fatty acids, and more

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy is the most expensive component in livestock diets. Lipids are concentrated energy sources and are known to affect growth, feed efficiency, feed dust, and diet palatability. A large majority of research evaluating lipids in livestock has utilized lipids of high quality, dealt mainly with anim...

  7. Fatty Acids from Membrane Lipids Become Incorporated into Lipid Bodies during Myxococcus xanthus Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Swapna; Boynton, Tye O.; Pham, Dan; Shimkets, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus responds to amino acid limitation by producing fruiting bodies containing dormant spores. During development, cells produce triacylglycerides in lipid bodies that become consumed during spore maturation. As the cells are starved to induce development, the production of triglycerides represents a counterintuitive metabolic switch. In this paper, lipid bodies were quantified in wild-type strain DK1622 and 33 developmental mutants at the cellular level by measuring the cross sectional area of the cell stained with the lipophilic dye Nile red. We provide five lines of evidence that triacylglycerides are derived from membrane phospholipids as cells shorten in length and then differentiate into myxospores. First, in wild type cells, lipid bodies appear early in development and their size increases concurrent with an 87% decline in membrane surface area. Second, developmental mutants blocked at different stages of shortening and differentiation accumulated lipid bodies proportionate with their cell length with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.76. Third, peripheral rods, developing cells that do not produce lipid bodies, fail to shorten. Fourth, genes for fatty acid synthesis are down-regulated while genes for fatty acid degradation are up regulated. Finally, direct movement of fatty acids from membrane lipids in growing cells to lipid bodies in developing cells was observed by pulse labeling cells with palmitate. Recycling of lipids released by Programmed Cell Death appears not to be necessary for lipid body production as a fadL mutant was defective in fatty acid uptake but proficient in lipid body production. The lipid body regulon involves many developmental genes that are not specifically involved in fatty acid synthesis or degradation. MazF RNA interferase and its target, enhancer-binding protein Nla6, appear to negatively regulate cell shortening and TAG accumulation whereas most cell-cell signals activate these processes. PMID:24906161

  8. Folic acid protects against lead acetate-induced hepatotoxicity by decreasing NF-κB, IL-1β production and lipid peroxidation mediataed cell injury.

    PubMed

    Abd Allah, Eman S H; Badary, Dalia M

    2017-03-01

    Folic acid plays an important role in cellular metabolic activities. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effect of folic acid against lead acetate-induced hepatotoxicity. Twenty four male Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into four groups, six animals each. Negative control group received the vehicle, positive control group received 1mg/kg folic acid for five consecutive days/week for 4 weeks orally, lead-exposed group received 10mg/kg lead acetate intraperitoneally (IP) for five consecutive days/week for 4 weeks, and lead-treated group received 10mg/kg lead acetate IP and 1mg/kg folic acid orally for five consecutive days/week for 4 weeks concurrently. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and γ- glutamyltransferase (GGT) were measured. Hepatic total peroxide and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were also investigated. Histopathological studies using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) and periodic acid shiff's (PAS) were carried out. The expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. Serum AST, ALT and GGT and hepatic total peroxide and IL-1β were significantly increased in lead-exposed group and were positively correlated with hepatic lead level. Moreover, lead-exposed rats showed hydropic degeneration, nuclear vesiculation, high lymphocytic infiltration, depletion of glycogen content and NF-κB expression. Concomitant folic acid administration resulted in a significant alleviation of biochemical and structural alteration-induced by lead. This was associated with reduction of hepatic total peroxide and IL-1β and reduction of NF-κB expression. In conclusion, folic acid protects against lead acetate-induced hepatotoxicity by decreasing NF-κB, IL-1β production and lipid peroxidation mediataed cell injury.

  9. Nucleic acid-lipid membrane interactions studied by DSC.

    PubMed

    Giatrellis, Sarantis; Nounesis, George

    2011-01-01

    The interactions of nucleic acids with lipid membranes are of great importance for biological mechanisms as well as for biotechnological applications in gene delivery and drug carriers. The optimization of liposomal vectors for clinical use is absolutely dependent upon the formation mechanisms, the morphology, and the molecular organization of the lipoplexes, that is, the complexes of lipid membranes with DNA. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has emerged as an efficient and relatively easy-to-operate experimental technique that can straightforwardly provide data related to the thermodynamics and the kinetics of the DNA-lipid complexation and especially to the lipid organization and phase transitions within the membrane. In this review, we summarize DSC studies considering nucleic acid-membrane systems, accentuating DSC capabilities, and data analysis. Published work involving cationic, anionic, and zwitterionic lipids as well as lipid mixtures interacting with RNA and DNA of different sizes and conformations are included. It is shown that despite limitations, issues such as DNA- or RNA-induced phase separation and microdomain lipid segregation, liposomal aggregation and fusion, alterations of the lipid long-range molecular order, as well as membrane-induced structural changes of the nucleic acids can be efficiently treated by systematic high-sensitivity DSC studies.

  10. Lipid redistribution by α-linolenic acid-rich chia seed inhibits stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 and induces cardiac and hepatic protection in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Poudyal, Hemant; Panchal, Sunil K; Waanders, Jennifer; Ward, Leigh; Brown, Lindsay

    2012-02-01

    Chia seeds contain the essential fatty acid, α-linolenic acid (ALA). This study has assessed whether chia seeds attenuated the metabolic, cardiovascular and hepatic signs of a high-carbohydrate, high-fat (H) diet [carbohydrates, 52% (wt/wt); fat, 24% (wt/wt) with 25% (wt/vol) fructose in drinking water] in rats. Diets of the treatment groups were supplemented with 5% chia seeds after 8 weeks on H diet for a further 8 weeks. Compared with the H rats, chia seed-supplemented rats had improved insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, reduced visceral adiposity, decreased hepatic steatosis and reduced cardiac and hepatic inflammation and fibrosis without changes in plasma lipids or blood pressure. Chia seeds induced lipid redistribution with lipid trafficking away from the visceral fat and liver with an increased accumulation in the heart. The stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 products were depleted in the heart, liver and the adipose tissue of chia seed-supplemented rats together with an increase in the substrate concentrations. The C18:1trans-7 was preferentially stored in the adipose tissue; the relatively inert C18:1n-9 was stored in sensitive organs such as liver and heart and C18:2n-6, the parent fatty acid of the n-6 pathway, was preferentially metabolized. Thus, chia seeds as a source of ALA induce lipid redistribution associated with cardioprotection and hepatoprotection.

  11. Increased beta-oxidation in muscle cells enhances insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism and protects against fatty acid-induced insulin resistance despite intramyocellular lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, German; Commerford, S Renee; Richard, Ann-Marie T; Adams, Sean H; Corkey, Barbara E; O'Doherty, Robert M; Brown, Nicholas F

    2004-06-25

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance may be aggravated by intramyocellular accumulation of fatty acid-derived metabolites that inhibit insulin signaling. We tested the hypothesis that enhanced fatty acid oxidation in myocytes should protect against fatty acid-induced insulin resistance by limiting lipid accumulation. L6 myotubes were transduced with adenoviruses encoding carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) isoforms or beta-galactosidase (control). Two to 3-fold overexpression of L-CPT I, the endogenous isoform in L6 cells, proportionally increased oxidation of the long-chain fatty acids palmitate and oleate and increased insulin stimulation of [(14)C]glucose incorporation into glycogen by 60% while enhancing insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of p38MAPK. Incubation of control cells with 0.2 mm palmitate for 18 h caused accumulation of triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, and ceramide (but not long-chain acyl-CoA) and decreased insulin-stimulated [(14)C]glucose incorporation into glycogen (60%), [(3)H]deoxyglucose uptake (60%), and protein kinase B phosphorylation (20%). In the context of L-CPT I overexpression, palmitate preincubation produced a relative decrease in insulin-stimulated incorporation of [(14)C]glucose into glycogen (60%) and [(3)H]deoxyglucose uptake (40%) but did not inhibit phosphorylation of protein kinase B. Due to the enhancement of insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism induced by L-CPT I overexpression itself, net insulin-stimulated incorporation of [(14)C]glucose into glycogen and [(3)H]deoxyglucose uptake in L-CPT I-transduced, palmitate-treated cells were significantly greater than in palmitate-treated control cells (71 and 75% greater, respectively). However, L-CPT I overexpression failed to decrease intracellular triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, ceramide, or long-chain acyl-CoA. We propose that accelerated beta-oxidation in muscle cells exerts an insulin-sensitizing effect independently of changes in intracellular lipid content.

  12. Effect of Salvianolic Acid b and Paeonol on Blood Lipid Metabolism and Hemorrheology in Myocardial Ischemia Rabbits Induced by Pituitruin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qian; Wang, Siwang; Xie, Yanhua; Wang, Jianbo; Li, Hua; Zhou, Xuanxuan; Liu, Wenbo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the therapeutic effect of salvianolic acid b and paeonol on coronary disease. The ischemia myocardial animal model is induced by administering pituitrin (20 μg·kg−1) intravenously via the abdominal vein. A combination of salvianolic acid b and paeonol (CSAP) (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg BW) was administrated to experimental rabbits. Biochemical indices were evaluated during six weeks of intervention. We found that the compound of salvianolic acid b and paeonol (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg BW) can markedly and dose-dependently reduce fibrinogen and malonaldehyde levels, increase the HDL level, improve blood viscosity and plasma viscosity in rabbits. In addition, the medicine can still reduce the ratio of NO/ET and the contents of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine phosphokinase (CPK) in a dose-dependent manner. This study demonstrates that compound of salvianolic acid b and paeonol (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg BW) can improve the blood hemorrheology, decrease oxidative injury and repair the function of blood vessel endothelium, and subsequently prevent the development of Coronary disease. PMID:21152295

  13. The effect of melatonin on lipid peroxidation and nitrite/nitrate levels, and on superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in kainic acid-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Akcay, Yasemin Delen; Yalcin, Ayfer; Sozmen, Eser Yildirim

    2005-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) initiates neuronal injury and death by inducing oxidative stress and nitric oxide release from various regions of the brain. It was recently shown that melatonin has free radical-scavenging action and may protect against kainate-induced toxicity. In order to assess the possible supportive effect of melatonin treatment in KA-induced injury in the rat brain cortex, we determined malondialdehyde (MDA) levels as an index of lipid peroxidation, and assessed the activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the levels of nitrite/nitrate 35 male rats were divided into five groups, each receiving a different intraperitoneal treatment: saline solution (0.2 ml), kainic acid (15 mg/kg), melatonin (20 mg/kg), KA then melatonin (each as above, 15 min apart), or melatonin then KA (each as above, 30 min apart). Administration of KA caused an about five-fold increase in the catalase activity and an increase in the SOD activity in the cortex relative to the activities for the controls. Treatment with melatonin 15 min after KA injection kept malondialdehyde levels and catalase and superoxide dismutase activities at the normal levels, and led to an increase in the levels of nitrite/nitrate. Our data suggests that melatonin treatment following KA administration has a protective effect on antioxidant enzyme activities and thus supports the role of melatonin and oxidative stress in the regulation of antioxidative enzyme activity.

  14. Novel interference in thiobarbituric acid assay for lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, W A; Baker, N; Hill, V A; Wright, E T

    1975-05-01

    The thiobarbituric acid test for lipid peroxidation, when applied to a mixture of acetaldehyde and sucrose, produces a 532 nm aborbing chromogen which is indistinguishable from that formed by malonaldehyde and thiobarbituric acid. Unless special procedures are adopted to correct for this effect, the combined action of acetaldehyde and sucrose interferes seriously with the assay of lipid peroxidation reactions, notably those implicated in alcohol-induced liver injuries. However, this unusual thiobarbituric acid effect also can be used as a sensitive method for the detection of acetaldehyde.

  15. Conjugated linoleic acid-induced milk fat depression in lactating ewes is accompanied by reduced expression of mammary genes involved in lipid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hussein, M; Harvatine, K H; Weerasinghe, W M P B; Sinclair, L A; Bauman, D E

    2013-06-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are produced during rumen biohydrogenation and exert a range of biological effects. The trans-10,cis-12 CLA isomer is a potent inhibitor of milk fat synthesis in lactating dairy cows and some aspects of the mechanism have been established. Conjugated linoleic acid-induced milk fat depression has also been observed in small ruminants and our objective was to examine the molecular mechanism in lactating ewes. Multiparous lactating ewes were fed a basal ration (0.55:0.45 concentrate-to-forage ratio; dry matter basis) and randomly allocated to 2 dietary CLA levels (n=8 ewes/treatment). Treatments were zero CLA (control) or 15 g/d of lipid-encapsulated CLA supplement containing cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12 CLA isomers in equal proportions. Treatments were fed for 10 wk and the CLA supplement provided 1.5 g of trans-10,cis-12/d. No treatment effects were observed on milk yield or milk composition for protein or lactose at wk 10 of the study. In contrast, CLA treatment significantly decreased both milk fat percentage and milk fat yield (g/d) by about 23%. The de novo synthesized fatty acids (FA; C16) was increased (10%) for the CLA treatment. In agreement with the reduced de novo FA synthesis, mRNA abundance of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase α, FA synthase, stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1, and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 6 decreased by 25 to 40% in the CLA-treated group. Conjugated linoleic acid treatment did not significantly reduce the mRNA abundance of enzymes involved in NADPH production, but the mRNA abundance for sterol regulatory element-binding factor 1 and insulin-induced gene 1, genes involved in regulation of transcription of lipogenic enzymes, was decreased by almost 30 and 55%, respectively, with CLA treatment. Furthermore, mRNA abundance of lipoprotein lipase decreased by almost 40% due to CLA treatment

  16. Dietary saturated fatty acids reduce hepatic lipid accumulation but induce fibrotic change in alcohol-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Ling; Peng, Hsiang-Chi; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Background In this study, we evaluated the influence of an ethanol-containing diet with high saturated fatty acids (SFAs) on alcoholic liver disease (ALD) in rats. Methods Male Wistar rats weighing about 160 g were divided into four groups: an ethanol (E) group fed an ethanol-containing liquid diet with 36% total calories as fat (corn oil, olive oil and safflower oil); a control (C) group pair-fed an isoenergetic diet without ethanol; an ethanol with saturated fat (EHS) group fed an ethanol-containing diet which contained 40% total calories as fat (90% lard); and a control with saturated fat (CHS) group fed an isoenergetic diet without ethanol, which contained 40% total calories as fat. Results After 8 weeks of treatment, the liver weight and plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities in E and EHS groups were significantly higher than those of C group. Significantly higher scores of inflammation, necrosis, and fatty changes were found in E group, whereas significantly higher scores of necrosis, bile duct hyperplasia, and fibrosis were found in EHS group. Although significantly lower plasma adiponectin concentrations were observed in both E and EHS groups, compared to C group, plasma adiponectin in EHS group was significantly higher than that in E group. There was no change in hepatic peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α expression between E and C groups, and rats in EHS group showed a significantly elevated level compared to the other groups. A lower hepatic sirtuins (SIRT)-1 level was found in E group, but it did not reach statistical significance. Moreover, the highest plasma TGF-β1 level was found in EHS group. Compared to C group, the hepatic reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio and thiobarbituric acid (TBA)-reactive substance level were significantly increased in E and EHS groups; however, there was no significant difference between E and EHS groups. Significantly increased hepatic CYP2E1 expression was observed in both E and

  17. A novel therapeutic application of solid lipid nanoparticles encapsulated thymoquinone (TQ-SLNs) on 3-nitroproponic acid induced Huntington's disease-like symptoms in wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Surekha; Thangarajan, Sumathi

    2016-08-25

    Huntington's disease (HD), a devastating neurodegenerative disease causing a remarkable pathogenesis involves mitochondrial dysfunction and bioenergetics failure. 3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP) is a unique toxin model of HD that are mainly confined to mitochondrial complex-II inhibition and free radical generation. Recently, several nanoparticle formulations were developed to treat against various neurodegenerative diseases including HD. One among them is solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), a colloidal carrier designed to enhance the brain drug delivery and to prolong the bio-availability of drugs in the system. Hence, the present study was framed to evaluate solid lipid nanoparticles encapsulated thymoquinone (TQ-SLNs) in comparison with thymoquinone suspension (TQ-S) against 3-NP induced behavioral despair, oxidative injury and striatal pathology. This study reports that theTQ-SLNs (10 and 20 mg/kg) and TQ-S (80 mg/kg) treated animals showed a significant (P < 0.01) improvement in the muscle strength, rigidity, movement and memory performances on 7th and 14th day behavioral analysis than TQ-S (40 mg/kg) treated group. Similarly, TQ-SLNs highly attenuated the levels of oxidative stress markers such as LPO, NO and protein carbonylsin 3-NP induced animals. Further, TQ-SLNs significantly restored the antioxidant defense system, controls the mitochondrial SDH inhibition and alleviates anti-cholinergic effect upon 3-NP induction. In addition, TQ-SLNs efficiently protected the striatal structural microelements against 3-NP toxicity, which was confirmed by light microscopic studies. Thus, the present investigation, collectively suggests that the low dose of TQ-SLNs supplementation is highly sufficient to attain the effect of TQ-S (80 mg/kg) to attenuate behavioral, biochemical and histological modifications in 3-NP exposed HD model.

  18. Effects of chicory inulin on serum metabolites of uric acid, lipids, glucose, and abdominal fat deposition in quails induced by purine-rich diets.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhijian; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Xiaoqing; Jin, Rui; Zhu, Wenjing

    2014-11-01

    Inulin, a group of dietary fibers, is reported to improve the metabolic disorders. In the present study, we investigated the effects of chicory inulin on serum metabolites of uric acid (UA), lipids, glucose, and abdominal fat deposition in quail model induced by a purine-rich diet. In this study, 60 male French quails were randomly allocated to five groups: CON (control group), MOD (model group), BEN (benzbromarone-treated group), CHI-H (high-dosage chicory inulin-treated group), and CHI-L (low-dosage chicory inulin-treated group). The serum UA level was significantly increased in the model group from days 7 to 28, as well as triglyceride (TG) and free fatty acid (FFA) increased later in the experimental period. The abdominal fat ratio was increased on day 28. Benzbromarone can decrease UA levels on days 14 and 28. The high and low dosage of chicory inulin also decreased serum UA levels on days 7, 14, and 28. The abdominal fat ratio, activity, and protein of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) were decreased in chicory inulin-treated groups. The activities of xanthine oxidase (XOD) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were increased in the model group and decreased in the benzbromarone and chicory inulin groups. This study evaluated a quail model of induced hyperuricemia with other metabolic disorders caused by a high-purine diet. The results indicated that a purine-rich diet might contribute to the development of hyperuricemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and abdominal obesity. Chicory inulin decreased serum UA, TG, and abdominal fat deposition in a quail model of hyperuricemia by altering the ACC protein expression and FAS and XOD activities.

  19. Lipid interaction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A. Acid-triggered permeabilization and aggregation of lipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Menestrina, G; Pederzolli, C; Forti, S; Gambale, F

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction of Pseudomonas exotoxin A with small unilamellar vesicles comprised of different phospholipids as a function of pH, toxin, and lipid concentration. We have found that this toxin induces vesicle permeabilization, as measured by the release of a fluorescent dye. Permeabilization is due to the formation of ion-conductive channels which we have directly observed in planar lipid bilayers. The toxin also produces vesicle aggregation, as indicated by an increase of the turbidity. Aggregation and permeabilization have completely different time course and extent upon toxin dose and lipid composition, thus suggesting that they are two independent events. Both time constants decrease by lowering the pH of the bulk phase or by introducing a negative lipid into the vesicles. Our results indicate that at least three steps are involved in the interaction of Pseudomonas exotoxin A with lipid vesicles. After protonation of one charged group the toxin becomes competent to bind to the surface of the vesicles. Binding is probably initiated by an electrostatic interaction because it is absolutely dependent on the presence of acidic phospholipids. Binding is a prerequisite for the subsequent insertion of the toxin into the lipid bilayer, with a special preference for phosphatidylglycerol-containing membranes, to form ionic channels. At high toxin and vesicle concentrations, bound toxin may also induce aggregation of the vesicles, particularly when phosphatidic acid is present in the lipid mixture. A quenching of the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the protein, which is induced by lowering the pH of the solution, becomes more drastic in the presence of lipid vesicles. However, this further quenching takes so long that it cannot be a prerequisite to either vesicle permeabilization or aggregation. Pseudomonas exotoxin A shares many of these properties with other bacterial toxins like diphtheria and tetanus toxin. Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 12

  20. Abscisic acid-lipid interactions: a phospholipid monolayer study.

    PubMed

    Bürner, H; Benz, R; Gimmler, H; Hartung, W; Stillwell, W

    1993-08-15

    Lipid monolayer studies were performed on a Langmuir trough in the absence and in the presence of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA). The ABA-induced effects on the lipid monolayers can be summarized as follows: (i) ABA as the free acid (pH below 5.3) increased the molecular area and slightly decreased the surface pressure in the collapse points of monolayers made of saturated, unsaturated and of mixed lipids; ABA as the anion showed only minor effects. (ii) The ABA-induced area increase of the lipid monolayers decreased when the surface pressure increased, but some ABA remained in the monolayers made of unsaturated phospholipids even at collapse pressure. (iii) The incorporation of ABA into the monolayers could be inhibited by adding the plant sterol beta-sitosterol to the monolayer forming phospholipids. (iv) There was no substantial difference of ABA action on plant phospholipids as compared with other phospholipids. (v) ABA had a much stronger influence on unsaturated phospholipids than on saturated ones. (vi) ABA decreased the phase-transition temperature of saturated phospholipids. These results, which agree with those obtained from phospholipid vesicle studies, indicate that the physical state of the lipid is important for the ability of ABA penetrating into the lipid monolayer. Finally, a possible relevance of these results is discussed in terms of the action of ABA on guard cell membranes of plants.

  1. Sequential depletion of rat testicular lipids with long-chain and very long-chain polyenoic fatty acids after X-ray-induced interruption of spermatogenesis[S

    PubMed Central

    Oresti, Gerardo M.; Ayuza Aresti, Pablo L.; Gigola, Graciela; Reyes, Luis E.; Aveldaño, Marta I.

    2010-01-01

    When a single dose of X-rays is applied to the adult rat testis, stem spermatogonia are damaged, and spermatogenesis is interrupted. Supported by Sertoli cells, spermatogenic cells that endure irradiation complete their differentiation and gradually leave the testis as spermatozoa. In this study, the in vivo changes taking place a number of weeks after irradiation revealed cell-specific features of testicular lipid classes. A linear drop, taking about six weeks, in testis weight, nonlipid materials, free cholesterol, and 22:5n-6-rich glycerophospholipids took place with germ cell depletion. Sphingomyelins and ceramides with nonhydroxy very long-chain polyenoic fatty acids (n-VLCPUFA) disappeared in four weeks, together with the last spermatocytes, whereas species with 2-hydroxy VLCPUFA lasted for six weeks, disappearing with the last spermatids and spermatozoa. The amount per testis of 22:5n-6-rich triacylglycerols, unchanged for four weeks, fell between weeks 4 and 6, associating these lipids with spermatids and their residual bodies, detected as small, bright lipid droplets. In contrast, 22:5n-6-rich species of cholesterol esters and large lipid droplets increased in seminiferous tubules up to week 6, revealing they are Sertoli cell products. At week 30, the lipid and fatty acid profiles reflected the resulting permanent testicular involution. Our data highlight the importance of Sertoli cells in maintaining lipid homeostasis during normal spermatogenesis. PMID:20529883

  2. Stability of lipid encapsulated ferulic acid particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Encapsulation of bioactive compounds by a solid lipid matrix provides stability and a mechanism for controlled release in formulated products. Phenolic compounds exhibit antioxidant and antimicrobial activities and have applications as functional food and feed additives. Ferulic acid, a common pheno...

  3. Quantitative analysis of aberrant fatty acid composition of zebrafish hepatic lipids induced by organochlorine pesticide using stable isotope-coded transmethylation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hongying; Dong, Linjie; Dong, Qingjian; Ke, Changshu; Fu, Jieying; Wang, Xiaoli; Liu, Cong; Dai, Ling

    2012-07-01

    Organochlorine pesticides have been extensively used worldwide for agricultural purposes. Due to their resistance to metabolism, a major public health concern has been raised. Aberrant hepatic lipid composition has been a hallmark of many liver diseases associated with exposure to various toxins and chemicals. And thus lots of efforts have been focused on the development of analytical techniques that can rapidly and quantitatively determine the changes in fatty acid composition of hepatic lipids. In this work, changes in fatty acid composition of hepatic lipids in response to DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) exposure were quantitatively analyzed by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometric approach based on stable isotope-coded transmethylation. It has been quantitatively demonstrated that polyunsaturated fatty acids including C20:3n3, C20:4n6, and C22:6n3 decrease in response to DDT exposure. However, saturated long chain fatty acids including C16:0, C18:0, as well as monounsaturated long chain fatty acid C18:1n9 consistently increase in a DDT-concentration-dependent manner. In particular, much higher changes in the level of hepatic C16:0 and C18:0 for male fish were observed than that for female fish. These experimental results are in accordance with qualitative histopathological analysis that revealed liver morphological alterations. The stable isotope-coded mass spectrometric approach provides a reliable means for investigating hepatotoxicity associated with fatty acid synthesis, desaturation, mitochondrial beta-oxidation, and lipid mobilization. It should be useful in elucidation of hepatotoxic mechanisms and safety assessment of environmental toxins.

  4. DMSO induces dehydration near lipid membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Song, Jinsuk; Pas, Jolien; Meijer, Lenny H H; Han, Songi

    2015-07-21

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been broadly used in biology as a cosolvent, a cryoprotectant, and an enhancer of membrane permeability, leading to the general assumption that DMSO-induced structural changes in cell membranes and their hydration water play important functional roles. Although the effects of DMSO on the membrane structure and the headgroup dehydration have been extensively studied, the mechanism by which DMSO invokes its effect on lipid membranes and the direct role of water in this process are unresolved. By directly probing the translational water diffusivity near unconfined lipid vesicle surfaces, the lipid headgroup mobility, and the repeat distances in multilamellar vesicles, we found that DMSO exclusively weakens the surface water network near the lipid membrane at a bulk DMSO mole fraction (XDMSO) of <0.1, regardless of the lipid composition and the lipid phase. Specifically, DMSO was found to effectively destabilize the hydration water structure at the lipid membrane surface at XDMSO <0.1, lower the energetic barrier to dehydrate this surface water, whose displacement otherwise requires a higher activation energy, consequently yielding compressed interbilayer distances in multilamellar vesicles at equilibrium with unaltered bilayer thicknesses. At XDMSO >0.1, DMSO enters the lipid interface and restricts the lipid headgroup motion. We postulate that DMSO acts as an efficient cryoprotectant even at low concentrations by exclusively disrupting the water network near the lipid membrane surface, weakening the cohesion between water and adhesion of water to the lipid headgroups, and so mitigating the stress induced by the volume change of water during freeze-thaw.

  5. Lipid modification processes induced by thiyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaljević, Branka; Bujak, Ivana Tartaro

    2016-07-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) oxidation by thiyl radicals (RS•) is believed to be responsible for some of the biological radiation damage. At the same time, RS• can cause isomerization of PUFA double bonds with the formation of trans isomers. The aim of this study was to better understand the competition between lipid peroxidation and geometrical isomerization processes in biomimetic model system of linoleic acid in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol using irradiation as a method for free radicals generation. In air-equilibrated conditions the propagation of lipid peroxidation was dominant up to the dose of 400 Gy, after which at higher doses up to 10 kGy the termination occurred with the predominance of geometrical isomerization. This study revealed that undesirable and permanent lipid modifications are possible at higher irradiation doses which should be considered in the planning of irradiation treatment of foods and feeds with high content of lipids and sulfur compounds.

  6. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Carol L; Walters, Katherine S; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2013-09-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces.

  7. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Carol L; Walters, Katherine S; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces. PMID:23867843

  8. Acetylsalicylic Acid reduces the severity of dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and increases the formation of anti-inflammatory lipid mediators.

    PubMed

    Köhnke, Thomas; Gomolka, Beate; Bilal, Süleyman; Zhou, Xiangzhi; Sun, Yanping; Rothe, Michael; Baumgart, Daniel C; Weylandt, Karsten H

    2013-01-01

    The role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in inflammatory bowel disease is controversial, as they have been implicated in disease aggravation. Different from other cyclooxygenase inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) enhances the formation of anti-inflammatory and proresolution lipoxins derived from arachidonic acid as well as resolvins from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). In this study, we examined the effect of ASA on murine dextran sodium sulfate colitis. A mouse magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol and post mortem assessment were used to assess disease severity, and lipid metabolites were measured using liquid chromatography-coupled tandem mass spectrometry. Decreased colitis activity was demonstrated by phenotype and MRI assessment in mice treated with ASA, and confirmed in postmortem analysis. Analysis of lipid mediators showed sustained formation of lipoxin A4 and an increase of DHA-derived 17-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (17-HDHA) after treatment with ASA. Furthermore, in vitro experiments in RAW264.7 murine macrophages demonstrated significantly increased phagocytosis activity after incubation with 17-HDHA, supporting its proresolution effect. These results show a protective effect of ASA in a murine colitis model and could give a rationale for a careful reassessment of ASA therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and particularly ulcerative colitis, possibly combined with DHA supplementation.

  9. The modulatory influence of p-methoxycinnamic acid, an active rice bran phenolic acid, against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced lipid peroxidation, antioxidant status and aberrant crypt foci in rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sivagami, Gunasekaran; Karthikkumar, Venkatachalam; Balasubramanian, Thangavel; Nalini, Namashivayam

    2012-03-05

    We investigated the chemopreventive effect of p-methoxycinnamic acid (p-MCA), an active phenolic acid of rice bran, turmeric, and Kaemperfia galanga against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. Male albino Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups. Group 1 consisted of control rats that received a modified pellet diet and 0.1% carboxymethyl cellulose. The rats in Group 2 received a modified pellet diet supplemented with p-MCA [80 mg/kg body weight (b.wt.) post-orally (p.o.)] everyday. The rats in Groups 3-6 received 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) (20 mg/kg b.wt.) via subcutaneous injections once a week for the first 4 weeks; additionally, the rats in Groups 4, 5 and 6 received p-MCA at doses of 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg b.wt./day p.o., respectively, everyday for 16 weeks. The rats were sacrificed at the end of the experimental period of 16 weeks. The DMH-treated rats exhibited an increased incidence of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) development; an increased crypt multiplicity; decreased concentrations of tissue lipid peroxidation markers such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), conjugated dienes (CD) and lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH); decreased levels of tissue enzymic antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR); and decreased levels of non-enzymic antioxidants such as reduced glutathione (GSH) and vitamins C, E and A in the colon. Supplementation with p-MCA significantly reversed these changes and significantly inhibited the formation of ACF and its multiplicity. Thus, our findings demonstrate that p-MCA exerts a strong chemopreventive activity against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinogenesis by virtue of its ability to prevent the alterations in DMH-induced circulatory and tissue oxidative stress and preneoplastic changes. p-MCA was more effective when administered at a dose of 40 mg/kg b.wt. than at the other two doses tested.

  10. Ursodeoxycholic acid improves insulin sensitivity and hepatic steatosis by inducing the excretion of hepatic lipids in high-fat diet-fed KK-Ay mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Takuma; Shiraishi, Muneshige; Ohta, Tetsuya; Sakai, Kaoru; Ishii, Shinichi

    2012-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is frequently accompanied by fatty liver/nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Hence, accumulation of lipids in the liver is considered to be one of the risk factors for insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is widely used for the treatment of liver dysfunction. We investigated the therapeutic effects of UDCA on type 2 diabetes mellitus exacerbating hepatic steatosis and the underlying mechanisms of its action using KK-A(y) mice fed a high-fat diet. KK-A(y) mice were prefed a high-fat diet; and 50, 150, and 450 mg/kg of UDCA was orally administered for 2 or 3 weeks. Administration of UDCA decreased fasting hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp analyses showed that UDCA improved hepatic (but not peripheral) insulin resistance. Hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol contents were significantly reduced by treatment with UDCA, although the genes involved in the synthesis of fatty acids and cholesterol, including fatty acid synthase and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, were upregulated. Fecal levels of bile acids, neutral sterols, fatty acids, and phospholipids were significantly increased by UDCA treatment. The gene expression levels and protein phosphorylation levels of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers were not changed by UDCA treatment. These results indicate that UDCA ameliorates hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia by improving hepatic insulin resistance and steatosis in high-fat diet-fed KK-A(y) mice. Reduction of hepatic lipids might be due to their excretion in feces, followed by enhanced utilization of glucose for the synthesis of fatty acids and cholesterol. Ursodeoxycholic acid should be effective for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus accompanying hepatic steatosis.

  11. Curvature-induced lipid segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bin; Meng, Qing-Tian; B. Selinger Robin, L.; V. Selinger, Jonathan; Ye, Fang-Fu

    2015-06-01

    We investigate how an externally imposed curvature influences lipid segregation on two-phase-coexistent membranes. We show that the bending-modulus contrast of the two phases and the curvature act together to yield a reduced effective line tension. On largely curved membranes, a state of multiple domains (or rafts) forms due to a mechanism analogous to that causing magnetic-vortex formation in type-II superconductors. We determine the criterion for such a multi-domain state to occur; we then calculate respectively the size of the domains formed on cylindrically and spherically curved membranes. Project supported by the Hundred-Talent Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (FY) and the National Science Foundation of USA via Grant DMR-1106014 (RLBS, JVS).

  12. Enzymatic lipid removal from surfaces--lipid desorption by a pH-induced "electrostatic explosion".

    PubMed

    Snabe, Torben; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Petersen, Steffen Bjørn

    2005-01-01

    Removal of lipidic molecules from surfaces can be accomplished using detergents containing lipases. Surface cleaning is usually performed under alkaline conditions due to increased solubility of the hydrolysis products, especially free fatty acids. This paper shows that removal of a triacylglycerol film from a surface can be dramatically enhanced in a sequential system where pH is shifted to alkaline conditions after an initial lipolytic reaction period at or below neutral pH. Data from three different biophysical techniques, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D), and total internal reflection fluorescence spectroscopy (TIRF) clearly show the effects of such cleaning procedure. Initially the reaction is carried out at pH below the pKa value of the fatty acids formed upon triacylglycerol hydrolysis, and the protonated fatty acids accumulate in the film. The mechanism of lipid removal, induced by increasing pH to a value above the fatty acid pKa, is explained by a burst caused by electrostatic repulsion between rapidly ionised fatty acids, i.e. by an "electrostatic explosion". Performing the initial hydrolysis at pH 6 and the subsequent rinse at pH 10, using triolein as model substrate, lipid removal from surfaces by both commercial detergent lipases and non-commercial lipases was significantly improved compared to a reaction at constant pH 10.

  13. Diapause induces remodeling of the fatty acid composition of membrane and storage lipids in overwintering larvae of Ostrinia nubilalis, Hubn. (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    PubMed

    Vukašinović, Elvira L; Pond, David W; Worland, M Roger; Kojić, Danijela; Purać, Jelena; Popović, Željko D; Grubor-Lajšić, Gordana

    2015-06-01

    Seasonal changes in the FA composition of triacylglycerols and phospholipids prepared from the whole bodies of non-diapausing and diapausing fifth instar larvae of Ostrinia nubilalis, Hubn. (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) were determined to evaluate the role of these lipids in diapause. Substantial changes in the FA composition of triacylglycerols and phospholipids were triggered by diapause development. This led to a significant increase in the overall FA unsaturation (UFAs/SFAs ratio), attributable to an increase in the relative proportion of MUFAs and the concomitant decrease in PUFAs and SFAs. In triacylglycerols, the significant changes in the FAs composition are the result of an increase in the relative proportions of MUFAs, palmitoleic acid (16:1n-7) and oleic acid (18:1n-9), and a concomitant reduction in the composition of SFAs and PUFAs, mainly palmitic acid (16:0) and linoleic acid (18:2n-6), respectively. Changes in the composition of phospholipids were more subtle with FAs contributing to the overall increase of FA unsaturation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis revealed that the melt transition temperatures of total lipids prepared from whole larvae, primarily attributable to the triacylglycerol component, were significantly lower during the time course of diapause compared with non-diapause. These observations were correlated to the FA composition of triacylglycerols, most likely enabling them to remain functional during colder winter conditions. We conclude that O. nubilalis undergoes remodeling of FA profiles of both energy storage triacylglycerols and membrane phospholipids as an element of its overwintering physiology which may improve the ability to cold harden during diapause.

  14. Effect of brown seaweed lipids on fatty acid composition and lipid hydroperoxide levels of mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Airanthi, M K Widjaja-Adhi; Sasaki, Naoya; Iwasaki, Sayaka; Baba, Nobuko; Abe, Masayuki; Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2011-04-27

    Brown seaweed lipids from Undaria pinnatifida (Wakame), Sargassum horneri (Akamoku), and Cystoseira hakodatensis (Uganomoku) contained several bioactive compounds, namely, fucoxanthin, polyphenols, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Fucoxanthin and polyphenol contents of Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids were higher than those of Wakame lipids, while Wakame lipids showed higher total omega-3 PUFA content than Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids. The levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) in liver lipids of KK-A(y) mouse significantly increased by Akamoku and Uganomoku lipid feeding as compared with the control, but not by Wakame lipid feeding. Fucoxanthin has been reported to accelerate the bioconversion of omega-3 PUFA and omega-6 PUFA to DHA and AA, respectively. The higher hepatic DHA and AA level of mice fed Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids would be attributed to the higher content of fucoxanthin of Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids. The lipid hydroperoxide levels of the liver of mice fed brown seaweed lipids were significantly lower than those of control mice, even though total PUFA content was higher in the liver of mice fed brown seaweed lipids. This would be, at least in part, due to the antioxidant activity of fucoxanthin metabolites in the liver.

  15. Leucine-enriched protein feeding does not impair exercise-induced free fatty acid availability and lipid oxidation: beneficial implications for training in carbohydrate-restricted states.

    PubMed

    Impey, Samuel G; Smith, Dominic; Robinson, Amy L; Owens, Daniel J; Bartlett, Jonathan D; Smith, Kenneth; Limb, Marie; Tang, Jonathan; Fraser, William D; Close, Graeme L; Morton, James P

    2015-02-01

    Given that the enhanced oxidative adaptations observed when training in carbohydrate (CHO)-restricted states is potentially regulated through free fatty acid (FFA)-mediated signalling and that leucine-rich protein elevates muscle protein synthesis, the present study aimed to test the hypothesis that leucine-enriched protein feeding enhances circulating leucine concentration but does not impair FFA availability or whole body lipid oxidation during exercise. Nine males cycled for 2 h at 70% VO2peak when fasted (PLACEBO) or having consumed a whey protein solution (WHEY) or a leucine-enriched whey protein gel (GEL), administered as 22 g 1 h pre-exercise, 11 g/h during and 22 g 30 min post-exercise. Total leucine administration was 14.4 g and 6.3 in GEL and WHEY, respectively. Mean plasma leucine concentrations were elevated in GEL (P = 0.001) compared with WHEY and PLACEBO (375 ± 100, 272 ± 51, 146 ± 14 µmol L(-1), respectively). No differences (P = 0.153) in plasma FFA (WHEY 0.53 ± 0.30, GEL 0.45 ± 0.25, PLACEBO 0.65 ± 0.30, mmol L(-1)) or whole body lipid oxidation during exercise (WHEY 0.37 ± 0.26, GEL 0.36 ± 0.24, PLACEBO 0.34 ± 0.24 g/min) were apparent between trials, despite elevated (P = 0.001) insulin in WHEY and GEL compared with PLACEBO (38 ± 16, 35 ± 16, 22 ± 11 pmol L(-1), respectively). We conclude that leucine-enriched protein feeding does not impair FFA availability or whole body lipid oxidation during exercise, thus having practical applications for athletes who deliberately train in CHO-restricted states to promote skeletal muscle adaptations.

  16. Fatty acid profile of 25 alternative lipid feedstocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports the fatty acid profiles of 25 alternative lipid feedstocks for the production of bio-based fuels and chemicals. Lipids were extracted using hexane from oil-bearing seeds using a standard Soxhlet apparatus. Fatty acid profiles were measured using gas chromatography-flame ionization...

  17. Regulation of exercise-induced lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Jordy, Andreas Børsting; Kiens, Bente

    2014-12-01

    Exercise increases the utilization of lipids in muscle. The sources of lipids are long-chain fatty acids taken up from the plasma and fatty acids released from stores of intramuscular triacylglycerol by the action of intramuscular lipases. In the present review, we focus on the role of fatty acid binding proteins, particularly fatty acid translocase/cluster of differentiation 36 (FAT/CD36), in the exercise- and contraction-induced increase in uptake of long-chain fatty acids in muscle. The FAT/CD36 translocates from intracellular depots to the surface membrane upon initiation of exercise/muscle contractions. This occurs independently of AMP-activated protein kinase, and data suggest that Ca(2+)-related signalling is responsible. The FAT/CD36 has an important role; long-chain fatty acid uptake is markedly decreased in FAT/CD36 knockout mice during contractions/exercise compared with wild-type control mice. In skeletal muscle, 98% of the lipase activity is accounted for by adipose triglyceride lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase. Give that inhibition or knockout of hormone-sensitive lipase does not impair lipolysis in muscle during contraction, the data point to an important role of adipose triglyceride lipase in regulation of muscle lipolysis. Although the molecular regulation of the lipases in muscle is not understood, it is speculated that intramuscular lipolysis may be regulated in part by the availability of the plasma concentration of long-chain fatty acids.

  18. Non-acidic activation of pain-related Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 3 by lipids.

    PubMed

    Marra, Sébastien; Ferru-Clément, Romain; Breuil, Véronique; Delaunay, Anne; Christin, Marine; Friend, Valérie; Sebille, Stéphane; Cognard, Christian; Ferreira, Thierry; Roux, Christian; Euller-Ziegler, Liana; Noel, Jacques; Lingueglia, Eric; Deval, Emmanuel

    2016-02-15

    Extracellular pH variations are seen as the principal endogenous signal that triggers activation of Acid-Sensing Ion Channels (ASICs), which are basically considered as proton sensors, and are involved in various processes associated with tissue acidification. Here, we show that human painful inflammatory exudates, displaying non-acidic pH, induce a slow constitutive activation of human ASIC3 channels. This effect is largely driven by lipids, and we identify lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and arachidonic acid (AA) as endogenous activators of ASIC3 in the absence of any extracellular acidification. The combination of LPC and AA evokes robust depolarizing current in DRG neurons at physiological pH 7.4, increases nociceptive C-fiber firing, and induces pain behavior in rats, effects that are all prevented by ASIC3 blockers. Lipid-induced pain is also significantly reduced in ASIC3 knockout mice. These findings open new perspectives on the roles of ASIC3 in the absence of tissue pH variation, as well as on the contribution of those channels to lipid-mediated signaling.

  19. 5-aminolevulinic acid induced lipid peroxidation after light exposure on human colon carcinoma cells and effects of alpha-tocopherol treatment.

    PubMed

    Gederaas, O A; Lagerberg, J W; Brekke, O; Berg, K; Dubbelman, T M

    2000-10-16

    This work relates to studies on modes of phototoxicity by protoporphyrin (PpIX) after incubation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) on cultured cells. Lipid peroxidation in the 5-ALA incubated primary adenocarcinoma cells from the rectosigmoid colon (WiDr cells) was determined by measurement of protein-associated thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). TBARS were increased 2-fold in cells treated with 2 mM 5-ALA for 3.5 h in serum enriched medium. After illumination of 5-ALA incubated cells, TBARS were formed in a light dose dependent manner. TBARS analysis were compared with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of malondialdehyde, and results indicate that 90% of the thiobarbituric reactive substances were due to malondialdehyde. Pretreating WiDr cells with alpha-tocopherol for 48 h inhibits the cytotoxic effect of 5-ALA and increases 5-fold the light dose needed to kill 50% of the cells. Pretreatment with alpha-tocopherol shows a considerable decrease (about 80%) on TBARS formation after illumination. The cellular content of alpha-tocopherol was determined by HPLC and found to be 15.3 pmol/10(6) cells.

  20. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Lipid Bilayers and Tubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Linda S.; Yuan, Jing; Pramudya, Yohannes; Nguyen, Lam T.

    2007-03-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are found in a variety of biological membranes and have been implicated with lipid raft formation and possible function, typical molecules include DHA (Docosahexanoic Acid) and AA (Alphalinoleic Acid) which have been the focus of considerable attention in recent years. We are interested in the phase behavior of these molecules in the lipid bilayer. The addition of lipid molecules with polyunsaturated chains has a clear effect on the fluidity and curvature of the membrane and we investigate the effects the addition of polyunsaturated lipids on bilayer structure and tubule formation. Self-assembled cylindrical lipid tubules have attracted considerable attention because of their interesting structures and potential technological applications. Using x-ray diffraction techniques, Atomic Force Microscopy and confocal fluorescence imaging, both symmetric and mixed chain lipids were incorporated into model membranes and the effects on bilayer structure and tubule formation investigated.

  1. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium.

    PubMed

    Vasavada, A R; Thampi, P; Yadav, S; Rawal, U M

    1993-12-01

    The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium) and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium). In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium) and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium). From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  2. Acidic pH-induced membrane insertion of colicin A into E. coli natural lipids probed by site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Pulagam, Lakshmi Padmavathi; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2013-05-27

    Colicin A is a pore-forming toxin that forms a voltage-gated channel in the inner membrane of the target bacteria. The structures of the closed and open channel states of membrane-bound colicin A are not resolved. In the present site-directed spin-labeling study, the insertion-competent state of colicin A is provoked by an acidic pH jump prior to the insertion into liposomes prepared from Escherichia coli natural lipids. The membrane-bound colicin A is able to open a voltage-dependent channel as demonstrated by the efflux of tempophosphate spin label from the lumen of liposomes. The EPR spectra of spin-labeled colicin A variants in the membrane-bound closed channel state reveal a conformational equilibrium with resolved interhelical tertiary contacts. The spin label accessibility and polarity profiles suggest the amphipathic helices (H1-H7 and H10) to be located in the membrane close to the membrane-water interface and the hydrophobic hairpin (H8 and H9) to be immersed more deeply in the membrane.

  3. Chlorogenic acid from honeysuckle improves hepatic lipid dysregulation and modulates hepatic fatty acid composition in rats with chronic endotoxin infusion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Ruan, Zheng; Wen, Yanmei; Yang, Yuhui; Mi, Shumei; Zhou, Lili; Wu, Xin; Ding, Sheng; Deng, Zeyuan; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2016-03-01

    Chlorogenic acid as a natural hydroxycinnamic acid has protective effect for liver. Endotoxin induced metabolic disorder, such as lipid dysregulation and hyperlipidemia. In this study, we investigated the effect of chlorogenic acid in rats with chronic endotoxin infusion. The Sprague-Dawley rats with lipid metabolic disorder (LD group) were intraperitoneally injected endotoxin. And the rats of chlorogenic acid-LD group were daily received chlorogenic acid by intragastric administration. In chlorogenic acid-LD group, the area of visceral adipocyte was decreased and liver injury was ameliorated, as compared to LD group. In chlorogenic acid-LD group, serum triglycerides, free fatty acids, hepatic triglycerides and cholesterol were decreased, the proportion of C20:1, C24:1 and C18:3n-6, Δ9-18 and Δ6-desaturase activity index in the liver were decreased, and the proportion of C18:3n-3 acid was increased, compared to the LD group. Moreover, levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I, and fatty acid β-oxidation were increased in chlorogenic acid-LD group compared to LD rats, whereas levels of fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase were decreased. These findings demonstrate that chlorogenic acid effectively improves hepatic lipid dysregulation in rats by regulating fatty acid metabolism enzymes, stimulating AMP-activated protein kinase activation, and modulating levels of hepatic fatty acids.

  4. Performance of structured lipids incorporating selected phenolic and ascorbic acids.

    PubMed

    Gruczynska, Eliza; Przybylski, Roman; Aladedunye, Felix

    2015-04-15

    Conditions applied during frying require antioxidant which is stable at these conditions and provides protection for frying oil and fried food. Novel structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants were formed by enzymatic transesterification, exploring canola oil and naturally occurring antioxidants such as ascorbic and selected phenolic acids as substrates. Lipozyme RM IM lipase from Rhizomucor miehei was used as biocatalyst. Frying performance and oxidative stability of the final transesterification products were evaluated. The novel lipids showed significantly improved frying performance compared to canola oil. Oxidative stability assessment of the structured lipids showed significant improvement in resistance to oxidative deterioration compared to original canola oil. Interestingly, the presence of ascorbic acid in an acylglycerol structure protected α-tocopherol against thermal degradation, which was not observed for the phenolic acids. Developed structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants may directly affect nutritional properties of lipids also offering nutraceutical ingredients for food formulation.

  5. Inability of pyrogenic, purified Bordetella pertussis lipid A to induce interleukin-1 release by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Caroff, M; Cavaillon, J M; Fitting, C; Haeffner-Cavaillon, N

    1986-01-01

    Free lipid A of Bordetella pertussis, Neisseria meningitidis, and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was prepared by hydrolysis in acetate buffer (pH 4.5); in addition, lipid A from B. pertussis and E. coli was prepared by hydrolysis in mineral acid (HCl). The precipitates obtained were purified by extraction methods in toluene-methanol and are referred to as crude lipid A. Purified lipid A from N. meningitidis and B. pertussis was obtained by extraction in a mixture of chloroform-methanol-water-triethylamine. The different preparations were tested for their pyrogenicity (endogenous pyrogen; EP) and their capacity to trigger the release of interleukin-1 (IL-1; previously known as lymphocyte-activating factor; LAF) by human monocytes. Crude lipid A from E. coli and N. meningitidis were both IL-1 inducers. Crude B. pertussis lipid A (acetate buffer; pH 4.5), which contains a beta-1-6-linked D-glucosamine disaccharide, two phosphoryl groups, and five fatty acids, was pyrogenic and an IL-1 inducer (EP+/LAF+); but crude B. pertussis lipid A (0.25 N HCl), which lacked the glycosidic phosphoryl group, was 1,000-fold less pyrogenic than the diphosphorylated lipid A, yet it retained its IL-1-inducing capacity (EP-/LAF+). Purified N. meningitidis lipid A was not an inducer of IL-1 release and purified B. pertussis lipid A exhibited identical pyrogenicity as the parent LPS but was devoid of any IL-1-release inducing capacity (EP+/LAF-). These results demonstrate that for some endotoxins, purified lipid A is unable to induce IL-1 release by human monocytes; however, it is pyrogenic, supporting the hypothesis that IL-1 and EP are induced by different determinants on the LPS molecule. Images PMID:2876960

  6. Acid test: lipid antigens get into the groove.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Mitchell; Sullivan, Barbara A

    2008-06-01

    How do CD1 molecules load lipid antigens? In this issue of Immunity, Relloso et al. (2008) uncover how lysosomal pH targets amino acids in CD1b, causing it to open and attain a conformation more receptive to lipid antigens.

  7. Antioxidative effect of rhizome of Zinziber officinale on paraben induced lipid peroxidation: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Asnani, Veena; Verma, Ramtej Jayram

    2007-01-01

    Antioxidative effect of aqueous extract of rhizome of Ginger (Zinziber officinale) was examined on p-hydroxybenzoic acid (paraben) induced lipid peroxidation. Addition of paraben (25-150 microg/mL) to liver and kidney homogenates significantly increases H2O2 induced lipid peroxidation in vitro. Effect was dose dependent up to 100 microg/mL concentration. An addition of aqueous extract of ginger significantly reduced paraben (100 microg/mL) induced lipid peroxidation in liver and kidney homogenates. The effect was concentration dependent.

  8. Peroxide-induced cell death and lipid peroxidation in C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Linden, Arne; Gülden, Michael; Martin, Hans-Jörg; Maser, Edmund; Seibert, Hasso

    2008-08-01

    Peroxides are often used as models to induce oxidative damage in cells in vitro. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of lipid peroxidation in peroxide-induced cell death. To this end (i) the ability to induce lipid peroxidation in C6 rat astroglioma cells of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) and t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) (ii) the relation between peroxide-induced lipid peroxidation and cell death in terms of time and concentration dependency and (iii) the capability of the lipid peroxidation chain breaking alpha-tocopherol to prevent peroxide-induced lipid peroxidation and/or cell death were investigated. Lipid peroxidation was characterised by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and, by HPLC, malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and hexanal. Within 2 h CHP, t-BuOOH and H2O2 induced cell death with EC50 values of 59+/-9 microM, 290+/-30 microM and 12+/-1.1 mM, respectively. CHP and t-BuOOH, but not H2O2 induced lipid peroxidation in C6 cells with EC50 values of 15+/-14 microM and 130+/-33 microM, respectively. The TBARS measured almost exclusively consisted of MDA. 4-HNE was mostly not detectable. The concentration of hexanal slightly increased with increasing concentrations of organic peroxides. Regarding time and concentration dependency lipid peroxidation preceded cell death. Pretreatment with alpha-tocopherol (10 microM, 24 h) prevented both, peroxide-induced lipid peroxidation and cell death. The results strongly indicate a major role of lipid peroxidation in the killing of C6 cells by organic peroxides but also that lipid peroxidation is not involved in H2O2 induced cell death.

  9. Lipid peroxidation and cytotoxicity induced by respirable volcanic ash.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Antonio-Nieto-Camacho; Gomez-Vidales, Virginia; Ramirez-Apan, María Teresa; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención; Kaufhold, Stephan; Abidin, Zeanal; Theng, Benny K G

    2014-06-15

    This paper reports that the main component of respirable volcanic ash, allophane, induces lipid peroxidation (LP), the oxidative degradation of lipids in cell membranes, and cytotoxicity in murin monocyle/macrophage cells. Naturally-occurring allophane collected from New Zealand, Japan, and Ecuador was studied. The quantification of LP was conducted using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS) assay. The cytotoxic effect was determined by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay. Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) determinations of naturally-occurring allophane confirmed the incorporation in the structure and clustering of structural Fe(3+), and nucleation and growth of small-sized Fe (oxyhydr)oxide or gibbsite. LP induced by allophane varied with time, and solid concentration and composition, reaching 6.7 ± 0.2 nmol TBARS mg prot(-1). LP was surface controlled but not restricted by structural or surface-bound Fe(3+), because redox processes induced by soluble components other than perferryl iron. The reactivity of Fe(3+) soluble species stemming from surface-bound Fe(3+) or small-sized Fe(3+) refractory minerals in allophane surpassed that of structural Fe(3+) located in tetrahedral or octahedral sites of phyllosilicates or bulk iron oxides. Desferrioxamine B mesylate salt (DFOB) or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) inhibited LP. EDTA acted as a more effective inhibitor, explained by multiple electron transfer pathways. Registered cell-viability values were as low as 68.5 ± 6.7%.

  10. Fatty acid methyl ester profiles of bat wing surface lipids.

    PubMed

    Pannkuk, Evan L; Fuller, Nathan W; Moore, Patrick R; Gilmore, David F; Savary, Brett J; Risch, Thomas S

    2014-11-01

    Sebocytes are specialized epithelial cells that rupture to secrete sebaceous lipids (sebum) across the mammalian integument. Sebum protects the integument from UV radiation, and maintains host microbial communities among other functions. Native glandular sebum is composed primarily of triacylglycerides (TAG) and wax esters (WE). Upon secretion (mature sebum), these lipids combine with minor cellular membrane components comprising total surface lipids. TAG and WE are further cleaved to smaller molecules through oxidation or host enzymatic digestion, resulting in a complex mixture of glycerolipids (e.g., TAG), sterols, unesterified fatty acids (FFA), WE, cholesteryl esters, and squalene comprising surface lipid. We are interested if fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiling of bat surface lipid could predict species specificity to the cutaneous fungal disease, white nose syndrome (WNS). We collected sebaceous secretions from 13 bat spp. using Sebutape(®) and converted them to FAME with an acid catalyzed transesterification. We found that Sebutape(®) adhesive patches removed ~6× more total lipid than Sebutape(®) indicator strips. Juvenile eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis) had significantly higher 18:1 than adults, but 14:0, 16:1, and 20:0 were higher in adults. FAME profiles among several bat species were similar. We concluded that bat surface lipid FAME profiling does not provide a robust model predicting species susceptibility to WNS. However, these results provide baseline data that can be used for lipid roles in future ecological studies, such as life history, diet, or migration.

  11. Enhanced lipid extraction from algae using free nitrous acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue; Naghdi, Forough Ghasemi; Ye, Liu; Lant, Paul; Pratt, Steven

    2014-05-01

    Lipid extraction has been identified as a major bottleneck for large-scale algal biodiesel production. In this work free nitrous acid (FNA) is presented as an effective and low cost pretreatment to enhance lipid recovery from algae. Two batch tests, with a range of FNA additions, were conducted to disrupt algal cells prior to lipid extraction by organic solvents. Total accessible lipid content was quantified by the Bligh and Dyer method, and was found to increase with pretreatment time (up to 48 h) and FNA concentration (up to 2.19 mg HNO2-N/L). Hexane extraction was used to study industrially accessible lipids. The mass transfer coefficient (k) for lipid extraction using hexane from algae treated with 2.19 mg HNO2-N/L FNA was found to be dramatically higher than for extraction from untreated algae. Consistent with extraction results, cell disruption analysis indicated the disruption of the cell membrane barrier.

  12. Silica radical-induced DNA damage and lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, X; Mao, Y; Daniel, L N; Saffiotti, U; Dalal, N S; Vallyathan, V

    1994-01-01

    In recent years, more attention has been given to the mechanism of disease induction caused by the surface properties of minerals. In this respect, specific research needs to be focused on the biologic interactions of oxygen radicals generated by mineral particles resulting in cell injury and DNA damage leading to fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis. In this investigation, we used electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin trapping to study oxygen radical generation from aqueous suspensions of freshly fractured crystalline silica. Hydroxyl radical (.OH), superoxide radical (O2.-) and singlet oxygen (1O2) were all detected. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) partially inhibited .OH yield, whereas catalase abolished .OH generation. H2O2 enhanced .OH generation while deferoxamine inhibited it, indicating that .OH is generated via a Haber-Weiss type reaction. These spin trapping measurements provide the first evidence that aqueous suspensions of silica particles generate O2.- and 1O2. Oxygen consumption measurements indicate that freshly fractured silica uses molecular oxygen to generate O2.- and 1O2. Electrophoretic assays of in vitro DNA strand breakages showed that freshly fractured silica induced DNA strand breakage, which was inhibited by catalase and enhanced by H2O2. In an argon atmosphere, DNA damage was suppressed, showing that molecular oxygen is required for the silica-induced DNA damage. Incubation of freshly fractured silica with linoleic acid generated linoleic acid-derived free radicals and caused dose-dependent lipid peroxidation as measured by ESR spin trapping and malondialdehyde formation. SOD, catalase, and sodium benzoate inhibited lipid peroxidation by 49, 52, and 75%, respectively, again showing the role of oxygen radicals in silica-induced lipid peroxidation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 7. PMID:7705289

  13. Evening primrose oil in rheumatoid arthritis: changes in serum lipids and fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Jäntti, J; Nikkari, T; Solakivi, T; Vapaatalo, H; Isomäki, H

    1989-01-01

    The serum concentration of lipids and composition of fatty acids after overnight fasting were studied in 18 patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated for 12 weeks with either 20 ml of evening primrose oil containing 9% of gamma-linolenic acid or olive oil. The serum concentrations of oleic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and apolipoprotein B decreased and those of linoleic acid, gamma-linolenic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and arachidonic acid increased during treatment with evening primrose oil. During olive oil treatment the serum concentration of eicosapentaenoic acid decreased and those of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I increased slightly. The decrease in serum eicosapentaenoic acid and the increase in arachidonic acid concentrations induced by evening primrose oil may not be favourable effects in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in the light of the roles of these fatty acids as precursors of eicosanoids. PMID:2649022

  14. Acid Base Equilibrium in a Lipid/Water Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streb, Kristina K.; Ilich, Predrag-Peter

    2003-12-01

    A new and original experiment in which partition of bromophenol blue dye between water and lipid/water gel causes a shift in the acid base equilibrium of the dye is described. The dye-absorbing material is a monoglyceride food additive of plant origin that mixes freely with water to form a stable cubic phase gel; the nascent gel absorbs the dye from aqueous solution and converts it to the acidic form. There are three concurrent processes taking place in the experiment: (a) formation of the lipid/water gel, (b) absorption of the dye by the gel, and (c) protonation of the dye in the lipid/water gel environment. As the aqueous solution of the dye is a deep purple-blue color at neutral pH and yellow at acidic pH the result of these processes is visually striking: the strongly green-yellow particles of lipid/water gel are suspended in purple-blue aqueous solution. The local acidity of the lipid/water gel is estimated by UV vis spectrophotometry. This experiment is an example of host-guest (lipid/water gel dye) interaction and is suitable for project-type biophysics, physical chemistry, or biochemistry labs. The experiment requires three, 3-hour lab sessions, two of which must not be separated by more than two days.

  15. [Linoleic acid and the immune system. Controversies about lipid emulsions].

    PubMed

    García de Lorenzo, A; Culebras, J M

    1992-01-01

    The selection of a given lipidic function for nutritional backup requires not only knowledge of the metabolism of the different existing lipidic emulsions and of their specific therapeutic indications, but also of their contraindications and controversies because, apart from their calorific value, the contribution of liposoluble vitamins and their function in preventing essential fatty acid deficiencies, we know that they are powerful metabolic modulators. This in associated with the fact that manipulation of dietary lipids (enteral or parenteral) can affect and modulate the response to the disease, attack or infection by improving or impairing the different immune functions. This review is focused on the scientific publications which have examined the varying effects of lipidic emulsions, in quantity and in quality (particularly linoleic acid) on the immune system, on the fatty acid composition of the cellular membranes and on the production of and prostaglandins and leukotrienes. An update is given of the known interrelation between lipids and immunity, with appraisal of triglycerides and long-medium -- and short-chain fatty acids, mixtures of medium -- and long-chain triglycerides, the proportions between infinity-3/infinity-6, and structured lipids.

  16. Ultraviolet and 5'fluorodeoxyuridine induced random mutagenesis in Chlorella vulgaris and its impact on fatty acid profile: a new insight on lipid-metabolizing genes and structural characterization of related proteins.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Josephine; Rangamaran, Vijaya Raghavan; Gopal, Dharani; Shivasankarasubbiah, Kumar T; Thilagam, Mary Leema J; Peter Dhassiah, Magesh; Padinjattayil, Divya Shridhar M; Valsalan, VinithKumar N; Manambrakat, Vijayakumaran; Dakshinamurthy, Sivakumar; Thirunavukkarasu, Sivaraman; Ramalingam, Kirubagaran

    2015-02-01

    The present study was aimed at randomly mutating the microalga, Chlorella vulgaris, in order to alter its cellular behaviour towards increased lipid production for efficient biodiesel production from algal biomass. Individual mutants from ultraviolet light (UV-1 (30 s exposure), UV-2 (60 s exposure) and UV-3 (90 s exposure)) and 5'fluorodeoxyuridine (5'FDU-1 (0.25 mM) and 5'FDU-2 (0.50 mM)) exposed cells were identified to explore an alternative method for lipid enhancement. A marginally significant decrease in biomass in the UV mutants; marked increase in the lipid content in UV-2 and 5'FDU-1 mutants; significant increase in saturated fatty acids level, especially in UV-2 mutant; insignificant increase in lipid production when these mutants were subjected to an additional stress of nitrogen starvation and predominantly enhanced level of unsaturated fatty acids in all the strains except UV-2 were noted. Chloroplast ultrastructural alterations and defective biosynthesis of chloroplast specific lipid constituents were observed in the mutants. Modelling of three-dimensional structures of acetyl coA carboxylase (ACCase), omega-6, plastid delta-12 and microsomal delta-12 fatty acid desaturases for the first time and ligand-interaction studies greatly substantiated our findings. A replacement of leucine by a serine residue in the acetyl coA carboxylase gene of UV-2 mutant suggests the reason behind lipid enhancement in UV-2 mutant. Higher activity of ACCase in UV-2 and 5'FDU-1 strongly proves the functional consequences of gene mutation to lipid production. In conclusion, algal mutants exhibited significant impact on biodiesel production through structural alterations in the lipid-metabolizing genes, thereby enhancing lipid production and saturated fatty acid levels.

  17. Solubilization of lipids and lipid phases by the styrene-maleic acid copolymer.

    PubMed

    Dominguez Pardo, Juan J; Dörr, Jonas M; Iyer, Aditya; Cox, Ruud C; Scheidelaar, Stefan; Koorengevel, Martijn C; Subramaniam, Vinod; Killian, J Antoinette

    2017-01-01

    A promising tool in membrane research is the use of the styrene-maleic acid (SMA) copolymer to solubilize membranes in the form of nanodiscs. Since membranes are heterogeneous in composition, it is important to know whether SMA thereby has a preference for solubilization of either specific types of lipids or specific bilayer phases. Here, we investigated this by performing partial solubilization of model membranes and analyzing the lipid composition of the solubilized fraction. We found that SMA displays no significant lipid preference in homogeneous binary lipid mixtures in the fluid phase, even when using lipids that by themselves show very different solubilization kinetics. By contrast, in heterogeneous phase-separated bilayers, SMA was found to have a strong preference for solubilization of lipids in the fluid phase as compared to those in either a gel phase or a liquid-ordered phase. Together the results suggest that (1) SMA is a reliable tool to characterize native interactions between membrane constituents, (2) any solubilization preference of SMA is not due to properties of individual lipids but rather due to properties of the membrane or membrane domains in which these lipids reside and (3) exploiting SMA resistance rather than detergent resistance may be an attractive approach for the isolation of ordered domains from biological membranes.

  18. Lipid oxidation stability of omega-3- and conjugated linoleic acid-enriched sous vide chicken meat.

    PubMed

    Narciso-Gaytán, C; Shin, D; Sams, A R; Keeton, J T; Miller, R K; Smith, S B; Sánchez-Plata, M X

    2011-02-01

    Lipid oxidation is known to occur rather rapidly in cooked chicken meat containing relatively high amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids. To assess the lipid oxidation stability of sous vide chicken meat enriched with n-3 and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) fatty acids, 624 Cobb × Ross broilers were raised during a 6-wk feeding period. The birds were fed diets containing CLA (50% cis-9, trans-11 and 50% trans-10, cis-12 isomers), flaxseed oil (FSO), or menhaden fish oil (MFO), each supplemented with 42 or 200 mg/kg of vitamin E (dl-α-tocopheryl acetate). Breast or thigh meat was vacuum-packed, cooked (74°C), cooled in ice water, and stored at 4.4°C for 0, 5, 10, 15, and 30 d. The lipid oxidation development of the meat was estimated by quantification of malonaldehyde (MDA) values, using the 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances analysis. Fatty acid, nonheme iron, moisture, and fat analyses were performed as well. Results showed that dietary CLA induced deposition of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomers, increased the proportion of saturated fatty acids, and decreased the proportions of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Flaxseed oil induced higher deposition of C18:1, C18:2, C18:3, and C20:4 fatty acids, whereas MFO induced higher deposition of n-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5), and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6; P < 0.05). Meat lipid oxidation stability was affected by the interaction of either dietary oil or vitamin E with storage day. Lower (P < 0.05) MDA values were found in the CLA treatment than in the MFO and FSO treatments. Lower (P < 0.05) MDA values were detected in meat samples from the 200 mg/kg of vitamin E than in meat samples from the 42 mg/kg of vitamin E. Nonheme iron values did not affect (P > 0.05) lipid oxidation development. In conclusion, dietary CLA, FSO, and MFO influenced the fatty acid composition of chicken muscle and the lipid oxidation stability of meat over the storage time. Supranutritional

  19. Lipid and fatty acid analysis of the Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus (PiGV) envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri-Bhalla, K.; Funk, C. J.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Virus envelope was isolated from Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus, produced in early fourth-instar larvae. Both polar and neutral lipids were analyzed by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography. Fatty acid composition of various individual neutral and polar lipids was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. The major components of envelope neutral lipid were diacylglycerols. Palmitic acid and stearic acid were the major saturated fatty acids in both polar and neutral lipids. Whereas palmitoleic acid was the major unsaturated fatty acids in neutral lipids, oleic acid was the major unsaturated fatty acid in the polar lipids.

  20. Fatty Acids and Bioactive Lipids of Potato Cultivars: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Mohamed Fawzy; Oraby, Hesahm Farouk

    2016-01-01

    Potato tuber is a highly nutritious, wherein genotype and environmental differences are known to exist in the shape, size and nutritional value of potatoes. Owing to its high consumption, potato could be an ideal carrier of health-promoting phytochemicals. Potato cultivars contain many bioactive lipidic compounds such as fatty acids, glycolipids, phospholipids, sterols, tocols and carotenoids, which are highly desirable in diet because of their health-promoting effects. In the scientific literature, information on the content and profile of bioactive lipidic compounds in potato cultivars are few. The concentration and stability of bioactive lipids are affected by many factors such as genotype, agronomic factors, postharvest storage, cooking and processing conditions. In this review levels and composition of bioactive lipids in terms of lipid classes, fatty acids, phytosterols, tocopherols, and caroteinoids distribution in different potato cultivars including genetically modified potato (GMP) were highlighted and discussed. In addition, factors affecting bioactive lipids levels, stability and health benefits are reviewed. In consideration of potential nutritional value, detailed knowledge on lipids of potato cultivars is of major importance.

  1. Simultaneous hydrolysis-esterification of wet microalgal lipid using acid.

    PubMed

    Takisawa, Kenji; Kanemoto, Kazuyo; Kartikawati, Muliasari; Kitamura, Yutaka

    2013-12-01

    This research demonstrated hydrolysis of wet microalgal lipid and esterification of free fatty acid (FFA) using acid in one-step process. The investigation of simultaneous hydrolysis-esterification (SHE) of wet microalgal lipid was conducted by using L27 orthogonal design and the effects of water content, volume of sulphuric acid, volume of methanol, temperature and time on SHE were examined. As a result, water content was found to be the most effective factor. The effects of various parameters on fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) content and equilibrium relation between FAME and FFA were also examined under water content 80%. Equimolar amounts of sulphuric acid and hydrochloric acid showed similar results. This method has great potential in terms of biodiesel production from microalgae since no organic solvents are used.

  2. Lipid and polymeric carrier-mediated nucleic acid delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Mahato, Ram I

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Nucleic acids such as plasmid DNA, antisense oligonucleotide, and RNA interference (RNAi) molecules, have a great potential to be used as therapeutics for the treatment of various genetic and acquired diseases. To design a successful nucleic acid delivery system, the pharmacological effect of nucleic acids, the physiological condition of the subjects or sites, and the physicochemical properties of nucleic acid and carriers have to be thoroughly examined. Areas covered in this review The commonly used lipids, polymers and corresponding delivery systems are reviewed in terms of their characteristics, applications, advantages and limitations. What the reader will gain This article aims to provide an overview of biological barriers and strategies to overcome these barriers by properly designing effective synthetic carriers for nucleic acid delivery. Take home message A thorough understanding of biological barriers and the structure–activity relationship of lipid and polymeric carriers is the key for effective nucleic acid therapy. PMID:20836625

  3. New fluorescent octadecapentaenoic acids as probes of lipid membranes and protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, C R; Souto, A A; Amat-Guerri, F; Acuña, A U

    1996-01-01

    The chemical and spectroscopic properties of the new fluorescent acids all(E)-8, 10, 12, 14, 16-octadecapentaenoic acid (t-COPA) and its (8Z)-isomer (c-COPA) have been characterized in solvents of different polarity, synthetic lipid bilayers, and lipid/protein systems. These compounds are reasonably photostable in solution, present an intense UV absorption band (epsilon(350 nm) approximately 10(5) M(-1) cm(-1)) strongly overlapped by tryptophan fluorescence and their emission, centered at 470 nm, is strongly polarized (r(O) = 0.385 +/- 0.005) and decays with a major component (85%) of lifetime 23 ns and a faster minor one of lifetime 2 ns (D,L-alpha-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), 15 degrees C). Both COPA isomers incorporate readily into vesicles and membranes (K(p) approximately 10(6)) and align parallel to the lipids. t-COPA distributes homogeneously between gel and fluid lipid domains and the changes in polarization accurately reflect the lipid T(m) values. From the decay of the fluorescence anisotropy in spherical bilayers of DMPC and POPC it is shown that t-COPA also correctly reflects the lipid order parameters, determined by 2H NMR techniques. Resonance energy transfer from tryptophan to the bound pentaenoic acid in serum albumin in solution, and from the tryptophan residues of gramicidin in lipid bilayers also containing the pentaenoic acid, show that this probe is a useful acceptor of protein tryptophan excitation, with R(O) values of 30-34 A. Images FIGURE 10 PMID:8889194

  4. Bicarbonate trigger for inducing lipid accumulation in algal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Robert; Peyton, Brent; Cooksey, Keith E.

    2015-08-04

    The present invention provides bicarbonate containing and/or bicarbonate-producing compositions and methods to induce lipid accumulation in an algae growth system, wherein the algae growth system is under light-dark cycling condition. By adding said compositions at a specific growth stage, said methods lead to much higher lipid accumulation and/or significantly reduced total time required for accumulating lipid in the algae growth system.

  5. Synthesis of Lipid Mediators during UVB-Induced Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sisignano, Marco; Angioni, Carlo; Ferreiros, Nerea; Schuh, Claus-Dieter; Suo, Jing; Schreiber, Yannick; Dawes, John M.; Antunes-Martins, Ana; Bennett, David L. H.; McMahon, Stephen B.; Geisslinger, Gerd; Scholich, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral sensitization during inflammatory pain is mediated by a variety of endogenous proalgesic mediators including a number of oxidized lipids, some of which serve endogenous modulators of sensory TRP-channels. These lipids are eicosanoids of the arachidonic acid and linoleic acid pathway, as well as lysophophatidic acids (LPAs). However, their regulation pattern during inflammatory pain and their contribution to peripheral sensitization is still unclear. Here, we used the UVB-model for inflammatory pain to investigate alterations of lipid concentrations at the site of inflammation, the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) as well as the spinal dorsal horn and quantified 21 lipid species from five different lipid families at the peak of inflammation 48 hours post irradiation. We found that known proinflammatory lipids as well as lipids with unknown roles in inflammatory pain to be strongly increased in the skin, whereas surprisingly little changes of lipid levels were seen in DRGs or the dorsal horn. Importantly, although there are profound differences between the number of cytochrome (CYP) genes between mice and rats, CYP-derived lipids were regulated similarly in both species. Since TRPV1 agonists such as LPA 18∶1, 9- and 13-HODE, 5- and 12-HETE were elevated in the skin, they may contribute to thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia during UVB-induced inflammatory pain. These results may explain why some studies show relatively weak analgesic effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors in UVB-induced skin inflammation, as they do not inhibit synthesis of other proalgesic lipids such as LPA 18∶1, 9-and 13-HODE and HETEs. PMID:24349046

  6. Quercetin Induces Hepatic Lipid Omega-Oxidation and Lowers Serum Lipid Levels in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hoek-van den Hil, Elise F.; Keijer, Jaap; Bunschoten, Annelies; Vervoort, Jacques J. M.; Stankova, Barbora; Bekkenkamp, Melissa; Herreman, Laure; Venema, Dini; Hollman, Peter C. H.; Tvrzicka, Eva; Rietjens, Ivonne M. C. M.; van Schothorst, Evert M.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated circulating lipid levels are known risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). In order to examine the effects of quercetin on lipid metabolism, mice received a mild-high-fat diet without (control) or with supplementation of 0.33% (w/w) quercetin for 12 weeks. Gas chromatography and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance were used to quantitatively measure serum lipid profiles. Whole genome microarray analysis of liver tissue was used to identify possible mechanisms underlying altered circulating lipid levels. Body weight, energy intake and hepatic lipid accumulation did not differ significantly between the quercetin and the control group. In serum of quercetin-fed mice, triglycerides (TG) were decreased with 14% (p<0.001) and total poly unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were increased with 13% (p<0.01). Palmitic acid, oleic acid, and linoleic acid were all decreased by 9–15% (p<0.05) in quercetin-fed mice. Both palmitic acid and oleic acid can be oxidized by omega (ω)-oxidation. Gene expression profiling showed that quercetin increased hepatic lipid metabolism, especially ω-oxidation. At the gene level, this was reflected by the up-regulation of cytochrome P450 (Cyp) 4a10, Cyp4a14, Cyp4a31 and Acyl-CoA thioesterase 3 (Acot3). Two relevant regulators, cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (Por, rate limiting for cytochrome P450s) and the transcription factor constitutive androstane receptor (Car; official symbol Nr1i3) were also up-regulated in the quercetin-fed mice. We conclude that quercetin intake increased hepatic lipid ω-oxidation and lowered corresponding circulating lipid levels, which may contribute to potential beneficial effects on CVD. PMID:23359794

  7. Quercetin induces hepatic lipid omega-oxidation and lowers serum lipid levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Hoek-van den Hil, Elise F; Keijer, Jaap; Bunschoten, Annelies; Vervoort, Jacques J M; Stankova, Barbora; Bekkenkamp, Melissa; Herreman, Laure; Venema, Dini; Hollman, Peter C H; Tvrzicka, Eva; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; van Schothorst, Evert M

    2013-01-01

    Elevated circulating lipid levels are known risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). In order to examine the effects of quercetin on lipid metabolism, mice received a mild-high-fat diet without (control) or with supplementation of 0.33% (w/w) quercetin for 12 weeks. Gas chromatography and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance were used to quantitatively measure serum lipid profiles. Whole genome microarray analysis of liver tissue was used to identify possible mechanisms underlying altered circulating lipid levels. Body weight, energy intake and hepatic lipid accumulation did not differ significantly between the quercetin and the control group. In serum of quercetin-fed mice, triglycerides (TG) were decreased with 14% (p<0.001) and total poly unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were increased with 13% (p<0.01). Palmitic acid, oleic acid, and linoleic acid were all decreased by 9-15% (p<0.05) in quercetin-fed mice. Both palmitic acid and oleic acid can be oxidized by omega (ω)-oxidation. Gene expression profiling showed that quercetin increased hepatic lipid metabolism, especially ω-oxidation. At the gene level, this was reflected by the up-regulation of cytochrome P450 (Cyp) 4a10, Cyp4a14, Cyp4a31 and Acyl-CoA thioesterase 3 (Acot3). Two relevant regulators, cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (Por, rate limiting for cytochrome P450s) and the transcription factor constitutive androstane receptor (Car; official symbol Nr1i3) were also up-regulated in the quercetin-fed mice. We conclude that quercetin intake increased hepatic lipid ω-oxidation and lowered corresponding circulating lipid levels, which may contribute to potential beneficial effects on CVD.

  8. A special acyl carrier protein for transferring long hydroxylated fatty acids to lipid A in Rhizobium.

    PubMed

    Brozek, K A; Carlson, R W; Raetz, C R

    1996-12-13

    Lipid A, the hydrophobic anchor of lipopolysaccharides in the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria, varies in structure among different Rhizobiaceae. The Rhizobium meliloti lipid A backbone, like that of Escherichia coli, is a beta1'-6-linked glucosamine disaccharide that is phosphorylated at positions 1 and 4'. Rhizobium leguminosarum lipid A lacks both phosphates, but contains aminogluconate in place of the proximal glucosamine 1-phosphate, and galacturonic acid instead of the 4'-phosphate. A peculiar feature of the lipid As of all Rhizobiaceae is acylation with 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid, a long hydroxylated fatty acid not found in E. coli. We now describe an in vitro system, consisting of a membrane enzyme and a cytosolic acyl donor from R. leguminosarum, that transfers 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid to (Kdo)2-lipid IVA, a key lipid A precursor common to both E. coli and R. leguminosarum. The 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid moiety was detected in the lipid product by mass spectrometry. The membrane enzyme required the presence of Kdo residues in the acceptor substrate for activity. The cytosolic acyl donor was purified from wild-type R. leguminosarum using the acylation of (Kdo)2-[4'-32P]-lipid IVA as the assay. Amino-terminal sequencing of the purified acyl donor revealed an exact 19-amino acid match with a partially sequenced gene (orf*) of R. leguminosarum. Orf* contains the consensus sequence, DSLD, for attachment of 4'-phosphopantetheine. When the entire orf* gene was sequenced, it was found to encode a protein of 92 amino acids. Orf* is a new kind of acyl carrier protein because it is only approximately 25% identical both to the constitutive acyl carrier protein (AcpP) and to the inducible acyl carrier protein (NodF) of R. leguminosarum. Mass spectrometry of purified active Orf* confirmed the presence of 4'-phosphopantetheine and 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid in the major species. Smaller mass peaks indicative of Orf* acylation with hydroxylated 20, 22, 24

  9. Enzymatically synthesized glycogen reduces lipid accumulation in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Furuyashiki, Takashi; Ogawa, Rui; Nakayama, Yoko; Honda, Kazuhisa; Kamisoyama, Hiroshi; Takata, Hiroki; Yasuda, Michiko; Kuriki, Takashi; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2013-09-01

    Based on a recent study indicating that enzymatically synthesized glycogen (ESG) possesses a dietary, fiber-like action, we hypothesized that ESG can reduce the risk of obesity. In this study, the antiobesity effects of ESG were investigated in a model of diet-induced obesity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups and fed a normal or high-fat diet, with or without 20% ESG, for 4 weeks. Body weight, food intake, lipid deposition in the white adipose tissues and liver, fecal lipid excretion, and plasma lipid profiles were measured. At week 3, the body fat mass was measured using an x-ray computed tomography system, which showed that ESG significantly suppressed the high-fat diet-induced lipid accumulation. Similar results were observed in the weight of the adipose tissue after the experiment. Moreover, ESG significantly suppressed the lipid accumulation in the liver but increased fecal lipid excretion. The plasma concentrations of triacylglycerol and nonesterified fatty acid were lowered after a high-fat diet, whereas the total bile acid concentration was increased by ESG. However, the hepatic messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of enzymes related to lipid metabolism were not affected by ESG. Conversely, the mRNA levels of long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase were up-regulated by ESG in the muscle. These results suggest that the combined effects of increased fecal lipid excretion, increased mRNA levels of enzymes that oxidize fatty acids in the muscle, and increased total bile acid concentration in the plasma mediate the inhibitory effect of ESG on lipid accumulation.

  10. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation Appears to Attenuate Particulate Air Pollution-induced Cardiac Effects and Lipid Changes in Healthy Middle-aged Adults.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Context: Air pollution exposure has been associated with adverse cardiovascular effects. A recent epidemiologic study reported that omega-3 fatty acid (fish oil) supplementation blunted the cardiac responses to air pollution exposure. Objective: To evaluate in a randomized contro...

  11. A feed-back regulatory loop between glycerol-3-phosphate and lipid transfer proteins DIR1 and AZI1 mediates azelaic acid-induced systemic immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR), a highly desirable form of plant defense, provides broad-spectrum immunity against diverse pathogens. The recent identification of seemingly unrelated chemical inducers of SAR warrants an investigation of their mutual interrelationships. We show that SAR induced b...

  12. Bile acid signaling in lipid metabolism: metabolomic and lipidomic analysis of lipid and bile acid markers linked to anti-obesity and anti-diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yunpeng; Jiang, Changtao; Cheng, Jie; Krausz, Kristopher W; Li, Tiangang; Ferrell, Jessica M; Gonzalez, Frank J; Chiang, John Y L

    2015-01-01

    Bile acid synthesis is the major pathway for catabolism of cholesterol. Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway in the liver and plays an important role in regulating lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Transgenic mice overexpressing CYP7A1 (CYP7A1-tg mice) were resistant to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, fatty liver, and diabetes. However the mechanism of resistance to HFD-induced obesity of CYP7A1-tg mice has not been determined. In this study, metabolomic and lipidomic profiles of CYP7A1-tg mice were analyzed to explore the metabolic alterations in CYP7A1-tg mice that govern the protection against obesity and insulin resistance by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry combined with multivariate analyses. Lipidomics analysis identified seven lipid markers including lysophosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins and ceramides that were significantly decreased in serum of HFD-fed CYP7A1-tg mice. Metabolomics analysis identified 13 metabolites in bile acid synthesis including taurochenodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, taurocholic acid, and tauro-β-muricholic acid (T-β-MCA) that differed between CYP7A1-tg and wild-type mice. Notably, T-β-MCA, an antagonist of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) was significantly increased in intestine of CYP7A1-tg mice. This study suggests that reducing 12α-hydroxylated bile acids and increasing intestinal T-β-MCA may reduce high fat diet-induced increase of phospholipids, sphingomyelins and ceramides, and ameliorate diabetes and obesity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics.

  13. Long-term melatonin administration increases polyunsaturated fatty acid percentage in plasma lipids of hypercholesterolemic rats.

    PubMed

    Pita, Maria L; Hoyos, Marta; Martin-Lacave, Inés; Osuna, Carmen; Fernández-Santos, Jose M; Guerrero, Juan M

    2002-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of melatonin on the fatty acid composition of plasma and tissue lipids. Melatonin administration to rats fed with a standard diet only increased long-chain n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in total plasma lipids and liver phospholipids but induced significant changes in hypercholesterolemic rats. In plasma, palmitoleic and oleic acids increased and n-6 and n-3 PUFA decreased in hypercholesterolemic rats; theses changes were reversed by melatonin administration. The analysis of lipid fractions revealed that only the cholesteryl ester fraction was affected by melatonin. Histological studies of the carotid artery intima revealed the appearance, in hypercholesterolemic rats, of fatty streaks produced by a mass of foam cells covered by the endothelium and by a thin layer of mononucleated cells. These changes were prevented by melatonin. We conclude that long-term melatonin administration modifies the fatty acid composition of rat plasma and liver lipids and ameliorates the arterial fatty infiltration induced by cholesterol.

  14. Multiscale structures of lipids in foods as parameters affecting fatty acid bioavailability and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Michalski, M C; Genot, C; Gayet, C; Lopez, C; Fine, F; Joffre, F; Vendeuvre, J L; Bouvier, J; Chardigny, J M; Raynal-Ljutovac, K

    2013-10-01

    On a nutritional standpoint, lipids are now being studied beyond their energy content and fatty acid (FA) profiles. Dietary FA are building blocks of a huge diversity of more complex molecules such as triacylglycerols (TAG) and phospholipids (PL), themselves organised in supramolecular structures presenting different thermal behaviours. They are generally embedded in complex food matrixes. Recent reports have revealed that molecular and supramolecular structures of lipids and their liquid or solid state at the body temperature influence both the digestibility and metabolism of dietary FA. The aim of the present review is to highlight recent knowledge on the impact on FA digestion, absorption and metabolism of: (i) the intramolecular structure of TAG; (ii) the nature of the lipid molecules carrying FA; (iii) the supramolecular organization and physical state of lipids in native and formulated food products and (iv) the food matrix. Further work should be accomplished now to obtain a more reliable body of evidence and integrate these data in future dietary recommendations. Additionally, innovative lipid formulations in which the health beneficial effects of either native or recomposed structures of lipids will be taken into account can be foreseen.

  15. Season-induced variation in lipid composition is associated with semen quality in Holstein bulls.

    PubMed

    Argov-Argaman, N; Mahgrefthe, K; Zeron, Y; Roth, Z

    2013-05-01

    Season-induced variation in fatty acid and cholesterol composition in bovine semen has been associated with semen quality. Given the specific roles of the various semen compartments (seminal fluids, sperm head, and sperm tail) in fertilization, we hypothesized that environmental-stress-induced alterations in the lipid composition of a specific compartment might impair semen quality and sperm function. Semen samples were collected from five mature Holstein-Friesian bulls during the summer (August to September) and winter (December to January). Semen was evaluated by computerized sperm-quality analyzer, calibrated for bulls' semen, and centrifuged to separate the spermatozoa from the seminal fluids. The spermatozoal fraction was sonicated to separate the sperm head and tail compartments. Cold lipid extraction was performed with chloroform:methanol (2:1, vol/vol). Lipids were identified and quantified by gas chromatography. Seasonal variation was found in both physiological and structural parameters. The proportion of spermatozoa defined as morphologically normal was higher in the winter, with higher motility, progressive motility, and velocity relative to summer samples. Lipid composition within fractions varied between seasons with prominent impairment in the tail compartment, characterized by high saturated fatty acid, low polyunsaturated fatty acid, and low cholesterol concentrations during the summer. Given the association between alterations in lipid composition and reduced sperm motility and velocity during the summer, it is suggested that lipid composition might serve to predict sperm quality.

  16. Epicuticular lipids induce aggregation in Chagas disease vectors

    PubMed Central

    Figueiras, Alicia N Lorenzo; Girotti, Juan R; Mijailovsky, Sergio J; Juárez, M Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Background The triatomine bugs are vectors of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Aggregation behavior plays an important role in their survival by facilitating the location of refuges and cohesion of aggregates, helping to keep them safely assembled into shelters during daylight time, when they are vulnerable to predators. There are evidences that aggregation is mediated by thigmotaxis, by volatile cues from their faeces, and by hexane-extractable contact chemoreceptive signals from their cuticle surface. The epicuticular lipids of Triatoma infestans include a complex mixture of hydrocarbons, free and esterified fatty acids, alcohols, and sterols. Results We analyzed the response of T. infestans fifth instar nymphs after exposure to different amounts either of total epicuticular lipid extracts or individual lipid fractions. Assays were performed in a circular arena, employing a binary choice test with filter papers acting as aggregation attractive sites; papers were either impregnated with a hexane-extract of the total lipids, or lipid fraction; or with the solvent. Insects were significantly aggregated around papers impregnated with the epicuticular lipid extracts. Among the lipid fractions separately tested, only the free fatty acid fraction promoted significant bug aggregation. We also investigated the response to different amounts of selected fatty acid components of this fraction; receptiveness varied with the fatty acid chain length. No response was elicited by hexadecanoic acid (C16:0), the major fatty acid component. Octadecanoic acid (C18:0) showed a significant assembling effect in the concentration range tested (0.1 to 2 insect equivalents). The very long chain hexacosanoic acid (C26:0) was significantly attractant at low doses (≤ 1 equivalent), although a repellent effect was observed at higher doses. Conclusion The detection of contact aggregation pheromones has practical application in Chagas disease

  17. Protective effects of Emblica officinalis (Amla) on metal-induced lipid peroxidation in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Vijay Kumar; Rather, Irfan Ahmad

    2016-05-01

    The protective potential of Emblica officinalis (amla) was investigated on metal-induced lipid per oxidation in human erythrocytes. Increases in the levels of MDA and catalase activity were assessed as lipid per oxidation. In addition, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione (GSH), and ascorbic acid levels were assessed as antioxidant indices. Preliminary investigation of the extract exhibited a significant reduction in lipid per oxidation and an increase in antioxidant abilities, such as a decrease in MDA, GPx and GSH (P<0.05). A significant reduction in erythrocyte hemolysis induced by hydrogen peroxide was observed using amla extract (P<0.05). These findings show that amla extract has significant protective potential against lipid per oxidation.

  18. Stimuli responsive charge-switchable lipids: Capture and release of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Hersey, Joseph S; LaManna, Caroline M; Lusic, Hrvoje; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-03-01

    Stimuli responsive lipids, which enable control over the formation, transformation, and disruption of supramolecular assemblies, are of interest for biosensing, diagnostics, drug delivery, and basic transmembrane protein studies. In particular, spatiotemporal control over a supramolecular structure can be achieved using light activated compounds to induce significant supramolecular rearrangements. As such, a family of cationic lipids are described which undergo a permanent switch in charge upon exposure to 365 nm ultraviolet (UV) light to enable the capture of negatively charged nucleic acids within the self-assembled supramolecular structure of the lipids and subsequent release of these macromolecules upon exposure to UV light and disruption of the assemblies. The lipids are composed of either two different tripeptide head groups, Lysine-Glycine-Glycine (KGG) and Glycine-Glycine-Glycine (GGG) and three different hydrocarbon chain lengths (C6, C10, or C14) terminated by a UV light responsive 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethanol (NPE) protected carboxylic acid. The photolysis of the NPE protected lipid is measured as a function of time, and the resulting changes in net molecular charge are observed using zeta potential analysis for each head group and chain length combination. A proof of concept study for the capture and release of both linear DNA (calf thymus) and siRNA is presented using an ethidium bromide quenching assay where a balance between binding affinity and supramolecular stability are found to be the key to optimal nucleic acid capture and release.

  19. [Effect of acetylsalicylic acid in complex with lipid nanostructures of various compositions on human platelet aggregation].

    PubMed

    Suslina, Z A; Prokhorov, D I; Shilova, A G; Kaplun, A P; Ionova, V G; Seĭfulla, R D

    2011-01-01

    The effect of lipid nanocomplexes loaded with acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) on platelet aggregation in vitro was investigated. The antithrombotic effect of aspirin in complex with liposomes prepared from pig brain glycosphingolipids is not only significantly higher compared to control, but also accompanied by leveling of the development of proaggregant effects. It was shown that ADP-induced platelet aggregation is reduced by the introduction of electrostatic charge in the structure of lipid bilayer of liposomes. The effect achieved for the liposomes possessing a negative charge was more pronounced in comparison to the effect of positively charged liposomes.

  20. Ozone-induced dissociation: elucidation of double bond position within mass-selected lipid ions.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael C; Mitchell, Todd W; Harman, David G; Deeley, Jane M; Nealon, Jessica R; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    Ions formed from lipids during electrospray ionization of crude lipid extracts have been mass-selected within a quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer and allowed to react with ozone vapor. Gas-phase ion-molecule reactions between unsaturated lipid ions and ozone are found to yield two primary product ions for each carbon-carbon double bond within the molecule. The mass-to-charge ratios of these chemically induced fragments are diagnostic of the position of unsaturation within the precursor ion. This novel analytical technique, dubbed ozone-induced dissociation (OzID), can be applied both in series and in parallel with conventional collision-induced dissociation (CID) to provide near-complete structural assignment of unknown lipids within complex mixtures without prior fractionation or derivatization. In this study, OzID is applied to a suite of complex lipid extracts from sources including human lens, bovine kidney, and commercial olive oil, thus demonstrating the technique to be applicable to a broad range of lipid classes including both neutral and acidic glycerophospholipids, sphingomyelins, and triacylglycerols. Gas-phase ozonolysis reactions are also observed with different types of precursor ions including [M+H]+, [M+Li]+, [M+Na]+, and [M-H]-: in each case yielding fragmentation data that allow double bond position to be unambiguously assigned. Within the human lens lipid extract, three sphingomyelin regioisomers, namely SM(d18:0/15Z-24:1), SM(d18:0/17Z-24:1), and SM(d18:0/19Z-24:1), and a novel phosphatidylethanolamine alkyl ether, GPEtn(11Z-18:1e/9Z-18:1), are identified using a combination of CID and OzID. These discoveries demonstrate that lipid identification based on CID alone belies the natural structural diversity in lipid biochemistry and illustrate the potential of OzID as a complementary approach within automated, high-throughput lipid analysis protocols.

  1. Effect of Evolvulus alsinoides on lipid metabolism of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Gomathi, Duraisamy; Ravikumar, Ganesan; Kalaiselvi, Manokaran; Devaki, Kanakasabapathi; Uma, Chandrasekar

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of ethanolic extract of Evolvulus alsinoides (E. alsinoides) on diabetes-induced changes in lipid metabolism. Methods The ethanolic extract of E. alsinoides on serum and tissue lipid levels were examined in control and experimental group rats. Results Oral administration of E. alsinoides extract to streptozotocin induced diabetic rats for 45 d significantly reduced the levels of triglycerids, phospholipids, cholesterol and free fatty acids in serum and tissues, it increases the high density lipoprotein in serum as that of control. Conclusions The ethanolic extract of E. alsinoides supplementation is useful in hyperlipidemia prevention during diabetes mellitus.

  2. Lipids and lipoteichoic acid of autolysis-defective Streptococcus faecium strains.

    PubMed

    Shungu, D L; Cornett, J B; Shockman, G D

    1980-06-01

    Two of four previously isolated autolysis-defective mutants of Streptococcus faecium (Streptococcus faecalis ATCC 9790) incorporated substantially more [14C]glycerol into lipids and lipoteichoic acid than did the parent strain. Consistent with increased accumulation of lipids and lipoteichoic acid, significantly higher levels of phosphorus were found in the corresponding fractions of the two mutant strains than in the wild type. Although the autolysis-defective mutant strains contained the same assortment of lipids as the wild type, the relative amount of [14C]glycerol incorporated into diphosphatidylglycerol increased, accompanied by a decreased fraction of phosphatidylglycerol. These results suggested that increased cellular content of two types of substances, acylated lipoteichoic acid and lipids (notably diphosphatidylglycerol), which previously had been shown to be potent inhibitors of the N-acetylmuramoylhydrolase of this species, contributed to the autolysis-defective phenotype of these mutants. Consistent with this interpretation are observations that (i) cerulenin inhibition of fatty acid synthesis increased the rates of benzylpenicillin-induced cellular lysis and that (ii) Triton X-100 or Zwittergent 3-14 treatment could reveal the presence of otherwise cryptic but substantial levels of the active form of the autolysin in cells of three of four mutants and of the proteinase-activable latent form in all four mutants.

  3. Omega-3 fatty acids, lipid rafts, and T cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tim Y; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-08-15

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been shown in many clinical studies to attenuate inflammatory responses. Although inflammatory responses are orchestrated by a wide spectrum of cells, CD4(+) T cells play an important role in the etiology of many chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease and obesity. In light of recent concerns over the safety profiles of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), alternatives such as bioactive nutraceuticals are becoming more attractive. In order for these agents to be accepted into mainstream medicine, however, the mechanisms by which nutraceuticals such as n-3 PUFA exert their anti-inflammatory effects must be fully elucidated. Lipid rafts are nanoscale, dynamic domains in the plasma membrane that are formed through favorable lipid-lipid (cholesterol, sphingolipids, and saturated fatty acids) and lipid-protein (membrane-actin cytoskeleton) interactions. These domains optimize the clustering of signaling proteins at the membrane to facilitate efficient cell signaling which is required for CD4(+) T cell activation and differentiation. This review summarizes novel emerging data documenting the ability of n-3 PUFA to perturb membrane-cytoskeletal structure and function in CD4(+) T cells. An understanding of these underlying mechanisms will provide a rationale for the use of n-3 PUFA in the treatment of chronic inflammation.

  4. Dynamics of lipid and fatty acid composition of shallow-water corals under thermal stress: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbs, A. B.; Yakovleva, I. M.

    2012-03-01

    Coral bleaching induces changes in lipid and fatty acid composition that result in low lipid content, reducing the likelihood of coral survival. Species-specific differences in the metabolism of lipid reserves may contribute to the differential resistance of corals under acute heat exposures. Here, we examined the dynamics of lipids and fatty acid abundance in corals subjected to short-term heat stress. The stony corals Acropora intermedia, Montipora digitata, and the soft coral Sinularia capitalis all showed a 60-75% decline in both storage and structural lipids. However, S. capitalis and M. digitata exhibited no significant change in the percentages of structural lipids (i.e., polar lipids and sterols) until they had lost 90-95% of their endosymbionts, whereas A. intermedia showed a rapid decline in structural lipids after a 50% loss of symbionts. After a 90-95% loss of symbionts under heat stress, all three corals showed a relative depletion of polyunsaturated fatty acids that had symbiont biomarkers, suggesting that polyunsaturated fatty acids were translocated from the symbiont to the coral host tissue.

  5. Effects of different biomass drying and lipid extraction methods on algal lipid yield, fatty acid profile, and biodiesel quality.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Javid; Liu, Yan; Lopes, Wilson A; Druzian, Janice I; Souza, Carolina O; Carvalho, Gilson C; Nascimento, Iracema A; Liao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Three lipid extraction methods of hexane Soxhlet (Sox-Hex), Halim (HIP), and Bligh and Dyer (BD) were applied on freeze-dried (FD) and oven-dried (OD) Chlorella vulgaris biomass to evaluate their effects on lipid yield, fatty acid profile, and algal biodiesel quality. Among these three methods, HIP was the preferred one for C. vulgaris lipid recovery considering both extraction efficiency and solvent toxicity. It had the highest lipid yields of 20.0 and 22.0% on FD and OD biomass, respectively, with corresponding neutral lipid yields of 14.8 and 12.7%. The lipid profiling analysis showed that palmitic, oleic, linoleic, and α-linolenic acids were the major fatty acids in the algal lipids, and there were no significant differences on the amount of these acids between different drying and extraction methods. Correlative models applied to the fatty acid profiles concluded that high contents of palmitic and oleic acids in algal lipids contributed to balancing the ratio of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and led to a high-quality algal biodiesel.

  6. Lipid oxidation induced oxidative degradation of cereal beta-glucan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Jie; Mäkelä, Noora; Maina, Ndegwa Henry; Lampi, Anna-Maija; Sontag-Strohm, Tuula

    2016-04-15

    In food systems, lipid oxidation can cause oxidation of other molecules. This research for the first time investigated oxidative degradation of β-glucan induced by lipid oxidation using an oil-in-water emulsion system which simulated a multi-phased aqueous food system containing oil and β-glucan. Lipid oxidation was monitored using peroxide value and hexanal production while β-glucan degradation was evaluated by viscosity and molecular weight measurements. The study showed that while lipid oxidation proceeded, β-glucan degradation occurred. Emulsions containing β-glucan, oil and ferrous ion showed significant viscosity and molecular weight decrease after 1 week of oxidation at room temperature. Elevated temperature (40°C) enhanced the oxidation reactions causing higher viscosity drop. In addition, the presence of β-glucan appeared to retard the hexanal production in lipid oxidation. The study revealed that lipid oxidation may induce the degradation of β-glucan in aqueous food systems where β-glucan and lipids co-exist.

  7. Morphology-induced defects enhance lipid transfer rates

    DOE PAGES

    Xia, Yan; Charubin, Kamil; Marquardt, Drew; ...

    2016-08-25

    Molecular transfer between nanoparticles has been considered to have important implications regarding nanoparticle stability. Recently, the interparticle spontaneous lipid transfer rate constant for discoidal bicelles was found to be very different from spherical, unilamellar vesicles (ULVs). Here, we investigate the mechanism responsible for this discrepancy. Analysis of the data indicates that lipid transfer is entropically favorable, but enthalpically unfavorable with an activation energy that is independent of bicelle size and long- to short-chain lipid molar ratio. Moreover, molecular dynamics simulations reveal a lower lipid dissociation energy cost in the vicinity of interfaces (“defects”) induced by the segregation of the long-more » and short-chain lipids in bicelles; these defects are not present in ULVs. Taken together, these results suggest that the enhanced lipid transfer observed in bicelles arises from interfacial defects as a result of the hydrophobic mismatch between the long- and short-chain lipid species. In conclusion, the observed lipid transfer rate is found to be independent of nanoparticle stability.« less

  8. Morphology-induced defects enhance lipid transfer rates

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yan; Charubin, Kamil; Marquardt, Drew; Heberle, Frederick A.; Katsaras, John; Tian, Jianhui; Cheng, Xiaolin; Liu, Ying; Nieh, Mu -Ping

    2016-08-25

    Molecular transfer between nanoparticles has been considered to have important implications regarding nanoparticle stability. Recently, the interparticle spontaneous lipid transfer rate constant for discoidal bicelles was found to be very different from spherical, unilamellar vesicles (ULVs). Here, we investigate the mechanism responsible for this discrepancy. Analysis of the data indicates that lipid transfer is entropically favorable, but enthalpically unfavorable with an activation energy that is independent of bicelle size and long- to short-chain lipid molar ratio. Moreover, molecular dynamics simulations reveal a lower lipid dissociation energy cost in the vicinity of interfaces (“defects”) induced by the segregation of the long- and short-chain lipids in bicelles; these defects are not present in ULVs. Taken together, these results suggest that the enhanced lipid transfer observed in bicelles arises from interfacial defects as a result of the hydrophobic mismatch between the long- and short-chain lipid species. In conclusion, the observed lipid transfer rate is found to be independent of nanoparticle stability.

  9. Ameliorative effects of ginger extract on paraben-induced lipid peroxidation in the liver of mice.

    PubMed

    Asnani, Veena M; Verma, Ramtej J

    2009-01-01

    We have evaluated the ameliorative effect of ginger extract on paraben (p-hydroxybenzoic acid)-induced lipid peroxidation in the liver of mice. Adult female albino mice were orally administered with 2.25 or 4.50 mg of paraben in 0.2 mL olive/animal/day (67.5 and 135 mg/kg of body weight) for 30 days. The results revealed significantly higher (p < or = 0.05) lipid peroxidation in the liver of paraben-treated mice than that of controls. As compared with the controls, the levels of non-enzymatic antioxidants: glutathione and ascorbic acid, as well as the enzymatic antioxidants: superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase were significantly (p < or = 0.05) lowered in the liver of paraben-treated mice. Oral administration of aqueous extract of Zinziber officinale (3 mg/animal/day) along with paraben for 30 days (Groups 6 and 7) caused significant (p < or = 0.05) amelioration in paraben-induced lipid peroxidation and increased significantly (p < or = 0.05) the activities of enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase) and contents of non-enzymatic (glutathione and ascorbic acid) antioxidants in the liver of mice, as compared with those given paraben alone (Groups 4, 5). Thus, oral administration of aqueous extract of Zinziber officinale along with paraben significantly (p < or = 0.05) ameliorates paraben-induced lipid peroxidation in the liver of mice.

  10. Mitochondrial fat oxidation is essential for lipid-induced inflammation in skeletal muscle in mice.

    PubMed

    Warfel, Jaycob D; Bermudez, Estrellita M; Mendoza, Tamra M; Ghosh, Sujoy; Zhang, Jingying; Elks, Carrie M; Mynatt, Randall; Vandanmagsar, Bolormaa

    2016-11-28

    Inflammation, lipotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction have been implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, how these factors are intertwined in the development of obesity/insulin resistance remains unclear. Here, we examine the role of mitochondrial fat oxidation on lipid-induced inflammation in skeletal muscle. We used skeletal muscle-specific Cpt1b knockout mouse model where the inhibition of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation results in accumulation of lipid metabolites in muscle and elevated circulating free fatty acids. Gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and cytokine- and members of TLR-signalling pathways were decreased in Cpt1b(m-/-) muscle. Inflammatory signalling pathways were not activated when evaluated by multiplex and immunoblot analysis. In addition, the inflammatory response to fatty acids was reduced in primary muscle cells derived from Cpt1b(m-/-) mice. Gene expression of Cd11c, the M1 macrophage marker, was decreased; while Cd206, the M2 macrophage marker, was increased in skeletal muscle of Cpt1b(m-/-) mice. Finally, expression of pro-inflammatory markers was decreased in white adipose tissue of Cpt1b(m-/-) mice. We show that the inflammatory response elicited by elevated intracellular lipids in skeletal muscle is repressed in Cpt1b(m-/-) mice, strongly supporting the hypothesis that mitochondrial processing of fatty acids is essential for the lipid-induction of inflammation in muscle.

  11. Mitochondrial fat oxidation is essential for lipid-induced inflammation in skeletal muscle in mice

    PubMed Central

    Warfel, Jaycob D.; Bermudez, Estrellita M.; Mendoza, Tamra M.; Ghosh, Sujoy; Zhang, Jingying; Elks, Carrie M.; Mynatt, Randall; Vandanmagsar, Bolormaa

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, lipotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction have been implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, how these factors are intertwined in the development of obesity/insulin resistance remains unclear. Here, we examine the role of mitochondrial fat oxidation on lipid-induced inflammation in skeletal muscle. We used skeletal muscle-specific Cpt1b knockout mouse model where the inhibition of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation results in accumulation of lipid metabolites in muscle and elevated circulating free fatty acids. Gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and cytokine- and members of TLR-signalling pathways were decreased in Cpt1bm−/− muscle. Inflammatory signalling pathways were not activated when evaluated by multiplex and immunoblot analysis. In addition, the inflammatory response to fatty acids was reduced in primary muscle cells derived from Cpt1bm−/− mice. Gene expression of Cd11c, the M1 macrophage marker, was decreased; while Cd206, the M2 macrophage marker, was increased in skeletal muscle of Cpt1bm−/− mice. Finally, expression of pro-inflammatory markers was decreased in white adipose tissue of Cpt1bm−/− mice. We show that the inflammatory response elicited by elevated intracellular lipids in skeletal muscle is repressed in Cpt1bm−/− mice, strongly supporting the hypothesis that mitochondrial processing of fatty acids is essential for the lipid-induction of inflammation in muscle. PMID:27892502

  12. Evidence that oleic acid exists in a separate phase within stratum corneum lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Ongpipattanakul, B.; Burnette, R.R.; Potts, R.O.; Francoeur, M.L. )

    1991-03-01

    Oleic acid is known to be a penetration enhancer for polar to moderately polar molecules. A mechanism related to lipid phase separation has been previously proposed by this laboratory to explain the increases in skin transport. In the studies presented here, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was utilized to investigate whether or not oleic acid exists in a separate phase within stratum corneum (SC) lipids. Per-deuterated oleic acid was employed allowing the conformational phase behavior of the exogenously added fatty acid and the endogenous SC lipids to be monitored independently of each other. The results indicated that oleic acid exerts a significant effect on the SC lipids, lowering the lipid transition temperature (Tm) in addition to increasing the conformational freedom or flexibility of the endogenous lipid alkyl chains above their Tm. At temperatures lower than Tm, however, oleic acid did not significantly change the chain disorder of the SC lipids. Similar results were obtained with lipids isolated from the SC by chloroform:methanol extraction. Oleic acid, itself, was almost fully disordered at temperatures both above and below the endogenous lipid Tm in the intact SC and extracted lipid samples. This finding suggested that oleic acid does exist as a liquid within the SC lipids. The coexistence of fluid oleic acid and ordered SC lipids, at physiological temperatures, is consistent with the previously proposed phase-separation transport mechanism for enhanced diffusion.

  13. Lipid and protein oxidation in hepatic homogenates and cell membranes exposed to bile acids.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Broto, Lorena; Martínez-Ballarín, Enrique; Miana-Mena, Javier; Berzosa, Cesar; Piedrafita, Eduardo; Cebrián, Igor; Reiter, Russel J; García, Joaquín J

    2009-01-01

    Cholestasis occurs in a variety of hepatic diseases and causes damage due to accumulation of bile acids in the liver. The aim was to investigate the effect of several bile acids, i.e. chenodeoxycholic, taurochenodeoxycholic, deoxycholic, taurodeoxycholic, ursodeoxycholic, lithocholic and taurolithocholic (TLC), in inducing oxidative damage. Hepatic tissue of male Sprague-Dawley rats was incubated with or without 1 mM of each bile acid, with or without 0.1 mM FeCl(3) and 0.1 mM ascorbic acid for the purpose of generating free radicals. Several bile acids increased lipid and protein oxidation, with TLC being the most pro-oxidative (657% and 175% in homogenates and 350% and 311% in membranes, respectively). TLC also enhanced iron-induced oxidative stress to lipids (21% in homogenates and 29% in membranes) and to proteins (74% in membranes). This enhancement was dose- and time-dependent and was reduced by melatonin. These results suggest that bile acids differentially mediate hepatic oxidative stress and may be involved in the physiopathology of cholestasis.

  14. A comparative study of the fatty acid composition of prochloron lipids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenrick, J. R.; Deane, E. M.; Bishop, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    The chemical analysis of lipids of Prochloron isolated from several hosts is discussed. The object was to determine whether differences in lipid composition could be used to characterize organisms from different sources. Major lipid components are given. An analysis of fatty acid composition of individual lipids slowed a distinctive disstribution of fatty acids. While present results do not justify the use of fatty acid content in the taxonomy of Prochlon, the variations found in the lipids of cells from the same host harvested from different areas, or at different times in the same area, suggest that a study of the effects of temperature and light intensity on lipid composition would be rewarding.

  15. A role for lipid rafts in the protection afforded by docosahexaenoic acid against ethanol toxicity in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Aliche-Djoudi, Fatiha; Podechard, Normand; Collin, Aurore; Chevanne, Martine; Provost, Emilie; Poul, Martine; Le Hégarat, Ludovic; Catheline, Daniel; Legrand, Philippe; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Sergent, Odile

    2013-10-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that eicosapentaenoic acid enhanced ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death in primary rat hepatocytes via an increase in membrane fluidity and lipid raft clustering. In this context, another n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), was tested with a special emphasis on physical and chemical alteration of lipid rafts. Pretreatment of hepatocytes with DHA reduced significantly ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death. DHA protection could be related to an alteration of lipid rafts. Indeed, rafts exhibited a marked increase in membrane fluidity and packing defects leading to the exclusion of a raft protein marker, flotillin. Furthermore, DHA strongly inhibited disulfide bridge formation, even in control cells, thus suggesting a disruption of protein-protein interactions inside lipid rafts. This particular spatial organization of lipid rafts due to DHA subsequently prevented the ethanol-induced lipid raft clustering. Such a prevention was then responsible for the inhibition of phospholipase C-γ translocation into rafts, and consequently of both lysosome accumulation and elevation in cellular low-molecular-weight iron content, a prooxidant factor. In total, the present study suggests that DHA supplementation could represent a new preventive approach for patients with alcoholic liver disease based upon modulation of the membrane structures.

  16. Permeability of lipid bilayers to amino acids and phosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Deamer, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Permeability coefficients for amino acid classes, including neutral, polar, hydrophobic, and charged species, were measured and compared with values for other ionic solutes such as phosphate. The rates of efflux of glycine, lysine, phenylalanine, serine and tryptophan were determined after they were passively entrapped in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) composed of egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). The following permeability coefficients were obtained for: glycine, 5.7 x 10(-12) cm s-1 (EPC), 2.0 x 10(-11) cm s-1 (DMPC); serine, 5.5 x 10(-12) cm s-1 (EPC), 1.6 x 10(-11) cm s-1 (DMPC); lysine, 5.1 x 10(-12) cm s-1 (EPC), 1.9 x 10(-11) cm s-1 (DMPC); tryptophan, 4.1 x 10(-10) cm s-1 (EPC); and phenylalanine, 2.5 x 10(-10) cm s-1 (EPC). Decreasing lipid chain length increased permeability slightly, while variations in pH had only minor effects on the permeability coefficients of the amino acids tested. Phosphate permeability was in the range of 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1 depending on the pH of the medium. The values for the polar and charged amino acids were surprisingly similar to those previously measured for monovalent cations such as sodium and potassium, which are in the range of 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1, depending on conditions and the lipid species used. This observation suggests that the permeation rates for the neutral, polar and charged amino acids are controlled by bilayer fluctuations and transient defects, rather than partition coefficients and Born energy barriers. The results are relevant to the permeation of certain peptides into lipid bilayers during protein translocation and membrane biogenesis.

  17. EDTA-induced membrane fluidization and destabilization: biophysical studies on artificial lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Tantimongcolwat, Tanawut; Nantasenamat, Chanin; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2007-11-01

    The molecular mechanism of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-induced membrane destabilization has been studied using a combination of four biophysical techniques on artificial lipid membranes. Data from Langmuir film balance and epifluorescence microscopy revealed the fluidization and expansion effect of EDTA on phase behavior of monolayers of either 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) or mixtures of DPPC and metal-chelating lipids, such as N(alpha),N(alpha)-Bis[carboxymethyl]-N(epsilon)-[(dioctadecylamino)succinyl]-L-lysine or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-[N-(5-amino-1-carboxypentyl iminodiacetic acid) succinyl]. A plausible explanation could be drawn from the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged groups of EDTA and the positively charged choline head group of DPPC. Intercalation of EDTA into the lipid membrane induced membrane curvature as elucidated by atomic force microscopy. Growth in size and shape of the membrane protrusion was found to be time-dependent upon exposure to EDTA. Further loss of material from the lipid membrane surface was monitored in real time using a quartz crystal microbalance. This indicates membrane restabilization by exclusion of the protrusions from the surface. Loss of lipid components facilitates membrane instability, leading to membrane permeabilization and lysis.

  18. Fish Lipids as a Valuable Source of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merdzhanova, Albena; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Dobreva, Diana A.; Makedonski, Lyubomir

    2017-03-01

    This article presents information about omega-3 (h-3) and omega-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) contents in a broad range of commercially important fish species available on Bulgarian fish markets. The aim is to raise consumers' awareness and encourage them to eat fish. Fish species from the Black Sea coast have relatively high proportion of n-3 PUFAs, of which more than 80% is by EPf (eicosapentaenoic acid, C 20:5 n-3) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid, C 22:6 n-3). Extensive epidemiological studies show that fish consumption is inversely associated with the incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), stroke and the functioning of the brain. About 0.5 g of omega-3 (EPA+DHA) a day or two savings of oily fish a week are required to reduce the risk of death from CVD. PUFAs needs should be satisfied not only with food additives but with fish lipids containing food.

  19. Hyperbaric nitrogen and pentobarbital on synaptosomal membrane lipids and free fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kostopanagiotou, G; Hamamoto, I; Hartwell, V; Nemoto, E M

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen at high pressures and anesthetics increase lipid monolayer surface pressure and in turn modulates monolayer associated lipolytic enzyme activity that could alter membrane lipids. We tested the hypothesis that nitrogen at pressures of 5 and 10 megapascals (MPa) and pentobarbital induce alterations in synaptosomal membrane phospholipid and free fatty acid (FFA). Rat cortical synaptosomes in Krebs-Henseleit buffer were placed in steel chambers and incubated for four hours at 37 degrees C: at 5 or 10 MPa of O2/balance N2; at one 0.1 MPa on room air, and with 10 mg pentobarbital. Free fatty acids (FFA) were quantified by thin-layer and gas chromatography, and neutral and acidic lipids by high-pressure thin layer chromatography and protein by Biorad colorimetric assay. Statistical analyses were by ANOVA and posthoc analysis by Neuman-Keuls and Kruskal-Wallis tests at p < 0.05. Sphyngomyelin, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, cerebroside and cholesterol were unchanged by 5 and 10 MPa nitrogen and pentobarbital. Free fatty acids (16:00, 18:00, 18:01, 20:00, 22:0, 22:01 and 24:01) at 10 MPa were reduced compared to 5 MPa (p < 0.05) but unaffected by pentobarbital. The decrease in synaptosomal membrane FFA at 10 MPa suggests attenuated hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids without detectable alterations in membrane phospholipid composition.

  20. Changes in lipid composition of hepatocyte plasma membrane induced by overfeeding in duck.

    PubMed

    Molee, W; Bouillier-Oudot, M; Auvergne, A; Babilé, R

    2005-08-01

    This experiment was carried out to examine the influence of overfeeding ducks with corn on the lipid composition of hepatocyte plasma membrane. Seventy-day-old male Mule ducks (Cairina moschata x Anas platyrhynchos) were overfed with corn for 12.5 days in order to induce fatty livers. The cholesterol and phospholipid contents were approximately 50% higher in hepatocyte plasma membranes from fatty livers compared to those of lean livers obtained from non-overfed ducks. However, the cholesterol/phospholipids molar ratio did not differ between both groups. Overfeeding induced a significant change in phospholipid composition of hepatocyte plasma membrane with a decrease in phosphatidylcholine proportion and conversely an increase in phosphatidylethanolamine. The fatty acid profile of phospholipids was also altered. In fatty hepatocyte plasma membrane, the overall proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was decreased and this was due to the decrease of some of, but not all, the PUFA. In addition, the proportions of oleic acid and n-9 series unsaturated fatty acids were higher in fatty than in lean liver membranes. This study provides evidence that overfeeding with a carbohydrate-rich corn-based diet induces a de novo hepatic lipogenesis in Mule duck which predominates over dietary lipid intake to change the lipid composition of the hepatocyte plasma membrane.

  1. Effects of carotenoids on damage of biological lipids induced by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Takeshi; Fujii, Noriko

    2014-05-01

    Carotenoids are considered to be involved in the radioresistant mechanisms of radioresistant bacteria. In these bacterial cells, carotenoids are present in biological lipids, and therefore may be related to the radiation-induced damage of lipids. However, only limited data are available for the role of carotenoids in such damage. In this study, we irradiated an α-linolenic acid-benzene solution with gamma rays and analyzed the resulting oxidative degradation and peroxidation damage in the presence or absence of two typical carotenoids: β-carotene and astaxanthin. The analyses revealed that oxidative degradation and peroxidation of α-linolenic acid, as evaluated by the amount of malondialdehyde and conjugated diene formed, respectively, increased in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, 8.5×10-3 M β-carotene inhibited gamma radiation-induced oxidative degradation of α-linolenic acid, whereas 5.0×10-5 and 5.0×10-6 M β-carotene, and 5.0×10-7 and 5.0×10-8 M astaxanthin promoted degradation. In contrast, neither β-carotene nor astaxanthin affected peroxidation of α-linolenic acid. These results suggest that an optimum concentration of carotenoids in radioresistant bacteria protects biological lipid structures from radiation-induced damage.

  2. Membrane Permeabilization Induced by Sphingosine: Effect of Negatively Charged Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Rojo, Noemi; Sot, Jesús; Viguera, Ana R.; Collado, M. Isabel; Torrecillas, Alejandro; Gómez-Fernández, J.C.; Goñi, Félix M.; Alonso, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine [(2S, 3R, 4E)-2-amino-4-octadecen-1, 3-diol] is the most common sphingoid long chain base in sphingolipids. It is the precursor of important cell signaling molecules, such as ceramides. In the last decade it has been shown to act itself as a potent metabolic signaling molecule, by activating a number of protein kinases. Moreover, sphingosine has been found to permeabilize phospholipid bilayers, giving rise to vesicle leakage. The present contribution intends to analyze the mechanism by which this bioactive lipid induces vesicle contents release, and the effect of negatively charged bilayers in the release process. Fluorescence lifetime measurements and confocal fluorescence microscopy have been applied to observe the mechanism of sphingosine efflux from large and giant unilamellar vesicles; a graded-release efflux has been detected. Additionally, stopped-flow measurements have shown that the rate of vesicle permeabilization increases with sphingosine concentration. Because at the physiological pH sphingosine has a net positive charge, its interaction with negatively charged phospholipids (e.g., bilayers containing phosphatidic acid together with sphingomyelins, phosphatidylethanolamine, and cholesterol) gives rise to a release of vesicular contents, faster than with electrically neutral bilayers. Furthermore, phosphorous 31-NMR and x-ray data show the capacity of sphingosine to facilitate the formation of nonbilayer (cubic phase) intermediates in negatively charged membranes. The data might explain the pathogenesis of Niemann-Pick type C1 disease. PMID:24940775

  3. L-Carnitine intake prevents irregular feeding-induced obesity and lipid metabolism disorder.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Guo, Anqi; Shu, Qingyu; Qi, Yangjian; Kong, Ying; Sun, Zhiping; Sun, Shumin; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-01-10

    L-Carnitine supplementation has been used to reduce obesity caused by high-fat diet, which is beneficial for lowering blood and hepatic lipid levels, and for ameliorating fatty liver. However, whether l-carnitine may affect irregular feeding-induced obesity and lipid metabolism disorder is still largely unknown. In the present study, we developed a time-delayed pattern of eating, and investigated the effects of l-carnitine on the irregular eating induced adiposity in mice. After an experimental period of 8 weeks with l-carnitine supplementation, l-carnitine significantly inhibited body weight increase and epididymal fat weight gain induced by the time-delayed feeding. In addition, l-carnitine administration decreased levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (GPT), glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT) and triglyceride (TG), which were significantly elevated by the irregular feeding. Moreover, mice supplemented with l-carnitine did not display glucose intolerance-associated hallmarks, which were found in the irregular feeding-induced obesity. Furthermore, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that l-carnitine counteracted the negative alterations of lipid metabolic gene expression (fatty acid synthase, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase, cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase) in the liver and fat of mice caused by the irregular feeding. Therefore, our results suggest that the time-delayed pattern of eating can induce adiposity and lipid metabolic disorders, while l-carnitine supplementation might prevent these negative symptoms.

  4. Aluminum contamination of parenteral nutrition additives, amino acid solutions, and lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Popińska, K; Kierkuś, J; Lyszkowska, M; Socha, J; Pietraszek, E; Kmiotek, W; Ksiazyk, J

    1999-09-01

    Contamination of parenteral nutrition solutions with aluminum may result in accumulation of this element in bones and, in premature infants, may inhibit bone calcium uptake and induce cholestasis. We measured the aluminum concentration of small-volume parenterals, amino acid solutions, lipid emulsions, and special solutions containing glucose, amino acids, electrolytes, and trace elements (standard I for children with a body weight of 3-5 kg, standard II for children with a body weight of 5-10 kg). The method used was graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry GTA-AAS (SpectrAA-400 Plus, Varian, PtY Ltd., Mulgrave, Australia). Quality control was run with the use of control serum (Seronorm, Nycomed, Oslo, Norway). The aluminum contents of parenterally administered solutions were: pediatric trace elements, 130 micrograms/L, and pediatric trace elements, 3000 micrograms/L; phosphorus salts: K-phosphates, 9800 micrograms/L, and Na/K phosphates, 13,000 micrograms/L; 10% calcium gluconate, 4400 micrograms/L; 6.5% amino acids, 30 micrograms/L; 10% amino acids, 120 micrograms/L; 12.5% amino acids, 121 micrograms/L; 20% lipid emulsion, 30 micrograms/L; 20% lipid emulsion, 180 micrograms/L; water-soluble vitamins, 12 micrograms/L; lipid soluble vitamins, 360 micrograms/L; standard I, 55 micrograms/L; standard II, 90 micrograms/L; The aluminum intake from parenteral nutrition was 6.6-10.8 micrograms.kg-1.d-1--a dose exceeding the safety limit of 2 micrograms.kg-1.d-1. The possible association of aluminum not only with metabolic bone disease, but also with encephalopathy, dictates caution when dealing with the pediatric population on long-term parenteral nutrition. In the absence of reliable label information, it seems proper to monitor the aluminum concentration in parenteral nutrition products and to report it in professional journals.

  5. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Loaded with Retinoic Acid and Lauric Acid as an Alternative for Topical Treatment of Acne Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elton Luiz; Carneiro, Guilherme; De Araújo, Lidiane Advíncula; Trindade, Mariana de Jesus Vaz; Yoshida, Maria Irene; Oréfice, Rodrigo Lambert; Farias, Luis de Macêdo; De Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Dos Santos, Simone Gonçalves; Goulart, Gisele Assis Castro; Alves, Ricardo José; Ferreira, Lucas Antônio Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Topical therapy is the first choice for the treatment of mild to moderate acne and all-trans retinoic acid is one of the most used drugs. The combination of retinoids and antimicrobials is an innovative approach for acne therapy. Recently, lauric acid, a saturated fatty acid, has shown strong antimicrobial activity against Propionibacterium acnes. However, topical application of retinoic acid is followed by high incidence of side-effects, including erythema and irritation. Solid lipid nanoparticles represent an alternative to overcome these side-effects. This work aims to develop solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with retinoic acid and lauric acid and evaluate their antibacterial activity. The influence of lipophilic stearylamine on the characteristics of solid lipid nanoparticles was investigated. Solid lipid nanoparticles were characterized for size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The in vitro inhibitory activity of retinoic acid-lauric acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles was evaluated against Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. High encapsulation efficiency was obtained at initial time (94 ± 7% and 100 ± 4% for retinoic acid and lauric acid, respectively) and it was demonstrated that lauric acid-loaded-solid lipid nanoparticles provided the incorporation of retinoic acid. However, the presence of stearylamine is necessary to ensure stability of encapsulation. Moreover, retinoic acid-lauric acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles showed growth inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus, representing an interesting alternative for the topical therapy of acne vulgaris.

  6. Modulation of therapy-induced senescence by reactive lipid aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Flor, A C; Doshi, A P; Kron, S J

    2016-01-01

    Current understanding points to unrepairable chromosomal damage as the critical determinant of accelerated senescence in cancer cells treated with radiation or chemotherapy. Nonetheless, the potent senescence inducer etoposide not only targets topoisomerase II to induce DNA damage but also produces abundant free radicals, increasing cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Toward examining roles for DNA damage and oxidative stress in therapy-induced senescence, we developed a quantitative flow cytometric senescence assay and screened 36 redox-active agents as enhancers of an otherwise ineffective dose of radiation. While senescence failed to correlate with total ROS, the radiation enhancers, etoposide and the other effective topoisomerase inhibitors each produced high levels of lipid peroxidation. The reactive aldehyde 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, a lipid peroxidation end product, was sufficient to induce senescence in irradiated cells. In turn, sequestering aldehydes with hydralazine blocked effects of etoposide and other senescence inducers. These results suggest that lipid peroxidation potentiates DNA damage from radiation and chemotherapy to drive therapy-induced senescence. PMID:27453792

  7. Ocean Warming and CO₂-Induced Acidification Impact the Lipid Content of a Marine Predatory Gastropod.

    PubMed

    Valles-Regino, Roselyn; Tate, Rick; Kelaher, Brendan; Savins, Dale; Dowell, Ashley; Benkendorff, Kirsten

    2015-09-24

    Ocean warming and acidification are current global environmental challenges impacting aquatic organisms. A shift in conditions outside the optimal environmental range for marine species is likely to generate stress that could impact metabolic activity, with consequences for the biosynthesis of marine lipids. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in the lipid content of Dicathais orbita exposed to current and predicted future climate change scenarios. The whelks were exposed to a combination of temperature and CO₂-induced acidification treatments in controlled flowthrough seawater mesocosms for 35 days. Under current conditions, D. orbita foot tissue has an average of 6 mg lipid/g tissue, but at predicted future ocean temperatures, the total lipid content dropped significantly, to almost half. The fatty acid composition is dominated by polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA 52%) with an n-3:6 fatty acid ratio of almost 2, which remains unchanged under future ocean conditions. However, we detected an interactive effect of temperature and pCO₂ on the % PUFAs and n-3 and n-6 fatty acids were significantly reduced by elevated water temperature, while both the saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids were significantly reduced under increased pCO₂ acidifying conditions. The present study indicates the potential for relatively small predicted changes in ocean conditions to reduce lipid reserves and alter the fatty acid composition of a predatory marine mollusc. This has potential implications for the growth and survivorship of whelks under future conditions, but only minimal implications for human consumption of D. orbita as nutritional seafood are predicted.

  8. Ocean Warming and CO2-Induced Acidification Impact the Lipid Content of a Marine Predatory Gastropod

    PubMed Central

    Valles-Regino, Roselyn; Tate, Rick; Kelaher, Brendan; Savins, Dale; Dowell, Ashley; Benkendorff, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Ocean warming and acidification are current global environmental challenges impacting aquatic organisms. A shift in conditions outside the optimal environmental range for marine species is likely to generate stress that could impact metabolic activity, with consequences for the biosynthesis of marine lipids. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in the lipid content of Dicathais orbita exposed to current and predicted future climate change scenarios. The whelks were exposed to a combination of temperature and CO2-induced acidification treatments in controlled flowthrough seawater mesocosms for 35 days. Under current conditions, D. orbita foot tissue has an average of 6 mg lipid/g tissue, but at predicted future ocean temperatures, the total lipid content dropped significantly, to almost half. The fatty acid composition is dominated by polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA 52%) with an n-3:6 fatty acid ratio of almost 2, which remains unchanged under future ocean conditions. However, we detected an interactive effect of temperature and pCO2 on the % PUFAs and n-3 and n-6 fatty acids were significantly reduced by elevated water temperature, while both the saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids were significantly reduced under increased pCO2 acidifying conditions. The present study indicates the potential for relatively small predicted changes in ocean conditions to reduce lipid reserves and alter the fatty acid composition of a predatory marine mollusc. This has potential implications for the growth and survivorship of whelks under future conditions, but only minimal implications for human consumption of D. orbita as nutritional seafood are predicted. PMID:26404318

  9. Oral Consumption of Bitter Gourd and Tomato Prevents Lipid Peroxidation in Liver Associated with DMBA Induced Skin Carcinogenesis in Mice.

    PubMed

    De, Sarmishtha; Chakraborty, Jamuna; Das, Sukta

    2000-01-01

    The protective role of two commonly consumed natural dietary items- bitter gourd and tomato against endogenous as well as 7,12- dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) induced lipid peroxidation in the livers of mice was investigated. The rationale for such an approach is that lipid peroxidation has been suggested to play a key role in human cancer development. There was a sharp rise in lipid peroxidation (measured as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances formation) during skin carcinogenesis induced by DMBA in mice. Aqueous extracts of bitter gourd and tomato juice were found to be very potent inhibitors of lipid peroxidation both in normal and DMBA treated mice. Our observations support the hypothesis that natural combinations of phytochemicals present in the fruit juices exert cancer-protective effects via a decrease in lipid peroxidation.

  10. Lipid growth requirement and influence of lipid supplement on fatty acid and aldehyde composition of Syntrophococcus sucromutans.

    PubMed Central

    Doré, J; Bryant, M P

    1989-01-01

    Results concerning the ruminal fluid growth requirement of the ruminal acetogen, Syntrophococcus sucromutans, indicate that octadecenoic acid isomers satisfy this essential requirement. Complex lipids, such as triglycerides and phospholipids, can also support growth. The cellular fatty acid and aldehyde composition closely reflects that of the lipid supplement provided to the cells. Up to 98% of the fatty acids and 80% of the fatty aldehydes are identical in chain length and degree of unsaturation to the octadecenoic acid supplement provided in the medium. S. sucromutans shows a tendency to have a greater proportion of the aldehyde form among its 18 carbon chains than it does with the shorter-chain simple lipids, which may be interpreted as a strategy to maintain membrane fluidity. 14C labeling showed that most of the oleic acid taken up from the medium was incorporated into the membrane fraction of the cells. PMID:2729991

  11. Polyunsaturated Branched-Chain Fatty Acid Geranylgeranoic Acid Induces Unfolded Protein Response in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwao, Chieko; Shidoji, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    The acyclic diterpenoid acid geranylgeranoic acid (GGA) has been reported to induce autophagic cell death in several human hepatoma-derived cell lines; however, the molecular mechanism for this remains unknown. In the present study, several diterpenoids were examined for ability to induce XBP1 splicing and/or lipotoxicity for human hepatoma cell lines. Here we show that three groups of diterpenoids emerged: 1) GGA, 2,3-dihydro GGA and 9-cis retinoic acid induce cell death and XBP1 splicing; 2) all-trans retinoic acid induces XBP1 splicing but little cell death; and 3) phytanic acid, phytenic acid and geranylgeraniol induce neither cell death nor XBP1 splicing. GGA-induced ER stress/ unfolded protein response (UPR) and its lipotoxicity were both blocked by co-treatment with oleic acid. The blocking activity of oleic acid for GGA-induced XBP1 splicing was not attenuated by methylation of oleic acid. These findings strongly suggest that GGA at micromolar concentrations induces the so-called lipid-induced ER stress response/UPR, which is oleate-suppressive, and shows its lipotoxicity in human hepatoma cells. PMID:26186544

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces the miR-33 locus to reprogram autophagy and host lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ouimet, Mireille; Koster, Stefan; Sakowski, Erik; Ramkhelawon, Bhama; van Solingen, Coen; Oldebeken, Scott; Karunakaran, Denuja; Celhay, Cynthia Portal; Sheedy, Frederick J.; Ray, Tathagat Dutta; Cecchini, Katharine; Zamore, Philip D; Rayner, Katey J; Marcel, Yves L; Philips, Jennifer A; Moore, Kathryn J

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) survives within macrophages by evading delivery to the lysosome and promoting the accumulation of lipid bodies, which serve as a bacterial source of nutrients. Here we show that by inducing miR-33 and its passenger strand miR-33*, Mtb inhibits integrated pathways involved in autophagy, lysosomal function and fatty acid oxidation to support bacterial replication. Silencing of miR-33 and miR-33* by genetic or pharmacological means promotes autophagy flux through derepression of key autophagy effectors such as ATG5, ATG12, LC3B and LAMP1 and AMPK-dependent activation of the transcription factors FOXO3 and TFEB, enhancing lipid catabolism and Mtb xenophagy. These data define a mammalian miRNA circuit utilized by Mtb to coordinately inhibit autophagy and reprogram host lipid metabolism to enable intracellular survival and persistence in the host. PMID:27089382

  13. Regulation of collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts by ascorbic-induced lipid peroxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Geesin, J.C. Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products, Inc., Skillman, NJ ); Gordon, J.S. ); Gordon, J.S. ); Berg, R.A. )

    1991-03-11

    Ascorbic acid has been shown to stimulate collagen synthesis through the induction of lipid peroxidation which leads to increased transcription of the collagen genes. To test the ability of aldehyde products of lipid peroxidation to mediate this effect, the authors treated cultured fibroblasts with 1-200{mu}M of malondialdehyde, acetaldehyde, glyoxal or hexenal in the presence of lipid peroxidation inducing or noninducing concentrations of ascorbic acid. The treatment process involved either pretreatment of cells for 66hrs with either concentration of ascorbate before a 6hr treatment in the presence of ascorbate and the aldehydes, or 6 or 72hr treatment of the cells in the presence of either concentration of ascorbate plus the aldehydes. No effect of any of these aldehydes was seen on ascorbate-stimulated collagen synthesis. Also, pretreatment of fibroblasts for 24hrs with 100nM phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which produces down regulation of protein kinase C(PKC), failed to alter the ascorbate-stimulation of collagen synthesis. Additionally, the authors tested the ability of benzamide, a poly ACP ribosylation inhibitor, to inhibit the ascorbate response with no specific effect noted. These results do not support the proposed roles for aldehydes, PKC, or poly ADP ribosylation in the mediation of the lipid peroxidation induced stimulation of collagen synthesis.

  14. The Lipid Droplet Protein Hypoxia-inducible Gene 2 Promotes Hepatic Triglyceride Deposition by Inhibiting Lipolysis*

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, Marina T.; Danai, Laura V.; Roth Flach, Rachel J.; Chawla, Anil; Pedersen, David J.; Guilherme, Adilson; Czech, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The liver is a major site of glucose, fatty acid, and triglyceride (TG) synthesis and serves as a major regulator of whole body nutrient homeostasis. Chronic exposure of humans or rodents to high-calorie diets promotes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, characterized by neutral lipid accumulation in lipid droplets (LD) of hepatocytes. Here we show that the LD protein hypoxia-inducible gene 2 (Hig2/Hilpda) functions to enhance lipid accumulation in hepatocytes by attenuating TG hydrolysis. Hig2 expression increased in livers of mice on a high-fat diet and during fasting, two states associated with enhanced hepatic TG content. Hig2 expressed in primary mouse hepatocytes localized to LDs and promoted LD TG deposition in the presence of oleate. Conversely, tamoxifen-inducible Hig2 deletion reduced both TG content and LD size in primary hepatocytes from mice harboring floxed alleles of Hig2 and a cre/ERT2 transgene controlled by the ubiquitin C promoter. Hepatic TG was also decreased by liver-specific deletion of Hig2 in mice with floxed Hig2 expressing cre controlled by the albumin promoter. Importantly, we demonstrate that Hig2-deficient hepatocytes exhibit increased TG lipolysis, TG turnover, and fatty acid oxidation as compared with controls. Interestingly, mice with liver-specific Hig2 deletion also display improved glucose tolerance. Taken together, these data indicate that Hig2 plays a major role in promoting lipid sequestration within LDs in mouse hepatocytes through a mechanism that impairs TG degradation. PMID:25922078

  15. The Lipid Droplet Protein Hypoxia-inducible Gene 2 Promotes Hepatic Triglyceride Deposition by Inhibiting Lipolysis.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Marina T; Danai, Laura V; Roth Flach, Rachel J; Chawla, Anil; Pedersen, David J; Guilherme, Adilson; Czech, Michael P

    2015-06-12

    The liver is a major site of glucose, fatty acid, and triglyceride (TG) synthesis and serves as a major regulator of whole body nutrient homeostasis. Chronic exposure of humans or rodents to high-calorie diets promotes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, characterized by neutral lipid accumulation in lipid droplets (LD) of hepatocytes. Here we show that the LD protein hypoxia-inducible gene 2 (Hig2/Hilpda) functions to enhance lipid accumulation in hepatocytes by attenuating TG hydrolysis. Hig2 expression increased in livers of mice on a high-fat diet and during fasting, two states associated with enhanced hepatic TG content. Hig2 expressed in primary mouse hepatocytes localized to LDs and promoted LD TG deposition in the presence of oleate. Conversely, tamoxifen-inducible Hig2 deletion reduced both TG content and LD size in primary hepatocytes from mice harboring floxed alleles of Hig2 and a cre/ERT2 transgene controlled by the ubiquitin C promoter. Hepatic TG was also decreased by liver-specific deletion of Hig2 in mice with floxed Hig2 expressing cre controlled by the albumin promoter. Importantly, we demonstrate that Hig2-deficient hepatocytes exhibit increased TG lipolysis, TG turnover, and fatty acid oxidation as compared with controls. Interestingly, mice with liver-specific Hig2 deletion also display improved glucose tolerance. Taken together, these data indicate that Hig2 plays a major role in promoting lipid sequestration within LDs in mouse hepatocytes through a mechanism that impairs TG degradation.

  16. Fatty acid composition of plasma lipids and erythrocyte membranes during simulated extravehicular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skedina, M. A.; Katuntsev, V. P.; Buravkova, L. B.; Naidina, V. P.

    Ten subjects (from 27 to 41 years) have been participated in 32 experiments. They were decompressed from ground level to 40-35 kPa in altitude chamber when breathed 100% oxygen by mask and performed repeated cycles of exercises (3.0 Kcal/min). The intervals between decompressions were 3-5 days. Plasma lipid and erythrocyte membrane fatty acid composition was evaluated in the fasting venous blood before and immediately after hypobaric exposure. There were 7 cases decompression sickness (DCS). Venous gas bubbles (GB) were detected in 27 cases (84.4%). Any significant changes in the fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes and plasma didn't practically induce after the first decompression. However, by the beginning of the second decompression the total lipid level in erythrocyte membranes decreased from 54.6 mg% to 40.4 mg% in group with DCS symptoms and from 51.2 mg% to 35.2 mg% (p < 0.05) without DCS symptoms. In group with DCS symptoms a tendency to increased level of saturated fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes (16:0, 18:0), the level of the polyunsaturated linoleic fatty acid (18:2) and arachidonic acid (20:4) tended to be decreased by the beginning of the second decompression. Insignificant changes in blood plasma fatty acid composition was observed in both groups. The obtained biochemical data that indicated the simulated extravehicular activity (EVA) condition is accompanied by the certain changes in the blood lipid metabolism, structural and functional state of erythrocyte membranes, which are reversible. The most pronounced changes are found in subjects with DCS symptoms.

  17. Stress Induced Domain Formation in Multilamellar Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayebi, Lobat; Gillmore, Sean; Parikh, Atul

    2010-03-01

    Domain formation in lipid mixtures due to phase separation of the components is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in mono- and bi-molecular lipid configurations. We report same phenomenon, however, in multilamellar configurations consisting of thousands of lamellae where the domain pattern in each layer is interestingly aligned with the other lamellae. In this process, both dehydration and hydration of lipid cake can act as the driving force to separate two phases of liquid ordered and liquid disordered. In a controlled experiment with a stack lipid saturated with water, mechanical perturbation can induce domain formation too. Series of experiments of this kind reaches us to the conclusion that any sort of stress in special condition may cause domain formation. We use a combination of microscopy tools including AFM, fluorescence confocal and bright-field microscopy to determine the influence of interaction between the line tension and key elastic properties of the lipid bilayers. As a particular interest we studied the dynamics of the domain pattern formation and the interactions between the domains such as long-term fusion.

  18. Modulation of radiation induced lipid peroxidation by phospholipase A 2 and calmodulin antagonists: Relevance to detoxification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Rajeev; Kale, R. K.

    1995-04-01

    Ghost membranes prepared from erythrocytes of Swiss albino mice were irradiated with 0.9 Gy s -1. Lipid peroxidation initiated by ionizing radiation was enhanced by phospholipase A 2, and required both phospholipase A 2 and GSH-peroxidase for consecutive action to convert fatty acid peroxides into corresponding alcohols. The ability of phospholipase A 2 to enhance lipid peroxidation was increased in presence of Ca 2+. However, in combination, phospholipase A 2 and GSH-peroxidase were effective in inhibiting lipid peroxidation. These findings show that free fatty acid peroxides considerably increase the peroxidation. Calmodulin antagonists inhibit lipid peroxidation and decrease the radiation induced release of Ca 2+ from the membranes. Our results suggest the importance of Ca 2+ dependent phospholipase A 2 in detoxification of fatty acid peroxides in the membranes. It is quite possible that scavenging of free radicals by calmodulin antagonists lower the formation of hydroperoxides, resulting in the decrease in activity of phospholipase A 2. Alternatively, decrease in Ca 2+ release due to the calmodulin antagonists might have affected the activity of phospholipase A 2. Our observations might be of considerable significance in the understanding of post irradiation effect on biological membranes.

  19. The influence of the long chain fatty acid on the antagonistic activities of Rhizobium sin-1 lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanghui; Wolfert, Margreet A.; Boons, Geert-Jan

    2007-01-01

    The lipid A from nitrogen-fixing bacterial species R. sin-1 is structurally unusual due to lack of phosphates and the presence of a 2-aminogluconolactone and a very long chain fatty acid, 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid (27OHC28:0), moiety. This structurally unusual lipid A can antagonize TNF-α production by human monocytes induced by E. coli LPS. To establish the relevance of the unusual long chain 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid for antagonistic properties, a highly convergent strategy for the synthesis of several derivatives of the lipid A of Rhizobium sin-1 has been developed. Compound 1 is a natural R. sin-1 lipid A having a 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid at C-2′, compound 2 contains an octacosanoic acid moiety at this position, and compound 3 is modified by a short chain tetradecanoic acid. Cellular activation studies with a human monocytic cell line have shown that the octacosanoic acid is important for optimal antagonistic properties. The hydroxyl of the natural 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic moiety does, however, not account for inhibitory activity. The resulting structure activity relationships are important for the design of compounds for the treatment of septic shock. PMID:17513113

  20. Lipid domains in zwitterionic-anionic lipid mixtures induced by combined effect of monovalent and divalent ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongcheng; Ganesan, Sai; Matysiak, Silvina

    Lipid domain formation is an important process for many cellular processes. In experiment, the effects of Ba2+, Sr2+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ in inducing lateral phase separation in the binary phosphatidylcholine-phosphatidylserine (PC-PS) bilayer are quite different, of which the molecular mechanism remains to be understood. We have explored the effect of monovalent (MI) and divalent (MII) cationic radii on lipid domain formation in mixed zwitterionic-anionic lipid bilayers. We propose a mechanism for the formation of divalent-cation-induced lipid domains based on MD simulations with our Water-Explicit Polarizable MEMbrane (WEPMEM) coarse-grained model, which uses PC as the model for zwitterionic and PS for anionic lipids. Lipid aggregation only occurs with limited range of monovalent and divalent ion sizes in agreement with experimental observations. More ordering and closer packing of the lipids are noted within the domains, which correlate with bilayer thickness, curvature and lipid asymmetry. The results of the simulations reveal that the lipid domain consists of MII-mediated anionic lipid dimer/trimer complexes bridged by monovalent ions MI and provide a stereochemical insight in understanding the experimentally observed calcium-induced phase separation.

  1. High fatty acid availability after exercise alters the regulation of muscle lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Newsom, Sean A; Schenk, Simon; Li, Minghua; Everett, Allison C; Horowitz, Jeffrey F

    2011-06-01

    We previously reported that a single exercise session protects against fatty acid (FA)-induced insulin resistance, perhaps in part through augmented intramyocellular triacylglycerol (IMTG) synthesis. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of elevated FA availability after exercise on factors regulating IMTG metabolism. After exercise (90 minutes, 65% peak oxygen uptake), 7 healthy women (body mass index, 23 ± 1 kg/m(2)) were infused overnight (16 hours) with either a lipid and heparin solution (LIPID, 0.11 g fat per kilogram per hour) or saline (SALINE). We measured resting FA oxidation (indirect calorimetry) and obtained a skeletal muscle biopsy sample the next morning. The 4-fold increase in overnight plasma FA concentration during LIPID increased IMTG by approximately 30% during LIPID vs SALINE. This was accompanied by an approximately 25% greater membrane-associated abundance of the FA transporter FAT/CD36 (P < .01) and an approximately 8% increase in the activity of the IMTG synthesis enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT, P < .01). In contrast, resting FA oxidation was not affected. We also found no difference in the protein abundance of GPAT1 and diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1, diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity, or the abundance of the lipid droplet coat proteins (perilipins 2, 3, 4, and 5) between treatments. Our findings suggest that augmented capacity for FA flux into muscle (ie, via membrane-associated FAT/CD36), perhaps together with a slight yet significant increase in activity of a key IMTG synthesis enzyme (GPAT), may enhance IMTG storage when FA availability is high after exercise. The importance of the absence of a change in perilipin protein abundance despite increased muscle lipid storage remains to be determined.

  2. Self-assembled multicompartment liquid crystalline lipid carriers for protein, peptide, and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Angelina; Angelov, Borislav; Mutafchieva, Rada; Lesieur, Sylviane; Couvreur, Patrick

    2011-02-15

    Lipids and lipopolymers self-assembled into biocompatible nano- and mesostructured functional materials offer many potential applications in medicine and diagnostics. In this Account, we demonstrate how high-resolution structural investigations of bicontinuous cubic templates made from lyotropic thermosensitive liquid-crystalline (LC) materials have initiated the development of innovative lipidopolymeric self-assembled nanocarriers. Such structures have tunable nanochannel sizes, morphologies, and hierarchical inner organizations and provide potential vehicles for the predictable loading and release of therapeutic proteins, peptides, or nucleic acids. This Account shows that structural studies of swelling of bicontinuous cubic lipid/water phases are essential for overcoming the nanoscale constraints for encapsulation of large therapeutic molecules in multicompartment lipid carriers. For the systems described here, we have employed time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution freeze-fracture electronic microscopy (FF-EM) to study the morphology and the dynamic topological transitions of these nanostructured multicomponent amphiphilic assemblies. Quasi-elastic light scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy can provide additional information at the nanoscale about the behavior of lipid/protein self-assemblies under conditions that approximate physiological hydration. We wanted to generalize these findings to control the stability and the hydration of the water nanochannels in liquid-crystalline lipid nanovehicles and confine therapeutic biomolecules within these structures. Therefore we analyzed the influence of amphiphilic and soluble additives (e.g. poly(ethylene glycol)monooleate (MO-PEG), octyl glucoside (OG), proteins) on the nanochannels' size in a diamond (D)-type bicontinuous cubic phase of the lipid glycerol monooleate (MO). At body temperature, we can stabilize long-living swollen states, corresponding to a diamond cubic phase

  3. Cutin monomer induces expression of the rice OsLTP5 lipid transfer protein gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Jong Ho; Kim, Moon Chul; Cho, Sung Ho

    2008-01-01

    Treatment with the cutin monomer 16-hydroxypalmitic acid (HPA), a major component of cutin, elicited the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in rice leaves and induced the expression of the lipid transfer protein gene OsLTP5. Treatment with HPA also induced expression of OsLTP1, OsLTP2, and the pathogen-related PR-10 genes to a lesser extent. The OsLTP5 transcript was expressed prominently in stems and flowers, but was barely detectable in leaves. Expression of OsLTP5 was induced in shoots in response to ABA and salicylic acid. It is proposed that HPA is perceived by rice as a signal, inducing defense reactions.

  4. Effect of dietary docosahexaenoic acid connecting phospholipids on the lipid peroxidation of the brain in mice.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Seiichi; Ishihara, Kenji; Kitagawa, Tomoko; Wada, Shun; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2008-12-01

    The effect of dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3) with two lipid types on lipid peroxidation of the brain was investigated in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. Each group of female Balb/c mice was fed a diet containing DHA-connecting phospholipids (DHA-PL) or DHA-connecting triacylglycerols (DHA-TG) for 5 wk. Safflower oil was fed as the control. The lipid peroxide level of the brain was significantly lower in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet when compared to those fed the DHA-TG and safflower oil diets, while the alpha-tocopherol level was significantly higher in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet than in those fed the DHA-TG and safflower oil diets. The DHA level of phosphatidylethanolamine in the brain was significantly higher in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet than in those fed the safflower oil diet. The dimethylacetal levels were significantly higher in the mice fed the DHA-PL diet than in those fed the safflower oil and DHA-TG diets. These results suggest that the dietary DHA-connecting phospholipids have an antioxidant activity on the brain lipids in mice, and the effect may be related to the brain plasmalogen.

  5. Metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by inhibiting FOXO1-mediated transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 4

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jun; Ren, Pingping; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xing Li; Chen, Li; Shen, Ying H.

    2010-02-26

    Objective: The accumulation of lipids in macrophages contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Strategies to reduce lipid accumulation in macrophages may have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been reported to reduce lipid accumulation in adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on lipid accumulation in macrophages and investigated the mechanisms involved. Methods and results: We observed that metformin significantly reduced palmitic acid (PA)-induced intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages. Metformin promoted the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1), while reduced the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) which was involved in PA-induced lipid accumulation. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that metformin regulates FABP4 expression at the transcriptional level. We identified forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 as a positive regulator of FABP4 expression. Inhibiting FOXO1 expression with FOXO1 siRNA significantly reduced basal and PA-induced FABP4 expression. Overexpression of wild-type FOXO1 and constitutively active FOXO1 significantly increased FABP4 expression, whereas dominant negative FOXO1 dramatically decreased FABP4 expression. Metformin reduced FABP4 expression by promoting FOXO1 nuclear exclusion and subsequently inhibiting its activity. Conclusions: Taken together, these results suggest that metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by repressing FOXO1-mediated FABP4 transcription. Thus, metformin may have a protective effect against lipid accumulation in macrophages and may serve as a therapeutic agent for preventing and treating atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome.

  6. [The action of week inorganic acids and lower carboxylic acids on the conductivity of bilayer lipid membranes].

    PubMed

    Kilivnik, K E; Khmarskaia, L A; Ksenzhek, O S

    2009-01-01

    The ability of weak inorganic acids (H2S, HCN) and lower carboxylic acids to interact with bilayer lipid membranes, change their conductivity, and act as protonophores has been investigated. The mechanism of changes in BLM conductivity was studied. Factors influencing the interaction of acids with model lipid membranes were determined. Maximum changes in conductivity were observed at pH values equal to the dissociation constants of weak acids and depend on the coefficients of distribution "octanol-water".

  7. Long Chain Fatty Acid Acylated Derivatives of Quercetin-3-O-Glucoside as Antioxidants to Prevent Lipid Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Warnakulasuriya, Sumudu N.; Ziaullah; Rupasinghe, H.P. Vasantha

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids have shown promise as natural plant-based antioxidants for protecting lipids from oxidation. It was hypothesized that their applications in lipophilic food systems can be further enhanced by esterification of flavonoids with fatty acids. Quercetin-3-O-glucoside (Q3G) was esterified individually with six selected long chain fatty acids: stearic acid (STA), oleic acid (OLA), linoleic acid (LNA), α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and decosahexaenoic acid (DHA), using Candida antarctica B lipase as the biocatalyst. The antioxidant activity of esterified flavonoids was evaluated using lipid oxidation model systems of poly-unsaturated fatty acids-rich fish oil and human low density lipoprotein (LDL), in vitro. In the oil-in-water emulsion, Q3G esters exhibited 50% to 100% inhibition in primary oxidation and 30% to 75% inhibition in secondary oxidation. In bulk oil, Q3G esters did not provide considerable protection from lipid oxidation; however, Q3G demonstrated more than 50% inhibition in primary oxidation. EPA, DHA and ALA esters of Q3G showed significantly higher inhibition in Cu2+- and peroxyl radical-induced LDL oxidation in comparison to Q3G. PMID:25384198

  8. Nitrooleic Acid Attenuates Lipid Metabolic Disorders and Liver Steatosis in DOCA-Salt Hypertensive Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiping; Sun, Jing; Jia, Zhanjun; Yang, Tianxin; Xu, Liang; Zhao, Bing; Yu, Kezhou; Wang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Nitrooleic acid (OA-NO2) is endogenous ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. The present study was aimed at investigating the beneficial effects of OA-NO2 on the lipid metabolism and liver steatosis in deoxycorticosterone acetate- (DOCA-) salt induced hypertensive mice model. Male C57BL/6 mice were divided to receive DOCA-salt plus OA-NO2 or DOCA-salt plus vehicle and another group received neither DOCA-salt nor OA-NO2 (control group). After 3-week treatment with DOCA-salt plus 1% sodium chloride in drinking fluid, the hypertension was noted; however, OA-NO2 had no effect on the hypertension. In DOCA-salt treated mice, the plasma triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were significantly increased compared to control mice, and pretreatment with OA-NO2 significantly reduced these parameters. Further, the histopathology of liver exhibited more lipid distribution together with more serious micro- and macrovesicular steatosis after DOCA-salt treatment and that was consistent with liver tissue triglyceride and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) content. The mice pretreated with OA-NO2 showed reduced liver damage accompanied with low liver lipid content. Moreover, the liver TBARS, together with the expressions of gp91phox and p47phox, were parallelly decreased. These findings indicated that OA-NO2 had the protective effect on liver injury against DOCA-salt administration and the beneficial effect could be attributed to its antihyperlipidemic activities.

  9. Membrane Lipid Interactions in Intestinal Ischemia/reperfusion-induced Injury

    PubMed Central

    Slone, Emily Archer; Fleming, Sherry D.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemia, lack of blood flow, and reperfusion, return of blood flow, is a common phenomenon affecting millions of Americans each year. Roughly 30,000 Americans per year experience intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR), which is associated with a high mortality rate. Previous studies of the intestine established a role for neutrophils, eicosanoids, the complement system and naturally occurring antibodies in IR-induced pathology. Furthermore, data indicate involvement of a lipid or lipid-like moiety in mediating IR-induced damage. It has been proposed that exposure of neo-antigens are recognized by antibodies, triggering action of the complement cascade. While it is evident that the pathophysiology of IR-induced injury is complex and multi-factorial, we focus this review on the involvement of eicosanoids, phospholipids and neo-antigens in the early pathogenesis. Lipid changes occurring in response to IR, neo-antigens exposed and the role of a phospholipid transporter, phospholipid scramblase 1 will be discussed. PMID:24814240

  10. A polyphenol rescues lipid induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells and adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Bhaskarjyoti; Chatterjee, Priyajit; Mukherjee, Sandip; Buragohain, Alak Kumar; Bhattacharya, Samir; Dasgupta, Suman

    2014-09-26

    Skeletal muscle and adipose tissues are known to be two important insulin target sites. Therefore, lipid induced insulin resistance in these tissues greatly contributes in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Ferulic acid (FRL) purified from the leaves of Hibiscus mutabilis, showed impressive effects in preventing saturated fatty acid (SFA) induced defects in skeletal muscle cells. Impairment of insulin signaling molecules by SFA was significantly waived by FRL. SFA markedly reduced insulin receptor β (IRβ) in skeletal muscle cells, this was affected due to the defects in high mobility group A1 (HMGA1) protein obtruded by phospho-PKCε and that adversely affects IRβ mRNA expression. FRL blocked PKCε activation and thereby permitted HMGA1 to activate IRβ promoter which improved IR expression deficiency. In high fat diet (HFD) fed diabetic rats, FRL reduced blood glucose level and enhanced lipid uptake activity of adipocytes isolated from adipose tissue. Importantly, FRL suppressed fetuin-A (FetA) gene expression, that reduced circulatory FetA level and since FetA is involved in adipose tissue inflammation, a significant attenuation of proinflammatory cytokines occurred. Collectively, FRL exhibited certain unique features for preventing lipid induced insulin resistance and therefore promises a better therapeutic choice for T2D.

  11. The environmental light influences the circulatory levels of retinoic acid and associates with hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wenqiang; Li, Chunying; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Shiming; Dong, Wei; Jiang, Pengjiu; Zhang, Jianfa

    2008-12-01

    Environmental light is involved in the regulation of photochemical reaction in mouse retina. It remains unclear whether light-mediated increase in all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) synthesis in retina will result in altering the circulatory levels of ATRA and regulating downstream gene expression and physiological function. Here we showed circulatory levels of ATRA decreased in mice under constant darkness and elevated by light exposure. Fat gene pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (mPlrp2) and its partner procolipase (mClps), but not hepatic lipase (mHl), activated in livers for responding to lack of light illuminating. Light-triggered alterations in circulatory ATRA levels regulated ecto-5'-nucleotidase gene expression by retinoic acid receptor retinoic acid receptor-alpha and modulated 5'-AMP levels in blood and were associated with mPlrp2 and mClps expression in the livers. Mice deficient in adenosine receptors displayed mPlrp2 and mClps expression in livers under 12-h light, 12-h dark cycles. Caffeine blocked adenosine receptors and induced hepatic mPlrp2 and mClps expression in wild-type mice. Mice activated in hepatic mPlrp2 and mClps expression lowered hepatic and serum lipid levels and markedly elevated circulatory levels of all-trans retinol. Our results suggest environmental light influence hepatic lipid homeostasis by light-modulated retinoic acid signaling associated with mPlrp2 and mClps gene expression in livers.

  12. Lipids and Oxidative Stress Associated with Ethanol-Induced Neurological Damage.

    PubMed

    Hernández, José A; López-Sánchez, Rosa C; Rendón-Ramírez, Adela

    2016-01-01

    The excessive intake of alcohol is a serious public health problem, especially given the severe damage provoked by chronic or prenatal exposure to alcohol that affects many physiological processes, such as memory, motor function, and cognitive abilities. This damage is related to the ethanol oxidation in the brain. The metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde and then to acetate is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species that accentuate the oxidative state of cells. This metabolism of ethanol can induce the oxidation of the fatty acids in phospholipids, and the bioactive aldehydes produced are known to be associated with neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration. As such, here we will review the role of lipids in the neuronal damage induced by ethanol-related oxidative stress and the role that lipids play in the related compensatory or defense mechanisms.

  13. Lipids and Oxidative Stress Associated with Ethanol-Induced Neurological Damage

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The excessive intake of alcohol is a serious public health problem, especially given the severe damage provoked by chronic or prenatal exposure to alcohol that affects many physiological processes, such as memory, motor function, and cognitive abilities. This damage is related to the ethanol oxidation in the brain. The metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde and then to acetate is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species that accentuate the oxidative state of cells. This metabolism of ethanol can induce the oxidation of the fatty acids in phospholipids, and the bioactive aldehydes produced are known to be associated with neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration. As such, here we will review the role of lipids in the neuronal damage induced by ethanol-related oxidative stress and the role that lipids play in the related compensatory or defense mechanisms. PMID:26949445

  14. Effects of a hypercholesterolaemia-inducing diet on biliary electrolytes and lipid secretion in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Monte, M. J.; Jimenez, R.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of a high cholesterol/cholate diet on the biliary secretion of bile acids, cholesterol, phospholipid and inorganic electrolytes in the rat were examined. Wistar rats were fed a hypercholesterolaemia-inducing diet (HID) for 20 days prior to the biliary experiments. Rats fed a standard laboratory diet were used as controls. The HID diet increased plasma cholesterol concentrations and the hepatic content of total, free and esterified cholesterol, without changes in ALP*, ALT and AST plasma activities. Bile flow and biliary secretion of bile acids and inorganic electrolytes were markedly increased in the hypercholesterolaemic animals. The stimulated biliary secretion was due to an increase in both the bile acid-dependent and bile acid-independent fractions of bile flow. An increase in the bile acid pool induced by the administration of exogenous cholic acid/cholesterol would account for these changes in bile flow and inorganic electrolyte secretion. Nevertheless, the increase in the bile acid-independent bile flow could be also related, at least to some extent, to a higher efficiency of bicarbonate transport into bile. The HID diet also increased both cholesterol and phospholipid biliary outputs, whereas it did not modify the relationship between lipid and bile acid secretion. The lithogenic index of bile was reduced in the rats after the HID regimen due to a relatively higher increase in the biliary outputs of phospholipids and bile acids than of cholesterol. PMID:8499321

  15. Crowding-induced mixing behavior of lipid bilayers: Examination of mixing energy, phase, packing geometry, and reversibility

    DOE PAGES

    Zeno, Wade F.; Rystov, Alice; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; ...

    2016-04-20

    In an effort to develop a general thermodynamic model from first-principles to describe the mixing behavior of lipid membranes, we examined lipid mixing induced by targeted binding of small (Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)) and large (nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs)) structures to specific phases of phase-separated lipid bilayers. Phases were targeted by incorporation of phase-partitioning iminodiacetic acid (IDA)-functionalized lipids into ternary lipid mixtures consisting of DPPC, DOPC, and cholesterol. GFP and NLPs, containing histidine tags, bound the IDA portion of these lipids via a metal, Cu2+, chelating mechanism. In giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), GFP and NLPs bound to the Lo domains ofmore » bilayers containing DPIDA, and bound to the Ld region of bilayers containing DOIDA. At sufficiently large concentrations of DPIDA or DOIDA, lipid mixing was induced by bound GFP and NLPs. The validity of the thermodynamic model was confirmed when it was found that the statistical mixing distribution as a function of crowding energy for smaller GFP and larger NLPs collapsed to the same trend line for each GUV composition. Moreover, results of this analysis show that the free energy of mixing for a ternary lipid bilayer consisting of DOPC, DPPC, and cholesterol varied from 7.9 × 10–22 to 1.5 × 10–20 J/lipid at the compositions observed, decreasing as the relative cholesterol concentration was increased. It was discovered that there appears to be a maximum packing density, and associated maximum crowding pressure, of the NLPs, suggestive of circular packing. A similarity in mixing induced by NLP1 and NLP3 despite large difference in projected areas was analytically consistent with monovalent (one histidine tag) versus divalent (two histidine tags) surface interactions, respectively. In addition to GUVs, binding and induced mixing behavior of NLPs was also observed on planar, supported lipid multibilayers. Furthermore, the mixing process was reversible, with

  16. Polymer-Induced Swelling of Solid-Supported Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Kreuzer, Martin; Trapp, Marcus; Dahint, Reiner; Steitz, Roland

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the interaction of charged polymers with solid-supported 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) membranes by in-situ neutron reflectivity. We observe an enormous swelling of the oligolamellar lipid bilayer stacks after incubation in solutions of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) in D2O. The positively charged polyelectrolyte molecules interact with the lipid bilayers and induce a drastic increase in their d-spacing by a factor of ~4. Temperature, time, and pH influence the swollen interfacial lipid linings. From our study, we conclude that electrostatic interactions introduced by the adsorbed PAH are the main cause for the drastic swelling of the lipid coatings. The DMPC membrane stacks do not detach from their solid support at T > Tm. Steric interactions, also introduced by the PAH molecules, are held responsible for the stabilizing effect. We believe that this novel system offers great potential for fundamental studies of biomembrane properties, keeping the membrane’s natural fluidity and freedom, decoupled from a solid support at physiological conditions. PMID:26703746

  17. Osmotically induced reversible transitions in lipid-DNA mesophases.

    PubMed

    Danino, Dganit; Kesselman, Ellina; Saper, Gadiel; Petrache, Horia I; Harries, Daniel

    2009-04-08

    We follow the effect of osmotic pressure on isoelectric complexes that self-assemble from mixtures of DNA and mixed neutral and cationic lipids. Using small angle x-ray diffraction and freeze-fracture cryo-electron microscopy, we find that lamellar complexes known to form in aqueous solutions can reversibly transition to hexagonal mesophases under high enough osmotic stress exerted by adding a neutral polymer. Using molecular spacings derived from x-ray diffraction, we estimate the reversible osmotic pressure-volume (Pi-V) work needed to induce this transition. We find that the transition free energy is comparable to the work required to elastically bend lipid layers around DNA. Consistent with this, the required work is significantly lowered by an addition of hexanol, which is known to soften lipid bilayers. Our findings not only help to resolve the free-energy contributions associated with lipid-DNA complex formation, but they also demonstrate the importance that osmotic stress can have to the macromolecular phase geometry in realistic biological environments.

  18. Salinity stress induced lipid synthesis to harness biodiesel during dual mode cultivation of mixotrophic microalgae.

    PubMed

    Venkata Mohan, S; Devi, M Prathima

    2014-08-01

    Influence of salinity as a stress factor to harness biodiesel was assessed during dual mode cultivation of microalgae by integrating biomass growth phase (BGP) and salinity induced lipid induction phase (LIP). BGP was evaluated in mixotrophic mode employing nutrients (NPK) and carbon (glucose) source while LIP was operated under stress environment with varying salt concentrations (0, 0.5, 1 and 2gNaCl/l). Salinity stress triggered both biomass growth and lipid synthesis in microalgae significantly. BGP showed higher increments in biomass growth (2.55g/l) while LIP showed higher lipid productivity (1gNaCl/l; total/neutral lipid, 23.4/9.2%) than BGP (total/neutral lipid, 15.2/6%). Lower concentrations of salinity showed positive influence on the process while higher concentrations showed marked inhibition. Salinity stress also facilitated in maintaining saturated fatty acid methyl esters in higher amounts which associates with the improved fuel properties. Efficient wastewater treatment was observed during BGP operation indicating the assimilation of carbon/nutrients by microalgae.

  19. The effect of dietary fat and omega-3 fatty acids on whole body lipid oxidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids yields several electrophilic, reactive carbonyl metabolites. We hypothesized that an increased intake of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3) would lead to increased lipid peroxidation metabolites compared to a diet low in n-3. As part of a randomized crossov...

  20. LIPID CLASS DISTRIBUTION OF HIGHLY UNSATURATED LONG CHAIN FATTY ACIDS IN MARINE DINOFLAGELLATES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The very long chain highly unsaturated C28 fatty acids, octacosaheptaenoic [28:7(n-6)] and octacosaoctaenoic acid [28:8(n-3)], were found to be associated with phospholipids, obtained by fractionation of total lipid extracts into distinct lipid classes, in 4 and 6, respectively, ...

  1. Process strategies to maximize lipid accumulations of novel yeast in acid and base treated hydrolyzates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oleaginous yeasts can accumulate up to 70% of cell biomass as lipids, predominantly as triacylglycerols. Yeast lipid fatty acid profiles have been reported to be similar to that of vegetable oils and consist primarily of oleic, palmitic, stearic, and linoleic acids. This capability provides the oppo...

  2. Oxidized lipids and lipid-mediators are involved in cardiovascular injury induced by diesel exhaust particles and ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms by which air pollutants induce cardiac and vascular injuries are unknown. We hypothesized that these injuries involve alterations in'aortic membrane lipids and lipid-mediators. We exposed male Wistar Kyoto rats (12-15 wk old), nose-only to air, ozone (03; 0.5 ppm),...

  3. Dopaminergic Neurons Respond to Iron-Induced Oxidative Stress by Modulating Lipid Acylation and Deacylation Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez Campos, Sofía; Rodríguez Diez, Guadalupe; Oresti, Gerardo Martín; Salvador, Gabriela Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Metal-imbalance has been reported as a contributor factor for the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson Disease (PD). Specifically, iron (Fe)-overload and copper (Cu) mis-compartmentalization have been reported to be involved in the injury of dopaminergic neurons in this pathology. The aim of this work was to characterize the mechanisms of membrane repair by studying lipid acylation and deacylation reactions and their role in oxidative injury in N27 dopaminergic neurons exposed to Fe-overload and Cu-supplementation. N27 dopaminergic neurons incubated with Fe (1mM) for 24 hs displayed increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation and elevated plasma membrane permeability. Cu-supplemented neurons (10, 50 μM) showed no evidence of oxidative stress markers. A different lipid acylation profile was observed in N27 neurons pre-labeled with [3H] arachidonic acid (AA) or [3H] oleic acid (OA). In Fe-exposed neurons, AA uptake was increased in triacylglycerols (TAG) whereas its incorporation into the phospholipid (PL) fraction was diminished. TAG content was 40% higher in Fe-exposed neurons than in controls. This increase was accompanied by the appearance of Nile red positive lipid bodies. Contrariwise, OA incorporation increased in the PL fractions and showed no changes in TAG. Lipid acylation profile in Cu-supplemented neurons showed AA accumulation into phosphatidylserine and no changes in TAG. The inhibition of deacylation/acylation reactions prompted an increase in oxidative stress markers and mitochondrial dysfunction in Fe-overloaded neurons. These findings provide evidence about the participation of lipid acylation mechanisms against Fe-induced oxidative injury and postulate that dopaminergic neurons cleverly preserve AA in TAG in response to oxidative stress. PMID:26076361

  4. Ghrelin induces abdominal obesity via GHS-R-dependent lipid retention.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jeffrey S; Kotokorpi, Pia; Eccles, Sinan R; Barnes, Sarah K; Tokarczuk, Pawel F; Allen, Sophie K; Whitworth, Hilary S; Guschina, Irina A; Evans, Bronwen A J; Mode, Agneta; Zigman, Jeffrey M; Wells, Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Circulating ghrelin elevates abdominal adiposity by a mechanism independent of its central orexigenic activity. In this study we tested the hypothesis that peripheral ghrelin induces a depot-specific increase in white adipose tissue (WAT) mass in vivo by GH secretagogue receptor (GHS-R(1a))-mediated lipolysis. Chronic iv infusion of acylated ghrelin increased retroperitoneal and inguinal WAT volume in rats without elevating superficial sc fat, food intake, or circulating lipids and glucose. Increased retroperitoneal WAT mass resulted from adipocyte enlargement probably due to reduced lipid export (ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 mRNA expression and circulating free fatty acids were halved by ghrelin infusion). In contrast, ghrelin treatment did not up-regulate biomarkers of adipogenesis (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma2 or CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-alpha) or substrate uptake (glucose transporter 4, lipoprotein lipase, or CD36) and although ghrelin elevated sterol-regulatory element-binding protein 1c expression, WAT-specific mediators of lipogenesis (liver X receptor-alpha and fatty acid synthase) were unchanged. Adiposity was unaffected by infusion of unacylated ghrelin, and the effects of acylated ghrelin were abolished by transcriptional blockade of GHS-R(1a), but GHS-R(1a) mRNA expression was similar in responsive and unresponsive WAT. Microarray analysis suggested that depot-specific sensitivity to ghrelin may arise from differential fine tuning of signal transduction and/or lipid-handling mechanisms. Acylated ghrelin also induced hepatic steatosis, increasing lipid droplet number and triacylglycerol content by a GHS-R(1a)-dependent mechanism. Our data imply that, during periods of energy insufficiency, exposure to acylated ghrelin may limit energy utilization in specific WAT depots by GHS-R(1a)-dependent lipid retention.

  5. Beta-glucan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae reduces plasma lipid peroxidation induced by haloperidol.

    PubMed

    Dietrich-Muszalska, Anna; Olas, Beata; Kontek, Bogdan; Rabe-Jabłońska, Jolanta

    2011-07-01

    Since oxidative stress observed in schizophrenia may be caused partially by the treatment of patients with various antipsychotics, the aim of the study was to establish the effects of beta-d-glucan, polysaccharide derived from the yeast cell walls of species such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the antipsychotics (the first generation antipsychotic (FGA) - haloperidol and the second generation antipsychotic (SGA) - amisulpride) action on plasma lipid peroxidation in vitro. Lipid peroxidation in human plasma was measured by the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS). The samples of plasma from healthy subjects were incubated with haloperidol or amisulpride in the presence of beta-glucan (4 μg/ml). The action of beta-d-glucan was also compared with the properties of a well characterized commercial monomeric polyphenol - resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene, the final concentration - 4 μg/ml). The two-way analysis variance showed that the differences in TBARS levels were depended on the type of tested drugs (p=7.9 × 10(-6)). We observed a statistically increase of the level of biomarker of lipid peroxidation such as TBARS after 1 and 24h incubation of plasma with haloperidol compared to the control samples (p<0.01, p<0.02, respectively). Amisulpride, contrary to haloperidol (after 1 and 24h) did not cause plasma lipid peroxidation (p>0.05). We showed that in the presence of beta-glucan, lipid peroxidation in plasma samples treated with haloperidol was significantly decreased. Moreover, we did not observe the synergistic action of beta-glucan and amisulpride on the inhibition of plasma lipid peroxidation. However, the beta-d-glucan was found to be more effective antioxidant, than the solution of pure resveratrol. The presented results indicate that beta-glucan seems to have distinctly protective effects against the impairment of plasma lipid molecules induced by haloperidol.

  6. Effect of Growth on Fatty Acid Composition of Total Intramuscular Lipid and Phospholipids in Ira Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shan; He, Zhifei; Lu, Jingzhi; Tao, Xiaoqi; Zheng, Li; Xie, Yuejie; Xiao, Xia; Peng, Rong; Li, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    The changes in fatty acid composition of total intramuscular lipid and phospholipids were investigated in the longissimus dorsi, left-hind leg muscle, and abdominal muscle of male Ira rabbits. Changes were monitored at 35, 45, 60, 75, and 90 d. Analysis using gas chromatography identified 21 types of fatty acids. Results showed that the intramuscular lipid increased and the intramuscular phospholipids (total intramuscular lipid %) decreased in all muscles with increasing age (p<0.05). An abundant amount of unsaturated fatty acids, especially polyunsaturated fatty acids, was distributed in male Ira rabbits at different ages and muscles. Palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), oleic acid (C18:1), linoleic acid (C18:2), and arachidonic acid (C20:4) were the major fatty acids, which account to the dynamic changes of the n-6/n-3 value in Ira rabbit meat.

  7. Lysophosphatidic acid induces osteocyte dendrite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Karagiosis, Sue A; Karin, Norman J

    2007-05-25

    Osteocytes elaborate an extensive mechanosensory network in bone matrix and communicate intercellularly via gap junctions established at dendrite termini. We developed a method to measure osteocyte dendritogenesis in vitro using a modified transwell assay and determined that the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a potent stimulator of dendrite outgrowth in MLO-Y4 osteocytes. The stimulatory effects were dose-dependent with maximal outgrowth observed within a physiological range of LPA. LPA-treated osteocytes exhibited distinct rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton and a more stellate morphology than control cells. LPA also promoted osteocyte chemotaxis, suggesting a shared molecular mechanism between dendrite outgrowth and cell motility. The LPA-induced increase in dendrite formation was blocked by the specific LPA-receptor antagonist Ki16425 and by pertussis toxin. Bone cells in vivo encounter platelet-derived LPA in regions of bone damage, and we postulate that this lipid factor is important for re-establishing osteocyte connectivity during fracture repair.

  8. Shape transformation of lipid vesicles induced by diffusing macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góźdź, W. T.

    2011-01-01

    The attachment of macromolecules to the surface of a lipid vesicle may cause its deformations such as budding or creation of cylindrical protrusions. Diffusion of the macromolecules in the membranes may cause its shape transformations. The process of shrinking the protrusions due to diffusion of the macromolecules is investigated. It is assumed that macromolecules modify locally the spontaneous curvature and bending rigidity of the lipid membrane. Both spontaneous curvature and bending rigidities depend on the concentration of membrane components. It has been shown that cylindrical protrusions are created when the macromolecules which induce large spontaneous curvature are accumulated at a piece of the vesicle surface. It has been observed that here the elastic constants influence very little the evolution of the vesicle shape caused by diffusing macromolecules and the most important is the value the spontaneous curvature imposed by the macromolecules.

  9. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Induces Human Adipocyte Delipidation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. Mark; Boysen, Maria Sandberg; Chung, Soonkyu; Fabiyi, Olowatoyin; Morrison, Ron F.; Mandrup, Susanne; McIntosh, Michael K.

    2005-01-01

    Dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) reduces body fat in animals and some humans. Here we show that trans-10, cis-12 CLA, but not cis-9, trans-11 CLA, when added to cultures of stromal vascular cells containing newly differentiated human adipocytes, caused a time-dependent decrease in triglyceride content, insulin-stimulated glucose and fatty acid uptake, incorporation into lipid, and oxidation compared with controls. In parallel, gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and many of its downstream targets were diminished by trans-10, cis-12 CLA, whereas leptin gene expression was increased. Prior to changes in gene expression and metabolism, trans-10, cis-12 CLA caused a robust and sustained activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-related kinase (MEK/ERK) signaling. Furthermore, the trans-10, cis-12 CLA-mediated activation of MEK/ERK could be attenuated by pretreatment with U0126 and pertussis toxin. In parallel, pretreatment with U0126 blocked the ability of trans-10, cis-12 CLA to alter gene expression and attenuate glucose and fatty acid uptake of the cultures. Intriguingly, the induction by CLA of MEK/ERK signaling was linked to hypersecretion of adipocytokines interleukin-6 and interleukin-8. Collectively, these data demonstrate for the first time that trans-10, cis-12 CLA decreases the triglyceride content of newly differentiated human adipocytes by inducing MEK/ERK signaling through the autocrine/paracrine actions of interleukins-6 and 8. PMID:15067015

  10. Effects of metal ions on lipid peroxidation in cultured rat hepatocytes loaded with alpha-linolenic acid.

    PubMed

    Furono, K; Suetsuga, T; Sugihara, N

    1996-06-07

    We investigated the ability of various redox-active metal ions to induce lipid peroxidation in normal and alpha-linolenic acid-loaded (LNA-loaded) cultured rat hepatocytes. Lipid peroxidation was estimated by the accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the culture medium. At low concentrations induction was highest with ferrous ions (Fe), whereas at high concentrations, vanadium (V) and copper ions (Cu) had the greatest effect on both groups of hepatocytes. With any one of the three metal ions, the extent of lipid peroxidation in LNA-loaded hepatocytes was several times greater compared to normal cells. In addition, upon the addition of Fe or V, LNA-loaded hepatocytes were injured whereas normal cells were not. The addition of Cu caused substantial cell injury in normal hepatocytes, and even greater injury in LNA-loaded cells. The prevention of lipid peroxidation in LNA-loaded hepatocytes by addition of an antioxidant like N,N'-diphenyl-p-phenylene-diamine (DPPD) almost completely prevented Fe- and V-induced cell injury, and reduced Cu-induced cell injury. alpha-Tocopherol behaved in a way similar to but less effective than DPPD. .OH radical scavengers such as mannitol and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) had no effect on lipid peroxidation induced by any metal ions in LNA-loaded hepatocytes. Addition of cadmium ions (Cd), which required the lowest concentration to cause cell injury, induced a slight increase in lipid peroxidation in normal hepatocytes, but did not induce lipid peroxidation to the same extent as seen in LNA-loaded cells treated with any of the three metal ions already mentioned. The inhibition of lipid peroxidation by DPPD scarcely protected LNA-loaded hepatocytes from Cd-induced cell injury. None of the other metal ions including aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and tin (Sn) ions, effectively induced lipid peroxidation in either group of hepatocytes, except cobalt ions (Co), which had a peroxidative effect in LNA

  11. Plasma lipid-bound sialic acid and carcinoembryonic antigen in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dnistrian, A M; Schwartz, M K

    1981-10-01

    We evaluated lipid-bound sialic acid as a "marker" in cancer patients and assessed the individual and combined value of lipid-bound sialic acid and carcinoembryonic antigen determinations in these patients. Plasma was sampled from 62 normal subjects and 125 cancer patients. Lipid-bound sialic acid was determined by the resorcinol method after total lipid extraction and isolation of the sialolipid fraction from plasma. Neither marker was increased in many breast cancer patients. Carcinoembryonic antigen was increased more commonly and to a greater degree in colon cancer patients and seems to be the preferred marker. Both markers were increased in lung cancer patients and their combined evaluation improved the rate of detection. Lipid-bound sialic acid was increased in more patients with leukemias, lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, and melanomas, suggesting that it may be a useful biochemical marker in these types of cancer.

  12. Subchronic effects of valproic acid on gene expression profiles for lipid metabolism in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Ho |; Kim, Mingoo |; Lee, Byung-Hoon |; Kim, Ju-Han |; Kang, Kyung-Sun |; Kim, Hyung-Lae |; Yoon, Byung-Il |; Chung, Heekyoung; Kong, Gu |; Lee, Mi-Ock ||

    2008-02-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is used clinically to treat epilepsy, however it induces hepatotoxicity such as microvesicular steatosis. Acute hepatotoxicity of VPA has been well documented by biochemical studies and microarray analysis, but little is known about the chronic effects of VPA in the liver. In the present investigation, we profiled gene expression patterns in the mouse liver after subchronic treatment with VPA. VPA was administered orally at a dose of 100 mg/kg/day or 500 mg/kg/day to ICR mice, and the livers were obtained after 1, 2, or 4 weeks. The activities of serum liver enzymes did not change, whereas triglyceride concentration increased significantly. Microarray analysis revealed that 1325 genes of a set of 32,996 individual genes were VPA responsive when examined by two-way ANOVA (P < 0.05) and fold change (> 1.5). Consistent with our previous results obtained using an acute VPA exposure model (Lee et al., Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 220:45-59, 2007), the most significantly over-represented biological terms for these genes included lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism. Biological pathway analysis suggests that the genes responsible for increased biosynthesis of cholesterol and triglyceride, and for decreased fatty acid {beta}-oxidation contribute to the abnormalities in lipid metabolism induced by subchronic VPA treatment. A comparison of the VPA-responsive genes in the acute and subchronic models extracted 15 commonly altered genes, such as Cyp4a14 and Adpn, which may have predictive power to distinguish the mode of action of hepatotoxicants. Our data provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of VPA-induced hepatotoxicity and useful information to predict steatogenic hepatotoxicity.

  13. Dynamics of crowding-induced mixing in phase separated lipid bilayers

    DOE PAGES

    Zeno, Wade F.; Johnson, Kaitlin E.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; ...

    2016-10-10

    We use fluorescence microscopy to examine the dynamics of the crowding-induced mixing transition of liquid ordered (Lo)–liquid disordered (Ld) phase separated lipid bilayers when the following particles of increasing size bind to either the Lo or Ld phase: Ubiquitin, green fluorescent protein (GFP), and nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) of two diameters. These proteinaceous particles contained histidine-tags, which were phase targeted by binding to iminodiacetic acid (IDA) head groups, via a Cu2+ chelating mechanism, of lipids that specifically partition into either the Lo phase or Ld phase. The degree of steric pressure was controlled by varying the size of the bound particlemore » (10–240 kDa) and the amount of binding sites present (i.e., DPIDA concentrations of 9 and 12 mol%) in the supported lipid multibilayer platform used here. We develop a mass transfer-based diffusional model to analyze the observed Lo phase domain dissolution that, along with visual observations and activation energy calculations, provides insight into the sequence of events in crowding-induced mixing. Furthermore, our results suggest that the degree of steric pressure and target phase influence not only the efficacy of steric-pressure induced mixing, but the rate and controlling mechanism for which it occurs.« less

  14. Dynamics of crowding-induced mixing in phase separated lipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeno, Wade F.; Johnson, Kaitlin E.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Risbud, Subhash H.; Longo, Marjorie L.

    2016-10-10

    We use fluorescence microscopy to examine the dynamics of the crowding-induced mixing transition of liquid ordered (Lo)–liquid disordered (Ld) phase separated lipid bilayers when the following particles of increasing size bind to either the Lo or Ld phase: Ubiquitin, green fluorescent protein (GFP), and nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) of two diameters. These proteinaceous particles contained histidine-tags, which were phase targeted by binding to iminodiacetic acid (IDA) head groups, via a Cu2+ chelating mechanism, of lipids that specifically partition into either the Lo phase or Ld phase. The degree of steric pressure was controlled by varying the size of the bound particle (10–240 kDa) and the amount of binding sites present (i.e., DPIDA concentrations of 9 and 12 mol%) in the supported lipid multibilayer platform used here. We develop a mass transfer-based diffusional model to analyze the observed Lo phase domain dissolution that, along with visual observations and activation energy calculations, provides insight into the sequence of events in crowding-induced mixing. Furthermore, our results suggest that the degree of steric pressure and target phase influence not only the efficacy of steric-pressure induced mixing, but the rate and controlling mechanism for which it occurs.

  15. An in vitro model to test relative antioxidant potential: Ultraviolet-induced lipid peroxidation in liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Pelle, E.; Maes, D.; Padulo, G.A.; Kim, E.K.; Smith, W.P. )

    1990-12-01

    Since antioxidants have been shown to play a major role in preventing some of the effects of aging and photoaging in skin, it is important to study this phenomenon in a controlled manner. This was accomplished by developing a simple and reliable in vitro technique to assay antioxidant efficacy. Inhibition of peroxidation by antioxidants was used as a measure of relative antioxidant potential. Liposomes, high in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), were dispersed in buffer and irradiated with ultraviolet (UV) light. Irradiated liposomes exhibited a significantly higher amount of hydroperoxides than liposomes containing antioxidants in a dose- and concentration-dependent manner. Lipid peroxidation was determined spectrophotometrically by an increase in thiobarbituric acid reacting substances. To further substantiate the production of lipid peroxides, gas chromatography was used to measure a decrease in PUFA substrate. In order of decreasing antioxidant effectiveness, the following results were found among lipophilic antioxidants: BHA greater than catechin greater than BHT greater than alpha-tocopherol greater than chlorogenic acid. Among hydrophilic antioxidants, ascorbic acid and dithiothreitol were effective while glutathione was ineffective. In addition, ascorbic acid was observed to act synergistically with alpha-tocopherol, which is in agreement with other published reports on the interaction of these two antioxidants. Although peroxyl radical scavengers seem to be at a selective advantage in this liposomal/UV system, these results demonstrate the validity of this technique as an assay for measuring an antioxidant's potential to inhibit UV-induced peroxidation.

  16. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury: Implications for temporal homeostasis of lipid metabolism and eicosanoid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Suciu, Maria; Gruia, Alexandra T; Nica, Dragos V; Azghadi, Seyed M R; Mic, Ani A; Mic, Felix A

    2015-12-05

    Acetaminophen is a commonly used drug that induces serious hepatotoxicity when overdosed, leading to increased levels of serum aminotransferases. However, little knowledge exists linking acetaminophen to liver free fatty acids and the eicosanoid-mediated signaling pathway. To this end, adult NMRI mice injected with a dose of 400 mg/kg acetaminophen were monitored for one week post-treatment. Consistent changes were observed in serum transaminases, profile of hepatic free fatty acids, expression of cyclooxygenase, elongase, lipogenesis, and lipolysis genes; as well as in expression patterns of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 in the liver. Both linoleic acid and arachidonic acid--substrates in eicosanoid biosynthesis--were significantly influenced by overdose, and the latter peaked first among the free fatty acids examined here. There was a close similarity between the temporal dynamics of linoleic acid and aspartate aminotransferases. Moreover, serum transaminases were reduced by cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, but not by cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitors. Our results hence attest to the hazard of acetaminophen overdose on the temporal homeostasis of hepatic concentrations of free fatty acids and expression of key genes underlying liver lipid metabolism. There is also evidence for activation of a cyclooxygenase-mediated signaling pathway, especially the cyclooxygenase 2-prostanoid pathway, during acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Therefore, the results of the present study should provide valuable information to a wide audience, working to understand the health hazard of this drug and the implications of the eicosanoid signaling pathway in liver pathophysiology.

  17. TORC1 inhibition induces lipid droplet replenishment in yeast.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Juliana B; Masuda, Claudio A; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M; Matos, Gabriel Soares; Montero-Lomelí, Mónica; Bozaquel-Morais, Bruno L

    2015-02-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are intracellular structures that regulate neutral lipid homeostasis. In mammals, LD synthesis is inhibited by rapamycin, a known inhibitor of the mTORC1 pathway. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, LD dynamics are modulated by the growth phase; however, the regulatory pathways involved are unknown. Therefore, we decided to study the role of the TORC1 pathway on LD metabolism in S. cerevisiae. Interestingly, rapamycin treatment resulted in a fast LD replenishment and growth inhibition. The discovery that osmotic stress (1 M sorbitol) also induced LD synthesis but not growth inhibition suggested that the induction of LDs in yeast is not a secondary response to reduced growth. The induction of LDs by rapamycin was due to increased triacylglycerol but not sterol ester synthesis. Induction was dependent on the TOR downstream effectors, the PP2A-related phosphatase Sit4p and the regulatory protein Tap42p. The TORC1-controlled transcriptional activators Gln3p, Gat1p, Rtg1p, and Rtg3p, but not Msn2p and Msn4p, were required for full induction of LDs by rapamycin. Furthermore, we show that the deletion of Gln3p and Gat1p transcription factors, which are activated in response to nitrogen availability, led to abnormal LD dynamics. These results reveal that the TORC1 pathway is involved in neutral lipid homeostasis in yeast.

  18. Plasma lipid-bound sialic acid alterations in neoplastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, C; Dixit, M; Hardy, R E

    1990-01-15

    Plasma lipid-bound sialic acid (LSA) was assayed in normal volunteers, patients with non-malignant diseases, and a variety of cancer patients. Mean plasma LSA in 50 normal volunteers, 16 patients with non-malignant diseases, 54 breast cancer, 17 lung cancer, 15 colon cancer, 7 ovarian cancer, 5 prostate cancer, 4 leukemia, 4 gastrointestinal, 3 thyroid cancer, 3 pancreas cancer and 2 adrenal cancer patients were 17.7, 23.2, 58, 85, 56.7, 46.2, 56.7, 53.3, 31.1, 33.2 and 119.5 mg/dl, respectively. None of the normal volunteers had elevated plasma LSA values. Plasma LSA level was not significantly different in male and female volunteers. Two out of 114 different cancer patients had plasma LSA levels within normal range exhibiting 98.2% sensitivity of the assay. Plasma LSA, which is relatively simple to assay, may be used as a tumor marker in wide variety of neoplastic diseases.

  19. Membrane lipid profiles of coral responded to zinc oxide nanoparticle-induced perturbations on the cellular membrane.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chuan-Ho; Lin, Ching-Yu; Lee, Shu-Hui; Wang, Wei-Hsien

    2017-03-31

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnOs) released from popular sunscreens used during marine recreation apparently endanger corals; however, the known biological effects are very limited. Membrane lipids constitute the basic structural element to create cell a dynamic structure according to the circumstance. Nano-specific effects have been shown to mechanically perturb the physical state of the lipid membrane, and the cells accommodating the actions of nZnOs can be involved in the alteration of the membrane lipid composition. To gain insight into the effects of nanoparticles on coral, glycerophosphocholine (GPC) profiling of the coral Seriatopora caliendrum exposed to nZnOs was performed in this study. Increasing lyso-GPCs, docosapentaenoic acid-possessing GPCs and docosahexaenoic acid-possessing GPCs and decreasing arachidonic acid-possessing GPCs were the predominant changes responded to nZnO exposure in the coral. A backfilling of polyunsaturated plasmanylcholines was observed in the coral exposed to nZnO levels over a threshold. These changes can be logically interpreted as an accommodation to nZnOs-induced mechanical disturbances in the cellular membrane based on the biophysical properties of the lipids. Moreover, the coral demonstrated a difference in the changes in lipid profiles between intra-colonial functionally differentiated polyps, indicating an initial membrane composition-dependent response. Based on the physicochemical properties and physiological functions of these changed lipids, some chronic biological effects can be incubated once the coral receives long-term exposure to nZnOs.

  20. Role of polysaccharide and lipid in lipopolysaccharide induced prion protein conversion

    PubMed Central

    LeVatte, Marcia; Wishart, David S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Conversion of native cellular prion protein (PrPc) from an α-helical structure to a toxic and infectious β-sheet structure (PrPSc) is a critical step in the development of prion disease. There are some indications that the formation of PrPSc is preceded by a β-sheet rich PrP (PrPβ) form which is non-infectious, but is an intermediate in the formation of infectious PrPSc. Furthermore the presence of lipid cofactors is thought to be critical in the formation of both intermediate-PrPβ and lethal, infectious PrPSc. We previously discovered that the endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interacts with recombinant PrPc and induces rapid conformational change to a β-sheet rich structure. This LPS induced PrPβ structure exhibits PrPSc-like features including proteinase K (PK) resistance and the capacity to form large oligomers and rod-like fibrils. LPS is a large, complex molecule with lipid, polysaccharide, 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate (Kdo) and glucosamine components. To learn more about which LPS chemical constituents are critical for binding PrPc and inducing β-sheet conversion we systematically investigated which chemical components of LPS either bind or induce PrP conversion to PrPβ. We analyzed this PrP conversion using resolution enhanced native acidic gel electrophoresis (RENAGE), tryptophan fluorescence, circular dichroism, electron microscopy and PK resistance. Our results indicate that a minimal version of LPS (called detoxified and partially de-acylated LPS or dLPS) containing a portion of the polysaccharide and a portion of the lipid component is sufficient for PrP conversion. Lipid components, alone, and saccharide components, alone, are insufficient for conversion. PMID:27906600

  1. Uric acid protects membranes and linolenic acid from ozone-induced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Meadows, J; Smith, R C; Reeves, J

    1986-05-29

    Aqueous preparations of linolenic acid, bovine serum albumin, and bovine erythrocyte membrane fragments were bubbled with ozone in the presence or absence of uric acid. Ozonation of the membrane fragments or the bovine serum albumin did not result in protein degradation. After 15 min of ozonation, the absorbance of the thiobarbituric acid-reactive material increased by 0.34 in the linolenic acid preparation and by 0.08 in the suspension of membrane fragments. In the presence of uric acid, these changes in absorbance were reduced to 0.14 for the fatty acid and to 0.01 for the membrane fragments. This result indicates that uric acid protects lipids from ozone-induced oxidation.

  2. Cold tolerance of UCP1-ablated mice: a skeletal muscle mitochondria switch toward lipid oxidation with marked UCP3 up-regulation not associated with increased basal, fatty acid- or ROS-induced uncoupling or enhanced GDP effects.

    PubMed

    Shabalina, Irina G; Hoeks, Joris; Kramarova, Tatiana V; Schrauwen, Patrick; Cannon, Barbara; Nedergaard, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Mice lacking the thermogenic mitochondrial membrane protein UCP1 (uncoupling protein 1)--and thus all heat production from brown adipose tissue--can still adapt to a cold environment (4 degrees C) if successively transferred to the cold. The mechanism behind this adaptation has not been clarified. To examine possible adaptive processes in the skeletal muscle, we isolated mitochondria from the hind limb muscles of cold-acclimated wild-type and UCP1(-/-) mice and examined their bioenergetic chracteristics. We observed a switch in metabolism, from carbohydrate towards lipid catabolism, and an increased total mitochondrial complement, with an increased total ATP production capacity. The UCP1(-/-) muscle mitochondria did not display a changed state-4 respiration rate (no uncoupling) and were less sensitive to the uncoupling effect of fatty acids than the wild-type mitochondria. The content of UCP3 was increased 3-4 fold, but despite this, endogenous superoxide could not invoke a higher proton leak, and the small inhibitory effect of GDP was unaltered, indicating that it was not mediated by UCP3. Double mutant mice (UCP1(-/-) plus superoxide dismutase 2-overexpression) were not more cold sensitive than UCP1(-/-), bringing into question an involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in activation of any alternative thermogenic mechanism. We conclude that there is no evidence for an involvement of UCP3 in basal, fatty-acid- or superoxide-stimulated oxygen consumption or in GDP sensitivity. The adaptations observed did not imply any direct alternative process for nonshivering thermogenesis but the adaptations observed would be congruent with adaptation to chronically enhanced muscle activity caused by incessant shivering in these mice.

  3. Chronic administration of ursodeoxycholic and tauroursodeoxycholic acid changes microsomal membrane lipid content and fatty acid compositions in rats.

    PubMed

    Bellentani, S; Chao, Y C; Ferretti, I; Panini, R; Tiribelli, C

    1996-03-27

    We studied the effect of oral supplementation with ursodeoxycholate (UDCA) or tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDCA) on the lipid content and fatty acid composition of rat hepatic microsomes. UDCA and TUDCA significantly increased the total amount of lipids with the exception of cholesteryl-esters. UDCA significantly increased the triglycerides and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) microsomal content, and decreased the cholesterol/phospholipids and the phosphatidylcholine (PC)/PE ratio. Both treatments increased the percentage oleic acid and of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in each class of lipids. UDCA and TUDCA had a different action on PUFA microsomal molar percentage of phospholipids: UDCA increased the relative percentage of PUFA in the PE fraction, while TUDCA increased the relative percentage of PUFA in the PC fraction. These changes in the hepatic lipid content and composition might in part explain both cytoprotective action of these hydrophillic bile acids and their effect on membrane fluidity.

  4. Effect of acetic acid on lipid accumulation by glucose-fed activated sludge cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Mondala, Andro; Hernandez, Rafael; French, Todd; McFarland, Linda; Sparks, Darrell; Holmes, William; Haque, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The effect of acetic acid, a lignocellulose hydrolysis by-product, on lipid accumulation by activated sludge cultures grown on glucose was investigated. This was done to assess the possible application of lignocellulose as low-cost and renewable fermentation substrates for biofuel feedstock production. Results: Biomass yield was reduced by around 54% at a 2 g L -1 acetic acid dosage but was increased by around 18% at 10 g L -1 acetic acid dosage relative to the control run. The final gravimetric lipid contents at 2 and 10 g L -1 acetic acid levels were 12.5 + 0.7% and 8.8 + 3.2% w/w, respectively, which were lower than the control (17.8 + 2.8% w/w). However, biodiesel yields from activated sludge grown with acetic acid (5.6 + 0.6% w/w for 2 g L -1 acetic acid and 4.2 + 3.0% w/w for 10 g L -1 acetic acid) were higher than in raw activated sludge (1-2% w/w). The fatty acid profiles of the accumulated lipids were similar with conventional plant oil biodiesel feedstocks. Conclusions: Acetic acid enhanced biomass production by activated sludge at high levels but reduced lipid production. Further studies are needed to enhance acetic acid utilization by activated sludge microorganisms for lipid biosynthesis.

  5. Structure-related aspects on water diffusivity in fatty acid-soap and skin lipid model systems.

    PubMed

    Norlén, L; Engblom, J

    2000-01-03

    Simplified skin barrier models are necessary to get a first hand understanding of the very complex morphology and physical properties of the human skin barrier. In addition, it is of great importance to construct relevant models that will allow for rational testing of barrier perturbing/occlusive effects of a large variety of substances. The primary objective of this work was to study the effect of lipid morphology on water permeation through various lipid mixtures (i.e., partly neutralised free fatty acids, as well as a skin lipid model mixture). In addition, the effects of incorporating Azone((R)) (1-dodecyl-azacycloheptan-2-one) into the skin lipid model mixture was studied. Small- and wide-angle X-ray diffraction was used for structure determinations. It is concluded that: (a) the water flux through a crystalline fatty acid-sodium soap-water mixture (s) is statistically significantly higher than the water flux through the corresponding lamellar (L(alpha)) and reversed hexagonal (H(II)) liquid crystalline phases, which do not differ between themselves; (b) the water flux through mixtures of L(alpha)/s decreases statistically significantly with increasing relative amounts of lamellar (L(alpha)) liquid crystalline phase; (c) the addition of Azone((R)) to a skin lipid model system induces a reduction in water flux. However, further studies are needed to more closely characterise the structural basis for the occlusive effects of Azone((R)) on water flux.

  6. Retinoid acid-related orphan receptor γ, RORγ, participates in diurnal transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolic genes

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Yukimasa; Kang, Hong Soon; Lih, Fred B.; Jiang, Hongfeng; Blaner, William S.; Jetten, Anton M.

    2014-01-01

    The hepatic circadian clock plays a pivotal role in regulating major aspects of energy homeostasis and lipid metabolism. In this study, we show that RORγ robustly regulates the rhythmic expression of several lipid metabolic genes, including the insulin-induced gene 2a, Insig2a, elongation of very long chain fatty acids-like 3, Elovl3 and sterol 12α-hydroxylase, Cyp8b1, by enhancing their expression at ZT20-4. The time-dependent increase in their expression correlates with the rhythmic expression pattern of RORγ. The enhanced recruitment of RORγ to ROREs in their promoter region, increased histone acetylation, and reporter and mutation analysis support the concept that RORγ regulates the transcription of several lipid metabolic genes directly by binding ROREs in their promoter regulatory region. Consistent with the disrupted expression of a number of lipid metabolic genes, loss of RORγ reduced the level of several lipids in liver and blood in a ZT-preferred manner. Particularly the whole-body bile acid pool size was considerably reduced in RORγ−/− mice in part through its regulation of several Cyp genes. Similar observations were made in liver-specific RORγ-deficient mice. Altogether, our study indicates that RORγ functions as an important link between the circadian clock and the transcriptional regulation of several metabolic genes. PMID:25143535

  7. Cytochrome c induces lipid demixing in weakly charged phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylglycerol model membranes as evidenced by resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna P; Trusova, Valeriya M; Molotkovsky, Julian G; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2009-06-01

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) between anthrylvinyl-labeled phosphatidylcholine (AV-PC) or phosphatidylglycerol (AV-PG) as donors and the heme groups of cytochrome c (cyt c) as acceptors was examined in PC/PG model membranes containing 10, 20 or 40 mol% PG with an emphasis on evaluating lipid demixing caused by this protein. The differences between AV-PC and AV-PG RET profiles observed at PG content 10 mol% were attributed to cyt c ability to produce segregation of acidic lipids into lateral domains. The radius of lipid domains recovered using Monte-Carlo simulation approach was found not to exceed 4 nm pointing to the local character of cyt c-induced lipid demixing. Increase of the membrane PG content to 20 or 40 mol% resulted in domain dissipation as evidenced by the absence of any RET enhancement while recruiting AV-PG instead of AV-PC.

  8. Salt-induced lipid changes in Catharanthus roseus cultured cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Elkahoui, Salem; Smaoui, Abderrazek; Zarrouk, Mokhtar; Ghrir, Rachid; Limam, Férid

    2004-07-01

    Salt treatment strongly affected cell growth by decreasing dry weight. Exposure of Catharanthus roseus cell suspensions to increasing salinity significantly enhanced total lipid (TL) content. The observed increase is mainly due to high level of phospholipids (PL). Hundred mM NaCl treatment increased phospholipid species phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), whereas it reduced glycolipid ones monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) but not sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG). Moreover, fatty acid composition was clearly modified when cells were cultured in the presence of 100 mM NaCl, whereas only few changes occurred at 50 mM. Salt treatment decreased palmitic acid (16:0) level and increased that of linolenic acid (18:2). Such effect was observed in phospholipid species PC and PE and in glycolipid DGDG. Double bond index (DBI) was enhanced more than 2-fold in fatty acids of either glycolipids or phospholipids from cells submitted to 100 mM NaCl. Free sterol content was also significantly enhanced, especially at 100 mM NaCl, whereas free sterols/phospholipids (St/PL) ratio was slightly decreased. All these salt-induced changes in membrane lipids suggest an increase in membrane fluidity of C. roseus cells.

  9. Lipid homeostasis and oxidative stress in the liver of male rats exposed to perfluorododecanoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Hongxia; Shi Zhimin; Liu Yang; Wei Yanhong; Dai Jiayin

    2008-02-15

    Perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA), a perfluorinated carboxylic acid (PFCA) with twelve carbon atoms, has broad industrial applications and is widely distributed in both wildlife and the environment. Unlike other PFCAs with short carbon chain, however, limited studies have been performed to date on the toxic effects of PFDoA on animals. To determine the hepatotoxicity of PFDoA, male rats were orally dosed by gavage for 14 days with 0, 1, 5, or 10 mg PFDoA/kg/day. Absolute liver weights were diminished, but the relative liver weight was significantly increased in the 5 and 10 mg PFDoA/kg/day groups. Meanwhile, serum triglyceride (TG) concentrations were decreased significantly in rats dosed with 1 and 5 mg PFDoA/kg/day, while the liver lipid accumulation was observed in ultrastructure. The expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-{alpha} and its target genes, and to a lesser extent PPAR{gamma}, was induced by PFDoA. No significant changes in the expression of liver X receptor {alpha} (LXR{alpha}) or its target genes CYP7A1 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) were noted, although the mRNA levels of several genes involved in lipogenesis and lipid transport were changed significantly in the certain of the experimental groups. In addition, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities were activated significantly in the 1 mg PFDoA/kg/day group and inhibited significantly with a concomitant increase of lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels in the 5 and 10 mg PFDoA/kg/day groups. Our results demonstrate that PFDoA exerts notable hepatotoxicity in male rats and that PPAR and its target genes, SOD and CAT activity, and LPO levels exhibited sensitivity to the toxicity of PFDoA.

  10. Olive Leaf Extract from Sicilian Cultivar Reduced Lipid Accumulation by Inducing Thermogenic Pathway during Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Palmeri, Rosa; Monteleone, Julieta I.; Spagna, Giovanni; Restuccia, Cristina; Raffaele, Marco; Vanella, Luca; Li Volti, Giovanni; Barbagallo, Ignazio

    2016-01-01

    Olive leaves contain a wide variety of phenolic compounds belonging to phenolic acids, phenolic alcohols, flavonoids, and secoiridoids, and include also many other pharmacological active compounds. They could play an important role in human diet and health because of their ability to lower blood pressure, increase coronary arteries blood flow and decrease the risk of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of olive leaf extract (OLE) from Sicilian cultivar on adipogenic differentiation of human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells and its impact on lipid metabolism. We showed that OLE treatment during adipogenic differentiation reduces inflammation, lipid accumulation and induces thermogenesis by activation of uncoupling protein uncoupling protein 1, sirtuin 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, and coactivator 1 alpha. Furthermore, OLE significantly decreases the expression of molecules involved in adipogenesis and upregulates the expression of mediators involved in thermogenesis and lipid metabolism. Taken together, our results suggest that OLE may promote the brown remodeling of white adipose tissue inducing thermogenesis and improving metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27303302

  11. Bilayer Deformation, Pores, and Micellation Induced by Oxidized Lipids.

    PubMed

    Boonnoy, Phansiri; Jarerattanachat, Viwan; Karttunen, Mikko; Wong-Ekkabut, Jirasak

    2015-12-17

    The influence of different oxidized lipids on lipid bilayers was investigated with 16 individual 1 μs atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Binary mixtures of lipid bilayers of 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (PLPC) and its peroxide and aldehyde products were performed at different concentrations. In addition, an asymmetrical short chain lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (PDPC), was used to compare the effects of polar/apolar groups in the lipid tail on lipid bilayer. Although water defects occurred with both aldehyde and peroxide lipids, full pore formation was observed only for aldehyde lipids. At medium concentrations the pores were stable. At higher concentrations, however, the pores became unstable and micellation occurred. Data analysis shows that aldehyde lipids' propensity for pore formation is due to their shorter and highly mobile tail. The highly polar peroxide lipids are stabilized by strong hydrogen bonds with interfacial water.

  12. Plant pentacyclic triterpenic acids as modulators of lipid membrane physical properties.

    PubMed

    Prades, Jesús; Vögler, Oliver; Alemany, Regina; Gomez-Florit, Manuel; Funari, Sérgio S; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Barceló, Francisca

    2011-03-01

    Free triterpenic acids (TTPs) present in plants are bioactive compounds exhibiting multiple nutriceutical activities. The underlying molecular mechanisms have only been examined in part and mainly focused on anti-inflammatory properties, cancer and cardiovascular diseases, in all of which TTPs frequently affect membrane-related proteins. Based on the structural characteristics of TTPs, we assume that their effect on biophysical properties of cell membranes could play a role for their biological activity. In this context, our study is focused on the compounds, oleanolic (3β-hydroxy-12-oleanen-28-oic acid, OLA), maslinic (2α,3β-dihydroxy-12-oleanen-28-oic acid, MSL) and ursolic ((3β)-3-hydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid, URL) as the most important TTPs present in orujo olive oil. X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance and Laurdan fluorescence data provide experimental evidence that OLA, MSL and URL altered the structural properties of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DPPC-Cholesterol (Cho) rich membranes, being located into the polar-hydrophobic interphase. Specifically, in DPPC membranes, TTPs altered the structural order of the L(β'), phase without destabilizing the lipid bilayer. The existence of a nonbilayer isotropic phase in coexistence with the liquid crystalline L(α) phase, as observed in DPPC:URL samples, indicated the presence of lipid structures with high curvature (probably inverted micelles). In DPPC:Cho membranes, TTPs affected the membrane phase properties increasing the Laurdan GP values above 40°C. MSL and URL induced segregation of Cho within the bilayer, in contrast to OLA, that reduced the structural organization of the membrane. These results strengthen the relevance of TTP interactions with cell membranes as a molecular mechanism underlying their broad spectrum of biological effects.

  13. Probing lipid peroxidation by using linoleic acid and benzophenone.

    PubMed

    Andreu, Inmaculada; Neshchadin, Dmytro; Rico, Enrique; Griesser, Markus; Samadi, Abdelouahid; Morera, Isabel M; Gescheidt, Georg; Miranda, Miguel A

    2011-08-29

    A thorough mechanistic study has been performed on the reaction between benzophenone (BZP) and a series of 1,4-dienes, including 1,4-cyclohexadiene (CHD), 1,4-dihydro-2-methylbenzoic acid (MBA), 1,4-dihydro-1,2-dimethylbenzoic acid (DMBA) and linoleic acid (LA). A combination of steady-state photolysis, laser flash photolysis (LFP), and photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) have been used. Irradiation of BZP and CHD led to a cross-coupled sensitizer-diene product, together with 6, 7, and 8. With MBA and DMBA as hydrogen donors, photoproducts arising from cross-coupling of sensitizer and diene radicals were found; compound 7 was also obtained, but 6 and o-toluic acid were only isolated in the irradiation of BZP with MBA. Triplet lifetimes were determined in the absence and in the presence of several diene concentrations. All three model compounds showed similar reactivity (k(q) ≈10(8)  M(-1)  s(-1)) towards triplet excited BZP. Partly reversible hydrogen abstraction of the allylic hydrogen atoms of CHD, MBA, and DMBA was also detected by photo-CIDNP on different timescales. Polarizations of the diamagnetic products were in full agreement with the results derived from LFP. Finally, LA also underwent partly reversible hydrogen abstraction during photoreaction with BZP. Subsequent hydrogen transfer between primary radicals led to conjugated derivatives of LA. The unpaired electron spin population in linoleyl radical (LA(.)) was predominantly found on H(1-5) protons. To date, LA-related radicals were only reported upon hydrogen transfer from highly substituted model compounds by steady-state EPR spectroscopy. Herein, we have experimentally established the formation of LA(.) and shown that it converts into two dominating conjugated isomers on the millisecond timescale. Such processes are at the basis of alterations of membrane structures caused by oxidative stress.

  14. Lipoic acid entrains the hepatic circadian clock and lipid metabolic proteins that have been desynchronized with advanced age

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, Dove; Finlay, Liam; Butler, Judy; Gómez, Luis; Smith, Eric; Moreau, Régis; Hagen, Tory

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 24 month old rats were supplemented with 0.2% lipoic acid in the diet for 2 weeks. • Lipoic acid shifts phase of core circadian clock proteins. • Lipoic acid corrects age-induced desynchronized lipid metabolism rhythms. - Abstract: It is well established that lipid metabolism is controlled, in part, by circadian clocks. However, circadian clocks lose temporal precision with age and correlates with elevated incidence in dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in older adults. Because our lab has shown that lipoic acid (LA) improves lipid homeostasis in aged animals, we hypothesized that LA affects the circadian clock to achieve these results. We fed 24 month old male F344 rats a diet supplemented with 0.2% (w/w) LA for 2 weeks prior to sacrifice and quantified hepatic circadian clock protein levels and clock-controlled lipid metabolic enzymes. LA treatment caused a significant phase-shift in the expression patterns of the circadian clock proteins Period (Per) 2, Brain and Muscle Arnt-Like1 (BMAL1), and Reverse Erythroblastosis virus (Rev-erb) β without altering the amplitude of protein levels during the light phase of the day. LA also significantly altered the oscillatory patterns of clock-controlled proteins associated with lipid metabolism. The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α was significantly increased and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were both significantly reduced, suggesting that the LA-supplemented aged animals are in a catabolic state. We conclude that LA remediates some of the dyslipidemic processes associated with advanced age, and this mechanism may be at least partially through entrainment of circadian clocks.

  15. LIPID CLASS DISTRIBUTION OF HIGHLY UNSATURATED LONG-CHAIN FATTY ACIDS IN MARINE DINOFLAGELLATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Very-long-chain highly unsaturated C28 fatty acids (HUFAs), found in a number of dinoflagellates, are released as methyl esters from phospholipids obtained by fractionation of lipid extracts. By contrast, the highly unsaturated C18 fatty acid octadecapentaenoic acid (18:5n-3), co...

  16. Enhancement effect of ethanol on lipid and fatty acid accumulation and composition of Scenedesmus sp.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengchen; Wang, Wei; Yue, Long; Yang, Zhen; Fu, Qiuguo; Ye, Qingfu

    2013-07-01

    The effects of ethanol concentration gradients along with varied cultivation times on lipid and fatty acid accumulation and composition of Scenedesmus sp. were studied. The maximum increment of algal density, lipid productivity, lipid content and fatty acid content were 6.61, 11.75, 1.34 and 3.14 times higher than the control group under 12h photoperiod. Algal light deprivation inhibited ethanol positive effects on algal growth and lipid biomass. The cumulative quantity of C16:0 and C18:0 decreased correspondingly with the increase of ethanol concentrations and cultivation times. Besides, unsaturated fatty acids appeared early in algal cells and increased 57.02% in maximum. However, only 2.27% (14)C was transferred from ethanol to fatty acids. The results indicated that adding proper amount of ethanol in algal culture medium was beneficial to biodiesel feedstock production and biodiesel properties.

  17. Ascorbic acid protects lipids in human plasma and low-density lipoprotein against oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, B. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors exposed human blood plasma and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to many different oxidative challenges and followed the temporal consumption of endogenous antioxidants in relation to the initiation of oxidative damage. Under all types of oxidizing conditions, ascorbic acid completely protects lipids in plasma and LDL against detectable peroxidative damage as assessed by a specific and highly sensitive assay for lipid peroxidation. Ascorbic acid proved to be superior to the other water-soluble plasma antioxidants bilirubin, uric acid, and protein thiols as well as to the lipoprotein-associated antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, lycopene, and beta-carotene. Although these antioxidants can lower the rate of detectable lipid peroxidation, they are not able to prevent its initiation. Only ascorbic acid is reactive enough to effectively intercept oxidants in the aqueous phase before they can attack and cause detectable oxidative damage to lipids.

  18. Metabolic changes in lipids of rat plasma and hepatocytes induced by 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol treatment.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Koide, K; Hirata, Y; Ohtani, H; Yamada, K; Kajiyama, G

    1986-11-14

    Cultured hepatocytes isolated from livers of 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol-treated rats were used to investigate the change of lipid metabolism induced by administration of 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol. Treatment with 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol caused a decrease of rat plasma lipids (free cholesterol, cholesterol ester, triacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine). No difference in the ability of urea nitrogen synthesis could be demonstrated between cultured hepatocytes isolated from livers of 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol-treated rats and propylene glycol-treated rats (control). Total cholesterol and cholesterol ester contents of cultured hepatocytes isolated from livers of 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol-treated rats were increased in comparison with those of the control. Triacylglycerol content of cultured hepatocytes was not affected by 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol treatment. There was no difference in the composition of lipid content between liver tissues and cultured hepatocytes. These results suggest that hepatocytes isolated from livers maintain the character of livers treated with 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol or livers treated with propylene glycol. Free cholesterol and cholesterol ester synthesis from [14C]acetic acid by cultured hepatocytes isolated from livers of 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol-treated rats were decreased to about 30% of the control. Triacylglycerol and polar lipid (phospholipid) synthesis from [14C]acetic acid were not affected by 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol treatment. Microsomal hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity of rat liver treated with 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol was decreased to about 50% of control. The secretions of free cholesterol, cholesterol ester, triacylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, apolipoprotein BL and BS by cultured hepatocytes isolated from livers of 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol treated rats were not decreased when compared with the control. Because lipid and apolipoprotein secretions from cultured hepatocytes treated with 17 alpha

  19. Resveratrol ameliorates methotrexate-induced hepatotoxicity in rats via inhibition of lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Dalaklioglu, S; Genc, G E; Aksoy, N H; Akcit, F; Gumuslu, S

    2013-06-01

    Hepatotoxicity is one of the major complications of methotrexate (MTX) therapy. This study was carried out to evaluate the possible protective effect of resveratrol (trans-3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene, RVT) against MTX-induced hepatotoxicity. Rats were randomly divided into four groups as control, MTX treated (7 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally (i.p.), once daily for 3 consecutive days), MTX + RVT treated (20 mg/kg/day, i.p.), and RVT treated. First dose of RVT was administrated 3 days before the MTX injection and continued for 3 days. Histopathology of liver was evaluated by light microscopy. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were used as biochemical markers of MTX-induced hepatic injury. The levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, a marker of lipid peroxidation) and activities of hepatic antioxidant enzymes such as catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) were used to analyze the oxidative stress-mediated lipid peroxidation in liver sections. Our results showed that MTX administration significantly increased ALT, ASP, and ALP levels. TBARS, CAT, and GST levels were also markedly increased in liver after MTX administration. RVT treatment significantly prevented MTX-induced hepatotoxicity, as indicated by AST, ALT, and ALP levels and liver histopathology. Moreover, administration of RVT significantly decreased the elevated levels of TBARS and activities of CAT and GST in the liver compared to MTX-treated group. These results revealed that RVT may have a protective effect against MTX-induced hepatotoxicity by inhibiting oxidative stress-mediated lipid peroxidation. Consequently, RVT treatment might be a promising strategy against MTX-induced hepatotoxicity.

  20. Pinolenic Acid Downregulates Lipid Anabolic Pathway in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ah Ron; Han, Sung Nim

    2016-07-01

    Pine nut oil (PNO) was reported to reduce lipid accumulation in the liver. However, the specific effect of pinolenic acid (18:3, all-cis-Δ5,9,12), a unique component of PNO, on lipid metabolism has not been studied. We hypothesized that pinolenic acid downregulates the lipid anabolic pathway in HepG2 cells. HepG2 cells were incubated in serum-free medium supplemented with 50 μM bovine serum albumin (BSA), palmitic acid, oleic acid, γ-linolenic acid, pinolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), or α-linolenic acid for 24 h. Lipid accumulation was determined by Oil Red O (ORO) staining. The mRNA levels of genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis (SREBP1c, FAS, SCD1, and ACC1), fatty acid oxidation (ACC2, PPARα, CPT1A, and ACADL), cholesterol synthesis (SREBP2 and HMGCR), and lipoprotein uptake (LDLr) and of genes that may be involved in the downregulation of the lipogenic pathway (ACSL3, ACSL4, and ACSL5) were determined by qPCR. LDLR protein levels were measured by Western blot analysis. The mRNA levels of SREBP1c, FAS, and SCD1 were significantly downregulated by pinolenic acid treatment compared to BSA control (53, 54, and 38 % lower, respectively). In addition, the mRNA levels of HMGCR, ACSL3, and LDLr were significantly lower (30, 30, and 43 % lower, respectively), and ACSL4 tended to be lower in the pinolenic acid group (20 % lower, P = 0.082) relative to the control group. In conclusion, pinolenic acid downregulated the lipid anabolic pathway in HepG2 cells by reducing expression of genes related to lipid synthesis, lipoprotein uptake, and the regulation of the lipogenic pathway.

  1. Exposure to TBT increases accumulation of lipids and alters fatty acid homeostasis in the ramshorn snail Marisa cornuarietis.

    PubMed

    Janer, Gemma; Navarro, Juan Carlos; Porte, Cinta

    2007-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that organotin compounds affect lipid homeostasis in vertebrates, probably through interaction with RXR and/or PPARgamma receptors. Molluscs are sensitive species to the toxic effects of tributyltin (TBT), particularly to masculinization, and TBT has been recently shown to bind to molluscs RXR. Thus, we hypothesized that exposure to TBT could affect lipid homeostasis in the ramshorn snail Marisa cornuarietis. For comparative purposes, the synthetic androgen methyl-testosterone (MT) was included in the study due to its masculinization effects, but its lack of binding to the RXR receptor. M. cornuarietis was exposed to different concentrations of TBT (30, 125, 500 ng/L as Sn) and MT (30, 300 ng/L) for 100 days. Females exposed to 500 ng/L TBT showed increased percentage of lipids and increased levels of fatty acids in the digestive gland/gonad complex (2- to 3-fold). In addition, fatty acid profiles were altered in both males and females exposed to 125 and 500 ng/L TBT. These effects were not observed in females exposed to MT. Overall, this work suggest that TBT acts as a potent inducer of lipid and fatty acid accumulation in M. cornuarietis as shown in vertebrate studies earlier, and that sex differences in sensitivity do exist.

  2. Fatty Acid and Lipid Profiles with Emphasis on n-3 Fatty Acids and Phospholipids from Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yadong; Wang, Miao; Lindström, Mikael E; Li, Jiebing

    2015-10-01

    In order to establish Ciona intestinalis as a new bioresource for n-3 fatty acids-rich marine lipids, the animal was fractionated into tunic and inner body tissues prior to lipid extraction. The lipids obtained were further classified into neutral lipids (NL), glycolipids (GL) and phospholipids (PL) followed by qualitative and quantitative analysis using GC-FID, GC-MS, (1)H NMR, 2D NMR, MALDI-TOF-MS and LC-ESI-MS methods. It was found that the tunic and inner body tissues contained 3.42-4.08% and 15.9-23.4% of lipids respectively. PL was the dominant lipid class (42-60%) irrespective of the anatomic fractions. From all lipid fractions and classes, the major fatty acids were 16:0, 18:1n-9, C20:1n-9, C20:5n-3 (EPA) and C22:6n-3 (DHA). The highest amounts of long chain n-3 fatty acids, mainly EPA and DHA, were located in PL from both body fractions. Cholestanol and cholesterol were the dominant sterols together with noticeable amounts of stellasterol, 22 (Z)-dehydrocholesterol and lathosterol. Several other identified and two yet unidentified sterols were observed for the first time from C. intestinalis. Different molecular species of phosphatidylcholine (34 species), sphingomyelin (2 species), phosphatidylethanolamine (2 species), phosphatidylserine (10 species), phosphatidylglycerol (9 species), ceramide (38 species) and lysophospholipid (5 species) were identified, representing the most systematic PL profiling knowledge so far for the animal. It could be concluded that C. intestinalis lipids should be a good alternative for fish oil with high contents of n-3 fatty acids. The lipids would be more bioavailable due to the presence of the fatty acids being mainly in the form of PL.

  3. Lipid Classes and Fatty Acids in Ophryotrocha cyclops, a Dorvilleid from Newfoundland Aquaculture Sites.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Flora; Dufour, Suzanne C; Hamoutene, Dounia; Parrish, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    A new opportunistic annelid (Ophryotrocha cyclops) discovered on benthic substrates underneath finfish aquaculture sites in Newfoundland (NL) may be involved in the remediation of organic wastes. At those aquaculture sites, bacterial mats and O. cyclops often coexist and are used as indicators of organic enrichment. Little is known on the trophic strategies used by these annelids, including whether they might consume bacteria or other aquaculture-derived wastes. We studied the lipid and fatty acid composition of the annelids and their potential food sources (degraded flocculent organic matter, fresh fish pellets and bacterial mats) to investigate feeding relationships in these habitats and compared the lipid and fatty acid composition of annelids before and after starvation. Fish pellets were rich in lipids, mainly terrestrially derived C18 fatty acids (18:1ω9, 18:2ω6, 18:3ω3), while bacterial samples were mainly composed of ω7 fatty acids, and flocculent matter appeared to be a mixture of fresh and degrading fish pellets, feces and bacteria. Ophryotrocha cyclops did not appear to store excessive amounts of lipids (13%) but showed a high concentration of ω3 and ω6 fatty acids, as well as a high proportion of the main fatty acids contained in fresh fish pellets and bacterial mats. The dorvilleids and all potential food sources differed significantly in their lipid and fatty acid composition. Interestingly, while all food sources contained low proportions of 20:5ω3 and 20:2ω6, the annelids showed high concentrations of these two fatty acids, along with 20:4ω6. A starvation period of 13 days did not result in a major decrease in total lipid content; however, microscopic observations revealed that very few visible lipid droplets remained in the gut epithelium after three months of starvation. Ophryotrocha cyclops appears well adapted to extreme environments and may rely on lipid-rich organic matter for survival and dispersal in cold environments.

  4. Physical activity-induced alterations on tissue lipid composition and lipid metabolism in fattening pigs.

    PubMed

    Daza, A; Rey, A I; Olivares, A; Cordero, G; Toldrá, F; López-Bote, C J

    2009-04-01

    In a first experiment one group of pigs was maintained in free-range conditions according to the traditional way in a Mediterranean forest (exercised-1) and another group was housed individually and received acorns (sedentary-1). In a second experiment two groups of pigs were fed a mixed diet for the whole experimental period. One of these groups was housed individually in 8m(2) pens (sedentary-2). The other group was housed in a corridor and forced to walk daily (exercised-2). The subcutaneous fat and neutral lipids of muscle from the exercised pigs fed acorns had higher C18:1n-9, MUFA, C18:1/C18:0, MUFA/SAT and lower C16:0 and SAT when compared with the fat from the pigs fed acorns in confinement. Those exercised animals fed the mixed diet had also lower C16:0 and SAT in subcutaneous fat and lower SAT and higher C18:2, C18:3, PUFA and MUFA/SAT in neutral lipids when compared with the sedentary pigs, which may indicate that delta-9-desaturase activity was higher in exercised than in sedentary pigs. Exercised pigs had higher acid and neutral esterases and lower neutral lipase activity than sedentary pigs. No differences in the α-tocopherol concentration and TBARS values of meat samples among the pigs that received a mixed diet either exercised or sedentary were observed. The moderate exercise reduced the postprandrial concentrations of triglycerides in plasma, but did not reduce other plasma levels.

  5. Effect of tachycardia on lipid metabolism and expression of fatty acid transporters in heart ventricles of the rat.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, B; Harasim, E; Zabielski, P; Chabowski, A; Gorski, J

    2015-10-01

    Tachycardia increases oxidation of the plasma-borne long chain fatty acids in the heart. The aim of the present study was to examine effect of tachycardia on: 1) the total level of free fatty acids, diacylglycerols, triacylglycerols and phospholipids in both heart ventricles; 2) (14)C-palmitate incorporation in the lipid fractions; 3) expression of fatty acid and glucose transporters in the ventricles. Tachycardia was induced in anesthetized rats by electrical atrial pacing at the rate of 600/min. Samples of the left (LV) and right (RV) ventricle were taken after 30 and 60 min pacing. The level free fatty acids, diacylglycerols, triacylglycerols and phospholipids was determined by means of gas-liquid chromatography and (14)C-palmitate incorporation by liquid scintillation counting, respectively. Expression of fatty acid- and glucose-transporters was determined using Western blot technique. In LV, 30min pacing increased the content of diacylglycerols whereas the content of other lipids remained stable. After 60 min of pacing the levels of the examined lipid fractions did not differ from the respective control values. In RV, the content of diacylglycerols and triacylglycerols was reduced both after 30 and 60 min pacing. Tachycardia also affected incorporation of (14)C-palmitate in lipid fractions of goth ventricles. 30 min pacing up-regulated plasmalemmal expression of FAT/CD36 (fatty acid translocase) in both ventricles and reduced its microsomal expression in LV. After 60 min pacing they did not differ from the respective control values. Plasmalemmal expression of FATP-1 (fatty acid transport protein 1) increased and its microsomal expression decreased in RV after 30 min pacing. After 60 min pacing the plasmalemmal FATP-1 expression remained elevated whereas the microsomal expression did not differ from the control value. Pacing did not affect or expression of FABPpm (plasma membrane associated fatty acid binding protein) in either plasma membranes and microsomal

  6. Modulation of lipid metabolism by n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in gestational diabetic rats and their macrosomic offspring.

    PubMed

    Soulimane-Mokhtari, Nassima A; Guermouche, Baya; Yessoufou, Akadiri; Saker, Myrieum; Moutairou, Kebirou; Hichami, Aziz; Merzouk, Hafida; Khan, Naim A

    2005-09-01

    The time course of changes in lipid metabolism by dietary n-3 PUFAs (polyunsaturated fatty acids) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats during pregnancy (days 12 and 21) and their macrosomic offspring at birth (day 0) and through adulthood (days 60 and 90) was studied with respect to adipose tissue, liver and serum lipid concentrations, and fatty acid composition. Glucose and insulin levels were also assessed in order to characterize the diabetic state of macrosomic offspring. Pregnant diabetic and control rats were fed either an Isio-4 or EPAX diet (enriched with n-3 PUFA). The same diets were also consumed by pups at weaning. Compared with control rats, during pregnancy diabetic rats had a significant elevation in liver and serum triacylglycerol (triglyceride) and cholesterol concentrations. At birth, macrosomic pups had higher serum insulin and glucose levels than control pups. The macrosomic rats maintained accelerated postnatal growth combined with high adipose tissue weight and lipid content through the first 12 weeks of age. The macrosomic pups from diabetic rats fed the Isio-4 diet also showed a significant enhancement in liver and serum triacylglycerol and cholesterol levels at birth and during adulthood. Feeding the EPAX diet to diabetic mothers as well as their macrosomic pups increased serum and liver levels of EPA (eicospentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) with a reduction in arachidonic acid. The EPAX diet induced a significant decrease in liver and serum triacylglycerol and cholesterol concentrations in mothers during pregnancy and in their macrosomic pups during adulthood. Since the EPAX diet improves lipid anomalies considerably in diabetic mothers and their macrosomic offspring, it may prevent long-term metabolic abnormalities associated with macrosomia.

  7. Maternal omega-3 fatty acids and micronutrients modulate fetal lipid metabolism: A review.

    PubMed

    Khaire, Amrita A; Kale, Anvita A; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2015-07-01

    It is well established that alterations in the mother's diet or metabolism during pregnancy has long-term adverse effects on the lipid metabolism in the offspring. There is growing interest in the role of specific nutrients especially omega-3 fatty acids in the pathophysiology of lipid disorders. A series of studies carried out in humans and rodents in our department have consistently suggested a link between omega-3 fatty acids especially docosahexaenoic acid and micronutrients (vitamin B12 and folic acid) in the one carbon metabolic cycle and its effect on the fatty acid metabolism, hepatic transcription factors and DNA methylation patterns. However the association of maternal intake or metabolism of these nutrients with fetal lipid metabolism is relatively less explored. In this review, we provide insights into the role of maternal omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin B12 and their influence on fetal lipid metabolism through various mechanisms which influence phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase activity, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor, adiponectin signaling pathway and epigenetic process like chromatin methylation. This will help understand the possible mechanisms involved in fetal lipid metabolism and may provide important clues for the prevention of lipid disorders in the offspring.

  8. Bioconversion of volatile fatty acids derived from waste activated sludge into lipids by Cryptococcus curvatus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Liu, Jia-Nan; Yuan, Ming; Shen, Zi-Heng; Peng, Kai-Ming; Lu, Li-Jun; Huang, Xiang-Feng

    2016-07-01

    Pure volatile fatty acid (VFA) solution derived from waste activated sludge (WAS) was used to produce microbial lipids as culture medium in this study, which aimed to realize the resource recovery of WAS and provide low-cost feedstock for biodiesel production simultaneously. Cryptococcus curvatus was selected among three oleaginous yeast to produce lipids with VFAs derived from WAS. In batch cultivation, lipid contents increased from 10.2% to 16.8% when carbon to nitrogen ratio increased from about 3.5 to 165 after removal of ammonia nitrogen by struvite precipitation. The lipid content further increased to 39.6% and the biomass increased from 1.56g/L to 4.53g/L after cultivation for five cycles using sequencing batch culture (SBC) strategy. The lipids produced from WAS-derived VFA solution contained nearly 50% of monounsaturated fatty acids, including palmitic acid, heptadecanoic acid, ginkgolic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, and linoleic acid, which showed the adequacy of biodiesel production.

  9. Identification of furan fatty acids in the lipids of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Chvalová, Daniela; Špička, Jiří

    2016-06-01

    Fatty acid (FA) composition was analyzed in muscle and gonad tissues of marketed common carp (Cyprinus carpio). The extracted lipids were separated into four fractions: polar lipids (PL), diacylglycerols, free fatty acids and triacylglycerols (TAG) using thin layer chromatography. FA content within the lipid fractions was determined by gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC/FID). The muscle lipids consisted primarily of TAG (96.9% of total FA), while PL were the major component of both male (67.6%) and female gonad (58.6%) lipids. Polyunsaturated fatty acids predominated in PL of all tissues (52.2-55.8% of total FA); monounsaturated fatty acids were the most abundant FA group in TAG of muscle (51.8%) and female gonads (47.8%) whereas high proportion of furan fatty acids (F-acids) (38.2%) was detected in TAG of male gonads. Eight F-acids were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in male gonad samples, including less common 12,15-epoxy-13,14-dimethylnonadeca-12,14-dienoic acid with even-numbered alkyl moiety.

  10. Lipid and fatty acid composition of Gluconobacter oxydans before and after intracytoplasmic membrane formation.

    PubMed Central

    Heefner, D L; Claus, G W

    1978-01-01

    Gluconobacter oxydans differentiates by forming quantities of intracytoplasmic membranes at the end of exponential growth, and this formation occurs concurrently with a 60% increase in cellular lipid. The present study was initiated to determine whether this newly synthesized lipid differed from that extracted before intracytoplasmic membrane synthesis. Undifferentiated exponential-phase cells were found to contain 30% phosphatidylcholine, 27.1% caridolipin, 25% phosphatidylethanolamine, 12.5% phosphatidylglycerol, 0.4% phosphatidic acid, 0.2% phosphatidylserine, and four additional unidentified lipids totaling less than 5%. The only change detected after formation of intracytoplasmic membranes was a slight decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine and a corresponding increase in phosphatidylcholine. An examination of lipid hydrolysates revealed 11 different fatty acids in the lipids from each cell type. Hexadecanoic acid and monounsaturated octadecenoic accounted for more than 75% of the total fatty acids for both cell types. Proportional changes were noted in all fatty acids except octadecenoate. Anteiso-pentadecanoate comprised less than 1% of the fatty acids from undifferentiated cells but more than 13% of the total fatty acids from cells containing intracytoplasmic membranes. These results suggest that anteiso-pentadecanoate formation closely parallels the formation of intracytoplasmic membranes. Increased concentrations of this fatty acid may contribute to the fluidity necessary for plasma membrane convolution during intracytoplasmic membrane development. PMID:649571

  11. Retinoic acid regulates several genes in bile acid and lipid metabolism via upregulation of small heterodimer partner in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mamoon, Abulkhair; Subauste, Angela; Subauste, Maria C; Subauste, Jose

    2014-10-25

    Retinoic acid (RA) affects multiple aspects of development, embryogenesis and cell differentiation processes. The liver is a major organ that stores RA suggesting that retinoids play an important role in the function of hepatocytes. In our previous studies, we have demonstrated the involvement of small heterodimer partner (SHP) in RA-induced signaling in a non-transformed hepatic cell line AML 12. In the present study, we have identified several critical genes in lipid homeostasis (Apoa1, Apoa2 and ApoF) that are repressed by RA-treatment in a SHP dependent manner, in vitro and also in vivo with the use of the SHP null mice. In a similar manner, RA also represses several critical genes involved in bile acid metabolism (Cyp7a1, Cyp8b1, Mdr2, Bsep, Baat and Ntcp) via upregulation of SHP. Collectively our data suggest that SHP plays a major role in RA-induced potential changes in pathophysiology of metabolic disorders in the liver.

  12. Yeast fermentation of carboxylic acids obtained from pyrolytic aqueous phases for lipid production.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jieni; Garcia-Perez, Manuel; Coates, Ralph; Wu, Hongwei; Chen, Shulin

    2012-08-01

    The presence of very reactive C1-C4 molecules adversely affects the quality bio-oils produced from the pyrolysis of lignocellulosic materials. In this paper a scheme to produce lipids with Cryptococcus curvatus from the carboxylic acids in the pyrolytic aqueous phase collected in fractional condensers is proposed. The capacities of three oleaginous yeasts C. curvatus, Rhodotorula glutinis, Lipomyces starkeyi to ferment acetate, formate, hydroxylacat-aldehyde, phenol and acetol were investigated. While acetate could be a good carbon source for lipid production, formate provides additional energy and contributes to yeast growth and lipid production as auxiliary energy resource. Acetol could slightly support yeast growth, but it inhibits lipid accumulation. Hydroxyacetaldehyde and phenols showed high yeast growth and lipid accumulation inhibition. A pyrolytic aqueous phase with 20 g/L acetate was fermented with C. curvatus, after neutralization and detoxification to produce 6.9 g/L dry biomass and 2.2 g/L lipid.

  13. Fatty acids for controlled release applications: A comparison between prilling and solid lipid extrusion as manufacturing techniques.

    PubMed

    Vervaeck, A; Monteyne, T; Siepmann, F; Boone, M N; Van Hoorebeke, L; De Beer, T; Siepmann, J; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the solid state characteristics, drug release and stability of fatty acid-based formulations after processing via prilling and solid lipid extrusion. Myristic acid (MA), stearic acid (SA) and behenic acid (BA) were used as matrix formers combined with metoprolol tartrate (MPT) as model drug. The prilling process allowed complete dissolution of MPT in the molten fatty acid phase, generating semi-crystalline MPT and the formation of hydrogen bonds between drug and fatty acids in the solid prills. In contrast, as solid lipid extrusion (SLE) induced only limited melting of the fatty acids, molecular interaction with the drug was inhibited, yielding crystalline MPT. Although the addition of a low melting fatty acid allowed more MPT/fatty acid interaction during extrusion, crystalline MPT was detected after processing. Mathematical modeling revealed that the extrudates exhibited a higher apparent drug/water mobility than prills of the same composition, probably due to differences in the inner systems' structure. Irrespective of the processing method, mixed fatty acid systems (e.g. MA/BA) exhibited a lower matrix porosity, resulting in a slower drug release rate. Solid state analysis of these systems indicated that the crystalline structure of the fatty acids was maintained after SLE, while prilling generated a reduced MA crystallinity. Binary MPT/fatty acid systems processed via extrusion showed better stability during storage at 40 °C than the corresponding prills. Although mixed fatty acid systems were stable at 25 °C, stability problems were encountered during storage at 40 °C: a faster release was obtained from the prills, whereas drug release from the extrudates was slower.

  14. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid isomers change the unsaturation degree of hepatic fatty acids in neutral lipids but not in polar lipids.

    PubMed

    Martins, Susana V; Lopes, Paula A; Alves, Susana P; Alfaia, Cristina M; Nascimento, Mafalda; Castro, Matilde F; Bessa, Rui J B; Prates, José António Mestre

    2011-03-01

    The fatty acid composition of phospholipids plays a key role in the structural and functional properties of cellular membrane. In this study, it was hypothesized that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomer supplementation changes the unsaturation degree of the fatty acids of neutral lipids (NLs) but not those of polar lipids (PLs). Thus, the main goal was to determine the pattern of fatty acid incorporation into hepatic PL and NL fractions. Wistar male rats were fed cis(c)9,trans(t)11 and t10,c12 CLA isomers, separately or as a mixture. Whereas the t10,c12 isomer incorporation in the PL fraction was similar when supplemented either individually or as a mixture, the c9,t11 isomer reached the highest values of incorporation when combined with t10,c12. In the PL fraction, the linoleic acid did not change; but the arachidonic acid decreased, especially in the rats given the mixture. Also in this fraction, the t10,c12 isomer, either separately or as a mixture, decreased the amounts of n-6 long-chain (LC) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and increased those of the n-3 LC PUFA relative to the control. In the NL fraction, linoleic acid incorporation followed the diet composition, whereas the arachidonic acid was similar among treatments. Facing CLA isomer supplementation, the present study suggests that fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids, through the balance between n-6 and n-3 LC PUFA, is dependent upon maintaining the unsaturation degree of cellular membrane.

  15. Hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors are essential for breast cancer cells to control their lipid/fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Stäubert, Claudia; Broom, Oliver Jay; Nordström, Anders

    2015-08-14

    Cancer cells exhibit characteristic changes in their metabolism with efforts being made to address them therapeutically. However, targeting metabolic enzymes as such is a major challenge due to their essentiality for normal proliferating cells. The most successful pharmaceutical targets are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), with more than 40% of all currently available drugs acting through them.We show that, a family of metabolite-sensing GPCRs, the Hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor family (HCAs), is crucial for breast cancer cells to control their metabolism and proliferation.We found HCA1 and HCA3 mRNA expression were significantly increased in breast cancer patient samples and detectable in primary human breast cancer patient cells. Furthermore, siRNA mediated knock-down of HCA3 induced considerable breast cancer cell death as did knock-down of HCA1, although to a lesser extent. Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry based analyses of breast cancer cell medium revealed a role for HCA3 in controlling intracellular lipid/fatty acid metabolism. The presence of etomoxir or perhexiline, both inhibitors of fatty acid β-oxidation rescues breast cancer cells with knocked-down HCA3 from cell death.Our data encourages the development of drugs acting on cancer-specific metabolite-sensing GPCRs as novel anti-proliferative agents for cancer therapy.

  16. Morphological changes of supported lipid bilayers induced by lysozyme: Planar domain formation vs. multilayer stacking

    PubMed Central

    Trusova, Valeriya M.; Gorbenko, Galyna P.; Akopova, Irina; Molotkovsky, Julian G.; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Borejdo, Julian; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2012-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) has been utilized to explore the effect of cationic protein lysozyme (Lz) on the morphology of solid-supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) comprised of zwitterionic lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) and its mixture with anionic lipid cardiolipin (CL). Kinetic TIRFM imaging of different systems revealed subtle interplay between lipid lateral segregation accompanied by exchange of neutral and acidic lipids in the protein–lipid interaction zone, and the formation of lipid multilayer stacks. The switch between these states was shown to be controlled by CL content. In weakly charged SLBs containing 5 mol% CL, assembling of CL molecules into planar domains upon Lz adsorption has been observed while at higher content of anionic lipid (25 mol%) in-plane domains tend to transform into multilayer stacks, thereby ensuring the most thermodynamically-favorable membrane conformation. PMID:20620034

  17. Morphological changes of supported lipid bilayers induced by lysozyme: planar domain formation vs. multilayer stacking.

    PubMed

    Trusova, Valeriya M; Gorbenko, Galyna P; Akopova, Irina; Molotkovsky, Julian G; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Borejdo, Julian; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2010-10-15

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) has been utilized to explore the effect of cationic protein lysozyme (Lz) on the morphology of solid-supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) comprised of zwitterionic lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) and its mixture with anionic lipid cardiolipin (CL). Kinetic TIRFM imaging of different systems revealed subtle interplay between lipid lateral segregation accompanied by exchange of neutral and acidic lipids in the protein-lipid interaction zone, and the formation of lipid multilayer stacks. The switch between these states was shown to be controlled by CL content. In weakly charged SLBs containing 5 mol% CL, assembling of CL molecules into planar domains upon Lz adsorption has been observed while at higher content of anionic lipid (25 mol%) in-plane domains tend to transform into multilayer stacks, thereby ensuring the most thermodynamically-favorable membrane conformation.

  18. Parenteral lipid fatty acid composition directly determines the fatty acid composition of red blood cell and brain lipids in preterm pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies in enterally-fed infants have shown a positive effect of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) supplementatin on neurodevelopment. The effect of n-3 LCPUFA in fish oil-based parenteral (PN) lipid emulsions on neuronal tissues of PN-fed preterm infants is unknown. The objective ...

  19. Palmitic acid-labeled lipids selectively incorporated into platelet cytoskeleton during aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Packham, M.A.; Guccione, M.A.; Bryant, N.L.; Livne, A. )

    1990-07-01

    Previous experiments showed that during the early stages (20-30 seconds) of aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate (ADP, 2 microM) or thrombin (0.1 U/mL) of rabbit or human platelets prelabeled with (3H)palmitic acid, labeled lipid became associated with the cytoskeleton isolated after lysis with 1% Triton X-100, 5 mM EGTA (ethylene glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether))-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid. The association appeared to be related to the number of sites of contact and was independent of the release of granule contents. We have now investigated the nature of the labeled lipids by thin-layer and column chromatography and found differences between the distribution of the label in intact platelets (both stimulated and unstimulated) and the isolated cytoskeletons. In both species, and with either ADP or thrombin as aggregating agent, 70-85% of the label in both intact platelets and in the cytoskeletons was in phospholipids. The distribution of label among the phospholipids in the cytoskeletons was similar to that in intact platelets except that the percentage of label in phosphatidylcholine was significantly higher in the cytoskeletons of human platelets than in the intact platelets, and the percentage of label in phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylinositol was significantly lower in the cytoskeletons of rabbit platelets and thrombin-aggregated human platelets than in intact platelets. The cytoskeletons contained a lower percentage of label in triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, and cholesterol ester than the intact platelets. Contrary to a report in the literature, we found no evidence for the incorporation of diacylglycerol and palmitic acid into the cytoskeleton.

  20. Bisphenol A Exposure May Induce Hepatic Lipid Accumulation via Reprogramming the DNA Methylation Patterns of Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Zhang-Hong; Pan, Jie-Xue; Jin, Lu-Yang; Xu, Hai-Yan; Yu, Tian-Tian; Ullah, Kamran; Rahman, Tanzil Ur; Ren, Jun; Cheng, Yi; Dong, Xin-Yan; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role of bisphenol A (BPA) in metabolic disorders. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Using a mouse BPA exposure model, we investigated the effects of long-term BPA exposure on lipid metabolism and the underlying mechanisms. The male mice exposed to BPA (0.5 μg BPA /kg/day, a human relevant dose) for 10 months exhibited significant hepatic accumulation of triglycerides and cholesterol. The liver cells from the BPA-exposed mice showed significantly increased expression levels of the genes related to lipid synthesis. These liver cells showed decreased DNA methylation levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2, and increased expression levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2 that may upregulate the genes related to lipid synthesis. The expression levels of DNA methyltransferases were decreased in BPA-exposed mouse liver. Hepa1-6 cell line treated with BPA showed decreased expression levels of DNA methyltransferases and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. DNA methyltransferase knockdown in Hepa1-6 led to hypo-methylation and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. Our results suggest that long-term BPA exposure could induce hepatic lipid accumulation, which may be due to the epigenetic reprogramming of the genes involved in lipid metabolism, such as the alterations of DNA methylation patterns.

  1. Bisphenol A Exposure May Induce Hepatic Lipid Accumulation via Reprogramming the DNA Methylation Patterns of Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Zhang-Hong; Pan, Jie-Xue; Jin, Lu-Yang; Xu, Hai-Yan; Yu, Tian-Tian; Ullah, Kamran; Rahman, Tanzil Ur; Ren, Jun; Cheng, Yi; Dong, Xin-Yan; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role of bisphenol A (BPA) in metabolic disorders. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Using a mouse BPA exposure model, we investigated the effects of long-term BPA exposure on lipid metabolism and the underlying mechanisms. The male mice exposed to BPA (0.5 μg BPA /kg/day, a human relevant dose) for 10 months exhibited significant hepatic accumulation of triglycerides and cholesterol. The liver cells from the BPA-exposed mice showed significantly increased expression levels of the genes related to lipid synthesis. These liver cells showed decreased DNA methylation levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2, and increased expression levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2 that may upregulate the genes related to lipid synthesis. The expression levels of DNA methyltransferases were decreased in BPA-exposed mouse liver. Hepa1-6 cell line treated with BPA showed decreased expression levels of DNA methyltransferases and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. DNA methyltransferase knockdown in Hepa1-6 led to hypo-methylation and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. Our results suggest that long-term BPA exposure could induce hepatic lipid accumulation, which may be due to the epigenetic reprogramming of the genes involved in lipid metabolism, such as the alterations of DNA methylation patterns. PMID:27502578

  2. Hydrogen sulfide decreases the plasma lipid peroxidation induced by homocysteine and its thiolactone.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Kontek, Bogdan

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been investigated widely in recent years. H2S plays a variety of roles in different biological systems, including cardiovascular system. It is the final product of amino acids metabolism, which contains sulfur-cysteine and homocysteine (Hcy). In human plasma, there are several various forms of homocysteine: free Hcy, protein-bound Hcy (S-linked, and N-linked), and homocysteine thiolactone (HTL). Our previous works have shown that both Hcy in the reduced form and its thiolactone may modify fibrinolysis, coagulation process, and biological activity of blood platelets. Moreover, we have observed that HTL, like its precursor-Hcy stimulated the generation of superoxide anion radicals (O 2 (-•) ) in blood platelets. The aim of our study in vitro was to establish the influence of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, as a fast-releasing H2S donor; at tested concentrations: 10-1000 µM) on the plasma lipid peroxidation induced by the reduced Hcy (at final concentrations of 0.01-1 mM) and HTL (at final concentrations of 0.1-1 µM). Our results indicate that 10 and 100 µM NaHS decreased the lipid peroxidation in plasma treated with 1 mM Hcy or 1 µM HTL (when NaHS and Hcy/HTL were added to plasma together). The protective effect of 10 and 100 µM NaHS against the lipid peroxidation in plasma preincubated with 1 mM Hcy or 1 µM HTL was also observed. Considering the data presented in this study, we suggest that the lipid peroxidation (induced by different forms of homocysteine) may be reduced by hydrogen sulfide.

  3. Alterations of the lipid content and fatty acid profile of Chlorella protothecoides under different light intensities.

    PubMed

    Krzemińska, Izabela; Piasecka, Agata; Nosalewicz, Artur; Simionato, Diana; Wawrzykowski, Jacek

    2015-11-01

    Chlorella protothecoides is a valuable source of lipids that may be used for biodiesel production. The present work shows analysis of the potential of photoheterotrophic cultivation of C. protothecoides under various light intensities aiming to identify the conditions with maximal biomass and lipid content. An increase in light intensity was associated with an increased specific growth rate and a shortened doubling time. Also, the relative total lipid content increased from 24.8% to 37.5% with increase of light intensity. The composition of fatty acid methyl esters was affected by light intensity with the C16-18 fatty acids increased from 76.97% to 90.24% of total fatty acids. However, the content of linolenic acids decreased with the increase of the culture irradiance. These studies indicate that cultures irradiated with high light intensities achieve the minimal specifications for biodiesel quality on linolenic acids and thus are suitable for biodiesel production.

  4. ω-Alkynyl lipid surrogates for polyunsaturated fatty acids: free radical and enzymatic oxidations.

    PubMed

    Beavers, William N; Serwa, Remigiusz; Shimozu, Yuki; Tallman, Keri A; Vaught, Melissa; Dalvie, Esha D; Marnett, Lawrence J; Porter, Ned A

    2014-08-13

    Lipid and lipid metabolite profiling are important parameters in understanding the pathogenesis of many diseases. Alkynylated polyunsaturated fatty acids are potentially useful probes for tracking the fate of fatty acid metabolites. The nonenzymatic and enzymatic oxidations of ω-alkynyl linoleic acid and ω-alkynyl arachidonic acid were compared to that of linoleic and arachidonic acid. There was no detectable difference in the primary products of nonenzymatic oxidation, which comprised cis,trans-hydroxy fatty acids. Similar hydroxy fatty acid products were formed when ω-alkynyl linoleic acid and ω-alkynyl arachidonic acid were reacted with lipoxygenase enzymes that introduce oxygen at different positions in the carbon chains. The rates of oxidation of ω-alkynylated fatty acids were reduced compared to those of the natural fatty acids. Cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 did not oxidize alkynyl linoleic but efficiently oxidized alkynyl arachidonic acid. The products were identified as alkynyl 11-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid, alkynyl 11-hydroxy-8,9-epoxy-eicosatrienoic acid, and alkynyl prostaglandins. This deviation from the metabolic profile of arachidonic acid may limit the utility of alkynyl arachidonic acid in the tracking of cyclooxygenase-based lipid oxidation. The formation of alkynyl 11-hydroxy-8,9-epoxy-eicosatrienoic acid compared to alkynyl prostaglandins suggests that the ω-alkyne group causes a conformational change in the fatty acid bound to the enzyme, which reduces the efficiency of cyclization of dioxalanyl intermediates to endoperoxide intermediates. Overall, ω-alkynyl linoleic acid and ω-alkynyl arachidonic acid appear to be metabolically competent surrogates for tracking the fate of polyunsaturated fatty acids when looking at models involving autoxidation and oxidation by lipoxygenases.

  5. Counteracting foaming caused by lipids or proteins in biogas reactors using rapeseed oil or oleic acid as antifoaming agents.

    PubMed

    Kougias, P G; Boe, K; Einarsdottir, E S; Angelidaki, I

    2015-08-01

    Foaming is one of the major operational problems in biogas plants, and dealing with foaming incidents is still based on empirical practices. Various types of antifoams are used arbitrarily to combat foaming in biogas plants, but without any scientific support this action can lead to serious deterioration of the methanogenic process. Many commercial antifoams are derivatives of fatty acids or oils. However, it is well known that lipids can induce foaming in manure based biogas plants. This study aimed to elucidate the effect of rapeseed oil and oleic acid on foam reduction and process performance in biogas reactors fed with protein or lipid rich substrates. The results showed that both antifoams efficiently suppressed foaming. Moreover rapeseed oil resulted in stimulation of the biogas production. Finally, it was reckoned that the chemical structure of lipids, and more specifically their carboxylic ends, is responsible for their foam promoting or foam counteracting behaviour. Thus, it was concluded that the fatty acids and oils could suppress foaming, while salt of fatty acids could generate foam.

  6. Ameliorative effects of black tea extract on aflatoxin-induced lipid peroxidation in the liver of mice.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Anamika; Verma, R J

    2005-01-01

    We have evaluated the ameliorative effect of black tea extract on aflatoxin-induced lipid peroxidation in the liver of mice. Adult male albino mice were orally administered with 25 and 50 microg of aflatoxin in 0.2 ml olive oil/animal/day for 30 days. Results revealed dose-dependent and significantly (p<0.05) higher lipid peroxidation in the liver of aflatoxin-treated mice than that of vehicle control. As compared with vehicle control, the levels of non-enzymatic antioxidants such as glutathione and ascorbic acid, as well as the enzymatic antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase were significantly (p<0.05) lowered in the liver of aflatoxin-treated mice. Oral administration of two percent aqueous black tea extract along with aflatoxin for 30 days (groups 6 and 7) caused significant (p<0.05) amelioration in aflatoxin-induced lipid peroxidation by increasing significantly (p<0.05) the activities of enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase) and contents of non-enzymatic (glutathione and ascorbic acid) antioxidants in the liver of mice as compared with those given aflatoxin alone (groups 4 and 5). Thus, oral administration of black tea along with aflatoxin significantly (p<0.05) ameliorates aflatoxin-induced lipid peroxidation in the liver of mice.

  7. Deciphering tissue-induced Klebsiella pneumoniae lipid A structure.

    PubMed

    Llobet, Enrique; Martínez-Moliner, Verónica; Moranta, David; Dahlström, Käthe M; Regueiro, Verónica; Tomás, Anna; Cano, Victoria; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Frank, Christian G; Fernández-Carrasco, Helena; Insua, José Luis; Salminen, Tiina A; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-11-17

    The outcome of an infection depends on host recognition of the pathogen, hence leading to the activation of signaling pathways controlling defense responses. A long-held belief is that the modification of the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide could help Gram-negative pathogens to evade innate immunity. However, direct evidence that this happens in vivo is lacking. Here we report the lipid A expressed in the tissues of infected mice by the human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our findings demonstrate that Klebsiella remodels its lipid A in a tissue-dependent manner. Lipid A species found in the lungs are consistent with a 2-hydroxyacyl-modified lipid A dependent on the PhoPQ-regulated oxygenase LpxO. The in vivo lipid A pattern is lost in minimally passaged bacteria isolated from the tissues. LpxO-dependent modification reduces the activation of inflammatory responses and mediates resistance to antimicrobial peptides. An lpxO mutant is attenuated in vivo thereby highlighting the importance of this lipid A modification in Klebsiella infection biology. Colistin, one of the last options to treat multidrug-resistant Klebsiella infections, triggers the in vivo lipid A pattern. Moreover, colistin-resistant isolates already express the in vivo lipid A pattern. In these isolates, LpxO-dependent lipid A modification mediates resistance to colistin. Deciphering the lipid A expressed in vivo opens the possibility of designing novel therapeutics targeting the enzymes responsible for the in vivo lipid A pattern.

  8. Deciphering tissue-induced Klebsiella pneumoniae lipid A structure

    PubMed Central

    Llobet, Enrique; Martínez-Moliner, Verónica; Moranta, David; Dahlström, Käthe M.; Regueiro, Verónica; Tomás, Anna; Cano, Victoria; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Frank, Christian G.; Fernández-Carrasco, Helena; Insua, José Luis; Salminen, Tiina A.; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A.

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of an infection depends on host recognition of the pathogen, hence leading to the activation of signaling pathways controlling defense responses. A long-held belief is that the modification of the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide could help Gram-negative pathogens to evade innate immunity. However, direct evidence that this happens in vivo is lacking. Here we report the lipid A expressed in the tissues of infected mice by the human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our findings demonstrate that Klebsiella remodels its lipid A in a tissue-dependent manner. Lipid A species found in the lungs are consistent with a 2-hydroxyacyl-modified lipid A dependent on the PhoPQ-regulated oxygenase LpxO. The in vivo lipid A pattern is lost in minimally passaged bacteria isolated from the tissues. LpxO-dependent modification reduces the activation of inflammatory responses and mediates resistance to antimicrobial peptides. An lpxO mutant is attenuated in vivo thereby highlighting the importance of this lipid A modification in Klebsiella infection biology. Colistin, one of the last options to treat multidrug-resistant Klebsiella infections, triggers the in vivo lipid A pattern. Moreover, colistin-resistant isolates already express the in vivo lipid A pattern. In these isolates, LpxO-dependent lipid A modification mediates resistance to colistin. Deciphering the lipid A expressed in vivo opens the possibility of designing novel therapeutics targeting the enzymes responsible for the in vivo lipid A pattern. PMID:26578797

  9. Delivery of retinoic acid to LNCap human prostate cancer cells using solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Akanda, Mushfiq H; Rai, Rajeev; Slipper, Ian J; Chowdhry, Babur Z; Lamprou, Dimitrios; Getti, Giulia; Douroumis, Dennis

    2015-09-30

    In this study retinoic acid (RTA) loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were optimized by tuning the process parameters (pressure/temperature) and using different lipids to develop nanodispersions with enhanced anticancer activity. The RTA-SLN dispersions were produced by high-pressure homogenization and characterized in terms of particle size, zeta potential, drug entrapment efficiency, stability, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and in vitro drug release. Thermal and X-ray analysis showed the RTA to be in the amorphous state, whilst microscopic images revealed a spherical shape and uniform particle size distribution of the nanoparticles. Anticancer efficiency was evaluated by incubating RTA-SLNs with human prostate cancer (LNCap) cells, which demonstrated reduced cell viability with increased drug concentrations (9.53% at 200 ug/ml) while blank SLNs displayed negligible cytotoxicity. The cellular uptake of SLN showed localization within the cytoplasm of cells and flow cytometry analysis indicated an increase in the fraction of cells expressing early apoptotic markers, suggesting that the RTA loaded SLNs are able to induce apoptosis in LNCap cells. The RTA-SLN dispersions have the potential to be used for prostate anticancer treatment.

  10. D-Xylose suppresses adipogenesis and regulates lipid metabolism genes in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Lim, Eunjin; Lim, Ji Ye; Shin, Jae-Ho; Seok, Pu Reum; Jung, Sangwon; Yoo, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yuri

    2015-07-01

    D-Xylose, a natural pentose, has been reported to reduce postprandial glucose levels, although its effect on lipid metabolism has not been investigated. Therefore, this study hypothesized that d-xylose, as an alternative sweetener, suppresses adipogenesis and lipid metabolism by regulating blood lipid profiles, blood glucose levels, and related gene expression in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Mice were fed a normal diet, a 60% HFD diet, or an HFD with 5% or 10% of the total sucrose content supplemented with d-xylose (Xylo 5 and Xylo 10 diets, respectively). Weight gain, food intake, and serum lipid levels for each group were measured. After 12 weeks, histopathology of liver sections and assays of gene expression related to adipogenesis and lipid metabolism in visceral fat and liver tissues were analyzed. Body weight gain; fasting blood glucose levels; weights of subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues; and serum biochemical markers, including total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-/high-density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein, were significantly lowered in the Xylo 5 and Xylo 10 groups. In addition, d-xylose supplementation resulted in the down-regulation of adipogenesis-related genes, including sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1C, fatty acid synthase, adipocyte protein 2, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α in visceral adipose tissues. Histopathologically, Xylo 5 and Xylo 10 supplementation reduced HFD-induced fat accumulation in the liver and decreased expressions of fatty acid synthase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. D-Xylose supplementation also enhanced lipid oxidation by increasing expressions of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A; cytochrome P450, family 4, subfamily a, polypeptide 10; and acyl-CoA oxidase. In conclusion, our finding suggests that d-xylose may help prevent or attenuate the progression of obesity-related metabolic disorders by alleviating adipogenesis

  11. Beyond lipids, pharmacological PPARalpha activation has important effects on amino acid metabolism as studied in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Kashif; Camejo, Germán; Lanne, Boel; Halvarsson, Torbjörn; Landergren, Marie Rydén; Oakes, Nicholas D

    2007-04-01

    PPARalpha agonists have been characterized largely in terms of their effects on lipids and glucose metabolism, whereas little has been reported about effects on amino acid metabolism. We studied responses to the PPARalpha agonist WY 14,643 (30 micromol x kg(-1) x day(-1) for 4 wk) in rats fed a saturated fat diet. Plasma and urine were analyzed with proton NMR. Plasma amino acids were measured using HPLC, and hepatic gene expression was assessed with DNA arrays. The high-fat diet elevated plasma levels of insulin and triglycerides (TG), and WY 14,643 treatment ameliorated this insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, lowering plasma insulin and TG levels. In addition, treatment decreased body weight gain, without altering cumulative food intake, and increased liver mass. WY 14,643 increased plasma levels of 12 of 22 amino acids, including glucogenic and some ketogenic amino acids, whereas arginine was significantly decreased. There was no alteration in branched-chain amino acid levels. Compared with the fat-fed control animals, WY 14,643-treated animals had raised plasma urea and ammonia levels as well as raised urine levels of N-methylnicotinamide and dimethylglycine. WY 14,643 induced changes in a number of key genes involved in amino acid metabolism in addition to expected effects on hepatic genes involved in lipid catabolism and ketone body formation. In conclusion, the present results suggest that, in rodents, effects of pharmacological PPARalpha activation extend beyond control of lipid metabolism to include important effects on whole body amino acid mobilization and hepatic amino acid metabolism.

  12. Benzo[a]pyrene induced lipid changes in the monoxenic arbuscular mycorrhizal chicory roots.

    PubMed

    Debiane, Djouher; Calonne, Maryline; Fontaine, Joël; Laruelle, Frédéric; Grandmougin-Ferjani, Anne; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa

    2012-03-30

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization may be one of the means that protects plants and allows them to thrive on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-polluted soils including the carcinogenic benzo(a)pyrene (B[a]P). To understand the mechanisms involved in the AM symbiosis tolerance to B[a]P toxicity, the purpose of this study was to compare the lipid compositions as well as the contents between mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal chicory root cultures grown in vitro under B[a]P pollution. Firstly, B[a]P induced significant decreases of the Glomalean lipid markers: C16:1ω5 and 24-methyl/methylene sterol amounts in AM roots indicating a reduced AM fungal development inside the roots. Secondly, whereas increases in fatty acid amounts after B[a]P application were measured in non-mycorrhizal roots, no changes were shown in mycorrhizal roots. On the other hand, while, after treatment with B[a]P, the total phospholipid contents were unmodified in non-mycorrhizal roots in comparison with the control, drastic reductions were observed in mycorrhizal roots, mainly owing to decreases in phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. Moreover, B[a]P affected AM root sterols by reducing stigmasterol. In conclusion, the findings presented in this paper have highlighted, for the first time, significant changes in the AM root lipid metabolism under B[a]P pollution and have culminated on their role in the defense/protection mechanisms.

  13. Manifestations of fasting-induced fatty liver and rapid recovery from steatosis in voles fed lard or flaxseed oil lipids.

    PubMed

    Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Kärjä, Vesa; Kilpiö, Michael; Tammi, Raija; Tammi, Markku; Rouvinen-Watt, Kirsti; Halonen, Toivo; Nieminen, Petteri

    2013-10-22

    Long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) can have beneficial effects against fat deposition, cardiovascular diseases, and liver steatosis. We investigated how diets based on lard (predominantly saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids) or flaxseed oil (rich in 18:3n-3) affect liver fat-% and fatty acid profiles of tundra voles (Microtus oeconomus). We also studied potential participation of hyaluronan (HA) in the pathology of fatty liver and whether the development and recovery of fasting-induced steatosis are influenced by n-3 PUFA. The dietary fatty acid composition was manifested in the liver fatty acid signatures. Fasting for 18 h induced macrovesicular steatosis and the liver fat-% increased to 22% independent of the preceding diet. Fasting-induced steatosis did not involve inflammation or connective tissue activation indicated by the absence of both leukocyte accumulation and increased HA. Food deprivation modified the liver fatty acid signatures to resemble more closely the diets. Fasting reduced the proportions of long-chain n-3 PUFA in both dietary regimes and n-3/n-6 PUFA ratios in the lard-fed voles. Decreases in long-chain n-3 PUFA may promote lipid accumulation by modulating the expression of lipid-metabolizing genes. Dietary 18:3n-3 did not prevent the development or attenuate the manifestation of steatosis in the fasted voles or promote the recovery.

  14. Acyl-CoA N-acyltransferase influences fertility by regulating lipid metabolism and jasmonic acid biogenesis in cotton

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wenfeng; Shen, Ying; Hao, Juan; Wu, Jianyong; Ke, Liping; Wu, Caiyun; Huang, Kai; Luo, Binglun; Xu, Mingfeng; Cheng, Xiaofei; Zhou, Xueping; Sun, Jie; Xing, Chaozhu; Sun, Yuqiang

    2015-01-01

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is an important economic crop and there is obvious heterosis in cotton, fertility has played an important role in this heterosis. However, the genes that exhibit critical roles in anther development and fertility are not well understood. Here, we report an acyl-CoA N-acyltransferase (EC2.3; GhACNAT) that plays a key role in anther development and fertility. Suppression of GhACNAT by virus-induced gene silencing in transgenic cotton (G. hirsutum L. cv. C312) resulted in indehiscent anthers that were full of pollen, diminished filaments and stamens, and plant sterility. We found GhACNAT was involved in lipid metabolism and jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis. The genes differentially expressed in GhACNAT-silenced plants and C312 were mainly involved in catalytic activity and transcription regulator activity in lipid metabolism. In GhACNAT-silenced plants, the expression levels of genes involved in lipid metabolism and jasmonic acid biosynthesis were significantly changed, the amount of JA in leaves and reproductive organs was significantly decreased compared with the amounts in C312. Treatments with exogenous methyl jasmonate rescued anther dehiscence and pollen release in GhACNAT-silenced plants and caused self-fertility. The GhACNAT gene may play an important role in controlling cotton fertility by regulating the pathways of lipid synthesis and JA biogenesis. PMID:26134787

  15. Role of Nrf2 in preventing ethanol-induced oxidative stress and lipid accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kai Connie; Liu, Jie; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2012-08-01

    Oxidative stress and lipid accumulation play important roles in alcohol-induced liver injury. Previous reports showed that, in livers of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-activated mice, genes involved in antioxidant defense are induced, whereas genes involved in lipid biosynthesis are suppressed. To investigate the role of Nrf2 in ethanol-induced hepatic alterations, Nrf2-null mice, wild-type mice, kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1-knockdown (Keap1-KD) mice with enhanced Nrf2, and Keap1-hepatocyte knockout (Keap1-HKO) mice with maximum Nrf2 activation, were treated with ethanol (5 g/kg, po). Blood and liver samples were collected 6 h thereafter. Ethanol increased alanine aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase activities as well as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in serum of Nrf2-null and wild-type mice, but not in Nrf2-enhanced mice. After ethanol administration, mitochondrial glutathione concentrations decreased markedly in Nrf2-null mice but not in Nrf2-enhanced mice. H{sub 2}DCFDA staining of primary hepatocytes isolated from the four genotypes of mice indicates that oxidative stress was higher in Nrf2-null cells, and lower in Nrf2-enhanced cells than in wild-type cells. Ethanol increased serum triglycerides and hepatic free fatty acids in Nrf2-null mice, and these increases were blunted in Nrf2-enhanced mice. In addition, the basal mRNA and nuclear protein levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1(Srebp-1) were decreased with graded Nrf2 activation. Ethanol further induced Srebp-1 mRNA in Nrf2-null mice but not in Nrf2-enhanced mice. In conclusion, Nrf2 activation prevented alcohol-induced oxidative stress and accumulation of free fatty acids in liver by increasing genes involved in antioxidant defense and decreasing genes involved in lipogenesis. -- Highlights: ► Ethanol depleted mitochondrial GSH in Nrf2-null mice but not in Keap1-KD mice. ► Ethanol increased ROS in hepatocytes isolated from Nrf2-null and wild

  16. Lipid metabolism is differentially modulated by salicylic acid and heptanoyl salicylic acid during the induction of resistance in wheat against powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Tayeh, Christine; Randoux, Béatrice; Bourdon, Natacha; Reignault, Philippe

    2013-12-15

    Heptanoyl salicylic acid (HSA) is a salicylic acid (SA) derivative obtained by esterification of 2-OH benzoic acid with heptanoic acid. In wheat, the protection levels obtained against Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt) increased from 50% with SA to 95% with HSA. Using molecular, biochemical and cytological approaches, we investigated here how wheat lipid metabolism is differentially activated by SA and HSA in both infectious and non-infectious conditions, and how Bgt infectious process is altered by both inducers. First, in the absence of Bgt, continuous lipoxygenase (LOX)-encoding gene expression and corresponding activity were specifically induced by HSA. Moreover, compared to SA, HSA treatment resulted in earlier up-regulations of the phospholipase C2-encoding gene expression and it specifically affected the expression of a lipid transfer protein-encoding gene. In infectious context, both HSA and SA sprayings impaired penetration events and therefore haustorium formation, leading to less frequent fungal colonies. While this alteration only slowed down the evolution of Bgt infectious process in SA-sprayed leaves, it completely impaired the establishment of successful infectious events in HSA-sprayed leaves. In addition, HSA induced continuous increases of a LOX-encoding gene expression and of the corresponding LOX activity when compared to SA-sprayed leaves. Lipid metabolism is therefore overall highly responsive to HSA spraying and could represent effective defence mechanism triggered during the induction of resistance in wheat toward Bgt. The concepts of priming and energy costs of the defences induced by SA and HSA are also discussed.

  17. Lipid deficient extender for bovine spermatozoa: its development and use in measuring freezing-induced lipid loss.

    PubMed

    Coulter, G H; Foote, R H

    1975-01-01

    To facilitate the measurement of lipid losses from spermatozoa due to freezing, three low-lipid seminal extenders containing lactose, bovine serum albumin, or soybean protein were evaluated as potential cryoprotectants. All extenders were formulated to have an osmotic pressure within the range of 270 to 330 mosmol and a pH of 6.8 to 7.0. Soybean protein (Promine-D) maintained the highest post-thaw motility of spermatozoa with similar survival for spermatozoa frozen in ampules and straws. The extender derived from testing several components consisted of Tris(hydroxymethyl) aminomethane (245 mM), and citric acid monohydrate (78mM), as the buffering compounds; and fructose (69 mM), glycerol (7% vol/vol), and Promine-D (1.5% wt/vol). Post-thaw sperm motility of approximately 40% was not different from the Tris-egg yolk control. Fertility of fresh rabbit semen treated with the extender was normal. After freeze-thawing, protected spermatozoa contained more lipid (1.61 versus 1.20 mug/10-6 sperm) and lost less glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase enzyme (102 versus 108 Karmen units) than when Promine-D was not incorporated. However, even with protection by soybean protein, spermatozoa lipid content decreased from 2.43 to 1.61 mug/10-6 sperm after one freeze-thawing. The lipid status of spermatozoa frozen and thawed in conventional bull seminal extenders containing large amounts of lipids is unknown.

  18. Modulation of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in murine salivary gland by dietary fatty acid ethyl esters.

    PubMed

    Avula, C P; Fernandes, G

    1999-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of n-9, n-6, and n-3 dietary fatty acid ethyl esters on basal (uninduced) and Fe2+/ascorbate (induced) lipid peroxidation (LPO) in salivary gland (SG) of mice. Feeding n-3 ethyl ester polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) increased the uninduced and induced LPO in SG homogenates. In contrast, feeding olive oil ethyl esters (n-9) significantly lowered the induced and uninduced LPO in SG tissue. Salivary gland susceptibility to LPO increased in the order of: olive oil < corn oil < safflower oil < n-3 ethyl esters. Olive oil esters in the diet increased primarily the 18:1 levels in SG tissue. Whereas feeding n-3 PUFA notably increased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities in SG homogenates, no significant changes were seen between n-9 and n-6 PUFA-fed mice. Lower levels of Vitamin E (Vit E) in the tissues of n-3 PUFA-fed mice indicate that the higher the dietary lipid unsaturation, the higher the requirement for Vit E in the diet. Our results indicate that, similar to other organs, salivary gland susceptibility to uninduced or induced oxidation depends on the source of dietary PUFA. In conclusion, feeding olive oil increases the resistance of SGs to induced and uninduced LPO.

  19. A conditional mutant of the fatty acid synthase unveils unexpected cross talks in mycobacterial lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cabruja, Matías; Mondino, Sonia; Tsai, Yi Ting; Lara, Julia; Gramajo, Hugo; Gago, Gabriela

    2017-02-01

    Unlike most bacteria, mycobacteria rely on the multi-domain enzyme eukaryote-like fatty acid synthase I (FAS I) to make fatty acids de novo. These metabolites are precursors of the biosynthesis of most of the lipids present both in the complex mycobacteria cell wall and in the storage lipids inside the cell. In order to study the role of the type I FAS system in Mycobacterium lipid metabolism in vivo, we constructed a conditional mutant in the fas-acpS operon of Mycobacterium smegmatis and analysed in detail the impact of reduced de novo fatty acid biosynthesis on the global architecture of the cell envelope. As expected, the mutant exhibited growth defect in the non-permissive condition that correlated well with the lower expression of fas-acpS and the concomitant reduction of FAS I, confirming that FAS I is essential for survival. The reduction observed in FAS I provoked an accumulation of its substrates, acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA, and a strong reduction of C12 to C18 acyl-CoAs, but not of long-chain acyl-CoAs (C19 to C24). The most intriguing result was the ability of the mutant to keep synthesizing mycolic acids when fatty acid biosynthesis was impaired. A detailed comparative lipidomic analysis showed that although reduced FAS I levels had a strong impact on fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis, mycolic acids were still being synthesized in the mutant, although with a different relative species distribution. However, when triacylglycerol degradation was inhibited, mycolic acid biosynthesis was significantly reduced, suggesting that storage lipids could be an intracellular reservoir of fatty acids for the biosynthesis of complex lipids in mycobacteria. Understanding the interaction between FAS I and the metabolic pathways that rely on FAS I products is a key step to better understand how lipid homeostasis is regulated in this microorganism and how this regulation could play a role during infection in pathogenic mycobacteria.

  20. In vitro cell injury by oxidized low density lipoprotein involves lipid hydroperoxide-induced formation of alkoxyl, lipid, and peroxyl radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, M D; Cole, R A; Colles, S M; Chisolm, G M

    1995-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports current theories linking lipoprotein oxidation to atherosclerosis. We sought the cellular biochemical mechanism by which oxidized LDL inflicts cell injury. Inhibitors of candidate pathways of cell death were used to treat human fibroblast target cells exposed to oxidized LDL.. Ebselen, which degrades lipid hydroperoxides, inhibited oxidized LDL toxicity, consistent with our recent report that 7 beta-hydroperoxycholesterol (7 beta-OOH chol) is the major cytotoxin of oxidized LDL. Intracellular chelation of metal ions inhibited, while preloading cells with iron enhanced, toxicity, Inhibition of oxidized LDL and 7 beta-OOH chol toxicity by 2-keto-4-thiolmethyl butyric acid, a putative alkoxyl radical scavenger and by vitamin E, probucol and diphenylphenylenediamine, putative scavengers of peroxyl radicals was consistent with the involvement of these radicals in the lethal sequence. Cell death was thus postulated to occur due to lipid peroxidation via a sequence involving lipid hydroperoxide-induced, iron-mediated formation of alkoxyl, lipid, and peroxyl radicals. Pathways involving other reactive oxygen species, new protein synthesis, or altered cholesterol metabolism were considered less likely, since putative inhibitors failed to lessen toxicity. Understanding the mechanism of cell injury by oxidized LDL and its toxic moiety, 7 beta-OOH chol, may indicate specific interventions in the cell injury believed to accompany vascular lesion development. PMID:7560078

  1. Prompt inhibition of fMLP-induced Ca2+ mobilization by parenteral lipid emulsions in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wanten, Geert; Rops, Angelique; van Emst-De Vries, Sjenet E; Naber, Ton; Willems, Peter H G M

    2002-04-01

    It remains unclear whether modulation of immune system functions by lipids contributes to the increased infection rate observed in patients treated with parenteral nutrition. We therefore evaluated the effects of lipid emulsions derived from fish oil [very long chain triglycerides (VLCT)], olive oil [long-chain triglycerides- mono-unsaturated fatty acid (LCT-MUFA)], soya oil [long-chain triglycerides (LCT)], or a physical mixture of coconut and soya oil [mixed long- and medium-chain triglycerides (LCT-MCT)] on neutrophil activation. N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) evoked an immediate increase of the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+](i,av)) in a suspension of neutrophils. When added 3 min before fMLP, however, all four lipid emulsions reduced the hormone-induced increase in [Ca2+](i,av) with the same efficacy but with different potency. Half-maximal inhibition was reached at emulsion concentrations of 0.24 mM VLCT, 0.32 mM LCT-MCT, 0.52 mM LCT, and 0.82 mM LCT-MUFA. Similarly to the lipids, the protein kinase C (PKC) activator PMA markedly reduced the fMLP-induced increase in [Ca2+](i,av). PMA inhibition was abolished by the PKC inhibitor staurosporine. In contrast, however, this drug did not interfere with the inhibitory lipid effect, indicating that the lipids act primarily in a PKC-independent manner. In summary, this study shows that nutritional lipids can evoke a prompt and significant attenuation of hormone-induced neutrophil stimulation and that the emulsions based on fish oil and a mixture of coconut oil and soya oil are among the most potent ones in this respect.

  2. Vanadate-induced toxicity towards isolated perfused rat livers: the role of lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Younes, M; Strubelt, O

    1991-02-11

    The toxic potential of sodium orthovanadate towards isolated perfused rat livers was investigated at a dose of 2 mmol/l. In livers from fasted rats, vanadate led to a release of cytosolic (glutamate-pyruvate-transaminase (GPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH] and mitochondrial (glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH] enzymes, an accumulation of calcium in the liver, a marked depletion of hepatic glutathione and an enhanced release of it into the perfusate, as well as an augmented formation and release of thiobarbituric acid-reactive material by the liver. Furthermore, a marked inhibition of oxygen consumption was observed. Vanadate-induced vasoconstriction resulted in a progressive decrease in perfusate flow rate. Control experiments with similarly reduced flow rates led to a comparable reduction in oxygen consumption. GPT and LDH release and hepatic glutathione depletion were also evident, though to a lesser extent than in the presence of vanadate, but no increase in GLDH release, in tissue calcium content or TBA-reactive material in the liver or the perfusate were observed. Thus, indirect toxic effects due to a reduced flow rate contribute only partly to vanadate hepatotoxicity and do not affect mitochondrial integrity. Omission of calcium from the perfusate did not prevent hepatotoxic responses to vanadate, although less calcium was present in the treated livers than in the control organs, indicating that calcium influx is not involved in vanadate-induced hepatotoxicity in the intact organ, in contrast to isolated hepatocytes. Feeding the animals, resulting in an activation of anaerobic energy conservation reactions, strongly attenuated vanadate hepatotoxicity indicating that the energetic status of the liver is the main target of vanadate. Superoxide dismutase did not affect the hepatotoxic responses of livers from fasted rats towards vanadate, while allopurinol and deferrioxamine inhibited lipid peroxidation and hepatotoxicity due to vanadate. The strong correlation

  3. Conjugated linoleic acid alters growth performance, tissue lipid deposition, and fatty acid composition of darkbarbel catfish (Pelteobagrus vachelli).

    PubMed

    Dong, Gui-Fang; Liu, Wen-Zuo; Wu, Lin-Zhou; Yu, Deng-Hang; Huang, Feng; Li, Peng-Cheng; Yang, Yan-Ou

    2015-02-01

    Fatty liver syndrome is a prevalent problem of farmed fish. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has received increased attention recently as a fat-reducing fatty acid to control fat deposition in mammals. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether dietary CLA can reduce tissue lipid content of darkbarbel catfish (Pelteobagrus vachelli) and whether decreased lipid content is partially due to alterations in lipid metabolism enzyme activities and fatty acid profiles. A 76-day feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary CLA on the growth, tissue lipid deposition, and fatty acid composition of darkbarbel catfish. Five diets containing 0 % (control), 0.5 % (CLA0.5), 1 % (CLA1), 2 % (CLA2), and 3 % (CLA3) CLA levels were evaluated. Results showed that fish fed with 2-3 % CLA diets showed a significantly lower specific growth rate and feed conversion efficiency than those fed with the control diet. Dietary CLA decreased the lipid contents in the liver and intraperitoneal fat with the CLA levels from 1 to 3 %. Fish fed with 2-3 % CLA diets showed significantly higher lipoprotein lipase and hepatic triacylglycerol lipase activities in liver than those of fish fed with the control, and fish fed with 1-3 % CLA diets had significantly higher pancreatic triacylglycerol lipase activities in liver than those of fish fed with the control. Dietary CLA was incorporated into liver, intraperitoneal fat, and muscle lipids, with higher percentages observed in liver compared with other tissues. Liver CLA deposition was at the expense of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). In contrast, CLA deposition appeared to be primarily at the expense of MUFA and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the intraperitoneal fat, whereas in muscle it was at the expense of n-3 PUFA. Our results suggested that CLA at a 1 % dose can reduce liver lipid content without eliciting any negative effect on growth rate in darkbarbel catfish. This lipid-lowering effect could

  4. Changes in amino acids and lipids during embryogenesis of European lobster, Homarus gammarus (Crustacea: Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Rosa, R; Calado, R; Andrade, A M; Narciso, L; Nunes, M L

    2005-02-01

    We studied the amino acid and lipid dynamics during embryogenesis of Homarus gammarus. Major essential amino acids (EAA) in the last stage of embryonic development were arginine, lysine and leucine; major nonessential amino acids (NEAA) were glutamic acid, aspartic acid, valine and glycine. The highest percent of utilization occurred in respect to EAA (27.8%), mainly due to a significant decrease (p<0.05) of methionine (38.3%) and threonine (36.0%). NEAA also decreased significantly (p<0.05, 11.4%), namely serine (38.1%), tyrosine (26.4%) and glutamic acid (25.7%). In contrast, the free amino acid content increased significantly (p<0.05) during embryonic development, especially the free nonessential amino acids (FNEAA). In the last stage, the most abundant FNEAA were glycine, proline, alanine and taurine, and the major free essential amino acids (FEAA) were arginine, lysine and leucine. Lipid content decreased significantly (p<0.05) during embryonic development. A substantial decrease in all neutral lipid classes was observed (>80% of utilization). Major fatty acids were 16:0, 18:0, 18:1n-9, 18:2n-6, 18:3n-3, 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3. Unsaturated (UFA) and saturated fatty acids (SFA) were used up at similar rates (76.5% and 76.3%, respectively). Within UFA, monounsaturates (MUFA) were consumed more than polyunsaturates (PUFA) (82.9% and 67.5%, respectively).

  5. Lipid peroxides and antioxidant enzymes in cisplatin-induced chronic nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    González, Ricardo; Romay, Cheyla; Borrego, Aluet; Hernández, Frank; Merino, Nelson; Zamora, Zullyt; Rojas, Enis

    2005-08-14

    Cisplatin (CDDP), an anticancer drug, induces remarkable toxicity in the kidneys of animals and humans and it has been well documented that reactive oxygen species and the renal antioxidant system are strongly involved in acute renal damage induced by CDDP. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether or not the renal antioxidant system plays also an important role in chronic renal damage induced by repeated doses of CDDP (1 mg/kg intraperitoneally twice weekly during 10 weeks in rats). In order to elucidate it, serum creatinine and urea levels, renal glutathione and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) content, as well as renal superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities were measured in the kidney homogenates of chronically CDDP-treated rats and additionally histological studies were performed in the rat kidneys. The chronic treatment with CDDP induced a significant increase in creatinine and urea levels in serum, but the other parameters mentioned above were not significantly modified as compared to the values in nontreated rats. Taking into account these results, we conclude that chronic CDDP administration induces also severe nephrotoxicity, in contrast to CDDP acute application, without any significant modification in the activity of relevant antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, renal glutathione and lipid peroxides, by which the role of the antioxidant system in chronic nephrotoxicity induced by CDDP in rats is uncertain.

  6. Crowding-induced mixing behavior of lipid bilayers: Examination of mixing energy, phase, packing geometry, and reversibility

    SciTech Connect

    Zeno, Wade F.; Rystov, Alice; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Risbud, Subhash H.; Longo, Marjorie L.

    2016-04-20

    In an effort to develop a general thermodynamic model from first-principles to describe the mixing behavior of lipid membranes, we examined lipid mixing induced by targeted binding of small (Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)) and large (nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs)) structures to specific phases of phase-separated lipid bilayers. Phases were targeted by incorporation of phase-partitioning iminodiacetic acid (IDA)-functionalized lipids into ternary lipid mixtures consisting of DPPC, DOPC, and cholesterol. GFP and NLPs, containing histidine tags, bound the IDA portion of these lipids via a metal, Cu2+, chelating mechanism. In giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), GFP and NLPs bound to the Lo domains of bilayers containing DPIDA, and bound to the Ld region of bilayers containing DOIDA. At sufficiently large concentrations of DPIDA or DOIDA, lipid mixing was induced by bound GFP and NLPs. The validity of the thermodynamic model was confirmed when it was found that the statistical mixing distribution as a function of crowding energy for smaller GFP and larger NLPs collapsed to the same trend line for each GUV composition. Moreover, results of this analysis show that the free energy of mixing for a ternary lipid bilayer consisting of DOPC, DPPC, and cholesterol varied from 7.9 × 10–22 to 1.5 × 10–20 J/lipid at the compositions observed, decreasing as the relative cholesterol concentration was increased. It was discovered that there appears to be a maximum packing density, and associated maximum crowding pressure, of the NLPs, suggestive of circular packing. A similarity in mixing induced by NLP1 and NLP3 despite large difference in projected areas was analytically consistent with monovalent (one histidine tag) versus divalent (two histidine tags) surface interactions, respectively. In addition to GUVs, binding and induced mixing behavior of NLPs was also observed on planar, supported lipid multibilayers. Furthermore, the mixing

  7. Temperature-induced plasticity in membrane and storage lipid composition: thermal reaction norms across five different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Van Dooremalen, Coby; Koekkoek, Jacco; Ellers, Jacintha

    2011-02-01

    Temperature is a key environmental factor inducing phenotypic plasticity in a wide range of behavioral, morphological, and life history traits in ectotherms. The strength of temperature-induced responses in fitness-related traits may be determined by plasticity of the underlying physiological or biochemical traits. Lipid composition may be an important trait underlying fitness response to temperature, because it affects membrane fluidity as well as availability of stored energy reserves. Here, we investigate the effect of temperature on lipid composition of the springtail Orchesella cincta by measuring thermal reaction norms across five different temperatures after four weeks of cold or warm acclimation. Fatty acid composition in storage and membrane lipids showed a highly plastic response to temperature, but the responses of single fatty acids revealed deviations from the expectations based on HVA theory. We found an accumulation of C(18:2n6) and C(18:3n3) at higher temperatures and the preservation of C(20:4n6) across temperatures, which is contrary to the expectation of decreased unsaturation at higher temperatures. The thermal response of these fatty acids in O. cincta differed from the findings in other species, and therefore shows there is interspecific variation in how single fatty acids contribute to HVA. Future research should determine the consequences of such variation in terms of costs and benefits for the thermal performance of species.

  8. Rat liver microsomal lipid peroxidation produced during the oxidative metabolism of ethacrynic acid.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Masubuchi, Y; Narimatsu, S; Kobayashi, S; Horie, T

    2001-04-01

    Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were produced in rat liver microsomal suspension incubated with ethacrynic acid (loop diuretic drug) and NADPH. Two oxidative metabolites of ethacrynic acid with dicarboxylic acid and hydroxylated ethyl group, respectively, were formed in the reaction mixture. The oxidative metabolism of ethacrynic acid was inhibited by cytochrome P450 inhibitors. The formation of TBARS was remarkably depressed by inhibitors like diethyldithiocarbamate and disulfiram. These results indicate that lipid peroxidation occurred in rat liver microsomes through the oxidative metabolism of ethacrynic acid.

  9. Variation in amino acid and lipid composition of latent fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Croxton, Ruth S; Baron, Mark G; Butler, David; Kent, Terry; Sears, Vaughn G

    2010-06-15

    The enhancement of latent fingerprints, both at the crime scene and in the laboratory using an array of chemical, physical and optical techniques, permits their use for identification. Despite the plethora of techniques available, there are occasions when latent fingerprints are not successfully enhanced. An understanding of latent fingerprint chemistry and behaviour will aid the improvement of current techniques and the development of novel ones. In this study the amino acid and fatty acid content of 'real' latent fingerprints collected on a non-porous surface was analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Squalene was also quantified in addition. Hexadecanoic acid, octadecanoic acid and cis-9-octadecenoic acid were the most abundant fatty acids in all samples. There was, however, wide variation in the relative amounts of each fatty acid in each sample. It was clearly demonstrated that touching sebum-rich areas of the face immediately prior to fingerprint deposition resulted in a significant increase in the amount of fatty acids and squalene deposited in the resulting 'groomed' fingerprints. Serine was the most abundant amino acid identified followed by glycine, alanine and aspartic acid. The significant quantitative differences between the 'natural' and 'groomed' fingerprint samples seen for fatty acids were not observed in the case of the amino acids. This study demonstrates the variation in latent fingerprint composition between individuals and the impact of the sampling protocol on the quantitative analysis of fingerprints.

  10. Prebiotic oligomerization of amino acids inside lipid vesicles of unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in hydrothermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, E.; Furuuchi, R.; Nemoto, A.; Hatori, K.; Honda, H.; Matsuno, K.

    We have already attempted an experimental model simulating seawater circulation in the vicinity of hydrothermal vents in the primitive ocean. We used a flow reactor that was constructed for simulating the pressure and temperature conditions of the hydrothermal vents. In the flow reactor, a high-temperature high-pressure fluid at 125˜ 250°C and at 20MPa was injected into a low temperature (0˜ 40°C ) chamber that was maintained at about the same high pressure as the fluid. We then experimentally examined a possibility of oligomerizing amino acids on or inside lipid vesicles. We compared three different kinds of lipid vesicles made of unsaturated fatty acids (oleic acid), saturated fatty acids (decanoic acid) and phospholipids (DPPC). Identification of the oligomeric products was made with the aid of an HPLC analysis. The oligomeric yields from glycine increased significantly in the presence of lipid vesicles compared to the case of their absence. On the other hand, there was found no significant difference in the yields of oligomers between in the presence of lipid vesicles dissolved by surfactant and in their absence. The possibility of lipid molecules serving as catalysts for oligomerization may be dismissed. The diameters of those lipid vesicles observed under a phase contrast microscope were about 10 micrometer or less. The total volume shared by oleic acid vesicles was about 5 % of the total volume of the suspension. Oligomerization of glycine inside oleic acid vesicles was enhanced more than 15 times compared to that proceeding in their outside. Enhancement of oligomerization of glycine in the presence of lipid vesicles was repeated as the reactants revisited the interface zone between the hot and cold regions. Even those lipid vesicles made of saturated fatty acid such as decanoic acid could have been functional in enhancing the oligomerization of monomers in their inside in the primitive ocean. References E. Imai, et al. (1999) Science 283, 831-833. H

  11. Oleic acid-induced mucosal injury in developing piglet intestine.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, O R; Henninger, K; Fowler, M; Tso, P; Crissinger, K D

    1993-03-01

    A role for luminal nutrients, in particular products of lipid digestion, in the pathogenesis of mucosal injury to developing intestine has been postulated. We evaluated changes in mucosal permeability and light and electron microscopic histology induced by luminal perfusion with the long-chain fatty acid oleate in developing piglet intestine as a function of age and concentration of the fatty acid. 51Cr-labeled EDTA plasma-to-lumen clearance was measured in jejunum and ileum of 1-day-, 3-day-, 2-wk-, and 1-mo-old piglets during sequential perfusion with saline control (20 min); 0, 1, 5, and 10 mM oleic acid/10 mM taurocholate in saline (20 min); and normal saline (60 min). The jejunum of piglets < or = 2 wk showed significantly greater increases in mucosal permeability compared with 1-mo-old animals after perfusion with oleic acid. This effect was dependent on the luminal concentration of the fatty acid and was associated with mucosal injury evident under light and electron microscopy. In contrast, the overall response in ileum was more attenuated compared with jejunum. Thus oleic acid, a common dietary fatty acid, induces dose- and age-dependent injury in developing piglet intestine. Investigation of the mechanisms of this injury may provide the basis for dietary modifications directed at decreasing the risk of mucosal injury during enteral feeding in neonatal intestine.

  12. Lipid Class Specific Quantitative Analysis of n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Food Supplements.

    PubMed

    Kutzner, Laura; Ostermann, Annika I; Konrad, Thade; Riegel, Dieter; Hellhake, Stefan; Schuchardt, Jan Philipp; Schebb, Nils Helge

    2017-01-11

    Supplementation products containing n-3 PUFA from marine sources serve a large market. Although the amount of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in the products is provided by the manufacturer, no or little information is available on their lipid pattern. Therefore, we quantitatively analyzed the fatty acid pattern in the lipid fractions triglycerides, phospholipids, ethyl esters, and free fatty acids in supplementation products by means of solid phase extraction and gas chromatography. Twelve products from the European and U.S. markets containing fish, krill, algal, or plant oil were analyzed. Total n-3 PUFA content ranged from 68 g/100 g fat (fish oil) to 42 g/100 g fat (algal oil) to 17 g/100 g fat (krill oil). On the basis of the n-3 PUFA containing lipid class, the supplements can be separated dominantly in ethyl ester, re-esterified triglyceride, triglyceride, and phospholipid containing products. Algae-based products contained natural triglycerides, krill oils a complex mixture of phospholipids, triglycerides, and free fatty acids, and fish oil products either ethyl esters, re-esterified triglycerides, or triglycerides. Even products of the same class and source showed distinct differences in their lipid pattern. A specification of the lipid composition of n-3 PUFA products would allow distinguishing the different (qualities of) supplements.

  13. Culture strategies for lipid production using acetic acid as sole carbon source by Rhodosporidium toruloides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang-Feng; Liu, Jia-Nan; Lu, Li-Jun; Peng, Kai-Ming; Yang, Gao-Xiang; Liu, Jia

    2016-04-01

    Rhodosporidium toruloides AS 2.1389 was tested using different concentrations of acetic acid as a low-cost carbon source for the production of microbial lipids, which are good raw materials for biodiesel production. It grew and had higher lipid contents in media containing 4-20 g/L acetic acid as the sole carbon source, compared with that in glucose-containing media under the same culture conditions. At acetic acid concentrations as high as 20 g/L and the optimal carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (C/N) of 200 in a batch culture, the highest biomass production was 4.35 g/L, with a lipid content of 48.2%. At acetic acid concentrations as low as 4 g/L, a sequencing batch culture (SBC) with a C/N of 100 increased biomass production to 4.21 g/L, with a lipid content of 38.6%. These results provide usable culture strategies for lipid production by R. toruloides AS 2.1389 when using diverse waste-derived volatile fatty acids.

  14. Bilirubin scavenges chloramines and inhibits myeloperoxidase-induced protein/lipid oxidation in physiologically relevant hyperbilirubinemic serum.

    PubMed

    Boon, A C; Hawkins, C L; Coombes, J S; Wagner, K H; Bulmer, A C

    2015-09-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), an oxidant produced by myeloperoxidase (MPO), induces protein and lipid oxidation, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Individuals with mildly elevated bilirubin concentrations (i.e., Gilbert syndrome; GS) are protected from atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, and related mortality. We aimed to investigate whether exogenous/endogenous unconjugated bilirubin (UCB), at physiological concentrations, can protect proteins/lipids from oxidation induced by reagent and enzymatically generated HOCl. Serum/plasma samples supplemented with exogenous UCB (≤250µM) were assessed for their susceptibility to HOCl and MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) oxidation, by measuring chloramine, protein carbonyl, and malondialdehyde (MDA) formation. Serum/plasma samples from hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rats and humans with GS were also exposed to MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) to: (1) validate in vitro data and (2) determine the relevance of endogenously elevated UCB in preventing protein and lipid oxidation. Exogenous UCB dose-dependently (P<0.05) inhibited HOCl and MPO/H2O2/Cl(-)-induced chloramine formation. Albumin-bound UCB efficiently and specifically (3.9-125µM; P<0.05) scavenged taurine, glycine, and N-α-acetyllysine chloramines. These results were translated into Gunn rat and GS serum/plasma, which showed significantly (P<0.01) reduced chloramine formation after MPO-induced oxidation. Protein carbonyl and MDA formation was also reduced after MPO oxidation in plasma supplemented with UCB (P<0.05; 25 and 50µM, respectively). Significant inhibition of protein and lipid oxidation was demonstrated within the physiological range of UCB, providing a hypothetical link to protection from atherosclerosis in hyperbilirubinemic individuals. These data demonstrate a novel and physiologically relevant mechanism whereby UCB could inhibit protein and lipid modification by quenching chloramines induced by MPO-induced HOCl.

  15. A comparative analysis of fatty acid composition of root and shoot lipids in Zea mays under copper and cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Chaffai, R; Seybou, T N; Marzouk, B; El Ferjani, E

    2009-03-01

    A comparative analysis of fatty acid composition was conducted in maize (Zea mays L.) under copper and cadmium stress. The unsaturation level (double-bond index) of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) was increased in response to both metal treatments, whereas the phosphatidylinositol (PI), the phosphatidylcholine (PC) showed no significant changes. The Cu-treated roots showed a marked increase (about 2-fold) in the phospholipid (PL) content, while the Cd-treated roots showed a slight but insignificant increase. The steryl lipid SL/PL ratio was markedly decreased in response to Cu stress, and therefore, may indicate an activated phospholipid biosynthesis and turnover, in response to damage caused by Cu stress. The double bond indices of chloroplastic lipids: phosphatidylglycerol (PG), monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) revealed a similar but not identical pattern of change. The PG and MGDG contents in shoots were markedly decreased under Cu (by 53 and 48%) and Cd (by 78 and 65%) stress. The increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) content in roots induced by both metals indicates lipid peroxidation. Generally, in the presence of Cu fatty acid composition was markedly modulated but to lesser extent under Cd stress. These results suggest that changes in the fatty acid composition under Cu and Cd stress conditions are metal-specific and may therefore result in differential metal tolerance.

  16. Studies on pyrazinoylguanidine. 2. Comparative drug and dose effects on glucose and lipid metabolism in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    A-Rahim, Y I; Beyer, K H; Vesell, E S

    1996-03-01

    In streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats, pyrazinoylguanidine (PZG) markedly reduced elevated fasting concentrations of plasma glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol. In contrast, these parameters were unaffected by a sulfonylurea, glyburide, or by a biguanide, metformin. PZG's glucose- and lipid-lowering effects were dose-dependent. These metabolic effects were also investigated after: (a) pyrazinoic acid (PZA), a metabolite of PZG; (b) 3-amino-PZG, an analog of PZG, and (c) 3-amino-PZA, a hydrolytic product of 3-amino-PZG. PZA moderately reduced elevated fasting glucose and lipid concentrations in STZ-diabetic rats, suggesting partial medication of PZG's antidiabetic actions by PZA. Neither 3-amino-PZG nor 3-amino-PZA exerted any glucose- or lipid-lowering effect in STZ-diabetic rats.

  17. Lipid and fatty acid analysis of uninfected and granulosis virus-infected Plodia interpunctella larvae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri-Bhalla, K.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A comparative study on the lipid and fatty acid composition of the uninfected and GV-infected Plodia interpunctella larvae was performed. Higher levels of free fatty acids were found in GV-infected larvae compared to those of the uninfected larvae, while the latter had more triacylglycerol compared to the former. The known identified phospholipids were fewer in the GV-infected larvae compared to those in the uninfected larvae. However, an unidentified phospholipid was found to be approximately two times higher in GV-infected larvae. The total lipid of both larvae had palmitic, oleic, and linoleic as the major fatty acids. The fatty acid composition of the GV-infected larval phospholipid differed considerably compared to that of the uninfected larvae, in that the ratio of unsaturated fatty acid to saturated fatty acid was 3.5 times less in the GV-infected larvae.

  18. Relationship between Active Oxygen Species, Lipid Peroxidation, Necrosis, and Phytoalexin Production Induced by Elicitins in Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Rusterucci, C.; Stallaert, V.; Milat, M. L.; Pugin, A.; Ricci, P.; Blein, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Excised leaves of Nicotiana tabacum var Xanthi and Nicotiana rustica were treated with cryptogein and capsicein, basic and acidic elicitins, respectively. Both compounds induced leaf necrosis, the intensity of which depended on concentration and duration of treatment. N. tabacum var Xanthi was the most sensitive species and cryptogein was the most active elicitin. Lipid peroxidation in elicitin-treated Nicotiana leaves was closely correlated with the appearance of necrosis. Elicitin treatments induced a rapid and transient burst of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell cultures of both Nicotiana species, with the production by Xanthi cells being 6-fold greater than that by N. rustica. Similar maximum AOS production levels were observed with both elicitins, but capsicein required 10-fold higher concentrations than those of cryptogein. Phytoalexin production was lower in response to both elicitins in N. tabacum var Xanthi cells than in N. rustica cells, and capsicein was the most efficient elicitor of this response. In cryptogein-treated cell suspensions, phytoalexin synthesis was unaffected by diphenyleneiodonium, which inhibited AOS generation, nor was it affected by tiron or catalase, which suppressed AOS accumulation in the extracellular medium. These results suggest that AOS production, lipid peroxidation, and necrosis are directly related, whereas phytoalexin production depends on neither the presence nor the intensity of these responses. PMID:12226334

  19. Tranexamic Acid-Induced Fixed Drug Eruption

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Natsuko; Hanami, Yuka; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old male showed multiple pigmented patches on his trunk and extremities after he took tranexamic acid for common cold. He stated that similar eruptions appeared when he was treated with tranexamic acid for influenza 10 months before. Patch test showed positive results at 48 h and 72 h by 1% and 10% tranexamic acid at the lesional skin only. To our knowledge, nine cases of fixed drug eruption induced by tranexamic acid have been reported in Japan. Tranexamic acid is a safe drug and frequently used because of its anti-fibrinolytic and anti-inflammatory effects, but caution of inducing fixed drug eruption should be necessary. PMID:26288438

  20. Tranexamic Acid-Induced Fixed Drug Eruption.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Natsuko; Hanami, Yuka; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old male showed multiple pigmented patches on his trunk and extremities after he took tranexamic acid for common cold. He stated that similar eruptions appeared when he was treated with tranexamic acid for influenza 10 months before. Patch test showed positive results at 48 h and 72 h by 1% and 10% tranexamic acid at the lesional skin only. To our knowledge, nine cases of fixed drug eruption induced by tranexamic acid have been reported in Japan. Tranexamic acid is a safe drug and frequently used because of its anti-fibrinolytic and anti-inflammatory effects, but caution of inducing fixed drug eruption should be necessary.

  1. Deregulation of Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity Induced by Central Lipid Infusion in Rats Is Mediated by Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Marsollier, Nicolas; Kassis, Nadim; Mezghenna, Karima; Soty, Maud; Fioramonti, Xavier; Lacombe, Amélie; Joly, Aurélie; Pillot, Bruno; Zitoun, Carine; Vilar, José; Mithieux, Gilles; Gross, René; Lajoix, Anne-Dominique; Routh, Vanessa; Magnan, Christophe; Cruciani-Guglielmacci, Céline

    2009-01-01

    Background Deregulation of hypothalamic fatty acid sensing lead to hepatic insulin-resistance which may partly contribute to further impairment of glucose homeostasis. Methodology We investigated here whether hypothalamic nitric oxide (NO) could mediate deleterious peripheral effect of central lipid overload. Thus we infused rats for 24 hours into carotid artery towards brain, either with heparinized triglyceride emulsion (Intralipid, IL) or heparinized saline (control rats). Principal Findings Lipids infusion led to hepatic insulin-resistance partly related to a decreased parasympathetic activity in the liver assessed by an increased acetylcholinesterase activity. Hypothalamic nitric oxide synthases (NOS) activities were significantly increased in IL rats, as the catalytically active neuronal NOS (nNOS) dimers compared to controls. This was related to a decrease in expression of protein inhibitor of nNOS (PIN). Effect of IL infusion on deregulated hepatic insulin-sensitivity was reversed by carotid injection of non selective NOS inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) and also by a selective inhibitor of the nNOS isoform, 7-Nitro-Indazole (7-Ni). In addition, NO donor injection (L-arginine and SNP) within carotid in control rats mimicked lipid effects onto impaired hepatic insulin sensitivity. In parallel we showed that cultured VMH neurons produce NO in response to fatty acid (oleic acid). Conclusions/Significance We conclude that cerebral fatty acid overload induces an enhancement of nNOS activity within hypothalamus which is, at least in part, responsible fatty acid increased hepatic glucose production. PMID:19680547

  2. Lipid rafts mediate ultraviolet light-induced Fas aggregation in M624 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Elyassaki, Walid; Wu, Shiyong

    2006-01-01

    Ultraviolet light (UV) induces aggregation of Fas-receptor through a Fas-ligand-independent pathway. However, the mechanism of ultraviolet light-induced Fas-receptor aggregation is not known. In this report, we show that lipid rafts mediate ultraviolet light-induced aggregation of Fas. Our data show that UV induces a redistribution of Fas-receptor in a 25-5% Optiprep continuous gradient. The amount of Fas-receptorS is significantly increased in a gradient fraction that contain lipid rafts and is associated with an increase of FADD and caspase-8. Our data also show that the active dimeric form of caspase-8 (p44/p41) is increased in the lipid raft fraction. In addition, our data show that cholesterol, a major component of lipid rafts, is significantly reduced in only the lipid raft fractions after UV-irradiation. However, ceramide, another major lipid raft component, is increased evenly in all gradient fractions after UV-irradiation. These results suggest that UV alters the composition of major lipid raft components, which leads to the recruitment of Fas-receptor and FADD, with subsequent activation of caspase-8. Based on our results, we propose a novel mechanism by which UV induces apoptosis through a membrane lipid raft-mediated signaling pathway.

  3. Orally Administered Berberine Modulates Hepatic Lipid Metabolism by Altering Microbial Bile Acid Metabolism and the Intestinal FXR Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Runbin; Yang, Na; Kong, Bo; Cao, Bei; Feng, Dong; Yu, Xiaoyi; Ge, Chun; Huang, Jingqiu; Shen, Jianliang; Wang, Pei; Feng, Siqi; Fei, Fei; Guo, Jiahua; He, Jun; Aa, Nan; Chen, Qiang; Pan, Yang; Schumacher, Justin D; Yang, Chung S; Guo, Grace L; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies suggest that the lipid-lowering effect of berberine (BBR) involves actions on the low-density lipoprotein receptor and the AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. However, the implication of these mechanisms is unclear because of the low bioavailability of BBR. Because the main action site of BBR is the gut and intestinal farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of lipid metabolism, we hypothesized that the effects of BBR on intestinal FXR signaling pathway might account for its pharmacological effectiveness. Using wild type (WT) and intestine-specific FXR knockout (FXR(int-/-)) mice, we found that BBR prevented the development of high-fat-diet-induced obesity and ameliorated triglyceride accumulation in livers of WT, but not FXR(int-/-) mice. BBR increased conjugated bile acids in serum and their excretion in feces. Furthermore, BBR inhibited bile salt hydrolase (BSH) activity in gut microbiota, and significantly increased the levels of tauro-conjugated bile acids, especially tauro-cholic acid(TCA), in the intestine. Both BBR and TCA treatment activated the intestinal FXR pathway and reduced the expression of fatty-acid translocase Cd36 in the liver. These results indicate that BBR may exert its lipid-lowering effect primarily in the gut by modulating the turnover of bile acids and subsequently the ileal FXR signaling pathway. In summary, we provide the first evidence to suggest a new mechanism of BBR action in the intestine that involves, sequentially, inhibiting BSH, elevating TCA, and activating FXR, which lead to the suppression of hepatic expression of Cd36 that results in reduced uptake of long-chain fatty acids in the liver.

  4. N-stearoylethanolamine restores pancreas lipid composition in obesity-induced insulin resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Onopchenko, Oleksandra V; Kosiakova, Galina V; Oz, Murat; Klimashevsky, Vitaliy M; Gula, Nadiya M

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the protective effect of N-stearoylethanolamine (NSE), a bioactive N-acylethanolamine , on the lipid profile distribution in the pancreas of obesity-induced insulin resistant (IR) rats fed with prolonged high fat diet (58% of fat for 6 months). The phospholipid composition was determined using 2D thin-layer chromatography. The level of individual phospholipids was estimated by measuring inorganic phosphorus content. The fatty acid (FA) composition and cholesterol level were investigated by gas-liquid chromatography. Compared to controls, plasma levels of triglycerides and insulin were significantly increased in IR rats. The pancreas lipid composition indicated a significant reduction of the free cholesterol level and some phospholipids such as phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho), phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn), phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns), phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) compared to controls. Moreover, the FA composition of pancreas showed a significant redistribution of the main FA (18:1n-9, 18:2n-6, 18:3n-6 and 20:4n-6) levels between phospholipid, free FA, triglyceride fractions under IR conditions that was accompanied by a change in the estimated activities of Δ9-, Δ6-, Δ5-desaturase. Administration of N-stearoylethanolamine (NSE, 50 mg/kg daily per os for 2 weeks) IR rats triggered an increase in the content of free cholesterol, PtdCho and normalization of PtdEtn, PtdSer level. Furthermore, the NSE modulated the activity of desaturases, thus influenced FA composition and restored the FA ratios in the lipid fractions. These NSE-induced changes were associated with a normalization of plasma triglyceride content, considerable decrease of insulin and index HOMA-IR level in rats under IR conditions.

  5. Ontogenetic change in the lipid and fatty acid composition of scleractinian coral larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, J.; Baird, A. H.; Cohen, M. F.; Flot, J.-F.; Kamiki, T.; Meziane, T.; Tsuchiya, M.; Yamasaki, H.

    2012-06-01

    Some scleractinian coral larvae have an extraordinary capacity to delay metamorphosis, and this is reflected in the large geographic range of many species. Coral eggs typically contain a high proportion of wax esters, which have been hypothesized to provide a source of energy for long-distance dispersal. To better understand the role of lipids in the dispersal of broadcast spawning coral larvae, ontogenetic changes in the lipid and fatty acid composition of Goniastrea retiformis were measured from the eggs until larvae were 30 days old. Egg biomass was 78.8 ± 0.5% lipids, 86.3 ± 0.2% of which were wax esters, 9.3 ± 0.0% polar lipids, 4.1 ± 0.2% sterols, and 0.3 ± 0.1% triacylglycerols. The biomass of wax esters declined significantly through time, while polar lipids, sterols and triacylglycerols remained relatively constant, suggesting that wax esters are the prime source of energy for development. The most prevalent fatty acid in the eggs was palmitic acid, a marker of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium, highlighting the importance of symbiosis in coral reproductive ecology. The proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids declined through time, suggesting that they are essential for larval development. Interestingly, triacylglycerols are only abundant in the propagules that contain Symbiodinium, suggesting important differences in the energetic of dispersal among species with vertical and horizontal transmission of symbionts.

  6. How Bacterial Pathogens Eat Host Lipids: Implications for the Development of Fatty Acid Synthesis Therapeutics*

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Rock, Charles O.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis (FASII) is a target for the development of novel therapeutics. Bacteria incorporate extracellular fatty acids into membrane lipids, raising the question of whether pathogens use host fatty acids to bypass FASII and defeat FASII therapeutics. Some pathogens suppress FASII when exogenous fatty acids are present to bypass FASII therapeutics. FASII inhibition cannot be bypassed in many bacteria because essential fatty acids cannot be obtained from the host. FASII antibiotics may not be effective against all bacteria, but a broad spectrum of Gram-negative and -positive pathogens can be effectively treated with FASII inhibitors. PMID:25648887

  7. Effects of UV radiation on hatching, lipid peroxidation, and fatty acid composition in the copepod Paracyclopina nana.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun-Ji; Lee, Yeonjung; Han, Jeonghoon; Hwang, Un-Ki; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Park, Heum Gi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of UV radiation on the reproductive physiology and macromolecules in marine zooplankton, several doses of UV radiation were used to treat the copepod Paracyclopina nana, and we analyzed in vivo endpoints of their life cycle such as mortality and reproductive parameters with in vitro biochemical biomarkers such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), the modulated enzyme activity of glutathione S-transferase (GST) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and the production of a byproduct of peroxidation (e.g. malonedialdehyde, MDA). After UV radiation, the survival rate of P. nana was significantly reduced. Also, egg sac damage and a reduction in the hatching rate of offspring were observed in UV-irradiated ovigerous females. According to the assessed biochemical parameters, we found dose-dependent increases in ROS levels and high levels of the lipid peroxidation decomposition product by 2 kJ m(-2), implying that P. nana was under off-balanced status by oxidative stress-mediated cellular damage. Antioxidant enzyme activities of GST and SOD increased over different doses of UV radiation. To measure UV-induced lipid peroxidation, we found a slight reduction in the composition of essential fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). These findings indicate that UV radiation can induce oxidative stress-triggered lipid peroxidation with modulation of antioxidant enzyme activity, leading to a significant effect on mortality and reproductive physiology (e.g. fecundity). These results demonstrate the involvement of UV radiation on essential fatty acids and its susceptibility to UV radiation in the copepod P. nana compared to other species.

  8. meso-Dihydroguaiaretic acid inhibits hepatic lipid accumulation by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung-Su; Kim, Kyung Jin; Kim, Daeyoung; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic lipid accumulation is a major risk factor for dyslipidemia, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and insulin resistance. The present study was conducted to evaluate hypolipidemic effects of meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid (MDA), anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory compound isolated from the Myristica fragrans HOUTT., by oil red O staining, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and Western blot. MDA significantly inhibited insulin-induced hepatic lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. The lipid-lowering effect of MDA was accompanied by increased expression of proteins involved in fatty acid oxidation and decreased expression of lipid synthetic proteins. In addition, MDA activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as determined by phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a downstream target of AMPK. The effects of MDA on lipogenic protein expression were suppressed by pretreatment with compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. Taken together, these findings show that MDA inhibits insulin-induced lipid accumulation in human HepG2 cells by suppressing expression of lipogenic proteins through AMPK signaling, suggesting a potent lipid-lowering agent.

  9. LOSS OF L-FABP, SCP-2/SCP-X, OR BOTH INDUCES HEPATIC LIPID ACCUMULATION IN FEMALE MICE

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Gregory G.; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Landrock, Kerstin K.; Landrock, Danilo; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Kier, Ann B.

    2015-01-01

    Although roles for both sterol carrier protein-2/sterol carrier protein-x (SCP-2/SCP-x) and liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) have been proposed in hepatic lipid accumulation, individually ablating these genes has been complicated by concomitant alterations in the other gene product(s). For example, ablating SCP2/SCP-x induces upregulation of L-FABP in female mice. Therefore, the impact of ablating SCP-2/SCP-x (DKO) or L-FABP (LKO) individually or both together (TKO) was examined in female mice. Loss of SCP-2/SCP-x (DKO, TKO) more so than loss of L-FABP alone (LKO) increased hepatic total lipid and total cholesterol content, especially cholesteryl ester. Hepatic accumulation of nonesterified long chain fatty acids (LCFA) and phospholipids occurred only in DKO and TKO mice. Loss of SCP-2/SCP-x (DKO, TKO) increased serum total lipid primarily by increasing triglycerides. Altered hepatic level of proteins involved in cholesterol uptake, efflux, and/or secretion was observed, but did not compensate for the loss of L-FABP, SCP-2/SCP-x or both. However, synergistic responses were not seen with the combinatorial knock out animals—suggesting that inhibiting SCP-2/SCP-x is more correlative with hepatic dysfunction than L-FABP. The DKO- and TKO-induced hepatic accumulation of cholesterol and long chain fatty acids shared significant phenotypic similarities with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). PMID:26116377

  10. Travelling lipid domains in a dynamic model for protein-induced pattern formation in biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Karin; Bär, Markus

    2005-06-01

    Cell membranes are composed of a mixture of lipids. Many biological processes require the formation of spatial domains in the lipid distribution of the plasma membrane. We have developed a mathematical model that describes the dynamic spatial distribution of acidic lipids in response to the presence of GMC proteins and regulating enzymes. The model encompasses diffusion of lipids and GMC proteins, electrostatic attraction between acidic lipids and GMC proteins as well as the kinetics of membrane attachment/detachment of GMC proteins. If the lipid-protein interaction is strong enough, phase separation occurs in the membrane as a result of free energy minimization and protein/lipid domains are formed. The picture is changed if a constant activity of enzymes is included into the model. We chose the myristoyl-electrostatic switch as a regulatory module. It consists of a protein kinase C that phosphorylates and removes the GMC proteins from the membrane and a phosphatase that dephosphorylates the proteins and enables them to rebind to the membrane. For sufficiently high enzymatic activity, the phase separation is replaced by travelling domains of acidic lipids and proteins. The latter active process is typical for nonequilibrium systems. It allows for a faster restructuring and polarization of the membrane since it acts on a larger length scale than the passive phase separation. The travelling domains can be pinned by spatial gradients in the activity; thus the membrane is able to detect spatial clues and can adapt its polarity dynamically to changes in the environment.

  11. Tight binding of NAP-22 with acidic membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Shohei; Kobayashi, Yuumi; Morita, Mitsuhiro; Suzaki, Toshinobu

    2015-07-23

    Recovery of various signal transduction molecules in the detergent-resistant membrane microdomain (DRM) fraction suggests the importance of this region in cellular functions. Insolubility of the outer leaflet of DRM to the non-ionic detergent is ascribed to the tight association of cholesterol and sphingolipid. Since, poor localization of sphingolipid is observed in the inner leaflet, the physicochemical background of the insolubility of the inner leaflet is hence still an enigma. NAP-22 (also called BASP1 or CAP-23) is a neuron-enriched calmodulin-binding protein and one of the major proteins in the DRM of the neuronal cell membrane. A previous study showed the presence of several lipids in a NAP-22 fraction after the process of extraction and column chromatography. In this study, the effect of lipid extraction on NAP-22 was studied through native-gel electrophoresis, ultracentrifugation, and electron microscopic observation. The mobility of NAP-22 in native-PAGE was shifted from low to high after delipidation. Delipidated NAP-22 bound phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylinosotol, and ganglioside. Some part of the mixture of PS and NAP-22 was recovered in the insoluble fraction after Triton X-100 treatment and the addition of cholesterol enhanced the amount of NAP-22 in the insoluble fraction.

  12. Coexisting role of fasting or feeding and dietary lipids in the control of gene expression of enzymes involved in the synthesis of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Sánchez González, Raúl; Sánchez García, Apolos M; Lòpez-Alarcòn, Mardia

    2012-03-15

    In the liver, maintaining lipid homeostasis is regulated by physiological and exogenous factors. These lipids are synthesized by Fasn, elongases and desaturases. Interactions in an organism among these factors are quite complex and, to date, relatively little is known about them. The aim of this study was to evaluate the coexisting role of physiological (insulin, fasting and feeding) and exogenous (dietary lipids) factors in the control of gene expression of Fasn, elongases and desaturases via Srebf-1c in liver from rats. Gene expression of encoding enzymes for fatty acid synthesis and fatty acid composition was evaluated in liver from rats in fasting and feeding (at 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after feeding) when food intake (adequate or high-lipid diet) was synchronized to a restricted period of 7h. Fasn, Scd and Fads2 were induced during 120 min after initial feeding in both dietary groups. This induction may be activated in part by insulin via Srebf-1c. Also, we showed for the first time that Elovl7 may be regulated by insulin and dietary lipids. The failure to synthesize saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids is consistent with a downregulation of Fasn and Scd, respectively, by dietary lipids. A higher content of LC-PUFAs was observed due to a high expression of Elovl2 and Elovl5, although Fads2 was suppressed by dietary lipids. Therefore, elongases may have a mechanism that is Srebf-1c-independent. This study suggests that a high-lipid diet triggers, during 120 min after initial feeding, a tight coordination among de novo lipogenesis, elongation, and desaturation and may not always be regulated by Srebf-1c. Finally, upregulation by feeding (insulin) of Fasn, Scd, Fads2 and Srebf-1c is insufficient to compensate for the inhibitory effect of dietary lipids.

  13. Increased hepatic Fatty Acid uptake and esterification contribute to tetracycline-induced steatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, You-Jin; Lee, Chae-Hyeon; Lee, Kang-Yo; Jung, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2015-06-01

    Tetracycline induces microvesicular steatosis, which has a poor long-term prognosis and a higher risk of steatohepatitis development compared with macrovesicular steatosis. Recent gene expression studies indicated that tetracycline treatment affects the expression of many genes associated with fatty acid transport and esterification. In this study, we investigated the role of fatty acid transport and esterification in tetracycline-induced steatosis. Intracellular lipid accumulation and the protein expression of fatty acid translocase (FAT or CD36) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) 2 were increased in both mouse liver and HepG2 cells treated with tetracycline at 50 mg/kg (intraperitoneal injection, i.p.) and 100 μM, respectively. Tetracycline increased the cellular uptake of boron-dipyrromethene-labeled C16 fatty acid, which was abolished by CD36 RNA interference. Oleate-induced cellular lipid accumulation was further enhanced by co-incubation with tetracycline. Tetracycline downregulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, which negatively regulated DGAT2 expression. U0126, a specific ERK inhibitor, also increased DGAT2 expression and cellular lipid accumulation. DGAT1 and 2 knock-down with specific small interfering (si)-RNA completely abrogated the steatogenic effect of tetracycline in HepG2 cells. Taken together, our data showed that tetracycline induces lipid accumulation by facilitating fatty acid transport and triglyceride esterification by upregulating CD36 and DGAT2, respectively.

  14. Hydroxyl radical induced by lipid in Maillard reaction model system promotes diet-derived N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine formation.

    PubMed

    Han, Lipeng; Li, Lin; Li, Bing; Zhao, Di; Li, Yuting; Xu, Zhenbo; Liu, Guoqin

    2013-10-01

    N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (CML) is commonly found in food, and is considered as a potential hazard to human health. However, the effect of lipids on CML formation in Maillard reaction is still not clarified. In this study, the content of diet-derived CML and its key intermediates, epsilon-fructoselysine (FL) and glyoxal (GO), is determined with high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrum (HPLC-MS) in model system containing lipid compounds. According to the results, hydroxyl radical (OH) induced by Fenton reagent can promote the three pathways of CML formation. Moreover, in the Maillard reaction system, linoleic acid (Lin), oleic acid (Ole) and glycerol trioleate (Tri) can induce more OH·, which promotes CML formation. Their level of promoting CML formation is in the order of Ole>Lin>Tri. On the contrary, glycerol (Gly) can scavenge OH·, which inhibit the CML formation. Finally, it is proved that FL content and GO content decreases with heating time in model system, while CML content increases with heating time. Thus, it is concluded that in the Maillard reaction system lipids can induce more OH·, which promotes the conversion from FL and GO to CML. Our research may contribute to the development of inhibitory methods for diet-derived CML by scavenging OH·.

  15. Studies in lipid histochemistry. XIII. The OPA (osmiumtetroxide-periodic acid-alpha-naphthylamine) method for the detection of apolar lipids.

    PubMed

    Elleder, M

    1975-09-29

    A new procedure for the detection of apolar lipids is described. It is a modification of the OTAN method (Adams, 1959) using periodic acid which oxidatively removes lower osmium derivatives from polar sites only, leaving those in apolar lipids intact and demonstrable with alpha-naphthylamine. Control steps for the exclusion of the possible interference of some less polar complex lipids and of lipopigments are described. The described technic is superior to the conventionally used sudan dyes due partly to the fact that only aqueous solutions are employed thus excluding any extraction of lipids, partly to the more distinct coloration.

  16. Inducing morphological changes in lipid bilayer membranes with microfabricated substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangjie; Collins, Liam F.; Ashkar, Rana; Heberle, Frederick A.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Collier, C. Patrick

    2016-11-01

    Lateral organization of lipids and proteins into distinct domains and anchoring to a cytoskeleton are two important strategies employed by biological membranes to carry out many cellular functions. However, these interactions are difficult to emulate with model systems. Here we use the physical architecture of substrates consisting of arrays of micropillars to systematically control the behavior of supported lipid bilayers - an important step in engineering model lipid membrane systems with well-defined functionalities. Competition between attractive interactions of supported lipid bilayers with the underlying substrate versus the energy cost associated with membrane bending at pillar edges can be systematically investigated as functions of pillar height and pitch, chemical functionalization of the microstructured substrate, and the type of unilamellar vesicles used for assembling the supported bilayer. Confocal fluorescent imaging and AFM measurements highlight correlations that exist between topological and mechanical properties of lipid bilayers and lateral lipid mobility in these confined environments. This study provides a baseline for future investigations into lipid domain reorganization on structured solid surfaces and scaffolds for cell growth.

  17. Glucose supplementation-induced changes in the Auxenochlorella protothecoides fatty acid composition suitable for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Krzemińska, Izabela; Oleszek, Marta

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluates the effect of different concentrations of glucose supplementation on growth, lipid accumulation, and the fatty acid profile in the Auxenochlorella protothecoides. Addition of glucose promoted the growth rate and decreased the chlorophyll content. Compared with photoautotrophic cells, an increase in the lipid content was observed in mixotrophic cells. The glucose addition induced changes in the fatty acid profile. Higher content of saturated fatty acids was found in the case of cells growing in the glucose-free medium. Oleic acid was the predominant component in mixotrophic cells supplemented with 5gL(-1) glucose, while linoleic acids dominated in cultures supplemented with both 1 and 3gL(-1) glucose. The use of glucose was associated with decreased levels of linolenic acid and PUFA. The changes in the fatty acid profile in mixotrophic cells are favourable for biodiesel production.

  18. Quercetin Inhibits LPS-Induced Inflammation and ox-LDL-Induced Lipid Deposition.

    PubMed

    Xue, Feng; Nie, Xiaobo; Shi, Jianping; Liu, Qingxue; Wang, Ziwei; Li, Xiting; Zhou, Jinqiu; Su, Jia; Xue, Mingming; Chen, Wei-Dong; Wang, Yan-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant activation of inflammation and excess accumulation of lipids play crucial role in the occurrence and progression of atherosclerosis (AS). Quercetin (QCT) has been tested effectively to cure AS. It is widely distributed in plant foods and has been proved to have potential antioxidative and anticancer activities. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of OCT in AS are not completely understood. In the present study, we stimulated murine RAW264.7 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL) to mimic the development of AS. The data show that QCT treatment leads to an obvious decrease of multiple inflammatory cytokines in transcript level, including interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) induced by LPS. Moreover, expressions of other factors that contribute to the AS development, such as matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) induced by LPS are also downregulated by QCT. Furthermore, we found that QCT suppressed LPS-induced the phosphorylation of STAT3. Meanwhile, QCT could ameliorate lipid deposition and overproduction of reactive oxygen species induced by ox-LDL, and block the expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) in cultured macrophages. Taken together, our data reveal that QCT has obvious anti-inflammatory and antioxidant virtues and could be a therapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of AS.

  19. Quercetin Inhibits LPS-Induced Inflammation and ox-LDL-Induced Lipid Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Feng; Nie, Xiaobo; Shi, Jianping; Liu, Qingxue; Wang, Ziwei; Li, Xiting; Zhou, Jinqiu; Su, Jia; Xue, Mingming; Chen, Wei-Dong; Wang, Yan-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant activation of inflammation and excess accumulation of lipids play crucial role in the occurrence and progression of atherosclerosis (AS). Quercetin (QCT) has been tested effectively to cure AS. It is widely distributed in plant foods and has been proved to have potential antioxidative and anticancer activities. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of OCT in AS are not completely understood. In the present study, we stimulated murine RAW264.7 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL) to mimic the development of AS. The data show that QCT treatment leads to an obvious decrease of multiple inflammatory cytokines in transcript level, including interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) induced by LPS. Moreover, expressions of other factors that contribute to the AS development, such as matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) induced by LPS are also downregulated by QCT. Furthermore, we found that QCT suppressed LPS-induced the phosphorylation of STAT3. Meanwhile, QCT could ameliorate lipid deposition and overproduction of reactive oxygen species induced by ox-LDL, and block the expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) in cultured macrophages. Taken together, our data reveal that QCT has obvious anti-inflammatory and antioxidant virtues and could be a therapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of AS. PMID:28217098

  20. Entry of Bluetongue Virus Capsid Requires the Late Endosome-specific Lipid Lysobisphosphatidic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Avnish; Mohl, Bjorn-Patrick; Roy, Polly

    2016-01-01

    The entry of viruses into host cells is one of the key processes of infection. The mechanisms of cellular entry for enveloped virus have been well studied. The fusion proteins as well as the facilitating cellular lipid factors involved in the viral fusion entry process have been well characterized. The process of non-enveloped virus cell entry, in comparison, remains poorly defined, particularly for large complex capsid viruses of the family Reoviridae, which comprises a range of mammalian pathogens. These viruses enter cells without the aid of a limiting membrane and thus cannot fuse with host cell membranes to enter cells. Instead, these viruses are believed to penetrate membranes of the host cell during endocytosis. However, the molecular mechanism of this process is largely undefined. Here we show, utilizing an in vitro liposome penetration assay and cell biology, that bluetongue virus (BTV), an archetypal member of the Reoviridae, utilizes the late endosome-specific lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid for productive membrane penetration and viral entry. Further, we provide preliminary evidence that lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid facilitates pore expansion during membrane penetration, suggesting a mechanism for lipid factor requirement of BTV. This finding indicates that despite the lack of a membrane envelope, the entry process of BTV is similar in specific lipid requirements to enveloped viruses that enter cells through the late endosome. These results are the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that a large non-enveloped virus of the Reoviridae has specific lipid requirements for membrane penetration and host cell entry. PMID:27036941

  1. Antioxidant action of Moringa oleifera Lam. (drumstick) against antitubercular drugs induced lipid peroxidation in rats.

    PubMed

    Ashok Kumar, N; Pari, L

    2003-01-01

    The protective effect of Moringa oleifera Lam. (Moringaceae) on hepatic marker enzymes, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidants was investigated during antitubercular drug (isoniazid, rifampicin, and pyrazinamide)-induced toxicity in rats. Enhanced hepatic marker enzymes and lipid peroxidation of antitubercular drug treatment was accompanied by a significant decrease in the levels of vitamin C, reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione S-transferase. Administration of Moringa oleifera extract and silymarin significantly decreased hepatic marker enzymes and lipid peroxidation with a simultaneous increase in the level of antioxidants. We speculate that Moringa oleifera extract exerts its protective effects by decreasing liver lipid peroxides and enhancing antioxidants.

  2. Enantioselective analysis of chiral anteiso fatty acids in the polar and neutral lipids of food.

    PubMed

    Hauff, Simone; Hottinger, Georg; Vetter, Walter

    2010-04-01

    Anteiso fatty acids (aFA) are substituted with a methyl group on the antepenultimate carbon of the straight acyl chain. This feature leads to a stereogenic center. The 12-methyltetradecanoic acid (a15:0) and the 14-methylhexadecanoic acid (a17:0) are the most common aFA found in food, although they occur only in very small quantities. In this study we used gas chromatography in combination with a chiral stationary phase to determine the enantiomeric distribution of both a15:0 and a17:0 in the neutral and polar lipids of aquatic food samples and cheese. The best suited column was selected out of four custom-made combinations of heptakis(6-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-2,3-di-O-methyl)-beta-cyclodextrin (beta-TBDM) with different amount and polarity of an achiral polysiloxane. After separation of polar and neutral lipids of the food samples by solid phase extraction, fatty acid methyl esters were prepared and the fatty acid methyl esters were fractionated by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. Measurements of fractions high in aFA by enantioselective GC/MS in the selected ion monitoring mode verified the dominance of the (S)-enantiomers of a15:0 and a17:0 in both lipid fractions. However (R)-enantiomers were detectable in all samples. The relative proportion of the (R)-enantiomers was up to fivefold higher in the polar lipids than in the neutral lipids. The higher proportions in the polar lipids indicate that microorganisms might be involved in the formation of (R)-aFA.

  3. Characteristic of lipids and fatty acid compositions of the neon flying squid, Ommastrephes bartramii.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    The lipids and fatty acids of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) were an-alyzed to clarify its lipid physiology and health benefit as marine food. Triacylglycerols were the only major component in the digestive gland (liver). In all other organs (mantle, arm, integument, and ovary), sterols and phospholipids were the major components with noticeable levels of ceramide aminoethyl phosphonate and sphingomyelin. The significant levels of sphingolipids suggest the O. bartramii lipids is a useful source for cosmetics. Although the lipid content between the liver and all other tissues markedly differed from each other, the same nine dominant fatty acids in the triacylglycerols were found in all organs; 14:0, 16:0, 18:0, 18:1n-9, 20:1n-9, 20:1n-11, 22:1n-11, 20:5n-3 (icosapentaenoic acid, EPA), and 22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid, DHA). Unusually high 20:1n-11 levels in the O. bartramii triacylglycerols were probably characteristic for western Pacific animal depot lipids, compared with non-detectable levels of 20:1n-11 reported in other marine animals. O. bartramii concurrently has high levels of DHA in their triacylglycerols. The major fatty acids in the phospholipids were 16:0, 18:0, 20:1n-9, EPA, and DHA without 20:1n-11. Markedly high levels of both EPA and DHA were observed in phosphatidylethanolamine, while only DHA was found as the major one in phosphatidylcholine. In particular, high levels of DHA were found both in its depot triacylglycerols and tissue phospholipids in all organs of O. bartramii, similar to that in highly migratory fishes. The high DHA levels in all its organs suggest that O. bartramii lipids is a healthy marine source for DHA supplements.

  4. Dietary lipids modify the fatty acid composition of cartilage, isolated chondrocytes and matrix vesicles.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Watkins, B A; Adkisson, H D

    1994-09-01

    The effects of dietary lipids on the fatty acid composition of hyaline cartilage, epiphyseal chondrocytes (EC) and matrix vesicles (MV) were evaluated in chicks. A basal semipurified diet was fed to chicks containing one of the following lipid sources at 70 g/kg: soybean oil, butter+corn oil, margarine+corn oil or menhaden oil+corn oil (MEC). Articular and epiphyseal growth cartilage were isolated from the proximal tibiotarsus; EC and MV were subsequently released by trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4) and collagenase (EC 3.4.24.3) digestion followed by ultracentrifugation. The fatty acid composition of polar lipids in chick epiphyseal cartilage at three and six weeks, as well as articular cartilage, EC and MV at eight weeks of age revealed the presence of high levels of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids (up to 85.5%) but low levels of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (2.6-10.2%). Mead acid (20:3n-9, > 3%) was also present in cartilage, EC and MV lipids, and was unaffected by the dietary lipid treatments. Total n-3 PUFA concentrations were the highest in cartilage, EC and MV of chicks consuming MEC. Feeding MEC lowered the levels of 20:4n-6 in cartilage, but increased 20:5n-3 levels. The data are consistent with those reported previously which showed that cartilage tissues are low in n-6 PUFA and that they contain 20:3n-9. We furthermore demonstrated that the PUFA composition of cartilage can be modified by dietary lipids.

  5. Maresin 1, a Proresolving Lipid Mediator, Mitigates Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Liver Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruidong; Wang, Yaxin; Zhao, Ende; Wu, Ke; Li, Wei; Shi, Liang; Wang, Di; Xie, Gengchen; Yin, Yuping; Deng, Meizhou; Zhang, Peng; Tao, Kaixiong

    2016-01-01

    Maresin 1 (MaR 1) was recently reported to have protective properties in several different animal models of acute inflammation by inhibiting inflammatory response. However, its function in acute liver injury is still unknown. To address this question, we induced liver injury in BALB/c mice with intraperitoneal injection of carbon tetrachloride with or without treatment of MaR 1. Our data showed that MaR 1 attenuated hepatic injury, oxidative stress, and lipid peroxidation induced by carbon tetrachloride, as evidenced by increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and reactive oxygen species levels were inhibited by treatment of MaR 1. Furthermore, MaR 1 increased activities of antioxidative mediators in carbon tetrachloride-treated mice liver. MaR 1 decreased indices of inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, monocyte chemotactic protein 1, myeloperoxidase, cyclooxygenase-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Administration of MaR 1 inhibited activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κb) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the liver of CCl4 treated mice. In conclusion, these results suggested the antioxidative, anti-inflammatory properties of MaR 1 in CCl4 induced liver injury. The possible mechanism is partly implicated in its abilities to inhibit ROS generation and activation of NF-κb and MAPK pathway. PMID:26881046

  6. Fatty acid analysis tool (FAAT): An FT-ICR MS lipid analysis algorithm.

    PubMed

    Leavell, Michael D; Leary, Julie A

    2006-08-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is becoming an established tool for the investigation of lipids. As the methods for lipid analysis become more mature and their throughput increases, computer algorithms for the interpretation of such data will become a necessity. Toward this end, an algorithm dedicated to the analysis of Fourier transform mass spectral data from lipid extracts has been developed. The algorithm, Fatty Acid Analysis Tool, termed FAAT, has been successfully used to investigate complex lipid extracts containing thousands of components, from various species of mycobacteria including M. tuberculosis and M. abscessus. FAAT is rapid, generally taking tens of seconds to interpret multiple spectra, and accessible to most users as it is implemented in Microsoft Excel Visual Basic Software. In the reduction of data, FAAT begins by scaling spectra (i.e., to account for dilution factors), identifying monoisotopic ions, and assigning isotope packets. Unique features of FAAT include the following: (1) overlapping saturated and unsaturated lipid species can be distinguished, (2) known ions are assigned from a user-defined library including species that possess methylene heterogeneity, (3) and isotopic shifts from stable isotope labeling experiments are identified and assigned (up to a user-defined maximum). In addition, abundance differences between samples grown under normal and stressed conditions can be determined. In the analysis of mycobacterial lipid extracts, FAAT has successfully identified isotopic shifts from incorporation of 15N in M. abscessus. Additionally, FAAT has been used to successfully determine differences in lipid abundances between M. tuberculosis wild-type and mutant strains.

  7. Roles of Chlorogenic Acid on Regulating Glucose and Lipids Metabolism: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Shengxi; Cao, Jianmei; Feng, Qin; Peng, Jinghua; Hu, Yiyang

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular glucose and lipid metabolic homeostasis is vital for maintaining basic life activities of a cell or an organism. Glucose and lipid metabolic disorders are closely related with the occurrence and progression of diabetes, obesity, hepatic steatosis, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Chlorogenic acid (CGA), one of the most abundant polyphenol compounds in the human diet, is a group of phenolic secondary metabolites produced by certain plant species and is an important component of coffee. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that CGA exerts many biological properties, including antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticarcinogenic activities. Recently, the roles and applications of CGA, particularly in relation to glucose and lipid metabolism, have been highlighted. This review addresses current studies investigating the roles of CGA in glucose and lipid metabolism. PMID:24062792

  8. Increased Hepatic Fatty Acids Uptake and Oxidation by LRPPRC-Driven Oxidative Phosphorylation Reduces Blood Lipid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shi; Sun, Run-zhu; Wang, Di; Gong, Mei-zhen; Su, Xiang-ping; Yi, Fei; Peng, Zheng-wu

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is one of the major risk factors of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. This study aimed to investigate the impact of leucine rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing protein (LRPPRC)-driven hepatic oxidative phoshorylation on blood lipid levels. The hepatic LRPPRC level was modulated by liver-specific transgenic or adeno-associated virus 8 carried shRNA targeting Lrpprc (aav-shLrpprc). Mice were fed with a high fat diet to induce obesity. Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and / or western blot. The hepatic ATP level, hepatic and serum lipids contents, and mitochondria oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) complex activities were measured using specific assay kits. The uptake and oxidation of fatty acid by hepatocytes were assessed using 14C-palmitate. LRPPRC regulated the expression of genes encoded by mitochondrial genome but not those by nuclear genome involved in mitochondria biogenesis, OxPhos, and lipid metabolism. Increased OxPhos in liver mediated by LRPPRC resulted in the increase of hepatic ATP level. Lrpprc promoted palmitate uptake and oxidation by hypatocytes. The hepatic and serum triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were inversely associated with the hepatic LRPPRC level. These data demonstrated that LRPPRC-driven hepatic OxPhos could promote fatty acids uptake and oxidation by hepatocytes and reduce both hepatic and circulating triglyceride and cholesterol levels. PMID:27462273

  9. Fatty acid metabolism in L1210 murine leukemia cells: differences in modification of fatty acids incorporated into various lipids.

    PubMed

    Burns, C P; Wei, S P; Spector, A A

    1978-10-01

    L1210 leukemia cells can utilize all of the main fatty acids that normally are present in the ascites fluid in which they grow. This finding is consistent with the view that L1210 cells derive most of their fatty acids from the ascites fluid. From 80--90% of each fatty acid was incorporated into cell lipids without structural modification, suggesting that the lipid composition of these cells can be altered by changing the type of fatty acids to which they are exposed. Most importantly, the palmitate that was subsequently incorporated into total cell phospholipids was elongated and desaturated somewhat more than that incorporated into triglycerides. This difference was due primarily to more extensive modification of the palmitate incorporated into the ethanolamine phosphoglycerides fraction. Although there was no difference between total phospholipids and triglycerides with linoleate, more of the linoleate incorporated into ethanolamine phosphoglycerides was elongated and further desaturated than that incorporated into choline phosphoglycerides and triglycerides. These findings indicate fatty acids incorporated into various cell lipid fractions are not structurally modified to the same extent. There appears to be greater modification of fatty acid used for ethanolamine phosphoglyceride synthesis as compared with triglyceride and choline phosphoglyceride synthesis.

  10. Lipids and fatty acids in Calanus sinicus during over-summering in the southern Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanqing; Li, Chaolun; Liu, Mengtan; Jin, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Over-summering is a crucial period for Calanus sinicus in the southern Yellow Sea, where it is a key member of the zooplankton community. Lipids play an important role in copepod diapause, which is part of their over-summering strategy. We investigated how different fatty acids and lipid classes, including wax esters, changed during over-summering of C. sinicus during three cruises in June and August 2011 and November 2010, corresponding to the pre-, during and post- diapause periods, respectively. Large amounts of lipids were accumulated, mainly wax esters as previously found in C. finmarchicus during its diapause, and most of the storage lipids were used during over-summering. Wax ester polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) showed the most variation of the fatty acids (FAs), while the percentage composition of FAs in polar lipids was relatively stable. Selective use of wax ester PUFAs has already been shown to play important roles in the winter diapause of Calanus species in other regions, and our FA results show that this is the case for the YSCBW population that diapauses in summer.

  11. Age-Specific Lipid and Fatty Acid Profiles of Atlantic Salmon Juveniles in the Varzuga River

    PubMed Central

    Murzina, Svetlana A.; Nefedova, Zinaida A.; Pekkoeva, Svetlana N.; Veselov, Alexey E.; Efremov, Denis A.; Nemova, Nina N.

    2016-01-01

    The age-specific lipid and fatty acid profiles of juvenile Atlantic salmon at different ages (0+, 1+, and 2+ years) after hatching from nests located in the mainstream of a large Arctic River, the Varzuga River, and resettling to the favorable Sobachji shoal in autumn before overwinter are herein presented. The contemporary methods of the lipid analysis were used: thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography. The results show that the stability of the regulation of important functions in developing organisms is maintained through structural alterations in lipids. These alterations can be considered as a sequence of the modifications and changes in the ratios of certain lipid classes and fatty acids constituents. In general, changes in the lipids and fatty acids (FAs) maintained the physiological limits and controls through the adaptive systems of the organism. The mechanisms of juvenile fish biochemical adaptation to the environmental conditions in the studied biotope include the modification of the energy metabolism and anabolism, and here belongs to the energy characteristics of metabolic processes. PMID:27376274

  12. Age-Specific Lipid and Fatty Acid Profiles of Atlantic Salmon Juveniles in the Varzuga River.

    PubMed

    Murzina, Svetlana A; Nefedova, Zinaida A; Pekkoeva, Svetlana N; Veselov, Alexey E; Efremov, Denis A; Nemova, Nina N

    2016-06-30

    The age-specific lipid and fatty acid profiles of juvenile Atlantic salmon at different ages (0+, 1+, and 2+ years) after hatching from nests located in the mainstream of a large Arctic River, the Varzuga River, and resettling to the favorable Sobachji shoal in autumn before overwinter are herein presented. The contemporary methods of the lipid analysis were used: thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography. The results show that the stability of the regulation of important functions in developing organisms is maintained through structural alterations in lipids. These alterations can be considered as a sequence of the modifications and changes in the ratios of certain lipid classes and fatty acids constituents. In general, changes in the lipids and fatty acids (FAs) maintained the physiological limits and controls through the adaptive systems of the organism. The mechanisms of juvenile fish biochemical adaptation to the environmental conditions in the studied biotope include the modification of the energy metabolism and anabolism, and here belongs to the energy characteristics of metabolic processes.

  13. Modulation of lipid rafts by Omega-3 fatty acids in inflammation and cancer: implications for use of lipids during nutrition support.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Rafat A; Harvey, Kevin A; Zaloga, Gary P; Stillwell, William

    2007-02-01

    Current understanding of biologic membrane structure and function is largely based on the concept of lipid rafts. Lipid rafts are composed primarily of tightly packed, liquid-ordered sphingolipids/cholesterol/saturated phospholipids that float in a sea of more unsaturated and loosely packed, liquid-disordered lipids. Lipid rafts have important clinical implications because many important membrane-signaling proteins are located within the raft regions of the membrane, and alterations in raft structure can alter activity of these signaling proteins. Because rafts are lipid-based, their composition, structure, and function are susceptible to manipulation by dietary components such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and by cholesterol depletion. We review how alteration of raft lipids affects the raft/nonraft localization and hence the function of several proteins involved in cell signaling. We focus our discussion of raft-signaling proteins on inflammation and cancer.

  14. Unsaturated fatty acids induce non-canonical autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Niso-Santano, Mireia; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Pietrocola, Federico; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Mariño, Guillermo; Cianfanelli, Valentina; Ben-Younès, Amena; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Markaki, Maria; Sica, Valentina; Izzo, Valentina; Chaba, Kariman; Bauvy, Chantal; Dupont, Nicolas; Kepp, Oliver; Rockenfeller, Patrick; Wolinski, Heimo; Madeo, Frank; Lavandero, Sergio; Codogno, Patrice; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Cecconi, Francesco; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-01-01

    To obtain mechanistic insights into the cross talk between lipolysis and autophagy, two key metabolic responses to starvation, we screened the autophagy-inducing potential of a panel of fatty acids in human cancer cells. Both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids such as palmitate and oleate, respectively, triggered autophagy, but the underlying molecular mechanisms differed. Oleate, but not palmitate, stimulated an autophagic response that required an intact Golgi apparatus. Conversely, autophagy triggered by palmitate, but not oleate, required AMPK, PKR and JNK1 and involved the activation of the BECN1/PIK3C3 lipid kinase complex. Accordingly, the downregulation of BECN1 and PIK3C3 abolished palmitate-induced, but not oleate-induced, autophagy in human cancer cells. Moreover, Becn1+/− mice as well as yeast cells and nematodes lacking the ortholog of human BECN1 mounted an autophagic response to oleate, but not palmitate. Thus, unsaturated fatty acids induce a non-canonical, phylogenetically conserved, autophagic response that in mammalian cells relies on the Golgi apparatus. PMID:25586377

  15. Glucagon-induced acetylation of Foxa2 regulates hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    von Meyenn, Ferdinand; Porstmann, Thomas; Gasser, Emanuel; Selevsek, Nathalie; Schmidt, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi; Stoffel, Markus

    2013-03-05

    Circulating levels of insulin and glucagon reflect the nutritional state of animals and elicit regulatory responses in the liver that maintain glucose and lipid homeostasis. The transcription factor Foxa2 activates lipid metabolism and ketogenesis during fasting and is inhibited via insulin-PI3K-Akt signaling-mediated phosphorylation at Thr156 and nuclear exclusion. Here we show that, in addition, Foxa2 is acetylated at the conserved residue Lys259 following inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) class I-III and the cofactors p300 and SirT1 are involved in Foxa2 acetylation and deacetylation, respectively. Physiologically, fasting states and glucagon stimulation are sufficient to induce Foxa2 acetylation. Introduction of the acetylation-mimicking (K259Q) or -deficient (K259R) mutations promotes or inhibits Foxa2 activity, respectively, and adenoviral expression of Foxa2-K259Q augments expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis. Our study reveals a molecular mechanism by which glucagon signaling activates a fasting response through acetylation of Foxa2.

  16. Rapid lipid enrichment in omega3 fatty acids: liver data.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Yvon A; Peltier, Sebastien; Portois, Laurence; Sener, Abdullah; Malaisse, Willy J

    2008-03-01

    The bolus intravenous injection of a novel medium-chain triglyceride:fish oil emulsion to normal subjects was recently reported to enrich within 60 min the phospholipid content of leucocytes and platelets in long-chain polyunsaturated omega3 fatty acids. The present study, conducted in second generation omega3-depleted rats, aims at investigating whether such a procedure may also increase within 60 min the phospholipid content of omega3 fatty acids in cells located outwards of the bloodstream, in this case liver cells, and whether this coincides with correction of the perturbation in the liver triglyceride fatty acid content and profile otherwise prevailing in these rats. The results indicate that such is indeed the case and further suggest a cause-to-effect relationship between the two events.

  17. Rapid lipid enrichment in omega3 fatty acids: cause-to-effect relationships.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Yvon A; Peltier, Sebastien; Portois, Laurence; Sener, Abdullah; Malaisse, Willy J

    2008-03-01

    The bolus intravenous administration of a novel medium-chain triglyceride:fish oil emulsion to second generation rats depleted in long-chain polyunsaturated omega3 fatty acids was recently found to enrich within 60 min the content of both plasma and liver lipids in such omega3 fatty acids, this coinciding with correction of the perturbation in liver triglyceride fatty acid content and profile otherwise prevailing in these rats. The present report draws attention to cause-to-effect relationships between changes in liver phospholipid and triglyceride fatty acid content and/or pattern operative under these experimental conditions.

  18. Direct comparison of fatty acid ratios in single cellular lipid droplets as determined by comparative Raman spectroscopy and gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Schie, Iwan W; Nolte, Lena; Pedersen, Theresa L; Smith, Zach; Wu, Jian; Yahiatène, Idir; Newman, John W; Huser, Thomas

    2013-11-07

    Cellular lipid droplets are the least studied and least understood cellular organelles in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Despite a significant body of research studying the physiology of lipid droplets it has not yet been possible to fully determine the composition of individual cellular lipid droplets. In this paper we use Raman spectroscopy on single cellular lipid droplets and least-squares fitting of pure fatty acid spectra to determine the composition of individual lipid droplets in cells after treatment with different ratios of oleic and palmitic acid. We validate the results of the Raman spectroscopy-based single lipid droplet analysis with results obtained by gas chromatography analysis of millions of cells, and find that our approach can accurately predict the relative amount of a specific fatty acid in the lipid droplet. Based on these results we show that the fatty acid composition in individual lipid droplets is on average similar to that of all lipid droplets found in the sample. Furthermore, we expand this approach to the investigation of the lipid composition in single cellular peroxisomes. We determine the location of cellular peroxisomes based on two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of peroxisomes labeled with the green fluorescent protein, and successive Raman spectroscopy of peroxisomes. We find that in some cases peroxisomes can produce a detectable CARS signal, and that the peroxisomal Raman spectra exhibit an oleic acid-like signature.

  19. Effects of dietary fats on plasma lipids and lipoproteins: an hypothesis for the lipid-lowering effect of unsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Spritz, Norton; Mishkel, Maurice A.

    1969-01-01

    Several aspects of the effects of dietary fat on plasma lipids and lipoproteins were investigated in 12 subjects during the long-term feeding of formulas containing 40% of their calories as either saturated or unsaturated fats. The changes in fatty acid composition of plasma lipids, shown previously to occur after prolonged feedings of a dietary fat, required 10-14 days to be complete and were synchronous with the effect of the fat on plasma lipid concentrations. The change in lipid concentration occurred in low but not in high density lipoproteins. The effects on lipid levels of the low density lipoproteins were found to occur with little or no effect on the concentration of the protein moiety of these lipoproteins; as a result, cholesterol- and phospholipid to protein ratios in low density lipoproteins fell during unsaturated fat feeding. The effects of dietary fat on plasma phospholipids were studied in detail: the relative amounts of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, sphingomyelin, and lysophosphatidylcholine were unaffected by the type of dietary fat. However, the molecular species of phosphatidylcholine were markedly affected. More than 90% of the fatty acids at the α-position were saturated during both saturated and unsaturated feedings. In contrast, during unsaturated feedings, linoleate at the β-position outnumbered oleate by approximately 4:1, whereas during saturated feedings these two types of fatty acids were present in nearly equal amounts. This paper also presents the following hypothesis for the lipid-lowering effect of unsaturated dietary fat: since unsaturated fatty acids occupy a greater area than saturated acids, they alter the spatial configuration of the lipids into which they are incorporated; as a result, fewer lipid molecules can be accommodated by the apoprotein of the low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and thus the lipid content of the lipoprotein is lowered. The experimental findings of this study, while not proving this

  20. Sulforaphane induces adipocyte browning and promotes glucose and lipid utilization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui Q.; Chen, Shi Y.; Wang, An S.; Yao, An J.; Fu, Jian F.; Zhao, Jin S.; Chen, Fen; Zou, Zu Q.; Shan, Yu J.; Bao, Yong P.

    2016-01-01

    1 Scope Obesity is closely related to the imbalance of white adipose tissue storing excess calories, and brown adipose tissue dissipating energy to produce heat in mammals. Recent studies revealed that acquisition of brown characteristics by white adipocytes, termed “browning,” may positively contribute to cellular bioenergetics and metabolism homeostasis. The goal was to investigate the putative effects of natural antioxidant sulforaphane (1‐isothiocyanate‐4‐methyl‐sulfonyl butane; SFN) on browning of white adipocytes. 2 Methods and results 3T3‐L1 mature white adipocytes were treated with SFN for 48 h, and then the mitochondrial content, function, and energy utilization were assessed. SFN was found to induce 3T3‐L1 adipocytes browning based on the increased mitochondrial content and activity of respiratory chain enzymes, whereas the mechanism involved the upregulation of nuclear factor E2‐related factor 2/sirtuin1/peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha signaling. SFN enhanced uncoupling protein 1 expression, a marker for brown adipocyte, leading to the decrease in cellular ATP. SFN also enhanced glucose uptake and oxidative utilization, lipolysis, and fatty acid oxidation in 3T3‐L1 adipocytes. 3 Conclusion SFN‐induced browning of white adipocytes enhanced the utilization of cellular fuel, and application of SFN is a promising strategy to combat obesity and obesity‐related metabolic disorder. PMID:27218607

  1. Acid sphingomyelinase activity is regulated by membrane lipids and facilitates cholesterol transfer by NPC2[S

    PubMed Central

    Oninla, Vincent O.; Breiden, Bernadette; Babalola, Jonathan O.; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    During endocytosis, membrane components move to intraluminal vesicles of the endolysosomal compartment for digestion. At the late endosomes, cholesterol is sorted out mainly by two sterol-binding proteins, Niemann-Pick protein type C (NPC)1 and NPC2. To study the NPC2-mediated intervesicular cholesterol transfer, we developed a liposomal assay system. (Abdul-Hammed, M., B. Breiden, M. A. Adebayo, J. O. Babalola, G. Schwarzmann, and K. Sandhoff. 2010. Role of endosomal membrane lipids and NPC2 in cholesterol transfer and membrane fusion. J. Lipid Res. 51: 1747–1760.) Anionic lipids stimulate cholesterol transfer between liposomes while SM inhibits it, even in the presence of anionic bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP). Preincubation of vesicles containing SM with acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) (SM phosphodiesterase, EC 3.1.4.12) results in hydrolysis of SM to ceramide (Cer), which enhances cholesterol transfer. Besides SM, ASM also cleaves liposomal phosphatidylcholine. Anionic phospholipids derived from the plasma membrane (phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidic acid) stimulate SM and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by ASM more effectively than BMP, which is generated during endocytosis. ASM-mediated hydrolysis of liposomal SM was also stimulated by incorporation of diacylglycerol (DAG), Cer, and free fatty acids into the liposomal membranes. Conversely, phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis was inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol, Cer, DAG, monoacylglycerol, and fatty acids. Our data suggest that SM degradation by ASM is required for physiological secretion of cholesterol from the late endosomal compartment, and is a key regulator of endolysosomal lipid digestion. PMID:25339683

  2. Dietary α-linolenic acid-rich flaxseed oil prevents against alcoholic hepatic steatosis via ameliorating lipid homeostasis at adipose tissue-liver axis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Feng, Kun; He, Chengwei; Li, Peng; Hu, Yuan-Jia; Su, Huanxing; Wan, Jian-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Low levels of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in serum and liver tissue biopsies are the common characteristics in patients with alcoholic liver disease. The α-linolenic acid (ALA) is a plant-derived n-3 PUFA and is rich in flaxseed oil. However, the impact of ALA on alcoholic fatty liver is largely unknown. In this study, we assessed the potential protective effects of ALA-rich flaxseed oil (FO) on ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and observed that dietary FO supplementation effectively attenuated the ethanol-induced hepatic lipid accumulation in mice. Ethanol exposure stimulated adipose lipolysis but reduced fatty acid/lipid uptake, which were normalized by FO. Our investigations into the corresponding mechanisms demonstrated that the ameliorating effect of FO might be associated with the lower endoplasmic reticulum stress and normalized lipid metabolism in adipose tissue. In the liver, alcohol exposure stimulated hepatic fatty acid uptake and triglyceride synthesis, which were attenuated by FO. Additionally, dietary FO upregulated plasma adiponectin concentration, hepatic adiponectin receptor 2 expression, and the activation of hepatic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase. Collectively, dietary FO protects against alcoholic hepatic steatosis by improving lipid homeostasis at the adipose tissue-liver axis, suggesting that dietary ALA-rich flaxseed oil might be a promising approach for prevention of alcoholic fatty liver. PMID:27220557

  3. Changes in the Total Lipid, Neutral Lipid, Phospholipid and Fatty Acid Composition of Phospholipid Fractions during Pastırma Processing, a Dry-Cured Meat Product

    PubMed Central

    Aksu, Muhammet Irfan; Dogan, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Pastırma is a dry-cured meat product, produced from whole beef or water buffalo muscles. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of production stages (raw meat, after curing, after 2nd drying and pastırma) on the total lipid, neutral lipid, phospholipid and fatty acid composition of phospholipid fraction of pastırma produced from beef M. Longissimus dorsi muscles. The pH and colour (L*, a* and b*) analyses were also performed in raw meat and pastırma. It was found that pastırma production stages had significant effects (p<0.01) on the total amounts of lipid, neutral lipid and phospholipid, and the highest amounts of lipid, neutral lipid and phospholipid were detected in pastırma. In pastırma, neutral lipid ratio was determined as 79.33±2.06% and phospholipid ratio as 20.67±2.06%. Phospholipids was proportionately lower in pastırma than raw meat. Pastırma production stages affected pentadecanoic acid (15:1) (p<0.01), linoleic acid (18:2n-6) (p<0.05), γ-linoleic acid (18:3n-6) (p<0.05), erucic acid (22:1n-9) (p<0.05), docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-6) (p<0.05), total unsaturated fatty acid (ΣUSFA) (p<0.05) and total saturated fatty acid (ΣSFA) (p<0.05) ratios of phospholipid fraction and also the moisture content (p<0.01). Pastırma process also affected pH and colour (L*, a* and b*) values (p<0.01), and these values were higher in pastırma than raw meat. PMID:28316467

  4. Electron transfer induced fragmentation of acetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Meneses, G.; Almeida, D.; Limão-Vieira, P.

    2014-04-01

    We present negative ion formation driven by electron transfer in atom (K) molecule (acetic acid) collisions. Acetic acid has been found in the interstellar medium, is also considered a biological related compound and as such studying low energy electron interactions will bring new insights as far as induced chemistry is concerned.

  5. Excess Folic Acid Increases Lipid Storage, Weight Gain, and Adipose Tissue Inflammation in High Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Karen B.; Kennelly, John P.; Ordonez, Marta; Nelson, Randal; Leonard, Kelly; Stabler, Sally; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio; Field, Catherine J.; Jacobs, René L.

    2016-01-01

    Folic acid intake has increased to high levels in many countries, raising concerns about possible adverse effects, including disturbances to energy and lipid metabolism. Our aim was to investigate the effects of excess folic acid (EFA) intake compared to adequate folic acid (AFA) intake on metabolic health in a rodent model. We conducted these investigations in the setting of either a 15% energy low fat (LF) diet or 60% energy high fat (HF) diet. There was no difference in weight gain, fat mass, or glucose tolerance in EFA-fed rats compared to AFA-fed rats when they were fed a LF diet. However, rats fed EFA in combination with a HF diet had significantly greater weight gain and fat mass compared to rats fed AFA (p < 0.05). Gene expression analysis showed increased mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and some of its target genes in adipose tissue of high fat-excess folic acid (HF-EFA) fed rats. Inflammation was increased in HF-EFA fed rats, associated with impaired glucose tolerance compared to high fat-adequate folic acid (HF-AFA) fed rats (p < 0.05). In addition, folic acid induced PPARγ expression and triglyceride accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells. Our results suggest that excess folic acid may exacerbate weight gain, fat accumulation, and inflammation caused by consumption of a HF diet. PMID:27669293

  6. Excess Folic Acid Increases Lipid Storage, Weight Gain, and Adipose Tissue Inflammation in High Fat Diet-Fed Rats.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Karen B; Kennelly, John P; Ordonez, Marta; Nelson, Randal; Leonard, Kelly; Stabler, Sally; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio; Field, Catherine J; Jacobs, René L

    2016-09-23

    Folic acid intake has increased to high levels in many countries, raising concerns about possible adverse effects, including disturbances to energy and lipid metabolism. Our aim was to investigate the effects of excess folic acid (EFA) intake compared to adequate folic acid (AFA) intake on metabolic health in a rodent model. We conducted these investigations in the setting of either a 15% energy low fat (LF) diet or 60% energy high fat (HF) diet. There was no difference in weight gain, fat mass, or glucose tolerance in EFA-fed rats compared to AFA-fed rats when they were fed a LF diet. However, rats fed EFA in combination with a HF diet had significantly greater weight gain and fat mass compared to rats fed AFA (p < 0.05). Gene expression analysis showed increased mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and some of its target genes in adipose tissue of high fat-excess folic acid (HF-EFA) fed rats. Inflammation was increased in HF-EFA fed rats, associated with impaired glucose tolerance compared to high fat-adequate folic acid (HF-AFA) fed rats (p < 0.05). In addition, folic acid induced PPARγ expression and triglyceride accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells. Our results suggest that excess folic acid may exacerbate weight gain, fat accumulation, and inflammation caused by consumption of a HF diet.

  7. Reversible phenotypic modulation induced by deprivation of exogenous essential fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Laposata, M; Minda, M; Capriotti, A M; Hartman, E J; Furth, E E; Iozzo, R V

    1988-12-01

    Essential fatty acid deficiency, produced by deprivation of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids, is a condition characterized by renal disease, dermatitis, and infertility. Although many of the biochemical aspects of this disorder have been investigated, little is known about the ultrastructural changes induced by essential fatty acid deficiency. Using a unique fatty acid-deficient cell line (EFD-1), which demonstrates the in vivo fatty acid changes of essential fatty acid deficiency, and the prostaglandin E2-producing mouse fibrosarcoma line from which it was derived (HSDM1C1), we correlated ultrastructural and biochemical changes induced by prolonged deprivation of all exogenous lipids and subsequent repletion of selected essential fatty acids. We found that in cells deprived of all exogenous lipids, there was dilation of rough endoplasmic reticulum and an associated defect in protein secretion; these changes were specifically reversed by arachidonate. There was also an accumulation of secondary lysosomes containing degraded membranes in these cells with an associated increase in phospholipids relative to parent HSDM1C1 cells. Cytoplasmic lipid bodies present in parent cells disappeared, with an associated decrease in triacylglycerol. After just 2 days in lipid-free medium, all these changes were apparent, and prostaglandin E2 production was markedly impaired despite normal amounts of cellular arachidonate. Incubation of EFD-1 cells with arachidonate, the major prostaglandin precursor fatty acid, induced a reversion to the HSDM1C1 phenotype, whereas other fatty acids were totally ineffective. These results indicate changes in fatty acid metabolism in essential fatty acid deficiency are associated with marked alterations in ultrastructure and secretion of protein from cells.

  8. A conditional mutant of the fatty acid synthase unveils unexpected cross talks in mycobacterial lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cabruja, Matías; Mondino, Sonia; Tsai, Yi Ting; Lara, Julia; Gramajo, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    Unlike most bacteria, mycobacteria rely on the multi-domain enzyme eukaryote-like fatty acid synthase I (FAS I) to make fatty acids de novo. These metabolites are precursors of the biosynthesis of most of the lipids present both in the complex mycobacteria cell wall and in the storage lipids inside the cell. In order to study the role of the type I FAS system in Mycobacterium lipid metabolism in vivo, we constructed a conditional mutant in the fas-acpS operon of Mycobacterium smegmatis and analysed in detail the impact of reduced de novo fatty acid biosynthesis on the global architecture of the cell envelope. As expected, the mutant exhibited growth defect in the non-permissive condition that correlated well with the lower expression of fas-acpS and the concomitant reduction of FAS I, confirming that FAS I is essential for survival. The reduction observed in FAS I provoked an accumulation of its substrates, acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA, and a strong reduction of C12 to C18 acyl-CoAs, but not of long-chain acyl-CoAs (C19 to C24). The most intriguing result was the ability of the mutant to keep synthesizing mycolic acids when fatty acid biosynthesis was impaired. A detailed comparative lipidomic analysis showed that although reduced FAS I levels had a strong impact on fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis, mycolic acids were still being synthesized in the mutant, although with a different relative species distribution. However, when triacylglycerol degradation was inhibited, mycolic acid biosynthesis was significantly reduced, suggesting that storage lipids could be an intracellular reservoir of fatty acids for the biosynthesis of complex lipids in mycobacteria. Understanding the interaction between FAS I and the metabolic pathways that rely on FAS I products is a key step to better understand how lipid homeostasis is regulated in this microorganism and how this regulation could play a role during infection in pathogenic mycobacteria. PMID:28228470

  9. Antioxidant properties of aqueous extracts of unripe Musa paradisiaca on sodium nitroprusside induced lipid peroxidation in rat pancreas in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shodehinde, Sidiqat Adamson; Oboh, Ganiyu

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare antioxidant activities of the aqueous extracts of unripe plantain (Musa paradisiaca), assess their inhibitory action on sodium nitroprusside induced lipid peroxidation in rat pancreas in vitro and to characterize the main phenolic constituents of the plantain products using gas chromatography analysis. Methods Aqueous extracts of plantain products (raw, elastic pastry, roasted and boiled) flour of 0.1 g/mL (each) were used to determine their total phenol, total flavonoid, 1,1 diphenyl-2 picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and hydroxyl (OH) radical scavenging ability. The inhibitory effect of the extracts on sodium nitroprusside induced lipid peroxidation was also determined. Results The results revealed that all the aqueous extracts showed antioxidant activity. The boiled flour had highest DPPH and OH radical scavenging ability while raw flour had the highest Fe2+ chelating ability, sodium nitroprusside inhibitory effect and vitamin C content. The antioxidant results showed that elastic pastry had the highest total phenol and total flavonoid content. Characterization of the unripe plantain products for polyphenol contents using gas chromatography showed varied quantity of apigenin, myricetin, luteolin, capsaicin, isorhaemnetin, caffeic acid, kampferol, quercetin, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, shogaol, glycitein and gingerol per product on the spectra. Conclusions Considering the antioxidant activities and ability to inhibit lipid peroxidation of unripe plantain, this could justify their traditional use in the management/prevention of diseases related to stress. PMID:23730557

  10. Metabolism of xenobiotic carboxylic acids: focus on coenzyme A conjugation, reactivity, and interference with lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Darnell, Malin; Weidolf, Lars

    2013-08-19

    While xenobiotic carboxylic acids (XCAs) have been studied extensively with respect to their enzymatic conversion to potentially reactive acyl glucuronides with implications to drug induced hepatotoxicity, the formation of xenobiotic-S-acyl-CoA thioesters (xenobiotic-CoAs) have been much less studied in spite of data indicating that such conjugates may be equally or more reactive than the corresponding acyl glucuronides. This review addresses enzymes and cell organelles involved in the formation of xenobiotic-CoAs, the reactivity of such conjugates toward biological macromolecules, and in vitro and in vivo methodology to assess consequences of such reactivity. Further, the propensity of xenobiotic-CoAs to interfere with endogenous lipid metabolism, e.g., inhibition of β-oxidation or depletion of the CoA or carnitine pools, adds to the complexity of the potential contribution of XCAs to hepatotoxicity by a number of mechanisms in addition to those in common with the corresponding acyl glucuronides. On the basis of our review of the literature on xenobiotic-CoA conjugates, there appear to be a number of gaps in our understanding of the bioactivation of XCA both with respect to the mechanisms involved and the experimental approaches to distinguish between the role of acyl glucuronides and xenobiotic-CoA conjugates. These aspects are focused upon and described in detail in this review.

  11. Ellagic acid ameliorates isoproterenol induced oxidative stress: Evidence from electrocardiological, biochemical and histological study.

    PubMed

    Kannan, M Mari; Quine, S Darlin

    2011-05-20

    The present study was designed to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of ellagic acid against isoproterenol induced myocardial infarction in rats by studying electrocardiography, blood pressure, cardiac markers, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant defense system and histological changes. Male Wistar rats were treated orally with ellagic acid (7.5 and 15mg/kg) daily for a period of 10 days. After 10 days of pretreatment, isoproterenol (100mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously to rats at an interval of 24h for 2 days to induce myocardial infarction. Isoproterenol administered rats showed significant changes in the electrocardiogram pattern, arterial pressure, and heart rate. Isoproterenol-induced rats also showed significant (P<0.05) increase in the levels of serum troponin-I, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, C-reactive protein, plasma homocysteine, heart tissue thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and lipid hydro peroxides. The activities/levels of antioxidant system were decreased in isoproterenol-induced rats. The histopathological findings of the myocardial tissue evidenced myocardial damage in isoproterenol induced rats. The oral pretreatment of ellagic acid restored the pathological electrocardiographic patterns, regulated the arterial blood pressures and heart rate in the isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats. The ellagic acid pretreatment significantly reduced the levels of biochemical markers, lipid peroxidation and significantly increased the activities/levels of the antioxidant system in the isoproterenol induced rats. An inhibited myocardial necrosis was evidenced by the histopathological findings in ellagic acid pretreated isoproterenol induced rats. Our study shows that oral pretreatment of ellagic acid prevents isoproterenol induced oxidative stress in myocardial infarction.

  12. Inhibition of Zymosan-Induced Inflammatory Factors Expression by ATRA Nanostructured Lipid Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongyan; Zhang, Wensong; Gao, Xunyi; Zhang, Hongguang; Kong, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The study aimed to evaluate the effect of all-trans retinoic acid-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (ATRA-NLCs) on the zymosan-induced expression of the cytokines IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-γ and the matrix metalloproteinases/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (MMPs/TIMPs) and TLR2 in rabbit corneal fibroblasts (RCFs). Methods. ATRA-NLCs were prepared by emulsification. RCFs were isolated and harvested after four to seven passages in monolayer culture. Cytokine release (IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-γ) induced by zymosan was analyzed by cytokine release assay, reverse transcription, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis detection. MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2, and TLR2 expression were analyzed by immunoblotting. Results. ATRA-NLCs were resistant to light and physically stable, and the average size of the ATRA-NLCs was 200 nm. ATRA-NLCs increased the zymosan-induced release of IL-4 and IL-10 and decreased the release of IFN-γ by RCFs. ATRA-NLCs decreased the levels of TLR2 and MMPs/TIMPs above. Conclusions. ATRA may be a potent anti-inflammatory agent for the therapy of fungal keratitis (FK). PMID:27340562

  13. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Eum, Sung Yong Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E.; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1 h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24 h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs. - Highlights: • PCB153 disturbed human brain endothelial barrier through disruption of occludin. • Lipid raft-associated PP

  14. The Lipid domain Phase diagram in a Dipalmitoyl-PC/Docosahaexnoic Acid-PE/Cholesterol System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lor, Chai; Hirst, Linda

    2011-03-01

    Lipid domains in bilayer membrane and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are thought to play an important role in cellular activities. In particular, lipids containing docosahaexnoic acid are an interesting class of PUFAs due to their health benefits. In this project, we perform oxidation measurements of DHA-PE to determine the rate of oxidation in combination with antioxidants. A ternary diagram of DPPC/DHA-PE/cholesterol is mapped out to identify phase separation phenomena using atomic force microscope (AFM). Fluorescence microscopy is also used to image lipid domains in a flat bilayer with fluorescent labels. As expected, we observe the phase, shape, and size of lipid domains changes with varying composition. Moreover, we find that the roughness of the domains changes possibly due to overpacking of cholesterol in domains. This model study provides further understanding of the role of cholesterol in the bilayer membrane leading towards a better understanding of cell membranes. NSF award # DMR 0852791, ``CAREER: Self-Assembly of Polyunsaturated Lipids and Cholesterol In The Cell Membrane.''

  15. The fusogenic lipid phosphatidic acid promotes the biogenesis of mitochondrial outer membrane protein Ugo1

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael; Taskin, Asli A.; Horvath, Susanne E.; Guan, Xue Li; Prinz, Claudia; Opalińska, Magdalena; Zorzin, Carina; van der Laan, Martin; Wenk, Markus R.; Schubert, Rolf; Wiedemann, Nils; Holzer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Import and assembly of mitochondrial proteins depend on a complex interplay of proteinaceous translocation machineries. The role of lipids in this process has been studied only marginally and so far no direct role for a specific lipid in mitochondrial protein biogenesis has been shown. Here we analyzed a potential role of phosphatidic acid (PA) in biogenesis of mitochondrial proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In vivo remodeling of the mitochondrial lipid composition by lithocholic acid treatment or by ablation of the lipid transport protein Ups1, both leading to an increase of mitochondrial PA levels, specifically stimulated the biogenesis of the outer membrane protein Ugo1, a component of the mitochondrial fusion machinery. We reconstituted the import and assembly pathway of Ugo1 in protein-free liposomes, mimicking the outer membrane phospholipid composition, and found a direct dependency of Ugo1 biogenesis on PA. Thus, PA represents the first lipid that is directly involved in the biogenesis pathway of a mitochondrial membrane protein. PMID:26347140

  16. Waste lipids to energy: how to optimize methane production from long‐chain fatty acids (LCFA)

    PubMed Central

    Alves, M. Madalena; Pereira, M. Alcina; Sousa, Diana Z.; Cavaleiro, Ana J.; Picavet, Merijn; Smidt, Hauke; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The position of high‐rate anaerobic technology (HR‐AnWT) in the wastewater treatment and bioenergy market can be enhanced if the range of suitable substrates is expanded. Analyzing existing technologies, applications and problems, it is clear that, until now, wastewaters with high lipids content are not effectively treated by HR‐AnWT. Nevertheless, waste lipids are ideal potential substrates for biogas production, since theoretically more methane can be produced, when compared with proteins or carbohydrates. In this minireview, the classical problems of lipids methanization in anaerobic processes are discussed and new concepts to enhance lipids degradation are presented. Reactors operation, feeding strategies and prospects of technological developments for wastewater treatment are discussed. Long‐chain fatty acids (LCFA) degradation is accomplished by syntrophic communities of anaerobic bacteria and methanogenic archaea. For optimal performance these syntrophic communities need to be clustered in compact aggregates, which is often difficult to achieve with wastewaters that contain fats and lipids. Driving the methane production from lipids/LCFA at industrial scale without risk of overloading and inhibition is still a challenge that has the potential for filling a gap in the existing processes and technologies for biological methane production associated to waste and wastewater treatment. PMID:21255287

  17. Identification of hydrophobic amino acids required for lipid activation of C. elegans CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Braker, Jay D; Hodel, Kevin J.; Mullins, David R.; Friesen, Jon A.

    2009-01-01

    CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT), critical for phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis, is activated by translocation to the membrane surface. The lipid activation region of Caenorhabditis elegans CCT is between residues 246 and 266 of the 347 amino acid polypeptide, a region proposed to form an amphipathic alpha helix. When leucine 246, tryptophan 249, isoleucine 256, isoleucine 257, or phenylalanine 260, on the hydrophobic face of the helix, were changed individually to serine low activity was observed in the absence of lipid vesicles, similar to wild-type CCT, while lipid stimulated activity was reduced compared to wild-type CCT. Mutational analysis of phenylalanine 260 implicated this residue as a contributor to auto-inhibition of CCT while mutation of L246, W249, I256, and I257 simultaneously to serine resulted in significantly higher activity in the absence of lipid vesicles and an enzyme that was not lipid activated. These results support a concerted mechanism of lipid activation that requires multiple residues on the hydrophobic face of the putative amphipathic alpha helix. PMID:19836342

  18. Waste lipids to energy: how to optimize methane production from long-chain fatty acids (LCFA).

    PubMed

    Alves, M Madalena; Pereira, M Alcina; Sousa, Diana Z; Cavaleiro, Ana J; Picavet, Merijn; Smidt, Hauke; Stams, Alfons J M

    2009-09-01

    The position of high-rate anaerobic technology (HR-AnWT) in the wastewater treatment and bioenergy market can be enhanced if the range of suitable substrates is expanded. Analyzing existing technologies, applications and problems, it is clear that, until now, wastewaters with high lipids content are not effectively treated by HR-AnWT. Nevertheless, waste lipids are ideal potential substrates for biogas production, since theoretically more methane can be produced, when compared with proteins or carbohydrates. In this minireview, the classical problems of lipids methanization in anaerobic processes are discussed and new concepts to enhance lipids degradation are presented. Reactors operation, feeding strategies and prospects of technological developments for wastewater treatment are discussed. Long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) degradation is accomplished by syntrophic communities of anaerobic bacteria and methanogenic archaea. For optimal performance these syntrophic communities need to be clustered in compact aggregates, which is often difficult to achieve with wastewaters that contain fats and lipids. Driving the methane production from lipids/LCFA at industrial scale without risk of overloading and inhibition is still a challenge that has the potential for filling a gap in the existing processes and technologies for biological methane production associated to waste and wastewater treatment.

  19. β-aminoisobutyric acid attenuates hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in mice with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chang-Xiang; Zhao, Ming-Xia; Shu, Xiao-Dong; Xiong, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Jue-Jin; Gao, Xing-Ya; Chen, Qi; Li, Yue-Hua; Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    β-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) is a nature thymine catabolite, and contributes to exercise-induced protection from metabolic diseases. Here we show the therapeutical effects of BAIBA on hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in diabetes. Type 2 diabetes was induced by combined streptozotocin (STZ) and high-fat diet (HFD) in mice. Oral administration of BAIBA for 4 weeks reduced blood glucose and lipids levels, hepatic key enzymes of gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis expressions, attenuated hepatic insulin resistance and lipid accumulation, and improved insulin signaling in type 2 diabetic mice. BAIBA reduced hepatic ER stress and apoptosis in type 2 diabetic mice. Furthermore, BAIBA alleviated ER stress in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells with glucosamine-induced insulin resistance. Hepatic AMPK phosphorylation was reduced in STZ/HFD mice and glucosamine-treated HepG2 cells, which were restored by BAIBA treatment. The suppressive effects of BAIBA on glucosamine-induced ER stress were reversed by knockdown of AMPK with siRNA. In addition, BAIBA prevented thapsigargin- or tunicamycin-induced ER stress, and tunicamycin–induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. These results indicate that BAIBA attenuates hepatic ER stress, apoptosis and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in mice with type 2 diabetes. AMPK signaling is involved to the role of BAIBA in attenuating ER stress. PMID:26907958

  20. β-aminoisobutyric acid attenuates hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in mice with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chang-Xiang; Zhao, Ming-Xia; Shu, Xiao-Dong; Xiong, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Jue-Jin; Gao, Xing-Ya; Chen, Qi; Li, Yue-Hua; Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2016-02-24

    β-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) is a nature thymine catabolite, and contributes to exercise-induced protection from metabolic diseases. Here we show the therapeutical effects of BAIBA on hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in diabetes. Type 2 diabetes was induced by combined streptozotocin (STZ) and high-fat diet (HFD) in mice. Oral administration of BAIBA for 4 weeks reduced blood glucose and lipids levels, hepatic key enzymes of gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis expressions, attenuated hepatic insulin resistance and lipid accumulation, and improved insulin signaling in type 2 diabetic mice. BAIBA reduced hepatic ER stress and apoptosis in type 2 diabetic mice. Furthermore, BAIBA alleviated ER stress in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells with glucosamine-induced insulin resistance. Hepatic AMPK phosphorylation was reduced in STZ/HFD mice and glucosamine-treated HepG2 cells, which were restored by BAIBA treatment. The suppressive effects of BAIBA on glucosamine-induced ER stress were reversed by knockdown of AMPK with siRNA. In addition, BAIBA prevented thapsigargin- or tunicamycin-induced ER stress, and tunicamycin-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. These results indicate that BAIBA attenuates hepatic ER stress, apoptosis and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in mice with type 2 diabetes. AMPK signaling is involved to the role of BAIBA in attenuating ER stress.

  1. Melittin-Induced Lipid Extraction Modulated by the Methylation Level of Phosphatidylcholine Headgroups

    PubMed Central

    Therrien, Alexandre; Lafleur, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Protein- and peptide-induced lipid extraction from membranes is a critical process for many biological events, including reverse cholesterol transport and sperm capacitation. In this work, we examine whether such processes could display specificity for some lipid species. Melittin, the main component of dry bee venom, was used as a model amphipathic α-helical peptide. We specifically determined the modulation of melittin-induced lipid extraction from membranes by the change of the methylation level of phospholipid headgroups. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers were demethylated either by substitution with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) or chemically by using mono- and dimethylated PE. It is shown that demethylation reduces the association of melittin with membranes, likely because of the resulting tighter chain packing of the phospholipids, which reduces the capacity of the membranes to accommodate inserted melittin. This reduced binding of the peptide is accompanied by an inhibition of the lipid extraction caused by melittin. We demonstrate that melittin selectively extracts PC from PC/PE membranes. This selectivity is proposed to be a consequence of a PE depletion in the surroundings of bound melittin to minimize disruption of the interphospholipid interactions. The resulting PC-enriched vicinity of melittin would be responsible for the observed formation of PC-enriched lipid/peptide particles resulting from the lipid efflux. These findings reveal that modulating the methylation level of phospholipid headgroups is a simple way to control the specificity of lipid extraction from membranes by peptides/proteins and thereby modulate the lipid composition of the membranes. PMID:26789763

  2. Lipid peroxidation induced by trichloroethylene in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Keiki; Hobara, Tatuya; Kobayashi, Haruo; Ishiyama, Hironobu; Gotoh, Masayuki; Imamura, Akihisa; Egami, Norio )

    1991-03-01

    It is well-known that trichloroethylene (TRI) is metabolized by cytochrome P-450 to TRI oxide, which binds irreversibly to cell macromolecules to generates hepatic damage. TRI oxide was metabolized to Chloral and Chloral hydrate, as an intramolecular rearrangement product of TRI oxide. However, recent studies have demonstrated that TRI oxide is not an obligate intermediate in the conversion of TRI to chloral. Therefore, there is no satisfactory explanation about the hepatic toxicity of TRI. On the other hand, the hepatic toxicity of halogenated compounds, may be closely related to lipid peroxidation, TRI enhances carbon tetrachloride hepatotoxicity in association with lipid peroxidation. In this report, the authors studied the effect of TRI on lipid peroxidation in vivo and in vitro.

  3. Effects of Fatty Acids on the Interfacial and Solution Behavior of Mixed Lipidic Aggregates Called Solid Lipid Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Gourab; Nahak, Prasant; Guha, Pritam; Roy, Biplab; Chettri, Priyam; Sapkota, Manish; Koirala, Suraj; Misono, Takeshi; Torigoe, Kanjiro; Ghosh, Shilpi; Panda, Amiya Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Mutual miscibility of soylecithin, tristearin, fatty acids (FAs), and curcumin was assessed by means of surface pressure-area isotherms at the air-solution interface in order to formulate modified solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN). Appearance of minima in the excess area (Aex) and changes in free energy of mixing (∆G(0)ex) were recorded for systems with 20 mole% FAs. Modified SLNs, promising as topical drug delivery systems, were formulated using the lipids in combination with curcumin, stabilized by an aqueous Tween 60 solution. Optimal formulations were assessed by judiciously varying the FA chain length and composition. Physicochemical properties of SLNs were studied such as the size, zeta potential (by dynamic light scattering), morphology (by freeze fracture transmission electron microscopy), and thermal behavior (by differential scanning calorimetry). The size and zeta potential of the formulations were in the range 300-500 nm and -10 to -20 mV, respectively. Absorption and emission spectroscopic analyses supported the dynamic light scattering and differential scanning calorimetry data and confirmed localization of curcumin to the palisade layer of SLNs. These nanoparticles showed a sustained release of incorporated curcumin. Curcumin-loaded SLNs were effective against a gram-positive bacterial species, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. Our results on the physicochemical properties of curcumin-loaded SLNs, the sustained release, and on antibacterial activity suggest that SLNs are promising delivery agents for topical drugs.

  4. Lipids and Fatty Acids in Algae: Extraction, Fractionation into Lipid Classes, and Analysis by Gas Chromatography Coupled with Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID).

    PubMed

    Guihéneuf, Freddy; Schmid, Matthias; Stengel, Dagmar B

    2015-01-01

    Despite the number of biochemical studies exploring algal lipids and fatty acid biosynthesis pathways and profiles, analytical methods used by phycologists for this purpose are often diverse and incompletely described. Potential confusion and potential variability of the results between studies can therefore occur due to change of protocols for lipid extraction and fractionation, as well as fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) preparation before gas chromatography (GC) analyses. Here, we describe a step-by-step procedure for the profiling of neutral and polar lipids using techniques such as solid-liquid extraction (SLE), thin-layer chromatography (TLC), and gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detector (GC-FID). As an example, in this protocol chapter, analyses of neutral and polar lipids from the marine microalga Pavlova lutheri (an EPA/DHA-rich haptophyte) will be outlined to describe the distribution of fatty acid residues within its major lipid classes. This method has been proven to be a reliable technique to assess changes in lipid and fatty acid profiles in several other microalgal species and seaweeds.

  5. Hot Pepper (Capsicum spp.) protects brain from sodium nitroprusside- and quinolinic acid-induced oxidative stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Oboh, G; Rocha, J B T

    2008-06-01

    One practical way through which free radical-mediated neurodegenerative diseases could be prevented is through the consumption of food rich in antioxidants. The ability of aqueous extracts of ripe and unripe Capsicum annum, Tepin (CAT) and Capsicum chinese, Habanero (CCH) to prevent lipid peroxidation induced by sodium nitroprusside and quinolinic acid in rat brain in vitro is assessed in this study. The aqueous extract of the peppers were prepared (1 g/20 mL). Incubating rat brain homogenates with pro-oxidant (7 microM sodium nitroprusside [222.5%] and 1 mM quinolinic acid [217.4%]) caused a significant increase (P < .05) in lipid peroxidation in rat brain homogenates. However, the aqueous extract of the peppers (4.2-16.8 mg/mL) caused a significant decrease (P < .05) in the lipid peroxidation in a dose-dependent manner. However, unripe CAT (92.5-55.2%) caused the highest inhibition of sodium nitroprusside-induced lipid peroxidation, while unripe CCH caused the least inhibition (161.0-102.1%). Furthermore, unripe CAT and CCH peppers had a significantly higher (P < .05) inhibitory effect on quinolinic acid-induced lipid peroxidation in rat brain than the ripe pepper (CAT and CCH). Therefore, the protection of the brain tissues by hot pepper depends on the total phenol content in sodium nitroprusside-induced lipid peroxidation, while ripening would reduce the protective properties of hot pepper against quinolinic acid-induced lipid peroxidation. However, unripe CAT has the highest protective properties against sodium nitroprusside- and quinolinic acid-induced lipid peroxidation in rat brain.

  6. [Effect of phytic acid and its derivatives on blood lipid peroxidation state in vitro].

    PubMed

    Martusevich, A K; Sidorova, M V; Mel'nikova, N B; Solov'eva, A G; Peretiagin, S P

    2014-01-01

    We have studied specific features of lipid peroxidation in whole human blood under the action of aqueous solutions of xymedone (19.6 microM), phytic acid (117.9 microM) and its complex (237.6 microM) synthesized in distilled water and isotonic (0.9%) solution of sodium chloride. The estimated parameters included lipid peroxidation (LPO) rate, total antioxidant potential, superoxide dismutase (SOD) level, and malonic dialdehyde (MDA) level in blood plasma and erythrocytes. It was established that the effect of phytic acid on blood samples includes moderate stimulation of total antioxidant activity and SOD activity with predominant prooxidant effect. The phytic acid--xymedone complex synthesized in distilled water exhibits an antioxidant action, while its synthesis in saline solution yields a prooxidant.

  7. The Role of Tetraether Lipid Composition in the Adaptation of Thermophilic Archaea to Acidity

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Eric S.; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Wang, Jinxiang; He, Liu; Zhang, Chuanlun L.

    2013-01-01

    Diether and tetraether lipids are fundamental components of the archaeal cell membrane. Archaea adjust the degree of tetraether lipid cyclization in order to maintain functional membranes and cellular homeostasis when confronted with pH and/or thermal stress. Thus, the ability to adjust tetraether lipid composition likely represents a critical phenotypic trait that enabled archaeal diversification into environments characterized by extremes in pH and/or temperature. Here we assess the relationship between geochemical variation, core- and polar-isoprenoid glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT, respectively) lipid composition, and archaeal 16S rRNA gene diversity and abundance in 27 geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The composition and abundance of C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal ecosystems were distinct from surrounding soils, indicating that they are synthesized endogenously. With the exception of GDGT-0 (no cyclopentyl rings), the abundances of individual C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids were significantly correlated. The abundance of a number of individual tetraether lipids varied positively with the relative abundance of individual 16S rRNA gene sequences, most notably crenarchaeol in both the core and polar GDGT fraction and sequences closely affiliated with Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii. This finding supports the proposal that crenarchaeol is a biomarker for nitrifying archaea. Variation in the degree of cyclization of C- and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal mats and sediments could best be explained by variation in spring pH, with lipids from acidic environments tending to have, on average, more internal cyclic rings than those from higher pH ecosystems. Likewise, variation in the phylogenetic composition of archaeal 16S rRNA genes could best be explained by spring pH. In turn, the phylogenetic similarity of archaeal 16S rRNA genes was significantly correlated with the similarity

  8. The role of tetraether lipid composition in the adaptation of thermophilic archaea to acidity.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Eric S; Hamilton, Trinity L; Wang, Jinxiang; He, Liu; Zhang, Chuanlun L

    2013-01-01

    Diether and tetraether lipids are fundamental components of the archaeal cell membrane. Archaea adjust the degree of tetraether lipid cyclization in order to maintain functional membranes and cellular homeostasis when confronted with pH and/or thermal stress. Thus, the ability to adjust tetraether lipid composition likely represents a critical phenotypic trait that enabled archaeal diversification into environments characterized by extremes in pH and/or temperature. Here we assess the relationship between geochemical variation, core- and polar-isoprenoid glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT, respectively) lipid composition, and archaeal 16S rRNA gene diversity and abundance in 27 geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The composition and abundance of C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal ecosystems were distinct from surrounding soils, indicating that they are synthesized endogenously. With the exception of GDGT-0 (no cyclopentyl rings), the abundances of individual C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids were significantly correlated. The abundance of a number of individual tetraether lipids varied positively with the relative abundance of individual 16S rRNA gene sequences, most notably crenarchaeol in both the core and polar GDGT fraction and sequences closely affiliated with Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii. This finding supports the proposal that crenarchaeol is a biomarker for nitrifying archaea. Variation in the degree of cyclization of C- and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal mats and sediments could best be explained by variation in spring pH, with lipids from acidic environments tending to have, on average, more internal cyclic rings than those from higher pH ecosystems. Likewise, variation in the phylogenetic composition of archaeal 16S rRNA genes could best be explained by spring pH. In turn, the phylogenetic similarity of archaeal 16S rRNA genes was significantly correlated with the similarity

  9. Anthrax toxin-induced rupture of artificial lipid bilayer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Nablo, Brian J.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L.; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E.; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes rupture artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm. PMID:23947891

  10. Anthrax toxin-induced rupture of artificial lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nablo, Brian J.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Bavari, Sina; Nguyen, Tam L.; Gussio, Rick; Ribot, Wil; Friedlander, Art; Chabot, Donald; Reiner, Joseph E.; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Balijepalli, Arvind; Halverson, Kelly M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that anthrax toxin complexes rupture artificial lipid bilayer membranes when isolated from the blood of infected animals. When the solution pH is temporally acidified to mimic that process in endosomes, recombinant anthrax toxin forms an irreversibly bound complex, which also destabilizes membranes. The results suggest an alternative mechanism for the translocation of anthrax toxin into the cytoplasm.

  11. Saturated and unsaturated anteiso-C19 acids in the seed lipids from Hesperopeuce mertensiana (Pinaceae).

    PubMed

    Destaillats, Frédéric; Wolff, Robert L; Angers, Paul

    2002-03-01

    Minor uncommon FA from Hesperopeuce mertensiana (a gymnosperm species of the Pinaceae family) seed oil were characterized through a combination of silver ion TLC of their FAME, and GLC coupled with MS of their picolinyl derivatives. These uncommon components have the structures 16-methyloctadecanoic (anteiso-19:0), 16-methyl-cis-9-octadecenoic (anteiso-19:1), and 1 6-methyl-cis-9,cis-12-octadecadienoic (anteiso-19:2) acids. These branched C19 acids were identified earlier in the wood of Picea abies, which would indicate that such acids could be widespread, though minor, components of Pinaceae lipids.

  12. Co-oxidation of the sulfur-containing amino acids in an autoxidizing lipid system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, G.A.; Dollar, A.M.

    1963-01-01

    Oxidation of the sulfur amino acids by autoxidizing lipids was studied in a model system consisting of an amino acid dispersed in cold-pressed, molecularly distilled menhaden oil (20–80% w/w). Under all conditions investigated, cysteine was oxidized completely to cystine. Preliminary results suggest that at 110°C the oxidation follows first-order kinetics for at least the first 8 hr. A specific reaction rate constant of 0.25 per hour was calculated. When fatty acids were added to the system, cystine was oxidized to its thiosulfinate ester. When the fatty acid-cystine ratio was 1:2, oxidation of cystine was a maximum. No oxidation of cystine occurred unless either a fatty acid, volatile organic acid, or ethanol was added. Under the conditions investigated, methionine was not oxidized to either its sulfoxide or its sulfone.

  13. Ginsenoside Rh2 induces ligand-independent Fas activation via lipid raft disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Jae-Sung; Choo, Hyo-Jung; Cho, Bong-Rae; Kim, Hwan-Myung; Kim, Yong-Nyun; Ham, Young-Mi; Ko, Young-Gyu

    2009-07-24

    Lipid rafts are plasma membrane platforms mediating signal transduction pathways for cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Here, we show that membrane fluidity was increased in HeLa cells following treatment with ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2), as determined by cell staining with carboxy-laurdan (C-laurdan), a two-photon dye designed for measuring membrane hydrophobicity. In the presence of Rh2, caveolin-1 appeared in non-raft fractions after sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. In addition, caveolin-1 and GM1, lipid raft landmarkers, were internalized within cells after exposure to Rh2, indicating that Rh2 might disrupt lipid rafts. Since cholesterol overloading, which fortifies lipid rafts, prevented an increase in Rh2-induced membrane fluidity, caveolin-1 internalization and apoptosis, lipid rafts appear to be essential for Rh2-induced apoptosis. Moreover, Rh2-induced Fas oligomerization was abolished following cholesterol overloading, and Rh2-induced apoptosis was inhibited following treatment with siRNA for Fas. This result suggests that Rh2 is a novel lipid raft disruptor leading to Fas oligomerization and apoptosis.

  14. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    PubMed

    Eum, Sung Yong; Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs.

  15. Conformational Changes in High-Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticles Induced by High Payloads of Paramagnetic Lipids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) nanoparticles doped with gadolinium lipids can be used as magnetic resonance imaging diagnostic agents for atherosclerosis. In this study, HDL nanoparticles with different molar fractions of gadolinium lipids (0 < xGd-lipids < 0.33) were prepared, and the MR relaxivity values (r1 and r2) for all compositions were measured. Both r1 and r2 parameters reached a maximal value at a molar fraction of approximately xGd-lipids = 0.2. Higher payloads of gadolinium did not significantly increase relaxivity values but induced changes in the structure of HDL, increasing the size of the particles from dH = 8.2 ± 1.6 to 51.7 ± 7.3 nm. High payloads of gadolinium lipids trigger conformational changes in HDL, with potential effects on the in vivo behavior of the nanoparticles. PMID:27713933

  16. [Effect of phensuccinal on lipid metabolism, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant system activity in rabbits with dithiazone-induced diabetes].

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, N I; Poltorak, V V; Gladkikh, A I; Ivanova, O V

    2003-01-01

    A three-month administration of phensuccinal improved glucose homeostasis, decreased the levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, fatty acids, and low-density lipoproteins in the blood serum, and reduced the lipid peroxidation rate as compared to the untreated diabetic control. In addition, phensuccinal increased the content of the antiatherogenic high-density lipoprotein fraction and the related paraoxonase enzyme activity. The preventive effect of phensuccinal with respect to diabetic dyslipidemia development, together with the antioxidant action, show this compound to be a promising therapeutic means of preventing and/or reducing macrovascular complications in diabetic patients.

  17. Chylomicron components mediate intestinal lipid-induced inhibition of gastric motor function.

    PubMed

    Glatzle, Jörg; Kalogeris, Theodore J; Zittel, Tilman T; Guerrini, Stephania; Tso, Patrick; Raybould, Helen E

    2002-01-01

    Lipid, particularly long-chain triglyceride, initiates feedback regulation of gastrointestinal function. To determine whether the site of action of lipid is pre- or postabsorptive, we investigated the ability of mesenteric lipid-fed lymph to inhibit gastric motor function. Lymph was collected from awake lymph-fistula rats during intestinal infusion with either a glucose-saline maintenance solution or lipid. Intra-arterial injection of lymph collected during intestinal lipid infusion significantly inhibited gastric motility in anesthetized recipient rats compared with injection of equivalent amounts of triglyceride or lymph collected during intestinal infusion of maintenance solution. Lymph collected from rats during lipid infusion with Pluronic L-81 [an inhibitor of chylomicron formation and apolipoprotein (apo) A-IV secretion] compared with lymph injection from donor animals treated with Pluronic L-63 (a noninhibitory control for Pluronic L-81) was significantly less potent. Injection of purified recombinant apo A-IV significantly inhibited gastric motility. Products of lipid digestion and absorption, other than fatty acids or triglyceride, released by the intestine during lipid digestion likely serve as signals to initiate intestinal feedback regulation of gastrointestinal function. Most likely, apo A-IV is one of the signals involved.

  18. Lipid emulsion attenuates apoptosis induced by a toxic dose of bupivacaine in H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Ok, S-H; Yu, J; Lee, Y; Cho, H; Shin, I-W; Sohn, J-T

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of lipid emulsion on apoptosis induced by a toxic dose of bupivacaine (BPV) in H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast cell lines. The effect of lipid emulsion on the decreased cell viability and count induced by BPV or mepivacaine (MPV) in the H9c2 cells was assessed using an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay or a cell count assay. The effect of BPV or lipid emulsion combined with BPV on cleaved caspase 3, caspase 8, and Bax in H9c2 cells was investigated using Western blotting. A terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed to detect apoptosis of H9c2 cells treated with BPV alone or lipid emulsion combined with BPV. The magnitude of lipid emulsion-mediated attenuation of decreased cell viability induced by BPV was higher than that of lipid emulsion-mediated attenuation of decreased cell viability induced by MPV. Lipid emulsion attenuated the increases in cleaved caspase 3, caspase 8 and Bax induced by BPV. Lipid emulsion attenuated the increases in TUNEL-positive cells induced by BPV. These results suggest that lipid emulsion attenuates a toxic dose of BPV-induced apoptosis via inhibition of the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. The protective effect of lipid emulsion may be partially associated with the relatively high lipid solubility of BPV.

  19. Effects of sewage discharges on lipid and fatty acid composition of the Patagonian bivalve Diplodon chilensis.

    PubMed

    Rocchetta, Iara; Pasquevich, María Y; Heras, Horacio; Ríos de Molina, María del Carmen; Luquet, Carlos M

    2014-02-15

    Lipid and fatty acid (FA) composition and selected oxidative stress parameters of freshwater clams (Dipolodon chilensis), from a sewage-polluted (SMA) and a clean site, were compared. Trophic markers FA were analyzed in clams and sediment. Saturated FA (SAFA), and bacteria and sewage markers were abundant in SMA sediments, while diatom markers were 50% lower. Proportions of SAFA, branched FA, 20:5n-3 (EPA) and 22:6n-3 (DHA) were higher in SMA clams. Chronic exposure of D. chilensis to increasing eutrophication affected its lipid and FA composition. The increase in EPA and DHA proportions could be an adaptive response, which increases stress resistance but could also lead to higher susceptibility to lipid peroxidation TBARS, lipofuscins (20-fold) and GSH concentrations were higher in SMA clams. FA markers indicated terrestrial plant detritus and bacteria are important items in D. chilensis diet. Anthropogenic input in their food could be traced using specific FA as trophic markers.

  20. The effect of interesterification on the bioavailability of fatty acids in structured lipids.

    PubMed

    Farfán, M; Villalón, M J; Ortíz, M E; Nieto, S; Bouchon, P

    2013-08-15

    Fatty acid (FA) profile is a critical factor in the nutritional properties of fats, but, stereochemistry may also play a fundamental role in the rate and extent to which FAs are absorbed and become available. To better understand this phenomenon, we evaluated the bioavailability of FAs in linseed-oil and palm-stearin blends compared to their interesterified mix, using a sn-1,3 stereospecific lipase, to determine if there was any difference in terms of FA availability when using this technology. Test meals were fed through an intragastric feeding tube on Sprague-Dawley male rats after 18 h fasting. Postprandial blood samples were collected after meal or physiological serum (control) administration and the FA profile of plasma lipids was determined. Results showed that modification of the melting profile through interesterification, without altering the bioavailability determined by sn-2 stereochemistry, could delay lipid absorption at the beginning, but had no effect on total lipid absorption.

  1. Fatty acid synthase 2 contributes to diapause preparation in a beetle by regulating lipid accumulation and stress tolerance genes expression

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Qian-Qian; Liu, Wen; Zhu, Fen; Lei, Chao-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Diapause, also known as dormancy, is a state of arrested development that allows insects to survive unfavorable environmental conditions. Diapause-destined insects store large amounts of fat when preparing for diapause. However, the extent to which these accumulated fat reserves influence diapause remains unclear. To address this question, we investigated the function of fatty acid synthase (FAS), which plays a central role in lipid synthesis, in stress tolerance, the duration of diapause preparation, and whether insects enter diapause or not. In diapause-destined adult female cabbage beetles, Colaphellus bowringi, FAS2 was more highly expressed than FAS1 at the peak stage of diapause preparation. FAS2 knockdown suppressed lipid accumulation and subsequently affected stress tolerance genes expression and water content. However, silencing FAS2 had no significant effects on the duration of diapause preparation or the incidence of diapause. FAS2 transcription was suppressed by juvenile hormone (JH) and the JH receptor methoprene-tolerant (Met). These results suggest that the absence of JH-Met induces FAS2 expression, thereby promoting lipid storage in diapause-destined female beetles. These results demonstrate that fat reserves regulate stress tolerance genes expression and water content, but have no significant effect on the duration of diapause preparation or the incidence of diapause. PMID:28071706

  2. Gamma-irradiation and UV-C light-induced lipid peroxidation: a Fourier transform-infrared absorption spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Kinder, R; Ziegler, C; Wessels, J M

    1997-05-01

    Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy of dry, multibilayer films has been used to study gamma-radiation and UV-C light induced lipid peroxidation in 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes. The observed spectral changes were compared with the results obtained from measurement of hydroperoxides, conjugated dienes and to the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, such as malondialdehyde (MDA) or MDA-like substances. Upon irradiation a decrease in intensity of the asymmetric C - H stretching vibration (va(CH2)) of the isolated cis C = C - H groups (3010 cm-1) was observed. Directly correlated with the decrease of the va(CH2) absorption was a shift of the asymmetric phosphate ester stretching vibration (va(P = O)) towards smaller wavenumbers (1260-->1244 cm-1), indicating that the lipid peroxidation induced molecular alterations in the fatty acid chains influence the packing of the phospholipids in dry multibilayer films. In addition, the formation of a new absorption band at 1693 cm-1 could be detected, the intensity of which was comparable with the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and, therefore, attributed to the (C = O) stretching of alpha, beta unsaturated aldehydes. Dose-dependent studies using ionizing radiation showed that the decrease of va(CH2) was directly correlated with an increase in absorption of the conjugated dienes at 234 nm and with the formation of hydroperoxides suggesting that the absorption at 3010 cm-1 is solely due to isolated cis C = C - H groups and hence subject to the early stages of the radical chain reaction. UV-C light induced lipid peroxidation revealed a non-linear decrease of I3010, which was directly correlated with the formation of hydroperoxides. The observed early saturation of the conjugated dienes was attributed to an early photodecomposition of the conjugated double bonds.

  3. Five Decades with Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Chemical Synthesis, Enzymatic Formation, Lipid Peroxidation and Its Biological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Catalá, Angel

    2013-01-01

    I have been involved in research on polyunsaturated fatty acids since 1964 and this review is intended to cover some of the most important aspects of this work. Polyunsaturated fatty acids have followed me during my whole scientific career and I have published a number of studies concerned with different aspects of them such as chemical synthesis, enzymatic formation, metabolism, transport, physical, chemical, and catalytic properties of a reconstructed desaturase system in liposomes, lipid peroxidation, and their effects. The first project I became involved in was the organic synthesis of [1-14C] eicosa-11,14-dienoic acid, with the aim of demonstrating the participation of that compound as a possible intermediary in the biosynthesis of arachidonic acid “in vivo.” From 1966 to 1982, I was involved in several projects that study the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids. In the eighties, we studied fatty acid binding protein. From 1990 up to now, our laboratory has been interested in the lipid peroxidation of biological membranes from various tissues and different species as well as liposomes prepared with phospholipids rich in PUFAs. We tested the effect of many antioxidants such as alpha tocopherol, vitamin A, melatonin and its structural analogues, and conjugated linoleic acid, among others. PMID:24490074

  4. Effects of ascorbic acid and antioxidants on color, lipid oxidation and volatiles of irradiated ground beef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, D. U.; Nam, K. C.

    2004-09-01

    Beef loins with 3 different aging times after slaughter were ground, added with none, 0.1% ascorbic acid, 0.01% sesamol+0.01% α-tocopherol, or 0.1% ascorbic acid+0.01% sesamol+0.01% tocopherol. The meats were packaged in oxygen-permeable bags, irradiated at 2.5 kGy, and color, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), lipid oxidation and volatile profiles were determined. Irradiation decreased the redness of ground beef, and visible color of beef changed from a bright red to a green/brown depending on the age of meat. Addition of ascorbic acid prevented color changes in irradiated beef, and the effect of ascorbic acid became greater as the age of meat or storage time after irradiation increased. The ground beef added with ascorbic acid had lower ORP than control, and the low ORP of meat helped maintaining the heme pigments in reduced form. During aerobic storage, S-volatiles disappeared while volatile aldehydes significantly increased in irradiated beef. Addition of ascorbic acid at 0.1% or sesamol+α-tocopherol at each 0.01% level to ground beef prior to irradiation were effective in reducing lipid oxidation and S-volatiles. As storage time increased, however, the antioxidant effect of sesamol+tocopherol in irradiated ground beef was superior to that of ascorbic acid.

  5. Automobile diesel exhaust particles induce lipid droplet formation in macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Jantzen, Kim; Gouveia, Ana Cecilia Damiao; Skovmand, Astrid; Roursgaard, Martin; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) has been associated with adverse cardiopulmonary health effects, which may be related to dysregulation of lipid metabolism and formation of macrophage foam cells. In this study, THP-1 derived macrophages were exposed to an automobile generated DEP (A-DEP) for 24h to study lipid droplet formation and possible mechanisms. The results show that A-DEP did not induce cytotoxicity. The production of reactive oxygen species was only significantly increased after exposure for 3h, but not 24h. Intracellular level of reduced glutathione was increased after 24h exposure. These results combined indicate an adaptive response to oxidative stress. Exposure to A-DEP was associated with significantly increased formation of lipid droplets, as well as changes in lysosomal function, assessed as reduced LysoTracker staining. In conclusion, these results indicated that exposure to A-DEP may induce formation of lipid droplets in macrophages in vitro possibly via lysosomal dysfunction.

  6. [Peroxidation of lipids in mitochondrial membranes, induced by enzymatic deamination of biogenic amines].

    PubMed

    Kagan, V E; Smirnov, A V; Savov, V M; Gorkin, V Z

    1984-01-01

    In presence of ferrous cations and ascorbate lipid peroxidation in mitochondrial membranes has been induced by incubation of fragments of the membrane devoid of catalase activity with amines which are substrates of monoamine oxidases of the B type (2-phenyl ethylamine, benzylamine) or transformed monoamine oxidases of type A (cadaverine). In the samples containing both cadaverine and benzylamine the highest stimulation of lipid peroxidation was noted. To the contrary, a substrate of the monoamine oxidases of the type A (serotonin) caused under the same conditions an antioxidative effect. The following conditions are obligatory to induce lipid peroxidation in mitochondria by incubation with amines: I. absence of catalase activity in the biomembranes; 2. presence of physiological concentrations of Fe2+. Physiological concentrations of ascorbate or alterations of pH in the samples caused additional stimulation of the lipid peroxidation.

  7. Protective effects of sinapic acid on lysosomal dysfunction in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats.

    PubMed

    Roy, Subhro Jyoti; Stanely Mainzen Prince, Ponnian

    2012-11-01

    In the pathology of myocardial infarction, lysosomal lipid peroxidation and resulting enzyme release play an important role. We evaluated the protective effects of sinapic acid on lysosomal dysfunction in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats. Male Wistar rats were treated with sinapic acid (12 mg/kg body weight) orally daily for 10 days and isoproterenol (100 mg/kg body weight) was injected twice at an interval of 24 h (9th and 10th day). Then, lysosomal lipid peroxidation, lysosomal enzymes in serum, heart homogenate, lysosomal fraction and myocardial infarct size were measured. Isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats showed a significant increase in serum creatine kinase-MB and lysosomal lipid peroxidation. The activities of β-glucuronidase, β-galactosidase, cathepsin-B and D were significantly increased in serum, heart and the activities of β-glucuronidase and cathepsin-D were significantly decreased in lysosomal fraction of myocardial infarcted rats. Pre-and-co-treatment with sinapic acid normalized all the biochemical parameters and reduced myocardial infarct size in myocardial infarcted rats. In vitro studies confirmed the free radical scavenging effects of sinapic acid. The possible mechanisms for the observed effects are attributed to sinapic acid's free radical scavenging and membrane stabilizing properties. Thus, sinapic acid has protective effects on lysosomal dysfunction in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats.

  8. The Immunosuppressant Mycophenolic Acid Alters Nucleotide and Lipid Metabolism in an Intestinal Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Heischmann, Svenja; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk; Leibfritz, Dieter; Christians, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    The study objective was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the negative effects of mycophenolic acid (MPA) on human intestinal cells. Effects of MPA exposure and guanosine supplementation on nucleotide concentrations in LS180 cells were assessed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Proteomics analysis was carried out using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture combined with gel-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and lipidome analysis using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Despite supplementation, depletion of guanosine nucleotides (p < 0.001 at 24 and 72 h; 5, 100, and 250 μM MPA) and upregulation of uridine and cytidine nucleotides (p < 0.001 at 24 h; 5 μM MPA) occurred after exposure to MPA. MPA significantly altered 35 proteins mainly related to nucleotide-dependent processes and lipid metabolism. Cross-reference with previous studies of MPA-associated protein changes widely corroborated these results, but showed differences that may be model- and/or method-dependent. MPA exposure increased intracellular concentrations of fatty acids, cholesterol, and phosphatidylcholine (p < 0.01 at 72 h; 100 μM MPA) which corresponded to the changes in lipid-metabolizing proteins. MPA affected intracellular nucleotide levels, nucleotide-dependent processes, expression of structural proteins, fatty acid and lipid metabolism in LS180 cells. These changes may compromise intestinal membrane integrity and contribute to gastrointestinal toxicity. PMID:28327659

  9. Immunomodulatory lipids in plants: plant fatty acid amides and the human endocannabinoid system.

    PubMed

    Gertsch, Jürg

    2008-05-01

    Since the discovery that endogenous lipid mediators show similar cannabimimetic effects as phytocannabinoids from CANNABIS SATIVA, our knowledge about the endocannabinoid system has rapidly expanded. Today, endocannabinoid action is known to be involved in various diseases, including inflammation and pain. As a consequence, the G-protein coupled cannabinoid receptors, endocannabinoid transport, as well as endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes represent targets to block or enhance cannabinoid receptor-mediated signalling for therapeutic intervention. Based on the finding that certain endocannabinoid-like fatty acid N-alkylamides from purple coneflower ( ECHINACEA spp.) potently activate CB2 cannabinoid receptors we have focused our interest on plant fatty acid amides (FAAs) and their overall cannabinomodulatory effects. Certain FAAs are also able to partially inhibit the action of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which controls the breakdown of endocannabinoids. Intriguingly, plants lack CB receptors and do not synthesize endocannabinoids, but express FAAH homologues capable of metabolizing plant endogenous N-acylethanolamines (NAEs). While the site of action of these NAEs in plants is unknown, endogenous NAEs and arachidonic acid glycerols in animals interact with distinct physiological lipid receptors, including cannabinoid receptors. There is increasing evidence that also plant FAAs other than NAEs can pharmacologically modulate the action of these endogenous lipid signals. The interference of plant FAAs with the animal endocannabinoid system could thus be a fortunate evolutionary cross point with yet unexplored therapeutic potential.

  10. Umbelliferone Improves an Impaired Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in High-Fat Diet/Streptozotocin-Induced Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Naowaboot, Jarinyaporn; Somparn, Nuntiya; Saentaweesuk, Suphaket; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan

    2015-06-08

    Umbelliferone (UMB) is a natural product that has several pharmacological effects including antihyperglycemic activity in diabetic rats. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the effect of UMB on insulin resistance and on the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetic rats. Type 2 diabetes was induced in rats by feeding a high-fat diet (45 kcal% fat) and a single dose of streptozotocin injection. After 8 weeks of treatment, UMB significantly reduced the elevated blood glucose levels and insulin resistance and increased the liver glycogen and serum adiponectin. Moreover, the serum lipid and the storages of triglyceride and non-esterified fatty acid in liver tissue were reduced. From histological examination, the lipid droplets in liver tissue were clearly decreased, and the fat cell size in the fat tissue was smaller in diabetic rats treated with UMB. Interestingly, UMB increased fat cell adiponectin, plasma membrane glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and liver PPARα protein expressions. Our findings demonstrate that UMB improves glucose and lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetes by stimulating the insulin secretion and the related mechanisms via stimulating expression of adiponectin, GLUT4, PPARγ, and PPARα-protein expressions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Lipid Body Organelles within the Parasite Trypanosoma cruzi: A Role for Intracellular Arachidonic Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Daniel A. M.; Roque, Natália R.; Teixeira, Lívia; Milán-Garcés, Erix A.; Carneiro, Alan B.; Almeida, Mariana R.; Andrade, Gustavo F. S.; Martins, Jefferson S.; Pinho, Roberto R.; Freire-de-Lima, Célio G.; Bozza, Patrícia T.; D’Avila, Heloisa

    2016-01-01

    Most eukaryotic cells contain varying amounts of cytosolic lipidic inclusions termed lipid bodies (LBs) or lipid droplets (LDs). In mammalian cells, such as macrophages, these lipid-rich organelles are formed in response to host-pathogen interaction during infectious diseases and are sites for biosynthesis of arachidonic acid (AA)-derived inflammatory mediators (eicosanoids). Less clear are the functions of LBs in pathogenic lower eukaryotes. In this study, we demonstrated that LBs, visualized by light microscopy with different probes and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), are produced in trypomastigote forms of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas’ disease, after both host interaction and exogenous AA stimulation. Quantitative TEM revealed that LBs from amastigotes, the intracellular forms of the parasite, growing in vivo have increased size and electron-density compared to LBs from amastigotes living in vitro. AA-stimulated trypomastigotes released high amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and showed PGE2 synthase expression. Raman spectroscopy demonstrated increased unsaturated lipid content and AA incorporation in stimulated parasites. Moreover, both Raman and MALDI mass spectroscopy revealed increased AA content in LBs purified from AA-stimulated parasites compared to LBs from unstimulated group. By using a specific technique for eicosanoid detection, we immunolocalized PGE2 within LBs from AA-stimulated trypomastigotes. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that LBs from the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi are not just lipid storage inclusions but dynamic organelles, able to respond to host interaction and inflammatory events and involved in the AA metabolism. Acting as sources of PGE2, a potent immunomodulatory lipid mediator that inhibits many aspects of innate and adaptive immunity, newly-formed parasite LBs may be implicated with the pathogen survival in its host. PMID:27490663

  12. Effect of hepatoprotectors on lipid metabolism in hepatitis induced by carbon tetrachloride

    SciTech Connect

    Vengerovskii, A.I.; Chuchalin, V.S.; Paul's; O.V.; Saratikov, A.S.

    1987-09-01

    The authors study the effect of the widely used hepatoprotective agents- the flavonoid silybinin and the phosphatidylcholine-containing substance essentiale - on the combination of disturbances of lipid metabolism present in severe toxic hepatitis induced by carbon tetrachloride in rats. It was found that CCl/sub 4/ caused a profound disturbance of lipid metabolism. The hepatoprotective effect of silybinin and essentiale is due to their antioxidant action and to normalization of function of the liver phospholipids.

  13. Characterization and Inducing Melanoma Cell Apoptosis Activity of Mannosylerythritol Lipids-A Produced from Pseudozyma aphidis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Linlin; Li, Hongji; Niu, Yongwu; Chen, Qihe

    2016-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are natural glycolipid biosurfactants which have potential applications in the fields of food, cosmetic and medicine. In this study, MELs were produced from vegetable oil by Pseudozyma aphidis. Their structural data through LC/MS, GC/MS and NMR analysis revealed that MEL-A with two acetyls was the major compound and the identified homologs of MEL-A contained a length of C8 to C14 fatty acid chains. This glycolipid exhibited a surface tension of 27.69 mN/m at a critical micelle concentration (CMC), self-assembling into particles in the water solution. It was observed to induce cell growth-inhibition and apoptosis of B16 melanoma cells in a dose-dependent manner, as well as cause cell cycle arrest at the S phase. Further quantitative RT-PCR analysis and western blotting revealed an increasing tendency of both mRNA and protein expressions of Caspase-12, CHOP, GRP78 and Caspase-3, and a down-regulation of protein Bcl-2. Combined with the up regulation of signaling IRE1 and ATF6, it can be speculated that MEL-A-induced B16 melanoma cell apoptosis was associated with the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). PMID:26828792

  14. DNA-Tile Structures Induce Ionic Currents through Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Göpfrich, Kerstin; Zettl, Thomas; Meijering, Anna E C; Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Kocabey, Samet; Liedl, Tim; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2015-05-13

    Self-assembled DNA nanostructures have been used to create man-made transmembrane channels in lipid bilayers. Here, we present a DNA-tile structure with a nominal subnanometer channel and cholesterol-tags for membrane anchoring. With an outer diameter of 5 nm and a molecular weight of 45 kDa, the dimensions of our synthetic nanostructure are comparable to biological ion channels. Because of its simple design, the structure self-assembles within a minute, making its creation scalable for applications in biology. Ionic current recordings demonstrate that the tile structures enable ion conduction through lipid bilayers and show gating and voltage-switching behavior. By demonstrating the design of DNA-based membrane channels with openings much smaller than that of the archetypical six-helix bundle, our work showcases their versatility inspired by the rich diversity of natural membrane components.

  15. Chemopreventive and renal protective effects for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA): implications of CRP and lipid peroxides

    PubMed Central

    El-Mesery, ME; Al-Gayyar, MM; Salem, HA; Darweish, MM; El-Mowafy, AM

    2009-01-01

    Background The fish oil-derived ω-3 fatty acids, like docosahexanoic (DHA), claim a plethora of health benefits. We currently evaluated the antitumor effects of DHA, alone or in combination with cisplatin (CP) in the EAC solid tumor mice model, and monitored concomitant changes in serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), lipid peroxidation (measured as malondialdehyde; MDA) and leukocytic count (LC). Further, we verified the capacity of DHA to ameliorate the lethal, CP-induced nephrotoxicity in rats and the molecular mechanisms involved therein. Results EAC-bearing mice exhibited markedly elevated LC (2-fold), CRP (11-fold) and MDA levels (2.7-fold). DHA (125, 250 mg/kg) elicited significant, dose-dependent reductions in tumor size (38%, 79%; respectively), as well as in LC, CRP and MDA levels. These effects for CP were appreciably lower than those of DHA (250 mg/kg). Interestingly, DHA (125 mg/kg) markedly enhanced the chemopreventive effects of CP and boosted its ability to reduce serum CRP and MDA levels. Correlation studies revealed a high degree of positive association between tumor growth and each of CRP (r = 0.85) and leukocytosis (r = 0.89), thus attesting to a diagnostic/prognostic role for CRP. On the other hand, a single CP dose (10 mg/kg) induced nephrotoxicity in rats that was evidenced by proteinuria, deterioration of glomerular filtration rate (GFR, -4-fold), a rise in serum creatinine/urea levels (2–5-fold) after 4 days, and globally-induced animal fatalities after 7 days. Kidney-homogenates from CP-treated rats displayed significantly elevated MDA- and TNF-α-, but reduced GSH-, levels. Rats treated with DHA (250 mg/kg, but not 125 mg/kg) survived the lethal effects of CP, and showed a significant recovery of GFR; while their homogenates had markedly-reduced MDA- and TNF-α-, but -increased GSH-levels. Significant association was detected between creatinine level and those of MDA (r = 0.81), TNF-α ) r = 0.92) and GSH (r = -0.82); implying

  16. Lipid Polymorphism Induced by Surfactant Peptide SP-B1-25

    PubMed Central

    Farver, R. Suzanne; Mills, Frank D.; Antharam, Vijay C.; Chebukati, Janetricks N.; Fanucci, Gail E.; Long, Joanna R.

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B) is an essential protein for lowering surface tension in the alveoli. SP-B1-25, a peptide comprised of the N-terminal 25 amino-acid residues of SP-B, is known to retain much of the biological activity of SP-B. Circular dichroism has shown that when SP-B1-25 interacts with negatively charged lipid vesicles, it contains significant helical structure for the lipid compositions and peptide/lipid ratios studied here. The effect of SP-B1-25 on lipid organization and polymorphisms was investigated via DSC, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. At 1-3 mol% peptide and physiologic temperature, SP-B1-25 partitions at the interface of negatively charged PC/PG lipid bilayers. In lipid mixtures containing 1-5 mol% peptide, the structure of SP-B1-25 remains constant, but 2H and 31P NMR spectra show the presence of an isotropic lipid phase in exchange with the lamellar phase below the Tm of the lipids. This behavior is observed for both DPPC/POPG and POPC/POPG lipid mixtures as well as for both the PC and PG components of the mixtures. For 1-3 mol% SP-B1-25, a return to a single lamellar phase above the lipid mixture Tm is observed, but for 5 mol% SP-B1-25 a significant isotropic component is observed at physiologic temperatures for DPPC and exchange broadening is observed in 2H and 31P NMR spectra of the other lipid components in the two mixtures. DLS and TEM rule out the formation of micellar structures and suggest that SP-B1-25 promotes the formation of a fluid isotropic phase. The ability of SP-B1-25 to fuse lipid lamellae via this mechanism, particularly those enriched in DPPC, suggests a specific role for the highly conserved N-terminus of SP-B in the packing of lipid lamellae into surfactant lamellar bodies or in stabilizing multilayer structures at the air-liquid interface. Importantly, this behavior has not been seen for the other SP-B fragments of SP-B8-25 and SP-B59

  17. Lipids rich in ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from microalgae.

    PubMed

    Santos-Sánchez, N F; Valadez-Blanco, R; Hernández-Carlos, B; Torres-Ariño, A; Guadarrama-Mendoza, P C; Salas-Coronado, R

    2016-10-01

    Despite microalgae recently receiving enormous attention as a potential source of biodiesel, their use is still not feasible as an alternative to fossil fuels. Recently, interest in microalgae has focused on the production of bioactive compounds such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which provide microalgae a high added value. Several considerations need to be assessed for optimizing PUFA production from microalgae. Firstly, a microalgae species that produces high PUFA concentrations should be selected, such as Nannochloropsis gaditana, Isochrysis galbana, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and Crypthecodinium cohnii, with marine species gaining more attention than do freshwater species. Closed cultivation processes, e.g., photobioreactors, are the most appropriate since temperature, pH, and nutrients can be controlled. An airlift column with LEDs or optical fibers to distribute photons into the culture media can be used at small scale to produce inoculum, while tubular and flat panels are used at commercial scale. Depending on the microalgae, a temperature range from 15 to 28 °C and a pH from 7 to 8 can be employed. Relevant conditions for PUFA production are medium light irradiances (50-300 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)), air enriched with (0-1 % (v/v) CO2, as well as nitrogen and phosphorous limitation. For research purposes, the most appropriate medium for PUFA production is Bold's Basal, whereas mixotrophic cultivation using sucrose or glucose as the carbon source has been reported for industrial processes. For cell harvesting, the use of tangential flow membrane filtration or disk stack centrifugation is advisable at commercial scale. Current researches on PUFA extraction have focused on the use of organic solvents assisted with ultrasound or microwaves, supercritical fluids, and electroporation or are enzyme assisted. Commercial-scale extraction involves mainly physical methods such as bead mills and expeller presses. All these factors should be taken into

  18. MUC1-induced alterations in a lipid metabolic gene network predict response of human breast cancers to tamoxifen treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pitroda, Sean P.; Khodarev, Nikolai N.; Beckett, Michael A.; Kufe, Donald W.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2009-01-01

    The mucin 1 (MUC1) oncoprotein is aberrantly overexpressed in human breast cancers. Although MUC1 modulates the activity of estrogen receptor α (ER), there is no information regarding the effects of MUC1 on global gene expression patterns and the potential role of MUC1-induced genes in predicting outcome for breast cancer patients. We have developed an experimental model of MUC1-induced transformation that has identified the activation of genes involved in cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism. A 38-gene set of experimentally derived MUC1-induced genes associated with lipid metabolism was applied to the analysis of ER+ breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen. The results obtained from 2 independent databases demonstrate that patients overexpressing MUC1 and the lipid metabolic pathways are at significantly higher risk for death and recurrence/distant metastasis. By contrast, these genes were not predictive in untreated patients. Furthermore, a positive correlation was found between expression of the 38-gene set and the ER signaling pathway. These findings indicate that (i) MUC1 regulates cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism, and (ii) activation of these pathways in ER+ breast cancers predicts failure to tamoxifen treatment. PMID:19289846

  19. Protective effects of ginger toward cadmium-induced testes and kidney lipid peroxidation and hematological impairment in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Onwuka, Frank C; Erhabor, Osaro; Eteng, M U; Umoh, I B

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effect of oral dietary supplementation with ginger on cadmium-induced toxic effects on biochemical, hematological, and pathophysiological indices of albino rats. The effect of cadmium and cadmium/ginger treatment on lipid peroxidation was measured by malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in testes and kidney; serum activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), acid phosphatase (ACP), and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) enzyme were investigated alongside hematological indices. The results showed that cadmium induces a significant increase in both testicular and kidney MDA, whereas cadmium/ginger treatment produced a significant reversal of the effect of lipid peroxidation (P=.004). Cadmium treatment induced 75%, 78%, and 22% increases in activities of ACP, PAP, and ALP, respectively, whereas the cadmium/ginger-treated group reversed these values for enzyme activities (P=.001). Results of organ weight and hematological indices analysis in the cadmium-treated rats showed a decrease in organ weight and distortion of the hemopoietic features, whereas the cadmium/ginger-treated rats showed an improvement in organ weight and hematological indices (P=.04 and .001, respectively). The reversal of the toxic effects of cadmium in the cadmium/ginger-treated albino rats heralds the antioxidant potency of ginger toward cadmium toxicity-associated oxidative stress.

  20. Lipid-induced insulin resistance mediated by the proinflammatory receptor TLR4 requires saturated fatty acid–induced ceramide biosynthesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Holland, William L.; Bikman, Benjamin T.; Wang, Li-Ping; Yuguang, Guan; Sargent, Katherine M.; Bulchand, Sarada; Knotts, Trina A.; Shui, Guanghou; Clegg, Deborah J.; Wenk, Markus R.; Pagliassotti, Michael J.; Scherer, Philipp E.; Summers, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an enhanced inflammatory response that exacerbates insulin resistance and contributes to diabetes, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular disease. One mechanism accounting for the increased inflammation associated with obesity is activation of the innate immune signaling pathway triggered by TLR4 recognition of saturated fatty acids, an event that is essential for lipid-induced insulin resistance. Using in vitro and in vivo systems to model lipid induction of TLR4-dependent inflammatory events in rodents, we show here that TLR4 is an upstream signaling component required for saturated fatty acid–induced ceramide biosynthesis. This increase in ceramide production was associated with the upregulation of genes driving ceramide biosynthesis, an event dependent of the activity of the proinflammatory kinase IKKβ. Importantly, increased ceramide production was not required for TLR4-dependent induction of inflammatory cytokines, but it was essential for TLR4-dependent insulin resistance. These findings suggest that sphingolipids such as ceramide might be key components of the signaling networks that link lipid-induced inflammatory pathways to the antagonism of insulin action that contributes to diabetes. PMID:21490391

  1. Lipid metabolism in response to individual short chain fatty acids during mixotrophic mode of microalgal cultivation: Influence on biodiesel saturation and protein profile.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Rashmi; Arora, Somya; Rohit, M V; Venkata Mohan, S

    2015-01-01

    Critical influence of different short chain fatty acids as organic carbon source, during growth (GP) and nutrient stress lipogenic phase (NSLP) was investigated on biomass and lipid productivity, in mixotrophic fed-batch microalgae cultivation. Nutrient deprivation induced physiological stress stimulated highest lipid productivity with acetate (total/neutral lipids, 35/17) with saturation index of 80.53% by the end of NSLP followed by butyrate (12/7%; 78%). Biomass growth followed the order of acetate (2.23 g/l) >butyrate (0.99 g/l) >propionate (0.77 g/l). VFA removal (as COD) was maximum with acetate (87%) followed by butyrate (55.09%) and propionate (10.60%). Palmitic acid was the most dominant fatty acid found in the fatty acid composition of all variants and butyrate fed system yielded a maximum of 44% palmitic acid. Protein profiling illustrated prominence of acetyl CoA-synthetase activity in acetate system. Thus, fatty acids provide a promising alternative feedstock for biodiesel production with integrated microalgae-biorefinery.

  2. Enhanced GLUT4-Dependent Glucose Transport Relieves Nutrient Stress in Obese Mice Through Changes in Lipid and Amino Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gurley, Jami M; Ilkayeva, Olga; Jackson, Robert M; Griesel, Beth A; White, Phillip; Matsuzaki, Satochi; Qaisar, Rizwan; Van Remmen, Holly; Humphries, Kenneth M; Newgard, Christopher B; Olson, Ann Louise

    2016-12-01

    Impaired GLUT4-dependent glucose uptake is a contributing factor in the development of whole-body insulin resistance in obese patients and obese animal models. Previously, we demonstrated that transgenic mice engineered to express the human GLUT4 gene under the control of the human GLUT4 promoter (i.e., transgenic [TG] mice) are resistant to obesity-induced insulin resistance. A likely mechanism underlying increased insulin sensitivity is increased glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to investigate the broader metabolic consequences of enhanced glucose uptake into muscle. We observed that the expression of several nuclear and mitochondrially encoded mitochondrial enzymes was decreased in TG mice but that mitochondrial number, size, and fatty acid respiration rates were unchanged. Interestingly, both pyruvate and glutamate respiration rates were decreased in TG mice. Metabolomics analyses of skeletal muscle samples revealed that increased GLUT4 transgene expression was associated with decreased levels of some tricarboxylic acid intermediates and amino acids, whereas the levels of several glucogenic amino acids were elevated. Furthermore, fasting acyl carnitines in obese TG mice were decreased, indicating that increased GLUT4-dependent glucose flux decreases nutrient stress by altering lipid and amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle.

  3. Promotion of iron-induced rat liver microsomal lipid peroxidation by copper.

    PubMed

    Beckman, J K; Borowitz, S M; Greene, H L; Burr, I M

    1988-06-01

    Although copper has been demonstrated to promote lipid peroxidation in a number of systems, the mechanisms involved have not been fully defined. In this study, the role of copper in modifying lipid peroxidation has been explored in rat hepatic microsomes. In an in vitro system containing reduced glutathione (GSH, 200 microM) and Tris buffer, pH 7.4, cupric sulfate (1-50 microM) potentiated lipid peroxidation induced by ferrous sulfate (10 microM) but was unable to elicit peroxidation in the absence of iron. Higher levels of cupric sulfate (100 microM or greater) were inhibitory. The nature as well as the extent of the peroxidative response of microsomes to cupric sulfate were dependent on glutathione levels in addition to those of iron. Cupric sulfate (100 microM) strongly potentiated ferrous ion-induced lipid peroxidation in the presence of 400-800 microM GSH, while it inhibited peroxidation at lower levels of GSH (0-200 microM) and did not affect ferrous ion-induced peroxidation with glutathione levels of 3-10 mM. The potentiating effect of copper on ferrous ion-induced lipid peroxidation was further explored by investigating: (1) potential GSH-mediated reduction of cupric ions; (2) potential copper/GSH-mediated reduction of ferric ions (formed by oxidation during incubation); and (3) possible promotion of propagation reactions by copper/GSH. Our results indicate that cupric ions are reduced by GSH and thus are converted from an inhibitor to an enhancer of iron-induced lipid peroxidation. Cuprous ions appear to potentiate lipid peroxidation by reduction of ferric ions, rather than by promoting propagation reactions. Iron (in a specific Fe+2/Fe+3 ratio) is then an effective promoter of initiation reactions.

  4. Interaction of tau protein with model lipid membranes induces tau structural compaction and membrane disruption

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Emmalee M.; Dubey, Manish; Camp, Phillip J.; Vernon, Briana C.; Biernat, Jacek; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Chi, Eva Y.

    2012-01-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of the intrinsically disordered, microtubule-associated tau protein into neurofibrillary tangles is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the mechanisms of tau aggregation and toxicity remain unknown. Recent work has shown that lipid membrane can induce tau aggregation and that membrane permeabilization may serve as a pathway by which protein aggregates exert toxicity, suggesting that the plasma membrane may play dual roles in tau pathology. This prompted our investigation to assess tau's propensity to interact with membranes and to elucidate the mutually disruptive structural perturbations the interactions induce in both tau and the membrane. We show that although highly charged and soluble, the full-length tau (hTau40) is also highly surface active, selectively inserts into anionic DMPG lipid monolayers and induces membrane morphological changes. To resolve molecular-scale structural details of hTau40 associated with lipid membranes, X-ray and neutron scattering techniques are utilized. X-ray reflectivity indicates hTau40's presence underneath a DMPG monolayer and penetration into the lipid headgroups and tailgroups, whereas grazing incidence X-ray diffraction shows that hTau40 insertion disrupts lipid packing. Moreover, both air/water and DMPG lipid membrane interfaces induce the disordered hTau40 to partially adopt a more compact conformation with density similar to that of a folded protein. Neutron reflectivity shows that tau completely disrupts supported DMPG bilayers while leaving the neutral DPPC bilayer intact. Our results show that hTau40's strong interaction with anionic lipids induces tau structural compaction and membrane disruption, suggesting possible membrane-based mechanisms of tau aggregation and toxicity in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22401494

  5. Motility and stem cell properties induced by the epithelial-mesenchymal transition require destabilization of lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Prijic, Sara; Chen, Xiaoling; Levental, Ilya; Chang, Jeffrey T.

    2016-01-01

    The Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is a developmental program that provides cancer cells with the characteristics necessary for metastasis, including increased motility and stem cell properties. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this process are not yet fully understood, hampering efforts to develop therapeutics. In recent years, it has become apparent that EMT is accompanied by wholesale changes in diverse signaling pathways that are initiated by proteins at the plasma membrane (PM). The PM contains thousands of lipid and protein species that are dynamically and spatially organized into lateral membrane domains, an example of which are lipid rafts. Since one of the major functions of rafts is modulation of signaling originating at the PM, we hypothesized that the signaling changes occurring during an EMT are associated with alterations in PM organization. To test this hypothesis, we used Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles (GPMVs) to study the organization of intact plasma membranes isolated from live cells. We observed that induction of EMT significantly destabilized lipid raft domains. Further, this reduction in stability was crucial for the maintenance of the stem cell phenotype and EMT-induced remodeling of PM-orchestrated pathways. Exogenously increasing raft stability by feeding cells with ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) repressed these phenotypes without altering EMT markers, and inhibited the metastatic capacity of breast cancer cells. Hence, modulating raft properties regulates cell phenotype, suggesting a novel approach for targeting the impact of EMT in cancer. PMID:27303921

  6. Phenolic Acids (Gallic and Tannic Acids) Modulate Antioxidant Status and Cisplatin Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Akomolafe, Seun F; Akinyemi, Ayodele J; Anadozie, Scholarstical O

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) or CDDP), used in the treatment of many solid-tissue cancers, has its chief side-effect in nephrotoxicity. Hence, this study sought to investigate and compare the protective effect of gallic acid (GA) and tannic acid (TA) against cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in rats. The rats were given a prophylactic treatment of GA and TA orally at a dose of 20 and 40 mg/kg body weight for 7 consecutive days before the administration of a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of cisplatin (CP) at 7.5 mg/kg bwt. The protective effects of both GA and TA on CP induced nephrotoxicity were investigated by assaying renal function, oxidative stress biomarkers, and histopathological examination of kidney architecture. A single dose of cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg bwt) injected i.p. caused a significant increase in some biomarkers of renal function (creatinine, uric acid, and urea levels), with a marked elevation in malondialdehyde (MDA) content accompanied by a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) content (103.27%) of kidney tissue as compared to control group. Furthermore, a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in kidney antioxidant enzymes (SOD, catalase, GPx, and GST) activity was observed. However, pretreatment with oral administration of tannic acid and gallic acid at a dose of 20 and 40 mg/kg body weight, respectively, for 7 days prior to cisplatin administration reduced histological renal damage and suppressed the generation of ROS, lipid peroxidation, and oxidative stress in kidney tissues. These results indicate that both gallic and tannic acids could serve as a preventive strategy against cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity.

  7. Very long chain fatty acid and lipid signaling in the response of plants to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Raffaele, Sylvain; Leger, Amandine

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that lipid signaling is essential for plant resistance to pathogens. Besides oxylipins and unsaturated fatty acids known to play important signaling functions during plant-pathogen interactions, the very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) biosynthesis pathway has been recently associated to plant defense through different aspects. VLCFAs are indeed required for the biosynthesis of the plant cuticle and the generation of sphingolipids. Elucidation of the roles of these lipids in biotic stress responses is the result of the use of genetic approaches together with the identification of the genes/proteins involved in their biosynthesis. This review focuses on recent observations which revealed the complex function of the cuticle and cuticle-derived signals, and the key role of sphingolipids as bioactive molecules involved in signal transduction and cell death regulation during plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:19649180

  8. Surfactant lipids regulate LPS-induced interleukin-8 production in A549 lung epithelial cells by inhibiting translocation of TLR4 into lipid raft domains

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Wondwossen; Alghaithy, Abdulaziz A.; Parton, Joan; Jones, Kenneth P.; Jackson, Simon K.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to providing mechanical stability, growing evidence suggests that surfactant lipid components can modulate inflammatory responses in the lung. However, little is known of the molecular mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory action of surfactant lipids. This study investigates the effect of the lipid-rich surfactant preparations Survanta®, Curosurf®, and the major surfactant phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) on interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene and protein expression in human A549 lung epithelial cells using immunoassay and PCR techniques. To examine potential mechanisms of the surfactant lipid effects, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, and membrane lipid raft domains were separated by density gradient ultracentrifugation and analyzed by immunoblotting with anti-TLR4 antibody. The lipid-rich surfactant preparations Survanta®, Curosurf®, and DPPC, at physiological concentrations, significantly downregulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced IL-8 expression in A549 cells both at the mRNA and protein levels. The surfactant preparations did not affect the cell surface expression of TLR4 or the binding of LPS to the cells. However, LPS treatment induced translocation of TLR4 into membrane lipid raft microdomains, and this translocation was inhibited by incubation of the cells with the surfactant lipid. This study provides important mechanistic details of the immune-modulating action of pulmonary surfactant lipids. PMID:19648651

  9. Characterization of solid lipid nanoparticles containing caffeic acid and determination of its effects on MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Dikmen, Gokhan; Guney, Gamze; Genc, Lutfi

    2015-01-01

    Many anticancer drugs that are currently used in cancer treatment are natural products or their analogues by structural modification. Caffeic acid (3, 4-dihydroxycinnamic acid; CA) is classified as hydroxycinnamic acid and has a variety of potential pharmacological effects, including antioxidant, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities. As a drug carrier, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) introduced to improve stability, provide controlled drug release, avoid organic solvents and are obtained in small sizes. In this study, we developed solid lipid nanoparticles incorporating with caffeic acid using hot homogenization method. Caffeic acid loaded solid lipid nanoparticles were characterized regarding particle size, zeta potential, drug entrapment efficiency, drug release, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and FT-IR. The effects of caffeic acid loaded solid lipid nanoparticles on MCF-7 cells were determined by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-dimethyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) test and Annexin V-PI analysis. As a result, solid lipid nanoparticles could potentially be used for the delivery of caffeic acid and solid lipid nanoparticles formulation enhanced the effects of caffeic acid on MCF-7 cells. Some relevant patents are also referred in this article.

  10. Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modify fatty acid composition in hepatic and abdominal adipose tissue of sucrose-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Alexander-Aguilera, Alfonso; Berruezo, Silvia; Hernández-Diaz, Guillermo; Angulo, Ofelia; Oliart-Ros, Rosamaria

    2011-12-01

    The fatty acid profile of hepatocytes and adipocytes is determined by the composition of the dietary lipids. It remains unclear which fatty acid components contribute to the development or reduction of insulin resistance. The present work examined the fatty acid composition of both tissues in sucrose-induced obese rats receiving fish oil to determine whether the effect of dietary (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on the reversion of metabolic syndrome in these rats is associated to changes in the fatty acid composition of hepatocyte and adipocyte membrane lipids. Animals with metabolic syndrome were divided into a corn-canola oil diet group and a fish oil diet group, and tissues fatty acids composition were analyzed after 6 weeks of dietary treatment. Fatty acid profiles of the total membrane lipids were modified by the fatty acid composition of the diets fed to rats. N-3 PUFAs levels in animals receiving the fish oil diet plus sucrose in drinking water were significantly higher than in animals under corn-canola oil diets. It is concluded that in sucrose-induced obese rats, consumption of dietary fish oil had beneficial effects on the metabolic syndrome and that such effects would be conditioned by the changes in the n-3 PUFAs composition in hepatic and adipose tissues because they alter membrane properties and modify the type of substrates available for the production of active lipid metabolites acting on insulin resistance and obesity.

  11. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of (lyso)phosphatidic acids, (lyso)phosphatidylserines and other lipid classes.

    PubMed

    Cífková, Eva; Hájek, Roman; Lísa, Miroslav; Holčapek, Michal

    2016-03-25

    The goal of this work is a systematic optimization of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) separation of acidic lipid classes (namely phosphatidic acids-PA, lysophosphatidic acids-LPA, phosphatidylserines-PS and lysophosphatidylserines-LPS) and other lipid classes under mass spectrometry (MS) compatible conditions. The main parameters included in this optimization are the type of stationary phases used in HILIC, pH of the mobile phase, the type and concentration of mobile phase additives. Nine HILIC columns with different chemistries (unmodified silica, modified silica using diol, 2-picolylamine, diethylamine and 1-aminoanthracene and hydride silica) are compared with the emphasis on peak shapes of acidic lipid classes. The optimization of pH is correlated with the theoretical calculation of acidobasic equilibria of studied lipid classes. The final method using the hydride column, pH 4 adjusted by formic acid and the gradient of acetonitrile and 40 mmol/L of aqueous ammonium formate provides good peak shapes for all analyzed lipid classes including acidic lipids. This method is applied for the identification of lipids in real samples of porcine brain and kidney extracts.

  12. Changes in fatty acid composition and lipid profile during koji fermentation and their relationships with soy sauce flavour.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yunzi; Chen, Zhiyao; Liu, Ning; Zhao, Haifeng; Cui, Chun; Zhao, Mouming

    2014-09-01

    Evolution of lipids during koji fermentation and the effect of lipase supplementation on the sensory properties of soy sauce were investigated. Results showed that total lipids of the koji samples were in the range of 16-21%. The extracted lipid of initial koji consisted mainly of triacylglycerols (TAGs, >98%), followed by phospholipids (PLs), diglycerides (DAGs), monoacylglycerols (MAGs) and free fatty acids (FFAs). As the fermentation proceeded, peroxide value of the lipids decreased while carbonyl value increased (p<0.05). Linoleic acid was utilised fastest according to the fatty acid composition of total lipids, and preferential degradation of PLs to liberate FFAs was also observed. Moreover, phospholipase supplementation had significant influence on the sensory characteristics of soy sauce, especially enhanced (p<0.05) scores for the umami and kokumi taste attributes. All these results indicated that the control of PLs utilisation during fermentation was a potential method to improve soy sauce's characteristic taste.

  13. Differential lipid and fatty acid profiles of photoautotrophic and heterotrophic Chlorella zofingiensis: assessment of algal oils for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Huang, Junchao; Sun, Zheng; Zhong, Yujuan; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Feng

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to document and compare the lipid class and fatty acid composition of the green microalga Chlorella zofingiensis cultivated under photoautotrophic and heterotrophic conditions. Compared with photoautotrophic cells, a 900% increase in lipid yield was achieved in heterotrophic cells fed with 30 g L(-1) of glucose. Furthermore heterotrophic cells accumulated predominantly neutral lipids (NL) that accounted for 79.5% of total lipids with 88.7% being triacylglycerol (TAG); whereas photoautotrophic cells contained mainly the membrane lipids glycolipids (GL) and phospholipids (PL). Together with the much higher content of oleic acid (C18:1) (35.2% of total fatty acids), oils from heterotrophic C. zofingiensis appear to be more feasible for biodiesel production. Our study highlights the possibility of using heterotrophic algae for producing high quality biodiesel.

  14. Lipids of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa IIPL32 with biodiesel potential: Oil yield, fatty acid profile, fuel properties.

    PubMed

    Khot, Mahesh; Ghosh, Debashish

    2017-04-01

    This study analyzes the single cell oil (SCO), fatty acid profile, and biodiesel fuel properties of the yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa IIPL32 grown on the pentose fraction of acid pre-treated sugarcane bagasse as a carbon source. The yeast biomass from nitrogen limiting culture conditions (15.3 g L(-1) ) was able to give the SCO yield of 0.17 g g(-1) of xylose consumed. Acid digestion, cryo-pulverization, direct in situ transesterification, and microwave assisted techniques were evaluated in comparison to the Soxhlet extraction for the total intracellular yeast lipid recovery. The significant differences were observed among the SCO yield of different methods and the in situ transesterification stood out most for effective yeast lipid recovery generating 97.23 mg lipid as FAME per gram dry biomass. The method was fast and consumed lesser solvent with greater FAME yield while accessing most cellular fatty acids present. The yeast lipids showed the major presence of monounsaturated fatty esters (35-55%; 18:1, 16:1) suitable for better ignition quality, oxidative stability, and cold-flow properties of the biodiesel. Analyzed fuel properties (density, kinematic viscosity, cetane number) of the yeast oil were in good agreement with international biodiesel standards. The sugarcane bagasse-derived xylose and the consolidated comparative assessment of lab scale SCO recovery methods highlight the necessity for careful substrate choice and validation of analytical method in yeast oil research. The use of less toxic co-solvents together with solvent recovery and recycling would help improve process economics for sustainable production of biodiesel from the hemicellulosic fraction of cheap renewable sources.

  15. Esterification of 24S-OHC induces formation of atypical lipid droplet-like structures, leading to neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Takabe, Wakako; Urano, Yasuomi; Vo, Diep-Khanh Ho; Shibuya, Kimiyuki; Tanno, Masaki; Kitagishi, Hiroaki; Fujimoto, Toyoshi; Noguchi, Noriko

    2016-11-01

    The 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol (24S-OHC), which plays an important role in maintaining brain cholesterol homeostasis, has been shown to possess neurotoxicity. We have previously reported that 24S-OHC esterification by ACAT1 and the resulting lipid droplet (LD) formation are responsible for 24S-OHC-induced cell death. In the present study, we investigate the functional roles of 24S-OHC esters and LD formation in 24S-OHC-induced cell death, and we identify four long-chain unsaturated fatty acids (oleic acid, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, and DHA) with which 24S-OHC is esterified in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells treated with 24S-OHC. Here, we find that cotreatment of cells with 24S-OHC and each of these four unsaturated fatty acids increases prevalence of the corresponding 24S-OHC ester and exacerbates induction of cell death as compared with cell death induced by treatment with 24S-OHC alone. Using electron microscopy, we find in the present study that 24S-OHC induces formation of LD-like structures coupled with enlarged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumina, and that these effects are suppressed by treatment with ACAT inhibitor. Collectively, these results illustrate that ACAT1-catalyzed esterification of 24S-OHC with long-chain unsaturated fatty acid followed by formation of atypical LD-like structures at the ER membrane is a critical requirement for 24S-OHC-induced cell death.

  16. Rifampicin-Induced Hepatic Lipid Accumulation: Association with Up-Regulation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Da-Gang; Li, Lu; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Previous study found that rifampicin caused intrahepatic cholestasis. This study investigated the effects of rifampicin on hepatic lipid metabolism. Mice were orally administered with rifampicin (200 mg/kg) daily for different periods. Results showed that serum TG level was progressively reduced after a short elevation. By contrast, hepatic TG content was markedly increased in rifampicin-treated mice. An obvious hepatic lipid accumulation, as determined by Oil Red O staining, was observed in mice treated with rifampicin for more than one week. Moreover, mRNA levels of Fas, Acc and Scd-1, several key genes for fatty acid synthesis, were elevated in rifampicin-treated mice. In addition, the class B scavenger receptor CD36 was progressively up-regulated by rifampicin. Interestingly, hepatic SREBP-1c and LXR-α, two important transcription factors that regulate genes for hepatic fatty acid synthesis, were not activated by rifampicin. Instead, hepatic PXR was rapidly activated in rifampicin-treated mice. Hepatic PPARγ, a downstream target of PXR, was transcriptionally up-regulated. Taken together, the increased hepatic lipid synthesis and uptake of fatty acids from circulation into liver jointly contribute to rifampicin-induced hepatic lipid accumulation. The increased uptake of fatty acids from circulation into liver might be partially attributed to rifampicin-induced up-regulation of PPARγ and its target genes. PMID:27806127

  17. Chemical vectors for gene delivery: a current review on polymers, peptides and lipids containing histidine or imidazole as nucleic acids carriers

    PubMed Central

    Midoux, Patrick; Pichon, Chantal; Yaouanc, Jean-Jacques; Jaffrès, Paul-Alain

    2009-01-01

    DNA/cationic lipid (lipoplexes), DNA/cationic polymer (polyplexes) and DNA/cationic polymer/cationic lipid (lipopolyplexes) electrostatic complexes are proposed as non-viral nucleic acids delivery systems. These DNA-nanoparticles are taken up by the cells through endocytosis processes, but the low capacity of DNA to escape from endosomes is regarded as the major limitations of their transfection efficiency. Here, we present a current report on a particular class of carriers including the polymers, peptides and lipids, which is based on the exploitation of the imidazole ring as an endosome destabilization device to favour the nucleic acids delivery in the cytosol. The imidazole ring of histidine is a weak base that has the ability to acquire a cationic charge when the pH of the environment drops bellow 6. As it has been demonstrated for poly(histidine), this phenomena can induce membrane fusion and/or membrane permeation in an acidic medium. Moreover, the accumulation of histidine residues inside acidic vesicles can induce a proton sponge effect, which increases their osmolarity and their swelling. The proof of concept has been shown with polylysine partially substituted with histidine residues that has caused a dramatic increase by 3–4.5 orders of magnitude of the transfection efficiency of DNA/polylysine polyplexes. Then, several histidine-rich polymers and peptides as well as lipids with imidazole, imidazolinium or imidazolium polar head have been reported to be efficient carriers to deliver nucleic acids including genes, mRNA or SiRNA in vitro and in vivo. More remarkable, histidylated carriers are often weakly cytotoxic, making them promising chemical vectors for nucleic acids delivery. This article is part of a themed section on Vector Design and Drug Delivery. For a list of all articles in this section see the end of this paper, or visit: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:19459843

  18. Inhibition of cumene hydroperoxide-induced lipid peroxidation by a novel pyridoindole antioxidant in rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Stefek, M; Masarykova, M; Benes, L

    1992-06-01

    The ability of stobadine, a novel pyridoindole antioxidant, to inhibit lipid peroxidation induced by cumene hydroperoxide was investigated in rat liver microsomes. In the micromolar range stobadine effectively inhibited lipid peroxidation as measured by the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive products. The peroxidation-related degradation of microsomal cytochrome P-450 was prevented by stobadine in the same pattern. Another line of evidence in support of the antioxidant action of stobadine was given by its inhibition of cumene hydroperoxide-induced oxygen consumption in microsomal incubations. Inhibition of lipid peroxidation was not a function of decreased bioactivation of cumene hydroperoxide, as stobadine did not affect the rate of cytochrome P-450 dependent cleavage of cumene hydroperoxide. Neither had stobadine any effect on cytochrome P-450 peroxidase function characterized by the rate of cumene hydroperoxide-dependent oxidation of TMPD, and no direct spectral interaction with microsomal cytochrome P-450 was observed in the micromolar region. We suggest that it is the ability of stobadine to scavenge alkoxyl and peroxyl radicals that is predominantly responsible for the observed antioxidant effect.

  19. Changes in cellular lipid synthesis of normal and neoplastic cells during cytolysis induced by alkyl lysophospholipid analogues.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, D B

    1985-09-01

    Susceptibility of eight different cell types of murine or human origins to alkyl lysophospholipid analogue (ALP)-induced cytolysis correlated well with a selective, dose-dependent inhibition of radiolabeled oleic acid incorporation into phosphatidylcholine (PC) and a concomitant stimulation of incorporation into neutral lipids (NL), mainly triacylglycerols. In resistant cells (murine macrophages, L929S, K562, and rMeth A) a counts per minute NL/counts per minute PC ratio of 0.8-1.0 was observed with 30 micrograms ALP/ml; in sensitive tumor targets (Meth A, HL60, YAC, and ABLS-8.1) values greater than 2.7 were found with 5-10 micrograms ALP/ml. Changes in lipid metabolism preceded cytolysis in Meth A fibrosarcoma cells. In degradation experiments the percentage of total lipid radioactivity in PC was reduced after 24 hours to 47% compared to that in controls in sensitive Meth A with 10 micrograms ALP/ml. The macrophage-PC was unaffected at the same concentration. Sensitivity to ALP was independent of cell proliferation. Resistance was not restricted to normal cells and was inducible in Meth A (and rMeth A).

  20. Control analysis of lipid biosynthesis in tissue cultures from oil crops shows that flux control is shared between fatty acid synthesis and lipid assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Ramli, Umi S; Baker, Darren S; Quant, Patti A; Harwood, John L

    2002-01-01

    Top-Down (Metabolic) Control Analysis (TDCA) was used to examine, quantitatively, lipid biosynthesis in tissue cultures from two commercially important oil crops, olive (Olea europaea L.) and oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.). A conceptually simplified system was defined comprising two blocks of reactions: fatty acid synthesis (Block A) and lipid assembly (Block B), which produced and consumed, respectively, a common and unique system intermediate, cytosolic acyl-CoA. We manipulated the steady-state levels of the system intermediate by adding exogenous oleic acid and, using two independent assays, measured the effect of the addition on the system fluxes (J(A) and J(B)). These were the rate of incorporation of radioactivity: (i) through Block A from [1-(14)C]acetate into fatty acids and (ii) via Block B from [U-(14)C]glycerol into complex lipids respectively. The data showed that fatty acid formation (Block A) exerted higher control than lipid assembly (Block B) in both tissues with the following group flux control coefficients (C):(i) Oil palm: *C(J(TL))(BlkA)=0.64+/-0.05 and *C(J(TL))(BlkB)=0.36+/-0.05(ii) Olive: *C(J(TL))(BlkA)=0.57+/-0.10 and *C(J(TL))(BlkB)=0.43+/-0.10where *C indicates the group flux control coefficient over the lipid biosynthesis flux (J(TL)) and the subscripts BlkA and BlkB refer to defined blocks of the system, Block A and Block B. Nevertheless, because both parts of the lipid biosynthetic pathway exert significant flux control, we suggest strongly that manipulation of single enzyme steps will not affect product yield appreciably. The present study represents the first use of TDCA to examine the overall lipid biosynthetic pathway in any tissue, and its findings are of immediate academic and economic relevance to the yield and nutritional quality of oil crops. PMID:12023882

  1. Control analysis of lipid biosynthesis in tissue cultures from oil crops shows that flux control is shared between fatty acid synthesis and lipid assembly.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Umi S; Baker, Darren S; Quant, Patti A; Harwood, John L

    2002-06-01

    Top-Down (Metabolic) Control Analysis (TDCA) was used to examine, quantitatively, lipid biosynthesis in tissue cultures from two commercially important oil crops, olive (Olea europaea L.) and oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.). A conceptually simplified system was defined comprising two blocks of reactions: fatty acid synthesis (Block A) and lipid assembly (Block B), which produced and consumed, respectively, a common and unique system intermediate, cytosolic acyl-CoA. We manipulated the steady-state levels of the system intermediate by adding exogenous oleic acid and, using two independent assays, measured the effect of the addition on the system fluxes (J(A) and J(B)). These were the rate of incorporation of radioactivity: (i) through Block A from [1-(14)C]acetate into fatty acids and (ii) via Block B from [U-(14)C]glycerol into complex lipids respectively. The data showed that fatty acid formation (Block A) exerted higher control than lipid assembly (Block B) in both tissues with the following group flux control coefficients (C):(i) Oil palm: *C(J(TL))(BlkA)=0.64+/-0.05 and *C(J(TL))(BlkB)=0.36+/-0.05(ii) Olive: *C(J(TL))(BlkA)=0.57+/-0.10 and *C(J(TL))(BlkB)=0.43+/-0.10where *C indicates the group flux control coefficient over the lipid biosynthesis flux (J(TL)) and the subscripts BlkA and BlkB refer to defined blocks of the system, Block A and Block B. Nevertheless, because both parts of the lipid biosynthetic pathway exert significant flux control, we suggest strongly that manipulation of single enzyme steps will not affect product yield appreciably. The present study represents the first use of TDCA to examine the overall lipid biosynthetic pathway in any tissue, and its findings are of immediate academic and economic relevance to the yield and nutritional quality of oil crops.

  2. Transient Hepatic Overexpression of Insulin-Like Growth Factor 2 Induces Free Cholesterol and Lipid Droplet Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Sonja M.; Laggai, Stephan; Van Wonterghem, Elien; Gemperlein, Katja; Müller, Rolf; Haybaeck, Johannes; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E.; Ogris, Manfred; Libert, Claude; Kiemer, Alexandra K.

    2016-01-01

    Although insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) has been reported to be overexpressed in steatosis and steatohepatitis, a causal role of IGF2 in steatosis development remains elusive. Aim of our study was to decipher the role of IGF2 in steatosis development. Hydrodynamic gene delivery of an Igf2 plasmid used for transient Igf2 overexpression employing codon-optimized plasmid DNA resulted in a strong induction of hepatic Igf2 expression. The exogenously delivered Igf2 had no influence on endogenous Igf2 expression. The downstream kinase AKT was activated in Igf2 animals. Decreased ALT levels mirrored the cytoprotective effect of IGF2. Serum cholesterol was increased and sulfo-phospho-vanillin colorimetric assay confirmed lipid accumulation in Igf2-livers while no signs of inflammation were observed. Interestingly, hepatic cholesterol and phospholipids, determined by thin layer chromatography, and free cholesterol by filipin staining, were specifically increased. Lipid droplet (LD) size was not changed, but their number was significantly elevated. Furthermore, free cholesterol, which can be stored in LDs and has been reported to be critical for steatosis progression, was elevated in Igf2 overexpressing mice. Accordingly, Hmgcr/HmgCoAR was upregulated. To have a closer look at de novo lipid synthesis we investigated expression of the lipogenic transcription factor SREBF1 and its target genes. SREBF1 was induced and also SREBF1 target genes were slightly upregulated. Interestingly, the expression of Cpt1a, which is responsible for mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, was induced. Hepatic IGF2 expression induces a fatty liver, characterized by increased cholesterol and phospholipids leading to accumulation of LDs. We therefore suggest a causal role for IGF2 in hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27199763

  3. The histone deacetylase inhibiting drug Entinostat induces lipid accumulation in differentiated HepaRG cells

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Abigail D. G.; Scopigno, Tullio; Pediconi, Natalia; Levrero, Massimo; Hagman, Henning; Kiskis, Juris; Enejder, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Dietary overload of toxic, free metabolic intermediates leads to disrupted insulin signalling and fatty liver disease. However, it was recently reported that this pathway might not be universal: depletion of histone deacetylase (HDAC) enhances insulin sensitivity alongside hepatic lipid accumulation in mice, but the mechanistic role of microscopic lipid structure in this effect remains unclear. Here we study the effect of Entinostat, a synthetic HDAC inhibitor undergoing clinical trials, on hepatic lipid metabolism in the paradigmatic HepaRG liver cell line. Specifically, we statistically quantify lipid droplet morphology at single cell level utilizing label-free microscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, supported by gene expression. We observe Entinostat efficiently rerouting carbohydrates and free-fatty acids into lipid droplets, upregulating lipid coat protein gene Plin4, and relocating droplets nearer to the nucleus. Our results demonstrate the power of Entinostat to promote lipid synthesis and storage, allowing reduced systemic sugar levels and sequestration of toxic metabolites within protected protein-coated droplets, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases such as diabetes and metabolic syndrome. PMID:27320682

  4. The histone deacetylase inhibiting drug Entinostat induces lipid accumulation in differentiated HepaRG cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, Abigail D. G.; Scopigno, Tullio; Pediconi, Natalia; Levrero, Massimo; Hagman, Henning; Kiskis, Juris; Enejder, Annika

    2016-06-01

    Dietary overload of toxic, free metabolic intermediates leads to disrupted insulin signalling and fatty liver disease. However, it was recently reported that this pathway might not be universal: depletion of histone deacetylase (HDAC) enhances insulin sensitivity alongside hepatic lipid accumulation in mice, but the mechanistic role of microscopic lipid structure in this effect remains unclear. Here we study the effect of Entinostat, a synthetic HDAC inhibitor undergoing clinical trials, on hepatic lipid metabolism in the paradigmatic HepaRG liver cell line. Specifically, we statistically quantify lipid droplet morphology at single cell level utilizing label-free microscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, supported by gene expression. We observe Entinostat efficiently rerouting carbohydrates and free-fatty acids into lipid droplets, upregulating lipid coat protein gene Plin4, and relocating droplets nearer to the nucleus. Our results demonstrate the power of Entinostat to promote lipid synthesis and storage, allowing reduced systemic sugar levels and sequestration of toxic metabolites within protected protein-coated droplets, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases such as diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

  5. Tributyltin (TBT) induces oxidative stress and modifies lipid profile in the filamentous fungus Cunninghamella elegans.

    PubMed

    Bernat, Przemysław; Gajewska, Ewa; Szewczyk, Rafał; Słaba, Mirosława; Długoński, Jerzy

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the response of the tributyltin-degrading fungal strain Cunninghamella elegans to the organotin, a comparative lipidomics strategy was employed using an LC/MS-MS technique. A total of 49 lipid species were identified. Individual phospholipids were then quantified using a multiple reaction monitoring method. Tributyltin (TBT) caused a decline in the amounts of many molecular species of phosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidylserine and an increase in the levels of phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine. In the presence of TBT, it was observed that overall unsaturation was lower than in the control. Lipidome data were analyzed using principal component analysis, which confirmed the compositional changes in membrane lipids in response to TBT. Additionally, treatment of fungal biomass with butyltin led to a significant increase in lipid peroxidation. It is suggested that modification of the phospholipids profile and lipids peroxidation may reflect damage to mycelium caused by TBT.

  6. S4(13)-PV cell-penetrating peptide induces physical and morphological changes in membrane-mimetic lipid systems and cell membranes: implications for cell internalization.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana M S; Trabulo, Sara; Cardoso, Ana L; Lorents, Annely; Morais, Catarina M; Gomes, Paula; Nunes, Cláudia; Lúcio, Marlene; Reis, Salette; Padari, Kärt; Pooga, Margus; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C; Jurado, Amália S

    2012-03-01

    The present work aims to gain insights into the role of peptide-lipid interactions in the mechanisms of cellular internalization and endosomal escape of the S4(13)-PV cell-penetrating peptide, which has been successfully used in our laboratory as a nucleic acid delivery system. A S4(13)-PV analogue, S4(13)-PVscr, displaying a scrambled amino acid sequence, deficient cell internalization and drug delivery inability, was used in this study for comparative purposes. Differential scanning calorimetry, fluorescence polarization and X-ray diffraction at small and wide angles techniques showed that both peptides interacted with anionic membranes composed of phosphatidylglycerol or a mixture of this lipid with phosphatidylethanolamine, increasing the lipid order, shifting the phase transition to higher temperatures and raising the correlation length between the bilayers. However, S4(13)-PVscr, in contrast to the wild-type peptide, did not promote lipid domain segregation and induced the formation of an inverted hexagonal lipid phase instead of a cubic phase in the lipid systems assayed. Electron microscopy showed that, as opposed to S4(13)-PVscr, the wild-type peptide induced the formation of a non-lamellar organization in membranes of HeLa cells. We concluded that lateral phase separation and destabilization of membrane lamellar structure without compromising membrane integrity are on the basis of the lipid-driven and receptor-independent mechanism of cell entry of S4(13)-PV peptide. Overall, our results can contribute to a better understanding of the role of peptide-lipid interactions in the mechanisms of cell-penetrating peptide membrane translocation, helping in the future design of more efficient cell-penetrating peptide-based drug delivery systems.

  7. Lipid and fatty acid profiles in rats consuming different high-fat ketogenic diets.

    PubMed

    Dell, C A; Likhodii, S S; Musa, K; Ryan, M A; Burnham, W M; Cunnane, S C

    2001-04-01

    High-fat ketogenic diets are used to treat intractable seizures in children, but little is known of the mechanism by which these diets work or whether fats rich in n-3 polyunsaturates might be beneficial. Tissue lipid and fatty acid profiles were determined in rats consuming very high fat (80 weight%), low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets containing either medium-chain triglyceride, flaxseed oil, butter, or an equal combination of these three fat sources. Ketogenic diets containing butter markedly raised liver triglyceride but had no effect on plasma cholesterol. Unlike the other fats, flaxseed oil in the ketogenic diet did not raise brain cholesterol. Brain total and free fatty acid profiles remained similar in all groups, but there was an increase in the proportion of arachidonate in brain total lipids in the medium-chain triglyceride group, while the two groups consuming flaxseed oil had significantly lower arachidonate in brain, liver, and plasma. The very high dietary intake of alpha-linolenate in the flaxseed group did not change docosahexaenoate levels in the brain. Our previous report based on these diets showed that although ketosis is higher in rats consuming a ketogenic diet based on medium-chain triglyceride oil, seizure resistance in the pentylenetetrazol model is not clearly related to the degree of ketosis achieved. In combination with our present data from the same seizure study, it appears that ketogenic diets with widely differing effects on tissue lipids and fatty acid profiles can confer a similar amount of seizure protection.

  8. Critical amino acid residues of maurocalcine involved in pharmacology, lipid interaction and cell penetration.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk, Kamel; Ram, Narendra; Boisseau, Sylvie; Strappazzon, Flavie; Rehaim, Amel; Sadoul, Rémy; Darbon, Hervé; Ronjat, Michel; De Waard, Michel

    2007-10-01

    Maurocalcine (MCa) is a 33-amino acid residue peptide that was initially identified in the Tunisian scorpion Scorpio maurus palmatus. This peptide triggers interest for three main reasons. First, it helps unravelling the mechanistic basis of Ca(2+) mobilization from the sarcoplasmic reticulum because of its sequence homology with a calcium channel domain involved in excitation-contraction coupling. Second, it shows potent pharmacological properties because of its ability to activate the ryanodine receptor. Finally, it is of technological value because of its ability to carry cell-impermeable compounds across the plasma membrane. Herein, we characterized the molecular determinants that underlie the pharmacological and cell-penetrating properties of maurocalcine. We identify several key amino acid residues of the peptide that will help the design of cell-penetrating analogues devoid of pharmacological activity and cell toxicity. Close examination of the determinants underlying cell penetration of maurocalcine reveals that basic amino acid residues are required for an interaction with negatively charged lipids of the plasma membrane. Maurocalcine analogues that penetrate better have also stronger interaction with negatively charged lipids. Conversely, less effective analogues present a diminished ability to interact with these lipids. These findings will also help the design of still more potent cell penetrating analogues of maurocalcine.

  9. ACSL3 and GSK-3β are essential for lipid upregulation induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress in liver cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yung-Sheng; Tsai, Chien-Ting; Huangfu, Chien-An; Huang, Wen-Ya; Lei, Huan-Yao; Lin, Chiou-Feng; Su, Ih-Jen; Chang, Wen-Tsan; Wu, Pei-Huan; Chen, Ya-Ting; Hung, Jui-Hsiang; Young, Kung-Chia; Lai, Ming-Derg

    2011-03-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is essential for lipid biosynthesis, and stress signals in this organelle are thought to alter lipid metabolism. Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie the dysregulation of lipid metabolism in hepatocytes may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of lipid accumulation. We first tested the effects of several inhibitors on lipid dysregulation induced by tunicamycin, an ER stress inducer. Triacsin C, an inhibitor of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) 1, 3, and 4, was the most potent among these inhibitors. We then analyzed the expression of the ACSL family during ER stress. The expression of ACSL3 was induced by ER stress in HuH-7 cells and in mice livers. ACSL3 shRNA, but not ACSL1 shRNA, inhibited the induction of lipid accumulation. GSK-3β inhibitors attenuated ACSL3 expression and the lipid accumulation induced by ER stress in HuH-7 cells. shRNA that target GSK-3β also inhibited the upregulation of ACSL3 and lipid accumulation in HuH-7 and HepG2 cells. The hepatitis B virus mutant large surface protein, which is known to induce ER stress, increased the lipid content of cells. Similarly, Triacsin C, and GSK-3β inhibitors abrogated the lipid dysregulation caused by the hepatitis B virus mutant large surface protein. Altogether, ACSL3 and GSK-3β represent novel therapeutic targets for lipid dysregulation by ER stress.

  10. Arabidopsis Lipins, PDAT1 Acyltransferase, and SDP1 Triacylglycerol Lipase Synergistically Direct Fatty Acids toward β-Oxidation, Thereby Maintaining Membrane Lipid Homeostasis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jilian; Yan, Chengshi; Roston, Rebecca; Shanklin, John

    2014-01-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) metabolism is a key aspect of intracellular lipid homeostasis in yeast and mammals, but its role in vegetative tissues of plants remains poorly defined. We previously reported that PHOSPHOLIPID:DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE1 (PDAT1) is crucial for diverting fatty acids (FAs) from membrane lipid synthesis to TAG and thereby protecting against FA-induced cell death in leaves. Here, we show that overexpression of PDAT1 enhances the turnover of FAs in leaf lipids. Using the trigalactosyldiacylglycerol1-1 (tgd1-1) mutant, which displays substantially enhanced PDAT1-mediated TAG synthesis, we demonstrate that disruption of SUGAR-DEPENDENT1 (SDP1) TAG lipase or PEROXISOMAL TRANSPORTER1 (PXA1) severely decreases FA turnover, leading to increases in leaf TAG accumulation, to 9% of dry weight, and in total leaf lipid, by 3-fold. The membrane lipid composition of tgd1-1 sdp1-4 and tgd1-1 pxa1-2 double mutants is altered, and their growth and development are compromised. We also show that two Arabidopsis thaliana lipin homologs provide most of the diacylglycerol for TAG synthesis and that loss of their functions markedly reduces TAG content, but with only minor impact on eukaryotic galactolipid synthesis. Collectively, these results show that Arabidopsis lipins, along with PDAT1 and SDP1, function synergistically in directing FAs toward peroxisomal β-oxidation via TAG intermediates, thereby maintaining membrane lipid homeostasis in leaves. PMID:25293755

  11. Lipid peroxidation induced by maternal cadmium exposure in mouse pups

    SciTech Connect

    Baohui Xu |; Yapin Jin; Zhaoliang Feng; Zhaofa Xu; Matsushita, Toshio

    1993-11-01

    Cadmium as an environmental pollutant has received considerable attention and its toxic effects have been studied extensively in human and adult animals. Moreover, an International Task Group on Metal Accumulation (1973) has established that although it is in a limited quantity cadmium can be transported across placenta and excreted through milk in animals. Likewise, it can pass through placenta in humans. Furthermore, the fact is that women in the cadmium-polluted areas are continuously exposed to cadmium during gestation and lactation. Even if they are removed from the exposure, the body burden of cadmium probably remains high because of the very long biological half-time of cadmium which is estimated to be between 17.6 and 33 years. Thus, it is possible that fetuses and pups may be exposed to cadmium during maternal gestation and lactation. Although placenta affords some protection from cadmium exposure, cadmium exposure prior to day 10-11 when placenta forms may be deleterious. Cadmium exposure during pregnancy and its effects on offsprings, which were mainly focused on litter size, pup survival, pup growth and cadmium contents in pups following maternal cadmium exposure have been reported. Lipid peroxide has been considered as a sensitive toxicological index for environmental pollutants. The inhibited antioxidant enzymes and enhanced lipid peroxidation due to cadmium exposure have been demonstrated both in humans and animals. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the toxic effects of maternal cadmium exposure on mouse pups using both the indices used in the previous studies and determinations of lipid peroxide concentrations in various pup organs. In conclusion, data from the present study indicate that the detection of LPO concentration in selected pup tissues is a sensitive index for evaluating the effects of maternal cadmium exposure on mouse pups. 16 refs., 4 tabs.

  12. Dietary Fat Interacts with PCBs to Induce Changes in Lipid Metabolism in Mice Deficient in Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Bernhard; Reiterer, Gudrun; Toborek, Michal; Matveev, Sergey V.; Daugherty, Alan; Smart, Eric; Robertson, Larry W.

    2005-01-01

    There is evidence that dietary fat can modify the cytotoxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and that coplanar PCBs can induce inflammatory processes critical in the pathology of vascular diseases. To test the hypothesis that the interaction of PCBs with dietary fat is dependent on the type of fat, low-density lipoprotein receptor–deficient (LDL-R−/−) mice were fed diets enriched with either olive oil or corn oil for 4 weeks. Half of the animals from each group were injected with PCB-77. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression in aortic arches was non-detectable in the olive-oil–fed mice but was highly expressed in the presence of PCB-77. PCB treatment increased liver neutral lipids and decreased serum fatty acid levels only in mice fed the corn-oil–enriched diet. PCB treatment increased mRNA expression of genes involved in inflammation, apoptosis, and oxidative stress in all mice. Upon PCB treatment, mice in both olive- and corn-oil–diet groups showed induction of genes involved in fatty acid degradation but with up-regulation of different key enzymes. Genes involved in fatty acid synthesis were reduced only upon PCB treatment in corn-oil–fed mice, whereas lipid transport/export genes were altered in olive-oil–fed mice. These data suggest that dietary fat can modify changes in lipid metabolism induced by PCBs in serum and tissues. These findings have implications for understanding the interactions of nutrients with environmental contaminants on the pathology of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. PMID:15626652

  13. Vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids together regulate lipid metabolism in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Khaire, Amrita; Rathod, Richa; Kale, Anvita; Joshi, Sadhana

    2015-08-01

    Our recent study indicates that maternal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status influence plasma and erythrocyte fatty acid profile in dams. The present study examines the effects of prenatal and postnatal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid status on lipid metabolism in the offspring. Pregnant dams were divided into five groups: Control; Vitamin B12 deficient (BD); Vitamin B12 supplemented (BS); Vitamin B12 deficient group supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids (BDO); Vitamin B12 supplemented group with omega-3 fatty acids (BSO). The offspring were continued on the same diets till 3 month of age. Vitamin B12 deficiency increased cholesterol levels (p<0.01) but reduced docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (p<0.05), liver mRNA levels of acetyl CoA carboxylase-1 (ACC-1) (p<0.05) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) (p<0.01) in the offspring. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation to this group normalized cholesterol but not mRNA levels of ACC-1 and CPT-1. Vitamin B12 supplementation normalized the levels cholesterol to that of control but increased plasma triglyceride (p<0.01) and reduced liver mRNA levels of adiponectin, ACC-1, and CPT-1 (p<0.01 for all). Supplementation of both vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid normalized triglyceride and mRNA levels of all the above genes. Prenatal and postnatal vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids together play a crucial role in regulating the genes involved in lipid metabolism in adult offspring.

  14. Branched short-chain fatty acids modulate glucose and lipid metabolism in primary adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, Emilia; Nyman, Margareta; Pålbrink, Ann-Ki; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin; Degerman, Eva

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), e.g. acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid, generated through colonic fermentation of dietary fibers, have been shown to reach the systemic circulation at micromolar concentrations. Moreover, SCFAs have been conferred anti-obesity properties in both animal models and human subjects. Branched SCFAs (BSCFAs), e.g., isobutyric and isovaleric acid, are generated by fermentation of branched amino acids, generated from undigested protein reaching colon. However, BSCFAs have been sparsely investigated when referring to effects on energy metabolism. Here we primarily investigate the effects of isobutyric acid and isovaleric acid on glucose and lipid metabolism in primary rat and human adipocytes. BSCFAs inhibited both cAMP-mediated lipolysis and insulin-stimulated de novo lipogenesis at 10 mM, whereas isobutyric acid potentiated insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by all concentrations (1, 3 and 10 mM) in rat adipocytes. For human adipocytes, only SCFAs inhibited lipolysis at 10 mM. In both in vitro models, BSCFAs and SCFAs reduced phosphorylation of hormone sensitive lipase, a rate limiting enzyme in lipolysis. In addition, BSCFAs and SCFAs, in contrast to insulin, inhibited lipolysis in the presence of wortmannin, a phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase inhibitor and OPC3911, a phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor in rat adipocytes. Furthermore, BSCFAs and SCFAs reduced insulin-mediated phosphorylation of protein kinase B. To conclude, BSCFAs have effects on adipocyte lipid and glucose metabolism that can contribute to improved insulin sensitivity in individuals with disturbed metabolism. PMID:27994949

  15. Determination of Total Lipids as Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAME) by in situ Transesterification: Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wychen, S.; Laurens, L. M. L.

    2013-12-01

    This procedure is based on a whole biomass transesterification of lipids to fatty acid methyl esters to represent an accurate reflection of the potential of microalgal biofuels. Lipids are present in many forms and play various roles within an algal cell, from cell membrane phospholipids to energy stored as triacylglycerols.

  16. Convergence of Nitric Oxide and Lipid Signaling: Anti-Inflammatory Nitro-Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Paul R.S.; Schopfer, Francisco J.; O’Donnell, Valerie B.; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    The signaling mediators nitric oxide (·NO) and oxidized lipids, once viewed to transduce metabolic and inflammatory information via discrete and independent pathways, are now appreciated as interdependent regulators of immune response and metabolic homeostasis. The interactions between these two classes of mediators result in reciprocal control of mediator sythesis that is strongly influenced by the local chemical environment. The relationship between the two pathways extends beyond co-regulation of ·NO and eicosanoid formation to converge via the nitration of unsaturated fatty acids to yield nitro derivatives (NO2-FA). These pluripotent signaling molecules are generated in vivo as an adaptive response to oxidative inflammatory conditions and manifest predominantly anti-inflammatory signaling reactions. These actions of NO2-FA are diverse, with these species serving as a potential chemical reserve of ·NO, reacting with cellular nucleophiles to post-translationally modify protein structure, function and localization. In this regard these species act as potent endogenous ligands for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ. Functional consequences of these signaling mechanisms have been shown in multiple model systems, including the inhibition of platelet and neutrophil functions, induction of heme oxygenase-1, inhibition of LPS-induced cytokine release in monocytes, increased insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake in adipocytes and relaxation of pre-constricted rat aortic segments. These observations have propelled further in vitro and in vivo studies of mechanisms of NO2-FA signaling and metabolism, highlighting the therapeutic potential of this class of molecules as anti-inflammatory drug candidates. PMID:19200454

  17. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits intestinal β-carotene absorption by downregulation of lipid transporter expression via PPAR-α dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mashurabad, Purna Chandra; Kondaiah, Palsa; Palika, Ravindranadh; Ghosh, Sudip; Nair, Madhavan K; Raghu, Pullakhandam

    2016-01-15

    The involvement of lipid transporters, the scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) and Niemann-Pick type C1 Like 1 protein (NPC1L1) in carotenoid absorption is demonstrated in intestinal cells and animal models. Dietary ω-3 fatty acids are known to possess antilipidemic properties, which could be mediated by activation of PPAR family transcription factors. The present study was conducted to determine the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), on intestinal β-carotene absorption. β-carotene uptake in Caco-2/TC7 cells was inhibited by EPA (p < 0.01) and PPARα agonist (P < 0.01), but not by DHA, PPARγ or PPARδ agonists. Despite unaltered β-carotene uptake, both DHA and PPARδ agonists inhibited the NPC1L1 expression. Further, EPA also induced the expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1A (CPT1A) expression, a PPARα target gene. Interestingly, EPA induced inhibition of β-carotene uptake and SR B1 expression were abrogated by specific PPARα antagonist, but not by PPARδ antagonist. EPA and PPARα agonist also inhibited the basolateral secretion of β-carotene from Caco-2 cells grown on permeable supports. These results suggest that EPA inhibits intestinal β-carotene absorption by down regulation of SR B1 expression via PPARα dependent mechanism and provide an evidence for dietary modulation of intestinal β-carotene absorption.

  18. Lipid peroxidation induced by indomethacin with horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide: involvement of indomethacin radicals.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toshiaki; Muraoka, Sanae; Fujimoto, Yukio

    2002-06-01

    Some of the side-effects of using indomethacin (IM) involve damage to the gastric mucosa and liver mitochondria. On the other hand, neutrophils infiltrate inflammatory sites to damage the tissues through the generation of reactive oxygen species by myeloperoxidase. The stomach and intestine have large amounts of peroxidase. These findings suggest that peroxidases are involved in tissue damage induced by IM. To clarify the basis for the tissue damage induced by IM in the presence of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and H2O2 (HRP-H2O2), lipid peroxidation was investigated. When IM was incubated with liver microsomes in the presence of HRP-H2O2 and ADP-Fe3+, lipid peroxidation was time-dependent. Catalase and desferrioxamine almost completely inhibited lipid peroxidation, indicating that H2O2 and iron are necessary for lipid peroxidation. Of interest, superoxide dismutase strongly inhibited lipid peroxidation, and it also inhibited the formation of bathophenanthroline-Fe2+, indicating that reduction of the ferric ion was due to superoxide (O2-). ESR signals of IM radicals were detected during the interaction of IM with HRP-H2O2. However, the IM radical by itself did not reduce the ferric ion. These results suggest that O2- may be generated during the interaction of IM radicals with H2O2. Ferryl species, which are formed during the reduction of iron by O2-, probably are involved in lipid peroxidation.

  19. Aminoguanidine inhibits reactive oxygen species formation, lipid peroxidation, and oxidant-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Giardino, I; Fard, A K; Hatchell, D L; Brownlee, M

    1998-07-01

    Aminoguanidine (AG) treatment, like nerve growth factor (NGF) treatment, prevents diabetes-induced apoptosis of retinal Müller cells in the rat eye, but the mechanism involved is unknown. In this study, the effects of preincubation with AG on oxidant-induced apoptosis, oxidant-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and lipid peroxidation were determined in rat retinal Müller cells and compared with the effects of NGF, a protein that protects neuronal cells from oxidative stress. The effect of AG on rabbit vitreous lipid peroxide levels was also determined. After exposure to increasing concentrations of H2O2, there was a corresponding increase in the percentage of apoptotic Müller cells. Preincubation with AG for 48 h completely inhibited oxidant-induced apoptosis in response to 10 micromol/l H2O2 (+AG 0 vs. 10 micromol/l, NS), and reduced the percentage of apoptotic cells in response to 50 micromol/l H2O2 by 50% (+AG vs. -AG, P < 0.01). Longer preincubation did not increase the antiapoptotic effect of AG. The effect of AG was dose-dependent. Similar results were obtained after preincubation with NGF. Both AG and NGF preincubation prevented the twofold increase in oxidant-induced lipid peroxides. The fivefold increase in oxidant-induced ROS production was decreased 100% by NGF, but only 61% by AG preincubation. The twofold increase in vitreous lipid peroxide level in diabetic rabbits was completely prevented by AG treatment. AG reduced H2O2-induced benzoate hydroxylation in a dose-dependent manner. Intracellular glutathione content was unchanged. These data demonstrate that AG can act as an antioxidant in vivo, quenching hydroxyl radicals and lipid peroxidation in cells and tissues and preventing oxidant-induced apoptosis.

  20. Betaine alleviates hepatic lipid accumulation via enhancing hepatic lipid export and fatty acid oxidation in rats fed with a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Huang, Danping; Hu, Qiaolin; Wu, Jing; Wang, Yizhen; Feng, Jie

    2015-06-28

    To assess the effects of betaine on hepatic lipid accumulation and investigate the underlying mechanism, thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 100 (sd 2·50) g were divided into four groups, and started on one of four treatments: basal diet, basal diet with betaine administration, high-fat diet and high-fat diet with betaine administration. The results showed that no significant difference of body weight was found among experimental groups. Compared with high-fat diet-fed rats, a betaine supplementation decreased (P< 0·05) hepatic TAG accumulation induced by high-fat diet, which was also supported by hepatic histology results. Additionally, hepatic betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase concentration [corrected] as well as its mRNA abundance and lecithin level were found increased (P< 0·05) by betaine supplementation in both basal diet-fed rats and high-fat diet-fed rats. Betaine administration in high-fat diet-fed rats exhibited a higher (P< 0·05) concentration [corrected] of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) compared with high-fat diet-fed rats. High-fat diet inhibited (P< 0·05) the gene expression of hepatic PPARα and CPT1. However, betaine administration in high-fat diet-fed rats elevated (P< 0·05) the gene expression of PPARα and CPT1. Moreover, concentration, gene and protein expressions of hepatic fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) were increased (P< 0·05) in response to betaine administration in high-fat diet group; meanwhile the gene expression of hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase was increased (P< 0·05) as well. The results suggest that betaine administration enhanced hepatic lipid export and fatty acid oxidation in high-fat diet-fed rats, thus effectively alleviating fat accumulation in the liver.

  1. Lipid content and fatty acid composition of green algae Scenedesmus obliquus grown in a constant cell density apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, K. J.; Nakhost, Z.; Barzana, E.; Karel, M.

    1987-01-01

    The lipids of alga Scenedesmus obliquus grown under controlled conditions were separated and fractionated by column and thin-layer chromatography, and fatty acid composition of each lipid component was studied by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC). Total lipids were 11.17%, and neutral lipid, glycolipid and phospholipid fractions were 7.24%, 2.45% and 1.48% on a dry weight basis, respectively. The major neutral lipids were diglycerides, triglycerides, free sterols, hydrocarbons and sterol esters. The glycolipids were: monogalactosyl diglyceride, digalactosyl diglyceride, esterified sterol glycoside, and sterol glycoside. The phospholipids included: phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl glycerol and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. Fourteen fatty acids were identified in the four lipid fractions by GLC. The main fatty acids were C18:2, C16:0, C18:3(alpha), C18:1, C16:3, C16:1, and C16:4. Total unsaturated fatty acid and essential fatty acid compositions of the total algal lipids were 80% and 38%, respectively.

  2. Lipid peroxidation in mitochondrial membranes induced by enzymatic deamination of biogenic amines.

    PubMed

    Kagan, V E; Smirnov, A V; Savov, V M; Prilipko, L L; Gorkin, V Z

    1983-01-01

    In the presence of Fe2+ and ascorbate lipid peroxidation in mitochondrial membranes is induced by incubation of membrane fragments devoid of catalase activity with amines which are the substrates of monoamine oxidases of the type B (2-phenylethylamine, benzylamine) or transformed monoamine oxidases of the type A (cadaverine). The highest stimulation of lipid peroxidation is observed in the samples containing both cadaverine and benzylamine. On the contrary, the substrate of the monoamine oxidases of the type A, serotonin, causes an antioxidative effect under these conditions. The necessary prerequisites for lipid peroxidation induction in mitochondria during their incubation with amines are i) the absence of catalase activity in the biomembranes and, ii) the presence of physiological concentrations of Fe2+. Physiological concentrations of ascorbate or pH shifts cause additional stimulation of lipid peroxidation.

  3. Short term exposure to perluoroalkyl acids causes increase of hepatic lipid and triglyceride in conjunction with liver hypertrophy

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Persistent presence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in the environment is due to extensive use of industrial and consumer products. These chemicals activate peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor-alpha (PPARa) in liver and after lipid metabolism. The current stu...

  4. Australian Acid Brine Lake as a Mars Analog: An Analysis of Preserved Lipids in Shore and Lake Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, H. V.; Stern, J. C.; Baldridge, A. M.; Thomsen, B. J.

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates organic molecules preserved in sediment cores from an acid brine lake. We explore the distribution and stable isotopic composition of lipids in order to understand preservation potential in similar martian environments.

  5. Chlorogenic acid stabilized nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) of atorvastatin: formulation, design and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saba; Baboota, Sanjula; Ali, Javed; Narang, R S; Narang, Jasjeet K

    2016-01-01

    The present work was aimed at developing an optimized oral nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) formulation of poorly soluble atorvastatin Ca (AT Ca) and assessing its in vitro release, oral bioavailability and pharmacodynamic activity. In this study, chlorogenic acid, a novel excipient having synergistic cholesterol lowering activity was utilized and explored in NLC formulation development. The drug-loaded NLC formulations were prepared using a high pressure homogenization technique and optimized by the Box-Behnken statistical design using the Design-Expert software. The optimized NLC formulation was composed of oleic acid and stearic acid as lipid phase (0.9% w/v), poloxamer 188 as surfactant (1% w/v) and chlorogenic acid (0.05% w/v). The mean particle size, polydispersity index (PDI) and % drug entrapment efficiency of optimized NLC were 203.56 ± 8.57 nm, 0.27 ± 0.028 and 83.66 ± 5.69, respectively. In vitro release studies showed that the release of drug from optimized NLC formulations were markedly enhanced as compared to solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and drug suspension. The plasma concentration time profile of AT Ca in rats showed 3.08- and 4.89-fold increase in relative bioavailability of developed NLC with respect to marketed preparation (ATORVA® tablet) and drug suspension, respectively. Pharmacodynamic study suggested highly significant (**p < 0.01) reduction in the cholesterol and triglyceride values by NLC in comparison with ATORVA® tablet. Therefore, the results of in vivo studies demonstrated promising prospects for successful oral delivery of AT Ca by means of its chlorogenic acid integrated NLC.

  6. Longitudinal Metabolomic Profiling of Amino Acids and Lipids across Healthy Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Karen L.; Hellmuth, Christian; Uhl, Olaf; Buss, Claudia; Wadhwa, Pathik D.; Koletzko, Berthold; Entringer, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by a complexity of metabolic processes that may impact fetal development and ultimately, infant health outcomes. However, our understanding of whole body maternal and fetal metabolism during this critical life stage remains incomplete. The objective of this study is to utilize metabolomics to profile longitudinal patterns of fasting maternal metabolites among a cohort of non-diabetic, healthy pregnant women in order to advance our understanding of changes in protein and lipid concentrations across gestation, the biochemical pathways by which they are metabolized and to describe variation in maternal metabolites between ethnic groups. Among 160 pregnant women, amino acids, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates, keto-bodies and non-esterified fatty acids were detected by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, while polar lipids were detected through flow-injected mass spectrometry. The maternal plasma concentration of several essential and non-essential amino acids, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, free carnitine, acetylcarnitine, phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins significantly decreased across pregnancy. Concentrations of several TCA intermediates increase as pregnancy progresses, as well as the keto-body β-hydroxybutyrate. Ratios of specific acylcarnitines used as indicators of metabolic pathways suggest a decreased beta-oxidation rate and increased carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 enzyme activity with advancing gestation. Decreasing amino acid concentrations likely reflects placental uptake and tissue biosynthesis. The absence of any increase in plasma non-esterified fatty acids is unexpected in the catabolic phase of later pregnancy and may reflect enhanced placental fatty acid uptake and utilization for fetal tissue growth. While it appears that energy production through the TCA cycle increases as pregnancy progresses, decreasing patterns of free carnitine and acetylcarnitine as well as increased

  7. Fish oil and 3-thia fatty acid have additive effects on lipid metabolism but antagonistic effects on oxidative damage when fed to rats for 50 weeks.

    PubMed

    Vigeru