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Sample records for acid induced writhing

  1. Isobolographic analysis of interaction between cyclooxygenase inhibitors and tramadol in acetic acid-induced writhing in mice.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, Padi S V; Jain, Naveen K; Singh, Amarjit; Kulkarni, Shrinivas K

    2004-07-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and opioids are the most commonly used analgesics in the management of acute and chronic pain. Combined use of NSAIDs and opioids has been indicated for achieving better analgesia with reduced side effects. The present study was aimed at evaluating the combination of different NSAIDs, which inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes and tramadol against acetic acid-induced writhing in mice. The expected beneficial effect of combination regimen was analyzed by isobolographic analysis. The oral and intrathecally administered tramadol, a mu-opioid and naproxen, a nonselective COX inhibitor produced dose-dependent antinociception, however, rofecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor lacked analgesic efficacy in writhing test. Isobolographic analysis showed synergistic or supra-additive interactions for the combinations of naproxen and tramadol after oral and intrathecal administration. However, similar interaction was not observed when tramadol was combined with rofecoxib. Pretreatment with naloxone partially reversed the antinociceptive effect of tramadol per se and its combination with naproxen without modifying the per se effect of NSAID. The results demonstrated marked synergistic interaction between naproxen and tramadol and such interaction involved opioid as well as non-opioid mechanisms of tramadol and inhibition of COX-1 but not COX-2 by naproxen.

  2. Aconitine-induced writhing as a method for assessing aspirin-like analgesic activity.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, T N; Bhargava, K P

    1980-01-01

    A painful writhing syndrome is produced by aconitine when given intraperitoneally. It is similar to that induced by other chemical agent viz. phenylquinone, acetic acid, and bradykinin. Aconitine writhing is quick to appear, shows greater frequency and longer duration than that induced by other agents. The nonnarcotic analgesics more selectively antagonize the aconitine writhing than orally-administered narcotic analgesics. Thus the aconitine writhing method is a very suitable method for the selective screening of the aspirin type of analgesic agent.

  3. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Gelsolin in Acetic Acid Induced Writhing, Tail Immersion and Carrageenan Induced Paw Edema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Parasar, Devraj; Sagar, Amin; Choudhary, Vikas; Chopra, Bhupinder Singh; Garg, Renu; Ashish; Khatri, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Plasma gelsolin levels significantly decline in several disease conditions, since gelsolin gets scavenged when it depolymerizes and caps filamentous actin released in the circulation following tissue injury. It is well established that our body require/implement inflammatory and analgesic responses to protect against cell damage and injury to the tissue. This study was envisaged to examine analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of exogenous gelsolin (8 mg/mouse) in mice models of pain and acute inflammation. Administration of gelsolin in acetic acid-induced writhing and tail immersion tests not only demonstrated a significant reduction in the number of acetic acid-induced writhing effects, but also exhibited an analgesic activity in tail immersion test in mice as compared to placebo treated mice. Additionally, anti-inflammatory function of gelsolin (8 mg/mouse) compared with anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium (10 mg/kg)] was confirmed in the carrageenan injection induced paw edema where latter was measured by vernier caliper and fluorescent tomography imaging. Interestingly, results showed that plasma gelsolin was capable of reducing severity of inflammation in mice comparable to diclofenac sodium. Analysis of cytokines and histo-pathological examinations of tissue revealed administration of gelsolin and diclofenac sodium significantly reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-6. Additionally, carrageenan groups pretreated with diclofenac sodium or gelsolin showed a marked decrease in edema and infiltration of inflammatory cells in paw tissue. Our study provides evidence that administration of gelsolin can effectively reduce the pain and inflammation in mice model. PMID:26426535

  4. Tipepidine enhances the antinociceptive-like action of carbamazepine in the acetic acid writhing test.

    PubMed

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Miki, Risa; Urashima, Yuri; Honda, Sokichi; Shehata, Ahmed M; Soeda, Fumio; Shirasaki, Tetsuya; Takahama, Kazuo

    2011-01-25

    Several antidepressants have been used to treat severe pain in clinics. Recently, we reported that the centrally acting non-narcotic antitussive (cough suppressant drug), tipepidine produces an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test, although the mechanism of action appears to be quite different from that of known antidepressants. In the present study, we investigated whether a combination of tipepidine and carbamazepine acts synergistically to induce an antinociceptive effect in the acetic acid-induced writhing test in mice. Prior to studying the combination of tipepidine and carbamazepine, the analgesic action of tipepidine alone was also examined in mice. Tipepidine at 5-40mg/kg i.p. significantly reduced the number of writhes induced by acetic acid in mice. Carbamazepine at 20mg/kg i.p. also significantly reduced the writhing reaction. Furthermore, co-administration of carbamazepine (5 and 10mg/kg, i.p.) and tipepidine (2.5mg/kg i.p.) significantly decreased the number of writhes induced by acetic acid. This finding suggests that a combination of carbamazepine and tipepidine may be a new strategy for the treatment of neuropathic pain such as what occurs in trigeminal neuralgia, because the use of carbamazepine is often limited by its adverse effects and by reduction of its analgesic efficacy by microsomal enzyme induction. PMID:21114989

  5. Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of Pyeongwisan on LPS-Stimulated Murine Macrophages and Mouse Models of Acetic Acid-Induced Writhing Response and Xylene-Induced Ear Edema

    PubMed Central

    Oh, You-Chang; Jeong, Yun Hee; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ha, Jeong-Ho; Gu, Min Jung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-01-01

    Pyeongwisan (PW) is an herbal medication used in traditional East Asian medicine to treat anorexia, abdominal distension, borborygmus and diarrhea caused by gastric catarrh, atony and dilatation. However, its effects on inflammation-related diseases are unknown. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of PW on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation in macrophages and on local inflammation in vivo. We investigated the biological effects of PW on the production of inflammatory mediators, pro-inflammatory cytokines and related products as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Additionally, we evaluated the analgesic effect on the acetic acid-induced writhing response and the inhibitory activity on xylene-induced ear edema in mice. PW showed anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In addition, PW strongly suppressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a NO synthesis enzyme, induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and inhibited NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation. Also, PW suppressed TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β cytokine production in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophage cells. Furthermore, PW showed an analgesic effect on the writhing response and an inhibitory effect on mice ear edema. We demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects and inhibitory mechanism in macrophages as well as inhibitory activity of PW in vivo for the first time. Our results suggest the potential value of PW as an inflammatory therapeutic agent developed from a natural substance. PMID:25569097

  6. The Writhe of Helical Structures in the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toeroek, T.; Berger, M. A.; Kliem, B.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Helicity is a fundamental property of magnetic fields, conserved in ideal MHD. In flux rope topology, it consists of twist and writhe helicity. Despite the common occurrence of helical structures in the solar atmosphere, little is known about how their shape relates to the writhe, which fraction of helicity is contained in writhe, and how much helicity is exchanged between twist and writhe when they erupt. Aims. Here we perform a quantitative investigation of these questions relevant for coronal flux ropes. Methods. The decomposition of the writhe of a curve into local and nonlocal components greatly facilitates its computation. We use it to study the relation between writhe and projected S shape of helical curves and to measure writhe and twist in numerical simulations of flux rope instabilities. The results are discussed with regard to filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results. (1) We demonstrate that the relation between writhe and projected S shape is not unique in principle, but that the ambiguity does not affect low-lying structures, thus supporting the established empirical rule which associates stable forward (reverse) S shaped structures low in the corona with positive (negative) helicity. (2) Kink-unstable erupting flux ropes are found to transform a far smaller fraction of their twist helicity into writhe helicity than often assumed. (3) Confined flux rope eruptions tend to show stronger writhe at low heights than ejective eruptions (CMEs). This argues against suggestions that the writhing facilitates the rise of the rope through the overlying field. (4) Erupting filaments which are S shaped already before the eruption and keep the sign of their axis writhe (which is expected if field of one chirality dominates the source volume of the eruption), must reverse their S shape in the course of the rise. Implications for the occurrence of the helical kink instability in such events are discussed.

  7. Effects of chlorpheniramine and ranitidine on the visceral nociception induced by acetic acid in rats: role of opioid system.

    PubMed

    Zanboori, A; Tamaddonfard, E; Mojtahedein, A

    2008-10-15

    In this study, effects of chlorpheniramine (H1-receptor blocker), ranitidine (H2-receptor blocker), morphine (an opioid agonist) and naloxone (an opioid antagonist) in separate and combined treatments were investigated on the visceral nociception in rats. Visceral nociception was induced by intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid (1 mL, 1%). The latency time to the beginning of the first abdominal wall contraction (first writhe) was measured and the numbers of writhes were counted for 1 h after acetic acid injection. Intraperitoneal injections of chlorpheniramine and ranitidine significantly (p < 0.05) increased the latency time to the beginning of the first writhe and also significantly (p < 0.05) decreased the numbers of writhes. The same results were obtained after subcutaneous injection of morphine. Subcutaneous injection of naloxone did not change the intensity of visceral nociception, but significantly (p < 0.05) prevented the morphine-induced antinociception. Intraperitoneal injection of chlorpheniramine significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced the morphine-induced analgesia, but did not reverse the effect of naloxone on nociceptive responses. Intraperitoneal injection of ranitidine, with no effect on the morphine-induced antinociception, significantly (p < 0.05) reversed the effect of naloxone on pain responses. These results suggest that both chlorpheniramine and ranitidine exert antinociceptive effect in the visceral nociception. In addition, morphine through a naloxone-dependent mechanism produces visceral antinociception. Moreover, the endogenous opioid system may participate in the chlorpheniramine- but not in the ranitidine-induced antinociception.

  8. Twisting and Writhing with George Ellery Hale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    2013-06-01

    Early in his productive career in astronomy, George Ellery Hale developed innovative solar instrumentation that allowed him to make narrow-band images. Among the solar phenomena he discovered were sunspot vortices, which he attributed to storms akin to cyclones in our own atmosphere. Using the concept of magnetic helicity, physicists and mathematicians describe the topology of magnetic fields, including twisting and writhing. Our contemporary understanding of Hale's vortices as a consequence of large-scale twist in sunspot magnetic fields hinges on a key property of helicity: conservation. I will describe the critical role that this property plays, when applied to twist and writhe, in a fundamental aspect of global solar magnetism: the hemispheric and solar cycle dependences of active region electric currents with respect to magnetic fields. With the advent of unbroken sequences of high-resolution magnetic images, such as those presently available from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on Solar Dynamics Observatory, the flux of magnetic helicity through the photosphere can be observed quantitatively. As magnetic flux tubes buoy up through the convection zone, buffeted and shredded by turbulence, they break up into fragments by repeated random bifurcation. We track these rising flux fragments in the photosphere, and calculate the flux of energy and magnetic helicity there. Using a quantitative model of coronal currents, we also track connections between these fragments to calculate the energy and magnetic helicity stored at topological interfaces that are in some ways analogous to the storage of stress at faults in the Earth's crust. Comparison of these values to solar flares and interplanetary coronal mass ejections implies that this is the primary storage mechanism for energy and magnetic helicity released in those phenomena, and suggests a useful tool for quantitative prediction of geomagnetic storms.

  9. The extended polar writhe: a tool for open curves mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, Christopher B.; Neukirch, Sébastien

    2016-05-01

    A measure of the writhing of a curve is introduced and is used to extend the Călugăreanu decomposition for closed curves, as well as the polar decomposition for curves bound between planes. The new writhe measure is also shown to be able to assess changes in linking due to belt-trick and knotting type deformations, and further its utility is illustrated on examples taken from elastic rod parameter-continuation studies. Finally C++ and mathematica codes are made available and shown to be faster than existing algorithms for the numerical computation of the writhe.

  10. Changes in saccharin preference behavior as a primary outcome to evaluate pain and analgesia in acetic acid-induced visceral pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    de la Puente, Beatriz; Romero-Alejo, Elizabeth; Vela, José Miguel; Merlos, Manuel; Zamanillo, Daniel; Portillo-Salido, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Reflex-based procedures are important measures in preclinical pain studies that evaluate stimulated behaviors. These procedures, however, are insufficient to capture the complexity of the pain experience, which is often associated with the depression of several innate behaviors. While recent studies have made efforts to evidence the suppression of some positively motivated behaviors in certain pain models, they are still far from being routinely used as readouts for analgesic screening. Here, we characterized and compared the effect of the analgesic ibuprofen (Ibu) and the stimulant, caffeine, in assays of acute pain-stimulated and pain-depressed behavior. Intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid (AA) served as a noxious stimulus to stimulate a writhing response or depress saccharin preference and locomotor activity (LMA) in mice. AA injection caused the maximum number of writhes between 5 and 20 minutes after administration, and writhing almost disappeared 1 hour later. AA-treated mice showed signs of depression-like behaviors after writhing resolution, as evidenced by reduced locomotion and saccharin preference for at least 4 and 6 hours, respectively. Depression-like behaviors resolved within 24 hours after AA administration. A dose of Ibu (40 mg/kg) – inactive to reduce AA-induced abdominal writhing – administered before or after AA injection significantly reverted pain-induced saccharin preference deficit. The same dose of Ibu also significantly reverted the AA-depressed LMA, but only when it was administered after AA injection. Caffeine restored locomotion – but not saccharin preference – in AA-treated mice, thus suggesting that the reduction in saccharin preference – but not in locomotion – was specifically sensitive to analgesics. In conclusion, AA-induced acute pain attenuated saccharin preference and LMA beyond the resolution of writhing behavior, and the changes in the expression of hedonic behavior, such as sweet taste preference, can be

  11. Changes in saccharin preference behavior as a primary outcome to evaluate pain and analgesia in acetic acid-induced visceral pain in mice.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Beatriz; Romero-Alejo, Elizabeth; Vela, José Miguel; Merlos, Manuel; Zamanillo, Daniel; Portillo-Salido, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Reflex-based procedures are important measures in preclinical pain studies that evaluate stimulated behaviors. These procedures, however, are insufficient to capture the complexity of the pain experience, which is often associated with the depression of several innate behaviors. While recent studies have made efforts to evidence the suppression of some positively motivated behaviors in certain pain models, they are still far from being routinely used as readouts for analgesic screening. Here, we characterized and compared the effect of the analgesic ibuprofen (Ibu) and the stimulant, caffeine, in assays of acute pain-stimulated and pain-depressed behavior. Intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid (AA) served as a noxious stimulus to stimulate a writhing response or depress saccharin preference and locomotor activity (LMA) in mice. AA injection caused the maximum number of writhes between 5 and 20 minutes after administration, and writhing almost disappeared 1 hour later. AA-treated mice showed signs of depression-like behaviors after writhing resolution, as evidenced by reduced locomotion and saccharin preference for at least 4 and 6 hours, respectively. Depression-like behaviors resolved within 24 hours after AA administration. A dose of Ibu (40 mg/kg) - inactive to reduce AA-induced abdominal writhing - administered before or after AA injection significantly reverted pain-induced saccharin preference deficit. The same dose of Ibu also significantly reverted the AA-depressed LMA, but only when it was administered after AA injection. Caffeine restored locomotion - but not saccharin preference - in AA-treated mice, thus suggesting that the reduction in saccharin preference - but not in locomotion - was specifically sensitive to analgesics. In conclusion, AA-induced acute pain attenuated saccharin preference and LMA beyond the resolution of writhing behavior, and the changes in the expression of hedonic behavior, such as sweet taste preference, can be used as a more

  12. Conservation of writhe helicity under anti-parallel reconnection

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Christian E.; Ricca, Renzo L.; Sumners, De Witt L.

    2015-01-01

    Reconnection is a fundamental event in many areas of science, from the interaction of vortices in classical and quantum fluids, and magnetic flux tubes in magnetohydrodynamics and plasma physics, to the recombination in polymer physics and DNA biology. By using fundamental results in topological fluid mechanics, the helicity of a flux tube can be calculated in terms of writhe and twist contributions. Here we show that the writhe is conserved under anti-parallel reconnection. Hence, for a pair of interacting flux tubes of equal flux, if the twist of the reconnected tube is the sum of the original twists of the interacting tubes, then helicity is conserved during reconnection. Thus, any deviation from helicity conservation is entirely due to the intrinsic twist inserted or deleted locally at the reconnection site. This result has important implications for helicity and energy considerations in various physical contexts. PMID:25820408

  13. Coupling of twist and writhe in short DNA loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medalion, Shlomi; Rappaport, Shay M.; Rabin, Yitzhak

    2010-01-01

    While bending and twist can be treated as independent degrees of freedom for linear DNA molecules, the loop closure constraint introduces a coupling between these variables in circular DNA. We performed Monte Carlo simulations of wormlike rods with both bending and twist rigidity in order to study the coupling between the writhe and twist distributions for various DNA lengths. We find that for sufficiently short DNA, the writhe distribution differs from that of a model with bending energy only. We show that the factorization approximation introduced by previous researchers coincides, within numerical accuracy, with our simulation results, and conclude that the closure constraint is fully accounted for by the White-Fuller relation. Experimental tests of our results for short DNA plasmids are proposed.

  14. The evolution of writhe in kink-unstable flux ropes and erupting filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Török, T.; Kliem, B.; Berger, M. A.; Linton, M. G.; Démoulin, P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.

    2014-06-01

    The helical kink instability of a twisted magnetic flux tube has been suggested as a trigger mechanism for solar filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In order to investigate if estimations of the pre-emptive twist can be obtained from observations of writhe in such events, we quantitatively analyze the conversion of twist into writhe in the course of the instability, using numerical simulations. We consider the line tied, cylindrically symmetric Gold-Hoyle flux rope model and measure the writhe using the formulae by Berger and Prior which express the quantity as a single integral in space. We find that the amount of twist converted into writhe does not simply scale with the initial flux rope twist, but depends mainly on the growth rates of the instability eigenmodes of higher longitudinal order than the basic mode. The saturation levels of the writhe, as well as the shapes of the kinked flux ropes, are very similar for considerable ranges of initial flux rope twists, which essentially precludes estimations of pre-eruptive twist from measurements of writhe. However, our simulations suggest an upper twist limit of ˜6π for the majority of filaments prior to their eruption.

  15. TWIST, WRITHE, AND HELICITY IN THE INNER PENUMBRA OF A SUNSPOT

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz Cobo, B.; Puschmann, K. G. E-mail: kgp@aip.de

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this work is the determination of the twist, writhe, and self-magnetic helicity of penumbral filaments located in an inner sunspot penumbra. For this purpose, we inverted data taken with the spectropolarimeter on board Hinode with the SIR (Stokes Inversion based on Response function) code. For the construction of a three-dimensional geometrical model we applied a genetic algorithm minimizing the divergence of B-vector and the net magnetohydrodynamic force, consequently a force-free solution would be reached if possible. We estimated two proxies to the magnetic helicity frequently used in literature: the force-free parameter {alpha}{sub z} and the current helicity term h{sub c{sub z}}. We show that both proxies are only qualitative indicators of the local twist as the magnetic field in the area under study significantly departs from a force-free configuration. The local twist shows significant values only at the borders of bright penumbral filaments with opposite signs on each side. These locations are precisely correlated to large electric currents. The average twist (and writhe) of penumbral structures is very small. The spines (dark filaments in the background) show a nearly zero writhe. The writhe per unit length of the intraspines diminishes with increasing length of the tube axes. Thus, the axes of tubes related to intraspines are less wrung when the tubes are more horizontal. As the writhe of the spines is very small, we can conclude that the writhe reaches only significant values when the tube includes the border of an intraspine.

  16. Bile acids but not acidic acids induce Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongfeng; Wang, Xiao; Gai, Zhibo; Song, Xiaoming; Jia, Xinyong; Tian, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is associated with the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Bile acids (BAs) refluxing into the esophagus contribute to esophageal injury, which results in BE and subsequent EAC. We developed two animal models to test the role of BAs in the pathogenesis of BE. We surgically generated BA reflux, with or without gastric acid, in rats. In a second experiment, we fed animals separately with BAs and gastric acid. Pathologic changes were examined and the expression of Muc2 and Cdx2 in BE tissue was tested by immunostaining. Inflammatory factors in the plasma, as well as differentiation genes in BE were examined through highly sensitive ELISA and semi-quantitative RT-PCR techniques. We found that BAs are sufficient for the induction of esophagitis and Barrett's-like metaplasia in the esophagus. Overexpression of inflammatory cells, IL-6, and TNF-α was observed both in animals fed with BAs and surgically generated BA reflux. Furthermore, elevated levels of Cdx2, Muc2, Bmp4, Kit19, and Tff2 (differentiation genes in BE) were found in BA-treated rats. In conclusion, BAs, but not gastric acid, are a major causative factor for BE. We confirmed that BAs contribute to the development of BE by inducing the inflammatory response in the esophagus. Inhibiting BAs may be a promising therapy for BE.

  17. The influence of neuropeptides on Malpighian tubule writhing and its significance for excretion.

    PubMed

    Coast, G M

    1998-01-01

    Diuretic peptides (locustakinin and Locusta-DH) increase the spontaneous contractile activity of visceral muscle fibers associated with Malpighian tubules from the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria) at concentrations that increase urine production. Muscle activity is shown to assist the flow of material in the tubule lumen, but is not essential for diuresis. Tubule writhing also serves to reduce unstirred layers (USLs) at the basolateral surface of the epithelium and thereby facilitates the excretion of solutes entering the lumen by passive diffusion. PMID:9533634

  18. The anti-nociceptive potential of tilmicosin against chemical-induced but not thermal-induced pain in mice.

    PubMed

    El-Mahmoudy, A; Gheith, I

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the analgesic activity of the macrolide antibiotic tilmicosin at dose levels of 20 and 40 mg/kg of body weight, subcutaneously, against chemical- and thermal-induced acute pains, using acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin-induced pain, hot-plate, and tail-flick models in mice. Tilmicosin showed a dose-dependent significant decrease in the number of writhes in the acetic acid-induced writhing test and significant decrease in hind paw-licking time in the late phase of the formalin test. However, it did not cause any significant changes in the reaction times to heat stimuli in the hot-plate and tail-flick models. In chemically-induced pains, both dose levels of tilmicosin showed significant effects compared to those of the corresponding standard peripheral analgesic, acetylsalicylic acid (200 mg/kg of body weight, subcutaneously) being 26.37±2.88 and 43.64±3.85% vs. 73.35±1.44% in acetic acid test; and 19.23±3.85 and 44.90±1.80% vs. 73.63±2.39% in the late phase of formalin test, respectively. These results may indicate that tilmicosin possesses a significant peripheral but not central analgesic potential that may be beneficial in symptomatic relief of pain when it is used in therapy, in addition to its well-established antibacterial effect.

  19. Observations from Hinode and SDO of a Twisting and Writhing Start to a Solar-filament-eruption Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Hara, Hirohisa

    2013-01-01

    Active region eruption of 1 June 2011. Ejective eruption. GOES class C4.1 flare. SDO/AIA, various filters (94, 131, 171, 193, 211, 304, 335 Ang.) High time cadence (24 s) and high spatial resolution (0 .6 pixels). SDO/HMI line-of-sight magnetograms. Hinode observed the onset, and the later decay phase. There are two filament eruptions (filament 1 and filament 2). Filament 1 has slow rise with steps, as in several previous cases. GOES "episodes" play role of "microflares" in other events; that is, filament jumps <=> intensity peaks. Episode 1 brightening: Accompanied by filament 1 s initial motions. (Rest of talk.) Filament 1 becomes unstable, and.. Episode 2 brightening: Flare ribbons following filament 1 s fast liftoff. This destabilizes neighboring filament 2, and... Episode 3 brightening: Flare ribbons of whole system following filament 2 s eruption.Something leads to reconnection; not totally clear what. Reconnection -> twisted flux rope in approx.20 min; episode 1 microflare (flare ribbons; TC) and filament jump. Twist -> writhe, via kink instability; filament-trajectory plateau, approx. 20 min. Writhe -> jump and eruption of filament 1, via instability; episode 2 microflare (flare ribbons; TC). (E.g., Williams et al.) First eruption -> second filament eruption (episode 3 flare ribbons; TC). (E.g., Sterling, Moore; Liu et al.; Torok et al.; Schrijver & Title.). Estimate amount of free energy in newly-twisted field (cf. Moore 1988): where we have taken L and r = 50, 3 arcsec. Energy of the total system is likely 1030 ergs or more. So "no" is answer to question. Additional energy comes from remainder of sheared large loop, shear (free energy) of second filament, etc. (Normally assumed situation.) Some history of twist-induced instability in filament eruptions: e.g., Sakurai, Torok & Kliem, Fan & Gibson, Gilbert et al., van Driel-Gesztelyi et al. Criterion : Kink instability for line-tied tube (Hood & Priest): 2.5pi; for Titov & Demoulin loop (Torok et al

  20. Effects of ginsenosides on opioid-induced hyperalgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Tang, Minke; Li, Hui; Huang, Xinjie; Chen, Lei; Zhai, Haifeng

    2014-07-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is characterized by nociceptive sensitization caused by the cessation of chronic opioid use. OIH can limit the clinical use of opioid analgesics and complicate withdrawal from opioid addiction. In this study, we investigated the effects of Re, Rg1, and Rb1 ginsenosides, the bioactive components of ginseng, on OIH. OIH was achieved in mice after subcutaneous administration of morphine for 7 consecutive days three times per day. During withdrawal (days 8 and 9), these mice were administered Re, Rg1, or Rb1 intragastrically two times per day. On the test day (day 10), mice were subjected to the thermal sensitivity test and the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Re (300 mg/kg) inhibited OIH in both the thermal sensitivity test and the acetic acid-induced writhing test. However, the Rg1 and Rb1 ginsenosides failed to prevent OIH in either test. Furthermore, Rg1 showed a tendency to aggravate OIH in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Our data suggested that the ginsenoside Re, but not Rg1 or Rb1, may contribute toward reversal of OIH.

  1. Dynamics of Bacillus subtilis helical macrofiber morphogenesis: writhing, folding, close packing, and contraction.

    PubMed Central

    Mendelson, N H

    1982-01-01

    Helical Bacillus subtilis macrofibers are highly ordered structures consisting of individual cells packed in a geometry remarkably similar to that found in helically twisted yarns (G. A. Carnaby, in J. W. S. Hearle et al., ed., The Mechanics of Flexible Fibre Assemblies, p. 99-112, 1980; N. H. Mendelson, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 75:2478-2482, 1978). The growth and formation of macrofibers were studied with time-lapse microscopy methods. The basic growth mode consisted of fiber elongation, folding, and the helical wrapping together of the folded portion into a tight helical fiber. This sequence was reiterated at both ends of the structure, resulting in terminal loops. Macrofiber growth was accompanied by the helical turning of the structure along its long axis. Right-handed structures turned clockwise and left-handed ones turned counterclockwise when viewed along the length of a fiber looking toward a loop end. Helical turning forced the individual cellular filaments into a close-packing arrangement during growth. Tension was evident within the structures and they writhed as they elongated. Tension was relieved by folding, which occurred when writhing became so violent that the structure touched itself, forming a loop. When the multistranded structure produced by repeated folding cycles became too rigid for additional folding, the morphogenesis of a ball-like structure began. The dynamics of helical macrofiber formation was interpreted in terms of stress-strain deformations. In view of the similarities between macrofiber structures and those found in multifilament yarns and cables, the physics of helical macrofiber structure and also growth may be suitable for analysis developed in these fields concerning the mechanics of flexible fiber assemblies (C. P. Buckley; J. W. S. Hearle; and J. J. Thwaites, in J. W. S. Hearle et al., ed., The Mechanics of Flexible Fibre Assemblies, p. 1-97, 1980). Images PMID:6806245

  2. Bak Foong Pills induce an analgesic effect by inhibiting nociception via the somatostatin pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, Dewi Kenneth; Cui, Yu Gui; So, Siu Cheung; Tsang, Lai Ling; Chung, Yiu Wa; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2012-01-01

    Dysmenorrhoea, defined as cramping pain in the lower abdomen occurring before or during menstruation, affects, to varying degrees, up to 90% of women of child-bearing age. We investigated whether BFP (Bak Foong Pills), a traditional Chinese medicine treatment for dysmenorrhoea, possesses analgesic properties. Results showed that BFP was able to significantly reduce pain responses following subchronic treatment for 3 days, but not following acute (1 h) treatment in response to acetic acid-induced writhing in C57/B6 mice. The analgesic effect was not due to inhibition of COX (cyclo-oxygenase) activity, evidenced by the lack of inhibition of prostacyclin and PGE2 (prostaglandin E2) production. Molecular analysis revealed that BFP treatment modulated the expression of a number of genes in the spinal cord of mice subjected to acetic acid writhing. RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) analysis of spinal cord samples showed that both sst4 (somatostatin receptor 4) and sst2 receptor mRNA, but not μOR (μ-opiate receptor) and NK1 (neurokinin-1) receptor mRNA, were down-regulated following BFP treatment, thus implicating somatostatin involvement in BFP-induced analgesia. Administration of c-som (cyclo-somatostatin), a somatostatin antagonist, prior to acetic acid-induced writhing inhibited the analgesic effect. Thus subchronic treatment with BFP has anti-nociceptive qualities mediated via the somatostatin pathway. PMID:21980955

  3. Omeprazole induces altered bile acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, K; Machida, M; Fukumura, M; Koide, K; Yamazaki, R

    1998-01-01

    Background—It has been reported that the acidity of gastric contents could be an important factor in regulating jejunal flora. 
Aims—To investigate the effects of omeprazole induced changes in gastric pH on jejunal flora and bile acid metabolism. 
Methods—Twenty one patients with gastric ulcer and 19 healthy volunteers were studied. Deconjugation of bile acids was detected using a bile acid breath test. Jejunal fluid was aspirated using a double lumen tube with a rubber cover on the tip and deconjugation was examined using thin layer chromatography. Fat malabsorption was detected by a triolein breath test. 
Results—In the bile acid breath test, expired breath samples from all patients and healthy volunteers showed significantly greater 14CO2 specific activity after omeprazole treatment (20 mg/day) than before treatment. Bacterial overgrowth was found in the jejunal fluid and gastric juice of both ulcer patients and healthy volunteers after omeprazole treatment. The following species were identified: Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, enterococcus, Lactobacillus bifidus, Bacteroides vulgatus, B uniformis, Eubacterium lentum, Eu parvum, and Corynebacterium granulosum. All of these species, except E coli and C albicans, deconjugate bile acids. There was a significant correlation between 14CO2 activity and gastric pH, both before and after omeprazole treatment in both groups. The triolein breath test revealed impaired fat absorption in both groups after omeprazole treatment. 
Conclusions—Both patients with gastric ulcer and healthy volunteers exhibited increased deconjugation of bile acids caused by bacterial overgrowth in the jejunum and fat malabsorption after omeprazole treatment. The bacterial overgrowth consisted of both anaerobes and aerobes with deconjugation ability and was probably associated with an omeprazole induced shift to neutral pH in the gastric juice. 

 Keywords: omeprazole; bacterial overgrowth; deconjugation; bile acid breath

  4. Drug-induced acid-base disorders.

    PubMed

    Kitterer, Daniel; Schwab, Matthias; Alscher, M Dominik; Braun, Niko; Latus, Joerg

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of acid-base disorders (ABDs) is high, especially in hospitalized patients. ABDs are often indicators for severe systemic disorders. In everyday clinical practice, analysis of ABDs must be performed in a standardized manner. Highly sensitive diagnostic tools to distinguish the various ABDs include the anion gap and the serum osmolar gap. Drug-induced ABDs can be classified into five different categories in terms of their pathophysiology: (1) metabolic acidosis caused by acid overload, which may occur through accumulation of acids by endogenous (e.g., lactic acidosis by biguanides, propofol-related syndrome) or exogenous (e.g., glycol-dependant drugs, such as diazepam or salicylates) mechanisms or by decreased renal acid excretion (e.g., distal renal tubular acidosis by amphotericin B, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vitamin D); (2) base loss: proximal renal tubular acidosis by drugs (e.g., ifosfamide, aminoglycosides, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, antiretrovirals, oxaliplatin or cisplatin) in the context of Fanconi syndrome; (3) alkalosis resulting from acid and/or chloride loss by renal (e.g., diuretics, penicillins, aminoglycosides) or extrarenal (e.g., laxative drugs) mechanisms; (4) exogenous bicarbonate loads: milk-alkali syndrome, overshoot alkalosis after bicarbonate therapy or citrate administration; and (5) respiratory acidosis or alkalosis resulting from drug-induced depression of the respiratory center or neuromuscular impairment (e.g., anesthetics, sedatives) or hyperventilation (e.g., salicylates, epinephrine, nicotine).

  5. Inhibition of neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase does not affect the analgesic effects of NMDA antagonists in visceral inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Srebro, Dragana; Vučković, Sonja; Prostran, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Previously we described the antinociceptive effect of magnesium sulfate and dizocilpine (MK-801) in the visceral and somatic rat models of pain. In the somatic model of pain, we established the influence of selective inhibitors of neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase on the antihyperalgesic effects of magnesium sulfate and dizocilpine. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to determine in the rat model of visceral pain whether same mechanisms are involved in the antinociceptive action of magnesium sulfate and dizocilpine. Analgesic activity was assessed using the acetic acid-induced writhing test in rats. Subcutaneous injection of either magnesium sulfate (15 mg/kg) or dizocilpine (0.01 mg/kg) decreased the number of writhes by about 60 and 70%, respectively. The role of nitric oxide on the effects of magnesium sulfate and dizocilpine was evaluated using selective inhibitor of neuronal (N-ω-Propyl-L-arginine hydrochloride (L-NPA)) and inducible (S-methylisothiourea (SMT)) nitric oxide synthase, which per se did not affect the number of writhes. We observed that the antinociceptive effect of magnesium sulfate or dizocilpine did not change in the presence of L-NPA (2 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) and SMT (0.015 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.). We conclude that, nitric oxide produced by neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase does not modulate the effects of magnesium sulfate and dizocilpine in the visceral inflammatory model of pain in the rat. PMID:27373948

  6. Glycyrrhetinic acid-induced permeability transition in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Mauro; Fiore, Cristina; Armanini, Decio; Toninello, Antonio

    2003-12-15

    Glycyrrhetinic acid, a hydrolysis product of one of the main constituents of licorice, the triterpene glycoside of glycyrrhizic acid, when added to rat liver mitochondria at micromolar concentrations induces swelling, loss of membrane potential, pyridine nucleotide oxidation, and release of cytochrome c and apoptosis inducing factor. These changes are Ca(2+) dependent and are prevented by cyclosporin A, bongkrekic acid, and N-ethylmaleimide. All these observations indicate that glycyrrhetinic acid is a potent inducer of mitochondrial permeability transition and can trigger the pro-apoptotic pathway. PMID:14637195

  7. OBSERVATIONS FROM SDO, HINODE, AND STEREO OF A TWISTING AND WRITHING START TO A SOLAR-FILAMENT-ERUPTION CASCADE

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Hara, Hirohisa E-mail: ron.moore@nasa.gov

    2012-12-10

    We analyze data from SDO (AIA, HMI), Hinode (SOT, XRT, EIS), and STEREO (EUVI) of a solar eruption sequence of 2011 June 1 near 16:00 UT, with an emphasis on the early evolution toward eruption. Ultimately, the sequence consisted of three emission bursts and two filament ejections. SDO/AIA 304 A images show absorbing-material strands initially in close proximity which over {approx}20 minutes form a twisted structure, presumably a flux rope with {approx}10{sup 29} erg of free energy that triggers the resulting evolution. A jump in the filament/flux rope's displacement (average velocity {approx}20 km s{sup -1}) and the first burst of emission accompanies the flux-rope formation. After {approx}20 more minutes, the flux rope/filament kinks and writhes, followed by a semi-steady state where the flux rope/filament rises at ({approx}5 km s{sup -1}) for {approx}10 minutes. Then the writhed flux rope/filament again becomes MHD unstable and violently erupts, along with rapid (50 km s{sup -1}) ejection of the filament and the second burst of emission. That ejection removed a field that had been restraining a second filament, which subsequently erupts as the second filament ejection accompanied by the third (final) burst of emission. Magnetograms from SDO/HMI and Hinode/SOT, and other data, reveal several possible causes for initiating the flux-rope-building reconnection, but we are not able to say which is dominant. Our observations are consistent with magnetic reconnection initiating the first burst and the flux-rope formation, with MHD processes initiating the further dynamics. Both filament ejections are consistent with the standard model for solar eruptions.

  8. Ursolic acid plays a role in Nepeta sibthorpii Bentham CNS depressing effects.

    PubMed

    Taviano, M F; Miceli, N; Monforte, M T; Tzakou, O; Galati, E M

    2007-04-01

    The sedative, anticonvulsant and analgesic activity of ursolic acid, a terpenoid bioassay-isolated from Nepeta sibthorpii Bentham, was evaluated in mice. The oral administration of ursolic acid (2.3 mg/kg) produced a significant depressant effect on CNS by reducing spontaneous motor activity and the number and lethality of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures. Two models of nociception, the writhing test and the hot plate test, were also used to examine the analgesic effect of ursolic acid. At a dose of 2.3 mg/kg, ursolic acid caused an inhibition of acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, but was inactive in the hot plate test. Treatment at a higher dose (20 mg/kg) significantly increased the reaction time in the hot plate test. This effect, reversed by naloxone, evidently involves opioid receptors, but the analgesic activity of ursolic acid may be related also to the antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties of this compound.

  9. Pharmacology of 4-benzyol-1-indancarboxylic acid (TAI-901) and 4-(4-methylbenzoyl)-1-indancarboxylic acid (TAI-908).

    PubMed

    Kawai, K; Tamura, S; Morimoto, S; Ishii, H; Kuzuna, S

    1982-01-01

    Pharmacological studies on the derivatives of 1-indancarboxylic acid yielded 4-benzoyl-1-indancarboxylic acid (TAI-901) and 4-(4-methylbenzoyl)-1-indancarboxylic acid (TAI-908). The relative potency (R.P.) of TAI-901 and TAI-908 assessed in parallel line assays (indomethacin - 1) demonstrated that both compounds were highly analgesic against various noxious stimuli induced in experimental animals. R.P. values of TAI-901 were 1.0, 1.7, 4.4 and 2.8 in the phenylquinone writhing, acetic acid writhing, adjuvant arthritic pain and urate arthritic pain tests, respectively. R.P. values of TAI-908 were 1.6, 2.0, 4.7 and 7.0, respectively, in these tests. Both compounds were more inhibitory than indomethacin against acute inflammation, but less inhibitory against chronic inflammation. The inhibitory activities of TAI-901 and TAI-908 on the prostaglandin biosynthesis by microsomes of rabbit renal medulla were 2.2 and 2.6 times that of indomethacin. TAI-901 was 1/3.8 1/7.1, and TAI-908 was 1/16.7 and 1/12.5 as toxic as indomethacin in male rats and mice, respectively. PMID:6978140

  10. Lysophosphatidic acid induces osteocyte dendrite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiosis, Sue A.; Karin, Norm J.

    2007-05-25

    A method was developed to measure dendrite formation in bone cells. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) was found to stimulate dendrite outgrowth. It is postulated that LPA plays a role in regulating the osteocyte network in vivo.

  11. Effects of phenylalaninol on centrally induced gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, H; Miyamae, T; Morikawa, T; Hagiwara, M

    1992-11-01

    The effects of phenylalaninol (D-isomer) on gastric acid secretion and gastric ulcer were studied in rats. The compound reduced the gastric acid secretion stimulated by intracisternal thyrotropin releasing hormone and intravenous 2-deoxy-D-glucose, but not that stimulated by subcutaneous carbachol or histamine. Phenylalaninol prevented stress- and indomethacin-induced gastric ulcers. We conclude that phenylalaninol inhibits ulcer formation mainly by central inhibition of gastric acid secretion. PMID:1477931

  12. Perflurooctanoic Acid Induces Developmental Cardiotoxicity in Chicken Embryos and Hatchlings

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a widespread environmental contaminant that is detectable in serum of the general U.S. population. PFOA is a known developmental toxicant that induces mortality in mammalian embryos and is thought to induce toxicity via interaction with the peroxi...

  13. Folic acid and pantothenic acid protection against valproic acid-induced neural tube defects in CD-1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Jennifer E.; Raymond, Angela M.; Winn, Louise M. . E-mail: winnl@biology.queensu.ca

    2006-03-01

    In utero exposure to valproic acid (VPA) during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of neural tube defects (NTDs). Although the mechanism by which VPA mediates these effects is unknown, VPA-initiated changes in embryonic protein levels have been implicated. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of in utero VPA exposure on embryonic protein levels of p53, NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, c-Myb, Bax, and Bcl-2 in the CD-1 mouse. We also evaluated the protective effects of folic acid and pantothenic acid on VPA-induced NTDs and VPA-induced embryonic protein changes in this model. Pregnant CD-1 mice were administered a teratogenic dose of VPA prior to neural tube closure and embryonic protein levels were analyzed. In our study, VPA (400 mg/kg)-induced NTDs (24%) and VPA-exposed embryos with an NTD showed a 2-fold increase in p53, and 4-fold decreases in NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, and c-Myb protein levels compared to their phenotypically normal littermates (P < 0.05). Additionally, VPA increased the ratio of embryonic Bax/Bcl-2 protein levels (P < 0.05). Pretreatment of pregnant dams with either folic acid or pantothenic acid prior to VPA significantly protected against VPA-induced NTDs (P < 0.05). Folic acid also reduced VPA-induced alterations in p53, NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, c-Myb, and Bax/Bcl-2 protein levels, while pantothenic acid prevented VPA-induced alterations in NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, and c-Myb. We hypothesize that folic acid and pantothenic acid protect CD-1 embryos from VPA-induced NTDs by independent, but not mutually exclusive mechanisms, both of which may be mediated by the prevention of VPA-induced alterations in proteins involved in neurulation.

  14. Ursodeoxycholic acid induced generalized fixed drug eruption.

    PubMed

    Ozkol, Hatice Uce; Calka, Omer; Dulger, Ahmet Cumhur; Bulut, Gulay

    2014-09-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a rare form of drug allergies that recur at the same cutaneous or mucosal site in every usage of drug. Single or multiple round, sharply demarcated and dusky red plaques appear soon after drug exposure. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA: 3α,7β-dihydroxy-5β-cholanic acid) is used for the treatment of cholestatic liver diseases. Some side effects may be observed, such as diarrhea, dyspepsia, pruritus and headaches. We encountered only three cases of lichenoid reaction regarding the use of UDCA among previous studies. In this article, we reported a generalized FDE case related to UDCA intake in a 59-year-old male patient with cholestasis for the first time in the literature. PMID:24147950

  15. Contribution of cinnamic acid analogues in rosmarinic acid to inhibition of snake venom induced hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Aung, Hnin Thanda; Furukawa, Tadashi; Nikai, Toshiaki; Niwa, Masatake; Takaya, Yoshiaki

    2011-04-01

    In our previous paper, we reported that rosmarinic acid (1) of Argusia argentea could neutralize snake venom induced hemorrhagic action. Rosmarinic acid (1) consists of two phenylpropanoids: caffeic acid (2) and 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)lactic acid (3). In this study, we investigated the structural requirements necessary for inhibition of snake venom activity through the use of compounds, which are structurally related to rosmarinic acid (1). By examining anti-hemorrhagic activity of cinnamic acid analogs against Protobothrops flavoviridis (Habu) venom, it was revealed that the presence of the E-enoic acid moiety (-CH=CH-COOH) was critical. Furthermore, among the compound tested, it was concluded that rosmarinic acid (1) (IC(50) 0.15 μM) was the most potent inhibitor against the venom.

  16. Habituation to organic acid anions induces resistance to acid and bile in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yimin; Carpenter, Charles E; Broadbent, Jeff R; Luo, Xin

    2014-03-01

    We evaluated the intrinsic and inducible resistance of four human pathogenic strains of Listeria monocytogenes to acid and bile, factors associated with virulence. Cells were grown in media at pH 7.4, or in media at pH 6.0 containing 0 (HCl control) or 4.75 mM of different organic acids, harvested at stationary or mid log phase, and challenged for 1h in acid or bile. Stationary phase cells were intrinsically more resistant to either challenge than log phase cells, and large differences between strains were evident among the latter. Compared to the HCl control, habituation to log phase with organic acids induced significant (p<0.05) and meaningful (≥1 log) increases in acid resistance of three of four strains tested, and in bile resistance of two strains suggesting that exposure to organic acid anions may enhance virulence in L. monocytogenes.

  17. Formic acid and acetic acid induce a programmed cell death in pathogenic Candida species.

    PubMed

    Lastauskienė, Eglė; Zinkevičienė, Auksė; Girkontaitė, Irutė; Kaunietis, Arnoldas; Kvedarienė, Violeta

    2014-09-01

    Cutaneous fungal infections are common and widespread. Antifungal agents used for the treatment of these infections often have undesirable side effects. Furthermore, increased resistance of the microorganisms to the antifungal drugs becomes the growing problem. Accordingly, the search for natural antifungal compounds continues to receive attention. Apoptosis is highly regulated programmed cell death. During yeast cell apoptosis, amino acids and peptides are released and can stimulate regeneration of human epithelium cells. Thus, detection of chemical compounds inducing apoptosis in yeast and nontoxic for humans is of great medical relevance. The aim of this study was to detect chemical compound inducing apoptosis in pathogenic Candida species with the lowest toxicity to the mammalian cells. Five chemical compounds--acetic acid, sodium bicarbonate, potassium carbonate, lithium acetate, and formic acid--were tested for evaluation of antifungal activity on C. albicans, C. guilliermondii, and C. lusitaniae. The results showed that acetic acid and formic acid at the lowest concentrations induced yeast cells death. Apoptosis analysis revealed that cells death was accompanied by activation of caspase. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of potassium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate induced Candida cells necrosis. Toxicity test with mammalian cell cultures showed that formic acid has the lowest effect on the growth of Jurkat and NIH 3T3 cells. In conclusion, our results show that a low concentration of formic acid induces apoptosis-like programmed cell death in the Candida yeast and has a minimal effect on the survivability of mammalian cells, suggesting potential applications in the treatment of these infections. PMID:24752490

  18. Cadmium Induces Retinoic Acid Signaling by Regulating Retinoic Acid Metabolic Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuxia; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal cadmium is an environmental teratogen. In addition, cadmium and retinoic acid can act synergistically to induce forelimb malformations. The molecular mechanism underlying the teratogenicity of cadmium and the synergistic effect with retinoic acid has not been addressed. An evolutionarily conserved gene, β,β-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase (BCMO), which is involved in retinoic acid biosynthesis, was studied in both Caenorhabditis elegans and murine Hepa 1–6 cells. In C. elegans, bcmo-1 was expressed in the intestine and was cadmium inducible. Similarly, in Hepa 1–6 cells, Bcmo1 was induced by cadmium. Retinoic acid-mediated signaling increased after 24-h exposures to 5 and 10 μm cadmium in Hepa 1–6 cells. Examination of gene expression demonstrated that the induction of retinoic acid signaling by cadmium may be mediated by overexpression of Bcmo1. Furthermore, cadmium inhibited the expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1, which are involved in retinoic acid degradation. These results indicate that cadmium-induced teratogenicity may be due to the ability of the metal to increase the levels of retinoic acid by disrupting the expression of retinoic acid-metabolizing genes. PMID:19556237

  19. Proteomic study on usnic-acid-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Zhao, Xiaoping; Lu, Xiaoyan; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Yi

    2012-07-25

    Usnic acid, a lichen metabolite, is used as a dietary supplement for weight loss. However, clinical studies have shown that usnic acid causes hepatotoxicity. The present study aims to investigate the mechanism of usnic acid hepatotoxicity in vivo. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to analyze the expression profiles of differentially regulated and expressed proteins in rat liver after usnic acid administration. The results reveal the differential expression of 10 proteins in usnic-acid-treated rats compared to the normal controls. These proteins are associated with oxidative stress, lipid metabolism, and several other molecular pathways. The endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria may be the primary targets of usnic-acid-induced hepatotoxicity.

  20. Stress-induced biosynthesis of dicaffeoylquinic acids in globe artichoke.

    PubMed

    Moglia, Andrea; Lanteri, Sergio; Comino, Cinzia; Acquadro, Alberto; de Vos, Ric; Beekwilder, Jules

    2008-09-24

    Leaf extracts from globe artichoke ( Cynara cardunculus L. var. scolymus) have been widely used in medicine as hepatoprotectant and choleretic agents. Globe artichoke leaves represent a natural source of phenolic acids with dicaffeoylquinic acids, such as cynarin (1,3-dicaffeoylquinic acid), along with its biosynthetic precursor chlorogenic acid (5-caffeoylquinic acid) as the most abundant molecules. This paper reports the development of an experimental system to induce caffeoylquinic acids. This system may serve to study the regulation of the biosynthesis of (poly)phenolic compounds in globe artichoke and the genetic basis of this metabolic regulation. By means of HPLC-PDA and accurate mass LC-QTOF MS and MS/MS analyses, the major phenolic compounds in globe artichoke leaves were identified: four isomers of dicaffeoylquinic acid, three isomers of caffeoylquinic acid, and the flavone luteolin 7-glucoside. Next, plant material was identified in which the concentration of phenolic compounds was comparable in the absence of particular treatments, with the aim to use this material to test the effect of stress application on the regulation of biosynthesis of caffeoylquinic acids. Using this material, the effect of UV-C, methyl jasmonate, and salicylic acid treatments on (poly)phenolic compounds was tested in different globe artichoke genotypes. UV-C exposure consistently increased the levels of dicaffeoylquinic acids in all genotypes, whereas the effect on compounds from the same biosynthetic pathway, for example, chlorogenic acid and luteolin-7-glucoside, was much less pronounced and was not statistically significant. No effect of methyl jasmonate or salicylic acid was found. Time-response experiments indicated that the level of dicaffeoylquinic acids reached a maximum at 24 h after UV radiation. On the basis of these results a role of dicaffeoylquinic acids in UV protection in globe artichoke is hypothesized.

  1. Stress-induced biosynthesis of dicaffeoylquinic acids in globe artichoke.

    PubMed

    Moglia, Andrea; Lanteri, Sergio; Comino, Cinzia; Acquadro, Alberto; de Vos, Ric; Beekwilder, Jules

    2008-09-24

    Leaf extracts from globe artichoke ( Cynara cardunculus L. var. scolymus) have been widely used in medicine as hepatoprotectant and choleretic agents. Globe artichoke leaves represent a natural source of phenolic acids with dicaffeoylquinic acids, such as cynarin (1,3-dicaffeoylquinic acid), along with its biosynthetic precursor chlorogenic acid (5-caffeoylquinic acid) as the most abundant molecules. This paper reports the development of an experimental system to induce caffeoylquinic acids. This system may serve to study the regulation of the biosynthesis of (poly)phenolic compounds in globe artichoke and the genetic basis of this metabolic regulation. By means of HPLC-PDA and accurate mass LC-QTOF MS and MS/MS analyses, the major phenolic compounds in globe artichoke leaves were identified: four isomers of dicaffeoylquinic acid, three isomers of caffeoylquinic acid, and the flavone luteolin 7-glucoside. Next, plant material was identified in which the concentration of phenolic compounds was comparable in the absence of particular treatments, with the aim to use this material to test the effect of stress application on the regulation of biosynthesis of caffeoylquinic acids. Using this material, the effect of UV-C, methyl jasmonate, and salicylic acid treatments on (poly)phenolic compounds was tested in different globe artichoke genotypes. UV-C exposure consistently increased the levels of dicaffeoylquinic acids in all genotypes, whereas the effect on compounds from the same biosynthetic pathway, for example, chlorogenic acid and luteolin-7-glucoside, was much less pronounced and was not statistically significant. No effect of methyl jasmonate or salicylic acid was found. Time-response experiments indicated that the level of dicaffeoylquinic acids reached a maximum at 24 h after UV radiation. On the basis of these results a role of dicaffeoylquinic acids in UV protection in globe artichoke is hypothesized. PMID:18710252

  2. Acetylsalicylic acid induces programmed cell death in Arabidopsis cell cultures.

    PubMed

    García-Heredia, José M; Hervás, Manuel; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Navarro, José A

    2008-06-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), a derivative from the plant hormone salicylic acid (SA), is a commonly used drug that has a dual role in animal organisms as an anti-inflammatory and anticancer agent. It acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenases (COXs), which catalyze prostaglandins production. It is known that ASA serves as an apoptotic agent on cancer cells through the inhibition of the COX-2 enzyme. Here, we provide evidences that ASA also behaves as an agent inducing programmed cell death (PCD) in cell cultures of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in a similar way than the well-established PCD-inducing agent H(2)O(2), although the induction of PCD by ASA requires much lower inducer concentrations. Moreover, ASA is herein shown to be a more efficient PCD-inducing agent than salicylic acid. ASA treatment of Arabidopsis cells induces typical PCD-linked morphological and biochemical changes, namely cell shrinkage, nuclear DNA degradation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from mitochondria and induction of caspase-like activity. However, the ASA effect can be partially reverted by jasmonic acid. Taking together, these results reveal the existence of common features in ASA-induced animal apoptosis and plant PCD, and also suggest that there are similarities between the pathways of synthesis and function of prostanoid-like lipid mediators in animal and plant organisms.

  3. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid-induced pemphigus vulgaris: case report.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Adone; Russo, Teresa; Faccenda, Franco; Piccolo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced pemphigus is a well-established variety of pemphigus, presenting with clinical and histopathologic features identical to idiopathic form. Medical history plays a fundamental role in the diagnosis of drug-induced pemphigus. A large variety of drugs have been implicated in its pathogenesis and they may induce acantholysis via biochemical and/or immune mechanism. We present a case of a 69-year-old woman affected by amoxicillin/clavulanic acid-induced pemphigus and discuss its pathogenetic mechanism.

  4. Ribonucleic acid interference induced gene knockdown

    PubMed Central

    Gottumukkala, Sruthima N. V. S.; Dwarakanath, C. D.; Sudarsan, Sabitha

    2013-01-01

    Despite major advances in periodontal regeneration over the past three decades, complete regeneration of the lost periodontium on a regular and predictable basis in humans has still remained elusive. The identification of stem cells in the periodontal ligament together with the growing concept of tissue engineering has opened new vistas in periodontal regenerative medicine. In this regard, ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) opens a new gate way for a novel RNA based approach in periodontal management. This paper aims to summarize the current opinion on the mechanisms underlying RNAi, in vitro and in vivo existing applications in the dental research, which could lead to their future use in periodontal regeneration. PMID:24174717

  5. Nitrous acid induced damage in T7 DNA and phage

    SciTech Connect

    Scearce, L.M.; Masker, W.E.

    1986-05-01

    The response of bacteriophage T7 to nitrous acid damage was investigated. The T7 system allows in vitro mimicry of most aspects of in vivo DNA metabolism. Nitrous acid is of special interest since it has been previously shown to induce deletions and point mutations as well as novel adducts in DNA. T7 phage was exposed to 56 mM nitrous acid at pH 4.6 in vivo, causing a time dependent 98% decrease in survival for each 10 min duration of exposure to nitrous acid. These studies were extended to include examination of pure T7 DNA exposed in vitro to nitrous acid conditions identical to those used in the in vivo survival studies. The treated DNA was dialyzed to remove the nitrous acid and the DNA was encapsulated into empty phage heads. These in vitro packaged phage showed a survival curve analogous to the in vivo system. There was no change in survival when either in vitro or in vivo exposed phage were grown on wild type E. coli or on E. coli strains deficient in DNA repair due to mutations in DNA polymerase I, exonuclease III or a uvrA mutation. Survival was not increased when nitrous acid treated T7 were grown on E. coli induced for SOS repair. In vitro replication of nitrous acid treated DNA showed a time dependent decrease in the total amount of DNA synthesized.

  6. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and chemically induced diabetes mellitus. Effect of omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Y; Das, U N

    2003-03-01

    In a previous study, we showed that prior oral feeding of oils rich in omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid and omega-6 gamma-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid prevent the development of alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus in experimental animals. We also observed that 99% pure omega-6 fatty acids gamma-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid protect against chemically induced diabetes mellitus. Here we report the results of our studies with omega-3 fatty acids. Alloxan-induced in vitro cytotoxicity and apoptosis in an insulin-secreting rat insulinoma cell line, RIN, was prevented by prior exposure of these cells to alpha-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid. Prior oral supplementation with alpha-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid prevented alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus. alpha-Linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid not only attenuated chemical-induced diabetes mellitus but also restored the anti-oxidant status to normal range in various tissues. These results suggested that omega-3 fatty acids can abrogate chemically induced diabetes in experimental animals and attenuate the oxidant stress that occurs in diabetes mellitus.

  7. Glycation inhibits trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-induced whey protein precipitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four different WPI saccharide conjugates were successfully prepared to test whether glycation could inhibit WPI precipitation induced by trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Conjugates molecular weights after glycation were analyzed with SDS-PAGE. No significant secondary structure change due to glycation wa...

  8. ASCORBIC ACID IS DECREASED IN INDUCED SPUTUM OF MILD ASTHMATICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthma is primarily an airways inflammatory disease, and the bronchial airways have been shown to be particularly susceptible to oxidant-induced tissue damage. The antioxidant ascorbic acid (AA) plays an essential role in defending against oxidant attack in the airways. Decreased...

  9. Cyclic phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid induce hyaluronic acid synthesis via CREB transcription factor regulation in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Maeda-Sano, Katsura; Gotoh, Mari; Morohoshi, Toshiro; Someya, Takao; Murofushi, Hiromu; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko

    2014-09-01

    Cyclic phosphatidic acid (cPA) is a naturally occurring phospholipid mediator and an analog of the growth factor-like phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). cPA has a unique cyclic phosphate ring at the sn-2 and sn-3 positions of its glycerol backbone. We showed before that a metabolically stabilized cPA derivative, 2-carba-cPA, relieved osteoarthritis pathogenesis in vivo and induced hyaluronic acid synthesis in human osteoarthritis synoviocytes in vitro. This study focused on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts, which retain moisture and maintain health in the dermis. We investigated the effects of cPA and LPA on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts (NB1RGB cells). Using particle exclusion and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, we found that both cPA and LPA dose-dependently induced hyaluronic acid synthesis. We revealed that the expression of hyaluronan synthase 2 messenger RNA and protein is up-regulated by cPA and LPA treatment time dependently. We then characterized the signaling pathways up-regulating hyaluronic acid synthesis mediated by cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. Pharmacological inhibition and reporter gene assays revealed that the activation of the LPA receptor LPAR1, Gi/o protein, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) but not nuclear factor κB induced hyaluronic acid synthesis by the treatment with cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. These results demonstrate for the first time that cPA and LPA induce hyaluronic acid synthesis in human skin fibroblasts mainly through the activation of LPAR1-Gi/o followed by the PI3K, ERK, and CREB signaling pathway.

  10. Increased isoprostane levels in oleic acid-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Koichi; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Tsushima, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Sumiko; Yokoyama, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Rikimaru; Obata, Toru

    2009-10-16

    The present study was performed to examine a role of oxidative stress in oleic acid-induced lung injury model. Fifteen anesthetized sheep were ventilated and instrumented with a lung lymph fistula and vascular catheters for blood gas analysis and measurement of isoprostanes (8-epi prostaglandin F2{alpha}). Following stable baseline measurements, oleic acid (0.08 ml/kg) was administered and observed 4 h. Isoprostane was measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry with the isotope dilution method. Isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph were significantly increased 2 h after oleic acid administration and then decreased at 4 h. The percent increases in isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph at 2 h were significantly correlated with deteriorated oxygenation at the same time point, respectively. These findings suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of the pulmonary fat embolism-induced acute lung injury model in sheep and that the increase relates with the deteriorated oxygenation.

  11. Salicylic Acid Inhibits Synthesis of Proteinase Inhibitors in Tomato Leaves Induced by Systemin and Jasmonic Acid.

    PubMed Central

    Doares, S. H.; Narvaez-Vasquez, J.; Conconi, A.; Ryan, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), previously shown to inhibit proteinase inhibitor synthesis induced by wounding, oligouronides (H.M. Doherty, R.R. Selvendran, D.J. Bowles [1988] Physiol Mol Plant Pathol 33: 377-384), and linolenic acid (H. Pena-Cortes, T. Albrecht, S. Prat, E.W. Weiler, L. Willmitzer [1993] Planta 191: 123-128), are shown here to be potent inhibitors of systemin-induced and jasmonic acid (JA)-induced synthesis of proteinase inhibitor mRNAs and proteins. The inhibition by SA and ASA of proteinase inhibitor synthesis induced by systemin and JA, as well as by wounding and oligosaccharide elicitors, provides further evidence that both oligosaccharide and polypeptide inducer molecules utilize the octadecanoid pathway to signal the activation of proteinase inhibitor genes. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) leaves were pulse labeled with [35S]methionine, followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the inhibitory effects of SA are shown to be specific for the synthesis of a small number of JA-inducible proteins that includes the proteinase inhibitors. Previous results have shown that SA inhibits the conversion of 13S-hydroperoxy linolenic acid to 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, thereby inhibiting the signaling pathway by blocking synthesis of JA. Here we report that the inhibition of synthesis of proteinase inhibitor proteins and mRNAs by SA in both light and darkness also occurs at a step in the signal transduction pathway, after JA synthesis but preceding transcription of the inhibitor genes. PMID:12228577

  12. Acid-induced secretory cell metaplasia in hamster bronchi

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, T.G.; Lucey, E.C.; Breuer, R.; Snider, G.L.

    1988-02-01

    Hamsters were exposed to an intratracheal instillation of 0.5 ml of 0.08 N nitric, hydrochloric, or sulfuric acid to determine their airway epithelial response. Three weeks after exposure, the left intrapulmonary bronchi in Alcian blue/PAS-strained paraffin sections were evaluated for the amount of secretory product in the airway epithelium as a measure of secretory cell metaplasia (SCM). Compared to saline-treated control animals, all three acids caused statistically significant SCM. In addition to the bronchial lesion, all three acids caused similar interstitial fibrosis, bronchiolectasis, and bronchiolization of alveoli that varied in individual animals from mild to severe. In a separate experiment to study the persistence of the SCM, hamsters treated with a single instillation of 0.1 N nitric acid showed significant SCM 3, 7, and 17 weeks after exposure. There was a high correlation (r = 0.96) between a subjective assessment of SCM and objective assessment using a digital image-analysis system. We conclude that protons induce SCM independently of the associated anion; the SCM persists at least 17 weeks. Sulfuric acid is an atmospheric pollutant and nitric acid may form locally on the mucosa of lungs exposed to nitrogen dioxide. These acids may contribute to the development of maintenance of the SCM seen in the conducting airways of humans with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  13. Computerized image analysis for acetic acid induced intraepithelial lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Ferris, Daron G.; Lieberman, Rich W.

    2008-03-01

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) exhibits certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Immature and dysphasic cervical squamous epithelium turns white after application of acetic acid during the exam. The whitening process occurs visually over several minutes and subjectively discriminates between dysphasic and normal tissue. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician analyzing the acetic acid induced lesions (acetowhite region) in a fully automatic way. This paper reports a study designed to measure multiple parameters of the acetowhitening process from two images captured with a digital colposcope. One image is captured before the acetic acid application, and the other is captured after the acetic acid application. The spatial change of the acetowhitening is extracted using color and texture information in the post acetic acid image; the temporal change is extracted from the intensity and color changes between the post acetic acid and pre acetic acid images with an automatic alignment. The imaging and data analysis system has been evaluated with a total of 99 human subjects and demonstrate its potential to screening underserved women where access to skilled colposcopists is limited.

  14. Bile acids induce hepatic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sawitza, Iris; Kordes, Claus; Götze, Silke; Herebian, Diran; Häussinger, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have the potential to differentiate into multiple cell lineages and their therapeutic potential has become obvious. In the liver, MSC are represented by stellate cells which have the potential to differentiate into hepatocytes after stimulation with growth factors. Since bile acids can promote liver regeneration, their influence on liver-resident and bone marrow-derived MSC was investigated. Physiological concentrations of bile acids such as tauroursodeoxycholic acid were able to initiate hepatic differentiation of MSC via the farnesoid X receptor and transmembrane G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 5 as investigated with knockout mice. Notch, hedgehog, transforming growth factor-β/bone morphogenic protein family and non-canonical Wnt signalling were also essential for bile acid-mediated differentiation, whereas β-catenin-dependent Wnt signalling was able to attenuate this process. Our findings reveal bile acid-mediated signalling as an alternative way to induce hepatic differentiaion of stem cells and highlight bile acids as important signalling molecules during liver regeneration. PMID:26304833

  15. Roles of β- and α2-adrenoceptors within the central nucleus of the amygdala in the visceral pain-induced aversion in rats.

    PubMed

    Deyama, Satoshi; Takishita, Azusa; Tanimoto, Sachi; Ide, Soichiro; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Satoh, Masamichi; Minami, Masabumi

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the roles of β- and α(2)-adrenoceptors within the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) in the negative affective and sensory components of visceral pain in rats. We observed a dose-dependent reduction of intraperitoneal acetic acid-induced conditioned place aversion by bilateral injections of timolol, a β-adrenoceptor antagonist, or clonidine, an α(2)-adrenoceptor agonist, without reducing writhing behaviors. These data suggest a pivotal role of intra-CeA adrenoceptors in the negative affective, but not sensory, component of visceral pain.

  16. Unsaturated fatty acids induce non-canonical autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Niso-Santano, Mireia; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Pietrocola, Federico; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Mariño, Guillermo; Cianfanelli, Valentina; Ben-Younès, Amena; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Markaki, Maria; Sica, Valentina; Izzo, Valentina; Chaba, Kariman; Bauvy, Chantal; Dupont, Nicolas; Kepp, Oliver; Rockenfeller, Patrick; Wolinski, Heimo; Madeo, Frank; Lavandero, Sergio; Codogno, Patrice; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Cecconi, Francesco; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-01-01

    To obtain mechanistic insights into the cross talk between lipolysis and autophagy, two key metabolic responses to starvation, we screened the autophagy-inducing potential of a panel of fatty acids in human cancer cells. Both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids such as palmitate and oleate, respectively, triggered autophagy, but the underlying molecular mechanisms differed. Oleate, but not palmitate, stimulated an autophagic response that required an intact Golgi apparatus. Conversely, autophagy triggered by palmitate, but not oleate, required AMPK, PKR and JNK1 and involved the activation of the BECN1/PIK3C3 lipid kinase complex. Accordingly, the downregulation of BECN1 and PIK3C3 abolished palmitate-induced, but not oleate-induced, autophagy in human cancer cells. Moreover, Becn1+/− mice as well as yeast cells and nematodes lacking the ortholog of human BECN1 mounted an autophagic response to oleate, but not palmitate. Thus, unsaturated fatty acids induce a non-canonical, phylogenetically conserved, autophagic response that in mammalian cells relies on the Golgi apparatus. PMID:25586377

  17. Characterization of salicylic acid-induced genes in Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Park, Y-S; Min, H-J; Ryang, S-H; Oh, K-J; Cha, J-S; Kim, H Y; Cho, T-J

    2003-06-01

    Salicylic acid is a messenger molecule in the activation of defense responses in plants. In this study, we isolated four cDNA clones representing salicylic acid-induced genes in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis) by subtractive hybridization. Of the four clones, the BC5-2 clone encodes a putative glucosyltransferase protein. The BC5-3 clone is highly similar to an Arabidopsis gene encoding a putative metal-binding farnesylated protein. The BC6-1 clone is a chitinase gene with similarities to a rapeseed class IV chitinase. Class IV chitinases have deletions in the chitin-binding and catalytic domains and the BC6-1 chitinase has an additional deletion in the catalytic domain. The BCP8-1 clone is most homologous to an Arabidopsis gene that contains a tandem array of two thiJ-like sequences. These four cabbage genes were barely expressed in healthy leaves, but were strongly induced by salicylic acid and benzothiadiazole. Expression of the three genes represented by the BC5-2, BC5-3 and BCP8-1 clones were also induced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, a nonhost pathogen that elicits a hypersensitive response in Chinese cabbage. None of these four genes, however, was strongly induced by methyl jasmonate or by ethylene.

  18. Protection of arsenic-induced hepatic disorder by arjunolic acid.

    PubMed

    Manna, Prasenjit; Sinha, Mahua; Sil, Parames C

    2007-11-01

    Arsenic is one of the ubiquitous environmental pollutants, which affects nearly all organ systems. The present study has been carried out to investigate the hepatoprotective role of arjunolic acid, a triterpenoid saponin, against arsenic-induced oxidative damages in murine livers. Administration of sodium arsenite at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight for 2 days significantly reduced the activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase as well as depleted the level of reduced glutathione and total thiols. In addition, sodium arsenite also increased the activities of serum marker enzymes, alanine transaminase and alkaline phosphatase, enhanced DNA fragmentation, protein carbonyl content, lipid peroxidation end-products and the level of oxidized glutathione. Studies with arjunolic acid show that in vitro it possesses free radical-scavenging and in vivo antioxidant activities. Treatment with arjunolic acid at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight for 4 days prior to arsenic administration prevents the alterations of the activities of all antioxidant indices and levels of the other parameters studied. Histological studies revealed less centrilobular necrosis in the liver treated with arjunolic acid prior to arsenic intoxication compared to the liver treated with the toxin alone. Effects of a known antioxidant, vitamin C, have been included in the study as a positive control. In conclusion, the results suggest that arjunolic acid possesses the ability to attenuate arsenic-induced oxidative stress in murine liver probably via its antioxidant activity.

  19. γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid-Induced Electrographic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Joseph; Lucey, Brendan P.; Duntley, Stephen P.; Darken, Rachel S.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of absence-like electrographic seizures during NREM sleep in a patient who was taking sodium oxybate, a sodium salt of γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). An overnight full montage electroencephalography (EEG) study revealed numerous frontally predominant rhythmic 1.5-2 Hz sharp waves and spike-wave activity during stage N2 and N3 sleep at the peak dose time for sodium oxybate, resembling atypical absence-like electrographic seizures. The patient was later weaned off sodium oxybate, and a repeat study did not show any such electrographic seizures. Absence-like seizures induced by GHB had previously been described in experimental animal models. We present the first reported human case of absence-like electrographic seizure associated with sodium oxybate. Citation: Cheung J, Lucey BP, Duntley SP, Darken RS. γ-hydroxybutyric acid-induced electrographic seizures. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(7):811-812. PMID:25024661

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Ellagic Acid on Acute Lung Injury Induced by Acid in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cornélio Favarin, Daniely; Martins Teixeira, Maxelle; Lemos de Andrade, Ednéia; de Freitas Alves, Claudiney; Lazo Chica, Javier Emilio; Artério Sorgi, Carlos; Paula Rogerio, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by alveolar edema and uncontrolled neutrophil migration to the lung, and no specific therapy is still available. Ellagic acid, a compound present in several fruits and medicinal plants, has shown anti-inflammatory activity in several experimental disease models. We used the nonlethal acid aspiration model of ALI in mice to determine whether preventive or therapeutic administration of ellagic acid (10 mg/kg; oral route) could interfere with the development or establishment of ALI inflammation. Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg; subcutaneous route) was used as a positive control. In both preventive and therapeutic treatments, ellagic acid reduced the vascular permeability changes and neutrophil recruitment to the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and to lung compared to the vehicle. In addition, the ellagic acid accelerated the resolution for lung neutrophilia. Moreover, ellagic acid reduced the COX-2-induced exacerbation of inflammation. These results were similar to the dexamethasone. However, while the anti-inflammatory effects of dexamethasone treatment were due to the reduced activation of NF-κB and AP-1, the ellagic acid treatment led to reduced BALF levels of IL-6 and increased levels of IL-10. In addition, dexamethasone treatment reduced IL-1β. Together, these findings identify ellagic acid as a potential therapeutic agent for ALI-associated inflammation. PMID:23533300

  1. Folic acid induces salicylic acid-dependent immunity in Arabidopsis and enhances susceptibility to Alternaria brassicicola.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Finni; Kanawati, Basem; Wenig, Marion; Hoffmann, Thomas; Franz-Oberdorf, Katrin; Schwab, Wilfried; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Vlot, A Corina

    2015-08-01

    Folates are essential for one-carbon transfer reactions in all organisms and contribute, for example, to de novo DNA synthesis. Here, we detected the folate precursors 7,8-dihydropteroate (DHP) and 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate (ADC) in extracts from Arabidopsis thaliana plants by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry. The accumulation of DHP, but not ADC, was induced after infection of plants with Pseudomonas syringae delivering the effector protein AvrRpm1. Application of folic acid or the DHP precursor 7,8-dihydroneopterin (DHN) enhanced resistance in Arabidopsis to P. syringae and elevated the transcript accumulation of the salicylic acid (SA) marker gene pathogenesis-related1 in both the treated and systemic untreated leaves. DHN- and folic acid-induced systemic resistance was dependent on SA biosynthesis and signalling. Similar to SA, folic acid application locally enhanced Arabidopsis susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola. Together, the data associate the folic acid pathway with innate immunity in Arabidopsis, simultaneously activating local and systemic SA-dependent resistance to P. syringae and suppressing local resistance to A. brassicicola.

  2. Neuroprotective effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester in 3-nitropropionic acid-induced striatal neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bak, Jia; Kim, Hee Jung; Kim, Seong Yun

    2016-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), derived from honeybee hives, is a bioactive compound with strong antioxidant activity. This study was designed to test the neuroprotective effect of CAPE in 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP)-induced striatal neurotoxicity, a chemical model of Huntington's disease (HD). Initially, to test CAPE's antioxidant activity, a 2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) antioxidant assay was employed, and CAPE showed a strong direct radical-scavenging eff ect. In addition, CAPE provided protection from 3NP-induced neuronal cell death in cultured striatal neurons. Based on these observations, the in vivo therapeutic potential of CAPE in 3NP-induced HD was tested. For this purpose, male C57BL/6 mice were repeatedly given 3NP to induce HD-like pathogenesis, and 30 mg/kg of CAPE or vehicle (5% dimethyl sulfoxide and 95% peanut oil) was administered daily. CAPE did not cause changes in body weight, but it reduced mortality by 29%. In addition, compared to the vehicle-treated group, robustly reduced striatal damage was observed in the CAPE-treated animals, and the 3NP-induced behavioral defi cits on the rotarod test were signifi cantly rescued after the CAPE treatment. Furthermore, immunohistochemical data showed that immunoreactivity to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and CD45, markers for astrocyte and microglia activation, respectively, were strikingly reduced. Combined, these data unequivocally indicate that CAPE has a strong antioxidant eff ect and can be used as a potential therapeutic agent against HD. PMID:27162482

  3. Neuroprotective effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester in 3-nitropropionic acid-induced striatal neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bak, Jia; Kim, Hee Jung; Kim, Seong Yun; Choi, Yun-Sik

    2016-05-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), derived from honeybee hives, is a bioactive compound with strong antioxidant activity. This study was designed to test the neuroprotective effect of CAPE in 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP)-induced striatal neurotoxicity, a chemical model of Huntington's disease (HD). Initially, to test CAPE's antioxidant activity, a 2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) antioxidant assay was employed, and CAPE showed a strong direct radical-scavenging eff ect. In addition, CAPE provided protection from 3NP-induced neuronal cell death in cultured striatal neurons. Based on these observations, the in vivo therapeutic potential of CAPE in 3NP-induced HD was tested. For this purpose, male C57BL/6 mice were repeatedly given 3NP to induce HD-like pathogenesis, and 30 mg/kg of CAPE or vehicle (5% dimethyl sulfoxide and 95% peanut oil) was administered daily. CAPE did not cause changes in body weight, but it reduced mortality by 29%. In addition, compared to the vehicle-treated group, robustly reduced striatal damage was observed in the CAPE-treated animals, and the 3NP-induced behavioral defi cits on the rotarod test were signifi cantly rescued after the CAPE treatment. Furthermore, immunohistochemical data showed that immunoreactivity to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and CD45, markers for astrocyte and microglia activation, respectively, were strikingly reduced. Combined, these data unequivocally indicate that CAPE has a strong antioxidant eff ect and can be used as a potential therapeutic agent against HD. PMID:27162482

  4. Acid exposure induces multiplication of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Ahirwar, Suneel Kumar; Pratap, Chandra Bhan; Patel, Saurabh Kumar; Shukla, Vijay K; Singh, Indarjeet Gambhir; Mishra, Om Prakash; Kumar, Kailash; Singh, Tej Bali; Nath, Gopal

    2014-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi faces several environmental stresses while going through the stomach (acidic pH) to the small intestine (basic pH) and intracellularly in macrophages (acidic pH) in humans. The acidic pH followed by alkaline pH in the small intestine might be responsible for expression of certain stress-induced genes, resulting in not only better survival but also induction of multiplication and invasion of the bacterium in the small intestine. Based on this hypothesis, we developed a process wherein we exposed the blood, urine, and stool specimens from 90 acute typhoid fever patients and 36 chronic typhoid carriers to acidic pH to see the effect on isolation rate of S. Typhi. About 5 g of freshly passed unpreserved stool, a centrifuged deposit of 15 ml of urine, and 5 ml of blood clot were subjected to 5 ml of Luria-Bertani (LB) broth (pH 3.5) for 20 min, followed by enrichment in bile broth-selenite F broth. When the combined isolation from all 3 specimens, i.e., blood, urine, and stool, after acid exposure was considered, a total of 77.7% of the acute typhoid patients were observed to be positive for the isolation of the S. Typhi serotype, compared to 8.8% by the conventional method. Similarly, 42% (15/36) of chronic carriers yielded positive for S. Typhi growth after acid exposure, compared to 5.5% (2/36) by the conventional method. It therefore can be concluded that acid shock triggers the multiplication of the bacteria, resulting in better isolation rates from blood clot, stool, and urine specimens.

  5. Bile-acid-induced cell injury and protection

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Maria J; Briz, Oscar

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have characterized the cellular and molecular mechanisms of hepatocyte injury caused by the retention of hydrophobic bile acids (BAs) in cholestatic diseases. BAs may disrupt cell membranes through their detergent action on lipid components and can promote the generation of reactive oxygen species that, in turn, oxidatively modify lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, and eventually cause hepatocyte necrosis and apoptosis. Several pathways are involved in triggering hepatocyte apoptosis. Toxic BAs can activate hepatocyte death receptors directly and induce oxidative damage, thereby causing mitochondrial dysfunction, and induce endoplasmic reticulum stress. When these compounds are taken up and accumulate inside biliary cells, they can also cause apoptosis. Regarding extrahepatic tissues, the accumulation of BAs in the systemic circulation may contribute to endothelial injury in the kidney and lungs. In gastrointestinal cells, BAs may behave as cancer promoters through an indirect mechanism involving oxidative stress and DNA damage, as well as acting as selection agents for apoptosis-resistant cells. The accumulation of BAs may have also deleterious effects on placental and fetal cells. However, other BAs, such as ursodeoxycholic acid, have been shown to modulate BA-induced injury in hepatocytes. The major beneficial effects of treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid are protection against cytotoxicity due to more toxic BAs; the stimulation of hepatobiliary secretion; antioxidant activity, due in part to an enhancement in glutathione levels; and the inhibition of liver cell apoptosis. Other natural BAs or their derivatives, such as cholyl-N-methylglycine or cholylsarcosine, have also aroused pharmacological interest owing to their protective properties. PMID:19360911

  6. Valproic Acid Induces Antimicrobial Compound Production in Doratomyces microspores.

    PubMed

    Zutz, Christoph; Bacher, Markus; Parich, Alexandra; Kluger, Bernhard; Gacek-Matthews, Agnieszka; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Wagner, Martin; Rychli, Kathrin; Strauss, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in public health is the rising number of antibiotic resistant pathogens and the lack of novel antibiotics. In recent years there is a rising focus on fungi as sources of antimicrobial compounds due to their ability to produce a large variety of bioactive compounds and the observation that virtually every fungus may still contain yet unknown so called "cryptic," often silenced, compounds. These putative metabolites could include novel bioactive compounds. Considerable effort is spent on methods to induce production of these "cryptic" metabolites. One approach is the use of small molecule effectors, potentially influencing chromatin landscape in fungi. We observed that the supernatant of the fungus Doratomyces (D.) microsporus treated with valproic acid (VPA) displayed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and two methicillin resistant clinical S. aureus isolates. VPA treatment resulted in enhanced production of seven antimicrobial compounds: cyclo-(L-proline-L-methionine) (cPM), p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, cyclo-(phenylalanine-proline) (cFP), indole-3-carboxylic acid, phenylacetic acid (PAA) and indole-3-acetic acid. The production of the antimicrobial compound phenyllactic acid was exclusively detectable after VPA treatment. Furthermore three compounds, cPM, cFP, and PAA, were able to boost the antimicrobial activity of other antimicrobial compounds. cPM, for the first time isolated from fungi, and to a lesser extent PAA, are even able to decrease the minimal inhibitory concentration of ampicillin in MRSA strains. In conclusion we could show in this study that VPA treatment is a potent tool for induction of "cryptic" antimicrobial compound production in fungi, and that the induced compounds are not exclusively linked to the secondary metabolism. Furthermore this is the first discovery of the rare diketopiperazine cPM in fungi. Additionally we could demonstrate that cPM and PAA boost antibiotic activity against antibiotic

  7. Valproic Acid Induces Antimicrobial Compound Production in Doratomyces microspores

    PubMed Central

    Zutz, Christoph; Bacher, Markus; Parich, Alexandra; Kluger, Bernhard; Gacek-Matthews, Agnieszka; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Wagner, Martin; Rychli, Kathrin; Strauss, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in public health is the rising number of antibiotic resistant pathogens and the lack of novel antibiotics. In recent years there is a rising focus on fungi as sources of antimicrobial compounds due to their ability to produce a large variety of bioactive compounds and the observation that virtually every fungus may still contain yet unknown so called “cryptic,” often silenced, compounds. These putative metabolites could include novel bioactive compounds. Considerable effort is spent on methods to induce production of these “cryptic” metabolites. One approach is the use of small molecule effectors, potentially influencing chromatin landscape in fungi. We observed that the supernatant of the fungus Doratomyces (D.) microsporus treated with valproic acid (VPA) displayed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and two methicillin resistant clinical S. aureus isolates. VPA treatment resulted in enhanced production of seven antimicrobial compounds: cyclo-(L-proline-L-methionine) (cPM), p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, cyclo-(phenylalanine-proline) (cFP), indole-3-carboxylic acid, phenylacetic acid (PAA) and indole-3-acetic acid. The production of the antimicrobial compound phenyllactic acid was exclusively detectable after VPA treatment. Furthermore three compounds, cPM, cFP, and PAA, were able to boost the antimicrobial activity of other antimicrobial compounds. cPM, for the first time isolated from fungi, and to a lesser extent PAA, are even able to decrease the minimal inhibitory concentration of ampicillin in MRSA strains. In conclusion we could show in this study that VPA treatment is a potent tool for induction of “cryptic” antimicrobial compound production in fungi, and that the induced compounds are not exclusively linked to the secondary metabolism. Furthermore this is the first discovery of the rare diketopiperazine cPM in fungi. Additionally we could demonstrate that cPM and PAA boost antibiotic activity

  8. Lysophosphatidic acid induces necrosis and apoptosis in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Holtsberg, F W; Steiner, M R; Keller, J N; Mark, R J; Mattson, M P; Steiner, S M

    1998-01-01

    A diverse body of evidence indicates a role for the lipid biomediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in the CNS. This study identifies and characterizes the induction of neuronal death by LPA. Treatment of cultured hippocampal neurons from embryonic rat brains with 50 microM LPA resulted in neuronal necrosis, as determined morphologically and by the release of lactate dehydrogenase. A concentration of LPA as low as 10 microM led to the release of lactate dehydrogenase. In contrast, treatment of neurons with 0.1 or 1.0 microM LPA resulted in apoptosis, as determined by chromatin condensation. In addition, neuronal death induced by 1 microM LPA was characterized as apoptotic on the basis of terminal dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining, externalization of phosphatidylserine, and protection against chromatin condensation, TUNEL staining, and phosphatidylserine externalization by treatment with N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone, a broad-spectrum inhibitor of caspases, i.e., members of the interleukin-1beta converting enzyme family. Studies with antagonists of ionotropic glutamate receptors did not indicate a significant role for these receptors in apoptosis induced by 1 microM LPA. LPA (1 microM) also induced a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Moreover, pretreatment of neurons with cyclosporin A protected against the LPA-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and neuronal apoptosis. Thus, LPA, at pathophysiological levels, can induce neuronal apoptosis and could thereby participate in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:9422348

  9. Glycyrrhizic acid alleviates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lili; Tang, Haiying; He, Huanyu; Liu, Jia; Mao, Jingwei; Ji, Hong; Lin, Hongli; Wu, Taihua

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and lethal form of interstitial lung disease that lacks effective therapies at present. Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), a natural compound extracted from a traditional Chinese herbal medicine Glycyrrhiza glabra, was recently reported to benefit lung injury and liver fibrosis in animal models, yet whether GA has a therapeutic effect on pulmonary fibrosis is unknown. In this study, we investigated the potential therapeutic effect of GA on pulmonary fibrosis in a rat model with bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The results indicated that GA treatment remarkably ameliorated BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis and attenuated BLM-induced inflammation, oxidative stress, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and activation of transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway in the lungs. Further, we demonstrated that GA treatment inhibited proliferation of 3T6 fibroblast cells, induced cell cycle arrest and promoted apoptosis in vitro, implying that GA-mediated suppression of fibroproliferation may contribute to the anti-fibrotic effect against BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis. In summary, our study suggests a therapeutic potential of GA in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26483688

  10. Orexin A attenuates palmitic acid-induced hypothalamic cell death.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Cayla M; Nixon, Joshua P; Butterick, Tammy A

    2016-09-01

    Palmitic acid (PA), an abundant dietary saturated fatty acid, contributes to obesity and hypothalamic dysregulation in part through increase in oxidative stress, insulin resistance, and neuroinflammation. Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of PA exposure contributes to the onset of neuronal apoptosis. Additionally, high fat diets lead to changes in hypothalamic gene expression profiles including suppression of the anti-apoptotic protein B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein B cell lymphoma 2 associated X protein (Bax). Orexin A (OXA), a hypothalamic peptide important in obesity resistance, also contributes to neuroprotection. Prior studies have demonstrated that OXA attenuates oxidative stress induced cell death. We hypothesized that OXA would be neuroprotective against PA induced cell death. To test this, we treated an immortalized hypothalamic cell line (designated mHypoA-1/2) with OXA and PA. We demonstrate that OXA attenuates PA-induced hypothalamic cell death via reduced caspase-3/7 apoptosis, stabilization of Bcl-2 gene expression, and reduced Bax/Bcl-2 gene expression ratio. We also found that OXA inhibits ROS production after PA exposure. Finally, we show that PA exposure in mHypoA-1/2 cells significantly reduces basal respiration, maximum respiration, ATP production, and reserve capacity. However, OXA treatment reverses PA-induced changes in intracellular metabolism, increasing basal respiration, maximum respiration, ATP production, and reserve capacity. Collectively, these results support that OXA protects against PA-induced hypothalamic dysregulation, and may represent one mechanism through which OXA can ameliorate effects of obesogenic diet on brain health. PMID:27449757

  11. Retinoic acid-induced neural differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jones-Villeneuve, E M; Rudnicki, M A; Harris, J F; McBurney, M W

    1983-01-01

    We have previously shown that the P19 line of embryonal carcinoma cells develops into neurons, astroglia, and fibroblasts after aggregation and exposure to retinoic acid. The neurons were initially identified by their morphology and by the presence of neurofilaments within their cytoplasm. We have more fully documented the neuronal nature of these cells by showing that their cell surfaces display tetanus toxin receptors, a neuronal cell marker, and that choline acetyl-transferase and acetyl cholinesterase activities appear coordinately in neuron-containing cultures. Several days before the appearance of neurons, there is a marked decrease in the amount of an embryonal carcinoma surface antigen, and at the same time there is a substantial decrease in the volumes of individual cells. Various retinoids were able to induce the development of neurons in cultures of aggregated P19 cells, but it did not appear that polyamine metabolism was involved in the effect. We have isolated a mutant clone which does not differentiate in the presence of any of the drugs which are normally effective in inducing differentiation of P19 cells. This mutant and others may help to elucidate the chain of events triggered by retinoic acid and other differentiation-inducing drugs. Images PMID:6656766

  12. Sulfuric acid-induced corrosion of aluminum surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Q.; Freedman, A.; Robinson, G.N.

    1995-12-01

    The sulfuric acid-induced corrosion of smooth (2 nm average roughness) aluminum surfaces has been studied in real times using an in situ Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectrometer and a quartz crystal microbalance. Submicron thick, 35 to 55 weight percent (5 to 12 molal), sulfuric acid films were formed on room temperature metal surfaces by the reaction of gas-phase SO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O vapor in a flowing gas system at a total pressure of {approximately}200 Torr. The deposition of the acid films and subsequent changes in their chemical composition resulting from corrosion of the aluminum substrate could be monitored using characteristic infrared absorption features. The corrosion process always significantly perturbed the spectral signature of the films from that which was observed on inert gold surfaces. Using changes in spectral features that are linked to the production of Al{sup 3+} as indicators of corrosion, the authors conclude the rate of corrosion of the metal is strongly enhanced by both higher relative humidities and increased rates of sulfuric acid deposition.

  13. Radiation induced crystallinity damage in poly( L-lactic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantoǧlu, Ömer; Güven, Olgun

    2002-12-01

    The radiation-induced crystallinity damage in poly( L-lactic acid) (PLLA) in the presence of air and in vacuum, is studied. From the heat of fusion enthalpy values of gamma irradiated samples, some changes on the thermal properties were determined. To identify these changes, first the glass transition temperature ( Tg) of L-lactic acid polymers irradiated to various doses in air and vacuum have been investigated and it is found that it is independent of irradiation atmosphere and dose. The fraction of damaged units of PLLA per unit of absorbed energy has been measured. For this purpose, SAXS and differential scanning calorimetry methods were used, and the radiation yield of number of damaged units ( G(- u)) is found to be 0.74 and 0.58 for PLLA samples irradiated in vacuum and air, respectively.

  14. Ursolic acid improves domoic acid-induced cognitive deficits in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dong-mei; Lu, Jun; Zhang, Yan-qiu; Zheng, Yuan-lin; Hu, Bin; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Zi-feng; Li, Meng-qiu

    2013-09-01

    Our previous findings suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction is the mechanism underlying cognitive deficits induced by domoic acid (DA). Ursolic acid (UA), a natural triterpenoid compound, possesses many important biological functions. Evidence shows that UA can activate PI3K/Akt signaling and suppress Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) activity. FoxO1 is an important regulator of mitochondrial function. Here we investigate whether FoxO1 is involved in the oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in DA-treated mice and whether UA inhibits DA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficits through regulating the PI3K/Akt and FoxO1 signaling pathways. Our results showed that FoxO1 knockdown reversed the mitochondrial abnormalities and cognitive deficits induced by DA in mice through decreasing HO-1 expression. Mechanistically, FoxO1 activation was associated with oxidative stress-induced JNK activation and decrease of Akt phosphorylation. Moreover, UA attenuated the mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficits through promoting Akt phosphorylation and FoxO1 nuclear exclusion in the hippocampus of DA-treated mice. LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K/Akt signaling, significantly decreased Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus of DA/UA mice, which weakened UA actions. These results suggest that UA could be recommended as a possible candidate for the prevention and therapy of cognitive deficits in excitotoxic brain disorders. - Highlights: • Ursolic acid (UA) is a naturally triterpenoid compound. • UA attenuated the mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficits. • Mechanistically, UA activates PI3K/Akt signaling and suppresses FoxO1 activity. • UA could be recommended as a possible candidate for anti-excitotoxic brain disorders.

  15. Antinociceptive Effect of Tephrosia sinapou Extract in the Acetic Acid, Phenyl-p-benzoquinone, Formalin, and Complete Freund's Adjuvant Models of Overt Pain-Like Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Renata M.; Zarpelon, Ana C.; Domiciano, Talita P.; Georgetti, Sandra R.; Baracat, Marcela M.; Moreira, Isabel C.; Andrei, Cesar C.; Verri, Waldiceu A.; Casagrande, Rubia

    2016-01-01

    Tephrosia toxicaria, which is currently known as Tephrosia sinapou (Buc'hoz) A. Chev. (Fabaceae), is a source of compounds such as flavonoids. T. sinapou has been used in Amazonian countries traditional medicine to alleviate pain and inflammation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effects of T. sinapou ethyl acetate extract in overt pain-like behavior models in mice by using writhing response and flinching/licking tests. We demonstrated in this study that T. sinapou extract inhibited, in a dose (1–100 mg/kg) dependent manner, acetic acid- and phenyl-p-benzoquinone- (PBQ-) induced writhing response. Furthermore, it was active via intraperitoneal, subcutaneous, and peroral routes of administration. T. sinapou extract also inhibited formalin- and complete Freund's adjuvant- (CFA-) induced flinching/licking at 100 mg/kg dose. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that T. sinapou ethyl acetate extract reduces inflammatory pain in the acetic acid, PBQ, formalin, and CFA models of overt pain-like behavior. Therefore, the potential of analgesic activity of T. sinapou indicates that it deserves further investigation. PMID:27293981

  16. Benzoic Acid-Inducible Gene Expression in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dragset, Marte S.; Barczak, Amy K.; Kannan, Nisha; Mærk, Mali; Flo, Trude H.; Valla, Svein; Rubin, Eric J.; Steigedal, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Conditional expression is a powerful tool to investigate the role of bacterial genes. Here, we adapt the Pseudomonas putida-derived positively regulated XylS/Pm expression system to control inducible gene expression in Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis. By making simple changes to a Gram-negative broad-host-range XylS/Pm-regulated gene expression vector, we prove that it is possible to adapt this well-studied expression system to non-Gram-negative species. With the benzoic acid-derived inducer m-toluate, we achieve a robust, time- and dose-dependent reversible induction of Pm-mediated expression in mycobacteria, with low background expression levels. XylS/Pm is thus an important addition to existing mycobacterial expression tools, especially when low basal expression is of particular importance. PMID:26348349

  17. Saturated phosphatidic acids mediate saturated fatty acid-induced vascular calcification and lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Masashi; Miyazaki-Anzai, Shinobu; Keenan, Audrey L; Okamura, Kayo; Kendrick, Jessica; Chonchol, Michel; Offermanns, Stefan; Ntambi, James M; Kuro-O, Makoto; Miyazaki, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that saturated fatty acid-induced (SFA-induced) lipotoxicity contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms that underlie SFA-induced lipotoxicity remain unclear. Here, we have shown that repression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) enzymes, which regulate the intracellular balance of SFAs and unsaturated FAs, and the subsequent accumulation of SFAs in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), are characteristic events in the development of vascular calcification. We evaluated whether SMC-specific inhibition of SCD and the resulting SFA accumulation plays a causative role in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification and generated mice with SMC-specific deletion of both Scd1 and Scd2. Mice lacking both SCD1 and SCD2 in SMCs displayed severe vascular calcification with increased ER stress. Moreover, we employed shRNA library screening and radiolabeling approaches, as well as in vitro and in vivo lipidomic analysis, and determined that fully saturated phosphatidic acids such as 1,2-distearoyl-PA (18:0/18:0-PA) mediate SFA-induced lipotoxicity and vascular calcification. Together, these results identify a key lipogenic pathway in SMCs that mediates vascular calcification. PMID:26517697

  18. Saturated phosphatidic acids mediate saturated fatty acid-induced vascular calcification and lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Masashi; Miyazaki-Anzai, Shinobu; Keenan, Audrey L; Okamura, Kayo; Kendrick, Jessica; Chonchol, Michel; Offermanns, Stefan; Ntambi, James M; Kuro-O, Makoto; Miyazaki, Makoto

    2015-10-26

    Recent evidence indicates that saturated fatty acid-induced (SFA-induced) lipotoxicity contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms that underlie SFA-induced lipotoxicity remain unclear. Here, we have shown that repression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) enzymes, which regulate the intracellular balance of SFAs and unsaturated FAs, and the subsequent accumulation of SFAs in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), are characteristic events in the development of vascular calcification. We evaluated whether SMC-specific inhibition of SCD and the resulting SFA accumulation plays a causative role in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification and generated mice with SMC-specific deletion of both Scd1 and Scd2. Mice lacking both SCD1 and SCD2 in SMCs displayed severe vascular calcification with increased ER stress. Moreover, we employed shRNA library screening and radiolabeling approaches, as well as in vitro and in vivo lipidomic analysis, and determined that fully saturated phosphatidic acids such as 1,2-distearoyl-PA (18:0/18:0-PA) mediate SFA-induced lipotoxicity and vascular calcification. Together, these results identify a key lipogenic pathway in SMCs that mediates vascular calcification.

  19. [Elucidation of mechanisms underlying docosahexaenoic acid-induced antinociception].

    PubMed

    Nishinaka, Takashi; Matsumoto, Kengo; Nakamoto, Kazuo; Anbo, Akihiro; Mankura, Mitsumasa; Koyama, Yutaka; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2013-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a predominant of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA), has numerous beneficial physiological effects, including neuroprotection and cardiovascular protection. Recently, a possible involvement of n-3 PUFA in pain control has gathered considerable attention because numerous studies have reported a regulatory role of n-3 PUFAs. However, the mechanisms underlying how DHA exerts antinociceptive effect remain unknown. Here, we performed elucidation of mechanisms underlying DHA-induced antinociception. DHA administration dose-dependently exerted an antinociceptive effect. This effect was abolished by pretreated with the β-funaltrexamine (β-FNA), a μ-opioid receptor antagonist, and the nartrindole (NTI), a δ-opioid receptor antagonist, but not by the nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI), a κ-opioid receptor antagonist. In the radioligand binding assay, DHA itself did not have the affinity for μ-, δ- and κ- opioid receptor. Furthermore, the pretreatment of anti β-endorphin antiserum inhibited DHA-induced antinociception. The plasma levels of β-endorphin increased 30 min after DHA administration. The β-endorphin immunoreactivity in the brain increased at 30 min after DHA treatment. Expression of GPR40 protein was widely observed in the brain as well as the spinal cord. The intracerebroventricular but not intrathecal injection of DHA and GW9508, a GPR40/GPR120 agonist, significantly reduced formalin-induced pain behavior. The β-endorphin immunoreactivity in the brain increased at 10 and 20 min after intracerebroventricular injection of DHA and GW9508. These findings suggest that DHA-induced antinociception via β-endorphin release may be mediated through GPR40 signaling in the supraspinal area. PMID:23649389

  20. Depressed phosphatidic acid-induced contractile activity of failing cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Tappia, Paramjit S; Maddaford, Thane G; Hurtado, Cecilia; Panagia, Vincenzo; Pierce, Grant N

    2003-01-10

    The effects of phosphatidic acid (PA), a known inotropic agent, on Ca(2+) transients and contractile activity of cardiomyocytes in congestive heart failure (CHF) due to myocardial infarction were examined. In control cells, PA induced a significant increase (25%) in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. The phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, 2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl N,N-diphenylcarbonate, blocked the positive inotropic action induced by PA, indicating that PA induces an increase in contractile activity and Ca(2+) transients through stimulation of PLC. Conversely, in failing cardiomyocytes there was a loss of PA-induced increase in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. PA did not alter resting cell length. Both diastolic and systolic [Ca(2+)] were significantly elevated in the failing cardiomyocytes. In vitro assessment of the cardiac sarcolemmal (SL) PLC activity revealed that the impaired failing cardiomyocyte response to PA was associated with a diminished stimulation of SL PLC activity by PA. Our results identify an important defect in the PA-PLC signaling pathway in failing cardiomyocytes, which may have significant implications for the depressed contractile function during CHF.

  1. Acid aspiration-induced airways hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed

    Allen, Gilman B; Leclair, Timothy R; von Reyn, Jessica; Larrabee, Yuna C; Cloutier, Mary E; Irvin, Charles G; Bates, Jason H T

    2009-12-01

    The role of gastroesophageal reflux and micro-aspiration as a trigger of airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in patients with asthma is controversial. The role of acid reflux and aspiration as a direct cause of AHR in normal subjects is also unclear. We speculated that aspiration of a weak acid with a pH (1.8) equivalent to the upper range of typical gastric contents would lead to AHR in naive mice. We further speculated that modest reductions in aspirate acidity to a level expected during gastric acid suppression therapy (pH 4.0) would impede aspiration-induced AHR. BALB/c female mice were briefly anesthetized with isoflurane and allowed to aspirate 75 microl of saline with HCl (pH 1.8, 4.0, or 7.4) or underwent sham aspiration. Mice were re-anesthetized 2 or 24 h later, underwent tracheostomy, and were coupled to a mechanical ventilator. Forced oscillations were used to periodically measure respiratory impedance (Zrs) following aerosol delivery of saline and increasing doses of methacholine to measure for AHR. Values for elastance (H), airways resistance (R(N)), and tissue damping (G) were derived from Zrs. Aspirate pH of 1.8 led to a significant overall increase in peak R(N), G, and H compared with pH 4.0 and 7.4 at 2 and 24 h. Differences between pH 7.4 and 4.0 were not significant. In mice aspirating pH 1.8 compared with controls, airway lavage fluid contained more neutrophils, higher protein, and demonstrated higher permeability. We conclude that acid aspiration triggers an acute AHR, driven principally by breakdown of epithelial barrier integrity within the airways. PMID:19797689

  2. Role of hepatocyte S6K1 in palmitic acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, lipotoxicity, insulin resistance and in oleic acid-induced protection.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Virginia; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Muntané, Jordi; Kozma, Sara C; Valverde, Ángela M

    2015-06-01

    The excess of saturated free fatty acids, such as palmitic acid, that induces lipotoxicity in hepatocytes, has been implicated in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease also associated with insulin resistance. By contrast, oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, attenuates the effects of palmitic acid. We evaluated whether palmitic acid is directly associated with both insulin resistance and lipoapoptosis in mouse and human hepatocytes and the impact of oleic acid in the molecular mechanisms that mediate both processes. In human and mouse hepatocytes palmitic acid at a lipotoxic concentration triggered early activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related kinases, induced the apoptotic transcription factor CHOP, activated caspase 3 and increased the percentage of apoptotic cells. These effects concurred with decreased IR/IRS1/Akt insulin pathway. Oleic acid suppressed the toxic effects of palmitic acid on ER stress activation, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance. Besides, oleic acid suppressed palmitic acid-induced activation of S6K1. This protection was mimicked by pharmacological or genetic inhibition of S6K1 in hepatocytes. In conclusion, this is the first study highlighting the activation of S6K1 by palmitic acid as a common and novel mechanism by which its inhibition by oleic acid prevents ER stress, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance in hepatocytes.

  3. Effect of supplemental folic acid on valproic acid-induced embryotoxicity and tissue zinc levels in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hansen, D K; Grafton, T F; Dial, S L; Gehring, T A; Siitonen, P H

    1995-11-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is an anti-convulsant drug known to cause spina bifida in humans. Administration of the vitamin, folic acid, has been shown to decrease the recurrence and possibly also the occurrence of neural tube defects, primarily spina bifida, in humans. Additionally, treatment with a derivative (folinic acid) of folic acid has been reported to decrease the frequency of VPA-induced exencephaly in mice treated with the drug in vivo. A protective effect by folinic acid has not been observed in vitro. The purpose of this investigation was to reexamine the ability of folinic acid to decrease the incidence of VPA-induced neural tube defects in vivo. We also examined the effect of increased intake of folic acid on zinc levels in various maternal and embryonic tissues. Folinic acid, whether administered by intraperitoneal injection or in osmotic mini-pumps, did not decrease the number of mouse fetuses with VPA-induced exencephaly. Dietary supplementation with 10-20 times the daily required intake of folic acid in rodents also failed to decrease the embryotoxicity of VPA. Such dietary supplementation had no effect on zinc levels in maternal liver, brain, or kidney, nor in embryonic tissues. These results indicate that folic acid is not able to reverse the embryotoxicity induced by the anticonvulsant, that there is no apparent effect of high dietary folate intake on maternal or embryonic zinc levels and suggest that folate is probably not involved in the mechanism of VPA-induced embryotoxicity. PMID:8838251

  4. Curcumin and folic acid abrogated methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sankrityayan, Himanshu; Majumdar, Anuradha S

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate, an antifolate drug widely used in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and cancer, is known to cause vascular endothelial dysfunction by causing hyperhomocysteinemia, direct injury to endothelium or by increasing the oxidative stress (raising levels of 7,8-dihydrobiopterin). Curcumin is a naturally occurring polyphenol with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action and therapeutic spectra similar to that of methotrexate. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of curcumin on methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and also compare its effect with that produced by folic acid (0.072 μg·g(-1)·day(-1), p.o., 2 weeks) per se and in combination. Male Wistar rats were exposed to methotrexate (0.35 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), i.p.) for 2 weeks to induce endothelial dysfunction. Methotrexate exposure led to shedding of endothelium, decreased vascular reactivity, increased oxidative stress, decreased serum nitrite levels, and increase in aortic collagen deposition. Curcumin (200 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) and 400 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), p.o.) for 4 weeks prevented the increase in oxidative stress, decrease in serum nitrite, aortic collagen deposition, and also vascular reactivity. The effects were comparable with those produced by folic acid therapy. The study shows that curcumin, when concomitantly administered with methotrexate, abrogated its vascular side effects by preventing an increase in oxidative stress and abating any reduction in physiological nitric oxide levels. PMID:26571019

  5. Curcumin and folic acid abrogated methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sankrityayan, Himanshu; Majumdar, Anuradha S

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate, an antifolate drug widely used in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and cancer, is known to cause vascular endothelial dysfunction by causing hyperhomocysteinemia, direct injury to endothelium or by increasing the oxidative stress (raising levels of 7,8-dihydrobiopterin). Curcumin is a naturally occurring polyphenol with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action and therapeutic spectra similar to that of methotrexate. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of curcumin on methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and also compare its effect with that produced by folic acid (0.072 μg·g(-1)·day(-1), p.o., 2 weeks) per se and in combination. Male Wistar rats were exposed to methotrexate (0.35 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), i.p.) for 2 weeks to induce endothelial dysfunction. Methotrexate exposure led to shedding of endothelium, decreased vascular reactivity, increased oxidative stress, decreased serum nitrite levels, and increase in aortic collagen deposition. Curcumin (200 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) and 400 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), p.o.) for 4 weeks prevented the increase in oxidative stress, decrease in serum nitrite, aortic collagen deposition, and also vascular reactivity. The effects were comparable with those produced by folic acid therapy. The study shows that curcumin, when concomitantly administered with methotrexate, abrogated its vascular side effects by preventing an increase in oxidative stress and abating any reduction in physiological nitric oxide levels.

  6. Lysophosphatidic acid-induced chemotaxis of bone cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiosis, Sue A.; Masiello, Lisa M.; Bollinger, Nikki; Karin, Norm J.

    2006-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a platelet-derived bioactive lipid that is postulated to regulate wound healing. LPA activates G protein-coupled receptors to induce Ca2+ signaling in MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts, and is a potent chemotactic stimulus for these cells. Since bone fracture healing requires the migration of osteoblast progenitors, we postulate that LPA is among the factors that stimulate bone repair. UMR 106-01 cells, which express a more mature osteoblastic phenotype than MC3T3-E1 cells, did not migrate in response to LPA, although they express LPA receptors and exhibit LPA-induced Ca2+ signals. This suggests that LPA differentially induces pre-osteoblast chemotaxis, consistent with our hypothesis that LPA stimulates the motility of osteoblast progenitors during bone healing. LPA-stimulated MC3T3-E1 cells exhibit striking changes in morphology and F-actin architecture, and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) is required for motility-associated cytoskeletal rearrangements in many cell types. We found a dose-dependent reduction in LPA-induced osteoblast migration when cells also were treated with the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. Treatment of many cell types with LPA is associated with an autocrine/paracrine transactivation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) via shedding of surface-tethered EGFR ligands, a phenomenon often required for LPA-induced chemotaxis. MC3T3-E1 cells express multiple EGFR ligands (epigen, epiregulin, HB-EGF and amphiregulin) and migrated in response to EGF. However, while EGF-stimulated motility in MC3T3-E1 cells was blocked by an EGFR inhibitor, there was no significant effect on LPA-induced chemotaxis. Activation of MAP kinases is a hallmark of EGFR-mediated signaling, and EGF treatment of MC3T3-E1 cells led to a strong stimulation of ERK1/2 kinase. In contrast, LPA induced only a minor elevation in ERK activity. Thus, it is likely that the increase in ERK activity by LPA is related to cell proliferation associated with lipid treatment. We

  7. Topiramate increases the risk of valproic acid-induced encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Noh, Young; Kim, Dong Wook; Chu, Kon; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Moon, Hye-Jin; Lee, Sang Kun

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic encephalopathy is a rare but serious complication of valproic acid (VPA) therapy that usually presents with impaired consciousness or increased seizure frequency. Although it has been suggested that topiramate (TPM) increases the risk of VPA-induced encephalopathy, the additional risk in patients receiving TPM therapy has not been evaluated. We reviewed all adult patients who took VPA between January 2005 and February 2009 at the Seoul National University Hospital and identified patients with VPA-induced encephalopathy based on clinical and electroencephalography (EEG) data. Information on sex, age, serum ammonia level, serum VPA level, liver function test, and EEG was collected from patient registry and medical data. We enrolled 8,372 patients who received VPA therapy and 1,236 patients who received VPA/TPM combination therapy. We identified 11 patients with VPA-induced encephalopathy (0.13%), 7 of whom received a combination therapy of VPA and TPM. The odds ratio of VPA-induced encephalopathy with TPM over that without TPM was 10.16. There were no significant differences in sex distribution, number of antiepileptic agents, ammonia level, VPA serum level, underlying diseases, dosage of VPA, duration of VPA treatment, treatment of encephalopathy, and outcomes between the two groups. Our study showed that the prevalence of VPA-induced encephalopathy is approximately 0.1% among patients treated with VPA and that the risk of this condition, although still low, can increase by approximately 10 times in the presence of TPM therapy. Based on these results, we suggest that TPM should be carefully used in patients receiving VPA treatment.

  8. Oleanolic acid alleviated pressure overload-induced cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hai-Han; Zhang, Nan; Feng, Hong; Zhang, Ning; Ma, Zhen-Guo; Yang, Zheng; Yuan, Yuan; Bian, Zhou-Yan; Tang, Qi-Zhu

    2015-11-01

    Previous study has demonstrated that oleanolic acid (OA) possessing the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties blunted high-glucose-induced diabetic cardiomyopathy and ameliorated experimental autoimmune myocarditis in mice. However, little is known about its effects on pressure overload-induced cardiac remodeling. Herein, we investigated the effect of OA on cardiac remodeling and underlying mechanism. Mice, subjected to aortic banding (AB), were randomly assigned into control group and experimental group. OA premixed in diets was administered to mice after 3 days of AB. Echocardiography and catheter-based measurements of hemodynamic parameters were performed after 8 weeks' treatment of OA. Histologic examination and molecular analyses were used to assess cardiac hypertrophy and tissue fibrosis. In addition, the inhibitory effects of OA on H9c2 cardiomyocytes and cardiac primary fibroblast responded to the stimulation of AngII were also investigated. OA ameliorated the systolic and diastolic dysfunction induced by pressure overload evidenced by echocardiography and catheter-based measurements. OA also decreased the mRNA expression of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis markers evidenced by RT-PCR. It has been shown in our study that pressure overload activated the phosphorylations of Akt, mTOR, p70s6k, S6, GSK3β, and FoxO3a, and treatment of OA attenuated the phosphorylation of these proteins. In addition, hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes and fibrosis markers induced by AngII was inhibited by OA in vitro. Our findings uncover that OA suppressed AB-induced cardiac hypertrophy, partly by inhibiting the activity of Akt/mTOR pathway, and suggest that treatment of OA may have a benefit on retarding the progress of cardiac remodeling under long terms of pressure overload. PMID:26215454

  9. Salicylic acid attenuates gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Randjelovic, Pavle; Veljkovic, Slavimir; Stojiljkovic, Nenad; Jankovic-Velickovic, Ljubinka; Sokolovic, Dusan; Stoiljkovic, Milan; Ilic, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Gentamicin (GM) is a widely used antibiotic against serious and life-threatening infections, but its usefulness is limited by the development of nephrotoxicity. The present study was designed to determine the protective effect of salicylic acid (SA) in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Quantitative evaluation of gentamicin-induced structural alterations and degree of functional alterations in the kidneys were performed by histopathological and biochemical analyses in order to determine potential beneficial effects of SA coadministration with gentamicin. Gentamicin was observed to cause a severe nephrotoxicity which was evidenced by an elevation of serum urea and creatinine levels. The significant increases in malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and protein carbonyl groups indicated that GM-induced tissue injury was mediated through oxidative reactions. On the other hand, simultaneous SA administration protected kidney tissue against the oxidative damage and the nephrotoxic effect caused by GM treatment. Exposure to GM caused necrosis of tubular epithelial cells. Necrosis of tubules was found to be prevented by SA pretreatment. The results from our study indicate that SA supplement attenuates oxidative-stress associated renal injury by reducing oxygen free radicals and lipid peroxidation in gentamicin-treated rats.

  10. Ursodeoxycholic Acid Ameliorates Fructose-Induced Metabolic Syndrome in Rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) is characterized by insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension. It is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and type-2 diabetes. Consumption of fructose is linked to increased prevalence of MS. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is a steroid bile acid with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory activities and has been shown to improve insulin resistance. The current study aims to investigate the effect of UDCA (150 mg/kg) on MS induced in rats by fructose administration (10%) in drinking water for 12 weeks. The effects of UDCA were compared to fenofibrate (100 mg/kg), an agonist of PPAR-α receptors. Treatment with UDCA or fenofibrate started from the 6th week after fructose administration once daily. Fructose administration resulted in significant increase in body weight, elevations of blood glucose, serum insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), uric acid levels, insulin resistance index and blood pressure compared to control rats. Moreover, fructose increased oxidative stress in aortic tissues indicated by significant increases of malondialdehyde (MDA), expression of iNOS and reduction of reduced glutathione (GSH) content. These disturbances were associated with decreased eNOS expression, increased infiltration of leukocytes and loss of aortic vascular elasticity. Treatment with UDCA successfully ameliorated the deleterious effects of fructose. The protective effect of UDCA could be attributed to its ability to decrease uric acid level, improve insulin resistance and diminish oxidative stress in vascular tissues. These results might support possible clinical application of UDCA in MS patients especially those present with liver diseases, taking into account its tolerability and safety. However, further investigations on human subjects are needed before the clinical application of UDCA for this indication. PMID:25202970

  11. Differential changes in taste perception induced by benzoic acid prickling.

    PubMed

    Otero-Losada, M E

    2003-03-01

    Benzoic acid (Bz) is a prickling compound used to preserve foods. However, its effects on taste are unknown. This work examines Bz-taste interaction using psychophysical methods [magnitude estimation (ME) and paired comparison (PC)] to measure taste intensity in aqueous solutions of pure tastants (T) and their respective mixtures with 10 mM Bz (Mix). Prototypical tastants induced basic taste qualities (mM): sucrose [90-1440, sweetness (Sw)], citric acid [1-64, sourness (So)], NaCl [15-960, saltiness (Sa)], quinine [0.01-0.64, bitterness (Bitt)], KCl (12.5-400, Sa and Bitt). MEs were analysed using Steven's and Beidler's equations. Bz increased Sw (all concentrations) and ionic tastes (low concentrations) and Bz effects were reduced by concentration increase according with quality and tastant Bz reduced Bitt(Quinine) (high concentrations). Bz reduced taste slopes (percentage decrease): Sw 45% (P<.02), So 34% (P<.01), Sa 35% or 41% (NaCl or KCl, P<.03), Bitt 33% or 60% (quinine P<.01 or KCl P<.04). Bz reduced K(diss) (affinity(-1)) (percentage reduction): Sw 79% (P<.0002), So 40% (P<.03), Sa(NaCl) 63% (P<.005), Sa(KCl) 48% (P<.04), Bitt(KCl) 64% (P<.04). Bz reduced ME(max) (percentage reduction): Sw 31% (P<.004), Bitt(Quinine) 29% (P<.03). PCs confirmed taste increases by Bz (percentage of 'Mix(intensity)>T(intensity)' answers/total answers): Sw 79-69% (90-1440 mM sucrose), So 75% (1 mM citric acid) and 71% (2 mM citric acid), Sa 75-71% (15-120 mM NaCl). Negative concentration dependence of taste increases by Bz suggests different levels of interaction. Biophysical and neurophysiological changes are discussed in relation with Bz properties and mechanism of interaction with taste. PMID:12676277

  12. Non-carboxylic analogues of aryl propionic acid: synthesis, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic and ulcerogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Eissa, S I; Farrag, A M; Galeel, A A A

    2014-09-01

    As a part of ongoing studies in developing new potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents, a series of novel 6-methoxy naphthalene derivatives was efficiently synthesized and characterized by spectral and elemental analyses. The newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activities using carrageenin-induced rat paw edema model, analgesic activities using acetic acid induced writhing model in mice and anti-pyretic activity using yeast induced hyperpyrexia method as well as ulcerogenic effects. Among the synthesized compounds, thiourea derivative (6a, e) exhibited higher anti-inflammatory activity than the standard drug naproxen in reduction of the rat paw edema (88.71, 89.77%) respectively. All of the non-carboxylic tested compounds were found to have promising anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activity, while were devoid of any ulcerogenic effects. PMID:24446206

  13. Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) But Not Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) Reverses Trans-10, Cis-12 Conjugated Linoleic Acid Induced Insulin Resistance in Mice1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: t10, c12-Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) induces insulin resistance and fatty liver in mice which can be reversed by fish oils. We determined if it is eicospentaenoic acid (20:5n-3, EPA) or docoshexaenoic acid (22:6n-3, DHA) that reverses these adverse effects of CLA. Research Design and M...

  14. Salicylic acid induces mitochondrial injury by inhibiting ferrochelatase heme biosynthesis activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipul; Liu, Shujie; Ando, Hideki; Ishii, Ryohei; Tateno, Shumpei; Kaneko, Yuki; Yugami, Masato; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Nureki, Osamu; Handa, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Salicylic acid is a classic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Although salicylic acid also induces mitochondrial injury, the mechanism of its antimitochondrial activity is not well understood. In this study, by using a one-step affinity purification scheme with salicylic acid-immobilized beads, ferrochelatase (FECH), a homodimeric enzyme involved in heme biosynthesis in mitochondria, was identified as a new molecular target of salicylic acid. Moreover, the cocrystal structure of the FECH-salicylic acid complex was determined. Structural and biochemical studies showed that salicylic acid binds to the dimer interface of FECH in two possible orientations and inhibits its enzymatic activity. Mutational analysis confirmed that Trp301 and Leu311, hydrophobic amino acid residues located at the dimer interface, are directly involved in salicylic acid binding. On a gel filtration column, salicylic acid caused a shift in the elution profile of FECH, indicating that its conformational change is induced by salicylic acid binding. In cultured human cells, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis, whereas salicylic acid did not exert its inhibitory effect in FECH knockdown cells. Concordantly, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis in zebrafish embryos. Strikingly, the salicylic acid-induced effect in zebrafish was partially rescued by FECH overexpression. Taken together, these findings illustrate that FECH is responsible for salicylic acid-induced inhibition of heme synthesis, which may contribute to its antimitochondrial and anti-inflammatory function. This study establishes a novel aspect of the complex pharmacological effects of salicylic acid.

  15. Isofraxidin exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and inhibited TNF-α production in LPS-induced mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro via the MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Xing, Wei; Li, Weifeng; Fan, Ting; Hu, Hua; Li, Yongmei

    2012-10-01

    Isofraxidin (IF) is a Coumarin compound that can be isolated from medicinal plants, such as Sarcandra glabra (Thunb.). Nakai is widely used in Asian countries for the treatment of anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumour action. The present investigation was designed to evaluate the effect of IF on inflammation and nociception. In addition, we investigated a potential novel mechanism to explain the anti-inflammatory properties of IF. In vivo, xylene-induced mouse ear edema, carrageenan-induced rat paw edema, LPS-induced mouse endotoxic shock, acetic acid-induced mice writhing and formalin-induced mouse pain models were used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of IF. In vitro, we examined the effects of IF inhibition on TNF-α production and the regulation of ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation activity in LPS-induced mouse peritoneal macrophages. Our results demonstrated that IF can significantly decrease xylene-induced ear edema, carrageenan-induced paw edema, acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin-induced pain. Moreover, IF greatly inhibited the production of TNF-α in the serum of LPS-stimulated mice and peritoneal macrophages, and it decreased phospho-p38 and ERK1/2 protein expression in LPS-stimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages. Overall, our data suggest that IF possesses significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities that may be mediated through the regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and the phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2.

  16. D-amino acid-induced expression of D-amino acid oxidase in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shouji; Okada, Hirotsune; Abe, Katsumasa; Kera, Yoshio

    2012-12-01

    We investigated D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) induction in the popular model yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The product of the putative DAO gene of the yeast expressed in E. coli displayed oxidase activity to neutral and basic D-amino acids, but not to an L-amino acid or acidic D-amino acids, showing that the putative DAO gene encodes catalytically active DAO. DAO activity was weakly detected in yeast cells grown on a culture medium without D-amino acid, and was approximately doubled by adding D-alanine. The elimination of ammonium chloride from culture medium induced activity by up to eight-fold. L-Alanine also induced the activity, but only by about half of that induced by D-alanine. The induction by D-alanine reached a maximum level at 2 h cultivation; it remained roughly constant until cell growth reached a stationary phase. The best inducer was D-alanine, followed by D-proline and then D-serine. Not effective were N-carbamoyl-D,L-alanine (a better inducer of DAO than D-alanine in the yeast Trigonopsis variabilis), and both basic and acidic D-amino acids. These results showed that S. pombe DAO could be a suitable model for analyzing the regulation of DAO expression in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:22986818

  17. Studies of radiation induced peroxidation in fatty acid micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, L.K.

    1980-01-01

    Studies of irradiation induced lipid peroxidation in fatty acid micelles, both from our own lab and others, are briefly summarized. Steady state measurements have shown the dependence of hydroperoxide yield on the state of aggregation in the lipid and the degree to which the reactive sites are close packed. Chromatographic measurements obeyed the square root dependence of yield on dose rate confirming the proposed chain mechanism. Application to antioxidant studies have demonstrated the highly efficient blockage of the peroxidation chain by ..cap alpha..-tocopherol and the subsequent prooxidant effect of the product formed. Time resolved studies have been used to determine rate information for .OH-lipid interaction, radical transfer within the lipid, radical peroxidation, lipid radical movement across the micellar boundary, chain termination, and radical interaction with ..cap alpha..-tocopherol. Complimentary laser studies have demonstrated, in contrast to .OH behavior, the comparatively high degree of selectively exhibited by alkoxy radicals toward allylic lipid sites.

  18. Ion-beam-induced deoxyribose nucleic acid transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anuntalabhochai, S.; Chandej, R.; Phanchaisri, B.; Yu, L. D.; Vilaithong, T.; Brown, I. G.

    2001-04-01

    We report our observations of the interaction of energetic ions with bacterial cells, inducing direct deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) transfer into Escherichia coli (E. coli). Argon- and nitrogen-ion beams were used to bombard the bacteria E. coli in a vacuum with energy of 26 keV and fluence in the range 0.5-4×1015 ions/cm2. Three DNA plasmids, pGEM2, pGEM-T easy, and pGFP, carrying different marker genes, were subsequently transferred (separately) into the appropriately ion-bombarded bacteria and successfully expressed. The results of this study indicate that ion beams with an energy such that the ion range is approximately equal to the cell envelope thickness, at a certain range of fluence, are able to generate pathways for macromolecule transfer through the envelope without irreversible damage.

  19. Chlorogenic acid and coffee prevent hypoxia-induced retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Jang, Holim; Ahn, Hong Ryul; Jo, Hyoung; Kim, Kyung-A; Lee, Eun Ha; Lee, Ki Won; Jung, Sang Hoon; Lee, Chang Y

    2014-01-01

    This study explored whether chlorogenic acid (CGA) and coffee have protective effects against retinal degeneration. Under hypoxic conditions, the viability of transformed retinal ganglion (RGC-5) cells was significantly reduced by treatment with the nitric oxide (NO) donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). However, pretreatment with CGA attenuated cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, CGA prevented the up-regulation of apoptotic proteins such as Bad and cleaved caspase-3. Similar beneficial effects of both CGA and coffee extracts were observed in mice that had undergone an optic nerve crush (ONC) procedure. CGA and coffee extract reduced cell death by preventing the down-regulation of Thy-1. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that coffee and its major component, CGA, significantly reduce apoptosis of retinal cells induced by hypoxia and NO, and that coffee consumption may help in preventing retinal degeneration. PMID:24295042

  20. Light-Induced Alterations in Basil Ganglia Kynurenic Acid Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sroufe, Angela E.; Whittaker, J. A.; Patrickson, J. W.; Orr, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The metabolic synthesis, release and breakdown of several known CNS neurotransmitters have been shown to follow a circadian pattern entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle. The levels of excitatory amino acid (EAA) transmitters such as glutamate, have been shown to vary with environmental lighting conditions. Kynurenic Acid (KA), an endogenous tryptophan metabolite and glutamate receptor antagonist, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects against EAA-induced excitotoxic cell damage. Changes in KA's activity within the mammalian basal ganglia has been proposed as being contributory to neurotoxicity in Huntington's Disease. It is not known whether CNS KA levels follow a circadian pattern or exhibit light-induced fluctuations. However, because the symptoms of certain degenerative motor disorders seem to fluctuate with daily 24 hour rhythm, we initiated studies to determine if basal ganglia KA were influenced by the daily light/dark cycle and could influence motor function. Therefore in this study, HPLC-EC was utilized to determine if basal ganglia KA levels in tissue extracts from adult male Long-Evans rats (200-250g) entrained to 24 and 48 hours constant light and dark conditions, respectively. Samples were taken one hour before the onset of the subjective day and one hour prior to the onset of the subjective night in order to detect possible phase differences in KA levels and to allow for accumulation of factors expressed in association with the light or dark phase. Data analysis revealed that KA levels in the basal ganglia vary with environmental lighting conditions; being elevated generally during the dark. Circadian phase differences in KA levels were also evident during the subjective night and subjective day, respectively. Results from these studies are discussed with respect to potential cyclic changes in neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxic damage during the daily 24 hour cycle and its possible relevance to future therapeutic approaches in

  1. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Verhaag, Esther M.; Buist-Homan, Manon; Koehorst, Martijn; Groen, Albert K.; Moshage, Han; Faber, Klaas Nico

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This may be explained by a hormetic response in hepatocytes that limits cell death during cholestasis. Aim To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the hormetic response that protect hepatocytes against experimental cholestatic conditions. Methods HepG2.rNtcp cells were preconditioned (24 h) with sub-apoptotic concentrations (0.1–50 μM) of various bile acids, the superoxide donor menadione, TNF-α or the Farsenoid X Receptor agonist GW4064, followed by a challenge with the apoptosis-inducing bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA; 200 μM for 4 h), menadione (50 μM, 6 h) or cytokine mixture (CM; 6 h). Levels of apoptotic and necrotic cell death, mRNA expression of the bile salt export pump (ABCB11) and bile acid sensors, as well as intracellular GCDCA levels were analyzed. Results Preconditioning with the pro-apoptotic bile acids GCDCA, taurocholic acid, or the protective bile acids (tauro)ursodeoxycholic acid reduced GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity in HepG2.rNtcp cells. Bile acid preconditioning did not induce significant levels of necrosis in GCDCA-challenged HepG2.rNtcp cells. In contrast, preconditioning with cholic acid, menadione or TNF-α potentiated GCDCA-induced apoptosis. GCDCA preconditioning specifically reduced GCDCA-induced cell death and not CM- or menadione-induced apoptosis. The hormetic effect of GCDCA preconditioning was concentration- and time-dependent. GCDCA-, CDCA- and GW4064- preconditioning enhanced ABCB11 mRNA levels, but in contrast to the bile acids, GW4064 did not significantly reduce GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity. The GCDCA challenge strongly increased intracellular levels of this bile acid, which was not lowered by GCDCA

  2. Iron Transformations Induced by an Acid-Tolerant Desulfosporosinus Species

    PubMed Central

    Bertel, Doug; Peck, John; Quick, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The mineralogical transformations of Fe phases induced by an acid-tolerant, Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfosporosinus sp. strain GBSRB4.2 were evaluated under geochemical conditions associated with acid mine drainage-impacted systems (i.e., low pH and high Fe concentrations). X-ray powder diffractometry coupled with magnetic analysis by first-order reversal curve diagrams were used to evaluate mineral phases produced by GBSRB4.2 in media containing different ratios of Fe(II) and Fe(III). In medium containing Fe predominately in the +II oxidation state, ferrimagnetic, single-domain greigite (Fe3S4) was formed, but the addition of Fe(III) inhibited greigite formation. In media that contained abundant Fe(III) [as schwertmannite; Fe8O8(OH)6SO4 · nH2O], the activities of strain GBSRB4.2 enhanced the transformation of schwertmannite to goethite (α-FeOOH), due to the increased pH and Fe(II) concentrations that resulted from the activities of GBSRB4.2. PMID:22038606

  3. Sphingoid bases inhibit acid-induced demineralization of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van 't Hof, Wim; Bikker, Floris J; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; Sotres, Javier; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Veerman, Enno C I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main constituent of dental enamel, is inherently susceptible to the etching and dissolving action of acids, resulting in tooth decay such as dental caries and dental erosion. Since the prevalence of erosive wear is gradually increasing, there is urgent need for agents that protect the enamel against erosive attacks. In the present study we studied in vitro the anti-erosive effects of a number of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases, which form the backbone of sphingolipids. Pretreatment of HAp discs with sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), PHS phosphate and sphinganine significantly protected these against acid-induced demineralization by 80 ± 17%, 78 ± 17%, 78 ± 7% and 81 ± 8%, respectively (p < 0.001). On the other hand, sphingomyelin, acetyl PHS, octanoyl PHS and stearoyl PHS had no anti-erosive effects. Atomic force measurement revealed that HAp discs treated with PHS were almost completely and homogeneously covered by patches of PHS. This suggests that PHS and other sphingoid bases form layers on the surface of HAp, which act as diffusion barriers against H(+) ions. In principle, these anti-erosive properties make PHS and related sphingosines promising and attractive candidates as ingredients in oral care products.

  4. Iron transformations induced by an acid-tolerant Desulfosporosinus species.

    PubMed

    Bertel, Doug; Peck, John; Quick, Thomas J; Senko, John M

    2012-01-01

    The mineralogical transformations of Fe phases induced by an acid-tolerant, Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfosporosinus sp. strain GBSRB4.2 were evaluated under geochemical conditions associated with acid mine drainage-impacted systems (i.e., low pH and high Fe concentrations). X-ray powder diffractometry coupled with magnetic analysis by first-order reversal curve diagrams were used to evaluate mineral phases produced by GBSRB4.2 in media containing different ratios of Fe(II) and Fe(III). In medium containing Fe predominately in the +II oxidation state, ferrimagnetic, single-domain greigite (Fe₃S₄) was formed, but the addition of Fe(III) inhibited greigite formation. In media that contained abundant Fe(III) [as schwertmannite; Fe₈O₈(OH)₆SO₄ · nH₂O], the activities of strain GBSRB4.2 enhanced the transformation of schwertmannite to goethite (α-FeOOH), due to the increased pH and Fe(II) concentrations that resulted from the activities of GBSRB4.2. PMID:22038606

  5. Excessive dietary linoleic acid induces proinflammatory markers in rats.

    PubMed

    Marchix, Justine; Choque, Benjamin; Kouba, Maryline; Fautrel, Alain; Catheline, Daniel; Legrand, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Following the historical dietary recommendations, the substitution of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) for saturated fatty acids (SFAs) resulted in a dramatic increase of linoleic acid (LA) in the Western diet. While proatherogenic properties of SFAs have been described, the involvement of LA on the inflammatory process remains controversial. Herein, we evaluated the effects of an excessive LA intake on the cytokine-induced expression of endothelial adhesion molecules vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), through the nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway, in comparison with a control diet and regarding a "positive" SFA diet. Wistar rats were fed experimental diets - a control diet or diets enriched with LA or SFA - for 11 weeks. Plasma lipid parameters and proinflammatory cytokine production such as interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were analyzed. Expression of endothelial adhesion molecules and NF-κB was determined by immunohistochemical analysis. No difference was observed in body weight. The enriched diets did not affect triglyceride and total cholesterol levels in plasma. Our results demonstrated that excessive dietary LA intake increased TNF-α levels (P<.05) in plasma. Rats fed the LA-enriched diet showed a significantly higher expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and NF-κB in aortas. In addition, our results demonstrated that an excess of LA is more efficient to activate endothelial molecular process than an excess of SFA. The present study provides further support for the proinflammatory properties of LA and suggests an LA-derivatives pathway involved in the inflammatory process.

  6. Aminomethylphosphonic acid and methoxyacetic acid induce apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Keshab R; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; You, Zongbing

    2015-01-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and its parent compound herbicide glyphosate are analogs to glycine, which have been reported to inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis of cancer cells, but not normal cells. Methoxyacetic acid (MAA) is the active metabolite of ester phthalates widely used in industry as gelling, viscosity and stabilizer; its exposure is associated with developmental and reproductive toxicities in both rodents and humans. MAA has been reported to suppress prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis. However, it is unknown whether AMPA and MAA can inhibit cancer cell growth. In this study, we found that AMPA and MAA inhibited cell growth in prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, C4-2B, PC-3 and DU-145) through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Importantly, the AMPA-induced apoptosis was potentiated with the addition of MAA, which was due to downregulation of the anti-apoptotic gene baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis protein repeat containing 2 (BIRC2), leading to activation of caspases 7 and 3. These results demonstrate that the combination of AMPA and MAA can promote the apoptosis of prostate cancer cells, suggesting that they can be used as potential therapeutic drugs in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  7. Docosahexaenoic acid and other fatty acids induce a decrease in pHi in Jurkat T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Aires, Virginie; Hichami, Aziz; Moutairou, Kabirou; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2003-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) induced rapid (t1/2=33 s) and dose-dependent decreases in pHi in BCECF-loaded human (Jurkat) T-cells. Addition of 5-(N,N-dimethyl)-amiloride, an inhibitor of Na+/H+ exchanger, prolonged DHA-induced acidification as a function of time, indicating that the exchanger is implicated in pHi recovery. Other fatty acids like oleic acid, arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, but not palmitic acid, also induced a fall in pHi in these cells. To assess the role of calcium in the DHA-induced acidification, we conducted experiments in Ca2+-free (0% Ca2+) and Ca2+-containing (100% Ca2+) buffer. We observed that there was no difference in the degree of DHA-induced transient acidification in both the experimental conditions, though pHi recovery was faster in 0% Ca2+ medium than that in 100% Ca2+ medium. In the presence of BAPTA, a calcium chelator, a rapid recovery of DHA-induced acidosis was observed. Furthermore, addition of CaCl2 into 0% Ca2+ medium curtailed DHA-evoked rapid pHi recovery. In 0% Ca2+ medium, containing BAPTA, DHA did not evoke increases in [Ca2+]i, though this fatty acid still induced a rapid acidification in these cells. These observations suggest that calcium is implicated in the long-lasting DHA-induced acidosis. DHA-induced rapid acidification may be due to its deprotonation in the plasma membrane (flip-flop model), as suggested by the following observations: (1) DHA with a –COOH group induced intracellular acidification, but this fatty acid with a –COOCH3 group failed to do so, and (2) DHA, but not propionic acid, -induced acidification was completely reversed by addition of fatty acid-free bovine serum albumin in these cells. These results suggest that DHA induces acidosis via deprotonation and Ca2+ mobilization in human T-cells. PMID:14645139

  8. Monomethylarsonous acid induces transformation of human bladder cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bredfeldt, Tiffany G.; Jagadish, Bhumasamudram; Eblin, Kylee E.; Mash, Eugene A.; Gandolfi, A. Jay . E-mail: gandolfi@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2006-10-01

    Arsenic is a human bladder carcinogen. Arsenic is methylated to both monomethyl and dimethyl metabolites which have been detected in human urine. The trivalent methylated arsenicals are more toxic than inorganic arsenic. It is unknown if these trivalent methylated metabolites can directly cause malignant transformation in human cells. The goal of this study is determine if monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) can induce malignant transformation in a human bladder urothelial cell line. To address this goal, a non-tumorigenic human urothelial cell line (UROtsa) was continuously exposed to 0.05 {mu}M MMA{sup III} for 52 weeks. Hyperproliferation was the first phenotypic change observed in exposed UROtsa (URO-MSC). After 12 weeks of exposure, doubling time had decreased from 42 h in unexposed control cells to 27 h in URO-MSC. Hyperproliferation continued to be a quality possessed by the URO-MSC cells after both 24 and 52 weeks of exposure to MMA{sup III}, which had a 40-50% reduction in doubling time. Throughout the 52-week exposure, URO-MSC cells retained an epithelial morphology with subtle morphological differences from control cells. 24 weeks of MMA{sup III} exposure was required to induce anchorage-independent growth as detected by colony formation in soft agar, a characteristic not found in UROtsa cells. To further substantiate that malignant transformation had occurred, URO-MSC cells were tested after 24 and 52 weeks of exposure to MMA{sup III} for the ability to form tumors in SCID mice. Enhanced tumorigenicity in SCID mouse xenografts was observed after 52 weeks of treatment with MMA{sup III}. These observations are the first demonstration of MMA{sup III}-induced malignant transformation in a human bladder urothelial cell line and provide important evidence that MMA{sup III} may be carcinogenic in human tissues.

  9. Capsaicin prevents kainic acid-induced epileptogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Hee; Lee, Jong-Geol; Yon, Jung-Min; Oh, Ki-Wan; Baek, In-Jeoung; Nahm, Sang-Soep; Lee, Beom Jun; Yun, Young Won; Nam, Sang-Yoon

    2011-05-01

    Epilepsy is a neurodegenerative disease with periodic occurrences of spontaneous seizures as the main symptom. The aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of capsaicin, the major ingredient of hot peppers, in a kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus model. After intraperitoneal injections of KA (30mg/kg) in 8-week-old male ICR mice, the animals were treated subcutaneously with capsaicin (0.33mg/kg or 1mg/kg) and then examined for any anti-ictogenic, hypothermic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic effects of the capsaicin treatment 3 days after KA treatment. KA injections significantly enhanced neurodegenerative conditions but co-injection with capsaicin reduced the detrimental effects of KA in a dose-dependent manner in mice. The co-administered group that received KA and 1mg/kg of capsaicin showed significantly decreased behavioral seizure activity and body temperature for 3h and also remarkably blocked intense and high-frequency seizure discharges in the parietal cortex for 3 days compared with those that received KA alone. Capsaicin treatment significantly diminished the levels of oxidant activity and malondialdehyde concentration and increased the antioxidant activity in the blood and brain of KA-treated mice. In addition, capsaicin significantly lowered the KA-induced increase in the concentration of the cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α in the brain. Furthermore, co-treatment of KA and capsaicin (1mg/kg) resulted in considerably decreased apoptotic cell death in the cornu ammonis sections of the hippocampus compared with that seen in the KA-alone group. These findings indicate that capsaicin is preventative for the epileptogenesis induced by KA in mice.

  10. Zebrafish retinal defects induced by ethanol exposure are rescued by retinoic acid and folic acid supplement.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Pooja; Sarmah, Swapnalee; Marrs, James A

    2015-03-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is caused by prenatal alcohol exposure, producing craniofacial, sensory, motor, and cognitive defects. FASD is highly prevalent in low socioeconomic populations, which are frequently accompanied by malnutrition. FASD-associated ocular pathologies include microphthalmia, optic nerve hypoplasia, and cataracts. The present study characterizes specific retinal tissue defects, identifies ethanol-sensitive stages during retinal development, and dissects the effect of nutrient supplements, such as retinoic acid (RA) and folic acid (FA) on ethanol-induced retinal defects. Exposure to pathophysiological concentrations of ethanol (during midblastula transition through somitogenesis; 2-24 h post fertilization [hpf]) altered critical transcription factor expression involved in retinal cell differentiation, and produced severe retinal ganglion cell, photoreceptor, and Müller glial differentiation defects. Ethanol exposure did not alter retinal cell differentiation induction, but increased retinal cell death and proliferation. RA and FA nutrient co-supplementation rescued retinal photoreceptor and ganglion cell differentiation defects. Ethanol exposure during retinal morphogenesis stages (16-24 hpf) produced retinal defects like those seen with ethanol exposure between 2 and 24 hpf. Significantly, during an ethanol-sensitive time window (16-24 hpf), RA co-supplementation moderately rescued these defects, whereas FA co-supplementation showed significant rescue of optic nerve and photoreceptor differentiation defects. Interestingly, RA, but not FA, supplementation after ethanol exposure could reverse ethanol-induced optic nerve and photoreceptor differentiation defects. Our results indicate that various ethanol-sensitive events underlie FASD-associated retinal defects. Nutrient supplements like retinoids and folate were effective in alleviating ethanol-induced retinal defects.

  11. Zebrafish retinal defects induced by ethanol exposure are rescued by retinoic acid and folic acid supplement

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Pooja; Sarmah, Swapnalee; Marrs, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is caused by prenatal alcohol exposure, producing craniofacial, sensory, motor, and cognitive defects. FASD is highly prevalent in low socioeconomic populations, which are frequently accompanied by malnutrition. FASD-associated ocular pathologies include microphthalmia, optic nerve hypoplasia, and cataracts. The present study characterizes specific retinal tissue defects, identifies ethanol-sensitive stages during retinal development, and dissects the effect of nutrient supplements, such as retinoic acid (RA) and folic acid (FA) on ethanol-induced retinal defects. Exposure to pathophysiological concentrations of ethanol (during midblastula transition through somitogenesis; 2–24 hours post fertilization [hpf]) altered critical transcription factor expression involved in retinal cell differentiation, and produced severe retinal ganglion cell, photoreceptor, and Müller glial differentiation defects. Ethanol exposure did not alter retinal cell differentiation induction, but increased retinal cell death and proliferation. RA and FA nutrient co-supplementation rescued retinal photoreceptor and ganglion cell differentiation defects. Ethanol exposure during retinal morphogenesis stages (16–24 hpf) produced retinal defects like those seen with ethanol exposure between 2–24 hpf. Significantly, during an ethanol-sensitive time window (16–24 hpf), RA co-supplementation moderately rescued these defects, whereas FA co-supplementation showed significant rescue of optic nerve and photoreceptor differentiation defects. Interestingly, RA, but not FA, supplementation after ethanol exposure could reverse ethanol-induced optic nerve and photoreceptor differentiation defects. Our results indicate that various ethanol-sensitive events underlie FASD-associated retinal defects. Nutrient supplements like retinoids and folate were effective in alleviating ethanol-induced retinal defects. PMID:25541501

  12. Unsaturated fatty acids induce calcium influx into keratinocytes and cause abnormal differentiation of epidermis.

    PubMed

    Katsuta, Yuji; Iida, Toshii; Inomata, Shinji; Denda, Mitsuhiro

    2005-05-01

    Abnormal follicular keratinization is involved in comedogenesis in acne vulgaris. We recently demonstrated that calcium influx into epidermal keratinocytes is associated with impaired skin barrier function and epidermal proliferation. Based on these results, we hypothesized that sebum components affect calcium dynamics in the keratinocyte and consequently induce abnormal keratinization. To test this idea, we first observed the effects of topical application of sebum components, triglycerides (triolein), saturated fatty acids (palmitic acid and stearic acid), and unsaturated fatty acids (oleic acid and palmitoleic acid) on hairless mouse skin. Neither triglyceride nor saturated fatty acids affected the skin surface morphology or epidermal proliferation. On the other hand, application of unsaturated fatty acids, oleic acid, and palmitoleic acid induced scaly skin, abnormal keratinization, and epidermal hyperplasia. Application of triglycerides and saturated fatty acids on cultured human keratinocytes did not affect the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), whereas unsaturated fatty acids increased the [Ca(2+)](i) of the keratinocytes. Moreover, application of oleic acid on hairless mouse skin induced an abnormal calcium distribution in the epidermis. These results suggest that unsaturated fatty acids in sebum alter the calcium dynamics in epidermal keratinocytes and induce abnormal follicular keratinization.

  13. Clavulanic acid inhibits MPP⁺-induced ROS generation and subsequent loss of dopaminergic cells.

    PubMed

    Kost, Gina Chun; Selvaraj, Senthil; Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Deog Joong; Ahn, Chang-Ho; Singh, Brij B

    2012-08-21

    Clavulanic acid is a psychoactive compound that has been shown to modulate central nervous system activity. Importantly, in neurotoxin-induced animal models, clavulanic acid has been shown to improve motor function (Huh et al., 2010) suggesting that it can be neuroprotective; however, the mechanism as how clavulanic acid can induce neuroprotection is not known. We demonstrate here that clavulanic acid abrogates the effects of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) which mimics Parkinson's disease (PD) by inducing neurodegeneration. To further establish the mechanism we identified that clavulanic acid inhibits neurotoxin-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production. Consistent with these results, neurotoxin-induced increase in Bax levels was also decreased in clavulanic acid treated cells. Importantly, neurotoxin-induced release of cytochrome c levels as well as caspase activation was also inhibited in clavulanic acid treated cells. In addition, Bcl-xl levels were also restored and the Bcl-xl/Bax ratio that is critical for inducing apoptosis was increased in clavulanic acid treated cells. Overall, these results suggest that clavulanic acid is intimately involved in inhibiting neurotoxin-induced loss of mitochondrial function and induction of apoptosis that contributes towards neuronal survival.

  14. Clavulanic acid inhibits MPP+-induced ROS generation and subsequent loss of dopaminergic cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Kost, Gina Chun; Selvaraj, Senthil; Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Deog Joong; Ahn, Chang-Ho; Singh, Brij B.

    2013-01-01

    Clavulanic acid is a psychoactive compound that has been shown to modulate central nervous system activity. Importantly, in neurotoxin-induced animal models, clavulanic acid has been shown to improve motor function (Huh et al., 2010) suggesting that it can be neuroprotective; however, the mechanism as how clavulanic acid can induce neuroprotection is not known. We demonstrate here that clavulanic acid abrogates the effects of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) which mimics Parkinson’s disease (PD) by inducing neurodegeneration. To further establish the mechanism we identified that clavulanic acid inhibits neurotoxin-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production. Consistent with these results, neurotoxin-induced increase in Bax levels was also decreased in clavulanic acid treated cells. Importantly, neurotoxin-induced release of cytochrome c levels as well as caspase activation was also inhibited in clavulanic acid treated cells. In addition, Bcl-xl levels were also restored and the Bcl-xl/Bax ratio that is critical for inducing apoptosis was increased in clavulanic acid treated cells. Overall, these results suggest that clavulanic acid is intimately involved in inhibiting neurotoxin-induced loss of mitochondrial function and induction of apoptosis that contributes towards neuronal survival. PMID:22750587

  15. Ultraviolet B irradiation induces changes in the distribution and release of arachidonic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in human keratinocytes in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Punnonen, K.; Puustinen, T.; Jansen, C.T.

    1987-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that derivatives of 20-carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids, the eicosanoids, play an important role in the inflammatory responses of the human skin. To better understand the metabolic fate of fatty acids in the skin, the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation (280-320 nm) on the distribution and release of /sup 14/C-labeled arachidonic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid in human keratinocytes in culture was investigated. Ultraviolet B irradiation induced the release of all three /sup 14/C-labeled fatty acids from the phospholipids, especially from phosphatidylethanolamine, and this was accompanied by increased labeling of the nonphosphorus lipids. This finding suggests that UVB induces a significant liberation of eicosanoid precursor fatty acids from cellular phospholipids, but the liberated fatty acids are largely reincorporated into the nonphosphorus lipids. In conclusion, the present study suggests that not only arachidonic acid but also dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid might be involved in the UVB irradiation-induced inflammatory reactions of human skin.

  16. Punicic Acid a Conjugated Linolenic Acid Inhibits TNFα-Induced Neutrophil Hyperactivation and Protects from Experimental Colon Inflammation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Boussetta, Tarek; Raad, Houssam; Lettéron, Philippe; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Marie, Jean-Claude

    2009-01-01

    Background Neutrophils play a major role in inflammation by releasing large amounts of ROS produced by NADPH-oxidase and myeloperoxidase (MPO). The proinflammatory cytokine TNFα primes ROS production through phosphorylation of the NADPH-oxidase subunit p47phox on Ser345. Conventional anti-inflammatory therapies remain partially successful and may have side effects. Therefore, regulation of neutrophil activation by natural dietary components represents an alternative therapeutic strategy in inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of punicic acid, a conjugated linolenic fatty acid from pomegranate seed oil on TNFα-induced neutrophil hyperactivation in vitro and on colon inflammation in vivo. Methodology and Principal Findings We analyzed the effect of punicic acid on TNFα-induced neutrophil upregulation of ROS production in vitro and on TNBS-induced rat colon inflammation. Results show that punicic acid inhibited TNFα-induced priming of ROS production in vitro while preserving formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced response. This effect was mediated by the inhibition of Ser345-p47phox phosphorylation and upstream kinase p38MAPK. Punicic acid also inhibited fMLP- and TNFα+fMLP-induced MPO extracellular release from neutrophils. In vivo experiments showed that punicic acid and pomegranate seed oil intake decreased neutrophil-activation and ROS/MPO-mediated tissue damage as measured by F2-isoprostane release and protected rats from TNBS-induced colon inflammation. Conclusions/Significance These data show that punicic acid exerts a potent anti-inflammatory effect through inhibition of TNFα-induced priming of NADPH oxidase by targeting the p38MAPKinase/Ser345-p47phox-axis and MPO release. This natural dietary compound may provide a novel alternative therapeutic strategy in inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:19649246

  17. Neuroprotection of a novel synthetic caffeic acid-syringic acid hybrid compound against experimentally induced transient cerebral ischemic damage.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Hye; Yan, Bing Chun; Park, Joon Ha; Yeun, Go Heum; Yim, Yongbae; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Jae-Chul; Hwang, In Koo; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kim, Young-Myeong; Lee, Yun Lyul; Park, Jeong Ho; Won, Moo-Ho

    2013-03-01

    We investigated effects of caffeic acid, syringic acid, and their synthesis on transient cerebral ischemic damage in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region. In the 10 mg/kg caffeic acid-, syringic acid-, and 20 mg/kg syringic-treated ischemia groups, we did not find any significant neuroprotection in the ischemic hippocampal CA region. In the 20 mg/kg caffeic acid- and 10 mg/kg caffeic acid-syringic acid-treated ischemia groups, moderate neuroprotection was found in the hippocampal CA1 region. In the 20 mg/kg caffeic acid-syringic acid-treated ischemia group, a strong neuroprotective effect was found in the ischemic hippocampal CA1 region: about 89 % of hippocampal CA1 region pyramidal neurons survived. We also observed changes in glial cells (astrocytes and microglia) in the ischemic hippocampal CA1 region in all the groups. Among them, the distribution pattern of the glial cells was only in the 20 mg/kg caffeic acid-syringic acid-treated ischemia group similar to that in the sham group (control). In brief, 20 mg/kg caffeic acid-syringic acid showed a strong neuroprotective effect with an inhibition of glia activation in the hippocampal CA1 region induced by transient cerebral ischemia.

  18. Antinociceptive effect of clavulanic acid and its preventive activity against development of morphine tolerance and dependence in animal models.

    PubMed

    Hajhashemi, V; Dehdashti, Kh

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate has a key role in pain perception and also development of tolerance and dependence to morphine. It has been reported that clavulanic acid affects glutamatergic transmission via activation of glutamate transporter. Therefore the present study was aimed to evaluate the possible antinociceptive effect of clavulanic acid and its preventive activity against development of morphine tolerance and dependence in animal models. Male Swiss mice (25-30 g) were used in this study. Acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin test and hot plate method were used to assess the antinociceptive effect of clavulanic acid. Morphine (30 mg/kg, s.c.) was administered to the mice two times a day (8 AM and 4 PM) for 3 days in order to produce tolerance. To develop morphine dependence, morphine sulfate (50, 50 and 75 mg/kg) was injected at 8 and 12 AM and 16 PM respectively and for 3 consecutive days. Naloxone (5 mg/kg, i.p) was used to induce morphine withdrawal syndrome and the number of jumps and presence of ptosis, piloerection, tremor, sniffing and diarrhea were recorded and compared with control group. Clavulanic acid at doses of 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg inhibited abdominal constriction and licking behavior of acetic acid and formalin-induced pain respectively. Clavulanic acid was not able to show any antinociception in hot plate model and could not prevent development of tolerance and dependence to morphine. Clavulanic acid has considerable antinociceptive activity and further studies are needed to clarify its exact mechanism.

  19. Radiation-induced grafting of acrylic acid onto polyethylene filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, K.; Okada, T.; Sakurada, I.

    Radiation-induced grafting of acrylic acid onto high density polyethylene (PE) filaments was carried out in order to raise softening temperature and impart flame retardance and hydrophilic properties. Mutual γ-irradiation method was employed for the grafting in a mixture of acrylic acid (AA), ethylene dichloride and water containing a small amount of ferrous ammonium sulfate. The rate of grafting was very low at room temperature. On the other hand, large percent grafts were obtained when the grafting was performed at an elevated temperature. Activation energy for the initial rate of grafting was found to be 17 {kcal}/{mol} between 20 and 60°C and 10 {kcal}/{mol} between 60 and 80°C. Original PE filament begins to shrink at 70°C, show maximum shrinkage of 50% at 130°C and then breaks off at 136°C. When a 34% AA graft is converted to metallic salt such as sodium and calcium, the graft filament retains its filament form even above 300°C and gives maximum shrinkage of 15%. Burning tests by a wire-netting basket method indicate that graft filaments and its metallic salts do not form melting drops upon burning and are self-extinguishing. Original PE filament shows no moisture absorption, however, that of AA-grafted PE increases with increasing graft percent. The sodium salt of 15% graft shows the same level of moisture regain as cotton. The AA-grafted PE filament and its metallic salts can be dyed with cationic dyes even at 1% graft. Tensile properties of PE filament is impaired neither by grafting nor by conversion to metallic salts.

  20. Epigenetic modifications in valproic acid-induced teratogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Emily W.Y.; Winn, Louise M.

    2010-11-01

    Exposure to the anticonvulsant drug valproic acid (VPA) in utero is associated with a 1-2% increase in neural tube defects (NTDs), however the molecular mechanisms by which VPA induces teratogenesis are unknown. Previous studies demonstrated that VPA, a direct inhibitor of histone deacetylase, can induce histone hyperacetylation and other epigenetic changes such as histone methylation and DNA demethylation. The objective of this study was to determine if maternal exposure to VPA in mice has the ability to cause these epigenetic alterations in the embryo and thus contribute to its mechanism of teratogenesis. Pregnant CD-1 mice (GD 9.0) were administered a teratogenic dose of VPA (400 mg/kg, s.c.) and embryos extracted 1, 3, 6, and 24 h after injection. To assess embryonic histone acetylation and histone methylation, Western blotting was performed on whole embryo homogenates, as well as immunohistochemical staining on embryonic sections. To measure DNA methylation changes, the cytosine extension assay was performed. Results demonstrated that a significant increase in histone acetylation that peaked 3 h after VPA exposure was accompanied by an increase in histone methylation at histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) and a decrease in histone methylation at histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9). Immunohistochemical staining revealed increased histone acetylation in the neuroepithelium, heart, and somites. A decrease in methylated histone H3K9 staining was observed in the neuroepithelium and somites, METHYLATED histone H3K4 staining was observed in the neuroepithelium. No significant differences in global or CpG island DNA methylation were observed in embryo homogenates. These results support the possibility that epigenetic modifications caused by VPA during early mouse organogenesis results in congenital malformations.

  1. Transcript and metabolite alterations increase ganoderic acid content in Ganoderma lucidum using acetic acid as an inducer.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ang; Li, Xiong-Biao; Miao, Zhi-Gang; Shi, Liang; Jaing, Ai-Liang; Zhao, Ming-Wen

    2014-12-01

    Acetic acid at 5-8 mM increased ganoderic acid (GA) accumulation in Ganoderma lucidum. After optimization by the response surface methodology, the GA content reached 5.5/100 mg dry weight, an increase of 105% compared with the control. The intermediate metabolites of GA biosynthesis, lanosterol and squalene also increased to 47 and 15.8 μg/g dry weight, respectively, in response to acetic acid. Acetic acid significantly induced transcription levels of sqs, lano, hmgs and cyp51 in the GA biosynthesis pathway. An acetic acid-unregulated acetyl coenzyme A synthase (acs) gene was selected from ten candidate homologous acs genes. The results indicate that acetic acid alters the expression of genes related to acetic acid assimilation and increases GA biosynthesis and the metabolic levels of lanosterol, squalene and GA-a, thereby resulting in GA accumulation.

  2. Chrysophanic Acid Induces Necrosis but not Necroptosis in Human Renal Cell Carcinoma Caki-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chrysophanic acid, also known as chrysophanol, has a number of biological activities. It enhances memory and learning abilities, raises superoxide dismutase activity, and has anti-cancer effects in several model systems. According to previous reports, chrysophanic acid-induced cell death shares features of necrotic cell death. However, the molecular and cellular processes underlying chrysophanic acid-induced cell death remain poorly understood. Methods: Chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was monitored by cell viability assay and Annexin V-propidium iodide (PI) staining of renal cell carcinoma Caki-2 cells. The induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by chrysophanic acid and the suppression of ROS by anti-oxidants were evaluated by 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate staining. The expression and phosphorylation of proteins that are involved in apoptosis and necroptosis were detected by immunoblotting. Results: The extent of chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was concentration and time dependent, and dead cells mainly appeared in the PI-positive population, which is a major feature of necrosis, upon fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. Chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was associated with the generation of intracellular ROS, and this effect was reversed by pretreatment with N-acetyl cysteine. Chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was not associated with changes in apoptotic or necroptotic marker proteins. Conclusions: The cell death induced by chrysophanic acid resembled neither apoptotic nor necroptotic cell death in human renal cell carcinoma Caki-2 cells. PMID:27390736

  3. Uric acid protects erythrocytes from ozone-induced changes

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.; Smith, R.C.

    1987-08-01

    Uric acid effectively reduced hemolysis and methemoglobin formation in bovine and swine erythrocytes bubbled with ozone in vitro. In bovine erythrocytes, formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive material was inhibited by uric acid, but there was little immediate protection for the swine cells. Antioxidant protection was due to preferential degradation of the uric acid by ozone. These results provide evidence to support the hypothesis that in plasma, uric acid can provide antioxidant protection for erythrocytes.

  4. Stability of sublethal acid stress adaptaion and induced cross protection against lauric arginate in Listeria monocytogenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stability of acid stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes and its induced cross protection effect against GRAS (generally recognized as safe) antimicrobial compounds has never been investigated before. In the present study, the acid stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes was initially induced...

  5. Protective Effects of Norursodeoxycholic Acid Versus Ursodeoxycholic Acid on Thioacetamide-induced Rat Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Buko, Vyacheslav U.; Lukivskaya, Oxana Y.; Naruta, Elena E.; Belonovskaya, Elena B.; Tauschel, Horst-Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Background/objectives Effects of norursodeoxycholic acid (norUDCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on liver fibrosis progression and liver fibrosis reversal in thioacetamide (TAA)-treated rats were studied. Methods Advanced liver fibrosis was induced by TAA treatment (200 mg/kg, i.p.) for 12 weeks. In the second experiment resolution of liver fibrosis was assessed after 8 weeks of TAA withdrawal. During 8 last weeks of each trial, fibrotic rats were daily administered with UDCA (80 mg/kg) and norUDCA (equimolar to 80 mg/kg of UDCA) by oral gavage. Liver fibrosis was assessed by Sirius red staining, liver hydroxyproline and serum fibrosis markers determination. Results The TAA treatment resulted in advanced fibrosis and increase in liver hydroxyproline content and serum fibrosis markers. These signs of fibrosis were less pronounced in rats after TAA withdrawal. Treatment with of norUDCA significantly decreased the total and relative liver hydroxyproline contents in rats with fibrosis reversal, whereas UDCA did not change these parameters. Both compounds decreased serum TGFβ and type IV collagen contents, whereas other serum markers did not differ from the placebo group. In the fibrosis progression model the square of connective tissue was decreased by norUDCA. Serum type IV collagen and procollagen III-NT contents in these experiments were lowered by both UDCA and norUDCA, whereas rest of serum fibrosis markers were diminished only by norUDCA. Conclusions Both norUDCA and UDCA showed therapeutic and prophylactic antifibrotic effect in rats with TAA-induced liver fibrosis. For most of tested parameters norUDCA was more effective than UDCA, especially in the experiment with liver fibrosis regression. PMID:25755576

  6. Soybean Aphid Infestation Induces Changes in Fatty Acid Metabolism in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Kanobe, Charles; McCarville, Michael T.; O’Neal, Matthew E.; Tylka, Gregory L.; MacIntosh, Gustavo C.

    2015-01-01

    The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) is one of the most important insect pests of soybeans in the North-central region of the US. It has been hypothesized that aphids avoid effective defenses by inhibition of jasmonate-regulated plant responses. Given the role fatty acids play in jasmonate-induced plant defenses, we analyzed the fatty acid profile of soybean leaves and seeds from aphid-infested plants. Aphid infestation reduced levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in leaves with a concomitant increase in palmitic acid. In seeds, a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids was associated with an increase in stearic acid and oleic acid. Soybean plants challenged with the brown stem rot fungus or with soybean cyst nematodes did not present changes in fatty acid levels in leaves or seeds, indicating that the changes induced by aphids are not a general response to pests. One of the polyunsaturated fatty acids, linolenic acid, is the precursor of jasmonate; thus, these changes in fatty acid metabolism may be examples of “metabolic hijacking” by the aphid to avoid the induction of effective defenses. Based on the changes in fatty acid levels observed in seeds and leaves, we hypothesize that aphids potentially induce interference in the fatty acid desaturation pathway, likely reducing FAD2 and FAD6 activity that leads to a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Our data support the idea that aphids block jasmonate-dependent defenses by reduction of the hormone precursor. PMID:26684003

  7. Asiatic acid inhibits pulmonary inflammation induced by cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Won; Park, Hyun Ah; Kwon, Ok-Kyoung; Jang, Yin-Gi; Kim, Ju Yeong; Choi, Bo Kyung; Lee, Hee Jae; Lee, Sangwoo; Paik, Jin-Hyub; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Ahn, Kyung-Seop; Lee, Hyun-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Asiatic acid (AA) is one of the major components of Titrated extract of Centella asiatica (TECA), which has been reported to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effect of AA on pulmonary inflammation induced by cigarette smoke (CS). AA significantly attenuated the infiltration of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of CS exposure mice. AA also decreased ROS production and NE activity, and inhibited the release of proinflammatory cytokines in BALF. AA reduced the recruitment of inflammatory cells and MCP-1 expression in lung tissue of CS exposure mice. AA also attenuated mucus overproduction, and decreased the activation of MAPKs and NF-kB in lung tissue. Furthermore, AA increased HO-1 expression and inhibited the reduced expression of SOD3 in lung tissue. These findings indicate that AA effectively inhibits pulmonary inflammatory response, which is an important process in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) via suppression of inflammatory mediators and induction of HO-1. Therefore, we suggest that AA has the potential to treat inflammatory disease such as COPD.

  8. Ion trap collision-induced dissociation of locked nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Huang, Teng-yi; Kharlamova, Anastasia; McLuckey, Scott A

    2010-01-01

    Gas-phase dissociation of model locked nucleic acid (LNA) oligonucleotides and functional LNA-DNA chimeras have been investigated as a function of precursor ion charge state using ion trap collision-induced dissociation (CID). For the model LNA 5 and 8 mer, containing all four LNA monomers in the sequence, cleavage of all backbone bonds, generating a/w-, b/x-, c/y-, and d/z-ions, was observed with no significant preference at lower charge states. Base loss ions, except loss of thymine, from the cleavage of N-glycosidic bonds were also present. In general, complete sequence coverage was achieved in all charge states. For the two LNA-DNA chimeras, however, dramatic differences in the relative contributions of the competing dissociation channels were observed among different precursor ion charge states. At lower charge states, sequence information limited to the a-Base/w-fragment ions from cleavage of the 3'C-O bond of DNA nucleotides, except thymidine (dT), was acquired from CID of both the LNA gapmer and mixmer ions. On the other hand, extensive fragmentation from various dissociation channels was observed from post-ion/ion ion trap CID of the higher charge state ions of both LNA-DNA chimeras. This report demonstrates that tandem mass spectrometry is effective in the sequence characterization of LNA oligonucleotides and LNA-DNA chimeric therapeutics.

  9. Ameliorative effects of phycocyanin against gibberellic acid induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Mohamed M A; Ali, Haytham A; Ahmed, Mona M

    2015-03-01

    Gibberellic acid (GA3) was used extensively unaware in agriculture in spite of its dangerous effects on human health. The current study was designed to investigate the ameliorative effects of the co-administration of phycocyanin with GA3 induced oxidative stress and histopathological changes in the liver. Forty male albino rats were randomly divided into four groups. Group I (control group) received normal saline for 6 weeks, Group II (GA3 treated group) received 3.85 mg/kg body weight GA3 once daily for 6 weeks, Group III (phycocyanin treated group) received Phycocyanin 200 mg/kg body weight/day for 6 weeks orally dissolved in distilled water and Group IV was treated with GA3 and phycocyanin at the same doses as groups 2 and 3. All treatments were given daily using intra-gastric intubation and continued for 6 weeks. Our results revealed significant downregulation of antioxidant enzyme activities and their mRNA levels (CAT, GPx and Cu-Zn, SOD) with marked elevation of liver enzymes and extensive fibrous connective tissue deposition with large biliary cells in hepatic tissue of GA3 treated rats, while treatment with phycocyanin improved the antioxidant defense system, liver enzymes and structural hepatocytes recovery in phycocyanin treated group with GA3. These data confirm the antioxidant potential of Phycocyanin and provide strong evidence to support the co-administration of Phycocyanin during using GA3. PMID:25868813

  10. Zoledronic acid induces apoptosis and autophagy in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-Te; Chou, Shou-Chu; Lin, Ying-Chin

    2014-12-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common gynecological cancers in association with high mortality and morbidity. The present study was aimed to investigate the in vitro effects of zoledronic acid (ZA) on viability and induction of apoptosis and autophagy as well as inflammatory effects in three human cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa, SiHa, and CaSki). Cell viability was measured by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT) assay. Induction of apoptosis was determined by quantitation of expression level of B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bax messenger RNA (mRNA) and identification of the proteolytic cleavage of poly (ADP)-ribose polymerase (PARP) and caspase-3. Autophagic effects were examined by quantitation of mRNA expression of autophagy protein 5 (ATG5) and beclin1 and identifying accumulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-II. Inflammatory effect was determined by measuring expression and production of IL-6 and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2). The results showed ZA significantly inhibited cell viability of cervical cancer cells. ZA-induced cell death displayed features characteristic to both apoptosis and autophagy and was associated with different changes in the levels of Bcl-2 and Bax in the various cervical cancer lines. Expression of metastatic cytokines, IL-6 and Cox-2, was upregulated in the presence of ZA at low concentration. Our data revealed that ZA inhibits cervical cancer cells through the synergistic effect of apoptosis induction and autophagy activation.

  11. Albumin-associated free fatty acids induce macropinocytosis in podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jun-Jae; Huber, Tobias B.; Gödel, Markus; Jarad, George; Hartleben, Björn; Kwoh, Christopher; Keil, Alexander; Karpitskiy, Aleksey; Hu, Jiancheng; Huh, Christine J.; Cella, Marina; Gross, Richard W.; Miner, Jeffrey H.; Shaw, Andrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Podocytes are specialized epithelial cells in the kidney glomerulus that play important structural and functional roles in maintaining the filtration barrier. Nephrotic syndrome results from a breakdown of the kidney filtration barrier and is associated with proteinuria, hyperlipidemia, and edema. Additionally, podocytes undergo changes in morphology and internalize plasma proteins in response to this disorder. Here, we used fluid-phase tracers in murine models and determined that podocytes actively internalize fluid from the plasma and that the rate of internalization is increased when the filtration barrier is disrupted. In cultured podocytes, the presence of free fatty acids (FFAs) associated with serum albumin stimulated macropinocytosis through a pathway that involves FFA receptors, the Gβ/Gγ complex, and RAC1. Moreover, mice with elevated levels of plasma FFAs as the result of a high-fat diet were more susceptible to Adriamycin-induced proteinuria than were animals on standard chow. Together, these results support a model in which podocytes sense the disruption of the filtration barrier via FFAs bound to albumin and respond by enhancing fluid-phase uptake. The response to FFAs may function in the development of nephrotic syndrome by amplifying the effects of proteinuria. PMID:25915582

  12. Lysophosphatidic acids induce contraction of rat isolated colon by two different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tokumura, A; Yube, N; Fujimoto, H; Tsukatani, H

    1991-11-01

    Lysophosphatidic acids (1-linoleoyl-, 1-linolenoyl, 1-arachidonoyl- and 1-O-hexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate) induced rapid contraction of rat isolated colon which was dependent on external Ca2+, 1-linolenoyl-lysophosphatidic acid having the greatest effect. The contraction induced by 1-linolenoyl-lysophosphatidic acid was reduced considerably by nifedipine and verapamil, but not by atropine or indomethacin. Phosphatidic acids with two short-chain acyl groups induced a small, atropine-sensitive contraction at 100 microM, but phosphatidic acids with two long-chain acyl groups were inactive. These results suggest that unlike phosphatidic acids, lysophosphatidic acids act directly on extracellular sites of the plasma membrane of smooth muscle cells in rat colon, mainly through activation of voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels.

  13. Attenuation of β-amyloid induced toxicity by sialic acid-conjugated dendrimers: role of sialic acid attachment

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dhara A.; Henry, James E.; Good, Theresa A.

    2007-01-01

    β-amyloid (Aβ) is the primary protein component of senile plaques in Alzheimer’s disease and is believed to be associated with neurotoxicity in the disease. We and others have shown that Aβ binds with relatively high affinity to clustered sialic acid residues on cell surfaces and that removal of cell surface sialic acids attenuate Aβ toxicity. We have also shown that sialic acid functionalized dendrimeric polymers can act as mimics of cell surface sialic acid clusters and attenuate Aβ induced neurotoxicity. In the current study, we prepared sialic acid conjugated dendrimers using a physiologically relevant attachment of the sialic acid to the dendrimeric termini, and evaluated the Aβ toxicity attenuation properties of the dendrimers. We compared performance of sialic acid conjugated dendrimeric polymers in which the sialic acid moeties were attached to dendrimeric termini via the anomeric hydroxyl group of the sialic acid, a physiological attachment, to polymers in which the attachment was made via the carboxylic acid group on the sialic acid, a non-physiological attachment. This work enhances our understanding of Aβ-cell surface binding and is a step towards the development of new classes of sequestering agents as therapeutics for the prevention of Aβ toxicity in AD. PMID:17604005

  14. Free fatty acids and protein kinase C activation induce GPR120 (free fatty acid receptor 4) phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Castillo-Badillo, Jean A; Takei, Yoshinori; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2014-01-15

    GPR120, free fatty acid receptor 4, is a recently deorphanized G protein-coupled receptor that seems to play cardinal roles in the regulation of metabolism and in the pathophysiology of inflammatory and metabolic disorders. In the present work a GPR120-Venus fusion protein was expressed in HEK293 Flp-In T-REx cells and its function (increase in intracellular calcium) and phosphorylation were studied. It was observed that the fusion protein migrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels as a band with a mass of ≈70-75kDa, although other bands of higher apparent weight (>130kDa) were also detected. Cell stimulation with docosahexaenoic acid or α-linolenic acid induced concentration-dependent increases in intracellular calcium and GPR120 phosphorylation. Activation of protein kinase C with phorbol esters also induced a marked receptor phosphorylation but did not alter the ability of 1µM docosahexaenoic acid to increase the intracellular calcium concentration. Phorbol ester-induced GPR120 phosphorylation, but not that induced with docosahexaenoic acid, was blocked by protein kinase C inhibitors (bis-indolyl-maleimide I and Gö 6976) suggesting that conventional kinase isoforms mediate this action. The absence of effect of protein kinase C inhibitors on agonist-induced GPR120 phosphorylation indicates that this kinase does not play a major role in agonist-induced receptor phosphorylation. Docosahexaenoic acid action was associated with marked GPR120 internalization whereas that induced with phorbol esters was smaller at early times. PMID:24239485

  15. LIMB DEFECTS INDUCED BY RETINOIC ACID SIGNALING ANTAGONISM AND SYNTHESIS INHIBITION ARE CONSISTENT WITH ETHANOL-INDUCED LIMB DEFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Limb defects induced by retinoic acid signaling antagonism and synthesis inhibition are consistent with ethanol-induced limb defects

    Johnson CS1, Sulik KK1,2, Hunter, ES III3
    1Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC....

  16. Neurotoxic effects induced by gammahydroxybutyric acid (GHB) in male rats.

    PubMed

    Pedraza, Carmen; García, Francisca Belén; Navarro, José Francisco

    2009-10-01

    Gammahydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous constituent of the central nervous system that has acquired great social relevance for its use as a recreational 'club drug'. GHB, popularly known as 'liquid ecstasy', is addictive when used continuously. Although the symptoms associated with acute intoxication are well known, the effects of prolonged use remain uncertain. We examined in male rats the effect of repeated administration of GHB (10 and 100 mg/kg) on various parameters: neurological damage, working memory and spatial memory, using neurological tests, the Morris water maze and the hole-board test. The results showed that repeated administration of GHB, especially at doses of 10 mg/kg, causes neurological damage, affecting the 'grasping' reflex, as well as alteration in spatial and working memories. Stereological quantification showed that this drug produces a drastic neuronal loss in the CA1 hippocampal region and in the prefrontal cortex, two areas clearly involved in cognitive and neurological functions. No effects were noted after quantification in the periaqueductal grey matter (PAG), a region lacking GHB receptors. Moreover, NCS-382, a putative antagonist of GHB receptor, prevented both neurological damage and working- memory impairment induced by GHB. This suggests that the effects of administration of this compound may be mediated, at least partly, by specific receptors in the nervous system. The results show for the first time that the repeated administration of GHB, especially at very low doses, produces neurotoxic effects. This is very relevant because its abuse, especially by young persons, could produce considerable neurological alterations after prolonged abuse.

  17. Caffeic acid directly targets ERK1/2 to attenuate solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ge; Fu, Yang; Malakhova, Margarita; Kurinov, Igor; Zhu, Feng; Yao, Ke; Li, Haitao; Chen, Hanyong; Li, Wei; Lim, Do Young; Sheng, Yuqiao; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Ziming; Dong, Zigang

    2014-01-01

    Caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) is a well-known phenolic phytochemical present in coffee and reportedly has anticancer activities. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and targeted proteins involved in the suppression of carcinogenesis by caffeic acid are not fully understood. In this study, we report that caffeic acid significantly inhibits colony formation of human skin cancer cells and EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of HaCaT cells dose-dependently. Caffeic acid topically applied to dorsal mouse skin significantly suppressed tumor incidence and volume in a solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis mouse model. A substantial reduction of phosphorylation in mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling was observed in mice treated with caffeic acid either before or after solar UV exposure. Caffeic acid directly interacted with ERK1/2 and inhibited ERK1/2 activities in vitro. Importantly, we resolved the co-crystal structure of ERK2 complexed with caffeic acid. Caffeic acid interacted directly with ERK2 at amino acid residues Q105, D106 and M108. Moreover, A431 cells expressing knockdown of ERK2 lost sensitivity to caffeic acid in a skin cancer xenograft mouse model. Taken together, our results suggest that caffeic acid exerts chemopreventive activity against solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis by targeting ERK1 and 2. PMID:25104643

  18. Gambogic acid induces apoptosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells via inducing proteasome inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xianping; Lan, Xiaoying; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Chong; Li, Xiaofen; Liu, Shouting; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Ningning; Zang, Dan; Liao, Yuning; Zhang, Peiquan; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a great challenge to improving the survival of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), especially those with activated B-cell-like DLBCL (ABC-DLBCL). Therefore it is urgent to search for novel agents for the treatment of DLBCL. Gambogic acid (GA), a small molecule derived from Chinese herb gamboges, has been approved for Phase II clinical trial for cancer therapy by Chinese FDA. In the present study, we investigated the effect of GA on cell survival and apoptosis in DLBCL cells including both GCB- and ABC-DLBCL cells. We found that GA induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of both GCB- and ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo, which is associated with proteasome malfunction. These findings provide significant pre-clinical evidence for potential usage of GA in DLBCL therapy particularly in ABC-DLBCL treatment. PMID:25853502

  19. Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Activities of Anthraquinone-2-Carboxylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Gwang; Kim, Seung Cheol; Kim, Yun Hwan; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Yong; Hong, Sungyoul; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Yoo, Byong Chul; Kim, Shi Hyung; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2016-01-01

    Anthraquinone compounds are one of the abundant polyphenols found in fruits, vegetables, and herbs. However, the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity and molecular mechanisms of anthraquinones have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the activity of anthraquinones using acute inflammatory and nociceptive experimental conditions. Anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (9,10-dihydro-9,10-dioxo-2-anthracenecarboxylic acid, AQCA), one of the major anthraquinones identified from Brazilian taheebo, ameliorated various inflammatory and algesic symptoms in EtOH/HCl- and acetylsalicylic acid- (ASA-) induced gastritis, arachidonic acid-induced edema, and acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing without displaying toxic profiles in body and organ weight, gastric irritation, or serum parameters. In addition, AQCA suppressed the expression of inflammatory genes such as cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2 in stomach tissues and lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) treated RAW264.7 cells. According to reporter gene assay and immunoblotting analyses, AQCA inhibited activation of the nuclear factor- (NF-) κB and activator protein- (AP-) 1 pathways by suppression of upstream signaling involving interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK1), p38, Src, and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). Our data strongly suggest that anthraquinones such as AQCA act as potent anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive components in vivo, thus contributing to the immune regulatory role of fruits and herbs. PMID:27057092

  20. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-oedematous effects of Lafoensia pacari extract and ellagic acid.

    PubMed

    Rogerio, Alexandre P; Fontanari, Caroline; Melo, Mirian C C; Ambrosio, Sérgio R; de Souza, Glória E P; Pereira, Paulo S; França, Suzelei C; da Costa, Fernando B; Albuquerque, Deijanira A; Faccioli, Lúcia H

    2006-09-01

    Lafoensia pacari St. Hil. (Lythraceae) is used in traditional medicine to treat inflammation. Previously, we demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effect that the ethanolic extract of L. pacari has in Toxocara canis infection (a model of systemic eosinophilia). In this study, we tested the anti-inflammatory activity of the same L. pacari extract in mice injected intraperitoneally with beta-glucan present in fraction 1 (F1) of the Histoplasma capsulatum cell wall (a model of acute eosinophilic inflammation). We also determined the anti-oedematous, analgesic and anti-pyretic effects of L. pacari extract in carrageenan-induced paw oedema, acetic acid writhing and LPS-induced fever, respectively. L. pacari extract significantly inhibited leucocyte recruitment into the peritoneal cavity induced by beta-glucan. In addition, the L. pacari extract presented significant analgesic, anti-oedematous and anti-pyretic effects. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the L. pacari extract in the F1 model led us to identify ellagic acid. As did the extract, ellagic acid presented anti-inflammatory, anti-oedematous and analgesic effects. However, ellagic acid had no anti-pyretic effect, suggesting that other compounds present in the plant stem are responsible for this effect. Nevertheless, our results demonstrate potential therapeutic effects of L. pacari extract and ellagic acid, providing new prospects for the development of drugs to treat pain, oedema and inflammation. PMID:16945186

  1. Endogenous released ascorbic acid suppresses ethanol-induced hydroxyl radical production in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mei; Liu, Wen; Li, Qiang; Wu, Chun Fu

    2002-07-19

    Previous studies have shown that acute systemic administration of ethanol induced ascorbic acid release in the striatum. However, the pharmacological implications of ethanol-induced striatal ascorbic acid release are unclear. In the present study, ethanol-induced extracellular changes of ascorbic acid and hydroxyl radical levels were detected in rat striatum by using brain microdialysis coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. It was found that both in male and female rats, ethanol (3.0 g/kg, i.p.) increased striatal ascorbic acid release in the first 60 min after ethanol administration. Meanwhile, the extracellular hydroxyl radical levels, detected as 2,3- and 2,5-DHBA, were significantly decreased. However, when the ascorbic acid levels returned to the baseline, hydroxyl radical levels rebounded. Administration of DL-fenfluramine (20 mg/kg, i.p.) had no effect on the basal levels of ascorbic acid and hydroxyl radical, but significantly blocked ethanol-induced ascorbic acid release and increased hydroxyl radical levels significantly. Exogenous administration of ascorbic acid (20 mg/kg, s.c.) increased the extracellular levels of ascorbic acid in the striatum, and inhibited the increase of 2,3- and 2,5-DHBA in DL-fenfluramine plus ethanol group. These results provide first evidence that release of endogenous ascorbic acid in the striatum plays an important role in preventing oxidative stress by trapping hydroxyl radical in the central nervous system.

  2. The memory-enhancing effect of erucic acid on scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunji; Ko, Hae Ju; Jeon, Se Jin; Lee, Sunhee; Lee, Hyung Eun; Kim, Ha Neul; Woo, Eun-Rhan; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2016-03-01

    Erucic acid is a monounsaturated omega-9 fatty acid isolated from the seed of Raphanus sativus L. that is known to normalize the accumulation of very long chain fatty acids in the brains of patients suffering from X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Here, we investigated whether erucic acid enhanced cognitive function or ameliorated scopolamine-induced memory impairment using the passive avoidance, Y-maze and Morris water maze tasks. Erucic acid (3mg/kg, p.o.) enhanced memory performance in normal naïve mice. In addition, erucic acid (3mg/kg, p.o.) ameliorated scopolamine-induced memory impairment, as assessed via the behavioral tasks. We then investigated the underlying mechanism of the memory-enhancing effect of erucic acid. The administration of erucic acid increased the phosphorylation levels of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase C zeta (PKCζ), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and additional protein kinase B (Akt) in the hippocampus. These results suggest that erucic acid has an ameliorative effect in mice with scopolamine-induced memory deficits and that the effect of erucic acid is partially due to the activation of PI3K-PKCζ-ERK-CREB signaling as well as an increase in phosphorylated Akt in the hippocampus. Therefore, erucic acid may be a novel therapeutic agent for diseases associated with cognitive deficits, such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26780350

  3. Low oleic acid-derived repression of jasmonic acid-inducible defense responses requires the WRKY50 and WRKY51 proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Signaling induced upon a reduction in oleic acid (18:1) levels simultaneously up-regulates salicylic acid (SA)-mediated responses and inhibits jasmonic acid (JA)-inducible defenses, resulting in enhanced resistance to biotrophs but increased susceptibility to necrotrophs. SA and the signaling compon...

  4. Luteolin prevents uric acid-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ying; Shi, Xuhui; Shuai, Xuanyu; Xu, Yuemei; Liu, Yun; Liang, Xiubin; Wei, Dong; Su, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Elevated uric acid causes direct injury to pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined the effects of luteolin, an important antioxidant, on uric acid-induced β-cell dysfunction. We first evaluated the effect of luteolin on nitric oxide (NO) formation in uric acid-stimulated Min6 cells using the Griess method. Next, we performed transient transfection and reporter assays to measure transcriptional activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Western blotting assays were also performed to assess the effect of luteolin on the expression of MafA and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in uric acid-treated cells. Finally, we evaluated the effect of luteolin on uric acid-induced inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in Min6 cells and freshly isolated mouse pancreatic islets. We found that luteolin significantly inhibited uric acid-induced NO production, which was well correlated with reduced expression of iNOS mRNA and protein. Furthermore, decreased activity of NF-κB was implicated in inhibition by luteolin of increased iNOS expression induced by uric acid. Besides, luteolin significantly increased MafA expression in Min6 cells exposed to uric acid, which was reversed by overexpression of iNOS. Moreover, luteolin prevented uric acid-induced inhibition of GSIS in both Min6 cells and mouse islets. In conclusion, luteolin protects pancreatic β-cells from uric acid-induced dysfunction and may confer benefit on the protection of pancreatic β-cells in hyperuricemia-associated diabetes. PMID:25050113

  5. Lipopolysaccharide Stimulates Butyric Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Fukushima, Kazuo; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    1999-01-01

    We previously reported that butyric acid, an extracellular metabolite from periodontopathic bacteria, induced apoptosis in murine thymocytes, splenic T cells, and human Jurkat T cells. In this study, we examined the ability of butyric acid to induce apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on this apoptosis. Butyric acid significantly inhibited the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody- and concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses in a dose-dependent fashion. This inhibition of PBMC growth by butyric acid depended on apoptosis in vitro. It was characterized by internucleosomal DNA digestion and revealed by gel electrophoresis followed by a colorimetric DNA fragmentation assay to occur in a concentration-dependent fashion. Butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis was accompanied by caspase-3 protease activity but not by caspase-1 protease activity. LPS potentiated butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed that LPS increased the proportion of sub-G1 cells and the number of late-stage apoptotic cells induced by butyric acid. Annexin V binding experiments with fractionated subpopulations of PBMC in flow cytometory revealed that LPS accelerated the butyric acid-induced CD3+-T-cell apoptosis followed by similar levels of both CD4+- and CD8+-T-cell apoptosis. The addition of LPS to PBMC cultures did not cause DNA fragmentation, suggesting that LPS was unable to induce PBMC apoptosis directly. These data suggest that LPS, in combination with butyric acid, potentiates CD3+ PBMC T-cell apoptosis and plays a role in the apoptotic depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. PMID:9864191

  6. Retinoic acid modulation of ultraviolet light-induced epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, N.J.; Breeding, J.

    1982-02-01

    Irradiation of skin with ultraviolet light of sunburn range (UVB) leads to a large and rapid induction of the polyamine biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase in the epidermis. Induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase also occurs following application of the tumor promoting agent 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13 acetate and topical retinoic acid is able to block both this ornithine decarboxylase induction and skin tumor promotion. In the studies described below, topical application of retinoic acid to hairless mouse skin leads to a significant inhibition of UVB-induced epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity. The degree of this inhibition was dependent on the dose, timing, and frequency of the application of retinoic acid. To show significant inhibition of UVB-induced ornithine decarboxylase the retinoic acid had to be applied within 5 hr of UVB irradiation. If retinoic acid treatment was delayed beyond 7 hr following UVB, then no inhibition of UVB-induced ornithine decarboxylase was observed. The quantities of retinoic acid used (1.7 nmol and 3.4 nmol) have been shown effective at inhibiting 12-0-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13 acetate induced ornithine decarboxylase. The results show that these concentrations of topical retinoic acid applied either before or immediately following UVB irradiation reduces the UVB induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase. The effect of retinoic acid in these regimens on UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis is currently under study.

  7. Cyclosporine A and palmitic acid treatment synergistically induce cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yi Rana, Payal; Will, Yvonne

    2012-06-01

    Immunosuppressant cyclosporine A (CsA) treatment can cause severe side effects. Patients taking immunosuppressant after organ transplantation often display hyperlipidemia and obesity. Elevated levels of free fatty acids have been linked to the etiology of metabolic syndromes, nonalcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis. The contribution of free fatty acids to CsA-induced toxicity is not known. In this study we explored the effect of palmitic acid on CsA-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells. CsA by itself at therapeutic exposure levels did not induce detectible cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. Co-treatment of palmitic acid and CsA resulted in a dose dependent increase in cytotoxicity, suggesting that fatty acid could sensitize cells to CsA-induced cytotoxicity at the therapeutic doses of CsA. A synergized induction of caspase-3/7 activity was also observed, indicating that apoptosis may contribute to the cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that CsA reduced cellular oxygen consumption which was further exacerbated by palmitic acid, implicating that impaired mitochondrial respiration might be an underlying mechanism for the enhanced toxicity. Inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) attenuated palmitic acid and CsA induced toxicity, suggesting that JNK activation plays an important role in mediating the enhanced palmitic acid/CsA-induced toxicity. Our data suggest that elevated FFA levels, especially saturated FFA such as palmitic acid, may be predisposing factors for CsA toxicity, and patients with underlying diseases that would elevate free fatty acids may be susceptible to CsA-induced toxicity. Furthermore, hyperlipidemia/obesity resulting from immunosuppressive therapy may aggravate CsA-induced toxicity and worsen the outcome in transplant patients. -- Highlights: ► Palmitic acid and cyclosporine (CsA) synergistically increased cytotoxicity. ► The impairment of mitochondrial functions may contribute to the enhanced toxicity. ► Inhibition of JNK activity attenuated

  8. Impurity-induced double proton transfer in benzoic acid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtom, G. R.; Trommsdorff, H. P.; Hochstrasser, R. M.

    1986-10-01

    Fluorescence decays of thioindigo (TI) and selenoindigo (SI) in benzoic acid crystals are reported. The structures interconvert concomitantly with proton tunnelling in the host. Two benzoic acid dimers appear to be coupled to the guest transition. The double proton tunnelling rate constant is (1.67± 0.07) × 10 8s -1 for both the SI and TI guest.

  9. [Occupationally induced nitric acid and sulfuric acid burns: an analysis of 2 patients from the aspect of occupational health].

    PubMed

    Orimo, H; Yamamoto, O; Kobayashi, M; Yasuda, H

    2001-03-01

    We report two patients who suffered from acid burns while working in chemical factories. Case 1: a 44-year-old man who received burn induced by nitric acid on the face and extremities. Despite his protecting facial mask, he was exposed to nitric acid on his face through a gap between the mask and skin surface. Nitric acid was also sprinkled on his scalp which was not covered by a helmet or a protecting device. In addition, he suffered from acid burn on the right scapular region, the right upper arm, and the lower extremities through the work clothes. Case 2: a 26-year-old man who suffered from sulfuric acid burn on the forearms. Both patients were accidentally exposed to acids while they filled tanks with the acids through a hose. Following the manual of the factories, they washed the exposed skin with water for more than 15 minutes after the exposure. Although they recovered without any serious sequel, there remained partial deep tissue destruction of the skin. We reviewed these two cases from the aspect of industrial medicine, and proposed the following three points for improvement in the workplace to prevent accidental acid burns. 1) re-education or enlightenment activities for the well-experienced workers to avoid negligence to the danger of strong acid. 2) recommendation to take a complete shower to avoid overlooking of unaware acid injury. 3) improvement in the protecting facial mask. In addition, clinicians who examine acid-burn patients should not pass over the presence of deep ulcers lying behind the thick crust on the injured area.

  10. [Role of NO signal in ABA-induced phenolic acids accumulation in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots].

    PubMed

    Shen, Lihong; Ren, Jiahui; Jin, Wenfang; Wang, Ruijie; Ni, Chunhong; Tong, Mengjiao; Liang, Zongsuo; Yang, Dongfeng

    2016-02-01

    To investigate roles of nitric oxide (NO) signal in accumulations of phenolic acids in abscisic.acid (ABA)-induced Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots, S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots were treated with different concentrations of sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-an exogenous NO donor, for 6 days, and contents of phenolic acids in the hairy roots are determined. Then with treatment of ABA and NO scavenger (2-(4-carboxy-2-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1- oxyl-3-oxide, c-PTIO) or NO synthase inhibitor (NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, L-NAME), contents of phenolic acids and expression levels of three key genes involved in phenolic acids biosynthesis were detected. Phenolic acids production in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots was most significantly improved by 100 µmoL/L SNP. Contents of RA and salvianolic acid B increased by 3 and 4 folds. ABA significantly improved transcript levels of PAL (phenylalanine ammonia lyase), TAT (tyrosine aminotransferase) and RAS (rosmarinic acid synthase), and increased phenolic acids accumulations. However, with treatments of ABA+c-PTIO or ABA+L-NAME, accumulations of phenolic acids and expression levels of the three key genes were significantly inhibited. Both NO and ABA can increase accumulations of phenolic acids in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots. NO signal probably mediates the ABA-induced phenolic acids production. PMID:27382772

  11. Effect of folic acid on prenatal alcohol-induced modification of brain proteome in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yajun; Tang, Yunan; Li, Yong

    2008-03-01

    Maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy can induce central nervous system abnormalities in the fetus, and folic acid supplementation can reverse some of the effects. The objective of the present study was to investigate prenatal alcohol exposure-induced fetal brain proteome alteration and the protective effect of folic acid using proteomic techniques. Alcohol (5.0 g/kg) was given intragastrically from gestational day (GD) 6 to 15, with or without 60.0 mg folic acid/kg given intragastrically during GD 1-16 to pregnant Balb/c mice. The control group received distilled water only. Results of litter evaluation on GD 18 showed that supplementation of folic acid reversed the prevalence of microcephaly induced by alcohol. Proteomic analysis indicated that, under the dosage of the present investigation, folic acid mainly reversed the alcohol-altered proteins involved in energy production, signal pathways and protein translation, which are all important for central nervous system development. PMID:17697403

  12. Anacardic acid induces apoptosis-like cell death in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Muzaffar, Suhail; Bose, Chinchu; Banerji, Ashok; Nair, Bipin G; Chattoo, Bharat B

    2016-01-01

    Anacardic acid (6-pentadecylsalicylic acid), extracted from cashew nut shell liquid, is a natural phenolic lipid well known for its strong antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities. Its effect has been well studied in bacterial and mammalian systems but remains largely unexplored in fungi. The present study identifies antifungal, cytotoxic, and antioxidant activities of anacardic acid in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. It was found that anacardic acid causes inhibition of conidial germination and mycelial growth in this ascomycetous fungus. Phosphatidylserine externalization, chromatin condensation, DNA degradation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential suggest that growth inhibition of fungus is mainly caused by apoptosis-like cell death. Broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK treatment indicated that anacardic acid induces caspase-independent apoptosis in M. oryzae. Expression of a predicted ortholog of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was upregulated during the process of apoptosis, suggesting the possibility of mitochondria dependent apoptosis via activation of apoptosis-inducing factor. Anacardic acid treatment leads to decrease in reactive oxygen species rather than increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation normally observed during apoptosis, confirming the antioxidant properties of anacardic acid as suggested by earlier reports. Our study also shows that anacardic acid renders the fungus highly sensitive to DNA damaging agents like ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). Treatment of rice leaves with anacardic acid prevents M. oryzae from infecting the plant without affecting the leaf, suggesting that anacardic acid can be an effective antifungal agent. PMID:26381667

  13. Antinociceptive Effect of 3-(2,3-Dimethoxyphenyl)-1-(5-methylfuran-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one in Mice Models of Induced Nociception.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Nur Izzati; Ming-Tatt, Lee; Lajis, Nordin; Akhtar, Muhammad Nadeem; Akira, Ahmad; Perimal, Enoch Kumar; Israf, Daud Ahmad; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan

    2016-08-22

    The antinociceptive effects produced by intraperitoneal administration of a novel synthetic chalcone, 3-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-(5-methylfuran-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one (DMFP), were investigated in several mouse models of induced nociception. The administration of DMFP (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 mg/kg) produced significant attenuation on the acetic acid-induced abdominal-writhing test. It also produced a significant increase in response latency time in the hot-plate test and a marked reduction in time spent licking the injected paw in both phases of the formalin-induced paw-licking test. In addition, it was also demonstrated that DMFP exhibited significant inhibition of the neurogenic nociceptive response induced by intraplantar injections of capsaicin and glutamate. Moreover, the antinociceptive effect of DMFP in the acetic acid-induced abdominal-writhing test and the hot-plate test was not antagonized by pretreatment with a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone. Finally, DMFP did not show any toxic effects and/or mortality in a study of acute toxicity and did not interfere with motor coordination during the Rota-rod test. Our present results show that DMFP exhibits both peripheral and central antinociceptive effects. It was suggested that its peripheral antinociceptive activity is associated with attenuated production and/or release of NO and various pro-inflammatory mediators, while central antinociceptive activity seems to be unrelated to the opioidergic system, but could involve, at least in part, an interaction with the inhibition of capsaicin-sensitive fibers and the glutamatergic system.

  14. Antinociceptive Effect of 3-(2,3-Dimethoxyphenyl)-1-(5-methylfuran-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one in Mice Models of Induced Nociception.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Nur Izzati; Ming-Tatt, Lee; Lajis, Nordin; Akhtar, Muhammad Nadeem; Akira, Ahmad; Perimal, Enoch Kumar; Israf, Daud Ahmad; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan

    2016-01-01

    The antinociceptive effects produced by intraperitoneal administration of a novel synthetic chalcone, 3-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-(5-methylfuran-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one (DMFP), were investigated in several mouse models of induced nociception. The administration of DMFP (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 mg/kg) produced significant attenuation on the acetic acid-induced abdominal-writhing test. It also produced a significant increase in response latency time in the hot-plate test and a marked reduction in time spent licking the injected paw in both phases of the formalin-induced paw-licking test. In addition, it was also demonstrated that DMFP exhibited significant inhibition of the neurogenic nociceptive response induced by intraplantar injections of capsaicin and glutamate. Moreover, the antinociceptive effect of DMFP in the acetic acid-induced abdominal-writhing test and the hot-plate test was not antagonized by pretreatment with a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone. Finally, DMFP did not show any toxic effects and/or mortality in a study of acute toxicity and did not interfere with motor coordination during the Rota-rod test. Our present results show that DMFP exhibits both peripheral and central antinociceptive effects. It was suggested that its peripheral antinociceptive activity is associated with attenuated production and/or release of NO and various pro-inflammatory mediators, while central antinociceptive activity seems to be unrelated to the opioidergic system, but could involve, at least in part, an interaction with the inhibition of capsaicin-sensitive fibers and the glutamatergic system. PMID:27556438

  15. Anti-inflammatory effect and low ulcerogenic activity of etodolac, a cyclooxygenase-2 selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Masaki; Inoue, Naoki; Yoshida, Eri; Matsui, Masami; Ukai, Yojiro; Yano, Junichi

    2003-06-01

    Adjuvant arthritic rats are known to be more susceptible to gastric damage induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) than are normal rats. We compared the relative gastric safety profile of etodolac with those of meloxicam, diclofenac sodium and indometacin in adjuvant arthritic rats and normal rats or mice. As a measure of the safety profiles of NSAIDs, we used the safety index, the ratio of the dose that elicits gastric mucosal lesions to the effective dose as an anti-inflammatory or analgesic compound. The anti-inflammatory or analgesic effects of NSAIDs were assessed by paw swelling in adjuvant arthritic rats, and either carrageenin-induced paw edema or brewer's yeast-induced hyperalgesia, as well as acetic acid-induced writhing, in normal rats or mice. In addition, we also investigated the effects of these NSAIDs on human COX-1 and COX-2 activity. Etodolac and other NSAIDs inhibited paw swelling and caused gastric mucosal lesions in adjuvant arthritic rats in a dose-dependent manner. Etodolac showed the highest UD(50) value and safety index among these NSAIDs in arthritic rats. In normal rats, etodolac also showed the highest UD(50) value and safety index, except when its effects were assessed by acetic acid-induced writhing. Etodolac and meloxicam showed selectivity for human COX-2 over COX-1. In contrast, diclofenac sodium and indometacin were selective for COX-1. These results suggest that etodolac, a COX-2 selective NSAID, has anti-inflammatory effects with a better safety profile for the stomach than do non-selective NSAIDs, including diclofenac sodium and indometacin, in adjuvant arthritic as well as normal rats.

  16. Induced accumulation of oleanolic acid and ursolic acid in cell suspension cultures of Uncaria tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Feria-Romero, Iris; Lazo, Elizabeth; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2005-06-01

    Increasing sucrose from 20 to 50 g l(-1) in Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures enhanced ursolic acid and oleanolic acid production from 129 +/- 61 to 553 +/- 193 microg g(-1) cell dry wt. The maximal concentration of both triterpenes (1680 +/- 39 microg g(-1) cell dry wt) was 8 days after elicitation by jasmonic acid, while yeast extract or citrus pectin treatments produced 1189 +/- 20 or 1120 +/- 26 microg g(-1) cell dry wt, respectively. The ratio of ursolic acid:oleanolic acid was constant at 70:30.

  17. Role of ellagic acid against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Ateşşahín, Ahmet; Ceríbaşi, Ali Osman; Yuce, Abdurrauf; Bulmus, Ozgür; Cikim, Gürkan

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible protective role of antioxidant treatment with ellagic acid on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity using biochemical and histopatological approaches. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups. The control group received 0.9% saline; animals in the ellagic acid group received only ellagic acid (10 mg/kg); animals in the cisplatin group received only cisplatin (7 mg/kg); animals in the cisplatin + ellagic acid group received ellagic acid for 10 days after cisplatin. The effects of ellagic acid on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity were evaluated by plasma creatinine, urea, sodium and calcium concentrations; kidney tissue malondialdehyde, reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH peroxidase) and catalase activities and histopatological examinations. Administration of cisplatin to rats induced a marked renal failure, characterized by significant increases in plasma creatinine, urea and calcium concentrations. Cisplatin also induced oxidative stress, as indicated by increased kidney tissue concentrations of malondialdehyde, and reduced activities of GSH peroxidase and catalase. Furthermore, treatment with cisplatin caused a marked tubular necrosis, degeneration and desquamation, luminal cast formation, karyomegaly, tubular dilatation, interstitial mononuclear cell infiltration and inter-tubular haemorrhagia. Ellagic acid markedly reduced elevated plasma creatinine, urea and calcium levels and counteracted the deleterious effects of cisplatin on oxidative stress markers. In the same way, ellagic acid ameliorated cisplatin-induced pathological changes including tubular necrosis, degeneration, karyomegaly, tubular dilatation when compared to the cisplatin alone group. These results indicate that the antioxidant ellagic acid might have a protective effect against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and oxidative stress in rat, but not enough to inhibit cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction.

  18. Absence of correlation between ACh-induced Ca influx and phosphatidic acid labeling in rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Ichida, S; Moriyama, M; Hirooka, Y; Okazaki, Y; Yoshioka, K

    1984-11-27

    Rat uterine smooth muscle was preincubated in Ca-depleted modified Locke-Ringer solution to investigate the correlation between the 32Pi incorporation into phosphatidic acid induced by acetylcholine and the contractile response to acetylcholine induced by the addition of CaCl2 (Ca influx). The results showed that in rat uterine smooth muscle under these conditions phosphatidic acid does not act as a Ca ionophore or as a trigger for opening the Ca channel.

  19. Salicylic acid is involved in the regulation of starvation stress-induced flowering in Lemna paucicostata.

    PubMed

    Shimakawa, Aya; Shiraya, Takeshi; Ishizuka, Yuta; Wada, Kaede C; Mitsui, Toshiaki; Takeno, Kiyotoshi

    2012-07-01

    The short-day plant, Lemna paucicostata (synonym Lemna aequinoctialis), was induced to flower when cultured in tap water without any additional nutrition under non-inductive long-day conditions. Flowering occurred in all three of the tested strains, and strain 6746 was the most sensitive to the starvation stress conditions. For each strain, the stress-induced flowering response was weaker than that induced by short-day treatment, and the stress-induced flowering of strain 6746 was completely inhibited by aminooxyacetic acid and l-2-aminooxy-3-phenylpropionic acid, which are inhibitors of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase. Significantly higher amounts of endogenous salicylic acid (SA) were detected in the fronds that flowered under the poor-nutrition conditions than in the vegetative fronds cultured under nutrition conditions, and exogenously applied SA promoted the flowering response. The results indicate that endogenous SA plays a role in the regulation of stress-induced flowering.

  20. Acid aspiration-induced lung injury in rabbits is mediated by interleukin-8-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Folkesson, H G; Matthay, M A; Hébert, C A; Broaddus, V C

    1995-01-01

    Acid aspiration lung injury may be mediated primarily by neutrophils recruited to the lung by acid-induced cytokines. We hypothesized that a major acid-induced cytokine was IL-8 and that a neutralizing anti-rabbit-IL-8 monoclonal antibody (ARIL8.2) would attenuate acid-induced lung injury in rabbits. Hydrochloric acid (pH = 1.5 in 1/3 normal saline) or 1/3 normal saline (4 ml/kg) was instilled into the lungs of ventilated, anesthetized rabbits. The rabbits were studied for 6 or 24 h. In acid-instilled rabbits without the anti-IL-8 monoclonal antibody, severe lung injury developed in the first 6 h; in the long-term experiments, all rabbits died with lung injury between 12 and 14 h. In acid-instilled rabbits given the anti-IL-8 monoclonal antibody (2 mg/kg, intravenously) either as pretreatment (5 min before the acid) or as treatment (1 h after the acid), acid-induced abnormalities in oxygenation and extravascular lung water were prevented and extravascular protein accumulation was reduced by 70%; in the long-term experiments, anti-IL-8 treatment similarly protected lung function throughout the 24-h period. The anti-IL-8 monoclonal antibody also significantly reduced air space neutrophil counts and IL-8 concentrations. This study establishes IL-8 as a critical cytokine for the development of acid-induced lung injury. Neutralization of IL-8 may provide the first useful therapy for this clinically important form of acute lung injury. Images PMID:7615779

  1. Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonemia in a Long Time Treated Patient

    PubMed Central

    Seide, Margaret; Stern, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a patient who had been on long time valproic acid for treatment of bipolar affective disorder. While being an inpatient, serology ammonia level testing revealed a very high ammonia level despite being asymptomatic. Dual therapy of carnitine and lactulose was provided to the patient for treatment of the hyperammonemia. It should also be noted that, during this treatment, valproic acid was not stopped. Consequently, this case illustrates that patients can present asymptomatically despite very high ammonia levels and hyperammonemia can occur in chronic valproic acid despite not increasing the dose of the medication and psychiatrists do not need to discontinue valproic acid in the presence of elevated levels of ammonia if the patient shows no signs of encephalopathy or delirium. PMID:27516916

  2. Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonemia in a Long Time Treated Patient.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Rohit; Seide, Margaret; Stern, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a patient who had been on long time valproic acid for treatment of bipolar affective disorder. While being an inpatient, serology ammonia level testing revealed a very high ammonia level despite being asymptomatic. Dual therapy of carnitine and lactulose was provided to the patient for treatment of the hyperammonemia. It should also be noted that, during this treatment, valproic acid was not stopped. Consequently, this case illustrates that patients can present asymptomatically despite very high ammonia levels and hyperammonemia can occur in chronic valproic acid despite not increasing the dose of the medication and psychiatrists do not need to discontinue valproic acid in the presence of elevated levels of ammonia if the patient shows no signs of encephalopathy or delirium. PMID:27516916

  3. Houttuyniae Herba Attenuates Kainic Acid-Induced Neurotoxicity via Calcium Response Modulation in the Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Geun; Jeong, Hyun Uk; Hong, Sung In; Oh, Myung Sook

    2015-12-01

    Epilepsy is a complex neurological disorder characterized by the repeated occurrence of electrical activity known as seizures. This activity induces increased intracellular calcium, which ultimately leads to neuronal damage. Houttuyniae Herba, the aerial part of Houttuynia cordata, has various pharmacological effects and is widely used as a traditional herb. In the present study, we evaluated the protective effects of Houttuyniae Herba water extract on kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. Kainic acid directly acts on calcium release, resulting in seizure behavior, neuronal damage, and cognitive impairment. In a rat primary hippocampal culture system, Houttuyniae Herba water extract significantly protected neuronal cells from kainic acid toxicity. In a seizure model where mice received intracerebellar kainic acid injections, Houttuyniae Herba water extract treatment resulted in a lower seizure stage score, ameliorated cognitive impairment, protected neuronal cells against kainic acid-induced toxicity, and suppressed neuronal degeneration in the hippocampus. In addition, Houttuyniae Herba water extract regulated increases in the intracellular calcium level, its related downstream pathways (reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial dysfunction), and calcium/calmodulin complex kinase type II immunoreactivity in the mouse hippocampus, which resulted from calcium influx stimulation induced by kainic acid. These results demonstrate the neuroprotective effects of Houttuyniae Herba water extract through inhibition of calcium generation in a kainic acid-induced epileptic model. PMID:26366753

  4. Protective effect of boric acid against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ince, Sinan; Keles, Hikmet; Erdogan, Metin; Hazman, Omer; Kucukkurt, Ismail

    2012-07-01

    The protective effect of boric acid against liver damage was evaluated by its attenuation of carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. Male albino mice were treated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with boric acid (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) or silymarin daily for 7 days and received 0.2% CCl(4) in olive oil (10 mL/kg, i.p.) on day 7. Results showed that administration of boric acid significantly reduced the elevation in serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, and the level of malondialdehyde in the liver that were induced by CCl(4) in mice. Boric acid treatment significantly increased glutathione content, as well as the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in the liver. Boric acid treatment improved the catalytic activity of cytochrome P450 2E1 and maintained activation of nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cell gene expression, with no effect on inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression in the livers of mice. Histopathologically, clear decreases in the severity of CCl(4)-induced lesions were observed, particularly at high boric acid concentrations. Results suggest that boric acid exhibits potent hepatoprotective effects on CCl(4)-induced liver damage in mice, likely the result of both the increase in antioxidant-defense system activity and the inhibition of lipid peroxidation.

  5. MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory


    MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have demonstrated the hepatocarcinogenicity of DCA in rodents when administered in dri...

  6. Poly(acrylic acid) to induce competitive crystallization of a theophylline/oxalic acid cocrystal and a theophylline polymorph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jisun; Kim, Il Won

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric additives to induce competitive crystallization of pharmaceutical compounds were explored. A cocrystal of theophylline and oxalic acid was used as a model system, and poly(acrylic acid), poly(caprolactone), and poly(ethylene glycol) were the additives. The cocrystal formation was selectively hindered with addition of poly(acrylic acid). First the size of the cocrystals were reduced, and eventually the cocrystallization was inhibited to generate neat theophylline crystals. The theophylline crystals were of a distinctively different crystal structure from known polymorphs, based on powder X-ray diffraction. They were also obtained in nanoscale size, when millimeter-scale crystals formed without poly(acrylic acid). Polymeric additives that could form specific interactions with crystallizing compounds seem to be useful tools for the phase and size control of pharmaceutical crystals.

  7. Inhibition of Long Chain Acyl Coenzyme A Synthetases during Fatty Acid Loading Induces Lipotoxicity in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saraswathi, Viswanathan; Hasty, Alyssa H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Obesity is often associated with hypertriglyceridemia and elevated free fatty acids (FFAs) which are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. While impairment of cholesterol homeostasis is known to induce toxicity in macrophages, the consequence of altered fatty acid homeostasis is not clear. METHODS AND RESULTS Long chain acyl CoA synthetases (ACSLs) play a critical role in fatty acid homeostasis by channeling fatty acids to diverse metabolic pools. We treated mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPMs) with VLDL or FFAs in the presence of triacsin C, an inhibitor of the three ACSL isoforms present in macrophages. Treatment of macrophages with VLDL and triacsin C resulted in reduced TG accumulation but increased intracellular FFA levels which induced lipotoxicity characterized by induction of apoptosis. Treatment of MPMs with the saturated fatty acid stearic acid in the presence of triacsin C increased intracellular stearic acid and induced apoptosis. Stromal vascular cells collected from high fat diet-fed mice displayed foam cell morphology and exhibited increased mRNA levels of macrophage markers and ACSL1. Importantly, all of these changes were associated with increased FFA level in AT. CONCLUSIONS Inhibition of ACSLs during fatty acid loading results in apoptosis via accumulation of FFAs. Our data have implications in understanding the consequences of dysregulated fatty acid metabolism in macrophages. PMID:19679826

  8. New insights into structural alteration of enamel apatite induced by citric acid and sodium fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojie; Klocke, Arndt; Mihailova, Boriana; Tosheva, Lubomira; Bismayer, Ulrich

    2008-07-24

    Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and complementary scanning electron microscopy were applied to analyze the surface structure of enamel apatite exposed to citric acid and to investigate the protective potential of fluorine-containing reagents against citric acid-induced erosion. Enamel and, for comparison, geological hydroxylapatite samples were treated with aqueous solutions of citric acid and sodium fluoride of different concentrations, ranging from 0.01 to 0.5 mol/L for citric acid solutions and from 0.5 to 2.0% for fluoride solutions. The two solutions were applied either simultaneously or consecutively. The citric acid-induced structural modification of apatite increases with the increase in the citric acid concentration and the number of treatments. The application of sodium fluoride alone does not suppress the atomic level changes in apatite exposed to acidic agents. The addition of sodium fluoride to citric acid solutions leads to formation of surface CaF2 and considerably reduces the changes in the apatite P-O-Ca framework. However, the CaF2 globules deposited on the enamel surface seem to be insufficient to prevent the alteration of the apatite structure upon further exposure to acidic agents. No evidence for fluorine-induced recovery of the apatite structure was found.

  9. The acid-induced folded state of Sac7d is the native state.

    PubMed Central

    Bedell, J. L.; McCrary, B. S.; Edmondson, S. P.; Shriver, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    Sac7d unfolds at low pH in the absence of salt, with the greatest extent of unfolding obtained at pH 2. We have previously shown that the acid unfolded protein is induced to refold by decreasing the pH to 0 or by addition of salt (McCrary BS, Bedell J. Edmondson SP, Shriver JW, 1998, J Mol Biol 276:203-224). Both near-ultraviolet circular dichroism spectra and ANS fluorescence enhancements indicate that the acid- and salt-induced folded states have a native fold and are not molten globular. 1H,15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR spectra confirm that the native, acid-, and salt-induced folded states are essentially identical. The most significant differences in amide 1H and 15N chemical shifts are attributed to hydrogen bonding to titrating carboxyl side chains and through-bond inductive effects. The 1H NMR chemical shifts of protons affected by ring currents in the hydrophobic core of the acid- and salt-induced folded states are identical to those observed in the native. The radius of gyration of the acid-induced folded state at pH 0 is shown to be identical to that of the native state at pH 7 by small angle X-ray scattering. We conclude that acid-induced collapse of Sac7d does not lead to a molten globule but proceeds directly to the native state. The folding of Sac7d as a function of pH and anion concentration is summarized with a phase diagram that is similar to those observed for other proteins that undergo acid-induced folding except that the A-state is encompassed by the native state. These results demonstrate that formation of a molten globule is not a general property of proteins that are refolded by acid. PMID:11106160

  10. Dietary linoleic acid-induced alterations in pro- and anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Amit; Majchrzak-Hong, Sharon F; Yang, Jun; Blanchard, Helene; Zamora, Daisy; Loewke, James D; Rapoport, Stanley I; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Davis, John M; Hammock, Bruce D; Taha, Ameer Y

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic idiopathic pain syndromes are major causes of personal suffering, disability, and societal expense. Dietary n-6 linoleic acid has increased markedly in modern industrialized populations over the past century. These high amounts of linoleic acid could hypothetically predispose to physical pain by increasing the production of pro-nociceptive linoleic acid-derived lipid autacoids and by interfering with the production of anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids derived from n-3 fatty acids. Here, we used a rat model to determine the effect of increasing dietary linoleic acid as a controlled variable for 15 weeks on nociceptive lipid autacoids and their precursor n-6 and n-3 fatty acids in tissues associated with idiopathic pain syndromes. Results Increasing dietary linoleic acid markedly increased the abundance of linoleic acid and its pro-nociceptive derivatives and reduced the abundance of n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid and their anti-nociceptive monoepoxide derivatives. Diet-induced changes occurred in a tissue-specific manner, with marked alterations of nociceptive lipid autacoids in both peripheral and central tissues, and the most pronounced changes in their fatty acid precursors in peripheral tissues. Conclusions The present findings provide biochemical support for the hypothesis that the high linoleic acid content of modern industrialized diets may create a biochemical susceptibility to develop chronic pain. Dietary linoleic acid lowering should be further investigated as part of an integrative strategy for the prevention and management of idiopathic pain syndromes. PMID:27030719

  11. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Mandi M.; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Many key actions of ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120). n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor. PMID:26821052

  12. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    SciTech Connect

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth; Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I.; Gholami, Parviz; Li, Feng; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Fan, Fang; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  13. Effects of kainic acid on hypothermia induced by reserpine, oxotremorine and apomorphine in mice.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Poisson, L; Larousse, C

    1987-03-01

    Antagonists of the norepinephrine reuptake and beta-adrenoreceptor agonists are potent, at once, on the three following tests: antagonism of hypothermia induced by reserpine, oxotremorine and apomorphine. 2-Carboxy-4-isopropenyl-3-pyrrolidine-acetic acid (kainic acid), which is a powerful stimulant of the neurons and a destroyer of the dopaminergic neurons, has been used in these tests to show if it is possible to antagonize hypothermia induced by different substances. The results obtained show that kainic acid is potent on these three tests, thus providing evidence that it is a stimulant of norepinephrine neurons as well as serotoninergic neurons, even if it is peripherically injected.

  14. Eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid reduce UVB- and TNF-alpha-induced IL-8 secretion in keratinocytes and UVB-induced IL-8 in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Storey, Amy; McArdle, Frank; Friedmann, Peter S; Jackson, Malcolm J; Rhodes, Lesley E

    2005-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) inhibit ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced inflammation and other inflammatory states, in vivo. We examined whether this may be mediated by modulation of interleukin (IL)-8, a chemokine pivotal to skin inflammation induced by UVB, in epidermal and dermal cells. We also explored the ability of n-3 PUFA to protect against tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha induction of IL-8, and assessed relative potencies of the principal dietary n-3 PUFA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Pre-supplementation, both HaCaT keratinocyte and CCD922SK fibroblast cell lines showed dose-responses for UVB-induced IL-8 release (p<0.001), assessed 48 h post-irradiation. Cells were supplemented with > or =90% purified EPA, DHA, oleic acid (OA) or vehicle control, for 4.5 d. EPA and DHA supplements were bioavailable to keratinocytes and fibroblasts. In keratinocytes, EPA and DHA were shown to reduce basal secretion of IL-8 by 66% and 63%, respectively (p<0.05), and UVB-induced levels by 66% and 65% at 48 h after 100 mJ per cm2, respectively, (p<0.01). A similar pattern occurred in fibroblasts, whereas OA had no influence on IL-8 release in either cell line. In addition, TNF-alpha-induced IL-8 secretion by keratinocytes was reduced by 54% and 42%, respectively, by EPA and DHA (p<0.001). Hence both n-3 PUFA inhibit production of UVB- and TNF-alpha-induced IL-8 in skin cells; this may be important in the photoprotective and other anti-inflammatory effects conferred by these agents.

  15. Energetic particle-induced enhancements of stratospheric nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1994-01-01

    Inclusion of complete ion chemistry in the calculation of minor species production during energetic particle deposition events leads to significant enhancement in the calculated nitric acid concentration during precipitation. An ionization rate of 1.2 x 10(exp 3)/cu cm/s imposed for 1 day increases HNO3 from 3 x 10(exp 5) to 6 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm at 50 km. With an ionization rate of 600 cu cm/s, the maximum HNO3 is 3 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm. Calculations which neglect negative ions predict the nitric acid will fall during precipitation events. The decay time for converting HNO3 into odd nitrogen and hydrogen is more than 1 day for equinoctial periods at 70 deg latitude. Examination of nitric acid data should yield important information on the magnitude and frequency of charged particle events.

  16. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity of the siaresinolic acid, a triterpene isolated from the leaves of Sabicea grisea Cham. & Schltdl. var. grisea.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Anderson Marques; de Araújo, Almair Ferreira; Lyra Lemos, Rosangela P; Conserva, Lucia M; de Souza Ferro, Jamylle Nunes; Barreto, Emiliano

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, siaresinolic acid (siaresinol, SA) was isolated from the leaves of Sabicea grisea and studied to evaluate its antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity. The antinociceptive effect of SA was investigated in mice using different animal models to study pain. In the acetic acid-induced writhing test, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of SA (0.1, 1, and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) 1 h before a pain stimulus significantly reduced the nociceptive response (by 42.3, 68.2, and 70.9 %, respectively). Pretreatment with glibenclamide, but not with yohimbine, metoclopramide, ketanserin, or naloxone, restored the antinociceptive effect induced by SA in the writhing test, suggesting that the K(+)ATP channel pathway might be involved in its mechanism of action. In the formalin test, SA (1 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased licking time in the second phase only, thereby indicating an anti-inflammatory effect. In the hot plate test, there was no significant difference in nociceptive behavior. In the rota-rod test, it was verified that a high dose of SA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) did not affect the locomotor activity of mice. In the pleurisy model, induced by carrageenan, treatment with SA inhibited important events involved in inflammatory responses, namely leukocyte influx, plasma leakage, and increased inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, and chemokine CXCL1), in the pleural exudate. Additionally, SA itself was not cytotoxic when evaluated using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in macrophages cultured for 24 h at concentrations ranging from 1 to 200 μg/mL. These results suggest, for the first time, that SA attenuates nociceptive behavior through mechanisms involving receptors for ATP-dependent potassium channels, in addition to suppressing acute inflammatory responses.

  17. [Pathology of placenta of rats induced by fatty acid deficiency].

    PubMed

    Glocker, T M

    2000-01-01

    Lipids are important cell components, both from the structural and the functional point of view. Besides, they intervene in transporting functions, cell recognition and immunity. Essential Fatty Acids (EFA) are important for the functional and structural maintenance of animal organisms. In our laboratory, it was demonstrated that one group of pregnant rats fed on an EFA deficient diet, and other group of rats fed on the same diet but with 5% of corn oil (rich in linoleic acid) showed alterations on the development of the metrial gland. In the present work, 57 female rats of a Wistar strain were fed since weaning with one of the following diets: EFAD: deficient in essential fatty acids, COD: EFAD + 5% corn oil (linoleic acid sufficient but alpha-linoleic acid deficient); SAD: EFAD + 5% soy oil (both EFA sufficient) and CD: commercial diet. After 3 months the animals were sacrificed on the 13 th. day of gestation. Uteru's horns were dissected and the implantation sities were fixed on formol and embebbed in parafin. The observations were carried out with H/E coloured cross-sections and the corialantoidea placenta, the cities of implantations and the sitios of reabsortions were studied. The metrial gland of DAGE and DAM rats presented structural modifications compared to DC rats. The most relevant findings were: indifferentiation of the granulated metrial gland cells and an increase in the amount of connective tissue. In DAS rats, on the contrary, the aspect of the metrial gland was similar to the observed in the DC group. In the DAGE and the DAM groups Labyrinthium was enlarged with vascular septum group. Mean while DAS was similar to group DC (thin and vascular). Differences in the cities of implantations and reabsortions were not detected. The present results suggest that alpha-linolenico acid is essential for the rat placenta to reach normal development.

  18. Stability of sublethal acid stress adaptation and induced cross protection against lauric arginate in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qian; Soni, Kamlesh A; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna

    2015-06-16

    The stability of acid stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes and its induced cross protection effect against GRAS (generally recognized as safe) antimicrobial compounds has never been investigated before. In the present study, the acid stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes was initially induced in pH 5.0 tryptic soy broth supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract (TSB-YE) at 37 °C. Subsequently, the stability of acid stress adaptation, which was defined as the capacity to maintain its acquired acid adaptation after induction in the absence of sublethal acid stress, was determined at 37 °C, 22 °C or 4 °C in broth and in different food substrates. Then, the acid stress adaptation induced cross protection against lauric arginate (LAE) and its stability was investigated in TSB-YE, milk and carrot juice. Our findings show that the acid stress adaptation was stable at 4 °C up to 24h but was reversed at 37 °C or 22 °C within 2h. In the cross protection assay with LAE, the acid stress adapted cells had approximately 2 log CFU/ml greater survival than non-adapted cells in broth at 22 °C or in milk and carrot juice at 4 °C. The acid adaptation induced cross protection against LAE in L. monocytogenes was reversible within 1h at 4 °C in the absence of sublethal acid stress. Our findings suggest that the stability of acid adaptation in L. monocytogenes under cold conditions should be taken into account when the risk analysis is performed during food processing.

  19. Pyroglutamic acid-induced metabolic acidosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Luyasu, S; Wamelink, M M C; Galanti, L; Dive, A

    2014-06-01

    High anion gap metabolic acidosis due to pyroglutamic acid (5-oxoproline) is a rare complication of acetaminophen treatment (which depletes glutathione stores) and is often associated with clinically moderate to severe encephalopathy. Acquired 5-oxoprolinase deficiency (penicillins) or the presence of other risk factors of glutathione depletion such as malnutrition or sepsis seems to be necessary for symptoms development. We report the case of a 55-year-old women who developed a symptomatic overproduction of 5-oxoproline during flucloxacillin treatment for severe sepsis while receiving acetaminophen for fever control. Hemodialysis accelerated the clearance of the accumulated organic acid, and was followed by a sustained clinical improvement.

  20. Nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Hui; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo

    2015-02-01

    Nucleic acids derived from viral pathogens are typical pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In mammals, the recognition of viral nucleic acids by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which include Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I-like receptors (RLRs), induces the release of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferons (IFNs) through the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3/7 pathways, triggering the host antiviral state. However, whether nucleic acids can induce similar antiviral immunity in invertebrates remains ambiguous. Several studies have reported that nucleic acid mimics, especially dsRNA mimic poly(I:C), can strongly induce non-specific antiviral immune responses in insects, shrimp, and oyster. This behavior shows multiple similarities to the hallmarks of mammalian IFN responses. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates. We also discuss the potential recognition and regulatory mechanisms that confer non-specific antiviral immunity on invertebrate hosts.

  1. [Effect of calcium on medium alkalinization induced by salicylic acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza suspension cultures].

    PubMed

    Liu, Liancheng; Wang, Cong; Dong, Juan'e; Su, Hui; Zhuo, Zequn; Xue, Yaxin

    2013-07-01

    We studied medium alkalinization in Salvia miltiorrhiza suspension cultures treated with salicylic acid and the effect of Ca2+ in this process through application of calcium channel antagonists (Verapamil, LaCl3, LiCl, 2-APB) and ionophore A23187. The results show that salicylic acid could induce significant medium alkalinization in S. miltiorrhiza culture. Verapamil and LaCl3 or LiCl and 2-APB, two different groups of calcium channel antagonist, significantly inhibited the medium alkalinization induced by salicylic acid. However, the suppression effect of verapamil or LaCl3 on medium alkalinization induced by salicylic acid was higher than that of LiCl or 2-APB. When two types of calcium channel inhibitor (LaCl3 and 2-APB) were used together, the medium alkalinization induced by salicylic acid was completely suppressed and even reduced the pH in medium. On the other hand, A23187 could promote the medium alkalinization. Based on the results above, we speculated that salicylic acid could induce significant medium alkalinization in S. miltiorrhiza culture, depending on the calcium from both extracell and intracell. Moreover, calcium from extracell plays a more dominant role in this process. Reveal of relationship in this research between Ca2+ and medium alkalinization can provide theory evidence for mechanism of the plant secondary metabolism.

  2. Glucose supplementation-induced changes in the Auxenochlorella protothecoides fatty acid composition suitable for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Krzemińska, Izabela; Oleszek, Marta

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluates the effect of different concentrations of glucose supplementation on growth, lipid accumulation, and the fatty acid profile in the Auxenochlorella protothecoides. Addition of glucose promoted the growth rate and decreased the chlorophyll content. Compared with photoautotrophic cells, an increase in the lipid content was observed in mixotrophic cells. The glucose addition induced changes in the fatty acid profile. Higher content of saturated fatty acids was found in the case of cells growing in the glucose-free medium. Oleic acid was the predominant component in mixotrophic cells supplemented with 5gL(-1) glucose, while linoleic acids dominated in cultures supplemented with both 1 and 3gL(-1) glucose. The use of glucose was associated with decreased levels of linolenic acid and PUFA. The changes in the fatty acid profile in mixotrophic cells are favourable for biodiesel production.

  3. Glucose supplementation-induced changes in the Auxenochlorella protothecoides fatty acid composition suitable for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Krzemińska, Izabela; Oleszek, Marta

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluates the effect of different concentrations of glucose supplementation on growth, lipid accumulation, and the fatty acid profile in the Auxenochlorella protothecoides. Addition of glucose promoted the growth rate and decreased the chlorophyll content. Compared with photoautotrophic cells, an increase in the lipid content was observed in mixotrophic cells. The glucose addition induced changes in the fatty acid profile. Higher content of saturated fatty acids was found in the case of cells growing in the glucose-free medium. Oleic acid was the predominant component in mixotrophic cells supplemented with 5gL(-1) glucose, while linoleic acids dominated in cultures supplemented with both 1 and 3gL(-1) glucose. The use of glucose was associated with decreased levels of linolenic acid and PUFA. The changes in the fatty acid profile in mixotrophic cells are favourable for biodiesel production. PMID:27485282

  4. Arginine- and Polyamine-Induced Lactic Acid Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zheng; Tang, M. Matt; Wu, Xueliang; Phillips, Nancy; Galkowski, Dariusz; Jarvis, Gary A.; Fan, Huizhou

    2016-01-01

    Microbe-derived lactic acid protects women from pathogens in their genital tract. The purpose of this study was to determine lactic acid susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and identify potential acid resistance mechanisms present in this pathogen. Tested in vitro, lactic acid killed all 10 gonococcal strains analyzed in a low pH-dependent manner. Full inactivation occurred at pH 4.5. At low pH, lactic acid treatment resulted in the entry of the DNA-binding fluorochrome propidium iodide into the microbial cells, suggesting that hydrogen ions from lactic acid compromise the integrity of the bacterial cell wall/membrane. Most likely, hydrogen ions also inactivate intracellular proteins since arginine rendered significant protection against lactic acid presumably through action of the gonococcal arginine decarboxylase, an enzyme located in the bacterial cytoplasm. Surprisingly, arginine also lessened lactic acid-mediated cell wall/membrane disruption. This effect is probably mediated by agmatine, a triamine product of arginine decarboxylase, since agmatine demonstrated a stronger protective effect on GC than arginine at equal molar concentration. In addition to agmatine, diamines cadaverine and putrescine, which are generated by bacterial vaginosis-associated microbes, also induced significant resistance to lactic acid-mediated GC killing and cell wall/membrane disruption. These findings suggest that the arginine-rich semen protects gonococci through both neutralization-dependent and independent mechanisms, whereas polyamine-induced acid resistance contributes to the increased risk of gonorrhea in women with bacterial vaginosis. PMID:26808268

  5. Arginine- and Polyamine-Induced Lactic Acid Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Tang, M Matt; Wu, Xueliang; Phillips, Nancy; Galkowski, Dariusz; Jarvis, Gary A; Fan, Huizhou

    2016-01-01

    Microbe-derived lactic acid protects women from pathogens in their genital tract. The purpose of this study was to determine lactic acid susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and identify potential acid resistance mechanisms present in this pathogen. Tested in vitro, lactic acid killed all 10 gonococcal strains analyzed in a low pH-dependent manner. Full inactivation occurred at pH 4.5. At low pH, lactic acid treatment resulted in the entry of the DNA-binding fluorochrome propidium iodide into the microbial cells, suggesting that hydrogen ions from lactic acid compromise the integrity of the bacterial cell wall/membrane. Most likely, hydrogen ions also inactivate intracellular proteins since arginine rendered significant protection against lactic acid presumably through action of the gonococcal arginine decarboxylase, an enzyme located in the bacterial cytoplasm. Surprisingly, arginine also lessened lactic acid-mediated cell wall/membrane disruption. This effect is probably mediated by agmatine, a triamine product of arginine decarboxylase, since agmatine demonstrated a stronger protective effect on GC than arginine at equal molar concentration. In addition to agmatine, diamines cadaverine and putrescine, which are generated by bacterial vaginosis-associated microbes, also induced significant resistance to lactic acid-mediated GC killing and cell wall/membrane disruption. These findings suggest that the arginine-rich semen protects gonococci through both neutralization-dependent and independent mechanisms, whereas polyamine-induced acid resistance contributes to the increased risk of gonorrhea in women with bacterial vaginosis.

  6. Arginine- and Polyamine-Induced Lactic Acid Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Tang, M Matt; Wu, Xueliang; Phillips, Nancy; Galkowski, Dariusz; Jarvis, Gary A; Fan, Huizhou

    2016-01-01

    Microbe-derived lactic acid protects women from pathogens in their genital tract. The purpose of this study was to determine lactic acid susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and identify potential acid resistance mechanisms present in this pathogen. Tested in vitro, lactic acid killed all 10 gonococcal strains analyzed in a low pH-dependent manner. Full inactivation occurred at pH 4.5. At low pH, lactic acid treatment resulted in the entry of the DNA-binding fluorochrome propidium iodide into the microbial cells, suggesting that hydrogen ions from lactic acid compromise the integrity of the bacterial cell wall/membrane. Most likely, hydrogen ions also inactivate intracellular proteins since arginine rendered significant protection against lactic acid presumably through action of the gonococcal arginine decarboxylase, an enzyme located in the bacterial cytoplasm. Surprisingly, arginine also lessened lactic acid-mediated cell wall/membrane disruption. This effect is probably mediated by agmatine, a triamine product of arginine decarboxylase, since agmatine demonstrated a stronger protective effect on GC than arginine at equal molar concentration. In addition to agmatine, diamines cadaverine and putrescine, which are generated by bacterial vaginosis-associated microbes, also induced significant resistance to lactic acid-mediated GC killing and cell wall/membrane disruption. These findings suggest that the arginine-rich semen protects gonococci through both neutralization-dependent and independent mechanisms, whereas polyamine-induced acid resistance contributes to the increased risk of gonorrhea in women with bacterial vaginosis. PMID:26808268

  7. Minocycline ameliorates prenatal valproic acid induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopment disorder. One percent worldwide population suffers with autism and males suffer more than females. Microglia plays an important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of minocycline in prenatal valproic acid induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have reduced social interaction (three chamber social behaviour apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complexes I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Treatment with minocycline significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, minocycline has also attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline should be explored further for its therapeutic benefits in autism.

  8. Minocycline ameliorates prenatal valproic acid induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopment disorder. One percent worldwide population suffers with autism and males suffer more than females. Microglia plays an important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of minocycline in prenatal valproic acid induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have reduced social interaction (three chamber social behaviour apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complexes I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Treatment with minocycline significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, minocycline has also attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline should be explored further for its therapeutic benefits in autism. PMID:26551768

  9. Pattern of aluminum-induced secretion of organic acids differs between rye and wheat.

    PubMed

    Li, X F; Ma, J F; Matsumoto, H

    2000-08-01

    Al-Induced secretion of organic acids from the roots has been considered as a mechanism of Al tolerance, but the processes leading to the secretion of organic acids are still unknown. In this study, the secretion pattern and alteration in the metabolism of organic acids under Al stress were examined in rye (Secale cereale L. cv King) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Atlas 66). Al induced rapid secretion of malate in the wheat, but a lag (6 and 10 h for malic and citric acids, respectively) between the exposure to Al and the secretion of organic acids was observed in the rye. The activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, and malate dehydrogenase were not affected by Al in either plant. The activity of citrate synthase was increased by the exposure to Al in the rye, but not in the wheat. The secretion of malate was not suppressed at low temperature in the wheat, but that of citrate was stopped in the rye. The Al-induced secretion of citrate from roots of the rye was inhibited by the inhibitors of a citrate carrier, which transports citrate from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm. All of these results suggest that alteration in the metabolism of organic acids is involved in the Al-induced secretion of organic acids in rye, but only activation of an anion channel seems to be responsible for the rapid secretion of malate in the wheat.

  10. Chronic exercise dampens hippocampal glutamate overflow induced by kainic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Philip V; Reiss, Jenny I; Murray, Patrick S; Dishman, Rod K; Spradley, Jessica M

    2015-05-01

    Our laboratory has previously reported that chronic, voluntary exercise diminishes seizure-related behaviors induced by convulsant doses of kainic acid. The present experiments tested the hypothesis that exercise exerts this protective effect through a mechanism involving suppression of glutamate release in the hippocampal formation. Following three weeks of voluntary wheel running or sedentary conditions, rats were injected with 10 mg/kg of kainic acid, and hippocampal glutamate was measured in real time using a telemetric, in vivo voltammetry system. A separate experiment measured electroencephalographic (EEG) activity following kainic acid treatment. Results of the voltammetry experiment revealed that the rise in hippocampal glutamate induced by kainic acid is attenuated in exercising rats compared to sedentary controls, indicating that the exercise-induced protection against seizures involves regulation of hippocampal glutamate release. The findings reveal the potential benefit of regular exercise in the treatment and prevention of seizure disorders and suggest a possible neurobiological mechanism underlying this effect. PMID:25668513

  11. Excitatory amino acid transporter 2 downregulation correlates with thalamic neuronal death following kainic acid-induced status epilepticus in rat.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Masashi; Kurokawa, Haruna; Shimada, Akinori; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Miyata, Hajime; Morita, Takehito

    2015-02-01

    Recurrent seizures without interictal resumption (status epilepticus) have been reported to induce neuronal death in the midline thalamic region that has functional roles in memory and decision-making; however, the pathogenesis underlying status epilepticus-induced thalamic neuronal death is yet to be determined. We performed histological and immunohistochemical studies as well as cerebral blood flow measurement using 4.7 tesla magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer on midline thalamic region in Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 75, male, 7 weeks after birth, body weight 250-300 g) treated with intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (10 mg/kg) to induce status epilepticus (n = 55) or normal saline solution (n = 20). Histological study using paraffin-embedded specimens revealed neuronal death showing ischemic-like changes and Fluoro-Jade C positivity with calcium deposition in the midline thalamic region of epileptic rats. The distribution of neuronal death was associated with focal loss of immunoreactivity for excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2), stronger immunoreaction for glutamate and increase in number of Iba-1-positive microglial cells showing swollen cytoplasm and long processes. Double immunofluorescence study demonstrated co-expression of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) within microglial cells, and loss of EAAT2 immunoreactivity in reactive astrocytes. These microglial alterations and astrocytic EAAT2 downregulation were also observed in tissue without obvious neuronal death in kainic acid-treated rats. These results suggest the possible role of glutamate excitotoxicity in neuronal death in the midline thalamic region following kainic acid-induced status epilepticus due to astrocytic EAAT2 downregulation following microglial activation showing upregulation of IL-1β and iNOS.

  12. ASCORBID ACID IS DECREASED IN INDUCED SPUTUM OF MILD ASTHMATICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    Evidence suggests that the antioxidant ascorbic acid (AA), plays an essential role in defending against oxidant attack in the airways. Decreased levels of AA have been reported in asthmatics but not at the site directly proximal to asthma pathology, i.e. the bronchial...

  13. Amino acid limitation induces down-regulation of WNT5a at transcriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zuguang; Chen Hong

    2009-01-23

    An aberrant WNT signaling contributes to the development and progression of multiple cancers. WNT5a is one of the WNT signaling molecules. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that amino acid deprivation induces changes in the WNT signaling pathway in colon cancer cells. Results showed that targets of the amino acid response pathway, ATF3 and p21, were induced in the human colon cancer cell line SW480 during amino acid limitation. There was a significant decrease in the WNT5a mRNA level following amino acid deprivation. The down-regulation of WNT5a mRNA by amino acid deprivation is not due to mRNA destabilization. There is a reduction of nuclear {beta}-catenin protein level by amino acid limitation. Under amino acid limitation, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was increased and the blockage of ERK1/2 by the inhibitor U0126 partially restored WNT5a mRNA level. In conclusion, amino acid limitation in colon cancer cells induces phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which then down-regulates WNT5a expression.

  14. Ascorbic Acid may Exacerbate Aspirin-Induced Increase in Intestinal Permeability.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Ivana R; Kruger, Marlena C; Hurst, Roger D; Lentle, Roger G

    2015-09-01

    Ascorbic acid in combination with aspirin has been used to prevent aspirin-induced oxidative GI damage. We aimed to determine whether ascorbic acid reduces or prevents aspirin-induced changes in intestinal permeability over a 6-hr period using saccharidic probes mannitol and lactulose. The effects of administration of 600 mg aspirin alone, 500 mg ascorbic acid alone and simultaneous dosage of both agents were compared in a cross-over study in 28 healthy female volunteers. These effects were also compared with that of a placebo. The ability of ascorbic acid to mitigate the effects of aspirin when administered either half an hour before or after dosage with aspirin was also assessed in 19 healthy female volunteers. The excretion of lactulose over the 6-hr period was augmented after consumption of either aspirin or ascorbic acid compared with that after consumption of placebo. Dosage with ascorbic acid alone augmented the excretion of lactulose more than did aspirin alone. Simultaneous dosage with both agents augmented the excretion of lactulose in an additive manner. The timing of dosage with ascorbic acid in relation to that with aspirin had no significant effect on the excretion of the two sugars. These findings indicate that ascorbic acid does not prevent aspirin-induced increase in gut permeability rather that both agents augment it to a similar extent. The additive effect on simultaneous dosage with both agents in augmenting the absorption of lactulose suggests that each influences paracellular permeability by different pathways.

  15. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhong, Wei; Li, Houkai; Li, Qiong; Qiu, Yunping; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Chen, Huiyuan; Zhao, Xueqing; Zhang, Shucha; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Zeisel, Steven H.; Jia, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the bile acid metabolism is limited by the fact that previous analyses have primarily focused on a selected few circulating bile acids; the bile acid profiles of the liver and gastrointestinal tract pools are rarely investigated. Here, we determined how chronic ethanol consumption altered the bile acids in multiple body compartments (liver, gastrointestinal tract, and serum) of rats. Rats were fed a modified Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet with 38% of calories as ethanol (the amount equivalent of 4–5 drinks in humans). While conjugated bile acids predominated in the liver (98.3%), duodenum (97.8%), and ileum (89.7%), unconjugated bile acids comprised the largest proportion of measured bile acids in serum (81.2%), the cecum (97.7%), and the rectum (97.5%). In particular, taurine-conjugated bile acids were significantly decreased in the liver and gastrointestinal tract of ethanol-treated rats, while unconjugated and glycine-conjugated species increased. Ethanol consumption caused increased expression of genes involved in bile acid biosynthesis, efflux transport, and reduced expression of genes regulating bile acid influx transport in the liver. These results provide an improved understanding of the systemic modulations of bile acid metabolism in mammals through the gut-liver axis.—Xie, G., Zhong, W., Li, H., Li, Q., Qiu, Y., Zheng, X., Chen, H., Zhao, X., Zhang, S., Zhou, Z., Zeisel, S. H., Jia, W. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption. PMID:23709616

  16. Fatty acid-induced changes in vascular reactivity in healthy adult rats.

    PubMed

    Christon, Raymond; Marette, André; Badeau, Mylène; Bourgoin, Frédéric; Mélançon, Sébastien; Bachelard, Hélène

    2005-12-01

    Dietary fatty acids (FAs) are known to modulate endothelial dysfunction, which is the first stage of atherosclerosis. However, their exact role in this initial phase is still unclear. The effects of isolated or combined (by 2) purified FAs from the main FA families were studied on the vascular response of isolated thoracic aorta in healthy rats to get a better understanding of the mechanisms of action of dietary FAs in regulating vascular endothelial function. Cumulative contraction curves to phenylephrine and relaxation curves to carbachol and then to sodium nitroprusside were obtained in the absence or presence of the FAs studied allowing endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent ability of the smooth muscle to relax to be assessed in each experimental group. The endothelium-dependent vasodilator response to carbachol was lowered by eicosapentaenoic acid, whereas it was not altered either by docosahexaenoic acid alone or by combined eicosapentaenoic acid-docosahexaenoic acid, oleic acid, or stearic acid, and it was increased by linoleic acid (LA). A decreased phenylephrine-induced contraction was observed after incubation with arachidonic acid and with stearic acid. On the other hand, the endothelium-dependent relaxation was reduced by the addition of combined LA-arachidonic acid and LA-oleic acid. In conclusion, these data point out the differential effects of different types of FAs and of FAs alone vs combined on vascular reactivity. The complex nature of these effects could be partially linked to metabolic specificities of endothelial cells and to interactions between some FAs.

  17. Sinapic Acid and Its Derivatives as Medicine in Oxidative Stress-Induced Diseases and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunye

    2016-01-01

    Sinapic acid (3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) is an orally bioavailable phytochemical, extensively found in spices, citrus and berry fruits, vegetables, cereals, and oilseed crops and is known to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antimutagenic, antiglycemic, neuroprotective, and antibacterial activities. The literature reveals that sinapic acid is a bioactive phenolic acid and has the potential to attenuate various chemically induced toxicities. This minireview is an effort to summarize the available literature about pharmacokinetic, therapeutic, and protective potential of this versatile molecule in health related areas. PMID:27069529

  18. Silybin from Silybum Marianum Seeds Inhibits Confluent-Induced Keratinocytes Differentiation as Effectively as Retinoic Acid without Inducing Inflammatory Cytokine.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Seiji; Yamaguchi, Kohji

    2009-09-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) has been effective for improving wrinkles. However, it has also been reported that RA induces skin irritation. In this study, we explored new botanical compounds that show RA-like activity, but do not induce inflammation in vitro. Keratinocytes were maintained in a confluent condition and induced differentiation. Under this condition keratinocytes were treated with many botanical extracts and their morphological change were observed and compared with RA-treated. We found that silybin, which is a major flavonolignan from Silybum Marianum seeds, induced RA-like morphological change and prevented differentiation. We showed that silybin, like RA, reduced the expression of keratinocyte terminal differentiation markers and stimulated the expression of basement membrane component proteins. In contrast, silybin, unlike RA, did not stimulate the secretion of IL-1alpha, which is a skin irritation mediator. These results suggest that silybin has RA-like activity on keratinocytes and has the potential to improve winkle without inducing skin irritation.

  19. Ameliorative Effect of Chronic Supplementation of Protocatechuic Acid Alone and in Combination with Ascorbic Acid in Aniline Hydrochloride Induced Spleen Toxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Upasana; Upaganlawar, Aman; Upasani, Chandrashekhar

    2016-01-01

    Background. Present study was designed to evaluate the protective effects of protocatechuic acid alone and in combination with ascorbic acid in aniline hydrochloride induced spleen toxicity in rats. Materials and Methods. Male Wistar rats of either sex (200-250 g) were used and divided into different groups. Spleen toxicity was induced by aniline hydrochloride (100 ppm) in drinking water for a period of 28 days. Treatment group received protocatechuic acid (40 mg/kg/day, p.o.), ascorbic acid (40 mg/kg/day, p.o.), and combination of protocatechuic acid (20 mg/kg/day, p.o.) and ascorbic acid (20 mg/kg/day, p.o.) followed by aniline hydrochloride. At the end of treatment period serum and tissue parameters were evaluated. Result. Rats supplemented with aniline hydrochloride showed a significant alteration in body weight, spleen weight, feed consumption, water intake, hematological parameters (haemoglobin content, red blood cells, white blood cells, and total iron content), tissue parameters (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, and nitric oxide content), and membrane bound phosphatase (ATPase) compared to control group. Histopathology of aniline hydrochloride induced spleen showed significant damage compared to control rats. Treatment with protocatechuic acid along with ascorbic acid showed better protection as compared to protocatechuic acid or ascorbic acid alone in aniline hydrochloride induced spleen toxicity. Conclusion. Treatment with protocatechuic acid and ascorbic acid in combination showed significant protection in aniline hydrochloride induced splenic toxicity in rats. PMID:27418998

  20. Ameliorative Effect of Chronic Supplementation of Protocatechuic Acid Alone and in Combination with Ascorbic Acid in Aniline Hydrochloride Induced Spleen Toxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Upasana; Upaganlawar, Aman; Upasani, Chandrashekhar

    2016-01-01

    Background. Present study was designed to evaluate the protective effects of protocatechuic acid alone and in combination with ascorbic acid in aniline hydrochloride induced spleen toxicity in rats. Materials and Methods. Male Wistar rats of either sex (200-250 g) were used and divided into different groups. Spleen toxicity was induced by aniline hydrochloride (100 ppm) in drinking water for a period of 28 days. Treatment group received protocatechuic acid (40 mg/kg/day, p.o.), ascorbic acid (40 mg/kg/day, p.o.), and combination of protocatechuic acid (20 mg/kg/day, p.o.) and ascorbic acid (20 mg/kg/day, p.o.) followed by aniline hydrochloride. At the end of treatment period serum and tissue parameters were evaluated. Result. Rats supplemented with aniline hydrochloride showed a significant alteration in body weight, spleen weight, feed consumption, water intake, hematological parameters (haemoglobin content, red blood cells, white blood cells, and total iron content), tissue parameters (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, and nitric oxide content), and membrane bound phosphatase (ATPase) compared to control group. Histopathology of aniline hydrochloride induced spleen showed significant damage compared to control rats. Treatment with protocatechuic acid along with ascorbic acid showed better protection as compared to protocatechuic acid or ascorbic acid alone in aniline hydrochloride induced spleen toxicity. Conclusion. Treatment with protocatechuic acid and ascorbic acid in combination showed significant protection in aniline hydrochloride induced splenic toxicity in rats.

  1. Ameliorative Effect of Chronic Supplementation of Protocatechuic Acid Alone and in Combination with Ascorbic Acid in Aniline Hydrochloride Induced Spleen Toxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Khairnar, Upasana; Upaganlawar, Aman; Upasani, Chandrashekhar

    2016-01-01

    Background. Present study was designed to evaluate the protective effects of protocatechuic acid alone and in combination with ascorbic acid in aniline hydrochloride induced spleen toxicity in rats. Materials and Methods. Male Wistar rats of either sex (200–250 g) were used and divided into different groups. Spleen toxicity was induced by aniline hydrochloride (100 ppm) in drinking water for a period of 28 days. Treatment group received protocatechuic acid (40 mg/kg/day, p.o.), ascorbic acid (40 mg/kg/day, p.o.), and combination of protocatechuic acid (20 mg/kg/day, p.o.) and ascorbic acid (20 mg/kg/day, p.o.) followed by aniline hydrochloride. At the end of treatment period serum and tissue parameters were evaluated. Result. Rats supplemented with aniline hydrochloride showed a significant alteration in body weight, spleen weight, feed consumption, water intake, hematological parameters (haemoglobin content, red blood cells, white blood cells, and total iron content), tissue parameters (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, and nitric oxide content), and membrane bound phosphatase (ATPase) compared to control group. Histopathology of aniline hydrochloride induced spleen showed significant damage compared to control rats. Treatment with protocatechuic acid along with ascorbic acid showed better protection as compared to protocatechuic acid or ascorbic acid alone in aniline hydrochloride induced spleen toxicity. Conclusion. Treatment with protocatechuic acid and ascorbic acid in combination showed significant protection in aniline hydrochloride induced splenic toxicity in rats. PMID:27418998

  2. The Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Arachidonic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid Induce Mouse Dendritic Cells Maturation but Reduce T-Cell Responses In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Johan A.; Wold, Agnes E.; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie; Östman, Sofia M.

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) might regulate T-cell activation and lineage commitment. Here, we measured the effects of omega-3 (n-3), n-6 and n-9 fatty acids on the interaction between dendritic cells (DCs) and naïve T cells. Spleen DCs from BALB/c mice were cultured in vitro with ovalbumin (OVA) with 50 μM fatty acids; α-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid (AA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), linoleic acid or oleic acid and thereafter OVA-specific DO11.10 T cells were added to the cultures. Fatty acids were taken up by the DCs, as shown by gas chromatography analysis. After culture with arachidonic acid or DHA CD11c+ CD11b+ and CD11c+ CD11bneg DCs expressed more CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86 and PDL-1, while IAd remained unchanged. However, fewer T cells co-cultured with these DCs proliferated (CellTrace Violetlow) and expressed CD69 or CD25, while more were necrotic (7AAD+). We noted an increased proportion of T cells with a regulatory T cell (Treg) phenotype, i.e., when gating on CD4+ FoxP3+ CTLA-4+, CD4+ FoxP3+ Helios+ or CD4+ FoxP3+ PD-1+, in co-cultures with arachidonic acid- or DHA-primed DCs relative to control cultures. The proportion of putative Tregs was inversely correlated to T-cell proliferation, indicating a suppressive function of these cells. With arachidonic acid DCs produced higher levels of prostaglandin E2 while T cells produced lower amounts of IL-10 and IFNγ. In conclusion arachidonic acid and DHA induced up-regulation of activation markers on DCs. However arachidonic acid- and DHA-primed DCs reduced T-cell proliferation and increased the proportion of T cells expressing FoxP3, indicating that these fatty acids can promote induction of regulatory T cells. PMID:26619195

  3. Congenital malformations induced by mescaline, lysergic acid diethylamide, and bromolysergic acid in the hamster.

    PubMed

    Geber, W F

    1967-10-13

    Malformations of the brain, spinal cord, liver, and other viscera; body edema; and localized hemorrhages were found in fetal hamsters from mothers injected subcutaneously with a single dose of mescaline, lysergic acid diethylamide, or 2-bromo-D lysergic acid diethylamide on the 8th day of pregnancy. In addition, all three drugs produced an increase in the percentages of small fetuses per litter, of resorptions, and of fetal mortality.

  4. Myristic acid potentiates palmitic acid-induced lipotoxicity and steatohepatitis associated with lipodystrophy by sustaning de novo ceramide synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Laura; Torres, Sandra; Baulies, Anna; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Elena, Montserrat; Fabriàs, Gemma; Casas, Josefina; Caballeria, Joan; Fernandez-Checa, Jose C.; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Palmitic acid (PA) induces hepatocyte apoptosis and fuels de novo ceramide synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Myristic acid (MA), a free fatty acid highly abundant in copra/palmist oils, is a predictor of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and stimulates ceramide synthesis. Here we investigated the synergism between MA and PA in ceramide synthesis, ER stress, lipotoxicity and NASH. Unlike PA, MA is not lipotoxic but potentiated PA-mediated lipoapoptosis, ER stress, caspase-3 activation and cytochrome c release in primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH). Moreover, MA kinetically sustained PA-induced total ceramide content by stimulating dehydroceramide desaturase and switched the ceramide profile from decreased to increased ceramide 14:0/ceramide16:0, without changing medium and long-chain ceramide species. PMH were more sensitive to equimolar ceramide14:0/ceramide16:0 exposure, which mimics the outcome of PA plus MA treatment on ceramide homeostasis, than to either ceramide alone. Treatment with myriocin to inhibit ceramide synthesis and tauroursodeoxycholic acid to prevent ER stress ameliorated PA plus MA induced apoptosis, similar to the protection afforded by the antioxidant BHA, the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-Fmk and JNK inhibition. Moreover, ruthenium red protected PMH against PA and MA-induced cell death. Recapitulating in vitro findings, mice fed a diet enriched in PA plus MA exhibited lipodystrophy, hepatosplenomegaly, increased liver ceramide content and cholesterol levels, ER stress, liver damage, inflammation and fibrosis compared to mice fed diets enriched in PA or MA alone. The deleterious effects of PA plus MA-enriched diet were largely prevented by in vivo myriocin treatment. These findings indicate a causal link between ceramide synthesis and ER stress in lipotoxicity, and imply that the consumption of diets enriched in MA and PA can cause NASH associated with lipodystrophy. PMID:26539645

  5. Myristic acid potentiates palmitic acid-induced lipotoxicity and steatohepatitis associated with lipodystrophy by sustaning de novo ceramide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Laura; Torres, Sandra; Baulies, Anna; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Elena, Montserrat; Fabriàs, Gemma; Casas, Josefina; Caballeria, Joan; Fernandez-Checa, Jose C; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2015-12-01

    Palmitic acid (PA) induces hepatocyte apoptosis and fuels de novo ceramide synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Myristic acid (MA), a free fatty acid highly abundant in copra/palmist oils, is a predictor of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and stimulates ceramide synthesis. Here we investigated the synergism between MA and PA in ceramide synthesis, ER stress, lipotoxicity and NASH. Unlike PA, MA is not lipotoxic but potentiated PA-mediated lipoapoptosis, ER stress, caspase-3 activation and cytochrome c release in primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH). Moreover, MA kinetically sustained PA-induced total ceramide content by stimulating dehydroceramide desaturase and switched the ceramide profile from decreased to increased ceramide 14:0/ceramide16:0, without changing medium and long-chain ceramide species. PMH were more sensitive to equimolar ceramide14:0/ceramide16:0 exposure, which mimics the outcome of PA plus MA treatment on ceramide homeostasis, than to either ceramide alone. Treatment with myriocin to inhibit ceramide synthesis and tauroursodeoxycholic acid to prevent ER stress ameliorated PA plus MA induced apoptosis, similar to the protection afforded by the antioxidant BHA, the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-Fmk and JNK inhibition. Moreover, ruthenium red protected PMH against PA and MA-induced cell death. Recapitulating in vitro findings, mice fed a diet enriched in PA plus MA exhibited lipodystrophy, hepatosplenomegaly, increased liver ceramide content and cholesterol levels, ER stress, liver damage, inflammation and fibrosis compared to mice fed diets enriched in PA or MA alone. The deleterious effects of PA plus MA-enriched diet were largely prevented by in vivo myriocin treatment. These findings indicate a causal link between ceramide synthesis and ER stress in lipotoxicity, and imply that the consumption of diets enriched in MA and PA can cause NASH associated with lipodystrophy.

  6. Castor oil induces laxation and uterus contraction via ricinoleic acid activating prostaglandin EP3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Tunaru, Sorin; Althoff, Till F; Nüsing, Rolf M; Diener, Martin; Offermanns, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Castor oil is one of the oldest drugs. When given orally, it has a laxative effect and induces labor in pregnant females. The effects of castor oil are mediated by ricinoleic acid, a hydroxylated fatty acid released from castor oil by intestinal lipases. Despite the wide-spread use of castor oil in conventional and folk medicine, the molecular mechanism by which ricinoleic acid acts remains unknown. Here we show that the EP(3) prostanoid receptor is specifically activated by ricinoleic acid and that it mediates the pharmacological effects of castor oil. In mice lacking EP(3) receptors, the laxative effect and the uterus contraction induced via ricinoleic acid are absent. Although a conditional deletion of the EP(3) receptor gene in intestinal epithelial cells did not affect castor oil-induced diarrhea, mice lacking EP(3) receptors only in smooth-muscle cells were unresponsive to this drug. Thus, the castor oil metabolite ricinoleic acid activates intestinal and uterine smooth-muscle cells via EP(3) prostanoid receptors. These findings identify the cellular and molecular mechanism underlying the pharmacological effects of castor oil and indicate a role of the EP(3) receptor as a target to induce laxative effects.

  7. Ascorbic acid protects against cadmium-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and germ cell apoptosis in testes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yan-Li; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Mei; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Meng, Xiu-Hong; Xu, De-Xiang

    2012-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a testicular toxicant which induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and germ cell apoptosis in testes. This study investigated the effects of ascorbic acid on Cd-evoked ER stress and germ cell apoptosis in testes. Male mice were intraperitoneally injected with CdCl(2) (2.0 mg/kg). As expected, a single dose of Cd induced testicular germ cell apoptosis. Interestingly, Cd-triggered testicular germ cell apoptosis was almost completely inhibited in mice treated with ascorbic acid. Interestingly, ascorbic acid significantly attenuated Cd-induced upregulation of GRP78 in testes. In addition, ascorbic acid significantly attenuated Cd-triggered testicular IRE1α and eIF2α phosphorylation and XBP-1 activation, indicating that this antioxidant counteracts Cd-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) in testes. Finally, ascorbic acid significantly attenuated Cd-evoked upregulation of CHOP and JNK phosphorylation, two components in ER stress-mediated apoptotic pathway. In conclusion, ascorbic acid protects mice from Cd-triggered germ cell apoptosis via inhibiting ER stress and UPR in testes. PMID:22569276

  8. The role of superoxide in xanthine oxidase-induced autooxidation of linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M J; Mehl, K S; Pryor, W A

    1982-07-25

    The effect of hydroxyperoxyoctadecadienoic acid, e.g. 13-hydroperoxy-cis,9,trans-11-octadecadienoic acid, on the autooxidation of linoleic acid induced by superoxide radical was examined in a system containing xanthine oxidase, acetaldehyde, and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid dissolved in an aqueous phosphate buffer containing 10% ethanol. The superoxide radical is required for autooxidation, as shown by essentially complete inhibition on the addition of superoxide dismutase. Pure linoleic acid was not readily oxidized, but the addition of lipid hydroperoxide markedly stimulated the autooxidation. Addition of 2.8 microM FeCl3 did not produce an increase in the rate of xanthine oxidase-induced autooxidation. Spontaneous autooxidation, a process slower than xanthine oxidase-induced autooxidation, was detectable on the time scale of these observations but was slower than the xanthine oxidase-induced autooxidation. Initiation of linoleic acid autooxidation is postulated to result from a reaction between superoxide and lipid hydroperoxide. The nature of this reaction is uncertain, but it does not appear to depend on iron catalysis. PMID:6282880

  9. Caffeic acid attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced sickness behaviour and neuroinflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Basu Mallik, Sanchari; Mudgal, Jayesh; Nampoothiri, Madhavan; Hall, Susan; Dukie, Shailendra Anoopkumar-; Grant, Gary; Rao, C Mallikarjuna; Arora, Devinder

    2016-10-01

    Accumulating data links inflammation, oxidative stress and immune system in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorders. Sickness behaviour is a set of behavioural changes that develop during infection, eventually leading to decrease in mobility and depressed behaviour. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces a depression-like state in animals that mimics sickness behaviour. Caffeic acid, a naturally occurring polyphenol, possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study was designed to explore the potential of caffeic acid against LPS-induced sickness behaviour in mice. Caffeic acid (30mg/kg) and imipramine (15mg/kg) were administered orally one hour prior to LPS (1.5mg/kg) challenge. Behavioural assessment was carried out between 1 and 2h and blood samples were collected at 3h post-LPS injection. Additionally, cytokines (brain and serum) and brain oxidative stress markers were estimated. LPS increased the systemic and brain cytokine levels, altered the anti-oxidant defence and produced key signs of sickness behaviour in animals. Caffeic acid treatment significantly reduced the LPS-induced changes, including reduced expression of inflammatory markers in serum and whole brain. Caffeic acid also exerted an anti-oxidant effect, which was evident from the decreased levels of oxidative stress markers in whole brain. Our data suggests that caffeic acid can prevent the neuroinflammation-induced acute and probably the long term neurodegenerative changes.

  10. vir-Gene-inducing activities of hydroxycinnamic acid amides in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, K; Buret, D; Guerin, B; Delay, D; Negrel, J; Delmotte, F M

    1998-11-20

    Expression of Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence genes and transformation of dicots by this organism are dependent upon host plant phenolic compounds. Several alkylsyringamides have recently been shown to be powerful inducers of these vir-genes. These synthetic amides, and especially ethylsyringamide, are much stronger inducers than syringic acid. In this work, four alkylamides derived from ferulic or sinapic acids were synthesized by a dicyclohexylcarbodiimide method and tested for their potential to induce vir-gene expression on A. tumefaciens strains harbouring virB::lacZ or virE::lacZ fusion plasmids. Their effectiveness was compared to that of ethylsyringamide and tyraminylferulamide, a naturally occurring amide in plants. Whatever the amine moiety of the amide (ethylamine, propylamine, tyramine or beta-alanine ethyl ester) conjugation of the acid functional group clearly diminished the toxicity to the bacteria of the respective acid at high concentration and thereby increased the vir-inducing potential. However, none of the inducers tested exhibited higher activity than acetosyringone, the reference compound for vir-gene induction, with the exception of ethylsyringamide at concentrations above 1mM. When tested on Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain A348(pSM243cd), ethylferulamide and ethylsinapamide were more efficient than the corresponding phenolic acids but only above 100 microM. PMID:11711062

  11. Salicylic acid and gentisic acid induce RNA silencing-related genes and plant resistance to RNA pathogens.

    PubMed

    Campos, Laura; Granell, Pablo; Tárraga, Susana; López-Gresa, Pilar; Conejero, Vicente; Bellés, José María; Rodrigo, Ismael; Lisón, Purificación

    2014-04-01

    We have observed that treatments with salicylic acid (SA) or gentisic acid (GA) induced resistance to RNA pathogens such as ToMV and CEVd in tomato and Gynura auriantiaca, respectively. Accumulation of SA and GA has been found to occur in plants infected by these pathogens, thus pointing out a possible defence role of both molecules. To study the molecular basis of the observed induced resistance to RNA pathogens the induction of silencing-related genes by SA and GA was considered. For that purpose, we searched for tomato genes which were orthologous to those described in Arabidopsis thaliana, such as AtDCL1, AtDCL2, AtDCL4, AtRDR1, AtRDR2 and AtRDR6, and we tracked their induction in tomato along virus and viroid infections. We observed that CEVd significantly induced all these genes in tomato, with the exception of ToRDR6, being the induction of ToDCL4 the most outstanding. Regarding the ToMV asymptomatic infection, with the exception of ToRDR2, we observed a significant induction of all the indicated silencing-related genes, being ToDCL2 the most induced gene. Subsequently, we analyzed their transcriptional activation by SA and at the time when ToMV was inoculated on plants. ToDCL2, ToRDR1 and ToRDR2 were significantly induced by both SA and GA, whereas ToDCL1 was only induced by SA. Such an induction resulted more effective by SA treatment, which is in agreement with the stronger SA-induced resistance observed. Our results suggest that the observed delay in the RNA pathogen accumulation could be due to the pre-induction of RNA silencing-related genes by SA or GA.

  12. Protective effect of bile acid derivatives in phalloidin-induced rat liver toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Herraez, Elisa; Macias, Rocio I.R.; Vazquez-Tato, Jose; Hierro, Carlos; Monte, Maria J.; Marin, Jose J.G.

    2009-08-15

    Phalloidin causes severe liver damage characterized by marked cholestasis, which is due in part to irreversible polymerization of actin filaments. Liver uptake of this toxin through the transporter OATP1B1 is inhibited by the bile acid derivative BALU-1, which does not inhibit the sodium-dependent bile acid transporter NTCP. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether BALU-1 prevents liver uptake of phalloidin without impairing endogenous bile acid handling and hence may have protective effects against the hepatotoxicity induced by this toxin. In anaesthetized rats, i.v. administration of BALU-1 increased bile flow more than taurocholic acid (TCA). Phalloidin administration decreased basal (- 60%) and TCA-stimulated bile flow (- 55%) without impairing bile acid output. Phalloidin-induced cholestasis was accompanied by liver necrosis, nephrotoxicity and haematuria. In BALU-1-treated animals, phalloidin-induced cholestasis was partially prevented. Moreover haematuria was not observed, which was consistent with histological evidences of BALU-1-prevented injury of liver and kidney tissue. HPLC-MS/MS analysis revealed that BALU-1 was secreted in bile mainly in non-conjugated form, although a small proportion (< 5%) of tauro-BALU-1 was detected. BALU-1 did not inhibit the biliary secretion of endogenous bile acids. When highly choleretic bile acids, - ursodeoxycholic (UDCA) and dehydrocholic acid (DHCA) - were administered, they were found less efficient than BALU-1 in preventing phalloidin-induced cholestasis. Biliary phalloidin elimination was low but it was increased by BALU-1 > TCA > DHCA > UDCA. In conclusion, BALU-1 is able to protect against phalloidin-induced hepatotoxicity, probably due to an inhibition of the liver uptake and an enhanced biliary secretion of this toxin.

  13. Rapid attenuation of receptor-induced diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid by phospholipase D-mediated transphosphatidylation: formation of bisphosphatidic acid.

    PubMed Central

    van Blitterswijk, W J; Hilkmann, H

    1993-01-01

    Generation and attenuation of lipid second messengers are key processes in cellular signalling. Receptor-mediated increase in 1,2-diacylglycerol (DG) levels is attenuated by DG kinase and DG lipase. We here report a novel mechanism of DG attenuation by phospholipase D (PLD), which also precludes the production of another (putative) second messenger, phosphatidic acid (PA). In the presence of an alcohol, PLD converts phosphatidylcholine (PC) into a phosphatidylalcohol (by transphosphatidylation) rather than into PA. We found in bradykinin-stimulated human fibroblasts that PLD mediates transphosphatidylation from PC (donor) to the endogenous 'alcohol' DG (acceptor), yielding bis(1,2-diacylglycero)-3-sn-phosphate (bisphosphatidic acid; bisPA). This uncommon phospholipid is thus a condensation product of the phospholipase C (PLC) and PLD signalling pathways, where PLC produces DG and PLD couples this DG to a phosphatidyl moiety. Long-term phorbol ester treatment blocks bradykinin-induced activation of PLD and consequent bisPA formation, thereby unveiling rapid formation of DG. BisPA formation is rapid (15 s) and transient (peaks at 2-10 min) and is also induced by other stimuli capable of raising DG and activating PLD simultaneously, e.g. endothelin, lysophosphatidic acid, fetal calf serum, phorbol ester, dioctanoylglycerol or bacterial PLC. This novel metabolic route counteracts rapid accumulation of receptor-induced DG and PA, and assigns for the first time a physiological role to the transphosphatidylation activity of PLD, that is signal attenuation. Images PMID:8392931

  14. Polyunsaturated fatty acids in the blood of spontaneously or induced muricidal male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Augier, S; Penes, M C; Debilly, G; Miachon, A S

    2003-04-15

    Serum levels of several n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids were compared in male Wistar muricidal (Mu) and non-Mu rats. The Mu behavior was either spontaneous or induced by long-term isolation, feeding with a starch-enriched polyunsaturated fatty acid diet (PUFA+S), water restriction, or adrenalectomy (ADX). Arachidonic acid (ARA) levels were lower in diet-induced (PUFA+S) Mu rats than in their non-Mu controls. Total n-6 fatty acid levels were also lower in spontaneously Mu rats than in spontaneously non-Mu rats. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and total n-3 fatty acids levels were lower in rats with isolation-induced Mu behavior. The n-3/n-6 ratio was higher in spontaneously Mu rats than in spontaneously non-Mu rats. The changes in ARA levels were greater than those in DHA levels, possibly due to the higher blood-brain barrier passage of arachidonic acid. The results were analyzed in the light of recent results showing a role of PUFAs in human and animal behavior. PMID:12725904

  15. Amelioration of cyclophosphamide induced myelosuppression and oxidative stress by cinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Patra, Kartick; Bose, Samadrita; Sarkar, Shehnaz; Rakshit, Jyotirmoy; Jana, Samarjit; Mukherjee, Avik; Roy, Abhishek; Mandal, Deba Prasad; Bhattacharjee, Shamee

    2012-02-01

    Cinnamic acid (C9H8O2), is a major constituent of the oriental Ayurvedic plant Cinnamomum cassia (Family: Lauraceae). This phenolic acid has been reported to possess various pharmacological properties of which its antioxidant activity is a prime one. Therefore it is rational to hypothesize that it may ameliorate myelosuppression and oxidative stress induced by cyclophosphamide, a widely used chemotherapeutic agent. Commercial cyclophosphamide, Endoxan, was administered intraperitoneally to Swiss albino mice (50mg/kg) pretreated with 15, 30 and 60mg/kg doses of cinnamic acid orally at alternate days for 15days. Cinnamic acid pre-treatment was found to reduce cyclophosphamide induced hypocellularity in the bone marrow and spleen. This recovery was also reflected in the peripheral blood count. Amelioration of hypocellularity could be correlated with the modulation of cell cycle phase distribution. Cinnamic acid pre-treatment reduced bone marrow and hepatic oxidative stress as evident by lipid peroxidation and activity assays of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase. The present study indicates that cinnamic acid pretreatment has protective influence on the myelosuppression and oxidative stress induced by cyclophosphamide. This investigation is an attempt and is the first of its kind to establish cinnamic acid as an agent whose consumption provides protection to normal cells from the toxic effects of a widely used anti-cancer drug.

  16. Adipokines enhance oleic acid-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells by inducing CD36 expression.

    PubMed

    Schlich, Raphaela; Lamers, Daniela; Eckel, Jürgen; Sell, Henrike

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue is not only releasing lipids but also various adipokines that are both dysregulated in the obese state and may contribute to obesity-associated vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular risk. We have previously shown that the combination of adipocyte-conditioned medium (CM) and oleic acid (OA) increases proliferation of human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in a synergistic way. We identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as a component within CM that is responsible for most of the observed effects. In this study, we investigate novel mechanisms that underlie the combined effects of adipokine and oleic acid-induced proliferation of VSMC. Oleic acid leads to significant lipid accumulation in VSMC that is further enhanced by the combined treatment with CM. Accordingly CM stimulates CD36 expression in VSMC while OA is not affecting CD36. Silencing of CD36 was established and prevents lipid accumulation in all tested conditions. CD36 silencing also abrogates CM- and OA-induced proliferation and considerably reduces proliferation induced by the combination of CM and OA. At the same time, VEGF secretion and VEGF-receptor 1 (VEGF-R1) by VSMC was not affected by CD36 silencing. However, VEGF was not able to induce any proliferation in VSMC after CD36 silencing that also blunted VEGF-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation. Finally, combined silencing of CD36 together with a blocking antibody against VEGF prevented most of CMOA-induced proliferation. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that CD36 is mediating CM-induced proliferation of VSMC. Induction of CD36 by adipokines enhances the response of VSMC towards VEGF and OA.

  17. Salicylic acid-induced resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici in tomato.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sudhamoy; Mallick, Nirupama; Mitra, Adinpunya

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrated that exogenous application of 200 microM salicylic acid through root feeding and foliar spray could induce resistance against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. Lycopersici (Fol) in tomato. Endogenous accumulation of free salicylic acid in tomato roots was detected by HPLC and identification was confirmed by LC-MS/MS analysis. At 168h of salicylic acid treatment through roots, the endogenous salicylic acid level in the roots increased to 1477ngg(-1) FW which was 10 times higher than control plants. Similarly, the salicylic acid content was 1001ngg(-1) FW at 168h of treatment by foliar spray, which was 8.7 times higher than control plants. The activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5) and peroxidase (POD, EC 1.11.1.7) were 5.9 and 4.7 times higher, respectively than the control plants at 168h of salicylic acid feeding through the roots. The increase in PAL and POD activities was 3.7 and 3.3 times higher, respectively at 168h of salicylic acid treatments through foliar spray than control plants. The salicylic acid-treated tomato plants challenged with Fol exhibited significantly reduced vascular browning and leaf yellowing wilting. The mycelial growth of Fol was not significantly affected by salicylic acid. Significant increase in basal level of salicylic acid in noninoculated plants indicated that tomato root system might have the capacity to assimilate and distribute salicylic acid throughout the plant. The results indicated that the induced resistance observed in tomato against Fol might be a case of salicylic acid-dependent systemic acquired resistance.

  18. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition potentiates amino acid- and bile acid-induced bicarbonate secretion in rat duodenum.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takuya; Wang, Joon-Ho; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Rudenkyy, Sergiy; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Guth, Paul H; Engel, Eli; Kaunitz, Jonathan D; Akiba, Yasutada

    2012-10-01

    Intestinal endocrine cells release gut hormones, including glucagon-like peptides (GLPs), in response to luminal nutrients. Luminal L-glutamate (L-Glu) and 5'-inosine monophosphate (IMP) synergistically increases duodenal HCO3- secretion via GLP-2 release. Since L cells express the bile acid receptor TGR5 and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV rapidly degrades GLPs, we hypothesized that luminal amino acids or bile acids stimulate duodenal HCO3- secretion via GLP-2 release, which is enhanced by DPPIV inhibition. We measured HCO3- secretion with pH and CO2 electrodes using a perfused rat duodenal loop under isoflurane anesthesia. L-Glu (10 mM) and IMP (0.1 mM) were luminally coperfused with or without luminal perfusion (0.1 mM) or intravenous (iv) injection (3 μmol/kg) of the DPPIV inhibitor NVP728. The loop was also perfused with a selective TGR5 agonist betulinic acid (BTA, 10 μM) or the non-bile acid type TGR5 agonist 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N,5-dimethylisoxazole-4-carboxamide (CCDC; 10 μM). DPPIV activity visualized by use of the fluorogenic substrate was present on the duodenal brush border and submucosal layer, both abolished by the incubation with NVP728 (0.1 mM). An iv injection of NVP728 enhanced L-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3- secretion, whereas luminal perfusion of NVP728 had no effect. BTA or CCDC had little effect on HCO3- secretion, whereas NVP728 iv markedly enhanced BTA- or CCDC-induced HCO3- secretion, the effects inhibited by a GLP-2 receptor antagonist. Coperfusion of the TGR5 agonist enhanced L-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3- secretion with the enhanced GLP-2 release, suggesting that TGR5 activation amplifies nutrient sensing signals. DPPIV inhibition potentiated luminal L-Glu/IMP-induced and TGR5 agonist-induced HCO3- secretion via a GLP-2 pathway, suggesting that the modulation of the local concentration of the endogenous secretagogue GLP-2 by luminal compounds and DPPIV inhibition helps regulate protective duodenal HCO3- secretion.

  19. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition potentiates amino acid- and bile acid-induced bicarbonate secretion in rat duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takuya; Wang, Joon-Ho; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Rudenkyy, Sergiy; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Guth, Paul H.; Engel, Eli; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal endocrine cells release gut hormones, including glucagon-like peptides (GLPs), in response to luminal nutrients. Luminal l-glutamate (l-Glu) and 5′-inosine monophosphate (IMP) synergistically increases duodenal HCO3− secretion via GLP-2 release. Since L cells express the bile acid receptor TGR5 and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV rapidly degrades GLPs, we hypothesized that luminal amino acids or bile acids stimulate duodenal HCO3− secretion via GLP-2 release, which is enhanced by DPPIV inhibition. We measured HCO3− secretion with pH and CO2 electrodes using a perfused rat duodenal loop under isoflurane anesthesia. l-Glu (10 mM) and IMP (0.1 mM) were luminally coperfused with or without luminal perfusion (0.1 mM) or intravenous (iv) injection (3 μmol/kg) of the DPPIV inhibitor NVP728. The loop was also perfused with a selective TGR5 agonist betulinic acid (BTA, 10 μM) or the non-bile acid type TGR5 agonist 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N,5-dimethylisoxazole-4-carboxamide (CCDC; 10 μM). DPPIV activity visualized by use of the fluorogenic substrate was present on the duodenal brush border and submucosal layer, both abolished by the incubation with NVP728 (0.1 mM). An iv injection of NVP728 enhanced l-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3− secretion, whereas luminal perfusion of NVP728 had no effect. BTA or CCDC had little effect on HCO3− secretion, whereas NVP728 iv markedly enhanced BTA- or CCDC-induced HCO3− secretion, the effects inhibited by a GLP-2 receptor antagonist. Coperfusion of the TGR5 agonist enhanced l-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3− secretion with the enhanced GLP-2 release, suggesting that TGR5 activation amplifies nutrient sensing signals. DPPIV inhibition potentiated luminal l-Glu/IMP-induced and TGR5 agonist-induced HCO3− secretion via a GLP-2 pathway, suggesting that the modulation of the local concentration of the endogenous secretagogue GLP-2 by luminal compounds and DPPIV inhibition helps regulate protective duodenal HCO3− secretion

  20. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition potentiates amino acid- and bile acid-induced bicarbonate secretion in rat duodenum.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takuya; Wang, Joon-Ho; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Rudenkyy, Sergiy; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Guth, Paul H; Engel, Eli; Kaunitz, Jonathan D; Akiba, Yasutada

    2012-10-01

    Intestinal endocrine cells release gut hormones, including glucagon-like peptides (GLPs), in response to luminal nutrients. Luminal L-glutamate (L-Glu) and 5'-inosine monophosphate (IMP) synergistically increases duodenal HCO3- secretion via GLP-2 release. Since L cells express the bile acid receptor TGR5 and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV rapidly degrades GLPs, we hypothesized that luminal amino acids or bile acids stimulate duodenal HCO3- secretion via GLP-2 release, which is enhanced by DPPIV inhibition. We measured HCO3- secretion with pH and CO2 electrodes using a perfused rat duodenal loop under isoflurane anesthesia. L-Glu (10 mM) and IMP (0.1 mM) were luminally coperfused with or without luminal perfusion (0.1 mM) or intravenous (iv) injection (3 μmol/kg) of the DPPIV inhibitor NVP728. The loop was also perfused with a selective TGR5 agonist betulinic acid (BTA, 10 μM) or the non-bile acid type TGR5 agonist 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N,5-dimethylisoxazole-4-carboxamide (CCDC; 10 μM). DPPIV activity visualized by use of the fluorogenic substrate was present on the duodenal brush border and submucosal layer, both abolished by the incubation with NVP728 (0.1 mM). An iv injection of NVP728 enhanced L-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3- secretion, whereas luminal perfusion of NVP728 had no effect. BTA or CCDC had little effect on HCO3- secretion, whereas NVP728 iv markedly enhanced BTA- or CCDC-induced HCO3- secretion, the effects inhibited by a GLP-2 receptor antagonist. Coperfusion of the TGR5 agonist enhanced L-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3- secretion with the enhanced GLP-2 release, suggesting that TGR5 activation amplifies nutrient sensing signals. DPPIV inhibition potentiated luminal L-Glu/IMP-induced and TGR5 agonist-induced HCO3- secretion via a GLP-2 pathway, suggesting that the modulation of the local concentration of the endogenous secretagogue GLP-2 by luminal compounds and DPPIV inhibition helps regulate protective duodenal HCO3- secretion. PMID:22821947

  1. The Potential Benefits and Adverse Effects of Phytic Acid Supplement in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Omoruyi, F. O.; Budiaman, A.; Eng, Y.; Olumese, F. E.; Hoesel, J. L.; Ejilemele, A.; Okorodudu, A. O.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effect of phytic acid supplement on streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats was investigated. Diabetic rats were fed rodent chow with or without phytic acid supplementation for thirty days. Blood and organ samples were collected for assays. The average food intake was the highest and the body weight gain was the lowest in the group fed phytic acid supplement compared to the diabetic and normal control groups. There was a downward trend in intestinal amylase activity in the group fed phytic acid supplement compared to the other groups. The spike in random blood glucose was the lowest in the same group. We noted reduced serum triglycerides and increased total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol levels in the group fed phytic acid supplement. Serum alkaline phosphatase and alanine amino transferase activities were significantly (P < 0.05) increased by phytic acid supplementation. Systemic IL-1β level was significantly (P < 0.05) elevated in the diabetic control and supplement treated groups. The liver lipogenic enzyme activities were not significantly altered among the groups. These results suggest that phytic acid supplementation may be beneficial in the management of diabetes mellitus. The observed adverse effect on the liver may be due to the combined effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes and phytic acid supplementation. PMID:24454345

  2. Ursolic acid enhances pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors via GABAergic neurotransmission in mice.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Se Jin; Park, Ho Jae; Gao, Qingtao; Pena, Irene Joy Dela; Park, Se Jin; Lee, Hyung Eun; Woo, Hyun; Kim, Hee Jin; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Hong, Eunyoung; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2015-09-01

    Prunella vulgaris is widely used as a herbal medicine for cancers, inflammatory diseases, and other infections. Although it has long been used, few studies have examined its effects on central nervous system function. Here, we first observed that ethanolic extracts of P. vulgaris (EEPV) prolonged pentobarbital-induced sleep duration in mice. It is known that EEPV consists of many active components including triterpenoid (ursolic acid and oleanolic acid), which have many biological activities. Therefore, we evaluated which EEPV components induced sleep extension in pentobarbital-mediated sleeping model in mice. Surprisingly, despite their structural similarity and other common functions such as anti-inflammation, anti-cancer, and tissue protection, only ursolic acid enhanced sleep duration in pentobarbital-treated mice. These results were attenuated by bicuculline treatment, which is a GABAA receptor antagonist. The present results suggest that ursolic acid from P. vulgaris enhances sleep duration through GABAA receptor activation and could be a therapeutic candidate for insomnia treatment.

  3. Valproic Acid-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis with Pseudocyst Formation: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Khamrui, Sujan; Kataria, Mohnish; Biswas, Jayanta; Saha, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Valproic acid is the most widely used anti-epilep­tic drug in children, and it is probably the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute pancreatitis. Outcomes for patients with valproic acid-associated pancreatitis vary from full recovery after discontinuation of the drug to severe acute pancreatitis and death. Here, we present a case of valproic acid-induced severe acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation in a 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy and generalized tonic-clonic seizure. There was no resolution of the pseudocyst after discontinuation of valproic acid. The patient became symptomatic with a progressive increase in the size of the pseudocyst. She was successfully treated with cystogastrostomy and was well at 12-month follow-up. PMID:26366333

  4. Determination of double bond location in fatty acids by manganese adduction and electron induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hyun Ju; Håkansson, Kristina

    2010-08-15

    Double bond locations in fatty acids can be determined from characteristic charge-remote fragmentation patterns of alkali metal-adducted fatty acids following high energy collision activated dissociation (CAD). With low energy CAD, several chemical derivatization methods, including ozonization, epoxidation, and hydroxylation, have been used to generate characteristic fragments. However, high energy CAD is not universally available and involves a high degree of scattering, causing product ion loss. Further, derivatization reactions involve side reactions and sample loss. Here, we analyzed metal-adducted fatty acids to investigate the utility of electron induced dissociation (EID) for determining double bond location. EID has been proposed to involve both electronic excitation, similar to high energy CAD, and vibrational excitation. Various metals (Li, Zn, Co, Ni, Mg, Ca, Fe, and Mn) were investigated to fix one charge at the carboxylate end of fatty acids to promote charge-remote fragmentation. EID of Mn(II)-adducted fatty acids allowed determination of all double bond locations of arachidonic acid, linolenic acid, oleic acid, and stearic acid. For Mn(II)-adducted fatty acids, reduced characteristic charge-remote product ion abundances at the double bond positions are indicative of double bond locations. However, other metal adducts did not generally provide characteristic product ion abundances at all double bond locations.

  5. Benfotiamine attenuates nicotine and uric acid-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction in the rat.

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Sharma, Ramica; Singh, Manjeet

    2008-01-01

    The study has been designed to investigate the effect of benfotiamine, a thiamine derivative, in nicotine and uric acid-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. Nicotine (2 mg kg(-1)day(-1), i.p., 4 weeks) and uric acid (150 mg kg(-1)day(-1), i.p., 3 weeks) were administered to produce VED in rats. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating serum and aortic concentration of nitrite/nitrate. Further, the integrity of vascular endothelium was assessed using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of thoracic aorta. Moreover, the oxidative stress was assessed by estimating serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and aortic superoxide anion generation. The administration of nicotine and uric acid produced VED by impairing the integrity of vascular endothelium and subsequently decreasing serum and aortic concentration of nitrite/nitrate and attenuating acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation. Further, nicotine and uric acid produced oxidative stress, which was assessed in terms of increase in serum TBARS and aortic superoxide generation. However, treatment with benfotiamine (70 mg kg(-1)day(-1), p.o.) or atorvastatin (30 mg kg(-1)day(-1) p.o., a standard agent) markedly prevented nicotine and uric acid-induced VED and oxidative stress by improving the integrity of vascular endothelium, increasing the concentration of serum and aortic nitrite/nitrate, enhancing the acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation and decreasing serum TBARS and aortic superoxide anion generation. Thus, it may be concluded that benfotiamine reduces the oxidative stress and consequently improves the integrity of vascular endothelium and enhances the generation of nitric oxide to prevent nicotine and uric acid-induced experimental VED. PMID:18951979

  6. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis. PMID:27598133

  7. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis. PMID:27598133

  8. Protective effect of hispidulin on kainic acid-induced seizures and neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Wang, Su Jane; Huang, Shu Kuei

    2015-05-15

    Hispidulin is a flavonoid compound which is an active ingredient in a number of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs, and it has been reported to inhibit glutamate release. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hispidulin protects against seizures induced by kainic acid, a glutamate analog with excitotoxic properties. The results indicated that intraperitoneally administering hispidulin (10 or 50mg/kg) to rats 30 min before intraperitoneally injecting kainic acid (15 mg/kg) increased seizure latency and decreased seizure score. In addition, hispidulin substantially attenuated kainic acid-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death, and this protective effect was accompanied by the suppression of microglial activation and the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus. Moreover, hispidulin reduced kainic acid-induced c-Fos expression and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the hippocampus. These data suggest that hispidulin has considerable antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and antiinflammatory effects on kainic acid-induced seizures in rats. PMID:25746462

  9. Lack of Acid Sphingomyelinase Induces Age-Related Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bill X.; Fan, Jie; Boyer, Nicholas P.; Jenkins, Russell W.; Koutalos, Yiannis; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Crosson, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) cause Niemann–Pick diseases type A and B, which are fatal inherited lipid lysosomal storage diseases, characterized with visceral organ abnormalities and neurodegeneration. However, the effects of suppressing retinal ASMase expression are not understood. The goal of this study was to determine if the disruption of ASMase expression impacts the retinal structure and function in the mouse, and begin to investigate the mechanisms underlying these abnormalities. Methods Acid sphingomyelinase knockout (ASMase KO) mice were utilized to study the roles of this sphingolipid metabolizing enzyme in the retina. Electroretinogram and morphometric analysis were used to assess the retinal function and structure at various ages. Sphingolipid profile was determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Western blots evaluated the level of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Results When compared to control animals, ASMase KO mice exhibited significant age-dependent reduction in ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes. Associated with these functional deficits, morphometric analysis revealed progressive thinning of retinal layers; however, the most prominent degeneration was observed in the photoreceptor and outer nuclear layer. Additional analyses of ASMase KO mice revealed early reduction in ERG c-wave amplitudes and increased lipofuscin accumulation in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Sphingolipid analyses showed abnormal accumulation of sphingomyelin and sphingosine in ASMase KO retinas. Western blot analyses showed a higher level of the autophagosome marker LC3-II. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that ASMase is necessary for the maintenance of normal retinal structure and function. The early outer retinal dysfunction, outer segment degeneration, accumulation of lipofuscin and autophagosome markers provide evidence that disruption of lysosomal function contributes to the age-dependent retinal degeneration exhibited by

  10. Enhancement of taxol-induced apoptosis by inhibition of NF-κB with ursorlic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunlong; Xing, Da

    2007-05-01

    Taxol is known to inhibit cell growth and triggers significant apoptosis in various cancer cells, and activation of proliferation factor NF-κB during Taxol-induced apoptosis is regarded as a main reason resulting in tumor cells resistance to Taxol. It has been found that ursorlic acid can inhibit the activation of NF-κB. In order to study whether ursorlic acid can enhance the Taxol-induced apoptosis, we use fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique and probe SCAT3 to compare the difference of caspase-3 activation between Taxol alone and Taxol combined ursorlic acid. With laser scanning confocal microscopy, we find that ursorlic acid, a nontoxic food component, sensitizes ASTC-a-1 cells more efficiently to Taxol-induced apoptosis by advanced activation of caspase 3. The result also suggests that there would be a synergistic effect between Taxol and ursorlic acid, and the more detailed mechanism of synergistic effect needs to be clarified further, such as the correlations among NF-κB, Akt, caspase 8, which leads to the advanced activation of caspase 3 during combined treatment of Taxol and ursorlic acid. Moreover, this may be a new way to improve Taxol-dependent tumor therapy.

  11. Protective effects of gallic acid against spinal cord injury-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong Hong; Wang, Zao; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Ran

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of gallic acid in oxidative stress induced during spinal cord injury (SCI). In order to measure oxidative stress, the levels of lipid peroxide, protein carbonyl, reactive oxygen species and nitrates/nitrites were determined. In addition, the antioxidant status during SCI injury and the protective role of gallic acid were investigated by determining glutathione levels as well as the activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase. Adenosine triphophatase (ATPase) enzyme activities were determined to evaluate the role of gallic acid in SCI-induced deregulation of the activity of enzymes involved in ion homeostasis. The levels of inflammatory markers such as nuclear factor (NF)-κB and cycloxygenase (COX)-2 were determined by western blot analysis. Treatment with gallic acid was observed to significantly mitigate SCI-induced oxidative stress and the inflammatory response by reducing the oxidative stress, decreasing the expression of NF-κB and COX-2 as well as increasing the antioxidant status of cells. In addition, gallic acid modulated the activity of ATPase enzymes. Thus the present study indicated that gallic acid may have a role as a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent against SCI.

  12. A West Nile virus mutant with increased resistance to acid-induced inactivation.

    PubMed

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2011-04-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for epidemics of febrile illness, meningitis, encephalitis and flaccid paralysis. WNV gains entry into host cells through endocytosis. The acid pH inside endosomes triggers rapid conformational rearrangements of the flavivirus envelope (E) glycoprotein that result in fusion of the endosomal membrane with the virion envelope. Conformational rearrangements of the E glycoprotein can be induced by acid exposure in solution in the absence of target membranes, thus causing a loss of infectivity. Following a genetic approach to study this process, a WNV mutant with increased resistance to acid-induced inactivation was isolated and its complete genome was sequenced. A single amino acid substitution, T70I, in the E glycoprotein was found to be responsible for the increased acid resistance, which was linked to an increase in the sensitivity of infection to the chemical rise of endosomal pH, suggesting that the mutant required a more acid pH inside the endosomes for fusion. No alterations in viral infection kinetics, plaque size or induced mortality rates in mice of the mutant were noted. However, by means of virus competition assays, a reduction in viral fitness under standard culture conditions was observed for the mutant. These results provide new evidence of the adaptive flexibility to environmental factors--pH variation in this case--of WNV populations. Implications of the T70I replacement on the E glycoprotein structure-function relationship are discussed.

  13. Alpha-lipoic acid prevents 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA)-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, N; Barrionuevo, M; Ramírez, M J; Del Río, J; Lasheras, B

    1999-11-26

    A single administration of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 20 mg/kg, i.p.), induced significant hyperthermia in rats and reduced 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) content and [3H]paroxetine-labeled 5-HT transporter density in the frontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus by 40-60% 1 week later. MDMA treatment also increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity in the hippocampus. Repeated administration of the metabolic antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid (100 mg/kg, i.p., b.i.d. for 2 consecutive days) 30 min prior to MDMA did not prevent the acute hyperthermia induced by the drug; however, it fully prevented the serotonergic deficits and the changes in the glial response induced by MDMA. These results further support the hypothesis that free radical formation is responsible for MDMA-induced neurotoxicity.

  14. Contributions of spinal D-amino acid oxidase to chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuai; Li, Xin-Yan; Gong, Nian; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2015-12-10

    Spinal D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) is an FAD-dependent peroxisomal flavoenzyme which mediates the conversion of neutral and polar D-amino acids (including D-serine) to the corresponding α-keto acids, and simultaneously produces hydrogen peroxide and ammonia. This study has aimed to explore the potential contributions of spinal DAAO and its mediated hydrogen peroxide/D-serine metabolism to the development of morphine-induced hyperalgesia. Bi-daily subcutaneous injections of morphine to mice over 7 days induced thermal hyperalgesia as measured by both the hot-plate and tail-immersion tests, and spinal astroglial activation with increased spinal gene expression of DAAO, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)). Subcutaneous injections of the potent DAAO inhibitor CBIO (5-chloro-benzo[D]isoxazol-3-ol) prevented and reversed the chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia. CBIO also inhibited both astrocyte activation and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Intrathecal injection of the hydrogen peroxide scavenger PBN (phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone) and of catalase completely reversed established morphine hyperalgesia, whereas subcutaneous injections of exogenous D-serine failed to alter chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia. These results provided evidence that spinal DAAO and its subsequent production of hydrogen peroxide rather than the D-serine metabolism contributed to the development of morphine-induced hyperalgesia.

  15. MLK3 promotes metabolic dysfunction induced by saturated fatty acid-enriched diet

    PubMed Central

    Gadang, Vidya; Kohli, Rohit; Myronovych, Andriy; Hui, David Y.; Perez-Tilve, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Saturated fatty acids activate the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway, resulting in chronic low-grade inflammation and the development of insulin resistance. Mixed-lineage kinase 3 (MLK3) is a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) that mediates JNK activation in response to saturated fatty acids in vitro; however, the exact mechanism for diet-induced JNK activation in vivo is not known. Here, we have used MLK3-deficient mice to examine the role of MLK3 in a saturated-fat diet model of obesity. MLK3-KO mice fed a high-fat diet enriched in medium-chain saturated fatty acids for 16 wk had decreased body fat compared with wild-type (WT) mice due to increased energy expenditure independently of food consumption and physical activity. Moreover, MLK3 deficiency attenuated palmitate-induced JNK activation and M1 polarization in bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro, and obesity induced JNK activation, macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines in vivo. In addition, loss of MLK3 improved insulin resistance and decreased hepatic steatosis. Together, these data demonstrate that MLK3 promotes saturated fatty acid-induced JNK activation in vivo and diet-induced metabolic dysfunction. PMID:23860122

  16. Gallic acid induces apoptosis in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancers by accelerating EGFR turnover.

    PubMed

    Nam, Boas; Rho, Jin Kyung; Shin, Dong-Myung; Son, Jaekyoung

    2016-10-01

    Gallic acid is a common botanic phenolic compound, which is present in plants and foods worldwide. Gallic acid is implicated in various biological processes such as cell growth and apoptosis. Indeed, gallic acid has been shown to induce apoptosis in many cancer types. However, the molecular mechanisms of gallic acid-induced apoptosis in cancer, particularly lung cancer, are still unclear. Here, we report that gallic acid induces apoptosis in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, but not in EGFR-WT NSCLC cells. Treatment with gallic acid resulted in a significant reduction in proliferation and induction of apoptosis, only in EGFR-mutant NSCLC cells. Interestingly, treatment with gallic acid led to a robust decrease in EGFR levels, which is critical for NSCLC survival. Treatment with gallic acid had no significant effect on transcription, but induced EGFR turnover. Indeed, treatment with a proteasome inhibitor dramatically reversed gallic acid-induced EGFR downregulation. Moreover, treatment with gallic acid induced EGFR turnover leading to apoptosis in EGFR-TKI (tyrosine kinase inhibitor)-resistant cell lines, which are dependent on EGFR signaling for survival. Thus, these studies suggest that gallic acid can induce apoptosis in EGFR-dependent lung cancers that are dependent on EGFR for growth and survival via acceleration of EGFR turnover.

  17. Gallic acid induces apoptosis in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancers by accelerating EGFR turnover.

    PubMed

    Nam, Boas; Rho, Jin Kyung; Shin, Dong-Myung; Son, Jaekyoung

    2016-10-01

    Gallic acid is a common botanic phenolic compound, which is present in plants and foods worldwide. Gallic acid is implicated in various biological processes such as cell growth and apoptosis. Indeed, gallic acid has been shown to induce apoptosis in many cancer types. However, the molecular mechanisms of gallic acid-induced apoptosis in cancer, particularly lung cancer, are still unclear. Here, we report that gallic acid induces apoptosis in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, but not in EGFR-WT NSCLC cells. Treatment with gallic acid resulted in a significant reduction in proliferation and induction of apoptosis, only in EGFR-mutant NSCLC cells. Interestingly, treatment with gallic acid led to a robust decrease in EGFR levels, which is critical for NSCLC survival. Treatment with gallic acid had no significant effect on transcription, but induced EGFR turnover. Indeed, treatment with a proteasome inhibitor dramatically reversed gallic acid-induced EGFR downregulation. Moreover, treatment with gallic acid induced EGFR turnover leading to apoptosis in EGFR-TKI (tyrosine kinase inhibitor)-resistant cell lines, which are dependent on EGFR signaling for survival. Thus, these studies suggest that gallic acid can induce apoptosis in EGFR-dependent lung cancers that are dependent on EGFR for growth and survival via acceleration of EGFR turnover. PMID:27597244

  18. Valproic acid sensitizes human glioma cells to gefitinib-induced autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Li, Jian-Ri; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Chen, Wen-Ying; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Wang, Wen-Yi; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2015-11-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis represent important cellular processes involved in cancer cell killing mechanisms. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor gefitinib and valproic acid have been implicated in the treatment of malignancies including glioma involving autophagic and apoptotic mechanisms. Therefore, it is interesting to investigate whether a combination of gefitinib and valproic acid shows better cancer cell killing effect on human glioma cells. We found that a nontoxic concentration of valproic acid sensitized U87 and T98G glioma cells to gefitinib cytotoxicity by inhibiting cell growth and long-term clonogenic survival. The augmented consequences were accompanied by the formation of autophagic vacuoles, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), and degradation of p62. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 but not broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor attenuated gefitinib/valproic acid-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib/valproic acid-induced autophagy was accompanied by the activation of liver kinase-B1 (LKB1)/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/ULK1. Silencing of AMPK and ULK1 suppressed gefitinib/valproic acid-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. Mechanistic studies showed that gefitinib/valproic acid increased intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and N-acetyl cysteine attenuated gefitinib/valproic acid-caused autophagy and growth inhibition. In addition to demonstrating the autophagic mechanisms of gefitinib/valproic acid, the results of this study further suggest that intracellular oxidative stress and the LKB1/AMPK signaling might be a potential target for the development of therapeutic strategy against glioma. PMID:26488897

  19. Proteomic investigation into betulinic acid-induced apoptosis of human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Pang, Qiuying; Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Aiqin; Luo, Shaman; Wang, Yang; Yan, Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid that exhibits anticancer functions in human cancer cells. This study provides evidence that betulinic acid is highly effective against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by inducing dose- and time-dependent apoptosis. The apoptotic process was further investigated using a proteomics approach to reveal protein expression changes in HeLa cells following betulinic acid treatment. Proteomic analysis revealed that there were six up- and thirty down-regulated proteins in betulinic acid-induced HeLa cells, and these proteins were then subjected to functional pathway analysis using multiple analysis software. UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decarboxylating, chain A Horf6-a novel human peroxidase enzyme that involved in redox process, was found to be down-regulated during the apoptosis process of the oxidative stress response pathway. Consistent with our results at the protein level, an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species was observed in betulinic acid-treated cells. The proteins glucose-regulated protein and cargo-selection protein TIP47, which are involved in the endoplasmic reticulum pathway, were up-regulated by betulinic acid treatment. Meanwhile, 14-3-3 family proteins, including 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε, were down-regulated in response to betulinic acid treatment, which is consistent with the decrease in expression of the target genes 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε. Furthermore, it was found that the antiapoptotic bcl-2 gene was down-regulated while the proapoptotic bax gene was up-regulated after betulinic acid treatment in HeLa cells. These results suggest that betulinic acid induces apoptosis of HeLa cells by triggering both the endoplasmic reticulum pathway and the ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

  20. Bile Acid-Induced Necrosis in Primary Human Hepatocytes and in Patients with Obstructive Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth; Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I.; Gholami, Parviz; Li, Feng; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Fan, Fang; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. PMID:25636263

  1. Arachidonic acid enhances reproduction in Daphnia magna and mitigates changes in sex ratios induced by pyriproxyfen.

    PubMed

    Ginjupalli, Gautam K; Gerard, Patrick D; Baldwin, William S

    2015-03-01

    Arachidonic acid is 1 of only 2 unsaturated fatty acids retained in the ovaries of crustaceans and an inhibitor of HR97g, a nuclear receptor expressed in adult ovaries. The authors hypothesized that, as a key fatty acid, arachidonic acid may be associated with reproduction and potentially environmental sex determination in Daphnia. Reproduction assays with arachidonic acid indicate that it alters female:male sex ratios by increasing female production. This reproductive effect only occurred during a restricted Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata diet. Next, the authors tested whether enriching a poorer algal diet (Chlorella vulgaris) with arachidonic acid enhances overall reproduction and sex ratios. Arachidonic acid enrichment of a C. vulgaris diet also enhances fecundity at 1.0 µM and 4.0 µM by 30% to 40% in the presence and absence of pyriproxyfen. This indicates that arachidonic acid is crucial in reproduction regardless of environmental sex determination. Furthermore, the data indicate that P. subcapitata may provide a threshold concentration of arachidonic acid needed for reproduction. Diet-switch experiments from P. subcapitata to C. vulgaris mitigate some, but not all, of arachidonic acid's effects when compared with a C. vulgaris-only diet, suggesting that some arachidonic acid provided by P. subcapitata is retained. In summary, arachidonic acid supplementation increases reproduction and represses pyriproxyfen-induced environmental sex determination in D. magna in restricted diets. A diet rich in arachidonic acid may provide protection from some reproductive toxicants such as the juvenile hormone agonist pyriproxyfen. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:527-535. © 2014 SETAC.

  2. Unsaturated fatty acid-induced non-canonical autophagy: unusual? or unappreciated?

    PubMed Central

    Bankaitis, Vytas A

    2015-01-01

    The breakdown of cellular components via autophagy is crucial for cellular homeostasis. In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Niso-Santano et al (2015) report the important observation that feeding cells with saturated or unsaturated fatty acids triggers mechanistically distinct autophagic responses. Feeding cells saturated fatty acid induced the canonical, BECN1/PI3K-dependent autophagy pathway. Conversely, the unsaturated fatty acid oleate triggered autophagic responses that were independent of the BECN1/PI3K complex, but that required a functional Golgi system. PMID:25762589

  3. Valproic acid defines a novel class of HDAC inhibitors inducing differentiation of transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Göttlicher, M; Minucci, S; Zhu, P; Krämer, O H; Schimpf, A; Giavara, S; Sleeman, J P; Lo Coco, F; Nervi, C; Pelicci, P G; Heinzel, T

    2001-12-17

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in transcriptional regulation and pathogenesis of cancer. Thus, HDAC inhibitors are candidate drugs for differentiation therapy of cancer. Here, we show that the well-tolerated antiepileptic drug valproic acid is a powerful HDAC inhibitor. Valproic acid relieves HDAC-dependent transcriptional repression and causes hyperacetylation of histones in cultured cells and in vivo. Valproic acid inhibits HDAC activity in vitro, most probably by binding to the catalytic center of HDACs. Most importantly, valproic acid induces differentiation of carcinoma cells, transformed hematopoietic progenitor cells and leukemic blasts from acute myeloid leukemia patients. More over, tumor growth and metastasis formation are significantly reduced in animal experiments. Therefore, valproic acid might serve as an effective drug for cancer therapy. PMID:11742974

  4. Valproic acid defines a novel class of HDAC inhibitors inducing differentiation of transformed cells

    PubMed Central

    Göttlicher, Martin; Minucci, Saverio; Zhu, Ping; Krämer, Oliver H.; Schimpf, Annemarie; Giavara, Sabrina; Sleeman, Jonathan P.; Lo Coco, Francesco; Nervi, Clara; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Heinzel, Thorsten

    2001-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in transcriptional regulation and pathogenesis of cancer. Thus, HDAC inhibitors are candidate drugs for differentiation therapy of cancer. Here, we show that the well-tolerated antiepileptic drug valproic acid is a powerful HDAC inhibitor. Valproic acid relieves HDAC-dependent transcriptional repression and causes hyperacetylation of histones in cultured cells and in vivo. Valproic acid inhibits HDAC activity in vitro, most probably by binding to the catalytic center of HDACs. Most importantly, valproic acid induces differentiation of carcinoma cells, transformed hematopoietic progenitor cells and leukemic blasts from acute myeloid leukemia patients. More over, tumor growth and metastasis formation are significantly reduced in animal experiments. Therefore, valproic acid might serve as an effective drug for cancer therapy. PMID:11742974

  5. Threshold collision-induced dissociation of hydrogen-bonded dimers of carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Jia, Beike; Angel, Laurence A; Ervin, Kent M

    2008-02-28

    Energy-resolved competitive collision-induced dissociation is used to investigate the proton-bound heterodimer anions of a series of carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, and benzoic acid) and nitrous acid with their conjugate bases. The dissociation reactions of the complexes [CH3COO.H.OOCH]-, [CH3COO.H.ONO]-, [HCOO.H. ONO]-, [C6H5COO.H.OOCH]-, and [C6H5COO.H.ONO]- are investigated using a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. Cross sections of the two dissociation channels are measured as a function of the collision energy between the complex ions and xenon target gas. Apparent relative gas-phase acidities are found by modeling the cross sections near the dissociation thresholds using statistical rate theory. Internal inconsistencies are found in the resulting relative acidities. These deviations apparently result from the formation of higher-energy conformers of the acids within the complex ions induced by double hydrogen bonding, which impedes the kinetics of dissociation to ground-state product acid conformations.

  6. Exacerbation of Alcohol-Induced Oxidative Stress in Rats by Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Iron Load

    PubMed Central

    Patere, S. N.; Majumdar, A. S.; Saraf, M. N.

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis that excessive intake of vegetable oil containing polyunsaturated fatty acids and iron load precipitate alcohol-induced liver damage was investigated in a rat model. In order to elucidate the mechanism underlying this synergism, the serum levels of iron, total protein, serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase, liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase in liver of rats treated with alcohol, polyunsaturated fatty acids and iron per se and in combination were examined. Alcohol was fed to the rats at a level of 10-30% (blood alcohol was maintained between 150-350 mg/dl by using head space gas chromatography), polyunsaturated fatty acids at a level of 15% of diet and carbonyl iron 1.5-2% of diet per se and in combination to different groups for 30 days. Hepatotoxicity was assessed by measuring serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase, which was elevated and serum total protein, which was decreased significantly in rats fed with a combination of alcohol, polyunsaturated fatty acids and iron. It was also associated with increased lipid peroxidation and disruption of antioxidant defense in combination fed rats as compared to rats fed with alcohol or polyunsaturated fatty acids or iron. The present study revealed significant exacerbation of the alcohol-induced oxidative stress in presence of polyunsaturated fatty acids and iron. PMID:22303057

  7. Toxicity induced by Basic Violet 14, Direct Red 28 and Acid Red 26 in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bing; Liu, Hong-Cui; Ou, Wen-Bin; Eilers, Grant; Zhou, Sheng-Mei; Meng, Fan-Guo; Li, Chun-Qi; Li, Yong-Quan

    2015-12-01

    Basic Violet 14, Direct Red 28 and Acid Red 26 are classified as carcinogenic dyes in the European textile ecology standard, despite insufficient toxicity data. In this study, the toxicity of these dyes was assessed in a zebrafish model, and the underlying toxic mechanisms were investigated. Basic Violet 14 and Direct Red 28 showed acute toxicity with a LC50 value at 60.63 and 476.84 µg ml(-1) , respectively, whereas the LC50 of Acid Red 26 was between 2500 and 2800 µg ml(-1) . Treatment with Basic Violet 14, Direct Red 28 and Acid Red 26 resulted in common developmental abnormalities including delayed yolk sac absorption and swimming bladder deflation. Hepatotoxicity was observed in zebrafish treated with Basic Violet 14, and cardiovascular toxicity was found in zebrafish treated with Acid Red 26 at concentrations higher than 2500 µg ml(-1) . Basic Violet 14 also caused significant up-regulation of GCLC gene expression in a dose-dependent manner whereas Acid Red 26 induced significant up-regulation of NKX2.5 and down-regulation of GATA4 at a high concentration in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that Basic Violet 14, Direct Red 28 and Acid Red 26 induce developmental and organ-specific toxicity, and oxidative stress may play a role in the hepatotoxicity of Basic Violet 14, the suppressed GATA4 expression may have a relation to the cardiovascular toxicity of Acid Red 26.

  8. Ethanol promotes saturated fatty acid-induced hepatoxicity through endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hong-Wei; Ma, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Wang, Cui-Fen; Lu, Jian; Cao, Wei; Wu, Xu-Dong

    2015-04-01

    Serum palmitic acid (PA), a type of saturated fatty acid, causes lipid accumulation and induces toxicity in hepatocytes. Ethanol (EtOH) is metabolized by the liver and induces hepatic injury and inflammation. Herein, we analyzed the effects of EtOH on PA-induced lipotoxicity in the liver. Our results indicated that EtOH aggravated PA-induced apoptosis and lipid accumulation in primary rat hepatocytes in dose-dependent manner. EtOH intensified PA-caused endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in vitro and in vivo, and the expressions of CHOP, ATF4, and XBP-1 in nucleus were significantly increased. EtOH also increased PA-caused cleaved caspase-3 in cytoplasm. In wild type and CHOP(-/-) mice treated with EtOH and high fat diet (HFD), EtOH worsened the HFD-induced liver injury and dyslipidemia, while CHOP knockout blocked toxic effects of EtOH and PA. Our study suggested that targeting UPR-signaling pathways is a promising, novel approach to reducing EtOH and saturated fatty acid-induced metabolic complications.

  9. Antagonistic effects of abscisic acid and jasmonates on salt stress-inducible transcripts in rice roots.

    PubMed Central

    Moons, A; Prinsen, E; Bauw, G; Van Montagu, M

    1997-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonates have been implicated in responses to water deficit and wounding. We compared the molecular and physiological effects of jasmonic acid (JA) (< or = 10 microM), ABA, and salt stress in roots of rice. JA markedly induced a cationic peroxidase, two novel 32- and 28-kD proteins, acidic PR-1 and PR-10 pathogenesis-related proteins, and the salt stress-responsive SalT protein in roots. Most JA-responsive proteins (JIPs) from roots also accumulated when plants were subjected to salt stress. None of the JIPs accumulated when plants were treated with ABA. JA did not induce an ABA-responsive group 3 late-embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein. Salt stress and ABA but not JA induced oslea3 transcript accumulation. By contrast, JA, ABA, and salt stress induced transcript accumulation of salT and osdrr, which encodes a rice PR-10 protein. However, ABA also negatively affected salT transcript accumulation, whereas JA negatively affected ABA-induced oslea3 transcript levels. Endogenous root ABA and methyl jasmonate levels showed a differential increase with the dose and the duration of salt stress. The results indicate that ABA and jasmonates antagonistically regulated the expression of salt stress-inducible proteins associated with water deficit or defense responses. PMID:9437865

  10. All-trans retinoic acid potentiates cisplatin-induced kidney injury in rats: impact of retinoic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Abdelrahman M; Abdelghany, Tamer M; Akool, El-Sayed; Abdel-Aziz, Abdel-Aziz H; Abdel-Bakky, Mohamed S

    2016-03-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diammine dichloroplatinum (II), CDDP) is a widely used drug for treatment of various types of cancers. However, CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity remains the main dose-limiting side effect. Retinoids are a group of vitamin A-related compounds that exert their effects through retinoid receptors activation. In this study, we investigated the effect of CDDP treatment on retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α) and retinoid X receptor-α (RXR-α) expression. In addition, we investigated the possible modulatory effects of RAR agonist, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), on CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity. Rats were treated with saline, DMSO, CDDP, ATRA, or CDDP/ATRA. Twenty-four hours after the last ATRA injection, rats were killed; blood samples were collected; kidneys were dissected; and biochemical, immunohistochemical, and histological examinations were performed. Our results revealed that CDDP treatment significantly increased serum levels of creatinine and urea, with concomitant decrease in serum albumin. Moreover, reduced glutathione (GSH) content as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities were significantly reduced with concurrent increase in kidney malondialdehyde (MDA) content following CDDP treatment. Furthermore, CDDP markedly upregulated tubular RAR-α, RXR-α, fibrin, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression. Although administration of ATRA to control rats did not produce marked alterations in kidney function parameters, administration of ATRA to CDDP-treated rats significantly exacerbated CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity. In addition, CDDP/ATRA co-treatment significantly increased RAR-α, RXR-α, fibrin, and iNOS protein expression compared to CDDP alone. In conclusion, we report, for the first time, the crucial role of retinoid receptors in CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity. Moreover, our findings indicate that co-administration of ATRA with CDDP, although beneficial on the therapeutic effects, their deleterious effects on

  11. Hepatic Fasting-Induced PPARα Activity Does Not Depend on Essential Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Polizzi, Arnaud; Fouché, Edwin; Ducheix, Simon; Lasserre, Frédéric; Marmugi, Alice P; Mselli-Lakhal, Laila; Loiseau, Nicolas; Wahli, Walter; Guillou, Hervé; Montagner, Alexandra

    2016-09-24

    The liver plays a central role in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism, which is highly sensitive to transcriptional responses to nutrients and hormones. Transcription factors involved in this process include nuclear hormone receptors. One such receptor, PPARα, which is highly expressed in the liver and activated by a variety of fatty acids, is a critical regulator of hepatic fatty acid catabolism during fasting. The present study compared the influence of dietary fatty acids and fasting on hepatic PPARα-dependent responses. Pparα(-/-) male mice and their wild-type controls were fed diets containing different fatty acids for 10 weeks prior to being subjected to fasting or normal feeding. In line with the role of PPARα in sensing dietary fatty acids, changes in chronic dietary fat consumption influenced liver damage during fasting. The changes were particularly marked in mice fed diets lacking essential fatty acids. However, fasting, rather than specific dietary fatty acids, induced acute PPARα activity in the liver. Taken together, the data imply that the potent signalling involved in triggering PPARα activity during fasting does not rely on essential fatty acid-derived ligand.

  12. Hepatic Fasting-Induced PPARα Activity Does Not Depend on Essential Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Polizzi, Arnaud; Fouché, Edwin; Ducheix, Simon; Lasserre, Frédéric; Marmugi, Alice P.; Mselli-Lakhal, Laila; Loiseau, Nicolas; Wahli, Walter; Guillou, Hervé; Montagner, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism, which is highly sensitive to transcriptional responses to nutrients and hormones. Transcription factors involved in this process include nuclear hormone receptors. One such receptor, PPARα, which is highly expressed in the liver and activated by a variety of fatty acids, is a critical regulator of hepatic fatty acid catabolism during fasting. The present study compared the influence of dietary fatty acids and fasting on hepatic PPARα-dependent responses. Pparα−/− male mice and their wild-type controls were fed diets containing different fatty acids for 10 weeks prior to being subjected to fasting or normal feeding. In line with the role of PPARα in sensing dietary fatty acids, changes in chronic dietary fat consumption influenced liver damage during fasting. The changes were particularly marked in mice fed diets lacking essential fatty acids. However, fasting, rather than specific dietary fatty acids, induced acute PPARα activity in the liver. Taken together, the data imply that the potent signalling involved in triggering PPARα activity during fasting does not rely on essential fatty acid-derived ligand. PMID:27669233

  13. Hepatic Fasting-Induced PPARα Activity Does Not Depend on Essential Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Polizzi, Arnaud; Fouché, Edwin; Ducheix, Simon; Lasserre, Frédéric; Marmugi, Alice P; Mselli-Lakhal, Laila; Loiseau, Nicolas; Wahli, Walter; Guillou, Hervé; Montagner, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism, which is highly sensitive to transcriptional responses to nutrients and hormones. Transcription factors involved in this process include nuclear hormone receptors. One such receptor, PPARα, which is highly expressed in the liver and activated by a variety of fatty acids, is a critical regulator of hepatic fatty acid catabolism during fasting. The present study compared the influence of dietary fatty acids and fasting on hepatic PPARα-dependent responses. Pparα(-/-) male mice and their wild-type controls were fed diets containing different fatty acids for 10 weeks prior to being subjected to fasting or normal feeding. In line with the role of PPARα in sensing dietary fatty acids, changes in chronic dietary fat consumption influenced liver damage during fasting. The changes were particularly marked in mice fed diets lacking essential fatty acids. However, fasting, rather than specific dietary fatty acids, induced acute PPARα activity in the liver. Taken together, the data imply that the potent signalling involved in triggering PPARα activity during fasting does not rely on essential fatty acid-derived ligand. PMID:27669233

  14. Theoretical study of ultraviolet induced photodissociation dynamics of sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tatsuhiro; Ohta, Ayumi; Suzuki, Tomoya; Ikeda, Kumiko; Danielache, Sebastian O.; Nanbu, Shinkoh

    2015-05-01

    Photodissociation dynamics of sulfuric acid after excitation to the first and second excited states (S1 and S2) were studied by an on-the-fly ab initio molecular dynamics simulations based on the Zhu-Nakamura version of the trajectory surface hopping (ZN-TSH). Forces acting on the nuclear motion were computed on-the-fly by CASSCF method with Dunning's augmented cc-pVDZ basis set. It was newly found that the parent molecule dissociated into two reaction-channels (i) HSO4(12A″) + H(2S) by S1-excitation, and (ii) HSO4(22A″) + H(2S) by S2-excitation. The direct dissociation dynamics yield products different from the SO2 + 2OH fragments often presented in the literature. Both channels result in the same product and differs only in the electronic state of the HSO4 fragment. The trajectories running on S2 do not hop with S0 and a nonadiabatic transition happens at the S2-S1 conical intersection located at a longer OH bond-length than the S1-S0 intersection producing an electronic excited state (22A″) of HSO4 product.

  15. Retinoic acid attenuates O2-induced inhibition of lung septation.

    PubMed

    Veness-Meehan, Kathleen A; Pierce, Richard A; Moats-Staats, Billie M; Stiles, Alan D

    2002-11-01

    Exposure of the newborn lung to hyperoxia is associated with impaired alveolar development. In newborn rats exposed to hyperoxia and studied at day 14 of life, retinoic acid (RA) treatment improved survival and increased lung collagen but did not improve alveolar development. To determine whether RA treatment during exposure to hyperoxia results in late improvement in alveolarization, we treated newborn rats with RA and hyperoxia from day 3 to day 14 and then weaned O2 to room air by day 20, and studied the animals on day 42. O2-exposed animals had larger mean lung volumes, larger alveoli, and decreased gas-exchange tissue relative to air-exposed animals, whereas RA-treated O2-exposed animals were not statistically different from air-exposed controls. Relative to control animals, elastin staining at day 14 was decreased in hyperoxia-exposed lung independent of RA treatment, and, at day 42, elastin staining was similar in all treatment groups. At day 14, elastin gene expression was similar in all treatment groups, whereas at day 42 lung previously exposed to hyperoxia showed increased elastin signal independent of RA treatment. These results indicate that RA treatment during hyperoxia exposure promotes septal formation without evidence of effects on elastin gene expression after 4 wk of recovery. PMID:12376350

  16. Intracrine prostaglandin E(2) signalling regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression through retinoic acid receptor-β.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Jiménez, María I Arenas; Manzano, Victoria Moreno; Lucio-Cazaña, Francisco J

    2012-12-01

    We have previously found in human renal proximal tubular HK-2 cells that hypoxia- and all-trans retinoic acid-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation is accompanied by retinoic acid receptor-β up-regulation. Here we first investigated whether hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression is dependent on retinoic acid receptor-β and our results confirmed it since (i) hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-inducing agents hypoxia, hypoxia-mimetic agent desferrioxamine, all-trans retinoic acid and interleukin-1β increased retinoic acid receptor-β expression, (ii) hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation was prevented by retinoic acid receptor-β antagonist LE-135 or siRNA retinoic acid receptor-β and (iii) there was direct binding of retinoic acid receptor-β to the retinoic acid response element in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α promoter upon treatment with all-trans retinoic acid and 16,16-dimethyl-prostaglandin E(2). Since intracellular prostaglandin E(2) mediates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation in normoxia in HK-2 cells, we next investigated and confirmed, its role in the up-regulation of retinoic acid receptor-β in normoxia by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-inducing agents all-trans retinoic acid, interleukin-1β and 16,16-dimethyl-prostaglandin E(2) by inhibiting cyclooxygenases, prostaglandin influx transporter or EP receptors. Interestingly, the hypoxia-induced increase in retinoic acid receptor-β expression and accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α was also blocked by the inhibitors tested. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that retinoic acid receptor-β signalling is involved in the control of the expression of transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in both normoxia and hypoxia and that retinoic acid receptor-β expression is found to be strictly regulated by intracellular prostaglandin E(2). Given the relevance of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in the kidney in terms of tumorigenesis, progressive renal failure, production

  17. Clavulanic acid induces penile erection and yawning in male rats: comparison with apomorphine.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Fabrizio; Melis, Maria Rosaria; Angioni, Laura; Argiolas, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    The beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid induced penile erection and yawning in a dose dependent manner when given intraperitoneally (IP, 0.05-5mg/kg), perorally (OS, 0.1-5mg/kg) and intracereboventricularly (ICV, 0.01-5 μg/rat) to male rats. The effect resembles that of the dopamine receptor agonist apomorphine given subcutaneously (SC) (0.02-0.25mg/kg), although the responses of the latter followed a U inverted dose-response curve, disappearing at doses higher than 0.1mg/kg. Clavulanic acid responses were reduced by about 55% by haloperidol, a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist (0.1mg/kg IP), and by d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin, an oxytocin receptor antagonist (2 μg/rat ICV), both given 15 min before clavulanic acid. A higher reduction of clavulanic acid responses (more than 80%) was also found with morphine, an opioid receptor agonist (5mg/kg IP), and with mianserin, a serotonin 5HT(2c) receptor antagonist (0.2mg/kg SC). In contrast, no reduction was found with naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist (1mg/kg IP). The ability of haloperidol, d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin and morphine to reduce clavulanic acid induced penile erection and yawning suggests that clavulanic acid induces these responses, at least in part, by increasing central dopaminergic neurotransmission. Dopamine in turn activates oxytocinergic neurotransmission and centrally released oxytocin induces penile erection and yawning. However, since both penile erection and yawning episodes were reduced not only by the blockade of central dopamine and oxytocin receptors and by the stimulation of opioid receptors, which inhibits oxytocinergic neurotransmission, but also by mianserin, an increase of central serotonin neurotransmission is also likely to participate in these clavulanic acid responses.

  18. Efficacy of ellagic acid and sildenafil in diabetes-induced sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sumanta Kumar; Vishwanath, Manikanta; Gangadarappa, Suma Kallahalli; Razdan, Rema; Inamdar, Mohammed Naseeruddin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetes induced sexual dysfunction is a leading cause of male sexual disorder and an early indicator of cardiovascular complication. Reactive oxygen species generated in body during diabetes is a main causative factor for erectile dysfunction, a sexual dysfunction. Adjuvant antioxidant therapy along with phosphodiesterases type 5 enzyme inhibitor (PDE5i) is more effective than PDE5i alone. Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate efficacy of ellagic acid a known antioxidant and sildenafil in diabetes induced erectile dysfunction. Materials and Methods: Type 1 diabetes was induced in male rats and rats were treated with ellagic acid (50 mg/kg, p.o.) and a combination of ellagic acid (50 mg/kg, p.o.) and sildenafil (5 mg/kg, p.o.), a PDE5i for 28 days. Sexual function was observed in diabetic rat and compared with those of treatment group and normal rats. Effect of ellagic acid was studied on advanced glycation end products (AGE) and isolated rat corpus cavernosum in vitro. Results: Sexual function of diabetic rats was found to be reduced and ellegic acid treatment could preserve sexual function of diabetic rats to some extent. Ellagic acid + sildenafil treatment was more efficient in management of diabetes induced sexual dysfunction. Ellagic acid inhibited (AGE) in vitro implying its role in reducing oxidative stress in diabetes. The polyphenol could not increase sexual function in normal rats and relax isolated rat corpus cavernosum smooth muscle significantly. Conclusion: The study proves usefulness of adjuvant antioxidant therapy in the management of erectile dysfunction in diabetes. PMID:25298678

  19. C-Myc induced compensated cardiac hypertrophy increases free fatty acid utilization for the citric acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Olson, Aaron K; Ledee, Dolena; Iwamoto, Kate; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A

    2013-02-01

    The protooncogene C-Myc (Myc) regulates cardiac hypertrophy. Myc promotes compensated cardiac function, suggesting that the operative mechanisms differ from those leading to heart failure. Myc regulation of substrate metabolism is a reasonable target, as Myc alters metabolism in other tissues. We hypothesize that Myc induced shifts in substrate utilization signal and promote compensated hypertrophy. We used cardiac specific Myc-inducible C57/BL6 male mice between 4-6 months old that develop hypertrophy with tamoxifen (tam) injections. Isolated working hearts and (13)Carbon ((13)C)-NMR were used to measure function and fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate containing (13)C-labeled free fatty acids, acetoacetate, lactate, unlabeled glucose and insulin. Studies were performed at pre-hypertrophy (3-days tam, 3dMyc), established hypertrophy (7-days tam, 7dMyc) or vehicle control (Cont). Non-transgenic siblings (NTG) received 7-days tam or vehicle to assess drug effect. Hypertrophy was assessed by echocardiograms and heart weights. Western blots were performed on key metabolic enzymes. Hypertrophy occurred in 7dMyc only. Cardiac function did not differ between groups. Tam alone did not affect substrate contributions in NTG. Substrate utilization was not significantly altered in 3dMyc versus Cont. The free fatty acid FC was significantly greater in 7dMyc versus Cont with decreased unlabeled Fc, which is predominately exogenous glucose. Free fatty acid flux to the citric acid cycle increased while lactate flux was diminished in 7dMyc compared to Cont. Total protein levels of a panel of key metabolic enzymes were unchanged; however total protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in 7dMyc. Substrate utilization changes for the citric acid cycle did not precede hypertrophy; therefore they are not the primary signal for cardiac growth in this model. Free fatty acid utilization and oxidation increase at established hypertrophy. Understanding the

  20. Intrarenal renin-angiotensin system mediates fatty acid-induced ER stress in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunling; Lin, Yu; Luo, Renfei; Chen, Shaoming; Wang, Feifei; Zheng, Peili; Levi, Moshe; Yang, Tianxin; Wang, Weidong

    2016-03-01

    Obesity-related kidney disease is related to caloric excess promoting deleterious cellular responses. Accumulation of saturated free fatty acids in tubular cells produces lipotoxicity involving significant cellular dysfunction and injury. The objectives of this study were to elucidate the role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation in saturated fatty acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in cultured human proximal tubule epithelial cells (HK2) and in mice fed with a high-fat diet. Treatment with saturated fatty acid palmitic acid (PA; 0.8 mM) for 24 h induced ER stress in HK2, leading to an unfolded protein response as reflected by increased expressions of the ER chaperone binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and proapoptotic transcription factor C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) protein as evaluated by immunoblotting. PA treatment also induced increased protein expression of inositol requiring protein 1α (IRE1α), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor-α (eIF2α), and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) as well as activation of caspase-3. PA treatment was associated with increased angiotensin II levels in cultured medium. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker valsartan or renin inhibitor aliskiren dramatically suppressed PA-induced upregulation of BiP, CHOP, IRE1α, p-eIF2α, and ATF4 in HK2 cells. In contrast, valsartan or aliskiren did not prevent ER stress induced by tunicamycin. C57BL/6 mice fed with a high-fat diet for 14 wk exhibited increased protein expressions of BiP and CHOP compared with control mice, which were significantly attenuated by the valsartan treatment. Increased angiotensin II levels in serum and urine were observed in mice fed with a high-fat diet when compared with controls. It is suggested that the intrarenal RAS activation may play an important role in diabetic kidney injury via mediating ER stress induced by saturated fatty acid. PMID:26672616

  1. Ultrastructural Changes in Chick Cerebellum Induced by Polyinosinic Polycytidylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mang C.; Young, Paul A.; Yu, Wan-Hua Amy

    1971-01-01

    The ultrastructural changes in cerebellar encephalopathy induced by intravenous injection of poly I:C in young chickens were studied. The neuroglia and the small blood vessels showed the most severe injury. In the astroglia, initial alterations consisted of a mild cytoplasmic swelling whereas terminally, evagination of the outer nuclear membrane, formation of large vacuoles, and mitochondrial swelling occurred. In the cortex, oligodendroglial alterations consisted of dilatation of the nuclear membranes and of the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas in the white matter, the interfascicular oligodendroglia exhibited clumping and coagulation of the chromatin material. Some small blood vessels appeared normal, while others showed massive erosion of the endothelium resulting in aneurysm-like ballooning of the vascular wall. The granule cells displayed marked edema. The myelin of nerve fibers showed an accumulation of fluid initially, with splitting occurring in the terminal stages. These studies indicated a severe cytotoxic effect of poly I:C on the cerebella of young chickens. ImagesFig 16Fig 17Fig 13Fig 14Fig 15Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11Fig 12Fig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4 PMID:5142269

  2. Oxidative DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, an amino acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Hiraku, Y; Sugimoto, J; Yamaguchi, T; Kawanishi, S

    1999-05-01

    We investigated DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, a metabolite of threonine and glycine. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that aminoacetone caused cellular DNA cleavage. Aminoacetone increased the amount of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in human cultured cells in a dose-dependent manner. The formation of 8-oxodG in calf thymus DNA increased due to aminoacetone only in the presence of Cu(II). DNA ladder formation was observed at higher concentrations of aminoacetone than those causing DNA cleavage. Flow cytometry showed that aminoacetone enhanced the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in cultured cells. Aminoacetone caused damage to 32P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments, obtained from the human c-Ha-ras-1 and p53 genes, at cytosine and thymine residues in the presence of Cu(II). Catalase and bathocuproine inhibited DNA damage, suggesting that H2O2 and Cu(I) were involved. Analysis of the products generated from aminoacetone revealed that aminoacetone underwent Cu(II)-mediated autoxidation in two different pathways: the major pathway in which methylglyoxal and NH+4 are generated and the minor pathway in which 2,5-dimethylpyrazine is formed through condensation of two molecules of aminoacetone. These findings suggest that H2O2 generated by the autoxidation of aminoacetone reacts with Cu(I) to form reactive species capable of causing oxidative DNA damage.

  3. Formic-acid-induced depolymerization of oxidized lignin to aromatics.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Alireza; Ulbrich, Arne; Coon, Joshua J; Stahl, Shannon S

    2014-11-13

    Lignin is a heterogeneous aromatic biopolymer that accounts for nearly 30% of the organic carbon on Earth and is one of the few renewable sources of aromatic chemicals. As the most recalcitrant of the three components of lignocellulosic biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), lignin has been treated as a waste product in the pulp and paper industry, where it is burned to supply energy and recover pulping chemicals in the operation of paper mills. Extraction of higher value from lignin is increasingly recognized as being crucial to the economic viability of integrated biorefineries. Depolymerization is an important starting point for many lignin valorization strategies, because it could generate valuable aromatic chemicals and/or provide a source of low-molecular-mass feedstocks suitable for downstream processing. Commercial precedents show that certain types of lignin (lignosulphonates) may be converted into vanillin and other marketable products, but new technologies are needed to enhance the lignin value chain. The complex, irregular structure of lignin complicates chemical conversion efforts, and known depolymerization methods typically afford ill-defined products in low yields (that is, less than 10-20wt%). Here we describe a method for the depolymerization of oxidized lignin under mild conditions in aqueous formic acid that results in more than 60wt% yield of low-molecular-mass aromatics. We present the discovery of this facile C-O cleavage method, its application to aspen lignin depolymerization, and mechanistic insights into the reaction. The broader implications of these results for lignin conversion and biomass refining are also considered.

  4. Formic-acid-induced depolymerization of oxidized lignin to aromatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Alireza; Ulbrich, Arne; Coon, Joshua J.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2014-11-01

    Lignin is a heterogeneous aromatic biopolymer that accounts for nearly 30% of the organic carbon on Earth and is one of the few renewable sources of aromatic chemicals. As the most recalcitrant of the three components of lignocellulosic biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), lignin has been treated as a waste product in the pulp and paper industry, where it is burned to supply energy and recover pulping chemicals in the operation of paper mills. Extraction of higher value from lignin is increasingly recognized as being crucial to the economic viability of integrated biorefineries. Depolymerization is an important starting point for many lignin valorization strategies, because it could generate valuable aromatic chemicals and/or provide a source of low-molecular-mass feedstocks suitable for downstream processing. Commercial precedents show that certain types of lignin (lignosulphonates) may be converted into vanillin and other marketable products, but new technologies are needed to enhance the lignin value chain. The complex, irregular structure of lignin complicates chemical conversion efforts, and known depolymerization methods typically afford ill-defined products in low yields (that is, less than 10-20wt%). Here we describe a method for the depolymerization of oxidized lignin under mild conditions in aqueous formic acid that results in more than 60wt% yield of low-molecular-mass aromatics. We present the discovery of this facile C-O cleavage method, its application to aspen lignin depolymerization, and mechanistic insights into the reaction. The broader implications of these results for lignin conversion and biomass refining are also considered.

  5. Nitrosyl induces phosphorous-acid dissociation in ruthenium(II).

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Daniela Ramos; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto; da Silva, Sebastião Claudino; Castellano, Eduardo Ernesto; Lima, Francisco das Chagas Alves; Franco, Douglas Wagner

    2011-12-28

    The trans-[Ru(NO)(NH(3))(4)(P(OH)(3))]Cl(3) complex was synthesized by reacting [Ru(H(2)O)(NH(3))(5)](2+) with H(3)PO(3) and characterized by spectroscopic ((31)P-NMR, δ = 68 ppm) and spectrophotometric techniques (λ = 525 nm, ε = 20 L mol(-1) cm(-1); λ = 319 nm, ε = 773 L mol(-1) cm(-1); λ = 241 nm, ε = 1385 L mol(-1) cm(-1); ν(NO(+)) = 1879 cm(-1)). A pK(a) of 0.74 was determined from infrared measurements as a function of pH for the reaction: trans-[Ru(NO)(NH(3))(4)(P(OH)(3))](3+) + H(2)O ⇌ trans-[Ru(NO)(NH(3))(4)(P(O(-))(OH)(2))](2+) + H(3)O(+). According to (31)P-NMR, IR, UV-vis, cyclic voltammetry and ab initio calculation data, upon deprotonation, trans-[Ru(NO)(NH(3))(4)(P(OH)(3))](3+) yields the O-bonded linkage isomer trans- [Ru(NO)(NH(3))(4)(OP(OH)(2))](2+), then the trans-[Ru(NO)(NH(3))(4)(OP(H)(OH)(2))](3+) decays to give the final products H(3)PO(3) and trans-[Ru(NO)(NH(3))(4)(H(2)O)](3+). The dissociation of phosphorous acid from the [Ru(NO)(NH(3))(4)](3+) moiety is pH dependent (k(obs) = 2.1 × 10(-4) s(-1) at pH 3.0, 25 °C). PMID:22027926

  6. Isolation of an osmotic stress- and abscisic acid-induced gene encoding an acidic endochitinase from Lycopersicon chilense.

    PubMed

    Chen, R D; Yu, L X; Greer, A F; Cheriti, H; Tabaeizadeh, Z

    1994-10-28

    We have identified one osmotic stress- and abscisic acid-responsive member of the endochitinase (EC 3.2.1.14) gene family from leaves of drought-stressed Lycopersicon chilense plants, a natural inhabitant of extremely arid regions in South America. The 966-bp full-length cDNA (designated pcht28) encodes an acidic chitinase precursor with an amino-terminal signal peptide. The mature protein is predicted to have 229 amino acid residues with a relative molecular mass of 24,943 and pI value of 6.2. Sequence analysis revealed that pcht28 has a high degree of homology with class II chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) from tomato and tobacco. Expression of the pcht28 protein in Escherichia coli verified that it is indeed a chitinase. Northern blot analysis indicated that this gene has evolved a different pattern of expression from that of other family members reported thus far. It is highly induced by both osmotic stress and the plant hormone abscisic acid. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA suggested that the pcht28-related genes may form a small multigene family in this species. The efficiency of induction of the gene by drought stress, in leaves and stems, is significantly higher in L. chilense than in the cultivated tomato. It is speculated that, besides its general defensive function, the pcht28-encoded chitinase may play a particular role in plant development or in protecting plants from pathogen attack during water stress. PMID:7816027

  7. Lysophosphatidic acid induces cell migration through the selective activation of Akt1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Yun, Sung Ji; Do, Kee Hun; Kim, Min Sung; Cho, Mong; Suh, Dong-Soo; Kim, Chi Dae; Kim, Jae Ho; Birnbaum, Morris J.

    2008-01-01

    Akt plays pivotal roles in many physiological responses including growth, proliferation, survival, metabolism, and migration. In the current studies, we have evaluated the isoform-specific role of akt in lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced cell migration. Ascites from ovarian cancer patients (AOCP) induced mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, ascites from liver cirrhosis patients (ALCP) did not induce MEF cell migration. AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely blocked by pre-treatment of cells with LPA receptor antagonist, Ki16425. Both LPA- and AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely attenuated by PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. Furthermore, cells lacking Akt1 displayed defect in LPA-induced cell migration. Re-expression of Akt1 in DKO (Akt1-/-Akt2-/-) cells restored LPA-induced cell migration, whereas re-expression of Akt2 in DKO cells could not restore the LPA-induced cell migration. Finally, Akt1 was selectively phosphorylated by LPA and AOCP stimulation. These results suggest that LPA is a major factor responsible for AOCP-induced cell migration and signaling specificity of Akt1 may dictate LPA-induced cell migration. PMID:18779657

  8. Acid-induced aggregation propensity of nivolumab is dependent on the Fc.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boning; Guo, Huaizu; Xu, Jin; Qin, Ting; Xu, Lu; Zhang, Junjie; Guo, Qingcheng; Zhang, Dapeng; Qian, Weizhu; Li, Bohua; Dai, Jianxin; Hou, Sheng; Guo, Yajun; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Nivolumab, an anti-programmed death (PD)1 IgG4 antibody, has shown notable success as a cancer treatment. Here, we report that nivolumab was susceptible to aggregation during manufacturing, particularly in routine purification steps. Our experimental results showed that exposure to low pH caused aggregation of nivolumab, and the Fc was primarily responsible for an acid-induced unfolding phenomenon. To compare the intrinsic propensity of acid-induced aggregation for other IgGs subclasses, tocilizumab (IgG1), panitumumab (IgG2) and atezolizumab (aglyco-IgG1) were also investigated. The accurate pH threshold of acid-induced aggregation for individual IgG Fc subclasses was identified and ranked as: IgG1 < aglyco-IgG1 < IgG2 < IgG4. This result was cross-validated by thermostability and conformation analysis. We also assessed the effect of several protein stabilizers on nivolumab, and found mannitol ameliorated the acid-induced aggregation of the molecule. Our results provide valuable insight into downstream manufacturing process development, especially for immune checkpoint modulating molecules with a human IgG4 backbone. PMID:27310175

  9. Role of mitochondrial permeability transition in human renal tubular epithelial cell death induced by aristolochic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Xinming; Cai Yan; Gong Likun; Liu Linlin; Chen Fangping; Xiao Ying; Wu Xiongfei; Li Yan; Xue Xiang |; Ren Jin . E-mail: cdser_simm@mail.shcnc.ac.cn

    2007-07-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA), a natural nephrotoxin and carcinogen, can induce a progressive tubulointerstitial nephropathy. However, the mechanism by which AA causes renal injury remains largely unknown. Here we reported that the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) plays an important role in the renal injury induced by aristolochic acid I (AAI). We found that in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}, AAI caused mitochondrial swelling, leakage of Ca{sup 2+}, membrane depolarization, and release of cytochrome c in isolated kidney mitochondria. These alterations were suppressed by cyclosporin A (CsA), an agent known to inhibit MPT. Culture of HK-2 cell, a human renal tubular epithelial cell line for 24 h with AAI caused a decrease in cellular ATP, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, and increase of caspase 3 activity. These toxic effects of AAI were attenuated by CsA and bongkrekic acid (BA), another specific MPT inhibitor. Furthermore, AAI greatly inhibited the activity of mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) in isolated mitochondria. We suggested that ANT may mediate, at least in part, the AAI-induced MPT. Taken together, these results suggested that MPT plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of HK-2 cell injury induced by AAI and implied that MPT might contribute to human nephrotoxicity of aristolochic acid.

  10. Dithiolopyrrolone antibiotic formation induced by adding valeric acid to the culture broth of Saccharothrix algeriensis.

    PubMed

    Merrouche, Rabiâa; Bouras, Noureddine; Coppel, Yannick; Mathieu, Florence; Monje, Marie-Carmen; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Lebrihi, Ahmed

    2010-06-25

    Three new antibiotics were isolated from the fermentation broth of Saccharothrix algeriensis NRRL B-24137 and characterized as the dithiolopyrrolone derivatives valerylpyrrothine (1), isovalerylpyrrothine (2), and formylpyrrothine (3) as well as the known antibiotic aureothricin. The production of the dithiolopyrrolone derivatives was induced by adding valeric acid to the culture medium. The compounds exhibited moderate antimicrobial activity in vitro.

  11. APOPTOSIS AND PROLIFERATION DURING DICHLOROACETIC ACID (DCA) INDUCED HEPTACELLULAR CARCINOGENESIS IN THE F344 MALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Apoptosis and Proliferation During DicWoroacetic Acid (DCA) Induced Hepatocellular
    Carcinogenesis in the F344 Male Rat

    Chlorine, introduced into public drinking \\\\'ater supplies for disinfection, can react with organic compounds in surface waters to form toxic by-prod...

  12. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase is an acid-induced, chromosomally encoded virulence factor in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pu; Wood, Derek; Nester, Eugene W

    2005-09-01

    The pckA gene, encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, catalyzes the reversible decarboxylation and phosphorylation of oxaloacetate to form phosphoenolpyruvate. Located on the circular chromosome of Agrobacterium, this locus is adjacent to the loci chvG and chvI, encoding a two-component regulatory system that has been shown to be important in virulence. Using a reporter gene fusion, studies showed that the pckA gene is induced by acidic pH but not by acetosyringone. This acid induction is regulated by the chvG-chvI regulatory system, which controls acid-inducible genes. A pckA mutant had no demonstrable PckA enzyme activity and grew on AB minimal medium with glucose but did not grow on the same medium with succinate as the sole carbon source and was more inhibited in its growth than the wild-type strain by an acidic environment. A pckA mutant was highly attenuated in tumor-inducing ability on tobacco leaf disks and was severely attenuated in vir gene expression. Although vir gene induction was completely restored when a constitutive virG gene was introduced into the mutant strain, virulence was only partially restored. These results suggest that avirulence may be due to a combination of the inhibition of this mutant in the acidic plant wound environment and the poor induction of the vir genes. PMID:16109945

  13. Arsenic-induced toxicity and the protective role of ascorbic acid in mouse testis

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Soo Im; Jin, Bohwan; Youn, Pilju; Park, Changbo; Park, Jung-Duck; Ryu, Doug-Young . E-mail: dyryu@snu.ac.kr

    2007-01-15

    Oxidative stress has been suggested to be a major cause of male reproductive failure. Here, we investigated whether arsenic, which impairs male reproductive functions in rodent models, acts by inducing oxidative stress. Male 8-week-old ICR mice were given drinking water containing 20 or 40 mg/l sodium arsenite with or without 0.75 or 1.5 g/l of the antioxidant ascorbic acid for 5 weeks. The arsenic-treated mice showed decreased epididymidal sperm counts and testicular weights compared to untreated mice. These effects were reversed in mice that were co-treated with ascorbic acid. Similarly, arsenic treatment lowered the activities of testicular 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) and 17{beta}-HSD, which play important roles in steroidogenesis, and this was reversed by co-treatment with ascorbic acid. The testicles of arsenic-treated mice had decreased glutathione (GSH) levels (which correlate inversely with the degree of cellular oxidative stress) and elevated levels of protein carbonyl (a marker of oxidative damage to tissue proteins). Ascorbic acid co-treatment reversed both of these effects. Thus, ascorbic acid blocks both the adverse effects of arsenic on male reproductive functions and the arsenic-induced testicular oxidative changes. These observations support the notion that arsenic impairs male reproductive function by inducing oxidative stress.

  14. EGFR Inhibition Blocks Palmitic Acid-induced inflammation in cardiomyocytes and Prevents Hyperlipidemia-induced Cardiac Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Weixin; Fang, Qilu; Zhong, Peng; Chen, Lingfeng; Wang, Lintao; Zhang, Yali; Wang, Jun; Li, Xiaokun; Wang, Yi; Wang, Jingying; Liang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is often associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Previous studies suggest that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antagonism may be effective for the treatment of angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy and diabetic cardiomyopathy. This study was performed to demonstrate if EGFR plays a role in the pathogenesis of hyperlipidemia/obesity-related cardiac injuries. The in vivo studies using both wild type (WT) and apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high fat diet (HFD) showed the beneficial effects of small-molecule EGFR inhibitors, AG1478 and 542, against obesity-induced myocardial injury. Administration of AG1478 and 542 significantly reduced myocardial inflammation, fibrosis, apoptosis, and dysfunction in both two obese mouse models. In vitro, EGFR signaling was blocked by either siRNA silencing or small-molecule EGFR inhibitors in palmitic acid (PA)-stimulated cardiomyocytes. EGFR inhibition attenuated PA-induced inflammatory response and apoptosis in H9C2 cells. Furthermore, we found that PA-induced EGFR activation was mediated by the upstream TLR4 and c-Src. This study has confirmed the detrimental effect of EGFR activation in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced cardiac inflammatory injuries in experimental mice, and has demonstrated the TLR4/c-Src-mediated mechanisms for PA-induced EGFR activation. Our data suggest that EGFR may be a therapeutic target for obesity-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27087279

  15. Protective effect of oleanolic acid on oxidized-low density lipoprotein induced endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianhua; Li, Guanghui; Wang, Meizhi; Li, Hui; Han, Zhiwu

    2015-10-01

    Oleanolic acid (3β-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid, OA) is a naturally-occurring triterpenoid with various promising pharmacological properties. The present study was conducted to determine the protective effects of OA against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced endothelial cell apoptosis and the possible underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that ox-LDL significantly decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). OA in the co-treatment showed a protective effect against ox-LDL induced loss in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis, which was associated with the modulating effect of OA on ox-LDL induced hypoxia-inducible factor 1α(HIF-1α) expression. Moreover, our results showed that the modulating effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HIF-1α expression was obtained via inhibition of lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1)/reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling. Collectively, we suggested that the protective effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HUVEC apoptosis might, at least in part, be obtained via inhibition of the LOX-1/ROS/HIF-1α signaling pathway. PMID:26559024

  16. Protective effect of oleanolic acid on oxidized-low density lipoprotein induced endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianhua; Li, Guanghui; Wang, Meizhi; Li, Hui; Han, Zhiwu

    2015-10-01

    Oleanolic acid (3β-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid, OA) is a naturally-occurring triterpenoid with various promising pharmacological properties. The present study was conducted to determine the protective effects of OA against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced endothelial cell apoptosis and the possible underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that ox-LDL significantly decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). OA in the co-treatment showed a protective effect against ox-LDL induced loss in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis, which was associated with the modulating effect of OA on ox-LDL induced hypoxia-inducible factor 1α(HIF-1α) expression. Moreover, our results showed that the modulating effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HIF-1α expression was obtained via inhibition of lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1)/reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling. Collectively, we suggested that the protective effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HUVEC apoptosis might, at least in part, be obtained via inhibition of the LOX-1/ROS/HIF-1α signaling pathway.

  17. Evaluation of docosahexaenoic acid in a dog model of hypertension induced left ventricular hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Stanley, William C; Cox, James W; Asemu, Girma; O'Connell, Kelly A; Dabkowski, Erinne R; Xu, Wenhong; Ribeiro, Rogerio F; Shekar, Kadambari C; Hoag, Stephen W; Rastogi, Sharad; Sabbah, Hani N; Daneault, Caroline; des Rosiers, Christine

    2013-12-01

    Marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids alter cardiac phospholipids and prevent cardiac pathology in rodents subjected to pressure overload. This approach has not been evaluated in humans or large animals with hypertension-induced pathological hypertrophy. We evaluated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in old female dogs with hypertension caused by 16 weeks of aldosterone infusion. Aldosterone-induced hypertension resulted in concentric left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and impaired diastolic function in placebo-treated dogs. DHA supplementation increased DHA and depleted arachidonic acid in cardiac phospholipids, but did not improve LV parameters compared to placebo. Surprisingly, DHA significantly increased serum aldosterone concentration and blood pressure compared to placebo. Cardiac mitochondrial yield was decreased in placebo-treated hypertensive dogs compared to normal animals, which was prevented by DHA. Extensive analysis of mitochondrial function found no differences between DHA and placebo groups. In conclusion, DHA did not favorably impact mitochondrial or LV function in aldosterone hypertensive dogs.

  18. Free fatty acids induce cell differentiation to infective forms in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Wainszelbaum, Marisa J; Belaunzarán, María L; Lammel, Estela M; Florin-Christensen, Mónica; Florin-Christensen, Jorge; Isola, Elvira L D

    2003-01-01

    Intestinal extracts of Triatoma infestans induce cell differentiation of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes into the infective metacyclic form. Part of this effect can be explained by the presence of haemoglobin fragments, which stimulate trypanosomal adenylate cyclase. In this work we examined the metacyclogenic activity of lipids present in this intestinal extract. We found that lipid extracts of the intestinal extract have significant stimulatory effects that reside with the free-fatty-acid fraction, especially oleic acid. These compounds stimulate de novo diacylglycerol formation and protein kinase C activity in the parasite. Moreover, metacyclogenesis is stimulated by phorbol esters and cell-permeant diacylglycerol, while protein kinase C down-regulation or incubation with inhibitors of this kinase abrogates this effect. These results indicate that free fatty acids are a novel signal, inducing metacyclogenesis, acting through a pathway involving diacylglycerol biosynthesis and protein kinase C activation. PMID:12887332

  19. Identification of jasmonic acid and its methyl ester as gum-inducing factors in tulips.

    PubMed

    Skrzypek, Edyta; Miyamoto, Kensuke; Saniewski, Marian; Ueda, Junichi

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify endogenous factors that induce gummosis and to show their role in gummosis in tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L. cv. Apeldoorn) stems. Using procedures to detect endogenous factors that induce gum in the stem of tulips, jasmonic acid (JA) and methyl jasmonate (JA-Me) were successfully identified using gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Total amounts of JA and JA-Me designated as jasmonates in tulip stems were also estimated at about 70-80 ng/g fresh weight, using deuterium-labeled jasmonates as internal standards. The application of JA and JA-Me as lanolin pastes substantially induced gums in tulip stems with ethylene production. The application of ethephon, an ethylene-generating compound, however, induced no gummosis although it slightly affected jasmonate content in tulip stems. These results strongly suggest that JA and JA-Me are endogenous factors that induce gummosis in tulip stems.

  20. Organic acids induce tolerance to zinc- and copper-exposed fungi under various growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Sazanova, Katerina; Osmolovskaya, Natalia; Schiparev, Sergey; Yakkonen, Kirill; Kuchaeva, Ludmila; Vlasov, Dmitry

    2015-04-01

    Heavy metals, Zn and Cu, in high concentration (2 mM for Zn and 0.5 mM for Cu) have some inhibiting effect on the growth of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium citrinum. Toxic effects of these metals considerably depend on cultivation conditions including nitrogen sources, pH of nutrient media, and its consistency (presence or absence of agar). In general, nitrate media provides less inhibiting effect on fungal growth under heavy metal exposure than ammonium-containing media. Adding of Zn in nitrate media induces oxalic acid production by fungi. Importance of oxalic acid production in detoxification of heavy metals is confirmed by the formation of Zn-containing crystals in fungal cultures. Cu bringing to the cultural media had no stimulating effect on oxalic acid production as well as no copper-containing crystals were observed. But proceeding from essential increase in oxalic acid production during a long-term fungi adaptation to Cu, it may be proposed that oxalic acid plays some functional role in Cu tolerance of fungi as well. It may be concluded that the role of organic acids and oxalate, in particular, in fungi tolerance and adaptation to heavy metals can be determined by the nature of the metal and its ability to form stable complexes with an acid anion. Stimulating effect of metals on acid production is not universal for all species of fungi and largely depends on metal concentration, nitrogen form in a medium, and other cultivation conditions.

  1. C-Myc Induced Compensated Cardiac Hypertrophy Increases Free Fatty Acid Utilization for the Citric Acid Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Aaron; Ledee, Dolena; Iwamoto, Kate; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-02-01

    The protooncogene C-Myc (Myc) regulates cardiac hypertrophy. Myc promotes compensated cardiac function, suggesting that the operative mechanisms differ from those leading to heart failure. Myc regulation of substrate metabolism is a reasonable target, as Myc alters metabolism in other tissues. We hypothesize that Myc-induced shifts in substrate utilization signal and promote compensated hypertrophy. We used cardiac specific Myc-inducible C57/BL6 male mice between 4-6 months old that develop hypertrophy with tamoxifen (tam). Isolated working hearts and 13Carbon (13C )-NMR were used to measure function and fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate containing 13C-labeled free fatty acids, acetoacetate, lactate, unlabeled glucose and insulin. Studies were performed at pre-hypertrophy (3-days tam, 3dMyc), established hypertrophy (7-days tam, 7dMyc) or vehicle control (cont). Non-transgenic siblings (NTG) received 7-days tam or vehicle to assess drug effect. Hypertrophy was confirmed by echocardiograms and heart weights. Western blots were performed on key metabolic enzymes. Hypertrophy occurred in 7dMyc only. Cardiac function did not differ between groups. Tam alone did not affect substrate contribution in NTG. Substrate utilization was not significantly altered in 3dMyc versus cont. The free fatty acid FC was significantly greater in 7dMyc vs cont with decreased unlabeled Fc, which is predominately exogenous glucose. Free fatty acid flux to the citric acid cycle increased while lactate flux was diminished in 7dMyc compared to cont. Total protein levels of a panel of key metabolic enzymes were unchanged; however total protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in 7dMyc. Substrate utilization changes did not precede hypertrophy; therefore they are not the primary signal for cardiac growth in this model. Free fatty acid utilization and oxidation increase at established hypertrophy. Understanding the mechanisms whereby this change maintained

  2. Characteristics of weak base-induced vacuoles formed around individual acidic organelles.

    PubMed

    Hiruma, Hiromi; Kawakami, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    We have previously found that the weak base 4-aminopyridine induces Brownian motion of acidic organelles around which vacuoles are formed, causing organelle traffic disorder in neurons. Our present study investigated the characteristics of vacuoles induced by weak bases (NH(4)Cl, aminopyridines, and chloroquine) using mouse cells. Individual vacuoles included acidic organelles identified by fluorescent protein expression. Mitochondria and actin filaments were extruded outside the vacuoles, composing the vacuole rim. Staining with amine-reactive fluorescence showed no protein/amino acid content in vacuoles. Thus, serous vacuolar contents are probably partitioned by viscous cytosol, other organelles, and cytoskeletons, but not membrane. The weak base (chloroquine) was immunochemically detected in intravacuolar organelles, but not in vacuoles. Early vacuolization was reversible, but long-term vacuolization caused cell death. The vacuolization and cell death were blocked by the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase inhibitor and Cl--free medium. Staining with LysoTracker or LysoSensor indicated that intravacuolar organelles were strongly acidic and vacuoles were slightly acidic. This suggests that vacuolization is caused by accumulation of weak base and H(+) in acidic organelles, driven by vacuolar H(+)-ATPase associated with Cl(-) entering, and probably by subsequent extrusion of H(+) and water from organelles to the surrounding cytoplasm. PMID:21744328

  3. Characteristics of weak base-induced vacuoles formed around individual acidic organelles.

    PubMed

    Hiruma, Hiromi; Kawakami, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    We have previously found that the weak base 4-aminopyridine induces Brownian motion of acidic organelles around which vacuoles are formed, causing organelle traffic disorder in neurons. Our present study investigated the characteristics of vacuoles induced by weak bases (NH(4)Cl, aminopyridines, and chloroquine) using mouse cells. Individual vacuoles included acidic organelles identified by fluorescent protein expression. Mitochondria and actin filaments were extruded outside the vacuoles, composing the vacuole rim. Staining with amine-reactive fluorescence showed no protein/amino acid content in vacuoles. Thus, serous vacuolar contents are probably partitioned by viscous cytosol, other organelles, and cytoskeletons, but not membrane. The weak base (chloroquine) was immunochemically detected in intravacuolar organelles, but not in vacuoles. Early vacuolization was reversible, but long-term vacuolization caused cell death. The vacuolization and cell death were blocked by the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase inhibitor and Cl--free medium. Staining with LysoTracker or LysoSensor indicated that intravacuolar organelles were strongly acidic and vacuoles were slightly acidic. This suggests that vacuolization is caused by accumulation of weak base and H(+) in acidic organelles, driven by vacuolar H(+)-ATPase associated with Cl(-) entering, and probably by subsequent extrusion of H(+) and water from organelles to the surrounding cytoplasm.

  4. Heat Stress Nephropathy From Exercise-Induced Uric Acid Crystalluria: A Perspective on Mesoamerican Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos; García-Trabanino, Ramón; Barregard, Lars; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Wesseling, Catharina; Harra, Tamara; Aragón, Aurora; Grases, Felix; Jarquin, Emmanuel R; González, Marvin A; Weiss, Ilana; Glaser, Jason; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Johnson, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Mesoamerican nephropathy (MeN), an epidemic in Central America, is a chronic kidney disease of unknown cause. In this article, we argue that MeN may be a uric acid disorder. Individuals at risk for developing the disease are primarily male workers exposed to heat stress and physical exertion that predisposes to recurrent water and volume depletion, often accompanied by urinary concentration and acidification. Uric acid is generated during heat stress, in part consequent to nucleotide release from muscles. We hypothesize that working in the sugarcane fields may result in cyclic uricosuria in which uric acid concentrations exceed solubility, leading to the formation of dihydrate urate crystals and local injury. Consistent with this hypothesis, we present pilot data documenting the common presence of urate crystals in the urine of sugarcane workers from El Salvador. High end-of-workday urinary uric acid concentrations were common in a pilot study, particularly if urine pH was corrected to 7. Hyperuricemia may induce glomerular hypertension, whereas the increased urinary uric acid may directly injure renal tubules. Thus, MeN may result from exercise and heat stress associated with dehydration-induced hyperuricemia and uricosuria. Increased hydration with water and salt, urinary alkalinization, reduction in sugary beverage intake, and inhibitors of uric acid synthesis should be tested for disease prevention.

  5. Ascorbic Acid Ameliorates Nicotine Exposure Induced Impaired Spatial Memory Performance in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sirasanagandla, SR; Rooben, RK; Rajkumar; Narayanan, SN; Jetti, R

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The long lasting behavioural and cognitive impairments in offspring prenatally exposed to nicotine have been confirmed in animal models. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ascorbic acid on prenatal nicotine exposure induced behavioural deficits in male offspring of rats. Methods: The pregnant Wistar dams were divided into four groups of six rats: control, vehicle control, nicotine and nicotine+ascorbic acid groups. The nicotine group received daily dose of subcutaneous injections of 0.96 mg/kg body weight (bw) nicotine free base throughout gestation. Pregnant dams in nicotine+ascorbic acid group were first given nicotine free base (0.96 mg/kg bw/day; subcutaneous route) followed by ascorbic acid (50 mg/kg bw/day, orally) daily throughout gestation. The cognitive function of male offspring of all the experimental groups was studied using Morris water maze test at postnatal day 40. Results: Prenatal nicotine exposure altered spatial learning and memory in male offspring. However, treatment with ascorbic acid ameliorated these changes in rats. Conclusion: Ascorbic acid supplementation was found to be effective in preventing the prenatal nicotine exposure induced cognitive deficits in rat offspring to some extent. PMID:25429474

  6. Inhibitory effects of acidic xylooligosaccharide on stress-induced gastric inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Kyoji; Higashi, Naoki; Koga, Kunimasa

    2006-12-01

    The preventive effects of acidic xylooligosaccharide prepared from xylan of corncobs and related sugars on stress-induced gastric inflammation in mice were investigated. Oral administration of acidic xylooligosaccharide and hydrocortisone at doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight significantly reduced the number of bleeding points in the gastric mucosa of mice loaded with cold-restraint stress. Acidic xylooligosaccharide showed concentration-dependent superoxide anion radical-scavenging activity at concentrations of 3.3-4.3 mg/mL and its IC50 was 3.5 mg/mL, although this value is approximately six times that of quercetin. The antioxidant activity of acidic xylooligosaccharide could contribute, in part, to its suppressive activities on stress-induced mouse gastritis. Xylose, xylobiose, xylan, and glucuronic acid showed no significant suppressive activities on mouse gastric inflammation at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. These results suggest that an appropriate degree of polymerization of xylan (larger than trimer) is necessary for the activities of acidic xylooligosaccharide.

  7. Nucleoside-nucleotide free diet protects rat colonic mucosa from damage induced by trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Adjei, A A; Morioka, T; Ameho, C K; Yamauchi, K; Kulkarni, A D; Al-Mansouri, H M; Kawajiri, A; Yamamoto, S

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Growing evidence suggests that intestinal recovery from injury induced by radiation, endotoxin, and protein deficiency is improved by the ingestion of nucleosides and nucleotides. AIM: This study examined the effect of dietary nucleosides and nucleotides supplementation on trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid induced colonic damage in experimental colitis. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were randomised into two groups and fed nucleic acid free 20% casein diet (control) or this diet supplemented with 0.5% nucleoside-nucleotide mixture for four weeks. On the second week, colonic inflammation was induced in rats by intracolonic administration of 0.25 ml of 50% ethanol containing 25 mg of trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid. Additionally, other sets of rats were treated with 0.25 ml of 50% ethanol, 25 mg of trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid in 0.25 ml saline, or 0.25 ml of 0.9% saline. RESULTS: After two weeks, colon weight, macroscopic and microscopic damage scores, were significantly greater (p < 0.05) in the nucleoside-nucleotide supplemented group compared with the non-supplemented control groups. The same variables seen in the trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-ethanol group fed nucleoside-nucleotide free diet were greater (p < 0.05) than in the rest of the groups fed nucleoside-nucleotide free diet and treated with ethanol, trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid in saline, or saline. Histologically, segmental ulceration and inflammation associated with significantly increased infiltration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes, macrophages, lymphocytes, fibroblasts were observed in the supplemented group compared with the controls. In the nucleoside-nucleotide supplemented group the epithelial damage, mucosal erosion, oedema, and coagulative necrosis of the muscularis propria was more extensive in comparison to the non-supplemented control groups. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that dietary nucleosides and nucleotides may aggravate colonic damage and inflammation in chemically

  8. Effect of aluminum ion on Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation in phospholipid liposomes under acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ohyashiki, T; Karino, T; Suzuki, S; Matsui, K

    1996-11-01

    The effects of Al3+ on Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation in phospholipid liposomes consisting of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylserine (PS) were examined under acidic conditions. The stimulatory effect of Al3+ on Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation in the liposomes showed a biphasic response against pH variation, and the maximum stimulation was observed around pH 6.0. In addition, it was found that the stimulatory effect of Al3+ on the lipid peroxidation was dependent on the proportion of PS in the liposomes. On the other hand, the lipid peroxidation in PC liposomes was not stimulated by the addition of Al3+. From these findings, it is suggested that the Al3+ effect on Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation under acidic conditions is largely dependent on the phospholipid composition. Trivalent cations such as Tb3+ and Ga3+ also stimulated Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation in PC/PS liposomes under acidic conditions, but divalent cations (Zn2+ and Mn2+) showed no stimulatory effect. The extents of Fe2+ disappearance and Fe3+ formation during the reaction were enhanced by the addition of Al3+ or Ga2+, but Tb3+ had no effect on Fe2+ disappearance. The results with 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) showed that the fluorescence anisotropy of DPH-labeled PC/PS liposomes under acidic conditions was increased by the addition of Al3+. Furthermore, there is a relation between the extents of the fluorescence anisotropy of the complex and TBARS production. In contrast, the fluorescence anisotropy of DPH molecules embedded in PC liposomes was not changed by the addition of Al3+. Based on these results, a possible mechanism of the stimulatory effect of Al3+ on Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation under acidic conditions is discussed. PMID:8982853

  9. Abscisic acid induces a cytosolic calcium decrease in barley aleurone protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Van Duijn, B; Schram, A W

    1991-01-14

    Cytosolic calcium concentrations (Cai) of barley aleurone protoplasts after stimulation with the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) were measured by using the calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye Indo-1. The measured basal Cai is about 200 nM. Stimulation with ABA induces a strong dose-dependent decrease in Cai to a minimal value of about 50 nM. This decrease occurs within 5 s. The Ca2+ antagonists La3+ and Cd2+ inhibit the ABA-induced Cai decrease in a dose-dependent manner, while the Ca2+ channel blockers verapamil and nifedipine give no inhibition. The induction of Cai decrease by ABA is consistent with activation of the plasma membrane Ca2(+)-ATPase by ABA. The possible role of this ABA-induced Cai decrease in ABA signal transduction and in counteracting the effects of gibberellic acid are discussed.

  10. Phytic acid suppresses ischemia-induced hydroxyl radical generation in rat myocardium.

    PubMed

    Obata, Toshio; Nakashima, Michiko

    2016-03-01

    The present study examined whether ischemia-reperfusion-induced hydroxyl radical (·OH) generation was attenuated by myo-inositol hexaphosphoric acid (phytic acid). A flexibly mounted microdialysis technique was used to detect the generation of ·OH in in vivo rat hearts. To measure the level of ·OH, sodium salicylate in Ringer's solution (0.5mM or 0.5 nmol/μl/min) was infused directly through a microdialysis probe to detect the generation of ·OH as reflected by the nonenzymatic formation of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA). To confirm the generation of ·OH by Fenton-type reaction, iron(II) was infused through a microdialysis probe. A positive linear correlation between iron(II) and the formation of 2,3-DHBA (R(2)=0.983) was observed. However, the level of 2,3-DHBA in norepinephrine (100 μM) plus phytic acid (100 μM) treated group were significantly lower than those observed in norepinephrine-only-treated group (n=6, *p<0.05). To examine the effect of phytic acid on ischemia-reperfusion-induced ·OH generation, the heart was subjected to myocardial ischemia for 15 min by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). When the heart was reperfused, the normal elevation of 2,3-DHBA in the heart dialysate was not observed in animals pretreated with phytic acid. These results suggest that phytic acid is associated with antioxidant effect due to the suppression of iron-induced ·OH generation.

  11. Retinoic acid inducible gene-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 are induced but not essential for dengue virus induced type I interferon response.

    PubMed

    Qin, Cheng-Feng; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Zhong-Yu; Jiang, Tao; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Xu-Dong; Yu, Man; Qin, E-De

    2011-08-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) are important human pathogens that cause mild dengue fever, and severe dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome, and no vaccine or antiviral therapy are currently available. At the initial stage of DENV infection, host pattern recognition receptors are responsible for sensing viral proteins or nucleic acids and initiating innate antiviral responses, including the activation of type I interferon (IFN) and proinflammatory cytokines. Two RNA helicases, retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5), are recently identified as cytoplasmic PPRs for virus infection. Here, in this study the involvement of RIG-I and MDA5 in DENV-induced IFN-β response A549 cells were investigated. DENV infection readily up-regulated RIG-I expression, activated IRF-3 and RIG-I mRNA transcription, and induced the production of IFN-β in A549 cells in a strain- and serotype-independent manner. While gene silencing of RIG-I by small interfering RNAs failed to significantly inhibit IFN-β production induced by DENV infection. Further experiments demonstrated that MDA5 was also induced by DENV infection, and MDA5 knockout did not block DENV induced IFN-β production in A549 cells. Our results demonstrated that both RIG-I and MDA5 were induced but neither of the two was essential for DENV induced IFN IFN-β response in A549 cells. These findings suggest that innate immune pathway are involved in the recognition of DENV by human non-immune cells, and provide insights for the understanding of the molecular mechanism for DENV-induced antiviral response.

  12. Combined staurosporine and retinoic acid induces differentiation in retinoic acid resistant acute promyelocytic leukemia cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dong-zheng; Sheng, Yan; Cai, Xun

    2014-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) resistance has been a critical problem in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) relapsed patients. In ATRA resistant APL cell lines NB4-R1 and NB4-R2, the combination of staurosporine and ATRA synergized to trigger differentiation accompanied by significantly enhanced protein level of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein ε (C/EBPε) and C/EBPβ as well as the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Furthermore, attenuation of the MEK activation blocked not only the differentiation but also the increased protein level of C/EBPε and C/EBPβ. Taken together, we concluded that the combination of ATRA and staurosporine could overcome differentiation block via MEK/ERK signaling pathway in ATRA-resistant APL cell lines. PMID:24769642

  13. Alpha-lipoic acid treatment of acetaminophen-induced rat liver damage.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Y I; Mahmoud, A A; Nassar, G

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a well-tolerated analgesic and antipyretic drug when used at therapeutic doses. Overdoses, however, cause oxidative stress, which leads to acute liver failure. Alpha lipoic acid is an antioxidant that has proven effective for ameliorating many pathological conditions caused by oxidative stress. We evaluated the effect of alpha lipoic acid on the histological and histochemical alterations of liver caused by an acute overdose of acetaminophen in rats. Livers of acetaminophen-intoxicated rats were congested and showed centrilobular necrosis, vacuolar degeneration and inflammatory cell infiltration. Necrotic hepatocytes lost most of their carbohydrates, lipids and structural proteins. Liver sections from rats pre-treated with lipoic acid showed fewer pathological changes; the hepatocytes appeared moderately vacuolated with moderate staining of carbohydrates and proteins. Nevertheless, alpha lipoic acid at the dose we used did not protect the liver fully from acetaminophen-induced acute toxicity. PMID:26179071

  14. Amino acid composition of cadmium-binding protein induced in a marine diatom

    SciTech Connect

    Maita, Y.; Kawaguchi, S. )

    1989-09-01

    Organisms living in environments polluted with heavy metals develop tolerance against these contaminants. The tolerance has been attributed to the ability to synthesize metal binding substances. These recent findings imply metal binding complexes from animals and plants, although having very similar functional properties, may have entirely different amino acid compositions. Researchers reported that cadystin from fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe was composed of only glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine. A year later, a heavy metal binding substance was isolated from Rauwolfia serpetina which contains only Glu, Cys, and Gly. Heavy metal binding complexes isolated from the water hyacinth and morning glory Datura innoxia also showed an amino acid composition similar to cadystin or phytochelatin. In this study, the cadmium binding protein induced in the marine diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, was isolated and purified and its amino acid composition determined.

  15. Alpha-lipoic acid treatment of acetaminophen-induced rat liver damage.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Y I; Mahmoud, A A; Nassar, G

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a well-tolerated analgesic and antipyretic drug when used at therapeutic doses. Overdoses, however, cause oxidative stress, which leads to acute liver failure. Alpha lipoic acid is an antioxidant that has proven effective for ameliorating many pathological conditions caused by oxidative stress. We evaluated the effect of alpha lipoic acid on the histological and histochemical alterations of liver caused by an acute overdose of acetaminophen in rats. Livers of acetaminophen-intoxicated rats were congested and showed centrilobular necrosis, vacuolar degeneration and inflammatory cell infiltration. Necrotic hepatocytes lost most of their carbohydrates, lipids and structural proteins. Liver sections from rats pre-treated with lipoic acid showed fewer pathological changes; the hepatocytes appeared moderately vacuolated with moderate staining of carbohydrates and proteins. Nevertheless, alpha lipoic acid at the dose we used did not protect the liver fully from acetaminophen-induced acute toxicity.

  16. GCN2 sustains mTORC1 suppression upon amino acid deprivation by inducing Sestrin2

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jiangbin; Palm, Wilhelm; Peng, Min; King, Bryan; Lindsten, Tullia; Li, Ming O.; Koumenis, Constantinos; Thompson, Craig B.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cells possess two amino acid-sensing kinases: general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) and mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Their combined effects orchestrate cellular adaptation to amino acid levels, but how their activities are coordinated remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate an important link between GCN2 and mTORC1 signaling. Upon deprivation of various amino acids, activated GCN2 up-regulates ATF4 to induce expression of the stress response protein Sestrin2, which is required to sustain repression of mTORC1 by blocking its lysosomal localization. Moreover, Sestrin2 induction is necessary for cell survival during glutamine deprivation, indicating that Sestrin2 is a critical effector of GCN2 signaling that regulates amino acid homeostasis through mTORC1 suppression. PMID:26543160

  17. The influence of the crystal structure on aggregation-induced luminescence of derivatives of aminobenzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosova, D. A.; Zarochentseva, E. P.; Vysotskaya, S. O.; Klemesheva, N. A.; Korotkov, V. I.

    2014-12-01

    The luminescence of three derivatives of 2-(phenylamino)-benzoic acid (N-phenylanthranilic, mefenamic, and niflumic acids) in benzene solution, in the polycrystalline state, and in the hexamethylbenzene matrix is studied. In the crystalline state, these compounds exhibit intense aggregation-induced luminescence. An increase in luminescence is also observed in the impurity crystal. The hexamethylbenzene crystal lattice restricts the mobility of molecules, thus ensuring the rigidity of the molecular structure of acids, which decreases the efficiency of nonradiative electron energy degradation. The main reason for the increase in the luminescence intensity in the case of fixation in a crystalline matrix is the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and dimers of acid molecules.

  18. Acetylsalicylic acid inhibits IL-18-induced cardiac fibroblast migration through the induction of RECK.

    PubMed

    Siddesha, Jalahalli M; Valente, Anthony J; Sakamuri, Siva S V P; Gardner, Jason D; Delafontaine, Patrice; Noda, Makoto; Chandrasekar, Bysani

    2014-07-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis and adverse remodeling is thought to involve the ROS-dependent induction of inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and the activation and migration of cardiac fibroblasts (CF). Here we investigated the role of RECK (reversion-inducing-cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs), a unique membrane-anchored MMP regulator, on IL-18-induced CF migration, and the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on this response. In a Matrigel invasion assay, IL-18-induced migration of primary mouse CF was dependent on both IKK/NF-κB- and JNK/AP-1-mediated MMP9 induction and Sp1-mediated RECK suppression, mechanisms that required Nox4-dependent H(2)O(2) generation. Notably, forced expression of RECK attenuated IL-18-induced MMP9 activation and CF migration. Further, therapeutic concentrations of ASA inhibited IL-18-induced H(2)O(2) generation, MMP9 activation, RECK suppression, and CF migration. The salicylic acid moiety of ASA similarly attenuated IL-18-induced CF migration. Thus, ASA may exert potential beneficial effect in cardiac fibrosis through multiple protective mechanisms.

  19. Phosphatidic acid-induced contraction in guinea-pig taenia coli.

    PubMed

    Ohata, H; Momose, K

    1990-06-01

    Natural phosphatidic acid from egg yolk lecithin (PA) caused a sustained contraction in guinea-pig taenia coli. The contractile response to PA was concentration-dependent (10(-6)-10(-4) M) in the normal medium and the maximal response to PA was about 20% of the response to carbachol (CCh) at 10(-6) M. Phospholipase D mimicked PA-induced contraction. This result suggests that increase in endogenous PA can induce contraction. The PA-induced contraction was not inhibited by atropine (10(-6) M). The contraction was more dependent on concentration of extracellular Ca2+ than CCh-induced contraction. PA increased 45Ca2+ uptake into the tissue. These results suggest that the PA-induced contraction results from increase in Ca2+ influx across plasma membranes, but not release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores in guinea-pig taenia coli. The PA-induced contraction was inhibited to 42% of the control response by propyl gallate (0.2 mM), a combined inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase. This result indicates that a portion of the contraction is related to release of arachidonic acid and its metabolites, and the other portions are based on direct action of PA. These results suggest a possibility that increased PA by agonist stimulation is related to the following extracellular Ca2(+)-dependent contraction.

  20. Humic acid inhibits HBV-induced autophagosome formation and induces apoptosis in HBV-transfected Hep G2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Kishor; Yadav, Ajay K.; Gupta, Parul; Rathore, Abhishek Singh; Nayak, Baibaswata; Venugopal, Senthil K.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) utilizes several mechanisms to survive in the host cells and one of the main pathways being autophagosome formation. Humic acid (HA), one of the major components of Mineral pitch, is an Ayurvedic medicinal food, commonly used by the people of the Himalayan regions of Nepal and India for various body ailments. We hypothesized that HA could induce cell death and inhibit HBV-induced autophagy in hepatic cells. Incubation of Hep G2.2.1.5 cells (HepG2 cells stably expressing HBV) with HA (100 μM) inhibited both cell proliferation and autophagosome formation significantly, while apoptosis induction was enhanced. Western blot results showed that HA incubation resulted in decreased levels of beclin-1, SIRT-1 and c-myc, while caspase-3 and β-catenin expression were up-regulated. Western blot results showed that HA significantly inhibited the expression of HBx (3-fold with 50 μM and 5-fold with 100 μM) compared to control cells. When HA was incubated with HBx-transfected Hep G2 cells, HBx-induced autophagosome formation and beclin-1 levels were decreased. These data showed that HA induced apoptosis and inhibited HBV-induced autophagosome formation and proliferation in hepatoma cells. PMID:27708347

  1. Effects of L-glutamine on acetylsalycylic acid induced gastric lesions and acid back diffusion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hung, C R; Takeuchi, K; Okabe, S; Murata, T; Takagi, K

    1976-12-01

    Effects of L-glutamine on acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)-induced gastric mucosal lesions were studied in mongrel dogs. It was confirmed that when oral ASA at 1.0 or 2.0 g per dog is given in two divided doses, there is severe and consistent dose-dependent mucosal damage in the glandular portion of the stomach in fasted dogs. However, when L-glutamine 2.0 or 4.0 g per dog in two divided doses is given concomitantly with ASA 2.0 g per dog orally, the gastric irritation is significantly inhibited. Instillation of 20 mM of ASA in 100 mM HCl solution into the Heidenhain pouch of Beagle dogs produced a significant loss of H+ from the pouch and a gain of Na+ in the lumen compared with ASA-free controls. When L-glutamine (100 mM) was given concomitantly with ASA (20 mM) into the pouch, changes of electrolyte fluxes in response to ASA alone were significantly suppressed. However, 50 mM of L-glutamine had no appreciable effect on acid back diffusion caused by ASA 20 mM. The amino acid itself had little effect on the ionic movement in the pouch. Gross bleeding from the pouch treated with ASA was never observed with the concomitant dosing of ASA and L-glutamine 50 or 100 mM. PMID:15154

  2. Mitigation of Inflammation-Induced Mood Dysregulation by Long-Chain Omega-3 Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Robert K

    2015-01-01

    Although evidence suggests that chronic elevations in immune-inflammatory signaling can precipitate mood symptoms in a subset of individuals, associated risk and resilience mechanisms remain poorly understood. Long-chain omega-3 (LCn-3) fatty acids, including eicosapentaenic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), have anti-inflammatory and inflammation-resolving properties that maintain immune-inflammatory signaling homeostasis. Cross-sectional evidence suggests that the mood disorders major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder are associated with low EPA and/or DHA biostatus, elevations in the LCn-6:LCn-3 fatty acid ratio, and elevated levels of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids, cytokines, and acute-phase proteins. Medications that are effective for reducing depressive symptoms or stabilizing manic depressive oscillations may act in part by downregulating immune-inflammatory signaling and are augmented by anti-inflammatory medications. Recent prospective longitudinal evidence suggests that elevations in the LCn-6:LCn-3 fatty acid ratio are a modifiable risk factor for the development of mood symptoms, including depression and irritability, in response to immune-inflammatory signaling. Together these data suggest that increasing LCn-3 fatty acid intake and biostatus represents a feasible strategy to mitigate the negative impact of elevated immune-inflammatory signaling on mood stability. Key teaching points: • Long-chain omega-3 (LCn-3) fatty acids have anti-inflammatory and inflammation-resolving properties. • Major mood disorders are associated with both LCn-3 fatty acids deficiency and elevated immune-inflammatory signaling. • Prospective evidence suggests that low LCn-3 fatty acid biostatus increases risk for developing inflammation-induced mood dysregulation. • Taken collectively, this evidence suggests that increasing LCn-3 fatty acid intake and biostatus represents a promising strategy to mitigate the detrimental effects of elevated immune

  3. Mechanical changes in rat tail tendons induced by dibasic amino acids as a function of age.

    PubMed

    Reihsner, R; Menzel, E J

    1994-01-01

    Rat tail tendons from 54-day-old and 900-day-old animals were incubated with different concentrations of the dibasic amino acids, lysine and arginine. We observed a significant incorporation of these amino acids into the tendons. Uniaxial tension tests and relaxation experiments were performed at strain levels within the linear portion of the stress-strain relationship. The incorporation of the amino acids resulted in a decrease of ultimate stress and maximum Young's modulus and, after separation of the elastic and viscous stress components, in a decrease of the elastic fraction. The incorporation of amino acids and the resulting mechanical alterations were more pronounced in the young animals. The reversibility of the effects induced by the amino acids was tested. After the glycosaminoglycan chains were digested with chondroitinase ABC, we showed that the dibasic amino acids bind predominantly to the proteoglycan matrix. A possible analogy to the effects of amino acid incorporation on biomechanics and swelling with a monovalent cation such as Na+ is discussed.

  4. Neuroprotective effects of MK-801 on L-2-chloropropionic acid-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Williams, R E; Lock, E A; Bachelard, H S

    2001-02-01

    L-2-Chloropropionic acid is selectively toxic to the cerebellum in rats; the granule cell necrosis observed within 48 h can be prevented by prior administration of MK-801. Short-term treatment (2 h) with L-2-chloropropionic acid has also been shown to activate the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in fasted adult rats. This study aimed to investigate the effect of prior exposure to MK-801 on the biochemical and neurotoxicological effects of L-2-chloropropionic acid. Extracts were prepared from the forebrain and cerebellum of animals that had been treated with L-2-chloropropionic acid, with and without prior treatment with MK-801, and were analysed using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and amino acid analysis. Glucose metabolism was studied by monitoring the metabolism of [1-(13)C]-glucose using GC/MS. L-2-Chloropropionic acid caused increased glucose metabolism in both brain regions 6 h after administration, confirming activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, which was not prevented by MK-801. After 48 h an increase in lactate and a decrease in N-acetylaspartate was observed only in the cerebellum, whereas phosphocreatine and ATP decreased in both tissues. MK-801 prevented the changes in lactate and N:-acetylaspartate, but not those on the energy state. These studies suggest that L-2-chloropropionic acid-induced neurotoxicity is only partly mediated by the NMDA subtype of glutamate receptor.

  5. Obestatin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Konturek, Peter; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide derived from the proghrelin, has been shown to exhibit some protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present study was to determine the effect of obestatin administration on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Obestatin was administered intraperitoneally twice a day at a dose of 8 nmol/kg, starting 24 h after the induction of colitis. Seven or 14 days after the induction of colitis, the healing rate of the colon was evaluated. Results. Treatment with obestatin after induction of colitis accelerated the healing of colonic wall damage and this effect was associated with a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase and content of interleukin-1β. Moreover, obestatin administration significantly reversed the colitis-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Conclusion. Administration of exogenous obestatin exhibits therapeutic effects in the course of acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect is related, at least in part, to the obestatin-evoked anti-inflammatory effect, an improvement of local blood flow, and an increase in cell proliferation in colonic mucosa.

  6. Icariin, a major constituent from Epimedium brevicornum, attenuates ibotenic acid-induced excitotoxicity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zong, Nan; Li, Fei; Deng, Yuanyuan; Shi, Jingshan; Jin, Feng; Gong, Qihai

    2016-10-15

    Excitotoxicity is one of the most extensively studied causes of neuronal death and plays an important role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Icariin is a flavonoid component of a traditional Chinese medicine reported to possess a broad spectrum of pharmacological effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of icariin against learning and memory impairment induced by excitotoxicity. Here, we demonstrated that rats receiving intracerebroventricular injection of excitatory neurotoxin ibotenic acid exhibited impaired learning and memory. Oral administration of icariin at doses of 20 and 40mg/kg rescued behavioral performance and protected against neurotoxicity in rat hippocampus by suppressing ibotenic acid induced pro-apoptosis. Furthermore, Western blott of hippocampal specimens revealed that icariin up-regulated the expression of calbindin-D28k protein following ibotenic acid administration. Additionally, icariin inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family phosphorylation and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling, implicating the MAPK signaling and NF-κB signaling pathways were involved in the mechanism underlying icariin-mediated neuroprotection against ibotenic acid-induced excitotoxicity. These data suggested that icariin could be a potential agent for treatment of excitotoxicity-related diseases, including AD. PMID:27368415

  7. Regulation of epinasty induced by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in pea and Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Pazmiño, D M; Rodríguez-Serrano, M; Sanz, M; Romero-Puertas, M C; Sandalio, L M

    2014-07-01

    The herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) causes uncontrolled cell division and malformed growth in plants, giving rise to leaf epinasty and stem curvature. In this study, mechanisms involved in the regulation of leaf epinasty induced by 2,4-D were studied using different chemicals involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation (diphenyleniodonium, butylated hydroxyanisole, EDTA, allopurinol), calcium channels (LaCl3), protein phosphorylation (cantharidin, wortmannin) and ethylene emission/perception (aminoethoxyvinyl glycine, AgNO3). The effect of these compounds on the epinasty induced by 2,4-D was analysed in shoots and leaf strips from pea plants. For further insight into the effect of 2,4-D, studies were also made in Arabidopsis mutants deficient in ROS production (rbohD, rbohF, xdh), ethylene (ein 3-1, ctr 1-1, etr 1-1), abscisic acid (aba 3.1), and jasmonic acid (coi 1.1, jar 1.1, opr 3) pathways. The results suggest that ROS production, mainly ·OH, is essential in the development of epinasty triggered by 2,4-D. Epinasty was also found to be regulated by Ca2+, protein phosphorylation and ethylene, although all these factors act downstream of ROS production. The use of Arabidopsis mutants appears to indicate that abscisic and jasmonic acid are not involved in regulating epinasty, although they could be involved in other symptoms induced by 2,4-D.

  8. Icariin, a major constituent from Epimedium brevicornum, attenuates ibotenic acid-induced excitotoxicity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zong, Nan; Li, Fei; Deng, Yuanyuan; Shi, Jingshan; Jin, Feng; Gong, Qihai

    2016-10-15

    Excitotoxicity is one of the most extensively studied causes of neuronal death and plays an important role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Icariin is a flavonoid component of a traditional Chinese medicine reported to possess a broad spectrum of pharmacological effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of icariin against learning and memory impairment induced by excitotoxicity. Here, we demonstrated that rats receiving intracerebroventricular injection of excitatory neurotoxin ibotenic acid exhibited impaired learning and memory. Oral administration of icariin at doses of 20 and 40mg/kg rescued behavioral performance and protected against neurotoxicity in rat hippocampus by suppressing ibotenic acid induced pro-apoptosis. Furthermore, Western blott of hippocampal specimens revealed that icariin up-regulated the expression of calbindin-D28k protein following ibotenic acid administration. Additionally, icariin inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family phosphorylation and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling, implicating the MAPK signaling and NF-κB signaling pathways were involved in the mechanism underlying icariin-mediated neuroprotection against ibotenic acid-induced excitotoxicity. These data suggested that icariin could be a potential agent for treatment of excitotoxicity-related diseases, including AD.

  9. Characterization of a salicylic acid- and pathogen-induced lipase-like gene in Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Ah; Cho, Tae-Ju

    2003-09-30

    A cDNA clone for a salicylic acid-induced gene in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis) was isolated and characterized. The cabbage gene, designated Br-sil1 (for Brassica rapa salicylate-induced lipase-like 1 gene), encodes a putative lipase that has the family II lipase motif GDSxxDxG around the active site serine. A database search showed that plant genomes have a large number of genes that contain the family II lipase motif. The lipase-like proteins include a myrosinase-associated protein, an anther-specific proline-rich protein APG, a pollen coat protein EXL, and an early nodule-specific protein. The Br-sil1 gene is strongly induced by salicylic acid and a nonhost pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, that elicits a hypersensitive response in Chinese cabbage. Treatment of the cabbage leaves with BTH, methyl jasmonate, or ethephon showed that the Br-sil1 gene expression is induced by BTH, but not by methyl jasmonate or ethylene. This indicates that the cabbage gene is activated via a salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway. An examination of the tissue-specific expression revealed that the induction of the Br-sil1 gene expression by BTH occurs in leaves and stems, but not in roots and flowers. Without the BTH treatment, however, the Br-sil1 gene is not expressed in any of the tissues that were examined.

  10. Ginseng alleviates cyclophosphamide-induced hepatotoxicity via reversing disordered homeostasis of glutathione and bile acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, He; Long, Min-Hui; Wu, Jie; Wang, Meng-Meng; Li, Xiu-Yang; Shen, Hong; Xu, Jin-Di; Zhou, Li; Fang, Zhi-Jun; Luo, Yi; Li, Song-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CP), a chemotherapeutic agent, is restricted due to its side effects, especially hepatotoxicity. Ginseng has often been clinically used with CP in China, but whether and how ginseng reduces the hepatotoxicity is unknown. In this study, the hepatoprotective effects and mechanisms under the combined usage were investigated. It was found that ginseng could ameliorate CP-induced elevations of ALP, ALT, ALS, MDA and hepatic deterioration, enhance antioxidant enzymes’ activities and GSH’s level. Metabolomics study revealed that 33 endogenous metabolites were changed by CP, 19 of which were reversed when ginseng was co-administrated via two main pathways, i.e., GSH metabolism and primary bile acids synthesis. Furthermore, ginseng could induce expression of GCLC, GCLM, GS and GST, which associate with the disposition of GSH, and expression of FXR, CYP7A1, NTCP and MRP 3, which play important roles in the synthesis and transport of bile acids. In addition, NRF 2, one of regulatory elements on the expression of GCLC, GCLM, GS, GST, NTCP and MRP3, was up-regulated when ginseng was co-administrated. In conclusion, ginseng could alleviate CP-induced hepatotoxicity via modulating the disordered homeostasis of GSH and bile acid, which might be mediated by inducing the expression of NRF 2 in liver. PMID:26625948

  11. Inhibition of Receptor Interacting Protein Kinases Attenuates Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy Induced by Palmitic Acid.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingyue; Lu, Lihui; Lei, Song; Chai, Hua; Wu, Siyuan; Tang, Xiaoju; Bao, Qinxue; Chen, Li; Wu, Wenchao; Liu, Xiaojing

    2016-01-01

    Palmitic acid (PA) is known to cause cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Cardiac hypertrophy is one of the important pathological features of PA-induced lipotoxicity, but the mechanism by which PA induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is still unclear. Therefore, our study was to test whether necroptosis, a receptor interacting protein kinase 1 and 3 (RIPK1 and RIPK3-) dependent programmed necrosis, was involved in the PA-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. We used the PA-treated primary neonatal rat cardiac myocytes (NCMs) or H9c2 cells to study lipotoxicity. Our results demonstrated that cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was induced by PA treatment, determined by upregulation of hypertrophic marker genes and cell surface area enlargement. Upon PA treatment, the expression of RIPK1 and RIPK3 was increased. Pretreatment with the RIPK1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1), the PA-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, was attenuated. Knockdown of RIPK1 or RIPK3 by siRNA suppressed the PA-induced myocardial hypertrophy. Moreover, a crosstalk between necroptosis and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was observed in PA-treated cardiomyocytes. Inhibition of RIPK1 with Nec-1, phosphorylation level of AKT (Ser473), and mTOR (Ser2481) was significantly reduced in PA-treated cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, RIPKs-dependent necroptosis might be crucial in PA-induced myocardial hypertrophy. Activation of mTOR may mediate the effect of necroptosis in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by PA. PMID:27057269

  12. The metabolic pathway of salicylic acid rather than of chlorogenic acid is involved in the stress-induced flowering of Pharbitis nil.

    PubMed

    Hatayama, Tomomi; Takeno, Kiyotoshi

    2003-05-01

    We examined the involvement of chlorogenic acid (CGA) and salicylic acid (SA) in the stress-induced flowering of Pharbitis nil (synonym Ipomoea nil). The incorporation efficiency of exogenously applied CGA and the deactivation rate of incorporated CGA were determined in cotyledons by high-performance liquid chromatography. The assay plants could not incorporate a sufficient amount of CGA via roots. The perfusion technique by which the assay solution was forced into the plant from the cut end of the hypocotyl improved the efficiency of CGA incorporation. However, no flower-inducing activity was detected, indicating that CGA was not involved in flowering. It was concluded that the close correlation between CGA content and flowering response is merely coincidence or a parallelism. Flowering under long-day conditions induced by low-temperature stress was completely inhibited by aminooxyacetic acid (AOA), an inhibitor of phenylalanine ammonialyase. The flower-inhibiting effect of AOA was nullified by co-applied t-cinnamic acid and by benzoic acid. This indicates that the metabolic pathway from t-cinnamic acid to SA via benzoic acid is involved in the stress-induced flowering. The results indicate that the metabolic pathway of SA is involved in the stress-induced flowering of P. nil not the metabolic pathway of CGA.

  13. Primary and secondary genetic responses after folic acid-induced acute renal injury in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Calvet, J P; Chadwick, L J

    1994-12-01

    Folic acid-induced acute renal injury results in dramatic changes in gene expression. Among the genes affected by folic acid treatment are the primary response genes, c-fos and c-myc, which are thought to function to initiate cell cycle events. In this report, changes in the expression of three other genes in response to folic acid injury have been investigated: ornithine decarboxylase, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2). Renal injury was found to cause a rapid decrease in EGF mRNA, which remained absent for several days after the initial injury, gradually returning to normal levels over an approximately 3-wk regeneration and recovery period. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA showed a similar decrease. In contrast, folic acid caused a rapid increase in SGP-2 mRNA, which peaked several days after treatment, decreasing to normal levels over the 3-wk period. The mRNAs for the primary response genes were superinduced in the injured kidneys in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. In contrast, the changes in EGF and SGP-2 mRNA levels were blocked by cycloheximide, indicating that these responses required new protein synthesis during the first few hours after folic acid injury. The opposite but parallel responses in the expression of the EGF and SGP-2 genes suggest that their regulation is coupled to the initial injury-induced dedifferentiation and subsequent return to the fully differentiated state.

  14. Neuroprotective Effect of Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid on N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rondón, Netxibeth; Esquiva, Gema; Germain, Francisco; de la Villa, Pedro; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell degeneration underlies the pathophysiology of diseases affecting the retina and optic nerve. Several studies have previously evidenced the anti-apoptotic properties of the bile constituent, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, in diverse models of photoreceptor degeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced damage in the rat retina using a functional and morphological approach. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid was administered intraperitoneally before and after intravitreal injection of NMDA. Three days after insult, full-field electroretinograms showed reductions in the amplitudes of the positive and negative-scotopic threshold responses, scotopic a- and b-waves and oscillatory potentials. Quantitative morphological evaluation of whole-mount retinas demonstrated a reduction in the density of retinal ganglion cells. Systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated the functional impairment induced by NMDA, which correlated with a higher retinal ganglion cell density. Our findings sustain the efficacy of tauroursodeoxycholic acid administration in vivo, suggesting it would be a good candidate for the pharmacological treatment of degenerative diseases coursing with retinal ganglion cell loss. PMID:26379056

  15. Experimental Protoporphyria: Effect of Bile Acids on Liver Damage Induced by Griseofulvin

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, María del Carmen; Ruspini, Silvina Fernanda; Afonso, Susana Graciela; Meiss, Roberto; Buzaleh, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    The effect of bile acids administration to an experimental mice model of Protoporphyria produced by griseofulvin (Gris) was investigated. The aim was to assess whether porphyrin excretion could be accelerated by bile acids treatment in an attempt to diminish liver damage induced by Gris. Liver damage markers, heme metabolism, and oxidative stress parameters were analyzed in mice treated with Gris and deoxycholic (DXA), dehydrocholic (DHA), chenodeoxycholic, or ursodeoxycholic (URSO). The administration of Gris alone increased the activities of glutathione reductase (GRed), superoxide dismutase (SOD), alkaline phosphatase (AP), gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST), as well as total porphyrins, glutathione (GSH), and cytochrome P450 (CYP) levels in liver. Among the bile acids studied, DXA and DHA increased PROTO IX excretion, DXA also abolished the action of Gris, reducing lipid peroxidation and hepatic GSH and CYP levels, and the activities of GGT, AP, SOD, and GST returned to control values. However, porphyrin accumulation was not prevented by URSO; instead this bile acid reduced ALA-S and the antioxidant defense enzymes system activities. In conclusion, we postulate that DXA acid would be more effective to prevent liver damage induced by Gris. PMID:25945334

  16. Neuroprotective Effect of Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid on N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Vicente, Violeta; Lax, Pedro; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rondón, Netxibeth; Esquiva, Gema; Germain, Francisco; de la Villa, Pedro; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell degeneration underlies the pathophysiology of diseases affecting the retina and optic nerve. Several studies have previously evidenced the anti-apoptotic properties of the bile constituent, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, in diverse models of photoreceptor degeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced damage in the rat retina using a functional and morphological approach. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid was administered intraperitoneally before and after intravitreal injection of NMDA. Three days after insult, full-field electroretinograms showed reductions in the amplitudes of the positive and negative-scotopic threshold responses, scotopic a- and b-waves and oscillatory potentials. Quantitative morphological evaluation of whole-mount retinas demonstrated a reduction in the density of retinal ganglion cells. Systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated the functional impairment induced by NMDA, which correlated with a higher retinal ganglion cell density. Our findings sustain the efficacy of tauroursodeoxycholic acid administration in vivo, suggesting it would be a good candidate for the pharmacological treatment of degenerative diseases coursing with retinal ganglion cell loss.

  17. Inhibition of Fatty Acid Synthesis Induces Apoptosis of Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Koji; Suzuki, Kenta; Sawamoto, Junpei; Tokizawa, Yuma; Iwase, Yumiko; Yumita, Nagahiko; Ikeda, Toshihiko

    2016-09-01

    Cancer cells tend to have a high requirement for lipids, including fatty acids, cholesterol and triglyceride, because of their rapid proliferative rate compared to normal cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of inhibition of lipid synthesis on the proliferation and viability of human pancreatic cancer cells. Of the inhibitors of lipid synthesis that were tested, 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA), which is an inhibitor of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and the fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibitors cerulenin and irgasan, significantly suppressed the proliferation of MiaPaCa-2 and AsPC-1 cells. Treatment of MiaPaCa-2 cells with these inhibitors significantly increased the number of apoptotic cells. In addition, TOFA increased caspase-3 activity and induced cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Moreover, addition of palmitate to MiaPaCa-2 cells treated with TOFA rescued cells from apoptotic cell death. These results suggest that TOFA induces apoptosis via depletion of fatty acids and that, among the various aspects of lipid metabolism, inhibition of fatty acid synthesis may be a notable target for the treatment of human pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:27630308

  18. Role of neurosteroids in experimental 3-nitropropionic acid induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pushpender; Kumar, Puneet; Khan, Aamir; Deshmukh, Rahul; Lal Sharma, Pyare

    2014-01-15

    Huntington's disease is an autosomal dominant, progressive, and fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor and non-motor symptoms. Systemic administration of 3-nitropropionic acid, a complex II inhibitor of the electron transport chain induces selective striatal lesions in rodents. Neurosteroids are synthesized in central nervous system, able to modulate GABAA receptor function and has been reported to have neuroprotective action. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of neurosteroids such as progesterone and pregnenolone which are positive and negative modulators of GABA respectively against 3-nitropropionic acid induced experimental Huntington's disease. Systemic administration of 3-nitropropionic acid (10mg/kg i.p.) for 14 days significantly reduced body weight, locomotor activity, motor coordination, balance beam walk performance, antioxidant defense enzymes (reduced glutathione and catalase) and significantly increase oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxidation and nitrite level) in striatum and cortex. 3-Nitropropionic acid treatment also increases pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β) level in striatum. Progesterone (10, 20mg/kg/day i.p.) treatments for 14 days significantly reversed the behavioral, antioxidant defense enzymes, oxidative stress marker and pro-inflammatory cytokines as compared to the 3-Nitropropionic acid treated group. Pregnenolone (1 and 2mg/kg i.p.), a negative modulator of GABAA pretreatment significantly reversed the protective effect of progesterone on behavioral and biochemical parameters. The results of the present study suggest that the positive GABAergic modulation may be beneficial for the treatment of motor disorder. PMID:24333475

  19. Comparative neuroprotective profile of statins in quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2011-01-01

    A possible neuroprotective role has been recently suggested for 3H3MGCoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Here, we sought to determine neuroprotective effect of statins in quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity in rats. Rats were surgically administered quinolinic acid and treated with Atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (15, 30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (5, 10 mg/kg) once daily up to 3 weeks. Atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (10 mg/kg) treatment significantly attenuated the quinolinic acid induced behavioral (locomotor activity, rotarod performance and beam walk test), biochemical (lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration, SOD and catalase), mitochondrial enzyme complex alterations in rats suggesting their free radical scavenging potential. Additionally, atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (10 mg/kg) significantly decrease the TNF-α level and striatal lesion volume in quinolinic acid treated animals indicating their anti-inflammatory effects. In comparing the protective effect of different statins, atorvastatin is effective at both the doses while simvastatin and fluvastatins at respective lower doses were not able to produce the protective effect in quinolinic acid treated animals. These modulations can account, at least partly, for the beneficial effect of statins in our rodent model of striatal degeneration. Our findings show that statins could be explored as possible neuroprotective agents for neurodegenerative disorders such as HD. PMID:20696189

  20. Licofelone attenuates quinolinic acid induced Huntington like symptoms: possible behavioral, biochemical and cellular alterations.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2011-03-30

    Cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase enzymes are involved in arachidonic acid metabolism. Emerging evidence indicates that cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors prevent neurodegenerative processes and related complications. Therefore, the present study has been designed to explore the neuroprotective potential of licofelone (dual COX-2/5-LOX inhibitor) against quinolinic acid induced Huntington like symptom in rats. Intrastriatal administration of quinolinic acid significantly caused reduction in body weight and motor function (locomotor activity, rotarod performance and beam walk test), oxidative defense (as evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration and decreased endogenous antioxidant enzymes), alteration in mitochondrial enzyme complex (I, II and IV) activities, raised TNF-α level and striatal lesion volume as compared to sham treated animals. Licofelone (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg) treatment significantly improved body weight, locomotor activity, rotarod performance, balance beam walk performance, oxidative defense, mitochondrial enzyme complex activities and attenuated TNF-α level and striatal lesion as compared to control (quinolinic acid). The present study highlights that licofelone attenuates behavioral, biochemical and cellular alterations against quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity and this could be an important therapeutic avenue to ameliorate the Huntington like symptoms. PMID:21237233

  1. Near-infrared laser-induced generation of three rare conformers of glycolic acid.

    PubMed

    Halasa, Anna; Lapinski, Leszek; Reva, Igor; Rostkowska, Hanna; Fausto, Rui; Nowak, Maciej J

    2014-07-31

    Structural transformations were induced in conformers of glycolic acid by selective excitation with monochromatic tunable near-infrared laser light. For the compound isolated in Ar matrixes, near-IR excitation led to generation of two higher-energy conformers (GAC; AAT) differing from the most stable SSC form by 180° rotation around the C-C bond. A detailed investigation of this transformation revealed that one conformer (GAC) is produced directly from the near-IR-excited most stable conformer. The other higher-energy conformer (AAT) was effectively generated only upon excitation of the primary photoproduct (GAC) with another near-IR photon. Once these higher-energy conformers of glycolic acid were generated in an Ar matrix, they could be subsequently transformed into one another upon selective near-IR excitations. Interestingly, no repopulation of the initial most stable SSC conformer occurred upon near-IR excitation of the higher-energy forms of the compound isolated in solid Ar. A dramatically different picture of near-IR-induced conformational transformations was observed for glycolic acid isolated in N2 matrixes. In this case, upon near-IR excitation, the most stable SSC form converted solely into a new conformer (SST), where the acid OH group is rotated by 180°. This conformational transformation was found to be photoreversible. Moreover, SST conformer, photoproduced in the N2 matrix, spontaneously converted to the most stable SSC form of glycolic acid, when the matrix was kept at cryogenic temperature and in the dark.

  2. Docosahexaenoic acid prevents palmitate-induced activation of proteolytic systems in C2C12 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Woodworth-Hobbs, Myra E; Hudson, Matthew B; Rahnert, Jill A; Zheng, Bin; Franch, Harold A; Price, S Russ

    2014-08-01

    Saturated fatty acids like palmitate contribute to muscle atrophy in a number of conditions (e.g., type II diabetes) by altering insulin signaling. Akt is a key modulator of protein balance that inhibits the FoxO transcription factors (e.g., FoxO3) which selectively induce the expression of atrophy-inducing genes (atrogenes) in the ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome systems. Conversely, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have beneficial effects on insulin signaling and may preserve muscle mass. In an earlier report, the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) protected myotubes from palmitate-induced atrophy; the mechanisms underlying the alterations in protein metabolism were not identified. This study investigated whether DHA prevents a palmitate-induced increase in proteolysis by restoring Akt/FoxO signaling. Palmitate increased the rate of protein degradation, while cotreatment with DHA prevented the response. Palmitate reduced the activation state of Akt and increased nuclear FoxO3 protein while decreasing its cytosolic level. Palmitate also increased the messenger RNAs (mRNAs) of two FoxO3 atrogene targets, the E3 ubiquitin ligase atrogin-1/MAFbx and the autophagy mediator Bnip3. DHA attenuated the effects of palmitate on Akt activation, FoxO3 localization and atrogene mRNAs. DHA, alone or in combination with palmitate and decreased the ratio of LC3B-II:LC3B-I protein as well as the rate of autophagosome formation, as indicated by reduced LC3B-II protein in the presence of 10 mmol/L methylamine, suggesting an independent effect of DHA on the macroautophagy pathway. These data indicate that palmitate induces myotube atrophy, at least in part, by activating multiple proteolytic systems and that DHA counters the catabolic effects of palmitate by restoring Akt/FoxO signaling. PMID:24835079

  3. Involvement of BID translocation in glycyrrhetinic acid and 11-deoxy glycyrrhetinic acid-induced attenuation of gastric cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dejian; Zhong, Wei; Li, Juan; Zhang, Bing; Song, Gang; Hu, Tianhui

    2014-01-01

    Glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), the main chemical constituents of licorice, has shown remarkable anticancer activity. However, the side effects limit its widespread use. 11-DOGA is produced through reduction of GA 11-carbonyl to 11-hydroxyl to reduce its side effects, although its anticancer activities are largely unknown. Here, we report that the functional mechanisms of GA and 11-DOGA in gastric cancers, as well as the comparison between these two drugs' pharmacological potential. Firstly, we found that GA and 11-DOGA significantly inhibits the viabilities of gastric cancer cells in dose- and time-dependent manners. Both GA and 11-DOGA induce gastric cancer cells apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in G2 phase by upregulation of p21 and downregulation of cdc2 and cyclin B1. Further studies show that GA and 11-DOGA-induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells is associated with BID translocation from nucleus to mitochondria. Moreover, GA and 11-DOGA could effectively inhibit tumor formation of gastric cancer cells in nude mice. Comparing with 11-DOGA, GA presents higher toxicity toward gastric cancer cells both in vivo and in vitro. Thus, the elucidation of the functional mechanisms of GA and 11-DOGA-induced attenuation of gastric cancer growth suggests a possible therapeutic role of GA and its derivatives.

  4. Simvastatin may induce insulin resistance through a novel fatty acid mediated cholesterol independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kain, Vasundhara; Kapadia, Bandish; Misra, Parimal; Saxena, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Statins are a class of oral drugs that are widely used for treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Recent clinical data suggest that chronic use of these drugs increases the frequency of new onset diabetes. Studies to define the risks of statin-induced diabetes and its underlying mechanisms are clearly necessary. We explored the possible mechanism of statin induced insulin resistance using a well-established cell based model and simvastatin as a prototype statin. Our data show that simvastatin induces insulin resistance in a cholesterol biosynthesis inhibition independent fashion but does so by a fatty acid mediated effect on insulin signaling pathway. These data may help design strategies for prevention of statin induced insulin resistance and diabetes in patients with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26345110

  5. Concentrated Phosphatidic Acid in Cereal Brans as Potential Protective Agents against Indomethacin-Induced Stomach Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Afroz, Sheuli; Ikoma, Teru; Yagi, Ayano; Kogure, Kentaro; Tokumura, Akira; Tanaka, Tamotsu

    2016-09-21

    One of complications associated with long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is peptic ulcer. Recently, we found that orally administered phosphatidic acid (PA) ameliorated aspirin-induced stomach lesions in mice. In this study, we identified PA-rich food sources and examined the effects of the food materials on indomethacin-induced stomach ulcer. Among examined, buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) bran contained the highest level of PA (188 mg/100 g). PA was the richest phospholipid (25%) in the lipid fraction of the buckwheat bran. Administration of the lipid extracts of buckwheat bran significantly ameliorated indomethacin-induced stomach lesions in mice. In contrast, wheat (Triticum durum) bran lipids (PA, 4%) and soybean (Glycine max) lipids (PA, 3%) were not associated with ameliorative effects. These results indicated that PA-rich lipids can be used as an effective supplement for prevention of NSAID-induced stomach ulcer. PMID:27561232

  6. Concentrated Phosphatidic Acid in Cereal Brans as Potential Protective Agents against Indomethacin-Induced Stomach Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Afroz, Sheuli; Ikoma, Teru; Yagi, Ayano; Kogure, Kentaro; Tokumura, Akira; Tanaka, Tamotsu

    2016-09-21

    One of complications associated with long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is peptic ulcer. Recently, we found that orally administered phosphatidic acid (PA) ameliorated aspirin-induced stomach lesions in mice. In this study, we identified PA-rich food sources and examined the effects of the food materials on indomethacin-induced stomach ulcer. Among examined, buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) bran contained the highest level of PA (188 mg/100 g). PA was the richest phospholipid (25%) in the lipid fraction of the buckwheat bran. Administration of the lipid extracts of buckwheat bran significantly ameliorated indomethacin-induced stomach lesions in mice. In contrast, wheat (Triticum durum) bran lipids (PA, 4%) and soybean (Glycine max) lipids (PA, 3%) were not associated with ameliorative effects. These results indicated that PA-rich lipids can be used as an effective supplement for prevention of NSAID-induced stomach ulcer.

  7. Nitro-Fatty Acids in Plant Signaling: Nitro-Linolenic Acid Induces the Molecular Chaperone Network in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, María N.; Begara-Morales, Juan C.; Luque, Francisco; Melguizo, Manuel; Fierro-Risco, Jesús; Peñas-Sanjuán, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FAs) are the product of the reaction between reactive nitrogen species derived of nitric oxide (NO) and unsaturated fatty acids. In animal systems, NO2-FAs are considered novel signaling mediators of cell function based on a proven antiinflammatory response. Nevertheless, the interaction of NO with fatty acids in plant systems has scarcely been studied. Here, we examine the endogenous occurrence of nitro-linolenic acid (NO2-Ln) in Arabidopsis and the modulation of NO2-Ln levels throughout this plant’s development by mass spectrometry. The observed levels of this NO2-FA at picomolar concentrations suggested its role as a signaling effector of cell function. In fact, a transcriptomic analysis by RNA-seq technology established a clear signaling role for this molecule, demonstrating that NO2-Ln was involved in plant defense response against different abiotic-stress conditions, mainly by inducing heat shock proteins and supporting a conserved mechanism of action in both animal and plant defense processes. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that NO2-Ln was also involved in the response to oxidative stress conditions, mainly depicted by H2O2, reactive oxygen species, and oxygen-containing compound responses, with a high induction of ascorbate peroxidase expression. Closely related to these results, NO2-Ln levels significantly rose under several abiotic-stress conditions such as wounding or exposure to salinity, cadmium, and low temperature, thus validating the outcomes found by RNA-seq technology. Jointly, to our knowledge, these are the first results showing the endogenous presence of NO2-Ln in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and supporting the strong signaling role of these molecules in the defense mechanism against different abiotic-stress situations. PMID:26628746

  8. Nitro-Fatty Acids in Plant Signaling: Nitro-Linolenic Acid Induces the Molecular Chaperone Network in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Padilla, María N; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Luque, Francisco; Melguizo, Manuel; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Fierro-Risco, Jesús; Peñas-Sanjuán, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2016-02-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FAs) are the product of the reaction between reactive nitrogen species derived of nitric oxide (NO) and unsaturated fatty acids. In animal systems, NO2-FAs are considered novel signaling mediators of cell function based on a proven antiinflammatory response. Nevertheless, the interaction of NO with fatty acids in plant systems has scarcely been studied. Here, we examine the endogenous occurrence of nitro-linolenic acid (NO2-Ln) in Arabidopsis and the modulation of NO2-Ln levels throughout this plant's development by mass spectrometry. The observed levels of this NO2-FA at picomolar concentrations suggested its role as a signaling effector of cell function. In fact, a transcriptomic analysis by RNA-seq technology established a clear signaling role for this molecule, demonstrating that NO2-Ln was involved in plant defense response against different abiotic-stress conditions, mainly by inducing heat shock proteins and supporting a conserved mechanism of action in both animal and plant defense processes. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that NO2-Ln was also involved in the response to oxidative stress conditions, mainly depicted by H2O2, reactive oxygen species, and oxygen-containing compound responses, with a high induction of ascorbate peroxidase expression. Closely related to these results, NO2-Ln levels significantly rose under several abiotic-stress conditions such as wounding or exposure to salinity, cadmium, and low temperature, thus validating the outcomes found by RNA-seq technology. Jointly, to our knowledge, these are the first results showing the endogenous presence of NO2-Ln in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and supporting the strong signaling role of these molecules in the defense mechanism against different abiotic-stress situations. PMID:26628746

  9. Antinociceptive effect of clavulanic acid and its preventive activity against development of morphine tolerance and dependence in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Hajhashemi, V.; Dehdashti, Kh.

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate has a key role in pain perception and also development of tolerance and dependence to morphine. It has been reported that clavulanic acid affects glutamatergic transmission via activation of glutamate transporter. Therefore the present study was aimed to evaluate the possible antinociceptive effect of clavulanic acid and its preventive activity against development of morphine tolerance and dependence in animal models. Male Swiss mice (25-30 g) were used in this study. Acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin test and hot plate method were used to assess the antinociceptive effect of clavulanic acid. Morphine (30 mg/kg, s.c.) was administered to the mice two times a day (8 AM and 4 PM) for 3 days in order to produce tolerance. To develop morphine dependence, morphine sulfate (50, 50 and 75 mg/kg) was injected at 8 and 12 AM and 16 PM respectively and for 3 consecutive days. Naloxone (5 mg/kg, i.p) was used to induce morphine withdrawal syndrome and the number of jumps and presence of ptosis, piloerection, tremor, sniffing and diarrhea were recorded and compared with control group. Clavulanic acid at doses of 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg inhibited abdominal constriction and licking behavior of acetic acid and formalin-induced pain respectively. Clavulanic acid was not able to show any antinociception in hot plate model and could not prevent development of tolerance and dependence to morphine. Clavulanic acid has considerable antinociceptive activity and further studies are needed to clarify its exact mechanism. PMID:25657803

  10. Global analysis of the acid-induced and urea-induced unfolding of staphylococcal nuclease and two of its variants.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, R M; Eftink, M R

    1997-02-01

    We have studied the equilibrium unfolding staphylococcal nuclease and two of its variants, V66W and V66W', over two perturbation axes (acid-induced unfolding as a function of urea concentration and urea-induced unfolding as a function of pH). The transitions were monitored by simultaneous measurements of circular dichroism and fluorescence. With this multidimensional array of data (2 perturbation axes and 2 signals), we present a strategy of performing a global analysis, over as many as 12 individual data sets, to test various models for the unfolding process, to determine with greater confidence the pertinent thermodynamic parameters, and to characterize unfolding intermediates. For example, wildtype nuclease shows a cooperative two-state transition with either urea or pH as denaturant, but the global fits are improved when the model is expanded to include a pH dependence of the urea m value or when two distinct classes of protonic groups are considered. The best fit for wild-type nuclease is with delta G degree 0,UN = 6.4 kcal/mol at pH 7, with the acid-induced unfolding being triggered by protonation of three to five carboxylate groups (with possible contribution from His121), and with the urea m = 2.5 kcal mol-1 M-1. V66W' lacks the last 13 amino acids on the C-terminus, has a tryptophan at position 66, has a predominantly beta-sheet structure, and is less stable than the wild type. For V66W', delta G degree 0,UN = 1.6 kcal/mol, m = 1.2 kcal mol-1 M-1, and there are two or three groups responsible for acid unfolding. V66W, a full-length mutant with two tryptophan residues, unfolds via a three-state mechanism: native reversible intermediate reversible unfolded. It appears that its beta-barrel subdomain retains structure in the intermediate state. Assuming that the unfolding of V66W' and the beta-barrel subdomain of V66W can be described by the same thermodynamic parameters, a global analysis enabled a description of the alpha subdomain of V66W with delta G

  11. Comparing the Effect of Mefenamic Acid and Vitex Agnus on Intrauterine Device Induced Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Yavarikia, Parisa; Shahnazi, Mahnaz; Hadavand Mirzaie, Samira; Javadzadeh, Yousef; Lutfi, Razieh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Increased bleeding is the most common cause of intrauterine device (IUD) removal. The use of alternative therapies to treat bleeding has increased due to the complications of medications. But most alternative therapies are not accepted by women. Therefore, conducting studies to find the right treatment with fewer complications and being acceptable is necessary. This study aimed to compare the effect of mefenamic acid and vitex agnus castus on IUD induced bleeding. Methods: This was a double blinded randomized controlled clinical trial. It was conducted on 84 women with random allocation in to two groups of 42 treated with mefenamic acid and vitex agnus capsules taking three times a day during menstruation for four months. Data were collected by demographic questionnaire and Higham 5 stage chart (1 month before the treatment and 4 months during the treatment)., Paired t-test, independent t-test, chi-square test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measurements, and SPSS software were used to determine the results. Results: Mefenamic acid and vitex agnus significantly decreased bleeding. This decrease in month 4 was 52% in the mefenamic acid group and 47.6% in the vitex agnus group. The mean bleeding score changes was statistically significant between the two groups in the first three months and before the intervention. In the mefenamic acid group, the decreased bleeding was significantly more than the vitex agnus group. However, during the 4th month, the mean change was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Mefenamic acid and vitex agnus were both effective on IUD induced bleeding; however, mefenamic acid was more effective. PMID:25276733

  12. Neuroprotective effects of butterbur and rough aster against kainic Acid-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sang Hee; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2005-01-01

    The separate and combined neuroprotective effects of rough aster (Aster scaber) and butterbur (Petasite japonicus) extracts against oxidative damage in the brain of mice challenged with kainic acid were examined by comparing behavioral changes and biochemical parameters of oxidative stress. Rough aster butanol extract (400 mg/kg) and/or butterbur butanol extract (150 or 400 mg/kg) were administered to male ICR mice, 6-8 weeks old, through a gavage for 4 days consecutively, and on day 4, kainic acid (50 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally. Compared with the vehicle-treated control, no significant changes in body and brain weight were observed in mice administered rough aster or butterbur butanol extract. Administration of kainic acid only, causing a lethality of approximately 54%, resulted in a significant decrease of total glutathione level and increase of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) value in brain tissue. The administration of butterbur or rough aster extract (400 mg/kg) decreased the lethality (50%) of kainic acid to 25%, alleviated the behavioral signs of neurotoxicity, restored the cytosolic glutathione level of brain homogenate to approximately 80% (P < .05), and reduced kainic acid-induced increases in TBARS values. In contrast to no significant neuroprotection by butterbur extract at a low dose (150 mg/kg), the combination of rough aster extract and butterbur extract reduced the lethality to 12.5%. Moreover, the combination delayed the onset time of behavioral signs by twofold, and significantly preserved the level of cytosolic glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities. However, the other biochemical parameters were not altered significantly by the combination. Thus, the combination of two vegetable extracts significantly increased the neuroprotective action against kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. Based on these findings, the combination of butterbur extract and rough aster extract contains a functional agent or

  13. Helicobacter pylori impedes acid-induced tightening of gastric epithelial junctions

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Elizabeth A.; Vagin, Olga; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Sachs, George

    2013-01-01

    Gastric infection by Helicobacter pylori is the most common cause of ulcer disease and gastric cancer. The mechanism of progression from gastritis and inflammation to ulcers and cancer in a fraction of those infected is not definitively known. Significant acidity is unique to the gastric environment and is required for ulcer development. The interplay between gastric acidity and H. pylori pathogenesis is important in progression to advanced disease. The aim of this study was to characterize the impact of acid on gastric epithelial integrity and cytokine release and how H. pylori infection alters these responses. Human gastric epithelial (HGE-20) cells were grown on porous inserts, and survival, barrier function, and cytokine release were studied at various apical pH levels in the presence and absence of H. pylori. With apical acidity, gastric epithelial cells demonstrate increased barrier function, as evidenced by increased transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and decreased paracellular permeability. This effect is reduced in the presence of wild-type, but not urease knockout, H. pylori. The epithelial inflammatory response is also modulated by acidity and H. pylori infection. Without H. pylori, epithelial IL-8 release decreases in acid, while IL-6 release increases. In the presence of H. pylori, acidic pH diminishes the magnitude of the previously reported increase in IL-8 and IL-6 release. H. pylori interferes with the gastric epithelial response to acid, contributing to altered barrier function and inflammatory response. H. pylori diminishes acid-induced tightening of cell junctions in a urease-dependent manner, suggesting that local pH elevation promotes barrier compromise and progression to mucosal damage. PMID:23989011

  14. Role of ion transporters in the bile acid-induced esophageal injury.

    PubMed

    Laczkó, Dorottya; Rosztóczy, András; Birkás, Klaudia; Katona, Máté; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Tiszlavicz, László; Róka, Richárd; Wittmann, Tibor; Hegyi, Péter; Venglovecz, Viktória

    2016-07-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is considered to be the most severe complication of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), in which the prolonged, repetitive episodes of combined acidic and biliary reflux result in the replacement of the squamous esophageal lining by columnar epithelium. Therefore, the acid-extruding mechanisms of esophageal epithelial cells (EECs) may play an important role in the defense. Our aim was to identify the presence of acid/base transporters on EECs and to investigate the effect of bile acids on their expressions and functions. Human EEC lines (CP-A and CP-D) were acutely exposed to bile acid cocktail (BAC) and the changes in intracellular pH (pHi) and Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) were measured by microfluorometry. mRNA and protein expression of ion transporters was investigated by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. We have identified the presence of a Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE), Na(+)/HCO3 (-) cotransporter (NBC), and a Cl(-)-dependent HCO3 (-) secretory mechanism in CP-A and CP-D cells. Acute administration of BAC stimulated HCO3 (-) secretion in both cell lines and the NHE activity in CP-D cells by an inositol triphosphate-dependent calcium release. Chronic administration of BAC to EECs increased the expression of ion transporters compared with nontreated cells. A similar expression pattern was observed in biopsy samples from BE compared with normal epithelium. We have shown that acute administration of bile acids differently alters ion transport mechanisms of EECs, whereas chronic exposure to bile acids increases the expression of acid/base transporters. We speculate that these adaptive processes of EECs represent an important mucosal defense against the bile acid-induced epithelial injury. PMID:27198194

  15. Valproic acid-induced acute pancreatitis in pediatric age: case series and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    COFINI, M.; QUADROZZI, F.; FAVORITI, P.; FAVORITI, M.; COFINI, G.

    2015-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is commonly prescribed medication for epilepsy, migraine and bipolar disorder. Although the common adverse effect associated with VPA are typically benign, less common adverse effect can occur; these include hepatotixicity, teratogenicity and acute pancreatitis (AP). VPA-induced pancreatitis does not depend on valproic acid serum level and may occur anytime after onset of therapy. Re-challenge with VPA is dangerous and should be avoided. The diagnosis of VPA-induced pancreatitis seems to be underestimated because of difficulties in determining the causative agent and the need for a retrospective re-evaluation of the causative factor. More of idiopathic pancreatitis should be a drug-induced pancreatitis. We report four cases of VPA-induced AP found in a group of 52 cases of AP in children come to our attention from January 2008 to December 2012. The aim of these reports is to point out our experience about clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, outcome in children with VPA-induced AP and review of literature. PMID:26712070

  16. Retinoic acid metabolism proteins are altered in trichoblastomas induced by mouse papillomavirus 1.

    PubMed

    Everts, Helen B; Suo, Liye; Ghim, Shinge; Bennett Jenson, A; Sundberg, John P

    2015-12-01

    Skin cancer burden is significant as treatment costs have skyrocketed to $8.1 million annually and some forms metastasize, such as cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) and melanoma. cSCC is caused by altered growth factor signaling induced by chemical carcinogens, ultraviolet light (UV) exposure, and infections with papillomaviruses (PVs). One of the few options for preventing cSCC in high-risk patients is oral retinoids. While much is understood about retinoid treatments and metabolism in mouse models of chemically and UV exposure induced cSCC, little is known about the role of retinoids in PV-induced cSCC. To better understand how retinoid metabolism is altered in cSCC, we examined the expression of this pathway in the newly discovered mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV1), which produces trichoblastomas in dorsal skin but not cSCC. We found significant increases in a rate-limiting enzyme involved in retinoic acid synthesis and retinoic acid binding proteins, suggestive of increased RA synthesis, in MmuPV1-induced tumors in B6.Cg-Foxn1(nu)/J mice. Similar increases in these proteins were seen after acute UVB exposure in Crl:SKH1-Hr(hr) mice and in regressing pre-cancerous lesions in a chemically-induced mouse model, suggesting a common mechanism in limiting the progression of papillomas to full blown cSCC. PMID:26416148

  17. Cytosolic alkalinization mediated by abscisic Acid is necessary, but not sufficient, for abscisic Acid-induced gene expression in barley aleurone protoplasts.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, R; Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S; Wang, M

    1992-10-01

    We investigated whether intracellular pH (pH(i)) is a causal mediator in abscisic acid (ABA)-induced gene expression. We measured the change in pH(i) by a "null-point" method during stimulation of barley (Hordeum vulgare cv Himalaya) aleurone protoplasts with ABA and found that ABA induces an increase in pH(i) from 7.11 to 7.30 within 45 min after stimulation. This increase is inhibited by plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase inhibitors, which induce a decrease in pH(i), both in the presence and absence of ABA. This ABA-induced pH(i) increase precedes the expression of RAB-16 mRNA, as measured by northern analysis. ABA-induced pH(i) changes can be bypassed or clamped by addition of either the weak acids 5,5-dimethyl-2,4-oxazolidinedione and propionic acid, which decrease the pH(i), or the weak bases methylamine and ammonia, which increase the pH(i). Artificial pH(i) increases or decreases induced by weak bases or weak acids, respectively, do not induce RAB-16 mRNA expression. Clamping of the pH(i) at a high value with methylamine or ammonia treatment affected the ABA-induced increase of RAB-16 mRNA only slightly. However, inhibition of the ABA-induced pH(i) increase with weak acid or proton pump inhibitor treatments strongly inhibited the ABA-induced RAB-16 mRNA expression. We conclude that, although the ABA-induced the pH(i) increase is correlated with and even precedes the induction of RAB-16 mRNA expression and is an essential component of the transduction pathway leading from the hormone to gene expression, it is not sufficient to cause such expression.

  18. Alpha-amylase production is induced by sulfuric acid in rice aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Mitsunaga, Shin-ichiro; Kobayashi, Midori; Fukui, Satoe; Fukuoka, Kayoko; Kawakami, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Junji; Ohshima, Masahiro; Mitsui, Toshiaki

    2007-12-01

    The hydrolytic enzyme alpha-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) is produced mainly in aleurone cells of germinating cereals, and the phytohormone gibberellin (GA) is essential for its induction. However, in rice (Oryza sativa L.), sulfuric acid (H(2)SO(4)) induces alpha-amylase production in aleurone tissue even in the absence of GA. Here, the pre-treatment of rice aleurone cells with H(2)SO(4) and incubation in water induced alpha-amylase activity, as if the cells had been incubated in GA solution. PMID:17988885

  19. Suppression of heparine-induced increment of rat free fatty acids by oxprenolol.

    PubMed

    Bartsokas, S K; Trichopoulou-Polychronopoulou, A D; Charissiadou, A; Valsamakis, S; Kalaitjidou, C

    1975-05-01

    Injection of heparin i.v. into rats increased significantly free fatty acids (FFAs) plasma levels. When 20 min before the heparin injection 1-(o-allyloxy-phenoxy)-3-isopropylamino-propane-2-ol-hydrochloride (oxprenolol, Trasicor) was administered i.p., FFAs increment was prevented. Isoproterenol-induced plasma FFAs rise was also inhibited by the administration of this beta-adrenergic receptor blocking agent. Treatment by beta-adrenergic receptor blockade for prevention of heparine-induced FFAs increase, which possibly contributes to the appearance of heart arrhythmias, must be considered. PMID:1242320

  20. The role of acid-base imbalance in statin-induced myotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Taha, Dhiaa A; De Moor, Cornelia H; Barrett, David A; Lee, Jong Bong; Gandhi, Raj D; Hoo, Chee Wei; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2016-08-01

    cellular uptake of the more lipophilic lactone or unionized hydroxy acid form. Consequently, our results suggest that comorbidities associated with acid-base imbalance can play a substantial role in the development and potentiation of statin-induced myotoxicity. PMID:27083388

  1. Ascorbic acid-induced crosslinking of lens proteins: evidence supporting a Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Ortwerth, B J; Olesen, P R

    1988-08-31

    The incubation of calf lens extracts with 20 mM ascorbic acid under sterile conditions for 8 weeks caused extensive protein crosslinking, which was not observed with either 20 mM sorbitol or 20 mM glucose. While no precipitation was observed, ascorbic acid did induce the formation of high-molecular-weight protein aggregates as determined by Agarose A-5m chromatography. Proteins modified by ascorbic acid bound strongly to a boronate affinity column, however, crosslinked proteins were present mainly in the unbound fraction. These observations suggest that the cis-diol groups of ascorbic acid were present in the primary adduct, but were either lost during the crosslinking reaction or sterically hindered from binding to the column matrix. The amino acid composition of the ascorbic acid-modified proteins was identical to controls except for a 15% decrease in lysine. Amino acid analysis after borohydride reduction, however, showed a 25% decrease in lysine, a 7% decrease in arginine and an additional peak which eluted between phenylalanine and histidine. Extensive browning occurred during the ascorbic acid-modification reaction. This resulted in protein-bound chromophores with a broad absorption spectrum from 300 to 400 nm, and protein-bound fluorophores with excitation/emission maxima of 350/450 nm. A 4 week incubation of dialyzed crude lens extract with [1-14C]ascorbic acid showed increased incorporation for 2 weeks, followed by a decrease over the next 2 weeks as crosslinking was initiated. The addition of cyanoborohydride to the reaction mixture completely inhibited crosslinking and increased [1-14C]ascorbic acid incorporation to a plateau value of 180 nmol per mg protein. Amino acid analysis showed a 50% loss of lysine, and 8% decrease in arginine and the presence of a new peak which eluted slightly earlier than methionine. These data are consistent with the non-enzymatic glycation of lens proteins by either ascorbic acid or an oxidation product of ascorbic acid via

  2. Oleanolic Acid Induces the Type III Secretion System of Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dousheng; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xuejiao; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of bacterial wilt, can naturally infect a wide range of host plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a major virulence determinant in this bacterium. Studies have shown that plant-derived compounds are able to inhibit or induce the T3SS in some plant pathogenic bacteria, though no specific T3SS inhibitor or inducer has yet been identified in R. solanacearum. In this study, a total of 50 different compounds were screened and almost half of them (22 of 50) significantly inhibited or induced the T3SS expression of R. solanacearum. Based on the strong induction activity on T3SS, the T3SS inducer oleanolic acid (OA) was chosen for further study. We found that OA induced the expression of T3SS through the HrpG-HrpB pathway. Some type III effector genes were induced in T3SS inducing medium supplemented with OA. In addition, OA targeted only the T3SS and did not affect other virulence determinants. Finally, we observed that induction of T3SS by OA accelerated disease progress on tobacco. Overall our results suggest that plant-derived compounds are an abundant source of R. solanacearum T3SS regulators, which could prove useful as tools to interrogate the regulation of this key virulence pathway. PMID:26732647

  3. Oleanolic Acid Induces the Type III Secretion System of Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dousheng; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xuejiao; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of bacterial wilt, can naturally infect a wide range of host plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a major virulence determinant in this bacterium. Studies have shown that plant-derived compounds are able to inhibit or induce the T3SS in some plant pathogenic bacteria, though no specific T3SS inhibitor or inducer has yet been identified in R. solanacearum. In this study, a total of 50 different compounds were screened and almost half of them (22 of 50) significantly inhibited or induced the T3SS expression of R. solanacearum. Based on the strong induction activity on T3SS, the T3SS inducer oleanolic acid (OA) was chosen for further study. We found that OA induced the expression of T3SS through the HrpG-HrpB pathway. Some type III effector genes were induced in T3SS inducing medium supplemented with OA. In addition, OA targeted only the T3SS and did not affect other virulence determinants. Finally, we observed that induction of T3SS by OA accelerated disease progress on tobacco. Overall our results suggest that plant-derived compounds are an abundant source of R. solanacearum T3SS regulators, which could prove useful as tools to interrogate the regulation of this key virulence pathway. PMID:26732647

  4. Luteolin protects the hippocampus against neuron impairments induced by kainic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Wang, Su Jane

    2016-07-01

    Glutamatergic excitotoxicity is crucial in the pathogenesis of numerous brain disorders. Luteolin, a flavonoid compound, inhibits glutamate release, however, its ability to affect glutamate-induced brain injury is unknown. Therefore, this study evaluated the protective effect of luteolin against brain damage induced by kainic acid (KA), a glutamate analog. Rats were treated with luteolin (10 or 50mg/kg, intraperitoneally) 30min before an intraperitoneal injection of KA (15mg/kg). Luteolin treatment reduced the KA-induced seizure score and elevations of glutamate levels in the hippocampus. A histopathological analysis showed that luteolin attenuated KA-induced neuronal death and microglial activation in the hippocampus. An immunoblotting analysis showed that luteolin restored the KA-induced reduction in Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Furthermore, a Morris water maze test revealed that luteolin effectively prevented KA-induced learning and memory impairments. The results suggest that luteolin protected rat brains from KA-induced excitotoxic damage by reducing glutamate levels, mitigating inflammation, and enhancing Akt activation in the hippocampus. Therefore, luteolin may be beneficial for preventing or treating brain disorders associated with excitotoxic neuronal damage. PMID:27185356

  5. Modulation of citric acid-induced cough following lipopolysaccharide-mediated neutrophilia in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Brown, Claire; Selig, William M; Ellis, James L

    2007-01-01

    This investigation examined a possible correlation between lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary neutrophilia and cough. Conscious male guinea pigs were acutely exposed to aerosolized LPS and thereafter at various times challenged with citric acid aerosol (CA; 250mM) to induce cough followed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) to quantitate inflammatory cell accumulation. LPS caused a hyporesponsive cough at 24h post-LPS with neutrophilia apparent from 2h post-LPS. By 96h post-LPS both cough and neutrophilia had returned towards normal. Dexamethasone (DEX, 2mgkg(-1)/day for 3 days prior) did not affect the cough hyporesponsiveness at 24h; however it attenuated LPS-induced BAL fluid neutrophilia. Since LPS can stimulate inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) we hypothesized that the cough hyporesponsiveness may involve nitric oxide. To investigate this we treated animals with an aerosolized iNOS inhibitor 1400W (1mM) immediately prior to LPS. 1400W had no significant effect on either cough hyporesponsiveness or BAL fluid neutrophilia at 24h post-LPS. Despite differing effects on neutrophilia, these findings clearly indicate that neither DEX nor iNOS inhibition had any direct effect on LPS-induced cough hyporesponsiveness. The mechanism underlying the LPS-induced cough hyporesponsiveness does not appear to be directly linked to LPS-induced neutrophilic inflammation.

  6. Evidence for fatty acids mediating CL 316,243-induced reductions in blood glucose in mice.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, Rebecca E K; Castellani, Laura; Beaudoin, Marie-Soleil; Wright, David C

    2014-10-01

    CL 316,243, a β3-adrenergic agonist, was developed as an antiobesity and diabetes drug and causes rapid decreases in blood glucose levels in mice. The mechanisms mediating this effect have not been fully elucidated; thus, the purpose of the current study was to examine the role of fatty acids and interleukin-6, reputed mediators of insulin secretion, in this process. To address this question, we used physiological and pharmacological approaches in combination with knockout mouse models. CL 316,243 treatment in male C57BL6 mice increased plasma fatty acids, glycerol, interleukin-6, and insulin and reduced blood glucose concentrations 2 h following injections. The ability of CL 316,243 to increase insulin and fatty acids and reduce glucose was preserved in interleukin-6-deficient mice. CL 316,243-induced drops in blood glucose occurred in parallel with increases in circulating fatty acids but prior to increases in plasma interleukin-6. CL 316,243-mediated increases in plasma insulin levels and reductions in blood glucose were attenuated when mice were pretreated with the lipase inhibitor nicotinic acid or in whole body adipose tissue triglyceride lipase knockout mice. Collectively, our findings demonstrate an important role for fatty acids in mediating the effects of CL 316,243 in mice. Not only do our results provide new insight into the mechanisms of action of CL 316,243, but they also hint at an unappreciated aspect of adipose tissue -pancreas cross-talk. PMID:25096179

  7. MNL1 regulates weak acid-induced stress responses of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ramsdale, Mark; Selway, Laura; Stead, David; Walker, Jan; Yin, Zhikang; Nicholls, Susan M; Crowe, Jonathan; Sheils, Emma M; Brown, Alistair J P

    2008-10-01

    MNL1, the Candida albicans homologue of an orphan Msn2-like gene (YER130c in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) has no known function. Here we report that MNL1 regulates weak acid stress responses. Deletion of MNL1 prevents the long-term adaptation of C. albicans cells to weak acid stresses and compromises their global transcriptional response under these conditions. The promoters of Mnl1-dependent genes contain a novel STRE-like element (SLE) that imposes Mnl1-dependent, weak acid stress-induced transcription upon a lacZ reporter in C. albicans. The SLE (HHYYCCCCTTYTY) is related to the Nrg1 response element (NRE) element recognized by the transcriptional repressor Nrg1. Deletion of NRG1 partially restores the ability of C. albicans mnl1 cells to adapt to weak acid stress, indicating that Mnl1 and Nrg1 act antagonistically to regulate this response. Molecular, microarray, and proteomic analyses revealed that Mnl1-dependent adaptation does not occur in cells exposed to proapoptotic or pronecrotic doses of weak acid, suggesting that Ras-pathway activation might suppress the Mnl1-dependent weak acid response in dying cells. Our work defines a role for this YER130c orthologue in stress adaptation and cell death. PMID:18653474

  8. Exogenous jasmonic acid induces stress tolerance in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) exposed to imazapic.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Armagan; Doganlar, Zeynep Banu

    2016-02-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) is one of the important phytohormones, regulating the stress responses as well as plant growth and development. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of exogenous JA application on stress responses of tobacco plant exposed to imazapic. In this study, phytotoxic responses resulting from both imazapic and imazapic combined with JA treatment are investigated comparatively for tobacco plants. For plants treated with imazapic at different concentrations (0.030, 0.060 and 0.120mM), antioxidant enzyme activities (catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase and glutathione reductase), carotenoids, glutathione and malondialdehyte (MDA) contents, jasmonic acid, abscisic acid and indole-3-acetic acid levels as well as herbicide residue amounts on leaves increased in general compared to the control group. In the plants treated with 45µM jasmonic acid, pigment content, antioxidant activity and phytohormone level increased whereas MDA content and the amount of herbicidal residue decreased compared to the non-treated plants. Our findings show that imazapic treatment induces some phytotoxic responses on tobacco leaves and that exogenous jasmonic acid treatment alleviates the negative effects of herbicide treatment by regulating these responses. PMID:26629659

  9. Synergistic interaction of ferulic acid with commercial hypoglycemic drugs in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Pranav Kumar; Prasad, Ram; Ali, Shakir; Doble, Mukesh

    2013-04-15

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder characterized by increased blood glucose level. The available commercial oral antidiabetic drugs have some serious side effects; hence there is a need for new hypoglycemic agents which will have therapeutic efficacy as well as less side effects. Ferulic acid, a phytochemical, might be a good supplement to manage diabetes. We investigated the antidiabetic and antilipidemic effect of ferulic acid alone and in combination with oral antidiabetic drugs (metformin and Thiazolidinedione (THZ)). Blood glucose, plasma lipid profiles levels, liver function and kidney function markers were measured in control and streptozotocin induced diabetic rats three weeks after administrating ferulic acid and OHDs (oral hypoglycemic drugs) alone and in combinations. The histopathological analysis of the pancreas was also carried out. Ferulic acid and OHDs significantly reduced the blood glucose, lipid profile, urea, creatinine, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminases (SGPT) and serum glutamic oxaloacetate transaminases (SGOT) in diabetic rats. Same level of reduction in blood glucose levels was achieved when ferulic acid was used in combination with even reduced amounts of OHDs. It decreased most of the side effects when used in combination with THZ. Histopathological analysis showed that combinations increased the number of islets. Ferulic acid interacts synergistically with both the drugs. It might be a good supplement with the OHDs to manage diabetic complications as well as reduces the use of the later. PMID:23490007

  10. Vasopressin induces release of arachidonic acid from vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grillone, L.R.; Clark, M.A.; Heckman, G.; Schmidt, D.; Stassen, F.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Cultured smooth muscle cells (A-10), derived from rat thoracic aorta, have vascular (V/sub 1/) vasopressin receptors. They have previously shown that these receptors mediate phosphatidylinositol turnover, Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, and inhibition of isoproterenol-induced increases in cAMP. Here they studied the effect of vasopressin on arachidonic acid metabolism of A-10 cells. Cells were incubated for 18-20 hr with (/sup 3/H)-arachidonic acid (80 Ci/mmol). Vasopressin stimulated release of arachidonic acid in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Significant release of arachidonic acid was observed after 4 min with 10/sup -9/ M vasopressin. Maximum release was reached 4 min after addition of 10/sup -7/ M vasopressin (1100 dpm/10/sup 6/ cells). About 800 dmp were released after 1 and 4 min with 10/sup -7/ M and 10/sup -8/ M vasopressin, respectively. The vasopressin-stimulated release of arachidonic acid was blocked by the specific V/sub 1//V/sub 2/ vasopressin antagonist d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)VAVP. These data indicate that vascular smooth muscle cells increase arachidonic acid release in response to vasopressin. This response is likely mediated by V/sub 1/ receptors.

  11. Correlation between arachidonic acid oxygenation and luminol-induced chemiluminescence in neutrophils: inhibition by diethyldithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Chabannes, B; Perraut, C; El Habib, R; Moliere, P; Pacheco, Y; Lagarde, M

    1997-04-01

    Neutrophils from allergic subjects were hypersensitive to stimulation by low calcium ionophore concentration (0.15 microM), resulting in an increased formation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 5S-hydroxy-6,8,11,14-(E,Z,Z,Z)-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), and other arachidonic acid metabolites through the 5-lipoxygenase pathway. In parallel, luminol-dependent chemiluminescence was also higher in neutrophils from allergic patients at the basal state and after stimulation by calcium ionophore, revealing an enhancement of radical oxygen species and peroxide production. The activity of glutathione peroxidase, the main enzyme responsible for hydroperoxide reduction, was lowered in these cells. Diethyl-dithiocarbamate (DTC) induced a concentration-dependent decrease in chemiluminescence and arachidonic acid metabolism after neutrophil stimulation. These data show that the elevation of arachidonic acid metabolism in neutrophils from allergic patients is strongly correlated with oxidative status. This elevation may be the consequence of an increased cellular hydroperoxide known to activate 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activity and/or an increased arachidonic acid availability, due either to phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activation or inhibition of arachidonate reesterification into phospholipids. Lowering this oxidative status was associated with a concomitant decrease of this metabolism. Our results suggest that the effect of DTC may be the consequence of an inhibition of peroxyl radical and cellular lipid hydroperoxide production. Thus, DTC may modulate arachidonic acid metabolism in neutrophils by modulating the cellular hydroperoxide level.

  12. Photoprotective Activity of Vulpinic and Gyrophoric Acids Toward Ultraviolet B-Induced Damage in Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Varol, Mehmet; Türk, Ayşen; Candan, Mehmet; Tay, Turgay; Koparal, Ayşe Tansu

    2016-01-01

    Vulpinic and gyrophoric acids are known as ultraviolet filters for natural lichen populations because of their chemical structures. However, to the best of our knowledge, there has been no reference to their cosmetic potential for skin protection against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced damage and, consequently, we propose to highlight their photoprotective profiles in human keratinocytes (HaCaT). Therefore, vulpinic acid and gyrophoric acid were isolated from acetone extracts of Letharia vulpina and Xanthoparmelia pokornyi, respectively. Their photoprotective activities on irradiated HaCaT cells and destructive effects on non-irradiated HaCaT cells were compared through in vitro experimentation: 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays, 4',6-diamino-2-phenylindole and tetramethylrhodamine B isothiocyanate-phalloidin staining protocols. Both of the lichen substances effectively prevented cytotoxic, apoptotic and cytoskeleton alterative activities of 2.5 J/cm(2) UVB in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, vulpinic and gyrophoric acids showed no toxic, apoptotic or cytoskeleton alterative effects on non-irradiated HaCaT cells, except at high doses (≥400 μM) of gyrophoric acid. The findings suggest that vulpinic and gyrophoric acids can be promising cosmetic ingredients to photo-protect human skin cells and should therefore be further investigated by in vitro and in vivo multiple bioassays.

  13. Rosmarinic acid mitigates signs of systemic oxidative stress in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats.

    PubMed

    Sotnikova, Ruzena; Kaprinay, Barbara; Navarova, Jana

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the work was to study the effect of rosmarinic acid (RA) on markers of oxidative stress in rats with diabetes. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (STZ), RA was administered orally for ten weeks. Water consumption was measured daily. Ten weeks after the first RA administration, urine was collected over 15 hours. N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAGA) activity, levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and glutathione (GSH) were determined in the pancreas, kidney, and plasma. RA administration to diabetic rats ameliorated markers of oxidative stress, as well as water consumption and urination. We assume that RA may mitigate STZ-induced diabetic manifestations by protecting rat tissues against damaging effect of free radicals. PMID:26374995

  14. Protective Effect of Ocimum basilicum Essential Oil Against Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, Amir; Roohi, Parnia; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Ghannadi, Ali Reza; Minaiyan, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    Ocimum basilicum L has been traditionally used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in Iran. This study investigates the ameliorative effect of Ocimum basilicum essential oil on an acetic acid-induced colitis model in rats. Ocimum basilicum essential oil with 2 doses (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly ameliorated wet weight/length ratio of colonic tissue compared to the control group. Higher doses of essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly reduced ulcer severity, ulcer area, and ulcer index. On the other hand, histological examination revealed the diminution of total colitis index as a marker for inflammatory cell infiltration in the colonic segments of rats treated with Ocimum basilicum essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). The increased level of myeloperoxidase was significantly decreased after the treatment with the essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). These results suggest that Ocimum basilicum exhibits protective effect against acetic acid-induced colitis.

  15. [The parietal cell mass and acid secretion: Helicobacter pylori does not induce changes in the course of a duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Testino, G; Sumberaz, A; Cornaggia, M

    1995-12-01

    Some studies have postulated that Helicobacter pylori (HP) itself might be responsible for hypergastrinemia and acid secretion in duodenal ulcer (DU). In each DU patient parietal cell mass (expressed by a parietal index) and stimulated acid secretion (expressed by maximal acid output) were evaluated. The study has been conducted grouping DU patients in relation to HP infection in antral mucosa. HP infection does not modify parietal cell mass and stimulated acid secretion. Therefore, mild chronic hypergastrinemia induced by HP infection is not sufficient to justify any increase of parietal index and acid secretion. In fact, parietal cells and acid secretion remain higher in DU subjects independently from HP infection.

  16. Asiatic acid alleviates cardiovascular remodelling in rats with L-NAME-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bunbupha, Sarawoot; Prachaney, Parichat; Kukongviriyapan, Upa; Kukongviriyapan, Veerapol; Welbat, Jariya Umka; Pakdeechote, Poungrat

    2015-11-01

    A previous study demonstrated the antihypertensive effect of asiatic acid. The current study investigates the effect of asiatic acid on cardiovascular remodelling and possible mechanisms involved in Nω -nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME)-induced hypertensive rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with L-NAME (40 mg/kg per day) for 3 weeks in order to induce hypertension. Hypertensive rats were administered asiatic acid (20 mg/kg per day) or vehicle for a further 2 weeks. It was found that hypertensive rats showed high systolic blood pressure, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, increases in LV fibrosis, aortic wall thickness and aortic collagen deposition (P < 0.05). Moreover, decreased plasma nitrate and nitrite (NOx) and increased plasma tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were observed in hypertensive rats (P < 0.05). This was consistent with downregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in heart and aortic tissues (P < 0.05). Levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in plasma, aortic and heart tissues were significantly increased in hypertensive rats (P < 0.05). Asiatic acid markedly reduced blood pressure, alleviated cardiovascular remodelling, and restored plasma NOx and TNF-α as well as eNOS/iNOS expression in heart and aortic tissues (P < 0.05). Additionally, there was a significant reduction of MDA levels in the tissues of treated hypertensive rats. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the therapeutic effects of asiatic acid on blood pressure and cardiovascular remodelling, which is possibly related to the restoration of eNOS/iNOS expression, and the resulting anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. PMID:26234646

  17. PI3K/AKT and ERK regulate retinoic acid-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Jingbo; Paul, Pritha; Lee, Sora; Qiao, Lan; Josifi, Erlena; Tiao, Joshua R.; Chung, Dai H.

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Retinoic acid (RA) induces neuroblastoma cells differentiation, which is accompanied by G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA resulted in neuroblastoma cell survival and inhibition of DNA fragmentation; this is regulated by PI3K pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA activates PI3K and ERK1/2 pathway; PI3K pathway mediates RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of p21 is necessary for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. -- Abstract: Neuroblastoma, the most common extra-cranial solid tumor in infants and children, is characterized by a high rate of spontaneous remissions in infancy. Retinoic acid (RA) has been known to induce neuroblastoma differentiation; however, the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways that are responsible for RA-mediated neuroblastoma cell differentiation remain unclear. Here, we sought to determine the cell signaling processes involved in RA-induced cellular differentiation. Upon RA administration, human neuroblastoma cell lines, SK-N-SH and BE(2)-C, demonstrated neurite extensions, which is an indicator of neuronal cell differentiation. Moreover, cell cycle arrest occurred in G1/G0 phase. The protein levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21 and p27{sup Kip}, which inhibit cell proliferation by blocking cell cycle progression at G1/S phase, increased after RA treatment. Interestingly, RA promoted cell survival during the differentiation process, hence suggesting a potential mechanism for neuroblastoma resistance to RA therapy. Importantly, we found that the PI3K/AKT pathway is required for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Our results elucidated the molecular mechanism of RA-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation, which may be important for developing novel therapeutic strategy against poorly differentiated neuroblastoma.

  18. Ascorbic acid combats arsenic-induced oxidative stress in mice liver.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Pathikrit; Bhattacharyya, Soumya Sundar; Bhattacharjee, Nandini; Pathak, Surajit; Boujedaini, Naoual; Belon, Philippe; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2009-02-01

    Repeated injections of arsenic trioxide induced oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity in mice as revealed from elevated levels of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminases, glutamate pyruvate transaminases, acid and alkaline phosphatases, lipid peroxidation along with reduction of superoxide dismutase, catalase, reduced glutathione content, glutathione reductase and succinate dehydrogenase activities. The present investigation was undertaken to test whether simultaneous feeding of vitamin C can combat hepatotoxicity in arsenic intoxicated mice. Hepatoprotective potential of vitamin C was indicated by its ability to restore GSH, SOD, CAT, AcP, AlkP and GRD levels towards near normal. Electron microscopic studies further supported the biochemical findings confirming the hepatoprotective potential of ascorbic acid. Besides, cytogenetical endpoints (chromosome aberrations, micronuclei, mitotic index and sperm head anomaly) were also analyzed. Administration of vitamin C alone did not show any sign of toxicity of its own. Based on the present findings, ascorbic acid appears to have protective effects against arsenic toxicity and oxidative stress.

  19. Thermal-induced conversion of maleic and fumaric acid anion radicals in poly(methyl methacrylate)

    SciTech Connect

    Torikai, A.; Fukumoto, M.

    1980-04-01

    Thermal-induced conversion of maleic and fumaric acid anion radicals produced by ..gamma.. irradiation at 77/sup 0/K in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was studied by electron spin resonance (ESR) and optical absorption spectroscopic measurements. The ESR spectra of these acid anion radicals change into two-line spectra with a line separation of ca. 10 G by thermal annealing. This spectrum is assigned to a protonated radical of each acid anion radical. Anion radicals of the solutes are relatively stable below the ..gamma.. transition point of PMMA and the conversion reaction takes place near this point. This means that the molecular motion of matrix molecule affects the radical conversion reaction.

  20. Lipidomic profiling reveals protective function of fatty acid oxidation in cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity[S

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaolei; Yao, Dan; Gosnell, Blake A.; Chen, Chi

    2012-01-01

    During cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity, lipid accumulation occurs prior to necrotic cell death in the liver. However, the exact influences of cocaine on the homeostasis of lipid metabolism remain largely unknown. In this study, the progression of subacute hepatotoxicity, including centrilobular necrosis in the liver and elevation of transaminase activity in serum, was observed in a three-day cocaine treatment, accompanying the disruption of triacylglycerol (TAG) turnover. Serum TAG level increased on day 1 of cocaine treatment but remained unchanged afterwards. In contrast, hepatic TAG level was elevated continuously during three days of cocaine treatment and was better correlated with the development of hepatotoxicity. Lipidomic analyses of serum and liver samples revealed time-dependent separation of the control and cocaine-treated mice in multivariate models, which was due to the accumulation of long-chain acylcarnitines together with the disturbances of many bioactive phospholipid species in the cocaine-treated mice. An in vitro function assay confirmed the progressive inhibition of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation after the cocaine treatment. Cotreatment of fenofibrate significantly increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)-targeted genes and the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation activity in the cocaine-treated mice, resulting in the inhibition of cocaine-induced acylcarnitine accumulation and other hepatotoxic effects. Overall, the results from this lipidomics-guided study revealed that the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation plays an important role in cocaine-induced liver injury. PMID:22904346

  1. Concerted action of p62 and Nrf2 protects cells from palmitic acid-induced lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Su; Kang, Dong Hoon; Lee, Da Hyun; Bae, Soo Han

    2015-10-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), frequently associated with obesity and diabetes mellitus, is caused by the accumulation of excess fatty acids within liver cells. Palmitic acid (PA), a common saturated fatty acid found in mammals, induces the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and elicits apoptotic cell death, known as lipotoxicity. However, protective mechanisms against PA-induced lipotoxicity have not been elucidated. In this study, we aimed to clarify the role of p62, an adapter protein in the autophagic process, as well as the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway, in protecting cells from PA-induced lipotoxicity. The Nrf2-Keap1 pathway is essential for the protection of cells from oxidative stress. p62 enhances its binding to Keap1 and leads to Nrf2 activation. Here, we show that PA potentiates Keap1 degradation and thereby activates the transcription of Nrf2 target genes partially through autophagy. Furthermore, this PA-mediated Keap1 degradation depends on p62. Correspondingly, a lack of p62 attenuates the PA-mediated Nrf2 activation and increases the susceptibility of cells to oxidative stress. These results indicate that p62 plays an important role in protecting cells against lipotoxicity through Keap1 degradation-mediated Nrf2 activation. PMID:26325428

  2. PDIA3 Knockdown Exacerbates Free Fatty Acid-Induced Hepatocyte Steatosis and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chao-hui; Xu, Cheng-fu; Xu, Lei; Li, You-ming; Chen, Wei-xing

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as one of the most common chronic liver disease over the past decades. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) plays a pivotal role during the development of NAFLD. This study aims to analyze the potential role of protein disulfide isomerase A3 precursor (PDIA3), one of the ER chaperones, in free fatty acid-induced cell model of NAFLD. Human liver L02 cell line was treated with sodium palmitate for 24 hours, which developed severe intracellular lipid accumulation. The increased protein level of PDIA3 was detected via immunoblotting analysis in the fat loaded cell models of NAFLD. siRNA-mediated knockdown of PDIA3 in L02 cells not only increased the cellular lipid accumulation, but also exacerbated hepatocytes apoptosis induced by sodium palmitate. Further investigation revealed that knockdown of PDIA3 up-regulated protein expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS), a key enzyme involved in fatty acid synthesis. PDIA3 knockdown also up-regulated key molecules of ERS pathway, including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), phospho-PKR-like ER kinase (p-PERK), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Our results suggested that ER chaperone PDIA3 plays a pivotal role in FFA-induced hepatocyte steatosis and apoptosis. PMID:26214517

  3. DNA damage and oxidative stress induced by acetylsalicylic acid in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Islas-Flores, Hariz; García-Medina, Sandra; SanJuan-Reyes, Nely

    2014-08-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory widely used due to its low cost and high effectiveness. This compound has been found in water bodies worldwide and is toxic to aquatic organisms; nevertheless its capacity to induce oxidative stress in bioindicators like Daphnia magna remains unknown. This study aimed to evaluate toxicity in D. magna induced by acetylsalicylic acid in water, using oxidative stress and DNA damage biomarkers. An acute toxicity test was conducted in order to determine the median lethal concentration (48-h LC50) and the concentrations to be used in the subsequent subacute toxicity test in which the following biomarkers were evaluated: lipid peroxidation, oxidized protein content, activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, and level of DNA damage. Lipid peroxidation level and oxidized protein content were significantly increased (p<0.05), and antioxidant enzymes significantly altered with respect to controls; while the DNA damage were significantly increased (p<0.05) too. In conclusion, acetylsalicylic acid induces oxidative stress and DNA damage in D. magna.

  4. Anti-osteoporosis activity of naringin in the retinoic acid-induced osteoporosis model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Yang, Zhonglin; Li, Ping; Zhang, Yabo; Sse, Wing Cho

    2007-01-01

    Isoflavonoids isolated from plants have been confirmed to fight osteoporosis and promote bone health. However, few studies have been conducted to describe the anti-osteoporosis activity of botanical flavonone. Based on the experimental outcomes, we demonstrated the ability of naringin to fight osteoporosis in vitro. We developed a retinoic acid-induced osteoporosis model of rats to assess whether naringin has similar bioactivity against osteoporosis in vitro. After a 14-day supplement of retinoic acid to induce osteoporosis, SD rats were administered naringin. A blood test showed that naringin-treated rats experienced significantly lower activity of serum alkaline phosphatase and had higher femur bone mineral density, compared to untreated rats. All three dosages of naringin improved the decrease in bone weight coefficient, the length and the diameter of the bone, the content of bone ash, calcium, and phosphorus content induced by retinoic acid. The data of histomorphological metrology of naringin groups showed no difference as compared to normal control rats. These outcomes suggest that naringin offer a potential in the management of osteoporosis in vitro. PMID:17708632

  5. Substrate-induced ubiquitylation and endocytosis of yeast amino acid permeases.

    PubMed

    Ghaddar, Kassem; Merhi, Ahmad; Saliba, Elie; Krammer, Eva-Maria; Prévost, Martine; André, Bruno

    2014-12-01

    Many plasma membrane transporters are downregulated by ubiquitylation, endocytosis, and delivery to the lysosome in response to various stimuli. We report here that two amino acid transporters of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the general amino acid permease (Gap1) and the arginine-specific permease (Can1), undergo ubiquitin-dependent downregulation in response to their substrates and that this downregulation is not due to intracellular accumulation of the transported amino acids but to transport catalysis itself. Following an approach based on permease structural modeling, mutagenesis, and kinetic parameter analysis, we obtained evidence that substrate-induced endocytosis requires transition of the permease to a conformational state preceding substrate release into the cell. Furthermore, this transient conformation must be stable enough, and thus sufficiently populated, for the permease to undergo efficient downregulation. Additional observations, including the constitutive downregulation of two active Gap1 mutants altered in cytosolic regions, support the model that the substrate-induced conformational transition inducing endocytosis involves remodeling of cytosolic regions of the permeases, thereby promoting their recognition by arrestin-like adaptors of the Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase. Similar mechanisms might control many other plasma membrane transporters according to the external concentrations of their substrates.

  6. Salicylic acid induces vanillin synthesis through the phospholipid signaling pathway in Capsicum chinense cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Rodas-Junco, Beatriz A; Cab-Guillén, Yahaira; Muñoz-Sánchez, J Armando; Vázquez-Flota, Felipe; Monforte-González, Miriam; Hernández-Sotomayor, S M Teresa

    2013-10-01

    Signal transduction via phospholipids is mediated by phospholipases such as phospholipase C (PLC) and D (PLD), which catalyze hydrolysis of plasma membrane structural phospholipids. Phospholipid signaling is also involved in plant responses to phytohormones such as salicylic acid (SA). The relationships between phospholipid signaling, SA, and secondary metabolism are not fully understood. Using a Capsicum chinense cell suspension as a model, we evaluated whether phospholipid signaling modulates SA-induced vanillin production through the activation of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), a key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway. Salicylic acid was found to elicit PAL activity and consequently vanillin production, which was diminished or reversed upon exposure to the phosphoinositide-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) signaling inhibitors neomycin and U73122. Exposure to the phosphatidic acid inhibitor 1-butanol altered PLD activity and prevented SA-induced vanillin production. Our results suggest that PLC and PLD-generated secondary messengers may be modulating SA-induced vanillin production through the activation of key biosynthetic pathway enzymes.

  7. C-1s NEXAFS spectroscopy reveals chemical fractionation of humic acid by cation-induced coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Christl,I.; Kretzschmar, R.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of cation-induced coagulation on the chemical composition of dissolved and coagulated fractions of humic acid was investigated in batch coagulation experiments for additions of aluminum at pH 4 and 5, iron at pH 4, and calcium and lead at pH 6. The partitioning of organic carbon and metals was determined by analyzing total organic carbon and total metal contents of the dissolved phase. Both the dissolved and the coagulated humic acid fractions were characterized using synchrotron scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and C-1s near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Intensities of {pi}* transitions of carboxyl carbon and {sigma}* transitions of alkyl, O-alkyl, and carboxyl carbon decreased with increasing metal concentration for the dissolved humic acid fractions. This decrease was accompanied by an increase of the respective intensities in the coagulated fraction as shown for lead. Intensities of aromatic and phenolic carbon were affected to a larger extent only by aluminum and iron additions. The changes observed in the C-1s NEXAFS spectra coincided with an increasing removal of organic carbon from the dissolved phase with increasing total metal concentrations. We conclude that humic acid was chemically fractionated by cation-induced coagulation, which preferentially removed functional groups involved in metal-cation binding from solution.

  8. Radiation-induced destruction of hydroxyl-containing amino acids and dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sladkova, А. А.; Sosnovskaya, А. А.; Edimecheva, I. P.; Shadyro, О. I.

    2012-12-01

    The yields of molecular products resulting from radiolysis of hydroxyl-containing amino acids and dipeptides under various conditions were determined. The possibility of a new radiation-induced destruction pathway has been shown for serine and threonine, as well as for the dipeptides having residues of these amino acids at the N-terminal part of the respective molecule. This process includes formation of N-centered radicals from the starting molecules followed by their decomposition with elimination of side substituents. On radiolysis, serine and threonine were also shown to undergo free-radical destruction to form acetaldehyde and acetone, respectively. A mechanism has been proposed including consecutive stages of fragmentation of α-hydroxyl-containing carbon-centered radicals with elimination of ammonia and decomposition of the secondary radicals with elimination of CO2. The yields of CO2 obtained on radiolysis of serine and threonine were significantly higher (except for solutions at pH 12) than those for alanine and valine, which have no hydroxyl groups in their structures. The obtained data indicate that the hydroxyl-containing amino acids occupy a special place among other amino acids as regards the variety of radiation-induced reactions which they may undergo due to their structural features.

  9. Dietary (n-3) long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids prevent sucrose-induced insulin resistance in rats.

    PubMed

    Ghafoorunissa; Ibrahim, Ahamed; Rajkumar, Laxmi; Acharya, Vani

    2005-11-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of substituting (n-3) long-chain PUFAs (LCPUFAs) for linoleic acid and hence decreasing the (n-6):(n-3) fatty acid ratio on sucrose-induced insulin resistance in rats. Weanling male Wistar rats were fed casein-based diets containing 100 g/kg fat for 12 wk. Insulin resistance was induced by replacing starch (ST) with sucrose (SU). The dietary fats were formulated with groundnut oil, palmolein, and fish oil to provide the following ratios of (n-6):(n-3) fatty acids: 210 (ST-210, SU-210), 50 (SU-50), 10 (SU-10), and 5 (SU-5). Compared with starch (ST-210), sucrose feeding (SU-210) significantly increased the plasma insulin and triglyceride concentrations and the plasma insulin area under the curve (AUC) in response to an oral glucose load. Adipocytes isolated from rats fed SU-210 had greater lipolytic rate, lower insulin stimulated glucose transport, and lower insulin-mediated antilipolysis than those from rats fed ST-210. Decreasing the dietary (n-6):(n-3) ratio in sucrose-fed rats (SU-10 and SU-5) normalized the plasma insulin concentration and the AUC of insulin after a glucose load. The sucrose-induced increase in plasma triglyceride concentration was normalized in rats fed SU-50, SU-10 and SU-5. Further, sucrose-induced alterations in adipocyte lipolysis and antilipolysis were partially reversed and glucose transport improved in rats fed diets SU-5 and SU-10. In diaphragm phospholipids, decreasing the (n-6):(n-3) ratio in the diet increased the concentration of (n-3) LCPUFAs with concomitant decreases in the concentration of (n-6) LCPUFAs. These results suggest that (n-3) LCPUFAs at a level of 2.6 g/kg diet [0.56% energy (n-3) LCPUFAs, (n-6):(n-3) ratio = 10] may prevent sucrose-induced insulin resistance by improving peripheral insulin sensitivity.

  10. Protection from cyanide-induced brain injury by the Nrf2 transcriptional activator carnosic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongxian; Lee, Brian; Nutter, Anthony; Song, Paul; Dolatabadi, Nima; Parker, James; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Newmeyer, Traci; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; McKercher, Scott R; Masliah, Eliezer; Lipton, Stuart A

    2015-06-01

    Cyanide is a life-threatening, bioterrorist agent, preventing cellular respiration by inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in cardiopulmonary failure, hypoxic brain injury, and death within minutes. However, even after treatment with various antidotes to protect cytochrome oxidase, cyanide intoxication in humans can induce a delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Additional mechanisms are thought to underlie cyanide-induced neuronal damage, including generation of reactive oxygen species. This may account for the fact that antioxidants prevent some aspects of cyanide-induced neuronal damage. Here, as a potential preemptive countermeasure against a bioterrorist attack with cyanide, we tested the CNS protective effect of carnosic acid (CA), a pro-electrophilic compound found in the herb rosemary. CA crosses the blood-brain barrier to up-regulate endogenous antioxidant enzymes via activation of the Nrf2 transcriptional pathway. We demonstrate that CA exerts neuroprotective effects on cyanide-induced brain damage in cultured rodent and human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons in vitro, and in vivo in various brain areas of a non-Swiss albino mouse model of cyanide poisoning that simulates damage observed in the human brain. Cyanide, a potential bioterrorist agent, can produce a chronic delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Here, cyanide poisoning treated with the proelectrophillic compound carnosic acid, results in reduced neuronal cell death in both in vitro and in vivo models through activation of the Nrf2/ARE transcriptional pathway. Carnosic acid is therefore a potential treatment for the toxic central nervous system (CNS) effects of cyanide poisoning. ARE, antioxidant responsive element; Nrf2 (NFE2L2, Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2).

  11. Antiapoptotic efficacy of folic acid and vitamin B₁₂ against arsenic-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sangita; Maiti, Anasuya; Karmakar, Subhra; Das, Asankur Sekhar; Mukherjee, Sandip; Das, Dolan; Mitra, Chandan

    2012-05-01

    Earlier, we proposed that the ability of folic acid and vitamin B₁₂ to preserve systemic and mitochondrial function after short-term exposure to arsenic may prevent further progression to more permanent injury and pathological changes leading to cell death. To elucidate its mechanism, the present study examined the antiapoptotic efficacy of folic acid and vitamin B₁₂ against short-term arsenic exposure-induced hepatic mitochondria oxidative stress and dysfunction. Sixteen to eighteen weeks old male albino rats weighing 140-150 × g were divided into five groups: Control (A), Arsenic-treated (B), Arsenic + folic acid (C), Arsenic +vitamin B₁₂ (D), and Arsenic + folic acid + vitamin B₁₂ (E). Data generated indicated that folic acid and vitamin B₁₂ separately or in combination can give significant protection against alterations in oxidative stress and apoptotic marker parameters and downstream changes in mitochondria, namely pro-oxidative (NO, TBARS, OH⁻) and antioxidative defense (SOD, CAT, GSH) markers, iNOS protein expression, mitochondrial swelling, cytochrome c oxidase and Ca²⁺-ATPase activity, Ca²⁺ content, caspase-3 activity. Additionally, results of hepatic cell DNA fragmentation, arsenic load of blood, hepatic tissue and urine, and histological observations, all strongly support that both these supplements have efficacy in preventing apoptotic changes and cellular damage. As the mechanisms of actions of both of these supplements are methylation related, a combined application was more effective. Results further reveal new molecular targets through which folic acid and vitamin B₁₂ separately or in combination work to alleviate one critical component of arsenic-induced liver injury: mitochondria dysfunction.

  12. Protective effect of arjunolic acid against arsenic-induced oxidative stress in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Mahua; Manna, Prasenjit; Sil, Parames C

    2008-02-01

    Arsenic, a notoriously poisonous metalloid, is ubiquitous in the environment, and it affects nearly all organ systems of animals including humans. The present study was designed to investigate the preventive role of a triterpenoid saponin, arjunolic acid against arsenic-induced oxidative damage in murine brain. Sodium arsenite was selected as a source of arsenic for this study. The free-radical-scavenging activity and the in vivo antioxidant power of arjunolic acid were determined from its 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical scavenging ability and ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay, respectively. Oral administration of sodium arsenite at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight for 2 days significantly decreased the activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase, the level of cellular metabolites, reduced glutathione, total thiols and increased the level of oxidized glutathione. In addition, it enhanced the levels of lipid peroxidation end products and protein carbonyl content. Treatment with arjunolic acid at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight for 4 days prior to arsenic administration almost normalized above indices. Histological findings due to arsenic intoxication and arjunolic acid treatment supported the other biochemical changes in murine brains. Results of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical scavenging and ferric reducing/antioxidant power assays clearly showed the in vitro radical scavenging as well as the in vivo antioxidant power of arjunolic acid, respectively. The effect of a well-established antioxidant, vitamin C, has been included in the study as a positive control. Combining all, results suggest that arjunolic acid possessed the ability to ameliorate arsenic-induced oxidative insult in murine brain and is probably due to its antioxidant activity.

  13. LED light stress induced biomass and fatty acid production in microalgal biosystem, Acutodesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong-Keun; Kumaran, Rangarajulu Senthil; Jeon, Hyeon Jin; Song, Hak-Jin; Yang, Yung-Hun; Lee, Sang Hyun; Song, Kyung-Guen; Kim, Kwang Jin; Singh, Vijay; Kim, Hyung Joo

    2015-06-15

    Microbial algal system can serve as a potential source for the production of much high value bioproducts and biofuels. The quality and intensity of light are the key elements to optimize the production of algal biomass and fatty acid contents. This study presents the effect of differential LED flashing light conditions on the growth of microalgae, Acutodesmus obliquus. The induced light stress was optimized for its biomass and fatty acid content. The microalgae are exposed to various frequency of intermittent LED flashing light (blue and red lights) at three different phases in the 18 day cell growth (log, lag and stationary phase). The frequency of light flashing rate was adjusted to 120, 10, 5, 3.75, and 1 times per min. The effect of light stress on growth and fatty acids composition of A. obliquus induced an increase in algae growth and fatty acid production. Different optimal timing for light stress was subjected to elucidate the effect of light stress on algae growth and fatty acid production. The results showed an increase in the algae growth (1.2mg/L of chl a content) under light stress condition at FT10 (flashing time, 10 times per min) from the initial day (log phase) compared with the control experiment (0.4 mg/L of chl a content). However, the total fatty acids (71 mg/g) and volumetric FAME production (9.4 ml/l) level was found to be significant under FT5 (flashing time, 5 times per min), adopting flashing light from day 10 (stationary phase). TEM studies also revealed the deposition of lipid to be largest in the 18 day old cells under flashing light (FT5) condition, representing maximum accumulation of lipids bodies (up to 770 nm diameter in particle size) occupying approximately 42% of the total area of the cell.

  14. LED light stress induced biomass and fatty acid production in microalgal biosystem, Acutodesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong-Keun; Kumaran, Rangarajulu Senthil; Jeon, Hyeon Jin; Song, Hak-Jin; Yang, Yung-Hun; Lee, Sang Hyun; Song, Kyung-Guen; Kim, Kwang Jin; Singh, Vijay; Kim, Hyung Joo

    2015-06-15

    Microbial algal system can serve as a potential source for the production of much high value bioproducts and biofuels. The quality and intensity of light are the key elements to optimize the production of algal biomass and fatty acid contents. This study presents the effect of differential LED flashing light conditions on the growth of microalgae, Acutodesmus obliquus. The induced light stress was optimized for its biomass and fatty acid content. The microalgae are exposed to various frequency of intermittent LED flashing light (blue and red lights) at three different phases in the 18 day cell growth (log, lag and stationary phase). The frequency of light flashing rate was adjusted to 120, 10, 5, 3.75, and 1 times per min. The effect of light stress on growth and fatty acids composition of A. obliquus induced an increase in algae growth and fatty acid production. Different optimal timing for light stress was subjected to elucidate the effect of light stress on algae growth and fatty acid production. The results showed an increase in the algae growth (1.2mg/L of chl a content) under light stress condition at FT10 (flashing time, 10 times per min) from the initial day (log phase) compared with the control experiment (0.4 mg/L of chl a content). However, the total fatty acids (71 mg/g) and volumetric FAME production (9.4 ml/l) level was found to be significant under FT5 (flashing time, 5 times per min), adopting flashing light from day 10 (stationary phase). TEM studies also revealed the deposition of lipid to be largest in the 18 day old cells under flashing light (FT5) condition, representing maximum accumulation of lipids bodies (up to 770 nm diameter in particle size) occupying approximately 42% of the total area of the cell. PMID:25791881

  15. LED light stress induced biomass and fatty acid production in microalgal biosystem, Acutodesmus obliquus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong-Keun; Kumaran, Rangarajulu Senthil; Jeon, Hyeon Jin; Song, Hak-Jin; Yang, Yung-Hun; Lee, Sang Hyun; Song, Kyung-Guen; Kim, Kwang Jin; Singh, Vijay; Kim, Hyung Joo

    2015-06-01

    Microbial algal system can serve as a potential source for the production of much high value bioproducts and biofuels. The quality and intensity of light are the key elements to optimize the production of algal biomass and fatty acid contents. This study presents the effect of differential LED flashing light conditions on the growth of microalgae, Acutodesmus obliquus. The induced light stress was optimized for its biomass and fatty acid content. The microalgae are exposed to various frequency of intermittent LED flashing light (blue and red lights) at three different phases in the 18 day cell growth (log, lag and stationary phase). The frequency of light flashing rate was adjusted to 120, 10, 5, 3.75, and 1 times per min. The effect of light stress on growth and fatty acids composition of A. obliquus induced an increase in algae growth and fatty acid production. Different optimal timing for light stress was subjected to elucidate the effect of light stress on algae growth and fatty acid production. The results showed an increase in the algae growth (1.2 mg/L of chl a content) under light stress condition at FT10 (flashing time, 10 times per min) from the initial day (log phase) compared with the control experiment (0.4 mg/L of chl a content). However, the total fatty acids (71 mg/g) and volumetric FAME production (9.4 ml/l) level was found to be significant under FT5 (flashing time, 5 times per min), adopting flashing light from day 10 (stationary phase). TEM studies also revealed the deposition of lipid to be largest in the 18 day old cells under flashing light (FT5) condition, representing maximum accumulation of lipids bodies (up to 770 nm diameter in particle size) occupying approximately 42% of the total area of the cell.

  16. Ketogenic Diet, but Not Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Diet, Reduces Spontaneous Seizures in Juvenile Rats with Kainic Acid-induced Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dustin, Simone M.; Stafstrom, Carl E.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) is effective in many cases of drug-resistant epilepsy, particularly in children. In the classic KD, fats consist primarily of long-chain saturated triglycerides. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially the n-3 type, decrease neuronal excitability and provide neuroprotection; pilot human studies have raised the possibility of using PUFAs to control seizures in patients. Methods: To determine the relative roles of the KD and PUFAs in an animal model, we induced epilepsy in juvenile rats (P29–35) using intraperitoneal kainic acid (KA). KA caused status epilepticus in all rats. Two days after KA, rats were randomized to one of 4 dietary groups: Control diet; PUFA diet; KD; or KD plus PUFA. All diets were administered isocalorically at 90% of the rat recommended daily calorie requirement. Spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) were assessed for 3 months after diet randomization. Results: Rats receiving the KD or KD-PUFA diet had significantly fewer SRS than those receiving the Control diet or PUFA diet. The PUFA diet did not reduce SRS compared to the Control diet. Conclusions: In the KA epilepsy model, the KD protects against SRS occurrence but dietary enhancement with PUFA does not afford additional protection against spontaneous seizures. PMID:27390673

  17. Phenylbutyric acid protects against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic fibrogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Qing; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Cheng; Tao, Li; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Xu, Yuan-Bao; Wang, Hua; Li, Jun; Xu, De-Xiang

    2013-01-15

    A recent report showed that the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling was activated in the pathogenesis of carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4})-induced hepatic fibrosis. Phenylbutyric acid (PBA) is a well-known chemical chaperone that inhibits endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling. In the present study, we investigated the effects of PBA on CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice. All mice were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with CCl{sub 4} (0.15 ml/kg BW, twice per week) for 8 weeks. In CCl{sub 4} + PBA group, mice were i.p. injected with PBA (150 mg/kg, twice per day) from the beginning of CCl{sub 4} injection to the end. As expected, PBA significantly attenuated CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic ER stress and UPR activation. Although PBA alleviated, only to a less extent, hepatic necrosis, it obviously inhibited CCl{sub 4}-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). Moreover, PBA inhibited CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 translocation and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. Interestingly, CCl{sub 4}-induced α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), a marker for the initiation phase of HSC activation, was significantly attenuated in mice pretreated with PBA. Correspondingly, CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic collagen (Col)1α1 and Col1α2, markers for the perpetuation phase of HSC activation, were inhibited in PBA-treated mice. Importantly, CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic fibrosis, as determined using Sirius red staining, was obviously attenuated by PBA. In conclusion, PBA prevents CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic fibrosis through inhibiting hepatic inflammatory response and HSC activation. Highlights: ► CCl{sub 4} induces hepatic ER stress, inflammation, HSC activation and hepatic fibrosis. ► PBA alleviates CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic ER stress and UPR signaling activation. ► PBA inhibits CCl{sub 4}-induced

  18. Alleviative effects of α-lipoic acid supplementation on acute heat stress-induced thermal panting and the level of plasma nonesterified fatty acids in hypothyroid broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Y

    2012-01-01

    1. The present study was conducted to examine the effects of α-lipoic acid on hypothyroidism-induced negative growth performance and whether α-lipoic acid alleviates acute heat stress in relation to hypothyroid status. 2. Female broiler chickens (14 d-old) were fed diets supplemented with α-lipoic acid (100 mg/kg) and an antithyroid substance, propylthiouracil (200 mg/kg), for 20 d under thermoneutral conditions (25°C). At 42 d of age, chickens were exposed to a high ambient temperature (36°C, 60% RH) for 4 h. 3. Under the thermoneutral condition, propylthiouracil administration decreased feed efficiency and concomitantly increased adipose tissue and thyroid gland weights. Plasma nonesterified fatty acids and triacylglycerol were also increased by propylthiouracil administration. However, α-lipoic acid supplementation did not affect the hypothyroidism-induced effects. 4. In hypothyroid chickens, the rise in respiratory rate induced by heat exposure was greatly inhibited by α-lipoic acid administration at 1 h, but this effect had disappeared at 4 h. In addition, a similar inhibitory effect on the concentrations of plasma nonesterified fatty acids was subsequently observed at 4 h. 5. Therefore, the present study suggested that α-lipoic acid alleviates acute heat stress if chickens are in a hypothyroid status.

  19. Comparison of salicylic acid, benzoic acid and p-hydroxybenzoic acid for their ability to induce flowering in Lemna Gibba G3

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, F.C.; Kang, B.G.; Khurana, J.P.

    1986-04-01

    The long-day plant Lemna gibba G3 fails to flower under continuous light on NH/sub 4//sup +/-free 0.5 H medium. This inhibition is completely reversed by 10 ..mu..M salicyclic acid (SA) or 32 ..mu..M benzoic acid (BA). By contrast, p-hydroxybenzoic acid (p-OH-BA) has virtually no effect on flowering at levels as high as 320 ..mu..M. Uptake rates for the three compounds are comparable. Competition studies using /sup 14/C-SA indicate that, compared to SA, BA is about 10-fold less effective and p-OH-BA is nearly 100-fold less effective in competing against /sup 14/C-SA uptake. Both the effectiveness of SA for inducing flowering and the uptake of /sup 14/C-SA are substantially increased as the pH of the medium is lowered from 8 to 4.5. Under a nitrogen atmosphere the uptake of /sup 14/C-SA is partially inhibited above pH 5. Phosphate metabolism may be important for flowering since increasing the phosphate level in the medium 10-15 fold results in substantial flowering, and suboptimal levels of Sa and phosphate interact synergistically to stimulate flowering. The interaction of phosphate with BA and p-OH-BA will be presented.

  20. Protective effect of naringin on 3-nitropropionic acid-induced neurodegeneration through the modulation of matrix metalloproteinases and glial fibrillary acidic protein.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Kulasekaran; Sudhandiran, Ganapasam

    2016-01-01

    Naringin (4',5,7-trihydroxy-flavonone-7-rhamnoglucoside), a flavonone present in grapefruit, has recently been reported to protect against neurodegeration, induced with 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), through its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic properties. This study used a rat model of 3-NP-induced neurodegeneration to investigate the neuroprotective effects of naringin exerted by modulating the expression of matrix metalloproteinases and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Neurodegeneration was induced with 3-NP (10 mg/kg body mass, by intraperitoneal injection) once a day for 2 weeks, and induced rats were treated with naringin (80 mg/kg body mass, by oral gavage, once a day for 2 weeks). Naringin ameliorated the motor abnormalities caused by 3-NP, and reduced blood-brain barrier dysfunction by decreasing the expression of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, along with increasing the expression of the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases 1 and 2 in 3-NP-induced rats. Further, naringin reduced 3-NP-induced neuroinflammation by decreasing the expression of nuclear factor-kappa B and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Thus, naringin exerts protective effects against 3-NP-induced neurodegeneration by ameliorating the expressions of matrix metalloproteinases and glial fibrillary acidic protein.

  1. Mechanisms of motility change on trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid-induced colonic inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Gab Jin; Cui, Yuan; Yeon, Dong-Soo; Kwon, Seong-Chun; Park, Byong-Gon

    2012-12-01

    Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) characterized by recurrent episodes of colonic inflammation and tissue degeneration in human or animal models. The contractile force generated by the smooth muscle is significantly attenuated, resulting in altered motility leading to diarrhea or constipation in IBD. The aim of this study is to clarify the altered contractility of circular and longitudinal smooth muscle layers in proximal colon of trinitrobenzen sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis mouse. Colitis was induced by direct injection of TNBS (120 mg/kg, 50% ethanol) in proximal colon of ICR mouse using a 30 G needle anesthetized with ketamin (50 mg/kg), whereas animals in the control group were injected of 50% ethanol alone. In TNBS-induced colitis, the wall of the proximal colon is diffusely thickened with loss of haustration, and showed mucosal and mucular edema with inflammatory infiltration. The colonic inflammation is significantly induced the reduction of colonic contractile activity including spontaneous contractile activity, depolarization-induced contractility, and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated contractile response in circular muscle layer compared to the longitudinal muscle layer. The inward rectification of currents, especially, important to Ca(2+) and Na(+) influx-induced depolarization and contraction, was markedly reduced in the TNBS-induced colitis compared to the control. The muscarinic acetylcholine-mediated contractile responses were significantly attenuated in the circular and longitudinal smooth muscle strips induced by the reduction of membrane expression of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channel isoforms from the proximal colon of the TNBS-induced colitis mouse than the control.

  2. Sensing and adaptation to low pH mediated by inducible amino acid decarboxylases in Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Viala, Julie P M; Méresse, Stéphane; Pocachard, Bérengère; Guilhon, Aude-Agnès; Aussel, Laurent; Barras, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    During the course of infection, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium must successively survive the harsh acid stress of the stomach and multiply into a mild acidic compartment within macrophages. Inducible amino acid decarboxylases are known to promote adaptation to acidic environments. Three low pH inducible amino acid decarboxylases were annotated in the genome of S. Typhimurium, AdiA, CadA and SpeF, which are specific for arginine, lysine and ornithine, respectively. In this study, we characterized and compared the contributions of those enzymes in response to acidic challenges. Individual mutants as well as a strain deleted for the three genes were tested for their ability (i) to survive an extreme acid shock, (ii) to grow at mild acidic pH and (iii) to infect the mouse animal model. We showed that the lysine decarboxylase CadA had the broadest range of activity since it both had the capacity to promote survival at pH 2.3 and growth at pH 4.5. The arginine decarboxylase AdiA was the most performant in protecting S. Typhimurium from a shock at pH 2.3 and the ornithine decarboxylase SpeF conferred the best growth advantage under anaerobiosis conditions at pH 4.5. We developed a GFP-based gene reporter to monitor the pH of the environment as perceived by S. Typhimurium. Results showed that activities of the lysine and ornithine decarboxylases at mild acidic pH did modify the local surrounding of S. Typhimurium both in culture medium and in macrophages. Finally, we tested the contribution of decarboxylases to virulence and found that these enzymes were dispensable for S. Typhimurium virulence during systemic infection. In the light of this result, we examined the genomes of Salmonella spp. normally responsible of systemic infection and observed that the genes encoding these enzymes were not well conserved, supporting the idea that these enzymes may be not required during systemic infection.

  3. Peripheral tackykinin and excitatory amino acid receptors mediate hyperalgesia induced by Phoneutria nigriventer venom.

    PubMed

    Zanchet, Eliane Maria; Cury, Yara

    2003-04-25

    The generation of hyperalgesia by Phoneutria nigriventer venom was investigated in rats using the paw pressure test, through the intraplantar injection of the venom. Hyperalgesia was significantly inhibited by N-[2-(4-chlorophenyl) ethyl]-1,3,4,5-tetrahydro-7,8-dihydroxy-2H-2-benzazepine-2-carbothioamide (capsazepine), a vanilloid receptor antagonist, by the local administration of pGlu-Ala-Asp-Pro-Asn-Lys-Phe-Tyr-Pro (spiro-gamma-lactam) Leu-Trp-NH(2) (GR82334) or of Phenyl-CO-Ala-Ala-D-Trp-Phe-D-Pro-Pro-Nle-NH(2) (GR94800), inhibitors of tachykinin NK(1) and NK(2) receptors, respectively, or by the local injection of dizocilpine (MK 801), (+/-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid ((+/-)-AP-5), or 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), antagonists of NMDA and non-NMDA excitatory amino acid receptors. The correlation between hyperalgesia and the inflammatory response induced by the venom was also investigated. The venom-induced edematogenic response was not modified by the pharmacological treatments. These results suggest that hyperalgesia induced by P. nigriventer venom is mediated by stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive neurons, with activation of peripheral tachykinin NK(1) and NK(2) receptors and of both the NMDA and AMPA receptors. Distinct mechanisms are involved in the development of hyperalgesia and edema induced by the venom.

  4. Hepatoprotective effect of trimethylgallic acid esters against carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Mamta; Chadha, Renu; Kumar, Anil; Karan, Maninder; Singh, Tejvir; Dhingra, Sameer

    2015-12-01

    Gallic acid and its derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating various oxidative stress mediated disorders. In the present study, we investigated the hepatoprotective effects of newly synthesized conjugated trimethylgallic acid (TMGA) esters against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Animals were pre-treated with TMGA esters at their respective doses for 7 days against CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity. The histopathological changes were evaluated to find out degenerative fatty changes including vacuole formation, inflammation and tissue necrosis. Various biomarkers of oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation, glutathione levels, and endogenous antioxidant enzyme activities), liver enzymes (AST and ALT), triacylglycerol and cholesterol were evaluated. Pre-treatment with TMGA esters (MRG, MGG, MSG, and MUG at the dose of 28.71, 30.03, 31.35, 33.62 mg/kg/day), respectively reversed the CCl4-induced liver injury scores (reduced vacuole formation, inflammation and necrosis), biochemical parameters of plasma (increased AST, ALT, TG, and cholesterol), antioxidant enzymes (increased lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels; decreased glutathione levels, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities) in liver tissues and inflammatory surge (serum TNF-α) significantly. The study revealed that TMGA esters exerted hepatoprotective effects in CCl4-induced rats, specifically by modulating oxidative-nitrosative stress and inflammation.

  5. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid dampens oncogenic apoptosis induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress during hepatocarcinogen exposure

    PubMed Central

    Vandewynckel, Yves-Paul; Laukens, Debby; Devisscher, Lindsey; Paridaens, Annelies; Bogaerts, Eliene; Verhelst, Xavier; Van den Bussche, Anja; Raevens, Sarah; Van Steenkiste, Christophe; Van Troys, Marleen; Ampe, Christophe; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Chris; Govaere, Olivier; Geerts, Anja; Van Vlierberghe, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is characterized by the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). However, the role of ER stress in tumor initiation and progression is controversial. To determine the impact of ER stress, we applied tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), a bile acid with chaperone properties. The effects of TUDCA were assessed using a diethylnitrosamine-induced mouse HCC model in preventive and therapeutic settings. Cell metabolic activity, proliferation and invasion were investigated in vitro. Tumor progression was assessed in the HepG2 xenograft model. Administration of TUDCA in the preventive setting reduced carcinogen-induced elevation of alanine and aspartate aminotransferase levels, apoptosis of hepatocytes and tumor burden. TUDCA also reduced eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIf2α) phosphorylation, C/EBP homologous protein expression and caspase-12 processing. Thus, TUDCA suppresses carcinogen-induced pro-apoptotic UPR. TUDCA alleviated hepatic inflammation by increasing NF-κB inhibitor IκBα. Furthermore, TUDCA altered the invasive phenotype and enhanced metabolic activity but not proliferation in HCC cells. TUDCA administration after tumor development did not alter orthotopic tumor or xenograft growth. Taken together, TUDCA attenuates hepatocarcinogenesis by suppressing carcinogen-induced ER stress-mediated cell death and inflammation without stimulating tumor progression. Therefore, this chemical chaperone could represent a novel chemopreventive agent. PMID:26293671

  6. Treatment with the hyaluronic Acid synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone suppresses LPS-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    McKallip, Robert J; Ban, Hao; Uchakina, Olga N

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to bacterial endotoxins, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), can lead to the induction of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). To date, there are no known effective treatments for LPS-induced inflammation. In the current study, we investigated the potential use of the hyaluronic acid (HA) synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) on LPS-induced acute lung inflammation. Culturing LPS-activated immune cells with 4-MU led to reduced proliferation, reduced cytokine production, and an increase in apoptosis when compared to untreated cells. Treatment of mice with 4-MU led to protection from LPS-induced lung injury. Specifically, 4-MU treatment led to a reduction in LPS-induced hyaluronic acid synthase (HAS) messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, reduction in lung permeability, and reduction in proinflammatory cytokine production. Taken together, these results suggest that use of 4-MU to target HA production may be an effective treatment for the inflammatory response following exposure to LPS.

  7. Tannic acid mitigates the DMBA/croton oil-induced skin cancer progression in mice.

    PubMed

    Majed, Ferial; Rashid, Summya; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Nafees, Sana; Ali, Nemat; Ali, Rashid; Khan, Rehan; Hasan, Syed Kazim; Mehdi, Syed Jafar; Sultana, Sarwat

    2015-01-01

    Skin cancer is the most common malignancy in the world and also one of the major causes of death worldwide. The toxic environmental pollutant 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) is a skin-specific carcinogen. Tannic acid (TA) is reported to be effective against various types of chemical-induced toxicities and carcinogenesis as well. In the present study, we have evaluated the therapeutic potential of tannic acid in DMBA + croton oil-induced skin cancer in Swiss albino mice. Protective effect of TA against skin cancer was evaluated in terms of antioxidant enzymes activities, lipid peroxidation, histopathological changes and expression of inflammation and early tumour markers. DMBA + croton oil causes depletion of antioxidant enzymes (p < 0.001) and elevation of early inflammatory and tumour promotional events. TA prevents the DMBA + croton oil-induced toxicity through a protective mechanism that involves the reduction of oxidative stress as well as COX-2, i-NOS, PCNA protein expression and level of proinflammatory cytokine such as IL-6 release at a very significant level (p < 0.001). It could be concluded from our results that TA attenuates DMBA + croton oil-induced tumour promotional potential possibly by inhibiting oxidative and inflammatory responses and acts as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative agent.

  8. Tachykinin inhibition of acid-induced gastric hyperaemia in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, A.; Jocic, M.; Herzeg, G.; Holzer, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. Primary afferent neurones releasing the vasodilator, calcitonin gene-related peptide, mediate the gastric hyperaemic response to acid back-diffusion. The tachykinins neurokinin A (NKA) and substance P (SP) are located in the same neurones and are co-released with calcitonin gene-related peptide. In this study we investigated the effect and possible role of tachykinins in the acid-evoked gastric vasodilatation in urethane-anaesthetized rats. 2. Gastric acid back-diffusion, induced by perfusing the stomach with 15% ethanol in the presence of 0.05 M HCl, increased gastric mucosal blood flow by 60-90%, as determined by the hydrogen clearance technique. NKA and SP (0.14-3.78 nmol min-1 kg-1, infused intra-aortically) inhibited the gastric mucosal hyperaemic response to acid back-diffusion in a dose-dependent manner, an effect that was accompanied by aggravation of ethanol/acid-induced macroscopic haemorrhagic lesions. 3. The inhibitory effect of NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) on the acid-induced gastric mucosal vasodilatation was prevented by the tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonists, MEN 10,627 (200 nmol kg-1) but left unaltered by the NK1 receptor antagonist, SR 140,333 (300 nmol kg-1) and the mast-cell stabilizer, ketotifen (4.6 mumol kg-1). 4. Under basal conditions, with 0.05 M HCl being perfused through the stomach, NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) reduced gastric mucosal blood flow by about 25%, an effect that was abolished by SR 140,333 but not MEN 10,627 or ketotifen. 5. SR 140,333, MEN 10,627 or ketotifen had no significant effect on basal gastric mucosal blood flow nor did they modify the gastric mucosal hyperaemic reaction to acid back-diffusion. 6. The effect of NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) in causing vasoconstriction and inhibiting the vasodilator response to acid back-diffusion was also seen when blood flow in the left gastric artery was measured with the ultrasonic transit time shift technique. 7. Arginine vasopressin (AVP, 0.1 nmol min-1 kg-1) induced gastric

  9. Salidroside protects against kainic acid-induced status epilepticus via suppressing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Si, Pei-Pei; Zhen, Jun-Li; Cai, Yun-Lei; Wang, Wen-Jing; Wang, Wei-Ping

    2016-04-01

    There are numerous mechanisms by which the brain generates seizures. It is well known that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in status epilepticus (SE). Salidroside (SDS) extracted from Rhodiola rosea L. shows multiple bioactive properties, such as neuroprotection and antioxidant activity in vitro and in vivo. This study explored the role of SDS in kainic acid (KA)-induced SE and investigated the underlying mechanism. Latency to SE increased in the SDS-pretreated mice compared to the KA group, while the percentage of incidence of SE was significantly reduced. These results suggested that pretreatment with SDS not only delayed SE, but it also decreased the incidence of SE induced by KA. KA increased MDA level and reduced the production of SOD and GSH at multiple timepoints after KA administration. SDS inhibited the change of MDA, SOD and GSH induced by KA prior to SE onset, indicating that SDS protects against KA-induced SE via suppressing oxidative stress. Based on these results, we investigated the possible molecular mechanism of SDS. Pretreatment with SDS reversed the KA-induced decrease in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK); increased the sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) deacetylase activity in KA-treated mice, which had no demonstrable effect on SIRT1 mRNA and protein; and suppressed the KA-induced increase in Ace-FoxO1. These results showed that AMPK/SIRT1/FoxO1 signaling is possibly the molecular mechanism of neuroprotection by SDS.

  10. Ferulic acid ameliorates memory impairment in d-galactose-induced aging mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Honggai; Qu, Zhuo; Zhang, Jingze; Huo, Liqin; Gao, Jing; Gao, Wenyuan

    2016-11-01

    Ferulic acid (FA) acts as a powerful antioxidant against various age-related diseases. To investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of FA against d-galactose(d-gal)-induced memory deficit, mice were injected with d-gal to induce memory impairment and simultaneously treated with FA and donepezil. The behavioral results revealed that chronic FA treatment reversed d-gal-induced memory impairment. Further, FA treatment inhibited d-gal-induced AChE activity and oxidative stress via increase of superoxide dismutase activity and reduced glutathione content, as well as decrease of malondialdehyde and nitric oxide levels. We also observed that FA significantly inhibits inflammation in the brain through reduction of NF-κB and IL-1β by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additionally, FA treatment significantly reduces the caspase-3 level in the hippocampus of d-gal-treated mice. Hematoxylin and eosin and Nissl staining showed that FA prevents neurodegeneration induced by d-gal. These findings showed that FA inhibits d-gal-induced AChE activity, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration, and consequently ameliorates memory impairment.

  11. A diet with lactosucrose supplementation ameliorates trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Ruan, Zheng; Zhou, Xiaoli; Huang, Xiaoliu; Li, Hua; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Cui; Liu, Shiqiang; Deng, Zeyuan; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Chronic intestinal inflammation contributes to an increased risk of colon cancer. Lactosucrose (LS), a kind of functional trisaccharide, can modulate immunity and promote microbe growth. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of LS on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis in rats. Rats were randomly divided into four treatment groups: the normal group, TNBS group, LS group, and salicylazosulfapyridine (SASP) group for five weeks. LS supplementation ameliorated TNBS-induced colitis. LS supplementation increased IL-10 production and suppressed the secretion of IL-12 in the colon, as compared to the TNBS group. LS decreased the production of TLR-2 protein and nuclear NF-κB p65 protein, as well as mRNA levels, as compared with colitic rats. These results indicate that chronic feeding of LS inhibited TNBS-induced chronic inflammation. LS has potential nutraceutical intervention to combat colitis.

  12. The protective effect of blueberry anthocyanins against perfluorooctanoic acid-induced disturbance in planarian (Dugesia japonica).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zuoqing; Zhang, Jianyong; Tu, Changchao; Wang, Zhijing; Xin, Wenpeng

    2016-05-01

    The influence of blueberry anthocyanins on perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)-induced stress response in planarian mitochondria was investigated. PFOA at 15mg/L and anthocyanins at 10 or 20mg/L were individually and simultaneously administered to planarians for up to 10d. The results showed PFOA treatment induced an increase in mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and a decrease antioxidant capacity and enzyme activities. In anthocyanin treated animals, the activity of succinate dehydrogenase, cytochrome oxidase and monoamine oxidase increased, but mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening decreased and total antioxidant capacity increased. An improvement in above-mentioned physiological and biochemical parameters was found in the combined PFOA and anthocyanin treated animals, in a dose-dependent manner. Anthocyanins attenuated the PFOA induced toxicity; antioxidant capacity and enzyme activities are involved in the protective mechanism of anthocyanins. PMID:26836138

  13. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Attenuates the Oxidative Stress-Induced Decrease of CD33 Expression in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Beltrán, Silvia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Gonzalez-Reyes, Susana; Juarez-Figueroa, Ulises E.; Gonzalez, Yolanda

    2013-01-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is a natural lignan with recognized antioxidant and beneficial properties that is isolated from Larrea tridentata. In this study, we evaluated the effect of NDGA on the downregulation of oxidant stress-induced CD33 in human monocytes (MNs). Oxidative stress was induced by iodoacetate (IAA) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and was evaluated using reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and cell viability. NDGA attenuates toxicity, ROS production and the oxidative stress-induced decrease of CD33 expression secondary to IAA or H2O2 in human MNs. It was also shown that NDGA (20 μM) attenuates cell death in the THP-1 cell line that is caused by treatment with either IAA or H2O2. These results suggest that NDGA has a protective effect on CD33 expression, which is associated with its antioxidant activity in human MNs. PMID:23533689

  14. Performance of computational tools in evaluating the functional impact of laboratory-induced amino acid mutations.

    PubMed

    Gray, Vanessa E; Kukurba, Kimberly R; Kumar, Sudhir

    2012-08-15

    Site-directed mutagenesis is frequently used by scientists to investigate the functional impact of amino acid mutations in the laboratory. Over 10,000 such laboratory-induced mutations have been reported in the UniProt database along with the outcomes of functional assays. Here, we explore the performance of state-of-the-art computational tools (Condel, PolyPhen-2 and SIFT) in correctly annotating the function-altering potential of 10,913 laboratory-induced mutations from 2372 proteins. We find that computational tools are very successful in diagnosing laboratory-induced mutations that elicit significant functional change in the laboratory (up to 92% accuracy). But, these tools consistently fail in correctly annotating laboratory-induced mutations that show no functional impact in the laboratory assays. Therefore, the overall accuracy of computational tools for laboratory-induced mutations is much lower than that observed for the naturally occurring human variants. We tested and rejected the possibilities that the preponderance of changes to alanine and the presence of multiple base-pair mutations in the laboratory were the reasons for the observed discordance between the performance of computational tools for natural and laboratory mutations. Instead, we discover that the laboratory-induced mutations occur predominately at the highly conserved positions in proteins, where the computational tools have the lowest accuracy of correct prediction for variants that do not impact function (neutral). Therefore, the comparisons of experimental-profiling results with those from computational predictions need to be sensitive to the evolutionary conservation of the positions harboring the amino acid change. PMID:22685075

  15. Triphenyl phosphate-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish: Potential role of the retinoic acid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Isales, Gregory M.; Hipszer, Rachel A.; Raftery, Tara D.; Chen, Albert; Stapleton, Heather M.; Volz, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Using zebrafish as a model, we previously reported that developmental exposure to triphenyl phosphate (TPP) – a high-production volume organophosphate-based flame retardant – results in dioxin-like cardiac looping impairments that are independent of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Using a pharmacologic approach, the objective of this study was to investigate the potential role of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) – a nuclear receptor that regulates vertebrate heart morphogenesis – in mediating TPP-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish. We first revealed that static exposure of zebrafish from 5-72 hours post-fertilization (hpf) to TPP in the presence of non-toxic concentrations of an RAR antagonist (BMS493) significantly enhanced TPP-induced toxicity (relative to TPP alone), even though identical non-toxic BMS493 concentrations mitigated retinoic acid (RA)-induced toxicity. BMS493-mediated enhancement of TPP toxicity was not a result of differential TPP uptake or metabolism, as internal embryonic doses of TPP and diphenyl phosphate (DPP) – a primary TPP metabolite - were not different in the presence or absence of BMS493. Using real-time PCR, we then quantified the relative change in expression of cytochrome P450 26a1 (cyp26a1) – a major target gene for RA-induced RAR activation in zebrafish – and found that RA and TPP exposure resulted in a ∼5-fold increase and decrease in cyp26a1 expression, respectively, relative to vehicle-exposed embryos. To address whether TPP may interact with human RARs, we then exposed Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with chimeric human RARα-, RARβ-, or RARγ to TPP in the presence of RA, and found that TPP significantly inhibited RA-induced luciferase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Overall, our findings suggest that zebrafish RARs may be involved in mediating TPP-induced developmental toxicity, a mechanism of action that may have relevance to humans. PMID:25725299

  16. The Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Mancozeb-Induced Toxicity in Rat Thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, V; Cekic, S; Kamenov, B; Ciric, M; Krtinic, D

    2015-01-01

    Mancozeb, as a dithiocarbamate fungicide, has been found to exhibit toxicological manifestations in different cells, mainly by generation of free radicals which may alter antioxidant defence systems in cells. The effect of mancozeb on the cells of a primary lymphoid organ has not been studied. In the present study, the effects of mancozeb (0.2, 2 and 5 μg/ml) or mancozeb+ascorbic acid (100 μg/ml), or ascorbic acid alone or control medium alone on the levels of cell viability, apoptosis, intracellular reactive oxygen species production (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP levels in rat thymocytes were examined in vitro. Cells treated with mancozeb displayed a concentration-dependent increase of hypodiploid cells and ROS production followed by markedly decreased viability of the cells, MMP and ATP levels. Application of ascorbic acid significantly reduced cytotoxicity in cell cultures treated with 0.2 and 2 μg/ml of mancozeb, together with significantly decreased ROS levels and increased MMP and ATP levels. In cells treated with 5 μg/ml of mancozeb, ascorbic acid failed to reduce toxicity while simultaneously increasing the apoptosis rate of thymocytes. These results suggest that ROS plays a significant role in mancozeb-induced toxicity, through alteration of mitochondrial function. Ascorbic acid administration reduced the toxicity rate in cells treated with lower mancozeb concentrations, while it may have the ability to shift cells from necrosis to apoptosis in the presence of highest mancozeb concentrations. PMID:26213857

  17. Insulin-induced phospho-oligosaccharide stimulates amino acid transport in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Varela, I; Avila, M; Mato, J M; Hue, L

    1990-01-01

    The ability of the insulin-induced phospho-oligosaccharide to stimulate amino acid transport was studied in isolated rat hepatocytes. At low alpha-aminoisobutyric acid concentrations (0.1 mM), both 100 nM-insulin and 10 microM-phospho-oligosaccharide doubled amino acid uptake after 2 h of incubation. This stimulation was prevented by 0.1 mM-cycloheximide or 5 micrograms of actinomycin D/ml, indicating that the phospho-oligosaccharide, like insulin, was acting via the synthesis of a high-affinity transport component. The effects of the phospho-oligosaccharide and of insulin were blocked by Ins2P (2.5 mM), but not by myo-inositol, inositol hexaphosphoric acid or several monosaccharides such as mannose, glucosamine and galactose. Both the temporal effect on amino acid entry and the extent of stimulation of this process by the phospho-oligosaccharide indicate that this molecule mimics, and may mediate, some of the long-term actions of insulin. However, the effects of phospho-oligosaccharide and insulin were not exactly the same, since the effect of insulin, but not of the phospho-oligosaccharide, was additive with that of glucagon. PMID:2185744

  18. The Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Mancozeb-Induced Toxicity in Rat Thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, V; Cekic, S; Kamenov, B; Ciric, M; Krtinic, D

    2015-01-01

    Mancozeb, as a dithiocarbamate fungicide, has been found to exhibit toxicological manifestations in different cells, mainly by generation of free radicals which may alter antioxidant defence systems in cells. The effect of mancozeb on the cells of a primary lymphoid organ has not been studied. In the present study, the effects of mancozeb (0.2, 2 and 5 μg/ml) or mancozeb+ascorbic acid (100 μg/ml), or ascorbic acid alone or control medium alone on the levels of cell viability, apoptosis, intracellular reactive oxygen species production (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP levels in rat thymocytes were examined in vitro. Cells treated with mancozeb displayed a concentration-dependent increase of hypodiploid cells and ROS production followed by markedly decreased viability of the cells, MMP and ATP levels. Application of ascorbic acid significantly reduced cytotoxicity in cell cultures treated with 0.2 and 2 μg/ml of mancozeb, together with significantly decreased ROS levels and increased MMP and ATP levels. In cells treated with 5 μg/ml of mancozeb, ascorbic acid failed to reduce toxicity while simultaneously increasing the apoptosis rate of thymocytes. These results suggest that ROS plays a significant role in mancozeb-induced toxicity, through alteration of mitochondrial function. Ascorbic acid administration reduced the toxicity rate in cells treated with lower mancozeb concentrations, while it may have the ability to shift cells from necrosis to apoptosis in the presence of highest mancozeb concentrations.

  19. Arachidonic acid-induced oxidative injury to cultured spinal cord neurons.

    PubMed

    Toborek, M; Malecki, A; Garrido, R; Mattson, M P; Hennig, B; Young, B

    1999-08-01

    Spinal cord trauma can cause a marked release of free fatty acids, in particular, arachidonic acid (AA), from cell membranes. Free fatty acids, and AA by itself, may lead to secondary damage to spinal cord neurons. To study this hypothesis, cultured spinal cord neurons were exposed to increasing concentrations of AA (0.01-10 microM). AA-induced injury to spinal cord neurons was assessed by measurements of cellular oxidative stress, intracellular calcium levels, activation of nuclear factor-KB (NF-kappaB), and cell viability. AA treatment increased intracellular calcium concentrations and decreased cell viability. Oxidative stress increased significantly in neurons exposed to 1 and 10 microM AA. In addition, AA treatment activated NF-kappaB and decreased levels of the inhibitory subunit, IKB. It is interesting that manganese superoxide dismutase protein levels and levels of intracellular total glutathione increased in neurons exposed to this fatty acid for 24 h, consistent with a compensatory response to increased oxidative stress. These results strongly support the hypothesis that free fatty acids contribute to the tissue injury observed following spinal cord trauma. PMID:10428065

  20. Mitochondria-dependent apoptosis of con A-activated T lymphocytes induced by asiatic acid for preventing murine fulminant hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenjie; Liu, Wen; Hong, Shaocheng; Liu, Hailiang; Qian, Cheng; Shen, Yan; Wu, Xuefeng; Sun, Yang; Xu, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Selectively facilitating apoptosis of activated T cells is essential for the clearance of pathogenic injurious cells and subsequent efficient resolution of inflammation. However, few chemicals have been reported to trigger apoptosis of activated T cells for the treatment of hepatitis without affecting quiescent T cells. In the present study, we found that asiatic acid, a natural triterpenoid, selectively triggered apoptosis of concanavalin A (Con A)-activated T cells in a mitochondria-dependent manner indicated by the disruption of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol, caspases activation, and cleavage of PARP. In addition, asiatic acid also induced the cleavage of caspase 8 and Bid and augmented Fas expression in Con A-activated T cells. However, following activation of T cells from MRL(lpr/lpr) mice with mutation of Fas demonstrated a similar susceptibility to asiatic acid-induced apoptosis compared with normal T cells, suggesting that Fas-mediated death-receptor apoptotic pathway does not mainly contribute to asiatic acid-induced cell death. Furthermore, asiatic acid significantly alleviated Con A-induced T cell-dependent fulminant hepatitis in mice, as assessed by reduced serum transaminases, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and pathologic parameters. Consistent with the in vitro results, asiatic acid also induced apoptosis of activated CD4(+) T cells in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the ability of asiatic acid to induce apoptosis of activated T cells and its potential use in the treatment of T-cell-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  1. Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids Increase Survival and Decrease Bacterial Load in Mice Subjected to Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Svahn, Sara L; Ulleryd, Marcus A; Grahnemo, Louise; Ståhlman, Marcus; Borén, Jan; Nilsson, Staffan; Jansson, John-Olov; Johansson, Maria E

    2016-04-01

    Sepsis caused by Staphylococcus aureus is increasing in incidence. With the alarming use of antibiotics,S. aureus is prone to become methicillin resistant. Antibiotics are the only widely used pharmacological treatment for sepsis. Interestingly, mice fed high-fat diet (HFD) rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids have better survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis than mice fed HFD rich in saturated fatty acids (HFD-S). To investigate what component of polyunsaturated fatty acids, i.e., omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids, exerts beneficial effects on the survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis, mice were fed HFD rich in omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids for 8 weeks prior to inoculation with S. aureus Further, mice fed HFD-S were treated with omega-3 fatty acid metabolites known as resolvins. Mice fed HFD rich in omega-3 fatty acids had increased survival and decreased bacterial loads compared to those for mice fed HFD-S after S. aureus-induced sepsis. Furthermore, the bacterial load was decreased in resolvin-treated mice fed HFD-S after S. aureus-induced sepsis compared with that in mice treated with vehicle. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids increase the survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis by reversing the deleterious effect of HFD-S on mouse survival.

  2. Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids Increase Survival and Decrease Bacterial Load in Mice Subjected to Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Ulleryd, Marcus A.; Grahnemo, Louise; Ståhlman, Marcus; Borén, Jan; Nilsson, Staffan; Jansson, John-Olov

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis caused by Staphylococcus aureus is increasing in incidence. With the alarming use of antibiotics, S. aureus is prone to become methicillin resistant. Antibiotics are the only widely used pharmacological treatment for sepsis. Interestingly, mice fed high-fat diet (HFD) rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids have better survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis than mice fed HFD rich in saturated fatty acids (HFD-S). To investigate what component of polyunsaturated fatty acids, i.e., omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids, exerts beneficial effects on the survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis, mice were fed HFD rich in omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids for 8 weeks prior to inoculation with S. aureus. Further, mice fed HFD-S were treated with omega-3 fatty acid metabolites known as resolvins. Mice fed HFD rich in omega-3 fatty acids had increased survival and decreased bacterial loads compared to those for mice fed HFD-S after S. aureus-induced sepsis. Furthermore, the bacterial load was decreased in resolvin-treated mice fed HFD-S after S. aureus-induced sepsis compared with that in mice treated with vehicle. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids increase the survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis by reversing the deleterious effect of HFD-S on mouse survival. PMID:26857576

  3. Equilibrium titrations of acid-induced unfolding-refolding and salt-induced molten globule of cytochrome c by FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aichun; Lam, Troy

    2005-04-01

    Despite extensive investigations on the acid-unfolded and acid/salt-induced molten globule(-like) states of cytochrome c using variety of techniques, structural features of the acid-unfolded state in terms of residual secondary structures and the structural transition between the acid-unfolded and acid/salt-refolded states have not been fully characterized beyond the circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. It is unusual that secondary structure(s) of the unfolded state leading to the molten globule state, an important protein folding intermediate, as determined by CD was not fully corroborated by independent experimental method(s). In this study, we carried out an equilibrium titration of acid-induced unfolding and subsequent acid- and salt-induced refolding of cytochrome c using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The spectral profiles of the equilibrium titration reveal new structural details about the acid-unfolded state and the structural transition associated with the acid/salt-refolded molten globule(-like) states of cytochrome c.

  4. Trans Fatty Acids Induce Vascular Inflammation and Reduce Vascular Nitric Oxide Production in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Naomi G.; Pham, Matilda; Rizzo, Norma O.; Cheng, Andrew M.; Maloney, Ezekiel; Kim, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Intake of trans fatty acids (TFA), which are consumed by eating foods made from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. This relation can be explained by many factors including TFA's negative effect on endothelial function and reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. In this study we investigated the effects of three different TFA (2 common isomers of C18 found in partially hydrogenated vegetable oil and a C18 isomer found from ruminant-derived—dairy products and meat) on endothelial NF-κB activation and nitric oxide (NO) production. Human endothelial cells were treated with increasing concentrations of Elaidic (trans-C18:1 (9 trans)), Linoelaidic (trans-C18:2 (9 trans, 12 trans)), and Transvaccenic (trans-C18:1 (11 trans)) for 3 h. Both Elaidic and Linoelaidic acids were associated with increasing NF-κB activation as measured by IL-6 levels and phosphorylation of IκBα, and impairment of endothelial insulin signaling and NO production, whereas Transvaccenic acid was not associated with these responses. We also measured superoxide production, which has been hypothesized to be necessary in fatty acid-dependent activation of NF-κB. Both Elaidic acid and Linoelaidic acid are associated with increased superoxide production, whereas Transvaccenic acid (which did not induce inflammatory responses) did not increase superoxide production. We observed differential activation of endothelial superoxide production, NF-κB activation, and reduction in NO production by different C18 isomers suggesting that the location and number of trans double bonds effect endothelial NF-κB activation. PMID:22216328

  5. Esophageal Submucosal Injection of Capsaicin but Not Acid Induces Symptoms in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert H; Korsapati, Hariprasad; Bhalla, Vikas; Varki, Nissi; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is a candidate for mediating acid-induced symptoms in the esophagus. We conducted studies to determine if the presence of acid in the mucosa/submucosa and direct activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin elicited symptoms in normal healthy subjects. We also studied the presence of TRPV1 receptors in the esophagus. Methods Unsedated endoscopy was performed on healthy subjects with no symptoms. Using a sclerotherapy needle, normal saline (pH 2.0–7.5) was injected into the mucosa/submucosa, 5 cm above the Z line. In a separate group of healthy subjects, injection of capsaicin and vehicle was also studied. Quality of symptoms was reported using the McGill Pain Questionnaire, and symptom intensity using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Immunohistochemistry was performed on 8 surgical esophagus specimens using TRPV1 antibody. Results Acid injection either did not elicit or elicited mild symptoms in subjects at all pH solutions. Capsaicin but not the vehicle elicited severe heartburn/chest pain in all subjects. Mean VAS for capsaicin was 91 ± 3 and symptoms lasted for 25 ± 1 minutes. Immunohistochemistry revealed a linear TRPV1 staining pattern between the epithelial layer and the submucosa that extended into the papillae. Eighty-five percent of papillae stained positive for TRPV1 with a mean 1.1 positive papillae per high-powered field. Conclusions The mechanism of acid-induced heartburn and chest pain is not the simple interaction of hydrogen ions with afferents located in the esophageal mucosa and submucosa. TRPV1 receptors are present in the lamina propria and their activation induces heartburn and chest pain. PMID:26932896

  6. An integrated metabonomics and transcriptomics approach to understanding metabolic pathway disturbance induced by perfluorooctanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Peng, Siyuan; Yan, Lijuan; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Zhanlin; Tian, Meiping; Shen, Heqing

    2013-12-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is one of the most representative perfluorinated compounds and liver is the major organ where PFOA is accumulated. Although the multiple toxicities had been reported, its toxicological profile remained unclear. In this study, a systems toxicology strategy integrating liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabonomics and transcriptomics analyses was applied for the first time to investigate the effects of PFOA on a representative Chinese normal human liver cell line L-02, with focusing on the metabolic disturbance. Fifteen potential biomarkers were identified on metabolic level and most observations were consistent with the altered levels of gene expression. Our results showed that PFOA induced the perturbations in various metabolic processes in L-02 cells, especially lipid metabolism-related pathways. The up-stream mitochondrial carnitine metabolism was proved to be influenced by PFOA treatment. The specific transformation from carnitine to acylcarnitines, which showed a dose-dependent effect, and the expression level of key genes involved in this pathway were observed to be altered correspondingly. Furthermore, the down-stream cholesterol biosynthesis was directly confirmed to be up-regulated by both increased cholesterol content and elevated expression level of key genes. The PFOA-induced lipid metabolism-related effects in L-02 cells started from the fatty acid catabolism in cytosol, fluctuated to the processes in mitochondria, extended to the cholesterol biosynthesis. Many other metabolic pathways like amino acid metabolism and tricarboxylic acid cycle might also be disturbed. The findings obtained from the systems biological research provide more details about metabolic disorders induced by PFOA in human liver.

  7. Effect of wheatgrass on membrane fatty acid composition during hepatotoxicity induced by alcohol and heated PUFA.

    PubMed

    Durairaj, Varalakshmi; Shakya, Garima; Pajaniradje, Sankar; Rajagopalan, Rukkumani

    2014-06-01

    Alcoholism is a broad term used for problems related to alcohol, medically considered as disease, specifically an addictive illness, abuse, and dependence. It is the major cause of liver disease in western countries. Alcoholic liver disease encompasses the hepatic alterations leading to fatty liver, hepatitis, and fibrosis or cirrhosis. Fried food items prepared with repeatedly heated polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) exacerbate the disturbances induced by alcohol. The use of herbs to treat diseases is almost universal. Wheatgrass (WG) is used as a supplemental nutrition because of its unique curative properties. As it has antioxidant property, it prevents cancer, diabetes, and acts as liver cleanser. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of WG on preserving membrane integrity in liver damage induced by alcohol and heated PUFA (ΔPUFA).The rats were divided into four groups. The animals in group 1 served as normal (standard diet), group 2 served as hepatotoxic (alcohol + ΔPUFA), group 3 served as treated (alcohol + ΔPUFA + WG), and group 4 served as WG control. The compositions of membrane fatty acid, total phospholipids, phospholipase A, C (PLA and PLC) were analyzed in liver to evaluate the effects of WG. Changes in fatty acid composition, decrease in phospholipids levels, and increase in PLA, PLC were observed in the diseased group. Restoration effect was seen in WG-treated rats. Histopathological observations were in correlation with the biochemical parameters. From the results obtained, we conclude that WG effectively protects the liver against alcohol and ΔPUFA-induced changes in fatty acid composition and preserves membrane integrity. PMID:24706101

  8. Mast cell mediators in citric acid-induced airway constriction of guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.-H.; Lai, Y.-L. . E-mail: tiger@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2005-08-15

    We demonstrated previously that mast cells play an important role in citric acid (CA)-induced airway constriction. In this study, we further investigated the underlying mediator(s) for this type of airway constriction. At first, to examine effects caused by blocking agents, 67 young Hartley guinea pigs were divided into 7 groups: saline + CA; methysergide (serotonin receptor antagonist) + CA; MK-886 (leukotriene synthesis inhibitor) + CA; mepyramine (histamine H{sub 1} receptor antagonist) + CA; indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) + CA; cromolyn sodium (mast cell stabilizer) + CA; and compound 48/80 (mast cell degranulating agent) + CA. Then, we tested whether leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) or histamine enhances CA-induced airway constriction in compound 48/80-pretreated guinea pigs. We measured dynamic respiratory compliance (Crs) and forced expiratory volume in 0.1 s (FEV{sub 0.1}) during either baseline or recovery period. In addition, we detected histamine level, an index of pulmonary mast cell degranulation, in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples. Citric acid aerosol inhalation caused decreases in Crs and FEV{sub 0.1}, indicating airway constriction in the control group. This airway constriction was significantly attenuated by MK-886, mepyramine, cromolyn sodium, and compound 48/80, but not by either methysergide or indomethacin. Both LTC{sub 4} and histamine infusion significantly increased the magnitude of CA-induced airway constriction in compound 48/80-pretreated guinea pigs. Citric acid inhalation caused significant increase in histamine level in the BAL sample, which was significantly suppressed by compound 48/80. These results suggest that leukotrienes and histamine originating from mast cells play an important role in CA inhalation-induced noncholinergic airway constriction.

  9. Pharmacological characterization of lysophosphatidic acid-induced pain with clinically relevant neuropathic pain drugs.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, K; Takasu, K; Shinohara, S; Yoneda, Y; Kato, A

    2012-08-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an initiator of neuropathic pain, causes allodynia. However, few studies have evaluated the pharmacological profile of LPA-induced pain. In this study, a LPA-induced pain model was developed and pharmacologically characterized with clinically relevant drugs used for neuropathic pain, including antiepileptics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, analgesics, local anaesthetics/antiarrhythmics and antidepressants. Gabapentin (1-30 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly reversed LPA-induced allodynia, but neither indomethacin (30 mg/kg, p.o.) nor morphine (0.3-3 mg/kg, s.c.) did, which indicates that LPA-induced pain consists mostly of neuropathic rather than inflammatory pain. Both pregabalin (0.3-10 mg/kg, p.o.) and ω-CgTX MVIIA (0.01-0.03 μg/mouse, i.t.) completely reversed LPA-induced allodynia in a dose-dependent manner. Lidocaine (1-30 mg/kg, s.c.), mexiletine (1-30 mg/kg, p.o.) and carbamazepine (10-100 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly ameliorated LPA-induced allodynia dose dependently. Milnacipran (30 mg/kg, i.p.) produced no significant analgesic effect in LPA-induced allodynia. In LPA-injected mice, expression of the α2δ1 subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) was increased in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal dorsal horn. Furthermore, the VGCC current was potentiated in both the DRG from LPA-injected mice and LPA (1 μM)-treated DRG from saline-injected mice, and the potentiated VGCC current was amended by treatment with gabapentin (100 μM). The LPA-induced pain model described here mimics aspects of the neuropathic pain state, including the sensitization of VGCC, and may be useful for the early assessment of drug candidates to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:22337641

  10. The effect of subchronic supplementation with folic acid on homocysteine induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Rasic-Markovic, A; Rankov-Petrovic, B; Hrncic, D; Krstic, D; Colovic, M; Macut, Dj; Djuric, D; Stanojlovic, Olivera

    2015-06-01

    Influence of folic acid on the CNS is still unclear. Folate has a neuroprotective effect, while on the other hand excess folate can exacerbate seizures in epileptics. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of subchronic administration of folic acid on behavioural and electroencephalographic (EEG) characteristics of DL homocysteine thiolactone induced seizures in adult rats. The activity of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and Mg²⁺-ATPase in different brain regions was investigated. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into groups: 1. Controls (C, 0.9% NaCl); 2. DL homocysteine-thiolactone 8.0 mmol/kg (H); 3. Subchronic supplementation with folic acid 5 mg/kg for 7 days (F) and 4. Subchronic supplementation with F + single dose of H (FH). Seizure behaviour was assessed by incidence, latency, number and intensity of seizure episodes. Seizure severity was described by a descriptive scale with grades 0-4. For EEG recordings, three gold-plated recording electrodes were implanted into the skull. Subchronic supplementation with folic acid did not affect seizure incidence, median number of seizure episodes and severity in FH, comparison with H (p > 0.05). The majority of seizure episodes in all groups were of grade 2. There were no significant differences in lethal outcomes at 24 h upon H injection in the FH vs. H group. The activity of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and Mg²⁺-ATPase was significantly increased in almost all examined structures in the FH vs. H group. Subchronic folic acid administration did not exacerbate H induced seizures and completely recovered the activity of ATPases.

  11. Electrophilic Fatty Acid Species Inhibit 5-Lipoxygenase and Attenuate Sepsis-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Awwad, Khader; Steinbrink, Svenja D.; Frömel, Timo; Lill, Nicole; Isaak, Johann; Häfner, Ann-Kathrin; Roos, Jessica; Hofmann, Bettina; Heide, Heinrich; Geisslinger, Gerd; Steinhilber, Dieter; Freeman, Bruce A.; Maier, Thorsten J.; Fleming, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The reaction of nitric oxide and nitrite-derived species with polyunsaturated fatty acids yields electrophilic fatty acid nitroalkene derivatives (NO2-FA), which display anti-inflammatory properties. Given that the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO, ALOX5) possesses critical nucleophilic amino acids, which are potentially sensitive to electrophilic modifications, we determined the consequences of NO2-FA on 5-LO activity in vitro and on 5-LO-mediated inflammation in vivo. Results: Stimulation of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) with nitro-oleic (NO2-OA) or nitro-linoleic acid (NO2-LA) (but not the parent lipids) resulted in the concentration-dependent and irreversible inhibition of 5-LO activity. Similar effects were observed in cell lysates and using the recombinant human protein, indicating a direct reaction with 5-LO. NO2-FAs did not affect the activity of the platelet-type 12-LO (ALOX12) or 15-LO-1 (ALOX15) in intact cells or the recombinant protein. The NO2-FA-induced inhibition of 5-LO was attributed to the alkylation of Cys418, and the exchange of Cys418 to serine rendered 5-LO insensitive to NO2-FA. In vivo, the systemic administration of NO2-OA to mice decreased neutrophil and monocyte mobilization in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), attenuated the formation of the 5-LO product 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), and inhibited lung injury. The administration of NO2-OA to 5-LO knockout mice had no effect on LPS-induced neutrophil or monocyte mobilization as well as on lung injury. Innovation: Prophylactic administration of NO2-OA to septic mice inhibits inflammation and promotes its resolution by interfering in 5-LO-mediated inflammatory processes. Conclusion: NO2-FAs directly and irreversibly inhibit 5-LO and attenuate downstream acute inflammatory responses. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2667–2680. PMID:24206143

  12. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antioxidant activities of 3,4-oxo-isopropylidene-shikimic acid.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin-Yao; You, Cui-Yu; Dong, Kai; You, Hai-Sheng; Xing, Jian-Feng

    2016-10-01

    Context 3,4-Oxo-isopropylidene-shikimic acid (ISA) is an analog of shikimic acid (SA). SA is extracted from the dry fruit of Illicium verum Hook. f. (Magnoliaceae), which has been used for treating stomachaches, skin inflammation and rheumatic pain. Objective To investigate the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antioxidant activities of ISA. Materials and methods Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ISA were evaluated using writhing, hot plate, xylene-induced ear oedema, carrageenan-induced paw oedema and cotton pellets-induced granuloma test, meanwhile the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were assessed in the oedema paw tissue. ISA (60, 120 and 240 mg/kg in mice model and 50, 120 and 200 mg/kg in rat model) was administered orally, 30 min before induction of inflammation/pain. Additionally, ISA was administered for 12 d in rats from the day of cotton pellet implantation. The active oxygen species scavenging potencies of ISA (10(-3)-10(-5) M) were evaluated by the electron spin resonance spin-trapping technique. Results ISA caused a reduction of inflammation induced by xylene (18.1-31.4%), carrageenan (7.8-51.0%) and cotton pellets (11.4-24.0%). Furthermore, ISA decreased the production of PGE2 and MDA in the rat paw tissue by 1.0-15.6% and 6.3-27.6%, respectively. ISA also reduced pain induced by acetic acid (15.6-48.9%) and hot plate (10.5-28.5%). Finally, ISA exhibited moderate antioxidant activity by scavenging the superoxide radical and hydroxyl radical with IC50 values of 0.214 and 0.450 μg/mL, respectively. Discussion and conclusion Our findings confirmed the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antioxidant activities of ISA. PMID:27609150

  13. Mesoporous MFI zeolites by microwave induced assembly between sulfonic acid functionalized MFI zeolite nanoparticles and alkyltrimethylammonium cationic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hailian; Ansari, Mohd Bismillah; Park, Sang-Eon

    2011-07-14

    Mesoporous MFI zeolites (ZSM-5, TS-1, S-1) having intracrystalline mesoporosity within zeolite crystals were synthesized by microwave induced assembly through the ionic interaction between the sulfonic acid functionalized MFI zeolite nanoparticles and alkyltrimethylammonium cationic surfactants.

  14. 5-caffeoylquinic acid and caffeic acid down-regulate the oxidative stress- and TNF-alpha-induced secretion of interleukin-8 from Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhaohui; Shin, Hee Soon; Satsu, Hideo; Totsuka, Mamoru; Shimizu, Makoto

    2008-05-28

    Although chlorogenic acid (CHA) easily reaches a millimolar level in the gastrointestinal tract because of its high concentration in coffee and fruits, its effects on intestinal epithelial cells have been little reported. We investigated in this study the down-regulative effects of 5-caffeoylquinic acid (CQA), the predominant isomer of CHA, on the H(2)O(2-) or TNF-alpha-induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-8, a central pro-inflammatory chemokine involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases, in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. After the cells had been pre- and simultaneously treated with CQA, the oversecretion of IL-8 and overexpression of its mRNA induced by H(2)O(2) were significantly suppressed in a dose-dependent manner in the range of 0.25-2.00 mmol/L. We further found that a metabolite of CQA, caffeic acid (CA), but not quinic acid, significantly inhibited the H(2)O(2)-induced IL-8 secretion and its mRNA expression in the same dose-dependent manner. Both CQA and CA suppressed the TNF-alpha-induced IL-8 secretion as well. Caffeic acid at 2.00 mmol/l was able to absolutely block the H(2)O(2)- or TNF-alpha-induced oversecretion of IL-8 in Caco-2 cells. However, CQA and CA did not suppress the TNF-alpha-induced increase in the IL-8 mRNA expression, indicating that the suppressive mechanisms are different between TNF-alpha-induced and H(2)O(2)-induced IL-8 production models. These results suggest that the habit of drinking coffee and/or eating fruits with a high CHA content may be beneficial to humans in preventing the genesis of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  15. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Zerumbone against Mono-Iodoacetate-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chien, Ting-Yi; Huang, Steven Kuan-Hua; Lee, Chia-Jung; Tsai, Po-Wei; Wang, Ching-Chiung

    2016-01-01

    The fresh rhizome of Zingiber zerumbet Smith (Zingiberaceae) is used as a food flavoring and also serves as a folk medicine as an antipyretic and for analgesics in Taiwan. Zerumbone, a monocyclic sesquiterpene was isolated from the rhizome of Z. zerumbet and is the major active compound. In this study, the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of zerumbone on arthritis were explored using in vitro and in vivo models. Results showed that zerumbone inhibited inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expressions, and NO and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production, but induced heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. When zerumbone was co-treated with an HO-1 inhibitor (tin protoporphyrin (SnPP)), the NO inhibitory effects of zerumbone were recovered. The above results suggest that zerumbone inhibited iNOS and COX-2 through induction of the HO-1 pathway. Moreover, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and COX-2 expressions of interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated primary rat chondrocytes were inhibited by zerumbone. In an in vivo assay, an acetic acid-induced writhing response in mice was significantly reduced by treatment with zerumbone. Furthermore, zerumbone reduced paw edema and the pain response in a mono-iodoacetate (MIA)-induced rat osteoarthritis model. Therefore, we suggest that zerumbone possesses anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects which indicate zerumbone could be a potential candidate for osteoarthritis treatment. PMID:26901193

  16. Role of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide in nicorandil-induced ulcerations: from hypothesis to demonstration.

    PubMed

    Trechot, Philippe; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Brouillard, Clotilde; Scala-Bertola, Julien; Petitpain, Nadine; Cuny, Jean-François; Gauchotte, Guillaume; Schmutz, Jean-Luc; Barbaud, Annick

    2015-10-01

    Nicorandil, a nicotinamide ester, was first reported to be involved in the induction of oral ulcers in 1997. Since then, many reports of single or multiple nicorandil-induced ulcerations (NIUs) have been reported. We hypothesised that in the case of high-dosage nicorandil or after an increased dosage of nicorandil, nicotinic acid and nicotinamide (two main metabolites of nicorandil) cannot appropriately merge into the endogenous pool of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide/phosphate, which leads to abnormal distribution of these metabolites in the body. In recent or maintained trauma, nicotinamide increases blood flow at the edge of the raw area, inducing epithelial proliferation, while nicotinic acid ulcerates this epithelial formation, ultimately flooding the entire scar. We demonstrate, by comparison to a control patient non-exposed to nicorandil, an abnormal amount of nicotinic acid (×38) and nicotinamide (×11) in the ulcerated area in a patient with NIUs. All practitioners, especially geriatricians, dermatologists and surgeons, must be aware of these serious and insidious side effects of nicorandil. It is critical to rapidly reassess the risk-benefit ratio of this drug for any patient, and not only for those with diverticular diseases.

  17. Terbium fluorescence as a sensitive, inexpensive probe for UV-induced damage in nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    El-Yazbi, Amira F; Loppnow, Glen R

    2013-07-01

    Much effort has been focused on developing methods for detecting damaged nucleic acids. However, almost all of the proposed methods consist of multi-step procedures, are limited, require expensive instruments, or suffer from a high level of interferences. In this paper, we present a novel simple, inexpensive, mix-and-read assay that is generally applicable to nucleic acid damage and uses the enhanced luminescence due to energy transfer from nucleic acids to terbium(III) (Tb(3+)). Single-stranded oligonucleotides greatly enhance the Tb(3+) emission, but duplex DNA does not. With the use of a DNA hairpin probe complementary to the oligonucleotide of interest, the Tb(3+)/hairpin probe is applied to detect ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage. The hairpin probe hybridizes only with the undamaged DNA. However, the damaged DNA remains single-stranded and enhances the intrinsic fluorescence of Tb(3+), producing a detectable signal directly proportional to the amount of DNA damage. This allows the Tb(3+)/hairpin probe to be used for sensitive quantification of UV-induced DNA damage. The Tb(3+)/hairpin probe showed superior selectivity to DNA damage compared to conventional molecular beacons probes (MBs) and its sensitivity is more than 2.5 times higher than MBs with a limit of detection of 4.36±1.2 nM. In addition, this probe is easier to synthesize and more than eight times cheaper than MBs, which makes its use recommended for high-throughput, quantitative analysis of DNA damage.

  18. Kolaviron and L-Ascorbic Acid Attenuate Chlorambucil-Induced Testicular Oxidative Stress in Rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chlorambucil (4-[4-[bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]phenyl]butanoic acid) is an alkylating agent, indicated in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Kolaviron (KV), a biflavonoid complex from Garcinia kola, and L-ascorbic acid (AA) are known to protect against oxidative damage in vivo. This study evaluates the protective capacity of KV and AA on chlorambucil-induced oxidative stress in the testes of rat. Twenty male Wistar rats (180–200 g) were randomized into four groups: I: control, II: chlorambucil (0.2 mg/kg b.w.), III: 0.2 mg/kg chlorambucil and 100 mg/kg KV, and IV: 0.2 mg/kg chlorambucil and 100 mg/kg AA. After 14 days of treatments, results indicated that chlorambucil caused significant reduction (P < 0.05) in testicular vitamin C and glutathione by 32% and 39%, respectively, relative to control. Similarly, activities of testicular GST, SOD, and CAT reduced significantly by 48%, 47%, and 49%, respectively, in chlorambucil-treated rats relative to control. Testicular MDA and activities of ALP, LDH, and ACP were increased significantly by 53%, 51%, 64%, and 70%, respectively, in the chlorambucil-treated rat. However, cotreatment with KV and AA offered protection and restored the levels of vitamin C, GSH, and MDA as well as SOD, CAT, GST, ACP, ALP, and LDH activities. Overall, kolaviron and L-ascorbic acid protected against chlorambucil-induced damage in the testes of the rat. PMID:25309592

  19. Dietary fatty acid modulation of mucosally-induced tolerogenic immune responses.

    PubMed

    Harbige, L S; Fisher, B A

    2001-11-01

    Immunological unresponsiveness or hyporesponsiveness (tolerance) can be induced by feeding protein antigens to naive animals. Using a classical oral ovalbumin gut-induced tolerance protocol in BALB/c mice we investigated the effects of dietary n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on high-and low-dose oral tolerance (and in non-tolerised animals, i.e. effects of antigen challenge alone) in relation to lymphoproliferative, cytokine and antibody responses. Fish oil rich in long-chain n-3 fatty acids decreased both T-helper (Th) 1- and Th2-like responses. In contrast, borage (Borago officinalis) oil rich in n-6 PUFA, of which gamma-linolenic acid is rapidly metabolised to longer-chain n-6 PUFA, increased Thl-like responses and decreased Th2-like responses, and possibly enhanced suppressor cell or Th3-like activity. These findings are in general agreement with other studies on the effects of long chain n-3 PUFA on immune system functions, and characterise important differences between long-chain n-3 and n-6 PUFA, defining more precisely and broadly the immunological regulatory mechanisms involved. They are also discussed in relation to autoimmune disease. PMID:12069397

  20. Corosolic acid suppresses the expression of inflammatory marker genes in CCL4-induced-hepatotoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Aristatile; Al-Assaf, Abdullah Hassan

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to asses the anti-inflammatory effects of corosolic acid on the carbon tetrachloride (CCL4) toxicity in rats. Liver toxicity was induced by administered CCL4 (single dose (1:1 in liquid paraffin) orally at 1.25 ml/kg. Rats were pretreated with CRA for 7 days before made CCL(4) toxicity at 20 mg/kg BW. The mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-6, iNOS, COX-2 and NF-kB were assayed by reverse transcriptase PCR analysis. The mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, and the inflammatory markers such as iNOS, COX-2 and NF-kB were significantly up regulated in CCl(4) induced rats and treatment with corosolic acid significantly reduced the expression of the above indicators. Our results suggest that the inhibition of TNF-α, IL-6, iNOS, COX-2 and NF-κB by corosolic acid, a potential candidate could possess anti-inflammatory activity besides its hepatoprotective effect in CCl4 liver toxicity in rats. PMID:27393448

  1. Role of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide in nicorandil-induced ulcerations: from hypothesis to demonstration.

    PubMed

    Trechot, Philippe; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Brouillard, Clotilde; Scala-Bertola, Julien; Petitpain, Nadine; Cuny, Jean-François; Gauchotte, Guillaume; Schmutz, Jean-Luc; Barbaud, Annick

    2015-10-01

    Nicorandil, a nicotinamide ester, was first reported to be involved in the induction of oral ulcers in 1997. Since then, many reports of single or multiple nicorandil-induced ulcerations (NIUs) have been reported. We hypothesised that in the case of high-dosage nicorandil or after an increased dosage of nicorandil, nicotinic acid and nicotinamide (two main metabolites of nicorandil) cannot appropriately merge into the endogenous pool of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide/phosphate, which leads to abnormal distribution of these metabolites in the body. In recent or maintained trauma, nicotinamide increases blood flow at the edge of the raw area, inducing epithelial proliferation, while nicotinic acid ulcerates this epithelial formation, ultimately flooding the entire scar. We demonstrate, by comparison to a control patient non-exposed to nicorandil, an abnormal amount of nicotinic acid (×38) and nicotinamide (×11) in the ulcerated area in a patient with NIUs. All practitioners, especially geriatricians, dermatologists and surgeons, must be aware of these serious and insidious side effects of nicorandil. It is critical to rapidly reassess the risk-benefit ratio of this drug for any patient, and not only for those with diverticular diseases. PMID:24028540

  2. Efficacy of trans-2-hydroxycinnamic Acid against trichlorfon-induced oxidative stress in wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Poonam; Singh, Rambir

    2012-09-01

    Trichlorfon is an organophosphate insecticide used to control cockroaches, crickets, silverfish, bedbugs, fleas, cattle grubs, flies, ticks, leaf miners, and leaf-hoppers. It is also used to treat domestic animals for control of internal parasites. Trans-2-hydroxycinnamic acid (T2HCA) is a hydroxyl derivative of cinnamic acid. The present study highlights trichlorofon-induced toxicity and the protective role of T2HCA in the liver, kidney, and brain of female Wistar rats. The rats were given a single dose of trichlorofon (150 mg / kg bw) and pre- and post-treatment T2HCA (50 mg / kg bw) for seven days. Trichlorofon enhanced oxidative stress in liver, kidney, and brain of the rats, which was evident from the elevation of lipid peroxidation (LPO). The reduced level of non-enzymatic antioxidant glutathione (GSH) also indicated the presence of an oxidative insult. The activity of enzymatic antioxidants like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-s-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) was significantly decreased on trichlorfon administration. Pre and post treatment with T2HCA decreased the LPO level and increased SOD, CAT, GST, GR, GPx, and GSH in the brain, liver, and kidney. Trichlorfon-induced reduction in acelylcholinestrase was also ameliorated with T2HCA treatment. In conclusion, trichlorfon-mediated induction in the reactive oxygen species and disturbance in the antioxidant enzymes' defense system was moderately ameliorated by antioxidant trans-2-hydroxycinnamic acid. PMID:23293469

  3. Effect of ethanol amine plasmalogens on Fe-induced peroxidation of arachidonic acid in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles.

    PubMed

    Omodeo Salè, M F; Rizzo, A M; Masserini, M

    2000-12-01

    We have investigated the influence of ethanolamine plasmalogens on iron-induced oxidation of arachidonic acid in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles. Lipoperoxidation was induced by the addition of 50 microM FeSO4 and studied above (50 degrees C) and below (15 degrees C) the gel-to liquid transition temperature of the vesicles, at two different pH values (7.4 or 6.4). The extent of peroxidation was measured as thiobarbituric reactive product formed and the influence exerted by ethanolamine plasmalogens (PEPL) in this process was compared to that of dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) and diacylphosphatidylethanolamines (DAPE). The extent of peroxidation of arachidonic acid embedded in DPPC vesicles was similar at the two temperatures and greater at 50 degrees C under acidic conditions. However, the peroxidative process was significantly decreased at 50 degrees C in the presence of PEPL, but not of DPPE or DAPE and the inhibitory effect was enhanced at pH 6.4. The possibility that a different phase distribution of the phospholipids, namely a transition from a lamellar to a hexagonal phase, may play a role in the scavenger effect of ethanolamine plasmalogens is discussed. PMID:11145167

  4. Reduced Gut Acidity Induces an Obese-Like Phenotype in Drosophila melanogaster and in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Jui-Hung; Kuo, Ping-Chang; Yeh, Sheng-Rong; Lin, Hung-Yu; Fu, Tsai-Feng; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Wang, Horng-Dar; Wang, Pei-Yu

    2015-01-01

    In order to identify genes involved in stress and metabolic regulation, we carried out a Drosophila P-element-mediated mutagenesis screen for starvation resistance. We isolated a mutant, m2, that showed a 23% increase in survival time under starvation conditions. The P-element insertion was mapped to the region upstream of the vha16-1 gene, which encodes the c subunit of the vacuolar-type H+-ATPase. We found that vha16-1 is highly expressed in the fly midgut, and that m2 mutant flies are hypomorphic for vha16-1 and also exhibit reduced midgut acidity. This deficit is likely to induce altered metabolism and contribute to accelerated aging, since vha16-1 mutant flies are short-lived and display increases in body weight and lipid accumulation. Similar phenotypes were also induced by pharmacological treatment, through feeding normal flies and mice with a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor (acetazolamide) or proton pump inhibitor (PPI, lansoprazole) to suppress gut acid production. Our study may thus provide a useful model for investigating chronic acid suppression in patients. PMID:26436771

  5. Long-term acid-induced wall extension in an in-vitro system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleland, R. E.; Cosgrove, D.; Tepfer, M.

    1987-01-01

    When frozen-thawed Avena sativa L. coleoptile and Cucumis sativa L. hypocotyl sections, under tension, are acid-treated, they undergo rapid elongation (acid-extension). The acid-extension response consists of two concurrent phases: a burst of extension which decays exponentially over 1-2 h (ExE), and a constant rate of extension (CE) which can persist for at least 6h. The extension (delta L) is closely represented by the equation: delta L = a-a e(-kt) + C t where a is the total extension of the exponential phase, k is the rate constant for ExE, and c is the rate of linear extension (CE). Low pH and high tension increased a and c, whereas temperature influenced k. The magnitude of the CE (over 50% extension/10 h), the similarity in its time course to auxin-induced growth, and the apparent yield threshold for CE indicate that CE is more likely than ExE to be the type of extension which cell walls undergo during normal auxin-induced growth.

  6. Efficacy of Trans-2-Hydroxycinnamic Acid Against Trichlorfon-Induced Oxidative Stress in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Poonam; Singh, Rambir

    2012-01-01

    Trichlorfon is an organophosphate insecticide used to control cockroaches, crickets, silverfish, bedbugs, fleas, cattle grubs, flies, ticks, leaf miners, and leaf-hoppers. It is also used to treat domestic animals for control of internal parasites. Trans-2-hydroxycinnamic acid (T2HCA) is a hydroxyl derivative of cinnamic acid. The present study highlights trichlorofon-induced toxicity and the protective role of T2HCA in the liver, kidney, and brain of female Wistar rats. The rats were given a single dose of trichlorofon (150 mg / kg bw) and pre- and post-treatment T2HCA (50 mg / kg bw) for seven days. Trichlorofon enhanced oxidative stress in liver, kidney, and brain of the rats, which was evident from the elevation of lipid peroxidation (LPO). The reduced level of non-enzymatic antioxidant glutathione (GSH) also indicated the presence of an oxidative insult. The activity of enzymatic antioxidants like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-s-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) was significantly decreased on trichlorfon administration. Pre and post treatment with T2HCA decreased the LPO level and increased SOD, CAT, GST, GR, GPx, and GSH in the brain, liver, and kidney. Trichlorfon-induced reduction in acelylcholinestrase was also ameliorated with T2HCA treatment. In conclusion, trichlorfon-mediated induction in the reactive oxygen species and disturbance in the antioxidant enzymes’ defense system was moderately ameliorated by antioxidant trans-2-hydroxycinnamic acid. PMID:23293469

  7. Asiatic Acid Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiling; Xiao, Xianzhong; Yang, Mingshi

    2016-10-01

    Asiatic acid (AA), a major triterpene isolated from Centella asiatica (L.) Urban, is known to exert various pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of AA on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) and clarify the underlying mechanisms. Lung pathological changes were assessed by H&E staining. The myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was detected by MPO assay. The levels of inflammatory cytokines were measured by ELISA. TLR4 and NF-kB expression was detected by Western blot analysis. AA obviously inhibited LPS-induced lung histopathological changes, MPO activity, and inflammatory cell numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Treatment of AA also inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production. Furthermore, Western blot analysis showed that AA inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression and NF-kB activation. In conclusion, AA inhibited LPS-induced ALI in mice by inhibiting inflammatory cytokine production, which is mediated via blocking of the TLR4/NF-kB signaling pathway.

  8. Atorvastatin Prevents Glutamate Uptake Reduction Induced by Quinolinic Acid Via MAPKs Signaling.

    PubMed

    Vandresen-Filho, S; Martins, W C; Bertoldo, D B; Rieger, D K; Maestri, M; Leal, R B; Tasca, C I

    2016-08-01

    Statins have been shown to promote neuroprotection in a wide range of neurological disorders. However, the mechanisms involved in such effects of statins are not fully understood. Quinolinic acid (QA) is a neurotoxin that induces seizures when infused in vivo and promotes glutamatergic excitotoxicity in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the putative glutamatergic mechanisms and the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the atorvastatin neuroprotective effects against QA toxicity. Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg) treatment for 7 days prevented the QA-induced decrease in glutamate uptake, but had no effect on increased glutamate release induced by QA. Moreover, atorvastatin treatment increased the phosphorylation of ERK1 and prevented the decrease in Akt phosphorylation induced by QA. Neither atorvastatin treatment nor QA infusion altered glutamine synthetase activity or the levels of phosphorylation of p38(MAPK) or JNK1/2 during the evaluation. Inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling pathway, but not PI3K/Akt signaling, abolished the neuroprotective effect of atorvastatin against QA-induced decrease in glutamate uptake. Our data suggest that atorvastatin protective effects against QA toxicity are related to modulation of glutamate transporters via MAPK/ERK signaling pathway.

  9. Effect of beta-adrenoceptors on the behaviour induced by the neuropeptide glutamic acid isoleucine amide.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Borzone, Mariela E; Attademo, Andrés; Baiardi, Gustavo; Celis, María Ester

    2007-07-30

    Excessive grooming behaviour is induced by intracerebroventricular injections of the neuropeptide glutamic acid isoleucine amide (neuropeptide-EI), via the activation of A-10 dopaminergic neurons and the noradrenergic system. Our object was to study the latter system involved in these behaviours, using male Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g with i.c.v. implants. The results show that all the adrenoceptor antagonists "per se" do not affect excessive grooming behaviour or motor activity. Intracerebroventricular administration of propranolol, a general beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, before neuropeptide-EI, inhibited the induced excessive grooming behaviour in a dose dependent manner. Metoprolol, a beta(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, also blocked this behaviour. However, intracerebroventricular injections of phentolamine, an alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist, and ((+/-)-1-[2,3-(Dihydro-7-methyl-1H-inden-4-yl)oxy]-3-[(1-methylethyl)amino]-2-butanol), a beta(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist, had no effect on the behaviour induced by neuropeptide-EI induced behaviour for any of the doses tested. On the other hand, isoproterenol, a general beta-adrenoceptor agonist and dobutamine, a beta(1)-adrenoceptor agonist, both elicited similar behaviours as those induced by neuropeptide-EI. These results support the hypothesis that a relationship exists between neuropeptide-EI and beta-adrenoceptors, more specifically the beta(1)-adrenoceptor, as found with other similar endogenous peptides such as neurotensin, cholecystin, substance P and alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone. Hence, neuropeptide-EI could probably be exerting a neuromodulating effect on the central nervous system.

  10. Protection from cyanide-induced brain injury by the Nrf2 transcriptional activator carnosic acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongxian; Lee, Brian; Nutter, Anthony; Song, Paul; Dolatabadi, Nima; Parker, James; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Newmeyer, Traci; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; McKercher, Scott R.; Masliah, Eliezer; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide is a life threatening, bioterrorist agent, preventing cellular respiration by inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in cardiopulmonary failure, hypoxic brain injury, and death within minutes. However, even after treatment with various antidotes to protect cytochrome oxidase, cyanide intoxication in humans can induce a delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Additional mechanisms are thought to underlie cyanide-induced neuronal damage, including generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This may account for the fact that antioxidants prevent some aspects of cyanide-induced neuronal damage. Here, as a potential preemptive countermeasure against a bioterrorist attack with cyanide, we tested the CNS protective effect of carnosic acid (CA), a pro-electrophilic compound found in the herb rosemary. CA crosses the blood-brain-barrier to upregulate endogenous antioxidant enzymes via activation of the Nrf2 transcriptional pathway. We demonstrate that CA exerts neuroprotective effects on cyanide-induced brain damage in cultured rodent and human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neurons in vitro, and in vivo in various brain areas of a non-Swiss albino (NSA) mouse model of cyanide poisoning that simulates damage observed in the human brain. PMID:25692407

  11. Salubrinal, ER stress inhibitor, attenuates kainic acid-induced hippocampal cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Soo; Heo, Rok Won; Kim, Hwajin; Yi, Chin-Ok; Shin, Hyun Joo; Han, Jong Woo; Roh, Gu Seob

    2014-10-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal death is closely linked to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial dysfunction. Parkin is an ubiquitin E3 ligase that mediates the ubiquitination of the Bcl-2 family of proteins and its mutations are associated with neuronal apoptosis in neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated the effect of salubrinal, an ER stress inhibitor, on the regulation of ER stress and mitochondrial apoptosis induced by KA, in particular, by controlling parkin expression. We showed that salubrinal significantly reduced seizure activity and increased survival rates of mice with KA-induced seizures. We found that salubrinal protected neurons against apoptotic death by reducing expression of mitochondrial apoptotic factors and elF2α-ATF4-CHOP signaling proteins. Interestingly, we showed that salubrinal decreased the KA-induced parkin expression and inhibited parkin translocation to mitochondria, which suggests that parkin may regulate a cross-talk between ER and mitochondria. Collectively, inhibition of ER stress attenuates mitochondrial apoptotic and ER stress pathways and controls parkin-mediated neuronal death following KA-induced seizures. PMID:24728926

  12. The role of abscisic acid and water stress in root herbivore-induced leaf resistance.

    PubMed

    Erb, Matthias; Köllner, Tobias G; Degenhardt, Jörg; Zwahlen, Claudia; Hibbard, Bruce E; Turlings, Ted C J

    2011-01-01

    • Herbivore-induced systemic resistance occurs in many plants and is commonly assumed to be adaptive. The mechanisms triggered by leaf-herbivores that lead to systemic resistance are largely understood, but it remains unknown how and why root herbivory also increases resistance in leaves. • To resolve this, we investigated the mechanism by which the root herbivore Diabrotica virgifera induces resistance against lepidopteran herbivores in the leaves of Zea mays. • Diabrotica virgifera infested plants suffered less aboveground herbivory in the field and showed reduced growth of Spodoptera littoralis caterpillars in the laboratory. Root herbivory did not lead to a jasmonate-dependent response in the leaves, but specifically triggered water loss and abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation. The induction of ABA by itself was partly responsible for the induction of leaf defenses, but not for the resistance against S. littoralis. Root-herbivore induced hydraulic changes in the leaves, however, were crucial for the increase in insect resistance. • We conclude that the induced leaf resistance after root feeding is the result of hydraulic changes, which reduce the quality of the leaves for chewing herbivores. This finding calls into question whether root-herbivore induced leaf-resistance is an evolved response.

  13. Necrostatin-1 protects against oleic acid-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Pan, Long; Yao, Dun-Chen; Yu, Yu-Zhong; Li, Sheng-Jie; Chen, Bing-Jun; Hu, Gui-He; Xi, Chang; Wang, Zi-Hui; Wang, Hong-Yan; Li, Jian-Hua; Tu, Yong-Sheng

    2016-09-30

    Necroptosis is a recently discovered necrotic cell death which is regulated by receptor interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) and RIPK3 under the stimulus of death signal and can be inhibited by necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) specifically. Therefore, the aim was to investigate the role of necroptosis in a rat model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) induced by oleic acid (OA) and assess the effect of Nec-1 on lung injury in ARDS. Our results found that RIPK1, RIPK3 and mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) were abundantly expressed in rat lung tissues of OA-induced ARDS. Nec-1 pretreatment improved pulmonary function and attenuated lung edema dramatically in OA-induced ARDS rats. Furthermore, Nec-1 reduced RIPK1-RIPK3 interaction and down-regulated RIPK1-RIPK3-MLKL signal pathway, and inhibited inflammatory response by reducing neutrophil infiltration and protein leakage into lung tissue in OA-induced ARDS. Collectively, our study proves the intervention of necroptosis in OA-induced ARDS. Moreover, our findings imply that Nec-1 plays an important role in the treatment of ARDS via inhibiting necroptosis and inflammation. PMID:27586277

  14. Salvianolic acid B attenuates lung inflammation induced by cigarette smoke in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong-Fang; Zhang, Jin; Li, Ran

    2015-08-15

    Salvianolic acid B (Sal B), a bioactive compound isolated from the Chinese herb Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae, has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidantive effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of Sal B on cigarette smoke (CS)-induced acute lung inflammation. Sal B was given intraperitoneally (i.p.) to mice 1h before CS exposure daily for four consecutive days. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected to assess the levels of inflammatory cytokines and cell counts. Lung tissues were used to analysis pathological changes, total glutathione (GSH), nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf-2), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) expression. The results showed that Sal B inhibited CS-induced lung pathological changes, the infiltration of inflammatory cells, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) productions. Sal B also up-regulated CS-induced total glutathione (GSH) production. Furthermore, Sal B was found to up-regulate Nrf-2, hemeoxygenase1 (HO1) expression and suppress CS-induced NF-κB activation. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Sal B exhibited a protective effect on CS-induced lung injury and the possible mechanism was involved in activating Nrf-2 and inhibiting NF-κB activation.

  15. Activation of the central histaminergic system mediates arachidonic-acid-induced cardiovascular effects.

    PubMed

    Altinbas, Burcin; Topuz, Bora Burak; İlhan, Tuncay; Yilmaz, Mustafa Sertac; Erdost, Hatice; Yalcin, Murat

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explain the involvement of the central histaminergic system in arachidonic acid (AA)-induced cardiovascular effects in normotensive rats using hemodynamic, immunohistochemistry, and microdialysis studies. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered AA (0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 μmol) induced dose- and time-dependent increases in mean arterial pressure and decreased heart rate in conscious normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats. Central injection of AA (0.5 μmol) also increased posterior hypothalamic extracellular histamine levels and produced strong COX-1 but not COX-2 immunoreactivity in the posterior hypothalamus of rats. Moreover, the cardiovascular effects and COX-1 immunoreactivity in the posterior hypothalamus induced by AA (0.5 μmol; i.c.v.) were almost completely blocked by the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (50 and 100 nmol; i.c.v.) and partially blocked by the H1 receptor blocker chlorpheniramine (100 nmol; i.c.v.) and the H3-H4 receptor antagonist thioperamide (50 and 100 nmol; i.c.v.). In conclusion, these results indicate that centrally administered AA induces pressor and bradycardic responses in conscious rats. Moreover, we suggest that AA may activate histaminergic neurons and increase extracellular histamine levels, particularly in the posterior hypothalamus. Acting as a neurotransmitter, histamine is potentially involved in AA-induced cardiovascular effects under normotensive conditions.

  16. Autocrine abscisic acid plays a key role in quartz-induced macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Magnone, Mirko; Sturla, Laura; Jacchetti, Emanuela; Scarfì, Sonia; Bruzzone, Santina; Usai, Cesare; Guida, Lucrezia; Salis, Annalisa; Damonte, Gianluca; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2012-03-01

    Inhalation of quartz induces silicosis, a lung disease where alveolar macrophages release inflammatory mediators, including prostaglandin-E(2) (PGE(2)) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Here we report the pivotal role of abscisic acid (ABA), a recently discovered human inflammatory hormone, in silica-induced activation of murine RAW264.7 macrophages and of rat alveolar macrophages (AMs). Stimulation of both RAW264.7 cells and AMs with quartz induced a significant increase of ABA release (5- and 10-fold, respectively), compared to untreated cells. In RAW264.7 cells, autocrine ABA released after quartz stimulation sequentially activates the plasma membrane receptor LANCL2 and NADPH oxidase, generating a Ca(2+) influx resulting in NFκ B nuclear translocation and PGE(2) and TNF-α release (3-, 2-, and 3.5-fold increase, respectively, compared to control, unstimulated cells). Quartz-stimulated RAW264.7 cells silenced for LANCL2 or preincubated with a monoclonal antibody against ABA show an almost complete inhibition of NFκ B nuclear translocation and PGE(2) and TNF-α release compared to controls electroporated with a scramble oligonucleotide or preincubated with an unrelated antibody. AMs showed similar early and late ABA-induced responses as RAW264.7 cells. These findings identify ABA and LANCL2 as key mediators in quartz-induced inflammation, providing possible new targets for antisilicotic therapy.

  17. Role of phosphatidic acid in carbachol-induced contraction in guinea pig Taenia coli.

    PubMed

    Ohata, H; Nobe, K; Momose, K

    1991-01-01

    Carbachol (CCh, 10(-8)-10(-4) M) increased in concentration-dependent manner the mass of phosphatidic acid (PA), but not the mass of diacylglycerol (DG) in the Taenia coli from guinea pig. The increase in the amount of PA caused by CCh was maintained for 20 min. Release of choline from choline phospholipids labeled with [methyl-3H]choline was not changed by CCh. A DG kinase inhibitor, R59022, inhibited the CCh-induced increase in the mass of PA. These results indicate that the increase in the mass of PA by CCh is due to immediate phosphorylation by DG kinase to PA, of the DG produced by phospholipase C (PLC). It is not due to formation of PA by the direct action of phospholipase D. CCh increased 45Ca2+ uptake into the tissue. R59022 inhibited the sustained phase of CCh-induced contraction and 45Ca2+ uptake into the tissue, but only slightly inhibited the initial phase of the CCh-induced contraction. This inhibition by R59022 may result from the inhibitory effect on the CCh-induced increase in PA. These results suggest that CCh activates both PLC and DG kinase and the resultant increase in the mass of PA contributes to the regulation of the sustained phase of CCh-induced contraction which is related to Ca2+ influx.

  18. Chiral Sensing of Various Amino Acids Using Induced Circularly Polarized Luminescence from Europium(III) Complexes of Phenanthroline Dicarboxylic Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Taka-Aki; Nozaki, Koichi; Iwamura, Munetaka

    2016-09-01

    Circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) was observed from [Eu(dppda)2 ](-) (dppda=4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid) and [Eu(pzpda)2 ](-) (pzpda=pyrazino[2,3-f][1,10]phenanthroline-7,10-dicarboxylic acid) in aqueous solutions containing various amino acids. The selectivity of these complexes towards amino acids enabled them to be used as chiral sensors and their behavior was compared with that of [Eu(pda)2 ](-) (pda=1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid). As these Eu(III) complexes have achiral D2d structures under ordinary conditions, there were no CPL signals in the emission assigned to f-f transitions. However, when the solutions contained particular amino acids they exhibited detectable CPL signals with glum values of about 0.1 (glum =CPL/2 TL; TL=total luminescence). On examining 13 amino acids with these three Eu(III) complexes, it was found that whether an amino acid induced a detectable CPL depended on the Eu(III) complex ligands. For example, when ornithine was used as a chiral agent, only [Eu(dppda)2 ](-) exhibited intense CPL in aqueous solutions of 10(-2)  mol dm(-3) . Steep amino acid concentration dependence suggested that CPL in [Eu(dppda)2 ](-) and [Eu(pzpda)2 ](-) was induced by the association of four or more amino acid molecules, whereas CPL in [Eu(pda)2 ](-) was induced by association of two arginine molecules.

  19. Chiral Sensing of Various Amino Acids Using Induced Circularly Polarized Luminescence from Europium(III) Complexes of Phenanthroline Dicarboxylic Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Taka-Aki; Nozaki, Koichi; Iwamura, Munetaka

    2016-09-01

    Circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) was observed from [Eu(dppda)2 ](-) (dppda=4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid) and [Eu(pzpda)2 ](-) (pzpda=pyrazino[2,3-f][1,10]phenanthroline-7,10-dicarboxylic acid) in aqueous solutions containing various amino acids. The selectivity of these complexes towards amino acids enabled them to be used as chiral sensors and their behavior was compared with that of [Eu(pda)2 ](-) (pda=1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid). As these Eu(III) complexes have achiral D2d structures under ordinary conditions, there were no CPL signals in the emission assigned to f-f transitions. However, when the solutions contained particular amino acids they exhibited detectable CPL signals with glum values of about 0.1 (glum =CPL/2 TL; TL=total luminescence). On examining 13 amino acids with these three Eu(III) complexes, it was found that whether an amino acid induced a detectable CPL depended on the Eu(III) complex ligands. For example, when ornithine was used as a chiral agent, only [Eu(dppda)2 ](-) exhibited intense CPL in aqueous solutions of 10(-2)  mol dm(-3) . Steep amino acid concentration dependence suggested that CPL in [Eu(dppda)2 ](-) and [Eu(pzpda)2 ](-) was induced by the association of four or more amino acid molecules, whereas CPL in [Eu(pda)2 ](-) was induced by association of two arginine molecules. PMID:27380553

  20. Angiotensin II induces phosphatidic acid formation in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts: evaluation of the roles of phospholipases C and D.

    PubMed

    Booz, G W; Taher, M M; Baker, K M; Singer, H A

    1994-12-21

    Phosphatidic acid has been proposed to contribute to the mitogenic actions of various growth factors. In 32P-labeled neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts, 100 nM [Sar1]angiotensin II was shown to rapidly induce formation of 32P-phosphatidic acid. Levels peaked at 5 min (1.5-fold above control), but were partially sustained over 2 h. Phospholipase D contributed in part to phosphatidic acid formation, as 32P- or 3H-phosphatidylethanol was produced when cells labeled with [32P]H3PO4 or 1-O-[1,2- 3H]hexadecyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were stimulated in the presence of 1% ethanol. [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phospholipase D activity was transient and mainly mediated through protein kinase C (PKC), since PKC downregulation reduced phosphatidylethanol formation by 68%. Residual activity may have been due to increased intracellular Ca2+, as ionomycin also activated phospholipase D in PKC-depleted cells. Phospholipase D did not fully account for [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid: 1) compared to PMA, a potent activator of phospholipase D, [Sar1]angiotensin II produced more phosphatidic acid relative to phosphatidylethanol, and 2) PKC downregulation did not affect [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid formation. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59949 depressed [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid formation by only 21%, indicating that activation of a phospholipase C and diacylglycerol kinase also can not account for the bulk of phosphatidic acid. Thus, additional pathways not involving phospholipases C and D, such as de novo synthesis, may contribute to [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid in these cells. Finally, as previously shown for [Sar1]angiotensin II, phosphatidic acid stimulated mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modify fatty acid composition in hepatic and abdominal adipose tissue of sucrose-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Alexander-Aguilera, Alfonso; Berruezo, Silvia; Hernández-Diaz, Guillermo; Angulo, Ofelia; Oliart-Ros, Rosamaria

    2011-12-01

    The fatty acid profile of hepatocytes and adipocytes is determined by the composition of the dietary lipids. It remains unclear which fatty acid components contribute to the development or reduction of insulin resistance. The present work examined the fatty acid composition of both tissues in sucrose-induced obese rats receiving fish oil to determine whether the effect of dietary (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on the reversion of metabolic syndrome in these rats is associated to changes in the fatty acid composition of hepatocyte and adipocyte membrane lipids. Animals with metabolic syndrome were divided into a corn-canola oil diet group and a fish oil diet group, and tissues fatty acids composition were analyzed after 6 weeks of dietary treatment. Fatty acid profiles of the total membrane lipids were modified by the fatty acid composition of the diets fed to rats. N-3 PUFAs levels in animals receiving the fish oil diet plus sucrose in drinking water were significantly higher than in animals under corn-canola oil diets. It is concluded that in sucrose-induced obese rats, consumption of dietary fish oil had beneficial effects on the metabolic syndrome and that such effects would be conditioned by the changes in the n-3 PUFAs composition in hepatic and adipose tissues because they alter membrane properties and modify the type of substrates available for the production of active lipid metabolites acting on insulin resistance and obesity. PMID:21695545

  2. Do pH and flavonoids influence hypochlorous acid-induced catalase inhibition and heme modification?

    PubMed

    Krych-Madej, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2015-09-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), highly reactive oxidizing and chlorinating species, is formed in the immune response to invading pathogens by the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with chloride catalyzed by the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Catalase, an important antioxidant enzyme, catalyzing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, hampers in vitro HOCl formation, but is also one of the main targets for HOCl. In this work we have investigated HOCl-induced catalase inhibition at different pH, and the influence of flavonoids (catechin, epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin) on this process. It has been shown that HOCl-induced catalase inhibition is independent on pH in the range 6.0-7.4. Preincubation of catalase with epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin before HOCl treatment enhances the degree of catalase inhibition, whereas catechin does not affect this process. Our rapid kinetic measurements of absorption changes around the heme group have revealed that heme modification by HOCl is mainly due to secondary, intramolecular processes. The presence of flavonoids, which reduce active catalase intermediate, Compound I to inactive Compound II have not influenced the kinetics of HOCl-induced heme modification. Possible mechanisms of the reaction of hypochlorous acid with catalase are proposed and the biological consequences are discussed.

  3. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells' molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  4. A High Linoleic Acid Diet does not Induce Inflammation in Mouse Liver or Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Roger A; Garrison, Richard L; Stamatikos, Alexis D; Kang, Minsung; Cooper, Jamie A; Paton, Chad M

    2015-11-01

    Recently, the pro-inflammatory effects of linoleic acid (LNA) have been re-examined. It is now becoming clear that relatively few studies have adequately assessed the effects of LNA, independent of obesity. The purpose of this work was to compare the effects of several fat-enriched but non-obesigenic diets on inflammation to provide a more accurate assessment of LNA's ability to induce inflammation. Specifically, 8-week-old male C57Bl/6 mice were fed either saturated (SFA), monounsaturated (MUFA), LNA, or alpha-linolenic acid enriched diets (50 % Kcal from fat, 22 % wt/wt) for 4 weeks. Chow and high-fat, hyper-caloric diets were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. Expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulant markers from epididymal fat, liver, and plasma were measured along with food intake and body weights. Mice fed the high SFA, MUFA, and high-fat diets exhibited increased pro-inflammatory markers in liver and adipose tissue; however, mice fed LNA for four weeks did not display significant changes in pro-inflammatory or pro-coagulant markers in epididymal fat, liver, or plasma. The present study demonstrates that LNA alone is insufficient to induce inflammation. Instead, it is more likely that hyper-caloric diets are responsible for diet-induced inflammation possibly due to adipose tissue remodeling.

  5. Jasmonic acid is a crucial signal transducer in heat shock induced sesquiterpene formation in Aquilaria sinensis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan-Hong; Liao, Yong-Cui; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Juan; Sun, Pei-Wen; Gao, Zhi-Hui; Sui, Chun; Wei, Jian-He

    2016-01-01

    Agarwood, a highly valuable resinous and fragrant heartwood of Aquilaria plants, is widely used in traditional medicines, incense and perfume. Only when Aquilaria trees are wounded by external stimuli do they form agarwood sesquiterpene defensive compounds. Therefore, understanding the signaling pathway of wound-induced agarwood formation is important. Jasmonic acid (JA) is a well-characterized molecule that mediates a plant's defense response and secondary metabolism. However, little is known about the function of endogenous JA in agarwood sesquiterpene biosynthesis. Here, we report that heat shock can up-regulate the expression of genes in JA signaling pathway, induce JA production and the accumulation of agarwood sesquiterpene in A. sinensis cell suspension cultures. A specific inhibitor of JA, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), could block the JA signaling pathway and reduce the accumulation of sesquiterpene compounds. Additionally, compared to SA and H2O2, exogenously supplied methyl jasmonate has the strongest stimulation effect on the production of sesquiterpene compounds. These results clearly demonstrate the central induction role of JA in heat-shock-induced sesquiterpene production in A. sinensis.

  6. Retinoic Acid Upregulates Preadipocyte Genes to Block Adipogenesis and Suppress Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Daniel C.; DeSantis, David; Soltanian, Hooman; Croniger, Colleen M.; Noy, Noa

    2012-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) protects mice from diet-induced obesity. The activity is mediated in part through activation of the nuclear receptors RA receptors (RARs) and peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor β/δ and their associated binding proteins cellular RA binding protein type II (CRABP-II) and fatty acid binding protein type 5 in adipocytes and skeletal muscle, leading to enhanced lipid oxidation and energy dissipation. It was also reported that RA inhibits differentiation of cultured preadipocytes. However, whether the hormone suppresses adipogenesis in vivo and how the activity is propagated remained unknown. In this study, we show that RA inhibits adipocyte differentiation by activating the CRABP-II/RARγ path in preadipose cells, thereby upregulating the expression of the adipogenesis inhibitors Pref-1, Sox9, and Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2). In turn, KLF2 induces the expression of CRABP-II and RARγ, further potentiating inhibition of adipocyte differentiation by RA. The data also indicate that RA suppresses adipogenesis in vivo and that the activity significantly contributes to the ability of the hormone to counteract diet-induced obesity. PMID:22396202

  7. Fatty acid nitroalkenes induce resistance to ischemic cardiac injury by modulating mitochondrial respiration at complex II

    PubMed Central

    Koenitzer, Jeffrey R.; Bonacci, Gustavo; Woodcock, Steven R.; Chen, Chen-Shan; Cantu-Medellin, Nadiezhda; Kelley, Eric E.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FA) are metabolic and inflammatory-derived electrophiles that mediate pleiotropic signaling actions. It was hypothesized that NO2-FA would impact mitochondrial redox reactions to induce tissue-protective metabolic shifts in cells. Nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) reversibly inhibited complex II-linked respiration in isolated rat heart mitochondria in a pH-dependent manner and suppressed superoxide formation. Nitroalkylation of Fp subunit was determined by BME capture and the site of modification by OA-NO2 defined by mass spectrometric analysis. These effects translated into reduced basal and maximal respiration and favored glycolytic metabolism in H9C2 cardiomyoblasts as assessed by extracellular H+ and O2 flux analysis. The perfusion of NO2-FA induced acute cardioprotection in an isolated perfused heart ischemia/reperfusion (IR) model as evidenced by significantly higher rate-pressure products. Together these findings indicate that NO2-FA can promote cardioprotection by inducing a shift from respiration to glycolysis and suppressing reactive species formation in the post-ischemic interval. PMID:26722838

  8. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells’ molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  9. Do pH and flavonoids influence hypochlorous acid-induced catalase inhibition and heme modification?

    PubMed

    Krych-Madej, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2015-09-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), highly reactive oxidizing and chlorinating species, is formed in the immune response to invading pathogens by the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with chloride catalyzed by the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Catalase, an important antioxidant enzyme, catalyzing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, hampers in vitro HOCl formation, but is also one of the main targets for HOCl. In this work we have investigated HOCl-induced catalase inhibition at different pH, and the influence of flavonoids (catechin, epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin) on this process. It has been shown that HOCl-induced catalase inhibition is independent on pH in the range 6.0-7.4. Preincubation of catalase with epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin before HOCl treatment enhances the degree of catalase inhibition, whereas catechin does not affect this process. Our rapid kinetic measurements of absorption changes around the heme group have revealed that heme modification by HOCl is mainly due to secondary, intramolecular processes. The presence of flavonoids, which reduce active catalase intermediate, Compound I to inactive Compound II have not influenced the kinetics of HOCl-induced heme modification. Possible mechanisms of the reaction of hypochlorous acid with catalase are proposed and the biological consequences are discussed. PMID:26116387

  10. Jasmonic acid is a crucial signal transducer in heat shock induced sesquiterpene formation in Aquilaria sinensis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan-Hong; Liao, Yong-Cui; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Juan; Sun, Pei-Wen; Gao, Zhi-Hui; Sui, Chun; Wei, Jian-He

    2016-01-01

    Agarwood, a highly valuable resinous and fragrant heartwood of Aquilaria plants, is widely used in traditional medicines, incense and perfume. Only when Aquilaria trees are wounded by external stimuli do they form agarwood sesquiterpene defensive compounds. Therefore, understanding the signaling pathway of wound-induced agarwood formation is important. Jasmonic acid (JA) is a well-characterized molecule that mediates a plant's defense response and secondary metabolism. However, little is known about the function of endogenous JA in agarwood sesquiterpene biosynthesis. Here, we report that heat shock can up-regulate the expression of genes in JA signaling pathway, induce JA production and the accumulation of agarwood sesquiterpene in A. sinensis cell suspension cultures. A specific inhibitor of JA, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), could block the JA signaling pathway and reduce the accumulation of sesquiterpene compounds. Additionally, compared to SA and H2O2, exogenously supplied methyl jasmonate has the strongest stimulation effect on the production of sesquiterpene compounds. These results clearly demonstrate the central induction role of JA in heat-shock-induced sesquiterpene production in A. sinensis. PMID:26902148

  11. 5-Aminosalicylic acid attenuates allergen-induced airway inflammation and oxidative stress in asthma.

    PubMed

    Raju, K Rama Satyanarayana; Kumar, M N Sathish; Gupta, Saurabh; Naga, Srinivas T; Shankar, Jaya K; Murthy, Vishakantha; Madhunapanthula, Subba Rao V; Mulukutla, Shashank; Ambhore, Nilesh S; Tummala, Shashank; Vishnuvarthan, V J; Azam, Afzal; Elango, Kannan

    2014-12-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines regulate the magnitude of allergic reactions during asthma. Tumor necrosis factor--alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) play a crucial role in aggravating the inflammatory conditions during allergic asthma. In addition, oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of asthma by altering the physiological condition resulting in the development of status asthmaticus. Anti-inflammatory corticosteroids are being widely used for treating allergic asthma. In the present study 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), a salicylic acid derivative, was evaluated, in vivo for its potential to suppress TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-13 using ovalbumin (OVA) induced allergic asthma in Balb/C mice. Oral administration of 65, 130 and 195 mg/kg 5-ASA significantly reduced the OVA induced total and differential leucocyte count, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-13, nitrite, nitrate, MDA, MPO and TPL levels in the lung lavage samples. Collectively, these findings suggest that 5-ASA is a potent immunomodulator and suppresses key Th2 cytokines production and oxidative stress in OVA-induced asthma.

  12. Acid aspiration-induced acute lung injury causes leukocyte-dependent systemic organ injury.

    PubMed

    St John, R C; Mizer, L A; Kindt, G C; Weisbrode, S E; Moore, S A; Dorinsky, P M

    1993-04-01

    The adult respiratory distress syndrome is a form of acute lung injury (ALI) that is frequently associated with systemic organ injury and often occurs in the setting of wide-spread inflammatory cell activation. However, whether conditions that lead to ALI result in systemic organ injury is unclear. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that ALI induced by acid aspiration will not result in systemic organ injury. Morphological alterations and lymph-to-plasma protein ratios were measured in autoperfused cat ileum preparations of four control animals and five animals with ALI produced by the endobronchial instillation of 0.1 N HCl (0.5 ml.kg-1.lung-1). After 2 h, the lymph-to-plasma protein ratio (a measure of microvascular permeability) was increased in the ilea of HCl-injured animals compared with control animals (0.234 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.121 +/- 0.005; P = 0.012) and was accompanied by extensive morphological alterations. Four additional HCl-injured animals were pretreated with an antileukocyte adherence antibody (anti-CD18, 2 mg/kg) that blocked the HCl-induced alterations in the ileum. This study provides evidence for significant systemic organ injury after acid aspiration-induced ALI and suggests that the neutrophil may be a key mediator.

  13. Jasmonic acid is a crucial signal transducer in heat shock induced sesquiterpene formation in Aquilaria sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan-Hong; Liao, Yong-Cui; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Juan; Sun, Pei-Wen; Gao, Zhi-Hui; Sui, Chun; Wei, Jian-He

    2016-01-01

    Agarwood, a highly valuable resinous and fragrant heartwood of Aquilaria plants, is widely used in traditional medicines, incense and perfume. Only when Aquilaria trees are wounded by external stimuli do they form agarwood sesquiterpene defensive compounds. Therefore, understanding the signaling pathway of wound-induced agarwood formation is important. Jasmonic acid (JA) is a well-characterized molecule that mediates a plant’s defense response and secondary metabolism. However, little is known about the function of endogenous JA in agarwood sesquiterpene biosynthesis. Here, we report that heat shock can up-regulate the expression of genes in JA signaling pathway, induce JA production and the accumulation of agarwood sesquiterpene in A. sinensis cell suspension cultures. A specific inhibitor of JA, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), could block the JA signaling pathway and reduce the accumulation of sesquiterpene compounds. Additionally, compared to SA and H2O2, exogenously supplied methyl jasmonate has the strongest stimulation effect on the production of sesquiterpene compounds. These results clearly demonstrate the central induction role of JA in heat-shock-induced sesquiterpene production in A. sinensis. PMID:26902148

  14. Effect of galactose on acid induced molten globule state of Soybean Agglutinin: Biophysical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Parvez; Naseem, Farha; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2015-11-01

    In the present study the formation of molten globule-like unfolding intermediate Soybean Agglutinin (SBA) in acidic pH range has been established with the help of acrylamide quenching, intrinsic fluorescence, ANS fluorescence measurement, far UV CD and dynamic light scattering measurement. A marked increase in ANS fluorescence was observed at pH 2.2. Ksv of acrylamide quenching was found to be higher at pH 2.2 than that of native SBA at pH 7. Far UV CD spectra of pH induced state suggest that SBA shows significant retention of secondary structure closure to native. Hydrodynamic radius of SBA at pH 2.2 was found be more as compared to native state and also in other pH induced states. Further we checked the effect of galactose on the molten globule state of SBA. This study suggests that SBA exist as molten globule at pH 2.2 and this study will help in acid induced molten globule state of other proteins.

  15. Combined Low-Intensity Exercise and Ascorbic Acid Attenuates Kainic Acid-Induced Seizure and Oxidative Stress in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jae; Song, Wook; Jin, Eun Hee; Kim, Jongkyu; Chun, Yoonseok; An, Eung Nam; Park, Sok

    2016-05-01

    Physical exercise and vitamins such as ascorbic acid (ASC) have been recognized as an effective strategy in neuroprotection and neurorehabilitatioin. However, there is a need to find an efficient treatment regimen that includes ASC and low-intensity exercise to diminish the risk of overtraining and nutritional treatment by attenuating oxidative stress. In the present study, we investigated the combined effect of low-intensity physical exercise (EX) and ASC on kainic acid (KA)-induced seizure