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Sample records for acid interference rnai

  1. Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) and control of citrus pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ribonucleic acid interference, RNAi, applications and function are described for the non-scientist to bring a better understanding of how this emerging technology is providing environmentally friendly, non-transgenic, insect pest control. ...

  2. Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) technology for control of Asian citrus psyllid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ribonucleic acid interference, RNAi, applications and function are described for the non-scientist to bring a better understanding of how this emerging technology is providing environmentally friendly, non-transgenic, insect pest control to the citrus industry. Two part Video presentation....

  3. Control of larval and egg development in Aedes aegypti with Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) against juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) is a powerful approach for elucidating gene functions in a variety of organisms, including mosquitoes and many other insects. Little has been done, however, to harness this approach in order to control adult and larval mosquitoes. Juvenile hormone (JH) plays a pi...

  4. Emerging strategies for RNA interference (RNAi) applications in insects

    PubMed Central

    Nandety, Raja Sekhar; Kuo, Yen-Wen; Nouri, Shahideh; Falk, Bryce W

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) in insects is a gene regulatory process that also plays a vital role in the maintenance and in the regulation of host defenses against invading viruses. Small RNAs determine the specificity of the RNAi through precise recognition of their targets. These small RNAs in insects comprise small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), micro RNAs (miRNAs) and Piwi interacting RNAs (piRNAs) of various lengths. In this review, we have explored different forms of the RNAi inducers that are presently in use, and their applications for an effective and efficient fundamental and practical RNAi research with insects. Further, we reviewed trends in next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies and their importance for insect RNAi, including the identification of novel insect targets as well as insect viruses. Here we also describe a rapidly emerging trend of using plant viruses to deliver the RNAi inducer molecules into insects for an efficient RNAi response. PMID:25424593

  5. Bringing RNA Interference (RNAi) into the High School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sengupta, Sibani

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (abbreviated RNAi) is a relatively new discovery in the field of mechanisms that serve to regulate gene expression (a.k.a. protein synthesis). Gene expression can be regulated at the transcriptional level (mRNA production, processing, or stability) and at the translational level (protein synthesis). RNAi acts in a gene-specific…

  6. RNA interference (RNAi) patents and human health related applications of RNAi.

    PubMed

    Ebhardt, H Alexander

    2007-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2006 was shared by A.Z. Fire and C.C. Mello. The honour was given to these two principal investigators for demonstrating in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans that double stranded RNA directs cleavage of messenger RNAs (mRNA) in a homologous manner. This process was termed RNA interference (RNAi) and was published in 1998. Since then, further research revealed that small 21-22 nts long RNAs guide an RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) to a target mRNA causing translational inhibition or mRNA cleavage. This review will focus on RNAi patents, delivery of RNAi to combat human disease and reviewing some recent applications regarding detection and possible cure of human diseases using RNAi. PMID:19075926

  7. RNA Interference in the Age of CRISPR: Will CRISPR Interfere with RNAi?

    PubMed

    Unniyampurath, Unnikrishnan; Pilankatta, Rajendra; Krishnan, Manoj N

    2016-01-01

    The recent emergence of multiple technologies for modifying gene structure has revolutionized mammalian biomedical research and enhanced the promises of gene therapy. Over the past decade, RNA interference (RNAi) based technologies widely dominated various research applications involving experimental modulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recently, a new gene editing technology, Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) and the CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) (CRISPR/Cas9) system, has received unprecedented acceptance in the scientific community for a variety of genetic applications. Unlike RNAi, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is bestowed with the ability to introduce heritable precision insertions and deletions in the eukaryotic genome. The combination of popularity and superior capabilities of CRISPR/Cas9 system raises the possibility that this technology may occupy the roles currently served by RNAi and may even make RNAi obsolete. We performed a comparative analysis of the technical aspects and applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system and RNAi in mammalian systems, with the purpose of charting out a predictive picture on whether the CRISPR/Cas9 system will eclipse the existence and future of RNAi. The conclusion drawn from this analysis is that RNAi will still occupy specific domains of biomedical research and clinical applications, under the current state of development of these technologies. However, further improvements in CRISPR/Cas9 based technology may ultimately enable it to dominate RNAi in the long term. PMID:26927085

  8. Role of RNA Interference (RNAi) in the Moss Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Muhammad Asif; Frank, Wolfgang; Khraiwesh, Basel

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism that regulates genes by either transcriptional (TGS) or posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS), required for genome maintenance and proper development of an organism. Small non-coding RNAs are the key players in RNAi and have been intensively studied in eukaryotes. In plants, several classes of small RNAs with specific sizes and dedicated functions have evolved. The major classes of small RNAs include microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which differ in their biogenesis. miRNAs are synthesized from a short hairpin structure while siRNAs are derived from long double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA). Both miRNA and siRNAs control the expression of cognate target RNAs by binding to reverse complementary sequences mediating cleavage or translational inhibition of the target RNA. They also act on the DNA and cause epigenetic changes such as DNA methylation and histone modifications. In the last years, the analysis of plant RNAi pathways was extended to the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens, a non-flowering, non-vascular ancient land plant that diverged from the lineage of seed plants approximately 450 million years ago. Based on a number of characteristic features and its phylogenetic key position in land plant evolution P. patens emerged as a plant model species to address basic as well as applied topics in plant biology. Here we summarize the current knowledge on the role of RNAi in P. patens that shows functional overlap with RNAi pathways from seed plants, and also unique features specific to this species. PMID:23344055

  9. Exploring systemic RNA interference in insects: a genome-wide survey for RNAi genes in Tribolium

    PubMed Central

    Tomoyasu, Yoshinori; Miller, Sherry C; Tomita, Shuichiro; Schoppmeier, Michael; Grossmann, Daniela; Bucher, Gregor

    2008-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is a highly conserved cellular mechanism. In some organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, the RNAi response can be transmitted systemically. Some insects also exhibit a systemic RNAi response. However, Drosophila, the leading insect model organism, does not show a robust systemic RNAi response, necessitating another model system to study the molecular mechanism of systemic RNAi in insects. Results We used Tribolium, which exhibits robust systemic RNAi, as an alternative model system. We have identified the core RNAi genes, as well as genes potentially involved in systemic RNAi, from the Tribolium genome. Both phylogenetic and functional analyses suggest that Tribolium has a somewhat larger inventory of core component genes than Drosophila, perhaps allowing a more sensitive response to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). We also identified three Tribolium homologs of C. elegans sid-1, which encodes a possible dsRNA channel. However, detailed sequence analysis has revealed that these Tribolium homologs share more identity with another C. elegans gene, tag-130. We analyzed tag-130 mutants, and found that this gene does not have a function in systemic RNAi in C. elegans. Likewise, the Tribolium sid-like genes do not seem to be required for systemic RNAi. These results suggest that insect sid-1-like genes have a different function than dsRNA uptake. Moreover, Tribolium lacks homologs of several genes important for RNAi in C. elegans. Conclusion Although both Tribolium and C. elegans show a robust systemic RNAi response, our genome-wide survey reveals significant differences between the RNAi mechanisms of these organisms. Thus, insects may use an alternative mechanism for the systemic RNAi response. Understanding this process would assist with rendering other insects amenable to systemic RNAi, and may influence pest control approaches. PMID:18201385

  10. Characterization of the Tyrosine Kinase-Regulated Proteome in Breast Cancer by Combined use of RNA interference (RNAi) and Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) Quantitative Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Stebbing, Justin; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Yichen; Grothey, Arnhild; Ajuh, Paul; Angelopoulos, Nicos; Giamas, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases (TKs) are central regulators in cellular activities and perturbations of TK signaling contribute to oncogenesis. However, less than half of the TKs have been thoroughly studied and a global functional analysis of their proteomic portrait is lacking. Here we conducted a combined approach of RNA interference (RNAi) and stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics to decode the TK-regulated proteome and associated signaling dynamics. As a result, a broad proteomic repertoire modulated by TKs was revealed, upon silencing of the 65 TKs expressed in MCF7 breast cancer cells. This yielded 10 new distinctive TK clusters according to similarity in TK-regulated proteome, each characterized by a unique signaling signature in contrast to previous classifications. We provide functional analyses and identify critical pathways for each cluster based on their common downstream targets. Analysis of different breast cancer subtypes showed distinct correlations of each cluster with clinical outcome. From the significantly up- and down-regulated proteins, we identified a number of markers of drug sensitivity and resistance. These data supports the role of TKs in regulating major aspects of cellular activity, but also reveals redundancy in signaling, explaining why kinase inhibitors alone often fail to achieve their clinical aims. The TK-SILACepedia provides a comprehensive resource for studying the global function of TKs in cancer. PMID:26089344

  11. Characterization of the Tyrosine Kinase-Regulated Proteome in Breast Cancer by Combined use of RNA interference (RNAi) and Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Stebbing, Justin; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Yichen; Grothey, Arnhild; Ajuh, Paul; Angelopoulos, Nicos; Giamas, Georgios

    2015-09-01

    Tyrosine kinases (TKs) are central regulators in cellular activities and perturbations of TK signaling contribute to oncogenesis. However, less than half of the TKs have been thoroughly studied and a global functional analysis of their proteomic portrait is lacking. Here we conducted a combined approach of RNA interference (RNAi) and stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics to decode the TK-regulated proteome and associated signaling dynamics. As a result, a broad proteomic repertoire modulated by TKs was revealed, upon silencing of the 65 TKs expressed in MCF7 breast cancer cells. This yielded 10 new distinctive TK clusters according to similarity in TK-regulated proteome, each characterized by a unique signaling signature in contrast to previous classifications. We provide functional analyses and identify critical pathways for each cluster based on their common downstream targets. Analysis of different breast cancer subtypes showed distinct correlations of each cluster with clinical outcome. From the significantly up- and down-regulated proteins, we identified a number of markers of drug sensitivity and resistance. These data supports the role of TKs in regulating major aspects of cellular activity, but also reveals redundancy in signaling, explaining why kinase inhibitors alone often fail to achieve their clinical aims. The TK-SILACepedia provides a comprehensive resource for studying the global function of TKs in cancer. PMID:26089344

  12. Analysis of Nuclear RNA Interference (RNAi) in Human Cells by Subcellular Fractionation and Argonaute Loading

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Keith T.; Li, Liande; Janowski, Bethany A.; Corey, David R.

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is well known for its ability to regulate gene expression in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. In mammalian cell nuclei, however, the impact of RNAi has remained more controversial. A key technical hurdle has been a lack of optimized protocols for the isolation and analysis of cell nuclei. Here we describe a simplified protocol for nuclei isolation from cultured cells that incorporates a method for obtaining nucleoplasmic and chromatin fractions and removing cytoplasmic contamination. Cell fractions can then be used to detect the presence and activity of RNAi factors in the nucleus. We present a protocol for investigating an early step in RNAi, Argonaute protein loading with small RNAs, which is enabled by our improved extract preparations. These protocols facilitate characterization of nuclear RNAi and can be applied to the analysis of other nuclear proteins and pathways. From cellular fractionation to analysis of Argonaute loading results, this protocol takes 4–6 d to complete. PMID:25079428

  13. The Role of RNA Interference (RNAi) in Arbovirus-Vector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Carol D.; Olson, Ken E.

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) was shown over 18 years ago to be a mechanism by which arbovirus replication and transmission could be controlled in arthropod vectors. During the intervening period, research on RNAi has defined many of the components and mechanisms of this antiviral pathway in arthropods, yet a number of unexplored questions remain. RNAi refers to RNA-mediated regulation of gene expression. Originally, the term described silencing of endogenous genes by introduction of exogenous double-stranded (ds)RNA with the same sequence as the gene to be silenced. Further research has shown that RNAi comprises three gene regulation pathways that are mediated by small RNAs: the small interfering (si)RNA, micro (mi)RNA, and Piwi-interacting (pi)RNA pathways. The exogenous (exo-)siRNA pathway is now recognized as a major antiviral innate immune response of arthropods. More recent studies suggest that the piRNA and miRNA pathways might also have important roles in arbovirus-vector interactions. This review will focus on current knowledge of the role of the exo-siRNA pathway as an arthropod vector antiviral response and on emerging research into vector piRNA and miRNA pathway modulation of arbovirus-vector interactions. Although it is assumed that arboviruses must evade the vector’s antiviral RNAi response in order to maintain their natural transmission cycles, the strategies by which this is accomplished are not well defined. RNAi is also an important tool for arthropod gene knock-down in functional genomics studies and in development of arbovirus-resistant mosquito populations. Possible arbovirus strategies for evasion of RNAi and applications of RNAi in functional genomics analysis and arbovirus transmission control will also be reviewed. PMID:25690800

  14. RNA Interference (RNAi) Induced Gene Silencing: A Promising Approach of Hi-Tech Plant Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Younis, Adnan; Siddique, Muhammad Irfan; Kim, Chang-Kil; Lim, Ki-Byung

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising gene regulatory approach in functional genomics that has significant impact on crop improvement which permits down-regulation in gene expression with greater precise manner without affecting the expression of other genes. RNAi mechanism is expedited by small molecules of interfering RNA to suppress a gene of interest effectively. RNAi has also been exploited in plants for resistance against pathogens, insect/pest, nematodes, and virus that cause significant economic losses. Keeping beside the significance in the genome integrity maintenance as well as growth and development, RNAi induced gene syntheses are vital in plant stress management. Modifying the genes by the interference of small RNAs is one of the ways through which plants react to the environmental stresses. Hence, investigating the role of small RNAs in regulating gene expression assists the researchers to explore the potentiality of small RNAs in abiotic and biotic stress management. This novel approach opens new avenues for crop improvement by developing disease resistant, abiotic or biotic stress tolerant, and high yielding elite varieties. PMID:25332689

  15. Spherical Nucleic Acid Nanoparticle Conjugates as an RNAi-Based Therapy for Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Samuel A.; Day, Emily S.; Ko, Caroline H.; Hurley, Lisa A.; Luciano, Janina P.; Kouri, Fotini M.; Merkel, Timothy J.; Luthi, Andrea J.; Patel, Pinal C.; Cutler, Joshua I.; Daniel, Weston L.; Scott, Alexander W.; Rotz, Matthew W.; Meade, Thomas J.; Giljohann, David A.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Stegh, Alexander H.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a neurologically debilitating disease that culminates in death 14 to 16 months after diagnosis. An incomplete understanding of how cataloged genetic aberrations promote therapy resistance, combined with ineffective drug delivery to the central nervous system, has rendered GBM incurable. Functional genomics efforts have implicated several oncogenes in GBM pathogenesis but have rarely led to the implementation of targeted therapies. This is partly because many “undruggable” oncogenes cannot be targeted by small molecules or antibodies. We preclinically evaluate an RNA interference (RNAi)–based nanomedicine platform, based on spherical nucleic acid (SNA) nanoparticle conjugates, to neutralize oncogene expression in GBM. SNAs consist of gold nanoparticles covalently functionalized with densely packed, highly oriented small interfering RNA duplexes. In the absence of auxiliary transfection strategies or chemical modifications, SNAs efficiently entered primary and transformed glial cells in vitro. In vivo, the SNAs penetrated the blood-brain barrier and blood-tumor barrier to disseminate throughout xenogeneic glioma explants. SNAs targeting the oncoprotein Bcl2Like12 (Bcl2L12)—an effector caspase and p53 inhibitor overexpressed in GBM relative to normal brain and low-grade astrocytomas—were effective in knocking down endogenous Bcl2L12 mRNA and protein levels, and sensitized glioma cells toward therapy-induced apoptosis by enhancing effector caspase and p53 activity. Further, systemically delivered SNAs reduced Bcl2L12 expression in intracerebral GBM, increased intratumoral apoptosis, and reduced tumor burden and progression in xenografted mice, without adverse side effects. Thus, silencing antiapoptotic signaling using SNAs represents a new approach for systemic RNAi therapy for GBM and possibly other lethal malignancies. PMID:24174328

  16. Expression profiling and cross-species RNA interference (RNAi) of desiccation-induced transcripts in the anhydrobiotic nematode Aphelenchus avenae

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Some organisms can survive extreme desiccation by entering a state of suspended animation known as anhydrobiosis. The free-living mycophagous nematode Aphelenchus avenae can be induced to enter anhydrobiosis by pre-exposure to moderate reductions in relative humidity (RH) prior to extreme desiccation. This preconditioning phase is thought to allow modification of the transcriptome by activation of genes required for desiccation tolerance. Results To identify such genes, a panel of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) enriched for sequences upregulated in A. avenae during preconditioning was created. A subset of 30 genes with significant matches in databases, together with a number of apparently novel sequences, were chosen for further study. Several of the recognisable genes are associated with water stress, encoding, for example, two new hydrophilic proteins related to the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family. Expression studies confirmed EST panel members to be upregulated by evaporative water loss, and the majority of genes was also induced by osmotic stress and cold, but rather fewer by heat. We attempted to use RNA interference (RNAi) to demonstrate the importance of this gene set for anhydrobiosis, but found A. avenae to be recalcitrant with the techniques used. Instead, therefore, we developed a cross-species RNAi procedure using A. avenae sequences in another anhydrobiotic nematode, Panagrolaimus superbus, which is amenable to gene silencing. Of 20 A. avenae ESTs screened, a significant reduction in survival of desiccation in treated P. superbus populations was observed with two sequences, one of which was novel, while the other encoded a glutathione peroxidase. To confirm a role for glutathione peroxidases in anhydrobiosis, RNAi with cognate sequences from P. superbus was performed and was also shown to reduce desiccation tolerance in this species. Conclusions This study has identified and characterised the expression profiles of members

  17. RNAi-Assisted Genome Evolution (RAGE) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Si, Tong; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi)-assisted genome evolution (RAGE) applies directed evolution principles to engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes. Here, we use acetic acid tolerance as a target trait to describe the key steps of RAGE. Briefly, iterative cycles of RNAi screening are performed to accumulate multiplex knockdown modifications, enabling directed evolution of the yeast genome and continuous improvement of a target phenotype. Detailed protocols are provided on the reconstitution of RNAi machinery, creation of genome-wide RNAi libraries, identification and integration of beneficial knockdown cassettes, and repeated RAGE cycles. PMID:27581294

  18. The 26S proteasome in Schistosoma mansoni: bioinformatics analysis, developmental expression, and RNA interference (RNAi) studies.

    PubMed

    Nabhan, Joseph F; El-Shehabi, Fouad; Patocka, Nicholas; Ribeiro, Paula

    2007-11-01

    The 26S proteasome is a proteolytic complex responsible for the degradation of the vast majority of eukaryotic proteins. Regulated proteolysis by the proteasome is thought to influence cell cycle progression, transcriptional control, and other critical cellular processes. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach to identify the proteasomal constituents of the parasitic trematode Schistosoma mansoni. A detailed search of the S. mansoni genome database identified a total of 31 putative proteasomal subunits, including 17 subunits of the regulatory (19S) complex and 14 predicted catalytic (20S) subunits. A quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis of subunit expression levels revealed that the S. mansoni proteasome components are differentially expressed among cercaria, schistosomula, and adult worms. In particular, the data suggest that the proteasome may be downregulated during the early stages of schistosomula development and is subsequently upregulated as the parasite matures to the adult stage. To test for biological relevance, we developed a transfection-based RNA interference method to knockdown the expression of the proteasome subunit, SmRPN11/POH1. Transfection of in vitro transformed S. mansoni schistosomula with specific short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) diminished SmRPN11/POH1 expression nearly 80%, as determined by quantitative RT-PCR analysis, and also decreased parasite viability 78%, whereas no significant effect could be seen after treatment with the same amount of an irrelevant siRNA. These results indicate that the subunit SmRPN11/POH1 is an essential gene in schistosomes and further suggest an important role for the proteasome in parasite development and survival. PMID:17892869

  19. Transgenic RNA interference (RNAi)-derived field resistance to cassava brown streak disease.

    PubMed

    Ogwok, Emmanuel; Odipio, John; Halsey, Mark; Gaitán-Solís, Eliana; Bua, Anton; Taylor, Nigel J; Fauquet, Claude M; Alicai, Titus

    2012-12-01

    Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD), caused by the Ipomoviruses Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan Cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV), is considered to be an imminent threat to food security in tropical Africa. Cassava plants were transgenically modified to generate small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) from truncated full-length (894-bp) and N-terminal (402-bp) portions of the UCBSV coat protein (ΔCP) sequence. Seven siRNA-producing lines from each gene construct were tested under confined field trials at Namulonge, Uganda. All nontransgenic control plants (n = 60) developed CBSD symptoms on aerial tissues by 6 months after planting, whereas plants transgenic for the full-length ΔCP sequence showed a 3-month delay in disease development, with 98% of clonal replicates within line 718-001 remaining symptom free over the 11-month trial. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) diagnostics indicated the presence of UCBSV within the leaves of 57% of the nontransgenic controls, but in only two of 413 plants tested (0.5%) across the 14 transgenic lines. All transgenic plants showing CBSD were PCR positive for the presence of CBSV, except for line 781-001, in which 93% of plants were confirmed to be free of both pathogens. At harvest, 90% of storage roots from nontransgenic plants were severely affected by CBSD-induced necrosis. However, transgenic lines 718-005 and 718-001 showed significant suppression of disease, with 95% of roots from the latter line remaining free from necrosis and RT-PCR negative for the presence of both viral pathogens. Cross-protection against CBSV by siRNAs generated from the full-length UCBSV ΔCP confirms a previous report in tobacco. The information presented provides proof of principle for the control of CBSD by RNA interference-mediated technology, and progress towards the potential control of this damaging disease. PMID:22845735

  20. RNA Interference

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIGMS Home > Science Education > RNA Interference Fact Sheet RNA Interference Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is RNA interference? RNA interference (RNAi) is a natural process ...

  1. Interference RNA (RNAi)-based silencing of endogenous thrombopoietin receptor (Mpl) in Dami cells resulted in decreased hNUDC-mediated megakaryocyte proliferation and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Shi-Feng; Li, Xiao-Kun; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Fang; Xu, Peilin

    2009-12-10

    Recently our laboratory reported evidence showing that hNUDC acts as an additional cytokine for thrombopoietin receptor (Mpl). Previously known as the human homolog of a fungal nuclear migration protein, hNUDC plays a critical role in megakaryocyte differentiation and maturation. Here we sought to further clarify the hNUDC-Mpl ligand-receptor relationship by utilizing interference RNA (RNAi) to knockdown Mpl expression in a megakaryocyte cell line. We created U6 promoter driven constructs to express short hairpin RNAs (shRNA) with affinity for different sites on Mpl mRNA. By including Mpl-EGFP fusion protein in these constructs, we were able to effectively screen the shRNA that was most efficient in inhibiting Mpl mRNA expression. This shRNA was subsequently transferred into a lentivirus vector and transduced into Dami cells, a cell line which constitutively expresses endogenous Mpl. This lentiviral vector was also designed to simultaneously express EGFP to monitor transfection efficiency. Our results show that lentivirus can be used to effectively deliver shRNAs into Dami cells and cause specific inhibition of Mpl protein expression after transduction. Furthermore, we show the functional effects of shRNA-mediated Mpl silencing by demonstrating reduced hNUDC stimulated megakaryocyte proliferation and differentiation. Thus, the use of a RNAi knockdown strategy has allowed us to pinpoint the connection of hNUDC with Mpl in the regulation of megakaryocyte maturation.

  2. RNAi Screening in Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subhanita; Singh, Gatikrushna; Sachdev, Bindiya; Kumar, Ajit; Malhotra, Pawan; Mukherjee, Sunil K; Bhatnagar, Raj K

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference is a potent and precise reverse genetic approach to carryout large-scale functional genomic studies in a given organism. During the past decade, RNAi has also emerged as an important investigative tool to understand the process of viral pathogenesis. Our laboratory has successfully generated transgenic reporter and RNAi sensor line of Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf21) cells and developed a reversal of silencing assay via siRNA or shRNA guided screening to investigate RNAi factors or viral pathogenic factors with extraordinary fidelity. Here we describe empirical approaches and conceptual understanding to execute successful RNAi screening in Spodoptera frugiperda 21-cell line. PMID:27581295

  3. RNAi-induced silencing of embryonic tryptophan oxygenase in the Pyralid moth, Plodia interpunctella

    PubMed Central

    Fabrick, Jeffrey A.; Kanost, Michael R.; Baker, James E.

    2004-01-01

    Gene silencing through the introduction of double-stranded RNA (RNA interference, RNAi) provides a powerful tool for the elucidation of gene function in many systems, including those where genomics and proteomics are incomplete. The use of RNAi technology for gene silencing in Lepidoptera has lacked significant attention compared to other systems. To demonstrate that RNAi can be utilized in the lepidopteran, Plodia interpunctella, we cloned a cDNA for tryptophan oxygenase, and showed that silencing of tryptophan oxygenase through RNAi during embryonic development resulted in loss of eye-color pigmentation. The complete amino acid sequence of Plodia tryptophan oxygenase can be accessed through NCBI Protein Database under NCBI Accession # AY427951. Abbreviation RNAi RNA interference PCR polymerase chain reaction RT-PCR reverse transcription-PCR PMID:15861231

  4. Non-transgenic RNAi technology to control insects on citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research demonstrated a non-transgenic delivery method for ribonucleic acid interference, RNAi, that reduced fitness as measured in increased mortality over time, of two insect pests of citrus, ie. psyllids and leafhoppers. The Asian citrus psyllid transmits a deadly plant-infecting bacterium o...

  5. A high-throughput RNA interference (RNAi)-based approach using hairy roots for the study of plant-rhizobia interactions.

    PubMed

    Sinharoy, Senjuti; Pislariu, Catalina I; Udvardi, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    Legumes are major contributors to sustainable agriculture; their key feature is their ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen through symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Legumes are often recalcitrant to regeneration and transformation by Agrobacterium tumefaciens; however, A. rhizogenes-mediated root transformation and composite plant generation are rapid and convenient alternatives to study root biology, including root nodule symbiosis. RNA interference (RNAi), coupled with A. rhizogenes-mediated root transformation, has been very successfully used for analyses of gene function by reverse genetics. Besides being applied to model legumes (Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus), this method has been adopted for several other legumes due to the ease and relative speed with which transgenic roots can be generated. Several protocols for hairy root transformation have been published. Here we describe an improved hairy root transformation protocol and the methods to study nodulation in Medicago. We also highlight the major differences between our protocol and others, and key steps that need to be adjusted in order to translate this method to other legumes. PMID:25740364

  6. Humic acid interference with virus recovery by electropositive microporous filters.

    PubMed Central

    Guttman-Bass, N; Catalano-Sherman, J

    1986-01-01

    The effects of humic acid on poliovirus type 1 recovery from water by Zeta Plus 60S filters were investigated. The humic acid interfered by preventing virus adsorption to the filters, and the interference increased as a function of the amount of humic acid filtered. Humic acid decreased virus adsorption when filtered before the virus, but did not elute virus which had adsorbed to the filters. The effects on virus recovery were not due to alterations in virus titer or neutralizability. The addition of AlCl3, which improved virus recovery by electronegative filters in the presence of humic acid, did not aid in overall virus recovery by the Zeta Plus filters in the presence or absence of humic acid. However, the salt and humic acid in combination improved virus adsorption and concurrently reduced virus elution efficiency. The addition of NaH2PO4 had no direct effect on virus recovery and did not alter the effect of humic acid. In an attempt to identify the components of humic acid responsible for the interference, humic materials were fractionated by size by using Sephadex gel chromatography and dialysis, and the fractions were tested for interfering activity. Interference was not associated with specific size fractions of the humic materials. PMID:3021058

  7. Towards the elements of successful insect RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Jeffrey G.; Michel, Kristin; Bartholomay, Lyric; Siegfried, Blair D.; Hunter, Wayne B.; Smagghe, Guy; Zhu, Kun Yan; Douglas, Angela E.

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), the sequence-specific suppression of gene expression, offers great opportunities for insect science, especially to analyze gene function, manage pest populations, and reduce disease pathogens. The accumulating body of literature on insect RNAi has revealed that the efficiency of RNAi varies between different species, the mode of RNAi delivery, and the genes being targeted. There is also variation in the duration of transcript suppression. At present, we have a limited capacity to predict the ideal experimental strategy for RNAi of a particular gene/insect because of our incomplete understanding of whether and how the RNAi signal is amplified and spread among insect cells. Consequently, development of the optimal RNAi protocols is a highly empirical process. This limitation can be relieved by systematic analysis of the molecular physiological basis of RNAi mechanisms in insects. An enhanced conceptual understanding of RNAi function in insects will facilitate the application of RNAi for dissection of gene function, and to fast-track the application of RNAi to both control pests and develop effective methods to protect beneficial insects and non-insect arthropods, particularly the honey bee (Apis mellifera) and cultured Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) from viral and parasitic diseases. PMID:24041495

  8. RNAI: Future in insect management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA interference is a post-transcriptional, gene regulation mechanism found in virtually all plants and animals including insects. The demonstration of RNAi in insects and its successful use as a tool in the study of functional genomics opened the door to the development of a variety of novel, envir...

  9. Are RNAi and miRNA therapeutics truly dead?

    PubMed

    Conde, João; Artzi, Natalie

    2015-03-01

    Only a few years ago pharmaceutical companies were excited about the potential of RNA interference (RNAi). Now, financial volatility and subsequent dissolutions of in-house facilities by pharmaceutical companies have had media channels pronouncing that RNAi therapeutics are dead. However, advances in nanomedicine may now help the vast potential of RNAi therapeutics to be fulfilled. PMID:25595555

  10. Control of larval and egg development in Aedes aegypti with RNA interference against juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase.

    PubMed

    Van Ekert, Evelien; Powell, Charles A; Shatters, Robert G; Borovsky, Dov

    2014-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful approach for elucidating gene functions in a variety of organisms, including mosquitoes and many other insects. Little has been done, however, to harness this approach in order to control adult and larval mosquitoes. Juvenile hormone (JH) plays a pivotal role in the control of reproduction in adults and metamorphism in larval mosquitoes. This report describes an approach to control Aedes aegypti using RNAi against JH acid methyl transferase (AeaJHAMT), the ultimate enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of JH III that converts JH acid III (JHA III) into JH III. In female A. aegypti that were injected or fed jmtA dsRNA targeting the AeaJHAMT gene (jmtA) transcript, egg development was inhibited in 50% of the treated females. In mosquito larvae that were fed transgenic Pichia pastoris cells expressing long hair pin (LHP) RNA, adult eclosion was delayed by 3 weeks causing high mortality. Northern blot analyses and qPCR studies show that jmtA dsRNA causes inhibition of jmtA transcript in adults and larvae, which is consistent with the observed inhibition of egg maturation and larval development. Taken together, these results suggest that jmtA LHP RNA expressed in heat inactivated genetically modified P. pastoris cells could be used to control mosquito populations in the marsh. PMID:25111689

  11. FlyRNAi: the Drosophila RNAi screening center database

    PubMed Central

    Flockhart, Ian; Booker, Matthew; Kiger, Amy; Boutros, Michael; Armknecht, Susan; Ramadan, Nadire; Richardson, Kris; Xu, Andrew; Perrimon, Norbert; Mathey-Prevot, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become a powerful tool for genetic screening in Drosophila. At the Drosophila RNAi Screening Center (DRSC), we are using a library of over 21 000 double-stranded RNAs targeting known and predicted genes in Drosophila. This library is available for the use of visiting scientists wishing to perform full-genome RNAi screens. The data generated from these screens are collected in the DRSC database () in a flexible format for the convenience of the scientist and for archiving data. The long-term goal of this database is to provide annotations for as many of the uncharacterized genes in Drosophila as possible. Data from published screens are available to the public through a highly configurable interface that allows detailed examination of the data and provides access to a number of other databases and bioinformatics tools. PMID:16381918

  12. Cardiac RNAi therapy using RAGE siRNA/deoxycholic acid-modified polyethylenimine complexes for myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jueun; Ku, Sook Hee; Lee, Min Sang; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Mok, Hyejung; Choi, Donghoon; Kim, Sun Hwa

    2014-08-01

    Inflammatory response in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury plays a critical role in ventricular remodeling. To avoid deleterious effects of overwhelming inflammation, we blocked the expression of receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), a key mediator of the local and systemic inflammatory responses, via RNAi mechanism. Herein, a facial amphipathic deoxycholic acid-modified low molecular weight polyethylenimine (DA-PEI) was used as a siRNA delivery carrier to myocardium. The DA-PEI conjugate formed a stable complex with siRNA via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. The siRAGE/DA-PEI formulation having negligible toxicity could enhance intracellular delivery efficiency and successfully suppress RAGE expression both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the cardiac administration of siRAGE/DA-PEI reduced apoptosis and inflammatory cytokine release, subsequently led to attenuation of left ventricular remodeling in rat myocardial infarction model. The potential therapeutic effects of RAGE gene silencing on myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury may suggest that the siRAGE/DA-PEI delivery system can be considered as a promising strategy for treating myocardial infarction. PMID:24917027

  13. Homogentisic acid interference in routine urine creatinine determination.

    PubMed

    Loken, Perry R; Magera, Mark J; Introne, Wendy; Tortorelli, Silvia; Gavrilov, Dimitar; Oglesbee, Devin; Rinaldo, Piero; Matern, Dietrich; Raymond, Kimiyo

    2010-05-01

    We report the artifactual elevation of homogentisic acid (HGA) in urine from alkaptonuric patients after replacing the creatinine method (Jaffe reaction) in our laboratory with an automated enzymatic method. Samples with elevated HGA by GC-MS had lower creatinine values as determined by the enzymatic method than by the Jaffe reaction. The low creatinine values were due to interference by HGA in the enzymatic method. The enzymatic method is unsuitable for creatinine determination in urine of patients with alkaptonuria. PMID:20138792

  14. RNAi revised - target mRNA-dependent enhancement of gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Dornseifer, Simon; Willkomm, Sarah; Far, Rosel Kretschmer-Kazemi; Liebschwager, Janine; Beltsiou, Foteini; Frank, Kirsten; Laufer, Sandra D.; Martinetz, Thomas; Sczakiel, Georg; Claussen, Jens Christian; Restle, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) gave rise to the development of new nucleic acid-based technologies as powerful investigational tools and potential therapeutics. Mechanistic key details of RNAi in humans need to be deciphered yet, before such approaches take root in biomedicine and molecular therapy. We developed and validated an in silico-based model of siRNA-mediated RNAi in human cells in order to link in vitro-derived pre-steady state kinetic data with a quantitative and time-resolved understanding of RNAi on the cellular level. The observation that product release by Argonaute 2 is accelerated in the presence of an excess of target RNA in vitro inspired us to suggest an associative mechanism for the RNA slicer reaction where incoming target mRNAs actively promote dissociation of cleaved mRNA fragments. This novel associative model is compatible with high multiple turnover rates of RNAi-based gene silencing in living cells and accounts for target mRNA concentration-dependent enhancement of the RNAi machinery. PMID:26578554

  15. RNAi revised--target mRNA-dependent enhancement of gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Dornseifer, Simon; Willkomm, Sarah; Far, Rosel Kretschmer-Kazemi; Liebschwager, Janine; Beltsiou, Foteini; Frank, Kirsten; Laufer, Sandra D; Martinetz, Thomas; Sczakiel, Georg; Claussen, Jens Christian; Restle, Tobias

    2015-12-15

    The discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) gave rise to the development of new nucleic acid-based technologies as powerful investigational tools and potential therapeutics. Mechanistic key details of RNAi in humans need to be deciphered yet, before such approaches take root in biomedicine and molecular therapy. We developed and validated an in silico-based model of siRNA-mediated RNAi in human cells in order to link in vitro-derived pre-steady state kinetic data with a quantitative and time-resolved understanding of RNAi on the cellular level. The observation that product release by Argonaute 2 is accelerated in the presence of an excess of target RNA in vitro inspired us to suggest an associative mechanism for the RNA slicer reaction where incoming target mRNAs actively promote dissociation of cleaved mRNA fragments. This novel associative model is compatible with high multiple turnover rates of RNAi-based gene silencing in living cells and accounts for target mRNA concentration-dependent enhancement of the RNAi machinery. PMID:26578554

  16. Nanoparticle-Based Delivery of RNAi Therapeutics: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua; Shum, Ka-To; Burnett, John C.; Rossi, John J.

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionarily conserved, endogenous process for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Although RNAi therapeutics have recently progressed through the pipeline toward clinical trials, the application of these as ideal, clinical therapeutics requires the development of safe and effective delivery systems. Inspired by the immense progress with nanotechnology in drug delivery, efforts have been dedicated to the development of nanoparticle-based RNAi delivery systems. For example, a precisely engineered, multifunctional nanocarrier with combined passive and active targeting capabilities may address the delivery challenges for the widespread use of RNAi as a therapy. Therefore, in this review, we introduce the major hurdles in achieving efficient RNAi delivery and discuss the current advances in applying nanotechnology-based delivery systems to overcome the delivery hurdles of RNAi therapeutics. In particular, some representative examples of nanoparticle-based delivery formulations for targeted RNAi therapeutics are highlighted. PMID:23667320

  17. Interference of N-hydroxysuccinimide with bicinchoninic acid protein assay.

    PubMed

    Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Dixit, Chandra Kumar

    2011-07-29

    We report here substantial interference from N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay. NHS is one of the most commonly used crosslinking agents in bioanalytical sciences, which can lead to serious potential errors in the BCA protein assay based protein estimation if it is present in the protein analyte solution. It was identified to be a reducing substance, which interferes with the BCA protein assay by reducing Cu(2+) in the BCA working reagent. The absorbance peak and absorbance signal of NHS were very similar to those of bovine serum albumin (BSA), thereby indicating a similar BCA reaction mechanism for NHS and protein. However, the combined absorbance of NHS and BSA was not additive. The time-response measurements of the BCA protein assay showed consistent single-phase kinetics for NHS and gradually decreasing kinetics for BSA. The error in protein estimation due to the presence of NHS was counteracted effectively by plotting additional BCA standard curve for BSA with a fixed concentration of NHS. The difference between the absorbance values of BSA and BSA with a fixed NHS concentration provided the absorbance contributed by NHS, which was then subtracted from the total absorbance of analyte sample to determine the actual absorbance of protein in the analyte sample. PMID:21762678

  18. Data Analysis for High-Throughput RNAi Screening.

    PubMed

    Azorsa, David O; Turnidge, Megan A; Arora, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput RNA interference (HT-RNAi) screening is an effective technology to help identify important genes and pathways involved in a biological process. Analysis of high-throughput RNAi screening data is a critical part of this technology, and many analysis methods have been described. Here, we summarize the workflow and types of analyses commonly used in high-throughput RNAi screening. PMID:27581298

  19. The best control for the specificity of RNAi.

    PubMed

    Sarov, Mihail; Stewart, A Francis

    2005-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is revolutionizing functional genomics. However, there are several reasons to be concerned about the specificity and off-target effects of this technique. A recent paper by Kittler et al. describes a straightforward way to validate RNAi specificity, which exploits the increasing availability of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone resources. Genetic rescue of the RNAi phenotype by BAC transgenesis is the best control yet described for specificity, and has further implications for reverse genetics. PMID:15979179

  20. RNAi-assisted genome evolution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for complex phenotype engineering.

    PubMed

    Si, Tong; Luo, Yunzi; Bao, Zehua; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-03-20

    A fundamental challenge in basic and applied biology is to reprogram cells with improved or novel traits on a genomic scale. However, the current ability to reprogram a cell on the genome scale is limited to bacterial cells. Here, we report RNA interference (RNAi)-assisted genome evolution (RAGE) as a generally applicable method for genome-scale engineering in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Through iterative cycles of creating a library of RNAi induced reduction-of-function mutants coupled with high throughput screening or selection, RAGE can continuously improve target trait(s) by accumulating multiplex beneficial genetic modifications in an evolving yeast genome. To validate the RNAi library constructed with yeast genomic DNA and convergent-promoter expression cassette, we demonstrated RNAi screening in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the first time by identifying two known and three novel suppressors of a telomerase-deficient mutation yku70Δ. We then showed the application of RAGE for improved acetic acid tolerance, a key trait for microbial production of chemicals and fuels. Three rounds of iterative RNAi screening led to the identification of three gene knockdown targets that acted synergistically to confer an engineered yeast strain with substantially improved acetic acid tolerance. RAGE should greatly accelerate the design and evolution of organisms with desired traits and provide new insights on genome structure, function, and evolution. PMID:24758359

  1. RNAi2015 - Ten years of RNAi Oxford.

    PubMed

    Bewicke-Copley, Findlay; Samuel, Priya; Carter, David Rf

    2015-01-01

    The tenth RNAi conference was held at St. Hilda's College Oxford on the 24-26 March 2015. The conference offered researchers from all over the world the chance to present, discuss and discover work pertaining to the field of RNAi. RNAi has become an essential technique in genomic research for functional validation as well as an exciting avenue to explore in therapeutic medicine. Emerging techniques such as CRISPR as well as improvements in efficiency of existing techniques and expansions in libraries have cemented the importance of RNAi at the cutting edge of research. Featured presentations and posters showcased recent research in the field ranging from RNA detection in bio fluids through to potential oligonucleotide therapies. PMID:26557153

  2. RNAi mediated, stable resistance to Triticum mosaic virus in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), discovered in 2006, affects wheat production systems in the Great Plains of the United States. There are no available TriMV resistant commercial varieties. RNA interference (RNAi) was evaluated as an alternative strategy to generate resistance to TriMV. An RNAi pANDA...

  3. "Caenorhabditis Elegans" as an Undergraduate Educational Tool for Teaching RNAi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Janet; Krichevsky, Alexander; Leheste, Joerg R.; Moloney, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Discovery of RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) is widely recognized as one of the most significant molecular biology breakthroughs in the past 10 years. There is a need for science educators to develop teaching tools and laboratory activities that demonstrate the power of this new technology and help students to better understand the RNAi process.…

  4. RNAi control of aflatoxins in peanut plants, a multifactorial system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA-interference (RNAi)-mediated control of aflatoxin contamination in peanut plants is a multifactorial and hyper variable system. The use of RNAi biotechnology to silence single genes in plants has inherently high-variability among transgenic events. Also the level of expression of small interfe...

  5. Novel Methods for Mosquito Control using RNAi.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The discovery and development of novel insecticides for vector control is a primary focus of toxicology research conducted at the Mosquito and Fly Research Unit, Gainesville, FL. Targeting critical genes/proteins in mosquitoes using RNA interference (RNAi) is being investigated as a method to devel...

  6. RNA interference (RNAi) mediated stable knockdown of protein casein kinase 2-alpha (CK2α) inhibits migration and invasion and enhances cisplatin-induced apoptosis in HEp-2 laryngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Yang, Bo; Shi, Shengli; Jiang, Xuejun

    2014-07-01

    Laryngeal carcinoma is a common malignant neoplasm occurring in the head and neck, threatening human health. Protein casein kinase 2-alpha (CK2α) has been indicated to participate in the pathogenesis of this cancer; however, the underlying mechanisms still need to be elucidated. In this study, short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) technology was utilized to inhibit the CK2α expression in HEp-2 laryngeal carcinoma cells. Results showed that both mRNA and protein expression levels of endogenous CK2α were markedly decreased in HEp-2 cells transfected with CK2α specific shRNA. Transwell assays revealed that stable knockdown of CK2α significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of HEp-2 cells. As compared with cells treated with negative control shRNA, epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) expression was increased, but snail, slug and vimentin were decreased in cells transfected with CK2α shRNA, indicating that inhibition of CK2α expression may suppress the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process of laryngeal carcinoma in vitro. Moreover, suppression of CK2α was found to enhance the apoptosis induced by cisplatin in laryngeal carcinoma cells, probably through inhibition of permeability glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) and multidrug-resistance protein (MRP1). In conclusion, our study may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for human laryngeal carcinoma by targeting CK2α. PMID:24831064

  7. RNAi-mediated plant protection against aphids.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiu-Dao; Liu, Zong-Cai; Huang, Si-Liang; Chen, Zhi-Qin; Sun, Yong-Wei; Duan, Peng-Fei; Ma, You-Zhi; Xia, Lan-Qin

    2016-06-01

    Aphids (Aphididae) are major agricultural pests that cause significant yield losses of crop plants each year by inflicting damage both through the direct effects of feeding and by vectoring harmful plant viruses. Expression of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) directed against suitable insect target genes in transgenic plants has been shown to give protection against pests through plant-mediated RNA interference (RNAi). Thus, as a potential alternative and effective strategy for insect pest management in agricultural practice, plant-mediated RNAi for aphid control has received close attention in recent years. In this review, the mechanism of RNAi in insects and the so far explored effective RNAi target genes in aphids, their potential applications in the development of transgenic plants for aphid control and the major challenges in this regard are reviewed, and the future prospects of using plant-mediated RNAi for aphid control are discussed. This review is intended to be a helpful insight into the generation of aphid-resistant plants through plant-mediated RNAi strategy. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26888776

  8. Conditional RNAi Using the Lentiviral GLTR System.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffenberger, Elisabeth; Sigl, Reinhard; Geley, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become an essential technology for functional gene analysis. Its success depends on the effective expression of target gene-specific RNAi-inducing small double-stranded interfering RNA molecules (siRNAs). Here, were describe the use of a recently developed lentiviral RNAi system that allows the rapid generation of stable cell lines with inducible RNAi based on conditional expression of double-stranded short hairpin RNA (shRNA). These lentiviral vectors can be generated rapidly using the GATEWAY recombination cloning technology. Conditional cell lines can be established by using either a two-vector system in which the regulator is encoded by a separate vector or by a one-vector system. The available different lentiviral vectors for conditional shRNA expression cassette delivery co-express additional genes that allow (1) the use of fluorescent proteins for color-coded combinatorial RNAi or monitoring RNAi induction (pGLTR-FP), (2) selection of transduced cells (pGLTR-S), and (3) the generation of conditional cell lines using a one-vector system (pGLTR-X). PMID:27317178

  9. Regulation of mammalian transcription and splicing by Nuclear RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Roya; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Corey, David R.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is well known as a mechanism for controlling mammalian mRNA translation in the cytoplasm, but what would be the consequences if it also functions in cell nuclei? Although RNAi has also been found in nuclei of plants, yeast, and other organisms, there has been relatively little progress towards understanding the potential involvement of mammalian RNAi factors in nuclear processes including transcription and splicing. This review summarizes evidence for mammalian RNAi factors in cell nuclei and mechanisms that might contribute to the control of gene expression. When RNAi factors bind small RNAs, they form ribonucleoprotein complexes that can be selective for target sequences within different classes of nuclear RNA substrates. The versatility of nuclear RNAi may supply a previously underappreciated layer of regulation to transcription, splicing, and other nuclear processes. PMID:26612865

  10. RNA Interference in Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Kocan, Katherine M.; Blouin, Edmour; de la Fuente, José

    2011-01-01

    Ticks are obligate hematophagous ectoparasites of wild and domestic animals and humans, and are considered to be second worldwide to mosquitoes as vectors of human diseases1 and the most important vectors affecting cattle industry worldwide2. Ticks are classified in the subclass Acari, order Parasitiformes, suborder Ixodida and are distributed worldwide from Arctic to tropical regions3. Despite efforts to control tick infestations, these ectoparasites remain a serious problem for human and animal health4,5. RNA interference (RNAi)6 is a nucleic acid-based reverse genetic approach that involves disruption of gene expression in order to determine gene function or its effect on a metabolic pathway. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are the effector molecules of the RNAi pathway that is initiated by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and results in a potent sequence-specific degradation of cytoplasmic mRNAs containing the same sequence as the dsRNA trigger7-9. Post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanisms initiated by dsRNA have been discovered in all eukaryotes studied thus far, and RNAi has been rapidly developed in a variety of organisms as a tool for functional genomics studies and other applications10. RNAi has become the most widely used gene-silencing technique in ticks and other organisms where alternative approaches for genetic manipulation are not available or are unreliable5,11. The genetic characterization of ticks has been limited until the recent application of RNAi12,13. In the short time that RNAi has been available, it has proved to be a valuable tool for studying tick gene function, the characterization of the tick-pathogen interface and the screening and characterization of tick protective antigens14. Herein, a method for RNAi through injection of dsRNA into unfed ticks is described. It is likely that the knowledge gained from this experimental approach will contribute markedly to the understanding of basic biological systems and the development of vaccines

  11. In Vivo RNAi Efficacy of Palmitic Acid-Conjugated Dicer-Substrate siRNA in a Subcutaneous Tumor Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takanori; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Seyama, Toshio

    2016-06-01

    Short interfering RNAs are used in RNA interference technology and are powerful tools for target gene silencing in a sequence-specific manner. In this study, we synthesized Dicer-substrate siRNAs consisting of 27-nt double-stranded RNAs conjugated with palmitic acid at the 5'-end of the sense strand and investigated their RNA interference efficacies in vitro and in vivo. The palmitic acid-conjugated 27-nt DsiRNAs (C16-Dsi27RNAs) were prepared by our simple synthesis strategy and achieved a good yield. C16-Dsi27RNAs showed enhanced in vitro RNA interference potency compared with not only non-modified Dsi27RNAs but also cholesterol-conjugated Dsi27RNAs against both an exogenous enhanced green fluorescent protein and the endogenous vascular endothelial growth factor gene in a human scirrhous-type gastric cancer cell line that stably expressed the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (GCIY-eGFP). Additionally, C16-Dsi27RNAs had potent gene silencing activity against both enhanced green fluorescent protein and vascular endothelial growth factor as target genes in a subcutaneous tumor mouse model generated from GCIY-eGFP cells administered by intratumoral injection. These results suggest that the C16-Dsi27RNAs will be useful next-generation RNA interference molecules that can overcome the problems associated with RNA interference technology. PMID:26800111

  12. Technological development of structural DNA/RNA-based RNAi systems and their applications.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eun Hye; Kim, Hyejin; Jang, Bora; Cho, Hyesoo; Ryu, Jaehee; Kim, Boyeon; Park, Youngkuk; Kim, Jieun; Lee, Jong Bum; Lee, Hyukjin

    2016-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene therapy has drawn tremendous attention due to its highly specific gene regulation by selective degradation of any target mRNA. There have been multiple reports regarding the development of various cationic materials for efficient siRNA delivery, however, many studies still suffer from the conventional delivery problems such as suboptimal transfection performance, a lack of tissue specificity, and potential cytotoxicity. Despite the huge therapeutic potential of siRNAs, conventional gene carriers have failed to guarantee successful gene silencing in vivo, thus not warranting clinical trials. The relatively short double-stranded structure of siRNAs has resulted in uncompromising delivery formulations, as well as low transfection efficiency, compared with the conventional nucleic acid drugs such as plasmid DNAs. Recent developments in structural siRNA and RNAi nanotechnology have enabled more refined and reliable in vivo gene silencing with multiple advantages over naked siRNAs. This review focuses on recent progress in the development of structural DNA/RNA-based RNAi systems and their potential therapeutic applications. In addition, an extensive list of prior reports on various RNAi systems is provided and categorized by their distinctive molecular characters. PMID:26494399

  13. The Nuclear Argonaute NRDE-3 Contributes to Transitive RNAi in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jimmy J.; Banse, Stephen A.; Hunter, Craig P.

    2013-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans nuclear RNA interference defective (Nrde) mutants were identified by their inability to silence polycistronic transcripts in enhanced RNAi (Eri) mutant backgrounds. Here, we report additional nrde-3-dependent RNAi phenomena that extend the mechanisms, roles, and functions of nuclear RNAi. We show that nrde-3 mutants are broadly RNAi deficient and that overexpressing NRDE-3 enhances RNAi. Consistent with NRDE-3 being a dose-dependent limiting resource for effective RNAi, we find that NRDE-3 is required for eri-dependent enhanced RNAi phenotypes, although only for a subset of target genes. We then identify pgl-1 as an additional limiting RNAi resource important for eri-dependent silencing of a nonoverlapping subset of target genes, so that an nrde-3; pgl-1; eri-1 triple mutant fails to show enhanced RNAi for any tested gene. These results suggest that nrde-3 and pgl-1 define separate and independent limiting RNAi resource pathways. Limiting RNAi resources are proposed to primarily act via endogenous RNA silencing pathways. Consistent with this, we find that nrde-3 mutants misexpress genes regulated by endogenous siRNAs and incompletely silence repetitive transgene arrays. Finally, we find that nrde-3 contributes to transitive RNAi, whereby amplified silencing triggers act in trans to silence sequence-similar genes. Because nrde-dependent silencing is thought to act in cis to limit the production of primary transcripts, this result reveals an unexpected role for nuclear processes in RNAi silencing. PMID:23457236

  14. The nuclear argonaute NRDE-3 contributes to transitive RNAi in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jimmy J; Banse, Stephen A; Hunter, Craig P

    2013-05-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans nuclear RNA interference defective (Nrde) mutants were identified by their inability to silence polycistronic transcripts in enhanced RNAi (Eri) mutant backgrounds. Here, we report additional nrde-3-dependent RNAi phenomena that extend the mechanisms, roles, and functions of nuclear RNAi. We show that nrde-3 mutants are broadly RNAi deficient and that overexpressing NRDE-3 enhances RNAi. Consistent with NRDE-3 being a dose-dependent limiting resource for effective RNAi, we find that NRDE-3 is required for eri-dependent enhanced RNAi phenotypes, although only for a subset of target genes. We then identify pgl-1 as an additional limiting RNAi resource important for eri-dependent silencing of a nonoverlapping subset of target genes, so that an nrde-3; pgl-1; eri-1 triple mutant fails to show enhanced RNAi for any tested gene. These results suggest that nrde-3 and pgl-1 define separate and independent limiting RNAi resource pathways. Limiting RNAi resources are proposed to primarily act via endogenous RNA silencing pathways. Consistent with this, we find that nrde-3 mutants misexpress genes regulated by endogenous siRNAs and incompletely silence repetitive transgene arrays. Finally, we find that nrde-3 contributes to transitive RNAi, whereby amplified silencing triggers act in trans to silence sequence-similar genes. Because nrde-dependent silencing is thought to act in cis to limit the production of primary transcripts, this result reveals an unexpected role for nuclear processes in RNAi silencing. PMID:23457236

  15. Enhancement of Larval RNAi Efficiency by Over-expressing Argonaute2 in Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiqian; Zeng, Baosheng; Ling, Lin; Xu, Jun; You, Lang; Aslam, Abu F.M.; Tan, Anjiang; Huang, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference has been described as a powerful genetic tool for gene functional analysis and a promising approach for pest management. However, RNAi efficiency varies significantly among insect species due to distinct RNAi machineries. Lepidopteran insects include a large number of pests as well as model insects, such as the silkworm, Bombyx mori. However, only limited success of in vivo RNAi has been reported in lepidoptera, particularly during the larval stages when the worms feed the most and do the most harm to the host plant. Enhancing the efficiency of larval RNAi in lepidoptera is urgently needed to develop RNAi-based pest management strategies. In the present study, we investigate the function of the conserved RNAi core factor, Argonaute2 (Ago2), in mediating B. mori RNAi efficiency. We demonstrate that introducing BmAgo2 dsRNA inhibits the RNAi response in both BmN cells and embryos. Furthermore, we establish several transgenic silkworm lines to assess the roles of BmAgo2 in larval RNAi. Over-expressing BmAgo2 significantly facilitated both dsRNA-mediated larval RNAi when targeting DsRed using dsRNA injection and shRNA-mediated larval RNAi when targeting BmBlos2 using transgenic shRNA expression. Our results show that BmAgo2 is involved in RNAi in B. mori and provides a promising approach for improving larval RNAi efficiency in B. mori and in lepidopteran insects in general. PMID:25561900

  16. Sense-, antisense- and RNAi-4CL1 regulate soluble phenolic acids, cell wall components and growth in transgenic Populus tomentosa Carr.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaoming; Xie, Jin; Zhao, Yanling; Lu, Hai; Liu, Shichang; Qu, Long; Li, Jianmei; Gai, Ying; Jiang, Xiangning

    2013-04-01

    Regulation of lignin biosynthesis affects plant growth and wood properties. Transgenic downregulation of 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL, EC 6.2.1.12) may reduce lignin content in cell walls, which could improve the qualities of pulp in papermaking and increase the efficiency of bioenergy applications. To determine the effects of Ptc4CL1 on lignin biosynthesis and plant growth, Populus tomentosa Carr. was transformed using sense-, antisense-, and RNAi-4CL1 genes. The growth properties, gene expression, enzyme activity, lignin content and composition and content of soluble phenolic acids were investigated in 1-year-old field-grown transgenic poplar trees. Transgenic up- and down-regulation of 4CL1 altered lignin content and composition in transgenic poplars, but there were no negative effects on the growth of transgenic plants. In addition, the severe changes in auxin observed in transgenic lines led to significantly enhanced growth performance. Furthermore, lignin content was tightly correlated with the alteration of 4CL1 enzymatic activity, which was correlated with 4CL1 gene expression. A significant increase in S units in lignin with a slight increase in sinapic acid was observed in 4CL1 down-regulated transgenic poplars. These results suggest that 4CL1 is a traffic control gene in monolignol biosynthesis and confirm that 4CL1 activity has been implicated with sinapoyl activation. Finally, our data demonstrate that there is cross-correlation among 4CL1 gene expression, 4CL1 enzyme activity, soluble phenolic acid, lignin monomer biosynthesis, and lignin content. PMID:23434928

  17. Imaging-guided delivery of RNAi for anticancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junqing; Mi, Peng; Lin, Gan; Wáng, Yì Xiáng J; Liu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-09-01

    The RNA interference (RNAi) technique is a new modality for cancer therapy, and several candidates are being tested clinically. In the development of RNAi-based therapeutics, imaging methods can provide a visible and quantitative way to investigate the therapeutic effect at anatomical, cellular, and molecular level; to noninvasively trace the distribution; to and study the biological processes in preclinical and clinical stages. Their abilities are important not only for therapeutic optimization and evaluation but also for shortening of the time of drug development to market. Typically, imaging-functionalized RNAi therapeutics delivery that combines nanovehicles and imaging techniques to study and improve their biodistribution and accumulation in tumor site has been progressively integrated into anticancer drug discovery and development processes. This review presents an overview of the current status of translating the RNAi cancer therapeutics in the clinic, a brief description of the biological barriers in drug delivery, and the roles of imaging in aspects of administration route, systemic circulation, and cellular barriers for the clinical translation of RNAi cancer therapeutics, and with partial content for discussing the safety concerns. Finally, we focus on imaging-guided delivery of RNAi therapeutics in preclinical development, including the basic principles of different imaging modalities, and their advantages and limitations for biological imaging. With growing number of RNAi therapeutics entering the clinic, various imaging methods will play an important role in facilitating the translation of RNAi cancer therapeutics from bench to bedside. PMID:26805788

  18. RNA therapeutics: RNAi and antisense mechanisms and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Chery, Jessica; Näär, Anders

    2016-01-01

    RNA therapeutics refers to the use of oligonucleotides to target primarily ribonucleic acids (RNA) for therapeutic efforts or in research studies to elucidate functions of genes. Oligonucleotides are distinct from other pharmacological modalities, such as small molecules and antibodies that target mainly proteins, due to their mechanisms of action and chemical properties. Nucleic acids come in two forms: deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) and ribonucleic acids (RNA). Although DNA is more stable, RNA offers more structural variety ranging from messenger RNA (mRNA) that codes for protein to non-coding RNAs, microRNA (miRNA), transfer RNA (tRNA), short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). As our understanding of the wide variety of RNAs deepens, researchers have sought to target RNA since >80% of the genome is estimated to be transcribed. These transcripts include non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs and siRNAs that function in gene regulation by playing key roles in the transfer of genetic information from DNA to protein, the final product of the central dogma in biology1. Currently there are two main approaches used to target RNA: double stranded RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) and antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). Both approaches are currently in clinical trials for targeting of RNAs involved in various diseases, such as cancer and neurodegeneration. In fact, ASOs targeting spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown positive results in clinical trials2. Advantages of ASOs include higher affinity due to the development of chemical modifications that increase affinity, selectivity while decreasing toxicity due to off-target effects. This review will highlight the major therapeutic approaches of RNA medicine currently being applied with a focus on RNAi and ASOs. PMID:27570789

  19. Antiviral RNAi: Translating Science Toward Therapeutic Success

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Viruses continuously evolve to contend with an ever-changing environment that involves transmission between hosts and sometimes species, immune responses, and in some cases therapeutic interventions. Given the high mutation rate of viruses relative to the timescales of host evolution and drug development, novel drug classes that are readily screened and translated to the clinic are needed. RNA interference (RNAi) – a natural mechanism for specific degradation of target RNAs that is conserved from plants to invertebrates and vertebrates – can potentially be harnessed to yield therapies with extensive specificity, ease of design, and broad application. In this review, we discuss basic mechanisms of action and therapeutic applications of RNAi, including design considerations and areas for future development in the field. PMID:21826573

  20. Salicylic acid interferes with clathrin-mediated endocytic protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Du, Yunlong; Tejos, Ricardo; Beck, Martina; Himschoot, Ellie; Li, Hongjiang; Robatzek, Silke; Vanneste, Steffen; Friml, Jirí

    2013-05-01

    Removal of cargos from the cell surface via endocytosis is an efficient mechanism to regulate activities of plasma membrane (PM)-resident proteins, such as receptors or transporters. Salicylic acid (SA) is an important plant hormone that is traditionally associated with pathogen defense. Here, we describe an unanticipated effect of SA on subcellular endocytic cycling of proteins. Both exogenous treatments and endogenously enhanced SA levels repressed endocytosis of different PM proteins. The SA effect on endocytosis did not involve transcription or known components of the SA signaling pathway for transcriptional regulation. SA likely targets an endocytic mechanism that involves the coat protein clathrin, because SA interfered with the clathrin incidence at the PM and clathrin-deficient mutants were less sensitive to the impact of SA on the auxin distribution and root bending during the gravitropic response. By contrast, SA did not affect the ligand-induced endocytosis of the flagellin sensing2 (FLS2) receptor during pathogen responses. Our data suggest that the established SA impact on transcription in plant immunity and the nontranscriptional effect of SA on clathrin-mediated endocytosis are independent mechanisms by which SA regulates distinct aspects of plant physiology. PMID:23613581

  1. Core RNAi Machinery and Sid1, a Component for Systemic RNAi, in the Hemipteran Insect, Aphis glycines

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Raman; Michel, Andy P.

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) offers a novel tool to manage hemipteran pests. For the success of RNAi based pest control in the field, a robust and systemic RNAi response is a prerequisite. We identified and characterized major genes of the RNAi machinery, Dicer2 (Dcr2), Argonaute2 (Ago2), and R2d2 in Aphis glycines, a serious pest of soybean. The A. glycines genome encodes for at least one copy of Dcr2, R2d2 and Ago2. Comparative and molecular evolution analyses (dN/dS) showed that domain regions of encoded proteins are highly conserved, whereas linker (non-domain) regions are diversified. Sequence homology and phylogenetic analyses suggested that the RNAi machinery of A. glycines is more similar to that of Tribolium casteneum as compared to that of Drosophila melanogaster. We also characterized Sid1, a major gene implicated in the systemic response for RNAi-mediated gene knockdown. Through qPCR, Dcr2, R2d2, Ago2, and Sid1 were found to be expressed at similar levels in various tissues, but higher expression of Dcr2, R2d2, and Ago2 was seen in first and second instars. Characterization of RNAi pathway and Sid1 in A. glycines will provide the foundation of future work for controlling one of the most important insect pests of soybean in North America. PMID:23396108

  2. Using RNAi in C. "elegans" to Demonstrate Gene Knockdown Phenotypes in the Undergraduate Biology Lab Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Nicole M.

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful technology used to knock down genes in basic research and medicine. In 2006 RNAi technology using "Caenorhabditis elegans" ("C. elegans") was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine and thus students graduating in the biological sciences should have experience with this technology. However,…

  3. Live Cell Microscopy-Based RNAi Screening in the Moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Miki, Tomohiro; Nakaoka, Yuki; Goshima, Gohta

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful technique enabling the identification of the genes involved in a certain cellular process. Here, we discuss protocols for microscopy-based RNAi screening in protonemal cells of the moss Physcomitrella patens, an emerging model system for plant cell biology. Our method is characterized by the use of conditional (inducible) RNAi vectors, transgenic moss lines in which the RNAi vector is integrated, and time-lapse fluorescent microscopy. This method allows for effective and efficient screening of >100 genes involved in various cellular processes such as mitotic cell division, organelle distribution, or cell growth. PMID:27581297

  4. Gene Silencing in Insect Cells Using RNAi.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsuan-Chen; March, John C; Bentley, William E

    2016-01-01

    A technique is described for synthesizing and transfecting double stranded RNA (dsRNA) for RNA interference (RNAi) in Sf-21 cell culture. Transfection with dsRNA only requires an hour and the cells usually recover within 12 h. Suggestions for designing dsRNA are included in the methods. Furthermore, websites are provided for rapid and effective dsRNA design. Three kits are essential for using the described methods: RNAqueous®-4PCR, Megascript™ T7 kit, and the Superscript™ III kit from Life Technologies, Inc. PMID:26820874

  5. siRNA and RNAi optimization.

    PubMed

    Alagia, Adele; Eritja, Ramon

    2016-05-01

    The discovery and examination of the posttranscriptional gene regulatory mechanism known as RNA interference (RNAi) contributed to the identification of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the comprehension of its enormous potential for clinical purposes. Theoretically, the ability of specific target gene downregulation makes the RNAi pathway an appealing solution for several diseases. Despite numerous hurdles resulting from the inherent properties of siRNA molecule and proper delivery to the target tissue, more than 50 RNA-based drugs are currently under clinical testing. In this work, we analyze the recent literature in the optimization of siRNA molecules. In detail, we focused on describing the most recent advances of siRNA field aimed at optimize siRNA pharmacokinetic properties. Special attention has been given in describing the impact of RNA modifications in the potential off-target effects (OTEs) such as saturation of the RNAi machinery, passenger strand-mediated silencing, immunostimulation, and miRNA-like OTEs as well as to recent developments on the delivery issue. The novel delivery systems and modified siRNA provide significant steps toward the development of reliable siRNA molecules for therapeutic use. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:316-329. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1337 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26840434

  6. RNAi microarray analysis in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Mousses, Spyro; Caplen, Natasha J; Cornelison, Robert; Weaver, Don; Basik, Mark; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Lotufo, Roberto A; Choudary, Ashish; Dougherty, Edward R; Suh, Ed; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2003-10-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) mediated by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is a powerful new tool for analyzing gene knockdown phenotypes in living mammalian cells. To facilitate large-scale, high-throughput functional genomics studies using RNAi, we have developed a microarray-based technology for highly parallel analysis. Specifically, siRNAs in a transfection matrix were first arrayed on glass slides, overlaid with a monolayer of adherent cells, incubated to allow reverse transfection, and assessed for the effects of gene silencing by digital image analysis at a single cell level. Validation experiments with HeLa cells stably expressing GFP showed spatially confined, sequence-specific, time- and dose-dependent inhibition of green fluorescence for those cells growing directly on microspots containing siRNA targeting the GFP sequence. Microarray-based siRNA transfections analyzed with a custom-made quantitative image analysis system produced results that were identical to those from traditional well-based transfection, quantified by flow cytometry. Finally, to integrate experimental details, image analysis, data display, and data archiving, we developed a prototype information management system for high-throughput cell-based analyses. In summary, this RNAi microarray platform, together with ongoing efforts to develop large-scale human siRNA libraries, should facilitate genomic-scale cell-based analyses of gene function. PMID:14525932

  7. Modulation of gene expression by RNAi.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Cezary; Fabunmi, Rosalind; DeMartino, George N

    2005-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a form of posttranscriptional gene silencing in which the presence within the cell of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) leads to the specific degradation of mRNA with a complimentary sequence. RNAi is a natural phenomenon that can be exploited as a powerful tool to study gene function by generating gene "knockdowns" in various cell types. RNAi is mediated by short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which are generated within cells from long dsRNAs. To avoid generalized toxic effects, mammalian cells are transfected directly with 21-23-bp-long siRNAs generated either by chemical synthesis or obtained by a series of enzymatic reactions. The present chapter deals with siRNA design, synthesis, transfection, and readout of efficiency in a mammalian cell culture system. The general principle is illustrated by the functional knockdown of p97/VCP (valosin-containing protein) in HeLa cells using five different siRNA sequences. PMID:16028696

  8. In Vivo RNAi-Based Screens: Studies in Model Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto-Hino, Miki; Goto, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a technique widely used for gene silencing in organisms and cultured cells, and depends on sequence homology between double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and target mRNA molecules. Numerous cell-based genome-wide screens have successfully identified novel genes involved in various biological processes, including signal transduction, cell viability/death, and cell morphology. However, cell-based screens cannot address cellular processes such as development, behavior, and immunity. Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans are two model organisms whose whole bodies and individual body parts have been subjected to RNAi-based genome-wide screening. Moreover, Drosophila RNAi allows the manipulation of gene function in a spatiotemporal manner when it is implemented using the Gal4/UAS system. Using this inducible RNAi technique, various large-scale screens have been performed in Drosophila, demonstrating that the method is straightforward and valuable. However, accumulated results reveal that the results of RNAi-based screens have relatively high levels of error, such as false positives and negatives. Here, we review in vivo RNAi screens in Drosophila and the methods that could be used to remove ambiguity from screening results. PMID:24705267

  9. Inducible RNAi system and its application in novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yi; Tang, Liling

    2016-08-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) was discovered as a cellular defense mechanism more than decade ago. It has been exploited as a powerful tool for genetic manipulation. Characterized with specifically silencing target gene expression, it has great potential application for disease treatment. Currently, there are human clinical trials in progress or planned. Despite the excitement regarding this prominent technology, there are many obstacles and concerns that prevent RNAi from being widely used in the therapeutic field. Among them, the non-spatial and non-temporal control is the most difficult challenge, as well as off-target effects and triggering type I immune responses. Inducible RNAi technology can effectively regulate target genes by inducer-mediated small hairpin RNA expression. Combination with inducible regulation systems this makes RNAi technology more sophisticated and may provide a wider application field. This review discusses approaches of inducible RNAi systems, the potential problem areas and solutions and their therapeutic applications. Given the limitations discussed herein being resolved, we believe that inducible RNAi will be a major therapeutic modality within the next several years. PMID:25697568

  10. Interference of Nitrite with Pyrite under Acidic Conditions: Implications for Studies of Chemolithotrophic Denitrification.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ruiwen; Kappler, Andreas; Peiffer, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Chemolithotrophic denitrification coupled to pyrite oxidation is regarded a key process in the removal of nitrate in aquifers. A common product is nitrite, which is a strong oxidant under acidic conditions. Nitrite may thus interfere with Fe(II) during acidic extraction, a procedure typically used to quantify microbial pyrite oxidation, in overestimating Fe(III) production. We studied the reaction between pyrite (5-125 mM) and nitrite (40-2000 μM) at pH 0, 5.5, and 6.8 in the absence and presence of oxygen. Significant oxidation of pyrite was measured at pH 0 with a yield of 100 μM Fe(III) after 5 mM pyrite was incubated with 2000 μM nitrite for 24 h. Dissolved oxygen increased the rate at pH 0. No oxidation of pyrite was observed at pH 5.5 and 6.8. Our data imply a cyclic model for pyrite oxidation by Fe(III) on the basis of the oxidation of residual Fe(II) by NO and NO2. Interference by nitrite could be avoided if nitrite was removed from the pyrite suspensions through a washing procedure prior to acidic extraction. We conclude that such interferences should be considered in studies on microbially mediated pyrite oxidation with nitrate. PMID:26335043

  11. The highly abundant urinary metabolite urobilin interferes with the bicinchoninic acid assay.

    PubMed

    Sampson, D L; Chng, Y L; Upton, Z; Hurst, C P; Parker, A W; Parker, T J

    2013-11-01

    Estimation of total protein concentration is an essential step in any protein- or peptide-centric analysis pipeline. This study demonstrates that urobilin, a breakdown product of heme and a major constituent of urine, interferes considerably with the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay. This interference is probably due to the propensity of urobilin to reduce cupric ions (Cu(2+)) to cuprous ions (Cu(1+)), thus mimicking the reduction of copper by proteins, which the assay was designed to do. In addition, it is demonstrated that the Bradford assay is more resistant to the influence of urobilin and other small molecules. As such, urobilin has a strong confounding effect on the estimate of total protein concentrations obtained by BCA assay and thus this assay should not be used for urinary protein quantification. It is recommended that the Bradford assay be used instead. PMID:23911526

  12. Environmental RNAi in herbivorous insects

    PubMed Central

    Ivashuta, Sergey; Zhang, Yuanji; Wiggins, B. Elizabeth; Ramaseshadri, Partha; Segers, Gerrit C.; Johnson, Steven; Meyer, Steve E.; Kerstetter, Randy A.; McNulty, Brian C.; Bolognesi, Renata; Heck, Gregory R.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental RNAi (eRNAi) is a sequence-specific regulation of endogenous gene expression in a receptive organism by exogenous double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Although demonstrated under artificial dietary conditions and via transgenic plant presentations in several herbivorous insects, the magnitude and consequence of exogenous dsRNA uptake and the role of eRNAi remains unknown under natural insect living conditions. Our analysis of coleopteran insects sensitive to eRNAi fed on wild-type plants revealed uptake of plant endogenous long dsRNAs, but not small RNAs. Subsequently, the dsRNAs were processed into 21 nt siRNAs by insects and accumulated in high quantities in insect cells. No accumulation of host plant-derived siRNAs was observed in lepidopteran larvae that are recalcitrant to eRNAi. Stability of ingested dsRNA in coleopteran larval gut followed by uptake and transport from the gut to distal tissues appeared to be enabling factors for eRNAi. Although a relatively large number of distinct coleopteran insect-processed plant-derived siRNAs had sequence complementarity to insect transcripts, the vast majority of the siRNAs were present in relatively low abundance, and RNA-seq analysis did not detect a significant effect of plant-derived siRNAs on insect transcriptome. In summary, we observed a broad genome-wide uptake of plant endogenous dsRNA and subsequent processing of ingested dsRNA into 21 nt siRNAs in eRNAi-sensitive insects under natural feeding conditions. In addition to dsRNA stability in gut lumen and uptake, dosage of siRNAs targeting a given insect transcript is likely an important factor in order to achieve measurable eRNAi-based regulation in eRNAi-competent insects that lack an apparent silencing amplification mechanism. PMID:25802407

  13. RNA Viruses and RNAi: Quasispecies Implications for Viral Escape

    PubMed Central

    Presloid, John B.; Novella, Isabel S.

    2015-01-01

    Due to high mutation rates, populations of RNA viruses exist as a collection of closely related mutants known as a quasispecies. A consequence of error-prone replication is the potential for rapid adaptation of RNA viruses when a selective pressure is applied, including host immune systems and antiviral drugs. RNA interference (RNAi) acts to inhibit protein synthesis by targeting specific mRNAs for degradation and this process has been developed to target RNA viruses, exhibiting their potential as a therapeutic against infections. However, viruses containing mutations conferring resistance to RNAi were isolated in nearly all cases, underlining the problems of rapid viral evolution. Thus, while promising, the use of RNAi in treating or preventing viral diseases remains fraught with the typical complications that result from high specificity of the target, as seen in other antiviral regimens. PMID:26102581

  14. RNAi and functional genomics in plant parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Rosso, M N; Jones, J T; Abad, P

    2009-01-01

    Plant nematology is currently undergoing a revolution with the availability of the first genome sequences as well as comprehensive expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries from a range of nematode species. Several strategies are being used to exploit this wealth of information. Comparative genomics is being used to explore the acquisition of novel genes associated with parasitic lifestyles. Functional analyses of nematode genes are moving toward larger scale studies including global transcriptome profiling. RNA interference (RNAi) has been shown to reduce expression of a range of plant parasitic nematode genes and is a powerful tool for functional analysis of nematode genes. RNAi-mediated suppression of genes essential for nematode development, survival, or parasitism is revealing new targets for nematode control. Plant nematology in the genomics era is now facing the challenge to develop RNAi screens adequate for high-throughput functional analyses. PMID:19400649

  15. Differential effects of RNAi treatments on field populations of the western corn rootworm.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia-Ching; Sun, Weilin; Spencer, Joseph L; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Seufferheld, Manfredo J

    2014-03-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) mediated crop protection against insect pests is a technology that is greatly anticipated by the academic and industrial pest control communities. Prior to commercialization, factors influencing the potential for evolution of insect resistance to RNAi should be evaluated. While mutations in genes encoding the RNAi machinery or the sequences targeted for interference may serve as a prominent mechanism of resistance evolution, differential effects of RNAi on target pests may also facilitate such evolution. However, to date, little is known about how variation of field insect populations could influence the effectiveness of RNAi treatments. To approach this question, we evaluated the effects of RNAi treatments on adults of three western corn rootworm (WCR; Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) populations exhibiting different levels of gut cysteine protease activity, tolerance of soybean herbivory, and immune gene expression; two populations were collected from crop rotation-resistant (RR) problem areas and one from a location where RR was not observed (wild type; WT). Our results demonstrated that RNAi targeting DvRS5 (a highly expressed cysteine protease gene) reduced gut cysteine protease activity in all three WCR populations. However, the proportion of the cysteine protease activity that was inhibited varied across populations. When WCR adults were treated with double-stranded RNA of an immune gene att1, different changes in survival among WT and RR populations on soybean diets occurred. Notably, for both genes, the sequences targeted for RNAi were the same across all populations examined. These findings indicate that the effectiveness of RNAi treatments could vary among field populations depending on their physiological and genetic backgrounds and that the consistency of an RNAi trait's effectiveness on phenotypically different populations should be considered or tested prior to wide deployment. Also, genes that are potentially subjected

  16. RNA Interference for Wheat Functional Gene Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA interference (RNAi) refers to a common mechanism of RNA-based post-transcriptional gene silencing in eukaryotic cells. In model plant species such as Arabidopsis and rice, RNAi has been routinely used to characterize gene function and to engineer novel phenotypes. In polyploid species, this appr...

  17. Buffer interference with protein dynamics: a case study on human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Long, Dong; Yang, Daiwen

    2009-02-18

    Selection of suitable buffer types is often a crucial step for generating appropriate protein samples for NMR and x-ray crystallographic studies. Although the possible interaction between MES buffer (2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid) and proteins has been discussed previously, the interaction is usually thought to have no significant effects on the structures of proteins. In this study, we demonstrate the direct, albeit weak, interaction between MES and human liver fatty acid binding protein (hLFABP). Rather than affecting the structure of hLFABP, we found that the dynamics of hLFABP, which were previously proposed to be relevant to its functions, were significantly affected by the binding of hLFABP with MES. Buffer interference with protein dynamics was also demonstrated with Bis-Tris buffer, which is quite different from MES and fatty acids in terms of their molecular structures and properties. This result, to our knowledge, is the first published report on buffer interference with protein dynamics on a microsecond to millisecond timescale and could represent a generic problem in the studies of functionally relevant protein dynamics. Although being a fortuity, our finding of buffer-induced changes in protein dynamics offers a clue to how hLFABP accommodates its ligands. PMID:19217864

  18. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Smialowska, Agata; Djupedal, Ingela; Wang, Jingwen; Kylsten, Per; Swoboda, Peter; Ekwall, Karl

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe.

  19. RNAi technologies in agricultural biotechnology: The Toxicology Forum 40th Annual Summer Meeting.

    PubMed

    Sherman, James H; Munyikwa, Tichafa; Chan, Stephen Y; Petrick, Jay S; Witwer, Kenneth W; Choudhuri, Supratim

    2015-11-01

    During the 40th Annual Meeting of The Toxicology Forum, the current and potential future science, regulations, and politics of agricultural biotechnology were presented and discussed. The meeting session described herein focused on the technology of RNA interference (RNAi) in agriculture. The general process by which RNAi works, currently registered RNAi-based plant traits, example RNAi-based traits in development, potential use of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) as topically applied pesticide active ingredients, research related to the safety of RNAi, biological barriers to ingested dsRNA, recent regulatory RNAi science reviews, and regulatory considerations related to the use of RNAi in agriculture were discussed. Participants generally agreed that the current regulatory framework is robust and appropriate for evaluating the safety of RNAi employed in agricultural biotechnology and were also supportive of the use of RNAi to develop improved crop traits. However, as with any emerging technology, the potential range of future products, potential future regulatory frameworks, and public acceptance of the technology will continue to evolve. As such, continuing dialogue was encouraged to promote education of consumers and science-based regulations. PMID:26361858

  20. RNAi phenotypes are influenced by the genetic background of the injected strain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool to study gene function in organisms that are not amenable to classical forward genetics. Hence, together with the ease of comprehensively identifying genes by new generation sequencing, RNAi is expanding the scope of animal species and questions that can be addressed in terms of gene function. In the case of genetic mutants, the genetic background of the strains used is known to influence the phenotype while this has not been described for RNAi experiments. Results Here we show in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum that RNAi against Tc-importin α1 leads to different phenotypes depending on the injected strain. We rule out off target effects and show that sequence divergence does not account for this difference. By quantitatively comparing phenotypes elicited by RNAi knockdown of four different genes we show that there is no general difference in RNAi sensitivity between these strains. Finally, we show that in case of Tc-importin α1 the difference depends on the maternal genotype. Conclusions These results show that in RNAi experiments strain specific differences have to be considered and that a proper documentation of the injected strain is required. This is especially important for the increasing number of emerging model organisms that are being functionally investigated using RNAi. In addition, our work shows that RNAi is suitable to systematically identify the differences in the gene regulatory networks present in populations of the same species, which will allow novel insights into the evolution of animal diversity. PMID:23324472

  1. Discrimination of dipicolinic acid and its interferents by femtosecond coherent Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu; Dogariu, Arthur; Avitzour, Yoav; Murawski, Robert K.; Pestov, Dmitry; Zhi, Miaochan; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2006-12-01

    Measurements of the beat frequencies between vibrational modes of dipicolinic acid (DPA) and a series of other molecules (interferents) are presented. The results were obtained from femtosecond time-resolved coherent Raman scattering, and the vibrational level spacings were determined from a Fourier transform of the signal versus probe pulse delay. The entire spectrum of the generated signal is recorded in order to demonstrate multimode excitation and to explain the variety of qualitatively different traces that can be obtained for the same molecule. Since the spectral signature of DPA is unique enough to be used for identification purposes, this technique has the potential to detect hazardous bacterial species, such as anthrax spores.

  2. Melamine and Cyanuric Acid do not interfere with Bradford and Ninhydrin assays for protein determination

    PubMed Central

    Field, Anjalie; Field, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    In the fall of 2007 pet food contaminated with melamine and cyanuric acid caused kidney stones in thousands of animals. In the summer of 2008, a more serious outbreak of adulterated dairy food caused the deaths of six infants and sickened about 290,000 children in China. In all cases, melamine was likely added to inflate the apparent protein content of the foods. To determine if we could measure protein without interference from melamine and cyanuric acid we tested these compounds in the Bradford and Ninhydrin assays, two common dye-based assays for protein, as well as by ammonia release, the most common assay used in the food industry. Neither compound was detected in the Ninhydrin and Bradford assays at concentrations of >100 μg/ml. The ammonia assay detected melamine but was inconclusive with respect to cyanuric acid. To develop an accurate test for food that would not detect either chemical as a protein, assays were run on cat food and reconstituted milk powder. The Bradford assay readily measured the protein content of each food, and importantly, the addition of melamine or cyanuric acid to reconstituted milk did not affect the readings. The protein concentrations obtained for reconstituted milk powder were as expected, but those for the cat food were 10 to 30-fold lower, due to its low solubility. We conclude that dye-binding assays can be employed to detect protein in food without interference from melamine and cyanuric acid, thus reducing the incentive to use them as additives. PMID:20228949

  3. Antiviral immunity in Drosophila requires systemic RNAi spread

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Maria-Carla; Tassetto, Michel; van Rij, Ronald P.; Goic, Bertsy; Gausson, Valérie; Berry, Bassam; Jacquier, Caroline; Antoniewski, Christophe; Andino, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular organisms evolved sophisticated defense systems to confer protection against pathogens. An important characteristic of these immune systems is their ability to act both locally at the site of infection and at distal uninfected locations1-4. In insects, such as Drosophila melanogaster, RNA interference (RNAi) mediates antiviral immunity5-7. However, the antiviral RNAi defense in flies is thought to be a local, cell-autonomous process, since flies are considered unable to generate a systemic RNAi response8. Here we show that a recently defined double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) uptake pathway9 is essential for effective antiviral RNAi immunity in adult flies. Mutant flies defective in this dsRNA uptake pathway were hypersensitive to infection with Drosophila C virus (DCV) and Sindbis virus. Mortality in dsRNA-uptake defective flies was accompanied by 100-to 105-fold increases in viral titers and higher levels of viral RNA. Furthermore, inoculating naked dsRNA into flies elicited a sequence specific antiviral immune response that required an intact dsRNA uptake pathway. These findings suggest that spread of dsRNA to uninfected sites is essential for effective antiviral immunity. Strikingly, infection with Sindbis-GFP suppressed expression of host-encoded GFP at a distal site. Thus, similar to protein-based immunity in vertebrates, the antiviral RNAi-response in flies also relies on the systemic spread of a virus-specific immunity signal. PMID:19204732

  4. RNAi pathway participates in chromosome segregation in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chuan; Wang, Xiaolin; Liu, Xu; Cao, Shuhuan; Shan, Ge

    2015-01-01

    The RNAi machinery is a mighty regulator in a myriad of life events. Despite lines of evidence that small RNAs and components of the RNAi pathway may be associated with structure and behavior of mitotic chromosomes in diverse organisms, a direct role of the RNAi pathway in mammalian mitotic chromosome segregation remains elusive. Here we report that Dicer and AGO2, two central components of the mammalian RNAi pathway, participate in the chromosome segregation. Knockdown of Dicer or AGO2 results in a higher incidence of chromosome lagging, and this effect is independent from microRNAs as examined with DGCR8 knockout cells. Further investigation has revealed that α-satellite RNA, a noncoding RNA derived from centromeric repeat region, is managed by AGO2 under the guidance of endogenous small interference RNAs (ASAT siRNAs) generated by Dicer. Furthermore, the slicer activity of AGO2 is essential for the chromosome segregation. Level and distribution of chromosome-associated α-satellite RNA have crucial regulatory effect on the localization of centromeric proteins such as centromere protein C1 (CENPC1). With these results, we also provide a paradigm in which the RNAi pathway participates in vital cellular events through the maintenance of level and distribution of noncoding RNAs in cells.

  5. Novel Drosophila Viruses Encode Host-Specific Suppressors of RNAi

    PubMed Central

    van Mierlo, Joël T.; Overheul, Gijs J.; Obadia, Benjamin; van Cleef, Koen W. R.; Webster, Claire L.; Saleh, Maria-Carla; Obbard, Darren J.; van Rij, Ronald P.

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing conflict between viruses and their hosts can drive the co-evolution between host immune genes and viral suppressors of immunity. It has been suggested that an evolutionary ‘arms race’ may occur between rapidly evolving components of the antiviral RNAi pathway of Drosophila and viral genes that antagonize it. We have recently shown that viral protein 1 (VP1) of Drosophila melanogaster Nora virus (DmelNV) suppresses Argonaute-2 (AGO2)-mediated target RNA cleavage (slicer activity) to antagonize antiviral RNAi. Here we show that viral AGO2 antagonists of divergent Nora-like viruses can have host specific activities. We have identified novel Nora-like viruses in wild-caught populations of D. immigrans (DimmNV) and D. subobscura (DsubNV) that are 36% and 26% divergent from DmelNV at the amino acid level. We show that DimmNV and DsubNV VP1 are unable to suppress RNAi in D. melanogaster S2 cells, whereas DmelNV VP1 potently suppresses RNAi in this host species. Moreover, we show that the RNAi suppressor activity of DimmNV VP1 is restricted to its natural host species, D. immigrans. Specifically, we find that DimmNV VP1 interacts with D. immigrans AGO2, but not with D. melanogaster AGO2, and that it suppresses slicer activity in embryo lysates from D. immigrans, but not in lysates from D. melanogaster. This species-specific interaction is reflected in the ability of DimmNV VP1 to enhance RNA production by a recombinant Sindbis virus in a host-specific manner. Our results emphasize the importance of analyzing viral RNAi suppressor activity in the relevant host species. We suggest that rapid co-evolution between RNA viruses and their hosts may result in host species-specific activities of RNAi suppressor proteins, and therefore that viral RNAi suppressors could be host-specificity factors. PMID:25032815

  6. RNAi effects on actin mRNAs in Homalodisca vitripennis cells

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Cristina; Kamita, Shizuo G; Dequine, Haley; Wuriyanghan, Ha; Lindbo, John A; Falk, Bryce W

    2010-01-01

    The xylem feeding leafhopper Homalodisaca vitripennis (H. vitripennis) is an unusually robust and efficient vector of Xylella fastidiosa, a Gram-negative bacterium which causes several very important plant diseases. Here we investigated RNA interference (RNAi) to target actin, a key component of insect cells and whole bodies, in H. vitripennis cells. RNAi effectors were delivered via lipid based transfection and real-time RT-PCR, RNA hybridization, and microscopic analyses were employed to verify RNAi effects. When actin dsRNAs were used, a 10-fold decrease in the target H. vitripennis actin mRNA level was seen in cells. Altered phenotypic effects also were evident in transfected cells, as were small interfering RNAs, hallmarks of RNAi. The use of H. vitripennis cells and RNAi offers new opportunities to research hemipterans, the most important insect vectors of plant pathogens. PMID:20628496

  7. A Drosophila RNAi library modulates Hippo pathway-dependent tissue growth.

    PubMed

    Vissers, Joseph H A; Manning, Samuel A; Kulkarni, Aishwarya; Harvey, Kieran F

    2016-01-01

    Libraries of transgenic Drosophila melanogaster carrying RNA interference (RNAi) constructs have been used extensively to perform large-scale functional genetic screens in vivo. For example, RNAi screens have facilitated the discovery of multiple components of the Hippo pathway, an evolutionarily conserved growth-regulatory network. Here we investigate an important technical limitation with the widely used VDRC KK RNAi collection. We find that approximately 25% of VDRC KK RNAi lines cause false-positive enhancement of the Hippo pathway, owing to ectopic expression of the Tiptop transcription factor. Of relevance to the broader Drosophila community, ectopic tiptop (tio) expression can also cause organ malformations and mask phenotypes such as organ overgrowth. To enhance the use of the VDRC KK RNAi library, we have generated a D. melanogaster strain that will allow researchers to test, in a single cross, whether their genetic screen of interest will be affected by ectopic tio expression. PMID:26758424

  8. A Drosophila RNAi library modulates Hippo pathway-dependent tissue growth

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, Joseph H.A.; Manning, Samuel A.; Kulkarni, Aishwarya; Harvey, Kieran F.

    2016-01-01

    Libraries of transgenic Drosophila melanogaster carrying RNA interference (RNAi) constructs have been used extensively to perform large-scale functional genetic screens in vivo. For example, RNAi screens have facilitated the discovery of multiple components of the Hippo pathway, an evolutionarily conserved growth-regulatory network. Here we investigate an important technical limitation with the widely used VDRC KK RNAi collection. We find that approximately 25% of VDRC KK RNAi lines cause false-positive enhancement of the Hippo pathway, owing to ectopic expression of the Tiptop transcription factor. Of relevance to the broader Drosophila community, ectopic tiptop (tio) expression can also cause organ malformations and mask phenotypes such as organ overgrowth. To enhance the use of the VDRC KK RNAi library, we have generated a D. melanogaster strain that will allow researchers to test, in a single cross, whether their genetic screen of interest will be affected by ectopic tio expression. PMID:26758424

  9. High-Throughput, Liquid-Based Genome-Wide RNAi Screening in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Linda P; Knoerdel, Ryan R; Silverman, Gary A; Pak, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a process in which double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules mediate the inhibition of gene expression. RNAi in C. elegans can be achieved by simply feeding animals with bacteria expressing dsRNA against the gene of interest. This "feeding" method has made it possible to conduct genome-wide RNAi experiments for the systematic knockdown and subsequent investigation of almost every single gene in the genome. Historically, these genome-scale RNAi screens have been labor and time intensive. However, recent advances in automated, high-throughput methodologies have allowed the development of more rapid and efficient screening protocols. In this report, we describe a fast and efficient, liquid-based method for genome-wide RNAi screening. PMID:27581291

  10. Postharvest Analysis of Lowland Transgenic Tomato Fruits Harboring hpRNAi-ACO1 Construct

    PubMed Central

    Behboodian, Bita; Mohd Ali, Zainon; Ismail, Ismanizan; Zainal, Zamri

    2012-01-01

    The plant hormone, ethylene, is an important regulator which involved in regulating fruit ripening and flower senescence. In this study, RNA interference (RNAi) technology was employed to silence the genes involved in ethylene biosynthetic pathway. This was achieved by blocking the expression of specific gene encoding the ACC oxidase. Initially, cDNA corresponding to ACO1 of lowland tomato cultivar (MT1), which has high identity with ACO1 of Solanum lycopersicum in GenBank, was cloned through RT-PCR. Using a partial coding region of ACO1, one hpRNAi transformation vector was constructed and expressed ectopically under the 35S promoter. Results showed that transgenic lines harboring the hpRNA-ACO1 construct had lower ethylene production and a longer shelf life of 32 days as compared to 10 days for wild-type fruits. Changes in cell wall degrading enzyme activities were also investigated in cases where the transgenic fruits exhibited reduced rates of firmness loss, which can be associated with a decrease in pectin methylesterase (PME) and polygalacturonase (PG) activities. However, no significant change was detected in both transgenic and wild-type fruits in terms of β-galactosidase (β-Gal) activity and levels of total soluble solid, titratable acid and ascorbic acid. PMID:22919320

  11. Inhibiting avian influenza virus shedding using a novel RNAi antiviral vector technology: proof of concept in an avian cell model.

    PubMed

    Linke, Lyndsey M; Wilusz, Jeffrey; Pabilonia, Kristy L; Fruehauf, Johannes; Magnuson, Roberta; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Triantis, Joni; Landolt, Gabriele; Salman, Mo

    2016-03-01

    Influenza A viruses pose significant health and economic threats to humans and animals. Outbreaks of avian influenza virus (AIV) are a liability to the poultry industry and increase the risk for transmission to humans. There are limitations to using the AIV vaccine in poultry, creating barriers to controlling outbreaks and a need for alternative effective control measures. Application of RNA interference (RNAi) techniques hold potential; however, the delivery of RNAi-mediating agents is a well-known obstacle to harnessing its clinical application. We introduce a novel antiviral approach using bacterial vectors that target avian mucosal epithelial cells and deliver (small interfering RNA) siRNAs against two AIV genes, nucleoprotein (NP) and polymerase acidic protein (PA). Using a red fluorescent reporter, we first demonstrated vector delivery and intracellular expression in avian epithelial cells. Subsequently, we demonstrated significant reductions in AIV shedding when applying these anti-AIV vectors prophylactically. These antiviral vectors provided up to a 10,000-fold reduction in viral titers shed, demonstrating in vitro proof-of-concept for using these novel anti-AIV vectors to inhibit AIV shedding. Our results indicate this siRNA vector technology could represent a scalable and clinically applicable antiviral technology for avian and human influenza and a prototype for RNAi-based vectors against other viruses. PMID:26910902

  12. Genome-Wide RNAi Screens in C. elegans to Identify Genes Influencing Lifespan and Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Amit; Rae, Robbie

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference is a rapid, inexpensive, and highly effective tool used to inhibit gene function. In C. elegans, whole genome screens have been used to identify genes involved with numerous traits including aging and innate immunity. RNAi in C. elegans can be carried out via feeding, soaking, or injection. Here we outline protocols used to maintain, grow, and carry out RNAi via feeding in C. elegans and determine whether the inhibited genes are essential for lifespan or innate immunity. PMID:27581293

  13. Online Phenotype Discovery in High-Content RNAi Screens using Gap Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zheng; Zhou, Xiaobo; Bakal, Chris; Li, Fuhai; Sun, Youxian; Perrimon, Norbert; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2007-11-01

    Discovering and identifying novel phenotypes from images inputting online is a major challenge in high-content RNA interference (RNAi) screens. Discovered phenotypes should be visually distinct from existing ones and make biological sense. An online phenotype discovery method featuring adaptive phenotype modeling and iterative cluster merging using gap statistics is proposed. The method works well on discovering new phenotypes adaptively when applied to both of synthetic data sets and RNAi high content screen (HCS) images with ground truth labels.

  14. HIV Develops Indirect Cross-resistance to Combinatorial RNAi Targeting Two Distinct and Spatially Distant Sites

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Priya S; Pham, Nhung P; Schaffer, David V

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to existing HIV therapies is an increasing problem, and alternative treatments are urgently needed. RNA interference (RNAi), an innate mechanism for sequence-specific gene silencing, can be harnessed therapeutically to treat viral infections, yet viral resistance can still emerge. Here, we demonstrate that HIV can develop indirect resistance to individual and combinatorial RNAi-targeting protein-coding regions up to 5,500 nucleotides (nt) downstream of the viral promoter. We identify several variants harboring mutations in the HIV promoter, and not within the RNAi targets, that produce more fully elongated transcripts. Furthermore, these variants are resistant to the RNAi, potentially by stoichiometrically overwhelming this cellular mechanism. Alarmingly, virus resistant to one short hairpin RNA (shRNA) also exhibits cross-resistance to a different shRNA, which targets a distinct and spatially distant region to which the virus has not been previously exposed. To our knowledge, this is the first example of HIV “cross-resistance” to viral inhibitors targeting different loci. Finally, combining anti-HIV RNAi with a small molecule enhancer of RNAi can inhibit the replication of an indirectly resistant mutant. These results suggest that indirect resistance to RNAi is a general mechanism that should be considered when investigating viral resistance and designing combinatorial RNAi therapies. PMID:22294151

  15. Fluorometric quantification of polyphosphate in environmental plankton samples: extraction protocols, matrix effects, and nucleic acid interference.

    PubMed

    Martin, Patrick; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S

    2013-01-01

    Polyphosphate (polyP) is a ubiquitous biochemical with many cellular functions and comprises an important environmental phosphorus pool. However, methodological challenges have hampered routine quantification of polyP in environmental samples. We tested 15 protocols to extract inorganic polyphosphate from natural marine samples and cultured cyanobacteria for fluorometric quantification with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) without prior purification. A combination of brief boiling and digestion with proteinase K was superior to all other protocols, including other enzymatic digestions and neutral or alkaline leaches. However, three successive extractions were required to extract all polyP. Standard addition revealed matrix effects that differed between sample types, causing polyP to be over- or underestimated by up to 50% in the samples tested here. Although previous studies judged that the presence of DNA would not complicate fluorometric quantification of polyP with DAPI, we show that RNA can cause significant interference at the wavelengths used to measure polyP. Importantly, treating samples with DNase and RNase before proteinase K digestion reduced fluorescence by up to 57%. We measured particulate polyP along a North Pacific coastal-to-open ocean transect and show that particulate polyP concentrations increased toward the open ocean. While our final method is optimized for marine particulate matter, different environmental sample types may need to be assessed for matrix effects, extraction efficiency, and nucleic acid interference. PMID:23104409

  16. Identification of Neural Outgrowth Genes using Genome-Wide RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Sepp, Katharine J.; Hong, Pengyu; Lizarraga, Sofia B.; Liu, Judy S.; Mejia, Luis A.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    While genetic screens have identified many genes essential for neurite outgrowth, they have been limited in their ability to identify neural genes that also have earlier critical roles in the gastrula, or neural genes for which maternally contributed RNA compensates for gene mutations in the zygote. To address this, we developed methods to screen the Drosophila genome using RNA-interference (RNAi) on primary neural cells and present the results of the first full-genome RNAi screen in neurons. We used live-cell imaging and quantitative image analysis to characterize the morphological phenotypes of fluorescently labelled primary neurons and glia in response to RNAi-mediated gene knockdown. From the full genome screen, we focused our analysis on 104 evolutionarily conserved genes that when downregulated by RNAi, have morphological defects such as reduced axon extension, excessive branching, loss of fasciculation, and blebbing. To assist in the phenotypic analysis of the large data sets, we generated image analysis algorithms that could assess the statistical significance of the mutant phenotypes. The algorithms were essential for the analysis of the thousands of images generated by the screening process and will become a valuable tool for future genome-wide screens in primary neurons. Our analysis revealed unexpected, essential roles in neurite outgrowth for genes representing a wide range of functional categories including signalling molecules, enzymes, channels, receptors, and cytoskeletal proteins. We also found that genes known to be involved in protein and vesicle trafficking showed similar RNAi phenotypes. We confirmed phenotypes of the protein trafficking genes Sec61alpha and Ran GTPase using Drosophila embryo and mouse embryonic cerebral cortical neurons, respectively. Collectively, our results showed that RNAi phenotypes in primary neural culture can parallel in vivo phenotypes, and the screening technique can be used to identify many new genes that have

  17. Noncoding flavivirus RNA displays RNA interference suppressor activity in insect and Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Schnettler, Esther; Sterken, Mark G; Leung, Jason Y; Metz, Stefan W; Geertsema, Corinne; Goldbach, Rob W; Vlak, Just M; Kohl, Alain; Khromykh, Alexander A; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2012-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV) are highly pathogenic, mosquito-borne flaviviruses (family Flaviviridae) that cause severe disease and death in humans. WNV and DENV actively replicate in mosquitoes and human hosts and thus encounter different host immune responses. RNA interference (RNAi) is the predominant antiviral response against invading RNA viruses in insects and plants. As a countermeasure, plant and insect RNA viruses encode RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins to block the generation/activity of small interfering RNA (siRNA). Enhanced flavivirus replication in mosquitoes depleted for RNAi factors suggests an important biological role for RNAi in restricting virus replication, but it has remained unclear whether or not flaviviruses counteract RNAi via expression of an RSS. First, we established that flaviviral RNA replication suppressed siRNA-induced gene silencing in WNV and DENV replicon-expressing cells. Next, we showed that none of the WNV encoded proteins displayed RSS activity in mammalian and insect cells and in plants by using robust RNAi suppressor assays. In contrast, we found that the 3'-untranslated region-derived RNA molecule known as subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) efficiently suppressed siRNA- and miRNA-induced RNAi pathways in both mammalian and insect cells. We also showed that WNV sfRNA inhibits in vitro cleavage of double-stranded RNA by Dicer. The results of the present study suggest a novel role for sfRNA, i.e., as a nucleic acid-based regulator of RNAi pathways, a strategy that may be conserved among flaviviruses. PMID:23035235

  18. Noncoding Flavivirus RNA Displays RNA Interference Suppressor Activity in Insect and Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schnettler, Esther; Sterken, Mark G.; Leung, Jason Y.; Metz, Stefan W.; Geertsema, Corinne; Goldbach, Rob W.; Vlak, Just M.; Kohl, Alain

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV) are highly pathogenic, mosquito-borne flaviviruses (family Flaviviridae) that cause severe disease and death in humans. WNV and DENV actively replicate in mosquitoes and human hosts and thus encounter different host immune responses. RNA interference (RNAi) is the predominant antiviral response against invading RNA viruses in insects and plants. As a countermeasure, plant and insect RNA viruses encode RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins to block the generation/activity of small interfering RNA (siRNA). Enhanced flavivirus replication in mosquitoes depleted for RNAi factors suggests an important biological role for RNAi in restricting virus replication, but it has remained unclear whether or not flaviviruses counteract RNAi via expression of an RSS. First, we established that flaviviral RNA replication suppressed siRNA-induced gene silencing in WNV and DENV replicon-expressing cells. Next, we showed that none of the WNV encoded proteins displayed RSS activity in mammalian and insect cells and in plants by using robust RNAi suppressor assays. In contrast, we found that the 3′-untranslated region-derived RNA molecule known as subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) efficiently suppressed siRNA- and miRNA-induced RNAi pathways in both mammalian and insect cells. We also showed that WNV sfRNA inhibits in vitro cleavage of double-stranded RNA by Dicer. The results of the present study suggest a novel role for sfRNA, i.e., as a nucleic acid-based regulator of RNAi pathways, a strategy that may be conserved among flaviviruses. PMID:23035235

  19. RNA Interference for Functional Genomics and Improvement of Cotton (Gossypium species)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA interference (RNAi), is a powerful new technology in the discovery of genetic sequence functions, and has become a valuable tool for functional genomics of cotton (Gossypium ssp.). The rapid adoption of RNAi has replaced previous antisense technology. RNAi has aided in the discovery of function ...

  20. Potential and development of inhaled RNAi therapeutics for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Man, Dede K W; Chow, Michael Y T; Casettari, Luca; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Lam, Jenny K W

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by the infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), continues to pose a serious threat to public health, and the situation is worsening with the rapid emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) TB. Current TB regimens require long duration of treatment, and their toxic side effects often lead to poor adherence and low success rates. There is an urgent need for shorter and more effective treatment for TB. In recent years, RNA interference (RNAi) has become a powerful tool for studying gene function by silencing the target genes. The survival of Mtb in host macrophages involves the attenuation of the antimicrobial responses mounted by the host cells. RNAi technology has helped to improve our understanding of how these bacilli interferes with the bactericidal effect and host immunity during TB infection. It has been suggested that the host-directed intervention by modulation of host pathways can be employed as a novel and effective therapy against TB. This therapeutic approach could be achieved by RNAi, which holds enormous potential beyond a laboratory to the clinic. RNAi therapy targeting TB is being investigated for enhancing host antibacterial capacity or improving drug efficacy on drug resistance strains while minimizing the associated adverse effects. One of the key challenges of RNAi therapeutics arises from the delivery of the RNAi molecules into the target cells, and inhalation could serve as a direct administration route for the treatment of pulmonary TB in a non-invasive manner. However, there are still major obstacles that need to be overcome. This review focuses on the RNAi candidates that are currently explored for the treatment of TB and discusses the major barriers of pulmonary RNAi delivery. From this, we hope to stimulate further studies of local RNAi therapeutics for pulmonary TB treatment. PMID:27108702

  1. RNAi-Mediated Inactivation of Autophagy Genes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Nicholas J; Meléndez, Alicia

    2016-02-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a process that results in the sequence-specific silencing of endogenous mRNA through the introduction of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, RNA inactivation can be used at any specific developmental stage or during adulthood to inhibit a given target gene. Investigators can take advantage of the fact that, in C. elegans, RNAi is unusual in that it is systemic, meaning that dsRNA can spread throughout the animal and can affect virtually all tissues except neurons. Here, we describe a protocol for the most common method to achieve RNAi in C. elegans, which is to feed them bacteria that express dsRNA complementary to a specific target gene. This method has various advantages, including the availability of libraries that essentially cover the whole genome, the ability to treat animals at any developmental stage, and that it is relatively cost effective. We also discuss how RNAi specific to autophagy genes has proven to be an excellent method to study the role of these genes in autophagy, as well as other cellular and developmental processes, while also highlighting the caveats that must be applied. PMID:26832686

  2. The interaction of fungi with the environment orchestrated by RNAi.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Escobedo, José Manuel; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Carreras-Villaseñor, Nohemí

    2016-01-01

    The fungal kingdom has been key in the investigation of the biogenesis and function of small RNAs (sRNAs). The discovery of phenomena such as quelling in Neurospora crassa represents pioneering work in the identification of the main elements of the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery. Recent discoveries in the regulatory mechanisms in some yeast and filamentous fungi are helping us reach a deeper understanding of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene-silencing mechanisms involved in genome protection against viral infections, DNA damage and transposon activity. Although most of these mechanisms are reasonably well understood, their role in the physiology, response to the environment and interaction of fungi with other organisms had remained elusive. Nevertheless, studies in fungi such as Mucor circinelloides, Magnaporthe oryzae, Cryptococcus neoformans, Trichoderma atroviride, Botrytis cinerea and others have started to shed light on the relevance of the RNAi pathway. In these fungi gene regulation by RNAi is important for growth, reproduction, control of viral infections and transposon activity, as well as in the development of antibiotic resistance and interactions with their hosts. Moreover, the increasing number of reports of the discovery of microRNA-like RNAs in fungi under different conditions highlights the importance of fungi as models for understanding adaptation to the environment using regulation by sRNAs. The goal of this review is to provide the reader with an up-to-date overview of the importance of RNAi in the interaction of fungi with their environment. PMID:26932186

  3. Control of HCV Replication With iMIRs, a Novel Anti-RNAi Agent

    PubMed Central

    Itami, Saori; Eguchi, Yutaka; Mizutani, Takayuki; Aoki, Eriko; Ohgi, Tadaaki; Kuroda, Masahiko; Ochiya, Takahiro; Kato, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Hiroshi I; Kawada, Norifumi; Murakami, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) serve important roles in regulating various physiological activities through RNA interference (RNAi). miR-122 is an important mediator of RNAi that is known to control hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication and is being investigated in clinical trials as a target for anti-HCV therapy. In this study, we developed novel oligonucleotides containing non-nucleotide residues, termed iMIRs, and tested their abilities to inhibit miR-122 function. We compared the inhibitory effects of iMIRs and locked nucleic acids (LNAs) on HCV replication in OR6 cells, which contained full-length HCV (genotype 1b) and a luciferase reporter gene. We found that RNA-type iMIRs with bulge-type, imperfect complementarity with respect to miR-122 were 10-fold more effective than LNAs in inhibiting HCV replication and functioned in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, iMIR treatment of OR6 cells reduced HCV replication without inducing interferon responses or cellular toxicity. Based on these results, we suggest that iMIRs can inhibit HCV replication more effectively than LNAs and are therefore promising as novel antiviral agents.

  4. RNAi pathways in Mucor: A tale of proteins, small RNAs and functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa M

    2016-05-01

    The existence of an RNA-mediated silencing mechanism in the opportunistic fungal pathogen Mucor circinelloides was first described in the early 2000. Since then, Mucor has reached an outstanding position within the fungal kingdom as a model system to achieve a deeper understanding of regulation of endogenous functions by the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery. M. circinelloides combines diverse components of its RNAi machinery to carry out functions not only limited to the defense against invasive nucleic acids, but also to regulate expression of its own genes by producing different classes of endogenous small RNA molecules (esRNAs). The recent discovery of a novel RNase that participates in a new RNA degradation pathway adds more elements to the gene silencing-mediated regulation. This review focuses on esRNAs in M. circinelloides, the different pathways involved in their biogenesis, and their roles in regulating specific physiological and developmental processes in response to environmental signals, highlighting the complexity of silencing-mediated regulation in fungi. PMID:26593631

  5. RNA Interference in Infectious Tropical Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Young S.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into some cells or organisms results in degradation of its homologous mRNA, a process called RNA interference (RNAi). The dsRNAs are processed into short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that subsequently bind to the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), causing degradation of target mRNAs. Because of this sequence-specific ability to silence target genes, RNAi has been extensively used to study gene functions and has the potential to control disease pathogens or vectors. With this promise of RNAi to control pathogens and vectors, this paper reviews the current status of RNAi in protozoans, animal parasitic helminths and disease-transmitting vectors, such as insects. Many pathogens and vectors cause severe parasitic diseases in tropical regions and it is difficult to control once the host has been invaded. Intracellularly, RNAi can be highly effective in impeding parasitic development and proliferation within the host. To fully realize its potential as a means to control tropical diseases, appropriate delivery methods for RNAi should be developed, and possible off-target effects should be minimized for specific gene suppression. RNAi can also be utilized to reduce vector competence to interfere with disease transmission, as genes critical for pathogenesis of tropical diseases are knockdowned via RNAi. PMID:18344671

  6. The Effectiveness of RNAi in Caenorhabditis elegans Is Maintained during Spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Toko; Mori, Chihiro; Sugimoto, Tomoko; Suzuki, Hiromi; Fukui, Keiji; Yamazaki, Takashi; Higashibata, Akira; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; Higashitani, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Background Overcoming spaceflight-induced (patho)physiologic adaptations is a major challenge preventing long-term deep space exploration. RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a promising therapeutic for combating diseases on Earth; however the efficacy of RNAi in space is currently unknown. Methods Caenorhabditis elegans were prepared in liquid media on Earth using standard techniques and treated acutely with RNAi or a vector control upon arrival in Low Earth Orbit. After culturing during 4 and 8 d spaceflight, experiments were stopped by freezing at −80°C until analysis by mRNA and microRNA array chips, microscopy and Western blot on return to Earth. Ground controls (GC) on Earth were simultaneously grown under identical conditions. Results After 8 d spaceflight, mRNA expression levels of components of the RNAi machinery were not different from that in GC (e.g., Dicer, Argonaute, Piwi; P>0.05). The expression of 228 microRNAs, of the 232 analysed, were also unaffected during 4 and 8 d spaceflight (P>0.05). In spaceflight, RNAi against green fluorescent protein (gfp) reduced chromosomal gfp expression in gonad tissue, which was not different from GC. RNAi against rbx-1 also induced abnormal chromosome segregation in the gonad during spaceflight as on Earth. Finally, culture in RNAi against lysosomal cathepsins prevented degradation of the muscle-specific α-actin protein in both spaceflight and GC conditions. Conclusions Treatment with RNAi works as effectively in the space environment as on Earth within multiple tissues, suggesting RNAi may provide an effective tool for combating spaceflight-induced pathologies aboard future long-duration space missions. Furthermore, this is the first demonstration that RNAi can be utilised to block muscle protein degradation, both on Earth and in space. PMID:21673804

  7. C. elegans rrf-1 mutations maintain RNAi efficiency in the soma in addition to the germline.

    PubMed

    Kumsta, Caroline; Hansen, Malene

    2012-01-01

    Gene inactivation through RNA interference (RNAi) has proven to be a valuable tool for studying gene function in C. elegans. When combined with tissue-specific gene inactivation methods, RNAi has the potential to shed light on the function of a gene in distinct tissues. In this study we characterized C. elegans rrf-1 mutants to determine their ability to process RNAi in various tissues. These mutants have been widely used in RNAi studies to assess the function of genes specifically in the C. elegans germline. Upon closer analysis, we found that two rrf-1 mutants carrying different loss-of-function alleles were capable of processing RNAi targeting several somatically expressed genes. Specifically, we observed that the intestine was able to process RNAi triggers efficiently, whereas cells in the hypodermis showed partial susceptibility to RNAi in rrf-1 mutants. Other somatic tissues in rrf-1 mutants, such as the muscles and the somatic gonad, appeared resistant to RNAi. In addition to these observations, we found that the rrf-1(pk1417) mutation induced the expression of several transgenic arrays, including the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16. Unexpectedly, rrf-1(pk1417) mutants showed increased endogenous expression of the DAF-16 target gene sod-3; however, the lifespan and thermo-tolerance of rrf-1(pk1417) mutants were similar to those of wild-type animals. In sum, these data show that rrf-1 mutants display several phenotypes not previously appreciated, including broader tissue-specific RNAi-processing capabilities, and our results underscore the need for careful characterization of tissue-specific RNAi tools. PMID:22574120

  8. Determination of the role of DDX3 a factor involved in mammalian RNAi pathway using an shRNA-expression library.

    PubMed

    Kasim, Vivi; Wu, Shourong; Taira, Kazunari; Miyagishi, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an endogenous RNA-destruction phenomenon induced by certain double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs). In RNAi, dsRNAs are processed into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) which in turn trigger the cleavage of the target mRNA. Here, using a short hairpin RNA-expression library, we identified a DEAD-box helicase 3, DDX3, as an essential factor involved in RNAi pathway and revealed that DDX3 is colocalized with Ago2, an essential factor in RNAi pathway that cleaves target mRNA. Results of experiments with a dominant negative mutant of DDX3 further confirmed that this factor affects the RNAi activity. Together, DDX3 functions to assure mammalian RNAi pathway. Together, our results indicate that DDX3 is a new key molecule to understand the molecular mechanism underlying RNAi pathway in mammals. PMID:23527197

  9. Antifungal drug resistance evokedvia RNAi-dependent epimutations

    PubMed Central

    Calo, Silvia; Shertz-Wall, Cecelia; Lee, Soo Chan; Bastidas, Robert J.; Nicolás, Francisco E.; Granek, Joshua A.; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Torres-Martinez, Santiago; Ruiz-Vazquez, Rosa M.; Cardenas, Maria E.; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms evolve via mechanisms spanning sexual/parasexual reproduction, mutators, aneuploidy, Hsp90, and even prions. Mechanisms that may seem detrimental can be repurposed to generate diversity. Here we show the human fungal pathogen Mucor circinelloides develops spontaneous resistance to the antifungal drug FK506 (tacrolimus) via two distinct mechanisms. One involves Mendelian mutations that confer stable drug resistance; the other occurs via an epigenetic RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated pathway resulting in unstable drug resistance. The peptidyl-prolyl isomerase FKBP12 interacts with FK506 forming a complex that inhibits the protein phosphatase calcineurin1. Calcineurin inhibition by FK506 blocks M. circinelloides transition to hyphae and enforces yeast growth2. Mutations in the fkbA gene encoding FKBP12 or the calcineurin cnbR or cnaA genes confer FK506 resistance (FK506R) and restore hyphal growth. In parallel, RNAi is spontaneously triggered to silence the FKBP12 fkbA gene, giving rise to drug-resistant epimutants. FK506R epimutants readily reverted to the drug-sensitive wild-type (WT) phenotype when grown without drug. The establishment of these epimutants is accompanied by generation of abundant fkbA small RNA (sRNA) and requires the RNAi pathway as well as other factors that constrain or reverse the epimutant state. Silencing involves generation of a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) trigger intermediate from the fkbA mature mRNA to produce antisense fkbA RNA. This study uncovers a novel epigenetic RNAi-based epimutation mechanism controlling phenotypic plasticity, with possible implications for antimicrobial drug resistance and RNAi-regulatory mechanisms in fungi and other eukaryotes. PMID:25079329

  10. Synthetic heterochromatin bypasses RNAi and centromeric repeats to establish functional centromeres.

    PubMed

    Kagansky, Alexander; Folco, Hernan Diego; Almeida, Ricardo; Pidoux, Alison L; Boukaba, Abdelhalim; Simmer, Femke; Urano, Takeshi; Hamilton, Georgina L; Allshire, Robin C

    2009-06-26

    In the central domain of fission yeast centromeres, the kinetochore is assembled on CENP-A(Cnp1) nucleosomes. Normally, small interfering RNAs generated from flanking outer repeat transcripts direct histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferase Clr4 to homologous loci to form heterochromatin. Outer repeats, RNA interference (RNAi), and centromeric heterochromatin are required to establish CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin. We demonstrated that tethering Clr4 via DNA-binding sites at euchromatic loci induces heterochromatin assembly, with or without active RNAi. This synthetic heterochromatin completely substitutes for outer repeats on plasmid-based minichromosomes, promoting de novo CENP-A(Cnp1) and kinetochore assembly, to allow their mitotic segregation, even with RNAi inactive. Thus, the role of outer repeats in centromere establishment is simply the provision of RNAi substrates to direct heterochromatin formation; H3K9 methylation-dependent heterochromatin is alone sufficient to form functional centromeres. PMID:19556509

  11. Engineered mammalian RNAi can elicit antiviral protection that negates the requirement for the interferon response

    PubMed Central

    Bouhaddou, Mehdi; Sachs, David; tenOever, Benjamin Robert

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY While the intrinsic antiviral cell defenses of many kingdoms utilize pathogen-specific small RNAs, the antiviral response of chordates is primarily protein-based and not uniquely tailored to the incoming microbe. In an effort to explain this evolutionary bifurcation, we determined whether antiviral RNA interference (RNAi) was sufficient to replace the protein-based type I interferon (IFN-I) system of mammals. To this end, we recreated an RNAi-like response in mammals and determined its effectiveness to combat influenza A virus in vivo in the presence and absence of the canonical IFN-I system. Mammalian antiviral RNAi, elicited by either host- or virus-derived small RNAs, effectively attenuated virus and prevented disease independently of the innate immune response. These data find that chordates could have utilized RNAi as their primary antiviral cell defense and suggest that the IFN-I system emerged as a result of natural selection imposed by ancient pathogens. PMID:26549455

  12. Soaking RNAi in Bombyx mori BmN4-SID1 cells arrests cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Mon, Hiroaki; Li, Zhiqing; Kobayashi, Isao; Tomita, Shuichiro; Lee, JaeMan; Sezutsu, Hideki; Tamura, Toshiki; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for sequence-specific gene silencing. Previously, the BmN4-SID1 cell expressing Caenorhabditis ele gans SID-1 was established, in which soaking RNAi could induce effective gene silencing. To establish its utility, 6 cell cycle progression related cDNAs, CDK1, MYC, MYB, RNRS, CDT1, and GEMININ, were isolated from the silkworm, Bombyx mori L. (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae), and their expressions were further silenced by soaking RNAi in the BmN4-SID1 cells. The cell cycle progression analysis using flow cytometer demonstrated that the small amount of double stranded RNA was enough to arrest cell cycle progression at the specific cell phases. These data suggest that RNAi in the BmN4-SID1 cells can be used as a powerful tool for loss-of-function analysis of B. mori genes. PMID:24773378

  13. Branch-PCR Constructed Stable shRNA Transcription Nanoparticles Have Long-Lasting RNAi Effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianbing; Wang, Runyu; Ma, Dejun; Li, Yanyan; Wei, Chao; Xi, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a cellular process for gene silencing. Because of poor serum stability, transferring dsRNA directly into the target cells is a challenge. We report a facile and universal strategy to construct short hairpin RNA (shRNA) transcription nanoparticles with multiple shRNA transcription templates by PCR with flexible branched primers (branch-PCR). Compared with conventional linear shRNA transcription templates, these shRNA transcription nanoparticles show excellent stability against digestion by exonuclease III. Importantly, we found that our highly stable shRNA transcription nanoparticles can also be transcribed and thus induce efficient and long-lasting RNAi with picomolar activity in living mammalian cells. These chemically well-defined branch-PCR-generated stable shRNA transcription nanoparticles might facilitate RNAi delivery with a long-lasting RNAi effects. PMID:26972444

  14. Retention and Loss of RNA Interference Pathways in Trypanosomatid Protozoans

    PubMed Central

    Murta, Silvane M. F.; Vieira, Ana Carolina; Turco, Salvatore J.; Tschudi, Christian; Ullu, Elisabetta; Beverley, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) pathways are widespread in metaozoans but the genes required show variable occurrence or activity in eukaryotic microbes, including many pathogens. While some Leishmania lack RNAi activity and Argonaute or Dicer genes, we show that Leishmania braziliensis and other species within the Leishmania subgenus Viannia elaborate active RNAi machinery. Strong attenuation of expression from a variety of reporter and endogenous genes was seen. As expected, RNAi knockdowns of the sole Argonaute gene implicated this protein in RNAi. The potential for functional genetics was established by testing RNAi knockdown lines lacking the paraflagellar rod, a key component of the parasite flagellum. This sets the stage for the systematic manipulation of gene expression through RNAi in these predominantly diploid asexual organisms, and may also allow selective RNAi-based chemotherapy. Functional evolutionary surveys of RNAi genes established that RNAi activity was lost after the separation of the Leishmania subgenus Viannia from the remaining Leishmania species, a divergence associated with profound changes in the parasite infectious cycle and virulence. The genus Leishmania therefore offers an accessible system for testing hypothesis about forces that may select for the loss of RNAi during evolution, such as invasion by viruses, changes in genome plasticity mediated by transposable elements and gene amplification (including those mediating drug resistance), and/or alterations in parasite virulence. PMID:21060810

  15. Vertically integrated translational studies of PDX1 as a therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer via a novel bifunctional RNAi platform.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Liu, S; Yu, J; Zhou, G; Rao, D; Jay, C M; Kumar, P; Sanchez, R; Templeton, N; Senzer, N; Maples, P; Nemunaitis, J; Brunicardi, F C

    2014-02-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) represents a powerful, new tool for scientific investigation as well as a promising new form of targeted gene therapy, with applications currently in clinical trials. Bifunctional short hairpin RNA (shRNA) are synthetic RNAi molecules, engineered to utilize multiple endogenous RNAi pathways to specifically silence target genes. Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1) is a key regulator of pancreatic development, β-cell differentiation, normal β-cell function and pancreatic cancer. Our aim is to review the process of identifying PDX1 as a specific, potential RNAi target in pancreatic cancer, as well as the underlying mechanisms and various forms of RNAi, with subsequent testing and development of PDX1-targeted bifunctional shRNA therapy. PMID:24457987

  16. RNA interference Pathways in Filamentous Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference is a conserved eukaryotic homology-dependent post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism. The filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa is one of the first organisms used for RNAi studies. Quelling and Meiotic Silencing by Unpaired DNA (MSUD) are two RNAi related phenomena discovered in Neurospora and their characterizations have contributed significantly to our understanding of RNAi mechanisms in eukaryotes. More recently, a type of DNA damage-induced small RNA, microRNA-like small RNAs and Dicer-independent small silencing RNAs have been discovered in Neurospora crassa which can regulate gene expression. In addition, there are at least six different pathways responsible for the production of these small RNAs, indicating that this fungus is an important model system to study small RNA function and biogenesis. The RNAi studies in other filamentous fungi such as Cryphonectria paracitica and Aspergillus provide evidences that RNAi plays an important role in antiviral defense and RNAi mechanism is widely conserved in filamentous fungi, and RNAi has been commonly used as an efficient tool for studying the gene function. The discovery of the endogenous small RNAs from M. circinelloides further indicates the richness and complex of the RNAi field in eukaryotes. PMID:20680389

  17. Transcript analysis of sedentary female reniform nematodes identifies potential targets ofr RNAi-mediated resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA-interference (RNAi) has become an attractive avenue of research in the development of crop resistance to sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes. A prerequisite for this type of research is the availability of high quality gene sequence data for the nematode in question. The reniform nematode (Rot...

  18. RNAi and emerging psyllid genomes - increasing the number of genetic targets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomics has changed the strategies used to manage insects and diseases. The ability to effect a change in proteins and transcripts through RNA-interference (RNAi) has produced a rush towards the development of the most state-of-the-art pest suppression strategy available. To rapidly advance these e...

  19. Chitosan-based nanoparticles for mucosal delivery of RNAi therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Alina; Olesen, Morten Jarlstad; Howard, Kenneth A

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) gene silencing by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) offers a potent and highly specific therapeutic strategy; however, enabling technologies that overcome extracellular and intracellular barriers are required. Polycation-based nanoparticles (termed polyplexes) composed of the polysaccharide chitosan have been used to facilitate delivery of siRNA across mucosal surfaces following local administration. This chapter describes the mucosal barriers that need to be addressed in order to design an effective mucosal delivery strategy and the utilization of the mucoadhesive properties of chitosan. Focus is given to preparation methods and the preclinical application of chitosan nanoparticles for respiratory and oral delivery of siRNA. PMID:25409611

  20. RNAi Trigger Delivery into Anopheles gambiae Pupae

    PubMed Central

    Regna, Kimberly; Harrison, Rachel M.; Heyse, Shannon A.; Chiles, Thomas C.; Michel, Kristin; Muskavitch, Marc A. T.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), a naturally occurring phenomenon in eukaryotic organisms, is an extremely valuable tool that can be utilized in the laboratory for functional genomic studies. The ability to knockdown individual genes selectively via this reverse genetic technique has allowed many researchers to rapidly uncover the biological roles of numerous genes within many organisms, by evaluation of loss-of-function phenotypes. In the major human malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, the predominant method used to reduce the function of targeted genes involves injection of double-stranded (dsRNA) into the hemocoel of the adult mosquito. While this method has been successful, gene knockdown in adults excludes the functional assessment of genes that are expressed and potentially play roles during pre-adult stages, as well as genes that are expressed in limited numbers of cells in adult mosquitoes. We describe a method for the injection of Serine Protease Inhibitor 2 (SRPN2) dsRNA during the early pupal stage and validate SRPN2 protein knockdown by observing decreased target protein levels and the formation of melanotic pseudo-tumors in SRPN2 knockdown adult mosquitoes. This evident phenotype has been described previously for adult stage knockdown of SRPN2 function, and we have recapitulated this adult phenotype by SRPN2 knockdown initiated during pupal development. When used in conjunction with a dye-labeled dsRNA solution, this technique enables easy visualization by simple light microscopy of injection quality and distribution of dsRNA in the hemocoel. PMID:27023367

  1. RNAi-based functional elucidation of PtrPRP, a gene encoding a hybrid proline rich protein, in cold tolerance of Poncirus trifoliata

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ting; Jia, Mao-Mao; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid proline-rich proteins (HyPRPs) have been suggested to play important roles in various plant development and stress response. In this study, we report the cloning and functional analysis of PtrPRP, a HyPRP-encoding gene of Poncirus trifoliata. PtrPRP contains 176 amino acids, among which 21% are proline residues, and has an 8-cysteine motif (8 CM) domain at the C terminal, a signal peptide and a proline-rich region at the N terminal. PtrPRP is constitutively expressed in root, stem and leaf, with the highest expression levels in leaf. It was progressively induced by cold, but transiently upregulated by salt and ABA. Transgenic P. trifoliata plants with knock-down PtrPRP by RNA interference (RNAi) were generated to investigate the role of PtrPRP in cold tolerance. When challenged by low temperature, the PtrPRP-RNAi plants displayed more sensitive performance compared with wild type (WT), as shown by higher electrolyte leakage and malondialdehyde content. In addition, the RNAi lines accumulated more reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lower levels of proline relative to WT. These results suggested that PtrPRP might be positively involved in cold tolerance by maintaining membrane integrity and ROS homeostasis. PMID:26483822

  2. RNAi-based functional elucidation of PtrPRP, a gene encoding a hybrid proline rich protein, in cold tolerance of Poncirus trifoliata.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ting; Jia, Mao-Mao; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid proline-rich proteins (HyPRPs) have been suggested to play important roles in various plant development and stress response. In this study, we report the cloning and functional analysis of PtrPRP, a HyPRP-encoding gene of Poncirus trifoliata. PtrPRP contains 176 amino acids, among which 21% are proline residues, and has an 8-cysteine motif (8 CM) domain at the C terminal, a signal peptide and a proline-rich region at the N terminal. PtrPRP is constitutively expressed in root, stem and leaf, with the highest expression levels in leaf. It was progressively induced by cold, but transiently upregulated by salt and ABA. Transgenic P. trifoliata plants with knock-down PtrPRP by RNA interference (RNAi) were generated to investigate the role of PtrPRP in cold tolerance. When challenged by low temperature, the PtrPRP-RNAi plants displayed more sensitive performance compared with wild type (WT), as shown by higher electrolyte leakage and malondialdehyde content. In addition, the RNAi lines accumulated more reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lower levels of proline relative to WT. These results suggested that PtrPRP might be positively involved in cold tolerance by maintaining membrane integrity and ROS homeostasis. PMID:26483822

  3. RNAi-mediated resistance to viruses in genetically engineered plants.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Abdulrazak B; Aragão, Francisco J L

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a leading technology in designing genetically modified crops engineered to resist viral infection. The last decades have seen the development of a large number of crops whose inherent posttranscriptional gene silencing mechanism has been exploited to target essential viral genes through the production of dsRNA that triggers an endogenous RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), leading to gene silencing in susceptible viruses conferring them with resistance even before the onset of infection. Selection and breeding events have allowed for establishing this highly important agronomic trait in diverse crops. With improved techniques and the availability of new data on genetic diversity among several viruses, significant progress is being made in engineering plants using RNAi with the release of a number of commercially available crops. Biosafety concerns with respect to consumption of RNAi crops, while relevant, have been addressed, given the fact that experimental evidence using miRNAs associated with the crops shows that they do not pose any health risk to humans and animals. PMID:25740357

  4. Affinity approaches in RNAi-based therapeutics purification.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Patrícia; Queiroz, João A; Figueiras, Ana; Sousa, Fani

    2016-05-15

    The recent investigation on RNA interference (RNAi) related mechanisms and applications led to an increased awareness of the importance of RNA in biology. Nowadays, RNAi-based technology has emerged as a potentially powerful tool for silencing gene expression, being exploited to develop new therapeutics for treating a vast number of human disease conditions, as it is expected that this technology can be translated onto clinical applications in a near future. This approach makes use of a large number of small (namely short interfering RNAs, microRNAs and PIWI-interacting RNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), which are likely to have a crucial role as the next generation therapeutics. The commercial and biomedical interest in these RNAi-based therapy applications have fostered the need to develop innovative procedures to easily and efficiently purify RNA, aiming to obtain the final product with high purity degree, good quality and biological activity. Recently, affinity chromatography has been applied to ncRNAs purification, in view of the high specificity. Therefore, this article intends to review the biogenesis pathways of regulatory ncRNAs and also to discuss the most significant and recent developments as well as applications of affinity chromatography in the challenging task of purifying ncRNAs. In addition, the importance of affinity chromatography in ncRNAs purification is addressed and prospects for what is forthcoming are presented. PMID:26830537

  5. Suppression of RNAi by dsRNA-degrading RNaseIII enzymes of viruses in animals and plants.

    PubMed

    Weinheimer, Isabel; Jiu, Yaming; Rajamäki, Minna-Liisa; Matilainen, Olli; Kallijärvi, Jukka; Cuellar, Wilmer J; Lu, Rui; Saarma, Mart; Holmberg, Carina I; Jäntti, Jussi; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2015-03-01

    Certain RNA and DNA viruses that infect plants, insects, fish or poikilothermic animals encode Class 1 RNaseIII endoribonuclease-like proteins. dsRNA-specific endoribonuclease activity of the RNaseIII of rock bream iridovirus infecting fish and Sweet potato chlorotic stunt crinivirus (SPCSV) infecting plants has been shown. Suppression of the host antiviral RNA interference (RNAi) pathway has been documented with the RNaseIII of SPCSV and Heliothis virescens ascovirus infecting insects. Suppression of RNAi by the viral RNaseIIIs in non-host organisms of different kingdoms is not known. Here we expressed PPR3, the RNaseIII of Pike-perch iridovirus, in the non-hosts Nicotiana benthamiana (plant) and Caenorhabditis elegans (nematode) and found that it cleaves double-stranded small interfering RNA (ds-siRNA) molecules that are pivotal in the host RNA interference (RNAi) pathway and thereby suppresses RNAi in non-host tissues. In N. benthamiana, PPR3 enhanced accumulation of Tobacco rattle tobravirus RNA1 replicon lacking the 16K RNAi suppressor. Furthermore, PPR3 suppressed single-stranded RNA (ssRNA)--mediated RNAi and rescued replication of Flock House virus RNA1 replicon lacking the B2 RNAi suppressor in C. elegans. Suppression of RNAi was debilitated with the catalytically compromised mutant PPR3-Ala. However, the RNaseIII (CSR3) produced by SPCSV, which cleaves ds-siRNA and counteracts antiviral RNAi in plants, failed to suppress ssRNA-mediated RNAi in C. elegans. In leaves of N. benthamiana, PPR3 suppressed RNAi induced by ssRNA and dsRNA and reversed silencing; CSR3, however, suppressed only RNAi induced by ssRNA and was unable to reverse silencing. Neither PPR3 nor CSR3 suppressed antisense-mediated RNAi in Drosophila melanogaster. These results show that the RNaseIII enzymes of RNA and DNA viruses suppress RNAi, which requires catalytic activities of RNaseIII. In contrast to other viral silencing suppression proteins, the RNaseIII enzymes are homologous in

  6. Suppression of RNAi by dsRNA-Degrading RNaseIII Enzymes of Viruses in Animals and Plants

    PubMed Central

    Matilainen, Olli; Kallijärvi, Jukka; Cuellar, Wilmer J.; Lu, Rui; Saarma, Mart; Holmberg, Carina I.; Jäntti, Jussi; Valkonen, Jari P. T.

    2015-01-01

    Certain RNA and DNA viruses that infect plants, insects, fish or poikilothermic animals encode Class 1 RNaseIII endoribonuclease-like proteins. dsRNA-specific endoribonuclease activity of the RNaseIII of rock bream iridovirus infecting fish and Sweet potato chlorotic stunt crinivirus (SPCSV) infecting plants has been shown. Suppression of the host antiviral RNA interference (RNAi) pathway has been documented with the RNaseIII of SPCSV and Heliothis virescens ascovirus infecting insects. Suppression of RNAi by the viral RNaseIIIs in non-host organisms of different kingdoms is not known. Here we expressed PPR3, the RNaseIII of Pike-perch iridovirus, in the non-hosts Nicotiana benthamiana (plant) and Caenorhabditis elegans (nematode) and found that it cleaves double-stranded small interfering RNA (ds-siRNA) molecules that are pivotal in the host RNA interference (RNAi) pathway and thereby suppresses RNAi in non-host tissues. In N. benthamiana, PPR3 enhanced accumulation of Tobacco rattle tobravirus RNA1 replicon lacking the 16K RNAi suppressor. Furthermore, PPR3 suppressed single-stranded RNA (ssRNA)—mediated RNAi and rescued replication of Flock House virus RNA1 replicon lacking the B2 RNAi suppressor in C. elegans. Suppression of RNAi was debilitated with the catalytically compromised mutant PPR3-Ala. However, the RNaseIII (CSR3) produced by SPCSV, which cleaves ds-siRNA and counteracts antiviral RNAi in plants, failed to suppress ssRNA-mediated RNAi in C. elegans. In leaves of N. benthamiana, PPR3 suppressed RNAi induced by ssRNA and dsRNA and reversed silencing; CSR3, however, suppressed only RNAi induced by ssRNA and was unable to reverse silencing. Neither PPR3 nor CSR3 suppressed antisense-mediated RNAi in Drosophila melanogaster. These results show that the RNaseIII enzymes of RNA and DNA viruses suppress RNAi, which requires catalytic activities of RNaseIII. In contrast to other viral silencing suppression proteins, the RNaseIII enzymes are homologous in

  7. The status of RNAi-based transgenic research in plant nematology

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Tushar K.; Banakar, Prakash; Rao, Uma

    2015-01-01

    With the understanding of nematode-plant interactions at the molecular level, new avenues for engineering resistance have opened up, with RNA interference being one of them. Induction of RNAi by delivering double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) has been very successful in the model non-parasitic nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, while in plant nematodes, dsRNA delivery has been accomplished by soaking nematodes with dsRNA solution mixed with synthetic neurostimulants. The success of in vitro RNAi of target genes has inspired the use of in planta delivery of dsRNA to feeding nematodes. The most convincing success of host-delivered RNAi has been achieved against root-knot nematodes. Plant-mediated RNAi has been shown to lead to the specific down-regulation of target genes in invading nematodes, which had a profound effect on nematode development. RNAi-based transgenics are advantageous as they do not produce any functional foreign proteins and target organisms in a sequence-specific manner. Although the development of RNAi-based transgenics against plant nematodes is still in the preliminary stage, they offer novel management strategy for the future. PMID:25628609

  8. Morphological Profiles of RNAi-Induced Gene Knockdown Are Highly Reproducible but Dominated by Seed Effects

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shantanu; Wu, Xiaoyun; Ljosa, Vebjorn; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Piccioni, Federica; Root, David E.; Doench, John G.; Boehm, Jesse S.; Carpenter, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference and morphological profiling—the measurement of thousands of phenotypes from individual cells by microscopy and image analysis—are a potentially powerful combination. We show that morphological profiles of RNAi-induced knockdown using the Cell Painting assay are in fact highly sensitive and reproducible. However, we find that the magnitude and prevalence of off-target effects via the RNAi seed-based mechanism make morphological profiles of RNAi reagents targeting the same gene look no more similar than reagents targeting different genes. Pairs of RNAi reagents that share the same seed sequence produce image-based profiles that are much more similar to each other than profiles from pairs designed to target the same gene, a phenomenon previously observed in small-scale gene-expression profiling experiments. Various strategies have been used to enrich on-target versus off-target effects in the context of RNAi screening where a narrow set of phenotypes are measured, mostly based on comparing multiple sequences targeting the same gene; however, new approaches will be needed to make RNAi morphological profiling (that is, comparing multi-dimensional phenotypes) viable. We have shared our raw data and computational pipelines to facilitate research. PMID:26197079

  9. Preclinical evaluation of RNAi as a treatment for transthyretin-mediated amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Butler, James S; Chan, Amy; Costelha, Susete; Fishman, Shannon; Willoughby, Jennifer L S; Borland, Todd D; Milstein, Stuart; Foster, Donald J; Gonçalves, Paula; Chen, Qingmin; Qin, June; Bettencourt, Brian R; Sah, Dinah W; Alvarez, Rene; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Manoharan, Muthiah; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Meyers, Rachel E; Nochur, Saraswathy V; Saraiva, Maria J; Zimmermann, Tracy S

    2016-06-01

    ATTR amyloidosis is a systemic, debilitating and fatal disease caused by transthyretin (TTR) amyloid accumulation. RNA interference (RNAi) is a clinically validated technology that may be a promising approach to the treatment of ATTR amyloidosis. The vast majority of TTR, the soluble precursor of TTR amyloid, is expressed and synthesized in the liver. RNAi technology enables robust hepatic gene silencing, the goal of which would be to reduce systemic levels of TTR and mitigate many of the clinical manifestations of ATTR that arise from hepatic TTR expression. To test this hypothesis, TTR-targeting siRNAs were evaluated in a murine model of hereditary ATTR amyloidosis. RNAi-mediated silencing of hepatic TTR expression inhibited TTR deposition and facilitated regression of existing TTR deposits in pathologically relevant tissues. Further, the extent of deposit regression correlated with the level of RNAi-mediated knockdown. In comparison to the TTR stabilizer, tafamidis, RNAi-mediated TTR knockdown led to greater regression of TTR deposits across a broader range of affected tissues. Together, the data presented herein support the therapeutic hypothesis behind TTR lowering and highlight the potential of RNAi in the treatment of patients afflicted with ATTR amyloidosis. PMID:27033334

  10. Preclinical evaluation of RNAi as a treatment for transthyretin-mediated amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Butler, James S.; Chan, Amy; Costelha, Susete; Fishman, Shannon; Willoughby, Jennifer L. S.; Borland, Todd D.; Milstein, Stuart; Foster, Donald J.; Gonçalves, Paula; Chen, Qingmin; Qin, June; Bettencourt, Brian R.; Sah, Dinah W.; Alvarez, Rene; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G.; Manoharan, Muthiah; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Meyers, Rachel E.; Nochur, Saraswathy V.; Saraiva, Maria J.; Zimmermann, Tracy S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract ATTR amyloidosis is a systemic, debilitating and fatal disease caused by transthyretin (TTR) amyloid accumulation. RNA interference (RNAi) is a clinically validated technology that may be a promising approach to the treatment of ATTR amyloidosis. The vast majority of TTR, the soluble precursor of TTR amyloid, is expressed and synthesized in the liver. RNAi technology enables robust hepatic gene silencing, the goal of which would be to reduce systemic levels of TTR and mitigate many of the clinical manifestations of ATTR that arise from hepatic TTR expression. To test this hypothesis, TTR-targeting siRNAs were evaluated in a murine model of hereditary ATTR amyloidosis. RNAi-mediated silencing of hepatic TTR expression inhibited TTR deposition and facilitated regression of existing TTR deposits in pathologically relevant tissues. Further, the extent of deposit regression correlated with the level of RNAi-mediated knockdown. In comparison to the TTR stabilizer, tafamidis, RNAi-mediated TTR knockdown led to greater regression of TTR deposits across a broader range of affected tissues. Together, the data presented herein support the therapeutic hypothesis behind TTR lowering and highlight the potential of RNAi in the treatment of patients afflicted with ATTR amyloidosis. PMID:27033334

  11. A Multi-RNAi Microsponge Platform for Simultaneous Controlled Delivery of Multiple Small Interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Roh, Young Hoon; Deng, Jason Z; Dreaden, Erik C; Park, Jae Hyon; Yun, Dong Soo; Shopsowitz, Kevin E; Hammond, Paula T

    2016-03-01

    Packaging multiple small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules into nanostructures at precisely defined ratios is a powerful delivery strategy for effective RNA interference (RNAi) therapy. We present a novel RNA nanotechnology based approach to produce multiple components of polymerized siRNA molecules that are simultaneously self-assembled and densely packaged into composite sponge-like porous microstructures (Multi-RNAi-MSs) by rolling circle transcription. The Multi-RNAi-MSs were designed to contain a combination of multiple polymeric siRNA molecules with precisely controlled stoichiometry within a singular microstructure by manipulating the types and ratios of the circular DNA templates. The Multi-RNAi-MSs were converted into nanosized complexes by polyelectrolyte condensation to manipulate their physicochemical properties (size, shape, and surface charge) for favorable delivery, while maintaining the multifunctional properties of the siRNAs for combined therapeutic effects. These Multi-RNAi-MS systems have great potential in RNAi-mediated biomedical applications, for example, for the treatment of cancer, genetic disorders, and viral infections. PMID:26695874

  12. Ups and downs of RNA interference in parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Britton, Collette; Samarasinghe, Buddhini; Knox, David P

    2012-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is widely used in Caenorhabiditis elegans to identify essential gene function. In parasitic nematodes RNAi has been reported to result in transcript knockdown of some target genes, but not others, thus limiting its use as a potential functional genomics tool. We recently extended work in Haemonchus contortus to examine why only some genes seem to be susceptible to RNAi and to test RNAi effects in vivo. Here we review our findings, which suggest that site of gene expression influences silencing. This most likely reflects limited uptake of dsRNA from the environment, a phenomenon also observed in other free-living nematodes. We discuss new technologies to improve dsRNA delivery, such as nanoparticles being developed for therapeutic siRNA delivery, and methods to monitor RNAi effects. Alternative approaches will be important in progressing the application of RNAi to identify essential gene function in parasitic nematodes. PMID:21854774

  13. The Insect Ecdysone Receptor is a Good Potential Target for RNAi-based Pest Control

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rong; Xu, Xinping; Liang, Yongkang; Tian, Honggang; Pan, Zhanqing; Jin, Shouheng; Wang, Na; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has great potential for use in insect pest control. However, some significant challenges must be overcome before RNAi-based pest control can become a reality. One challenge is the proper selection of a good target gene for RNAi. Here, we report that the insect ecdysone receptor (EcR) is a good potential target for RNAi-based pest control in the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens, a serious insect pest of rice plants. We demonstrated that the use of a 360 bp fragment (NlEcR-c) that is common between NlEcR-A and NlEcR-B for feeding RNAi experiments significantly decreased the relative mRNA expression levels of NlEcR compared with those in the dsGFP control. Feeding RNAi also resulted in a significant reduction in the number of offspring per pair of N. lugens. Consequently, a transgenic rice line expressing NlEcR dsRNA was constructed by Agrobacterium- mediated transformation. The results of qRT-PCR showed that the total copy number of the target gene in all transgenic rice lines was 2. Northern blot analysis showed that the small RNA of the hairpin dsNlEcR-c was successfully expressed in the transgenic rice lines. After newly hatched nymphs of N. lugens fed on the transgenic rice lines, effective RNAi was observed. The NlEcR expression levels in all lines examined were decreased significantly compared with the control. In all lines, the survival rate of the nymphs was nearly 90%, and the average number of offspring per pair in the treated groups was significantly less than that observed in the control, with a decrease of 44.18-66.27%. These findings support an RNAi-based pest control strategy and are also important for the management of rice insect pests. PMID:25516715

  14. The insect ecdysone receptor is a good potential target for RNAi-based pest control.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rong; Xu, Xinping; Liang, Yongkang; Tian, Honggang; Pan, Zhanqing; Jin, Shouheng; Wang, Na; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has great potential for use in insect pest control. However, some significant challenges must be overcome before RNAi-based pest control can become a reality. One challenge is the proper selection of a good target gene for RNAi. Here, we report that the insect ecdysone receptor (EcR) is a good potential target for RNAi-based pest control in the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens, a serious insect pest of rice plants. We demonstrated that the use of a 360 bp fragment (NlEcR-c) that is common between NlEcR-A and NlEcR-B for feeding RNAi experiments significantly decreased the relative mRNA expression levels of NlEcR compared with those in the dsGFP control. Feeding RNAi also resulted in a significant reduction in the number of offspring per pair of N. lugens. Consequently, a transgenic rice line expressing NlEcR dsRNA was constructed by Agrobacterium- mediated transformation. The results of qRT-PCR showed that the total copy number of the target gene in all transgenic rice lines was 2. Northern blot analysis showed that the small RNA of the hairpin dsNlEcR-c was successfully expressed in the transgenic rice lines. After newly hatched nymphs of N. lugens fed on the transgenic rice lines, effective RNAi was observed. The NlEcR expression levels in all lines examined were decreased significantly compared with the control. In all lines, the survival rate of the nymphs was nearly 90%, and the average number of offspring per pair in the treated groups was significantly less than that observed in the control, with a decrease of 44.18-66.27%. These findings support an RNAi-based pest control strategy and are also important for the management of rice insect pests. PMID:25516715

  15. RNAi in agriculturally-important arthropods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our aim in this chapter is to provide an overview of the profound knowledge accumulated in recent years from invertebrate RNAi studies, but with a focus on agriculturally important arthropods. We start with a brief discussion of the RNAi mechanism to introduce readers to key concepts that underlie t...

  16. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase by RNAi suppresses cell growth in human melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhou, Fusheng; Du, Wenhui; Dou, Jinfa; Xu, Yu; Gao, Wanwan; Chen, Gang; Zuo, Xianbo; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Xuejun; Yang, Sen

    2016-05-01

    Melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, causes more than 40,000 deaths each year worldwide. And epidermoid carcinoma is another major form of skin cancer, which could be studied together with melanoma in several aspects. Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the glutamine- and ATP-dependent conversion of aspartic acid to asparagine, and its expression is associated with the chemotherapy resistance and prognosis in several human cancers. The present study aims to explore the potential role of ASNS in melanoma cells A375 and human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431. We applied a lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) system to study its function in cell growth of both cells. The results revealed that inhibition of ASNS expression by RNAi significantly suppressed the growth of melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells, and induced a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in melanoma cells. Knockdown of ASNS in A375 cells remarkably downregulated the expression levels of CDK4, CDK6, and Cyclin D1, and upregulated the expression of p21. Therefore, our study provides evidence that ASNS may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:25858017

  17. Amino acids interference on the quantification of reducing sugars by the 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid assay mislead carbohydrase activity measurements.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Ricardo Sposina Sobral; da Silva, Ayla Sant'Ana; Ferreira-Leitão, Viridiana Santana; da Silva Bon, Elba Pinto

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated the interference of the amino acids tryptophan, cysteine, histidine, tyrosine, hydroxyproline, leucine, proline, serine, glycine, valine, glutamic acid, phenylalanine, and methionine on the measurement of reducing sugars using a phenol-free 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) reagent. It was found that in reaction mixtures containing 20mM of either tryptophan, cysteine, histidine, tyrosine, or hydroxyproline the measurement of 3.7 mM glucose was overestimated by 76%, 50%, 35%, 18%, and 10%, respectively. The amino acids valine, glutamic acid, and phenylalanine did not affect the DNS reaction, while methionine decreased the color development by 5%. The measurement of glucose, xylose, arabinose, and cellobiose at the 3.7-12.4 mM range in the presence of 20 mM cysteine resulted in an overestimated concentration of 34.8-50%. Enzymatic assays for measuring xylanolytic and filter paper activity (FPAse) were conducted in the presence of 20-60 mM cysteine, and compared to cysteine-free assays. In the presence of cysteine, the measured xylanase activity increased threefold and the FPAse activity increased twofold due to the overestimation of the reducing sugar concentrations in the assays. The interference from cysteine was reduced to a maximum of 8.6% when a DNS reagent containing phenol was used. PMID:23103512

  18. Measuring acetic and formic acid by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry: sensitivity, humidity dependence, and quantifying interferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baasandorj, M.; Millet, D. B.; Hu, L.; Mitroo, D.; Williams, B. J.

    2014-10-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the factors governing the quantification of formic acid (FA), acetic acid (AA) and their relevant mass analogues by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), assess the underlying fragmentation pathways and humidity dependencies, and present a new method for separating FA and AA from their main isobaric interferences. PTR-MS sensitivities towards glycolaldehyde, ethyl acetate and peroxyacetic acid at m/z 61 are comparable to that for AA; when present, these species will interfere with ambient AA measurements by PTR-MS. Likewise, when it is present, dimethyl ether can interfere with FA measurements. On the other hand, for E/N = 125 Townsend (Td), the PTR-MS sensitivity towards ethanol at m/z 47 is 5-20× lower than for FA; ethanol will then only be an important interference when present in much higher abundance than FA. Sensitivity towards 2-propanol is <1% of that for AA, so that propanols will not in general represent a significant interference for AA. Hydrated product ions of AA, glycoaldehyde, and propanols occur at m/z 79, which is also commonly used to measure benzene. However, the resulting interference for benzene is only significant when E/N is low (<∼100 Td). Addition of water vapor affects the PTR-MS response to a given compound by (i) changing the yield for fragmentation reactions, and (ii) increasing the importance of ligand switching reactions. In the case of AA, sensitivity to the molecular ion increases with humidity at low E/N, but decreases with humidity at high E/N due to water-driven fragmentation. Sensitivity towards FA decreases with humidity throughout the full range of E/N. For glycoaldehyde and the alcohols, the sensitivity increases with humidity due to ligand switching reactions (at low E/N) and reduced fragmentation in the presence of water (at high E/N). Their role as interferences will typically be greatest at high humidity. For compounds such as AA where the humidity effect depends

  19. Measuring acetic and formic acid by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry: sensitivity, humidity dependence, and quantifying interferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baasandorj, M.; Millet, D. B.; Hu, L.; Mitroo, D.; Williams, B. J.

    2015-03-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the factors governing the quantification of formic acid (FA), acetic acid (AA), and their relevant mass analogues by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), assess the underlying fragmentation pathways and humidity dependencies, and present a new method for separating FA and AA from their main isobaric interferences. PTR-MS sensitivities towards glycolaldehyde, ethyl acetate, and peroxyacetic acid at m/z 61 are comparable to that for AA; when present, these species will interfere with ambient AA measurements by PTR-MS. Likewise, when it is present, dimethyl ether can interfere with FA measurements. For a reduced electric field (E/N) of 125 Townsend (Td), the PTR-MS sensitivity towards ethanol at m/z 47 is 5-20 times lower than for FA; ethanol will then only be an important interference when present in much higher abundance than FA. Sensitivity towards 2-propanol is <1% of that for AA, so that propanols will not in general represent a significant interference for AA. Hydrated product ions of AA, glycolaldehyde, and propanols occur at m/z 79, which is also commonly used to measure benzene. However, the resulting interference for benzene is only significant when E/N is low (≲100 Td). Addition of water vapor affects the PTR-MS response to a given compound by (i) changing the yield for fragmentation reactions and (ii) increasing the importance of ligand switching reactions. In the case of AA, sensitivity to the molecular ion increases with humidity at low E/N but decreases with humidity at high E/N due to water-driven fragmentation. Sensitivity towards FA decreases with humidity throughout the full range of E/N. For glycolaldehyde and the alcohols, the sensitivity increases with humidity due to ligand switching reactions (at low E/N) and reduced fragmentation in the presence of water (at high E/N). Their role as interferences will typically be greatest at high humidity. For compounds such as AA where the

  20. Cis-2-dodecenoic acid signal modulates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa through interference with quorum sensing systems and T3SS

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cis-2-dodecenoic acid (BDSF) is well known for its important functions in intraspecies signaling in Burkholderia cenocepacia. Previous work has also established an important role of BDSF in interspecies and inter-kingdom communications. It was identified that BDSF modulates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, how BDSF interferes with virulence of P. aeruginosa is still not clear. Results We report here that BDSF mediates the cross-talk between B. cenocepacia and P. aeruginosa through interference with quorum sensing (QS) systems and type III secretion system (T3SS) of P. aeruginosa. Bioassay results revealed that exogenous addition of BDSF not only reduced the transcriptional expression of the regulator encoding gene of QS systems, i.e., lasR, pqsR, and rhlR, but also simultaneously decreased the production of QS signals including 3-oxo-C12-HSL, Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) and C4-HSL, consequently resulting in the down-regulation of biofilm formation and virulence factor production of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, BDSF and some of its derivatives are also capable of inhibiting T3SS of P. aeruginosa at a micromolar level. Treatment with BDSF obviously reduced the virulence of P. aeruginosa in both HeLa cell and zebrafish infection models. Conclusions These results depict that BDSF modulates virulence of P. aeruginosa through interference with QS systems and T3SS. PMID:24134835

  1. Soraphen A, an inhibitor of acetyl CoA carboxylase activity, interferes with fatty acid elongation

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Donald B.; Torres-Gonzalez, Moises; Olson, L. Karl

    2010-01-01

    Acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC1 & ACC2) generates malonyl CoA, a substrate for de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and an inhibitor of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO). Malonyl CoA is also a substrate for microsomal fatty acid elongation, an important pathway for saturated (SFA), mono- (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthesis. Despite the interest in ACC as a target for obesity and cancer therapy, little attention has been given to the role ACC plays in long chain fatty acid synthesis. This report examines the effect of pharmacological inhibition of ACC on DNL & palmitate (16:0) and linoleate (18:2,n-6) metabolism in HepG2 and LnCap cells. The ACC inhibitor, soraphen A, lowers cellular malonyl CoA, attenuates DNL and the formation of fatty acid elongation products derived from exogenous fatty acids, i.e., 16:0 & 18:2,n-6; IC50 ~ 5 nM. Elevated expression of fatty acid elongases (Elovl5, Elovl6) or desaturases (FADS1, FADS2) failed to override the soraphen A effect on SFA, MUFA or PUFA synthesis. Inhibition of fatty acid elongation leads to the accumulation of 16- and 18-carbon unsaturated fatty acids derived from 16:0 and 18:2,n-6, respectively. Pharmacological inhibition of ACC activity will not only attenuate DNL and induce FAO, but will also attenuate the synthesis of very long chain saturated, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:21184748

  2. A new Houdini act: multiple routes for HIV-1 escape from RNAi-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Berkhout, Ben

    2009-03-01

    Evaluation of: Leonard JN, Shah PS, Burnett JC, Schaffer DV: HIV evades RNA interference directed at TAR by an indirect compensatory mechanism. Cell Host Microbe 4, 484-494 (2008). RNAi can be used to induce the silencing of messenger RNAs in a sequence-specific manner. Several therapeutic RNAi applications are actively being pursued, including the targeting of the RNA genome of human pathogenic viruses such as HIV-1. Viruses are able to escape from RNAi attack by mutation of the targeted sequence. In this report, Leonard and co-workers present evidence of a more indirect viral escape route by selection of up-mutations in the promoter that boosts viral gene expression. This indirect route may serve as a general viral evasion mechanism. PMID:19257841

  3. Biosafety research for non-target organism risk assessment of RNAi-based GE plants

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Andrew F.; Devos, Yann; Lemgo, Godwin N. Y.; Zhou, Xuguo

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference, or RNAi, refers to a set of biological processes that make use of conserved cellular machinery to silence genes. Although there are several variations in the source and mechanism, they are all triggered by double stranded RNA (dsRNA) which is processed by a protein complex into small, single stranded RNA, referred to as small interfering RNAs (siRNA) with complementarity to sequences in genes targeted for silencing. The use of the RNAi mechanism to develop new traits in plants has fueled a discussion about the environmental safety of the technology for these applications, and this was the subject of a symposium session at the 13th ISBGMO in Cape Town, South Africa. This paper continues that discussion by proposing research areas that may be beneficial for future environmental risk assessments of RNAi-based genetically modified plants, with a particular focus on non-target organism assessment. PMID:26594220

  4. Biosafety research for non-target organism risk assessment of RNAi-based GE plants.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Andrew F; Devos, Yann; Lemgo, Godwin N Y; Zhou, Xuguo

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference, or RNAi, refers to a set of biological processes that make use of conserved cellular machinery to silence genes. Although there are several variations in the source and mechanism, they are all triggered by double stranded RNA (dsRNA) which is processed by a protein complex into small, single stranded RNA, referred to as small interfering RNAs (siRNA) with complementarity to sequences in genes targeted for silencing. The use of the RNAi mechanism to develop new traits in plants has fueled a discussion about the environmental safety of the technology for these applications, and this was the subject of a symposium session at the 13th ISBGMO in Cape Town, South Africa. This paper continues that discussion by proposing research areas that may be beneficial for future environmental risk assessments of RNAi-based genetically modified plants, with a particular focus on non-target organism assessment. PMID:26594220

  5. RNA interference: concept to reality in crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Saurabh, Satyajit; Vidyarthi, Ambarish S; Prasad, Dinesh

    2014-03-01

    The phenomenon of RNA interference (RNAi) is involved in sequence-specific gene regulation driven by the introduction of dsRNA resulting in inhibition of translation or transcriptional repression. Since the discovery of RNAi and its regulatory potentials, it has become evident that RNAi has immense potential in opening a new vista for crop improvement. RNAi technology is precise, efficient, stable and better than antisense technology. It has been employed successfully to alter the gene expression in plants for better quality traits. The impact of RNAi to improve the crop plants has proved to be a novel approach in combating the biotic and abiotic stresses and the nutritional improvement in terms of bio-fortification and bio-elimination. It has been employed successfully to bring about modifications of several desired traits in different plants. These modifications include nutritional improvements, reduced content of food allergens and toxic compounds, enhanced defence against biotic and abiotic stresses, alteration in morphology, crafting male sterility, enhanced secondary metabolite synthesis and seedless plant varieties. However, crop plants developed by RNAi strategy may create biosafety risks. So, there is a need for risk assessment of GM crops in order to make RNAi a better tool to develop crops with biosafety measures. This article is an attempt to review the RNAi, its biochemistry, and the achievements attributed to the application of RNAi in crop improvement. PMID:24402564

  6. Feasibility, limitation and possible solutions of RNAi-based technology for insect pest control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Hai-Chao; Miao, Xue-Xia

    2013-02-01

    Numerous studies indicate that target gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) could lead to insect death. This phenomenon has been considered as a potential strategy for insect pest control, and it is termed RNAi-mediated crop protection. However, there are many limitations using RNAi-based technology for pest control, with the effectiveness target gene selection and reliable double-strand RNA (dsRNA) delivery being two of the major challenges. With respect to target gene selection, at present, the use of homologous genes and genome-scale high-throughput screening are the main strategies adopted by researchers. Once the target gene is identified, dsRNA can be delivered by micro-injection or by feeding as a dietary component. However, micro-injection, which is the most common method, can only be used in laboratory experiments. Expression of dsRNAs directed against insect genes in transgenic plants and spraying dsRNA reagents have been shown to induce RNAi effects on target insects. Hence, RNAi-mediated crop protection has been considered as a potential new-generation technology for pest control, or as a complementary method of existing pest control strategies; however, further development to improve the efficacy of protection and range of species affected is necessary. In this review, we have summarized current research on RNAi-based technology for pest insect management. Current progress has proven that RNAi technology has the potential to be a tool for designing a new generation of insect control measures. To accelerate its practical application in crop protection, further study on dsRNA uptake mechanisms based on the knowledge of insect physiology and biochemistry is needed. PMID:23955822

  7. Synthesis and properties of vitamin E analog-conjugated neomycin for delivery of RNAi drugs to liver cells.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Rintaro; Nakayama, Futoshi; Hirochi, Sakie; Sato, Kazuki; Piao, Wenying; Nishina, Kazutaka; Yokota, Takanori; Wada, Takeshi

    2015-02-15

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising tool to regulate gene expression by external double stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) such as siRNAs. As an efficient method to deliver siRNAs to liver cells, we propose a novel strategy using vitamin E (VE)-conjugated neomycin derivatives. With the aim of delivering RNAi-based drugs to liver cells, several tripod-type and prodrug-type neomycin derivatives were synthesized, all of which were thermodynamically stabilized RNA duplexes. The prodrug-type derivative 7 and the tripod-type derivative 10 were delivered to liver cancer cells and successfully induced RNAi activity. These results indicated the potential use of natural aminoglycosides as carriers of RNAi drugs. PMID:25597008

  8. RNAi screens reveal novel metabolic regulators: RIP140, MAP4k4 and the lipid droplet associated fat specific protein (FSP) 27.

    PubMed

    Puri, V; Virbasius, J V; Guilherme, A; Czech, M P

    2008-01-01

    Adipose tissue modulates whole body metabolism and insulin sensitivity by controlling circulating lipid levels and producing molecules that can regulate fatty acid metabolism in such tissues as muscle and liver. We have developed RNA interference (RNAi) screens to identify genes in cultured adipocytes that regulate insulin signalling and key metabolic pathways. These short interfering RNA (siRNA)-based screens identified the transcriptional corepressor receptor interacting protein 140 (RIP140) (J Clin Invest 116: 125, 2006) and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP4k4) (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103: 2087, 2006) as negative regulators of insulin-responsive hexose uptake and oxidative metabolism. Gene expression profiling revealed that RIP140 depletion upregulates the expression of clusters of genes in the pathways of glucose uptake, glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation. RIP140-null mice resist weight gain on a high-fat diet and display enhanced glucose tolerance. MAP4k4 depletion in adipocytes increases many of the RIP140-sensitive genes, increases adipogenesis and mediates some actions of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Remarkably, another hit in our RNAi screens was fat specific protein 27 (FSP27), a highly expressed isoform of Cidea. We discovered that FSP27 unexpectedly associates specifically with lipid droplets and regulates fat storage. We conclude that RIP140, MAP4k4 and the novel lipid droplet protein FSP27 are powerful regulators of adipose tissue metabolism and are potential therapeutic targets for controlling metabolic disease. The discovery of these novel proteins validates the power of RNAi screening for discovery of new therapeutic approaches to type 2 diabetes and obesity. PMID:18171433

  9. Key enzymes and proteins of crop insects as candidate for RNAi based gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Kola, Vijaya Sudhakara Rao; Renuka, P.; Madhav, Maganti Sheshu; Mangrauthia, Satendra K.

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism of homology dependent gene silencing present in plants and animals. It operates through 21–24 nucleotides small RNAs which are processed through a set of core enzymatic machinery that involves Dicer and Argonaute proteins. In recent past, the technology has been well appreciated toward the control of plant pathogens and insects through suppression of key genes/proteins of infecting organisms. The genes encoding key enzymes/proteins with the great potential for developing an effective insect control by RNAi approach are actylcholinesterase, cytochrome P450 enzymes, amino peptidase N, allatostatin, allatotropin, tryptophan oxygenase, arginine kinase, vacuolar ATPase, chitin synthase, glutathione-S-transferase, catalase, trehalose phosphate synthase, vitellogenin, hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and hormone receptor genes. Through various studies, it is demonstrated that RNAi is a reliable molecular tool which offers great promises in meeting the challenges imposed by crop insects with careful selection of key enzymes/proteins. Utilization of RNAi tool to target some of these key proteins of crop insects through various approaches is described here. The major challenges of RNAi based insect control such as identifying potential targets, delivery methods of silencing trigger, off target effects, and complexity of insect biology are very well illustrated. Further, required efforts to address these challenges are also discussed. PMID:25954206

  10. Core RNAi machinery and gene knockdown in the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chaoyang; Alvarez Gonzales, Miguel A; Poland, Therese M; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2015-01-01

    The RNA interference (RNAi) technology has been widely used in insect functional genomics research and provides an alternative approach for insect pest management. To understand whether the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis), an invasive and destructive coleopteran insect pest of ash tree (Fraxinus spp.), possesses a strong RNAi machinery that is capable of degrading target mRNA as a response to exogenous double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) induction, we identified three RNAi pathway core component genes, Dicer-2, Argonaute-2 and R2D2, from the A. planipennis genome sequence. Characterization of these core components revealed that they contain conserved domains essential for the proteins to function in the RNAi pathway. Phylogenetic analyses showed that they are closely related to homologs derived from other coleopteran species. We also delivered the dsRNA fragment of AplaScrB-2, a β-fructofuranosidase-encoding gene horizontally acquired by A. planipennis as we reported previously, into A. planipennis adults through microinjection. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis on the dsRNA-treated beetles demonstrated a significantly decreased gene expression level of AplaScrB-2 appearing on day 2 and lasting until at least day 6. This study is the first record of RNAi applied in A. planipennis. PMID:25541004

  11. Mmi1 RNA surveillance machinery directs RNAi complex RITS to specific meiotic genes in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hiriart, Edwige; Vavasseur, Aurélia; Touat-Todeschini, Leila; Yamashita, Akira; Gilquin, Benoit; Lambert, Emeline; Perot, Jonathan; Shichino, Yuichi; Nazaret, Nicolas; Boyault, Cyril; Lachuer, Joel; Perazza, Daniel; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Verdel, André

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) silences gene expression by acting both at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in a broad range of eukaryotes. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe the RNA-Induced Transcriptional Silencing (RITS) RNAi complex mediates heterochromatin formation at non-coding and repetitive DNA. However, the targeting and role of RITS at other genomic regions, including protein-coding genes, remain unknown. Here we show that RITS localizes to specific meiotic genes and mRNAs. Remarkably, RITS is guided to these meiotic targets by the RNA-binding protein Mmi1 and its associated RNA surveillance machinery that together degrade selective meiotic mRNAs during vegetative growth. Upon sexual differentiation, RITS localization to the meiotic genes and mRNAs is lost. Large-scale identification of Mmi1 RNA targets reveals that RITS subunit Chp1 associates with the vast majority of them. In addition, loss of RNAi affects the effective repression of sexual differentiation mediated by the Mmi1 RNA surveillance machinery. These findings uncover a new mechanism for recruiting RNAi to specific meiotic genes and suggest that RNAi participates in the control of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. PMID:22522705

  12. Two sets of RNAi components are required for heterochromatin formation in trans triggered by truncated transgenes.

    PubMed

    Götz, Ulrike; Marker, Simone; Cheaib, Miriam; Andresen, Karsten; Shrestha, Simon; Durai, Dilip A; Nordström, Karl J; Schulz, Marcel H; Simon, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Across kingdoms, RNA interference (RNAi) has been shown to control gene expression at the transcriptional- or the post-transcriptional level. Here, we describe a mechanism which involves both aspects: truncated transgenes, which fail to produce intact mRNA, induce siRNA accumulation and silencing of homologous loci in trans in the ciliate Paramecium We show that silencing is achieved by co-transcriptional silencing, associated with repressive histone marks at the endogenous gene. This is accompanied by secondary siRNA accumulation, strictly limited to the open reading frame of the remote locus. Our data shows that in this mechanism, heterochromatic marks depend on a variety of RNAi components. These include RDR3 and PTIWI14 as well as a second set of components, which are also involved in post-transcriptional silencing: RDR2, PTIWI13, DCR1 and CID2. Our data indicates differential processing of nascent un-spliced and long, spliced transcripts thus suggesting a hitherto-unrecognized functional interaction between post-transcriptional and co-transcriptional RNAi. Both sets of RNAi components are required for efficient trans-acting RNAi at the chromatin level and our data indicates similar mechanisms contributing to genome wide regulation of gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:27085807

  13. Two sets of RNAi components are required for heterochromatin formation in trans triggered by truncated transgenes

    PubMed Central

    Götz, Ulrike; Marker, Simone; Cheaib, Miriam; Andresen, Karsten; Shrestha, Simon; Durai, Dilip A.; Nordström, Karl J.; Schulz, Marcel H.; Simon, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Across kingdoms, RNA interference (RNAi) has been shown to control gene expression at the transcriptional- or the post-transcriptional level. Here, we describe a mechanism which involves both aspects: truncated transgenes, which fail to produce intact mRNA, induce siRNA accumulation and silencing of homologous loci in trans in the ciliate Paramecium. We show that silencing is achieved by co-transcriptional silencing, associated with repressive histone marks at the endogenous gene. This is accompanied by secondary siRNA accumulation, strictly limited to the open reading frame of the remote locus. Our data shows that in this mechanism, heterochromatic marks depend on a variety of RNAi components. These include RDR3 and PTIWI14 as well as a second set of components, which are also involved in post-transcriptional silencing: RDR2, PTIWI13, DCR1 and CID2. Our data indicates differential processing of nascent un-spliced and long, spliced transcripts thus suggesting a hitherto-unrecognized functional interaction between post-transcriptional and co-transcriptional RNAi. Both sets of RNAi components are required for efficient trans-acting RNAi at the chromatin level and our data indicates similar mechanisms contributing to genome wide regulation of gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:27085807

  14. Recent advances in RNAi-based strategies for therapy and prevention of HIV-1/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Manjunath N; Wu, Haoquan; Shankar, Premlata

    2016-08-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) provides a powerful tool to silence specific gene expression and has been widely used to suppress host factors such as CCR5 and/or viral genes involved in HIV-1 replication. Newer nuclease-based gene-editing technologies, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system, also provide powerful tools to ablate specific genes. Because of differences in co-receptor usage and the high mutability of the HIV-1 genome, a combination of host factors and viral genes needs to be suppressed for effective prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. Whereas the continued presence of small interfering/short hairpin RNA (si/shRNA) mediators is needed for RNAi to be effective, the continued expression of nucleases in the gene-editing systems is undesirable. Thus, RNAi provides the only practical way for expression of multiple silencers in infected and uninfected cells, which is needed for effective prevention/treatment of infection. There have been several advances in the RNAi field in terms of si/shRNA design, targeted delivery to HIV-1 susceptible cells, and testing for efficacy in preclinical humanized mouse models. Here, we comprehensively review the latest advances in RNAi technology towards prevention and treatment of HIV-1. PMID:27013255

  15. Intelligent Interfaces for Mining Large-Scale RNAi-HCS Image Databases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen; Mak, Wayne; Hong, Pengyu; Sepp, Katharine; Perrimon, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Recently, High-content screening (HCS) has been combined with RNA interference (RNAi) to become an essential image-based high-throughput method for studying genes and biological networks through RNAi-induced cellular phenotype analyses. However, a genome-wide RNAi-HCS screen typically generates tens of thousands of images, most of which remain uncategorized due to the inadequacies of existing HCS image analysis tools. Until now, it still requires highly trained scientists to browse a prohibitively large RNAi-HCS image database and produce only a handful of qualitative results regarding cellular morphological phenotypes. For this reason we have developed intelligent interfaces to facilitate the application of the HCS technology in biomedical research. Our new interfaces empower biologists with computational power not only to effectively and efficiently explore large-scale RNAi-HCS image databases, but also to apply their knowledge and experience to interactive mining of cellular phenotypes using Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) with Relevance Feedback (RF) techniques. PMID:21278820

  16. Antiviral RNA Interference against Orsay Virus Is neither Systemic nor Transgenerational in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sarkies, Peter; Le Pen, Jérémie; Tanguy, Mélanie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antiviral RNA-mediated silencing (RNA interference [RNAi]) acts as a powerful innate immunity defense in plants, invertebrates, and mammals. In Caenorhabditis elegans, RNAi is systemic; i.e., RNAi silencing signals can move between cells and tissues. Furthermore, RNAi effects can be inherited transgenerationally and may last for many generations. Neither the biological relevance of systemic RNAi nor transgenerational RNAi is currently understood. Here we examined the role of both pathways in the protection of C. elegans from viral infection. We studied the Orsay virus, a positive-strand RNA virus related to Nodaviridae and the first and only virus known to infect C. elegans. Immunity to Orsay virus infection requires the RNAi pathway. Surprisingly, we found that genes required for systemic or transgenerational RNAi did not have a role in antiviral defense. Furthermore, we found that Orsay virus infection did not elicit a systemic RNAi response even when a target for RNAi was provided by using transgenes. Finally, we show that viral siRNAs, the effectors of RNAi, are not inherited to a level that provides any significant resistance to viral infection in the next generation. We conclude that systemic or transgenerational RNAi does not play a role in the defense against natural Orsay virus infection. Furthermore, our data suggest that there is a qualitative difference between experimental RNAi and antiviral RNAi. Our data are consistent with a model of systemic and transgenerational RNAi that requires a nuclear or germ line component that is lacking in almost all RNA virus infections. IMPORTANCE Since its discovery in Caenorhabditis elegans, RNAi has proven a valuable scientific tool in many organisms. In C. elegans, exogenous RNAi spreads throughout the organism and can be passed between generations; however, there has been controversy as to the endogenous role(s) that the RNAi pathway plays. One endogenous role for which spreading both within the infected

  17. Absence of transitive and systemic pathways allows cell-specific and isoform-specific RNAi in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    ROIGNANT, JEAN-YVES; CARRÉ, CLÉMENT; MUGAT, BRUNO; SZYMCZAK, DIMITRI; LEPESANT, JEAN-ANTOINE; ANTONIEWSKI, CHRISTOPHE

    2003-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) designates the multistep process by which double-stranded RNA induces the silencing of homologous endogenous genes. Some aspects of RNAi appear to be conserved throughout evolution, including the processing of trigger dsRNAs into small 21–23-bp siRNAs and their use to guide the degradation of complementary mRNAs. Two remarkable features of RNAi were uncovered in plants and Caenorhabditid elegans. First, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activities allow the synthesis of siRNA complementary to sequences upstream of or downstream from the initial trigger region in the target mRNA, leading to a transitive RNAi with sequences that had not been initially targeted. Secondly, systemic RNAi may cause the targeting of gene silencing in one tissue to spread to other tissues. Using transgenes expressing dsRNA, we investigated whether transitive and systemic RNAi occur in Drosophila. DsRNA-producing transgenes targeted RNAi to specific regions of alternative mRNA species of one gene without transitive effect directed to sequences downstream from or upstream of the initial trigger region. Moreover, specific expression of a dsRNA, using either cell-specific GAL4 drivers or random clonal activation of a GAL4 driver, mediated a cell-autonomous RNAi. Together, our results provide evidence that transitive and systemic aspects of RNAi are not conserved in Drosophila and demonstrate that dsRNA-producing transgenes allow powerful reverse genetic approaches to be conducted in this model organism, by knocking down gene functions at the resolution of a single-cell type and of a single isoform. PMID:12592004

  18. Non-spectral interferences due to the presence of sulfuric acid in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Poyo, M. Carmen; Grindlay, Guillermo; Gras, Luis; de Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T. C.; Mora, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Results of a systematic study concerning non-spectral interferences from sulfuric acid containing matrices on a large number of elements in inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are presented in this work. The signals obtained with sulfuric acid solutions of different concentrations (up to 5% w w- 1) have been compared with the corresponding signals for a 1% w w- 1- nitric acid solution at different experimental conditions (i.e., sample uptake rates, nebulizer gas flows and r.f. powers). The signals observed for 128Te+, 78Se+ and 75As+ were significantly higher when using sulfuric acid matrices (up to 2.2-fold for 128Te+ and 78Se+ and 1.8-fold for 75As+ in the presence of 5 w w-1 sulfuric acid) for the whole range of experimental conditions tested. This is in agreement with previously reported observations. The signal for 31P+ is also higher (1.1-fold) in the presence of sulfuric acid. The signal enhancements for 128Te+, 78Se+, 75As+ and 31P+ are explained in relation to an increase in the analyte ion population as a result of charge transfer reactions involving S+ species in the plasma. Theoretical data suggest that Os, Sb, Pt, Ir, Zn and Hg could also be involved in sulfur-based charge transfer reactions, but no experimental evidence has been found. The presence of sulfuric acid gives rise to lower ion signals (about 10-20% lower) for the other nuclides tested, thus indicating the negative matrix effect caused by changes in the amount of analyte loading of the plasma. The elemental composition of a certified low-density polyethylene sample (ERM-EC681K) was determined by ICP-MS after two different sample digestion procedures, one of them including sulfuric acid. Element concentrations were in agreement with the certified values, irrespective of the acids used for the digestion. These results demonstrate that the use of matrix-matched standards allows the accurate determination of the tested elements in a sulfuric acid matrix.

  19. An elastic liposomal formulation for RNAi-based topical treatment of skin disorders: Proof-of-concept in the treatment of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Desmet, Eline; Bracke, Stefanie; Forier, Katrien; Taevernier, Lien; Stuart, Marc C A; De Spiegeleer, Bart; Raemdonck, Koen; Van Gele, Mireille; Lambert, Jo

    2016-03-16

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a rapidly emerging approach for targeted gene silencing to alleviate disease pathology. However, lack of efficient carriers for targeted delivery delays the clinical translation of RNAi. An interesting target for local RNAi therapeutics is the skin as it allows direct access to target cells. Still, applications are limited due to the effective skin barrier which hinders penetration. Herein, a description is given of a liposomal carrier, called 'DDC642', capable of delivering RNAi molecules to the epidermis of impaired and intact human skin, without targeting the dermis or circulatory system. In a psoriasis tissue model, down-regulation of the psoriasis marker human beta-defensin 2 by DDC642-delivered siRNA was confirmed, providing proof-of-concept. These liposomes thus hold great potential as topical delivery system for RNAi therapeutics in the treatment of numerous skin diseases. PMID:26806466

  20. The protein kinase TOUSLED facilitates RNAi in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Mohammad Nazim; Dunoyer, Patrice; Schott, Gregory; Akhter, Salina; Shi, Chunlin; Lucas, William J.; Voinnet, Olivier; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2014-01-01

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism triggered by double-stranded RNA that is processed into 21- to 24-nt small interfering (si)RNA or micro (mi)RNA by RNaseIII-like enzymes called Dicers. Gene regulations by RNA silencing have fundamental implications in a large number of biological processes that include antiviral defense, maintenance of genome integrity and the orchestration of cell fates. Although most generic or core components of the various plant small RNA pathways have been likely identified over the past 15 years, factors involved in RNAi regulation through post-translational modifications are just starting to emerge, mostly through forward genetic studies. A genetic screen designed to identify factors required for RNAi in Arabidopsis identified the serine/threonine protein kinase, TOUSLED (TSL). Mutations in TSL affect exogenous and virus-derived siRNA activity in a manner dependent upon its kinase activity. By contrast, despite their pleiotropic developmental phenotype, tsl mutants show no defect in biogenesis or activity of miRNA or endogenous trans-acting siRNA. These data suggest a possible role for TSL phosphorylation in the specific regulation of exogenous and antiviral RNA silencing in Arabidopsis and identify TSL as an intrinsic regulator of RNA interference. PMID:24920830

  1. RNAi and Antiviral Defense in the Honey Bee

    PubMed Central

    Brutscher, Laura M.; Flenniken, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees play an important agricultural and ecological role as pollinators of numerous agricultural crops and other plant species. Therefore, investigating the factors associated with high annual losses of honey bee colonies in the US is an important and active area of research. Pathogen incidence and abundance correlate with Colony Collapse Disorder- (CCD-) affected colonies in the US and colony losses in the US and in some European countries. Honey bees are readily infected by single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses. Largely dependent on the host immune response, virus infections can either remain asymptomatic or result in deformities, paralysis, or death of adults or larvae. RNA interference (RNAi) is an important antiviral defense mechanism in insects, including honey bees. Herein, we review the role of RNAi in honey bee antiviral defense and highlight some parallels between insect and mammalian immune systems. A more thorough understanding of the role of pathogens on honey bee health and the immune mechanisms bees utilize to combat infectious agents may lead to the development of strategies that enhance honey bee health and result in the discovery of additional mechanisms of immunity in metazoans. PMID:26798663

  2. Metformin interferes with bile acid homeostasis through AMPK-FXR crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Lien, Fleur; Berthier, Alexandre; Bouchaert, Emmanuel; Gheeraert, Céline; Alexandre, Jeremy; Porez, Geoffrey; Prawitt, Janne; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Colin, Sophie; Lucas, Anthony; Patrice, Alexandre; Pattou, François; Diemer, Hélène; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rachez, Christophe; Kamilic, Jelena; Groen, Albert K; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2014-03-01

    The nuclear bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is an important transcriptional regulator of bile acid, lipid, and glucose metabolism. FXR is highly expressed in the liver and intestine and controls the synthesis and enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. However, little is known about FXR-associated proteins that contribute to metabolic regulation. Here, we performed a mass spectrometry-based search for FXR-interacting proteins in human hepatoma cells and identified AMPK as a coregulator of FXR. FXR interacted with the nutrient-sensitive kinase AMPK in the cytoplasm of target cells and was phosphorylated in its hinge domain. In cultured human and murine hepatocytes and enterocytes, pharmacological activation of AMPK inhibited FXR transcriptional activity and prevented FXR coactivator recruitment to promoters of FXR-regulated genes. Furthermore, treatment with AMPK activators, including the antidiabetic biguanide metformin, inhibited FXR agonist induction of FXR target genes in mouse liver and intestine. In a mouse model of intrahepatic cholestasis, metformin treatment induced FXR phosphorylation, perturbed bile acid homeostasis, and worsened liver injury. Together, our data indicate that AMPK directly phosphorylates and regulates FXR transcriptional activity to precipitate liver injury under conditions favoring cholestasis. PMID:24531544

  3. Interference by morpholine ethanesulfonic acid (MES) and related buffers in phenolic oxidation by peroxidase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While characterizing the kinetic parameters of apoplastic phenolic oxidation by peroxidase, we found anomalies caused by the 4-morpholine ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer being used. In the presence of MES, certain phenolics appeared not to be oxidized by peroxidase, yet the oxidant, H2O2, was uti...

  4. Metformin interferes with bile acid homeostasis through AMPK-FXR crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Fleur; Berthier, Alexandre; Bouchaert, Emmanuel; Gheeraert, Céline; Alexandre, Jeremy; Porez, Geoffrey; Prawitt, Janne; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Colin, Sophie; Lucas, Anthony; Patrice, Alexandre; Pattou, François; Diemer, Hélène; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rachez, Christophe; Kamilic, Jelena; Groen, Albert K.; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is an important transcriptional regulator of bile acid, lipid, and glucose metabolism. FXR is highly expressed in the liver and intestine and controls the synthesis and enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. However, little is known about FXR-associated proteins that contribute to metabolic regulation. Here, we performed a mass spectrometry–based search for FXR-interacting proteins in human hepatoma cells and identified AMPK as a coregulator of FXR. FXR interacted with the nutrient-sensitive kinase AMPK in the cytoplasm of target cells and was phosphorylated in its hinge domain. In cultured human and murine hepatocytes and enterocytes, pharmacological activation of AMPK inhibited FXR transcriptional activity and prevented FXR coactivator recruitment to promoters of FXR-regulated genes. Furthermore, treatment with AMPK activators, including the antidiabetic biguanide metformin, inhibited FXR agonist induction of FXR target genes in mouse liver and intestine. In a mouse model of intrahepatic cholestasis, metformin treatment induced FXR phosphorylation, perturbed bile acid homeostasis, and worsened liver injury. Together, our data indicate that AMPK directly phosphorylates and regulates FXR transcriptional activity to precipitate liver injury under conditions favoring cholestasis. PMID:24531544

  5. RNA interference in Lepidoptera: an overview of successful and unsuccessful studies and implications for experimental design

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene silencing through RNA interference (RNAi) has revolutionized the study of gene function, particularly in non-model insects. However, in Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) RNAi has many times proven to be difficult to achieve. Most of the negative results have been anecdotal and the positive ex...

  6. Inhibition of avian tumor viruses by vector-based RNA interference

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been shown to reduce the replication of certain animal viruses both in cell culture and in live animals. We developed RNAi-based anti-viral strategies against two important chicken pathogens: avian leukosis virus (ALV) and Marek’s Disease virus MDV). Entry plasmids conta...

  7. Role of RNA interference in plant improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagtap, Umesh Balkrishna; Gurav, Ranjit Gajanan; Bapat, Vishwas Anant

    2011-06-01

    Research to alter crops for their better performance involving modern technology is underway in numerous plants, and achievements in transgenic plants are impacting crop improvements in unparalleled ways. Striking progress has been made using genetic engineering technology over the past two decades in manipulating genes from diverse and exotic sources, and inserting them into crop plants for inducing desirable characteristics. RNA interference (RNAi) has recently been identified as a natural mechanism for regulation of gene expression in all higher organisms from plants to humans and promises greater accuracy and precision to plant improvement. The expression of any gene can be down-regulated in a highly explicit manner exclusive of affecting the expression of any other gene by using RNAi technologies. Additional research in this field has been focused on a number of other areas including microRNAs, hairpin RNA, and promoter methylation. Manipulating new RNAi pathways, which generate small RNA molecules to amend gene expression in crops, can produce new quality traits and having better potentiality of protection against abiotic and biotic stresses. Nutritional improvement, change in morphology, or enhanced secondary metabolite synthesis are some of the other advantages of RNAi technology. In addition to its roles in regulating gene expression, RNAi is also used as a natural defense mechanism against molecular parasites such as jumping genes and viral genetic elements that affect genome stability. Even though much advancement has been made on the field of RNAi over the preceding few years, the full prospective of RNAi for crop improvement remains to be fully realized. The intricacy of RNAi pathway, the molecular machineries, and how it relates to plant development are still to be explained.

  8. Application of RNAi to Genomic Drug Target Validation in Schistosomes

    PubMed Central

    Guidi, Alessandra; Mansour, Nuha R.; Paveley, Ross A.; Carruthers, Ian M.; Besnard, Jérémy; Hopkins, Andrew L.; Gilbert, Ian H.; Bickle, Quentin D.

    2015-01-01

    Concerns over the possibility of resistance developing to praziquantel (PZQ), has stimulated efforts to develop new drugs for schistosomiasis. In addition to the development of improved whole organism screens, the success of RNA interference (RNAi) in schistosomes offers great promise for the identification of potential drug targets to initiate drug discovery. In this study we set out to contribute to RNAi based validation of putative drug targets. Initially a list of 24 target candidates was compiled based on the identification of putative essential genes in schistosomes orthologous of C. elegans essential genes. Knockdown of Calmodulin (Smp_026560.2) (Sm-Calm), that topped this list, produced a phenotype characterised by waves of contraction in adult worms but no phenotype in schistosomula. Knockdown of the atypical Protein Kinase C (Smp_096310) (Sm-aPKC) resulted in loss of viability in both schistosomula and adults and led us to focus our attention on other kinase genes that were identified in the above list and through whole organism screening of known kinase inhibitor sets followed by chemogenomic evaluation. RNAi knockdown of these kinase genes failed to affect adult worm viability but, like Sm-aPKC, knockdown of Polo-like kinase 1, Sm-PLK1 (Smp_009600) and p38-MAPK, Sm-MAPK p38 (Smp_133020) resulted in an increased mortality of schistosomula after 2-3 weeks, an effect more marked in the presence of human red blood cells (hRBC). For Sm-PLK-1 the same effects were seen with the specific inhibitor, BI2536, which also affected viable egg production in adult worms. For Sm-PLK-1 and Sm-aPKC the in vitro effects were reflected in lower recoveries in vivo. We conclude that the use of RNAi combined with culture with hRBC is a reliable method for evaluating genes important for larval development. However, in view of the slow manifestation of the effects of Sm-aPKC knockdown in adults and the lack of effects of Sm-PLK-1 and Sm-MAPK p38 on adult viability, these

  9. Application of RNAi to Genomic Drug Target Validation in Schistosomes.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Alessandra; Mansour, Nuha R; Paveley, Ross A; Carruthers, Ian M; Besnard, Jérémy; Hopkins, Andrew L; Gilbert, Ian H; Bickle, Quentin D

    2015-05-01

    Concerns over the possibility of resistance developing to praziquantel (PZQ), has stimulated efforts to develop new drugs for schistosomiasis. In addition to the development of improved whole organism screens, the success of RNA interference (RNAi) in schistosomes offers great promise for the identification of potential drug targets to initiate drug discovery. In this study we set out to contribute to RNAi based validation of putative drug targets. Initially a list of 24 target candidates was compiled based on the identification of putative essential genes in schistosomes orthologous of C. elegans essential genes. Knockdown of Calmodulin (Smp_026560.2) (Sm-Calm), that topped this list, produced a phenotype characterised by waves of contraction in adult worms but no phenotype in schistosomula. Knockdown of the atypical Protein Kinase C (Smp_096310) (Sm-aPKC) resulted in loss of viability in both schistosomula and adults and led us to focus our attention on other kinase genes that were identified in the above list and through whole organism screening of known kinase inhibitor sets followed by chemogenomic evaluation. RNAi knockdown of these kinase genes failed to affect adult worm viability but, like Sm-aPKC, knockdown of Polo-like kinase 1, Sm-PLK1 (Smp_009600) and p38-MAPK, Sm-MAPK p38 (Smp_133020) resulted in an increased mortality of schistosomula after 2-3 weeks, an effect more marked in the presence of human red blood cells (hRBC). For Sm-PLK-1 the same effects were seen with the specific inhibitor, BI2536, which also affected viable egg production in adult worms. For Sm-PLK-1 and Sm-aPKC the in vitro effects were reflected in lower recoveries in vivo. We conclude that the use of RNAi combined with culture with hRBC is a reliable method for evaluating genes important for larval development. However, in view of the slow manifestation of the effects of Sm-aPKC knockdown in adults and the lack of effects of Sm-PLK-1 and Sm-MAPK p38 on adult viability, these

  10. Fatty acid-induced NLRP3-PYCARD inflammasome activation interferes with insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Haitao; Gris, Denis; Lei, Yu; Jha, Sushmita; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Max Tze-Han; Brickey, Willie June; Ting, Jenny P.-Y.

    2014-01-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) and inflammation are key contributors to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Interleukin (IL)-1β plays a role in insulin resistance; yet, how IL-1β is induced by fatty acid with HFD, and how this alters insulin signaling is unclear. We show that the saturated fatty acid, palmitate, but not unsaturated oleate, induces the activation of NLRP3-PYCARD inflammasome, causing caspase-1, IL-1β, and IL-18 production. This involves mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and the AMP-activated protein kinase and ULK1 autophagy signaling cascade. Inflammasome activation in hematopoietic cells impairs insulin signaling in several target tissues to reduce glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, IL-1β affects insulin sensitivity via TNF-independent and dependent pathways. These findings provide insights into the association of inflammation, diet and T2D. PMID:21478880

  11. Anti-angiogenic and anti-proliferative effects of inhibition of HIF-1α by p-HIF-1α RNAi in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yan-Yan; Hu, Song-Jiao; Bao, Yi-Jie; Liang, Bo; Yan, Cui-Na; Shi, Xiao-Jing; Yu, Hui; Zou, Yu; Tang, Li-Rui; Tang, Qing-Feng; Feng, Wen; Yin, Pei-Hao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to construct an RNA-interference plasmid (p-HIF-1α RNAi) targeting the human HIF-1α gene and assess its effects on HIF-1α expression and its anti-tumour functions in vitro. p-HIF-1α RNAi was constructed and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and western blot were performed to detect HIF-1α expression in HCT116 cells following transfection of p-HIF-1α RNAi and p-control. The anti-tumour effects and mechanism of action of p-HIF-1α RNAi in HCT116 cells were further investigated. p-HIF-1α RNAi significantly inhibited HIF-1α expression in the HCT116 cell line. p-HIF-1α RNAi inhibited cell viability and reduced VEGF but not bFGF expression in the supernatant of HCT116 cells, down-regulated b-catenin and VEGF expression, and altered β-catenin location in the HCT116 cell nucleus. The plasmid p-HIF-1α RNAi can effectively and specifically inhibit HIF-1α expression, inhibit cell proliferation, and alter the expression of key components in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Thus, p-HIF-1α RNAi is a novel and extremely promising therapeutic inhibitor of HIF-1α. PMID:26339356

  12. Persistence and transgenerational effect of plant-mediated RNAi in aphids

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, A. D.; Wouters, R. H. M.; Mugford, S. T.; Hogenhout, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Plant-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) has been successfully used as a tool to study gene function in aphids. The persistence and transgenerational effects of plant-mediated RNAi in the green peach aphid (GPA) Myzus persicae were investigated, with a focus on three genes with different functions in the aphid. Rack1 is a key component of various cellular processes inside aphids, while candidate effector genes MpC002 and MpPIntO2 (Mp2) modulate aphid–plant interactions. The gene sequences and functions did not affect RNAi-mediated down-regulation and persistence levels in the aphids. Maximal reduction of gene expression was ~70% and this was achieved at between 4 d and 8 d of exposure of the aphids to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-producing transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana. Moreover, gene expression levels returned to wild-type levels within ~6 d after removal of the aphids from the transgenic plants, indicating that a continuous supply of dsRNA is required to maintain the RNAi effect. Target genes were also down-regulated in nymphs born from mothers exposed to dsRNA-producing transgenic plants, and the RNAi effect lasted twice as long (12–14 d) in these nymphs. Investigations of the impact of RNAi over three generations of aphids revealed that aphids reared on dsMpC002 transgenic plants experienced a 60% decline in aphid reproduction levels compared with a 40% decline of aphids reared on dsRack1 and dsMpPIntO2 plants. In a field setting, a reduction of the aphid reproduction by 40–60% would dramatically decrease aphid population growth, contributing to a substantial reduction in agricultural losses. PMID:25403918

  13. Persistence and transgenerational effect of plant-mediated RNAi in aphids.

    PubMed

    Coleman, A D; Wouters, R H M; Mugford, S T; Hogenhout, S A

    2015-02-01

    Plant-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) has been successfully used as a tool to study gene function in aphids. The persistence and transgenerational effects of plant-mediated RNAi in the green peach aphid (GPA) Myzus persicae were investigated, with a focus on three genes with different functions in the aphid. Rack1 is a key component of various cellular processes inside aphids, while candidate effector genes MpC002 and MpPIntO2 (Mp2) modulate aphid-plant interactions. The gene sequences and functions did not affect RNAi-mediated down-regulation and persistence levels in the aphids. Maximal reduction of gene expression was ~70% and this was achieved at between 4 d and 8 d of exposure of the aphids to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-producing transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana. Moreover, gene expression levels returned to wild-type levels within ~6 d after removal of the aphids from the transgenic plants, indicating that a continuous supply of dsRNA is required to maintain the RNAi effect. Target genes were also down-regulated in nymphs born from mothers exposed to dsRNA-producing transgenic plants, and the RNAi effect lasted twice as long (12-14 d) in these nymphs. Investigations of the impact of RNAi over three generations of aphids revealed that aphids reared on dsMpC002 transgenic plants experienced a 60% decline in aphid reproduction levels compared with a 40% decline of aphids reared on dsRack1 and dsMpPIntO2 plants. In a field setting, a reduction of the aphid reproduction by 40-60% would dramatically decrease aphid population growth, contributing to a substantial reduction in agricultural losses. PMID:25403918

  14. Lentiviral Delivery of RNAi for In Vivo Lineage-Specific Modulation of Gene Expression in Mouse Lung Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew A; Kwok, Letty W; Porter, Emily L; Payne, Julie G; McElroy, Gregory S; Ohle, Sarah J; Greenhill, Sara R; Blahna, Matthew T; Yamamoto, Kazuko; Jean, Jyh C; Mizgerd, Joseph P; Kotton, Darrell N

    2013-01-01

    Although RNA interference (RNAi) has become a ubiquitous laboratory tool since its discovery 12 years ago, in vivo delivery to selected cell types remains a major technical challenge. Here, we report the use of lentiviral vectors for long-term in vivo delivery of RNAi selectively to resident alveolar macrophages (AMs), key immune effector cells in the lung. We demonstrate the therapeutic potential of this approach by RNAi-based downregulation of p65 (RelA), a component of the pro-inflammatory transcriptional regulator, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and a key participant in lung disease pathogenesis. In vivo RNAi delivery results in decreased induction of NF-κB and downstream neutrophilic chemokines in transduced AMs as well as attenuated lung neutrophilia following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Through concurrent delivery of a novel lentiviral reporter vector (lenti-NF-κB-luc-GFP) we track in vivo expression of NF-κB target genes in real time, a critical step towards extending RNAi-based therapy to longstanding lung diseases. Application of this system reveals that resident AMs persist in the airspaces of mice following the resolution of LPS-induced inflammation, thus allowing these localized cells to be used as effective vehicles for prolonged RNAi delivery in disease settings. PMID:23403494

  15. Degradation of carbohydrates during dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment can interfere with lignin measurements in solid residues.

    PubMed

    Katahira, Rui; Sluiter, Justin B; Schell, Daniel J; Davis, Mark F

    2013-04-01

    The lignin content measured after dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover indicates more lignin than could be accounted for on the basis of the untreated corn stover lignin content. This phenomenon was investigated using a combination of (13)C cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and lignin removal using acid chlorite bleaching. Only minimal contamination with carbohydrates and proteins was observed in the pretreated corn stover. Incorporating degradation products from sugars was also investigated using (13)C-labeled sugars. The results indicate that sugar degradation products are present in the pretreatment residue and may be intimately associated with the lignin. Studies comparing whole corn stover (CS) to extractives-free corn stover [CS(Ext)] clearly demonstrated that extractives are a key contributor to the high-lignin mass balance closure (MBC). Sugars and other low molecular weight compounds present in plant extractives polymerize and form solids during pretreatment, resulting in apparent Klason lignin measurements that are biased high. PMID:23428141

  16. Application of multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares method for determination of caffeic acid in the presence of catechin interference.

    PubMed

    Meshki, Marzieh; Behpour, Mohsen; Masoum, Saeed

    2015-03-15

    In the current article, preparation and application of a graphene oxide nanosheets-based sensor for electrochemical determination of caffeic acid (CA) in the presence of catechin is described. This measurement was performed using the differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) technique and chemometric methods such as multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). The modified sensor was characterized by various techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Operating conditions and influencing variables (involving several chemical and instrumental variables) were optimized with central composite rotatable design and response surface methodology. The second-order electrochemical data were generated by changing the pulse height in DPV, and after potential shift correction MCR-ALS was applied. Under the optimized conditions, the dynamic range for CA was from 0.5 to 100.0 μM and the detection limit was found to be 1.1×10(-9) M. The results revealed that the modified electrode shows an improvement in anodic oxidation activity of CA due to a marked enhancement in the current response compared with the bare carbon paste electrode. The modified electrode demonstrated good sensitivity, selectivity, and stability. The proposed method was successfully applied in determination of caffeic acid in the presence of unexpected electroactive interferences with a very high degree of overlapping such as catechin in real samples. PMID:25432066

  17. Design and Methods of Large-Scale RNA Interference Screens in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Tong, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila is an ideal model system for addressing important questions in biology. The use of RNA interference (RNAi) to knockdown gene expression in fly tissues is both very effective and relatively simple. In the past few decades, genome-wide UAS-RNAi transgenic libraries and thousands of Gal4 strains have been generated and have facilitated large-scale in vivo RNAi screening. Here, we discuss methods for the design and performance of a large-scale in vivo RNAi screen in Drosophila. Furthermore, methods for the validation of results and analysis of data will be introduced. PMID:27581292

  18. 9-Hydroxystearic acid interferes with EGF signalling in a human colon adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Calonghi, Natalia; Pagnotta, Eleonora; Parolin, Carola; Tognoli, Cristina; Boga, Carla; Masotti, Lanfranco . E-mail: natalia.calonghi@unibo.it

    2006-04-07

    The epidermal growth factor has long been known to be strictly correlated with the highly proliferating activities of cancer cells and primary tumors. Moreover, in the nucleus, the epidermal growth factor/epidermal growth factor receptor complex (EGF/EGFR) functions as a transcriptional regulator that activates the cyclin D1 gene. 9-hydroxystearic acid (9-HSA) induces cell proliferation arrest and differentiation in HT29 colon cancer cells by inhibiting histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1). 9-HSA-treated HT29, when stimulated with EGF, are not responsive and surprisingly undergo a further arrest. In order to understand the mechanisms of this effect, we analyzed the degree of internalization of the EGF/EGFR complex and its interactions with HDAC1. It appears that HDAC1, as modified by 9-HSA, is unable to associate with cyclin D1, interfering with the cell proliferation program, and sequesters the EGF/EGFR complex interrupting the transduction of the mitogenic signal.

  19. Synthetic analogues of the natural compound cryphonectric acid interfere with photosynthetic machinery through two different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Róbson Ricardo; Pereira, Wagner Luiz; Tomaz, Deborah Campos; de Oliveira, Fabrício Marques; Giberti, Samuele; Forlani, Giuseppe

    2013-06-12

    A series of isobenzofuran-1(3H)-ones (phthalides), analogues of the naturally occurring phytotoxin cryphonectric acid, were designed, synthesized, and fully characterized by NMR, IR, and MS analyses. Their synthesis was achieved via condensation, aromatization, and acetylation reactions. The measurement of the electron transport chain in spinach chloroplasts showed that several derivatives are capable of interfering with the photosynthetic apparatus. Few of them were found to inhibit the basal rate, but a significant inhibition was brought about only at concentrations exceeding 50 μM. Some other analogues acted as uncouplers or energy transfer inhibitors, with a remarkably higher effectiveness. Isobenzofuranone addition to the culture medium inhibited the growth of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus , with patterns consistent with the effects measured in vitro upon isolated chloroplasts. The most active derivatives, being able to completely suppress algal growth at 20 μM, may represent structures to be exploited for the design of new active ingredients for weed control. PMID:23678958

  20. RNA Interference for Functional Genomics and Improvement of Cotton (Gossypium sp.).

    PubMed

    Abdurakhmonov, Ibrokhim Y; Ayubov, Mirzakamol S; Ubaydullaeva, Khurshida A; Buriev, Zabardast T; Shermatov, Shukhrat E; Ruziboev, Haydarali S; Shapulatov, Umid M; Saha, Sukumar; Ulloa, Mauricio; Yu, John Z; Percy, Richard G; Devor, Eric J; Sharma, Govind C; Sripathi, Venkateswara R; Kumpatla, Siva P; van der Krol, Alexander; Kater, Hake D; Khamidov, Khakimdjan; Salikhov, Shavkat I; Jenkins, Johnie N; Abdukarimov, Abdusattor; Pepper, Alan E

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), is a powerful new technology in the discovery of genetic sequence functions, and has become a valuable tool for functional genomics of cotton (Gossypium sp.). The rapid adoption of RNAi has replaced previous antisense technology. RNAi has aided in the discovery of function and biological roles of many key cotton genes involved in fiber development, fertility and somatic embryogenesis, resistance to important biotic and abiotic stresses, and oil and seed quality improvements as well as the key agronomic traits including yield and maturity. Here, we have comparatively reviewed seminal research efforts in previously used antisense approaches and currently applied breakthrough RNAi studies in cotton, analyzing developed RNAi methodologies, achievements, limitations, and future needs in functional characterizations of cotton genes. We also highlighted needed efforts in the development of RNAi-based cotton cultivars, and their safety and risk assessment, small and large-scale field trials, and commercialization. PMID:26941765

  1. RNA Interference for Functional Genomics and Improvement of Cotton (Gossypium sp.)

    PubMed Central

    Abdurakhmonov, Ibrokhim Y.; Ayubov, Mirzakamol S.; Ubaydullaeva, Khurshida A.; Buriev, Zabardast T.; Shermatov, Shukhrat E.; Ruziboev, Haydarali S.; Shapulatov, Umid M.; Saha, Sukumar; Ulloa, Mauricio; Yu, John Z.; Percy, Richard G.; Devor, Eric J.; Sharma, Govind C.; Sripathi, Venkateswara R.; Kumpatla, Siva P.; van der Krol, Alexander; Kater, Hake D.; Khamidov, Khakimdjan; Salikhov, Shavkat I.; Jenkins, Johnie N.; Abdukarimov, Abdusattor; Pepper, Alan E.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), is a powerful new technology in the discovery of genetic sequence functions, and has become a valuable tool for functional genomics of cotton (Gossypium sp.). The rapid adoption of RNAi has replaced previous antisense technology. RNAi has aided in the discovery of function and biological roles of many key cotton genes involved in fiber development, fertility and somatic embryogenesis, resistance to important biotic and abiotic stresses, and oil and seed quality improvements as well as the key agronomic traits including yield and maturity. Here, we have comparatively reviewed seminal research efforts in previously used antisense approaches and currently applied breakthrough RNAi studies in cotton, analyzing developed RNAi methodologies, achievements, limitations, and future needs in functional characterizations of cotton genes. We also highlighted needed efforts in the development of RNAi-based cotton cultivars, and their safety and risk assessment, small and large-scale field trials, and commercialization. PMID:26941765

  2. A small molecule enhances RNA interference and promotes microRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Ge; Li, Yujing; Zhang, Junliang; Li, Wendi; Szulwach, Keith E; Duan, Ranhui; Faghihi, Mohammad A; Khalil, Ahmad M; Lu, Lianghua; Paroo, Zain; Chan, Anthony W S; Shi, Zhangjie; Liu, Qinghua; Wahlestedt, Claes; He, Chuan; Jin, Peng

    2010-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are sequence-specific post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Although major components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway have been identified, regulatory mechanisms for this pathway remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the RNAi pathway can be modulated intracellularly by small molecules. We have developed a cell-based assay to monitor the activity of the RNAi pathway and find that the small-molecule enoxacin (Penetrex) enhances siRNA-mediated mRNA degradation and promotes the biogenesis of endogenous miRNAs. We show that this RNAi-enhancing activity depends on the trans-activation-responsive region RNA-binding protein. Our results provide a proof-of-principle demonstration that small molecules can be used to modulate the activity of the RNAi pathway. RNAi enhancers may be useful in the development of research tools and therapeutics. PMID:18641635

  3. iScreen: Image-Based High-Content RNAi Screening Analysis Tools.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Rui; Dong, Xiaonan; Levine, Beth; Xie, Yang; Xiao, Guanghua

    2015-09-01

    High-throughput RNA interference (RNAi) screening has opened up a path to investigating functional genomics in a genome-wide pattern. However, such studies are often restricted to assays that have a single readout format. Recently, advanced image technologies have been coupled with high-throughput RNAi screening to develop high-content screening, in which one or more cell image(s), instead of a single readout, were generated from each well. This image-based high-content screening technology has led to genome-wide functional annotation in a wider spectrum of biological research studies, as well as in drug and target discovery, so that complex cellular phenotypes can be measured in a multiparametric format. Despite these advances, data analysis and visualization tools are still largely lacking for these types of experiments. Therefore, we developed iScreen (image-Based High-content RNAi Screening Analysis Tool), an R package for the statistical modeling and visualization of image-based high-content RNAi screening. Two case studies were used to demonstrate the capability and efficiency of the iScreen package. iScreen is available for download on CRAN (http://cran.cnr.berkeley.edu/web/packages/iScreen/index.html). The user manual is also available as a supplementary document. PMID:25548139

  4. Human Papillomavirus: Current and Future RNAi Therapeutic Strategies for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hun Soon; Rajasekaran, Nirmal; Ju, Woong; Shin, Young Kee

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small DNA viruses; some oncogenic ones can cause different types of cancer, in particular cervical cancer. HPV-associated carcinogenesis provides a classical model system for RNA interference (RNAi) based cancer therapies, because the viral oncogenes E6 and E7 that cause cervical cancer are expressed only in cancerous cells. Previous studies on the development of therapeutic RNAi facilitated the advancement of therapeutic siRNAs and demonstrated its versatility by siRNA-mediated depletion of single or multiple cellular/viral targets. Sequence-specific gene silencing using RNAi shows promise as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of a variety of diseases that currently lack effective treatments. However, siRNA-based targeting requires further validation of its efficacy in vitro and in vivo, for its potential off-target effects, and of the design of conventional therapies to be used in combination with siRNAs and their drug delivery vehicles. In this review we discuss what is currently known about HPV-associated carcinogenesis and the potential for combining siRNA with other treatment strategies for the development of future therapies. Finally, we present our assessment of the most promising path to the development of RNAi therapeutic strategies for clinical settings. PMID:26239469

  5. RNAi as a management tool for the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera.

    PubMed

    Fishilevich, Elane; Vélez, Ana M; Storer, Nicholas P; Li, Huarong; Bowling, Andrew J; Rangasamy, Murugesan; Worden, Sarah E; Narva, Kenneth E; Siegfried, Blair D

    2016-09-01

    The western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is the most important pest of corn in the US Corn Belt. Economic estimates indicate that costs of control and yield loss associated with WCR damage exceed $US 1 billion annually. Historically, corn rootworm management has been extremely difficult because of its ability to evolve resistance to both chemical insecticides and cultural control practices. Since 2003, the only novel commercialized developments in rootworm management have been transgenic plants expressing Bt insecticidal proteins. Four transgenic insecticidal proteins are currently registered for rootworm management, and field resistance to proteins from the Cry3 family highlights the importance of developing traits with new modes of action. One of the newest approaches for controlling rootworm pests involves RNA interference (RNAi). This review describes the current understanding of the RNAi mechanisms in WCR and the use of this technology for WCR management. Further, the review addresses ecological risk assessment of RNAi and insect resistance management of RNAi for corn rootworm. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:27218412

  6. Clone mapper: an online suite of tools for RNAi experiments in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Nishant; Pujol, Nathalie; Tichit, Laurent; Ewbank, Jonathan J

    2014-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), mediated by the introduction of a specific double-stranded RNA, is a powerful method to investigate gene function. It is widely used in the Caenorhabditis elegans research community. An expanding number of laboratories conduct genome-wide RNAi screens, using standard libraries of bacterial clones each designed to produce a specific double-stranded RNA. Proper interpretation of results from RNAi experiments requires a series of analytical steps, from the verification of the identity of bacterial clones, to the identification of the clones' potential targets. Despite the popularity of the technique, no user-friendly set of tools allowing these steps to be carried out accurately, automatically, and at a large scale, is currently available. We report here the design and production of Clone Mapper, an online suite of tools specifically adapted to the analysis pipeline typical for RNAi experiments with C. elegans. We show that Clone Mapper overcomes the limitations of existing techniques and provide examples illustrating its potential for the identification of biologically relevant genes. The Clone Mapper tools are freely available via http://www.ciml.univ-mrs.fr/EWBANK_jonathan/software.html. PMID:25187039

  7. Robust RNAi enhancement via human Argonaute-2 overexpression from plasmids, viral vectors and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Börner, Kathleen; Niopek, Dominik; Cotugno, Gabriella; Kaldenbach, Michaela; Pankert, Teresa; Willemsen, Joschka; Zhang, Xian; Schürmann, Nina; Mockenhaupt, Stefan; Serva, Andrius; Hiet, Marie-Sophie; Wiedtke, Ellen; Castoldi, Mirco; Starkuviene, Vytaute; Erfle, Holger; Gilbert, Daniel F.; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Boutros, Michael; Binder, Marco; Streetz, Konrad; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Grimm, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    As the only mammalian Argonaute protein capable of directly cleaving mRNAs in a small RNA-guided manner, Argonaute-2 (Ago2) is a keyplayer in RNA interference (RNAi) silencing via small interfering (si) or short hairpin (sh) RNAs. It is also a rate-limiting factor whose saturation by si/shRNAs limits RNAi efficiency and causes numerous adverse side effects. Here, we report a set of versatile tools and widely applicable strategies for transient or stable Ago2 co-expression, which overcome these concerns. Specifically, we engineered plasmids and viral vectors to co-encode a codon-optimized human Ago2 cDNA along with custom shRNAs. Furthermore, we stably integrated this Ago2 cDNA into a panel of standard human cell lines via plasmid transfection or lentiviral transduction. Using various endo- or exogenous targets, we demonstrate the potential of all three strategies to boost mRNA silencing efficiencies in cell culture by up to 10-fold, and to facilitate combinatorial knockdowns. Importantly, these robust improvements were reflected by augmented RNAi phenotypes and accompanied by reduced off-targeting effects. We moreover show that Ago2/shRNA-co-encoding vectors can enhance and prolong transgene silencing in livers of adult mice, while concurrently alleviating hepatotoxicity. Our customizable reagents and avenues should broadly improve future in vitro and in vivo RNAi experiments in mammalian systems. PMID:24049077

  8. Metabolic engineering of cottonseed oil biosynthesis pathway via RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhongping; Li, Jingwen; Guo, Xiaoping; Jin, Shuangxia; Zhang, Xianlong

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed oil is recognized as an important oil in food industry for its unique characters: low flavor reversion and the high level of antioxidants (VitaminE) as well as unsaturated fatty acid. However, the cottonseed oil content of cultivated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is only around 20%. In this study, we modified the accumulation of oils by the down-regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase 1 (GhPEPC1) via RNA interference in transgenic cotton plants. The qRT-PCR and enzyme activity assay revealed that the transcription and expression of GhPEPC1 was dramatically down-regulated in transgenic lines. Consequently, the cottonseed oil content in several transgenic lines showed a significant (P < 0.01) increase (up to 16.7%) without obvious phenotypic changes under filed condition when compared to the control plants. In order to elucidate the molecular mechanism of GhPEPC1 in the regulation of seed oil content, we quantified the expression of the carbon metabolism related genes of transgenic GhPEPC1 RNAi lines by transcriptome analysis. This analysis revealed the decrease of GhPEPC1 expression led to the increase expression of triacylglycerol biosynthesis-related genes, which eventually contributed to the lipid biosynthesis in cotton. This result provides a valuable information for cottonseed oil biosynthesis pathway and shows the potential of creating high cottonseed oil germplasm by RNAi strategy for cotton breeding. PMID:27620452

  9. Symbiont-mediated RNA interference in insects

    PubMed Central

    Whitten, Miranda M. A.; Facey, Paul D.; Del Sol, Ricardo; Fernández-Martínez, Lorena T.; Evans, Meirwyn C.; Mitchell, Jacob J.; Bodger, Owen G.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) methods for insects are often limited by problems with double-stranded (ds) RNA delivery, which restricts reverse genetics studies and the development of RNAi-based biocides. We therefore delegated to insect symbiotic bacteria the task of: (i) constitutive dsRNA synthesis and (ii) trauma-free delivery. RNaseIII-deficient, dsRNA-expressing bacterial strains were created from the symbionts of two very diverse pest species: a long-lived blood-sucking bug, Rhodnius prolixus, and a short-lived globally invasive polyphagous agricultural pest, western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis). When ingested, the manipulated bacteria colonized the insects, successfully competed with the wild-type microflora, and sustainably mediated systemic knockdown phenotypes that were horizontally transmissible. This represents a significant advance in the ability to deliver RNAi, potentially to a large range of non-model insects. PMID:26911963

  10. Symbiont-mediated RNA interference in insects.

    PubMed

    Whitten, Miranda M A; Facey, Paul D; Del Sol, Ricardo; Fernández-Martínez, Lorena T; Evans, Meirwyn C; Mitchell, Jacob J; Bodger, Owen G; Dyson, Paul J

    2016-02-24

    RNA interference (RNAi) methods for insects are often limited by problems with double-stranded (ds) RNA delivery, which restricts reverse genetics studies and the development of RNAi-based biocides. We therefore delegated to insect symbiotic bacteria the task of: (i) constitutive dsRNA synthesis and (ii) trauma-free delivery. RNaseIII-deficient, dsRNA-expressing bacterial strains were created from the symbionts of two very diverse pest species: a long-lived blood-sucking bug, Rhodnius prolixus, and a short-lived globally invasive polyphagous agricultural pest, western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis). When ingested, the manipulated bacteria colonized the insects, successfully competed with the wild-type microflora, and sustainably mediated systemic knockdown phenotypes that were horizontally transmissible. This represents a significant advance in the ability to deliver RNAi, potentially to a large range of non-model insects. PMID:26911963

  11. Endocytic pathway mediates refractoriness of insect Bactrocera dorsalis to RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoxue; Dong, Xiaolong; Zou, Cong; Zhang, Hongyu

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful and convenient tool for sequence-specific gene silencing, and it is triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). RNAi can be easily achieved in many eukaryotes by either injecting or feeding dsRNAs. This mechanism has demonstrated its potential in fundamental research on genetics, medicine and agriculture. However, the possibility that insects might develop refractoriness to RNAi remains unexplored. In this study, we report that the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, became refractory to RNAi using orally administered dsRNA targeting endogenous genes. Furthermore, refractoriness to RNAi is not gene-specific, and its duration depends on the dsRNA concentration. RNAi blockage requires the endocytic pathway. Fluorescence microscopy indicated that in RNAi refractory flies, dsRNA uptake is blocked. Genes involved in the entry of dsRNAs into cells, including chc, cog3, light and others, are down-regulated in RNAi refractory flies. Increasing the endocytic capacity by improving F-actin polymerization disrupts RNAi refractoriness after both primary and secondary dsRNA exposures. Our results demonstrate that an insect can become refractory to RNAi by preventing the entry of dsRNA into its cells. PMID:25731667

  12. Endocytic pathway mediates refractoriness of insect Bactrocera dorsalis to RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxue; Dong, Xiaolong; Zou, Cong; Zhang, Hongyu

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful and convenient tool for sequence-specific gene silencing, and it is triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). RNAi can be easily achieved in many eukaryotes by either injecting or feeding dsRNAs. This mechanism has demonstrated its potential in fundamental research on genetics, medicine and agriculture. However, the possibility that insects might develop refractoriness to RNAi remains unexplored. In this study, we report that the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, became refractory to RNAi using orally administered dsRNA targeting endogenous genes. Furthermore, refractoriness to RNAi is not gene-specific, and its duration depends on the dsRNA concentration. RNAi blockage requires the endocytic pathway. Fluorescence microscopy indicated that in RNAi refractory flies, dsRNA uptake is blocked. Genes involved in the entry of dsRNAs into cells, including chc, cog3, light and others, are down-regulated in RNAi refractory flies. Increasing the endocytic capacity by improving F-actin polymerization disrupts RNAi refractoriness after both primary and secondary dsRNA exposures. Our results demonstrate that an insect can become refractory to RNAi by preventing the entry of dsRNA into its cells. PMID:25731667

  13. Dimethylated H3K27 Is a Repressive Epigenetic Histone Mark in the Protist Entamoeba histolytica and Is Significantly Enriched in Genes Silenced via the RNAi Pathway.

    PubMed

    Foda, Bardees M; Singh, Upinder

    2015-08-21

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a fundamental biological process that plays a crucial role in regulation of gene expression in many organisms. Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) is one of the important nuclear roles of RNAi. Our previous data show that Entamoeba histolytica has a robust RNAi pathway that links to TGS via Argonaute 2-2 (Ago2-2) associated 27-nucleotide small RNAs with 5'-polyphosphate termini. Here, we report the first repressive histone mark to be identified in E. histolytica, dimethylation of H3K27 (H3K27Me2), and demonstrate that it is enriched at genes that are silenced by RNAi-mediated TGS. An RNAi-silencing trigger can induce H3K27Me2 deposits at both episomal and chromosomal loci, mediating gene silencing. Our data support two phases of RNAi-mediated TGS: an active silencing phase where the RNAi trigger is present and both H3K27Me2 and Ago2-2 concurrently enrich at chromosomal loci; and an established silencing phase in which the RNAi trigger is removed, but gene silencing with H3K27Me2 enrichment persist independently of Ago2-2 deposition. Importantly, some genes display resistance to chromosomal silencing despite induction of functional small RNAs. In those situations, the RNAi-triggering plasmid that is maintained episomally gets partially silenced and has H3K27Me2 enrichment, but the chromosomal copy displays no repressive histone enrichment. Our data are consistent with a model in which H3K27Me2 is a repressive histone modification, which is strongly associated with transcriptional repression. This is the first example of an epigenetic histone modification that functions to mediate RNAi-mediated TGS in the deep-branching eukaryote E. histolytica. PMID:26149683

  14. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Replication Inhibitor That Interferes with the Nucleic Acid Unwinding of the Viral Helicase

    PubMed Central

    Adedeji, Adeyemi O.; Singh, Kamalendra; Calcaterra, Nicholas E.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Enjuanes, Luis; Weiss, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a highly contagious disease, caused by SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), for which there are no approved treatments. We report the discovery of a potent inhibitor of SARS-CoV that blocks replication by inhibiting the unwinding activity of the SARS-CoV helicase (nsp13). We used a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based helicase assay to screen the Maybridge Hitfinder chemical library. We identified and validated a compound (SSYA10-001) that specifically blocks the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and dsDNA unwinding activities of nsp13, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of 5.70 and 5.30 μM, respectively. This compound also has inhibitory activity (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 8.95 μM) in a SARS-CoV replicon assay, with low cytotoxicity (50% cytotoxic concentration [CC50] = >250 μM), suggesting that the helicase plays a still unidentified critical role in the SARS-CoV life cycle. Enzyme kinetic studies on the mechanism of nsp13 inhibition revealed that SSYA10-001 acts as a noncompetitive inhibitor of nsp13 with respect to nucleic acid and ATP substrates. Moreover, SSYA10-001 does not affect ATP hydrolysis or nsp13 binding to the nucleic acid substrate. SSYA10-001 did not inhibit hepatitis C virus (HCV) helicase, other bacterial and viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases, or reverse transcriptase. These results suggest that SSYA10-001 specifically blocks nsp13 through a novel mechanism and is less likely to interfere with the functions of cellular enzymes that process nucleic acids or ATP. Hence, it is possible that SSYA10-001 inhibits unwinding by nsp13 by affecting conformational changes during the course of the reaction or translocation on the nucleic acid. SSYA10-001 will be a valuable tool for studying the specific role of nsp13 in the SARS-CoV life cycle, which could be a model for other nidoviruses and also a candidate for further development as a SARS antiviral target. PMID:22733076

  15. RNA interference of peroxisome-related genes in C. elegans: a new model for human peroxisomal disorders.

    PubMed

    Petriv, Oleh I; Pilgrim, David B; Rachubinski, Richard A; Titorenko, Vladimir I

    2002-08-14

    RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) for the posttranscriptional silencing of genes was used to evaluate the importance of various peroxisomal enzymes and peroxins for the development of Caenorhabditis elegans and to compare the roles of these proteins in the nematode to their roles in yeasts and humans. The nematode counterparts of the human ATP-binding cassette half-transporters, the enzymes alkyldihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase and Delta(3,5)-Delta (2,4)-dienoyl-CoA isomerase, the receptors for peroxisomal membrane and matrix proteins (Pex19p and Pex5p), and components of the docking and translocation machineries for matrix proteins (Pex13p and Pex12p) are essential for the development of C. elegans. Unexpectedly, RNAi silencing of the acyl-CoA synthetase-mediated activation of fatty acids, the alpha- and beta-oxidation of fatty acids, the intraperoxisomal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, and the peroxins Pex1p, Pex2p, and Pex6p had no apparent effect on C. elegans development. The described analysis of functional gene knockouts through RNAi provides a basis for the use of C. elegans as a valuable model system with which to study the molecular and physiological defects underlying the human peroxisomal disorders. PMID:12181365

  16. Jasmonic Acid and Its Precursor 12-Oxophytodienoic Acid Control Different Aspects of Constitutive and Induced Herbivore Defenses in Tomato1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Marko; Wright, Louwrance P.; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Wasternack, Claus; Hause, Bettina; Schaller, Andreas; Stintzi, Annick

    2014-01-01

    The jasmonate family of growth regulators includes the isoleucine (Ile) conjugate of jasmonic acid (JA-Ile) and its biosynthetic precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA) as signaling molecules. To assess the relative contribution of JA/JA-Ile and OPDA to insect resistance in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), we silenced the expression of OPDA reductase3 (OPR3) by RNA interference (RNAi). Consistent with a block in the biosynthetic pathway downstream of OPDA, OPR3-RNAi plants contained wild-type levels of OPDA but failed to accumulate JA or JA-Ile after wounding. JA/JA-Ile deficiency in OPR3-RNAi plants resulted in reduced trichome formation and impaired monoterpene and sesquiterpene production. The loss of these JA/JA-Ile -dependent defense traits rendered them more attractive to the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta with respect to feeding and oviposition. Oviposition preference resulted from reduced levels of repellant monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Feeding preference, on the other hand, was caused by increased production of cis-3-hexenal acting as a feeding stimulant for M. sexta larvae in OPR3-RNAi plants. Despite impaired constitutive defenses and increased palatability of OPR3-RNAi leaves, larval development was indistinguishable on OPR3-RNAi and wild-type plants, and was much delayed compared with development on the jasmonic acid-insensitive1 (jai1) mutant. Apparently, signaling through JAI1, the tomato ortholog of the ubiquitin ligase CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), is required for defense, whereas the conversion of OPDA to JA/JA-Ile is not. Comparing the signaling activities of OPDA and JA/JA-Ile, we found that OPDA can substitute for JA/JA-Ile in the local induction of defense gene expression, but the production of JA/JA-Ile is required for a systemic response. PMID:25073705

  17. Use of genome-wide RNAi screens to identify regulators of embryonic stem cell self-renewal and pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaofeng; Hu, Guang

    2014-01-01

    Summary Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are characterized by two defining features: pluripotency and self-renewal. They hold tremendous promise for both basic research and regenerative medicine. To fully realize their potentials, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms regulating ESC pluripotency and self-renewal. The development of RNA interference (RNAi) technology has revolutionized functional genetic studies in mammalian cells. In recent years, genome-wide RNAi screens have been adopted to systematically study ESC pluripotency and self-renewal, and have uncovered many previously unknown regulators, including transcription factors, chromatin remodelers, and post-transcriptional modulators. Here, we describe a method for the identification of regulators of ESC pluripotency and self-renewal using RNAi screens, as well as assays for further validation and characterization of the identified candidates. With modifications, this method can also be adapted to study the fate specification events during ESC differentiation. PMID:24743997

  18. RNA interference as a method for target-site screening in the Western Corn Rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA interference (RNAi) is one of the most powerful and extraordinarily-specific means by which to silence genes. The ability of RNAi to silence genes makes it possible to ascertain function from genomic data, thereby making it an excellent choice for target-site screening. To test the efficacy of...

  19. Advances in RNA interference: dsRNA treatment in trees and grapevines for insect pest population suppression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a breakthrough technology that has significantly impacted contemporary approaches to control the damage caused by insect pests. Most well-known RNAi studies continue to rely on injecting the dsRNA molecules directly into the organism; this approach is not suitable for use...

  20. Larval RNA interference in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Linz, David M; Clark-Hachtel, Courtney M; Borràs-Castells, Ferran; Tomoyasu, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, offers a repertoire of experimental tools for genetic and developmental studies, including a fully annotated genome sequence, transposon-based transgenesis, and effective RNA interference (RNAi). Among these advantages, RNAi-based gene knockdown techniques are at the core of Tribolium research. T. castaneum show a robust systemic RNAi response, making it possible to perform RNAi at any life stage by simply injecting double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into the beetle's body cavity. In this report, we provide an overview of our larval RNAi technique in T. castaneum. The protocol includes (i) isolation of the proper stage of T. castaneum larvae for injection, (ii) preparation for the injection setting, and (iii) dsRNA injection. Larval RNAi is a simple, but powerful technique that provides us with quick access to loss-of-function phenotypes, including multiple gene knockdown phenotypes as well as a series of hypomorphic phenotypes. Since virtually all T. castaneum tissues are susceptible to extracellular dsRNA, the larval RNAi technique allows researchers to study a wide variety of tissues in diverse contexts, including the genetic basis of organismal responses to the outside environment. In addition, the simplicity of this technique stimulates more student involvement in research, making T. castaneum an ideal genetic system for use in a classroom setting. PMID:25350485

  1. Larval RNA Interference in the Red Flour Beetle, Tribolium castaneum

    PubMed Central

    Tomoyasu, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, offers a repertoire of experimental tools for genetic and developmental studies, including a fully annotated genome sequence, transposon-based transgenesis, and effective RNA interference (RNAi). Among these advantages, RNAi-based gene knockdown techniques are at the core of Tribolium research. T. castaneum show a robust systemic RNAi response, making it possible to perform RNAi at any life stage by simply injecting double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into the beetle’s body cavity. In this report, we provide an overview of our larval RNAi technique in T. castaneum. The protocol includes (i) isolation of the proper stage of T. castaneum larvae for injection, (ii) preparation for the injection setting, and (iii) dsRNA injection. Larval RNAi is a simple, but powerful technique that provides us with quick access to loss-of-function phenotypes, including multiple gene knockdown phenotypes as well as a series of hypomorphic phenotypes. Since virtually all T. castaneum tissues are susceptible to extracellular dsRNA, the larval RNAi technique allows researchers to study a wide variety of tissues in diverse contexts, including the genetic basis of organismal responses to the outside environment. In addition, the simplicity of this technique stimulates more student involvement in research, making T. castaneum an ideal genetic system for use in a classroom setting. PMID:25350485

  2. Endogenous RNA interference is driven by copy number

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Cristina; Houseley, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    A plethora of non-protein coding RNAs are produced throughout eukaryotic genomes, many of which are transcribed antisense to protein-coding genes and could potentially instigate RNA interference (RNAi) responses. Here we have used a synthetic RNAi system to show that gene copy number is a key factor controlling RNAi for transcripts from endogenous loci, since transcripts from multi-copy loci form double stranded RNA more efficiently than transcripts from equivalently expressed single-copy loci. Selectivity towards transcripts from high-copy DNA is therefore an emergent property of a minimal RNAi system. The ability of RNAi to selectively degrade transcripts from high-copy loci would allow suppression of newly emerging transposable elements, but such a surveillance system requires transcription. We show that low-level genome-wide pervasive transcription is sufficient to instigate RNAi, and propose that pervasive transcription is part of a defense mechanism capable of directing a sequence-independent RNAi response against transposable elements amplifying within the genome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01581.001 PMID:24520161

  3. Mutations in the antiviral RNAi defense pathway modify Brome mosaic virus RNA recombinant profiles.

    PubMed

    Dzianott, Aleksandra; Sztuba-Solińska, Joanna; Bujarski, Jozef J

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) mechanism targets viral RNA for degradation. To test whether RNAi gene products contributed to viral RNA recombination, a series of Arabidopsis thaliana RNAi-defective mutants were infected with Brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNAs that have been engineered to support crossovers within the RNA3 segment. Single-cross RNA3-RNA1, RNA3-RNA2, and RNA3-RNA3 recombinants accumulated in both the wild-type (wt) and all knock-out lines at comparable frequencies. However, a reduced accumulation of novel 3' mosaic RNA3 recombinants was observed in ago1, dcl2, dcl4, and rdr6 lines but not in wt Col-0 or the dcl3 line. A BMV replicase mutant accumulated a low level of RNA3-RNA1 single-cross recombinants in Col-0 plants while, in a dcl2 dcl4 double mutant, the formation of both RNA3-RNA1 and mosaic recombinants was at a low level. A control infection in the cpr5-2 mutant, a more susceptible BMV Arabidopsis host, generated similar-to-Col-0 profiles of both single-cross and mosaic recombinants, indicating that recombinant profiles were, to some extent, independent of a viral replication rate. Also, the relative growth experiments revealed similar selection pressure for recombinants among the host lines. Thus, the altered recombinant RNA profiles have originated at the level of recombinant formation rather than because of altered selection. In conclusion, the viral replicase and the host RNAi gene products contribute in distinct ways to BMV RNA recombination. Our studies reveal that the antiviral RNAi mechanisms are utilized by plant RNA viruses to increase their variability, reminiscent of phenomena previously demonstrated in fungi. PMID:21936664

  4. Accelerating Cancer Modeling with RNAi and Nongermline Genetically Engineered Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Livshits, Geulah; Lowe, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    For more than two decades, genetically engineered mouse models have been key to our mechanistic understanding of tumorigenesis and cancer progression. Recently, the massive quantity of data emerging from cancer genomics studies has demanded a corresponding increase in the efficiency and throughput of in vivo models for functional testing of putative cancer genes. Already a mainstay of cancer research, recent innovations in RNA interference (RNAi) technology have extended its utility for studying gene function and genetic interactions, enabling tissue-specific, inducible and reversible gene silencing in vivo. Concurrent advances in embryonic stem cell (ESC) culture and genome engineering have accelerated several steps of genetically engineered mouse model production and have facilitated the incorporation of RNAi technology into these models. Here, we review the current state of these technologies and examine how their integration has the potential to dramatically enhance the throughput and capabilities of animal models for cancer. PMID:24184755

  5. RNA Pol II subunit Rpb7 promotes centromeric transcription and RNAi-directed chromatin silencing

    PubMed Central

    Djupedal, Ingela; Portoso, Manuela; Spåhr, Henrik; Bonilla, Carolina; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Allshire, Robin C.; Ekwall, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Fission yeast centromeric repeats are transcribed into small interfering RNA (siRNA) precursors (pre-siRNAs), which are processed by Dicer to direct heterochromatin formation. Recently, Rpb1 and Rpb2 subunits of RNA polymerase II (RNA Pol II) were shown to mediate RNA interference (RNAi)-directed chromatin modification but did not affect pre-siRNA levels. Here we show that another Pol II subunit, Rpb7 has a specific role in pre-siRNA transcription. We define a centromeric pre-siRNA promoter from which initiation is exquisitely sensitive to the rpb7-G150D mutation. In contrast to other Pol II subunits, Rpb7 promotes pre-siRNA transcription required for RNAi-directed chromatin silencing. PMID:16204182

  6. What RNAi screens in model organisms revealed about microbicidal response in mammals?

    PubMed Central

    Abnave, Prasad; Conti, Filippo; Torre, Cedric; Ghigo, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The strategies evolved by pathogens to infect hosts and the mechanisms used by the host to eliminate intruders are highly complex. Because several biological pathways and processes are conserved across model organisms, these organisms have been used for many years to elucidate and understand the mechanisms of the host-pathogen relationship and particularly to unravel the molecular processes enacted by the host to kill pathogens. The emergence of RNA interference (RNAi) and the ability to apply it toward studies in model organisms have allowed a breakthrough in the elucidation of host-pathogen interactions. The aim of this mini-review is to highlight and describe recent breakthroughs in the field of host-pathogen interactions using RNAi screens of model organisms. We will focus specifically on the model organisms Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Danio rerio. Moreover, a recent study examining the immune system of planarian will be discussed. PMID:25629007

  7. RNAi targeting multiple cell adhesion molecules reduces immune cell recruitment and vascular inflammation after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sager, Hendrik B; Dutta, Partha; Dahlman, James E; Hulsmans, Maarten; Courties, Gabriel; Sun, Yuan; Heidt, Timo; Vinegoni, Claudio; Borodovsky, Anna; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Tricot, Benoit; Khan, Omar F; Kauffman, Kevin J; Xing, Yiping; Shaw, Taylor E; Libby, Peter; Langer, Robert; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K; Anderson, Daniel G; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) leads to a systemic surge of vascular inflammation in mice and humans, resulting in secondary ischemic complications and high mortality. We show that, in ApoE(-/-) mice with coronary ligation, increased sympathetic tone up-regulates not only hematopoietic leukocyte production but also plaque endothelial expression of adhesion molecules. To counteract the resulting arterial leukocyte recruitment, we developed nanoparticle-based RNA interference (RNAi) that effectively silences five key adhesion molecules. Simultaneously encapsulating small interfering RNA (siRNA)-targeting intercellular cell adhesion molecules 1 and 2 (Icam1 and Icam2), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (Vcam1), and E- and P-selectins (Sele and Selp) into polymeric endothelial-avid nanoparticles reduced post-MI neutrophil and monocyte recruitment into atherosclerotic lesions and decreased matrix-degrading plaque protease activity. Five-gene combination RNAi also curtailed leukocyte recruitment to ischemic myocardium. Therefore, targeted multigene silencing may prevent complications after acute MI. PMID:27280687

  8. RNAi related mechanisms affect both transcriptional and posttranscriptional transgene silencing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Pal-Bhadra, Manika; Bhadra, Utpal; Birchler, James A

    2002-02-01

    Two types of transgene silencing were found for the Alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) transcription unit. Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) is Polycomb dependent and occurs when Adh is driven by the white eye color gene promoter. Full-length Adh transgenes are silenced posttranscriptionally at high copy number or by a pulsed increase over a threshold. The posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) exhibits molecular hallmarks typical of RNA interference (RNAi), including the production of 21--25 bp length sense and antisense RNAs homologous to the silenced RNA. Mutations in piwi, which belongs to a gene family with members required for RNAi, block PTGS and one aspect of TGS, indicating a connection between the two types of silencing. PMID:11864605

  9. RNAi: double-stranded RNA directs the ATP-dependent cleavage of mRNA at 21 to 23 nucleotide intervals.

    PubMed

    Zamore, P D; Tuschl, T; Sharp, P A; Bartel, D P

    2000-03-31

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) directs the sequence-specific degradation of mRNA through a process known as RNA interference (RNAi). Using a recently developed Drosophila in vitro system, we examined the molecular mechanism underlying RNAi. We find that RNAi is ATP dependent yet uncoupled from mRNA translation. During the RNAi reaction, both strands of the dsRNA are processed to RNA segments 21-23 nucleotides in length. Processing of the dsRNA to the small RNA fragments does not require the targeted mRNA. The mRNA is cleaved only within the region of identity with the dsRNA. Cleavage occurs at sites 21-23 nucleotides apart, the same interval observed for the dsRNA itself, suggesting that the 21-23 nucleotide fragments from the dsRNA are guiding mRNA cleavage. PMID:10778853

  10. A network-based integrative approach to prioritize reliable hits from multiple genome-wide RNAi screens in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Tu, Zhidong; Sun, Fengzhu

    2009-01-01

    Background The recently developed RNA interference (RNAi) technology has created an unprecedented opportunity which allows the function of individual genes in whole organisms or cell lines to be interrogated at genome-wide scale. However, multiple issues, such as off-target effects or low efficacies in knocking down certain genes, have produced RNAi screening results that are often noisy and that potentially yield both high rates of false positives and false negatives. Therefore, integrating RNAi screening results with other information, such as protein-protein interaction (PPI), may help to address these issues. Results By analyzing 24 genome-wide RNAi screens interrogating various biological processes in Drosophila, we found that RNAi positive hits were significantly more connected to each other when analyzed within a protein-protein interaction network, as opposed to random cases, for nearly all screens. Based on this finding, we developed a network-based approach to identify false positives (FPs) and false negatives (FNs) in these screening results. This approach relied on a scoring function, which we termed NePhe, to integrate information obtained from both PPI network and RNAi screening results. Using a novel rank-based test, we compared the performance of different NePhe scoring functions and found that diffusion kernel-based methods generally outperformed others, such as direct neighbor-based methods. Using two genome-wide RNAi screens as examples, we validated our approach extensively from multiple aspects. We prioritized hits in the original screens that were more likely to be reproduced by the validation screen and recovered potential FNs whose involvements in the biological process were suggested by previous knowledge and mutant phenotypes. Finally, we demonstrated that the NePhe scoring system helped to biologically interpret RNAi results at the module level. Conclusion By comprehensively analyzing multiple genome-wide RNAi screens, we conclude that

  11. Reduced stability and intracellular transport of dsRNA contribute to poor RNAi response in lepidopteran insects.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Jayendra Nath; Kalsi, Megha; Sethi, Amit; Narva, Kenneth E; Fishilevich, Elane; Singh, Satnam; Mogilicherla, Kanakachari; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2016-07-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become a widely used reverse genetic tool to study gene function in eukaryotic organisms and is being developed as a technology for insect pest management. The efficiency of RNAi varies among organisms. Insects from different orders also display differential efficiency of RNAi, ranging from highly efficient (coleopterans) to very low efficient (lepidopterans). We investigated the reasons for varying RNAi efficiency between lepidopteran and coleopteran cell lines and also between the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata and tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens. The dsRNA either injected or fed was degraded faster in H. virescens than in L. decemlineata. Both lepidopteran and coleopteran cell lines and tissues efficiently took up the dsRNA. Interestingly, the dsRNA administered to coleopteran cell lines and tissues was taken up and processed to siRNA whereas the dsRNA was taken up by lepidopteran cell lines and tissues but no siRNA was detected in the total RNA isolated from these cell lines and tissues. The data included in this paper showed that the degradation and intracellular transport of dsRNA are the major factors responsible for reduced RNAi efficiency in lepidopteran insects. PMID:27245473

  12. New wind in the sails: improving the agronomic value of crop plants through RNAi-mediated gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Koch, Aline; Kogel, Karl-Heinz

    2014-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a powerful genetic tool for scientific research over the past several years. It has been utilized not only in fundamental research for the assessment of gene function, but also in various fields of applied research, such as human and veterinary medicine and agriculture. In plants, RNAi strategies have the potential to allow manipulation of various aspects of food quality and nutritional content. In addition, the demonstration that agricultural pests, such as insects and nematodes, can be killed by exogenously supplied RNAi targeting their essential genes has raised the possibility that plant predation can be controlled by lethal RNAi signals generated in planta. Indeed, recent evidence argues that this strategy, called host-induced gene silencing (HIGS), is effective against sucking insects and nematodes; it also has been shown to compromise the growth and development of pathogenic fungi, as well as bacteria and viruses, on their plant hosts. Here, we review recent studies that reveal the enormous potential RNAi strategies hold not only for improving the nutritive value and safety of the food supply, but also for providing an environmentally friendly mechanism for plant protection. PMID:25040343

  13. The possible impact of persistent virus infection on the function of the RNAi machinery in insects: a hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Swevers, Luc; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Smagghe, Guy

    2013-01-01

    RNAi experiments in insects are characterized by great variability in efficiency; for instance beetles and locusts are very amenable to dsRNA-mediated gene silencing, while other insect groups, most notably lepidopterans, are more refractory to RNAi. Several factors can be forwarded that could affect the efficiency of RNAi, such as the composition and function of the intracellular RNAi machinery, the mechanism of dsRNA uptake, the presence of dsRNA- and siRNA-degrading enzymes and non-specific activation of the innate immune response. In this essay, we investigate the evidence whether persistent infection with RNA viruses could be a major factor that affects the response to exogenous dsRNA in insects. The occurrence of RNA viruses in different insect groups will be discussed, as well as several mechanisms by which viruses could interfere with the process of RNAi. Finally, the impact of RNA virus infection on the design of dsRNA-based insect control strategies will be considered. PMID:24204347

  14. Reduced stability and intracellular transport of dsRNA contribute to poor RNAi response in lepidopteran insects

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Jayendra Nath; Kalsi, Megha; Sethi, Amit; Narva, Kenneth E.; Fishilevich, Elane; Singh, Satnam; Mogilicherla, Kanakachari; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA interference (RNAi) has become a widely used reverse genetic tool to study gene function in eukaryotic organisms and is being developed as a technology for insect pest management. The efficiency of RNAi varies among organisms. Insects from different orders also display differential efficiency of RNAi, ranging from highly efficient (coleopterans) to very low efficient (lepidopterans). We investigated the reasons for varying RNAi efficiency between lepidopteran and coleopteran cell lines and also between the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata and tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens. The dsRNA either injected or fed was degraded faster in H. virescens than in L. decemlineata. Both lepidopteran and coleopteran cell lines and tissues efficiently took up the dsRNA. Interestingly, the dsRNA administered to coleopteran cell lines and tissues was taken up and processed to siRNA whereas the dsRNA was taken up by lepidopteran cell lines and tissues but no siRNA was detected in the total RNA isolated from these cell lines and tissues. The data included in this paper showed that the degradation and intracellular transport of dsRNA are the major factors responsible for reduced RNAi efficiency in lepidopteran insects. PMID:27245473

  15. Cellular localization of long non-coding RNAs affects silencing by RNAi more than by antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Kim A; Behlke, Mark A

    2016-01-29

    Thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified in mammalian cells. Some have important functions and their dysregulation can contribute to a variety of disease states. However, most lncRNAs have not been functionally characterized. Complicating their study, lncRNAs have widely varying subcellular distributions: some reside predominantly in the nucleus, the cytoplasm or in both compartments. One method to query function is to suppress expression and examine the resulting phenotype. Methods to suppress expression of mRNAs include antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and RNA interference (RNAi). Antisense and RNAi-based gene-knockdown methods vary in efficacy between different cellular compartments. It is not known if this affects their ability to suppress lncRNAs. To address whether localization of the lncRNA influences susceptibility to degradation by either ASOs or RNAi, nuclear lncRNAs (MALAT1 and NEAT1), cytoplasmic lncRNAs (DANCR and OIP5-AS1) and dual-localized lncRNAs (TUG1, CasC7 and HOTAIR) were compared for knockdown efficiency. We found that nuclear lncRNAs were more effectively suppressed using ASOs, cytoplasmic lncRNAs were more effectively suppressed using RNAi and dual-localized lncRNAs were suppressed using both methods. A mixed-modality approach combining ASOs and RNAi reagents improved knockdown efficacy, particularly for those lncRNAs that localize to both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. PMID:26578588

  16. Comparability analysis of anti-CD20 commercial (rituximab) and RNAi-mediated fucosylated antibodies by two LC-MS approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen; Rossomando, Anthony; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Karger, Barry L.

    2013-01-01

    In developing biosimilar or biobetter products, comparability to the reference product is required to claim similar integrity or intended purpose. In this work, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody developed using RNA interference to decrease core fucosylation (RNAi-mediated) was comprehensively characterized by LC-MS and compared with the commercially-available anti-CD20 rituximab (MabThera®). As anticipated, < 30% core fucose was found within the RNAi-produced molecule (compared with > 90% in rituximab), and the reduction in fucose resulting in a significant improvement in FcγRΙΙΙa binding and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Two mutations, S258Y (fully mutated) and F174I/L (partially mutated), however, were detected in the production of the RNAi-mediated molecule. An alternative LC-MS approach using dimethyl labeling (i.e., 2CH2 for rituximab and 2CD2 for the RNAi-mediated molecule) was developed to additionally compare the two mAbs and confirm the full sequence with the two mutation sites. Furthermore, disulfide linkages were found to be the same for the two antibodies, with a small portion of unpaired cysteines in both products. Disulfides were correctly linked if the samples were prepared at low pH (i.e., enzymatic digestion by pepsin at pH 2); however, trace amounts of scrambling were found by trypsin digestion at pH 6.8, and this scrambling increased significantly at pH 8. Typical modifications, such as pyro-Glu formation at the N-terminus, K clipping at the C-terminus, oxidation at Met, and deamidation at Asn, were also detected with no significant differences between the two products. Using the LC-MS approaches for the comparability study, product integrity with critical structure information was revealed for confirmation of intended purpose (core fucosylation), identification of critical parameters (e.g., sample pH), and correction as needed (amino acid mutation). PMID:23751726

  17. RNAiFold 2.0: a web server and software to design custom and Rfam-based RNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Dotu, Ivan; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Several algorithms for RNA inverse folding have been used to design synthetic riboswitches, ribozymes and thermoswitches, whose activity has been experimentally validated. The RNAiFold software is unique among approaches for inverse folding in that (exhaustive) constraint programming is used instead of heuristic methods. For that reason, RNAiFold can generate all sequences that fold into the target structure or determine that there is no solution. RNAiFold 2.0 is a complete overhaul of RNAiFold 1.0, rewritten from the now defunct COMET language to C++. The new code properly extends the capabilities of its predecessor by providing a user-friendly pipeline to design synthetic constructs having the functionality of given Rfam families. In addition, the new software supports amino acid constraints, even for proteins translated in different reading frames from overlapping coding sequences; moreover, structure compatibility/incompatibility constraints have been expanded. With these features, RNAiFold 2.0 allows the user to design single RNA molecules as well as hybridization complexes of two RNA molecules. Availability: the web server, source code and linux binaries are publicly accessible at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAiFold2.0. PMID:26019176

  18. RNA Interference of the PBAN/Pyrokinin Gene: Impact on Ant, Solenopsis invicta, and Moth, Helicoverpa zea, Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, an emerging RNA interference (RNAi) technology has shown high potential for development of novel biologically-based control agents as alternatives to insecticides. This represents a paradigm shift that will avoid many problems associated with conventional insecticides. Insect neuropeptide ...

  19. Characterization, expression and silencing by RNAi of p53 from Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wenting; Qiu, Lihua; Zhao, Chao; Fu, Mingjun; Ma, Zhenhua; Zhou, Falin; Yang, Qibin

    2016-06-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a sequence-specific transcription factor, whose target genes can regulate genomic stability, the cellular response to DNA damage and cell-cycle progression. In the present study, the full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) sequence of p53 gene from Penaeus monodon (Pmp53) was cloned by the technology of rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The cDNA of Pmp53 was 2239 bp, encoding a protein of 450 amino acids with calculated molecular weight of 50.62 kDa. The temporal expression of Pmp53 in different tissues (ovary, heart, intestine, brain, muscles, stomach and gills) and different developmental stages of ovary was investigated by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). The lowest expression level of Pmp53 was observed in the stomach, while the highest expression level was detected in the brain. During the ovary development stages, the expression level of Pmp53 reached the peak at stage III. RNA interference (RNAi) and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) injection experiments were conducted to study the expression profile of Pmp53 and PmCDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2, CDK2). Knocked down of Pmp53 by dsRNA-p53 was sequence-specific and successful. Expression levels of Pmp53 and PmCDK2 in ovary of P. monodon were significantly increased at 12-96 h post 5-HT injection. These results indicate that Pmp53 may be involved in the regulation of ovarian development of P. monodon. PMID:27112755

  20. Dissociation of Paramyxovirus Interferon Evasion Activities: Universal and Virus-Specific Requirements for Conserved V Protein Amino Acids in MDA5 Interference

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Aparna; Horvath, Curt M.

    2010-01-01

    The V protein of the paramyxovirus subfamily Paramyxovirinae is an important virulence factor that can interfere with host innate immunity by inactivating the cytosolic pathogen recognition receptor MDA5. This interference is a result of a protein-protein interaction between the highly conserved carboxyl-terminal domain of the V protein and the helicase domain of MDA5. The V protein C-terminal domain (CTD) is an evolutionarily conserved 49- to 68-amino-acid region that coordinates two zinc atoms per protein chain. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved residues in the V protein CTD has revealed both universal and virus-specific requirements for zinc coordination in MDA5 engagement and has also identified other conserved residues as critical for MDA5 interaction and interference. Mutation of these residues produces V proteins that are specifically defective for MDA5 interference and not impaired in targeting STAT1 for proteasomal degradation via the VDC ubiquitin ligase complex. Results demonstrate that mutation of conserved charged residues in the V proteins of Nipah virus, measles virus, and mumps virus also abolishes MDA5 interaction. These findings clearly define molecular determinants for MDA5 inhibition by the paramyxovirus V proteins. PMID:20719949

  1. Cloning and RNAi-mediated functional characterization of MaLac2 of the pine sawyer, Monochamus alternatus.

    PubMed

    Niu, B-L; Shen, W-F; Liu, Y; Weng, H-B; He, L-H; Mu, J-J; Wu, Z-L; Jiang, P; Tao, Y-Z; Meng, Z-Q

    2008-06-01

    Laccase, a member of a group of proteins collectively known as multicopper oxidases, is hypothesized to play an important role in insect cuticle sclerotization by oxidizing catechols in the cuticle to their corresponding quinones, which then catalyze protein cross-linking reactions. Laccase 2 has been proved as the gene required for beetle cuticle tanning through RNA interference (RNAi) experiments on red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. The pine sawyer beetle, Monochamus alternatus (Coleoptero: Cerambycidae) is the insect serving as a major vector of the pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, which is the causative agent for pine wilt disease. The cDNA of MaLac2 was cloned from the insect in this study. The conceptual amino-acid sequence deduced was much conserved with other known insect laccases, particularly with the enzyme of Tribolium castaneum. Injection in hemolymph of pine sawyer larva of dsRNA targeting the laccase 2 mRNA leads to important alterations of the tanning, hardening and sclerotization of the pupal and adult cuticles. Defaults appear in a dose-dependent manner and high loads of dsRNA are lethal. The decrease of the endogenous laccase 2 mRNA affects the procuticle which is thinner and without the characteristic piling up of successive layers. The observations reinforce the role of laccase 2 as an essential phenoloxidase for making cuticle. PMID:18477244

  2. Gene Silencing by RNA Interference in the White Rot Fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium▿

    PubMed Central

    Matityahu, Avi; Hadar, Yitzhak; Dosoretz, Carlos G.; Belinky, Paula A.

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of RNA interference (RNAi) is demonstrated in the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. The manganese-containing superoxide dismutase gene (MnSOD1) was used as the target for RNAi. The plasmid constructed for gene silencing contained a transcriptional unit for hairpin RNA expression. Significantly lower MnSOD expression at both the mRNA and protein activity levels was detected in RNAi transformants. Furthermore, even though P. chrysosporium possesses three copies of the MnSOD gene, this RNAi construct was sufficient to decrease the enzymatic activity by as much as 70% relative to control levels. Implementation of the RNAi technique in P. chrysosporium provides an alternative genetic tool for studies of gene function, particularly of essential genes or gene families. PMID:18606804

  3. RNAi-mediated resistance to Cassava brown streak Uganda virus in transgenic cassava.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Jitender S; Ogwok, Emmanuel; Wagaba, Henry; Patil, Basavaprabhu L; Bagewadi, Basavaraj; Alicai, Titus; Gaitan-Solis, Eliana; Taylor, Nigel J; Fauquet, Claude M

    2011-09-01

    Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD), caused by Cassava brown streak Uganda virus (CBSUV) and Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV), is of new epidemic importance to cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) production in East Africa, and an emerging threat to the crop in Central and West Africa. This study demonstrates that at least one of these two ipomoviruses, CBSUV, can be efficiently controlled using RNA interference (RNAi) technology in cassava. An RNAi construct targeting the near full-length coat protein (FL-CP) of CBSUV was expressed constitutively as a hairpin construct in cassava. Transgenic cassava lines expressing small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against this sequence showed 100% resistance to CBSUV across replicated graft inoculation experiments. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed the presence of CBSUV in leaves and some tuberous roots from challenged controls, but not in the same tissues from transgenic plants. This is the first demonstration of RNAi-mediated resistance to the ipomovirus CBSUV in cassava. PMID:21726367

  4. Heterochromatin and RNAi are required to establish CENP-A chromatin at centromeres.

    PubMed

    Folco, Hernan Diego; Pidoux, Alison L; Urano, Takeshi; Allshire, Robin C

    2008-01-01

    Heterochromatin is defined by distinct posttranslational modifications on histones, such as methylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9), which allows heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1)-related chromodomain proteins to bind. Heterochromatin is frequently found near CENP-A chromatin, which is the key determinant of kinetochore assembly. We have discovered that the RNA interference (RNAi)-directed heterochromatin flanking the central kinetochore domain at fission yeast centromeres is required to promote CENP-A(Cnp1) and kinetochore assembly over the central domain. The H3K9 methyltransferase Clr4 (Suv39); the ribonuclease Dicer, which cleaves heterochromatic double-stranded RNA to small interfering RNA (siRNA); Chp1, a component of the RNAi effector complex (RNA-induced initiation of transcriptional gene silencing; RITS); and Swi6 (HP1) are required to establish CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin on naïve templates. Once assembled, CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin is propagated by epigenetic means in the absence of heterochromatin. Thus, another, potentially conserved, role for centromeric RNAi-directed heterochromatin has been identified. PMID:18174443

  5. Genome-Wide RNAi Screening to Dissect the TGF-β Signal Transduction Pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaochu; Xu, Lan

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family of cytokines figures prominently in regulation of embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis from Drosophila to mammals. Genetic defects affecting TGF-β signaling underlie developmental disorders and diseases such as cancer in human. Therefore, delineating the molecular mechanism by which TGF-β regulates cell biology is critical for understanding normal biology and disease mechanisms. Forward genetic screens in model organisms and biochemical approaches in mammalian tissue culture were instrumental in initial characterization of the TGF-β signal transduction pathway. With complete sequence information of the genomes and the advent of RNA interference (RNAi) technology, genome-wide RNAi screening emerged as a powerful functional genomics approach to systematically delineate molecular components of signal transduction pathways. Here, we describe a protocol for image-based whole-genome RNAi screening aimed at identifying molecules required for TGF-β signaling into the nucleus. Using this protocol we examined >90 % of annotated Drosophila open reading frames (ORF) individually and successfully uncovered several novel factors serving critical roles in the TGF-β pathway. Thus cell-based high-throughput functional genomics can uncover new mechanistic insights on signaling pathways beyond what the classical genetics had revealed. PMID:26520138

  6. Phytochrome RNAi enhances major fibre quality and agronomic traits of the cotton Gossypium hirsutum L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurakhmonov, Ibrokhim Y.; Buriev, Zabardast T.; Saha, Sukumar; Jenkins, Johnie N.; Abdukarimov, Abdusattor; Pepper, Alan E.

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous improvement of fibre quality, early-flowering, early-maturity and productivity in Upland cotton (G. hirsutum) is a challenging task for conventional breeding. The influence of red/far-red light ratio on the fibre length prompted us to examine the phenotypic effects of RNA interference (RNAi) of the cotton PHYA1 gene. Here we show a suppression of up to ~70% for the PHYA1 transcript, and compensatory overexpression of up to ~20-fold in the remaining phytochromes in somatically regenerated PHYA1 RNAi cotton plants. Two independent transformants of three generations exhibited vigorous root and vegetative growth, early-flowering, significantly improved upper half mean fibre length and an improvement in other major fibre characteristics. Small decreases in lint traits were observed but seed cotton yield was increased an average 10-17% compared with controls. RNAi-associated phenotypes were heritable and transferable via sexual hybridization. These results should aid in the development of early-maturing and productive Upland cultivars with superior fibre quality.

  7. Harnessing RNAi-based nanomedicines for therapeutic gene silencing in B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Shiri; Toker, Itai A.; Emmanuel, Rafi; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Rosenblum, Daniel; Goldsmith, Meir; Abraham, Avigdor; Benjamini, Ohad; Bairey, Osnat; Raanani, Pia; Nagler, Arnon; Lieberman, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in systemic small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery to the liver and to solid tumors, systemic siRNA delivery to leukocytes remains challenging. The ability to silence gene expression in leukocytes has great potential for identifying drug targets and for RNAi-based therapy for leukocyte diseases. However, both normal and malignant leukocytes are among the most difficult targets for siRNA delivery as they are resistant to conventional transfection reagents and are dispersed in the body. We used mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) as a prototypic blood cancer for validating a novel siRNA delivery strategy. MCL is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma that overexpresses cyclin D1 with relatively poor prognosis. Down-regulation of cyclin D1 using RNA interference (RNAi) is a potential therapeutic approach to this malignancy. Here, we designed lipid-based nanoparticles (LNPs) coated with anti-CD38 monoclonal antibodies that are specifically taken up by human MCL cells in the bone marrow of xenografted mice. When loaded with siRNAs against cyclin D1, CD38-targeted LNPs induced gene silencing in MCL cells and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice with no observed adverse effects. These results highlight the therapeutic potential of cyclin D1 therapy in MCL and present a novel RNAi delivery system that opens new therapeutic opportunities for treating MCL and other B-cell malignancies. PMID:26699502

  8. RNAi-based inhibition of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus replication in transgenic pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Li, Qiuyan; Bao, Yonghua; Li, Jinxiu; Chen, Zhisheng; Yu, Xiuling; Zhao, Yaofeng; Tian, Kegong; Li, Ning

    2014-02-10

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an economically devastating viral disease causing heavy losses to the swine industry worldwide. Many studies have shown that transient delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) or adenovirus-mediated RNA interfere (RNAi) could potentially inhibit porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) replication in vivo and in vitro. Here, we applied RNAi to produce transgenic (TG) pigs that constitutively expressed PRRSV-specific siRNA derived from small hairpin RNA (shRNA). First, we evaluated siRNA expression in the founding and F1 generation pigs and confirmed stable transmission. Then, we detected the expression of IFN-β and protein kinase R (PKR) and found no difference among TG, non-transgenic (NTG), and wild-type pigs. Lastly, the F1 generation pigs, including TG and NTG piglets, were challenged with 3×10⁴·⁵ TCID₅₀ of JXA1, a highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV). Our results showed that the in vivo siRNA expression substantially reduced the serum HP-PRRSV titers and increased survival time by 3 days when TG pigs were compared with the NTG controls. These data suggested that RNAi-based genetic modification might be used to breed viral-resistant livestock with stable siRNA expression with no complications of siRNA toxicity. PMID:24333125

  9. Compositional equivalency of RNAi-mediated virus-resistant transgenic soybean and its nontransgenic counterpart.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuchun; Zhao, Pingjuan; Wu, Kunxin; Zhang, Yuliang; Peng, Ming; Liu, Zhixin

    2014-05-14

    RNA silencing or RNA interference (RNAi), which is triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), is an evolutionarily conserved process that is active in a wide variety of eukaryotic organisms. Engineering plants with hairpin construct in which the viral gene is arranged in inverted repeats (IR) renders plants resistant to plant virus infection. However, there is no report on whether biologically important changes occurred by the insertion of IR, which confer transgenic plants virus resistance. In the present study, the compositions of virus-resistant transgenic soybean seeds developed by insertion of three short IRs, each containing the specific, highly conserved sequences derived from one virus, were compared with those of nontransgenic counterparts by applying the principle of substantial equivalence to determine whether significant undesirable biological changes occurred by IR insertion. The results revealed that the nutrient components as well as antinutrient contents of these virus-resistant soybean lines are substantially equivalent to those of the nontransgenic counterparts, and the majority of the measured amounts of nutritional components and antinutrient contents are well within the range of values reported for other commercial soybean lines. The results imply that no biologically important changes occurred by the insertion of IRs in the RNAi-mediated virus-resistant transgenic soybeans. The results can serve as baseline information for developing RNAi-mediated transgenic soybean cultivars or other crops with broader spectrum virus resistance. PMID:24754373

  10. Harnessing RNAi-based nanomedicines for therapeutic gene silencing in B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Shiri; Toker, Itai A; Emmanuel, Rafi; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Rosenblum, Daniel; Goldsmith, Meir; Abraham, Avigdor; Benjamini, Ohad; Bairey, Osnat; Raanani, Pia; Nagler, Arnon; Lieberman, Judy; Peer, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in systemic small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery to the liver and to solid tumors, systemic siRNA delivery to leukocytes remains challenging. The ability to silence gene expression in leukocytes has great potential for identifying drug targets and for RNAi-based therapy for leukocyte diseases. However, both normal and malignant leukocytes are among the most difficult targets for siRNA delivery as they are resistant to conventional transfection reagents and are dispersed in the body. We used mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) as a prototypic blood cancer for validating a novel siRNA delivery strategy. MCL is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma that overexpresses cyclin D1 with relatively poor prognosis. Down-regulation of cyclin D1 using RNA interference (RNAi) is a potential therapeutic approach to this malignancy. Here, we designed lipid-based nanoparticles (LNPs) coated with anti-CD38 monoclonal antibodies that are specifically taken up by human MCL cells in the bone marrow of xenografted mice. When loaded with siRNAs against cyclin D1, CD38-targeted LNPs induced gene silencing in MCL cells and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice with no observed adverse effects. These results highlight the therapeutic potential of cyclin D1 therapy in MCL and present a novel RNAi delivery system that opens new therapeutic opportunities for treating MCL and other B-cell malignancies. PMID:26699502

  11. Brain-targeting delivery for RNAi neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    An, Sai; Kuang, Yuyang; Shen, Teng; Li, Jianfeng; Ma, Haojun; Guo, Yubo; He, Xi; Jiang, Chen

    2013-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with modification of brain-targeting molecules have been extensively exploited for therapeutic gene delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). As one of the effective RNA interference (RNAi) approaches, short hairpin RNA (shRNA) has been proved to be promising in the field of gene therapy. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (Ask1) has been reported to be an important target for gene therapy against cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. In this study, dendrigraft poly-l-lysine (DGL) was decorated by dermorphin (a μ-opiate receptor agonist) through PEG for efficient brain-targeting, then complexed with anti-Ask1 shRNA plasmid DNA, yielding the DGL-PEG-dermorphin/shRNA NPs. The DGL-PEG-dermorphin/shRNA NPs were characterized and estimated the brain-targeting ability. In vitro, increased cellular uptake and transfection efficiency were explored; in vivo, preferable accumulation and gene transfection in brain were showed in images. The DGL-PEG-dermorphin/shRNA NPs also revealed high efficiency of neuroprotection. As a result of RNAi, corresponding mRNA was distinctly degraded, expression of Ask1 protein was obviously suppressed, apoptotic cell death was apparently decreased and cerebral infarct area was significantly reduced. Above all, DGL-PEG-dermorphin/shRNA NPs were proved to be efficient and safe for brain-targeting RNAi neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. PMID:23968852

  12. Multiple Renal Cyst Development but Not Situs Abnormalities in Transgenic RNAi Mice against Inv::GFP Rescue Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kamijho, Yuki; Shiozaki, Yayoi; Sakurai, Eiki; Hanaoka, Kazunori; Watanabe, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    In this study we generated RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene knockdown transgenic mice (transgenic RNAi mice) against the functional Inv gene. Inv mutant mice show consistently reversed internal organs (situs inversus), multiple renal cysts and neonatal lethality. The Inv::GFP-rescue mice, which introduced the Inv::GFP fusion gene, can rescue inv mutant mice phenotypes. This indicates that the Inv::GFP gene is functional in vivo. To analyze the physiological functions of the Inv gene, and to demonstrate the availability of transgenic RNAi mice, we introduced a short hairpin RNA expression vector against GFP mRNA into Inv::GFP-rescue mice and analyzed the gene silencing effects and Inv functions by examining phenotypes. Transgenic RNAi mice with the Inv::GFP-rescue gene (Inv-KD mice) down-regulated Inv::GFP fusion protein and showed hypomorphic phenotypes of inv mutant mice, such as renal cyst development, but not situs abnormalities or postnatal lethality. This indicates that shRNAi-mediated gene silencing systems that target the tag sequence of the fusion gene work properly in vivo, and suggests that a relatively high level of Inv protein is required for kidney development in contrast to left/right axis determination. Inv::GFP protein was significantly down-regulated in the germ cells of Inv-KD mice testis compared with somatic cells, suggesting the existence of a testicular germ cell-specific enhanced RNAi system that regulates germ cell development. The Inv-KD mouse is useful for studying Inv gene functions in adult tissue that are unable to be analyzed in inv mutant mice showing postnatal lethality. In addition, the shRNA-based gene silencing system against the tag sequence of the fusion gene can be utilized as a new technique to regulate gene expression in either in vitro or in vivo experiments. PMID:24586938

  13. Citrus tristeza virus-based RNAi in citrus plants induces gene silencing in Diaphorina citri, a phloem-sap sucking insect vector of citrus greening disease (Huanglongbing).

    PubMed

    Hajeri, Subhas; Killiny, Nabil; El-Mohtar, Choaa; Dawson, William O; Gowda, Siddarame

    2014-04-20

    A transient expression vector based on Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is unusually stable. Because of its stability it is being considered for use in the field to control Huanglongbing (HLB), which is caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) and vectored by Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri. In the absence of effective control strategies for CLas, emphasis has been on control of D. citri. Coincident cohabitation in phloem tissue by CLas, D. citri and CTV was exploited to develop a novel method to mitigate HLB through RNA interference (RNAi). Since CTV has three RNA silencing suppressors, it was not known if CTV-based vector could induce RNAi in citrus. Yet, expression of sequences targeting citrus phytoene desaturase gene by CTV-RNAi resulted in photo-bleaching phenotype. CTV-RNAi vector, engineered with truncated abnormal wing disc (Awd) gene of D. citri, induced altered Awd expression when silencing triggers ingested by feeding D. citri nymphs. Decreased Awd in nymphs resulted in malformed-wing phenotype in adults and increased adult mortality. This impaired ability of D. citri to fly would potentially limit the successful vectoring of CLas bacteria between citrus trees in the grove. CTV-RNAi vector would be relevant for fast-track screening of candidate sequences for RNAi-mediated pest control. PMID:24572372

  14. Hypocotyl-based Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of soybean (Glycine max) and application for RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Wang, Geliang; Xu, Yinong

    2008-07-01

    An efficient system of gene transformation is necessary for soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] functional genomics and gene modification by using RNA interference (RNAi) technology. To establish such system, we improved the conditions of tissue culture and transformation for increasing the frequency of adventitious shoots and decreasing the browning and necrosis of hypocotyls. Adding N(6)-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and silver nitrate in culture medium enhanced the shoot formation on hypocotyls. BAP increased the frequency of the hypocotyls containing adventitious shoots, while silver nitrate increased the number of shoots on the hypocotyls. As a result, the number of adventitious shoots on hypocotyls cultured in medium containing both BAP and silver nitrate was 5-fold higher than the controls. Adding antioxidants in co-cultivation medium resulted in a significant decrease in occurrence of browning and necrosis of hypocotyls and increase in levels of beta-Glucuronidase (GUS) gene expression. Histochemical assays showed that the apical meristem of hypocotyls was the "target tissue" for Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation of soybean. Gene silencing of functional gene by using RNAi technology was carried out under above conditions. A silencing construct containing an inverted-repeat fragment of the GmFAD2 gene was introduced into soybean by using the A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Several lines with high oleic acid were obtained, in which mean oleic acid content ranged from 71.5 to 81.9%. Our study demonstrates that this transgenic approach could be efficiently used to improve soybean quality and productivity through functional genomics. PMID:18347801

  15. funRNA: a fungi-centered genomics platform for genes encoding key components of RNAi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is involved in genome defense as well as diverse cellular, developmental, and physiological processes. Key components of RNAi are Argonaute, Dicer, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), which have been functionally characterized mainly in model organisms. The key components are believed to exist throughout eukaryotes; however, there is no systematic platform for archiving and dissecting these important gene families. In addition, few fungi have been studied to date, limiting our understanding of RNAi in fungi. Here we present funRNA http://funrna.riceblast.snu.ac.kr/, a fungal kingdom-wide comparative genomics platform for putative genes encoding Argonaute, Dicer, and RdRP. Description To identify and archive genes encoding the abovementioned key components, protein domain profiles were determined from reference sequences obtained from UniProtKB/SwissProt. The domain profiles were searched using fungal, metazoan, and plant genomes, as well as bacterial and archaeal genomes. 1,163, 442, and 678 genes encoding Argonaute, Dicer, and RdRP, respectively, were predicted. Based on the identification results, active site variation of Argonaute, diversification of Dicer, and sequence analysis of RdRP were discussed in a fungus-oriented manner. funRNA provides results from diverse bioinformatics programs and job submission forms for BLAST, BLASTMatrix, and ClustalW. Furthermore, sequence collections created in funRNA are synced with several gene family analysis portals and databases, offering further analysis opportunities. Conclusions funRNA provides identification results from a broad taxonomic range and diverse analysis functions, and could be used in diverse comparative and evolutionary studies. It could serve as a versatile genomics workbench for key components of RNAi. PMID:25522231

  16. RNA interference of IL-10 in leukemic B-1 cells.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Brian A; Mansour, Amal; Lin, Yi-Chu; Kotenko, Sergei; Raveche, Elizabeth

    2004-07-23

    RNA interference, or RNAi, is designed to work by Watson-Crick base pairing and to result in a posttranscriptional block in protein synthesis. Antiapoptotic proteins are a major focus of cancer therapy and make attractive targets for RNAi. An IL-10 RNAi sequence was designed in accordance with Tuschl rules and was modeled to a hairpin configuration. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the most common leukemia in the Western world, the failure to undergo apoptosis may be responsible for the accumulation of malignant B-1 cells. Interleukin-10, despite controversy, has been shown to have antiapoptotic properties, and increased endogenous IL-10 production has been found in CLL by several labs. A malignant B-1 cell line, LNC, derived from an NZB mouse (a murine model for CLL) was utilized as a target for IL-10 RNAi. Our earlier studies of antisense IL-10 resulted in antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects. The cytotoxic effects of IL-10 RNAi were dose- and time-dependent, with an optimal dose 10-fold lower than that of antisense IL-10. IL-10 RNAi lowered IL-10 protein as measured by ELISA. 2 micro M IL-10 RNAi initiated a G2/M block and a decrease in the message for cdc25C, the M-phase inducer phosphatase. IL-10 RNAi efficiently induced apoptosis. Bcl7C, a member of the antiapoptotic Bcl family, was significantly down-regulated. IL-10 modulating Bcl7C expression represents a novel mechanism in the evasion of apoptosis. This approach, by itself or in conjunction with current therapies, merits consideration in similar B-cell malignancies. PMID:15270555

  17. Long-term effect of systemic RNA interference on circadian clock genes in hemimetabolous insects.

    PubMed

    Uryu, Outa; Kamae, Yuichi; Tomioka, Kenji; Yoshii, Taishi

    2013-04-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) strategy, which enables gene-specific knock-down of transcripts, has been spread across a wide area of insect studies for investigating gene function without regard to model and non-model insects. This technique is of particular benefit to promote molecular studies on non-model insects. However, the optimal conditions for RNAi are still not well understood because of its variable efficiency depending on the species, target genes, and experimental conditions. To apply RNAi technique to long-running experiments such as chronobiological studies, the effects of RNAi have to persist throughout the experiment. In this study, we attempted to determine the optimal concentration of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) for systemic RNAi and its effective period in two different insect species, the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus and the firebrat Thermobia domestica. In both species, higher concentrations of dsRNA principally yielded a more efficient knock-down of mRNA levels of tested clock genes, although the effect depended on the gene and the species. Surprisingly, the effect of the RNAi reached its maximum effect 1-2 weeks and 1 month after the injection of dsRNA in the crickets and the firebrats, respectively, suggesting a slow but long-term effect of RNAi. Our study provides fundamental information for utilizing RNAi technique in any long-running experiment. PMID:23458340

  18. Interference Among Group A Arboviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zebovitz, Eugene; Brown, Arthur

    1968-01-01

    Interference among group A arboviruses is described which does not involve the mediation of interferon. Interference was observed only if the interfering virus had an advantage over the challenge virus, either in time or in multiplicity of infection. Adsorption, penetration, and uncoating of challenge virus did not appear to be inhibited, but the synthesis of infectious viral ribonucleic acid of the challenge virus was significantly retarded. It was shown with temperature-sensitive viruses or mutants that the replication of viral ribonucleic acid by the interfering virus was required to establish interference. A mechanism of interference based on a competition for replication sites or substrates is compared with other possible explanations. PMID:5701825

  19. Constraint factor graph cut–based active contour method for automated cellular image segmentation in RNAi screening

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, C.; LI, H.; ZHOU, X.; WONG, S. T. C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Image-based, high throughput genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) experiments are increasingly carried out to facilitate the understanding of gene functions in intricate biological processes. Automated screening of such experiments generates a large number of images with great variations in image quality, which makes manual analysis unreasonably time-consuming. Therefore, effective techniques for automatic image analysis are urgently needed, in which segmentation is one of the most important steps. This paper proposes a fully automatic method for cells segmentation in genome-wide RNAi screening images. The method consists of two steps: nuclei and cytoplasm segmentation. Nuclei are extracted and labelled to initialize cytoplasm segmentation. Since the quality of RNAi image is rather poor, a novel scale-adaptive steerable filter is designed to enhance the image in order to extract long and thin protrusions on the spiky cells. Then, constraint factor GCBAC method and morphological algorithms are combined to be an integrated method to segment tight clustered cells. Compared with the results obtained by using seeded watershed and the ground truth, that is, manual labelling results by experts in RNAi screening data, our method achieves higher accuracy. Compared with active contour methods, our method consumes much less time. The positive results indicate that the proposed method can be applied in automatic image analysis of multi-channel image screening data. PMID:18445146

  20. The novel ABC transporter ABCH1 is a potential target for RNAi-based insect pest control and resistance management

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhaojiang; Kang, Shi; Zhu, Xun; Xia, Jixing; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xie, Wen; Zhang, Youjun

    2015-01-01

    Insect pests cause serious crop damage and develop high-level resistance to chemical insecticides and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal Cry toxins. A new promising approach for controlling them and overcoming this resistance is RNA interference (RNAi). The RNAi-based insect control strategy depends on the selection of suitable target genes. In this study, we cloned and characterized a novel ABC transporter gene PxABCH1 in diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). Phylogenetic analysis showed that PxABCH1 is closely related to ABCA and ABCG subfamily members. Spatial-temporal expression detection revealed that PxABCH1 was expressed in all tissues and developmental stages, and highest expressed in head and male adult. Midgut sequence variation and expression analyses of PxABCH1 in all the susceptible and Bt-resistant P. xylostella strains and the functional analysis by sublethal RNAi demonstrated that Cry1Ac resistance was independent of this gene. Silencing of PxABCH1 by a relatively high dose of dsRNA dramatically reduced its expression and resulted in larval and pupal lethal phenotypes in both susceptible and Cry1Ac-resistant P. xylostella strains. To our knowledge, this study provides the first insight into ABCH1 in lepidopterans and reveals it as an excellent target for RNAi-based insect pest control and resistance management. PMID:26333918

  1. The novel ABC transporter ABCH1 is a potential target for RNAi-based insect pest control and resistance management.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaojiang; Kang, Shi; Zhu, Xun; Xia, Jixing; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xie, Wen; Zhang, Youjun

    2015-01-01

    Insect pests cause serious crop damage and develop high-level resistance to chemical insecticides and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal Cry toxins. A new promising approach for controlling them and overcoming this resistance is RNA interference (RNAi). The RNAi-based insect control strategy depends on the selection of suitable target genes. In this study, we cloned and characterized a novel ABC transporter gene PxABCH1 in diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). Phylogenetic analysis showed that PxABCH1 is closely related to ABCA and ABCG subfamily members. Spatial-temporal expression detection revealed that PxABCH1 was expressed in all tissues and developmental stages, and highest expressed in head and male adult. Midgut sequence variation and expression analyses of PxABCH1 in all the susceptible and Bt-resistant P. xylostella strains and the functional analysis by sublethal RNAi demonstrated that Cry1Ac resistance was independent of this gene. Silencing of PxABCH1 by a relatively high dose of dsRNA dramatically reduced its expression and resulted in larval and pupal lethal phenotypes in both susceptible and Cry1Ac-resistant P. xylostella strains. To our knowledge, this study provides the first insight into ABCH1 in lepidopterans and reveals it as an excellent target for RNAi-based insect pest control and resistance management. PMID:26333918

  2. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of the β-subunit gene in 7S globulin protein in soybean using RNAi technology.

    PubMed

    Qu, J; Liu, S Y; Wang, P W; Guan, S Y; Fan, Y G; Yao, D; Zhang, L; Dai, J L

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use RNA interference (RNAi) to improve protein quality and decrease anti-nutritional effects in soybean. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation was conducted using RNAi and an expression vector containing the 7S globulin β-subunit gene. The BAR gene was used as the selective marker and cotyledonary nodes of soybean genotype Jinong 27 were chosen as explant material. Regenerated plants were detected by molecular biology techniques. Transformation of the β-subunit gene in the 7S protein was detected by PCR, Southern blot, and q-PCR. Positive plants (10 T0, and 6 T1, and 13 T2) were tested by PCR. Hybridization bands were detected by Southern blot analysis in two of the T1 transgenic plants. RNAi expression vectors containing the soybean 7S protein β-subunit gene were successfully integrated into the genome of transgenic plants. qRT-PCR analysis in soybean seeds showed a clear decrease in expression of the soybean β-subunit gene. The level of 7S protein β-subunit expression in transgenic plants decreased by 77.5% as compared to that of the wild-type plants. This study has established a basis for the application of RNAi to improve the anti-nutritional effects of soybean. PMID:27173254

  3. Drosophila RNAi screening in a postgenomic world

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has a long history as a model organism with several unique features that make it an ideal research tool for the study of the relationship between genotype and phenotype. Importantly fundamental genetic principles as well as key human disease genes have been uncovered through the use of Drosophila. The contribution of the fruit fly to science and medicine continues in the postgenomic era as cell-based Drosophila RNAi screens are a cost-effective and scalable enabling technology that can be used to quantify the contribution of different genes to diverse cellular processes. Drosophila high-throughput screens can also be used as integral part of systems-level approaches to describe the architecture and dynamics of cellular networks. PMID:21752787

  4. RNAi Screening of Leukemia Cells Using Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anupriya; Tyner, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    RNAi-mediated screening has been an integral tool for biological discovery for the past 15 years. A variety of approaches have been employed for implementation of this technique, including pooled, depletion/enrichment screening with lentiviral shRNAs, and segregated screening of panels of individual siRNAs. The latter approach of siRNA panel screening requires efficient methods for transfection of siRNAs into the target cells. In the case of suspension leukemia cell lines and primary cells, many of the conventional transfection techniques using liposomal or calcium phosphate-mediated transfection provide very low efficiency. In this case, electroporation is the only transfection technique offering high efficiency transfection of siRNAs into the target leukemia cells. Here, we describe methods for optimization and implementation of siRNA electroporation into leukemia cell lines and primary patient specimens, and we further offer suggested electroporation settings for some commonly used leukemia cell lines. PMID:27581286

  5. Current issues of RNAi therapeutics delivery and development.

    PubMed

    Haussecker, D

    2014-12-10

    12 years following the discovery of the RNAi mechanism in Man, a number of RNAi therapeutics development candidates have emerged with profiles suggesting that they could become drugs of significant medical importance for diseases like TTR amyloidosis, HBV, solid cancers, and hemophilia. Despite this robust progress, the perception of RNAi therapeutics has been on a roller-coaster ride driven not only by science, but also regulatory trends, the stock markets, and Big Pharma business development decisions [1]. This presentation provides an update on the current state of RNAi therapeutics development with a particular focus on what RNAi delivery can achieve today and key challenges to be overcome to expand therapeutic opportunities. The delivery of RNAi triggers to disease-relevant cell types clearly represents the rate-limiting factor in broadly expanding the applicability of RNAi therapeutics. Today, with at least 3 delivery options (lipid nanoparticles/LNPs, GalNAc-siRNA conjugates, Dynamic PolyConjugates/DPCs) for which profound gene knockdowns have been demonstrated in non-human primates and in the clinic, RNAi therapeutics should in principle be able to address most diseases related to gene expression in the liver. Given the central importance of the liver in systemic physiology, this already represents a significant therapeutic and commercial opportunity rivaling that of e.g. monoclonal antibodies. Beyond the liver, there is a reason to believe that current RNAi therapeutics technologies can address a number of solid tumors (e.g. LNPs), diseases of the eye (e.g. self-delivering RNAi triggers) as well as diseases involving the respiratory epithelium (e.g. aerosolized LNPs), certain phagocytic cells (LNPs), hematopoietic stem cells and their progeny (lentiviral DNA-directed RNAi), vascular endothelial cells (cationic lipoplexes), and certain cell types in the kidney (self-delivering RNAi triggers, DPCs; Table 1). Despite this success, there has been a sense that

  6. Lipid and polymeric carrier-mediated nucleic acid delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Mahato, Ram I

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Nucleic acids such as plasmid DNA, antisense oligonucleotide, and RNA interference (RNAi) molecules, have a great potential to be used as therapeutics for the treatment of various genetic and acquired diseases. To design a successful nucleic acid delivery system, the pharmacological effect of nucleic acids, the physiological condition of the subjects or sites, and the physicochemical properties of nucleic acid and carriers have to be thoroughly examined. Areas covered in this review The commonly used lipids, polymers and corresponding delivery systems are reviewed in terms of their characteristics, applications, advantages and limitations. What the reader will gain This article aims to provide an overview of biological barriers and strategies to overcome these barriers by properly designing effective synthetic carriers for nucleic acid delivery. Take home message A thorough understanding of biological barriers and the structure–activity relationship of lipid and polymeric carriers is the key for effective nucleic acid therapy. PMID:20836625

  7. A Combination of CRISPR/Cas9 and Standardized RNAi as a Versatile Platform for the Characterization of Gene Function

    PubMed Central

    Wissel, Sebastian; Kieser, Anja; Yasugi, Tetsuo; Duchek, Peter; Roitinger, Elisabeth; Gokcezade, Joseph; Steinmann, Victoria; Gaul, Ulrike; Mechtler, Karl; Förstemann, Klaus; Knoblich, Jürgen A.; Neumüller, Ralph A.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional loss-of-function studies in Drosophila suffer from a number of shortcomings, including off-target effects in the case of RNA interference (RNAi) or the stochastic nature of mosaic clonal analysis. Here, we describe minimal in vivo GFP interference (miGFPi) as a versatile strategy to characterize gene function and to conduct highly stringent, cell type-specific loss-of-function experiments in Drosophila. miGFPi combines CRISPR/Cas9-mediated tagging of genes at their endogenous locus with an immunotag and an exogenous 21 nucleotide RNAi effector sequence with the use of a single reagent, highly validated RNAi line targeting this sequence. We demonstrate the utility and time effectiveness of this method by characterizing the function of the Polymerase I (Pol I)-associated transcription factor Tif-1a, and the previously uncharacterized gene MESR4, in the Drosophila female germline stem cell lineage. In addition, we show that miGFPi serves as a powerful technique to functionally characterize individual isoforms of a gene. We exemplify this aspect of miGFPi by studying isoform-specific loss-of-function phenotypes of the longitudinals lacking (lola) gene in neural stem cells. Altogether, the miGFPi strategy constitutes a generalized loss-of-function approach that is amenable to the study of the function of all genes in the genome in a stringent and highly time effective manner. PMID:27280787

  8. A Combination of CRISPR/Cas9 and Standardized RNAi as a Versatile Platform for the Characterization of Gene Function.

    PubMed

    Wissel, Sebastian; Kieser, Anja; Yasugi, Tetsuo; Duchek, Peter; Roitinger, Elisabeth; Gokcezade, Joseph; Steinmann, Victoria; Gaul, Ulrike; Mechtler, Karl; Förstemann, Klaus; Knoblich, Jürgen A; Neumüller, Ralph A

    2016-01-01

    Traditional loss-of-function studies in Drosophila suffer from a number of shortcomings, including off-target effects in the case of RNA interference (RNAi) or the stochastic nature of mosaic clonal analysis. Here, we describe minimal in vivo GFP interference (miGFPi) as a versatile strategy to characterize gene function and to conduct highly stringent, cell type-specific loss-of-function experiments in Drosophila miGFPi combines CRISPR/Cas9-mediated tagging of genes at their endogenous locus with an immunotag and an exogenous 21 nucleotide RNAi effector sequence with the use of a single reagent, highly validated RNAi line targeting this sequence. We demonstrate the utility and time effectiveness of this method by characterizing the function of the Polymerase I (Pol I)-associated transcription factor Tif-1a, and the previously uncharacterized gene MESR4, in the Drosophila female germline stem cell lineage. In addition, we show that miGFPi serves as a powerful technique to functionally characterize individual isoforms of a gene. We exemplify this aspect of miGFPi by studying isoform-specific loss-of-function phenotypes of the longitudinals lacking (lola) gene in neural stem cells. Altogether, the miGFPi strategy constitutes a generalized loss-of-function approach that is amenable to the study of the function of all genes in the genome in a stringent and highly time effective manner. PMID:27280787

  9. Dexamethasone alone and in combination with desipramine, phenytoin, valproic acid or levetiracetam interferes with 5-ALA-mediated PpIX production and cellular retention in glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Johnathan E; Steele, Christopher J; Rovin, Richard A; Belton, Robert J; Winn, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Extent of resection of glioblastoma (GBM) correlates with overall survival. Fluorescence-guided resection (FGR) using 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) can improve the extent of resection. Unfortunately not all patients given 5-ALA accumulate sufficient quantities of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) for successful FGR. In this study, we investigated the effects of dexamethasone, desipramine, phenytoin, valproic acid, and levetiracetam on the production and accumulation of PpIX in U87MG cells. All of these drugs, except levetiracetam, reduce the total amount of PpIX produced by GBM cells (p < 0.05). When dexamethasone is mixed with another drug (desipramine, phenytoin, valproic acid or levetiracetam) the amount of PpIX produced is further decreased (p < 0.01). However, when cells are analyzed for PpIX cellular retention, dexamethasone accumulated significantly more PpIX than the vehicle control (p < 0.05). Cellular retention of PpIX was not different from controls in cells treated with dexamethasone plus desipramine, valproic acid or levetiracetam, but was significantly less for dexamethasone plus phenytoin (p < 0.01). These data suggest that medications given before and during surgery may interfere with PpIX accumulation in malignant cells. At this time, levetiracetam appears to be the best medication in its class (anticonvulsants) for patients undergoing 5-ALA-mediated FGR. PMID:26643803

  10. Monitoring the Wet-Heat Inactivation Dynamics of Single Spores of Bacillus Species by Using Raman Tweezers, Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy, and Nucleic Acid Dye Fluorescence Microscopy▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengfei; Kong, Lingbo; Wang, Guiwen; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-qing

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic processes during wet-heat treatment of individual spores of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, and Bacillus subtilis at 80 to 90°C were investigated using dual-trap Raman spectroscopy, differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy, and nucleic acid stain (SYTO 16) fluorescence microscopy. During spore wet-heat treatment, while the spores' 1:1 chelate of Ca2+ with dipicolinic acid (CaDPA) was released rapidly at a highly variable time Tlag, the levels of spore nucleic acids remained nearly unchanged, and the Tlag times for individual spores from the same preparation were increased somewhat as spore levels of CaDPA increased. The brightness of the spores' DIC image decreased by ∼50% in parallel with CaDPA release, and there was no spore cortex hydrolysis observed. The lateral diameters of the spores' DIC image and SYTO 16 fluorescence image also decreased in parallel with CaDPA release. The SYTO 16 fluorescence intensity began to increase during wet-heat treatment at a time before Tlag and reached maximum at a time slightly later than Trelease. However, the fluorescence intensities of wet-heat-inactivated spores were ∼15-fold lower than those of nutrient-germinated spores, and this low SYTO 16 fluorescence intensity may be due in part to the low permeability of the dormant spores' inner membranes to SYTO 16 and in part to nucleic acid denaturation during the wet-heat treatment. PMID:21602365

  11. In Vitro High-Throughput RNAi Screening to Accelerate the Process of Target Identification and Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hongwei; Kassner, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput RNA interference (HT-RNAi) is a powerful tool that can be used to knock down gene expression in order to identify novel genes and pathways involved in many cellular processes. It is a systematic, yet unbiased, approach to identify essential or synthetic lethal genes that promote cell survival in diseased cells as well as genes that confer resistance or sensitivity to drug treatment. This information serves as a foundation for enhancing current treatments for cancer and other diseases by identifying new drug targets, uncovering potential combination therapies, and helping clinicians match patients with the most effective treatment based on genetic information. Here, we describe the method of performing an in vitro HT-RNAi screen using chemically synthesized siRNA. PMID:27581290

  12. Physiological and Cellular Responses Caused by RNAi- Mediated Suppression of Snf7 Orthologue in Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Ramaseshadri, Parthasarathy; Segers, Gerrit; Flannagan, Ronald; Wiggins, Elizabeth; Clinton, William; Ilagan, Oliver; McNulty, Brian; Clark, Thomas; Bolognesi, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Ingestion of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) has been previously demonstrated to be effective in triggering RNA interference (RNAi) in western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte), providing potential novel opportunities for insect pest control. The putative Snf7 homolog of WCR (DvSnf7) has previously been shown to be an effective RNAi target for insect control, as DvSnf7 RNAi leads to lethality of WCR larvae. Snf7 functions as a part of the ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport) pathway which plays a crucial role in cellular housekeeping by internalization, transport, sorting and lysosomal degradation of transmembrane proteins. To understand the effects that lead to death of WCR larvae by DvSnf7 RNAi, we examined some of the distinct cellular processes associated with ESCRT functions such as de-ubiquitination of proteins and autophagy. Our data indicate that ubiquitinated proteins accumulate in DvSnf7 dsRNA-fed larval tissues and that the autophagy process seems to be impaired. These findings suggest that the malfunctioning of these cellular processes in both midgut and fat body tissues triggered by DvSnf7 RNAi were the main effects leading to the death of WCR. This study also illustrates that Snf7 is an essential gene in WCR and its functions are consistent with biological functions described for other eukaryotes. PMID:23349844

  13. Use of chromatin remodeling ATPases as RNAi targets for parental control of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) and Neotropical brown stink bug (Euschistus heros).

    PubMed

    Fishilevich, Elane; Vélez, Ana M; Khajuria, Chitvan; Frey, Meghan L F; Hamm, Ronda L; Wang, Haichuan; Schulenberg, Greg A; Bowling, Andrew J; Pence, Heather E; Gandra, Premchand; Arora, Kanika; Storer, Nicholas P; Narva, Kenneth E; Siegfried, Blair D

    2016-04-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism that is present in animals and plants and is triggered by double stranded RNA (dsRNA) or small interfering RNA (siRNA), depending on the organism. In the western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), RNAi can be achieved by feeding rootworms dsRNA added to artificial diet or plant tissues transformed to express dsRNA. The effect of RNAi depends on the targeted gene function and can range from an absence of phenotypic response to readily apparent responses, including lethality. Furthermore, RNAi can directly affect individuals that consume dsRNA or the effect may be transferred to the next generation. Our previous work described the potential use of genes involved in embryonic development as a parental RNAi technology for the control of WCR. In this study, we describe the use of chromatin-remodeling ATPases as target genes to achieve parental gene silencing in two insect pests, a coleopteran, WCR, and a hemipteran, the Neotropical brown stink bug, Euschistus heros Fabricius (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae). Our results show that dsRNA targeting chromatin-remodeling ATPase transcripts, brahma, mi-2, and iswi strongly reduced the fecundity of the exposed females in both insect species. Additionally, knockdown of chd1 reduced the fecundity of E. heros. PMID:26873291

  14. Physiological and cellular responses caused by RNAi- mediated suppression of Snf7 orthologue in western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) larvae.

    PubMed

    Ramaseshadri, Parthasarathy; Segers, Gerrit; Flannagan, Ronald; Wiggins, Elizabeth; Clinton, William; Ilagan, Oliver; McNulty, Brian; Clark, Thomas; Bolognesi, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Ingestion of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) has been previously demonstrated to be effective in triggering RNA interference (RNAi) in western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte), providing potential novel opportunities for insect pest control. The putative Snf7 homolog of WCR (DvSnf7) has previously been shown to be an effective RNAi target for insect control, as DvSnf7 RNAi leads to lethality of WCR larvae. Snf7 functions as a part of the ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport) pathway which plays a crucial role in cellular housekeeping by internalization, transport, sorting and lysosomal degradation of transmembrane proteins. To understand the effects that lead to death of WCR larvae by DvSnf7 RNAi, we examined some of the distinct cellular processes associated with ESCRT functions such as de-ubiquitination of proteins and autophagy. Our data indicate that ubiquitinated proteins accumulate in DvSnf7 dsRNA-fed larval tissues and that the autophagy process seems to be impaired. These findings suggest that the malfunctioning of these cellular processes in both midgut and fat body tissues triggered by DvSnf7 RNAi were the main effects leading to the death of WCR. This study also illustrates that Snf7 is an essential gene in WCR and its functions are consistent with biological functions described for other eukaryotes. PMID:23349844

  15. A Single RNaseIII Domain Protein from Entamoeba histolytica Has dsRNA Cleavage Activity and Can Help Mediate RNAi Gene Silencing in a Heterologous System.

    PubMed

    Pompey, Justine M; Foda, Bardees; Singh, Upinder

    2015-01-01

    Dicer enzymes process double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small RNAs that target gene silencing through the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Dicer enzymes are complex, multi-domain RNaseIII proteins, however structural minimalism of this protein has recently emerged in parasitic and fungal systems. The most minimal Dicer, Saccharomyces castellii Dicer1, has a single RNaseIII domain and two double stranded RNA binding domains. In the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica 27nt small RNAs are abundant and mediate silencing, yet no canonical Dicer enzyme has been identified. Although EhRNaseIII does not exhibit robust dsRNA cleavage in vitro, it can process dsRNA in the RNAi-negative background of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in conjunction with S. castellii Argonaute1 can partially reconstitute the RNAi pathway. Thus, although EhRNaseIII lacks the domain architecture of canonical or minimal Dicer enzymes, it has dsRNA processing activity that contributes to gene silencing via RNAi. Our data advance the understanding of small RNA biogenesis in Entamoeba as well as broaden the spectrum of non-canonical Dicer enzymes that contribute to the RNAi pathway. PMID:26230096

  16. A Single RNaseIII Domain Protein from Entamoeba histolytica Has dsRNA Cleavage Activity and Can Help Mediate RNAi Gene Silencing in a Heterologous System

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Upinder

    2015-01-01

    Dicer enzymes process double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small RNAs that target gene silencing through the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Dicer enzymes are complex, multi-domain RNaseIII proteins, however structural minimalism of this protein has recently emerged in parasitic and fungal systems. The most minimal Dicer, Saccharomyces castellii Dicer1, has a single RNaseIII domain and two double stranded RNA binding domains. In the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica 27nt small RNAs are abundant and mediate silencing, yet no canonical Dicer enzyme has been identified. Although EhRNaseIII does not exhibit robust dsRNA cleavage in vitro, it can process dsRNA in the RNAi-negative background of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in conjunction with S. castellii Argonaute1 can partially reconstitute the RNAi pathway. Thus, although EhRNaseIII lacks the domain architecture of canonical or minimal Dicer enzymes, it has dsRNA processing activity that contributes to gene silencing via RNAi. Our data advance the understanding of small RNA biogenesis in Entamoeba as well as broaden the spectrum of non-canonical Dicer enzymes that contribute to the RNAi pathway. PMID:26230096

  17. Efficacy of a Novel Class of RNA Interference Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; D'Alessandro-Gabazza, Corina N.; Gil-Bernabe, Paloma; Boveda-Ruiz, Daniel; Naito, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Tetsu; Toda, Masaaki; Mizutani, Takayuki; Taguchi, Osamu; Morser, John; Eguchi, Yutaka; Kuroda, Masahiko; Ochiya, Takahiro; Hayashi, Hirotake; Gabazza, Esteban C.; Ohgi, Tadaaki

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is being widely used in functional gene research and is an important tool for drug discovery. However, canonical double-stranded short interfering RNAs are unstable and induce undesirable adverse effects, and thus there is no currently RNAi-based therapy in the clinic. We have developed a novel class of RNAi agents, and evaluated their effectiveness in vitro and in mouse models of acute lung injury (ALI) and pulmonary fibrosis. The novel class of RNAi agents (nkRNA®, PnkRNA™) were synthesized on solid phase as single-stranded RNAs that, following synthesis, self-anneal into a unique helical structure containing a central stem and two loops. They are resistant to degradation and suppress their target genes. nkRNA and PnkRNA directed against TGF-β1mRNA ameliorate outcomes and induce no off-target effects in three animal models of lung disease. The results of this study support the pathological relevance of TGF-β1 in lung diseases, and suggest the potential usefulness of these novel RNAi agents for therapeutic application. PMID:22916145

  18. Redefining regulation of DNA methylation by RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Muthusamy, Viswanathan; Bosenberg, Marcus; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic changes refer to heritable changes that may modulate gene expression without affecting DNA sequence. DNA methylation is one such heritable epigenetic change, which is causally associated with the transcription regulation of many genes in the mammalian genome. Altered DNA methylation has been implicated in a wide variety of human diseases including cancer. Understanding the regulation of DNA methylation is likely to improve the ability to diagnose and treat these diseases. With the advent of high-throughput RNA interference (RNAi) screens, answering epigenetic questions on a genomic scale is now possible. Two recent genome-wide RNAi screens have addressed the regulation of DNA methylation in cancer, leading to the identification of the regulators of epigenetic silencing by oncogenic RAS and how epigenetic silencing of the tumor suppressor RASSF1A is maintained. These RNAi screens have much wider applications, since similar screens can now be adapted to identify the mechanism of silencing of any human disease-associated gene that is epigenetically regulated. In this review, we discuss two recent genome-wide RNAi screens for epigenetic regulators and explore potential applications in understanding DNA methylation and gene expression regulation in mammalian cells. We also discuss some of the key unanswered questions in the field of DNA methylation and suggest genome-wide RNAi screens designed to answer them. PMID:20620207

  19. Harnessing RNA interference for the treatment of viral infections.

    PubMed

    Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Exploiting the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway to inhibit viral gene expression has become an active field of research. The approach has potential for therapeutic application and several viruses are susceptible to RNAi-mediated knockdown. Differences in the characteristics of individual viruses require that viral gene silencing be tailored to specific infections. Important considerations are viral tissue tropism, acute or chronic nature of the infection and the efficiency with which antiviral sequences can be delivered to affected tissue. Both synthetic short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and expressed RNAi activators are being developed for viral therapy. The sustained silencing of expressed antiviral sequences is useful for countering chronic viral infection. siRNAs, which may be chemically modified to improve specificity and stability, are being developed for knockdown of viruses that cause acute or chronic infections. Preventing viral escape from silencing is important and overcoming this problem using combinatorial RNAi or through silencing of host dependency factors is promising. Although improving delivery efficiency and limiting off-target effects remain obstacles, rapid progress continues to be made in the field and it is likely that the goal of achieving licensed RNAi-based viral therapies will soon be realized. PMID:20697601

  20. Does smoking interfere with the effect of histamine H2-receptor antagonists on intragastric acidity in man?

    PubMed Central

    Bauerfeind, P; Cilluffo, T; Fimmel, C J; Emde, C; von Ritter, C; Kohler, W; Gugler, R; Gasser, T; Blum, A L

    1987-01-01

    The interaction between smoking and the effect of histamine H2-antagonists on intragastric acidity was examined in a double blind double dummy placebo controlled study. Healthy volunteers, 11 smokers and 10 non-smokers, were given, on four separate days at least one week apart, either placebo or cimetidine 800 mg nocte or ranitidine 2 X 150 mg per day or ranitidine 300 mg nocte. Tablets were taken at 2115 and 0900 h. Smokers smoked a cigarette hourly from 0700 to 2300 h. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner were standardised. Intragastric acidity was measured with a combined intragastric glass electrode and a solid state recorder. The subjects were fully ambulatory. The three histamine H2-receptor antagonist regimens were less effective (p = 0.04) in smokers than in non-smokers, but the difference between acidity of smokers and non-smokers was small. Means of medians of pH during a 24-h period with placebo, cimetidine 800 mg, ranitidine 2 X 150 mg and ranitidine 300 mg were 1.6, 2.3, 3.1, and 2.7 in smokers and 1.5, 2.7, 3.2, and 3.1 in non-smokers, respectively. In a second part of the study seven chronic smokers were reexamined after acutely stopping smoking: inhibition of gastric acidity by histamine H2-receptor antagonists was similar before and after withdrawal. Smoking does not affect intragastric acidity in untreated volunteers and only slightly decreases the effectiveness of histamine H2-receptor antagonists on intragastric acidity. This effect best in part explains the unfavourable effect of smoking on healing of peptic ulcer in patients treated with these drugs. PMID:3596336

  1. Biotechnological uses of RNAi in plants: risk assessment considerations.

    PubMed

    Casacuberta, Josep M; Devos, Yann; du Jardin, Patrick; Ramon, Matthew; Vaucheret, Hervé; Nogué, Fabien

    2015-03-01

    RNAi offers opportunities to generate new traits in genetically modified (GM) plants. Instead of expressing novel proteins, RNAi-based GM plants reduce target gene expression. Silencing of off-target genes may trigger unintended effects, and identifying these genes would facilitate risk assessment. However, using bioinformatics alone is not reliable, due to the lack of genomic data and insufficient knowledge of mechanisms governing mRNA-small (s)RNA interactions. PMID:25721261

  2. RNAi screening to identify postembryonic phenotypes in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Beifuss, Katherine K; Gumienny, Tina L

    2012-01-01

    C. elegans has proven to be a valuable model system for the discovery and functional characterization of many genes and gene pathways. More sophisticated tools and resources for studies in this system are facilitating continued discovery of genes with more subtle phenotypes or roles. Here we present a generalized protocol we adapted for identifying C. elegans genes with postembryonic phenotypes of interest using RNAi. This procedure is easily modified to assay the phenotype of choice, whether by light or fluorescence optics on a dissecting or compound microscope. This screening protocol capitalizes on the physical assets of the organism and molecular tools the C. elegans research community has produced. As an example, we demonstrate the use of an integrated transgene that expresses a fluorescent product in an RNAi screen to identify genes required for the normal localization of this product in late stage larvae and adults. First, we used a commercially available genomic RNAi library with full-length cDNA inserts. This library facilitates the rapid identification of multiple candidates by RNAi reduction of the candidate gene product. Second, we generated an integrated transgene that expresses our fluorecently tagged protein of interest in an RNAi-sensitive background. Third, by exposing hatched animals to RNAi, this screen permits identification of gene products that have a vital embryonic role that would otherwise mask a post-embryonic role in regulating the protein of interest. Lastly, this screen uses a compound microscope equipped for single cell resolution. PMID:22353760

  3. Institutional Profile: The Sheffield RNAi screening facility: a service for high-throughput, genome-wide Drosophila RNAi screens.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen

    2010-12-01

    The Sheffield RNAi Screening Facility (SRSF) was established in November 2008, as Britain's first Drosophila RNAi screening centre, funded by the University of Sheffield, Biomedical Sciences Department and the Wellcome Trust. The SRSF was formed to service the needs of research groups wanting to carry out high-throughput RNAi screens with Drosophila cells. The rationale for the SRSF is to provide RNAi libraries and the specialist equipment and expertise to do such screens. The facility supports both plate reader assays, high-content microscopy as well as the equipment needed to process these samples in a high-throughput fashion. The SRSF can either be used to identify genes involved in disease representing future drug targets, or to identify genes involved in drug resistance and efficacy. PMID:21428803

  4. Requirement for CRIF1 in RNA interference and Dicer-2 stability

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Su Jun; Scott, Anthony; Xiong, Xiao-Peng; Vahidpour, Shabnam; Karijolich, John; Guo, Dongdong; Pei, Shanshan; Yu, Yi-Tao; Zhou, Rui; Li, Willis X

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a eukaryotic gene-silencing system. Although the biochemistry of RNAi is relatively well defined, how this pathway is regulated remains incompletely understood. To identify genes involved in regulating the RNAi pathway, we screened for genetic mutations in Drosophila that alter the efficiency of RNAi. We identified the Drosophila homolog of the mammalian CR6-interacting factor 1 (CRIF1), also known as growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 45-gamma interacting protein (Gadd45GIP1), as a potential new regulator of the RNAi pathway. Loss-of-function mutants of Drosophila CRIF1 (dCRIF) are deficient in RNAi-mediated target gene knock-down, in the biogenesis of small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules, and in antiviral immunity. Moreover, we show that dCRIF may function by interacting with, and stabilizing, the RNase III enzyme Dicer-2. Our results suggest that dCRIF may play an important role in regulating the RNAi pathway. PMID:25483042

  5. RNAi-mediated Gene Silencing of Mutant Myotilin Improves Myopathy in LGMD1A Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Wallace, Lindsay M; Garwick-Coppens, Sara E; Sloboda, Darcée D; Davis, Carol S; Hakim, Chady H; Hauser, Michael A; Brooks, Susan V; Mendell, Jerry R; Harper, Scott Q

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress suggests gene therapy may one day be an option for treating some forms of limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). Nevertheless, approaches targeting LGMD have so far focused on gene replacement strategies for recessive forms of the disease. In contrast, no attempts have been made to develop molecular therapies for any of the eight dominantly inherited forms of LGMD. Importantly, the emergence of RNA interference (RNAi) therapeutics in the last decade provided new tools to combat dominantly inherited LGMDs with molecular therapy. In this study, we describe the first RNAi-based, preclinical gene therapy approach for silencing a gene associated with dominant LGMD. To do this, we developed adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV6) carrying designed therapeutic microRNAs targeting mutant myotilin (MYOT), which is the underlying cause of LGMD type 1A (LGMD1A). Our best MYOT-targeted microRNA vector (called miMYOT) significantly reduced mutant myotilin mRNA and soluble protein expression in muscles of LGMD1A mice (the TgT57I model) both 3 and 9 months after delivery, demonstrating short- and long-term silencing effects. This MYOT gene silencing subsequently decreased deposition of MYOT-seeded intramuscular protein aggregates, which is the hallmark feature of LGMD1A. Histological improvements were accompanied by significant functional correction, as miMYOT-treated animals showed increased muscle weight and improved specific force in the gastrocnemius, which is one of the most severely affected muscles in TgT57I mice and patients with dominant myotilin mutations. These promising results in a preclinical model of LGMD1A support the further development of RNAi-based molecular therapy as a prospective treatment for LGMD1A. Furthermore, this study sets a foundation that may be refined and adapted to treat other dominant LGMD and related disorders. PMID:24781192

  6. Metal interferences and their removal prior to the determination of As(T) and As(III) in acid mine waters by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Ball, James W.

    2003-01-01

    Hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS) is a sensitive and selective method for the determination of total arsenic (arsenic(III) plus arsenic(V)) and arsenic(III); however, it is subject to metal interferences for acid mine waters. Sodium borohydride is used to produce arsine gas, but high metal concentrations can suppress arsine production. This report investigates interferences of sixteen metal species including aluminum, antimony(III), antimony(V), cadmium, chromium(III), chromium(IV), cobalt, copper(II), iron(III), iron(II), lead, manganese, nickel, selenium(IV), selenium(VI), and zinc ranging in concentration from 0 to 1,000 milligrams per liter and offers a method for removing interfering metal cations with cation exchange resin. The degree of interference for each metal without cation-exchange on the determination of total arsenic and arsenic(III) was evaluated by spiking synthetic samples containing arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) with the potential interfering metal. Total arsenic recoveries ranged from 92 to 102 percent for all metals tested except antimony(III) and antimony(V) which suppressed arsine formation when the antimony(III)/total arsenic molar ratio exceeded 4 or the antimony(V)/total arsenic molar ratio exceeded 2. Arsenic(III) recoveries for samples spiked with aluminum, chromium(III), cobalt, iron(II), lead, manganese, nickel, selenium(VI), and zinc ranged from 84 to 107 percent over the entire concentration range tested. Low arsenic(III) recoveries occurred when the molar ratios of metals to arsenic(III) were copper greater than 120, iron(III) greater than 70, chromium(VI) greater than 2, cadmium greater than 800, antimony(III) greater than 3, antimony(V) greater than 12, or selenium(IV) greater than 1. Low recoveries result when interfering metals compete for available sodium borohydride, causing incomplete arsine production, or when the interfering metal oxidizes arsenic(III). Separation of interfering metal cations using

  7. Interference of L-α-aminoocy-β-phenylpropionic acid with cold-induced sphagnorubin synthesis in Sphagnum magellanicum BRID.

    PubMed

    Tutschek, R

    1982-08-01

    The ability of the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL)-inhibitor L-α-aminooxy-β-phenyl-propionic acid (AOPP) to suppress the synthesis of the main reddish-violet wall pigment of Sphagnum magellanicum (sphagnorubin) was investigated. Fifty percent inhibition is achieved with 14 μM AOPP in mosses stimulated to intensive coloring by sugar feeding. AOPP does not affect the content of free amino acids, except for phenylalanine, during cold-induced sphagnorubin synthesis. AOPP dramatically amplifies the increase in extractable PAL activity in response to cold treatment. Phenylalanine applied in vivo causes an eminent increase in PAL activity, above the level of the cold-treated mosses. The results from the feeding experiments are discussed in connection with a possible end-product repression in PAL activity with sphagnorubin-synthesizing mosses. These results are correspond best to the theory that the enzyme level is regulated independently from a mechanism of feedback repression. PMID:24271864

  8. Interference by Mes [2-(4-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid] and related buffers with phenolic oxidation by peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Baker, C Jacyn; Mock, Norton M; Roberts, Daniel P; Deahl, Kenneth L; Hapeman, Cathleen J; Schmidt, Walter F; Kochansky, Jan

    2007-11-01

    While characterizing the kinetic parameters of apoplastic phenolic oxidation by peroxidase, we found anomalies caused by the Mes [2-(4-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid] buffer being used. In the presence of Mes, certain phenolics appeared not to be oxidized by peroxidase, yet the oxidant, H(2)O(2), was utilized. This anomaly seems to be due to the recycling of the phenolic substrate. The reaction is relatively inefficient, but at buffer concentrations of 10 mM or greater the recycling effect is nearly 100% with substrate concentrations less than 100 microM. The recycling effect is dependent on substrate structure, occurring with 4'-hydroxyacetophenone but not with 3',5'-dimethoxy-4'-hydroxyacetophenone (acetosyringone). Characterization of the reaction parameters suggests that the phenoxyl radical from the peroxidase reaction interacts with Mes, causing the reduction and regeneration of the phenol. Similar responses occurred with related buffers such as Hepes [4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid] and Pipes [piperazine-1,4-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid)]. Results from this work and other reports in the literature indicate that great care is required in interpreting any results involving these buffers under oxidizing conditions. PMID:17893045

  9. Recombinant AAV as a Platform for Translating the Therapeutic Potential of RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Florie; Kay, Mark A; Mueller, Christian

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference has become a ubiquitous biological tool, and is being harnessed for therapeutic purposes as well. Therapeutic posttranscriptional gene silencing takes advantage of the endogenous RNAi pathway through delivery of either chemically synthesized siRNAs, or transgenes expressing hairpin-based inhibitory RNAs (e.g., shRNAs and artificial miRNAs). RNAi has expanded the field of viral gene therapy from gene replacement to gene knockdown. Here, we review various noncoding RNAs such as shRNAs, miRNAs, and miRNA decoys which can be utilized for therapeutic applications when expressed from recombinant adeno-associated vectors (AAV), and present examples of their basic design. In addition the basis of exploiting cellular miRNA profiles for detargeting AAV expression from specific cells is described. Finally, an overview of AAV-mediated RNAi preclinical studies is presented, and current RNAi-based clinical trials are reviewed. PMID:24352214

  10. Establishing an in vivo assay system to identify components involved in environmental RNA interference in the western corn rootworm.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Keita; Ramaseshadri, Parthasarathy; Zhang, Yuanji; Segers, Gerrit; Bolognesi, Renata; Tomoyasu, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of environmental RNA interference (RNAi), in which gene expression is suppressed via feeding with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules, opened the door to the practical application of RNAi-based techniques in crop pest management. The western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) is one of the most devastating corn pests in North America. Interestingly, WCR displays a robust environmental RNAi response, raising the possibility of applying an RNAi-based pest management strategy to this pest. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the WCR environmental RNAi process will allow for determining the rate limiting steps involved with dsRNA toxicity and potential dsRNA resistance mechanisms in WCR. In this study, we have established a two-step in vivo assay system, which allows us to evaluate the involvement of genes in environmental RNAi in WCR. We show that laccase 2 and ebony, critical cuticle pigmentation/tanning genes, can be used as marker genes in our assay system, with ebony being a more stable marker to monitor RNAi activity. In addition, we optimized the dsRNA dose and length for the assay, and confirmed that this assay system is sensitive to detect well-known RNAi components such as Dicer-2 and Argonaute-2. We also evaluated two WCR sid1- like (sil) genes with this assay system. This system will be useful to quickly survey candidate systemic RNAi genes in WCR, and also will be adaptable for a genome-wide RNAi screening to give us an unbiased view of the environmental/systemic RNAi pathway in WCR. PMID:25003334

  11. Parental RNA interference of genes involved in embryonic development of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte.

    PubMed

    Khajuria, Chitvan; Vélez, Ana M; Rangasamy, Murugesan; Wang, Haichuan; Fishilevich, Elane; Frey, Meghan L F; Carneiro, Newton Portilho; Gandra, Premchand; Narva, Kenneth E; Siegfried, Blair D

    2015-08-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is being developed as a potential tool for insect pest management and one of the most likely target pest species for transgenic plants that express double stranded RNA (dsRNA) is the western corn rootworm. Thus far, most genes proposed as targets for RNAi in rootworm cause lethality in the larval stage. In this study, we describe RNAi-mediated knockdown of two developmental genes, hunchback (hb) and brahma (brm), in the western corn rootworm delivered via dsRNA fed to adult females. dsRNA feeding caused a significant decrease in hb and brm transcripts in the adult females. Although total oviposition was not significantly affected, there was almost complete absence of hatching in the eggs collected from females exposed to dsRNA for either gene. These results confirm that RNAi is systemic in nature for western corn rootworms. These results also indicate that hunchback and brahma play important roles in rootworm embryonic development and could provide useful RNAi targets in adult rootworms to prevent crop injury by impacting the population of larval progeny of exposed adults. The ability to deliver dsRNA in a trans-generational manner by feeding to adult rootworms may offer an additional approach to utilizing RNAi for rootworm pest management. The potential to develop parental RNAi technology targeting progeny of adult rootworms in combination with Bt proteins or dsRNA lethal to larvae may increase opportunities to develop sustainable approaches to rootworm management involving RNAi technologies for rootworm control. PMID:26005118

  12. A viral RNA silencing suppressor interferes with abscisic acid-mediated signalling and induces drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Westwood, Jack H; McCann, Lucy; Naish, Matthew; Dixon, Heather; Murphy, Alex M; Stancombe, Matthew A; Bennett, Mark H; Powell, Glen; Webb, Alex A R; Carr, John P

    2013-02-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) encodes the 2b protein, which plays a role in local and systemic virus movement, symptom induction and suppression of RNA silencing. It also disrupts signalling regulated by salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. CMV induced an increase in tolerance to drought in Arabidopsis thaliana. This was caused by the 2b protein, as transgenic plants expressing this viral factor showed increased drought tolerance, but plants infected with CMVΔ2b, a viral mutant lacking the 2b gene, did not. The silencing effector ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1) controls a microRNA-mediated drought tolerance mechanism and, in this study, we noted that plants (dcl2/3/4 triple mutants) lacking functional short-interfering RNA-mediated silencing were also drought tolerant. However, drought tolerance engendered by CMV may be independent of the silencing suppressor activity of the 2b protein. Although CMV infection did not alter the accumulation of the drought response hormone abscisic acid (ABA), 2b-transgenic and ago1-mutant seeds were hypersensitive to ABA-mediated inhibition of germination. However, the induction of ABA-regulated genes in 2b-transgenic and CMV-infected plants was inhibited more strongly than in ago1-mutant plants. The virus engenders drought tolerance by altering the characteristics of the roots and not of the aerial tissues as, compared with the leaves of silencing mutants, leaves excised from CMV-infected or 2b-transgenic plants showed greater stomatal permeability and lost water more rapidly. This further indicates that CMV-induced drought tolerance is not mediated via a change in the silencing-regulated drought response mechanism. Under natural conditions, virus-induced drought tolerance may serve viruses by aiding susceptible hosts to survive periods of environmental stress. PMID:23083401

  13. CD22ΔE12 as a molecular target for RNAi therapy

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, Fatih M.; Ma, Hong; Cheng, Jianjun; Myers, Dorothea E.; Qazi, Sanjive

    2015-01-01

    B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BPL) is the most common form of cancer in children and adolescents. Our recent studies have demonstrated that CD22ΔE12 is a characteristic genetic defect of therapy-refractory clones in pediatric BPL and implicated the CD22ΔE12 genetic defect in the aggressive biology of relapsed or therapy-refractory pediatric BPL. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the biologic significance of the CD22ΔE12 molecular lesion in BPL and determine if it could serve as a molecular target for RNA interference (RNAi) therapy. Here we report a previously unrecognized causal link between CD22ΔE12 and aggressive biology of human BPL cells by demonstrating that siRNA-mediated knockdown of CD22ΔE12 in primary leukemic B-cell precursors is associated with a marked inhibition of their clonogenicity. Additionally, we report a nanoscale liposomal formulation of CD22ΔE12-specific siRNA with potent in vitro and in vivo anti-leukemic activity against primary human BPL cells as a first-in-class RNAi therapeutic candidate targeting CD22ΔE12. PMID:25659406

  14. Morphogenesis defects are associated with abnormal nervous system regeneration following roboA RNAi in planarians.

    PubMed

    Cebrià, Francesc; Newmark, Phillip A

    2007-03-01

    The process by which the proper pattern is restored to newly formed tissues during metazoan regeneration remains an open question. Here, we provide evidence that the nervous system plays a role in regulating morphogenesis during anterior regeneration in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown of a planarian ortholog of the axon-guidance receptor roundabout (robo) leads to unexpected phenotypes during anterior regeneration, including the development of a supernumerary pharynx (the feeding organ of the animal) and the production of ectopic, dorsal outgrowths with cephalic identity. We show that Smed-roboA RNAi knockdown disrupts nervous system structure during cephalic regeneration: the newly regenerated brain and ventral nerve cords do not re-establish proper connections. These neural defects precede, and are correlated with, the development of ectopic structures. We propose that, in the absence of proper connectivity between the cephalic ganglia and the ventral nerve cords, neurally derived signals promote the differentiation of pharyngeal and cephalic structures. Together with previous studies on regeneration in annelids and amphibians, these results suggest a conserved role of the nervous system in pattern formation during blastema-based regeneration. PMID:17251262

  15. Engineering cherry rootstocks with resistance to Prunus necrotic ring spot virus through RNAi-mediated silencing.

    PubMed

    Song, Guo-qing; Sink, Kenneth C; Walworth, Aaron E; Cook, Meridith A; Allison, Richard F; Lang, Gregory A

    2013-08-01

    Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is a major pollen-disseminated ilarvirus that adversely affects many Prunus species. In this study, an RNA interference (RNAi) vector pART27-PNRSV containing an inverted repeat (IR) region of PNRSV was transformed into two hybrid (triploid) cherry rootstocks, 'Gisela 6' (GI 148-1) and 'Gisela 7'(GI 148-8)', which are tolerant and sensitive, respectively, to PNRSV infection. One year after inoculation with PNRSV plus Prune Dwarf Virus, nontransgenic 'Gisela 6' exhibited no symptoms but a significant PNRSV titre, while the transgenic 'Gisela 6' had no symptoms and minimal PNRSV titre. The nontransgenic 'Gisela 7' trees died, while the transgenic 'Gisela 7' trees survived. These results demonstrate the RNAi strategy is useful for developing viral resistance in fruit rootstocks, and such transgenic rootstocks may have potential to enhance production of standard, nongenetically modified fruit varieties while avoiding concerns about transgene flow and exogenous protein production that are inherent for transformed fruiting genotypes. PMID:23521804

  16. Efficiency of gene silencing in Arabidopsis: direct inverted repeats vs. transitive RNAi vectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Filichkin, Sergei A; DiFazio, Steven P; Brunner, Amy M; Davis, John M; Yang, Zamin Koo; Kalluri, Udaya C; Arias, Renee S; Etherington, Elizabeth; Tuskan, Gerald A; Strauss, S

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of RNA interference (RNAi) in Arabidopsis using transitive and homologous inverted repeat (hIR) vectors. hIR constructs carry self-complementary intron-spliced fragments of the target gene whereas transitive vectors have the target sequence fragment adjacent to an intron-spliced, inverted repeat of heterologous origin. Both transitive and hIR constructs facilitated specific and heritable silencing in the three genes studied (AP1, ETTIN and TTG1). Both types of vectors produced a phenotypic series that phenocopied reduction of function mutants for the respective target gene. The hIR yielded up to fourfold higher proportions of events with strongly manifested reduction of function phenotypes compared to transitive RNAi. We further investigated the efficiency and potential off-target effects of AP1 silencing by both types of vectors using genome-scale microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR. The depletion of AP1 transcripts coincided with reduction of function phenotypic changes among both hIR and transitive lines and also showed similar expression patterns among differentially regulated genes. We did not detect significant silencing directed against homologous potential off-target genes when constructs were designed with minimal sequence similarity. Both hIR and transitive methods are useful tools in plant biotechnology and genomics. The choice of vector will depend on specific objectives such as cloning throughput, number of events and degree of suppression required.

  17. Expanding the Diversity of Imaging-Based RNAi Screen Applications Using Cell Spot Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, Juha K.; Kwon, Sunjong; Korkola, James; Gray, Joe W.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, great strides have been made in identifying gene aberrations and deregulated pathways that are associated with specific disease states. These association studies guide experimental studies aimed at identifying the aberrant genes and networks that cause the disease states. This requires functional manipulation of these genes and networks in laboratory models of normal and diseased cells. One approach is to assess molecular and biological responses to high-throughput RNA interference (RNAi)-induced gene knockdown. These responses can be revealed by immunofluorescent staining for a molecular or cellular process of interest and quantified using fluorescence image analysis. These applications are typically performed in multiwell format, but are limited by high reagent costs and long plate processing times. These limitations can be mitigated by analyzing cells grown in cell spot microarray (CSMA) format. CSMAs are produced by growing cells on small (~200 μm diameter) spots with each spot carrying an siRNA with transfection reagent. The spacing between spots is only a few hundred micrometers, thus thousands of cell spots can be arranged on a single cell culture surface. These high-density cell cultures can be immunofluorescently stained with minimal reagent consumption and analyzed quickly using automated fluorescence microscopy platforms. This review covers basic aspects of imaging-based CSMA technology, describes a wide range of immunofluorescence assays that have already been implemented successfully for CSMA screening and suggests future directions for advanced RNAi screening experiments.

  18. DNA vector-based RNAi approach for stable depletion of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Rashmi G.; Ghodgaonkar, Medini M.; Affar, El Bachir; Shah, Girish M. . E-mail: girish.shah@crchul.ulaval.ca

    2005-05-27

    RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) is a powerful technique that is now being used in mammalian cells to specifically silence a gene. Some recent studies have used this technique to achieve variable extent of depletion of a nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). These studies reported either transient silencing of PARP-1 using double-stranded RNA or stable silencing of PARP-1 with a DNA vector which was introduced by a viral delivery system. In contrast, here we report that a simple RNAi approach which utilizes a pBS-U6-based DNA vector containing strategically selected PARP-1 targeting sequence, introduced in the cells by conventional CaPO{sub 4} protocol, can be used to achieve stable and specific silencing of PARP-1 in different types of cells. We also provide a detailed strategy for selection and cloning of PARP-1-targeting sequences for the DNA vector, and demonstrate that this technique does not affect expression of its closest functional homolog PARP-2.

  19. A ribonuclease coordinates siRNA amplification and mRNA cleavage during RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsin-Yue; Chen, Chun-Chieh G.; Conte, Darryl; Moresco, James J.; Chaves, Daniel A.; Mitani, Shohei; Yates, John R.; Tsai, Ming-Daw; Mello, Craig C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Effective silencing by RNA-interference (RNAi) depends on mechanisms that amplify and propagate the silencing signal. In some organisms, small-interfering (si) RNAs are amplified from target mRNAs by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP). Both RdRP recruitment and mRNA silencing require Argonaute proteins, which are generally thought to degrade RNAi targets by directly cleaving them. However in C. elegans, the enzymatic activity of the primary Argonaute, RDE-1, is not required for silencing activity. We show that RDE-1 can instead recruit an endoribonuclease, RDE-8, to target RNA. RDE-8 can cleave RNA in vitro and is needed for the production of 3′ uridylated fragments of target mRNA in vivo. We also find that RDE-8 promotes RdRP activity, thereby ensuring amplification of siRNAs. Together, our findings suggest a model in which RDE-8 cleaves target mRNAs to mediate silencing, while generating 3’ uridylated mRNA fragments to serve as templates for the RdRP-directed amplification of the silencing signal. PMID:25635455

  20. Allele-specific RNAi Mitigates Phenotypic Progression in a Transgenic Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Lebrón, Edgardo; Gouvion, Cynthia M; Moore, Steven A; Davidson, Beverly L; Paulson, Henry L

    2009-01-01

    Despite recent advances suggesting new therapeutic targets, Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains incurable. Aberrant production and accumulation of the Aβ peptide resulting from altered processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is central to the pathogenesis of disease, particularly in dominantly inherited forms of AD. Thus, modulating the production of APP is a potential route to effective AD therapy. Here, we describe the successful use of an allele-specific RNA interference (RNAi) approach targeting the Swedish variant of APP (APPsw) in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV), we delivered an anti-APPsw short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) to the hippocampus of AD transgenic mice (APP/PS1). In short- and long-term transduction experiments, reduced levels of APPsw transprotein were observed throughout targeted regions of the hippocampus while levels of wild-type murine APP remained unaltered. Moreover, intracellular production of transfer RNA (tRNA)-valine promoter–driven shRNAs did not lead to detectable neuronal toxicity. Finally, long-term bilateral hippocampal expression of anti-APPsw shRNA mitigated abnormal behaviors in this mouse model of AD. The difference in phenotype progression was associated with reduced levels of soluble Aβ but not with a reduced number of amyloid plaques. Our results support the development of allele-specific RNAi strategies to treat familial AD and other dominantly inherited neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19532137

  1. Genome-wide analysis of Notch signalling in Drosophila by transgenic RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Mummery-Widmer, Jennifer L.; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Stoeger, Thomas; Novatchkova, Maria; Bhalerao, Sheetal; Chen, Doris; Dietzl, Georg; Dickson, Barry J.; Knoblich, Juergen A.

    2010-01-01

    Genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screens have identified near-complete sets of genes involved in cellular processes. However, this methodology has not yet been used to study complex developmental processes in a tissue-specific manner. Here we report the use of a library of Drosophila strains expressing inducible hairpin RNAi constructs to study the Notch signalling pathway during external sensory organ development. We assigned putative loss-of-function phenotypes to 21.2% of the protein-coding Drosophila genes. Using secondary assays, we identified 6 new genes involved in asymmetric cell division and 23 novel genes regulating the Notch signalling pathway. By integrating our phenotypic results with protein interaction data, we constructed a genome-wide, functionally validated interaction network governing Notch signalling and asymmetric cell division. We used clustering algorithms to identify nuclear import pathways and the COP9 signallosome as Notch regulators. Our results show that complex developmental processes can be analysed on a genome-wide level and provide a unique resource for functional annotation of the Drosophila genome. PMID:19363474

  2. Glassy carbon electrodes sequentially modified by cysteamine-capped gold nanoparticles and poly(amidoamine) dendrimers generation 4.5 for detecting uric acid in human serum without ascorbic acid interference.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Segovia, A S; Banda-Alemán, J A; Gutiérrez-Granados, S; Rodríguez, A; Rodríguez, F J; Godínez, Luis A; Bustos, E; Manríquez, J

    2014-02-17

    Glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) were sequentially modified by cysteamine-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNp@cysteamine) and PAMAM dendrimers generation 4.5 bearing 128-COOH peripheral groups (GCE/AuNp@cysteamine/PAMAM), in order to explore their capabilities as electrochemical detectors of uric acid (UA) in human serum samples at pH 2. The results showed that concentrations of UA detected by cyclic voltammetry with GCE/AuNp@cysteamine/PAMAM were comparable (deviation <±10%; limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 1.7×10(-4) and 5.8×10(-4) mg dL(-1), respectively) to those concentrations obtained using the uricase-based enzymatic-colorimetric method. It was also observed that the presence of dendrimers in the GCE/AuNp@cysteamine/PAMAM system minimizes ascorbic acid (AA) interference during UA oxidation, thus improving the electrocatalytic activity of the gold nanoparticles. PMID:24491759

  3. RNA Interference in Schistosoma mansoni Schistosomula: Selectivity, Sensitivity and Operation for Larger-Scale Screening

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Martin; Braschi, Simon; Sojka, Daniel; Ruelas, Debbie S.; Suzuki, Brian; Lim, Kee-Chong; Hopkins, Stephanie D.; McKerrow, James H.; Caffrey, Conor R.

    2010-01-01

    Background The possible emergence of resistance to the only available drug for schistosomiasis spurs drug discovery that has been recently incentivized by the availability of improved transcriptome and genome sequence information. Transient RNAi has emerged as a straightforward and important technique to interrogate that information through decreased or loss of gene function and identify potential drug targets. To date, RNAi studies in schistosome stages infecting humans have focused on single (or up to 3) genes of interest. Therefore, in the context of standardizing larger RNAi screens, data are limited on the extent of possible off-targeting effects, gene-to-gene variability in RNAi efficiency and the operational capabilities and limits of RNAi. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated in vitro the sensitivity and selectivity of RNAi using double-stranded (ds)RNA (approximately 500 bp) designed to target 11 Schistosoma mansoni genes that are expressed in different tissues; the gut, tegument and otherwise. Among the genes investigated were 5 that had been previously predicted to be essential for parasite survival. We employed mechanically transformed schistosomula that are relevant to parasitism in humans, amenable to screen automation and easier to obtain in greater numbers than adult parasites. The operational parameters investigated included defined culture media for optimal parasite maintenance, transfection strategy, time- and dose- dependency of RNAi, and dosing limits. Of 7 defined culture media tested, Basch Medium 169 was optimal for parasite maintenance. RNAi was best achieved by co-incubating parasites and dsRNA (standardized to 30 µg/ml for 6 days); electroporation provided no added benefit. RNAi, including interference of more than one transcript, was selective to the gene target(s) within the pools of transcripts representative of each tissue. Concentrations of dsRNA above 90 µg/ml were directly toxic. RNAi efficiency was transcript

  4. A Genome-Wide RNAi Screen to Dissect Centriole Duplication and Centrosome Maturation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dobbelaere, Jeroen; Josué, Filipe; Suijkerbuijk, Saskia; Baum, Buzz; Tapon, Nicolas; Raff, Jordan

    2008-01-01

    Centrosomes comprise a pair of centrioles surrounded by an amorphous pericentriolar material (PCM). Here, we have performed a microscopy-based genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila cells to identify proteins required for centriole duplication and mitotic PCM recruitment. We analysed 92% of the Drosophila genome (13,059 genes) and identified 32 genes involved in centrosome function. An extensive series of secondary screens classified these genes into four categories: (1) nine are required for centriole duplication, (2) 11 are required for centrosome maturation, (3) nine are required for both functions, and (4) three genes regulate centrosome separation. These 32 hits include several new centrosomal components, some of which have human homologs. In addition, we find that the individual depletion of only two proteins, Polo and Centrosomin (Cnn) can completely block centrosome maturation. Cnn is phosphorylated during mitosis in a Polo-dependent manner, suggesting that the Polo-dependent phosphorylation of Cnn initiates centrosome maturation in flies. PMID:18798690

  5. Toolkit for evaluating genes required for proliferation and survival using tetracycline-regulated RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Johannes; McJunkin, Katherine; Fellmann, Christof; Dow, Lukas E; Taylor, Meredith J; Hannon, Gregory J; Lowe, Scott W

    2012-01-01

    Short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) are versatile tools for analyzing loss-of-function phenotypes in vitro and in vivo1. However, their use for studying genes involved in proliferation and survival, which are potential therapeutic targets in cancer and other diseases, is confounded by the strong selective advantage of cells in which shRNA expression is inefficient. We therefore developed a toolkit that combines Tet-regulated miR30-shRNA technology, robust transactivator expression and two fluorescent reporters to track and isolate cells with potent target knockdown. We demonstrated that this system improves the study of essential genes and was sufficiently robust to eradicate aggressive cancer in mice by suppressing a single gene. Further, we applied this system for in vivo negative-selection screening with pooled shRNAs and propose a streamlined, inexpensive workflow that will facilitate the use of RNA interference (RNAi) for the identification and evaluation of essential therapeutic targets. PMID:21131983

  6. INDUCIBLE RNAi-MEDIATED GENE SILENCING USING NANOSTRUCTURED GENE DELIVERY ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, David George James; McKnight, Timothy E; Mcpherson, Jackson; Hoyt, Peter R; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Simpson, Michael L; Sayler, Gary Steven

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference has become a powerful biological tool over the last decade. In this study, a tetracycline-inducible shRNA vector system was designed for silencing CFP expression and introduced alongside the yfp marker gene into Chinese hamster ovary cells using spatially indexed vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays (VACNFs) in a gene delivery process termed impalefection. The VACNF architecture provided simultaneous delivery of multiple genes, subsequent adherence and proliferation of interfaced cells, and repeated monitoring of single cells over time. 24 hours after nanofiber-mediated delivery, 53.1% 10.4% of the cells that expressed the yfp marker gene were also fully silenced by the inducible CFP-silencing shRNA vector. Additionally, efficient CFP-silencing was observed in single cells among a population of cells that remained CFP-expressing. This effective transient expression system enables rapid analysis of gene silencing effects using RNAi in single cells and cell populations.

  7. INDUCIBLE RNAi-MEDIATED GENE SILENCING USING NANOSTRUCTURED GENE DELIVERY ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, David George James; McKnight, Timothy E; Mcpherson, Jackson; Hoyt, Peter R; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Simpson, Michael L; Sayler, Gary Steven

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference has become a powerful biological tool over the last decade. In this study, a tetracycline-inducible shRNA vector system was designed for silencing CFP expression and delivered alongside the yfp marker gene into Chinese hamster ovary cells using impalefection on spatially indexed vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays (VACNFs). The VACNF architecture provided simultaneous delivery of multiple genes, subsequent adherence and proliferation of interfaced cells, and repeated monitoring of single cells over time. Following impalefection and tetracycline induction, 53.1% 10.4% of impalefected cells were fully silenced by the inducible CFP-silencing shRNA vector. Additionally, efficient CFP-silencing was observed in single cells among a population of cells that remained CFP-expressing. This effective transient expression system enables rapid analysis of gene silencing effects using RNAi in single cells and cell populations.

  8. Persistence of RNAi-Mediated Knockdown in Drosophila Complicates Mosaic Analysis Yet Enables Highly Sensitive Lineage Tracing.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Justin A; Sumabat, Taryn M; Hariharan, Iswar K

    2016-05-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a powerful way of reducing gene function in Drosophila melanogaster tissues. By expressing synthetic short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) using the Gal4/UAS system, knockdown is efficiently achieved in specific tissues or in clones of marked cells. Here we show that knockdown by shRNAs is so potent and persistent that even transient exposure of cells to shRNAs can reduce gene function in their descendants. When using the FLP-out Gal4 method, in some instances we observed unmarked "shadow RNAi" clones adjacent to Gal4-expressing clones, which may have resulted from brief Gal4 expression following recombination but prior to cell division. Similarly, Gal4 driver lines with dynamic expression patterns can generate shadow RNAi cells after their activity has ceased in those cells. Importantly, these effects can lead to erroneous conclusions regarding the cell autonomy of knockdown phenotypes. We have investigated the basis of this phenomenon and suggested experimental designs for eliminating ambiguities in interpretation. We have also exploited the persistence of shRNA-mediated knockdown to design a sensitive lineage-tracing method, i-TRACE, which is capable of detecting even low levels of past reporter expression. Using i-TRACE, we demonstrate transient infidelities in the expression of some cell-identity markers near compartment boundaries in the wing imaginal disc. PMID:26984059

  9. Ultrastructural changes caused by Snf7 RNAi in larval enterocytes of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Le Conte).

    PubMed

    Koči, Juraj; Ramaseshadri, Parthasarathy; Bolognesi, Renata; Segers, Gerrit; Flannagan, Ronald; Park, Yoonseong

    2014-01-01

    The high sensitivity to oral RNA interference (RNAi) of western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Le Conte) provides a novel tool for pest control. Previous studies have shown that RNAi of DvSnf7, an essential cellular component of endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT), caused deficiencies in protein de-ubiquitination and autophagy, leading to WCR death. Here we investigated the detailed mechanism leading to larval death by analyzing the ultrastructural changes in midgut enterocytes of WCR treated with double-stranded RNA (ds-DvSnf7). The progressive phases of pathological symptoms caused by DvSnf7-RNAi in enterocytes include: 1) the appearance of irregularly shaped macroautophagic complexes consisting of relatively large lysosomes and multi-lamellar bodies, indicative of failure in autolysosome formation; 2) cell sloughing and loss of apical microvilli, and eventually, 3) massive loss of cellular contents indicating loss of membrane integrity. These data suggest that the critical functions of Snf7 in insect midgut cells demonstrated by the ultrastructural changes in DvSnf7 larval enterocytes underlies the conserved essential function of the ESCRT pathway in autophagy and membrane stability in other organisms. PMID:24409288

  10. Short-term increase of plasma free fatty acids does not interfere with intrinsic mitochondrial function in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Brands, Myrte; Hoeks, Joris; Sauerwein, Hans P; Ackermans, Mariette T; Ouwens, Margriet; Lammers, Nicolette M; van der Plas, Mart N; Schrauwen, Patrick; Groen, Albert K; Serlie, Mireille J

    2011-10-01

    Free fatty acid (FFA)- and obesity-induced insulin resistance has been associated with disturbed mitochondrial function. Elevated plasma FFA can impair insulin-induced increase of adenosine triphosphate synthesis and downregulate the expression of genes important in the biogenesis of mitochondria in human skeletal muscle. Whether FAs have a direct effect on intrinsic mitochondrial capacity remains to be established. Therefore, we measured ex vivo mitochondrial respiratory capacity in human skeletal muscle after exposure to hyperinsulinemia and high levels of plasma FFA. Nine healthy lean men were studied during a 6-hour hyperinsulinemic (600 pmol/L) euglycemic clamp with concomitant infusion of Intralipid (Fresensius Kabi Nederland, Den Bosch, the Netherlands) (FFA clamped at 0.5 mmol/L) or saline. Mitochondrial respiratory capacity was measured by high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized muscle fibers using an Oxygraph (OROBOROS Instruments, Innsbruck, Austria). Each participant served as his own control. Peripheral glucose uptake (rate of disappearance) was significantly lower during infusion of the lipid emulsion compared with the control saline infusion (68 μmol/kg·min [saline] vs 40 μmol/kg·min [lipid], P = .008). However, adenosine diphosphate-stimulated and maximal carbonylcyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)-phenylhydrazone-stimulated uncoupled respiration rates were not different in permeabilized skeletal muscle fibers after exposure to high levels of FFA compared with the control condition. We conclude that short-term elevation of FFA within the physiological range induces insulin resistance but does not affect intrinsic mitochondrial capacity in skeletal muscle in humans. PMID:21489571

  11. RNA interference as a tool for Alzheimer's disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Orlacchio, Antonio; Bernardi, Giorgio; Orlacchio, Aldo; Martino, Sabata

    2007-11-01

    RNA interference is a biological process that controls gene silencing in all living cells. Targeting the RNA interference system represents a novel therapeutic strategy able to intercede with multiple disease-related genes and to target many neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, the design of small interfering RNA-selective compounds has become more straightforward because of the significant progress made in predictive modeling for new therapeutic approaches. Although in vivo delivery of RNA interference remains a significant obstacle, new data show that RNAi blocks gene function in vivo, suggesting a potential therapeutic approach for humans. Some groups have demonstrated the efficacy of RNAi therapy in Alzheimer's disease. Results, based on animal models, show a down-regulation of the amyloid precursor protein and a consequent reduction of the amyloid-beta peptide accumulation in the brain or the inactivation of beta-secretase (BACE1). Indeed, lentiviral vectors expressing siRNAs targeting BACE1 reduce amyloid production and the neurodegenerative and behavioural deficit in APP transgenic mice. This review highlights recent advances in RNA research and focuses on strengths and weaknesses of RNAi compounds in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:18045220

  12. Identification and RNA Interference of the Pheromone Biosynthesis Activating Neuropeptide (PBAN) in the Common Cutworm Moth Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Lu, Qin; Huang, Ling-Yan; Chen, Peng; Yu, Jin-Feng; Xu, Jin; Deng, Jian-Yu; Ye, Hui

    2015-06-01

    Spodoptera litura F. is one of the most destructive insect pests of many agricultural crops and notorious for developing insecticide resistance. Developing environmental friendly control methods such as novel pheromone and RNAi-related control strategies is imperative to control this pest. In the present study, the full-length cDNA encoding the diapause hormone and pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (DH-PBAN) was identified and characterized in S. litura. This 809-bp transcript contains a 573-nucleotide ORF encoding a 191-amino acid protein, from which five putative neuropeptides, including PBAN, DH, and α-, β-, and γ-subesophageal ganglion neuropeptides, were derived. Phylogenetic analysis showed that both the whole protein and each of the five neuropeptides have high similarities to those of DH-PBANs from other insect orders particularly Lepidoptera. Females treated with TKYFSPRLamide (the active core fragment of PBAN) produced significantly more four types of pheromone compounds (A; B; C; D) than controls. RNA interference by injection of PBAN dsRNA significantly reduced the relative expression levels of this gene in adult females (approximately reduced by 60%). As a consequence, females treated with PBAN dsRNA produced significantly less four types of pheromone compounds (A; B; C; D) than controls. These results suggest that PBAN function in activating sex pheromone biosynthesis and the RNAi of DH-PBAN gene can be induced by the injection of dsRNA into the body cavity in S. litura. This study suggests the possibility of novel pheromone-related pest control strategies based on RNAi techniques. PMID:26470263

  13. Cationic Lipid-Based Nucleic Acid Vectors.

    PubMed

    Jubeli, Emile; Goldring, William P D; Pungente, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    The delivery of nucleic acids into cells remains an important laboratory cell culture technique and potential clinical therapy, based upon the initial cellular uptake, then translation into protein (in the case of DNA), or gene deletion by RNA interference (RNAi). Although viral delivery vectors are more efficient, the high production costs, limited cargo capacity, and the potential for clinical adverse events make nonviral strategies attractive. Cationic lipids are the most widely applied and studied nonviral vectors; however, much remains to be solved to overcome limitations of these systems. Advances in the field of cationic lipid-based nucleic acid (lipoplex) delivery rely upon the development of robust and reproducible lipoplex formulations, together with the use of cell culture assays. This chapter provides detailed protocols towards the formulation, delivery, and assessment of in vitro cationic lipid-based delivery of DNA. PMID:27436310

  14. Applicability of RNA interference in cancer therapy: Current status.

    PubMed

    Maduri, S

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a manifestation of dysregulated gene function arising from a complex interplay of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes present in our body. Cancer has been constantly chased using various therapies but all in vain as most of them are highly effective only in the early stages of cancer. Recently, RNA interference (RNAi) therapy, a comparatively new entrant is evolving as a promising player in the battle against cancer due to its post-transcriptional gene silencing ability. The most alluring feature of this non-invasive technology lies in its utility in the cancer detection and the cancer treatment at any stage. Once this technology is fully exploited it can bring a whole new era of therapeutics capable of curing cancer at any stage mainly due to its ability to target the vital processes required for cell proliferation such as response to growth factors, nutrient uptake/synthesis, and energy generation. This therapy can also be used to treat stage IV cancer, the most difficult to treat till date, by virtue of its metastasis inhibiting capability. Recent research has also proved that cancer can even be prevented by proper modulation of physiological RNAi pathways and researchers have found that many nutrients, which are a part of routine diet, can effectively modulate these pathways and prevent cancer. Even after having all these advantages the potential of RNAi therapy could not be fully tapped earlier, due to many limitations associated with the administration of RNAi based therapeutics. However, recent advancements in this direction, such as the development of small interfering RNA (siRNA) tolerant to nucleases and the development of non-viral vectors such as cationic liposomes and nanoparticles, can overcome this obstacle and facilitate the clinical use of RNAi based therapeutics in the treatment of cancer. The present review focuses on the current status of RNAi therapeutics and explores their potential as future diagnostics and therapeutics against

  15. Neurobehavioral effects of exposure to propionic acid revisited-Does psychosocial stress interfere with distractive effects in volunteers?

    PubMed

    Pacharra, Marlene; Schäper, Michael; Kleinbeck, Stefan; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Golka, Klaus; van Thriel, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Local irritants stimulate the nervous system via chemosensory pathways that trigger cognitive distraction, subjective complaints about impaired health, and physiological defense reflexes (e.g. eye-blinks). At workplaces and in the environment chemical exposures often co-occur with psychosocial stress. This study investigated if stress modulates adverse effects of exposure to the local irritant and malodorant propionic acid (PA). Forty-eight participants were randomly assigned to an experimental (false negative feedback+salient surveillance) or control group. In a cross-over design, both groups were exposed for 4h to PA in concentrations of 0.3 and 0-20ppm (time-weighted average=10ppm). In the experimental group, the stress protocol induced moderate psychosocial stress as indicated by salivary cortisol and subjective responses. Despite concentration-dependent increases in chemosensory perceptions and symptoms, the level of exposure to PA had no impact upon the results of four out of six neurobehavioral tests. In the sustained attention test, there was a significant increase in error rates that corresponded to the exposure levels. However, a concentration-dependent impairment of spatial working memory and an adverse increase in eye-blink frequency were restricted to the control group. Stressed participants had shorter simple reaction times and high eye-blink frequency irrespective of exposure suggesting enhanced alertness. Psychosocial stress increased complaints, ocular irritation and unspecific symptoms at the end of the 0.3ppm exposure to a level that was comparable with that in the control group during exposure to 0-20ppm. Results indicate that the adverse effects of a local irritant and psychosocial stress are non-additive. PMID:27246649

  16. Short-interference RNAs: becoming medicines

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Tamara; Jiménez, Ana Isabel; Pañeda, Covadonga

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference is a cellular mechanism by which small molecules of double stranded RNA modulate gene expression acting on the concentration and/or availability of a given messenger RNA. Almost 10 years after Fire and Mello received the Nobel Prize for the discovery of this mechanism in flat worms, RNA interference is on the edge of becoming a new class of therapeutics. With various phase III studies underway, the following years will determine whether RNAi-therapeutics can rise up to the challenge and become mainstream medicines. The present review gives a thorough overview of the current status of this technology focusing on the path to the clinic of this new class of compounds. PMID:26648823

  17. Field Trial and Molecular Characterization of RNAi-Transgenic Tomato Plants That Exhibit Resistance to Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Geminivirus.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Alejandro; Carlos, Natacha; Ruiz, Yoslaine; Callard, Danay; Sánchez, Yadira; Ochagavía, María Elena; Seguin, Jonathan; Malpica-López, Nachelli; Hohn, Thomas; Lecca, Maria Rita; Pérez, Rosabel; Doreste, Vivian; Rehrauer, Hubert; Farinelli, Laurent; Pujol, Merardo; Pooggin, Mikhail M

    2016-03-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a widely used approach to generate virus-resistant transgenic crops. However, issues of agricultural importance like the long-term durability of RNAi-mediated resistance under field conditions and the potential side effects provoked in the plant by the stable RNAi expression remain poorly investigated. Here, we performed field trials and molecular characterization studies of two homozygous transgenic tomato lines, with different selection markers, expressing an intron-hairpin RNA cognate to the Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) C1 gene. The tested F6 and F4 progenies of the respective kanamycin- and basta-resistant plants exhibited unchanged field resistance to TYLCV and stably expressed the transgene-derived short interfering RNA (siRNAs) to represent 6 to 8% of the total plant small RNAs. This value outnumbered the average percentage of viral siRNAs in the nontransformed plants exposed to TYLCV-infested whiteflies. As a result of the RNAi transgene expression, a common set of up- and downregulated genes was revealed in the transcriptome profile of the plants selected from either of the two transgenic events. A previously unidentified geminivirus causing no symptoms of viral disease was detected in some of the transgenic plants. The novel virus acquired V1 and V2 genes from TYLCV and C1, C2, C3, and C4 genes from a distantly related geminivirus and, thereby, it could evade the repressive sequence-specific action of transgene-derived siRNAs. Our findings shed light on the mechanisms of siRNA-directed antiviral silencing in transgenic plants and highlight the applicability limitations of this technology as it may alter the transcriptional pattern of nontarget genes. PMID:26713353

  18. Transcription and RNAi in the formation of heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, Shiv S.; Elgin, Sarah C R

    2010-01-01

    Preface Our title appears to be an oxymoron – surely “silenced” chromatin should not be transcribed! But there have been frequent reports of low level transcription in heterochromatic domains, and in Drosophila several hundred genes are found within heterochromatic regions1. Most striking, recent investigations implicate RNAi (in the broadest sense) in targeting and maintaining heterochromatin, and RNAi-based mechanisms are inherently dependent on transcription. While this might involve trans-acting sources of the critical small RNAs, in some cases transcription of the domain to be silenced appears to be required at least initially, a seeming contradiction. PMID:17522672

  19. Design of tomato fruits with reduced allergenicity by dsRNAi-mediated inhibition of ns-LTP (Lyc e 3) expression.

    PubMed

    Le, Lien Quynh; Lorenz, Yvonne; Scheurer, Stephan; Fötisch, Kay; Enrique, Ernesto; Bartra, Joan; Biemelt, Sophia; Vieths, Stefan; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2006-03-01

    Plant genetic engineering has the potential to introduce new allergenic proteins into foods but, at the same time, it can be used to remove established allergens. Here, we report the molecular characterization of Lyc e 3, a new tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) allergen, and the efficient down-regulation of its expression in transgenic tomato plants. Following the identification of an immunoglobulin E (IgE)-binding 9-kDa polypeptide in tomato peel, designated Lyc e 3, its partial amino acid sequence was determined by N-terminal protein sequencing. Sequence comparison revealed that Lyc e 3 encodes a nonspecific lipid transfer protein (ns-LTP). In plants, ns-LTPs are encoded by large gene families which differ in primary amino acid sequence, expression and proposed cellular function. To identify Lyc e 3 encoding complementary DNAs (cDNAs), public tomato expressed sequence tag (EST) databases were screened for ns-LTP sequences. Following this strategy, two cDNAs, LTPG1 and LTPG2, with high homology to the N-terminal sequence of Lyc e 3, were identified. Ectopic expression of LTPG1 and LTPG2 in Escherichia coli, followed by immunoblotting, verified their IgE reactivity. Subsequently, transgenic tomato plants constitutively expressing LTPG1- or LTPG2-specific double-stranded RNA interference (dsRNAi) constructs were created and tested for the suppression of Lyc e 3 accumulation. Efficient silencing of Lyc e 3 was documented by Northern and Western blotting. In both cases, Lyc e 3 accumulation was decreased to levels below the detection limit (less than 0.5% of the wild-type protein). The allergenic potential of Lyc e 3-deficient tomato fruits was tested by measuring histamine release from sensitized human basophils stimulated with transgenic and parental lines. These assays revealed a strong (10- to 100-fold) decrease in histamine release of human basophils challenged with transgenic fruit extracts when compared with control extracts. These results demonstrate the

  20. RNAi down-regulation of cinnamate-4-hydroxylase increases artemisinin biosynthesis in Artemisia annua

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ritesh; Vashisth, Divya; Misra, Amita; Akhtar, Md Qussen; Jalil, Syed Uzma; Shanker, Karuna; Gupta, Madan Mohan; Rout, Prashant Kumar; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Shasany, Ajit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) converts trans-cinnamic acid (CA) to p-coumaric acid (COA) in the phenylpropanoid/lignin biosynthesis pathway. Earlier we reported increased expression of AaCYP71AV1 (an important gene of artemisinin biosynthesis pathway) caused by CA treatment in Artemisia annua. Hence, AaC4H gene was identified, cloned, characterized and silenced in A. annua with the assumption that the elevated internal CA due to knock down may increase the artemisinin yield. Accumulation of trans-cinnamic acid in the plant due to AaC4H knockdown was accompanied with the reduction of p-coumaric acid, total phenolics, anthocyanin, cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activities but increase in salicylic acid (SA) and artemisinin. Interestingly, feeding trans-cinnamic acid to the RNAi line increased the level of artemisinin along with benzoic (BA) and SA with no effect on the downstream metabolites p-coumaric acid, coniferylaldehyde and sinapaldehyde, whereas p-coumaric acid feeding increased the content of downstream coniferylaldehyde and sinapaldehyde with no effect on BA, SA, trans-cinnamic acid or artemisinin. SA is reported earlier to be inducing the artemisinin yield. This report demonstrates the link between the phenylpropanoid/lignin pathway with artemisinin pathway through SA, triggered by accumulation of trans-cinnamic acid because of the blockage at C4H. PMID:27220407

  1. RNAi down-regulation of cinnamate-4-hydroxylase increases artemisinin biosynthesis in Artemisia annua.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ritesh; Vashisth, Divya; Misra, Amita; Akhtar, Md Qussen; Jalil, Syed Uzma; Shanker, Karuna; Gupta, Madan Mohan; Rout, Prashant Kumar; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Shasany, Ajit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) converts trans-cinnamic acid (CA) to p-coumaric acid (COA) in the phenylpropanoid/lignin biosynthesis pathway. Earlier we reported increased expression of AaCYP71AV1 (an important gene of artemisinin biosynthesis pathway) caused by CA treatment in Artemisia annua. Hence, AaC4H gene was identified, cloned, characterized and silenced in A. annua with the assumption that the elevated internal CA due to knock down may increase the artemisinin yield. Accumulation of trans-cinnamic acid in the plant due to AaC4H knockdown was accompanied with the reduction of p-coumaric acid, total phenolics, anthocyanin, cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activities but increase in salicylic acid (SA) and artemisinin. Interestingly, feeding trans-cinnamic acid to the RNAi line increased the level of artemisinin along with benzoic (BA) and SA with no effect on the downstream metabolites p-coumaric acid, coniferylaldehyde and sinapaldehyde, whereas p-coumaric acid feeding increased the content of downstream coniferylaldehyde and sinapaldehyde with no effect on BA, SA, trans-cinnamic acid or artemisinin. SA is reported earlier to be inducing the artemisinin yield. This report demonstrates the link between the phenylpropanoid/lignin pathway with artemisinin pathway through SA, triggered by accumulation of trans-cinnamic acid because of the blockage at C4H. PMID:27220407

  2. Inhibition of Marek's disease virus replication by retroviral vector-based RNA interference

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising antiviral methodology. We recently demonstrated that retroviral vectors expressing short hairpin RNAs (shRNA-mirs) in the context of a modified endogenous micro-RNA (miRNA) can be effective in reducing replication of other retroviruses in chicken cells. In thi...

  3. Functional specialization among insect chitinase family genes revealed by RNA interference

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biological functions of individual members of the large family of chitinase-like proteins from the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, were examined using gene-specific RNA interference (RNAi). One chitinase, TcCHT5, was found to be required for pupal-adult molting only. A lethal phenotype ...

  4. A Simple Laboratory Practical to Illustrate RNA Mediated Gene Interference Using Drosophila Cell Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buluwela, Laki; Kamalati, Tahereh; Photiou, Andy; Heathcote, Dean A.; Jones, Michael D.; Ali, Simak

    2010-01-01

    RNA mediated gene interference (RNAi) is now a key tool in eukaryotic cell and molecular biology research. This article describes a five session laboratory practical, spread over a seven day period, to introduce and illustrate the technique. During the exercise, students working in small groups purify PCR products that encode "in vitro"…

  5. How Golden Is Silence? Teaching Undergraduates the Power and Limits of RNA Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuldell, Natalie H.

    2006-01-01

    It is hard and getting harder to strike a satisfying balance in teaching. Time dedicated to student-generated models or ideas is often sacrificed in an effort to "get through the syllabus." I describe a series of RNA interference (RNAi) experiments for undergraduate students that simultaneously explores fundamental concepts in gene regulation,…

  6. RNAi: antiviral therapy against dengue virus

    PubMed Central

    Idrees, Sobia; Ashfaq, Usman A

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus infection has become a global threat affecting around 100 countries in the world. Currently, there is no licensed antiviral agent available against dengue. Thus, there is a strong need to develop therapeutic strategies that can tackle this life threatening disease. RNA interference is an important and effective gene silencing process which degrades targeted RNA by a sequence specific process. Several studies have been conducted during the last decade to evaluate the efficiency of siRNA in inhibiting dengue virus replication. This review summarizes siRNAs as a therapeutic approach against dengue virus serotypes and concludes that siRNAs against virus and host genes can be next generation treatment of dengue virus infection. PMID:23620845

  7. Metabolic and secretory responses of parotid cells to cationic amino acids. Oxidation of the amino acids and interference with the oxidation of D-glucose or endogenous nutrients.

    PubMed

    Sener, A; Mourtada, A; Blachier, F; Malaisse, W J

    1990-09-01

    Cationic amino acids were recently found to stimulate amylase release from rat parotid cells. The possible relevance of their oxidative catabolism to such a secretory stimulation was investigated. D-Glucose, which was efficiently metabolized in parotid cells and which augmented O2 uptake above basal value, failed to affect basal or stimulated amylase release. L-Arginine, L-lysine and L-histidine failed to stimulate the oxidation of either exogenous D-[6-14C]glucose or endogenous nutrients in cells pre-labelled with [U-14C]palmitate or L-[U-14C]glutamine. The oxidation of L-[U-14C]arginine, L-[U-14C]ornithine, L-[U-14C]lysine and L-[U-14C]histidine, all tested at a 10 mM concentration, was much lower than that of D-[U-14C]glucose (5.6 mM). These findings argue against the view that the stimulation of amylase release by cationic amino acids would be related to their role as a source of energy in the parotid cells. PMID:1703792

  8. Optimization of RNA interference (RNAi) targeting acetylcholinesterase in the Southern cattle tick (Rhipicephalus microplus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the primary target for organophosphate (OP) acaricides. OP resistant strains of the Southern cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus have been identified and represent a major threat to the control of this important disease vector. R. microplus ticks possess at least three...

  9. Removal of An Abundant Allergen From Soybean Seeds By RNA Interference (RNAi)Technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybeans are extensively used as a high-protein feed ingredient in livestock production. Because of its functional qualities and many health benefits, soy protein is widely used in a variety of food products. However, it is becoming evident that soy proteins can cause allergic reactions in livestock...

  10. Studying membrane trafficking in the worm C. elegans by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Balklava, Zita; Sztul, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    A powerful approach to gain understanding of molecular machinery responsible for membrane trafficking is through inactivation of gene function by RNA interference (RNAi). RNAi-mediated gene silencing occurs when a double-stranded RNA is introduced into cells and targets a complementary mRNA for degradation. The subsequent lack of mRNA prevents the synthesis of the corresponding protein and ultimately causes depletion of a particular gene product from the cell. The effects of such depletion can then by analyzed by functional, morphological, and biochemical assays. RNAi-mediated knockdowns of numerous gene products in cultured cells of mammalian and other species origins have provided significant new insight into traffic regulation and represent standard approaches in current cell biology. However, RNAi in the multicellular nematode Caenorhabditis elegans model allows RNAi studies within the context of a whole organism, and thus provides an unprecedented opportunity to explore effects of specific trafficking regulators within the context of distinct developmental stages and diverse cell types. In addition, various transgenic C. elegans strains have been developed that express marker proteins tagged with fluorescent proteins to facilitate the analysis of trafficking within the secretory and endocytic pathways. This chapter provides a detailed description of a basic RNAi approach that can be used to analyze the function of any gene of interest in secretory and endosomal trafficking in C. elegans. PMID:24295300

  11. Colorado potato beetle (Coleoptera) gut transcriptome analysis: expression of RNA interference-related genes.

    PubMed

    Swevers, L; Huvenne, H; Menschaert, G; Kontogiannatos, D; Kourti, A; Pauchet, Y; ffrench-Constant, R; Smagghe, G

    2013-12-01

    In the search for new methods of pest control, the potential of RNA interference (RNAi) is being explored. Because the gut is the first barrier for the uptake of double-stranded (ds)RNA, pyrosequencing of the gut transcriptome is a powerful tool for obtaining the necessary sequences for specific dsRNA-mediated pest control. In the present study, a dataset representing the gut transcriptome of the Colorado potato beetle (CPB; Leptinotarsa decemlineata) was generated and analysed for the presence of RNAi-related genes. Almost all selected genes that were implicated in silencing efficiency at different levels in the RNAi pathway (core machinery, associated intracellular factors, dsRNA uptake, antiviral RNAi, nucleases), which uses different types of small RNA (small interfering RNA, microRNA and piwi-RNA), were expressed in the CPB gut. Although the database is of lower quality, the majority of the RNAi genes are also found to be present in the gut transcriptome of the tobacco hornworm [TH; Manduca sexta (19 out of 35 genes analysed)]. The high quality of the CPB transcriptome database will lay the foundation for future gene expression and functional studies regarding the gut and RNAi. PMID:24580832

  12. RNA interference: Applications and advances in insect toxicology and insect pest management.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ho; Soumaila Issa, Moustapha; Cooper, Anastasia M W; Zhu, Kun Yan

    2015-05-01

    Since its discovery, RNA interference (RNAi) has revolutionized functional genomic studies due to its sequence-specific nature of post-transcriptional gene silencing. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive review of the recent literature and summarize the current knowledge and advances in the applications of RNAi technologies in the field of insect toxicology and insect pest management. Many recent studies have focused on identification and validation of the genes encoding insecticide target proteins, such as acetylcholinesterases, ion channels, Bacillus thuringiensis receptors, and other receptors in the nervous system. RNAi technologies have also been widely applied to reveal the role of genes encoding cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, carboxylesterases, and glutathione S-transferases in insecticide detoxification and resistance. More recently, studies have focused on understanding the mechanism of insecticide-mediated up-regulation of detoxification genes in insects. As RNAi has already shown great potentials for insect pest management, many recent studies have also focused on host-induced gene silencing, in which several RNAi-based transgenic plants have been developed and tested as proof of concept for insect pest management. These studies indicate that RNAi is a valuable tool to address various fundamental questions in insect toxicology and may soon become an effective strategy for insect pest management. PMID:25987228

  13. GENE SILENCING BY PARENTAL RNA INTERFERENCE IN THE GREEN RICE LEAFHOPPER, Nephotettix cincticeps (HEMIPTERA: CICADELLIDAE).

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yukiko; Hattori, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been widely used for investigating gene function in many nonmodel insect species. Parental RNAi causes gene knockdown in the next generation through the administration of double-strand RNA (dsRNA) to the mother generation. In this study, we demonstrate that parental RNAi mediated gene silencing is effective in determining the gene function of the cuticle and the salivary glands in green rice leafhopper (GRH), Nephotettix cincticeps (Uhler). Injection of dsRNA of NcLac2 (9 ng/female) to female parents caused a strong knockdown of laccase-2 gene of first instar nymphs, which eventually led to high mortality rates and depigmentation of side lines on the body. The effects of parental RNAi on the mortality of the nymphs were maintained through 12-14 days after the injections. We also confirmed the effectiveness of parental RNAi induced silencing on the gene expressed in the salivary gland, the gene product of which is passed from instar to instar. The parental RNAi method can be used to examine gene function by phenotyping many offspring nymphs with injection of dsRNA into a small number of parent females, and may be applicable to high-efficiency determination of gene functions in this species. PMID:26728387

  14. Global effects on gene expression in fission yeast by silencing and RNA interference machineries.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Klavs R; Burns, Gavin; Mata, Juan; Volpe, Thomas A; Martienssen, Robert A; Bähler, Jürg; Thon, Geneviève

    2005-01-01

    Histone modifications influence gene expression in complex ways. The RNA interference (RNAi) machinery can repress transcription by recruiting histone-modifying enzymes to chromatin, although it is not clear whether this is a general mechanism for gene silencing or whether it requires repeated sequences such as long terminal repeats (LTRs). We analyzed the global effects of the Clr3 and Clr6 histone deacetylases, the Clr4 methyltransferase, the zinc finger protein Clr1, and the RNAi proteins Dicer, RdRP, and Argonaute on the transcriptome of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast). The clr mutants derepressed similar subsets of genes, many of which also became transcriptionally activated in cells that were exposed to environmental stresses such as nitrogen starvation. Many genes that were repressed by the Clr proteins clustered in extended regions close to the telomeres. Surprisingly few genes were repressed by both the silencing and RNAi machineries, with transcripts from centromeric repeats and Tf2 retrotransposons being notable exceptions. We found no correlation between repression by RNAi and proximity to LTRs, and the wtf family of repeated sequences seems to be repressed by histone deacetylation independent of RNAi. Our data indicate that the RNAi and Clr proteins show only a limited functional overlap and that the Clr proteins play more global roles in gene silencing. PMID:15632061

  15. The stay-green phenotype of TaNAM-RNAi wheat plants is associated with maintenance of chloroplast structure and high enzymatic antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Checovich, Mariana L; Galatro, Andrea; Moriconi, Jorge I; Simontacchi, Marcela; Dubcovsky, Jorge; Santa-María, Guillermo E

    2016-07-01

    TaNAM transcription factors play an important role in controlling senescence, which in turn, influences the delivery of nitrogen, iron and other elements to the grain of wheat (Triticum aestivum) plants, thus contributing to grain nutritional value. While lack or diminished expression of TaNAMs determines a stay-green phenotype, the precise effect of these factors on chloroplast structure has not been studied. In this work we focused on the events undergone by chloroplasts in two wheat lines having either control or diminished TaNAM expression due to RNA interference (RNAi). It was found that in RNAi plants maintenance of chlorophyll levels and maximal photochemical efficiency of photosystem II were associated with lack of chloroplast dismantling. Flow cytometer studies and electron microscope analysis showed that RNAi plants conserved organelle ultrastructure and complexity. It was also found that senescence in control plants was accompanied by a low leaf enzymatic antioxidant activity. Lack of chloroplast dismantling in RNAi plants was associated with maintenance of protein and iron concentration in the flag leaf, the opposite being observed in control plants. These data provide a structural basis for the observation that down regulation of TaNAMs confers a functional stay-green phenotype and indicate that the low export of iron and nitrogen from the flag leaf of these plants is concomitant, within the developmental window studied, with lack of chloroplast degradation and high enzymatic antioxidant activity. PMID:27061370

  16. Enhanced BBB permeability of osmotically active poly(mannitol-co-PEI) modified with rabies virus glycoprotein via selective stimulation of caveolar endocytosis for RNAi therapeutics in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae-Eun; Singh, Bijay; Li, Huishan; Lee, Jun-Yeong; Kang, Sang-Kee; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Chong-Su

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) holds one of the promising tools for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment by directly arresting the causative genes. For successful RNAi therapeutics for AD, limited access of therapeutic genes to the brain needs to be overcome by developing siRNA delivery system that could cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we report a non-viral vector, rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG)-modified poly(mannitol-co-PEI) gene transporter (PMT), R-PEG-PMT. The RVG ligand directed the PMT/siRNA complexes toward the brain through binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on BBB. In mechanistic study using in vitro BBB model, we observed that osmotically-active PMT enhanced the receptor-mediated transcytosis by stimulating the caveolar endocytosis. The potential of RNAi therapeutics for AD using R-PEG-PMT/siBACE1 complexes was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that R-PEG-PMT is a powerful gene carrier system for brain targeted RNAi therapeutics with synergistic effect of RVG ligand and PMT on well-modulated receptor-mediated transcytosis through BBB. PMID:25457984

  17. RNA Interference-Mediated Repression of MtCCD1 in Mycorrhizal Roots of Medicago truncatula Causes Accumulation of C27 Apocarotenoids, Shedding Light on the Functional Role of CCD11[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Floss, Daniela S.; Schliemann, Willibald; Schmidt, Jürgen; Strack, Dieter; Walter, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Tailoring carotenoids by plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) generates various bioactive apocarotenoids. Recombinant CCD1 has been shown to catalyze symmetrical cleavage of C40 carotenoid substrates at 9,10 and 9′,10′ positions. The actual substrate(s) of the enzyme in planta, however, is still unknown. In this study, we have carried out RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated repression of a Medicago truncatula CCD1 gene in hairy roots colonized by the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus intraradices. As a consequence, the normal AM-mediated accumulation of apocarotenoids (C13 cyclohexenone and C14 mycorradicin derivatives) was differentially modified. Mycorradicin derivatives were strongly reduced to 3% to 6% of the controls, while the cyclohexenone derivatives were only reduced to 30% to 47%. Concomitantly, a yellow-orange color appeared in RNAi roots. Based on ultraviolet light spectra and mass spectrometry analyses, the new compounds are C27 apocarotenoic acid derivatives. These metabolic alterations did not lead to major changes in molecular markers of the AM symbiosis, although a moderate shift to more degenerating arbuscules was observed in RNAi roots. The unexpected outcome of the RNAi approach suggests C27 apocarotenoids as the major substrates of CCD1 in mycorrhizal root cells. Moreover, literature data implicate C27 apocarotenoid cleavage as the general functional role of CCD1 in planta. A revised scheme of plant carotenoid cleavage in two consecutive steps is proposed, in which CCD1 catalyzes only the second step in the cytosol (C27 → C14 + C13), while the first step (C40 → C27 + C13) may be catalyzed by CCD7 and/or CCD4 inside plastids. PMID:18790999

  18. RNAi at work: Targeting invertebrate pests and beneficial organisms' diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invertebrates present two types of large scale RNAi application opportunities: pest control and beneficial insect health. The former involves the introduction of sustainable applications to keep pest populations low, and the latter represents the challenge of keeping beneficial organisms healthy. RN...

  19. RNA interference in parasitic helminths: current situation, potential pitfalls and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Geldhof, P; Visser, A; Clark, D; Saunders, G; Britton, C; Gilleard, J; Berriman, M; Knox, D

    2007-05-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become an invaluable tool for the functional analysis of genes in a wide variety of organisms including the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Recently, attempts have been made to apply this technology to parasitic helminths of animals and plants with variable success. Gene knockdown has been reported for Schistosoma mansoni by soaking or electroporating different life-stages in dsRNA. Similar approaches have been tested on parasitic nematodes which clearly showed that, under certain conditions, it was possible to interfere with gene expression. However, despite these successes, the current utility of this technology in parasite research is questionable. First, problems have arisen with the specificity of RNAi. Treatment of the parasites with dsRNA resulted, in many cases, in non-specific effects. Second, the current RNAi methods have a limited efficiency and effects are sometimes difficult to reproduce. This was especially the case in strongylid parasites where only a small number of genes were susceptible to RNAi-mediated gene knockdown. The future application of RNAi in parasite functional genomics will greatly depend on how we can overcome these difficulties. Optimization of the dsRNA delivery methods and in vitro culture conditions will be the major challenges. PMID:17201997

  20. Inhibition of RNA interference and modulation of transposable element expression by cell death in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weiwu; Liang, Chengzhi; Birchler, James A

    2011-08-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) regulates gene expression by sequence-specific destruction of RNA. It acts as a defense mechanism against viruses and represses the expression of transposable elements (TEs) and some endogenous genes. We report that mutations and transgene constructs that condition cell death suppress RNA interference in adjacent cells in Drosophila melanogaster. The reversal of RNAi is effective for both the white (w) eye color gene and green fluorescent protein (GFP), indicating the generality of the inhibition. Antiapoptotic transgenes that reverse cell death will also reverse the inhibition of RNAi. Using GFP and a low level of cell death produced by a heat shock-head involution defective (hs-hid) transgene, the inhibition appears to occur by blocking the conversion of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to short interfering RNA (siRNA). We also demonstrate that the mus308 gene and endogenous transposable elements, which are both regularly silenced by RNAi, are increased in expression and accompanied by a reduced level of siRNA, when cell death occurs. The finding that chronic ectopic cell death affects RNAi is critical for an understanding of the application of the technique in basic and applied studies. These results also suggest that developmental perturbations, disease states, or environmental insults that cause ectopic cell death would alter transposon and gene expression patterns in the organism by the inhibition of small RNA silencing processes. PMID:21596898

  1. Stable silencing of β-lactoglobulin (BLG) gene by lentivirus-mediated RNAi in goat fetal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shumin; Xiong, Kai; Xie, Zhourui; Nan, Wenting; Liu, Honglin; Chen, Jie

    2012-01-01

    β-lactoglobulin (BLG), a dominant allergen in goat milk, is difficult to remove by traditional biochemical methods. Its elimination from goat milk by genetic modification therefore poses a major challenge for modern goat breeders. A shRNA targeting BLG mRNA with high interference efficiency was identified, with which lentiviral vectors were used for mediating stable shRNA interference in goat-fetal fibroblast cells. Apart from high efficiency in the knockdown of BLG expression in these cells, lentivector-mediated RNAi manifested stable integration into the goat genome itself. Consequently, an in vitro model for goat BLG-content control was compiled, and a goat-cell line for accompanying transgenetic goat production created. PMID:23055809

  2. Genome-wide analyses of proliferation-important genes of Iridovirus-tiger frog virus by RNAi.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun-Feng; Lai, Yu-Xiong; Huang, Li-Jie; Huang, Run-Qing; Yang, Shao-Wei; Shi, Yan; Weng, Shao-Ping; Zhang, Yong; He, Jian-Guo

    2014-08-30

    Tiger frog virus (TFV), a species of genus Ranavirus in the family Iridoviridae, is a nuclear cytoplasmic large DNA virus that infects aquatic vertebrates such as tiger frog (Rana tigrina rugulosa) and Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Trionyx sinensis). Based on the available genome sequences of TFV, the well-developed RNA interference (RNAi) technique, and the reliable cell line for infection model, we decided to analyze the functional importance of all predicted genes. Firstly, a relative quantitative cytopathogenic effect (Q-CPE) assay was established to monitor the viral proliferation in fish cells. Then, genome-wide RNAi screens of 95 small interference (si) RNAs against TFV were performed to characterize the functional importance of nearly all (95%) predicted TFV genes by Q-CPE scaling system. We identified 32 (33.7%) genes as essential, 50 (52.6%) genes as semi-essential and 13 (13.7%) genes as nonessential for TFV proliferation. Quantitative RT-PCR and titer assays of selected genes were performed to verify the screen results. Furthermore, the screened essential genes were analyzed for their genome distribution and conservative comparison within Ranavirus. Such a systematic screen for viral functional genes by cell phenotypes should provide further insights into understanding of the information in antiviral targets, and in viral replication and pathogenesis of iridovirus. PMID:24886972

  3. Targeting chitinase gene of Helicoverpa armigera by host-induced RNA interference confers insect resistance in tobacco and tomato.

    PubMed

    Mamta; Reddy, K R K; Rajam, M V

    2016-02-01

    Helicoverpa armigera Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is a devastating agricultural insect pest with broad spectrum of host range, causing million dollars crop loss annually. Limitations in the present conventional and transgenic approaches have made it crucial to develop sustainable and environmental friendly methods for crop improvement. In the present study, host-induced RNA interference (HI-RNAi) approach was used to develop H. armigera resistant tobacco and tomato plants. Chitinase (HaCHI) gene, critically required for insect molting and metamorphosis was selected as a potential target. Hair-pin RNAi construct was prepared from the conserved off-target free partial HaCHI gene sequence and was used to generate several HaCHI-RNAi tobacco and tomato plants. Northern hybridization confirmed the production of HaCHI gene-specific siRNAs in HaCHI-RNAi tobacco and tomato lines. Continuous feeding on leaves of RNAi lines drastically reduced the target gene transcripts and consequently, affected the overall growth and survival of H. armigera. Various developmental deformities were also manifested in H. armigera larvae after feeding on the leaves of RNAi lines. These results demonstrated the role of chitinase in insect development and potential of HI-RNAi for effective management of H. armigera. PMID:26659592

  4. Optimization of a yeast RNA interference system for controlling gene expression and enabling rapid metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Crook, Nathan C; Schmitz, Alexander C; Alper, Hal S

    2014-05-16

    Reduction of endogenous gene expression is a fundamental operation of metabolic engineering, yet current methods for gene knockdown (i.e., genome editing) remain laborious and slow, especially in yeast. In contrast, RNA interference allows facile and tunable gene knockdown via a simple plasmid transformation step, enabling metabolic engineers to rapidly prototype knockdown strategies in multiple strains before expending significant cost to undertake genome editing. Although RNAi is naturally present in a myriad of eukaryotes, it has only been recently implemented in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a heterologous pathway and so has not yet been optimized as a metabolic engineering tool. In this study, we elucidate a set of design principles for the construction of hairpin RNA expression cassettes in yeast and implement RNA interference to quickly identify routes for improvement of itaconic acid production in this organism. The approach developed here enables rapid prototyping of knockdown strategies and thus accelerates and reduces the cost of the design-build-test cycle in yeast. PMID:24328131

  5. siDirect: highly effective, target-specific siRNA design software for mammalian RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Yuki; Yamada, Tomoyuki; Ui-Tei, Kumiko; Morishita, Shinichi; Saigo, Kaoru

    2004-01-01

    siDirect (http://design.RNAi.jp/) is a web-based online software system for computing highly effective small interfering RNA (siRNA) sequences with maximum target-specificity for mammalian RNA interference (RNAi). Highly effective siRNA sequences are selected using novel guidelines that were established through an extensive study of the relationship between siRNA sequences and RNAi activity. Our efficient software avoids off-target gene silencing to enumerate potential cross-hybridization candidates that the widely used BLAST search may overlook. The website accepts an arbitrary sequence as input and quickly returns siRNA candidates, providing a wide scope of applications in mammalian RNAi, including systematic functional genomics and therapeutic gene silencing. PMID:15215364

  6. High-throughput RNA interference screening using pooled shRNA libraries and next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) screening is a state-of-the-art technology that enables the dissection of biological processes and disease-related phenotypes. The commercial availability of genome-wide, short hairpin RNA (shRNA) libraries has fueled interest in this area but the generation and analysis of these complex data remain a challenge. Here, we describe complete experimental protocols and novel open source computational methodologies, shALIGN and shRNAseq, that allow RNAi screens to be rapidly deconvoluted using next generation sequencing. Our computational pipeline offers efficient screen analysis and the flexibility and scalability to quickly incorporate future developments in shRNA library technology. PMID:22018332

  7. A genome scale RNAi screen identifies GLI1 as a novel gene regulating vorinostat sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, K J; Newbold, A; Gould, C M; Luu, J; Trapani, J A; Matthews, G M; Simpson, K J; Johnstone, R W

    2016-07-01

    Vorinostat is an FDA-approved histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) that has proven clinical success in some patients; however, it remains unclear why certain patients remain unresponsive to this agent and other HDACis. Constitutive STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) activation, overexpression of prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins and loss of HR23B have been identified as potential biomarkers of HDACi resistance; however, none have yet been used to aid the clinical utility of HDACi. Herein, we aimed to further elucidate vorinostat-resistance mechanisms through a functional genomics screen to identify novel genes that when knocked down by RNA interference (RNAi) sensitized cells to vorinostat-induced apoptosis. A synthetic lethal functional screen using a whole-genome protein-coding RNAi library was used to identify genes that when knocked down cooperated with vorinostat to induce tumor cell apoptosis in otherwise resistant cells. Through iterative screening, we identified 10 vorinostat-resistance candidate genes that sensitized specifically to vorinostat. One of these vorinostat-resistance genes was GLI1, an oncogene not previously known to regulate the activity of HDACi. Treatment of vorinostat-resistant cells with the GLI1 small-molecule inhibitor, GANT61, phenocopied the effect of GLI1 knockdown. The mechanism by which GLI1 loss of function sensitized tumor cells to vorinostat-induced apoptosis is at least in part through interactions with vorinostat to alter gene expression in a manner that favored apoptosis. Upon GLI1 knockdown and vorinostat treatment, BCL2L1 expression was repressed and overexpression of BCL2L1 inhibited GLI1-knockdown-mediated vorinostat sensitization. Taken together, we present the identification and characterization of GLI1 as a new HDACi resistance gene, providing a strong rationale for development of GLI1 inhibitors for clinical use in combination with HDACi therapy. PMID:26868908

  8. RNAi-mediated oncogene silencing confers resistance to crown gall tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Escobar, M A; Civerolo, E L; Summerfelt, K R; Dandekar, A M

    2001-11-01

    Crown gall disease, caused by the soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens, results in significant economic losses in perennial crops worldwide. A. tumefaciens is one of the few organisms with a well characterized horizontal gene transfer system, possessing a suite of oncogenes that, when integrated into the plant genome, orchestrate de novo auxin and cytokinin biosynthesis to generate tumors. Specifically, the iaaM and ipt oncogenes, which show approximately 90% DNA sequence identity across studied A. tumefaciens strains, are required for tumor formation. By expressing two self-complementary RNA constructions designed to initiate RNA interference (RNAi) of iaaM and ipt, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana and Lycopersicon esculentum plants that are highly resistant to crown gall disease development. In in vitro root inoculation bioassays with two biovar I strains of A. tumefaciens, transgenic Arabidopsis lines averaged 0.0-1.5% tumorigenesis, whereas wild-type controls averaged 97.5% tumorigenesis. Similarly, several transformed tomato lines that were challenged by stem inoculation with three biovar I strains, one biovar II strain, and one biovar III strain of A. tumefaciens displayed between 0.0% and 24.2% tumorigenesis, whereas controls averaged 100% tumorigenesis. This mechanism of resistance, which is based on mRNA sequence homology rather than the highly specific receptor-ligand binding interactions characteristic of traditional plant resistance genes, should be highly durable. If successful and durable under field conditions, RNAi-mediated oncogene silencing may find broad applicability in the improvement of tree crop and ornamental rootstocks. PMID:11687652

  9. Factors affecting susceptibility to RNA interference in Haemonchus contortus and in vivo silencing of an H11 aminopeptidase gene.

    PubMed

    Samarasinghe, Buddhini; Knox, David P; Britton, Collette

    2011-01-01

    Gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) has been applied very successfully to Caenorhabditis elegans to study gene function but has proven less effective in parasitic nematodes. In the sheep gastrointestinal nematode Haemonchus contortus, previous studies demonstrated reproducible silencing of β-tubulin but not of other genes targeted. Here we aimed to examine whether the level of target transcript or site of gene expression influence susceptibility to RNAi by soaking. Target genes represented by a high number of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the H. contortus L3 stage were not reproducibly silenced. In contrast, four out of six genes putatively expressed in the intestine, excretory cell or amphids were consistently silenced by RNAi. This suggests that genes expressed in sites accessible to the environment are more likely to be susceptible to RNAi by soaking. Silenced genes included those encoding the highly protective gut aminopeptidase H11, secretory protein Hc-ASP-1, β-tubulin and homologues of aquaporin and RNA helicase. To determine whether RNAi silencing of H11 could mimic H11 vaccination in reducing worm and egg counts, we examined the in vivo effects of H11 RNAi. This is the first, to our knowledge, in vivo study of RNAi in an animal parasitic nematode. RNAi of the H11 gene in infective larvae prior to infection resulted in a 57% reduction in faecal egg count (FEC), 40% reduction in worm burden and 64% decrease in aminopeptidase activity compared with pre-soaking in control dsRNA. Thus, in this study we have established that RNAi is a valid and feasible approach to identify essential gene function. However, using current methods, this may be limited to genes expressed in accessible sites. PMID:20699100

  10. An efficient RNA interference screening strategy for gene functional analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is commonly applied in genome-scale gene functional screens. However, a one-on-one RNAi analysis that targets each gene is cost-ineffective and laborious. Previous studies have indicated that siRNAs can also affect RNAs that are near-perfectly complementary, and this phenomenon has been termed an off-target effect. This phenomenon implies that it is possible to silence several genes simultaneously with a carefully designed siRNA. Results We propose a strategy that is combined with a heuristic algorithm to design suitable siRNAs that can target multiple genes and a group testing method that would reduce the number of required RNAi experiments in a large-scale RNAi analysis. To verify the efficacy of our strategy, we used the Orchid expressed sequence tag data as a case study to screen the putative transcription factors that are involved in plant disease responses. According to our computation, 94 qualified siRNAs were sufficient to examine all of the predicated 229 transcription factors. In addition, among the 94 computer-designed siRNAs, an siRNA that targets both TF15 (a previously identified transcription factor that is involved in the plant disease-response pathway) and TF21 was introduced into orchids. The experimental results showed that this siRNA can simultaneously silence TF15 and TF21, and application of our strategy successfully confirmed that TF15 is involved in plant defense responses. Interestingly, our second-round analysis, which used an siRNA specific to TF21, indicated that TF21 is a previously unidentified transcription factor that is related to plant defense responses. Conclusions Our computational results showed that it is possible to screen all genes with fewer experiments than would be required for the traditional one-on-one RNAi screening. We also verified that our strategy is capable of identifying genes that are involved in a specific phenotype. PMID:22988976

  11. Suppression of Bedbug's Reproduction by RNA Interference of Vitellogenin.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Minoru; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Tanahashi, Masahiko; Nikoh, Naruo; Fukatsu, Takema

    2016-01-01

    Recent resurgence of the bedbug Cimex lectularius is a global problem on the public health. On account of the worldwide rise of insecticide-resistant bedbug populations, exploration of new approaches to the bedbug control and management is anticipated. In this context, gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) has been considered for its potential application to pest control and management, because RNAi enables specific suppression of target genes and thus flexible selection of target traits to be disrupted. In this study, in an attempt to develop a control strategy targeting reproduction of the bedbug, we investigated RNAi-mediated gene silencing of vitellogenin (Vg), a major yolk protein precursor essential for oogenesis. From the bedbug transcriptomes, we identified a typical Vg gene and a truncated Vg gene, which were designated as ClVg and ClVg-like, respectively. ClVg gene was highly expressed mainly in the fat body of adult females, which was more than 100 times higher than the expression level of ClVg-like gene, indicating that ClVg gene is the primary functional Vg gene in the bedbug. RNAi-mediated suppression of ClVg gene expression in adult females resulted in drastically reduced egg production, atrophied ovaries, and inflated abdomen due to hypertrophied fat bodies. These phenotypic consequences are expected not only to suppress the bedbug reproduction directly but also to deteriorate its feeding and survival indirectly via behavioral modifications. These results suggest the potential of ClVg gene as a promising target for RNAi-based population management of the bedbug. PMID:27096422

  12. RNA interference revealed the roles of two carboxylesterase genes in insecticide detoxification in Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianqin; Li, Daqi; Ge, Pingting; Yang, Meiling; Guo, Yaping; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2013-10-01

    Carboxylesterases (CarEs) play key roles in metabolism of specific hormones and detoxification of dietary and environmental xenobiotics in insects. We sequenced and characterized CarE cDNAs putatively derived from two different genes named LmCesA1 and LmCesA2 from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, one of the most important agricultural pests in the world. The full-length cDNAs of LmCesA1 (1892 bp) and LmCesA2 (1643 bp) encode 543 and 501 amino acid residues, respectively. The two deduced CarEs share a characteristic α/β-hydrolase structure, including a catalytic triad composed of Ser-Glu (Asp)-His and a consensus sequence GQSAG, which suggests that both CarEs are biologically active. Phylogenetic analysis grouped both LmCesA1 and LmCesA2 into clade A which has been suggested to be involved in dietary detoxification. Both transcripts were highly expressed in all the nymphal and adult stages, but only slightly expressed in eggs. Analyses of tissue-dependent expression and in situ hybridization revealed that both transcripts were primarily expressed in gastric caeca. RNA interference (RNAi) of LmCesA1 and LmCesA2 followed by a topical application of carbaryl or deltamethrin did not lead to a significantly increased mortality with either insecticide. However, RNAi of LmCesA1 and LmCesA2 increased insect mortalities by 20.9% and 14.5%, respectively, when chlorpyrifos was applied. These results suggest that these genes might not play a significant role in detoxification of carbaryl and deltamethrin but are most likely to be involved in detoxification of chlorpyrifos in L. migratoria. PMID:23899922

  13. Two fatty acid desaturases, STEAROYL-ACYL CARRIER PROTEIN Δ9-DESATURASE6 and FATTY ACID DESATURASE3, are involved in drought and hypoxia stress signaling in Arabidopsis crown galls.

    PubMed

    Klinkenberg, Joern; Faist, Hanna; Saupe, Stefanie; Lambertz, Sophie; Krischke, Markus; Stingl, Nadja; Fekete, Agnes; Mueller, Martin J; Feussner, Ivo; Hedrich, Rainer; Deeken, Rosalia

    2014-02-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-derived crown galls of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contain elevated levels of unsaturated fatty acids and strongly express two fatty acid desaturase genes, ω3 FATTY ACID DESATURASE3 (FAD3) and STEAROYL-ACYL CARRIER PROTEIN Δ9-DESATURASE6 (SAD6). The fad3-2 mutant with impaired α-linolenic acid synthesis developed significantly smaller crown galls under normal, but not under high, relative humidity. This strongly suggests that FAD3 plays a role in increasing drought stress tolerance of crown galls. SAD6 is a member of the SAD family of as yet unknown function. Expression of the SAD6 gene is limited to hypoxia, a physiological condition found in crown galls. As no sad6 mutant exists and to link the function of SAD6 with fatty acid desaturation in crown galls, the lipid pattern was analyzed of plants with constitutive SAD6 overexpression (SAD6-OE). SAD6-OE plants contained lower stearic acid and higher oleic acid levels, which upon reduction of SAD6 overexpression by RNA interference (SAD6-OE-RNAi) regained wild-type-like levels. The development of crown galls was not affected either in SAD6-OE or SAD6-OE-RNAi or by RNA interference in crown galls. Since biochemical analysis of SAD6 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and Escherichia coli failed, SAD6 was ectopically expressed in the background of the well-known suppressor of salicylic acid-insensitive2 (ssi2-2) mutant to confirm the desaturase function of SAD6. All known ssi2-2 phenotypes were rescued, including the high stearic acid level. Thus, our findings suggest that SAD6 functions as a Δ9-desaturase, and together with FAD3 it increases the levels of unsaturated fatty acids in crown galls under hypoxia and drought stress conditions. PMID:24368335

  14. Herschel's Interference Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkalskis, Benjamin S.; Freeman, J. Reuben

    2000-01-01

    Describes Herschel's demonstration of interference arising from many coherent rays. Presents a method for students to reproduce this demonstration and obtain beautiful multiple-beam interference patterns. (CCM)

  15. Confirming the RNAi-mediated mechanism of action of siRNA-based cancer therapeutics in mice

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Adam D.; Robbins, Marjorie; Tavakoli, Iran; Levi, Jasna; Hu, Lina; Fronda, Anna; Ambegia, Ellen; McClintock, Kevin; MacLachlan, Ian

    2009-01-01

    siRNAs that specifically silence the expression of cancer-related genes offer a therapeutic approach in oncology. However, it remains critical to determine the true mechanism of their therapeutic effects. Here, we describe the preclinical development of chemically modified siRNA targeting the essential cell-cycle proteins polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and kinesin spindle protein (KSP) in mice. siRNA formulated in stable nucleic acid lipid particles (SNALP) displayed potent antitumor efficacy in both hepatic and subcutaneous tumor models. This was correlated with target gene silencing following a single intravenous administration that was sufficient to cause extensive mitotic disruption and tumor cell apoptosis. Our siRNA formulations induced no measurable immune response, minimizing the potential for nonspecific effects. Additionally, RNAi-specific mRNA cleavage products were found in tumor cells, and their presence correlated with the duration of target mRNA silencing. Histological biomarkers confirmed that RNAi-mediated gene silencing effectively inhibited the target’s biological activity. This report supports an RNAi-mediated mechanism of action for siRNA antitumor effects, suggesting a new methodology for targeting other key genes in cancer development with siRNA-based therapeutics. PMID:19229107

  16. Optical imaging of RNAi-mediated silencing of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiya, Takahiro; Honma, Kimi; Takeshita, Fumitaka; Nagahara, Shunji

    2008-02-01

    RNAi has rapidly become a powerful tool for drug target discovery and validation in an in vitro culture system and, consequently, interest is rapidly growing for extension of its application to in vivo systems, such as animal disease models and human therapeutics. Cancer is one obvious application for RNAi therapeutics, because abnormal gene expression is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis and maintenance of the malignant phenotype of cancer and thereby many oncogenes and cell-signaling molecules present enticing drug target possibilities. RNAi, potent and specific, could silence tumor-related genes and would appear to be a rational approach to inhibit tumor growth. In subsequent in vivo studies, the appropriate cancer model must be developed for an evaluation of siRNA effects on tumors. How to evaluate the effect of siRNA in an in vivo therapeutic model is also important. Accelerating the analyses of these models and improving their predictive value through whole animal imaging methods, which provide cancer inhibition in real time and are sensitive to subtle changes, are crucial for rapid advancement of these approaches. Bioluminescent imaging is one of these optically based imaging methods that enable rapid in vivo analyses of a variety of cellular and molecular events with extreme sensitivity.

  17. Chemical and structural modifications of RNAi therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ku, Sook Hee; Jo, Sung Duk; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kim, Sun Hwa

    2016-09-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA), a 21-23nt double-stranded RNA responsible for post-transcriptional gene silencing, has attracted great interests as promising genomic drugs, due to its strong ability to silence target genes in a sequence-specific manner. Despite high silencing efficiency and on-target specificity, the clinical translation of siRNA has been hindered by its inherent features: poor intracellular delivery, limited blood stability, unpredictable immune responses and unwanted off-targeting effects. To overcome these hindrances, researchers have made various advances to modify siRNA itself and to improve its delivery. In this review paper, first we briefly discuss the innate properties and delivery barriers of siRNA. Then, we describe recent progress in (1) chemically and structurally modified siRNAs to solve their intrinsic problems and (2) siRNA delivery formulations including siRNA conjugates, polymerized siRNA, and nucleic acid-based nanoparticles to improve in vivo delivery. PMID:26549145

  18. Synergistic anticancer properties of docosahexaenoic acid and 5-fluorouracil through interference with energy metabolism and cell cycle arrest in human gastric cancer cell line AGS cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kun; Liang, Qi; Zhao, Zhi-Hao; Li, You-Fen; Wang, Shu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the synergistic effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)/5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on the human gastric cancer cell line AGS and examine the underlying mechanism. METHODS: AGS cells were cultured and treated with a series of concentrations of DHA and 5-FU alone or in combination for 24 and 48 h. To investigate the synergistic effect of DHA and 5-FU on AGS cells, the inhibition of cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay and cell morphology. Flow cytometric analysis was also used to assess cell cycle distribution, and the expression of mitochondrial electron transfer chain complexes (METCs) I, II and V in AGS cells was further determined by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: DHA and 5-FU alone or in combination could markedly suppress the proliferation of AGS cells in a significant time and dose-dependent manner. DHA markedly strengthened the antiproliferative effect of 5-FU, decreasing the IC50 by 3.56-2.15-fold in an apparent synergy. The morphological changes of the cells were characterized by shrinkage, cell membrane blebbing and decreased adherence. Cell cycle analysis showed a shift of cells into the G0/G1 phase from the S phase following treatment with DHA or 5-FU (G0/G1 phase: 30.04% ± 1.54% vs 49.05% ± 6.41% and 63.39% ± 6.83%, respectively, P < 0.05; S phase: 56.76% ± 3.14% vs 34.75% ± 2.35% and 25.63% ± 2.21%, respectively, P < 0.05). Combination treatment of DHA and 5-FU resulted in a significantly larger shift toward the G0/G1 phase and subsequent reduction in S phase (G0/G1 phase: 69.06% ± 2.63% vs 49.05% ± 6.41% and 63.39% ± 6.83%, respectively, P < 0.05; S phase: 19.80% ± 4.30% vs 34.75% ± 2.35% and 25.63% ± 2.21%, respectively, P < 0.05). This synergy was also reflected in the significant downregulation of the expression of METCs in AGS cells. CONCLUSION: Synergistic anticancer properties of DHA and 5-FU may involve interference with energy production of AGS cells via downregulation of METCs and cell cycle arrest. PMID

  19. Interference of hepatitis C virus RNA replication by short interfering RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapadia, Sharookh B.; Brideau-Andersen, Amy; Chisari, Francis V.

    2003-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease, which can lead to the development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Current therapy of patients with chronic HCV infection includes treatment with IFN in combination with ribavirin. Because most treated patients do not resolve the infection, alternative treatment is essential. RNA interference (RNAi) is a recently discovered antiviral mechanism present in plants and animals that induces double-stranded RNA degradation. Using a selectable subgenomic HCV replicon cell culture system, we have shown that RNAi can specifically inhibit HCV RNA replication and protein expression in Huh-7 cells that stably replicate the HCV genome, and that this antiviral effect is independent of IFN. These results suggest that RNAi may represent a new approach for the treatment of persistent HCV infection.

  20. Advances in CRISPR-Cas9 genome engineering: lessons learned from RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Birmingham, Amanda; Wiemann, Stefan; Beijersbergen, Roderick L.; Hornung, Veit; Smith, Anja van Brabant

    2015-01-01

    The discovery that the machinery of the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 bacterial immune system can be re-purposed to easily create deletions, insertions and replacements in the mammalian genome has revolutionized the field of genome engineering and re-invigorated the field of gene therapy. Many parallels have been drawn between the newly discovered CRISPR-Cas9 system and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway in terms of their utility for understanding and interrogating gene function in mammalian cells. Given this similarity, the CRISPR-Cas9 field stands to benefit immensely from lessons learned during the development of RNAi technology. We examine how the history of RNAi can inform today's challenges in CRISPR-Cas9 genome engineering such as efficiency, specificity, high-throughput screening and delivery for in vivo and therapeutic applications. PMID:25800748

  1. Ewing's Sarcoma: Development of RNA Interference-Based Therapy for Advanced Disease

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Olivia; Maples, Phillip B.; Senzer, Neil; Nemunaitis, John

    2012-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma tumors are associated with chromosomal translocation between the EWS gene and the ETS transcription factor gene. These unique target sequences provide opportunity for RNA interference(i)-based therapy. A summary of RNAi mechanism and therapeutically designed products including siRNA, shRNA and bi-shRNA are described. Comparison is made between each of these approaches. Systemic RNAi-based therapy, however, requires protected delivery to the Ewing's sarcoma tumor site for activity. Delivery systems which have been most effective in preclinical and clinical testing are reviewed, followed by preclinical assessment of various silencing strategies with demonstration of effectiveness to EWS/FLI-1 target sequences. It is concluded that RNAi-based therapeutics may have testable and achievable activity in management of Ewing's sarcoma. PMID:22523703

  2. RNAi-mediated resistance to diverse isolates belonging to two virus species involved in Cassava brown streak disease.

    PubMed

    Patil, Basavaprabhu L; Ogwok, Emmanuel; Wagaba, Henry; Mohammed, Ibrahim U; Yadav, Jitender S; Bagewadi, Basavaraj; Taylor, Nigel J; Kreuze, Jan F; Maruthi, M N; Alicai, Titus; Fauquet, Claude M

    2011-01-01

    Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) is emerging as one of the most important viral diseases of cassava (Manihot esculenta) and is considered today as the biggest threat to cassava cultivation in East Africa. The disease is caused by isolates of at least two phylogenetically distinct species of single-stranded RNA viruses belonging to the family Potyviridae, genus Ipomovirus. The two species are present predominantly in the coastal lowland [Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV); Tanzania and Mozambique] and highland [Cassava brown streak Uganda virus (CBSUV); Lake Victoria Basin, Uganda, Kenya and Malawi] in East Africa. In this study, we demonstrate that CBSD can be efficiently controlled using RNA interference (RNAi). Three RNAi constructs targeting the highland species were generated, consisting of the full-length (FL; 894 nucleotides), 397-nucleotide N-terminal and 491-nucleotide C-terminal portions of the coat protein (CP) gene of a Ugandan isolate of CBSUV (CBSUV-[UG:Nam:04]), and expressed constitutively in Nicotiana benthamiana. After challenge with CBSUV-[UG:Nam:04], plants homozygous for FL-CP showed the highest resistance, followed by the N-terminal and C-terminal lines with similar resistance. In the case of FL, approximately 85% of the transgenic plant lines produced were completely resistant. Some transgenic lines were also challenged with six distinct isolates representing both species: CBSV and CBSUV. In addition to nearly complete resistance to the homologous virus, two FL plant lines showed 100% resistance and two C-terminal lines expressed 50-100% resistance, whereas the N-terminal lines succumbed to the nonhomologous CBSV isolates. Northern blotting revealed a positive correlation between the level of transgene-specific small interfering RNAs detected in transgenic plants and the level of virus resistance. This is the first demonstration of RNAi-mediated resistance to CBSD and protection across very distant isolates (more than 25% in nucleotide

  3. Therapeutic impact of systemic AAV-mediated RNA interference in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bisset, Darren R; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa A; Zavaljevski, Maja; Wei, Jessica; Carter, Gregory T; Weiss, Michael D; Chamberlain, Joel R

    2015-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) offers a promising therapeutic approach for dominant genetic disorders that involve gain-of-function mechanisms. One candidate disease for RNAi therapy application is myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), which results from toxicity of a mutant mRNA. DM1 is caused by expansion of a CTG repeat in the 3' UTR of the DMPK gene. The expression of DMPK mRNA containing an expanded CUG repeat (CUG(exp)) leads to defects in RNA biogenesis and turnover. We designed miRNA-based RNAi hairpins to target the CUG(exp) mRNA in the human α-skeletal muscle actin long-repeat (HSA(LR)) mouse model of DM1. RNAi expression cassettes were delivered to HSA(LR) mice using recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors injected intravenously as a route to systemic gene therapy. Vector delivery significantly reduced disease pathology in muscles of the HSA(LR) mice, including a reduction in the CUG(exp) mRNA, a reduction in myotonic discharges, a shift toward adult pre-mRNA splicing patterns, reduced myofiber hypertrophy and a decrease in myonuclear foci containing the CUG(exp) mRNA. Significant reversal of hallmarks of DM1 in the rAAV RNAi-treated HSA(LR) mice indicate that defects characteristic of DM1 can be mitigated with a systemic RNAi approach targeting the nuclei of terminally differentiated myofibers. Efficient rAAV-mediated delivery of RNAi has the potential to provide a long-term therapy for DM1 and other dominant muscular dystrophies. PMID:26082468

  4. RNA interference in plant parasitic nematodes: a summary of the current status.

    PubMed

    Lilley, C J; Davies, L J; Urwin, P E

    2012-04-01

    SUMMARYRNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as an invaluable gene-silencing tool for functional analysis in a wide variety of organisms, particularly the free-living model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. An increasing number of studies have now described its application to plant parasitic nematodes. Genes expressed in a range of cell types are silenced when nematodes take up double stranded RNA (dsRNA) or short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that elicit a systemic RNAi response. Despite many successful reports, there is still poor understanding of the range of factors that influence optimal gene silencing. Recent in vitro studies have highlighted significant variations in the RNAi phenotype that can occur with different dsRNA concentrations, construct size and duration of soaking. Discrepancies in methodology thwart efforts to reliably compare the efficacy of RNAi between different nematodes or target tissues. Nevertheless, RNAi has become an established experimental tool for plant parasitic nematodes and also offers the prospect of being developed into a novel control strategy when delivered from transgenic plants. PMID:22217302

  5. RNA Interference Using c-Myc-Conjugated Nanoparticles Suppresses Breast and Colorectal Cancer Models.

    PubMed

    Tangudu, Naveen K; Verma, Vinod K; Clemons, Tristan D; Beevi, Syed S; Hay, Trevor; Mahidhara, Ganesh; Raja, Meera; Nair, Rekha A; Alexander, Liza E; Patel, Anant B; Jose, Jedy; Smith, Nicole M; Zdyrko, Bogdan; Bourdoncle, Anne; Luzinov, Igor; Iyer, K Swaminathan; Clarke, Alan R; Dinesh Kumar, Lekha

    2015-05-01

    In this article, we report the development and preclinical validation of combinatorial therapy for treatment of cancers using RNA interference (RNAi). RNAi technology is an attractive approach to silence genes responsible for disease onset and progression. Currently, the critical challenge facing the clinical success of RNAi technology is in the difficulty of delivery of RNAi inducers, due to low transfection efficiency, difficulties of integration into host DNA and unstable expression. Using the macromolecule polyglycidal methacrylate (PGMA) as a platform to graft multiple polyethyleneimine (PEI) chains, we demonstrate effective delivery of small oligos (anti-miRs and mimics) and larger DNAs (encoding shRNAs) in a wide variety of cancer cell lines by successful silencing/activation of their respective target genes. Furthermore, the effectiveness of this therapy was validated for in vivo tumor suppression using two transgenic mouse models; first, tumor growth arrest and increased animal survival was seen in mice bearing Brca2/p53-mutant mammary tumors following daily intratumoral treatment with nanoparticles conjugated to c-Myc shRNA. Second, oral delivery of the conjugate to an Apc-deficient crypt progenitor colon cancer model increased animal survival and returned intestinal tissue to a non-wnt-deregulated state. This study demonstrates, through careful design of nonviral nanoparticles and appropriate selection of therapeutic gene targets, that RNAi technology can be made an affordable and amenable therapy for cancer. PMID:25695957

  6. RNA interference technology used for the study of aquatic virus infections.

    PubMed

    Reshi, Mohammad Latif; Wu, Jen-Leih; Wang, Hao-Ven; Hong, Jiann-Ruey

    2014-09-01

    Aquaculture is one of the most important economic activities in Asia and is presently the fastest growing sector of food production in the world. Explosive increases in global fish farming have been accompanied by an increase in viral diseases. Viral infections are responsible for huge economic losses in fish farming, and control of these viral diseases in aquaculture remains a serious challenge. Recent advances in biotechnology have had a significant impact on disease reduction in aquaculture. RNAi is one of the most important technological breakthroughs in modern biology, allowing us to directly observe the effects of the loss of specific genes in living systems. RNA interference technology has emerged as a powerful tool for manipulating gene expression in the laboratory. This technology represents a new therapeutic approach for treating aquatic diseases, including viral infections. RNAi technology is based on a naturally occurring post-transcriptional gene silencing process mediated by the formation of dsRNA. RNAi has been proven widely effective for gene knockdown in mammalian cultured cells, but its utility in fish remains unexplored. This review aims to highlight the RNAi technology that has made significant contributions toward the improvement of aquatic animal health and will also summarize the current status and future strategies concerning the therapeutic applications of RNAi to combat viral disease in aquacultured organisms. PMID:24945574

  7. [Interference of ethylene glycol on lactate assays].

    PubMed

    Graïne, H; Toumi, K; Roullier, V; Capeau, J; Lefèvre, G

    2007-01-01

    Ethylene glycol is broken down to three main organic acids: glycolic acid, glyoxylic acid and oxalic acid which cause severe metabolic acidosis. Effect of these three acids on lactate assays was evaluated in five blood gas analysers and two clinical chemistry analysers. For all systems, no influence of oxalic acid on lactate results could be demonstrated. No interference of glycolic acid could be observed on lactate assay performed with Rapid Lab 1265 (R: 104,9 +/- 12,1%), Vitros 950 (R: 105,7 +/- 5,3 %) and Architect ci8200 (R: 104,9 +/- 4,7%), but on the contrary, CCX 4, OMNI S, ABL 725 and 825 demonstrated a concentration-dependent interference. No interference of glyoxylic acid could be observed with Vitros 950, but a positive interference could be observed with ABL 725 and 825, OMNI S, CCX4 and Architect ci8200 A linear relationship between apparent lactate concentration found with ABL 725 and 825, OMNI S, CCX 4, and glyoxylic acid could be observed (0,94 < r < 0,99), a weaker interference being observed with Rapid Lab 1265 and Architect ci 8200. Our results demonstrated that in case of ethylene glycol poisoning, cautious interpretation of lactate assay should be done, since wrong results of lactacidemia could lead to misdiagnostic and delay patient treatment. PMID:17627925

  8. Amino Acid-Functionalized Dendritic Polyglycerol for Safe and Effective siRNA Delivery.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hanxiang; Schlesener, Cathleen; Cromwell, Olivia; Hellmund, Markus; Haag, Rainer; Guan, Zhibin

    2015-12-14

    The development of safe and effective delivery vectors is a great challenge for the medicinal application of RNA interference (RNAi). In this study, we aimed to develop new synthetic transfection agents based on dendritic polyglycercol (dPG), which has shown great biocompatibility in several biomaterial applications. Histidine and aromatic amino acids were conjugated to the amine-terminated dPGs through amide bonds. We systematically tuned the amino acid combination, functionalization ratio, ligand density, and dPG core size to find optimal vectors. It was found that histidine-tryptophan-functionalized dPGs exhibited improved delivery efficiency and greatly reduced toxicity over simple amine-terminated dPGs. Furthermore, the optimized vectors exhibited strong siRNA binding and high transfection efficiency in serum containing media. The results indicate that the current amino acid-functionalized dPG system is a promising candidate for in vivo siRNA delivery applications. PMID:26569043

  9. Persistence of RNAi-Mediated Knockdown in Drosophila Complicates Mosaic Analysis Yet Enables Highly Sensitive Lineage Tracing

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Justin A.; Sumabat, Taryn M.; Hariharan, Iswar K.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a powerful way of reducing gene function in Drosophila melanogaster tissues. By expressing synthetic short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) using the Gal4/UAS system, knockdown is efficiently achieved in specific tissues or in clones of marked cells. Here we show that knockdown by shRNAs is so potent and persistent that even transient exposure of cells to shRNAs can reduce gene function in their descendants. When using the FLP-out Gal4 method, in some instances we observed unmarked “shadow RNAi” clones adjacent to Gal4-expressing clones, which may have resulted from brief Gal4 expression following recombination but prior to cell division. Similarly, Gal4 driver lines with dynamic expression patterns can generate shadow RNAi cells after their activity has ceased in those cells. Importantly, these effects can lead to erroneous conclusions regarding the cell autonomy of knockdown phenotypes. We have investigated the basis of this phenomenon and suggested experimental designs for eliminating ambiguities in interpretation. We have also exploited the persistence of shRNA-mediated knockdown to design a sensitive lineage-tracing method, i-TRACE, which is capable of detecting even low levels of past reporter expression. Using i-TRACE, we demonstrate transient infidelities in the expression of some cell-identity markers near compartment boundaries in the wing imaginal disc. PMID:26984059

  10. RNAi-mediated knockdown of the voltage gated sodium ion channel TcNav causes mortality in Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Abd El Halim, Hesham M; Alshukri, Baida M H; Ahmad, Munawar S; Nakasu, Erich Y T; Awwad, Mohammed H; Salama, Elham M; Gatehouse, Angharad M R; Edwards, Martin G

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium ion channel (VGSC) belongs to the largest superfamily of ion channels. Since VGSCs play key roles in physiological processes they are major targets for effective insecticides. RNA interference (RNAi) is widely used to analyse gene function, but recently, it has shown potential to contribute to novel strategies for selectively controlling agricultural insect pests. The current study evaluates the delivery of dsRNA targeted to the sodium ion channel paralytic A (TcNav) gene in Tribolium castaneum as a viable means of controlling this insect pest. Delivery of TcNav dsRNA caused severe developmental arrest with larval mortalities up to 73% post injection of dsRNA. Injected larvae showed significant (p < 0.05) knockdown in gene expression between 30-60%. Expression was also significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in pupae following injection causing 30% and 42% knockdown for early and late pupal stages, respectively. Oral delivery of dsRNA caused dose-dependant mortalities of between 19 and 51.34%; this was accompanied by significant (p < 0.05) knockdown in gene expression following 3 days of continuous feeding. The majority of larvae injected with, or fed, dsRNA died during the final larval stage prior to pupation. This work provides evidence of a viable RNAi-based strategy for insect control. PMID:27411529

  11. RNAi-mediated knockdown of the voltage gated sodium ion channel TcNav causes mortality in Tribolium castaneum

    PubMed Central

    Abd El Halim, Hesham M.; Alshukri, Baida M. H.; Ahmad, Munawar S.; Nakasu, Erich Y. T.; Awwad, Mohammed H.; Salama, Elham M.; Gatehouse, Angharad M. R.; Edwards, Martin G.

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium ion channel (VGSC) belongs to the largest superfamily of ion channels. Since VGSCs play key roles in physiological processes they are major targets for effective insecticides. RNA interference (RNAi) is widely used to analyse gene function, but recently, it has shown potential to contribute to novel strategies for selectively controlling agricultural insect pests. The current study evaluates the delivery of dsRNA targeted to the sodium ion channel paralytic A (TcNav) gene in Tribolium castaneum as a viable means of controlling this insect pest. Delivery of TcNav dsRNA caused severe developmental arrest with larval mortalities up to 73% post injection of dsRNA. Injected larvae showed significant (p < 0.05) knockdown in gene expression between 30–60%. Expression was also significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in pupae following injection causing 30% and 42% knockdown for early and late pupal stages, respectively. Oral delivery of dsRNA caused dose-dependant mortalities of between 19 and 51.34%; this was accompanied by significant (p < 0.05) knockdown in gene expression following 3 days of continuous feeding. The majority of larvae injected with, or fed, dsRNA died during the final larval stage prior to pupation. This work provides evidence of a viable RNAi-based strategy for insect control. PMID:27411529

  12. Silencing the HaHR3 Gene by Transgenic Plant-mediated RNAi to Disrupt Helicoverpa armigera Development

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yehui; Zeng, Hongmei; Zhang, Yuliang; Xu, Dawei; Qiu, Dewen

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) caused by exogenous double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) has developed into a powerful technique in functional genomics, and to date it is widely used to down-regulate crucial physiology-related genes to control pest insects. A molt-regulating transcription factor gene, HaHR3, of cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera) was selected as the target gene. Four different fragments covering the coding sequence (CDS) of HaHR3 were cloned into vector L4440 to express dsRNAs in Escherichia coli. The most effective silencing fragment was then cloned into a plant over-expression vector to express a hairpin RNA (hpRNA) in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). When H. armigera larvae were fed the E. coli or transgenic plants, the HaHR3 mRNA and protein levels dramatically decreased, resulting developmental deformity and larval lethality. The results demonstrate that both recombinant bacteria and transgenic plants could induce HaHR3 silence to disrupt H. armigera development, transgenic plant-mediated RNAi is emerging as a powerful approach for controlling insect pests. PMID:23630449

  13. Precise RNAi-mediated silencing of metabolically active proteins in the defence secretions of juvenile leaf beetles

    PubMed Central

    Bodemann, René Roberto; Rahfeld, Peter; Stock, Magdalena; Kunert, Maritta; Wielsch, Natalie; Groth, Marco; Frick, Sindy; Boland, Wilhelm; Burse, Antje

    2012-01-01

    Allomones are widely used by insects to impede predation. Frequently these chemical stimuli are released from specialized glands. The larvae of Chrysomelina leaf beetles produce allomones in gland reservoirs into which the required precursors and also the enzymes are secreted from attached gland cells. Hence, the reservoirs can be considered as closed bio-reactors for producing defensive secretions. We used RNA interference (RNAi) to analyse in vivo functions of proteins in biosynthetic pathways occurring in insect secretions. After a salicyl alcohol oxidase was silenced in juveniles of the poplar leaf beetles, Chrysomela populi, the precursor salicyl alcohol increased to 98 per cent, while salicyl aldehyde was reduced to 2 per cent within 5 days. By analogy, we have silenced a novel protein annotated as a member of the juvenile hormone-binding protein superfamily in the juvenile defensive glands of the related mustard leaf beetle, Phaedon cochleariae. The protein is associated with the cyclization of 8-oxogeranial to iridoids (methylcyclopentanoid monoterpenes) in the larval exudates made clear by the accumulation of the acylic precursor 5 days after RNAi triggering. A similar cyclization reaction produces the secologanin part of indole alkaloids in plants. PMID:22874750

  14. Development of a host-induced RNAi system in the wheat stripe rust fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chuntao; Jurgenson, James E; Hulbert, Scot H

    2011-05-01

    Rust fungi cause devastating diseases of wheat and other cereal species globally. Genetic resistance is the preferred method to control rusts but the effectiveness of race-specific resistance is typically transient due to the genetic plasticity of rust populations. The advent of RNA interference (RNAi) technology has shown promise for the engineering of resistance to some biotrophic pathogens in plants by altering the expression of essential pathogens' genes. Gene fragments from the rust fungi Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici or P. graminis f. sp. tritici were delivered to plant cells through the Barley stripe mosaic virus system, and some reduced the expression of the corresponding genes in the rust fungus. The ability to detect suppression was associated with the expression patterns of the fungal genes because reduction was only detected in transcripts with relatively high levels of expression in fungal haustoria. The results indicate that an in planta RNAi approach can be used in functional genomics research for rust fungi and that it could potentially be used to engineer durable resistance. PMID:21190437

  15. Improved production of heterologous lipase in Trichoderma reesei by RNAi mediated gene silencing of an endogenic highly expressed gene.

    PubMed

    Qin, Li-Na; Cai, Fu-Rong; Dong, Xin-Rui; Huang, Zhen-Bang; Tao, Yong; Huang, Jian-Zhong; Dong, Zhi-Yang

    2012-04-01

    A lipase gene (Lip) of the Aspergillus niger was de novo synthesized and expressed in the Trichoderma reesei under the promoter of the cellobiohydrolase I gene (cbh1). RNAi-mediated gene silencing was successfully used to further improve the recombinant lipase production via down-regulation of CBHI which comprised more than 60% of the total extracellular proteins in T. reesei. The gene and protein expression of CBHI and recombinant lipase were analyzed by real-time PCR, SDS-PAGE and activity assay. The results demonstrated that RNAi-mediated gene silencing could effectively suppress cbh1 gene expression and the reduction of CBHI could result in obvious improvement of heterologous lipase production. The reconstructed strains with decreased CBHI production exhibited 1.8- to 3.2-fold increase in lipase activity than that of parental strain. The study herein provided a feasible and advantageous method of increasing heterologous target gene expression in T. reesei through preventing the high expression of a specific endogenenous gene by RNA interference. PMID:22305540

  16. A significant increase of RNAi efficiency in human cells by the CMV enhancer with a tRNAlys promoter.

    PubMed

    Weiwei, Ma; Zhenhua, Xie; Feng, Liu; Hang, Ning; Yuyang, Jiang

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is the process of mRNA degradation induced by double-stranded RNA in a sequence-specific manner. Different types of promoters, such as U6, H1, tRNA, and CMV, have been used to control the inhibitory effect of RNAi expression vectors. In the present study, we constructed two shRNA expression vectors, respectively, controlled by tRNA(lys) and CMV enhancer-tRNA(lys) promoters. Compared to the vectors with tRNA(lys) or U6 promoter, the vector with a CMV enhancer-tRNA(lys) promoter silenced pokemon more efficiently on both the mRNA and the protein levels. Meanwhile, the silencing of pokemon inhibited the proliferation of MCF7 cells, but the induction of apoptosis of MCF7 cells was not observed. We conclude that the CMV enhancer-tRNA(lys) promoter may be a powerful tool in driving intracellular expression of shRNA which can efficiently silence targeted gene. PMID:19859553

  17. A Significant Increase of RNAi Efficiency in Human Cells by the CMV Enhancer with a tRNAlys Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Weiwei, Ma; Zhenhua, Xie; Feng, Liu; Hang, Ning; Yuyang, Jiang

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is the process of mRNA degradation induced by double-stranded RNA in a sequence-specific manner. Different types of promoters, such as U6, H1, tRNA, and CMV, have been used to control the inhibitory effect of RNAi expression vectors. In the present study, we constructed two shRNA expression vectors, respectively, controlled by tRNAlys and CMV enhancer-tRNAlys promoters. Compared to the vectors with tRNAlys or U6 promoter, the vector with a CMV enhancer-tRNAlys promoter silenced pokemon more efficiently on both the mRNA and the protein levels. Meanwhile, the silencing of pokemon inhibited the proliferation of MCF7 cells, but the induction of apoptosis of MCF7 cells was not observed. We conclude that the CMV enhancer-tRNAlys promoter may be a powerful tool in driving intracellular expression of shRNA which can efficiently silence targeted gene. PMID:19859553

  18. Transcriptome analysis of the synganglion from the honey bee mite, Varroa destructor and RNAi knockdown of neural peptide targets.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ewan M; Budge, Giles E; Watkins, Max; Bowman, Alan S

    2016-03-01

    Varroa mites (Varroa destructor) and the viruses that they transmit are one of the major contributing factors to the global honey bee crisis. Gene products within the nervous system are the targets of all the insecticides currently used to control Varroa but there is a paucity of transcriptomic data available for Varroa neural tissues. A cDNA library from the synganglia ("brains") of adult female Varroa was constructed and 600 ESTs sequenced and analysed revealing several current and potential druggable targets. Contigs coding for the deformed wing virus (DWV) variants V. destructor virus-1 (VDV-1) and the recombinant (VDV-1DVD) were present in the synganglion library. Negative-sense RNA-specific PCR indicated that VDV-1 replicates in the Varroa synganglion and all other tissues tested, but we could not detect DWV replicating in any Varroa tissue. Two neuropeptides were identified in the synganlion EST library: a B-type allatostatin and a member of the crustacean hyperglycaemic hormone (CHH) superfamily. Knockdown of the allatostatin or the CHH-like gene by double-stranded RNA-interference (dsRNAi) resulted in 85% and 55% mortality, respectively, of Varroa. Here, we present the first transcriptomic survey in Varroa and demonstrate that neural genes can be targeted by dsRNAi either for genetic validation of putative targets during drug discovery programmes or as a potential control measure in itself. PMID:26721201

  19. Advances in RNA interference technology and its impact on nutritional improvement, disease and insect control in plants.

    PubMed

    Katoch, Rajan; Thakur, Neelam

    2013-03-01

    This review highlights the advances in the knowledge of RNA interference (RNAi) and discusses recent progress on the functionality of different components RNAi machinery operating in the organisms. The silencing of genes by RNA interference has become the technology of choice for investigation of gene functions in different organisms. The refinement in the knowledge of the endogenous RNAi pathways in plants along with the development of new strategies and applications for the improvement of nutritional value of important agricultural crops through suppression of genes in different plants have opened new vistas for nutritional security. The improvement in the nutritional status of the plants and reduction in the level of toxins or antinutrients was desired for long, but the available technology was not completely successful in achieving the tissue specific regulation of some genes. In the recent years, a number of economically important crop plants have been tested successfully for improving plant nutritional value through metabolic engineering using RNAi. The implications of this technology for crop improvement programs, including nutritional enrichment, reduction of antinutrients, disease, and insect control have been successfully tested in variety of crops with commercial considerations. The enhancement of the nutraceutical traits for the desired health benefits in common crop plants through manipulation of gene expression has been elaborated in this article. The tremendous potential with RNAi technology is expected to revolutionize the modern agriculture for meeting the growing challenges is discussed. PMID:23322250

  20. Baculovirus-mediated Gene Delivery and RNAi Applications

    PubMed Central

    Makkonen, Kaisa-Emilia; Airenne, Kari; Ylä-Herttulala, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    Baculoviruses are widely encountered in nature and a great deal of data is available about their safety and biology. Recently, these versatile, insect-specific viruses have demonstrated their usefulness in various biotechnological applications including protein production and gene transfer. Multiple in vitro and in vivo studies exist and support their use as gene delivery vehicles in vertebrate cells. Recently, baculoviruses have also demonstrated high potential in RNAi applications in which several advantages of the virus make it a promising tool for RNA gene transfer with high safety and wide tropism. PMID:25912715

  1. Nonionic surfactant vesicles for delivery of RNAi therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Paecharoenchai, Orapan; Teng, Lesheng; Yung, Bryant C; Teng, Lirong; Opanasopit, Praneet; Lee, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    RNAi is a promising potential therapeutic approach for many diseases. A major barrier to its clinical translation is the lack of efficient delivery systems for siRNA. Among nonviral vectors, nonionic surfactant vesicles (niosomes) have shown a great deal of promise in terms of their efficacy and toxicity profiles. Nonionic surfactants have been shown to be a superior alternative to phospholipids in several studies. There is a large selection of surfactants with various properties that have been incorporated into niosomes. Therefore, there is great potential for innovation in terms of nisome composition. This article summarizes recent advancements in niosome technology for the delivery of siRNA. PMID:24156490

  2. A targeted RNAi screen for genes involved in chromosome morphogenesis and nuclear organization in the Caenorhabditis elegans germline.

    PubMed Central

    Colaiácovo, M P; Stanfield, G M; Reddy, K C; Reinke, V; Kim, S K; Villeneuve, A M

    2002-01-01

    We have implemented a functional genomics strategy to identify genes involved in chromosome morphogenesis and nuclear organization during meiotic prophase in the Caenorhabditis elegans germline. This approach took advantage of a gene-expression survey that used DNA microarray technology to identify genes preferentially expressed in the germline. We defined a subset of 192 germline-enriched genes whose expression profiles were similar to those of previously identified meiosis genes and designed a screen to identify genes for which inhibition by RNA interference (RNAi) elicited defects in function or development of the germline. We obtained strong germline phenotypes for 27% of the genes tested, indicating that this targeted approach greatly enriched for genes that function in the germline. In addition to genes involved in key meiotic prophase events, we identified genes involved in meiotic progression, germline proliferation, and chromosome organization and/or segregation during mitotic growth. PMID:12242227

  3. An oncogenomics-based in vivo RNAi screen identifies tumor suppressors in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zender, Lars; Xue, Wen; Zuber, Johannes; Semighini, Camile P.; Krasnitz, Alexander; Ma, Beicong; Zender, Peggy; Kubicka, Stefan; Luk, John M.; Schirmacher, Peter; McCombie, Richard W.; Wigler, Michael; Hicks, James; Hannon, Gregory J.; Powers, Scott; Lowe, Scott W.

    2010-01-01

    Cancers are highly heterogeneous and contain many passenger and driver mutations. To functionally identify tumor suppressor genes relevant to human cancer, we compiled pools of short harpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting the mouse orthologs of genes recurrently deleted in a series of human hepatocellular carcinomas, and tested their ability to promote tumorigenesis in a mosaic mouse model. In contrast to randomly selected shRNA pools, many deletion-specific pools accelerated hepatocarcinogenesis in mice. Through further analysis, we identified and validated 13 tumor suppressor genes, 12 of which had not been linked to cancer before. One gene, XPO4, encodes a nuclear export protein whose substrate EIF5A2 is amplified in human tumors, is required for proliferation of XPO4-deficient tumor cells, and promotes hepatocellular carcinoma in mice. Our results establish the feasibility of in vivo RNAi screens and illustrate how combining cancer genomics, RNA interference, and mosaic mouse models can facilitate the functional annotation of the cancer genome. PMID:19012953

  4. The Impact of Unprotected T Cells in RNAi-based Gene Therapy for HIV-AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Liu, Ying Poi; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is highly effective in inhibiting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication by the expression of antiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in stably transduced T-cell lines. For the development of a durable gene therapy that prevents viral escape, we proposed to combine multiple shRNAs against highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 RNA genome. The future in vivo application of such a gene therapy protocol will reach only a fraction of the T cells, such that HIV-1 replication will continue in the unmodified T cells, thereby possibly frustrating the therapy by generation of HIV-1 variants that escape from the inhibition imposed by the protected cells. We studied virus inhibition and evolution in pure cultures of shRNA-expressing cells versus mixed cell cultures of protected and unprotected T cells. The addition of the unprotected T cells indeed seems to accelerate HIV-1 evolution and escape from a single shRNA inhibitor. However, expression of three antiviral shRNAs from a single lentiviral vector prevents virus escape even in the presence of unprotected cells. These results support the idea to validate the therapeutic potential of this anti-HIV approach in appropriate in vivo models. PMID:24336172

  5. Plasmid-based shRNA lentiviral particle production for RNAi applications

    PubMed Central

    Shum, David; Djaballah, Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors have become mainstream gene transfer vehicles for their ability to delivery and integrate into host cells. In RNA interference (RNAi) applications, lentiviral constructs constitutively express dsRNA molecules usually as short hairpin RNA (shRNA) enabling long-term gene silencing and when pseudotyped with a broad host glycoprotein envelope; allows a multitude of cell types to be transduced. Their successful use ultimately relies on the production of lentiviral particles in high-titer and uniformity. Typical methods require the transfection of three or more plasmids in which essential viral elements have been encoded separated so as to remain replication deficient. These transfection procedures are of critical importance; however, methods often vary among laboratories making it difficult to assess the overall efficiency of lentiviral particle production. In this report, we focused exclusively on this step and compared the overall impact of the commercial transfection reagent FuGENE 6 to FuGENE HD. We found that FuGENE HD resulted in at least 5-fold improvement in viral particle titer as assessed by the p24 standard ELISA assay. We present the complete optimized workflow and demonstrate this utility in which a single modification of this transfection step improved the lentiviral particle production. PMID:24939963

  6. Genome-wide RNAi screen for nuclear actin reveals a network of cofilin regulators

    PubMed Central

    Dopie, Joseph; Rajakylä, Eeva K.; Joensuu, Merja S.; Huet, Guillaume; Ferrantelli, Evelina; Xie, Tiao; Jäälinoja, Harri; Jokitalo, Eija; Vartiainen, Maria K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nuclear actin plays an important role in many processes that regulate gene expression. Cytoplasmic actin dynamics are tightly controlled by numerous actin-binding proteins, but regulation of nuclear actin has remained unclear. Here, we performed a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila cells to identify proteins that influence either nuclear polymerization or import of actin. We validate 19 factors as specific hits, and show that Chinmo (known as Bach2 in mammals), SNF4Aγ (Prkag1 in mammals) and Rab18 play a role in nuclear localization of actin in both fly and mammalian cells. We identify several new regulators of cofilin activity, and characterize modulators of both cofilin kinases and phosphatase. For example, Chinmo/Bach2, which regulates nuclear actin levels also in vivo, maintains active cofilin by repressing the expression of the kinase Cdi (Tesk in mammals). Finally, we show that Nup98 and lamin are candidates for regulating nuclear actin polymerization. Our screen therefore reveals new aspects of actin regulation and links nuclear actin to many cellular processes. PMID:26021350

  7. Genome-wide RNAi screen for nuclear actin reveals a network of cofilin regulators.

    PubMed

    Dopie, Joseph; Rajakylä, Eeva K; Joensuu, Merja S; Huet, Guillaume; Ferrantelli, Evelina; Xie, Tiao; Jäälinoja, Harri; Jokitalo, Eija; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear actin plays an important role in many processes that regulate gene expression. Cytoplasmic actin dynamics are tightly controlled by numerous actin-binding proteins, but regulation of nuclear actin has remained unclear. Here, we performed a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila cells to identify proteins that influence either nuclear polymerization or import of actin. We validate 19 factors as specific hits, and show that Chinmo (known as Bach2 in mammals), SNF4Aγ (Prkag1 in mammals) and Rab18 play a role in nuclear localization of actin in both fly and mammalian cells. We identify several new regulators of cofilin activity, and characterize modulators of both cofilin kinases and phosphatase. For example, Chinmo/Bach2, which regulates nuclear actin levels also in vivo, maintains active cofilin by repressing the expression of the kinase Cdi (Tesk in mammals). Finally, we show that Nup98 and lamin are candidates for regulating nuclear actin polymerization. Our screen therefore reveals new aspects of actin regulation and links nuclear actin to many cellular processes. PMID:26021350

  8. Systemic RNAi-mediated Gene Silencing in Nonhuman Primate and Rodent Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Novobrantseva, Tatiana I; Borodovsky, Anna; Wong, Jamie; Klebanov, Boris; Zafari, Mohammad; Yucius, Kristina; Querbes, William; Ge, Pei; Ruda, Vera M; Milstein, Stuart; Speciner, Lauren; Duncan, Rick; Barros, Scott; Basha, Genc; Cullis, Pieter; Akinc, Akin; Donahoe, Jessica S; Narayanannair Jayaprakash, K; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; Bogorad, Roman L; Love, Kevin; Whitehead, Katie; Levins, Chris; Manoharan, Muthiah; Swirski, Filip K; Weissleder, Ralph; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; de Fougerolles, Antonin; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Koteliansky, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Leukocytes are central regulators of inflammation and the target cells of therapies for key diseases, including autoimmune, cardiovascular, and malignant disorders. Efficient in vivo delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to immune cells could thus enable novel treatment strategies with broad applicability. In this report, we develop systemic delivery methods of siRNA encapsulated in lipid nanoparticles (LNP) for durable and potent in vivo RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing in myeloid cells. This work provides the first demonstration of siRNA-mediated silencing in myeloid cell types of nonhuman primates (NHPs) and establishes the feasibility of targeting multiple gene targets in rodent myeloid cells. The therapeutic potential of these formulations was demonstrated using siRNA targeting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) which induced substantial attenuation of disease progression comparable to a potent antibody treatment in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In summary, we demonstrate a broadly applicable and therapeutically relevant platform for silencing disease genes in immune cells. PMID:23344621

  9. In Vivo RNAi Screen Reveals Neddylation Genes as Novel Regulators of Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ying; Liu, Min; Ospina, Jason K.; Yang, Shengyuan; Zhu, Alan Jian

    2011-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is highly conserved in all metazoan animals and plays critical roles in many developmental processes. Dysregulation of the Hh signaling cascade has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer. Although key components of the Hh pathway have been identified, significant gaps remain in our understanding of the regulation of individual Hh signaling molecules. Here, we report the identification of novel regulators of the Hh pathway, obtained from an in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila. By selectively targeting critical genes functioning in post-translational modification systems utilizing ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like proteins, we identify two novel genes (dUba3 and dUbc12) that negatively regulate Hh signaling activity. We provide in vivo and in vitro evidence illustrating that dUba3 and dUbc12 are essential components of the neddylation pathway; they function in an enzyme cascade to conjugate the ubiquitin-like NEDD8 modifier to Cullin proteins. Neddylation activates the Cullin-containing ubiquitin ligase complex, which in turn promotes the degradation of Cubitus interruptus (Ci), the downstream transcription factor of the Hh pathway. Our study reveals a conserved molecular mechanism of the neddylation pathway in Drosophila and sheds light on the complex post-translational regulations in Hh signaling. PMID:21931660

  10. RNA interference in adult Ascaris suum – an opportunity for the development of a functional genomics platform that supports organism-, tissue- and cell-based biology in a nematode parasite

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Ciaran J.; Warnock, Neil D.; Atkinson, Louise E.; Atcheson, Erwan; Martin, Richard J.; Robertson, Alan P.; Maule, Aaron G.; Marks, Nikki J.; Mousley, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The sustainable control of animal parasitic nematodes requires the development of efficient functional genomics platforms to facilitate target validation and enhance anthelmintic discovery. Unfortunately, the utility of RNA interference (RNAi) for the validation of novel drug targets in nematode parasites remains problematic. Ascaris suum is an important veterinary parasite and a zoonotic pathogen. Here we show that adult A. suum is RNAi competent, and highlight the induction, spread and consistency of RNAi across multiple tissue types. This platform provides a new opportunity to undertake whole organism-, tissue- and cell-level gene function studies to enhance target validation processes for nematode parasites of veterinary/medical significance. PMID:26149642

  11. Inhibition of Tulane Virus Replication in vitro with RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qiang; Wei, Chao; Xia, Ming; Jiang, Xi

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), a conserved mechanism triggered by small interfering RNA (siRNA), has been used for suppressing gene expression through RNA degradation. The replication of caliciviruses (CVs) with RNAi was studied using the Tulane virus (TV) as a model. Five siRNAs targeting the non-structural, the major (VP1) and minor (VP2) structural genes of the TV were developed and the viruses were quantified using qPCR and TCID50 assay. Treatment of the cells with siRNA 4 hours before viral inoculation significantly reduced viral titer by up to 2.6 logs and dramatically decreased viral RNA copy numbers and viral titers 48 hours post infection in four of the five siRNAs studied. The results were confirmed by Western blot, in which the major structural protein VP1 was markedly reduced in both the cells and the culture medium. Two small protein bands of the S and P domains of the viral capsid protein were also detected in the cell lysates, although their role in viral replication remains unknown. Since the TV shares many biological properties with human noroviruses (NoVs), the successful demonstration of RNAi in TV replication would provide valuable information in control of acute gastroenteritis caused by human NoVs. PMID:23154881

  12. The efficiency of RNA interference in Bursaphelenchus xylophilus.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Eun; Lee, Kyong Yun; Lee, Se-Jin; Oh, Wan-Suk; Jeong, Pan-Young; Woo, Taeha; Kim, Chang-Bae; Paik, Young-Ki; Koo, Hyeon-Sook

    2008-07-31

    RNA interference (RNAi) was performed on several essential genes in the pinewood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, which causes pine wilt disease. Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) was delivered to larvae or adult worms by soaking, electroporation, or microinjection. Soaking and electroporation of L2-L3 stage worms in solutions containing dsRNA for essential genes induced over 25% lethality after 5 days, and gene-specific phenotypes were observed. This lethality agreed with significant reductions of the targeted transcripts, as assayed by reverse-transcription coupled with real time PCR. Microinjection was the most efficient route as measured by the hatching rate of F1 embryos, which was reduced by 46%. When adult worms were soaked in dsRNA, lethality was induced in the F1 larvae, revealing the persistence of knockdown phenotypes. The penetrance of the RNAi phenotypes for essential genes was relatively low but consistent, indicating that RNAi should be useful for studying the in vivo functions of B. xylophilus gene products. PMID:18525237

  13. Inducing RNA interference in the arbovirus vector, Culicoides sonorensis

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Mary K.; Nayduch, D.; Michel, K.

    2014-01-01

    Biting midges in the genus Culicoides are important vectors of arboviral diseases, including epizootic hemorrhagic disease, bluetongue, and likely Schmallenberg, which cause significant economic burden worldwide. Research on these vectors has been hindered by the lack of a sequenced genome, the difficulty of consistent culturing of certain species, and the absence of molecular techniques such as RNA interference (RNAi). Here, we report the establishment of RNAi as a research tool for the adult midge, Culicoides sonorensis. Based on previous research and transcriptome analysis, which revealed putative siRNA pathway member orthologs, we hypothesized that adult C. sonorensis midges have the molecular machinery needed to preform RNA silencing. Injection of control dsRNA, dsGFP, into the hemocoel 2–3 day old adult female midges resulted in survival curves that support virus transmission. DsRNA injection targeting the newly identified C. sonorensis inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (CsIAP1) ortholog, resulted in a 40% decrease of transcript levels and 73% shortened median survivals as compared to dsGFP-injected controls. These results reveal the conserved function of IAP1. Importantly, they also demonstrate the feasibility of RNAi by dsRNA injection in adult midges, which will greatly facilitate studies of the underlying mechanisms of vector competence in C. sonorensis. PMID:25293805

  14. Inducing RNA interference in the arbovirus vector, Culicoides sonorensis.

    PubMed

    Mills, M K; Nayduch, D; Michel, K

    2015-02-01

    Biting midges in the genus Culicoides are important vectors of arboviral diseases, including epizootic haemorrhagic disease, bluetongue and most likely Schmallenberg, which cause significant economic burdens worldwide. Research on these vectors has been hindered by the lack of a sequenced genome, the difficulty of consistent culturing of certain species and the absence of molecular techniques such as RNA interference (RNAi). Here, we report the establishment of RNAi as a research tool for the adult midge, Culicoides sonorensis. Based on previous research and transcriptome analysis, which revealed putative small interfering RNA pathway member orthologues, we hypothesized that adult C. sonorensis midges have the molecular machinery needed to perform RNA silencing. Injection of control double-stranded RNA targeting green fluorescent protein (dsGFP), into the haemocoel of 2-3-day-old adult female midges resulted in survival curves that support virus transmission. dsRNA injection targeting the newly identified C. sonorensis inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (CsIAP1) orthologue resulted in a 40% decrease of transcript levels and 73% shorter median survivals as compared with dsGFP-injected controls. These results reveal the conserved function of IAP1. Importantly, they also demonstrate the feasibility of RNAi by dsRNA injection in adult midges, which will greatly facilitate studies of the underlying mechanisms of vector competence in C. sonorensis. PMID:25293805

  15. Genetically Modifying the Insect Gut Microbiota to Control Chagas Disease Vectors through Systemic RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Taracena, Mabel L.; Oliveira, Pedro L.; Almendares, Olivia; Umaña, Claudia; Lowenberger, Carl; Dotson, Ellen M.; Paiva-Silva, Gabriela O.; Pennington, Pamela M.

    2015-01-01

    Technologies based on RNA interference may be used for insect control. Sustainable strategies are needed to control vectors of Chagas disease such as Rhodnius prolixus. The insect microbiota can be modified to deliver molecules to the gut. Here, Escherichia coli HT115(DE3) expressing dsRNA for the Rhodnius heme-binding protein (RHBP) and for catalase (CAT) were fed to nymphs and adult triatomine stages. RHBP is an egg protein and CAT is an antioxidant enzyme expressed in all tissues by all developmental stages. The RNA interference effect was systemic and temporal. Concentrations of E. coli HT115(DE3) above 3.35 × 107 CFU/mL produced a significant RHBP and CAT gene knockdown in nymphs and adults. RHBP expression in the fat body was reduced by 99% three days after feeding, returning to normal levels 10 days after feeding. CAT expression was reduced by 99% and 96% in the ovary and the posterior midgut, respectively, five days after ingestion. Mortality rates increased by 24-30% in first instars fed RHBP and CAT bacteria. Molting rates were reduced by 100% in first instars and 80% in third instars fed bacteria producing RHBP or CAT dsRNA. Oviposition was reduced by 43% (RHBP) and 84% (CAT). Embryogenesis was arrested in 16% (RHBP) and 20% (CAT) of laid eggs. Feeding females 105 CFU/mL of the natural symbiont, Rhodococcus rhodnii, transformed to express RHBP-specific hairpin RNA reduced RHBP expression by 89% and reduced oviposition. Modifying the insect microbiota to induce systemic RNAi in R. prolixus may result in a paratransgenic strategy for sustainable vector control. PMID:25675102

  16. Mapping and identification of cassava mosaic geminivirus DNA-A and DNA-B genome sequences for efficient siRNA expression and RNAi based virus resistance by transient agro-infiltration studies.

    PubMed

    Patil, Basavaprabhu L; Bagewadi, Basavaraj; Yadav, Jitender S; Fauquet, Claude M

    2016-02-01

    Geminiviruses are among the most serious pathogens of many economically important crop plants and RNA interference (RNAi) is an important strategy for their control. Although any fragment of a viral genome can be used to generate a double stranded (ds) RNA trigger, the precursor for generation of siRNAs, the exact sequence and size requirements for efficient gene silencing and virus resistance have so far not been investigated. Previous efforts to control geminiviruses by gene silencing mostly targeted AC1, the gene encoding replication-associated protein. In this study we made RNAi constructs for all the genes of both the genomic components (DNA-A and DNA-B) of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV-CM), one of the most devastating geminiviruses causing cassava mosaic disease (CMD) in Africa. Using transient agro-infiltration studies, RNAi constructs were evaluated for their ability to trigger gene silencing against the invading virus and protection against it. The results show that the selection of the DNA target sequence is an important determinant for the amount of siRNA produced and the extent of resistance. The ACMV genes AC1, AC2, AC4 from DNA-A and BC1 from DNA-B were effective targets for RNAi-mediated resistance and their siRNA expression was higher compared to other RNAi constructs. The RNAi construct targeting AC2, the suppressor of gene silencing of ACMV-CM gave highest level of resistance in the transient studies. This is the first report of targeting DNA-B to confer resistance to a bipartite geminivirus infection. PMID:26581664

  17. Genome-wide RNAi screen reveals a role for the ESCRT complex in rotavirus cell entry.

    PubMed

    Silva-Ayala, Daniela; López, Tomás; Gutiérrez, Michelle; Perrimon, Norbert; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2013-06-18

    Rotavirus (RV) is the major cause of childhood gastroenteritis worldwide. This study presents a functional genome-scale analysis of cellular proteins and pathways relevant for RV infection using RNAi. Among the 522 proteins selected in the screen for their ability to affect viral infectivity, an enriched group that participates in endocytic processes was identified. Within these proteins, subunits of the vacuolar ATPase, small GTPases, actinin 4, and, of special interest, components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery were found. Here we provide evidence for a role of the ESCRT complex in the entry of simian and human RV strains in both monkey and human epithelial cells. In addition, the ESCRT-associated ATPase VPS4A and phospholipid lysobisphosphatidic acid, both crucial for the formation of intralumenal vesicles in multivesicular bodies, were also found to be required for cell entry. Interestingly, it seems that regardless of the molecules that rhesus RV and human RV strains use for cell-surface attachment and the distinct endocytic pathway used, all these viruses converge in early endosomes and use multivesicular bodies for cell entry. Furthermore, the small GTPases RHOA and CDC42, which regulate different types of clathrin-independent endocytosis, as well as early endosomal antigen 1 (EEA1), were found to be involved in this process. This work reports the direct involvement of the ESCRT machinery in the life cycle of a nonenveloped virus and highlights the complex mechanism that these viruses use to enter cells. It also illustrates the efficiency of high-throughput RNAi screenings as genetic tools for comprehensively studying the interaction between viruses and their host cells. PMID:23733942

  18. Nodes-and-connections RNAi knockdown screening: identification of a signaling molecule network involved in fulvestrant action and breast cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, N; Wittner, B S; Shioda, K; Hitora, T; Ito, T; Ramaswamy, S; Isselbacher, K J; Sgroi, D C; Shioda, T

    2015-01-01

    Although RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown screening of cancer cell cultures is an effective approach to predict drug targets or therapeutic/prognostic biomarkers, interactions among identified targets often remain obscure. Here, we introduce the nodes-and-connections RNAi knockdown screening that generates a map of target interactions through systematic iterations of in silico prediction of targets and their experimental validation. An initial RNAi knockdown screening of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells targeting 6560 proteins identified four signaling molecules required for their fulvestrant-induced apoptosis. Signaling molecules physically or functionally interacting with these four primary node targets were computationally predicted and experimentally validated, resulting in identification of four second-generation nodes. Three rounds of further iterations of the prediction–validation cycle generated third, fourth and fifth generation of nodes, completing a 19-node interaction map that contained three predicted nodes but without experimental validation because of technical limitations. The interaction map involved all three members of the death-associated protein kinases (DAPKs) as well as their upstream and downstream signaling molecules (calmodulins and myosin light chain kinases), suggesting that DAPKs play critical roles in the cytocidal action of fulvestrant. The in silico Kaplan–Meier analysis of previously reported human breast cancer cohorts demonstrated significant prognostic predictive power for five of the experimentally validated nodes and for three of the prediction-only nodes. Immunohistochemical studies on the expression of 10 nodal proteins in human breast cancer tissues not only supported their prognostic prediction power but also provided statistically significant evidence of their synchronized expression, implying functional interactions among these nodal proteins. Thus, the Nodes-and-Connections approach to RNAi knockdown screening yields

  19. RNAi-mediated Control of Aflatoxins in Peanut: Method to Analyze Mycotoxin Production and Transgene Expression in the Peanut/Aspergillus Pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Renée S.; Dang, Phat M.; Sobolev, Victor S.

    2015-01-01

    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that 25% of the food crops in the world are contaminated with aflatoxins. That represents 100 million tons of food being destroyed or diverted to non-human consumption each year. Aflatoxins are powerful carcinogens normally accumulated by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus in cereals, nuts, root crops and other agricultural products. Silencing of five aflatoxin-synthesis genes by RNA interference (RNAi) in peanut plants was used to control aflatoxin accumulation following inoculation with A. flavus. Previously, no method existed to analyze the effectiveness of RNAi in individual peanut transgenic events, as these usually produce few seeds, and traditional methods of large field experiments under aflatoxin-conducive conditions were not an option. In the field, the probability of finding naturally contaminated seeds is often 1/100 to 1/1,000. In addition, aflatoxin contamination is not uniformly distributed. Our method uses few seeds per transgenic event, with small pieces processed for real-time PCR (RT-PCR) or small RNA sequencing, and for analysis of aflatoxin accumulation by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). RNAi-expressing peanut lines 288-72 and 288-74, showed up to 100% reduction (p≤0.01) in aflatoxin B1 and B2 compared to the control that accumulated up to 14,000 ng.g-1 of aflatoxin B1 when inoculated with aflatoxigenic A. flavus. As reference, the maximum total of aflatoxins allowable for human consumption in the United States is 20 ng.g-1. This protocol describes the application of RNAi-mediated control of aflatoxins in transgenic peanut seeds and methods for its evaluation. We believe that its application in breeding of peanut and other crops will bring rapid advancement in this important area of science, medicine and human nutrition, and will significantly contribute to the international effort to control aflatoxins, and potentially other mycotoxins in major

  20. Systematic analysis of RNAi reports identifies dismal commonality at gene-level & reveals an unprecedented enrichment in pooled shRNA screens

    PubMed Central

    Bhinder, Bhavneet; Djaballah, Hakim

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has opened promising avenues to better understand gene function. Though many RNAi screens report on the identification of genes, very few, if any, have been further studied and validated. Data discrepancy is emerging as one of RNAi main pitfalls. We reasoned that a systematic analysis of lethality-based screens, since they score for cell death, would examine the extent of hit discordance at inter-screen level. To this end, we developed a methodology for literature mining and overlap analysis of several screens using both siRNA and shRNA flavors, and obtained 64 gene lists censoring an initial list of 7,430 nominated genes. We further performed a comparative analysis first at a global level followed by hit re-assessment under much more stringent conditions. To our surprise, none of the hits overlapped across the board even for PLK1, which emerged as a strong candidate in siRNA screens; but only marginally in the shRNA ones. Furthermore, EIF5B emerges as the most common hit only in the shRNA screens. A highly unusual and unprecedented result was the observation that 5,269 out of 6,664 nominated genes (~80%) in the shRNA screens were exclusive to the pooled format, raising concerns as to the merits of pooled screens which qualify hits based on relative depletions, possibly due to multiple integrations per cell, data deconvolution or inaccuracies in intracellular processing causing off-target effects. Without golden standards in place, we would encourage the community to pay more attention to RNAi screening data analysis practices, bearing in mind that it is combinatorial in nature and one active siRNA duplex or shRNA hairpin per gene does not suffice credible hit nomination. Finally, we also would like to caution interpretation of pooled shRNA screening outcomes. PMID:23848309

  1. High-efficiency generation of RNAi mutants of apple by use of multi-vector transformation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high-efficiency transformation and selection system was used to create apple RNAi mutants for determination of function of candidate genes in resistance of apple to Erwinia amylovora (fire blight). The M.26 apple genotype was transformed with a mixture of five RNAi EST-silencing vectors in each t...

  2. Abscisic Acid Plays an Important Role in the Regulation of Strawberry Fruit Ripening1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hai-Feng; Chai, Ye-Mao; Li, Chun-Li; Lu, Dong; Luo, Jing-Jing; Qin, Ling; Shen, Yuan-Yue

    2011-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) has been suggested to play a role in fruit development, but supporting genetic evidence has been lacking. Here, we report that ABA promotes strawberry (Fragaria ananassa) fruit ripening. Using a newly established Tobacco rattle virus-induced gene silencing technique in strawberry fruit, the expression of a 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase gene (FaNCED1), which is key to ABA biosynthesis, was down-regulated, resulting in a significant decrease in ABA levels and uncolored fruits. Interestingly, a similar uncolored phenotype was observed in the transgenic RNA interference (RNAi) fruits, in which the expression of a putative ABA receptor gene encoding the magnesium chelatase H subunit (FaCHLH/ABAR) was down-regulated by virus-induced gene silencing. More importantly, the uncolored phenotype of the FaNCED1-down-regulated RNAi fruits could be rescued by exogenous ABA, but the ABA treatment could not reverse the uncolored phenotype of the FaCHLH/ABAR-down-regulated RNAi fruits. We observed that down-regulation of the FaCHLH/ABAR gene in the RNAi fruit altered both ABA levels and sugar content as well as a set of ABA- and/or sugar-responsive genes. Additionally, we showed that exogenous sugars, particularly sucrose, can significantly promote ripening while stimulating ABA accumulation. These data provide evidence that ABA is a signal molecule that promotes strawberry ripening and that the putative ABA receptor, FaCHLH/ABAR, is a positive regulator of ripening in response to ABA. PMID:21734113

  3. Silencing of Gm FAD3 gene by siRNA leads to low a-linolenic acids (18:3) of fad3 -mutant phenotype in soybean [Glycine max (Merr.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been recently employed as a powerful experimental tool for both basic and applied biological studies in various organisms including plants. RNAi deploys small RNAs, either small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) or microRNAs (miRNAs), to mediate the degradation or translational r...

  4. RNA-mediated interference and reverse transcription control the persistence of RNA viruses in the insect model Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Goic, Bertsy; Vodovar, Nicolas; Mondotte, Juan A; Monot, Clément; Frangeul, Lionel; Blanc, Hervé; Gausson, Valérie; Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Cristofari, Gael; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2013-04-01

    How persistent viral infections are established and maintained is widely debated and remains poorly understood. We found here that the persistence of RNA viruses in Drosophila melanogaster was achieved through the combined action of cellular reverse-transcriptase activity and the RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) pathway. Fragments of diverse RNA viruses were reverse-transcribed early during infection, which resulted in DNA forms embedded in retrotransposon sequences. Those virus-retrotransposon DNA chimeras produced transcripts processed by the RNAi machinery, which in turn inhibited viral replication. Conversely, inhibition of reverse transcription hindered the appearance of chimeric DNA and prevented persistence. Our results identify a cooperative function for retrotransposons and antiviral RNAi in the control of lethal acute infection for the establishment of viral persistence. PMID:23435119

  5. RNAi-directed downregulation of OsBADH2 results in aroma (2-acetyl-1-pyrroline) production in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiangli; Tang, Wei; Huang, Weizao; Ren, Guangjun; Wang, Qilin; Luo, Di; Xiao, Yingyong; Yang, Shimei; Wang, Feng; Lu, Bao-Rong; Gao, Fangyuan; Lu, Tiegang; Liu, Yongsheng

    2008-01-01

    Background Aromatic rice is popular worldwide because of its characteristic fragrance. Genetic studies and physical fine mapping reveal that a candidate gene (fgr/OsBADH2) homologous to betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase is responsible for aroma metabolism in fragrant rice varieties, but the direct evidence demonstrating the functions of OsBADH2 is lacking. To elucidate the physiological roles of OsBADH2, sequencing approach and RNA interference (RNAi) technique were employed to analyze allelic variation and functions of OsBADH2 gene in aroma production. Semi-quantitative, real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), as well as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were conducted to determine the expression levels of OsBADH2 and the fragrant compound in wild type and transgenic OsBADH2-RNAi repression lines, respectively. Results The results showed that multiple mutations identical to fgr allele occur in the 13 fragrant rice accessions across China; OsBADH2 is expressed constitutively, with less expression abundance in mature roots; the disrupted OsBADH2 by RNA interference leads to significantly increased 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline production. Conclusion We have found that the altered expression levels of OsBADH2 gene influence aroma accumulation, and the prevalent aromatic allele probably has a single evolutionary origin. PMID:18840300

  6. Formation of Iron Complexes from Trifluoroacetic Acid Based Liquid Chromatography Mobile Phases as Interference Ions in LC-ESI-MS Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Anil; Zhang, Rui; Orton, Daniel; Zhao, Rui; Clauss, Therese; Moore, Ronald; Smith, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Two unexpected singly charged ions at m/z 1103 and 944 have been observed in mass spectra obtained from electrospray ionization-mass spectrometric analysis of liquid chromatography effluents with mobile phases containing trifluoroacetic acid that severely interfered with sample analysis. Accurate mass measurement and tandem mass spectrometry studies revealed that these two ions are composed of three components; clusters of trifluoroacetic acid, clusters of mass 159 and iron. Formation of these ions is inhibited by removing trifluoroacetic acid from the mobile phases and using formic acid in its place, replacing the stainless steel union with a titanium union or by adding a small blank fused silica capillary column between the chromatography column and the electrospray tip via a stainless steel union without any adverse effects to chromatographic separation, peak broadening or peptide identifications. PMID:21504012

  7. Interference-free determination of thallium in aqua regia leaches from rocks, soils and sediments by D(2)-ETAAS method using mixed palladium-citric acid-lithium chemical modifier.

    PubMed

    Husáková, Lenka; Cernohorský, Tomás; Srámková, Jitka; Hubácková, Katerina; Dolezalová, Iva

    2008-04-28

    The mixture of palladium (chloride) with citric acid and lithium is proposed as a new chemical modifier for the elimination of interference occurred during the determination of Tl in aqua regia extracts from rocks, soils and sediments by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using instrumentation with deuterium-lamp background correction (D(2)-ETAAS). Palladium was preferred to rhodium and platinum as to analyte stabilization, citric acid served as an effective reducing agent facilitating formation of Pd-Tl stable covalent bonds playing an important role in the analyte stabilization. Citric acid in addition helps to remove most of interfering chloride at low temperature. The further addition of Li increased significantly the robustness of chemical modifier against strongly interfering ZnCl2 matrix by binding free chlorine into a more stable LiCl molecule. In the presence of the proposed chemical modifier the temperature for the final step of pyrolysis was adjustable up to 1000 degrees C, without any noticeable loss of volatile Tl species and the interference of the rest chloride matrix was significantly reduced. The application of the modifier to direct determination of Tl in aqua regia extracts from rocks, soils and sediments has ensured the characteristic mass and LOD value for the original sample 13 pg and 0.043 microg g(-1), respectively (10-microL aliquots of sample) and has enabled the use of matrix-free standard solutions for attaining accurate analysis. The accuracy was verified by the analysis of certified reference samples and by the comparison of results with those found by an inductively coupled plasma orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ICP-oa-TOFMS) method. PMID:18405679

  8. Efficient in vitro RNA interference and immunofluorescence-based phenotype analysis in a human parasitic nematode, Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is an efficient reverse genetics technique for investigating gene function in eukaryotes. The method has been widely used in model organisms, such as the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, where it has been deployed in genome-wide high throughput screens to identify genes involved in many cellular and developmental processes. However, RNAi techniques have not translated efficiently to animal parasitic nematodes that afflict humans, livestock and companion animals across the globe, creating a dependency on data tentatively inferred from C. elegans. Results We report improved and effective in vitro RNAi procedures we have developed using heterogeneous short interfering RNA (hsiRNA) mixtures that when coupled with optimized immunostaining techniques yield detailed analysis of cytological defects in the human parasitic nematode, Brugia malayi. The cellular disorganization observed in B. malayi embryos following RNAi targeting the genes encoding γ-tubulin, and the polarity determinant protein, PAR-1, faithfully phenocopy the known defects associated with gene silencing of their C. elegans orthologs. Targeting the B. malayi cell junction protein, AJM-1 gave a similar but more severe phenotype than that observed in C. elegans. Cellular phenotypes induced by our in vitro RNAi procedure can be observed by immunofluorescence in as little as one week. Conclusions We observed cytological defects following RNAi targeting all seven B. malayi transcripts tested and the phenotypes mirror those documented for orthologous genes in the model organism C. elegans. This highlights the reliability, effectiveness and specificity of our RNAi and immunostaining procedures. We anticipate that these techniques will be widely applicable to other important animal parasitic nematodes, which have hitherto been mostly refractory to such genetic analysis. PMID:22243803

  9. Single-target RNA interference for the blockade of multiple interacting proinflammatory and profibrotic pathways in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tank, Juliane; Lindner, Diana; Wang, Xiaomin; Stroux, Andrea; Gilke, Leona; Gast, Martina; Zietsch, Christin; Skurk, Carsten; Scheibenbogen, Carmen; Klingel, Karin; Lassner, Dirk; Kühl, Uwe; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Westermann, Dirk; Poller, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic targets of broad relevance are likely located in pathogenic pathways common to disorders of various etiologies. Screening for targets of this type revealed CCN genes to be consistently upregulated in multiple cardiomyopathies. We developed RNA interference (RNAi) to silence CCN2 and found this single-target approach to block multiple proinflammatory and profibrotic pathways in activated primary cardiac fibroblasts (PCFBs). The RNAi-strategy was developed in murine PCFBs and then investigated in "individual" human PCFBs grown from human endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs). Screening of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) sequences for high silencing efficacy and specificity yielded RNAi adenovectors silencing CCN2 in murine or human PCFBs, respectively. Comparison of RNAi with CCN2-modulating microRNA (miR) vectors expressing miR-30c or miR-133b showed higher efficacy of RNAi. In murine PCFBs, CCN2 silencing resulted in strongly reduced expression of stretch-induced chemokines (Ccl2, Ccl7, Ccl8), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP2, MMP9), extracellular matrix (Col3a1), and a cell-to-cell contact protein (Cx43), suggesting multiple signal pathways to be linked to CCN2. Immune cell chemotaxis towards CCN2-depleted PCFBs was significantly reduced. We demonstrate here that this RNAi strategy is technically applicable to "individual" human PCFBs, too, but that these display individually strikingly different responses to CCN2 depletion. Either genomically encoded factors or stable epigenetic modification may explain different responses between individual PCFBs. The new RNAi approach addresses a key regulator protein induced in cardiomyopathies. Investigation of this and other molecular therapies in individual human PCBFs may help to dissect differential pathogenic processes between otherwise similar disease entities and individuals. PMID:24239602

  10. Transcriptome analysis and RNA interference of cockroach phototransduction indicate three opsins and suggest a major role for TRPL channels

    PubMed Central

    French, Andrew S.; Meisner, Shannon; Liu, Hongxia; Weckström, Matti; Torkkeli, Päivi H.

    2015-01-01

    Our current understanding of insect phototransduction is based on a small number of species, but insects occupy many different visual environments. We created the retinal transcriptome of a nocturnal insect, the cockroach, Periplaneta americana to identify proteins involved in the earliest stages of compound eye phototransduction, and test the hypothesis that different visual environments are reflected in different molecular contributions to function. We assembled five novel mRNAs: two green opsins, one UV opsin, and one each TRP and TRPL ion channel homologs. One green opsin mRNA (pGO1) was 100–1000 times more abundant than the other opsins (pGO2 and pUVO), while pTRPL mRNA was 10 times more abundant than pTRP, estimated by transcriptome analysis or quantitative PCR (qPCR). Electroretinograms were used to record photoreceptor responses. Gene-specific in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) was achieved by injecting long (596–708 bp) double-stranded RNA into head hemolymph, and verified by qPCR. RNAi of the most abundant green opsin reduced both green opsins by more than 97% without affecting UV opsin, and gave a maximal reduction of 75% in ERG amplitude 7 days after injection that persisted for at least 19 days. RNAi of pTRP and pTRPL genes each specifically reduced the corresponding mRNA by 90%. Electroretinogram (ERG) reduction by pTRPL RNAi was slower than for opsin, reaching 75% attenuation by 21 days, without recovery at 29 days. pTRP RNAi attenuated ERG much less; only 30% after 21 days. Combined pTRP plus pTRPL RNAi gave only weak evidence of any cooperative interactions. We conclude that silencing retinal genes by in vivo RNAi using long dsRNA is effective, that visible light transduction in Periplaneta is dominated by pGO1, and that pTRPL plays a major role in cockroach phototransduction. PMID:26257659

  11. A key gene of the RNA interference pathway in the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon: identification and functional characterisation of Dicer-1.

    PubMed

    Su, Jianguo; Oanh, Dang T H; Lyons, Russell E; Leeton, Lisa; van Hulten, Marielle C W; Tan, Siok-Hwee; Song, Linsheng; Rajendran, K V; Walker, Peter J

    2008-02-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism by which double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) initiates post-transcriptional silencing of homologous genes. Here we report the amplification and characterisation of a full length cDNA from black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) that encodes the bidentate RNAase III Dicer, a key component of the RNAi pathway. The full length of the shrimp Dicer (Pm Dcr1) cDNA is 7629bp in length, including a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 130bp, a 3' UTR of 77bp, and an open reading frame of 7422bp encoding a polypeptide of 2473 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 277.895kDa and a predicted isoelectric point of 4.86. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence indicated that the mature peptide contains all the seven recognised functional domains and is most similar to the mosquito (Aedes aegypti) Dicer-1 sequence with a similarity of 34.6%. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that Pm Dcr1 mRNA is most highly expressed in haemolymph and lymphoid organ tissues (P<0.05). However, there was no correlation between Pm Dcr1 mRNA levels in lymphoid organ and the viral genetic loads in shrimp naturally infected with gill-associated virus (GAV) and Mourilyan virus (P>0.05). Treatment with synthetic dsRNA corresponding to Pm Dcr1 sequence resulted in knock-down of Pm Dcr1 mRNA expression in both uninfected shrimp and shrimp infected experimentally with GAV. Knock-down of Pm Dcr1 expression resulted in more rapid mortalities and higher viral loads. These data demonstrated that Dicer is involved in antiviral defence in shrimp. PMID:18166489

  12. RNAi in Arthropods: Insight into the Machinery and Applications for Understanding the Pathogen-Vector Interface

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Annette-Christi; Nijhof, Ard M.; Fick, Wilma; Stutzer, Christian; Maritz-Olivier, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The availability of genome sequencing data in combination with knowledge of expressed genes via transcriptome and proteome data has greatly advanced our understanding of arthropod vectors of disease. Not only have we gained insight into vector biology, but also into their respective vector-pathogen interactions. By combining the strengths of postgenomic databases and reverse genetic approaches such as RNAi, the numbers of available drug and vaccine targets, as well as number of transgenes for subsequent transgenic or paratransgenic approaches, have expanded. These are now paving the way for in-field control strategies of vectors and their pathogens. Basic scientific questions, such as understanding the basic components of the vector RNAi machinery, is vital, as this allows for the transfer of basic RNAi machinery components into RNAi-deficient vectors, thereby expanding the genetic toolbox of these RNAi-deficient vectors and pathogens. In this review, we focus on the current knowledge of arthropod vector RNAi machinery and the impact of RNAi on understanding vector biology and vector-pathogen interactions for which vector genomic data is available on VectorBase. PMID:24705082

  13. ATARiS: Computational quantification of gene suppression phenotypes from multisample RNAi screens

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Diane D.; Tsherniak, Aviad; Gopal, Shuba; Weir, Barbara A.; Tamayo, Pablo; Stransky, Nicolas; Schumacher, Steven E.; Zack, Travis I.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Garraway, Levi A.; Margolin, Adam A.; Root, David E.; Hahn, William C.; Mesirov, Jill P.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-scale RNAi libraries enable the systematic interrogation of gene function. However, the interpretation of RNAi screens is complicated by the observation that RNAi reagents designed to suppress the mRNA transcripts of the same gene often produce a spectrum of phenotypic outcomes due to differential on-target gene suppression or perturbation of off-target transcripts. Here we present a computational method, Analytic Technique for Assessment of RNAi by Similarity (ATARiS), that takes advantage of patterns in RNAi data across multiple samples in order to enrich for RNAi reagents whose phenotypic effects relate to suppression of their intended targets. By summarizing only such reagent effects for each gene, ATARiS produces quantitative, gene-level phenotype values, which provide an intuitive measure of the effect of gene suppression in each sample. This method is robust for data sets that contain as few as 10 samples and can be used to analyze screens of any number of targeted genes. We used this analytic approach to interrogate RNAi data derived from screening more than 100 human cancer cell lines and identified HNF1B as a transforming oncogene required for the survival of cancer cells that harbor HNF1B amplifications. ATARiS is publicly available at http://broadinstitute.org/ataris. PMID:23269662

  14. Procurement of State-of-the-Art Research Equipment to Support Faculty Members Within the RNAi Therapeutics Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Terence Flotte, MD; Patricia McNulty

    2010-06-29

    This project funded the procurement of state-of-the-art research equipment to support world class faculty members within the RNAi Therapeutics Institute, a central program of the Advanced Therapeutics Cluster (ATC) project. The equipment purchased under this grant supports the RNA Therapeutics Institute (RTI) at the University of Massachusetts Medical School which seeks to build a community of scientists passionate about RNA. By uniting researchers studying the fundamental biology and mechanisms of cellular RNAs with those working to devise human therapies using or targeting nucleic acids, the RTI represents a new model for scientific exploration. By interweaving basic and applied nucleic acid scientists with clinicians dedicated to finding new cures, our goal is to create a new paradigm for organizing molecular research that enables the rapid application of new biological discoveries to solutions for unmet challenges in human health.

  15. Wind tunnel wall interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Perry A.; Mineck, Raymond E.; Barnwell, Richard W.; Kemp, William B., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    About a decade ago, interest in alleviating wind tunnel wall interference was renewed by advances in computational aerodynamics, concepts of adaptive test section walls, and plans for high Reynolds number transonic test facilities. Selection of NASA Langley cryogenic concept for the National Transonic Facility (NTF) tended to focus the renewed wall interference efforts. A brief overview and current status of some Langley sponsored transonic wind tunnel wall interference research are presented. Included are continuing efforts in basic wall flow studies, wall interference assessment/correction procedures, and adaptive wall technology.

  16. Persistence of double-stranded RNA in insect hemolymph as a potential determiner of RNA interference success: evidence from Manduca sexta and Blattella germanica.

    PubMed

    Garbutt, Jennie S; Bellés, Xavier; Richards, Elaine H; Reynolds, Stuart E

    2013-02-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a specific gene silencing mechanism mediated by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which has been harnessed as a useful reverse genetics tool in insects. Unfortunately, however, this technology has been limited by the variable sensitivity of insect species to RNAi. We propose that rapid degradation of dsRNA in insect hemolymph could impede gene silencing by RNAi and experimentally investigate the dynamics of dsRNA persistence in two insects, the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, a species in which experimental difficulty has been experienced with RNAi protocols and the German cockroach, Blattella germanica, which is known to be highly susceptible to experimental RNAi. An ex vivo assay revealed that dsRNA was rapidly degraded by an enzyme in M. sexta hemolymph plasma, whilst dsRNA persisted much longer in B. germanica plasma. A quantitative reverse transcription PCR-based assay revealed that dsRNA, accordingly, disappeared rapidly from M. sexta hemolymph in vivo. The M. sexta dsRNAse is inactivated by exposure to high temperature and is inhibited by EDTA. These findings lead us to propose that the rate of persistence of dsRNA in insect hemolymph (mediated by the action of one or more nucleases) could be an important factor in determining the susceptibility of insect species to RNAi. PMID:22664137

  17. Targeting Marek's disease virus by RNA interference delivered from a herpesvirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lambeth, Luke S; Zhao, Yuguang; Smith, Lorraine P; Kgosana, Lydia; Nair, Venugopal

    2009-01-01

    Live attenuated herpesvirus vaccines such as herpesvirus of turkey (HVT) have been used since 1970 for the control of Marek's disease (MD), a highly infectious lymphoproliferative disease of poultry. Despite the success of these vaccines in reducing losses from the disease, Marek's disease virus (MDV) strains have shown a continuing increase in virulence, presumably due to the inability of the current vaccines in preventing MDV replication. The highly specific and effective nature of RNA interference (RNAi) makes this technology particularly attractive for new antiviral strategies. In order to exploit the power of RNAi-mediated suppression of MDV replication in vivo delivered through existing vaccines, we engineered recombinant HVT expressing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against MDV genes gB and UL29. The levels of protection induced by the RNAi-expressing HVT against virulent virus challenge were similar to the parent pHVT3 virus. However, chickens vaccinated with recombinant HVT expressing shRNA showed moderate reduction of challenge virus replication in blood and feather samples. Delivery of RNAi-based gene silencing through live attenuated vaccines for reducing replication of pathogenic viruses is a novel approach for the control of infectious diseases. PMID:18977264

  18. An unusual Dicer-like1 protein fuels the RNA interference pathway in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huafang; Tschudi, Christian; Ullu, Elisabetta

    2006-12-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionarily conserved gene-silencing pathway that is triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Central to this pathway are two ribonucleases: Dicer, a multidomain RNase III family enzyme that initiates RNAi by generating small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), and Argonaute or Slicer, an RNase H signature enzyme that affects cleavage of mRNA. Previous studies in the early diverging protozoan Trypanosoma brucei have established a key role for Argonaute 1 in RNAi. However, the identity of Dicer has not been resolved. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of a T. brucei Dicer-like enzyme (TbDcl1). Using genetic and biochemical approaches, we provide evidence that TbDcl1 is required for the generation of siRNA-size molecules and for RNAi. Whereas Dicer and Dicer-like proteins are endowed with two adjacent RNase III domains at the carboxyl terminus (RNase IIIa and RNase IIIb), the arrangement of these two domains is unusual in TbDcl1. RNase IIIa is close to the amino terminus, and RNase IIIb is located approximately in the center of the molecule. This domain organization is specific to trypanosomatids and further illustrates the variable structures of protozoan Dicer-like proteins as compared to fungal and metazoan Dicer. PMID:17053086

  19. RNA interference can be used to disrupt gene function in tardigrades

    PubMed Central

    Tenlen, Jennifer R.; McCaskill, Shaina; Goldstein, Bob

    2012-01-01

    How morphological diversity arises is a key question in evolutionary developmental biology. As a long-term approach to address this question, we are developing the water bear Hypsibius dujardini (Phylum Tardigrada) as a model system. We expect that using a close relative of two well-studied models, Drosophila (Phylum Arthropoda) and Caenorhabditis elegans (Phylum Nematoda), will facilitate identifying genetic pathways relevant to understanding the evolution of development. Tardigrades are also valuable research subjects for investigating how organisms and biological materials can survive extreme conditions. Methods to disrupt gene activity are essential to each of these efforts, but no such method yet exists for the Phylum Tardigrada. We developed a protocol to disrupt tardigrade gene functions by double-stranded RNA-mediated RNA interference (RNAi). We show that targeting tardigrade homologs of essential developmental genes by RNAi produced embryonic lethality, whereas targeting green fluorescent protein did not. Disruption of gene functions appears to be relatively specific by two criteria: targeting distinct genes resulted in distinct phenotypes that were consistent with predicted gene functions, and by RT-PCR, RNAi reduced the level of a target mRNA and not a control mRNA. These studies represent the first evidence that gene functions can be disrupted by RNAi in the phylum Tardigrada. Our results form a platform for dissecting tardigrade gene functions for understanding the evolution of developmental mechanisms and survival in extreme environments. PMID:23187800

  20. RNA interference-inducing hairpin RNAs in plants act through the viral defence pathway.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Adriana F; Matthew, Louisa; Smith, Neil A; Curtin, Shaun J; Dedic-Hagan, Jasmina; Ellacott, Geoff A; Watson, John M; Wang, Ming-Bo; Brosnan, Chris; Carroll, Bernard J; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2006-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is widely used to silence genes in plants and animals. It operates through the degradation of target mRNA by endonuclease complexes guided by approximately 21 nucleotide (nt) short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). A similar process regulates the expression of some developmental genes through approximately 21 nt microRNAs. Plants have four types of Dicer-like (DCL) enzyme, each producing small RNAs with different functions. Here, we show that DCL2, DCL3 and DCL4 in Arabidopsis process both replicating viral RNAs and RNAi-inducing hairpin RNAs (hpRNAs) into 22-, 24- and 21 nt siRNAs, respectively, and that loss of both DCL2 and DCL4 activities is required to negate RNAi and to release the plant's repression of viral replication. We also show that hpRNAs, similar to viral infection, can engender long-distance silencing signals and that hpRNA-induced silencing is suppressed by the expression of a virus-derived suppressor protein. These findings indicate that hpRNA-mediated RNAi in plants operates through the viral defence pathway. PMID:17039251

  1. Self-Assembled Cell Microarray (SAMcell) for High-Throughput RNAi Screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanshuo; Li, Juan

    2016-01-01

    RNAi has now become a valuable research tool for cell-based high-throughput screening. However, traditional RNAi high-throughput methods are based on multi-well plates, relying on expensive instruments and complicated operations. In this chapter, we describe a method termed self-assembled cell microarray (SAMcell), which integrates micro-fabrication, reverse transfection, and RNAi technologies and allows for cell behavior investigations to be performed directly on the cell chip. This method has been successfully employed to perform large-scale functional screening assays to identify gene modulators of cell migration, cell proliferation, and cellular apoptosis. PMID:27581287

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: RNAi nanomedicines: challenges and opportunities within the immune system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, Shiri; Peer, Dan

    2010-06-01

    RNAi, as a novel therapeutic modality, has an enormous potential to bring the era of personalized medicine one step further from notion into reality. However, delivery of RNAi effector molecules into their target tissues and cells remain extremely challenging. Major attempts have been made in recent years to develop sophisticated nanocarriers that could overcome these hurdles. This review will present the recent progress with the challenges and opportunities in this emerging field, focusing mostly on the in vivo applications with special emphasis on the strategies for RNAi delivery into immune cells.

  3. RNAi screen identifies Brd4 as a therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Johannes; Shi, Junwei; Wang, Eric; Rappaport, Amy R.; Herrmann, Harald; Sison, Edward A.; Magoon, Daniel; Qi, Jun; Blatt, Katharina; Wunderlich, Mark; Taylor, Meredith J.; Johns, Christopher; Chicas, Agustin; Mulloy, James C.; Kogan, Scott C.; Brown, Patrick; Valent, Peter; Bradner, James E.; Lowe, Scott W.; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic pathways can regulate gene expression by controlling and interpreting chromatin modifications. Cancer cells are characterized by altered epigenetic landscapes, and commonly exploit the chromatin regulatory machinery to enforce oncogenic gene expression programs1. Although chromatin alterations are, in principle, reversible and often amenable to drug intervention, the promise of targeting such pathways therapeutically has been limited by an incomplete understanding of cancer-specific dependencies on epigenetic regulators. Here we describe a non-biased approach to probe epigenetic vulnerabilities in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), an aggressive haematopoietic malignancy that is often associated with aberrant chromatin states2. By screening a custom library of small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting known chromatin regulators in a genetically defined AML mouse model, we identify the protein bromodomain-containing 4 (Brd4) as being critically required for disease maintenance. Suppression of Brd4 using shRNAs or the small-molecule inhibitor JQ1 led to robust antileukaemic effects in vitro and in vivo, accompanied by terminal myeloid differentiation and elimination of leukaemia stem cells. Similar sensitivities were observed in a variety of human AML cell lines and primary patient samples, revealing that JQ1 has broad activity in diverse AML subtypes. The effects of Brd4 suppression are, at least in part, due to its role in sustaining Myc expression to promote aberrant self-renewal, which implicates JQ1 as a pharmacological means to suppress MYC in cancer. Our results establish small-molecule inhibition of Brd4 as a promising therapeutic strategy in AML and, potentially, other cancers, and highlight the utility of RNA interference (RNAi) screening for revealing epigenetic vulnerabilities that can be exploited for direct pharmacological intervention. PMID:21814200

  4. Preclinical Development of a Subcutaneous ALAS1 RNAi Therapeutic for Treatment of Hepatic Porphyrias Using Circulating RNA Quantification.

    PubMed

    Chan, Amy; Liebow, Abigail; Yasuda, Makiko; Gan, Lin; Racie, Tim; Maier, Martin; Kuchimanchi, Satya; Foster, Don; Milstein, Stuart; Charisse, Klaus; Sehgal, Alfica; Manoharan, Muthiah; Meyers, Rachel; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Simon, Amy; Desnick, Robert J; Querbes, William

    2015-01-01

    The acute hepatic porphyrias are caused by inherited enzymatic deficiencies in the heme biosynthesis pathway. Induction of the first enzyme 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase 1 (ALAS1) by triggers such as fasting or drug exposure can lead to accumulation of neurotoxic heme intermediates that cause disease symptoms. We have demonstrated that hepatic ALAS1 silencing using siRNA in a lipid nanoparticle effectively prevents and treats induced attacks in a mouse model of acute intermittent porphyria. Herein, we report the development of ALN-AS1, an investigational GalNAc-conjugated RNAi therapeutic targeting ALAS1. One challenge in advancing ALN-AS1 to patients is the inability to detect liver ALAS1 mRNA in the absence of liver biopsies. We here describe a less invasive circulating extracellular RNA detection assay to monitor RNAi drug activity in serum and urine. A striking correlation in ALAS1 mRNA was observed across liver, serum, and urine in both rodents and nonhuman primates (NHPs) following treatment with ALN-AS1. Moreover, in donor-matched human urine and serum, we demonstrate a notable correspondence in ALAS1 levels, minimal interday assay variability, low interpatient variability from serial sample collections, and the ability to distinguish between healthy volunteers and porphyria patients with induced ALAS1 levels. The collective data highlight the potential utility of this assay in the clinical development of ALN-AS1, and in broadening our understanding of acute hepatic porphyrias disease pathophysiology. PMID:26528940

  5. Preclinical Development of a Subcutaneous ALAS1 RNAi Therapeutic for Treatment of Hepatic Porphyrias Using Circulating RNA Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Amy; Liebow, Abigail; Yasuda, Makiko; Gan, Lin; Racie, Tim; Maier, Martin; Kuchimanchi, Satya; Foster, Don; Milstein, Stuart; Charisse, Klaus; Sehgal, Alfica; Manoharan, Muthiah; Meyers, Rachel; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Simon, Amy; Desnick, Robert J; Querbes, William

    2015-01-01

    The acute hepatic porphyrias are caused by inherited enzymatic deficiencies in the heme biosynthesis pathway. Induction of the first enzyme 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase 1 (ALAS1) by triggers such as fasting or drug exposure can lead to accumulation of neurotoxic heme intermediates that cause disease symptoms. We have demonstrated that hepatic ALAS1 silencing using siRNA in a lipid nanoparticle effectively prevents and treats induced attacks in a mouse model of acute intermittent porphyria. Herein, we report the development of ALN-AS1, an investigational GalNAc-conjugated RNAi therapeutic targeting ALAS1. One challenge in advancing ALN-AS1 to patients is the inability to detect liver ALAS1 mRNA in the absence of liver biopsies. We here describe a less invasive circulating extracellular RNA detection assay to monitor RNAi drug activity in serum and urine. A striking correlation in ALAS1 mRNA was observed across liver, serum, and urine in both rodents and nonhuman primates (NHPs) following treatment with ALN-AS1. Moreover, in donor-matched human urine and serum, we demonstrate a notable correspondence in ALAS1 levels, minimal interday assay variability, low interpatient variability from serial sample collections, and the ability to distinguish between healthy volunteers and porphyria patients with induced ALAS1 levels. The collective data highlight the potential utility of this assay in the clinical development of ALN-AS1, and in broadening our understanding of acute hepatic porphyrias disease pathophysiology. PMID:26528940

  6. RNAi-based therapeutic nanostrategy: IL-8 gene silencing in pancreatic cancer cells using gold nanorods delivery vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panwar, Nishtha; Yang, Chengbin; Yin, Feng; Yoon, Ho Sup; Swee Chuan, Tjin; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2015-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene silencing possesses great ability for therapeutic intervention in pancreatic cancer. Among various oncogene mutations, Interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene mutations are found to be overexpressed in many pancreatic cell lines. In this work, we demonstrate IL-8 gene silencing by employing an RNAi-based gene therapy approach and this is achieved by using gold nanorods (AuNRs) for efficient delivery of IL-8 small interfering RNA (siRNA) to the pancreatic cell lines of MiaPaCa-2 and Panc-1. Upon comparing to Panc-1 cells, we found that the dominant expression of the IL-8 gene in MiaPaCa-2 cells resulted in an aggressive behavior towards the processes of cell invasion and metastasis. We have hence investigated the suitability of using AuNRs as novel non-viral nanocarriers for the efficient uptake and delivery of IL-8 siRNA in realizing gene knockdown of both MiaPaCa-2 and Panc-1 cells. Flow cytometry and fluorescence imaging techniques have been applied to confirm transfection and release of IL-8 siRNA. The ratio of AuNRs and siRNA has been optimized and transfection efficiencies as high as 88.40 ± 2.14% have been achieved. Upon successful delivery of IL-8 siRNA into cancer cells, the effects of IL-8 gene knockdown are quantified in terms of gene expression, cell invasion, cell migration and cell apoptosis assays. Statistical comparative studies for both MiaPaCa-2 and Panc-1 cells are presented in this work. IL-8 gene silencing has been demonstrated with knockdown efficiencies of 81.02 ± 10.14% and 75.73 ± 6.41% in MiaPaCa-2 and Panc-1 cells, respectively. Our results are then compared with a commercial transfection reagent, Oligofectamine, serving as positive control. The gene knockdown results illustrate the potential role of AuNRs as non-viral gene delivery vehicles for RNAi-based targeted cancer therapy applications.

  7. RNAi-based therapeutic nanostrategy: IL-8 gene silencing in pancreatic cancer cells using gold nanorods delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Nishtha; Yang, Chengbin; Yin, Feng; Yoon, Ho Sup; Chuan, Tjin Swee; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2015-09-11

    RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene silencing possesses great ability for therapeutic intervention in pancreatic cancer. Among various oncogene mutations, Interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene mutations are found to be overexpressed in many pancreatic cell lines. In this work, we demonstrate IL-8 gene silencing by employing an RNAi-based gene therapy approach and this is achieved by using gold nanorods (AuNRs) for efficient delivery of IL-8 small interfering RNA (siRNA) to the pancreatic cell lines of MiaPaCa-2 and Panc-1. Upon comparing to Panc-1 cells, we found that the dominant expression of the IL-8 gene in MiaPaCa-2 cells resulted in an aggressive behavior towards the processes of cell invasion and metastasis. We have hence investigated the suitability of using AuNRs as novel non-viral nanocarriers for the efficient uptake and delivery of IL-8 siRNA in realizing gene knockdown of both MiaPaCa-2 and Panc-1 cells. Flow cytometry and fluorescence imaging techniques have been applied to confirm transfection and release of IL-8 siRNA. The ratio of AuNRs and siRNA has been optimized and transfection efficiencies as high as 88.40 ± 2.14% have been achieved. Upon successful delivery of IL-8 siRNA into cancer cells, the effects of IL-8 gene knockdown are quantified in terms of gene expression, cell invasion, cell migration and cell apoptosis assays. Statistical comparative studies for both MiaPaCa-2 and Panc-1 cells are presented in this work. IL-8 gene silencing has been demonstrated with knockdown efficiencies of 81.02 ± 10.14% and 75.73 ± 6.41% in MiaPaCa-2 and Panc-1 cells, respectively. Our results are then compared with a commercial transfection reagent, Oligofectamine, serving as positive control. The gene knockdown results illustrate the potential role of AuNRs as non-viral gene delivery vehicles for RNAi-based targeted cancer therapy applications. PMID:26291710

  8. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a type of B vitamin. This article discusses the test to measure the amount of folic acid in the blood. ... that may interfere with test results, including folic acid supplements. Drugs that can decrease folic acid measurements ...

  9. Thick Film Interference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trefil, James

    1983-01-01

    Discusses why interference effects cannot be seen with a thick film, starting with a review of the origin of interference patterns in thin films. Considers properties of materials in films, properties of the light source, and the nature of light. (JN)

  10. Formation of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based liquid chromatography mobile phases as interference ions in liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil K.; Zhang, Rui; Orton, Daniel J.; Zhao, Rui; Clauss, Therese RW; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-05-30

    Two unexpected singly charged ions at m/z 1103 and 944 have been observed in mass spectra obtained from electrospray ionization-mass spectrometric analysis of liquid chromatography effluents with mobile phases containing trifluoroacetic acid. Accurate mass measurement and tandem mass spectrometry studies revealed that these two ions are not due to any contamination from solvents and chemicals used for mobile and stationary phases or from the laboratory atmospheric environment. Instead these ions are clusters of trifluoroacetic acid formed in association with acetonitrile, water and iron from the stainless steel union used to connect the column with the electrospray tip and to apply high voltage; the molecular formulae are Fe+((OH)(H2O)2)9(CF3COOH)5 and Fe+((OH)(H2O)2)6 (CF3COOH)5.

  11. Plant-mediated RNAi of a gap gene-enhanced tobacco tolerance against the Myzus persicae.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jianjun; Zeng, Fanrong

    2014-02-01

    Plant-mediated RNAi has been developed as a powerful weapon in the fight against agricultural insect pests. The gap gene hunchback (hb) is of crucial importance in insect axial patterning and knockdown of hb is deforming and lethal to the next generation. The peach potato aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), has many host plants and can be found throughout the world. To investigate the effect of plant-mediated RNAi on control of this insect, the hb gene in M. persicae was cloned, plant RNAi vector was constructed, and transgenic tobacco expressing Mphb dsRNA was developed. Transgenic tobacco had a different integration pattern of the transgene. Bioassays were performed by applying neonate aphids to homozygous transgenic plants in the T2 generation. Results revealed that continuous feeding of transgenic diet reduced Mphb mRNA level in the fed aphids and inhibited insect reproduction, indicating successful knockdown of the target gene in M. persicae by plant-mediated RNAi. PMID:23949691

  12. A Genome-wide RNAi Screen for Polypeptides that Alter rpS6 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, Angela; Avruch, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a giant protein kinase that controls cell proliferation, growth, and metabolism. mTOR is regulated by nutrient availability, by mitogens, and by stress, and operates through two independently regulated hetero-oligomeric complexes. We have attempted to identify the cellular components necessary to maintain the activity of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), the amino acid-dependent, rapamycin-inhibitable complex, using a whole genome approach involving RNAi-induced depletion of cellular polypeptides. We have used a pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell line, Mia-PaCa for this screen; as with many pancreatic cancers, these cells exhibit constitutive activation of mTORC1. PDAC is the most common form of pancreatic cancer and the 5-year survival rate remains 3–5% despite current nonspecific and targeted therapies. Although rapamycin-related mTOR inhibitors have yet to demonstrate encouraging clinical responses, it is now evident that this class of compounds is capable of only partial mTORC1 inhibition. Identifying previously unappreciated proteins needed for maintenance of mTORC1 activity may provide new targets and lead to the development of beneficial therapies for pancreatic cancer. PMID:22125066

  13. RNAi screens in mice identify physiological regulators of oncogenic growth

    PubMed Central

    Beronja, Slobodan; Janki, Peter; Heller, Evan; Lien, Wen-Hui; Keyes, Brice; Oshimori, Naoki; Fuchs, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tissue growth is the multifaceted outcome of a cell’s intrinsic capabilities and its interactions with the surrounding environment. Decoding these complexities is essential for understanding human development and tumorigenesis. Here, we tackle this problem by carrying out the first genome-wide RNAi-mediated screens in mice. Focusing on skin development and oncogenic (HrasG12V-induced) hyperplasia, our screens uncover novel as well as anticipated regulators of embryonic epidermal growth. Among top oncogenic screen hits are Mllt6 and the Wnt effector β-catenin; they maintain HrasG12V-dependent hyperproliferation. We also expose β-catenin as an unanticipated antagonist of normal epidermal growth, functioning through Wnt-independent intercellular adhesion. Finally, we document physiological relevance to mouse and human cancers, thereby establishing the feasibility of in vivo mammalian genome-wide investigations to dissect tissue development and tumorigenesis. By documenting some oncogenic growth regulators, we pave the way for future investigations of other hits and raise promise for unearthing new targets for cancer therapies. PMID:23945586

  14. Vitellogenin RNAi halts ovarian growth and diverts reproductive proteins and lipids in young grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Tokar, Derek R; Veleta, Katherine A; Canzano, Joseph; Hahn, Daniel A; Hatle, John D

    2014-11-01

    Reduced reproduction extends lifespan of females in many animals. To test the effects of reproduction on storage of macronutrients, we block reproductive output in the lubber grasshopper by injecting RNAi against the precursor to egg-yolk protein, vitellogenin, in early adulthood. Controls were injected with either buffer or RNAi against the major storage protein in the hemolymph, hexamerin-90. Vitellogenin RNAi greatly reduced both levels of mRNA for vitellogenin and ovarian growth, in comparison to both controls. Fat body mass was increased upon vitellogenin RNAi, but concentrations of the three hexameric storage proteins from the hemolymph were not. Surprisingly, hemolymph vitellogenin levels were increased upon vitellogenin RNAi. Total reproductive protein (hemolymph vitellogenin plus ovarian vitellin) was unchanged by vitellogenin RNAi, as reproductive protein was diverted to the hemolymph. Similarly, the increased lipid storage upon vitellogenin RNAi was largely attributable to the reduction in lipid in the ovary, due to decreased ovarian growth. A BLAST search revealed that the 515 bp sequence of vitellogenin used for RNAi had three 11 bp regions identical to the vitellogenin receptor of the cockroach Leucophaea maderae. This suggests that our treatment, in addition to reducing levels of vitellogenin transcript, may have also blocked transport of vitellogenin from the hemolymph to the ovary. This would be consistent with halted ovarian growth simultaneous with high levels of vitellogenin in the hemolymph. Nonetheless, the accumulation of vitellogenin, instead of hexameric storage proteins, is inconsistent with a simple model of the trade-off between reproduction and storage. This was observed in young females; future studies will address whether investment of proteins may shift to the soma as individuals age. Overall, our results suggest that blockage of reproduction in young grasshoppers redirects lipids to storage and reproductive proteins to the hemolymph

  15. Host gene targets for novel influenza therapies elucidated by high-throughput RNA interference screens

    PubMed Central

    Meliopoulos, Victoria A.; Andersen, Lauren E.; Birrer, Katherine F.; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Lowenthal, John W.; Bean, Andrew G. D.; Stambas, John; Stewart, Cameron R.; Tompkins, S. Mark; van Beusechem, Victor W.; Fraser, Iain; Mhlanga, Musa; Barichievy, Samantha; Smith, Queta; Leake, Devin; Karpilow, Jon; Buck, Amy; Jona, Ghil; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus encodes only 11 viral proteins but replicates in a broad range of avian and mammalian species by exploiting host cell functions. Genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) has proven to be a powerful tool for identifying the host molecules that participate in each step of virus replication. Meta-analysis of findings from genome-wide RNAi screens has shown influenza virus to be dependent on functional nodes in host cell pathways, requiring a wide variety of molecules and cellular proteins for replication. Because rapid evolution of the influenza A viruses persistently complicates the effectiveness of vaccines and therapeutics, a further understanding of the complex host cell pathways coopted by influenza virus for replication may provide new targets and strategies for antiviral therapy. RNAi genome screening technologies together with bioinformatics can provide the ability to rapidly identify specific host factors involved in resistance and susceptibility to influenza virus, allowing for novel disease intervention strategies.—Meliopoulos, V. A., Andersen, L. E., Birrer, K. F., Simpson, K. J., Lowenthal, J. W., Bean, A. G. D., Stambas, J., Stewart, C. R., Tompkins, S. M., van Beusechem, V. W., Fraser, I., Mhlanga, M., Barichievy, S., Smith, Q., Leake, D., Karpilow, J., Buck, A., Jona, G., Tripp, R. A. Host gene targets for novel influenza therapies elucidated by high-throughput RNA interference screens. PMID:22247330

  16. Next-generation libraries for robust RNA interference-based genome-wide screens

    PubMed Central

    Kampmann, Martin; Horlbeck, Max A.; Chen, Yuwen; Tsai, Jordan C.; Bassik, Michael C.; Gilbert, Luke A.; Villalta, Jacqueline E.; Kwon, S. Chul; Chang, Hyeshik; Kim, V. Narry; Weissman, Jonathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic screening based on loss-of-function phenotypes is a powerful discovery tool in biology. Although the recent development of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-based screening approaches in mammalian cell culture has enormous potential, RNA interference (RNAi)-based screening remains the method of choice in several biological contexts. We previously demonstrated that ultracomplex pooled short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) libraries can largely overcome the problem of RNAi off-target effects in genome-wide screens. Here, we systematically optimize several aspects of our shRNA library, including the promoter and microRNA context for shRNA expression, selection of guide strands, and features relevant for postscreen sample preparation for deep sequencing. We present next-generation high-complexity libraries targeting human and mouse protein-coding genes, which we grouped into 12 sublibraries based on biological function. A pilot screen suggests that our next-generation RNAi library performs comparably to current CRISPR interference (CRISPRi)-based approaches and can yield complementary results with high sensitivity and high specificity. PMID:26080438

  17. Lipid Nanoparticles as Carriers for RNAi against Viral Infections: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia; Solinís, María Ángeles; del Pozo-Rodríguez, Ana

    2014-01-01

    The efforts made to develop RNAi-based therapies have led to productive research in the field of infections in humans, such as hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), herpetic keratitis, human papillomavirus, or influenza virus. Naked RNAi molecules are rapidly digested by nucleases in the serum, and due to their negative surface charge, entry into the cell cytoplasm is also hampered, which makes necessary the use of delivery systems to exploit the full potential of RNAi therapeutics. Lipid nanoparticles (LNP) represent one of the most widely used delivery systems for in vivo application of RNAi due to their relative safety and simplicity of production, joint with the enhanced payload and protection of encapsulated RNAs. Moreover, LNP may be functionalized to reach target cells, and they may be used to combine RNAi molecules with conventional drug substances to reduce resistance or improve efficiency. This review features the current application of LNP in RNAi mediated therapy against viral infections and aims to explore possible future lines of action in this field. PMID:25184135

  18. RNAi mediated IL-6 in vitro knockdown in psoriasis skin model with topical siRNA delivery system based on liquid crystalline phase.

    PubMed

    Depieri, Lívia Vieira; Borgheti-Cardoso, Lívia Neves; Campos, Patrícia Mazureki; Otaguiri, Katia Kaori; Vicentini, Fabiana Testa Moura de Carvalho; Lopes, Luciana Biagini; Fonseca, Maria José Vieira; Bentley, M Vitória Lopes Badra

    2016-08-01

    Gene therapy by RNA interference (RNAi) is a post-transcriptional silencing process that can suppress the expression of a particular gene and it is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of many severe diseases, including cutaneous disorders. However, difficulties related to administration and body distribution limit the clinical use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules. In this study, we proposed to use nanocarriers to enable siRNA application in the topical treatment of skin disorders. A siRNA nanodispersion based on liquid crystalline phase and composed of monoolein (MO), oleic acid (OA) and polyethylenimine (PEI) was developed and its physicochemical properties, efficiency of complexation and carrier/siRNA stability were assessed. Subsequently, cell viability, cellular uptake, in vitro skin irritation test using reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) and in vitro IL-6 knockdown in psoriasis skin model were evaluated. The results showed that the liquid crystalline nanodispersion is a promising topical delivery system for administration of siRNA, being able to overcome the limitations of the route of administration, as well those resulting from the characteristics of siRNA molecules. The formulation was effective at complexing the siRNA, presented high rate of cell uptake (∼90%), increased the skin penetration of siRNA in vitro, and did not cause skin irritation compared with Triton-X (a moderate irritant), resulting in a 4-fold higher viability of reconstructed human epidermis and a 15.6-fold lower release of IL-1α. A single treatment with the liquid crystalline nanodispersion carrying IL-6 siRNA for 6h was able to reduce the extracellular IL-6 levels by 3.3-fold compared with control treatment in psoriasis skin model. Therefore, liquid crystalline nanodispersion is a suitable nanocarrier for siRNA with therapeutic potential to suppress skin disease-specific genes. This study also highlights the applicability of reconstructed skin models in

  19. Suppression of Bedbug’s Reproduction by RNA Interference of Vitellogenin

    PubMed Central

    Moriyama, Minoru; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Tanahashi, Masahiko; Nikoh, Naruo; Fukatsu, Takema

    2016-01-01

    Recent resurgence of the bedbug Cimex lectularius is a global problem on the public health. On account of the worldwide rise of insecticide-resistant bedbug populations, exploration of new approaches to the bedbug control and management is anticipated. In this context, gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) has been considered for its potential application to pest control and management, because RNAi enables specific suppression of target genes and thus flexible selection of target traits to be disrupted. In this study, in an attempt to develop a control strategy targeting reproduction of the bedbug, we investigated RNAi-mediated gene silencing of vitellogenin (Vg), a major yolk protein precursor essential for oogenesis. From the bedbug transcriptomes, we identified a typical Vg gene and a truncated Vg gene, which were designated as ClVg and ClVg-like, respectively. ClVg gene was highly expressed mainly in the fat body of adult females, which was more than 100 times higher than the expression level of ClVg-like gene, indicating that ClVg gene is the primary functional Vg gene in the bedbug. RNAi-mediated suppression of ClVg gene expression in adult females resulted in drastically reduced egg production, atrophied ovaries, and inflated abdomen due to hypertrophied fat bodies. These phenotypic consequences are expected not only to suppress the bedbug reproduction directly but also to deteriorate its feeding and survival indirectly via behavioral modifications. These results suggest the potential of ClVg gene as a promising target for RNAi-based population management of the bedbug. PMID:27096422

  20. Interference and Polarized Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charas, Seymour

    1988-01-01

    Discusses a demonstration of interference phenomena using three sheets of polaroid material, a light source, and a light meter. Describes instructional procedures with mathematical expressions and a diagram. (YP)

  1. Role of Halloween genes in ecdysteroids biosynthesis of the swimming crab (Portunus trituberculatus): Implications from RNA interference and eyestalk ablation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xi; Liu, Zhiye; Liu, Mingxin; Tao, Tian; Shen, Xiquan; Zhu, Dongfa

    2016-09-01

    Molting, including metamorphosis molting in arthropods are controlled by the ecdysteroids that are synthesized and secreted by the crustacean Y-organ (YO) or the insect prothoracic gland (PG). The Halloween genes encoding the enzymes mainly involved in the biosynthesis of ecdysteroids are well studied in insects but not in crustaceans. Given the importance of Halloween genes in ecdysteroids biosynthesis, we have previously reported the cDNA cloning of disembodied (Dib) in P. trituberculatus. Here, cDNA sequences of another two Halloween genes, Spook (Spo) and Shadow (Sad), were further identified and characterized. The predicted amino acid sequences for these two Halloween genes of Portunus trituberculatus were compared to those of several other arthropods, and several typical domains of the cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase (CYP) were identified. Similar to the tissue distribution of Dib, the Spo and Sad also showed high specificity to the YO. RNA interference (RNAi) of these 3 genes indicated they all play essential role in ecdysteroids biosynthesis. To investigate the relationships of the Halloween genes to the eyestalk neuropeptides such as molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH), effects of eyestalk ablation (ESA) on the expression of Dib, Spo and Sad were detected. Expression of Dib and Sad, but not Spo, was significantly induced by ESA. The result indicated that the inhibition of MIH in ecdysteroids biosynthesis may be partly through the transcriptional regulation of certain Halloween genes, such as Dib and Sad, while the Spo might not be the target for MIH signal. PMID:27267122

  2. Functional analysis of the cellulose gene of the pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, using RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Ma, H B; Lu, Q; Liang, J; Zhang, X Y

    2011-01-01

    Cellulases are pathogenic substances suspected to be responsible for the development of the early symptoms of nematode disease. The pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Parasitaphelenchidae), is the causal agent of pine wilt disease, which kills millions of pine trees. We used RNA interference (RNAi), a reverse genetic tool, to analyze the function of the endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene of B. xylophilus, which causes the most serious forest tree disease in China and the rest of eastern Asia. Silencing of this gene was detected through real-time PCR and cellulase activity assays after soaking for 24 h in dsRNA. The cellulase gene silencing effects differed among various siRNAs. The propagation and dispersal ability of these nematodes decreased when the endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene was silenced. It is important to select an effective siRNA before performing an RNAi test. PMID:21948755

  3. Virus-Derived Gene Expression and RNA Interference Vector for Grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Elizabeth G.; Peremyslov, Valera V.; Prokhnevsky, Alexey I.; Kasschau, Kristin D.; Miller, Marilyn; Carrington, James C.

    2012-01-01

    The improvement of the agricultural and wine-making qualities of the grapevine (Vitis vinifera) is hampered by adherence to traditional varieties, the recalcitrance of this plant to genetic modifications, and public resistance to genetically modified organism (GMO) technologies. To address these challenges, we developed an RNA virus-based vector for the introduction of desired traits into grapevine without heritable modifications to the genome. This vector expresses recombinant proteins in the phloem tissue that is involved in sugar transport throughout the plant, from leaves to roots to berries. Furthermore, the vector provides a powerful RNA interference (RNAi) capability of regulating the expression of endogenous genes via virus-induced gene-silencing (VIGS) technology. Additional advantages of this vector include superb genetic capacity and stability, as well as the swiftness of technology implementation. The most significant applications of the viral vector include functional genomics of the grapevine and disease control via RNAi-enabled vaccination against pathogens or invertebrate pests. PMID:22438553

  4. Fungal small RNAs suppress plant immunity by hijacking host RNA interference pathways.

    PubMed

    Weiberg, Arne; Wang, Ming; Lin, Feng-Mao; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhang, Zhihong; Kaloshian, Isgouhi; Huang, Hsien-Da; Jin, Hailing

    2013-10-01

    Botrytis cinerea, the causative agent of gray mold disease, is an aggressive fungal pathogen that infects more than 200 plant species. Here, we show that some B. cinerea small RNAs (Bc-sRNAs) can silence Arabidopsis and tomato genes involved in immunity. These Bc-sRNAs hijack the host RNA interference (RNAi) machinery by binding to Arabidopsis Argonaute 1 (AGO1) and selectively silencing host immunity genes. The Arabidopsis ago1 mutant exhibits reduced susceptibility to B. cinerea, and the B. cinerea dcl1 dcl2 double mutant that can no longer produce these Bc-sRNAs displays reduced pathogenicity on Arabidopsis and tomato. Thus, this fungal pathogen transfers "virulent" sRNA effectors into host plant cells to suppress host immunity and achieve infection, which demonstrates a naturally occurring cross-kingdom RNAi as an advanced virulence mechanism. PMID:24092744

  5. RNAi therapeutics and applications of microRNAs in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Keita; Ochiya, Takahiro; Takeshita, Fumitaka

    2013-06-01

    RNA interference-based therapies are proving to be powerful tools for combating various diseases, including cancer. Scientists are researching the development of safe and efficient systems for the delivery of small RNA molecules, which are extremely fragile in serum, to target organs and cells in the human body. A dozen pre-clinical and clinical trials have been under way over the past few years involving biodegradable nanoparticles, lipids, chemical modification and conjugation. On the other hand, microRNAs, which control the balance of cellular biological processes, have been studied as attractive therapeutic targets in cancer treatment. In this review, we provide an overview of RNA interference-based therapeutics in clinical trials and discuss the latest technology for the systemic delivery of nucleic acid drugs. Furthermore, we focus on dysregulated microRNAs in human cancer, which have progressed in pre-clinical trials as therapeutic targets, and describe a wide range of strategies to control the expression levels of endogenous microRNAs. Further development of RNA interference technologies and progression of clinical trials will contribute to the achievement of practical applications of nucleic acid drugs. PMID:23592885

  6. Use of double-stranded RNA interference in Drosophila cell lines to dissect signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, James C.; Worby, Carolyn A.; Simonson-Leff, Nancy; Muda, Marco; Maehama, Tomohiko; Hemmings, Brian A.; Dixon, Jack E.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate the efficacy of double-stranded RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) of gene expression in generating “knock-out” phenotypes for specific proteins in several Drosophila cell lines. We prove the applicability of this technique for studying signaling cascades by dissecting the well-characterized insulin signal transduction pathway. Specifically, we demonstrate that inhibiting the expression of the DSOR1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, MAPKK) prevents the activation of the downstream ERK-A (MAPK). In contrast, blocking ERK-A expression results in increased activation of DSOR1. We also show that Drosophila AKT (DAKT) activation depends on the insulin receptor substrate, CHICO (IRS1–4). Finally, we demonstrate that blocking the expression of Drosophila PTEN results in the activation of DAKT. In all cases, the interference of the biochemical cascade by RNAi is consistent with the known steps in the pathway. We extend this powerful technique to study two proteins, DSH3PX1 and Drosophila ACK (DACK). DSH3PX1 is an SH3, phox homology domain-containing protein, and DACK is homologous to the mammalian activated Cdc42 tyrosine kinase, ACK. Using RNAi, we demonstrate that DACK is upstream of DSH3PX1 phosphorylation, making DSH3PX1 an identified downstream target/substrate of ACK-like tyrosine kinases. These experiments highlight the usefulness of RNAi in dissecting complex biochemical signaling cascades and provide a highly effective method for determining the function of the identified genes arising from the Drosophila genome sequencing project. PMID:10823906

  7. New perspectives on the diversification of the RNA interference system: insights from comparative genomics and small RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, Alexander Maxwell; Ando, Yoshinari; Aravind, L

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the pervasive involvement of small RNAs in regulating diverse biological processes has been greatly augmented by recent application of deep-sequencing technologies to small RNA across diverse eukaryotes. We review the currently-known small RNA classes and place them in context of the reconstructed evolutionary history of the RNAi protein machinery. This synthesis indicates the earliest versions of eukaryotic RNAi systems likely utilized small RNA processed from three types of precursors: 1) sense-antisense transcriptional products, 2) genome-encoded, imperfectly-complementary hairpin sequences, and 3) larger non-coding RNA precursor sequences. Structural dissection of PIWI proteins along with recent discovery of novel families (including Med13 of the Mediator complex) suggest that emergence of a distinct architecture with the N-terminal domains (also occurring separately fused to endoDNases in prokaryotes) formed via duplication of an ancestral unit was key to their recruitment as primary RNAi effectors and use of small RNAs of certain preferred lengths. Prokaryotic PIWI proteins are typically components of several RNA-directed DNA restriction or CRISPR/Cas systems. However, eukaryotic versions appear to have emerged from a subset that evolved RNA-directed RNA interference. They were recruited alongside RNaseIII domains and RdRP domains, also from prokaryotic systems, to form the core eukaryotic RNAi system. Like certain regulatory systems, RNAi diversified into two distinct but linked arms concomitant with eukaryotic nucleo-cytoplasmic compartmentalization. Subsequent elaboration of RNAi proceeded via diversification of the core protein machinery through lineage-specific expansions and recruitment of new components from prokaryotes (nucleases and small RNA-modifying enzymes), allowing for diversification of associating small RNAs. PMID:24311560

  8. An RNAi-based screen reveals PLK1, CDK1 and NDC80 as potential therapeutic targets in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Linton, A; Cheng, Y Y; Griggs, K; Kirschner, M B; Gattani, S; Srikaran, S; Chuan-Hao Kao, S; McCaughan, B C; Klebe, S; van Zandwijk, N; Reid, G

    2014-01-01

    Background: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive tumour originating in the thoracic mesothelium. Prognosis remains poor with 9- to 12-month median survival, and new targets for treatments are desperately needed. Methods: Utilising an RNA interference (RNAi)-based screen of 40 genes overexpressed in tumours, including genes involved in the control of cell cycle, DNA replication and repair, we investigated potential therapeutic targets for MPM. Following in vitro characterisation of the effects of target silencing on MPM cells, candidates were assessed in tumour samples from 154 patients. Results: Gene knockdown in MPM cell lines identified growth inhibition following knockdown of NDC80, CDK1 and PLK1. Target knockdown induced cell-cycle arrest and increased apoptosis. Using small-molecule inhibitors specific for these three proteins also led to growth inhibition of MPM cell lines, and Roscovitine (inhibitor of CDK1) sensitised cells to cisplatin. Protein expression was also measured in tumour samples, with markedly variable levels of CDK1 and PLK1 noted. PLK1 expression in over 10% of cells correlated significantly with a poor prognosis. Conclusion: These results suggest that RNAi-based screening has utility in identifying new targets for MPM, and that inhibition of NDC80, CDK1 and PLK1 may hold promise for treatment of this disease. PMID:24327015

  9. Oral delivery of double-stranded RNAs and siRNAs induces RNAi effects in the potato/tomato psyllid, Bactericerca cockerelli.

    PubMed

    Wuriyanghan, Hada; Rosa, Cristina; Falk, Bryce W

    2011-01-01

    The potato/tomato psyllid, Bactericerca cockerelli (B. cockerelli), and the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (D. citri), are very important plant pests, but they are also vectors of phloem-limited bacteria that are associated with two devastating plant diseases. B. cockerelli is the vector of Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous (solanacearum), which is associated with zebra chip disease of potatoes, and D. citri is the vector of Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus, which is associated with the Huanglongbing (citrus greening) disease that currently threatens the entire Florida citrus industry. Here we used EST sequence information from D. citri to identify potential targets for RNA interference in B. cockerelli. We targeted ubiquitously expressed and gut-abundant mRNAs via injection and oral acquisition of double-stranded RNAs and siRNAs and were able to induce mortality in recipient psyllids. We also showed knockdown of target mRNAs, and that oral acquisition resulted primarily in mRNA knockdown in the psyllid gut. Concurrent with gene knockdown was the accumulation of target specific ∼ 21 nucleotide siRNAs for an abundant mRNA for BC-Actin. These results showed that RNAi can be a powerful tool for gene function studies in psyllids, and give support for continued efforts for investigating RNAi approaches as possible tools for psyllid and plant disease control. PMID:22110747

  10. Unbiased RNAi screen for hepcidin regulators links hepcidin suppression to proliferative Ras/RAF and nutrient-dependent mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Mleczko-Sanecka, Katarzyna; Roche, Franziska; da Silva, Ana Rita; Call, Debora; D'Alessio, Flavia; Ragab, Anan; Lapinski, Philip E; Ummanni, Ramesh; Korf, Ulrike; Oakes, Christopher; Damm, Georg; D'Alessandro, Lorenza A; Klingmüller, Ursula; King, Philip D; Boutros, Michael; Hentze, Matthias W; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2014-03-01

    The hepatic hormone hepcidin is a key regulator of systemic iron metabolism. Its expression is largely regulated by 2 signaling pathways: the "iron-regulated" bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and the inflammatory JAK-STAT pathways. To obtain broader insights into cellular processes that modulate hepcidin transcription and to provide a resource to identify novel genetic modifiers of systemic iron homeostasis, we designed an RNA interference (RNAi) screen that monitors hepcidin promoter activity after the knockdown of 19 599 genes in hepatocarcinoma cells. Interestingly, many of the putative hepcidin activators play roles in signal transduction, inflammation, or transcription, and affect hepcidin transcription through BMP-responsive elements. Furthermore, our work sheds light on new components of the transcriptional machinery that maintain steady-state levels of hepcidin expression and its responses to the BMP- and interleukin-6-triggered signals. Notably, we discover hepcidin suppression mediated via components of Ras/RAF MAPK and mTOR signaling, linking hepcidin transcriptional control to the pathways that respond to mitogen stimulation and nutrient status. Thus using a combination of RNAi screening, reverse phase protein arrays, and small molecules testing, we identify links between the control of systemic iron homeostasis and critical liver processes such as regeneration, response to injury, carcinogenesis, and nutrient metabolism. PMID:24385536

  11. Compressed sensing methods for DNA microarrays, RNA interference, and metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Rao, Aditya; P, Deepthi; Renumadhavi, C H; Chandra, M Girish; Srinivasan, Rajgopal

    2015-02-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) is a sparse signal sampling methodology for efficiently acquiring and reconstructing a signal from relatively few measurements. Recent work shows that CS is well-suited to be applied to problems in genomics, including probe design in microarrays, RNA interference (RNAi), and taxonomic assignment in metagenomics. The principle of using different CS recovery methods in these applications has thus been established, but a comprehensive study of using a wide range of CS methods has not been done. For each of these applications, we apply three hitherto unused CS methods, namely, l1-magic, CoSaMP, and l1-homotopy, in conjunction with CS measurement matrices such as randomly generated CS m matrix, Hamming matrix, and projective geometry-based matrix. We find that, in RNAi, the l1-magic (the standard package for l1 minimization) and l1-homotopy methods show significant reduction in reconstruction error compared to the baseline. In metagenomics, we find that l1-homotopy as well as CoSaMP estimate concentration with significantly reduced time when compared to the GPSR and WGSQuikr methods. PMID:25629590

  12. Testing the efficacy of RNA interference constructs in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Henry, Christine; Mouyna, Isabelle; Latgé, Jean-Paul

    2007-04-01

    We recently developed a silencing vector in Aspergillus fumigatus which carries a hygromycin resistance marker and a transcriptional unit for hairpin RNA expression under the control of the inducible glucoamylase promoter (pGla) (Mouyna et al. in FEMS Microbiol Lett 237:317-324, 2004). We showed previously that this vector can be used for the RNA interference application of two genes ALB1 and FKS1 of which reduced mRNA levels occurred for both, with phenotypic consequences resembling disruptions of genes involved in melanin (ALB1) and beta(1-3)glucan biosynthesis (FKS1). We reported here the silencing of KRE6 and CRH1, two other genes putatively involved in cell wall biosynthesis using a similar construction under the control of the constitutive promoter glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (pgpdA). Silencing of the expression of these two genes was obtained. Further analysis of the transformants showed however that (1) a 100% loss of expression was never achieved for all genes tested (2) the vector used for RNAi is lost or modified over successive transfers resulting in an inhibition of the silencing. These disadvantages of RNAi indicate that classical gene disruption by gene replacement remains the most efficient method for a molecular analysis of gene function in A. fumigatus. PMID:17273823

  13. Trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) interferes with lipid droplet accumulation during 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yeganeh, Azadeh; Taylor, Carla G; Tworek, Leslee; Poole, Jenna; Zahradka, Peter

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we hypothesize that the biologically active isomers of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), cis-9,trans-11 (c9,t11) and trans-10,cis-12 (t10,c12) CLA, have different effects on early and late stages 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation. Both c9-t11 and t10-c12CLA stimulated early stage pre-adipocyte differentiation (day 2), while t10-c12CLA inhibited late differentiation (day 8) as determined by lipid droplet numbers and both perilipin-1 levels and phosphorylation state. At day 8, the adipokines adiponectin, chemerin and adipsin were all reduced in t10-c12CLA treated cells versus control cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed perilipin-1 was present solely on lipid droplets on day 8 in t10-c12 treated 3T3-L1 cells, whereas preilipin-1 was also located in the perinuclear region in control and c9-t11 treated cells. The t10-c12CLA isomer also decreased levels of hormone-sensitive lipase and inhibited lipolysis. These findings indicate that the decrease in lipid droplets caused by t10-c12CLA is the result of an inhibition of lipid droplet production during adipogenesis rather than a stimulation of lipolysis. Additionally, treatment with Gö6976 blocked the effect of t10-c12CLA on perilipin-1 phosphorylation, implicating PKCα in perilipin-1 phosphorylation, and thus a regulator of triglyceride catabolism. These data are supported by evidence that t10-c12CLA activated PKCα. These are the first data to show that CLA isomers can affect lipid droplet dynamics in adipocytes through PKCα. PMID:27131602

  14. Knockdown of Midgut Genes by dsRNA-Transgenic Plant-Mediated RNA Interference in the Hemipteran Insect Nilaparvata lugens

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Wenjun; Peng, Xinxin; Chen, Rongzhi; Du, Bo; Zhu, Lili; He, Guangcun

    2011-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful technique for functional genomics research in insects. Transgenic plants producing double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) directed against insect genes have been reported for lepidopteran and coleopteran insects, showing potential for field-level control of insect pests, but this has not been reported for other insect orders. Methodology/Principal Findings The Hemipteran insect brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens Stål) is a typical phloem sap feeder specific to rice (Oryza sativa L.). To analyze the potential of exploiting RNAi-mediated effects in this insect, we identified genes (Nlsid-1 and Nlaub) encoding proteins that might be involved in the RNAi pathway in N. lugens. Both genes are expressed ubiquitously in nymphs and adult insects. Three genes (the hexose transporter gene NlHT1, the carboxypeptidase gene Nlcar and the trypsin-like serine protease gene Nltry) that are highly expressed in the N. lugens midgut were isolated and used to develop dsRNA constructs for transforming rice. RNA blot analysis showed that the dsRNAs were transcribed and some of them were processed to siRNAs in the transgenic lines. When nymphs were fed on rice plants expressing dsRNA, levels of transcripts of the targeted genes in the midgut were reduced; however, lethal phenotypic effects after dsRNA feeding were not observed. Conclusions Our study shows that genes for the RNAi pathway (Nlsid-1 and Nlaub) are present in N. lugens. When insects were fed on rice plant materials expressing dsRNAs, RNA interference was triggered and the target genes transcript levels were suppressed. The gene knockdown technique described here may prove to be a valuable tool for further investigations in N. lugens. The results demonstrate the potential of dsRNA-mediated RNAi for field-level control of planthoppers, but appropriate target genes must be selected when designing the dsRNA-transgenic plants. PMID:21655219

  15. Application of Controlled Radical Polymerization for Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    CHU, DAVID S.H.; SCHELLINGER, JOAN G.; SHI, JULIE; CONVERTINE, ANTHONY J.; STAYTON, PATRICK S.; PUN, SUZIE H.

    2012-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Nucleic acid-based therapeutics can potentially address otherwise untreatable genetic disorders and have significant potential for a wide range of diseases. Therapeutic gene delivery can restore protein function by replacing defunct genes to restore cellular health while RNA interference (RNAi) can mask mutated and harmful genes. Cationic polymers have been extensively studied for nucleic acid delivery applications due to their self-assembly with nucleic acids into virus-sized nanoparticles and high transfection efficiency in vitro, but toxicity and particle stability have limited their clinical applications. The advent of controlled radical polymerization has improved the quality, control and reproducibility of synthesized materials. Controlled radical polymerization yields well-defined, narrowly disperse materials of designable architectures and molecular weight, allowing study of the effects of polymer architecture and molecular weight on transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity for improved design of next-generation vectors. Robust methods such as atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), reverse addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT), and ring-opening metastasis polymerization (ROMP) have been used to engineer materials that specifically enhance extracellular stability, cellular specificity, and decrease toxicity. This Account reviews findings from structure-function studies that have elucidated key design motifs necessary for the development of effective nucleic acid vectors. In addition, polymers that are biodegradable, form supramolecular structures, target specific cells, or facilitate endosomal release are also discussed. Finally, promising materials with in vivo applications ranging from pulmonary gene delivery to DNA vaccines are described. PMID:22242774

  16. Reversal of multidrug resistance in MCF-7/Adr cells by codelivery of doxorubicin and BCL2 siRNA using a folic acid-conjugated polyethylenimine hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin nanocarrier

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Wei; Su, Hua; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Tan, Cai-Ping; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2015-01-01

    Systemic administration of chemotherapy for cancer often faces drug resistance, limiting its applications in cancer therapy. In this study, we developed a simple multifunctional nanocarrier based on polyethylenimine (PEI) to codeliver doxorubicin (DOX) and BCL2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) for overcoming multidrug resistance (MDR) and enhancing apoptosis in MCF-7/Adr cancer cells by combining chemotherapy and RNA interference (RNAi) therapy. The low-molecular-weight branch PEI was used to conjugate hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) and folic acid (FA), forming the codelivery nanocarrier (FA-HP-β-CD-PEI) to encapsulate DOX with the cavity HP-β-CD and bind siRNA with the positive charge of PEI for tumor-targeting codelivering drugs. The drug-loaded nanocomplexes (FA-HP-β-CD-PEI/DOX/siRNA) showed uniform size distribution, high cellular uptake, and significant gene suppression of BCL2, displaying the potential of overcoming MDR for enhancing the effect of anticancer drugs. Furthermore, the nanocomplexes achieved significant cell apoptosis through a mechanism of downregulating the antiapoptotic protein BCL2, resulted in improving therapeutic efficacy of the coadministered DOX by tumor targeting and RNA interference. Our study indicated that combined RNAi therapy and chemotherapy using our functional codelivery nanocarrier could overcome MDR and enhance apoptosis in MDR cancer cells for a potential application in treating MDR cancers. PMID:25960653

  17. Scavenger Receptor Mediates Systemic RNA Interference in Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Kyaw Min; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; Liao, Min; Xuenan, Xuan; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Linggatong Galay, Remil; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference is an efficient method to silence gene and protein expressions. Here, the class B scavenger receptor CD36 (SRB) mediated the uptake of exogenous dsRNAs in the induction of the RNAi responses in ticks. Unfed female Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks were injected with a single or a combination of H. longicornis SRB (HlSRB) dsRNA, vitellogenin-1 (HlVg-1) dsRNA, and vitellogenin receptor (HlVgR) dsRNA. We found that specific and systemic silencing of the HlSRB, HlVg-1, and HlVgR genes was achieved in ticks injected with a single dsRNA of HlSRB, HlVg-1, and HlVgR. In ticks injected first with HlVg-1 or HlVgR dsRNA followed 96 hours later with HlSRB dsRNA (HlVg-1/HlSRB or HlVgR/HlSRB), gene silencing of HlSRB was achieved in addition to first knockdown in HlVg-1 or HlVgR, and prominent phenotypic changes were observed in engorgement, mortality, and hatchability, indicating that a systemic and specific double knockdown of target genes had been simultaneously attained in these ticks. However, in ticks injected with HlSRB dsRNA followed 96 hours later with HlVg-1 or HlVgR dsRNAs, silencing of HlSRB was achieved, but no subsequent knockdown in HlVgR or HlVg-1 was observed. The Westernblot and immunohistochemical examinations revealed that the endogenous HlSRB protein was fully abolished in midguts of ticks injected with HlSRB/HlVg-1 dsRNAs but HlVg-1 was normally expressed in midguts, suggesting that HlVg-1 dsRNA-mediated RNAi was fully inhibited by the first knockdown of HlSRB. Similarly, the abolished localization of HlSRB protein was recognized in ovaries of ticks injected with HlSRB/HlVgR, while normal localization of HlVgR was observed in ovaries, suggesting that the failure to knock-down HlVgR could be attributed to the first knockdown of HlSRB. In summary, we demonstrated for the first time that SRB may not only mediate the effective knock-down of gene expression by RNAi but also play essential roles for systemic RNAi of ticks. PMID:22145043

  18. Preventing bee mortality with RNA interference

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present a real world example of the successful use of an RNAi product for disease control. RNAi increased bee health in the presence of the bee viral pathogen, IAPV. The importance of honey bees to the world economy far surpasses their contribution in terms of honey production; they are responsib...

  19. The Transgenic RNAi Project at Harvard Medical School: Resources and Validation.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Lizabeth A; Holderbaum, Laura; Tao, Rong; Hu, Yanhui; Sopko, Richelle; McCall, Kim; Yang-Zhou, Donghui; Flockhart, Ian; Binari, Richard; Shim, Hye-Seok; Miller, Audrey; Housden, Amy; Foos, Marianna; Randkelv, Sakara; Kelley, Colleen; Namgyal, Pema; Villalta, Christians; Liu, Lu-Ping; Jiang, Xia; Huan-Huan, Qiao; Wang, Xia; Fujiyama, Asao; Toyoda, Atsushi; Ayers, Kathleen; Blum, Allison; Czech, Benjamin; Neumuller, Ralph; Yan, Dong; Cavallaro, Amanda; Hibbard, Karen; Hall, Don; Cooley, Lynn; Hannon, Gregory J; Lehmann, Ruth; Parks, Annette; Mohr, Stephanie E; Ueda, Ryu; Kondo, Shu; Ni, Jian-Quan; Perrimon, Norbert

    2015-11-01

    To facilitate large-scale functional studies in Drosophila, the Drosophila Transgenic RNAi Project (TRiP) at Harvard Medical School (HMS) was established along with several goals: developing efficient vectors for RNAi that work in all tissues, generating a genome-scale collection of RNAi stocks with input from the community, distributing the lines as they are generated through existing stock centers, validating as many lines as possible using RT-qPCR and phenotypic analyses, and developing tools and web resources for identifying RNAi lines and retrieving existing information on their quality. With these goals in mind, here we describe in detail the various tools we developed and the status of the collection, which is currently composed of 11,491 lines and covering 71% of Drosophila genes. Data on the characterization of the lines either by RT-qPCR or phenotype is available on a dedicated website, the RNAi Stock Validation and Phenotypes Project (RSVP, http://www.flyrnai.org/RSVP.html), and stocks are available from three stock centers, the Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center (United States), National Institute of Genetics (Japan), and TsingHua Fly Center (China). PMID:26320097

  20. West Nile Virus Infection of Drosophila melanogaster Induces a Protective RNAi Response

    PubMed Central

    Chotkowski, Heather L.; Ciota, Alexander T.; Jia, Yongqing; Puig-Basagoiti, Francesc; Kramer, Laura D.; Shi, Pei-Yong; Glaser, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    To determine if West Nile virus (WNV) infection of insect cells induces a protective RNAi response, Drosophila melanogaster S2 and Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells were infected with WNV, and the production of WNV-homologous small RNAs was assayed as an indicator of RNAi induction. A distinct population of ~25 nt WNV-homologous small RNAs was detected in infected S2 cells but not C6/36 cells. RNAi knockdown of Argonaute 2 in S2 cells resulted in slightly increased susceptibility to WNV infection, suggesting that some WNV-homologous small RNAs produced in infected S2 cells are functional small interfering RNAs. WNV was shown to infect adult D. melanogaster, and adult flies containing mutations in each of four different RNAi genes (Argonaute 2, spindle-E, piwi, and Dicer-2) were significantly more susceptible to WNV infection than wildtype flies. These results combined with the analysis of WNV infection of S2 and C6/36 cells support the conclusion that WNV infection of D. melanogaster, but perhaps not Ae. albopictus, induces a protective RNAi response. PMID:18501400

  1. Comprehensive RNAi-based screening of human and mouse TLR pathways identifies species-specific preferences in signaling protein use.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Li, Ning; Oh, Kyu-Seon; Dutta, Bhaskar; Vayttaden, Sharat J; Lin, Bin; Ebert, Thomas S; De Nardo, Dominic; Davis, Joie; Bagirzadeh, Rustam; Lounsbury, Nicolas W; Pasare, Chandrashekhar; Latz, Eicke; Hornung, Veit; Fraser, Iain D C

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a major class of pattern recognition receptors, which mediate the responses of innate immune cells to microbial stimuli. To systematically determine the roles of proteins in canonical TLR signaling pathways, we conducted an RNA interference (RNAi)-based screen in human and mouse macrophages. We observed a pattern of conserved signaling module dependencies across species, but found notable species-specific requirements at the level of individual proteins. Among these, we identified unexpected differences in the involvement of members of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) family between the human and mouse TLR pathways. Whereas TLR signaling in mouse macrophages depended primarily on IRAK4 and IRAK2, with little or no role for IRAK1, TLR signaling and proinflammatory cytokine production in human macrophages depended on IRAK1, with knockdown of IRAK4 or IRAK2 having less of an effect. Consistent with species-specific roles for these kinases, IRAK4 orthologs failed to rescue signaling in IRAK4-deficient macrophages from the other species, and only mouse macrophages required the kinase activity of IRAK4 to mediate TLR responses. The identification of a critical role for IRAK1 in TLR signaling in humans could potentially explain the association of IRAK1 with several autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, this study demonstrated how systematic screening can be used to identify important characteristics of innate immune responses across species, which could optimize therapeutic targeting to manipulate human TLR-dependent outputs. PMID:26732763

  2. Orthologs of Human Disease Associated Genes and RNAi Analysis of Silencing Insulin Receptor Gene in Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zan; Teng, Xiaolu; Chen, Maohua; Li, Fei

    2014-01-01

    The silkworm, Bombyx mori L., is an important economic insect that has been domesticated for thousands of years to produce silk. It is our great interest to investigate the possibility of developing the B. mori as human disease model. We searched the orthologs of human disease associated genes in the B. mori by bi-directional best hits of BLAST and confirmed by searching the OrthoDB. In total, 5006 genes corresponding to 1612 kinds of human diseases had orthologs in the B. mori, among which, there are 25 genes associated with diabetes mellitus. Of these, we selected the insulin receptor gene of the B. mori (Bm-INSR) to study its expression in different tissues and at different developmental stages and tissues. Quantitative PCR showed that Bm-INSR was highly expressed in the Malpighian tubules but expressed at low levels in the testis. It was highly expressed in the 3rd and 4th instar larvae, and adult. We knocked down Bm-INSR expression using RNA interference. The abundance of Bm-INSR transcripts were dramatically reduced to ~4% of the control level at 6 days after dsRNA injection and the RNAi-treated B. mori individuals showed apparent growth inhibition and malformation such as abnormal body color in black, which is the typical symptom of diabetic patients. Our results demonstrate that B. mori has potential use as an animal model for diabetic mellitus research. PMID:25302617

  3. Nuclease Tudor-SN Is Involved in Tick dsRNA-Mediated RNA Interference and Feeding but Not in Defense against Flaviviral or Anaplasma phagocytophilum Rickettsial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ayllón, Nieves; Naranjo, Victoria; Hajdušek, Ondrej; Villar, Margarita; Galindo, Ruth C.; Kocan, Katherine M.; Alberdi, Pilar; Šíma, Radek; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Rückert, Claudia; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Kazimírová, Mária; Havlíková, Sabína; Klempa, Boris; Kopáček, Petr; de la Fuente, José

    2015-01-01

    Tudor staphylococcal nuclease (Tudor-SN) and Argonaute (Ago) are conserved components of the basic RNA interference (RNAi) machinery with a variety of functions including immune response and gene regulation. The RNAi machinery has been characterized in tick vectors of human and animal diseases but information is not available on the role of Tudor-SN in tick RNAi and other cellular processes. Our hypothesis is that tick Tudor-SN is part of the RNAi machinery and may be involved in innate immune response and other cellular processes. To address this hypothesis, Ixodes scapularis and I. ricinus ticks and/or cell lines were used to annotate and characterize the role of Tudor-SN in dsRNA-mediated RNAi, immune response to infection with the rickettsia Anaplasma phagocytophilum and the flaviviruses TBEV or LGTV and tick feeding. The results showed that Tudor-SN is conserved in ticks and involved in dsRNA-mediated RNAi and tick feeding but not in defense against infection with the examined viral and rickettsial pathogens. The effect of Tudor-SN gene knockdown on tick feeding could be due to down-regulation of genes that are required for protein processing and blood digestion through a mechanism that may involve selective degradation of dsRNAs enriched in G:U pairs that form as a result of adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing. These results demonstrated that Tudor-SN plays a role in tick RNAi pathway and feeding but no strong evidence for a role in innate immune responses to pathogen infection was found. PMID:26186700

  4. RNA Interference Knockdown of BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 in Maize Reveals Novel Functions for Brassinosteroid Signaling in Controlling Plant Architecture1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kir, Gokhan; Ye, Huaxun; Nelissen, Hilde; Neelakandan, Anjanasree K.; Kusnandar, Andree S.; Luo, Anding; Inzé, Dirk; Sylvester, Anne W.; Yin, Yanhai; Becraft, Philip W.

    2015-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are plant hormones involved in various growth and developmental processes. The BR signaling system is well established in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa) but poorly understood in maize (Zea mays). BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) is a BR receptor, and database searches and additional genomic sequencing identified five maize homologs including duplicate copies of BRI1 itself. RNA interference (RNAi) using the extracellular coding region of a maize zmbri1 complementary DNA knocked down the expression of all five homologs. Decreased response to exogenously applied brassinolide and altered BR marker gene expression demonstrate that zmbri1-RNAi transgenic lines have compromised BR signaling. zmbri1-RNAi plants showed dwarf stature due to shortened internodes, with upper internodes most strongly affected. Leaves of zmbri1-RNAi plants are dark green, upright, and twisted, with decreased auricle formation. Kinematic analysis showed that decreased cell division and cell elongation both contributed to the shortened leaves. A BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1-ETHYL METHANESULFONATE-SUPPRESSOR1-yellow fluorescent protein (BES1-YFP) transgenic line was developed that showed BR-inducible BES1-YFP accumulation in the nucleus, which was decreased in zmbri1-RNAi. Expression of the BES1-YFP reporter was strong in the auricle region of developing leaves, suggesting that localized BR signaling is involved in promoting auricle development, consistent with the zmbri1-RNAi phenotype. The blade-sheath boundary disruption, shorter ligule, and disrupted auricle morphology of RNAi lines resemble KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX (KNOX) mutants, consistent with a mechanistic connection between KNOX genes and BR signaling. PMID:26162429

  5. Synergistic effect of silencing the expression of tick protective antigens 4D8 and Rs86 in Rhipicephalus sanguineus by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, José; Almazán, Consuelo; Naranjo, Victoria; Blouin, Edmour F; Kocan, Katherine M

    2006-07-01

    Tick proteins have been shown to be useful for the development of vaccines which reduce tick infestations. Potential tick protective antigens have been identified and characterized, in part, by use of RNA interference (RNAi). RNAi allows for analysis of gene function by characterizing the impact of loss of gene expression on tick physiology. Herein, we used RNAi in Rhipicephalus sanguineus to evaluate gene functions of two tick protective antigens, 4D8 and Rs86, the homologue of Bm86, on tick infestation, feeding and oviposition. Silencing of 4D8 alone resulted in decreased tick attachment, survival, feeding and oviposition. Although the effect of Rs86 RNAi was less pronounced, silencing of this gene also reduced tick weight and oviposition. Most notably, simultaneous silencing of 4D8 and Rs86 by RNAi resulted in a synergistic effect in which tick survival, attachment, feeding, weight and oviposition were profoundly reduced. Microscopic evaluation of tick tissues revealed that guts from dual injected ticks were distended with epithelial cells sparsely distributed along the basement membrane. These results demonstrated the synergistic effect of the silencing expression of two tick protective genes. Inclusion of multiple tick protective antigens may, therefore, enhance the efficacy of tick vaccines. PMID:16518610

  6. Subolesin/akirin orthologs from Ornithodoros spp. soft ticks: cloning, RNAi gene silencing and protective effect of the recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Manzano-Román, Raúl; Díaz-Martín, Verónica; Oleaga, Ana; Siles-Lucas, Mar; Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo

    2012-04-30

    Subolesin/akirin is a well characterized protective antigen highly conserved across vector species and thus potentially useful for the development of a broad-spectrum vaccine for the control of arthropod infestations including hard ticks, mosquitoes, sand flies and the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae. Soft ticks could be also targeted by this vaccine if proved that the soft tick subolesin orthologs are conserved and induce protective immune responses too. However, to date no soft tick subolesin orthologs have been fully characterized nor tested as recombinant antigens in vaccination trials. The objectives of the present work were to clone and characterize the subolesin orthologs from two important vector species of soft ticks as Ornithodoros erraticus and O. moubata, to evaluate the effect of subolesin gene silencing by RNAi, and to test the protective value of the recombinant antigens in vaccination trials. The obtained results demonstrate that both soft tick subolesins are highly conserved showing more than 69% and 74% identity with those of hard ticks in their nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively. Additionally, we demonstrate that both soft ticks possess fully operative RNAi machinery, and that subolesin gene silencing by dsRNA injection inhibits oviposition indicating the involvement of subolesin in tick reproduction. Finally, vaccination with the recombinant soft tick subolesins induced a partial protective effect resulting in the reduction of the oviposition rate. These preliminary results encourage further studies on the use of recombinant subolesins as vaccines for the control of soft tick infestations, either alone or in combination with other specific molecules. PMID:22105082

  7. Vitellogenin-RNAi and ovariectomy each increase lifespan, increase protein storage, and decrease feeding, but are not additive in grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Tetlak, Alicia G; Burnett, Jacob B; Hahn, Daniel A; Hatle, John D

    2015-12-01

    Reduced reproduction has been shown to increase lifespan in many animals, yet the mechanisms behind this trade-off are unclear. We addressed this question by combining two distinct, direct means of life-extension via reduced reproduction, to test whether they were additive. In the lubber grasshopper, Romalea microptera, ovariectomized (OVX) individuals had a ~20% increase in lifespan and a doubling of storage relative to controls (Sham operated). Similarly, young female grasshoppers treated with RNAi against vitellogenin (the precursor to egg yolk protein) had increased fat body mass and halted ovarian growth. In this study, we compared VgRNAi to two control groups that do not reduce reproduction, namely buffer injection (Buffer) and injection with RNAi against a hexameric storage protein (Hex90RNAi). Each injection treatment was tested with and without ovariectomy. Hence, we tested feeding, storage, and lifespans in six groups: OVX and Buffer, OVX and Hex90RNAi, OVX and VgRNAi, Sham and Buffer, Sham and Hex90RNAi, and Sham and VgRNAi. Ovariectomized grasshoppers and VgRNAi grasshoppers each had similar reductions in feeding (~40%), increases in protein storage in the hemolymph (150-300%), and extensions in lifespan (13-21%). Ovariectomized grasshoppers had higher vitellogenin protein levels than did VgRNAi grasshoppers. Last but not least, when ovariectomy and VgRNAi were applied together, there was no greater effect on feeding, protein storage, or longevity. Hence, feeding regulation, and protein storage in insects, may be conserved components of life-extension via reduced reproduction. PMID:26298568

  8. eIF1A augments Ago2-mediated Dicer-independent miRNA biogenesis and RNA interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Tingfang; Arthanari, Haribabu; Akabayov, Barak; Song, Huaidong; Papadopoulos, Evangelos; Qi, Hank H.; Jedrychowski, Mark; Güttler, Thomas; Guo, Cuicui; Luna, Rafael E.; Gygi, Steven P.; Huang, Stephen A.; Wagner, Gerhard

    2015-05-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and miRNA-guided RNA interference (RNAi) are essential for gene expression in eukaryotes. Here we report that translation initiation factor eIF1A directly interacts with Ago2 and promotes Ago2 activities in RNAi and miR-451 biogenesis. Biochemical and NMR analyses demonstrate that eIF1A binds to the MID domain of Ago2 and this interaction does not impair translation initiation. Alanine mutation of the Ago2-facing Lys56 in eIF1A impairs RNAi activities in human cells and zebrafish. The eIF1A-Ago2 assembly facilitates Dicer-independent biogenesis of miR-451, which mediates erythrocyte maturation. Human eIF1A (heIF1A), but not heIF1A(K56A), rescues the erythrocyte maturation delay in eif1axb knockdown zebrafish. Consistently, miR-451 partly compensates erythrocyte maturation defects in zebrafish with eif1axb knockdown and eIF1A(K56A) expression, supporting a role of eIF1A in miRNA-451 biogenesis in this model. Our results suggest that eIF1A is a novel component of the Ago2-centred RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs) and augments Ago2-dependent RNAi and miRNA biogenesis.

  9. eIF1A augments Ago2-mediated Dicer-independent miRNA biogenesis and RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Tingfang; Arthanari, Haribabu; Akabayov, Barak; Song, Huaidong; Papadopoulos, Evangelos; Qi, Hank H.; Jedrychowski, Mark; Güttler, Thomas; Guo, Cuicui; Luna, Rafael E.; Gygi, Steven P.; Huang, Stephen A.; Wagner, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and miRNA-guided RNA interference (RNAi) are essential for gene expression in eukaryotes. Here we report that translation initiation factor eIF1A directly interacts with Ago2 and promotes Ago2 activities in RNAi and miR-451 biogenesis. Biochemical and NMR analyses demonstrate that eIF1A binds to the MID-domain of Ago2 and this interaction does not impair translation initiation. Alanine mutation of the Ago2-facing Lys56 in eIF1A impairs RNAi activities in human cells and zebrafish. The eIF1A-Ago2 assembly facilitates Dicer-independent biogenesis of miR-451, which mediates erythrocyte maturation. Human eIF1A (heIF1A), but not heIF1A(K56A), rescues the erythrocyte maturation delay in eif1axb knockdown zebrafish. Consistently, miR-451 partly compensates erythrocyte maturation defects in zebrafish with eif1axb knockdown and eIF1A(K56A) expression, supporting a role of eIF1A in miRNA-451 biogenesis in this model. Our results suggest that eIF1A is a novel component of the Ago2-centered RNA induced silencing complexes (RISCs) and augments Ago2-dependent RNAi and miRNA biogenesis. PMID:26018492

  10. Quantum interference in polyenes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Yuta; Hoffmann, Roald; Movassagh, Ramis; Datta, Supriyo

    2014-12-14

    The explicit form of the zeroth Green's function in the Hückel model, approximated by the negative of the inverse of the Hückel matrix, has direct quantum interference consequences for molecular conductance. We derive a set of rules for transmission between two electrodes attached to a polyene, when the molecule is extended by an even number of carbons at either end (transmission unchanged) or by an odd number of carbons at both ends (transmission turned on or annihilated). These prescriptions for the occurrence of quantum interference lead to an unexpected consequence for switches which realize such extension through electrocyclic reactions: for some specific attachment modes the chemically closed ring will be the ON position of the switch. Normally the signs of the entries of the Green's function matrix are assumed to have no physical significance; however, we show that the signs may have observable consequences. In particular, in the case of multiple probe attachments – if coherence in probe connections can be arranged – in some cases new destructive interference results, while in others one may have constructive interference. One such case may already exist in the literature.

  11. A kinetic model for RNA-interference of focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Focal adhesions are integrin-based cell-matrix contacts that transduce and integrate mechanical and biochemical cues from the environment. They develop from smaller and more numerous focal complexes under the influence of mechanical force and are key elements for many physiological and disease-related processes, including wound healing and metastasis. More than 150 different proteins localize to focal adhesions and have been systematically classified in the adhesome project (http://www.adhesome.org). First RNAi-screens have been performed for focal adhesions and the effect of knockdown of many of these components on the number, size, shape and location of focal adhesions has been reported. Results We have developed a kinetic model for RNA interference of focal adhesions which represents some of its main elements: a spatially layered structure, signaling through the small GTPases Rac and Rho, and maturation from focal complexes to focal adhesions under force. The response to force is described by two complementary scenarios corresponding to slip and catch bond behavior, respectively. Using estimated and literature values for the model parameters, three time scales of the dynamics of RNAi-influenced focal adhesions are identified: a sub-minute time scale for the assembly of focal complexes, a sub-hour time scale for the maturation to focal adhesions, and a time scale of days that controls the siRNA-mediated knockdown. Our model shows bistability between states dominated by focal complexes and focal adhesions, respectively. Catch bonding strongly extends the range of stability of the state dominated by focal adhesions. A sensitivity analysis predicts that knockdown of focal adhesion components is more efficient for focal adhesions with slip bonds or if the system is in a state dominated by focal complexes. Knockdown of Rho leads to an increase of focal complexes. Conclusions The suggested model provides a kinetic description of the effect of RNA-interference

  12. RNAiFold2T: Constraint Programming design of thermo-IRES switches

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Dotu, Ivan; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Lozano, Gloria; Ramajo, Jorge; Martinez-Salas, Encarnacion; Clote, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: RNA thermometers (RNATs) are cis-regulatory elements that change secondary structure upon temperature shift. Often involved in the regulation of heat shock, cold shock and virulence genes, RNATs constitute an interesting potential resource in synthetic biology, where engineered RNATs could prove to be useful tools in biosensors and conditional gene regulation. Results: Solving the 2-temperature inverse folding problem is critical for RNAT engineering. Here we introduce RNAiFold2T, the first Constraint Programming (CP) and Large Neighborhood Search (LNS) algorithms to solve this problem. Benchmarking tests of RNAiFold2T against existent programs (adaptive walk and genetic algorithm) inverse folding show that our software generates two orders of magnitude more solutions, thus allowing ample exploration of the space of solutions. Subsequently, solutions can be prioritized by computing various measures, including probability of target structure in the ensemble, melting temperature, etc. Using this strategy, we rationally designed two thermosensor internal ribosome entry site (thermo-IRES) elements, whose normalized cap-independent translation efficiency is approximately 50% greater at 42 °C than 30 °C, when tested in reticulocyte lysates. Translation efficiency is lower than that of the wild-type IRES element, which on the other hand is fully resistant to temperature shift-up. This appears to be the first purely computational design of functional RNA thermoswitches, and certainly the first purely computational design of functional thermo-IRES elements. Availability: RNAiFold2T is publicly available as part of the new release RNAiFold3.0 at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAiFold and http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAiFold, which latter has a web server as well. The software is written in C ++ and uses OR-Tools CP search engine. Contact: clote@bc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID

  13. Choosing the Right Tool for the Job: RNAi, TALEN or CRISPR

    PubMed Central

    Boettcher, Michael; McManus, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    The most widely used approach for defining a genes’ function is to reduce or completely disrupt its normal expression. For over a decade, RNAi has ruled the lab, offering a magic bullet to disrupt gene expression in many organisms. However, new biotechnological tools - specifically CRISPR-based technologies - have become available and are squeezing out RNAi dominance in mammalian cell studies. These seemingly competing technologies leave research investigators with the question: ‘Which technology should I use in my experiment?’ This review offers a practical resource to compare and contrast these technologies, guiding the investigator when and where to use this fantastic array of powerful tools. PMID:26000843

  14. Discovery of midgut genes for the RNA interference control of corn rootworm

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xu; Richtman, Nina M.; Zhao, Jian-Zhou; Duncan, Keith E.; Niu, Xiping; Procyk, Lisa A.; Oneal, Meghan A.; Kernodle, Bliss M.; Steimel, Joseph P.; Crane, Virginia C.; Sandahl, Gary; Ritland, Julie L.; Howard, Richard J.; Presnail, James K.; Lu, Albert L.; Wu, Gusui

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising new technology for corn rootworm control. This paper presents the discovery of new gene targets - dvssj1 and dvssj2, in western corn rootworm (WCR). Dvssj1 and dvssj2 are orthologs of the Drosophila genes snakeskin (ssk) and mesh, respectively. These genes encode membrane proteins associated with smooth septate junctions (SSJ) which are required for intestinal barrier function. Based on bioinformatics analysis, dvssj1 appears to be an arthropod-specific gene. Diet based insect feeding assays using double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) targeting dvssj1 and dvssj2 demonstrate targeted mRNA suppression, larval growth inhibition, and mortality. In RNAi treated WCR, injury to the midgut was manifested by “blebbing” of the midgut epithelium into the gut lumen. Ultrastructural examination of midgut epithelial cells revealed apoptosis and regenerative activities. Transgenic plants expressing dsRNA targeting dvssj1 show insecticidal activity and significant plant protection from WCR damage. The data indicate that dvssj1 and dvssj2 are effective gene targets for the control of WCR using RNAi technology, by apparent suppression of production of their respective smooth septate junction membrane proteins located within the intestinal lining, leading to growth inhibition and mortality. PMID:27464714

  15. Efficient gene silencing in mesenchymal stem cells by substrate-mediated RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shan-Hui; Huang, Guo-Shiang; Ho, Tung-Tso; Feng, Fuh

    2014-11-01

    We described a novel substrate-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) technology to investigate the effect of neural crest marker expression on the multipotency of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). HGFs showed significantly higher neural and chondrogenic differentiation potentials compared with adult bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth. By sending target-specific RNAi agents with the conventional vehicle (PolyFect), we observed that the multipotency of HGFs was closely associated with the expression of neural crest marker gene Forkhead box D3 (FoxD3). Using the novel chitosan substrate-mediated method, we successfully delivered short-hairpin RNA constructs to HGFs grown on chitosan without the use of conventional vehicles. The delivery efficiency measured by flow cytometry showed a 10-fold increase for HGFs on chitosan versus those on culture dish, and the cell viability was >95%. Moreover, HGFs with FoxD3 gene knockdown did not form spheroids on chitosan. Based on this working principle, we further selected the gene-silenced population from HGFs. The nonsilenced HGFs showed much higher neural differentiation ability with the nestin expression 40-fold greater than FoxD3-silenced population after induction, suggesting the feasibility of the method to silence genes. The new substrate-mediated gene silencing platform that combines the use of substrate and RNAi can be used to clarify the functions of important genes without suffering the toxicity. PMID:24624901

  16. Self-assembled RNA interference microsponges for efficient siRNA delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong Bum; Hong, Jinkee; Bonner, Daniel K.; Poon, Zhiyong; Hammond, Paula T.

    2012-04-01

    The encapsulation and delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA) has been realized using lipid nanoparticles, cationic complexes, inorganic nanoparticles, RNA nanoparticles and dendrimers. Still, the instability of RNA and the relatively ineffectual encapsulation process of siRNA remain critical issues towards the clinical translation of RNA as a therapeutic. Here we report the synthesis of a delivery vehicle that combines carrier and cargo: RNA interference (RNAi) polymers that self-assemble into nanoscale pleated sheets of hairpin RNA, which in turn form sponge-like microspheres. The RNAi-microsponges consist entirely of cleavable RNA strands, and are processed by the cell’s RNA machinery to convert the stable hairpin RNA to siRNA only after cellular uptake, thus inherently providing protection for siRNA during delivery and transport to the cytoplasm. More than half a million copies of siRNA can be delivered to a cell with the uptake of a single RNAi-microsponge. The approach could lead to novel therapeutic routes for siRNA delivery.

  17. siRNA Design Software for a Target Gene-Specific RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Yuki; Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism through which small interfering RNA (siRNA) induces sequence-specific posttranscriptional gene silencing. RNAi is commonly recognized as a powerful tool not only for functional genomics but also for therapeutic applications. Twenty-one-nucleotide-long siRNA suppresses the expression of the intended gene whose transcript possesses perfect complementarity to the siRNA guide strand. Hence, its silencing effect has been assumed to be extremely specific. However, accumulated evidences revealed that siRNA could downregulate unintended genes with partial complementarities mainly to the seven-nucleotide seed region of siRNA. This phenomenon is referred to as off-target effect. We have revealed that the capability to induce off-target effect is strongly correlated to the thermodynamic stability in siRNA seed-target duplex. For understanding accurate target gene function and successful therapeutic application, it may be critical to select a target gene-specific siRNA with minimized off-target effect. Here we present our siRNA design software for a target-specific RNAi. In addition, we also introduce the software programs open to the public for designing functional siRNAs. PMID:22701467

  18. siRNA Design Software for a Target Gene-Specific RNA Interference.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yuki; Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism through which small interfering RNA (siRNA) induces sequence-specific posttranscriptional gene silencing. RNAi is commonly recognized as a powerful tool not only for functional genomics but also for therapeutic applications. Twenty-one-nucleotide-long siRNA suppresses the expression of the intended gene whose transcript possesses perfect complementarity to the siRNA guide strand. Hence, its silencing effect has been assumed to be extremely specific. However, accumulated evidences revealed that siRNA could downregulate unintended genes with partial complementarities mainly to the seven-nucleotide seed region of siRNA. This phenomenon is referred to as off-target effect. We have revealed that the capability to induce off-target effect is strongly correlated to the thermodynamic stability in siRNA seed-target duplex. For understanding accurate target gene function and successful therapeutic application, it may be critical to select a target gene-specific siRNA with minimized off-target effect. Here we present our siRNA design software for a target-specific RNAi. In addition, we also introduce the software programs open to the public for designing functional siRNAs. PMID:22701467

  19. RNA interference improves myopathic phenotypes in mice over-expressing FSHD region gene 1 (FRG1).

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lindsay M; Garwick-Coppens, Sara E; Tupler, Rossella; Harper, Scott Q

    2011-11-01

    Muscular dystrophies, and other diseases of muscle, arise from recessive and dominant gene mutations. Gene replacement strategies may be beneficial for the former, while gene silencing approaches may provide treatment for the latter. In the last two decades, muscle-directed gene therapies were primarily focused on treating recessive disorders. This disparity at least partly arose because feasible mechanisms to silence dominant disease genes lagged behind gene replacement strategies. With the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) and its subsequent development as a promising new gene silencing tool, the landscape has changed. In this study, our objective was to demonstrate proof-of-principle for RNAi therapy of a dominant myopathy in vivo. We tested the potential of adeno-associated viral (AAV)-delivered therapeutic microRNAs, targeting the human Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1), to correct myopathic features in mice expressing toxic levels of human FRG1 (FRG1(-high) mice). We found that FRG1 gene silencing improved muscle mass, strength, and histopathological abnormalities associated with muscular dystrophy in FRG1(-high) mice, thereby demonstrating therapeutic promise for treatment of dominantly inherited myopathies using RNAi. This approach potentially applies to as many as 29 different gene mutations responsible for myopathies inherited as dominant disorders. PMID:21730972

  20. Discovery of midgut genes for the RNA interference control of corn rootworm.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xu; Richtman, Nina M; Zhao, Jian-Zhou; Duncan, Keith E; Niu, Xiping; Procyk, Lisa A; Oneal, Meghan A; Kernodle, Bliss M; Steimel, Joseph P; Crane, Virginia C; Sandahl, Gary; Ritland, Julie L; Howard, Richard J; Presnail, James K; Lu, Albert L; Wu, Gusui

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising new technology for corn rootworm control. This paper presents the discovery of new gene targets - dvssj1 and dvssj2, in western corn rootworm (WCR). Dvssj1 and dvssj2 are orthologs of the Drosophila genes snakeskin (ssk) and mesh, respectively. These genes encode membrane proteins associated with smooth septate junctions (SSJ) which are required for intestinal barrier function. Based on bioinformatics analysis, dvssj1 appears to be an arthropod-specific gene. Diet based insect feeding assays using double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) targeting dvssj1 and dvssj2 demonstrate targeted mRNA suppression, larval growth inhibition, and mortality. In RNAi treated WCR, injury to the midgut was manifested by "blebbing" of the midgut epithelium into the gut lumen. Ultrastructural examination of midgut epithelial cells revealed apoptosis and regenerative activities. Transgenic plants expressing dsRNA targeting dvssj1 show insecticidal activity and significant plant protection from WCR damage. The data indicate that dvssj1 and dvssj2 are effective gene targets for the control of WCR using RNAi technology, by apparent suppression of production of their respective smooth septate junction membrane proteins located within the intestinal lining, leading to growth inhibition and mortality. PMID:27464714

  1. RNA Interference Improves Myopathic Phenotypes in Mice Over-expressing FSHD Region Gene 1 (FRG1)

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Lindsay M; Garwick-Coppens, Sara E; Tupler, Rossella; Harper, Scott Q

    2011-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies, and other diseases of muscle, arise from recessive and dominant gene mutations. Gene replacement strategies may be beneficial for the former, while gene silencing approaches may provide treatment for the latter. In the last two decades, muscle-directed gene therapies were primarily focused on treating recessive disorders. This disparity at least partly arose because feasible mechanisms to silence dominant disease genes lagged behind gene replacement strategies. With the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) and its subsequent development as a promising new gene silencing tool, the landscape has changed. In this study, our objective was to demonstrate proof-of-principle for RNAi therapy of a dominant myopathy in vivo. We tested the potential of adeno-associated viral (AAV)-delivered therapeutic microRNAs, targeting the human Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1), to correct myopathic features in mice expressing toxic levels of human FRG1 (FRG1−high mice). We found that FRG1 gene silencing improved muscle mass, strength, and histopathological abnormalities associated with muscular dystrophy in FRG1−high mice, thereby demonstrating therapeutic promise for treatment of dominantly inherited myopathies using RNAi. This approach potentially applies to as many as 29 different gene mutations responsible for myopathies inherited as dominant disorders. PMID:21730972

  2. Increased keratinocyte proliferation initiated through downregulation of desmoplakin by RNA interference

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Hong . E-mail: hong.wan@cancer.org.uk; South, Andrew P.; Hart, Ian R.

    2007-07-01

    The intercellular adhesive junction desmosomes are essential for the maintenance of tissue structure and integrity in skin. Desmoplakin (Dp) is a major obligate plaque protein which plays a fundamental role in anchoring intermediate filaments to desmosomal cadherins. Evidence from hereditary human disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding Dp, e.g. Dp haploinsufficiency, suggests that alterations in Dp expression result not only in the disruption of tissue structure and integrity but also could evoke changes in keratinocyte proliferation. We have used transient RNA interference (RNAi) to downregulate Dp specifically in HaCaT keratinocytes. We showed that this Dp downregulation also caused reduced expression of several other desmosomal proteins. Increased cell proliferation and enhanced G{sub 1}-to-S-phase entry in the cell cycle, as monitored by colonial cellular density and BrdU incorporation, were seen in Dp RNAi-treated cells. These proliferative changes were associated with elevated phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-Akt levels. Furthermore, this increase in phospho-ERK/1/2 and phospho-Akt levels was sustained in Dp RNAi-treated cells at confluence whereas in control cells there was a significant reduction in phosphorylation of ERK1/2. This study indicates that Dp may participate in the regulation of keratinocyte cell proliferation by, in part at least, regulating cell cycle progression.

  3. Palmitic acid interferes with energy metabolism balance by adversely switching the SIRT1-CD36-fatty acid pathway to the PKC zeta-GLUT4-glucose pathway in cardiomyoblasts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yeh-Peng; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Shen, Chia-Yao; Day, Cecilia-Hsuan; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Chen, Ray-Jade; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Padma, V Vijaya; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic regulation is inextricably linked with cardiac function. Fatty acid metabolism is a significant mechanism for creating energy for the heart. However, cardiomyocytes are able to switch the fatty acids or glucose, depending on different situations, such as ischemia or anoxia. Lipotoxicity in obesity causes impairments in energy metabolism and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. We utilized the treatment of H9c2 cardiomyoblast cells palmitic acid (PA) as a model for hyperlipidemia to investigate the signaling mechanisms involved in these processes. Our results show PA induces time- and dose-dependent lipotoxicity in H9c2 cells. Moreover, PA enhances cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) and reduces glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) pathway protein levels following a short period of treatment, but cells switch from CD36 back to the GLUT4 pathway after during long-term exposure to PA. As sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ) play important roles in CD36 and GLUT4 translocation, we used the SIRT1 activator resveratrol and si-PKCζ to identify the switches in metabolism. Although PA reduced CD36 and increased GLUT4 metabolic pathway proteins, when we pretreated cells with resveratrol to activate SIRT1 or transfected si-PKCζ, both were able to significantly increase CD36 metabolic pathway proteins and reduce GLUT4 pathway proteins. High-fat diets affect energy metabolism pathways in both normal and aging rats and involve switching the energy source from the CD36 pathway to GLUT4. In conclusion, PA and high-fat diets cause lipotoxicity in vivo and in vitro and adversely switch the energy source from the CD36 pathway to the GLUT4 pathway. PMID:27133433

  4. Tenfibgen Ligand Nanoencapsulation Delivers Bi-Functional Anti-CK2 RNAi Oligomer to Key Sites for Prostate Cancer Targeting Using Human Xenograft Tumors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trembley, Janeen H.; Unger, Gretchen M.; Korman, Vicci L.; Abedin, Md. Joynal; Nacusi, Lucas P.; Vogel, Rachel I.; Slaton, Joel W.; Kren, Betsy T.; Ahmed, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Protected and specific delivery of nucleic acids to malignant cells remains a highly desirable approach for cancer therapy. Here we present data on the physical and chemical characteristics, mechanism of action, and pilot therapeutic efficacy of a tenfibgen (TBG)-shell nanocapsule technology for tumor-directed delivery of single stranded DNA/RNA chimeric oligomers targeting CK2αα' to xenograft tumors in mice. The sub-50 nm size TBG nanocapsule (s50-TBG) is a slightly negatively charged, uniform particle of 15 - 20 nm size which confers protection to the nucleic acid cargo. The DNA/RNA chimeric oligomer (RNAi-CK2) functions to decrease CK2αα' expression levels via both siRNA and antisense mechanisms. Systemic delivery of s50-TBG-RNAi-CK2 specifically targets malignant cells, including tumor cells in bone, and at low doses reduces size and CK2-related signals in orthotopic primary and metastatic xenograft prostate cancer tumors. In conclusion, the s50-TBG nanoencapsulation technology together with the chimeric oligomer targeting CK2αα' offer significant promise for systemic treatment of prostate malignancy. PMID:25333839

  5. Cell Type-Specific Delivery of RNAi by Ligand-Functionalized Curdlan Nanoparticles: Balancing the Receptor Mediation and the Charge Motivation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yinga; Cai, Jia; Han, Jingfen; Baigude, Huricha

    2015-09-30

    Tissue-specific delivery of therapeutic RNAi has great potential for clinical applications. Receptor-mediated endocytosis plays a crucial role in targeted delivery of biotherapeutics including short interfering RNA (siRNA). Previously we reported a novel Curdlan-based nanoparticle for intracellular delivery of siRNA. Here we designed a nanoparticle based on ligand-functionalized Curdlan. Disaccharides were site-specifically conjugated to 6-deoxy-6-amino Curdlan, and the cell line specificity, cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and siRNA delivery efficiency of the corresponding disaccharide-modified 6-deoxy-6-amino-Curdlan were investigated. Observation by fluorescence microscopy as well as flow cytometry showed that galactose-containing Curdlan derivatives delivered fluorescently labeled short nucleic acid to HepG2 cells expressing ASGPR receptor but not in other cells lacking surface ASGPR protein. Moreover, highly galactose-substituted Curdlan derivatives delivered siRNA specifically to ASGPR-expressing cells and induced RNAi activities, silencing endogenous GAPDH gene expression. Our data demonstrated that galactose-functionalized 6-deoxy-6-amino-Curdlan is a promising carrier for short therapeutic nucleic acids for clinical applications. PMID:26345600

  6. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid- and fibrinogen gamma-chain carboxyterminal peptides inhibit platelet adherence to arterial subendothelium at high wall shear rates. An effect dissociable from interference with adhesive protein binding.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J B; Kramer, W S; McKeown, L P; Williams, S B; Gralnick, H R

    1990-01-01

    Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)- and fibrinogen gamma-chain carboxyterminal (GQQHHLGGAKQAGDV) peptides inhibit fibrinogen, fibronectin (Fn), vitronectin, and von Willebrand factor (vWF) binding to the platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex (GP IIb-IIIa). GP IIb-IIIa, vWF, and Fn are essential for normal platelet adherence to subendothelium. We added peptides to normal citrated whole blood before perfusion over human umbilical artery subendothelium and evaluated platelet adherence morphometrically at high (2,600 s-1) and low (800 s-1) wall shear rates. We also examined the effects of the peptides on platelet adhesion to collagen in a static system. At the high wall shear rate, RGDS and GQQHHLGGAKQAGDV caused dose-dependent reduction in the surface coverage with spread and adherent platelets. Amino acid transposition and conservative substitutions of RGD peptides and the AGDV peptide significantly inhibited platelet adherence at 2,600 s-1. By contrast, the modified RGD peptides and AGDV do not affect adhesive protein binding to platelets. None of the native or modified RGD- or fibrinogen gamma-chain peptides significantly inhibited either platelet adherence to subendothelium at 800 s-1 or platelet adhesion to collagen. Our findings demonstrate that peptides that interfere with adhesive protein binding to GP IIb-IIIa inhibit platelet adherence to vascular subendothelium with flowing blood only at high wall shear rates. Platelet adherence to subendothelium at high wall shear rates appears to be mediated by different recognition specificities from those required for fluid-phase adhesive protein binding or static platelet adhesion. PMID:2243140

  7. Differential interference contrast tomography.

    PubMed

    Vishnyakov, Gennady; Levin, Gennady; Minaev, Vladimir; Latushko, Mikhail; Nekrasov, Nikolay; Pickalov, Valery

    2016-07-01

    We present a new approach to optical tomography of phase objects that is referred to as differential interference contrast tomography (DICT). The main feature of DICT is that the result of tomographic reconstruction is a 3D DIC image. This image is described by partial derivative of 3D refractive index distribution in one direction. The DICT setup consists of a lateral shearing phase-shifting interference microscope with low-coherent LED illumination. To create projections of the sample at various illumination angles, an angular scanning beam was used. 3D DIC tomograms of a white blood cell are presented. The comparison between the reconstructed DIC tomogram slices and the conventional DIC images of the same sample at the same depths are also represented. PMID:27367095

  8. Interference suppression of SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanov, V P

    2011-01-24

    The theory of three-wave SRS is developed, which takes into account nonlinear dispersion of a medium for arbitrary phases of the pump waves at the input to the medium. The effect of interference suppression of SRS is predicted for values of the total phase of the three-wave pump (2n+1){pi} (n=0, {+-}1, {+-}2...), the effect being caused by the destructive interference of polarisations of the nonresonant dipole-allowed transitions. The relation between the contributions of the linear and nonlinear dispersions to the SRS is found. It is shown that at a sufficiently large wave detuning, the anti-Stokes wave amplitude experiences spatial oscillations. (nonlinear-optics phenomena)

  9. VSG switching in Trypanosoma brucei: antigenic variation analysed using RNAi in the absence of immune selection

    PubMed Central

    Aitcheson, Niall; Talbot, Suzanne; Shapiro, Jesse; Hughes, Katie; Adkin, Carl; Butt, Thomas; Sheader, Karen; Rudenko, Gloria

    2006-01-01

    Summary Trypanosoma brucei relies on antigenic variation of its Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) coat for survival. We show that VSG switching can be efficiently studied in vitro using VSG RNAi in place of an immune system to select for switch variants. Contrary to models predicting an instant switch after inhibition of VSG synthesis, switching was not induced by VSG RNAi and occurred at a rate of 10−4 per division. We find a highly reproducible hierarchy of VSG activation which appears to be capable of resetting, whereby more than half of the switch events over 12 experiments were to one of two VSGs. We characterised switched clones according to switch mechanism using marker genes in the active VSG expression site (ES). Transcriptional switches between ESs were the preferred switching mechanism, whereby at least 10 of the 17 ESs identified in T. brucei 427 can be functionally active in vitro. We could specifically select for switches mediated by DNA rearrangements by inducing VSG RNAi in the presence of drug selection for the active ES. Most of the preferentially activated VSGs could be activated by multiple mechanisms. This VSG RNAi based procedure provides a rapid and powerful means for analysing VSG switching in African trypanosomes entirely in vitro. PMID:16135228

  10. [Mutation frequencies in HIV-1 subtype-A genome in regions containing efficient RNAi targets].

    PubMed

    Kravatsky, Y V; Chechetkin, V R; Fedoseeva, D M; Gorbacheva, M A; Kretova, O V; Tchurikov, N A

    2016-01-01

    The development of gene-therapy technology using RNAi for AIDS/HIV-1 treatment is a prospective alternative to traditional anti-retroviral therapy. RNAi targets could be selected in HIV-1 transcripts and in CCR5 mRNA. Previously, we experimentally selected a number of efficient siRNAs that target HIV-1 RNAs. The viral genome mutates frequently, and RNAi strength is very sensitive, even for a single mismatches. That is why it is important to study nucleotide sequences of targets in clinical isolates of HIV-1. In the present study, we analyzed mutations in 6 of about 300-bp regions containing RNAi targets from HIV-1 subtype A isolates in Russia. Estimates of the mean frequencies of mutations in the targets were obtained and the frequencies of mutations in the different codon positions were compared. The frequencies of mutations in the vicinity of the targets and directly within the targets were also compared and have been shown to be approximately the same. The frequencies of indels in the chosen regions have been assessed. Their frequencies have proved to be two to three orders of magnitude less compared to that for mutations. PMID:27414786

  11. RNAiFold: a web server for RNA inverse folding and molecular design.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter; Dotu, Ivan

    2013-07-01

    Synthetic biology and nanotechnology are poised to make revolutionary contributions to the 21st century. In this article, we describe a new web server to support in silico RNA molecular design. Given an input target RNA secondary structure, together with optional constraints, such as requiring GC-content to lie within a certain range, requiring the number of strong (GC), weak (AU) and wobble (GU) base pairs to lie in a certain range, the RNAiFold web server determines one or more RNA sequences, whose minimum free-energy secondary structure is the target structure. RNAiFold provides access to two servers: RNA-CPdesign, which applies constraint programming, and RNA-LNSdesign, which applies the large neighborhood search heuristic; hence, it is suitable for larger input structures. Both servers can also solve the RNA inverse hybridization problem, i.e. given a representation of the desired hybridization structure, RNAiFold returns two sequences, whose minimum free-energy hybridization is the input target structure. The web server is publicly accessible at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAiFold, which provides access to two specialized servers: RNA-CPdesign and RNA-LNSdesign. Source code for the underlying algorithms, implemented in COMET and supported on linux, can be downloaded at the server website. PMID:23700314

  12. Transcriptome analysis and systemic RNAi response in the African sweetpotato weevil (Cylas puncticollis, Coleoptera, Brentidae).

    PubMed

    Prentice, Katterinne; Pertry, Ine; Christiaens, Olivier; Bauters, Lander; Bailey, Ana; Niblett, Chuck; Ghislain, Marc; Gheysen, Godelieve; Smagghe, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The African sweetpotato weevil (SPW) Cylas puncticollis Boheman is one of the most important constraints of sweetpotato production in Sub-Saharan Africa and yet is largely an uncharacterized insect pest. Here, we report on the transcriptome analysis of SPW generated using an Illumina platform. More than 213 million sequencing reads were obtained and assembled into 89,599 contigs. This assembly was followed by a gene ontology annotation. Subsequently, a transcriptome search showed that the necessary RNAi components relevant to the three major RNAi pathways, were found to be expressed in SPW. To address the functionality of the RNAi mechanism in this species, dsRNA was injected into second instar larvae targeting laccase2, a gene which encodes an enzyme involved in the sclerotization of insect exoskeleton. The body of treated insects showed inhibition of sclerotization, leading eventually to death. Quantitative Real Time PCR (qPCR) confirmed this phenotype to be the result of gene silencing. Together, our results provide valuable sequence data on this important insect pest and demonstrate that a functional RNAi pathway with a strong and systemic effect is present in SPW and can further be explored as a new strategy for controlling this important pest. PMID:25590333

  13. An Arabidopsis tissue-specific RNAi method for studying genes essential to mitosis.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Rivera, Brunilís; Dawe, R Kelly

    2012-01-01

    A large fraction of the genes in plants can be considered essential in the sense that when absent the plant fails to develop past the first few cell divisions. The fact that angiosperms pass through a haploid gametophyte stage can make it challenging to propagate such mutants even in the heterozygous condition. Here we describe a tissue-specific RNAi method that allows us to visualize cell division phenotypes in petals, which are large dispensable organs. Portions of the APETALA (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI) promoters confer early petal-specific expression. We show that when either promoter is used to drive the expression of a beta-glucuronidase (GUS) RNAi transgene in plants uniformly expressing GUS, GUS expression is knocked down specifically in petals. We further tested the system by targeting the essential kinetochore protein CENPC and two different components of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (MAD2 and BUBR1). Plant lines expressing petal-specific RNAi hairpins targeting these genes exhibited an array of petal phenotypes. Cytological analyses of the affected flower buds confirmed that CENPC knockdown causes cell cycle arrest but provided no evidence that either MAD2 or BUBR1 are required for mitosis (although both genes are required for petal growth by this assay). A key benefit of the petal-specific RNAi method is that the phenotypes are not expressed in the lineages leading to germ cells, and the phenotypes are faithfully transmitted for at least four generations despite their pronounced effects on growth. PMID:23236491

  14. Phenotypic screen for RNAi effects in the codling moth Cydia pomonella.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNAi-based technologies have the potential to augment, or replace existing pest management strategies. However, some insect taxa are less susceptible to the induction of the post-transcriptional gene silencing effect than others, such as the Lepidoptera. Here we describe experiments to investigate t...

  15. RNAi-based insecticidal crops: potential effects on non-target species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNAi is a sequence specific mechanism that silences protein production when particular mRNAs are bound and enzymatically cleaved. Genetically modified crops that silence critical gene function in insect pests have been developed, and are a likely future direction for commercial pest management. Pote...

  16. Transcriptome Analysis and Systemic RNAi Response in the African Sweetpotato Weevil (Cylas puncticollis, Coleoptera, Brentidae)

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Katterinne; Pertry, Ine; Christiaens, Olivier; Bauters, Lander; Bailey, Ana; Niblett, Chuck; Ghislain, Marc; Gheysen, Godelieve; Smagghe, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The African sweetpotato weevil (SPW) Cylas puncticollis Boheman is one of the most important constraints of sweetpotato production in Sub-Saharan Africa and yet is largely an uncharacterized insect pest. Here, we report on the transcriptome analysis of SPW generated using an Illumina platform. More than 213 million sequencing reads were obtained and assembled into 89,599 contigs. This assembly was followed by a gene ontology annotation. Subsequently, a transcriptome search showed that the necessary RNAi components relevant to the three major RNAi pathways, were found to be expressed in SPW. To address the functionality of the RNAi mechanism in this species, dsRNA was injected into second instar larvae targeting laccase2, a gene which encodes an enzyme involved in the sclerotization of insect exoskeleton. The body of treated insects showed inhibition of sclerotization, leading eventually to death. Quantitative Real Time PCR (qPCR) confirmed this phenotype to be the result of gene silencing. Together, our results provide valuable sequence data on this important insect pest and demonstrate that a functional RNAi pathway with a strong and systemic effect is present in SPW and can further be explored as a new strategy for controlling this important pest. PMID:25590333

  17. RNAi-directed post transcriptional gene silencing of an Arabidopsis Myb transgene in tobacco

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The AtMyb90 gene encodes the 'production of anthocyanin pigment 2' (PAP2) transcription factor of Arabidopsis thaliana and is able to induce a visible hyper-pigmented phenotype when expressed in tobacco. Based upon this phenotype, we have used the AtMyb90 gene as a reporter gene to examine RNAi-dire...

  18. A novel platform to enable inhaled naked RNAi medicine for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yu; Takeshita, Fumitaka; Mizutani, Takayuki; Ohgi, Tadaaki; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based therapeutics have been used in humans and offer distinct advantages over traditional therapies. However, previous investigations have shown that there are several technical obstacles that need to be overcome before routine clinical applications are used. Currently, we are launching a novel class of RNAi therapeutic agents (PnkRNA™, nkRNA) that show high resistance to degradation and are less immunogenic, less cytotoxic, and capable of efficient intracellular delivery. Here, we develop a novel platform to promote naked RNAi approaches administered through inhalation without sophisticated delivery technology in mice. Furthermore, a naked and unmodified novel RNAi agent, such as ribophorin II (RPN2-PnkRNA), which has been selected as a therapeutic target for lung cancer, resulted in efficient inhibition of tumor growth without any significant toxicity. Thus, this new technology using aerosol delivery could represent a safe, potentially RNAi-based strategy for clinical applications in lung cancer treatment without delivery vehicles. PMID:24270189

  19. Drosophila Dicer-2 has an RNA interference-independent function that modulates Toll immune signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaowei; Wu, Di; Liu, Yongxiang; Xia, Xiaoling; Gong, Wanyun; Qiu, Yang; Yang, Jie; Zheng, Ya; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Yu-Feng; Xiang, Ye; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2015-10-01

    Dicer-2 is the central player for small interfering RNA biogenesis in the Drosophila RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Intriguingly, we found that Dicer-2 has an unconventional RNAi-independent function that positively modulates Toll immune signaling, which defends against Gram-positive bacteria, fungi, and some viruses, in both cells and adult flies. The loss of Dicer-2 expression makes fruit flies more susceptible to fungal infection. We further revealed that Dicer-2 posttranscriptionally modulates Toll signaling because Dicer-2 is required for the proper expression of Toll protein but not for Toll protein stability or Toll mRNA transcription. Moreover, Dicer-2 directly binds to the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of Toll mRNA via its PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille) domain and is required for protein translation mediated by Toll 3'UTR. The loss of Toll 3'UTR binding activity makes Dicer-2 incapable of promoting Toll signaling. These data indicate that the interaction between Dicer-2 and Toll mRNA plays a pivotal role in Toll immune signaling. In addition, we found that Dicer-2 is also required for the Toll signaling induced by two different RNA viruses in Drosophila cells. Consequently, our findings uncover a novel RNAi-independent function of Dicer-2 in the posttranscriptional regulation of Toll protein expression and signaling, indicate an unexpected intersection of the RNAi pathway and the Toll pathway, and provide new insights into Toll immune signaling, Drosophila Dicer-2, and probably Dicer and Dicer-related proteins in other organisms. PMID:26601278

  20. Defining the molecular profile of planarian pluripotent stem cells using a combinatorial RNA-seq, RNA interference and irradiation approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Planarian stem cells, or neoblasts, drive the almost unlimited regeneration capacities of freshwater planarians. Neoblasts are traditionally described by their morphological features and by the fact that they are the only proliferative cell type in asexual planarians. Therefore, they can be specifically eliminated by irradiation. Irradiation, however, is likely to induce transcriptome-wide changes in gene expression that are not associated with neoblast ablation. This has affected the accurate description of their specific transcriptomic profile. Results We introduce the use of Smed-histone-2B RNA interference (RNAi) for genetic ablation of neoblast cells in Schmidtea mediterranea as an alternative to irradiation. We characterize the rapid, neoblast-specific phenotype induced by Smed-histone-2B RNAi, resulting in neoblast ablation. We compare and triangulate RNA-seq data after using both irradiation and Smed-histone-2B RNAi over a time course as means of neoblast ablation. Our analyses show that Smed-histone-2B RNAi eliminates neoblast gene expression with high specificity and discrimination from gene expression in other cellular compartments. We compile a high confidence list of genes downregulated by both irradiation and Smed-histone-2B RNAi and validate their expression in neoblast cells. Lastly, we analyze the overall expression profile of neoblast cells. Conclusions Our list of neoblast genes parallels their morphological features and is highly enriched for nuclear components, chromatin remodeling factors, RNA splicing factors, RNA granule components and the machinery of cell division. Our data reveal that the regulation of planarian stem cells relies on posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms and suggest that planarians are an ideal model for this understudied aspect of stem cell biology. PMID:22439894

  1. Functional Identification of Tumor Suppressor Genes Through an in vivo RNA Interference Screen in a Mouse Lymphoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Bric, Anka; Miething, Cornelius; Bialucha, Carl Uli; Scuoppo, Claudio; Zender, Lars; Krasnitz, Alexander; Xuan, Zhenyu; Zuber, Johannes; Wigler, Michael; Hicks, James; McCombie, Richard W.; Hemann, Michael T.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Powers, Scott; Lowe, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) capable of stably suppressing gene function by RNA interference (RNAi) can mimic tumor suppressor gene loss in mice. By selecting for shRNAs capable of accelerating lymphomagenesis in a well-characterized mouse lymphoma model, we identified over ten candidate tumor suppressors, including Sfrp1, Numb, Mek1, and Angiopoietin 2. Several components of the DNA damage response machinery were also identified, including Rad17, which acts as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor that responds to oncogenic stress and whose loss is associated with poor prognosis in human patients. Our results emphasize the utility of in vivo RNAi screens, identify and validate a diverse set of tumor suppressors, and have therapeutic implications. PMID:19800577

  2. Interference competition and species coexistence.

    PubMed Central

    Amarasekare, Priyanga

    2002-01-01

    Interference competition is ubiquitous in nature. Yet its effects on resource exploitation remain largely unexplored for species that compete for dynamic resources. Here, I present a model of exploitative and interference competition with explicit resource dynamics. The model incorporates both biotic and abiotic resources. It considers interference competition both in the classical sense (i.e. each species suffers a net reduction in per capita growth rate via interference from, and interference on, the other species) and in the broad sense (i.e. each species suffers a net reduction in per capita growth rate via interference from, but can experience an increase in growth rate via interference on, the other species). Coexistence cannot occur under classical interference competition even when the species inferior at resource exploitation is superior at interference. Such a trade-off can, however, change the mechanism of competitive exclusion from dominance by the superior resource exploiter to a priority effect. Now the inferior resource exploiter can exclude the superior resource exploiter provided it has a higher initial abundance. By contrast, when interference is beneficial to the interacting species, coexistence is possible via a trade-off between exploitation and interference. These results hold regardless of whether the resource is biotic or abiotic, indicating that the outcome of exploitative and interference competition does not depend on the exact nature of resource dynamics. The model makes two key predictions. First, species that engage in costly interference mechanisms (e.g. territoriality, overgrowth or undercutting, allelopathy and other forms of chemical competition) should not be able to coexist unless they also engage in beneficial interference mechanisms (e.g. predation or parasitism). Second, exotic invasive species that displace native biota should be superior resource exploiters that have strong interference effects on native species with little

  3. Sensors Locate Radio Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    After receiving a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center, Soneticom Inc., based in West Melbourne, Florida, created algorithms for time difference of arrival and radio interferometry, which it used in its Lynx Location System (LLS) to locate electromagnetic interference that can disrupt radio communications. Soneticom is collaborating with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to install and test the LLS at its field test center in New Jersey in preparation for deploying the LLS at commercial airports. The software collects data from each sensor in order to compute the location of the interfering emitter.

  4. Targeted fibrillar nanocarbon RNAi treatment of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Alidori, Simone; Akhavein, Nima; Thorek, Daniel L J; Behling, Katja; Romin, Yevgeniy; Queen, Dawn; Beattie, Bradley J; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Bergkvist, Magnus; Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2016-03-23

    RNA interference has tremendous yet unrealized potential to treat a wide range of illnesses. Innovative solutions are needed to protect and selectively deliver small interfering RNA (siRNA) cargo to and within a target cell to fully exploit siRNA as a therapeutic tool in vivo. Herein, we describe ammonium-functionalized carbon nanotube (fCNT)-mediated transport of siRNA selectively and with high efficiency to renal proximal tubule cells in animal models of acute kidney injury (AKI). fCNT enhanced siRNA delivery to tubule cells compared to siRNA alone and effectively knocked down the expression of several target genes, includingTrp53,Mep1b,Ctr1, andEGFP A clinically relevant cisplatin-induced murine model of AKI was used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of fCNT-targeted siRNA to effectively halt the pathogenesis of renal injury. Prophylactic treatment with a combination of fCNT/siMep1band fCNT/siTrp53significantly improved progression-free survival compared to controls via a mechanism that required concurrent reduction of meprin-1β and p53 expression. The fCNT/siRNA was well tolerated, and no toxicological consequences were observed in murine models. Toward clinical application of this platform, fCNTs were evaluated for the first time in nonhuman primates. The rapid and kidney-specific pharmacokinetic profile of fCNT in primates was comparable to what was observed in mice and suggests that this approach is amenable for use in humans. The nanocarbon-mediated delivery of siRNA provides a therapeutic means for the prevention of AKI to safely overcome the persistent barrier of nephrotoxicity during medical intervention. PMID:27009268

  5. Targeted fibrillar nanocarbon RNAi treatment of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Alidori, Simone; Akhavein, Nima; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Behling, Katja; Romin, Yevgeniy; Queen, Dawn; Beattie, Bradley J.; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Bergkvist, Magnus; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference has tremendous yet unrealized potential to treat a wide range of illnesses. Innovative solutions are needed to protect and selectively deliver small interfering RNA (siRNA) cargo to and within a target cell to fully exploit siRNA as a therapeutic tool in vivo. Herein, we describe ammonium-functionalized carbon nanotube (fCNT)–mediated transport of siRNA selectively and with high efficiency to renal proximal tubule cells in animal models of acute kidney injury (AKI). fCNT enhanced siRNA delivery to tubule cells compared to siRNA alone and effectively knocked down the expression of several target genes, including Trp53, Mep1b, Ctr1, and EGFP. A clinically relevant cisplatin-induced murine model of AKI was used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of fCNT-targeted siRNA to effectively halt the pathogenesis of renal injury. Prophylactic treatment with a combination of fCNT/siMep1b and fCNT/siTrp53 significantly improved progression-free survival compared to controls via a mechanism that required concurrent reduction of meprin-1β and p53 expression. The fCNT/siRNA was well tolerated, and no toxicological consequences were observed in murine models. Toward clinical application of this platform, fCNTs were evaluated for the first time in nonhuman primates. The rapid and kidney-specific pharmacokinetic profile of fCNT in primates was comparable to what was observed in mice and suggests that this approach is amenable for use in humans. The nanocarbon-mediated delivery of siRNA provides a therapeutic means for the prevention of AKI to safely overcome the persistent barrier of nephrotoxicity during medical intervention. PMID:27009268

  6. Gene Network Polymorphism Illuminates Loss and Retention of Novel RNAi Silencing Components in the Cryptococcus Pathogenic Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Clancey, Shelly Applen; Wang, Xuying; Heitman, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    RNAi is a ubiquitous pathway that serves central functions throughout eukaryotes, including maintenance of genome stability and repression of transposon expression and movement. However, a number of organisms have lost their RNAi pathways, including the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis, the human pathogen Cryptococcus deuterogattii, and some human parasite pathogens, suggesting there may be adaptive benefits associated with both retention and loss of RNAi. By comparing the RNAi-deficient genome of the Pacific Northwest Outbreak C. deuterogattii strain R265 with the RNAi-proficient genomes of the Cryptococcus pathogenic species complex, we identified a set of conserved genes that were lost in R265 and all other C. deuterogattii isolates examined. Genetic and molecular analyses reveal several of these lost genes play roles in RNAi pathways. Four novel components were examined further. Znf3 (a zinc finger protein) and Qip1 (a homolog of N. crassa Qip) were found to be essential for RNAi, while Cpr2 (a constitutive pheromone receptor) and Fzc28 (a transcription factor) are involved in sex-induced but not mitosis-induced silencing. Our results demonstrate that the mitotic and sex-induced RNAi pathways rely on the same core components, but sex-induced silencing may be a more specific, highly induced variant that involves additional specialized or regulatory components. Our studies further illustrate how gene network polymorphisms involving known components of key cellular pathways can inform identification of novel elements and suggest that RNAi loss may have been a core event in the speciation of C. deuterogattii and possibly contributed to its pathogenic trajectory. PMID:26943821

  7. Knockdown of RNA Interference Pathway Genes in Western Corn Rootworms (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Le Conte) Demonstrates a Possible Mechanism of Resistance to Lethal dsRNA

    PubMed Central

    Vélez, Ana María; Khajuria, Chitvan; Wang, Haichuan; Narva, Kenneth E.; Siegfried, Blair D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is being developed as a potential tool for insect pest management. Increased understanding of the RNAi pathway in target insect pests will provide information to use this technology effectively and to inform decisions related to resistant management strategies for RNAi based traits. Dicer 2 (Dcr2), an endonuclease responsible for formation of small interfering RNA’s and Argonaute 2 (Ago2), an essential catalytic component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) have both been associated with the RNAi pathway in a number of different insect species including the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). We identified both genes from a transcriptome library generated from different tissues and developmental stages of the western corn rootworm, an important target pest for transgenic plants expressing dsRNA targeting essential genes. The expression of these genes was suppressed by more than 90% after injecting gene specific dsRNA into adult rootworms. The injected beetles were then fed vATPase A dsRNA which has previously been demonstrated to cause mortality in western corn rootworm adults. The suppression of both RNAi pathway genes resulted in reduced mortality after subsequent exposure to lethal concentrations of vATPase A dsRNA as well as increased vATPase A expression relative to control treatments. Injections with dsRNA for a non-lethal target sequence (Laccase 2) did not affect mortality or expression caused by vATPase A dsRNA indicating that the results observed with Argo and Dicer dsRNA were not caused by simple competition among different dsRNA’s. These results confirm that both genes play an important role in the RNAi pathway for western corn rootworms and indicate that selection pressures that potentially affect the expression of these genes may provide a basis for future studies to understand potential mechanisms of resistance. PMID:27310918

  8. Electromagnetic Interference on Pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    Erdogan, Okan

    2002-01-01

    External sources, either within or outside the hospital environment, may interfere with the appropriate function of pacemakers which are being implanted all around the world in current medical practice. The patient and the physician who is responsible for follow-up of the pacing systems may be confronted with some specific problems regarding the various types of electromagnetic interference (EMI). To avoid these unwanted EMI effects one must be aware of this potential problem and need to take some precautions. The effects of EMI on pacemaker function and precautions to overcome some specific problems were discussed in this review article. There are many sources of EMI interacting with pacemakers. Magnetic resonance imaging creates real problem and should be avoided in pacemaker patients. Cellular phones might be responsible for EMI when they were held on the same side with the pacemaker. Otherwise they don't cause any specific type of interaction with pacemakers. Sale security systems are not a problem if one walks through it without lingering in or near it. Patients having unipolar pacemaker systems are prone to develop EMI because of pectoral muscle artifacts during vigorous active physical exercise. PMID:17006562

  9. Broad Meloidogyne Resistance in Potato Based on RNA Interference of Effector Gene 16D10.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Phuong T Y; Zhang, Linhai; Mojtahedi, Hassan; Brown, Charles R; Elling, Axel A

    2015-03-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are a significant problem in potato (Solanum tuberosum) production. There is no potato cultivar with Meloidogyne resistance, even though resistance genes have been identified in wild potato species and were introgressed into breeding lines. The objectives of this study were to generate stable transgenic potato lines in a cv. Russet Burbank background that carry an RNA interference (RNAi) transgene capable of silencing the 16D10 Meloidogyne effector gene, and test for resistance against some of the most important root-knot nematode species affecting potato, i.e., M. arenaria, M. chitwoodi, M. hapla, M. incognita, and M. javanica. At 35 days after inoculation (DAI), the number of egg masses per plant was significantly reduced by 65% to 97% (P < 0.05) in the RNAi line compared to wild type and empty vector controls. The largest reduction was observed in M. hapla, whereas the smallest reduction occurred in M. javanica. Likewise, the number of eggs per plant was significantly reduced by 66% to 87% in M. arenaria and M. hapla, respectively, compared to wild type and empty vector controls (P < 0.05). Plant-mediated RNAi silencing of the 16D10 effector gene resulted in significant resistance against all of the root-knot nematode species tested, whereas R Mc1(blb) , the only known Meloidogyne resistance gene in potato, did not have a broad resistance effect. Silencing of 16D10 did not interfere with the attraction of M. incognita second-stage juveniles to roots, nor did it reduce root invasion. PMID:25861119

  10. High-throughput transcriptomic and RNAi analysis identifies AIM1, ERGIC1, TMED3 and TPX2 as potential drug targets in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vainio, Paula; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Kohonen, Pekka; Fey, Vidal; Mirtti, Tuomas; Alanen, Kalle A; Perälä, Merja; Kallioniemi, Olli; Iljin, Kristiina

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases and there is a need for more efficient and targeted methods of treatment. In this study, the potential of gene expression data and RNA interference technique were combined to advance future personalized prostate cancer therapeutics. To distinguish the most promising in vivo prevalidated prostate cancer drug targets, a bioinformatic analysis was carried out using genome-wide gene expression data from 9873 human tissue samples. In total, 295 genes were selected for further functional studies in cultured prostate cancer cells due to their high mRNA expression in prostate, prostate cancer or in metastatic prostate cancer samples. Second, RNAi based cell viability assay was performed in VCaP and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Based on the siRNA results, gene expression patterns in human tissues and novelty, endoplasmic reticulum function associated targets AIM1, ERGIC1 and TMED3, as well as mitosis regulating TPX2 were selected for further validation. AIM1, ERGIC1, and TPX2 were shown to be highly expressed especially in prostate cancer tissues, and high mRNA expression of ERGIC1 and TMED3 associated with AR and ERG oncogene expression. ERGIC1 silencing specifically regulated the proliferation of ERG oncogene positive prostate cancer cells and inhibited ERG mRNA expression in these cells, indicating that it is a potent drug target in ERG positive subgroup of prostate cancers. TPX2 expression associated with PSA failure and TPX2 silencing reduced PSA expression, indicating that TPX2 regulates androgen receptor mediated signaling. In conclusion, the combinatorial usage of microarray and RNAi techniques yielded in a large number of potential novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets, for future development of targeted and personalized approaches for prostate cancer management. PMID:22761906