Science.gov

Sample records for acid ion units

  1. Ion electric propulsion unit

    DOEpatents

    Light, Max E; Colestock, Patrick L

    2014-01-28

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) thruster is disclosed having a plasma chamber which is electrically biased with a positive voltage. The chamber bias serves to efficiently accelerate and expel the positive ions from the chamber. Electrons follow the exiting ions, serving to provide an electrically neutral exhaust plume. In a further embodiment, a downstream shaping magnetic field serves to further accelerate and/or shape the exhaust plume.

  2. Acid rain reduced in eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Bowersox, V.C.; Lynch, J.A.; Grimm, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    Sulfate and free hydrogen ion concentrations in precipitation decreased 10 to 25 percent over large areas of the eastern United States in 1995. The largest decreases in both ions occurred in and downwind of the Ohio River Valley, the same area where Phase I of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments set limitations, effective January 1, 1995, on sulfur dioxide emissions from affected coal-fired sources. Based on our analysis of precipitation chemistry and emissions data, we conclude that substantial declines in acid rain occurred in the eastern United States in 1995 because of large reductions in sulfur dioxide emissions in the same region.

  3. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1996-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  4. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1994-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene disphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  5. ION SOURCE UNIT FOR CALUTRON

    DOEpatents

    Sloan, D.H.; Yockey, H.P.; Schmidt, F.H.

    1959-04-14

    An improvement in the mounting arrangement for an ion source within the vacuum tank of a calutron device is reported. The cathode and arc block of the source are independently supported from a stem passing through the tank wall. The arc block may be pivoted and moved longitudinally with respect to the stem to thereby align the arc chamber in the biock with the cathode and magnetic field in the tank. With this arrangement the elements of the ion source are capable of precise adjustment with respect to one another, promoting increased source efficiency.

  6. Lithium-Ion Cell Charge Control Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha; Button, Robert; Manzo, Michelle; McKissock, Barbara; Miller, Thomas; Gemeiner, Russel; Bennett, William; Hand, Evan

    2006-01-01

    Life-test data of Lithium-Ion battery cells is critical in order to establish their performance capabilities for NASA missions and Exploration goals. Lithium-ion cells have the potential to replace rechargeable alkaline cells in aerospace applications, but they require a more complex charging scheme than is typically required for alkaline cells. To address these requirements in our Lithium-Ion Cell Test Verification Program, a Lithium-Ion Cell Charge Control Unit was developed by NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). This unit gives researchers the ability to test cells together as a pack, while allowing each cell to charge individually. This allows the inherent cell-to-cell variations to be addressed on a series string of cells and results in a substantial reduction in test costs as compared to individual cell testing. The Naval Surface Warfare Center at Crane, Indiana developed a power reduction scheme that works in conjunction with the Lithium-Ion Cell Charge Control Unit. This scheme minimizes the power dissipation required by the circuitry to prolong circuit life and improve its reliability.

  7. Ion exclusion chromatography of aromatic acids.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Fotouh R; Kirkpatrick, Christine L; Danielson, Neil D

    2013-08-01

    The determination of aromatic acids by ion exclusion chromatography is challenging due to peak tailing and the long retention time of hydrophobic solutes. This review discusses the retention mechanisms and the factors affecting retention, eluents and detection methods used in ion exclusion chromatography of aromatic acids such as mono-, di-, tri- and tetra-carboxylic acids, amino acids, sulfonates and phenol. In addition, the different approaches used to improve the chromatographic separation of these compounds are also discussed. These approaches include introducing an internal gradient of the ionic strength, using vacancy ion exclusion chromatography, employing a hydrophilic cation exchange resin or adding a modifier such as heptanol to the dilute sulfuric acid mobile phase. The applications of these methods in the analysis of aromatic acids are provided with a table summarizing the stationary phases, the mobile phases and the detection methods.

  8. Ion Atmosphere Near Nucleic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Udayan

    2015-03-01

    We will discuss all­atom structure based model that explicitly includes ionic effects, i.e., electrostatic interactions with explicit magnesium ions and implicit KCl that allow us to carry out explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of adenine riboswitch and SAM­I riboswitch. Our predictions for the excess ions around the riboswitch, and the magnesium­RNA interaction free energy will be compared with experimental data. We will provide upper and lower bounds for preferential interaction coefficient, a statistical mechanical quantity that is a measure of excess ion atmosphere around a polyelectrolyte. We will discuss the role of surface charge density of mobile ions from added salt in determining the counterion release entropy associated with chain collapse. Finally, the Poisson's ratio of oligomeric DNA will be determined. (Work done in collaboration with R. Hayes, J. Noel, P. Whitford, S. Hennelly, J. Onuchic, and K. Sanbonmatsu.) Work supported by fellowship from John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

  9. A united physicochemical description of the protonation and metal ion complexation equilibria of natural organic acids (humic and fulvic acids). 2. Influence of polyelectrolyte properties and functional group heterogeneity on the protonation equilibria of fulvic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ephraim, J.; Alegret, S.; Mathuthu, A.; Bicking, M.; Malcolm, R.L.; Marinsky, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Potentiometric studies of the neutralization of several fulvic acid sources with standard base in aqueous and nonaqueous media have been conducted. Analysis of the results with a recently developed unified physicochemical model has shown that the protonation behavior of these fulvic acid sources is a reflection of (1) their polyelectrolyte nature and (2) their heterogeneity. It has been possible to ascribe the polyelectrolyte properties observed to a rather inflexible fulvic acid molecule whose variably charged surface is impermeable to simple electrolyte. ?? 1986 American Chemical Society.

  10. Flufenamic acid as an ion channel modulator

    PubMed Central

    Guinamard, Romain; Simard, Christophe; Negro, Christopher Del

    2014-01-01

    Flufenamic acid has been known since the 1960s to have anti-inflammatory properties attributable to the reduction of prostaglandin synthesis. Thirty years later, flufenamic acid appeared to be an ion channel modulator. Thus, while its use in medicine diminished, its use in ionic channel research expanded. Flufenamic acid commonly affects non-selective cation channels and chloride channels, but also modulates potassium, calcium and sodium channels with effective concentrations ranging from 10-6 M in TRPM4 channel inhibition to 10-3 M in two-pore outwardly rectifying potassium channel activation. Because flufenamic acid effects develop and reverse rapidly, it is a convenient and widely used tool. However, given the broad spectrum of its targets, experimental results have to be interpreted cautiously. Here we provide an overview of ion channels targeted by flufenamic acid to aid in interpreting its effects at the molecular, cellular, and systems levels. If it is used with good practices, flufenamic acid remains a useful tool for ion channel research. Understanding the targets of FFA may help reevaluate its physiological impacts and revive interest in its therapeutic potential. PMID:23356979

  11. Persistent ion pairing in aqueous hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Baer, Marcel D; Fulton, John L; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Schenter, Gregory K; Mundy, Christopher J

    2014-07-03

    For strong acids, like hydrochloric acid, the complete dissociation into an excess proton and conjugated base as well as the formation of independent solvated charged fragments is assumed. The existence of chloride-hydronium (Cl(-)···H3O(+)) contact ion pairs even in moderate concentration hydrochloric acid (2.5 m) demonstrates that the counterions do not behave merely as spectators. Through comparison of recent extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements to state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) simulations, we are able to obtain a unique view into the molecular structure of medium-to-high concentrated electrolytes. Here we report that the Cl(-)···H3O(+) contact ion pair structure persists throughout the entire concentration range studied and that these structures differ significantly from moieties studied in microsolvated hydrochloric acid gas phase clusters. Characterizing distinct populations of these ion pairs gives rise to a novel molecular level description of how to view the reaction network for acid dissociation and how it relates to our picture of acid-base equilibria.

  12. Persistent Ion Pairing in Aqueous Hydrochloric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel D.; Fulton, John L.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Schenter, Gregory K.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2014-07-03

    For strong acids, like hydrochloric acid, the complete dissociation into an excess proton and conjugated base as well as the formation of independent solvated charged fragments is assumed. The existence of a chloride-Hyronium (Cl-H3O+) contact ion pairs even in moderate concentration hydrochloric acid (2.5 m) demonstrates that the counter ions do not behave merely as spectators. Through the use of modern extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements in conjunction with state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) simulations, we are able to obtain an unprecedented view into the molecular structure of medium to high concentrated electrolytes. Here we report that the Cl-H3O+ contact ion pair structure persists throughout the entire concentration range studied and that these structures differ significantly from moieties studied in micro-solvated hydrochloric acid clusters. Characterizing distinct populations of these ion pairs gives rise to a novel molecular level description of how to think about the activity of the proton that impacts our picture of the pH scale. Funding for CJM, GKS, and JLF was provided by DOE Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Science, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Funding for MDB was provided throught the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. MB was funded through Argonne National Laboratory.

  13. Arachidonic acid and ion channels: an update

    PubMed Central

    Meves, H

    2008-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid with four double bonds, has multiple actions on living cells. Many of these effects are mediated by an action of AA or its metabolites on ion channels. During the last 10 years, new types of ion channels, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) channels and non-SOCE channels have been studied. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the effects of AA on TRP and non-SOCE channels as well as classical ion channels. It aims to distinguish between effects of AA itself and effects of AA metabolites. Lipid mediators are of clinical interest because some of them (for example, leukotrienes) play a role in various diseases, others (such as prostaglandins) are targets for pharmacological therapeutic intervention. PMID:18552881

  14. Acid-Sensing Ion Channels and Pain.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qihai; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2010-05-11

    Pathophysiological conditions such as inflammation, ischemia, infection and tissue injury can all evoke pain, and each is accompanied by local acidosis. Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated cation channels expressed in both central and peripheral nervous systems. Increasing evidence suggests that ASICs represent essential sensors for tissue acidosis-related pain. This review provides an update on the role of ASICs in pain sensation and discusses their therapeutic potential for pain management.

  15. Lithium-Ion Cell Charge-Control Unit Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Buton, Robert M.; Gemeiner, Russel

    2005-01-01

    A lithium-ion (Li-ion) cell charge-control unit was developed as part of a Li-ion cell verification program. This unit manages the complex charging scheme that is required when Li-ion cells are charged in series. It enables researchers to test cells together as a pack, while allowing each cell to charge individually. This allows the inherent cell-to-cell variations to be addressed on a series string of cells and reduces test costs substantially in comparison to individual cell testing.

  16. Acid-sensing ion channels under hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Yingjun, Guo; Xun, Qu

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia represents the lack of oxygen below the basic level, and the range of known channels related to hypoxia is continually increasing. Since abnormal hypoxia initiates pathological processes in numerous diseases via, to a great degree, producing acidic microenvironment, the significance of these channels in this environment has, until now, remained completely unknown. However, recent discovery of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) have enhanced our understanding of the hypoxic channelome. They belong to the degenerin/epithelial Na+ channel family and function once extracellular pH decreases to a certain level. So does the ratiocination emerge that ASICs participate in many hypoxia-induced pathological processes, including pain, apoptosis, malignancy, which all appear to involve them. Since evidence suggests that activity of ASICs is altered under pathological hypoxia, future studies are needed to deeply explore the relationship between ASICs and hypoxia, which may provide a progressive understanding of hypoxic effects in cancer, arthritis, intervertebral disc degeneration, ischemic brain injury and so on. PMID:23764948

  17. Acid-sensing ion channels under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Yingjun, Guo; Xun, Qu

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia represents the lack of oxygen below the basic level, and the range of known channels related to hypoxia is continually increasing. Since abnormal hypoxia initiates pathological processes in numerous diseases via, to a great degree, producing acidic microenvironment, the significance of these channels in this environment has, until now, remained completely unknown. However, recent discovery of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) have enhanced our understanding of the hypoxic channelome. They belong to the degenerin/epithelial Na (+) channel family and function once extracellular pH decreases to a certain level. So does the ratiocination emerge that ASICs participate in many hypoxia-induced pathological processes, including pain, apoptosis, malignancy, which all appear to involve them. Since evidence suggests that activity of ASICs is altered under pathological hypoxia, future studies are needed to deeply explore the relationship between ASICs and hypoxia, which may provide a progressive understanding of hypoxic effects in cancer, arthritis, intervertebral disc degeneration, ischemic brain injury and so on.

  18. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoichi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Tani, Atsushi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-29

    Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid (O2NOOH) was performed by combining an acidic eluate with an UV-vis detector and immersing the separation column in an ice-water bath. The decomposition behavior of peroxynitric acid in the solution was also studied using this system. The fraction for the peroxynitric acid peak was collected. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of this fraction, after standing at room temperature for 24h, showed that the decomposition products were mainly nitrate ions with a very small amount of nitrous acid. The peroxynitric acid peak area correlated perfectly with the total amount of decomposition products. The ion-exchange chromatographic isolation allowed us to evaluate the molar extinction coefficient of peroxynitric acid precisely in a wider wavelength range than previous reports. The value decreases monotonically from 1729±26M(-1)cm(-1) at 200nm to 12.0±0.5M(-1)cm(-1) at 290nm.

  19. Ion exchange selectivity for cross-linked polyacrylic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Philipp, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    The ion separation factors for 21 common metal ions with cross-linked polyacrylic acid were determined as a function of pH and the percent of the cross-linked polyacrylic acid neutralized. The calcium ion was used as a reference. At a pH of 5 the decreasing order of affinity of the ions for the cross-linked polyacrylic acid was found to be: Hg++, Fe+++, Pb++, Cr+++, Cu++, Cd++, Al+++, Ag+, Zn++, Ni++, Mn++, Co++, Ca++, Sr++, Ba++, Mg++, K+, Rb+, Cs+, Na+, and Li+. Members of a chemical family exhibited similar selectivities. The Hg++ ion appeared to be about a million times more strongly bound than the alkali metal ions. The relative binding of most of the metal ions varied with pH; the very tightly and very weakly bound ions showed the largest variations with pH. The calcium ion-hydrogen ion equilibrium was perturbed very little by the presence of the other ions. The separation factors and selectivity coefficients are discussed in terms of equilibrium and thermodynamic significance.

  20. Extracting metal ions with diphosphonic acid, or derivative thereof

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, Earl P.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    1994-01-01

    Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulphur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described.

  1. Extracting metal ions with diphosphonic acid, or derivative thereof

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Gatrone, R.C.; Nash, K.L.

    1994-07-26

    Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulfur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described. 1 fig.

  2. Charge-Control Unit for Testing Lithium-Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.; Mazo, Michelle A.; Button, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    A charge-control unit was developed as part of a program to validate Li-ion cells packaged together in batteries for aerospace use. The lithium-ion cell charge-control unit will be useful to anyone who performs testing of battery cells for aerospace and non-aerospace uses and to anyone who manufacturers battery test equipment. This technology reduces the quantity of costly power supplies and independent channels that are needed for test programs in which multiple cells are tested. Battery test equipment manufacturers can integrate the technology into their battery test equipment as a method to manage charging of multiple cells in series. The unit manages a complex scheme that is required for charging Li-ion cells electrically connected in series. The unit makes it possible to evaluate cells together as a pack using a single primary test channel, while also making it possible to charge each cell individually. Hence, inherent cell-to-cell variations in a series string of cells can be addressed, and yet the cost of testing is reduced substantially below the cost of testing each cell as a separate entity. The unit consists of electronic circuits and thermal-management devices housed in a common package. It also includes isolated annunciators to signal when the cells are being actively bypassed. These annunciators can be used by external charge managers or can be connected in series to signal that all cells have reached maximum charge. The charge-control circuitry for each cell amounts to regulator circuitry and is powered by that cell, eliminating the need for an external power source or controller. A 110-VAC source of electricity is required to power the thermal-management portion of the unit. A small direct-current source can be used to supply power for an annunciator signal, if desired.

  3. Acid rain reduced in Eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, J.A.; Bowersox, V.C.; Grimm, J.W.

    2000-03-15

    Concentrations of sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) and free hydrogen ions (H{sup +}) in precipitation decreased from 10% to 25% over a large area of the Eastern US from 1995 through 1997 as compared to the previous 12-year (1983--1994) reference period. These decreases were unprecedented in magnitude and spatial extent. In contrast, nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) concentrations generally did not change over this period. The largest decreases in both H{sup +} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} concentrations, which nearly mimicked one another, occurred in and downwind of the Ohio River Valley, the same area where Title 4 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) set limitations on sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions from a large number of utility-owned coal-fired sources. Phase 1 of the CAAA required that these limitations be met by January 1, 1995. On the basis of their analysis of precipitation chemistry and emissions data, the authors conclude that significant declines in acid rain occurred in many parts of the Eastern US from 1995 through 1997 because of large reductions in SO{sub 2} emissions in this region and a corresponding reduction in SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} concentrations in precipitation.

  4. Composition and process for separating cesium ions from an acidic aqueous solution also containing other ions

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Mark L.; Horwitz, E. Philip; Bartsch, Richard A.; Barrans, Jr., Richard E.; Rausch, David

    1999-01-01

    A crown ether cesium ion extractant is disclosed as is its synthesis. The crown ether cesium ion extractant is useful for the selective purification of cesium ions from aqueous acidic media, and more particularly useful for the isolation of radioactive cesium-137 from nuclear waste streams. Processes for isolating cesium ions from aqueous acidic media using the crown ether cesium extractant are disclosed as are processes for recycling the crown ether cesium extractant and processes for recovering cesium from a crown ether cesium extractant solution.

  5. Composition and process for separating cesium ions from an acidic aqueous solution also containing other ions

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bartsch, R.A.; Barrans, R.E. Jr.; Rausch, D.

    1999-03-30

    A crown ether cesium ion extractant is disclosed as is its synthesis. The crown ether cesium ion extractant is useful for the selective purification of cesium ions from aqueous acidic media, and more particularly useful for the isolation of radioactive cesium-137 from nuclear waste streams. Processes for isolating cesium ions from aqueous acidic media using the crown ether cesium extractant are disclosed as are processes for recycling the crown ether cesium extractant and processes for recovering cesium from a crown ether cesium extractant solution. 4 figs.

  6. Recovery of boric acid from ion exchangers

    DOEpatents

    Pollock, Charles W.

    1976-01-01

    The recovery of boric acid from an anion exchange resin is improved by eluting the boric acid with an aqueous solution of ammonium bicarbonate. The boric acid can be readily purified and concentrated by distilling off the water and ammonium bicarbonate. This process is especially useful for the recovery of boric acid containing a high percentage of .sup.10 B which may be found in some nuclear reactor coolant solutions.

  7. Fulvic acid-sulfide ion competition for mercury ion binding in the Florida everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Aiken, G.R.

    2001-01-01

    Negatively charged functional groups of fulvic acid compete with inorganic sulfide ion for mercury ion binding. This competition is evaluated here by using a discrete site-electrostatic model to calculate mercury solution speciation in the presence of fulvic acid. Model calculated species distributions are used to estimate a mercury-fulvic acid apparent binding constant to quantify fulvic acid and sulfide ion competition for dissolved inorganic mercury (Hg(II)) ion binding. Speciation calculations done with PHREEQC, modified to use the estimated mercury-fulvic acid apparent binding constant, suggest that mercury-fulvic acid and mercury-sulfide complex concentrations are equivalent for very low sulfide ion concentrations (about 10-11 M) in Everglades' surface water. Where measurable total sulfide concentration (about 10-7 M or greater) is present in Everglades' surface water, mercury-sulfide complexes should dominate dissolved inorganic mercury solution speciation. In the absence of sulfide ion (for example, in oxygenated Everglades' surface water), fulvic acid binding should dominate Everglades' dissolved inorganic mercury speciation.

  8. Acid Hydrolysis of Trioxalatocobaltate (III) Ion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggans, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an investigation involving acid hydrolysis and using both volumetric and kinetic techniques. Presents examples of the determination of the rate constant and its variation with temperature. (GS)

  9. SAXS studies of ion-nucleic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Lois

    2011-01-01

    Positively charged ions, atoms, or molecules compensate the high negative charge of the nucleic acid backbone. Their presence is critical to the biological function of DNA and RNA. This review focuses on experimental studies probing (a) interactions between small ions and nucleic acids and (b) ion-mediated interactions between nucleic acid duplexes. Experimental results on these simple model systems can be compared with specific theoretical models to validate their predictions. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) provides unique insight into these interactions. Anomalous SAXS reports the spatial correlations of condensed (e.g., locally concentrated) counterions to individual DNA or RNA duplexes. SAXS very effectively reports interactions between nucleic acid helices, which range from strongly repulsive to strongly attractive depending on the ionic species present. The sign and strength of interparticle interactions are easily deduced from dramatic changes in the scattering profiles of interacting duplexes.

  10. Vacancy ion-exclusion chromatography of haloacetic acids on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Helaleh, Murad I H; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Mori, Masanobu; Xu, Qun; Taoda, Hiroshi; Ding, Ming-Yu; Hu, Wenzhi; Hasebe, Kiyoshi; Haddad, Paul R

    2003-05-16

    A new and simple approach is described for the determination of the haloacetic acids (such as mono-, di- and trichloroacetic acids) usually found in drinking water as chlorination by-products after disinfection processes and acetic acid. The new approach, termed vacancy ion-exclusion chromatography, is based on an ion-exclusion mechanism but using the sample solution as the mobile phase, pure water as the injected sample, and a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column (TSKgel OApak-A) as the stationary phase. The addition of sulfuric acid to the mobile phase results in highly sensitive conductivity detection with sharp and well-shaped peaks, leading to excellent and efficient separations. The elution order was sulfuric acid, dichloroacetic acid, monochloroacetic acid, trichloroacetic acid, and acetic acid. The separation of these acids depends on their pKa values. Acids with lower pKa values were eluted earlier than those with higher pKa, except for trichloroacetic acid due to a hydrophobic-adsorption effect occurring as a side-effect of vacancy ion-exclusion chromatography. The detection limits of these acids in the present study with conductivity detection were 3.4 microM for monochloroacetic acid, 0.86 microM for dichloroacetic acid and 0.15 microM for trichloroacetic acid.

  11. Cation–Anion Interactions within the Nucleic Acid Ion Atmosphere Revealed by Ion Counting

    PubMed Central

    Gebala, Magdalena; Giambasu, George M.; Lipfert, Jan; Bisaria, Namita; Bonilla, Steve; Li, Guangchao; York, Darrin M.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The ion atmosphere is a critical structural, dynamic, and energetic component of nucleic acids that profoundly affects their interactions with proteins and ligands. Experimental methods that “count” the number of ions thermodynamically associated with the ion atmosphere allow dissection of energetic properties of the ion atmosphere, and thus provide direct comparison to theoretical results. Previous experiments have focused primarily on the cations that are attracted to nucleic acid polyanions, but have also showed that anions are excluded from the ion atmosphere. Herein, we have systematically explored the properties of anion exclusion, testing the zeroth-order model that anions of different identity are equally excluded due to electrostatic repulsion. Using a series of monovalent salts, we find, surprisingly, that the extent of anion exclusion and cation inclusion significantly depends on salt identity. The differences are prominent at higher concentrations and mirror trends in mean activity coefficients of the electrolyte solutions. Salts with lower activity coefficients exhibit greater accumulation of both cations and anions within the ion atmosphere, strongly suggesting that cation–anion correlation effects are present in the ion atmosphere and need to be accounted for to understand electrostatic interactions of nucleic acids. To test whether the effects of cation–anion correlations extend to nucleic acid kinetics and thermodynamics, we followed the folding of P4–P6, a domain of the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme, via single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer in solutions with different salts. Solutions of identical concentration but lower activity gave slower and less favorable folding. Our results reveal hitherto unknown properties of the ion atmosphere and suggest possible roles of oriented ion pairs or anion-bridged cations in the ion atmosphere for electrolyte solutions of salts with reduced activity. Consideration of these new

  12. Pore architecture and ion sites in acid-sensing ion channels and P2X receptors.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Eric B; Kawate, Toshimitsu; Gouaux, Eric

    2009-07-30

    Acid-sensing ion channels are proton-activated, sodium-selective channels composed of three subunits, and are members of the superfamily of epithelial sodium channels, mechanosensitive and FMRF-amide peptide-gated ion channels. These ubiquitous eukaryotic ion channels have essential roles in biological activities as diverse as sodium homeostasis, taste and pain. Despite their crucial roles in biology and their unusual trimeric subunit stoichiometry, there is little knowledge of the structural and chemical principles underlying their ion channel architecture and ion-binding sites. Here we present the structure of a functional acid-sensing ion channel in a desensitized state at 3 A resolution, the location and composition of the approximately 8 A 'thick' desensitization gate, and the trigonal antiprism coordination of caesium ions bound in the extracellular vestibule. Comparison of the acid-sensing ion channel structure with the ATP-gated P2X(4) receptor reveals similarity in pore architecture and aqueous vestibules, suggesting that there are unanticipated yet common structural and mechanistic principles.

  13. Ion exchange at TNX using the SKID unit

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, M.L.; Bibler, J.P.

    1993-10-21

    An ion exchange unit has been manufactured for WSRC by British Nuclear Fuels, Ltd. This unit consists of three columns, ancillary valving, pumps, lines, and computer controls. It has been delivered to TNX for use in testing a cesium-specific ion exchange resin, developed at WSRC as a potential second generation process for the decontamination of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) supernate. This resin also has Department of Energy applications at both Oak Ridge and Hanford. Oak Ridge is interested in decontaminating the Melton Valley storage tank supernate, while Hanford is interested in decontaminating the 101-AW and 101-SY supernate streams. Another potential developmental interest is the Savannah River Site (SRS) DWPF recycle stream. The three primary waste streams of interest are the Oak Ridge, Hanford, and SRS, SWPF supernate streams. For these three waste streams, the cesium decontamination factor (DF) will be measured for a non-radioactive, simulated, high-level waste solution. The test objectives, process outlines, and broad characterization of the waste streams are described.

  14. Ion-mediated nucleic acid helix-helix interactions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2006-07-15

    Salt ions are essential for the folding of nucleic acids. We use the tightly bound ion (TBI) model, which can account for the correlations and fluctuations for the ions bound to the nucleic acids, to investigate the electrostatic free-energy landscape for two parallel nucleic acid helices in the solution of added salt. The theory is based on realistic atomic structures of the helices. In monovalent salt, the helices are predicted to repel each other. For divalent salt, while the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann theory predicts only the repulsion, the TBI theory predicts an effective attraction between the helices. The helices are predicted to be stabilized at an interhelix distance approximately 26-36 A, and the strength of the attractive force can reach -0.37 k(B)T/bp for helix length in the range of 9-12 bp. Both the stable helix-helix distance and the strength of the attraction are strongly dependent on the salt concentration and ion size. With the increase of the salt concentration, the helix-helix attraction becomes stronger and the most stable helix-helix separation distance becomes smaller. For divalent ions, at very high ion concentration, further addition of ions leads to the weakening of the attraction. Smaller ion size causes stronger helix-helix attraction and stabilizes the helices at a shorter distance. In addition, the TBI model shows that a decrease in the solvent dielectric constant would enhance the ion-mediated attraction. The theoretical findings from the TBI theory agree with the experimental measurements on the osmotic pressure of DNA array as well as the results from the computer simulations.

  15. Recovery of very dilute acetic acid using ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Cloete, F.L.D.; Marais, A.P.

    1995-07-01

    Acetic and related acids occur in many industrial wastewaters, often mixed with several other classes of organic compounds. Acetic acid can be recovered from 1% solutions using weakly basic ion exchange resins. The acid is adsorbed by the free-base form of the resin, which can then be eluted using a slurry of lime to give a solution of calcium acetate. This solution could either be evaporated to crystallize calcium acetate or reacted with sulfuric acid to form acetic acid and gypsum. Laboratory tests of the proposed process gave product solutions of 15--20% acetic acid using pure 1% acetic acid as feed. Some measurements using a typical industrial effluent gave similar recoveries and showed that there was no initial fouling of the resins.

  16. How acidic are monomeric structural units of heparin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remko, Milan; Broer, Ria; Van Duijnen, Piet Th.

    2013-12-01

    Density functional theory methods with the B3LYP functional have been used to letter the acidity of carboxyl, O-sulfo and N-sulfo groups in six basic monomeric structural units of heparin (1-OMe ΔUA-2S, 1-OMe GlcN-S6S, 1,4-DiOMe GlcA, 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S3S6S, 1,4-DiOMe IdoA-2S, and 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S6S). The predicted gas-phase acidity of the acidic functional groups in the monomeric structural units of heparin is: O-sulfo > N-sulfo > carboxyl. The computed pKa values provide the same order of acidity as was observed in water solution. This implies that hydration does not change ordering of acidity of major acidic groups of monomeric structural units of heparin.

  17. Nucleic acid-metal ion interactions in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Katsuyuki; Murayama, Kazutaka

    2012-01-01

    Metal ions play a key role in nucleic acid structure and activity. Elucidation of the rules that govern the binding of metal ions is therefore an essential step for better understanding of the nucleic acid functions. This review is as an update to a preceding one (Metal Ions Biol. Syst., 1996, 32, 91-134), in which we offered a general view of metal ion interactions with mono-, di-, tri-, and oligonucleotides in the solid state, based on their crystal structures reported before 1994. In this chapter, we survey all the crystal structures of metal ion complexes with nucleotides involving oligonucleotides reported after 1994 and we have tried to uncover new characteristic metal bonding patterns for mononucleotides and oligonucleotides with A-RNA and A/B/Z-DNA fragments that form duplexes. We do not cover quadruplexes, duplexes with metal-mediated base-pairs, tRNAs, rRNAs in ribosome, ribozymes, and nucleic acid-drug and -protein complexes. Factors that affect metal binding to mononucleotides and oligonucleotide duplexes are also dealt with.

  18. Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in Gastrointestinal Function

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Gastric acid is of paramount importance for digestion and protection from pathogens but, at the same time, is a threat to the integrity of the mucosa in the upper gastrointestinal tract and may give rise to pain if inflammation or ulceration ensues. Luminal acidity in the colon is determined by lactate production and microbial transformation of carbohydrates to short chain fatty acids as well as formation of ammonia. The pH in the oesophagus, stomach and intestine is surveyed by a network of acid sensors among which acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and acid-sensitive members of transient receptor potential ion channels take a special place. In the gut, ASICs (ASIC1, ASIC2, ASIC3) are primarily expressed by the peripheral axons of vagal and spinal afferent neurons and are responsible for distinct proton-gated currents in these neurons. ASICs survey moderate decreases in extracellular pH and through these properties contribute to a protective blood flow increase in the face of mucosal acid challenge. Importantly, experimental studies provide increasing evidence that ASICs contribute to gastric acid hypersensitivity and pain under conditions of gastritis and peptic ulceration but also participate in colonic hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli (distension) under conditions of irritation that are not necessarily associated with overt inflammation. These functional implications and their upregulation by inflammatory and non-inflammatory pathologies make ASICs potential targets to manage visceral hypersensitivity and pain associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:25582294

  19. Acid-sensing ion channels in gastrointestinal function.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Gastric acid is of paramount importance for digestion and protection from pathogens but, at the same time, is a threat to the integrity of the mucosa in the upper gastrointestinal tract and may give rise to pain if inflammation or ulceration ensues. Luminal acidity in the colon is determined by lactate production and microbial transformation of carbohydrates to short chain fatty acids as well as formation of ammonia. The pH in the oesophagus, stomach and intestine is surveyed by a network of acid sensors among which acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and acid-sensitive members of transient receptor potential ion channels take a special place. In the gut, ASICs (ASIC1, ASIC2, ASIC3) are primarily expressed by the peripheral axons of vagal and spinal afferent neurons and are responsible for distinct proton-gated currents in these neurons. ASICs survey moderate decreases in extracellular pH and through these properties contribute to a protective blood flow increase in the face of mucosal acid challenge. Importantly, experimental studies provide increasing evidence that ASICs contribute to gastric acid hypersensitivity and pain under conditions of gastritis and peptic ulceration but also participate in colonic hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli (distension) under conditions of irritation that are not necessarily associated with overt inflammation. These functional implications and their upregulation by inflammatory and non-inflammatory pathologies make ASICs potential targets to manage visceral hypersensitivity and pain associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'.

  20. Unit: Indicating Acidity, Inspection Pack, National Trial Print.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Science Education Project, Toorak, Victoria.

    The introductory core activities in this trial unit, prepared for students in grades seven through nine of Australian schools, use indicators derived from flower pigments to provide a more convenient measure of acidity than taste. Students are offered choices among seven options after completion of the core: "How Acidic is That?";…

  1. Local Dynamics of Acid- and Ion-containing Copolymer Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winey, Karen; Middleton, Robert; Tarver, Jacob; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Soles, Christopher; Frischknecht, Amalie

    Interest in acid- and ion-containing polymers arises in part from applications as single-ion conductors for selectively transporting a counter ion for battery applications. Structurally, the low dielectric constant of organic polymers and strong ionic interactions leads to ionic aggregation. Here the polymer backbone motion was investigated through quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements (QENS) and compared with fully atomistic molecular dynamic simulations of precise poly(ethylene-acrylic acid) copolymers and their ionomers (pxAA-y%Li). The effect of carbon spacer length (x =9, 15, 21) between the acid groups and the degree of neutralization (y) with Li on PE backbone dynamics were considered. Systematic slowing in chain dynamics were observed with increasing neutralization where polymer dynamics appear constrained due to anchoring effects. Simulations provide complementary viewpoints indicating a gradient in chain dynamics as a distance away from acid groups. These results indicate that the addition of pendant acid groups inhibit typical PE backbone motion and the neutralized forms strongly suppress the fraction of mobile PE chain.

  2. Acid-sensing ion channels contribute to neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xiang-Ping; Grasing, Kenneth A; Wang, John Q

    2014-02-01

    Acidosis that occurs under pathological conditions not only affects intracellular signaling molecules, but also directly activates a unique family of ligand-gated ion channels: acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). ASICs are widely expressed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems and play roles in pain sensation, learning and memory, and fear conditioning. Overactivation of ASICs contributes to neurodegenerative diseases such as ischemic brain/spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. Thus, targeting ASICs might be a potential therapeutic strategy for these conditions. This mini-review focuses on the electrophysiology and pharmacology of ASICs and roles of ASICs in neuronal toxicity.

  3. Acid-sensing ion channels in pain and disease.

    PubMed

    Wemmie, John A; Taugher, Rebecca J; Kreple, Collin J

    2013-07-01

    Why do neurons sense extracellular acid? In large part, this question has driven increasing investigation on acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in the CNS and the peripheral nervous system for the past two decades. Significant progress has been made in understanding the structure and function of ASICs at the molecular level. Studies aimed at clarifying their physiological importance have suggested roles for ASICs in pain, neurological and psychiatric disease. This Review highlights recent findings linking these channels to physiology and disease. In addition, it discusses some of the implications for therapy and points out questions that remain unanswered.

  4. Amino acid-sensing ion channels in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, Edgar P.

    2014-08-12

    The title of our project is “Amino acid-sensing ion channels in plants”. Its goals are two-fold: to determine the molecular functions of glutamate receptor-like (GLR) proteins, and to elucidate their biological roles (physiological or developmental) in plants. Here is our final technical report. We were highly successful in two of the three aims, modestly successful in the third.

  5. Corrosion abatement in sulfuric acid alkylation unit horizontal contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Schutt, H.U.

    1997-09-01

    The need to increase throughput in alkylation plants has resulted in higher operating temperatures and higher water levels in alkylation acids than projected by design. Combined with higher flow rates, the more severe process environment causes carbon steel to corrode at increased rates. Carbon steel is the main material of construction for horizontal contactors (Stratco reactors). A leak to the atmosphere in the hydraulic end cone of one contactor and the realization that basic corrosion data are not available for high throughput process conditions in alkylation units prompted a laboratory study to develop the lacking expertise. Corrosion in alkylation unit horizontal contactors is successfully mitigated by saturating fresh alkylation acid with ferrous sulfate.

  6. Corrosion abatement in sulfuric acid alkylation unit horizontal contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Schutt, H.U.

    1999-03-01

    A leak to the atmosphere in the hydraulic end cone of a horizontal contactor and the realization that basic corrosion data are not available for high-throughput process conditions in alkylation units prompted a laboratory study to develop the lacking expertise. Corrosion in the horizontal contractor of an alkylation unit was mitigated successfully by saturating fresh alkylation acid with ferrous sulfate (FeSO{sub 4}).

  7. Closed cycle ion exchange method for regenerating acids, bases and salts

    DOEpatents

    Dreyfuss, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    A method for conducting a chemical reaction in acidic, basic, or neutral solution as required and then regenerating the acid, base, or salt by means of ion exchange in a closed cycle reaction sequence which comprises contacting the spent acid, base, or salt with an ion exchanger, preferably a synthetic organic ion-exchange resin, so selected that the counter ions thereof are ions also produced as a by-product in the closed reaction cycle, and then regenerating the spent ion exchanger by contact with the by-product counter ions. The method is particularly applicable to closed cycle processes for the thermochemical production of hydrogen.

  8. United in diversity: mechanosensitive ion channels in plants.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Eric S; Schlegel, Angela M; Haswell, Elizabeth S

    2015-01-01

    Mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels are a common mechanism for perceiving and responding to mechanical force. This class of mechanoreceptors is capable of transducing membrane tension directly into ion flux. In plant systems, MS ion channels have been proposed to play a wide array of roles, from the perception of touch and gravity to the osmotic homeostasis of intracellular organelles. Three families of plant MS ion channels have been identified: the MscS-like (MSL), Mid1-complementing activity (MCA), and two-pore potassium (TPK) families. Channels from these families vary widely in structure and function, localize to multiple cellular compartments, and conduct chloride, calcium, and/or potassium ions. However, they are still likely to represent only a fraction of the MS ion channel diversity in plant systems.

  9. United in Diversity: Mechanosensitive Ion Channels in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Eric S.; Schlegel, Angela M.; Haswell, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels are a common mechanism for perceiving and responding to mechanical force. This class of mechanoreceptors is capable of transducing membrane tension directly into ion flux. In plant systems, MS ion channels have been proposed to play a wide array of roles, from the perception of touch and gravity to the osmotic homeostasis of intracellular organelles. Three families of plant MS ion channels have been identified: the MscS-like (MSL), Mid1-complementing activity (MCA), and two-pore potassium (TPK) families. Channels from these families vary widely in structure and function, localize to multiple cellular compartments, and conduct chloride, calcium, and/or potassium ions. However, they are still likely to represent only a fraction of the MS ion channel diversity in plant systems. PMID:25494462

  10. Homochiral frameworks formed by reactions of lanthanide ions with a chiral antimony tartrate secondary building unit.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiang; Wang, Xiqu; Jacobson, Allan J

    2011-09-19

    A chiral cluster compound, dipotassium bis(μ-tartrato)diantimony(III), K(2)Sb(2)L(2) (H(4)L = L-tartaric acid), was used as a secondary building unit to react with lanthanide ions. Three series of homochiral coordination compounds were obtained: 0D [La(H(2)L)(H(2)O)(4)](2)[Sb(2)L(2)]·7H(2)O (0D-La), 1D Ln(Sb(2)L(2))(H(2)O)(5)(NO(3))·H(2)O (1D-Ln) (Ln = La-Lu or Y, expect Pm), 2D(I) [(Ln(H(2)O)(5))(2)(Sb(2)L(2))(3)]·5H(2)O (2D(I)-Ln) (Ln = La, Ce, Pr), and 2D(II) [(La(H(2)O)(5))(2)(Sb(2)L(2))(3)]·6H(2)O (2D(II)-La). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies indicated that 0D-La crystallizes in space group P1, and the structure contains isolated Sb(2)L(2)(2-) units located between chains of composition La(H(2)L)(H(2)O)(4). The series of 1D-Ln compounds is isostructural and crystallizes in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1). In the structure, Sb(2)L(2)(2-) units are coordinated to two Ln ions by two out of the four free tartrate oxygen atoms to form a linear chain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a homochiral structure that can be formed for the whole lanthanide series. In the 2D(I)-Ln structure series, which crystallizes in space group P2(1), the Sb(2)L(2)(2-) units have two distinct coordination modes: one is the same as that found in the 1D structure, while in the other all four free tartrate oxygen atoms are coordinated to four Ln ions in a very distorted tetrahedral arrangement. The connectivity between Sb(2)L(2)(2-) secondary units and LnO(9) polyhedra gives rise to infinite layers. 2D(II) [(La(H(2)O)(5))(2)(Sb(2)L(2))(3)]·6H(2)O, which crystallizes in space group C2, has a similar network to the 2D(I)-Ln compounds. The trends in lattice parameters, bond lengths, and ionic radii in the 1D-Ln series were analyzed to show the effect of the lanthanide contraction.

  11. Separation of hafnium from zirconium in sulfuric acid solutions using pressurized ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    High-resolution pressurized ion exchange has been used successfully to study and separate hafnium and zirconium sulfate complexes by chromatographic elution from Dowex 50W-X8 (15 to 25 ..mu..m) resin with sulfuric acid solutions. Techniques were developed to continuously monitor the column effluents for zirconium and hafnium by reaction with fluorometric and colorimetric reagents. Since neither reagent was specific for either metal ion, peak patterns were initially identified by using the stable isotopes /sup 90/Zr and /sup 180/Hf as fingerprints of their elution position. Distribution ratios for both zirconium and hafnium decrease as the inverse fourth power of the sulfuric acid concentration below 2N and as the inverse second power at higher acid concentration. The hafnium-to-zirconium separation factor is approximately constant (approx. 8) over the 0.5 to 3N range. Under certain conditions, an unseparated fraction was observed that was not retained by the resin. The amount of this fraction which is thought to be a polymeric hydrolysis product appears to be a function of metal and sulfuric acid concentrations. Conditions are being sought to give the highest zirconium concentration and the lowest acid concentration that can be used as a feed material for commercial scale-up in the continuous annular chromatographic (CAC) unit without formation of the polymer.

  12. Template-directed synthesis of oligoguanylic acids - Metal ion catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridson, P. K.; Fakhrai, H.; Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Van Roode, M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of Zn(2+), Pb(2+) and other metal ions on the efficiency and stereo-selectivity of the template-directed oligomerization of guanosine 5'-phosphorimidazolide are investigated. Reactions were run in the presence of a polyC template in a 2,6-lutidine buffer, and products analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography on an RPC-5 column. The presence of the Pb(2+) ion is found to lead to the formation of 2'-5' linked oligomers up to the 40-mer, while Zn(2+) favors the formation of predominantly 3'-5' linked oligomers up to the 35-mer. When amounts of uracil, cytidine or adenosine 5'-phosphorimidazole equal to those of the guanosine derivative are included in the reaction mixture, the incorrect base is incorporated into the oligomer about 10% of the time with a Pb(2+) catalyst, but less than 0.5% of the time with Zn(2+). The Sn(2+), Sb(3+) and Bi(3+) ions are also found to promote the formation of 2'-5' oligomers, although not as effectively as Pb(2+), while no metal ions other than Zn(2+) promote the formation of the 3'-5' oligomers. The results may be important for the understanding of the evolution of nucleic acid replication in the absence of enzymes.

  13. [Acid-Sensing Ion Channels (ASICs) in pain].

    PubMed

    Lingueglia, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of new drug targets represents a real opportunity for developing fresh strategies against pain. Ion channels are interesting targets because they are directly involved in the detection and the transmission of noxious stimuli by sensory fibres of the peripheral nervous system and by neurons of the spinal cord. Acid-Sensing Ion Channels (ASICs) have emerged as important players in the pain pathway. They are neuronal, voltage-independent depolarizing sodium channels activated by extracellular protons. The ASIC family comprises several subunits that need to associate into homo- or hetero-trimers to form a functional channel. The ASIC1 and ASIC3 isoforms are particularly important in sensory neurons, whereas ASIC1a, alone or in association with ASIC2, is essential in the central nervous system. The potent analgesic effects associated with their inhibition in animals (which can be comparable to those of morphine) and data suggesting a role in human pain illustrate the therapeutic potential of these channels.

  14. International Symposium on Ion Therapy: Planning the First Hospital-Based Heavy Ion Therapy Center in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Aaron; Pompos, Arnold; Story, Michael; Jiang, Steve; Timmerman, Robert; Choy, Hak

    2015-01-01

    Investigation into the use of heavy ions for therapeutic purposes was initially pioneered at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the 1970s [1, 2]. More recently, however, significant advances in determining the safety and efficacy of using heavy ions in the hospital setting have been reported in Japan and Germany [3, 4]. These promising results have helped to resurrect interest in the establishment of hospital-based heavy ion therapy in the United States. In line with these efforts, world experts in the field of heavy ion therapy were invited to attend the first annual International Symposium on Ion Therapy, which was held at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, from November 12 to 14, 2014. A brief overview of the results and discussions that took place during the symposium are presented in this article. PMID:27110586

  15. Acid-sensing ion channels and transient-receptor potential ion channels in zebrafish taste buds.

    PubMed

    Levanti, M; Randazzo, B; Viña, E; Montalbano, G; Garcia-Suarez, O; Germanà, A; Vega, J A; Abbate, F

    2016-09-01

    Sensory information from the environment is required for life and survival, and it is detected by specialized cells which together make up the sensory system. The fish sensory system includes specialized organs that are able to detect mechanical and chemical stimuli. In particular, taste buds are small organs located on the tongue in terrestrial vertebrates that function in the perception of taste. In fish, taste buds occur on the lips, the flanks, and the caudal (tail) fins of some species and on the barbels of others. In fish taste receptor cells, different classes of ion channels have been detected which, like in mammals, presumably participate in the detection and/or transduction of chemical gustatory signals. However, since some of these ion channels are involved in the detection of additional sensory modalities, it can be hypothesized that taste cells sense stimuli other than those specific for taste. This mini-review summarizes current knowledge on the presence of transient-receptor potential (TRP) and acid-sensing (ASIC) ion channels in the taste buds of teleosts, especially adult zebrafish. Up to now ASIC4, TRPC2, TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPV4 ion channels have been found in the sensory cells, while ASIC2 was detected in the nerves supplying the taste buds.

  16. Epithelial Sodium and Acid-Sensing Ion Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellenberger, Stephan

    The epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are non-voltage-gated Na+ channels that form their own subfamilies within the ENaC/degenerin ion channel family. ASICs are sensors of extracellular pH, and ENaC, whose main function is trans-epithelial Na+ transport, can sense extra- and intra-cellular Na+. In aldosterone-responsive epithelial cells of the kidney, ENaC plays a critical role in the control of sodium balance, blood volume and blood pressure. In airway epithelia, ENaC has a distinct role in controlling fluid reabsorption at the air-liquid interface, thereby determining the rate of mucociliary transport. In taste receptor cells of the tongue, ENaC is involved in salt taste sensation. ASICs have emerged as key sensors for extracellular protons in central and peripheral neurons. Although not all of their physiological and pathological functions are firmly established yet, there is good evidence for a role of ASICs in the brain in learning, expression of fear, and in neurodegeneration after ischaemic stroke. In sensory neurons, ASICs are involved in nociception and mechanosensation. ENaC and ASIC subunits share substantial sequence homology and the conservation of several functional domains. This chapter summarises our current understanding of the physiological functions and of the mechanisms of ion permeation, gating and regulation of ENaC and ASICs.

  17. Kinetic studies of clavulanic acid recovery by ion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Barboza, M; Almeida, R M; Hokka, C O

    2001-01-01

    Clavulanic acid (CA) is a beta-lactamase inhibitor produced by strains of Streptomyces clavuligerus. Nowadays, the combination of CA with amoxycillin is the most successful example of the use of a beta-lactam antibiotic sensitive to beta-lactamases together with an inhibitor of these enzymes. Clavulanic acid is purified from fermentation broth by a series of steps consisting mainly of two-phase separation processes such as liquid-liquid extraction, adsorption or ion-exchange chromatography, among others. Amberlite IRA 400, a strong anion-exchange resin, has a very high adsorption capacity for CA (Mayer et al. 1997). This resin can be pre-treated with NaCl (chloride cycle), to remove selectively only those anions, which are able to displace chloride from the resin or with NaOH (hydroxyl cycle), to remove all species of anions. In order to decide the best operating conditions for CA recovery by ion-exchange resins and then to construct a model of this separation process, batch experiments were conducted using Amberlite IRA 400 in the chloride cycle. These runs were carried out in a 200 ml stirred tank, at two different initial solution pH, 6.2 and 4.0; the temperature was maintained at 10 degrees C and 20 degrees C during adsorption and 30 degrees C during the desorption step. It was possible, on the basis of these batch results, to model the separation process, including the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium data and mass transfer limitations.

  18. Functional nucleic acids as in vivo metabolite and ion biosensors.

    PubMed

    Alsaafin, Alaa; McKeague, Maureen

    2017-02-21

    Characterizing the role of metabolites, metals, and proteins is required to understand normal cell function, and ultimately, elucidate the mechanism of disease. Metabolite concentration and transformation results collected from cell lysates or fixed-cells conceal important dynamic information and differences between individual cells that often have profound functional consequences. Functional nucleic acid-based biosensors are emerging tools that are capable of monitoring ions and metabolites in cell populations or whole animals. Functional nucleic acids (FNAs) are a class of biomolecules that can exhibit either ligand binding or enzymatic activity. Unlike their protein analogues or the use of instrument-based analysis, FNA-based biosensors are capable of entering cells without disruption to the cellular environment and can report on the concentration, dynamics, and spatial localization of molecules in cells. Here, we review the types of FNAs that have been used as in vivo biosensors, and how FNAs can be coupled to transduction systems and delivered inside cells. We also provide examples from the literature that demonstrate their impact in practical applications. Finally, we comment on the critical limitations that need to be addressed to enable their use for single-cell dynamic tracking of metabolites and ions in vivo.

  19. Amiloride Docking to Acid-sensing Ion Channel-1*

    PubMed Central

    Qadri, Yawar J.; Song, Yuhua; Fuller, Catherine M.; Benos, Dale J.

    2010-01-01

    Amiloride is a small molecule diuretic, which has been used to dissect sodium transport pathways in many different systems. This drug is known to interact with the epithelial sodium channel and acid-sensing ion channel proteins, as well as sodium/hydrogen antiporters and sodium/calcium exchangers. The exact structural basis for these interactions has not been elucidated as crystal structures of these proteins have been challenging to obtain, though some involved residues and domains have been mapped. This work examines the interaction of amiloride with acid-sensing ion channel-1, a protein whose structure is available using computational and experimental techniques. Using molecular docking software, amiloride and related molecules were docked to model structures of homomeric human ASIC-1 to generate potential interaction sites and predict which analogs would be more or less potent than amiloride. The predictions made were experimentally tested using whole-cell patch clamp. Drugs previously classified as NCX or NHE inhibitors are shown to also inhibit hASIC-1. Potential docking sites were re-examined against experimental data to remove spurious interaction sites. The voltage sensitivity of inhibitors was also examined. Using the aggregated data from these computational and experimental experiments, putative interaction sites for amiloride and hASIC-1 have been defined. Future work will experimentally verify these interaction sites, but at present this should allow for virtual screening of drug libraries at these putative interaction sites. PMID:20048170

  20. Calcium ion binding to a soil fulvic acid using a donnan potential model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marinsky, J.A.; Mathuthu, A.; Ephraim, J.H.; Reddy, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    Calcium ion binding to a soil fulvic acid (Armadale Bh Horizon) was evaluated over a range of calcium ion concentrations, from pH 3.8 to 7.3, using potentiometric titrations and calcium ion electrode measurements. Fulvic acid concentration was constant (100 milligrams per liter) and calcium ion concentration varied up to 8 X 10-4 moles per liter. Experiments discussed here included: (1) titrations of fulvic acid-calcium ion containing solutions with sodium hydroxide; and (2) titrations of fully neutralized fulvic acid with calcium chloride solutions. Apparent binding constants (expressed as the logarithm of the value, log ??app) vary with solution pH, calcium ion concentration, degree of acid dissociation, and ionic strength (from log ??app = 2.5 to 3.9) and are similar to those reported by others. Fulvic acid charge, and the associated Donnan Potential, influences calcium ion-fulvic acid ion pair formation. A Donnan Potential corrrection term allowed calculation of intrinsic calcium ion-fulvic acid binding constants. Intrinsic binding constants vary from 1.2 to 2.5 (the average value is about log??= 1.6) and are similar to, but somewhat higher than, stability constants for calcium ion-carboxylic acid monodentate complexes. ?? by Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag, Mu??nchen.

  1. Ion uptake and acid secretion in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2009-06-01

    Transepithelial transport is one of the major processes involved in the mechanism of homeostasis of body fluids in vertebrates including fish. The current models of ion regulation in fish gill ionocytes have been proposed mainly based on studies in traditional model species like salmon, trout, tilapia, eel and killifish, but the mechanisms are still being debated due to the lack of convincing molecular physiological evidence. Taking advantage of plentiful genetic databases for zebrafish, we studied the molecular/cellular mechanisms of ion regulation in fish skin/gills. In our recently proposed model, there are at least three subtypes of ionocytes in zebrafish skin/gills: Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-rich (NaR), Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) and H(+)-ATPase-rich (HR) cells. Specific isoforms of transporters and enzymes have been identified as being expressed by these ionocytes: zECaC, zPMCA2 and zNCX1b by NaR cells; zNCC gill form by NCC cells; and zH(+)-ATPase, zNHE3b, zCA2-like a and zCA15a by HR cells. Serial molecular physiological experiments demonstrated the distinct roles of these ionocytes in the transport of various ions: HR, NaR and NCC cells are respectively responsible for acid secretion/Na(+) uptake, Ca(2+) uptake and Cl(-) uptake. The expression, regulation and function of transporters in HR and NaR cells are much better understood than those in NCC cells. The basolateral transport pathways in HR and NCC cells are still unclear, and the driving forces for the operations of apical NHE and NCC are another unresolved issue. Studies on zebrafish skin/gill ionocytes are providing new insights into fish ion-regulatory mechanisms, but the zebrafish model cannot simply be applied to other species because of species differences and a lack of sufficient molecular physiological evidence in other species.

  2. An acid-sensing ion channel that detects ischemic pain.

    PubMed

    Naves, L A; McCleskey, E W

    2005-11-01

    Ischemic pain occurs when there is insufficient blood flow for the metabolic needs of an organ. The pain of a heart attack is the prototypical example. Multiple compounds released from ischemic muscle likely contribute to this pain by acting on sensory neurons that innervate muscle. One such compound is lactic acid. Here, we show that ASIC3 (acid-sensing ion channel #3) has the appropriate expression pattern and physical properties to be the detector of this lactic acid. In rats, it is expressed only in sensory neurons and then only on a minority (approximately 40%) of these. Nevertheless, it is expressed at extremely high levels on virtually all dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons that innervate the heart. It is extraordinarily sensitive to protons (Hill slope 4, half-activating pH 6.7), allowing it to readily respond to the small changes in extracellular pH (from 7.4 to 7.0) that occur during muscle ischemia. Moreover, both extracellular lactate and extracellular ATP increase the sensitivity of ASIC3 to protons. This final property makes ASIC3 a "coincidence detector" of three molecules that appear during ischemia, thereby allowing it to better detect acidosis caused by ischemia than other forms of systemic acidosis such as hypercapnia.

  3. Removal of copper ions from aqueous solution by the sodium salt of the maleic acid-allylpropionate-styrene terpolymer.

    PubMed

    Akperov, Elchin; Akperov, Oktay; Jafarova, Elnara; Gafarova, Sabahiye

    2016-09-01

    The sodium salt of the maleic acid-allylpropionate-styrene terpolymer was used for recovery of copper ions from aqueous solution. Effects of contact time, sorbent weight and initial Cu(2+) ion concentrations on removal efficiency were tested. The maximum experimental sorption capacity of the sorbent for copper ions is 0.71 g g(-1). The sorption isotherm of copper ions onto a prepared polymer sorbent has been studied and the equilibrium data were analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The adsorption isotherm data showed that copper ions adsorption on the sorbent was better fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model. The Lagergren pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order kinetic models were applied to examine the kinetics of the copper ions sorption by the synthesized sorbent. The kinetic data are best described by the pseudo-second-order model. The calculated value of the maximum sorption capacity by the pseudo-second-order equation (0.62 g g(-1)) corresponds well with its experimentally found value (0.71 g g(-1)). Considering the obtained kinetic data, and the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and UV-vis spectra of the sorbent after the sorption, it is possible to come to the conclusion that during the sorption process Cu(2+) ions enter a complex with the carboxylic groups of the maleic acid units of the sorbent.

  4. ION-EXCLUSION CHROMATOGRAPHIC DETERMINATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACIDS USED TO SUPPORT THE MICROBIALLY MEDIATED REDUCTIVE DECHLORINATION OF TETRACHLOROETHENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical method was developed for the determination of lactic acid, formic acid, acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid in environmental microcosm samples using ion-exclusion chromatography. The chromatographic behavior of various eluents was studied to determine the ...

  5. Acid-sensing ion channels: trafficking and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei-Zheng; Liu, Di-Shi; Xu, Tian-Le

    2014-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated cation channels that are widely expressed in both the peripheral and central nervous systems. ASICs contribute to a variety of pathophysiological conditions that involve tissue acidosis, such as ischemic stroke, epileptic seizures and multiple sclerosis. Although much progress has been made in researching the structure-function relationship and pharmacology of ASICs, little is known about the trafficking of ASICs and its contribution to ASIC function. The recent identification of the mechanism of membrane insertion and endocytosis of ASIC1a highlights the emerging role of ASIC trafficking in regulating its pathophysiological functions. In this review, we summarize the recent advances and discuss future directions on this topic.

  6. Comparative toxicity of hypochlorous acid and hypochlorite ions to mosquitofish

    SciTech Connect

    Mattice, J.S.; Tsai, S.C.; Burch, M.B.

    1981-07-01

    We examined the relative toxicity of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and the hypochlorite ion (OCl/sup -/) by exposing mosquitofish Gambusia affinis for 1 hour to predominantly free residual chlorine (FRC) at six levels of pH following a 7-day acclimation to the test pH. Median lethal concentrations (LC50), in terms of total residual chlorine (TRC), increased with increasing pH. Because of the influence of hydrogen ion concentration on dissociation of HOCl, the percent of FRC present as HOCl is about 97% and 13%, respectively, at the low and high pH. Cursory examination of toxicity of monochloramine (NH/sub 2/Cl) and mixtures of NH/sub 2/Cl and dichloramine (NHCl/sub 2/) suggested that their contributions to toxicity were negligible at any test pH. Free residual chlorine concentrations at the LC50 for each pH were fitted to a theoretical model derived from an assumption that toxicities of HOCl and OCl/sup -/ were additive.

  7. Acid-sensing ion channels in postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Deval, Emmanuel; Noël, Jacques; Gasull, Xavier; Delaunay, Anne; Alloui, Abdelkrim; Friend, Valérie; Eschalier, Alain; Lazdunski, Michel; Lingueglia, Eric

    2011-04-20

    Iatrogenic pain consecutive to a large number of surgical procedures has become a growing health concern. The etiology and pathophysiology of postoperative pain are still poorly understood, but hydrogen ions appear to be important in this process. We have investigated the role of peripheral acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), which form depolarizing channels activated by extracellular protons, in a rat model of postoperative pain (i.e., hindpaw skin/muscle incision). We report high levels of ASIC-type currents (∼ 77%) in sensory neurons innervating the hindpaw muscles, with a prevalence of ASIC3-like currents. The ASIC3 protein is largely expressed in lumbar DRG neurons innervating the plantar muscle, and its mRNA and protein levels are increased by plantar incision 24 h after surgery. Pharmacological inhibition of ASIC3 channels with the specific toxin APETx2 or in vivo knockdown of ASIC3 subunit by small interfering RNA led to a significant reduction of postoperative spontaneous, thermal, and postural pain behaviors (spontaneous flinching, heat hyperalgesia, and weight bearing). ASIC3 appears to have an important role in deep tissue but also affects prolonged pain evoked by skin incision alone. The specific homomeric ASIC1a blocker PcTx1 has no effect on spontaneous flinching, when applied peripherally. Together, these data demonstrate a significant role for peripheral ASIC3-containing channels in postoperative pain.

  8. Acid-sensing ion channels: trafficking and synaptic function

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular acidification occurs in the brain with elevated neural activity, increased metabolism, and neuronal injury. This reduction in pH can have profound effects on brain function because pH regulates essentially every single biochemical reaction. Therefore, it is not surprising to see that Nature evolves a family of proteins, the acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), to sense extracellular pH reduction. ASICs are proton-gated cation channels that are mainly expressed in the nervous system. In recent years, a growing body of literature has shown that acidosis, through activating ASICs, contributes to multiple diseases, including ischemia, multiple sclerosis, and seizures. In addition, ASICs play a key role in fear and anxiety related psychiatric disorders. Several recent reviews have summarized the importance and therapeutic potential of ASICs in neurological diseases, as well as the structure-function relationship of ASICs. However, there is little focused coverage on either the basic biology of ASICs or their contribution to neural plasticity. This review will center on these topics, with an emphasis on the synaptic role of ASICs and molecular mechanisms regulating the spatial distribution and function of these ion channels. PMID:23281934

  9. Regulating the Skin Permeation Rate of Escitalopram by Ion-pair Formation with Organic Acids.

    PubMed

    Song, Tian; Quan, Peng; Xiang, Rongwu; Fang, Liang

    2016-12-01

    In order to regulate the skin permeation rate (flux) of escitalopram (ESP), ion-pair strategy was used in our work. Five organic acids with different physicochemical properties, benzoic acid (BA), ibuprofen (IB), salicylic acid (SA), benzenesulfonic acid (BSA), and p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), were employed as counter-ions to regulate the permeation rate of ESP across the rabbit abdominal skin in vitro. The interaction between ESP and organic acids was characterized by FTIR and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Results showed that all organic acids investigated in this study performed a controlling effect on ESP flux. To further analyze the factors concerned with the permeation capability of ESP-acid complex, a multiple linear regression model was used. It is concluded that the steady-state flux (J) of ESP-acid complexes had a positive correlation with log K o/w (the n-octanol/water partition coefficient of ion-pair complex) and pK a (the acidity of organic acid counter-ion), but a negative correlation with MW (the molecular weight of ion-pair complex). The logK o/w of ion-pair complex is the primary one in all the factors that influence the skin permeation rate of ESP. The results demonstrated that organic acid with appropriate physicochemical properties can be considered as suitable candidate for the transdermal drug delivery of escitalopram.

  10. Quenching of fluorescence of phenolic compounds and modified humic acids by cadmium ions.

    PubMed

    Tchaikovskaya, O N; Nechaev, L V; Yudina, N V; Mal'tseva, E V

    2016-08-01

    The interaction of a number of phenolic compounds, being 'model fragments' of humic acids, with cadmium ions was investigated. The fluorescence quenching method was used to determine the complexation constants of these compounds with cadmium ions. It was established that bonding of phenolic compounds by cadmium ions at рН 7 is weak and reaches a maximum value of 15% for interaction with resorcinol. It was demonstrated that modification of humic acids by the mechanoactivation method increases by three times bonding of cadmium ions, which is caused by strengthening the acid properties of carboxyl and hydroxyl groups at the aromatic ring. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Copper (II) ion adsorption from aqueous solution onto fatty hydroxamic acid - Immobilized zeolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhsinun, Sugita, Purwantiningsih; Purwaningsih, Henny

    2017-01-01

    Separation of Cu (II) ion from a mixture containing Zn (II) ion was conducted by solid-liquid extraction method through column chromatography. The column was filled with FHA-ZEO resin. This resin is the result of immobilized fatty hydroxamic acid (FHA) into activated natural zeolite (ZEO) involving as solid phase. Parameters becoming variable were resin mass to concentration ratio and pH of Cu (II) ion solution. The research result shows that optimum condition of Cu (II) ion adsorption was 1 gram resin mass FHA-ZEO to ion Cu (II) solution concentration of 100 ppm with pH value of 5. This Cu (II) ion separation from its mixture containing Zn (II) ion gives Cu(II) ion adsorption capacity of 162.39 mg/g FHA-ZEO in that optimum condition, 4 times higher than Zn (II) ion adsorption with Cu (II) ion recovery of 93,88%.

  12. Gas-phase ion/ion reactions of peptides and proteins: acid/base, redox, and covalent chemistries.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Boone M; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-02-01

    Gas-phase ion/ion reactions are emerging as useful and flexible means for the manipulation and characterization of peptide and protein biopolymers. Acid/base-like chemical reactions (i.e., proton transfer reactions) and reduction/oxidation (redox) reactions (i.e., electron transfer reactions) represent relatively mature classes of gas-phase chemical reactions. Even so, especially in regards to redox chemistry, the widespread utility of these two types of chemistries is undergoing rapid growth and development. Additionally, a relatively new class of gas-phase ion/ion transformations is emerging which involves the selective formation of functional-group-specific covalent bonds. This feature details our current work and perspective on the developments and current capabilities of these three areas of ion/ion chemistry with an eye towards possible future directions of the field.

  13. Gas-phase ion/ion reactions of peptides and proteins: acid/base, redox, and covalent chemistries

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Boone M.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase ion/ion reactions are emerging as useful and flexible means for the manipulation and characterization of peptide and protein biopolymers. Acid/base-like chemical reactions (i.e., proton transfer reactions) and reduction/oxidation (redox) reactions (i.e., electron transfer reactions) represent relatively mature classes of gas-phase chemical reactions. Even so, especially in regards to redox chemistry, the widespread utility of these two types of chemistries is undergoing rapid growth and development. Additionally, a relatively new class of gas-phase ion/ion transformations is emerging which involves the selective formation of functional-group-specific covalent bonds. This feature details our current work and perspective on the developments and current capabilities of these three areas of ion/ion chemistry with an eye towards possible future directions of the field. PMID:23257901

  14. Application of partially fluorinated carboxylic acids as ion-pairing reagents in LC/ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Eiichi; Ishihama, Yasushi; Asakawa, Naoki

    2014-09-01

    This report describes the application of partially fluorinated carboxylic acids as ion-pairing reagents for basic analytes in high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS) in positive-ion mode. Partially fluoridated carboxylic acids such as difluoroacetic acid, 3,3,3-trifluoropropionic acid and 3,3,3-trifluoromethyl-2-trifluoromethylpropionic acid functioned as volatile paired-ion similarly as trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). These acids provided basic analytes larger retention factor (k) compared to acetic acid or formic acid in LC. The ESI-MS signal strength of analytes with these acids were higher than that of TFA and was analogous to that of acetic acid or formic acid. The performances of partially fluorinated carboxylic acids in LC and ESI-MS for basic analytes were analyzed by multivariate statistical analysis using physicochemical descriptors of acids. Equations obtained in the analysis enabled us the quantitative evaluation of the performance of fluorinated carboxylic acids as ion-pair reagents for basic analytes in LC/ESI-MS.

  15. United States Army Group 31 and Group 34 Li-ion Battery Specification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-08

    Technical Working Group. Requirements for the Li ion batteries are broken down into design & construction, performance, environmental, and safety. The...ion rechargeable draft specification that is currently under development by the DOD Power Sources Battery Technical Working Group. Requirements for...shall be capable of charging to 100% capacity from a standard 12V or 24V lead acid vehicle battery charger in less than 2 hours from 0% state of charge

  16. Resolution and quantification of isomeric fatty acids by silver ion HPLC: fatty acid composition of aniseed oil (Pimpinella anisum, Apiaceae).

    PubMed

    Denev, Roumen V; Kuzmanova, Ivalina S; Momchilova, Svetlana M; Nikolova-Damyanova, Boryana M

    2011-01-01

    A silver ion HPLC procedure is described that is suitable to determine the fatty acid composition of plant seed oils. After conversion of fatty acids to p-methoxyphenacyl derivatives, it was possible to achieve baseline resolution of all fatty acid components with 0 to 3 double bonds, including the positionally isomeric 18:1 fatty acids oleic acid (cis 9-18:1), petroselinic acid (cis 6-18:1), and cis-vaccenic acid (cis 11-18:1), in aniseed oil (Pimpinella anisum, Apiaceae) by a single gradient run on a single cation exchange column laboratory converted to the silver ion form. The UV detector response (280 nm) was linearly related to the fatty acid concentration in the range 0.01 to 3.5 mg/mL.

  17. Determination of water-soluble forms of oxalic and formic acids in soils by ion chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karicheva, E.; Guseva, N.; Kambalina, M.

    2016-03-01

    Carboxylic acids (CA) play an important role in the chemical composition origin of soils and migration of elements. The content of these acids and their salts is one of the important characteristics for agrochemical, ecological, ameliorative and hygienic assessment of soils. The aim of the article is to determine water-soluble forms of same carboxylic acids — (oxalic and formic acids) in soils by ion chromatography with gradient elution. For the separation and determination of water-soluble carboxylic acids we used reagent-free gradient elution ion-exchange chromatography ICS-2000 (Dionex, USA), the model solutions of oxalate and formate ions, and leachates from soils of the Kola Peninsula. The optimal gradient program was established for separation and detection of oxalate and formate ions in water solutions by ion chromatography. A stability indicating method was developed for the simultaneous determination of water-soluble organic acids in soils. The method has shown high detection limits such as 0.03 mg/L for oxalate ion and 0.02 mg/L for formate ion. High signal reproducibility was achieved in wide range of intensities which correspond to the following ion concentrations: from 0.04 mg/g to 10 mg/L (formate), from 0.1 mg/g to 25 mg/L (oxalate). The concentration of formate and oxalate ions in soil samples is from 0.04 to 0.9 mg/L and 0.45 to 17 mg/L respectively.

  18. Detection of alkylmethylphosphonic acids on leaf surfaces by static secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, J.C.; Groenewold, G.S.; Appelhans, A.D.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A. )

    1995-01-01

    Detection of environmental degradation products of nerve agents directly from the surface of plant leaves using static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is demonstrated. Pinacolylmethylphosphonic acid (PMPA), isopropylmethylphosphonic acid (IMPA), and ethylmethylphosphonic acid (EMPA) were spiked from aqueous solutions onto philodendron leaves prior to analysis by static SIMS. Fragment ions were observed in the anion SIMS spectra from all three compounds at m/z 63, 77, 79, and 95, which are attributed to PO[sub 2][sup [minus

  19. Hyaluronic acid ion-pairing nanoparticles for targeted tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenhao; Yi, Xiaoli; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Zhirong; Fu, Yao; Gong, Tao

    2016-03-10

    Hyaluronic acid (HA)-based doxorubicin (DOX) nanoparticles (HA-NPs) were fabricated via ion-pairing between positively charged DOX and negatively charged HA, which displayed near-spherical shapes with an average size distribution of 180.2nm (PDI=0.184). Next, HA-NPs were encapsulated in liposomal carriers to afford HA-based DOX liposomes (HA-LPs), which also showed near-spherical morphology with an average size of 130.5nm (PDI=0.201). HA-NPs and HA-LPs displayed desirable sustained-release profiles compared to free DOX, and moreover, HA-LPs were proven to prevent premature release of DOX from HA-NPs. Cell based studies demonstrated HA-NPs and HA-LPs were selectively taken up by CD44(+) tumor cells, and DOX was released intracellularly to target the cell nuclei. Both HA-NPs and HA-LPs showed comparable levels of penetration efficiency in tumor spheroids. In vivo studies revealed that HA-NPs and HA-LPs significantly prolonged the blood circulation time of DOX, decreased accumulation in the normal tissues and enriched drugs into the tumors. Furthermore, HA-NPs and HA-LPs greatly enhanced therapeutic efficacy of DOX in tumor-bearing mice and minimized systemic toxicity against vital organs. In sum, HA-NPs and HA-LPs represent promising nanocarriers for CD44(+) tumor-targeted delivery.

  20. Receptor for protons: First observations on Acid Sensing Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Krishtal, Oleg

    2015-07-01

    The history of ASICs began in 1980 with unexpected observation. The concept of highly selective Na(+) current gated by specific receptors for protons was not easily accepted. It took 16 years to get these receptor/channels cloned and start a new stage in their investigation. "The receptor for protons" became ASIC comprising under this name a family of receptor/channels ubiquitous for mammalian nervous system, both peripheral and central. The role of ASICs as putative nociceptors was suggested almost immediately after their discovery. This role subsequently was proven in many forms of pain-related phenomena. Many other functions of ASICs have been also found or primed for speculations both in physiology and in disease. Despite the width of field and strength of efforts, numerous basic questions are to be answered before we understand how the local changes in pH in the nervous tissue transform into electric and messenger signaling via ASICs as transducers. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'.

  1. Acid-sensing ion channels in pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Xiang-Ping; Xiong, Zhi-Gang

    2013-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), a novel family of proton-gated amiloride-sensitive cation channels, are expressed primarily in neurons of peripheral sensory and central nervous systems. Recent studies have shown that activation of ASICs, particularly the ASIC1a channels, plays a critical role in neuronal injury associated with neurological disorders such as brain ischemia, multiple sclerosis, and spinal cord injury, etc. In normal conditions in vitro, ASIC1a channels desensitize rapidly in the presence of a continuous acidosis or following a pre-exposure to minor pH drop, raising doubt for their contributions to the acidosis-mediated neuronal injury. It is now known that the properties of ASICs can be dramatically modulated by signaling molecules or biochemical changes associated with pathological conditions. Modulation of ASICs by these molecules can lead to dramatically enhanced and/or prolonged activities of these channels thus promoting their pathological functions. Understanding of how ASICs behave in pathological conditions may help define new strategies for the treatment and/or prevention of neuronal injury associated with various neurological disorders. PMID:23224900

  2. Neurosensory mechanotransduction through acid-sensing ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Cheng; Wong, Chia-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are voltage-insensitive cation channels responding to extracellular acidification. ASIC proteins have two transmembrane domains and a large extracellular domain. The molecular topology of ASICs is similar to that of the mechanosensory abnormality 4- or 10-proteins expressed in touch receptor neurons and involved in neurosensory mechanotransduction in nematodes. The ASIC proteins are involved in neurosensory mechanotransduction in mammals. The ASIC isoforms are expressed in Merkel cell–neurite complexes, periodontal Ruffini endings and specialized nerve terminals of skin and muscle spindles, so they might participate in mechanosensation. In knockout mouse models, lacking an ASIC isoform produces defects in neurosensory mechanotransduction of tissue such as skin, stomach, colon, aortic arch, venoatrial junction and cochlea. The ASICs are thus implicated in touch, pain, digestive function, baroreception, blood volume control and hearing. However, the role of ASICs in mechanotransduction is still controversial, because we lack evidence that the channels are mechanically sensitive when expressed in heterologous cells. Thus, ASIC channels alone are not sufficient to reconstruct the path of transducing molecules of mechanically activated channels. The mechanotransducers associated with ASICs need further elucidation. In this review, we discuss the expression of ASICs in sensory afferents of mechanoreceptors, findings of knockout studies, technical issues concerning studies of neurosensory mechanotransduction and possible missing links. Also we propose a molecular model and a new approach to disclose the molecular mechanism underlying the neurosensory mechanotransduction. PMID:23490035

  3. Inhibition of acid-sensing ion channels by chlorogenic acid in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zu-Wei; Liu, Ting-Ting; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Li, Jia-Da; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2014-05-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is one of the most abundant polyphenol compounds in the human diet. Recently, it is demonstrated to have potent antinociceptive effect. However, little is understood about the mechanism underlying CGA analgesia. Here, we have found that CGA can exert an inhibitory effect on the functional activity of native acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. First, CGA decreased the peak amplitude of proton-gated currents mediated by ASICs in a concentration-dependent manner. Second, CGA shifted the proton concentration-response curve downward, with a decrease of 41.76 ± 8.65% in the maximum current response to protons but with no significant change in the pH0.5 value. Third, CGA altered acidosis-evoked membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons and caused a significant decrease in the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripheral administered CGA attenuated nociceptive response to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. ASICs are distributed in peripheral sensory neurons and participate in nociception. Our findings CGA inhibition of native ASICs indicated that CGA may exert analgesic action by modulating ASICs in the primary afferent neurons, which revealed a novel cellular and molecular mechanism underlying CGA analgesia.

  4. Behaviors of acrylamide/itaconic acid hydrogels in uptake of uranyl ions from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Karadag, E.; Saraydin, D.; Gueven, O.

    1995-12-01

    In this study, adsorptions of uranyl ions from two different aqueous uranyl solutions by acrylamide-itaconic acid hydrogels were investigated by a spectroscopic method. The hydrogels were prepared by irradiating with {gamma}-radiation. In the experiment of uranyl ions adsorption, Type II adsorption was found. One gram of acrylamide-itaconic acid hydrogels sorbed 178-219 mg uranyl ions from the solutions of uranyl acetate, 42-76 mg uranyl ions from the aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate, while acrylamide hydrogel did not sorb any uranyl ion. For the hydrogel containing 40 mg of itaconic acid and irradiated to 3.73 kGy, swelling of the hydrogels was observed in water (1660%), in the aqueous solution of uranyl acetate (730%), and in the aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate (580%). Diffusions of water onto hydrogels were a non-Fickian type of diffusion, whereas diffusions of uranyl ions were a Fickian type of diffusion.

  5. Computational scheme for the prediction of metal ion binding by a soil fulvic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marinsky, J.A.; Reddy, M.M.; Ephraim, J.H.; Mathuthu, A.S.

    1995-01-01

    The dissociation and metal ion binding properties of a soil fulvic acid have been characterized. Information thus gained was used to compensate for salt and site heterogeneity effects in metal ion complexation by the fulvic acid. An earlier computational scheme has been modified by incorporating an additional step which improves the accuracy of metal ion speciation estimates. An algorithm is employed for the prediction of metal ion binding by organic acid constituents of natural waters (once the organic acid is characterized in terms of functional group identity and abundance). The approach discussed here, currently used with a spreadsheet program on a personal computer, is conceptually envisaged to be compatible with computer programs available for ion binding by inorganic ligands in natural waters.

  6. Non-acidic activation of pain-related Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 3 by lipids.

    PubMed

    Marra, Sébastien; Ferru-Clément, Romain; Breuil, Véronique; Delaunay, Anne; Christin, Marine; Friend, Valérie; Sebille, Stéphane; Cognard, Christian; Ferreira, Thierry; Roux, Christian; Euller-Ziegler, Liana; Noel, Jacques; Lingueglia, Eric; Deval, Emmanuel

    2016-02-15

    Extracellular pH variations are seen as the principal endogenous signal that triggers activation of Acid-Sensing Ion Channels (ASICs), which are basically considered as proton sensors, and are involved in various processes associated with tissue acidification. Here, we show that human painful inflammatory exudates, displaying non-acidic pH, induce a slow constitutive activation of human ASIC3 channels. This effect is largely driven by lipids, and we identify lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and arachidonic acid (AA) as endogenous activators of ASIC3 in the absence of any extracellular acidification. The combination of LPC and AA evokes robust depolarizing current in DRG neurons at physiological pH 7.4, increases nociceptive C-fiber firing, and induces pain behavior in rats, effects that are all prevented by ASIC3 blockers. Lipid-induced pain is also significantly reduced in ASIC3 knockout mice. These findings open new perspectives on the roles of ASIC3 in the absence of tissue pH variation, as well as on the contribution of those channels to lipid-mediated signaling.

  7. Acidity and Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Normal and Alzheimer's Disease Brain.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Eric B; Sumien, Nathalie

    2017-02-15

    Alzheimer's disease prevalence has reached epidemic proportion with very few treatment options, which are associated with a multitude of side effects. A potential avenue of research for new therapies are protons, and their associated receptor: acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC). Protons are often overlooked neurotransmitters, and proton-gated currents have been identified in the brain. Furthermore, ASICs have been determined to be crucial for proper brain function. While there is more work to be done, this review is intended to highlight protons as neurotransmitters and their role along with the role of ASICs within physiological functioning of the brain. We will also cover the pathophysiological associations between ASICs and modulators of ASICs. Finally, this review will sum up how the studies of protons, ASICs and their modulators may generate new therapeutic molecules for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Modulation of acid-sensing ion channels: molecular mechanisms and therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Xiang-Ping; Papasian, Christopher J; Wang, John Q; Xiong, Zhi-Gang

    2011-01-01

    Increases in extracellular proton concentrations, which takes place in physiological conditions such as synaptic signaling and pathological conditions such as tissue inflammation, ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and epileptic seizure, activates a unique family of membrane ion channels; the acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). All ASICs belong to amiloride-sensitive degenerin/epithelial Na+ channel superfamily. Four genes encoded at seven sub-units have been identified. ASICs are expressed primarily in neurons and have been shown to play critical roles in synaptic plasticity, learning/memory, fear conditioning, sensory transduction, pain perception, ischemic brain injury, seizure, and other neurological as well as psychological disorders. Although protons are the primary activator for ASICs, the properties and/or level of expression of these channels are modulated dramatically by neuropeptides, di-and polyvalent cations, inflammatory mediators, associated proteins, and protein phosphorylations, etc. Modulation of ASICs can result in profound changes in the activities and functions of these channels in both physiological and pathological processes. In this article, we provide an up to date review on the modulations of ASICs by exogenous agents and endogenous signaling molecules. A better understanding of how ASICs can be modulated should help define new strategies to counteract the deleterious effects of dysregulated ASIC activity. PMID:22162785

  9. Theory of ion transport with fast acid-base equilibrations in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, J E; Biesheuvel, P M; Bruning, H; Ter Heijne, A

    2014-07-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems recover valuable components and energy in the form of hydrogen or electricity from aqueous organic streams. We derive a one-dimensional steady-state model for ion transport in a bioelectrochemical system, with the ions subject to diffusional and electrical forces. Since most of the ionic species can undergo acid-base reactions, ion transport is combined in our model with infinitely fast ion acid-base equilibrations. The model describes the current-induced ammonia evaporation and recovery at the cathode side of a bioelectrochemical system that runs on an organic stream containing ammonium ions. We identify that the rate of ammonia evaporation depends not only on the current but also on the flow rate of gas in the cathode chamber, the diffusion of ammonia from the cathode back into the anode chamber, through the ion exchange membrane placed in between, and the membrane charge density.

  10. Theory of ion transport with fast acid-base equilibrations in bioelectrochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykstra, J. E.; Biesheuvel, P. M.; Bruning, H.; Ter Heijne, A.

    2014-07-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems recover valuable components and energy in the form of hydrogen or electricity from aqueous organic streams. We derive a one-dimensional steady-state model for ion transport in a bioelectrochemical system, with the ions subject to diffusional and electrical forces. Since most of the ionic species can undergo acid-base reactions, ion transport is combined in our model with infinitely fast ion acid-base equilibrations. The model describes the current-induced ammonia evaporation and recovery at the cathode side of a bioelectrochemical system that runs on an organic stream containing ammonium ions. We identify that the rate of ammonia evaporation depends not only on the current but also on the flow rate of gas in the cathode chamber, the diffusion of ammonia from the cathode back into the anode chamber, through the ion exchange membrane placed in between, and the membrane charge density.

  11. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A.; Dearden, David V.

    2016-08-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy.

  12. Indirect UV detection-ion-exclusion/cation-exchange chromatography of common inorganic ions with sulfosalicylic acid eluent.

    PubMed

    Kozaki, Daisuke; Mori, Masanobu; Nakatani, Nobutake; Arai, Kaori; Masuno, Tomoe; Koseki, Masakazu; Itabashi, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we describe indirect UV detection-ion-exclusion/cation-exchange chromatography (IEC/CEC) on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H(+)-form (TSKgel Super IC-A/C) using sulfosalicylic acid as the eluent. The goal of the study was to characterize the peaks detected by UV detector. The peak directions of analyte ions in UV at 315 nm were negative because the molar absorbance coefficients of analyte anions and cations were lower than that of the sulfosalicylic acid eluent. Good chromatographic resolution and high signal-to-noise ratios of analyte ions were obtained for the separations performed using 1.1 mM sulfosalicylic acid and 1.5 mM 18-crown-6 as the eluent. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the peak areas ranged from 0.6 to 4.9%. Lower detection limits of the analytes were achieved using indirect UV detection at 315 nm (0.23 - 0.98 μM) than those obtained with conductometric detection (CD) (0.61 - 2.1 μM) under the optimized elution conditions. The calibration curves were linear in the range from 0.01 to 1.0 mM except for Cl(-), which was from 0.02 to 2.0 mM. The present method was successfully applied to determine common inorganic ions in a pond water sample.

  13. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results.

    PubMed

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A; Dearden, David V

    2016-08-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  14. Acid stress mediated adaptive divergence in ion channel function during embryogenesis in Rana arvalis

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Longfei; Laurila, Anssi; Räsänen, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels and pumps are responsible for ion flux in cells, and are key mechanisms mediating cellular function. Many environmental stressors, such as salinity and acidification, are known to severely disrupt ionic balance of organisms thereby challenging fitness of natural populations. Although ion channels can have several vital functions during early life-stages (e.g. embryogenesis), it is currently not known i) how developing embryos maintain proper intracellular conditions when exposed to environmental stress and ii) to what extent environmental stress can drive intra-specific divergence in ion channels. Here we studied the moor frog, Rana arvalis, from three divergent populations to investigate the role of different ion channels and pumps for embryonic survival under acid stress (pH 4 vs 7.5) and whether populations adapted to contrasting acidities differ in the relative role of different ion channel/pumps. We found that ion channels that mediate Ca2+ influx are essential for embryonic survival under acidic pH, and, intriguingly, that populations differ in calcium channel function. Our results suggest that adaptive divergence in embryonic acid stress tolerance of amphibians may in part be mediated by Ca2+ balance. We suggest that ion flux may mediate adaptive divergence of natural populations at early life-stages in the face of environmental stress. PMID:26381453

  15. [Determination of organic acids in rice wine by ion-exclusion chromatography].

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaojie; Wei, Wei; He, Zhigang; Lin, Xiaozi

    2014-03-01

    An ion-exclusion chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of organic acids in rice wine was developed. An IC-Pak Ion Exclusion column (300 mm x 7.8 mm, 7 microm) was used at 50 degrees C. The mobile phases were H2SO4 (phase A) and acetonitrile (phase B) (98:2, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. The gradient elution program was as follows: 0-40 min, 0.01 mol/L H2SO4 to 0.02 mol/L H2SO4; 40-50 min, 0.01 mol/L H2SO4. The injection volume was 10 microL. The detection wavelength was set at 210 nm. The results showed that oxalic acid, maleic acid, citric acid, tartaric acid, malic acid, ascorbic acid, succinic acid, lactic, fumaric acid, acetic acid, propionic acid, isobutyric acid and butyric acid were completely separated and determined in 30 min. The linear correlation coefficients were above 0.999 7 in the range of 0.001- 1.000 g/L. Under the optimized conditions, the recoveries of organic acids in rice wine were in the range of 93.4% - 103.8% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 5) of 0.1% - 1.5%. This method is feasible, convenient, fast, accurate and applicable for the quantitative analysis of the organic acids in rice wine.

  16. Does Cation Size Affect Occupancy and Electrostatic Screening of the Nucleic Acid Ion Atmosphere?

    PubMed

    Gebala, Magdalena; Bonilla, Steve; Bisaria, Namita; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-08-31

    Electrostatics are central to all aspects of nucleic acid behavior, including their folding, condensation, and binding to other molecules, and the energetics of these processes are profoundly influenced by the ion atmosphere that surrounds nucleic acids. Given the highly complex and dynamic nature of the ion atmosphere, understanding its properties and effects will require synergy between computational modeling and experiment. Prior computational models and experiments suggest that cation occupancy in the ion atmosphere depends on the size of the cation. However, the computational models have not been independently tested, and the experimentally observed effects were small. Here, we evaluate a computational model of ion size effects by experimentally testing a blind prediction made from that model, and we present additional experimental results that extend our understanding of the ion atmosphere. Giambasu et al. developed and implemented a three-dimensional reference interaction site (3D-RISM) model for monovalent cations surrounding DNA and RNA helices, and this model predicts that Na(+) would outcompete Cs(+) by 1.8-2.1-fold; i.e., with Cs(+) in 2-fold excess of Na(+) the ion atmosphere would contain an equal number of each cation (Nucleic Acids Res. 2015, 43, 8405). However, our ion counting experiments indicate that there is no significant preference for Na(+) over Cs(+). There is an ∼25% preferential occupancy of Li(+) over larger cations in the ion atmosphere but, counter to general expectations from existing models, no size dependence for the other alkali metal ions. Further, we followed the folding of the P4-P6 RNA and showed that differences in folding with different alkali metal ions observed at high concentration arise from cation-anion interactions and not cation size effects. Overall, our results provide a critical test of a computational prediction, fundamental information about ion atmosphere properties, and parameters that will aid in the

  17. Hydration studies of electrospray ions from amino acids and small peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Chuong (Steve)

    This project was undertaken to gain a better understanding of the hydration behaviors of gas phase ions from solutions containing amino acids and peptides. In order to characterize their hydration behavior, the molecules of interest in solutions were first converted into gas phase ions by electrospray ionization (ESI). The completely desolvated ions were then deliberately dispersed into an inert bath gas, usually nitrogen, containing accurately known concentrations of solvent vapor. The resulting mixtures of ions and bath gas were subsequently passed into a vacuum chamber by way of an adiabatic supersonic free jet expansion. The cooling during that expansion caused solvation of the ions, the extent of which was determined by a quadrupole mass analyzer. Mass analysis of the solute ions in the absence of vapor showed peaks with the mass to charge ratios corresponding to the desolvated ions. On the other hand, mass spectrometric analyses of ions in the presence of solvent vapor showed sequences of peaks corresponding to the solvated ions with varying numbers of water molecules. The extent of the ion solvation was controlled by varying the concentration of solvent vapor in the bath gas. Two different scales were proposed for the evaluation of the relative affinities of amino acids for water molecules. One was based primarily on the assumption that the affinities of amino acids for water molecules are directly proportional to their gas phase solvation rate constants ( k). An alternative approach produced an affinity scale based on the extent of ion hydration occurred during the free jet expansion. It was found that the addition of a polar solvent vapor to the bath gas at low concentrations substantially enhanced the production of the bare solute ions from the evaporating charged droplets. This remarkable result not only provided a means to increase the ion production and thus detection sensitivity of mass spectrometric analyses, but also yielded important information

  18. A structural and thermal packaging approach for power processing units for 30-cm ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloy, J. E.; Sharp, G. R.

    1975-01-01

    Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) is currently being studied for possible use in a number of near earth and planetary missions. The thruster subsystem for these missions would consist of 30 centimeter ion thrusters with Power Processor Units (PPU) clustered in assemblies of from two to ten units. A preliminary design study of the electronic packaging of the PPU has been completed at Lewis Research Center of NASA. This study evaluates designs meeting the competing requirements of low system weight and overall mission flexibility. These requirements are evaluated regarding structural and thermal design, electrical efficiency, and integration of the electrical circuits into a functional PPU layout.

  19. The Extravehicular Maneuvering Unit's New Long Life Battery and Lithium Ion Battery Charger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Samuel P.; Elder, Mark A.; Williams, Anthony G.; Dembeck, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The Long Life (Lithium Ion) Battery is designed to replace the current Extravehicular Mobility Unit Silver/Zinc Increased Capacity Battery, which is used to provide power to the Primary Life Support Subsystem during Extravehicular Activities. The Charger is designed to charge, discharge, and condition the battery either in a charger-strapped configuration or in a suit-mounted configuration. This paper will provide an overview of the capabilities and systems engineering development approach for both the battery and the charger

  20. Effects of pH adjustment and sodium ions on sour taste intensity of organic acids.

    PubMed

    Neta, E R D; Johanningsmeier, S D; Drake, M A; McFeeters, R F

    2009-01-01

    Protonated organic acid species have been shown to be the primary stimuli responsible for sour taste of organic acids. However, we have observed that sour taste may be modulated when the pH of acid solutions is raised using sodium hydroxide. Objectives were to evaluate the effect of pH adjustment on sour taste of equimolar protonated organic acid solutions and to investigate the potential roles of organic anions and sodium ions on sour taste perception. Despite equal concentrations of protonated acid species, sour taste intensity decreased significantly with increased pH for acetic, lactic, malic, and citric acids (P < 0.05). Total organic anion concentration did not explain the suppression of sour taste in solutions containing a blend of 3 organic acids with constant concentration of protonated organic acid species and hydrogen ions and variable organic anion concentrations (R(2)= 0.480, P = 0.12). Sour taste suppression in these solutions seemed to be more closely related to sodium ions added in the form of NaOH (R(2)= 0.861, P = 0.007). Addition of 20 mM NaCl to acid solutions resulted in significant suppression of sour taste (P = 0.016). However, sour taste did not decrease with further addition of NaCl up to 80 mM. Presence of sodium ions was clearly shown to decrease sour taste of organic acid solutions. Nonetheless, suppression of sour taste in pH adjusted single acid solutions was greater than what would be expected based on the sodium ion concentration alone, indicating an additional suppression mechanism may be involved.

  1. Acetic acid and aromatics units planned in China

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1993-01-27

    The Shanghai Wujing Chemical Complex (SWCC; Shanghai) is proceeding with construction of an acetic acid plant. The 100,000-m.t./year until will use BP Chemicals carbonylation technology, originally developed by Monsanto. John Brown has been selected by China National Technical Import Corp. (CNTIC) to supply the plant, Chinese sources say. The UK contractor, which competed against Mitsui Engineering Shipbuilding (Tokyo) and Lurgi (Frankfurt), has built a similar plant for BP in the UK, although using different technology. The new plant will require 54,000 m.t./year of methanol, which is available onsite. Carbon monoxide will be delivered from a new plant. The acetic acid unit will joint two other acetic plants in China supplied some time ago by Uhde (Dortmund). SWCC is due to be integrated with two adjacent complexes to form Shanghai Pacific Chemical. Meanwhile, four groups are competing to supply a UOP-process aromatics complex for Jilin Chemical Industrial Corp. They are Toyo Engineering, Lurgi, Lucky/Foster Wheeler, and Eurotechnica. The complex will include plants with annual capacities for 115,000 m.t. of benzene, 90,000 m.t. of ortho-xylene, 93,000 m.t. of mixed xylenes, and 20,000 m.t. of toluene. The plants will form part of a $2-billion petrochemical complex based on a 300,000-m.t./year ethylene plant awarded last year to a consortium of Samsung Engineering and Linde. Downstream plants will have annual capacities for 120,000 m.t. of linear low-density polyethylene, 80,000 m.t. of ethylene oxide, 100,000 m.t. of ethylene glycol, 80,000 m.t. of phenol, 100,000 m.t. of acrylonitrile, 20,000 m.t. of sodium cyanide, 40,000 m.t. of phthalic anhydride, 40,000 m.t. of ethylene propylene rubber, 20,000 m.t. of styrene butadiene styrene, and 30,000 m.t. of acrylic fiber.

  2. Using amino acids for the chromatofocusing of metal ions on silica with bonded tetraethylenepentamine groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. V.

    2014-09-01

    Amino acid-based eluents are used for the chromatofocusing of metal ions on Tetren-SiO2 chelating sorbent (silica with bonded tetraethylenepentamine groups) for the first time. The smoothest quasilinear pH gradients form for eluents based on glutamic and aspartic acids. The separation of Mn2+, Cr3+, Co2+, Ni2+, and Cu2+ is achieved.

  3. Interaction of metal ions and amino acids - Possible mechanisms for the adsorption of amino acids on homoionic smectite clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Loew, G. H.; Lawless, J.

    1983-01-01

    A semiempirical molecular orbital method is used to characterize the binding of amino acids to hexahydrated Cu(2+) and Ni(2+), a process presumed to occur when they are adsorbed in the interlamellar space of homoionic smectite clays. Five alpha-amino acids, beta-alanine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid were used to investigate the metal ion and amino acid specificity in binding. It was assumed that the alpha, beta, and gamma-amino acids would bind as bidentate anionic ligands, forming either 1:1 or 1:2 six-coordinated five, six, and seven-membered-ring chelate complexes, respectively. Energies of complex formation, optimized geometries, and electron and spin distribution were determined; and steric constraints of binding of the amino acids to the ion-exchanged cations in the interlamellar spacing of a clay were examined. Results indicate that hexahydrated Cu(2+) forms more stable complexes than hexahydrated Ni(2+) with all the amino acids studied. However, among these amino acids, complex formation does not favor the adsorption of the biological subset. Calculated energetics of complex formation and steric constraints are shown to predict that 1:1 rather than 1:2 metal-amino acid complexes are generally favored in the clay.

  4. Mathematical modeling of copper(II) ion inhibition on COD removal in an activated sludge unit.

    PubMed

    Pamukoglu, M Yunus; Kargi, Fikret

    2007-07-19

    A mathematical model was developed to describe the Cu(II) ion inhibition on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal from synthetic wastewater containing 15 mg l(-1) Cu(II) in an activated sludge unit. Experimental data obtained at different sludge ages (5-30 days) and hydraulic residence times (HRT) (5-25 h) were used to determine the kinetic, stoichiometric and inhibition constants for the COD removal rate in the presence and absence of Cu(II) ions. The inhibition pattern was identified as non-competitive, since Cu(II) ion inhibitions were observed both on maximum specific substrate removal rate (k) and on the saturation constant (Ks) with the inhibition constants of 97 and 18 mg l(-1), respectively, indicating more pronounced inhibition on Ks. The growth yield coefficient (Y) decreased and the death rate constant (b) increased in the presence of Cu(II) ions due to copper ion toxicity on microbial growth with inhibition constants of 29 and 200 mg l(-1), respectively indicating more effective inhibition on the growth yield coefficient or higher maintenance requirements. The mathematical model with the predetermined kinetic constants was able to predict the system performance reasonably well especially at high HRT operations.

  5. Adsorptions of some heavy metal ions in aqueous solutions by acrylamide/maleic acid hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Saraydin, D.; Karadag, E.; Gueven, O.

    1995-10-01

    In this study, acrylamide-maleic acid (AAm/MA) hydrogels in the form of rod have been prepared by {gamma}-radiation. They have been used for adsorption of some heavy metal ions such as uranium, iron, and copper. For the hydrogel containing 40 mg of maleic acid and irradiated at 3.73 kGy, maximum and minimum swellings in the aqueous solutions of the heavy metal ions have been observed with water (1480%) and the aqueous solution of iron(III) nitrate (410%), respectively. Diffusions of water and heavy metal ions onto hydrogels have been found to be of the non-Fickian type of diffusion. In experiments of uranyl ions adsorption, Type II adsorption has been found. One gram of AAa/MA hydrogels sorbed 14-86 mg uranyl ions from solutions of uranyl acetate, 14-90 mg uranyl ions from solutions of uranyl nitrate, 16-39 mg iron ions from solutions of iron(IV) nitrate, and 28-81 mg copper ions from solutions of copper acetate, while acrylamide hydrogel did not sorb any heavy metals ions.

  6. [Simultaneous separation of organic acid and organic salts by electrostatic ion chromatography].

    PubMed

    Shen, G J; Yang, R F; Yu, A M

    2001-09-01

    The electrostatic ion chromatographic column was prepared by coating conjugated acid salt micelles on the surface of octadecyl silica stationary phase. Pure water was used as mobile phase, and the conductance detector was connected on-line to electrostatic ion chromatograph. The conditions under which organic acid and organic salts were detected were studied. The mechanism for the above separation is discussed. Sodium benzoate and citric acid in Lichee drink were separated and determined. This method is rapid, simple with little interference and good reproducibility without any pollution since the mobile phase is water. This is an environmental friendly analytical method.

  7. Phase equilibria and distribution constants of metal ions in diantipyryl alkane-organic acid-hydrochloric acid-water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtev, M. I.; Popova, O. N.; Yuminova, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    The ability of antipyrine and its derivatives (diantipyryl alkanes) to form separating systems in the presence of salicylic (sulfosalicylic) acid and hydrochloric acid and water is studied. The optimum volume of the organic phase, the composition of complexes, and the mechanism for the distribution of metal ions are determined, depending on the concentrations of the main components and the salting-out agent. The complex distribution and extraction constants are calculated.

  8. Determination of volatile fatty acids in landfill leachates by ion-exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Atsushi; Yasuhara, Akio; Kodama, Shuji; Matsunaga, Akinobu; Suzuki, Shigeru; Mohri, Shino; Yamada, Masato

    2004-03-01

    An ion-exclusion chromatographic method with on-line desalinization for the determination of volatile fatty acids in landfill leachates is described. Highly sensitive conductivity detection of the organic acids was achieved by using dilute p-hydroxybenzoic acid solution as an eluent. Interference with mineral acids was reduced by treatment with barium chloride solution prior to desalinization. A silver-loaded cation-exchange guard column for the desalinization was installed in series with the analytical column to avoid the contamination of organic acids. This method features detection limits of 0.01 mg L(-1) formic acid, 0.02 mg L(-1) acetic acid, 0.05 mg L(-1) propionic acid, and 0.1 mg L(-1) butyric acid, respectively, with an injection of 20 microL sample. Application of the on-line desalinization LC method is illustrated for leachate samples from a Japanese sanitary landfill.

  9. Dental unit waterlines disinfection using hypochlorous acid-based disinfectant

    PubMed Central

    Shajahan, Irfana Fathima; Kandaswamy, D; Srikanth, Padma; Narayana, L Lakshmi; Selvarajan, R

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate the efficacy of a new disinfectant to disinfect the dental unit waterlines. Materials and Methods: New dental unit waterlines were installed in 13 dental chairs, and biofilm was allowed to grow for 10 days. Disinfection treatment procedure was carried out in the 12 units, and one unit was left untreated. The dental unit waterlines were removed and analyzed using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) (TESCAN VEGA3 SBU). Result: On examination, SEM images showed that there was no slime layer or bacterial cells seen in any of the 12 cut sections obtained from the treated dental waterlines which mean that there was no evident of biofilm formation. Untreated dental unit waterlines showed a microbial colonization with continuous filamentous organic matrix. There was significant biofilm formation in the control tube relative to the samples. Conclusion: The tested disinfectant was found to be effective in the removal of biofilm from the dental unit waterlines. PMID:27563184

  10. The effect of feeding with a tryptophan-free amino acid mixture on rat liver magnesium ion-activated deoxyribonucleic acid-dependent ribonucleic acid polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, A. R.

    1970-01-01

    1. The Widnell & Tata (1966) assay method for Mg2+-activated DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was used for initial-velocity determinations of rat liver nuclear RNA polymerase. One unit (U) of RNA polymerase was defined as that amount of enzyme required for 1 mmol of [3H]GMP incorporation/min at 37°C. 2. Colony fed rats were found to have a mean RNA polymerase activity of 65.9μU/mg of DNA and 18h-starved rats had a mean activity of 53.2μU/mg of DNA. Longer periods of starvation did not significantly decrease RNA polymerase activity further. 3. Rats that had been starved for 18h were used for all feeding experiments. Complete and tryptophan-deficient amino acid mixtures were given by stomach tube and the animals were killed 15–120min later. The response of RNA polymerase to the feeding with the complete amino acid mixture was rapid and almost linear over the first hour of feeding, resulting in a doubling of activity. The activity was still elevated above the starvation value at 120min after feeding. The tryptophan-deficient amino acid mixture produced a much less vigorous response about 45min after the feeding, and the activity had returned to the starvation value by 120min after the feeding. 4. The response of RNA polymerase to the feeding with the complete amino acid mixture was shown to occur within a period of less than 5min to about 10min after the feeding. 5. Pretreatment of the animals with puromycin or cycloheximide was found to abolish the 15min RNA polymerase response to the feeding with the complete amino acid mixture, but the activity of the controls was unaffected. 6. The characteristics of the RNA polymerase from 18h-starved animals and animals fed with the complete or incomplete amino acid mixtures for 1h were examined. The effects of Mg2+ ions, pH, actinomycin D and nucleoside triphosphate omissions were determined. The [Mg2+]– and pH–activity profiles of the RNA polymerase from the animal fed with the complete mixture appeared to differ from

  11. Ion-exclusion chromatography of carboxylic acids on silica gel modified with aluminium.

    PubMed

    Ohta, K; Tanaka, K

    1999-07-30

    The modification of silica gel with aluminium by a coating method was effective for the preparation of a silica-based stationary phase, which acted as a cation exchanger under strongly acidic conditions. In order to expand the utility of the laboratory-made aluminium-adsorbing silica gel it was applied as a stationary phase to the ion-exclusion chromatography of various carboxylic acids. Good separations for both aliphatic carboxylic acids and benzenecarboxylic acids with a hydrophobic nature under acidic eluent conditions were achieved in 25 min.

  12. Luminal hydrochloric acid stimulates rapid transepithelial ion fluxes in rodent esophageal stratified squamous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lin, B R; Hsieh, H T; Lee, J M; Lai, I R; Chen, C F; Yu, L C H

    2008-09-01

    It remains unclear whether enhanced ion fluxes occur in the esophageal stratified squamous epithelium upon acid exposure. Rat esophageal tissues devoid of submucosal glands displayed basal short-circuit current (Isc) of 5.03 +/- 1.93 microA/cm(2) and lumen-negative potential difference (PD) in association with net absorption of Na+ and Cl-, and secretion of HCO3(-). Luminal hydrochloric acid (HCl) challenge (pH = 1.6) triggered an acute rise of the Isc and increment of negative PD to seven-fold of baseline, which was diminished in HCO3(-)-free, but not Na+- free buffer. The rise of Isc was inhibited by pretreatment with di-isothiocyanatostilbene-2, 2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) and 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)-amiloride (EIPA). Topical carbachol, capsaicin, forskolin or CFTR(inh)-172 had no effect on basal Isc.CFTR(inh)-172 did not reduce the acid-increased Isc. Functional ablation of capsaicin-sensitive nerves had no effect on the acid-induced Isc. The phenomenon of enhanced ion fluxes upon acid stimulation was confirmed in human esophageal specimens. Our results demonstrated that the mechanism of acid-induced rapid transepithelial ion fluxes is dependent on the presence of bicarbonate ions as well as functional anion transporters and Na+/H+ exchanger, but independent of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The capsaicin-sensitive and muscarinic-dependent nerve pathways did not play roles in the mechanism.

  13. Equilibrium II: Acids and Bases. Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). Unit P3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inner London Education Authority (England).

    This unit on equilibrium is one of 10 first year units produced by the Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). The unit, which consists of two levels, focuses on the application of equilibrium principles to equilibria involving weak acids and bases, including buffer solutions and indicators. Level one uses Le Chatelier's…

  14. Separation of ions in acidic solution by capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Michelle

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an effective method for separating ionic species according to differences in their electrophoretic mobilities. CE separations of amino acids by direct detection are difficult due to their similar electrophoretic mobilities and low absorbances. However, native amino acids can be separated by CE as cations at a low pH by adding an alkanesulfonic acid to the electrolyte carrier which imparts selectivity to the system. Derivatization is unnecessary when direct UV detection is used at 185 nm. Simultaneous speciation of metal cations such as vanadium (IV) and vanadium (V) can easily be performed without complexation prior to analysis. An indirect UV detection scheme for acidic conditions was also developed using guanidine as the background carrier electrolyte (BCE) for the indirect detection of metal cations. Three chapters have been removed for separate processing. This report contains introductory material, references, and general conclusions. 80 refs.

  15. The Role of Lactic Acid Adsorption by Ion Exchange Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tongcun; Zhang, Jian; Jia, Shiru; Yu, Changyan; Jiang, Kunyu; Gao, Nianfa

    2010-01-01

    Background The polyacrylic resin Amberlite IRA-67 is a promising adsorbent for lactic acid extraction from aqueous solution, but little systematic research has been devoted to the separation efficiency of lactic acid under different operating conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings In this paper, we investigated the effects of temperature, resin dose and lactic acid loading concentration on the adsorption of lactic acid by Amberlite IRA-67 in batch kinetic experiments. The obtained kinetic data followed the pseudo-second order model well and both the equilibrium and ultimate adsorption slightly decreased with the increase of the temperature at 293–323K and 42.5 g/liter lactic acid loading concentration. The adsorption was a chemically heterogeneous process with a mean free energy value of 12.18 kJ/mol. According to the Boyd_plot, the lactic acid uptake process was primarily found to be an intraparticle diffusion at a lower concentration (<50 g/liter) but a film diffusion at a higher concentration (>70 g/liter). The values of effective diffusion coefficient Di increased with temperature. By using our Equation (21), the negative values of ΔG° and ΔH° revealed that the adsorption process was spontaneous and exothermic. Moreover, the negative value of ΔS° reflected the decrease of solid-liquid interface randomness at the solid-liquid interface when adsorbing lactic acid on IRA-67. Conclusions/Significance With the weakly basic resin IRA-67, in situ product removal of lactic acid can be accomplished especially from an open and thermophilic fermentation system without sterilization. PMID:21085600

  16. Solvent extraction equilibria of the nickel-3-(2-furyl)-2-mercaptopropenoic acid complex as an ion-pair with the diphenylguanidinium ion.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, A; Prat, M D; Garbayo, A

    1988-12-01

    The extraction of nickel from aqueous media (0.1M NaClO(4)) with 3-(2-furyl)-2-mercaptopropenoic acid (FMPA) in dichloroethane at 25 degrees has been studied. The extraction is efficient only if a suitable counter-ion is present to form an ion-associate with the Ni-FMPA complex. The diphenylguanidinium ion has been found suitable as the counter-ion.

  17. Acid-induced structural modifications of unsaturated Fatty acids and phenolic olive oil constituents by nitrite ions: a chemical assessment.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Alessandra; Panzella, Lucia; Savarese, Maria; Sacchi, Raffaele; Giudicianni, Italo; Paolillo, Livio; d'Ischia, Marco

    2004-10-01

    The structural modifications of the unsaturated fatty acid components of triglycerides in extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) following exposure to nitrite ions in acidic media were determined by two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy, aided by (15)N labeling and GC analysis, allowing investigation of the matrix without fractionation steps. In the presence of excess nitrite ions in a 1% sulfuric acid/oil biphasic system, extensive double bond isomerization of the oleic/linoleic acid components of triglycerides was observed associated with nitration/oxidation processes. Structurally modified species were identified as E/Z-nitroalkene, 1,2-nitrohydroxy, and 3-nitro-1-alkene(1,5-diene) derivatives based on (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N 2D NMR analysis in comparison with model compounds. Minor constituents of EVOO, including phenolic compounds and tocopherols, were also substantially modified by nitrite-derived nitrating species, even under milder reaction conditions relevant to those occurring in the gastric compartments. Novel nitrated derivatives of tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, and oleuropein (6-8) were identified by LC/MS analysis of the polar fraction of EVOO and by comparison with synthetic samples. Overall, these results provide the first systematic description at the chemical level of the consequences of exposing EVOO to nitrite ions at acidic pH and offer an improved basis for further investigations in the field of toxic nitrosation/nitration reactions and dietary antinitrosating agents.

  18. Acid-sensing ion channel 3 matches the acid-gated current in cardiac ischemia-sensing neurons.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, S P; Benson, C J; Adelman, J P; McCleskey, E W

    2001-01-16

    Cardiac afferents are sensory neurons that mediate angina, pain that occurs when the heart receives insufficient blood supply for its metabolic demand (ischemia). These neurons display enormous acid-evoked depolarizing currents, and they fire action potentials in response to extracellular acidification that accompanies myocardial ischemia. Here we show that acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3), but no other known acid-sensing ion channel, reproduces the functional features of the channel that underlies the large acid-evoked current in cardiac afferents. ASIC3 and the native channel are both especially sensitive to pH, interact similarly with Ca(2+), and gate rapidly between closed, open, and desensitized states. Particularly important is the ability of ASIC3 and the native channel to open at pH 7, a value reached in the first few minutes of a heart attack. The steep activation curve suggests that the channel opens when four protons bind. We propose that ASIC3, a member of the degenerin channel (of Caenorhabditis elegans)/epithelial sodium channel family of ion channels, is the sensor of myocardial acidity that triggers cardiac pain, and that it might be a useful pharmaceutical target for treating angina.

  19. Molecular alteration and carbonization of aspartic acid upon N + ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, F. Z.; Sun, S. Q.; Zhang, D. M.; Ma, Z. L.; Chen, G. Q.

    2000-06-01

    Structural changes of aspartic acid (Asp) irradiated by nitrogen ions of 30 keV were studied using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Significant decreases of the intensities of COO -, NH 3+, COOH and CH 2 vibrations in the FTIR spectra, compared with those of unirradiated Asp, were observed for the sample irradiated at the fluence of 1×10 16 ions/cm 2. The decrease rates of the intensities of COO -, NH 3+, COOH and CH 2 vibrations with respect to the increasing irradiation fluences up to 4×10 16 ions/cm 2 were different. The results were attributable to the nonstoichiometrical desorption of corresponding volatile species such as H 2, NH 3+ and CO 2. The radiolysis residue of Asp after irradiation at a high fluence of 1×10 17 ions/cm 2 was analyzed and fatty acid was detected.

  20. Systems Maturity Assessment of the Lithium Ion Battery for Extravehicular Mobility Unit Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Samuel P.

    2011-01-01

    The Long Life (Lithium Ion) Battery (LLB/LIB) is designed to replace the current Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Silver/Zinc (Ag/Zn) Increased Capacity Battery (ICB), which is used to provide power to the Primary Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) during Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). The LLB (a battery based on commercial lithium ion cell technology) is designed to have the same electrical and mechanical interfaces as the current ICB. The EMU LIB Charger is designed to charge, discharge, and condition the LLB either in a charger-strapped configuration or in an EMU-mounted configuration. This paper will retroactively apply the principles of Systems Maturity Assessment to the LLB project through use of the Integration Readiness Level and Earned Readiness Management. The viability of this methodology will be considered for application to new and existing technology development projects.

  1. Efficient Generation of Chemiluminescence during the reduction of manganese(IV) ions with lactic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaplev, Yu. B.

    2016-12-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of chemiluminescence during the reduction of manganese(IV) ions with lactic acid in an H2SO4-AcOH medium are studied. Kinetic spectrophotometric measurements are used to determine the profiles of change in the concentrations of Mn(IV) and Mn(III) ions during the reaction. The results from kinetic spectrophotometric measurements are compared to the light yield kinetics. The quantum chemiluminescence and chemiexcitation yields reach record values.

  2. Advances in silver ion chromatography for the analysis of fatty acids and triacylglycerols-2001 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Momchilova, Svetlana M; Nikolova-Damyanova, Boryana M

    2012-01-01

    An effort is made to critically present the achievements in silver ion chromatography during the last decade. Novelties in columns, mobile-phase compositions and detectors are described. Recent applications of silver ion chromatography in the analysis of fatty acids and triacylglycerols are presented while stressing novel analytical strategies or new objects. The tendencies in the application of the method in complementary ways with reversed-phase chromatography, chiral chromatography and, especially, mass detection are outlined.

  3. Formic acid interaction with the uranyl(VI) ion: structural and photochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Lucks, Christian; Rossberg, André; Tsushima, Satoru; Foerstendorf, Harald; Fahmy, Karim; Bernhard, Gert

    2013-10-07

    Complex formation between the uranyl(VI) ion and formic acid was studied by infrared absorption (IR) and X-ray absorption (EXAFS) spectroscopy as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In contrast to the acetate ion which forms exclusively a bidentate complex with uranyl(VI), the formate ion binds to uranyl(VI) in a unidentate fashion. The photochemistry of the uranyl(VI)-formic acid system was explored by DFT calculations and photoreduction of uranyl(VI) in the presence of formic acid was found to occur via an intermolecular process, that is, hydrogen abstraction from hydrogenformate by the photo-excited uranyl(VI). There is no photo-induced decarboxylation of uranyl(VI) formate via an intramolecular process, presumably due to lack of a C=C double bond.

  4. The inhibitory effect of metals and other ions on acid phosphatase activity from Vigna aconitifolia seeds.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pramod Kumar; Anand, Asha

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity of acid phosphatase from Vigna aconitifolia seeds to metal ions, fluoride, and phosphate was examined. All the effectors had different degree of inhibitory effect on the enzyme. Among metal ions, molybdate and ferric ion were observed to be most potent inhibitors and both exhibited mixed type of inhibition. Acid phosphatase activity was inhibited by Cu2+ in a noncompetitive manner. Zn and Mn showed mild inhibition on the enzyme activity. Inhibition kinetics analysis explored molybdate as a potent inhibitor for acid phosphatase in comparison with other effectors used in this study. Fluoride was the next most strong inhibitor for the enzyme activity, and caused a mixed type of inhibition. Phosphate inhibited the enzyme competitively, which demonstrates that inhibition due to phosphate is one of the regulatory factors for enzyme activity.

  5. Hard and soft acids and bases: atoms and atomic ions.

    PubMed

    Reed, James L

    2008-07-07

    The structural origin of hard-soft behavior in atomic acids and bases has been explored using a simple orbital model. The Pearson principle of hard and soft acids and bases has been taken to be the defining statement about hard-soft behavior and as a definition of chemical hardness. There are a number of conditions that are imposed on any candidate structure and associated property by the Pearson principle, which have been exploited. The Pearson principle itself has been used to generate a thermodynamically based scale of relative hardness and softness for acids and bases (operational chemical hardness), and a modified Slater model has been used to discern the electronic origin of hard-soft behavior. Whereas chemical hardness is a chemical property of an acid or base and the operational chemical hardness is an experimental measure of it, the absolute hardness is a physical property of an atom or molecule. A critical examination of chemical hardness, which has been based on a more rigorous application of the Pearson principle and the availability of quantitative measures of chemical hardness, suggests that the origin of hard-soft behavior for both acids and bases resides in the relaxation of the electrons not undergoing transfer during the acid-base interaction. Furthermore, the results suggest that the absolute hardness should not be taken as synonymous with chemical hardness but that the relationship is somewhat more complex. Finally, this work provides additional groundwork for a better understanding of chemical hardness that will inform the understanding of hardness in molecules.

  6. Elucidating the Role of Ferrous Ion Cocatalyst in Enhancing Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H.; Donohoe, B. S.; Vinzant, T. B.; Ciesielski, P. N.; Wang, W.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Zeng, Y.; Johnson, D. K.; Ding, S. Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Tucker, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Recently developed iron cocatalyst enhancement of dilute acid pretreatment of biomass is a promising approach for enhancing sugar release from recalcitrant lignocellulosic biomass. However, very little is known about the underlying mechanisms of this enhancement. In the current study, our aim was to identify several essential factors that contribute to ferrous ion-enhanced efficiency during dilute acid pretreatment of biomass and to initiate the investigation of the mechanisms that result in this enhancement. During dilute acid and ferrous ion cocatalyst pretreatments, we observed concomitant increases in solubilized sugars in the hydrolysate and reducing sugars in the (insoluble) biomass residues. We also observed enhancements in sugar release during subsequent enzymatic saccharification of iron cocatalyst-pretreated biomass. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy showed that major peaks representing the C-O-C and C-H bonds in cellulose are significantly attenuated by iron cocatalyst pretreatment. Imaging using Prussian blue staining indicated that Fe{sup 2+} ions associate with both cellulose/xylan and lignin in untreated as well as dilute acid/Fe{sup 2+} ion-pretreated corn stover samples. Analyses by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed structural details of biomass after dilute acid/Fe{sup 2+} ion pretreatment, in which delamination and fibrillation of the cell wall were observed. By using this multimodal approach, we have revealed that (1) acid-ferrous ion-assisted pretreatment increases solubilization and enzymatic digestion of both cellulose and xylan to monomers and (2) this pretreatment likely targets multiple chemistries in plant cell wall polymer networks, including those represented by the C-O-C and C-H bonds in cellulose.

  7. Dynamics of lithium ions in borotellurite mixed former glasses: Correlation between the characteristic length scales of mobile ions and glass network structural units

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, A.; Ghosh, A.

    2014-10-28

    We have studied the mixed network former effect on the dynamics of lithium ions in borotellurite glasses in wide composition and temperature ranges. The length scales of ion dynamics, such as characteristic mean square displacement and spatial extent of sub-diffusive motion of lithium ions have been determined from the ac conductivity and dielectric spectra, respectively, in the framework of linear response theory. The relative concentrations of different network structural units have been determined from the deconvolution of the FTIR spectra. A direct correlation between the ion dynamics and the characteristic length scales and the relative concentration of BO{sub 4} units has been established for different compositions of the borotellurite glasses.

  8. Stream chemistry in the eastern United States. 2. Current sources of acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing-capacity streams

    SciTech Connect

    Herlihy, A.T.; Kaufmann, P.R.; Mitch, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    The authors examined anion composition in National Stream Survey (NSS) data in order to evaluate the most probable sources of current acidity in acidic and low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) streams in the eastern United States. Acidic streams that had almost no organic influence (less than 10% of total anions) and sulfate and nitrate concentrations indicative of evaporative concentration of atmospheric deposition were classified as acidic due to acidic deposition. These acidic streams were located in small forested watersheds in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands (an estimated 1950 km of stream length) and in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain (1250 km). Acidic streams affected primarily by acidic deposition but also influenced by naturally occurring organic anions accounted for another 1180 km of acidic stream length and were located in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, plateau tops in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands, and the Florida Panhandle. The total length of streams acidic due to acid mine drainage in the NSS (4590 km) was about the same as the total length of acidic streams likely affected by acidic deposition (4380 km). Acidic streams whose acid anion composition was dominated by organics were located in Florida and the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. In Florida, most of the acidic streams were organic dominated, whereas about half of the streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain were organic dominated. Organic-dominated acidic streams were not observed in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands.

  9. Stream chemistry in the eastern United States, 2, Current sources of acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing capacity streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlihy, Alan T.; Kaufmann, Philip R.; Mitch, Mark E.

    1991-04-01

    We examined anion composition in National Stream Survey (NSS) data in order to evaluate the most probable sources of current acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) streams in the eastern United States. Acidic streams that had almost no organic influence (less than 10% of total anions) and sulfate and nitrate concentrations indicative of evaporative concentration of atmospheric deposition were classified as acidic due to acidic deposition. These acidic streams were located in small (<30 km2) forested watersheds in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands (an estimated 1950 km of stream length) and in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain (1250 km). Acidic streams affected primarily by acidic deposition but also influenced by naturally occurring organic anions accounted for another 1180 km of acidic stream length and were located in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, plateau tops in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands, and the Florida Panhandle. The total length of streams acidic due to acid mine drainage in the NSS (4590 km) was about the same as the total length of acidic streams likely affected by acidic deposition (4380 km). Acidic streams whose acid anion composition was dominated by organics were located in Florida and the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. In Florida, most of the acidic streams were organic dominated, whereas about half of the streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain were organic dominated. Organic-dominated acidic streams were not observed in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands.

  10. Reactions of Thiocyanate Ions with Acid: A Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glidewell, Christopher; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and typical results are provided for a three-part experiment involving reactions of potassium thiocynate (KNCS) with sulfuric acid. The experiment represents the final stage of structured work prior to students' research projects during their final year. (JM)

  11. Study of a lithium-ion battery charge-discharge test unit characteristics*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylov, E. A.; Mizrah, E. A.; Fedchenko, A. S.; Lobanov, D. K.

    2016-04-01

    The article describes the structure of a charge-discharge unit which allows to perform electrical, resource and thermal testing of several lithium-ion batteries simultaneously. The principle of operation of a one battery research channel (BRC) is shown. This study evaluated the stabilization error and rate of change of charge/discharge currents, the switching time from the charge mode to the discharge mode and vice versa for a single BRC and parallel BRCs. The possibility of increasing the maximum battery testing current due to the parallel connection of multiple BRCs without using a current alignment device between channels was discussed.

  12. The effects of acid treatment and calcium ions on the solubility of concanavalin A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cacioppo, Elizabeth; Pusey, Marc L.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of acid treatment (which removes Mn and Ca ions) and Ca(2+) ions on the solubility of jack-bean-meal concanavalin A were investigated using two techniques: the sitting drop technique and the microcolumn technique. It was found that the solubility of concanavalin A varied with the protein preparation procedures and with measurement techniques. Addition of Ca(2+) resulted in greatly lowered solubilities compared with the acid treated protein. The sitting drop solubilities for the recalcified protein agreed better with those reported by Mikol and Giege (1989) than with solubilities determined from column data.

  13. [Analysis of aliphatic carboxylic acids in anaerobic digestion process waters by ion-exclusion chromatography].

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuaki; Sakamoto, Jun; Nagaoka, Kazuya; Takayama, Yohichi; Kanahori, Takashi; Sunahara, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Tsuneo; Sato, Shinji; Hirokawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of seven aliphatic carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, iso-butyric, n-butyric, iso-valeric and n-valeric acid) in anaerobic digestion process waters for biogas production was examined by ion-exclusion chromatography with dilute acidic eluents (benzoic acid, perfluorobutyric acid (PFBA) and sulfuric acid) and non-suppressed conductivity/ultraviolet (UV) detection. The columns used were a styrene/divinylbenzene-based strongly acidic cation-exchange resin column (TSKgel SCX) and a polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column (TSKgel Super IC-A/C). Good separation was performed on the TSKgel SCX in shorter retention times. For the TSKgel Super IC-A/C, peak shape of the acids was sharp and symmetrical in spite of longer retention times. In addition, the mutual separation of the acids was good except for iso- and n-butyric acids. The better separation and good detection was achieved by using the two columns (TSKgel SCX and TSKgel Super IC-A/C connected in series), lower concentrations of PFBA and sulfuric acid as eluents, non-suppressed conductivity detection and UV detection at 210 nm. This analysis was applied to anaerobic digestion process waters. The chromatograms with conductivity detection were relatively simpler compared with those of UV detection. The use of two columns with different selectivities for the aliphatic carboxylic acids and the two detection modes was effective for the determination and identification of the analytes in anaerobic digestion process waters containing complex matrices.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of triflic acid and triflate ion/water mixtures: a proton conducting electrolytic component in fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Sunda, Anurag Prakash; Venkatnathan, Arun

    2011-11-30

    Triflic acid is a functional group of perflourosulfonated polymer electrolyte membranes where the sulfonate group is responsible for proton conduction. However, even at extremely low hydration, triflic acid exists as a triflate ion. In this work, we have developed a force-field for triflic acid and triflate ion by deriving force-field parameters using ab initio calculations and incorporated these parameters with the Optimized Potentials for Liquid Simulations - All Atom (OPLS-AA) force-field. We have employed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the developed force field to characterize structural and dynamical properties of triflic acid (270-450 K) and triflate ion/water mixtures (300 K). The radial distribution functions (RDFs) show the hydrophobic nature of CF(3) group and presence of strong hydrogen bonding in triflic acid and temperature has an insignificant effect. Results from our MD simulations show that the diffusion of triflic acid increases with temperature. The RDFs from triflate ion/water mixtures shows that increasing hydration causes water molecules to orient around the SO(3)(-) group of triflate ions, solvate the hydronium ions, and other water molecules. The diffusion of triflate ions, hydronium ion, and water molecules shows an increase with hydration. At λ = 1, the diffusion of triflate ion is 30 times lower than the diffusion of triflic acid due to the formation of stable triflate ion-hydronium ion complex. With increasing hydration, water molecules break the stability of triflate ion-hydronium ion complex leading to enhanced diffusion. The RDFs and diffusion coefficients of triflate ions, hydronium ions and water molecules resemble qualitatively the previous findings using per-fluorosulfonated membranes.

  15. Potentiometric Determination of Phytic Acid and Investigations of Phytate Interactions with Some Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Marolt, Gregor; Pihlar, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Determination of correct amount (concentration) of phytic acid is of vital importance when dealing with protonation and/or metal complexation equilibria. A novel approach for precise and reliable assay of phytic acid, based on the difference between end points by potentiometric titration, has been presented. Twelve phytic acid protons are classified into three groups of acidity, which enables detection of 2 to 3 distinct equivalent points (EPs) depending on experimental conditions, e.g. counter-ion concentration. Using the differences between individual EPs enables correct phytate determination as well as identification of potential contamination and/or determination of initial protonation degree. Impact of uncertainty of phytate amount on the calculation of protonation constants has been evaluated using computer simulation program (Hyperquad2013). With the analysis of titration curves different binding sites on phytate ligand have been proposed for complexation of Ca2+ and Fe3+ ions.

  16. The removal of uranium from acidic media using ion exchange and/or extraction chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    FitzPatrick, J.R.; Schake, B.S.; Murphy, J.; Holmes, K; West, M.H.

    1996-06-01

    The separation and purification of uranium from either nitric acid or hydrochloric acid media can be accomplished by using either solvent extraction or ion-exchange. Over the past two years at Los Alamos, emerging programs are focused on recapturing the expertise required to do limited, small-quantity processing of enriched uranium. During this period of time, we have been investigating ion-addition, waste stream polishing is associated with this effort in order to achieve more complete removal of uranium prior to recycle of the acid. Extraction chromatography has been demonstrated to further polish the uranium from both nitric and hydrochloric acid media thus allowing for a more complete recovery of the actinide material and creation of less waste during the processing steps.

  17. Separation of aliphatic carboxylic acids and benzenecarboxylic acids by ion-exclusion chromatography with various cation-exchange resin columns and sulfuric acid as eluent.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Kazutoku; Ohashi, Masayoshi; Jin, Ji-Ye; Takeuchi, Toyohide; Fujimoto, Chuzo; Choi, Seong-Ho; Ryoo, Jae-Jeong; Lee, Kwang-Pill

    2003-05-16

    The application of various hydrophilic cation-exchange resins for high-performance liquid chromatography (sulfonated silica gel: TSKgel SP-2SW, carboxylated silica gel: TSKgel CM-2SW, sulfonated polymethacrylate resin: TSKgel SP-5PW, carboxylated polymethacrylate resins: TSKgel CM-5PW and TSKgel OA-Pak A) as stationary phases in ion-exclusion chromatography for C1-C7 aliphatic carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, butyric, isovaleric, valeric, isocaproic, caproic, 2-methylhexanoic and heptanoic acids) and benzenecarboxylic acids (pyromellitic, trimellitic, hemimellitic, o-phthalic, m-phthalic, p-phthalic, benzoic, salicylic acids and phenol) was carried out using diluted sulfuric acid as the eluent. Silica-based cation-exchange resins (TSKgel SP-2SW and TSKgel CM-2SW) were very suitable for the ion-exclusion chromatographic separation of these benzenecarboxylic acids. Excellent simultaneous separation of these benzenecarboxylic acids was achieved on a TSKgel SP-2SW column (150 x 6 mm I.D.) in 17 min using a 2.5 mM sulfuric acid at pH 2.4 as the eluent. Polymethacrylate-based cation-exchange resins (TSKgel SP-5PW, TSKgel CM-5PW and TSKgel OA-Pak A) acted as advanced stationary phases for the ion-exclusion chromatographic separation of these C1-C7 aliphatic carboxylic acids. Excellent simultaneous separation of these C1-C7 acids was achieved on a TSKgel CM-5PW column (150 x 6 mm I.D.) in 32 min using a 0.05 mM sulfuric acid at pH 4.0 as the eluent.

  18. Regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon saturated with inorganic ions by cavitation united with ion exchange method.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Gao, Hong; Li, Yansheng; Yang, Huixin

    2011-06-01

    Using ion exchange resin as transfer media, regenerate powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorbed inorganic ions by cavitation to enhance the transfer; we studied how the regeneration time and the mass ratio of resin and PAC influence the regeneration rate respectively through re-adsorption. The result showed that the effective regeneration of PAC saturated with inorganic ions was above 90% using ion exchange resin as media and transfer carrier, the quantity of PAC did not reduced but activated in the process.

  19. Interaction of metal ions with acid sites of biosorbents peat moss and Vaucheria and model substances alginic and humic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Crist, R.H.; Martin, J.R.; Crist, D.R.

    1999-07-01

    The interaction between added metal ions and acid sites of two biosorbents, peat moss and the alga Vaucheria, was studied. Results were interpreted in terms of two model substances, alginic acid, a copolymer of guluronic and mannuronic acids present in marine algae, and humic acid in peat moss. For peat moss and Vaucheria at pH 4--6, two protons were displaced per Cd sorbed, after correction for sorbed metals also displaced by the heavy metal. The frequent neglect of exchange of heavy metals for metals either sorbed on the native material or added for pH adjustment leads to erroneous conclusions about proton displacement stoichiometry. Proton displacement constants K{sub ex}{sup H} decreased logarithmically with pH and had similar slopes for alginic acid and biosorbents. This pH effect was interpreted as an electrostatic effect of increasing anionic charge making proton removal less favorable. The maximum number of exchangeable acid sites (capacity C{sub H}) decreased with pH for alginic acid but increased with pH for biosorbents. Consistent with titration behavior, this difference was explained in terms of more weak acid sites in the biosorbents.

  20. Silver ions-mediated conformational switch: facile design of structure-controllable nucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongxiang; Li, Jishan; Wang, Hao; Jin, Jianyu; Liu, Jinhua; Wang, Kemin; Tan, Weihong; Yang, Ronghua

    2010-08-01

    Conformationally constraint nucleic acid probes were usually designed by forming an intramolecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. The disadvantages of these approaches are the inflexibility and instability in complex environment of the Watson-Crick-based duplex. We report that this hydrogen bonding pattern can be replaced by metal-ligation between specific metal ions and the natural bases. To demonstrate the feasibility of this principle, two linear oligonucleotides and silver ions were examined as models for DNA hybridization assay and adenosine triphosphate detection. The both nucleic acids contain target binding sequences in the middle and cytosine (C)-rich sequences at the lateral portions. The strong interaction between Ag(+) ions and cytosines forms stable C-Ag(+)-C structures, which promises the oligonucleotides to form conformationally constraint formations. In the presence of its target, interaction between the loop sequences and the target unfolds the C-Ag(+)-C structures, and the corresponding probes unfolding can be detected by a change in their fluorescence emission. We discuss the thermodynamic and kinetic opportunities that are provided by using Ag(+) ion complexes instead of traditional Watson-Crick-based duplex. In particular, the intrinsic feature of the metal-ligation motif facilitates the design of functional nucleic acids probes by independently varying the concentration of Ag(+) ions in the medium.

  1. Bifunctional phenyl monophosphonic/sulfonic acid ion exchange resin and process for using the same

    DOEpatents

    Alexandratos, Spiro; Shelley, Christopher A.; Horwitz, E. Philip; Chiarizia, Renato

    2001-01-01

    A cross-linked water-insoluble ion exchange resin comprised of polymerized monomers having a phenyl ring is disclosed. A contemplated resin contains (i) polymerized phenyl ring-containing monomers having a phosphonic acid ligand linked to the phenyl ring, (ii) about 2 to about 5 millimoles per gram (mmol/g) of phosphorus as phosphonic acid ligands, and (iii) a sufficient amount of a sulfonic acid ligand such that the ratio of mmol/g of phosphonic acid to mmol/g sulfonic acid is up to 3:1. A process for removing polyvalent metal cations from aqueous solution, and a process for removing iron(III) cations from acidic copper(II) cation-containing solutions that utilize the contemplated resin or other resins are disclosed.

  2. Bifunctional phenyl monophosphonic/sulfonic acid ion exchange resin and process for using the same

    DOEpatents

    Alexandratos, Spiro; Shelley, Christopher A.; Horwitz, E. Philip; Chiarizia, Renato; Gula, Michael J.; Xue, Sui; Harvey, James T.

    2002-01-01

    A cross-linked water-insoluble ion exchange resin comprised of polymerized monomers having a phenyl ring is disclosed. A contemplated resin contains (i) polymerized phenyl ring-containing monomers having a phosphonic acid ligand linked to the phenyl ring, (ii) about 2 to about 5 millimoles per gram (mmol/g) of phosphorus as phosphonic acid ligands, and (iii) a sufficient amount of a sulfonic acid ligand such that the ratio of mmol/g of phosphonic acid to mmol/g sulfonic acid is up to 3:1. A process for removing polyvalent metal cations from aqueous solution, and a process for removing iron(III) cations from acidic copper(II) cation-containing solutions that utilize the contemplated resin or other resins are disclosed.

  3. Acidity field of soils as ion-exchange systems and the diagnostics of genetic soil horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokotov, Yu. A.; Sukhacheva, E. Yu.; Aparin, B. F.

    2014-12-01

    For the comprehensive description of the acidity of a two-phase ion-exchange system, we should analyze two curves of the ionite titration by a strong base in water and salt solutions and find the quantitative relationships between the corresponding pH characteristics. An idea of the three-dimensional field of acidity of ion-exchange systems (the phase space of the soil acidity characteristics) and its three two-dimensional projections is suggested. For soils, three interrelated characteristics—the pH values of the salt and water extracts and the degree of base saturation—can serve as spatial coordinates for the acidity field. Representation of factual data in this field makes it possible to compare and analyze the acidity characteristics of different soils and soil horizons and to determine their specific features. Differentiation of the field into separate volumes allows one to present the data in a discrete form. We have studied the distribution patterns of the groups of soil horizons from Leningrad oblast and other regions of northwestern Russia in the acidity field. The studied samples are grouped in different partially overlapping areas of the projections of the acidity field. The results of this grouping attest to the correctness of the modern classification of Russian soils. A notion of the characteristic soil area in the acidity field is suggested; it can be applied to all the soils with a leaching soil water regime.

  4. Formation and Fragmentation of Unsaturated Fatty Acid [M - 2H + Na]- Ions: Stabilized Carbanions for Charge-Directed Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Michael C.; Kirk, Benjamin B.; Altvater, Jens; Blanksby, Stephen J.; Nette, Geoffrey W.

    2013-12-01

    Fatty acids are long-chain carboxylic acids that readily produce [M - H]- ions upon negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) and cationic complexes with alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals in positive ion ESI. In contrast, only one anionic monomeric fatty acid-metal ion complex has been reported in the literature, namely [M - 2H + FeIICl]-. In this manuscript, we present two methods to form anionic unsaturated fatty acid-sodium ion complexes (i.e., [M - 2H + Na]-). We find that these ions may be generated efficiently by two distinct methods: (1) negative ion ESI of a methanolic solution containing the fatty acid and sodium fluoride forming an [M - H + NaF]- ion. Subsequent collision-induced dissociation (CID) results in the desired [M - 2H + Na]- ion via the neutral loss of HF. (2) Direct formation of the [M - 2H + Na]- ion by negative ion ESI of a methanolic solution containing the fatty acid and sodium hydroxide or bicarbonate. In addition to deprotonation of the carboxylic acid moiety, formation of [M - 2H + Na]- ions requires the removal of a proton from the fatty acid acyl chain. We propose that this deprotonation occurs at the bis-allylic position(s) of polyunsaturated fatty acids resulting in the formation of a resonance-stabilized carbanion. This proposal is supported by ab initio calculations, which reveal that removal of a proton from the bis-allylic position, followed by neutral loss of HX (where X = F- and -OH), is the lowest energy dissociation pathway.

  5. IMPROVEMENT UPON THE CARRIER PRECIPITATION OF PLUTONIUM IONS FROM NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    James, R.A.; Thompson, S.G.

    1958-12-23

    A process is reported for improving the removal of plutonlum by carrier precipitation by the addition of nitrite ions to a nitrlc acid solutlon of neutronirradiated unanium so as to destroy any hydrazine that may be present in the solution since the hydrazine tends to complex the tetravalent plutonium and prevents removal by the carrier precipltate, such as bismuth phospbate.

  6. Direct sensing of total acidity by chronopotentiometric flash titrations at polymer membrane ion-selective electrodes.

    PubMed

    Gemene, Kebede L; Bakker, Eric

    2008-05-15

    Polymer membrane ion-selective electrodes containing lipophilic ionophores are traditionally interrogated by zero current potentiometry, which, ideally, gives information on the sample activity of ionic species. It is shown here that a discrete cathodic current pulse across an H (+)-selective polymeric membrane doped with the ionophore ETH 5294 may be used for the chronopotentiometric detection of pH in well-buffered samples. However, a reduction in the buffer capacity leads to large deviations from the expected Nernstian response slope. This is explained by the local depletion of hydrogen ions at the sample-membrane interface as a result of the galvanostatically imposed ion flux in direction of the membrane. This depletion is found to be a function of the total acidity of the sample and can be directly monitored chronopotentiometrically in a flash titration experiment. The subsequent application of a baseline potential pulse reverses the extraction process of the current pulse, allowing one to interrogate the sample with minimal perturbation. In one protocol, total acidity is found to be proportional to the magnitude of applied current at the flash titration end point. More conveniently, the square root of the flash titration end point time observed at a fixed applied current is a linear function of the total acid concentration. This suggests that it is possible to perform rapid localized pH titrations at ion-selective electrodes without the need for volumetric titrimetry. The technique is explored here for acetic acid, MES and citric acid with promising results. Polymeric membrane electrodes based on poly(vinyl chloride) plasticized with o-nitrophenyl octyl ether in a 1:2 mass ratio may be used for the detection of acids of up to ca. 1 mM concentration, with flash titration times on the order of a few seconds. Possible limitations of the technique are discussed, including variations of the acid diffusion coefficients and influence of electrical migration.

  7. Ion exchange properties of monolithic and particle type iminodiacetic acid modified silica.

    PubMed

    Sugrue, Edel; Nesterenko, Pavel; Paull, Brett

    2004-07-01

    A 10 cm silica monolith has been modified with iminodiacetic acid (IDA) groups and characterised for its selectivity toward alkali, alkaline earth, and selected transition metal cations. Physical characterisation of the modified monolith found non-homogeneous modification along the length of the monolith, although sufficient capacity was achieved to facilitate significant retention of alkaline earth and transition/heavy metal ions over a range of eluent pH and ionic strength conditions. For alkaline earth and transition/heavy metal ions, selectivity of the 10 cm IDA monolith closely matched that seen with a 25 cm IDA modified silica gel particle packed column, although the separation of alkali metal ions was noticeably poorer on the monolithic column. Peak efficiencies for most metal ions were of a similar order for both column types, except for Zn(II), which showed significant peak broadening on the IDA monolithic column.

  8. The reduction process of phytic acid silver ion system: A pulse radiolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Ravi; Mukherjee, Tulsi

    2007-05-01

    Reduction of silver ion in a silver-phytic acid (1:1 ratio) system has been studied using pulse radiolysis technique. Time-resolved transformation of the intermediates, Ag +→Ag 0→Ag 2+→Ag 32+, has been clearly observed in the reduction of silver-phytic acid (1:1) system. The effect of phytic acid on the formation and decay of initial silver clusters has been also studied. The surface plasmon absorption band of stable silver nanoparticle (410 nm) and dynamic light scattering technique has been used to characterize the nanoparticles and measure the average size ( Rav=100 nm).

  9. Acidic pH promotes intervertebral disc degeneration: Acid-sensing ion channel -3 as a potential therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Hamish T. J.; Hodson, Nathan; Baird, Pauline; Richardson, Stephen M.; Hoyland, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    The aetiology of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration remains poorly understood. Painful IVD degeneration is associated with an acidic intradiscal pH but the response of NP cells to this aberrant microenvironmental factor remains to be fully characterised. The aim here was to address the hypothesis that acidic pH, similar to that found in degenerate IVDs, leads to the altered cell/functional phenotype observed during IVD degeneration, and to investigate the involvement of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) -3 in the response. Human NP cells were treated with a range of pH, from that of a non-degenerate (pH 7.4 and 7.1) through to mildly degenerate (pH 6.8) and severely degenerate IVD (pH 6.5 and 6.2). Increasing acidity of pH caused a decrease in cell proliferation and viability, a shift towards matrix catabolism and increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines and pain-related factors. Acidic pH resulted in an increase in ASIC-3 expression. Importantly, inhibition of ASIC-3 prevented the acidic pH induced proinflammatory and pain-related phenotype in NP cells. Acidic pH causes a catabolic and degenerate phenotype in NP cells which is inhibited by blocking ASIC-3 activity, suggesting that this may be a useful therapeutic target for treatment of IVD degeneration. PMID:27853274

  10. Influence of phosphate ions on buffer capacity of soil humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguta, P.; Sokołowska, Z.

    2012-02-01

    The object of this study was to determine change of natural buffer capacity of humic acids by strong buffering agents, which were phosphate ions. Studies were carried out on the humic acids extracted from peat soils. Additional information was obtained by determination of water holding capacity, density, ash and pH for peats and optical parameter Q4/6 for humic acids. Humic acid suspensions exhibited the highest buffer properties at low pH and reached maximum at pH ~ 4. Phosphates possessed buffer properties in the pH range from 4.5 to 8.0. The maximum of buffering was at pH~6.8 and increased proportionally with an increase in the concentration of phosphate ions. The study indicated that the presence of phosphate ions may strongly change natural buffer capacity of humic acids by shifting buffering maximum toward higher pH values. Significant correlations were found for the degree of the secondary transformation with both the buffer capacity and the titrant volume used during titration.

  11. Ionization Efficiency of Doubly Charged Ions Formed from Polyprotic Acids in Electrospray Negative Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liigand, Piia; Kaupmees, Karl; Kruve, Anneli

    2016-07-01

    The ability of polyprotic acids to give doubly charged ions in negative mode electrospray was studied and related to physicochemical properties of the acids via linear discriminant analysis (LDA). It was discovered that the compound has to be strongly acidic (low p K a1 and p K a2) and to have high hydrophobicity (log P ow) to become multiply charged. Ability to give multiply charged ions in ESI/MS cannot be directly predicted from the solution phase acidities. Therefore, for the first time, a quantitative model to predict the charge state of the analyte in ESI/MS is proposed and validated for small anions. Also, a model to predict ionization efficiencies of these analytes was developed. Results indicate that acidity of the analyte, its octanol-water partition coefficient, and charge delocalization are important factors that influence ionization efficiencies as well as charge states of the analytes. The pH of the solvent was also found to be an important factor influencing the ionization efficiency of doubly charged ions.

  12. Complexation of Nickel Ions by Boric Acid or (Poly)borates.

    PubMed

    Graff, Anais; Barrez, Etienne; Baranek, Philippe; Bachet, Martin; Bénézeth, Pascale

    2017-01-01

    An experiment based on electrochemical reactions and pH monitoring was performed in which nickel ions were gradually formed by oxidation of a nickel metal electrode in a solution of boric acid. Based on the experimental results and aqueous speciation modeling, the evolution of pH showed the existence of significant nickel-boron complexation. A triborate nickel complex was postulated at high boric acid concentrations when polyborates are present, and the equilibrium constants were determined at 25, 50 and 70 °C. The calculated enthalpy and entropy at 25 °C for the formation of the complex from boric acid and Ni(2+) ions are respectively equal to (65.6 ± 3.1) kJ·mol(-1) and (0.5 ± 11.1) J·K(-1)·mol(-1). The results of this study suggest that complexation of nickel ions by borates can significantly enhance the solubility of nickel metal and nickel oxide depending on the concentration of boric acid and pH. First principles calculations were investigated and tend to show that the complex is thermodynamically stable and the nickel cation in solution should interact more strongly with the [Formula: see text] than with boric acid.

  13. [Determination of trace haloacetic acids in drinking water using ion chromatography coupled with solid phase extraction].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingxue; Huang, Jianjun; Gu, Ping

    2006-05-01

    The combined solid phase extraction (SPE)-ion chromatography (IC) method was developed for the analysis of trace haloacetic acids (HAAs) in drinking water. The tested HAAs included monochloroacetic acid (MCAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), monobromoacetic acid (MBAA) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA). For trace determination of HAAs in real drinking water samples, conditions of LiChrolut EN SPE cartridge were investigated for HAAs preconcentration and matrix elimination. Elution was carried out by 2 mL of sodium hydroxide (10 mmol/L) with the flow rate of 2 mL/min. The Dionex IonPac AS16 column (250 mm x 4 mm i. d.), a high capacity and hydroxide-selective anion-exchange column designed for the determination of polarizable anions, was chosen for chromatographic separation. HAAs were analyzed with a concentration gradient of NaOH with the flow rate of 0.8 mL/min and detected by suppressed conductivity. A 500 microL sample loop was used. The detection limits of this SPE-IC method for MCAA, DCAA, DBAA and TCAA were 0.38-1.69 microg/L and MBAA was 12.5 microg/L under 25-fold preconcentration. The results demonstrate that the method is suitable for the analysis of trace haloacetic acids in drinking water.

  14. Reaction of methanol with chlorate ions in acid solution containing Hg{sup +2} by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, W.R.; Indu, B.; Crump, B.; Gelbaum, L.T.

    1996-05-01

    The reaction rate of methanol was measured in solutions of sodium chlorate and sulfuric acid at several levels of temperature and concentration, in the presence of mercuric nitrate. The progress of the reaction was monitored by proton NMR signals corresponding to methanol and formic acid. Chlorine dioxide formation was suppressed by adding mercuric nitrate, which was shown earlier to catalyze the disproportionation of the intermediate species, chlorous acid, and sequester chloride ions. The reaction is first order in methanol and chlorate concentration and in the Hammett acidity function. The reaction of formic acid, sodium chlorate and sulfuric acid was also studied using the same technique. Formic acid was stable and did not react with chlorate at a measurable rate, even at concentrations and temperatures of a commercial process. This study related to commercial processes that produce chlorine dioxide by reducing chlorate ions with methanol. Chlorine dioxide is an oxidizing chemical that is used in water purification and is replacing chlorine in many chemical bleaching processes because of environmental concerns.

  15. The dichotomized role for acid sensing ion channels in musculoskeletal pain and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sluka, Kathleen A; Gregory, Nicholas S

    2015-07-01

    Chronic muscle pain affects between 11 and 24% of the world's population with the majority of people experiencing musculoskeletal pain at some time in their life. Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are important sensors of modest decreases in extracellular pH that occur within the physiological range. These decreases in extracellular pH occur in response to inflammation, fatiguing exercise, and ischemia. Further, injection of acidic saline into muscle produces enhanced nociceptive behaviors in animals and pain in human subjects. Of the different types of ASICs, ASIC3 and ASIC1 have been implicated in transmission of nociceptive information from the musculoskeletal system. The current review will provide an overview of the evidence for ASIC3 and ASIC1 in musculoskeletal pain in both inflammatory and non-inflammatory models. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'.

  16. Site-Specific Characterization of d-Amino Acid Containing Peptide Epimers by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the d-amino acid containing peptide (DAACP) candidate can be discovered by observing the differences of biological activity and chromatographic retention time between the synthetic peptides and naturally occurring peptides. However, it is difficult to determine the exact position of d-amino acid in the DAACP candidates. Herein, we developed a novel site-specific strategy to rapidly and precisely localize d-amino acids in peptides by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) analysis of mass spectrometry (MS)-generated epimeric fragment ions. Briefly, the d/l-peptide epimers were separated by online reversed-phase liquid chromatography and fragmented by collision-induced dissociation (CID), followed by IMS analysis. The epimeric fragment ions resulting from d/l-peptide epimers exhibit conformational differences, thus showing different mobilities in IMS. The arrival time shift between the epimeric fragment ions was used as criteria to localize the d-amino acid substitution. The utility of this strategy was demonstrated by analysis of peptide epimers with different molecular sizes, [d-Trp]-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, [d-Ala]-deltorphin, [d-Phe]-achatin-I, and their counterparts that contain all-l amino acids. Furthermore, the crustacean hyperglycemia hormones (CHHs, 8.5 kDa) were isolated from the American lobster Homarus americanus and identified by integration of MS-based bottom-up and top-down sequencing approaches. The IMS data acquired using our novel site-specific strategy localized the site of isomerization of l- to d-Phe at the third residue of the CHHs from the N-terminus. Collectively, this study demonstrates a new method for discovery of DAACPs using IMS technique with the ability to localize d-amino acid residues. PMID:24328107

  17. Proton and metal ion binding to natural organic polyelectrolytes-II. Preliminary investigation with a peat and a humic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marinsky, J.A.; Reddy, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    We summarize here experimental studies of proton and metal ion binding to a peat and a humic acid. Data analysis is based on a unified physico-chemical model for reaction of simple ions with polyelectrolytes employing a modified Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. Peat exhibited an apparent intrinsic acid dissociation constant of 10-4.05, and an apparent intrinsic metal ion binding constant of: 400 for cadmium ion; 600 for zinc ion; 4000 for copper ion; 20000 for lead ion. A humic acid was found to have an apparent intrinsic proton binding constant of 10-2.6. Copper ion binding to this humic acid sample occurred at two types of sites. The first site exhibited reaction characteristics which were independent of solution pH and required the interaction of two ligands on the humic acid matrix to simultaneously complex with each copper ion. The second complex species is assumed to be a simple monodentate copper ion-carboxylate species with a stability constant of 18. ?? 1984.

  18. Fluorescence Quenching of Two Coumarin-3-carboxylic Acids by Trivalent Lanthanide Ions.

    PubMed

    Cisse, Lamine; Djande, Abdoulaye; Capo-Chichi, Martine; Delattre, François; Saba, Adama; Brochon, Jean-Claude; Sanouski, Serguei; Tine, Alphonse; Aaron, Jean-Jacques

    2017-03-01

    The effects of various trivalent lanthanide ions (acetates of Ce(3+), Er(3+), Eu(3+), Nd(3+)) on the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of un-substituted coumarin-3-carboxylic acid (CCA) and 7-N,N-diethylamino-coumarin-3-carboxylic acid (DECCA) have been investigated in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) at room temperature. Depending on the lanthanide ion nature and concentration, significant spectral changes of absorption bands occurred for both coumarin derivatives. These spectral changes were attributed to the formation of ground-state complexes between the coumarin carboxylate derivatives and lanthanide ions. The fluorescence quenching of CCA and DECCA upon increasing the lanthanide ion concentration was studied. Different quantitative treatments, including the Stern-Volmer equation, the Perrin equation and a polynomial equation, were applied and compared in order to determine the nature of the quenching mechanisms for both coumarin derivatives. The results suggested the contribution of both dynamic and static quenching. Significant differences of CCA and DECCA fluorescence quenching efficiency were also observed, depending on the lanthanide ion. DECCA fluorescence lifetime measurements, performed in the absence and in the presence of Ln(3+), confirmed a contribution of static quenching.

  19. Development Status of a Power Processing Unit for Low Power Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; Bowers, Glen E.; Lafontaine, Eric M.

    2000-01-01

    An advanced breadboard Power Processing Unit (PPU) for a low power ion propulsion system incorporating mass reduction techniques was designed and fabricated. As a result of similar output current requirements, the discharge supply was also used to provide the neutralizer heater and discharge heater functions by using three relays to switch the output connections. This multi-function supply reduces to four the number of power converters needed to produce the required six electrical outputs. Switching frequencies of 20 and 50 kHz were chosen as a compromise between the size of the magnetic components and switching losses. The advanced breadboard PPU is capable of a maximum total output power of 0.47 kW. Its component mass is 0.65 kg and its total mass 1.9 kg. The total efficiency at full power is 0.89.

  20. New Lithium-ion Polymer Battery for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, J. A.; Darcy, E. C.

    2004-01-01

    The Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) suit currently has a silver-zinc battery that is 20.5 V and 45 Ah capacity. The EMU's portable life support system (PLSS) will draw power from the battery during the entire period of an EVA. Due to the disadvantages of using the silver-zinc battery in terms of cost and performance, a new high energy density battery is being developed for future use, The new battery (Lithium-ion battery or LIB) will consist of Li-ion polymer cells that will provide power to the EMU suit. The battery design consists of five 8 Ah cells in parallel to form a single module of 40 Ah and five such modules will be placed in series to give a 20.5 V, 40 Ah battery. Charging will be accomplished on the Shuttle or Station using the new LIB charger or the existing ALPS (Air Lock Power Supply) charger. The LIB delivers a maximum of 3.8 A on the average, for seven continuous hours, at voltages ranging from 20.5 V to 16.0 V and it should be capable of supporting transient pulses during start up and once every hour to support PLSS fan and pump operation. Figure 1 shows the placement of the battery in the backpack area of the EMU suit. The battery and cells will undergo testing under different conditions to understand its performance and safety characteristics.

  1. Removal of uranyl ions by p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arene acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu (Hoştuc), Ioana-Carmen; Petru, Filip; Humelnicu, Ionel; Mateescu, Marina; Militaru, Ecaterina; Humelnicu, Doina

    2014-10-01

    Radioactive pollution is a significant threat for the people’s health. Therefore highly effective radioactive decontamination methods are required. Ion exchange, biotechnologies and phytoremediation in constructed wetlands have been used as radioactive decontamination technologies for uranium contaminated soil and water remediation. Recently, beside those classical methods the calix[n]arenic derivatives’ utilization as radioactive decontaminators has jogged attention. The present work aims to present the preliminary research results of uranyl ion sorption studies on the p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arenic acid. The effect of temperature, contact time, sorbent amount and uranyl concentration variation on sorption efficiency was investigated. Isotherm models revealed that the sorption process fit better Langmuir isotherm.

  2. Determination of Cr(III) in chromic acid. Comparison of spectrophotometric and ion chromatographic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Smith, C.H.

    1986-04-01

    Two methods have been developed for determining Cr(III) in chromic acid solutions. Both methods are based on the formation of a Cr-EDTA complex. The ion chromatographic method detects the Cr-EDTA as an anion using chemically suppressed conductivity. The spectrophotometric method detects the Cr-EDTA as a colored complex by measuring the absorbance at 540 nm. The conditions necessary for forming the Cr-EDTA complex are described. The results obtained by the spectrophotometric and ion chromatographic methods are compared. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) is activated by alterations of its membrane environment.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Axel; Lenzig, Pia; Oslender-Bujotzek, Adrienne; Kusch, Jana; Lucas, Susana Dias; Gründer, Stefan; Wiemuth, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    The bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) is a member of the DEG/ENaC family of ion channels. Channels of this family are characterized by a common structure, their physiological functions and modes of activation, however, are diverse. Rat BASIC is expressed in brain, liver and intestinal tract and activated by bile acids. The physiological function of BASIC and its mechanism of bile acid activation remain a puzzle. Here we addressed the question whether amphiphilic bile acids activate BASIC by directly binding to the channel or indirectly by altering the properties of the surrounding membrane. We show that membrane-active substances other than bile acids also affect the activity of BASIC and that activation by bile acids and other membrane-active substances is non-additive, suggesting that BASIC is sensitive for changes in its membrane environment. Furthermore based on results from chimeras between BASIC and ASIC1a, we show that the extracellular and the transmembrane domains are important for membrane sensitivity.

  4. Formation of complex precursors of amino acids by irradiation of simulated interstellar media with heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Suzuki, N.; Taniuchi, T.; Kaneko, T.; Yoshida, S.

    A wide variety of organic compounds have been detected in such extraterrestrial bodies as meteorites and comets Amino acids were identified in the extracts from Murchison meteorite and other carbonaceous chondrites It is hypothesized that these compounds are originally formed in ice mantles of interstellar dusts ISDs in molecular clouds by cosmic rays and ultraviolet light UV Formation of amino acid precursors by high energy protons or UV irradiation of simulated ISDs was reported by several groups The amino acid precursors were however not well-characterized We irradiated a frozen mixture of methanol ammonia and water with heavy ions to study possible organic compounds abiotically formed in molecular clouds by cosmic rays A mixture of methanol ammonia and water was irradiated with carbon beams 290 MeV u from a heavy ion accelerator HIMAC of National Institute of Radiological Sciences Japan Irradiation was performed either at room temperature liquid phase or at 77 K solid phase The products were characterized by gel filtration chromatography GFC FT-IR pyrolysis PY -GC MS etc Amino acids were analyzed by HPLC and GC MS after acid hydrolysis or the products Amino acids such as glycine and alanine were identified in the products in both the cases of liquid phase and solid phase irradiation Energy yields G-values of glycine were 0 014 liquid phase and 0 007 solid phase respectively Average molecular weights of the products were estimated as to 2300 in both the case Aromatic hydrocarbons N-containing heterocyclic

  5. Complexation of Hg (II) ions with humic acids of tundra soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilevich, Roman

    2013-04-01

    Humic acids (HA) play an important role in processes of heavy metals migration, controlling their geochemical streams in environment. Accumulative and detoxification abilities of HA to heavy metals are realized by means of formation of steady complexes salycylate and pyrocatechin types. Modern researches show that HA of the Arctic and Subarctic areas are poorly enriched by aromatic frames, so and metalbinding centres. The work purpose is to study interaction mechanisms of Hg (II) ions with HA and to define tread possibilities of a tundra soils humic acids. It is established that binding ability of Hg (II) ions depends on concentration of an element, on quantity of functional groups in peripheral and nuclear parts of HA molecule as well as on a solution pH. coomplexation proceeds at pH 2.5-3.5 efficiently. On the basis of kinetic models it is shown that HA interaction with Hg (II) ions, at microconcentration of a pollutant (0.025-5.0 mkmol/dm3), has a zero order of reaction. Rate of a reaction does not depend on initial components concentration and is defined by process of Hg (II) ions diffusion to organic ligands. High correlation of a HA sorption capacity to Hg (II) ions is observed: with the nitrogen content and maintenance of amino groups (according to a 13C-NMR, element composition) and negative correlation - with degree of HA aromaticity. It testifies to primary binding of Hg (II) ions by amino-acid fragments of a HA molecule peripheral part. When concentration of Hg (II) ions increases, binding proceeds on carboxylic and phenolic groups of a molecule nuclear part. Higher order of kinetic models reaction and FTIR spectroscopy data testify to it. Comparison of FTIR spectra of HA preparations and mercury humates, shows that Hg (II) ions binding in humate complexes is carried out mainly by -COOH. Reduction of a spectral line intensity not ionized -COOH at 1700-1720 sm-1 and intensity increases of dissymetric valency vibration at 1610-1650 sm-1 diagnose increase

  6. Modification of Hydroxyapatite with Ion-Selective Complexants: 1-Hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) was modified with 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDP), and its effect on divalent metal ion binding was determined. HAP was synthesized from calcium hydroxide and phosphoric acid. After calcination, it was modified with HEDP, and the influence of time and temperature on the modification was investigated. HEDP incorporation increased as its initial solution concentration increased from 0.01 to 0.50 M. Unmodified and modified HAP were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and specific surface area analysis. Ca/P ratios, acid capacities, and phosphorus elemental analyses gave the effect of modification on composition and surface characteristics. A high reaction temperature produced new phosphonate bands at 993, 1082, and 1144 cm–1 that indicated the presence of HEDP. HAP modification at a high temperature–long reaction time had the highest HEDP loading and gave the sharpest XRD peaks. The emergence of new HAP–HEDP strands was observed in SEM images for treated samples while EDS showed high phosphorus contents in these strands. Modified HAP had a high acid capacity from the additional P–OH groups in HEDP. The P(O)OH groups maintain their ability to bind metal ions within the HAP matrix: contacting the modified HAP with 10–4 N nitrate solutions of five transition metal ions gives an affinity sequence of Pb(II) > Cd(II) > Zn(II) > Ni(II) > Cu(II). This result is comparable to that of commercially available di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid, a common solvent extractant, and the trend is consistent with the Misono softness parameter of metal ion polarizabilities. PMID:25678741

  7. Ruthenium oxide ion selective thin-film electrodes for engine oil acidity monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, D. K.; Sardarinejad, A.; Alameh, K.

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate the concept of a low-cost, rugged, miniaturized ion selective electrode (ISE) comprising a thin film RuO2 on platinum sensing electrode deposited using RF magnetron sputtered in conjunction with an integrated Ag/AgCl and Ag reference electrodes for engine oil acidity monitoring. Model oil samples are produced by adding nitric acid into fresh fully synthetic engine oil and used for sensor evaluation. Experimental results show a linear potential-versus-acid-concentration response for nitric acid concentration between 0 (fresh oil) to 400 ppm, which demonstrate the accuracy of the RuO2 sensor in real-time operation, making it attractive for use in cars and industrial engines.

  8. Chemical synthesis of lactic acid from cellulose catalysed by lead(II) ions in water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanliang; Deng, Weiping; Wang, Binju; Zhang, Qinghong; Wan, Xiaoyue; Tang, Zhenchen; Wang, Ye; Zhu, Chun; Cao, Zexing; Wang, Guichang; Wan, Huilin

    2013-01-01

    The direct transformation of cellulose, which is the main component of lignocellulosic biomass, into building-block chemicals is the key to establishing biomass-based sustainable chemical processes. Only limited successes have been achieved for such transformations under mild conditions. Here we report the simple and efficient chemocatalytic conversion of cellulose in water in the presence of dilute lead(II) ions, into lactic acid, which is a high-value chemical used for the production of fine chemicals and biodegradable plastics. The lactic acid yield from microcrystalline cellulose and several lignocellulose-based raw biomasses is >60% at 463 K. Both theoretical and experimental studies suggest that lead(II) in combination with water catalyses a series of cascading steps for lactic acid formation, including the isomerization of glucose formed via the hydrolysis of cellulose into fructose, the selective cleavage of the C3-C4 bond of fructose to trioses and the selective conversion of trioses into lactic acid.

  9. Sustainable production of acrylic acid: alkali-ion exchanged beta zeolite for gas-phase dehydration of lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bo; Tao, Li-Zhi; Liang, Yu; Xu, Bo-Qing

    2014-06-01

    Gas-phase dehydration of lactic acid (LA) to acrylic acid (AA) was investigated over alkali-exchanged β zeolite (M(x)Na(1-x)β, M=Li(+), K(+), Rb(+), or Cs(+)) of different exchange degrees (x). The reaction was conducted under varying conditions to understand the catalyst selectivity for AA production and trends of byproduct formation. The nature and exchange degree of M(+) were found to be critical for the acid-base properties and catalytic performance of the exchanged zeolite. K(x)Na(1-x)β of x=0.94 appeared to be the best performing catalyst whereas Li(x)Na(1-x)β and Naβ were the poorest in terms of AA selectivity and yield. The AA yield as high as 61 mol % (selectivity: 64 mol %) could be obtained under optimized reaction conditions for up to 8 h over the best performing K0.94Na0.06β. The acid and base properties of the catalysts were probed, respectively by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of adsorbed NH3 and CO2, and were related to the electrostatic potentials of the alkali ions in the zeolite, which provided a basis for the discussion of the acid-base catalysis for sustainable AA formation from LA.

  10. Rheological characterization of acid pectin samples in the absence and presence of monovalent ions.

    PubMed

    Ström, Anna; Schuster, Erich; Goh, Suk Meng

    2014-11-26

    Pectins are traditionally divided into two groups, high methoxy and low methoxy. The groupings determine the charge of the pectin and the gelation mechanism. However, not as yet extensively studied is the impact on gelation of the distribution of the charges as characterized by an absolute degree of blockiness (DBabs). The aim of this study was to characterize rheologically the acid gelation of a pectin with a high DBabs and a degree of methyl esterification of ∼ 37%, in the absence and presence of monovalent ions. The results obtained suggest that a pectin with a blocky charge distribution at pH conditions close to or below the pKa exhibits weak gel-like properties at intermediate frequencies, despite the absence of a permanent network structure. The addition of monovalent ions changed the rheological behavior to resemble that of a strong gel whose properties depended on the type and concentration of the ions.

  11. Stability of ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin in the presence and absence of metal ions in acidic solution.

    PubMed

    Hubicka, Urszula; Krzek, Jan; Walczak, Maria

    2010-01-01

    A thin-layer chromatographic-densitometric method was used to determine the stability of ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin in the presence and absence of metal ions in acidic solutions at 22 degrees C, 50 degrees C and 90 degrees C. The degradation of ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin followed first order reaction kinetics in presence of metal ions. The extent of this degradation however depended on the type of metal ion and temperature. Product structures of ciprofloxacin (1-cyclopropyl-6-fluoro-7-(piperazin-1-yl)quinolin-4(1H)-one) and norfloxacin (1-ethyl-6-fluoro-7-(piperazin-1-yl)quinolin-4(1H)-one) were determined by analysis of UV spectra and using LC-MS method.

  12. Micro/nanofabrication of poly(L-lactic acid) using focused ion beam direct etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Tomoko Gowa; Hinata, Toru; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Oshima, Akihiro; Washio, Masakazu; Tagawa, Seiichi; Taguchi, Mitsumasa

    2013-10-01

    Micro/nanofabrication of biocompatible and biodegradable poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) using focused Ga ion beam direct etching was evaluated for future bio-device applications. The fabrication performance was determined with different ion fluences and fluxes (beam currents), and it was found that the etching speed and fabrication accuracy were affected by irradiation-induced heat. Focused ion beam (FIB)-irradiated surfaces were analyzed using micro-area X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Owing to reactions such as the physical sputtering of atoms and radiation-induced decomposition, PLLA was gradually carbonized with increasing C=C bonds. Controlled micro/nanostructures of PLLA were fabricated with C=C bond-rich surfaces expected to have good cell attachment properties.

  13. Recent Selected Ion Flow Tube (SIFT) Studies Concerning the Formation of Amino Acids in the Gas Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Douglas M.; Adams, Nigel G.; Babcock, Lucia M.

    2006-01-01

    Recently the simplest amino acid, glycine, has been detected in interstellar clouds, ISC, although this has since been contested. In order to substantiate either of these claims, plausible routes to amino acids need to be investigated. For gas phase synthesis, the SIFT technique has been employed to study simple amino acids via ion-molecule reactions of several ions of interstellar interest with methylamine, ethylamine, formic acid, acetic acid, and methyl formate. Carboxylic acid type ions were considered in the reactions involving the amines. In reactions where the carboxylic acid and methyl formate neutrals were studied, the reactant ions were primarily amine ion fragments. It was observed that the amines and acids preferentially fragment or accept a proton whenever energetically possible. NH3(+), however, uniquely reacted with the neutrals via atom abstraction to form NH4(+). These studies yielded a body of data relevant to astrochemistry, supplementing the available literature. However, the search for gas phase routes to amino acids using conventional molecules has been frustrated. Our most recent research investigates the fragmentation patterns of several amino acids and several possible routes have been suggested for future study.

  14. Pharmacology of acid-sensing ion channels - Physiological and therapeutical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Baron, Anne; Lingueglia, Eric

    2015-07-01

    Development of the pharmacology of Acid-Sensing Ion Channels (ASICs) has become a key challenge to study their structure, their molecular and cellular functions and their physiopathological roles. This review provides a summary of the different compounds that directly interact with these channels, either with inhibitory or stimulatory effect, and with high selectivity or poor specificity. They include drugs and endogenous regulators, natural compounds of vegetal origin, and peptides isolated from animal venoms. The in vivo use of some of these pharmacological modulators in animal models and a few small clinical studies in humans have provided substantial data on the physiological and physiopathological roles of ASIC channels. Modulation of these channels will certainly provide new therapeutic opportunities in neurological and psychiatric diseases including pain, stroke, epilepsy, anxiety, depression or traumatic injury, as well as in some non-neurological pathologies. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'.

  15. Fragmentation of amino acids induced by collisions with low-energy highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekarski, D. G.; Maclot, S.; Domaracka, A.; Adoui, L.; Alcamí, M.; Rousseau, P.; Díaz-Tendero, S.; Huber, B. A.; Martín, F.

    2014-04-01

    Fragmentation of amino acids NH2-(CH2)n-COOH (n=1 glycine; n=2 β-alanine and n=3 γ-aminobutyric acid GABA) following collisions with slow highly charged ions has been studied in the gas phase by a combined experimental and theoretical approach. In the experiments, a multi-coincidence detection method was used to deduce the charge state of the molecules before fragmentation. Quantum chemistry calculations have been carried out in the basis of the density functional theory and ab initio molecular dynamics. The combination of both methodologies is essential to unambiguously unravel the different fragmentation pathways.

  16. Gas-Phase Amidation of Carboxylic Acids with Woodward's Reagent K Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhou; Pilo, Alice L.; Luongo, Carl A.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-06-01

    Gas-phase amidation of carboxylic acids in multiply-charged peptides is demonstrated via ion/ion reactions with Woodward's reagent K (wrk) in both positive and negative mode. Woodward's reagent K, N-ethyl-3-phenylisoxazolium-3'-sulfonate, is a commonly used reagent that activates carboxylates to form amide bonds with amines in solution. Here, we demonstrate that the analogous gas-phase chemistry occurs upon reaction of the wrk ions and doubly protonated (or doubly deprotonated) peptide ions containing the carboxylic acid functionality. The reaction involves the formation of the enol ester intermediate in the electrostatic complex. Upon collisional activation, the ethyl amine on the reagent is transferred to the activated carbonyl carbon on the peptide, resulting in the formation of an ethyl amide (addition of 27 Da to the peptide) with loss of a neutral ketene derivative. Further collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the products and comparison with solution-phase amidation product confirms the structure of the ethyl amide.

  17. Poly(acrylic acid) modifying bentonite with in-situ polymerization for removing lead ions.

    PubMed

    He, Y F; Zhang, L; Yan, D Z; Liu, S L; Wang, H; Li, H R; Wang, R M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a new kind of poly(acrylic acid) modified clay adsorbent, the poly(acrylic acid)/bentonite composite (PAA/HB) was prepared by in-situ polymerization, and utilized to remove lead(II) ions from solutions. The maximum adsorption of adsorbent is at pH 5 for metal ions, whereas the adsorption starts at pH 2. The effects of contact time (5-60 min), initial concentration of metal ions (200-1,000 mg/L) and adsorbent dosage (0.04-0.12 g/100 mL) have been reported in this article. The experimental data were investigated by means of kinetic and equilibrium adsorption isotherms. The kinetic data were analyzed by the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equation. The experimental data fitted the pseudo-second-order kinetic model very well. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were tried for the system to better understand the adsorption isotherm process. The maximal adsorption capacity of the lead(II) ions on the PAA/HB, as calculated from the Langmuir model, was 769.2 mg/g. The results in this study indicated that PAA/HB was an attractive candidate for removing lead(II) (99%).

  18. nC60 deposition kinetics: the complex contribution of humic acid, ion concentration, and valence.

    PubMed

    McNew, Coy P; LeBoeuf, Eugene J

    2016-07-01

    The demonstrated toxicity coupled with inevitable environmental release of nC60 raise serious concerns about its environmental fate and transport, therefore it is crucial to understand how nC60 will interact with subsurface materials including attached phase soil and sediment organic matter (AP-SOM). This study investigated the attachment of nC60 onto a Harpeth humic acid (HHA) coated silica surface under various solution conditions using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The HHA coating greatly enhanced nC60 attachment at low ion concentrations while hindering attachment at high ion concentrations in the presence of both mono and divalent cations. At low ion concentrations, the HHA greatly reduced the surface potential of the silica, enhancing nC60 deposition through reduction in the electrostatic repulsion. At high ion concentrations however, the reduced surface potential became less important due to the near zero energy barrier to deposition and therefore non-DLVO forces dominated, induced by compaction of the HHA layer, and leading to hindered attachment. In this manner, observed contributions from the HHA layer were more complex than previously reported and by monitoring surface charge and calculated DLVO interaction energy alongside attachment experiments, this study advances the mechanistic understanding of the variable attachment contributions from the humic acid layer.

  19. Hydrometallurgical recovery of metal values from sulfuric acid leaching liquor of spent lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangping; Chen, Yongbin; Zhou, Tao; Liu, Depei; Hu, Hang; Fan, Shaoyun

    2015-04-01

    Environmentally hazardous substances contained in spent Li-ion batteries, such as heavy metals and nocuous organics, will pose a threat to the environment and human health. On the other hand, the sustainable recycling of spent lithium-ion batteries may bring about environmental and economic benefits. In this study, a hydrometallurgical process was adopted for the comprehensive recovery of nickel, manganese, cobalt and lithium from sulfuric acid leaching liquor from waste cathode materials of spent lithium-ion batteries. First, nickel ions were selectively precipitated and recovered using dimethylglyoxime reagent. Recycled dimethylglyoxime could be re-used as precipitant for nickel and revealed similar precipitation performance compared with fresh dimethylglyoxime. Then the separation of manganese and cobalt was conducted by solvent extraction method using cobalt loaded D2EHPA. And McCabe-Thiele isotherm was employed for the prediction of the degree of separation and the number of extraction stages needed at specific experimental conditions. Finally, cobalt and lithium were sequentially precipitated and recovered as CoC2O4 ⋅ 2H2O and Li2CO3 using ammonium oxalate solution and saturated sodium carbonate solution, respectively. Recovery efficiencies could be attained as follows: 98.7% for Ni; 97.1% for Mn, 98.2% for Co and 81.0% for Li under optimized experimental conditions. This hydrometallurgical process may promise a candidate for the effective separation and recovery of metal values from the sulfuric acid leaching liquor.

  20. Lewis Acid Promoted Oxonium Ion Driven Carboamination of Alkynes for the Synthesis of 4-Alkoxy Quinolines.

    PubMed

    Gharpure, Santosh J; Nanda, Santosh K; Adate, Priyanka A; Shelke, Yogesh G

    2017-02-17

    Lewis acid mediated multisegment coupling cascade is designed for the synthesis of densely substituted 4-alkoxy quinolines via an oxonium ion triggered alkyne carboamination sequence involving C-C and C-N bond formations. Cyclic ether fused-quinolines could also be accessed using this fast, operationally simple, high yielding, chemoselective and functional group tolerant method. Versatility and utility of this methodology is demonstrated by postfunctionalization of products obtained and its use in synthesis of potent drug molecules.

  1. Implementation of boric acid in the field - Indian Point Unit 3 plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jusino, B.J.

    1983-05-01

    A corrosion phenomenon termed denting has occurred in some operating PWR nuclear steam generators. A steam-generator boric-acid-conditioning program was implemented at Indian Point Unit 3 to demonstrate the effectiveness of boric acid in reducing or stopping the progression of denting. The program included a four-day low-power, boric-acid soak of the steam generators followed by continuous addition of boric acid at high-power operation. An on-line hydrogen-monitoring technique and steam-generator inspection technique were used to determine the baseline condition of the steam generators and to provide an indication of the rate of denting progression after the addition of boric acid to the steam generators. The results from these tests indicated that, although denting had continued, it had progressed at a slower rate than the immediate period before the boric-acid treatment.

  2. Simultaneous and sensitive analysis of aliphatic carboxylic acids by ion-chromatography using on-line complexation with copper(II) ion.

    PubMed

    Kemmei, Tomoko; Kodama, Shuji; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Inoue, Yoshinori; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2015-01-02

    A new approach to ion chromatography is proposed to improve the UV detection of aliphatic carboxylic acids separated by anion-exchange chromatography. When copper(II) ion added to the mobile phase, it forms complexes with carboxylic acids that can be detected at 240 nm. The absorbance was found to increase with increasing copper(II) ion concentration. The retention times of α-hydroxy acids were also found to depend on the copper(II) ion concentration. Addition of acetonitrile to the mobile phase improved the separation of aliphatic carboxylic acids. The detection limits of the examined carboxylic acids (formate, glycolate, acetate, lactate, propionate, 3-hydroxypropionate, n-butyrate, isobutyrate, n-valerate, isovalerate, n-caproate) calculated at S/N=3 ranged from 0.06 to 3 μM. The detector signal was linear over three orders of magnitude of carboxylic acid concentration. The proposed method was successfully applied to analyze aliphatic carboxylic acids in rainwater and bread.

  3. Detection of Fatty Acids from Intact Microorganisms by Molecular Beam Static Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, Jani Cheri; Lehman, Richard Michael; Bauer, William Francis; O'Connell, Sean Patrick; Colwell, Frederick Scott; Shaw, Andrew D.

    2003-06-01

    We report the use of a surface analysis approach, static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) equipped with a molecular (ReO4-) ion primary beam, to analyze the surface of intact microbial cells. SIMS spectra of 28 microorganisms were compared to fatty acid profiles determined by gas chromatographic analysis of transesterfied fatty acids extracted from the same organisms. The results indicate that surface bombardment using the molecular primary beam cleaved the ester linkage characteristic of bacteria at the glycerophosphate backbone of the phospholipid components of the cell membrane. This cleavage enables direct detection of the fatty acid conjugate base of intact microorganisms by static SIMS. The limit of detection for this approach is approximately 107 bacterial cells/cm2. Multivariate statistical methods were applied in a graded approach to the SIMS microbial data. The results showed that the full data set could initially be statistically grouped based upon major differences in biochemical composition of the cell wall. The gram-positive bacteria were further statistically analyzed, followed by final analysis of a specific bacterial genus that was successfully grouped by species. Additionally, the use of SIMS to detect microbes on mineral surfaces is demonstrated by an analysis of Shewanella oneidensis on crushed hematite. The results of this study provide evidence for the potential of static SIMS to rapidly detect bacterial species based on ion fragments originating from cell membrane lipids directly from sample surfaces.

  4. The influence of mineral ions on the microbial production and molecular weight of hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Pires, Aline Mara B; Eguchi, Silvia Y; Santana, Maria Helena Andrade

    2010-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the culture medium supplementation with mineral ions, focusing on the growth of Streptococcus zooepidemicus as well as on the production and average molecular weight (MW) of hyaluronic acid (HA). The ions were investigated in terms of individual absence from the totally supplemented medium (C+) or individual presence in the non-supplemented medium (C-), where C+ and C- were used as controls. Differences between the effects were analyzed using the Tukey's test at p < 0.05. The adopted criteria considered required the ions, whose individual absence attained at 80% or less of the C+ and their individual presence was 20% or more than the C-. The supplementation was either inhibitory or acted in synergy with other ions, when the individual absence or presence was 20% higher than C+ or 20% lower than C-, respectively. Results showed that the effects of C+ or C- were equal for both the production of HA and its yield from glucose. However, C+ showed to be beneficial to cell growth while the individual absence of Na+ was beneficial to the production of HA. The highest MW of HA (7.4 x 10⁷ Da) was observed in the individual presence of Na+ in spite of the lowest HA concentration (0.65 g x L⁻¹). These results suggest that the quality of HA can be modulated through the mineral ion supplementation.

  5. Linking molecular models with ion mobility experiments. Illustration with a rigid nucleic acid structure

    PubMed Central

    D'Atri, Valentina; Porrini, Massimiliano; Rosu, Frédéric; Gabelica, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry experiments allow the mass spectrometrist to determine an ion's rotationally averaged collision cross section ΩEXP. Molecular modelling is used to visualize what ion three-dimensional structure(s) is(are) compatible with the experiment. The collision cross sections of candidate molecular models have to be calculated, and the resulting ΩCALC are compared with the experimental data. Researchers who want to apply this strategy to a new type of molecule face many questions: (1) What experimental error is associated with ΩEXP determination, and how to estimate it (in particular when using a calibration for traveling wave ion guides)? (2) How to generate plausible 3D models in the gas phase? (3) Different collision cross section calculation models exist, which have been developed for other analytes than mine. Which one(s) can I apply to my systems? To apply ion mobility spectrometry to nucleic acid structural characterization, we explored each of these questions using a rigid structure which we know is preserved in the gas phase: the tetramolecular G-quadruplex [dTGGGGT]4, and we will present these detailed investigation in this tutorial. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26259654

  6. Density Functional Theory Study on the Interactions of Metal Ions with Long Chain Deprotonated Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Mehandzhiyski, Aleksandar Y; Riccardi, Enrico; van Erp, Titus S; Koch, Henrik; Åstrand, Per-Olof; Trinh, Thuat T; Grimes, Brian A

    2015-10-08

    In this work, interactions between carboxylate ions and calcium or sodium ions are investigated via density functional theory (DFT). Despite the ubiquitous presence of these interactions in natural and industrial chemical processes, few DFT studies on these systems exist in the literature. Special focus has been placed on determining the influence of the multibody interactions (with up to 4 carboxylates and one metal ion) on an effective pair-interaction potential, such as those used in molecular mechanics (MM). Specifically, DFT calculations are employed to quantify an effective pair-potential that implicitly includes multibody interactions to construct potential energy curves for carboxylate-metal ion pairs. The DFT calculated potential curves are compared to a widely used molecular mechanics force field (OPLS-AA). The calculations indicate that multibody effects do influence the energetic behavior of these ionic pairs and the extent of this influence is determined by a balance between (a) charge transfer from the carboxylate to the metal ions which stabilizes the complex and (b) repulsion between carboxylates, which destabilizes the complex. Additionally, the potential curves of the complexes with 1 and 2 carboxylates and one counterion have been examined to higher separation distance (20 Å) by the use of relaxed scan optimization and constrained density functional theory (CDFT). The results from the relaxed scan optimization indicate that near the equilibrium distance, the charge transfer between the metal ion and the deprotonated carboxylic acid group is significant and leads to non-negligible differences between the DFT and MM potential curves, especially for calcium. However, at longer separation distances the MM calculated interaction potential functions converge to those calculated with CDFT, effectively indicating the approximate domain of the separation distance coordinate where charge transfer between the ions is occurring.

  7. Multi-shell model of ion-induced nucleic acid condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolokh, Igor S.; Drozdetski, Aleksander V.; Pollack, Lois; Baker, Nathan A.; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2016-04-01

    We present a semi-quantitative model of condensation of short nucleic acid (NA) duplexes induced by trivalent cobalt(iii) hexammine (CoHex) ions. The model is based on partitioning of bound counterion distribution around single NA duplex into "external" and "internal" ion binding shells distinguished by the proximity to duplex helical axis. In the aggregated phase the shells overlap, which leads to significantly increased attraction of CoHex ions in these overlaps with the neighboring duplexes. The duplex aggregation free energy is decomposed into attractive and repulsive components in such a way that they can be represented by simple analytical expressions with parameters derived from molecular dynamic simulations and numerical solutions of Poisson equation. The attractive term depends on the fractions of bound ions in the overlapping shells and affinity of CoHex to the "external" shell of nearly neutralized duplex. The repulsive components of the free energy are duplex configurational entropy loss upon the aggregation and the electrostatic repulsion of the duplexes that remains after neutralization by bound CoHex ions. The estimates of the aggregation free energy are consistent with the experimental range of NA duplex condensation propensities, including the unusually poor condensation of RNA structures and subtle sequence effects upon DNA condensation. The model predicts that, in contrast to DNA, RNA duplexes may condense into tighter packed aggregates with a higher degree of duplex neutralization. An appreciable CoHex mediated RNA-RNA attraction requires closer inter-duplex separation to engage CoHex ions (bound mostly in the "internal" shell of RNA) into short-range attractive interactions. The model also predicts that longer NA fragments will condense more readily than shorter ones. The ability of this model to explain experimentally observed trends in NA condensation lends support to proposed NA condensation picture based on the multivalent "ion binding

  8. Stereochemical Sequence Ion Selectivity: Proline versus Pipecolic-acid-containing Protonated Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Guan, Shanshan; Bythell, Benjamin J.

    2017-01-01

    Substitution of proline by pipecolic acid, the six-membered ring congener of proline, results in vastly different tandem mass spectra. The well-known proline effect is eliminated and amide bond cleavage C-terminal to pipecolic acid dominates instead. Why do these two ostensibly similar residues produce dramatically differing spectra? Recent evidence indicates that the proton affinities of these residues are similar, so are unlikely to explain the result [Raulfs et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 25, 1705-1715 (2014)]. An additional hypothesis based on increased flexibility was also advocated. Here, we provide a computational investigation of the "pipecolic acid effect," to test this and other hypotheses to determine if theory can shed additional light on this fascinating result. Our calculations provide evidence for both the increased flexibility of pipecolic-acid-containing peptides, and structural changes in the transition structures necessary to produce the sequence ions. The most striking computational finding is inversion of the stereochemistry of the transition structures leading to "proline effect"-type amide bond fragmentation between the proline/pipecolic acid-congeners: R (proline) to S (pipecolic acid). Additionally, our calculations predict substantial stabilization of the amide bond cleavage barriers for the pipecolic acid congeners by reduction in deleterious steric interactions and provide evidence for the importance of experimental energy regime in rationalizing the spectra.

  9. Some polyphenols inhibit the formation of pentyl radical and octanoic acid radical in the reaction mixture of linoleic acid hydroperoxide with ferrous ions.

    PubMed Central

    Iwahashi, H

    2000-01-01

    Effects of some polyphenols and their related compounds (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, quinic acid, ferulic acid, gallic acid, D-(+)-catechin, D-(-)-catechin, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid, salicylic acid, L-dopa, dopamine, L-adrenaline, L-noradrenaline, o-dihydroxybenzene, m-dihydroxybenzene, and p-dihydroxybenzene) on the formation of 13-hydroperoxide octadecadienoic (13-HPODE) acid-derived radicals (pentyl radical and octanoic acid radical) were examined. The ESR spin trapping showed that chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, gallic acid, D-(+)-catechin, D-(-)-catechin, L-dopa, dopamine, L-adrenaline, L-noradrenaline, and o-dihydroxybenzene inhibited the overall formation of 13-HPODE acid-derived radicals in the reaction mixture of 13-HPODE with ferrous ions. The ESR peak heights of alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone (4-POBN)/13-HPODE-derived radical adducts decreased to 46+/-4% (chlorogenic acid), 54+/-2% (caffeic acid), 49+/-2% (gallic acid), 55+/-1% [D-(+)-catechin], 60+/-3% [D-(-)-catechin], 42+/-1% (L-dopa), 30+/-2% (dopamine), 49+/-2% (L-adrenaline), 24+/-2% (L-noradrenaline), and 54+/-5% (o-dihydroxybenzene) of the control, respectively. The high performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance (HPLC-ESR) and high performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance-mass spectrometries (HPLC-ESR-MS) showed that caffeic acid inhibited the formation of octanoic acid radical and pentyl radical to 42+/-2% and 52+/-7% of the control, respectively. On the other hand, the polyphenols and their related compounds had few inhibitory effects on the radical formation in the presence of EDTA. Visible absorbance measurement revealed that all the polyphenols exhibiting the inhibitory effect chelate ferrous ions. Above results indicated that the chelation of ferrous ion is essential to the inhibitory effects of the polyphenols. PMID:10677343

  10. Structural link between giant molybdenum oxide based ions and derived Keggin structure: modular assemblies based on the [BW11O39]9- ion and pentagonal {M'M5} units (M' = W; M = Mo,W).

    PubMed

    Leclerc-Laronze, Nathalie; Marrot, Jérôme; Thouvenot, René; Cadot, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    Linked to the Pentagon: The addition of molybdate to [HBW(11)O(39)](8-) ions leads to the formation of mixed pentagonal units {W(Mo(5))} and {W(WMo(4))} trapped as linkers in the resulting modular assemblies, thus establishing the first link between the conventional Keggin ion derivatives and the giant molybdenum oxide and keplerate ions.

  11. The effect of various treatment conditions on natural zeolites: ion exchange, acidic, thermal and steam treatments.

    PubMed

    Ates, Ayten; Hardacre, Christopher

    2012-04-15

    Two different natural zeolites having different phase compositions were obtained from different regions of Turkey and modified by ion-exchange (0.5M NH(4)NO(3)) and acid leaching using 1M HCl. The natural and modified samples were treated at low temperature (LT), high temperature (HT) and steam (ST) conditions and characterised by XRF, XRD, BET, FTIR, DR-UV-Vis, NH(3)-TPD and TGA. Ion-exchange with NH(4)(+) of natural zeolites results in the exchange of the Na(+) and Ca(2+) cations and the partial exchange of the Fe(3+) and Mg(2+) cations. However, steam and acidic treatments cause significant dealumination and decationisation, as well as loss of crystalline, sintering of phases and the formation of amorphous material. The presence of mordenite and quartz phases in the natural zeolites increases the stability towards acid treatment, whereas the structure of clinoptilolite-rich zeolites is mostly maintained after high temperature and steam treatments. The natural and modified zeolites treated at high temperature and in steam were found to be less stable compared with synthetic zeolites, resulting in a loss of crystallinity, a decrease in the surface area and pore volume, a decrease in the surface acidity as well as dealumination, and decationisation.

  12. Transition metal ion-assisted photochemical generation of alkyl halides and hydrocarbons from carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Carraher, Jack; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2012-03-14

    Near-UV photolysis of aqueous solutions of propionic acid and aqueous Fe3+ in the absence of oxygen generates a mixture of hydrocarbons (ethane, ethylene and butane), carbon dioxide, and Fe2+. The reaction becomes mildly catalytic (about five turnovers) in the presence of oxygen which converts a portion of alkyl radicals to oxidizing intermediates that reoxidize Fe2+. The photochemistry in the presence of halide ions (X− = Cl−, Br−) generates ethyl halides via halogen atom abstraction from FeXn3−n by ethyl radicals. Near-quantitative yields of C2H5X are obtained at ≥0.05 M X−. Competition experiments with Co(NH3)5Br2+ provided kinetic data for the reaction of ethyl radicals with FeCl2+ (k = (4.0 ± 0.5) × 106 M−1 s−1) and with FeBr2+ (k = (3.0 ± 0.5) × 107 M−1 s−1). Photochemical decarboxylation of propionic acid in the presence of Cu2+ generates ethylene and Cu+. Longer-chain acids also yield alpha olefins as exclusive products. These reactions become catalytic under constant purge with oxygen which plays a dual role. It reoxidizes Cu+ to Cu2+, and removes gaseous olefins to prevent accumulation of Cu+(olefin) complexes and depletion of Cu2+. The results underscore the profound effect that the choice of metal ions, the medium, and reaction conditions exert on the photochemistry of carboxylic acids.

  13. Solid Polymer Electrolytes Based on Functionalized Tannic Acids from Natural Resources for All-Solid-State Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jimin; Bae, Ki Yoon; Kim, Hee Joong; Lee, Jin Hong; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Yoon, Woo Young; Lee, Jong-Chan

    2015-12-21

    Solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) for all-solid-state lithium-ion batteries are prepared by simple one-pot polymerization induced by ultraviolet (UV) light using poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) as an ion-conducting monomeric unit and tannic acid (TA)-based crosslinking agent and plasticizer. The crosslinking agent and plasticizer based on natural resources are obtained from the reaction of TA with glycidyl methacrylate and glycidyl poly(ethylene glycol), respectively. Dimensionally stable free-standing SPE having a large ionic conductivity of 5.6×10(-4)  Scm(-1) at room temperature can be obtained by the polymerization of PEGMA into P(PEGMA) with a very small amount (0.1 wt %) of the crosslinking agent and 2.0 wt % of the plasticizer. The ionic conductivity value of SPE with a crosslinked structure is one order of magnitude larger than that of linear P(PEGMA) in the waxy state.

  14. Uneven distribution of metallic ions in deposits precipitated in the Koshijihara DGA CO{sub 2} removal units

    SciTech Connect

    Tomoe, Y.; Sato, K.

    1997-08-01

    304 stainless steel has been suffering from general corrosion in CO{sub 2} removal units using a high concentration DGA solution in a natural gas processing plant. Deposits precipitated in the DGA units were sampled during annual inspections and analyzed for metallic ions and their compounds. It was found that Fe and Cr were rich in the deposits along the lean DGA lines and Ni was rich along the rich DGA lines. Fe and Cr precipitated as oxides and Ni precipitated as sulfides. This uneven distribution of metallic ions in the units was due to the differences in metal chelate stability with DGA and/or DGA carbamate and also due to the trace amount of H{sub 2}S in the raw natural gas. There has not been a direct proof of carbamates playing some roles in an actual amine unit, this uneven distribution of metallic ions is one evidence that DGA carbamate really plays some roles in actual DGA units.

  15. Using problem based learning and guided inquiry in a high school acid-base chemistry unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, Katie

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if incorporating problem based learning and guided inquiry would improve student achievement in an acid base unit for high school chemistry. The activities and labs in the unit were modified to be centered around the problem of a fish kill that students investigated. Students also participated in guided inquiry labs to increase the amount of critical thinking and problem solving being done in the classroom. The hypothesis was that the implementation of problem based learning and guided inquiry would foster student learning. Students took a pre-test and post-test on questions covering the objectives of the acid base unit. These assessments were compared to determine the effectiveness of the unit. The results indicate that the unit was effective in increasing student performance on the unit test. This study also analyzed the process of problem based learning. Problem based learning can be an effective method of engaging students in inquiry. However, designing an effective problem based learning unit requires careful design of the problem and enough structure to assure students learn the intended content.

  16. Experimental particle formation rates spanning tropospheric sulfuric acid and ammonia abundances, ion production rates, and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürten, Andreas; Bianchi, Federico; Almeida, Joao; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Dunne, Eimear M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Williamson, Christina; Barmet, Peter; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Gordon, Hamish; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Ickes, Luisa; Jokinen, Tuija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Onnela, Antti; Ortega, Ismael K.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Smith, James N.; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Wagner, Paul E.; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Ken; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-10-01

    Binary nucleation of sulfuric acid and water as well as ternary nucleation involving ammonia are thought to be the dominant processes responsible for new particle formation (NPF) in the cold temperatures of the middle and upper troposphere. Ions are also thought to be important for particle nucleation in these regions. However, global models presently lack experimentally measured NPF rates under controlled laboratory conditions and so at present must rely on theoretical or empirical parameterizations. Here with data obtained in the European Organization for Nuclear Research CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber, we present the first experimental survey of NPF rates spanning free tropospheric conditions. The conditions during nucleation cover a temperature range from 208 to 298 K, sulfuric acid concentrations between 5 × 105 and 1 × 109 cm-3, and ammonia mixing ratios from zero added ammonia, i.e., nominally pure binary, to a maximum of 1400 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). We performed nucleation studies under pure neutral conditions with zero ions being present in the chamber and at ionization rates of up to 75 ion pairs cm-3 s-1 to study neutral and ion-induced nucleation. We found that the contribution from ion-induced nucleation is small at temperatures between 208 and 248 K when ammonia is present at several pptv or higher. However, the presence of charges significantly enhances the nucleation rates, especially at 248 K with zero added ammonia, and for higher temperatures independent of NH3 levels. We compare these experimental data with calculated cluster formation rates from the Atmospheric Cluster Dynamics Code with cluster evaporation rates obtained from quantum chemistry.

  17. Actions and Mechanisms of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Elinder, Fredrik; Liin, Sara I.

    2017-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) act on most ion channels, thereby having significant physiological and pharmacological effects. In this review we summarize data from numerous PUFAs on voltage-gated ion channels containing one or several voltage-sensor domains, such as voltage-gated sodium (NaV), potassium (KV), calcium (CaV), and proton (HV) channels, as well as calcium-activated potassium (KCa), and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Some effects of fatty acids appear to be channel specific, whereas others seem to be more general. Common features for the fatty acids to act on the ion channels are at least two double bonds in cis geometry and a charged carboxyl group. In total we identify and label five different sites for the PUFAs. PUFA site 1: The intracellular cavity. Binding of PUFA reduces the current, sometimes as a time-dependent block, inducing an apparent inactivation. PUFA site 2: The extracellular entrance to the pore. Binding leads to a block of the channel. PUFA site 3: The intracellular gate. Binding to this site can bend the gate open and increase the current. PUFA site 4: The interface between the extracellular leaflet of the lipid bilayer and the voltage-sensor domain. Binding to this site leads to an opening of the channel via an electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged PUFA and the positively charged voltage sensor. PUFA site 5: The interface between the extracellular leaflet of the lipid bilayer and the pore domain. Binding to this site affects slow inactivation. This mapping of functional PUFA sites can form the basis for physiological and pharmacological modifications of voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:28220076

  18. Determination of naphthenic acids in crude oils using nonaqueous ion exchange solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Jones, D M; Watson, J S; Meredith, W; Chen, M; Bennett, B

    2001-02-01

    A method is presented for the routine, rapid, and quantitative analysis of aliphatic and naphthenic acids in crude oils, based on their isolation using nonaqueous ion exchange solid-phase extraction cartridges. The isolated acid fractions are methylated and analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The method is effective on both light and heavy oils and is capable of providing mechanistic information of geochemical significance on the origin of the acids in the oils. Analysis of oils that were solvent extracted from laboratory and field mesocosm marine sediment oil degradation studies indicate that this new method of analyzing the products of hydrocarbon biodegradation may be a useful tool for monitoring the progress of bioremediation of oil spills in the environment.

  19. Acids and Alkalis. Seychelles Integrated Science. [Teacher and Pupil Booklets]. Unit 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brophy, M.; Fryars, M.

    Seychelles Integrated Science (SIS), a 3-year laboratory-based science program for students (ages 11-15) in upper primary grades 7, 8, and 9, was developed from an extensive evaluation and modification of previous P7-P9 materials. This P8 SIS unit focuses on: (1) the uses of acids and bases (alkalis) in students' everyday lives, stressing their…

  20. Enhancement of L(+)-Lactic Acid Production of Immobilized Rhizopus Oryzae Implanted by Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yonghong; Yang, Yingge; Zheng, Zhiming; Li, Wen; Wang, Peng; Yao, Liming; Yu, Zengliang

    2008-02-01

    Immobilized Rhizopus oryzae culturing may be a solution to the inhibited production of L(+)-lactic acid in submerged fermentation, which is caused by aggregated mycelia floc. In the present study, a R. oryzae mutant (RL6041) with a 90% conversion rate of glucose into L-lactic acid was obtained by N+ implantation under the optimized conditions of a beam energy of 15 keV and a dose of 2.6 × 1015 ions/cm2. Using polyurethane foam as the immobilization matrix, the optimal L-lactic acid production conditions were determined as 4 mm polyurethane foam, 150 r/min, 50 g/L ~ 80 g/L of initial glucose, 38°C and pH 6.0. 15-cycle repeated productions of L-lactic acid by immobilized RL6041 were performed under the optimized culturing conditions and over 80% of the glucose was converted into L-lactic acid in 30 hours on average. The results show that immobilized RL6041 is a promising candidate for continuous L-lactic acid production.

  1. DDQ-promoted dehydrogenation from natural rigid polycyclic acids or flexible alkyl acids to generate lactones by a radical ion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ye; Huang, Zhangjian; Yin, Jian; Lai, Yisheng; Zhang, Shibo; Zhang, Zhiguo; Fang, Lei; Peng, Sixun; Zhang, Yihua

    2011-09-07

    A novel and facile DDQ-mediated dehydrogenation from natural rigid polycyclic acids or flexible alkyl acids to generate lactones is described. The formation of lactones proceeds by a radical ion mechanism, which has been established by DPPH˙-mediated chemical identification, ESR spectroscopy and an enol intermediate trapping.

  2. Fortification of corn masa flour with folic acid in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fleischman, Alan R; Oinuma, Motoko

    2011-08-01

    Food fortification is an effective public health tool for addressing micronutrient deficiencies. The mandatory fortification of enriched cereal grains (e.g., wheat flour) with folic acid, which began in the United States in 1998, is an example of a successful intervention that significantly reduced the rate of neural tube defects (NTDs). However, despite the drop in NTD rates across all racial/ethnic groups after fortification, Hispanics continue to have the highest rates of this condition. One possible way to reduce this disparity is to fortify corn masa flour to increase the overall intake of folic acid in Hispanic women. We present the available evidence in favor of this approach, address possible safety issues, and outline next steps in the fortification of corn masa flour with folic acid in the United States.

  3. Determination of some aliphatic carboxylic acids in anaerobic digestion process waters by ion-exclusion chromatography with conductimetric detection on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuaki; Takayama, Yohichi; Ikedo, Mikaru; Mori, Masanobu; Taoda, Hiroshi; Xu, Qun; Hu, Wenzhi; Sunahara, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Tsuneo; Sato, Shinji; Hirokawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2004-06-11

    The determination of seven aliphatic carboxylic acids, formic, acetic, propionic, isobutyric, n-butyric, isovaleric and n-valeric acids in anaerobic digestion process waters was examined using ion-exclusion chromatography with conductimetric detection. The analysis of these biologically important carboxylic acids is necessary as a measure for evaluating and controlling the process. The ion-exclusion chromatography system employed consisted of polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin columns (TSKgel OApak-A or TSKgel Super IC-A/C). weakly acidic eluent (benzoic acid), and conductimetric detection. Particle size and cation-exchange capacity were 5 microm and 0.1 meq./ml for TSKgel OApak-A and 3 microm and 0.2 meq./ml for TSKgel Super IC-A/C, respectively. A dilute eluent (1.0-2.0 mM) of benzoic acid was effective for the high resolution and highly conductimetric detection of the carboxylic acids. The good separation of isobutyric and n-butyric acids was performed using the TSKgel Super IC-A/C column (150 mm x 6.0 mm i.d. x 2). The simple and good chromatograms were obtained by the optimized ion-exclusion chromatography conditions for real samples from mesophilic anaerobic digestors, thus the aliphatic carboxylic acids were successfully determined without any interferences.

  4. Removal and recovery of metal ions from acid mine drainage using lignite--A low cost sorbent.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dinesh; Chander, Subhash

    2006-10-11

    Acid mine drainage (AMD), has long been a significant environmental problem resulting from the microbial oxidation of iron pyrite in presence of water and air, affording an acidic solution that contains toxic metal ions. The main objective of this study was to remove and recover metal ions from acid mine drainage (AMD) by using lignite, a low cost sorbent. Lignite has been characterized and used for the AMD treatment. Sorption of ferrous, ferric, manganese, zinc and calcium in multi-component aqueous systems was investigated. Studies were performed at different pH to find optimum pH. To simulate industrial conditions for acid mine wastewater treatment, all the studies were performed using single and multi-columns setup in down flow mode. The empty bed contact time (EBCT) model was used for minimizing the sorbent usage. Recovery of the metal ions as well as regeneration of sorbent was achieved successfully using 0.1 M nitric acid without dismantling the columns.

  5. EXAFS determinations of uranium structures: The uranyl ion complexed with tartaric, citric, and malic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.G.; Shuh, D.K.; Bucher, J.J.

    1996-01-31

    Studies of the coordination chemistry of uranium in aqueous solutions are increasingly important for understanding the behavior of uranium in the environment. Actinide speciation information is essential for assessing and developing long-term strategies addressing problems such as migration in nuclear waste repositories or improvements in the processing of nuclear waste and materials. Relative to the latter, one method for removing uranium contamination from soils involves extraction using a chelating agent such as Tiron, or citrate. These types of extractants are quite efficient at binding the uranyl ion and thus are suitable for removing uranium contamination when it is in the hexavalent uranyl ion form. Martell et al. and Markovits et al. have published a series of articles detailing the complexation of the uranyl ion with tartaric, malic, and citric acids as a function of pH. Using the functional dependencies of potentiometric titration results, they showed that, in the pH range 2-4, the uranyl ion forms a 2:2 dimeric species, (UO{sub 2}){sub 2-} (L){sub 2}, where L = tartrate, malate, or citrate ligands. The authors have reinvestigated the solution structures of the uranyl complexes formed in these systems with the structural technique extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy.

  6. Removal of textile dyes and metallic ions using polyelectrolytes and macroelectrolytes containing sulfonic acid groups.

    PubMed

    Caldera Villalobos, M; Peláez Cid, A A; Herrera González, Ana M

    2016-07-15

    This work reports the removal of textile dyes and metallic ions by means of adsorption and coagulation-flocculation using two polyelectrolytes and two macroelectrolytes containing sulfonic acid groups. The adsorption of textile dyes was studied in aqueous solutions containing cationic dyes and in wastewater containing a vat dye. Also, removal of vat and naphthol dyes was studied using the process of coagulation-flocculation. The results show these materials possess elevated adsorption capacity, and they accomplished removal rates above 97% in aqueous solutions. The removal of the vat dye improved the quality of the wastewater notably, and an uncolored effluent was obtained at the end of the treatment. The treatment using adsorption decreased the values for coloration, conductivity, suspended solids, and pH. The removal of vat and naphthol dyes by means of coagulation-flocculation was studied as well, and removal rates of 90% were obtained. The polyelectrolytes and macroelectrolytes also proved effective in the adsorption of metallic ions in wastewater. The treatment using adsorption accomplished high removal rates of metallic ions, and it showed greater selectivity towards Cu(2+), Fe(3+) and Pb(2+). A decrease in the content of solids as well as the values for COD and conductivity was observed in the wastewater as well. The analyses of FT-IR indicated that cationic dyes and metallic ions were chemisorbed by means of ionic exchange.

  7. Multivalent ion-mediated nucleic acid helix-helix interactions: RNA versus DNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuan-Yan; Zhang, Zhong-Liang; Zhang, Jin-Si; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2015-07-13

    Ion-mediated interaction is critical to the structure and stability of nucleic acids. Recent experiments suggest that the multivalent ion-induced aggregation of double-stranded (ds) RNAs and DNAs may strongly depend on the topological nature of helices, while there is still lack of an understanding on the relevant ion-mediated interactions at atomistic level. In this work, we have directly calculated the potentials of mean force (PMF) between two dsRNAs and between two dsDNAs in Co(NH3)6 (3+) (Co-Hex) solutions by the atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Our calculations show that at low [Co-Hex], the PMFs between B-DNAs and between A-RNAs are both (strongly) repulsive. However, at high [Co-Hex], the PMF between B-DNAs is strongly attractive, while those between A-RNAs and between A-DNAs are still (weakly) repulsive. The microscopic analyses show that for A-form helices, Co-Hex would become 'internal binding' into the deep major groove and consequently cannot form the evident ion-bridge between adjacent helices, while for B-form helices without deep grooves, Co-Hex would exhibit 'external binding' to strongly bridge adjacent helices. In addition, our further calculations show that, the PMF between A-RNAs could become strongly attractive either at very high [Co-Hex] or when the bottom of deep major groove is fixed with a layer of water.

  8. Analysis of underivatized amino acids in geological samples using ion-pairing liquid chromatography and electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, De-Ling; Beegle, Luther W; Kanik, Isik

    2008-04-01

    The capability of detecting biomarkers, such as amino acids, in chemically complex field samples is essential to establishing the knowledge required to search for chemical signatures of life in future planetary explorations. However, due to the complexities of in situ investigations, it is important to establish a new analytical scheme that utilizes a minimal amount of sample preparation. This paper reports the feasibility of a novel and sensitive technique, which has been established to quantitate amino acids in terrestrial crust samples directly without derivatization using volatile ion-pairing liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry equipped with an electrospray ionization source. Adequate separation of 20 underivatized amino acids was achieved on a C(18) capillary column within 26 min with nonafluoropentanoic acid (NFPA) as ion-pairing reagent. Each amino acid was identified from its retention time as well as from its characteristic parent-to-daughter ion transition. Using tandem mass spectrometry as a detection technique allows co-elution of some amino acids, as it is more specific than traditional spectrophotometric methods. In the present study, terrestrial samples collected from 3 different locations were analyzed for their water-extractable free amino acid contents, following the removal of metal and organic interferences via ion exchange procedures. This is the first time that amino acids in geological samples were directly determined quantitatively without complicated derivatization steps. Depending on the amino acid, the detection limits varied from 0.02 to 5.7 pmol with the use of a 1 microl sample injection loop.

  9. Study of coagulation processes of selected humic acids under copper ions influence*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguta, Patrycja; Sokolowska, Zofia

    2013-04-01

    Humic acids have limited sorption capacity and big dose of metal or other mineral component which can be sorbed on humic acids, can cause saturation of negative, surface charge of humic acids leading to destabilization of dissolved humic acids compounds. Destabilisation can be observed as coagulation and floculation proces of humic acids. However there are a lot of mechanisms which causing precipitation of humic acids. Thereby, in order to full description of coagulation process, different methods should be applied. Ordinarily, humic acids coagulation is studied by measurement of absorbance, transmittance or carbon loss in solution. Meanwhile, very significant information is also variation of metal content in soil solution and information whether metal goes to precipitate together with humic acids or stays in dissolved form in solution. So, that, from one side, processes of stronger accumulation of metal can lead to soil degradation and micronutrient deficiency for plants. However, there is also possibility to stay metal in solution in toxic and bioavailable form for plants. Main aim of this paper was to study coagulation process of different humic acids extracted from mucking peats under copper ions influence at adjusted pH to 5. In order to this, four peaty-muck soils were taken from selected places in east part of Poland (meadows and river valleys). These soils differed by humification degree, secondary transformation, density and pH. At next step, humic acids were extracted from soils using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) extractant. After exact purification by washing with HF-HCl mixture and water, humic acids were liofilized. Solutions of humic acids were prepared at concentration 40 mg/dm3 with addition of different amount of copper ions to obtain final concentration of Cu(II) ranged from 0-40mg/dm3. After 24 hours solutions were investigated using measurements of absorbance at 470nm (UV-VIS spectrometer Jasco V-530), measurements of organic carbon in solution

  10. Use of monoatomic and polyatomic projectiles for the characterisation of polylactic acid by static secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Boschmans, Bart; Van Royen, Pieter; Van Vaeck, Luc

    2005-01-01

    The application of polyatomic primary ions is a strongly developing branch of static secondary ion mass spectrometry (S-SIMS), since these projectiles allow a significant increase in the secondary ion yields to be achieved. However, the different limitations and possibilities of certain polyatomic primary ions for use on specific functional classes of samples are still not completely known. This paper compares the use of monoatomic and polyatomic primary ions in S-SIMS for thin layers of polylactic acid (PLA), obtained by spin-coating solutions on silicon wafers. Bombardment with Ga+, Xe+ and SF5+ primary ions allowed the contribution of the projectile mass and number of atoms in the gain in ion yield and molecular specificity (relative importance of high m/z and low m/z signals) to be assessed. Samples obtained by spin-coating solutions with increasing concentration showed that optimal layer thickness depended on the primary ion used. In comparison with the use of Ga+ projectiles, the yield of structural ions increased by a factor of about 1.5 to 2 and by about 7 to 12 when Xe+ and SF5+ primary ion bombardment were applied, respectively. A detailed fragmentation pattern was elaborated to interpret ion signal intensity changes for different projectiles in terms of energy deposition and collective processes in the subsurface, and the internal energy of radical and even-electron precursor ions.

  11. Two Dual Ion Spectrometer Flight Units of the Fast Plasma Instrument Suite (FPI) for the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi

    2014-01-01

    Two Dual Ion Spectrometer flight units of the Fast Plasma Instrument Suite (FPI) for the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) have returned to MSFC for flight testing. Anticipated to begin on June 30, tests will ensue in the Low Energy Electron and Ion Facility of the Heliophysics and Planetary Science Office (ZP13), managed by Dr. Victoria Coffey of the Natural Environments Branch of the Engineering Directorate (EV44). The MMS mission consists of four identical spacecraft, whose purpose is to study magnetic reconnection in the boundary regions of Earth's magnetosphere.

  12. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Chelsea L.; Wright, Patience M.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides.

  13. The Prebiotic Synthesis of Ethylenediamine Monoacetic Acid, The Repeating Unit of Peptide Nucleic Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Kevin E.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1992-01-01

    The polymerization of ribonucleic acids or their precursors constitutes an important event in prebiotic chemistry. The various problems using ribonucleotides to make RNA suggest that there may have been a precursor. An attractive possibility are the peptide nucleic acids (PNA). PNAs are nucleotide analogs that make use of a polymer of ethylenediamine monoacetic acid (EDMA or 2-amninoethyl glycine) with the bases attached by an acetic acid. EDMA is an especially attractive alternative to the ribose phosphate or deoxyribose phosphate backbone because it contains no chiral centers and is potentially prebiotic, but there is no reported prebiotic synthesis. We have synthesized both EDMA and ethylenediamine diacetic acid (EDDA) from the prebiotic compounds ethylenediamine, formaldehyde, and hydrogen cyanide. The yields of EDMA range from 11 to 79% along with some sEDDA and uEDDA. These reactions work with concentrations of 10(exp -1)M and as low as 10(exp -4)M, and the reaction is likely to be effective at even lower concentrations. Ethylenediamine is a likely prebiotic compound, but it has not yet been demonstrated, although compounds such as ethanolamine and cysteamine have been proven to be prebiotic. Under neutral pH and heating at l00 C, EDMA is converted to the lactam, monoketopiperazine (MKP). The cyclization occurs and has an approximate ratio of MKP/EDMA = 3 at equilibrium. We have measured the solubilities of EDMA center dot H20 as 6.4 m, EDMA center dot HCl center dot H20 as 13.7 m, and EDMA center dot 2HCl center dot H20 as 3.4 m. These syntheses together with the high solubility of EDMA suggest that EDMA would concentrate in drying lagoons and might efficiently form polymers. Given the instability of ribose and the poor polymerizability of nucleotides, the prebiotic presence of EDMA and the possibility of its polymerization raises the possibility that PNAs are the progenitors of present day nucleic acids. A pre-RNA world may have existed in which PNAs or

  14. Hypotonic stimuli enhance proton-gated currents of acid-sensing ion channel-1b

    SciTech Connect

    Ugawa, Shinya Ishida, Yusuke; Ueda, Takashi; Yu, Yong; Shimada, Shoichi

    2008-03-14

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are strong candidates for mammalian mechanoreceptors. We investigated whether mouse acid-sensing ion channel-1b (ASIC1b) is sensitive to mechanical stimuli using oocyte electrophysiology, because ASIC1b is located in the mechanosensory stereocilia of cochlear hair cells. Hypotonic stimuli that induced membrane stretch of oocytes evoked no significant current in ASIC1b-expressing oocytes at pH 7.5. However, acid (pH 4.0 or 5.0)-evoked currents in the oocytes were substantially enhanced by the hypotonicity, showing mechanosensitivity of ASIC1b and possible mechanogating of the channel in the presence of other components. Interestingly, the ASIC1b channel was permeable to K{sup +} (a principal charge carrier for cochlear sensory transduction) and the affinity of the channel for amiloride (IC{sub 50} (inhibition constant) = approximately 48.3 {mu}M) was quite similar to that described for the mouse hair cell mechanotransducer current. Taken together, these data raise the possibility that ASIC1b participates in cochlear mechanoelectrical transduction.

  15. A mini-review on functional nucleic acids-based heavy metal ion detection.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Shenshan; Wu, Yuangen; Wang, Lumei; Zhan, Xuejia; Zhou, Pei

    2016-12-15

    Recent years have witnessed great progress in developing functional nucleic acids (FNAs)-based sensors for the detection of heavy metal ion. In this review, four types of the FNAs that most widely-used in heavy metal ions detection were briefly introduced and a dozen of recently published review articles which summarized those FNAs-based sensors were introduced. Particularly, according to the degree of automation and system integration, those FNAs-based sensors which belong to the lab-on-a-chip (LOC) category were reviewed in more detail by classifying them into six types such as microfluidic LOC system, microchip, lateral flow dipstick, personal glucose meter, microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) and disc-based analytical platform. After gave a brief description of the sensing strategies, properties, advantages or disadvantages of these FNAs-based sensors, existing problems and future perspectives were also discussed.

  16. The Interaction of Positively-charged Ions with Nucleic Acid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Lois

    2003-01-01

    The successful development of extremely low background sample cells for x-ray scattering studies has enabled experiments designed to elucidate some of the fundamental physical interactions involved in macromolecular folding. Microfabrication techniques were used to fabricate low volume (50 micro-liter) sample cells with silicon nitride membranes (sub micron in thickness) as x-ray windows. Scientifically, these studies focus on the interaction of negatively charged nucleic acid systems, RNA and DNA, with their surrounding (positively charged) ion atmospheres. Understanding the structure of the ion atmosphere and its influence on the shape/conformation of the macromolecule will help reveal the underlying physical forces employed by nature in the self-assembly of these important molecules.

  17. Neutrophil chemotaxis and arachidonic acid metabolism are not linked: evidence from metal ion probe studies

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, S.R.; Turner, R.A.; Smith, D.M.; Johnson, J.A.

    1986-03-05

    Heavy metal ions can inhibit arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism protect against ionophore cytotoxicity (ibid) and inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis. In this study they used Au/sup 3 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, Cr/sup 3 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/ and Cu/sup 2 +/ as probes of the interrelationships among AA metabolism, ionophore-mediated cytotoxicity, and chemotaxis. Phospholipid deacylation was measured in ionophore-treated cells prelabeled with /sup 3/H-AA. Eicosanoid release from ionophore-treated cells was monitored by radioimmunoassay. Cytoprotection was quantitated as ability to exclude trypan blue. Chemotaxis toward f-met-leu-phe was measured by leading front analysis. The results imply that metal ions attenuate ionophore cytotoxicity by blocking phospholipid deacylation and eicosanoid release. In contrast to previous reports, no correlation between AA metabolism and chemotaxis was demonstrated, suggesting that these 2 processes are not linked.

  18. Grafting of acrylic acid onto polypropylene films irradiated with argon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, G.; Mazzei, R.; García Bermúdez, G.; Filevich, A.; Smolko, E.

    2005-07-01

    Polypropylene (PP) foils were irradiated with 100 keV energy Argon ions at different fluences ranging from 1012 up to 2 × 1015 cm-2 and then grafted with acrylic acid (AA). The grafting yield was measured by weight difference and the structural changes on the films were analysed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Different parameters that determined the grafting process such us fluence, grafting time and monomer concentration were analysed. The grafting reached an optimum value at 79% in aqueous solution at 30 min grafting time. The grafting yield as a function of the ion fluence plot, presented a maximum value, as previously found in a study of heavy beam on polymers.

  19. Role of transient receptor potential and acid-sensing ion channels in peripheral inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    White, John P M; Cibelli, Mario; Rei Fidalgo, Antonio; Paule, Cleoper C; Noormohamed, Faruq; Urban, Laszlo; Maze, Mervyn; Nagy, Istvan

    2010-03-01

    Pain originating in inflammation is the most common pathologic pain condition encountered by the anesthesiologist whether in the context of surgery, its aftermath, or in the practice of pain medicine. Inflammatory agents, released as components of the body's response to peripheral tissue damage or disease, are now known to be collectively capable of activating transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4, transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1, and acid-sensing ion channels, whereas individual agents may activate only certain of these ion channels. These ionotropic receptors serve many physiologic functions-as, indeed, do many of the inflammagens released in the inflammatory process. Here, we introduce the reader to the role of these ionotropic receptors in mediating peripheral pain in response to inflammation.

  20. Novel Insights into Acid-Sensing Ion Channels: Implications for Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ren-Peng; Wu, Xiao-Shan; Wang, Zhi-Sen; Xie, Ya-Ya; Ge, Jin-Fang; Chen, Fei-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative diseases often strike older adults and are characterized by progressive deterioration of cells, eventually leading to tissue and organ degeneration for which limited effective treatment options are currently available. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), a family of extracellular H+-activated ligand-gated ion channels, play critical roles in physiological and pathological conditions. Aberrant activation of ASICs is reported to regulate cell apoptosis, differentiation and autophagy. Accumulating evidence has highlighted a dramatic increase and activation of ASICs in degenerative disorders, including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, intervertebral disc degeneration and arthritis. In this review, we have comprehensively discussed the critical roles of ASICs and their potential utility as therapeutic targets in degenerative diseases. PMID:27493834

  1. Structural and optical properties of Cd2+ ion on the growth of sulphamic acid single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajyalakshmi, S.; Rao, Valluru Srinivasa; Reddy, P. V. S. S. S. N.; Krishna, V. Y. Rama; Samatha, K.; Rao, K. Ramachandra

    2016-05-01

    Transparent single crystals of Cadmium doped Sulphamic acid (SA) was grown by Conventional slow evaporation solution technique (SEST) which had the size of 13 × 8 × 7 mm3. The grown single crystals have been characterized using single crystal X-ray diffraction UV-visible Spectral studies and Second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency and the results were discussed. The lattice parameters of the grown Cd2+ ion doped SA crystal are confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction and belong to orthorhombic system. Optical transmittance of the crystal was recorded using UV-vis NIR spectrophotometer with its lower cut off wavelength around 259nm. SHG measurements indicate that the SHG efficiency of the grown Cd2+ ion doped SA crystal at a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm is approximately equal to KDP.

  2. Analysis of carbonic acid in water samples by ion-exclusion chromatography with pure water as eluent.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hui; Ding, Mingyu; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Hu, Wenzhi

    2005-02-01

    A simple, sensitive and rapid ion-exclusion chromatographic method for the simultaneous separation of carbonic acid and short chain organic acids (formic acid, acetic acid, and propionic acid) has been developed. A weakly acidic cation exchange resin column TSKgel OApak-A was used for the separation; pure water, owing to its lower background conductance, was employed as eluent in order to obtain high detection sensitivity. A good separation of these weak acids was achieved in 16 min. The linear range of the peak area calibration curve for carbonic acid was from 3.0 mg/L to 500 mg/L. The conductivity detection limit calculated at S/N = 3 was 0.084 mg/L for carbonic acid. The method developed in this work was successfully applied to the determination of carbonic acid in several environmental water samples without any pretreatment.

  3. Hydrometallurgical recovery of metal values from sulfuric acid leaching liquor of spent lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiangping; Chen, Yongbin; Zhou, Tao Liu, Depei; Hu, Hang; Fan, Shaoyun

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Selective precipitation and solvent extraction were adopted. • Nickel, cobalt and lithium were selectively precipitated. • Co-D2EHPA was employed as high-efficiency extraction reagent for manganese. • High recovery percentages could be achieved for all metal values. - Abstract: Environmentally hazardous substances contained in spent Li-ion batteries, such as heavy metals and nocuous organics, will pose a threat to the environment and human health. On the other hand, the sustainable recycling of spent lithium-ion batteries may bring about environmental and economic benefits. In this study, a hydrometallurgical process was adopted for the comprehensive recovery of nickel, manganese, cobalt and lithium from sulfuric acid leaching liquor from waste cathode materials of spent lithium-ion batteries. First, nickel ions were selectively precipitated and recovered using dimethylglyoxime reagent. Recycled dimethylglyoxime could be re-used as precipitant for nickel and revealed similar precipitation performance compared with fresh dimethylglyoxime. Then the separation of manganese and cobalt was conducted by solvent extraction method using cobalt loaded D2EHPA. And McCabe–Thiele isotherm was employed for the prediction of the degree of separation and the number of extraction stages needed at specific experimental conditions. Finally, cobalt and lithium were sequentially precipitated and recovered as CoC{sub 2}O{sub 4}⋅2H{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} using ammonium oxalate solution and saturated sodium carbonate solution, respectively. Recovery efficiencies could be attained as follows: 98.7% for Ni; 97.1% for Mn, 98.2% for Co and 81.0% for Li under optimized experimental conditions. This hydrometallurgical process may promise a candidate for the effective separation and recovery of metal values from the sulfuric acid leaching liquor.

  4. Influence on the generation of disinfection byproducts in a tannic acid solution by aluminum ions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Chen, Xin; Chen, Hongbin

    2016-08-17

    Aluminum (Al) commonly exists in natural waters, and its salts are often used as coagulants in drinking water treatment. Therefore, associated with the security of drinking water, functions of Al ions (Al(3+)) on generation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) should not be ignored. This study focuses on DBPs and the carcinogenic factor of chlorinated water samples after the addition of Al(3+) with different Al(3+)/initial tannic acid molar ratios. The results imply that Al(3+) acts as a promoter of haloacetic acids (HAAs) and an inhibitor of trihalomethanes (THMs) when tannic acid is selected as model compound of natural organic matter during chlorination. Depending on the results of size exclusion chromatography and ultraviolet spectrophotometer, an equilibrium system can be assumed between hydrolysis and flocculation in tannic acid solution with Al(3+). Furthermore, influences on the equilibrium system for Al(3+) addition may result in various effects on generation and distribution ratios of THMs and HAAs during chlorination. Finally, according to the analyses of a fluorescence spectrophotometer, it is demonstrated that the presence of Al(3+) helps to increase precursors of DBPs (humic acid-like organics) and then improve the generation of DBPs.

  5. Phytic acid suppresses 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion-induced hydroxyl radical generation in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Obata, Toshio

    2003-07-18

    The present study examined the antioxidant effect of phytic acid on iron (II)-enhanced hydroxyl radical (*OH) generation induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+)) in the extracellular fluid of rat striatum. Rats were anesthetized, and sodium salicylate in Ringer's solution (0.5 nmol/microl/min) was infused through a microdialysis probe to detect the generation of *OH as reflected by the non-enzymatic formation of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) in the striatum. Phytic acid (100 microM) did not significantly decrease the levels of MPP(+)-induced *OH formation trapped as 2,3-DHBA. To confirm the generation of *OH by the Fenton-type reaction, iron (II) was infused through a microdialysis probe. Introduction of iron (II) (10 microM) enhanced MPP(+) induced *OH generation. However, phytic acid significantly suppressed iron (II)-enhanced *OH formation after MPP(+) treatment (n=6, P<0.05). These results suggest that the antiradical effect of phytic acid occurs by chelating iron required for the MPP(+)-enhanced *OH generation via the Fenton-type reaction.

  6. Ascorbic-acid-assisted recovery of cobalt and lithium from spent Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Lu, Jun; Ren, Yang; Zhang, Xiao Xiao; Chen, Ren Jie; Wu, Feng; Amine, Khalil

    2012-11-01

    Recycling of the major components from spent Li-ion batteries (LIBs) is considered desirable to prevent environmental pollution and recycle valuable metals. The present work investigates a novel process for recovering Co and Li from the cathode materials (containing LiCoO2 and Al) by a combination of ultrasonic washing, calcination, and organic acid leaching. Copper can also be recovered from the anode materials after they are manually separated from the cathode. Ascorbic acid is chosen as both leaching reagent and reducing agent to improve the Co recovery efficiency. Leaching efficiencies as high as 94.8% for Co and 98.5% for Li are achieved with a 1.25 mol L-1 ascorbic acid solution, leaching temperature of 70 °C, leaching time of 20 min, and solid-to-liquid ratio of 25 gL-1. The acid leaching reaction mechanism has been preliminarily studied based on the structure of ascorbic acid. This method is shown to offer an efficient way to recycle valuable materials from spent LIBs, and it can be scaled up for commercial application.

  7. Insight toward epithelial Na+ channel mechanism revealed by the acid-sensing ion channel 1 structure.

    PubMed

    Stockand, James D; Staruschenko, Alexander; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Booth, Rachell E; Silverthorn, Dee U

    2008-09-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel/degenerin (ENaC/DEG) protein family includes a diverse group of ion channels, including nonvoltage-gated Na(+) channels of epithelia and neurons, and the acid-sensing ion channel 1 (ASIC1). In mammalian epithelia, ENaC helps regulate Na(+) and associated water transport, making it a critical determinant of systemic blood pressure and pulmonary mucosal fluidity. In the nervous system, ENaC/DEG proteins are related to sensory transduction. While the importance and physiological function of these ion channels are established, less is known about their structure. One hallmark of the ENaC/DEG channel family is that each channel subunit has only two transmembrane domains connected by an exceedingly large extracellular loop. This subunit structure was recently confirmed when Jasti and colleagues determined the crystal structure of chicken ASIC1, a neuronal acid-sensing ENaC/DEG channel. By mapping ENaC to the structural coordinates of cASIC1, as we do here, we hope to provide insight toward ENaC structure. ENaC, like ASIC1, appears to be a trimeric channel containing 1alpha, 1beta, and 1gamma subunit. Heterotrimeric ENaC and monomeric ENaC subunits within the trimer possibly contain many of the major secondary, tertiary, and quaternary features identified in cASIC1 with a few subtle but critical differences. These differences are expected to have profound effects on channel behavior. In particular, they may contribute to ENaC insensitivity to acid and to its constitutive activity in the absence of time- and ligand-dependent inactivation. Experiments resulting from this comparison of cASIC1 and ENaC may help clarify unresolved issues related to ENaC architecture, and may help identify secondary structures and residues critical to ENaC function.

  8. Absolute Stereochemistry of the β-Hydroxy Acid Unit in Hantupeptins and Trungapeptins.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepak Kumar; Ding, Gary Chi Ying; Teo, Yong Chua; Tan, Lik Tong

    2016-01-01

    The β-hydroxy/amino acid unit is a common structural feature of many bioactive marine cyanobacterial depsipeptides. In this study, the absolute stereochemistry of the β-hydroxy acid moieties in hantupeptins and trungapeptins were determined through their synthesis and HPLC analysis of the Mosher ester derivatives. Synthesis of two3-hydroxy-2-methyloctanoic acid (Hmoa) stereoisomers, (2S,3R)-Hmoa and (2S,3S)-Hmoa, were achieved using diastereoselective asymmetric method and the retention times of all four Hmoa isomers were established indirectly by RPLC-MS analysis of their Mosher ester derivative standards. Based on the retention times of the standards, the absolute configuration of the Hmoa unit in hantupeptin C (3) and trungapeptin C (6) was assigned as (2R,3S)- and (2S,3R)-Hmoa, respectively. The use of the Mosher's reagents, coupled with HPLC analysis, provided a viable alternative to the absolute stereochemical determination of β-hydroxy acid units in depsipeptides.

  9. Formation of Amino Acid Precursors by Bombardment of Interstellar Ice Analogs with High Energy Heavy Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kensei; Mita, Hajime; Yoshida, Satoshi; Shibata, Hiromi; Enomoto, Shingo; Matsuda, Tomoyuki; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Kondo, Kotaro; Oguri, Yoshiyuki; Kebukawa, Yoko

    2016-07-01

    A wide variety of organic compounds have been detected in extraterrestrial bodies. It has been recognized that carbonaceous chondrites contain pristine amino acids [1]. There are several scenarios of the formation of such extraterrestrial amino acids or their precursors. Greenberg proposed a scenario that complex organic compounds were formed in interstellar ices in dense clouds, which were brought into solar system small bodies when the solar system was formed [2]. The ice mantles of interstellar dust particles (ISDs) in dense clouds are composed of H2O, CO, CH3OH, CH4, CO2, NH3, etc. In order to verify the scenario, a number of laboratory experiments have been conducted where interstellar ice analogs were irradiated with high-energy particles [3,4] or UV [5,6], and formation of complex organic compounds including amino acid precursors were detected in the products. Though ion-molecular reactions in gaseous phase and surface reactions on the ice mantles have been studied intensively, much less works on cosmic rays-induced reaction have been reported. In order to study possible formation of complex molecules in interstellar ices, frozen mixtures of water, methanol and ammonia with various mixing ratios were irradiated with high-energy heavy ions such as carbon ions (290 MeV/u) and neon ions (400 MeV/u) from HIMAC, NIRS, Japan. For comparison, gaseous mixtures of water, ammonia, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and/or methane were irradiated with protons (2.5 MeV) from a Tandem accelerator, Tokyo Tech, Japan. Amino acids in the products were determined by cation exchange HPLC after acid hydrolysis. Products, both before and after acid hydrolysis, were also characterized by FT-IR and other techniques. Amino acids were detected in the hydrolyzed products after mixture of CH3OH, NH3 and H2O with various mixing ratios were irradiated with heavy ions, including when their mixing ratio was set close to the reported value of the interstellar ices (10:1:37). In the HIMAC

  10. Modulation of the Activities of Neuronal Ion Channels by Fatty Acid-Derived Pro-Resolvents

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Geunyeol; Hwang, Sun Wook

    2016-01-01

    Progress of inflammation depends on the balance between two biological mechanisms: pro-inflammatory and pro-resolving processes. Many extracellular and intracellular molecular components including cytokines, growth factors, steroids, neurotransmitters, and lipidergic mediators and their receptors contribute to the two processes, generated from cellular participants during inflammation. Fatty acid-derived mediators are crucial in directing the inflammatory phase and orchestrating heterogeneous reactions of participants such as inflamed cells, innate immune cells, vascular components, innervating neurons, etc. As well as activating specific types of receptor molecules, lipidergic mediators can actively control the functions of various ion channels via direct binding and/or signal transduction, thereby altering cellular functions. Lipid mediators can be divided into two classes based on which of the two processes they promote: pro-inflammatory, which includes prostaglandins and leukotrienes, and pro-resolving, which includes lipoxins, resolvins, and maresins. The research on the modulations of neuronal ion channels regarding the actions of the pro-inflammatory class has begun relatively earlier while the focus is currently expanding to cover the ion channel interaction with pro-resolvents. As a result, knowledge of inhibitory mechanisms by the pro-resolvents, historically seldom found for other known endogenous modulators or pro-inflammatory mediators, is accumulating particularly upon sensory neuronal cation channels. Diverse mechanistic explanations at molecular levels are being proposed and refined. Here we overviewed the interactions of lipidergic pro-resolvents with neuronal ion channels and outcomes from the interactions, focusing on transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. We also discuss unanswered hypotheses and perspectives regarding their interactions. PMID:27877134

  11. Removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions by sulphuric acid-treated wheat bran.

    PubMed

    Ozer, A

    2007-03-22

    Sulphuric acid-treated wheat bran (STWB) was used as an adsorbent to remove Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution. It was observed that the adsorption yield of Pb(II) ions was found to be pH dependent. The equilibrium time for the process was determined as 2h. STWB gave the highest adsorption yield at around pH 6.0. At this pH, adsorption percentage for an initial Pb(II) ions concentration of 100mg/L was found to be 82.8 at 25 degrees C for contact time of 2h. The equilibrium data obtained at different temperatures fitted to the non-linear form of Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson and linear form of Langmuir and Freundlich models. Isotherm constants were calculated and compared for the models used. The maximum adsorption capacity (q(max)) which was obtained linear form of Langmuir model increased from 55.56 to 79.37mg/g with increasing temperature from 25 to 60 degrees C. Similar trend was observed for other isotherm constants related to the adsorption capacity. Linear form of Langmuir isotherm data was evaluated to determine the thermodynamic parameters for the process. Thermodynamic parameters show that adsorption process of Pb(II) ions is an endothermic and more effective process at high temperatures. The pseudo nth order kinetic model was successfully applied to the kinetic data and the order (n) of adsorption reaction was calculated at the range from 1.711 to 1.929. The values of k(ad) were found to be 5.82x10(-4) and 21.81x10(-4)(min(-1))(mg/g)(1-n) at 25 and 60 degrees C, respectively. Activation energy was determined as 29.65kJ/mol for the process. This suggest that the adsorption Pb(II) ions by STWB is chemically controlled.

  12. Multi-shell model of ion-induced nucleic acid condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolokh, Igor S.; Drozdetski, Aleksander V.; Pollack, Lois; Baker, Nathan A.; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2016-04-21

    We present a semi-quantitative model of condensation of short nucleic acid (NA) duplexes in- duced by tri-valent cobalt hexammine (CoHex) ions. The model is based on partitioning of bound counterion distribution around single NA duplex into “external” and “internal” ion binding shells distinguished by the proximity to duplex helical axis. The duplex aggregation free energy is de- composed into attraction and repulsion components represented by simple analytic expressions. The source of the short-range attraction between NA duplexes in the aggregated phase is the in- teraction of CoHex ions in the overlapping regions of the “external” shells with the oppositely charged duplexes. The attraction depends on CoHex binding affinity to the “external” shell of nearly neutralized duplex and the number of ions in the shell overlapping volume. For a given NA duplex sequence and structure, these parameters are estimated from molecular dynamics simula- tion. The attraction is opposed by the residual repulsion of nearly neutralized duplexes as well as duplex configurational entropy loss upon aggregation. The estimates of the aggregation free energy are consistent with the experimental range of NA duplex condensation propensities, including the unusually poor condensation of RNA structures and subtle sequence effects upon DNA conden- sation. The model predicts that, in contrast to DNA, RNA duplexes may condense into tighter packed aggregates with a higher degree of duplex neutralization. The model also predicts that longer NA fragments will condense easier than shorter ones. The ability of this model to explain experimentally observed trends in NA condensation, lends support to proposed NA condensation picture based on the multivalent “ion binding shells”.

  13. The effect of the use of NP305 masks in improving respiratory symptoms in workers exposed to sulfuric acid mists in plating and pickling units

    PubMed Central

    Rafieepour, Athena; Dolatshahi, Narges Gholamzadeh Taj; Ghasemkhan, Alireza Haj; Asghari, Mehdi; Sadeghian, Marzieh; Asadi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: Plating and pickling processes are the most effective ways for increasing the strength of metal structures, and workers in these units are exposed to various contaminants, including acid mists. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of protective masks in decreasing the respiratory symptoms and the aerobic capacity of workers that are exposed sulfuric acid mist. Methods: This interventional study was based on National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) standard 7903 in which silica gel tubes are used for sampling the air in plating and pickling units for eight hours. After the samples were acquired and prepared, they were analyzed by ion chromatography and were compared with the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) exposure limits. Respiratory symptoms were evaluated among two sets of test subjects, i.e., those who used NP305 masks in the workplace and those who did not use the mask. Results: The results showed that the concentration of sulfuric acid mist in the plating units was greater than the exposure limits, and concentrations at this level can cause an increase in symptoms related to irritation of the airway and a slight decrease in respiratory capacity. In this study, smoking had no significant effect on the severity of pulmonary dysfunction. Conclusion: The results indicated that the use of an NP305 mask is effective for decreasing symptoms resulting from exposure to sulfuric acid mist and improving respiratory capacity. PMID:26120392

  14. Preparation and characterization of 5-sulphosalicylic acid doped tetraethoxysilane composite ion-exchange material by sol-gel method.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Suhail-ul; Islam, Nasarul; Ahad, Sozia; Fatima, Syed Zeeshan; Pandith, Altaf Hussain

    2013-09-15

    In this manuscript, we report the preparation and characterization of sulphosalicylic doped tetraethoxysilane (SATEOS), composite material by sol-gel method as a new ion exchanger for the removal of Ni(II) from aqueous solution. The fine granular material was prepared by acid catalyzed condensation polymerization through sol-gel mechanism in the presence of cationic surfactant. The material has an ion exchange capacity of 0.64 mequiv./g(dry) for sodium ions, 0.60 mequiv./g(dry) for potassium ions, 1.84 mequiv./g(dry) for magnesium ions, 1.08 mequiv./g(dry) for calcium ions and 1.36 mequiv./g(dry) for strontium ions. Its X-ray diffraction studies suggest that it is crystalline in nature. The material has been characterized by SEM, IR, TGA and DTG so as to identify the various functional groups and ion exchange sites present in this material. Quantum chemical computations at DFT/B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) level on model systems were performed to substantiate the structural conclusions based ion instrumental techniques. Investigations into the elution behaviour, ion exchange reversibility and distribution capacities of this material towards certain environmentally hazardous metal ions are also performed. The material shows good chemical stability towards acidic conditions and exhibits fast elution of exchangeable H(+) ions under neutral conditions. This material shows remarkable selectivity for Ni(II) and on the basis of its Kd value (4×10(2) in 0.01M HClO4) some binary separations of Ni(II) from other metal ions are performed.

  15. Chromatographic retention prediction and octanol-water partition coefficient determination of monobasic weak acidic compounds in ion-suppression reversed-phase liquid chromatography using acids as ion-suppressors.

    PubMed

    Ming, Xin; Han, Shu-ying; Qi, Zheng-chun; Sheng, Dong; Lian, Hong-zhen

    2009-08-15

    Although simple acids, replacing buffers, have been widely applied to suppress the ionization of weakly ionizable acidic analytes in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), none of the previously reported works focused on the systematic studies about the retention behavior of the acidic solutes in this ion-suppression RPLC mode. The subject of this paper was therefore to investigate the retention behavior of monobasic weak acidic compounds using acetic, perchloric and phosphoric acids as the ion-suppressors. The apparent octanol-water partition coefficient (K" ow) was proposed to calibrate the octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)) of these weak acidic compounds, which resulted in a better linear correlation with log k(w), the logarithm of the hypothetical retention factor corresponding to neat aqueous fraction of hydroorganic mobile phase. This log K" ow-log k w linear correlation was successfully validated by the results of monocarboxylic acids and monohydrating phenols, and moreover by the results under diverse experimental conditions for the same solutes. This straightforward relationship not only can be used to effectively predict the retention values of weak acidic solutes combined with Snyder-Soczewinski equation, but also can offer a promising medium for directly measuring K(ow) data of these compounds via Collander equation. In addition, the influence of the different ion-suppressors on the retention of weak acidic compounds was also compared in this RPLC mode.

  16. Experimental Investigations from the Operation of a 2 Kw Brayton Power Conversion Unit and a Xenon Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee; Birchenough, Arthur; Pinero, Luis

    2004-01-01

    A 2 kW Brayton Power Conversion Unit (PCU) and a xenon ion thruster were integrated with a Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) system as part of a Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) Testbed at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Brayton converters and ion thrusters are potential candidates for use on future high power NEP missions such as the proposed Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO). The use of existing lower power test hardware provided a cost-effective means to investigate the critical electrical interface between the power conversion system and ion propulsion system. The testing successfully demonstrated compatible electrical operations between the converter and the thruster, including end-to-end electric power throughput, high efficiency AC to DC conversion, and thruster recycle fault protection. The details of this demonstration are reported herein.

  17. The dichotomized role for acid sensing ion channels in musculoskeletal pain and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sluka, Kathleen A.; Gregory, Nicholas S.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic muscle pain affects between 11–24% of the world’s population with the majority of people experiencing musculoskeletal pain at some time in their life. Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are important sensors of modest decreases in extracellular pH that occur within the physiological range. These decreases in extracellular pH occur in response to inflammation, fatiguing exercise,, and ischemia. Further, injection of acidic saline into muscle produces enhanced nociceptive behaviors in animals and pain in human subjects. Of the different types of ASICs, ASIC3 and ASIC1 have been implicated in transmission of nociceptive information from the musculoskeletal system. The current review will provide an overview of the evidence for ASIC3 and ASIC1 in musculoskeletal pain in both inflammatory and non-inflammatory models. PMID:25582293

  18. Acid-Sensing Ion Channels as Potential Pharmacological Targets in Peripheral and Central Nervous System Diseases.

    PubMed

    Radu, Beatrice Mihaela; Banciu, Adela; Banciu, Daniel Dumitru; Radu, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are widely expressed in the body and represent good sensors for detecting protons. The pH drop in the nervous system is equivalent to ischemia and acidosis, and ASICs are very good detectors in discriminating slight changes in acidity. ASICs are important pharmacological targets being involved in a variety of pathophysiological processes affecting both the peripheral nervous system (e.g., peripheral pain, diabetic neuropathy) and the central nervous system (e.g., stroke, epilepsy, migraine, anxiety, fear, depression, neurodegenerative diseases, etc.). This review discusses the role played by ASICs in different pathologies and the pharmacological agents acting on ASICs that might represent promising drugs. As the majority of above-mentioned pathologies involve not only neuronal dysfunctions but also microvascular alterations, in the next future, ASICs may be also considered as potential pharmacological targets at the vasculature level. Perspectives and limitations in the use of ASICs antagonists and modulators as pharmaceutical agents are also discussed.

  19. Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 1a Contributes to Airway Hyperreactivity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Reznikov, Leah R.; Meyerholz, David K.; Adam, Ryan J.; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud; Jaffer, Omar; Michalski, Andrew S.; Powers, Linda S.; Price, Margaret P.; Stoltz, David A.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons innervating the airways contribute to airway hyperreactivity (AHR), a hallmark feature of asthma. Several observations suggested that acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), neuronal cation channels activated by protons, might contribute to AHR. For example, ASICs are found in vagal sensory neurons that innervate airways, and asthmatic airways can become acidic. Moreover, airway acidification activates ASIC currents and depolarizes neurons innervating airways. We found ASIC1a protein in vagal ganglia neurons, but not airway epithelium or smooth muscle. We induced AHR by sensitizing mice to ovalbumin and found that ASIC1a-/- mice failed to exhibit AHR despite a robust inflammatory response. Loss of ASIC1a also decreased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid levels of substance P, a sensory neuropeptide secreted from vagal sensory neurons that contributes to AHR. These findings suggest that ASIC1a is an important mediator of AHR and raise the possibility that inhibiting ASIC channels might be beneficial in asthma. PMID:27820848

  20. Synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion in crude oil distillation unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, B. S.; Yin, W. F.; Sang, D. H.; Jiang, Z. Y.

    2012-10-01

    The synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion at high temperature in crude oil distillation unit was studied using Q235 carbon-manganese steel and 316 stainless steel. The corrosion of Q235 and 316 in corrosion media containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acid at 280 °C was investigated by weight loss, scanning electron microscope (SEM), EDS and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis. The results showed that in corrosion media containing only sulfur, the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316 first increased and then decreased with the increase of sulfur content. In corrosion media containing naphthenic acid and sulfur, with the variations of acid value or sulfur content, the synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion has a great influence on the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316. It was indicated that the sulfur accelerated naphthenic acid corrosion below a certain sulfur content but prevented naphthenic acid corrosion above that. The corrosion products on two steels after exposure to corrosion media were investigated. The stable Cr5S8 phases detected in the corrosion products film of 316 were considered as the reason why 316 has greater corrosion resistance to that of Q235.

  1. Acid-base and ion balance in fishes with bimodal respiration.

    PubMed

    Shartau, R B; Brauner, C J

    2014-03-01

    The evolution of air breathing during the Devonian provided early fishes with bimodal respiration with a stable O2 supply from air. This was, however, probably associated with challenges and trade-offs in terms of acid-base balance and ionoregulation due to reduced gill:water interaction and changes in gill morphology associated with air breathing. While many aspects of acid-base and ionoregulation in air-breathing fishes are similar to water breathers, the specific cellular and molecular mechanisms involved remain largely unstudied. In general, reduced ionic permeability appears to be an important adaptation in the few bimodal fishes investigated but it is not known if this is a general characteristic. The kidney appears to play an important role in minimizing ion loss to the freshwater environment in the few species investigated, and while ion uptake across the gut is probably important, it has been largely unexplored. In general, air breathing in facultative air-breathing fishes is associated with an acid-base disturbance, resulting in an increased partial pressure of arterial CO2 and a reduction in extracellular pH (pHE ); however, several fishes appear to be capable of tightly regulating tissue intracellular pH (pHI ), despite a large sustained reduction in pHE , a trait termed preferential pHI regulation. Further studies are needed to determine whether preferential pHI regulation is a general trait among bimodal fishes and if this confers reduced sensitivity to acid-base disturbances, including those induced by hypercarbia, exhaustive exercise and hypoxia or anoxia. Additionally, elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanisms may yield insight into whether preferential pHI regulation is a trait ultimately associated with the early evolution of air breathing in vertebrates.

  2. Colorimetric sensor array based on gold nanoparticles and amino acids for identification of toxic metal ions in water.

    PubMed

    Sener, Gulsu; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2014-01-01

    A facile colorimetric sensor array for detection of multiple toxic heavy metal ions (Hg(2+), Cd(2+), Fe(3+), Pb(2+), Al(3+), Cu(2+), and Cr(3+)) in water is demonstrated using 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA)-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and five amino acids (lysine, cysteine, histidine, tyrosine, and arginine). The presence of amino acids (which have functional groups that can form complexes with metal ions and MUA) regulates the aggregation of MUA-capped particles; it can either enhance or diminish the particle aggregation. The combinatorial colorimetric response of all channels of the sensor array (i.e., color change in each of AuNP and amino acid couples) enables naked-eye discrimination of all of the metal ions tested in this study with excellent selectivity.

  3. Formation and Fragmentation of Protonated Molecules after Ionization of Amino Acid and Lactic Acid Clusters by Collision with Ions in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Poully, Jean-Christophe; Vizcaino, Violaine; Schwob, Lucas; Delaunay, Rudy; Kocisek, Jaroslav; Eden, Samuel; Chesnel, Jean-Yves; Méry, Alain; Rangama, Jimmy; Adoui, Lamri; Huber, Bernd

    2015-08-03

    Collisions between O(3+) ions and neutral clusters of amino acids (alanine, valine and glycine) as well as lactic acid are performed in the gas phase, in order to investigate the effect of ionizing radiation on these biologically relevant molecular systems. All monomers and dimers are found to be predominantly protonated, and ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on model systems indicate that for amino acids, this is due to proton transfer within the clusters after ionization. For lactic acid, which has a lower proton affinity than amino acids, a significant non-negligible amount of the radical cation monomer is observed. New fragment-ion channels observed from clusters, as opposed to isolated molecules, are assigned to the statistical dissociation of protonated molecules formed upon ionization of the clusters. These new dissociation channels exhibit strong delayed fragmentation on the microsecond time scale, especially after multiple ionization.

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of formation of chlorate ion from the hypochlorous acid/chlorite ion reaction at pH 6-10

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, G.; Tachiyashiki, Satoshi )

    1991-03-01

    The reaction between free chlorine (HOCl/OCl{sup {minus}}) and chlorite ion (ClO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) has been studied in the pH 6.4-10.0 region. The reaction proceeds through the Cl{sub 2}O{sub 2} intermediate followed by a direct reaction of the intermediate with hypochlorous acid to form chlorate ion. Time-concentration profiles were measured for each chlorine species, resulting in both total chlorine and redox balance. Negligibly small amounts of chlorine dioxide are formed above pH 7. Indirect evidence suggests that, in this pH region, the formation of any chlorine dioxide is primarily due to the presence of concentration gradients or because of the adventitious presence of catalytic metal ion impurities. Details of the overall reaction mechanism for the formation of chlorate ion are presented.

  5. Expressing acid-sensing ion channel 3 in the brain alters acid-evoked currents and impairs fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Vralsted, V C; Price, M P; Du, J; Schnizler, M; Wunsch, A M; Ziemann, A E; Welsh, M J; Wemmie, J A

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies on mice with a disruption of the gene encoding acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a) suggest that ASIC1a is required for normal fear behavior. To investigate the effects of altering the subunit composition of brain ASICs on behavior, we developed transgenic mice expressing ASIC3 via the pan-neuronal synapsin I promoter. These mice express ASIC3 in the brain, where the endogenous ASIC3 protein is not detected. We found that in ASIC3 transgenic mice, ASIC3 co-immunoprecipitated with the endogenous ASIC1a protein and distributed in the same subcellular brain fractions as ASIC1a. In addition, ASIC3 significantly increased the rate of desensitization of acid-evoked currents in cultured cortical neurons. Importantly, ASIC3 reduced Pavlovian fear conditioning to both context and auditory cues. These observations suggest that ASIC3 can heteromultimerize with ASIC1a in the brain and alter the biophysical properties of the endogenous channel complex. Moreover, these data suggest that ASIC subunit composition and channel desensitization may be critical determinants for ASIC-dependent behavior.

  6. Soil water samplers in ion balance studies on acidic forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, L.; Joergensen, P.; Kruse, S.

    1986-04-01

    During the last years an increasing consciousness has appeared of the injurious effects of acid rain on the forest ecosystems both in Europe and North America. At several localities ion balance studies have been implemented in order to evaluate the impact of the atmospheric deposition of acidic substances and heavy metals on the forest ecosystem. In many localities the leaching of material to the ground water or output from the ecosystem has to be determined by means of tensiometer measurements and soil water sampling. Many different soil water samplers are available on the market and they show useful applicability under the given circumstances. But in many cases soil water samples taken with different equipment give incommensurable results leading to differing explanations of the effects of acid precipitation on elements and their cycling in the ecosystem. The purpose of the present study is twofold. Firstly, the sorption characteristics of different types of soil water samplers are examined under acidic soil conditions both by installation in the field and by laboratory experiments. Secondly, a new method is introduced for current and constant soil water sampling under varying soil suctions in the unsaturated zone.

  7. Gastrodin inhibits the activity of acid-sensing ion channels in rat primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Fang; Liu, Ting-Ting; Qu, Zu-Wei; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Yang, Zhifan; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2014-05-15

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), a family of proton-gated cation channels, are believed to mediate pain caused by extracellular acidification. Gastrodin is a main bioactive constituent of the traditional herbal Gastrodia elata Blume, which has been widely used in Oriental countries for centuries. As an analgesic, gastrodin has been used clinically to treat pain such as migraine and headache. However, the mechanisms underlying analgesic action of gastrodin are still poorly understood. Here, we have found that gastrodin inhibited the activity of native ASICs in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Gastrodin dose-dependently inhibited proton-gated currents mediated by ASICs. Gastrodin shifted the proton concentration-response curve downwards, with a decrease of 36.92 ± 6.23% in the maximum current response but with no significant change in the pH0.5 value. Moreover, gastrodin altered acid-evoked membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons and caused a significant decrease in the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripheral applied gastrodin relieved pain evoked by intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. Our results indicate that gastrodin can inhibit the activity of ASICs in the primary sensory neurons, which provided a novel mechanism underlying analgesic action of gastrodin.

  8. Investigation of metal ion extraction and aggregate formation combining acidic and neutral organophosphorous reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Braatz, A.D.; Nilsson, M.; Ellis, R.; Antonio, M.

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, we investigate how varying mixtures of tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and dibutyl phosphate (HDBP) results in enhanced extraction of lanthanum(III), La{sup 3+}, and dysprosium(III), Dy{sup 3+}. Water and metal ion extraction were carefully monitored as a function of TBP:HDBP mole ratio.In addition to these techniques, EXAFS was used to determine the coordination environment of the metal ion in this system. To produce the necessary signal, a concentration of 1.25*10{sup -3} M La{sup 3+} and Dy{sup 3+} was used. Although previous studies of synergistic extraction of metal cations using combinations of neutral and acidic reagents explain the enhanced extraction by increased dehydration of the metal ion and the formation of mixed extractant complexes, our evidence for the increased water extraction coupled with the aggregate formation suggests a reverse micellar aspect to synergism in the system containing TBP and HDBP. It is quite possible that both of these phenomena contribute to our system behavior. The EXAFS data shows that, based on coordination numbers alone, several possible structures may exist. From this study, we cannot provide a definitive answer as to the nature of extraction in this system or the exact complex formed during extraction.

  9. Laser ion beam photodissociation studies of model amino acids and peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Techlenburg, R.E. Jr.; Miller, M.N.; Russell, D.H. )

    1989-02-15

    Visible (458-514.5 nm) and uv (333-385 nm) photodissociation of the (M + H){sup +} ions of dinitrophenyl (DNP) derivatized amino acids and peptides is reported. Photoexcitation of the DNP peptides by a visible proton results in fragmentation of the peptide chain with little fragmentation within the chromophore. Conversely, uv photoexcitation of the DNP peptides results in fragmentation of the chromophore as well as the peptide chain, but loss of NO or NO{sub 2} (within the chromophore) often dominates the photofragment ion spectrum. These results are rationalized with particular emphasis on energy-selective dissociation channels of large ionic systems. DNP-leucine and DNP-isoleucine (M + H){sup +} can be differentiated on the basis of photodissociation reactions which yield distonic radical cations. The rate of dissociation of photoexcited ions of DNP peptides is shown to decrease with increasing molecular weight (degrees of freedom). Lastly, comparisons between photodissociation and collision-induced dissociation as a structural probe are presented. 55 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Regulation of ion homeostasis by aminolevulinic acid in salt-stressed wheat seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türk, Hülya; Genişel, Mucip; Erdal, Serkan

    2016-04-01

    Salinity is regarded as a worldwide agricultural threat, as it seriously limits plant development and productivity. Salt stress reduces water uptake in plants by disrupting the osmotic balance of soil solution. In addition, it creates a damaged metabolic process by causing ion imbalance in cells. In this study, we aim to examine the negative effects of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) (20 mg/l) on the ion balance in wheat seedling leaves exposed to salt stress (150 mM). Sodium is known to be highly toxic for plant cells at high concentrations, and is significantly increased by salt stress. However, it can be reduced by combined application of ALA and salt, compared to salt application alone. On the other hand, while the K+/Na+ ratio was reduced by salt stress, ALA application changed this ratio in favor of K+. Manganese, iron, and copper were also able to reduce stress. However, ALA pre-treatment resulted in mineral level increments. Conversely, the stress-induced rise in magnesium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, and molybdenum were further improved by ALA application. These data clearly show that ALA has an important regulatory effect of ion balance in wheat leaves.

  11. Structural plasticity and dynamic selectivity of acid-sensing ion channel-spider toxin complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Baconguis, Isabelle; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-07-29

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are voltage-independent, amiloride-sensitive channels involved in diverse physiological processes ranging from nociception to taste. Despite the importance of ASICs in physiology, we know little about the mechanism of channel activation. Here we show that psalmotoxin activates non-selective and Na+-selective currents in chicken ASIC1a at pH7.25 and 5.5, respectively. Crystal structures of ASIC1a–psalmotoxin complexes map the toxin binding site to the extracellular domain and show how toxin binding triggers an expansion of the extracellular vestibule and stabilization of the open channel pore. At pH7.25 the pore is approximately 10Å in diameter, whereas at pH5.5 the pore is largely hydrophobic and elliptical in cross-section with dimensions of approximately 5 by 7Å, consistent with a barrier mechanism for ion selectivity. These studies define mechanisms for activation of ASICs, illuminate the basis for dynamic ion selectivity and provide the blueprints for new therapeutic agents.

  12. Competitive Binding to Cuprous Ions of Protein and BCA in the Bicinchoninic Acid Protein Assay

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Long, Mian; Huo, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Although Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) has been widely used to determine protein concentration, the mechanism of interaction between protein, copper ion and BCA in this assay is still not well known. Using the Micro BCA protein assay kit (Pierce Company), we measured the absorbance at 562 nm of BSA solutions with different concentrations of protein, and also varied the BCA concentration. When the concentration of protein was increased, the absorbance exhibited the known linear and nonlinear increase, and then reached an unexpected plateau followed by a gradual decrease. We introduced a model in which peptide chains competed with BCA for binding to cuprous ions. Formation of the well-known chromogenic complex of BCA-Cu1+-BCA was competed with the binding of two peptide bonds (NTPB) to cuprous ion, and there is the possibility of the existence of two new complexes. A simple equilibrium equation was established to describe the correlations between the substances in solution at equilibrium, and an empirical exponential function was introduced to describe the reduction reaction. Theoretical predictions of absorbance from the model were in good agreement with the measurements, which not only validated the competitive binding model, but also predicted a new complex of BCA-Cu1+-NTPB that might exist in the final solution. This work provides a new insight into understanding the chemical bases of the BCA protein assay and might extend the assay to higher protein concentration. PMID:21625379

  13. Ion activity and distribution of heavy metals in acid mine drainage polluted subtropical soils.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Tao; Becquer, Thierry; Dai, Jun; Quantin, Cécile; Benedetti, Marc F

    2009-04-01

    The oxidative dissolution of mine wastes gives rise to acidic, metal-enriched mine drainage (AMD) and has typically posed an additional risk to the environment. The poly-metallic mine Dabaoshan in South China is an excellent test site to understand the processes affecting the surrounding polluted agricultural fields. Our objectives were firstly to investigate metal ion activity in soil solution, distribution in solid constituents, and spatial distribution in samples, secondly to determine dominant environment factors controlling metal activity in the long-term AMD-polluted subtropical soils. Soil Column Donnan Membrane Technology (SC-DMT) combined with sequential extraction shows that unusually large proportion of the metal ions are present as free ion in the soil solutions. The narrow range of low pH values prevents any pH effects during the binding onto oxides or organic matter. The differences in speciation of the soil solutions may explain the different soil degradation observed between paddy and non-paddy soils.

  14. D-penicillamine-templated copper nanoparticles via ascorbic acid reduction as a mercury ion sensor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu Min; Geng, Shuo; Li, Na; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2016-05-01

    Mercury ion is one of the most hazardous metal pollutants that can cause deleterious effects on human health and the environment even at low concentrations. It is necessary to develop new mercury detection methods with high sensitivity, specificity and rapidity. In this study, a novel and green strategy for synthesizing D-penicillamine-capped copper nanoparticles (DPA-CuNPs) was successfully established by a chemical reduction method, in which D-penicillamine and ascorbic acid were used as stabilizing agent and reducing agent, respectively. The as-prepared DPA-CuNPs showed strong red fluorescence and had a large Stoke's shift (270nm). Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry were utilized to elucidate the possible fluorescence mechanism, which could be aggregation-induced emission effect. Based on the phenomenon that trace mercury ion can disperse the aggregated DPA-CuNPs, resulting in great fluorescence quench of the system, a sensitive and selective assay for mercury ion in aqueous solution with the DPA-CuNPs was developed. Under optimum conditions, this assay can be applied to the quantification of Hg(2+) in the 1.0-30μM concentration range and the detection limit (3σ/slope) is 32nM. The method was successfully applied to determine Hg(2+) in real water samples.

  15. Competitive Binding to Cuprous Ions of Protein and BCA in the Bicinchoninic Acid Protein Assay.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Long, Mian; Huo, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Although Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) has been widely used to determine protein concentration, the mechanism of interaction between protein, copper ion and BCA in this assay is still not well known. Using the Micro BCA protein assay kit (Pierce Company), we measured the absorbance at 562 nm of BSA solutions with different concentrations of protein, and also varied the BCA concentration. When the concentration of protein was increased, the absorbance exhibited the known linear and nonlinear increase, and then reached an unexpected plateau followed by a gradual decrease. We introduced a model in which peptide chains competed with BCA for binding to cuprous ions. Formation of the well-known chromogenic complex of BCA-Cu(1+)-BCA was competed with the binding of two peptide bonds (NTPB) to cuprous ion, and there is the possibility of the existence of two new complexes. A simple equilibrium equation was established to describe the correlations between the substances in solution at equilibrium, and an empirical exponential function was introduced to describe the reduction reaction. Theoretical predictions of absorbance from the model were in good agreement with the measurements, which not only validated the competitive binding model, but also predicted a new complex of BCA-Cu(1+)-NTPB that might exist in the final solution. This work provides a new insight into understanding the chemical bases of the BCA protein assay and might extend the assay to higher protein concentration.

  16. Structural plasticity and dynamic selectivity of acid-sensing ion channel-spider toxin complexes.

    PubMed

    Baconguis, Isabelle; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-09-20

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are voltage-independent, amiloride-sensitive channels involved in diverse physiological processes ranging from nociception to taste. Despite the importance of ASICs in physiology, we know little about the mechanism of channel activation. Here we show that psalmotoxin activates non-selective and Na(+)-selective currents in chicken ASIC1a at pH 7.25 and 5.5, respectively. Crystal structures of ASIC1a-psalmotoxin complexes map the toxin binding site to the extracellular domain and show how toxin binding triggers an expansion of the extracellular vestibule and stabilization of the open channel pore. At pH 7.25 the pore is approximately 10 Å in diameter, whereas at pH 5.5 the pore is largely hydrophobic and elliptical in cross-section with dimensions of approximately 5 by 7 Å, consistent with a barrier mechanism for ion selectivity. These studies define mechanisms for activation of ASICs, illuminate the basis for dynamic ion selectivity and provide the blueprints for new therapeutic agents.

  17. Catchment and atmospheric effects on acidity of lakes in the northeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.B.; Anderson, D.S.; Rhodes, T.E.

    1995-06-01

    Sedimentary evidence from 12 lakes in northeastern United States reveals that both catchment and atmospheric processes have caused changes in lake acidity. Diatom remains indicate pH 5.2 to 5.8 (one lake 6.8) for one to two centuries before impacts on the catchment by Euro-americans. These low-alkalinity lakes were very sensitive to altered fluxes of base cations and acids. Several lakes increased in pH by 0.2 to 0.6 unit in the 1800s and early 1900s when their catchments were logged. Re-acidification of some of the lakes was initially due to forest succession. Older sediment from one of the lakes also shows alkalization by natural disturbance, and acidification paralleling forest succession. However, much of the recent acidification, to uniquely low levels by the 1970s is due to high sulfur deposition.

  18. Glyceryl ether monooxygenase resembles aromatic amino acid hydroxylases in metal ion and tetrahydrobiopterin dependence.

    PubMed

    Watschinger, Katrin; Keller, Markus A; Hermetter, Albin; Golderer, Georg; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele; Werner, Ernst R

    2009-01-01

    Glyceryl ether monooxygenase is a tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent membrane-bound enzyme which catalyses the cleavage of lipid ethers into glycerol and the corresponding aldehyde. Despite many different characterisation and purification attempts, so far no gene and primary sequence have been assigned to this enzyme. The seven other tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent enzymes can be divided in the family of aromatic amino acid hydroxylases - comprising phenylalanine hydroxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase and the two tryptophan hydroxylases - and into the three nitric oxide synthases. We tested the influences of different metal ions and metal ion chelators on glyceryl ether monooxygenase, phenylalanine hydroxylase and nitric oxide synthase activity to elucidate the relationship of glyceryl ether monooxygenase to these two families. 1,10-Phenanthroline, an inhibitor of non-heme iron-dependent enzymes, was able to potently block glyceryl ether monooxygenase as well as phenylalanine hydroxylase, but had no effect on inducible nitric oxide synthase. Two tetrahydrobiopterin analogues, N(5)-methyltetrahydrobiopterin and 4-aminotetrahydrobiopterin, had a similar impact on glyceryl ether monooxygenase activity, as has already been shown for phenylalanine hydroxylase. These observations point to a close analogy of the role of tetrahydrobiopterin in glyceryl ether monooxygenase and in aromatic amino acid hydroxylases and suggest that glyceryl ether monooxygenase may require a non-heme iron for catalysis.

  19. High performance ion chromatography of haloacetic acids on macrocyclic cryptand anion exchanger.

    PubMed

    Bruzzoniti, Maria Concetta; De Carlo, Rosa Maria; Horvath, Krisztian; Perrachon, Daniela; Prelle, Ambra; Tófalvi, Renáta; Sarzanini, Corrado; Hajós, Péter

    2008-04-11

    A new high performance ion chromatographic method has been developed for the separation of the nine chlorinated-brominated haloacetic acids (HAAs) that are the disinfection by-products of chlorination of drinking water, using a macrocycle-based adjustable-capacity anion-exchange separator column (IonPac Cryptand A1). A gradient method based on theoretical and experimental considerations has been optimized in which 10 mM NaOH-LiOH step gradient was performed at the third minute of the analysis. The optimized method allowed us to separate the nine HAAs and seven possibly interfering inorganic anions in less than 25 min with acceptable resolution. The minimum concentrations detectable for HAAs were between 8.0 (MBA) and 210 (TBA) microg L(-1), with linearity included between 0.9947 (TBA) and 0.9998 (MBA). To increase sensitivity, a 25-fold preconcentration step on a reversed phase substrate (LiChrolut EN) has been coupled. Application of this method to the analysis of haloacetic acids in real tap water samples is illustrated.

  20. Acid-Sensing Ion Channels and nociception in the peripheral and central nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Deval, Emmanuel; Lingueglia, Eric

    2015-07-01

    Since their molecular cloning in the late 90's, Acid-Sensing Ion Channels (ASICs) have been shown to be involved in many aspects of nociception, both in peripheral and central neurons. In rodents, the combination of specific or non-specific pharmacological modulators of ASICs, together with in vivo knockdown and/or knockout animals has revealed their contribution to the detection, the modulation and the sensitization of the pain message by primary and secondary sensory neurons. Functional ASICs are homo or heterotrimers of different homologous subunits (ASIC1-3). Channels containing ASIC3 or ASIC1 subunits, appear to be important in peripheral nociceptors, where they are subject to intense regulation, while ASIC1a-containing channels also have a prominent role in central neurons, including spinal cord neurons that modulate and transmit the pain signal to the brain. In humans, experiments performed in healthy volunteers using drugs already used in the clinic and acting as poorly-selective inhibitors of ASICs, together with recent in vitro data obtained from stem cell-derived sensory neurons both support a role for these channels in nociception. These data thus suggest a real translational potential in the development of inhibitory strategies of ASICs for the treatment of pain. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'.

  1. Dissociative Electron-Ion Recombination of the Protonated Interstellar Species Glycolaldehyde, Acetic Acid, and Methyl Formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Patrick; Adams, Nigel

    2011-10-01

    Recently, the prebiotic molecule and primitive sugar glycolaldehyde and its structural isomers acetic acid and the abundant methyl formate have been detected in the interstellar medium(ISM). Understanding the processes involving these molecules is vital to understand the ISM, where stars are formed. The rate constants, αe, for dissociative electron-ion recombination of protonated gycolaldehyde, (HOCH2CHO)H^+, and protonated methyl formate, (HCOOCH3)H^+, have been determined at 300K in a variable temperature flowing afterglow using a Langmuir probe to determine the electron density. The αe at 300K are 3.2 x 10-7 cm^3 s-1 for protonated methyl formate and 7.5 x 10-7 cm^3 s-1 for protonated glycolaldehyde. The αe of protonated acetic acid could not be directly measured due to difficulty in producing the ion, but it appears to have a recombination rate constant, αe, on the ˜10-7 cm^3 s-1 scale. Additional temperature dependence information was obtained. The astrochemical implications of the αe measurements and protonation routes are also discussed.

  2. Elevated Expression of Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 3 Inhibits Epilepsy via Activation of Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qingqing; Wang, Wei; Gu, Juan; Jiang, Guohui; Bian, Xiling; Wang, Kewei; Xu, Zucai; Li, Jie; Chen, Guojun; Wang, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that acid-sensing ion channels may play a significant role in the termination of epilepsy. In particular, acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) is expressed in the central nervous system and is most sensitive to extracellular pH. However, whether ASIC3 plays a role in epilepsy is unknown. In this study, qRT-PCR, Western blot, immunohistochemistry, double immunofluorescence labeling, and slice recordings were used. We first detected elevated ASIC3 expression patterns in the brains of temporal lobe epilepsy patients and epileptic rats. ASIC3 was expressed in neurons and glia in both humans and in an experimental model of epilepsy, and ASIC3 was colocalized with inhibitory GABAergic interneurons. By blocking ASIC3 with its antagonist APETx2, we observed that injected APETx2 shortened the latency to seizure and increased the incidence of generalized tonic clonic seizure compared to the control group in models of both pilocarpine- and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures. Additionally, blocking ASIC3 significantly decreased the frequency of action potential (AP) firing in interneurons. Moreover, APETx2 significantly reduced the amplitudes and frequencies of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) while showed no differences with the APETx2 + bicuculline group and the bicuculline group. These findings suggest that elevated levels of ASIC3 may serve as an anti-epileptic mechanism via postsynaptic mechanisms in interneurons. It could represent a novel therapeutic strategy for epilepsy treatment.

  3. Acid-sensing ion channels detect moderate acidifications to induce ocular pain.

    PubMed

    Callejo, Gerard; Castellanos, Aida; Castany, Marta; Gual, Arcadi; Luna, Carolina; Acosta, M Carmen; Gallar, Juana; Giblin, Jonathan P; Gasull, Xavier

    2015-03-01

    Sensory nerve fibers innervating the ocular anterior surface detect external stimuli producing innocuous and painful sensations. Protons are among the first mediators released by damaged cells during inflammation, tissue injury, or other chronic ophthalmic conditions. We studied whether acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are expressed in corneal sensory neurons and their roles in the response to moderate acidifications of the ocular surface and in pathologies producing ocular surface inflammation. Moderate acidic pH (6.6) activated ASIC-like currents in corneal sensory neurons, which were blocked by ASIC1- or ASIC3-specific toxins. Acidic pH depolarizes corneal sensory neurons to fire action potentials, an effect blocked by the ASIC3 inhibitor APETx2. 2-Guanidino-4-methylquinazoline, an ASIC3 agonist, activated a population of corneal polymodal sensory nerve fibers and significantly increased the blinking and tearing rate. The nocifensive behaviors produced by application of either a moderate acidic stimulus or ophthalmic drugs formulated in acidic solution were abolished by ASIC blockers. In a model of allergic keratoconjunctivitis, nocifensive behavior was greatly reduced by ASIC3 blockade, presumably by reducing nociceptor sensitization during the inflammatory process. Our results show that, in addition to the established role of TRPV1, ASICs play a significant role in the detection of acidic insults at the ocular surface. The identification of ASICs in corneal neurons and their alterations during different diseases is critical for the understanding of sensory ocular pathophysiology. They are likely to mediate some of the discomfort sensations accompanying several ophthalmic formulations and may represent novel targets for the development of new therapeutics for ocular pathologies.

  4. Assay of prolyl 4-hydroxylase by the chromatographic determination of [14C]succinic acid on ion-exchange minicolumns.

    PubMed Central

    Cunliffe, C J; Franklin, T J; Gaskell, R M

    1986-01-01

    An assay for prolyl 4-hydroxylase (EC 1.14.11.2) is described which measures succinic acid produced during the decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutaric acid in the presence of poly(L-Pro-Gly-L-Pro). [1-14C]Succinic acid was separated from its precursor 2-oxo[5-14C]glutaric acid by using ion-exchange minicolumns. The contamination of succinic acid by 2-oxoglutaric acid was approx. 1%, and the recovery of succinic acid was 100%. Kinetic parameters of prolyl 4-hydroxylase measured by the assay showed good agreement with published values. Our experience indicates that the measurement of prolyl 4-hydroxylase by the production of succinic acid is especially suited to investigations involving large numbers of assays. PMID:3028379

  5. Alkali metal ion binding to amino acids versus their methyl esters: affinity trends and structural changes in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Talley, Jody M; Cerda, Blas A; Ohanessian, Gilles; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2002-03-15

    The relative alkali metal ion (M(+)) affinities (binding energies) between seventeen different amino acids (AA) and the corresponding methyl esters (AAOMe) were determined in the gas phase by the kinetic method based on the dissociation of AA-M(+)-AAOMe heterodimers (M=Li, Na, K, Cs). With the exception of proline, the Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) affinities of the other aliphatic amino acids increase in the order AAacids, which are particularly basic molecules, the order AA>AAOMe is already observed for K(+). Proline binds more strongly than its methyl ester to all M(+) except Li(+). Ab initio calculations on the M(+) complexes of alanine, beta-aminoisobutyric acid, proline, glycine methyl ester, alanine methyl ester, and proline methyl ester show that their energetically most favorable complexes result from charge solvation, except for proline which forms salt bridges. The most stable mode of charge solvation depends on the ligand (AA or AAOMe) and, for AA, it gradually changes with metal ion size. Esters chelate all M(+) ions through the amine and carbonyl groups. Amino acids coordinate Li(+) and Na(+) ions through the amine and carbonyl groups as well, but K(+) and Cs(+) ions are coordinated by the O atoms of the carboxyl group. Upon consideration of these differences in favored binding geometries, the theoretically derived relative M(+) affinities between aliphatic AA and AAOMe are in good overall agreement with the above given experimental trends. The majority of side chain functionalized amino acids studied show experimentally the affinity order AAions, which is consistent with charge solvation. Deviations are only observed with the most basic amino acids lysine and arginine, whose K(+) (for arginine) and Cs(+) complexes (for both) follow the affinity order AA>AAOMe. The latter ranking is attributed to salt bridge formation.

  6. The Safety and Regulatory Process for Amino Acids in Europe and the United States.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Ashley

    2016-12-01

    The safety of long-term, high-dose amino acid consumption marketed as dietary supplements or functional or medical foods requires regulatory clearance in the European Union through the novel food process or through the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act or the GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) route in the United States. The safety assessment of high daily doses of amino acids for bodybuilding or other health benefits is expected to require human studies to support tolerability and safety. The need for human studies is based on the fact that there is little or no evidence of toxicity from the conduct of animal toxicity studies and because standard animal testing would be inappropriate because of the large dosages required to provide a suitable margin of safety when extrapolating from animals to humans. Furthermore, the large dosages in animals required to provide a substantial margin of safety could lead to nutritional and physiologic imbalances, potentially confounding an amino acid safety assessment.

  7. Binary and ternary complexes of some inner transition metal ions with amino acids and acetyl acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Eittah, R. H.; Abdou, M. M.; Salem, M. B.

    1998-05-01

    The stability constants of the 1:1 and 1:2 (whenever possible) complexes formed between La3+, Ce3+, Th4+ and the amino acid anions L-alaninate, L-phenylalaninate and L-histidinate were determined by potentiometric titration in aqueous solution (25± 1 ^circC, I = 0.1 M KCl) and compared together with the constants previously determined. The various formation degree of the resulting M(L) and M(L)2 were determined. In order to relate the formation degree of M(L) and M(L)2 with the basicity of the amino acid anion (L^-), the acidity constants of the protonated amino acids, H2L^+, were also measured. The main results of this work prove that Th4+ ion forms the strongest complex with the studied amino acids. It is the only ion which forms a 1:2 complex. The heterocyclic ring of histidine plays a significant role in complexing with the studied metal ions as is clearly seen from the distribution of the degree of formation of the different complexes. The stability constants of the 1:1:1, 1:2:1 and 1:1:2 complexes formed between La3+, Ce3+, Th4+ and the anions L-alaninate, L-phenylalaninate and L-histidinate together with the acetyl acetonate ion were also determined following the same experimental set up used in the study of the simple complexes. The mixed-ligand complexes turned out to be very much stronger than the simple ligand complexes. Formation of a mixed ligand complex can be considered as a type of senergism. Les constantes de stabilité des complexes 1:1 et 2:2 (lorsque cela est possible) formés entre La3+, Ce3+, Th4+ et les anions aminoacides L-alaninate, L-phénylalaninate et L-histidinate ont été déterminées par dosage potentiométrique en solution aqueuse (25± 1 ^circC, I = 0,1 M KCl), et comparées à celles de la littérature. Les différents degrés de formation de M(L) et M(L)2 ont été quantifiés. Pour mettre en évidence la relation entre le degré de formation de M(L) et M(L)2 et la basicité des anions aminoacides (L^-), les constantes d

  8. Study on the interaction of ions of transient metals with ascorbic acid in the presence of different scavengers of active oxygen species in SOS chromotest.

    PubMed

    Marczewska, Jadwiga; Koziorowska, Jadwiga H

    2002-03-01

    SOS chromotest was employed to study the interaction of ascorbic acid with free ions of transient metals in the presence of added catalase, superoxide dismutase or D-mannitol. Catalase diminished the genotoxic activity of the mixture of ascorbic acid with copper ions in E. coli strains PQ37 and PQ 300, but genotoxicity of this mixture was not suppressed by superoxide dismutase and D-mannitol. The results suggest that copper ions diminished the content of peroxide generated by ascorbic acid.

  9. Dilute nitric or nitrous acid solution containing halide ions as effective media for pure gold dissolution.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Masashi; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Okamura, Kei

    2015-08-14

    The greatly enhanced oxidation ability of dilute aqueous nitric acid (0.10-2.0 mol L(-1)) containing bromide and iodide salts as well as chloride salts has been examined based on the dissolution kinetics of pure gold at 30-60 °C. It has been found that bromide salts are more effective than chloride salts in gaining the ability of dissolving gold in dilute aqueous nitric acid solution. At 60 °C, a piece of gold-wire (ca. 20 mg) is dissolved in 20 mL of as low as 0.10 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution containing 1.0-5.0 mol L(-1) NaBr and the dissolution rate constant, log(k/s(-1)), increases linearly (from -5.78 to -4.52) with the increasing NaBr concentration. The addition of organic solvents, such as acetonitrile and acetic acid, causes acceleration of gold dissolution in LiBr and NaBr solutions. With increasing MeCN contents, for instance, the log(k/s(-1)) value of 0.10 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution containing 2.0 mol L(-1) NaBr increases linearly from -5.30 to -4.61 at 30% (v/v) MeCN. The bromide salts affect the gold dissolution rate constant in the order of KBr < NaBr < LiBr < CaBr2. With increasing NaI concentration (0.20-3.0 mol L(-1)), some acceleration in log(k/s(-1)) of 0.50 or 1.0 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution has been observed; however, the slope of acceleration as the function of NaI concentration is much smaller than that of NaCl or NaBr. The gold dissolution ability has been examined also for nitrous acid containing chloride and bromide ions at 35 °C. The NaNO2 solution containing twice or more amounts of HX (X = Cl, Br) gives the maximum efficiency for gold dissolution, according to the log(k/s(-1)) values of the mixed solutions of NaNO2 (0.10-2.0 mol L(-1)) and HX of various concentrations. The influence of oxidation by dilute nitric and nitrous acids on the gold dissolution is discussed from the standpoint of the redox potentials in "modified" aqueous solutions and not of the changes in the activity coefficients of ions.

  10. Separation of tissue and serum acid phosphatase isoenzymes by ion-exchange column chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mercer, D W

    1977-01-01

    I describe a simple, rapid ion-exchange column-chromatographic technique for separating the acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) isoenzymes in human serum and tissue. Extracts of platelets, spleen, liver, erythrocytes, and prostate were used to determine optimum conditions for separating these isoenzymes. Samples layered on mini-colunms of DEAE-Sephadex A-50 were eluted stepwise with sodium chloride (100, 200, and 300 mmol/liter, buffered with tris (hydroxymethyl)aminomethane). Activity in column effluents was measured with p-nitrophenol phosphate as substrate, and their isoenzyme content was assessed by electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gel. Comparision of activity patterns so derived for various tissues revealed prostatic tissue to be a rich source of acid phosphatase isoenzyme 2 activity. Evaluation of sera from six patients with prostatic cancer revealed isoenzyme patterns with prominent amount of isoenzyme 2 (3.8 to 27.6 U/liter). sera from 10 healthy laboratory technicians contained isoenzyme 2 in the range of 0.3-0.5 U/liter. Samples from two patients with abnormally high activity owing to nonprostatic conditions (Gaucher's disease and carcinoma of lung) exhibited less than 2 U of isoenzyme 2 per liter and acid phosphatase isoenzymes 3-5 that were 50- to 100-fold the normal range. Quantification of isoenzyme 2 by DEAE-Sephadex column chromatography as described appears to provide a more sensitive and specific approach to diagnosis of prostatic cancer.

  11. Potentiation of acid-sensing ion channel activity by peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiong; Wu, Jing; Ren, Cuixia; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Li, Yan-Kun; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate activates peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and contributes to inflammatory pain. However, it is still not clear the mechanisms are involved in group I mGluR-mediated peripheral sensitization. Herein, we report that group I mGluRs signaling sensitizes acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and contributes to acidosis-evoked pain. DHPG, a selective group I mGluR agonist, can potentiate the functional activity of ASICs, which mediated the proton-induced events. DHPG concentration-dependently increased proton-gated currents in DRG neurons. It shifted the proton concentration-response curve upwards, with a 47.3±7.0% increase of the maximal current response to proton. Group I mGluRs, especially mGluR5, mediated the potentiation of DHPG via an intracellular cascade. DHPG potentiation of proton-gated currents disappeared after inhibition of intracellular Gq/11 proteins, PLCβ, PKC or PICK1 signaling. Moreover, DHPG enhanced proton-evoked membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons and increased the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripherally administration of DHPG dose-dependently exacerbated nociceptive responses to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. Potentiation of ASIC activity by group I mGluR signaling in rat DRG neurons revealed a novel peripheral mechanism underlying group I mGluRs involvement in hyperalgesia.

  12. Inhibition of acid-sensing ion channel currents by propofol in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhen; Li, Xiaoyu; Wang, Guizhi; Fei, Jianchun; Meng, Tao; Zhang, Xinyu; Yu, Jingya; Yu, Jingui; Li, Jingxin

    2014-04-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), part of the epithelial sodium channel/degenerin family, are activated by extracellular protons. The ASICs play a significant role in the acidosis-mediated perception of pain. The anaesthetic agent propofol also exerts antinociceptive effects, but the underlying mechanisms for this effect are not clear. We used whole-cell patch clamping to investigate the effect of propofol on proton-gated currents in: (i) rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons; and (ii) HEK293 cells transfected with either ASIC1a or ASIC3. Propofol inhibited the amplitude of proton-gated currents in DRG neurons, but did not change the sensitivity of ASICs to H(+). Notably, propofol altered acid-evoked excitability of rat DRG neurons and decreased the number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. In addition, we demonstrated that propofol inhibited ASICs by directly binding with these channels in HEK293 cells. These results suggest that propofol inhibits proton-gated currents in DRG neurons and that inhibition of proton-gated currents explains, in part, the antinociceptive effects of propofol in primary afferent neurons.

  13. Usefulness of vonoprazan, a potassium ion-competitive acid blocker, for primary eradication of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Shinya; Kawakami, Takumi; Nakatsugawa, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Takahiro; Fujii, Hideki; Tomatsuri, Naoya; Nakamura, Hideki; Sato, Hideki; Okuyama, Yusuke; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Norimasa

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate usefulness of triple therapy with vonoprazan, a potassium ion-competitive acid blocker and antibiotics, for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication. METHODS The H. pylori eradication rate was examined in 2507 patients (2055 undergoing primary eradication and 452 undergoing secondary eradication, excluding patients with subtotal gastrectomy) at the Japanese Red Cross Kyoto Daiichi Hospital from March 2013 to September 2015. For patients treated from March 2013 to February 2015, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) was used to reduce acid secretion, while vonoprazan was used after March 2015. The success rates of the 2 regimens (PPI + amoxicillin + clarithromycin/metronidazole, or vonoprazan + amoxicillin + clarithromycin/metronidazole) were compared. RESULTS The success rate of primary H. pylori eradication was significantly higher in the vonoprazan group. When stratified by the underlying disease, a significant increase of the H. pylori eradication rate was observed in patients with chronic gastritis. A significantly lower H. pylori eradication rate was observed in younger patients compared to older patients in the PPI group, but there was no difference according to age in the vonoprazan group. On the other hand, the success rate of secondary eradication was similar at approximately 90% in both groups. CONCLUSION Vonoprazan is very useful for primary eradication of H. pylori, and may become a first-line acid secretion inhibitor instead of PPIs. PMID:27867688

  14. Acid-sensing ion channels are expressed in the ventrolateral medulla and contribute to central chemoreception

    PubMed Central

    Song, Nana; Guan, Ruijuan; Jiang, Qian; Hassanzadeh, Comron J.; Chu, Yuyang; Zhao, Xiaomei; Wang, Xia; Yang, Dawei; Du, Qijun; Chu, Xiang-Ping; Shen, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    The role of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in the ventrolateral medulla (VLM) remains uncertain. Here, we found that ASIC1a and ASIC2 are widely expressed in rat medulla, and the expression level is higher at neonatal stage as compared to adult stage. The two ASIC subunits co-localized in medualla neurons. Furthermore, pH reduction triggered typical ASIC-type currents in the medulla, including the VLM. These currents showed a pH50 value of 6.6 and were blocked by amiloride. Based on their sensitivity to psalmotoxin 1 (PcTx1) and zinc, homomeric ASIC1a and heteromeric ASIC1a/2 channels were likely responsible for acid-mediated currents in the mouse medulla. ASIC currents triggered by pH 5 disappeared in the VLM neurons from ASIC1−/−, but not ASIC2−/− mice. Activation of ASICs in the medulla also triggered neuronal excitation. Moreover, microinjection of artificial cerebrospinal fluid at a pH of 6.5 into the VLM increased integrated phrenic nerve discharge, inspiratory time and respiratory drive in rats. Both amiloride and PcTx1 inhibited the acid-induced stimulating effect on respiration. Collectively, our data suggest that ASICs are highly expressed in the medulla including the VLM, and activation of ASICs in the VLM contributes to central chemoreception. PMID:27934921

  15. Trace anion determination in concentrated hydrofluoric acid solutions by two-dimensional ion chromatography I. Matrix elimination by ion-exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vermeiren, Koen

    2005-08-26

    Since years, ion exclusion chromatography (ICE) has been the standard method to separate strong acid analyte anions from concentrated weak acid matrices such as hydrofluoric acid (HF). In this work, the commercially available IonPac ICE-AS 1 column was used to separate trace levels of chloride, nitrate, sulfate and phosphate from HF solutions at 20% (w/w). The efficiency of the separation was studied in more detail using techniques such as ion chromatography (IC), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and ICP-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). For 20% (w/w) HF solutions and at a water carrier flow-rate of 0.50 ml/min, the cut window was set from 8.5 to 14.5 min. Under these conditions, analyte recoveries of better than 90% were obtained for chloride, nitrate and sulfate, but only about 75% for phosphate. The HF rejection efficiency was better than 99.9%. It was found that the ICP techniques, measuring total element levels and not species, yielded significantly higher recoveries for phosphorus and sulfur compared to IC. Evidence will be given that part of the added phosphorus (approximately 15% for an addition of 10 mg PO4/kg) is present as mono-fluorophosphoric acid (H2FPO3). In the case of sulfate, the difference between IC and ICP-MS could be attributed to an important matrix effect from the residual HF concentration.

  16. A UHPLC method for the simultaneous analysis of biogenic amines, amino acids and ammonium ions in beer.

    PubMed

    Redruello, Begoña; Ladero, Victor; Del Rio, Beatriz; Fernández, María; Martin, M C; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2017-02-15

    This paper reports a novel UHPLC method for simultaneously quantifying nine biogenic amines, 21 amino acids, and ammonium ions, in beer. Precision values of standard curves slopes were lower than 3.4% and recovery was between 85% and 106%, indicating the absence of matrix effect. Linear calibration curves were obtained for analyte concentrations between two and four orders of magnitude (R(2)>0.996). Repeatability tests returned mean variations of 3.2% and 0.5% for beer and a standard solution, respectively. Sensitivity ranged between 0.03mg/L and 0.63mg/L for the biogenic amines, and 0.05mg/L and 5.19mg/L for other compounds. Original data on the habitual presence of ethanolamine in beers are presented. The method allows for more samples to be assayed per unit time, it uses less solvent than other techniques and therefore reduces costs and the associated waste. It could be a valuable tool for monitoring the safety and quality of beers.

  17. Studies on the ion-association of methylene blue and salicylic acid in neat and mixed binary solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Soumen; Ghosh, Sujit Kumar; Kundu, Subrata; Nath, Sudip; Panigrahi, Sudipa; Praharaj, Snigdhamayee; Pal, Tarasankar

    2005-05-01

    Thiazine dye, methylene blue forms 1:1 ion-associate with salicylic acid in aqueous phase and the ion-associate can be extracted in a series of non-polar non-coordinating solvent systems. The influence of different parameters on the process of ion-association has been studied. The suitability of a number of phenolic precursors for the formation of ion-associate with methylene blue has been tested. Charge-transfer absorption band of the dye molecules in relation to ion-pair has been followed in a sequence of neat and mixed binary solvents and the dependence of the absorption maxima has been found to correlate well with the solvent polarity.

  18. Changes in the physiological properties and kinetics of citric acid accumulation via carbon ion irradiation mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger *

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Chen, Ji-hong; Wang, Shu-yang; Liu, Jing; Song, Yuan; Wu, Qing-feng; Li, Wen-jian

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to produce citric acid from corn starch using a newly isolated mutant of Aspergillus niger, and to analyze the relationship between changes in the physiological properties of A. niger induced by carbon ion irradiation and citric acid accumulation. Our results showed that the physiological characteristics of conidia in A. niger were closely related to citric acid accumulation and that lower growth rate and viability of conidia may be beneficial to citric acid accumulation. Using corn starch as a raw material, a high-yielding citric acid mutant, named HW2, was obtained. In a 10-L bioreactor, HW2 can accumulate 118.9 g/L citric acid with a residual total sugar concentration of only 14.4 g/L. This represented an 18% increase in citric acid accumulation and a 12.5% decrease in sugar utilization compared with the original strain.

  19. Effect of manganese ions on ethanol fermentation by xylose isomerase expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae under acetic acid stress.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ja Kyong; Um, Youngsoon; Lee, Sun-Mi

    2016-12-01

    The efficient fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the presence of inhibitors is highly desirable for bioethanol production. Among the inhibitors, acetic acid released during the pretreatment of lignocellulose negatively affects the fermentation performance of biofuel producing organisms. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of acetic acid on glucose and xylose fermentation by a high performance engineered strain of xylose utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SXA-R2P-E, harboring a xylose isomerase based pathway. The presence of acetic acid severely decreased the xylose fermentation performance of this strain. However, the acetic acid stress was alleviated by metal ion supplementation resulting in a 52% increased ethanol production rate under 2g/L of acetic acid stress. This study shows the inhibitory effect of acetic acid on an engineered isomerase-based xylose utilizing strain and suggests a simple but effective method to improve the co-fermentation performance under acetic acid stress for efficient bioethanol production.

  20. Use of mild organic acid reagents to recover the Co and Li from spent Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Nayaka, Girish Praveen; Pai, Karkala Vasantakumar; Manjanna, Jayappa; Keny, Sangita J

    2016-05-01

    New organic acid mixtures have been investigated to recover the valuable metal ions from the cathode material of spent Li-ion batteries. The cathodic active material (LiCoO2) collected from spent Li-ion batteries (LIBs) is dissolved in mild organic acids, iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and maleic acid (MA), to recover the metals. Almost complete dissolution occurred in slightly excess (than the stoichiometric requirement) of IDA or MA at 80°C for 6h, based on the Co and Li released. The reducing agent, ascorbic acid (AA), converts the dissolved Co(III)- to Co(II)-L (L=IDA or MA) thereby selective recovery of Co as Co(II)-oxalate is possible. The formation of Co(III)- and Co(II)-L is evident from the UV-Vis spectra of the dissolved solution as a function of dissolution time. Thus, the reductive-complexing dissolution mechanism is proposed here. These mild organic acids are environmentally benign unlike the mineral acids.

  1. Palmitic acid, verified by lipid profiling using secondary ion mass spectrometry, demonstrates anti-multiple myeloma activity.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yasuyuki; Ishizaki, Itsuko; Waki, Michihiko; Ide, Yoshimi; Hossen, Md Amir; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Miyayama, Takuya; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies indicate that lipid metabolic changes affect the survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), an imaging mass spectrometry technique, is used to visualize the subcellular distribution of biomolecules including lipids. We therefore applied this method to human clinical specimens to analyze the membrane fatty acid composition and determine candidate molecules for MM therapies. We isolated MM cells and normal plasma cells (PCs) from bone marrow aspirates of MM patients and healthy volunteers, respectively, and these separated cells were analyzed by TOF-SIMS. Multiple ions including fatty acids were detected and their ion counts were estimated. In MM cells, the mean intensity of palmitic acid was significantly lower than the mean intensity in PCs. In a cell death assay, palmitic acid reduced U266 cell viability dose-dependently at doses between 50 and 1000 μM. The percentage of apoptotic cells increased from 24h after palmitic acid administration. In contrast, palmitic acid had no effect on the viability of normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The results of this study indicated that palmitic acid is a potential candidate for novel therapeutic agents that specifically attack MM cells.

  2. Application of hydrophilic interaction chromatography retention coefficients for predicting peptide elution with TFA and methanesulfonic acid ion-pairing reagents.

    PubMed

    Wujcik, Chad E; Tweed, Joseph; Kadar, Eugene P

    2010-03-01

    Hydrophilic retention coefficients for 17 peptides were calculated based on retention coefficients previously published for TSKgel silica-60 and were compared with the experimental elution profile on a Waters Atlantis HILIC silica column using TFA and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) as ion-pairing reagents. Relative peptide retention could be accurately determined with both counter-ions. Peptide retention and chromatographic behavior were influenced by the percent acid modifier used with increases in both retention and peak symmetry observed at increasing modifier concentrations. The enhancement of net peptide polarity through MSA pairing shifted retention out by nearly five-fold for the earliest eluting peptide, compared with TFA. Despite improvements in retention and efficiency (N(eff)) for MSA over TFA, a consistent reduction in calculated selectivity (alpha) was observed. This result is believed to be attributed to the stronger polar contribution of MSA masking and diminishing the underlying influence of the amino acid residues of each associated peptide. Finally, post-column infusion of propionic acid and acetic acid was evaluated for their potential to recover signal intensity for TFA and MSA counter-ions for LC-ESI-MS applications. Acetic acid generally yielded more substantial signal improvements over propionic acid on the TFA system while minimal benefits and some further reductions were noted with MSA.

  3. In vitro synthesis of the unit that links teichoic acid to peptidoglycan.

    PubMed

    Hancock, I; Baddiley, J

    1976-03-01

    The role of cytidine diphosphate (CDP)-glycerol in gram-positive bacteria whose walls lack poly(glycerol phosphate) was investigated. Membrane preparations from Staphylococcus aureus H, Bacillus subtilis W23, and Micrococcus sp. 2102 catalyzed the incorporation of glycerol phosphate residues from radioactive CDP-glycerol into a water-soluble polymer. In toluenized cells of Micrococcus sp. 2102, some of this product became linked to the wall. In each case, maximum incorporation of glycerol phosphate residues required the presence of the nucleotide precursors of wall teichoic acid and of uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine. In membrane preparations capable of synthesizing peptidoglycan, vancomycin caused a decrease in the incorporation of isotope from CDP-glycerol into polymer. Synthesis of the poly (glycerol phosphate) unit thus depended at an early stage on the concomitant synthesis of wall teichoic acid and later on the synthesis of peptidoglycan. It is concluded that CDP-glycerol is the biosynthetic precursor of the tri(glycerol phosphate) linkage unit between teichoic acid and peptidoglycan that has recently been characterized in S. aureus H.

  4. Grafting of acrylic acid on etched latent tracks induced by swift heavy ions on polypropylene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzei, R.; Fernández, A.; García Bermúdez, G.; Torres, A.; Gutierrez, M. C.; Magni, M.; Celma, G.; Tadey, D.

    2008-06-01

    In order to continue with a systematic study that include different polymers and monomers, the residual active sites produced by heavy ion beams, that remain after the etching process, were used to start the grafting process. To produce tracks, foils of polypropylene (PP) were irradiated with 208Pb of 25.62 MeV/n. Then, these were etched and grafted with acrylic acid (AA) monomers. Experimental curves of grafting yield as a function of grafting time with the etching time as a parameter were measured. Also, the grating yield as a function of the fluence and etching time was obtained. In addition, the permeation of solutions, with different pH, through PP grafted foils was measured.

  5. Graphene oxide wrapped croconic acid disodium salt for sodium ion battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chao; Zhu, Yujie; Xu, Yunhua; Liu, Yihang; Gao, Tao; Wang, Jing; Wang, Chunsheng

    2014-03-01

    Croconic acid disodium salt (CADS), a renewable or recyclable organic compound, is investigated as an anode material in sodium ion battery for the first time. The pristine micro-sized CADS delivers a high capacity of 246.7 mAh g-1, but it suffers from fast capacity decay during charge/discharge cycles. The detailed investigation reveals that the severe capacity loss is mainly attributed to the pulverization of CADS particles induced by the large volume change during sodiation/desodiation rather than the generally believed dissolution of CADS in the organic electrolyte. Minimizing the particle size can effectively suppress the pulverization, thus improving the cycling stability. Wrapping CADS with graphene oxide by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis can enhance the integration and conductivity of CADS electrodes, thus providing a high capacity of 293 mAh g-1.

  6. Determination of chloroacetic acids in drinking water using suppressed ion chromatography with solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Kenji; Soda, Yuko; Sakuragawa, Akio

    2009-12-01

    Suppressed ion chromatography with a conductivity detector was developed for the determination of trace amounts of underivatized chloroacetic acids (CAAs). When sodium carbonate and methanol were used as a mobile phase, the simultaneous determination of each CAA took approximately 25 min. The linearity, reproducibility and detection limits were determined for the proposed method. For the solid-phase extraction step, the effects of the pH of the sample solution, sample volume and the eluting agent were tested. Under the optimized extracting conditions, the average recoveries for CAAs spiked in tap water were 83-107%, with an optimal preconcentration factor of 20. The reproducibility of recovery rate for CAAs was 1.2-3.8%, based upon 6 repetitions of the recovery experiments.

  7. Acid-sensing ion channels: A new target for pain and CNS diseases.

    PubMed

    Sluka, Kathleen A; Winter, Olivia C; Wemmie, John A

    2009-09-01

    Low pH in tissue can evoke pain in animals and humans, and is an important factor in hyperalgesia. Research has also implicated acidosis in psychiatric and neurological diseases. One emerging class of pH-detecting receptors is that of the acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). Advances in ASIC research have improved the understanding of the role played by pH dynamics in physiological and pathophysiological processes. Increasing evidence suggests that targeting ASICs with pharmacological agents may offer an effective and novel approach for treating pain and diseases of the CNS. However, the development of pharmaceuticals that target ASICs and are suitable for clinical use remains an obstacle. This review provides an update on ASICs and their potential for therapeutic modification in pain and CNS diseases.

  8. Acid-sensing ion channels 3: a potential therapeutic target for pain treatment in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Feng-Lai; Chen, Fei-Hu; Lu, Wei-Guo; Li, Xia

    2010-10-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels 3 (ASIC3) is the most sensitive to such a pH change, predominantly distributed in the sensory peripheral nervous system, and strongly correlated with pain. Recently, there is increasing evidence that ASIC3 may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory pain diseases due to it is predominantly expressed in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons making it a good candidate for a pain sensor. Elevated expression of ASIC3 was found in DRG of rodents with inflamed hind paws. In addition, it has been shown that ASIC3 gene knock-out mice (ASIC3-/-) exhibited no enhanced hyperalgesia in inflamed joint. All theses findings suggest that ASIC3 have important biological effects in inflammation that might be a promising therapeutic target for arthritis pain. In this review, we will briefly discuss the biological features of ASIC3 and summarize recent advances on the role of ASIC3 in the pathogenesis and treatment of arthritis pain.

  9. Translational strategies for neuroprotection in ischemic stroke - focusing on Acid Sensing Ion Channel 1a

    PubMed Central

    O'Bryant, Zaven; Vann, Kiara T.; Xiong, Zhi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke contributes to the majority of brain injuries and remains to be a leading cause of death and long-term disability. Despite the devastating pathology and high incidence of disease, there remain only few treatment options (tPA and endovascular procedures), which may be hampered by time dependent administration among a variety of other factors. Promising research of glutamate receptor antagonists has been unsuccessful in clinical trial. But, the mechanism by which glutamate receptors initiate injury by excessive calcium overload has spurred investigation of new and potentially successful candidates for stroke therapy. Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) may contribute to poor stroke prognosis due to localized drop in brain pH, resulting in excessive calcium overload, independent of glutamate activation. Accumulating studies targeting ASICs have underscored the importance of understanding inhibition, regulation, desensitization and trafficking of this channel and its role in disease. This review will discuss potential directions in translational ASIC research for future stroke therapies. PMID:24390970

  10. Morphine inhibits acid-sensing ion channel currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qi; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Qiu, Fang; Liu, Ting-Ting; Qu, Zu-Wei; Liu, Yu-Min; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2014-03-20

    Extracellular acidosis is a common feature in pain-generating pathological conditions. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), pH sensors, are distributed in peripheral sensory neurons and participate in nociception. Morphine exerts potent analgesic effects through the activation of opioid receptors for various pain conditions. A cross-talk between ASICs and opioid receptors in peripheral sensory neurons has not been shown so far. Here, we have found that morphine inhibits the activity of native ASICs in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Morphine dose-dependently inhibited proton-gated currents mediated by ASICs in the presence of the TRPV1 inhibitor capsazepine. Morphine shifted the proton concentration-response curve downwards, with a decrease of 51.4±3.8% in the maximum current response but with no significant change in the pH0.5 value. Another μ-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO induced a similar decrease in ASIC currents compared with morphine. The morphine inhibition of ASIC currents was blocked by naloxone, a specific opioid receptor antagonist. Pretreatment of forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, or the addition of cAMP reversed the inhibitory effect of morphine. Moreover, morphine altered acid-evoked excitability of rat DRG neurons and decreased the number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripheral applied morphine relieved pain evoked by intraplantar of acetic acid in rats. Our results indicate that morphine can inhibit the activity of ASICs via μ-opioid receptor and cAMP dependent signal pathway. These observations demonstrate a cross-talk between ASICs and opioid receptors in peripheral sensory neurons, which was a novel analgesic mechanism of morphine.

  11. Experimental Investigation from the Operation of a 2 kW Brayton Power Conversion Unit and a Xenon Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hervol, David; Mason, Lee; Birchenough, Art; Pinero, Luis

    2004-01-01

    A 2kW Brayton Power Conversion Unit (PCU) and a xenon ion thruster were integrated with a Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) system as part of a Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) Testbed at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Brayton Converters and ion thrusters are potential candidates for use on future high power NEP mission such as the proposed Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO). The use of a existing lower power test hardware provided a cost effective means to investigate the critical electrical interface between the power conversion system and the propulsion system. The testing successfully demonstrated compatible electrical operations between the converter and the thruster, including end-to-end electric power throughput, high efficiency AC to DC conversion, and thruster recycle fault protection. The details of this demonstration are reported herein.

  12. Ion-solvent and ion-ion interactions of phosphomolybdic acid in aqueous solution of catechol at 298.15, 308.15, and 318.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, M. N.; Sah, R. S.; Pradhan, P. P.; Roy, P. K.

    2009-11-01

    Apparent molar volume ( V Ø) and viscosity B-coefficients were measured for phosphomolybdicacid in aqueous solution of catechol from solution density ( ρ) and viscosity ( η) at 298.15, 308.15, and 318.15 K at various solute concentrations. The experimental density data were evaluated by Masson equation and the derived data were interpreted in terms of ion-solvent and ion-ion interactions. The viscosity data have been analyzed using Jones-Dole equation and the derived parameters, B and A, have been interpreted in terms of ion-solvent and ion-ion interactions respectively. The structure-making or breaking capacity of the solute under investigation has been discussed in terms of sign of ( δ 2 V {Ø/o}/ δT 2) P . The activation parameters of viscous flow were determined and discussed by application of transition state theory.

  13. Radiation grafting of acrylic acid onto partially deacetylated chitin for metal ion adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hien, Nguyen Quoc; Van Phu, Dang; Duy, Nguyen Ngoc; Huy, Ha Thuc

    2005-07-01

    Radiation processing technology is proved to be a useful tool for modification of polymer material including grafting of monomer onto polymer. In this study, partially deacetylated chitin (PD-chitin) was prepared by soaking chitin in NaOH solution with various concentrations from 10% to 50% (w/w) at room temperature for four days. The degree of deacetylation (DD%) of chitin samples was measured by IR spectroscopy method. Radiation grafting of acrylic acid (AAc) onto PD-chitin was carried out by immerging PD-chitin in AAc solution (5-20%v/v) for swelling two days. The swelled PD-chitin sample was filtered and irradiated with Co-60 radiation at dose of 4.8 kGy for grafting. The resulting product, so called PD-chitin-g-PAA was changed to sodium form, PD-chitin-g-PANa by treating with NaOH 1 N and used as metal ion adsorbent. The adsorption capacities of studied chitin samples for metal ion typically for Cu2+ was determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results showed that the adsorption capacities for Cu2+ were as the following order: chitin < PD-chitin < PD-chitin-g-PANa < chitosan (DD76%). In addition, equilibrium isotherms were well fitted by Langmuir equation with the constants KL = 15.5 and 19.4 (mg/g); b = 0.02 and 0.04 (L/mg) for PD-chitin and PD-chitin-g-PANa, respectively. The obtained product, PD-chitin-g-PANa can be produced on large scale with competitive cost and used as metal ion adsorbent for water purification as well as for other purposes such as for sorption of dyes and for immobilization of bioactive substances.

  14. The adsorption of Cd(II) ions on sulphuric acid-treated wheat bran.

    PubMed

    Ozer, A; Pirinççi, H B

    2006-09-21

    The adsorption of Cd(II) ions which is one of the most important toxic metals by using sulphuric acid-treated wheat bran (STWB) was investigated. The effects of solution pH and temperature, contact time and initial Cd(II) concentration on the adsorption yield were studied. The equilibrium time for the adsorption process was determined as 4 h. The adsorbent used in this study gave the highest adsorption capacity at around pH 5.4. At this pH, adsorption capacity for an initial Cd(II) ions concentration of 100 mg/L was found to be 43.1 mg/g at 25 degrees C for contact time of 4 h. The equilibrium data were analysed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models to calculate isotherm constants. The maximum adsorption capacity (qmax) which is a Langmuir constant decreased from 101.0 to 62.5 mg/g with increasing temperature from 25 to 70 degrees C. Langmuir isotherm data were evaluated to determine the thermodynamic parameters for the adsorption process. The enthalpy change (deltaH(o)) for the process was found to be exothermic. The free energy change (deltaG(o)) showed that the process was feasible. The kinetic results indicated that the adsorption process of Cd(II) ions by STWB followed first-order rate expression and adsorption rate constant was calculated as 0.0081 l/min at 25 degrees C. It was observed that the desorption yield of Cd(II) was highly pH dependent.

  15. Synthesis of formamide and isocyanic acid after ion irradiation of frozen gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaňuchová, Z.; Urso, R. G.; Baratta, G. A.; Brucato, J. R.; Palumbo, M. E.; Strazzulla, G.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Formamide (NH2HCO) and isocyanic acid (HNCO) have been observed as gaseous species in several astronomical environments such as cometary comae and pre- and proto-stellar objects. A debate is open on the formation route of those molecules, in particular if they are formed by chemical reactions in the gas phase and/or on grains. In this latter case it is relevant to understand if the formation occurs through surface reactions or is induced by energetic processing. Aims: We present arguments that support the formation of formamide in the solid phase by cosmic-ion-induced energetic processing of ices present as mantles of interstellar grains and on comets. Formamides, along with other molecules, are expelled in the gas phase when the physical parameters are appropriate to induce the desorption of ices. Methods: We have performed several laboratory experiments in which ice mixtures (H2O:CH4:N2, H2O:CH4:NH3, and CH3OH:N2) were bombarded with energetic (30-200 keV) ions (H+ or He+). FTIR spectroscopy was performed before, during, and after ion bombardment. In particular, the formation of HNCO and NH2HCO was measured quantiatively. Results: Energetic processing of ice can quantitatively reproduce the amount of NH2HCO observed in cometary comae and in many circumstellar regions. HNCO is also formed, but additional formation mechanisms are requested to quantitatively account for the astronomical observations. Conclusions: We suggest that energetic processing of ices in the pre- and proto-stellar regions and in comets is the main mechanism to produce formamide, which, once it is released in the gas phase because of desorption of ices, is observed in the gas phase in these astrophysical environments.

  16. Effect of heavy metal ions on neutrophil arachidonic acid metabolism and chemotaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Turner, S.R.; Johnson, J.A.; Turner, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    Heavy metal ions can inhibit arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism, protect against ionophore cytotoxicity (ibid) and inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis. In this study they used Au/sup +3/, Zn/sup +2/, Cr/sup +3/, Mn/sup +2/, and Cu/sup +2/ as probes of the interrelationships among AA metabolism, ionophore-mediated cytotoxicity, and chemotaxis. Phospholipid deacylation was measured in ionophore-treated cells prelabeled with /sup 3/H-AA. Eicosanoid release from ionophore-treated cells was monitored both qualitatively by thin-layer chromatography of /sup 3/H-AA metabolities and quantitatively by radioimmunoassay. Cytoprotection was quantitated as ability to exclude trypan blue. Chemotaxis toward f-Met-Leu-Phe was measured by leading front analysis. The results imply that metal ions attenuate ionophore cytotoxicity by blocking phospholipid deacylation and eicosanoid production. In contrast to previous reports, the data obtained using Au/sup +3/ and Cu/sup +2/ demonstrates no correlation between AA metabolism and chemotaxis, suggesting that these 2 processes are not linked.

  17. Fatty Acid Regulation of Voltage- and Ligand-Gated Ion Channel Function.

    PubMed

    Antollini, Silvia S; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Free fatty acids (FFA) are essential components of the cell, where they play a key role in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, and most particularly in cell membranes, where they are central actors in shaping the physicochemical properties of the lipid bilayer and the cellular adaptation to the environment. FFA are continuously being produced and degraded, and a feedback regulatory function has been attributed to their turnover. The massive increase observed under some pathological conditions, especially in brain, has been interpreted as a protective mechanism possibly operative on ion channels, which in some cases is of stimulatory nature and in other cases inhibitory. Here we discuss the correlation between the structure of FFA and their ability to modulate protein function, evaluating the influence of saturation/unsaturation, number of double bonds, and cis vs. trans isomerism. We further focus on the mechanisms of FFA modulation operating on voltage-gated and ligand-gated ion channel function, contrasting the still conflicting evidence on direct vs. indirect mechanisms of action.

  18. Role of ion-pair interactions on asphaltene stabilization by alkylbenzenesulfonic acids.

    PubMed

    Goual, Lamia; Sedghi, Mohammad

    2015-02-15

    The dispersion of asphaltenes by dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) has been the subject of several studies in the past. However, it is unclear how these interactions affect the structure of asphaltenes and why asphaltene aggregates are larger in the presence of ionic DBSA. The main goal of this study was to address these points using a combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Another objective was to compare ionic DBSA (i.e., dodecylbenzenesulfonate or DBS(-)) to nonionic amphiphiles such as alkylphenols. A striking similarity between dodecylbenzenesulfonate and alkylphenols was that both favored the formation of filamentary rather than globular asphaltene flocculates. However the mechanism by which those filaments formed was very different. Two strong electrostatic interactions between DBSA and asphaltenes were found: (i) those between protonated asphaltenes (i.e., AH(+)) and DBS(-) molecules, which were fifteen times stronger than asphaltene-alkylphenol interactions, and (ii) those between two asphaltene-dispersant pairs (i.e., AH(+)-DBS(-) ion pairs), which did not exist with alkylphenols. These interactions promoted the formation of large and compact asphaltene flocculates, as compared to small and loose ones formed without DBSA. Flocculates with DBSA could further bind to each other through ion-pair interactions. The binding occurred in series (generating long filaments) or in parallel (generating lateral ramifications). However the series configuration was energetically favored due to less steric effects generated by the side aliphatic chains of asphaltenes and DBSA.

  19. Psalmotoxin-1 Docking to Human Acid-sensing Ion Channel-1*

    PubMed Central

    Qadri, Yawar J.; Berdiev, Bakhrom K.; Song, Yuhua; Lippton, Howard L.; Fuller, Catherine M.; Benos, Dale J.

    2009-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channel-1 (ASIC-1) is a proton-gated ion channel implicated in nociception and neuronal death during ischemia. Recently the first crystal structure of a chicken ASIC was obtained. Expanding upon this work, homology models of the human ASICs were constructed and evaluated. Energy-minimized structures were tested for validity by in silico docking of the models to psalmotoxin-1, which potently inhibits ASIC-1 and not other members of the family. The data are consistent with prior radioligand binding and functional assays while also explaining the selectivity of PcTX-1 for homomeric hASIC-1a. Binding energy calculations suggest that the toxin and channel create a complex that is more stable than the channel alone. The binding is dominated by the coulombic contributions, which account for why the toxin-channel interaction is not observed at low pH. The computational data were experimentally verified with single channel and whole-cell electrophysiological studies. These validated models should allow for the rational design of specific and potent peptidomimetic compounds that may be useful for the treatment of pain or ischemic stroke. PMID:19395383

  20. Acid-sensing ion channels: a novel therapeutic target for pain and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Guang; Xu, Tian-Le

    2015-01-01

    The acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) has emerged as a novel type of ion channel that is activated by extracellular protons as well as nonproton ligands. Advances in ASIC research have resolved its multifaceted structural and functional properties, including its widespread distribution, polymodal activation, and activity-dependent regulation of its expression. All of these properties promote a better understanding of the roles played by pH dynamics as well as damage-related signals through activation of ASICs in pain and anxiety. Importantly, even more studies have provided strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of targeting ASICs with pharmacological agents or gene knockdown for treating pain and anxiety. Here we review the contribution of ASICs at the peripheral and central levels to the development of acute pain, inflammatory pain, neuropathic pain, and anxiety-related disorders, as well as their potential underlying mechanisms. Accumulating evidence suggests that ASICs represent a novel class of promising targets for developing effective therapies for pain and anxiety.

  1. Black mamba venom peptides target acid-sensing ion channels to abolish pain.

    PubMed

    Diochot, Sylvie; Baron, Anne; Salinas, Miguel; Douguet, Dominique; Scarzello, Sabine; Dabert-Gay, Anne-Sophie; Debayle, Delphine; Friend, Valérie; Alloui, Abdelkrim; Lazdunski, Michel; Lingueglia, Eric

    2012-10-25

    Polypeptide toxins have played a central part in understanding physiological and physiopathological functions of ion channels. In the field of pain, they led to important advances in basic research and even to clinical applications. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are generally considered principal players in the pain pathway, including in humans. A snake toxin activating peripheral ASICs in nociceptive neurons has been recently shown to evoke pain. Here we show that a new class of three-finger peptides from another snake, the black mamba, is able to abolish pain through inhibition of ASICs expressed either in central or peripheral neurons. These peptides, which we call mambalgins, are not toxic in mice but show a potent analgesic effect upon central and peripheral injection that can be as strong as morphine. This effect is, however, resistant to naloxone, and mambalgins cause much less tolerance than morphine and no respiratory distress. Pharmacological inhibition by mambalgins combined with the use of knockdown and knockout animals indicates that blockade of heteromeric channels made of ASIC1a and ASIC2a subunits in central neurons and of ASIC1b-containing channels in nociceptors is involved in the analgesic effect of mambalgins. These findings identify new potential therapeutic targets for pain and introduce natural peptides that block them to produce a potent analgesia.

  2. Fatty Acid Regulation of Voltage- and Ligand-Gated Ion Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    Antollini, Silvia S.; Barrantes, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Free fatty acids (FFA) are essential components of the cell, where they play a key role in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, and most particularly in cell membranes, where they are central actors in shaping the physicochemical properties of the lipid bilayer and the cellular adaptation to the environment. FFA are continuously being produced and degraded, and a feedback regulatory function has been attributed to their turnover. The massive increase observed under some pathological conditions, especially in brain, has been interpreted as a protective mechanism possibly operative on ion channels, which in some cases is of stimulatory nature and in other cases inhibitory. Here we discuss the correlation between the structure of FFA and their ability to modulate protein function, evaluating the influence of saturation/unsaturation, number of double bonds, and cis vs. trans isomerism. We further focus on the mechanisms of FFA modulation operating on voltage-gated and ligand-gated ion channel function, contrasting the still conflicting evidence on direct vs. indirect mechanisms of action. PMID:27965583

  3. Laboratory study of isocyanic acid ions: Rotational spectroscopy of NCO-, H2NCO+, and HNCOH+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzi, Valerio; Gottlieb, Carl A.; Thaddeus, Patrick; Thorwirth, Sven; McCarthy, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    We report detection of protonated isocyanic acid in two isomeric forms, H2NCO+ and HNCOH+, by high-resolution spectroscopy. The two ions were first observed at centimeter wavelengths by Fourier Transform (FT) microwave spectroscopy, in a discharge through HNCO heavily diluted in hydrogen in the throat of a supersonic nozzle. Spectroscopic constants derived from the two lowest rotational transitions of both isomers agree very well with those derived from theoretical structures computed at the coupled cluster level of theory. In the same molecular beam, the fundamental rotational transition of NCO- was observed with well-resolved nitrogen quadrupole hyperfine structure. Detection of NCO- and H2NCO+ in our beam was subsequently confirmed by observation of several millimeter-wave transitions in a low pressure discharge through cyanogen and water. The spectroscopic constants of NCO- obtained earlier by infrared laser spectroscopy are in good agreement with the highly accurate constants derived here. Owing to the high abundance of HNCO in many galactic molecular sources, both ions are excellent candidates for astronomical detection in the radio band.

  4. Optical control of trimeric P2X receptors and acid-sensing ion channels.

    PubMed

    Browne, Liam E; Nunes, João P M; Sim, Joan A; Chudasama, Vijay; Bragg, Laricia; Caddick, Stephen; North, R Alan

    2014-01-07

    P2X receptors are trimeric membrane proteins that function as ion channels gated by extracellular ATP. We have engineered a P2X2 receptor that opens within milliseconds by irradiation at 440 nm, and rapidly closes at 360 nm. This requires bridging receptor subunits via covalent attachment of 4,4'-bis(maleimido)azobenzene to a cysteine residue (P329C) introduced into each second transmembrane domain. The cis-trans isomerization of the azobenzene pushes apart the outer ends of the transmembrane helices and opens the channel in a light-dependent manner. Light-activated channels exhibited similar unitary currents, rectification, calcium permeability, and dye uptake as P2X2 receptors activated by ATP. P2X3 receptors with an equivalent mutation (P320C) were also light sensitive after chemical modification. They showed typical rapid desensitization, and they could coassemble with native P2X2 subunits in pheochromocytoma cells to form light-activated heteromeric P2X2/3 receptors. A similar approach was used to open and close human acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), which are also trimers but are unrelated in sequence to P2X receptors. The experiments indicate that the opening of the permeation pathway requires similar and substantial movements of the transmembrane helices in both P2X receptors and ASICs, and the method will allow precise optical control of P2X receptors or ASICs in intact tissues.

  5. Cadmium ion-doped magnetic poly(styrene-acrylic acid) nanospheres for sensitive electrochemical immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Cui, Yuling; Liu, Bingqian; Chen, Huafeng; Chen, Guonan; Tang, Dianping

    2012-05-15

    A novel class of molecular tags, cadmium ion-doped magnetic poly(styrene-acrylic acid) nanospheres (Cd-MPSA), was first synthesized and functionalized with polyclonal rabbit anti-human luteinizing hormone antibodies (PAb(2)) for highly efficient electrochemical immunoassay of luteinizing hormone (LH). Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FTIR) were employed to characterize the prepared Cd-MPSA. By using Cd-MPSA-labeled PAb(2) as molecular tags, a novel sandwich-type immunoassay protocol was built for determination of LH on monoclonal mouse anti-human luteinizing hormone antibody (MAb(1))-functionalized gold electrode. The assay was carried out in pH 5.3 HAc-NaAc buffer solution by square wave voltammetry (SWV). The signal was obtained by the reduction of the doped cadmium ions in the Cd-MPSA. Under optimal conditions, the currents increased with the increasing LH level in the sample, and exhibited a linear range from 0.25 to 240 mIU mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.08 mIU mL(-1) LH at 3s(B). The precision, reproducibility, and specificity were acceptable. No obvious difference was encountered in the analysis of spiking LH samples into newborn calf serum with the referenced values.

  6. Supramolecular complexes obtained from the interaction of violuric acid with manganese ion and nitrogenous ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Humberto C.; Diniz, Renata; Speziali, Nivaldo L.; de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando C.

    2014-07-01

    This work describes the synthesis, spectroscopic characterization (Raman and infrared) and structural arrangement of three new supramolecular complexes named [Mn(H2Vi)2(H2O)4)](bpy)2(1), [Mn(bpa)2(H2O)4](H2Vi)2(2) and [Mn(bpp)2(H2Vi)2]·(bpp)2(H2O)2(3); these compounds have been obtained making use of different building blocks such as 4,4‧-bipyridyne (bpy), 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane (bpa) and 4,4‧-trimethylene-dipyridine (bpp) acting as spacers with violuric acid and manganese ion, presenting behavior related to processes of molecular self-assembling and self-organization, very common in studies of supramolecular systems. In all these compounds the violurate anion appears in the crystalline arrangement as monodentate, anionic and chelate forms for 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The important to note is that monodentate coordination in 1 and chelate in 3 through O2 and O3 oxygen atoms from the oxime group can be considered the first example in literature involving violuric acid, both in coordination or interaction with manganese ion. Moreover, it can be seen a good agreement between the structural results and the spectroscopic data; for instance the presence of an intense band in the Raman spectrum around 1603 and 1012 cm-1 in all obtained compounds, assigned to the ν(CC)/ν(CN) and ν(ring)modes of the pyridyl ligand, respectively. Other important band can be observed in 1031 cm-1 only for compound 3, assigned to the ν(Nsbnd O) mode of the violurate ligand; the band at 1284 cm-1 referring to the ν(Ndbnd O) mode, very characteristic of violurate species is not seen in the spectrum, thus confirming the coordination of this building block by the oxime moiety.

  7. Bile acids potentiate proton-activated currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing human acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC1a).

    PubMed

    Ilyaskin, Alexandr V; Diakov, Alexei; Korbmacher, Christoph; Haerteis, Silke

    2017-02-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are nonvoltage-gated sodium channels transiently activated by extracellular protons and belong to the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)/Degenerin (DEG) family of ion channels. Bile acids have been shown to activate two members of this family, the bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) and ENaC. To investigate whether bile acids also modulate ASIC function, human ASIC1a was heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Exposing oocytes to tauro-conjugated cholic (t-CA), deoxycholic (t-DCA), and chenodeoxycholic (t-CDCA) acid at pH 7.4 did not activate ASIC1a-mediated whole-cell currents. However, in ASIC1a expressing oocytes the whole-cell currents elicited by pH 5.5 were significantly increased in the presence of these bile acids. Single-channel recordings in outside-out patches confirmed that t-DCA enhanced the stimulatory effect of pH 5.5 on ASIC1a channel activity. Interestingly, t-DCA reduced single-channel current amplitude by ~15% which suggests an interaction of t-DCA with a region close to the channel pore. Molecular docking predicted binding of bile acids to the pore region near the degenerin site (G433) in the open conformation of the channel. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the amino acid residue G433 is critically involved in the potentiating effect of bile acids on ASIC1a activation by protons.

  8. Cesium removal from liquid acidic wastes with the primary focus on ammonium molybdophosphate as an ion exchanger: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.J.

    1995-03-01

    Many articles have been written concerning the selective removal of cesium from both acidic and alkaline defense wastes. The majority of the work performed for cesium removal from defense wastes involves alkaline feed solutions. Several different techniques for cesium removal from acidic solutions have been evaluated such as precipitation, solvent extraction, and ion exchange. The purpose of this paper is to briefly review various techniques for cesium removal from acidic solutions. The main focus of the review will be on ion exchange techniques, particularly those involving ammonium molybdophosphate as the exchanger. The pertinent literature sources are condensed into a single document for quick reference. The information contained in this document was used as an aid in determining techniques to evaluate cesium removal from the acidic Idaho Chemical Processing Plant waste matrices. 47 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Size distribution of acidic sulfate ions in fine ambient particulate matter and assessment of source region effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazi, Y.; Heikkinen, M. S. A.; Cohen, B. S.

    Human exposure studies strongly suggested that the fine fraction of ambient particulate matter (PM) and its associated acidic sulfates are closely correlated with observed adverse health effects. Acidic sulfates are the products of atmospheric sulfur dioxide oxidation and neutralization processes. Few data are available on the amount and size distribution of acidic sulfates within the fine fraction of ambient PM. Knowledge of this distribution will help to understand their toxic mechanisms in the human respiratory tract. The goals of this research were: (1) to measure the size distribution of hydrogen ion, sulfate, and ammonium within the fine fraction of the ambient aerosol in air masses originating from different source regions; and (2) to examine the effect of the source region and the seasons on the sampled PM composition. Six size fractions within the fine ambient PM were collected using a micro-orifice impactor. Results from 30 sampling sessions demonstrated that higher total concentrations of these three ions were observed during the warm months than during the cold months of the year. Size distribution results show that the midpoint diameter of the fraction of particles with the largest fraction of hydrogen, sulfate and ammonium ions was 0.38 μm. Although most of the mass containing hydrogen and sulfate ions was measured in the fraction of particles with 0.38 μm midpoint diameter, the ultrafine fraction (<0.1 μm) was found to be more acidic. Ambient ion concentrations varied between sampling sessions and seasons, but the overall size distribution profiles are similar. Air mass back trajectories were used to identify the source region of the sampled aerosols. No apparent source region effect was observed in terms of the distribution profile of the ions. However, samples collected from air masses that originated from, or passed over, high sulfur dioxide emission areas demonstrated higher concentrations of the different ions.

  10. Acidic deposition in the northeastern United States: Sources and inputs, ecosystem effects, and management strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, C.T.; Lawrence, G.B.; Bulger, A.J.; Butler, T.J.; Cronan, C.S.; Eagar, C.; Lambert, K.F.; Likens, G.E.; Stoddard, J.L.; Weathers, K.C.

    2001-01-01

    North America and Europe are in the midst of a large-scale experiment. Sulfuric and nitric acids have acidified soils, lakes, and streams, thereby stressing or killing terrestrial and aquatic biota. It is therefore critical to measure and to understand the recovery of complex ecosystems in response to decreases in acidic deposition. Fortunately, the NADP, CASTNet, and AIRMoN-dry networks are in place to measure anticipated improvements in air quality and in atmospheric deposition. Unfortunately, networks to measure changes in water quality are sparse, and networks to monitor soil, vegetation, and fish responses are even more limited. There is an acute need to assess the response of these resources to decreases in acid loading. It would be particularly valuable to assess the recovery of aquatic biota - which respond directly to acid stress - to changes in surface water chemistry (Gunn and Mills 1998). We used long-term research from the HBEF and other sites across the northeastern United States to synthesize data on the effects of acidic deposition and to assess ecosystem responses to reductions in emissions. On the basis of existing data, it is clear that in the northeastern United States ??? reductions of SO2 emissions since 1970 have resulted in statistically significant decreases in SO42- in wet and bulk deposition and in surface waters ??? emissions of NOX and concentrations of NO3- in wet and bulk deposition and in surface waters have shown no increase or decrease since the 1980s ??? estimates of NH3 emissions are uncertain, although atmospheric deposition of NH4+ remains important for forest management and stream NO3- loss ??? acidic deposition has accelerated the leaching of base cations from soils, thus delaying the recovery of ANC in lakes and streams from decreased emissions of SO2 (at the HBEF the available soil Ca pool appears to have declined 50% over the past 50 years) ???sulfur and N from atmospheric deposition have accumulated in forest soils across

  11. Interaction of charged amino-acid side chains with ions: an optimization strategy for classical force fields.

    PubMed

    Kahlen, Jens; Salimi, Leila; Sulpizi, Marialore; Peter, Christine; Donadio, Davide

    2014-04-10

    Many well-established classical biomolecular force fields, fitted on the solvation properties of single ions, do not necessarily describe all the details of ion pairing accurately, especially for complex polyatomic ions. Depending on the target application, it might not be sufficient to reproduce the thermodynamics of ion pairing, but it may also be necessary to correctly capture structural details, such as the coordination mode. In this work, we analyzed how classical force fields can be optimized to yield a realistic description of these different aspects of ion pairing. Given the prominent role of the interactions of negatively charged amino-acid side chains and divalent cations in many biomolecular systems, we chose calcium acetate as a benchmark system to devise a general optimization strategy that we applied to two popular force fields, namely, GROMOS and OPLS-AA. Using experimental association constants and first-principles molecular dynamics simulations as a reference, we found that small modifications of the van der Waals ion-ion interaction parameters allow a systematic improvement of the essential thermodynamic and structural properties of ion pairing.

  12. Quantifying the ion atmosphere of unfolded, single-stranded nucleic acids using equilibrium dialysis and single-molecule methods

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, David R.; Saleh, Omar A.

    2016-01-01

    To form secondary structure, nucleic acids (NAs) must overcome electrostatic strand–strand repulsion, which is moderated by the surrounding atmosphere of screening ions. The free energy of NA folding therefore depends on the interactions of this ion atmosphere with both the folded and unfolded states. We quantify such interactions using the preferential ion interaction coefficient or ion excess: the number of ions present near the NA in excess of the bulk concentration. The ion excess of the folded, double-helical state has been extensively studied; however, much less is known about the salt-dependent ion excess of the unfolded, single-stranded state. We measure this quantity using three complementary approaches: a direct approach of Donnan equilibrium dialysis read out by atomic emission spectroscopy and two indirect approaches involving either single-molecule force spectroscopy or existing thermal denaturation data. The results of these three approaches, each involving an independent experimental technique, are in good agreement. Even though the single-stranded NAs are flexible polymers that are expected to adopt random-coil configurations, we find that their ion atmosphere is quantitatively described by rod-like models that neglect large-scale conformational freedom, an effect that we explain in terms of the competition between the relevant structural and electrostatic length scales. PMID:27036864

  13. Studies of endothelial monolayer formation on irradiated poly-L-lactide acid with ions of different stopping power and velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbeitman, Claudia R.; del Grosso, Mariela F.; Ibañez, Irene L.; Behar, Moni; Grasselli, Mariano; Bermúdez, Gerardo García

    2015-12-01

    In this work we study cell viability, proliferation and morphology of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) cultured on poly-L-lactide acid (PLLA) modified by heavy ion irradiation. In a previous study comparing ions beams with the same stopping power we observed an increase in cell density and a better cell morphology at higher ion velocities. In the present work we continued this study using heavy ions beam with different stopping power and ion velocities. To this end thin films of 50 μm thickness were irradiated with 2 MeV/u and 0.10 MeV/u ion beams provided the Tandar (Buenos Aires, Argentina) and Tandetron (Porto Alegre, Brazil) accelerators, respectively. The results suggest that a more dense and elongated cell shapes, similar to the BAEC cells on the internal surface of bovine aorta, was obtained for stopping power of 18.2-22.1 MeV cm2 mg-1 and ion velocity of 2 MeV/u. On the other hand, for low ion velocity 0.10 MeV/u the cells present a more globular shapes.

  14. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 5): Auto Ion Chemicals, Inc., operable unit 2, Kalamazoo, MI, September 23, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Auto Ion site (Operable Unit 2), Kalamazoo, Michigan. The purpose of this remedy is to establish Alternate Concentration Limits (ACLs) for groundwater and institute a groundwater monitoring program that will ensure that groundwater does not pose a risk to human health or the environment. It should be noted that the soil cleanup conducted in 1993 will have a significant impact on groundwater quality due to the fact it removed the vast majority of the source to further groundwater contamination.

  15. Localization of fatty acids with selective chain length by imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Richter, Katrin; Nygren, Håkan; Malmberg, Per; Hagenhoff, Birgit

    2007-07-01

    Localization of fatty acids in biological tissues was made by using TOF-SIMS (time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry). Two cell-types with a specific fatty acid distribution are shown. In rat cerebellum, different distribution patterns of stearic acid (C18:0), palmitic acid (C16:0), and oleic acid (C18:1) were found. Stearic acid signals were observed accumulated in Purkinje cells with high intensities inside the cell, but not in the nucleus region. The signals colocalized with high intensity signals of the phosphocholine head group, indicating origin from phosphatidylcholine or sphingomyelin. In mouse intestine, high palmitic acid signals were found in the secretory crypt cells together with high levels of phosphorylinositol colocalized in the crypt region. Palmitic acid was also seen in the intestinal lumen that contains high amounts of mucine, which is known to be produced in the crypt cells. Linoleic acid signals (C18:2) were low in the crypt region and high in the villus region. Oleic acid signals were seen in the villi and stearic acid signals were ubiquitous with no specific localization in the intestine. We conclude that the results obtained by using imaging TOF-SIMS are consistent with known brain and intestine biochemistry and that the localization of fatty acids is specific in differentiated cells.

  16. Analysis of trace inorganic anions in weak acid salts by single pump cycling-column-switching ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhongping; Ni, Chengzhu; Zhu, Zhuyi; Pan, Zaifa; Wang, Lili; Zhu, Yan

    2015-05-01

    The application of ion chromatography with the single pump cycling-column-switching technique was described for the analysis of trace inorganic anions in weak acid salts within a single run. Due to the hydrogen ions provided by an anion suppressor electrolyzing water, weak acid anions could be transformed into weak acids, existing as molecules, after passing through the suppressor. Therefore, an anion suppressor and ion-exclusion column were adopted to achieve on-line matrix elimination of weak acid anions with high concentration for the analysis of trace inorganic anions in weak acid salts. A series of standard solutions consisting of target anions of various concentrations from 0.005 to 10 mg/L were analyzed, with correlation coefficients r ≥ 0.9990. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.67 to 1.51 μg/L, based on the signal-to-noise ratio of 3 and a 25 μL injection volume. Relative standard deviations for retention time, peak area, and peak height were all less than 2.01%. A spiking study was performed with satisfactory recoveries between 90.3 and 104.4% for all anions. The chromatographic system was successfully applied to the analysis of trace inorganic anions in five weak acid salts.

  17. [MOLECULAR EVOLUTION OF ION CHANNELS: AMINO ACID SEQUENCES AND 3D STRUCTURES].

    PubMed

    Korkosh, V S; Zhorov, B S; Tikhonov, D B

    2016-01-01

    An integral part of modern evolutionary biology is comparative analysis of structure and function of macromolecules such as proteins. The first and critical step to understand evolution of homologous proteins is their amino acid sequence alignment. However, standard algorithms fop not provide unambiguous sequence alignments for proteins of poor homology. More reliable results can be obtained by comparing experimental 3D structures obtained at atomic resolution, for instance, with the aid of X-ray structural analysis. If such structures are lacking, homology modeling is used, which may take into account indirect experimental data on functional roles of individual amino-acid residues. An important problem is that the sequence alignment, which reflects genetic modifications, does not necessarily correspond to the functional homology. The latter depends on three-dimensional structures which are critical for natural selection. Since alignment techniques relying only on the analysis of primary structures carry no information on the functional properties of proteins, including 3D structures into consideration is very important. Here we consider several examples involving ion channels and demonstrate that alignment of their three-dimensional structures can significantly improve sequence alignments obtained by traditional methods.

  18. A process for separating acid-sugar mixtures using ion exclusion chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Hester, R.D.; Hartfield, S.W.; Farina, G.E.

    1994-10-01

    Work using a low-temperature concentrated sulfuric acid hydrolysis process to convert the cellulosic fraction of corn stover to monomeric sugars demonstrated the high conversion efficiencies possible with that process. The TVA work also confirmed the need for a cost-effective acid-sugar separation process. A preparative-scale ion-exclusion chromatography (IEC) system was designed, constructed, and tested with a variety of synthetic solutions and actual hydrolyzates. Although significant dispersion was observed initially, design changes were effective in minimizing this phenomenon. Data collected during the operation of the preparative-scale system were used in the design and construction of an IEC miniplant capable of processing larger volumes of synthetic solutions or hydrolyzates and in the design of an extraction-assisted IEC system. The data were also used to assess the viability of a continuous feed IEC system. This paper includes a discussion of the IEC process, provides overall material balances for various IEC process scenarios, and presents a discussion on process economics.

  19. Simultaneous determination of trace oxyhalides and haloacetic acids using suppressed ion chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barron, Leon; Paull, Brett

    2006-05-15

    A new analytical procedure for the simultaneous determination of trace oxyhalides and haloacetic acids (HAs) in drinking water and aqueous soil extracts is described. The method uses micro-bore ion chromatography (IC) coupled with suppressed conductivity (SC) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection (ESI-MS). The IC-SC-ESI-MS system included a secondary flow of 100% MeOH, which was added to the column eluate (post-suppressor) and resulted in a significant increase in sensitivity for all analytes. All ESI-MS parameters were optimized for HA analysis and sensitivity quantitatively compared to suppressed conductivity. Full analytical performance characteristics for the developed method are presented for monochloro-, monobromo-, dichloro-, dibromo-, trichloro-, bromochloro, chlorodifluoro-, trifluoro-, dichlorobromo- and dibromochloroacetic acid, as well as the oxyhalides iodate, bromate, chlorate and perchlorate. In the case of the HAs, an optimised 25-fold SPE preconcentration method meant all analytes could be readily detected well below the USEPA 60mug/L regulatory limit using conductivity and/or ESI-MS. The IC-ESI-MS method was applied to the determination of oxyhalides and HAs in both soil extracts and drinking water samples. Soil samples were extracted using ultra pure water with subsequent determination of perchlorate at 1.68mug/g of soil. A drinking water sample containing HAs was preconcentrated using LiChrolut EN solid phase extraction cartridges with subsequent sulphate and chloride removal. Total HAs were determined at 13mug/L.

  20. Experimental study on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of AISI347 in acid chloride ion solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yanpeng; Wang, Runkun; Wang, Chao; Chen, Songying

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of AISI347 austenitic stainless steel exposed to acid solution containing chloride ion at different temperature and pressure is studied through slow strain rate testing (SSRT) at different test condition. The result of SSRT shows, with the pressure increasing, the SCC resistance is getting worse and the trend of brittle fracture presented by the fracture surface is more obvious. With the temperature rising, the mechanical properties of AISI347 getting worse first and then getting better, it gets to be the worst when the temperature is 260 °C. The result of significance effect analysis of temperature and pressure on SCC shows that the temperature has a greater effect on the resistance to SCC of AISI347 austenitic stainless steel than the pressure. The main component of passive film is analyzed and the mechanism of SCC is discussed. Chromium oxides soluble in the acidic chloride solution results in the forming of corrosion pits and the cracking of the passive film under stress.

  1. Acid-sensing ion channels 1a (ASIC1a) inhibit neuromuscular transmission in female mice

    PubMed Central

    Lino, Noelia G.; González-Inchauspe, Carlota M. F.; González, Laura E.; Colettis, Natalia; Vattino, Lucas G.; Wunsch, Amanda M.; Wemmie, John A.; Uchitel, Osvaldo D.

    2013-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC) open in response to extracellular acidosis. ASIC1a, a particular subtype of these channels, has been described to have a postsynaptic distribution in the brain, being involved not only in ischemia and epilepsy, but also in fear and psychiatric pathologies. High-frequency stimulation of skeletal motor nerve terminals (MNTs) can induce presynaptic pH changes in combination with an acidification of the synaptic cleft, known to contribute to muscle fatigue. Here, we studied the role of ASIC1a channels on neuromuscular transmission. We combined a behavioral wire hanging test with electrophysiology, pharmacological, and immunofluorescence techniques to compare wild-type and ASIC1a lacking mice (ASIC1a −/− knockout). Our results showed that 1) ASIC1a −/− female mice were weaker than wild type, presenting shorter times during the wire hanging test; 2) spontaneous neurotransmitter release was reduced by ASIC1a activation, suggesting a presynaptic location of these channels at individual MNTs; 3) ASIC1a-mediated effects were emulated by extracellular local application of acid saline solutions (pH = 6.0; HEPES/MES-based solution); and 4) immunofluorescence techniques revealed the presence of ASIC1a antigens on MNTs. These results suggest that ASIC1a channels might be involved in controlling neuromuscular transmission, muscle contraction and fatigue in female mice. PMID:24336653

  2. Determination of dissolved naphthenic acids in natural waters by using negative-ion electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Headley, John V; Peru, Kerry M; McMartin, Dena W; Winkler, Marcus

    2002-01-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) have been implicated as some of the most toxic substances in oil sands leachates and identified as priority substances impacting on aquatic environments. As a group of compounds, NAs are not well characterized and comprise a large group of saturated aliphatic and alicyclic carboxylic acids found in hydrocarbon deposits (petroleum, oil sands bitumen, and crude oils). Described is an analytical method using negative-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ES/MS) of extracts. Preconcentration was achieved by using a solid-phase extraction procedure utilizing a crosslinked polystyrene-based polymer with acetonitrile elution. Recovery of the Fluka Chemicals NA mixture was highly pH-dependent, with 100% recovery at pH 3.0, but only 66 and 51% recoveries at pHs 7 and 9, respectively. The dissolved phase of the NA was very dependent on sample pH. It is thus critical to measure the pH and determine the appropriate mass profiles to identify NAs in natural waters. The ES/MS analytical procedure proved to be a fast and sensitive method for the recovery and detection of NAs in natural waters, with a detection limit of 0.01 mg/L.

  3. A nonproton ligand sensor in the acid-sensing ion channel.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ye; Chen, Zhi; Li, Wei-Guang; Cao, Hui; Feng, En-Guang; Yu, Fang; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Hualiang; Xu, Tian-Le

    2010-10-06

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) have long been considered as extracellular proton (H(+))-gated cation channels, and peripheral ASIC3 channels seem to be a natural sensor of acidic pain. Here, we report the identification of a nonproton sensor on ASIC3. We show first that 2-guanidine-4-methylquinazoline (GMQ) causes persistent ASIC3 channel activation at the normal pH. Using GMQ as a probe and combining mutagenesis and covalent modification analysis, we then uncovered a ligand sensor lined by residues around E423 and E79 of the extracellular "palm" domain of the ASIC3 channel that is crucial for activation by nonproton activators. Furthermore, we show that GMQ activates sensory neurons and causes pain-related behaviors in an ASIC3-dependent manner, indicating the functional significance of ASIC activation by nonproton ligands. Thus, natural ligands beyond protons may activate ASICs under physiological and pathological conditions through the nonproton ligand sensor, serving for channel activation independent of abrupt and marked acidosis.

  4. Dissociative electron-ion recombination of the interstellar species protonated glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, and methyl formate.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Patrick A; Osborne, David S; Adams, Nigel G

    2012-03-22

    Recently, methyl formate, glycolaldehyde, and acetic acid have been detected in the Interstellar Medium, ISM. The rate constants, α(e), for dissociative electron-ion recombination of protonated gycolaldehyde, (HOCH(2)CHO)H(+), and protonated methyl formate, (HCOOCH(3))H(+), have been determined at 300 K in a variable temperature flowing afterglow using a Langmuir probe to obtain the electron density. The recombination rate constants at 300 K are 3.2 × 10(-7) cm(3) s(-1) for protonated methyl formate and 7.5 × 10(-7) cm(3) s(-1) for protonated glycolaldehyde. The recombination rate constant of protonated acetic acid could not be directly measured, but it appears to have a rate constant, α(e), on the 10(-7) cm(3) s(-1) scale. Several high- and low-temperature measurements for protonated methyl formate were made. In addition, an α(e) measurement at 220 K for protonated glycolaldehyde was performed. The astrochemical implications of the rates of recombination, α(e), and protonation routes are discussed.

  5. Integrated li-ion ultracapacitor with lead acid battery for vehicular start-stop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manla, Emad

    Advancements in automobile manufacturing aim at improving the driving experience at every level possible. One improvement aspect is increasing gas efficiency via hybridization, which can be achieved by introducing a feature called start-stop. This feature automatically switches the internal combustion engine off when it idles and switches it back on when it is time to resume driving. This application has been proven to reduce the amount of gas consumption and emission of greenhouse effect gases in the atmosphere. However, the repeated cranking of the engine puts a large amount of stress on the lead acid battery required to perform the cranking, which effectively reduces its life span. This dissertation presents a hybrid energy storage system assembled from a lead acid battery and an ultracapacitor module connected in parallel. The Li-ion ultracapacitor was tested and modeled to predict its behavior when connected in a system requiring pulsed power such as the one proposed. Both test and simulation results show that the proposed hybrid design significantly reduces the cranking loading and stress on the battery. The ultracapacitor module can take the majority of the cranking current, effectively reducing the stress on the battery. The amount of cranking current provided by the ultracapacitor can be easily controlled via controlling the resistance of the cable connected directly between the ultracapacitor module and the car circuitry.

  6. Novel approach to recover cobalt and lithium from spent lithium-ion battery using oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xianlai; Li, Jinhui; Shen, Bingyu

    2015-09-15

    With the booming of consumer electronics (CE) and electric vehicle (EV), a large number of spent lithium-ion battery (LIBs) have been generated worldwide. Resource depletion and environmental concern driven from the sustainable industry of CE and EV have motivated spent LIBs should be recovered urgently. However, the conventional process combined with leaching, precipitating, and filtering was quite complicated to recover cobalt and lithium from spent LIBs. In this work, we developed a novel recovery process, only combined with oxalic acid leaching and filtering. When the optimal parameters for leaching process is controlled at 150 min retention time, 95 °C heating temperature, 15 g L(-1) solid-liquid ratio, and 400 rpm rotation rate, the recovery rate of lithium and cobalt from spent LIBs can reach about 98% and 97%, respectively. Additionally, we also tentatively discovered the leaching mechanism of lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) using oxalic acid, and the leaching order of the sampling LiCoO2 of spent LIBs. All the obtained results can contribute to a short-cut and high-efficiency process of spent LIBs recycling toward a sound closed-loop cycle.

  7. Acid-sensing ion channel 2 (asic 2) and trkb interrelationships within the intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta, Antonio; Viña, Eliseo; Cabo, Roberto; Vázquez, Gorka; Cobo, Ramón; García-Suárez, Olivia; García-Cosamalón, José; Vega, José A

    2015-01-01

    The cells of the intervertebral disc (IVD) have an unusual acidic and hyperosmotic microenvironment. They express acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), gated by extracellular protons and mechanical forces, as well as neurotrophins and their signalling receptors. In the nervous tissues some neurotrophins regulate the expression of ASICs. The expression of ASIC2 and TrkB in human normal and degenerated IVD was assessed using quantitative-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, we investigated immunohistochemically the expression of ASIC2 in the IVD of TrkB-deficient mice. ASIC2 and TrkB mRNAs were found in normal human IVD and both increased significantly in degenerated IVD. ASIC2 and TrkB proteins were also found co-localized in a variable percentage of cells, being significantly higher in degenerated IVD than in controls. The murine IVD displayed ASIC2 immunoreactivity which was absent in the IVD of TrkB-deficient mice. Present results demonstrate the occurrence of ASIC2 and TrkB in the human IVD, and the increased expression of both in pathological IVD suggest their involvement in IVD degeneration. These data also suggest that TrkB-ligands might be involved in the regulation of ASIC2 expression, and therefore in mechanisms by which the IVD cells accommodate to low pH and hypertonicity. PMID:26617738

  8. Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy of the copper-aspartic acid anion and its hydrated complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Haopeng; Bowen, Kit H.; Martínez, Ana; Salpin, Jean-Yves; Schermann, Jean-Pierre

    2010-08-01

    Negative ions of copper-aspartic acid Cu(Asp)- and its hydrated complexes have been produced in the gas phase and studied by anion photoelectron spectroscopy. The vertical detachment energies (VDE) of Cu(Asp)- and Cu(Asp)-(H2O)1,2 were determined to be 1.6, 1.95, and 2.20 eV, respectively. The spectral profiles of Cu(Asp)-(H2O)1 and Cu(Asp)-(H2O)2 closely resembled that of Cu(Asp)-, indicating that hydration had not changed the structure of Cu(Asp)- significantly. The successive shifts to higher electron binding energies by the spectra of the hydrated species provided measures of their stepwise solvation energies. Density functional calculations were performed on anionic Cu(Asp)- and on its corresponding neutral. The agreement between the calculated and measured VDE values implied that the structure of the Cu(Asp)- complex originated with a zwitterionic form of aspartic acid in which a copper atom had inserted into the N-H bond.

  9. Acid-sensing ion channels 1a (ASIC1a) inhibit neuromuscular transmission in female mice.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Francisco J; Lino, Noelia G; González-Inchauspe, Carlota M F; González, Laura E; Colettis, Natalia; Vattino, Lucas G; Wunsch, Amanda M; Wemmie, John A; Uchitel, Osvaldo D

    2014-02-15

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC) open in response to extracellular acidosis. ASIC1a, a particular subtype of these channels, has been described to have a postsynaptic distribution in the brain, being involved not only in ischemia and epilepsy, but also in fear and psychiatric pathologies. High-frequency stimulation of skeletal motor nerve terminals (MNTs) can induce presynaptic pH changes in combination with an acidification of the synaptic cleft, known to contribute to muscle fatigue. Here, we studied the role of ASIC1a channels on neuromuscular transmission. We combined a behavioral wire hanging test with electrophysiology, pharmacological, and immunofluorescence techniques to compare wild-type and ASIC1a lacking mice (ASIC1a (-/-) knockout). Our results showed that 1) ASIC1a (-/-) female mice were weaker than wild type, presenting shorter times during the wire hanging test; 2) spontaneous neurotransmitter release was reduced by ASIC1a activation, suggesting a presynaptic location of these channels at individual MNTs; 3) ASIC1a-mediated effects were emulated by extracellular local application of acid saline solutions (pH = 6.0; HEPES/MES-based solution); and 4) immunofluorescence techniques revealed the presence of ASIC1a antigens on MNTs. These results suggest that ASIC1a channels might be involved in controlling neuromuscular transmission, muscle contraction and fatigue in female mice.

  10. Positional isomeric tunable two Co(II) 6-connected 3-D frameworks with pentanuclear to binuclear units: structures, ion-exchange and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Han, Min-Le; Duan, Ya-Ping; Li, Dong-Sheng; Wang, Hai-Bin; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Yao-Yu

    2014-11-07

    Two new Co(II) based metal-organic frameworks, namely {[Co5(μ3-OH)2(m-pda)3(bix)4]·2ClO4}n (1) and {[Co2(p-pda)2(bix)2(H2O)]·H2O}n (2), were prepared by hydrothermal reactions of Co(II) salt with two isomeric dicarboxyl tectons 1,3-phenylenediacetic acid (m-pda) and 1,4-phenylenediacetic acid (p-pda), along with 1,3-bis(imidazol-L-ylmethyl)benzene (bix). Both complexes 1 and 2 have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). 1 shows a 6-connected 3-D pcu cationic framework with pentanuclear [Co5(μ3-OH)2(COO)6(bix)2](2+) units, while 2 exhibits a 6-connected 3-D msw net based on [Co2(μ2-H2O)(COO)2](2+) clusters. The results indicate that the different dispositions of the carboxylic groups of dicarboxylates have an important effect on the overall coordination frameworks. Perchlorate anions in 1 can be partly exchanged by thiocyanate and azide anions, however they are unavailable to nitrate anions. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that both 1 and 2 show weak antiferromagnetic interactions between the adjacent Co(II) ions.

  11. Regulation of the synthesis of barley aleurone. cap alpha. -amylase by gibberellic acid and calcium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.L.; Carbonell, J.

    1984-09-01

    The effects of gibberellic acid (GA/sub 3/) and calcium ions on the production of ..cap alpha..-amylase and acid phosphatase by isolated aleurone layers of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Himalaya) were studied. Aleurone layers not previously exposed to GA/sub 3/ or CA/sup 2 +/ show qualitative and quantitative changes in hydrolase production following incubation in either GA/sub 3/ or CA/sup 2 +/ or both. In cubation in H/sub 2/O or CA/sup 2 +/ results in the production of low levels of ..cap alpha..-amylase or acid phosphatase. The addition of GA/sub 3/ to the incubation medium causes 10- to 20-fold increase in the amounts of these enzymes released from the tissue, and addition of CA/sup 2 +/ at 10 millimolar causes a further 8- to 9-fold increase in ..cap alpha..-amylase release and a 75% increase in phosphatase release. Production of ..cap alpha..-amylase isoenzymes is also modified by the levels of GA/sub 3/ and CA/sup 2 +/ in the incubation medium. ..cap alpha..-amylase 2 is produced under all conditions of incubation, while ..cap alpha..-amylase 1 appears only when layers are incubated in GA/sub 3/ or GA/sub 3/ plus CA/sup 2 +/. The synthesis of ..cap alpha..-amylases 3 and 4 requires the presence of both GA/sub 3/ and CA/sup 2 +/ in the incubation medium. Laurell rocket immunoelectrophoresis shows that two distinct groups of ..cap alpha..-amylase antigens are present in incubation media of aleurone layers incubated with both GA/sub 3/ and CA/sup 2 +/, while only one group of antigens is found in media of layers incubated in GA/sub 3/ alone. Strontium ions can be substituted for CA/sup 2 +/ in increasing hydrolase production, although higher concentrations of Sr/sup 2 +/ are requried for maximal response. We conclude that GA/sub 3/ is required for the production of ..cap alpha..-amylase 1 and that both GA/sub 3/ and either CA/sup 2 +/ or Sr/sup 2 +/ are required for the production of isoenzymes 3 and 4 of barley aleurone ..cap alpha..-amylase. 22 references, 8

  12. Contact ion pair formation between hard acids and soft bases in aqueous solutions observed with 2DIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zheng; Zhang, Wenkai; Ji, Minbiao; Hartsock, Robert; Gaffney, Kelly J

    2013-12-12

    The interaction of charged species in aqueous solution has important implications for chemical, biological, and environmental processes. We have used 2DIR spectroscopy to study the equilibrium dynamics of thiocyanate chemical exchange between free ion (NCS(-)) and contact ion pair configurations (MNCS(+)), where M(2+) = Mg(2+) or Ca(2+). Detailed studies of the influence of anion concentration and anion speciation show that the chemical exchange observed with the 2DIR measurements results from NCS(-) exchanging with other anion species in the first solvation shell surrounding Mg(2+) or Ca(2+). The presence of chemical exchange in the 2DIR spectra provides an indirect, but robust, determinant of contact ion pair formation. We observe preferential contact ion pair formation between soft Lewis base anions and hard Lewis acid cations. This observation cannot be easily reconciled with Pearson's acid-base concept or Collins' Law of Matching Water Affinities. The anions that form contact ion pairs also correspond to the ions with an affinity for water and protein surfaces, so similar physical and chemical properties may control these distinct phenomena.

  13. Chemical Speciation Analysis of Sports Drinks by Acid-Base Titrimetry and Ion Chromatography: A Challenging Beverage Formulation Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drossman, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Students have standardized a sodium hydroxide solution and analyzed commercially available sports drinks by titrimetric analysis of the triprotic citric acid, dihydrogen phosphate, and dihydrogen citrate and by ion chromatography for chloride, total phosphate and citrate. These experiments are interesting examples of analyzing real-world food and…

  14. Measuring Gas-Phase Basicities of Amino Acids Using an Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer: A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunderlin, Lee S.; Ryzhov, Victor; Keller, Lanea M. M.; Gaillard, Elizabeth R.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is performed to measure the relative gas-phase basicities of a series of five amino acids to compare the results to literature values. The experiments use the kinetic method for deriving ion thermochemistry and allow students to perform accurate measurements of thermodynamics in a relatively short time.

  15. Zinc, magnesium, and calcium ion supplementation confers tolerance to acetic acid stress in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae utilizing xylose.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ku Syahidah Ku; Sakamoto, Takatoshi; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Zhao, Xin-Qing; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a potential substrate for ethanol production. However, pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials produces inhibitory compounds such as acetic acid, which negatively affect ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Supplementation of the medium with three metal ions (Zn(2+) , Mg(2+) , and Ca(2+) ) increased the tolerance of S. cerevisiae toward acetic acid compared to the absence of the ions. Ethanol production from xylose was most improved (by 34%) when the medium was supplemented with 2 mM Ca(2+) , followed by supplementation with 3.5 mM Mg(2+) (29% improvement), and 180 μM Zn(2+) (26% improvement). Higher ethanol production was linked to high cell viability in the presence of metal ions. Comparative transcriptomics between the supplemented cultures and the control suggested that improved cell viability resulted from the induction of genes controlling the cell wall and membrane. Only one gene, FIT2, was found to be up-regulated in common between the three metal ions. Also up-regulation of HXT1 and TKL1 might enhance xylose consumption in the presence of acetic acid. Thus, the addition of ionic nutrients is a simple and cost-effective method to improve the acetic acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae.

  16. Simultaneous determination of three chloroacetic acids, three herbicides, and 12 anions in water by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ximing; Chen, Liang; Zhao, Yanqing

    2015-09-01

    An ion chromatography method was developed for the simultaneous detection of three soluble herbicides (glyphosate, bentazone and picloram), three chlorine disinfection byproducts (monochloroacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid) and 12 anions in water (Cl(-), Br(-), SO4(2-), CO3(2-), ClO3(-), ClO4(-), BrO3(-), PO4(3-), NO2(-), NO3(-), CH3COO(-) and COO(-)). High linearity (r(2) > 0.996) was observed for all target analytes for each respective concentration range. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation were between 0.21-0.85 and 0.06-25.46 μg/L, respectively. However, the interference effect of Cl(-), NO3(-) , SO4 (2-) and CO3(2-) on some target analytes must be considered during the analysis. Sample pre-treatment by a hydrogen column (H-column) required to reduce the negative effect of CO3(2-). Additionally, sample pre-treatment by a sliver-hydrogen column (Ag-H-column) is required when Cl(-) > 100 mg/L and SO4(2-) < 50 mg/L, and pre-treatment by both a barium column (Ba-column) and an H-column is required when Cl(-) > 100 mg/L and SO4(2-) > 50 mg/L. When Cl(-) > 100 mg/L, SO4(2-) > 50 mg/L and CO3(2-) > 20 mg/L, the sample pre-treatment by either an Ag-H-Ba-column or an Ag-H-column and Ba-column is required to minimize interference.

  17. A heteromeric Texas coral snake toxin targets acid-sensing ion channels to produce pain.

    PubMed

    Bohlen, Christopher J; Chesler, Alexander T; Sharif-Naeini, Reza; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Zhou, Sharleen; King, David; Sánchez, Elda E; Burlingame, Alma L; Basbaum, Allan I; Julius, David

    2011-11-16

    Natural products that elicit discomfort or pain represent invaluable tools for probing molecular mechanisms underlying pain sensation. Plant-derived irritants have predominated in this regard, but animal venoms have also evolved to avert predators by targeting neurons and receptors whose activation produces noxious sensations. As such, venoms provide a rich and varied source of small molecule and protein pharmacophores that can be exploited to characterize and manipulate key components of the pain-signalling pathway. With this in mind, here we perform an unbiased in vitro screen to identify snake venoms capable of activating somatosensory neurons. Venom from the Texas coral snake (Micrurus tener tener), whose bite produces intense and unremitting pain, excites a large cohort of sensory neurons. The purified active species (MitTx) consists of a heteromeric complex between Kunitz- and phospholipase-A2-like proteins that together function as a potent, persistent and selective agonist for acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), showing equal or greater efficacy compared with acidic pH. MitTx is highly selective for the ASIC1 subtype at neutral pH; under more acidic conditions (pH < 6.5), MitTx massively potentiates (>100-fold) proton-evoked activation of ASIC2a channels. These observations raise the possibility that ASIC channels function as coincidence detectors for extracellular protons and other, as yet unidentified, endogenous factors. Purified MitTx elicits robust pain-related behaviour in mice by activation of ASIC1 channels on capsaicin-sensitive nerve fibres. These findings reveal a mechanism whereby snake venoms produce pain, and highlight an unexpected contribution of ASIC1 channels to nociception.

  18. Electrochemical performance of fulvic acid-based electrospun hard carbon nanofibers as promising anodes for sodium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pin-Yi; Zhang, Jie; Li, Qi; Wang, Cheng-Yang

    2016-12-01

    The electrochemical performance of fulvic acid-based electrospun hard carbon nanofibers (PF-CNFs) as anodes for sodium-ion batteries is reported. PF-CNFs were prepared, stabilization in air at 280 °C and then carbonized in N2 at 800, 1000, 1300 or 1500 °C. The PF-CNFs prepared at 1300 °C had abundant oxygen functional groups, large interlayer spaces and stable morphologies and when used as anodes in sodium-ion batteries, a reversible sodium intercalation capacity of 248 mAh g-1 was obtained with capacity retention ratio of 91% after 100 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g-1. This large capacity combined with the superior cycling performance indicates that fulvic acid-based carbon nanofibers are promising electrode materials for use in rechargeable sodium-ion batteries.

  19. Correlation between stabilities of uranyl ion complexes with various monocarboxylic acids and Hammett-Taft substituent constants

    SciTech Connect

    Poluektov, N.S.; Perfil'ev, V.A.; Meshkova, S.B.; Mishchenko, V.T.

    1987-01-01

    A correlation has been observed between the stabilities of uranyl ion complexes (1:1 composition) and the substituent inductive constants in formic and acetic acid derivatives. For substituents which are not directly involved in couples formation the parameters of the Hammett-Taft equation log K/sub 1/ = A + B have the following values: A = 1.311, B = -2.360. For substituents which form a coordination bond with the uranyl ion, A = 7.0077 and B = - 17.321. In the case of complexes formed between the uranyl ion and salicylic acid and its derivatives, there is a correlation between complex stability and sigma/sub m/ and sigma/sub p/ substituent constants for the meta- and para-positions, respectively (A = 12.72, B = -4.41).

  20. Feasibility investigation on deep ocean compact autonomous Raman spectrometer developed for in-situ detection of acid radical ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zengfeng; Li, Ying; Chen, Jing; Guo, Jinjia; Zheng, Rong'er

    2015-03-01

    A newly developed Deep Ocean Compact Autonomous Raman Spectrometer (DOCARS) system is introduced and used for in-situ detection of acid radical ions in this paper. To evaluate the feasibility and capability of DOCARS for quantitative analysis of the acid radical ions in the deep ocean, extensive investigations have been carried out both in laboratory and sea trials during the development phase. In the laboratory investigations, Raman spectra of the prepared samples (acid radical ions solutions) were obtained, and analyzed using the method of internal standard normalization in data processing. The Raman signal of acid radical ions was normalized by that of water molecules. The calibration curve showed that the normalized Raman signal intensity of SO{4/2-}, NO{3/-}, and HCO{2/-} increases linearly as the concentration rises with correlation coefficient R 2 of 0.99, 0.99, and 0.98 respectively. The linear function obtained from the calibration curve was then used for the analysis of the spectra data acquired in the sea trial under a simulating chemical field in the deep-sea environment. It was found that the detected concentration of NO{3/-} according to the linear function can reflect the concentration changes of NO{3/-} after the sample was released, and the detection accuracy of the DOCARS system for SO{4/2-} is 8%. All the results showed that the DOCARS system has great potential in quantitative detection of acid radical ions under the deep-sea environment, while the sensitivity of the DOCARS system is expected to be improved.

  1. Spectrophotometric determination and removal of unchelated europium ions from solutions containing Eu-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid chelate-peptide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Elshan, N G R Dayan; Patek, Renata; Vagner, Josef; Mash, Eugene A

    2014-11-01

    Europium chelates conjugated with peptide ligands are routinely used as probes for conducting in vitro binding experiments. The presence of unchelated Eu ions in these formulations gives high background luminescence and can lead to poor results in binding assays. In our experience, the reported methods for purification of these probes do not achieve adequate removal of unchelated metal ions in a reliable manner. In this work, a xylenol orange-based assay for the quantification of unchelated metal ions was streamlined and used to determine levels of metal ion contamination as well as the success of metal ion removal on attempted purification. We compared the use of Empore chelating disks and Chelex 100 resin for the selective removal of unchelated Eu ions from several Eu-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid chelate-peptide conjugates. Both purification methods gave complete and selective removal of the contaminant metal ions. However, Empore chelating disks were found to give much higher recoveries of the probes under the conditions used. Related to the issue of probe recovery, we also describe a significantly more efficient method for the synthesis of one such probe using Rink amide AM resin in place of Tentagel S resin.

  2. [Simultaneous determination of 16 organic acids in feed additives by on-line enrichment and ion chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhiyu; Dong, Ying; Zhou, Hongbin; Yu, Yang; Li, Jing; Sun, Li

    2014-02-01

    A novel analytical method for simultaneous determination of sixteen organic acids by on-line enrichment and ion chromatography-mass spectrometry (IC-MS) was developed. Online enrichment and separation of the organic acids were performed by ion chromatography on a homemade enrichment column and a homemade separation column. The qualitative and quantitative analyses of the organic acids were performed by mass spectrometry in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode on the basis of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source in negative mode. The sample of 200 microL was injected for the analysis, and the on-line enrichment time was 3 min. The sodium hydroxide solution was used as a gradient elution system. The two columns made it possible to have a low limit of detection due to the good enrichment and separation capability. The sixteen organic acids were separated completely within 30 min. All curves showed good linearity within the test concentration ranges. The limits of detection (LODs) were between 0.01 and 0.22 mg/L, and the average recoveries were between 70.6% and 110.8%. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were less than 6.3%. The results indicate that this method is simple, rapid, sensitive and accurate for the determination of the organic acids in feed additives.

  3. Antimicrobial activity of gallic acid against thermophilic Campylobacter is strain specific and associated with a loss of calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Sarjit, Amreeta; Wang, Yi; Dykes, Gary A

    2015-04-01

    Gallic acid has been suggested as a potential antimicrobial for the control of Campylobacter but its effectiveness is poorly studied. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of gallic acid against Campylobacter jejuni (n = 8) and Campylobacter coli (n = 4) strains was determined. Gallic acid inhibited the growth of five C. jejuni strains and three C. coli strains (MIC: 15.63-250 μg mL(-1)). Gallic acid was only bactericidal to two C. coli strains (MBC: 125 and 62.5 μg mL(-1)). The mechanism of the bactericidal effect against these two strains (and selected non-susceptible controls) was investigated by determining decimal reduction times and by monitoring the loss of cellular content and calcium ions, and changes in cell morphology. Gallic acid did not result in a loss of cellular content or morphological changes in the susceptible strains as compared to the controls. Gallic acid resulted in a loss of calcium ions (0.58-1.53 μg mL(-1) and 0.54-1.17 μg mL(-1), respectively, over a 180 min period) from the susceptible strains but not the controls. Gallic acid is unlikely to be an effective antimicrobial against Campylobacter in a practical sense unless further interventions to ensure an effective bactericidal mode of action against all strains are developed.

  4. Fortification of corn masa flour with folic acid in the United States: an overview of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Hamner, Heather C; Tinker, Sarah C

    2014-04-01

    Corn masa flour, used to make products such as corn tortillas, is a staple food for Hispanic populations residing in the United States, particularly among Mexican Americans and Central Americans. Research has indicated that Hispanic women in the United States continue to be at a higher risk of having a neural tube defect-affected pregnancy than women of other races/ethnicities, even after the introduction of folic acid fortification of cereal grain products labeled as "enriched." Corn masa flour has, therefore, been suggested as a potential food vehicle for folic acid in the United States. This paper explores the potential impact that folic acid fortification of corn masa flour could have on the Hispanic population in the United States.

  5. Rapid Screening of Carboxylic Acids from Waste and Surface Waters by ESI-MS/MS Using Barium Ion Chemistry and On-Line Membrane Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Kyle D.; Volmer, Dietrich A.; Gill, Chris G.; Krogh, Erik T.

    2016-03-01

    Negative ion tandem mass spectrometric analysis of aliphatic carboxylic acids often yields only non-diagnostic ([M - H]-) ions with limited selective fragmentation. However, carboxylates cationized with Ba2+ have demonstrated efficient dissociation in positive ion mode, providing structurally diagnostic product ions. We report the application of barium adducts followed by collision induced dissociation (CID), to improve selectivity for rapid screening of carboxylic acids in complex aqueous samples. The quantitative MS/MS method presented utilizes common product ions of [M - H + Ba]+ precursor ions. The mechanism of product ion formation is investigated using isotopically labeled standards and a series of structurally related carboxylic acids. The results suggest that hydrogen atoms in the β and γ positions yield common product ions ([BaH]+ and [BaOH]+). Furthermore, the diagnostic product ion at m/z 196 serves as a qualifying ion for carboxylate species. This methodology has been successfully used in conjunction with condensed phase membrane introduction mass spectrometry (CP-MIMS), with barium acetate added directly to the methanol acceptor phase. The combination enables rapid screening of carboxylic acids directly from acidified water samples (wastewater effluent, spiked natural waters) using a capillary hollow fiber PDMS membrane immersion probe. We have applied this technique for the direct analysis of complex naphthenic acid mixtures spiked into natural surface waters using CP-MIMS. Selectivity at the ionization and tandem mass spectrometry level eliminate isobaric interferences from hydroxylated species present within the samples, which have been observed in negative electrospray ionization.

  6. Rapid Screening of Carboxylic Acids from Waste and Surface Waters by ESI-MS/MS Using Barium Ion Chemistry and On-Line Membrane Sampling.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Kyle D; Volmer, Dietrich A; Gill, Chris G; Krogh, Erik T

    2016-03-01

    Negative ion tandem mass spectrometric analysis of aliphatic carboxylic acids often yields only non-diagnostic ([M - H](-)) ions with limited selective fragmentation. However, carboxylates cationized with Ba(2+) have demonstrated efficient dissociation in positive ion mode, providing structurally diagnostic product ions. We report the application of barium adducts followed by collision induced dissociation (CID), to improve selectivity for rapid screening of carboxylic acids in complex aqueous samples. The quantitative MS/MS method presented utilizes common product ions of [M - H + Ba](+) precursor ions. The mechanism of product ion formation is investigated using isotopically labeled standards and a series of structurally related carboxylic acids. The results suggest that hydrogen atoms in the β and γ positions yield common product ions ([BaH](+) and [BaOH](+)). Furthermore, the diagnostic product ion at m/z 196 serves as a qualifying ion for carboxylate species. This methodology has been successfully used in conjunction with condensed phase membrane introduction mass spectrometry (CP-MIMS), with barium acetate added directly to the methanol acceptor phase. The combination enables rapid screening of carboxylic acids directly from acidified water samples (wastewater effluent, spiked natural waters) using a capillary hollow fiber PDMS membrane immersion probe. We have applied this technique for the direct analysis of complex naphthenic acid mixtures spiked into natural surface waters using CP-MIMS. Selectivity at the ionization and tandem mass spectrometry level eliminate isobaric interferences from hydroxylated species present within the samples, which have been observed in negative electrospray ionization.

  7. Ion-exclusion chromatographic behavior of aliphatic carboxylic acids and benzenecarboxylic acids on a sulfonated styrene--divinylbenzene co-polymer resin column with sulfuric acid containing various alcohols as eluent.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Kazutoku; Towata, Atsuya; Ohashi, Masayoshi

    2003-05-16

    The addition of C1-C7 alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol, heptanol, hexanol and heptanol) to dilute sulfuric acid as eluent in ion-exclusion chromatography using a highly sulfonated styrene-divinylbenzene co-polymer resin (TSKgel SCX) in the H+ form as the stationary phase was carried out for the simultaneous separations of both (a) C1-C7 aliphatic carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, isobutyric, butyric, isovaleric, valeric, 2-methylvaleric, isocaproic, caproic, 2,2-dimethyl-n-valeric, 2-methylhexanoic, 5-methylhexanoic and heptanoic acids) and (b) benzenecarboxylic acids (pyromellitic, hemimellitic, trimellitic, o-phthalic, m-phthalic, p-phthalic, benzoic and salicylic acids and phenol). Heptanol was the most effective modifier in ion-exclusion chromatography for the improvement of peak shapes and a reduction in retention volumes for higher aliphatic carboxylic acids and benzenecarboxylic acids. Excellent simultaneous separation and relatively highly sensitive conductimetric detection for these C1-C7 aliphatic carboxylic acids were achieved on the TSKgel SCX column (150 x 6 mm I.D.) in 30 min using 0.5 mM sulfuric acid containing 0.025% heptanol as eluent. Excellent simultaneous separation and highly sensitive UV detection at 200 nm for these benzenecarboxylic acids were also achieved on the TSKgel SCX column in 30 min using 5 mM sulfuric acid containing 0.075% heptanol as eluent.

  8. Spectroscopic study of Mg(II) ion influence on the autoxidation of gallic acid in weakly alkaline aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, G. M.; Veselinović, A. M.; Nikolić, R. S.; Mitić, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    Gallic acid autoxidation in weakly alkaline aqueous solutions was studied by UV-Vis spectrophotometry and ESR spectroscopy under various conditions. Lowering the pH value from 10 to 8.5 probably changes the mechanism of the autoxidation reaction as evidenced by the different time variations of UV-Vis spectra of solutions. The presence of Mg(II) ions greatly influences the autoxidation reaction at pH 8.5. Although the UV-Vis spectral changes with time follow the similar pattern during the gallic acid autoxidation at pH 10 and at pH 8.5 in the presence of Mg(II) ions, some small differences indicate that Mg(II) ions not only affect the electron density of absorbing species but also influence the overall mechanism of the autoxidation reaction. ESR spectra of free radials formed during the initial stage of gallic acid autoxidation at pH 8.5 in the presence of Mg(II) ions were recorded. Computer simulation of ESR spectra allows partial characterization of these free radicals.

  9. Acid-catalysed chlorine transfer from N-chloramines to iodide ion: experimental evidence for a predicted change in mechanism.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Paula; Crugeiras, Juan; Ríos, Ana

    2010-09-21

    Rate constants for acid catalysis of the reactions of N-chlorodimethylamine (1), N-chloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethylamine (2) and N,N-dichlorotaurine (3) with iodide ion were determined in H(2)O at 25 degrees C and I = 0.5 (NaClO(4)). The failure to detect significant catalysis by general acids of chlorine transfer from 1 to the nucleophile, together with the observed inverse solvent deuterium isotope effect on the hydronium ion-catalysed reaction (k(H)/k(D) = 0.37), indicates that this process occurs by protonation of 1 in a fast equilibrium step, followed by rate determining chlorine transfer to iodide ion. The appearance of general acid catalysis for the reactions of 2 and 3 shows that increasing the leaving group ability leads to a change to a concerted mechanism, which is suggested to be enforced by the absence of a significant lifetime of the protonated chloramine intermediate in the presence of iodide ion.

  10. Structure of Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 1 at 1.9 angstrom Resolution and Low pH

    SciTech Connect

    Jasti,J.; Furukawa, H.; Gonzales, E.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are voltage-independent, proton-activated receptors that belong to the epithelial sodium channel/degenerin family of ion channels and are implicated in perception of pain, ischaemic stroke, mechanosensation, learning and memory. Here we report the low-pH crystal structure of a chicken ASIC1 deletion mutant at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. Each subunit of the chalice-shaped homotrimer is composed of short amino and carboxy termini, two transmembrane helices, a bound chloride ion and a disulphide-rich, multidomain extracellular region enriched in acidic residues and carboxyl-carboxylate pairs within 3 Angstroms, suggesting that at least one carboxyl group bears a proton. Electrophysiological studies on aspartate-to-asparagine mutants confirm that these carboxyl-carboxylate pairs participate in proton sensing. Between the acidic residues and the transmembrane pore lies a disulphide-rich 'thumb' domain poised to couple the binding of protons to the opening of the ion channel, thus demonstrating that proton activation involves long-range conformational changes.

  11. Impact of Lactic Acid and Hydrogen Ion on the Simultaneous Fermentation of Glucose and Xylose by the Carbon Catabolite Derepressed Lactobacillus brevis ATCC 14869.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyung Hun; Israr, Beenish; Shoemaker, Sharon P; Mills, David A; Kim, Jaehan

    2016-07-28

    Lactobacillus brevis ATCC 14869 exhibited a carbon catabolite de-repressed (CCR) phenotype which has ability to consume fermentable sugar simultaneously with glucose. To evaluate this unusual phenotype under harsh conditions during fermentation, the effect of lactic acid and hydrogen ion concentrations on L. brevis ATCC 14869 were examined. Kinetic equations describing the relationship between specific cell growth rate and lactic acid or hydrogen ion concentration has been reduced. The change of substrate utilization and product formation according to lactic acid and hydrogen ion concentration in the media were quantitatively described. Moreover; utilization of other compounds were also observed along with hydrogen ion and lactic acid concentration simultaneously. It has been found that substrate preference changes significantly regarding to utilization of compounds in media. That could result into formation of two-carbon products. In particular, acetic acid present in the media as sodium acetate were consumed by L. brevis ATCC 14869 under extreme pH of both acid and alkaline conditions.

  12. Altered Expression Pattern of Acid-Sensing Ion Channel Isoforms in Piriform Cortex After Seizures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Wang, Chao; Liu, Bei; Li, Huanfa; Zhang, Yu; Dong, Shan; Gao, Guodong; Zhang, Hua

    2016-04-01

    The piriform cortex (PC) is highly susceptible to chemical and electrical seizure induction. Epileptiform activity is associated with an acid shift in extracellular pH, suggesting that acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) expressed by PC neurons may contribute to this enhanced epileptogenic potential. In epileptic rats and surgical samples from patients with medial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), PC layer II ASIC1a-immunopositive neurons appeared swollen with dendritic elongation, and there was loss of ASIC1a-positive neurons in layer III, consistent with enhanced vulnerability to TLE-induced plasticity and cell death. In rats, pilocarpine-induced seizures led to transient downregulation of ASIC1a and concomitant upregulation of ASIC2a in the first few days post-seizure. These changes in expression may be due to seizure-induced oxidative stress as a similar reciprocal change in ASIC1a, and ASIC2a expression was observed in PC12 cells following H2O2 application. The proportion of ASIC1a/ASIC2a heteromers was reduced in the acute phase following status epilepticus (SE) but increased during the latent phase when rats developed spontaneous seizures. Knockdown of ASIC2a by RNAi reduced dendritic length and spine density in primary neurons, suggesting that seizure-induced upregulation of ASIC2a contributes to dendritic lengthening in PC layer II in rats. Administration of the ASIC inhibitor amiloride before pilocarpine reduced the proportion of rats reaching Racine level IV seizures, protected layer II and III neurons, and prolonged survival in the acute phase following SE. Our findings suggest that ASICs may enhance susceptibility to epileptogenesis in the PC. Inhibition of ASICs, particularly ASIC2a, may suppress seizures originating in the PC.

  13. Characterization of acid-sensing ion channel expression in oligodendrocyte-lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Daniel H; Horiuchi, Makoto; Keachie, Krista; Mccauley, Erica; Bannerman, Peter; Itoh, Aki; Itoh, Takayuki; Pleasure, David

    2008-08-15

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are widely expressed in neurons, where they serve in pain and mechanical sensation, and contribute to learning and memory. Six ASIC subunit proteins form homo- or heteromeric channel complexes with distinct physiological properties. Of such complexes, only monomeric ASIC1a channels are Ca2+ permeable. Prior pharmacologic and genetic studies have shown that ASIC1a channel inactivation markedly diminishes CNS susceptibility to ischemic damage. Here, we characterize ASIC expression in oligodendrocyte lineage cells (OLC) by molecular, electrophysiological, calcium imaging, and immunofluorescence techniques. ASIC1a, ASIC2a, and ASIC4 mRNAs were expressed in cultured rat OLC, with steady-state levels of each of these mRNAs several-fold higher in oligodendroglial progenitors than in mature oligodendroglia. ASIC transcripts were also detected in brain white matter, and ASIC1a protein expression was detected in white matter oligodendroglia. Inactivating, proton-gated, amiloride-sensitive OLC currents were detected by whole-cell voltage clamp. These currents showed profound tachyphylaxis with slow recovery, and were predominantly blocked by psalmotoxin, indicating that homomeric ASIC1a comprised a large fraction of functional ASIC in the cultured OLC. ASIC activation substantially depolarized OLC plasma membrane in current clamp studies, and elicited transient elevations in intracellular Ca2+ in imaging studies. Thus, OLC ASIC1a channels provide a means by which an acid shift in CNS extracellular pH, by diminishing plasma membrane potential and increasing Ca2+ permeability, can activate OLC signaling pathways, and may contribute to OLC vulnerability to CNS ischemia.

  14. Photoluminescent sensing for acidic amino acids based on the disruption of graphene quantum dots/europium ions aggregates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Song, Chan; Zhao, Ting; Fu, Hai-Wei; Wang, Hui-Zhen; Wang, Yong-Jian; Kong, De-Ming

    2015-03-15

    A simple mix-and-detect photoluminescence method was developed for the turn-on detection of acidic amino acids. To achieve this, graphene quantum dots (GQDs), which emit both down-conversion and up-conversion photoluminescence were prepared by solvothermal synthesis. The carboxylic acid-rich surface not only increases the water solubility of the prepared GQDs, but also makes Eu(3+)-triggered GQDs aggregation possible, thus causing the photoluminescence quenching of GQDs. The quenched photoluminescence can be recovered by the competition between acidic amino acids and GQDs for Eu(3+). Under optimized conditions, sensitive and specific acidic amino acids quantitation can be achieved by utilizing the changes in either down-conversion or up-conversion photoluminescence. Up-conversion mode gives a little lower detection limit than the down-conversion one. Nearly overlapped calibration curves were obtained for the two acidic amino acids, glutamic acid (Glu) and aspartic acid (Asp), thus suggesting that the proposed method can be used not only for the quantitation of individual acidic amino acids, but also for the detection of total amount of them.

  15. Trends for isolated amino acids and dipeptides: Conformation, divalent ion binding, and remarkable similarity of binding to calcium and lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ropo, M.; Blum, V.; Baldauf, C.

    2016-11-01

    We derive structural and binding energy trends for twenty amino acids, their dipeptides, and their interactions with the divalent cations Ca2+, Ba2+, Sr2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, and Hg2+. The underlying data set consists of more than 45,000 first-principles predicted conformers with relative energies up to ~4 eV (~400 kJ/mol). We show that only very few distinct backbone structures of isolated amino acids and their dipeptides emerge as lowest-energy conformers. The isolated amino acids predominantly adopt structures that involve an acidic proton shared between the carboxy and amino function. Dipeptides adopt one of two intramolecular-hydrogen bonded conformations C5 or . Upon complexation with a divalent cation, the accessible conformational space shrinks and intramolecular hydrogen bonding is prevented due to strong electrostatic interaction of backbone and side chain functional groups with cations. Clear correlations emerge from the binding energies of the six divalent ions with amino acids and dipeptides. Cd2+ and Hg2+ show the largest binding energies–a potential correlation with their known high acute toxicities. Ca2+ and Pb2+ reveal almost identical binding energies across the entire series of amino acids and dipeptides. This observation validates past indications that ion-mimicry of calcium and lead should play an important role in a toxicological context.

  16. Trends for isolated amino acids and dipeptides: Conformation, divalent ion binding, and remarkable similarity of binding to calcium and lead

    PubMed Central

    Ropo, M.; Blum, V.; Baldauf, C.

    2016-01-01

    We derive structural and binding energy trends for twenty amino acids, their dipeptides, and their interactions with the divalent cations Ca2+, Ba2+, Sr2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, and Hg2+. The underlying data set consists of more than 45,000 first-principles predicted conformers with relative energies up to ~4 eV (~400 kJ/mol). We show that only very few distinct backbone structures of isolated amino acids and their dipeptides emerge as lowest-energy conformers. The isolated amino acids predominantly adopt structures that involve an acidic proton shared between the carboxy and amino function. Dipeptides adopt one of two intramolecular-hydrogen bonded conformations C5 or . Upon complexation with a divalent cation, the accessible conformational space shrinks and intramolecular hydrogen bonding is prevented due to strong electrostatic interaction of backbone and side chain functional groups with cations. Clear correlations emerge from the binding energies of the six divalent ions with amino acids and dipeptides. Cd2+ and Hg2+ show the largest binding energies–a potential correlation with their known high acute toxicities. Ca2+ and Pb2+ reveal almost identical binding energies across the entire series of amino acids and dipeptides. This observation validates past indications that ion-mimicry of calcium and lead should play an important role in a toxicological context. PMID:27808109

  17. Characterizing the interaction between uranyl ion and fulvic acid using regional integration analysis (RIA) and fluorescence quenching.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bingqi; Ryan, David K

    2016-03-01

    The development of chemometric methods has substantially improved the quantitative usefulness of the fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) in the analysis of dissolved organic matter (DOM). In this study, Regional Integration Analysis (RIA) was used to quantitatively interpret EEMs and assess fluorescence quenching behavior in order to study the binding between uranyl ion and fulvic acid. Three fulvic acids including soil fulvic acid (SFA), Oyster River fulvic acid (ORFA) and Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) were used and investigated by the spectroscopic techniques. The EEM spectra obtained were divided into five regions according to fluorescence structural features and two distinct peaks were observed in region III and region V. Fluorescence quenching analysis was conducted for these two regions with the stability constants, ligand concentrations and residual fluorescence values calculated using the Ryan-Weber model. Results indicated a relatively strong binding ability between uranyl ion and fulvic acid samples at low pH (log K value varies from 4.11 to 4.67 at pH 3.50). Fluorophores in region III showed a higher binding ability with fewer binding sites than in region V. Stability constants followed the order, SFA > ORFA > SRFA, while ligand concentrations followed the reverse order, SRFA > ORFA > SFA. A comparison between RIA and Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC) data treatment methods was also performed and good agreement between these two methods (less than 4% difference in log K values) demonstrates the reliability of the RIA method in this study.

  18. Adsorption of copper ions from aqueous solution by citric acid modified soybean straw.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo; Fan, Tongxiang; Zhang, Di

    2008-05-01

    The objectives of the present study were to convert soybean straw to a metal ion adsorbent and further to investigate the potential of using the adsorbent for the removal of Cu(2+) from aqueous solution. The soybean straw was water or base washed and citric acid (CA) modified to enhance its nature adsorption capacity. The morphological and chemical characteristics of the adsorbent were evaluated by spectroscopy and N(2)-adsorption techniques. The porous structure, as well as high amounts of introduced free carboxyl groups of CA modified soybean straw makes the adsorbent be good to retain Cu(2+). The adsorption capacities increased when the solution pH increased from 2 to 6 and reached the maximum value at pH 6 (0.64 mmol g(-1) for the base washed, CA modified soybean straw (CA-BWSS)). The Cu(2+) uptake increased and percentage adsorption of the Cu(2+) decreased with the increase in initial Cu(2+) concentration from 1 mM to 20 mM. Both the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were tested, and the Freundlich model fited much better than the Langmuir model. It was found that CA-BWSS have the highest adsorption capacity of the four kinds of pretreated soybean straw.

  19. Acid-sensing ion channel 1a contributes to hippocampal LTP inducibility through multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Gang; Li, Hu-Song; Li, Wei-Guang; Wu, Yan-Jiao; Deng, Shi-Ning; Huang, Chen; Maximyuk, Oleksandr; Sukach, Volodymyr; Krishtal, Oleg; Zhu, Michael X.; Xu, Tian-Le

    2016-01-01

    The exact roles of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in synaptic plasticity remain elusive. Here, we address the contribution of ASIC1a to five forms of synaptic plasticity in the mouse hippocampus using an in vitro multi-electrode array recording system. We found that genetic deletion or pharmacological blockade of ASIC1a greatly reduced, but did not fully abolish, the probability of long-term potentiation (LTP) induction by either single or repeated high frequency stimulation or theta burst stimulation in the CA1 region. However, these treatments did not affect hippocampal long-term depression induced by low frequency electrical stimulation or (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine. We also show that ASIC1a exerts its action in hippocampal LTP through multiple mechanisms that include but are not limited to augmentation of NMDA receptor function. Taken together, these results reveal new insights into the role of ASIC1a in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and the underlying mechanisms. This unbiased study also demonstrates a novel and objective way to assay synaptic plasticity mechanisms in the brain. PMID:26996240

  20. Ion-exchange equilibrium of N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid on a strong anionic exchanger.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinglan; Ke, Xu; Zhang, Xudong; Zhuang, Wei; Zhou, Jingwei; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-09-15

    N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) is a high value-added product widely applied in the food industry. A suitable equilibrium model is required for purification of Neu5Ac based on ion-exchange chromatography. Hence, the equilibrium uptake of Neu5Ac on a strong anion exchanger, AD-1 was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The uptake of Neu5Ac by the hydroxyl form of the resin occurred primarily by a stoichiometric exchange of Neu5Ac(-) and OH(-). The experimental data showed that the selectivity coefficient for the exchange of Neu5Ac(-) with OH(-) was a non-constant quantity. Subsequently, the Saunders' model, which took into account the dissociation reactions of Neu5Ac and the condition of electroneutrality, was used to correlate the Neu5Ac sorption isotherms at various solution pHs and Neu5Ac concentrations. The model provided an excellent fit to the binary exchange data for Cl(-)/OH(-) and Neu5Ac(-)/OH(-), and an approximate prediction of equilibrium in the ternary system Cl(-)/Neu5Ac(-)/OH(-). This basic information combined with the general mass transfer model could lay the foundation for the prediction of dynamic behavior of fixed bed separation process afterwards.

  1. Acid-sensing ion channels contribute to synaptic transmission and inhibit cocaine-evoked plasticity.

    PubMed

    Kreple, Collin J; Lu, Yuan; Taugher, Rebecca J; Schwager-Gutman, Andrea L; Du, Jianyang; Stump, Madeliene; Wang, Yimo; Ghobbeh, Ali; Fan, Rong; Cosme, Caitlin V; Sowers, Levi P; Welsh, Michael J; Radley, Jason J; LaLumiere, Ryan T; Wemmie, John A

    2014-08-01

    Acid-sensing ion channel 1A (ASIC1A) is abundant in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a region known for its role in addiction. Because ASIC1A has been suggested to promote associative learning, we hypothesized that disrupting ASIC1A in the NAc would reduce drug-associated learning and memory. However, contrary to this hypothesis, we found that disrupting ASIC1A in the mouse NAc increased cocaine-conditioned place preference, suggesting an unexpected role for ASIC1A in addiction-related behavior. Moreover, overexpressing ASIC1A in rat NAc reduced cocaine self-administration. Investigating the underlying mechanisms, we identified a previously unknown postsynaptic current during neurotransmission that was mediated by ASIC1A and ASIC2 and thus well positioned to regulate synapse structure and function. Consistent with this possibility, disrupting ASIC1A altered dendritic spine density and glutamate receptor function, and increased cocaine-evoked plasticity, which resemble changes previously associated with cocaine-induced behavior. Together, these data suggest that ASIC1A inhibits the plasticity underlying addiction-related behavior and raise the possibility of developing therapies for drug addiction by targeting ASIC-dependent neurotransmission.

  2. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs): therapeutic targets for neurological diseases and their regulation.

    PubMed

    Kweon, Hae-Jin; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2013-06-01

    Extracellular acidification occurs not only in pathological conditions such as inflammation and brain ischemia, but also in normal physiological conditions such as synaptic transmission. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) can detect a broad range of physiological pH changes during pathological and synaptic cellular activities. ASICs are voltage-independent, proton-gated cation channels widely expressed throughout the central and peripheral nervous system. Activation of ASICs is involved in pain perception, synaptic plasticity, learning and memory, fear, ischemic neuronal injury, seizure termination, neuronal degeneration, and mechanosensation. Therefore, ASICs emerge as potential therapeutic targets for manipulating pain and neurological diseases. The activity of these channels can be regulated by many factors such as lactate, Zn(2+), and Phe-Met-Arg-Phe amide (FMRFamide)-like neuropeptides by interacting with the channel's large extracellular loop. ASICs are also modulated by G protein-coupled receptors such as CB1 cannabinoid receptors and 5-HT2. This review focuses on the physiological roles of ASICs and the molecular mechanisms by which these channels are regulated.

  3. Synthesis and acid digestion of biomorphic ceramics: determination of alkaline and alkaline earth ions.

    PubMed

    Bosch Ojeda, Catalina; Sánchez Rojas, Fuensanta; Cano Pavón, José Manuel

    2007-09-01

    Ceramic and glass are some of the more recent engineering materials and those that are most resistant to environmental conditions. They belong to advanced materials in that they are being developed for the aerospace and electronics industries. In the last decade, a new class of ceramic materials has been the focus of particular attention. The materials were produced with natural, renewable resources (wood or wood-based products). In this work, we have synthesised a new biomorphic ceramic material from oak wood and Si infiltration. After the material characterization, we have optimized the dissolution of the sample by acid attack in an oven under microwave irradiation. Experimental designs were used as a multivariate strategy for the evaluation of the effects of varying several variables at the same time. The optimization was performed in two steps using factorial design for preliminary evaluation and a Draper-Lin design for determination of the critical experimental conditions. Five variables (time, power, volume of HNO3, volume H2SO4 and volume of HF) were considered as factors and as a response the concentration of different metal ions in the optimization process. Interactions between analytical factors and their optimal levels were investigated using a Draper-Lin design.

  4. Fractionation of equine antivenom using caprylic acid precipitation in combination with cationic ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Raweerith, Rutai; Ratanabanangkoon, Kavi

    2003-11-01

    A combined process of caprylic acid (CA) precipitation and ion-exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose was studied as a means to fractionate pepsin-digested horse antivenom F(ab')(2) antibody. In the CA precipitation, the optimal concentration for fractionation of F(ab')(2) from pepsin-digested horse plasma was 2%, in which 89.61% of F(ab')(2) antibody activity was recovered in the supernatant with 1.5-fold purification. A significant amount of pepsin was not precipitated and remained active under these conditions. An analytical cation exchanger Protein-Pak SP 8HR HPLC column was tested to establish optimal conditions for the effective separation of IgG, albumin, pepsin and CA from the F(ab')(2) product. From these results, the supernatant from CA precipitation of pepsin-digested plasma was subjected to a SP-Sepharose column chromatography using a linear salt gradient. With stepwise elution, a peak containing F(ab')(2) antibody could be obtained by elution with 0.25 M NaCl. The total recovery of antibody was 65.56% with 2.91-fold purification, which was higher than that achieved by ammonium sulfate precipitation. This process simultaneously and effectively removed residual pepsin, high molecular weight aggregates and CA in the final F(ab')(2) product, and should be suitable for large-scale fractionation of therapeutic equine antivenoms.

  5. Nicotinic acid is a common regulator of heat-sensing TRPV1-4 ion channels.

    PubMed

    Ma, Linlin; Lee, Bo Hyun; Clifton, Heather; Schaefer, Saul; Zheng, Jie

    2015-03-10

    Nicotinic acid (NA, a.k.a. vitamin B3 or niacin) can reduce blood cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins whereas increase high-density lipoproteins. However, when NA is used to treat dyslipidemias, it causes a strong side effect of cutaneous vasodilation, commonly called flushing. A recent study showed that NA may cause flushing by lowering activation threshold temperature of the heat-sensitive capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel, leading to its activation at body temperature. The finding calls into question whether NA might also interact with the homologous heat-sensitive TRPV2-4 channels, particularly given that TRPV3 and TRPV4 are abundantly expressed in keratinocytes of the skin where much of the flushing response occurs. We found that NA indeed potentiated TRPV3 while inhibited TRPV2 and TRPV4. Consistent with these gating effects, NA lowered the heat-activation threshold of TRPV3 but elevated that of TRPV4. We further found that activity of TRPV1 was substantially prolonged by extracellular NA, which may further enhance the direct activation effect. Consistent with the broad gating effect on TRPV1-4 channels, evidence from the present study hints that NA may share the same activation pathway as 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), a common agonist for these TRPV channels. These findings shed new light on the molecular mechanism underlying NA regulation of TRPV channels.

  6. Structural Elucidation of cis/trans Dicaffeoylquinic Acid Photoisomerization Using Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xueyun; Renslow, Ryan S; Makola, Mpho M; Webb, Ian K; Deng, Liulin; Thomas, Dennis G; Govind, Niranjan; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Kabanda, Mwadham M; Dubery, Ian A; Heyman, Heino M; Smith, Richard D; Madala, Ntakadzeni E; Baker, Erin S

    2017-04-06

    Due to the recently uncovered health benefits and anti-HIV activities of dicaffeoylquinic acids (diCQAs), understanding their structures and functions is of great interest for drug discovery efforts. DiCQAs are analytically challenging to identify and quantify since they commonly exist as a diverse mixture of positional and geometric (cis/trans) isomers. In this work, we utilized ion mobility spectrometry coupled with mass spectrometry to separate the various isomers before and after UV irradiation. The experimental collision cross sections were then compared with theoretical structures to differentiate and identify the diCQA isomers. Our analyses found that naturally the diCQAs existed predominantly as trans/trans isomers, but after 3 h of UV irradiation, cis/cis, cis/trans, trans/cis, and trans/trans isomers were all present in the mixture. This is the first report of successful differentiation of cis/trans diCQA isomers individually, which shows the great promise of IMS coupled with theoretical calculations for determining the structure and activity relationships of different isomers in drug discovery studies.

  7. Acidotoxicity and acid-sensing ion channels contribute to motoneuron degeneration.

    PubMed

    Behan, A T; Breen, B; Hogg, M; Woods, I; Coughlan, K; Mitchem, M; Prehn, J H M

    2013-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurological condition with no cure. Mitochondrial dysfunction, Ca(2+) overloading and local hypoxic/ischemic environments have been implicated in the pathophysiology of ALS and are conditions that may initiate metabolic acidosis in the affected tissue. We tested the hypothesis that acidotoxicity and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are involved in the pathophysiology of ALS. We found that motoneurons were selectively vulnerable to acidotoxicity in vitro, and that acidotoxicity was partially reduced in asic1a-deficient motoneuron cultures. Cross-breeding of SOD1(G93A) ALS mice with asic1a-deficient mice delayed the onset and progression of motor dysfunction in SOD1 mice. Interestingly, we also noted a strong increase in ASIC2 expression in motoneurons of SOD1 mice and sporadic ALS patients during disease progression. Pharmacological pan-inhibition of ASIC channels with the lipophilic amiloride derivative, 5-(N,N-dimethyl)-amiloride hydrochloride, potently protected cultured motoneurons against acidotoxicity, and, given post-symptom onset, significantly improved lifespan, motor performance and motoneuron survival in SOD1 mice. Together, our data provide strong evidence for the involvement of acidotoxicity and ASIC channels in motoneuron degeneration, and highlight the potential of ASIC inhibitors as a new treatment approach for ALS.

  8. Biosorption of heavy metal ions onto agricultural residues buckwheat hulls functionalized with 1-hydroxylethylidenediphosphonic acid.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ping; Wang, Zengdi; Qu, Rongjun; Liu, Xiguang; Zhang, Jiang; Xu, Qiang

    2012-11-28

    Novel biosorbent materials obtained from agricultural residues buckwheat hulls (BH) were successfully developed through functionalization with 1-hydroxylethylidenediphosphonic acid (HEDP), and they were characterized. This paper reports the feasibility of using HEDP-BH for removal of heavy metals from stimulated wastewater, the experimental results revealed that the adsorption property of functionalized buckwheat hulls with 120 mesh 120-HEDP-BH for Au(III) was very excellent, and the monolayer maximum adsorption capacity for Au(III) calculated from the Langmuir isotherm models was up to 450.45 mg/g at 35 °C. The combined effect of initial solution pH, 120-HEDP-BH dosage, and initial Au(III) concentration was investigated using response surface methodology (RSM), and the result showed that biomass dosage exerted a stronger influence on Au(III) uptake than those of initial pH and initial Au(III) concentration. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the quadratic model demonstrated that the model was highly significant. Moreover, investigation on the adsorption selectivity showed that 120-HEDP-BH displayed strong affinity for gold in aqueous solutions and even exhibited 100% selectivity for Au(III) ions in the presence of Zn(II) and Co(II). Regeneration capacities of 120-HEDP-BH were studied using the eluent solutions of 0.0-5.0% thiourea in 0.1 mmol/L HCl, and it was found that the adsorption capability remains high after several cycles of adsorption-desorption process.

  9. Use of a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column and propionic acid as an eluent in ion-exclusion/adsorption chromatography of aliphatic carboxylic acids and ethanol in food samples.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanobu; Hironaga, Takahiro; Kajiwara, Hiroe; Nakatani, Nobutake; Kozaki, Daisuke; Itabashi, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    We developed an ion-exclusion/adsorption chromatography (IEAC) method employing a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin (PS-WCX) column with propionic acid as the eluent for the simultaneous determination of multivalent aliphatic carboxylic acids and ethanol in food samples. The PS-WCX column well resolved mono-, di-, and trivalent carboxylic acids in the acidic eluent. Propionic acid as the eluent gave a higher signal-to-noise ratio, and enabled sensitive conductimetric detection of analyte acids. We found the optimal separation condition to be the combination of a PS-WCX column and 20-mM propionic acid. Practical applicability of the developed method was confirmed by using a short precolumn with a strongly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H(+)-form connected before the separation column; this was to remove cations from food samples by converting them to hydrogen ions. Consequently, common carboxylic acids and ethanol in beer, wine, and soy sauce were successfully separated by the developed method.

  10. Anion Transport in Liposomes Responds to Variations in the Anchor Chains and the Fourth Amino Acid of Heptapeptide Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ferdani, Riccardo; Pajewski, Robert; Djedovič, Natasha; Pajewska, Jolanta; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Gokel, George W.

    2008-01-01

    Seven heptapeptide derivatives have been prepared. The peptide structure is (Gly)3Xxx(Gly)3 in which Xxx stands for a variable amino acid. The amino acid variations include azetidine carboxylic acid, pipecolic acid, meta-aminobenzoic acid, proline, and leucine. All seven compounds have a C-terminal benzyl group. In all cases, the heptapeptide's N-terminus was linked to diglycolic acid and a dialkylamine. In five cases, the N-terminal group was didecylamine and in two cases, N-ethyl-N-decyl. Chloride and carboxyfluorescein release from phospholipid vesicles was studied with the result that C10H21N(C2H5) COCH2OCH2CO-NH-(Gly)3Leu(Gly)3-OCH2Ph was the most active. Hill analysis showed that this compound involves pore formation by four monomer units rather than two, as previously found for other members of this family. PMID:19169373

  11. Ethacrynic acid analogues lacking the alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl unit--potential anti-metastatic drugs.

    PubMed

    Janser, Romy F J; Meka, Ranjith K; Bryant, Zack E; Adogla, Enoch A; Vogel, Elizabeth K; Wharton, Jaimie L; Tilley, Cynthia M; Kaminski, Catherine N; Ferrey, Seth L; Van Slambrouck, Severine; Steelant, Wim F A; Janser, Ingo

    2010-03-15

    A series of ethacrynic acid analogues, lacking the alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl unit, was synthesized and subsequently evaluated for their ability to inhibit the migration of human breast cancer cells, MCF-7/AZ. Several of the analogues were already active in the low micromolar range, whereas ethacrynic acid itself shows no potential to inhibit the migration of these cancer cells. Preliminary studies show that the presence of one or more methoxy groups at the phenyl ring of ethacrynic acid is important in order for the ethacrynic acid analogues to demonstrate an inhibitory effect on the migration.

  12. Gas chromatography with tandem differential mobility spectrometry of fatty acid alkyl esters and the selective detection of methyl linolenate in biodiesels by dual-stage ion filtering.

    PubMed

    Pasupuleti, D; Pierce, K; Eiceman, G A

    2015-11-20

    Alkyl esters of fatty acids (FAAEs) with carbon numbers from 8 to 20 formed protonated monomers and proton bound dimers through atmospheric pressure chemical ionization reactions and these gas ions were characterized for their field dependent mobility coefficients using differential mobility spectrometry (DMS). Separation of ion peaks with a vapor modifier was achieved for ions with masses of 317-1033 Da though the differences in these coefficients and the resolution of ion peaks decreased proportionally with increased ion mass. Differences in dispersion curves were sufficient to isolate ions from specific FAAEs in the effluent of a gas chromatograph by dual stage ion filtering using a tandem DMS detector. Methyl linolenate was isolated from nearby eluting methyl oleate, methyl stearate and methyl linoleate within analysis times of 10s without measureable complications from charge suppression in the ion source or leakage in filtering of ions with close proximity of dispersion behavior.

  13. Lead-acid and lithium-ion batteries for the Chinese electric bike market and implications on future technology advancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Burke, Andrew F.; Wei, Xuezhe

    China has been experiencing a rapid increase in battery-powered personal transportation since the late 1990s due to the strong growth of the electric bike and scooter (i.e. e-bike) market. Annual sales in China reached 17 million bikes year -1 in 2006. E-bike growth has been in part due to improvements in rechargeable valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) battery technology, the primary battery type for e-bikes. Further improvements in technology and a transition from VRLA to lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries will impact the future market growth of this transportation mode in China and abroad. Battery performance and cost for these two types are compared to assess the feasibility of a shift from VRLA to Li-ion battery e-bikes. The requirements for batteries used in e-bikes are assessed. A widespread shift from VRLA to Li-ion batteries seems improbable in the near future for the mass market given the cost premium relative to the performance advantages of Li-ion batteries. As both battery technologies gain more real-world use in e-bike applications, both will improve. Cell variability is a key problematic area to be addressed with VRLA technology. For Li-ion technology, safety and cost are the key problem areas which are being addressed through the use of new cathode materials.

  14. Comparison of three strong ion models used for quantifying the acid-base status of human plasma with special emphasis on the plasma weak acids.

    PubMed

    Anstey, Chris M

    2005-06-01

    Currently, three strong ion models exist for the determination of plasma pH. Mathematically, they vary in their treatment of weak acids, and this study was designed to determine whether any significant differences exist in the simulated performance of these models. The models were subjected to a "metabolic" stress either in the form of variable strong ion difference and fixed weak acid effect, or vice versa, and compared over the range 25 < or = Pco(2) < or = 135 Torr. The predictive equations for each model were iteratively solved for pH at each Pco(2) step, and the results were plotted as a series of log(Pco(2))-pH titration curves. The results were analyzed for linearity by using ordinary least squares regression and for collinearity by using correlation. In every case, the results revealed a linear relationship between log(Pco(2)) and pH over the range 6.8 < or = pH < or = 7.8, and no significant difference between the curve predictions under metabolic stress. The curves were statistically collinear. Ultimately, their clinical utility will be determined both by acceptance of the strong ion framework for describing acid-base physiology and by the ease of measurement of the independent model parameters.

  15. Evidence of sulphur and nitrogen deposition signals at the United Kingdom Acid Waters Monitoring Network sites.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D M

    2005-09-01

    Some recent studies of trends in sulphate in surface waters have alluded to possible lag effects imposed by catchment soils, resulting in discrepancies between trends in deposition and run-off. To assess the extent of these possible effects in the UK, sulphate concentration data from the United Kingdom Acid Waters Monitoring Network (AWMN) sites are compared with estimates of sulphur deposition at each site. From these data, input-output budgets are computed at an annual time scale. The estimated budgets suggest a close association between catchment sulphur inputs and outputs at an annual scale, with well-balanced annual budgets at most sites, indicative of only minor lag effects. A similar analysis of the AWMN site nitrogen budget shows little evidence of an association between nitrogen inputs and outputs at this time scale.

  16. Controlled fed-batch fermentations of dilute-acid hydrolysate in pilot development unit scale.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Andreas; Galbe, Mats; Lidén, Gunnar

    2004-01-01

    Inhibitors formed during wood hydrolysis constitute a major problem in fermenting dilute-acid hydrolysates. By applying a fed-batch technique, the levels of inhibitory compounds may be held low, enabling high ethanol productivity. In this study, a previously developed fed-batch strategy was modified and implemented for use in pilot development unit (PDU) scale. The rate of total gas formation, measured with a mass flow meter, was used as input variable in the control algorithm. The feed rate in the PDU-scale experiments could be properly controlled based on the gas evolution from the reactor. In fed-batch experiments utilizing TMB 3000, an inhibitor-tolerant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, close to 100% of the hexoses in the hydrolysate was converted.

  17. Combined effects of lanthanum ion and acid rain on growth, photosynthesis and chloroplast ultrastructure in soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Wen, Kejia; Liang, Chanjuan; Wang, Lihong; Hu, Gang; Zhou, Qing

    2011-07-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) have been accumulated in the agricultural environment. Acid rain is a serious environmental issue. In the present work, the effects of lanthanum ion (La(3+)) and acid rain on the growth, photosynthesis and chloroplast ultrastructure in soybean seedlings were investigated using the gas exchange measurements system, chlorophyll fluorometer, transmission electron microscopy and some biochemical techniques. It was found that although the growth and photosynthesis of soybean seedlings treated with the low concentration of La(3+) was improved, the growth and photosynthesis of soybean seedlings were obviously inhibited in the combined treatment with the low concentration of La(3+) and acid rain. At the same time, the chloroplast ultrastructure in the cell of soybean seedlings was destroyed. Under the combined treatment with the high concentration of La(3+) and acid rain, the chloroplast ultrastructure in the cell of soybean seedlings was seriously destroyed, and the growth and of photosynthesis were greatly decreased compared with those of the control, the single treatment with the high concentration of La(3+) and the single treatment with acid rain, respectively. The degree of decrease and destruction on chloroplast ultrastructure depended on the increases in the concentration of La(3+) and acid rain (H(+)). In conclusion, the combined pollution of La(3+) and acid rain obviously destroyed the chloroplast ultrastructure of cell and aggravated the harmful effect of the single La(3+) and acid rain on soybean seedlings. As a new combined pollutant, the harmful effect of REEs ions and acid rain on plant should be paid attention to.

  18. Comparison of negative-ion proton-transfer with iodide ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry for quantification of isocyanic acid in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward-Massey, Robert; Taha, Youssef M.; Moussa, Samar G.; Osthoff, Hans D.

    2014-12-01

    Isocyanic acid (HNCO) is a trace gas pollutant of potential importance to human health whose measurement has recently become possible through the development of negative-ion proton-transfer chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS) with acetate reagent ion. In this manuscript, an alternative ionization and detection scheme, in which HNCO is quantified by iodide CIMS (iCIMS) as a cluster ion at m/z 170, is described. The sensitivity was inversely proportional to water vapor concentration but could be made independent of humidity changes in the sampled air by humidifying the ion-molecule reaction (IMR) region of the CIMS. The performance of the two ionization schemes was compared and contrasted using ambient air measurements of HNCO mixing ratios in Calgary, AB, Canada, by NI-PT-CIMS with acetate reagent ion from Dec 16 to 20, 2013, and by the same CIMS operated in iCIMS mode from Feb 3 to 7, 2014. The iCIMS exhibited a greater signal-to-noise ratio than the NI-PT-CIMS, not because of its sensitivity, which was lower (˜0.083 normalized counts per second (NCPS) per parts-per-trillion by volume (pptv) compared to ˜9.7 NCPS pptv-1), but because of a much lower and more stable background (3 ± 4 compared to a range of ˜2 × 103 to ˜6 × 103 NCPS). For the Feb 2014 data set, the HNCO mixing ratios in Calgary air ranged from <12 to 94 pptv (median 34 pptv), were marginally higher at night than during day, and correlated with nitrogen oxide (NOx = NO + NO2) mixing ratios and submicron particle volume. The ratios of HNCO to NOx observed are within the range of emission ratios reported for gasoline-powered motor vehicles.

  19. Design of a Modular 5-kW Power Processing Unit for the Next-Generation 40-cm Ion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; Bond, Thomas; Okada, Don; Pyter, Janusz; Wiseman, Steve

    2002-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a 5/10-kW ion engine for a broad range of mission applications. Simultaneously, a 5-kW breadboard poster processing unit is being designed and fabricated. The design includes a beam supply consisting of four 1.1 kW power modules connected in parallel, equally sharing the output current. A novel phase-shifted/pulse-width-modulated dual full-bridge topology was chosen for its soft-switching characteristics. The proposed modular approach allows scalability to higher powers as well as the possibility of implementing an N+1 redundant beam supply. Efficiencies in excess of 96% were measured during testing of a breadboard beam power module. A specific mass of 3.0 kg/kW is expected for a flight PRO. This represents a 50% reduction from the state of the art NSTAR power processor.

  20. Tranexamic Acid for Trauma Resuscitation in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Mark; Thomas, Scott; Moore, Ernest; Moore, Hunter; Piscoya, Andres; Hake, Daniel; Son, Michael; Pohlman, Tim; Wegner, Julie; Bryant, John; Grassetto, Alberto; Davis, Patrick; Nielsen, Nathan; Crepinsek, Anton; Shreve, Jacob T; Castellino, Francis

    2017-03-01

    The utilization of tranexamic acid (TXA) for the management of bleeding trauma patients has been a subject of much debate on both sides of the Atlantic and in Australia. As a result of the large randomized controlled study called the Clinical Randomization of an Antifibrinolytic in Severe Hemorrhage (CRASH-2), there was an initial enthusiasm for the use of TXA to treat bleeding patients. However, the adoption of TXA in the United States was delayed by concerns of "knowledge and evidence gaps" of the CRASH-2 study and because of a lack of mechanistic rationale that would explain the survival benefit noted in the study. Subsequent nonrandomized controlled trials questioned the liberal use of TXA in trauma patients. This narrative review explores the historical as well as clinical and theoretical grounds for the more measured use of TXA in the United States and proposes a clinical and point-of-care guided utilization of TXA, blood components, and adjunctive hemostatic agents in bleeding trauma patients.

  1. Temperature Rise Induced by Light Curing Unit Can Shorten Enamel Acid-Etching Time

    PubMed Central

    Najafi Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Sheikh-Al-Eslamian, Seyedeh Mahsa; Panahandeh, Narges

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this in-vitro study was to assess the thermal effect of light emitting diode (LED) light curing unit on the enamel etching time. Materials and Methods: Three treatment groups with 15 enamel specimens each were used in this study: G1: Fifteen seconds of etching, G2: Five seconds of etching, G3: Five seconds of etching plus LED light irradiation (simultaneously). The micro shear bond strength (μSBS) of composite resin to enamel was measured. Results: The mean μSBS values ± standard deviation were 51.28±2.35, 40.47±2.75 and 50.00±2.59 MPa in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. There was a significant difference between groups 1 and 2 (P=0.013) and between groups 2 and 3 (P=0.032) in this respect, while there was no difference between groups 1 and 3 (P=0.932). Conclusion: Simultaneous application of phosphoric acid gel over enamel surface and light irradiation using a LED light curing unit decreased enamel etching time to five seconds without compromising the μSBS. PMID:27559352

  2. Formulation and physicochemical properties of macro- and microemulsions prepared by interfacial ion-pair formation between amino acids and fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, G.T.P.

    1987-01-01

    Emulsions were prepared by dissolving an amino acid in the aqueous phase and a fatty acid in the oil phase of the emulsions. When the two phases were mixed, the amino acid and fatty acid formed an ion pair at the oil-water interface which stabilized one phase as small droplets within the other to give a stable emulsion. NMR spectra indicated protonation on the amino groups when a carboxylic acid was added to an aqueous solution of an amino acid. Various hydrocarbons and mineral oil could be emulsified into oil-in-water emulsions with a high volume ratio containing up to 75% internal oil phase. Vegetable oils such as soybean oil, safflower seed oil and cottonseed oil were emulsified to a lesser extent. Both oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsions could be formed with the same emulsifying agents depending on the phase volume ratio and the order of addition of oil phase to water phase or the reverse. Particle size measurements using laser light-scattering techniques indicated an oil-in-water emulsion mixed by a magnetic stirring bar had an internal droplet size in the range of 0.1 to 0.3 micron. Such emulsions were stable at 50/degrees/ and 60/degrees/C for three to six months. In addition to the macroemulsions described above, completely clear water-in-oil microemulsions can be prepared from the above systems by the addition of long-chain fatty alcohols such as oleyl alcohol. Clear regions of such clear microemulsions were characterized. Microemulsion systems suitable for tertiary oil recovery were also studied. Clear microemulsions prepared by ion-pairing between ammonia and hexanoic acid could contain octane or tetradecane in the form of oil-in-water or water-in-oil microemulsions at a wide range of oil to aqueous ratio.

  3. Variation of Select Flavonols and Chlorogenic Acid Content of Elderberry Collected Throughout the Eastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Mudge, Elizabeth; Applequist, Wendy L.; Finley, Jamie; Lister, Patience; Townesmith, Andrew K.; Walker, Karen M.; Brown, Paula N.

    2016-01-01

    American elderberries are commonly collected from wild plants for use as food and medicinal products. The degree of phytochemical variation amongst wild populations has not been established and might affect the overall quality of elderberry dietary supplements. The three major flavonols identified in elderberries are rutin, quercetin and isoquercetin. Variation in the flavonols and chlorogenic acid was determined for 107 collections of elderberries from throughout the eastern United States using an optimized high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection method. The mean content was 71.9 mg per 100g fresh weight with variation ranging from 7.0 to 209.7 mg per 100 g fresh weight within the collected population. Elderberries collected from southeastern regions had significantly higher contents in comparison with those in more northern regions. The variability of the individual flavonol and chlorogenic acid profiles of the berries was complex and likely influenced by multiple factors. Several outliers were identified based on unique phytochemical profiles in comparison with average populations. This is the first study to determine the inherent variability of American elderberries from wild collections and can be used to identify potential new cultivars that may produce fruits of unique or high-quality phytochemical content for the food and dietary supplement industries. PMID:26877585

  4. Tuning charge-discharge induced unit cell breathing in layer-structured cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yong-Ning; Ma, Jun; Hu, Enyuan; Yu, Xiqian; Gu, Lin; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Chen, Liquan; Wang, Zhaoxiang; Yang, Xiao-Qing

    2014-12-18

    For LiMO2 (M=Co, Ni, Mn) cathode materials, lattice parameters, a(b), contract during charge. Here we report such changes in opposite directions for lithium molybdenum trioxide (Li2MoO3). A ‘unit cell breathing’ mechanism is proposed based on crystal and electronic structural changes of transition metal oxides during charge-discharge. Metal–metal bonding is used to explain such ‘abnormal’ behaviour and a generalized hypothesis is developed. The expansion of the metal-metal bond becomes the controlling factor for a(b) evolution during charge, in contrast to the shrinking metal-oxygen bond as controlling factor in ‘normal’ materials. The cation mixing caused by migration of molybdenum ions at higher oxidation state provides the benefits of reducing the c expansion range in the early stage of charging and suppressing the structure collapse at high voltage charge. These results may open a new strategy for designing layered cathode materials for high energy density lithium-ion batteries.

  5. Tuning charge–discharge induced unit cell breathing in layer-structured cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yong-Ning; Ma, Jun; Hu, Enyuan; Yu, Xiqian; Gu, Lin; Nam, Kyung -Wan; Chen, Liquan; Wang, Zhaoxiang; Yang, Xiao -Qing

    2014-11-18

    Through a systematic study of lithium molybdenum trioxide (Li2MoO3), a new ‘unit cell breathing’ mechanism is introduced based on both crystal and electronic structural changes of transition metal oxide cathode materials during charge–discharge: For widely used LiMO2 (M = Co, Ni, Mn), lattice parameters, a and b, contracts during charge. However, for Li2MoO3, such changes are in opposite directions. Metal–metal bonding is used to explain such ‘abnormal’ behaviour and a generalized hypothesis is developed. The expansion of M–M bond becomes the controlling factor for a(b) evolution during charge, in contrast to the shrinking M–O as controlling factor in ‘normal’ materials. The cation mixing caused by migration of Mo ions at higher oxidation state provides the benefits of reducing the c expansion range in early stage of charging and suppressing the structure collapse at high voltage charge. These results open a new strategy for designing and engineering layered cathode materials for high energy density lithium-ion batteries.

  6. Tuning charge–discharge induced unit cell breathing in layer-structured cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Yong-Ning; Ma, Jun; Hu, Enyuan; ...

    2014-11-18

    Through a systematic study of lithium molybdenum trioxide (Li2MoO3), a new ‘unit cell breathing’ mechanism is introduced based on both crystal and electronic structural changes of transition metal oxide cathode materials during charge–discharge: For widely used LiMO2 (M = Co, Ni, Mn), lattice parameters, a and b, contracts during charge. However, for Li2MoO3, such changes are in opposite directions. Metal–metal bonding is used to explain such ‘abnormal’ behaviour and a generalized hypothesis is developed. The expansion of M–M bond becomes the controlling factor for a(b) evolution during charge, in contrast to the shrinking M–O as controlling factor in ‘normal’ materials.more » The cation mixing caused by migration of Mo ions at higher oxidation state provides the benefits of reducing the c expansion range in early stage of charging and suppressing the structure collapse at high voltage charge. These results open a new strategy for designing and engineering layered cathode materials for high energy density lithium-ion batteries.« less

  7. Potential of vancomycin for the enantiomeric resolution of FMOC-amino acids by capillary electrophoresis-ion-trap-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hernández, Laura; Domínguez-Vega, Elena; Montealegre, Cristina; Castro-Puyana, María; Marina, María Luisa; Crego, Antonio L

    2014-05-01

    The potential of the antibiotic vancomycin (VC) as chiral selector for the enantiomeric separation of amino acids by CE-ESI-MS/MS² was investigated for the first time in this work. Derivatization of amino acids with FMOC-Cl was carried out to enable their interaction with VC as well as the formation of precursor ions with larger m/z which were employed in MS² experiments. The partial filling of a coated capillary was employed to avoid the loss in MS sensitivity originated by the introduction of VC in the ionization source. Under optimized conditions, the simultaneous enantiomeric separation and unequivocal identification of 17 amino acids (two of them being nonprotein amino acids) took place in about 20 min with LODs in the micromolar range.

  8. Simultaneous determination of amino acids and carbohydrates in culture media of Clostridium thermocellum by valve-switching ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fa, Yun; Yang, Haiyan; Ji, Chengshuai; Cui, He; Zhu, Xinshu; Du, Juan; Gao, Jun

    2013-10-10

    An improved method for the simultaneous determination of 20 amino acids and 7 carbohydrates using one-valve switching after injection, ion chromatography, and integrated pulsed amperometric detection is proposed. The resolution of the amino acids and carbohydrates in the cation trap column was investigated. In addition, parameters including flow liquid type, flow rate, concentration, and valve-switch timing were optimized. The method is time-saving, effective, and accurate for the simultaneous separation of amino acids and carbohydrates, with a mean correlation coefficient of >0.99 and repeatability of 0.5-4.6% for eight replicates. The method was successfully applied in the analysis of amino acids and carbohydrates in aseptic media and in extracellular culture media of three phenotypes of Clostridium thermocellum.

  9. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J.; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K.; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P.; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N.; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E.; Wagner, Paul E.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-05-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere.

  10. Method for characterization of low molecular weight organic acids in atmospheric aerosols using ion chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brent, Lacey C; Reiner, Jessica L; Dickerson, Russell R; Sander, Lane C

    2014-08-05

    The structural composition of PM2.5 monitored in the atmosphere is usually divided by the analysis of organic carbon, black (also called elemental) carbon, and inorganic salts. The characterization of the chemical composition of aerosols represents a significant challenge to analysts, and studies are frequently limited to determination of aerosol bulk properties. To better understand the potential health effects and combined interactions of components in aerosols, a variety of measurement techniques for individual analytes in PM2.5 need to be implemented. The method developed here for the measurement of organic acids achieves class separation of aliphatic monoacids, aliphatic diacids, aromatic acids, and polyacids. The selective ion monitoring capability of a triple quadropole mass analyzer was frequently capable of overcoming instances of incomplete separations. Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1649b Urban Dust was characterized; 34 organic acids were qualitatively identified, and 6 organic acids were quantified.

  11. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of pentathionate ion by chlorine dioxide in a slightly acidic medium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Csekő, György; Petz, Andrea; Horváth, Attila K

    2014-02-27

    The chlorine dioxide-pentathionate reaction has been studied at a slightly acidic medium by conventional UV-vis spectroscopy monitoring the absorbance at 430 nm. We have shown that pentathionate was oxidized to sulfate, but chlorate is also a marginal product of the reaction besides the chloride ion. The stoichiometry of the reaction can be established as a linear combination of two limiting stoichiometries under our experimental conditions. Kinetics of the reaction was found to be also complex because initial rate studies revealed that formal kinetic orders of both the hydrogen ion and chlorine dioxide is far from unity. Moreover, log-log plot of the initial rate against pentathionate concentration indicated a nonconstant formal kinetic order. We also observed a significant catalytic effect of chloride ion. Based on our observations and simultaneous evaluation of the kinetic curves, an 11-step kinetic model is obtained with 6 fitted rate coefficients. A relatively simple rate equation has also been derived and discussed.

  12. Micro/nanofabrication of poly({sub L}-lactic acid) using focused ion beam direct etching

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, Tomoko Gowa; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Hinata, Toru; Washio, Masakazu; Oshima, Akihiro; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2013-10-14

    Micro/nanofabrication of biocompatible and biodegradable poly({sub L}-lactic acid) (PLLA) using focused Ga ion beam direct etching was evaluated for future bio-device applications. The fabrication performance was determined with different ion fluences and fluxes (beam currents), and it was found that the etching speed and fabrication accuracy were affected by irradiation-induced heat. Focused ion beam (FIB)-irradiated surfaces were analyzed using micro-area X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Owing to reactions such as the physical sputtering of atoms and radiation-induced decomposition, PLLA was gradually carbonized with increasing C=C bonds. Controlled micro/nanostructures of PLLA were fabricated with C=C bond-rich surfaces expected to have good cell attachment properties.

  13. Calcium-permeable acid-sensing ion channel in nociceptive plasticity: a new target for pain control.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tian-Le; Duan, Bo

    2009-02-01

    The development of chronic pain involves increased sensitivity of peripheral nociceptors and elevated neuronal activity in many regions of the central nervous system. Much of these changes are caused by the amplification of nociceptive signals resulting from the modulation and altered expression of specific ion channels and receptors in the central and peripheral nervous system. Understanding the processes by which these ion channels and receptors are regulated and how these mechanisms malfunction may lead to new treatments for chronic pain. Here we review the contribution of the Ca2+-permeable acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC(Ca)) in the development and persistence of chronic pain, and the potential underlying mechanisms. Accumulating evidence suggests that ASIC(Ca) represents an attractive new target for developing effective therapies for chronic pain.

  14. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Nano Silver Ion Substituted Poly Acrylic Acid Films on Titanium by Plasma Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yeong-Mu; Myung, Sung-Woon; Kook, Joong-Ki; Jung, Sang-Chul; Kim, Byung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial activity of oral pathogens such as Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus when silver ion immobilized on commercially pure (CP) titanium (Ti) surface was investigated in this study. Plasma-polymerized acrylic acid to have carboxyl group was deposited on CP-Ti surface and then ion-exchanged with Ag+ ions in 0.1 N AgNO3. In anti-adherent experiment, antibacterial activity was tested using broth culture methods. The biofilm formation assay was performed using semi-defined biofilm medium with sucrose. The silver coated CP-Ti completely inhibited the growth of S. mutans and S. sobrinus. In addition, the biofilm formation was significantly inhibited in silver-coated CP-Ti group.

  15. Interaction of strontium and europium with an aquatic fulvic acid studied by ultrafiltration and ion exchange techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordén, Maria; Ephraim, James; Allard, Bert

    The complexation of an aquatic fulvic acid, FA, with Sr2+ and Eu3+ was studied using an ultrafiltration technique and an ion exchange distribution method. The total amount of bound metal (Sr2+ and Eu3+) was measured as a function of pH at low metal concentrations (trace levels) and constant FA concentration. In the Sr-FA system the bound metal fraction increased slightly with pH, and the values obtained from the two experimental techniques were comparable. For Eu-FA, according to the ultrafiltration data, the fraction of bound metal ion was relatively insensitive to pH changes, whereas values from the ion exchange measurements showed a strong and positive dependence on pH. The results are discussed in the light of possible intrinsic problems of the two methods.

  16. Ischemic postconditioning protects against ischemic brain injury by up-regulation of acid-sensing ion channel 2a

    PubMed Central

    Duanmu, Wang-sheng; Cao, Liu; Chen, Jing-yu; Ge, Hong-fei; Hu, Rong; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic postconditioning renders brain tissue tolerant to brain ischemia, thereby alleviating ischemic brain injury. However, the exact mechanism of action is still unclear. In this study, a rat model of global brain ischemia was subjected to ischemic postconditioning treatment using the vessel occlusion method. After 2 hours of ischemia, the bilateral common carotid arteries were blocked immediately for 10 seconds and then perfused for 10 seconds. This procedure was repeated six times. Ischemic postconditioning was found to mitigate hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage in rats with brain ischemia, and up-regulate acid-sensing ion channel 2a expression at the mRNA and protein level. These findings suggest that ischemic postconditioning up-regulates acid-sensing ion channel 2a expression in the rat hippocampus after global brain ischemia, which promotes neuronal tolerance to ischemic brain injury. PMID:27212927

  17. Cysteamine-induced inhibition of acid neutralization and the increase in hydrogen ion back-diffusion in duodenal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Ohe, K.; Okada, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Inoue, M.; Miyoshi, A.

    1982-03-01

    To investigate the possible impairment of defensive mechanisms in cysteamine-induced duodenal ulceration, the effect of cysteamine on the neutralization of acid by the duodenum and the back-diffusion of hydrogen ions into the duodenal mucosa has been studied. The results obtained were as follows. (1) The intraduodenal pH started to decrease between 3 and 4 hr after cysteamine injection. (2) By perfusion of the duodenal loop excluding the opening of bile and pancreatic ducts, the amount of hydrogen ions (H+) neutralized was found to be significantly lower in cysteamine-treated animals than in the controls. (3) the back-diffusion of luminal H+ into the duodenal mucosa, estimated by measuring the H+ disappearance from the test solution including 100 mM HCl, was significantly increased by cysteamine. From these findings, it has been concluded that cysteamine reduces the resistance of duodenal mucosa to acid coming from the stomach.

  18. Postprandial acid-base balance and ion regulation in freshwater and seawater-acclimated European flounder, Platichthys flesus.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Josi R; Whittamore, Jonathan M; Wilson, Rod W; Grosell, Martin

    2007-08-01

    The effects of feeding on both acid-base and ion exchange with the environment, and internal acid-base and ion balance, in freshwater and seawater-acclimated flounder were investigated. Following voluntary feeding on a meal of 2.5-5% body mass and subsequent gastric acid secretion, no systemic alkaline tide or respiratory compensation was observed in either group. Ammonia efflux rates more than doubled from 489 +/- 35 and 555 +/- 64 mumol kg(-1) h(-1) under control conditions to 1,228 +/- 127 and 1,300 +/- 154 mumol kg(-1) h(-1) post-feeding in freshwater and seawater-acclimated fish, respectively. Based on predictions of gastric acid secreted during digestion, we calculated net postprandial internal base gains (i.e., HCO (3) (-) secreted from gastric parietal cells into the blood) of 3.4 mmol kg(-1) in seawater and 9.1 mmol kg(-1 )in freshwater-acclimated flounder. However, net fluxes of ammonia, titratable alkalinity, Na(+) and Cl(-) indicated that branchial Cl(-)/HCO (3) (-) and Na(+)/H(+) exchange played minimal roles in counteracting these predicted base gains and cannot explain the absence of alkaline tide. Instead, intestinal Cl(-)/HCO (3) (-) exchange appears to be enhanced after feeding in both freshwater and seawater flounder. This implicates the intestine rather than the gills as a potential route of postprandial base excretion in fish, to compensate for gastric acid secretion.

  19. Quantum Chemical Benchmarking, Validation, and Prediction of Acidity Constants for Substituted Pyridinium Ions and Pyridinyl Radicals.

    PubMed

    Keith, John A; Carter, Emily A

    2012-09-11

    Sensibly modeling (photo)electrocatalytic reactions involving proton and electron transfer with computational quantum chemistry requires accurate descriptions of protonated, deprotonated, and radical species in solution. Procedures to do this are generally nontrivial, especially in cases that involve radical anions that are unstable in the gas phase. Recently, pyridinium and the corresponding reduced neutral radical have been postulated as key catalysts in the reduction of CO2 to methanol. To assess practical methodologies to describe the acid/base chemistry of these species, we employed density functional theory (DFT) in tandem with implicit solvation models to calculate acidity constants for 22 substituted pyridinium cations and their corresponding pyridinyl radicals in water solvent. We first benchmarked our calculations against experimental pyridinium deprotonation energies in both gas and aqueous phases. DFT with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals provide chemical accuracy for gas-phase data and allow absolute prediction of experimental pKas with unsigned errors under 1 pKa unit. The accuracy of this economical pKa calculation approach was further verified by benchmarking against highly accurate (but very expensive) CCSD(T)-F12 calculations. We compare the relative importance and sensitivity of these energies to selection of solvation model, solvation energy definitions, implicit solvation cavity definition, basis sets, electron densities, model geometries, and mixed implicit/explicit models. After determining the most accurate model to reproduce experimentally-known pKas from first principles, we apply the same approach to predict pKas for radical pyridinyl species that have been proposed relevant under electrochemical conditions. This work provides considerable insight into the pitfalls using continuum solvation models, particularly when used for radical species.

  20. pH-responsive ion transport in polyelectrolyte multilayers of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) and poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) (PSS-MA) bearing strong- and weak anionic groups.

    PubMed

    Maza, Eliana; Tuninetti, Jimena S; Politakos, Nikolaos; Knoll, Wolfgang; Moya, Sergio; Azzaroni, Omar

    2015-11-28

    The layer-by-layer construction of interfacial architectures displaying stimuli-responsive control of mass transport is attracting increasing interest in materials science. In this work, we describe the creation of interfacial architectures displaying pH-dependent ionic transport properties which until now have not been observed in polyelectrolyte multilayers. We describe a novel approach to create pH-controlled ion-rectifying systems employing polyelectrolyte multilayers assembled from a copolymer containing both weakly and strongly charged pendant groups, poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) (PSS-MA), alternately deposited with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC). The conceptual framework is based on the very contrasting and differential interactions of PSS and MA units with PDADMAC. In our setting, sulfonate groups play a structural role by conferring stability to the multilayer due to the strong electrostatic interactions with the polycations, while the weakly interacting MA groups remain "silent" within the film and then act as on-demand pH-responsive units. When these multilayers are combined with a strong cationic capping layer that repels the passage of cationic probes, a pH-gateable rectified transport of anions is observed. Concomitantly, we also observed that these functional properties are significantly affected when multilayers are subjected to extensive pH cycling as a consequence of irreversible morphological changes taking place in the film. We envision that the synergy derived from combining weak and strong interactions within the same multilayer will play a key role in the construction of new interfacial architectures displaying tailorable ion transport properties.

  1. Ion-pair mediated transport of small model peptides in liquid phase micro extraction under acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Reubsaet, J Léon E; Paulsen, Jonas V

    2005-02-01

    This paper discusses the behaviour of five small model peptides in a three phase (aqueous donor-organic-aqueous acceptor) liquid phase micro extraction system in relation to their physico-chemical properties (charge, hydrophobicity). It is proved that for all peptides transport over the organic phase is mediated by aliphatic sulphonic acids. Heptane-1-sulphonic acid gave the best overall recoveries. It appeared that peptides with hydrophobic properties (IPI) and a high number of positive charges (KYK) show good recoveries and are enriched in the acceptor phase. Variation in the pH (1.6-4.4) of the donor phase shows that there are peptide-dependent optimal pH-values for their recovery. Increasing pH in the acceptor phase shows that in most cases the recovery decreases due to decreased ion-pair mediated membrane transport. For KYK the partition between the organic phase and the aqueous acceptor-phase is also driven by the solubility in the aqueous acceptor phase. Increase of the ion strength of the acceptor phase did not affect the recovery of the peptides. Except for KYK, which showed decreased recovery when the ion strength increased. Another finding is that delocalisation of positive charge causes bad recovery, probably due to incomplete ion-pair-peptide complex formation.

  2. Flow reactor and triple quadrupole mass spectrometer investigations of negative ion reactions involving nitric acid - Implications for atmospheric HNO3 detection by chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehler, O.; Arnold, F.

    1991-07-01

    The ion-molecule reactions on which Active Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ACIMS) measurements of atmospheric nitric acid are based are presently subjected to product-ion distribution and rate coefficient measurements. The results obtained indicate that while previous stratospheric nitric acid measurements were not impared by collisional dissociation processes, these processes may have played a major role during previous tropospheric measurements: leading to an undereestimation of nitric acid concentrations. A novel ACIMS ion source has been developed in order to avoid these problems.

  3. Central metal ion exchange in a coordination polymer based on lanthanide ions and di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid: exchange rate and tunable affinity.

    PubMed

    Tasaki-Handa, Yuiko; Abe, Yukie; Ooi, Kenta; Tanaka, Mikiya; Wakisaka, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the exchange of lanthanide(III) ions (Ln(3+)) between a solution and a coordination polymer (CP) of di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (Hdehp), [Ln(dehp)3], is studied. Kinetic and selectivity studies suggest that a polymeric network of [Ln(dehp)3] has different characteristics than the corresponding monomeric complex. The reaction rate is remarkably slow and requires over 600 h to reach in nearly equilibrium, and this can be explained by the polymeric crystalline structure and high valency of Ln(3+). The affinity of the exchange reaction reaches a maximum with the Ln(3+) possessing an ionic radius 7% smaller than that of the central Ln(3+), therefore, the affinity of the [Ln(dehp)3] is tunable based on the choice of the central metal ion. Such unique affinity, which differs from the monomeric complex, can be explained by two factors: the coordination preference and steric strain caused by the polymeric structure. The latter likely becomes predominant for Ln(3+) exchange when the ionic radius of the ion in solution is smaller than the original Ln(3+) by more than 7%. Structural studies suggest that the incoming Ln(3+) forms a new phase though an exchange reaction, and this could plausibly cause the structural strain.

  4. Structures, Hydration, and Electrical Mobilities of Bisulfate Ion-Sulfuric Acid-Ammonia/Dimethylamine Clusters: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Tsona, Narcisse T; Henschel, Henning; Bork, Nicolai; Loukonen, Ville; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2015-09-17

    Despite the well-established role of small molecular clusters in the very first steps of atmospheric particle formation, their thermochemical data are still not completely available due to limitation of the experimental techniques to treat such small clusters. We have investigated the structures and the thermochemistry of stepwise hydration of clusters containing one bisulfate ion, sulfuric acid, base (ammonia or dimethylamine), and water molecules using quantum chemical methods. We found that water facilitates proton transfer from sulfuric acid or the bisulfate ion to the base or water molecules, and depending on the hydration level, the sulfate ion was formed in most of the base-containing clusters. The calculated hydration energies indicate that water binds more strongly to ammonia-containing clusters than to dimethylamine-containing and base-free clusters, which results in a wider hydrate distribution for ammonia-containing clusters. The electrical mobilities of all clusters were calculated using a particle dynamics model. The results indicate that the effect of humidity is negligible on the electrical mobilities of molecular clusters formed in the very first steps of atmospheric particle formation. The combination of the results of this study with those previously published on the hydration of neutral clusters by our group provides a comprehensive set of thermochemical data on neutral and negatively charged clusters containing sulfuric acid, ammonia, or dimethylamine.

  5. Improvement of L(+)-Lactic Acid Production of Rhizopus Oryzae by Low-Energy Ions and Analysis of Its Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Chunmei; Yang, Yingge; Fan, Yonghong; Li, Wen; Pan, Renrui; Zheng, Zhiming; Yu, Zengliang

    2008-02-01

    The wild type strain Rhizopus oryzae PW352 was mutated by means of nitrogen ion implantation (15 keV, 7.8 × 1014 ~ 2.08 × 1015 ions/cm2) to find an industrial strain with a higher L(+)-lactic acid yield, and two mutants RE3303 and RF9052 were isolated. In order to discuss the mechanism primarily, Lactate Dehydrogenase of Rhizopus oryzae was studied. While the two mutants produced L(+)-lactic acid by 75% more than the wild strain did, their specific activity of Lactate Dehydrogenase was found to be higher than that in the wild strain. The optimum temperature of Lactate Dehydrogenase in Rhizopus oryzae RF9052 was higher. Compared to the wild strain, the Michaelis constant (Km) value of Lactate Dehydrogenase in the mutants was changed. All these changes show that L(+)-lactic acid production has a correlation with the specific activity of Lactate Dehydrogenase. The low-energy ions, implanted into the strain, may improve the specific activity of Lactate Dehydrogenase by influencing its gene structure and protein structure.

  6. Crystallization of calcium sulfate dihydrate under simulated conditions of phosphoric acid production in the presence of aluminum and magnesium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashad, M. M.; Mahmoud, M. H. H.; Ibrahim, I. A.; Abdel-Aal, E. A.

    2004-06-01

    The effect of Al 3+ and Mg 2+ ions, as additives, on the crystallization of gypsum was studied under simulated conditions of the phosphoric acid production. Calcium hydrogen phosphate and sulfuric acid were mixed with dilute phosphoric acid at 80°C, and the turbidity of the reaction mixture was measured at different time periods to calculate the induction time of gypsum crystals formation. Addition of Al 3+ ions up to 2% decreased the induction time and increased the growth efficiency while addition of Mg 2+ increased the induction time and decreased the growth efficiency compared with in absence of additives. Interestingly, the crystals mean and median diameters were found to increase in the presence of Al 3+ and decrease in the presence of Mg 2+. The surface energy increased with Al 3+ and decreased with Mg 2+ compared to the baseline (without additives). Gypsum morphology changed from needle-like type in absence of additives to thick-rhombic in the presence of Al 3+ ions.

  7. [Effects of thiourea on pH and availability of metal ions in acid red soil].

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Wen; Zeng, Qing-Ru; Zhou, Xi-Hong

    2014-03-01

    Through the simulation research, the effects of application of thiourea and urea on pH and availability of metal ions in acid red soil were studied, and the results showed that after applying urea, the soil pH increased in the first experimental stage and then reduced gradually to a low level, however, decreased trends of soil pH values were inhibited by the application of thiourea, especially when the concentration of thiourea reached to 5.0 mmol x kg(-1) dry soil, the soil pH was stable at high level, which exceeded to 6.0. It proved that the application of thiourea could inhibit the soil acidification due to urea application. After applying urea with different concentrations of thiourea, the available contents of Zn and Al decreased with the increasing concentration of thiourea, nevertheless, when the concentration of thiourea reached to 5.0 mmol x kg(-1), the available content of Mn was stable at high level which was over 110 mg x kg(-1). In addition, the results showed a highly significant negative correlation between the soil pH and the available content of Cu, Zn and Al, but for Mn, no discipline was found between the soil pH and the availability after applying thiourea. Moreover, the soil pH became higher after applying urea with thiourea compared to add urea only, which led to the decreasing of available content of Al, and it was benefited for the control of the phytotoxic effect of Al. The available content of Mn in the soil not only depended on soil pH but also the content of thiourea due to its redox and complexing reaction with Mn.

  8. New transition metal ion complexes with benzimidazole-5-carboxylic acid hydrazides with antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Galal, Shadia A; Hegab, Khaled H; Kassab, Ahmed S; Rodriguez, Mireya L; Kerwin, Sean M; el-Khamry, Abdel-Mo'men A; el-Diwani, Hoda I

    2009-04-01

    Metal complexes of 2-methyl-1H-benzimidazole-5-carboxylic acid hydrazide (4a; L(1)) and its Schiff base 2-methyl-N-(propan-2-ylidene)-1H-benzimidazole-5-carbohydrazide (5a; L(2)) with transition metal ions e.g., copper, silver, nickel, iron and manganese were prepared. The complexes formed were 1:1 or 1:2 M:L complexes and have the structural formulae [Cu(L(1))Cl(H(2)O)]Cl x 3 H(2)O (6), [Ag(L(1))NO(3)(H(2)O)] (7), [Ni(L(1))Cl(2)(H(2)O)(2)] x H(2)O (8), [Fe(L(1))Cl(3)(H(2)O)] x 3 H(2)O (9) and [Mn(L(1))(2)Cl(H(2)O)]Cl x 3 H(2)O (10) for ligand L(1), and [Cu(L(2))Cl(2)(H(2)O)(2)] x H(2)O (11), [Ag(L(2))(2)]NO(3) x H(2)O (12), [Ni(L(2))(2)Cl(2)] x 5 H(2)O (13), [Fe(L(2))(2)Cl(2)]Cl x 2 H(2)O (14) and [Mn(L(2))Cl(2)(H(2)O)(2)] x H(2)O (15) for ligand L(2). The antitumor activity of the synthesized compounds has been studied. The silver complex 7 was found to display cytotoxicity (IC(50)=2 microM) against both human lung cancer cell line A549 and human breast cancer cell line MCF-7.

  9. Ion-transfer voltammetric determination of folic acid at meso-liquid-liquid interface arrays.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuheng; Gao, Kui; Hu, Daopan; Wang, Huanhuan; Bian, Shujuan; Chen, Yong

    2015-04-21

    Voltammetric studies on the simple ion transfer (IT) behaviors of an important water-soluble B-vitamin, folic acid (FA), at the liquid-liquid (L-L) interface were firstly performed and then applied as a novel detection method for FA under physiological conditions. Meso-water-1,6-dichlorohexane (W-DCH) and meso-water-organogel interface arrays were built by using a hybrid mesoporous silica membrane (HMSM) with a unique structure of pores-in-pores and employed as the new platforms for the IT voltammetric study. In view of the unique structure of the HMSM, the impact of the ionic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), self-assembled within the silica nanochannels of the HMSM, was investigated. In particular, its effect on the IT voltammetric behavior and detection of FA at meso-L-L interface arrays was systematically examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and differential pulse stripping voltammetry (DPSV). It was found that all the voltammetric responses of CV, DPV, and DPSV and the corresponding detection limit of FA at such meso-L-L interface arrays are closely related to the CTAB in the HMSM. Significantly, the calculated detection limit of FA could be improved to 80 nM after the combination of the DPSV technique with the additional preconcentration of FA in the silica-CTAB nanochannels, achieved through an anion-exchange process between FA(-) and the bromide of CTAB in HMSM. This provides a new and attractive strategy for the detection of those biological anions.

  10. Improvement of the Power Control Unit for Ion Thruster to Cope with Milli-Newton Range RIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceruti, Luca; Polli, Aldo; Galantini, Paolo

    2014-08-01

    The recent development and testing activities of a miniaturized Radio-Frequency Ion Thruster, with relevant ancillary elements, in the range of 10 to 100 micro-Newtons, joined with past flight heritage in the milli-Newton range (RIT-10 for Artemis), shows an appealing capability of such an electrical propulsion technology to support thrust in a wide range of space applications from very fine attitude control up to deorbiting of small-medium satellites. As expectable, this implies that the mentioned ancillary elements (mainly Radio-Frequency Generator and Power Control Unit) require adaptation to the different requirements imposed to different missions and thrust ranges. Regarding the Power Control Unit different power levels, both the controllability requirements and the spacecraft interfaces impose non negligible adaptation leading to significant increase of development activities and associated cost (nonrecurring) increase. From that and with the main purpose to minimize such impacts and provide reliable equipments, Selex ES since a few years is devoting maximum attention in the incremental innovation of the existing design in order to maximize their reuse.

  11. Formation of [b3 - 1 + cat]+ ions from metal-cationized tetrapeptides containing beta-alanine, gamma-aminobutyric acid or epsilon-aminocaproic acid residues.

    PubMed

    Osburn, Sandra M; Ochola, Sila O; Talaty, Erach R; Van Stipdonk, Michael J

    2008-11-01

    The presence and position of a single beta-alanine (betaA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (gammaABu) or epsilon-aminocaproic acid (Cap) residue has been shown to have a significant influence on the formation of b(n)+ and y(n)+ product ions from a series of model, protonated peptides. In this study, we examined the effect of the same residues on the formation of analogous [b3 - 1 + cat]+ products from metal (Li+, Na+ and Ag+)-cationized peptides. The larger amino acids suppress formation of b3+ from protonated peptides with general sequence AAXG (where X = beta-alanine, gamma-aminobutyric acid or epsilon-aminocaproic acid), presumably because of the prohibitive effect of larger cyclic intermediates in the 'oxazolone' pathway. However, abundant [b3 - 1 + cat]+ products are generated from metal-cationized versions of AAXG. Using a group of deuterium-labeled and exchanged peptides, we found that formation of [b3 - 1 + cat]+ involves transfer of either amide or alpha-carbon position H atoms, and the tendency to transfer the atom from the alpha-carbon position increases with the size of the amino acid in position X. To account for the transfer of the H atom, a mechanism involving formation of a ketene product as [b3 - 1 + cat]+ is proposed.

  12. Collision-induced dissociation of fatty acid [M - 2H + Na]- ions: charge-directed fragmentation and assignment of double bond position.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael C; Altvater, Jens; Gallagher, Thomas J; Nette, Geoffrey W

    2014-11-01

    The collision-induced dissociation (CID) of cationic fatty acid-metal ion complexes has been extensively studied and, in general, provides rich structural information. In particular, charge-remote fragmentation processes are commonly observed allowing the assignment of double bond position. In a previous manuscript, we presented two methods to doubly deprotonate polyunsaturated fatty acids to form anionic fatty acid-sodium ion complexes, referred to as [M - 2H + Na] (-) ions. In the current manuscript, the CID behavior of these [M - 2H + Na] (-) ions is investigated for the first time. Significantly, we also present a deuterium-labeling experiment, which excludes the possibility that deprotonation occurs predominately at the α-carbon in the formation of fatty acid [M - H + NaF](-) ions. This supports our original proposal where deprotonation occurs at the bis-allylic positions of polyunsaturated fatty acids. CID spectra of polyunsaturated fatty acid [M - 2H + Na](-) ions display abundant product ions arising from acyl chain cleavages. Through the examination of fatty acid isomers, it is demonstrated that double bond position may be unequivocally determined for methylene-interrupted polyunsaturated fatty acids with three or more carbon-carbon double bonds. In addition, CID of [M - 2H + Na](-) ions was applied to 18:3 isomers of Nannochloropsis oculata and three isomers were tentatively identified: ∆(9,12,15)18:3, ∆(6,9,12)18:3, and ∆(5,8,11)18:3. We propose that structurally-informative product ions are formed via charge-driven fragmentation processes at the site of the resonance-stabilized carbanion as opposed to charge-remote fragmentation processes, which could be inferred if deprotonation occurred predominately at the α-carbon.

  13. Silylium ion-catalyzed challenging Diels-Alder reactions: the danger of hidden proton catalysis with strong Lewis acids.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ruth K; Müther, Kristine; Mück-Lichtenfeld, Christian; Grimme, Stefan; Oestreich, Martin

    2012-03-07

    The pronounced Lewis acidity of tricoordinate silicon cations brings about unusual reactivity in Lewis acid catalysis. The downside of catalysis with strong Lewis acids is, though, that these do have the potential to mediate the formation of protons by various mechanisms, and the thus released Brønsted acid might even outcompete the Lewis acid as the true catalyst. That is an often ignored point. One way of eliminating a hidden proton-catalyzed pathway is to add a proton scavenger. The low-temperature Diels-Alder reactions catalyzed by our ferrocene-stabilized silicon cation are such a case where the possibility of proton catalysis must be meticulously examined. Addition of the common hindered base 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine resulted, however, in slow decomposition along with formation of the corresponding pyridinium ion. Quantitative deprotonation of the silicon cation was observed with more basic (Mes)(3)P to yield the phosphonium ion. A deuterium-labeling experiment verified that the proton is abstracted from the ferrocene backbone. A reasonable mechanism of the proton formation is proposed on the basis of quantum-chemical calculations. This is, admittedly, a particular case but suggests that the use of proton scavengers must be carefully scrutinized, as proton formation might be provoked rather than prevented. Proton-catalyzed Diels-Alder reactions are not well-documented in the literature, and a representative survey employing TfOH is included here. The outcome of these catalyses is compared with our silylium ion-catalyzed Diels-Alder reactions, thereby clearly corroborating that hidden Brønsted acid catalysis is not operating with our Lewis acid. Several simple-looking but challenging Diels-Alder reactions with exceptionally rare dienophile/enophile combinations are reported. Another indication is obtained from the chemoselectivity of the catalyses. The silylium ion-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction is general with regard to the oxidation level of the

  14. Size distributions of nano/micron dicarboxylic acids and inorganic ions in suburban PM episode and non-episodic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Li-Ying; Kuo, Su-Ching; Chen, Chien-Lung; Tsai, Ying I.

    The distribution of nano/micron dicarboxylic acids and inorganic ions in size-segregated suburban aerosol of southern Taiwan was studied for a PM episode and a non-episodic pollution period, revealing for the first time the distribution of these nanoscale particles in suburban aerosols. Inorganic species, especially nitrate, were present in higher concentrations during the PM episode. A combination of gas-to-nuclei conversion of nitrate particles and accumulation of secondary photochemical products originating from traffic-related emissions was likely a crucial cause of the PM episode. Sulfate, ammonium, and oxalic acid were the dominant anion, cation, and dicarboxylic acid, respectively, accounting for a minimum of 49% of the total anion, cation or dicarboxylic acid mass. Peak concentrations of these species occurred at 0.54 μm in the droplet mode during both non-episodic and PM episode periods, indicating an association with cloud-processed particles. On average, sulfate concentration was 16-17 times that of oxalic acid. Oxalic acid was nevertheless the most abundant dicarboxylic acid during both periods, followed by succinic, malonic, maleic, malic and tartaric acid. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of oxalic acid was 0.77 μm with a bi-modal presence at 0.54 μm and 18 nm during non-episodic pollution and an MMAD of 0.67 μm with mono-modal presence at 0.54 μm in PM episode aerosol. The concomitant formation of malonic acid and oxalic acid was attributed to in-cloud processes. During the PM episode in the 5-100 nm nanoscale range, an oxalic acid/sulfate mass ratio of 40.2-82.3% suggested a stronger formation potential for oxalic acid than for sulfate in the nuclei mode. For total cations (TC), total inorganic anions (TIA) and total dicarboxylic acids (TDA), major contributing particles were in the droplet mode, with least in the nuclei mode. The ratio of TDA to TIA in the nuclei mode increased greatly from 8.40% during the non-episodic pollution

  15. Determination of trace levels of haloacetic acids and perchlorate in drinking water by ion chromatography with direct injection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongjian; Mou, Shifen

    2003-05-16

    Disinfection by products of haloacetic acids and perchlorate pose significant health risks, even at low microg/l levels in drinking water. A new method for the simultaneous determination of nine haloacetic acids (HAAs) and perchlorate as well as some common anions in one run with ion chromatography was developed. The HAAs tested included mono-, di-, trichloroacetic acids, mono, di-, tribromoacetic acids, bromochloroacetic acid, dibromochloroacetic acid, and bromodichloroacetic acid. Two high-capacity anion-exchange columns, a carbonate-selective column and a hydroxide-selective hydrophilic one, were used for the investigation. With the carbonate-selective column, the nine HAAs as well as fluoride, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, phosphate and sulfate could be well separated and determined in one run. With the very hydrophilic column and a gradient elution of sodium hydroxide, methanol and deionized water, the nine HAAs, fluoride, chloride, nitrite, nitrate as well as perchlorate could be simultaneously determined in one run within 34 min. The detection limits for HAAs were between 1.11 and 9.32 microg/l. For perchlorate, it was 0.60 microg/l.

  16. Effects of metal ions on lipid peroxidation in cultured rat hepatocytes loaded with alpha-linolenic acid.

    PubMed

    Furono, K; Suetsuga, T; Sugihara, N

    1996-06-07

    We investigated the ability of various redox-active metal ions to induce lipid peroxidation in normal and alpha-linolenic acid-loaded (LNA-loaded) cultured rat hepatocytes. Lipid peroxidation was estimated by the accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the culture medium. At low concentrations induction was highest with ferrous ions (Fe), whereas at high concentrations, vanadium (V) and copper ions (Cu) had the greatest effect on both groups of hepatocytes. With any one of the three metal ions, the extent of lipid peroxidation in LNA-loaded hepatocytes was several times greater compared to normal cells. In addition, upon the addition of Fe or V, LNA-loaded hepatocytes were injured whereas normal cells were not. The addition of Cu caused substantial cell injury in normal hepatocytes, and even greater injury in LNA-loaded cells. The prevention of lipid peroxidation in LNA-loaded hepatocytes by addition of an antioxidant like N,N'-diphenyl-p-phenylene-diamine (DPPD) almost completely prevented Fe- and V-induced cell injury, and reduced Cu-induced cell injury. alpha-Tocopherol behaved in a way similar to but less effective than DPPD. .OH radical scavengers such as mannitol and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) had no effect on lipid peroxidation induced by any metal ions in LNA-loaded hepatocytes. Addition of cadmium ions (Cd), which required the lowest concentration to cause cell injury, induced a slight increase in lipid peroxidation in normal hepatocytes, but did not induce lipid peroxidation to the same extent as seen in LNA-loaded cells treated with any of the three metal ions already mentioned. The inhibition of lipid peroxidation by DPPD scarcely protected LNA-loaded hepatocytes from Cd-induced cell injury. None of the other metal ions including aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and tin (Sn) ions, effectively induced lipid peroxidation in either group of hepatocytes, except cobalt ions (Co), which had a peroxidative effect in LNA

  17. An ion-exchange nanomembrane sensor for detection of nucleic acids using a surface charge inversion phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Satyajyoti; Slouka, Zdenek; Shah, Sunny S; Behura, Susanta K; Shi, Zonggao; Stack, M Sharon; Severson, David W; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2014-10-15

    We present a novel low-cost biosensor for rapid, sensitive and selective detection of nucleic acids based on an ionic diode feature of an anion exchange nanoporous membrane under DC bias. The ionic diode feature is associated with external surface charge inversion on the positively charged anion exchange nanomembrane upon hybridization of negatively charged nucleic acid molecules to single-stranded oligoprobes functionalized on the membrane surface resulting in the formation of a cation selective monolayer. The resulting bipolar membrane causes a transition from electroconvection-controlled to water-splitting controlled ion conductance, with a large ion current signature that can be used to accurately quantify the hybridized nucleic acids. The platform is capable of distinguishing two base-pair mismatches in a 22-base pairing segment of microRNAs associated with oral cancer, as well as serotype-specific detection of dengue virus. We also show the sensor' capability to selectively capture target nucleic acids from a heterogeneous mixture. The limit of detection is 1 pM for short 27 base target molecules in a 15-min assay. Similar hybridization results are shown for short DNA molecules as well as RNAs from Brucella and Escherichia coli. The versatility and simplicity of this low-cost biosensor should enable point-of-care diagnostics in food, medical and environmental safety markets.

  18. The fluorescence of a chelating two-photon-absorbing dye is enhanced with the addition of transition metal ions but quenched in the presence of acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, David J.; Long, Stephanie L.; Yu, Zhenning; Kannan, Ramamurthi; Mikhailov, Alexandr; Rebane, Aleksander; Tan, Loon-Seng; Haley, Joy E.

    2016-09-01

    A pseudo-symmetric two-photon absorbing dye (1) containing a central piperazine unit substituted with (benzothiazol-2- yl)-9,9-diethylfluoren-2-yl pendant groups has been synthesized and characterized. The molecule has a two-photonabsorption cross-section of σ2 = 140 GM in tetrahydrofuran at 740 nm and shows significant solvatochromism in the excited-state fluorescence spectra. The emission spectra broaden and the maxima bathochromically shift from 411 nm to 524 nm in n-hexane and acetonitrile, respectively. Moreover, the central piperazine moiety serves as a potential chelation site for ions. Addition of copper(I) hexafluorophosphate and zinc(II) triflate in acetonitrile indicate ground-state complexation with a shift in the emission maximum from 524 nm to 489 nm and 487 nm, respectively. Interestingly, the newly formed Cu and Zn complexes are more strongly emissive than the free dye. Finally, addition of p-toluenesulfonic acid in tetrahydrofuran also blue-shifts the emission maximum, but the intensity is quenched. Due to the photophysical changes induced by addition of metal ions and protons, the dye shows promise as a potential sensor.

  19. Behavior of transplutonium elements on ion-exchange materials in mixed aqueous-organic solutions of mineral acids

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirov, G.S.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-03-01

    Systematic studies are reported on the behavior of transplutonium elements (TPE) on cation-exchange and anion-exchange materials in mixed aqueous-organic solutions of mineral acids (HClO/sub 4/, HCl, HNO/sub 3/, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/) as affected by solution composition, nature of acid, and nature of organic solvent. With all these acids, replacing most of the water by alcohol increases the TPE uptake on the ion exchangers, and the effect occurs for the cation exchangers at lower contents of the organic component. Optimum conditions have been identified for concentrating and separating TPE from numerous elements. The most effective system consists of anion exchanger with HNO/sub 3/ and alcohol.

  20. P Limitation and Microbial Biogeochemistry in Acidic Forest Soils of the Northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smemo, K. A.; Deforest, J. L.; Burke, D. J.; Elliot, H. L.; Kluber, L. A.; Carrino-Kyker, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    In forest ecosystems with acidic soils, such as many hardwood forests of the Northeastern United States, net primary productivity should be limited by phosphorus (P) because P is biologically less available at pH < 5 and nitrogen (N) has become more abundant in response to anthropogenic inputs. However, previous studies have failed to demonstrate widespread P limitation in temperate forests that have naturally acidic soil or are exposed to chronic acid deposition; such findings are contrary to biogeochemical expectations. We hypothesize that many eastern forests possess an underlying P limitation not realized at the ecosystem level. Instead, shifts in the composition, structure and function of soil microbial communities compensate by acquiring more P from organic sources and P limitation is therefore not manifested at the aboveground (plant) level. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated soil pH and P availability in 72 20 x 40 m mature hardwood forest plots across northeastern (glaciated) and southeastern (unglaciated) Ohio beginning in late summer 2009. Ten months after treatment initiation, soil pH has increased from 4.5 to 5.5 and soil P has increased from 3 to ~25 mg P/kg soil on glaciated soils and from 0.5 to ~5 mg P/kg soil on unglaciated soils. To quantify treatment responses, we measured the activity of soil extracellular enzymes associated with liberation of P, N, and C from organic matter, as well as pools of N and N cycling processes. We saw no significant effects of our treatments on pools of available ammonium or nitrate, nor did we see effects on net N mineralization and net nitrification rates. However, glaciated soils had significantly greater nitrate pools and higher N cycling rates than older unglaciated soils. Nitrogen and C cycling enzymes in treatment plots were not significantly different than control plots, but N-acetylglucosaminidase activity (N acquisition) was significantly greater in the unglaciated soils and β-glucosidase and

  1. A self-charging power unit by integration of a textile triboelectric nanogenerator and a flexible lithium-ion battery for wearable electronics.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xiong; Li, Linxuan; Song, Huanqiao; Du, Chunhua; Zhao, Zhengfu; Jiang, Chunyan; Cao, Guozhong; Hu, Weiguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-04-17

    A novel integrated power unit realizes both energy harvesting and energy storage by a textile triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG)-cloth and a flexible lithium-ion battery (LIB) belt, respectively. The mechanical energy of daily human motion is converted into electricity by the TENG-cloth, sustaining the energy of the LIB belt to power wearable smart electronics.

  2. Effects of acidic pH on voltage-gated ion channels in rat trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jin-Eon; Cho, Jin-Hwa; Choi, In-Sun; Kim, Do-Yeon

    2017-01-01

    The effects of acidic pH on several voltage-dependent ion channels, such as voltage-dependent K+ and Ca2+ channels, and hyperpolarization-gated and cyclic nucleotide-activated cation (HCN) channels, were examined using a whole-cell patch clamp technique on mechanically isolated rat mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neurons. The application of a pH 6.5 solution had no effect on the peak amplitude of voltage-dependent K+ currents. A pH 6.0 solution slightly, but significantly inhibited the peak amplitude of voltage-dependent K+ currents. The pH 6.0 also shifted both the current-voltage and conductance-voltage relationships to the depolarization range. The application of a pH 6.5 solution scarcely affected the peak amplitude of membrane currents mediated by HCN channels, which were profoundly inhibited by the general HCN channel blocker Cs+ (1 mM). However, the pH 6.0 solution slightly, but significantly inhibited the peak amplitude of HCN-mediated currents. Although the pH 6.0 solution showed complex modulation of the current-voltage and conductance-voltage relationships, the midpoint voltages for the activation of HCN channels were not changed by acidic pH. On the other hand, voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels were significantly inhibited by an acidic pH. The application of an acidic pH solution significantly shifted the current-voltage and conductance-voltage relationships to the depolarization range. The modulation of several voltage-dependent ion channels by an acidic pH might affect the excitability of mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neurons, and thus physiological functions mediated by the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus could be affected in acidic pH conditions. PMID:28280415

  3. Neural tube defects and maternal folate intake among pregnancies conceived after folic acid fortification in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Bridget S; Cleves, Mario A; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Shaw, Gary M; Canfield, Mark A; Waller, D Kim; Werler, Martha M; Hobbs, Charlotte A

    2009-01-01

    Rates of neural tube defects have decreased since folic acid fortification of the food supply in the United States. The authors' objective was to evaluate the associations between neural tube defects and maternal folic acid intake among pregnancies conceived after fortification. This is a multicenter, case-control study that uses data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, 1998-2003. Logistic regression was used to compute crude and adjusted odds ratios between cases and controls assessing maternal periconceptional use of folic acid and intake of dietary folic acid. Among 180 anencephalic cases, 385 spina bifida cases, and 3, 963 controls, 21.1%, 25.2%, and 26.1%, respectively, reported periconceptional use of folic acid supplements. Periconceptional supplement use did not reduce the risk of having a pregnancy affected by a neural tube defect. Maternal intake of dietary folate was not significantly associated with neural tube defects. In this study conducted among pregnancies conceived after mandatory folic acid fortification, the authors found little evidence of an association between neural tube defects and maternal folic acid intake. A possible explanation is that folic acid fortification reduced the occurrence of folic acid-sensitive neural tube defects. Further investigation is warranted to possibly identify women who remain at increased risk of preventable neural tube defects.

  4. Effects of nanoscale aggregation on mechanical properties and local dynamics of precise acid- and ion-containing polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Luri Robert

    Acid- and ion-containing polymers have interchain interactions that alter polymer behavior at the nano, micro, and bulk length scales. Strong secondary-bonds act as thermo-reversible physical crosslinks between chains which drive self-assembly. Tuning theses interactions can modify bulk polymer properties including stiffness, toughness, melt viscosity, resilience, clarity, abrasion resistance and puncture resistance. Furthermore, understanding and improving the relevant factors that control transport properties would have vast implications on developing solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) for technologically important applications including water desalination, ion exchange membranes and microelectronics. This thesis explores the structure - processing - morphology - property relationships of acid and ionic functionalized polymers. Improvements in synthetic techniques and advancements in characterization methods have enabled new studies of associating polymer systems. Synthesis of entangled, high molecular weight, linear polyethylene (PE) chains functionalized with interacting pendant groups (acidic or ionic) placed periodically along the polymer backbone represent a new class of associating polymers. These polymers with periodic distributions of acid groups are much more homogenous than the commercially available polymers. Previous studies of these polymers with greater structural homogeneity revealed great variety in morphologies of the nano-aggregated polar groups within the non-polar polymer matrix. This thesis correlated the morphologies with bulk properties through real-time X-ray scattering and tensile deformation at a range of temperatures and sample compositions. New, transient morphologies and hierarchical morphologies were observed which coincided with unusual tensile strain hardening. These results indicate that improvements in synthetic control of polymers can enhance physical properties such as tensile strain-hardening, through cooperative bonding

  5. Counting the number of magnesium ions bound to the surface-immobilized thymine oligonucleotides that comprise spherical nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Walter, Stephanie R; Young, Kaylie L; Holland, Joseph G; Gieseck, Richard L; Mirkin, Chad A; Geiger, Franz M

    2013-11-20

    Label-free studies carried out under aqueous phase conditions quantify the number of Mg(2+) ions binding to surface-immobilized T40 sequences, the subsequent reordering of DNA on the surface, and the consequences of Mg(2+) binding for DNA-DNA interactions. Second harmonic generation measurements indicate that, within error, 18-20 Mg(2+) ions are bound to the T40 strand at saturation and that the metal-DNA interaction is associated with a near 30% length contraction of the strand. Structural reordering, evaluated using vibrational sum frequency generation, atomic force microscopy, and dynamic light scattering, is attributed to increased charge screening as the Mg(2+) ions bind to the negatively charged DNA, reducing repulsive Coulomb forces between nucleotides and allowing the DNA single strands to collapse or coil upon themselves. The impact of Mg(2+) binding on DNA hybridization and duplex stability is assessed with spherical nucleic acid (SNA) gold nanoparticle conjugates in order to determine an optimal working range of Mg(2+) concentrations for DNA-DNA interactions in the absence of NaCl. The findings are consistent with a charge titration effect in which, in the absence of NaCl, (1) hybridization does not occur at room temperature if an average of 17.5 or less Mg(2+) ions are bound per T40 strand, which is not reached until the bulk Mg(2+) concentration approaches 0.5 mM; (2) hybridization proceeds, albeit with low duplex stability having an average Tm of 31(3)°C, if an average of 17.5-18.0 Mg(2+) ions are bound; and (3) highly stable duplexes having a Tm of 64(2)°C form if 18.5-19.0 Mg(2+) ions are bound, corresponding to saturation of the T40 strand.

  6. Gas chromatography and silver-ion high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of conjugated linoleic acid isomers in free fatty acid form using sulphuric acid in methanol as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Luna, Pilar; Juárez, Manuela; de la Fuente, Miguel Angel

    2008-09-12

    This study used GC and silver-ion HPLC to examine the effects of temperature and time on methylation of individual and mixtures of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers in free fatty acid form using sulphuric acid as catalyst. In the conditions tested (temperatures between 20 and 50 degrees C and times between 10 and 60 min) methylation was complete while avoiding isomerization of conjugated dienes and the formation of artefacts that could interfere with chromatographic determinations. An analytical method using solvent extraction of the lipids followed by selective elution of the free fatty acids from aminopropyl bonded phase columns and methylation with H(2)SO(4) in mild conditions was then applied to determine the CLA isomers in free fatty acid form in rumen fluid, and the results were evaluated.

  7. Extraction of Lanthanide and Actinide Ions from Aqueous Mixtures Using a Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Porous Aromatic Framework.

    PubMed

    Demir, Selvan; Brune, Nicholas K; Van Humbeck, Jeffrey F; Mason, Jarad A; Plakhova, Tatiana V; Wang, Shuao; Tian, Guoxin; Minasian, Stefan G; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Tohru; Kalmykov, Stepan N; Shiwaku, Hideaki; Shuh, David K; Long, Jeffrey R

    2016-04-27

    Porous aromatic frameworks (PAFs) incorporating a high concentration of acid functional groups possess characteristics that are promising for use in separating lanthanide and actinide metal ions, as required in the treatment of radioactive waste. These materials have been shown to be indefinitely stable to concentrated acids and bases, potentially allowing for multiple adsorption/stripping cycles. Additionally, the PAFs combine exceptional features from MOFs and inorganic/activated carbons giving rise to tunable pore surfaces and maximum chemical stability. Herein, we present a study of the adsorption of selected metal ions, Sr(2+), Fe(3+), Nd(3+), and Am(3+), from aqueous solutions employing a carbon-based porous aromatic framework, BPP-7 (Berkeley Porous Polymer-7). This material displays high metal loading capacities together with excellent adsorption selectivity for neodymium over strontium based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms and ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) calculations. Based in part upon X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, the stronger adsorption of neodymium is attributed to multiple metal ion and binding site interactions resulting from the densely functionalized and highly interpenetrated structure of BPP-7. Recyclability and combustibility experiments demonstrate that multiple adsorption/stripping cycles can be completed with minimal degradation of the polymer adsorption capacity.

  8. Extraction of Lanthanide and Actinide Ions from Aqueous Mixtures Using a Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Porous Aromatic Framework

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Porous aromatic frameworks (PAFs) incorporating a high concentration of acid functional groups possess characteristics that are promising for use in separating lanthanide and actinide metal ions, as required in the treatment of radioactive waste. These materials have been shown to be indefinitely stable to concentrated acids and bases, potentially allowing for multiple adsorption/stripping cycles. Additionally, the PAFs combine exceptional features from MOFs and inorganic/activated carbons giving rise to tunable pore surfaces and maximum chemical stability. Herein, we present a study of the adsorption of selected metal ions, Sr2+, Fe3+, Nd3+, and Am3+, from aqueous solutions employing a carbon-based porous aromatic framework, BPP-7 (Berkeley Porous Polymer-7). This material displays high metal loading capacities together with excellent adsorption selectivity for neodymium over strontium based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms and ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) calculations. Based in part upon X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, the stronger adsorption of neodymium is attributed to multiple metal ion and binding site interactions resulting from the densely functionalized and highly interpenetrated structure of BPP-7. Recyclability and combustibility experiments demonstrate that multiple adsorption/stripping cycles can be completed with minimal degradation of the polymer adsorption capacity. PMID:27163056

  9. Effects of pH adjustment and sodium ions on sour taste intensity of organic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protonated organic acid species have been shown to be the primary stimuli responsible for sour taste of organic acids. However, we have observed that sour taste may be modulated when the pH of acid solutions is raised using sodium hydroxide. Objectives were to evaluate the effect of pH adjustment on...

  10. Skin lipids: localization of ceramide and fatty acid in the unit cell of the long periodicity phase.

    PubMed

    Mojumdar, Enamul H; Gooris, Gert S; Barlow, David J; Lawrence, M Jayne; Deme, Bruno; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2015-06-02

    The lipid matrix of the skin's stratum corneum plays a key role in the barrier function, which protects the body from desiccation. The lipids that make up this matrix consist of ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids, and can form two coexisting crystalline lamellar phases: the long periodicity phase (LPP) and the short periodicity phase (SPP). To fully understand the skin barrier function, information on the molecular arrangement of the lipids in the unit cell of these lamellar phases is very desirable. To determine this arrangement in previous studies, we examined the molecular arrangement of the SPP. In this study, neutron diffraction studies were performed to obtain information on the molecular arrangement of the LPP. The diffraction pattern reveals nine diffraction orders attributed to the LPP with a repeating unit of 129.4 ± 0.5 Å. Using D2O/H2O contrast variation, the scattering length density profiles were calculated for protiated samples and samples that included either the perdeuterated acyl chain of the most abundant ceramide or the most abundant perdeuterated fatty acid. Both perdeuterated chains are predominantly located in the central part of the unit cell with substantial interdigitation of the acyl chains in the unit cell center. However, a fraction of the perdeuterated chains is also located near the border of the unit cell with their acyl chains directing toward the center. This arrangement of lipids in the LPP unit cell corresponds with the location of their lipid headgroups at the border and also inside of the unit cell at a well-defined position (±21 Å from the unit cell center), indicative of a three-layer lipid arrangement within the 129.4 ± 0.5 Å repeating unit.

  11. Yeast and lactic acid flora of tej, an indigenous Ethiopian honey wine: variations within and between production units.

    PubMed

    Bahiru, Bekele; Mehari, Tetemke; Ashenafi, Mogessie

    2006-05-01

    A total of 200 samples of tej, an indigenous Ethiopian honey wine, were collected from ten production units at different production times. The samples were analysed for their microbial flora. Mean counts of aerobic mesophilic bacteria and aerobic spores for the different production units were <3 log cfu/ml. Coliforms and other members of Enterobacteriaceae were below detectable levels basically due to the low pH of the samples (<4.0). Yeasts were among the dominant micro-organisms in all samples with mean counts of 6 log cfu/ml for all production units. Over 25% of the yeast isolates belonged to Saccharomyces cerevisiae followed by Kluyvermyces bulgaricus (16%), Debaromyces phaffi (14%) and K. veronae (10%). Yeast counts showed significant variation within samples of a production unit (CV>10%) and difference in counts among all samples was also significant (P<0.01). The lactic acid bacteria had counts of 6 log cfu/ml with a significant variation within samples of a production unit (CV>10%) or among all samples (P<0.01). In most production units, the heterolactics had higher counts than the homolactics. The lactic flora consisted of Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Leuconostoc and Pediococcus species. The lactobacilli were, however, the most frequently encountered groups. In most of the samples, the lactic flora was dominated by two (49.5%) or three (46%) groups of lactic acid bacteria.

  12. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of amino acids assisted by gold nanoparticles and Gd(3+) ions.

    PubMed

    López-Neira, Juan Pablo; Galicia-Hernández, José Mario; Reyes-Coronado, Alejandro; Pérez, Elías; Castillo-Rivera, Francisco

    2015-05-07

    The surface enhanced raman scattering (SERS) signal from the l-tyrosine (tyr) molecule adsorbed on gold nanoparticles (Au-tyr) is compared with the SERS signal assisted by the presence of gadolinium ions (Gd(3+)) coordinated with the Au-tyr system. An enhancement factor of the SERS signal in the presence of Gd(3+) ions was ∼5 times higher than that produced by l-tyrosine adsorbed on gold nanoparticles. The enhancement of the SERS signal can be attributed to a corresponding increase in the local electric field due to the presence of Gd(3+) ions in the vicinity of a gold dimer configuration. This scenario was confirmed by solving numerically Maxwell equations, showing an increase of 1 order of magnitude in the local electric scattered field when the Gd(3+) ion is located in between a gold dimer compared with naked gold nanoparticles.

  13. Low-damage milling of an amino acid thin film with cluster ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hada, Masaki; Ibuki, Sachi; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Matsuo, Jiro; Hontani, Yusaku; Yamamoto, Yasuyuki; Ichiki, Kazuya; Seki, Toshio; Aoki, Takaaki

    2011-11-01

    In this work, we characterized the surface damage layer and sputtering yield of polycrystalline L-leucine films before and after irradiation with Ar cluster or monomer ion beams with x ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ellipsometry. Irradiation with Ar monomer ion beams induced heavy damage on the surface of L-leucine films, such as bond breaking and carbonization. In contrast, no significant surface damage was observed in the films irradiated with Ar cluster ion beams. The sputtering yield of L-leucine decreased dramatically with increasing fluence of monomer Ar ions and approached the value of the sputtering yield of graphite; but under irradiation with Ar cluster ion beams, the sputtering yield remained constant with fluence. The differences in sputtering yield behavior were explained in relation with the surface damage layer on organic materials. Thus, cluster ion beams could potentially be used to mill down biological materials without significant damage on the surface and could contribute to various applications in the analysis and processing of life matter.

  14. New Insight into Metal Ion-Driven Catalysis of Nucleic Acids by Influenza PA-Nter

    PubMed Central

    Kotlarek, Daria; Worch, Remigiusz

    2016-01-01

    PA subunit of influenza RNA-dependent RNA polymerase deserves constantly increasing attention due to its essential role in influenza life cycle. N-terminal domain of PA (PA-Nter) harbors endonuclease activity, which is indispensable in viral transcription and replication. Interestingly, existing literature reports on in vitro ion preferences of the enzyme are contradictory. Some show PA-Nter activity exclusively with Mn2+, whereas others report Mg2+ as a natural cofactor. To clarify it, we performed a series of experiments with varied ion concentrations and substrate type. We observed cleavage in the presence of both ions, with a slight preference for manganese, however PA-Nter activity highly depended on the amount of residual, co-purified ions. Furthermore, to quantify cleavage reaction rate, we applied fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS), providing highly sensitive and real-time monitoring of single molecules. Using nanomolar ssDNA in the regime of enzyme excess, we estimated the maximum reaction rate at 0.81± 0.38 and 1.38± 0.34 nM/min for Mg2+ and Mn2+, respectively. However, our calculations of PA-Nter ion occupancy, based on thermodynamic data, suggest Mg2+ to be a canonical metal in PA-Nter processing of RNA in vivo. Presented studies constitute a step toward better understanding of PA-Nter ion-dependent activity, which will possibly contribute to new successful inhibitor design in the future. PMID:27300442

  15. Selective recovery of Pd(II) from extremely acidic solution using ion-imprinted chitosan fiber: Adsorption performance and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuo; Wei, Wei; Wu, Xiaohui; Zhou, Tao; Mao, Juan; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2015-12-15

    A novel, selective and acid-resisting chitosan fiber adsorbent was prepared by the ion-imprinting technique using Pd(II) and epichlorohydrin as the template and two-step crosslinking agent, respectively. The resulting ion-imprinted chitosan fibers (IIF) were used to selectively adsorb Pd(II) under extremely acidic synthetic metal solutions. The adsorption and selectivity performances of IIF including kinetics, isotherms, pH effects, and regeneration were investigated. Pd(II) rapidly adsorbed on the IIF within 100 min, achieving the adsorption equilibrium. The isotherm results showed that the maximum Pd(II) uptake on the IIF was maintained as 324.6-326.4 mg g(-1) in solutions containing single and multiple metals, whereas the Pd(II) uptake on non-imprinted fibers (NIF) decreased from 313.7 to 235.3 mg g(-1) in solution containing multiple metals. Higher selectivity coefficients values were obtained from the adsorption on the IIF, indicating a better Pd(II) selectivity. The amine group, supposedly the predominant adsorption site for Pd(II), was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The pH value played a significant role on the mechanism of the selective adsorption in the extremely acidic conditions. Furthermore, the stabilized performance for three cycles of sorption/desorption shows a potential for further large-scale applications.

  16. UV-Visible Spectroscopy Detection of Iron(III) Ion on Modified Gold Nanoparticles With a Hydroxamic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, C.; Alizadeh, A.; Taher, M. A.; Hamidi, Z.; Bahrami, B.

    2016-09-01

    The present work describes the preparation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with hydroxamic acid and the use of them in UV-visible spectroscopy detection of iron(III) ions. The prepared AuNPs were thoroughly characterized by using UV-visible spectroscopy, TEM, and 1H NMR techniques. The newly synthesized hydroxamic acid-AuNPs are brown in color due to the intense surface plasmon absorption band centered at 527 nm. In the presence of Fe(III), the surface plasmon absorption band is centered at 540 nm. However, the sensitivity of hydroxamic acid-AuNPs towards other metal ions such as Mg(II), Ca(II), Ag(I), Cu(II), Mn(II), Cr(II), Ni(II), Co(II),Fe(II), Hg(II), and Pb(II) can be negligible. This highly selective sensor allows a direct quantitative assay of Fe(III) with a UVvisible spectroscopy detection limited to 45.8 nM.

  17. Stream chemistry in the eastern United States. 2. Current sources of acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing capacity streams

    SciTech Connect

    Herlihy, A.T.; Kaufmann, P.R.; Mitch, M.E. )

    1991-04-01

    The authors examined anion composition in National Stream Survey (NSS) data in order to evaluate the most probably sources of current acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) streams in the eastern US. Acidic streams that had almost no organic influence (less than 10% of total anions) and sulfate and nitrate concentrations indicative of evaporative concentration of atmospheric deposition were classified as acidic due to acidic deposition. These acidic streams were located in small (<30 km{sup 2}) forested watersheds in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands (an estimated 1,950 km of stream length) and in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain (1,250 km). Acidic streams affected primarily by acidic deposition but also influenced by naturally occurring organic anions accounted for another 1,180 km of acidic stream length, and were located in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, plateau tops in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands, and the Florida Panhandle. The total length of streams acidic due to acid mine drainage in the NSS (4,590 km) was about the same as the total length of acidic streams likely affected by acidic deposition (4,380 km). Acidic streams whose acid anion composition was dominated by organics were located in Florida and the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. In Florida, most of the acidic streams were organic dominated, whereas about half of the streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain were organic dominated. Organic-dominated acidic streams were not observed in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands.

  18. Folding study of Venus reveals a strong ion dependence of its yellow fluorescence under mildly acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; Blaser, Georg; Behrens, Caroline; Cabrita, Lisa D; Dobson, Christopher M; Jackson, Sophie E

    2010-02-12

    Venus is a yellow fluorescent protein that has been developed for its fast chromophore maturation rate and bright yellow fluorescence that is relatively insensitive to changes in pH and ion concentrations. Here, we present a detailed study of the stability and folding of Venus in the pH range from 6.0 to 8.0 using chemical denaturants and a variety of spectroscopic probes. By following hydrogen-deuterium exchange of (15)N-labeled Venus using NMR spectroscopy over 13 months, residue-specific free energies of unfolding of some highly protected amide groups have been determined. Exchange rates of less than one per year are observed for some amide groups. A super-stable core is identified for Venus and compared with that previously reported for green fluorescent protein. These results are discussed in terms of the stability and folding of fluorescent proteins. Under mildly acidic conditions, we show that Venus undergoes a drastic decrease in yellow fluorescence at relatively low concentrations of guanidinium chloride. A detailed study of this effect establishes that it is due to pH-dependent, nonspecific interactions of ions with the protein. In contrast to previous studies on enhanced green fluorescence protein variant S65T/T203Y, which showed a specific halide ion-binding site, NMR chemical shift mapping shows no evidence for specific ion binding. Instead, chemical shift perturbations are observed for many residues primarily located in both lids of the beta-barrel structure, which suggests that small scale structural rearrangements occur on increasing ionic strength under mildly acidic conditions and that these are propagated to the chromophore resulting in fluorescence quenching.

  19. Arachidonic acid activates release of calcium ions from reticulum via ryanodine receptor channels in C2C12 skeletal myotubes.

    PubMed

    Muslikhov, E R; Sukhanova, I F; Avdonin, P V

    2014-05-01

    Arachidonic acid causes an increase in free cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in differentiated skeletal multinucleated myotubes C2C12 and does not induce calcium response in C2C12 myoblasts. The same reaction of myotubes to arachidonic acid is observed in Ca2+-free medium. This indicates that arachidonic acid induces release of calcium ions from intracellular stores. The blocker of ryanodine receptor channels of sarcoplasmic reticulum dantrolene (20 µM) inhibits this effect by 68.7 ± 6.3% (p < 0.001). The inhibitor of two-pore calcium channels of endolysosomal vesicles trans-NED19 (10 µM) decreases the response to arachidonic acid by 35.8 ± 5.4% (p < 0.05). The phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 (10 µM) has no effect. These data indicate the involvement of ryanodine receptor calcium channels of sarcoplasmic reticulum in [Ca2+]i elevation in skeletal myotubes caused by arachidonic acid and possible participation of two-pore calcium channels from endolysosomal vesicles in this process.

  20. Cyclopentadithiophene-benzoic acid copolymers as conductive binders for silicon nanoparticles in anode electrodes of lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuo-Lung; Kuo, Tzu-Husan; Yao, Chun-Feng; Chang, Shu-Wei; Yang, Yu-Shuo; Huang, Hsin-Kai; Tsai, Cho-Jen; Horie, Masaki

    2017-02-02

    Cyclopentadithiophene and methyl-2,5-dibromobenzoate have been copolymerised via palladium complex catalysed direct arylation. The methyl ester group in the benzoate unit is converted to the carboxyl group via saponification. The polymers are mixed with Si nanoparticles for use as conducting binders in the fabrication of an anode electrode in lithium ion batteries. The battery with the electrode incorporating the saponified polymer shows much higher specific capacity of up to 1820 mA h g(-1) (total weight) and a higher stability compared with the battery including the polymer before the saponification.

  1. [EFfect of quinazolone-alkyl-carboxylic acid derivatives on the transmembrane Ca2+ ion flux mediated by AMPA receptors].

    PubMed

    Szárics, Eva; LaszTóczi, Bálint; Nyikos, Lajos; Barabás, Péter; Kovács, Ilona; Skuban, Nina; Nagy, Péter I; Kökösi, József; Takácsné, Novák Krisztina; Kardos, Julianna

    2002-01-01

    The excitatory neurotransmitter, Glu, plays a crucial role in many sensory and motor functions as well as in brain development, learning and memory and it is also involved in the pathogenesis of a number of neurological disorders, including epilepsy, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Therefore, the study of Glu receptors (GluRs) is of therapeutical importance. We showed here by fluorescence monitoring of transmembrane Ca2+ ion fluxes in response to (S)-alpha-amino-3-hidroxi-5-metil-4-izoxazol propionic acid ((S)-AMPA) on the time scale of 0.00004-10 s that Ca2+ ion influx proceeds through faster and slower desensitizing receptors. Pharmacological isolation of the slower and faster desensitizing AMPA receptor was possible by fluorescence monitoring of Ca2+ ion translocation in response to (S)-AMPA in the presence and absence of various 2-methyl-4-oxo-3H-quinazoline-3-alkyl-carboxilic acid derivatives (Qxs): the acetic acid Q1 inhibits the slower desensitizing receptor response specifically, while the acetyl-piperidine Q5 is a more potent inhibitor of the faster desensitizing receptor response. In addition, spontaneous interictal activity, as induced by high [K+] conditions in hippocampal slices, was reduced significantly by Q5, suggesting a possible anticonvulsant property of Q5. Substitutions of Qxs into the GluR2 S1S2 binding core were consistent with their effect by causing variable degree of S1S2 bridging interaction as one of the main determinants of AMPA receptor agonist activity. The exploitation of differences between similar receptors will be important in the development and use of drugs with high pharmacological specificity.

  2. Electrospray mass spectrometry of some proteins and the aqueous solution acid/base equilibrium model in the negative ion detection mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Blanc, J. C. Y.; Guevremont, R.; Siu, K. W. M.

    1993-06-01

    Basic solutions of myoglobin, [beta]-lactoglobulin, pepsin and ubiquitin have been examined by means of electrospray mass spectrometry in the negative ion detection mode. The distribution of protein ions in the mass spectra was found to correlate well with the distribution of protein species in solution calculated from published titration data. These results lend further credibility to an earlier proposed aqueous solution acid/base equilibrium model, which relates the "bellshape" ion distribution observed in the electrospray mass spectrometry of proteins to the distribution of protein ions in solution.

  3. Dicarboxylic acids, ω-oxocarboxylic acids, α-dicarbonyls, WSOC, OC, EC, and inorganic ions in wintertime size-segregated aerosols from central India: Sources and formation processes.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Dhananjay K; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Deb, Manas K

    2016-10-01

    The size distributions of aerosols can provide evidences for their sources and formation processes in the atmosphere. Size-segregated aerosols (9-sizes) were collected in urban site (Raipur: 21.2°N and 82.3°E) in central India during winter of 2012-2013. The samples were analyzed for dicarboxylic acids (C2-C12), ω-oxocarboxylic acids (ωC2-ωC9), pyruvic acid and α-dicarbonyls (C2-C3) as well as elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), water-soluble OC (WSOC) and inorganic ions. Diacids showed a predominance of oxalic acid (C2) followed by succinic and azelaic acid whereas ω-oxoacids exhibited a predominance of glyoxylic acid and glyoxal was more abundant than methylglyoxal in all the sizes. Diacids, ω-oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls showed bimodal size distribution with peaks in fine and coarse modes. High correlations of fine mode diacids and related compounds with potassium and levoglucosan suggest that they were presumably due to a substantial contribution of primary emission from biomass burning and secondary production from biomass burning derived precursors. High correlations of C2 with higher carbon number diacids (C3-C9) suggest that they have similar sources and C2 may be produced via the decay of its higher homologous diacids in fine mode. Considerable portions of diacids and related compounds in coarse mode suggest that they were associated with mineral dust particles by their adsorption and photooxidation of anthropogenic and biogenic precursors via heterogeneous reaction on dust surface. This study demonstrates that biomass burning and dust particles are two major factors to control the size distribution of diacids and related compounds in the urban aerosols from central India.

  4. Development of Negative Ion Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (NI-PTR TOFMS) for the Measurement of Gas Phase Acids in the Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, A. K.; Begashaw, I.; Jessamy, C.; Bililign, S.

    2008-12-01

    We report on the progress and feasibility tests of an on-line time-of-flight (TOF) technique for negative ion proton transfer reactive mass spectrometry (NI-PTRMS) for the measurement of trace gas phase carboxylic acids. Acetate ions are produced via alpha particle ionization of acetic acid through a polonium-210. The target carboxylic gases undergo proton transfer reactions with the acetate ions due to the affinity differences. This technique has the potential for improvement in mass resolution as well as shorter integration periods which lead to faster measurements with greater sensitivity. We report on initial instrument sensitivity, calibrations, and clustering effects of some known gases as well as some carboxylic acids for some comparisons with recent negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS) results. This work is supported in part by both NOAA (Award NA06OAR4810187) and NSF (award 0803016).

  5. The use of pulsed amperometry combined with ion-exclusion chromatography for the simultaneous analysis of ascorbic acid and sulfite.

    PubMed

    Wagner, H P; McGarrity, M J

    1991-06-21

    Initial attempts to monitor ascorbic acid and sulfite, in a beer matrix, by combining ion-exclusion chromatography with a pulsed amperometric detector using a single applied voltage to the platinum working electrode, were unsuccessful. Alternatively, good chromatograms for the separation of the two antioxidants were achieved utilizing a standard, amperometric cell. However, remarkably superior results were observed when this standard cell was operated in a pulsed mode and cleaning cycles were continually applied throughout the analysis. The working electrode stability and precision have been examined. Preliminary spike recovery data indicate acceptable accuracy for the method. Comparisons of this method to standard reference methods are currently ongoing.

  6. NEGATIVE ION ELECTROSPRAY OF BROMO- AND CHLORACETIC ACIDS AND AN EVALUATION OF EXACT MASS MEASUREMENTS WITH A BENCH-TOP TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS SPECTROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The negative ion electrospray mass spectra of six bromo- and chloroacetic acids were measured using two different electrospray interfaces and single quadrupole and bench-top time-of-flight mass spectrometers. With each acid at 50 ug/mL in aqueous methanol at pH 10, the anions ob...

  7. Analysis of fusaric acid in maize using molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) clean-up and ion-pair LC with diode array UV detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusaric acid is a phytotoxin and mycotoxin occasionally found in maize contaminated with Fusarium fungi. A selective sample clean-up procedure was developed to detect fusaric acid in maize using molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) clean-up coupled with ion-pair liquid chromatography...

  8. New complexes of cobalt(II) ions with pyridinecarboxylic acid N-oxides and 4,4‧-byp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnatejko, Zbigniew; Dutkiewicz, Grzegorz; Kubicki, Maciej; Lis, Stefan

    2013-02-01

    This paper reports a study concerning the isolation and characterization of mixed ligand complexes of the Co(II) ions with pyridinecarboxylic acids N-oxides (picolinic (PNO), nicotinic (NNO) and isonicotinic (INO)), [Co(PNO)2(4,4'-byp)]·6H2O 1, [Co(NNO)(4,4'-byp)NO3]·8H2O 2 and [Co(INO)(4,4'-byp)NO3]·7H2O 3; (4,4'-byp = 4,4'-bipyridine). The complexes 2 and 3 were prepared by the hydrothermal synthesis. The structures of the complexes were elucidated on the basis of elemental analysis, thermal decomposition, IR and mass spectroscopy. IR spectra show that N-oxides act as bidentate ligands, in which both the N-oxide and the carboxylate groups are involved in coordination. In 2 and 3 the Co(II) ion exists in the same coordination environment. For 1, the X-ray crystal structure has been determined and it turned out that it contains the coordination polymers, created by the chains of Co ions joined by 4,4'-byp ligands. The Co(II) ion occupies the center of symmetry in the space group C2/c. This ion is coordinated by two nitrogen atoms (from two 4,4'-byp ligands) and four oxygen atoms from two PNO anions. The extensive network of hydrogen bonds involving six different water molecules connects the one-dimensional polymers into three-dimensional crystal structure.

  9. Hydrogen ion (H+) in waste acid as a driver for environmentally sustainable processes: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    German, Michael; SenGupta, Arup K; Greenleaf, John

    2013-03-05

    Acid-base neutralization reaction in the aqueous phase is thermodynamically favorable and kinetically fast. Waste acid neutralization is also the most common waste management practice globally. However, waste acid neutralization is yet to be used for any work/energy generation because of the low concentrations of the waste acid and the high heat capacity of aqueous solutions. In this paper, we address potential processes that can effectively take advantage of the high energy inherent in neutralization reactions, in accordance with the goal of sustainable development.

  10. Detection, isolation, and characterization of oligo/poly(sialic acid) and oligo/poly(deaminoneuraminic acid) units in glycoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Kitazume, S; Kitajima, K; Inoue, S; Inoue, Y

    1992-04-01

    We have evaluated methods for separation, preparation, and characterization of alpha-2----8-linked oligomers of sialic acids (Neu5Ac and Neu5Gc) and deaminated neuraminic acid (KDN; 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-glycero-D-galacto-nononic acid) recently found as a naturally occurring novel type of sialic acid analogue. (A) We examined preparative anion-exchange chromatography for fractionation and preparation of oligo(Neu5Ac), oligo(Neu5Gc), and oligo(KDN). (B) We also examined the TLC method for separation and differentiation of the partial acid hydrolysates of colominic acid, as well as polysialoglycoproteins (PSGP) and poly(KDN)-glycoproteins (KDN-gp) isolated from rainbow trout eggs, and for discrimination of lower oligomers of Neu5Ac, Neu5Gc, and KDN. (C) We developed the high-performance adsorption-partition chromatographic method for (a) separation of monomers and oligomers of three nonulosonates according to the difference in substituents at C-5 and the presence or absence of 9-O-acetyl groups in oligo(KDN) and (b) separation of three homologous series of lower oligomers according to the degree of polymerization. (D) We examined and compared high-performance anion-exchange chromatographic separation of 3H-labeled oligo(Neu5Ac), oligo(Neu5Gc), and oligo(KDN) alditols by using Mono-Q HR 5/5 resin. (E) We examined a method of selective and quantitative microprecipitation for separation and purification of oligomers and polymers of Neu5Ac by treating them with cetylpyridinium chloride. We also used PSGP and KDN-gp to test both the sensitivity and the selectivity of this method.

  11. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intake of Pregnant Women and Women of Childbearing Age in the United States: Potential for Deficiency?

    PubMed Central

    Nordgren, Tara M.; Lyden, Elizabeth; Anderson-Berry, Ann; Hanson, Corrine

    2017-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids play critical roles during fetal growth and development with increased intakes associated with improved maternal-fetal outcomes. Omega-3 fatty acid intake in Western diets is low, and the impact of socioeconomic factors on omega-3 fatty acid intake in pregnant women and women of childbearing age has not been reported. We used the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cycles 2003–2012 to assess the relationship between omega-3 fatty acid intake and socioeconomic factors in women of childbearing age. Out of 7266 eligible participants, 6478 were women of childbearing age, while 788 were identified as pregnant at the time of the survey. Mean EPA+DHA intake of the population was 89.0 mg with no significant difference between pregnant and non-pregnant women. By univariate and multivariate analyses adjusting for confounders, omega-3 fatty acid intake was significantly associated with poverty-to-income ratio, race, and educational attainment. Our results demonstrate that omega-3 fatty acid intake is a concern in pregnant women and women of childbearing age in the United States, and that socioeconomically disadvantaged populations are more susceptible to potential deficiencies. Strategies to increase omega-3 fatty acid intake in these populations could have the potential to improve maternal and infant health outcomes. PMID:28245632

  12. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intake of Pregnant Women and Women of Childbearing Age in the United States: Potential for Deficiency?

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Tara M; Lyden, Elizabeth; Anderson-Berry, Ann; Hanson, Corrine

    2017-02-26

    Omega-3 fatty acids play critical roles during fetal growth and development with increased intakes associated with improved maternal-fetal outcomes. Omega-3 fatty acid intake in Western diets is low, and the impact of socioeconomic factors on omega-3 fatty acid intake in pregnant women and women of childbearing age has not been reported. We used the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cycles 2003-2012 to assess the relationship between omega-3 fatty acid intake and socioeconomic factors in women of childbearing age. Out of 7266 eligible participants, 6478 were women of childbearing age, while 788 were identified as pregnant at the time of the survey. Mean EPA+DHA intake of the population was 89.0 mg with no significant difference between pregnant and non-pregnant women. By univariate and multivariate analyses adjusting for confounders, omega-3 fatty acid intake was significantly associated with poverty-to-income ratio, race, and educational attainment. Our results demonstrate that omega-3 fatty acid intake is a concern in pregnant women and women of childbearing age in the United States, and that socioeconomically disadvantaged populations are more susceptible to potential deficiencies. Strategies to increase omega-3 fatty acid intake in these populations could have the potential to improve maternal and infant health outcomes.

  13. Interaction of gold nanoparticles mediated by captopril and S-nitrosocaptopril: the effect of manganese ions in mild acid medium.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Emilia; Prado-Gotor, Rafael

    2015-01-07

    We report herein results regarding reactivity and assembly of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) mediated by captopril (cap) and S-nitrosocaptopril (NOcap), two angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and antihypertensive agents. The results were compared with that of cysteine (Cys), a thiol-containing amino acid found in plasma. The interparticle interactions were characterized by monitoring the evolution of the surface plasmon resonance band using the spectrophotometric method. The original gold nanoparticles were efficiently modified by small amounts of Mn(+2) ions, which are adsorbed onto the surface of 15.4 nm citrate-capped gold nanoparticles, giving rise to manganese-gold nanoparticles (Mn-AuNPs) that, in mild acid medium, have proved to be highly sensitive and a rapid colorimetric detection method for thiols. Depending on the concentration of the Mn(+2) ions the aggregation of AuNPs can be rapidly induced. The kinetics of the assembly process has been studied. Good first-order kinetics has been observed, with the exception of captopril-mediated nanoparticle aggregation at low concentration of either cap or acid. The rate of Cys-mediated assembly of gold nanoparticles in aqueous 10 mM acetic acid is more than 20-times faster than pure AuNPs and concentrations of Cys as low as 34 nM can be detected in less than 40 min under conditions of stable Mn-AuNPs. Similar effects were observed with cap or NOcap. The assembly-disassembly reversibility is shown with cap and NOcap and depends highly on pH.

  14. Exact masses and chemical formulas of individual Suwannee River fulvic acids from ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Stenson, Alexandra C; Marshall, Alan G; Cooper, William T

    2003-03-15

    Molecular formulas have been assigned for 4626 individual Suwannee River fulvic acids based on accurate mass measurements from ions generated by electrospray ionization and observed by ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). Formula assignments were possible because of the mass accuracy of FTICR MS at high field (9.4 T) and the regular mass spacing patterns found in fulvic acid mixtures. Sorting the 4626 individually observed ions according to Kendrick mass defect and nominal mass series (z* score) revealed that all could be assigned to 1 of 266 distinct homologous series that differ in oxygen content and double bond equivalence. Tandem mass spectrometry based on infrared multiphoton dissociation identified labile fragments of fulvic acid molecules, whose chemical formulas led to plausible structures consistent with degraded lignin as a source of Suwannee River fulvic acids.

  15. Formation of Iron Complexes from Trifluoroacetic Acid Based Liquid Chromatography Mobile Phases as Interference Ions in LC-ESI-MS Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Anil; Zhang, Rui; Orton, Daniel; Zhao, Rui; Clauss, Therese; Moore, Ronald; Smith, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Two unexpected singly charged ions at m/z 1103 and 944 have been observed in mass spectra obtained from electrospray ionization-mass spectrometric analysis of liquid chromatography effluents with mobile phases containing trifluoroacetic acid that severely interfered with sample analysis. Accurate mass measurement and tandem mass spectrometry studies revealed that these two ions are composed of three components; clusters of trifluoroacetic acid, clusters of mass 159 and iron. Formation of these ions is inhibited by removing trifluoroacetic acid from the mobile phases and using formic acid in its place, replacing the stainless steel union with a titanium union or by adding a small blank fused silica capillary column between the chromatography column and the electrospray tip via a stainless steel union without any adverse effects to chromatographic separation, peak broadening or peptide identifications. PMID:21504012

  16. Influence of metal ions and pH on the hydraulic properties of potential acid sulfate soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, T. M. H.; Collins, R. N.; Waite, T. D.

    2008-07-01

    SummaryAcid sulfate soils (ASS) cover extensive areas of east Australian coastal floodplains. Upon oxidation, these hydromorphic pyritic sediments produce large quantities of sulfuric acid. In addition, due to their geographic location, these soils may also come in contact with high ionic strength estuarine tidal waters. As a result, there is typically a large variation in acidity (pH) and cation concentrations in soil porewaters and adjacent aquatic systems (e.g., agricultural field drains, rivers, estuaries, etc.). Acid sulfate soils, especially from the unoxidized gelatinous deeper layers, contain a relatively high proportion of montmorillonite, which is wellknown for its shrink-swell properties. Variations in cation concentrations, including H3O+, can influence montmorillonite platelet interactions and may, thus, also significantly affect the hydraulic conductivity of materials containing this clay. In this paper we report on the effect of four common cations, at reasonable environmental concentrations, on the hydraulic properties of potential (unoxidized) acid sulfate soil materials. The natural system was simplified by examining individually the effects of each cation (H+, Ca2+, Fe2+ and Na+) on a soil-water suspension in a filtration cell unit. Moisture ratio, hydraulic conductivity and the consolidation coefficient of the deposited filter cakes were calculated using material coordinates theory. The results indicate that the hydraulic conductivity of potential acid sulfate soils increases at low pH and with cation concentration. Although an increase in the charge of amphoteric edge groups on montmorillonite clays may result in some aggregation between individual clay platelets, we conclude that the extent of these changes are unlikely to cause significant increases in the transportation of acidity (and contaminants) through potential acid sulfate soils as the hydraulic conductivity of these materials remain low (<10-9 m/s) at pH and ionic conditions normally

  17. Stochastic pumping of ions based on colored noise in bacterial channels under acidic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, M. Lidón; Queralt-Martín, María; Alcaraz, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Fluctuation-driven ion transport can be obtained in bacterial channels with the aid of different types of colored noise including the biologically relevant Lorentzian one. Using the electrochemical rectification of the channel current as a ratchet mechanism we observe transport of ions up to their concentration gradient under conditions similar to that met in vivo, namely moderate pH gradients and asymmetrically charged lipid membranes. We find that depending on the direction of the concentration gradient the channel can pump either cations or anions from the diluted side to the concentrated one. We discuss the possible relevance of this phenomenon for the pH homeostasis of bacterial cells.Fluctuation-driven ion transport can be obtained in bacterial channels with the aid of different types of colored noise including the biologically relevant Lorentzian one. Using the electrochemical rectification of the channel current as a ratchet mechanism we observe transport of ions up to their concentration gradient under conditions similar to that met in vivo, namely moderate pH gradients and asymmetrically charged lipid membranes. We find that depending on the direction of the concentration gradient the channel can pump either cations or anions from the diluted side to the concentrated one. We discuss the possible relevance of this phenomenon for the pH homeostasis of bacterial cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02638a

  18. Seasonal and rainfall-type variations in inorganic ions and dicarboxylic acids and acidity of wet deposition samples collected from subtropical East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ying I.; Hsieh, Li-Ying; Kuo, Su-Ching; Chen, Chien-Lung; Wu, Pei-Ling

    2011-07-01

    malonic acid to succinic acid (M:S ratio) indicated that both traffic and secondary photochemical reactions are major contributors to all but TOC Rain, for which the M:S ratio of 4.54 indicates a relative abundance of pollutants from secondary photochemical reactions. An ion balance (IB) ratio analysis demonstrated the validity of the results in this research.

  19. Hydrometallurgical process for the recovery of metal values from spent lithium-ion batteries in citric acid media.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangping; Zhou, Tao

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a hydrometallurgical process has been proposed to recover valuable metals from spent lithium-ion batteries in citric acid media. Leaching efficiencies as high as 97%, 95%, 94%, and 99% of Ni, Co, Mn, and Li were achieved under the optimal leaching experimental conditions of citric acid concentration of 2 mol L(-1), leaching temperature of 80 °C, leaching time of 90 min, liquid-solid ratio of 30 ml g(-1), and 2 vol. % H2O2. For the metals recovery process, nickel and cobalt were selectively precipitated by dimethylglyoxime reagent and ammonium oxalate sequentially. Then manganese was extracted by Na-D2EHPA and the manganese-loaded D2EHPA was stripped with sulfuric acid. The manganese was recovered as MnSO4 in aqueous phase and D2EHPA could be reused after saponification. Finally, lithium was precipitated by 0.5 mol L(-1) sodium phosphate. Under their optimal conditions, the recovery percentages of Ni, Co, Mn, and Li can reach 98%, 97%, 98%, and 89%, respectively. This is a relatively simple route in which all metal values could be effectively leached and recovered in citric acid media.

  20. Probing metal ion complexation with salicylic acid and its derivatives with excited state proton transfer and luminescence anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Friedrich, D.M.; Ainsworth, C.C.

    1996-10-01

    Salicylic acid and its derivatives in which the phenolic proton is preserved show a characteristic dual fluorescence: one band in the UV, due to a {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} excited state emission, and the other in the visible range, is assigned to excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The transition energy, quantum yield and fluorescence lifetime as well as fluorescence anisotropy are sensitive to the solvent environment, temperature and properties of the substituents (complexation) at the phenolic and carboxylic oxygens. The ESIPT band disappears in molecules in which the intramolecular hydrogen bond between phenolic hydrogen and the carbonyl oxygen is prohibited. In this work, the complexation of Na(I), Ca(II), Al(III) and La(III) with salicylic acid, 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, methylsalicylate and anisic acid in both aqueous and non-aqueous solvents has been studied by absorption and steady state luminescence spectroscopy, picosecond to nanosecond luminescence lifetimes and luminescence anisotropy measurements in a range of solvent and in ethanol at 77 K. Speciation in these complex systems, binding characteristics between the metal ion and the ligand, and ligand-centered energetics are discussed in terms of the spectroscopic properties, luminescence and anisotropy decay kinetics.

  1. Simultaneous removal of acid green 25 and mercury ions from aqueous solutions using glutamine modified chitosan magnetic composite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xue; Li, Kun; Yan, Han; Yang, Hu; Li, Aimin

    2016-02-01

    In this current work, the magnetic composite microsphere containing glutamine modified chitosan and silica coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles (CS-Gln-MCM) has been successfully prepared and extensively characterized, which is a kind of biodegradable materials. CS-Gln-MCM shows enhanced removal efficiency for both acid green 25 (AG25), an amphoteric dye, and mercury ions (Hg(2+)) from water in the respective while measured pH range compared with chitosan magnetic composite microsphere (CS-MCM) without modification. It is due to the fact that the grafted amino acid provides a variety of additional adsorption active sites and diverse adsorption mechanisms are involved. In AG25 and Hg(2+) aqueous mixture, the modified adsorbents bear preferential adsorption for AG25 over Hg(2+) in strong acidic solutions ascribed to multiple interactions between AG25 and CS-Gln-MCM, such as hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions. While, in weak acidic conditions, an efficient simultaneous removal is observed for different adsorption effects involved in aforementioned two pollutants. Besides, CS-Gln-MCM illuminates not only short equilibrium time for adsorption of each pollutant less than 20.0 min but also rapid magnetic separation from water and efficient regeneration after saturated adsorption. Therefore, CS-Gln-MCM bears great application potentials in water treatment.

  2. Separation of phytic acid and other related inositol phosphates by high-performance ion chromatography and its applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing-Chuan; Li, Betty W

    2003-11-07

    A high-performance anion-exchange chromatographic method was developed for the separation of phytic acid and other inositol phosphates (myo-inositol bis-, tris-, tetrakis-, and pentakisphosphates) with gradient elution and ultraviolet absorbance detection after post-column derivatization. With the acidic eluents, the combination of anion-exchange and ion suppression retention mechanisms led to the separation of 35 inositol phosphates (excluding enantiomers) into 27 peaks for the first time, and the retention behaviors of all myo-inositol bis- to hexakisphosphate isomers were studied. The whole separation procedure was completed within 65 min. Based on the investigations of nonenzymatic hydrolysis of phytic acid under different conditions by using this method, an in-house reference standard solution was produced, which can be used for method development. In addition, by applying this method to in vitro kinetic studies, at least one new enzymatic hydrolysis pathway of phytic acid was found, and one rule of enzymatic dephosphorylation of inositol phosphates (position effect) was proposed and another one (neighboring effect) was confirmed. The principle of the proposed identification approach for several inositol phosphate isomers based on hydrolysis products study will be applicable to other natural products analysis, for which standards are very expensive or not available.

  3. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E; Wagner, Paul E; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-05-20

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere.

  4. Tunicate-Inspired Gallic Acid/Metal Ion Complex for Instant and Efficient Treatment of Dentin Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Prajatelistia, Ekavianty; Ju, Sung-Won; Sanandiya, Naresh D; Jun, Sang Ho; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-04-20

    Dentin hypersensitivity is sharp and unpleasant pains caused by exposed dentinal tubules when enamel outside of the tooth wears away. The occlusion of dentinal tubules via in situ remineralization of hydroxyapatite is the best method to alleviate the symptoms caused by dentin hypersensitivity. Commercially available dental desensitizers are generally effective only on a specific area and are relatively toxic, and their performance usually depends on the skill of the clinician. Here, a facile and efficient dentin hypersensitivity treatment with remarkable aesthetic improvement inspired by the tunicate-self-healing process is reported. As pyrogallol groups in tunicate proteins conjugate with metal ions to heal the torn body armor of a tunicate, the ingenious mechanism by introducing gallic acid (GA) as a cheap, abundant, and edible alternative to the pyrogallol groups of the tunicate combined with a varied daily intake of metal ion sources is mimicked. In particular, the GA/Fe(3+) complex exhibits the most promising results, to the instant ≈52% blockage in tubules within 4 min and ≈87% after 7 d of immersion in artificial saliva. Overall, the GA/metal ion complex-mediated coating is facile, instant, and effective, and is suggested as an aesthetic solution for treating dentin hypersensitivity.

  5. Identifying the Types of Ion Channel-Targeted Conotoxins by Incorporating New Properties of Residues into Pseudo Amino Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Conotoxins are a kind of neurotoxin which can specifically interact with potassium, sodium type, and calcium channels. They have become potential drug candidates to treat diseases such as chronic pain, epilepsy, and cardiovascular diseases. Thus, correctly identifying the types of ion channel-targeted conotoxins will provide important clue to understand their function and find potential drugs. Based on this consideration, we developed a new computational method to rapidly and accurately predict the types of ion-targeted conotoxins. Three kinds of new properties of residues were proposed to use in pseudo amino acid composition to formulate conotoxins samples. The support vector machine was utilized as classifier. A feature selection technique based on F-score was used to optimize features. Jackknife cross-validated results showed that the overall accuracy of 94.6% was achieved, which is higher than other published results, demonstrating that the proposed method is superior to published methods. Hence the current method may play a complementary role to other existing methods for recognizing the types of ion-target conotoxins. PMID:27631006

  6. Ion exchange of Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), and Cr(3+) on natural clinoptilolite: selectivity determination and influence of acidity on metal uptake.

    PubMed

    Inglezakis, Vassilis J; Loizidou, Maria D; Grigoropoulou, Helen P

    2003-05-01

    In the present study ion exchange of Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), and Cr(3+) on natural Greek clinoptilolite was examined in terms of selectivity toward the above heavy metals in single- and multicomponent solutions in batch systems. Also examined are the influence of clinoptilolite on solution acidity and the effect of acidity on the ion exchange process. Clinoptilolite increases solution acidity due to the exchange of H(+) cations with the cations initially present in its structure. H(+) cations should be considered as competitive ones in ion exchange processes, and consequently ion exchange of metals is favored at high acidity values. Cu(2+) and Cr(3+) are the most sensitive cations with respect to acidity. Selectivity determination demonstrates that the selectivity at total concentration 0.01 N and acidity 2 in both single- and multicomponent solutions is following the order Pb(2+)>Fe(3+)>Cr(3+) > or =Cu(2+). This order is set since the first days of equilibration. However, Cu(2+) shows remarkable changes in selectivity and generally its uptake and selectivity are increasing with time. On the other hand selectivity in single metal solutions where acidity is not adjusted is following the order Pb(2+)>Cr(3+)>Fe(3+) congruent with Cu(2+).

  7. A Cytosolic Amphiphilic α-Helix Controls the Activity of the Bile Acid-sensitive Ion Channel (BASIC).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Axel; Löhrer, Daniel; Alsop, Richard J; Lenzig, Pia; Oslender-Bujotzek, Adrienne; Wirtz, Monika; Rheinstädter, Maikel C; Gründer, Stefan; Wiemuth, Dominik

    2016-11-18

    The bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) is a member of the degenerin/epithelial Na(+) channel (Deg/ENaC) family of ion channels. It is mainly found in bile duct epithelial cells, the intestinal tract, and the cerebellum and is activated by alterations of its membrane environment. Bile acids, one class of putative physiological activators, exert their effect by changing membrane properties, leading to an opening of the channel. The physiological function of BASIC, however, is unknown. Deg/ENaC channels are characterized by a trimeric subunit composition. Each subunit is composed of two transmembrane segments, which are linked by a large extracellular domain. The termini of the channels protrude into the cytosol. Many Deg/ENaC channels contain regulatory domains and sequence motifs within their cytosolic domains. In this study, we show that BASIC contains an amphiphilic α-helical structure within its N-terminal domain. This α-helix binds to the cytosolic face of the plasma membrane and stabilizes a closed state. Truncation of this domain renders the channel hyperactive. Collectively, we identify a cytoplasmic domain, unique to BASIC, that controls channel activity via membrane interaction.

  8. Immobilized chiral tropine ionic liquid on silica gel as adsorbent for separation of metal ions and racemic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Qian, Guofei; Song, Hang; Yao, Shun

    2016-01-15

    Tropine-type chiral ionic liquid with proline anion was immobilized on silica gel by chemical modification method for the first time, which was proved by elemental, infrared spectrum and thermogravimetric analysis. Secondly, the performance of this kind of ionic liquid-modified silica gel was investigated in the adsorption of some metal ions, which included Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+) and Ni(2+). Then the effects of time, initial concentration and temperature on adsorption for Cu(2+) ions were studied in detail, which was followed by the further research of adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics. The adsorption could be better described by pseudo-second-order kinetics model and that the process was spontaneous, exothermic and entropy decreasing. In the mode of 'reuse after adsorption', the ionic liquid-modified silica gel with saturated adsorption of Cu(2+) was finally used in resolution of racemic amino acids for the first time. The static experiment showed that adsorption rate of two enantiomers was obviously different. Inspired by this, the complex was packed in chromatographic column for the separation of racemic amino acids and d-enantiomers were firstly eluted by water or ethanol. Steric hindrance was found as one of key influencing factors for its effect on the stability of the complex.

  9. Non-proton ligand-sensing domain of acid-sensing ion channel 3 is required for itch sensation.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhen; Sami Shaikh, Abdul; Zheng, Wenshuai; Yu, Xiao; Yu, Jingui; Li, Jingxin

    2016-12-01

    Itch, the unpleasant sensation that evokes a desire to scratch, accompanies numerous skin and nervous system disorders. However, the molecular mechanisms of itch are unclear. Acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) is a sensor of acidic and primary inflammatory pain. The whole-cell patch clamp technique was used to determine the effect of chloroquine (CQ) on ASICs currents in primary sensory neurons or the Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with rat ASIC1a or ASIC3. Site-directed mutagenesis of plasmid was performed. Scratching behavior was evaluated by measuring the number of bouts during 30 min after injection. CQ, an anti-malarial drug defined as a histamine-independent pruritogen, selectively enhanced the sustained phase of ASIC3 current in a concentration-dependent manner either in ASIC3-transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells or in primary cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. Further studies revealed that the effect of CQ on ASIC3 channels depends on the newly identified non-proton ligand-sensing domain. Importantly, CQ-evoked scratching behavior was largely alleviated by APETx2, a selective ASIC3 channel blocker. Like CQ, other compounds such as amiloride, 2-guanidine-4-methylquinazoline and neuropeptide FF, which have been previously reported to be non-proton ligands that activate ASIC3, undoubtedly evoked the scratching response. In conclusion, ASIC3, a proton-gated ion channel critical for pain sensation, also functions as an essential component of itch transduction.

  10. Determination of phytic acid and inositol pentakisphosphates in foods by high-performance ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingchuan

    2004-07-28

    A high-performance anion exchange chromatographic method was adapted for the quantitative determination of phytic acid and inositol pentakisphosphate isomers (excluding enantiomers) in foods. Because of the cost and limited availability of inositol phosphate standards, a phytic acid sodium salt standard was used for the calculation of an average relative response factor for the quantification of inositol pentakisphosphate isomers, and the purity of phytic acid sodium salt standard was also accurately established. The detection limits (S/N = 3) for phytic acid and inositol pentakisphosphates were in the range of 1.5-3.4 microM (0.1-0.2 microg/100 microL). This method has been successfully applied to the determination of phytic acid and inositol pentakisphosphates in a variety of beans and nuts after extraction with 0.5 M HCl and cleanup with solid phase extraction cartridges. The results demonstrated that there was a strong correlation between either the phytic acid content or the total content of phytic acid together with inositol pentakisphosphates and the total dietary fiber content in the group of all raw dry beans and in the group of raw dry black beans but not in the group of raw dry red kidney beans, which was probably due to the insufficient number of the raw dry red kidney bean samples.

  11. Acid-base and metal-ion-binding properties of xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) in aqueous solution: complex stabilities, isomeric equilibria, and extent of macrochelation.

    PubMed

    Sigel, Helmut; Massoud, Salah S; Song, Bin; Griesser, Rolf; Knobloch, Bernd; Operschall, Bert P

    2006-10-25

    The four acidity constants of threefold protonated xanthosine 5'-monophosphate, H3(XMP)+, reveal that at the physiological pH of 7.5 (XMP-H)(3-) strongly dominates (and not XMP(2-) as given in textbooks); this is in contrast to the related inosine (IMP(2-)) and guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP(2-)) and it means that XMP should better be named as xanthosinate 5'-monophosphate. In addition, evidence is provided for a tautomeric (XMP-HN1)(3-)/(XMP-HN3)(3-) equilibrium. The stability constants of the M(H;XMP)+ species were estimated and those of the M(XMP) and M(XMP-H)- complexes (M2+=Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+) measured potentiometrically in aqueous solution. The primary M2+ binding site in M(XMP) is (mostly) N7 of the monodeprotonated xanthine residue, the proton being at the phosphate group. The corresponding macrochelates involving P(O)2(OH)- (most likely outer-sphere) are formed to approximately 65% for nearly all M2+. In M(XMP-H)- the primary M2+ binding site is (mostly) the phosphate group; here the formation degree of the N7 macrochelates varies widely from close to zero for the alkaline earth ions, to approximately 50% for Mn2+, and approximately 90% or more for Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+. Because for (XMP-H)(3-) the micro stability constants quantifying the M2+ affinity of the xanthosinate and PO3(2-) residues are known, one may apply a recently developed quantification method for the chelate effect to the corresponding macrochelates; this chelate effect is close to zero for the alkaline earth ions and it amounts to about one log unit for Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+. This method also allows calculation of the formation degrees of the monodentatally coordinated isomers; this information is of relevance for biological systems because it demonstrates how metal ions can switch from one site to another through macrochelate formation. These insights are meaningful for metal-ion-dependent reactions of XMP in metabolic pathways; previous

  12. Dental erosion and sulfuric ion exposure levels in individuals working with sulfuric acid in lead storage battery manufacturing plant measured with mouth-rinse index.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Yuji; Takaku, Satoru; Okawa, Yoshikazu; Matsukubo, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    To investigate dental erosion in employees working with sulfuric acid at a lead storage battery manufacturing plant and level of personal exposure to sulfuric ions, we measured sulfuric ion concentrations in the mouth rinse of those employees. We also measured exposure levels from air samples obtained from 2 employees from the same plant who did not work with sulfuric acid using a portable air sampler. At the same time, we collected and compared their mouth rinses with those from other employees. More specifically, we measured and compared sulfuric ion, calcium, and magnesium concentrations, along with pH levels from the mouth rinse of these two groups. Positive correlations were found between sulfuric ion and calcium concentrations (r=0.61, p<0.005), calcium and magnesium concentrations (r=0.61, p<0.005), Ca/Mg and calcium concentrations (r=0.64, p<0.005), and sulfuric ion and magnesium concentrations (r=0.55, p<0.005). Negative correlations were found between sulfuric ion concentrations and pH levels (r=-0.31, p<0.01), and magnesium concentrations and pH levels (r=-0.32, p<0.01). This suggests that mouth rinse from employees working with sulfuric acid could function as an indicator of sulfuric ion concentration in the work environment. Furthermore, this could lead to the development of a more accurate indicator of individual exposure.

  13. A field test of the effect of acidic rain on ion balance in a woodland salamander

    SciTech Connect

    Frisbie, M.P.; Wyman, R.L. )

    1994-06-01

    Earlier laboratory studies demonstrated that red-backed salamanders, Plethodon cinereus, are susceptible to osmotic disruption by low pH substrates. In natural systems, however, acidic input from precipitation may be mediated by soils before it impacts salamanders. We tested the effect of acidic rain on sodium balance in salamanders by confining individuals in enclosure in two forest types (hemlock, beech) for 34 d. Enclosures received artificial rain of either pH 3 or 5 every 3-4 d. Soils inside enclosures in the hemlock forest were more acidic than those in the beech forest at the outset. At termination, [H[sup +

  14. Ion Irradiation of Sulfuric Acid: Implications for its Stability on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    The Galileo near-infrared mapping spectrometer (NIMS) detected regions on Europa's surface containing distorted H2O bands. This distortion likely indicates that there are other molecules mixed with the water ice. Based on spectral comparison, some of the leading possibilities are sulfuric acid, salts. or possibly H3O(+). Previous laboratory studies have shown that sulfuric acid can be created by irradiation of H2OSO2 mixtures, and both molecules are present on Europa. In this project, we were interested in investigating the radiation stability of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and determining its lifetime on the surface of Europa.

  15. Lanthanide ion exchange properties of a coordination polymer consisting of di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid and trivalent metal ions (Ce3+, Fe3+, or Al3+).

    PubMed

    Ooi, Kenta; Tasaki-Handa, Yuiko; Abe, Yukie; Wakisaka, Akihiko

    2014-03-28

    Three kinds of coordination polymers ([M(dehp)3], M = Ce, Fe, or Al) were prepared by mixing the sodium form (Na(dehp)) of di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid and MCl3 in an ethanol-water binary mixture. They have monoclinic crystalline structure with similar lattice parameters. The lanthanide ion (Ln(3+) = La(3+), Sm(3+), Dy(3+), or Yb(3+)) exchange properties were studied in a 20 : 80 vol% ethanol-water binary mixture containing 2 mM Ln(NO3)3 at room temperature. The rate of Ln(3+) adsorption is relatively slow; it requires over 3 weeks to reach equilibrium. [M(dehp)3] has different Ln(3+) affinities depending on the kind of central metal ions: the affinity order at 3 week adsorption is Yb(3+) < La(3+) < Dy(3+) < Sm(3+) for [Ce(dehp)3], La(3+) < Sm(3+) < Dy(3+) < Yb(3+) for [Fe(dehp)3], and La(3+) < Sm(3+), Dy(3+), Yb(3+) for [Al(dehp)3]. The difference in affinity order can be explained by two factors: the coordination preference and steric strain caused by the polymeric structure. The chemical and structural analyses suggested that the Ln(3+) adsorption progresses first by the central M(3+)/Ln(3+) exchange, followed by a morphological change to a rod-like or fibrous form by a solid phase reaction. In the case of [Fe(dehp)3], the eluted Fe(3+) may be hydrolyzed and precipitated as amorphous iron hydroxide.

  16. Application of zirconium-modified silica gel as a stationary phase in the ion-exclusion chromatography of carboxylic acids. II. Separation of aliphatic carboxylic acids with pyromellitic acid as eluent and with suppressed conductimetric detection.

    PubMed

    Ohta, K

    2001-06-22

    The application of zirconium-modified silica gels (Zr-Silica) as stationary phases for ion-exclusion chromatography with conductimetric detection (IEC-CD) for C1-C8 aliphatic carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, butyric, valeric, caproic, heptanoic and caprylic acids) was carried out using pyromellitic acid as the eluent. Zr-Silicas were prepared by the reaction of the silanol group on the surface of silica gel with zirconium tetrabutoxide [Zr(OCH2CH2CH2CH3)4] in ethanol solution. An ASRS-Ultra anion self-regenerating suppressor in the K+ form was used for the enhancement of conductimetric detector response of these aliphatic carboxylic acids. A Zr-Silica adsorbed on 10 mg zirconium g(-1) silica gel was the most suitable stationary phase in IEC-CD for the separation of these aliphatic carboxylic acids. Excellent simultaneous separation and highly sensitive detection for these aliphatic carboxylic acids were achieved in 25 min by IEC-CD with the Zr-Silica column (250x4.6 mm I.D.) and a 0.2 mM pyromellitic acid containing 0.15% heptanol as the eluent.

  17. Application of zirconium-modified silica gel as a stationary phase in the ion-exclusion chromatography of carboxylic acids. I. Separation of benzenecarboxylic acids with tartaric acid as eluent and with UV-photometric detection.

    PubMed

    Ohta, K

    2001-06-22

    The application of zirconium-modified silica gels (Zr-Silicas) as stationary phases for ion-exclusion chromatography with UV-photometric detection (IEC-PD) for mono-, di-, tri- and tetrabenzenecarboxylic acids (pyromellitic, trimellitic, hemimellitic, o-phthalic, salicylic and benzoic acids) and phenol was carried out using tartaric acid as the eluent. Zr-Silicas were prepared by the reaction of the silanol group on the surface of silica gel with zirconium tetrabutoxide [Zr(OCH2CH2CH2CH3)4] in ethanol solution. The effect of the amount of zirconium adsorbed on silica gel on chromatographic behavior of these benzenecarboxylic acids and phenol was investigated. As a result, Zr-Silica adsorbed on 20 mg zirconium g(-1) silica gel was the most suitable stationary phase in the IEC-PD for the simultaneous separation of these benzenecarboxylic acids and phenol. Excellent simultaneous separation and highly sensitive UV detection at 254 nm for these benzenecarboxylic acids and phenol were achieved in 20 min by the IEC-PD using the Zr-Silica column (250x4.6 mm I.D.) and a 10 mM tartaric acid at pH 2.5 as eluent.

  18. Occurrence of acid precipitation on the West Coast of the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, C.F.; Rambo, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    Compilation of published and unpublished data shows acid precipitation to be more widespread in the Pacific coastal states than is generally recognized. Although information is scattered and discontinuous, precipitation is definitely acidic in the Los Angeles Basin and north-central California and in the Puget Sound region in Washington. Acid-rain occurrences were observed in western and eastern Oregon, but data are inadequate for regional generalization. New stations currently being established in Washington and Oregon, largely in response to the recently renewed activity of Mount St. Helens, will greatly facilitate assessment of precipitation acidity in the Northwest.

  19. Characterization of iron counter-ion environment in bulk and supported phosphomolybdic acid based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Q.; Millet, J. M. M.

    2005-05-01

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) was used to characterize the environment of iron counter-cations in Keggin type phosphomolybdic compounds used as catalysts for oxidation reactions. Iron doped compounds corresponding to bulk acid and to acid supported on the cesium salt were prepared and studied. Iron formed hexa-hydrated complex of both Fe3+ and Fe2+ in the bulk acid, whereas it was present as Fe(OH)2+ hydroxy-cations in the acid supported on the cesium salt. Upon heating the hexa-hydrated complex lost one molecule of water to bind to the Keggin anion through a terminal oxygen. (Fe O Mo bond). The environment of the iron hydroxy-cation changed upon heating while its closer coordination append to remained unchanged.

  20. A bidentate Lewis acid with a telluronium ion as an anion-binding site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haiyan; Gabbaï, François P.

    2010-11-01

    The search for receptors that can selectively capture small and potentially toxic anions in protic media has sparked a renewed interest in the synthesis and anion-binding properties of polydentate Lewis acids. Seeking new paradigms to enhance the anion affinities of such systems, we synthesized a bidentate Lewis acid that contains a boryl and a telluronium moiety as Lewis acidic sites. Anion-complexation studies indicate that this telluronium borane displays a high affinity for fluoride in methanol. Structural and computational studies show that the unusual fluoride affinity of this bidentate telluronium borane can be correlated with the formation of a B-F --> Te chelate motif supported by a strong lone-pair(F) --> σ*(Te-C) donor-acceptor interaction. These results, which illustrate the viability of heavier chalcogenium centres as anion-binding sites, allow us to introduce a novel strategy for the design of polydentate Lewis acids with enhanced anion affinities.

  1. A bidentate Lewis acid with a telluronium ion as an anion-binding site.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyan; Gabbaï, François P

    2010-11-01

    The search for receptors that can selectively capture small and potentially toxic anions in protic media has sparked a renewed interest in the synthesis and anion-binding properties of polydentate Lewis acids. Seeking new paradigms to enhance the anion affinities of such systems, we synthesized a bidentate Lewis acid that contains a boryl and a telluronium moiety as Lewis acidic sites. Anion-complexation studies indicate that this telluronium borane displays a high affinity for fluoride in methanol. Structural and computational studies show that the unusual fluoride affinity of this bidentate telluronium borane can be correlated with the formation of a B-F → Te chelate motif supported by a strong lone-pair(F) → σ*(Te-C) donor-acceptor interaction. These results, which illustrate the viability of heavier chalcogenium centres as anion-binding sites, allow us to introduce a novel strategy for the design of polydentate Lewis acids with enhanced anion affinities.

  2. The acquisition of Clostridium tyrobutyricum mutants with improved bioproduction under acidic conditions after two rounds of heavy-ion beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Yang, Zhen; Jiang, Ting-Ting; Wang, Shu-Yang; Liang, Jian-Ping; Lu, Xi-Hong; Wang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    End-product inhibition is a key factor limiting the production of organic acid during fermentation. Two rounds of heavy-ion beam irradiation may be an inexpensive, indispensable and reliable approach to increase the production of butyric acid during industrial fermentation processes. However, studies of the application of heavy ion radiation for butyric acid fermentation engineering are lacking. In this study, a second 12C6+ heavy-ion irradiation-response curve is used to describe the effect of exposure to a given dose of heavy ions on mutant strains of Clostridium tyrobutyricum. Versatile statistical elements are introduced to characterize the mechanism and factors contributing to improved butyric acid production and enhanced acid tolerance in adapted mutant strains harvested from the fermentations. We characterized the physiological properties of the strains over a large pH value gradient, which revealed that the mutant strains obtained after a second round of radiation exposure were most resistant to harsh external pH values and were better able to tolerate external pH values between 4.5 and 5.0. A customized second round of heavy-ion beam irradiation may be invaluable in process engineering. PMID:27426447

  3. High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization/Ion Mobility Spectrometer for Detection of Abiotic Amino Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, L. W.; Terrell, C. A.; Kim, H.; Kanik, I.

    2003-01-01

    One of the primary goals of the current NASA thrust in Astrobiology is the detection and identification of organic molecules as part of an in-situ lander platform on the surface of Mars or Europa. The identification of these molecules should help determine whether indigenous organisms exist on the surface of Mars or in an undersea environment on Europa. In addition, a detailed organic chemical inventory of surface and near surface molecules will help elucidate the possibilities of life elsewhere in the Universe. Terrestrial life has, as its backbone, the family of molecules known as the amino acids (AA), and while AA can be found in the terrestrial environments as part of more complex molecules, such as peptides, and proteins, they also exist as individual molecules due to of the hydrolyses of biopolymers. In terrestrial biochemistry, there are 20 principal amino acids which are necessary for life. However, some forms of these molecules can be found in nature synthesized via abiotic process. For example, they are known to exist extraterrestrially as a component of carbonaceous meteorites. The idea that amino acids are readily created by abiotic means has been demonstrated by their positive identification in the Murchison CM2 meteorite, which fell in 1969. This meteorite was analyzed before contamination by terrestrial microbes could result. Three laboratories individually tested parts of the meteorite and concluded that the amino acids present in them were indigenous to the meteorite because, among other reasons, they had equal L- and D- enantiomers. Final identification of the constituents of the Murchison included 33 amino acids which have no known biotic source, 11 amino acids which have limited distribution and 8 (Glycine, Alanine, Valine, Proline, Leucine, Isoleucine, Aspartic Acid, and Glutamic Acid), which readily occur in terrestrial proteins.

  4. Adsorption characteristics of malic acid from aqueous solutions by weakly basic ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiang; Pan, Chaoqiang; Liu, Fabao; Lu, Fuping; Wang, Depei; Zhang, Jian; Zhu, Yan

    2012-08-17

    In this study, we reported the effects of temperature, malic acid loading concentration, and resin dose on malic acid adsorption by IRA-67 in batch experiments. The kinetic data well fitted the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Both the equilibrium and ultimate adsorption slightly decreased with increased temperature from 303 to 323 K at 74.7 g/L malic acid loading concentration. The malic acid adsorption was revealed as a homogeneous adsorbent process by the Langmuir model and film diffusion process at loading concentrations of 18.2-94.5 g/L malic acid by the Boyd plot. The values of effective diffusion coefficient D(i) also increased with the temperature. Based on Eq. (15), the negative values of ΔG° and ΔH° revealed that the adsorption process was spontaneous and exothermic. The negative value of ΔS° also indicated the decrease in the solid-liquid interface randomness at this interface when malic acid is adsorbed by IRA-67.

  5. Cell wall extension in Nitella as influenced by acids and ions.

    PubMed

    Métraux, J P; Taiz, L

    1977-04-01

    The giant internode cells of Nitella axillaris exhibit acid-induced growth similar to that found in higher plants. The threshold pH is 4.5, with a maximum at 3.5. The acid growth effect is transient, lasting no more than 32 min. Extensibility measurements of isolated cell walls showed a similar pattern of acid enhancement. Prolonged boiling in water (12 hr) only partially inhibited the acid-induced wall extensibility and actually increased the extensibility at pH 6. It was concluded that physical, rather than enzymatic, processes were responsible for acid-enhanced continuous extension ("creep") in Nitella walls. A complex cation-sensitive mechanism that affects extensibility was also characterized. Among the stimulatory (wall-softening) cations, divalents were generally more effective than monovalents, with magnesium being the most stimulatory. The inhibitory (wall-hardening) cations included divalents and trivalents, aluminum being the most inhibitory. Ionic effects on extensibility were even less sensitive to prolonged boiling in water than acid effects.

  6. Strong Relationships in Acid-Base Chemistry – Modeling Protons Based on Predictable Concentrations of Strong Ions, Total Weak Acid Concentrations, and pCO2

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding acid-base regulation is often reduced to pigeonholing clinical states into categories of disorders based on arterial blood sampling. An earlier ambition to quantitatively explain disorders by measuring production and elimination of acid has not become standard clinical practice. Seeking back to classical physical chemistry we propose that in any compartment, the requirement of electroneutrality leads to a strong relationship between charged moieties. This relationship is derived in the form of a general equation stating charge balance, making it possible to calculate [H+] and pH based on all other charged moieties. Therefore, to validate this construct we investigated a large number of blood samples from intensive care patients, where both data and pathology is plentiful, by comparing the measured pH to the modeled pH. We were able to predict both the mean pattern and the individual fluctuation in pH based on all other measured charges with a correlation of approximately 90% in individual patient series. However, there was a shift in pH so that fitted pH in general is overestimated (95% confidence interval -0.072–0.210) and we examine some explanations for this shift. Having confirmed the relationship between charged species we then examine some of the classical and recent literature concerning the importance of charge balance. We conclude that focusing on the charges which are predictable such as strong ions and total concentrations of weak acids leads to new insights with important implications for medicine and physiology. Importantly this construct should pave the way for quantitative acid-base models looking into the underlying mechanisms of disorders rather than just classifying them. PMID:27631369

  7. The roles of entropy and enthalpy in stabilizing ion-pairs at transition states in zeolite acid catalysis.

    PubMed

    Gounder, Rajamani; Iglesia, Enrique

    2012-02-21

    Acidic zeolites are indispensable catalysts in the petrochemical industry because they select reactants and their chemical pathways based on size and shape. Voids of molecular dimensions confine reactive intermediates and transition states that mediate chemical reactions, stabilizing them by van der Waals interactions. This behavior is reminiscent of the solvation effects prevalent within enzyme pockets and has analogous consequences for catalytic specificity. Voids provide the "right fit" for certain transition states, reflected in their lower free energies, thus extending the catalytic diversity of zeolites well beyond simple size discrimination. This catalytic diversity is even more remarkable because acid strength is essentially unaffected by confinement among known crystalline aluminosilicates. In this Account, we discuss factors that determine the "right fit" for a specific chemical reaction, exploring predictive criteria that extend the prevailing discourse based on size and shape. We link the structures of reactants, transition states, and confining voids to chemical reactivity and selectivity. Confinement mediates enthalpy-entropy compromises that determine the Gibbs free energies of transition states and relevant reactants; these activation free energies determine turnover rates via transition state theory. At low temperatures (400-500 K), dimethyl ether carbonylation occurs with high specificity within small eight-membered ring (8-MR) voids in FER and MOR zeolite structures, but at undetectable rates within larger voids (MFI, BEA, FAU, and SiO(2)-Al(2)O(3)). More effective van der Waals stabilization within 8-MR voids leads to lower ion-pair enthalpies but also lower entropies; taken together, carbonylation activation free energies are lower within 8-MR voids. The "right fit" is a "tight fit" at low temperatures, a consequence of how temperature appears in the defining equation for Gibbs free energy. In contrast, entropy effects dominate in high

  8. Diet-dependent net acid load and risk of incident hypertension in United States women.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luxia; Curhan, Gary C; Forman, John P

    2009-10-01

    Animal and human studies suggest a potential link between acid-base status and blood pressure. Contemporary Western diets yield a daily systemic acid load of varying amounts, yet the association with hypertension has never been explored. We prospectively examined the association between the diet-dependent net acid load (also known as the estimated net endogenous acid production) and the risk of incident hypertension among 87 293 women without a history of hypertension in the Nurses' Health Study II. We also used the ratio of animal protein intake to potassium intake as an alternative evaluation of diet-dependent net acid load. We identified 15 385 incident cases of hypertension during 995 239 person-years of follow-up. After adjusting for potential confounders, women in the top decile of estimated diet-dependent net acid load had an increased risk of hypertension (relative risk: 1.14; 95% CI: 1.05 to 1.24; P for trend=0.01) compared with women in the bottom decile. To test whether the association between estimated diet-dependent net acid load and hypertension is independent of its individual components, an additional adjustment for intakes of protein and potassium was made and resulted in a relative risk of 1.23 (95% CI: 1.08 to 1.41; P for trend=0.003) for the top decile of estimated diet-dependent net acid load. Results of the ratio of animal protein intake to potassium intake were similar with those of estimated diet-depend net acid load. In conclusion, a high diet-dependent net acid load is independently associated with a higher risk of incident hypertension.

  9. A Synopsis of Ion Propulsion Development Projects in the United States: SERT 1 to Deep Space I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Patterson, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    The historical background and characteristics of the experimental flights of ion propulsion systems and the major ground-based technology demonstrations were reviewed. The results of the first successful ion engine flight in 1964, SERT I which demonstrated ion beam neutralization, are discussed along with the extended operation of SERT II starting in 1970. These results together with the technology employed on the early cesium engine flights. the Applications Technology Satellite (ATS) series, and the ground-test demonstrations, have provided the evolutionary path for the development of xenon ion thruster component technologies, control systems, and power circuit implementations. In the 1997-1999 period, the communication satellite flights using ion engine systems and the Deep Space I flight confirmed that these auxiliary and primary propulsion systems have advanced to a high-level of flight-readiness.

  10. Detection, identification, and occurrence of thiotetronic acids in drinking water from underground sources by electrospray ionization-high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lyczko, Jadwiga; Beach, Daniel; Gabryelski, Wojciech

    2015-10-06

    This paper demonstrates that electrospray ionization (ESI) with differential ion mobility spectroscopy (FAIMS) and "soft" mass spectrometry (MS) provide unique analytical capabilities that led to the discovery of sulfur-containing polar congeners of thiotetronic acid (TA) in drinking water from underground sources in Canada and the United States. Polar TAs accumulate in underground aquifers and appear to be the most abundant class of organic compounds in bottled water but cannot be detected by conventional mass spectrometry methods. We show that normally stable TAs are converted into very reactive ions in ESI which have to be analyzed using special conditions in ESI-FAIMS-MS to avoid extensive dissociation and ion/molecule reactions. De novo identification of 10 TAs was accomplished by the comparative tandem mass spectrometry analysis of authentic TA derivatives from groundwater samples and synthetic TA analogues prepared for this study. We present highlights of gas phase ion chemistry of polar TAs to explain their unique properties and reactivity. TA derivatives were originally isolated from soil bacteria and are of interest in the pharmaceutical industry due to their potent activity against a broad spectrum of pathogenic bacteria and negligible toxicity to mammals. We suspect that TAs are natural disinfection agents protecting groundwater from bacterial contamination, but these compound undergo modifications or decompose during an ozonation water treatment.

  11. Acid-Sensing Ion Channels Expression, Identity and Role in the Excitability of the Cochlear Afferent Neurons

    PubMed Central

    González-Garrido, Antonia; Vega, Rosario; Mercado, Francisco; López, Iván A.; Soto, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are activated by an increase in the extracellular proton concentration. There are four genes (ASIC1-4) that encode six subunits, and they are involved in diverse neuronal functions, such as mechanosensation, learning and memory, nociception, and modulation of retinal function. In this study, we characterize the ASIC currents of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). These ASIC currents are primarily carried by Na+, exhibit fast activation and desensitization, display a pH50 of 6.2 and are blocked by amiloride, indicating that these are ASIC currents. The ASIC currents were further characterized using several pharmacological tools. Gadolinium and acetylsalicylic acid reduced these currents, and FMRFamide, zinc (at high concentrations) and N,N,N’,N’–tetrakis-(2-piridilmetil)-ethylenediamine increased them, indicating that functional ASICs are composed of the subunits ASIC1, ASIC2, and ASIC3. Neomycin and streptomycin reduced the desensitization rate of the ASIC current in SGNs, indicating that ASICs may contribute to the ototoxic action of aminoglycosides. RT-PCR of the spiral ganglion revealed significant expression of all ASIC subunits. By immunohistochemistry the expression of the ASIC1a, ASIC2a, ASIC2b, and ASIC3 subunits was detected in SGNs. Although only a few SGNs exhibited action potential firing in response to an acidic stimulus, protons in the extracellular solution modulated SGN activity during sinusoidal stimulation. Our results show that protons modulate the excitability of SGNs via ASICs. PMID:26733809

  12. Determination of short chain carboxylic acids in vegetable oils and fats using ion exclusion chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Viidanoja, Jyrki

    2015-02-27

    A new method for quantification of short chain C1-C6 carboxylic acids in vegetable oils and fats by employing Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) has been developed. The method requires minor sample preparation and applies non-conventional Electrospray Ionization (ESI) liquid phase chemistry. Samples are first dissolved in chloroform and then extracted using water that has been spiked with stable isotope labeled internal standards that are used for signal normalization and absolute quantification of sele