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Sample records for acid ion-exchange resin

  1. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1994-01-25

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 9 figures.

  2. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1996-07-23

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  3. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1994-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene disphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  4. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1996-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  5. Bifunctional phenyl monophosphonic/sulfonic acid ion exchange resin and process for using the same

    DOEpatents

    Alexandratos, Spiro; Shelley, Christopher A.; Horwitz, E. Philip; Chiarizia, Renato

    2001-01-01

    A cross-linked water-insoluble ion exchange resin comprised of polymerized monomers having a phenyl ring is disclosed. A contemplated resin contains (i) polymerized phenyl ring-containing monomers having a phosphonic acid ligand linked to the phenyl ring, (ii) about 2 to about 5 millimoles per gram (mmol/g) of phosphorus as phosphonic acid ligands, and (iii) a sufficient amount of a sulfonic acid ligand such that the ratio of mmol/g of phosphonic acid to mmol/g sulfonic acid is up to 3:1. A process for removing polyvalent metal cations from aqueous solution, and a process for removing iron(III) cations from acidic copper(II) cation-containing solutions that utilize the contemplated resin or other resins are disclosed.

  6. Bifunctional phenyl monophosphonic/sulfonic acid ion exchange resin and process for using the same

    DOEpatents

    Alexandratos, Spiro; Shelley, Christopher A.; Horwitz, E. Philip; Chiarizia, Renato; Gula, Michael J.; Xue, Sui; Harvey, James T.

    2002-01-01

    A cross-linked water-insoluble ion exchange resin comprised of polymerized monomers having a phenyl ring is disclosed. A contemplated resin contains (i) polymerized phenyl ring-containing monomers having a phosphonic acid ligand linked to the phenyl ring, (ii) about 2 to about 5 millimoles per gram (mmol/g) of phosphorus as phosphonic acid ligands, and (iii) a sufficient amount of a sulfonic acid ligand such that the ratio of mmol/g of phosphonic acid to mmol/g sulfonic acid is up to 3:1. A process for removing polyvalent metal cations from aqueous solution, and a process for removing iron(III) cations from acidic copper(II) cation-containing solutions that utilize the contemplated resin or other resins are disclosed.

  7. Vitrification of ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Workman, Rhonda Jackson

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to vitrification of ion exchange resins that have become loaded with hazardous or radioactive wastes, in a way that produces a homogenous and durable waste form and reduces the disposal volume of the resin. The methods of the present invention involve directly adding borosilicate glass formers and an oxidizer to the ion exchange resin and heating the mixture at sufficient temperature to produce homogeneous glass.

  8. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Alexandratos, Spiro; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1997-01-01

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  9. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, A.W.; Gatrone, R.C.; Alexandratos, S.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1997-04-08

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorus. The pendent groups have the formula as shown in the patent wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R{sup 1} is hydrogen or an C{sub 1}-C{sub 2} alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  10. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Alexandratos, Spiro; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1998-01-27

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange-resin are also disclosed.

  11. Disposal of bead ion exchange resin wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, R.L.; Granthan, L.F.

    1985-12-17

    Bead ion exchange resin wastes are disposed of by a process which involves spray-drying a bead ion exchange resin waste in order to remove substantially all of the water present in such waste, including the water on the surface of the ion exchange resin beads and the water inside the ion exchange resin beads. The resulting dried ion exchange resin beads can then be solidified in a suitable solid matrix-forming material, such as a polymer, which solidifies to contain the dried ion exchange resin beads in a solid monolith suitable for disposal by burial or other conventional means.

  12. Fermentation and recovery of glutamic acid from palm waste hydrolysate by Ion-exchange resin column.

    PubMed

    Das, K; Anis, M; Azemi, B M; Ismail, N

    1995-12-01

    Glutamic acid produced from palm waste hydrolysate by fermentation with Brevibacterium lactofermentum ATCC 13869 is produced with a remarkably high yield compared with that produced from pure glucose as a carbon source. The produce yield is 70 g/L with glucose, wherease, when palm waste hydrolysate is the fermentation medium in the same bioreactor under same conditions, it is 88 g/L. The higher yield may be attributed to the fact that this organism has the ability to convert sugars other than only glucose present in the hydrolysate. Bioreactor conditions most conducive for maximum production are pH 7.5, temperature of 30 degrees rmentation period of 48 h, inoculum size 6%, substrate concentration of 10 g per 100 mL, yeast extract 0.5 g per 100 mL as a suitable N source, and biotin at a concentration of 10 pg/L. Palm waste hydrolysate used in this study was prepared by enzymic saccharification of treated palm press fiber under conditions that yielded a maximum of 30 g/L total reducing sugars. Glutamic acid from fermentation broth was recovered by using a chromatographic column (5cm x 60 cm) packed with a strong ion-exchange resin. The filtered broth containing glutamic acid and other inorganic ions was fed to the fully charged column. The broth was continuously recycled at a flow rate of 50 mL/min (retention time of 55 min) until glutamic acid was fully adsorbed on the column leaving other ions in the effluent. Recovery was done by eluting with urea and sodium hydroxide for total displacement of glutamic acid from the resin. The eluent containing 88 g/L of glutamic acid was concentrated by evaporation to obtain solid crystals of the product. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Novel silica-based ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Eichrom`s highly successful Diphonixo resin resembles a conventional ion exchange resin in its use of sulfonic acid ligands on a styrene- divinylbenzene matrix. Diphonix resin exhibits rapid exchange kinetics that allow economical operation of ion exchange systems. Unlike conventional resins, Diphonix resin contains chelating ligands that are diphosphonic acid groups that recognize and remove the targeted metals and reject the more common elements such as sodium, calcium and magnesium. This latter property makes Diphonix ideal for many industrial scale applications, including those involving waste treatment. For treatment of low-level, transuranic (TRU) and high- level radioactive wastes, Diphonix`s polystyrene backbone hinders its application due to radiolytic stability of the carbon-hydrogen bonds and lack of compatibility with expected vitrification schemes. Polystyrene-based Diphonix is approximately 60% carbon- hydrogen. In response to an identified need within the Department of Energy for a resin with the positive attributes of Diphonix that also exhibits greater radiolytic stability and final waste form compatibility, Eichrom has successfully developed a new, silica-based resin version of Diphonix. Target application for this new resin is for use in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving the processing of low-level, transuranic and high-level radioactive wastes. The resin can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste (waste that contains low level radioactivity and hazardous constituents) including mixed wastes contaminated with organic compounds. Silica-based Diphonix is only 10% carbon-hydrogen, with the bulk of the matrix silica.

  14. Novel silica-based ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Gula, M.; Harvey, J.

    1996-12-31

    Shortcomings of chelating resins have been addressed by a new class of ion exchange resins called dual mechanism bifunctional polymers (DMBPs). DMBPs use hydrophilic cation exchange ligands with rapid uptake kinetics and use chelating ligands for selectivity for one or more metals; result is a resin that quickly recognizes and removes targeted metals from waste, remediation, and process streams. Eichrom`s Diphonix {reg_sign} resin is the first DMBP to be widely released as a commercial product; it is polystyrene based. Objective of this work is to synthesize commercial quantities of a silica-based ion exchange resin with the same or better metal ion selectivity, metal uptake kinetics, and acid stability as Diphonix. Feasibility was determined, however the process needs to be optimized. Studies at Eichrom and ANL of the performance of Diphonix resin over a broad range of HNO3 and HCl conditions and inorganic salt loadings are discussed together with the proposed method of incorporating similar characteristics into a silica-based resin. The new, silica-based resin functionalized with diphosphonic acid ligands can be used in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving processing of low-level, transuranic, and high-level radioactive wastes; it can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste including wastes contaminated with organic compounds.

  15. Pharmaceutical Applications of Ion-Exchange Resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, David P.

    2005-04-01

    The historical uses of ion-exchange resins and a summary of the basic chemical principles involved in the ion-exchange process are discussed. Specific applications of ion-exchange resins are provided. The utility of these agents to stabilize drugs are evaluated. Commonly occurring chemical and physical incompatibilities are reviewed. Ion-exchange resins have found applicability as inactive pharmaceutical constituents, particularly as disintegrants (inactive tablet ingredient whose function is to rapidly disrupt the tablet matrix on contact with gastric fluid). One of the more elegant approaches to improving palatability of ionizable drugs is the use of ion-exchange resins as taste-masking agents. The selection, optimization of drug:resin ratio and particle size, together with a review of scaleup of typical manufacturing processes for taste-masked products are provided. Ion-exchange resins have been extensively utilized in oral sustained-release products. The selection, optimization of drug:resin ratio and particle size, together with a summary of commonly occurring commercial sustained-release products are discussed. Ion-exchange resins have also been used in topical products for local application to the skin, including those where drug flux is controlled by a differential electrical current (ionotophoretic delivery). General applicability of ion-exchange resins, including ophthalmic delivery, nasal delivery, use as drugs in their own right (e.g., colestyramine, formerly referred to as cholestyramine), as well as measuring gastrointestinal transit times, are discussed. Finally, pharmaceutical monographs for ion-exchange resins are reviewed.

  16. Pharmaceutical Applications of Ion-Exchange Resins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, David

    2005-01-01

    The historical uses of ion-exchanged resins and a summary of the basic chemical principles involved in the ion-exchanged process are discussed. Specific applications of ion-exchange are provided that include drug stabilization, pharmaceutical excipients, taste-masking agents, oral sustained-release products, topical products for local application…

  17. Porous Ceramic Spheres from Ion Exchange Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    A commercial cation ion exchange resin, cross-linked polystyrene, has been successfully used as a template to fabricate 20 to 50 micron porous ceramic spheres. Ion exchange resins have dual template capabilities. Pore architecture of the ceramic spheres can be altered by changing the template pattern. Templating can be achieved by utilizing the internal porous structure or the external surface of the resin beads. Synthesis methods and chemical/physical characteristics of the ceramic spheres will be reported.

  18. ELUTION OF URANIUM VALUES FROM ION EXCHANGE RESINS

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, R.H.

    1959-11-24

    A process is described for eluting complex uranium ions absorbed on ion exchange resins. The resin is subjected to the action of an aqueous eluting solution contuining sulfuric acid and an alkali metal, ammonium, or magnesium chloride or nitrate, the elution being carried out until the desired amount of the uranium is removed from the resin.

  19. MODELING RESULTS FROM CESIUM ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Hang, T.; Aleman, S.

    2011-01-03

    Ion exchange modeling was conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to compare the performance of two organic resins in support of Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX). In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal at Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The spherical forms of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) as well as a hypothetical spherical SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 (SL644) are evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake wastes (supernates). Both SuperLig{reg_sign} and resorcinol formaldehyde resin beds can exhibit hydraulic problems in their granular (nonspherical) forms. SRS waste is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. Using VERSE-LC Version 7.8 along with the cesium Freundlich/Langmuir isotherms to simulate the waste decontamination in ion exchange columns, spherical SL644 was found to reduce column cycling by 50% for high-potassium supernates, but sRF performed equally well for the lowest-potassium feeds. Reduced cycling results in reduction of nitric acid (resin elution) and sodium addition (resin regeneration), therefore, significantly reducing life-cycle operational costs. These findings motivate the development of a spherical form of SL644. This work demonstrates the versatility of the ion exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. The value of a resin with increased selectivity for cesium over potassium can be assessed for further development.

  20. Radionuclide Leaching from Organic Ion Exchange Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Rinehart, D.E.

    1999-04-02

    Laboratory tests were performed to examine the efficacy of leach treatments for decontaminating organic ion exchange resins (OIER), which have been found in a number of samples retrieved from K East Basin sludge. Based on process records, the OIER found in the K Basins is a mixed-bet strong acid/strong base material marketed as Purolite{trademark} NRW-037. Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the OIER can restrict its disposal to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The need for testing to support development of a treatment process for K Basin sludge has been described in Section 4.2 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basins Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). To help understand the effects of anticipated OIER elutriation and washing, tests were performed with well-rinsed OIER material from K East Basin floor sludge (sample H-08 BEAD G) and with well-rinsed OIER having approximately 5% added K East canister composite sludge (sample KECOMP). The rinsed resin-bearing material also contained the inorganic ion exchanger Zeolon-900{trademark}, a zeolite primarily composed of the mineral mordenite. The zeolite was estimated to comprise 27 weight percent of the dry H-08 BEAD G material.

  1. Elution profiles of lanthanides with α-hydroxyisobutyric acid by ion exchange chromatography using fine resin.

    PubMed

    Trikha, Rahul; Sharma, Bal Krishan; Sabharwal, Kanwal Nain; Prabhu, Krishan

    2015-11-01

    Experiments were carried out using a strong acid cation exchange resin with a particle size of 75-150 μm, termed as "fine resin" in hydrogen ion form for the elution of individual lanthanides Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, and Dy that are produced as fission products in the spent nuclear fuel and generated in the effluent during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Batch experiments were carried out to study the effect of concentration of nitric acid on distribution coefficient. The distribution coefficient values for these individual lanthanides were determined in nitric acid medium in the concentration range of 0.01-4.0 N. Uptake of each individual lanthanide by resin was increased with increased nitric acid concentration from 0.01 to 0.5 N and remained similar from 0.5 to 1.0 N and decreased thereafter up to 4.0 N. Column experiments were also carried out using the same resin to study the parameters like pH of the eluent, flow rate, and resin bed height under isocratic elution conditions for eluting lanthanide elements using α-hydroxyisobutyric acid as eluent. The results of this study have indicated the possibility for the elution of individual lanthanides.

  2. Ion Exchange Temperature Testing with SRF Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Brown, Garrett N.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2012-03-01

    Ion exchange using the Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection for use in the Pretreatment Facility of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in an at-tank deployment for removing 137Cs. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues prior to reaching the ion exchange columns may be required. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of SRF resin performance under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes. This research examined the impact of elevated temperature on resin loading and resin degradation during extended solution flow using elevated temperature (45°, 50°, 55°, 60°, 65°, 75°C). Testing for extended times at elevated temperatures showed that the resin does degrade and loading capacity is reduced at and above 45°C. Above 60°C the resin appears to not load at all.

  3. Organic ion exchange resin separation methods evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Witwer, K.S.

    1998-05-27

    This document describes testing to find effective methods to separate Organic Ion Exchange Resin (OIER) from a sludge simulant. This task supports a comprehensive strategy for treatment and processing of K-Basin sludge. The simulant to be used resembles sludge that has accumulated in the 105KE and 105KW Basins in the 1OOK area of the Hanford Site. The sludge is an accumulation of fuel element corrosion products, organic and inorganic ion exchange materials, canister gasket materials, iron and aluminum corrosion products, sand, dirt, and other minor amounts of organic matter.

  4. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative /sup 137/Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either /sup 85/Sr or /sup 60/Co. Release rates of /sup 137/Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement.

  5. Synthesis of methyl tert-butyl ether catalyzed by acidic ion-exchange resins. Influence of the proton activity

    SciTech Connect

    Panneman, H.J.; Beenackers, A.A.C.M.

    1995-12-01

    The catalytic activity of various strong acid ion-exchange resins on the synthesis of methyl tert-butyl ether (MtBE) from methanol and isobutene has been investigated. Relative to Amberlyst 15, Kastel CS 381 and Amberlyst CSP have similar rate constants, whereas Duolite ES 276 and Amberlyst XE 307 have significantly higher and Duolite C26 and Duolite C16P substantially lower rate constants. All resins show a great decrease in catalytic activity if part of the protons is exchanged by sodium ions. At 10% proton capacity the rate constants per equivalent acid are reduced by a factor of 9 (for Amberlyst Xe 307 and Kastel Cs 381) to more than a factor 20 for Amberlyst 15 and Duolite ES 276, resulting in 100--200 times lower MtBE production rates. Depending on the catalyst applied, mass transfer limitations start to occur between 50 and 80 C. Values of the effective diffusion coefficient of isobutene varied between 0.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} and 4.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} m{sup 2}/s at 80 C.

  6. Scintillating 99Tc Selective Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell Greenhalgh; Richard D. Tillotson

    2012-07-01

    Scintillating technetium (99Tc) selective ion exchange resins have been developed and evaluated for equilibrium capacities and detection efficiencies. These resins can be utilized for the in-situ concentration and detection of low levels of pertechnetate anions (99TcO4-) in natural waters. Three different polystyrene type resin support materials were impregnated with varying amounts of tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) extractant, several different scintillating fluors and wavelength shifters. The prepared resins were contacted batch-wise to equilibrium over a wide range of 99TcO4- concentrations in natural water. The measured capacities were used to develop Langmuir adsorption isotherms for each resin. 99Tc detection efficiencies were determined and up to 71.4 ± 2.6% was achieved with some resins. The results demonstrate that a low level detection limit for 99TcO4- in natural waters can be realized.

  7. Separation of organic ion exchange resins from sludge -- engineering study

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.B.

    1998-08-25

    This engineering study evaluates the use of physical separation technologies to separate organic ion exchange resin from KE Basin sludge prior to nitric acid dissolution. This separation is necessitate to prevent nitration of the organics in the acid dissolver. The technologies under consideration are: screening, sedimentation, elutriation. The recommended approach is to first screen the Sludge and resin 300 microns then subject the 300 microns plus material to elutriation.

  8. Ion Exchange Temperature Testing with SRF Resin - 12088

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, R.L.; Rinehart, D.E.; Brown, G.N.; Peterson, R.A.

    2012-07-01

    Ion exchange using the Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection for use in the Pretreatment Facility of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in an at-tank deployment for removing Cs-137. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that higher temperatures (50 deg. C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues prior to reaching the ion exchange columns may be required. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of SRF resin performance under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes. This research examined the impact of elevated temperature on resin loading and resin degradation during extended solution flow at elevated temperature (45 deg., 50 deg., 55 deg., 60 deg., 65 deg., 75 deg. C). Testing for extended times at elevated temperatures showed that the resin does degrade and loading capacity is reduced at and above 45 deg. C. Above 60 deg. C the resin appears to not load at all. It was observed that the resin disintegrated at 75 deg. C until not much was left and partially disintegrated at 65 deg. C, which caused the column to plug in both tests after ∼336 hours. The results indicate that WTP will lose resin loading capacity if the ion exchange process is performed above 25 deg. C, and the resin will disintegrate above 65 deg. C. Therefore, WTP will have a restricted operating range of temperatures to perform the ion exchange process with this resin. PNNL and WTP are currently evaluating the operating limits of the resin in further detail. Aging in 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} also caused the resin to lose capacity above 25 deg. C and to completely dissolve at 55 deg. C. Again, WTP will have a restricted operating range of temperatures when eluting the resin with nitric acid in order to maintain resin loading capacity and avoid disintegration of the resin

  9. Isolation and separation of transplutonium elements from other actinides on ion exchange resins from aqueous and aqueous ethanol solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-11-01

    The behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, and other actinides, as well as Zr, on an anion exchange resin and a cation exchange resin in aqueous and aqueous alcohol solutions of sulfuric acid was investigated as a function of the concentration of various components of the solution. It was found that the presence of alcohol in sulfuric acid solutions leads to an increase in the distribution coefficients both on cation exchange resins and on anion exchange resins. The possibility of using ion exchange resins for the concentration and separation of transplutonium elements from U, Np, Pu, Zr, and other elements that form strong complexes with sulfate ions in a wide range of sulfuric acid concentrations was demonstrated.

  10. Tc-99 Ion Exchange Resin Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2010-08-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by CHPRC to evaluate the release of 99Tc from spent resin used to treat water from well 299-W15-765 and stored for several years. The key questions to be answered are: 1) does 99Tc readily release from the spent ion exchange resin after being in storage for several years; 2) if hot water stripping is used to remove the co-contaminant carbon tetrachloride, will 99Tc that has been sequestered by the resin be released; and 3) can spent resin be encapsulated into a cementitious waste form; if so, how much 99Tc would be released from the weathering of the monolith waste form? The results from the long term stability leach test results confirm that the resin is not releasing a significant amount of the sequestered 99Tc, evident by the less than 0.02% of the total 99Tc loaded being identified in the solution. Furthermore, it is possible that the measured 99Tc concentration is the result of 99Tc contained in the pore spaces of the resin. In addition to these results, analyses conducted to examine the impact of hot water on the release of 99Tc suggest that only a small percentage of the total is being released. This suggest that hot water stripping to remove carbon tetrachloride will not have a significant affect on the resin’s ability to hold-on to sequestered 99Tc. Finally, encapsulation of spent resin in a cementitious material may be a viable disposal option, but additional tests are needed to examine the extent of physical degradation caused by moisture loss and the effect this degradation process can have on the release of 99Tc.

  11. Determination of the inner surface of macroporous ion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Martinola, F; Meyer, A

    1975-12-01

    Study on macroporours IX resins and the pore structure. In addition to ion exchange reactions, macroporous ion exchange resins also show adsorptive properties which are due to the large pores of the resin beads and to the inner surface inside the beads. To measure this surface and the pore radii requires very precise fixation of the condition existing prior to the drying of the water-moist resin beads. Such stabilizing fixation can be achieved by displacing the regain water by isopropyl alcohol and subsequent drying for measuring the pore data. PMID:1223012

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF CYCLED SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

    2010-02-23

    This report presents characterization data for two spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin beds that had processed cesium in non-radioactive and radioactive cycles. All column cycle operations for the resin beds including loading, displacements, elution, regeneration, breakthroughs, and solution analyses are reported in Nash and Duignan, 2009a. That report covered four ion exchange (IX) campaigns using the two {approx}11 mL beds in columns in a lead-lag arrangement. The first two campaigns used Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 2F nonradioactive simulant while the latter two were fed with actual dissolved salt in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells. Both radioactive cycles ran to cesium breakthrough of the lead column. The resin beds saw in excess of 400 bed volumes of feed in each cycle. Resin disposal plans in tank farm processing depend on characterizations of resin used with actual tank feed. Following a final 30 bed volume (BV) elution with nitric acid, the resin beds were found to contain detectable chromium, barium, boron, aluminum, iron, sodium, sulfur, plutonium, cesium, and mercury. Resin affinity for plutonium is important in criticality safety considerations. Cesium-137 was found to be less than 10E+7 dpm/g of resin, similar to past work with sRF resin. Sulfur levels are reasonably consistent with other work and are expected to represent sulfur chemistry used in the resin manufacture. There were low but detectable levels of technetium, americium, and curium. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) work on the used (eluted) resin samples showed significant contents of mercury, barium, and chromium. One resin sample exceeded the TCLP level for mercury while the other metals were below TCLP levels. TCLP organics measurements indicated measurable benzene in one case, though the source was unknown. Results of this work were compared with other work on similar sRF resin characterizations in this report. This is the first

  13. K Basin Sludge Conditioning Process Testing Project Results from Test 4, ''Acid Digestion of Mixed-Bed Ion Exchange Resin''

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Delegard, C.H.; Schmidt, A.J.; Thornton, B.M.; Silvers, K.L.

    1999-04-02

    Approximately 73 m{sup 3} of heterogeneous solid material, ''sludge,'' (upper bound estimate, Packer 1997) have accumulated at the bottom of the K Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. This sludge is a mixture of spent fuel element corrosion products, ion exchange materials (organic and inorganic), graphite-based gasket materials, iron and aluminum metal corrosion products, sand, and debris (Makenas et al. 1996, 1997). In addition, small amounts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been found. Ultimately, it is planned to transfer the K Basins sludge to the Hanford double shell tanks (DSTs). The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (HSNF) project has conducted a number of evaluations to examine technology and processing alternatives to pretreat K Basin sludge to meet storage and disposal requirements. From these evaluations, chemical pretreatment has been selected to address criticality issues, reactivity, and the destruction or removal of PCBs before the K Basin sludge can be transferred to the DSTs. Chemical pretreatment, referred to as the K Basin sludge conditioning process, includes nitric acid dissolution of the sludge (with removal of acid insoluble solids), neutrons absorber addition, neutralization, and reprecipitation. Laboratory testing is being conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide data necessary to develop the sludge conditioning process.

  14. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1995-09-12

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  15. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1995-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  16. Diverse secondary interactions between ions exchanged into the resin phase and their analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Yuchi, Akio

    2014-01-01

    The research activities by the author's group to elucidate the chemical states of ions within the ion exchange resin phase are summarized. The resin with the higher exchange capacity has the smaller space available for ion exchange, and the higher cross linking degree interferes more with swelling of the resin. As a result, diverse secondary interactions between exchanged ions are observed on the resins of high exchange capacities and high cross linking degrees: the van der Waals contact results in incomplete exchange or enhanced dehydration of ions, hydrogen bond formation between acidic anions, and coadsorption of anions with metal ions. Contribution of the simple ion exchange mechanism to the reactions of iminodiactate-type chelating resins with metal ions in the acidic media is quantitatively discussed. The resulting complexes were successfully applied to preconcentration and separation of anions. PMID:24420244

  17. Method and solvent composition for regenerating an ion exchange resin

    DOEpatents

    Even, William R.; Irvin, David J.; Irvin, Jennifer A.; Tarver, Edward E.; Brown, Gilbert M.; Wang, James C. F.

    2002-01-01

    A method and composition for removing perchlorate from a highly selective ion exchange resin is disclosed. The disclosed approach comprises treating the resin in a solution of super critical or liquid carbon dioxide and one or more quaternary ammonium chloride surfactant compounds.

  18. Radiation degradation in EPICOR-2 ion exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Johnson, D.A.; Sanders, R.D. Sr.

    1990-09-01

    The Low-Level Waste Data base Development -- EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Program funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is investigating chemical and physical conditions for organic ion exchange resins contained in several EPICOR-II prefilters. Those prefilters were used during cleanup of contaminated water from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station after the March 1979 accident. The work was performed by EG G Idaho, Inc. at the Idaho Engineering Laboratory. This is the final report of this task and summarizes results and analyses of three samplings of ion exchange resins from prefilters PF-8 and -20. Results are compared with baseline data from tests performed on unirradiated resins supplied by Epicor, Inc. to determine the extent of degradation due to the high internal radiation dose received by the organic resins. Results also are compared with those of other researchers. 18 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Cesium-specific phenolic ion exchange resin

    DOEpatents

    Bibler, J.P.; Wallace, R.M.

    1995-08-15

    A phenolic, cesium-specific, cation exchange resin is prepared by neutralizing resorcinol with potassium hydroxide, condensing/polymerizing the resulting intermediate with formaldehyde, heat-curing the resulting polymer to effect cross-linking and grinding it to desired particle size for use. This resin will selectively and efficiently adsorb cesium ions in the presence of a high concentration of sodium ions with a low carbon to cesium ratio. 2 figs.

  20. Cesium-specific phenolic ion exchange resin

    DOEpatents

    Bibler, Jane P.; Wallace, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    A phenolic, cesium-specific, cation exchange resin is prepared by neutralizing resorcinol with potassium hydroxide, condensing/polymerizing the resulting intermediate with formaldehyde, heat-curing the resulting polymer to effect cross-linking and grinding it to desired particle size for use. This resin will selectively and efficiently adsorb cesium ions in the presence of a high concentration of sodium ions with a low carbon to cesium ratio.

  1. A mechanism for enhancing ionic accessibility into selective ion exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandratos, S.D.; Shelley, C.A.; Horwitz, E.P.; Chiarizia, R.

    1998-07-01

    A bifunctional monophosphonic/sulfonic acid ion exchange resin with high capacity has been synthesized. Metal ion studies have been carried out with europium, americium, and ferric nitrate in solutions of varying acidity, with and without sodium nitrate added. The bifunctional resin complexes far higher levels of Eu(III) from 0.5 and 1 N nitric acid than the monofunctional phosphonic acid resin. It is postulated that the sulfonic acid ligand provides an access mechanism for the metal ions into the polymer matrix by hydrating the matrix and preventing its collapse in high ionic strength solutions thus allowing for rapid ionic complexation by the selective phosphonic acid ligands. The bifunctional monophosphonic/sulfonic acid resin has both ligands bound to a polystyrene support. It complexes higher levels of metal ions than a comparable resin differing only by having the monophosphonic acid ligand directly bound to the C-C backbone. Results are compared to a diphosphonic/sulfonic acid resin.

  2. Analysis of radionuclide release from spent ion-exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Su, S.I.; Yim, M.S.

    2000-04-01

    Ion-exchange resins represent one of the most important waste streams in low-level waste management due to the unstabilized nature of the waste form and the large amount of radioactivity contained. To describe the release of radionuclides from ion-exchange resins stored in a disposal facility, a mechanistic release model was developed. The model is based on description of radionuclide migration both in the resin bead phase and the bulk pore water phase within waste containers. This modeling setup provides the capability to describe all the major physical processes taking place for the release of radionuclides. Because of the difficulty in obtaining analytical solutions, the numerical solution approach was employed in this model. The new resin release model was used to examine key processes and parameters in describing radionuclide release. These were found to be diffusion within the bulk pore water phase, flow rate of infiltrating leachant water, concentration of counterions of the leachant water, and sorption during the transport in the bulk pore water phase. Some parameters were found to have little impact in describing the release. These include the interdiffusion coefficient within resin beads and the density and radius of resin beads. Existing simplified modeling approaches were also compared with the new resin release model, and validities of using these simplified models are discussed.

  3. Closed cycle ion exchange method for regenerating acids, bases and salts

    DOEpatents

    Dreyfuss, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    A method for conducting a chemical reaction in acidic, basic, or neutral solution as required and then regenerating the acid, base, or salt by means of ion exchange in a closed cycle reaction sequence which comprises contacting the spent acid, base, or salt with an ion exchanger, preferably a synthetic organic ion-exchange resin, so selected that the counter ions thereof are ions also produced as a by-product in the closed reaction cycle, and then regenerating the spent ion exchanger by contact with the by-product counter ions. The method is particularly applicable to closed cycle processes for the thermochemical production of hydrogen.

  4. Vitrification of cesium-contaminated organic ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, T.N. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    Vitrification has been declared by the Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) as the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Savannah River Site currently uses a sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from a wastewater solution created from the processing of nuclear fuel. This process has several disadvantages such as the formation of a benzene waste stream. It has been proposed to replace the precipitation process with an ion exchange process using a new resorcinol-formaldehyde resin developed by Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC). Preliminary tests, however, showed that problems such as crust formation and a reduced final glass wasteform exist when the resin is placed in the melter environment. The newly developed stirred melter could be capable of overcoming these problems. This research explored the operational feasibility of using the stirred tank melter to vitrify an organic ion exchange resin. Preliminary tests included crucible studies to determine the reducing potential of the resin and the extent of oxygen consuming reactions and oxygen transfer tests to approximate the extent of oxygen transfer into the molten glass using an impeller and a combination of the impeller and an external oxygen transfer system. These preliminary studies were used as a basis for the final test which was using the stirred tank melter to vitrify nonradioactive cesium loaded organic ion exchange resin. Results from this test included a cesium mass balance, a characterization of the semi-volatile organic compounds present in the off gas as products of incomplete combustion (PIC), a qualitative analysis of other volatile metals, and observations relating to the effect the resin had on the final redox state of the glass.

  5. Enhanced DOC removal using anion and cation ion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Arias-Paic, Miguel; Cawley, Kaelin M; Byg, Steve; Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando L

    2016-01-01

    Hardness and DOC removal in a single ion exchange unit operation allows for less infrastructure, is advantageous for process operation and depending on the water source, could enhance anion exchange resin removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Simultaneous application of cationic (Plus) and anionic (MIEX) ion exchange resin in a single contact vessel was tested at pilot and bench scales, under multiple regeneration cycles. Hardness removal correlated with theoretical predictions; where measured hardness was between 88 and 98% of the predicted value. Comparing bench scale DOC removal of solely treating water with MIEX compared to Plus and MIEX treated water showed an enhanced DOC removal, where removal was increased from 0.5 to 1.25 mg/L for the simultaneous resin application compared to solely applying MIEX resin. A full scale MIEX treatment plant (14.5 MGD) reduced raw water DOC from 13.7 mg/L to 4.90 mg/L in the treated effluent at a bed volume (BV) treatment rate of 800, where a parallel operation of a simultaneous MIEX and Plus resin pilot (10 gpm) measured effluent DOC concentrations of no greater than 3.4 mg/L, even at bed volumes of treatment 37.5% greater than the full scale plant. MIEX effluent compared to simultaneous Plus and MIEX effluent resulted in differences in fluorescence intensity that correlated to decreases in DOC concentration. The simultaneous treatment of Plus and MIEX resin produced water with predominantly microbial character, indicating the enhanced DOC removal was principally due to increased removal of terrestrially derived organic matter. The addition of Plus resin to a process train with MIEX resin allows for one treatment process to remove both DOC and hardness, where a single brine waste stream can be sent to sewer at a full-scale plant, completely removing lime chemical addition and sludge waste disposal for precipitative softening processes. PMID:26624231

  6. Demonstration of an Ion Exchange Resin Addition/Removal System with Superlig 659

    SciTech Connect

    Norato, M.A.

    2000-12-19

    A pilot facility was designed and built in the Thermal Fluids Laboratory at the Savannah River Technology Center to demonstrate the slurry transport of ion exchange resins in and out of ion exchange columns.

  7. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY2012

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-06-11

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.0 , which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590 PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590 PTF TEF RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  8. Cesium Ion Exchange Loading Kinetics Testing with SRF Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Brown, Garrett N.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2012-11-02

    Ion exchange using the Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection for use in the Pretreatment Facility of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in an at-tank deployment for removing 137Cs. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (2 to 8 M) due to caustic leaching and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues prior to reaching the ion exchange columns. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of SRF resin performance under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes. This research examined the impact of linear load velocity (4, 6, 8 cm/min), initial sodium concentration (2, 5, 8 M), initial sodium-to-cesium ratio (1.4E+05, 2.1E+05, 2.8E+05 mol/mol), initial sodium-to-hydroxide ratio (2.0, 3.0, 4.0 mol/mol), and resin degradation during extended solution flow using elevated temperature (45°, 50°, 55°, 60°, 65°, 75°C). Testing was performed using a~2mL column packed with SRF resin with feed flowing through it in an up-flow pattern. Samples were taken at set intervals and the data analyzed to help understand the impact of these conditions on the SRF resin performance. It was found that the loading kinetics were not significantly impacted by the sodium concentration over the range tested. However, the loading kinetics were impacted by the linear load velocity. These results indicated that at the test temperature, the adsorption of cesium is strongly dependent on mass transfer through the film and not significantly impacted by interparticle diffusion. Testing for extended times at elevated temperatures showed that the resin does degrade and loading capacity is reduced at and above 45°C. Above 60°C the resin appears to not load at all.

  9. Management of Spent Organic Ion-Exchange Resins by Photochemical Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivas, C.; Sugilal, S.; Wattal, P. K.

    2003-02-26

    Management of spent ion-exchange resin waste arising from nuclear reactor operations by traditional practice of encapsulation in cement is associated with problems such as swelling and disintegration. Complete oxidation (mineralization) is an attractive alternative option. This paper reports the development of photochemical mineralization process for organic ion-exchange resins of poly (styrene-divinyl benzene) type with sulfonic acid and quaternary ammonium functional groups. It is a two-step process consisting of dissolution (conversion of solid resin into water-soluble reaction products) and photo-Fenton mineralization of the dissolved resin. Cation and anion resin dissolution was effected by reaction of the resin with H2O2 at 50-60 C in the presence of ferrous/copper sulphate catalyst. Direct dissolution of mixed resin was not efficient. However, the cation resin portion in the mixed resin could be selectively dissolved without affecting the anion portion. The solid anion resin after separation from the cation resin solution could be dissolved. About 0.5 liters of 50% H2O2 was required for dissolution of one kg of wet resin. The reaction time was 4-5 hours. Dissolution experiments were conducted on up to 8 liters of wet resin. The second step, viz., photo-Fenton mineralization of the dissolved resin was effected at ambient temperature(25-35 C). Kinetic results of laboratory scale experiments in immersion type photo-reactor and pilot scale experiments in tubular flow photo-reactor were presented. These results clearly demonstrated the photo-Fenton mineralization of dissolved resin at ambient temperature with stoichiometric quantity of H2O2 as against 70-200% excess H2O2 requirement in chemical mineralization experiments under Fenton oxidation conditions at 90-95 C. Based on these studies, a treatment scheme was developed and presented in this paper.

  10. Modeling Ion-Exchange Processing With Spherical Resins For Cesium Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, T.; Nash, C. A.; Aleman, S. E.

    2012-09-19

    The spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde and hypothetical spherical SuperLig(r) 644 ion-exchange resins are evaluated for cesium removal from radioactive waste solutions. Modeling results show that spherical SuperLig(r) 644 reduces column cycling by 50% for high-potassium solutions. Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde performs equally well for the lowest-potassium wastes. Less cycling reduces nitric acid usage during resin elution and sodium addition during resin regeneration, therefore, significantly decreasing life-cycle operational costs. A model assessment of the mechanism behind ''cesium bleed'' is also conducted. When a resin bed is eluted, a relatively small amount of cesium remains within resin particles. Cesium can bleed into otherwise decontaminated product in the next loading cycle. The bleed mechanism is shown to be fully isotherm-controlled vs. mass transfer controlled. Knowledge of residual post-elution cesium level and resin isotherm can be utilized to predict rate of cesium bleed in a mostly non-loaded column. Overall, this work demonstrates the versatility of the ion-exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. This evaluation justifies further development of a spherical form of the SL644 resin.

  11. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-07-02

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.01, which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590-PTF-TEF-RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  12. Ion Exchange Resin and Clay Vitrification by Plasma Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz A., Laura V.; Pacheco S., Joel O.; Pacheco P., Marquidia; Monroy G., Fabiola; Emeterio H., Miguel; Ramos F., Fidel

    2006-12-01

    The lack of treatment of a low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILRW) lead us to propose a vitrification process based on a plasma discharge; this technique incorporates LILRW into a matrix glass composed of ceramic clays material. The Mexican Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ), uses an ion exchange resin IRN 150 (styrene-divinilbence copolymer) in the TRIGA MARK III nuclear reactor. The principal objective of this resin is to absorb particles containing heavy metals and low-level radioactive particles. Once the IRN 150 resin filter capacity has been exceeded, it should be replaced and treated as LILRW. In this work, a transferred plasma system was realized to vitrify this resin taking advantage of its high power density, enthalpy and chemical reactivity as well as its rapid quenching and high operation temperatures. In order to characterize the morphological structure of these clay samples, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques were applied before and after the plasma treatment.

  13. Polymer modification of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (R-F) ion-exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Hubler, T.L.; Franz, J.A.; Yang, J.J.; Shreeve, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (R-F) resin is a candidate regenerable ion-exchange resin for removal of radioactive cesium from highly alkaline waste tank supernates at both the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Previous investigations into the structure/function relationships of R-F resin have shown that the R-F resin undergoes facile oxidation to produce para-quinones, with loss of ion-exchange sites, hence lowered performance of the resin for cesium ion-exchange. In this report, we give the results of our studies into polymer resins prepared using 4-methylresorcinol and 4-fluororesorcinol. The reaction of 4-methylresorcinol with formaldehyde formed oligomeric structures, while a mixture of 4-fluororesorcinol, phenol, and formaldehyde produced a non-soluble resin in aqueous/alkaline conditions. The 4-fluororesorcinol resin underwent significant nucleophilic displacement of the fluorine substituent to give oxidized resins with lower ion-exchange performance.

  14. Separation of hemicellulose-derived saccharides from wood hydrolysate by lime and ion exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojun; Zhuang, Jingshun; Fu, Yingjuan; Tian, Guoyu; Wang, Zhaojiang; Qin, Menghua

    2016-04-01

    A combined process of lime treatment and mixed bed ion exchange was proposed to separate hemicellulose-derived saccharides (HDS) from prehydrolysis liquor (PHL) of lignocellulose as value added products. The optimization of lime treatment achieved up to 44.2% removal of non-saccharide organic compounds (NSOC), mainly colloidal substances, with negligible HDS degradation at 0.5% lime level and subsequent neutralization by phosphoric acid. The residual NSOC and calcium ions in lime-treated PHL were eliminated by mixed bed ion exchange. The breakthrough curves of HDS and NSOC showed selective retention toward NSOC, leading to 75% HDS recovery with 95% purity at 17 bed volumes of exchange capacity. In addition, macroporous resin showed higher exchange capacity than gel resin as indicated by the triple processing volume. The remarkable selectivity of the combined process suggested the feasibility for HDS separation from PHL. PMID:26859331

  15. Recovery of boric acid from ion exchangers

    DOEpatents

    Pollock, Charles W.

    1976-01-01

    The recovery of boric acid from an anion exchange resin is improved by eluting the boric acid with an aqueous solution of ammonium bicarbonate. The boric acid can be readily purified and concentrated by distilling off the water and ammonium bicarbonate. This process is especially useful for the recovery of boric acid containing a high percentage of .sup.10 B which may be found in some nuclear reactor coolant solutions.

  16. Commercial Ion Exchange Resin Vitrification in Borosilicate Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Cicero-Herman, C.A.; Workman, P.; Poole, K.; Erich, D.; Harden, J.

    1998-05-01

    Bench-scale studies were performed to determine the feasibility of vitrification treatment of six resins representative of those used in the commercial nuclear industry. Each resin was successfully immobilized using the same proprietary borosilicate glass formulation. Waste loadings varied from 38 to 70 g of resin/100 g of glass produced depending on the particular resin, with volume reductions of 28 percent to 68 percent. The bench-scale results were used to perform a melter demonstration with one of the resins at the Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL). The resin used was a weakly acidic meth acrylic cation exchange resin. The vitrification process utilized represented a approximately 64 percent volume reduction. Glass characterization, radionuclide retention, offgas analyses, and system compatibility results will be discussed in this paper.

  17. Multivariant ion exchange: applications of weak-electrolyte resins in water purification

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelwright, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    Weak-electrolyte ion exchange resins differ from strong-electrolyte resins in several aspects, including the dependence of exchange capacity on pH, the tendency to shrink or swell appreciably, and the stronger forces holding the counter-ion in the resin matrix. These differences lead to variations in sorption performance. A model has been developed based on the mass-action law for exchange of a multi-protic weak-acid anion on a weak-base resin, to aid in evaluating resin suitability. This model, extended to include chloride ion competing with acid-anions for resin sites, has been used to predict the column behavior of phosphate removal on a weak-base resin accompanied by chloride and sulfate removal. While simplification (neglect of factors such as sulfate ions competing for resin sites, Donnan inclusion of neural salts, and resin shrinking and swelling) prevents full agreement between the model and published data, the model aids in the interpretation of experimental data by providing a theoretical estimation of plateau concentrations and transition velocities. A novel process, with wide potential application, has been developed for the removal of nitrate from water containing sulfate and chloride. This segmented-bed process reduces the amount of sulfate removed, by first separating sulfate and nitrate in different ion exchange columns, and then regenerating the sulfate column with chloride effluent from the exhaustion operation, so as to return sulfate to the water supply. Equilibrium analysis and column experiments indicate that successful operation can be expected. Two additional multivariate problems have been examined. The adsorption behavior of benzene on a charcoal bed under adiabatic conditions has been modeled with the multilayer equilibrium relationship of Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller, and examples have been solved in which condensation occurs.

  18. HIGH ASPECT RATIO ION EXCHANGE RESIN BED - HYDRAULIC RESULTS FOR SPERICAL RESIN BEADS

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M; Charles Nash, C; Timothy Punch, T

    2007-09-27

    A principal role of the DOE Savannah River Site is to safely dispose of a large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. An in-tank ion exchange unit is being considered for cesium removal to accelerate waste processing. This unit is planned to have a relatively high bed height to diameter ratio (10:1). Complicating the design is the need to cool the ion exchange media; therefore, the ion exchange column will have a central cooling core making the flow path annular. To separate cesium from waste the media being considered is made of resorcinol formaldehyde resin deposited on spherical plastic beads and is a substitute for a previously tested resin made of crystalline silicotitanate. This spherical media not only has an advantage of being mechanically robust, but, unlike its predecessor, it is also reusable, that is, loaded cesium can be removed through elution and regeneration. Resin regeneration leads to more efficient operation and less spent resin waste, but its hydraulic performance in the planned ion exchange column was unknown. Moreover, the recycling process of this spherical resorcinol formaldehyde causes its volume to significantly shrink and swell. To determine the spherical media's hydraulic demand a linearly scaled column was designed and tested. The waste simulant used was prototypic of the wastes' viscosity and density. This paper discusses the hydraulic performance of the media that will be used to assist in the design of a full-scale unit.

  19. Porous metal oxide microspheres from ion exchange resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picart, S.; Parant, P.; Caisso, M.; Remy, E.; Mokhtari, H.; Jobelin, I.; Bayle, J. P.; Martin, C. L.; Blanchart, P.; Ayral, A.; Delahaye, T.

    2015-07-01

    This study is devoted to the synthesis and the characterization of porous metal oxide microsphere from metal loaded ion exchange resin. Their application concerns the fabrication of uranium-americium oxide pellets using the powder-free process called Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP). Those mixed oxide ceramics are one of the materials envisaged for americium transmutation in sodium fast neutron reactors. The advantage of such microsphere precursor compared to classical oxide powder is the diminution of the risk of fine dissemination which can be critical for the handling of highly radioactive powders such as americium based oxides and the improvement of flowability for the filling of compaction chamber. Those millimetric oxide microspheres incorporating uranium and americium were synthesized and characterizations showed a very porous microstructure very brittle in nature which occurred to be adapted to shaping by compaction. Studies allowed to determine an optimal heat treatment with calcination temperature comprised between 700-800 °C and temperature rate lower than 2 °C/min. Oxide Precursors were die-pressed into pellets and then sintered under air to form regular ceramic pellets of 95% of theoretical density (TD) and of homogeneous microstructure. This study validated thus the scientific feasibility of the CRMP process to prepare bearing americium target in a powder free manner.

  20. Separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from trivalent transplutonium and rare earth elements on ion exchange resins in solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-11-01

    Th behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Ce, Eu, and Pr on an anion exchange resin and a cation exchange resin in a mixture with PbO/sub 2/ was investigated in sulfuric acid solutions. A substantial difference was detected in the distribution coefficients of Bk and Ce, on the one hand, and the remaining transplutonium and rare earth elements, on the other, associated with oxidation of the first two elements to the tetravalent state. Methods are proposed for the concentration and separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from the other transplutonium and rare earth elements on an anion exchange resin in solution of 0.01-0.25 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and a cation exchange resin in 0.75-1.0 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/.

  1. Speciation and surface interactions of actinides on aged ion-exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.E.; Buscher, C.T.; Donohoe, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy is presently faced with the stabilization and safe disposition of hundreds of metric tons of residue materials resulting from 50+ years of nuclear weapons production activities. These residues encompass a broad range of substrates and radionuclides and include both solid and liquid materials. Combustible residues constitute a significant fraction of the total residue inventory, and an important constituent within the combustible category is spent anion ion-exchange resins. These resins are typically utilized for the separation of plutonium from other radionuclides under strongly acidic nitric or hydrochloric acid solution conditions which favor the formation and partitioning of anionic Pu(IV) nitrato or chloride species. The spent resins are usually rinsed prior to storage as residues to reduce both acid and radionuclide concentrations, but significant radionuclide concentrations remain in these resins, and the long-term effects of concentrated acid and radiolysis on the resin integrity are relatively unexplored. Thus, new research is needed to assess the stability of these resin residues and address the need for further treatment to ensure stability prior to long-term disposal.

  2. Assessment of cadmium in aquatic sediment using dialysis samplers with ion-exchange-resin collection

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, B.; Allen, H.E.; Desnoyers, C.

    1998-05-01

    Simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) and acid volatile sulfide (AVS) show the potential for toxicity on the basis of their ratio. Accordingly, the authors spiked cadmium in a range for which Cd/AVS ratios were from 0.2 to 10 in the sediment with its weight about 8 kg in each batch. Dialysis samplers with a cation ion-exchange resin (Dowex 50W-X4) collection were used in a laboratory for the determination of free cadmium concentrations in pore water of the collected sediment. When equilibrium was reached among cadmium in pore water, sediment, and ion-exchange resin, cadmium exchanged onto resin phase was regenerated with 1 N hydrochloric acid (OPTIMA grade) and determined using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (Zeeman 5000) with a graphite furnace accessory. Cadmium determined using the dialysis sampler is considered as free cadmium which is related to the metal bioavailability toward aquatic biota. The developed methodology provides a new technique for assessment of free metal in aquatic sediment systems.

  3. Fractionation of sulphite spent liquor for biochemical processing using ion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, D L A; Silva, C M; Xavier, A M R B; Evtuguin, D V

    2012-12-31

    Sulphite spent liquor (SSL) is a side product from acidic sulphite pulping of wood, which organic counterpart is composed mainly by lignosulphonates (LS) and sugars. The last are a prominent substrate for the bioprocessing although a previous purification step is necessary to eliminate microbial inhibitors. In this study a fractionation of hardwood SSL (HSSL) has been accomplished employing ion exchange resins in order to separate sugars fraction from concomitant inhibitors: LS, acetic acid, furan derivatives, phenolics, acetic acid and excess of inorganic salts. The fractionation of HSSL has been carried out using two fixed-bed ion exchangers in series (cationic+anionic). The first cation exchange column packed with Dowex 50WX2 resin was able to eliminate free cations and partially separate sugars from high molecular weight LS and furan derivatives. The second anion exchange column packed with Amberlite IRA-96 sorbed remaining LS, phenolics and acetic acid. Overall, the series arrangement under investigation has removed 99.99% of Mg(2+), 99.0% of Ca(2+), 99.6% of LS, and 100% of acetic acid, whereas the yield of recovered sugars was at least 72% of their total amount in HSSL.

  4. Coupled acoustic-gravity field for dynamic evaluation of ion exchange with a single resin bead.

    PubMed

    Kanazaki, Takahiro; Hirawa, Shungo; Harada, Makoto; Okada, Tetsuo

    2010-06-01

    A coupled acoustic-gravity field is efficient for entrapping a particle at the position determined by its acoustic properties rather than its size. This field has been applied to the dynamic observation of ion-exchange reactions occurring in a single resin bead. The replacement of counterions in an ion-exchange resin induces changes in its acoustic properties, such as density and compressibility. Therefore, we can visually trace the advancement of an ion-exchange reaction as a time change in the levitation position of a resin bead entrapped in the field. Cation-exchange reactions occurring in resin beads with diameters of 40-120 microm are typically completed within 100-200 s. Ion-exchange equilibrium or kinetics is often evaluated with off-line chemical analyses, which require a batch amount of ion exchangers. Measurements with a single resin particle allow us to evaluate ion-exchange dynamics and kinetics of ions including those that are difficult to measure by usual off-line analyses. The diffusion properties of ions in resins have been successfully evaluated from the time change in the levitation positions of resin beads. PMID:20462180

  5. Dissolution of ion exchange resin by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.C.

    1981-08-01

    The resin dissolution process was conducted successfully in full-scale equipment at the SRL Semiworks. A solution containing 0.001M Fe/sup 2 +/, or Fe/sup 3 +/, and 3 vol % H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in 0.1M HNO/sub 3/ is sufficient to dissolve up to 40 vol % resin slurry (Dowex 50W-X8). Foaming and pressurization can be eliminated by maintaining the dissolution temperature below 99/sup 0/C. The recommended dissolution temperature range is 85 to 90/sup 0/C. Premixing hydrogen peroxide with all reactants will not create a safety hazard, but operating with a continual feed of hydrogen peroxide is recommended to control the dissolution rate. An air sparging rate of 1.0 to 1.5 scfm will provide sufficient mixing. Spent resin from chemical separation contains DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) residue, and the resin must be washed with 0.1M NH/sub 4/ OH to remove excess DTPA before dissolution. Gamma irradiation of resin up to 4 kW-hr/L did not change the dissolution rate significantly.

  6. Protonation and ion exchange equilibria of weak base anion-exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yoshinobu; Nakai, Mariko

    2011-09-30

    Protonation and ion exchange equilibria of weak base anion-exchange resins, in which tertiary amine moieties were introduced as a functional group, were investigated by applying NMR spectroscopy to species adsorbed into the resins. (31)P NMR signals of the phosphinate ion in the resin phases shifted to a lower field due to the influence of protonation of the tertiary amine groups of the resins in the pH range of 4-10. Protonation constants of the tertiary amine groups in styrene-divinylbenzene (DVB)-based resins were estimated to be K(H)=10(6.4) for Amberlite IRA96 and 10(6.5) for DIAION WA30 by the (31)P NMR method using the phosphinate ion as a probe species. In addition to the low field shift caused by the protonation of the tertiary amine moieties, another low field shift was observed for the phosphinate ion in acrylic acid-DVB-based resins at a rather high pH. This shift should be due to an unexpected deprotonation in the acrylic resin: a tautomerism accompanying the proton release from the amide form to the imide one in the functional group, thus, the resin could exhibit a cation exchange property at the high pH. Protonation constants of the tertiary amine moieties in the acrylic resins were estimated to be 10(8.8) for DIAION WA10, 10(9.0) for Amberlite IRA67 and 10(9.3) for Bio-Rad AG 4-X4 on the basis of the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation using the resin phase pH estimated by the (133)Cs and (1)H NMR signal intensities.

  7. Adsorption of o-cresol and benzoic acid in an adsorber packed with an ion-exchange resin: A comparative study of diffusional models

    SciTech Connect

    Run-Tun Huang; Teh-Liang Chen; Hung-Shan Weng

    1994-10-01

    Both solid- and pore-diffusion models were employed to simulate the adsorption of o-cresol and benzoic acid in a fixed-bed adsorber packed with an anion-exchange resin. The equilibrium adsorption data were modeled by a Langmuir isotherm. When the shape of the adsorption isotherm was approximately linear (as in the case of o-cresol), both models agreed well with the experimental break-through data, and they could be effectively applied to predict the breakthrough curve of longer columns. For a favorable adsorption isotherm (say, benzoic acid), however, better results were obtained by using the solid-diffusion model. In addition to the shape of the adsorption isotherm, several factors, such as the type of adsorbent, modeling of equilibrium data, computation efficiency, and concentration dependence of the intraparticle diffusivity, should also be taken into account for selecting a suitable diffusion model.

  8. Adsorption of three pharmaceuticals on two magnetic ion-exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Miao; Yang, Weiben; Zhang, Ziwei; Yang, Zhen; Wang, Yuping

    2015-05-01

    The presence of pharmaceuticals in aquatic environments poses potential risks to the ecology and human health. This study investigated the removal of three widely detected and abundant pharmaceuticals, namely, ibuprofen (IBU), diclofenac (DC), and sulfadiazine (SDZ), by two magnetic ion-exchange resins. The adsorption kinetics of the three adsorbates onto both resins was relatively fast and followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. Despite the different pore structures of the two resins, similar adsorption patterns of DC and SDZ were observed, implying the existence of an ion-exchange mechanism. IBU demonstrated a combination of interactions during the adsorption process. These interactions were dependent on the specific surface area and functional groups of the resin. The adsorption isotherm fittings verified the differences in the behavior of the three pharmaceuticals on the two magnetic ion-exchange resins. The presence of Cl- and SO4(2-) suppressed the adsorption amount, but with different inhibition levels for different adsorbates. This work facilitates the understanding of the adsorption behavior and mechanism of pharmaceuticals on magnetic ion-exchange resins. The results will expand the application of magnetic ion-exchange resins to the removal of pharmaceuticals in waters.

  9. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoichi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Tani, Atsushi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-29

    Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid (O2NOOH) was performed by combining an acidic eluate with an UV-vis detector and immersing the separation column in an ice-water bath. The decomposition behavior of peroxynitric acid in the solution was also studied using this system. The fraction for the peroxynitric acid peak was collected. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of this fraction, after standing at room temperature for 24h, showed that the decomposition products were mainly nitrate ions with a very small amount of nitrous acid. The peroxynitric acid peak area correlated perfectly with the total amount of decomposition products. The ion-exchange chromatographic isolation allowed us to evaluate the molar extinction coefficient of peroxynitric acid precisely in a wider wavelength range than previous reports. The value decreases monotonically from 1729±26M(-1)cm(-1) at 200nm to 12.0±0.5M(-1)cm(-1) at 290nm.

  10. Biocompatibility Research of a Novel pH Sensitive Ion Exchange Resin Microsphere

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongfei; Shi, Shuangshuang; Pan, Weisan; Sun, Changshan; Zou, Xiaomian; Fu, Min; Feng, Yingshu; Ding, Hui

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate biocompatibility and provide in-vivo pharmacological and toxicological evidence for further investigation of the possibility of pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere for clinical utilizations. Acute toxicity study and general pharmacological studies were conducted on the pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere we prepared. The general pharmacological studies consist of the effects of the pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere on the nervous system of mice, the functional coordination of mice, the hypnosis of mice treated with nembutal at subliminal dose, the autonomic activities of tested mice, and the heart rate, blood pressure, ECG and breathing of the anesthetic cats. The LD50 of pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere after oral administration was more than 18.84 g·Kg-1. Mice were orally administered with 16 mg·Kg-1, 32 mg·Kg-1 and 64 mg·Kg-1 of pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere and there was no significant influence on mice nervous system, general behavior, function coordination, hypnotic effect treated with nembutal at subliminal dose and frequency of autonomic activities. Within the 90 min after 5 mg·Kg-1, 10 mg·Kg-1, 20 mg·Kg-1 pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere was injected to cat duodenum, the heart rate, blood pressure, breathing and ECG of the cats didn’t make significant changes in each experimental group compared with the control group. The desirable pharmacological and toxicological behaviors of the pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere exhibited that it has safe biocompatibility and is possible for clinical use. PMID:25276183

  11. Biocompatibility Research of a Novel pH Sensitive Ion Exchange Resin Microsphere.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongfei; Shi, Shuangshuang; Pan, Weisan; Sun, Changshan; Zou, Xiaomian; Fu, Min; Feng, Yingshu; Ding, Hui

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate biocompatibility and provide in-vivo pharmacological and toxicological evidence for further investigation of the possibility of pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere for clinical utilizations. Acute toxicity study and general pharmacological studies were conducted on the pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere we prepared. The general pharmacological studies consist of the effects of the pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere on the nervous system of mice, the functional coordination of mice, the hypnosis of mice treated with nembutal at subliminal dose, the autonomic activities of tested mice, and the heart rate, blood pressure, ECG and breathing of the anesthetic cats. The LD50 of pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere after oral administration was more than 18.84 g·Kg(-1). Mice were orally administered with 16 mg·Kg(-1), 32 mg·Kg(-1) and 64 mg·Kg(-1) of pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere and there was no significant influence on mice nervous system, general behavior, function coordination, hypnotic effect treated with nembutal at subliminal dose and frequency of autonomic activities. Within the 90 min after 5 mg·Kg(-1), 10 mg·Kg(-1), 20 mg·Kg(-1) pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere was injected to cat duodenum, the heart rate, blood pressure, breathing and ECG of the cats didn't make significant changes in each experimental group compared with the control group. The desirable pharmacological and toxicological behaviors of the pH sensitive ion exchange resin microsphere exhibited that it has safe biocompatibility and is possible for clinical use.

  12. Ion-exchange properties of strontium hydroxyapatite under acidic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Nishioka, Hitoshi; Moriga, Toshihiro; Hayashi, Hiromu; Moffat, J.B.

    1998-09-01

    The ion exchange of strontium hydroxyapatite (SrHAp) with Pb{sup 2+} has been investigated under acidic conditions at 293 K. The addition of various acids to the exchanging solution enhanced the exchange capacity in the order HCl > HBr > HF > HNO{sub 3} > no acid, corresponding to the formation of halogen apatites with the former three acids or hydrogen phosphate with HNO{sub 3}. Since the ion-exchange capacity of SrHAp under nonacidic conditions is higher than that of chlorapatite, the aforementioned observations can be attributed to the participation of the protons introduced by the acids.z

  13. RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN CHEMISTRY FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

    2010-01-14

    A principal goal at the Savannah River Site is to safely dispose of the large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. In-tank ion exchange technology is being considered for cesium removal using a polymer resin made of resorcinol formaldehyde that has been engineered into microspheres. The waste under study is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste; therefore, the resin performance was evaluated with actual dissolved salt waste. The ion exchange performance and resin chemistry results are discussed.

  14. Vitrification of Cesium-Laden Organic Ion Exchange Resin in a Stirred Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Cicero-Herman, C.A; Sargent, T.N.; Overcamp, T.J.; Bickford, D.F.

    1997-07-09

    The goal of this research was a feasibility study for vitrifying the organic ion exchange resin in a stirred-tank melter. Tests were conducted to determine the fate of cesium including the feed, exit glass, and offgas streams and to assess any impact of feeding the resin on the melter or its performance.

  15. Anion selective membrane. [ion exchange resins and ion exchange membrane electrolytes for electrolytic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, S. S.; Geoffroy, R. R.; Hodgdon, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental anion permselective membranes were prepared and tested for their suitability as cell separators in a chemical redox power storage system being developed at NASA-Lewis Research Center. The goals of long-term (1000 hr) oxidative and thermal stability at 80 C in FeCl3 and CrCl3 electrolytes were met by most of the weak base and strong base amino exchange groups considered in the program. Good stability is exhibited by several of the membrane substrate resins. These are 'styrene' divinylbenzene copolymer and PVC film. At least four membrane systems produce strong flexible films with electrochemical properties (resistivity, cation transfer) superior to those of the 103QZL, the most promising commercial membrane. The physical and chemical properties of the resins are listed.

  16. Ion exchange - Simulation and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, Cal C.; Finn, John E.

    1991-01-01

    A FORTRAN program for simulating multicomponent adsorption by ion-exchange resins was adapted for use as both an ASPEN-callable module and as a free-standing simulator of the ion-exchange bed. Four polystyrene-divinylbenzene sulfonic acid resins have been characterized for three principal ions. It is concluded that a chelating resin appears appropriate as a heavy-metal trap. The same ASPEN-callable module is used to model this resin when Wilson parameters can be obtained.

  17. Weak-acid ion exchange for removing barium, radium, and hardness

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, D.W.; Snoeyink, V.L.; Pfeffer, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Weak-acid resin in the hydrogen form was found to effectively remove barium, radium, and hardness, without increasing the sodium content of the product water. The maximum capacity of the weak-acid resin was about 2.3 times that of strong-acid resin, and much less spent regenerant per unit volume of water treated was produced from a weak-acid column than from a strong-acid column. There are, however, some disadvantages to weak-acid ion exchange: swelling of the resin during exhaustion; the need to use acid-resistant materials; the inability to remove noncarbonate hardness; the necessity of stripping carbon dioxide from the product water and adjusting the pH; and the probable higher cost.

  18. Uranium Adsorption on Ion-Exchange Resins - Batch Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    The uranium adsorption performance of five resins (Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 [fresh], Dowex 21K 16-30 [regenerated], Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200) were tested using unspiked, nitrate-spiked, and nitrate-spiked/pH adjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests were conducted in support of a resin selection process in which the best resin to use for uranium treatment in the 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system will be identified. The results from these tests are as follows: • The data from the high-nitrate (1331 mg/L) tests indicated that Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 (fresh), Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200 all adsorbed uranium similarly well with Kd values ranging from ~15,000 to 95,000 ml/g. All four resins would be considered suitable for use in the treatment system based on uranium adsorption characteristics. • Lowering the pH of the high nitrate test conditions from 8.2 to 7.5 did not significantly change the uranium adsorption isotherms for the four tested resins. The Kd values for these four resins under high nitrate (1338 mg/L), lower pH (7.5) ranged from ~15,000 to 80,000 ml/g. • Higher nitrate concentrations greatly reduced the uranium adsorption on all four resins. Tests conducted with unspiked (no amendments; nitrate at 337 mg/L and pH at 8.2) source water yielded Kd values for Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 (fresh), Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200 resins ranging from ~800,000 to >3,000,000 ml/g. These values are about two orders of magnitude higher than the Kd values noted from tests conducted using amended source water. • Compared to the fresh resin, the regenerated Dowex 21K 16-30 resin exhibited significantly lower uranium-adsorption performance under all test conditions. The calculated Kd values for the regenerated resin were typically an order of magnitude lower than the values calculated for the fresh resin. • Additional testing using laboratory columns is recommended to better

  19. An evaluation of organic substance fraction removal during ion exchange with Miex-DOC resin.

    PubMed

    Wolska, Małgorzata

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the usefulness of Miex-DOC resin in eliminating organic substances and their fractions from water sources for drinking water was evaluated. The objects of study were samples from three surface water sources and one infiltration water source taken at water treatment plants before treatment in technical conditions. In particular, the effectiveness of removing biodegradable and non-biodegradable fractions as a function of resin dosages and water-resin contact times was evaluated. The ion exchange process with the Miex-DOC resin achieved a high effectiveness in removing aromatic non-biodegradable organic substances, and therefore a reduction in UV254 absorbance. The biodegradable fraction is much less susceptible to removal yet its removal effectiveness allows for a significant reduction in hazards connected with secondary microorganism development. The results of this study indicate the possibility of using ion exchange with the Miex-DOC resin for effective removal of disinfection by-product precursors.

  20. An evaluation of organic substance fraction removal during ion exchange with Miex-DOC resin.

    PubMed

    Wolska, Małgorzata

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the usefulness of Miex-DOC resin in eliminating organic substances and their fractions from water sources for drinking water was evaluated. The objects of study were samples from three surface water sources and one infiltration water source taken at water treatment plants before treatment in technical conditions. In particular, the effectiveness of removing biodegradable and non-biodegradable fractions as a function of resin dosages and water-resin contact times was evaluated. The ion exchange process with the Miex-DOC resin achieved a high effectiveness in removing aromatic non-biodegradable organic substances, and therefore a reduction in UV254 absorbance. The biodegradable fraction is much less susceptible to removal yet its removal effectiveness allows for a significant reduction in hazards connected with secondary microorganism development. The results of this study indicate the possibility of using ion exchange with the Miex-DOC resin for effective removal of disinfection by-product precursors. PMID:25976333

  1. Evaluation of chelating ion-exchange resins for separating Cr(III) from industrial effluents.

    PubMed

    Cavaco, Sofia A; Fernandes, Sandra; Augusto, Cátia M; Quina, Margarida J; Gando-Ferreira, Licínio M

    2009-09-30

    In this study two chelating resins containing iminodiacetic acid groups (Amberlite IRC 748 and Diaion CR 11) and a chelating resin based on sulfonic and diphosphonic acid groups (Diphonix) were investigated in order to separate Cr(III) from industrial effluents produced in hard and decorative electroplating. Samples of two industrial plants were characterized during a period of about one year and a half in terms of the metals content (Cr, Cu, Na, Ca, Fe and Ni), Total Suspended Solids (TSS), Total Dissolved Solids (TDS), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and pH. Some of the physical properties of the resins, namely the moisture content, apparent density, intraparticle porosity and the particle size distribution were also evaluated. To quantify the sorption capacity of the resins, batch experiments were performed using synthetic solutions of Cr(III), as well as solutions of Fe in the case of Diphonix. The Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich isotherms enabled a good description of the ion-exchange equilibrium data, and the maximum sorption capacity determined for Amberlite and Diaion was 3.6 mequiv./g(dry resin). For Diphonix that parameter was 3.4 mequiv./g(dry resin). The Diphonix resin exhibits a high selectivity for transition metals (Fe, Ni) over the chromium trivalent. Therefore, it was screened as the most suitable for selectively removing those metal impurities from chromium electroplating effluents. For this resin, the sorption capacity is strongly dependent on the initial pH of the solution. Though, high regeneration efficiencies of Diphonix for stripping Cr(III) were found by using a mixture of NaOH/H(2)O(2). The mathematical model tested for describing the dynamics of the process allowed a good fitting to the experimental data and enabled the estimation of effective pore diffusivity of Cr(III). The saturations of Diphonix with industrial effluents demonstrated that the breakthrough capacity of the resin is affected by the presence of other species in solution

  2. Technical Task and Quality Assurance Plan in Support of BNFL Part B: Studies of Ion Exchange Resin Integrity under Flowsheet Extremes: Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.A.

    2000-08-23

    This task will address four items related to ion exchange stability: (1) process upset evaluation of resin in contact with 1 molar sodium permanganate at 25 and 40 degrees C, (2) accelerated aging with nitric acid solution used during normal regeneration operations, (3) prolonged contacting of SuperLig 644 resin with 5 molar nitric acid at room temperature, and (4) prolonged contacting of SuperLig 644 resin with deionized water at 60 plus/minus 5 degrees C.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and application of ion exchange resin as a slow-release fertilizer for wheat cultivation in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bowei; Dong, Chen; Chu, Zhengpei; Zhang, Weizhe; Wang, Minjuan; Liu, Hong; Xie, Beizhen

    2016-10-01

    In addition to the bio-regenerative air revitalization, water recycling and waste management systems and their associated challenges, enhancing the crop yield with less fertilizer input for sustainable food production in space is also a challenge that needs to be overcome. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of applying ion exchange resin as a slow-release fertilizer for wheat cultivation in space. Strong-acid cationic exchange resins and weak-base anion exchange resins soaked in 1X, 5X, 10X and 15X Hoagland nutrient solutions, respectively, were used as fertilizers in clinoptilolite to cultivate wheat plants, and the morphological and physiological characteristics of the wheat plants were studied and compared with that of the wheat planted in vermiculite and nutrient solutions. The results showed that more ions were attached on the surface of the ion exchange resins as the solution concentration increased. After 14 days, the fresh weight of wheat planted in the ion exchange resin-clinoptilolite (IER-clinoptilolite) treated with 10X and 15X solutions were 190% and 192% higher than that of wheat planted in nutrient solution with the same concentration. Chlorophyll content of wheat plants cultivated in the two kinds of solid medium is significantly higher than that of liquid cultivation. The lowest peroxidase (POD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents of wheat plants cultivated in the IER-clinoptilolite appeared on the 14th day. According to all the experimental data, it's promising to produce slow-release nutrient fertilizer by using strong-acid cationic exchange resins and weak-base anion exchange resins for wheat cultivation in space.

  4. Storage and Aging Effects on Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Ion Exchange Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Arm, Stuart T.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Steele, Marilyn J.; Thomas, Kathie K.

    2007-09-10

    Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is evaluating the alternate Cs ion exchanger, spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), for use in the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP).( ) Previous test activities with spherical RF indicate that it has adequate capacity, selectivity, and kinetics to perform in the plant according to the flowsheet needs. It appears to have better elution and hydraulic properties than the existing alternatives: ground-gel RF and SuperLig® 644 (SL 644).( ) To date, the spherical RF performance testing has been conducted on freshly manufactured resin (within ~2 months of manufacture). The ion exchange resins will be manufactured and shipped to the WTP up to 1 year before being used in the plant. Changes in the resin properties during storage could reduce the capacity of the resin to remove Cs from low-activity waste solutions. Active sites on organic SL-644 resin have been shown to degrade during storage (Arm et al. 2004). Additional testing was needed to study the effects of storage conditions and aging on spherical RF ion exchange performance. Variables that could have a significant impact on ion exchange resins during storage include storage temperature, medium, and time. Battelle—Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD) was contracted to test the effects of various storage conditions on spherical RF resin. Data obtained from the testing will be used by the WTP operations to provide direction for suitable storage conditions and manage the spherical RF resin stock. Storage test conditions included wet and dry resin configurations under nitrogen at three temperatures. Work was initially conducted under contract number 24590-101-TSA-W000-00004 satisfying the needs defined in Appendix C of the Research and Technology Plan( ) TSS A-219 to evaluate the impact of storage conditions on RF resin performance. In February 2007, the contract mechanism was switched to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Operating Contract DE-AC05-76RL

  5. Denitration of Rocky Flats Ion-Exchange Resins: Recommendation of Denitration Processes, October 19, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob Espinoza; Mary Barr; Wayne Smith

    1998-12-01

    Resin denitration via anion-exchange is an implementable process that can effectively mitigate the hazards associated with stored resins in which the bulk of the nitrate consists of an "exchangeable nitrate" ionically bound to the cationic sites of the anion-exchange resins. Salicylate has been selected as the exchange anion of choice because of its superior selectivity for the Rocky Flats resins and its unique potential for comprehensive recovery and recycle. This report outlines a single recommended resin denigration procedure that is reasonably independent of the resin composition and the current stored form. This procedure is not optimized but rather seeks to `over-treat' the resins so that a single procedure works for the variety of stored resins. The recommended treatment with sodium salicylate reduces resins by 95-99+% the measured exothermic behavior of the ion-exchange.

  6. 21 CFR 173.25 - Ion-exchange resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide whereby the resin contains not more than 15 percent by weight of vinyl N,N-di-methyl..., carbonate, chloride, hydrogen, hydroxyl, magnesium, potassium, sodium, and sulfate except that: The ion... resins in the hydrogen form identified in paragraphs (a) (1), (2), and (11) of this section; or (ii)...

  7. 21 CFR 173.25 - Ion-exchange resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... oxidized with hydrogen peroxide whereby the resin contains not more than 15 percent by weight of vinyl N,N..., carbonate, chloride, hydrogen, hydroxyl, magnesium, potassium, sodium, and sulfate except that: The ion... resins in the hydrogen form identified in paragraphs (a) (1), (2), and (11) of this section; or (ii)...

  8. 21 CFR 173.25 - Ion-exchange resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide whereby the resin contains not more than 15 percent by weight of vinyl N,N-di-methyl..., carbonate, chloride, hydrogen, hydroxyl, magnesium, potassium, sodium, and sulfate except that: The ion... resins in the hydrogen form identified in paragraphs (a) (1), (2), and (11) of this section; or (ii)...

  9. 21 CFR 173.25 - Ion-exchange resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide whereby the resin contains not more than 15 percent by weight of vinyl N,N-di-methyl..., carbonate, chloride, hydrogen, hydroxyl, magnesium, potassium, sodium, and sulfate except that: The ion... resins in the hydrogen form identified in paragraphs (a) (1), (2), and (11) of this section; or (ii)...

  10. 21 CFR 173.25 - Ion-exchange resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide whereby the resin contains not more than 15 percent by weight of vinyl N,N-di-methyl..., carbonate, chloride, hydrogen, hydroxyl, magnesium, potassium, sodium, and sulfate except that: The ion... resins in the hydrogen form identified in paragraphs (a) (1), (2), and (11) of this section; or (ii)...

  11. Evaluation of Selective Ion Exchange Resins for Removal of Mercury from the H-Area Water Treatment Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    2000-09-05

    This study investigated the ability of seven ion exchange (IX) resins, some of which were mercury specific, to remove mercury in H-Area WTU waters from three sources (Reverse Osmosis (RO) Feed, RO Permeate from Train A, and a mercury ''hot spot'' extraction well HEX 18). Seven ion exchange resins, including ResinTech CG8 and Dowex 21K (the cation and anion exchange resins currently used at the H-Area WTU) were screened against five alternative ion exchange materials plus an experimental blank. Mercury decontamination factors (DFs), mercury breakthrough, and post-test contaminant concentrations of IX resins were determined for each IX material tested.

  12. The characteristic assessment of spent ion exchange resin from PUSPATI TRIGA REACTOR (RTP) for immobilization process

    SciTech Connect

    Wahida, Nurul; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Majid, Amran Ab; Irwan, M. N.; Wahab, Mohd Abd; Marzukee, Nik; Paulus, Wilfred; Phillip, Esther; Thanaletchumy

    2014-09-03

    In this paper, spent ion exchange resin generated from PUSPATI TRIGA reactor (RTP) in Malaysian Nuclear Agency were characterized based on the water content, radionuclide content and radionuclide leachability. The result revealed that the water content in the spent resin is 48%. Gamma spectrometry analysis indicated the presence of {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co and {sup 65}Zn. The leachability test shows a small concentrations (<1 Bq/l) of {sup 152}Eu and {sup 134}Cs were leached out from the spent resin while {sup 60}Co activity concentrations slightly exceeded the limit generally used for industrial wastewater i.e. 1 Bq/l. Characterization of spent ion exchange resin sampled from RTP show that this characterization is important as a basis to immobilize this radioactive waste using geopolymer technology.

  13. The characteristic assessment of spent ion exchange resin from PUSPATI TRIGA REACTOR (RTP) for immobilization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahida, Nurul; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Majid, Amran Ab; Wahab, Mohd Abd; Marzukee, Nik; Paulus, Wilfred; Phillip, Esther; Thanaletchumy, Irwan, M. N.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, spent ion exchange resin generated from PUSPATI TRIGA reactor (RTP) in Malaysian Nuclear Agency were characterized based on the water content, radionuclide content and radionuclide leachability. The result revealed that the water content in the spent resin is 48%. Gamma spectrometry analysis indicated the presence of 134Cs, 137Cs, 152Eu, 54Mn, 58Co, 60Co and 65Zn. The leachability test shows a small concentrations (<1 Bq/l) of 152Eu and 134Cs were leached out from the spent resin while 60Co activity concentrations slightly exceeded the limit generally used for industrial wastewater i.e. 1 Bq/l. Characterization of spent ion exchange resin sampled from RTP show that this characterization is important as a basis to immobilize this radioactive waste using geopolymer technology.

  14. Recycling asymmetric hydrogenation catalysts by their immobilization onto ion-exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Barbaro, Pierluigi

    2006-07-24

    Ion-exchange resins can be used as supports for the preparation of single-site, heterogenised asymmetric hydrogenation catalysts. The immobilised catalysts obtained can be efficiently and conveniently recovered and recycled. This article reviews the significant contributions in the field including the main concepts behind the design and the applications of this type of catalyst. PMID:16552795

  15. The use of Diphonix{sup {trademark}} ion exchange resin as a preconcentration step for the lanthanides and actinides in analytical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rollins, A.N.; Thakkar, A.H.; Fern, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    Diphonix ion exchange resin is a chelating ion exchange resin containing sulfonic and gemdiphosphonic acid groups. This resin has a high specificity for the lanthanides and actinides, especially at acidities below pH = 3. Currently, we are investigating new ways to use Diphonix resin as a preconcentration step to separate the lanthanides and actinides from interfering elements present in a variety of environmental matrices. Once the lanthanides and actinides have been separated from the interfering matrix constituents, the elements are removed from the resin and passed through subsequent separation schemes. This presentation will outline the use of Diphonix resin with a variety of problem matrices, and demonstrate its usefulness for analysis of the lanthanides and actinides.

  16. SuperLig Ion Exchange Resin Swelling and Buoyancy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, N.M.

    2000-07-27

    The objective of this study was to achieve a fundamental understanding of SuperLig resin swelling and shrinking characteristics, which lead to channeling and early breakthrough during loading cycles. The density of salt solution that causes resin floating was also determined to establish a limit for operation. Specific tests performed include (a) pH dependence, (b) ionic strength dependence and (c) buoyancy effect vs. simulant composition.

  17. Repeated use of ion-exchange resin membranes in calcareous soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, S.K.; Belnap, Jayne; Miller, M.E.

    2003-01-01

    This study compared the consistency of nutrient extraction among repeated cycles of ion-exchange resin membrane use. Two sandy calcareous soils and different equilibration temperatures were tested. No single nutrient retained consistent values from cycle to cycle in all treatments, although both soil source and temperature conferred some influence. It was concluded that the most conservative use of resin membranes is single-use.

  18. Corrosion of steel drums containing cemented ion-exchange resins as intermediate level nuclear waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffó, G. S.; Farina, S. B.; Schulz, F. M.

    2013-07-01

    Exhausted ion-exchange resins used in nuclear reactors are immobilized by cementation before being stored. They are contained in steel drums that may undergo internal corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The objective of this work is to evaluate the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins with different aggressive species. The corrosion potential and the corrosion rate of the steel, and the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored for 900 days. Results show that the cementation of ion-exchange resins seems not to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums. The corrosion rate of the steel in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins in the absence of contaminants or in the presence of 2.3 wt.% sulphate content remains low (less than 0.1 μm/year) during the whole period of the study (900 days). The presence of chloride ions increases the corrosion rate of the steel at the beginning of the exposure but, after 1 year, the corrosion rate drops abruptly reaching a value close to 0.1 μm/year. This is probably due to the lack of water to sustain the corrosion process. When applying the results obtained in the present work to estimate the corrosion depth of the steel drums containing the cemented radioactive waste after a period of 300 years, it is found that in the most unfavourable case (high chloride contamination), the corrosion penetration will be considerably lower than the thickness of the wall of the steel drums. Cementation of ion-exchange resins does not seem to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums that contained them; even in the case the matrix is highly contaminated with chloride ions.

  19. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoichi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Tani, Atsushi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-29

    Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid (O2NOOH) was performed by combining an acidic eluate with an UV-vis detector and immersing the separation column in an ice-water bath. The decomposition behavior of peroxynitric acid in the solution was also studied using this system. The fraction for the peroxynitric acid peak was collected. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of this fraction, after standing at room temperature for 24h, showed that the decomposition products were mainly nitrate ions with a very small amount of nitrous acid. The peroxynitric acid peak area correlated perfectly with the total amount of decomposition products. The ion-exchange chromatographic isolation allowed us to evaluate the molar extinction coefficient of peroxynitric acid precisely in a wider wavelength range than previous reports. The value decreases monotonically from 1729±26M(-1)cm(-1) at 200nm to 12.0±0.5M(-1)cm(-1) at 290nm. PMID:26748867

  20. THERMAL MODELING OF ION EXCHANGE COLUMNS WITH SPHERICAL RF RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; King, W.

    2009-12-30

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal performance of RF columns fully loaded with radioactive cesium. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated during Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process upset conditions with a focus on implementation at Hanford. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results will provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on RF. The current full-scale design for the SCIX system includes a central cooling tube, and one objective of these calculations was to examine its elimination to simplify the design. Results confirmed that a column design without a central cooling tube is feasible for RF, allowing for the possibility of significant design simplifications if it can be assumed that the columns are always filled with liquid. With active cooling through the four outer tubes, the maximum column diameter expected to maintain the temperature below the assumed media and safety limits is 26 inches, which is comparable to the current design diameter. Additional analysis was conducted to predict the maximum column temperatures for the previously unevaluated accident scenario involving inadvertent drainage of liquid from a cesium-saturated column, with retention of the ion exchange media and cesium in the column. As expected, much higher maximum temperatures are observed in this case due to the poor heat transfer properties of air versus liquid. For this hypothetical accident scenario involving inadvertent and complete drainage of liquid from a cesium-saturated column, the modeling results indicate that the maximum temperature within a 28 inch diameter RF column with external cooling is expected to exceed 250 C within 2 days, while the maximum temperature of a 12 inch column is maintained below

  1. Synthesis of biodiesel from pongamia oil using heterogeneous ion-exchange resin catalyst.

    PubMed

    Jaya, N; Selvan, B Karpanai; Vennison, S John

    2015-11-01

    Biodiesel is a clean-burning renewable substitute fuel for petroleum. Biodiesel could be effectively produced by transesterification reaction of triglycerides of vegetable oils with short-chain alcohols in the presence of homogeneous or heterogeneous catalysts. Conventionally, biodiesel manufacturing processes employ strong acids or bases as catalysts. But, separation of the catalyst and the by-product glycerol from the product ester is too expensive to justify the product use as an automobile fuel. Hence heterogeneous catalysts are preferred. In this study, transesterification of pongamia oil with ethanol was performed using a solid ion-exchange resin catalyst. It is a macro porous strongly basic anion exchange resin. The process parameters affecting the ethyl ester yield were investigated. The reaction conditions were optimized for the maximum yield of fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE) of pongamia oil. The properties of FAEE were compared with accepted standards of biodiesel. Engine performance was also studied with pongamia oil diesel blend and engine emission characteristics were observed.

  2. Synthesis of biodiesel from pongamia oil using heterogeneous ion-exchange resin catalyst.

    PubMed

    Jaya, N; Selvan, B Karpanai; Vennison, S John

    2015-11-01

    Biodiesel is a clean-burning renewable substitute fuel for petroleum. Biodiesel could be effectively produced by transesterification reaction of triglycerides of vegetable oils with short-chain alcohols in the presence of homogeneous or heterogeneous catalysts. Conventionally, biodiesel manufacturing processes employ strong acids or bases as catalysts. But, separation of the catalyst and the by-product glycerol from the product ester is too expensive to justify the product use as an automobile fuel. Hence heterogeneous catalysts are preferred. In this study, transesterification of pongamia oil with ethanol was performed using a solid ion-exchange resin catalyst. It is a macro porous strongly basic anion exchange resin. The process parameters affecting the ethyl ester yield were investigated. The reaction conditions were optimized for the maximum yield of fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE) of pongamia oil. The properties of FAEE were compared with accepted standards of biodiesel. Engine performance was also studied with pongamia oil diesel blend and engine emission characteristics were observed. PMID:26254204

  3. Development and evaluation of oral controlled release chlorpheniramine-ion exchange resinate suspension.

    PubMed

    Kadam, A U; Sakarkar, D M; Kawtikwar, P S

    2008-01-01

    An oral controlled release suspension of chlorpheniramine maleate was prepared using ion-exchange resin technology. A strong cation exchange resin Indion 244 was utilized for the sorption of the drug and the drug resinates was evaluated for various physical and chemical parameters. The drug-resinate complex was microencapsulated with a polymer Eudragit RS 100 to further retard the release characteristics. Both the drug-resinate complex and microencapsulated drug resinate were suspended in a palatable aqueous suspension base and were evaluated for controlled release characteristic. Stability study indicated that elevated temperature did not alter the sustained release nature of the dosage form indicating that polymer membrane surrounding the core material remained intact throughout the storage period.

  4. Effects of Gamma Radiation on Individual and Mixed Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, E.W.

    2003-01-06

    The ion exchange resins that are used to deionize moderator in the reactor purification systems may accumulate sufficient radiation dose to damage the resins. This radiation damage would be manifested by: (1) loss of useful exchange capacity of the bed, which is costly since resins from the reactor deionizers are not reused; (2) shrinking or swelling of the resins, which may have some effect on the hydraulic behavior of the beds; (3) release of resin degradation products into the process stream, which pollutes moderator with impurities and precursors of the neutron-induced radioisotopes. This document details results of a laboratory study to determine the magnitude of these three effects by gamma irradiation of individual resins and their mixtures.

  5. Biodiesel production using anionic ion-exchange resin as heterogeneous catalyst.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki-Kitakawa, Naomi; Honda, Hiroki; Kuribayashi, Homare; Toda, Takuji; Fukumura, Takuya; Yonemoto, Toshikuni

    2007-01-01

    The transesterification reactions of triolein with ethanol using various ion-exchange resin catalysts were conducted to produce ethyl oleate as a biodiesel. The anion-exchange resins exhibited much higher catalytic activities than the cation-exchange resin. The anion-exchange resin with a lower cross-linking density and a smaller particle size gave a high reaction rate as well as a high conversion. By combining the three-step regeneration method, the resin could be repeatedly used for the batch transesterification without any loss in the catalytic activity. A continuous transesterification reaction was carried out using an expanded bed reactor packed with the most active resin. The reactor system permitted the continuous production of ethyl oleate with a high conversion.

  6. Distribution of Components in Ion Exchange Materials Taken from the K East Basin and Leaching of Ion Exchange Materials by Nitric/Hydrofluoric Acid and Nitric/Oxalic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Rinehart, D.E.; Hoopes, F.V.

    1999-04-02

    Laboratory tests were performed to examine the efficacy of mixed nitric/hydrofluoric acid followed by mixed nitric/oxalic acid leach treatments to decontaminate ion exchange materials that have been found in a number of samples retrieved from K East (KE)Basin sludge. The ion exchange materials contain organic ion exchange resins and zeolite inorganic ion exchange material. Based on process records, the ion exchange resins found in the K Basins is a mixed-bed, strong acid/strong base material marketed as Purolite NRW-037. The zeolite material is Zeolon-900, a granular material composed of the mineral mordenite. Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the ion exchange material can restrict its disposal to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The need for testing to support development of a treatment process for K Basin sludge has been described in Section 4.2 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basins Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). Elutriation and washing steps are designed to remove the organic resins from the K Basin sludge. To help understand the effects of the anticipated separation steps, tests were performed with well-rinsed ion exchange (IX) material from KE Basin floor sludge (sample H-08 BEAD G) and with well-rinsed IX having small quantities of added KE canister composite sludge (sample KECOMP). Tests also were performed to determine the relative quantities of organic and inorganic IX materials present in the H-08 K Basin sludge material. Based on chemical analyses of the separated fractions, the rinsed and dry IX material H-08 BEAD G was found to contain 36 weight percent inorganic material (primarily zeolite). The as-received (unrinsed) and dried H-08 material was estimated to contain 45 weight percent inorganic material.

  7. Evaluation of ion exchange resins and various enzymes in thiamine analysis.

    PubMed

    Ellefson, W C; Richter, E; Adams, M; Baillies, N T

    1981-11-01

    Four ion exchange resins and 9 enzyme preparations are evaluated for use in the official AOAC thiamine method because Decalso and Clarase or Mylase P either are no longer available or are available in a form that is not suitable for use in the assay. The enzymes are prepared in the same manner described for Clarase or Mylase P in the AOAC method and are compared with Clarase T300 for their effectiveness in releasing thiamine from thiamine phosphate, and their ability to produce similar results on samples. Rhozyme S is 90-100% as effective as Clarase T300 in both of these respects. The other enzymes tested were not satisfactory. Further study is necessary because Rhozyme S also is no longer manufactured. The ion exchange resins are prepared for use in the manner described for Decalso in the AOAC method. Recoveries of thiamine range from 95 to 100%, using Bio-Rex 70 (hydrogen form) ion exchange resin. The other resins tested were not satisfactory. PMID:7309654

  8. Hydraulic Permeability of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Ion-Exchange Resin - Effects of Oxygen Uptake and Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Paul Allen

    2009-01-01

    An ion-exchange process, using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin is the baseline process for removing cesium from the dissolved salt solution in the high-level waste tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site in Washington State. The RF resin is also being evaluated for use in the proposed Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) system, which is an alternative treatment option at DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS)in South Carolina. Testing at ORNL will determine the impact of radiation exposure and oxygen uptake by the RF resin on the hydraulic permeability of the resin. Samples of the resin will be removed periodically to measure physical properties (bead size and compressibility) and cesium capacity. The proposed full-scale treatment system at Hanford, the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), will use an ion-exchange column containing nominally 680 gal of resin, which will treat 30 gpm of waste solution. The ion-exchange column is designed for a typical pressure drop of 6 psig, with a maximum of 9.7 psig. The lab-scale column is 3-in. clear PVC pipe and is prototypic of the proposed Hanford column. The fluid velocity in the lab-scale test will be much higher than for the full-scale column, in order to generate the maximum pressure drop expected in that column (9.7 psig). The frictional drag from this high velocity will produce similar forces on the resin in the lab-scale column as would be expected at the bottom of the full-scale column. The chemical changes in the resin caused by radiation exposure and oxygen uptake are expected to cause physical changes in the resin that could reduce the bed porosity and reduce the hydraulic permeability of the resin bed. These changes will be monitored by measuring the pressure drop through the lab-scale column and by measuring the physical properties of samples of the resin. The test loop with the lab-scale column is currently being fabricated, and operation will start by late May. Testing will be completed by the

  9. Intragastric distribution of ion-exchange resins: a drug delivery system for the topical treatment of the gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Burton, S; Washington, N; Steele, R J; Musson, R; Feely, L

    1995-11-01

    Previous studies by this group on freeze-dried oral dosage forms containing finely-divided ion-exchange resins revealed prolonged gastric residence and uniform distribution within the stomach. The present study was carried out to ascertain whether this was due to freeze-drying, properties of the radiolabelled ionic exchange resin, or the small dosing volume used. 99mTc-labelled cholestyramine resin was administered in two dosage forms, a freeze-dried tablet which dissolved in the oral cavity (orally dissolving tablet; ODT) and a 1.5 mL aqueous suspension. Two resin particle sizes (20-40 and 90-125 microns) were studied. Oesophageal transit and intragastric distribution and residence were followed by gamma scintigraphy. In a second study, in six subjects, gastric emptying of the water-soluble fraction of the ODT and 1.5 mL of water, was measured using 99mTc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Oesophageal transit of a water-soluble marker and resin in suspension was rapid, but the transit of the resin in the ODTs was significantly prolonged. Regardless of particle size or dosage form, the resin was evenly distributed throughout the stomach with 20-25% remaining for 5.5 h. In contrast, the water-soluble marker cleared from the stomach rapidly from both dosage forms. We suggest that oral dose forms containing finely-divided ion-exchange resins may form a useful system for topical treatment of the gastric mucosa, for example in targeting to Helicobacter pylori infection. PMID:8708983

  10. Hydraulic Testing of Ion Exchange Resins for Cesium Removal from Hanford Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Augspurger, Brian S.; Blanchard, David L.; Cuta, Judith M.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Thorson, Murray R.

    2006-08-28

    Forty years of cold war nuclear weapons production activities have resulted in the by-product of millions of gallons of highly radioactive liquid and solid wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Department of Energy has contracted the construction of a waste-treatment processing plant to remove the major portions of radioactive isotopes from the liquid waste portion for follow-on processing and vitrification of the high-activity waste separately from the low-activity waste. The plant will use ion exchange processing for 137Cs removal from the supernatant portion of Hanford tank wastes. Currently, SuperLig? 644 (IBC Advanced Technologies, Utah) is the ion exchange resin of choice. However, during pilot-scale testing, significant pressure build-up occurred after multiple load-elute cycles. Current testing activities are evaluating resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin as an alternative to achieve comparable loading and elution performance with improved hydraulic performance. Studies have been conducted with both a ground gel RF resin (Boulder Scientific, Colorado) and a spherical RF resin developed by Microbeads (Trondheim, Norway). The purpose of this testing was then to compare the vertical and radial forces of the expanding resin, the breakage of the resin beads, and the differential pressure across the resin bed during multiple load-elute cycles. These tests were done in a small-scale column with high flow rates to simulate the hydraulic conditions that would be experienced in a full-scale column.

  11. Permissible radionuclide loading for organic ion exchange resins from nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    MacKenzie, D.R.; Lin, M.; Barletta, R.E.

    1983-10-01

    A questionnaire on the use of ion exchange resins in nuclear power plants was sent to all operating reactors in the US. Responses were received from 23 of the 48 utilities approached. Information was sought concerning the amounts of radionuclides held by the resins, and the effects of its radiation on the resins both during operation and after removal from service. Relevant information from the questionnaires is summarized and discussed. Available literature on the effects of ionizing radiation on organic ion exchange resins has been reviewed. On the basis of published data on damage to resins by radiation, the technical rationale is given to support NRC's draft branch technical position on a maximum permissible radionuclide loading. It is considered advisable to formulate the rule in terms of a delivered dose rather than a curie loading. A maximum permissible dose of 10/sup 8/ rad is chosen because, while it is large enough that a measurable amount of damage will be done to the resin, it is small enough that the damage will be negligible at a power plant or disposal site. A test procedure has been written which a generator could use to qualify a specific resin for service at a higher dose than permitted by the general rule.

  12. Expanded-bed adsorption utilizing ion-exchange resin to purify extracellular beta-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Pereira, J A; Vieira E Rosa, P De T; Pastore, G M; Santana, C C

    1998-01-01

    The application of expanded-bed ion-exchange resins allows the elimination of intermediary particulate separation steps like filtration or centrifugation prior to adsorption steps in enzyme-purification processes from crude fermentation broths. This work is concerned with the experimental evaluation data of a process related to the adsorption of an extracellular p-galactosidase from the fungi Scopulariopsis. The protein recovery in the ion-exchange resin Accell Plus QMA was accomplished using a continuous-monitoring method. The direct adsorption step was followed by a elution step with concentrated NaCl solutions aiming to improve the enzyme-specific activity. Experimental data for fixed and expanded bed were compared.

  13. The use of histological techniques for the demonstration of ion exchange resins.

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, A J

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To establish the staining characteristics of certain ion exchange resins in histological material, with a view to enabling confident differential identification. METHODS: Various histological staining procedures were applied to selected pathological material and prepared agar blocks containing the cation exchange resin calcium polystyrene sulphonate and the anion exchange resin cholestyramine. RESULTS: Calcium polystyrene sulphonate uniquely stained strongly by a direct Schiff's reagent procedure without any preoxidation and by the Ziehl-Neelsen method. Cholestyramine was negative by the former method but stained strongly with a standard Congo red technique. CONCLUSIONS: These staining results are consistent with the known structure and properties of polystyrene sulphonate and cholestyramine resins. Polystyrene sulphonate resins have the virtually pathognomonic feature of direct Schiff positivity, while morphology, location, and strong non-birefringent Congo red positivity facilitate the identification of cholestyramine. It is possible that the intrinsic staining characteristics of cholestyramine may be lost once it has bound to its target. Images PMID:10674039

  14. Kinetics of cadmium ion sorption on ion exchange and chelating resins

    SciTech Connect

    Bilba, D.; Bilba, N.; Albu, M.

    1999-11-01

    Cadmium sorption from aqueous solutions on sulfonic (C-150) and iminodiacetic (S-930) Purolite macroporous resins was investigated. The influence of operating variables such as initial pH, Cd(II) concentration, time and temperature on the equilibrium parameters was measured. The ion preference and sorption ability of resins, i.e., binding constant (b) and saturation capacity (x{sub m}), derived from sorption isotherm, depend on the functional group structure. The Cd(II) uptake is only particle diffusion controlled. The kinetic parameters, i.e., t{sub 1/2} values for 50% attainment of equilibrium sorption, rate constant ({bar K}) and diffusion coefficient ({bar D}) are higher on the sulfonic resin. The moving boundary particle diffusion model fits the entire ion sorption process on chelating resin, but only the initial sorption on the sulfonic resin, confirming the difference in chemistry between chelation and ion exchange.

  15. ION EXCHANGE MODELING FOR REMOVAL OF CESIUM FROM HANFORD WASTE USING SUPERLIG 644 RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L

    2004-05-01

    The expected performance of a proposed ion exchange column using SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 resin for the removal of cesium from Hanford high level radioactive alkaline waste is discussed. This report represents a final report on the ability and knowledge with regard to modeling the Cesium-SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 resin ion exchange system. Only the loading phase of the cycle process is addressed within this report. Pertinent bench-scale column tests and batch equilibrium experiments are addressed. The methodology employed and sensitivity analyses are also included (i.e., existing methodology employed is referenced to prior developmental efforts while updated methodology is discussed). Pilot-scale testing is not assessed since no pilot-scale testing was available at the time of this report. Column performance predictions are made considering three selected feed compositions under nominal operating conditions. The sensitivity analyses provided help to identify key parameters that aid in resin procurement acceptance criteria. The methodology and application presented within this report reflect the expected behavior of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 resin manufactured at the production-scale (i.e, 250 gallon batch size level). The primary objective of this work was, through modeling and verification based on experimental assessments, to predict the cesium removal performance of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 resin for application in the RPP pretreatment facility.

  16. In Situ Perchlorate Determination on Purolite A850 Ion Exchange Resin via Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Sinkov, Sergei I.; Bryan, Samuel A.

    2007-07-17

    The reported investigation represents a first step toward development of a sensor methodology for in-situ determination of ionic species retained on ion exchange column. Raman spectroscopy was demonstrated as a detection method for determining perchlorate loading on a non-selective ion exchange resin, Purolite A850 acrylic gel. This method has been established using laboratory water (DIW) samples and actual California ground water (CAGW) samples with the complexities of competing ions, dissolved organics, and other potential interfering agents. The detection limit for this method of monitoring perchlorate on resin was measured to be 0.014 meq g-1 for both DIW and CAGW systems. The anion selectivity of the A850 resin was determined via batch contact experiments using CAGW. Linear correlation between resin loading with perchlorate and the intensity of the Raman perchlorate signal was observed and quantitatively described. The obtained relationship was applied for the determination of the perchlorate retained on the A850 resin in the column elution experiments.

  17. Ion Exchange Modeling Of Cesium Removal From Hanford Waste Using Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, S.; Hamm, L.; Smith, F.

    2007-06-27

    This report discusses the expected performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline Hanford radioactive waste. Predictions of full scale column performance in a carousel mode are made for the Hot Commissioning, Envelope B, and Subsequent Operations waste compositions under nominal operating conditions and for perturbations from the nominal. Only the loading phase of the process cycle is addressed in this report. Pertinent bench-scale column tests, kinetic experiments, and batch equilibrium experiments are used to estimate model parameters and to benchmark the ion-exchange model. The methodology and application presented in this report reflect the expected behavior of spherical RF resin manufactured at the intermediate-scale (i.e., approximately 100 gallon batch size; batch 5E-370/641). It is generally believed that scale-up to production-scale in resin manufacturing will result in similarly behaving resin batches whose chemical selectivity is unaffected while total capacity per gram of resin may vary some. As such, the full-scale facility predictions provided within this report should provide reasonable estimates of production-scale column performance.

  18. Synthesis, structural characterization, and performance evaluation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) ion-exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Hubler, T.L.; Franz, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.; Bryan, S.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Brown, G.N.; Bray, L.A.; Linehan, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    The 177 underground storage tanks at the DOE`s Hanford Site contain an estimated 180 million tons of high-level radioactive wastes. It is desirable to remove and concentrate the highly radioactive fraction of the tank wastes for vitrification. Resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin, an organic ion-exchange resin with high selectivity and capacity for the cesium ion, which is a candidate ion-exchange material for use in remediation of tank wastes. The report includes information on the structure/function analysis of R-F resin and the synthetic factors that affect performance of the resin. CS-100, a commercially available phenol-formaldehyde (P-F) resin, and currently the baseline ion-exchanger for removal of cesium ion at Hanford, is compared with the R-F resin. The primary structural unit of the R-F resin was determined to consist of a 1,2,3,4-tetrasubstituted resorcinol ring unit while CS-100, was composed mainly of a 1,2,4-trisubstituted ring. CS-100 shows the presence of phenoxy-ether groups, and this may account for the much lower decontamination factor of CS-100 for cesium ion. Curing temperatures for the R-F resin were found to be optimal at 105--130C. At lower temperatures, insufficient curing, hence crosslinking, of the polymer resin occurs and selectivity for cesium drops. Curing at elevated temperatures leads to chemical degradation. Optimal particle size for R-F resin is in the range of 20--50 mesh-sized particles. R-F resin undergoes chemical degradation or oxidation which destroys ion-exchange sites. The ion-exchange sites (hydroxyl groups) are converted to quinones and ketones. CS-100, though it has much lower performance for cesium ion-exchange, is significantly more chemically stable than R-F resin. To gamma radiation, CS-100 is more radiolytically stable than R-F resin.

  19. Processing of Spent Ion Exchange Resins in a Rotary Calciner - 12212

    SciTech Connect

    Kascheev, Vladimir; Musatov, Nikolay

    2012-07-01

    Processing Russian nuclear ion exchange resin KU-2 using a 'Rotary' calciner was conducted. The resulting product is a dry free flowing powder (moisture content 3 wt.%, Angle of repose of ≅ 20 deg.). Compared with the original exchange resin the volume of the final product is about 3 times less.. Rotary calciner product can be stored in metal drums or in special reinforced concrete cubicles. After thermal treatment in a rotary calciner, the spent resin product can be solidified in cement yielding the following attributes: - The cemented waste is only a 35% increase over the volume of powder product; - The volume of cement calciner product is almost 9 times less (8.7) than the volume of cement solidified resin; - The mechanical strength of cemented calciner product meets the radioactive waste regulations in Russia. (authors)

  20. Potential mechanisms for bioregeneration of perchlorate-containing ion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Sharbatmaleki, Mohamadali; Unz, Richard F; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2015-05-15

    Ion-exchange (IX) is the most feasible technology for perchlorate removal from drinking water. Reuse of resins present challenges, however. Selective resins are non-regenerable, and are incinerated after one time use, while non-selective resins, when regenerable, produce a waste stream that contains high concentration of perchlorate that must be disposed of. A process to bioregenerate spent resin containing perchlorate with perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) has been recently developed. In this research, potential mechanisms for bioregeneration of resin-attached perchlorate (RAP) were investigated. Batch bioregeneration experiments were performed using gel-type and macroporous-type resins. Various initial chloride concentrations and various resin bead sizes were used. The results of the bioregeneration experiments suggested that chloride, i.e. the product of perchlorate biodegradation, is more likely the desorbing agent of RAP; and increasing the concentration of chloride enhances the bioregeneration process. Both film and pore diffusion were found to be relevant with respect to the rate of perchlorate mass-transfer to the bulk liquid. Bioregeneration was found to be more effective for macroporous than for gel-type resins, especially in the case of macroporous resins with relatively small bead size in the presence of higher chloride concentration.

  1. Cement waste-form development for ion-exchange resins at the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Veazey, G.W.; Ames, R.L.

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the development of a cement waste form to stabilize ion-exchange resins at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). These resins have an elevated potential for ignition due to inadequate wetness and contact with nitrates. The work focused on the preparation and performance evaluation of several Portland cement/resin formulations. The performance standards were chosen to address Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and Environmental Protection Agency Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements, compatibility with Rocky Flats equipment, and throughput efficiency. The work was performed with surrogate gel-type Dowex cation- and anion-exchange resins chosen to be representative of the resin inventory at RFETS. Work was initiated with nonactinide resins to establish formulation ranges that would meet performance standards. Results were then verified and refined with actinide-containing resins. The final recommended formulation that passed all performance standards was determined to be a cement/water/resin (C/W/R) wt % ratio of 63/27/10 at a pH of 9 to 12. The recommendations include the acceptable compositional ranges for each component of the C/W/R ratio. Also included in this report are a recommended procedure, an equipment list, and observations/suggestions for implementation at RFETS. In addition, information is included that explains why denitration of the resin is unnecessary for stabilizing its ignitability potential.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF AN APPROACH TO MODELING LOADING AND ELUTION OF SPHERICAL RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION-EXCHANGE RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, S.; Hamm, L.; Smith, F.

    2011-10-03

    fixed ionogenic groups that make up sRF. Recent literature reviews and scoping titration tests strongly indicate that sRF is a polyfunctional cation exchange resin with at least three dominant types of ring groups playing a role in its isotherm behavior over the wide pH range of operations. Also three types of fixed ionogenic acid groups are present: sulfonic (SO{sub 3}H{sup -}) groups; carboxylic (COOH{sup -}) groups, and resorcylic (OH{sup -}) groups. It is this premise that we are working under in the development of a robust isotherm model for sRF over its entire planned pH operating range. The application of prototypic isotherms for modeling ion-exchange column behavior is demonstrated in Section 3 of this report. This preliminary work served to focus the development effort on the use of a mass-action based isotherm. In Section 4 of this report, the foundational material required to develop a robust isotherm model for sRF is provided. The paths taken, and choices made, are given for the reader to better understand our current status with respect to this goal and to highlight our most recent understanding of sRF exchange equilibria. Our ultimate goal is to update the CERMOD code (Aleman and Hamm, 2007) with a robust isotherm model for sRF that spans the entire pH and concentration ranges of planned operations. The isotherm model will then be used in the VERSE-LC code to model an entire ion-exchange cycle.

  3. 1-Butanol absorption in poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) ion exchange resins for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Maciá, M A; Curcó, D; Bringué, R; Iborra, M; Rodríguez-Ropero, F; van der Vegt, N F A; Aleman, Carlos

    2015-12-21

    The swelling behaviour of poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene), P(S-DVB), ion exchange resins in 1-butanol (BuOH) has been studied by means of atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations (MD). The topological characteristics reported for the resin in the dry state, which exhibited complex internal loops (macropores), were considered for the starting models used to examine the swelling induced by BuOH contents ranging from 10% to 50% w/w. Experimental measurements using a laser diffraction particle size analyzer indicate that swelling causes a volume variation with respect to the dry resin of 21%. According to MD simulations, such a volume increment corresponds to a BuOH absorption of 31-32% w/w, which is in excellent agreement with the indirect experimental estimation (i.e. 31% w/w). Simulations reveal that, independently of the content of BuOH, the density of the swelled resin is higher than that of the dry resin, evidencing that the alcohol provokes important structural changes in the polymeric matrix. Thus, BuOH molecules cause a collapse of the resin macropores when the content of alcohol is ≤20% w/w. In contrast, when the concentration of BuOH is close to the experimental value (∼30% w/w), P(S-DVB) chains remain separated by pores faciliting the access of the reactants to the reaction centers. On the other hand, evaluation of both bonding and non-bonding interactions indicates that the mixing energy is the most important contribution to the absorption of BuOH into the P(S-DVB) resin. Overall, the results displayed in this work represent a starting point for the theoretical study of the catalytic conversion of BuOH into di-n-butyl ether in P(S-DVB) ion exchange resins using sophisticated electronic methods. PMID:26411792

  4. Protein adsorption on DEAE ion-exchange resins with different ligand densities and pore sizes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui-Li; Lin, Dong-Qiang; Zhu, Mi-Mi; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2012-11-01

    Ion exchange chromatography (IEC) is a common and powerful technique for the purification of proteins. The ligand density and pore properties of ion-exchange resins have significant effects on the separation behaviors of protein, however, the understandings are quite limited. In the present work, the adsorption isotherms of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) were investigated systematically with series of diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) ion-exchange resins, which have different ligand densities and pore sizes. The Langmuir equation was used to fit the experimental data and the influences of ligand density and pore size on the saturated adsorption capacity and the dissociation constant were discussed. The zeta potentials and hydrodynamic diameters of proteins at different pHs were also measured, and the surface charge characteristics of proteins and the adsorption mechanism were discussed. The results demonstrated that the ligand density, pore size, and protein properties affect the protein adsorption capacities in an integrative way. An integrative parameter was introduced to describe the complicated effects of ligand density and pore size on the protein adsorption. For a given protein, the ligand density and pore size should be optimized for improving the protein adsorption.

  5. Synthesis of Anomeric Methyl Fructofuranosides and Their Separation on an Ion-Exchange Resin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nurminen, Erkki; Poijarvi, Paivi; Koskua, Katja; Hovinen, Jari

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of d-fructose with methanol in the presence of acid as a catalyst gives a mixture of methyl-[beta]-d-fructopyranoside, methyl-[alpha]-D-fructofuranoside, and methyl-[beta]-d-fructofuranoside, which were separated on an ion exchange column and characterized polarimetrically.

  6. Using Process Knowledge to Manage Disposal Classification of Ion-Exchange Resin - 13566

    SciTech Connect

    Bohnsack, Jonathan N.; James, David W.

    2013-07-01

    It has been previously shown by EPRI [1] that Class B and C resins represent a small portion by volume of the overall generation of radioactively contaminated resins. In fact, if all of the resins were taken together the overall classification would meet Class A disposal requirements. Lowering the classification of the ion exchange resins as they are presented for disposal provides a path for minimizing the amount of waste stored. Currently there are commercial options for blending wastes from various generators for Class A disposal in development. The NRC may have by this time introduced changes and clarifications to the Branch Technical Position (BTP) on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation [2] that may ultimately add more flexibility to what can be done at the plant level. The BTP has always maintained that mixtures of resins that are combined for ALARA purposes or operational efficiency can be classified on the basis of the mixture. This is a point often misinterpreted and misapplied. This paper will address options that can be exercised by the generator that can limit B and C waste generation by more rigorous tracking of generation and taking advantage of the normal mix of wastes. This can be achieved through the monitoring of reactor coolant chemistry data and coupled with our knowledge of radionuclide production mechanisms. This knowledge can be used to determine the overall accumulation of activity in ion-exchange resins and provides a 'real-time' waste classification determination of the resin and thereby provide a mechanism to reduce the production of waste that exceeds class A limits. It should be noted that this alternative approach, although rarely used in a nuclear power plant setting, is acknowledged in the original BTP on classification [3] as a viable option for determining radionuclide inventories for classification of waste. Also included is a discussion of an examination performed at the Byron plant to estimate radionuclide content in the

  7. PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, D.

    2009-05-28

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin hydraulic cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Sixteen of these cycles were completed in the 24-inch IX Column (1/2 scale column). Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 3 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale IX system. The RF resin bed showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. The hydraulic and chemical performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins. The pilot-scale testing indicates that the RF resin is durable and should hold up to many hydraulic cycles in actual radioactive Cesium (Cs) separation.

  8. Effect of resin charged functional group, porosity, and chemical matrix on the long-term pharmaceutical removal mechanism by conventional ion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Li, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Shengliu; Sun, Jian; Zheng, Shaokui

    2016-10-01

    This study attempted to clarify the long-term pharmaceutical removal mechanism from sewage treatment plant effluent during the cyclical adsorption-regeneration operation of 5 commercial resin-based fixed-bed reactors with the simultaneous occurrence of electrostatic interactions and complex non-electrostatic interactions. It examined 12 pharmaceuticals belonging to 10 therapeutic classes with different predominant existing forms and hydrophobicities. Furthermore, the effect of the resin charged functional group (strong-base vs. strong-acid vs. non-ionic), porosity (macroporous vs. gel), and chemical matrix (polystyrenic vs. polyacrylic) on the mechanism was investigated to optimize resin properties and achieve higher pharmaceutical removal. The results reported herein indicate the importance of non-electrostatic interactions between pharmaceuticals and the resin backbone during short-term cyclical operation (i.e., the 1st adsorption-regeneration cycle). With the development of cyclical operation, however, non-electrostatic interaction-induced pharmaceutical removal generally decreased and even disappeared when equilibrium was achieved between the influent and the resin. Despite pharmaceutical therapeutic class or hydrophilicity, anion (or cation) exchange resin preferentially removed those pharmaceuticals that were predominantly present as organic anions (or cations) by ion exchange process during long-term cyclical operation (i.e., ≥6 adsorption-regeneration cycles). Besides pharmaceuticals predominantly present as undissociated molecules, some amphoteric pharmaceuticals containing large amounts of zwitterions were also difficult to remove by ion exchange resin. Additionally, neither resin porosity nor chemical matrix had any significant effect on the long-term pharmaceutical removal mechanism.

  9. Effect of resin charged functional group, porosity, and chemical matrix on the long-term pharmaceutical removal mechanism by conventional ion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Li, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Shengliu; Sun, Jian; Zheng, Shaokui

    2016-10-01

    This study attempted to clarify the long-term pharmaceutical removal mechanism from sewage treatment plant effluent during the cyclical adsorption-regeneration operation of 5 commercial resin-based fixed-bed reactors with the simultaneous occurrence of electrostatic interactions and complex non-electrostatic interactions. It examined 12 pharmaceuticals belonging to 10 therapeutic classes with different predominant existing forms and hydrophobicities. Furthermore, the effect of the resin charged functional group (strong-base vs. strong-acid vs. non-ionic), porosity (macroporous vs. gel), and chemical matrix (polystyrenic vs. polyacrylic) on the mechanism was investigated to optimize resin properties and achieve higher pharmaceutical removal. The results reported herein indicate the importance of non-electrostatic interactions between pharmaceuticals and the resin backbone during short-term cyclical operation (i.e., the 1st adsorption-regeneration cycle). With the development of cyclical operation, however, non-electrostatic interaction-induced pharmaceutical removal generally decreased and even disappeared when equilibrium was achieved between the influent and the resin. Despite pharmaceutical therapeutic class or hydrophilicity, anion (or cation) exchange resin preferentially removed those pharmaceuticals that were predominantly present as organic anions (or cations) by ion exchange process during long-term cyclical operation (i.e., ≥6 adsorption-regeneration cycles). Besides pharmaceuticals predominantly present as undissociated molecules, some amphoteric pharmaceuticals containing large amounts of zwitterions were also difficult to remove by ion exchange resin. Additionally, neither resin porosity nor chemical matrix had any significant effect on the long-term pharmaceutical removal mechanism. PMID:27367175

  10. Development and validation of a novel modeling framework integrating ion exchange and resin regeneration for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Amini, Adib; O'Neal, Jeremy A; Boyer, Treavor H; Zhang, Qiong

    2015-11-01

    Models have been developed to simulate the process of ion exchange for water treatment. However the modeling of resin regeneration process, which can predict regeneration efficiency and residual stream for determining technology sustainability, was not incorporated into previous models. Therefore a model integrating both ion exchange and resin regeneration considering regeneration efficiency is needed for evaluating and improving ion exchange technology. This study developed an integrated model aiming to simulate ion exchange and resin regeneration in different configurations (fixed bed, fluidized bed) for the first time. The integrated model has been validated via comparing model predictions with experimental data. The impacts of dimensionless groups (i.e. the Péclet number, the diffusion modulus, and the Biot number) on ion exchange breakthrough curve have been analyzed using this model. In addition, this integrated model has been used to optimize the regeneration frequency to improve the overall performance of ion exchange. It demonstrated this integrated model could be a useful tool for further studies in ion exchange technology.

  11. An investigation of the radiolytic stability of a resorcinol-formaldehyde ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.; Bibler, N.E.

    1994-01-31

    Developing and demonstrating waste separations technologies are the principal objectives of the Underground Storage Tank -Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID) Program carried out by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) at the DOE Hanford site. One planned separation technique utilizes ion exchange for removal of cesium and strontium from high-level liquid supernates. A resorcinol-formaldehyde resin, which is a polycondensation-type cation exchange resin for cesium removal, has been developed at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and has demonstrated superlative performance in testing at SRS, Oak Ridge and PNL. Advantages of this resin relative to other media for cesium removal are its high capacity for cesium and its compatibility with the high pH and aluminum and sodium concentrations of both Hanford and SRS high-level liquid wastes.

  12. Spent ion exchange resin-its treatment from the point of view of safe disposal.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, K S; Raj, S S; Lal, K B

    2003-01-01

    Ion exchange process is one of the treatment methods for radioactive waste. The resin becomes no longer useful after number of cycles of usage. At the same time the regenerated resin cannot be considered as non active waste for disposal. Hence it is felt necessary that the regenerated resin is treated in a fashion so as to result in a form which can be considered as inactive material. It is possible to convert this spent resin into multivalent ionic form which are generally non leachable, thus providing the necessary properties for meeting the disposal criteria. Studies were carried out for the exchange of radioactive ions on these resins with ions like Al3+, Sn4+, Pb2+ and Fe3+ etc. The studies included leachability aspects, exchange with other active ions, thermal characteristics, compressive strength of the cement blocks loaded with the resin etc. Our studies indicated that the order of the stability of the resin with respect to properties like leachability, exchange properties etc. follow the trend as follows: Sn4+ > Pb2+ > Al3+ > Fe3+.

  13. Removal of natural organic matter from water using ion-exchange resins and cyclodextrin polyurethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkambule, T. I.; Krause, R. W.; Mamba, B. B.; Haarhoff, J.

    Natural organic matter (NOM) consists of a complex mixture of naturally occurring organic compounds. Although it is not considered toxic by itself, NOM present during water disinfection may result in the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs), many of which are either carcinogenic or mutagenic. Although it is difficult to completely characterize NOM due to its complex and large structure, a consideration of its structure is necessary for a better understanding of the mechanism of NOM removal from water. In this study, water from the Vaalkop water treatment plant was characterized for its NOM composition by fractionation over ion-exchange resins. Fractionation at different pH with different resins resulted in the isolation of the neutral, basic and acidic fractions of both the hydrophobic and hydrophilic NOM. The hydrophilic basic fraction was found to be the most abundant fraction in the source water. Each of the isolated NOM fractions were percolated through cyclodextrin (CD) polyurethanes, resulting in an adsorption efficiency of between 6% and 33%. The acidic fractions were the most adsorbed fractions by the CD polyurethanes, while the neutral fractions being the least adsorbed. The water samples were then subjected to an ozonation regime at the treatment plant and then fractionated as before. As expected there were decreases of the neutral and basic fractions after ozonation. The application of CD polyurethanes to the fractions after ozonation resulted in a removal efficiency of up to 59%, nearly double that of the non-treated sample. Also, in the case of the ozone pre-treated samples, it was mainly the hydrophilic basic fraction which was removed. All the fractions were subjected to a chlorination test to determine the trihalomethane (THM) formation potential. All six NOM fractions resulted in THM formation, but the hydrophilic basic fraction was found to be the most reactive and formed the highest THM concentration. The effect of the combination of

  14. PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, D

    2007-01-09

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12-inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24-inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead

  15. PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, D

    2006-11-08

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12 inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24 inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead

  16. Properties of radioactive wastes and waste containers. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1980. [Resin/bitumen composites; cement/ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Morcos, N.; Weiss, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    A study was initiated to evaluate the leachability and integrity of bitumen/organic ion exchange resin composites. Mixtures of anionic and cationic resins in the SO/sub 4//sup -2/, H/sup +/, Cs/sup +/, and Sr/sup +2/ forms were used. The leachability of sodium and cesium from the bitumen/organic ion exchange resin composites was observed to increase when anionic resins in the sulfate form were incorporated in the composite. Topical application of a coat of bitumen on these composites decreased Na leachability by sixfold. The leachability of cesium-137 from cement waste forms and cement/organic ion exchange resin (H/sup +/ form) was studied. Portland II and lumnite cements were used in making the forms. Cesium-137 was leached at a faster rate from portland II/ion exchange resin composites that contained the higher ratio of cement to resins, and also from portland II cement waste forms than from that were made with lumnite cement. An experiment was initiated to study the volumetric changes of organic ion exchange resin beds in aquwous media as a function of ionic species and their concentrations in an aqueous milieu. The species studied were cesium, strontium, and aluminum. The resin volumes were observed to decrease when the solute ionic concentration increased, and a hysteresis effect was observed when the solute concentration was then decreased. The resin bed volumes were observed to increase as the solute concentrations decreased, but the resin volumes did not return to their original values. This observed shrinking and swelling is used to explain the disintegration of cement/organic ion exchange resin composites when immersed in water. The paper on ''Radiation effects on ion exchangers used in radioactive waste management'' in Appendix A has been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. 18 refs., 15 figs., 13 tabs.

  17. An investigation of the applicability of the new ion exchange resin, Reillex{trademark}-HPQ, in ATW separations. Milestone 4, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, K.R.; Ball, J.; Grissom, M.; Williamson, M.; Cobb, S.; Young, D.; Wu, Yen-Yuan J.

    1993-09-07

    The investigations with the anion exchange resin Reillex{trademark}-HPQ is continuing along several different paths. The topics of current investigations that are reported here are: The sorption behavior of chromium(VI) on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ from nitric acid solutions and from sodium hydroxide/sodium nitrate solutions; sorption behavior of F{sup {minus}} on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin in acidic sodium nitrate solution; sorption behavior of Cl{sup {minus}} on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin in acidic sodium nitrate solution; sorption behavior of Br{sup {minus}} on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin in acidic sodium nitrate solution; and the Honors thesis by one of the students is attached as Appendix II (on ion exchange properties of a new macroperous resin using bromide as the model ion in aqueous nitrate solutions).

  18. Destruction of Ion-Exchange Resin In Waste From the HFIR, T1 and T2 Tanks Using Fenton's Reagent

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.A.

    2002-11-06

    The use of Fenton's reagent (hydrogen peroxide and a ferrous iron catalyst) has been tested as a method for destroying ion-exchange resin in radioactive waste from three underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The resin in these wastes must be destroyed before they can be transferred to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) prior to solidification and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The reaction with ion-exchange resin requires a dilute acidic solution (pH = 3 to 5) and moderate temperatures (T = 60 to 100 C). Laboratory-scale tests of the process have been successfully completed using both simulants and actual waste samples. The ion-exchange resin is oxidized to carbon dioxide and inorganic salts. The reaction rate is quite slow for temperatures below 70 C but increases almost linearly as the temperature of the slurry increases from 70 to 90 C. Pilot-scale tests have demonstrated the process using larger samples of actual waste slurries. A sample from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) tank, containing 500 mL of settled solids (resin and inorganic sludge) in a total volume of 1800 mL, was successfully treated to meet MVST waste acceptance requirements in 9 h of processing time, using 1650 mL of 50 wt% hydrogen peroxide. A composite sample from the T1 and T2 tanks, which contained 1000 mL of settled solids in a total volume of 2000 mL required 8 h of treatment, using 1540 mL of 50 wt% peroxide, to meet waste acceptance requirements. Hydrogen peroxide reaction rates were 0.71 to 0.74 g H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/L/min, with very low (<2000 mg/L) concentrations of peroxide in the slurry. The reaction produces mostly carbon dioxide gas during the early part of the treatment, when organic carbon concentrations in the slurry are high, and then produces increasing amounts of oxygen as the organic carbon concentration drops. Small amounts (<3 vol%) of carbon monoxide are also generated. The off-gas from the pilot-scale tests, which was 81

  19. Stabilization of Metal-Loaded Ion-Exchange Resin with a Porous Silica Supporter Through Thermal Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, I-T. Park, H-S.; Yoo, J-H.; Kim, J-H.

    2003-02-25

    A new ion exchanger with porous silica as a supporting material and diphosphonic acid as a functional chelating group has been developed at ANL for the effective removal of transition metals and actinide ions from very acidic radioactive liquid wastes. The applicability of this resin for the treatment of low- and/or intermediate-level aqueous waste from nuclear power plants (NPP) has not been reported in scientific literature, but is under study now in Korea. The major radioisotopes in NPP radioactive liquid waste are Cs and Co in neutral pH ranges. This study on the thermal stabilization of metal-loaded waste resin has been carried out in parallel with the sorption experiment. Thermal treatment of metal (Co, Cs or U) loaded resin was accomplished to see the possibility of enhancing the safety and stability of the final product during transportation and disposal. In this paper, characteristics of the metal-loaded resins before and after heat treatment at three different thermal conditions were investigated and compared with each other to see the effectiveness of the thermal treatment method.

  20. Vitrification of ion-exchange (IEX) resins: Advantages and technical challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.; Peeler, D.K.; Cicero, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Technologies are being developed by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the commercial sector to convert low-level radioactive ion exchange (IEX) resin wastes from the nuclear utilities to solid stabilized waste forms for permanent disposal. One of the alternative waste stabilization technologies is vitrification of the resin into glass. Wastes can be vitrified at elevated temperatures by thermal treatment. One alternative thermal treatment is conventional Joule heated melting. Vitrification of wastes into glass is an attractive option because it atomistically bonds both hazardous and radioactive species in the glass structure, and volume reduces the wastes by 70-80%. The large volume reductions allow for large associated savings in disposal and/or long term storage costs.

  1. Microbial desalination cells packed with ion-exchange resin to enhance water desalination rate.

    PubMed

    Morel, Alexandre; Zuo, Kuichang; Xia, Xue; Wei, Jincheng; Luo, Xi; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia

    2012-08-01

    A novel configuration of microbial desalination cell (MDC) packed with ion-exchange resin (R-MDC) was proposed to enhance water desalination rate. Compared with classic MDC (C-MDC), an obvious increase in desalination rate (DR) was obtained by R-MDC. With relatively low concentration (10-2 g/L NaCl) influents, the DR values of R-MDC were about 1.5-8 times those of C-MDC. Ion-exchange resins packed in the desalination chamber worked as conductor and thus counteracted the increase in ohmic resistance during treatment of low concentration salt water. Ohmic resistances of R-MDC stabilized at 3.0-4.7 Ω. By contrast, the ohmic resistances of C-MDC ranged from 5.5 to 12.7 Ω, which were 55-272% higher than those of R-MDC. Remarkable improvement in desalination rate helped improve charge efficiency for desalination in R-MDC. The results first showed the potential of R-MDC in the desalination of water with low salinity.

  2. Mathematical modelling and reactor design for multi-cycle bioregeneration of nitrate exhausted ion exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Shelir; Roberts, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate contamination is one of the largest issues facing communities worldwide. One of the most common methods for nitrate removal from water is ion exchange using nitrate selective resin. Although these resins have a great capacity for nitrate removal, they are considered non regenerable. The sustainability of nitrate-contaminated water treatment processes can be achieved by regenerating the exhausted resin several times rather than replacing and incineration of exhausted resin. The use of multi-cycle exhaustion/bioregeneration of resin enclosed in a membrane has been shown to be an effective and innovative regeneration method. In this research, the mechanisms for bioregeneration of resin were studied and a mathematical model which incorporated physical desorption process with biological removal kinetics was developed. Regardless of the salt concentration of the solution, this specific resin is a pore-diffusion controlled process (XδD ¯CDr0(5+2α)<1). Also, Thiele modulus was calculated to be between 4 and 12 depending on the temperature and salt concentration. High Thiele modulus (>3) shows that the bioregeneration process is controlled by reaction kinetics and is governed by biological removal of nitrate. The model was validated by comparison to experimental data; the average of R-squared values for cycle 1 to 5 of regeneration was 0.94 ± 0.06 which shows that the developed model predicted the experimental results very well. The model sensitivity for different parameters was evaluated and a model bioreactor design for bioregeneration of highly selective resins was also presented. PMID:26595098

  3. Mathematical modelling and reactor design for multi-cycle bioregeneration of nitrate exhausted ion exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Shelir; Roberts, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate contamination is one of the largest issues facing communities worldwide. One of the most common methods for nitrate removal from water is ion exchange using nitrate selective resin. Although these resins have a great capacity for nitrate removal, they are considered non regenerable. The sustainability of nitrate-contaminated water treatment processes can be achieved by regenerating the exhausted resin several times rather than replacing and incineration of exhausted resin. The use of multi-cycle exhaustion/bioregeneration of resin enclosed in a membrane has been shown to be an effective and innovative regeneration method. In this research, the mechanisms for bioregeneration of resin were studied and a mathematical model which incorporated physical desorption process with biological removal kinetics was developed. Regardless of the salt concentration of the solution, this specific resin is a pore-diffusion controlled process (XδD ¯CDr0(5+2α)<1). Also, Thiele modulus was calculated to be between 4 and 12 depending on the temperature and salt concentration. High Thiele modulus (>3) shows that the bioregeneration process is controlled by reaction kinetics and is governed by biological removal of nitrate. The model was validated by comparison to experimental data; the average of R-squared values for cycle 1 to 5 of regeneration was 0.94 ± 0.06 which shows that the developed model predicted the experimental results very well. The model sensitivity for different parameters was evaluated and a model bioreactor design for bioregeneration of highly selective resins was also presented.

  4. Removal of aqueous cyanide with strongly basic ion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Halis; Kobya, Mehmet; Khan, Eakalak; Bezbaruah, Achintya N

    2015-01-01

    The removal of cyanide (CN-) from aqueous solutions using a strongly basic ion-exchange resin, Purolite A-250, was investigated. The effects of contact time, initial CN- concentration, pH, temperature, resin dosage, agitation speed, and particle size distribution on the removal of CN- were examined. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted the Langmuir isotherm very well. The maximum CN- adsorption capacity of Purolite A-250 was found to be 44 mg CN- g(-1) resin. More than 90% CN- adsorption was achieved for most CN- solutions (50, 100, and 200 mg CN- L(-1)) with a resin dose of 2 g L(-1). The equilibrium time was ∼20 min, optimum pH was 10.0-10.5, and optimum agitation speed was 150 rpm. An increase in adsorption of CN- with increasing resin dosage was observed. Adsorption of CN- by the resin was marginally affected (maximum 4% variation) within an environmentally relevant temperature range of 20-50 °C. Fixed-bed column (20.5 mm internal diameters) experiments were performed to investigate the effects of resin bed depth and influent flow rate on breakthrough behaviour. Breakthrough occurred in 5 min for 0.60 cm bed depth while it was 340 min for 5.40 cm bed depth. Adsorption capacity was 25.5 mg CN- g(-1) for 5 mL min(-1) flow rate and 3.9 mg CN- g(-1) for 20 mL min(-1) flow rate. The research has established that the resin can be effectively used for CN- removal from aqueous solutions.

  5. REAL WASTE TESTING OF SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

    2009-10-30

    This report presents data on batch contact and column testing tasks for spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin. The testing used a non-radioactive simulant of SRS Tank 2F dissolved salt, as well as an actual radioactive waste sample of similar composition, which are both notably high in sodium (6 M). The resin was Microbeads batch 5E-370/641 which had been made on the hundred gallon scale. Equilibrium batch contact work focused on cesium at a temperature of 25 C due to the lack of such data to better benchmark existing isotherm models. Two campaigns were performed with small-scale ion exchange columns, first with Tank 2F simulant, then with actual dissolved salt in the Shielded Cells. An extrapolation of the batch contact results with radioactive waste over-predicted the cesium loaded onto the IX sRF resin bed by approximately 11%. This difference is not unexpected considering uncertainties from measurement and extrapolation and because the ion exchange that occurs when waste flows through a resin bed probably cannot reach the same level of equilibrium as when waste and resin are joined in a long term batch contact. Resin was also characterized to better understand basic chemistry issues such as holdup of trace transition metals present in the waste feed streams. The column tests involved using two beds of sRF resin in series, with the first bed referred to as the Lead column and the second bed as the Lag column. The test matrix included two complete IX cycles for both the simulant and actual waste phases. A cycle involves cesium adsorption, until the resin in the Lead column reaches saturation, and then regenerating the sRF resin, which includes eluting the cesium. Both the simulated and the actual wastes were treated with two cycles of operation, and the resin beds that were used in the Lead and Lag columns of simulant test phase were regenerated and reused in the actual waste test phase. This task is the first to demonstrate the treatment of SRS waste

  6. Batch and fixed-bed assessment of sulphate removal by the weak base ion exchange resin Amberlyst A21.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Damaris; Leão, Versiane A

    2014-09-15

    This paper investigated sulphate removal from aqueous solutions by Amberlyst A21, a polystyrene weak base ion exchange resin. Both the pH and initial sulphate concentration were observed to strongly affect sorption yields, which were largest in acidic environments. Working under optimum operational conditions, sulphate sorption by Amberlyst A21 was relatively fast and reached equilibrium after 45 min of contact between the solid and liquid phases. Sorption kinetics could be described by either the pseudo-first order (k1=3.05 × 10(-5)s(-1)) or pseudo-second order model (k2=1.67 × 10(-4)s(-1)), and both the Freundlich and Langmuir models successfully fitted the equilibrium data. Sulphate uptake by Amberlyst A21 was a physisorption process (ΔH=-25.06 kJ mol(-1)) that occurred with entropy reduction (ΔS=-0.042 kJ mol(-1)K(-1)). Elution experiments showed that sulphate is easily desorbed (∼ 100%) from the resin by sodium hydroxide solutions at pH 10 or pH 12. Fixed-bed experiments assessed the effects of the initial sulphate concentration, bed height and flow rate on the breakthrough curves and the efficiency of the Amberlyst A21 in the treatment of a real effluent. In all studied conditions, the maximum sulphate loading resin varied between 8 and 40 mg(SO4(2-))mL(resin)(-1).

  7. Batch and fixed-bed assessment of sulphate removal by the weak base ion exchange resin Amberlyst A21.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Damaris; Leão, Versiane A

    2014-09-15

    This paper investigated sulphate removal from aqueous solutions by Amberlyst A21, a polystyrene weak base ion exchange resin. Both the pH and initial sulphate concentration were observed to strongly affect sorption yields, which were largest in acidic environments. Working under optimum operational conditions, sulphate sorption by Amberlyst A21 was relatively fast and reached equilibrium after 45 min of contact between the solid and liquid phases. Sorption kinetics could be described by either the pseudo-first order (k1=3.05 × 10(-5)s(-1)) or pseudo-second order model (k2=1.67 × 10(-4)s(-1)), and both the Freundlich and Langmuir models successfully fitted the equilibrium data. Sulphate uptake by Amberlyst A21 was a physisorption process (ΔH=-25.06 kJ mol(-1)) that occurred with entropy reduction (ΔS=-0.042 kJ mol(-1)K(-1)). Elution experiments showed that sulphate is easily desorbed (∼ 100%) from the resin by sodium hydroxide solutions at pH 10 or pH 12. Fixed-bed experiments assessed the effects of the initial sulphate concentration, bed height and flow rate on the breakthrough curves and the efficiency of the Amberlyst A21 in the treatment of a real effluent. In all studied conditions, the maximum sulphate loading resin varied between 8 and 40 mg(SO4(2-))mL(resin)(-1). PMID:25151243

  8. Preliminary flowsheet: Ion exchange process for the separation of cesium from Hanford tank waste using Duolite{trademark} CS-100 resin

    SciTech Connect

    Eager, K.M.; Penwell, D.L.; Knutson, B.J.

    1994-12-01

    This preliminary flowsheet document describes an ion exchange process which uses Duolite{trademark} CS-100 resin to remove cesium from Hanford Tank waste. The flowsheet describes one possible equipment configuration, and contains mass balances based on that configuration with feeds of Neutralized Current Acid Waste, and Double Shell Slurry Feed. Process alternatives, unresolved issues, and development needs are discussed which relate to the process.

  9. REMOVAL OF CESIUM FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE WITH SPHERICAL RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN EXPERIMENTAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.; Nash, C.

    2010-03-31

    A principal goal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is to safely dispose of the large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal. The spherical form of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) is being evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake waste at SRS, which is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. The sRF performance with SRS waste was evaluated in two phases: resin batch contacts and IX column testing with both simulated and actual dissolved salt waste. The tests, equipment, and results are discussed.

  10. The radiolysis of poly(4-vinylpyridine) quaternary salt ion exchange resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Kazuyuki; LaVerne, Jay A.; Tandon, Lav; Enriquez, Alejandro E.; Matonic, John H.

    2008-02-01

    The radiation chemical yields of gaseous products, especially molecular hydrogen (H 2), have been determined in the radiolysis of different poly(4-vinylpyridine) quaternary salt ion exchange resins with up to about 30 wt% of absorbed water. Irradiations were performed with 5 MeV 4He ions to simulate α-particle radiolysis and with γ-rays for comparison. The resins were quaternary salts of chloride and nitrate that are commonly used as matrixes in anion exchange and in plutonium recovery processes. An increase in H 2 yields with increasing water loading was observed for both types of ionizing radiation in all of the resins. The yield of H 2 for the nitrate-form was lower than that for the chloride and the yield of H 2 was lower when the pyridinium nitrogen atom is coordinated to a methyl group rather than to atomic hydrogen. Spectroscopic studies included UV/vis, IR, and Raman and suggested that all the resins exhibit a high radiolytic stability.

  11. Ion-exchange resins for the treatment of hyperkalemia: are they safe and effective?

    PubMed

    Sterns, Richard H; Rojas, Maria; Bernstein, Paul; Chennupati, Sreedevi

    2010-05-01

    Sodium polystyrene sulfonate (SPS), an ion-exchange resin designed to bind potassium in the colon, was approved in 1958 as a treatment for hyperkalemia by the US Food and Drug Administration, 4 years before drug manufacturers were required to prove the effectiveness and safety of their drugs. In September 2009, citing reports of colonic necrosis, the Food and Drug Administration issued a warning advising against concomitant administration of sorbitol, an osmotic cathartic used to prevent SPS-induced fecal impaction and to speed delivery of resin to the colon, with the powdered resin; however, a premixed suspension of SPS in sorbitol, the only preparation stocked by many hospital pharmacies, is prescribed routinely for treatment of hyperkalemia. We can find no convincing evidence that SPS increases fecal potassium losses in experimental animals or humans and no evidence that adding sorbitol to the resin increases its effectiveness as a treatment for hyperkalemia. There is growing concern, however, that suspensions of SPS in sorbitol can be harmful. It would be wise to exhaust other alternatives for managing hyperkalemia before turning to these largely unproven and potentially harmful therapies. PMID:20167700

  12. Structure-function investigations of modified phenol-formaldehyde and resorcinol-formaldehyde ion-exchange resins that are selective for cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Hubler, T.L.; Hallen, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (R-F) resin is a candidate regenerable ion-exchange material for removal of radioactive cesium from alkaline waste tank supernates at both the Hanford and Savannah River sites. The chemical stability of the R-F resin is a primary issue under the typical process conditions encountered for cesium removal, especially during the acid elution step. Part of our examination into this issue has been directed toward preparation of resins that contain fluorine to examine the effect on chemical stability of resorcinol and phenol based resins and to explore the effect of structural modification of the polymer on its cesium selectivity. Polymer modifiers included 2-, 3-, and 4-fluorophenol as well as 2,5-, 3,4-, and 3,5-difluorophenol. The resins were characterized using spectroscopic techniques (IR, {sup 13}C CP-MAS NMR) and by determination of cesium-specific distribution coefficients (K{sub d}`s).

  13. Radium-228 determination of natural waters via concentration on manganese dioxide and separation using Diphonix ion exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Nour, S; El-Sharkawy, A; Burnett, W C; Horwitz, E P

    2004-12-01

    The objective of this work was to establish a new procedure for 228Ra determination of natural waters via preconcentration of radium on MnO2 and separation of its daughter, 228Ac, using Diphonix ion exchange resin. Following removal of potential interferences via passage through an initial Diphonix Resin column, the first daughter of 228Ra, 228Ac, is isolated by chromatographic separation via a second Diphonix column. A holding time of > 30 h for 228Ac ingrowth in between the two column separations ensures secular equilibrium. Barium-133 is used as a yield tracer. Actinium-228 is eluted from the second Diphonix Resin with 5 ml 1M 1-Hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) and quantified by addition of scintillation cocktail and LSC counting. Radium (and 133Ba) from the load and rinse solutions from the 2nd Diphonix column may be prepared for alpha spectrometry (for determination of 223Ra, 224Ra, and 226Ra) by BaSO4 microprecipitation and filtration. Decontamination tests indicate that U, Th, and Ra series nuclides do not interfere with these measurements, although high contents of 90Sr (90Y) require additional treatment for accurate measurement of 228Ra. Addition of stable Sr as a "hold back" carrier during the initial MnO2 preconcentration step was shown to remove most 90Sr interference.

  14. Radium-228 determination of natural waters via concentration on manganese dioxide and separation using Diphonix ion exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Nour, S; El-Sharkawy, A; Burnett, W C; Horwitz, E P

    2004-12-01

    The objective of this work was to establish a new procedure for 228Ra determination of natural waters via preconcentration of radium on MnO2 and separation of its daughter, 228Ac, using Diphonix ion exchange resin. Following removal of potential interferences via passage through an initial Diphonix Resin column, the first daughter of 228Ra, 228Ac, is isolated by chromatographic separation via a second Diphonix column. A holding time of > 30 h for 228Ac ingrowth in between the two column separations ensures secular equilibrium. Barium-133 is used as a yield tracer. Actinium-228 is eluted from the second Diphonix Resin with 5 ml 1M 1-Hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) and quantified by addition of scintillation cocktail and LSC counting. Radium (and 133Ba) from the load and rinse solutions from the 2nd Diphonix column may be prepared for alpha spectrometry (for determination of 223Ra, 224Ra, and 226Ra) by BaSO4 microprecipitation and filtration. Decontamination tests indicate that U, Th, and Ra series nuclides do not interfere with these measurements, although high contents of 90Sr (90Y) require additional treatment for accurate measurement of 228Ra. Addition of stable Sr as a "hold back" carrier during the initial MnO2 preconcentration step was shown to remove most 90Sr interference. PMID:15388106

  15. Method for digesting spent ion exchange resins and recovering actinides therefrom using microwave radiation

    DOEpatents

    Maxwell, III, Sherrod L.; Nichols, Sheldon T.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods for digesting diphosphonic acid substituted cation exchange resins that have become loaded with actinides, rare earth metals, or heavy metals, in a way that allows for downstream chromatographic analysis of the adsorbed species without damage to or inadequate elution from the downstream chromatographic resins. The methods of the present invention involve contacting the loaded diphosphonic acid resin with concentrated oxidizing acid in a closed vessel, and irradiating this mixture with microwave radiation. This efficiently increases the temperature of the mixture to a level suitable for digestion of the resin without the use of dehydrating acids that can damage downstream analytical resins. In order to ensure more complete digestion, the irradiated mixture can be mixed with hydrogen peroxide or other oxidant, and reirradiated with microwave radiation.

  16. A combined process of activated carbon adsorption, ion exchange resin treatment and membrane concentration for recovery of dissolved organics in pre-hydrolysis liquor of the kraft-based dissolving pulp production process.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jing; Kaur, Ishneet; Baktash, Mir Mojtaba; He, Zhibin; Ni, Yonghao

    2013-01-01

    To recover dissolved organics in pre-hydrolysis liquor (PHL) of the kraft-based dissolving pulp production process, a new combined process concept of sequential steps of activated carbon adsorption, ion exchange resin treatment, and membrane concentration, was proposed. The removal of lignin in the PHL was achieved in the activated carbon adsorption step, which also facilitates the subsequent operations, such as the membrane filtration and ion exchange resin treatment. The ion exchange resin treatment resulted in the removal/concentration of acetic acid, which opens the door for acetic acid recovery. The membrane filtration is to recover/concentrate the dissolved sugars. The combined process resulted in the production of PHL-based concentrate with relatively high concentration of hemicellulosic sugars, i.e., 22.13%.

  17. Preliminary Ion Exchange Modeling for Removal of Cesium from Hanford Waste Using SuperLig 644 Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.L.

    2000-08-23

    A proposed facility is being designed for the immobilization of Hanford high-level radioactive waste. One unit process in the facility is designed to remove radioactive cesium by ion-exchange from the strongly alkaline aqueous phase. A resin specifically designed with high selectivity of cesium under alkaline conditions is being investigated. The resin also is elutable under more acidic conditions. The proposed design of the facility consists of two sets of two packed columns placed in series (i.e., a lead column followed by a lag (guard) column configuration). During operation, upon reaching a specified cesium concentration criterion at the exit of the lag column, operation is switched to the second set of lead and lag columns. The cesium-loaded lead column is processed (i.e., washed and eluted) and switched to the lag position. the previous lag column is then placed in the lead position (without eluting) and the system is ready for use in the next cycle. For a well designed process, the loading and elution processes result in significant volume reductions in aqueous high-level waste.

  18. Swelling behavior of ion exchange resins incorporated in tri-calcium silicate cement matrix: I. Chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neji, M.; Bary, B.; Le Bescop, P.; Burlion, N.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the first part of a theoretical and experimental work aiming at modeling the chemo-mechanical behavior of composites made up of ion exchange resins (IER) solidified in a tri-calcium silicate cement paste (C3S). Because of ion exchange processes, the volume change of the IER may cause internal pressures leading to the degradation of the material. In this study, a predictive modeling is developed for describing the chemical behavior of such material. It is based on thermodynamic equilibria to determine the evolution of the ion exchange processes, and the potential precipitation of portlandite in the composite. In parallel, a phenomenological study has been set up to understand chemical phenomena related to the swelling mechanisms. The model created has been finally implemented in a finite elements software; the simulation of a laboratory test has been performed and the results compared to experimental data.

  19. Northeast utilities, Millstone station experience with Eichrom Industries` Diphonix{trademark} selective ion exchange resin in liquid radwaste processing, update, May 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Peiffer, D.; Jassin, L.

    1995-11-01

    The three nuclear units at Millstone station, GE BRW (unit 1), C-E PRW (unit 2) and Westinghouse PWR (unit 3), have completed a series of bench top and side stream pilot scale tests of Eichrom`s DiphoniXTm resin, a novel gel type ion exchange resin. This testing was part of an overall optimization of their radwaste systems. The optimization also included a review of coagulants and cesium specific materials. The project has been so successful that Millstone now operates with Diphonix resin in Unit 2 and is expanding its use to Unit 1. These installations provide Millstone with an effective means of minimizing spent resin generation from their liquid radwaste systems and provide an effective means of minimizing the activity discharged into the environment. The liquid radwaste processed by these systems contains sodium, calcium, chloride and sulfate ions at concentrations approximately one billion times those of the radioactive components present. Standard mixed bed resins are exhausted by exchanging the sodium, calcium, chloride and sulfate ions. The resin`s exchange capacity is consumed by the common ions allowing the radioactive components to pass through. The result is the need to replace resin beds at a much higher frequency than desirable. Diphonix resin differs from typical cation exchange resin through its unique combination of diphosphonic acid and sulfonic acid functional groups which exhibit selectivity for Co, Zn and other transition metals over sodium and calcium (2). Samples of radwaste liquids from each Millstone unit were passed through laboratory scale columns of Diphonix resin. These tests demonstrated that Diphonix resin was capable of removing all detectable cationic Co-58, Co-60 and Zn-65. In another test, a side stream was taken from the discharge of unit I`s radwaste system carbon bed effluent and passed through a column of Diphonix resin over a period of months.

  20. Removal of aluminum(III)-based turbidity in water using hydrous titanium oxide dispersed in ion-exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataramani, B.; Karweer, S.B.; Iyer, R.K.; Phatak, G.M.; Iyer, R.M.

    1988-04-01

    An adsorber consisting of hydrous titanium oxide (HTiO) dispersed in a Dowex-type ion-exchange resin matrix (designated RT resins) has been developed which is capable of removing Al(III)-based colloidal dispersions in the neutral pH condition. The effect of resin crosslinking, particle size, HTiO loading, turbidity level, and flow rate on the turbidity removal efficiency of RT resins has been studied. It is demonstrated that a train of columns comprising RT resin, H/sup +/, and OH/sup -/ form of resins could be used for large-scale purification operations at high flow rates. These columns, apart from removing turbidity and associated radioactivity, can effectively remove dissolved uranium present in ppb levels when used for water purification in nuclear reactors.

  1. Development and evaluation of sustained release tablet of betahistine hydrochloride using ion exchange resin tulsion t344.

    PubMed

    Wagh, Vijay D; Pawar, Nilesh

    2012-01-01

    An attempt was made to sustain the release of Betahistine hydrochloride by complexation technique using strong cation-exchange resin, Tulsion T344. The drug loading onto ion-exchange resin was optimized for mixing time, activation, effect of pH, swelling time, ratio of drug : resin, and temperature. The resinate was evaluated for micromeritic properties and characterized using XRPD and IR. For resinate sustained release tablets were formulated using hydoxypropyl methylcellulose K100M. The tablets were evaluated for hardness, thickness, friability, drug content, weight variation, and in vitro drug release. Tablets thus formulated (Batch T-3) provided sustained release of drug over a period of 12 h. The release of Betahistine HCl from resinate controls the diffusion of drug molecules through the polymeric material into aqueous medium. Results showed that Betahistine HCl was formulated into a sustained dosage form as an alternative to the conventional tablet. PMID:22779010

  2. Kinetics of esterification of acidified oil with different alcohols by a cation ion-exchange resin/polyethersulfone hybrid catalytic membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Honglei; Ding, Jincheng; Qiu, Yanli; Zhao, Zengdian

    2012-05-01

    Hybrid catalytic membranes consisting of cation ion-exchange resin particles (CERP) and polyethersulfone (PES) were prepared by immersion phase inversion and used as heterogeneous catalysts for the esterification of acidified oil with methanol, ethanol, propanol and butanol. The membranes were characterized by ion exchange capacity and swelling degree tests. The membranes were annealed at different temperatures to improve catalytic activity and membranes annealed at 393 K had the highest catalytic activity. Butanol allowed the highest free fatty acids (FFAs) conversion of 95.28% since it has better miscibility than the other alcohols which strengthened mass and heat transfer. Furthermore, pseudo-homogeneous kinetic models of the esterification of acidified oil with the four alcohols were established according to the experimental data. The kinetic models can well predict the FFA conversion. PMID:22424925

  3. Extraction of steroidal glucosiduronic acids from aqueous solutions by anionic liquid ion-exchangers

    PubMed Central

    Mattox, Vernon R.; Litwiller, Robert D.; Goodrich, June E.

    1972-01-01

    A pilot study on the extraction of three steroidal glucosiduronic acids from water into organic solutions of liquid ion-exchangers is reported. A single extraction of a 0.5mm aqueous solution of either 11-deoxycorticosterone 21-glucosiduronic acid or cortisone 21-glucosiduronic acid with 0.1m-tetraheptylammonium chloride in chloroform took more than 99% of the conjugate into the organic phase; under the same conditions, the very polar conjugate, β-cortol 3-glucosiduronic acid, was extracted to the extent of 43%. The presence of a small amount of chloride, acetate, or sulphate ion in the aqueous phase inhibited extraction, but making the aqueous phase 4.0m with ammonium sulphate promoted extraction strongly. An increase in the concentration of ion-exchanger in the organic phase also promoted extraction. The amount of cortisone 21-glucosiduronic acid extracted by tetraheptylammonium chloride over the pH range of 3.9 to 10.7 was essentially constant. Chloroform solutions of a tertiary, a secondary, or a primary amine hydrochloride also will extract cortisone 21-glucosiduronic acid from water. The various liquid ion exchangers will extract steroidal glucosiduronic acid methyl esters from water into chloroform, although less completely than the corresponding free acids. The extraction of the glucosiduronic acids from water by tetraheptylammonium chloride occurs by an ion-exchange process; extraction of the esters does not involve ion exchange. PMID:5075264

  4. Optimizing liquid waste treatment processing in PWRs: focus on modeling of the variation of ion-exchange resins selectivity coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Gressier, Frederic; Van der Lee, Jan; Schneider, Helene; Bachet, Martin; Catalette, Hubert

    2007-07-01

    A bibliographic survey has highlighted the essential role of selectivity on resin efficiency, especially the variation of selectivity coefficients in function of the resin saturation state and the operating conditions. This phenomenon has been experimentally confirmed but is not yet implemented into an ion-exchange model specific for resins. This paper reviews the state of the art in predicting sorption capacity of ion-exchange resins. Different models accounting for ions activities inside the resin phase are available. Moreover, a comparison between the values found in the literature and our results has been done. The results of sorption experiments of cobalt chloride on a strong cationic gel type resin used in French PWRs are presented. The graph describing the variation of selectivity coefficient with respect to cobalt equivalent fraction is drawn. The parameters determined by the analysis of this graph are injected in a new physico-chemical law. Implementation of this model in the chemical speciation simulation code CHESS enables to study the overall effect of this approach for the sorption in a batch. (authors)

  5. LAB STUDY ON REGENERATION OF SPENT DOWEX 21K 16-20 MESH ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, J.B.

    2007-01-24

    Currently the effort to remove chromate from groundwater in the 100K and 100H Areas uses DOWEX 21K 16-20. This report addresses the procedure and results of a laboratory study for regeneration of the spent resin by sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid, or sodium sulfate to determine if onsite regeneration by the Effluent Treatment Facility is a feasible option.

  6. Radioactive Spent Ion-Exchange Resins Conditioning by the Hot Supercompaction Process at Tihange NPP - Early Experience - 12200

    SciTech Connect

    Braet, Johan; Charpentier, David; Centner, Baudouin; Vanderperre, Serge

    2012-07-01

    Spent ion-exchange resins are considered to be problematic waste that, in many cases, requires special approaches and precautions during their conditioning to meet the acceptance criteria for disposal. In Belgium, for economical reasons, the Volume Reduction Factor is a key criterion. After Tractebel Engineering performed a technical and economical comparison of the industrially available systems, Tihange NPP decided to install a spent ion-exchange resins hot supercompaction unit with Tractebel Engineering in the role of architect-engineer. The treatment and conditioning unit processes the spent ion-exchange resins through the following steps: dewatering of the resins, drying the resins under deep vacuum, discharging the dried resins into compactable drums, super-compacting the drums to generate pellets, grouting the pellets into standard 400 litres waste drums (overpacks) licensed for final disposal in the near-surface repository in Belgium. Several developments were required to adapt the reference process and equipment to PWR spent ion-exchange bead resins and Belgian radioactive waste acceptance criteria. In order to avoid cracks on the compacted drum, and external surface contamination from resin leaks, some improvements were achieved to minimize spring-back as well as the risk of cracking the drum wall. Placing the compactable drum inside a second, slightly larger drum, guarantees clean and reproducible pellets. Currently the commissioning phase is on-going. Numerous process validation tests have been completed. An acceptance file was transmitted to the Belgian Waste Management Authority recently. This will be followed by demonstration tests necessary to obtain their final acceptance of the installation. More than 3 800 drums of mixed powdered and bead resins have been processed by the reference Hot Compaction process, achieving a Volume Reduction Factor (VRF) of 2.5. The equipment has been proven to be a reliable technology with low operation and maintenance

  7. Preparation of high purity biphenyl cyclooctene lignans from Schisandra extract by ion exchange resin catalytic transformation combined with macroporous resin separation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chun-hui; Liu, Ting-ting; Yang, Lei; Zu, Yuan-gang; Yang, Feng-jian; Zhao, Chun-jian; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Zhong-hua

    2011-11-15

    In this study, ester-bond biphenyl cyclooctene lignans were efficiently hydrolytically degraded into free biphenyl cyclooctene lignans by ion exchange resin transformation and simultaneous removal of impurities by macroporous resin. The OH-type strongly basic anion exchange resin 201×7 was the best one, and the dynamic hydrolysis efficiency was 146.7±5.0%. HPD5000 macroporous resin, which offered higher adsorption and desorption capacities and faster adsorption than other resins. The purity of free biphenyl cyclooctene lignans in the product increased from 5.14±0.24% to 79.67±0.0.67%. After dynamic catalytic transformation by 201×7 resin combined with purification of HPD5000 resin, the yield and the purity of free biphenyl cyclooctene lignans in the product were 132.1±4.7% and 80.91±3.53%, respectively.

  8. Effect of pH on the release of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resins collected from operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Data are presented on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small-scale waste--form specimens collected during solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station were leach-tested and subjected to compressive strength testing in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1). Samples of untreated resin waste collected from each solidification vessel before the solidification process were analyzed for concentrations of radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to determine the quantities of these chemicals in the waste-form specimens. The chelating agents included oxalic, citric, and picolinic acids. In order to determine the effect of leachant chemical composition and pH on the stability and leachability of the waste forms, waste-form specimens were leached in various leachants. Results of this study indicate that differences in pH do not affect releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms, but that differences in leachant chemistry and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. Also, this study indicates that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents are similar for waste- form specimens that decomposed and those that retained their general physical form. 36 refs., 60 figs., 28 tabs.

  9. Protein adsorption on ion exchange resins and monoclonal antibody charge variant modulation.

    PubMed

    Guélat, Bertrand; Khalaf, Rushd; Lattuada, Marco; Costioli, Matteo; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-05-20

    A novel multicomponent adsorption equilibrium model for proteins on ion-exchange resins is developed on a statistical thermodynamic basis including surface coverage effects and protein-resin and protein-protein interactions. The resulting model exhibits a general competitive Langmuirian behavior and was applied to the study and optimization of the separation of monoclonal antibody charge variants on two strong cation exchangers. The model accounts explicitly for the effect of both pH and salt concentration, and its parameters can be determined in diluted conditions, that is, through physically sound assumptions, all model parameters can be obtained using solely experiments in diluted conditions, and be used to make predictions in overloaded conditions. The parameterization of the model and optimization of the separation is based on a two-step approach. First, gradient experiments in diluted conditions are undertaken in order to determine the model parameters. Based on these experiments and on information about the proteins of interest and the stationary phase used, all the model parameters can be estimated. Second, using the parameterized model, an initial Pareto optimization is undertaken where overloaded operating conditions are investigated. Experiments from this Pareto set are then used to refine the estimation of the model parameters. A second Pareto optimization can then be undertaken, this time with the refined parameters. This can be repeated until a satisfactory set of model parameters is found. This iterative approach is shown to be extremely efficient and to provide large amounts of knowledge based on only a few experiments. It is shown that due to the strong physical foundation of the model and the very low number of adjustable parameters, the number of iterations is expected to be at most two or three. Furthermore, the model based tool is improved as more experimental knowledge is provided, allowing for better estimations of the chromatographic

  10. Protein adsorption on ion exchange resins and monoclonal antibody charge variant modulation.

    PubMed

    Guélat, Bertrand; Khalaf, Rushd; Lattuada, Marco; Costioli, Matteo; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-05-20

    A novel multicomponent adsorption equilibrium model for proteins on ion-exchange resins is developed on a statistical thermodynamic basis including surface coverage effects and protein-resin and protein-protein interactions. The resulting model exhibits a general competitive Langmuirian behavior and was applied to the study and optimization of the separation of monoclonal antibody charge variants on two strong cation exchangers. The model accounts explicitly for the effect of both pH and salt concentration, and its parameters can be determined in diluted conditions, that is, through physically sound assumptions, all model parameters can be obtained using solely experiments in diluted conditions, and be used to make predictions in overloaded conditions. The parameterization of the model and optimization of the separation is based on a two-step approach. First, gradient experiments in diluted conditions are undertaken in order to determine the model parameters. Based on these experiments and on information about the proteins of interest and the stationary phase used, all the model parameters can be estimated. Second, using the parameterized model, an initial Pareto optimization is undertaken where overloaded operating conditions are investigated. Experiments from this Pareto set are then used to refine the estimation of the model parameters. A second Pareto optimization can then be undertaken, this time with the refined parameters. This can be repeated until a satisfactory set of model parameters is found. This iterative approach is shown to be extremely efficient and to provide large amounts of knowledge based on only a few experiments. It is shown that due to the strong physical foundation of the model and the very low number of adjustable parameters, the number of iterations is expected to be at most two or three. Furthermore, the model based tool is improved as more experimental knowledge is provided, allowing for better estimations of the chromatographic

  11. Direct Encapsulation of Spent Ion-exchange Resins at the Dukovany Nuclear Power Plant, Czech Republic - 12367

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Paul; Rima, Steve

    2012-07-01

    At the Dukovany Nuclear Power Plant there are large amounts of spent ion exchange resins contained within storage tanks. These resins are a product of the operation of an Active Water Purification System within the Power Plant. Activity levels of the resins are in the range of 105 to 10{sup 6} Bq/l and the main isotopes present are Co-60, Cs-137, Mn-54 and Ag-110m. In order to maintain storage tank availability throughout the planned lifetime of the Power Plant these resins must be removed and disposed of safely. The storage tanks do not have an effective retrieval route for the resins and the installed agitation system is inoperable. A proven system for retrieving and directly encapsulating these resins to a standard required for the Czech repository is described, together with an overview of operational performance. Experience gained from this and other projects has highlighted some common challenges relating to the treatment of ion-exchange resins and sludges. There are common approaches that can assist in overcoming these challenges. 1. Transport resin / sludge type waste over as short a distance as possible to avoid issues with line plugging. 2. Transport these wastes once and once only wherever possible. 3. Try to keep the treatment process as simple as possible. With sludge or resin handling equipment consider the physical properties foremost - radiological issues can be addressed within any subsequent design. 4. Consider the use of dry-mix technologies. This avoids the requirement for expensive and complicated grouting plant. 5. Avoid the use of make up water for transport purposes if at all possible - it introduces secondary waste that needs to be treated at additional cost. 6. Consider alternative disposal techniques. SIAL{sup R} is AMEC's preferred technology as we developed it and understand it well - additionally the waste loading factors are much higher than for cement. 7. Consider final waste volumes when selecting the disposal technique. Disposal

  12. Technology transfer: Ion exchange resins for Technetium-99 removal from X-705 raffinates

    SciTech Connect

    Deacon, L.E.; Greiner, M.J.

    1982-12-03

    An ion exchange process will be used at Portsmouth to remove Technetium-99 from uranium recovery waste solutions (raffinates). Subsequent treatment will then remove nitrates from the raffinates by a biodenitrification process prior to discharge to receiving streams to meet environmental standards for liquid wastes. Ion exchange process parameters affecting safe and efficient raffinate treatment have been examined in the laboratory, and results are described in this report. 4 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Impact of anionic ion exchange resins on NOM fractions: Effect on N-DBPs and C-DBPs precursors.

    PubMed

    Bazri, Mohammad Mahdi; Martijn, Bram; Kroesbergen, Jan; Mohseni, Madjid

    2016-02-01

    The formation potential of carbonaceous and nitrogenous disinfection by-products (C-DBPs, N-DBPs) after ion exchange treatment (IEX) of three different water types in multiple consecutive loading cycles was investigated. Liquid chromatography with organic carbon detector (LC-OCD) was employed to gauge the impact of IEX on different natural organic matter (NOM) fractions and data obtained were used to correlate these changes to DBPs Formation Potential (FP) under chlorination. Humic (-like) substances fractions of NOM were mainly targeted by ion exchange resins (40-67% removal), whereas hydrophilic, non-ionic fractions such as neutrals and building blocks were poorly removed during the treatment (12-33% removal). Application of ion exchange resins removed 13-20% of total carbonaceous DBPs FP and 3-50% of total nitrogenous DBPs FP. Effect of the inorganic nitrogen (i.e., Nitrate) presence on N-DBPs FP was insignificant while the presence of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) was found to be a key parameter affecting the formation of N-DBPs. DON especially the portion affiliated with humic substances fraction, was reduced effectively (∼77%) as a result of IEX treatment. PMID:26547880

  14. Impact of anionic ion exchange resins on NOM fractions: Effect on N-DBPs and C-DBPs precursors.

    PubMed

    Bazri, Mohammad Mahdi; Martijn, Bram; Kroesbergen, Jan; Mohseni, Madjid

    2016-02-01

    The formation potential of carbonaceous and nitrogenous disinfection by-products (C-DBPs, N-DBPs) after ion exchange treatment (IEX) of three different water types in multiple consecutive loading cycles was investigated. Liquid chromatography with organic carbon detector (LC-OCD) was employed to gauge the impact of IEX on different natural organic matter (NOM) fractions and data obtained were used to correlate these changes to DBPs Formation Potential (FP) under chlorination. Humic (-like) substances fractions of NOM were mainly targeted by ion exchange resins (40-67% removal), whereas hydrophilic, non-ionic fractions such as neutrals and building blocks were poorly removed during the treatment (12-33% removal). Application of ion exchange resins removed 13-20% of total carbonaceous DBPs FP and 3-50% of total nitrogenous DBPs FP. Effect of the inorganic nitrogen (i.e., Nitrate) presence on N-DBPs FP was insignificant while the presence of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) was found to be a key parameter affecting the formation of N-DBPs. DON especially the portion affiliated with humic substances fraction, was reduced effectively (∼77%) as a result of IEX treatment.

  15. Two solid-phase recycling method for basic ionic liquid [C4mim]Ac by macroporous resin and ion exchange resin from Schisandra chinensis fruits extract.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chun-hui; Zu, Yuan-gang; Yang, Lei; Li, Jian

    2015-01-22

    In this study, two solid-phase recycling method for basic ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C4mim]Ac) were studied through a digestion extraction system of extracting biphenyl cyclooctene lignans from Schisandra chinensis. The RP-HPLC detection method for [C4mim]Ac was established in order to investigate the recovery efficiency of IL. The recycling method of [C4mim]Ac is divided into two steps, the first step was the separation of lignans from the IL solution containing HPD 5000 macroporous resin, the recovery efficiency and purity of [C4mim]Ac achieved were 97.8% and 67.7%, respectively. This method cannot only separate the lignans from [C4mim]Ac solution, also improve the purity of lignans, the absorption rate of lignans in [C4mim]Ac solution was found to be higher (69.2%) than that in ethanol solution (57.7%). The second step was the purification of [C4mim]Ac by the SK1B strong acid ion exchange resin, an [C4mim]Ac recovery efficiency of 55.9% and the purity higher than 90% were achieved. Additionally, [C4mim]Ac as solvent extraction of lignans from S. chinensis was optimized, the hydrolysis temperature was 90°C and the hydrolysis time was 2h. PMID:25463641

  16. Two solid-phase recycling method for basic ionic liquid [C4mim]Ac by macroporous resin and ion exchange resin from Schisandra chinensis fruits extract.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chun-hui; Zu, Yuan-gang; Yang, Lei; Li, Jian

    2015-01-22

    In this study, two solid-phase recycling method for basic ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C4mim]Ac) were studied through a digestion extraction system of extracting biphenyl cyclooctene lignans from Schisandra chinensis. The RP-HPLC detection method for [C4mim]Ac was established in order to investigate the recovery efficiency of IL. The recycling method of [C4mim]Ac is divided into two steps, the first step was the separation of lignans from the IL solution containing HPD 5000 macroporous resin, the recovery efficiency and purity of [C4mim]Ac achieved were 97.8% and 67.7%, respectively. This method cannot only separate the lignans from [C4mim]Ac solution, also improve the purity of lignans, the absorption rate of lignans in [C4mim]Ac solution was found to be higher (69.2%) than that in ethanol solution (57.7%). The second step was the purification of [C4mim]Ac by the SK1B strong acid ion exchange resin, an [C4mim]Ac recovery efficiency of 55.9% and the purity higher than 90% were achieved. Additionally, [C4mim]Ac as solvent extraction of lignans from S. chinensis was optimized, the hydrolysis temperature was 90°C and the hydrolysis time was 2h.

  17. Determination of boron concentration in oilfield water with a microfluidic ion exchange resin instrument.

    PubMed

    Floquet, Cedric F A; Sieben, Vincent J; MacKay, Bruce A; Mostowfi, Farshid

    2016-07-01

    We developed and validated a microfluidic instrument for interference-free determination of boron in produced water. The instrument uses a boron-specific chelating resin to separate the analyte from its complex matrix. Ten produced water samples were analyzed with the instrument and the results were successfully validated against ICP-MS measurements. Removing interference effects enables precise boron measurement for wastewater even with high total dissolved solid (TDS) levels. 1,4-Piperazinediethanesulfonic acid conditions the resin and maintains the optimum pH for boron adsorption from the sample. Boron is then eluted from the resin using a 10% sulfuric acid solution and its concentration measured with the colorimetric carminic acid assay in 95% sulfuric acid. The use of a microfluidic mixer greatly enhances the sensitivity and kinetics of the carminic acid assay, by factors of 2 and 7.5, respectively, when compared against the same assay performed manually. A maximum sensitivity of 2.5mg(-1)L, a precision of 4.2% over the 0-40.0mgL(-1) measuring range, a 0.3mgL(-1) limit of detection, and a sampling rate of up to four samples per hour were achieved. Automation and microfluidics reduce the operator workload and fluid manipulation errors, translating into safer and higher-quality measurements in the field. PMID:27154679

  18. Sustainable nitrate-contaminated water treatment using multi cycle ion-exchange/bioregeneration of nitrate selective resin.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Shelir; Roberts, Deborah J

    2013-11-15

    The sustainability of ion-exchange treatment processes using high capacity single use resins to remove nitrate from contaminated drinking water can be achieved by regenerating the exhausted resin and reusing it multiple times. In this study, multi cycle loading and bioregeneration of tributylamine strong base anion (SBA) exchange resin was studied. After each cycle of exhaustion, biological regeneration of the resin was performed using a salt-tolerant, nitrate-perchlorate-reducing culture for 48 h. The resin was enclosed in a membrane to avoid direct contact of the resin with the culture. The results show that the culture was capable of regenerating the resin and allowing the resin to be used in multiple cycles. The concentrations of nitrate in the samples reached a peak in first 0.5-1h after placing the resin in medium because of desorption of nitrate from resin with desorption rate of 0.099 ± 0.003 hr(-1). After this time, since microorganisms began to degrade the nitrate in the aqueous phase, the nitrate concentration was generally non-detectable after 10h. The average of calculated specific degradation rate of nitrate was -0.015 mg NO3(-)/mg VSS h. Applying 6 cycles of resin exhaustion/regeneration shows resin can be used for 4 cycles without a loss of capacity, after 6 cycles only 6% of the capacity was lost. This is the first published research to examine the direct regeneration of a resin enclosed in a membrane, to allow reuse without any disinfection or cleaning procedures.

  19. Rapid fabrication of microfluidic polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell in PDMS by surface patterning of perfluorinated ion-exchange resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yong-Ak; Batista, Candy; Sarpeshkar, Rahul; Han, Jongyoon

    In this paper we demonstrate a simple and rapid fabrication method for a microfluidic polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which has become the de facto standard material in BioMEMS. Instead of integrating a Nafion sheet film between two layers of a PDMS device in a traditional "sandwich format," we pattern a perfluorinated ion-exchange resin such as a Nafion resin on a glass substrate using a reversibly bonded PDMS microchannel to generate an ion-selective membrane between the fuel-cell electrodes. After this patterning step, the assembly of the microfluidic fuel cell is accomplished by simple oxygen plasma bonding between the PDMS chip and the glass substrate. In an example implementation, the planar PEM microfluidic fuel cell generates an open circuit voltage of 600-800 mV and delivers a maximum current output of nearly 4 μA. To enhance the power output of the fuel cell we utilize self-assembled colloidal arrays as a support matrix for the Nafion resin. Such arrays allow us to increase the thickness of the ion-selective membrane to 20 μm and increase the current output by 166%. Our novel fabrication method enables rapid prototyping of microfluidic fuel cells to study various ion-exchange resins for the polymer electrolyte membrane. Our work will facilitate the development of miniature, implantable, on-chip power sources for biomedical applications.

  20. Breadboard wash water renovation system. [using ferric chloride and ion exchange resins to remove soap and dissolved salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A total wash water renovation system concept was developed for removing objectionable materials from spacecraft wash water in order to make the water reusable. The breadboard model system described provides for pretreatment with ferric chloride to remove soap by chemical precipitation, carbon adsorption to remove trace dissolved organics, and ion exchange for removal of dissolved salts. The entire system was put into continuous operation and carefully monitored to assess overall efficiency and equipment maintenance problems that could be expected in actual use. In addition, the capacity of the carbon adsorbers and the ion-exchange resin was calculated and taken into consideration in the final evaluation of the system adequacy. The product water produced was well within the Tentative Wash Water Standards with regard to total organic carbon, conductivity, urea content, sodium chloride content, color, odor, and clarity.

  1. Ion-exchange equilibrium of N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid on a strong anionic exchanger.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinglan; Ke, Xu; Zhang, Xudong; Zhuang, Wei; Zhou, Jingwei; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-09-15

    N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) is a high value-added product widely applied in the food industry. A suitable equilibrium model is required for purification of Neu5Ac based on ion-exchange chromatography. Hence, the equilibrium uptake of Neu5Ac on a strong anion exchanger, AD-1 was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The uptake of Neu5Ac by the hydroxyl form of the resin occurred primarily by a stoichiometric exchange of Neu5Ac(-) and OH(-). The experimental data showed that the selectivity coefficient for the exchange of Neu5Ac(-) with OH(-) was a non-constant quantity. Subsequently, the Saunders' model, which took into account the dissociation reactions of Neu5Ac and the condition of electroneutrality, was used to correlate the Neu5Ac sorption isotherms at various solution pHs and Neu5Ac concentrations. The model provided an excellent fit to the binary exchange data for Cl(-)/OH(-) and Neu5Ac(-)/OH(-), and an approximate prediction of equilibrium in the ternary system Cl(-)/Neu5Ac(-)/OH(-). This basic information combined with the general mass transfer model could lay the foundation for the prediction of dynamic behavior of fixed bed separation process afterwards.

  2. Kinetics and mechanism of the interaction of phenol with ethylene oxide in the presence of ion-exchange resin wofatit SBW as catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Boeva, R.; Markov, K.; Kotov, S.

    1980-04-01

    The reaction of ethylene oxide with phenol, generally catalyzed with homogeneous catalyst in the production of detergents, was studied with an ion-exchange resin catalyst, i.e., the hydroxyl form of a microreticular gel containing trimethylammonium active groups. The reaction produced only phenoxyethanol. At sufficient excess of ethylene oxide (at least 2.5:1 mole ratio), the reaction was zero order in ethylene oxide, zero order in phenol, proportional to the catalyst amount, and had an activation energy of 17.6 kcal/mole. Under reaction conditions, a catalytically active phenolate counterion apparently formed at the resin, which was not removed by washing with benzene or ether, but was removed by dilute hydrochloric acid. These results suggested that the mechanism and kinetics were the same as with homogeneous basic nucleophilic catalysts.

  3. Minimization of short-term low-pressure membrane fouling using a magnetic ion exchange (MIEX(®)) resin.

    PubMed

    Jutaporn, Panitan; Singer, Philip C; Cory, Rose M; Coronell, Orlando

    2016-07-01

    Two challenges to low-pressure membrane (LPM) filtration are limited rejection of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and membrane fouling by DOM. The magnetic ion exchange resin MIEX(®) (Ixom Watercare Inc.) has been demonstrated to remove substantial amounts of DOM from many source waters, suggesting that MIEX can both reduce DOM content in membrane feed waters and minimize LPM fouling. We tested the effect of MIEX pretreatment on the reduction of short-term LPM fouling potential using feed waters varying in DOM concentration and composition. Four natural and two synthetic waters were studied and a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane was used in membrane fouling tests. To evaluate whether MIEX removes the fractions of DOM that cause LPM fouling, the DOM in raw, MIEX-treated, and membrane feed and backwash waters was characterized in terms of DOM concentration and composition. Results showed that: (i) the efficacy of MIEX to reduce LPM fouling varies broadly with source water; (ii) MIEX preferentially removes terrestrial DOM over microbial DOM; (iii) microbial DOM is a more important contributor to LPM fouling than terrestrial DOM, relative to their respective concentrations in source waters; and (iv) the fluorescence intensity of microbial DOM in source waters can be used as a quantitative indicator of the ability of MIEX to reduce their membrane fouling potential. Thus, when ion exchange resin processes are used for DOM removal towards membrane fouling reduction, it is advisable to use a resin that has been designed to effectively remove microbial DOM.

  4. Degradation of 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol Using Hydrogen Peroxide Catalyzed by Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron Supported on Ion Exchange Resin.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chao; She, Jiaping; Yin, Yongguang; Zhao, Tongqian; Wu, Li

    2016-06-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) supported on ion exchange resin was prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy, with a simple model developed for describing the catalyst. The degradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) by hydrogen peroxide using NZVI supported on ion exchange resin as the catalyst, was studied. The results showed that 2,4,6-TCP with a concentration of 1 mmol L(-1) could be well degraded into low molecule weight organic acids in two hours. The optimized condition was as follows: pH, 3.0; temperature, 35 degrees C; catalyst dosage, 1.5 g; and hydrogen peroxide, 0.16 mmol L(-1). The catalyst has good reusability, with no catalytic efficiency decreasing even after ten times recycles. A possible mechanism of 2,4,6-TCP degradation was proposed, based on the products indentified by GC-MS after derived using trimethylsulfonium hydroxide. PMID:27427643

  5. Sodium concentration measurement during hemodialysis through ion-exchange resin and conductivity measure approach: in vitro experiments.

    PubMed

    Tura, Andrea; Sbrignadello, Stefano; Mambelli, Emanuele; Ravazzani, Paolo; Santoro, Antonio; Pacini, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Sodium measurement during hemodialysis treatment is important to preserve the patient from clinical events related to hypo- or hyper-natremia Usually, sodium measurement is performed through laboratory equipment which is typically expensive, and requires manual intervention. We propose a new method, based on conductivity measurement after treatment of dialysate solution through ion-exchange resin. To test this method, we performed in vitro experiments. We prepared 40 ml sodium chloride (NaCl) samples at 280, 140, 70, 35, 17.5, 8.75, 4.375 mEq/l, and some "mixed samples", i.e., with added potassium chloride (KCl) at different concentrations (4.375-17.5 mEq/l), to simulate the confounding factors in a conductivity-based sodium measurement. We measured the conductivity of all samples. Afterwards, each sample was treated for 1 min with 1 g of Dowex G-26 resin, and conductivity was measured again. On average, the difference in the conductivity between mixed samples and corresponding pure NaCl samples (at the same NaCl concentration) was 20.9%. After treatment with the exchange resin, it was 14.7%, i.e., 42% lower. Similar experiments were performed with calcium chloride and magnesium chloride as confounding factors, with similar results. We also performed some experiments on actual dialysate solution during hemodialysis sessions in 15 patients, and found that the correlation between conductivity measures and sodium concentration improved after resin treatment (R=0.839 before treatment, R=0.924 after treatment, P<0.0001). We conclude that ion-exchange resin treatment coupled with conductivity measures may improve the measurement of sodium compared to conductivity measures alone, and may become a possible simple approach for continuous and automatic sodium measurement during hemodialysis.

  6. Carbonylation of formaldehyde over ion exchange resin catalysts. 1. Batch reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sang Young Lee; Jae Chang Kim; Jae Sung Lee; Young Gul Kim )

    1993-02-01

    Methyl glycolate was synthesized as a precursor to ethylene glycol from the catalytic carbonylation of formaldehyde followed by esterification with methanol. Various cation exchange polystyrene-sulfonic acid resins showed excellent activity and methyl glycolate selectivity. The perfluorinated sulfonic acid resin Nafion-H showed higher activity per proton site, yet was less effective per weight of the catalyst. The effects of process variables such as pressure, temperature, catalyst loading, and solvent were studied. High CO pressures were required to promote formaldehyde carbonylation relative to side reactions between formaldehyde. The presence of water reduced the reaction rate, yet improved the selectivity to methyl glycolate. 1,4-Dioxane was found to be the best solvent in the presence of water. At 135 C, 3,500 psig, and reactant mole ratio of HCHO:H[sub 2]O:H[sup +] = 10:10:1, complete conversion of formaldehyde was achieved in 2-4 h with selectivities of methyl glycolate better than 80%. Catalysts did not show any significant deterioration in performance in repeated use up to 10 batches.

  7. Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.; Morcos, N.

    1992-08-01

    The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form`` (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity.

  8. Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.; Morcos, N.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity.

  9. Ion exchange selectivity for cross-linked polyacrylic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Philipp, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    The ion separation factors for 21 common metal ions with cross-linked polyacrylic acid were determined as a function of pH and the percent of the cross-linked polyacrylic acid neutralized. The calcium ion was used as a reference. At a pH of 5 the decreasing order of affinity of the ions for the cross-linked polyacrylic acid was found to be: Hg++, Fe+++, Pb++, Cr+++, Cu++, Cd++, Al+++, Ag+, Zn++, Ni++, Mn++, Co++, Ca++, Sr++, Ba++, Mg++, K+, Rb+, Cs+, Na+, and Li+. Members of a chemical family exhibited similar selectivities. The Hg++ ion appeared to be about a million times more strongly bound than the alkali metal ions. The relative binding of most of the metal ions varied with pH; the very tightly and very weakly bound ions showed the largest variations with pH. The calcium ion-hydrogen ion equilibrium was perturbed very little by the presence of the other ions. The separation factors and selectivity coefficients are discussed in terms of equilibrium and thermodynamic significance.

  10. An investigation of the radiolytic stability of a resorcinol- formaldehyde ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.; Bibler, N.E.; Bibler, J.P.

    1993-12-31

    Radiolytic stability of a resorcinol-formaldehyde polycondensation-type cation exchange resin was investigated for up to lE09 rads total dose. The resorcinol-formaldehyde resin is a resin that has potential cesium decontamination applications at Pacific Northwest and Savannah River. We have determined both radiation and storage effects on performance of the resin using 101-AW Hanford simulant and ASTM Type-I water. Distribution coefficient determinations, total carbon analysis, and physical observations lead us to conclude that radiation up to lE08 rads does not significantly affect the performance of the resin. The resin is more stable to radiation in water than in 101-AW Hanford simulant. Also radiation or storage does not affect the thermal stability of the resin. Gas production rates for several resin slurries increased in the order of resin/101-AW Hanford simulant, resin/ASTM water, and resin/0.5 M HNO{sub 3}. H{sub 2} is produced from radiolysis of resin in 101-AW Hanford simulant with a G value of G(H{sub 2}) of 0.11 {plus_minus} 0.02 molecules/100eV and in 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} with a G value of G(H{sub 2}) of 0.27 {plus_minus} 0.02 molecules/lOOeV.

  11. Permanganate Degradation of Reillex HPQ Ion Exchange Resin for Use in HB-Line

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, B.W.

    1999-06-02

    This study evaluated the use of Reillex TM HPQ resin as a replacement for the Ionac A-641 resin currently authorized for use in H B-Line. The study concentrated on the ability of the existing alkaline permanganate digestion process to convert spent resin for disposal.

  12. Mineral Separation in a CELSS by Ion-exchange Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Spitze, L. A.; Wong, F. W.; Wydeven, T.; Johnson, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    Operational parameters pertinent to ion exchange chromatography separation were identified. The experiments were performed with 9 mm diameter ion exchange columns and conventional column accessories. The cation separation beds were packed with AG 50W-X2 strong acid cation exchange resin in H(+) form and 200-400 dry mesh particle size. The stripper beds used in some experiments were packed with AG 1-XB strong base cation exchange resin in OH(-) form and 200-400 dry mesh particle size.

  13. Minimization of short-term low-pressure membrane fouling using a magnetic ion exchange (MIEX(®)) resin.

    PubMed

    Jutaporn, Panitan; Singer, Philip C; Cory, Rose M; Coronell, Orlando

    2016-07-01

    Two challenges to low-pressure membrane (LPM) filtration are limited rejection of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and membrane fouling by DOM. The magnetic ion exchange resin MIEX(®) (Ixom Watercare Inc.) has been demonstrated to remove substantial amounts of DOM from many source waters, suggesting that MIEX can both reduce DOM content in membrane feed waters and minimize LPM fouling. We tested the effect of MIEX pretreatment on the reduction of short-term LPM fouling potential using feed waters varying in DOM concentration and composition. Four natural and two synthetic waters were studied and a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane was used in membrane fouling tests. To evaluate whether MIEX removes the fractions of DOM that cause LPM fouling, the DOM in raw, MIEX-treated, and membrane feed and backwash waters was characterized in terms of DOM concentration and composition. Results showed that: (i) the efficacy of MIEX to reduce LPM fouling varies broadly with source water; (ii) MIEX preferentially removes terrestrial DOM over microbial DOM; (iii) microbial DOM is a more important contributor to LPM fouling than terrestrial DOM, relative to their respective concentrations in source waters; and (iv) the fluorescence intensity of microbial DOM in source waters can be used as a quantitative indicator of the ability of MIEX to reduce their membrane fouling potential. Thus, when ion exchange resin processes are used for DOM removal towards membrane fouling reduction, it is advisable to use a resin that has been designed to effectively remove microbial DOM. PMID:27107140

  14. Experimental design approach for identification of the factors influencing the γ-radiolysis of ion exchange resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rébufa, C.; Traboulsi, A.; Labed, V.; Dupuy, N.; Sergent, M.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma radiolysis was investigated on a nuclear grade mixed bed ion exchange resin and its pure components under different irradiation conditions. Screening designs were performed to identify the factors influencing gas production after their γ-radiolysis and to compare their γ-degradation stability. Only hydrogen and trimethylamine quantities were considered as the response in the experimental designs. The other detected gases and water-soluble products were used to improve the resins degradation. Aerobic irradiation atmosphere decreased the H2g production of AmbOH, MB400, and amines. The water presence increased the H2g quantities for AmbH and decreased those for MB400 resin. Liquid water had no effect on H2g production from AmbOH but was favorable to increased amine production. The H2g production of AmbH increased with the absorbed dose that had little effect on the AmbOH resin. No impact of dose on the H2g production was detected for MB400 that appeared to be less degraded.

  15. Modelling of the interaction between chemical and mechanical behaviour of ion exchange resins incorporated into a cement-based matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neji, M.; Bary, B.; Burlion, N.; Le Bescop, P.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present a predictive model, based on experimental data, to determine the macroscopic mechanical behavior of a material made up of ion exchange resins solidified into a CEM III cement paste. Some observations have shown that in some cases, a significant macroscopic expansion of this composite material may be expected, due to internal pressures generated in the resin. To build the model, we made the choice to break down the problem in two scale's studies. The first deals with the mechanical behavior of the different heterogeneities of the composite, i.e. the resin and the cement paste. The second upscales the information from the heterogeneities to the Representative Elementary Volume (REV) of the composite. The heterogeneities effects are taken into account in the REV by applying a homogenization method derived from the Eshelby theory combined with an interaction coefficient drawn from the poroelasticity theory. At the first scale, from the second thermodynamic law, a formulation is developed to estimate the resin microscopic swelling. The model response is illustrated on a simple example showing the impact of the calculated internal pressure, on the macroscopic strain.

  16. Impact of a magnetic ion exchange resin on ozone demand and bromate formation during drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Clayton J; Singer, Philip C

    2004-10-01

    The objective of this research was to examine the impact of a magnetic ion exchange resin (MIEX) on ozone demand and bromate formation in two different ozonated waters at bench scale. The first raw water had a high bromide ion concentration, a high ozone demand, and was highly colored. Based on experimental findings from the first water, the second water was selected as a model water in which more controlled experiments were performed. The waters were treated with the MIEX resin using jar test procedures to find the optimal MIEX dosage based upon the removal of ultraviolet (UV)-absorbing substances, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and bromide. The optimal resin dosage was chosen for bulk MIEX treatment and subsequent ozonation in a semi-batch reactor. The ozone demand and formation of bromate were analyzed as a function of ozone dosage and dissolved ozone concentration for the MIEX pre-treated water, and compared to the results obtained by ozonating the water without MIEX pre-treatment. The results indicate that pre-treatment of the water with the MIEX resin significantly reduces total organic carbon, DOC, UV absorbance, color, and to some extent, bromide. MIEX pre-treatment of the water prior to ozonation substantially lowered the ozone demand and formation of bromate during subsequent ozonation.

  17. Taste Masked Orodispersible Formulation of Fexofenadine Hydrochloride Using Ion Exchange Resins

    PubMed Central

    Suares, Divya; Hiray, Arti

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research work was to mask the intense bitter taste of fexofenadine hydrochloride using weak cation exchange resins and to formulate orodispersible tablet of taste masked drug-resin complex. Five resins indion 204, indion 234, indion 414, kyron T-114 and kyron T-314 were used. Depending on maximum drug loading capacity of resins indion 234 and kyron T-314 were finalized for further study. Drug-resin complex was optimized by considering parameters such as drug to resin ratio, soaking time of resins, stirring time, temperature and pH on maximum drug loading. The drug-resin complex was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The drug-resin complex was also subjected to various evaluation studies such as taste mask evaluation by panel method, drug content and in vitro drug release at salivary and gastric pH. The orodispersible tablets of taste masked drug-resin complex for indion 234 and kyron T-314 were prepared by direct compression method. Formulated orodispersible tablets were subjected to various evaluation parameters such as diameter and thickness measurement, hardness test, weight variation test, in vitro United States Pharmacopoeia disintegration test, wetting time, test for content uniformity, assay, friability test and in vitro dissolution studies. The results indicate that orodispersible tablets of fexofenadine hydrochloride containing indion 234 and kyron T-314 are palatable and provide quick disintegration and fast drug release without addition of superdisintegrants. PMID:26798169

  18. Swelling behavior of ion exchange resins incorporated in tri-calcium silicate cement matrix: II. Mechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neji, M.; Bary, B.; Le Bescop, P.; Burlion, N.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the second part of a study aiming at modelling the mechanical behavior of composites made up of ion exchange resins (IER) solidified in a tri-calcium silicate cement paste (C3S). Such composites may be subjected to internal pressures due to ion exchange processes between ionic species which are in IER and interstitial solution of the cement paste. The reactive transport model developed in the companion paper is coupled in this study to a multi-scale approach describing the mechanical behavior of the material. It is based on an analogy with thermomechanics for taking in account the IER internal pressures, and on Eshelby-based homogenization techniques to estimate both mechanical and coupling parameters. A laboratory test has been set up to measure the macroscopic strain caused by the swelling phenomenon. The model has been finally implemented in a finite elements software. The simulation of the laboratory tests has been performed and the results have been analyzed and compared to experimental data.

  19. Enhanced production of L-(+)-lactic acid in chemostat by Lactobacillus casei DSM 20011 using ion-exchange resins and cross-flow filtration in a fully automated pilot plant controlled via NIR.

    PubMed

    González-Vara Y R, A; Vaccari, G; Dosi, E; Trilli, A; Rossi, M; Matteuzzi, D

    2000-01-20

    Due to the lack of suitable in-process sensors, on-line monitoring of fermentation processes is restricted almost exclusively to the measurement of physical parameters only indirectly related to key process variables, i.e., substrate, product, and biomass concentration. This obstacle can be overcome by near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, which allows not only real-time process monitoring, but also automated process control, provided that NIR-generated information is fed to a suitable computerized bioreactor control system. Once the relevant calibrations have been obtained, substrate, biomass and product concentration can be evaluated on-line and used by the bioreactor control system to manage the fermentation. In this work, an NIR-based control system allowed the full automation of a small-scale pilot plant for lactic acid production and provided an excellent tool for process optimization. The growth-inhibiting effect of lactic acid present in the culture broth is enhanced when the growth-limiting substrate, glucose, is also present at relatively high concentrations. Both combined factors can result in a severe reduction of the performance of the lactate production process. A dedicated software enabling on-line NIR data acquisition and reduction, and automated process management through feed addition, culture removal and/or product recovery by microfiltration was developed in order to allow the implementation of continuous fermentation processes with recycling of culture medium and cell recycling. Both operation modes were tested at different dilution rates and the respective cultivation parameters observed were compared with those obtained in a conventional continuous fermentation. Steady states were obtained in both modes with high performance on lactate production. The highest lactate volumetric productivity, 138 g L(-1) h(-1), was obtained in continuous fermentation with cell recycling.

  20. Analysis of trihalomethane precursor removal from sub-tropical reservoir waters by a magnetic ion exchange resin using a combined method of chloride concentration variation and surrogate organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Phetrak, Athit; Lohwacharin, Jenyuk; Takizawa, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    In small reservoirs in tropical islands in Japan, the disinfection by-product formation potential is high due to elevated concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and bromide. We employed a combined method of variation of chloride concentrations and the use of DOM surrogates to investigate removal mechanisms of bromide and different fractions of DOM by chloride-based magnetic ion exchange (MIEX®) resin. The DOM in reservoir waters was fractionated by resins based on their hydrophobicity, and characterized by size-exclusion chromatography and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectrophotometry. The hydrophobic acid (HPO acid) fraction was found to be the largest contributor of the trihalomethane (THM) precursors, while hydrophilic acid (HPI acid) was the most reactive precursors of all the four THM species. Bromide and DOM with a molecular weight (MW) greater than 1kDa, representing HPO acid (MW 1-3kDa) and HPI acid (MW 1-2kDa), were effectively removed by MIEX® resin; however, DOM with a MW lower than 1kDa, representing HPI non-acid, was only moderately removed. The removal of THM precursors by MIEX® resin was interfered by high chloride concentrations, which was similar to the removal of glutamic acid (HPI acid surrogate) and bromide. However, elevated chloride concentrations had only a minor effect on tannic acid (HPO acid surrogate) removal, indicating that HPO acid fraction was removed by a combination of ion exchange and physical adsorption on MIEX® resin. Our study demonstrated that the combined use of DOM surrogates and elevated chloride concentrations is an effective method to estimate the removal mechanisms of various DOM fractions by MIEX® resin.

  1. Competitive migration behaviors of multiple ions and their impacts on ion-exchange resin packed microbial desalination cell.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Kuichang; Yuan, Lulu; Wei, Jincheng; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia

    2013-10-01

    Mixed ion-exchange resins packed microbial desalination cell (R-MDC) could stabilize the internal resistance, however, the impacts of multiple ions on R-MDC performance was unclear. This study investigated the desalination performance, multiple ions migration behaviors and their impacts on R-MDCs fed with salt solution containing multiple anions and cations. Results showed that R-MDC removed multiple anions better than multiple cations with desalination efficiency of 99% (effluent conductivity <0.05 ms/cm) at hydraulic retention time of 50 h. Competitive migration order was SO4(2-)>NO3(-)>Cl(-) for anions and Ca(2+)≈Mg(2+)>NH4(+)>Na(+) for cations, jointly affected by both their molar conductivity and exchange selectivity on resins. After long-term operation, the existence of higher concentration Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) caused the electric conductivity of mixed resins decrease and scaling on the surface of cation-exchange membrane adjoined with cathode chamber, suggesting that R-MDC would be more suitable for desalination of water with lower hardness.

  2. Preparation and evaluation of orally disintegrating tablets of taste masked phencynonate HCl using ion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhenzhong; Yang, Meiyan; Wang, Yuli; Shan, Li; Gao, Chunsheng

    2015-06-01

    This study was intended to design an orally disintegrating tablet (ODT) formulation that can mask the extremely bitter and metallic taste of phencynonate HCl by novel ion-exchange resins. The drug-resin complexes (DRCs) were prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. In vitro properties (dissolution, wetting time and disintegration time) and in vivo behavior (disintegration time and taste-masking effect) in healthy volunteers of the prepared ODTs were also investigated. The drug was changed from the crystal structure to the amorphous form in the DRC. Compared with commercial tablets, the in vitro and in vivo disintegration of optimized DRC-loaded ODTs with a drug-resin ratio of 1:1 was greatly improved and better palatability with a low bitterness index (0.33) was obtained. The current DRC-loaded ODT could promise a good way to mask the unpleasant taste of certain drugs and accordingly improve the patient compliance.

  3. Comparison of methods for nutrient measurement in calcareous soils: Ion-exchange resin bag, capsule, membrane, and chemical extractions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, S.K.; Belnap, J.; Miller, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    Four methods for measuring quantities of 12 plant-available nutrients were compared using three sandy soils in a series of three experiments. Three of the methods use different ion-exchange resin forms-bags, capsules, and membranes-and the fourth was conventional chemical extraction. The first experiment compared nutrient extraction data from a medium of sand saturated with a nutrient solution. The second and third experiments used Nakai and Sheppard series soils from Canyonlands National Park, which are relatively high in soil carbonates. The second experiment compared nutrient extraction data provided by the four methods from soils equilibrated at two temperatures, "warm" and "cold." The third experiment extracted nutrients from the same soils in a field equilibration. Our results show that the four extraction techniques are not comparable. This conclusion is due to differences among the methods in the net quantities of nutrients extracted from equivalent soil volumes, in the proportional representation of nutrients within similar soils and treatments, in the measurement of nutrients that were added in known quantities, and even in the order of nutrients ranked by net abundance. We attribute the disparities in nutrient measurement among the different resin forms to interacting effects of the inherent differences in resin exchange capacity, differences among nutrients in their resin affinities, and possibly the relatively short equilibration time for laboratory trials. One constraint for measuring carbonate-related nutrients in high-carbonate soils is the conventional ammonium acetate extraction method, which we suspect of dissolving fine CaCO3 particles that are more abundant in Nakai series soils, resulting in erroneously high Ca2+ estimates. For study of plant-available nutrients, it is important to identify the nutrients of foremost interest and understand differences in their resin sorption dynamics to determine the most appropriate extraction method.

  4. Uptake of actinides and other ions by Diphosil, a new silica-based chelating ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarizia, R.; Horwitz, E.P.; D`Arcy, K.A.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Trochimczuk

    1996-06-01

    After adsorption of actinides on a phosphonic acid resin, it may be desirable to leave the actinides on the resin. It may be preferable that the polymeric resin matrix be replaced by an inorganic material, in order to prevent formation of radiolytic gases from the organic polymer. A new version of the Diphonix resin has been prepared, where the chelating diphosphonic acid groups are grafted to a silica support. This material is called Diphosil, for Diphonix on silica. This paper reports some results on equilibrium and kinetics of uptake of a number of actinide species and other metal ions of nuclear, environmental, or hydrometallurgical interest by Diphosil.

  5. Acidity field of soils as ion-exchange systems and the diagnostics of genetic soil horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokotov, Yu. A.; Sukhacheva, E. Yu.; Aparin, B. F.

    2014-12-01

    For the comprehensive description of the acidity of a two-phase ion-exchange system, we should analyze two curves of the ionite titration by a strong base in water and salt solutions and find the quantitative relationships between the corresponding pH characteristics. An idea of the three-dimensional field of acidity of ion-exchange systems (the phase space of the soil acidity characteristics) and its three two-dimensional projections is suggested. For soils, three interrelated characteristics—the pH values of the salt and water extracts and the degree of base saturation—can serve as spatial coordinates for the acidity field. Representation of factual data in this field makes it possible to compare and analyze the acidity characteristics of different soils and soil horizons and to determine their specific features. Differentiation of the field into separate volumes allows one to present the data in a discrete form. We have studied the distribution patterns of the groups of soil horizons from Leningrad oblast and other regions of northwestern Russia in the acidity field. The studied samples are grouped in different partially overlapping areas of the projections of the acidity field. The results of this grouping attest to the correctness of the modern classification of Russian soils. A notion of the characteristic soil area in the acidity field is suggested; it can be applied to all the soils with a leaching soil water regime.

  6. Summary of pilot-scale activities with resorcinol ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Cicero, C.A.; Bickford, D.F.; Sargent, T.N.; Andrews, M.K.; Bibler, J.P.; Bibler, N.E.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1995-10-02

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) of the Department of Energy (DOE) is currently investigating vitrification technology for treatment of low level mixed wastes (LLMW). They have chartered the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) to study vitrification of the wastes through an Office of Technology Development (OTD) Technical Task Plan (TTP). SRTC`s efforts have included crucible-scale studies and pilot scale testing on simulated LLMW sludges, resins, soils, and other solid wastes. Results from the crucible-scale studies have been used as the basis for the pilot-scale demonstrations. As part of the fiscal year (FY) 1995 activities, SRTC performed crucible-scale studies with organic resins. This waste stream was selected because of the large number of DOE sites, as well as commercial industries, that use resins for treatment of liquid wastes. Pilot-scale studies were to be completed in FY 1995, but could not be due to a reduction in funding. Instead, a compilation of pilot-scale tests with organic resins performed under the guidance of SRTC was provided in this report. The studies which will be discussed used a resorcinol- formaldehyde resin loaded with non-radioactive cesium, which was fed with simulated wastewater treatment sludge feed. The first study was performed at the SRTC in the mini-melter, 1/100th scale of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter, and also involved limited crucible-scale studies to determine the resin loading obtainable. The other study was performed at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research (Center) and involved both crucible and pilot-scale testing in the Stir-Melter stirred-melter. Both studies were successful in vitrifying the resin in simulated radioactive sludge and glass additive feeds.

  7. Efficiencies and Optimization of Weak Base Anion Ion-Exchange Resin for Groundwater Hexavalent Chromium Removal at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Nesham, Dean O.; Ivarson, Kristine A.; Hanson, James P.; Miller, Charles W.; Meyers, P.; Jaschke, Naomi M.

    2014-02-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) contractor, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, has successfully converted a series of groundwater treatment facilities to use a new treatment resin that is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiency in treating groundwater contamination at the DOE Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. During the production era, the nuclear reactors at the Hanford Site required a continuous supply of high-quality cooling water during operations. Cooling water consumption ranged from about 151,417 to 378,541 L/min (40,000 to 100,000 gal/min) per reactor, depending on specific operating conditions. Water from the Columbia River was filtered and treated chemically prior to use as cooling water, including the addition of sodium dichromate as a corrosion inhibitor. Hexavalent chromium was the primary component of the sodium dichromate and was introduced into the groundwater at the Hanford Site as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from the reactors starting in 1944. Groundwater contamination by hexavalent chromium and other contaminants related to nuclear reactor operations resulted in the need for groundwater remedial actions within the Hanford Site reactor areas. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated, leading to the use of pump-and-treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex™ 21K, a regenerable, strong-base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which was performed offsite. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion for the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. As a result, CH2M HILL performed testing at the Hanford Site in 2009 and 2010 to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at different waste sites. The testing demonstrated that a weak-base anion, single-use resin, specifically ResinTech SIR-700 ®, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly

  8. A ten liter stacked microbial desalination cell packed with mixed ion-exchange resins for secondary effluent desalination.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Kuichang; Cai, Jiaxiang; Liang, Shuai; Wu, Shijia; Zhang, Changyong; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia

    2014-08-19

    The architecture and performance of microbial desalination cell (MDC) have been significantly improved in the past few years. However, the application of MDC is still limited in a scope of small-scale (milliliter) reactors and high-salinity-water desalination. In this study, a large-scale (>10 L) stacked MDC packed with mixed ion-exchange resins was fabricated and operated in the batch mode with a salt concentration of 0.5 g/L NaCl, a typical level of domestic wastewater. With circulation flow rate of 80 mL/min, the stacked resin-packed MDC (SR-MDC) achieved a desalination efficiency of 95.8% and a final effluent concentration of 0.02 g/L in 12 h, which is comparable with the effluent quality of reverse osmosis in terms of salinity. Moreover, the SR-MDC kept a stable desalination performance (>93%) when concentrate volume decreased from 2.4 to 0.1 L (diluate/concentrate volume ratio increased from 1:1 to 1:0.04), where only 0.875 L of nonfresh water was consumed to desalinate 1 L of saline water. In addition, the SR-MDC achieved a considerable desalination rate (95.4 mg/h), suggesting a promising application for secondary effluent desalination through deriving biochemical electricity from wastewater.

  9. Fixed-site ion exchanger for liquid chromatographic determination of multifunctional carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Cassidy, R.M.; Elchuk, S.

    1985-03-01

    Reversed phases coated with a permanently sorbed ion exchanger and indirect UV detection have been investigated for the determination of simple and multifunctional carboxylic acids in chemical cleaning solutions. The advantages of being able to vary both the ion-exchange capacity and the hydrophobic interactions on these types of ion exchangers for the optimization of resolution and detection are illustrated, and the selection of optimum separation conditions is discussed. Dissolved iron interferes with the analysis due to photochemical, redox, and kinetic effects but good recoveries can be obtained after reduction of the iron with hydroxylamine and complexation with 1,2-diaminocyclohexanetetraacetic acid. Detection limits (3 x base line noise) for oxalate, citrate, ethylenediaminetetraacetate, and hydroxyethylenediaminetriacetate are 0.6-20 ..mu..g x mL/sup -1/ for a 20-..mu..L sample, and relative standard deviations are 3 to % in the 75-350 ..mu..g x mL/sup -1/ range. Analysis results for reactor decontamination solutions containing up to 250 ..mu..g x mL/sup -1/ of iron agree with results obtained by other techniques, and it is shown that this technique should also be useful for determination of metal ions in the samples. A determination of the above reagents in the presence of Fe(II) and Ni(II) takes 7 to 12 min after a 5 to 10 min reduction step. Cr(III) forms nonlabile complexes with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and its presence will cause low results for this acid. 17 references, 4 figures, 6 tables.

  10. EFFECTS OF PH AND COMPETING ANIONS ON THE SOLUTION SPECIATION OF ARSENIC BY ION EXCHANGE RESINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anion-exchange resins (AER) are used to differentiate As(V) and As(III) by retaining As(V) and allowing As(III) to pass through. AERs allow rapid speciation of As in the field which precludes the effects sample preservation on As speciation. Aqueous environmental samples contai...

  11. UREA/ammonium ion removal system for the orbiting frog otolith experiment. [ion exchange resins for water treatment during space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, J. R.; Anselmi, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of using free urease enzyme and ANGC-101 ion exchange resin to remove urea and ammonium ion for space system waste water applications was studied. Specifically examined is the prevention of urea and ammonia toxicity in a 30-day Orbiting Frog Otolith (OFO) flight experiment. It is shown that free urease enzyme used in conjunction with ANGC-101 ion-exchange resin and pH control can control urea and amonium ion concentration in unbuffered recirculating water. In addition, the resin does not adversely effect the bullfrogs by lowering the concentration of cations below critical minimum levels. Further investigations on bioburden control, frog waste excretion on an OFO diet, a trade-off analysis of methods of automating the urea/ammonium ion removal system and fabrication and test of a semiautomated breadboard were recommended as continuing efforts. Photographs of test equipment and test animals are shown.

  12. Porous solid ion exchange wafer for immobilizing biomolecules

    DOEpatents

    Arora, Michelle B.; Hestekin, Jamie A.; Lin, YuPo J.; St. Martin, Edward J.; Snyder, Seth W.

    2007-12-11

    A porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer. Also disclosed is a porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer containing a biomolecule with a tag. A separate bioreactor is also disclosed incorporating the wafer described above.

  13. ION EXCHANGE ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM SEPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.E.; Russell, E.R.; Taylor, M.D.

    1961-07-11

    Ion exchange processes for the separation of plutonium from fission products are described. In accordance with these processes an aqueous solution containing plutonium and fission products is contacted with a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring adsorption of plutonium and fission products on the resin. A portion of the fission product is then eluted with a solution containing 0.05 to 1% by weight of a carboxylic acid. Plutonium is next eluted with a solution containing 2 to 8 per cent by weight of the same carboxylic acid, and the remaining fission products on the resin are eluted with an aqueous solution containing over 10 per cent by weight of sodium bisulfate.

  14. Diphonix: A new ion exchange resin for the treatment of industrial waste streams, contaminated groundwaters, and mixed-wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.

    1994-03-01

    The resin contains geminally substituted diphosphonic acid functional groups; it is synthesized by copolymerization of a tetralkylvinylidene diphosphonate with styrene, divinylbenzene, and acrylonitrile, followed by deesterifaction by refluxing with conc. HCl (the nitrile group is hydrolyzed to a carboxylic acid). The diphosphonic acid functional dominates the resin behavior toward metal ions; it has strong affinity for actinides in all oxidation states, even in 10 M HNO{sub 3} and high salt concentrations. (Efficient agents for stripping actinides from Diphonix all have a strong complexing agent containing the gem-diphosphonic acid functionality.) Diphonix can also remove heavy, toxi metals in high salt concentrations. 4 figs, 2 tabs.

  15. Evaluating ion exchange resin efficiency and oxidative capacity for the separation of uranium(IV) and uranium(VI)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previously described methods to separate dissolved U(IV) from dissolved U(VI) under acidic anoxic conditions prior to laboratory analysis were ineffective with materials currently available commercially. Three strong anion exchange resins were examined for their efficiency in separating, recovering, and preserving both redox states during separation. Results Under oxic conditions, recovery of U(VI) from three exchange resins (Bio-Rad AG® 1x8 Poly-Prep® prefilled columns, Bio-Rad AG® 1x8 powder, and Dowex® 1x8 powder) ranged from 72% to 100% depending on the dosed mass, eluent volume, and resin selected. Dowex® 1x8 resin was the only resin found to provide 100% recovery of U(VI) with fewer than 5 bed volumes of eluent. Under anoxic conditions, all three resins oxidized U(IV) in aqueous solutions with relatively low U(IV) concentrations (<3x10-6 M). Resin-induced oxidation was observed visually using a leuco dye, safranin-o. Oxidants associated with the resin were irreversibly reduced by the addition of Ti(III). After anoxic resin pre-treatment, a series of U(IV)/U(VI) mixtures at micro-molar levels were prepared and separated using the Dowex® 1x8 resin with 100% recovery of both U(IV) and U(VI) with no resin-induced changes in oxidation state. Conclusions Currently available anion exchange resins with apparently identical physical properties were found to have significantly different recoveries for hexavalent uranium at micro-molar concentrations. A novel qualitative technique was developed to visually assess oxidative capacities of anion exchange resins under acidic anoxic conditions. A protocol was developed for pre-treatment and use of currently available anion exchange resins to achieve quantitative separation of U(IV) and U(VI) in aqueous solutions with low U(IV) concentrations. This method can be applied to future work to quantitatively assess dissolved U(IV) and U(VI) concentrations in both laboratory and field samples. PMID:23363052

  16. Highly selective inorganic crystalline ion-exchange material for Sr{sup 2+} in acidic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, T.M.; Miller, J.E.; Thoma, S.G.; Trudell, D.E.

    1996-12-01

    We report a novel antimony titanate ion exchange material, stable in highly acidic conditions and selective to strontium against competing cations, with possible applications at Defense Waste Sites. Its development was based on good selectivity for Cs and Sr by the CSTs and literature information on the ion exchange properties of antimony compounds. This new material has been tested for the selective removal of parts per million level concentrations of Sr{sup 2+} ions from solutions with a pH in the range of 1 M HNO{sub 3} tO 5.7 M Na{sup +}/0.6 M OH{sup -} (with the most important results in the highly acidic regimes). This doped titanate has been characterized with an array of techniques, including equilibrium distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) determinations over a wide pH range, power X-ray diffraction, TEM, BET, direct-current plasma (DCP), and thermal analyses. 13 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. The influence of EI-21 redox ion-exchange resins on the secondary-coolant circuit water chemistry of vehicular nuclear power installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskvin, L. N.; Rakov, V. T.

    2015-06-01

    The results obtained from testing the secondary-coolant circuit water chemistry of full-scale land-based prototype bench models of vehicular nuclear power installations equipped with water-cooled water-moderated and liquid-metal reactor plants are presented. The influence of copper-containing redox ionexchange resins intended for chemically deoxygenating steam condensate on the working fluid circulation loop's water chemistry is determined. The influence of redox ion-exchange resins on the water chemistry is evaluated by generalizing an array of data obtained in the course of extended monitoring using the methods relating to physicochemical analysis of the quality of condensate-feedwater path media and the methods relating to metallographic analysis of the state of a faulty steam generator's tube system surfaces. The deoxygenating effectiveness of the normal state turbine condensate vacuum deaeration system is experimentally determined. The refusal from applying redox ion-exchange resins in the condensate polishing ion-exchange filters is formulated based on the obtained data on the adverse effect of copper-containing redox ionexchange resins on the condensate-feedwater path water chemistry and based on the data testifying a sufficient effect from using the normal state turbine condensate vacuum deaeration system. Data on long-term operation of the prototype bench model of a vehicular nuclear power installation without subjecting the turbine condensate to chemical deoxygenation are presented.

  18. Microscale continuous ion exchanger.

    PubMed

    Kuban, Petr; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Morris, Kavin A

    2002-11-01

    A microscale continuous ion exchanger based on two liquid streams flowing in parallel is presented. The ion exchange reaction occurs through diffusional transfer of molecules between the ion exchanger phase and the eluent phase and is applied for conductivity suppression. Two approaches are demonstrated. In the first approach, a liquid ion exchanger (i.e. a strongly basic compound, e.g., tetraoctylammonium hydroxide, or a secondary amine, e.g., Amberlite IA-2) is dissolved in an organic solvent immiscible with the aqueous eluent. The system allows for sensitive suppressed conductivity detection of various inorganic cations. When the weakly basic secondary amine is used, conductometric detection of heavy metals is possible. In the second approach, a suspension of finely ground ion-exchange resin is used as the ion exchanger phase. In this case, the suspension need not involve an organic solvent. Theoretical models and computations are presented along with experimental results. The potential of such a system as a chip-scale post-separation suppressor/reactor is evident.

  19. Iodine adsorption on ion-exchange resins and activated carbons: batch testing

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-09-30

    Iodine sorption onto seven resins and six carbon materials was evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36 on the Hanford Site. These materials were tested using a range of solution-to-solid ratios. The test results are as follows. The efficacy of the resin and granular activated carbon materials was less than predicted based on manufacturers’ performance data. It is hypothesized that this is due to the differences in speciation previously determined for Hanford groundwater. The sorption of iodine is affected by the iodine species in the source water. Iodine loading on resins using source water ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 189.9 to 227.0 mL/g. The sorption values when the iodine is converted to iodide ranged from 2.75 to 5.90 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 536.3 to 2979.6 mL/g. It is recommended that methods to convert iodine to iodide be investigated in fiscal year (FY) 2015. The chemicals used to convert iodine to iodate adversely affected the sorption of iodine onto the carbon materials. Using as-received source water, loading and Kd values ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g and 189.8 to 226.3 mL/g respectively. After treatment, loading and Kd values could not be calculated because there was little change between the initial and final iodine concentration. It is recommended the cause of the decrease in iodine sorption be investigated in FY15. In direct support of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has evaluated samples from within the 200W pump and treat bioreactors. As part of this analysis, pictures taken within the bioreactor reveal a precipitate that, based on physical properties and known aqueous chemistry, is hypothesized to be iron pyrite or chalcopyrite, which could affect iodine adsorption. It is recommended these materials be tested at different solution-to-solid ratios in FY15 to determine their effect on iodine

  20. Atmospheric deposition of inorganic nitrogen in Spanish forests of Quercus ilex measured with ion-exchange resins and conventional collectors.

    PubMed

    García-Gomez, Héctor; Izquieta-Rojano, Sheila; Aguillaume, Laura; González-Fernández, Ignacio; Valiño, Fernando; Elustondo, David; Santamaría, Jesús M; Àvila, Anna; Fenn, Mark E; Alonso, Rocío

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition is one of the main threats for biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Measurement techniques like ion-exchange resin collectors (IECs), which are less expensive and time-consuming than conventional methods, are gaining relevance in the study of atmospheric deposition and are recommended to expand monitoring networks. In the present work, bulk and throughfall deposition of inorganic nitrogen were monitored in three different holm oak forests in Spain during two years. The results obtained with IECs were contrasted with a conventional technique using bottle collectors and with a literature review of similar studies. The performance of IECs in comparison with the conventional method was good for measuring bulk deposition of nitrate and acceptable for ammonium and total dissolved inorganic nitrogen. Mean annual bulk deposition of inorganic nitrogen ranged 3.09-5.43 kg N ha(-1) according to IEC methodology, and 2.42-6.83 kg N ha(-1) y(-1) using the conventional method. Intra-annual variability of the net throughfall deposition of nitrogen measured with the conventional method revealed the existence of input pulses of nitrogen into the forest soil after dry periods, presumably originated from the washing of dry deposition accumulated in the canopy. Important methodological recommendations on the IEC method and discussed, compiled and summarized.

  1. Evaluation of SuperLig 639 Ion Exchange Resin for the Removal of Rhenium from Hanford Envelope A Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.D.

    2000-07-27

    Hanford Radioactive Waste materials have been categorized into four envelopes labeled A through D as specified in the Tank Waste Remediation Contract between BNFL and DOE. 1 Envelopes A, B and C contain only solubilized species and are specified as Low-Activity Waste (LAW). Each envelope is defined based on compositional maximums of chemical and radioactive constituents. Envelopes A and B contain low concentrations of organic species and the primary form of technetium is pertechnetate (TcO4-). Envelope C contains higher levels of organic species and technetium which is primarily in the nonpertechnetate form (presumably complexed TcO2). Envelope D is sludge which has been separated from the supernate and is referred to as High Activity Waste. The current plant design utilizes SuperLig ion exchange resins to remove cesium and technetium (the primary radioactive constituents) from the Hanford LAW. The process is designed to produce a decontaminated waste stream and a concentrated eluate waste stream for vitrification into low and high activity glasses, respectively.

  2. Optimization of Cesium Removal from Hanford Envelope A Simulant with SuperLig 639 Ion Exchange Resin

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.D.

    2000-07-27

    Hanford RadioactiveWaste materials have been categorized into four envelopes labeled A through D as specified in the Tank Waste Remediation Contract between BNFL and DOE. 1 Envelopes A, B and C contain only solubilized species and are specified as Low-Activity Waste (LAW). Each envelope is defined based on compositional maximums of chemical and radioactive constituents. Envelopes A and B contain low concentrations of organic species and the primary form of technetium is pertechnetate (TcO4-). Envelope C contains higher levels of organic species and technetium which is primarily in the nonpertechnetate form (presumably complexed TcO2). Envelope D is sludge which has been separated from the supernate and is referred to as High Activity Waste. The current plant design utilizes SuperLig ion exchange resins to remove cesium and technetium (the primary radioactive constituents) from the Hanford LAW. The process is designed to produce a decontaminated waste stream and a concentrated eluate waste stream for vitrification into low and high activity glasses, respectively.

  3. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Yen, S. P. S.; Klein, E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, crosslinked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  4. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  5. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  6. Ion Exchange Distribution Coefficient Tests and Computer Modeling at High Ionic Strength Supporting Technetium Removal Resin Maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Charles A.; Hamm, L. Larry; Smith, Frank G.; McCabe, Daniel J.

    2014-12-19

    The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that is currently under construction. The baseline plan for this facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW). Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and poured into canisters for disposition. The LAW glass will be disposed onsite in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Due to the water solubility properties of pertechnetate and long half-life of 99Tc, effective management of 99Tc is important to the overall success of the Hanford River Protection Project mission. To achieve the full target WTP throughput, additional LAW immobilization capacity is needed, and options are being explored to immobilize the supplemental LAW portion of the tank waste. Removal of 99Tc, followed by off-site disposal, would eliminate a key risk contributor for the IDF Performance Assessment (PA) for supplemental waste forms, and has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing some conceptual flow sheets for supplemental LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal. One of these flowsheets will specifically examine removing 99Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. To enable an informed decision regarding the viability of technetium removal, further maturation of available technologies is being performed. This report contains results of experimental ion exchange distribution coefficient testing and computer modeling using the resin SuperLig® 639a to selectively remove perrhenate from high ionic strength simulated LAW. It is advantageous to operate at higher concentration in order to treat the waste

  7. Ion-exchange chromatography of mono- and divalent cations in natural waters on a weak-acid anion-exclusion column.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Ohta, K; Haddad, P R; Fritz, J S

    1998-04-24

    Ion-exchange chromatography with indirect conductimetric detection for the simultaneous determination of mono- and divalent cations is investigated using an anion-exclusion chromatographic column packed with polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H+ form (Tosoh TSKgel OA-PAK-A, 300 mm x 7.8 mm I.D.). An eluent comprising a strong acid, a weak organic acid, methanol and water is used. Using 0.75 mM sulfuric acid, 2 mM tartaric acid, 7.5% (v/v) methanol in water as eluent, the monovalent cations (Na+, NH4+, and K+) and divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+) were separated simultaneously by a cation-exchange mechanism in about 25 min. The application of this method to the analysis of several natural waters including rain, river, lake, underground and forest soil waters for estimating acid rain effects on the natural and urban environments is presented.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Templated Ion Exchange Resins for the Selective Complexation of Actinide Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Uy, O. Manual

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a polymeric extractant for the selective complexation of uranyl ions (and subsequently other actinyl and actinide ions) from aqueous solutions (lakes, streams, waste tanks and even body fluids). Chemical insights into what makes a good complexation site will be used to synthesize reagents tailor-made for the complexation of uranyl and other actinide ions. These insights, derived from studies of molecular recognition include ion coordination number and geometry, ionic size and ionic shape, as well as ion to ligand thermodynamic affinity. Selectivity for a specific actinide ion will be obtained by providing the polymers with cavities lined with complexing ligands so arranged as to match the charge, coordination number, coordination geometry, and size of the actinide metal ion. These cavity-containing polymers will be produced by using a specific ion (or surrogate) as a template around which monomeric complexing ligands will be polymerized. The complexing ligands will be ones containing functional groups known to form stable complexes with a specific ion and less stable complexes with other cations. Prior investigator's approaches for making templated resins for metal ions have had marginal success. We have extended and amended these methodologies in our work with Pb(II) and uranyl ion, by changing the order of the steps, by the inclusion of sonication, by using higher complex loading, and the selection of functional groups with better complexation constants. This has resulted in significant improvements to selectivity. The unusual shape of the uranyl ion suggests that this approach will result in even greater selectivities than already observed for Pb(II). Preliminary data obtained for uranyl templated polymers shows unprecedented selectivity and has resulted in the first ion selective electrode for uranyl ion.

  9. Use of ion exchange resins in the analysis of rocks and minerals: Separation of sodium and potassium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichen, L.E.

    1958-01-01

    This procedure was developed primarily for analyses in which limited amounts of sample are available. Sodium and potassium can be separated from the other constituents of silicate rocks by cation exchange resin (Amberlite IR-120). The sample is decomposed with hydrofluoric and sulfuric acids and passed through the resin bed after expulsion of the fluorine. The column is eluted with 0.12N hydrochloric acid at a fast flow rate of 4 ml. per sq. cm. per minute and the sodium and potassium are recovered together within a reasonable time. Other constituents of the sample, except silica, can be determined on the same portion of sample.

  10. The Isomerization of (-)-Menthone to (+)-Isomenthone Catalyzed by an Ion-Exchange Resin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginzburg, Aurora L.; Baca, Nicholas A.; Hampton, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    A traditional organic chemistry laboratory experiment involves the acid-catalyzed isomerization of (-)-menthone to (+)-isomenthone. This experiment generates large quantities of organic and aqueous waste, and only allows the final ratio of isomers to be determined. A "green" modification has been developed that replaces the mineral acid…

  11. Fundamental aspects related to batch and fixed-bed sulfate sorption by the macroporous type 1 strong base ion exchange resin Purolite A500.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Damaris; Leão, Versiane A

    2014-12-01

    Acid mine drainage is a natural process occurring when sulfide minerals such as pyrite are exposed to water and oxygen. The bacterially catalyzed oxidation of pyrite is particularly common in coal mining operations and usually results in a low-pH water polluted with toxic metals and sulfate. Although high sulfate concentrations can be reduced by gypsum precipitation, removing lower concentrations (below 1200 mg/L) remains a challenge. Therefore, this work sought to investigate the application of ion exchange resins for sulfate sorption. The macroporous type 1 strong base IX resin Purolite A500 was selected for bath and fixed-bed sorption experiments using synthetic sulfate solutions. Equilibrium experiments showed that sulfate loading on the resin can be described by the Langmuir isotherm with a maximum uptake of 59 mg mL-resin(-1). The enthalpy of sorption was determined as +2.83 kJ mol(-1), implying an endothermic physisorption process that occurred with decreasing entropy (-15.5 J mol(-1).K(-1)). Fixed-bed experiments were performed at different bed depths, flow rates, and initial sulfate concentrations. The Miura and Hashimoto model predicted a maximum bed loading of 25-30 g L-bed(-1) and indicated that both film diffusion (3.2 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 22.6 × 10(-3) cm s(-1)) and surface diffusion (1.46 × 10(-7) cm(2) s(-1) to 5.64 × 10(-7) cm(2) s(-1)) resistances control the sorption process. It was shown that IX resins are an alternative for the removal of sulfate from mine waters; they ensure very low residual concentrations, particularly in effluents where the sulfate concentration is below the gypsum solubility threshold. PMID:25014887

  12. Preparation of polymer-coated, scintillating ion-exchange resins for monitoring of 99Tc in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Seliman, Ayman F; Samadi, Azadeh; Husson, Scott M; Borai, Emad H; DeVol, Timothy A

    2011-06-15

    The present study was oriented to prepare new scintillating anion-exchange resins for measurement of (99)TcO(4)(-) in natural waters. The organic fluor 2-(1-naphthyl)-5-phenyloxazole was diffused into (chloromethyl)polystyrene resin. Thereafter, a thin layer of poly[[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl]trimethylammonium chloride] was grafted from the resin surface by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization as an attempt to overcome potential problems related to the leaching of fluor molecules during usage. The residual chloromethyl groups of the polymer-coated resin were aminated by reaction with two different tertiary amines, triethylamine (TEA) and methyldioctylamine (MDOA). Off- and on-line quantification of (99)Tc was achieved with high detection efficiencies of 60.72 ± 1.93% and 72.83 ± 0.81% for resin with TEA and MDOA functional groups, respectively. The detection limit was determined to be less than the maximum contaminant level (33 Bq L(-1)) established under the Safe Drinking Water Act. The two functionalized resins were demonstrated to be selective for pertechnetate from synthetic groundwater containing up to 1000 ppm Cl(-), SO(4)(2-), and HCO(3)(-) and up to 1200 ppb Cr(2)O(7)(2-) in an acidic medium. PMID:21609030

  13. Atmospheric Ionic Deposition in Tropical Sites of Central Sulawesi Determined by Ion Exchange Resin Collectors and Bulk Water Collector.

    PubMed

    Köhler, S; Jungkunst, H F; Gutzler, C; Herrera, R; Gerold, G

    2012-09-01

    In the light of global change, the necessity to monitor atmospheric depositions that have relevant effects on ecosystems is ever increasing particularly for tropical sites. For this study, atmospheric ionic depositions were measured on tropical Central Sulawesi at remote sites with both a conventional bulk water collector system (BWS collector) and with a passive ion exchange resin collector system (IER collector). The principle of IER collector to fix all ionic depositions, i.e. anions and cations, has certain advantages referring to (1) post-deposition transformation processes, (2) low ionic concentrations and (3) low rainfall and associated particulate inputs, e.g. dust or sand. The ionic concentrations to be measured for BWS collectors may easily fall below detection limits under low deposition conditions which are common for tropical sites of low land use intensity. Additionally, BWS collections are not as independent from the amount of rain fallen as are IER collections. For this study, the significant differences between both collectors found for nearly all measured elements were partly correlated to the rainfall pattern, i.e. for calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium. However, the significant differences were, in most cases, not highly relevant. More relevant differences between the systems were found for aluminium and nitrate (434-484 %). Almost five times higher values for nitrate clarified the advantage of the IER system particularly for low deposition rate which is one particularity of atmospheric ionic deposition in tropical sites of extensive land use. The monthly resolution of the IER data offers new insights into the temporal distribution of annual ionic depositions. Here, it did not follow the tropical rain pattern of a drier season within generally wet conditions.

  14. Enhanced Ionic Conductivity and Power Generation Using Ion-Exchange Resin Beads in a Reverse-Electrodialysis Stack.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bopeng; Gao, Haiping; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-12-15

    Reverse electrodialysis (RED) is a promising technique for harvesting energy by mixing seawater with river water. The energy production is usually limited by ionic conductivity in dilute compartments of a RED system. Novel tests were conducted in this research, which used ion-exchange resin beads (IERB) to replace nonconductive spacer fabrics in RED compartments with dilute NaCl solution in a modified stack containing Fumasep FKS and Fumasep FAS membranes. We compared the conductivity of an IERB packed bed with that of an inert glass-beads-packed bed as a control to confirm IERB's effectiveness. When applied in a RED system, IERB decreased the stack resistance by up to 40%. The maximum gross power density improved by 83% in the RED stack compared to that in a regular RED stack at 1.3 cm/s average linear flow velocity. IERB-filled stack resistance was modeled. The model results fit well with experimental data, thereby confirming the effectiveness of the new approach presented here. The net power density is also estimated based on the measured pressure drop and pumping energy model. Both gross and net power density was improved by over 75% at higher flow rate. A net power density of 0.44 W/m(2) was achieved at a cell thickness of 500 μm. To the best of our knowledge, this research is the first to study the impact of IERB on power generation and establishes a new approach to improving the power performance of a RED system.

  15. Reduction of aldehydes and hydrogen cyanide yields in mainstream cigarette smoke using an amine functionalised ion exchange resin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is a well recognized cause of diseases such as lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cardiovascular disease. Of the more than 5000 identified species in cigarette smoke, at least 150 have toxicological activity. For example, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde have been assigned as Group 1 and Group 2B carcinogens by IARC, and hydrogen cyanide has been identified as a respiratory and cardiovascular toxicant. Active carbon has been shown to be an effective material for the physical adsorption of many of the smoke volatile species. However, physical adsorption of acetaldehyde, formaldehyde and also hydrogen cyanide from smoke is less effective using carbon. Alternative methods for the removal of these species from cigarette smoke are therefore of interest. A macroporous, polystyrene based ion-exchange resin (Diaion®CR20) with surface amine group functionality has been investigated for its ability to react with aldehydes and HCN in an aerosol stream, and thus selectively reduce the yields of these compounds (in particular formaldehyde) in mainstream cigarette smoke. Results Resin surface chemistry was characterized using vapour sorption, XPS, TOF-SIMS and 15N NMR. Diaion®CR20 was found to have structural characteristics indicating weak physisorption properties, but sufficient surface functionalities to selectively remove aldehydes and HCN from cigarette smoke. Using 60 mg of Diaion®CR20 in a cigarette cavity filter gave reductions in smoke formaldehyde greater than 50% (estimated to be equivalent to >80% of the formaldehyde present in the smoke vapour phase) independent of a range of flow rates. Substantial removal of HCN (>80%) and acetaldehyde (>60%) was also observed. The performance of Diaion®CR20 was found to be consistent over a test period of 6 months. The overall adsorption for the majority of smoke compounds measured appeared to follow a pseudo-first order approximation to second order kinetics. Conclusions This

  16. Conductivity measures coupled with treatment with ion-exchange resin for the assessment of sodium concentration in physiological fluids: analyses on artificial solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tura, A.; Sbrignadello, S.; Mambelli, E.; Ravazzani, P.; Santoro, A.; Pacini, G.

    2013-09-01

    In humans, sodium is essential for the regulation of blood volume and pressure. During hemodialysis, sodium measurement is important to preserve the patient from hypo- or hyper-natremia Usually, sodium measurement is performed through laboratory equipment which is typically expensive, and requires manual intervention. We propose a new method, based on conductivity measurement after treatment of dialysate solution through ion-exchange resin. To test this method, we performed in vitro experiments. We prepared 40 ml sodium chloride (NaCl) samples at 280, 140, 70, 35, 17.5, 8.75, 4.375 mEq/l, and some "mixed samples", i.e., with added potassium chloride (KCl) at different concentrations (4.375-17.5 mEq/l), to simulate the confounding factors in a conductivity-based sodium measurement. We measured the conductivity of all samples. Afterwards, each sample was treated for 1 min with 1 g of Dowex G-26 resin, and conductivity measured again. On average, the difference ɛ in the conductivity between mixed samples and corresponding pure NaCl samples (at the same NaCl concentration) was 20.9%. With treatment with the resin, it was 9.9%, only. We conclude that ion-exchange resin treatment coupled with conductivity measures may be a possible simple approach for continuous and automatic sodium measurement during hemodialysis.

  17. Effects of ionizing radiation on modern ion exchange materials

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1993-10-01

    We review published studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on ion exchange materials, emphasizing those published in recent years. A brief overview is followed by a more detailed examination of recent developments. Our review includes styrene/divinylbenzene copolymers with cation-exchange or anion-exchange functional groups, polyvinylpyridine anion exchangers, chelating resins, multifunctional resins, and inorganic exchangers. In general, strong-acid cation exchange resins are more resistant to radiation than are strong-base anion exchange resins, and polyvinylpyridine resins are more resistant than polystyrene resins. Cross-linkage, salt form, moisture content, and the surrounding medium all affect the radiation stability of a specific exchanger. Inorganic exchangers usually, but not always, exhibit high radiation resistance. Liquid ion exchangers, which have been used so extensively in nuclear processing applications, also are included.

  18. Comparison of ion-exchange resin counterions in the nutrient measurement of calcareous soils: Implications for correlative studies of plant-soil relationships

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, S.K.; Belnap, J.; Miller, M.E.

    2003-01-01

    For more than 40 years, ion-exchange resins have been used to characterize nutrient bioavailability in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. To date, however, no standardized methodology has been developed, particularly with respect to the counterions that initially occupy resin exchange sites. To determine whether different resin counterions yield different measures of soil nutrients and rank soils differently with respect to their measured nutrient bioavailability, we compared nutrient measurements by three common counterion combinations (HCl, HOH, and NaHCO3). Five sandy calcareous soils were chosen to represent a range of soil characteristics at Canyonlands National Park, Utah, and resin capsules charged with the different counterions equilibrated in saturated pastes of these soils for one week. Data were converted to proportions of total ions of corresponding charge for ANOVA. Results from the different methods were not comparable with respect to any nutrient. Of eleven nutrients measured, all but iron (Fe2+), manganese (Mn2+), and zinc (Zn2+) differed significantly (p ??? 0.05) as a function of soil x counterion interactions; Fe2+ and Zn2+ varied as functions of counterion alone. Of the counterion combinations, HCl-resins yielded the most net ion exchange with all measured nutrients except Na+, NH4+, and HPO42-, the three of which desorbed in the greatest quantities from HOH-resins. Conventional chemical extractions using ammonium acetate generally yielded high proportional values of Ca2+, K+, and Na+. Further, among-soil rankings of nutrient bioavailability varied widely among methods. This study highlights the fact that various ion-exchange resin techniques for measuring soil nutrients may have differential effects on the soil-resin environment and yield data that should not be compared nor considered interchangeable. The most appropriate methods for characterizing soil-nutrient bioavailability depends on soil characteristics and likely on the physiological

  19. Comparison of ion-exchange resin counterions in the nutrient measurement of calcareous soils: implications for correlative studies of plant-soil relationships

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, S.K.; Belnap, Jayne; Miller, M.E.

    2003-01-01

    For more than 40 years, ion-exchange resins have been used to characterize nutrient bioavailability in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. To date, however, no standardized methodology has been developed, particularly with respect to the counterions that initially occupy resin exchange sites. To determine whether different resin counterions yield different measures of soil nutrients and rank soils differently with respect to their measured nutrient bioavailability, we compared nutrient measurements by three common counterion combinations (HCl, HOH, and NaHCO3). Five sandy calcareous soils were chosen to represent a range of soil characteristics at Canyonlands National Park, Utah, and resin capsules charged with the different counterions equilibrated in saturated pastes of these soils for one week. Data were converted to proportions of total ions of corresponding charge for ANOVA. Results from the different methods were not comparable with respect to any nutrient. Of eleven nutrients measured, all but iron (Fe2+), manganese (Mn2+), and zinc (Zn2+) differed significantly (pa??0.05) as a function of soilcounterion interactions; Fe2+ and Zn2+ varied as functions of counterion alone. Of the counterion combinations, HCl-resins yielded the most net ion exchange with all measured nutrients except Na+, and the three of which desorbed in the greatest quantities from HOH-resins. Conventional chemical extractions using ammonium acetate generally yielded high proportional values of Ca2+, K+, and Na+. Further, among-soil rankings of nutrient bioavailability varied widely among methods. This study highlights the fact that various ion-exchange resin techniques for measuring soil nutrients may have differential effects on the soil-resin environment and yield data that should not be compared nor considered interchangeable. The most appropriate methods for characterizing soil-nutrient bioavailability depends on soil characteristics and likely on the physiological uptake mechanisms of

  20. Rat small-intestinal β-galactosidases. Studies on the fractionation of `acid' β-galactosidase with isoelectric focusing, gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Asp, Nils-Georg

    1970-01-01

    1. Different forms of the rat small-intestinal `acid' β-galactosidase were separated by using the isoelectric-focusing technique. The isoelectric points of the different forms were at pH4.2, 4.6, 5.4, 6.1 and approx. 8. 2. The two forms of `acid' β-galactosidase isoelectric at pH4.2 and 4.6 were completely excluded from the Sephadex G-200 gel, whereas the form isoelectric at pH8 had Kav. 0.4. The concentration and pH of the elution buffer influenced the distribution of enzyme activity between different forms. Thus, under certain conditions of ionic strength and pH, the enzyme seems to form high-molecular-weight aggregates with low isoelectric points. These may be homopolymeric aggregates or the result of binding of enzyme to, for example, membrane fragments. The forms isoelectric at pH5.4 and 6.1 are probably aggregates of intermediate size. 3. During ion-exchange chromatography at pH6.0 one fraction of `acid' β-galactosidase was not retained on the column and was isoelectric at pH8 and another fraction was eluted when the buffer concentration in the eluate had increased to about 50mm. The main part of enzyme eluted in this second fraction was also isoelectric at pH8, indicating that the elution of this fraction is not a simple ion-exchange procedure but probably also involves a splitting of high-molecular-weight aggregates, originally retained because of their low isoelectric points. The enzyme subunits have a higher isoelectric point, and are therefore no longer bound to the ion-exchange resin. PMID:5420050

  1. Cesium removal from liquid acidic wastes with the primary focus on ammonium molybdophosphate as an ion exchanger: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.J.

    1995-03-01

    Many articles have been written concerning the selective removal of cesium from both acidic and alkaline defense wastes. The majority of the work performed for cesium removal from defense wastes involves alkaline feed solutions. Several different techniques for cesium removal from acidic solutions have been evaluated such as precipitation, solvent extraction, and ion exchange. The purpose of this paper is to briefly review various techniques for cesium removal from acidic solutions. The main focus of the review will be on ion exchange techniques, particularly those involving ammonium molybdophosphate as the exchanger. The pertinent literature sources are condensed into a single document for quick reference. The information contained in this document was used as an aid in determining techniques to evaluate cesium removal from the acidic Idaho Chemical Processing Plant waste matrices. 47 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and applications of a new cation exchanger tamarind sulphonic acid (TSA) resin.

    PubMed

    Singh, A V; Sharma, Naresh Kumar; Rathore, Abhay S

    2012-01-01

    A new composite cation exchanger, tamarind sulphonic acid (TSA) resin has been synthesized. The chemically modified TSA ion exchange resin has been used for the removal and preconcentration of Zn2+, Cd2+, Fe2+, Co2+ and Cu2+ ions in aqueous solution and effluent from the Laxmi steel plant in Jodhpur, India. This type of composite represents a new class of hybrid ion exchangers with good ion exchange capacity, stability, reproducibility and selectivity for toxic metal ions found in effluent from the steel industry. The characterization of the resin was carried out by determining the ion-exchange capacity, elemental analysis, pH titration, Fourier transform infrared spectra and thermal analysis. The distribution coefficients (K(d)) of toxic metal ions were determined in a reference aqueous solution and the steel plant effluent at different pH values; the absorbency of different metal ions on the TSA resin was studied for up to 10 cycles. The adsorption of different metal ions on TSA resin follows the order: Co2+ > Cu2+ > Zn2+ > Fe2+ > Cd2+. The ion exchange capacity of TSA resin is 2.87%. PMID:22629619

  3. Structure/function studies of resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) and phenol-formaldehyde (P-F) copolymer ion-exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Hubler, T.L.; Franz, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.; Hogan, M.O.; Hallen, R.T.; Brown, G.N.; Linehan, J.C.

    1996-09-01

    he U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site was established to produce plutonium for the U.S. defense mission. Over the course of decades, hazardous, toxic, and radioactive chemical wastes were generated and disposed of in a variety of ways including storage in underground tanks. An estimated 180 million tons of high-level radioactive wastes are stored in 177 underground storage tanks. During production of fissile plutonium, large quantities of 90Sr and 137CS were produced. The high abundance and intermediate length half- lives of these fission products are the reason that effort is directed toward selective removal of these radionuclides from the bulk waste stream before final tank waste disposal is effected. Economically, it is desirable to remove the highly radioactive fraction of the tank waste for vitrification. Ion-exchange technology is being evaluated for removing cesium from Hanford Site waste tanks. This report summarizes data and analysis performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)for both resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) and phenol-formaldehyde (P-F) resins and relates their observed differences in performance and chemical stability to their structure. The experimental approach used to characterize the resins was conducted using primarily two types of data: batch distribution coefficients (Kds) and solid-state 13C NMR. Comparison of these data for a particular resin allowed correlation of resin performance to resin structure. Additional characterization techniques included solid-state 19F NMR, and elemental analyses.

  4. Radiological implications of readings with a NaI(Tl) monitor set on an ion exchange resin column for purifying primary coolant water.

    PubMed

    Fukui, M

    1994-12-01

    Changes in readings of a NaI(Tl) monitor set on the surface of an ion exchange resin column used to purify primary coolant water at the Kyoto University Research Reactor were examined with mathematical models to clarify the radiological meanings. The concentration distributions of the nuclides in the interstitial water of the resin bed and those adsorbed on the resins were determined by use of the dispersion-convection theory coupled with the linear isotherm adsorption relation. The adsorbed amount that was assessed by this model was theoretically related to that made by a compartmental model. The buildup concentrations of nuclides in the core water and the decreased accompanying power operation and shut-down were modeled using the value representing the cleanup rate by the purification circuit. The values of this parameter were determined by the least squares method for observed concentrations of 24Na, a major radionuclide in the core water. Recognizing that the adsorption band had remained within the top 10 cm during the circulation of water through the column, the change in the amount of radionuclide adsorbed on the resin was calculated using a compartmental model. The amount of radionuclide adsorbed on the resin predicted by the model agreed well with the readings of the NaI(TI) monitor. Factors that affect the reading are discussed in relation to early detection of fuel defects. PMID:7960785

  5. Parallel transport of an organic acid by solid-phase and macropore diffusion in a weakly basic ion exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Takatsuji; Wataru

    2000-04-01

    The parallel transport of an organic acid by solid-phase and macropore diffusion within a porous ion exchanger was studied by measuring equilibrium isotherms and uptake curves for adsorption of acetic acid and lactic acid on a weakly basic ion exchanger, DIAION WA30. Experimental adsorption isotherms were correlated by the Langmuir equation. The Langmuir equilibrium constant of acetic acid was close to that of lactic acid, and the saturation capacity of acetic acid was about 84% that of lactic acid. Intraparticle effective diffusivity D{sub eff} was determined using the homogeneous Fickian diffusion model. The value of D{sub eff} for acetic acid was about 1.5 times lactic acid. Because D{sub eff} increased with linearly increasing bulk phase concentration C{sub 0}, D{sub eff} was separated to the solid-phase diffusivity D{sub s} and the macropore diffusivity D{sub P} by applying the parallel diffusion model. The model agreed well with the experimental curves. The values of D{sub S} and D{sub P} for acetic acid were about 2 and 1.5 times those of lactic acid, respectively. The acetic acid and the lactic acid may be separated by the difference of the diffusion rates.

  6. Evaluation of electrochemical ion exchange for cesium elution

    SciTech Connect

    Bontha, J.D.; Kurath, D.E.; Surma, J.E.; Buehler, M.F.

    1996-04-01

    Electrochemical elution was investigated as an alternative method to acid elution for the desorption of cesium from loaded ion exchange resins. The approach was found to have several potential advantages over existing technologies, in particular, electrochemical elution eliminates the need for addition of chemicals to elute cesium from the ion exchange resin. Also, since, in the electrochemical elution process the eluting solution is not in direct contact with the ion exchange material, very small volumes of the eluting solution can be used in a complete recycle mode in order to minimize the total volume of the cesium elute. In addition, the cesium is eluted as an alkaline solution that does not require neutralization with caustic to meet the tank farm specifications. Other advantages include easy incorporation of the electrochemical elution process into the present cesium recovery schemes.

  7. Radiation effects on amberlite IRA-938 and bio-rad AG MP-50 ion exchange resins. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kazanjian, A.R.; Killion, M.E.

    1982-01-15

    The radiation stability of Amberlite IRA-938, an anion exchange resin, and Bio-Rad AG MP-50, a cation exchange resin, was investigated. The resins were gamma irradiated and analyzed for exchange capacity, gas generation, thermal stability, and plutonium capacity. The radiation stabilities were comparable to those of Dowex 11 and Dowex 50W-X8, the resins presently used in Rocky Flats recovery operations.

  8. Friedel-Crafts Alkylation of Arenes Catalyzed by Ion-Exchange Resin Nanoparticles: An Expedient Synthesis of Triarylmethanes.

    PubMed

    Reddy, B V Subba; Venkateswarlu, A; Sridevi, B; Aldeyab, Salem S; Vinu, Ajayan

    2015-09-01

    Friedel-Crafts alkylation of electron-rich arenes with aldehydes has been achieved in the presence of an active and selective Amberlyst-15 catalyst at the reaction temperature of 60 degrees C in solvent-free conditions. The catalyst exhibits a very high activity and offers the corresponding triarylmethanes in excellent yields with a high selectivity. The use of highly reactive and selective Amberlyist-15 makes this procedure simple, convenient, cost-effective, practical and environmentally friendly. This method provides an easy access to triarylmethanes in a single step using a readily available acidic ionic resin, which is a stable and easy to separate from the reaction mixture by a simple filtration technique. PMID:26716251

  9. Ion Exchange Studies for Removal of Sulfate from Hanford Tank Waste Envelope C (241-AN-107) Using SuperLig 655 Resin

    SciTech Connect

    DE Kurath; JR Bontha; DL Blanchard; SK Fiskum; BM Rapko

    2000-08-23

    BNFL Inc. is evaluating various pretreatment technologies to mitigate the impacts of sulfate on the LAW vitrification system. One pretreatment technology for separating sulfate from LAW solutions involves the use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 655 (SL-655), a proprietary ion exchange material developed and supplied by IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT. This report describes testing of SL-655 with diluted ([Na] {approximately} 5 M) waste from Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Division. Batch contact studies were conducted from 4 to 96 hours to determine the sulfate distribution coefficient and reaction kinetics. A small-scale ion exchange column test was conducted to evaluate sulfate removal, loading, breakthrough, and elution from the SL-655. In all of these tests, an archived 241-AN-107 tank waste sample (pretreated to remove Cs, Sr, and transuranics elements) was used. The experimental details and results are described in this report. Under the test conditions, SL-655 was found to have no significant ion exchange affinity for sulfate in this matrix. The batch contact study resulted in no measurable difference in the aqueous sulfate concentration following resin contact (K{sub d} {approximately} 0). The column test also demonstrated SL-655 had no practical affinity for sulfate in the tested matrix. Within experimental error, the sulfate concentration in the column effluent was equal to the concentration in the feed after passing 3 bed volumes of sample through the columns. Furthermore, some, if not all, of the decreased sulfate concentration in these first three column volumes of effluent can be ascribed to mixing and dilution of the 241-AN-107 feed with the interstitial liquid present in the column at the start of the loading cycle. Finally, ICP-AES measurements on the eluate solutions showed the presence of barium as soon as contact with the feed solution is completed. Barium is a metal not detected in the feed solution. Should the

  10. Nanostructured gadolinium-doped ceria microsphere synthesis from ion exchange resin: Multi-scale in-situ studies of solid solution formation

    SciTech Connect

    Caisso, Marie; Lebreton, Florent; Horlait, Denis; Neuville, Daniel R.; Dardenne, Kathy; Rothe, Jörg; Delahaye, Thibaud

    2014-10-15

    In the current nano-sized material revolution, the main limitations to a large-scale deployment of nanomaterials involve health concerns related to nano-dissemination via air. Developing new chemical routes benefiting from nano-size advantages while avoiding their hazards could overcome these limitations. Addressing this need, a chemical route leading to soft nano-particle agglomerates, i.e., macroscopic precursors presenting the ability to be decomposed into nano-sized materials, was developed and applied to Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2−δ}. Using cerium/gadolinium-loaded ion exchange resin, the Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2−δ} solid solution formation as a function of temperature was studied in-situ through X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Temperatures corresponding to the organic skeleton decomposition and to the mixed oxide crystallization were identified. An optimal heat treatment, leading to nanostructured soft agglomerates, was established. Microsphere processing capabilities were evaluated and particle size distribution measurements were recorded. A very low fracture strength was calculated, and a nanometric particle size distribution (170 nm) was determined. - Graphical abstract: The elaboration of micro-spherical precursors leading to the formation of nano-oxide soft agglomerates was studied and approved through the use of ion exchange resin loaded with cerium and gadolinium. The formation of the solid solution was followed through in-situ measurements such as XAS, XRD, Raman, TGA and DSC. Key temperatures were identified for the formation of the mixed-oxide. Following this study, the microstructure and particle size of oxide microspheres formed highlight the formation of soft nano-arrangments. - Highlights: • Soft microspherical agglomerates able to be decomposed into nano-sized materials. • In situ study of cerium/gadolinium-loaded ion exchange resin conversion in oxide. • In situ multi-scale study

  11. Ion-exchange selectivity of tertiary pyridine-type anion-exchange resin for treatment of spent nuclear fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Nogami, Masanobu; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Akira; Ohe, Shinobu; Kawai, Hiroomi; Yoneda, Morihiro

    1996-09-01

    The tertiary pyridine-type anion-exchange resin has been synthesized for the treatment of spent nuclear fuels and high-level radioactive waste. This resin, with a uniform diameter of 60 {micro}m, is mechanically strong enough and shows no swelling or shrinking regardless of its chemical forms. Systematic analysis was made of the adsorption selectivities of the resin in HCl solutions for a number of cations that exist in spent fuels, such as uranium and fission product elements. The results indicate that the resin is suitable to be used for the treatment of spent fuels and high-level radioactive waste.

  12. Immobilization of α-amylase and amyloglucosidase onto ion-exchange resin beads and hydrolysis of natural starch at high concentration.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kapish; Jana, Asim Kumar; Kumar, Sandeep; Maiti, Mithu

    2013-11-01

    α-Amylase was immobilized on Dowex MAC-3 with 88 % yield and amyloglucosidase on Amberlite IRA-400 ion-exchange resin beads with 54 % yield by adsorption process. Immobilized enzymes were characterized to measure the kinetic parameters and optimal operational parameters. Optimum substrate concentration and temperature were higher for immobilized enzymes. The thermal stability of the enzymes enhanced after the immobilization. Immobilized enzymes were used in the hydrolysis of the natural starch at high concentration (35 % w/v). The time required for liquefaction of starch to 10 dextrose equivalent (DE) and saccharification of liquefied starch to 96 DE increased. Immobilized enzymes showed the potential for use in starch hydrolysis as done in industry.

  13. In vitro and in vivo correlation of disintegration and bitter taste masking using orally disintegrating tablet containing ion exchange resin-drug complex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Il; Cho, Sang-Min; Cui, Jing-Hao; Cao, Qing-Ri; Oh, Euichaul; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2013-10-15

    Although the taste-masking of bitter drug using ion exchange resin has been recognized, in vitro testing using an electronic tongue (e-Tongue) and in vivo bitterness test by human panel test was not fully understood. In case of orally disintegrating tablet (ODT) containing bitter medicine, in vitro and in vivo disintegration is also importance for dosage performance. Donepezil hydrochloride was chosen as a model drug due to its bitterness and requires rapid disintegration for the preparation of ODT. In this study, ion exchange resin drug complex (IRDC) at three different ratios (1:2, 1:1, 2:1) was prepared using a spray-drying method and then IRDC-loaded ODT containing superdisintegrants (crospovidone, croscarmellose sodium, and sodium starch glycolate) were prepared by the direct compression method. The physical properties and morphologies were then characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (PXRD) and electrophoretic laser scattering (ELS), respectively. The in vitro taste-masking efficiency was measured with an electronic tongue (e-Tongue). In vivo bitterness scale was also evaluated by human volunteers and then we defined new term, "bitterness index (BI)" to link in vitro e-Tongue. There was a good correlation of IRDC between in vitro e-Tongue values and in vivo BI. Furthermore, IRDC-loaded ODT showed good in vitro/in vivo correlation in the disintegration time. The optimal IRDC-loaded ODTs displayed similar drug release profiles to the reference tablet (Aricept(®) ODT) in release media of pH 1.2, pH 4.0, pH 6.8 and distilled water but had significantly better palatability in vivo taste-masking evaluation. The current IRDC-loaded ODT according to the in vitro and in vivo correlation of disintegration and bitter taste masking could provide platforms in ODT dosage formulations of donepezil hydrochloride for improved patient compliances. PMID:23933050

  14. Metal-Carbon Hybrid Electrocatalysts Derived from Ion-Exchange Resin Containing Heavy Metals for Efficient Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yucheng; Zhou, Weijia; Hou, Dongman; Li, Guoqiang; Wan, Jinquan; Feng, Chunhua; Tang, Zhenghua; Chen, Shaowei

    2016-05-01

    Transition metal-carbon hybrids have been proposed as efficient electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in acidic media. Herein, effective HER electrocatalysts based on metal-carbon composites are prepared by controlled pyrolysis of resin containing a variety of heavy metals. For the first time, Cr2 O3 nanoparticles of 3-6 nm in diameter homogeneously dispersed in the resulting porous carbon framework (Cr-C hybrid) is synthesized as efficient HER electrocatalyst. Electrochemical measurements show that Cr-C hybrids display a high HER activity with an onset potential of -49 mV (vs reversible hydrogen electrode), a Tafel slope of 90 mV dec(-1) , a large catalytic current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at -123 mV, and the prominent electrochemical durability. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements confirm that electron transfer occurs from Cr2 O3 into carbon, which is consistent with the reported metal@carbon systems. The obtained correlation between metals and HER activities may be exploited as a rational guideline in the design and engineering of HER electrocatalysts. PMID:27061759

  15. Metal-Carbon Hybrid Electrocatalysts Derived from Ion-Exchange Resin Containing Heavy Metals for Efficient Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yucheng; Zhou, Weijia; Hou, Dongman; Li, Guoqiang; Wan, Jinquan; Feng, Chunhua; Tang, Zhenghua; Chen, Shaowei

    2016-05-01

    Transition metal-carbon hybrids have been proposed as efficient electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in acidic media. Herein, effective HER electrocatalysts based on metal-carbon composites are prepared by controlled pyrolysis of resin containing a variety of heavy metals. For the first time, Cr2 O3 nanoparticles of 3-6 nm in diameter homogeneously dispersed in the resulting porous carbon framework (Cr-C hybrid) is synthesized as efficient HER electrocatalyst. Electrochemical measurements show that Cr-C hybrids display a high HER activity with an onset potential of -49 mV (vs reversible hydrogen electrode), a Tafel slope of 90 mV dec(-1) , a large catalytic current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at -123 mV, and the prominent electrochemical durability. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements confirm that electron transfer occurs from Cr2 O3 into carbon, which is consistent with the reported metal@carbon systems. The obtained correlation between metals and HER activities may be exploited as a rational guideline in the design and engineering of HER electrocatalysts.

  16. Application of the new thermodynamic approach to the description of superequivalent sorption by ion exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, O. N.

    2014-08-01

    Using the example of sorption systems with the participation of amino acids, it is shown that the novel thermodynamic approach to describing superequivalent sorption as a combination of ion exchange and nonexchangeable absorption allows us to adequately describe such equilibria. Results from calculating the activity coefficients of components of a sorbent phase and the thermodynamic constants of ion exchange equilibrium and the superequivalent absorption of phenylalanine by AV-17-8 anion exchange resin are presented.

  17. Ion-exchange selectivities of periderm and cuticular membranes toward alkali cations

    SciTech Connect

    Ersoz, M.; Duncan, H.J.

    1994-08-01

    The ion-exchange selectivities of lithium, sodium, potassium, and cesium on isolated potato periderm (Solanum tuberosum) and pear fruit cuticular membranes were investigated; the general order of preference both for cation selectivities and ion-exchange capacities was lithium > sodium > potassium > cesium. The potato periderm and pear fruit cuticular membranes exhibited a behavior typical of ion-exchange resins of the weak acid type. At constant pH 7, the ion-exchange capacities of periderm and cuticular membranes increased with hydrated ionic radius, and also with increasing pH and neutral salt concentration, and decreased with crystal ionic radius. Counterion selectivities also exhibited the same behavior. The ion-exchange properties are discussed in terms of the structure and function of potato periderm and pear fruit cuticular membranes.

  18. Selective adsorption of Pt ions from chloride solutions obtained by leaching chlorinated spent automotive catalysts on ion exchange resin Diaion WA21J.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shaobo; Guishen, Liang; Pan, Tonglin; He, JunZhang; Guo, Zhanchen

    2011-12-15

    Thermodynamic and kinetics studies for adsorption of Pt ions complexes from the chloride solutions obtained by leaching chlorinated spent automotive catalysts on anionic exchange resin Diaion WA21J were carried out. It was found that only Si, Pt, Rh and Pd from the solution were selectively adsorbed on the resin Diaion WA21J more strongly. The adsorption equilibrium time for Pt ions was about 20 h. The isothermal adsorption of Pt ions was found to fit Langmuir, Freundlich and DKR models. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacities Q(max) and X(m) of Pt ions on the resin based on Langmuir and DKR model were 4.85, 5.36 and 5.69 mg/g as well as 5.01, 5.63 and 5.98 mg/g for temperatures 18°C, 28°C and 40°C, respectively. The apparent adsorption energy E(ad) based on DKR model were -11.79, -11.04 and -11.04 kJ/mol for the temperatures 18°C, 28°C and 40°C, respectively. Ion exchange was the mechanism involved in the adsorption process. The adsorption of Pt ions on the resin underwent pseudo-first-order kinetic process, and the apparent adsorption activation energy E(a,1) was 12.6 kJ/mol. The intraparticle diffusion of Pt ions was a main rate-controlling step in most of time of adsorption process.

  19. Identification of a matrix effect in the MC-ICP-MS due to sample purification using ion exchange resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietruszka, Aaron J.; Reznik, Audrey D.

    2008-02-01

    Multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) has become the preferred method for precise and accurate measurements of the relative abundances of many radiogenic and stable isotopes in natural materials. Isotopic analyses by MC-ICP-MS require a correction for instrumental mass-dependent isotopic fractionation ("instrumental mass bias"). Two techniques have been used to correct for instrumental mass bias in the MC-ICP-MS: (1) standard-sample bracketing (SSB) or (2) double spiking. SSB is often cited as the preferred method, but it is more susceptible to matrix effects. Here we demonstrate that a matrix effect in the MC-ICP-MS may arise indirectly from the chemical separation and purification of molybdenum using anion exchange resin. The results of our experiments show that a Mo standard passed through a column of anion exchange resin or a Mo standard added to a Mo-free solution that had been collected from anion exchange resin appears to be isotopically lighter than expected from direct analysis of the same standard. Using amounts of Mo similar to what might be expected from most natural samples (~3 [mu]g per column cut), these offsets span a significant fraction (~10-60%) of the total known range of mass-dependent Mo isotopic variation in nature. This "column matrix effect" appears to be caused by organic material stripped from the resin. All of our attempts to eliminate or control this column matrix effect have failed, making it difficult (if not impossible) to obtain accurate measurements of mass-dependent Mo isotopic variations in natural materials using the anion exchange resin procedure described in this study and SSB techniques to correct for instrumental mass bias in the MC-ICP-MS. It is currently unknown if this type of column matrix effect will affect measurements of other stable or radiogenic isotopes by MC-ICP-MS when SSB is used to correct for instrumental mass bias.

  20. Ion Exchange Formation via Sulfonated Bicomponent Nonwovens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoughton, Hannah L.

    For many years ion exchange resins were used to: remove heavy metals from water, recover materials from wastewater, and eliminate harmful gases from the air. While use of these resin beads dominates the ion exchange industry, the beads have limitations that should be considered when decisions are made to employ them. For instance, officials must balance the inherent zero sum surface area and porosity of the materials. This series of studies investigates the use of bicomponent nonwovens as a base substrate for producing high surface area ion exchange materials for the removal of heavy metal ions. Functionalized materials were produced in a two-step process: (1) PET/PE spunbond bicomponent fibers were fractured completely, producing the high surface area nonwoven to be used as the base ion exchange material, and (2) the conditions for functionalizing the PET fibers of the nonwoven webs were investigated where an epoxy containing monomer was grafted to the surface followed by sulfonation of the monomer. The functionalization reactions of the PET fibers were monitored based on: weight gain, FTIR, TOF-SIMS, and SEM. Ion exchange properties were evaluated using titration and copper ion removal capacity from test solutions. The relationship between web structure and removal efficiency of the metal ions was defined through a comparison of the bicomponent and homocomponent nonwovens for copper ion removal efficiency. The investigation revealed that utilizing the high surface area, fractured bicomponent nonwoven ion exchange materials with capacities comparable to commercially available ion exchange resins could be produced.

  1. Upgrade to Ion Exchange Modeling for Removal of Technetium from Hanford Waste Using SuperLig® 639 Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.; Smith, F.; Aleman, S.; McCabe, D.

    2013-05-16

    This report documents the development and application of computer models to describe the sorption of pertechnetate [TcO₄⁻], and its surrogate perrhenate [ReO₄⁻], on SuperLig® 639 resin. Two models have been developed: 1) A thermodynamic isotherm model, based on experimental data, that predicts [TcO₄⁻] and [ReO₄⁻] sorption as a function of solution composition and temperature and 2) A column model that uses the isotherm calculated by the first model to simulate the performance of a full-scale sorption process. The isotherm model provides a synthesis of experimental data collected from many different sources to give a best estimate prediction of the behavior of the pertechnetate-SuperLig® 639 system and an estimate of the uncertainty in this prediction. The column model provides a prediction of the expected performance of the plant process by determining the volume of waste solution that can be processed based on process design parameters such as column size, flow rate and resin physical properties.

  2. Partition Coefficients of Selected Compounds Using Ion Exchange Separation of Cesium From High Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, James J.; Blanchard, David L.; Arm, Stuart T.; Urie, Michael W.

    2004-04-24

    The removal of cesium radioisotope (137Cs) from the High Level Waste stored in underground storage tanks at the Hanford site is a formidable chemical separations challenge for the Waste Treatment Plant. An eluatable organic-based ion exchange resin was selected as the baseline technology (1). The baseline technology design employs a proprietary macrocyclic weak-acid ion exchange resin to adsorb the cesium (137Cs) during the process loading cycle in a fixed bed column design. Following loading, the cesium is eluted from the resin using a nitric acid eluant. Previous work provided limited understanding of the performance of the resin, processed with actual wastes, and under multiple load and elute conditions, which are required for the ion exchange technology to be underpinned sufficiently for resolution of all process-related design issues before flowsheet and construction drawings can be released. By performing multiple ion exchange column tests with waste feeds, and measuring the chemical and radionuclide compositions of the waste feeds, column effluents and column eluants, ion exchange stream composition information can be provided for supporting resolution of selected design issues.

  3. Decomposition of 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl with iron supported on an activated carbon from an ion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yifei; Takaoka, Masaki; Takeda, Nobuo; Wang, Wei; Zeng, Xiaolan; Zhu, Tianle

    2012-08-01

    An activated carbon (AC) containing a high concentration (374mgg(-1)) of Fe was prepared by carbonization of an ion-exchange resin. To examine its chemical reactivity as a catalyst to decompose 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB-153), the decomposition parameters of temperature and time were varied under air or N(2). Decomposition at 350°C was achieved within 15min under air and 30min under N(2), and the efficiency of PCB-153 decomposition was 99.7% and 98.0%, respectively. An analysis of inorganic chloride ions revealed that PCB-153 was mineralized effectively during the decomposition. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and pore volume of the AC were measured to assess the adsorption capacity before and after the decomposition. The differences between decomposition under air and N(2) reflected the differences in the BET surface and pore volume measurements. A decomposition pathway was postulated, and the reactive characteristics of chlorine atoms loaded on the benzene rings followed the order of para>meta>ortho, which agrees with the calculated results from a density functional theory study.

  4. B and N isolate-doped graphitic carbon nanosheets from nitrogen-containing ion-exchanged resins for enhanced oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Yu, Peng; Zhao, Lu; Tian, Chungui; Zhao, Dongdong; Zhou, Wei; Yin, Jie; Wang, Ruihong; Fu, Honggang

    2014-06-01

    B,N-codoped carbon nanostructures (BNCS) can serve as alternative low-cost metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). However, the compensation effect between the p- (B atoms) and n-type (N atoms) dopants would make the covalent boron-nitride (BN) easily formed during the synthesis of BNCS, leading to a unsatisfactory ORR activity. Therefore, it has been challenging to develop facile and rapid synthetic strategies for highly active BNCS without forming the direct covalent BN. Here, a facile method is developed to prepare B and N isolate-doped graphitic nanosheets (BNGS) by using iron species for saving N element and simultaneous doping the B element from nitrogen-containing ion-exchanged resins (NR). The resulting BNGS exhibits much more onset potential (Eonset) compared with the B-doped graphitic carbon nanosheets (BGS), N-doped graphitic carbon nanosheets (NGS), as well as B,N-codoped disorder carbon (BNC). Moreover, the BNGS shows well methanol tolerance propery and excellent stability (a minimal loss of activity after 5,000 potential cycles) compared to that of commercial Pt/C catalyst. The goog performance for BNGS towards ORR is attributed to the synergistic effect between B and N, and the well electrons transport property of graphitic carbon in BNGS.

  5. B and N isolate-doped graphitic carbon nanosheets from nitrogen-containing ion-exchanged resins for enhanced oxygen reduction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Yu, Peng; Zhao, Lu; Tian, Chungui; Zhao, Dongdong; Zhou, Wei; Yin, Jie; Wang, Ruihong; Fu, Honggang

    2014-01-01

    B,N-codoped carbon nanostructures (BNCS) can serve as alternative low-cost metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). However, the compensation effect between the p- (B atoms) and n-type (N atoms) dopants would make the covalent boron-nitride (BN) easily formed during the synthesis of BNCS, leading to a unsatisfactory ORR activity. Therefore, it has been challenging to develop facile and rapid synthetic strategies for highly active BNCS without forming the direct covalent BN. Here, a facile method is developed to prepare B and N isolate-doped graphitic nanosheets (BNGS) by using iron species for saving N element and simultaneous doping the B element from nitrogen-containing ion-exchanged resins (NR). The resulting BNGS exhibits much more onset potential (Eonset) compared with the B-doped graphitic carbon nanosheets (BGS), N-doped graphitic carbon nanosheets (NGS), as well as B,N-codoped disorder carbon (BNC). Moreover, the BNGS shows well methanol tolerance propery and excellent stability (a minimal loss of activity after 5,000 potential cycles) compared to that of commercial Pt/C catalyst. The goog performance for BNGS towards ORR is attributed to the synergistic effect between B and N, and the well electrons transport property of graphitic carbon in BNGS. PMID:24898033

  6. Effects of pH and Competing Anions on the Solution Speciation of Arsenic by Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Impellitteri, Christopher A.; Ryan, JAmes A.; Al-Abed, Souhail R.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Randall, Paul M.; Richardson, Collin A.

    2003-03-26

    Anion-exchange resins (AER) are used to differentiate As(V) and As(III) by retaining As(V) and allowing As(III) to pass through. AERs allow rapid speciation of As in the field which precludes the effects of sample preservation on As speciation. Aqueous environmental samples contain anions that may interfere with the speciation of As. This study compares the speciation of As by two commercially available AERs. A silica-based AER was selected for further study. As(V) and As(III) were passed through the AER in the presence of NO3 -, SO4 2-, HPO4 2-, Cl- and HCO3 - at pH 4, 6 and 8. Recoveries of As species in mixed systems range between 90 to 100%. Breakthrough curves for As(V) are presented which allow calculation of loading rates. HPO4 2- has the greatest effect on the speciation of As by AER.

  7. Selective ion exchange recovery of rare earth elements from uranium mining solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychkov, Vladimir N.; Kirillov, Evgeny V.; Kirillov, Sergey V.; Bunkov, Grigory M.; Mashkovtsev, Maxim A.; Botalov, Maxim S.; Semenishchev, Vladimir S.; Volkovich, Vladimir A.

    2016-09-01

    A comparative study of rare earth, ferric and aluminum ions ion exchange behavior on gel sulfonated p;olystyrene cation exchange resins depending on the degree of the matrix cross-linking and pH of the solution is presented. Selective ion exchange of REEs is possible at the pH range of 1.5-2.0 using strongly acidic cation exchange resins containing more than 8 % of DVB. The preliminary results of testing the efficiency of REEs recovery from the industrial uranium underground leaching solutions are also presented.

  8. Determination of microamounts of hafnium in zirconium using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry during their separation by ion exchange on Diphonix chelating resin.

    PubMed

    Smolik, Marek; Jakóbik-Kolon, Agata

    2009-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) methods were applied to check the possibility of determination of hafnium in zirconium at a level lower than 100 ppm. A zirconium matrix of hafnium content lower than 10 ppm was obtained using a worked-out separation method exploiting ion exchange on Diphonix resin. Both methods give results in good agreement with each other as well as with those for certified reference material BCR-098 (Zircaloy-4). They were utilized in determination of Hf in the samples collected during separation of microamounts of hafnium from zirconium by the mentioned ion exchange. These results proved the earlier described method of separation on Diphonix resin to be effective even when the initial concentration of hafnium in zirconium decreases from 2.4% to 0.0082%.

  9. TECHNICAL COMPARISON OF CANDIDATE ION EXCHANGE MEDIA FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE (SCIX) APPLICATIONS IN SUPPORT OF SUPPLEMENTAL LAW PRETREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    RAMSEY AA; THORSON MR

    2010-12-28

    At-tank supplemental pretreatment including both filtration and small column ion exchange is currently under evaluation to facilitate salt waste retrieval and processing in the Hanford tank farms. Spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) resin is the baseline ion exchange resin for use in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). This document provides background and technical rationale to assist in determining whether spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) is also the appropriate ion exchange resin for supplemental LAW pretreatment processes and compares sRF with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) as potential supplemental pretreatment ion exchange media.

  10. Effect of long-term organic removal on ion exchange properties and performance during sewage tertiary treatment by conventional anion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Li, Xiaofeng; Quan, Ying; Yin, Yunjun; Zheng, Shaokui

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the long-term dissolved organic matter (DOM), phosphorus and nitrogen removal performance of a commercially available conventional anion exchange resin (AER) from actual secondary effluent (SE) in a sewage treatment plant based on a pilot-scale operation (2.2 m(3) d(-1), 185 cycles, 37,000 bed volume, 1.5 years). Particular emphasis was given to the potential effect of DOM fouling on the ion exchange properties and performance during the long-term operation. Despite the large range of COD (15.6-33.5 mg L(-1)), BOD5 (3.0-5.6 mg L(-1)), DOC (6.5-24.2 mg L(-1)), and UV254 (UV absorption at 254 nm) (0.108-0.229 cm(-1)) levels in the SE, the removal efficiencies of the AER for the aforementioned parameters were 43±12%, 46±15%, 45±9%, and 72±4%, respectively. Based on three-dimensional fluorescence excitation-emission matrix data, i.e., the fluorescence intensities of four regions (peaks A-D), all organic components of the SE were effectively removed (peak A 74%, peak B 48%, peak C 55%, and peak D 45%) following the adsorption. The AER effluent still has considerable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons' ecological hazard on freshwater fishes when they were significantly removed from SE. The obvious DOM fouling on the AER, identified by color change, had no significant influence on the long-term removal of the representative inorganic anions (averaging 95±4% phosphate, 100±0% SO4(2-), and 62±17% NO3(-)) and AER properties (including total exchange capacity, moisture content, and true density). The conventional AER can produce high quality reclaimed water from SE at a low operational cost.

  11. Effect of long-term organic removal on ion exchange properties and performance during sewage tertiary treatment by conventional anion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Li, Xiaofeng; Quan, Ying; Yin, Yunjun; Zheng, Shaokui

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the long-term dissolved organic matter (DOM), phosphorus and nitrogen removal performance of a commercially available conventional anion exchange resin (AER) from actual secondary effluent (SE) in a sewage treatment plant based on a pilot-scale operation (2.2 m(3) d(-1), 185 cycles, 37,000 bed volume, 1.5 years). Particular emphasis was given to the potential effect of DOM fouling on the ion exchange properties and performance during the long-term operation. Despite the large range of COD (15.6-33.5 mg L(-1)), BOD5 (3.0-5.6 mg L(-1)), DOC (6.5-24.2 mg L(-1)), and UV254 (UV absorption at 254 nm) (0.108-0.229 cm(-1)) levels in the SE, the removal efficiencies of the AER for the aforementioned parameters were 43±12%, 46±15%, 45±9%, and 72±4%, respectively. Based on three-dimensional fluorescence excitation-emission matrix data, i.e., the fluorescence intensities of four regions (peaks A-D), all organic components of the SE were effectively removed (peak A 74%, peak B 48%, peak C 55%, and peak D 45%) following the adsorption. The AER effluent still has considerable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons' ecological hazard on freshwater fishes when they were significantly removed from SE. The obvious DOM fouling on the AER, identified by color change, had no significant influence on the long-term removal of the representative inorganic anions (averaging 95±4% phosphate, 100±0% SO4(2-), and 62±17% NO3(-)) and AER properties (including total exchange capacity, moisture content, and true density). The conventional AER can produce high quality reclaimed water from SE at a low operational cost. PMID:25996990

  12. Physical Property Requirements of Ion-exchange Polymer Membranes for Acid-base Flow Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roddecha, Supacharee; Thayer, Peter; Jorne', Jacob; Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2013-03-01

    Flow batteries offer feasible solutions to grid-scale storage of intermittent power. We are developing a new type of flow battery that reversibly controls an acid-base neutralization reaction. The battery consists of two highly reversible hydrogen gas electrodes that are exposed to low and high pH process streams. A brine solution runs between the acid and base streams and is separated by cationic and anionic exchange membranes. For both charge and discharge phases, hydrogen gas is produced at one electrode and consumed at the other. During charging, an external potential is applied across the two electrodes to electrochemically produce acid and base from the fed brine solution. Discharge involves electrochemical neutralization of acid and base streams, resulting in current flow through an external load. Several charge and discharge cycles were performed to demonstrate proof of concept. Experiments were conducted to determine the physical property requirements of the ionic exchange polymer layers. Properties including ion conductivity, permselectivity, and membrane stability will be discussed.

  13. ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY AND PURIFICATION OF MATERIALS

    DOEpatents

    Long, R.S.; Bailes, R.H.

    1958-04-15

    A process for the recovery of certain metallic ions from aqueous solutions by ion exchange techniques is described. It is applicable to elements such as vanadium, chromium, nnanganese, and the like, which are capable of forming lower valent cations soluble in aqueous solutions and which also form ldgher valent anions soluble in aqueous acidic solutions. For example, small amounts of vanadium occurring in phosphoric acid prepared from phosphate rock may be recovered by reducing the vanadium to a trivalent cation adsorbing; the vanadium in a cationic exchange resin, then treating the resin with a suitable oxidizing agent to convert the adsorbed vanadium to a higher valent state, and finally eluting; the vanadium as an anion from the resin by means of an aqueous acidic solution.

  14. Revised Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J

    2006-04-11

    This document updates a previous calculation of the temperature distributions in a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ion exchange column.1 LANL operates two laboratory-scale anion exchange columns, in series, to extract Pu-238 from nitric acid solutions. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has requested an updated analysis to calculate maximum temperatures for higher resin loading capacities obtained with a new formulation of the Reillex HPQ anion exchange resin. The increased resin loading capacity will not exceed 118 g plutonium per L of resin bed. Calculations were requested for normal operation of the resin bed at the minimum allowable solution feed rate of 30 mL/min and after an interruption of flow at the end of the feed stage, when one of the columns is fully loaded. The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades. At low temperatures, resin bed temperatures increase primarily due to decay heat. At {approx}70 C a Low Temperature Exotherm (LTE) resulting from the reaction between 8-12 M HNO{sub 3} and the resin has been observed. The LTE has been attributed to an irreversible oxidation of pendant ethyl benzene groups at the termini of the resin polymer chains by nitric acid. The ethyl benzene groups are converted to benzoic acid moities. The resin can be treated to permanently remove the LTE by heating a resin suspension in 8M HNO{sub 3} for 30-45 minutes. No degradation of the resin performance is observed after the LTE removal treatment. In fact, heating the resin in boiling ({approx}115-120 C) 12 M HNO{sub 3} for 3 hr displays thermal stability analogous to resin that has been treated to remove the LTE. The analysis is based on a previous study of the SRS Frames Waste Recovery (FWR) column, performed in support of the Pu-238 production campaign for NASA's Cassini mission. In that study, temperature transients

  15. Biodegradation of ion-exchange media

    SciTech Connect

    Bowerman, B.S.; Clinton, J.H.; Cowdery, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate further the potential for ion-exchange media (resin beads or powdered filter media) to support biological growth. A mixed microbial culture was grown from resin wastes obtained from the BNL HFBR by mixing the resin with a nutrient salt solution containing peptone and yeast extract. Bacterial and fungal growths appeared in the solution and on the resins after 7 to 10 days incubation at 337)degree)C. The mixed microbial cultures were used to inoculate several resin types, both irradiated and unirradiated. 12 refs., 5 tabs.

  16. Enhanced biocatalytic production of L-cysteine by Pseudomonas sp. B-3 with in situ product removal using ion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; He, Jun-Yao; Yin, Jiang-Feng

    2015-03-01

    Bioconversion of DL-2-amino-Δ(2)-thiazoline-4-carboxylic acid (DL-ATC) catalyzed by whole cells of Pseudomonas sp. was successfully applied for the production of L-cysteine. It was found, however, like most whole-cell biocatalytic processes, the accumulated L-cysteine produced obvious inhibition to the activity of biocatalyst and reduced the yield. To improve L-cysteine productivity, an anion exchange-based in situ product removal (ISPR) approach was developed. Several anion-exchange resins were tested to select a suitable adsorbent used in the bioconversion of DL-ATC for the in situ removal of L-cysteine. The strong basic anion-exchange resin 201 × 7 exhibited the highest adsorption capacity for L-cysteine and low adsorption for DL-ATC, which is a favorable option. With in situ addition of 60 g L(-1) resin 201 × 7, the product inhibition can be reduced significantly and 200 mmol L(-1) of DL-ATC was converted to L-cysteine with 90.4 % of yield and 28.6 mmol L(-1 )h(-1) of volumetric productivity. Compared to the bioconversion without the addition of resin, the volumetric productivity of L-cysteine was improved by 2.27-fold using ISPR method.

  17. Spatial patterns of atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur using ion-exchange resin collectors in Rocky Mountain National Park, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, David W.; Roop, Heidi; Nanus, Leora; Fenn, Mark; Sexstone, Graham A.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes and streams in Class 1 wilderness areas in the western United States (U.S.) are at risk from atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S), and protection of these resources is mandated under the Federal Clean Air Act and amendments. Assessment of critical loads, which are the maximum exposure to pollution an area can receive without adverse effects on sensitive ecosystems, requires accurate deposition estimates. However, deposition is difficult and expensive to measure in high-elevation wilderness, and spatial patterns in N and S deposition in these areas remain poorly quantified. In this study, ion-exchange resin (IER) collectors were used to measure dissolved inorganic N (DIN) and S deposition during June 2006–September 2007 at approximately 20 alpine/subalpine sites spanning the Continental Divide in Rocky Mountain National Park. Results indicated good agreement between deposition estimated from IER collectors and commonly used wet + dry methods during summer, but poor agreement during winter. Snowpack sampling was found to be a more accurate way of quantifying DIN and S deposition during winter. Summer DIN deposition was significantly greater on the east side of the park than on the west side (25–50%; p ≤ 0.03), consistent with transport of pollutants to the park from urban and agricultural areas to the east. Sources of atmospheric nitrate (NO3−) were examined using N isotopes. The average δ15N of NO3− from IER collectors was 3.5‰ higher during winter than during summer (p < 0.001), indicating a seasonal shift in the relative importance of regional NOxsources, such as coal combustion and vehicular sources of atmospheric NO3−. There were no significant differences in δ15N of NO3− between east and west sides of the park during summer or winter (p = 0.83), indicating that the two areas may have similar sources of atmospheric NO3−. Results from this study indicate that a combination of IER collectors and snowpack

  18. Spatial patterns of atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur using ion-exchange resin collectors in Rocky Mountain National Park, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clow, David W.; Roop, Heidi A.; Nanus, Leora; Fenn, Mark E.; Sexstone, Graham A.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes and streams in Class 1 wilderness areas in the western United States (U.S.) are at risk from atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S), and protection of these resources is mandated under the Federal Clean Air Act and amendments. Assessment of critical loads, which are the maximum exposure to pollution an area can receive without adverse effects on sensitive ecosystems, requires accurate deposition estimates. However, deposition is difficult and expensive to measure in high-elevation wilderness, and spatial patterns in N and S deposition in these areas remain poorly quantified. In this study, ion-exchange resin (IER) collectors were used to measure dissolved inorganic N (DIN) and S deposition during June 2006-September 2007 at approximately 20 alpine/subalpine sites spanning the Continental Divide in Rocky Mountain National Park. Results indicated good agreement between deposition estimated from IER collectors and commonly used wet + dry methods during summer, but poor agreement during winter. Snowpack sampling was found to be a more accurate way of quantifying DIN and S deposition during winter. Summer DIN deposition was significantly greater on the east side of the park than on the west side (25-50%; p ≤ 0.03), consistent with transport of pollutants to the park from urban and agricultural areas to the east. Sources of atmospheric nitrate (NO3-) were examined using N isotopes. The average δ15N of NO3- from IER collectors was 3.5‰ higher during winter than during summer (p < 0.001), indicating a seasonal shift in the relative importance of regional NOx sources, such as coal combustion and vehicular sources of atmospheric NO3-. There were no significant differences in δ15N of NO3- between east and west sides of the park during summer or winter (p = 0.83), indicating that the two areas may have similar sources of atmospheric NO3-. Results from this study indicate that a combination of IER collectors and snowpack sampling can be used to

  19. Liquid membrane coated ion-exchange column solids

    DOEpatents

    Barkey, Dale P.

    1988-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for improving the performance of liquid membrane separations by coating a liquid membrane onto solid ion-exchange resin beads in a fixed bed. Ion-exchange beads fabricated from an ion-exchange resin are swelled with water and are coated with a liquid membrane material that forms a film over the beads. The beads constitute a fixed bed ion-exchange column. Fluid being treated that contains the desired ion to be trapped by the ion-exchange particle is passed through the column. A carrier molecule, contained in the liquid membrane ion-exchange material, is selective for the desired ion in the fluid. The carrier molecule forms a complex with the desired ion, transporting it through the membrane and thus separating it from the other ions. The solution is fed continuously until breakthrough occurs at which time the ion is recovered, and the bed is regenerated.

  20. Liquid membrane coated ion-exchange column solids

    DOEpatents

    Barkey, Dale P.

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for improving the performance of liquid embrane separations by coating a liquid membrane onto solid ion-exchange resin beads in a fixed bed. Ion-exchange beads fabricated from an ion-exchange resin are swelled with water and are coated with a liquid membrane material that forms a film over the beads. The beads constitute a fixed bed ion-exchange column. Fluid being treated that contains the desired ion to be trapped by the ion-exchange particle is passed through the column. A carrier molecule, contained in the liquid membrane ion-exchange material, is selected for the desired ion in the fluid. The carrier molecule forms a complex with the desired ion, transporting it through the membrane and thus separating it from the other ions. The solution is fed continuously until breakthrough occurs at which time the ion is recovered, and the bed is regenerated.

  1. Separation of clavulanic acid from fermented broth of amino acids by an aqueous two-phase system and ion-exchange adsorption.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Clovis Sacardo; Cuel, Maressa Fabiano; Barreto, Verônica Orlandin; Kwong, Wu Hong; Hokka, Carlos O; Barboza, M

    2012-02-15

    The clavulanic acid is a substance which inhibits the β-lactamases used with penicillins for therapeutic treatment. After the fermentation, by-products of low molecular weight such as amino acids lysine, histidine, proline and tyrosine are present in the fermented broth. To remove these impurities the techniques of extraction by an aqueous two-phase system of 17% polyethylene glycol molecular weight 600 and 15% potassium phosphate were used for a partial purification. A subsequent ion-exchange adsorption was used for the recuperation of the clavulanic acid of the top phase and purification getting a concentration factor of 2 and purification of 100% in relation to the amino acids lysine, histidine, proline and tyrosine.

  2. Neomycin-loaded poly(styrene sulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) (PSSA-MA)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) ion exchange nanofibers for wound dressing materials.

    PubMed

    Nitanan, Todsapon; Akkaramongkolporn, Prasert; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2013-05-01

    In this study, poly(styrene sulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) (PSSA-MA) blended with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was electrospun and then subjected to thermal crosslinking to produce PSSA-MA/PVA ion exchange nanofiber mats. The cationic drug neomycin (0.001, 0.01, and 0.1%, w/v) was loaded onto the cationic exchange fibers. The amount of neomycin loaded and released and the cytotoxicity of the fiber mats were analyzed. In vivo wound healing tests were also performed in Wistar rats. The results indicated that the diameters of the fibers were on the nanoscale (250 ± 21 nm). The ion exchange capacity (IEC) value and the percentage of water uptake were 2.19 ± 0.1 mequiv./g-dry fibers and 268 ± 15%, respectively. The loading capacity was increased upon increasing the neomycin concentration. An initial concentration of 0.1% (w/v) neomycin (F3) showed the highest loading capacity (65.7 mg/g-dry fibers). The neomycin-loaded nanofiber mats demonstrated satisfactory antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and an in vivo wound healing test revealed that these mats performed better than gauze and blank nanofiber mats in decreasing acute wound size during the first week after tissue damage. In conclusion, the antibacterial neomycin-loaded PSSA-MA/PVA cationic exchange nanofiber mats have the potential for use as wound dressing materials.

  3. Adsorptive Membranes vs. Resins for Acetic Acid Removal from Biomass Hydrolysates

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B.; Carvalho, W.; Canilha, L.; da Silva, S. S.; e Silva, J. B. A.; McMillan, J. D.; Wickramasinghe, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    Acetic acid is a compound commonly found in hemicellulosic hydrolysates. This weak acid strongly influences the bioconversion of sugar containing hydrolysates. Previous investigators have used anion exchange resins for acetic acid removal from different hemicellulosic hydrolysates. In this study, the efficiency of an anion exchange membrane was compared to that of an anion exchange resin, for acetic acid removal from a DI water solution and an acidic hemicellulose hydrolysate pretreated using two different methods. Ion exchange membranes and resins have very different geometries. Here the performance of membranes and resins is compared using two dimensionless parameters, the relative mass throughput and chromatographic bed number. The relative mass throughput arises naturally from the Thomas solution for ion exchange. The results show that the membrane exhibit better performance in terms of capacity, and loss of the desired sugars. In addition acetic acid may be eluted at a higher concentration from the membrane thus leading to the possibility of recovery and re-use of the acetic acid.

  4. EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

    2010-12-22

    Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE-complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange resin selected for use in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). It is also the primary ion exchange material under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step ion exchange process is typically done with 0.5 M nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the high-level waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. A study has been conducted to explore non-acid elution as an alternative. Batch contact sorption equilibrium screening tests have been conducted with 36 potential non-acid eluants. The sorption tests involve equilibrating each cesium-containing eluant solution with the sRF resin for 48 hours at 25 C in a shaker oven. In the sorption tests, an eluant is deemed to have a high cesium elution potential if it minimizes cesium sorption onto the sRF resin. The top candidates (based on lowest cesium sorption distribution coefficients) include ammonium carbonate, ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate, rubidium carbonate, ammonium acetate, ammonium acetate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate/ammonium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. A select few of the top candidate eluants from the screening tests were subjected to actual sorption (loading) and elution tests to confirm their elution ability. The actual sorption (loading) and elution tests mimicked the typical sRF-cesium ion exchange process (i.e., sorption or loading, caustic wash, water rinse, and elution) via batch contact sorption and quasi column caustic wash/water rinse/elution. The eluants tested included ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, calcium acetate, magnesium

  5. Separation of thorium and uranium in nitric acid solution using silica based anion exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanliang; Wei, Yuezhou; He, Linfeng; Tang, Fangdong

    2016-09-30

    To separate thorium and uranium in nitric acid solution using anion exchange process, a strong base silica-based anion exchange resin (SiPyR-N4) was synthesized. Batch experiments were conducted and the separation factor of thorium and uranium in 9M nitric acid was about 10. Ion exchange chromatography was applied to separate thorium and uranium in different ratios. Uranium could be eluted by 9M nitric acid and thorium was eluted by 0.1M nitric acid. It was proved that thorium and uranium can be separated and recovered successfully by this method.

  6. Separation of thorium and uranium in nitric acid solution using silica based anion exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanliang; Wei, Yuezhou; He, Linfeng; Tang, Fangdong

    2016-09-30

    To separate thorium and uranium in nitric acid solution using anion exchange process, a strong base silica-based anion exchange resin (SiPyR-N4) was synthesized. Batch experiments were conducted and the separation factor of thorium and uranium in 9M nitric acid was about 10. Ion exchange chromatography was applied to separate thorium and uranium in different ratios. Uranium could be eluted by 9M nitric acid and thorium was eluted by 0.1M nitric acid. It was proved that thorium and uranium can be separated and recovered successfully by this method. PMID:27614730

  7. Method of uranium reclamation from aqueous systems by reactive ion exchange. [US DOE patent application; anion exchange resin of copolymerized divinyl-benzene and styrene having quarternary ammonium groups and bicarbonate ligands

    DOEpatents

    Maya, L.

    1981-11-05

    A reactive ion exchange method for separation and recovery of values of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, or americium from substantially neutral aqueous systems of said metals comprises contacting said system with an effective amount of a basic anion exchange resin of copolymerized divinyl-benzene and styrene having quarternary ammonium groups and bicarbonate ligands to achieve nearly 100% sorption of said actinyl ion onto said resin and an aqueous system practically free of said actinyl ions. The method is operational over an extensive range of concentrations from about 10/sup -6/ M to 1.0 M actinyl ion and a pH range of about 4 to 7. The method has particulr application to treatment of waste streams from Purex-type nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities and hydrometallurgical processes involving U, Np, P, or Am.

  8. Study on methane conversion to syngas over nano Pt-CeO2-ZrO2/MgO catalysts: Structure and catalytic behavior of catalysts prepared by using ion exchange resin method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Guo, Haijun; Li, Yansheng; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Le

    2011-06-01

    Nano Pt-Ce02-Zr02/MgO catalysts with 0.8 wt.% Pt, 3.0 wt.% Ce02 and 3.0 wt.% Zr02 were prepared by wet impregnation mothod. Support MgO was obtained using ion exchange resin method or using commercial MgO. SBET, XRD, TEM and C02-TPD were used to characterize the supports and catalysts. CH4-C02 reforming to synthesis gas was performed to test the catalytic behavior of the catalysts. The catalysts prepared using ion exchange resin exhibited more regular structure, more basic sites and higher stability of Pt and MgO than prepared from commercial MgO. At 1073 K, atmospheric pressure, and at high gas hourly space velocity of 36,000 mL/(g-hr) with a stoichiometric feed of CH4 and C02, the catalyst supported on the MOH(GD)-IE showed a higher and more stable activity for CH4-C02 reforming reaction than the catalyst prepared using commercial MgO. The characterisation results demonstrated that the high activity and stability of the catalyst stem from the high dispersion of Pt, the stable structure and the high resistance to carbon deposition on the catalyst.

  9. Impact of natural organic matter properties on the kinetics of suspended ion exchange process.

    PubMed

    Bazri, Mohammad Mahdi; Mohseni, Madjid

    2016-03-15

    Removal kinetics of four standard organic matter isolates under the application of strongly basic ion exchange resins (IEX) in suspended mode was studied under commercial application conditions. Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM), SR fulvic acid (SRFA), and Pony Lake fulvic acid (PLFA) were greatly removed (>90%) and highly preferred by IEX resins (α > 5, over Cl(-), and HCO3(-)) while SR humic acid (SRHA) was the least preferred organic structure among the four isolates studied (α ≈ 1). Moreover, the efficacy of removal for fulvic acids (i.e., SRFA, PLFA) was consistent over consecutive reuse of IEX resins (i.e., loading cycles) whereas it decreased for SRNOM and SRHA over the course of operation. The stoichiometric correlation between the chloride released from the resins as a result of organic molecules uptake indicated that ion exchange was the dominant mechanism. Results obtained indicated that molecular weight and charge density of isolates played a major role in the performance of ion exchange process for organic matter removal. Furthermore, various empirical and physical models were evaluated using the experimental data and pore diffusion was found to be the rate-liming step during the uptake of organic matters; hence, it was used as the appropriate model to predict the kinetics of removal. Consequently, free liquid diffusivities and effective pore diffusion coefficients of organic molecules were estimated and findings were in agreement with the literature data that were obtained from spectrophotometric methods.

  10. Studies on the application of temperature-responsive ion exchange polymers with whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Maharjan, Pankaj; Campi, Eva M; De Silva, Kirthi; Woonton, Brad W; Jackson, W Roy; Hearn, Milton T W

    2016-03-18

    Several new types of temperature-responsive ion exchange resins of different polymer composition have been prepared by grafting the products from the co-polymerisation of N-phenylacrylamide, N-iso-propylacrylamide and acrylic acid derivatives onto cross-linked agarose. Analysis of the binding isotherms for these different resins obtained under batch adsorption conditions indicated that the resin based on N-iso-propylacrylamide containing 5% (w/w) N-phenylacrylamide and 5% (w/w) acrylic acid resulted in the highest adsorption capacity, Bmax, for the whey protein, bovine lactoferrin, e.g. 14 mg bovine lactoferrin/mL resin at 4 °C and 62 mg bovine lactoferrin/mL resin at 40 °C, respectively. Under dynamic loading conditions at 40 °C, 94% of the loaded bovine lactoferrin on a normalised mg protein per mL resin basis was adsorbed by this new temperature-responsive ion-exchanger, and 76% was eluted by a single cycle temperature shift to 4 °C without varying the composition of the 10mM sodium dihydrogen phosphate buffer, pH 6.5, or the flow rate. The binding characteristics of these different ion exchange resins with bovine lactoferrin were also compared to results obtained using other resins based on N-isopropylacrylamide but contained N-tert-butylacrylamide rather than N-phenylacrylamide, where the corresponding dynamic capture and release properties for bovine lactoferrin required different temperature conditions of 20 °C and 50 °C, respectively for optimal desorption/adsorption. The cationic protein, bovine lactoperoxidase, was also adsorbed and desorbed with these temperature-responsive resins under similar conditions of changing temperature, whereas the anionic protein, bovine β-lactoglobulin, was not adsorbed under this regime of temperature conditions but instead eluted in the flow-through.

  11. Sorption properties of radiation-cross-linked polymer hydrogels containing ion-exchange fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezvova, M. A.; Zhevnyk, V. D.; Pak, V.; Borodin, Y. V.; Kachina, E. V.

    2016-02-01

    Polymer hydrogel modification for soft contact lenses by ion-exchange fibers was studied in this work. The obtained results showed that the ion-exchange fiber modifiers have a number of advantages as compared with ion-exchange resin modifiers.

  12. Direct high-performance liquid chromatographic enantioseparation of free α-, β- and γ-aminophosphonic acids employing cinchona-based chiral zwitterionic ion exchangers.

    PubMed

    Gargano, Andrea F G; Kohout, Michal; Macíková, Pavla; Lämmerhofer, Michael; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    We report a chiral high-performance liquid chromatographic enantioseparation method for free α-aminophosphonic, β-aminophosphonic, and γ-aminophosphonic acids, aminohydroxyphosphonic acids, and aromatic aminophosphinic acids with different substitution patterns. Enantioseparation of these synthons was achieved by means of high-performance liquid chromatography on CHIRALPAK ZWIX(+) and ZWIX(-) (cinchona-based chiral zwitterionic ion exchangers) under polar organic chromatographic elution conditions. Mobile phase characteristics such as acid-to-base ratio, type of counterion, and solvent composition were systematically varied in order to investigate their effect on the separation performance and to achieve optimal separation conditions for the set of analytes. Under the optimized conditions, 32 of 37 racemic aminophosphonic acids studied reached baseline separation when we employed a single generic mass-spectrometry-compatible mobile phase, with reversal of the elution order when we used (+) and (-) versions of the chiral stationary phase.

  13. Direct high-performance liquid chromatographic enantioseparation of free α-, β- and γ-aminophosphonic acids employing cinchona-based chiral zwitterionic ion exchangers.

    PubMed

    Gargano, Andrea F G; Kohout, Michal; Macíková, Pavla; Lämmerhofer, Michael; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    We report a chiral high-performance liquid chromatographic enantioseparation method for free α-aminophosphonic, β-aminophosphonic, and γ-aminophosphonic acids, aminohydroxyphosphonic acids, and aromatic aminophosphinic acids with different substitution patterns. Enantioseparation of these synthons was achieved by means of high-performance liquid chromatography on CHIRALPAK ZWIX(+) and ZWIX(-) (cinchona-based chiral zwitterionic ion exchangers) under polar organic chromatographic elution conditions. Mobile phase characteristics such as acid-to-base ratio, type of counterion, and solvent composition were systematically varied in order to investigate their effect on the separation performance and to achieve optimal separation conditions for the set of analytes. Under the optimized conditions, 32 of 37 racemic aminophosphonic acids studied reached baseline separation when we employed a single generic mass-spectrometry-compatible mobile phase, with reversal of the elution order when we used (+) and (-) versions of the chiral stationary phase. PMID:23748643

  14. Separation of berkelium (IV) from trivalent transplutonium elements on ion-exchangers in solutions of phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.; Tikhomirova, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    The dependences of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf and Es behavior on anion- and cation-exchangers in solutions of 0.1-8.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ on acid concentration and oxidant content in solution (KBrO/sub 3/) or in resin (PbO/sub 2/) have been studied. Significant differences in distribution coefficients of Bk and other transplutonium elements (TPE) have been found that can be explained by Bk oxidation to the tetravalent state. A simple and effective method of Bk (IV) separation from trivalent TPE has been developed. The method was applied to the isolation of isotopes Bk-249 and Bk-250; the purification factor of Bk (IV) from other TPE is 10/sup 4/-10/sub 6/ per cycle. The possibility of Bk separation from bromate and phosphate ions by its sorption on a cation-exchanger from diluted H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ solutions with subsequent desorption by the mineral acid has been shown. 20 references, 8 figures.

  15. Removal of boron from wastewater of geothermal power plant by selective ion-exchange resins. 1: Batch sorption-elution studies

    SciTech Connect

    Badruk, M.; Kabay, N.; Demircioglu, M.; Mordogan, H.; Ipekoglu, U.

    1999-09-01

    Boron removal was studied using N-glucamine-type resins Diaion CRB 02 and Purolite S 108. The resin Diaion CRB 02 exhibited a higher sorption capacity for boron removal from 0.01 M H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} solution than did Purolite S 108. The presence of calcium, sodium, and chloride ions did not make a large interference on boron removal by both Diaion CRB 02 and Purolite S 108 resins. The sorption behavior of these two chelating resins obeyed the Langmuir isotherm model. Kinetic tests were performed to find the mass transfer mechanism of the sorption process of boron by Diaion CRB 02 resin. Five kinetic models were applied to fit the kinetic data obtained by using glucamine type-resin Diaion CRB 02. The results showed that the rate-determining step is particle diffusion for boron removal by Diaion CRB 02. The quantitative stripping of boron from both chelating resins was obtained with either 0.05 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or 0.1 M HCl solutions. Boron in wastewater of the Kizildere geothermal field was effectively removed by both Diaion CRB 02 and Purolite S 108 resins. Preliminary column tests showed that Diaion CRB 02 is a potential resin for column removal of boron from wastewater of a geothermal power plant.

  16. Purification of organic acids by chromatography with strong anionic resins: Investigation of uptake mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Julien; Blanc, Claire-Line; Lutin, Florence; Théoleyre, Marc-André; Stambouli, Moncef; Pareau, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    Bio-based organic acids are promising renewable carbon sources for the chemical industry. However energy-consuming purification processes are used, like distillation or crystallization, to reach high purities required in some applications. That is why preparative chromatography was studied as an alternative separation technique. In a previous work dealing with the purification of lactic, succinic and citric acids, the Langmuir model was insufficient to explain the elution profiles obtained with a strong anionic resin. Consequently the Langmuir model was coupled with a usual ion-exchange model to take into account the retention of their conjugate bases (<2%), which are commonly neglected at low pH (<1.5). Elution simulations with both uptake mechanisms fitted very well with experimental pulse tests. Only two parameters were optimized (equilibrium constant of acid uptake and ion-exchange selectivity coefficient of conjugate base) and their value were coherent with experimental and resin suppliers' data. These results confirmed that the singular tailing and apparent delay observed with succinic and citric acids can be explained by the high affinity of succinate and citrate for resin cationic sites. The model was implemented in a preparative chromatography simulation program in order to optimize operating parameters of our pilot-scale ISMB unit (Improved Simulated Moving Bed). The comparison with experimental ISMB profiles was conclusive. PMID:27373374

  17. Purification of organic acids by chromatography with strong anionic resins: Investigation of uptake mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Julien; Blanc, Claire-Line; Lutin, Florence; Théoleyre, Marc-André; Stambouli, Moncef; Pareau, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    Bio-based organic acids are promising renewable carbon sources for the chemical industry. However energy-consuming purification processes are used, like distillation or crystallization, to reach high purities required in some applications. That is why preparative chromatography was studied as an alternative separation technique. In a previous work dealing with the purification of lactic, succinic and citric acids, the Langmuir model was insufficient to explain the elution profiles obtained with a strong anionic resin. Consequently the Langmuir model was coupled with a usual ion-exchange model to take into account the retention of their conjugate bases (<2%), which are commonly neglected at low pH (<1.5). Elution simulations with both uptake mechanisms fitted very well with experimental pulse tests. Only two parameters were optimized (equilibrium constant of acid uptake and ion-exchange selectivity coefficient of conjugate base) and their value were coherent with experimental and resin suppliers' data. These results confirmed that the singular tailing and apparent delay observed with succinic and citric acids can be explained by the high affinity of succinate and citrate for resin cationic sites. The model was implemented in a preparative chromatography simulation program in order to optimize operating parameters of our pilot-scale ISMB unit (Improved Simulated Moving Bed). The comparison with experimental ISMB profiles was conclusive.

  18. REMOVAL OF TECHNETIUM 99 FROM THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY (ETF) BASIN 44 USING PUROLITE A-530E & REILLEX HPQ & SYBRON IONAC SR-7 ION EXCHANGE RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB

    2004-10-29

    This report documents the laboratory testing and analyses as directed under the test plan, RPP-20407. The overall goal of this task was to evaluate and compare candidate anion exchange resins for their capacity to remove Technetium-99 from Basin 44 Reverse Osmosis reject stream. The candidate resins evaluated were Purolite A-530E, Reillex HPQ, and Sybron IONAC SR-7.

  19. Sustainable production of acrylic acid: alkali-ion exchanged beta zeolite for gas-phase dehydration of lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bo; Tao, Li-Zhi; Liang, Yu; Xu, Bo-Qing

    2014-06-01

    Gas-phase dehydration of lactic acid (LA) to acrylic acid (AA) was investigated over alkali-exchanged β zeolite (M(x)Na(1-x)β, M=Li(+), K(+), Rb(+), or Cs(+)) of different exchange degrees (x). The reaction was conducted under varying conditions to understand the catalyst selectivity for AA production and trends of byproduct formation. The nature and exchange degree of M(+) were found to be critical for the acid-base properties and catalytic performance of the exchanged zeolite. K(x)Na(1-x)β of x=0.94 appeared to be the best performing catalyst whereas Li(x)Na(1-x)β and Naβ were the poorest in terms of AA selectivity and yield. The AA yield as high as 61 mol % (selectivity: 64 mol %) could be obtained under optimized reaction conditions for up to 8 h over the best performing K0.94Na0.06β. The acid and base properties of the catalysts were probed, respectively by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of adsorbed NH3 and CO2, and were related to the electrostatic potentials of the alkali ions in the zeolite, which provided a basis for the discussion of the acid-base catalysis for sustainable AA formation from LA.

  20. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  1. Composite ion exchange materials

    SciTech Connect

    Amarasinghe, S.; Zook, L.; Leddy, J.

    1994-12-31

    Composite ion exchange materials can be formed by sorbing ion exchange polymers on inert, high surface area substrates. In general, the flux of ions and molecules through these composites, as measured electrochemically, increases as the ratio of the surface area of the substrate increases relative to the volume of the ion exchanger. This suggests that fields and gradients established at the interface between the ion exchanger and substrate are important in determining the transport characteristics of the composites. Here, the authors will focus on composites formed with a cation exchange polymer, Nafion, and two different types of microbeads: polystyrene microspheres and polystyrene coated magnetic microbeads. For the polystyrene microbeads, scanning electron micrographs suggest the beads cluster in a self-similar manner, independent of the bead diameter. Flux of Ru(NH3)63+ through the composites was studied as a function of bead fraction, bead radii, and fixed surface area with mixed bead sizes. Flux was well modeled by surface diffusion along a fractal interface. Magnetic composites were formed with columns of magnetic microbeads normal to the electrode surface. Flux of Ru(NH3)63+ through these composites increased exponentially with bead fraction. For electrolyses, the difference in the molar magnetic susceptibility of the products and reactants, Dcm, tends to be non-zero. For seven redox reactions, the ratio of the flux through the magnetic composites to the flux through a Nafion film increases monotonically with {vert_bar}Dcm{vert_bar}, with enhancements as large as thirty-fold. For reversible species, the electrolysis potential through the magnetic composites is 35 mV positive of that for the Nafion films.

  2. Effect of humic acid on ciprofloxacin removal by magnetic multifunctional resins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Cheng, Jiade; Jin, Jing; Zhou, Qing; Ma, Yan; Zhao, Qingqing; Li, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Background organic matter significantly influences the removal of emerging contaminants in natural water. In this work, the adsorption of ciprofloxacin (CPX) onto a series of magnetic multifunctional resins (GMA10-GMA90) in the presence and absence of humic acid (HA) was conducted to demonstrate the effect of HA. Both hydrophobic and ion exchange interactions contributed to CPX adsorption. Negative charge-assisted hydrogen bonds also participated in the adsorption process, resulting in the high adsorption amount of anionic CPX onto the negatively charged GMA30 under basic solutions. HA could impact CPX adsorption not only as a competitive adsorbate but also as an additional adsorbent. At pH 5.6, the additional adsorption sites provided by adsorbed HA molecules on the resins dominated and thus facilitated the adsorption process. While at pH 10, HA inhibited the adsorption of CPX by directly competing for ion exchange sites and coexisting with CPX in the solution. The ratio of the amount of CPX adsorbed by dissolved HA to that by the resin reached as high as 1.61 for GMA90. The adsorbed HA molecules onto the resins could provide additional adsorption sites for CPX as proven by the enhanced CPX adsorption in HA-preloading systems at pH 5.6. PMID:27464502

  3. Effect of humic acid on ciprofloxacin removal by magnetic multifunctional resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Cheng, Jiade; Jin, Jing; Zhou, Qing; Ma, Yan; Zhao, Qingqing; Li, Aimin

    2016-07-01

    Background organic matter significantly influences the removal of emerging contaminants in natural water. In this work, the adsorption of ciprofloxacin (CPX) onto a series of magnetic multifunctional resins (GMA10-GMA90) in the presence and absence of humic acid (HA) was conducted to demonstrate the effect of HA. Both hydrophobic and ion exchange interactions contributed to CPX adsorption. Negative charge-assisted hydrogen bonds also participated in the adsorption process, resulting in the high adsorption amount of anionic CPX onto the negatively charged GMA30 under basic solutions. HA could impact CPX adsorption not only as a competitive adsorbate but also as an additional adsorbent. At pH 5.6, the additional adsorption sites provided by adsorbed HA molecules on the resins dominated and thus facilitated the adsorption process. While at pH 10, HA inhibited the adsorption of CPX by directly competing for ion exchange sites and coexisting with CPX in the solution. The ratio of the amount of CPX adsorbed by dissolved HA to that by the resin reached as high as 1.61 for GMA90. The adsorbed HA molecules onto the resins could provide additional adsorption sites for CPX as proven by the enhanced CPX adsorption in HA-preloading systems at pH 5.6.

  4. A Novel Ion Exchange System to Purify Mixed ISS Waste Water Brines for Chemical Production and Enhanced Water Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunn, Griffin Michael; Spencer, LaShelle E.; Ruby, Anna Maria; McCaskill, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Current International Space Station water recovery regimes produce a sizable portion of waste water brine. This brine is highly toxic and water recovery is poor: a highly wasteful proposition. With new biological techniques that do not require waste water chemical pretreatment, the resulting brine would be chromium-free and nitrate rich which can allow possible fertilizer recovery for future plant systems. Using a system of ion exchange resins we can remove hardness, sulfate, phosphate and nitrate from these brines to leave only sodium and potassium chloride. At this point modern chlor-alkali cells can be utilized to produce a low salt stream as well as an acid and base stream. The first stream can be used to gain higher water recovery through recycle to the water separation stage while the last two streams can be used to regenerate the ion exchange beds used here, as well as other ion exchange beds in the ISS. Conveniently these waste products from ion exchange regeneration would be suitable as plant fertilizer. In this report we go over the performance of state of the art resins designed for high selectivity of target ions under brine conditions. Using ersatz ISS waste water we can evaluate the performance of specific resins and calculate mass balances to determine resin effectiveness and process viability. If this system is feasible then we will be one step closer to closed loop environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) for current or future applications.

  5. Ion exchange at the critical point of solution.

    PubMed

    Savoy, J D; Baird, J K; Lang, J R

    2016-03-11

    A mixture of isobutyric acid (IBA)+water has an upper critical point of solution at 26.7°C and an IBA concentration of 4.40M. We have determined the Langmuir isotherms for the hydroxide form of Amberlite IRN-78 resin in contact with mixtures of IBA+water at temperatures, 27.0, 29.0, 31.0 and 38.0°C, respectively. The Langmuir plot at 38.0°C forms a straight line. At the three lower temperatures, however, a peak in the Langmuir plot is observed for IBA concentrations in the vicinity of 4.40M. We regard this peak to be a critical effect not only because it is located close to 4.40M, but also because its height becomes more pronounced as the temperature of the isotherm approaches the critical temperature. For concentrations in the vicinity of the peak, the data indicate that the larger isobutyrate ion is rejected by the resin in favor of the smaller hydroxide ion. This reversal of the expected ion exchange reaction might be used to separate ions according to size. Using the Donnan theory of ion exchange equilibrium, we link the swelling pressure to the osmotic pressure. We show that the peak in the Langmuir plot is associated with a maximum in the "osmotic" energy. This maximum has its origin in the concentration derivative of the osmotic pressure, which goes to zero as the critical point is approached.

  6. Ion exchange at the critical point of solution.

    PubMed

    Savoy, J D; Baird, J K; Lang, J R

    2016-03-11

    A mixture of isobutyric acid (IBA)+water has an upper critical point of solution at 26.7°C and an IBA concentration of 4.40M. We have determined the Langmuir isotherms for the hydroxide form of Amberlite IRN-78 resin in contact with mixtures of IBA+water at temperatures, 27.0, 29.0, 31.0 and 38.0°C, respectively. The Langmuir plot at 38.0°C forms a straight line. At the three lower temperatures, however, a peak in the Langmuir plot is observed for IBA concentrations in the vicinity of 4.40M. We regard this peak to be a critical effect not only because it is located close to 4.40M, but also because its height becomes more pronounced as the temperature of the isotherm approaches the critical temperature. For concentrations in the vicinity of the peak, the data indicate that the larger isobutyrate ion is rejected by the resin in favor of the smaller hydroxide ion. This reversal of the expected ion exchange reaction might be used to separate ions according to size. Using the Donnan theory of ion exchange equilibrium, we link the swelling pressure to the osmotic pressure. We show that the peak in the Langmuir plot is associated with a maximum in the "osmotic" energy. This maximum has its origin in the concentration derivative of the osmotic pressure, which goes to zero as the critical point is approached. PMID:26884137

  7. Volumetric Interpretation of Protein Adsorption: Ion-Exchange Adsorbent Capacity, Protein pI, and Interaction Energetics

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Hyeran; Yohe, Stefan; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2008-01-01

    Adsorption of lysozyme (Lys), human serum albumin (HSA), and immunoglobulin G (IgG) to anion- and cation-exchange resins is dominated by electrostatic interactions between protein and adsorbent. The solution-depletion method of measuring adsorption shows, however, that these proteins do not irreversibly adsorb to ion-exchange surfaces, even when the charge disparity between adsorbent and protein inferred from protein pI is large. Net-positively-charged Lys (pI = 11) and net-negatively-charged HSA (pI = 5.5) adsorb so strongly to sulfopropyl sepharose (SP; a negatively-charged, strong cation exchange resin, −0.22 mmol/mL exchange capacity) that both resist displacement by net-neutral IgG (pI = 7.0) in simultaneous adsorption-competition experiments. By contrast, IgG readily displaces both Lys and HSA adsorbed either to quarternary-ammonium sepharose (Q; a positively-charged, strong anion exchanger, + 0.22 mmol/mL exchange capacity) or octadecyl sepharose (ODS, a neutral hydrophobic resin, 0 mmol/mL exchange capacity). Thus it is concluded that adsorption results do not sensibly correlate with protein pI and that pI is actually a rather poor predictor of affinity for ion-exchange surfaces. Adsorption of Lys, HSA, and IgG to ion-exchange resins from stagnant solution leads to adsorbed multi-layers, into-or-onto which IgG adsorbs in adsorption-competition experiments. Comparison of adsorption to ion-exchange resins and neutral ODS leads to the conclusion that the apparent standard free-energy-of-adsorption ΔGadso of Lys, HSA, and IgG is not large in comparison to thermal energy due to energy-compensating interactions between water, protein, and ion-exchange surfaces that leaves a small net ΔGadso. Thus water is found to control protein adsorption to a full range of substratum types spanning hydrophobic (poorly water wettable) surfaces, hydrophilic surfaces bearing relatively-weak Lewis acid/base functionalities that wet with (hydrogen bond to) water but do not

  8. Separation and preconcentration of the rare-earth elements and yttrium from geological materials by ion-exchange and sequential acid elution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Lichte, F.E.; Riddle, G.O.; Beech, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    The abundance of rare-earth elements (REE) and yttrium in geological materials is generally low, and most samples contain elements that interfere in the determination of the REE and Y, so a separation and/or preconcentration step is often necessary. This is often achieved by ion-exchange chromatography with either nitric or hydrochloric acid. It is advantageous, however, to use both acids sequentially. The final solution thus obtained contains only the REE and Y, with minor amounts of Al, Ba, Ca, Sc, Sr and Ti. Elements that potentially interfere, such as Be, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Th, U, V and Zr, are virtually eliminated. Inductively-coupled argon plasma atomic-emission spectroscopy can then be used for a final precise and accurate measurement. The method can also be used with other instrumental methods of analysis. ?? 1986.

  9. Safety research of multi-functional reprocessing process considering nonproliferation based on an ion-exchange method

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, Shin-ichi; Ozawa, Masaki |; Okada, Ken; Kurosawa, Kiyoko; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2007-07-01

    A simplified separation process was proposed based on an ion-exchange technique. A tertiary pyridine-type ion-exchange resin was used in this process to treat the mixed oxide fuel highly irradiated in the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'. It was demonstrated that the process is a realistic candidate for future reprocessing using hydrochloric acid and a mixed eluent solution of nitric acid and methanol. In order to develop an engineering scale concept, it is indispensable to establish the conditions for safe operation, so two types of experiments were done to obtain fundamental aspects. The corrosion experiment for structural materials in hydrochloric acid at room temperature was done using tantalum, zirconium, niobium, hastelloy and SUS316L. Results showed that tantalum, zirconium, niobium, and hastelloy had good corrosion resistance to hydrochloric acid. The second experiment looked at the thermal hazards of pyridine-type ion-exchange resin and the methanol, or nitric acid eluent system from the viewpoints of fire and explosion safety. No hazardous reactions occurred between the resin and the eluent system. Above 150 deg. C, attention should be paid to the exothermic reactions for the dried resin. (authors)

  10. Development and testing of ion exchangers for treatment of liquid wastes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.L.; Davidson, D.J.; Chase, C.W.; Egan, B.Z.; Ensor, D.D.; Bright, R.M.; Glasgow, D.C.

    1993-03-01

    This report addresses three areas of waste treatment: (1) treatment of newly generated low-level liquid waste and Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernate using inorganic ion exchangers; (2) treatment of processing streams at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC); and (3) removal of radionuclides from organic solutions. Distribution of various radionuclides between simulated waste solutions and several sorbents was determined in batch tests. Inorganic ion exchangers were prepared in the form of microspheres by an intemal gelation process. Microspheres of hydrous titania, hydrous zirconia, hydrous titania containing embedded sodium cobalt hexacyanoferrate, and the corresponding phosphate forms of these materials were prepared. Several zeolites (PDZ-140, PDZ-300, EE-96, CBV-10A) and inorganic ion exchangers (hydrous titania, hydrous zirconia, polyantimanic acid, sodium cobalt hexacyanoferrate) were tested for the removal of cesium and strontium from the acidic simulated Cleanex raffinate generated at REDC. A resorcinol-based ion-exchange resin and three types of sodium titanate were tested for removal of cesium and strontium from the REDC caustic dissolver solution. Hydrous titania, hydrous zirconia, and their corresponding phosphates were tested for the removal of Eu{sup 3+} from various solutions of di-2-ethylbexyl phosphoric acid (HDEHP) in toluene or dodecane.

  11. Solvent Extraction and Ion Exchange in Radiochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarnemark, G.

    In 1805, Bucholz extracted uranium from a nitric acid solution into ether and back-extracted it into pure water. This is probably the first reported solvent-extraction investigation. During the following decades, the distribution of neutral compounds between aqueous phases and pure solvents was studied, e.g., by Peligot, Berthelot and Jungfleisch, and Nernst. Selective extractants for analytical purposes became available during the first decades of the twentieth century. From about 1940, extractants such as organophosphorous esters and amines were developed for use in the nuclear fuel cycle. This connection between radiochemistry and solvent-extraction chemistry made radiochemists heavily involved in the development of new solvent extraction processes, and eventually solvent extraction became a major separation technique in radiochemistry. About 160 years ago, Thompson and Way observed that soil can remove potassium and ammonium ions from an aqueous solution and release calcium ions. This is probably the first scientific report on an ion-exchange separation. The first synthesis of the type of organic ion exchangers that are used today was performed by Adams and Holmes in 1935. Since then, ion-exchange techniques have been used extensively for separations of various radionuclides in trace as well as macro amounts. During the last 4 decades, inorganic ion exchangers have also found a variety of applications. Today, solvent extraction as well as ion exchange are used extensively in the nuclear industry and for nuclear, chemical, and medical research. Some of these applications are discussed in the chapter.

  12. Poly(vinyl alcohol) and alginate cross-linked matrix with immobilized Prussian blue and ion exchange resin for cesium removal from waters.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Chen; Chang, Yin-Ru; Chen, Man-Li; Lo, Yu-Kuo; Lai, Juin-Yih; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-08-01

    Cesium (Cs) removal from contaminated water bodies is an emerging issue after the disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The Prussian blue (PB) is an effective Cs adsorbent but will release hexacyanoferrate fragments from the adsorbent matrix during adsorption. Alginate is an affordable biopolymer for PB particles immobilization. This study synthesized poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and alginate cross-linked matrix for immobilization of PB nano-sized particles and a surface-modified styrene-ethyl styrene divinyl benzene resin and tested their swelling stability and Cs adsorption performance in fresh water and in seawater. The PVA-alginate granules have high structural stability in both fresh water and seawater, with the Cs adsorption capability higher for the former than the latter. The adopted resin effectively remove released PB fragments from the tested granules. The transport and reaction parameters for the granules and for the sand filter bed were estimated. PMID:27132227

  13. Adsorption of Pd(II) complexes from chloride solutions obtained by leaching chlorinated spent automotive catalysts on ion exchange resin Diaion WA21J.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shaobo; Pan, Tonglin; Liu, Xinqiang; Yuan, Lei; Zhang, Yongjian; Wang, Jinchao; Guo, Zhanchen

    2010-05-01

    It was found that Rh, Pd and Pt contained in the spent ceramic automotive catalysts could be effectively extracted by dry chlorination with chlorine. In order to concentrate Pd(II) contained in the chloride solution obtained from the dry chlorination process, thermodynamic and kinetics studies for adsorption of Pd(II) complexes from the chloride solutions on anionic exchange resin Diaion WA21J were carried out. It was found that Pd, Pt, Rh, Al, Fe, Si, Zn and Pb from the chloride solution could be adsorbed on the resin. The isothermal adsorption of Pd(II) was found to fit Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich models under the adsorption conditions. The adsorption of Pd(II) on the resin was favorable according to the values of 1/n and R(L) from Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms, respectively. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacities Q(max) based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms were 5.70, 4.84 and 4.05 mg/g and the corresponding value X(m) based on Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich were 5.55, 4.69 and 4.01 mg/g at temperatures 18 degrees C, 28 degrees C and 40 degrees C, respectively. The apparent adsorption energies (E(ad)) based on Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich isotherm were -15.43, -16.22 and -23.57 kJ/mol for the temperatures 18 degrees C, 28 degrees C and 40 degrees C, respectively. Chemical adsorption was a main mechanism involved in the adsorption process. Pd(II) adsorption on the resin could be accelerated by increasing the adsorption temperature. The adsorption of Pd(II) from the chloride solution on the resin underwent pseudo-first order kinetic process and the apparent adsorption activation energy E(a) was 15.0 kJ/mol. The intra-particle diffusion was a main rate controlling step in the Pd(II) adsorption process under the adsorption conditions.

  14. Production of citric acid using its extraction wastewater treated by anaerobic digestion and ion exchange in an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2014-08-01

    In order to solve the problem of extraction wastewater pollution in citric acid industry, an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process is proposed in this study. Extraction wastewater was treated by mesophilic anaerobic digestion and then used to make mash for the next batch of citric acid fermentation. The recycling process was done for seven batches. Citric acid production (82.4 g/L on average) decreased by 34.1 % in the recycling batches (2nd-7th) compared with the first batch. And the residual reducing sugar exceeded 40 g/L on average in the recycling batches. Pigment substances, acetic acid, ammonium, and metal ions in anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) were considered to be the inhibitors, and their effects on the fermentation were studied. Results indicated that ammonium, Na(+) and K(+) in the ADE significantly inhibited citric acid fermentation. Therefore, the ADE was treated by acidic cation exchange resin prior to reuse to make mash for citric acid fermentation. The recycling process was performed for ten batches, and citric acid productions in the recycling batches were 126.6 g/L on average, increasing by 1.7 % compared with the first batch. This process could eliminate extraction wastewater discharge and reduce water resource consumption.

  15. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be...) Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins are produced by the polymerization of acrylamide with partial hydrolysis or...

  16. Process calculation for ion-exchanger regeneration in apparatus with stationary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Zen'kevich, L.A.; Konstantinov, V.A.; Volzhinskii, A.I.; Smirnov, N.N.

    1986-09-20

    Ion exchange is widely used in various branches of chemical technology, including water treatment and waste water purification. The economic efficiency of an ion exchange process is determined mainly by the cost of exchanger regeneration. In order to reduce this cost it is necessary to accurately determine the technological parameters of the process: reagent concentration, flow rate, and amount of reagent needed to achieve the desired degree of exchange resin purity. The present work presents a study of the effect of concentration and hydrodynamic conditions on the kinetics of the regeneration of the leading industrial strong-acid cation-exchanger KU-2-ich from Cu/sup 2 +/, Ni/sup 2 +/, Co/sup 2 +/, and Fe/sup 3 +/. On the basis of the experimental data an effective diffusion coefficients was calculated for various regenerant concentrations. The results of the calculation are evidence for a significant change of diffusion coefficient with acid concentration.

  17. Determination of 63Ni and 59Ni in spent ion-exchange resin and activated charcoal from the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor.

    PubMed

    Taddei, M H T; Macacini, J F; Vicente, R; Marumo, J T; Sakata, S K; Terremoto, L A A

    2013-07-01

    A radiochemical method has been adapted to determine (59)Ni and (63)Ni in samples of radioactive wastes from the water cleanup system of the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor. The process includes extraction chromatographic resin with dimethylglyoxime (DMG) as a functional group. Activity concentrations of (59)Ni and (63)Ni were measured, respectively, by X-ray spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting, whereas the chemical yield was determined by ICP-OES. The average ratio of measured activity concentrations of (63)Ni and (59)Ni agree well with theory.

  18. Ion Exchange Technology Development in Support of the Urine Processor Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Julie; Broyan, James; Pickering, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The urine processor assembly (UPA) on the International Space Station (ISS) recovers water from urine via a vacuum distillation process. The distillation occurs in a rotating distillation assembly (DA) where the urine is heated and subjected to sub-ambient pressure. As water is removed, the original organics, salts, and minerals in the urine become more concentrated and result in urine brine. Eventually, water removal will concentrate the urine brine to super saturation of individual constituents, and precipitation occurs. Under typical UPA DA operating conditions, calcium sulfate or gypsum is the first chemical to precipitate in substantial quantity. During preflight testing with ground urine, the UPA achieved 85% water recovery without precipitation. However, on ISS, it is possible that crewmember urine can be significantly more concentrated relative to urine from ground donors. As a result, gypsum precipitated in the DA when operating at water recovery rates at or near 85%, causing the failure and subsequent re14 NASA Tech Briefs, September 2013 placement of the DA. Later investigations have demonstrated that an excess of calcium and sulfate will cause precipitation at water recovery rates greater than 70%. The source of the excess calcium is likely physiological in nature, via crewmembers' bone loss, while the excess sulfate is primarily due to the sulfuric acid component of the urine pretreatment. To prevent gypsum precipitation in the UPA, the Precipitation Prevention Project (PPP) team has focused on removing the calcium ion from pretreated urine, using ion exchange resins as calcium removal agents. The selectivity and effectiveness of ion exchange resins are determined by such factors as the mobility of the liquid phase through the polymer matrix, the density of functional groups, type of functional groups bound to the matrix, and the chemical characteristics of the liquid phase (pH, oxidation potential, and ionic strength). Previous experience with ion

  19. Adsorption of Rh(III) complexes from chloride solutions obtained by leaching chlorinated spent automotive catalysts on ion-exchange resin Diaion WA21J.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shaobo; Pan, Tonglin; Liu, Xinqiang; Yuan, Lei; Wang, Jinchao; Zhang, Yongjian; Guo, Zhanchen

    2010-07-15

    It was found that Rh, Pd and Pt contained in the spent ceramic automotive catalysts could be effectively extracted by dry chlorination with chlorine. In order to concentrate Rh(III) ions contained in the chloride solutions obtained, thermodynamic and kinetics studies for adsorption of Rh(III) complexes from the chloride solutions on an anionic exchange resin Diaion WA21J were carried out. Rh, Pd, Pt, Al, Fe, Si, Zn and Pb from the chloride solution could be adsorbed on the resin. The distribution coefficients (K(d)) of Rh(III) decreased with the increase in initial Rh(III) concentration or in adsorption temperature. The isothermal adsorption of Rh(III) was found to fit Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich models under the adsorption conditions. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacities Q(max) based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms were 6.39, 6.61 and 5.81 mg/g for temperatures 18, 28 and 40 degrees C, respectively. The apparent adsorption energy of Rh was about -7.6 kJ/mol and thus Rh(III) adsorption was a physical type. The experimental data obtained could be better simulated by pseudo-first-order kinetic model and the activation energy obtained was 6.54 J/mol. The adsorption rate of Rh(III) was controlled by intraparticle diffusion in most of time of adsorption process.

  20. Adsorption of Rh(III) complexes from chloride solutions obtained by leaching chlorinated spent automotive catalysts on ion-exchange resin Diaion WA21J.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shaobo; Pan, Tonglin; Liu, Xinqiang; Yuan, Lei; Wang, Jinchao; Zhang, Yongjian; Guo, Zhanchen

    2010-07-15

    It was found that Rh, Pd and Pt contained in the spent ceramic automotive catalysts could be effectively extracted by dry chlorination with chlorine. In order to concentrate Rh(III) ions contained in the chloride solutions obtained, thermodynamic and kinetics studies for adsorption of Rh(III) complexes from the chloride solutions on an anionic exchange resin Diaion WA21J were carried out. Rh, Pd, Pt, Al, Fe, Si, Zn and Pb from the chloride solution could be adsorbed on the resin. The distribution coefficients (K(d)) of Rh(III) decreased with the increase in initial Rh(III) concentration or in adsorption temperature. The isothermal adsorption of Rh(III) was found to fit Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich models under the adsorption conditions. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacities Q(max) based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms were 6.39, 6.61 and 5.81 mg/g for temperatures 18, 28 and 40 degrees C, respectively. The apparent adsorption energy of Rh was about -7.6 kJ/mol and thus Rh(III) adsorption was a physical type. The experimental data obtained could be better simulated by pseudo-first-order kinetic model and the activation energy obtained was 6.54 J/mol. The adsorption rate of Rh(III) was controlled by intraparticle diffusion in most of time of adsorption process. PMID:20346581

  1. Evaluation of Ion Exchange Materials in K Basin Floor Sludge and Potential Solvents for PCB Extraction from Ion Exchange Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A.J.; Klinger, G.S.; Bredt, P.R.

    1999-04-10

    Approximately 73 m{sup 3} of heterogeneous solid material, ''sludge,'' (upper bound estimate, Packer 1997) have accumulated at the bottom of the K Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. This sludge is a mixture of spent fuel element corrosion products, ion exchange materials (organic and inorganic), graphite-based gasket materials, iron and aluminum metal corrosion products, sand, and debris (Makenas et al. 1996, 1997). In addition, small amounts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been found. These small amounts are significant from a regulatory standpoint. Ultimately, it is planned to transfer the K Basins sludge to the Hanford double shell tanks (DSTs). Chemical pretreatment is required to address criticality issues and the destruction or removal of PCBs before the K Basin sludge can be transferred to the DSTs. Eleven technologies have been evaluated (Papp 1997) as potential pretreatment methods. Based on the evaluations and engineering studies and limited testing, Fluor Daniel Hanford recommended solvent washing of the K Basin sludge, followed by nitric acid dissolution and, potentially, peroxide addition (FDH 1997). The solvent washing (extraction) and peroxide addition would be used to facilitate PCB removal and destruction. Following solvent extraction, the PCBs could be distilled and concentrated for disposal as a low-level waste. The purpose of the work reported here was to continue investigating solvent extraction, first by better identifying the ion exchange materials in the actual sludge samples and then evaluating various solvents for removing the PCBs or possibly dissolving the resins. This report documents some of the process knowledge on ion exchange materials used and spilled in the K Basins and describes the materials identified from wet sieving KE Basin floor and canister sludge and the results of other analyses. Several photographs are included to compare materials and illustrate material behavior. A summary of previous tests on

  2. PRELIMINARY REPORT ON EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

    2010-09-01

    Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE-complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange resin selected for use in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). It is also the primary ion exchange material under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step ion exchange process is typically done with 0.5 M nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the high-level waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. Studies are ongoing to explore non-acid elution as an alternative. Batch contact sorption equilibrium screening tests have been conducted with 36 potential non-acid eluants. The sorption tests involve equilibrating each cesium-containing eluant solution with the sRF resin for 48 hours at 25 C in a shaker oven. In the sorption tests, an eluant is deemed to have a high cesium elution potential if it minimizes cesium sorption onto the sRF resin. The top candidates (based on lowest cesium sorption distribution coefficients) include ammonium carbonate, ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate, rubidium carbonate, ammonium acetate, ammonium acetate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate/ammonium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. The next phase of testing for this work will focus on the following down selected eluants: Ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, nitric acid, and ammonium hydroxide. The next testing phase is a confirmation of the elution ability of the selected eluants. It will mimic a typical sRF cesium ion exchange process i.e., sorption or loading, caustic wash, water rinse, and elution via batch contact sorption and quasi column caustic wash/water rinse/elution. Due to corrosion

  3. Electrically switched ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, M.A.; Schwartz, D.T.; Genders, D.

    1997-10-01

    A variety of waste types containing radioactive {sup 137}Cs are found throughout the DOE complex. These waste types include water in reactor cooling basins, radioactive high-level waste (HLW) in underground storage tanks, and groundwater. Safety and regulatory requirements and economics require the removal of radiocesium before these wastes can be permanently disposed of. Electrically Switched Ion Exchange (ESIX) is an approach for radioactive cesium separation that combines IX and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible, and economic separation method that also produces little or no secondary waste. In the ESIX process, an electroactive IX film is deposited electrochemically onto a high-surface area electrode, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulating the potential of the film. For cesium, the electroactive films under investigation are ferrocyanides, which are well known to have high selectivities for cesium in concentrated sodium solutions. When a cathode potential is applied to the film, Fe{sup +3} is reduced to the Fe{sup +2} state, and a cation must be intercalated into the film to maintain charge neutrality (i.e., Cs{sup +} is loaded). Conversely, if an anodic potential is applied, a cation must be released from the film (i.e., Cs{sup +} is unloaded). Therefore, to load the film with cesium, the film is simply reduced; to unload cesium, the film is oxidized.

  4. Recovery of lactic acid from simultaneous saccharification and fermentation media using anion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Moldes, A B; Alonso, J L; Parajó, J C

    2003-07-01

    The physicochemical properties (capacity, kinetics and selectivity) of the ion exchange resins Amberlite IRA900, IRA400, IRA96 and IRA67 were determined to evaluate their comparative suitability for lactic acid recovery. Both the kinetics of lactic acid sorption from aqueous solutions and the equilibrium were assessed using mathematical models, which provided a close interpretation of the experimental results. The best resins (Amberlite IRA96 and IRA67) were employed in further fixed-bed operation using aqueous lactic acid solutions as feed. In this set of experiments, parameters such as capacity, regenerant consumption, percentage of lactic acid recovery and product concentration were measured. Amberlite IRA67, a weak base resin, was selected for lactic acid recovery from SSF (simultaneous saccharification and fermentation) broths. Owing to the presence of nutrients and ions other than lactate, a slightly decreased capacity was determined when using SSF media instead aqueous lactic acid solutions, but quantitative lactic acid recoveries at constant capacities were obtained in four sequential load/regeneration cycles.

  5. Combination of ion exchange and partial nitritation/Anammox process for ammonium removal from mainstream municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Malovanyy, Andriy; Plaza, Elzbieta; Trela, Jozef; Malovanyy, Myroslav

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a new technology of nitrogen removal from mainstream municipal wastewater is proposed. It is based on ammonium removal by ion exchange and regeneration of ion exchange material with 10-30 g/L NaCl solution with further nitrogen removal from spent regenerant by partial nitritation/Anammox process. Influence of regenerant strength on performance of ion exchange and biological parts of the proposed technology was evaluated. Moreover, the technology was tested in batch mode using pretreated municipal wastewater, strong acid cation (SAC) resin and partial nitritation/Anammox biomass. It was shown that with ion exchange it is possible to remove 99.9% of ammonium from wastewater while increasing the concentration of ammonium in spent regenerant by 18 times. Up to 95% of nitrogen from spent regenerant, produced by regeneration of SAC resin with 10 g/L NaCl solution, was removed biologically by partial nitritation/Anammox biomass. Moreover, the possibilities of integration of the technology into municipal wastewater treatment technology, and the challenges and advantages are discussed.

  6. An ion-exchange nanomembrane sensor for detection of nucleic acids using a surface charge inversion phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Satyajyoti; Slouka, Zdenek; Shah, Sunny S; Behura, Susanta K; Shi, Zonggao; Stack, M Sharon; Severson, David W; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2014-10-15

    We present a novel low-cost biosensor for rapid, sensitive and selective detection of nucleic acids based on an ionic diode feature of an anion exchange nanoporous membrane under DC bias. The ionic diode feature is associated with external surface charge inversion on the positively charged anion exchange nanomembrane upon hybridization of negatively charged nucleic acid molecules to single-stranded oligoprobes functionalized on the membrane surface resulting in the formation of a cation selective monolayer. The resulting bipolar membrane causes a transition from electroconvection-controlled to water-splitting controlled ion conductance, with a large ion current signature that can be used to accurately quantify the hybridized nucleic acids. The platform is capable of distinguishing two base-pair mismatches in a 22-base pairing segment of microRNAs associated with oral cancer, as well as serotype-specific detection of dengue virus. We also show the sensor' capability to selectively capture target nucleic acids from a heterogeneous mixture. The limit of detection is 1 pM for short 27 base target molecules in a 15-min assay. Similar hybridization results are shown for short DNA molecules as well as RNAs from Brucella and Escherichia coli. The versatility and simplicity of this low-cost biosensor should enable point-of-care diagnostics in food, medical and environmental safety markets.

  7. Ion Exchange Media for Reduction of Liquid Radwaste in Commercial Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Yarnell, P.A.; Tavares, A.

    2008-07-01

    Ion exchange resins currently make up as much as one-half of all radioactive waste generated by commercial nuclear power plants. A major challenge is reduction of the quantity of ion exchange media requiring disposal. Although the amount of spent ion exchange resins disposed has decreased year after year, a new urgency has arisen with the pending closure of a major disposal site in 2008. This paper explores whether ion exchange resins also can be used to potentially reduce radioactive liquid waste volumes and / or limit them to Class A wastes only. Source term reduction and minimization of manpower exposure to radioactivity are other important goals. Specialty ion exchange products may help to achieve source term reduction of certain radionuclides. Some established operations, data, and process concepts are presented to address these critical issues encountered in liquid radwaste management. (authors)

  8. FB-Line resin testing final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.

    1992-01-23

    The Dowex 50W-X8 and 50W-Xl2 resin samples are both strong acid cation materials in the hydrogen form. Each material has a water retention capacity characteristic of its respective marketed degree of cross-linking. Dowex 21K gives confirmatory responses to tests for a strong anion exchange resin in the nitrate form. All three resins have the manufacturer's specified ionic type and form, and the Dowex 50W resins have characteristic water retention capacities. These tests conclude that the ion exchange resins in use in FB-Line meet the approved safety document criteria for cross-linking, ionic form, and resin type.

  9. FB-Line resin testing final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.

    1992-01-23

    The Dowex 50W-X8 and 50W-Xl2 resin samples are both strong acid cation materials in the hydrogen form. Each material has a water retention capacity characteristic of its respective marketed degree of cross-linking. Dowex 21K gives confirmatory responses to tests for a strong anion exchange resin in the nitrate form. All three resins have the manufacturer`s specified ionic type and form, and the Dowex 50W resins have characteristic water retention capacities. These tests conclude that the ion exchange resins in use in FB-Line meet the approved safety document criteria for cross-linking, ionic form, and resin type.

  10. EVALUATING ION EXCHANGE FOR REMOVING RADIUM FROM GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article, the second in a series, focuses on the results of bench- and pilot-scale studies of ion exchange processes for radium removal from groundwater in Lemont, Ill. Batch and column studies indicated a very high resin selectivity for radium compared with common cations. E...

  11. Copper Removal from A-01 Outfall by Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.N.

    1999-02-17

    Chelex100, a commercially available ion exchange resin, has been identified in this study as having a significant affinity for copper and zinc in the A-01 outfall water. Removal of copper and zinc from A-01 outfall water will ensure that the outfall meets the state of South Carolina's limit on these heavy metals.

  12. The Award for the Development of Ion Exchange Systems for Food Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Eiya

    In the food industry, ion exchange resins have been used not only for water treatment, but also for the purification of foodstuff itself. Here I will introduce some topics in the development and improvement of ion exchange systems for food proccssing that I have worked on.

  13. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  14. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  15. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  16. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  17. [Determination of succinic acid in desvenlafaxine succinate by high performance ion-exclusion chromatography and high performance ion-exchange chromatography].

    PubMed

    Zong, Yanping; Li, Jinghua; Sun, Wei; Liu, Guixia; Lu, Jinghua; Shan, Guangzhi

    2016-02-01

    New methods were developed for the determination of succinic acid in desvenlafaxine succinate (DVS) by high performance ion-exclusion chromatography (HPIEC) and high performance ion-exchange chromatography (HPIC). HPIEC and HPIC methods were used separately to determinate the succinic acid in DVS. With HPIEC, the sample was diluted with 2. 50 x 10(-3) mol/L sulfuric acid solution and filtrated by 0. 22 µm polyether sulfone filter membrane, and then analyzed by HPIEC directly without any further pretreatment. The analytical column was Phenomenex Rezex ROA-organic Acid H+(8%) (300 mmx7. 8 mm). The mobile phase was 2. 50x10(-3) mol/L sulfuric acid solution at the flow rate of 0. 5 mL/min. The column temperature was set at 40 °C, and the detection wavelength was 210 nm. The injection volume was 10 KL. The assay was quantified by external standard method. With HPIC, the sample was diluted with ultrapure water and filtrated by 0. 22 µm polyether sulfone filter membrane, and then analyzed by HPIC directly without any further pretreatment. The analytical column was Dionex IonPac AS11-HC (250 mm x 4 mm) with a guard column IonPacAG11-HC (50 mm x 4 mm). Isocratic KOH elute generator was used at the flow rate of 1. 0 mL/min. The detection was performed by a Dionex suppressed (DIONEX AERS 500 4-mm) conductivity detector. The injection volume was 10 µL. The content computation was performed with peak area external reference method. The results of HPIEC method for succinic acid were 28. 8%, 28. 9% and 28. 9%, while the results of HPIEC method were 28. 2%, 28. 6% and 28. 6%. The results of HPIEC and HPIC methods were not significantly different. The two methods can both be used to determine the contents of succinic acid in DVS. The surveillance analytical method should be chosen according to the situation. PMID:27382725

  18. [Determination of succinic acid in desvenlafaxine succinate by high performance ion-exclusion chromatography and high performance ion-exchange chromatography].

    PubMed

    Zong, Yanping; Li, Jinghua; Sun, Wei; Liu, Guixia; Lu, Jinghua; Shan, Guangzhi

    2016-02-01

    New methods were developed for the determination of succinic acid in desvenlafaxine succinate (DVS) by high performance ion-exclusion chromatography (HPIEC) and high performance ion-exchange chromatography (HPIC). HPIEC and HPIC methods were used separately to determinate the succinic acid in DVS. With HPIEC, the sample was diluted with 2. 50 x 10(-3) mol/L sulfuric acid solution and filtrated by 0. 22 µm polyether sulfone filter membrane, and then analyzed by HPIEC directly without any further pretreatment. The analytical column was Phenomenex Rezex ROA-organic Acid H+(8%) (300 mmx7. 8 mm). The mobile phase was 2. 50x10(-3) mol/L sulfuric acid solution at the flow rate of 0. 5 mL/min. The column temperature was set at 40 °C, and the detection wavelength was 210 nm. The injection volume was 10 KL. The assay was quantified by external standard method. With HPIC, the sample was diluted with ultrapure water and filtrated by 0. 22 µm polyether sulfone filter membrane, and then analyzed by HPIC directly without any further pretreatment. The analytical column was Dionex IonPac AS11-HC (250 mm x 4 mm) with a guard column IonPacAG11-HC (50 mm x 4 mm). Isocratic KOH elute generator was used at the flow rate of 1. 0 mL/min. The detection was performed by a Dionex suppressed (DIONEX AERS 500 4-mm) conductivity detector. The injection volume was 10 µL. The content computation was performed with peak area external reference method. The results of HPIEC method for succinic acid were 28. 8%, 28. 9% and 28. 9%, while the results of HPIEC method were 28. 2%, 28. 6% and 28. 6%. The results of HPIEC and HPIC methods were not significantly different. The two methods can both be used to determine the contents of succinic acid in DVS. The surveillance analytical method should be chosen according to the situation.

  19. Dissolution of beidellite in acidic solutions: Ion exchange reactions and effect of crystal chemistry on smectite reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Valentin; Tertre, Emmanuel; Regnault, Olivier; Descostes, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The dissolution rate of beidellite, a dioctahedral smectite with tetrahedral charge that is a common swelling clay mineral in surface and subsurface natural environments, was studied in acidic solutions at 25 °C under far from equilibrium conditions. A <0.3 μm size fraction of SBId1 beidellite ((Si7.148Al0.852)(Al3.624Mg0.18Fe(III)0.224)O20(OH)4M+0.948) purchased from the Clay Mineral Society was used as the starting material, and experiments were performed in stirred flow-through reactors using HCl solutions with pH values ranging from 1 to 3. Several hydrodynamic conditions were tested using different flow rates with stirred and non-stirred particles. The aqueous Al/Si ratio measured at the outlet of the reactor was followed as a function of time and compared to solid stoichiometry values to assess the mechanisms occurring at the solid/solution interface. The reversible adsorption of Al3+ in the smectite interlayer space was evidenced for pH > 1.1, and the presence of an amorphous Si-enriched layer can be reasonably assumed in some cases from the interpretation of the aqueous concentrations and the characterization of the solid phase (X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy). Beidellite dissolution rates normalized to the sample mass (mol g-1 s-1) were obtained from Si and Al concentrations under steady state dissolution conditions. Calculated rates were compared with those previously reported for montmorillonite in several publications. The beidellite dissolution rates are, on average, ten times lower than those of montmorillonite. This implies that the smectite crystal chemistry (i.e., amount of Al3+ versus Mg2+ or Fe3+ substitution in the structure) has a strong effect on its stability and should be considered in reactive transport models in which the dissolution properties of smectites are taken into account.

  20. Effect of competing amines on the removal of tetramethylammonium hydroxide from solution using ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Citraningrum, H M; Liu, Jhy-Chern

    2016-01-01

    Tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH, TMA(+)) has been widely used as the photoresist developer in semiconductor and thin film transistor liquid crystal display manufacturing. In this study, TMAH-containing wastewater was treated by ion exchange method. Strong acid cation exchange resin was used. A kinetics study revealed that the ion exchange reaction reached equilibrium within 20 min and it could be described by a pseudo-second-order model. To assess the effects of competing ions, wastewater was spiked with three different amines, namely ethylamine (EA(+)), diethylamine (DEA(+)), and triethylamine (TEA(+)). TMAH uptake decreased when in the presence of amines, and it decreased in the order EA(+) < DEA(+) < TEA(+). It could be attributed to different proton affinity (PA) and the strength of affinity between amine molecules and resin matrix, as found from the ab initio calculation values and Langmuir isotherm parameters. However, the interaction energy between sulphonic acid groups and interfering amines in solution using density functional theory (DFT) calculation resulted in a different trend compared with that of PA. The difference might be caused by stabilization of amines by resin matrix and different molecular structures. PMID:27438252

  1. Transport properties of highly ordered heterogeneous ion-exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, V; Freger, V; Linder, C; Oren, Y

    2008-08-01

    Model "ordered" heterogeneous ion exchange membranes are made with ion exchange particles heaving ion exchange capacity in the range 3 to 2.5 meq/gr (dry basis) and diameters ranging from 37 to 7 microm and 2 component room-temperature vulcanizing silicon rubber as a polymeric matrix, by applying an electric field normal to the membrane surface during preparation. These membranes were shown to have an improved ionic conductivity compared with "nonordered" membranes based on the same ion exchange content (for instance, at 10% resin content "nonordered" membranes show <10(-5) mS/cm while "ordered" membranes have conductivity of 1 mS/cm). The transport properties of ordered membranes were compared with those of nonordered membranes, through the current-voltage characteristics. Limiting currents measured for the ordered membranes were significantly higher than those of the nonordered membranes with the same resin concentration. In addition, higher limiting currents were observed in ordered membranes as the resin particles became smaller. Energy dispersion spectrometry analyses revealed that the concentration of cation exchange groups on the membrane surface was higher for ordered membrane as compared to that of nonordered membranes. This implies that the local current density for the conducting domains at the surface of the nonordered membranes is higher, leading to higher concentration polarization and, eventually, to lower average limiting current densities. The effect of ordering the particles on the membrane conductivity and transport properties was studied, and the advantages of the ordered membranes are discussed.

  2. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  3. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  4. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  5. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  6. Electrically Switched Cesium Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    JPH Sukamto; ML Lilga; RK Orth

    1998-10-23

    This report discusses the results of work to develop Electrically Switched Ion Exchange (ESIX) for separations of ions from waste streams relevant to DOE site clean-up. ESIX combines ion exchange and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible method for radionuclide separation that lowers costs and minimizes secondary waste generation typically associated with conventional ion exchange. In the ESIX process, an electroactive ion exchange film is deposited onto. a high surface area electrode, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulating the potential of the film. As a result, the production of secondary waste is minimized, since the large volumes of solution associated with elution, wash, and regeneration cycles typical of standard ion exchange are not needed for the ESIX process. The document is presented in two parts: Part I, the Summary Report, discusses the objectives of the project, describes the ESIX concept and the approach taken, and summarizes the major results; Part II, the Technology Description, provides a technical description of the experimental procedures and in-depth discussions on modeling, case studies, and cost comparisons between ESIX and currently used technologies.

  7. Ion exchange polymers and method for making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H. (Inventor); Street, Kenneth W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An ion exchange polymer comprised of an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal salt of a poly(carboxylic acid) in a poly(vinyl acetal) matrix is described. The polymer is made by treating a mixture made of poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(acrylic acid) with a suitable aldehyde and an acid catalyst to cause acetalization with some cross-linking. The material is then subjected to an alkaline aqueous solution of an alkali metal salt or an alkali earth metal salt. All of the film forming and cross-linking steps can be carried out simultaneously, if desired.

  8. Environmentally benign hardness removal using ion-exchange fibers and snowmelt.

    PubMed

    Greenleaf, John E; Sengupta, Arup K

    2006-01-01

    Many industrial unit operations and unit processes require near-complete removal of hardness to avoid scaling in heat-transfer equipment, fouling in membranes, and high consumption of detergents and sequestering chemicals in cooling and wash water. Lime softening and cation exchange are the most commonly used processes practiced to date for hardness removal. Herein, we report and discuss the results and attributes of a new hardness removal process using ion-exchange fibers (IX-fibers). Most importantly, the process uses harvested snowmelt (or rainwater) as the regenerant chemical along with sparged carbon dioxide. Consequently, the spent regenerant does not contain a high concentration of aggressive chemicals such as sodium chloride or acid like traditional ion-exchange processes nor does the process produce voluminous sludges similar to lime softening. The bulk of carbon dioxide consumed during regeneration remains sequestered in the aqueous phase as alkalinity. IX-fibers form the heart of the process. They are essentially thin cylindrical polymeric strands 10-20 microm in diameter. The weak-acid carboxylate functional groups reside near to the surface of these cylindrical fibers. Low intraparticle diffusional resistance is the underlying reason IX-fibers are amenable to efficient regeneration with snowmelt sparged with carbon dioxide. When the carbon dioxide partial pressure is increased to 6.8 atm, over 90% calcium desorption efficiency is obtained. On the contrary, commercial weak-acid ion-exchange resins in spherical bead forms are ineffective for regeneration with carbon-dioxide-sparged snowmelt due to extremely slow ion-exchange kinetics involving counter-transport of Ca2+ and H+.

  9. Ion Exchange Kinetics Testing with SRF Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Brown, Garrett N.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2012-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site contains more than 53 million gallons of legacy waste generated as a byproduct of plutonium production and reprocessing operations. The wastes are a complex mixture composed mostly of NaNO3, NaNO2, NaOH, NaAlO2, Na3PO4, and Na2SO4, with a number of minor and trace metals, organics, and radionuclides stored in underground waste tanks. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) has contracted Bechtel National Incorporated (BNI) to build a pretreatment facility, the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP), that will separate long-lived transuranics (TRU) and highly radioactive components (specifically 137Cs and, in selected cases, 90Sr) from the bulk (non-radioactive) constituents and immobilize the wastes by vitrification. The plant is designed to produce two waste streams: a high-volume low-activity waste (LAW) and a low-volume high-activity waste (HLW).

  10. Radium separation through complexation by aqueous crown ethers and ion exchange or solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Burnett, W.C.

    1997-11-01

    The effect of three water-soluble, unsubstituted crown ethers (15-crown-5 (15C5), 18-crown-6 (18C6) and 21-crown-7 (21C7)) on the uptake of Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra cations by a sulfonic acid cation exchange resin, and on the extraction of the same cations by xylene solutions of dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (HDNNS) from aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions has been investigated. The crown ethers enhance the sorption of the larger cations by the ion exchange resin, thereby improving the resin selectivity over calcium, a result of a synergistic interaction between the crown ether and the ionic functional groups of the resin. Similarly, the extraction of the larger alkaline earth cations into xylene by HDNNS is strongly synergized by the presence of the crown ethers in the aqueous phase. Promising results for intra-Group IIa cation separations have been obtained using each of the three crown ethers as the aqueous ligands and the sulfonic acid cation exchange resin. Even greater separation factors for the radium-calcium couple have been measured with the crown-ethers and HDNNS solutions in the solvent extraction mode. The application of the uptake and extraction results to the development of radium separation schemes is discussed and a possible flowchart for the determination of {sup 226}Ra/{sup 228}Ra in natural waters is presented.

  11. ION EXCHANGE PERFORMANCE OF TITANOSILICATES, GERMANATES AND CARBON NANOTUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Alsobrook, A. N.; Hobbs, D. T.

    2013-04-24

    This report presents a summary of testing the affinity of titanosilicates (TSP), germanium-substituted titanosilicates (Ge-TSP) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for lanthanide ions in dilute nitric acid solution. The K-TSP ion exchanger exhibited the highest affinity for lanthanides in dilute nitric acid solutions. The Ge-TSP ion exchanger shows promise as a material with high affinity, but additional tests are needed to confirm the preliminary results. The MWCNT exhibited much lower affinities than the K-TSP in dilute nitric acid solutions. However, the MWCNT are much more chemically stable to concentrated nitric acid solutions and, therefore, may candidates for ion exchange in more concentrated nitric acid solutions. This technical report serves as the deliverable documenting completion of the FY13 research milestone, M4FT-13SR0303061 – measure actinide and lanthanide distribution values in nitric acid solutions with sodium and potassium titanosilicate materials.

  12. Extraction and isolation of TPE from other elements on ion exchangers in aqueous and aqueous-organic solutions of phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1988-07-01

    The behavior of Am-Es and other actinides on anion and cation exchange resins in aqueous and aqueous-organic solutions of phosphoric acid has been studied in a wide range of concentration of various components of the solution. The sorptivity of transplutonium elements (TPE) on anion exchangers from dilute H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ with a concentration less than or equal to 1 M in presence of organic solvents (alcohols, ketones, etc.) and on cation exchangers from concentrated H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ has been found to be significant. The possibility of use of phosphoric acid solutions for isolation of TPE from Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, and Zr and separation of TPE in different oxidation states in presence of a high-purity oxidant has been shown.

  13. Small-Column Ion Exchange Testing of Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Garrett N.; Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2011-03-03

    Ion exchange using the Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in an at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown the SRF resin to be effective for removing Cs-137 from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants. Prior work focused primarily on the loading behavior for 5 M sodium (Na) solutions at 25°C and the eluting behavior of the loaded SRF resin with virgin 0.5 M HNO3. Recent proposed changes to the process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (2 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. In addition, elution will likely utilize variable-strength recycled nitric acid containing trace amounts of Cs-137. Cesium ion exchange loading and elution curves were generated for a 5 M Na, 2.4E-05 M Cs loading solution traced with Cs-134 followed by elution with variable HNO3 (0.02, 0.07, 0.15, 0.23, and 0.28 M) containing variable CsNO3 (5.0E-09, 5.0E-08, and 5.0E-07 M) and traced with Cs-137. The ion exchange system consisted of a pump, tubing, process solutions, and a single, small (~15 mL) bed of SRF resin with a water-jacketed column for temperature-control. The columns were loaded with approximately 250 bed volumes (BVs) of feed solution at 45°C and at 1.5 to 12 BV per hour (0.15 to 1.2 cm/min). The columns were then eluted with approximately 25 BVs of HNO3 processed at 25°C and at 1.4 BV/hr. The two independent tracers allowed analysis of the on-column cesium interaction between the loading and elution solutions. The objective of these tests was to improve the correlation between the spent resin cesium content and cesium leached out of the resin in subsequent loading cycles (cesium bleed), to help establish acid

  14. Regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon saturated with inorganic ions by cavitation united with ion exchange method.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Gao, Hong; Li, Yansheng; Yang, Huixin

    2011-06-01

    Using ion exchange resin as transfer media, regenerate powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorbed inorganic ions by cavitation to enhance the transfer; we studied how the regeneration time and the mass ratio of resin and PAC influence the regeneration rate respectively through re-adsorption. The result showed that the effective regeneration of PAC saturated with inorganic ions was above 90% using ion exchange resin as media and transfer carrier, the quantity of PAC did not reduced but activated in the process. PMID:25084579

  15. Synergistic integration of ion-exchange and catalytic reduction for complete decomposition of perchlorate in waste water.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Na; Choi, Minkee

    2014-07-01

    Ion-exchange has been frequently used for the treatment of perchlorate (ClO4(-)), but disposal or regeneration of the spent resins has been the major hurdle for field application. Here we demonstrate a synergistic integration of ion-exchange and catalytic decomposition by using Pd-supported ion-exchange resin as an adsorption/catalysis bifunctional material. The ion-exchange capability of the resin did not change after generation of the Pd clusters via mild ethanol reduction, and thus showed very high ion-exchange selectivity and capacity toward ClO4(-). After the resin was saturated with ClO4(-) in an adsorption mode, it was possible to fully decompose the adsorbed ClO4(-) into nontoxic Cl(-) by the catalytic function of the Pd catalysts under H2 atmosphere. It was demonstrated that prewetting the ion-exchange resin with ethanol significantly accelerate the decomposition of ClO4(-) due to the weaker association of ClO4(-) with the ion-exchange sites of the resin, which allows more facile access of ClO4(-) to the catalytically active Pd-resin interface. In the presence of ethanol, >90% of the adsorbed ClO4(-) could be decomposed within 24 h at 10 bar H2 and 373 K. The ClO4(-) adsorption-catalytic decomposition cycle could be repeated up to five times without loss of ClO4(-) adsorption capacity and selectivity.

  16. Synthesis of silver nanocubes with controlled size using water-soluble poly(amic acid) salt as the intermediate via a novel ion-exchange self-assembly technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shengli; Shen, Xiangyue; Lin, Zhiwei; Tian, Guofeng; Wu, Dezhen; Jin, Riguang

    2013-11-01

    Here, we report for the first time on the successful fabrication of monodispersed silver nanocubes with regular shape and controlled size in the solid phase via a novel ion-exchange self-assembly technique by using water-soluble poly(amic acid) salt as the intermediate and silver nitrate as the metal precursor. By simply altering the annealing times at high temperature, the size of the silver nanocubes could be finely tuned in the range of 90-160 nm in the present case. Further attempts with different metal salts show that the present method is also feasible for other metal species and might be universal.Here, we report for the first time on the successful fabrication of monodispersed silver nanocubes with regular shape and controlled size in the solid phase via a novel ion-exchange self-assembly technique by using water-soluble poly(amic acid) salt as the intermediate and silver nitrate as the metal precursor. By simply altering the annealing times at high temperature, the size of the silver nanocubes could be finely tuned in the range of 90-160 nm in the present case. Further attempts with different metal salts show that the present method is also feasible for other metal species and might be universal. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SEM images for the CuO, NiO and Co3O4 nanocubes prepared by the ion-exchange self-assembly technique by using CuCl2, NiSO4 and Co(NO3)2 as the metal precursors and PMDA/ODA-based water-soluble poly(amic acid) salt as the intermediate (Fig. S1-S3) TGA, DSC and DMTA analyses for the pure poly(amic acid) salt and that loaded with 1 mol% silver(i) (Fig. S4-S6). See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03212d

  17. Surface modification with phosphoric acid of SiO2/Nb2O5 prepared by the sol-gel method: structural-textural and acid sites studies and an ion exchange model.

    PubMed

    Francisco, M S P; Cardoso, W S; Gushikem, Y; Landers, R; Kholin, Y V

    2004-09-28

    In this work, the structural and textural properties of the SiO2/Nb2O5 system prepared by the sol-gel method and then modified by phosphoric acid were studied. The different materials were prepared, with three different mol % Nb2O5 (2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 mol %), and calcined in the temperature range of 423-1273 K. BET specific surface area determinations, scanning electron microscopy connected to a X-ray emission analyzer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used for the investigation. For the lowest temperature of calcination (423 K), the mesopores and micropores of the modified material were blocked, resulting in a decrease of the specific surface area compared to the SBET values obtained for the SiNb matrix. Under intermediate temperatures of calcination (423-873 K), the modified material acquired textural stability. By XPS analysis, the presence of the dihydrogenphosphate species was identified, the P/Nb atomic ratios being independent of the thermal treatment. 31P magic angle spinning NMR confirmed the XPS data and also showed that the chemical shift of the (H2PO4)- ions strongly depended on the crystallization degree of the Nb2O5. Structural thermal stability was also shown by the presence of Brønsted acid sites in the modified material calcined at high temperature (1273 K). The thermal stability is directly associated with obtainment of the same value for K+ exchange capacity (0.74 mmol g(-1), average value) for the modified materials calcined at 423 and 1273 K. The chemical analyses of phosphorus for the modified materials were made by using the inductively coupled plasma. The value was 0.36 mmol g(-1), corroborating the presence of (H2PO4)- ions. The ion exchange isotherms presented an S-shaped form characteristic of energetically heterogeneous ion exchangers, permitting application of a model of fixed polydentate centers, in which ion exchange took place. PMID:15379496

  18. Insoluble polyelectrolyte and ion-exchange hollow fiber impregnated therewith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The number of quaternary sites and ion exchange capacity of a polyquaternary, cross linked, insoluble copolymer of a vinyl pyridine and a dihalo organic compound is increased by about 15-35% by reaction of the polymer with an amine followed by quaternization, if required. The polymer forms spontaneously in the presence of a substrate such as within the pores of a hollow fiber. The improved resin impregnated fiber may be utilized to remove ions from waste or process steams.

  19. Electrically controlled cesium ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, M.

    1996-10-01

    Several sites within the DOE complex (Savannah River, Idaho, Oak Ridge and Hanford) have underground storage tanks containing high-level waste resulting from nuclear engineering activities. To facilitate final disposal of the tank waste, it is advantageous to separate and concentrate the radionuclides for final immobilization in a vitrified glass matrix. This task proposes a new approach for radionuclide separation by combining ion exchange (IX) and electrochemistry to provide a selective and economic separation method.

  20. Radiation stability of sodium titanate ion exchange materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kenna, B.T.

    1980-02-01

    Sodium titanate and sodium titanate loaded macroreticular resin are being considered as ion exchangers to remove /sup 90/Sr and actinides from the large volume of defense waste stored at Hanford Site in Washington. Preliminary studies to determine the radiation effect on Sr/sup +2/ and I/sup -/ capacity of these ion-exchange materials were conducted. Samples of sodium titanate powder, sodium titanate loaded macroreticular resin, as well as the nitrate form of macroreticular anion resin were irradiated with up to 2 x 10/sup 9/ Rads of /sup 60/Co gamma rays. Sodium titanate cation capacity decreased about 50% while the sodium titanate loaded macroeticular resin displayed a dramatic decrease in cation capacity when irradiated with 10/sup 8/-10/sup 9/ Rad. The latter decrease is tentatively ascribed to radiation damage to the organic portion which subsequently inhibits interaction with the contained sodium titanate. The anion capacity of both macroreticular resin and sodium titanate loaded macroreticular resin exhibited significant decreases with increasing radiation exposure. These results suggest that consideration should be given to the potential effects of radiation degradation if column regeneration is to be used. 5 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Stability Of A Carbon-Dioxide-Removing Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, Theodore; Wood, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experiments determing long-term chemical stability of IRA-45, commerical ion-exchange resin candidate for use in removing CO2 from atmosphere of Space Station. In proposed system, cabin air passes through resin, and acidic CO2 absorbed by weakly-basic hydrated diethylenetriamine bonded to porous resin substrate. When resin absorbs all CO2, disconnects from airstream and heated with steam to desorb CO2. Resin reuseable. Removed by post-treating process air with phosphoric acid on charcoal. Other chemicals removed by trace-contaminant-control subsystem of Space Station.

  2. Synthesis of silver nanocubes with controlled size using water-soluble poly(amic acid) salt as the intermediate via a novel ion-exchange self-assembly technique.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shengli; Shen, Xiangyue; Lin, Zhiwei; Tian, GuoFeng; Wu, Dezhen; Jin, Riguang

    2013-12-21

    Here, we report for the first time on the successful fabrication of monodispersed silver nanocubes with regular shape and controlled size in the solid phase via a novel ion-exchange self-assembly technique by using water-soluble poly(amic acid) salt as the intermediate and silver nitrate as the metal precursor. By simply altering the annealing times at high temperature, the size of the silver nanocubes could be finely tuned in the range of 90-160 nm in the present case. Further attempts with different metal salts show that the present method is also feasible for other metal species and might be universal.

  3. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid...

  4. LITERATURE REVIEWS TO SUPPORT ION EXCHANGE TECHNOLOGY SELECTION FOR MODULAR SALT PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    King, W

    2007-11-30

    . Application of RF for cesium removal in the Hanford WTP does not involve in-riser columns but does utilize the resin in large scale column configurations in a waste treatment facility. The basic conceptual design for SCIX involves the dissolution of saltcake in SRS Tanks 1-3 to give approximately 6 M sodium solutions and the treatment of these solutions for cesium removal using one or two columns supported within a high level waste tank. Prior to ion exchange treatment, the solutions will be filtered for removal of entrained solids. In addition to Tanks 1-3, solutions in two other tanks (37 and 41) will require treatment for cesium removal in the SCIX unit. The previous SCIX design (McCabe, 2005) utilized CST for cesium removal with downflow supernate processing and included a CST grinder following cesium loading. Grinding of CST was necessary to make the cesium-loaded material suitable for vitrification in the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Because RF resin is elutable (and reusable) and processing requires conversion between sodium and hydrogen forms using caustic and acidic solutions more liquid processing steps are involved. The WTP baseline process involves a series of caustic and acidic solutions (downflow processing) with water washes between pH transitions across neutral. In addition, due to resin swelling during conversion from hydrogen to sodium form an upflow caustic regeneration step is required. Presumably, one of these basic processes (or some variation) will be utilized for MSP for the appropriate ion exchange technology selected. CST processing involves two primary waste products: loaded CST and decontaminated salt solution (DSS). RF processing involves three primary waste products: spent RF resin, DSS, and acidic cesium eluate, although the resin is reusable and typically does not require replacement until completion of multiple treatment cycles. CST processing requires grinding of the ion exchange media, handling of solids with high cesium

  5. PRTR ion exchange vault column sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Cornwell, B.C.

    1995-03-14

    This report documents ion exchange column sampling and Non Destructive Assay (NDA) results from activities in 1994, for the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) ion exchange vault. The objective was to obtain sufficient information to prepare disposal documentation for the ion exchange columns found in the PRTR Ion exchange vault. This activity also allowed for the monitoring of the liquid level in the lower vault. The sampling activity contained five separate activities: (1) Sampling an ion exchange column and analyzing the ion exchange media for purpose of waste disposal; (2) Gamma and neutron NDA testing on ion exchange columns located in the upper vault; (3) Lower vault liquid level measurement; (4) Radiological survey of the upper vault; and (5) Secure the vault pending waste disposal.

  6. [Ion-exchange hemosorption in the intensive therapy of liver insufficiency in patients with obstructive jaundice].

    PubMed

    Minina, K Z; Kurapov, E P; Goncharov, V V; Leĭkin, Iu A; Tarasova, T I; Treushnikova, N Iu

    1989-01-01

    Hemosorption on thromboresistant ion-exchange resins synthetized at D. I. Mendeleev Moscow Chemical Technological Institute (MCTI) was used in combined therapy of hepatic failure. Use was made of anion-exchange resin A-I-II MCTI, catonit C-I-II MCTI, polyampholit. Stability of hemodynamic parameters, absence of blood element disturbances, effective sampling of anionic and cationic metabolites have been observed.

  7. Small-Column Cesium Ion Exchange Elution Testing of Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Garrett N.; Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2011-10-21

    This report summarizes the work performed to evaluate multiple, cesium loading, and elution cycles for small columns containing SRF resin using a simple, high-level waste (HLW) simulant. Cesium ion exchange loading and elution curves were generated for a nominal 5 M Na, 2.4E-05 M Cs, 0.115 M Al loading solution traced with 134Cs followed by elution with variable HNO3 (0.02, 0.07, 0.15, 0.23, and 0.28 M) containing variable CsNO3 (5.0E-09, 5.0E-08, and 5.0E-07 M) and traced with 137Cs. The ion exchange system consisted of a pump, tubing, process solutions, and a single, small ({approx}15.7 mL) bed of SRF resin with a water-jacketed column for temperature-control. The columns were loaded with approximately 250 bed volumes (BVs) of feed solution at 45 C and at 1.5 to 12 BV per hour (0.15 to 1.2 cm/min). The columns were then eluted with 29+ BVs of HNO3 processed at 25 C and at 1.4 BV/h. The two independent tracers allowed analysis of the on-column cesium interaction between the loading and elution solutions. The objective of these tests was to improve the correlation between the spent resin cesium content and cesium leached out of the resin in subsequent loading cycles (cesium leakage) to help establish acid strength and purity requirements.

  8. Ion exchange properties of novel hydrous metal oxide materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, T.J.; McLaughlin, L.I.

    1996-12-31

    Hydrous metal oxide (HMO) materials are inorganic ion exchangers which have many desirable characteristics for catalyst support applications, including high cation exchange capacity, anion exchange capability, high surface area, ease of adjustment of acidity and basicity, bulk or thin film preparation, and similar chemistry for preparation of various transition metal oxides. Cation exchange capacity is engineered into these materials through the uniform incorporation of alkali cations via manipulation of alkoxide chemistry. Specific examples of the effects of Na stoichiometry and the addition of SiO{sub 2} to hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) on ion exchange behavior will be given. Acid titration and cationic metal precursor complex exchange will be used to characterize the ion exchange behavior of these novel materials.

  9. Experimental Ion Exchange Column With SuperLig 639 And Simulant Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, Megan; Nash, C.

    2013-08-26

    SuperLig®639 ion exchange resin was tested as a retrieval mechanism for pertechnetate, through decontamination of a perrhenate spiked 5M Simple Average Na{sup +} Mass Based Simulant. Testing included batch contacts and a three-column ion exchange campaign. A decontamination of perrhenate exceeding 99% from the liquid feed was demonstrated. Analysis of the first formulation of a SBS/WESP simulant found unexpectedly low concentrations of soluble aluminum. Follow-on work will complete the formulation.

  10. Preliminary Ion Exchange Modeling for Removal of Cesium from Hanford Waste Using Hydrous Crystalline Silicotitanate Material

    SciTech Connect

    HAMM, LUTHER L.

    2004-07-27

    For the current pretreatment facility design of the River Protection Project (RPP) Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), the removal of cesium from low activity waste (LAW) is achieved by ion-exchange technology based on SuperLig(R) 644 resin. Due to recent concerns over potential radiological and chemical degradation of SuperLig(R) 644 resin and increased pressure drops observed during pilot-scale column studies, an increased interest in developing a potential backup ion-exchanger material has resulted. Ideally, a backup ion-exchanger material would replace the SuperLig(R) 644 resin and have no other major impacts on the pretreatment facility flowsheet. Such an ideal exchanger has not been identified to date. However, Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion-exchanger materials have been studied for the removal of cesium from a variety of DOE wastes over the last decade. CST ion-exchanger materials demonstrate a high affinity for cesium under high alkalinity conditions and have been under investigation for cesium removal specifically at Hanford and SRS during the last six years. Since CST is an inorganic based material (with excellent properties in regard to chemical, radiological, and thermal stability) that is considered to be practically non-elutable (while SuperLig(R) 644 is an organic based elutable resin), the overall pretreatment facility flowsheet would be impacted in various ways. However, the CST material is still being considered as a potential backup ion-exchanger material. The performance of a proposed backup ion-exchange column using IONSIV IE-911 (CST in its engineered-form) material for the removal of cesium from Hanford high level radioactive alkaline waste is discussed. This report focuses attention on the ion-exchange aspects and addresses the loading phase of the process cycle.

  11. Ion exchange purification of scandium

    DOEpatents

    Herchenroeder, Laurie A.; Burkholder, Harvey R.

    1990-10-23

    An improvement in purification of scandium through ion exchange chromatography is disclosed in which the oxidation potential of the eluting solution is altered by the addition of potassium chlorate or ammonium chloride so that removal of contaminants is encouraged. The temperature, pH and concentration of the eluent HEDTA are controlled in order to maintain the scandium in the column while minimizing dilution of the scandium band. Recovery of scandium is improved by pumping dilute scandium over the column prior to stripping the scandium and precipitation. This eliminates the HEDTA ion and other monovalent cations contaminating the scandium band. This method maximizes recovery of scandium while maintaining purity.

  12. Ion exchange purification of scandium

    DOEpatents

    Herchenroeder, L.A.; Burkholder, H.R.

    1990-10-23

    An improvement in purification of scandium through ion exchange chromatography is disclosed in which the oxidation potential of the eluting solution is altered by the addition of potassium chlorate or ammonium chloride so that removal of contaminants is encouraged. The temperature, pH and concentration of the eluent HEDTA are controlled in order to maintain the scandium in the column while minimizing dilution of the scandium band. Recovery of scandium is improved by pumping dilute scandium over the column prior to stripping the scandium and precipitation. This eliminates the HEDTA ion and other monovalent cations contaminating the scandium band. This method maximizes recovery of scandium while maintaining purity. 2 figs.

  13. Inorganic ion exchangers for nuclear waste remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Clearfield, A.; Bortun, A.; Bortun, L.; Behrens, E.

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this work is to provide a broad spectrum of inorganic ion exchangers that can be used for a range of applications and separations involving remediation of groundwater and tank wastes. The authors intend to scale-up the most promising exchangers, through partnership with AlliedSignal Inc., to provide samples for testing at various DOE sites. While much of the focus is on exchangers for removal of Cs{sup +} and Sr{sup 2+} from highly alkaline tank wastes, especially at Hanford, the authors have also synthesized exchangers for acid wastes, alkaline wastes, groundwater, and mercury, cobalt, and chromium removal. These exchangers are now available for use at DOE sites. Many of the ion exchangers described here are new, and others are improved versions of previously known exchangers. They are generally one of three types: (1) layered compounds, (2) framework or tunnel compounds, and (3) amorphous exchangers in which a gel exchanger is used to bind a fine powder into a bead for column use. Most of these exchangers can be regenerated and used again.

  14. Nitrate and Perchlorate removal from groundwater by ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Burge, S; Halden, R

    1999-09-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of a small scale ion exchange unit (Krudico, Inc of Auborn, IA) for removal of nitrate and perchlorate from groundwater at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300. The unit was able to treat 3,600 gallons of Site 300 groundwater, at an average influent concentration of 100 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -} before breakthrough occurred. The unit contained 2.5 ft{sup 3} of Sybron SR-7 resin. Seventy gallons of regeneration waste were generated (water treated to waste ratio of 51:1). The effluent concentration was about 20 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -}, which is equivalent to a treatment efficiency of at least 80%. There are several options for implementing this technology at Site 300. A target well, in the 817 area, has been selected. It has a 3 to 4 gpm flow rate, and concentrations of 90 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -} and 40 {micro}g/L perchlorate. The different treatment options include ion exchange treatment of nitrate only, nitrate and perchlorate, or perchlorate only. Option 1: For the treatment of nitrate only, this unit will be able to treat 3,700 gallons of water before regeneration is required. If both columns of the ion exchange unit are used, 7,400 gallons could be treated before the columns will need to be regenerated (producing 140 gallons of waste, per cycle or every 1.5 days). The effluent nitrate concentration is expected to be about 17 mg/L. Annual operation and maintenance costs are estimated to be $0.14 per gallon of water treated. Option 2: If only perchlorate is to be removed with ion exchange at the 817 area, a smaller unit should be considered. A 55 gallon canister filled with ion exchange resin should be able to reduce perchlorate concentrations in the groundwater from 40 {micro}g/L to non-detect levels for three years before the resin would need to be replaced. The contaminant-laden resin would be disposed of as hazardous waste. It is not practical to regenerate the resin because of the extreme difficulty of

  15. Development and evaluation of ion exchange hollow fibers. [vinyl copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    An ion exchange hollow fiber impregnated with a vinylpyridine base was developed. The basic exchange resin used to impart the necessary permselectivity to the hollow fiber is a copolymer of vinylpyridine and dibromoethane prepared according to Rembaum. A slight pressure was used to impregnate the exchange monomer mixture into the void structure of the fiber wall, and with maintenance of subambient temperatures, the rate of cross-linking is slow enough to allow the growing polymer to permeate the wall structure before significant increase in polymer molecular weight. These ion exchange fibers are produced from polyacrylonitrile hollow fibers with an appropriate wall structure that enables the impregnating vinylpyridine monomer mixture to form a truly semipermeable anion barrier after curing.

  16. EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K.; Nash, C.; Pennebaker, F.

    2011-10-23

    Ion Exchange column loading and elution of cesium from spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde resin have been conducted for two potential non-acid eluants -(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}COONH{sub 4}. The results revealed encouraging cesium elution performance. 100% elution was achieved in at most 22 hours ({approx}28 bed volumes) of elution. Elution performance was fairly high at 6 hours ({approx}8 bed volumes) of elution for some of the eluants and also practically comparable to the benchmark acid eluant (HNO{sub 3}). Hence, it is quite possible 100% percent elution will be closer to the 6th hour than the 22nd hour. Elution is generally enhanced by increasing the concentration and pH of the eluants, and combining the eluants.

  17. Reduction of polyester resin shrinkage by means of epoxy resin—I. Epoxy resin modified with acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzak, M.; Brzostowski, A.

    An attempt was made to decrease the shrinkage of unsaturated polyester resin, taking place during radiation-induced curing, by the addition of epoxy resin. In order to combine chemically both resins, the epoxy component was modified with cinnamic and acrylic acids. A composition of 90 parts of polyesster resin, 10 parts of epoxy resin modified with cinnamic acid, and 150 parts of a silica filler showed a volume shrinkage of 1.2%.

  18. Ion Exchange and Liquid Column Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Harold F.

    1980-01-01

    Emphasizes recent advances in principles and methodology in ion exchange and chromatography. Two tables list representative examples for inorganic ions and organic compounds. Cites 544 references. (CS)

  19. Determination of aminopolycarboxylic acids at ultra-trace levels by means of online coupling ion exchange chromatography and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry with indirect detection via their Pd²⁺-complexes.

    PubMed

    Nette, David; Seubert, Andreas

    2015-07-16

    A new indirect IC-ICP-MS method for the determination of aminopolycarboxylic acids in water samples is described. It is based on the addition of an excess of Pd(II) to water samples. The analytes are forced into very strong and negatively charged palladium complexes, separated by ion exchange chromatography and detected by their palladium content, utilizing an on-line coupled ICP-MS. This method is suitable to determine the concentration of 8 aminopolycarboxylic acids (nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), (2-carboxyethyl) iminodiacetic acid (β-ADA), methylglycinediacetic acid (MGDA), 2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediamine triacetic acid (HEDTA), diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), ethylendiamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), 1,3-diaminopropane tetraacetic acid (1,3-PDTA) and 1,2-diaminopropane tetraacetic acid (1,2-PDTA) at the ng kg(-1) level. The method is faster and easier than the established gas chromatography (GC)-method ISO 16588:2002 and up to two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the ion pair chromatography based method of DIN 38413-8. Analytic performance is superior to ISO 16588:2002 and the comparability is good. PMID:26073818

  20. Influence of hydrophobicity on the ion exchange selectivity coefficients for aromatic amines.

    PubMed

    Kril, M B; Fung, H L

    1990-05-01

    Hydrophobic effects could play an important role in determining the selectivity of organic ions for ion-exchange resins in aqueous solutions. We used the octanol-water partition coefficient (P) and the chromatographic capacity factor (K') as indices of hydrophobicity of a series of primary and secondary amines, and examined their relationships with the amine selectivity coefficient (K) in binding to the Amberlite IRP-69 ion-exchange resin. Good correlations were found between log K versus log P and log K versus log K', but the relationship appears to be dependent on the degree of substitution at the amino nitrogen. These relationships may be useful for the estimation of selectivity coefficients of various amine drug candidates when they are considered for incorporation with ion-exchange resins in potential controlled-release systems.

  1. Implications of weak Donnan potential in ion-exchange reactions. An alternate strategy for modeling sorption processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, V.M.

    1998-09-01

    Donnan potential generated during an ion-exchange process is conventionally believed to play an important role in partitioning co-ions in the resin and solution phases; most earlier studies implied near total exclusion of co-ions from the resin pores. The present work attempts to investigate implications of weak Donnan potential with specific reference to the sorption of acids on weak base resins. An alternate mathematical treatment has been proposed to describe the sorption behavior of any type of acid by assuming diffusion and sorption of single species, the composite acid molecule, in the resin pores. Fick`s law is then used to characterize the diffusion process. The proposed model is validated using data reported in the literature for the sorption of a strong monobasic acid (HCl) and also for a weak monobasic acid (HCOOH). The fit of the model is excellent, and the regressed values of the effective diffusion coefficient are shown to be reasonable and correct to the order of magnitude. The model is expected to offer a simpler and unified approach for modeling sorption behavior of different types of acids and will be more useful in problems of acid separation from mixtures.

  2. Selectivity of ion exchangers in extracting cesium and rubidium from alkaline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelkovnikova, L. A.; Kargov, S. I.; Gavlina, O. T.; Ivanov, V. A.; Al'tshuler, G. N.

    2013-01-01

    We compare the ion exchange selectivity of phenol-type sorbents based on phenol formaldehyde resins, products of condensation of diatomic phenols with formaldehyde, and crosslinked polymer based on C-phenyl[4]resorcinarene resin, for cesium and rubidium ions. It is shown that phenol formaldehyde sorbents are the ones most selective. The interaction of alkali metal cations with the anion of calix[4]arene is investigated via quantum-chemical modeling. It is shown that the selectivity toward cesium and rubidium ions in ion exchangers of the phenolic type is not due to specific interactions of ions with phenolic groups.

  3. Summary of Testing of SuperLig 639 at the TFL Ion Exchange Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J.L.

    2000-12-19

    A pilot scale facility was designed and built in the Thermal Fluids Laboratory at the Savannah River Technology Center to test ion exchange resins for removing technetium and cesium from simulated Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW). The facility supports the design of the Hanford River Protection Project for BNFL, Inc. The pilot scale system mimics the full-length of the columns and the operational scenario of the planned ion exchange system. Purposes of the testing include confirmation of the design, evaluation of methods for process optimization and developing methods for waste volume minimization. This report documents the performance of the technetium removal resin.

  4. Removal of charged micropollutants from water by ion-exchange polymers -- effects of competing electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Bäuerlein, Patrick S; Ter Laak, Thomas L; Hofman-Caris, Roberta C H M; de Voogt, Pim; Droge, Steven T J

    2012-10-15

    A wide variety of environmental compounds of concern, e.g. pharmaceuticals or illicit drugs, are acids or bases that may predominantly be present as charged species in drinking water sources. These charged micropollutants may prove difficult to remove by currently used water treatment steps (e.g. UV/H(2)O(2), activated carbon (AC) or membranes). We studied the sorption affinity of some ionic organic compounds to both AC and different charged polymeric materials. Ion-exchange polymers may be effective as additional extraction phases in water treatment, because sorption of all charged compounds to oppositely charged polymers was stronger than to AC, especially for the double-charged cation metformin. Tested below 1% of the polymer ion-exchange capacity, the sorption affinity of charged micropollutants is nonlinear and depends on the composition of the aqueous medium. Whereas oppositely charged electrolytes do not impact sorption of organic ions, equally charged electrolytes do influence sorption indicating ion-exchange (IE) to be the main sorption mechanism. For the tested polymers, a tenfold increased salt concentration lowered the IE-sorption affinity by a factor two. Different electrolytes affect IE with organic ions in a similar way as inorganic ions on IE-resins, and no clear differences in this trend were observed between the sulphonated and the carboxylated cation-exchanger. Sorption of organic cations is five fold less in Ca(2+) solutions compared to similar concentrations of Na(+), while that of anionic compounds is three fold weaker in SO(4)(2-) solutions compared to equal concentrations of Cl(-). PMID:22818952

  5. ION EXCHANGE SUBSTANCES BY SAPONIFICATION OF ALLYL PHOSPHATE POLYMERS

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, J.

    1959-04-14

    An ion exchange resin having a relatively high adsorption capacity tor uranyl ion as compared with many common cations is reported. The resin comprises an alphyl-allyl hydrogen phosphate polymer, the alphyl group being either allyl or a lower alkyl group having up to 5 carbon atoins. The resin is prepared by polymerizing compounds such as alkyl-diallyl phosphate and triallyl phosphate in the presence of a free radical generating substance and then partially hydrolyzing the resulting polymer to cause partial replacement of organic radicals by cations. A preferred free radical gencrating agent is dibenzoyl peroxide. The partial hydrolysis is brought about by refluxing the polymer with concentrated aqueous NaOH for three or four hours.

  6. Test and evaluation of a pilot system for ion exchange treatment of cadmium cyanide wastes. Final report, September 1991 - October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, R.; O'Donnell, J.; Balasco, A.

    1993-09-01

    Developmental tests were conducted for an ion exchange process developed to treat rinsewaters generated from cadmium cyanide electroplating operations. Results of previous laboratory studies were used as the basis of design for the construction of a pilot-scale system that was installed at the North Island Naval Aviation Depot, San Diego, CA. In this process, a chelating cationic resin in the sodium form is used to remove Cd(+2) followed by a strong base anionic resin for removal of free cyanide. Tests were conducted using both simulated rinsewaters and actual wastewaters. The results showed that the removal of Cd(+2) was successful in all cases and the effluent concentration was below the Federal Pretreatment Standards in most cases. The success of the cation resin is due to its ability to break the metal cyanide complex and selectively remove Cd(+2) even in the presence of high concentrations of other cations. The removal of CN(-) was not as successful. Effluent concentrations were above Federal discharge standards. The cationic resin was regenerated with sulfuric acid, producing a concentrated solution of cadmium sulfate. Cadmium was recovered from the regenerant solution by electrowinning. The anionic resin was regenerated with sodium hydroxide, producing a concentrated sodium cyanide solution. Ion exchange, cadmium, cyanide, wastewater treatment, metal recovery.

  7. Titania bound sodium titanate ion exchanger

    DOEpatents

    DeFilippi, Irene C. G.; Yates, Stephen Frederic; Shen, Jian-Kun; Gaita, Romulus; Sedath, Robert Henry; Seminara, Gary Joseph; Straszewski, Michael Peter; Anderson, David Joseph

    1999-03-23

    This invention is method for preparing a titania bound ion exchange composition comprising admixing crystalline sodium titanate and a hydrolyzable titanium compound and, thereafter drying the titania bound crystalline sodium titanate and subjecting the dried titania bound ion exchange composition to optional compaction and calcination steps to improve the physical strength of the titania bound composition.

  8. Ion Exchange and Adsorption of Inorganic Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the first part of the chapter, the fundamentals of ion exchange and adsorption processes are explained, with the goal of demonstrating how these principles influence process design for inorganic contaminant removal. In the second part, ion exchange and adsorption processes th...

  9. Ion exchange in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, J.P.

    1990-12-31

    Ion exchange is used in nearly every part of the nuclear fuel cycle -- from the purification of uranium from its ore to the final recovery of uranium and transmutation products. Ion exchange also plays a valuable role in the management of nuclear wastes generated in the fuel cycle.

  10. Ion exchange in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Ion exchange is used in nearly every part of the nuclear fuel cycle -- from the purification of uranium from its ore to the final recovery of uranium and transmutation products. Ion exchange also plays a valuable role in the management of nuclear wastes generated in the fuel cycle.

  11. Ion exchange recovery of Ni(II) from simulated electroplating waste solutions containing anionic ligands.

    PubMed

    Juang, Ruey-Shin; Kao, Hsiang-Chien; Liu, Fong-Yi

    2006-01-16

    Ion exchange is widely used for the recovery and removal of metals from process and waste streams in chemical process industries. The Na-form of strong-acid Purolite NRW-100 resin was used to recover Ni(II) from a simulated electroplating waste solution containing NiSO4, NH4Cl, NaH2PO4, and citrate. A set of mass balance equations that take into account possible aqueous complexation reactions was used to establish the pH diagram of Ni(II) species in the presence of anionic ligand citrate or phosphate. Experiments were performed as a function of initial solution pH (0.5-6.0), initial concentration of Ni(II) (0.85-11.9 mol/m3), and temperature (15-45 degrees C). It was shown that the amount of Ni(II) exchanged leveled off when the equilibrium pH was higher than around 2.5. The exchange isotherms obtained at various equilibrium pH values were well fitted by the Langmuir equation. The enthalpy of Ni(II) exchange was also evaluated based on the Langmuir constant. Finally, the kinetics of the present ion exchange process was analyzed.

  12. MODELING AN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR CESIUM REMOVAL FROM ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F; Luther Hamm, L; Sebastian Aleman, S; Johnston Michael, J

    2008-08-26

    The performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde ion-exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline radioactive waste solutions has been investigated through computer modeling. Cesium adsorption isotherms were obtained by fitting experimental data using a thermodynamic framework. Results show that ion-exchange is an efficient method for cesium removal from highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions. On average, two 1300 liter columns operating in series are able to treat 690,000 liters of waste with an initial cesium concentration of 0.09 mM in 11 days achieving a decontamination factor of over 50,000. The study also tested the sensitivity of ion-exchange column performance to variations in flow rate, temperature and column dimensions. Modeling results can be used to optimize design of the ion exchange system.

  13. A novel electrochemical ion exchange system and its application in water treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Yansheng; Li, Yongbin; Liu, Zhigang; Wu, Tao; Tian, Ying

    2011-06-01

    A novel electrochemical ion exchange system with porous cylinder electrodes is proposed for treatment of wastewater. This system can be used for desalination without the costly ion-exchange membrane and extra chemical reagents. Since the electrodes are completely uniform and no ion-exchange membrane was used in this system, it can be operated by switching anodes and cathodes flexibly for eliminating the scaling on the surface of electrodes. The strong base ion-exchange resin grains placed among the anode and cathode have played as supporting electrolyte, which is capable for the treatment of wastewater with low conductivity. The concentrated and neutralized anolyte containing chlorine is effective for disinfection and contaminants removal. Under the experimental conditions, the removal percentage of total dissolved salts was 83% and the removal percentage of chemical oxygen demand was 92% without consumption of extra chemical reagents.

  14. Improved brine recycling during nitrate removal using ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Bae, Byung-Uk; Jung, Yoo-Hoon; Han, Woon-Woo; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2002-07-01

    Ion exchange technology is currently the best for removing nitrate from drinking water. However, problems related to the disposal of spent brine from regeneration of exhausted resins must be overcome so that ion exchange can be applied more widely and economically, especially in small communities. For this purpose, a novel spent brine recycling system using combined biological denitrification and sulfate reduction processes was developed for more efficient reuse of brine. A granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption column was introduced as an additional step to prevent contamination of resins by bio-polymers and dissolved organics present in the bio-reactor effluent. Two upflow sludge blanket reactors (USBRs) were operated in series for 166 days to provide denitrification and sulfate reduction. The denitrification reactor provided a nitrate removal efficiency of 96% at a nitrate-N loading rate of 5.4 g NO3(-)-N/l d. The sulfate reduction efficiency of the sulfate reduction reactor remained approximately 62% at a sulfate loading rate of 1.8 g SO4(2-)/l d. Five ion exchange columns containing A520E resins were repeatedly operated in up to 25 cycles of service and regeneration using five kinds of brine: one virgin 3% NaCl and four differently recycled spent brines. Throughput decreased remarkably when the biologically recycled brine was not treated with the GAC column, probably due to the presence of bio-polymers and dissolved organic compounds. The sulfate reduction reactor placed after the denitrification step increased the bicarbonate concentration, which could be used as a co-regenerant with chloride. The inclusion of the sulfate reduction reactor into the conventional brine recycling system allowed more efficient reuse of brine, resulting in both reduced salt consumption and brine discharge.

  15. Assessment of commercially available ion exchange materials for cesium removal from highly alkaline wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, K.P.; Kim, A.Y.; Kurath, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    Approximately 61 million gallons of nuclear waste generated in plutonium production, radionuclide removal campaigns, and research and development activities is stored on the Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. Although the pretreatment process and disposal requirements are still being defined, most pretreatment scenarios include removal of cesium from the aqueous streams. In many cases, after cesium is removed, the dissolved salt cakes and supernates can be disposed of as LLW. Ion exchange has been a leading candidate for this separation. Ion exchange systems have the advantage of simplicity of equipment and operation and provide many theoretical stages in a small space. The organic ion exchange material Duolite{trademark} CS-100 has been selected as the baseline exchanger for conceptual design of the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM). Use of CS-100 was chosen because it is considered a conservative, technologically feasible approach. During FY 96, final resin down-selection will occur for IPM Title 1 design. Alternate ion exchange materials for cesium exchange will be considered at that time. The purpose of this report is to conduct a search for commercially available ion exchange materials which could potentially replace CS-100. This report will provide where possible a comparison of these resin in their ability to remove low concentrations of cesium from highly alkaline solutions. Materials which show promise can be studied further, while less encouraging resins can be eliminated from consideration.

  16. Ion exchange extraction of heavy metals from wastewater sludges.

    PubMed

    Al-Enezi, G; Hamoda, M F; Fawzi, N

    2004-01-01

    Heavy metals are common contaminants of some industrial wastewater. They find their way to municipal wastewaters due to industrial discharges into the sewerage system or through household chemicals. The most common heavy metals found in wastewaters are lead, copper, nickel, cadmium, zinc, mercury, arsenic, and chromium. Such metals are toxic and pose serious threats to the environment and public health. In recent years, the ion exchange process has been increasingly used for the removal of heavy metals or the recovery of precious metals. It is a versatile separation process with the potential for broad applications in the water and wastewater treatment field. This article summarizes the results obtained from a laboratory study on the removal of heavy metals from municipal wastewater sludges obtained from Ardhiya plant in Kuwait. Data on heavy metal content of the wastewater and sludge samples collected from the plant are presented. The results obtained from laboratory experiments using a commercially available ion exchange resin to remove heavy metals from sludge were discussed. A technique was developed to solubilize such heavy metals from the sludge for subsequent treatment by the ion exchange process. The results showed high efficiency of extraction, almost 99.9%, of heavy metals in the concentration range bound in wastewater effluents and sludges. Selective removal of heavy metals from a contaminated wastewater/sludge combines the benefits of being economically prudent and providing the possibility of reuse/recycle of the treated wastewater effluents and sludges.

  17. Comparison or organic and inorganic ion exchange materials for removal of cesium and strontium from Hanford waste

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.N.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J.

    1997-10-01

    This work is part of an ESP-CP task to develop and evaluate high-capacity, selective, solid extractants for the uptake of cesium, strontium, and technetium (Cs, Sr, and Tc) from nuclear wastes. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff, in collaboration with researchers from industry, academia, and national laboratories are investigating these and other novel and commercial ion exchangers for use in nuclear waste remediation of groundwater, HLW, and LLW. Since FY 1995, experimental work at PNNL has focused on small-scale batch distribution (K{sub d}) testing of numerous solid sorbents with actual and simulated Hanford wastes, chemical and radiolytic stability of various organic ion exchanger resins, bench-scale column ion exchange testing in actual and simulated Complexant Concentrate (CC) and Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW), and Tc and Sr removal from groundwater and LLW. In addition, PNNL has continued to support various site demonstrations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, West Valley Nuclear Services, Hanford N-Springs, and Hanford N-Basin using technologies developed by their industrial partners. This summary will focus on batch distribution results from the actual waste tests. The data collected in these development and testing tasks provide a rational basis for the selection and direct comparison of various ion exchange materials in simulated and actual HLW, LLW, and groundwater. In addition, prediction of large-scale column loading performance for the materials tested is possible using smaller volumes of actual waste solution. The method maximizes information while minimizing experimental expense, time, and laboratory and process wastes.

  18. Separation of americium from curium by oxidation and ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Burns, Jonathan D; Shehee, Thomas C; Clearfield, Abraham; Hobbs, David T

    2012-08-21

    Nuclear energy has the potential to be a clean alternative to fossil fuels, but in order for it to play a major role in the US, many questions about the back end of the fuel cycle must be addressed. One of these questions is the difficult separation of americium from curium. Here, we report the oxidation of Am in two systems, perchloric acid and nitric acid and the affect of changing the acid has on the oxidation. K(d) values were observed and a direct separation factor was calculated and was seen to be as high as 20 for four metal(IV) pillared phosphate phosphonate inorganic organic hybrid ion exchange materials. These ion exchangers are characterized by very low selectivity for cations with low charge but extremely high uptake of ions of high charge.

  19. The electrochemical investigation of salts partition with ion exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Ata, Nejla; Yazicigil, Zafer; Oztekin, Yasemin

    2008-12-15

    The regenaration of acid and base from the solutions containing metallic salts was achieved by salt splitting method (SSM) using not only anion-exchange membranes (AEM) but also cation-exchange membrane (CEM). In these experiments, while the ion exchange membrane was anion-exchange membrane, acid solutions were used as an anolyte and different salts of potassium were used as a catholyte. In addition to these experiments, while the ion exchange membrane was cation-exchange membrane, base solutions were used as a catholyte and different salts of potassium were used as an anolyte. The effects of current density, initial concentrations of anolyte and catholyte solutions, the type of salt solution and the type of the ion-exchange membranes on the recovery ratio of bases and acids were investigated. The results of the experiments were investigated with the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) program. The obtained results show that this technique can be used not only for recovering the acid and base wastes of industry but also for removing the impurities in order to obtain pure acids and bases in laboratory conditions. PMID:18417288

  20. Small-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-103

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, N.M.

    2000-07-27

    The pretreatment process for BNFL, Inc.'s Hanford River Protection Project is to provide decontaminated low activity waste and concentrated eluate streams for vitrification into low activity and high level waste glass, respectively. The pretreatment includes sludge washing, filtration, precipitation, and ion exchange processes to remove entrained solids, cesium, transuranics, technetium, and strontium. The ion exchange removal of cesium (Cs) and technetium (Tc) ions is accomplished by using SuperLig 644, and 639 resins from IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork, Utah. The resins were shown to selectively remove cesium and technetium (as pertechnetate), from alkaline salt solutions. The efficiency of ion exchange column loading and elution is a complex function involving feed compositions, equilibrium and kinetic behavior of ion exchange resins, diffusion, and the ionic strength and pH of the aqueous solution. A previous experimental program completed at the Savannah River Technology Center demonstrated the conceptualized flow sheet parameters with a similar Hanford tank sample (241-AW-101). Those experiments included determination of Cs and Tc batch distribution coefficients by SuperLig 644 and 639 resins and demonstration of small-scale column breakthrough and elution. The experimental findings were used in support of preliminary design bases and pretreatment flow sheet development by BNFL, Inc.

  1. Small-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-102

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, N.M.

    2000-07-27

    The pretreatment process for BNFL, Inc.'s Hanford River Protection Project is to provide decontaminated low activity waste and concentrated eluate streams for vitrification into low and high activity waste glass, respectively. The pretreatment includes sludge washing, filtration, precipitation, and ion exchange processes to remove entrained solids, cesium, transuranics, technetium, and strontium. The cesium (Cs-137) and technetium (Tc-99) ion exchange removal is accomplished by using SuperLig 644, and 639 resins from IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork, Utah. The resins were shown to selectively remove cesium and technetium (as anionic pertechnetate ) from alkaline salt solutions. The efficiency of ion exchange column loading and elution is a complex function involving feed compositions, equilibrium and kinetic behavior of ion exchange resins, diffusion, and the ionic strength and pH of the aqueous solution. A previous experimental program completed at the Savannah River Tech nology Center2 demonstrated the conceptualized flow sheet parameters with an Envelope C sample from Hanford Tank 241-AN-107. Those experiments also included determination of Cs and Tc batch distribution coefficients by SuperLig 644 and 639 resins and demonstration of small-scale column breakthrough and elution. The experimental findings were used in support of preliminary design bases and pretreatment flow sheet development by BNFL, Inc.

  2. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... resins are prepared by the reaction of trimellitic anhydride with 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediol followed by reaction of the resin thus produced with phosphoric acid anhydride to produce a resin having...

  3. Diffusion kinetics of the ion exchange of benzocaine on sulfocationites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al'tshuler, O. G.; Shkurenko, G. Yu.; Gorlov, A. A.; Al'tshuler, G. N.

    2016-06-01

    The theory of the ion exchange kinetics on strong acid cationites with the participation of weak electrolytes is discussed. The kinetics of desorption of benzocaine in the protonated and molecular forms from strong acid cationites, sulfonated polycalixarene, and KU-23 30/100 sulfocationite, is studied experimentally. It is shown that the flow of protonated benzocaine from cationite upon desorption proceeding by the ion-exchange mechanism is more intense than upon desorption of nonionized benzocaine molecules. It is established that the diffusion coefficient of benzocaine cations is (1.21 ± 0.23) × 10-12 m2/s in KU-23 30/100 sulfocation and (0.65 ± 0.06) × 10-13 m2/s in sulfonated polycalixarene, while the diffusion coefficient of benzocaine molecules is (0.65 ± 0.15) × 10-14 m2/s in sulfonated polycalixarene.

  4. Immobilization of Acetobacter aceti on cellulose ion exchangers: adsorption isotherms

    SciTech Connect

    Bar, R.; Gainer, J.L.; Kirwan, D.J.

    1986-08-01

    The adsorptive behavior of cells of Acetobacter aceti, ATCC 23746, on DEAE-, TEAE-, and DEHPAE-cellulose ion exchangers in a modified Hoyer's medium at 30 degrees Centigrade was investigated. The maximum observed adsorption capacities varied from 46 to 64 mg dry wt/g resin. The Langmuir isotherm form was used to fit the data, since the cells formed a monolayer on the resin and exhibited saturation. The equilibrium constant in the Langmuir expression was qualitatively correlated with the surface charge density of the resin. The adsorption was also ''normalized'' by considering the ionic capacities of the resins. The exceptionally high normalized adsorption capacity of ECTEOLA-cellulose, 261 mg dry/meq, may be explained by an interaction between the cell wall and the polyglyceryl chains of the exchanging groups in addition to the electrostatic effects. The effect of pH on the bacterial adsorption capacity of ECTEOLA-, TEAE-, and phosphate-cellulose resins was studied and the pH of the bacteria was estimated to be 3.0. 17 references.

  5. Ion-exchange selectivity of diclofenac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and naproxen in ureolyzed human urine.

    PubMed

    Landry, Kelly A; Sun, Peizhe; Huang, Ching-Hua; Boyer, Treavor H

    2015-01-01

    This research advances the knowledge of ion-exchange of four non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) - diclofenac (DCF), ibuprofen (IBP), ketoprofen (KTP), and naproxen (NPX) - and one analgesic drug-paracetamol (PCM) - by strong-base anion exchange resin (AER) in synthetic ureolyzed urine. Freundlich, Langmuir, Dubinin-Astakhov, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models were fit to experimental equilibrium data using nonlinear least squares method. Favorable ion-exchange was observed for DCF, KTP, and NPX, whereas unfavorable ion-exchange was observed for IBP and PCM. The ion-exchange selectivity of the AER was enhanced by van der Waals interactions between the pharmaceutical and AER as well as the hydrophobicity of the pharmaceutical. For instance, the high selectivity of the AER for DCF was due to the combination of Coulombic interactions between quaternary ammonium functional group of resin and carboxylate functional group of DCF, van der Waals interactions between polystyrene resin matrix and benzene rings of DCF, and possibly hydrogen bonding between dimethylethanol amine functional group side chain and carboxylate and amine functional groups of DCF. Based on analysis of covariance, the presence of multiple pharmaceuticals did not have a significant effect on ion-exchange removal when the NSAIDs were combined in solution. The AER reached saturation of the pharmaceuticals in a continuous-flow column at varying bed volumes following a decreasing order of DCF > NPX ≈ KTP > IBP. Complete regeneration of the column was achieved using a 5% (m/m) NaCl, equal-volume water-methanol solution. Results from multiple treatment and regeneration cycles provide insight into the practical application of pharmaceutical ion-exchange in ureolyzed urine using AER. PMID:25462757

  6. Ion-exchange selectivity of diclofenac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and naproxen in ureolyzed human urine.

    PubMed

    Landry, Kelly A; Sun, Peizhe; Huang, Ching-Hua; Boyer, Treavor H

    2015-01-01

    This research advances the knowledge of ion-exchange of four non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) - diclofenac (DCF), ibuprofen (IBP), ketoprofen (KTP), and naproxen (NPX) - and one analgesic drug-paracetamol (PCM) - by strong-base anion exchange resin (AER) in synthetic ureolyzed urine. Freundlich, Langmuir, Dubinin-Astakhov, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models were fit to experimental equilibrium data using nonlinear least squares method. Favorable ion-exchange was observed for DCF, KTP, and NPX, whereas unfavorable ion-exchange was observed for IBP and PCM. The ion-exchange selectivity of the AER was enhanced by van der Waals interactions between the pharmaceutical and AER as well as the hydrophobicity of the pharmaceutical. For instance, the high selectivity of the AER for DCF was due to the combination of Coulombic interactions between quaternary ammonium functional group of resin and carboxylate functional group of DCF, van der Waals interactions between polystyrene resin matrix and benzene rings of DCF, and possibly hydrogen bonding between dimethylethanol amine functional group side chain and carboxylate and amine functional groups of DCF. Based on analysis of covariance, the presence of multiple pharmaceuticals did not have a significant effect on ion-exchange removal when the NSAIDs were combined in solution. The AER reached saturation of the pharmaceuticals in a continuous-flow column at varying bed volumes following a decreasing order of DCF > NPX ≈ KTP > IBP. Complete regeneration of the column was achieved using a 5% (m/m) NaCl, equal-volume water-methanol solution. Results from multiple treatment and regeneration cycles provide insight into the practical application of pharmaceutical ion-exchange in ureolyzed urine using AER.

  7. 21 CFR 173.20 - Ion-exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ion-exchange membranes. 173.20 Section 173.20 Food... for Food Treatment § 173.20 Ion-exchange membranes. Ion-exchange membranes may be safely used in the processing of food under the following prescribed conditions: (a) The ion-exchange membrane is prepared...

  8. 21 CFR 173.20 - Ion-exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ion-exchange membranes. 173.20 Section 173.20 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.20 Ion-exchange membranes. Ion-exchange... ion-exchange membrane is prepared by subjecting a polyethylene base conforming to § 177.1520 of...

  9. 21 CFR 173.20 - Ion-exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ion-exchange membranes. 173.20 Section 173.20 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.20 Ion-exchange membranes. Ion-exchange... ion-exchange membrane is prepared by subjecting a polyethylene base conforming to § 177.1520 of...

  10. 21 CFR 173.20 - Ion-exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ion-exchange membranes. 173.20 Section 173.20 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.20 Ion-exchange membranes. Ion-exchange... ion-exchange membrane is prepared by subjecting a polyethylene base conforming to § 177.1520 of...

  11. 21 CFR 173.20 - Ion-exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ion-exchange membranes. 173.20 Section 173.20 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.20 Ion-exchange membranes. Ion-exchange... ion-exchange membrane is prepared by subjecting a polyethylene base conforming to § 177.1520 of...

  12. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins... of polyester resins. Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins identified in this section... resins are prepared by the reaction of trimellitic anhydride with 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediol...

  13. Ion exchange and surface charge on montmorillonite clay

    SciTech Connect

    Sperry, J.M.; Peirce, J.J.

    1999-05-01

    An ion-exchange model originally developed for pure oxides prepared in the laboratory is extended to study of ion exchange and surface charge on a naturally occurring montmorillonite clay. The range of surface charges measured for montmorillonite with various electrolyte solutions and clay pretreatments is within the range of those measured for a wide variety of oxides prepared in the laboratory, including MnO{sub 2}-IC1, MnO{sub 2}-IC12, MnO{sub 2}-IC22, titanium dioxide, ferric oxide, and aluminum oxide. In addition, fitted parameter values for lateral interaction constants and equilibrium constants for the acid sites that characterize ion exchange on montmorillonite are on the same order of magnitude as those obtained for pure oxides. Surface charge of montmorillonite in sodium nitrate solution is measured to be approximately 15 to 25% greater than that measured between a pH of 4 and 9 in calcium chloride solution. This difference is attributed to the greater charge on the calcium (2{sup +}) ion; thus, its stronger electrostatic attraction to the acid hydroxyl site. An order of magnitude change in solids concentration (C{sub p}) can lead to a difference in measured net surface charge density of the same oxide sample of several orders of magnitude. This difference increases at higher pH, indicating the importance of reporting the corresponding C{sub p} at which experiments are conducted.

  14. Ion Exchange and Thin Layer Chromatographic Separation and Identification of Amino Acids in a Mixture: An Experiment for General Chemistry and Biotechnology Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunauer, Linda S.; Caslavka, Katelyn E.; Van Groningen, Karinne

    2014-01-01

    A multiday laboratory exercise is described that is suitable for first-year undergraduate chemistry, biochemistry, or biotechnology students. Students gain experience in performing chromatographic separations of biomolecules, in both a column and thin layer chromatography (TLC) format. Students chromatographically separate amino acids (AA) in an…

  15. In situ remediation of groundwater contaminated by heavy- and transition-metal ions by selective ion-exchange methods.

    PubMed

    Vilensky, Mark Y; Berkowitz, Brian; Warshawsky, Abraham

    2002-04-15

    Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate the feasibility of using ion-exchange resins in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for the remediation of groundwater contaminated by heavy and transition metals. Ion-exchange resins represent an essentially neglected class of materials which may, in addition to iron, activated carbon, and zeolites, prove effective for use in PRBs. Four resins were considered: two commercially available resins, Duolite GT-73 (Rohm and Haas) and Amberlite IRC-748 (Rohm and Haas), and two solvent-impregnated resins (SIRs). The SIRs were prepared from Amberlite IRA-96 (Rohm and Haas) and two different thiophosphoric extractants. All four resins are able to reduce cadmium, lead, and copper concentrations from 1000 microg/L (typical for contaminated groundwaters) to below 5 microg/L. Significantly, all of the resins are effective for the capture of cadmium, copper, and lead, even in the presence of CaCl2 and clay. Because of their high hydraulic conductivity, the use of these resins in clusters of wells, as an alternative to continuous walls, is considered in the design of effective PRBs. Numerical solution of the groundwater flow equations shows that, depending on the well configuration, most (or all) of the contaminated groundwater can pass through the resins. These results demonstrate the possibility of using selective ion-exchange resins as an effective, active material in PRBs for in situ groundwater remediation.

  16. Modeling of Crystalline Silicotitanate Ion Exchange Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1999-03-09

    Non-elutable ion exchange is being considered as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removing cesium from Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste. Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) particles are the reference ion exchange medium for the process. A major factor in the construction cost of this process is the size of the ion exchange column required to meet product specifications for decontaminated waste. To validate SRS column sizing calculations, SRS subcontracted two reknowned experts in this field to perform similar calculations: Professor R. G. Anthony, Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&038;M University, and Professor S. W. Wang, Department of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University. The appendices of this document contain reports from the two subcontractors. Definition of the design problem came through several meetings and conference calls between the participants and SRS personnel over the past few months. This document summarizes the problem definition and results from the two reports.

  17. Experimental Findings On Minor Actinide And Lanthanide Separations Using Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D. T.; Shehee, T. C.; Clearfield, A.

    2013-09-17

    This project seeks to determine if inorganic or hybrid inorganic ion-exchange materials can be exploited to provide effective americium and curium separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of the tested ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. During FY13, experimental work focused in the following areas: (1) investigating methods to oxidize americium in dilute nitric acid with subsequent ion-exchange performance measurements of ion exchangers with the oxidized americium and (2) synthesis, characterization and testing of ion-exchange materials. Ion-exchange materials tested included alkali titanates, alkali titanosilicates, carbon nanotubes and group(IV) metal phosphonates. Americium oxidation testing sought to determine the influence that other redox active components may have on the oxidation of Am(III). Experimental findings indicated that Pu(IV) is oxidized to Pu(VI) by peroxydisulfate, but there are no indications that the presence of plutonium affects the rate or extent of americium oxidation at the concentrations of peroxydisulfate being used. Tests also explored the influence of nitrite on the oxidation of Am(III). Given the formation of Am(V) and Am(VI) in the presence of nitrite, it appears that nitrite is not a strong deterrent to the oxidation of Am(III), but may be limiting Am(VI) by quickly reducing Am(VI) to Am(V). Interestingly, additional absorbance peaks were observed in the UV-Vis spectra at 524 and 544 nm in both nitric acid and perchloric acid solutions when the peroxydisulfate was added as a solution. These peaks have not been previously observed and do not correspond to the expected peak locations for oxidized americium in solution. Additional studies are in progress to identify these unknown peaks. Three titanosilicate ion exchangers were synthesized using a microwave-accelerated reaction system (MARS) and determined to have high affinities

  18. Gelation via ion exchange in discotic suspensions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ya-Wen; Mejia, Andres F; Cheng, Zhengdong; Di, Xiaojun; McKenna, Gregory B

    2012-06-15

    The phase behavior of charged disk suspensions displays a strong dependence on ionic strengths, as the interplay between excluded volume and electrostatic interactions determines the formation of glasses, gels, and liquid crystal states. The various ions in natural soil or brine, however, could present additional effects, especially considering that most platelet structures bear a momentous ion-exchange capacity. Here we observed how ion exchange modulates and controls the interaction between individual disks and leads to unconventional phase transitions from isotropic gel to nematic gel and finally to nematic liquid crystals.

  19. Reactivity of Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin with Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    King, William D.; Fondeur, Fernando F.; Wilmarth, William R.; Pettis, Myra E.

    2005-10-25

    Solid-state infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and elemental analysis have been used to evaluate the reactivity of resorcinol formaldehyde resin with nitric acid and characterize the solid product. Two distinct reactions were identified within the temperature range 25-55 C. The first reaction is primarily associated with resin nitration, while the second involves bulk oxidation and degradation of the polymer network leading to dissolution and off-gassing. The threshold conditions promoting reaction have been identified. Reaction was confirmed with nitric acid concentrations as low as 3 M at 25 C applied temperature and 0.625 M at 66 C. Although a nitrated resin product can be isolated under appropriate experimental conditions, calorimetry testing indicates no significant hazard associated with handling the dry material.

  20. REACTIVITY OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE RESIN WITH NITRIC ACID

    SciTech Connect

    King, W; Fernando Fondeur, F; Bill Wilmarth, B; Myra Pettis, M; Shirley Mccollum, S

    2006-06-14

    Solid-state infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and elemental analysis have been used to evaluate the reactivity of resorcinol formaldehyde resin with nitric acid and characterize the solid product. Two distinct reactions were identified within the temperature range 25-55 C. The first reaction is primarily associated with resin nitration, while the second involves bulk oxidation and degradation of the polymer network leading to dissolution and off-gassing. Reaction was confirmed with nitric acid concentrations as low as 3 M at 25 C applied temperature and 0.625 M at 66 C. Although a nitrated resin product can be isolated under appropriate experimental conditions, calorimetry testing indicates no significant hazard associated with handling the dry material.

  1. Stability of phenol-formaldehyde ion-exchange sorbents in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelkovnikova, L. A.; Gavlina, O. T.; Ivanov, V. A.

    2011-09-01

    It is shown that ion-exchange sorbents based on phenol-formaldehyde resins can be used for a long time for isolating and separating rare alkali metals without any significant changes in the ion-exchange selectivity and capacity. When the phenol sorbents were used in alkaline solutions at elevated temperatures, carboxyl groups gradually accumulated in them as a result of the oxidation of methylol groups with oxygen dissolved in the solution. This led to a considerable increase in the ion-exchange capacity of the sorbents and a simultaneous decrease in the selectivity with respect to Cs+-Rb+ and Rb+-K+ ions (it is desirable to avoid the drying of phenol ionites in air by storing them in a swelled state in closed vessels).

  2. Properties of a Novel Ion-Exchange Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol M.; Philipp, Warren H.; Tanner, Stephen P.; Gorse, Joseph; Lusk, Amy; Taylor, Jason; Dickens, Jason

    2004-01-01

    A new ion-exchange material (based on polyacrylic acid) and some of its analytical applications have been reported. This paper contains data on the ion-exchange properties of the film form of the material and its potential application to the decontamination of waste water and drinking water. The film has a high exchange capacity of 5 to 6 meq/g and a pK(sub a) of 5.7. The calcium form is the most effective for removing metal ions from solution, and the optimum pH range is between 5 and 7. The exchange rates are slower for the film than for bead and powder forms of the ion-exchange material; otherwise, the properties are similar. The film is effective when hard water solutions are employed and also when metal ions are in the complex matrix of waste water from electroplating. The film can be used in flow systems having a flow channel large enough to allow passage of turbid solutions.

  3. Properties of a Novel Ion-Exchange Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol M.; Philipp, Warren H.; Tanner, Stephen P.; Gorse, Joseph; Lusk, Amy; Taylor, Jason; Dickens, Jason

    2002-01-01

    A new ion-exchange material (based on polyacrylic acid) and some of its analytical applications have been reported. This paper contains data on the ion-exchange properties of the film form of the material and its potential application to the decontamination of waste water and drinking water. The film has a high exchange capacity of 5 to 6 meq/g and a pK(sub a) of 5.7. The calcium form is the most effective for removing metal ions from solution, and the optimum pH range is between 5 and 7. The exchange rates are slower for the film than for bead and powder forms of the ion-exchange material; otherwise, the properties are similar. The film is effective when hard water solutions are employed and also when metal ions are in the complex matrix of waste water from electroplating. The film can be used in flow systems having a flow channel large enough to allow passage of turbid solutions.

  4. Separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from trivalent transplutonium and rare-earth elements on ion exchangers in solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1988-05-01

    The behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Ce, Eu, and Pr on anion exchangers and cation exchangers mixed with PbO/sub 2/ in solutions of sulfuric acid has been investigated. A significant difference between the distribution coefficients of Bk and Ce, on the one hand, and the remaining transplutonium elements and rare-earth elements, on the other hand, which has been attributed to the oxidation of the first two elements to the tetravalent state, has been discovered. Methods for the preconcentration and separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from the other transplutonium and rare-earth element son anion exchangers in 0.01-0.25 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions and on cation exchangers in 0.75-1.0 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions have been proposed.

  5. Low-level liquid waste decontamination by ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D.O.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.

    1991-12-01

    Improved processes are being developed to treat contaminated liquid wastes that have been and continue to be generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Both inorganic and organic ion-exchange methods have given promising results. Nickel and cobalt hexacyanoferrate(2) compounds are extremely selective for cesium removal, with distribution coefficients in excess of 10{sup 6} and remarkable insensitivity to competition from sodium and potassium. They tend to lose effectiveness at pH > {approximately}11, but some formulations are useful for limited periods of time up to pH {approximately}13. Sodium titanate is selective for strontium removal at high pH. The separations are so efficient that simple batch processes can yield large decontamination factors while generating small volumes of solid waste. A resorcinol-based resin developed at the Savannah River Site gave superior cesium removal, compared with other organic ion exchangers; the distribution coefficient was limited primarily by competition from potassium and was nearly independent of sodium. The optimum pH was {approximately}12.5. It was much less effective for strontium removal, which was limited by competition from sodium. 8 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Small Column Ion Exchange Monitor System Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    CASELLA, VITO

    2004-09-30

    A Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) system has been designed by the Oak Ridge and Savannah River National Laboratories (ORNL and SRNL) as a potential way to reduce Cs-137 concentrations in high-level radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site. SRNL was asked to develop gamma-ray monitors at six locations within the SCIX system. Gamma-ray monitors are required to verify the proper operation of the ion exchange system, detect cesium breakthrough, and confirm presence of cesium before and after used resin is transferred to a grinder module. The only observable gamma ray in the decay of Cs-137 is from its short-lived Ba-137m daughter. Chemical processes, such as the SCIX, may disrupt the secular equilibrium between this parent-daughter pair; meaning that measurement of Ba-137m will not necessarily yield information about Cs-137 content. While this is a complicating factor that can not be ignored, it is controllable by either: allowing sufficient time for equilibrium to be reestablished (about 20 minutes), or by making multiple measurements with sufficient statistical precision to determine the extent of disequilibrium. The present work provides a means of measuring the Cs-137 and Ba-137m by taking multiple measurements in a process isolation loop that contains the process solution of interest.

  7. Inline Monitors for the SRS Small Column Ion Exchange Process

    SciTech Connect

    VITO, CASELLA

    2005-05-16

    A Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) system, designed by the Oak Ridge and Savannah River National Laboratories (ORNL and SRNL), is a potential way to reduce Cs-137 concentrations in high-level radioactive waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS). SRNL has developed gamma-ray monitors for six locations within the SCIX system to verify the proper operation of the ion exchange system, detect cesium breakthrough, and confirm the presence of cesium before and after used resin is transferred to a grinder module. Two sodium iodide breakthrough monitors, one Geiger-Mueller breakthrough monitor, and three Geiger-Mueller transfer monitors were used. The present work provides a means of measuring the Cs-137 and Ba-137m breakthrough by taking multiple measurements in a process flow diversion and isolation loop. A lead shield was used for the NaI detectors, and the aperture of the collimator tube in this shield was designed using Monte Carlo analyses to provide the desired count rate for the gamma rays of interest. A computer program was written to collect data from the process monitors, provide alarm notification, and plot the data for ease of operation.

  8. Continuous ion exchange separation of zirconium and hafnium

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Sisson, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    A pressurized continuous annular chromatograph (CAC) has been developed for truly continuous ion exchange preparative separations. This device utilizes a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material, fixed multiple feed points, and fixed withdrawal locations. Most of our investigations have been performed with a 28-cm-diam by 60-cm-long CAC, but a larger model has recently been designed and constructed. A detailed study has been made of the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a simulated carbonate leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Recent studies have investigated the ion exchange separation of zirconium and hafnium from a sulfate feed solution. Nuclear reactor-grade zirconium, containing < 0.01 wt % hafnium, and hafnium, containing < 1% zirconium, have been continuously prepared using cation exchange resin in the pressurized CAC. This device, because of its continuous feed and product withdrawal, its adaptability to largescale operations, and its ability to separate many components, is expected to make chromatography a more competitive process in the industrial sector.

  9. Central metal ion exchange in a coordination polymer based on lanthanide ions and di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid: exchange rate and tunable affinity.

    PubMed

    Tasaki-Handa, Yuiko; Abe, Yukie; Ooi, Kenta; Tanaka, Mikiya; Wakisaka, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the exchange of lanthanide(III) ions (Ln(3+)) between a solution and a coordination polymer (CP) of di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (Hdehp), [Ln(dehp)3], is studied. Kinetic and selectivity studies suggest that a polymeric network of [Ln(dehp)3] has different characteristics than the corresponding monomeric complex. The reaction rate is remarkably slow and requires over 600 h to reach in nearly equilibrium, and this can be explained by the polymeric crystalline structure and high valency of Ln(3+). The affinity of the exchange reaction reaches a maximum with the Ln(3+) possessing an ionic radius 7% smaller than that of the central Ln(3+), therefore, the affinity of the [Ln(dehp)3] is tunable based on the choice of the central metal ion. Such unique affinity, which differs from the monomeric complex, can be explained by two factors: the coordination preference and steric strain caused by the polymeric structure. The latter likely becomes predominant for Ln(3+) exchange when the ionic radius of the ion in solution is smaller than the original Ln(3+) by more than 7%. Structural studies suggest that the incoming Ln(3+) forms a new phase though an exchange reaction, and this could plausibly cause the structural strain.

  10. ION-EXCHANGE METHOD FOR SEPARATING RADIUM FROM RADIUM-BARIUM MIXTURES

    DOEpatents

    Fuentevilla, M.E.

    1959-06-30

    An improved process is presented for separating radium from an aqueous feed solution containing radium and barium values and a complexing agent for these metals. In this process a feed solutlon containing radium and barium ions and a complexing agent for said ions ls cycled through an exchange zone in resins. The radiumenriched resin is then stripped of radium values to form a regeneration liquid, a portion of which is collected as an enriched product, the remaining portion being recycled to the exchange zone to further enrich the ion exchange resin in radium.

  11. Lanthanide ion exchange properties of a coordination polymer consisting of di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid and trivalent metal ions (Ce3+, Fe3+, or Al3+).

    PubMed

    Ooi, Kenta; Tasaki-Handa, Yuiko; Abe, Yukie; Wakisaka, Akihiko

    2014-03-28

    Three kinds of coordination polymers ([M(dehp)3], M = Ce, Fe, or Al) were prepared by mixing the sodium form (Na(dehp)) of di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid and MCl3 in an ethanol-water binary mixture. They have monoclinic crystalline structure with similar lattice parameters. The lanthanide ion (Ln(3+) = La(3+), Sm(3+), Dy(3+), or Yb(3+)) exchange properties were studied in a 20 : 80 vol% ethanol-water binary mixture containing 2 mM Ln(NO3)3 at room temperature. The rate of Ln(3+) adsorption is relatively slow; it requires over 3 weeks to reach equilibrium. [M(dehp)3] has different Ln(3+) affinities depending on the kind of central metal ions: the affinity order at 3 week adsorption is Yb(3+) < La(3+) < Dy(3+) < Sm(3+) for [Ce(dehp)3], La(3+) < Sm(3+) < Dy(3+) < Yb(3+) for [Fe(dehp)3], and La(3+) < Sm(3+), Dy(3+), Yb(3+) for [Al(dehp)3]. The difference in affinity order can be explained by two factors: the coordination preference and steric strain caused by the polymeric structure. The chemical and structural analyses suggested that the Ln(3+) adsorption progresses first by the central M(3+)/Ln(3+) exchange, followed by a morphological change to a rod-like or fibrous form by a solid phase reaction. In the case of [Fe(dehp)3], the eluted Fe(3+) may be hydrolyzed and precipitated as amorphous iron hydroxide.

  12. Equilibrium data for cesium ion exchange of Hanford CC and NCAW tank waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, L.A.; Carson, K.J.; Elovich, R.J.; Kurath, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    Hanford alkaline waste storage-tank contents will be processed to remove the soluble salts. A major fraction of these solutions will require cesium recovery to produce a low-level waste (LLW). The technology for decontamination of high-level alkaline waste and sludge wash waters is being developed. At the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has studied several ion exchange materials for the recovery of cesium from Hanford waste tanks. The WHC program was divided into tow main tasks, (1) to obtain equilibrium data for cesium ion exchange, and (2) to evaluate ion exchange column performance. The subject of this letter report is the measurement of batch distribution coefficients for several ion exchange media for a range of operating conditions for two types of waste; complexant concentrate (CC) and neutralized current acid waste (NCAW).

  13. Model-based prediction of monoclonal antibody retention in ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guélat, Bertrand; Delegrange, Lydia; Valax, Pascal; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2013-07-12

    In order to support a model-based process design in ion-exchange chromatography, an adsorption equilibrium model was adapted to predict the protein retention behavior from the amino acid sequence and from structural information on the resin. It is based on the computation of protein-resin interactions with a colloidal model and accounts for the contribution of each ionizable amino acid to the protein charge. As a verification of the protein charge model, the experimental titration curve of a monoclonal antibody was compared to its predicted net charge. Using this protein charge model in the computation of the protein-resin interactions, it is possible to predict the adsorption equilibrium constant (i.e. retention factor or Henry constant) with an explicit pH and salt dependence. The application of the model-based predictions for an in silico screening of the protein retention on various stationary phases or, alternatively, for the comparison of various monoclonal antibodies on a given cation-exchanger was demonstrated. Furthermore, considering the structural differences between charge variants of a monoclonal antibody, it was possible to predict their individual retention times. The selectivity between the side variants and the main isoform of the monoclonal antibody were computed. The comparison with the experimental data showed that the model was reliable with respect to the identification of the operating conditions maximizing the selectivity, i.e. the most promising conditions for a monoclonal antibody variant separation. Such predictions can be useful in reducing the experimental effort to identify the parameter space. PMID:23759301

  14. Modeling of dual gradient elution in ion exchange and mixed-mode chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi Feng; Schmidt, Michael; Graalfs, Heiner; Hafner, Mathias; Frech, Christian

    2015-10-23

    Protein retention using dual gradient elution in ion exchange- and mixed-mode chromatography can be modeled using the combination of a modified Yamamoto's LGE model and a conversion term to correlate the elution salt concentration and pH at any given gradient slope. Incorporation of the pH dependence of the binding charges into the model also provides some insights on the dual effects of salt and pH in protein-ligand interaction. The fitted thermodynamic parameters (ΔGP(0)/RT, ΔGS(0)/RT, number of charged amino acids involved in binding) of the dual gradient elution data using lysozyme and mAbs on SP Sepharose(®) FF, Eshmuno(®) HCX, and Capto(®) MMC ImpRes were consistent to the results of mono gradient data. This gives rise to an approach to perform thermodynamic modeling of protein retention in ion exchange- and mixed-mode chromatography by combining both salt and pH gradient into a single run of dual gradient elution which will increase time and cost efficiency. The dual gradients used in this study encompassed a wide range of pH (4-8) and NaCl concentrations (0-1M). Curve fits showed that ΔGP(0)/RT is protein type and ligand dependent. ΔGS(0)/RT is strongly dependent on the stationary phase but not the protein. For mAb04 on mixed-mode resin Capto(®) MMC, ΔGS(0)/RT is 5-6 times higher than the result reported for the same protein on cation exchanger Fractogel(®) EMD SO3(-) (S).

  15. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY ION-EXCHANGE

    DOEpatents

    Schubert, J.

    1958-06-01

    A process is described for the separation of plutonium from an aqueous solution of a plutonium salt, which comprises adding to the solution an acid of the group consisting of sulfuric acid, phosphoric acid, and oxalic acid, and mixtures thereof to provide an acid concentration between 0.0001 and 1 M, contacting the resultant solution with a synthetic organic anion exchange resin, and separating the aqueous phase and the resin which contains the plutonium.

  16. An Engineering Evaluation of Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Birdwell Jr, Joseph F; Lee, Denise L; Taylor, Paul Allen; Collins, Robert T; Hunt, Rodney Dale

    2010-09-01

    A small column ion exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removal of cesium from caustic, supernatant, and dissolved salt solutions stored or generated from high-level tank wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site and Savannah River Sites. In both instances, deployment of SCIX systems, either in-tank or near-tank, is a means of expediting waste pretreatment and dispositioning with minimal or no new infrastructure requirements. Conceptually, the treatment approach can utilize a range of ion exchange media. Previously, both crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic, nonelutable sorbent, and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), an organic, elutable resin, have been considered for cesium removal from tank waste. More recently, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644, an elutable ion exchange medium, for the subject application. Results of testing indicate hydraulic limitations of the SuperLig{reg_sign} resin, specifically a high pressure drop through packed ion exchange columns. This limitation is likely the result of swelling and shrinkage of the irregularly shaped (granular) resin during repeated conversions between sodium and hydrogen forms as the resin is first loaded then eluted. It is anticipated that a similar flow limitation would exist in columns packed with conventional, granular RF resin. However, use of spherical RF resin is a likely means of mitigating processing limitations due to excessive pressure drop. Although size changes occur as the spherical resin is cycled through loading and elution operations, the geometry of the resin is expected to effectively mitigate the close packing that leads to high pressure drops across ion exchange columns. Multiple evaluations have been performed to determine the feasibility of using spherical RF resin and to obtain data necessary for design of an SCIX process. The work performed consisted of examination of radiation effects on resin performance

  17. ION EXCHANGE SOFTENING: EFFECTS ON METAL CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A corrosion control pipe loop study to evaluate the effect of ion exchange water softening on metal leaching from household plumbing materials was conducted on two different water qualities having different pH's and hardness levels. The results showed that removing hardness ions ...

  18. Decontamination and dismantlement of the building 594 waste ion exchange facility at Argonne National Laboratory-East project final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, E. C.

    1998-11-23

    The Building 594 D&D Project was directed toward the following goals: Removal of any radioactive and hazardous materials associated with the Waste Ion Exchange Facility; Decontamination of the Waste Ion Exchange Facility to unrestricted use levels; Demolition of Building 594; and Documentation of all project activities affecting quality (i.e., waste packaging, instrument calibration, audit results, and personnel exposure) These goals had been set in order to eliminate the radiological and hazardous safety concerns inherent in the Waste Ion Exchange Facility and to allow, upon completion of the project, unescorted and unmonitored access to the area. The ion exchange system and the resin contained in the system were the primary areas of concern, while the condition of the building which housed the system was of secondary concern. ANL-E health physics technicians characterized the Building 594 Waste Ion Exchange Facility in September 1996. The characterization identified a total of three radionuclides present in the Waste Ion Exchange Facility with a total activity of less than 5 {micro}Ci (175 kBq). The radionuclides of concern were Co{sup 60}, Cs{sup 137}, and Am{sup 241}. The highest dose rates observed during the project were associated with the resin in the exchange vessels. DOE Order 5480.2A establishes the maximum whole body exposure for occupational workers at 5 rem (50 mSv)/yr; the administrative limit at ANL-E is 1 rem/yr (10 mSv/yr).

  19. Highly-selective and Regenerable Ion Exchange for Perchlorate Remediation, Recovery, and Environmental Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, B.; Brown, G.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) has recently emerged as a widespread contaminant found in drinking water and groundwater supplies in the United States and is known to disrupt thyroid function by inhibiting iodide uptake. Among various treatment technologies, the highly-selective and regenerable ion-exchange technology has recently been developed at ORNL for removing ClO4- from contaminated water. The selective ion exchange technology relies on a unique, highly specific resin to trap ClO4- from contaminated water. The treatment system is then regenerated and perchlorate is destroyed. The reaction that destroys ClO4- produces Cl- and Fe(III) that are used to regenerate the resin, resulting in practically zero secondary waste production. In comparison with conventional non-selective ion-exchange technology, this new treatment process is expected to result in not only a reduced O&M cost but also the elimination of the disposal of hazardous wastes containing perchlorate. Additionally, the selective and regenerable ion exchange technology has allowed the quantitative recovery of perchlorate from contaminated water for reuse, or from other environmental matrices such as sediment, groundwater, and salt deposits for perchlorate isotopic and source identification. Naturally-forming perchlorate has been found to contain distinct oxygen and chlorine isotope signatures or anomalies as compared with anthropogenic perchlorate and can thus provide unambiguous identification of the sources of perchlorate contamination as a powerful tool for the forensics of perchlorate in the environment.

  20. Salt Processing Through Ion Exchange at the Savannah River Site Selection of Exchange Media and Column Configuration - 9198

    SciTech Connect

    Spires, Renee; Punch, Timothy; McCabe, Daniel

    2009-02-11

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed, modeled, and tested several different ion exchange media and column designs for cesium removal. One elutable resin and one non-elutable resin were considered for this salt processing application. Deployment of non-elutable Crystalline Silicotitanate and elutable Resorcinol Formaldehyde in several different column configurations were assessed in a formal Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE). Salt solutions were selected that would allow a grouping of non-compliant tanks to be closed. Tests were run with the elutable resin to determine compatibility with the resin configuration required for an in-tank ion exchange system. Models were run to estimate the ion exchange cycles required with the two resins in several column configurations. Material balance calculations were performed to estimate the impact on the High Level Waste (HLW) system at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Conceptual process diagrams were used to support the hazard analysis. Data from the hazard analysis was used to determine the relative impact on safety. This report will discuss the technical inputs, SEE methods, results and path forward to complete the technical maturation of ion exchange.

  1. Tramadol loading, release and iontophoretic characteristics of ion-exchange fiber.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanan; Yuan, Jing; Liu, Hongzhuo; Yang, Yang; Hou, Yanlong; Li, Sanming

    2014-04-25

    The objective of this study was to investigate the drug loading, release and iontophoretic characteristics of strong acidic ion-exchange fiber, using tramadol hydrochloride as a model drug. The complex of charged model drug and ion-exchange fiber was studied as a new approach to achieve controlled drug delivery. Structural characterization of the fiber was elucidated through different approaches including differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). And the mechanism of drug binding into ion-exchange fibers was validated to be ion-exchange. The drug loading into and release from ion-exchange fiber were affected by the concentration, volume and valence of the counter-ions in the external solution. Iontophoresis could significantly increase the delivery rate and amount of transdermal drug, and the iontophoretic dose could be easily controlled by adjusting the current intensity and the amount of release medium. The tramadol could be steadily released both from the drug-loaded fiber and drug solution when applied the iontophoretic method, which was in disagreement with the previous publications. As a drug reservoir, ion-exchange fiber has good regularity of drug loading, release and iontophoretic characteristics.

  2. Adsorption and removal of clofibric acid and diclofenac from water with MIEX resin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xian; Shao, Yisheng; Gao, Naiyun; Chen, Juxiang; Zhang, Yansen; Wang, Qiongfang; Lu, Yuqi

    2016-10-01

    This study demonstrates the use of MIEX resin as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of clofibric acid (CA) and diclofenac (DCF). The adsorption performance of CA and DCF are investigated by a batch mode in single-component or bi-component adsorption system. Various factors influencing the adsorption of CA and DCF, including initial concentration, contact time, adsorbent dosage, initial solution pH, agitation speed, natural organic matter and coexistent anions are studied. The Langmuir model can well describe CA adsorption in single-component system, while the Freundlich model gives better fitting in bi-component system. The DCF adsorption can be well fitted by the Freundlich model in both systems. Thermodynamic analyses show that the adsorption of CA and DCF is an endothermic (ΔH(o) > 0), entropy driven (ΔS(o) > 0) process and more randomness exists in the DCF adsorption process. The values of Gibbs free energy (ΔG(o) < 0) indicate the adsorption of DCF is spontaneous but nonspontaneous (ΔG(o) > 0) for CA adsorption. The kinetic data suggest the adsorption of CA and DCF follow the pseudo-first-order model in both systems and the intra-particle is not the unique rate-limiting step. The adsorption process is controlled simultaneously by external mass transfer and surface diffusion according to the surface diffusion modified Biot number (Bis) ranging from 1.06 to 26.15. Moreover, the possible removal mechanism for CA and DCF is respectively proposed based on the ion exchange stoichiometry. PMID:27448753

  3. An Empirical Formula From Ion Exchange Chromatography and Colorimetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Steven D.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a detailed procedure for finding an empirical formula from ion exchange chromatography and colorimetry. Introduces students to more varied techniques including volumetric manipulation, titration, ion-exchange, preparation of a calibration curve, and the use of colorimetry. (JRH)

  4. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal by the electrochemical ion-exchange process.

    PubMed

    Dharnaik, Amit Shivputra; Ghosh, Pranab Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In the present investigation, the performance of a laboratory-scale plate and frame-type electrochemical ion-exchange (EIX) cell on removal ofhexavalent chromium from synthetic wastewater containing 5 mg/l of Cr(VI) was evaluated under varying applied voltages. Ruthenium dioxide-coated titanium plate (RuO2/Ti) was used as anode and stainless steel plates as cathode. The EIX cell was run at different hydraulic retention time (HRT). Before using in the electrochemical cell, the capacity of ion-exchange resin was evaluated through kinetic and isotherm equilibrium tests in batch mode. The batch kinetic study result showed that the equilibrium time for effective ion exchange with resin is 2 h. The isotherm equilibrium data fit well to both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Maximum capacity (qm) of resin calculated from Langmuir isotherm was 71.42 mg/g. Up to 99% of chromium removal was noticed in the EIX cell containing fresh resin at applied voltages of 10 V and higher. Migration of chromium ion to anode chamber was not noticed while performing the experiment with fresh resin. As high as 50% removal of chromium was observed from the middle chamber containing exhausted resin at an applied voltage of 25 V when the influent flow rate was maintained at 45 min of HRT. The performance of the reactor was increased to 72% when the influent flow rate was decreased to maintain at 90 min of HRT. Build-up of chromium in the anode chamber took place when exhausted resin was used in the process.

  5. Feasibility Study of Solidification for Low-Level Liquid Waste Generated by Sulfuric Acid Elution Treatment of Spent Ion Exchange Resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Takashi; Kawasaki, Tooru; Higuchi, Natsuko; Horikawa, Yoshihiko

    We studied cement-like solidification process for low-level liquid waste with relatively high levels of radioactivity that contains a high concentration of sodium sulfate. For this type waste, it is important that the sulfate ion should not dissolve from the solid waste because it forms ettringite on reaction with minerals in the concrete of the planned repository, and this leads to cracking during repository storage. It is also preferable that the pH of the pore water of the solid waste be low, because the bentonite of the repository changes in quality on exposure to alkaline solution. Therefore, the present solidification process has two procedures: conversion into insoluble sulfate from sodium sulfate (CIS) and formation of low pH cement-like solid (FLS). In the CIS procedure, BaSO4 precipitation occurs with addition of Ba(OH)2•8H2O to the liquid waste. In the FLS procedure, silica fume and blast furnace slag are added to the liquid waste containing BaSO4 precipitate. We show the range of appropriate Ba/SO4 molar ratio is from 1.1 to 1.5 in the present solidification process by leaching tests for some kinds of solid waste samples. The CIS reaction yield is over 98% at a typical CIS condition, i.e. Ba/SO4 molar ratio=1.3, reaction temperature=60°C, and time=3 hr.

  6. Fatty and resinic acids extractions from crude tall oil

    SciTech Connect

    Nogueira, J.M.F.

    1996-11-01

    The separation of fatty and resinic acidic fractions from crude tall-oil soap solutions with n-heptane by the technique of dissociation extraction is discussed. The theory of the overall process is supported by a systematic study developed to cover the high selectivity demonstrated in the differential solubility and the aptness between fatty and diterpenic acids to both liquids phases. To study the main factors affecting those liquid-liquid extraction systems and the amphiphilic behavior of such molecules involved, sodium salts aqueous solutions of crude tall oil and synthetic mixtures as molecular acidic models were used.

  7. 21 CFR 173.21 - Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes. 173.21... ion exchange membranes. Substances identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as ion exchange membranes intended for use in the treatment of bulk quantities of liquid food under...

  8. 21 CFR 173.21 - Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes. 173.21... ion exchange membranes. Substances identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as ion exchange membranes intended for use in the treatment of bulk quantities of liquid food under...

  9. 21 CFR 173.21 - Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes. 173.21... Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.21 Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes. Substances identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as ion exchange membranes intended for use in...

  10. 21 CFR 173.21 - Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes. 173.21... ion exchange membranes. Substances identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as ion exchange membranes intended for use in the treatment of bulk quantities of liquid food under...

  11. 21 CFR 173.21 - Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes. 173.21... ion exchange membranes. Substances identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as ion exchange membranes intended for use in the treatment of bulk quantities of liquid food under...

  12. Chemical derivatization of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde resin leading to enhanced chemical/oxidative stability of the resin

    SciTech Connect

    Hubler, T.L.; Franz, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (R-F) resin is a candidate regenerable ion-exchange resin for removal of radioactive cesium from highly alkaline waste tank supernates at both the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Our previous investigations into the structure/function relationships of R-F resin have shown that the R-F resin undergoes facile oxidation to produce, para-bisquinones, with loss of ion-exchange sites, hence lowered performance of the resin for cesium ion-exchange. Our studies have also shown that Phenol-Formaldehyde (P-F) resin has a substantially lower capacity compared to R-F resin, based on predicted values, because over half the ion-exchange sites of the P-F resin undergo etherification during the standard synthetic procedures used for preparation of these resins. In this report, we present our studies into rational synthetic solutions to enhance the chemical/oxidative stability of R-F resin.

  13. PRTR ion exchange vault water removal

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.E.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents the removal of radiologically contaminated water from the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) ion exchange vault. Approximately 57,000 liters (15,000 gallons) of water had accumulated in the vault due to the absence of a rain cover. The water was removed and the vault inspected for signs of leakage. No evidence of leakage was found. The removal and disposal of the radiologically contaminated water decreased the risk of environmental contamination.

  14. Comparison of XAD macroporous resins for the concentration of fulvic acid from aqueous solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    Five macroreticular, nonlonlc AmberlHe XAD resins were evaluated for concentration and Isolation of fulvlc acid from aqueous solution. The capacity of each resin for fulvlc acid was measured by both batch and column techniques. Elution efficiencies were determined by desorptlon with 0.1 N NaOH. Highest recoveries were obtained with the acrylic ester resins which proved to be most efficient for both adsorption and elution of fulvlc acid. Compared to the acrylic ester resins, usefulness of the styrene dvlnybenzene resins to remove fulvlc acid is limited because of slow diffusion-controlled adsorption and formation of charge-transfer complexes, which hinders elution. ?? 1979 American Chemical Society.

  15. IMPACT OF THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS ON THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY - 12112

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Lambert, D.; Fox, K.; Stone, M.

    2011-11-07

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is investigating the deployment of a parallel technology to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF, presently under construction) to accelerate high activity salt waste processing. The proposed technology combines large waste tank strikes of monosodium titanate (MST) to sorb strontium and actinides with two ion exchange columns packed with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) resin to sorb cesium. The new process was designated Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX), since the ion exchange columns were sized to fit within a waste storage tank riser. Loaded resins are to be combined with high activity sludge waste and fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for incorporation into the current glass waste form. Decontaminated salt solution produced by SCIX will be fed to the SRS Saltstone Facility for on-site immobilization as a grout waste form. Determining the potential impact of SCIX resins on DWPF processing was the basis for this study. Accelerated salt waste treatment is projected to produce a significant savings in the overall life cycle cost of waste treatment at SRS.

  16. Biocidal quaternary ammonium resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janauer, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Activated carbon (charcoal) and polymeric resin sorbents are widely used in the filtration and treatment of drinking water, mainly to remove dissolved organic and inorganic impurities and to improve the taste. Earlier hopes that activated carbon might "disinfect' water proved to be unfounded. The feasibility of protecting against microbial infestation in charcoal and resin beds such as those to be incorporated into total water reuse systems in spacecraft was investigated. The biocidal effect of IPCD (insoluable polymeric contact disinfectants) in combination with a representative charcoal was assessed. The ion exchange resins (IPCD) were shown to adequately protect charcoal and ion exchange beds.

  17. Polystyrene sulphonic acid resins with enhanced acid strength via macromolecular self-assembly within confined nanospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Zhao, Yaopeng; Xu, Shutao; Yang, Yan; Liu, Jia; Wei, Yingxu; Yang, Qihua

    2014-01-01

    Tightening environmental legislation is driving the chemical industries to develop efficient solid acid catalysts to replace conventional mineral acids. Polystyrene sulphonic acid resins, as some of the most important solid acid catalysts, have been widely studied. However, the influence of the morphology on their acid strength—closely related to the catalytic activity—has seldom been reported. Herein, we demonstrate that the acid strength of polystyrene sulphonic acid resins can be adjusted through their reversible morphology transformation from aggregated to swelling state, mainly driven by the formation and breakage of hydrogen bond interactions among adjacent sulphonic acid groups within the confined nanospace of hollow silica nanospheres. The hybrid solid acid catalyst demonstrates high activity and selectivity in a series of important acid-catalysed reactions. This may offer an efficient strategy to fabricate hybrid solid acid catalysts for green chemical processes.

  18. Ion-exchange chromatographic protein refolding.

    PubMed

    Freydell, Esteban J; van der Wielen, Luuk; Eppink, Michel; Ottens, Marcel

    2010-11-12

    The application of ion-exchange (IEX) chromatography to protein refolding (IExR) has been successfully proven, as supported by various studies using different model proteins, ion-exchange media and flow configurations. Ion-exchange refolding offers a relatively high degree of process intensification, represented by the possibility of performing protein refolding, product purification and product concentration, in one unit operation. Besides its high degree of process intensification, IExR offers an additional set of key advantages including: spatial isolation of the bound protein molecules and the controllable change in chemical composition using gradients. Despite of the acknowledgement of the former advantages, the lack of mechanistic understanding on how they influence the process performance of the ion-exchange refolding reactor, limits the ability to exploit them in order to optimize the performance of the unit. This paper presents a quantitative analysis that assesses the effect that the spatial isolation and the urea gradient, have on the IExR performance, judged on the basis of the refolding yield (Y(N)) and the fractional mass recovery (f(Prot,Rec)). Additionally, this work discusses the effect of the protein load, the protein loading state (i.e., native, denatured, denatured and reduced (D&R)) and the adsorbent type on f(Prot,Rec). The presented work shows: (1) that the protein load has a direct effect on f(Prot,Rec), and the magnitude of this effect depends on the loading state of the protein solution and the adsorbent type; (2) that irrespectively of the type of adsorbent used, the saturation capacity of a denatured protein is less than the native protein and that this difference can be linked to differences in accessible binding surface area; (3) that there is a clear correlation between fractional surface coverage (θ) and f(Prot,Rec), indicating that the former could serve as a good descriptor to assess spatial isolation, and (4) that the urea

  19. Ion exchange polymers for anion separations

    DOEpatents

    Jarvinen, G.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Bartsch, R.A.

    1997-09-23

    Anion exchange resins including at least two positively charged sites and a well-defined spacing between the positive sites are provided together with a process of removing anions or anionic metal complexes from aqueous solutions by use of such resins. The resins can be substituted poly(vinylpyridine) and substituted polystyrene.

  20. Ion exchange polymers for anion separations

    DOEpatents

    Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Marsh, S. Fredric; Bartsch, Richard A.

    1997-01-01

    Anion exchange resins including at least two positively charged sites and a ell-defined spacing between the positive sites are provided together with a process of removing anions or anionic metal complexes from aqueous solutions by use of such resins. The resins can be substituted poly(vinylpyridine) and substituted polystyrene.

  1. 25th anniversary article: Ion exchange in colloidal nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shuchi; Kershaw, Stephen V; Rogach, Andrey L

    2013-12-23

    We review the progress in ion exchange in a variety of nanocrystal structures from the earliest accounts dating back over two decades ago to the present day. In recent years the number of groups using this method to form otherwise difficult or inaccessible nanoparticle shapes and morphologies has increased considerably and the field has experienced a resurgence of interest. Whilst most of the early work on cation exchange centered on II-VI materials, the methodology has been expanded to cover a far broader range of semiconductor nanocrystals including low toxicity I-III-VI materials and the much less facile III-V materials. The extent of exchange can be controlled leading to lightly doped nanoparticles, alloys, core-shells, segmented rods and dots-in-rods. Progress has been driven by a better understanding of the underlying principles of the exchange process - from thermodynamic factors (differences in cation solubilities); the interactions between ions and transfer agents (solvents, ligands, anions, co-dopants); ionic in-diffusion mechanisms and kinetics. More recent availability of very detailed electron microscopy coupled with image reconstruction techniques has been a valuable tool to investigate the resulting heterostructures and internal interfaces. We start by surveying the range of synthetic approaches most often used to carry out ion exchange, mainly focusing on cation replacement strategies, and then describe the rich variety of nanostructures these techniques can bring forth. We also describe some of the principles that are used to establish the relative ease of exchange and to systematically improve the process where the basic energetics are less favorable. To help further the understanding of the underlying fundamentals we have gathered together useful data from the literature on solubilities, cation and anion hardness, ligand and solvent Lewis acid or base strengths for a wide range of chemical species generally used. We offer a perspective on the

  2. Combined bio-regeneration and ion-exchange system for perchlorate removal.

    PubMed

    Bae, B U

    2014-01-01

    In order to prove that perchlorate-laden resins could be bio-regenerated through direct contact with perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB), a combined bio-regeneration and ion-exchange (IX) system was operated. Two kinds of perchlorate-laden resins, nitrate-selective A520E and perchlorate-selective A530E, were successfully regenerated by PRB cultivated under anaerobic conditions. The bio-regeneration efficiency of perchlorate-laden resins increased with the amount of flow passed through the IX column. When the fully exhausted resin was bio-regenerated for 10 days at the flow rate of 2 BV (bed volume)/min and mixed liquor suspended solids concentration of 80 mg/L, almost 100% of IX capacity was recovered. A520E resin had higher bio-regeneration efficiency than A530E under all conditions, probably due to the fact that the perchlorate ion is more strongly bonded to the functional group of perchlorate-selective A530E resin. Measurement of perchlorate concentrations in the column effluents also revealed that the amount of perchlorate eluted from A520E resin was higher than that from A530E resin. Since only 10-20% of perchlorate was eluted from the resin during 10 days of bio-regeneration, the main mechanism of bio-regeneration appears to be the direct reduction of perchlorate by PRB on the resin. PMID:24804673

  3. METHOD OF SEPARATING RARE EARTHS BY ION EXCHANGE

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Powell, J.E.

    1960-10-18

    A process is given for separating yttrium and rare earth values having atomic numbers of from 57 through 60 and 68 through 71 from an aqueous solution whose pH value can range from 1 to 9. All rare earths and yttrium are first adsorbed on a cation exchange resin, and they are then eluted with a solution of N-hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) in the order of decreasing atomic number, yttrium behaving like element 61; the effluents are collected in fractions. The HEDTA is recovered by elution with ammonia solution and the resin is regenerated with sulfuric acid. Rare earths are precipitated from the various effluents with oxalic acid, and each supernatant is passed over cation exchange resin for adsorption of HEDTA and nonprecipitated rare earths: the oxalic acid is not retained by the resin.

  4. A novel method to enhance the efficiency of drug transdermal iontophoresis delivery by using complexes of drug and ion-exchange fibers.

    PubMed

    Xin, Che; Li-hong, Wang; Yue, Yuan; Ya-nan, Gao; Qi-fang, Wang; Yang, Yang; San-ming, Li

    2012-05-30

    The main reason for generally low efficiency of the transdermal iontophoretic drug delivery is that the fraction of the total current contributed by the drug ions is very small. The objective of this study was to find a method to increase the fraction of the total current contributed by the drug ions so as to enhance the drug's iontophoretic delivery. Iontophoretic transport of diclofenac solution and diclofenac assisted by ion exchange materials, including ion-exchange resin, ion-exchange membrane and ion-exchange fiber, across the rat skin were investigated. Both in vitro and in vivo iontophoretic transport experiments showed the amount of diclofenac permeated across rat skin from the diclofenac-fibers was highest among those from the diclofenac simple solutions and ion exchange materials complexes. The results of this study suggested that there is an enhancement of drug across rat skin by ion-exchange fibers in ion-exchange fibers assisted iontophoresis. The present study has demonstrated the potential of a new approach using ion-exchange fibers to enhance transdermal iontophoretic transport of an ionizable drug.

  5. Ion exchanger from chemically modified banana leaves.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, Ahmed A; Mohamed, Samar H; Abd-Elkader, Amal H

    2013-07-25

    Cation exchangers from chemically modified banana leaves have been prepared. Banana leaves were treated with different molarities of KMnO4 and cross linked with epichlorohydrin and their effect on metal ion adsorption was investigated. Phosphorylation of chemically modified banana leaves was also studied. The metal ion uptake by these modified banana leaves was clarified. Effect of different varieties, e.g. activation of produced cation exchanger, concentration of metal ions was also investigated. Characterization of the prepared ion exchangers by using infrared and thermal analysis was also taken in consideration. PMID:23768590

  6. Enigmatic ion-exchange behavior of myo-inositol phosphates.

    PubMed

    Shelor, C Phillip; Liao, Hongzhu; Kadjo, Akinde Florence; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2015-05-01

    The separation of myo-inositol mono-, di-, tri-, tetra-, pentakis-, and hexakisphosphate (InsP1, InsP2, InsP3, InsP4, InsP5, InsP6) was carried out using hydroxide eluent ion chromatography. Acid hydrolysis of InsP6 (phytate) was used to prepare a distribution of InsPs, ranging from InsP1 to InsP5's and including unhydrolyzed InsP6. Counting all possible positional isomers (many of which have stereoisomers that will not be separable by conventional ion exchange), 40 chromatographically separable peaks are possible; up to 22 were separated and identified by mass spectrometry. InsPs show unusual ion-exchange behavior in two respects: (a) the retention order is not monotonically related with the charge on the ion and (b) at the same hydroxide eluent concentration, retention is greatly dependent on the eluent metal cation. The retention of InsP3-InsP6 was determined to be controlled by steric factors while elution was influenced by eluent cation complexation. These highly phosphorylated InsPs have a much greater affinity for alkali metals (Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+)) than quaternary ammonium ions. This difference in cation affinity was exploited to improve separation through the use of a tetramethylammonium hydroxide-sodium hydroxide gradient.

  7. Improved recovery and purification of plutonium at Los Alamos using macroporous anion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Mann, M.J.

    1987-05-01

    For almost 30 years, Los Alamos National Laboratory has used anion exchange in nitric acid as the major aqueous process or the recovery and purification of plutonium. One of the few disadvantages of this system is the particularly slow rate at which the anionic nitrato complex of Pu(IV) equilibrates with the resin. The Nuclear Materials Process Technology Group at Los Alamos recently completed an ion exchange development program that focused on improving the slow sorption kinetics that limits this process. A comprehensive investigation of modern anion exchange resins identified porosity and bead size as the properties that most influence plutonium sorption kinetics. Our study found that small beads of macroporous resin produced a dramatic increase in plutonium process efficiency. The Rocky Flats Plant has already adopted this improved ion exchange technology, and it currently is being evaluated for use in other DOE plutonium-processing facilities.

  8. Electrodialysis-ion exchange for the separation of dissolved salts

    SciTech Connect

    Baroch, C.J.; Grant, P.J.

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy generates and stores a significant quantity of low level, high level, and mixed wastes. As some of the DOE facilities are decontaminated and decommissioned, additional and possibly different forms of wastes will be generated. A significant portion of these wastes are aqueous streams containing acids, bases, and salts, or are wet solids containing inorganic salts. Some of these wastes are quite dilute solutions, whereas others contain large quantities of nitrates either in the form of dissolved salts or acids. Many of the wastes are also contaminated with heavy metals, radioactive products, or organics. Some of these wastes are in storage because a satisfactory treatment and disposal processes have not been developed. There is considerable interest in developing processes that remove or destroy the nitrate wastes. Electrodialysis-Ion Exchange (EDIX) is a possible process that should be more cost effective in treating aqueous waste steams. This report describes the EDIX process.

  9. Electrodialysis-ion exchange for the separation of dissolved salts

    SciTech Connect

    Baroch, C.J.; Grant, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Department of Energy generates and stores a significant quantity of low level, high level, and mixed wastes. As some of the DOE facilities are decontaminated and decommissioned, additional and possibly different forms of wastes will be generated. A significant portion of these wastes are aqueous streams containing acids, bases, and salts, or are wet solids containing inorganic salts. Some of these wastes are quite dilute solutions, whereas others contain large quantities of nitrates either in the form of dissolved salts or acids. Many of the wastes are also contaminated with heavy metals, radioactive products, or organics. Some of these wastes are in storage because a satisfactory treatment and disposal processes have not been developed. This report describes the process of electrodialysis-ion exchange (EDIX) for treating aqueous wastes streams consisting of nitrates, sodium, organics, heavy metals, and radioactive species.

  10. Multicomponent liquid ion exchange with chabazite zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.M.; Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Byers, C.W.

    1993-10-01

    In spite of the increasing commercial use of zeolites for binary and multicomponent sorption, the understanding of the basic mass-transfer processes associated with multicomponent zeolite ion-exchange systems is quite limited. This study was undertaken to evaluate Na-Ca-Mg-Cs-Sr ion exchange from an aqueous solution using a chabazite zeolite. Mass-transfer coefficients and equilibrium equations were determined from experimental batch-reactor data for single and multicomponent systems. The Langmuir isotherm was used to represent the equilibrium relationship for binary systems, and a modified Dubinin-Polyani model was used for the multicomponent systems. The experimental data indicate that diffusion through the microporous zeolite crystals is the primary diffusional resistance. Macropore diffusion also significantly contributes to the mass-transfer resistance. Various mass-transfer models were compared to the experimental data to determine mass-transfer coefficients. Effective diffusivities were obtained which accurately predicted experimental data using a variety of models. Only the model which accounts for micropore and macropore diffusion occurring in series accurately predicted multicomponent data using single-component diffusivities. Liquid and surface diffusion both contribute to macropore diffusion. Surface and micropore diffusivities were determined to be concentration dependent.

  11. Ion exchange in hydroxyapatite with lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Creagh, A Louise; Haynes, Charles A; Orvig, Chris

    2015-02-16

    Naturally occurring hydroxyapatite, Ca5(PO4)3(OH) (HAP), is the main inorganic component of bone matrix, with synthetic analogues finding applications in bioceramics and catalysis. An interesting and valuable property of both natural and synthetic HAP is the ability to undergo cationic and anionic substitution. The lanthanides are well-suited for substitution for the Ca(2+) sites within HAP, because of their similarities in ionic radii, donor atom requirements, and coordination geometries. We have used isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to investigate the thermodynamics of ion exchange in HAP with a representative series of lanthanide ions, La(3+), Sm(3+), Gd(3+), Ho(3+), Yb(3+) and Lu(3+), reporting the association constant (Ka), ion-exchange thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS, ΔG), and binding stoichiometry (n). We also probe the nature of the La(3+):HAP interaction by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P NMR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), in support of the ITC results. PMID:25594577

  12. Ruthenium/technetium separations after the accelerator transmutation of waste: Ozonolysis vs ion-exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, N.C.; Abney, K.D.; Kinkead, S.

    1993-12-31

    Technetium, because of its long half-life (213,000 years) and ability to migrate in the environment, is a primary contributor to the long-term radioactivity related risk associated with geologic nuclear waste disposal. One proposal for converting technetium to an environmentally benign element is its transmutation to ruthenium by reaction of {sup 99}Tc with thermal neutrons to form stable {sup 100}Ru. Los Alamos is currently investigating transmutation with an accelerator-based system (i.e, Accelerator Transmutation of Waste, ATW). Flowsheets developed for this process predict a steady state ruthenium concentration of {minus}10{sup {minus}3} M exiting the transmuter. Seperation of ruthenium from the bulk technetium solution (2 M) is required to preserve neutron economy and to prevent multiple (n, {gamma}) reactions on ruthenium leading to radioactive {sup 103,106}Ru. Ruthenium/technetium separation factors of 1200 have been achieved by ion-exchange. However, the complex chemistry of ruthenium on ion exchange resins and the disposal of the exhausted resins, required that an alternative for this 30-year old baseline technology be sought. For these reasons, volatilization of RuO{sub 4}, formed by ozonolysis of ruthenium is being considered for this separation. The results of experiments showing the violatilization efficiency using ozone will be compared to the separation of ruthenium using the baseline ion-exchange technique.

  13. Evaluation of the Reactivity of Reillex HPQ in 64 Percent Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, W.J. III

    2001-02-20

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the reactivity of Reillex HPQ in 64 percent nitric acid and to address an accident scenario in which 64 percent nitric acid solution is inadvertently added to an HB-Line ion exchange column containing Reillex HPQ anion exchange resin.

  14. Heterogeneous catalytic esterification of omega-sulfhydryl fatty acids: Avoidance of thioethers, thioesters, and disulfides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two mesoporous silicas functionalized with propylsulfonic (SBA-15-PSA) and arenesulfonic (SBA-15-ASA) acid groups, and a highly acidic, functionalized styrene divinylbenzene copolymer ion exchange resin (Amberlyst-15) were examined for their ability to catalyze the ethanolic esterification of the N-...

  15. Ion exchange chromatography and radioimmunoassay procedure for measuring opioid peptides and substance P

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstroem, L.; Christensson, I.; Folkesson, R.; Stenstroem, B.; Terenius, L.

    1983-10-01

    The measurements of peptides of the enkephalin, dynorphin and substance P systems is complicated by the number of possible precursor fragments and degradation products that might cross-react with the antisera. By using an ion-exchanger step before radioimmunoassay one can reduce the possibility that observed peptide levels are due to precursors or metabolites. The ion-exchanger method runs with good recovery and its main advantage is that many samples can be run in parallel. The recovery from the ion-exchanger was similar using two different homogenizing media, whereas the measured endogenous levels of (Met) and (Leu)enkephalin were 3-4 fold higher with 1M acetic acid than when a 1:1 MeOH/HCl mixture was used for tissue extraction.

  16. Lanthanum-NaY zeolite ion exchange. 2; Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.Y.; Lu, T.S.; Chen, S.H.; Chao, K.J. )

    1990-10-01

    This paper reports on La-NaY ion exchange breakthrough curves which were obtained experimentally at 27 and 60{degrees}C. A mathematical model of an ion exchanger was formulated and employed to calculate the ion exchanger coefficients. An ionic diffusion coefficient of the order of 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 2}/s was obtained. The effects of zeolite particle size, temperature, and column packing conditions on the kinetics of the exchange were investigated also.

  17. Literature Review of Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde for Cesium Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Garrett N.

    2014-09-30

    The current report summarizes work performed throughout the scientific community and DOE complex as reported in the open literature and DOE-sponsored reports to evaluate the Cs+ ion exchange (CIX) characteristics of SRF resin. King (2007) completed a similar literature review in support of material selection for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project. Josephson et al. (2010) and Sams et al. (2009) provided a similar brief review of SRF CIX for the near-tank Cs+ removal (NTCR) project. Thorson (2008a) documented the basis for recommending SRF over SuperLigTM 644 as the primary CIX resin in the WTP. The current review expands on previous work, summarizes additional work completed to date, and provides a broad view of the literature without focusing on a specific column system. Although the focus of the current review is the SRF resin, many cited references include multiple materials such as the non-spherical GGRF and SuperLigTM 644 organic resins and crystalline silicotitanate (CST) IONSIVTM IE-911, a non-elutable inorganic material. This report summarizes relevant information provided in the literature.

  18. Novel ion-exchange membranes for electrodialysis prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuneda, Satoshi; Saito, Kyoichi; Misuhara, Hisashi; Sugo, Takanobu

    1995-11-01

    Ion-exchange membranes have been used to concentrate seawater to produce salt as well as to desalinate brackish water to render it potable. Also, the interest in applications of ion-exchange membranes as separators for electrodialytic desalination of bioproducts and separators in hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells has been growing. Novel ion-exchange membranes containing sulfonic acid (SO{sub 3}H) and trimethyl ammonium [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}] groups were prepared by a simple method of radiation-induced cografting of sodium styrene sulfonate (SSS) with acrylic acid (AAc) and vinyl benzyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (VBTAC) with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), onto a polyethylene film with a thickness of 50 {micro}m. The high density graft chain was introduced throughout the polyethylene film. The maximum cation- and anion-exchange capacities of the resultant membranes were 2.5 and 1.3 mol/kg, receptively. These membranes exhibited an electrical resistance one order lower than commercially available ion-exchange membranes; for example, 12 h cografting provided cation- and anion-exchange membranes whose electrical resistances in a 0.5 M NaCl solution were 0.25 and 0.85 {Omega} cm{sup 2}, respectively. From the evaluation of electrodialytic desalination in a batch mode, using a pair of the graft-type ion-exchange membranes, the time required to achieve 99.5% desalination of the initial 0.5 M NaCl solutions was reduced to 85% comparing with that of the commercial ion-exchange membranes.

  19. Advanced integrated solvent extraction and ion exchange systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, P.

    1996-10-01

    Advanced integrated solvent extraction (SX) and ion exchange (IX) systems are a series of novel SX and IX processes that extract and recover uranium and transuranics (TRUs) (neptunium, plutonium, americium) and fission products {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 137}Cs from acidic high-level liquid waste and that sorb and recover {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 137}Cs from alkaline supernatant high-level waste. Each system is based on the use of new selective liquid extractants or chromatographic materials. The purpose of the integrated SX and IX processes is to minimize the quantity of waste that must be vitrified and buried in a deep geologic repository by producing raffinates (from SX) and effluent streams (from IX) that will meet the specifications of Class A low-level waste.

  20. Semisynthesis of the antiviral abietane diterpenoid jiadifenoic acid C from callitrisic acid (4-epidehydroabietic acid) isolated from sandarac resin.

    PubMed

    González, Miguel A; Zaragozá, Ramón J

    2014-09-26

    The semisynthesis of the antiviral abietane diterpenoid (+)-jiadifenoic acid C starting from the available methyl ester of callitrisic acid (4-epidehydroabietic acid) isolated from sandarac resin is reported. A protocol for the isolation of methyl callitrisate (methyl 4-epidehydroabietate) in gram quantities from sandarac resin is also described. Allylic C-17 oxygenation was introduced by regioselective dehydrogenation of the isopropyl group of methyl callitrisate with DDQ followed by selenium-catalyzed allylic oxidation. Ester hydrolysis afforded (+)-jiadifenoic acid C in 22% overall yield from methyl callitrisate. This semisynthetic route provides a convenient source of this anti-Coxsackie virus B natural product for further biological studies. PMID:25166492

  1. Extraction of cesium from an alkaline leaching solution of spent catalysts using an ion-exchange column

    SciTech Connect

    Dumont, N.; Favre-Reguillon, A.; Dunjic, B.; Lemaire, M.

    1996-04-01

    The selective extraction of cesium from an alkaline leaching solution of spent catalysts using phenolic resins was studied. The resins were synthesized by alkaline polycondensation of formaldehyde by phenol, resorcinol, catechol, and phloroglucinol. Their ionoselectivities for five alkali metals were evaluated with a solid-liquid extraction, and their ion-exchange capacities were compared. The resin with the best selectivity for cesium was tested with a real solution at different pH values. An on-column extraction is proposed to obtain cesium with high purity.

  2. Ion exchange materials, method of forming ion exchange materials, and methods of treating liquids

    DOEpatents

    Wertsching, Alan K.; Peterson, Eric S.; Wey, John E.

    2007-12-25

    The invention includes an ion affinity material having an organic component which is sulfonated and which is chemically bonded to an inorganic substrate component. The invention includes a method of forming a metal binding material. A solid support material comprising surface oxide groups is provided and an organic component having at least one alkyl halide is covalently linked to at least some of the surface oxide groups to form a modified support material. The at least one alkyl halide is subsequently converted into an alkyl sulfonate. The invention further includes a method and system for extracting ions from a liquid. An ion exchange material having a sulfonated alkyl silane component covalently bonded to a metal oxide support material is provided and a liquid is exposed to the ion exchange material.

  3. MODELING OF ION-EXCHANGE FOR CESIUM REMOVAL FROM DISSOLVED SALTCAKE IN SRS TANKS 1-3, 37 AND 41

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F

    2007-08-15

    This report presents an evaluation of the expected performance of engineered Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange resin for the removal of cesium from dissolved saltcake in SRS Tanks 1-3, 37 and 41. The application presented in this report reflects the expected behavior of engineered CST IE-911 and spherical RF resin manufactured at the intermediate-scale (approximately 100 gallon batch size; batch 5E-370/641). It is generally believed that scale-up to production-scale in RF resin manufacturing will result in similarly behaving resin batches whose chemical selectivity is unaffected while total capacity per gram of resin may vary. As such, the predictions provided within this report should provide reasonable estimates of production-scale column performance. Two versions of the RF cesium isotherm were used. The older version provides a conservative estimate of the resin capacity while the newer version more accurately fits the most recent experimental data.

  4. Equilibrium distribution of SO/sub 2/ between anion-exchange resins and aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Vulikh, A.I.; Alovyainikov, A.A.

    1983-05-20

    The results are published of a systematic study of SO/sub 2/ adsorption by ion-exchange resins in the presence of moisture. The swelling water in an ion-exchange resin is the medium for transfer of SO/sub 2/ (and of other gases which dissolve in water) from the gas phase to the functional groups of the resin. An external solution of SO/sub 2/ in water is also formed at 100% relative humidity of the gas mixture, and an equilibrium distribution of SO/sub 2/ over the chain of contacting media is established: SO/sub 2/ (gas) ..-->..0 SO/sub 2/ (external solution) ..-->..0 SO/sub 2/ (solution in resin) ..-->..0 SO/sub 2/ (resin runctional groups). If the swollen ion-exchange resin is considered a single phase, then the SO/sub 2/ distribution between it and the water-saturated gas phase may be calculated using data for the individual gas phase-aqueous SO/sub 2/ solution and SO/sub 2/ solution-swollen resin systems. Exhaustive handbook data are available for gas phase-aqueous SO/sub 2/ solution systems. The SO/sub 2/ solution-swollen resin system was studied for a number of resin in the present work. The distribution of SO/sub 2/ between anion-exchange resins in basic forms and aqueous solutons (and the equilibrium gas phase) is described by equations for the neutralization of the resins by sulfurous acid and ion exchange in the system. Anion-exchange resin AV-17 takes up form 1 mole SO/sub 2//g-eq exchange capacity for C/sub SO/sub 2/(g)/ > 1 g/m/sub 3/ to approx.0.5 m/g-eq for C/sub SO/sub 2/(g)/ < 1 mg/m/sup 3/ from the moisture-saturated gas phase. Weekly basic anion-exchange resins (pK/sub B/ > 7) absorb approx.1 mole/g-eq for C/sub SO/sub 2/(g)/ > 50 g/m/sup 3/, but their volume decreases sharply for C/sub SO/sub 2/(g)/ < 10 g/m/sup 3/, and there is virtually no adsorption at C/sub SO/sub 2/(g)/ approx.1 mg/m/sup 3/.

  5. Using Ion Exchange Chromatography to Separate and Quantify Complex Ions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange chromatography is an important technique in the separation of charged species, particularly in biological, inorganic, and environmental samples. In this experiment, students are supplied with a mixture of two substitution-inert complex ions. They separate the complexes by ion exchange chromatography using a "flash"…

  6. Ion Exchange Chromatography and Spectrophotometry: An Introductory Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, N.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which students use ion exchange chromatography to separate a mixture of chloro complexes of transition metal ions and then use spectrophotometry to define qualitatively the efficiency of the ion exchange columns. Background information, materials needed, and procedures used are included. (JN)

  7. Anisotropic microporous supports impregnated with polymeric ion-exchange materials

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Dwayne; Babcock, Walter C.; Tuttle, Mark

    1985-05-07

    Novel ion-exchange media are disclosed, the media comprising polymeric anisotropic microporous supports containing polymeric ion-exchange or ion-complexing materials. The supports are anisotropic, having small exterior pores and larger interior pores, and are preferably in the form of beads, fibers and sheets.

  8. Anisotropic microporous supports impregnated with polymeric ion-exchange materials

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, D.; Babcock, W.C.; Tuttle, M.

    1985-05-07

    Novel ion-exchange media are disclosed, the media comprising polymeric anisotropic microporous supports containing polymeric ion-exchange or ion-complexing materials. The supports are anisotropic, having small exterior pores and larger interior pores, and are preferably in the form of beads, fibers and sheets. 5 figs.

  9. Rupture Loop Annex (RLA) ion exchange vault entry and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.E.

    1996-01-04

    This engineering report documents the entry and characterization of the Rupture Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located near the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns were found in the vault. Some of which contained transuranics, Cs 137, and Co 60. The characterization information is necessary for future vault cleanout and column disposal.

  10. Remediation of groundwater containing radionuclides and heavy metals using ion exchange and the AlgaSORB[reg sign] biosorbent system

    SciTech Connect

    Feiler, H.D. ); Darnall, D.W. )

    1991-11-07

    Bio-Recovery Systems, Inc. (BRS) studied the application of an immobilized algal biomass, termed AlgaSORB[reg sign], which has high affinity for heavy metal ions to DOE-contaminated groundwaters. The material can be packed into columns similar to commercial ion exchange resins. Dilute solutions containing heavy metals are passed through columns where metals are absorbed by the AlgaSORB[reg sign] resins. Once saturated, metal ions can be stripped from the resin biomass in a highly concentrated solution. Groundwaters contaminated with heavy metal ions from three different Department of Energy (DOE) sites: Savannah River, Hanford and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant were studied. The objective was to perform bench-scale treatability studies to establish treatment protocols and to optimize an AlgaSORB[reg sign]/ion exchange technology system to remove and recover toxic metal ions from these contaminated groundwaters. The specialty ion exchange/AlgaSORB[reg sign] resins tested in these studies show promise for selectively removing chromium, mercury and uranium from contaminated groundwater at DOE sites. The data show that effluents which satisfy the allowable metal ion limits are possible and most likely achievable. The use of these highly selective resins also offer advantages in terms of cost/benefit, risk and scheduling. Their high selectivity allows for high capacity and opportunities for recovery of removed constituents due to high pollutant concentration possible (3 to 4 orders of magnitude). Ion exchange is a proven technology which is easily automated and can be cost-effective, depending on the application.

  11. Isolation of organic acids from large volumes of water by adsorption on macroporous resins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, George R.; Suffet, I.H.; Malaiyandi, Murugan

    1987-01-01

    Adsorption on synthetic macroporous resins, such as the Amberlite XAD series and Duolite A-7, is routinely used to isolate and concentrate organic acids from forge volumes of water. Samples as large as 24,500 L have been processed on site by using these resins. Two established extraction schemes using XAD-8 and Duolite A-7 resins are described. The choice of the appropriate resin and extraction scheme is dependent on the organic solutes of interest. The factors that affect resin performance, selectivity, and capacity for a particular solute are solution pH, resin surface area and pore size, and resin composition. The logistical problems of sample handling, filtration, and preservation are also discussed.

  12. Determination of traces of Pt and Rh in soil and quartz samples contaminated by automobile exhaust after an ion-exchange matrix separation.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Joanna; Kińska, Katarzyna; Pałdyna, Joanna; Czyżewska, Monika; Boder, Kamila; Krasnodębska-Ostręga, Beata

    2014-09-01

    Monitoring of PGEs content in the natural samples is a crucial point in the environment science since catalytic car converters have been introduced. In the presented paper application of a very sensitive voltammetric method for determination of traces of Pt and Rh in the environmental samples contaminated by automobile exhausts is discussed. Voltammetric measurements were carried out in the supporting electrolyte containing formaldehyde and semicarbazide. PGEs were separated from the digested solutions of soils or quartz samples, collected from monitoring plots-by applying an ion-exchange resin Cellex-T. Pt was very effectively separated from the matrix approaching nearly 100% recovery after its elution by hydrochloric acid. Moreover the conditions of soil and quartz samples digestion were discussed. To validate the obtained result an independent analytical method-ICP MS was applied and analysis of certified reference material road dust 723-was completed.

  13. Identification of fermentation inhibitors in wood hydrolyzates and removal of inhibitors by ion exchange and liquid-liquid extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Caidian

    1998-12-01

    Common methods employed in the ethanol production from biomass consist of chemical or enzymatic degradation of biomass into sugars and then fermentation of sugars into ethanol or other chemicals. However, some degradation products severely inhibit the fermentation processes and substantially reduce the efficiency of ethanol production. How to remove inhibitors from the reaction product mixture and increase the production efficiency are critical in the commercialization of any processes of energy from biomass. The present study has investigated anion exchange and liquid-liquid extraction as potential methods for inhibitor removal. An analytical method has been developed to identify the fermentation inhibitors in a hydrolyzate. The majority of inhibitors present in hybrid poplar hydrolyzate have positively been identified. Ion exchange with weak basic Dowex-MWA-1 resin has been proved to be an effective mean to remove fermentation inhibitors from hybrid poplar hydrolyzate and significantly increase the fermentation productivity. Extraction with n-butanol might be a preferred way to remove inhibitors from wood hydrolyzates and improve the fermentability of sugars in the hydrolyzates. n-Butanol also removes some glucose, mannose and xylose from the hydrolyzate. Inhibitor identification reveals that lignin and sugar degradation compounds including both aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes and carboxylic acids formed in hydrolysis, plus fatty acids and other components from wood extractives are major fermentation inhibitors in Sacchromyces cerevisiae fermentation. There are 35 components identified as fermentation inhibitors. Among them, 4-hydroxy benzoic acid, 3,4-dihydroxy benzoic acid, syringic acid, syringaldehyde, and ferulic acid are among the most abundant aromatic inhibitors in hybrid poplar hydrolyzate. The conversion of aldehyde groups into carboxylic acid groups in the nitric acid catalyzed hydrolysis reduces the toxicity of the hydrolyzate. A wide spectrum of

  14. Vibrational spectroscopy of ion exchange membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Dunesh

    Infrared Spectroscopy (IR) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to study Nafion, a sulfonated tetrafluoroethylene ionomer used as the electrolyte material of choice for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). A methodology is described for assignment of infrared peaks in terms of mechanically coupled internal coordinates of near neighbor functional groups. This work demonstrates (chapter 2--4) the use of ionomer functional group internal coordinate coupling analysis to assign two key Nafion peaks formerly assigned as the sulfonate symmetric stretch (1056 cm -1) and a COC (A) vibrational mode (971 cm-1). The experiments and theory complement each other to show that the dominate motions of the 1056 cm-1 and 971 cm-1 modes are attributed to the COC (A) and the sulfonate stretch respectively, exactly reverse of the convention used for decades. The salient point is that both peaks result from mechanically coupled internal coordinates of both functional groups. This explains why the 1056 cm-1 and 971 cm -1 peaks shift together with changes in the sulfonate group environment (i.e., ion exchange or membrane dehydration). The assignments, correlated with extensive literature data, and new data showing both peaks vanishing upon rigorous dehydration (i.e. conversion of a C3V deprotonated -SO3- to a C1 -SO3H) of the membrane, were based on the correlation of observed IR peaks with animations of mechanically coupled internal coordinates obtained by DFT calculations. Further, the above methodology was augmented with polarization modulated infrared reflection-adsorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) to elucidate the Nafion ionomers functional groups that participate in self-assembly of Nafion onto Pt surfaces. A model for Nafion adsorption onto Pt shows that the Nafion side-chain sulfonate and CF3 co-adsorbates are structural components of the Nafion-Pt interface. The DFT-spectroscopy method of assigning peaks in terms of mechanically coupled internal

  15. Separation and recovery of lead from a mixture of some heavy metals using Amberlite IRC 718 chelating resin.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Archana; Sahu, K K

    2006-05-20

    A weakly acidic ion exchanger resin containing the iminodiacetate group has been used to separate and recover metal ion from their mixtures. Batch and column methods were applied for the separation studies. Previous study on the kinetics and thermodynamics shows that the selectivity of this resin for transition metals was quite high as compared to that of alkaline earth metals. The efficiency of this resin in different experimental conditions was established and because of the large difference in the distribution coefficient values separation of the metal ions from their mixture was performed.

  16. Photolysis and biodegradation of selected resin acids in River Saale water, Germany.

    PubMed

    McMartin, Dena W; Headley, John V; Neu, Thomas R; Friesen, Duane A

    2003-01-01

    The River Saale is the Elbe's major tributary flowing through the state of Thuringia, Germany and receives organics inputs from several industrial facilities including pulp and paper mills. Resin acids constitute a major class of polar organics and environmental toxins derived primarily from pulp and paper processing of softwoods. Since wastewater treatment methods at pulp and paper mills are not always capable of removing the persistent resin acids prior to effluent discharge, alternative or complementary degradation methods may be required. Here, the facile photodegradation of four resin acids--abietic, dehydroabietic, isopimaric, and pimaric--was observed with pseudo-first-order kinetics when exposed to broad band and UV254-radiation. Further experimentation in rotating annular biofilm reactors with UV-exposed and unexposed River Saale water spiked with abietic and dehydroabietic acids indicated that photolysis is an effective pretreatment method for resin acid biodegradation. The bacterial toxicity of the aqueous resin acids solutions as measured with Microtox luminescence assays decreased with exposure time. Consequently, photo- and biodegradation of the resin acids did not generate any notable amounts of toxic intermediates and/or the intermediates formed were further degraded into compounds of lower toxicity than the parents. With tandem photo- and biological treatment at pulp and paper mills, as well as in-situ degradation by solar radiation and natural biofilms within the River Saale, resin acid inputs can be reduced in both concentration and toxicity to near undetectable levels with little or no ecological significance.

  17. Combined ion exchange treatment for removal of dissolved organic matter and hardness.

    PubMed

    Apell, Jennifer N; Boyer, Treavor H

    2010-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) and hardness cations are two common constituents of natural waters that substantially impact water treatment processes. Anion exchange treatment, and in particular magnetic ion exchange (MIEX), has been shown to effectively remove DOM from natural waters. An important advantage of the MIEX process is that it is used as a slurry in a completely mixed flow reactor at the beginning of the treatment train. Hardness ions can be removed with cation exchange resins, although typically using a fixed bed reactor at the end of a treatment train. In this research, the feasibility of combining anion and cation exchange treatment in a single completely mixed reactor for treatment of raw water was investigated. The sequence of anion and cation exchange treatment, the number of regeneration cycles, and the chemistry of the regeneration solution were systematically explored. Simultaneous removal of DOM (70% as dissolved organic carbon) and hardness (>55% as total hardness) was achieved by combined ion exchange treatment. Combined ion exchange is expected to be useful as a pre-treatment for membrane systems because both DOM and divalent cations are major foulants of membranes.

  18. Electrochemical Ion-Exchange Regeneration and Fluidized Bed Crystallization for Zero-Liquid-Discharge Water Softening.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingying; Davis, Jake R; Nguyen, Chi H; Baygents, James C; Farrell, James

    2016-06-01

    This research investigated the use of an electrochemical system for regenerating ion-exchange media and for promoting the crystallization of hardness minerals in a fluidized bed crystallization reactor (FBCR). The closed-loop process eliminates the creation of waste brine solutions that are normally produced when regenerating ion-exchange media. A bipolar membrane electrodialysis stack was used to generate acids and bases from 100 mM salt solutions. The acid was used to regenerate weak acid cation (WAC) ion-exchange media used for water softening. The base solutions were used to absorb CO2 gas and to provide a source of alkalinity for removing noncarbonate hardness by WAC media operated in H(+) form. The base solutions were also used to promote the crystallization of CaCO3 and Mg(OH)2 in a FBCR. The overall process removes hardness ions from the water being softened and replaces them with H(+) ions, slightly decreasing the pH value of the softened water. The current utilization efficiency for acid and base production was ∼75% over the operational range of interest, and the energy costs for producing acids and bases were an order of magnitude lower than the costs for purchasing acid and base in bulk quantities. Ion balances indicate that the closed-loop system will accumulate SO4(2-), Cl(-), and alkali metal ions. Acid and base balances indicate that for a typical water, small amounts of base will be accumulated. PMID:27161852

  19. Electrochemical Ion-Exchange Regeneration and Fluidized Bed Crystallization for Zero-Liquid-Discharge Water Softening.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingying; Davis, Jake R; Nguyen, Chi H; Baygents, James C; Farrell, James

    2016-06-01

    This research investigated the use of an electrochemical system for regenerating ion-exchange media and for promoting the crystallization of hardness minerals in a fluidized bed crystallization reactor (FBCR). The closed-loop process eliminates the creation of waste brine solutions that are normally produced when regenerating ion-exchange media. A bipolar membrane electrodialysis stack was used to generate acids and bases from 100 mM salt solutions. The acid was used to regenerate weak acid cation (WAC) ion-exchange media used for water softening. The base solutions were used to absorb CO2 gas and to provide a source of alkalinity for removing noncarbonate hardness by WAC media operated in H(+) form. The base solutions were also used to promote the crystallization of CaCO3 and Mg(OH)2 in a FBCR. The overall process removes hardness ions from the water being softened and replaces them with H(+) ions, slightly decreasing the pH value of the softened water. The current utilization efficiency for acid and base production was ∼75% over the operational range of interest, and the energy costs for producing acids and bases were an order of magnitude lower than the costs for purchasing acid and base in bulk quantities. Ion balances indicate that the closed-loop system will accumulate SO4(2-), Cl(-), and alkali metal ions. Acid and base balances indicate that for a typical water, small amounts of base will be accumulated.

  20. Photocatalytic reduction of nitrate using titanium dioxide for regeneration of ion exchange brine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Doudrick, Kyle; Westerhoff, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Nitrate is often removed from groundwater by ion exchange (IX) before its use as drinking water. Accumulation of nitrate in IX brine reduces the efficiency of IX regeneration and the useful life of the regeneration brine. For the first time, we present a strategy to photocatalytically reduce nitrate in IX brine, thereby extending the use of the brine. Titanium dioxide (Evonik P90), acting as photocatalyst, reduced nitrate effectively in both synthetic brines and sulfate-removed IX brine when formic acid (FA) was used as the hole scavenger (i.e., electron donor) and the initial FA to nitrate molar ratio (IFNR) was 5.6. Increasing the NaCl level in the synthetic brine slowed the nitrate reduction rate without affecting by-product selectivity of ammonium and gaseous N species (e.g., N(2), N(2)O). In a non-modified IX brine, nitrate removal was greatly inhibited owing to the presence of sulfate, which competed with nitrate for active surface sites on P90 and induced aggregation of P90 nanoparticles. After removing sulfate through barium sulfate precipitation, nitrate was effectively reduced; approximately 3.6 × 10(24) photons were required to reduce each mole of nitrate to 83% N Gases and 17% NH(4)(+). To make optimum use of FA and control the residual FA level in treated brine, the IFNR was varied. High IFNRs (e.g., 4, 5.6) were found to be more efficient for nitrate reduction but left higher residual FA in brine. IX column tests were performed to investigate the impact of residual FA for brine reuse. The residual FA in the brine did not significantly affect the nitrate removal capacity of IX resins, and formate contamination of treated water could be eliminated by rinsing with one bed volume of fresh brine.