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Sample records for acid ka-induced status

  1. Salidroside protects against kainic acid-induced status epilepticus via suppressing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Si, Pei-Pei; Zhen, Jun-Li; Cai, Yun-Lei; Wang, Wen-Jing; Wang, Wei-Ping

    2016-04-01

    There are numerous mechanisms by which the brain generates seizures. It is well known that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in status epilepticus (SE). Salidroside (SDS) extracted from Rhodiola rosea L. shows multiple bioactive properties, such as neuroprotection and antioxidant activity in vitro and in vivo. This study explored the role of SDS in kainic acid (KA)-induced SE and investigated the underlying mechanism. Latency to SE increased in the SDS-pretreated mice compared to the KA group, while the percentage of incidence of SE was significantly reduced. These results suggested that pretreatment with SDS not only delayed SE, but it also decreased the incidence of SE induced by KA. KA increased MDA level and reduced the production of SOD and GSH at multiple timepoints after KA administration. SDS inhibited the change of MDA, SOD and GSH induced by KA prior to SE onset, indicating that SDS protects against KA-induced SE via suppressing oxidative stress. Based on these results, we investigated the possible molecular mechanism of SDS. Pretreatment with SDS reversed the KA-induced decrease in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK); increased the sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) deacetylase activity in KA-treated mice, which had no demonstrable effect on SIRT1 mRNA and protein; and suppressed the KA-induced increase in Ace-FoxO1. These results showed that AMPK/SIRT1/FoxO1 signaling is possibly the molecular mechanism of neuroprotection by SDS. PMID:26940236

  2. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein haplodeficiency attenuates seizure severity and NF-κB-mediated neuroinflammation in kainic acid-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Shin, H J; Kim, H; Heo, R W; Kim, H J; Choi, W S; Kwon, H M; Roh, G S

    2014-07-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures followed by neuronal death are associated with neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is known as a transcriptional factor activating osmoprotective genes, and in brain, it is expressed in neuronal nuclei. Thus dysregulation of TonEBP may be involved in the pathology of KA-induced seizures. Here we used TonEBP heterozygote (+/-) mice to study the roles of TonEBP. Electroencephalographic study showed that TonEBP (+/-) mice reduced seizure frequency and severity compared with wild type during KA-induced status epilepticus. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting analysis showed that KA-induced neuroinflammation and BBB leakage were dramatically reduced in TonEBP (+/-) mice. Similarly, TonEBP-specific siRNA reduced glutamate-induced death in HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells. TonEBP haplodeficiency prevented KA-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and attenuated inflammation. Our findings identify TonEBP as a critical regulator of neuroinflammation and BBB leakage in KA-induced seizures, which suggests TonEBP as a good therapeutic target. PMID:24608792

  3. Role for pro-inflammatory cytokines in regulating expression of GABA transporter type 1 and 3 in specific brain regions of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Su, Jing; Yin, Jian; Qin, Wei; Sha, Suxu; Xu, Jun; Jiang, Changbin

    2015-03-01

    In general, pro-inflammatory cytokines (PICs) contribute to regulation of epilepsy-associated pathophysiological processes in the central nerve system. In this report, we examined the specific activation of PICs, namely IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in rat brain after kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus (SE). Also, we examined the role played by PICs in regulating expression of GABA transporter type 1 and 3 (GAT-1 and GAT-3, respectively), which are the two important subtypes of GATs responsible for the regulation of extracellular GABA levels in the brain. Our results show that IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were significantly increased in the parietal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala of KA-rats as compared with sham control animals (P < 0.05, KA rats vs. control rats). KA-induced SE also significantly increased (P < 0.05 vs. controls) the protein expression of GAT-1 and GAT-3 in those brain regions. In addition, central administration of antagonists to IL-1β and TNF-α receptors significantly attenuated amplified GAT-1 and GAT-3 (P < 0.05 vs. vehicle control for each antagonist group). However, antagonist to IL-6 receptor failed to attenuate enhancement in expression of GAT-1 and GAT-3 induced by KA-induced SE. Overall, our data demonstrate that PIC pathways are activated in the specific brain regions during SE which thereby selectively leads to upregulation of GABA transporters. As a result, it is likely that de-inhibition of GABA system is increased in the brain. This support a role for PICs in engagement of the adaptive mechanisms associated with epileptic activity, and has pharmacological implications to target specific PICs for neuronal dysfunction and vulnerability related to epilepsy. PMID:25708016

  4. Multi-omics profile of the mouse dentate gyrus after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Marijn; Bielefeld, Pascal; Fratantoni, Silvina A; Hubens, Chantal J; Piersma, Sander R; Pham, Thang V; Voskuyl, Rob A; Lucassen, Paul J; Jimenez, Connie R; Fitzsimons, Carlos P

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) can develop from alterations in hippocampal structure and circuit characteristics, and can be modeled in mice by administration of kainic acid (KA). Adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) contributes to hippocampal functions and has been reported to contribute to the development of TLE. Some of the phenotypical changes include neural stem and precursor cells (NPSC) apoptosis, shortly after their birth, before they produce hippocampal neurons. Here we explored these early phenotypical changes in the DG 3 days after a systemic injection of KA inducing status epilepticus (KA-SE), in mice. We performed a multi-omics experimental setup and analyzed DG tissue samples using proteomics, transcriptomics and microRNA profiling techniques, detecting the expression of 2327 proteins, 13401 mRNAs and 311 microRNAs. We here present a description of how these data were obtained and make them available for further analysis and validation. Our data may help to further identify and characterize molecular mechanisms involved in the alterations induced shortly after KA-SE in the mouse DG. PMID:27529540

  5. Multi-omics profile of the mouse dentate gyrus after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Schouten, Marijn; Bielefeld, Pascal; Fratantoni, Silvina A.; Hubens, Chantal J.; Piersma, Sander R.; Pham, Thang V.; Voskuyl, Rob A.; Lucassen, Paul J.; Jimenez, Connie R.; Fitzsimons, Carlos P.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) can develop from alterations in hippocampal structure and circuit characteristics, and can be modeled in mice by administration of kainic acid (KA). Adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) contributes to hippocampal functions and has been reported to contribute to the development of TLE. Some of the phenotypical changes include neural stem and precursor cells (NPSC) apoptosis, shortly after their birth, before they produce hippocampal neurons. Here we explored these early phenotypical changes in the DG 3 days after a systemic injection of KA inducing status epilepticus (KA-SE), in mice. We performed a multi-omics experimental setup and analyzed DG tissue samples using proteomics, transcriptomics and microRNA profiling techniques, detecting the expression of 2327 proteins, 13401 mRNAs and 311 microRNAs. We here present a description of how these data were obtained and make them available for further analysis and validation. Our data may help to further identify and characterize molecular mechanisms involved in the alterations induced shortly after KA-SE in the mouse DG. PMID:27529540

  6. Transcriptome analysis of the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell region after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus in juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Laurén, Hanna B; Lopez-Picon, Francisco R; Brandt, Annika M; Rios-Rojas, Clarissa J; Holopainen, Irma E

    2010-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms involved in epileptogenesis in the developing brain remain poorly understood. The gene array approach could reveal some of the factors involved by allowing the identification of a broad scale of genes altered by seizures. In this study we used microarray analysis to reveal the gene expression profile of the laser microdissected hippocampal CA1 subregion one week after kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus (SE) in 21-day-old rats, which are developmentally roughly comparable to juvenile children. The gene expression analysis with the Chipster software generated a total of 1592 differently expressed genes in the CA1 subregion of KA-treated rats compared to control rats. The KEGG database revealed that the identified genes were involved in pathways such as oxidative phosporylation (26 genes changed), and long-term potentiation (LTP; 18 genes changed). Also genes involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis, gliosis, inflammation, and GABAergic transmission were altered. To validate the microarray results we further examined the protein expression for a subset of selected genes, glial fibrillary protein (GFAP), apolipoprotein E (apo E), cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1), Purkinje cell protein 4 (PEP-19), and interleukin 8 receptor (CXCR1), with immunohistochemistry, which confirmed the transcriptome results. Our results showed that SE resulted in no obvious CA1 neuronal loss, and alterations in the expression pattern of several genes during the early epileptogenic phase were comparable to previous gene expression studies of the adult hippocampus of both experimental epileptic animals and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). However, some changes seem to occur after SE specifically in the juvenile rat hippocampus. Insight of the SE-induced alterations in gene expression and their related pathways could give us hints for the development of new target-specific antiepileptic drugs that interfere with the progression of the disease in the juvenile age

  7. The Effects of Acid Rain on Forest Nutrient Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Dale W.; Turner, John; Kelly, J. M.

    1982-06-01

    The effects of acidic atmospheric inputs on forest nutrient status must be assessed within the context of natural, internal acid production by carbonic and organic acids as well as the nutrient inputs and drains by management practices such as harvesting, fire, and fertilization. In all cases the anion associated with acid inputs must be mobile in the soil if leaching is to occur; immobilization of anions can effectively prevent cation leaching. Soil acidification will occur only if the often substantial buffering capacity of the soil in question is exceeded by acid inputs and if cation weathering from primary minerals is insufficient to offset cation losses by leaching. Such circumstances are rare but certainly could occur in theory, at least, given sufficiently large acid inputs on poorly buffered soils. Soils most sensitive to change are thought to be those of moderately acid pH and low cation exchange capacity. Neither very acid soils nor neutral, highly buffered soils are sensitive to acidification by acid rain. Given extremely high acid inputs, acid rain can cause temporary increases in nitrogen mineralization and nitritication as well as Al mobilization in soils. While temporary increases in N availability can cause increased forest growth in N-deficient forests, increased Al availability can cause toxic reactions in tree roots. Little is known about tree Al toxicity levels as yet, however. It must be emphasized that assessment of acid rain effects is a problem of quantification. Given sufficiently high inputs on sensitive sites, negative effects of acid rain must occur, as is true of inputs of any substance, including H2O. Acid rain inputs of sufficient magnitude to cause acute effects, such as growth increase due to N mobilization or growth decrease due to Al mobilization, are apparently very rare under ambient field conditions. Long-term effects on forest nutrient status can be either beneficial or adverse, depending on site nutrient status, silvicultural

  8. Therapeutic nucleic acids: current clinical status.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Kannan; Gogtay, Nithya Jaideep

    2016-09-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) are simple linear polymers that have been the subject of considerable research in the last two decades and have now moved into the realm of being stand-alone therapeutic agents. Much of this has stemmed from the appreciation that they carry out myriad functions that go beyond mere storage of genetic information and protein synthesis. Therapy with nucleic acids either uses unmodified DNA or RNA or closely related compounds. From both a development and regulatory perspective, they fall somewhere between small molecules and biologics. Several of these compounds are in clinical development and many have received regulatory approval for human use. This review addresses therapeutic uses of DNA based on antisense oligonucleotides, DNA aptamers and gene therapy; and therapeutic uses of RNA including micro RNAs, short interfering RNAs, ribozymes, RNA decoys and circular RNAs. With their specificity, functional diversity and limited toxicity, therapeutic nucleic acids hold enormous promise. However, challenges that need to be addressed include targeted delivery, mass production at low cost, sustaining efficacy and minimizing off-target toxicity. Technological developments will hold the key to this and help accelerate drug approvals in the years to come. PMID:27111518

  9. The effects of acid rain on forest nutrient status

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Turner, J.; Kelly, J.M.

    1982-06-01

    The effects of acidic atmospheric inputs on forest nutrient status must be assessed within the context of natural, internal acid production by carbonic and organic acids as well as the nutrient inputs and drains by management practices such as harvesting, fire, and fertilization. Soil acidification will occur only if the often substantial buffering capacity of the soil in question is exceeded by acid inputs and if cation weathering from primary minerals is insufficient to offset cation losses by leaching. Such circumstances are rare but certainly could occur given sufficiently large acid inputs on poorly buffered soils. Soils most sensitive to change are thought to be those of moderately acid pH and low cation exchange capacity. Neither very acid soils nor neutral, highly buffered soils are sensitive to acidification by acid rain. Given extremely high acid inputs, acid rain can cause temporary increases in nitrogen mineralization and nitrification as well as Al mobilization in soils. While temporary increases in N availability can cause increased forest growth in N-deficient forests, increased Al availability can cause toxic reactions in tree roots. Given sufficiently high inputs on sensitive sites, negative effects of acid rain must occur, as is true of inputs of any substance, including H/sub 2/O. Acid rain inputs of sufficient magnitude to cause acute effects, such as growth increase due to N mobilization or growth decrease due to Al mobilization, are apparently very rare under ambient field conditions. Long-term effects on forest nutrient status can be either beneficial or adverse, depending on site nutrient status, silvicultural practices, and amount of atmospheric inputs. (JMT)

  10. Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Technology Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, S. N.; King, R. B.; Prokopius, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    A review of the current phosphoric acid fuel cell system technology development efforts is presented both for multimegawatt systems for electric utility applications and for multikilowatt systems for on-site integrated energy system applications. Improving fuel cell performance, reducing cost, and increasing durability are the technology drivers at this time. Electrodes, matrices, intercell cooling, bipolar/separator plates, electrolyte management, and fuel selection are discussed.

  11. Epileptogenesis following Kainic Acid-Induced Status Epilepticus in Cyclin D2 Knock-Out Mice with Diminished Adult Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kondratiuk, Ilona; Plucinska, Gabriela; Miszczuk, Diana; Wozniak, Grazyna; Szydlowska, Kinga; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Filipkowski, Robert K; Lukasiuk, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether a substantial decrease in adult neurogenesis influences epileptogenesis evoked by the intra-amygdala injection of kainic acid (KA). Cyclin D2 knockout (cD2 KO) mice, which lack adult neurogenesis almost entirely, were used as a model. First, we examined whether status epilepticus (SE) evoked by an intra-amygdala injection of KA induces cell proliferation in cD2 KO mice. On the day after SE, we injected BrdU into mice for 5 days and evaluated the number of DCX- and DCX/BrdU-immunopositive cells 3 days later. In cD2 KO control animals, only a small number of DCX+ cells was observed. The number of DCX+ and DCX/BrdU+ cells/mm of subgranular layer in cD2 KO mice increased significantly following SE (p<0.05). However, the number of newly born cells was very low and was significantly lower than in KA-treated wild type (wt) mice. To evaluate the impact of diminished neurogenesis on epileptogenesis and early epilepsy, we performed video-EEG monitoring of wt and cD2 KO mice for 16 days following SE. The number of animals with seizures did not differ between wt (11 out of 15) and cD2 KO (9 out of 12) mice. The median latency to the first spontaneous seizure was 4 days (range 2-10 days) in wt mice and 8 days (range 2-16 days) in cD2 KO mice and did not differ significantly between groups. Similarly, no differences were observed in median seizure frequency (wt: 1.23, range 0.1-3.4; cD2 KO: 0.57, range 0.1-2.0 seizures/day) or median seizure duration (wt: 51 s, range 23-103; cD2 KO: 51 s, range 23-103). Our results indicate that SE-induced epileptogenesis is not disrupted in mice with markedly reduced adult neurogenesis. However, we cannot exclude the contribution of reduced neurogenesis to the chronic epileptic state. PMID:26020770

  12. Lower fetal status of docosahexaenoic acid, arachidonic acid and essential fatty acids is associated with less favorable neonatal neurological condition.

    PubMed

    Dijck-Brouwer, D A Janneke; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Bouwstra, Hylco; Decsi, Tamás; Boehm, Günther; Martini, Ingrid A; Boersma, E Rudy; Muskiet, Frits A J

    2005-01-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, notably arachidonic (AA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids are abundant in brain and may be conditionally essential in fetal life. We investigated umbilical artery (UA) and vein (UV) fatty acid compositions and early neonatal neurological condition in 317 term infants. Neurological condition was summarized as a clinical classification and a 'neurological optimality score' (NOS). Neurologically abnormal infants (n=27) had lower UV DHA and essential fatty acid (EFA) status. NOS correlated positively with AA (UV), and EFA (UV) and DHA status (UV and UA) and negatively with 18:2omega6 and omega9 (UV), and 20:3omega9, omega7 and C18 trans fatty acids (UV and UA). UV DHA, AA, saturated fatty acids, gestational age and obstetrical optimality score explained 16.2% of the NOS variance. Early postnatal neurological condition seems negatively influenced by lower fetal DHA, AA and EFA status. C18 trans fatty acids and 18:2omega6 may exert negative effects by impairment of LCP status. PMID:15589396

  13. Docosahexaenoic Acid Status in Pregnancy Determines the Maternal Docosahexaenoic Acid Status 3-, 6- and 12 Months Postpartum. Results from a Longitudinal Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Markhus, Maria Wik; Rasinger, Josef Daniel; Malde, Marian Kjellevold; Frøyland, Livar; Skotheim, Siv; Braarud, Hanne Cecilie; Stormark, Kjell Morten; Graff, Ingvild Eide

    2015-01-01

    Background Essential fatty acid status as well as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) declines during pregnancy and lactation. As a result, the DHA status may not be optimal for child development and may increase the risk for maternal postpartum depression. The objective of this study was to assess changes in the maternal fatty acid status from pregnancy to 12 months postpartum, and to study the impact of seafood consumption on the individual fatty acid status. Methods Blood samples and seafood consumption habits (gestation week 28, and three-, six- and 12 months postpartum) were collected in a longitudinal observational study of pregnant and postpartum women (n = 118). Multilevel linear modeling was used to assess both changes over time in the fatty acid status of red blood cells (RBC), and in the seafood consumption. Results Six fatty acids varied the most (>80%) across the four time points analyzed, including the derivative of the essential α-linoleic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3), DHA; the essential linoleic acid (LA, 18:2 n-6); and the LA derivative, arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6). Over all, a large variation in individuals’ DHA- and AA status was observed; however, over the 15-month study period only small inter-individual differences in the longitudinal trajectory of DHA- and AA abundance in the RBC were detected. The median intake of seafood was lower than recommended. Regardless, the total weekly frequency of seafood and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3)/DHA-supplement intake predicted the maternal level of DHA (μg/g RBC). Conclusion The period of depletion of the maternal DHA status during pregnancy and lactation, seem to turn to repletion from about six months postpartum towards one year after childbirth, irrespective of RBC concentration of DHA during pregnancy. Seafood and EPA/DHA-supplement intake predicted the DHA levels over time. Trial Registration www.helseforskning.etikkom.no 2009/570/REC, project number: 083.09 PMID:26331947

  14. Maternal B vitamin status in pregnancy week 18 according to reported use of folic acid supplements

    PubMed Central

    Bjørke-Monsen, Anne Lise; Roth, Christine; Magnus, Per; Midttun, Øivind; Nilsen, Roy M.; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Susser, Ezra; Vollset, Stein Emil; Ueland, Per Magne

    2013-01-01

    Scope Epidemiological studies on the association between pregnancy outcomes and use of periconceptional folic acid are often based on maternal reported intake. Use of folic acid during pregnancy is associated with a higher socioeconomic status known to have an impact on diet quality. We have studied plasma B vitamin status according to reported use of folic acid supplements during the periconceptional period in Norwegian women. Methods and results Plasma levels of folate, cobalamin, pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (vitamin B6), riboflavin and the metabolic markers total homocysteine, methylmalonic acid and 3-hydroxykynurenine were measured in pregnancy week 18 and related to reported intake of folic acid from 4 weeks prior to conception throughout week 18 in 2911 women from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Being a folic acid user during the periconceptional period was associated with a better socioeconomic status, and a higher intake of several micronutrients, including vitamins, trace-metals and omega 3 fatty acids. Folic acid users had a significantly better plasma B vitamin status. Conclusions Epidemiological data based on maternal reported intake of folic acid supplements during pregnancy, should take into account the numerous nutritional implications, in addition to higher blood folate levels, of being a folic acid user. PMID:23001761

  15. Biotechnological production of muconic acid: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Xie, Neng-Zhong; Liang, Hong; Huang, Ri-Bo; Xu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Muconic acid (MA), a high value-added bio-product with reactive dicarboxylic groups and conjugated double bonds, has garnered increasing interest owing to its potential applications in the manufacture of new functional resins, bio-plastics, food additives, agrochemicals, and pharmaceuticals. At the very least, MA can be used to produce commercially important bulk chemicals such as adipic acid, terephthalic acid and trimellitic acid. Recently, great progress has been made in the development of biotechnological routes for MA production. This present review provides a comprehensive and systematic overview of recent advances and challenges in biotechnological production of MA. Various biological methods are summarized and compared, and their constraints and possible solutions are also described. Finally, the future prospects are discussed with respect to the current state, challenges, and trends in this field, and the guidelines to develop high-performance microbial cell factories are also proposed for the MA production by systems metabolic engineering. PMID:24751381

  16. Circulating Unmetabolized Folic Acid: Relationship to Folate Status and Effect of Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Carolyn; O'Connor, Deborah; Koren, Gideon

    2012-01-01

    There are increasing concerns that exposure to unmetabolized folic acid, which results from folic acid intakes that overwhelm the liver's metabolic capacity, may be associated with adverse effects. In this paper, we examined the folic acid status of women of reproductive age in relation to dietary intake and the effect of folic acid supplementation (1.1 mg or 5 mg). Plasma unmetabolized folic acid was not significantly correlated with folate intake estimated by food frequency questionnaire or biomarkers. The proportion of women with detectable levels of unmetabolized folic acid increased from 65% to 100% after twelve weeks of supplementation (P < 0.05); however, the increase in concentrations did not reach statistical significance and the effect was not sustained. Moreover, there were no significant differences between the two doses. This suggests that there are mechanisms by which the body adapts to high folic acid intakes to limit exposure to unmetabolized folic acid. PMID:22529856

  17. Maternal Fatty Acid Status During Pregnancy and Child Autistic Traits: The Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    Steenweg-de Graaff, Jolien; Tiemeier, Henning; Ghassabian, Akhgar; Rijlaarsdam, Jolien; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Verhulst, Frank C; Roza, Sabine J

    2016-05-01

    ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids are important for brain function and development. We examined whether maternal polyunsaturated fatty acid status during pregnancy affects risk of autistic traits in childhood. Within the Generation R cohort, we measured maternal plasma polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations and the ω-3:ω-6 ratio in midpregnancy (Rotterdam, the Netherlands, 2001-2005). Child autistic traits at 6 years were assessed by using the Social Responsiveness Scale short form in 4,624 children. A lower maternal ω-3:ω-6 ratio during pregnancy was associated with more autistic traits in the offspring (β = -0.008, 95% confidence interval: -0.016, -0.001). In particular, a higher total ω-6 and linoleic acid status were associated with more autistic traits (all P's < 0.05). Associations were independent of child intelligence, suggesting that the fatty acid distribution specifically affects the development of autistic traits in addition to general neurodevelopment. Maternal plasma ω-3 status was not associated with child autistic traits and, consistently, neither was prenatal dietary fish intake. Our study shows that a lower prenatal ω-3:ω-6 ratio is associated with more child autistic traits, which is largely accounted for by higher ω-6 instead of lower ω-3 status. These results suggest a biological pathway between maternal fatty acid intake during pregnancy and autistic traits in the offspring. PMID:27052119

  18. STATUS OF RESEARCH TO DEVELOP ACIDIC DRY DEPOSITION MONITORING CAPABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dry deposition is thought to be as important as wet deposition in acidifying ecosystems. However, at present acidic dry deposition of relevant particles and gases cannot be monitored directly in a quantitative manner. The U.S. EPA Workshop on Dry Deposition (Report No. EPA-600/9-...

  19. Status of the lead/acid battery industry in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Richard

    Since 1985, the marked appreciation of the Taiwanese currency has exerted a strong influence on the local lead/acid battery industry. In particular, imports of automotive and motorcycle batteries have risen steadily. By contrast, there has been a significant increase in the production of small sealed batteries. The battery industry has recognized the need both to satisfy new environmental requirements and to invest in advanced equipment for battery manufacture.

  20. Status of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshay, M.; Prokopius, P. R.; Simons, S. N.; King, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    A review of the current commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system development efforts is presented. In both the electric utility and on-site integrated energy system applications, reducing cost and increasing reliability are important. The barrier to the attainment of these goals has been materials. The differences in approach among the three major participants are their technological features, including electrodes, matrices, intercell cooling, bipolar/separator plates, electrolyte management, fuel selection and system design philosophy.

  1. Impact of multiple micronutrient vs. iron - folic acid supplements on maternal anemia and micronutrient status in pregnancy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Multiple micronutrient (MMN) supplements could increase hemoglobin and improve micronutrient status of pregnant women more than iron ± folic acid supplements alone. Objective. To compare the effects of MMN vs. iron ± folic acid supplements on hemoglobin and micronutrient status of pregn...

  2. Achieving optimal essential fatty acid status in vegetarians: current knowledge and practical implications.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brenda C; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2003-09-01

    Although vegetarian diets are generally lower in total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol than are nonvegetarian diets, they provide comparable levels of essential fatty acids. Vegetarian, especially vegan, diets are relatively low in alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) compared with linoleic acid (LA) and provide little, if any, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Clinical studies suggest that tissue levels of long-chain n-3 fatty acids are depressed in vegetarians, particularly in vegans. n-3 Fatty acids have numerous physiologic benefits, including potent cardioprotective effects. These effects have been demonstrated for ALA as well as EPA and DHA, although the response is generally less for ALA than for EPA and DHA. Conversion of ALA by the body to the more active longer-chain metabolites is inefficient: < 5-10% for EPA and 2-5% for DHA. Thus, total n-3 requirements may be higher for vegetarians than for nonvegetarians, as vegetarians must rely on conversion of ALA to EPA and DHA. Because of the beneficial effects of n-3 fatty acids, it is recommended that vegetarians make dietary changes to optimize n-3 fatty acid status. PMID:12936959

  3. Docosahexaenoic acid status in females of reproductive age with maple syrup urine disease.

    PubMed

    Mazer, Laura M; Yi, Sarah H L; Singh, Rani H

    2010-04-01

    Individuals with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) have impaired metabolism of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) valine, isoleucine, and leucine. Life-long dietary therapy is recommended to restrict BCAA intake and thus prevent poor neurological outcomes and death. To maintain adequate nutritional status, the majority of protein and nutrients are derived from synthetic BCAA-free medical foods with variable fatty acid content. Given the restrictive diet and the importance of omega-3 fatty acids, particularly docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in neurological development, this study evaluated the dietary and fatty acid status of females of reproductive age with MSUD attending a metabolic camp. Healthy controls of similar age and sex were selected from existing normal laboratory data. Total lipid fatty acid concentration in plasma and erythrocytes was analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Participants with MSUD had normal to increased concentrations of plasma and erythrocyte alpha linolenic acid (ALA) but significantly lower concentrations of plasma and erythrocyte docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as percent of total lipid fatty acids compared with controls (plasma DHA: MSUD 1.03 +/- 0.35, controls 2.87 +/- 1.08; P = 0.001; erythrocyte DHA: MSUD 2.58 +/- 0.58, controls 3.66 +/- 0.80; P = 0.011). Dietary records reflected negligible or no DHA intake over the 3-day period prior to the blood draw (range 0-2 mg). These results suggest females of reproductive age with MSUD have lower blood DHA concentrations than age-matched controls. In addition, the presence of ALA in medical foods and the background diet may not counter the lack of preformed DHA in the diet. The implications of these results warrant further investigation. PMID:20217236

  4. Phenolic Acids (Gallic and Tannic Acids) Modulate Antioxidant Status and Cisplatin Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Akomolafe, Seun F.; Akinyemi, Ayodele J.; Anadozie, Scholarstical O.

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) or CDDP), used in the treatment of many solid-tissue cancers, has its chief side-effect in nephrotoxicity. Hence, this study sought to investigate and compare the protective effect of gallic acid (GA) and tannic acid (TA) against cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in rats. The rats were given a prophylactic treatment of GA and TA orally at a dose of 20 and 40 mg/kg body weight for 7 consecutive days before the administration of a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of cisplatin (CP) at 7.5 mg/kg bwt. The protective effects of both GA and TA on CP induced nephrotoxicity were investigated by assaying renal function, oxidative stress biomarkers, and histopathological examination of kidney architecture. A single dose of cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg bwt) injected i.p. caused a significant increase in some biomarkers of renal function (creatinine, uric acid, and urea levels), with a marked elevation in malondialdehyde (MDA) content accompanied by a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) content (103.27%) of kidney tissue as compared to control group. Furthermore, a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in kidney antioxidant enzymes (SOD, catalase, GPx, and GST) activity was observed. However, pretreatment with oral administration of tannic acid and gallic acid at a dose of 20 and 40 mg/kg body weight, respectively, for 7 days prior to cisplatin administration reduced histological renal damage and suppressed the generation of ROS, lipid peroxidation, and oxidative stress in kidney tissues. These results indicate that both gallic and tannic acids could serve as a preventive strategy against cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:27382634

  5. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid status in obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fekete, K; Györei, E; Lohner, S; Verduci, E; Agostoni, C; Decsi, T

    2015-06-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) status has recently been related to the pathogenesis of obesity. Our aims were to systematically review observational studies investigating LCPUFA status from different blood compartments in overweight or obese subjects and to assess the relationship between LCPUFA profile and obesity. The Ovid MEDLINE, Scopus and Cochrane Library CENTRAL databases were searched from inception to January 2014. The meta-analysis showed significant differences in the LCPUFA composition of total plasma lipids, plasma phospholipids and plasma cholesteryl esters between overweight or obese subjects and controls. Dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA) values were significantly higher in overweight or obese subjects compared with controls in all the investigated biomarkers. In addition, the DGLA/linoleic acid ratio (surrogate parameter for Δ6 desaturase activity) in plasma phospholipids was significantly elevated (mean difference [MD]: 0.05; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.02, 0.08; n = 280), while the arachidonic acid/DGLA ratio (surrogate parameter for Δ5 desaturase activity) was significantly decreased (MD: -0.55; 95% CI: -0.71, -0.39; n = 347) in overweight or obese subjects compared with controls. The results of the present meta-analysis confirm that LCPUFA profile is altered in obesity and suggest that the differences observed in desaturase activities may be responsible for the disturbed LCPUFA metabolism in obesity. PMID:25828602

  6. Basal omega-3 fatty acid status affects fatty acid and oxylipin responses to high-dose n3-HUFA in healthy volunteers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Baseline concentrations of highly unsaturated omega-3 fatty acid (n3-HUFA) may influence the ability of dietary n3-HUFA to affect changes in concentrations of esterified fatty acids and their metabolites. This study evaluates the influence of basal n3-HUFA and n3-HUFA metabolite status ...

  7. Fatty Acid Status and Its Relationship to Cognitive Decline and Homocysteine Levels in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Baierle, Marília; Vencato, Patrícia H.; Oldenburg, Luiza; Bordignon, Suelen; Zibetti, Murilo; Trentini, Clarissa M.; Duarte, Marta M. M. F.; Veit, Juliana C.; Somacal, Sabrina; Emanuelli, Tatiana; Grune, Tilman; Breusing, Nicolle; Garcia, Solange C.

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially the n-3 series, are known for their protective effects. Considering that cardiovascular diseases are risk factors for dementia, which is common at aging, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether fatty acid status in the elderly was associated with cognitive function and cardiovascular risk. Forty-five elderly persons (age ≥60 years) were included and divided into two groups based on their Mini-Mental Status Examination score adjusted for educational level: the case group (n = 12) and the control group (n = 33). Serum fatty acid composition, homocysteine (Hcy), hs-CRP, lipid profile and different cognitive domains were evaluated. The case group, characterized by reduced cognitive performance, showed higher levels of 14:0, 16:0, 16:1n-7 fatty acids and lower levels of 22:0, 24:1n-9, 22:6n-3 (DHA) and total PUFAs compared to the control group (p < 0.05). The n-6/n-3 ratio was elevated in both study groups, whereas alterations in Hcy, hs-CRP and lipid profile were observed in the case group. Cognitive function was positively associated with the 24:1n-9, DHA and total n-3 PUFAs, while 14:0, 16:0 and 16:1n-7 fatty acids, the n-6/n-3 ratio and Hcy were inversely associated. In addition, n-3 PUFAs, particularly DHA, were inversely associated with cardiovascular risk, assessed by Hcy levels in the elderly. PMID:25221976

  8. KINEMATIC VARIABLES AND BLOOD ACID-BASE STATUS IN THE ANALYSIS OF COLLEGIATE SWIMMERS’ ANAEROBIC CAPACITY

    PubMed Central

    Bielec, G.; Makar, P.; Laskowski, R.

    2013-01-01

    Short duration repeated maximal efforts are often used in swimming training to improve lactate tolerance, which gives swimmers the ability to maintain a high work rate for a longer period of time. The aim of the study was to examine the kinematics of swimming and its relation to the changes in blood acid-base status and potassium level. Seven collegiate swimmers, with at least 6 years of training experience, volunteered to participate in the study. The test consisted of 8 x 25 m front crawl performed with maximum effort. The rest period between repetitions was set to five seconds. Blood samples were taken from the fingertip at rest, after warm-up and in the 3rd minute after completion of the test. The swimming was recorded with a video recorder, for later analysis of time, velocity and technique (stroke index). Based on the swimming velocity results, the obtained curve can be divided into rapid decrease of velocity and relatively stable velocities. The breaking point of repetition in swimming velocity was assumed as the swimming velocity threshold and it was highly correlated with the decrease of the blood acid-base status (pH r=0.82, BE r=0.87, HCO3 - r=0.76; p<0.05 in all cases). There was no correlation between stroke index or fatigue index and blood acid-base status. Analysis of the swimming speed in the 8 x 25 m test seems to be helpful in evaluation of lactate tolerance (anaerobic capacity) in collegiate swimmers. PMID:24744491

  9. STREAM CHEMISTRY IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES: I. SYNOPTIC SURVEY DESIGN, ACID-BASE STATUS, AND REGIONAL PATTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess the regional acid-base status of streams in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern United States, spring baseflow chemistry was surveyed in a probability sample of 500 stream reaches representing a population of 64,300 reaches. Approximately half of the streams had acid neut...

  10. Impact of fatty acid status on immune function of children in low-income countries.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Andrew M; van der Merwe, Liandré

    2011-04-01

    In vitro and animal studies point to numerous mechanisms by which fatty acids, especially long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA), can modulate the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. These data strongly suggest that improving the fatty acid supply of young children in low-income countries might have immune benefits. Unfortunately, there have been virtually no studies of fatty acid/immune interactions in such settings. Clinical trial registers list over 150 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving PUFAs, only one in a low-income setting (the Gambia). We summarize those results here. There was evidence for improved growth and nutritional status, but the primary end point of chronic environmental enteropathy showed no benefit, possibly because the infants were still substantially breastfed. In high-income settings, there have been RCTs with fatty acids (usually LCPUFAs) in relation to 18 disease end points, for some of which there have been numerous trials (asthma, inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis). For these diseases, the evidence is judged reasonable for risk reduction for childhood asthma (but not in adults), as yielding possible benefit in Crohn's disease (insufficient evidence in ulcerative colitis) and for convincing evidence for rheumatoid arthritis at sufficient dose levels, though formal meta-analyses are not yet available. This analysis suggests that fatty acid interventions could yield immune benefits in children in poor settings, especially in non-breastfed children and in relation to inflammatory conditions such as persistent enteropathy. Benefits might include improved responses to enteric vaccines, which frequently perform poorly in low-income settings, and these questions merit randomized trials. PMID:21366869

  11. Non-convulsive status epilepticus associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody.

    PubMed

    Cikrikçili, Ugur; Ulusoy, Canan; Turan, Selin; Yildiz, Senay; Bilgiç, Basar; Hanagasi, Hasmet; Baykan, Betül; Tüzün, Erdem; Gürvit, Hakan

    2013-07-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-Ab) often presents with treatment-resistant partial seizures, as well as other central nervous system symptoms. In contrast to several other well-characterized autoantibodies, GAD-Ab has very rarely been associated with status epilepticus. We report a 63-year-old woman initially admitted with somnolence and psychiatric findings. The EEG findings, of generalized and rhythmical slow spike-wave activity over the posterior regions of both hemispheres, together with the clinical deterioration in responsiveness, led to the diagnosis of non-convulsive status epilepticus. Investigation of a broad panel of autoantibodies, revealed only increased serum GAD-Ab levels. Following methylprednisolone and intravenous immunoglobulin treatments, the patient's neurological symptoms improved, EEG findings disappeared and GAD-Ab levels significantly decreased. GAD-Ab should be added to the list of anti-neuronal antibodies associated with non-convulsive status epilepticus. Disappearance of clinical findings and seroreversion after immunotherapy suggest that GAD-Ab might be involved in seizure pathogenesis.  PMID:23820312

  12. Refractory status epilepticus and glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies in adults: presentation, treatment and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Ayaz M; Vines, Brannon L; Miller, David W; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Amara, Amy W

    2016-03-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-Abs) have been implicated in refractory epilepsy. The association with refractory status epilepticus in adults has been rarely described. We discuss our experience in managing three adult patients who presented with refractory status epilepticus associated with GAD-Abs. Case series with retrospective chart and literature review. Three patients without pre-existing epilepsy who presented to our institution with generalized seizures between 2013 and 2014 were identified. Seizures proved refractory to first and second-line therapies and persisted beyond 24 hours. Patient 1 was a 22-year-old female who had elevated serum GAD-Ab titres at 0.49 mmol/l (normal: <0.02) and was treated with multiple immuno- and chemotherapies, with eventual partial seizure control. Patient 2 was a 61-year-old black female whose serum GAD-Ab titre was 0.08 mmol/l. EEG showed persistent generalized periodic discharges despite maximized therapy with anticonvulsants but no immunotherapy, resulting in withdrawal of care and discharge to nursing home. Patient 3 was a 50-year-old black female whose serum GAD-Ab titre was 0.08 mmol/l, and was discovered to have pulmonary sarcoidosis. Treatment with steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin resulted in seizure resolution. Due to the responsiveness to immunotherapy, there may be an association between GAD-Abs and refractory seizures, including refractory status epilepticus. Causation cannot be established since GAD-Abs may be elevated secondary to concurrent autoimmune diseases or formed de novo in response to GAD antigen exposure by neuronal injury. Based on this report and available literature, there may be a role for immuno- and chemotherapy in the management of refractory status epilepticus associated with GAD-Abs. PMID:26878120

  13. Luteolin protects the hippocampus against neuron impairments induced by kainic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Wang, Su Jane

    2016-07-01

    Glutamatergic excitotoxicity is crucial in the pathogenesis of numerous brain disorders. Luteolin, a flavonoid compound, inhibits glutamate release, however, its ability to affect glutamate-induced brain injury is unknown. Therefore, this study evaluated the protective effect of luteolin against brain damage induced by kainic acid (KA), a glutamate analog. Rats were treated with luteolin (10 or 50mg/kg, intraperitoneally) 30min before an intraperitoneal injection of KA (15mg/kg). Luteolin treatment reduced the KA-induced seizure score and elevations of glutamate levels in the hippocampus. A histopathological analysis showed that luteolin attenuated KA-induced neuronal death and microglial activation in the hippocampus. An immunoblotting analysis showed that luteolin restored the KA-induced reduction in Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Furthermore, a Morris water maze test revealed that luteolin effectively prevented KA-induced learning and memory impairments. The results suggest that luteolin protected rat brains from KA-induced excitotoxic damage by reducing glutamate levels, mitigating inflammation, and enhancing Akt activation in the hippocampus. Therefore, luteolin may be beneficial for preventing or treating brain disorders associated with excitotoxic neuronal damage. PMID:27185356

  14. Refractory status epilepticus after inadvertent intrathecal injection of tranexamic acid treated by magnesium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Hatch, D M; Atito-Narh, E; Herschmiller, E J; Olufolabi, A J; Owen, M D

    2016-05-01

    We present a case of accidental injection of tranexamic acid during spinal anesthesia for an elective cesarean delivery. Immediately following intrathecal injection of 2mL of solution, the patient complained of severe back pain, followed by muscle spasm and tetany. As there was no evidence of spinal block, the medications given were checked and a 'used' ampoule of tranexamic acid was found on the spinal tray. General anesthesia was induced but muscle spasm and tetany persisted despite administration of a non-depolarizing muscle relaxant. Hemodynamic instability, ventricular tachycardia, and status epilepticus developed, which were refractory to phenytoin, diazepam, and infusions of thiopental, midazolam and amiodarone. Magnesium sulfate was administered postoperatively in the intensive care unit, following which the frequency of seizures decreased, eventually stopping. Unfortunately, on postoperative day three the patient died from cardiopulmonary arrest after an oxygen supply failure that was not associated with the initial event. This report underlines the importance of double-checking medications before injection in order to avoid a drug error. As well, it suggests that magnesium sulfate may be useful in stopping seizures caused by the intrathecal injection of tranexamic acid. PMID:26775897

  15. Physiological responses of dogs on exposure to hot, arid conditions. Acid-base status.

    PubMed

    Krausz, S; Marder, J

    1977-09-16

    Acid-base parameters were determined in chronically cannulated dogs exposed to ambient temperatures increasing from 25-47 degrees C (with relative humidity below 30%). pH increased from 7.409 +/- 0.004 (S.E.M.) to 7.538 +/- 0.017, PaCO2 decreased from 33.0 +/- 0.5 to 20.9 +/- 1.2 torr, and [HCO3-] decreased from 20.9 +/- 0.3 to 17.2 +/- 0.4 mEq/l. Minimal base excess change, together with a rapid return to normal parameters upon recooling to 25 degrees C, suggests that the stress is almost exclusively respiratory, with little metabolic involvement. Analysis of serial exposures shows no acclimatization effect in acid-base status. This suggests the possible existence of natural acclimation to heat in dogs maintained in a warm climate, permitting excellent tolerance of hot, arid conditions with limited acid-base disturbance. PMID:563058

  16. Influence of natural acidity and fisheries management activities upon the status of Adirondack fish populations

    SciTech Connect

    Retzsch, W.C.; Everett, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Acidification and the disappearance of fish from some Adirondack waters does not appear to be caused solely by acid rain. Acidification is a natural process under certain conditions and precipitation acidified by industrial emissions appears to be only one of many possible causes of pond, lake and stream acidification. Factors other than acid precipitation can cause acidification or reduce fish stocks. As a result of glaciation, northern New York State has hundreds of glacial ponds and lakes, most of which are dystrophic or oligotrophic. Many such waters are located in the western and central portions of the Adirondacks, an area frequently cited as exhibiting the most pronounced effects of acid rain. It is widely recognized that natural unpolluted bogs and peat deposits result in low pH environments. Seasonal and weather conditions also appear to have a substantial effect upon the acidity of peat-bog outflows. An evaluation of recent survey data on critically acidified Adirondack waters indicates that of 192 waters with values less than pH 5.0, approximately 61 percent appear to be directly influenced by natural bog conditions and an additional 14 percent are probably influenced. A review of historical and recent survey data suggest that significant factors, such as natural causes of acidification, low oxygen concentrations, high CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S concentrations, and extreme temperatures may have been ignored or underestimated in evaluating the cause of acidification and fish disappearances in some Adirondack waters. Another factor responsible for the current status of fish stocks in the Adirondacks involves past and present fishery resource management activities.

  17. Photodynamic therapy using 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced photosensitization: current clinical status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Stuart L.; Golub, Allyn L.; Shulman, D. Geoffrey

    1995-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy using 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced photosensitization (ALA PDT) via endogenous protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) synthesis has been reported as efficacious, using topical formulations, in the treatment of a variety of dermatologic diseases including superficial basal cell carcinoma, Bowen's disease, and actinic (solar) keratoses. Application of ALA PDT to the detection and treatment of both malignant and non-malignant diseases of internal organs has recently been reported. Local internal application of ALA has been used for the detection, via PpIX fluorescence, of pathological conditions of the human urinary bladder and for selective endometrial ablation in animal model systems. Systemic, oral administration of ALA has been used for ALA PDT of superficial head and neck cancer and of colorectal cancer. This paper reviews the current clinical status of ALA PDT.

  18. Serum phospholipid monounsaturated fatty acid composition and Δ-9-desaturase activity are associated with early alteration of fasting glycemic status.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae Sun; Baek, Seung Han; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Jong Ho; Kim, Oh Yoen

    2014-09-01

    Because alterations in blood fatty acid (FA) composition by dietary lipids are associated with insulin resistance and related metabolic disorders, we hypothesized that serum phospholipid FA composition would reflect the early alteration of fasting glycemic status, even in people without metabolic syndrome (MetS). To examine this hypothesis, serum phospholipid FA, desaturase activities, fasting glycemic status, and cardiometabolic parameters were measured in study participants (n = 1022; 30-69 years; male, n = 527; female, n = 495; nondiabetics without disease) who were stratified into normal fasting glucose (NFG) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) groups. Total monounsaturated FA (MUFA), oleic acid (OA; 18:1n-9), dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA; 20:3n-6), Δ-9-desaturase activity (D9D; 18:1n-9/18:0), and DGLA/linoleic acid (20:3n-6/18:2n-6) in serum phospholipids were significantly higher in IFG subjects than NFG controls. Study subjects were subdivided into 4 groups, based on fasting glucose levels and MetS status. Palmitoleic acid (16:1n-7) was highest in IFG-MetS and lowest in NFG-non-MetS subjects. Oleic acid and D9D were higher in IFG-MetS than in the other 3 groups. Dihomo-γ-linolenic acid and DGLA/linoleic acid were higher in MetS than in non-MetS, regardless of fasting glucose levels. The high-sensitivity C-reactive proteins (hs-CRPs) and 8-epi-prostaglandin-F2α were higher in IFG than in NFG, regardless of MetS status. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins were higher in IFG-MetS than in the other 3 groups. Total MUFAs, OA, and D9D were positively correlated with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, fasting glucose, triglyceride, hs-CRP, and 8-epi-prostaglandin-F2α. Palmitoleic acid was positively correlated with triglyceride and hs-CRP. Lastly, total MUFA, OA, palmitoleic acid, and D9D were associated with early alteration of fasting glycemic status, therefore suggesting that these may be useful markers for predicting the risk of type 2

  19. Perinatal protein restriction affects milk free amino acid and fatty acid profile in lactating rats: potential role on pup growth and metabolic status.

    PubMed

    Martin Agnoux, Aurore; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Boquien, Clair-Yves; David, Agnes; Desnots, Emmanuelle; Ferchaud-Roucher, Veronique; Darmaun, Dominique; Parnet, Patricia; Alexandre-Gouabau, Marie-Cécile

    2015-07-01

    Perinatal undernutrition affects not only fetal and neonatal growth but also adult health outcome, as suggested by the metabolic imprinting concept. Although maternal milk is the only channel through which nutrients are transferred from mother to offspring during the postnatal period, the impact of maternal undernutrition on milk composition is poorly understood. The present study investigates, in a rat model of nutritional programming, the effects of feeding an isocaloric, low-protein diet throughout gestation and lactation on milk composition and its possible consequences on offspring's growth and metabolic status. We used an integrated methodological approach that combined targeted analyses of macronutrients, free amino acid and fatty acid content throughout lactation, with an untargeted mass-spectrometric-based metabolomic phenotyping. Whereas perinatal dietary protein restriction failed to alter milk protein content, it dramatically decreased the concentration of most free amino acids at the end of lactation. Interestingly, a decrease of several amino acids involved in insulin secretion or gluconeogenesis was observed, suggesting that maternal protein restriction during the perinatal period may impact the insulinotrophic effect of milk, which may, in turn, account for the slower growth of the suckled male offspring. Besides, the decrease in sulfur amino acids may alter redox status in the offspring. Maternal undernutrition was also associated with an increase in milk total fatty acid content, with modifications in their pattern. Altogether, our results show that milk composition is clearly influenced by maternal diet and suggest that alterations in milk composition may play a role in offspring growth and metabolic programming. PMID:25935308

  20. Effects of trimetazidine in ethanol- and acetic acid-induced colitis: oxidant/anti-oxidant status.

    PubMed

    Girgin; Karaoglu; Tüzün; Erkus; Ozütemiz; Dinçer; Batur; Tanyalçin

    1999-11-01

    There is overwhelming evidence in favour of a significant role of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM) in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in man and in experimental animal models. This study was undertaken to investigate the possible protective effects of pretreatment with trimetazidine (TMZ) on the oxidant-anti-oxidant balance in ethanol- and acetic acid-induced colonic damage in rats. TMZ was chosen because of its various cytoprotective features (preserving cellular ATP levels, limiting intracellular acidosis and limiting inorganic phosphate, Na(+) and Ca(2+) accumulation) and anti-oxy characteristics which were previously reported. A total of 80 rats were randomized into eight major groups each consisting of 10 animals. Animals in groups 1, 2 and 3 served as models of ethanol-induced colitis (0.25 ml of 30% (v/v) ethanol), while group 4 served as their control. Animals in groups 5, 6 and 7 served as models of acetic acid-induced colitis (1 ml of 4% (v/v) acetic acid), while group 8 served as their control. TMZ was administered 5 mg/kg by intrarectal (i.r.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) routes to groups 1, 2, 5 and 6. Intraperitoneal administration of TMZ was used in order to evaluate its systemic effect while i.r. administration was used to determine its local effect. After decapitation, colon mucosa samples were obtained and evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities as markers for inflammation, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels as markers for oxidant stress and reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels as markers for anti-oxidant status were determined. Acute colitis was observed in macroscopic and microscopic evaluation in ethanol- and acetic acid-administered groups compared with controls (P = 0.000). The macroscopic and microscopic scores in colitis groups were correlated with MPO activities (r = 0.5365, P = 0.000 and r = 0.5499, P = 0.000, respectively). MDA

  1. Nuclear Localization of Haa1, Which Is Linked to Its Phosphorylation Status, Mediates Lactic Acid Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Minetaka; Akase, Shin-Pei; Nakanishi, Ryota; Horie, Hitoshi; Kaneko, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-01

    Improvement of the lactic acid resistance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for the application of the yeast in industrial production of lactic acid from renewable resources. However, we still do not know the precise mechanisms of the lactic acid adaptation response in yeast and, consequently, lack effective approaches for improving its lactic acid tolerance. To enhance our understanding of the adaptation response, we screened for S. cerevisiae genes that confer enhanced lactic acid resistance when present in multiple copies and identified the transcriptional factor Haa1 as conferring resistance to toxic levels of lactic acid when overexpressed. The enhanced tolerance probably results from increased expression of its target genes. When cells that expressed Haa1 only from the endogenous promoter were exposed to lactic acid stress, the main subcellular localization of Haa1 changed from the cytoplasm to the nucleus within 5 min. This nuclear accumulation induced upregulation of the Haa1 target genes YGP1, GPG1, and SPI1, while the degree of Haa1 phosphorylation observed under lactic acid-free conditions decreased. Disruption of the exportin gene MSN5 led to accumulation of Haa1 in the nucleus even when no lactic acid was present. Since Msn5 was reported to interact with Haa1 and preferentially exports phosphorylated cargo proteins, our results suggest that regulation of the subcellular localization of Haa1, together with alteration of its phosphorylation status, mediates the adaptation to lactic acid stress in yeast. PMID:24682296

  2. Anthocyanins do not influence long-chain n-3 fatty acid status: studies in cells, rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Vauzour, David; Tejera, Noemi; O'Neill, Colette; Booz, Valeria; Jude, Baptiste; Wolf, Insa M A; Rigby, Neil; Silvan, Jose Manuel; Curtis, Peter J; Cassidy, Aedin; de Pascual-Teresa, Sonia; Rimbach, Gerald; Minihane, Anne Marie

    2015-03-01

    Increased tissue status of the long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is associated with cardiovascular and cognitive benefits. Limited epidemiological and animal data suggest that flavonoids, and specifically anthocyanins, may increase EPA and DHA levels, potentially by increasing their synthesis from the shorter-chain n-3 PUFA, α-linolenic acid. Using complimentary cell, rodent and human studies we investigated the impact of anthocyanins and anthocyanin-rich foods/extracts on plasma and tissue EPA and DHA levels and on the expression of fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2), which represents the rate limiting enzymes in EPA and DHA synthesis. In experiment 1, rats were fed a standard diet containing either palm oil or rapeseed oil supplemented with pure anthocyanins for 8 weeks. Retrospective fatty acid analysis was conducted on plasma samples collected from a human randomized controlled trial where participants consumed an elderberry extract for 12 weeks (experiment 2). HepG2 cells were cultured with α-linolenic acid with or without select anthocyanins and their in vivo metabolites for 24 h and 48 h (experiment 3). The fatty acid composition of the cell membranes, plasma and liver tissues were analyzed by gas chromatography. Anthocyanins and anthocyanin-rich food intake had no significant impact on EPA or DHA status or FADS2 gene expression in any model system. These data indicate little impact of dietary anthocyanins on n-3 PUFA distribution and suggest that the increasingly recognized benefits of anthocyanins are unlikely to be the result of a beneficial impact on tissue fatty acid status. PMID:25573539

  3. Anthocyanins do not influence long-chain n-3 fatty acid status: studies in cells, rodents and humans☆

    PubMed Central

    Vauzour, David; Tejera, Noemi; O'Neill, Colette; Booz, Valeria; Jude, Baptiste; Wolf, Insa M.A.; Rigby, Neil; Silvan, Jose Manuel; Curtis, Peter J.; Cassidy, Aedin; de Pascual-Teresa, Sonia; Rimbach, Gerald; Minihane, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Increased tissue status of the long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is associated with cardiovascular and cognitive benefits. Limited epidemiological and animal data suggest that flavonoids, and specifically anthocyanins, may increase EPA and DHA levels, potentially by increasing their synthesis from the shorter-chain n-3 PUFA, α-linolenic acid. Using complimentary cell, rodent and human studies we investigated the impact of anthocyanins and anthocyanin-rich foods/extracts on plasma and tissue EPA and DHA levels and on the expression of fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2), which represents the rate limiting enzymes in EPA and DHA synthesis. In experiment 1, rats were fed a standard diet containing either palm oil or rapeseed oil supplemented with pure anthocyanins for 8 weeks. Retrospective fatty acid analysis was conducted on plasma samples collected from a human randomized controlled trial where participants consumed an elderberry extract for 12 weeks (experiment 2). HepG2 cells were cultured with α-linolenic acid with or without select anthocyanins and their in vivo metabolites for 24 h and 48 h (experiment 3). The fatty acid composition of the cell membranes, plasma and liver tissues were analyzed by gas chromatography. Anthocyanins and anthocyanin-rich food intake had no significant impact on EPA or DHA status or FADS2 gene expression in any model system. These data indicate little impact of dietary anthocyanins on n-3 PUFA distribution and suggest that the increasingly recognized benefits of anthocyanins are unlikely to be the result of a beneficial impact on tissue fatty acid status. PMID:25573539

  4. Effect of Dietary n − 3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Oxidant/Antioxidant Status in Macrosomic Offspring of Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guermouche, B.; Soulimane-Mokhtari, N. A.; Bouanane, S.; Merzouk, H.; Merzouk, S.; Narce, M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the effect of dietary n − 3 PUFA on oxidant/antioxidant status, in vitro very low and low density lipoprotein (VLDL-LDL), and VLDL-LDL-fatty acid composition in macrosomic pups of diabetic mothers. We hypothesized that n − 3 PUFA would improve oxidative stress in macrosomia. Diabetes was induced in female Wistar rats fed with the ISIO diet (control) or with the EPAX diet (enriched in n − 3 PUFAs), by streptozotocin. The macrosomic pups were killed at birth (day 0) and at adulthood (day 90). Lipid parameters and VLDL-LDL-fatty acid composition were investigated. The oxidant/antioxidant status was determined by measuring plasma oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), hydroperoxides, carbonyl proteins, and VLDL-LDL oxidation. Macrosomic rats of ISIO fed diabetic mothers showed an increase in plasma and VLDL-LDL-triglycerides and VLDL-LDL-cholesterol levels and altered VLDL-LDL-fatty acid composition. Plasma ORAC was low with high hydroperoxide and carbonyl protein levels. The in vitro oxidizability of VLDL-LDL was enhanced in these macrosomic rats. The EPAX diet corrected lipid parameters and improved oxidant/antioxidant status but increased VLDL-LDL susceptibility to oxidation. Macrosomia is associated with lipid abnormalities and oxidative stress. n − 3 PUFA exerts favorable effects on lipid metabolism and on the oxidant/antioxidant status of macrosomic rats. However, there are no evident effects on VLDL-LDL oxidation. PMID:24987679

  5. The status of the passive treatment systems for acid mine drainage in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Sangwoo; Kim, Sunjoon; Ko, Juin

    2008-09-01

    This study was performed to investigate the operating status, evaluate the problems, and discuss possible improvement methods of passive treatment systems for acid mine drainage (AMD) in South Korea. Thirty-five passive treatment systems in 29 mines have been constructed from 1996 to 2002 using successive alkalinity producing systems (SAPS) as the main treatment process. We investigated 29 systems (two for metal mines), 19 of which revealed various problems. Overflows of drainage from SAPS, wetland, or oxidation ponds were caused by the flow rate exceeding the capacities of the facilities or by the reduced permeability of the organic substance layer. Leakages occurred at various parts of the systems. In some cases, clogged and broken pipes at the mouths of the mine adits made the whole system unusable. Some systems showed very low efficiencies without apparent leakage or overflow. Even though the systems showed fairly good efficiencies in metal removal ratios (mainly iron) and pH control; sulfate removal rates were very poor except in three systems, which may indicate very poor sulfate reductions with sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) as a means.

  6. Evidence for Status Epilepticus and Pro-Inflammatory Changes after Intranasal Kainic Acid Administration in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sabilallah, Mounira; Fontanaud, Pierre; Linck, Nathalie; Boussadia, Badreddine; Peyroutou, Ronan; Lasgouzes, Thibault; Rassendren, François A; Marchi, Nicola; Hirbec, Helene E

    2016-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) is routinely used to elicit status epilepticus (SE) and epileptogenesis. Among the available KA administration protocols, intranasal instillation (IN) remains understudied. Dosages of KA were instilled IN in mice. Racine Scale and Video-EEG were used to assess and quantify SE onset. Time spent in SE and spike activity was quantified for each animal and confirmed by power spectrum analysis. Immunohistochemistry and qPCR were performed to define brain inflammation occurring after SE, including activated microglial phenotypes. Long term video-EEG recording was also performed. Titration of IN KA showed that a dose of 30 mg/kg was associated with low mortality while eliciting SE. IN KA provoked at least one behavioral and electrographic SE in the majority of the mice (>90%). Behavioral and EEG SE were accompanied by a rapid and persistent microglial-astrocytic cell activation and hippocampal neurodegeneration. Specifically, microglial modifications involved both pro- (M1) and anti-inflammatory (M2) genes. Our initial long-term video-EEG exploration conducted using a small cohort of mice indicated the appearance of spike activity or SE. Our study demonstrated that induction of SE is attainable using IN KA in mice. Typical pro-inflammatory brain changes were observed in this model after SE, supporting disease pathophysiology. Our results are in favor of the further development of IN KA as a means to study seizure disorders. A possibility for tailoring this model to drug testing or to study mechanisms of disease is offered. PMID:26963100

  7. Evidence for Status Epilepticus and Pro-Inflammatory Changes after Intranasal Kainic Acid Administration in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sabilallah, Mounira; Fontanaud, Pierre; Linck, Nathalie; Boussadia, Badreddine; Peyroutou, Ronan; Lasgouzes, Thibault; Rassendren, François A.

    2016-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) is routinely used to elicit status epilepticus (SE) and epileptogenesis. Among the available KA administration protocols, intranasal instillation (IN) remains understudied. Dosages of KA were instilled IN in mice. Racine Scale and Video-EEG were used to assess and quantify SE onset. Time spent in SE and spike activity was quantified for each animal and confirmed by power spectrum analysis. Immunohistochemistry and qPCR were performed to define brain inflammation occurring after SE, including activated microglial phenotypes. Long term video-EEG recording was also performed. Titration of IN KA showed that a dose of 30 mg/kg was associated with low mortality while eliciting SE. IN KA provoked at least one behavioral and electrographic SE in the majority of the mice (>90%). Behavioral and EEG SE were accompanied by a rapid and persistent microglial-astrocytic cell activation and hippocampal neurodegeneration. Specifically, microglial modifications involved both pro- (M1) and anti-inflammatory (M2) genes. Our initial long-term video-EEG exploration conducted using a small cohort of mice indicated the appearance of spike activity or SE. Our study demonstrated that induction of SE is attainable using IN KA in mice. Typical pro-inflammatory brain changes were observed in this model after SE, supporting disease pathophysiology. Our results are in favor of the further development of IN KA as a means to study seizure disorders. A possibility for tailoring this model to drug testing or to study mechanisms of disease is offered. PMID:26963100

  8. Current status and emerging role of glutathione in food grade lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have taken centre stage in perspectives of modern fermented food industry and probiotic based therapeutics. These bacteria encounter various stress conditions during industrial processing or in the gastrointestinal environment. Such conditions are overcome by complex molecular assemblies capable of synthesizing and/or metabolizing molecules that play a specific role in stress adaptation. Thiols are important class of molecules which contribute towards stress management in cell. Glutathione, a low molecular weight thiol antioxidant distributed widely in eukaryotes and Gram negative organisms, is present sporadically in Gram positive bacteria. However, new insights on its occurrence and role in the latter group are coming to light. Some LAB and closely related Gram positive organisms are proposed to possess glutathione synthesis and/or utilization machinery. Also, supplementation of glutathione in food grade LAB is gaining attention for its role in stress protection and as a nutrient and sulfur source. Owing to the immense benefits of glutathione, its release by probiotic bacteria could also find important applications in health improvement. This review presents our current understanding about the status of glutathione and its role as an exogenously added molecule in food grade LAB and closely related organisms. PMID:22920585

  9. Harmful effects of atmospheric nitrous acid on the physiological status of Scots pine trees.

    PubMed

    Sakugawa, Hiroshi; Cape, J Neil

    2007-06-01

    An open top chamber experiment was carried out in the summer of 2003 to examine the effect of nitrous acid (HONO) gas on the physiological status of Scots pine saplings (Pinus sylvestris). Four-year-old pine trees were exposed to two different levels of HONO gas (at ca. 2.5 ppb and 5.0 ppb) and a control (filtered air) from early evening to early morning (18:00-6:00), in duplicate open top chambers. Significant decreases in the ratios of chlorophylls a to b, an increase in the carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio, and a reduction of maximum yield of PS II (F(v)/F(m)) in pine needles were also observed after the 2 months' fumigation. Cation contents of pine needles were also decreased by the fumigation with HONO gas. The results could be explained by the harmful effects of OH radicals, generated from photolysis of HONO gas, and/or aqueous phase HONO (NO(2)(-)/HONO), on the photosynthetic capacity of pine needles. PMID:17400347

  10. High oleic ready-to-use therapeutic food maintains docosahexaenoic acid status in severe malnutrition: a randomized, blinded trial

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ji-Cheng; Liu, Lei; Zeilani, Mamane; Ickes, Scott; Trehan, Indi; Maleta, Ken; Craig, Christina; Thakwalakwa, Chrissie; Singh, Lauren; Brenna, J. Thomas; Manary, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) is the preferred treatment for uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition. RUTF contains large amounts of linoleic acid and very little α-linolenic acid, which may reduce the availability of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) to the recovering child. A novel high oleic RUTF (HO-RUTF) was developed with less linoleic acid to determine its effect on DHA and EPA status. Methods We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, clinical effectiveness trial treating rural Malawian children with severe acute malnutrition. Children were treated with either HO-RUTF or standard RUTF. Plasma phospholipid (PL) fatty acid status was measured upon enrollment and after 4 weeks and compared between the two intervention groups. Results Among the 141 children enrolled, 48/71 receiving HO-RUTF and 50/70 receiving RUTF recovered. Plasma PL samples were analyzed from 43 children consuming HO-RUTF and 35 children consuming RUTF. The change in DHA content during the first 4 weeks was +4% and −25% in the HO-RUTF and RUTF groups, respectively (P = 0.04). For EPA, the change in content was 63% and −24% in the HO-RUTF and RUTF groups (P < 0.001). For arachidonic acid, the change in content was −3% and 13% in the HO-RUTF and RUTF groups (P < 0.009). Conclusions The changes in DHA and EPA seen in the children treated with HO-RUTF warrant further investigation as they suggest HO-RUTF support improved PUFA status, necessary for neural development and recovery. PMID:25633498

  11. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Status Enhances the Prevention of Cognitive Decline by B Vitamins in Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Oulhaj, Abderrahim; Jernerén, Fredrik; Refsum, Helga; Smith, A David; de Jager, Celeste A

    2015-01-01

    A randomized trial (VITACOG) in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) found that B vitamin treatment to lower homocysteine slowed the rate of cognitive and clinical decline. We have used data from this trial to see whether baseline omega-3 fatty acid status interacts with the effects of B vitamin treatment. 266 participants with MCI aged ≥70 years were randomized to B vitamins (folic acid, vitamins B6 and B12) or placebo for 2 years. Baseline cognitive test performance, clinical dementia rating (CDR) scale, and plasma concentrations of total homocysteine, total docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids (omega-3 fatty acids) were measured. Final scores for verbal delayed recall, global cognition, and CDR sum-of-boxes were better in the B vitamin-treated group according to increasing baseline concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids, whereas scores in the placebo group were similar across these concentrations. Among those with good omega-3 status, 33% of those on B vitamin treatment had global CDR scores >0 compared with 59% among those on placebo. For all three outcome measures, higher concentrations of docosahexaenoic acid alone significantly enhanced the cognitive effects of B vitamins, while eicosapentaenoic acid appeared less effective. When omega-3 fatty acid concentrations are low, B vitamin treatment has no effect on cognitive decline in MCI, but when omega-3 levels are in the upper normal range, B vitamins interact to slow cognitive decline. A clinical trial of B vitamins combined with omega-3 fatty acids is needed to see whether it is possible to slow the conversion from MCI to AD. PMID:26757190

  12. Effects of thyroid hormone status on metabolic pathways of arachidonic acid in mice and humans: A targeted metabolomic approach.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xuan; Sa, Rina; Ye, Cheng; Zhang, Duo; Zhang, Shengjie; Xia, Hongfeng; Wang, Yu-cheng; Jiang, Jingjing; Yin, Huiyong; Ying, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms of cardiovascular diseases are frequently found in patients with hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. However, it is unknown whether arachidonic acid metabolites, the potent mediators in cardiovascular system, are involved in cardiovascular disorders caused by hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. To answer this question, serum levels of arachidonic acid metabolites in human subjects with hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism and mice with hypothyroidism or thyroid hormone treatment were determined by a mass spectrometry-based method. Over ten arachidonic acid metabolites belonging to three catalytic pathways: cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases, and cytochrome P450, were quantified simultaneously and displayed characteristic profiles under different thyroid hormone status. The level of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, a cytochrome P450 metabolite, was positively correlated with thyroid hormone level and possibly contributed to the elevated blood pressured in hyperthyroidism. The increased prostanoid (PG) I2 and decreased PGE2 levels in hypothyroid patients might serve to alleviate atherosclerosis associated with dyslipidemia. The elevated level of thromboxane (TX) A2, as indicated by TXB2, in hyperthyroid patients and mice treated with thyroid hormone might bring about pulmonary hypertension frequently found in hyperthyroid patients. In conclusion, our prospective study revealed that arachidonic acid metabolites were differentially affected by thyroid hormone status. Certain metabolites may be involved in cardiovascular disorders associated with thyroid diseases. PMID:25841349

  13. Effects of Dietary Milled Seed Mixture on Fatty Acid Status and Inflammatory Markers in Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Perunicic-Pekovic, Gordana; Takic, Marija; Popovic, Tamara; Arsic, Aleksandra; Glibetic, Marija

    2014-01-01

    Background. Plant seeds have gained interest for their health benefits due to their fatty acid content. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of dietary consumption of milled sesame/pumpkin/flax seed mixture on glycemic control, serum lipids, phospholipid fatty acid status, and inflammatory factors in patients on hemodialysis. Methods. Thirty patients with well nutrition status (18 male, 12 female) were enrolled in the study. Participants consumed 30 g of milled sesame/pumpkin/flax (6 g/6 g/18 g, resp.) seeds mixture added to their habitual diet. Results. Total n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and levels of linoleic, dihomo-gamma-linolenic (DGLA), arachidonic, alpha-linolenic (ALA), eicosapentaenoic, docosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acid were increased after 12 weeks of supplementation. A significant decrease of the serum triglyceride level (P < 0.001), glucose, insulin, calculated IR HOMA (P < 0.05), and inflammatory markers (TNF-alpha, IL-6, and hs-CRP, P < 0.001) was observed after seed mixture treatment. The serum levels of CRP and TNF-alpha negative correlate with ALA, DHA, and DGLA. Conclusion. Results of this study indicated that dietary milled sesame/pumpkin/flax seed mixture added to a habitual diet lowered triglyceride and CRP, TNF-alpha, IL-6 levels, affect glycemic control and improved fatty acid profile and pruritus symptoms in hemodialysis patients. PMID:24578648

  14. Higher n3-fatty acid status is associated with lower risk of iron depletion among food insecure Canadian Inuit women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High rates of iron deficiency and anemia are common among Inuit and Arctic women despite a traditional diet based on animal source foods. However, representative data on iron status and relevant determinants for this population are lacking. The objectives were to determine the prevalence of anemia and depletion of iron stores, then to identify correlates of iron status in non-pregnant Canadian Inuit women. Methods In a cross-sectional survey of 1550 women in the International Polar Year Inuit Health Survey, 2007-2008, hemoglobin, serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (on a subset), C-reactive protein (CRP), RBC fatty acid composition, and H pylori serology were analyzed on fasting venous blood. Sociodemographic, food security status, anthropometric, dietary, and health data were collected. Correlates of iron status were assessed with multivariate linear and logistic models. Results Anemia was observed in 21.7% and iron deficient erythropoiesis in 3.3% of women. For women with CRP ≤ 10 mg/L (n = 1260) 29.4% had depleted iron stores. Inadequate iron intakes were observed in 16% of premenopausal and <1% of postmenopausal women. Among food insecure women, higher long-chain (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) status, which reflects a more traditional food pattern, was associated with reduced risk of iron depletion. Conclusions Iron depletion and anemia are a concern for Inuit women despite adequate total dietary iron intake primarily from heme sources. The high prevalence of H. pylori exposure, together with dietary iron adequacy, suggests an inflammation-driven iron deficiency and mild anemia. The anti-inflammatory properties of LC-PUFA may be important for iron status in this population. PMID:23547888

  15. High-oleic ready-to-use therapeutic food maintains docosahexaenoic acid status in severe malnutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) is the preferred treatment for uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition. It contains large amounts of linoleic acid and little a-linolenic acid, which may reduce the availability of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) to the recovering child...

  16. Effects of dietary n-6:n-3 fatty acid ratio and vitamin E on semen quality, fatty acid composition and antioxidant status in boars.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Zhou, Y F; Duan, R J; Wei, H K; Jiang, S W; Peng, J

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of dietary n-6:n-3 fatty acid (FA) ratio and vitamin E on the semen quality, FA composition and antioxidant status of boars. Forty-eight Landrace boars were randomly distributed in a 3×2 factorial design with three n-6:n-3 FA ratios (14.4, 6.6 and 2.2) by the inclusion of three oil sources (soybean, fish/soybean, fish) and two vitamin E levels (200 and 400mg/kg). During the 8 weeks of treatment, semen parameters were evaluated. Serum, sperm and seminal plasma samples were taken at 0 and 8 weeks to monitor the FA composition and antioxidant status. Results showed that the 6.6 and 2.2 dietary ratios very effectively increased docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and decreased docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and n-6:n-3 ratio in spermatozoa. The 6.6 dietary ratio contributed to a greater progressive sperm motility (P<0.05) than the 14.4 and 2.2 dietary ratio, and this ratio also enhanced the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) (P<0.05) in seminal plasma more significantly than the other two ratios at week 8. Compared with 200mg/kg supplementation of vitamin E, 400mg/kg supplementation of vitamin E increased the progressive sperm motility, SOD of sperm, TAC and SOD of seminal plasma and serum, and decreased sperm malondialdehyde (MDA) (P<0.05). In conclusion, the 6.6 dietary ratio and 400mg/kg vitamin E supplementation improve progressive sperm motility by modifying the sperm FA composition and antioxidant status. PMID:26417649

  17. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase by kainic acid mediates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression through a NF-kappaB dependent mechanism in C6 glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Hana; Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Jung Yeon; Choi, Ji Hyun; Lee, Ju Hie; Baik, Hyung Hwan; Kim, Sung Soo; Choe, Wonchae; Yoon, Kyung-Sik; Ha, Joohun; Kang, Insug

    2008-07-04

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of energy homeostasis. Kainic acid (KA), a prototype excitotoxin is known to induce brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in brain. In this study, we examined the role of AMPK in KA-induced BDNF expression in C6 glioma cells. We showed that KA and KA receptor agonist induced activation of AMPK and KA-induced AMPK activation was blocked by inhibition of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) {beta}. We then showed that inhibition of AMPK by compound C, a selective inhibitor of AMPK, or small interfering RNA of AMPK{alpha}1 blocked KA-induced BDNF mRNA and protein expression. Inhibition of AMPK blocked KA-induced phosphorylation of CaMKII and I kappaB kinase (IKK) in C6 cells. Finally, we showed that inhibition of AMPK reduced DNA binding and transcriptional activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-{kappa}B) in KA-treated cells. These results suggest that AMPK mediates KA-induced BDNF expression by regulating NF-{kappa}B activation.

  18. Kainic acid-induced neurodegeneration and activation of inflammatory processes in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures: treatment with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor does not prevent neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Järvelä, Juha T; Ruohonen, Saku; Kukko-Lukjanov, Tiina-Kaisa; Plysjuk, Anna; Lopez-Picon, Francisco R; Holopainen, Irma E

    2011-06-01

    In the postnatal rodent hippocampus status epilepticus (SE) leads to age- and region-specific excitotoxic neuronal damage, the precise mechanisms of which are still incompletely known. Recent studies suggest that the activation of inflammatory responses together with glial cell reactivity highly contribute to excitotoxic neuronal damage. However, pharmacological tools to attenuate their activation in the postnatal brain are still poorly elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of inflammatory mediators in kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal damage in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs). A specific cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor N-[2-(cyclohexyloxy)-4-nitrophenyl]-methanesulfonamide (NS-398) was used to study whether or not it could ameliorate neuronal death. Our results show that KA treatment (24 h) resulted in a dose-dependent degeneration of CA3a/b pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, COX-2 immunoreactivity was pronouncedly enhanced particularly in CA3c pyramidal neurons, microglial and astrocyte morphology changed from a resting to active appearance, the expression of the microglial specific protein, Iba1, increased, and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production increased. These indicated the activation of inflammatory processes. However, the expression of neither proinflammatory cytokines, i.e. tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), nor the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 mRNA was significantly altered by KA treatment as studied by real-time PCR. Despite activation of an array of inflammatory processes, neuronal damage could not be rescued either with the combined pre- and co-treatment with a specific COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398. Our results suggest that KA induces activation of a repertoire of inflammatory processes in immature OHCs, and that the timing of anti-inflammatory treatment to achieve neuroprotection is a challenge due to developmental properties and the complexity of inflammatory processes activated by

  19. Effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) treatment on insulin sensitivity in an animal model of diabetes: improvement of the inflammatory status.

    PubMed

    Figueras, Maite; Olivan, Mireia; Busquets, Sílvia; López-Soriano, Francisco J; Argilés, Josep M

    2011-02-01

    In addition to decreased insulin sensitivity, diabetes is a pathological condition associated with increased inflammation. The ω-3 fatty acids have been proposed as anti-inflammatory agents. Thus, the major goal of this study was to analyze the effects of fatty acid supplementation on both insulin sensitivity and inflammatory status in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. Diabetic rats (Goto-Kakizaki model) were treated with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or linoleic acid at 0.5 g/kg body weigh (bw) dose. In vivo incorporation of (14)C-triolein into adipose tissue was improved by the ω-3 administration. In vitro incubations of adipose tissue slices from EPA-treated rats showed an increase in (14)C-palmitate incorporation into the lipid fraction. These observations were linked with a decreased rate of fatty acid oxidation. EPA treatment resulted in a decreased fatty acid oxidation in incubated strips from extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. The changes in lipid utilization were associated with a decrease in insulin plasma concentration, suggesting an improvement in insulin sensitivity. These changes in lipid metabolism were associated with an activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in white adipose tissue. In addition, EPA treatment resulted in a decreased content of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) and PPARδ and in increased GLUT4 expression in skeletal muscle. Moreover, EPA increased 2-deoxy-D-[(14)C]glucose (2-DOG) uptake in C2C12 myotubes, suggesting an improvement in glucose metabolism. Concerning the inflammatory status, EPA treatment resulted in a decreased gene expression for both tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) both in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. The data suggest that EPA treatment to diabetic rats clearly improves lipid metabolism although the evidences on insulin sensitization are less clear. PMID:20885391

  20. The effects of land-use characteristics and acid sensitivity on the ecological status of Maryland coastal plain streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.W. Jr.; Scott, M.C.; Killen, W.D. Jr.; Anderson, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    A 2-year study was conducted to evaluate the ecological status of 12 acid-sensitive and 12 non-acid-sensitive Maryland coastal plain streams during the spring, summer, and fall of 1992 to 1993. An index of biotic integrity (IBI) for fish, chemical parameters, and physical habitat conditions were evaluated in these streams. Correlations of land-use activities (forested streams vs agricultural dominated streams) and watershed size were identified in the coastal plain streams with biological, chemical, and physical conditions. These data were also used to determine if a poor IBI for coastal plain stream fish can be related to stream sensitivity from acidic inputs. Physical habitat was more important than water quality in determining IBI values for the 2-year period. Acid sensitivity was also important in influencing the IBI but the influence of acid sensitivity was overshadowed by physical habitat. When variation in physical habitat was accounted for among sites, the IBI in nonacid-sensitive streams was higher than in acid-sensitive streams. Initial results demonstrated that IBI values were higher in agricultural dominated streams when compared to forested streams. Consideration of only two dominant land-use types caused oversimplification of these results because urban land use (often associated with negative effects) was positively correlated with forested streams and negatively correlated with agricultural streams.

  1. Acute inhibition of neurosteroid estrogen synthesis suppresses status epilepticus in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Satoru M; Woolley, Catherine S

    2016-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a common neurological emergency for which new treatments are needed. In vitro studies suggest a novel approach to controlling seizures in SE: acute inhibition of estrogen synthesis in the brain. Here, we show in rats that systemic administration of an aromatase (estrogen synthase) inhibitor after seizure onset strongly suppresses both electrographic and behavioral seizures induced by kainic acid (KA). We found that KA-induced SE stimulates synthesis of estradiol (E2) in the hippocampus, a brain region commonly involved in seizures and where E2 is known to acutely promote neural activity. Hippocampal E2 levels were higher in rats experiencing more severe seizures. Consistent with a seizure-promoting effect of hippocampal estrogen synthesis, intra-hippocampal aromatase inhibition also suppressed seizures. These results reveal neurosteroid estrogen synthesis as a previously unknown factor in the escalation of seizures and suggest that acute administration of aromatase inhibitors may be an effective treatment for SE. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12917.001 PMID:27083045

  2. The Role of Organic Acids in the Acid-Base Status of Surface Waters at Bickford Watershed, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshleman, K. N.; Hemond, H. F.

    1985-10-01

    An experimental field study of the alkalinity and major ion budgets of Bickford watershed in central Massachusetts indicates that organic acid production by the ecosystem contributes measurably to surface water acidification. Applying the concepts of alkalinity, electroneutrality of solutions, and mass balance, organic acids were found to comprise 20% of all strong acid sources on one subcatchment annually, a value half as large as the measured bulk mineral acid deposition. Inorganic cation to anion ratios in Provencial Brook varied between 1.0 in winter and 1.6 during summer, suggesting the presence of up to 100 μeq/L of unmeasured charge from organic anions during the growing season. Base titrations and ultraviolet photooxidation experiments confirmed the existence of low pKa (3.5-5.0) acidic functional groups. A positive linear relationship between dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and anion deficit for a group of surface and groundwater samples indicates the DOC contains about 7.5 meq carboxylic groups per gram C. Biological factors related to both upland and wetland carbon metabolism apparently control this natural acidification phenomenon, which has not been documented on other watersheds in the northeastern United States for which annual alkalinity budgets have been determined.

  3. Naringin Attenuates Autophagic Stress and Neuroinflammation in Kainic Acid-Treated Hippocampus In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2015-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) is well known as a chemical compound to study epileptic seizures and neuronal excitotoxicity. KA-induced excitotoxicity causes neuronal death by induction of autophagic stress and microglia-derived neuroinflammation, suggesting that the control of KA-induced effects may be important to inhibit epileptic seizures with neuroprotection. Naringin, a flavonoid in grapefruit and citrus fruits, has anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities, resulting in neuroprotection in animal models from neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, we examined its beneficial effects involved in antiautophagic stress and antineuroinflammation in the KA-treated hippocampus. Our results showed that naringin treatment delayed the onset of KA-induced seizures and decreased the occurrence of chronic spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) in KA-treated mice. Moreover, naringin treatment protected hippocampal CA1 neurons in the KA-treated hippocampus, ameliorated KA-induced autophagic stress, confirmed by the expression of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3), and attenuated an increase in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) in activated microglia. These results suggest that naringin may have beneficial effects of preventing epileptic events and neuronal death through antiautophagic stress and antineuroinflammation in the hippocampus in vivo. PMID:26124853

  4. Trace element status and fatty acids metabolism during healthy ageing: an example of a population from the Tunisian eastern coast.

    PubMed

    Sfar, Sonia; El Heni, Jihen; Laporte, François; Braham, Hamadi; Jawed, Abdelhafidh; Amor, Salah; Sfar, Mohamed Tahar; Kerkeni, Abdelhamid

    2012-03-01

    Micronutrients as well as essential fatty acids are indispensable for the correct functioning of the organism. The risk of disturbance in the associated nutrition and metabolism is expected to increase during ageing. In addition, it seems that trace elements are involved in the fatty acids metabolism. The aim of the present study was then to assess age-related changes in trace elements status and in plasma essential fatty acids composition with an emphasis on the desaturase activity estimation. Two hundred healthy Tunisian subjects (30-85 years old) were recruited and separated into two subgroups: elderly (65-85 years old) and middle-aged (30-60 years old). The findings revealed that plasma zinc and calcium concentrations significantly decreased according to age. The prevalence of zinc deficiency was therefore shown to increase in old age (over 60% of elderly subjects were deficient or at risk of deficiency). No age-related changes were obtained for copper or magnesium status. The Δ6 desaturase, involved in the EFAs conversion, was shown to decrease according to age and to be associated with the plasma zinc level. Since elderly subjects were at risk of nutritional imbalance, it would be interesting to set optimal dietary proportion. This will help to prevent age-associated alterations and diseases for a better and healthy ageing. PMID:22222317

  5. Influence of formulas with borage oil or borage oil plus fish oil on the arachidonic acid status in premature infants.

    PubMed

    Demmelmair, H; Feldl, F; Horváth, I; Niederland, T; Ruszinkó, V; Raederstorff, D; De Min, C; Muggli, R; Koletzko, B

    2001-06-01

    Several studies have reported that feeding gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) has resulted in no increase in arachidonic acid (AA) in newborns. This result was ascribed to the eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)-rich fish oil used in these formulas. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) sources with only minor amounts of EPA are now available, thus the addition of GLA to infant formulas might be considered an alternative to AA supplementation. Sixty-six premature infants were randomized to feeding one of four formulas [ST: no GLA, no long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids; BO: 0.6% GLA (borage oil); BO + FOLOW: 0.6% GLA, 0.3% DHA, 0.06% EPA; BO + FOHIGH: 0.6% GLA, 0.3% DHA, 0.2% EPA] or human milk (HM, nonrandomized) for 4 wk. Anthropometric measures and blood samples were obtained at study entry and after 14 and 28 d. There were no significant differences between groups in anthropometric measures, tocopherol, and retinol status at any of the studied time points. The AA content of plasma phospholipids was similar between groups at study start and decreased significantly until day 28 in all formulafed groups, but not in the breast-fed infants [ST: 6.6 +/- 0.2%, BO: 6.9 +/- 0.3%, BO + FOLOW: 6.9 +/- 0.4%, BO + FOHIGH: 6.7 +/- 0.2%, HM: 8.6 +/- 0.5%, where values are reported as mean +/- standard error; all formulas significantly different (P< 0.05) from HM]. There was no significant influence of GLA or fish oil addition to the diet. GLA had only a very limited effect on AA status which was too small to obtain satisfactory concentrations (concentrations similar to breast-fed babies) under the circumstances tested. The effect of GLA on AA is independent of the EPA and DHA content in the diet within the dose ranges studied. PMID:11485158

  6. Amino Acid Homeostasis Modulates Salicylic Acid–Associated Redox Status and Defense Responses in Arabidopsis[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guosheng; Ji, Yuanyuan; Bhuiyan, Nazmul H.; Pilot, Guillaume; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Zou, Jitao; Wei, Yangdou

    2010-01-01

    The tight association between nitrogen status and pathogenesis has been broadly documented in plant–pathogen interactions. However, the interface between primary metabolism and disease responses remains largely unclear. Here, we show that knockout of a single amino acid transporter, LYSINE HISTIDINE TRANSPORTER1 (LHT1), is sufficient for Arabidopsis thaliana plants to confer a broad spectrum of disease resistance in a salicylic acid–dependent manner. We found that redox fine-tuning in photosynthetic cells was causally linked to the lht1 mutant-associated phenotypes. Furthermore, the enhanced resistance in lht1 could be attributed to a specific deficiency of its main physiological substrate, Gln, and not to a general nitrogen deficiency. Thus, by enabling nitrogen metabolism to moderate the cellular redox status, a plant primary metabolite, Gln, plays a crucial role in plant disease resistance. PMID:21097712

  7. Single sodium pyruvate ingestion modifies blood acid-base status and post-exercise lactate concentration in humans.

    PubMed

    Olek, Robert A; Kujach, Sylwester; Wnuk, Damian; Laskowski, Radoslaw

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the effect of a single sodium pyruvate ingestion on a blood acid-base status and exercise metabolism markers. Nine active, but non-specifically trained, male subjects participated in the double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. One hour prior to the exercise, subjects ingested either 0.1 g·kg(-1) of body mass of a sodium pyruvate or placebo. The capillary blood samples were obtained at rest, 60 min after ingestion, and then three and 15 min after completing the workout protocol to analyze acid-base status and lactate, pyruvate, alanine, glucose concentrations. The pulmonary gas exchange, minute ventilation and the heart rate were measured during the exercise at a constant power output, corresponding to ~90% VO2max. The blood pH, bicarbonate and the base excess were significantly higher after sodium pyruvate ingestion than in the placebo trial. The blood lactate concentration was not different after the ingestion, but the post-exercise was significantly higher in the pyruvate trial (12.9 ± 0.9 mM) than in the placebo trial (10.6 ± 0.3 mM, p < 0.05) and remained elevated (nonsignificant) after 15 min of recovery. The blood pyruvate, alanine and glucose concentrations, as well as the overall pulmonary gas exchange during the exercise were not affected by the pyruvate ingestion. In conclusion, the sodium pyruvate ingestion one hour before workout modified the blood acid-base status and the lactate production during the exercise. PMID:24841105

  8. Single Sodium Pyruvate Ingestion Modifies Blood Acid-Base Status and Post-Exercise Lactate Concentration in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Olek, Robert A.; Kujach, Sylwester; Wnuk, Damian; Laskowski, Radoslaw

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of a single sodium pyruvate ingestion on a blood acid-base status and exercise metabolism markers. Nine active, but non-specifically trained, male subjects participated in the double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. One hour prior to the exercise, subjects ingested either 0.1 g·kg−1 of body mass of a sodium pyruvate or placebo. The capillary blood samples were obtained at rest, 60 min after ingestion, and then three and 15 min after completing the workout protocol to analyze acid-base status and lactate, pyruvate, alanine, glucose concentrations. The pulmonary gas exchange, minute ventilation and the heart rate were measured during the exercise at a constant power output, corresponding to ~90% O2max. The blood pH, bicarbonate and the base excess were significantly higher after sodium pyruvate ingestion than in the placebo trial. The blood lactate concentration was not different after the ingestion, but the post-exercise was significantly higher in the pyruvate trial (12.9 ± 0.9 mM) than in the placebo trial (10.6 ± 0.3 mM, p < 0.05) and remained elevated (nonsignificant) after 15 min of recovery. The blood pyruvate, alanine and glucose concentrations, as well as the overall pulmonary gas exchange during the exercise were not affected by the pyruvate ingestion. In conclusion, the sodium pyruvate ingestion one hour before workout modified the blood acid-base status and the lactate production during the exercise. PMID:24841105

  9. Contemporary Trends in the Acid-Base Status of the Two Acid-Sensitive Streams in Western Maryland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshleman, Keith N.; Kline, Kathleen M.; Morgan, Raymond P., II; Castro, Nancy M.; Negley, Timothy L.

    2008-01-01

    Recovery of streamwater acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) resulting from declines in regional acid deposition was examined using contemporary (1990-2005) data from two long-term monitoring stations located on the Appalachian Plateau in western Maryland, U.S. Two computational methods were used to estimate daily, monthly, and annual fluxes and discharge-weighted concentrations of ANC, sulfate, nitrate, and base cations over the period of record, and two statistical methods were used to evaluate long-term trends in fluxes and concentrations. The methods used to estimate concentrations, as well as the, statistical techniques, produced very similar results, underlining the robustness of the identified trends. We found clear evidence that streamwater sulfate concentrations have declined at an average rate of about 3 (microns)eq L(exp -1) yr(exp -1) at the two sites due to a 34% reduction in wet atmospheric sulfur deposition. Trends in nitrate concentrations appear to be related to other watershed factors, especially forest disturbance. The best evidence of recovery is based on a doubling of ANC (from 21 to 42 (microns)eq L(exp -1) at the more acid-sensitive site over the 16-year period. A slowing, or possible reversal, in the sulfate, nitrate, and SBC trends is evident in our data and may portend a decline in the rate of--or end to--further recovery.

  10. Contemporary trends in the acid-base status of two acid-sensitive streams in Western Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Keith N. Eshleman; Kathleen M. Kline; Raymond P. Morgan II; Nancy M. Castro; Timothy L. Negley

    2008-01-01

    Recovery of streamwater acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) resulting from declines in regional acid deposition was examined using contemporary (1990-2005) data from two long-term monitoring stations located on the Appalachian Plateau in western Maryland, U.S. Two computational methods were used to estimate daily, monthly, and annual fluxes and discharge-weighted concentrations of ANC, sulfate, nitrate, and base cations over the period of record, and two statistical methods were used to evaluate long-term trends in fluxes and concentrations. The methods used to estimate concentrations, as well as the statistical techniques, produced very similar results, underlining the robustness of the identified trends. We found clear evidence that streamwater sulfate concentrations have declined at an average rate of about 3 {mu}eq L{sup -1} yr{sup -1} at the two sites due to a 34% reduction in wet atmospheric sulfur deposition. Trends in nitrate concentrations appear to be related to other watershed factors, especially forest disturbance. The best evidence of recovery is based on a doubling of ANC (from 21 to 42 {mu}eq L{sup -1}) at the more acid-sensitive site over the 16-year period. A slowing, or possible reversal, in the sulfate, nitrate, and SBC trends is evident in our data and may portend a decline in the rate of or end to further recovery. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Bio-production of lactobionic acid: current status, applications and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Saúl; Rendueles, Manuel; Díaz, Mario

    2013-12-01

    Lactobionic acid has appeared on the commercial scene as a versatile polyhydroxy acid with numerous promising applications in the food, medicine, pharmaceutical, cosmetics and chemical industries. This high value-added bio-product has recently received growing attention as a bioactive compound, providing an excellent chemical platform for the synthesis of novel potentially biocompatible and biodegradable drug delivery vehicles. Recent advances in tissue engineering and nanomedicine have also underlined the increased importance of this organic acid as a key biofunctionalization agent. The growing commercial relevance of lactobionic acid has therefore prompted the development of novel systems for its biotechnological production that are both sustainable and efficient. The present review explores recent advances and studies related to lactobionic acid bio-production, whether through microbial or enzymatic approaches, highlighting the key bioprocessing conditions for enhanced bio-production. Detailed overviews of the current microbial cell factories as well as downstream processing methodologies for lactobionic acid production are also presented. Furthermore, the potential prospects and current applications of this polyhydroxy acid are also discussed, with an emphasis on the role of lactobionic acid as a key platform in the development of novel drugs, biomaterials, nanoparticles and biopolymer systems. PMID:23651661

  12. Anodized aluminum on LDEF: A current status of measurements on chromic acid anodized aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1992-01-01

    Chromic acid anodize was used as the exterior coating for aluminum surfaces on LDEF to provide passive thermal control. Chromic acid anodized aluminum was also used as test specimens in thermal control coatings experiments. The following is a compilation and analysis of the data obtained thus far.

  13. High-fat diet lowers the nutritional status indicators of pantothenic acid in weaning rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Erina; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Ohtsubo, Masako; Shibata, Katsumi

    2010-01-01

    Weaning rats were fed a 5% or 30% fat diet containing limited calcium pantothenate for 28 d. The plasma, liver and adrenal pantothenic acid levels in the rats fed on the 30% fat diet were significantly lower than with the 5% fat diet. The results suggest that the high-fat diet affected pantothenic acid metabolism. PMID:20699566

  14. Biotechnological production of alpha-keto acids: Current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Liu, Long; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Alpha-keto (α-keto) acids are used widely in feeds, food additives, pharmaceuticals, and in chemical synthesis processes. Although most α-keto acids are currently produced by chemical synthesis, their biotechnological production from renewable carbohydrates is a promising new approach. In this mini-review, we first present the different types of α-keto acids as well as their applications; next, we summarize the recent progresses in the biotechnological production of some important α-keto acids; namely, pyruvate, α-ketoglutarate, α-ketoisovalerate, α-ketoisocaproate, phenylpyruvate, α-keto-γ-methylthiobutyrate, and 2,5-diketo-d-gluconate. Finally, we discuss the future prospects as well as favorable directions for the biotechnological production of keto acids that ultimately would be more environment-friendly and simpler compared with the production by chemical synthesis. PMID:27575335

  15. Folate Catabolites in Spot Urine as Non-Invasive Biomarkers of Folate Status during Habitual Intake and Folic Acid Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Niesser, Mareile; Demmelmair, Hans; Weith, Thea; Moretti, Diego; Rauh-Pfeiffer, Astrid; van Lipzig, Marola; Vaes, Wouter; Koletzko, Berthold; Peissner, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Background Folate status, as reflected by red blood cell (RCF) and plasma folates (PF), is related to health and disease risk. Folate degradation products para-aminobenzoylglutamate (pABG) and para-acetamidobenzoylglutamate (apABG) in 24 hour urine have recently been shown to correlate with blood folate. Aim Since blood sampling and collection of 24 hour urine are cumbersome, we investigated whether the determination of urinary folate catabolites in fasted spot urine is a suitable non-invasive biomarker for folate status in subjects before and during folic acid supplementation. Study Design and Methods Immediate effects of oral folic acid bolus intake on urinary folate catabolites were assessed in a short-term pre-study. In the main study we included 53 healthy men. Of these, 29 were selected for a 12 week folic acid supplementation (400 µg). Blood, 24 hour and spot urine were collected at baseline and after 6 and 12 weeks and PF, RCF, urinary apABG and pABG were determined. Results Intake of a 400 µg folic acid bolus resulted in immediate increase of urinary catabolites. In the main study pABG and apABG concentrations in spot urine correlated well with their excretion in 24 hour urine. In healthy men consuming habitual diet, pABG showed closer correlation with PF (rs = 0.676) and RCF (rs = 0.649) than apABG (rs = 0.264, ns and 0.543). Supplementation led to significantly increased folate in plasma and red cells as well as elevated urinary folate catabolites, while only pABG correlated significantly with PF (rs = 0.574) after 12 weeks. Conclusion Quantification of folate catabolites in fasted spot urine seems suitable as a non-invasive alternative to blood or 24 hour urine analysis for evaluation of folate status in populations consuming habitual diet. In non-steady-state conditions (folic acid supplementation) correlations between folate marker (RCF, PF, urinary catabolites) decrease due to differing kinetics. PMID:23457526

  16. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid (PUFA) Status in Pregnant Women: Associations with Sleep Quality, Inflammation, and Length of Gestation.

    PubMed

    Christian, Lisa M; Blair, Lisa M; Porter, Kyle; Lower, Mary; Cole, Rachel M; Belury, Martha A

    2016-01-01

    Mechanistic pathways linking maternal polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) status with gestational length are poorly delineated. This study examined whether inflammation and sleep quality serve as mediators, focusing on the antiinflammatory ω-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n3) and proinflammatory ω-6 arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4n6). Pregnant women (n = 135) provided a blood sample and completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) at 20-27 weeks gestation. Red blood cell (RBC) fatty acid levels were determined by gas chromatography and serum inflammatory markers [interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, and C-reactive protein] by electrochemiluminescence using high sensitivity kits. Both higher serum IL-8 (95% CI = 0.10,3.84) and poor sleep (95% CI = 0.03,0.28) served as significant mediators linking lower DHA:AA ratios with shorter gestation. Further, a serial mediation model moving from the DHA:AA ratio → sleep → IL-8 → length of gestation was statistically significant (95% CI = 0.02, 0.79). These relationships remained after adjusting for depressive symptoms, age, BMI, income, race, and smoking. No interactions with race were observed in relation to length of gestation as a continuous variable. However, a significant interaction between race and the DHA:AA ratio in predicting preterm birth was observed (p = 0.049); among African Americans only, odds of preterm birth decreased as DHA:AA increased (p = 0.048). These data support a role for both inflammatory pathways and sleep quality in linking less optimal RBC PUFA status with shorter gestation in African American and European American women and suggest that African-Americans have greater risk for preterm birth in the context of a low DHA:AA ratio. PMID:26859301

  17. Undernutrition, fatty acid and micronutrient status in relation to cognitive performance in Indian school children: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Eilander, Ans; Muthayya, Sumithra; van der Knaap, Henk; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Thomas, Tinku; Kok, Frans J; Kurpad, Anura V; Osendarp, Saskia J M

    2010-04-01

    While undernutrition and anaemia have previously been linked to poor development of children, relatively little is known about the role of B-vitamins and fatty acids on cognition. The present study aims to explore the associations between indicators of body size, fatty acid and micronutrient status on cognitive performance in 598 Indian school children aged 6-10 years. Baseline data of a clinical study were used to assess these associations by analyses of variance adjusting for age, sex, school, maternal education and cognitive tester. The Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children II was used to measure four cognitive domains, including fluid reasoning, short-term memory, retrieval ability and cognitive speediness. Scores were combined into an overall measure, named mental processing index (MPI). Body size indicators and Hb concentrations were significantly positively related to cognitive domains and MPI, such that increases of 1 sd in height-for-age and weight-for-age z-scores would each translate into a 0.09 sd increase in MPI, P = 0.0006 and 0.002, respectively. A 10 g/l increase in Hb concentrations would translate into a 0.08 sd increase in MPI, P = 0.0008. Log-transformed vitamin B12 concentrations were significantly inversely associated with short-term memory, retrieval ability and MPI (beta (95 % CI) = - 0.124 (- 0.224, - 0.023), P = 0.02). Other indicators of Fe, iodine, folate and fatty acid status were not significantly related to cognition. Our findings for body size, fatty acids and micronutrients were in agreement with previous observational studies. The inverse association of vitamin B12 with mental development was unexpected and needed further study. PMID:20003612

  18. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid (PUFA) Status in Pregnant Women: Associations with Sleep Quality, Inflammation, and Length of Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Lisa M.; Blair, Lisa M.; Porter, Kyle; Lower, Mary; Cole, Rachel M.; Belury, Martha A.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanistic pathways linking maternal polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) status with gestational length are poorly delineated. This study examined whether inflammation and sleep quality serve as mediators, focusing on the antiinflammatory ω-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n3) and proinflammatory ω-6 arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4n6). Pregnant women (n = 135) provided a blood sample and completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) at 20–27 weeks gestation. Red blood cell (RBC) fatty acid levels were determined by gas chromatography and serum inflammatory markers [interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, and C-reactive protein] by electrochemiluminescence using high sensitivity kits. Both higher serum IL-8 (95% CI = 0.10,3.84) and poor sleep (95% CI = 0.03,0.28) served as significant mediators linking lower DHA:AA ratios with shorter gestation. Further, a serial mediation model moving from the DHA:AA ratio → sleep → IL-8 → length of gestation was statistically significant (95% CI = 0.02, 0.79). These relationships remained after adjusting for depressive symptoms, age, BMI, income, race, and smoking. No interactions with race were observed in relation to length of gestation as a continuous variable. However, a significant interaction between race and the DHA:AA ratio in predicting preterm birth was observed (p = 0.049); among African Americans only, odds of preterm birth decreased as DHA:AA increased (p = 0.048). These data support a role for both inflammatory pathways and sleep quality in linking less optimal RBC PUFA status with shorter gestation in African American and European American women and suggest that African-Americans have greater risk for preterm birth in the context of a low DHA:AA ratio. PMID:26859301

  19. Suicide Deaths of Active Duty U.S. Military and Omega-3 Fatty Acid Status: A Case Control Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Michael D.; Hibbeln, Joseph R.; Johnson, Jeremiah E.; Lin, Yu Hong; Hyun, Duk Y.; Loewke, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The recent escalation of US Military suicide deaths to record numbers has been an sentinel for impaired force efficacy and has accelerated the search for reversible risk factors. Objective Determine if deficiencies of neuroactive highly unsaturated omega-3 essential fatty acids (n-3 HUFA), in particular docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are associated with increased risk of suicide death among a large random sample of active duty US military. Methods Serum fatty acids were quantified as % of total fatty acids, among US military suicide deaths (n= 800) and controls (n=800) matched for age, date of collection, sex, rank and year of incident. Participants were Active Duty US Military personnel (2002–2008). Outcome measures, included death by suicide, post deployment health assessment questionnaire and ICD-9 mental health diagnosis data. Results Risks of suicide death was 14% higher, per standard deviation [SD] lower DHA % (OR =1.14, 95% CI; 1.02–1.27, p<0.03), in adjusted logistic regressions. Among men risk of suicide death was 62% greater with low serum DHA status (adjusted Odds Ratio [OR] =1.62, 95% CI 1.12–2.34, p<0.01, comparing DHA below 1.75% [n=1,389] to above [n=141]). Risk of suicide death was 54% greater in those who reported having seen wounded, dead or killed coalition personnel (OR = 1.54, 95% CI; 1.12–2.12, p< 0.007.) Conclusion This US military population had a very low and narrow range of n-3 HUFA status. Although these data suggest that low serum DHA may be a risk factor for suicides, well designed intervention trials are needed to evaluate causality. PMID:21903029

  20. Dietary Zinc Deficiency Affects Blood Linoleic Acid: Dihomo-γ-linolenic Acid (LA:DGLA) Ratio; a Sensitive Physiological Marker of Zinc Status in Vivo (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Spenser; Qin, Xia; Ran-Ressler, Rinat; Brenna, James Thomas; Glahn, Raymond P.; Tako, Elad

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is a vital micronutrient used for over 300 enzymatic reactions and multiple biochemical and structural processes in the body. To date, sensitive and specific biological markers of zinc status are still needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate Gallus gallus as an in vivo model in the context of assessing the sensitivity of a previously unexplored potential zinc biomarker, the erythrocyte linoleic acid: dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio. Diets identical in composition were formulated and two groups of birds (n = 12) were randomly separated upon hatching into two diets, Zn(+) (zinc adequate control, 42.3 μg/g zinc), and Zn(−) (zinc deficient, 2.5 μg/g zinc). Dietary zinc intake, body weight, serum zinc, and the erythrocyte fatty acid profile were measured weekly. At the conclusion of the study, tissues were collected for gene expression analysis. Body weight, feed consumption, zinc intake, and serum zinc were higher in the Zn(+) control versus Zn(−) group (p < 0.05). Hepatic TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 gene expression were higher in the Zn(+) control group (p < 0.05), and hepatic Δ6 desaturase was significantly higher in the Zn(+) group (p < 0.001). The LA:DGLA ratio was significantly elevated in the Zn(−) group compared to the Zn(+) group (22.6 ± 0.5 and 18.5 ± 0.5, % w/w, respectively, p < 0.001). This study suggests erythrocyte LA:DGLA is able to differentiate zinc status between zinc adequate and zinc deficient birds, and may be a sensitive biomarker to assess dietary zinc manipulation. PMID:24658588

  1. Dietary zinc deficiency affects blood linoleic acid: dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio; a sensitive physiological marker of zinc status in vivo (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Reed, Spenser; Qin, Xia; Ran-Ressler, Rinat; Brenna, James Thomas; Glahn, Raymond P; Tako, Elad

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is a vital micronutrient used for over 300 enzymatic reactions and multiple biochemical and structural processes in the body. To date, sensitive and specific biological markers of zinc status are still needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate Gallus gallus as an in vivo model in the context of assessing the sensitivity of a previously unexplored potential zinc biomarker, the erythrocyte linoleic acid: dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio. Diets identical in composition were formulated and two groups of birds (n = 12) were randomly separated upon hatching into two diets, Zn⁺ (zinc adequate control, 42.3 μg/g zinc), and Zn⁻ (zinc deficient, 2.5 μg/g zinc). Dietary zinc intake, body weight, serum zinc, and the erythrocyte fatty acid profile were measured weekly. At the conclusion of the study, tissues were collected for gene expression analysis. Body weight, feed consumption, zinc intake, and serum zinc were higher in the Zn⁺ control versus Zn⁻ group (p < 0.05). Hepatic TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 gene expression were higher in the Zn⁺ control group (p < 0.05), and hepatic Δ⁶ desaturase was significantly higher in the Zn⁺ group (p < 0.001). The LA:DGLA ratio was significantly elevated in the Zn⁻ group compared to the Zn⁺ group (22.6 ± 0.5 and 18.5 ± 0.5, % w/w, respectively, p < 0.001). This study suggests erythrocyte LA:DGLA is able to differentiate zinc status between zinc adequate and zinc deficient birds, and may be a sensitive biomarker to assess dietary zinc manipulation. PMID:24658588

  2. Foliar nutrient status of Pinus ponderosa exposed to ozone and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.D.; Houpis, J.L.J. )

    1991-05-01

    A direct effect of foliar exposure to acid rain may be increased leaching of nutrient elements. Ozone exposure, through degradation of the cuticle and cellular membranes, may also result in increased nutrient leaching. To test these hypotheses, the foliar concentrations of 13 nutrient elements were monitored for mature branches of three clones of Pinus ponderosa exposed to ozone and/or acid rain. The three clones represented three distinct levels of phenotypic vigor. Branches were exposed to charcoal filtered, ambient, or 2 x ambient concentrations of ozone and received no acid rain (NAP), pH 5.1 rain (5.1), or pH 3.0 (3.0) rain. Following 10 months of continuous ozone exposure and 3 months of weekly rain applications, the concentrations of P and Mg differed significantly among rain treatments with a ranking of: 5.1 < NAP < 3.0. The S concentration increased with rain application regardless of pH. For the clones of moderate and low vigor, the concentration of N decreased with increasing rain acidity. There was no evidence of significant ozone or ozone x acid rain response. Among the three families, high phenotypic vigor was associated with significantly greater concentrations of N, P, K, Mg, B and An. These results indicate generally negligible leaching as a result of exposure to acid rain and/or ozone for one growing season. Increases in foliar concentrations of S, Mg and P are possibly the result of evaporative surface deposition from the rain solution.

  3. [Acid-base status in newborn calves during the first days of life considering different states of vitality].

    PubMed

    Herfen, K; Bostedt, H

    1999-06-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the differentiations of the acid-base status in bovine neonates during the first 96 hours of life. Due to the short intervals in the taking of blood samples, noticeable fluctuations in the acid-base status during the first minutes and hours of life of newborn calves were documented. Altogether, 25 matures and eutrophe calves of the DSB, DRB and DFV breeds were provided by the clinic for this study. Apart from an immediate post natum clinical interpretation of the vital signs in the neonates-using the APGAR-score-the pH value, current Base Excess and the CO2 pressure were simultaneously ascertained. Further continuous evaluation of the acid-base status was subsequently followed in the first phase of adaptation. For that alone, twelve blood samples were taken from the vena jugularis within the first 60 minutes after parturition. Until the end of the examination period on the fourth day of life, the tests amounted to 26 measurements altogether per experimentee. Due to the concrete results ascertained from the initial clinical and laboratory observations, the experimentees could be divided into distinct classes of vitality. The acid-base status of all the calves deteriorated during the first minutes of life, indicating that the pH value and Base Excess fall clearly under the initial level in all aspects of vitality directly post natum. On average the minimum pH values are reached between the third and 15th minute of life and remain between 0.019 and 0.096 below the initial values during this period. A varying rapid increase of the pH value follows, together with a balancing out of the Base difference. Despite isolated individual variations as the acid-base status develops, the lowering of the pH values in the first minutes of life is assessed as being a normal biological phenomenon. Deviations from this occur rarely (8%) and do not conform to the norm. The pH value stabilization in connection with this crucial early postnatal phase

  4. Maternal plasma polyunsaturated fatty acid status in late pregnancy is associated with offspring body composition in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Moon, RJ; Harvey, NC; Robinson, SM; Ntani, G; Davies, JH; Inskip, HM; Godfrey, KM; Dennison, EM; Calder, PC; Cooper, C

    2013-01-01

    Context Maternal diet during pregnancy has been linked to offspring adiposity, but it is unclear whether maternal polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) status during pregnancy affects offspring body composition. Objective We investigated the associations between maternal plasma n-3 and n-6 PUFA status at 34 weeks gestation and offspring body composition. Design and setting A prospective UK population-based mother-offspring cohort: the Southampton Women’s Survey (SWS). Participants 12583 non-pregnant women were recruited into the SWS, of which 1987 delivered a baby before 31st December 2003. 293 mother-child pairs had complete measurements of maternal plasma PUFA concentrations in late pregnancy and offspring body composition at ages 4 and 6 years. Main Outcomes Measured Offspring body composition by DXA, yielding fat mass(FM), lean mass(LM), percentage fat mass(%FM) and percentage lean mass(%LM). Results Maternal plasma n-6 PUFA concentration positively predicted offspring fat mass at 4 years (β=0.14 SD/SD, p=0.01) and 6 years (β=0.11 SD/SD, p=0.04), but there was no association with offspring lean mass at either age (β=0.005 SD/SD, p=0.89 & β=0.008 SD/SD, p=0.81, respectively). Maternal plasma n-3 PUFA concentration displayed no associations with offspring fat mass at 4 years (β=0.057 SD/SD, p=0.34) or 6 years (β=0.069 SD/SD, p=0.21). Maternal plasma n-3 PUFA status positively correlated with offspring lean mass on univariate analysis (4yrs β=0.11, p=0.06; 6yrs β=0.14, p=0.02), however this was confounded by a positive association with offspring height. Conclusions This observational study suggests that maternal n-6 PUFA status during pregnancy might influence offspring adiposity in childhood. PMID:23162098

  5. Achieving optimal n-3 fatty acid status: the vegetarian's challenge... or not.

    PubMed

    Harris, William S

    2014-07-01

    The long chain n-3 (omega-3) fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), although originally synthesized by microorganisms in the oceans, are primarily obtained from the consumption of fish. Vegetarians, by definition, do not eat fish and thus consume virtually no EPA and DHA. Because conversion of the plant-derived n-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid (ALA) to EPA and DHA is very low, n-3 tissue concentrations in vegetarians are lower than in omnivores. This review asks 2 questions: what is the evidence that increased n-3 concentrations reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in vegetarians, and, if it does, how can vegetarians increase their blood and tissue concentrations of these animal-derived fatty acids? At present, both cardiovascular risk markers and cardiovascular events appear to be significantly reduced in vegetarians compared with those in omnivores. If so, and in the absence of data to show that risk in vegetarians could be even lower with higher n-3 concentrations, then the second question becomes moot. However, the absence of evidence is not evidence of absence; therefore, at our present state of knowledge, increasing n-3 concentrations is not an unreasonable goal for vegetarians. This can be accomplished by a variety of approaches, including increased intakes of ALA, consumption of stearidonic acid-enriched soybean oil (if and when it comes to the market), and the use of supplements containing EPA, DHA, or both derived from nonanimal sources (microalgae, biotech yeast, and, in the future, biotech plant oils). PMID:24898239

  6. Involvement of the neuronal phosphotyrosine signal adaptor N-Shc in kainic acid-induced epileptiform activity

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Shiro; Onga, Kazuko; Kakizawa, Sho; Ohyama, Kyoji; Yasuda, Kunihiko; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Scott, Brian W.; Burnham, W. McIntyre; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Mori, Nozomu

    2016-01-01

    BDNF-TrkB signaling is implicated in experimental seizures and epilepsy. However, the downstream signaling involved in the epileptiform activity caused by TrkB receptor activation is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine whether TrkB-mediated N-Shc signal transduction was involved in kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptiform activity. We investigated KA-induced behavioral seizures, epileptiform activities and neuronal cell loss in hippocampus between N-Shc deficient and control mice. There was a significant reduction in seizure severity and the frequency of epileptiform discharges in N-Shc deficient mice, as compared with wild-type and C57BL/6 mice. KA-induced neuronal cell loss in the CA3 of hippocampus was also inhibited in N-Shc deficient mice. This study demonstrates that the activation of N-Shc signaling pathway contributes to an acute KA-induced epileptiform activity and neuronal cell loss in the hippocampus. We propose that the N-Shc-mediated signaling pathway could provide a potential target for the novel therapeutic approaches of epilepsy. PMID:27273072

  7. Involvement of the neuronal phosphotyrosine signal adaptor N-Shc in kainic acid-induced epileptiform activity.

    PubMed

    Baba, Shiro; Onga, Kazuko; Kakizawa, Sho; Ohyama, Kyoji; Yasuda, Kunihiko; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Scott, Brian W; Burnham, W McIntyre; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Mori, Nozomu

    2016-01-01

    BDNF-TrkB signaling is implicated in experimental seizures and epilepsy. However, the downstream signaling involved in the epileptiform activity caused by TrkB receptor activation is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine whether TrkB-mediated N-Shc signal transduction was involved in kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptiform activity. We investigated KA-induced behavioral seizures, epileptiform activities and neuronal cell loss in hippocampus between N-Shc deficient and control mice. There was a significant reduction in seizure severity and the frequency of epileptiform discharges in N-Shc deficient mice, as compared with wild-type and C57BL/6 mice. KA-induced neuronal cell loss in the CA3 of hippocampus was also inhibited in N-Shc deficient mice. This study demonstrates that the activation of N-Shc signaling pathway contributes to an acute KA-induced epileptiform activity and neuronal cell loss in the hippocampus. We propose that the N-Shc-mediated signaling pathway could provide a potential target for the novel therapeutic approaches of epilepsy. PMID:27273072

  8. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Composition of Maternal Diet and Erythrocyte Phospholipid Status in Chilean Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Bascuñán, Karla A.; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Chamorro, Rodrigo; Valencia, Alejandra; Barrera, Cynthia; Puigrredon, Claudia; Sandoval, Jorge; Valenzuela, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Chilean diets are characterized by a low supply of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA), which are critical nutrients during pregnancy and lactation, because of their role in brain and visual development. DHA is the most relevant n-3 PUFA in this period. We evaluated the dietary n-3 PUFA intake and erythrocyte phospholipids n-3 PUFA in Chilean pregnant women. Eighty healthy pregnant women (20–36 years old) in the 3rd–6th month of pregnancy were included in the study. Dietary assessment was done applying a food frequency questionnaire, and data were analyzed through the Food Processor SQL® software. Fatty acids of erythrocyte phospholipids were assessed by gas-liquid chromatography. Diet composition was high in saturated fat, low in mono- and PUFA, high in n-6 PUFA (linoleic acid) and low in n-3 PUFA (alpha-linolenic acid and DHA), with imbalance in the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio. Similar results were observed for fatty acids from erythrocyte phospholipids. The sample of Chilean pregnant women showed high consumption of saturated fat and low consumption of n-3 PUFA, which is reflected in the low DHA content of erythrocyte phospholipids. Imbalance between n-6/n-3 PUFA could negatively affect fetal development. New strategies are necessary to improve n-3 PUFA intake throughout pregnancy and breast feeding periods. Furthermore, it is necessary to develop dietary interventions to improve the quality of consumed foods with particular emphasis on n-3 PUFA. PMID:25386693

  9. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of carboxylic acids: current status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Derek A; Zelle, Rintze M; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2009-12-01

    To meet the demands of future generations for chemicals and energy and to reduce the environmental footprint of the chemical industry, alternatives for petrochemistry are required. Microbial conversion of renewable feedstocks has a huge potential for cleaner, sustainable industrial production of fuels and chemicals. Microbial production of organic acids is a promising approach for production of chemical building blocks that can replace their petrochemically derived equivalents. Although Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not naturally produce organic acids in large quantities, its robustness, pH tolerance, simple nutrient requirements and long history as an industrial workhorse make it an excellent candidate biocatalyst for such processes. Genetic engineering, along with evolution and selection, has been successfully used to divert carbon from ethanol, the natural endproduct of S. cerevisiae, to pyruvate. Further engineering, which included expression of heterologous enzymes and transporters, yielded strains capable of producing lactate and malate from pyruvate. Besides these metabolic engineering strategies, this review discusses the impact of transport and energetics as well as the tolerance towards these organic acids. In addition to recent progress in engineering S. cerevisiae for organic acid production, the key limitations and challenges are discussed in the context of sustainable industrial production of organic acids from renewable feedstocks. PMID:19566685

  10. The effects of omega 3 fatty acid supplementation on brain tissue oxidative status in aged wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Avramovic, N; Dragutinovic, V; Krstic, D; Colovic, MB; Trbovic, A; de Luka, S; Milovanovic, I; Popovic, T

    2012-01-01

    Background: The omega 3 fatty acids play an important role in many physiological processes. Their effect is well documented in neurodegenerative diseases and inflammatory diseases. Also, aging as a biophysiological process could be influenced by eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA) components of fish oil. However there are not many studies showing the effect of PUFA (polyunsaturated FA) suplementation in eldery brain functions and the response to oxidative strees. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on levels of lipid peroxidation and oxidant/antioxidant status of brain tissue in aged (24 months old) Wistar rats. Methods: Animals were divided in two groups. Control group (n=8) was fed with standard laboratory food and received water ad libitum. Treated group (n=8) was also fed with standard laboratory food, water ad libitum and received fish oil capsules (EPA+DHA) for 6 weeks. Daily dose was 30mg EPA and 45mg DHA (capsules: 200mg EPA and 300mg DHA; in-house method). At the end of treatment animals were sacrificed and brains were collected and frozen on -80ºC. The levels of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde - MDA), activity of catalase (CAT) and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were examined in cerebral cortex. Catalase activity was determined by measuring the decrease in absorbance (H2O2 degradation) at 240 nm for 3 min and expressed as U/mg protein. Total SOD (superoxide dismutase) activity was performed at room temperature according to the method of Misra and Fridovich. The extent of lipid peroxidation (LPO) was estimated as the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive product malondialdehyde (MDA) by using the method of Aruoma et al. The incorporation of fatty acids in cellular membranes was confirmed by gas chromatography. Results: Our results showed that lipid peroxidation significantly decreased in treated animal group, where MDA concentration was 0.38±0.001 vs

  11. Effects of mechanical stress or abscisic acid on growth, water status and leaf abscisic acid content of eggplant seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latimer, J. G.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    Container-grown eggplant (Solanum melongena L. var esculentum Nees. 'Burpee's Black Beauty') seedlings were conditioned with brief, periodic mechanical stress or abscisic acid (ABA) in a greenhouse prior to outdoor exposure. Mechanical stress consisted of seismic (shaking) or thigmic (stem flexing) treatment. Exogenous ABA (10(-3) or 10(-4)M) was applied as a soil drench 3 days prior to outdoor transfer. During conditioning, only thigmic stress reduced stem elongation and only 10(-3) M ABA reduced relative growth rate (RGR). Both conditioning treatments increased leaf specific chlorophyll content, but mechanical stress did not affect leaf ABA content. Outdoor exposure of unconditioned eggplant seedlings decreased RGR and leaf-specific chlorophyll content, but tended to increase leaf ABA content relative to that of plants maintained in the greenhouse. Conditioning did not affect RGR of plants subsequently transferred outdoors, but did reduce stem growth. Seismic stress applied in the greenhouse reduced dry weight gain by plants subsequently transferred outdoors. Mechanical stress treatments increased leaf water potential by 18-25% relative to that of untreated plants.

  12. History and current status of valve-regulated lead/acid batteries in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Hiroto; Fuchida, Kyo

    The valve-regulated design of the sealed lead/acid battery (VRB), developed in the first half of the 1960s in Japan for use in portable television sets, has achieved successful market growth. This paper reviews the history of development of VRBs during the past thirty years, present production models, production quality, major applications, and technical problems.

  13. Soil calcium status and the response of stream chemistry to changing acidic deposition rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.; Lovett, Gary M.; Murdoch, Peter S.; Burns, Douglas A.; Stoddard, J.L.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Porter, J.H.; Thompson, A.W.

    1999-01-01

    Despite a decreasing trend in acidic deposition rates over the past two to three decades, acidified surface waters in the northeastern United States have shown minimal changes. Depletion of soil Ca pools has been suggested as a cause, although changes in soil Ca pools have not been directly related to long-term records of stream chemistry. To investigate this problem, a comprehensive watershed study was conducted in the Neversink River Basin, in the Catskill Mountains of New York, during 1991-1996. Spatial variations of atmospheric deposition, soil chemistry, and stream chemistry were evaluated over an elevation range of 817-1234 m to determine whether these factors exhibited elevational patterns. An increase in atmospheric deposition of SO4 with increasing elevation corresponded with upslope decreases of exchangeable soil base concentrations and acid-neutralizing capacity of stream water. Exchangeable base concentrations in homogeneous soil incubated within the soil profile for one year also decreased with increasing elevation. An elevational gradient in precipitation was not observed, and effects of a temperature gradient on soil properties were not detected. Laboratory leaching experiments with soils from this watershed showed that (1) concentrations of Ca in leachate increased as the concentrations of acid anions in added solution increased, and (2) the slope of this relationship was positively correlated with base saturation. Field and laboratory soil analyses are consistent with the interpretation that decreasing trends in acid-neutralizing capacity in stream water in the Neversink Basin, dating back to 1984, are the result of decreases in soil base saturation caused by acidic deposition.

  14. A linked spatial and temporal model of the chemical and biological status of a large, acid-sensitive river network.

    PubMed

    Evans, Chris D; Cooper, David M; Juggins, Steve; Jenkins, Alan; Norris, Dave

    2006-07-15

    Freshwater sensitivity to acidification varies according to geology, soils and land-use, and consequently it remains difficult to quantify the current extent of acidification, or its biological impacts, based on limited spot samples. The problem is particularly acute for river systems, where the transition from acid to circum-neutral conditions can occur within short distances. This paper links an established point-based long-term acidification model (MAGIC) with a landscape-based mixing model (PEARLS) to simulate spatial and temporal variations in acidification for a 256 km(2) catchment in North Wales. Empirical relationships are used to predict changes in the probability of occurrence of an indicator invertebrate species, Baetis rhodani, across the catchment as a function of changing chemical status. Results suggest that, at present, 27% of the river network has a mean acid neutralising capacity (ANC) below a biologically-relevant threshold of 20 microeq l(-1). At high flows, this proportion increases to 45%. The model suggests that only around 16% of the stream network had a mean ANC < 20 microeq l(-1) in 1850, but that this increased to 42% at the sulphur deposition peak around 1970. By 2050 recovery is predicted, but with some persistence of acid conditions in the most sensitive, peaty headwaters. Stream chemical suitability for Baetis rhodani is also expected to increase in formerly acidified areas, but for overall abundance to remain below that simulated in 1850. The approach of linking plot-scale process-based models to catchment mixing models provides a potential means of predicting the past and future spatial extent of acidification within large, heterogeneous river networks and regions. Further development of ecological response models to include other chemical predictor variables and the effects of acid episodes would allow more realistic simulation of the temporal and spatial dynamics of ecosystem recovery from acidification. PMID:16580046

  15. Prediction of Residue Status to Be Protected or Not Protected From Hy-drogen Exchange Using Amino Acid Sequence Only.

    PubMed

    Nikita V, Dovidchenko; Oxana V, Galzitskaya

    2008-01-01

    We have outlined here some structural aspects of local flexibility. Important functional properties are related to flexible segments. We try to predict regions that have been shown to exhibit the highest probability of being folded in the equilibrium intermediate or native state and will be protected from hydrogen exchange using amino acid sequence only. Our approach FoldUnfold for the prediction of unstructured regions has been applied to seven different proteins. For 80% of the residues considered in this paper we can predict correctly their status: will they be protected or not from hydrogen exchange. An additional goal of our study is to assess whether properties inferred using the bioinformatics approach are easily applicable to predict behavior of proteins in solution. PMID:18949078

  16. Prediction of Residue Status to Be Protected or Not Protected From Hy-drogen Exchange Using Amino Acid Sequence Only

    PubMed Central

    Dovidchenko, Nikita V; Galzitskaya, Oxana V

    2008-01-01

    We have outlined here some structural aspects of local flexibility. Important functional properties are related to flexible segments. We try to predict regions that have been shown to exhibit the highest probability of being folded in the equilibrium intermediate or native state and will be protected from hydrogen exchange using amino acid sequence only. Our approach FoldUnfold for the prediction of unstructured regions has been applied to seven different proteins. For 80% of the residues considered in this paper we can predict correctly their status: will they be protected or not from hydrogen exchange. An additional goal of our study is to assess whether properties inferred using the bioinformatics approach are easily applicable to predict behavior of proteins in solution. PMID:18949078

  17. Regulation of mTORC1 by growth factors, energy status, amino acids and mechanical stimuli at a glance.

    PubMed

    Bond, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of skeletal muscle protein synthesis. Activation of the complex leads to phosphorylation of two important sets of substrates, namely eIF4E binding proteins and ribosomal S6 kinases. Phosphorylation of these substrates then leads to an increase in protein synthesis, mainly by enhancing translation initiation. mTORC1 activity is regulated by several inputs, such as growth factors, energy status, amino acids and mechanical stimuli. Research in this field is rapidly evolving and unraveling how these inputs regulate the complex. Therefore this review attempts to provide a brief and up-to-date narrative on the regulation of this marvelous protein complex. Additionally, some sports supplements which have been shown to regulate mTORC1 activity are discussed. PMID:26937223

  18. The oxidative stress, antioxidant profile and acid-base status in preterm and term canine neonates.

    PubMed

    Vannucchi, C I; Kishi, D; Regazzi, F M; Silva, L C G; Veiga, G A L; Angrimani, D S R; Lucio, C F; Nichi, M

    2015-04-01

    During the initiation of neonatal pulmonary respiration, there is an exponential increase in reactive oxygen species that must be scavenged by antioxidant defences. However, neonate and preterm newborns are known to possess immature antioxidant mechanisms to neutralize these toxic effects. The purposes of this study were to compare the development of antioxidant system between preterm and term canine neonates and to evaluate the magnitude of acid-base balance during the initial 4 h of life. A prospective study was conducted involving 18 neonatal puppies assigned to Term Group (63 days of gestation; n = 5), Preterm-57 Group (57 days of gestation; n = 8) and Preterm-55 Group (55 days of gestation; n = 5). Neonates were physically examined through Apgar score and venous haemogasometry within 5 min, 2 and 4 h after birth. No difference on amniotic fluid and serum superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and the marker of oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances; TBARS) was verified. Irrespective of prematurity, all neonates presented low vitality, hypothermia, acidosis, hypoxaemia and hypercapnia at birth. However, term puppies clinically evolved more rapidly than preterm newborns. During the course of the study, premature neonates presented more severe complications, such as prolonged hypoxaemia and even death. In conclusion, premature puppies have no signs of immature enzymatic mechanisms for controlling oxidative stress, although SOD and GPx may participate in achieving acid-base balance. Aside from initial unremarkable symptoms, premature puppies should be carefully followed up, as they are at high risk of succumbing to odds of prematurity. PMID:25611795

  19. Genetic and epigenetic transgenerational implications related to omega-3 fatty acids. Part I: maternal FADS2 genotype and DNA methylation correlate with polyunsaturated fatty acid status in toddlers: an exploratory analysis.

    PubMed

    Lupu, Daniel S; Cheatham, Carol L; Corbin, Karen D; Niculescu, Mihai D

    2015-11-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism in toddlers is regulated by a complex network of interacting factors. The contribution of maternal genetic and epigenetic makeup to this milieu is not well understood. In a cohort of mothers and toddlers 16 months of age (n = 65 mother-child pairs), we investigated the association between maternal genetic and epigenetic fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2) profiles and toddlers' n-6 and n-3 fatty acid metabolism. FADS2 rs174575 variation and DNA methylation status were interrogated in mothers and toddlers, as well as food intake and plasma fatty acid concentrations in toddlers. A multivariate fit model indicated that maternal rs174575 genotype, combined with DNA methylation, can predict α-linolenic acid plasma concentration in all toddlers and arachidonic acid concentrations in boys. Arachidonic acid intake was predictive for its plasma concentration in girls, whereas intake of 3 major n-3 species (eicosapentaenoic, docosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic acids) were predictive for their plasma concentrations in boys. FADS2 genotype and DNA methylation in toddlers were not related to plasma concentrations or food intakes, except for CpG8 methylation. Maternal FADS2 methylation was a predictor for the boys' α-linolenic acid intakes. This exploratory study suggests that maternal FADS2 genetic and epigenetic status could be related to toddlers' polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism. PMID:26439440

  20. Effect of baicalin on hippocampal damage in kainic acid-induced epileptic mice

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zheng-Jian; Liang, Ri-Sheng; Shi, Song-Sheng; Wang, Chun-Hua; Yang, Wei-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of baicalin on the expression of miR-497 and its target B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) in the hippocampus of kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptic mice. To establish status epilepticus (SE), 0.1 µg/5 µl KA was injected into the lateral cerebral ventricle in mice, which then received an intraperitoneal injection of baicalin (100 mg/kg) after 1 and 8 h. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to observe the pathological changes in morphology and neuronal apoptosis was determined by terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling staining. Western blot analysis was used to detect the expression of Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 proteins in the hippocampus, while reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify hippocampal miR-497 expression. The results showed that baicalin significantly attenuated neuronal damage and apoptosis in the hippocampus 72 h after SE. In addition, baicalin decreased SE-induced expression of miR-497 and cleaved caspase-3 protein, while upregulating the expression of Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, the present results suggest that baicalin possesses potent antiapoptotic properties and attenuates hippocampal injury in mice after SE, which may be associated with the downregulation of miR-497 and cleaved caspase-3 and the upregulation of Bcl-2. PMID:27588062

  1. Status of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshay, M.

    1987-01-01

    A technology development and commercial feasibility evaluation is presented for phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs) applicable to electric utility operations. The correction of identified design deficiencies in the control card and water treatment subsystems is projected to be able to substantially increase average powerplant availability from the 63 percent achieved in recent field tests of a PAFC system. Current development work is proceeding under NASA research contracts at the output levels of a multimegawatt facility for electric utility use, a multikilowatt on-site integrated energy generation facility, and advanced electrocatalysts applicable to PAFCs.

  2. The phosphorylation status and cytoskeletal remodeling of striatal astrocytes treated with quinolinic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; Ortiz de Lima, Bárbara; Gonçalves Fernandes, Carolina; Totarelli Monteforte, Priscila; Castro Medaglia, Natalia de; Bincoletto, Claudia; Soubhi Smaili, Soraya; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2014-04-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is a glutamate agonist which markedly enhances the vulnerability of neural cells to excitotoxicity. QUIN is produced from the amino acid tryptophan through the kynurenine pathway (KP). Dysregulation of this pathway is associated with neurodegenerative conditions. In this study we treated striatal astrocytes in culture with QUIN and assayed the endogenous phosphorylating system associated with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin as well as cytoskeletal remodeling. After 24 h incubation with 100 µM QUIN, cells were exposed to {sup 32}P-orthophosphate and/or protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase dependent of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin II (PKCaMII) or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, H89 (20 μM), KN93 (10 μM) and staurosporin (10 nM), respectively. Results showed that hyperphosphorylation was abrogated by PKA and PKC inhibitors but not by the PKCaMII inhibitor. The specific antagonists to ionotropic NMDA and non-NMDA (50 µM DL-AP5 and CNQX, respectively) glutamate receptors as well as to metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGLUR; 50 µM MCPG), mGLUR1 (100 µM MPEP) and mGLUR5 (10 µM 4C3HPG) prevented the hyperphosphorylation provoked by QUIN. Also, intra and extracellular Ca{sup 2+} quelators (1 mM EGTA; 10 µM BAPTA-AM, respectively) prevented QUIN-mediated effect, while Ca{sup 2+} influx through voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} channel type L (L-VDCC) (blocker: 10 µM verapamil) is not implicated in this effect. Morphological analysis showed dramatically altered actin cytoskeleton with concomitant change of morphology to fusiform and/or flattened cells with retracted cytoplasm and disruption of the GFAP meshwork, supporting misregulation of actin cytoskeleton. Both hyperphosphorylation and cytoskeletal remodeling were reversed 24 h after QUIN removal. Astrocytes are highly plastic cells and the vulnerability of astrocyte cytoskeleton may have important implications for understanding the neurotoxicity of QUIN in neurodegenerative

  3. Effect of dietary potassium and anionic salts on acid-base and mineral status in periparturient cows.

    PubMed

    Rérat, M; Schlegel, P

    2014-06-01

    Dry cow diets based on grassland forage from intensive production contain high amounts of K and could be responsible for a reduced ability to maintain Ca homoeostasis. The aim of this study was to determine whether a moderate anionic salt supplementation to a forage-based pre-calving diet with varying native K content affects the mineral and acid-base status in transition cows. Twenty-four dry and pregnant Holstein cows, without antecedent episodes of clinical hypocalcemia, were assigned to two diets during the last 4 weeks before estimated calving date. Twelve cows were fed a hay-based diet low in K (18 g K/kg DM), and 12, a hay-based diet high in K (35 g K/kg DM). Within each diet, six cows received anionic salts during the last 2 weeks before the estimated calving day. After calving, all cows received the high K diet ad libitum. Blood samples were taken daily from day 11 pre-partum to day 5 post-partum. Urine samples were taken on days 7 and 2 pre-partum and on day 2 post-partum. The anionic salt did not alter feed intake during the pre-partum period. Serum Ca was not influenced by the dietary treatments. Feeding pre-partum diets with low K concentrations induced a reduced metabolic alkalotic charge, as indicated by reduced pre-partum urinary base-acid quotient. Transition cows fed the low K diet including anionic salts induced a mild metabolic acidosis before calving, as indicated by higher urinary Ca, lower urinary pH and net acid-base excretion. Although serum Ca during the post-partum period was not affected by dietary treatment, feeding a low K diet moderately supplemented with anionic salts to reach a dietary cation-anion difference close to zero permitted to obtain a metabolic response in periparturient cows without altering the dry matter intake. PMID:23796109

  4. Development status of a sealed bipolar lead/acid battery for high-power battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, J. L.; Rowlette, J. J.; Drake, E. D.

    A sealed bipolar lead/acid (SBLA) battery is being developed by Arias Research Associates (ARA) which will offer a number of important advantages in applications requiring high power densities. These applications include electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles, uninterruptable power supplies (UPS), electrically-heated catalysts (EHCs) for automobiles, utility-power peak-shaving, and others. The advantages of the SBLA over other types of batteries will by significantly higher power density, together with good energy density, high cycle life, high voltage density, low production cost and zero maintenance. In addition, the lead/acid battery represents a technology which is familiar and accepted by Society, is recyclable within the existing infrastructure, and does not raise the safety concerns of many other new batteries (e.g., fire, explosion and toxic gases). This paper briefly reviews the basic design concepts and issues of the SBLA battery technology, various quasi-bipolar approaches and the results of ARA's development work during the past four years. Performance data are given based on both in-house and independent testing of ARA laboratory test batteries. In addition, performance projections and other characteristics are given for three ARA SBLA battery designs, which are compared with other batteries in three example applications: UPS, EHCs, and EVs. The most notable advantages of the SBLA battery are substantial reductions in product size and weight for the UPS, smaller packaging and longer life for the EHC, and higher vehicle performance and lower cost for the EV, compared to both existing and advanced EV batteries.

  5. Growth performance, vitamin E status, and proximate and fatty acid composition of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, fed diets containing various levels of fish oil and vitamin E

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of increasing dietary levels of fish oil on vitamin E requirement and their effect on growth performance, liver vitamin E status, and tissue proximate and fatty acid compositions of channel catfish. Basal purified diets (42% protein and 3,800 kcal DE/kg)...

  6. Controlling Salmonella infection in weanling pigs through water delivery of direct-fed microbials or organic acids; Part I. Effects on growth performance, microbial populations and immune status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigs (n=88) weaned at 19 ± 2 d of age were used in a 14 d study to evaluate the effects of water-delivered direct-fed microbials (DFM) or organic acids on immune status, Salmonella infection and shedding, and intestinal microbial populations following a Salmonella Typhimurium challenge. Pigs were ch...

  7. Polyunsaturated fatty acid status in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression, and Alzheimer's disease: towards an omega-3 index for mental health?

    PubMed

    Milte, Catherine M; Sinn, Natalie; Howe, Peter R C

    2009-10-01

    Interest in the role of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), particularly long-chain (LC) omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs, in mental health is increasing. This review investigates whether n-3 PUFA levels are abnormal in people with three prevalent mental health problems - attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression, and dementia. Data sources included PubMed, Web of Science, and bibliographies of papers published in English that describe PUFA levels in the circulation of individuals who have these mental health conditions. Although abnormal blood PUFA levels were reported in a number of studies, weighted comparisons of PUFA status showed no significant differences overall between people with mental health problems and controls. Whether those with low n-3 PUFA status are likely to be more responsive to n-3 PUFA supplementation is not yet resolved. Further studies assessing PUFA levels and mental status with greater uniformity are required in order to clarify the relationship between LC n-3 PUFA status and mental health. PMID:19785689

  8. Soil acidity status in the vicinity of the Severonikel copper-nickel industrial complex, Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashulina, G. M.; Kubrak, A. N.; Korobeinikova, N. M.

    2015-04-01

    The physicochemical properties of soils exposed to emissions from the Severonikel industrial complex (one of the largest sources of SO2 and heavy metals in northern Europe) for 70 years were studied. The results showed that even after the long-term impact of heavy SO2 emissions, the , the content of exchangeable bases, and the base saturation remained at the medium and high levels inherent to undisturbed soils of the region studied. An exclusion was the illuvial horizon of the podzols, where a relative reduction of the (at the level of low values of the natural variation) was revealed. At the same time, the hydrolytic acidity and cation exchange capacity in most samples of podzols, peat eutrophic, and mountain soils in the zone exposed to emissions (local zone) were also reduced. This fact is explained by indirect effects of the emissions: the gradual decrease in the organic matter content in the soils due to the destruction of the vegetation, the absence of fresh plant falloff, the development of erosion, and the disturbance of the hydrological regime of the soils and landscapes.

  9. Stomatal response to abscisic Acid is a function of current plant water status.

    PubMed

    Tardieu, F; Davies, W J

    1992-02-01

    We investigated, under laboratory and field conditions, the possibility that increasing abscisic acid (ABA) concentrations and decreasing water potentials can interact in their effects on stomata. One experiment was carried out with epidermal pieces of Commelina communis incubated in media with a variety of ABA and polyethylene glycol concentrations. In the media without ABA, incubation in solutions with water potentials between -0.3 and -1.5 megapascals had no significant effect on stomatal aperture. Conversely, the sensitivity of stomatal aperture to ABA was trebled in solutions at -1.5 megapascals compared with sensitivity at -0.3 megapascals. The effect of the change in sensitivity was more important than the absolute effect of ABA at the highest water potential. In a field experiment, sensitivity of maize stomatal conductance to the concentration of ABA in the xylem sap varied strongly with the time of the day. We consider that the most likely explanation for this is the influence of a change in leaf or epidermal water potential that accompanies an increase in irradiance and saturation deficit as the day progresses. These observations suggest that epidermal water relations may act as a modulator of the responses of stomata to ABA. We argue that such changes must be taken into account in studies or modeling of plant responses to drought stress. PMID:16668674

  10. Combined Low-Intensity Exercise and Ascorbic Acid Attenuates Kainic Acid-Induced Seizure and Oxidative Stress in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jae; Song, Wook; Jin, Eun Hee; Kim, Jongkyu; Chun, Yoonseok; An, Eung Nam; Park, Sok

    2016-05-01

    Physical exercise and vitamins such as ascorbic acid (ASC) have been recognized as an effective strategy in neuroprotection and neurorehabilitatioin. However, there is a need to find an efficient treatment regimen that includes ASC and low-intensity exercise to diminish the risk of overtraining and nutritional treatment by attenuating oxidative stress. In the present study, we investigated the combined effect of low-intensity physical exercise (EX) and ASC on kainic acid (KA)-induced seizure activity and oxidative stress in mice. The mice were randomly assigned into groups as follows: "KA only" (n = 11), "ASC + KA" (n = 11), "Ex + KA" (n = 11), "ASC + Ex + KA" (n = 11). In the present study, low intensity of swimming training period lasted 8 weeks and consisted of 30-min sessions daily (three times per week) without tail weighting. Although no preventive effect of low-intensity exercise or ASC on KA seizure occurrence was evident, there was a decrease of seizure activity, seizure development (latency to first seizures), and mortality in "ASC + Ex + KA" compared to "ASC + KA", "Ex + KA", and "KA only" group. In addition, a preventive synergistic coordination of low-intensity exercise and ASC was evident in glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activity compared to separate treatment. These results suggest that low-intensity exercise and ASC treatment have preventive effects on seizure activity and development with alternation of oxidative status. PMID:26646003

  11. Redox balance influences differentiation status of neuroblastoma in the presence of all-trans retinoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Silvis, Anne M.; McCormick, Michael L.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Kiningham, Kinsley K.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor in childhood; and patients in stage IV of the disease have a high propensity for tumor recurrence. Retinoid therapy has been utilized as a means to induce differentiation of tumor cells and to inhibit relapse. In this study, the expression of a common neuronal differentiation marker [neurofilament M (NF-M)] in human SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells treated with 10 μM all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) showed significantly increased expression in accordance with reduced cell number. This was accompanied by an increase in MitoSOX and DCFH2 oxidation that could be indicative of increased steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as O2•− and H2O2, which correlated with increased levels of MnSOD activity and immuno-reactive protein. Furthermore PEG-catalase inhibited the DCFH2 oxidation signal to a greater extent in the ATRA-treated cells (relative to controls) at 96 h indicating that as the cells became more differentiated, steady-state levels of H2O2 increased in the absence of increases in peroxide-scavenging antioxidants (i.e., glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase). In addition, ATRA-induced stimulation of NF-M at 48 and 72 h was enhanced by decreasing SOD activity using siRNA directed at MnSOD. Finally, treatment with ATRA for 96 h in the presence of MnSOD siRNA or PEG-catalase inhibited ATRA induced increases in NF-M expression. These results provide strong support for the hypothesis that changes in steady-state levels of O2•− and H2O2 significantly contribute to the process of ATRA-induced differentiation in neuroblastoma, and suggest that retinoid therapy for neuroblastoma could potentially be enhanced by redox-based manipulations of superoxide metabolism to improve patient outcome. PMID:26678800

  12. Simultaneous double-isotope autoradiographic measurement of local cerebral glucose metabolic rate and acid-base status in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, A H; Peek, K E; Berridge, M; Bogue, L; Yap, E

    1987-03-01

    We developed a double-isotope autoradiographic method for the simultaneous measurement of the local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (1CMRG) and index of regional acid-base status (rABI) in single brain slices using [2-14C]deoxy-D-glucose (DG) and 5,5-dimethyl-[2-14C]oxazolidine-2,4,dione (DMO). After iv isotope administration, paper chromatography separates plasma DMO from DG activity using a methanol-methylene chloride solvent system. Initial tissue autoradiograms depict regional DMO plus DG and DG metabolite distribution. After 14 days in a well-ventilated hood, 97.5 +/- 0.5% of all DMO is lost from tissue sections by sublimation, and a second autoradiogram depicts DG plus DG metabolite distribution. Retention of brain lipids does not alter beta-particle self-absorption, avoiding problems associated with isotope extraction with solvents. Autoradiograms are digitized and converted to isotope-content images. The second autoradiogram is used for 1CMRG computation. After subtracting the second regional isotope-content value from the first, the DMO content is obtained and used to compute rABI. Application of this method to normal animals yields expected values for 1CMRG and rABI. This method is amenable to whole-slice digitization and creation of functional images of 1CMRG and ABI followed by pixel-by-pixel correlations of the two variables, making this a potentially valuable tool for the investigation of the relationships between glucose metabolism and brain acid-base balance. PMID:3505334

  13. Modulatory efficacy of rosmarinic acid on premalignant lesions and antioxidant status in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Karthikkumar, V; Sivagami, G; Vinothkumar, R; Rajkumar, D; Nalini, N

    2012-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths in Western countries and is becoming increasingly common in Asia. Rosmarinic acid (RA), one of the major components of polyphenol possesses attractive remedial features. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possible chemopreventive mechanism of action of RA against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induced rat colon carcinogenesis by evaluating the circulatory antioxidant status and colonic bacterial enzymes activities. Additionally, we analyzed the aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation and multiplicity in the colon of experimental groups. Wistar male rats were divided into six groups. Group 1 was control rats, group 2 rats received RA (10 mg/kg b.w., p.o. everyday), rats in groups 3-6 received DMH (20 mg/kg b.w., s.c.) for the first 4 weeks. In addition to DMH, groups 4-6 received 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg b.w. RA respectively. The results revealed that supplementation with RA significantly reduced the formation of ACF and ACF multiplicity in DMH treated rats. Moreover RA supplementation prevented the alterations in circulatory antioxidant enzymes and colonic bacterial enzymes activities. Overall, our results showed that all three doses of RA inhibited carcinogenesis, though the effect of the intermediary dose of 5 mg/kg b.w. was more pronounced. PMID:22960260

  14. IGF-I regulates redox status in breast cancer cells by activating the amino acid transport molecule xC−

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuzhe; Yee, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate cell growth in part by increasing amino acid uptake. xCT (SLC7A11) encodes the functional subunit of the cell surface transport system xC− which mediates cystine uptake, a pivotal step in glutathione synthesis and cellular redox control. In this study, we show that IGF-I regulates cystine uptake and cellular redox status by activating the expression and function of xCT in estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer cells by a mechanism that relies on the IGF receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). Breast cancer cell proliferation mediated by IGF-I was suppressed by attenuating xCT expression or blocking xCT activity with the pharmacological inhibitor sulfasalazine (SASP). Notably, SASP sensitized breast cancer cells to inhibitors of the IGF-I receptor in a manner reversed by the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Thus, IGF-I promoted the proliferation of ER+ breast cancer cells by regulating xC− transporter function to protect cancer cells from ROS in an IRS-1 dependent manner. Our findings suggest that inhibiting xC− transporter function may synergize with modalities that target the IGF-I receptor to heighten their therapeutic effects. PMID:24686172

  15. Effect of tolbutamide, glyburide and glipizide administered supraspinally on CA3 hippocampal neuronal cell death and hyperglycemia induced by kainic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chea-Ha; Park, Soo-Hyun; Sim, Yun-Beom; Kim, Sung-Su; Kim, Su-Jin; Lim, Su-Min; Jung, Jun-Sub; Suh, Hong-Won

    2014-05-20

    Sulfonylureas are widely used oral drugs for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. In the present study, the effects of sulfonylureas administered supraspinally on kainic acid (KA)-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death and hyperglycemia were studied in ICR mice. Mice were pretreated intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) with 30μg of tolbutamide, glyburide or glipizide for 10min and then, mice were administered i.c.v. with KA (0.1μg). The neuronal cell death in the CA3 region in the hippocampus was assessed 24h after KA administration and the blood glucose level was measured 30, 60, and 120min after KA administration. We found that i.c.v. pretreatment with tolbutamide, glyburide or glipizide attenuated the KA-induced neuronal cell death in CA3 region of the hippocampus and hyperglycemia. In addition, KA administered i.c.v. caused an elevation of plasma corticosterone level and a reduction of the plasma insulin level. The i.c.v. pretreatment with tolbutamide, glyburide or glipizide attenuated KA-induced increase of plasma corticosterone level. Furthermore, i.c.v. pretreatment with tolbutamide, glyburide or glipizide causes an elevation of plasma insulin level. Glipizide, but not tolbutamide or glyburide, pretreated i.c.v. caused a reversal of KA-induced hypoinsulinemic effect. Our results suggest that supraspinally administered tolbutamide, glyburide and glipizide exert a protective effect against KA-induced neuronal cells death in CA3 region of the hippocampus. The neuroprotective effect of tolbutamide, glyburide and glipizide appears to be mediated by lowering the blood glucose level induced by KA. PMID:24713348

  16. The β2-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol elicits neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic actions in the kainic acid model of excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Lorna C; Ryan, Katie J; Griffin, Eadaoin W; Connor, Thomas J; Harkin, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    Excitotoxicity is a mechanism of neuronal cell death implicated in a range of neurodegenerative conditions. Systemic administration of the excitotoxin kainic acid (KA) induces inflammation and apoptosis in the hippocampus, resulting in neuronal loss. Evidence indicates that stimulation of glial β(2)-adrenoceptors has anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic properties that could result in neuroprotection. Consequently, in this study we examined the effect of the β(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol on KA-induced inflammation, neurotrophic factor expression and apoptosis in the hippocampus. Clenbuterol (0.5mg/kg) was administered to rats one hour prior to KA (10mg/kg). Epileptic behaviour induced by KA was assessed for three hours following administration using the Racine scale. Twenty-four hours later TUNEL staining in the CA3 hippocampal subfield and hippocampal caspase-3 activity was assessed to measure KA-induced apoptosis. In addition, expression of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IFN-γ), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), kynurenine pathway enzymes indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO), the microglial activation marker CD11b, and the neurotrophins BDNF and NGF were quantified in the hippocampus using real-time PCR. Whilst clenbuterol treatment did not significantly alter KA-induced epileptic behavior it ameliorated KA-induced apoptosis, and this neuroprotective effect was accompanied by reduced inflammatory cytokine expression, reduced expression of iNOS, IDO, KMO and CD11b, coupled with increased BDNF and NGF expression in KA-treated rats. In conclusion, the β(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol has anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic actions and elicits a neuroprotective effect in the KA model of neurodegeneration. PMID:20599496

  17. Changes in brain glucose use and extracellular ions associated with kainic acid-induced seizures: (/sup 14/C)-2-deoxyglucose and intracranial

    SciTech Connect

    Chastain, J.E Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of kainic acid (KA) on brain glucose use with coadministration of diazepam, and the effect of KA on brain extracellular (K/sup +/), Ca/sup 2 +/), and (Na/sup +/) was investigated in rats by means of (/sup 14/C)-2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) and intracranial microdialysis, respectively. Also, the impact of intracranial microdialysis on brain regional metabolic function was studied. Co-treatment with KA and diazepam attenuated KA-induced 3 hr increases and prevented 48 hr decreases in glucose use within all structures measured, particularly the piriform cortex and amygdala. Hippocampal CA/sub 3/, CA/sub 4/, and CA/sub 1/-ventral were least affected by diazepam. The results suggest that diazepam suppresses KA seizure spread from its focus, proposed to be CA/sub 3/. KA-induced ions changes were studied by intracranial microdialysis. Dialysis fibers were implanted within the hippocampus or piriform cortex and perfused 24 hr later. Samples, collected before and after KA, were analyzed for (K/sup +/), (Ca/sup 2 +/), and (Na/sup +/). KA caused an early and prolonged increase in extracellular (K/sup +/) and a negligible decrease in (Ca/sup 2 +/) within the hippocampus. In the piriform cortex, both (K/sup +/) and (Na/sup +/) increase during a period of early seizure signs. The results indicate that ion homostatic control of ion levels is better maintained during parenteral KA-induced seizures than when the brain is activated locally or during ischemia/hypoxia. The effect of intracranial microdialysis was studied by means of 2-DG in control state and KA-induced seizure state. The results indicate that intracranial microdialysis alters brain metabolic function during KA-induced seizures, but not in the control state. At 3 hr post KA, seizure metabolic activity was enhanced within the piriform cortex, and attenuated within the hippocampus.

  18. Influence of lactic acid bacteria on redox status and on proteolytic activity of buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) sourdoughs.

    PubMed

    Capuani, Alessandro; Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F

    2013-07-15

    Redox potential and proteolysis determine protein networks in doughs and thus dough rheology as well as the structure of baked goods. Namely, gluten-free bakery products needs structural improvements but little is known about these parameters in gluten free dough systems. In this work the influence of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on redox status and proteolysis of buckwheat sourdoughs was investigated. An increase of free thiol groups was detected as redox potential was decreasing during fermentation. Thiol content at 8 h was higher in doughs fermented with strains with high reductive activity, such as Weissella (W.) cibaria in comparison to Pediococcus (P.) pentosaceus, which exhibited a lower reducing activity. At 24 h each fermentation showed a similar content of free thiol groups. Endogenous buckwheat proteases were characterized using various protease inhibitors in buckwheat doughs. Until pH3.1 a proteolysis increase was monitored in doughs. Employed LAB didn't show any detectable extracellular proteolytic activity. Flour proteases are thus responsible for protein breakdown, and this was demonstrated comparing free amino nitrogen (FAN) values and protein electrophoretic patterns of sourdough fermentations with chemical acidified (CA) doughs. FAN content at 24 h using P. pentosaceus, proteolytic comparative strain of Enterococcus faecalis, W. cibaria, mixed culture (containing P. pentosaceus and W. cibaria), CA and CA doughs containing glutathione (GSH) reached 45.9±1.3, 42.4±1.3, 40±1, 31±2, 29±2 and 17.8±3.9 mmol kg(-1) flour, respectively. Proteolysis was mainly influenced by pH and incubation time. The addition of GSH showed a decrease of proteolysis and of free amino acids. CA doughs showed a higher total free amino acids content than sourdough fermented with LAB indicating their metabolization. Fermentations with high FAN values exhibited lower band intensity (analyzed under reducing condition) in electrophoretic patterns. These results show that

  19. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Status Enhances the Prevention of Cognitive Decline by B Vitamins in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Oulhaj, Abderrahim; Jernerén, Fredrik; Refsum, Helga; Smith, A. David; de Jager, Celeste A.

    2016-01-01

    A randomized trial (VITACOG) in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) found that B vitamin treatment to lower homocysteine slowed the rate of cognitive and clinical decline. We have used data from this trial to see whether baseline omega-3 fatty acid status interacts with the effects of B vitamin treatment. 266 participants with MCI aged ≥70 years were randomized to B vitamins (folic acid, vitamins B6 and B12) or placebo for 2 years. Baseline cognitive test performance, clinical dementia rating (CDR) scale, and plasma concentrations of total homocysteine, total docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids (omega-3 fatty acids) were measured. Final scores for verbal delayed recall, global cognition, and CDR sum-of-boxes were better in the B vitamin-treated group according to increasing baseline concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids, whereas scores in the placebo group were similar across these concentrations. Among those with good omega-3 status, 33% of those on B vitamin treatment had global CDR scores >0 compared with 59% among those on placebo. For all three outcome measures, higher concentrations of docosahexaenoic acid alone significantly enhanced the cognitive effects of B vitamins, while eicosapentaenoic acid appeared less effective. When omega-3 fatty acid concentrations are low, B vitamin treatment has no effect on cognitive decline in MCI, but when omega-3 levels are in the upper normal range, B vitamins interact to slow cognitive decline. A clinical trial of B vitamins combined with omega-3 fatty acids is needed to see whether it is possible to slow the conversion from MCI to AD. PMID:26757190

  20. Short-term supplementation of low-dose gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), or GLA plus ALA does not augment LCP omega 3 status of Dutch vegans to an appreciable extent.

    PubMed

    Fokkema, M R; Brouwer, D A; Hasperhoven, M B; Martini, I A; Muskiet, F A

    2000-11-01

    Vegans do not consume meat and fish and have therefore low intakes of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCP). They may consequently have little negative feedback inhibition from dietary LCP on conversion of alpha -linolenic acid (ALA) to the LCP omega 3 eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids. We investigated whether supplementation of nine apparently healthy vegans with 2.01 g ALA (4 ml linseed oil), 1.17 g gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) (6 ml borage oil) or their combination increases the LCP omega 3 contents of erythrocytes (RBC) and platelets (PLT), and of plasma phospholipids (PL), cholesterol esters (CE) and triglycerides (TG). The supplements changed the dietary LA/ALA ratio (in g/g) from about 13.7 (baseline) to 6.8 (linseed oil), 14.3 (borage oil) and 6.4 (linseed + borage oil), respectively. ALA or GLA given as single supplements did not increase LCP omega 3 status, but their combination augmented LCP omega 3 (in CE) and EPA (in fasting TG) to a statistically significant, but nevertheless negligible, extent. We conclude that negative feedback inhibition by dietary LCP, if any, does not play an important role in the inability to augment notably DHA status by dietary ALA. The reach of a DHA plateau already at low dietary ALA intakes suggests that dietary DHA causes a non-functional DHA surplus, or is, alternatively, important for maintaining DHA status at a functionally relevant level. PMID:11090255

  1. Feeding rolled barley grain steeped in lactic acid modulated energy status and innate immunity in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, S; Zebeli, Q; Mazzolari, A; Dunn, S M; Ametaj, B N

    2010-11-01

    plasma concentrations of cortisol, β-hydroxybutyrate, and nonesterified fatty acids or rumen endotoxin was evidenced. Taken together, our results demonstrated that feeding barley grain steeped in 0.5% LA modulated both energy status and innate immunity of dairy cows fed relatively high levels (45% of dry matter) of dietary concentrate. PMID:20965330

  2. Monitoring of vitamin B-12 nutritional status in the United States by using plasma methylmalonic acid and serum vitamin B-121234

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Regan L; Carmel, Ralph; Green, Ralph; Pfeiffer, Christine M; Cogswell, Mary E; Osterloh, John D; Sempos, Christopher T; Yetley, Elizabeth A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Various definitions, criteria, tests, and cutoffs have been used to define vitamin B-12 status; however, a need exists for the systematic study of vitamin B-12 status in the United States because of concerns about high folic acid intakes and the potential for associated adverse effects. Objective: The objective was to determine the effect of different cutoff choices on outcomes and of the different degrees of serum vitamin B-12 status, definable by the concurrent use of a functional and circulating marker as the first steps to developing a data-based consensus on the biochemical diagnosis of vitamin B-12 deficiency. Design: Data from NHANES, a nationally representative cross-sectional survey, were examined for adults aged >19 y (mean ± SD age: 45 ± 1 y) from 1999 to 2004 (n = 12,612). Results: Commonly used cutoffs had a greater effect on prevalence estimates of low vitamin B-12 status with the use of vitamin B-12 than with the use of methylmalonic acid (MMA; 3–26% and 2–6%, respectively). A cutoff of >148 pmol/L for vitamin B-12 and of ≤210 nmol/L for MMA resulted in significant misclassifications. Approximately 1% of adults had a clear vitamin B-12 deficiency (low vitamin B-12 and elevated MMA); 92% of adults had adequate vitamin B-12 status. A high percentage of younger women characterized the group with low vitamin B-12 and normal MMA (2% of adults) and may have falsely reflected low vitamin B-12. Adults with elevated MMA (5%) only were demographically similar (ie, by age and race) to the deficient group and may have included some individuals with early vitamin B-12 deficiency. Conclusions: These analyses indicate the challenges of assessing vitamin B-12 status when uncertainties exist about the appropriate cutoffs. Future studies should determine definable endpoints to achieve this goal. PMID:21677051

  3. Fatty Acid Blood Levels, Vitamin D Status, Physical Performance, Activity, and Resiliency: A Novel Potential Screening Tool for Depressed Mood in Active Duty Soldiers.

    PubMed

    Barringer, Nicholas D; Kotwal, Russ S; Lewis, Michael D; Funderburk, Leslee K; Elliott, Timothy R; Crouse, Stephen F; Smith, Stephen B; Greenwood, Michael; Kreider, Richard B

    2016-09-01

    This study examined whether blood fatty acid levels, vitamin D status, and/or physical activity are associated with physical fitness scores; a measure of mood, Patient Health Questionnaire-9; and a measure of resiliency, Dispositional Resiliency Scale-15 in active duty Soldiers. 100 active duty males at Fort Hood, Texas, underwent a battery of psychometric tests, anthropometric measurements, and fitness tests, and they also provided fasting blood samples for fatty acid and vitamin D analysis. Pearson bivariate correlation analysis revealed significant correlations among psychometric tests, anthropometric measurements, physical performance, reported physical inactivity (sitting time), and fatty acid and vitamin D blood levels. On the basis of these findings, a regression equation was developed to predict a depressed mood status as determined by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. The equation accurately predicted depressed mood status in 80% of our participants with a sensitivity of 76.9% and a specificity of 80.5%. Results indicate that the use of a regression equation may be helpful in identifying Soldiers at higher risk for mental health issues. Future studies should evaluate the impact of exercise and diet as a means of improving resiliency and reducing depressed mood in Soldiers. PMID:27612362

  4. A Prosaposin-Derived Peptide Alleviates Kainic Acid-Induced Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nabeka, Hiroaki; Shimokawa, Tetsuya; Doihara, Takuya; Saito, Shouichiro; Wakisaka, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Fumihiko; Kobayashi, Naoto; Matsuda, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Four sphingolipid activator proteins (i.e., saposins A–D) are synthesized from a single precursor protein, prosaposin (PS), which exerts exogenous neurotrophic effects in vivo and in vitro. Kainic acid (KA) injection in rodents is a good model in which to study neurotrophic factor elevation; PS and its mRNA are increased in neurons and the choroid plexus in this animal model. An 18-mer peptide (LSELIINNATEELLIKGL; PS18) derived from the PS neurotrophic region prevents neuronal damage after ischemia, and PS18 is a potent candidate molecule for use in alleviating ischemia-induced learning disabilities and neuronal loss. KA is a glutamate analog that stimulates excitatory neurotransmitter release and induces ischemia-like neuronal degeneration; it has been used to define mechanisms involved in neurodegeneration and neuroprotection. In the present study, we demonstrate that a subcutaneous injection of 0.2 and 2.0 mg/kg PS18 significantly improved behavioral deficits of Wistar rats (n = 6 per group), and enhanced the survival of hippocampal and cortical neurons against neurotoxicity induced by 12 mg/kg KA compared with control animals. PS18 significantly protected hippocampal synapses against KA-induced destruction. To evaluate the extent of PS18- and KA-induced effects in these hippocampal regions, we performed histological evaluations using semithin sections stained with toluidine blue, as well as ordinal sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin. We revealed a distinctive feature of KA-induced brain injury, which reportedly mimics ischemia, but affects a much wider area than ischemia-induced injury: KA induced neuronal degeneration not only in the CA1 region, where neurons degenerate following ischemia, but also in the CA2, CA3, and CA4 hippocampal regions. PMID:25993033

  5. Does maternal long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid status in pregnancy influence the bone health of children? The Southampton Women’s Survey

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Nicholas; Dhanwal, Dinesh; Robinson, Siân; Kim, Miranda; Inskip, Hazel; Godfrey, Keith; Dennison, Elaine; Calder, Philip; Cooper, Cyrus

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Maternal diet in pregnancy has been linked to childhood bone mass, but the mechanisms and nutrients involved are uncertain. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) have been shown to affect bone metabolism, but the relationship between maternal fatty acid status and bone mass in the offspring remains unknown. Methods We evaluated the association between maternal LCPUFA status in late pregnancy (34 weeks gestation) and bone density in their children at age four years, within 727 mother-child pairs taking part in the Southampton Women’s Survey. Results Concentrations of the n-3 LCPUFA component of maternal plasma phosphatidylcholine were positively associated with a number of bone mineral measures at the age of 4 years; these associations persisted after adjustment for maternal body build, walking speed and infant feeding. Relationships were most evident for eicosapentaenoic acid (r=0.09, p=0.02 for whole body areal bone mineral density [aBMD] and r=0.1, p=0.008 for lumbar spine aBMD) and for docosapentaenoic acid (r=0.09, p=0.02 for whole body aBMD and r=0.12, p=0.002 for lumbar spine aBMD). Conclusions These findings suggest that variation in early exposure to n-3 and n-6 LCPUFA may have potential consequences for bone development and that the effects appear to persist into early childhood. PMID:22159749

  6. Altered expression of sphingosine kinase 1 and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 in mouse hippocampus after kainic acid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Jeon, Byeong Tak; Jeong, Eun Ae; Kim, Joon Soo; Cho, Yong Woon; Kim, Hyun Joon; Kang, Sang Soo; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Choi, Wan Sung; Roh, Gu Seob

    2010-03-12

    Kainic acid (KA) induces hippocampal cell death and astrocyte proliferation. There are reports that sphingosine kinase (SPHK)1 and sphingosine-1- phosphate (S1P) receptor 1 (S1P{sub 1}) signaling axis controls astrocyte proliferation. Here we examined the temporal changes of SPHK1/S1P{sub 1} in mouse hippocampus during KA-induced hippocampal cell death. Mice were killed at 2, 6, 24, or 48 h after KA (30 mg/kg) injection. There was an increase in Fluoro-Jade B-positive cells in the hippocampus of KA-treated mice with temporal changes of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression. The lowest level of SPHK1 protein expression was found 2 h after KA treatment. Six hours after KA treatment, the expression of SPHK1 and S1P{sub 1} proteins steadily increased in the hippocampus. In immunohistochemical analysis, SPHK1 and S1P{sub 1} are more immunoreactive in astrocytes within the hippocampus of KA-treated mice than in hippocampus of control mice. These results indicate that SPHK1/S1P{sub 1} signaling axis may play an important role in astrocytes proliferation during KA-induced excitotoxicity.

  7. Nitric oxide (NO), citrulline-NO cycle enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and oxidative status in kainic acid-mediated excitotoxicity in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Mummedy; Sirajudeen, Kuttulebbai N S; Chandran, Govindasamy

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal excitation, involving the excitatory glutamate receptors, is recognized as an important underlying mechanism in neurodegenerative disorders. To understand their role in excitotoxicity, the nitric oxide synthase (NOS), argininosuccinate synthetase (AS), argininosuccinate lyase (AL), glutamine synthetase (GS), and arginase activities, along with the concentration of nitrate/nitrite, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), and total antioxidant status (TAS), were estimated in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and brain stem of rats subjected to kainic acid-mediated excitotoxicity. The results of this study clearly demonstrated the increased production of NO by increased activity of NOS. The increased activities of AS and AL suggest the increased and effective recycling of citrulline to arginine in excitotoxicity, making NO production more effective and contributing to its toxic effects. The decreased activity of GS may favor the prolonged availability of glutamic acid, causing excitotoxicity, leading to neuronal damage. The increased formation of TBARS and decreased TAS indicate the presence of oxidative stress in excitotoxicity. PMID:19793024

  8. Could the acid-base status of Antarctic sea urchins indicate a better-than-expected resilience to near-future ocean acidification?

    PubMed

    Collard, Marie; De Ridder, Chantal; David, Bruno; Dehairs, Frank; Dubois, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration alters the chemistry of the oceans towards more acidic conditions. Polar oceans are particularly affected due to their low temperature, low carbonate content and mixing patterns, for instance upwellings. Calcifying organisms are expected to be highly impacted by the decrease in the oceans' pH and carbonate ions concentration. In particular, sea urchins, members of the phylum Echinodermata, are hypothesized to be at risk due to their high-magnesium calcite skeleton. However, tolerance to ocean acidification in metazoans is first linked to acid-base regulation capacities of the extracellular fluids. No information on this is available to date for Antarctic echinoderms and inference from temperate and tropical studies needs support. In this study, we investigated the acid-base status of 9 species of sea urchins (3 cidaroids, 2 regular euechinoids and 4 irregular echinoids). It appears that Antarctic regular euechinoids seem equipped with similar acid-base regulation systems as tropical and temperate regular euechinoids but could rely on more passive ion transfer systems, minimizing energy requirements. Cidaroids have an acid-base status similar to that of tropical cidaroids. Therefore Antarctic cidaroids will most probably not be affected by decreasing seawater pH, the pH drop linked to ocean acidification being negligible in comparison of the naturally low pH of the coelomic fluid. Irregular echinoids might not suffer from reduced seawater pH if acidosis of the coelomic fluid pH does not occur but more data on their acid-base regulation are needed. Combining these results with the resilience of Antarctic sea urchin larvae strongly suggests that these organisms might not be the expected victims of ocean acidification. However, data on the impact of other global stressors such as temperature and of the combination of the different stressors needs to be acquired to assess the sensitivity of these organisms to global

  9. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL STATUS OF LAKES AND STREAMS IN THE UPPER MIDWEST: ASSESSMENT OF ACIDIC DEPOSITION EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many lakes in three areas in the Upper Midwest--northeastern Minnesota, northern Wisconsin, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan--have low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and may be susceptible to change by acidic deposition. These acidic lakes are precipitation-dominated, clearw...

  10. The effects of dormancy status on the endogenous contents and biological activities of jasmonic acid, n-(jasmonoyl)-isoleucine, and tuberonic acid in potato tubers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of storage and dormancy progression on the endogenous contents and the growth-regulating activities of jasmonic acid (JA), jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile), and tuberonic acid (TA) were determined in potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Russet Burbank) minitubers and seed tubers over several ha...

  11. The effect of modifying dietary LA and ALA intakes on omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 LCPUFA) status in human adults: a systematic review and commentary.

    PubMed

    Wood, K E; Mantzioris, E; Gibson, R A; Ramsden, C E; Muhlhausler, B S

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a systematic review of human studies investigating the effect of altering dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-6 PUFA) linoleic acid (LA) intakes on n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) status in adult humans. The results suggest that it is possible to increase n-3 LCPUFA status by reducing LA and/or increasing ALA intake in humans, although decreasing LA intake to below 2.5%E may be required to specifically increase levels of the n-3 LCPUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The majority of studies in this area to date have been relatively poor in quality, which limits the ability to draw robust conclusions, and we present a series of recommendations to improve the quality of future studies in fatty acid nutrition in humans. PMID:25687496

  12. Chemical and biological status of lakes and streams in the upper midwest: assessment of acidic deposition effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiener, J.G.; Eilers, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Many lakes in three areas in the Upper Midwest - northeastern Minnesota, northern Wisconsin, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan - have low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and may be susceptible to change by acidic deposition. Northcentral Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan together contain about 150-300 acidic lakes (ANC ≤ 0), whereas none have been found in Minnesota. These acidic lakes are precipitation-dominated, Clearwater seepage lakes having small surface area, shallow depth, and low concentrations of dissolved organic carbon. The spatial distribution of these acidic lakes parallels a west to east gradient of increasing sulfate and hydrogen ion deposition. Several of these acidic lakes exhibit chemical characteristics and biological changes consistent with those observed elsewhere in waters reported to be acidified by acidic deposition. However, an hypothesis of recent lake acidification is not supported by analyses of either historical chemical data or diatom remains in lake sediments, and natural sources of acidity and alternative ecological processes have not been conclusively eliminated as causative factors. Streams in this three-state region have high ANC and appear to be insensitive to acidic deposition. The species richness and composition of lacustrine fish communities in the region are partly related to pH and associated chemical factors. Sport fishes considered acid-sensitive and of primary concern with regard to acidification include walleye, smallmouth bass, and black crappie. The fishery in at least one lake, Morgan Lake in Wisconsin (pH 4.6), may have declined because of acidification. Given the general lack of quantitative fishery data for acidic Wisconsin and Michigan lakes, however, more general conclusions concerning impacts or the absence of impacts of acidification on the region's fishery resources are not possible.

  13. Plasma omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid status and monounsaturated fatty acids are altered by chronic social stress and predict endocrine responses to acute stress in titi monkeys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disturbances in fatty acid (FA) metabolism may link chronic psychological stress, endocrine responsiveness, and psychopathology. Therefore, lipid metabolome-wide responses and their relationships with endocrine (cortisol; insulin; adiponectin) responsiveness to acute stress (AS) were assessed in a ...

  14. Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency selectively up-regulates delta6-desaturase expression and activity indices in rat liver: prevention by normalization of omega-3 fatty acid status.

    PubMed

    Hofacer, Rylon; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Magrisso, I Jack; Benoit, Stephen C; McNamara, Robert K

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of perinatal dietary omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid depletion and subsequent repletion on the expression of genes that regulate long-chain (LC) polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in rat liver and brain. It was hypothesized that chronic n-3 fatty acid deficiency would increase liver Fads1 and Fads2 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression/activity and that n-3 fatty acid repletion would normalize this response. Adult rats fed the n-3-free diet during perinatal development exhibited significantly lower erythrocyte, liver, and frontal cortex LCn-3 fatty acid composition and reciprocal elevations in LC omega-6 (n-6) fatty acid composition compared with controls (CONs) and repleted rats. Liver Fads2, but not Fads1, Elovl2, or Elovl5, mRNA expression was significantly greater in n-3-deficient (DEF) rats compared with CONs and was partially normalized in repleted rats. The liver 18:3n-6/18:2n-6 ratio, an index of delta6-desturase activity, was significantly greater in DEF rats compared with CON and repleted rats and was positively correlated with Fads2 mRNA expression among all rats. The liver 18:3n-6/18:2n-6 ratio, but not Fads2 mRNA expression, was also positively correlated with erythrocyte and frontal cortex LCn-6 fatty acid compositions. Neither Fads1 or Fads2 mRNA expression was altered in brain cortex of DEF rats. These results confirm previous findings that liver, but not brain, delta6-desaturase expression and activity indices are negatively regulated by dietary n-3 fatty acids. PMID:22024496

  15. Naringenin ameliorates kainic acid-induced morphological alterations in the dentate gyrus in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungha; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Shin, Won-Ho; Bae, Young-Seuk; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-10-19

    Granule cell dispersion (GCD) in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is a morphological alteration characteristic of temporal lobe epilepsy. Recently, we reported that treatment with naringin, a flavonoid found in grapefruit and citrus fruits, reduced spontaneous recurrent seizures by inhibiting kainic acid (KA)-induced GCD and neuronal cell death in mouse hippocampus, suggesting that naringin might have beneficial effects for preventing epileptic events in the adult brain. However, it is still unclear whether the beneficial effects of naringin treatment are mediated by the metabolism of naringin into naringenin in the KA-treated hippocampus. To investigate this possibility, we evaluated whether intraperitoneal injections of naringenin could mimic naringin-induced effects against GCD caused by intrahippocampal KA injections in mice. Our results showed that treatment with naringenin delayed the onset of KA-induced seizures and attenuated KA-induced GCD by inhibiting activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 in both neurons and reactive astrocytes in the DG. In addition, its administration attenuated the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) from microglial activation in the DG following KA treatment. These results suggest that naringenin may be an active metabolite of naringin and help prevent the progression of epileptic insults in the hippocampus in vivo; therefore, naringenin may be a beneficial metabolite of naringin for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:27584687

  16. Maternal Multiple Micronutrient Supplementation Has Limited Impact on Micronutrient Status of Bangladeshi Infants Compared with Standard Iron Folic Acid Supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the impact of type of maternal micronutrient supplement, time of introduction of a prenatal food supplement and the two interventions combined on micronutrient status of infants in rural Bangladesh. In a community trial, 4436 pregnant women were randomized to Early or Usual start of food...

  17. Pre-storage application of oxalic acid alleviates chilling injury in mango fruit by modulating proline metabolism and energy status under chilling stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Peiyan; Zheng, Xiaolin; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Yuyan

    2014-01-01

    Effects of oxalic acid on chilling injury, proline metabolism and energy status in mango fruit were investigated after mango fruit (Mangifera indica L. cv. Zill) were dipped in 5mM oxalic acid solution for 10min at 25°C and then stored at low temperature (10±0.5°C) for 49days thereafter transferred to 25°C for 4days. Pre-storage application of oxalic acid apparently inhibited the development of chilling injury, notably elevated proline accumulation actually associated with increase in Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS) activity and decrease in proline dehydrogenase (PDH) activity in the peel and the flesh, without activation of ornithine-δ-aminotransferase (OAT) activity, and maintained high ATP level and energy charge in the flesh during storage. It was suggested that these effects of oxalic acid might collectively contribute to improving chilling tolerance, thereby alleviating chilling injury and maintaining quality of mango fruit in long term cold storage. PMID:24001814

  18. RBC deformability and amino acid concentrations after hypo-osmotic challenge may reflect chronic cell hydration status in healthy young men

    PubMed Central

    Stookey, Jodi D; Klein, Alexis; Hamer, Janice; Chi, Christine; Higa, Annie; Ng, Vivian; Arieff, Allen; Kuypers, Frans A; Larkin, Sandra; Perrier, Erica; Lang, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Biomarkers of chronic cell hydration status are needed to determine whether chronic hyperosmotic stress increases chronic disease risk in population-representative samples. In vitro, cells adapt to chronic hyperosmotic stress by upregulating protein breakdown to counter the osmotic gradient with higher intracellular amino acid concentrations. If cells are subsequently exposed to hypo-osmotic conditions, the adaptation results in excess cell swelling and/or efflux of free amino acids. This study explored whether increased red blood cell (RBC) swelling and/or plasma or urine amino acid concentrations after hypo-osmotic challenge might be informative about relative chronic hyperosmotic stress in free-living men. Five healthy men (20–25 years) with baseline total water intake below 2 L/day participated in an 8-week clinical study: four 2-week periods in a U-shaped A-B-C-A design. Intake of drinking water was increased by +0.8 ± 0.3 L/day in period 2, and +1.5 ± 0.3 L/day in period 3, and returned to baseline intake (0.4 ± 0.2 L/day) in period 4. Each week, fasting blood and urine were collected after a 750 mL bolus of drinking water, following overnight water restriction. The periods of higher water intake were associated with significant decreases in RBC deformability (index of cell swelling), plasma histidine, urine arginine, and urine glutamic acid. After 4 weeks of higher water intake, four out of five participants had ½ maximal RBC deformability below 400 mmol/kg; plasma histidine below 100 μmol/L; and/or undetectable urine arginine and urine glutamic acid concentrations. Work is warranted to pursue RBC deformability and amino acid concentrations after hypo-osmotic challenge as possible biomarkers of chronic cell hydration. PMID:24303184

  19. Value of plasma chloride concentration and acid-base status in the differential diagnosis of hyperpara-thyroidism from other causes of hypercalcaemia

    PubMed Central

    Wills, M. R.

    1971-01-01

    A study is reported of the estimation of plasma chloride concentration and acid-base status in the differentiation of primary hyperparathyroidism from all other causes of hypercalcaemia. In the two groups of patients studied, all of whom had hypercalcaemia, there was complete separation between the two groups on the basis of plasma chloride concentration and acid-base status. In 16 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism the increase in plasma chloride concentration and associated metabolic acidosis could have been accounted for by the known renal tubular effects of parathyroid hormone. In 13 patients with hypercalcaemia due to various other causes the decrease in plasma chloride concentration and associated metabolic alkalosis could be accounted for either by the known effects of an excess of calcium-ion on the renal tubules, or perhaps by suppression of endogenous parathyroid hormone secretion. In patients with hypercalcaemia and hypophosphataemia of `pseudohyperparathyroidism' associated with non-endocrine tumours it is postulated that the low plasma chloride concentrations and metabolic alkalosis found in these patients were due either to a differing biological activity of the parathyroid-hormone-like polypeptide secreted by the tumour cells, or possibly to simultaneous secretion by these cells of an ACTH-like polypeptide. PMID:5573436

  20. A low omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-6 PUFA) diet increases omega-3 (n-3) long chain PUFA status in plasma phospholipids in humans.

    PubMed

    Wood, K E; Lau, A; Mantzioris, E; Gibson, R A; Ramsden, C E; Muhlhausler, B S

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of reducing the dietary linoleic acid (LA) intake from ~5% to <2.5% energy (%E) on n-3 long chain PUFA (LCPUFA) status in humans. Thirty-six participants followed a <2.5%E LA diet for 4 weeks. Nutrient intakes were estimated from diet diaries and blood samples were collected for assessment of fatty acid composition in plasma and erythrocyte phospholipids. LA intakes were reduced from 4.6%E to 2%E during the low LA intervention (P<0.001) while n-3 LCPUFA intakes were unchanged. LA and total n-6 PUFA content of plasma and erythrocyte phospholipids were significantly reduced after the low LA diet phase (P<0.001). The n-3 LCPUFA content of plasma phospholipids was significantly increased after the low LA diet compared to baseline (6.22% vs. 5.53%, P<0.001). These data demonstrate that reducing LA intake for 4 weeks increases n-3 LCPUFA status in humans in the absence of increased n-3 LCPUFA intake. PMID:24456663

  1. Dietary Supplementation of Benzoic Acid and Essential Oil Compounds Affects Buffering Capacity of the Feeds, Performance of Turkey Poults and Their Antioxidant Status, pH in the Digestive Tract, Intestinal Microbiota and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Giannenas, I.; Papaneophytou, C. P.; Tsalie, E.; Pappas, I.; Triantafillou, E.; Tontis, D.; Kontopidis, G. A.

    2014-01-01

    Three trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of supplementation of a basal diet with benzoic acid or thymol or a mixture of essential oil blends (MEO) or a combination of benzoic acid with MEO (BMEO) on growth performance of turkey poults. Control groups were fed a basal diet. In trial 1, benzoic acid was supplied at levels of 300 and 1,000 mg/kg. In trial 2, thymol or the MEO were supplied at levels of 30 mg/kg. In trial 3, the combination of benzoic acid with MEO was evaluated. Benzoic acid, MEO and BMEO improved performance, increased lactic acid bacteria populations and decreased coliform bacteria in the caeca. Thymol, MEO and BMEO improved antioxidant status of turkeys. Benzoic acid and BMEO reduced the buffering capacity compared to control feed and the pH values of the caecal content. Benzoic acid and EOs may be suggested as an effective alternative to AGP in turkeys. PMID:25049947

  2. Nitro-Oleic Acid Reduces J774A.1 Macrophage Oxidative Status and Triglyceride Mass: Involvement of Paraoxonase2 and Triglyceride Metabolizing Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rosenblat, Mira; Rom, Oren; Volkova, Nina; Aviram, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Nitro-fatty acids possess anti-atherogenic properties, but their effects on macrophage oxidative status and lipid metabolism that play important roles in atherosclerosis development are unclear. This study compared the effects of nitro-oleic acid (OLA-NO2) with those of native oleic acid (OLA) on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, anti-oxidants and metabolism of triglycerides and cholesterol in J774A.1 macrophages. Upon incubating the cells with physiological concentrations of OLA-NO2 (0-1 µM) or with equivalent levels of OLA, ROS levels measured by 2, 7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, decreased dose-dependently, but the anti-oxidative effects of OLA-NO2 were significantly augmented. Copper ion addition increased ROS generation in OLA treated macrophages without affecting OLA-NO2 treated cells. These effects could be attributed to elevated glutathione levels and to increased activity and expression of paraoxonase2 that were observed in OLA-NO2 vs OLA treated cells. Beneficial effects on triglyceride metabolism were noted in OLA-NO2 vs OLA treated macrophages in which cellular triglycerides were reduced due to attenuated biosynthesis and accelerated hydrolysis of triglycerides. Accordingly, OLA-NO2 treated cells demonstrated down-regulation of diacylglycerol acyltransferase1, the key enzyme in triglyceride biosynthesis, and increased expression of hormone-sensitive lipase and adipose triglyceride lipase that regulate triglyceride hydrolysis. Finally, OLA-NO2 vs OLA treatment resulted in modest but significant beneficial effects on macrophage cholesterol metabolism, reducing cholesterol biosynthesis rate and low density lipoprotein influx into the cells, while increasing high density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol efflux from the macrophages. Collectively, compared with OLA, OLA-NO2 modestly but significantly reduces macrophage oxidative status and cellular triglyceride content via modulation of cellular anti-oxidants and triglyceride

  3. Optimizing dietary lipid use to improve essential fatty acid status and reproductive performance of the modern lactating sow: a review.

    PubMed

    Rosero, David S; Boyd, R Dean; Odle, Jack; van Heugten, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Dietary lipid supplementation benefits the prolific and high-producing modern lactating sow. A comprehensive review of recent studies showed that lipid supplementation increases average daily energy intake, which is partitioned for lactation as indicated by greater milk fat output and improved litter growth rate. Recent compelling findings showed that addition of particular lipids during lactation improved the subsequent reproductive outcome of sows. Such benefits were related to the level of dietary essential fatty acids (EFA, linoleic acid, C18:2n-6; and α-linolenic acid, C18:3n-3) during lactation. Lactation diets without supplemental EFA resulted in a pronounced negative balance (intake minus milk output) of linoleic (-25.49 g/d) and α-linolenic acid (-2.75 g/d); which compromised sow fertility (farrowing rate < 75 % and culling rates > 25 % of weaned sows). This phenomenon seems to be increasingly important with advancing sow age because of a progressive reduction of body EFA pool over successive lactations. The net effect of supplemental EFA during lactation was to create a positive EFA balance, which improved the subsequent reproduction of sows. Adequate linoleic acid intake improved the proportion of sows that farrowed in the subsequent cycle (Farrowing rate (%) = [(-1.5 × 10(-3) × linoleic acid intake (g/d)(2)) + (0.53 × linoleic acid intake (g/d)) + (45.2)]; quadratic P = 0.002, R(2) = 0.997, RMSE = 0.031). In addition, increasing linoleic acid intake increased the number of pigs born in the subsequent cycle (total pigs born (n) = [(9.4 × 10(-5) × linoleic acid intake (g/d)(2)) + (0.04 × linoleic acid intake (g/d)) + (10.94)]; quadratic P = 0.002, R(2) = 0.997, RMSE = 0.031). Supplemental α-linolenic acid resulted in a rapid return to estrus (sows bred: sows weaned = 94.2 %; wean-to-estrus interval = 4.0 d) and achieved a high retention of pregnancy (sows

  4. Influence of stimulation by electroejaculation on myocardial function, acid-base and electrolyte status, and hematobiochemical profiles in male dromedary camels.

    PubMed

    Tharwat, M; Ali, A; Al-Sobayil, F; Derar, R; Al-Hawas, A

    2014-10-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of electroejaculation (EEJ) on myocardial function, acid-base balance, and hematobiochemical profiles in male dromedary camels. Twenty sexually mature, apparently healthy male camels were assigned to EEJ. Parallel, eight naturally mated male camels were enrolled as a control group. Three blood samples were collected from each camel: just before (T0), directly after (T1), and 24 hours after (T2) EEJ or natural mating. The serum concentrations of the cardiac biomarker troponin I (cTnI), blood gas parameters, and hematobiochemical profiles were determined. Nineteen camels were ejaculated by the end of the second circuit and one by the end of the first circuit. In both groups, the mean heart and respiratory rates had increased significantly immediately after the procedure, but returned to normal values 24 hours after the procedure. The mean serum concentration of cTnI had increased significantly in all camels after EEJ, but not in controls. However, at 24 hours post-EEJ, the serum concentration of cTnI did not differ significantly compared with baseline values. The blood pH and base excess had decreased, and the PCO2 and lactic acid had increased after EEJ. The EEJ provoked decreases in hematocrit and mean corpuscular volume. In the control group, the base excess, HCO3(-), TCO2, anion gap, and lactic acid increased slightly after mating but did not reach a significant level compared with premating values. It is concluded that EEJ in camels results in a reversible myocardial injury, changes in the acid-base status, and increase the lactic acid concentration. PMID:25139755

  5. Effects of dietary pantothenic acid on growth, intestinal function, anti-oxidative status and fatty acids synthesis of juvenile blunt snout bream Megalobrama amblycephala.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yu; Li, Xiang-Fei; Zhang, Ding-Dong; Cai, Dong-Sen; Tian, Hong-Yan; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Four groups of juvenile Megalobrama amblycephala were fed three times daily with six semi-purified diets containing 3.39 (PA unsupplied diet), 10.54, 19.28, 31.04, 48.38 and 59.72 mg kg(-1) calcium D-pantothenate. The results showed that survival rate, final weight, specific growth rate, protein efficiency ratio and nitrogen retention efficiency all increased significantly (P<0.01) as dietary PA levels increased from 3.39 to 19.28 mg kg(-1), whereas the opposite was true for feed conversion ratio. Whole-body crude protein increased as dietary PA levels increased, while the opposite pattern was found for the crude lipid content. Intestinal α-amylase, lipase, protease, Na+-K+-ATPase, alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase activities were all elevated in fish fed PA-supplemented diets. Hepatic catalase activities improved with increases in dietary PA, while the opposite was true for malondialdehyde contents. The liver PA concentration and coenzyme A content rose significantly (P<0.01), up to 31.04 mg kg(-1), with increasing dietary PA levels and then plateaued. The percentage of hepatic saturated fatty acids increased significantly (P<0.01) as dietary PA levels increased, while the percentages of monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) decreased as dietary PA increased. Fish fed diets containing 19.28 and 31.04 mg kg(-1) PA exhibited higher (P<0.01) docosahexaenoic acid and PUFA percentages in muscle than those fed with other diets. The expression of the gene encoding pantothenate kinase was significantly up-regulated (P<0.01) in fish fed PA-supplemented diets. Hepatic Acetyl-CoA carboxylase α, fatty acid synthetase, stearoyl regulatory element-binding protein 1 and X receptor α genes all increased significantly (P<0.01) as dietary PA levels increased from 3.39 to 31.04 mg kg(-1). Based on broken-line regression analyses of weight gain, liver CoA concentrations and PA contents against dietary PA levels, the optimal dietary PA

  6. Effects of Dietary Pantothenic Acid on Growth, Intestinal Function, Anti-Oxidative Status and Fatty Acids Synthesis of Juvenile Blunt Snout Bream Megalobrama amblycephala

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yu; Li, Xiang-Fei; Zhang, Ding-Dong; Cai, Dong-Sen; Tian, Hong-Yan; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Four groups of juvenile Megalobrama amblycephala were fed three times daily with six semi-purified diets containing 3.39 (PA unsupplied diet), 10.54, 19.28, 31.04, 48.38 and 59.72 mg kg-1 calcium D-pantothenate. The results showed that survival rate, final weight, specific growth rate, protein efficiency ratio and nitrogen retention efficiency all increased significantly (P<0.01) as dietary PA levels increased from 3.39 to 19.28 mg kg-1, whereas the opposite was true for feed conversion ratio. Whole-body crude protein increased as dietary PA levels increased, while the opposite pattern was found for the crude lipid content. Intestinal α-amylase, lipase, protease, Na+-K+-ATPase, alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase activities were all elevated in fish fed PA-supplemented diets. Hepatic catalase activities improved with increases in dietary PA, while the opposite was true for malondialdehyde contents. The liver PA concentration and coenzyme A content rose significantly (P<0.01), up to 31.04 mg kg-1, with increasing dietary PA levels and then plateaued. The percentage of hepatic saturated fatty acids increased significantly (P<0.01) as dietary PA levels increased, while the percentages of monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) decreased as dietary PA increased. Fish fed diets containing 19.28 and 31.04 mg kg-1 PA exhibited higher (P<0.01) docosahexaenoic acid and PUFA percentages in muscle than those fed with other diets. The expression of the gene encoding pantothenate kinase was significantly up-regulated (P<0.01) in fish fed PA-supplemented diets. Hepatic Acetyl-CoA carboxylase α, fatty acid synthetase, stearoyl regulatory element-binding protein 1 and X receptor α genes all increased significantly (P<0.01) as dietary PA levels increased from 3.39 to 31.04 mg kg-1. Based on broken-line regression analyses of weight gain, liver CoA concentrations and PA contents against dietary PA levels, the optimal dietary PA

  7. Long-term changes (1930-32 to 1984) in the acid-base status of forest soils in the Adirondacks of New York

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, S.B.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of this research was to determine if Adirondack forest soil acid-base status changed over several decades by comparing soil pH and available lime measured in 1930-32 by Heimburger (1934) to measurements of soils resampled in 1984 and analyzed using original methods. In 1984, 18 sites mapped by Heimburger in a mixed deciduous-coniferous experimental forest near Newcomb (N.Y.) were relocated by surveying from existing markers. 50 additional sites were relocated throughout the Adirondacks from Heimburger's descriptions. Oe, Oa, E, B, and C horizons were collected and analyzed for available lime by Heimburger's method. Organic horizon pH was measured by quinhydrone electrode. The original methods were checked for the introduction of error and bias. Data from 48 sites were stratified by confidence of site relocation in 1984 and compared between 1930-32 and 1984 using the student's t-test. The pH of initially moderately acid organic horizons decreased significantly while the pH of originally strongly acid organic horizons did not change significantly. On average, the available lime of upper horizons (Oe, Oa, E) decreased significantly while that of lower horizons (B,C) did not change significantly.

  8. Microbial Community Structure and Physiological Status of Different Types of Biofilms in an Acid Mine Drainage Site Determined by Phospholipid Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, J.

    2009-12-01

    A unique aspect of the acid mine drainage (AMD) system at the Green Valley coal mine site (GVS) in western Indiana is the abundance of biofims and biolaminates - stromatolites. Three major types of biofilms have been observed from the AMD site: bright green biofilm dominated by the acidophilic, oxygenic photosynthetic protozoan Euglena mutabilis, olive green biofilm of photosynthetic diatom belonging to the genus Nitzschia, and an olive-green to brownish-green filamentous algae-dominated community. These biofilms are either attached to hard substrata of the effluent channel, or floating at the surface of the effluent with abundant oxygen bubbles, with or without encrusted Fe precipitates. We analyzed lipids (hydrocarbons, wax esters, phospholipids, glycolipids, and neutral lipids) to determine the microbial biomass, community structure and physiological status of biofims collected from the GVS site. Distinctive lipid compositions were observed. The attached, red-crusted biofilms were characterized by abundant wax esters, monounsaturated fatty acids, whereas the floating biofilms by phytadienes, phytanol, polyunsaturated n-alkenes, polyunsaturated fatty acids. The accumulation of abundant wax esters probably reflects the readily available carbon and limitation of nutrients to the biofilm. Alternatively, the wax esters may be the biochemical relics of the anaerobic past of the Earth and the detection of these compounds has important implications for the evolution of eukaryotes and the paleo-environmental conditions on early Earth. This type of biochemical machine may have allowed early eukaryotes to survive recurrent anoxic conditions on early Earth.

  9. Free Amino Acid Profiles from 'Pinot Noir' Grapes are Influenced by Vine N-status and Sample Preparation Method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined the impact of extraction method on ammonia, free amino acids, and YAN (yeast assimilable nitrogen) concentrations in 'Pinot noir' berries obtained from a vine nutrition study (altered supply of N, P, or K). Berries were either juiced or exhaustively extracted as whole berries pri...

  10. Update on the management of rosacea: a status report on the current role and new horizons with topical azelaic acid.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Kircik, Leon H

    2014-12-01

    Azelaic acid (AzA) 15% gel has been available in the United States for slightly over a decade, approved for treatment of the inflammatory lesions (papules and pustules) of rosacea. Efficacy and safety have been established in multiple studies both as monotherapy and in combination with oral doxycycline. Azelaic acid 15% gel has been shown not to induce epidermal permeability barrier impairment, and proper skin care reduces the likelihood of neurosensory adverse effects of stinging and burning that can affect a subset of patients with rosacea. Azelaic acid 15% gel appears to produce a quicker onset of clinical effect than metronidazole in some patients when either agent is used in combination with subantimicrobial dose doxycycline; however, both topical agents are effective when used in this combination approach for papulopustular rosacea (PPR). Although more information is needed on the modes of action of AzA in the treatment of rosacea, downregulation of the cathelicidin pathway appears to be one operative mode of action based on in vitro and in vivo studies, including data from patients treated with AzA 15% gel for PPR. Azelaic acid 15% foam is currently in the latter stages of development for PPR, with pivotal studies demonstrating efficacy and favorable tolerability, including a very low incidence of stinging, burning, and itching even without the use of designated skin care products. PMID:25607798

  11. PMK-S005 Alleviates Age-Related Gastric Acid Secretion, Inflammation, and Oxidative Status in the Rat Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jeong; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Ju Yup; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Suh, Ji Hyung; Lee, Sun Min; Ham, Min Hee; Jo, Hyun Jin; Shim, Young Kwang; Park, Yo Han; Lee, Jong-Chan; Choi, Yoon Jin; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the synthetic S-allyl-l-cysteine (SAC) PMK-S005 on gastric acid secretion, inflammation, and antioxidant enzymes in aging rats. Methods The rats were divided into four groups at 31 weeks of age and were continuously fed a diet containing a vehicle control, PMK-S005 (5 or 10 mg/kg), or lansoprazole (5 mg/kg). Gastric acid secretion and connective tissue thickness of the lamina propria were evaluated at 74 weeks and 2 years of age. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and COX-2 levels were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) or Western blot assays. Levels of antioxidant enzymes, including heme oxyganase 1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1), were also measured. Results As the rats aged, gastric acid secretion significantly decreased, and the connective tissue of the lamina propria increased. However, 74-week-old rats in the PMK-S005 group exhibited greater levels of gastric acid secretion than those of the control and lansoprazole groups. The increase of TNF-α, IL-1β, and COX-2 expression in 74-week and 2-year-old control rats were inhibited by PMK-S005. In addition, the decrease in HO-1 and NQO-1 protein expression that occurred with aging was inhibited by PMK-S005 in the 74-week-old rats. Conclusions These results suggest that PMK-S005 has therapeutic potential as an antiaging agent to ameliorate age-related gastric acid secretion, inflammation, and oxidative stress in the stomach. PMID:27172930

  12. Uncaria rhynchophylla and rhynchophylline improved kainic acid-induced epileptic seizures via IL-1β and brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tin-Yun; Tang, Nou-Ying; Hsiang, Chien-Yun; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2014-05-15

    Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR) has been used for the treatment of convulsions and epilepsy in traditional Chinese medicine. This study reported the major anti-convulsive signaling pathways and effective targets of UR and rhynchophylline (RP) using genomic and immunohistochemical studies. Epileptic seizure model was established by intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (KA) in rats. Electroencephalogram and electromyogram recordings indicated that UR and RP improved KA-induced epileptic seizures. Toll-like receptor (TLR) and neurotrophin signaling pathways were regulated by UR in both cortex and hippocampus of KA-treated rats. KA upregulated the expression levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF), which were involved in TLR and neurotrophin signaling pathways, respectively. However, UR and RP downregulated the KA-induced IL-1β and BDNF gene expressions. Our findings suggested that UR and RP exhibited anti-convulsive effects in KA-induced rats via the regulation of TLR and neurotrophin signaling pathways, and the subsequent inhibition of IL-1β and BDNF gene expressions. PMID:24636743

  13. Characterization of temporal expressions of FOXO and pFOXO proteins in the hippocampus by kainic acid in mice: involvement of NMDA and non-NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Hyun; Sim, Yun-Beom; Lee, Jin-Koo; Lee, Jae-Yong; Suh, Hong-Won

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we characterized the expression and role of forkhead box O (FoxO3a) in kainic acid (KA)-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death. FoxO3a and pFoxO3a expression in the CA1, CA2, and dentate gyrus regions in the hippocampus increased 0.5 and 1 h after intracerebroventricular administration of KA. In addition, both FoxO3a and pFoxO3a expression in the hippocampal CA3 region increased significantly and equally for 1 h but decreased gradually for 24 h after KA administration. In particular, the KA-induced increases in FoxO3a and pFoxO3a expression in the hippocampal CA3 region were inhibited by pretreatment with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist (MK-801, dizocilpine, 1 µg/5 µl) or a non-NMDA receptor antagonist (CNQX, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, 0.5 µg/5 µl). Furthermore, dizocilpine and CNQX produced a neuroprotective effect against KA-induced neuronal death in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Our results suggest that FoxO3a and pFoxO3 expression is upregulated by KA. Both FoxO3a and pFoxO3a expression appear to be responsible for KA-induced neuronal death in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. PMID:26987339

  14. Validation of the i-STAT system for the analysis of blood gases and acid-base status in juvenile sandbar shark (Carcharhinus plumbeus).

    PubMed

    Harter, T S; Morrison, P R; Mandelman, J W; Rummer, J L; Farrell, A P; Brill, R W; Brauner, C J

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measurements of blood gases and acid-base status require an array of sophisticated laboratory equipment that is typically not available during field research; such is the case for many studies on the stress physiology, ecology and conservation of elasmobranch fish species. Consequently, researchers have adopted portable clinical analysers that were developed for the analysis of human blood characteristics, but often without thoroughly validating these systems for their use on fish. The aim of our study was to test the suitability of the i-STAT system, the most commonly used portable clinical analyser in studies on fish, for analysing blood gases and acid-base status in elasmobranchs, over a broad range of conditions and using the sandbar shark (Carcharhinus plumbeus) as a model organism. Our results indicate that the i-STAT system can generate useful measurements of whole blood pH, and the use of appropriate correction factors may increase the accuracy of results. The i-STAT system was, however, unable to generate reliable results for measurements of partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) and the derived parameter of haemoglobin O2 saturation. This is probably due to the effect of a closed-system temperature change on PO2 within the i-STAT cartridge and the fact that the temperature correction algorithms used by i-STAT assume a human temperature dependency of haemoglobin-O2 binding; in many ectotherms, this assumption will lead to equivocal i-STAT PO2 results. The in vivo partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) in resting sandbar sharks is probably below the detection limit for PCO2 in the i-STAT system, and the measurement of higher PCO2 tensions was associated with a large measurement error. In agreement with previous work, our results indicate that the i-STAT system can generate useful data on whole blood pH in fishes, but not blood gases. PMID:27293687

  15. Transcranial focal electrical stimulation reduces the convulsive expression and amino acid release in the hippocampus during pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in rats.

    PubMed

    Santana-Gómez, César E; Alcántara-González, David; Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Bañuelos-Cabrera, Ivette; Magdaleno-Madrigal, Víctor; Fernández-Mas, Rodrigo; Besio, Walter; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of transcranial focal electrical stimulation (TFS) on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate release in the hippocampus under basal conditions and during pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). Animals were previously implanted with a guide cannula attached to a bipolar electrode into the right ventral hippocampus and a concentric ring electrode placed on the skull surface. The first microdialysis experiment was designed to determine, under basal conditions, the effects of TFS (300 Hz, 200 μs biphasic square pulses, for 30 min) on afterdischarge threshold (ADT) and the release of GABA and glutamate in the hippocampus. The results obtained indicate that at low current intensities (<2800 μA), TFS enhances and decreases the basal extracellular levels of GABA and glutamate, respectively. However, TFS did not modify the ADT. During the second microdialysis experiment, a group of animals was subjected to SE induced by pilocarpine administration (300 mg/kg, i.p.; SE group). The SE was associated with a significant rise of GABA and glutamate release (up to 120 and 182% respectively, 5h after pilocarpine injection) and the prevalence of high-voltage rhythmic spikes and increased spectral potency of delta, gamma, and theta bands. A group of animals (SE-TFS group) received TFS continuously during 2h at 100 μA, 5 min after the establishment of SE. This group showed a significant decrease in the expression of the convulsive activity and spectral potency in gamma and theta bands. The extracellular levels of GABA and glutamate in the hippocampus remained at basal conditions. These results suggest that TFS induces anticonvulsant effects when applied during the SE, an effect associated with lower amino acid release. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". PMID:26006058

  16. Change of plasma volume, osmolality, and acid-base status in healthy calves after feeding of milk and water- and milk-based oral rehydration solutions.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, L; Schmidt, B; Rauwolf, U; Wenge, J; Coenen, M

    2012-10-01

    Oral rehydration solutions (ORS) are a simple and cheap method to treat diarrheal dehydration and acidosis. To maintain the energy supply of diarrheic calves, it is necessary to continue milk feeding. Suckling of milk or milk-based or hypertonic water-based ORS produces a slower rate of abomasal emptying than suckling isotonic water-based ORS. The faster abomasal passage of isotonic water-based ORS implies that efficacious electrolytes reach the gut more quickly, possibly providing a faster rate of rehydration. The aim of the study was to verify when and to what extent milk and water- and milk-based ORS increase plasma volume and affect plasma osmolality and acid-base status in healthy suckling calves. Eleven calves were fed with milk and with an ORS that was prepared in water or milk. Moreover, for one experiment, the calves remained fasting without suckling milk or ORS. During the experimental phase, the calves were deprived of water, hay, and concentrates. Blood samples were taken before and at various time points after feeding. Total plasma protein, osmolality, [Na(+)], [K(+)], [Cl(-)], and albumin were determined. In 6 of 11 experiments, blood gas analysis was also performed. The calculated change in plasma volume after feeding was assessed from the plasma protein concentration before feeding (P(t=0)) and the plasma protein concentration after feeding (P(t=x)): (P(t=0)- P(t=x)) × 100/P(t=x). Water- and milk-based ORS produced equal rates of plasma expansion in healthy calves. After milk feeding, the change in plasma volume was decelerated. Because of water influx, we did not observe a significant effect of feeding regimen on plasma osmolality. Acid-base status was little affected by feeding regimen. Feeding of milk-based ORS increased plasma strong ion difference, an alkaline response, which could potentially also reduce acidosis in calves suffering from diarrhea. PMID:22863100

  17. Efficacy of Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C) and/N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) Supplementation on Nutritional and Antioxidant Status of Male Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Patients.

    PubMed

    Pirabbasi, Elham; Shahar, Suzana; Manaf, Zahara Abdul; Rajab, Nor Fadilah; Manap, Roslina Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant therapy has a potential to be introduced as therapeutic modality for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. This study aimed to determine the effect of antioxidant supplementation [ascorbic acid and N-Acetylcysteine (NAC)] on nutritional and antioxidant status in male COPD patients. A parallel and single blind randomised controlled clinical trial (RCT) was conducted at two medical centers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Seventy-nine subjects were recruited and randomly divided into four trial arms (i.e., NAC, vitamin C, NAC+vitamin C and control groups) for six mo. The primary outcome was changes in body mass index by estimating power of 90% and significance level of p<0.05. Repeated Measure ANOVA showed that there was a significant interaction effect on BMI (p=0.046) and carbohydrate intake (p=0.030), especially in the NAC group. Plasma glutathione (GSH) increased significantly in all intervention groups, especially in vitamin C (p=0.005). A single supplementation of NAC or vitamin C improved nutritional and antioxidant status of subjects. PMID:27117852

  18. Cross-Sectional Associations of Serum Perfluoroalkyl Acids and Thyroid Hormones in U.S. Adults: Variation According to TPOAb and Iodine Status (NHANES 2007–2008)

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Glenys M.; Rauch, Stephen A.; Marie, Nathalie Ste; Mattman, Andre; Lanphear, Bruce P.; Venners, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFASs) are suspected thyroid toxicants, but results from epidemiological studies are inconsistent. Objectives: We examined associations between serum PFASs and thyroid hormones (THs) in a representative, cross-sectional sample of U.S. adults. We hypothesized that people with high thyroid peroxidase antibodies and low iodine would be more susceptible to PFAS-induced thyroid disruption. Methods: Our sample included 1,525 adults (≥ 18 years) from the 2007–2008 NHANES study with available serum PFASs and THs. We examined associations between four serum PFASs [perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorononanoate (PFNA), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)], and serum THs [free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), fT3/fT4, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), total T3 (TT3), and total T4 (TT4)] using multivariable linear regression. We stratified subjects into four groups by two indicators of thyroid “stress”: thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb ≥ 9 IU/mL) and iodine status (< 100 μg/L urine). Results: Of 1,525 participants, 400 (26%) had low iodine only (T0I1), 87 (6%) had high TPOAb only (T1I0), and 26 (2%) had both high TPOAb and low iodine (T1I1). In general, associations were similar among participants in the groups with neither (T0I0) or only one thyroid stressor (T0I1 or T1I0), suggesting that PFAS–TH associations were not modified by high TPOAb or low iodine alone. However, PFHxS and PFOS were negatively associated (p < 0.05) with fT4, and all four PFASs were positively associated (p < 0.05) with fT3, fT3/fT4, TSH, and TT3 in the group with joint exposure to high TPOAb and low iodine (T1I1). Conclusions: We found evidence of PFAS-associated thyroid disruption in a subset of U.S. adults with high TPOAb (a marker of autoimmune hypothyroidism) and low iodine status, who may represent a vulnerable subgroup. However, the small sample size, cross-sectional design, and possibility of

  19. [Sanitary-hygienic characteristics of work conditions and health status of workers in nitric acid production industry].

    PubMed

    Rumiantsev, G I; Kozlova, T A; Atiakina, I K; Pavlova, A P

    1990-01-01

    Workers engaged in thin nitric acid manufacturing are exhibited to the combined action of both physical and chemical factors (noise, heating microclimate, nitric oxides, ammonia). Within the working hours, ECG changes and arterial blood pressure instability are displayed in operators and technicians. Influenza, acute respiratory disorders and osseo-muscular diseases present the main causes of morbidity with temporary disability. Technicians are characterized by a markedly greater morbidity rate. Ammonia and nitric oxides, as aggressive media, lead to higher rates of oral mucoid, hard dental tissues and periodontium lesions. Health-related labour conditions improvement measures are proposed. PMID:2161779

  20. Disruption of BASIGIN decreases lactic acid export and sensitizes non-small cell lung cancer to biguanides independently of the LKB1 status.

    PubMed

    Granja, Sara; Marchiq, Ibtissam; Le Floch, Renaud; Moura, Conceição Souto; Baltazar, Fátima; Pouysségur, Jacques

    2015-03-30

    Most cancers rely on aerobic glycolysis to generate energy and metabolic intermediates. To maintain a high glycolytic rate, cells must efficiently export lactic acid through the proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporters (MCT1/4). These transporters require a chaperone, CD147/BASIGIN (BSG) for trafficking to the plasma membrane and function.To validate the key role of these transporters in lung cancer, we first analysed the expression of MCT1/4 and BSG in 50 non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. These proteins were specifically upregulated in tumour tissues. We then disrupted BSG in three NSCLC cell lines (A549, H1975 and H292) via 'Zinc-Finger Nucleases'. The three homozygous BSG-/- cell lines displayed a low MCT activity (10- to 5-fold reduction, for MCT1 and MCT4, respectively) compared to wild-type cells. Consequently, the rate of glycolysis, compared to the wild-type counterpart, was reduced by 2.0- to 3.5-fold, whereas the rate of respiration was stimulated in BSG-/- cell lines. Both wild-type and BSG-null cells were extremely sensitive to the mitochondria inhibitor metformin/phenformin in normoxia. However, only BSG-null cells, independently of their LKB1 status, remained sensitive to biguanides in hypoxia in vitro and tumour growth in nude mice. Our results demonstrate that inhibiting glycolysis by targeting lactic acid export sensitizes NSCLC to phenformin. PMID:25894929

  1. EE-drospirenone-levomefolate calcium versus EE-drospirenone + folic acid: folate status during 24 weeks of treatment and over 20 weeks following treatment cessation

    PubMed Central

    Diefenbach, Konstanze; Trummer, Dietmar; Ebert, Frank; Lissy, Michael; Koch, Manuela; Rohde, Beate; Blode, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Background Adequate folate supplementation in the periconceptional phase is recommended to reduce the risk of neural tube defects. Oral contraceptives may provide a reasonable delivery vehicle for folate supplementation before conception in women of childbearing potential. This study aimed to demonstrate that a fixed-dose combination of an oral contraceptive and levomefolate calcium leads to sustainable improvements in folate status compared with an oral contraceptive + folic acid. Methods This was a double-blind, randomized, parallel-group study in which 172 healthy women aged 18–40 years received ethinylestradiol (EE)-drospirenone-levomefolate calcium or EE-drospirenone + folic acid for 24 weeks (invasion phase), and EE-drospirenone for an additional 20 weeks (folate elimination phase). The main objective of the invasion phase was to examine the area under the folate concentration time-curve for plasma and red blood cell (RBC) folate, while the main objective of the elimination phase was to determine the duration of time for which RBC folate concentration remained ≥ 906 nmol/L after cessation of EE-drospirenone-levomefolate calcium. Results Mean concentration-time curves for plasma folate, RBC folate, and homocysteine were comparable between treatment groups during both study phases. During the invasion phase, plasma and RBC folate concentrations increased and approached steady-state after about 8 weeks (plasma) or 24 weeks (RBC). After cessation of treatment with levomefolate calcium, folate concentrations decreased slowly. The median time to RBC folate concentrations falling below 906 nmol/L was 10 weeks (95% confidence interval 8–12 weeks) after cessation of EE-drospirenone-levomefolate calcium treatment. Plasma and RBC folate levels remained above baseline values in 41.3% and 89.3% of women, respectively, at the end of the 20-week elimination phase. Conclusion Improvements in folate status were comparable between EE-drospirenone-levomefolate calcium and

  2. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photodiagnosis (PD) using endogenous photosensitization induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA): current clinical and development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Stuart L.; Sobel, Russel S.; Golub, Allyn L.; Carroll, Ronald L.; Lundahl, Scott L.; Shulman, D. Geoffrey

    1996-04-01

    Exogenous provision of ALA to many tissues results in the accumulation of sufficient quantities of the endogenous photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX, (PpIX), to produce a photodynamic effect. Therefore, ALA may be considered the only current PDT agent in clinical development which is a biochemical precursor of a photosensitizer. Topical ALA application, followed by exposure to activating light (ALA PDT), has been reported effective for the treatment of a variety of dermatologic diseases including cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, superficial basal cell carcinoma, Bowen's disease, and actinic (solar) keratoses, and is also being examined for treatment of acne and hirsutism. PpIX induced by ALA application also may serve as a fluorescence detection marker for photodiagnosis (PD) of malignant and pre- malignant conditions of the urinary bladder and other organs. Local internal application of ALA has also been used for selective endometrial ablation in animal model systems and is beginning to be examined in human clinical studies. Systemic, oral administration of ALA has been used for ALA PDT of superficial head and neck cancer, various gastrointestinal cancers, and the condition known as Barrett's esophagus. This brief paper reviews the current clinical and development status of ALA PDT.

  3. Can breeder reproductive status, performance and egg quality be enhanced by supplementation and transition of n-3 fatty acids?

    PubMed

    Delezie, E; Koppenol, A; Buyse, J; Everaert, N

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this experiment was to investigate the effect of n-3 fatty acid (FA) supplemented diets on breeder performance, productivity and egg quality. Breeders (n = 480) were fed the supplemented diet from 18 weeks onwards; the inclusion level of n-3 FA was increased from 1.5% to 3.0% from 34 weeks of age onwards until 48 weeks of age. Ross-308 broiler breeders (n = 480) were fed one of four different diets: a basal diet rich in n-6 FA (control diet) or one of three diets rich in n-3 FA. For the n-3 FA diets, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5 n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 n-3) were fed to the broiler breeders at different ratios formulated to obtain EPA/DHA ratios of 1/1, 1/2 or 2/1. Differences in performance, reproduction and egg quality parameters due to n-3 supplementation were noted more for the 1.5% followed by the 3.0% fed broilers than their 1.5% supplemented counterparts. Egg weight (p < 0.001) and egg mass (p = 0.003) were significantly lower and feed conversion (p = 0.008) significantly higher for the n-3 FA (at 3.0% inclusion level) fed broilers compared to the control group. For the EPA- and DHA-fed breeders, a higher proportional abdominal fat percentage (p = 0.025) and proportional albumen weight (%) (p = 0.041) were found respectively. Dietary treatments did not affect reproduction. It can be concluded that the results of the present experiment indicate no significant differences between treatments at 1.5% inclusion levels. However, increasing this level to 3.0% is not recommended due to the rather negative effects on the measured parameters. It should be further investigated whether these adverse effects were obtained due to (i) the higher supplementation level, (ii) combining a supplementation level of 1.5% with 3% or (iii) the duration of supplementation. PMID:26854179

  4. Growth performance, vitamin E status, and proximate and fatty acid composition of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, fed diets containing various levels of fish oil and vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chhorn; Yildirim-Aksoy, Mediha; Shelby, Richard; Li, Menghe H; Klesius, Phillip H

    2010-12-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of increasing dietary levels of fish oil on vitamin E requirement and their effect on growth performance, liver vitamin E status, and tissue proximate and fatty acid compositions of channel catfish. Basal purified diets (42% protein and 3,800 kcal DE/kg) supplemented with 6, 10, and 14% menhaden fish oil were each supplemented with 50, 100, and 200 mg vitamin E/kg (3×3 factorial experiment). Each diet was fed to juvenile channel catfish in three random aquaria to apparent satiation twice daily for 12 weeks. Weight gain, feed intake, and feed efficiency ratio were not affected by dietary levels of fish oil, vitamin E, or their interaction. Survival rate at the end of week 12 was significantly lower for fish fed diets containing 14% fish oil, regardless of vitamin E content. Whole-body moisture significantly decreased and lipid increased when dietary lipid levels were increased to 10 or 14%. Dietary vitamin E levels had no effect on body proximate composition. Lipid content of liver was not influenced by dietary levels of fish oil and vitamin E or their interaction. Hepatosomatic index significantly decreased with increasing lipid levels but was not affected by dietary levels of vitamin E. Liver vitamin E increased with increasing dietary vitamin E but decreased with increasing fish oil levels. Fatty acid composition of whole body and liver reflected that of dietary lipid but was not influenced by dietary levels of vitamin E. Whole-body saturates increased, whereas MUFA decreased with increasing dietary levels of fish oil. Liver saturates were not affected by fish oil levels, but MUFA and n-6 decreased and increased, respectively, with increasing fish oil levels. Total n-3 and n-3 HUFA in both tissues increased with increasing fish oil levels in diets, but liver stored much higher levels of these fatty acids. PMID:19821044

  5. Protective effect of ellagic acid on oxidative stress and antioxidant status in Cyprinus carpio during malathion exposure.

    PubMed

    Ural, M Ş; Yonar, M E; Mişe Yonar, S

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine protective efficiency of ellagic acid (EA) on malathion toxicity in carp. The fish were exposed to two sublethal concentrations of malathion (0.5 and 1 mg/L), and EA (100 mg per kg of fish weight) was simultaneously administered for 14 days. Malondialdehyde (MDA) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH—Px), and glutathione—S—transferase (GST) activities were evaluated in liver, kidney and gills, which were collected at the end of the experiment. In conclusion, the findings of this study demonstrated that malathion caused oxidative stress and negative alterations on the antioxidant enzyme activities of the fish. However, this toxic effect was neutralised by the administration of EA. Thus, the present results suggest that simultaneous treatment with EA (100 mg per kg of fish weight) may alleviate malathion—induced oxidative stress. PMID:26516111

  6. Folic acid supplemented goat milk has beneficial effects on hepatic physiology, haematological status and antioxidant defence during chronic Fe repletion.

    PubMed

    Alférez, María J M; Rivas, Emilio; Díaz-Castro, Javier; Hijano, Silvia; Nestares, Teresa; Moreno, Miguel; Campos, Margarita S; Serrano-Reina, Jose A; López-Aliaga, Inmaculada

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the current study was to asses the effect of goat or cow milk-based diets, either normal or Fe-overloaded and folic acid supplement on some aspects of hepatic physiology, enzymatic antioxidant defence and lipid peroxidation in liver, brain and erythrocyte of control and anaemic rats after chronic Fe repletion. 160 male Wistar rats were placed on 40 d in two groups, a control group receiving normal-Fe diet and the Fe-deficient group receiving low Fe diet. Lately, the rats were fed with goat and cow milk-based diets during 30 d, with normal-Fe content or Fe-overload and either with normal folic or folic acid supplemented. Fe-overload increased plasma alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase levels when cow milk was supplied. Dietary folate supplementation reduced plasma transaminases levels in animals fed goat milk with chronic Fe overload. A remarkable increase in the superoxide dismutase activity was observed in the animals fed cow milk. Dietary folate supplement lead to a decrease on the activity of this enzyme in all the tissues studied with both milk-based diets. A concomitant increment in catalase was also observed. The increase in lipid peroxidation products levels in rats fed cow milk with Fe-overload, suggest an imbalance in the functioning of the enzymatic antioxidant defence. In conclusion, dietary folate-supplemented goat milk reduces both plasma transaminases levels, suggesting a hepatoprotective effect and has beneficial effects in situation of Fe-overload, improving the antioxidant enzymes activities and reducing lipid peroxidation. PMID:25394837

  7. A comparison of the effect of water-delivered direct fed microbials or organic acids with an in-feed antibiotic on weanling pig growth performance, intestinal morphology, gut microbiota and immune status following a...

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigs (n=88) weaned at 19 days of age were used in a 14-days experiment to compare the effects of water delivered direct fed microbials (DFM) or a propionic acid (PA) based blend with an in-feed antibiotic on growth performance, intestinal morphology, gut microbiota and immune status following a Salm...

  8. Effects of dietary fatty acids on mitochondrial phospholipid compositions, oxidative status and mitochondrial gene expression of zebrafish at different ages.

    PubMed

    Betancor, M B; Almaida-Pagán, P F; Hernández, A; Tocher, D R

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial decay is generally associated with impairment in the organelle bioenergetics function and increased oxidative stress, and it appears that deterioration of mitochondrial inner membrane phospholipids (PL) and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are among the main mechanisms involved in this process. In the present study, mitochondrial membrane PL compositions, oxidative status (TBARS content and SOD activity) and mtDNA gene expression of muscle and liver were analyzed in zebrafish fed two diets with lipid supplied either by rapeseed oil (RO) or a blend 60:40 of RO and DHA500 TG oil (DHA). Two feeding trials were performed using zebrafish from the same population of two ages (8 and 21 months). Dietary FA composition affected fish growth in 8-month-old animals, which could be related to an increase in stress promoted by diet composition. Lipid peroxidation was considerably higher in mitochondria of 8-month-old zebrafish fed the DHA diet than in animals fed the RO diet. This could indicate higher oxidative damage to mitochondrial lipids, very likely due to increased incorporation of DHA in PL of mitochondrial membranes. Lipids would be among the first molecules affected by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and lipid peroxidation could propagate oxidative reactions that would damage other molecules, including mtDNA. Mitochondrial lipid peroxidation and gene expression of 21-month-old fish showed lower responsiveness to diet composition than those of younger fish. Differences found in the effect of diet composition on mitochondrial lipids between the two age groups could be indicating age-related changes in the ability to maintain structural homeostasis of mitochondrial membranes. PMID:26156499

  9. Altering histone acetylation status in donor cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid does not affect dog cloning efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Geon A; Suh, Han Na; Jo, Young Kwang; Choi, Yoo Bin; Kim, Dong Hoon; Han, Ho Jae; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2015-10-15

    Although dog cloning technology has been applied to conservation of endangered canids, propagation of elite dogs, and production of transgenic dogs, the efficiency of cloning is still very low. To help overcome this problem, we evaluated the effect of treating donor cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on dog cloning efficiency. Relative messenger RNA expressions of the bax1/bcl2 ratio and Dnmt1 in fibroblasts treated with different concentrations (0, 1, 10, 50 μM) of SAHA and durations (0, 20, 44 hours) were compared. Treatment with 1 μM for 20 hours showed significantly lower bax1/bcl2 and Dnmt1 transcript abundance. Acetylation of H3K9 was significantly increased after SAHA treatment, but H4K5, H4K8 and H4K16 were not changed. After SCNT using control or donor cells treated with SAHA, a total of 76 and 64 cloned embryos were transferred to seven and five recipients, respectively. Three fetuses were diagnosed in both control and SAHA-treated groups by ultrasonography 29 days after the embryo transfer, but there was no significant difference in the pregnancy rate (4.2% vs. 4.3%). In conclusion, although SAHA treatment as used in this study significantly decreased bax1/bcl2 and Dnmt1 transcripts of donor nuclei, as well as increased H3 acetylation, it was not enough to increase in vivo developmental competence of cloned dog embryos. PMID:26259535

  10. Effects of salinity and ascorbic acid on growth, water status and antioxidant system in a perennial halophyte

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Abdul; Gulzar, Salman; Aziz, Irfan; Hussain, Tabassum; Gul, Bilquees; Khan, M. Ajmal

    2015-01-01

    Salinity causes oxidative stress in plants by enhancing production of reactive oxygen species, so that an efficient antioxidant system, of which ascorbic acid (AsA) is a key component, is an essential requirement of tolerance. However, antioxidant responses of plants to salinity vary considerably among species. Limonium stocksii is a sub-tropical halophyte found in the coastal marshes from Gujarat (India) to Karachi (Pakistan) but little information exists on its salt resistance. In order to investigate the role of AsA in tolerance, 2-month-old plants were treated with 0 (control), 300 (moderate) and 600 (high) mM NaCl for 30 days with or without exogenous application of AsA (20 mM) or distilled water. Shoot growth of unsprayed plants at moderate salinity was similar to that of controls while at high salinity growth was inhibited substantially. Sap osmolality, AsA concentrations and activities of AsA-dependant antioxidant enzymes increased with increasing salinity. Water spray resulted in some improvement in growth, indicating that the growth promotion by exogenous treatments could partly be attributed to water. However, exogenous application of AsA on plants grown under saline conditions improved growth and AsA dependent antioxidant enzymes more than the water control treatment. Our data show that AsA-dependent antioxidant enzymes play an important role in salinity tolerance of L. stocksii. PMID:25603966

  11. Effects of salinity and ascorbic acid on growth, water status and antioxidant system in a perennial halophyte.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Abdul; Gulzar, Salman; Aziz, Irfan; Hussain, Tabassum; Gul, Bilquees; Khan, M Ajmal

    2015-01-01

    Salinity causes oxidative stress in plants by enhancing production of reactive oxygen species, so that an efficient antioxidant system, of which ascorbic acid (AsA) is a key component, is an essential requirement of tolerance. However, antioxidant responses of plants to salinity vary considerably among species. Limonium stocksii is a sub-tropical halophyte found in the coastal marshes from Gujarat (India) to Karachi (Pakistan) but little information exists on its salt resistance. In order to investigate the role of AsA in tolerance, 2-month-old plants were treated with 0 (control), 300 (moderate) and 600 (high) mM NaCl for 30 days with or without exogenous application of AsA (20 mM) or distilled water. Shoot growth of unsprayed plants at moderate salinity was similar to that of controls while at high salinity growth was inhibited substantially. Sap osmolality, AsA concentrations and activities of AsA-dependant antioxidant enzymes increased with increasing salinity. Water spray resulted in some improvement in growth, indicating that the growth promotion by exogenous treatments could partly be attributed to water. However, exogenous application of AsA on plants grown under saline conditions improved growth and AsA dependent antioxidant enzymes more than the water control treatment. Our data show that AsA-dependent antioxidant enzymes play an important role in salinity tolerance of L. stocksii. PMID:25603966

  12. Aquatic amphibians in the Sierra Nevada: Current status and potential effects of acidic deposition on populations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, D.F.; Gordon, M.S.

    1992-05-01

    Toxicity testing indicated that amphibians are at little risk from low pH in water acidified to a pH of 5.0 and aluminum concentrations from 39 to 80 micrograms/l. However, sublethal effects (reduced growth rate and earlier hatching) were observed for pH as high as 5.25 and the aluminum concentrations tested. The authors tested the hypothesis that acidification of habitats in the field has resulted in elimination of populationss from waters most vulnerable to acidification, i.e., low in pH or ANC, or from waters low in ionic strength a condition that increases the sensitivity of amphibians to low pH. The authors surveyed potential breeding sites for two declining and one non-declining species at high elevation within 30 randomly selected survey areas, and compared chemical parameters between sites containing a species and sites lacking the species. No significant differences were found that were consistent with the hypothesis, and water chemistry did not differ among sites inhabited by the three species. These findings imply that acidic deposition is unlikely to have been a cause of recent amphibian population declines in the Sierra Nevada.

  13. Immunometabolic Status during the Peripartum Period Is Enhanced with Supplemental Zn, Mn, and Cu from Amino Acid Complexes and Co from Co Glucoheptonate

    PubMed Central

    Batistel, Fernanda; Osorio, Johan S.; Ferrari, Annarita; Trevisi, Erminio; Socha, Michael T.; Loor, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    The peripartum (or transition) period is the most-critical phase in the productive life of lactating dairy cows and optimal supply of trace minerals through more bioavailable forms could minimize the negative effects associated with this phase. Twenty Holstein cows received a common prepartal diet and postpartal diet. Both diets were partially supplemented with an inorganic (INO) mix of Zn, Mn, and Cu to supply 35, 45, and 6 ppm, respectively, of the diet dry matter (DM). Cows were assigned to treatments in a randomized completed block design, receiving an daily oral bolus with INO or organic trace minerals (AAC) Zn, Mn, Cu, and Co to achieve 75, 65, 11, and 1 ppm supplemental, respectively, in the diet DM. Liver tissue and blood samples were collected throughout the experiment. The lower glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase concentration after 15 days in milk in AAC cows indicate lower hepatic cell damage. The concentration of cholesterol and albumin increased, while IL-6 decreased over time in AAC cows compared with INO indicating a lower degree of inflammation and better liver function. Although the acute-phase protein ceruloplasmin tended to be lower in AAC cows and corresponded with the reduction in the inflammatory status, the tendency for greater serum amyloid A concentration in AAC indicated an inconsistent response on acute-phase proteins. Oxygen radical absorbance capacity increased over time in AAC cows. Furthermore, the concentrations of nitric oxide, nitrite, nitrate, and the ferric reducing ability of plasma decreased with AAC indicating a lower oxidative stress status. The expression of IL10 and ALB in liver tissue was greater overall in AAC cows reinforcing the anti-inflammatory response detected in plasma. The greater overall expression of PCK1 in AAC cows indicated a greater gluconeogenic capacity, and partly explained the greater milk production response over time. Overall, feeding organic trace minerals as complexed with amino acids during the

  14. Immunometabolic Status during the Peripartum Period Is Enhanced with Supplemental Zn, Mn, and Cu from Amino Acid Complexes and Co from Co Glucoheptonate.

    PubMed

    Batistel, Fernanda; Osorio, Johan S; Ferrari, Annarita; Trevisi, Erminio; Socha, Michael T; Loor, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    The peripartum (or transition) period is the most-critical phase in the productive life of lactating dairy cows and optimal supply of trace minerals through more bioavailable forms could minimize the negative effects associated with this phase. Twenty Holstein cows received a common prepartal diet and postpartal diet. Both diets were partially supplemented with an inorganic (INO) mix of Zn, Mn, and Cu to supply 35, 45, and 6 ppm, respectively, of the diet dry matter (DM). Cows were assigned to treatments in a randomized completed block design, receiving an daily oral bolus with INO or organic trace minerals (AAC) Zn, Mn, Cu, and Co to achieve 75, 65, 11, and 1 ppm supplemental, respectively, in the diet DM. Liver tissue and blood samples were collected throughout the experiment. The lower glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase concentration after 15 days in milk in AAC cows indicate lower hepatic cell damage. The concentration of cholesterol and albumin increased, while IL-6 decreased over time in AAC cows compared with INO indicating a lower degree of inflammation and better liver function. Although the acute-phase protein ceruloplasmin tended to be lower in AAC cows and corresponded with the reduction in the inflammatory status, the tendency for greater serum amyloid A concentration in AAC indicated an inconsistent response on acute-phase proteins. Oxygen radical absorbance capacity increased over time in AAC cows. Furthermore, the concentrations of nitric oxide, nitrite, nitrate, and the ferric reducing ability of plasma decreased with AAC indicating a lower oxidative stress status. The expression of IL10 and ALB in liver tissue was greater overall in AAC cows reinforcing the anti-inflammatory response detected in plasma. The greater overall expression of PCK1 in AAC cows indicated a greater gluconeogenic capacity, and partly explained the greater milk production response over time. Overall, feeding organic trace minerals as complexed with amino acids during the

  15. Comparison of short-term effects of midazolam and lorazepam in the intra-amygdala kainic acid model of status epilepticus in mice.

    PubMed

    Diviney, Mairead; Reynolds, James P; Henshall, David C

    2015-10-01

    Benzodiazepines remain as the first-line treatment for status epilepticus (SE), but debate continues as to the choice and delivery route of pharmacotherapy. Lorazepam is currently the preferred anticonvulsant for clinical use, but midazolam has become a popular alternative, particularly as it can be given by nonintravenous routes. Anticonvulsants are also commonly used to terminate SE in animal models. Here, we aimed to compare the efficacy of midazolam with that of lorazepam in an experimental model of focal-onset SE. Status epilepticus was induced by intra-amygdala microinjection of kainic acid in 8week old C57Bl/6 mice. Forty minutes later, mice were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of either lorazepam or midazolam (8mg/kg). Electroencephalogram (EEG) activity, histology, and behavioral tests assessing recovery of function were evaluated and compared between groups. Intraperitoneal injection of either lorazepam or midazolam resulted in similar patterns of reduced EEG epileptiform activity during 1-hour recordings. Damage to the hippocampus and presentation of postinsult anxiety-related behavior did not significantly differ between treatment groups at 72h. However, return of normal behaviors such as grooming, levels of activity, and the evaluation of overall recovery of SE mice were all superior at 24h in animals given midazolam compared with lorazepam. Our results indicate that midazolam is as effective as lorazepam as an anticonvulsant in this model while also providing improved animal recovery after SE. These data suggest that midazolam might be considered by researchers as an anticonvulsant in animal models of SE, particularly as it appears to satisfy the requirements of refining procedures involving experimental animals at early time-points after SE. PMID:26291773

  16. The combination of tetraiodothyroacetic acid and cetuximab inhibits cell proliferation in colorectal cancers with different K-ras status.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yee-Shin; Chin, Yu-Tang; Yang, Yu-Chen S H; Wei, Po-Li; Wu, Han-Chung; Shih, Ai; Lu, Yueh-Tong; Pedersen, Jens Z; Incerpi, Sandra; Liu, Leroy F; Lin, Hung-Yun; Davis, Paul J

    2016-07-01

    Thyroid hormone induces cancer cell proliferation through its cell surface receptor integrin αvβ3. Acting via integrin αvβ3, the deaminated T4 analog tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac), and its nanoparticle formulation nano-diamino-tetrac (NDAT) could inhibit cell proliferation and xenograft growth. In this study, we investigated the T4 effects on proliferation in colorectal cancer cell lines based on the proliferation marker expressions at both mRNA and protein levels. The effects of tetrac/NDAT, the monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab, and their combinations on colorectal cancer cell proliferation were examined according to the relevant gene expression profiles and cell count analysis. The results showed that T4 significantly enhanced PCNA, Cyclin D1 and c-Myc levels in both K-ras wild type HT-29 and mutant HCT 116 cells. In HCT 116 cells, the combination of NDAT and cetuximab significantly suppressed the mRNA expressions of proliferative genes PCNA, Cyclin D1, c-Myc and RRM2 raised by T4 compared to cetuximab alone. In addition, T4-suppressed mRNA expressions of pro-apoptotic genes p53 and RRM2B could be significantly elevated by the combination of NDAT and cetuximab compared to cetuximab alone. In the K-ras mutant HCT 116 cells, but not in the K-ras wild type COLO 205 cells, the combinations of tetrac/NDAT and cetuximab significantly reduced cell proliferation compared to cetuximab alone. In conclusion, T4 promoted colorectal cancer cell proliferation which could be repressed by tetrac and NDAT. The combinations of tetrac/NDAT and cetuximab potentiated cetuximab actions in K-ras mutant colorectal cancer cells. PMID:26980146

  17. Effect of endurance training on seizure susceptibility, behavioral changes and neuronal damage after kainate-induced status epilepticus in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Tchekalarova, J; Shishmanova, M; Atanasova, D; Stefanova, M; Alova, L; Lazarov, N; Georgieva, K

    2015-11-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of regular physical exercises in an animal model of epilepsy and depression comorbidity has been confirmed previously. In the present study, we examined the effects of endurance training on susceptibility to kainate (KA)-induced status epilepticus (SE), behavioral changes and neuronal damage in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Male SHRs were randomly divided into two groups. One group was exercised on a treadmill with submaximal loading for four weeks and the other group was sedentary. Immediately after the training period, SE was evoked in half of the sedentary and trained rats by KA, while the other half of the two groups received saline. Basal systolic (SP), diastolic (DP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) of all rats were measured at the beginning and at the end of the training period. Anxiety, memory and depression-like behaviour were evaluated a month after SE. The release of 5-HT in the hippocampus was measured using a liquid scintillation method and neuronal damage was analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. SP and MAP of exercised SHRs decreased in comparison with the initial values. The increased resistance of SHRs to KA-induced SE was accompanied by an elongated latent seizure-free period, improved object recognition memory and antidepressant effect after the training program. While the anticonvulsant and positive behavioral effects of endurance training were accompanied by an increase of 5-HT release in the hippocampus, it did not exert neuroprotective activity. Our results indicate that prior exercise is an effective means to attenuate KA-induced seizures and comorbid behavioral changes in a model of hypertension and epilepsy suggesting a potential influence of hippocampal 5-HT on a comorbid depression. However, this beneficial impact does not prevent the development of epilepsy and concomitant brain damage. PMID:26319691

  18. Moderate doses of conjugated linoleic acid reduce fat gain, maintain insulin sensitivity without impairing inflammatory adipose tissue status in mice fed a high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The enrichment of diet with nutrients with potential benefits on body composition is a strategy to combat obesity. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) due its beneficial effects on body composition and inflammatory processes becomes an interesting candidate, since the promotion and impairment of obesity is closely linked to a low-grade inflammation state of adipose tissue. Previously we reported the favourable effects of moderate doses of CLA mixture on body composition and inflammatory status of adipose tissue in mice fed a standard-fat diet. In the present study we assessed the potential beneficial effects of CLA mixture (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12, 50:50) in mice fed a high-fat diet. Methods Two doses were assayed: 0.15 g (CLA1) and 0.5 g CLA/kg body weight (CLA2) for the first 30 days of the study and then animals received a double amount for another 35 days. Results The lowest dose (CLA1) had minor effects on body composition, plasma parameters and gene expression. However, a clear reduction in fat accumulation was achieved by CLA2, accompanied by a reduction in leptin, adiponectin and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) plasma concentrations. Insulin sensitivity was maintained despite a slight increase in fasting glucose and insulin plasma concentrations. The study of gene expression both in adipocytes and in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) suggested that CLA may reduce either the infiltration of macrophages in adipose tissue or the induction of expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Conclusion In conclusion, the use of moderate doses of an equimolar mix of the two main CLA isomers reduces body fat content, improves plasma lipid profile, maintains insulin sensitivity (despite a moderate degree of hyperinsulinaemia) without the promotion of inflammatory markers in adipose tissue of mice fed a high-fat diet. PMID:20180981

  19. Evaluation of the Total Carbon Dioxide Apparatus and pH Meter for the Determination of Acid-Base Status in Diarrheic and Healthy Calves

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Jonathan M.

    1987-01-01

    Three simple tests of acid-base status were evaluated for field use. Blood samples were collected from 20 diarrheic and 24 healthy calves less than six weeks of age. One sample was collected anaerobically and immediately analyzed on a blood gas analyzer. The other samples were used for measurement of blood and serum pH using a pH meter and pH paper, and for serum total carbon dioxide (TCO2) using a TCO2 apparatus. The TCO2 apparatus gave the best results and would be useful in the field. TCO2 apparatus measurements had a high correlation, r=0.91, with blood gas analyzer blood bicarbonate values. Healthy calves have a serum TCO2 content of 30 mmol/L and bicarbonate requirements for correcting metabolic acidosis in diarrheic calves can be calculated: Bicarbonate required (mmol) = (30-TCO2) × Body Weight × 0.6 This can be converted to grams of sodium bicarbonate by dividing by 12. PMID:17422884

  20. Feeding rumen-protected gamma-aminobutyric acid enhances the immune response and antioxidant status of heat-stressed lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianbo; Zheng, Nan; Sun, Xianzhi; Li, Songli; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhang, Yangdong

    2016-08-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of rumen-protected gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on immune function and antioxidant status in heat-stressed dairy cows. Sixty Holstein dairy cows were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments according to a completely randomized block design. The treatments consisted of 0 (control), 40, 80, or 120mg of GABA/kg DM from rumen-protected GABA. The trial lasted 10 weeks. The average temperature-humidity indices at 0700, 1400 and 2200h were 78.4, 80.2 and 78.7, respectively. Rectal temperatures decreased linearly at 0700, 1400, and 2200h with increasing GABA. As the GABA increased, the immunoglobulin (Ig) A and IgG contents and the proportions of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes increased linearly (P<0.05), whereas concentrations of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) decreased linearly (P<0.05). The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-PX) and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) increased linearly (P<0.05), whereas malondialdehyde (MDA) content decreased linearly (P<0.05) with increasing GABA. These results indicate that rumen-protected GABA supplementation to heat-stressed dairy cows can improve their immune function and antioxidant activity. PMID:27503722

  1. Effects of lead exposure on the status of platelet indices in workers involved in a lead-acid battery manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Barman, Tapu; Kalahasthi, Ravibabu; Rajmohan, H R

    2014-11-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effect of Pb exposure on the status of platelet indices in workers exposed to Pb during lead-acid battery plant process. Platelet indices and blood lead levels (BLLs) were determined in 429 male workers. BLLs were determined by using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Platelet indices in the samples were quantified by using the Sysmex KX-21 hematology analyzer. The levels of platelet count (PLT), plateletcrit (PCT) and mean platelet mass (MPM) were significantly decreased and platelet distribution width (PDW), platelet large cell ratio (P-LCR) and mean platelet volume were increased with an increase in BLLs. The results of linear multiple regression analysis showed that the platelet count (β -0.143, P=0.005), PCT (β -0.115, P=0.023) and MPM (β -0.110, P=0.030) were negatively associated with BLLs and P-LCR (β 0.122, P=0.016) was positively associated with BLLs. The variable of body mass index showed a positive association with PCT (β 0.105, P=0.032) and MPM (β 0.101, P=0.039). The results of the study may indicate that lead exposure may impair coagulation function through endothelial tissue injury and reduction of nitric oxide. PMID:24849799

  2. Changes in Renal Function and Oxidative Status Associated with the Hypotensive Effects of Oleanolic Acid and Related Synthetic Derivatives in Experimental Animals

    PubMed Central

    Madlala, Hlengiwe Pretty; Van Heerden, Fanie Retief; Mubagwa, Kanigula; Musabayane, Cephas Tagumirwa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The triterpene oleanolic acid (OA) is known to possess antihypertensive actions. In the present study we to compared the effects of the triterpene on mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and kidney function following acute administration in normotensive animals with those of its related oleanane synthetic derivatives (brominated oleanolic acid, Br-OA and oleanolic acid methyl ester, Me-OA). We also used experimental models of hypertension to further explore the effects of sub-chronic oral OA treatment and evaluated influences on oxidative status. Methods OA was extracted from dried flower buds of Syzygium aromaticum using a previously validated protocol in our laboratory. Me-OA and Br-OA were synthesized according to a method described. Rats were supplemented with lithium chloride (12 mmol L-1) prior to experimentation in order to raise plasma lithium to allow measurements of lithium clearance and fractional excretion (FELi) as indices of proximal tubular Na+ handling. Anaesthetized animals were continuously infused via the right jugular with 0.077M NaCl. MAP was measured via a cannula inserted in the carotid artery, and urine was collected through a cannula inserted in the bladder. After a 3.5 h equilibration, MAP, urine flow, electrolyte excretion rates were determined for 4 h of 1 h control, 1.5 h treatment and 1.5 h recovery periods. OA, Me-OA and Br-OA were added to the infusate during the treatment period. We evaluated sub-chronic effects on MAP and kidney function in normotensive Wistar rats and in two animal models of hypertension, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Dahl salt-sensitive (DSS) rats, during 9-week administration of OA (p.o.). Tissue oxidative status was examined in these animals at the end of the study. Increasing evidence suggests that and renal function disturbances and oxidative stress play major roles in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Results Acute infusion OA and oleanane derivatives displayed qualitatively similar effects

  3. Resource allocation and extracellular acid-base status in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis in response to CO₂ induced seawater acidification.

    PubMed

    Stumpp, M; Trübenbach, K; Brennecke, D; Hu, M Y; Melzner, F

    2012-04-01

    Anthropogenic CO(2) emission will lead to an increase in seawater pCO(2) of up to 80-100 Pa (800-1000 μatm) within this century and to an acidification of the oceans. Green sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis) occurring in Kattegat experience seasonal hypercapnic and hypoxic conditions already today. Thus, anthropogenic CO(2) emissions will add up to existing values and will lead to even higher pCO(2) values >200 Pa (>2000 μatm). To estimate the green sea urchins' potential to acclimate to acidified seawater, we calculated an energy budget and determined the extracellular acid base status of adult S. droebachiensis exposed to moderately (102-145 Pa, 1007-1431 μatm) and highly (284-385 Pa, 2800-3800 μatm) elevated seawater pCO(2) for 10 and 45 days. A 45-day exposure to elevated pCO(2) resulted in a shift in energy budgets, leading to reduced somatic and reproductive growth. Metabolic rates were not significantly affected, but ammonium excretion increased in response to elevated pCO(2). This led to decreased O:N ratios. These findings suggest that protein metabolism is possibly enhanced under elevated pCO(2) in order to support ion homeostasis by increasing net acid extrusion. The perivisceral coelomic fluid acid-base status revealed that S. droebachiensis is able to fully (intermediate pCO(2)) or partially (high pCO(2)) compensate extracellular pH (pH(e)) changes by accumulation of bicarbonate (maximum increases 2.5mM), albeit at a slower rate than typically observed in other taxa (10-day duration for full pH(e) compensation). At intermediate pCO(2), sea urchins were able to maintain fully compensated pH(e) for 45 days. Sea urchins from the higher pCO(2) treatment could be divided into two groups following medium-term acclimation: one group of experimental animals (29%) contained remnants of food in their digestive system and maintained partially compensated pH(e) (+2.3mM HCO(3)(-)), while the other group (71%) exhibited an empty digestive system and

  4. The organization of the human GSTP1-1 gene promoter and its response to retinoic acid and cellular redox status.

    PubMed Central

    Xia, C; Hu, J; Ketterer, B; Taylor, J B

    1996-01-01

    High levels of expression of GSTP1-1 are associated with cell proliferation, embryogenesis and malignancy. Given the role of glutathione S-transferase (GST) in detoxication, it is possible that GSTP1-1 evolved specifically to protect proliferating cells and share regulatory mechanisms with other cellular genes which are involved in cell division and tumorigenesis. We have previously shown that the expression of GSTP1 is suppressed by retinoic acid (RA) in the presence of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) as a result of decreased transcription from its promoter. Through deletion analysis, we show here that the RA-RAR-dependent repression is mediated by the region -73 to +8. Further mutation analysis of this region indicates that the DNA sequence required for RA-RAR-dependent repression co-localizes with a consensus activator protein-1 (AP1) site essential for the promoter activity. The degree of repression correlates with the residual activity of the AP1 site. There are two adjacent G/C boxes. The one immediately downstream from the AP1 site is not essential for the promoter activity, but mutation of the second, further downstream, impairs the promoter. On the other hand, mutation of either of these two G/C boxes has little effect on RA-RAR suppression. We also show that the expression of GSTP1 is regulated by the redox status of the cell. Using the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay system, we have demonstrated that treatment with H2O2 induced transcription from the promoter and that this effect can be blocked by pre-incubation with N-acetylcysteine (NAC). It was shown that the induction by H2O2 is mediated by trans-acting factor NF-kappa B (nuclear factor kappa B), via a putative NF-kappa B site, 'GGGACCCTCC', located from -96 to -86. Co-transfection with an NF-kappa B (p65) expression construct increased the promoter activity, an effect which could be blocked by co-transfection with an I kappa B (MAD-3) expression construct. Deletion of the NF-kappa B site

  5. Increased abscisic acid levels in transgenic maize overexpressing AtLOS5 mediated root ion fluxes and leaf water status under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Yu, Haiyue; Zhang, Yushi; Wang, Yubing; Li, Maoying; Zhang, Jiachang; Duan, Liusheng; Zhang, Mingcai; Li, Zhaohu

    2016-03-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a vital cellular signal in plants, and effective ABA signalling is pivotal for stress tolerance. AtLOS5 encoding molybdenum cofactor sulphurase is a key regulator of ABA biosynthesis. Here, transgenic AtLOS5 plants were generated to explore the role of AtLOS5 in salt tolerance in maize. AtLOS5 overexpression significantly up-regulated the expression of ZmVp14-2, ZmAO, and ZmMOCO, and increased aldehyde oxidase activities, which enhanced ABA accumulation in transgenic plants under salt stress. Concurrently, AtLOS5 overexpression induced the expression of ZmNHX1, ZmCBL4, and ZmCIPK16, and enhanced the root net Na(+) efflux and H(+) influx, but decreased net K(+) efflux, which maintained a high cytosolic K(+)/Na(+) ratio in transgenic plants under salt stress. However, amiloride or sodium orthovanadate could significantly elevate K(+) effluxes and decrease Na(+) efflux and H(+) influx in salt-treated transgenic roots, but the K(+) effluxes were inhibited by TEA, suggesting that ion fluxes regulated by AtLOS5 overexpression were possibly due to activation of Na(+)/H(+) antiport and K(+) channels across the plasma membrane. Moreover, AtLOS5 overexpression could up-regulate the transcripts of ZmPIP1:1, ZmPIP1:5, and ZmPIP2:4, and enhance root hydraulic conductivity. Thus transgenic plants had higher leaf water potential and turgor, which was correlated with greater biomass accumulation under salt stress. Thus AtLOS5 overexpression induced the expression of ABA biosynthetic genes to promote ABA accumulation, which activated ion transporter and PIP aquaporin gene expression to regulate root ion fluxes and water uptake, thus maintaining high cytosolic K(+) and Na(+) homeostasis and better water status in maize exposed to salt stress. PMID:26743432

  6. Cobalamin and Folic Acid Status in Relation to the Etiopathogenesis of Pancytopenia in Adults at a Tertiary Care Centre in North India

    PubMed Central

    Premkumar, M.; Gupta, N.; Singh, T.; Velpandian, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Pancytopenia has multiple etiologies like megaloblastic anemia, aplastic anemia, leukemia, and various infections. We investigated the clinical, etiological and hematological profile including bone marrow morphology of patients with pancytopenia in relation to their vitamin B12 and folic acid status at a tertiary care referral hospital in north India. Methods. A total of 140 consecutive patients with pancytopenia were selected from June 2007 to December 2008. Bone marrow examination and other tests were carried out as warranted, including serum cobalamin and folate assays using liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy (LC MS/MS). Results. The study population consisted of 92 males and 48 females with a mean age of 32.8 years. Megaloblastic anemia 60.7%, aplastic anemia (7.8%), and leukemia (9.2%) were common causes. Infectious causes (16.4% of all cases) included leishmaniasis, HIV–AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. Severe cobalamin deficiency (B12 < 100 pg/mL) was seen in 81% of all patients including 91.6% of patients with MA. In contrast, only 7.14% of all pancytopenic patients were folate deficient. Folate deficiency (<5 ng/mL) was seen in just 5% MA patients. Combined cobalamin and folate deficiency was seen in 5 patients (3.51%). Conclusion. Cobalamin deficiency was found to be more common in our setting and is largely underdiagnosed in the age of folate supplementation. Infectious diseases like tuberculosis, leishmaniasis, and increasingly HIV are important and treatable causes of pancytopenia. This is in contrast with the developed nations where the bulk of disease is due to malignancy or marrow aplasia. PMID:22545211

  7. Increased abscisic acid levels in transgenic maize overexpressing AtLOS5 mediated root ion fluxes and leaf water status under salt stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Yu, Haiyue; Zhang, Yushi; Wang, Yubing; Li, Maoying; Zhang, Jiachang; Duan, Liusheng; Zhang, Mingcai; Li, Zhaohu

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a vital cellular signal in plants, and effective ABA signalling is pivotal for stress tolerance. AtLOS5 encoding molybdenum cofactor sulphurase is a key regulator of ABA biosynthesis. Here, transgenic AtLOS5 plants were generated to explore the role of AtLOS5 in salt tolerance in maize. AtLOS5 overexpression significantly up-regulated the expression of ZmVp14-2, ZmAO, and ZmMOCO, and increased aldehyde oxidase activities, which enhanced ABA accumulation in transgenic plants under salt stress. Concurrently, AtLOS5 overexpression induced the expression of ZmNHX1, ZmCBL4, and ZmCIPK16, and enhanced the root net Na+ efflux and H+ influx, but decreased net K+ efflux, which maintained a high cytosolic K+/Na+ ratio in transgenic plants under salt stress. However, amiloride or sodium orthovanadate could significantly elevate K+ effluxes and decrease Na+ efflux and H+ influx in salt-treated transgenic roots, but the K+ effluxes were inhibited by TEA, suggesting that ion fluxes regulated by AtLOS5 overexpression were possibly due to activation of Na+/H+ antiport and K+ channels across the plasma membrane. Moreover, AtLOS5 overexpression could up-regulate the transcripts of ZmPIP1:1, ZmPIP1:5, and ZmPIP2:4, and enhance root hydraulic conductivity. Thus transgenic plants had higher leaf water potential and turgor, which was correlated with greater biomass accumulation under salt stress. Thus AtLOS5 overexpression induced the expression of ABA biosynthetic genes to promote ABA accumulation, which activated ion transporter and PIP aquaporin gene expression to regulate root ion fluxes and water uptake, thus maintaining high cytosolic K+ and Na+ homeostasis and better water status in maize exposed to salt stress. PMID:26743432

  8. The Effect of n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Supplementation on Androgen Status in Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Hajishafiee, M; Askari, G; Iranj, B; Ghiasvand, R; Bellissimo, N; Totosy de Zepetnek, J; Salehi-Abargouei, A

    2016-05-01

    The anti-androgenic role of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) among patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) has recently been proposed. The present study aimed to systematically review clinical trials assessing the effects of n-3 PUFAs consumption on androgen status among adult females with PCOS. PubMed, ISI Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus were searched up to December 2015. Clinical investigations assessing the effect of n-3 PUFAs on adult females with PCOS were included. Mean±standard deviation of change in serum total testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and dehydroepiandrostrone sulfate (DHEAS) were extracted. Eight clinical trials with 298 participants were eligible. Meta-analysis showed that n-3 PUFAs supplementation marginally reduces total testosterone (mean difference [MD]: - 0.19 nmol/l; 95% CI: - 0.39 to 0.00; p=0.054), but not SHBG (MD: 1.75 nmol/l; 95% CI: -0.51 to 4.01; p=0.129) or serum DHEAS levels (Hedes' g: -0.11 nmol/l; 95% CI: -0.29 to 0.06; p=0.19) among adult females with PCOS. Subgroup analyses showed that only before-after studies (Hedges' g: 0.15; 95% CI: -0.27 to -0.04; p=0.01) and long-term interventions (>6 weeks) (Hedges' g: -0.17; 95% CI, -0.29 to -0.05; p=0.004) had reducing effects on serum DHEAS levels. The majority of long-term trials utilized a single group design (no control group). It does not appear that n-3 PUFAs supplementation significantly affects the androgenic profile of females with PCOS; however, some before-after and long-term intervention studies show reduced DHEAS levels. Future studies incorporating double blinded placebo controlled clinical trials with long follow-up periods are warranted. PMID:27077458

  9. Antioxidant status of blood and liver of turkeys fed diets enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids and fruit pomaces as a source of polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, J; Juśkiewicz, J; Zduńczyk, P; Kosmala, M; Zieliński, H; Antoszkiewicz, Z; Zduńczyk, Z

    2016-01-01

    It was hypothesized that dietary polyphenol-rich fruit pomaces can improve the antioxidant status of both diets and the tissues of turkeys fed such diets. Turkeys were fed diets containing a cellulose preparation (C) or 5% dried apple pomace (AP), blackcurrant pomace (BCP), strawberry pomace (SP) and seedless strawberry pomace (SSP). Blood and liver biochemical parameters were determined in 7 birds from each experimental group slaughtered at 15 weeks of age, after 5 weeks of feeding diets containing soybean oil and linseed oil (approx. 1:1 ratio). Dietary linseed oil added to diets at 2.5% lowered the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio from approx. 7:1 to below 2:1, thus reducing the antioxidant properties of diets measured using DPPH, ABTS and photo-chemiluminescence assays, compared with diets containing only soybean oil and administered to birds in the first phase of feeding. Fruit pomaces, in particular SSP with the highest polyphenol content (32.81 g/kg) and the highest antioxidant activity (256.4 μM Trolox/g), increased the antioxidant capacity of turkey diets. In comparison with the control group, the dietary treatments with fruit pomaces improved blood antioxidant parameters, including catalase activity (groups AP and BCP), the total antioxidant capacity of hydrophilic (group AP) and lipophilic (groups AP, SP, and SSP) compounds, peroxide levels (groups AP and SSP) and antioxidant capacity measured by the FRAP (ferric reducing antioxidant power of plasma) assay (groups AP, BCP and SSP). Significantly lower concentrations of both vitamin E and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were noted in the livers of turkeys fed all diets with dried fruit pomaces. PMID:27096792

  10. Benzene Uptake and Glutathione S-transferase T1 Status as Determinants of S-Phenylmercapturic Acid in Cigarette Smokers in the Multiethnic Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Haiman, Christopher A.; Patel, Yesha M.; Stram, Daniel O.; Carmella, Steven G.; Chen, Menglan; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Le Marchand, Loic; Hecht, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    Research from the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC) demonstrated that, for the same quantity of cigarette smoking, African Americans and Native Hawaiians have a higher lung cancer risk than Whites, while Latinos and Japanese Americans are less susceptible. We collected urine samples from 2,239 cigarette smokers from five different ethnic groups in the MEC and analyzed each sample for S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA), a specific biomarker of benzene uptake. African Americans had significantly higher (geometric mean [SE] 3.69 [0.2], p<0.005) SPMA/ml urine than Whites (2.67 [0.13]) while Japanese Americans had significantly lower levels than Whites (1.65 [0.07], p<0.005). SPMA levels in Native Hawaiians and Latinos were not significantly different from those of Whites. We also conducted a genome-wide association study in search of genetic risk factors related to benzene exposure. The glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) deletion explained between 14.2–31.6% (p = 5.4x10-157) and the GSTM1 deletion explained between 0.2%-2.4% of the variance (p = 1.1x10-9) of SPMA levels in these populations. Ethnic differences in levels of SPMA remained strong even after controlling for the effects of these two deletions. These results demonstrate the powerful effect of GSTT1 status on SPMA levels in urine and show that uptake of benzene in African American, White, and Japanese American cigarette smokers is consistent with their lung cancer risk in the MEC. While benzene is not generally considered a cause of lung cancer, its metabolite SPMA could be a biomarker for other volatile lung carcinogens in cigarette smoke. PMID:26959369

  11. Long-term feeding of Atlantic salmon in seawater with low dietary long-chain n-3 fatty acids affects tissue status of the brain, retina and erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sissener, N H; Torstensen, B E; Stubhaug, I; Rosenlund, G

    2016-06-01

    In two long-term feeding trials in seawater, Atlantic salmon were fed EPA+DHA in graded levels, from 1·3 to 7·4 % of fatty acids (FA, 4-24 g/kg feed) combined with approximately 10 % 18 : 3n-3, at 6 and 12°C. Dietary EPA appeared to be sufficient in all diet groups, as no differences were seen in polar lipid tissue concentrations of either the brain, retina or erythrocytes. For DHA, a reduction in tissue levels was observed with low dietary supply. Effects on brain DHA at ≤1·4 % EPA+DHA of dietary FA and retina DHA at ≤2·7 % EPA+DHA of dietary FA were only observed in fish reared at 6°C, suggesting an effect of temperature, whereas tissue levels of n-6 FA increased as a response to increased dietary n-6 FA in both the brain and the retina at both temperatures. DHA levels in erythrocytes were affected by ≤2·7 % EPA+DHA at both temperatures. Therefore, DHA appears to be the limiting n-3 FA in diets where EPA and DHA are present in the ratios found in fishmeal and fish oil. To assess the physiological significance of FA differences in erythrocytes, the osmotic resistance was tested, but it did not vary between dietary groups. In conclusion, ≤2·7 % EPA+DHA of FA (≤9 g/kg feed) is not sufficient to maintain tissue DHA status in important tissues of Atlantic salmon throughout the seawater production cycle despite the presence of dietary 18 : 3n-3, and effects may be more severe at low water temperatures. PMID:27044510

  12. Benzene Uptake and Glutathione S-transferase T1 Status as Determinants of S-Phenylmercapturic Acid in Cigarette Smokers in the Multiethnic Cohort.

    PubMed

    Haiman, Christopher A; Patel, Yesha M; Stram, Daniel O; Carmella, Steven G; Chen, Menglan; Wilkens, Lynne R; Le Marchand, Loic; Hecht, Stephen S

    2016-01-01

    Research from the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC) demonstrated that, for the same quantity of cigarette smoking, African Americans and Native Hawaiians have a higher lung cancer risk than Whites, while Latinos and Japanese Americans are less susceptible. We collected urine samples from 2,239 cigarette smokers from five different ethnic groups in the MEC and analyzed each sample for S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA), a specific biomarker of benzene uptake. African Americans had significantly higher (geometric mean [SE] 3.69 [0.2], p<0.005) SPMA/ml urine than Whites (2.67 [0.13]) while Japanese Americans had significantly lower levels than Whites (1.65 [0.07], p<0.005). SPMA levels in Native Hawaiians and Latinos were not significantly different from those of Whites. We also conducted a genome-wide association study in search of genetic risk factors related to benzene exposure. The glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) deletion explained between 14.2-31.6% (p = 5.4x10-157) and the GSTM1 deletion explained between 0.2%-2.4% of the variance (p = 1.1x10-9) of SPMA levels in these populations. Ethnic differences in levels of SPMA remained strong even after controlling for the effects of these two deletions. These results demonstrate the powerful effect of GSTT1 status on SPMA levels in urine and show that uptake of benzene in African American, White, and Japanese American cigarette smokers is consistent with their lung cancer risk in the MEC. While benzene is not generally considered a cause of lung cancer, its metabolite SPMA could be a biomarker for other volatile lung carcinogens in cigarette smoke. PMID:26959369

  13. Effect of long-term intermittent supplementation with multiple micronutrients compared with iron-and-folic acid supplementation on Hb and micronutrient status of non-anaemic adolescent schoolgirls in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faruk; Khan, Moududur R; Akhtaruzzaman, Mohammad; Karim, Rezaul; Williams, Gail; Banu, Cadi P; Nahar, Badrun; Darnton-Hill, Ian

    2012-10-28

    The present study examined whether long-term supplementation with once- and twice-weekly multiple micronutrients (MMN-1 and MMN-2) can improve Hb and micronutrient status more than twice-weekly Fe-folic acid (IFA-2) supplementation in non-anaemic adolescent girls in Bangladesh. An equal number of 324 rural schoolgirls aged 11-17 years were given MMN-1 or MMN-2 or IFA-2 supplements for 52 weeks in a randomised, double-blind trial. Blood samples were collected at baseline, and at 26 and 52 weeks of supplementation. The girls receiving IFA-2 supplements were more likely to be anaemic than the girls receiving MMN-2 supplements for 26 weeks (OR 5·1, 95% CI 1·3, 19·5; P = 0·018). All three supplements reduced Fe deficiency effectively. Both the MMN-1 and MMN-2 groups showed significantly greater improvements in vitamins A, B(2) and C status than the girls in the IFA-2 group, as might be expected. Receiving a MMN-1 supplement was found to be less effective than MMN-2 supplement in improving Fe, vitamins A, B(2) and folic acid status. Receiving micronutrient supplements beyond 26 weeks showed little additional benefit in improving micronutrient status. In conclusion, given twice-weekly for 26 weeks, MMN supplements can improve micronutrient status effectively with no significant increase in Hb concentration compared with IFA supplements in non-anaemic Bangladeshi adolescent girls. However, it significantly reduces the risk of anaemia. Before any recommendations can be made, further research, including into cost-effectiveness, is needed to see whether MMN supplementation has any additional longer-term health benefits over that of IFA supplementation in this population. PMID:22244349

  14. Kainic Acid-Induced Excitotoxicity Experimental Model: Protective Merits of Natural Products and Plant Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Sairazi, Nur Shafika; Sirajudeen, K. N. S.; Asari, Mohd Asnizam; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Mummedy, Swamy; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah

    2015-01-01

    Excitotoxicity is well recognized as a major pathological process of neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases involving the central nervous system (CNS). In the animal models of neurodegeneration, excitotoxicity is commonly induced experimentally by chemical convulsants, particularly kainic acid (KA). KA-induced excitotoxicity in rodent models has been shown to result in seizures, behavioral changes, oxidative stress, glial activation, inflammatory mediator production, endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and selective neurodegeneration in the brain upon KA administration. Recently, there is an emerging trend to search for natural sources to combat against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegenerative diseases. Natural products and plant extracts had attracted a considerable amount of attention because of their reported beneficial effects on the CNS, particularly their neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity. They provide significant reduction and/or protection against the development and progression of acute and chronic neurodegeneration. This indicates that natural products and plants extracts may be useful in protecting against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegeneration. Thus, targeting of multiple pathways simultaneously may be the strategy to maximize the neuroprotection effect. This review summarizes the mechanisms involved in KA-induced excitotoxicity and attempts to collate the various researches related to the protective effect of natural products and plant extracts in the KA model of neurodegeneration. PMID:26793262

  15. A New Derivative of Valproic Acid Amide Possesses a Broad-spectrum Antiseizure Profile and Unique Activity Against Status Epilepticus and Organophosphate Neuronal Damage

    PubMed Central

    White, H. Steve; Alex, Anitha B.; Pollock, Amanda; Hen, Naama; Shekh-Ahmad, Tawfeeq; Wilcox, Karen S.; McDonough, John H.; Stables, James P.; Kaufmann, Dan; Yagen, Boris; Bialer, Meir

    2011-01-01

    Summary Purpose sec-Butyl-propylacetamide (SPD) is a one-carbon homologue of valnoctamide (VCD), a CNS-active amide derivative of valproic acid (VPA) currently in phase II clinical trials. The current study evaluated the anticonvulsant activity of SPD in a battery of rodent seizure and epilepsy models and assessed its efficacy in rat and guinea pig models of status epilepticus (SE) and neuroprotection in an organotypic hippocampal slice model of excitotoxic cell death. Methods SPD’s anticonvulsant activity was evaluated in several rodent seizure and epilepsy models including: maximal electroshock (MES), 6Hz psychomotor, subcutaneous (s.c.) metrazol-, s.c., picrotoxin, s.c. bicuculline, audiogenic and corneal and hippocampal kindled seizures following intraperitoneal administration. Results obtained with SPD are discussed in relationship to those obtained with VPA and VCD. SPD was also evaluated for its ability to block benzodiazepine-resistant SE induced by pilocarpine (rats) and soman (rats and guinea pigs) following intraperitoneal administration. SPD was tested for its ability to block excitotoxic cell death induced by the glutamate agonists N-methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) and kainic acid (KA) using organotypic hippocampal slices and SE-induced hippocampal cell death using FluoroJade B staining. The cognitive function of SPD-treated rats that were protected against pilocarpine-induced convulsive SE was examined 10-14 days post SE using the Morris water maze (MWM). The relationship between the pharmacokinetic profile of SPD and its efficacy against soman-induced SE was evaluated in two parallel studies following SPD (60 mg/kg, i.p.) administration in the soman SE rat model. Key Findings SPD was highly effective and displayed a wide protective index (PI=TD50/ED50) in the standardized seizure and epilepsy models employed. SPD’s wide PI values demonstrate that it is effective at doses well below those that produce behavioral impairment. Unlike VCD, SPD also

  16. Effects of short-term acid and aluminum exposure on the parr-smolt transformation in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar): Disruption of seawater tolerance and endocrine status

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monette, M.Y.; Bjornsson, Bjorn Thrandur; McCormick, S.D.

    2008-01-01

    Episodic acidification resulting in increased acidity and inorganic aluminum (Ali) is known to interfere with the parr-smolt transformation of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and has been implicated as a possible cause of population decline. To determine the extent and mechanism(s) by which short-term acid/Al exposure compromises smolt development, Atlantic salmon smolts were exposed to either control (pH 6.7-6.9) or acid/Al (pH 5.4-6.3, 28-64 ??g l-1 Ali) conditions for 2 and 5 days, and impacts on freshwater (FW) ion regulation, seawater (SW) tolerance, plasma hormone levels and stress response were examined. Gill Al concentrations were elevated in all smolts exposed to acid/Al relative to controls confirming exposure to increased Ali. There was no effect of acid/Al on plasma ion concentrations in FW however, smolts exposed to acid/Al followed by a 24 h SW challenge exhibited greater plasma Cl- levels than controls, indicating reduced SW tolerance. Loss of SW tolerance was accompanied by reductions in gill Na+,K+-ATPase (NKA) activity and Na+,K+,2Cl- (NKCC) cotransporter protein abundance. Acid/Al exposure resulted in decreased plasma insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) and 3,3???,5???-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3) levels, whereas no effect of treatment was seen on plasma cortisol, growth hormone (GH), or thyroxine (T4) levels. Acid/Al exposure resulted in increased hematocrit and plasma glucose levels in FW, but both returned to control levels after 24 h in SW. The results indicate that smolt development and SW tolerance are compromised by short-term exposure to acid/Al in the absence of detectable impacts on FW ion regulation. Loss of SW tolerance during short-term acid/Al exposure likely results from reductions in gill NKA and NKCC, possibly mediated by decreases in plasma IGF-I and T3. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc.

  17. High-performance liquid chromatographic method for profiling 2-oxo acids in urine and its application in evaluating vitamin status in rats.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Katsumi; Nakata, Chifumi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    B-group vitamins are involved in the catabolism of 2-oxo acids. To identify the functional biomarkers of B-group vitamins, we developed a high-performance liquid chromatographic method for profiling 2-oxo acids in urine and applied this method to urine samples from rats deficient in vitamins B1 and B6 and pantothenic acid. 2-Oxo acids were reacted with 1,2-diamino-4,5-methylenebenzene to produce fluorescent derivatives, which were then separated using a TSKgel ODS-80Ts column with 30 mmol/L of KH2PO4 (pH 3.0):acetonitrile (7:3) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Vitamin B1 deficiency increased urinary levels of all 2-oxo acids, while vitamin B6 deficiency only increased levels of sum of 2-oxaloacetic acid and pyruvic acid, and pantothenic acid deficiency only increased levels of 2-oxoisovaleric acid. Profiles of 2-oxo acids in urine samples might be a non-invasive way of clarifying the functional biomarker of B-group vitamins. PMID:26745680

  18. Effect of processing on proximate composition, anti-nutrient status and amino acid content in three accessions of African locust bean (Parkia biglobosa (jacq.) benth.

    PubMed

    Urua, Ikootobong Sunday; Uyoh, Edak Aniedi; Ntui, Valentine Otang; Okpako, Elza Cletus

    2013-02-01

    Proximate composition, amino acid levels and anti-nutrient factors (polyphenols, phytic acid and oxalate) in the seeds of Parkia biglobosa were determined at three stages: raw, boiled and fermented. The highest anti-nutrient factor present in the raw state was oxalate, while phytic acid was the least. The amino acid of the raw seeds matched favourably to the World Health Organization reference standard. After processing, boiling increased fat, crude fibre and protein, while it reduced moisture, ash and the anti-nutrient content in 64% of the cases examined. Fermentation reduced ash, crude fibre and carbohydrate in all the accessions. It increased the moisture, fat and protein, while reducing the anti-nutrient factors in 78% of the cases. The high levels of protein, fat and amino acids coupled with the low levels of the anti-nutrients in the boiled and fermented seeds make Parkia a good source of nutrients for humans and livestock. PMID:22789074

  19. Effect of turmeric powder (Curcuma longa L.) and ascorbic acid on physical characteristics and oxidative status of fresh and stored rabbit burgers.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Simone; Preziuso, Giovanna; Dal Bosco, Alessandro; Roscini, Valentina; Szendrő, Zsolt; Fratini, Filippo; Paci, Gisella

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of Curcuma longa powder and ascorbic acid on some quality traits of rabbit burgers. The burgers (burgers control with no additives; burgers with 3.5 g of turmeric powder/100g meat; burgers with 0.1g of ascorbic acid/100g meat) were analyzed at Days 0 and 7 for pH, color, drip loss, cooking loss, fatty acid profile, TBARS, antioxidant capacity (ABTS, DPPH and FRAP) and microbial growth. The addition of turmeric powder modified the meat color, produced an antioxidant capacity similar to ascorbic acid and determined a lower cooking loss than other formulations. Turmeric powder might be considered as a useful natural antioxidant, increasing the quality and extending the shelf life of rabbit burgers. PMID:26188362

  20. Dietary Fatty Acids from Leaves of Clerodendrum Volubile Induce Cell Cycle Arrest, Downregulate Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Expression, and Modulate Redox Status in Human Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Erukainure, Ochuko L; Zaruwa, Moses Z; Choudhary, M Iqbal; Naqvi, S Asma; Ashraf, Nadia; Hafizur, Rahman M; Muhammad, Aliyu; Ebuehi, Osaretin A T; Elemo, Gloria N

    2016-01-01

    The antiproliferative effect of the fatty acid components of Clerodendrum volubile leaves as well as its antioxidant effect on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines were investigated. Fatty acids extracted from C. volubile leaf oil were subjected to gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) analysis. The cells were cultured and treated with the fatty acids for 48 h, after which the antiproliferation effect was ascertained via MTT assay and cell viability analysis using BD fluorescence activated cells sorting (FACS) Calibur. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry on FACS Calibur. Western blotting was used in determining expression of proteins in the cell lines. The treated cell lines were assessed for reduced glutathione level, catalase, superoxide dismutase, and lipid peroxidation. The fatty acids significantly inhibited cell proliferation, arrested G0/G1 phase, downregulated the expression of MMP-9, and attenuated oxidative stress in of MCF-7 cell lines but had little or no effect on MDA-MB-231 cell lines. These results indicate the therapeutic potential of the fatty acids components of the leaves of C. volubile on human breast cancer, which may be explored further in drug development. PMID:27043182

  1. Folate and vitamin B-12 status in relation to anemia, macrocytosis, and cognitive impairment in older Americans in the age of folic acid fortification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Historic data on folic acid treatment of pernicious anemia suggested that high-level fortification would delay diagnosis or exacerbate effects of vitamin B12 deficiency, which affects many seniors. This idea is controversial, however, because observational data are few and inconclusive and experime...

  2. Effect of early maternal docosahexaenoic acid intake on neuropsychological status and visual acuity at five years of age of breast-fed infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously reported better psychomotor development at 30 months of age in infants whose mothers received a docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplement for the first 4 months of lactation. We now assess neuropsychological and visual function of the same children at 5 years of age. Breastfeeding women w...

  3. Dietary supplementation with α-tocopherol reduces neuroinflammation and neuronal degeneration in the rat brain after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Betti, Michele; Minelli, Andrea; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Ciuffoli, Stefano; Viola, Valentina; Galli, Francesco; Canonico, Barbara; Lattanzi, Davide; Colombo, Evelin; Sestili, Piero; Cuppini, Riccardo

    2011-10-01

    Vitamin E (as α-tocopherol, α-T) is proposed to alleviate glia-mediated inflammation in neurological diseases, but such a role in epilepsy is still elusive. This study investigated the effect of α-T supplementation on glial activation, neuronal cell death and oxidative stress of rat brain exposed to kainate-induced seizures. Animals were fed for 2 weeks with a α-T-enriched diet (estimated intake of 750 mg/kg/day) before undergoing status epilepticus. Compliance to supplementation was demonstrated by the remarkable increase in brain α-T. Four days after seizure, brain α-T returned to baseline and lipid peroxidation markers decreased as compared to non-supplemented rats. Status epilepticus induced a lower up-regulation of astrocytic and microglial antigens (GFAP and MHC II, respectively) and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α) in supplemented than in non-supplemented animals. This anti-inflammatory effect was associated with a lower neuronal cell death. In conclusion, α-T dietary supplementation prevents oxidative stress, neuroglial over-activation and cell death occurring after kainate-induced seizures. This evidence paves the way to an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective role of α-T interventions in epilepsy. PMID:21749318

  4. Neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of lidocaine in kainic acid-injected rats.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Kuan Ming; Lu, Cheng Wei; Lee, Ming Yi; Wang, Ming Jiuh; Lin, Tzu Yu; Wang, Su Jane

    2016-05-01

    Lidocaine, the most commonly used local anesthetic, inhibits glutamate release from nerve terminals. Given the involvement of glutamate neurotoxicity in the pathogenesis of various neurological disorders, this study investigated the role of lidocaine in hippocampal neuronal death and inflammatory events induced by an i.p. injection of kainic acid (KA) (15 mg/kg), a glutamate analog. The results showed that KA significantly led to neuronal death in the CA3 pyramidal layers of the hippocampus and this effect was attenuated by the systemic administration of lidocaine (0.8 or 4 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before KA injection. Moreover, KA-induced microglia activation and gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, namely, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the hippocampus were reduced by the lidocaine pretreatment. Altogether, the results suggest that lidocaine can effectively treat glutamate excitotoxicity-related brain disorders. PMID:26999361

  5. Salicylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Shamsul; Irfan, Mohd; Wani, Arif; Nasser, Alyemeni; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid is well known phytohormone, emerging recently as a new paradigm of an array of manifestations of growth regulators. The area unleashed yet encompassed the applied agriculture sector to find the roles to strengthen the crops against plethora of abiotic and biotic stresses. The skipped part of integrated picture, however, was the evolutionary insight of salicylic acid to either allow or discard the microbial invasion depending upon various internal factors of two interactants under the prevailing external conditions. The metabolic status that allows the host invasion either as pathogenesis or symbiosis with possible intermediary stages in close systems has been tried to underpin here. PMID:22301975

  6. Alterations in blood pressure, antioxidant status and caspase 8 expression in cobalt chloride-induced cardio-renal dysfunction are reversed by Ocimum gratissimum and gallic acid in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Akinrinde, A S; Oyagbemi, A A; Omobowale, T O; Asenuga, E R; Ajibade, T O

    2016-07-01

    The protective abilities of the chloroform extract of Ocimum gratissimum (COG) and gallic acid against cobalt chloride (CoCl2) - induced cardiac and renal toxicity were evaluated. Rats were exposed to CoCl2 (350ppm) for 7 days, either alone, or in combination with COG (100 and 200mg/kg) or gallic acid (120mg/kg). CoCl2 given alone, caused significant increases (p<0.05) in oxidative stress parameters (hydrogen peroxide, H2O2 and malondialdehyde, MDA) and increased expression of the apoptotic initiator caspase 8 in the heart and kidneys. There was significant reduction (p<0.05) in reduced glutathione (GSH) in cardiac and renal tissues; reduction in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the kidneys and adaptive increases in Glutathione S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT). CoCl2 also produced significant reduction (p<0.05) in systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and mean arterial (MAP) blood pressures. Oral COG and gallic acid treatment significantly reduced (p<0.05) the levels of H2O2 and MDA; with reduced expression of caspase 8 and restoration of GSH levels, GPx, SOD and CAT activities, howbeit, to varying degrees in the heart and kidneys. COG (200mg/kg) was most effective in restoring the blood pressures in the rats to near control levels. CoCl2-induced histopathological lesions including myocardial infarction and inflammation and renal tubular necrosis and inflammation were effectively ameliorated by the treatments administered. This study provides evidence for the protective roles of O. gratissimum and gallic acid by modulation of CoCl2-induced alterations in blood pressure, antioxidant status and pro-apoptotic caspase 8 in Wistar rats. PMID:27259349

  7. Post-treatment with prolactin protects hippocampal CA1 neurons of the ovariectomized female rat against kainic acid-induced neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Mendoza, Julio; Morales, Teresa

    2016-07-22

    Kainic acid (KA) is a glutamate agonist widely used in studies of neurodegeneration due to its ability to induce excitotoxic damage in the rodent brain. Previously, we reported that pre-treatment with prolactin (PRL) prevents the neuron loss induced by KA administration in CA1, CA3 and CA4 of the hippocampus of the female rat. Here, we investigated if PRL has a neuroprotective effect in the dorsal hippocampus when it is administered after KA. For this, 100ng of KA or 0.9% saline was administered intracerebroventricularly (ICV) to ovariectomized female rats. One hour later, they received subcutaneous PRL (103μg/day for 7days) or saline through an osmotic minipump. Also, to determine the hippocampal neurogenesis rate, the rats were administered bromodeoxyuridine along with the PRL treatment. Immunostaining for NeuN revealed that neuronal loss is lower in the CA1 of PRL-treated rats compared with the untreated group, but PRL did not confer any protection in the CA3 and CA4 subfields. Furthermore, PRL prevented the KA-induced cognitive deficit measured as a better performance in the novel object recognition test. The PRL treatment did not modify the neurogenesis rate. These data indicate that post-treatment with PRL confers differential neuroprotection against KA-induced neuronal loss in hippocampal subfield CA1, which correlates with a more mild cognitive deficit compared with the untreated control group. PMID:27126559

  8. Effects of Graded Levels of Chromium Methionine on Performance, Carcass Traits, Meat Quality, Fatty Acid Profiles of Fat, Tissue Chromium Concentrations, and Antioxidant Status in Growing-Finishing Pigs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yao-Yao; Gong, Li-Min; Xue, Jian-Xiang; Cao, Jun; Zhang, Li-Ying

    2015-11-01

    A 97-day feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary chromium methionine (CrMet) on performance, carcass traits, meat quality, fatty acid profiles of fat, tissue chromium concentrations, and antioxidant status in growing-finishing pigs. A total of 180 crossbred pigs with a mean initial body weight (BW) 30.18 ± 0.28 kg were allotted to 5 treatments with 6 replicates per treatment and 6 pigs per pen in a randomized complete block design based on BW and sex. Treatments were added with 0 (control), 100, 200, 400, and 800 μg/kg chromium as CrMet. Blood samples were obtained from the anterior vena cava on days 97. Carcass characteristics, pork quality, and tissue chromium concentration data were collected from one pig per pen. The results indicated that supplemental CrMet did not significantly affect growth performance, carcass traits, or meat amino acid profiles. Chromium at 100, 400, and 800 μg/kg decreased drip loss but increased shear force (P < 0.05). Pigs fed 100 or 400 μg/kg had a higher 24-h pH than the control (P < 0.05). While meat color, muscle moisture, crude protein, or crude fat were not affected by CrMet. Supplemental 800 μg/kg chromium reduced C18:0 levels in belly fat (P < 0.05), and chromium supplementation increased cis-9, trans 11-conjugated linoleic acid levels linearly (P < 0.05). Dietary CrMet supplementation increased serum, kidney, and muscle chromium contents (P < 0.05) but did not affect liver chromium contents. Besides, tissue chromium concentrations were increased linearly with increased chromium dosage (P < 0.05). Chromium at 400 μg/kg increased serum glutathione peroxidase activities (P < 0.05), and chromium at 800 μg/kg decreased serum total antioxidant capacity levels (P < 0.05). Nevertheless, liver and kidney antioxidant status were not significantly affected by CrMet. These results indicated that dietary supplementation CrMet did not significantly influence growth

  9. Dietary Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Improve the Neurolipidome and Restore the DHA Status while Promoting Functional Recovery after Experimental Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Johnny D.; Cordero, Kathia; llán, Miguel S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) confer multiple health benefits and decrease the risk of neurological disorders. Studies are needed, however, to identify promising cellular targets and to assess their prophylactic value against neurodegeneration. The present study (1) examined the efficacy of a preventive diet enriched with ω-3 PUFAs to reduce dysfunction in a well-established spinal cord injury (SCI) animal model and (2) used a novel metabolomics data analysis to identify potential neurolipidomic targets. Rats were fed with either control chow or chow enriched with ω-3 PUFAs (750 mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks before being subjected to a sham or a contusion SCI operation. We report new evidence showing that rats subjected to SCI after being pre-treated with a diet enriched with ω-3 PUFAs exhibit significantly better functional outcomes. Pre-treated animals exhibited lower sensory deficits, autonomic bladder recovery, and early improvements in locomotion that persisted for at least 8 weeks after trauma. We found that SCI triggers a robust alteration in the cord PUFA neurolipidome, which was characterized by a marked docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) deficiency. This DHA deficiency was associated with dysfunction and corrected with the ω-3 PUFA-enriched diet. Multivariate data analyses revealed that the spinal cord of animals consuming the ω-3 PUFA-enriched diet had a fundamentally distinct neurolipidome, particularly increasing the levels of essential and long chain ω-3 fatty acids and lysolipids at the expense of ω-6 fatty acids and its metabolites. Altogether, dietary ω-3 PUFAs prophylaxis confers resiliency to SCI mediated, at least in part, by generating a neuroprotective and restorative neurolipidome. PMID:23294084

  10. Preventive effect of geniposide on metabolic disease status in spontaneously obese type 2 diabetic mice and free fatty acid-treated HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kazuko; Shimada, Tsutomu; Nagareda, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Michiru; Ishizaki, Junko; Sai, Yoshimichi; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Aburada, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    Accumulation of visceral fat induces various symptoms of metabolic syndrome such as insulin resistance and abnormal glucose/lipid metabolism and eventually leads to the onset of ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. Geniposide, which is iridoid glycoside from the fruit of Gardenia jasminoides ELLIS, is recognized as being useful against hyperlipidemia and fatty liver. In order to clarify the effect of geniposide on metabolic disease-based visceral fat accumulation and the relevant molecular mechanism, experiments were performed in spontaneously obese Type 2 diabetic TSOD mice and the free fatty acid-treated HepG2 cells. In the TSOD mice, geniposide showed suppression of body weight and visceral fat accumulation, alleviation of abnormal lipid metabolism and suppression of intrahepatic lipid accumulation. In addition, geniposide alleviated abnormal glucose tolerance and hyperinsulinemia, suggesting that geniposide has an insulin resistance-alleviating effect. Next, in order to investigate the direct effect of geniposide on the liver, the effect on the free fatty acid-treated HepG2 fatty liver model was investigated using genipin, which is the aglycone portion of geniposide. Genipin suppressed the intracellular lipid accumulation caused by the free fatty acid treatment and also significantly increased the intracellular expression of a fatty acid oxidation-related gene (peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor: PPARα). From these results, it was confirmed that geniposide has an anti-obesity effect, an insulin resistance-alleviating effect and an abnormal lipid metabolism-alleviating effect, and the metabolite genipin shows a direct effect on the liver, inducing expression of a lipid metabolism-related gene as one of its molecular mechanisms. PMID:21963504

  11. Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids improve the neurolipidome and restore the DHA status while promoting functional recovery after experimental spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Johnny D; Cordero, Kathia; Llán, Miguel S; De Leon, Marino

    2013-05-15

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) confer multiple health benefits and decrease the risk of neurological disorders. Studies are needed, however, to identify promising cellular targets and to assess their prophylactic value against neurodegeneration. The present study (1) examined the efficacy of a preventive diet enriched with ω-3 PUFAs to reduce dysfunction in a well-established spinal cord injury (SCI) animal model and (2) used a novel metabolomics data analysis to identify potential neurolipidomic targets. Rats were fed with either control chow or chow enriched with ω-3 PUFAs (750 mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks before being subjected to a sham or a contusion SCI operation. We report new evidence showing that rats subjected to SCI after being pre-treated with a diet enriched with ω-3 PUFAs exhibit significantly better functional outcomes. Pre-treated animals exhibited lower sensory deficits, autonomic bladder recovery, and early improvements in locomotion that persisted for at least 8 weeks after trauma. We found that SCI triggers a robust alteration in the cord PUFA neurolipidome, which was characterized by a marked docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) deficiency. This DHA deficiency was associated with dysfunction and corrected with the ω-3 PUFA-enriched diet. Multivariate data analyses revealed that the spinal cord of animals consuming the ω-3 PUFA-enriched diet had a fundamentally distinct neurolipidome, particularly increasing the levels of essential and long chain ω-3 fatty acids and lysolipids at the expense of ω-6 fatty acids and its metabolites. Altogether, dietary ω-3 PUFAs prophylaxis confers resiliency to SCI mediated, at least in part, by generating a neuroprotective and restorative neurolipidome. PMID:23294084

  12. Evaluation of oxidative stress via total antioxidant status, sialic acid, malondialdehyde and RT-PCR findings in sheep affected with bluetongue

    PubMed Central

    Aytekin, I.; Aksit, H.; Sait, A.; Kaya, F.; Aksit, D.; Gokmen, M.; Baca, A. Unsal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bluetongue (BT) is a non-contagious infectious disease of ruminants. The disease agent bluetongue virus (BTV) is classified in the Reoviridae family Orbivirus. Aims and objectives The aim of this study was to determine serum malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidative stres (TAS), total sialic acid (TSA), ceruloplasmin, triglyceride, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), cholesterol, creatinine, albumin, and total protein levels in sheep with and without bluetongue (BT). Materials and Methods The study included 13 Sakiz crossbreed sheep, aged 1–4 years and usually in the last stage of pregnancy, as the BT group and a control group consisting of 10 healthy sheep. All sheep were clinically examined before collecting blood samples. Serum ALT, AST, cholesterol, triglyceride, albumin, GGT, total protein, creatinine and TAS levels were measured using commercially available kits as per manufacturer's recommendations using a Biochemistry Auto Analyzer (Sinnowa D280, China). Serum lipid peroxidation was estimated through a previously described method in which MDA reacts with thiobarbituric acid (TBA) to form a coloured complex at a maximum absorbance of 535 nm. The TSA value was measured at 549 nm using the method described by Warren (1959): sialic acid was oxidised to formyl-pyruvic acid, which reacts with TBA to form a pink product. The ceruloplasmin concentration was measured according to Sunderman and Nomoto (1970): ceruloplasmin and p-phenylenediamine formed a coloured oxidation product that was proportional to the concentration of serum ceruloplasmin. Real time RT-PCR and conventional RT-PCR were performed as described by Shaw and others (2007). Results Biochemistry analysis of serum showed that in the BT group, TSA, MDA, triglyceride and ALT and AST were higher and that ceruloplasmin and TAS were lower than in the control group. Serum albumin, cholesterol, creatinine, total protein and GGT did

  13. Effects of linseed and quercetin added to the diet of fattening lambs on the fatty acid profile and lipid antioxidant status of meat samples.

    PubMed

    Andrés, S; Morán, L; Aldai, N; Tejido, M L; Prieto, N; Bodas, R; Giráldez, F J

    2014-06-01

    Thirty-two Merino lambs fed barley straw and a concentrate formulated either with palm oil (CTRL group) or with linseed (+LS group), both alone or supplemented with quercetin (+QCT group or +LS+QCT group) were used to assess the effects of these dietary supplements on meat quality attributes. After being slaughtered, the longissimus thoracis muscles were used to study the fatty acid (FA) profile in detail, whilst longissimus lumborum slices were stored under refrigerated conditions to determine the lipid stability. Linseed increased the content of highly unsaturated n-3 long-chain fatty acid (20:5n-3; 22:5n-3; 22:6n-3). Interestingly, a significant increment of rumenic acid content (9c,11t-18:2) was observed when this seed was administered together with dietary quercetin. Moreover, the feeding of quercetin resulted in a reduction in the proportion of saturated FA and a decrease in lipid peroxidation of meat when the lambs were fed linseed. In conclusion, from both a nutritional and a commercial (shelf-life) point of view, it may be useful to include a source of quercetin when lambs are fed linseed diets. PMID:24583323

  14. Oligo-carrageenan kappa-induced reducing redox status and activation of TRR/TRX system increase the level of indole-3-acetic acid, gibberellin A3 and trans-zeatin in Eucalyptus globulus trees.

    PubMed

    González, Alberto; Contreras, Rodrigo A; Zúiga, Gustavo; Moenne, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    Eucalyptus globulus trees treated with oligo-carrageenan (OC) kappa showed an increase in NADPH, ascorbate and glutathione levels and activation of the thioredoxin reductase (TRR)/thioredoxin (TRX) system which enhance photosynthesis, basal metabolism and growth. In order to analyze whether the reducing redox status and the activation of thioredoxin reductase (TRR)/thioredoxin (TRX) increased the level of growth-promoting hormones, trees were treated with water (control), with OC kappa, or with inhibitors of ascorbate synthesis, lycorine, glutathione synthesis, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), NADPH synthesis, CHS-828, and thioredoxin reductase activity, auranofine, and with OC kappa, and cultivated for four additional months. Eucalyptus trees treated with OC kappa showed an increase in the levels of the auxin indole 3-acetic acid (IAA), gibberellin A3 (GA3) and the cytokinin trans-zeatin (t-Z) as well as a decrease in the level of the brassinosteroid epi-brassinolide (EB). In addition, treatment with lycorine, BSO, CHS-828 and auranofine inhibited the increase in IAA, GA3 and t-Z as well as the decrease in EB levels. Thus, the reducing redox status and the activation of TRR/TRX system induced by OC kappa increased the levels of IAA, GA3 and t-Z levels determining, at least in part, the stimulation of growth in Eucalyptus trees. PMID:25140447

  15. The ratio of dietary (n-6) to (n-3) fatty acids influences immune system function, eicosanoid metabolism, lipid peroxidation and vitamin E status in aged dogs.

    PubMed

    Wander, R C; Hall, J A; Gradin, J L; Du, S H; Jewell, D E

    1997-06-01

    We studied the effects of feeding experimental diets containing (n-6) to (n-3) fatty acid ratios of 31:1, 5.4:1, and 1.4:1 to 20 healthy female geriatric Beagles (9.5-11.5 y) for 8-12 wk on various indices of the immune response. Compared with the 31:1 diet, consumption of the 5.4:1 and 1.4:1 diets significantly increased (n-3) fatty acids in plasma (2.17 +/- 0.64, 9.05 +/- 0.64, 17.46 +/- 0.64 g/100 g fatty acids, respectively, P < 0.0001). Although supplementation with (n-3) fatty acids did not significantly alter the humoral immune response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), it significantly suppressed the cell-mediated immune response based on results of a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test. The DTH response after intradermal injection of KLH at 24 h was significantly lower in the group consuming the 1.4:1 diet compared with the group consuming the 5.4:1 (P = 0.02) or the 31:1 diets (P = 0.04), and remained significantly suppressed at 48 h in the group fed 1.4:1 relative to the group fed 31:1. After consumption of the 1.4:1 diet, stimulated mononuclear cells produced 52% less prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) than those from dogs fed the 31:1 diet (224 +/- 74 and 451 +/- 71 pmol/L, respectively, P = 0.04). Plasma concentration of alpha-tocopherol was 20% lower in dogs fed the 1.4:1 diet compared with those fed the 31:1 diet (P = 0.04), and lipid peroxidation was greater in both plasma (P = 0.03) and urine (P = 0.002). These data suggest that although a ratio of dietary (n-6) to (n-3) fatty acids of 1.4:1 depresses the cell-mediated immune response and PGE2 production, it increases lipid peroxidation and lowers vitamin E concentration. PMID:9187636

  16. DOE's near-term electric vehicle battery program. Status of improved lead-acid, nickel/iron, and nickel/zinc battery developments

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, N.P.; Christianson, C.C.; Elliott, R.C.; Lee, T.S.; Miller, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    From the inception of the DOE/ANL Near-Term eV Battery Program in 1978, significant progress in lead-acid, nickel/iron and nickel/zinc battery technology has been made towards achieving the technical performance goals necessary for widespread use of these battery systems in electric vehicle applications. The energy density of lead-acid eV batteries has advanced from 25 to 30 Wh/kg to over 40 Wh/kg. The prospect for obtaining a lead-acid battery having both high energy density and long cycle life in a few years is very promising. Nickel/iron modules have demonstrated a specific energy of nearly 50 Wh/kg and a specific power of 100 W/kg, cycle lives of 300 have been achieved during early 1980 and testing continues, and the energy efficiency has been improved from less than 50% to over 65%. Nickel/zinc module test data have shown a specific energy of nearly 70 Wh/kg and a specific power of 130 W/kg. However, cycle life improvements are still needed. Cost reduction continues to receive major emphasis at developers of both nickel/zinc and nickel/iron batteries. Based on the continued demonstration of viable solutions to technical problems in the 1980 to 1983 time-frame, these near-term batteries will emerge as contenders for electric vehicle applications. The relative cost/performance/life tradeoff of these battery systems continues to receive emphasis in the DOE/ANL R and D Program. While it would be premature at the present time to select winning systems or specific technical approaches, it is the intent of the DOE/ANL program management to continue supporting the development of the most viable approaches in response to the 1986 commercialization goal.

  17. Evaluation of the effects of future controls on sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions on the acid-base status of a northern forest ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbondo-Tugbawa, Solomon S.; Driscoll, Charles T.

    The integrated biogeochemical model, PnET-BGC, was used to simulate the response of soil and surface water at the reference watershed (W6) at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, to changes in atmospheric deposition. The performance of the model was assessed using two objective statistical criteria, the normalized mean absolute error, and the efficiency, in order to compare simulated results with observed values between 1980 and 1998. Model results showed good agreement with measured concentrations of stream Ca 2+, and SO 42-, while stream NO 3- and Al concentrations and soil solution Ca/Al ratios were over predicted after 1990. Model simulations showed that there was some improvement in soil and stream chemistry in response to the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAAA) compared to conditions without this legislation. However, the 1990 CAAA will not result in substantial changes in critical indicators (e.g. soil base saturation, soil solution Ca/Al, stream pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and Al concentrations). The slow recovery rates suggest that additional reduction in strong acid inputs will be required to significantly alleviate ecosystem stress from acidic deposition. Simulation of the impact of equivalent reductions in SO 42- and NO 3- deposition indicated slightly greater recovery under the SO 42- reductions compared with NO 3-. An inter-annual pattern of stream NO 3- concentrations suggests that nitrification under snowpack is a significant source of N in the ecosystem. Vegetation N uptake during summer greatly limits NO 3- loss, and as a result, summer utility controls of NO x emissions will not significantly mitigate stream NO 3- loss and associated surface water acidification.

  18. Relevance of the carnosic acid/carnosol ratio for the level of rosemary diterpene transfer and for improving lamb meat antioxidant status.

    PubMed

    Jordán, María J; Castillo, Julián; Bañón, Sancho; Martínez-Conesa, Cristina; Sotomayor, José A

    2014-05-15

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate whether the relation between the concentrations of the two major diterpenes present in two typified rosemary extracts affects their levels of deposition and antioxidant capacity in different lamb tissues. The composition of the extracts expressed as percentage of weight/weight was 1:1 (14-16)% and 2:1 (25-11)% (carnosic acid-carnosol), respectively. Thirty weaned lambs were assigned randomly to three homogeneous groups. One group was fed a basal diet as a control and the diets of the other two were enriched with rosemary extracts 1:1 and 2:1, respectively. HPLC-ESI-MS/TOF identified a metabolite (C19H22O3) described for the first time in lamb tissues, along with carnosol, carnosic acid, rosmanol and carnosol-p-quinone. The results obtained corroborate the importance of the presence of carnosol in the dietary administration of rosemary extract as a way of improving the stability of the diterpene fraction during feed manufacturing and the level of deposition and antioxidant efficacy of diterpenes after ruminal fermentation. PMID:24423523

  19. The effects of dietary verbascoside on blood and liver oxidative stress status induced by a high n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids diet in piglets.

    PubMed

    Di Giancamillo, A; Rossi, R; Pastorelli, G; Deponti, D; Carollo, V; Casamassima, D; Domeneghini, C; Corino, C

    2015-06-01

    Twenty-four weaned female Hypor piglets (10.9 ± 0.1 kg mean BW) were used to evaluate the antioxidant effect of a natural extract, titrated in verbascoside, on blood and liver oxidative status in relation to a high intake of n-6 PUFA, inducing oxidative stress. Piglets were assigned to 1 of 3 experimental groups; the first group was fed a diet with 9% sunflower oil (T1) and the second received the sunflower oil diet supplemented with 5 mg of verbascoside/kg feed from Verbenaceae extract (Lippia spp.; T2). The third group was fed a control diet (CTR), in which an isoenergetic replacement of oil by starch was done. Blood samples were collected at the beginning and the end of the trial (30 d). At the end of the trial, the animals were slaughtered and the liver specimens were collected. Oxidative stress markers, including total antiradical activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and catalase (CAT) activities, were determined in blood samples. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) plasma levels were also evaluated. Immunohistochemistry and western blot analyses were performed in liver to evaluate heat shock protein (Hsp) 70, Hsp90, and Kupffer and Ito cell activation. Liver activities of SOD, GPX, and CAT were also determined. Total antiradical activity in blood and red blood cells were affected (P < 0.01) by dietary treatments. The n-6 PUFA supplementation at a high dosage for 30 d induced oxidative stress, decreasing total antiradical activity in blood and red blood cells (CTR vs. T1 + T2; P < 0.01) and plasma CAT activity (CTR vs. T1 + T2; P = 0.088) and increasing ALT value (CTR vs. T1 + T2; P < 0.01). Also, in liver, the CAT and GPX activities tended to be lower in pigs fed n-6 PUFA diets than pigs fed a control diet (CTR vs. T1 + T2; = 0.090 and = 0.085, respectively). The liver samples presented a normal architecture and no Ito and Kupffer cell activations were observed. In

  20. An LC-MS/MS method for serum methylmalonic acid suitable for monitoring vitamin B12 status in population surveys1

    PubMed Central

    Mineva, Ekaterina M.; Zhang, Mindy; Rabinowitz, Daniel J.; Phinney, Karen W.; Pfeiffer, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Methylmalonic acid (MMA), a functional indicator of vitamin B12 insufficiency, was measured in the U.S. population in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 1999–2004 using a GC/MS procedure that required 275 µL of sample and had a low throughput (36 samples/run). Our objective was to introduce a more efficient, yet highly accurate LC-MS/MS method for NHANES 2011–2014. We adapted the sample preparation with some modifications from a published isotope-dilution LC-MS/MS procedure. The procedure utilized liquid-liquid extraction and generation of MMA di-butyl ester. Reversed-phase chromatography with isocratic elution allowed baseline resolution of MMA from its naturally occurring structural isomer succinic acid within 4.5 min. Our new method afforded an increased throughput (≤160 samples/run) and measured serum MMA with high sensitivity (LOD = 22.1 nmol/L) in only 75 µL of sample. Mean (±SD) recovery of MMA spiked into serum (2 days, 4 levels, 2 replicates each) was 94±5.5%. Total imprecision (41 days, 2 replicates each) for three serum quality control pools was 4.9–7.9% (97.1–548 nmol/L). The LC-MS/MS method showed excellent correlation (n=326, r=0.99) and no bias (Deming regression, Bland-Altman analysis) compared to the previous GC/MS method. Both methods produced virtually identical mean (±SD) MMA concentrations [LC-MS/MS: 18.47±0.71 ng/mL (n=17), GC/MS: 18.18±0.67 ng/mL (n=11)] on a future plasma reference material compared to a GC/MS method procedure from the National Institute of Standards and Technology [18.41±0.70 ng/mL (n=15)]. No adjustment will be necessary to compare previous (1999–2004) to future (2011–2014) NHANES MMA data. PMID:25258283

  1. Maslinic Acid, a Triterpene from Olive, Affects the Antioxidant and Mitochondrial Status of B16F10 Melanoma Cells Grown under Stressful Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari, Khalida; Rufino-Palomares, Eva E.; Pérez-Jiménez, Amalia; Reyes-Zurita, Fernando J.; Figuera, Celeny; García-Salguero, Leticia; Medina, Pedro P.; Peragón, Juan; Lupiáñez, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Maslinic acid (MA) is a natural compound whose structure corresponds to a pentacyclic triterpene. It is abundant in the cuticular lipid layer of olives. MA has many biological and therapeutic properties related to health, including antitumor, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiparasitic, antihypertensive, and antioxidant activities. However, no studies have been performed to understand the molecular mechanism induced by this compound in melanoma cancer. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of MA in melanoma (B16F10) cells grown in the presence or absence of fetal bovine serum (FBS). We performed cell proliferation measurements, and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurements using dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR 123) and activities of catalase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glutathione S-transferase, and superoxide dismutase. These changes were corroborated by expression assays. FBS absence reduced cell viability decreasing IC50 values of MA. The DHR 123 data showed an increase in the ROS level in the absence of FBS. Furthermore, MA had an antioxidant effect at lower assayed levels measured as DHR and antioxidant defense. However, at higher dosages MA induced cellular damage by apoptosis as seen in the results obtained. PMID:26236377

  2. Maslinic Acid, a Triterpene from Olive, Affects the Antioxidant and Mitochondrial Status of B16F10 Melanoma Cells Grown under Stressful Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Khalida; Rufino-Palomares, Eva E; Pérez-Jiménez, Amalia; Reyes-Zurita, Fernando J; Figuera, Celeny; García-Salguero, Leticia; Medina, Pedro P; Peragón, Juan; Lupiáñez, José A

    2015-01-01

    Maslinic acid (MA) is a natural compound whose structure corresponds to a pentacyclic triterpene. It is abundant in the cuticular lipid layer of olives. MA has many biological and therapeutic properties related to health, including antitumor, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiparasitic, antihypertensive, and antioxidant activities. However, no studies have been performed to understand the molecular mechanism induced by this compound in melanoma cancer. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of MA in melanoma (B16F10) cells grown in the presence or absence of fetal bovine serum (FBS). We performed cell proliferation measurements, and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurements using dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR 123) and activities of catalase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glutathione S-transferase, and superoxide dismutase. These changes were corroborated by expression assays. FBS absence reduced cell viability decreasing IC50 values of MA. The DHR 123 data showed an increase in the ROS level in the absence of FBS. Furthermore, MA had an antioxidant effect at lower assayed levels measured as DHR and antioxidant defense. However, at higher dosages MA induced cellular damage by apoptosis as seen in the results obtained. PMID:26236377

  3. The modulatory influence of p-methoxycinnamic acid, an active rice bran phenolic acid, against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced lipid peroxidation, antioxidant status and aberrant crypt foci in rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sivagami, Gunasekaran; Karthikkumar, Venkatachalam; Balasubramanian, Thangavel; Nalini, Namashivayam

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the chemopreventive effect of p-methoxycinnamic acid (p-MCA), an active phenolic acid of rice bran, turmeric, and Kaemperfia galanga against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. Male albino Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups. Group 1 consisted of control rats that received a modified pellet diet and 0.1% carboxymethyl cellulose. The rats in Group 2 received a modified pellet diet supplemented with p-MCA [80 mg/kg body weight (b.wt.) post-orally (p.o.)] everyday. The rats in Groups 3-6 received 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) (20 mg/kg b.wt.) via subcutaneous injections once a week for the first 4 weeks; additionally, the rats in Groups 4, 5 and 6 received p-MCA at doses of 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg b.wt./day p.o., respectively, everyday for 16 weeks. The rats were sacrificed at the end of the experimental period of 16 weeks. The DMH-treated rats exhibited an increased incidence of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) development; an increased crypt multiplicity; decreased concentrations of tissue lipid peroxidation markers such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), conjugated dienes (CD) and lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH); decreased levels of tissue enzymic antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR); and decreased levels of non-enzymic antioxidants such as reduced glutathione (GSH) and vitamins C, E and A in the colon. Supplementation with p-MCA significantly reversed these changes and significantly inhibited the formation of ACF and its multiplicity. Thus, our findings demonstrate that p-MCA exerts a strong chemopreventive activity against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinogenesis by virtue of its ability to prevent the alterations in DMH-induced circulatory and tissue oxidative stress and preneoplastic changes. p-MCA was more effective when administered at a dose of 40 mg/kg b.wt. than at the other two doses tested. PMID:22326950

  4. Micronutrient status in phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Robert, M; Rocha, J C; van Rijn, M; Ahring, K; Bélanger-Quintana, A; MacDonald, A; Dokoupil, K; Gokmen Ozel, H; Lammardo, A M; Goyens, P; Feillet, F

    2013-01-01

    Patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) encompass an 'at risk' group for micronutrient imbalances. Optimal nutrient status is challenging particularly when a substantial proportion of nutrient intake is from non-natural sources. In PKU patients following dietary treatment, supplementation with micronutrients is a necessity and vitamins and minerals should either be added to supplement phenylalanine-free l-amino acids or given separately. In this literature review of papers published since 1990, the prevalence of vitamin and mineral deficiency is described, with reference to age of treatment commencement, type of treatment, dietary compliance, and dietary practices. Biological micronutrient inadequacies have been mainly reported for zinc, selenium, iron, vitamin B12 and folate. The aetiology of these results and possible clinical and biological implications are discussed. In PKU there is not a simple relationship between the dietary intake and nutritional status, and there are many independent and interrelated complex factors that should be considered other than quantitative nutritional intake. PMID:24113686

  5. Compliance status

    SciTech Connect

    Black, D.G.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the activities conducted to ensure that the Hanford Site is in compliance with federal environmental protection statutes and related Washington State and local environmental protection regulations and the status of Hanford`s compliance with these requirements. Environmental permits required under the environmental protection regulations are discussed under the applicable statute.

  6. GMI Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimchansky, Sergey; Newell, David

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation is concerned with the status of the Global Precipitation Measurement-Microwave Imager (GMI). Included in the presentation is an overview that shows a diagram of the craft, the improvements over other precipitation measurement satellites, and information about the calibration approach.

  7. Effect of In Vitro Maturation Technique and Alpha Lipoic Acid Supplementation on Oocyte Maturation Rate: Focus on Oxidative Status of Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zavareh, Saeed; Karimi, Isaac; Salehnia, Mojdeh; Rahnama, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic potential of in vitro maturation (IVM) in infertility is growing with great promise. Although significant progress is obtained in recent years, existing IVM protocols are far from favorable results. The first aim of this study was to investigate whether two step IVM manner change reactive oxygen species (ROS) and total anti- oxidant capacity (TAC) levels. The second aim was to find the effect of alpha lipoic acid (ALA) supplementation on oocyte maturation rate and on ROS/TAC levels during IVM. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, mouse germinal vesicle (GV) oocytes divided into cumulus denuded oocytes (DOs) and cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) groups. GVs were matured in vitro in the presence or absence of ALA only for 18 hours (control) or with pre-culture of forskolin plus cilostamide for an additional 18 hours. Matured oocytes obtained following 18 and 36 hours based on experimental design. In parallel, the ROS and TAC levels were measured at different time (0, 18 and 36 hours) by 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCFH) probe and ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) assay, respectively. Results Maturation rate of COCs was significantly higher than DOs in control group (P<0.05), while there was no significant difference between COCs and DOs when were pre-cultured with forskolin plus cilostamide. ROS and TAC levels was increased and decreased respectively in DOs after 18 hours while in COCs did not change at 18 hours and showed a significant increase and decrease respectively at 36 hours (P<0.05). ROS and TAC levels in the presence of ALA were significantly decreased and increased respectively after 36 hours (P<0.05) whereas, maturation rates of COCs and DOs were similar to their corresponding control groups. Conclusion ALA decreased ROS and increased TAC but could not affect maturation rate of both COCs and DOs in one or two step IVM manner. PMID:26985332

  8. Associations of serum perfluoroalkyl acid levels with T-helper cell-specific cytokines in children: By gender and asthma status.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Qin, Xiao-Di; Zeng, Xiao-Wen; Paul, Gunther; Morawska, Lidia; Su, Ming-Wei; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Wang, Si-Quan; Lee, Yungling Leo; Dong, Guang-Hui

    2016-07-15

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a group of common chemicals that ubiquitously exist in wildlife and humans. Experimental data suggest that they may alter T-lymphocyte functioning in situ by preferentially enhancing the development of T-helper 2 (TH2)- and inhibiting TH1-lymphocyte development and might increase allergic inflammation, but few human studies have been conducted. To evaluate the association between serum PFAAs concentrations and T-lymphocyte-related immunological markers of asthma in children, and further to assess whether gender modified this association, 231 asthmatic children and 225 non-asthmatic control children from Northern Taiwan were recruited into the Genetic and Biomarker study for Childhood Asthma. Serum concentrations of ten PFAAs and levels of TH1 [interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2] and TH2 (IL-4 and IL-5) cytokines were measured. The results showed that asthmatics had significantly higher serum PFAAs concentrations compared with the healthy controls. When stratified by gender, a greater number of significant associations between PFAAs and asthma outcomes were found in males than in females. Among males, adjusted odds ratios for asthma among those with the highest versus lowest quartile of PFAAs exposure ranged from 2.59 (95% CI: 1.14, 5.87) for the perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS) to 4.38 (95% CI: 2.02, 9.50) for perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS); and serum PFAAs were associated positively with TH2 cytokines and inversely with TH1 cytokines among male asthmatics. Among females, no significant associations between PFAAs and TH2 cytokines could be detected. In conclusion, increased serum PFAAs levels may promote TH cell dysregulation and alter the availability of key TH1 and TH2 cytokines, ultimately contributing to the development of asthma that may differentially impact males to a greater degree than females. These results have potential relevance in asthma prevention. PMID:27060656

  9. AV3V lesions attenuate the cardiovascular responses produced by blood-borne excitatory amino acid analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, E. J.; Beltz, T. G.; Lewis, S. J.; Johnson, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Systemic injections of the excitatory amino acid (EAA) analogs, kainic acid (KA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), produce a pressor response in conscious rats that is caused by a centrally mediated activation of sympathetic drive and the release of arginine vasopressin (AVP). This study tested the hypothesis that the tissue surrounding the anteroventral part of the third ventricle (AV3V) plays a role in the expression of the pressor responses produced by systemically injected EAA analogs. Specifically, we examined whether prior electrolytic ablation of the AV3V region would affect the pressor responses to KA and NMDA (1 mg/kg iv) in conscious rats. The KA-induced pressor response was smaller in AV3V-lesioned than in sham-lesioned rats (11 +/- 2 vs. 29 +/- 2 mmHg; P < 0.05). After ganglion blockade, KA produced a pressor response in sham-lesioned but not AV3V-lesioned rats (+27 +/- 3 vs. +1 +/- 2 mmHg; P < 0.05). The KA-induced pressor response in ganglion-blocked sham-lesioned rats was abolished by a vasopressin V1-receptor antagonist. Similar results were obtained with NMDA. The pressor response to AVP (10 ng/kg iv) was slightly smaller in AV3V-lesioned than in sham-lesioned ganglion-blocked rats (45 +/- 3 vs. 57 +/- 4 mmHg; P < 0.05). This study demonstrates that the pressor responses to systemically injected EAA analogs are smaller in AV3V-lesioned rats. The EAA analogs may produce pressor responses by stimulation of EAA receptors in the AV3V region, or the AV3V region may play an important role in the expression of these responses.

  10. Updated status of conductance/capacity correlation studies to determine the state-of-health of automotive and stand-by lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feder, D. O.; Hlavac, M. J.; McShane, S. J.

    1994-02-01

    For the past seven years, Midtronics has developed and manufactured battery conductance testers for determining the condition of automotive batteries. This paper presents a further refinement of the technology. Studies by automobile manufacturers, automotive battery manufacturers, as well as testing by Midtronics and an independent test laboratory have established the utility of conductance technology in evaluating the condition of automotive batteries, even at very low states-of-charge. The use of conductance to determine the state-of-health of stand-by batteries has attracted increasing worldwide interest among both battery manufacturers and users. Attention has focused first on the area of valve-regulated lead/acid batteries (VRBs) for which there are no reliable diagnostics other than a cumbersome discharge test. Several recent studies have demonstrated the validity of conductance testing as an accurate predictor of battery capacity in railroad, electric power utility, stand-by power and telecommunications applications. Other benefits includes: (1) for the first time, tests have resulted in the accumulation and publication of large quantities of actual capacity data for individual valve-regulated cells and batteries that will serve as a standard against which conductance results can be compared; (2) results of these capacity tests have shown both unusually wide-spread capacity variation and significant numbers of premature capacity failures in valve-regulated cells over a wide range of applications in telecommunications, UPS, photovoltaic and railroad signaling systems; these failures have appeared to occur without regard to specific manufacturers, design, application or use environment; (3) in addition, both users and manufacturers have generally become more knowledgeable of performance characteristics, ageing mechanisms and failure modes of valve-regulated cells, so that it is now clearly recognized that the number of serious failure modes significantly

  11. Associations of prepartum plasma cortisol, haptoglobin, fecal cortisol metabolites, and nonesterified fatty acids with postpartum health status in Holstein dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Huzzey, J M; Nydam, D V; Grant, R J; Overton, T R

    2011-12-01

    The association between negative energy balance and health has led to the testing of blood analytes such as nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) to identify opportunities for improving the management of transition dairy cows. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether prepartum analytes associated with stress (cortisol) or inflammation (haptoglobin) could also identify dairy cattle at increased risk for health complications after calving. Prepartum blood and fecal samples were collected once weekly from 412 Holstein dairy cows on 2 commercial dairy farms (at wk -3, -2, and -1 relative to calving) and analyzed for concentrations of NEFA, haptoglobin (Hp), and cortisol in plasma and cortisol metabolites in feces. Retained placenta (RP), displaced abomasum (DA), subclinical ketosis (SCK), high Hp concentration (HiHp), and death were recorded up to 30 d in milk (DIM), and animals were subsequently categorized into 3 health categories: (1) no disorder of interest (NDI); (2) one disorder (RP, DA, SCK, or HiHp); or (3) more than one disorder (RP, DA, SCK, HiHp) or death. With the exception of prepartum NEFA, no associations were detected between prepartum concentrations of our analytes of interest and the occurrence of one disorder (RP, DA, SCK, or HiHP) by 30 DIM. Haptoglobin concentration tended to be greater during wk -2 and -1 in cows that developed more than one disorder or that died by 30 DIM; however, when calving assistance was included as a covariate in the analysis prepartum, Hp was no longer a significant risk factor for this postpartum health outcome. Primiparous cows with plasma cortisol concentrations >22.2 nmol/L during wk -2 had reduced odds [odds ratio (OR) 0.41; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.17-0.98] of developing more than one disorder or death by 30 DIM, whereas multiparous cows with plasma cortisol >34.1 nmol/L during wk -2 tended to have greater odds (OR 2.53; 95% CI 0.87-7.37) of developing more than one disorder or death by 30 DIM. Individual

  12. Autistic-Like Behaviors, Oxidative Stress Status, and Histopathological Changes in Cerebellum of Valproic Acid Rat Model of Autism Are Improved by the Combined Extract of Purple Rice and Silkworm Pupae.

    PubMed

    Morakotsriwan, Nartnutda; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Kirisattayakul, Woranan; Chaisiwamongkol, Kowit

    2016-01-01

    Due to the crucial role of oxidative stress on the pathophysiology of autism and the concept of synergistic effect, the benefit of the combined extract of purple rice and silkworm pupae (AP1) for autism disorder was the focus. Therefore, we aimed to determine the effect of AP1 on autistic-like behaviors, oxidative stress status, and histopathological change of cerebellum in valproic acid (VPA) rat model of autism. VPA was injected on postnatal day (PND) 14 and the animals were orally given AP1 at doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg·kg(-1) BW between PND 14 and PND 40. The autism-like behaviors were analyzed via hot-plate, rotarod, elevated plus-maze, learning, memory, and social behavior tests. Oxidative stress and the histological change in the cerebellum were assessed at the end of study. AP1 treated rats improved behaviors in all tests except that in hot-plate test. The improvement of oxidative stress and Purkinje cell loss was also observed in the cerebellum of VPA-treated rats. Our data suggest that AP1 partially reduced autism-like behaviors by improving oxidative stress and Purkinje cell loss. Further research is required to identify the active ingredients in AP1 and gender difference effect. PMID:27034733

  13. Autistic-Like Behaviors, Oxidative Stress Status, and Histopathological Changes in Cerebellum of Valproic Acid Rat Model of Autism Are Improved by the Combined Extract of Purple Rice and Silkworm Pupae

    PubMed Central

    Chaisiwamongkol, Kowit

    2016-01-01

    Due to the crucial role of oxidative stress on the pathophysiology of autism and the concept of synergistic effect, the benefit of the combined extract of purple rice and silkworm pupae (AP1) for autism disorder was the focus. Therefore, we aimed to determine the effect of AP1 on autistic-like behaviors, oxidative stress status, and histopathological change of cerebellum in valproic acid (VPA) rat model of autism. VPA was injected on postnatal day (PND) 14 and the animals were orally given AP1 at doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg·kg−1 BW between PND 14 and PND 40. The autism-like behaviors were analyzed via hot-plate, rotarod, elevated plus-maze, learning, memory, and social behavior tests. Oxidative stress and the histological change in the cerebellum were assessed at the end of study. AP1 treated rats improved behaviors in all tests except that in hot-plate test. The improvement of oxidative stress and Purkinje cell loss was also observed in the cerebellum of VPA-treated rats. Our data suggest that AP1 partially reduced autism-like behaviors by improving oxidative stress and Purkinje cell loss. Further research is required to identify the active ingredients in AP1 and gender difference effect. PMID:27034733

  14. Treatment of Established Status Epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Falco-Walter, Jessica J; Bleck, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Status epilepticus is the most severe form of epilepsy, with a high mortality rate and high health care costs. Status epilepticus is divided into four stages: early, established, refractory, and super-refractory. While initial treatment with benzodiazepines has become standard of care for early status epilepticus, treatment after benzodiazepine failure (established status epilepticus (ESE)) is incompletely studied. Effective treatment of ESE is critical as morbidity and mortality increases dramatically the longer convulsive status epilepticus persists. Phenytoin/fosphenytoin, valproic acid, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, and lacosamide are the most frequently prescribed antiseizure medications for treatment of ESE. To date there are no class 1 data to support pharmacologic recommendations of one agent over another. We review each of these medications, their pharmacology, the scientific evidence in support and against each in the available literature, adverse effects and safety profiles, dosing recommendations, and limitations of the available evidence. We also discuss future directions including the established status epilepticus treatment trial (ESETT). Substantial further research is urgently needed to identify these patients (particularly those with non-convulsive status epilepticus), elucidate the most efficacious antiseizure treatment with head-to-head randomized prospective trials, and determine whether this differs for convulsive vs. non-convulsive ESE. PMID:27120626

  15. Treatment of Established Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Falco-Walter, Jessica J.; Bleck, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Status epilepticus is the most severe form of epilepsy, with a high mortality rate and high health care costs. Status epilepticus is divided into four stages: early, established, refractory, and super-refractory. While initial treatment with benzodiazepines has become standard of care for early status epilepticus, treatment after benzodiazepine failure (established status epilepticus (ESE)) is incompletely studied. Effective treatment of ESE is critical as morbidity and mortality increases dramatically the longer convulsive status epilepticus persists. Phenytoin/fosphenytoin, valproic acid, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, and lacosamide are the most frequently prescribed antiseizure medications for treatment of ESE. To date there are no class 1 data to support pharmacologic recommendations of one agent over another. We review each of these medications, their pharmacology, the scientific evidence in support and against each in the available literature, adverse effects and safety profiles, dosing recommendations, and limitations of the available evidence. We also discuss future directions including the established status epilepticus treatment trial (ESETT). Substantial further research is urgently needed to identify these patients (particularly those with non-convulsive status epilepticus), elucidate the most efficacious antiseizure treatment with head-to-head randomized prospective trials, and determine whether this differs for convulsive vs. non-convulsive ESE. PMID:27120626

  16. RHIC Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peggs, Steve

    1997-05-01

    The design and construction status of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is discussed. Those novel performance features of a heavy ion collider that are distinct from hadron colliders in general are noted. These features are derived from the experimental requirements of operation with a variety of ion species over a wide energy range, including collisions between protons and ions, and between ions of unequal energies. The project is in the fifth year of a seven year construction cycle. A brief review of the recent Sextant Test is given, together with progress to date on machine construction.

  17. Tevatron status

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, G.

    1989-03-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron is both the world's highest energy accelerator system and first large-scale superconducting synchrotron. Since Tevatron commissioning in July 1983, the accelerator has operated in 1984, 1985 and 1987 with extracted beams of 800 GeV for three runs of fixed target physics, and in 1987, and 1988, with proton-antiproton colliding beams at 900 /times/ 900 GeV. This paper will focus on the collider operation of the Tevatron: its present status and the outlook for its longer-term future evolution. 18 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Inhibitory effects of imidazoline receptor ligands on basal and kainic acid-induced neurotoxic signalling in mice.

    PubMed

    Keller, Benjamin; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2016-09-01

    This in vivo study assessed the potential of the imidazoline receptor (IR) ligands moxonidine (selective I1-IR), BU224 (selective I2-IR) and LSL61122 (mixed I1/I2-IR) to dampen excitotoxic signalling induced by kainic acid (KA; 45 mg/kg) in the mouse brain (hippocampus and cerebral cortex). KA triggered a strong behavioural syndrome (seizures; maximal at 60-90 minutes) and sustained stimulation (at 72 hours with otherwise normal mouse behaviour) of pro-apoptotic c-Jun-N-terminal kinases (JNK) and calpain with increased cleavage of p35 into neurotoxic p25 (cyclin-dependent kinase 5 [Cdk5] activators) in mouse hippocampus. Pretreatment (five days) with LSL61122 (10 mg/kg), but not moxonidine (1 mg/kg) or BU224 (20 mg/kg), attenuated the KA-induced behavioural syndrome, and all three IR ligands inhibited JNK and calpain activation, as well as p35/p25 cleavage after KA in the hippocampus (effects also observed after acute IR drug treatments). Efaroxan (I1-IR, 10 mg/kg) and idazoxan (I2-IR, 10 mg/kg), postulated IR antagonists, did not antagonise the effects of moxonidine and LSL61122 on KA targets (these IR ligands showed agonistic properties inhibiting pro-apoptotic JNK). Brain subcellular preparations revealed reduced synaptosomal postsynaptic density-95 protein contents (a mediator of JNK activation) and indicated increased p35/Cdk5 complexes (with pro-survival functions) after treatment with moxonidine, BU224 and LSL61122. These results showed that I1- and I2-IR ligands (moxonidine and BU224), and especially the mixed I1/I2-IR ligand LSL61122, are partly neuroprotective against KA-induced excitotoxic signalling. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential of IR drugs in disorders associated with glutamate-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:27302941

  19. RHIC status

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S.

    1997-08-01

    The design and construction status of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, which is in the seventh year of a nine year construction cycle, is discussed. Those novel performance features of a heavy ion collider that are distinct from hadron colliders in general are noted. These features are derived from the experimental requirements of operation with a variety of ion species over a wide energy range, including collisions between protons and ions, and between ions of unequal energies. Section 1 gives a brief introduction to the major parameters and overall layout of RHIC. A review of the superconducting magnet program is given in Section 2. Activities during the recent Sextant Test are briefly reviewed in Section 3. Finally, Section 4 presents the plans for RHIC commissioning in 1999.

  20. 21 CFR 862.1450 - Lactic acid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....1450 Lactic acid test system. (a) Identification. A lactic acid test system is a device intended to measure lactic acid in whole blood and plasma. Lactic acid measurements that evaluate the acid-base status... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lactic acid test system. 862.1450 Section...

  1. Neuroprotective effects of lactation against kainic acid treatment in the dorsal hippocampus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Vanoye-Carlo, América; Morales, Teresa; Ramos, Eugenia; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Adriana; Cerbón, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Marked hippocampal changes in response to excitatory amino acid agonists occur during pregnancy (e.g. decreased frequency in spontaneous recurrent seizures in rats with KA lesions of the hippocampus) and lactation (e.g. reduced c-Fos expression in response to N-methyl-d,l-aspartic acid but not to kainic acid). In this study, the possibility that lactation protects against the excitotoxic damage induced by KA in hippocampal areas was explored. We compared cell damage induced 24 h after a single systemic administration of KA (5 or 7.5 mg/kg bw) in regions CA1, CA3, and CA4 of the dorsal hippocampus of rats in the final week of lactation to that in diestrus phase. To determine cellular damage in a rostro-caudal segment of the dorsal hippocampus, we used NISSL and Fluorojade staining, immunohistochemistry for active caspase-3 and TUNEL, and we observed that the KA treatment provoked a significant loss of neurons in diestrus rats, principally in the pyramidal cells of CA1 region. In contrast, in lactating rats, pyramidal neurons from CA1, CA3, and CA4 in the dorsal hippocampus were significantly protected against KA-induced neuronal damage, indicating that lactation may be a natural model of neuroprotection. PMID:17963758

  2. Effects of brain IKKβ gene silencing by small interfering RNA on P-glycoprotein expression and brain damage in the rat kainic acid-induced seizure model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nian; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Yan-Fang; Su, Ling-Ying; Liu, Xin-Hong; Li, Le-Chao; Hao, Jin-Bo; Huang, Xian-Jing; Di, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by over-expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in brain is an important mechanism accounting for the drug-therapy failure in epilepsy. Over-expression of P-gp in epilepsy rat brain may be regulated by inflammation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Inhibitory κ B kinase subunit β (IKKβ) is an up-stream molecular controlling NF-κB activation. With the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique and kainic acid (KA)-induced rat epileptic seizure model, the present study was aimed to further evaluate the role of NF-κB inhibition, via blocking IKKβ gene transcription, in the epileptic brain P-gp over-expression, seizure susceptibility, and post-seizure brain damage. siRNA targeting IKKβ was administered to rats via intracerebroventricular injection before seizure induction by KA microinjection; scrambled siRNA was used as control. Brain mRNA and protein levels of IKKβ and P-gp were detected by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. NF-κB activity was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Latency to grade III or V seizure onset was recorded, brain damage was evaluated by neuronal cell counting and epileptiform activity was monitored by electroencephalography. IKKβ siRNA pre-treatment inhibited NF-κB activation and abolished P-gp over-expression in KA-induced epileptic rat brain, accompanied by decreased seizure susceptibility. These findings suggested that epileptogenic-induced P-gp over-expression could be regulated by IKKβ through the NF-κB pathway. PMID:24040792

  3. Serum Uric Acid in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Bassam E.; Hamed, Jamal M.; Touhala, Luma M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To demonstrate the possible effect of smoking on serum uric acid. Methods Subjects enrolled in study were divided into two groups; nonsmokers and smokers, each with 60 male volunteers of the same social class and dietary habit without history of alcohol consumption, diabetes mellitus, hyperuricemia and gout, renal, joint, lung or heart diseases. Fasting blood and random urine samples were obtained from both groups for measurement of uric acid and creatinine. Calculation of both urine uric acid/urine creatinine ratio and fraction excretion of uric acid were done. The results were statistically evaluated by standard statistical methods. Results No significant differences in the age, serum creatinine, spot urine uric acid/urine creatinine ratio and fraction excretion of uric acid between the two groups, serum uric acid was significantly lower in smokers. In smokers there was significant negative correlation of smoking status (average number of cigarette smoked/day, duration of smoking and cumulative amount of smoking) with serum uric acid. Conclusion After exclusion of other factors affecting uric acid level, the significant low serum uric acid level in smokers was attributed to reduce endogenous production as a result of chronic exposure to cigarette smoke that is a significant source of oxidative stress. As this reduction is proportionate with smoking status and predisposes to cardiovascular disease, it is, therefore, recommended for smokers to stop or reduce smoking and introduce serum uric acid estimation as routine test since its cheap and simple to reflect their antioxidant level. Keywords Smokers; Uric acid; CVD. PMID:22334840

  4. Biomarkers of Selenium Status

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Gerald F.

    2015-01-01

    The essential trace element, selenium (Se), has multiple biological activities, which depend on the level of Se intake. Relatively low Se intakes determine the expression of selenoenzymes in which it serves as an essential constituent. Higher intakes have been shown to have anti-tumorigenic potential; and very high Se intakes can produce adverse effects. This hierarchy of biological activities calls for biomarkers informative at different levels of Se exposure. Some Se-biomarkers, such as the selenoproteins and particularly GPX3 and SEPP1, provide information about function directly and are of value in identifying nutritional Se deficiency and tracking responses of deficient individuals to Se-treatment. They are useful under conditions of Se intake within the range of regulated selenoprotein expression, e.g., for humans <55 μg/day and for animals <20 μg/kg diet. Other Se-biomarkers provide information indirectly through inferences based on Se levels of foods, tissues, urine or feces. They can indicate the likelihood of deficiency or adverse effects, but they do not provide direct evidence of either condition. Their value is in providing information about Se status over a wide range of Se intake, particularly from food forms. There is need for additional Se biomarkers particularly for assessing Se status in non-deficient individuals for whom the prospects of cancer risk reduction and adverse effects risk are the primary health considerations. This would include determining whether supranutritional intakes of Se may be required for maximal selenoprotein expression in immune surveillance cells. It would also include developing methods to determine low molecular weight Se-metabolites, i.e., selenoamino acids and methylated Se-metabolites, which to date have not been detectable in biological specimens. Recent analytical advances using tandem liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry suggest prospects for detecting these metabolites. PMID:25835046

  5. Neuroprotective effects of trans-caryophyllene against kainic acid induced seizure activity and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Song, Zhi; Liao, Daguang; Zhang, Tianyi; Liu, Feng; Zhuang, Kai; Luo, Kui; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Trans-caryophyllene (TC), a component of essential oil found in many flowering plants, has shown its neuroprotective effects in various neurological disorders. However, the effects of TC on epilepsy haven't been reported before. In this study, we investigated the effect of TC on kainic acid-induced seizure activity caused by oxidative stress and pro-inflammation. We found that TC pretreatment significantly decreased seizure activity score compared to kainic acid treated group. Importantly, TC pretreatment leads to lowering the mortality in kainic acid treated mice. In addition, TC was found to significantly inhibit KA-induced generation of malondialdehyde. TC pretreatment also preserved the activity of GPx, SOD, and CAT. Notably, our data shows that an important property of TC is its capacity to exert cerebral anti-inflammatory effects by mitigating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β. These data suggest that TC has a potential protective effect on chemical induced seizure and brain damage. PMID:25417010

  6. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . Amino acids and proteins are the building blocks of life. When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids are left. The human body uses amino acids ...

  7. Prophylactic treatment with melatonin after status epilepticus: effects on epileptogenesis, neuronal damage, and behavioral changes in a kainate model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tchekalarova, Jana; Petkova, Zlatina; Pechlivanova, Daniela; Moyanova, Slavianka; Kortenska, Lidia; Mitreva, Rumiana; Lozanov, Valentin; Atanasova, Dimitrina; Lazarov, Nikolai; Stoynev, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Melatonin is a potent antioxidant which showed anticonvulsant activities both in experimental and clinical studies. In the present study, we examined the effect of melatonin treatment (10mg/kg/day, diluted in drinking water, 8 weeks) during epileptogenesis on the consequences of a kainate (KA)-induced status epilepticus (SE) in rats. Melatonin increased the latency in the appearance of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRSs) and decreased their frequency only during the treatment period. The behavioral alterations associated with hyperactivity, depression-like behavior during the light phase, and deficits in hippocampus-dependent working memory were positively affected by melatonin treatment in rats with epilepsy. Melatonin reduced the neuronal damage in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and piriform cortex and recovered the decrease of hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) level in rats with epilepsy. Taken together, long-term melatonin treatment after SE was unable to suppress the development of epileptogenesis. However, it showed a potential in reducing some of the deleterious alterations that develop during the chronic epileptic state in a diurnal phase-dependent mode. PMID:23435277

  8. Lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Kathryn R.

    Lead/acid batteries are produced in sizes from less than 1 to 3000 Ah for a wide variety of portable, industrial and automotive applications. Designs include Planté, Fauré or pasted, and tubular electrodes. In addition to the traditional designs which are flooded with sulfuric acid, newer 'valve-regulated" designs have the acid immolibized in a silica gel or absorbed in a porous glass separator. Development is ongoing worldwide to increase the specific power, energy and deep discharge cycle life of this commercially successful system to meet the needs of new applications such as electric vehicles, load leveling, and solar energy storage. The operating principles, current status, technical challenges and commercial impact of the lead/acid battery are reviewed.

  9. Heuristic status polling

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Parker, Jeffrey J.; Ratterman, Joseph D.

    2011-06-07

    Methods, compute nodes, and computer program products are provided for heuristic status polling of a component in a computing system. Embodiments include receiving, by a polling module from a requesting application, a status request requesting status of a component; determining, by the polling module, whether an activity history for the component satisfies heuristic polling criteria; polling, by the polling module, the component for status if the activity history for the component satisfies the heuristic polling criteria; and not polling, by the polling module, the component for status if the activity history for the component does not satisfy the heuristic criteria.

  10. Gene expression of fatty acid transport and binding proteins in the blood-brain barrier and the cerebral cortex of the rat: differences across development and with different DHA brain status.

    PubMed

    Pélerin, Hélène; Jouin, Mélanie; Lallemand, Marie-Sylvie; Alessandri, Jean-Marc; Cunnane, Stephen C; Langelier, Bénédicte; Guesnet, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Specific mechanisms for maintaining docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) concentration in brain cells but also transporting DHA from the blood across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are not agreed upon. Our main objective was therefore to evaluate the level of gene expression of fatty acid transport and fatty acid binding proteins in the cerebral cortex and at the BBB level during the perinatal period of active brain DHA accretion, at weaning, and until the adult age. We measured by real time RT-PCR the mRNA expression of different isoforms of fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs), long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs), fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) and the fatty acid transporter (FAT)/CD36 in cerebral cortex and isolated microvessels at embryonic day 18 (E18) and postnatal days 14, 21 and 60 (P14, P21 and P60, respectively) in rats receiving different n-3 PUFA dietary supplies (control, totally deficient or DHA-supplemented). In control rats, all the genes were expressed at the BBB level (P14 to P60), the mRNA levels of FABP5 and ACSL3 having the highest values. Age-dependent differences included a systematic decrease in the mRNA expressions between P14-P21 and P60 (2 to 3-fold), with FABP7 mRNA abundance being the most affected (10-fold). In the cerebral cortex, mRNA levels varied differently since FATP4, ACSL3 and ACSL6 and the three FABPs genes were highly expressed. There were no significant differences in the expression of the 10 genes studied in n-3 deficient or DHA-supplemented rats despite significant differences in their brain DHA content, suggesting that brain DHA uptake from the blood does not necessarily require specific transporters within cerebral endothelial cells and could, under these experimental conditions, be a simple passive diffusion process. PMID:25123062

  11. Conditioned Medium Reconditions Hippocampal Neurons against Kainic Acid Induced Excitotoxicity: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Bevinahal, Pradeep Kumar K.; Venugopal, Chaitra; Yencharla, Harish Chandra Prasad S.; Chandanala, Shashank; Trichur, Raju R.; Talakad, Sathyaprabha N.; Bhonde, Ramesh R.; Dhanushkodi, Anandh

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is gaining attention as a promising treatment option for neurodegenerative diseases. The functional efficacy of grafted cells is a matter of debate and the recent consensus is that the cellular and functional recoveries might be due to “by-stander” effects of grafted cells. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of conditioned medium (CM) derived from human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells in a kainic acid (KA) induced hippocampal degeneration model system in in vitro condition. Hippocampal cell line was exposed to KA (200 µM) for 24 hrs (lesion group) whereas, in the treatment group, hippocampal cell line was exposed to KA in combination with HEK-CM (KA + HEK-CM). We observed that KA exposure to cells resulted in significant neuronal loss. Interestingly, HEK-CM cotreatment completely attenuated the excitotoxic effects of KA. In HEK-CM cotreatment group, the cell viability was ~85–95% as opposed to 47% in KA alone group. Further investigation demonstrated that treatment with HEK-CM stimulated the endogenous cell survival factors like brain derived neurotrophic factors (BDNF) and antiapoptotic factor Bcl-2, revealing the possible mechanism of neuroprotection. Our results suggest that HEK-CM protects hippocampal neurons against excitotoxicity by stimulating the host's endogenous cell survival mechanisms. PMID:25505907

  12. Glycyrrhizin attenuates kainic Acid-induced neuronal cell death in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lidan; Jin, Yinchuan; Kim, Il-Doo; Lee, Ja-Kyeong

    2013-06-01

    Glycyrrhizin (GL), a triterpene that is present in the roots and rhizomes of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-viral effects. Recently, we demonstrated that GL produced the neuroprotective effects with the suppression of microglia activation and proinflammatory cytokine induction in the postischemic brain with middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats and improved motor impairment and neurological deficits. In the present study, we investigated whether GL has a beneficial effect in kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal death model. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of 0.94 nmole (0.2 µg) of KA produced typical neuronal death in both CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. In contrast, administration of GL (10 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before KA administration significantly suppressed the neuronal death, and this protective effect was more stronger at 50 mg/kg. Moreover, the GL-mediated neuroprotection was accompanied with the suppression of gliosis and induction of proinflammatory markers (COX-2, iNOS, and TNF-α). The anti-inflammatory and anti-excitotoxic effects of GL were verified in LPS-treated primary microglial cultures and in NMDA- or KA-treated primary cortical cultures. Together these results suggest that GL confers the neuroprotection through the mechanism of anti-inflammatory and anti-excitotoxic effects in KA-treated brain. PMID:23833559

  13. Protective role of miR-23b-3p in kainic acid-induced seizure.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Lianbo; Yao, Yi; Fu, Huajun; Li, Zhenghui; Wang, Fengpeng; Zhang, Xiaobin; He, Wencan; Zheng, Weihong; Zhang, Yunwu; Zheng, Honghua

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulation of microRNAs has been proposed to contribute toward epilepsy. The miRNA miR-23b-3p has been found to protect against neuronal apoptosis and the production of reactive oxygen species. In this study, we assessed the potential role of miR-23b-3p in the kainic acid (KA)-induced seizure model. We found that miR-23b-3p levels were significantly decreased in the brain cortex of mice and in cultured mouse primary neurons treated with KA. Importantly, supplement of miR-23b-3p agomir by an intacerebroventricular injection alleviated seizure behaviors and abnormal cortical electroencephalogram recordings in KA-treated mice. Together, these results indicate that miR-23b-3p plays a crucial role in suppressing seizure formation in experimental models of epilepsy and that miR-23b-3p supplement may be a potential anabolic strategy for ameliorating seizure. PMID:27232518

  14. INFLUENCE OF AQUEOUS ALUMINUM AND ORGANIC ACIDS ON MEASUREMENT OF ACID NEUTRALIZING CAPACITY IN SURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) is used to quantify the acid-base status of surface waters. Acidic waters have bean defined as having ANC values less than zero, and acidification is often quantified by decreases in ANC. Measured and calculated values of ANC generally agree, exce...

  15. Kaurenoic Acid Possesses Leishmanicidal Activity by Triggering a NLRP12/IL-1β/cNOS/NO Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Milena Menegazzo; Panis, Carolina; da Silva, Suelen Santos; Macri, Juliana Aparecida; Kawakami, Natalia Yoshie; Hayashida, Thiago Hideki; Madeira, Tiago Bervelieri; Acquaro, Vinicius Ricardo; Nixdorf, Suzana Lucy; Pizzatti, Luciana; Ambrósio, Sérgio Ricardo; Cecchini, Rubens; Arakawa, Nilton Syogo; Verri, Waldiceu Aparecido; Pavanelli, Wander Rogério

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis (L. amazonensis) infection can cause severe local and diffuse injuries in humans, a condition clinically known as American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL). Currently, the therapeutic approach for ACL is based on Glucantime, which shows high toxicity and poor effectiveness. Therefore, ACL remains a neglected disease with limited options for treatment. Herein, the in vitro antiprotozoal effect and mechanisms of the diterpene kaurenoic acid [ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid] (KA) against L. amazonensis were investigated. KA exhibited a direct antileishmanial effect on L. amazonensis promastigotes. Importantly, KA also reduced the intracellular number of amastigote forms and percentage of infected peritoneal macrophages of BALB/c mice. Mechanistically, KA treatment reestablished the production of nitric oxide (NO) in a constitutive NO synthase- (cNOS-) dependent manner, subverting the NO-depleting escape mechanism of L. amazonensis. Furthermore, KA induced increased production of IL-1β and expression of the inflammasome-activating component NLRP12. These findings demonstrate the leishmanicidal capability of KA against L. amazonensis in macrophage culture by triggering a NLRP12/IL-1β/cNOS/NO mechanism. PMID:26074677

  16. Kaurenoic Acid Possesses Leishmanicidal Activity by Triggering a NLRP12/IL-1β/cNOS/NO Pathway.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Milena Menegazzo; Panis, Carolina; da Silva, Suelen Santos; Macri, Juliana Aparecida; Kawakami, Natalia Yoshie; Hayashida, Thiago Hideki; Madeira, Tiago Bervelieri; Acquaro, Vinicius Ricardo; Nixdorf, Suzana Lucy; Pizzatti, Luciana; Ambrósio, Sérgio Ricardo; Cecchini, Rubens; Arakawa, Nilton Syogo; Verri, Waldiceu Aparecido; Costa, Ivete Conchon; Pavanelli, Wander Rogério

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis (L. amazonensis) infection can cause severe local and diffuse injuries in humans, a condition clinically known as American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL). Currently, the therapeutic approach for ACL is based on Glucantime, which shows high toxicity and poor effectiveness. Therefore, ACL remains a neglected disease with limited options for treatment. Herein, the in vitro antiprotozoal effect and mechanisms of the diterpene kaurenoic acid [ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid] (KA) against L. amazonensis were investigated. KA exhibited a direct antileishmanial effect on L. amazonensis promastigotes. Importantly, KA also reduced the intracellular number of amastigote forms and percentage of infected peritoneal macrophages of BALB/c mice. Mechanistically, KA treatment reestablished the production of nitric oxide (NO) in a constitutive NO synthase- (cNOS-) dependent manner, subverting the NO-depleting escape mechanism of L. amazonensis. Furthermore, KA induced increased production of IL-1β and expression of the inflammasome-activating component NLRP12. These findings demonstrate the leishmanicidal capability of KA against L. amazonensis in macrophage culture by triggering a NLRP12/IL-1β/cNOS/NO mechanism. PMID:26074677

  17. Pediatric Super-Refractory Status Epilepticus Treated with Allopregnanolone

    PubMed Central

    Broomall, Eileen; Natale, JoAnne E.; Grimason, Michele; Goldstein, Joshua; Smith, Craig M.; Chang, Celia; Kanes, Stephen; Rogawski, Michael A.; Wainwright, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Super-refractory status epilepticus is a life-threatening condition. Resistance to benzodiazepine and barbiturate treatment for this disorder is thought to be due to internalization of synaptic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors, and withdrawal of benzodiazepines and barbiturates during treatment often triggers seizure recurrence. The neurosteroid allopregnanolone acts as a positive allosteric modulator of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors. Here we describe the use of allopregnanolone in 2 pediatric patients with super-refractory status epilepticus. This treatment allowed the general anesthetic infusions to be weaned with resolution of status epilepticus. This is the first report of allopregnanolone use to treat status epilepticus in children. PMID:25363147

  18. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...

  19. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is used to treat or prevent folic acid deficiency. It is a B-complex vitamin needed by ... Folic acid comes in tablets. It usually is taken once a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label ...

  20. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as ...

  1. Indian aerosols: present status.

    PubMed

    Mitra, A P; Sharma, C

    2002-12-01

    This article presents the status of aerosols in India based on the research activities undertaken during last few decades in this region. Programs, like International Geophysical Year (IGY), Monsoon Experiment (MONEX), Indian Middle Atmospheric Program (IMAP) and recently conducted Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), have thrown new lights on the role of aerosols in global change. INDOEX has proved that the effects of aerosols are no longer confined to the local levels but extend at regional as well as global scales due to occurrence of long range transportation of aerosols from source regions along with wind trajectories. The loading of aerosols in the atmosphere is on rising due to energy intensive activities for developmental processes and other anthropogenic activities. One of the significant observation of INDOEX is the presence of high concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols in the near persistent winter time haze layer over tropical Indian Ocean which have probably been emitted from the burning of fossil-fuels and biofuels in the source region. These have significant bearing on the radiative forcing in the region and, therefore, have potential to alter monsoon and hydrological cycles. In general, the SPM concentrations have been found to be on higher sides in ambient atmosphere in many Indian cities but the NOx concentrations have been found to be on lower side. Even in the haze layer over Indian Ocean and surrounding areas, the NOx concentrations have been reported to be low which is not conducive of O3 formation in the haze/smog layer. The acid rain problem does not seem to exist at the moment in India because of the presence of neutralizing soil dust in the atmosphere. But the high particulate concentrations in most of the cities' atmosphere in India are of concern as it can cause deteriorated health conditions. PMID:12492171

  2. CALIPSO Mission Status Update: Payload Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhappen, Ron; Borchardt, Robert; MacDonnell, David; Cisewski, Mike

    2007-01-01

    The CALIPSO mission payload status update is presented. The contents include: 1) Wide Field Camera Overview; 2) WFC Temperatures; 3) WFC Voltages; 4) Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) Health; 5) IIR Voltages; 6) Payload Control (PLC) Voltages; 7) PLC Temperatures; 8) Low Voltage Power Supply (LVPS) (CALOPS0025N); 9) PLC Radiation Effects; 10) SDS Status (CALOPS0020N); 11) CALIOP LIDAR; 12) Laser Energy Trends; 13) Laser Energy Zoom; 14) Laser Management Approach; 15) Green / Red Ratio; 16) Pedestal @ SHG Temperature Trends; 17) LOM Heater Duty Cycle Trends; 18) LOM Pressure Trends; 19) Boresight Trend; 20) 1064 Dark Noise Trend; 21) 532 SNR Trend; 22) Spike Trends; 23) LIDAR Highlights; 24) Backup Laser Status; and 25) Future Plans.

  3. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  4. Neutron Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Chatake, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The hydration shells surrounding nucleic acids and hydrogen-bonding networks involving water molecules and nucleic acids are essential interactions for the structural stability and function of nucleic acids. Water molecules in the hydration shells influence various conformations of DNA and RNA by specific hydrogen-bonding networks, which often contribute to the chemical reactivity and molecular recognition of nucleic acids. However, X-ray crystallography could not provide a complete description of structural information with respect to hydrogen bonds. Indeed, X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for determining the locations of water molecules, i.e., the location of the oxygen atom of H2O; however, it is very difficult to determine the orientation of the water molecules, i.e., the orientation of the two hydrogen atoms of H2O, because X-ray scattering from the hydrogen atom is very small.Neutron crystallography is a specialized tool for determining the positions of hydrogen atoms. Neutrons are not diffracted by electrons, but are diffracted by atomic nuclei; accordingly, neutron scattering lengths of hydrogen and its isotopes are comparable to those of non-hydrogen atoms. Therefore, neutron crystallography can determine both of the locations and orientations of water molecules. This chapter describes the current status of neutron nucleic acid crystallographic research as well as the basic principles of neutron diffraction experiments performed on nucleic acid crystals: materials, crystallization, diffraction experiments, and structure determination. PMID:26227050

  5. X-33 Program Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Charlie C.; Austin, Robert E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The presentation briefly presents the current status of the program. The program's objectives and near term plans are stated. A brief description of the vehicle configuration, the technologies to be demonstrated and the missions to be flown are presented. Finally, a status of the vehicle assembly, the launch control center development and the significant test programs' accomplishments are presented.

  6. Status Equalization Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Elizabeth G.; Deslonde, James

    The introduction of the Multiple Ability Curriculum (MAC) and Expectation Training (ET) into the curriculum of racially integrated elementary schools appears to improve the equal status interaction between students of differing academic and social status. The goals of the MAC and ET are the following: (1) prevent classroom dominance by students of…

  7. Nuclear proliferation status report. Status report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-07-01

    This report contains information concerning the nuclear proliferation status of the following countries: (1) Russia, (2) Ukraine, (3) Belarus, (4) Kazakhstan, (5) Israel, (6) India, (7) Pakistan, (8) South Africa, (9) North Korea, (10) Iraq, (11) Iran, (12) Lybia, (13) Algeria, (14) Syria, (15) Brazil, (16) Argentina, and (17) Taiwan.

  8. Getting folic acid nutrition right

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The two articles in this issue of the journal provide some definitive answers to questions relating to folic acid exposure and folate nutritional status of the US population in the post-fortification era, and, by implication, pose other questions. Most convincingly, these reports, which are based la...

  9. Acid soil and acid rain, 2nd edition

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, I.R.

    1992-01-01

    This book examines the basic chemical processes involved in acidification in order to better assess their long-term effects on the status of soils, the health of plants and other living species that depend on them. It also discusses acidity, pH and protons their significance in bioenergetics and the consequent role of autotrophic organisms in acidifying ecosystems. This edition incorporates and integrates recent findings that render more explanations of the causes of the environmental impacts of acidity, especially in forests and lakes. Also explores current research into acid rain and soil in order to devise appropriate measures for their amelioration.

  10. Ecological status of soils in Moscow Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurkova, N. E.; Yurkov, A. M.; Smagin, A. V.

    2009-03-01

    The quantitative assessment of the status of soils in Moscow Zoo was performed using traditional and original methods based on the differentiated system of indices. The studies were conducted in animal open-air cages and on plots available for visitors. The dynamics of the temperature and water-air regimes in the root-inhabited layer, the density, the acidity, and the salinity of the soils were studied. The level of the biological activity was assessed according to the intensity of the organic matter decomposition and the substrate-induced respiration. In the background of the rather satisfactory status of the soils, negative factors were found: a periodic excess or deficit of moisture and, for the most part, low biological activity (low respiration and decomposition of the lignin-cellulose test material). Recommendations for the improvement of the status of the soil cover in Moscow Zoo are proposed.

  11. Kainic acid as a tool to study the regulation and function of opioid peptides in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hong, J S; Grimes, L; Kanamatsu, T; McGinty, J F

    1987-10-30

    Kainic acid (KA), an excitatory neurotoxin, was used as a tool to study the metabolism of hippocampal opioid peptides and their functional role in the expression of wet-dog shakes (WDS). A single intracerebral injection of KA (1 microgram/rat) caused recurrent motor seizures lasting 3-6 h. During the convulsive period, native Met5-enkephalin-like (ME-LI) and dynorphin A(1-8)-like (DYN-LI) immunoreactivities in hippocampus decreased by 31 and 63%, respectively. By 24 h after dosing, the hippocampal opioid peptides had returned to control levels, and by 48 h ME-LI had increased 270% and DYN-LI 150%. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that ME-LI and Leu5-enkephalin-like (LE-LI) immunostaining in the mossy fibers of dentate granule cells and the perforant-temporoammonic pathway had decreased visibly by 6 h and had increased markedly by 48 h following KA. A visible decrease in DYN-LI in mossy fiber axons within 6 h was followed by a substantial increase at 48 h. To determine whether the increases in hippocampal ME-LI reflected changes in ME biosynthesis, levels of mRNA coding for preproenkephalin (mRNAenk) and cryptic ME-LI cleaved by enzyme digestion from preproenkephalin were measured. Following the convulsive period (6 h), mRNAenk was 400% of control, and by 24 h, cryptic ME-LI was 300% of control. Increases in native and cryptic ME-LI and in mRNAenk were also noted in entorhinal cortex, but not in hypothalamus or uninjected striatum. Our data suggest that KA-induced seizures cause an increase in ME release, followed by a compensatory increase in ME biosynthesis in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. Several lines of evidence from this study have suggested that hippocampal enkephalins are intimately related to KA-elicited WDS. The shaking behavior was attenuated by pretreatment with naloxone or antisera against [Met5]-enkephalin. We also observed that KA-induced WDS can be mimicked by intrahippocampal injection of enkephalin-related peptides. Furthermore, this

  12. Status epilepticus associated with borage oil ingestion.

    PubMed

    Al-Khamees, Wafa'a A; Schwartz, Michael D; Alrashdi, Saleh; Algren, Adam D; Morgan, Brent W

    2011-06-01

    The use of herbal and complementary medicine is common. Many herbal products are known to produce serious adverse effects. Borage oil is derived from the seeds of the borage plant (Borago officinalis) an abundant source of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), and Borage oil has been promoted as a treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, atopic dermatitis, diabetic neuropathy, and menopause-related symptoms. We report a case of status epilepticus in a patient who consumed borage oil for one week. PMID:21387119

  13. Technology Status: Fuel Cells and Electrolysis Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbryar, H.

    1978-01-01

    The status of the baselined shuttle fuel cell as well as the acid membrane fuel cell and space-oriented water electrolysis technologies are presented. The more recent advances in the alkaline fuel cell technology area are the subject of a companion paper. A preliminary plan for the focusing of these technologies towards regenerative energy storage applications in the multi-hundred kilowatt range is also discussed.

  14. The Future of Butyric Acid in Industry

    PubMed Central

    Dwidar, Mohammed; Park, Jae-Yeon; Mitchell, Robert J.; Sang, Byoung-In

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the different applications of butyric acid and its current and future production status are highlighted, with a particular emphasis on the biofuels industry. As such, this paper discusses different issues regarding butyric acid fermentations and provides suggestions for future improvements and their approaches. PMID:22593687

  15. Vegetarian diets and bone status.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Katherine L

    2014-07-01

    Osteoporosis is a common chronic condition associated with progressive loss of bone mineral density (BMD) and compromised bone strength, with increasing risk of fracture over time. Vegetarian diets have been shown to contain lower amounts of calcium, vitamin D, vitamin B-12, protein, and n-3 (ω-3) fatty acids, all of which have important roles in maintaining bone health. Although zinc intakes are not necessarily lower quantitatively, they are considerably less bioavailable in vegetarian diets, which suggests the need for even higher intakes to maintain adequate status. At the same time, healthy vegetarian diets tend to contain more of several protective nutrients, including magnesium, potassium, vitamin K, and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory phytonutrients. On balance, there is evidence that vegetarians, and particularly vegans, may be at greater risk of lower BMD and fracture. Attention to potential shortfall nutrients through the careful selection of foods or fortified foods or the use of supplements can help ensure healthy bone status to reduce fracture risk in individuals who adhere to vegetarian diets. PMID:24898237

  16. Status Epilepticus and Refractory Status Epilepticus Management

    PubMed Central

    Abend, Nicholas S.; Bearden, David; Helbig, Ingo; McGuire, Jennifer; Narula, Sona; Panzer, Jessica A.; Topjian, Alexis; Dlugos, Dennis J.

    2014-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) describes persistent or recurring seizures without a return to baseline mental status, and is a common neurologic emergency. SE can occur in the context of epilepsy or may be symptomatic of a wide range of underlying etiologies. The clinician’s aim is to rapidly institute care that simultaneously stabilizes the patient medically, identifies and manages any precipitant conditions, and terminates seizures. Seizure management involves “emergent” treatment with benzodiazepines followed by “urgent” therapy with other anti-seizure medications. If seizures persist then refractory SE is diagnosed and management options include additional anti-seizure medications or infusions of midazolam or pentobarbital. This paper reviews the management of pediatric SE and RSE. PMID:25727508

  17. Regional assessment of the response of the acid-base status of lake watersheds in the Adirondack region of New York to changes in atmospheric deposition using PnET-BGC.

    PubMed

    Chen, Limin; Driscoll, Charles T

    2005-02-01

    Understanding the response of soil and surface waters to changes in atmospheric deposition is critical for guiding future legislation on air pollution. The Adirondack region of New York experiences among the most severe ecological impacts from acidic deposition. The region is characterized by considerable variability in atmospheric deposition, surficial and bedrock geology, hydrologic flow paths, and vegetation resulting in variability in effects of acidic deposition. In this study, an integrated biogeochemical model (PnET-BGC) was applied to 37 forest lake watersheds to assess the response of soil and surface waters of the Adirondacks to changes in atmospheric deposition at a regional scale. Model-simulated surface water chemistry was validated against data from two synoptic surveys conducted in 1984 and 2001. Results indicate that the model is able to capture the observed changes in surface water chemistry during this period. The model was further used to forecast the response of soil and surface waters to three future emission control scenarios. Results indicate that under the Clean Air Act, surface water SO4(2-) concentrations will continue to decrease at a median rate of -0.38 microeq/L-yr, and surface water ANC is predicted to increase at a median rate of 0.11 microeq/L-yr. More aggressive emission reductions will accelerate the rate of recovery. Under an aggressive control scenario, which represents an additional 75% reduction in SO2 emissions beyond the implementation of the Clean Air Act, surface water SO4(2-) concentrations are predicted to decrease at a median rate of -0.88 microeq/L-yr, and surface water ANC is predicted to increase at a median rate of 0.43 microeq/L-yr. Model predictions of several biologically relevant chemical indicators are also reported. PMID:15757340

  18. Substrate properties of C1 inhibitor Ma (alanine 434----glutamic acid). Genetic and structural evidence suggesting that the P12-region contains critical determinants of serine protease inhibitor/substrate status.

    PubMed

    Skriver, K; Wikoff, W R; Patston, P A; Tausk, F; Schapira, M; Kaplan, A P; Bock, S C

    1991-05-15

    The serine protease inhibitor (serpin) C1 inhibitor inactivates enzymes involved in the regulation of vascular permeability. A patient from the Ma family with the genetic disorder hereditary angioedema inherited a dysfunctional C1 inhibitor allele. Relative to normal plasma, the patients's plasma contained an additional C1 inhibitor immunoreactive band, which comigrated with normal C1 inhibitor cleaved by plasma kallikrein, C1s, or factor XIIa. C1 inhibitor Ma did not react with a monoclonal antibody to a neoepitope that is present in complexed and cleaved normal C1 inhibitor, suggesting conformational differences between cleaved normal C1- inhibitor and cleaved C1 inhibitor Ma. Molecular cloning and sequencing of exon 8 of the C1 inhibitor Ma allele revealed a single C to A mutation, changing alanine 434 to glutamic acid. Ala 434 of C1 inhibitor aligns with the P12 residue of the prototypical serpin alpha 1-antitrypsin. The P12 amino acid of all inhibitory serpins is alanine, and it is present in a highly conserved region on the amino-terminal side of the serpin-reactive center loop. Whereas normal C1 inhibitor expressed by transfected COS-1 cells formed complexes with and was cleaved by kallikrein, fXIIa, and C1s, COS-1-expressed Ala434---Glu C1 inhibitor was cleaved by these enzymes but did not form complexes with them. These results, together with evidence from other studies, suggest that serpin protease inhibitor activity is the result of protein conformational change that occurs when the P12 region of a serpin moves from a surface location, on the reactive site loop of the native molecule, to an internal location within sheet A of the complexed inhibitor. PMID:2026621

  19. New experimental therapies for status epilepticus in preclinical development.

    PubMed

    Walker, Matthew C; Williams, Robin S B

    2015-08-01

    Starting with the established antiepileptic drug, valproic acid, we have taken a novel approach to develop new antiseizure drugs that may be effective in status epilepticus. We first identified that valproic acid has a potent effect on a biochemical pathway, the phosphoinositide pathway, in Dictyostelium discoideum, and we demonstrated that this may relate to its mechanism of action against seizures in mammalian systems. Through screening in this pathway, we have identified a large array of fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives with antiseizure potential. These were then evaluated in an in vitro mammalian system. One compound that we identified through this process is a major constituent of the ketogenic diet, strongly arguing that it may be the fatty acids that are mediating the antiseizure effect of this diet. We further tested two of the more potent compounds in an in vivo model of status epilepticus and demonstrated that they were more effective than valproic acid in treating the status epilepticus. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". PMID:26189787

  20. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  1. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Mefenamic acid is used to relieve mild to moderate pain, including menstrual pain (pain that happens before or during a menstrual period). Mefenamic acid is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. ...

  2. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  3. Ascorbic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops to ...

  4. Acid mucopolysaccharides

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003368.htm Acid mucopolysaccharides To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acid mucopolysaccharides is a test that measures the amount ...

  5. Ethacrynic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  6. Mental status testing

    MedlinePlus

    Mental status exam; Neurocognitive testing ... A nurse, doctor, physician assistant, or mental health worker will ask a number of questions. The test can be done in the home, in an office, nursing home, or ...

  7. Valproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Valproic acid is used alone or with other medications to treat certain types of seizures. Valproic acid is also used to treat mania (episodes of ... to relieve headaches that have already begun. Valproic acid is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. ...

  8. Safety system status monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.R.; Morgenstern, M.H.; Rideout, T.H.; Cowley, P.J.

    1984-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has studied the safety aspects of monitoring the preoperational status of safety systems in nuclear power plants. The goals of the study were to assess for the NRC the effectiveness of current monitoring systems and procedures, to develop near-term guidelines for reducing human errors associated with monitoring safety system status, and to recommend a regulatory position on this issue. A review of safety system status monitoring practices indicated that current systems and procedures do not adequately aid control room operators in monitoring safety system status. This is true even of some systems and procedures installed to meet existing regulatory guidelines (Regulatory Guide 1.47). In consequence, this report suggests acceptance criteria for meeting the functional requirements of an adequate system for monitoring safety system status. Also suggested are near-term guidelines that could reduce the likelihood of human errors in specific, high-priority status monitoring tasks. It is recommended that (1) Regulatory Guide 1.47 be revised to address these acceptance criteria, and (2) the revised Regulatory Guide 1.47 be applied to all plants, including those built since the issuance of the original Regulatory Guide.

  9. Redox Status and Neuro Inflammation Indexes in Cerebellum and Motor Cortex of Wistar Rats Supplemented with Natural Sources of Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Astaxanthin: Fish Oil, Krill Oil, and Algal Biomass.

    PubMed

    Polotow, Tatiana G; Poppe, Sandra C; Vardaris, Cristina V; Ganini, Douglas; Guariroba, Maísa; Mattei, Rita; Hatanaka, Elaine; Martins, Maria F; Bondan, Eduardo F; Barros, Marcelo P

    2015-10-01

    Health authorities worldwide have consistently recommended the regular consumption of marine fishes and seafood to preserve memory, sustain cognitive functions, and prevent neurodegenerative processes in humans. Shrimp, crabs, lobster, and salmon are of particular interest in the human diet due to their substantial provision of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3/PUFAs) and the antioxidant carotenoid astaxanthin (ASTA). However, the optimal ratio between these nutraceuticals in natural sources is apparently the key factor for maximum protection against most neuro-motor disorders. Therefore, we aimed here to investigate the effects of a long-term supplementation with (n-3)/PUFAs-rich fish oil, ASTA-rich algal biomass, the combination of them, or krill oil (a natural combination of both nutrients) on baseline redox balance and neuro-inflammation indexes in cerebellum and motor cortex of Wistar rats. Significant changes in redox metabolism were only observed upon ASTA supplementation, which reinforce its antioxidant properties with a putative mitochondrial-centered action in rat brain. Krill oil imposed mild astrocyte activation in motor cortex of Wistar rats, although no redox or inflammatory index was concomitantly altered. In summary, there is no experimental evidence that krill oil, fish oil, oralgal biomass (minor variation), drastically change the baseline oxidative conditions or the neuro-inflammatory scenario in neuromotor-associated rat brain regions. PMID:26426026

  10. Redox Status and Neuro Inflammation Indexes in Cerebellum and Motor Cortex of Wistar Rats Supplemented with Natural Sources of Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Astaxanthin: Fish Oil, Krill Oil, and Algal Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Polotow, Tatiana G.; Poppe, Sandra C.; Vardaris, Cristina V.; Ganini, Douglas; Guariroba, Maísa; Mattei, Rita; Hatanaka, Elaine; Martins, Maria F.; Bondan, Eduardo F.; Barros, Marcelo P.

    2015-01-01

    Health authorities worldwide have consistently recommended the regular consumption of marine fishes and seafood to preserve memory, sustain cognitive functions, and prevent neurodegenerative processes in humans. Shrimp, crabs, lobster, and salmon are of particular interest in the human diet due to their substantial provision of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3/PUFAs) and the antioxidant carotenoid astaxanthin (ASTA). However, the optimal ratio between these nutraceuticals in natural sources is apparently the key factor for maximum protection against most neuro-motor disorders. Therefore, we aimed here to investigate the effects of a long-term supplementation with (n-3)/PUFAs-rich fish oil, ASTA-rich algal biomass, the combination of them, or krill oil (a natural combination of both nutrients) on baseline redox balance and neuro-inflammation indexes in cerebellum and motor cortex of Wistar rats. Significant changes in redox metabolism were only observed upon ASTA supplementation, which reinforce its antioxidant properties with a putative mitochondrial-centered action in rat brain. Krill oil imposed mild astrocyte activation in motor cortex of Wistar rats, although no redox or inflammatory index was concomitantly altered. In summary, there is no experimental evidence that krill oil, fish oil, oralgal biomass (minor variation), drastically change the baseline oxidative conditions or the neuro-inflammatory scenario in neuromotor-associated rat brain regions. PMID:26426026

  11. Web Operational Status Boards

    2004-04-16

    Web Operational Status Boards (WebOSB)is a web-based application designed to acquire, display, and update highly dynamic status information between multiple users and jurisdictions. WebOSB is able to disseminate real-time status information—support the timely sharing of information—with constant, dynamic updates via personal computers and the Internet between emergency operations centers (EOCs), incident command centers, and to users outside the EOC who need to know the information (hospitals, shelters, schools). The WebOSB application far exceeds outdated information-sharingmore » methods used by emergency workers: whiteboards, Word and Excel documents, or even locality-specific Web sites. WebOSB’s capabilities include the following elements: - Secure access. Multiple users can access information on WebOSB from any personal computer with Internet access and a secure ID. Privileges are use to control access and distribution of status information and to identify users who are authorized to add or edit information. - Simultaneous update. WebOSB provides options for users to add, display, and update dynamic information simultaneously at all locations involved in the emergency management effort, A single status board can be updated from multiple locations enabling shelters and hospitals to post bed availability or list decontamination capability. - On-the-fly modification. Allowing the definition of an existing status board to be modified on-the-fly can be an asset during an emergency, where information requirements can change quickly. The status board designer feature allows an administrator to quickly define, modi,, add to, and implement new status boards in minutes without needing the help of Web designers and computer programmers. - Publisher/subscriber notification. As a subscriber, each user automatically receives notification of any new information relating to specific status boards. The publisher/subscriber feature automatically notified each user of any

  12. Fatty acids - trans fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk is consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fat and rudiment fat. The adverse effect of trans fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein profiles is consisten...

  13. Using Willie's Acid-Base Box for Blood Gas Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a method developed by Dr. William T. Lipscomb for teaching blood gas analysis of acid-base status and provides three examples using Willie's acid-base box. Willie's acid-base box is constructed using three of the parameters of standard arterial blood gas analysis: (1) pH; (2) bicarbonate; and (3) CO[subscript…

  14. Effects of AT1 receptor antagonism on kainate-induced seizures and concomitant changes in hippocampal extracellular noradrenaline, serotonin, and dopamine levels in Wistar-Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Tchekalarova, Jana; Loyens, Ellen; Smolders, Ilse

    2015-05-01

    In the management of epilepsy, AT1 receptor antagonists have been suggested as an additional treatment strategy. A hyperactive brain angiotensin (Ang) II system and upregulated AT1 receptors are implicated in the cerebrovascular alterations in a genetic form of hypertension. Uncontrolled hypertension could also, in turn, be a risk factor for a seizure threshold decrease and development of epileptogenesis. The present study aimed to assess the effects of the selective AT1 receptor antagonist ZD7155 on kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus (SE) development and accompanying changes in the hippocampal extracellular (EC) neurotransmitter levels of noradrenaline (NAD), serotonin (5-HT), and dopamine (DA) in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and their parent strain Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, since monoamines are well-known neurotransmitters involved in mechanisms of both epilepsy and hypertension. Status epilepticus was evoked in freely moving rats by a repetitive intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of KA in subconvulsant doses. In the treatment group, ZD7155 (5mg/kg i.p.) was coadministered with the first KA injection. Spontaneously hypertensive rats exhibited higher susceptibility to SE than WKY rats, but the AT1 receptor antagonist did not alter the development of SE in SHRs or in WKY rats. In vivo microdialysis demonstrated significant KA-induced increases of the hippocampal NAD and DA levels in SHRs and of NAD, 5-HT, and DA in WKY rats. Although SHRs developed more severe seizures while receiving a lower dose of KA compared to WKY rats, AT1 receptor antagonism completely prevented all KA-induced increases of hippocampal monoamine levels in both rat strains without affecting seizure development per se. These results suggest a lack of direct relationship between KA-induced seizure susceptibility and adaptive changes of hippocampal NAD, 5-HT, and DA levels in the effects of ZD7155 in WKY rats and SHRs. PMID:25922088

  15. Combined indicator of vitamin B12 status: modification for missing biomarkers and folate status, and recommendations for revised cut-points

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: We propose a novel approach to diagnose B12 status by combining four blood markers: total B12 (B12), holo-transcobalamin (holoTC), methylmalonic acid (MMA) and total homocysteine (tHcy). Combined B12 status is expressed as cB12=log10[(holoTC•B12)/(MMA•Hcy)]–(reference, age function). Her...

  16. Combined indicator of vitamin B 12 status: modification for missing biomarkers and folate status and recommendations for revised cut-points

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: A novel approach to determine vitamin B 12 status is to combine four blood markers: total B 12 (B 12 ), holotranscobalamin (holoTC), methylmalonic acid (MMA) and total homocysteine (tHcy). This combined indicator of B 12 status is expressed as cB 12 = log 10 [(holoTC · B 12 )/ (MMA · Hcy...

  17. System status display evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Leland G.

    1988-01-01

    The System Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the crew with an enhanced capability for monitoring and managing the aircraft systems. A flight simulation in a fixed base cockpit simulator was used to evaluate alternative design concepts for this display system. The alternative concepts included pictorial versus alphanumeric text formats, multifunction versus dedicated controls, and integration of the procedures with the system status information versus paper checklists. Twelve pilots manually flew approach patterns with the different concepts. System malfunctions occurred which required the pilots to respond to the alert by reconfiguring the system. The pictorial display, the multifunction control interfaces collocated with the system display, and the procedures integrated with the status information all had shorter event processing times and lower subjective workloads.

  18. Communication about social status.

    PubMed

    Fernald, Russell D

    2014-10-01

    Dominance hierarchies are ubiquitous in social species and serve to organize social systems. Social and sexual status is communicated directly among animals via sensory systems evolved in the particular species. Such signals may be chemical, visual, auditory, postural or a combination of signals. In most species, status is initially established through physical conflict between individuals that leads to ritualized conflict or threats, reducing possibly dangerous results of fighting. Many of the status signals contain other information, as in some bird species that communicate both the size of their group and their individual rank vocally. Recent studies have shown that scent signaling among hyenas of east Africa is unique, being produced by fermentative, odor producing bacteria residing in the scent glands. PMID:24793315

  19. Nutritional Status Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2008-01-01

    Nutritional Status Assessment (Nutrition) is the most comprehensive inflight study done by NASA to date of human physiologic changes during long-duration space flight; this includes measures of bone metabolism, oxidative damage, nutritional assessments, and hormonal changes. This study will impact both the definition of nutritional requirements and development of food systems for future space exploration missions to the Moon and Mars. This experiment will also help to understand the impact of countermeasures (exercise and pharmaceuticals) on nutritional status and nutrient requirements for astronauts.

  20. Achieving Magnet status.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Beckie; Gates, Judy

    2005-01-01

    Magnet has become the gold standard for nursing excellence. It is the symbol of effective and safe patient care. It evaluates components that inspire safe care, including employee satisfaction and retention, professional education, and effective interdisciplinary collaboration. In an organization whose mission focuses on excellent patient care, Banner Thunderbird Medical Center found that pursuing Magnet status was clearly the next step. In this article, we will discuss committee selection, education, team building, planning, and the discovery process that define the Magnet journey. The road to obtaining Magnet status has permitted many opportunities to celebrate our achievements. PMID:16056158

  1. FRIB Cryogenic Plant Status

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Kelly D.; Ganni, Venkatarao; Knudsen, Peter N.; Casagranda, Fabio

    2015-12-01

    After practical changes were approved to the initial conceptual design of the cryogenic system for MSU FRIB and an agreement was made with JLab in 2012 to lead the design effort of the cryogenic plant, many activities are in place leading toward a cool-down of the linacs prior to 2018. This is mostly due to using similar equipment used at CHLII for the 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and an aggressive schedule maintained by the MSU Conventional Facilities department. Reported here is an updated status of the cryogenic plant, including the equipment procurement status, plant layout, facility equipment and project schedule.

  2. Nutritional Status in Self-Neglecting Elderly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, S. Mathews; Kelly, P. A.; Pickens, S.; Burnett, J.; Dyer, C. B.; Smith, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    Elder self-neglect is the most common, and most compelling form of elder mistreatment. Individuals who cannot provide the basic needs for themselves may develop social, functional, and physical deficits. The CREST project has the goal of systematically characterizing these individuals, and the objective of the study reported here is to characterize aspects of their nutritional status. Self-neglect (SN) subjects referred from Adult Protective Services were recruited and consented. Control (CN) subjects were matched for age, gender, race, and socio-economic status when possible. Reported here are data on 47 SN subjects (age 77 +/- 7, mean +/- SD; body weight 76 kg +/- 26) and 40 CN subjects (77 +/- 7, 79 kg +/- 20). Blood samples were analyzed for indices of nutritional status. SN subjects had higher serum concentrations of homocysteine (p < 0.01) and methylmalonic acid (p < 0.05). Red blood cell folate levels were lower (p < 0.01) in the SN subjects and serum folate levels tended (p < 0.07) to be lower, also. C-reactive protein concentrations were higher than 10 mg/dL in 36% of SN subjects and 18% of CN subjects. Total cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were similar in the two groups. These data demonstrate that the self-neglecting elderly population is at risk with respect to several markers of nutritional status.

  3. Biopreservation by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stiles, M E

    1996-10-01

    Biopreservation refers to extended storage life and enhanced safety of foods using the natural microflora and (or) their antibacterial products. Lactic acid bacteria have a major potential for use in biopreservation because they are safe to consume and during storage they naturally dominate the microflora of many foods. In milk, brined vegetables, many cereal products and meats with added carbohydrate, the growth of lactic acid bacteria produces a new food product. In raw meats and fish that are chill stored under vacuum or in an environment with elevated carbon dioxide concentration, the lactic acid bacteria become the dominant population and preserve the meat with a "hidden' fermentation. The same applies to processed meats provided that the lactic acid bacteria survive the heat treatment or they are inoculated onto the product after heat treatment. This paper reviews the current status and potential for controlled biopreservation of foods. PMID:8879414

  4. Acidification and Acid Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    endangers the existing biota. Concerns about acid (or acidic) rain in its modern sense were publicized by the Swedish soil scientist Svante Odén (1968). He argued, initially in the Swedish press, that long-term increases in the atmospheric deposition of acid could lower the pH of surface waters, cause a decline in fish stocks, deplete soils of nutrients, and accelerate damage to materials. By the 1970s, acidification of surface waters was reported in many countries in Europe as well as in North America. The late twentieth-century rush to understand the impact of acid rain was driven by: (i) reports of damaged or threatened freshwater fisheries and (ii) damaged forests. Perhaps the earliest linkage between acidic surface water and damage to fish was made by Dahl (1921) in southern Norway. There, spring runoff was sufficiently acidic to kill trout. It was not until the 1970s that a strong link was established between depressed pH, mobilization of aluminum from soil, and fish status ( Schofield and Trojnar,1980). The relationship between acidification of soils and forest health started with hypotheses in the 1960s and has slowly developed. Acid rain enhances the availability of some nutrients (e.g., nitrogen), and may either enhance or diminish the availability of others (e.g., calcium, magnesium, potassium, and phosphorus). Damage to anthropogenic structures, human health, and visibility have also raised concerns. The history of these early developments was summarized by Cowling (1982). Since the 1970s, sulfur and nitrogen emissions to the atmosphere have been reduced by 50-85% and 0-30%, respectively, both in North America and Europe. The emission reductions have occurred as a consequence of knowledge gained and economic factors. While recovery of water quality is underway in some areas, problems of acidification persist, and are now complicated by the effects of climate change ( Schindler, 1997).

  5. Status of HRD Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document contains four papers presented at a symposium on the status of human resource development (HRD) research moderated by Barry Johansen at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "An Exploration of the Type of Research Appearing in the AHRD Conference Proceedings" (David E. Arnold) reviews and classifies the…

  6. Kurdish. Materials Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC. Language/Area Reference Center.

    The materials status report for Kurdish is one of a series intended to provide the nonspecialist with a picture of the availability and quality of texts for teaching a given language to English speakers. Each report consists of: (1) a brief narrative description of the language, the areas where it is spoken, its major dialects, its writing system,…

  7. Iran: Country Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFerren, Margaret

    A survey of the status of language usage in Iran begins with an overview of the usage pattern of Persian, the official language spoken by just over half the population, and the competing languages of six ethnic and linguistic minorities: Azerbaijani, Kurdish, Arabic, Gilaki, Luri-Bakhtiari, and Mazandarani. The development of language policy…

  8. Iraq: Country Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFerren, Margaret

    A survey of the status of language usage in Iraq begins with an overview of the usage patterns of Arabic and Kurdish, especially in the context of recent political events and the agreement to make Kurdish a second official language in the Kurdish autonomous region, and to allow limited use of Kurdish in instruction and public communication. A…

  9. NASA Armstrong Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Armstrong (formerly Dryden) Flight Research Center continues it's legacy of exciting work in the area of dynamics and control of advanced vehicle concepts. This status presentation highlights the research and technology development that Armstrong's Control and Dynamics branch is performing in the areas of Control of Flexible Structures and Automated Cooperative Trajectories.

  10. NASA Dryden Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Timothy H.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the status of several Dryden projects. They are: the Ikhana Project, development of the F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System, the development of a C-20A Precision Autopilot for use in Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR), the development of the X-48B Blended Wing Body aircraft, and development of Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA).

  11. LNLS status report

    SciTech Connect

    )); Accelerator Physics and Instrumentation Groups of LNLS

    1992-01-01

    In this report, we present briefly the status of the LNLS vacuum ultraviolet soft X-ray electron storage ring. The basic parameters of the magnet lattice and the program for the development of beam lines and experimental workstations are described.

  12. The status of GALLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Wink, R. )

    1991-01-01

    We describe the status of G A L L E X solar neutrino experiment until the end of June 1991. Since June 1990 31 desorptions with the full equipment have been done. The results of the first 27 desorptions are presented. We also describe our low level proportional counters including the counting system.

  13. The status of GALLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Wink, R.; The GALLEX Collaboration

    1991-12-31

    We describe the status of G A L L E X solar neutrino experiment until the end of June 1991. Since June 1990 31 desorptions with the full equipment have been done. The results of the first 27 desorptions are presented. We also describe our low level proportional counters including the counting system.

  14. NASA Dryden Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John T.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the status of several NASA Dryden projects. These include: the Lift And Nozzle Change Effects on Tail Shock (LANCETS), Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) F-18 #853 Testbed X-48B, Blended Wing Body flights, Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), Ikhana Project, and the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Launch Abort Systems Tests

  15. Tanzania: Country Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robson, Barbara

    A survey of the status of language usage in Tanzania begins with an overview of the three levels of language use: (1) Swahili, the national and official language, used in public life; (2) English, used in international affairs and in technical and intellectual matters; and (3) the over 120 vernacular languages used in family and religious life,…

  16. Status and the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Utevsky, Amanda V.; Platt, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Social hierarchy is a fact of life for many animals. Navigating social hierarchy requires understanding one's own status relative to others and behaving accordingly, while achieving higher status may call upon cunning and strategic thinking. The neural mechanisms mediating social status have become increasingly well understood in invertebrates and model organisms like fish and mice but until recently have remained more opaque in humans and other primates. In a new study in this issue, Noonan and colleagues explore the neural correlates of social rank in macaques. Using both structural and functional brain imaging, they found neural changes associated with individual monkeys' social status, including alterations in the amygdala, hypothalamus, and brainstem—areas previously implicated in dominance-related behavior in other vertebrates. A separate but related network in the temporal and prefrontal cortex appears to mediate more cognitive aspects of strategic social behavior. These findings begin to delineate the neural circuits that enable us to navigate our own social worlds. A major remaining challenge is identifying how these networks contribute functionally to our social lives, which may open new avenues for developing innovative treatments for social disorders. PMID:25181006

  17. MICE Construction Status

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2008-02-21

    MICE, the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment, is an approved experiment at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. In this paper, we briefly review the aims of the experiment, give an overview of the system, and indicate the design and/or construction status of the various major subsystems that comprise the experiment. First beam is expected in January 2008.

  18. TRU relocation status report

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, R.M.

    1997-01-20

    To meet an internal milestone, 257 containers identified as contact- handled transuranic waste are being relocated from uncovered drum modules in the Low-Level Burial Grounds into covered facilities. The project is not yet complete. This report discusses the project and its status as of December 31, 1996.

  19. Mexico: Country Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFerren, Margaret

    A survey of the status of language usage in Mexico begins with an overview of language distribution among the population, mono- and multilingualism, changes in patterns of usage between the 1970 and 1980 censuses, and linguistic issues related to assimilation of the Indian population and the role and philosophy of the Instituto Nacional…

  20. Status, Numbers and Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melamed, David; Savage, Scott V.

    2013-01-01

    We develop a theoretical model of social influence in n-person groups. We argue that disagreement between group members introduces uncertainty into the social situation, and this uncertainty motivates people to use status characteristics to evaluate the merits of a particular opinion. Our model takes the numerical distribution of opinions and the…

  1. Acid Deposition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator presents acid deposition trends in the contiguous U.S. from 1989 to 2007. Data are broken down by wet and dry deposition and deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds. Acid deposition is particularly damaging to lakes, streams, and forests and the plants and a...

  2. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.C. )

    1988-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the third annual conference sponsored by the Acid Rain Information Clearinghouse (ARIC). Topics covered include: Legal aspects of the source-receptor relationship: an energy perspective; Scientific uncertainty, agency inaction, and the courts; and Acid rain: the emerging legal framework.

  3. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Elsworth, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book was written in a concise and readable style for the lay public. It's purpose was to make the public aware of the damage caused by acid rain and to mobilize public opinion to favor the elimination of the causes of acid rain.

  4. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1980-06-20

    Acid precipitation includes not only rain but also acidified snow, hail and frost, as well as sulfur and nitrogen dust. The principal source of acid precipitation is pollution emitted by power plants and smelters. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds contained in the emissions combine with moisture to form droplets with a high acid content - sometimes as acidic as vinegar. When sufficiently concentrated, these acids can kill fish and damage material structures. Under certain circumstances they may reduce crop and forest yields and cause or aggravate respiratory diseases in humans. During the summer, especially, pollutants tend to collect over the Great Lakes in high pressure systems. Since winds typically are westerly and rotate clockwise around high pressure systems, the pollutants gradually are dispersed throughout the eastern part of the continent.

  5. Asparagusic acid.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2014-01-01

    Asparagusic acid (1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid) is a simple sulphur-containing 5-membered heterocyclic compound that appears unique to asparagus, though other dithiolane derivatives have been identified in non-food species. This molecule, apparently innocuous toxicologically to man, is the most probable culprit responsible for the curious excretion of odorous urine following asparagus ingestion. The presence of the two adjacent sulphur atoms leads to an enhanced chemical reactivity, endowing it with biological properties including the ability to substitute potentially for α-lipoic acid in α-keto-acid oxidation systems. This brief review collects the scattered data available in the literature concerning asparagusic acid and highlights its properties, intermediary metabolism and exploratory applications. PMID:24099657

  6. Assessment of Mental Status.

    PubMed

    Finney, Glen R; Minagar, Alireza; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2016-02-01

    Assessing the mental status of patients with a neurobehavioral disorder is a critical element in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. This assessment should always be performed after the patient's history it taken and a general physical as well as a neurologic examination is completed. The mental status examination commences with observing the patient's appearance and level of consciousness. The examiner should also pay attention to patient's social behavior, emotional state and mood. There are 3 major means of assessing a patient's mental status. One type attempts to determine if the patient is demented and the severity of the dementia as it pertains to their ability to perform activities of daily living as well as instrumental activities. A second type of assessment utilizes what may be termed as "screening tests" or "omnibus tests". These brief tests are performed independent of the patient's history and examination. The two most frequently used screening tests are the Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). The third means of assessing a patient's mental status is by using specific neuropsychological tests that focus on specific domains of cognition, such as frontal executive functions, attention, episodic verbal and visuospatial memory, declarative knowledge such as language (speech, reading and writing) and arithmetical, as well as visuospatial and perceptual abilities. These neurobehavioral, neuropsychiatric and neuropsychological assessments of patients with a cognitive decline and behavioral abnormalities should often be accompanied by laboratory tests, and neuroimaging that can help determine the underlying pathologic process so that effective therapeutic and management approaches can be provided. PMID:26613992

  7. Folate status and health: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Rima; Oexle, Konrad; Rißmann, Anke; Pietrzik, Klaus; Koletzko, Berthold

    2016-04-01

    Each year approximately 2400 pregnancies develop folic acid-preventable spina bifida and anencephaly in Europe. Currently, 70% of all affected pregnancies are terminated after prenatal diagnosis. The prevalence of neural tube defects (NTDs) has been significantly lowered in more than 70 countries worldwide by applying fortification with folic acid. Periconceptional supplementation of folic acid also reduces the risk of congenital heart diseases, preterm birth, low birth weight, and health problems associated with child mortality and morbidity. All European governments failed to issue folic acid fortification of centrally processed and widely eaten foods in order to prevent NTDs and other unwanted birth outcomes. The estimated average dietary intake of folate in Germany is 200 μg dietary folate equivalents (DFE)/day. More than half of German women of reproductive age do not consume sufficient dietary folate to achieve optimal serum or red blood cell folate concentrations (>18 or 1000 nmol/L, respectively) necessary to prevent spina bifida and anencephaly. To date, targeted supplementation is recommended in Europe, but this approach failed to reduce the rate of NTDs during the last 10 years. Public health centers for prenatal care and fortification with folic acid in Europe are urgently needed. Only such an action will sufficiently improve folate status, prevent at least 50% of the NTD cases, reduce child mortality and morbidity, and alleviate other health problems associated with low folate such as anemia. PMID:25825915

  8. [Gastric Acid].

    PubMed

    Ruíz Chávez, R

    1996-01-01

    Gastric acid, a product of parietal cells secretion, full fills multiple biological roles which are absolutely necessary to keep corporal homeostasis. The production of the acid depends upon an effector cellular process represented in the first step by histamine, acetilcholine and gastrin, first messengers of the process. These interact with specific receptors than in sequence activate second messengers -cAMP and the calcium-calmodulin system- which afterwards activate a kinase. An specific protein is then phosphorilated by this enzyme, being the crucial factor that starts the production of acid. Finally, a proton bomb, extrudes the acid towards the gastric lumen. The secretion process mentioned above, is progressive lyactivated in three steps, two of which are stimulators -cephalic and gastric phases- and the other one inhibitor or intestinal phase. These stages are started by mental and neurological phenomena -thought, sight, smell or memory-; by food, drugs or other ingested substances; and by products of digestion. Changes in regulation of acid secretion, in the structure of gastro-duodenal mucosal barrier by a wide spectrum of factors and agents including food, drugs and H. pylori, are the basis of acid-peptic disease, entity in which gastric acid plays a fundamental role. From the therapeutic point of view, so at the theoretical as at the practical levels, t is possible to interfere with the secretion of acid by neutralization of some of the steps of the effector cellular process. An adequate knowledge of the basics related to gastric acid, allows to create strategies for the clinical handling of associated pathology, specifically in relation to peptic acid disease in all of the known clinical forms. PMID:12165790

  9. Modulation of DL-. alpha. -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid/quisqualate receptors by phospholipase A sub 2 : A necessary step in long-term potentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Massicotte, G.; Baudry, M. ); Vanderklish, P.; Lynch, G. )

    1991-03-01

    The effects of kainate (KA)-induced epileptic seizures on the binding properites of hippocampal glutamate receptors, on the modulation of DL-{alpha}-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/quisqualate receptor by phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2}), and on the formation of long-term potentiation (LTP) were studied in hippocampal membranes and hippocampal slices. Systemic administration of KA produced specific changes in the binding properties of the AMPA/quisqualate receptors and its regulation. Whereas the binding of various ligands to the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors was not modified by KA treatment, there was a singificant decrease in the maximal number of binding sites for ({sup 3}H)AMPA. The loss of LTP was not due to changes in postsynaptic responses elicited by the bursts that trigger the potentiation effect, thus suggesting that KA treatment disrupts processes that follow N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation. Systemic administration of KA was associated with calpain activation as the amount of spectrin breakdown products was increased severalfold in hippocampus but not in cerebellum. Pretreatment of telencephalic membranes with calpain greatly reduced the PLA{sub 2}-induced increase in ({sup 3}H)AMPA binding. The results provide evidence in favor of an essential role of PLA{sub 2} in the development of LTP and suggest that the order of activation of different calcium-dependent processes is critical for producing the final changes underlying LTP.

  10. Functional restoration using basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) infusion in Kainic acid induced cognitive dysfunction in rat: neurobehavioural and neurochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nishi; Seth, Kavita; Srivastava, Nalini; Khanna, Vinay K; Agrawal, Ashok Kumar

    2008-07-01

    Neurogenesis occurs in dentate gyrus of adult hippocampus under the influence of various mitogenic factors. Growth factors besides instigating the proliferation of neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) in dentate gyrus, also supports their differentiation to cholinergic neurons. In the present study, an attempt has been made to investigate the neurotrophic effect of bFGF in Kainic acid (KA) induced cognitive dysfunction in rats. Stereotaxic lesioning using (KA) was performed in hippocampal CA3 region of rat's brain. Four-weeks post lesioning rats were assessed for impairment in learning and memory using Y maze followed by bFGF infusion in dentate gyrus region. The recovery was evaluated after bFGF infusion using neurochemical, neurobehavioural and immunohistochemical approaches and compared with lesioned group. Significant impairment in learning and memory (P < 0.01) observed in lesioned animals, four weeks post lesioning exhibited significant restoration (P < 0.001) following bFGF infusion twice at one and four week post lesion. The bFGF infused animals exhibited recovery in hippocampus cholinergic (76%)/ dopaminergic (46%) receptor binding and enhanced Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity in CA3 region. The results suggest restorative potential of bFGF in cognitive dysfunctions, possibly due to mitogenic effect on dentate gyrus neurogenic area leading to generation and migration of newer cholinergic neurons. PMID:17955369

  11. Antiepileptic Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla and Rhynchophylline Involved in the Initiation of c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Phosphorylation of MAPK Signal Pathways in Acute Seizures of Kainic Acid-Treated Rats.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsin-Cheng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Chung-Hsiang; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Seizures cause inflammation of the central nervous system. The extent of the inflammation is related to the severity and recurrence of the seizures. Cell surface receptors are stimulated by stimulators such as kainic acid (KA), which causes intracellular mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal pathway transmission to coordinate a response. It is known that Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR) and rhynchophylline (RP) have anticonvulsive effects, although the mechanisms remain unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop a novel strategy for treating epilepsy by investigating how UR and RP initiate their anticonvulsive mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered KA (12 mg/kg, i.p.) to induce seizure before being sacrificed. The brain was removed 3 h after KA administration. The results indicate that pretreatment with UR (1.0 g/kg), RP (0.25 mg/kg), and valproic acid (VA, 250 mg/kg) for 3 d could reduce epileptic seizures and could also reduce the expression of c-Jun aminoterminal kinase phosphorylation (JNKp) of MAPK signal pathways in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus brain tissues. Proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 β , IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor- α remain unchanged, indicating that the anticonvulsive effect of UR and RP is initially involved in the JNKp MAPK signal pathway during the KA-induced acute seizure period. PMID:24381640

  12. Acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Hileman, B.

    1983-03-01

    Fog in areas of southern California previously thought to be pollution-free has been shown to have a pH as low as 1.69. It has been found to be most acidic after smoggy days, suggesting that it forms on the aerosol associated with the previously exiting smog. Studies on Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks show that fog water is often 10 times as acidic as rainwater. As a result of their studies, California plans to spend $4 million on acid deposition research in the coming year. (JMT)

  13. Direct Imaging of Hippocampal Epileptiform Calcium Motifs Following Kainic Acid Administration in Freely Behaving Mice

    PubMed Central

    Berdyyeva, Tamara K.; Frady, E. Paxon; Nassi, Jonathan J.; Aluisio, Leah; Cherkas, Yauheniya; Otte, Stephani; Wyatt, Ryan M.; Dugovic, Christine; Ghosh, Kunal K.; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Lovenberg, Timothy; Bonaventure, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to abnormally high calcium concentrations is thought to be a core mechanism underlying hippocampal damage in epileptic patients; however, no prior study has characterized calcium activity during seizures in the live, intact hippocampus. We have directly investigated this possibility by combining whole-brain electroencephalographic (EEG) measurements with microendoscopic calcium imaging of pyramidal cells in the CA1 hippocampal region of freely behaving mice treated with the pro-convulsant kainic acid (KA). We observed that KA administration led to systematic patterns of epileptiform calcium activity: a series of large-scale, intensifying flashes of increased calcium fluorescence concurrent with a cluster of low-amplitude EEG waveforms. This was accompanied by a steady increase in cellular calcium levels (>5 fold increase relative to the baseline), followed by an intense spreading calcium wave characterized by a 218% increase in global mean intensity of calcium fluorescence (n = 8, range [114–349%], p < 10−4; t-test). The wave had no consistent EEG phenotype and occurred before the onset of motor convulsions. Similar changes in calcium activity were also observed in animals treated with 2 different proconvulsant agents, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), suggesting the measured changes in calcium dynamics are a signature of seizure activity rather than a KA-specific pathology. Additionally, despite reducing the behavioral severity of KA-induced seizures, the anticonvulsant drug valproate (VA, 300 mg/kg) did not modify the observed abnormalities in calcium dynamics. These results confirm the presence of pathological calcium activity preceding convulsive motor seizures and support calcium as a candidate signaling molecule in a pathway connecting seizures to subsequent cellular damage. Integrating in vivo calcium imaging with traditional assessment of seizures could potentially increase translatability of pharmacological

  14. Neuroprotective effect of Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis against kainic acid-neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Juárez, Angélica; Chamorro, Germán; Alva-Sánchez, Claudia; Paniagua-Castro, Norma; Pacheco-Rosado, Jorge

    2016-08-01

    Context Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis (SP) is a cyanobacterium which has attracted attention because of its nutritional value and pharmacological properties. It was previously reported that SP reduces oxidative stress in the hippocampus and protects against damaging neurobehavioural effects of systemic kainic acid (KA). It is widely known that the systemic administration of KA induces neuronal damage, specifically in the CA3 hippocampal region. Objective The present study determines if the SP sub-chronic treatment has neuroprotective properties against KA. Materials and methods Male SW mice were treated with SP during 24 d, at doses of 0, 200, and 800 mg/kg, once daily, and with KA (35 mg/kg, ip) as a single dose on day 14. After the treatment, a histological analysis was performed and the number of atrophic neuronal cells in CA3 hippocampal region was quantified. Results Pretreatment with SP does not protect against seizures induced by KA. However, mortality in the SP 200 and the SP 800 groups was of 20%, while for the KA group, it was of 60%. A single KA ip administration produced a considerable neuronal damage, whereas both doses of SP sub-chronic treatment reduced the number of atrophic neurons in CA3 hippocampal region with respect to the KA group. Discussion The SP neurobehaviour improvement after KA systemic administration correlates with the capacity of SP to reduce KA-neuronal death in CA3 hippocampal cells. This neuroprotection may be related to the antioxidant properties of SP. Conclusion SP reduces KA-neuronal death in CA3 hippocampal cells. PMID:26799655

  15. Mental Representations of Social Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiao, Joan Y.; Bordeaux, Andrew R.; Ambady, Nalni

    2004-01-01

    How do people think about social status? We investigated the nature of social status and number representations using a semantic distance latency test. In Study 1, 21 college students compared words connoting different social status as well as numbers, which served as a control task. Participants were faster at comparing occupations and numbers…

  16. Sibling Status Effects: Adult Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskett, Linda Musun

    1985-01-01

    This study attempted to determine what expectations or beliefs adults might hold about a child based on his or her sibling status alone. Ratings on 50 adjective pairs for each of three sibling status types, only, oldest, and youngest child, were assessed in relation to adult expectations, birth order, and parental status of rater. (Author/DST)

  17. Comparing Health Status

    PubMed Central

    Shah, C.P.; Johnson, R.

    1992-01-01

    European settlers in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand each developed similar policies in dealing with the indigenous peoples of the land they colonized. As a result of contact with the Europeans, these peoples experinced dispossession, deprivation, and demographic decline. Their morbidity and mortality retes are consistently higher than those of the nonindigenous population. To achieve further improvement in their health status, indigenous peoples must begin to play a dominant role in the planning and delivery of health care services. PMID:21221339

  18. Status of MARS Code

    SciTech Connect

    N.V. Mokhov

    2003-04-09

    Status and recent developments of the MARS 14 Monte Carlo code system for simulation of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades in shielding, accelerator and detector components in the energy range from a fraction of an electronvolt up to 100 TeV are described. these include physics models both in strong and electromagnetic interaction sectors, variance reduction techniques, residual dose, geometry, tracking, histograming. MAD-MARS Beam Line Build and Graphical-User Interface.

  19. Gaia: Status and Promises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozzetti, A.

    2015-10-01

    The power of micro-arcsecond (µas) astrometry is about to be unleashed. ESA's Gaia mission, now entering its second year of routine science operations, will soon fulfil its promise for revolutionary science in the countless aspects of Galactic astronomy and astrophysics. I will briefly review the Gaia mission status of operations, and the scenario for intermediate data releases. Iwill then illustrate the potential of µas astrometry for detection and improved characterization of planetary systems in the neighborhood of the Sun.

  20. NASA Dryden Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    NASA Dryden has been engaged in exciting work that will enable lighter weight and more fuel efficient vehicles through advanced control and dynamics technologies. The main areas of emphasis are Enabling Light-weight Flexible Structures, real time control surface optimization for fuel efficiency and autonomous formation flight. This presentation provides a description of the current and upcoming work in these areas. Additionally, status is provided Dryden's work on HTV-2.

  1. The status of GALLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Cribier, M. . Dept. de Physique des Particules Elementaires)

    1990-01-01

    The present status of the Gallium Solar Neutrino Experiment performed by the GALLEX Collaboration in the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory is described. The implementation phase of this experiment is now completed, the whole gallium is at hand and data taking starts now. After a short introduction and an outline of the basic experimental procedure, details will be given on different parts of the experiment and on some background. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Automated Status Notification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Automated Status Notification System (ASNS) was born out of need. To prevent "hacker attacks," Lewis' telephone system needed to monitor communications activities 24 hr a day, 7 days a week. With decreasing staff resources, this continuous monitoring had to be automated. By utilizing existing communications hardware, a UNIX workstation, and NAWK (a pattern scanning and processing language), we implemented a continuous monitoring system.

  3. Status of Sundstrand research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bateman, Don

    1991-01-01

    Wind shear detection status is presented in the form of view-graphs. The following subject areas are covered: second generation detection (Q-bias, gamma bias, temperature biases, maneuvering flight modulation, and altitude modulation); third generation wind shear detection (use wind shear computation to augment flight path and terrain alerts, modulation of alert thresholds based on wind/terrain data base, incorporate wind shear/terrain alert enhancements from predictive sensor data); and future research and development.

  4. System status display information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, L. G.; Erickson, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    The system Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the flight crew with enhanced capabilities for monitoring and managing aircraft systems. Guidelines for the design of the electronic system displays were established. The technical approach involved the application of a system engineering approach to the design of candidate displays and the evaluation of a Hernative concepts by part-task simulation. The system engineering and selection of candidate displays are covered.

  5. MARS Flight Engineering Status

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Morris, Scott J.; Thompson, Robert C.; Willett, Jesse A.

    2010-04-06

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey Flight Engineering project (MARS FE) has designed a high purity germanium (HPGe) crystal array for conducting a wide range of field measurements. In addition to the HPGe detector system, a platform-specific shock and vibration isolation system and environmental housing have been designed to support demonstration activities in a maritime environment on an Unmanned Surface Vehicle (USV). This report describes the status of the equipment as of the end of FY09.

  6. Electronic Status Board

    2004-06-02

    This software was developed to post real-time process status and building conditions to operators, system engineers, system managers, and all support personnel. Data input is via operator console, strategically located throughout the facility, or by electronic rounds tablet. The system requires a person to log in with a unique user id and password to edit data. Viewing system status does not require log in and can be done from any desktop location running FileMaker. Oncemore » logged into the system, all new records saved are stamped with date, time and user name, and a historical copy is created that can be brought up to review status. There is no limitation to the amount of records that can be saved in the historical databases. The system will flag all out of limit conditions on the screen and enter that record on a turnover summery page which displays only flagged items. System conditions are displayed on a plasma display which scrolls through the various system condition screens. The system also shows floor plans that reflect specific building radiological conditions which aides in pre job briefings to show all hazards to personnel entering specific locations. The input screen is displayed on a second standard computer monitor connected to the input PC. There are several popup screens that require user intervention to ensure that the user wants to edit the data, is editing the appropriate sytem, and if they want to continue to stay logged into the system. Each workstation is connected to a Uninterrupted Power Supply which will shut each system down safely in a power failure. The server is configured to print out current status upon notification from the UPS that power has failed. The system also has a video input card which is connected to a DVD/VCR which shows safety meetings, and images taken from a digital camera used to show specific locations/items for pre-job briefings.« less

  7. Status of VIRGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgo Collaboration; Acernese, F.; Amico, P.; Arnaud, N.; Babusci, D.; Ballardin, G.; Barillé, R.; Barone, F.; Barsuglia, M.; Beauville, F.; Bellachia, F.; Bizouard, M. A.; Boccara, C.; Boget, D.; Bondu, F.; Bourgoin, C.; Bozzi, A.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brillet, A.; Brisson, V.; Brocco, L.; Buskulic, D.; Cachenaut, J.; Calamai, G.; Calloni, E.; Campagna, E.; Casciano, C.; Cattuto, C.; Cavalier, F.; Cavaliere, S.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chollet, F.; Cleva, F.; Cokelaer, T.; Conforto, G.; Cortese, S.; Coulon, J. P.; Cuoco, E.; Dattilo, V.; Y Davíd, P.; Davier, M.; De Rosa, M.; De Rosa, R.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dujardin, B.; Dominici, P.; Eleuteri, A.; Enard, D.; Evangelista, G.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Forest, D.; Fournier, J. D.; Fournier, L.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganau, P.; Gennai, A.; Gennaro, G.; Giacobone, L.; Giazotto, A.; Giordano, G.; Girard, C.; Gougoulat, G.; Guidi, G. M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hermel, R.; Heusse, P.; Holloway, L.; Honglie, F.; Iannarelli, M.; Journet, L.; Krecklbergh, S.; Lagrange, B.; La Penna, P.; Leliboux, M.; Lieunard, B.; Lomtadze, T.; Loriette, V.; Losurdo, G.; Loupias, M.; Mackowski, J. M.; Majorana, E.; Man, C. N.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Martelli, F.; Masserot, A.; Massonnet, L.; Mataguez, S.; Menzinger, F.; Mazzoni, M.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Montorio, J. L.; Moreau, F.; Moreau, J.; Morgado, N.; Mornet, F.; Mours, B.; Mugnier, P.; Nenci, F.; Pacheco, J.; Pai, A.; Palomba, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Paoli, L.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Perciballi, M.; Peruzzi, S.; Perniola, B.; Pinard, L.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E.; Puccinelli, S.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Qipiani, K.; Ramonet, J.; Rapagnani, P.; Reita, V.; Remillieux, A.; Ricci, F.; Richard, F.; Roger, J. P.; Ruggi, P.; Russo, G.; Solimeno, S.; Stanga, R.; Taddei, R.; Teuler, J. M.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Trinquet, H.; Turri, E.; Varvella, M.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Veziant, O.; Viceré, A.; Vilalte, S.; Y Vinet, J.; Vocca, H.; Yvert, M.; Zhang, Z.

    2003-09-01

    We report on the status of the VIRGO detector as of the beginning of 2003. In particular, we summarize the results obtained during the commissioning of the central portion of the detector, consisting of a power-recycled Michelson interferometer, and we outline the steps which will lead during 2003 and 2004 to the commissioning and operation of the full scale, 3 km long VIRGO detector.

  8. Folic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the blood vessel to keep it open. Bipolar disorder. Taking folic acid does not appear to improve the antidepressant effects of lithium in people with bipolar disorder. However, taking folate with the medication valproate improves ...

  9. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... as mefenamic acid may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may ... like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.Keep all appointments with your ...

  10. ACID RAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid precipitation has become one of the major environmental problems of this decade. It is a challenge to scientists throughout the world. Researchers from such diverse disciplines as plant pathology, soil science, bacteriology, meteorology and engineering are investigating diff...

  11. Acid Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the fact that the acidity of rain and snow falling on parts of the U.S. and Europe has been rising. The reasons are still not entirely clear and the consequences have yet to be well evaluated. (MLH)

  12. Carnosic acid.

    PubMed

    Birtić, Simona; Dussort, Pierre; Pierre, François-Xavier; Bily, Antoine C; Roller, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Carnosic acid (salvin), which possesses antioxidative and antimicrobial properties, is increasingly exploited within the food, nutritional health and cosmetics industries. Since its first extraction from a Salvia species (∼70 years ago) and its identification (∼50 years ago), numerous articles and patents (∼400) have been published on specific food and medicinal applications of Rosmarinus and Salvia plant extracts abundant in carnosic acid. In contrast, relevant biochemical, physiological or molecular studies in planta have remained rare. In this overview, recent advances in understanding of carnosic acid distribution, biosynthesis, accumulation and role in planta, and its applications are summarised. We also discuss the deficiencies in our understanding of the relevant biochemical processes, and suggest the molecular targets of carnosic acid. Finally, future perspectives and studies related to its potential roles are highlighted. PMID:25639596

  13. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Amicar® Oral Solution ... Aminocaproic acid comes as a tablet and a solution (liquid) to take by mouth. It is usually ... it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away ...

  14. Tranexamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat heavy bleeding during the menstrual cycle (monthly periods) in women. Tranexamic acid is in ... tablets for more than 5 days in a menstrual cycle or take more than 6 tablets in a ...

  15. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  16. Status of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshay, M.; Prokopius, P. R.; Simons, S. N.; King, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    In both the electric utility and onsite integrated energy system applications, reducing cost and increasing reliability are the main technology drivers. The longstanding barrier to the attainment of these goals, which manifests itself in a number of ways, was materials. The differences in approach among the three major participants (United Technologies Corporation, Westinghouse Electric Corporation/Energy Research Corporation, and Engelhard Industries) and their unique technological features, including electrodes, matrices, intercell cooling, bipolar/separator plates, electrolyte management, fuel selection and system design philosophy are discussed.

  17. Sensing of redox status by TRP channels.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Nozomi; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Mori, Yasuo

    2016-08-01

    Cellular redox status is maintained by the balance between series of antioxidant systems and production of reactive oxygen/nitrogenous species. Cells utilize this redox balance to mediate diverse physiological functions. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are non-selective cation channels that act as biosensors for environmental and noxious stimuli, such as capsaicin and allicin, as well as changes in temperature and conditions inside the cell. TRP channels also have an emerging role as essential players in detecting cellular redox status to regulate cellular signals mediating physiological phenomena. Reactive species activate TRP channels either directly through oxidative amino acid modifications or indirectly through second messengers. For instance, TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPC5 channels are directly activated by oxidizing agents through cysteine modification; whereas, TRPM2 channel is indirectly activated by production of ADP-ribose. One intriguing property of several TRP channels is susceptibility to both oxidizing and reducing stimuli, suggesting TRP channels could potentially act as a bidirectional sensor for detecting deviations in redox status. In this review, we discuss the unique chemical physiologies of redox sensitive TRP channels and their physiological significance in Ca(2+) signaling. PMID:26969190

  18. Pharmacotherapy for Status Epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Trinka, Eugen; Höfler, Julia; Leitinger, Markus; Brigo, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) represents the most severe form of epilepsy. It is one of the most common neurologic emergencies, with an incidence of up to 61 per 100,000 per year and an estimated mortality of 20 %. Clinically, tonic-clonic convulsive SE is divided into four subsequent stages: early, established, refractory, and super-refractory. Pharmacotherapy of status epilepticus, especially of its later stages, represents an "evidence-free zone," due to a lack of high-quality, controlled trials to inform clinical decisions. This comprehensive narrative review focuses on the pharmacotherapy of SE, presented according to the four-staged approach outlined above, and providing pharmacological properties and efficacy/safety data for each antiepileptic drug according to the strength of scientific evidence from the available literature. Data sources included MEDLINE and back-tracking of references in pertinent studies. Intravenous lorazepam or intramuscular midazolam effectively control early SE in approximately 63-73 % of patients. Despite a suboptimal safety profile, intravenous phenytoin or phenobarbital are widely used treatments for established SE; alternatives include valproate, levetiracetam, and lacosamide. Anesthetics are widely used in refractory and super-refractory SE, despite the current lack of trials in this field. Data on alternative treatments in the later stages are limited. Valproate and levetiracetam represent safe and effective alternatives to phenobarbital and phenytoin for treatment of established SE persisting despite first-line treatment with benzodiazepines. To date there are no class I data to support recommendations for most antiepileptic drugs for established, refractory, and super-refractory SE. Limiting the methodologic heterogeneity across studies is required and high-class randomized, controlled trials to inform clinicians about the best treatment in established and refractory status are needed. PMID:26310189

  19. VISTA: project status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherson, Alistair M.; Born, Andrew; Sutherland, Will; Emerson, Jim; Little, Bryan; Jeffers, Paul; Stewart, Malcolm; Murray, John; Ward, Kim

    2006-06-01

    VISTA is a 4-m wide field survey telescope with a near infra-red camera and a demanding f/1 primary design now well into its manufacturing phase. We contracted out major items, and generated a coordinated approach to the management of engineering budgets through systems engineering, risks through risk management, and safety through the generation of safety cases. Control of the interfaces and science requirements has been maintained and developed through the current phase. The project is developing the commissioning plan to deliver an effective and safe facility. The current status of VISTA is presented as we move towards the on site integration phase.

  20. CHEF: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Ostiguy, J.-F.; Michelotti, L.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    CHEF refers both to a framework and to an interactive application emphasizing accelerator optics calculations. The framework supports multiple domains of applications: e.g. nonlinear analysis, perturbation theory, and tracking. Its underlying philosophy is to provide an infrastructure with minimum hidden implicit assumptions, general enough to facilitate both routine and specialized computational tasks, and to minimize the duplication of necessary, complex bookkeeping tasks. CHEF was already described in recent conferences. This paper is a status report on recent developments, including issues related to applications to high energy linacs.

  1. Waterborne cryptosporidiosis: current status.

    PubMed

    Smith, H V; Rose, J B

    1998-01-01

    In the past ten years Cryptosporidium oocysts have been shown to be common contaminants of water, causing at least 19 waterborne outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis which have affected more than 427 000 individuals. Recommended methods for oocyst isolation and enumeration are time-consuming and inefficient and experts state that the absence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in drinking water can never be guaranteed. In the UK alone, a National Research Programme costing pound3 million has been undertaken. Here, Huw Smith and Joan Rose review the current status of knowledge and identify approaches taken by UK and USA Government regulatory bodies in order to reduce the likelihood of waterborne transmission. PMID:17040684

  2. Model Validation Status Review

    SciTech Connect

    E.L. Hardin

    2001-11-28

    The primary objective for the Model Validation Status Review was to perform a one-time evaluation of model validation associated with the analysis/model reports (AMRs) containing model input to total-system performance assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain site recommendation (SR). This review was performed in response to Corrective Action Request BSC-01-C-01 (Clark 2001, Krisha 2001) pursuant to Quality Assurance review findings of an adverse trend in model validation deficiency. The review findings in this report provide the following information which defines the extent of model validation deficiency and the corrective action needed: (1) AMRs that contain or support models are identified, and conversely, for each model the supporting documentation is identified. (2) The use for each model is determined based on whether the output is used directly for TSPA-SR, or for screening (exclusion) of features, events, and processes (FEPs), and the nature of the model output. (3) Two approaches are used to evaluate the extent to which the validation for each model is compliant with AP-3.10Q (Analyses and Models). The approaches differ in regard to whether model validation is achieved within individual AMRs as originally intended, or whether model validation could be readily achieved by incorporating information from other sources. (4) Recommendations are presented for changes to the AMRs, and additional model development activities or data collection, that will remedy model validation review findings, in support of licensing activities. The Model Validation Status Review emphasized those AMRs that support TSPA-SR (CRWMS M&O 2000bl and 2000bm). A series of workshops and teleconferences was held to discuss and integrate the review findings. The review encompassed 125 AMRs (Table 1) plus certain other supporting documents and data needed to assess model validity. The AMRs were grouped in 21 model areas representing the modeling of processes affecting the natural and

  3. Assessing volume status.

    PubMed

    Scott, Michael C; Mallemat, Haney

    2014-11-01

    Shock is a physiologic state associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. The clinician has several tools available to evaluate volume status. Each modality has its benefits and limitations but, to date, no one test can indicate with 100% accuracy which patients will be truly volume responsive. Although the search for the Holy Grail of a perfect intravascular monitor continues, we must remember the importance of early, aggressive, and goal-directed interventions for patients in shock. Finally, there is no substitute for the most important intervention-the frequent presence of the physician at the patient's bedside. PMID:25441036

  4. Status of GEO 600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willke, B.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Balasubramanian, R.; Barr, B. W.; Berukoff, S.; Cagnoli, G.; Cantley, C. A.; Casey, M. M.; Chelkowski, S.; Churches, D.; Colacino, C. N.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Cutler, C.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, R.; Dupuis, R. J.; Elliffe, E.; Fallnich, C.; Freise, A.; Goßler, S.; Grant, A.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Harms, J.; Heinzel, G.; Heng, I. S.; Hepstonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hough, J.; Ingley, R.; Itoh, Y.; Jennrich, O.; Jones, R.; Hutter, S. H.; Kawabe, K.; Killow, C.; Kötter, K.; Krishnan, B.; Leonhardt, V.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Malec, M.; Mercer, R. A.; Messenger, C.; Mohanty, S.; Mossavi, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Nagano, S.; Newton, G. P.; Papa, M. A.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Pitkin, M.; Plissi, M. V.; Quetschke, V.; Re, V.; Reid, S.; Ribichini, L.; Robertson, D. I.; Robertson, N. A.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Seifert, F.; Sintes, A. M.; Smith, J. R.; Sneddon, P. H.; Strain, K. A.; Taylor, I.; Torrie, C. I.; Ungarelli, C.; Vecchio, A.; Ward, H.; Weiland, U.; Welling, H.; Williams, P.; Winkler, W.; Woan, G.; Zawischa, I.

    2004-03-01

    The GEO 600 laser interferometer with 600 m armlength is currently being commissioned as a part of a worldwide network of gravitational wave detectors. Due to the use of advanced technologies such as signal recycling and multiple pendulum suspensions with a monolithic last stage the anticipated sensitivity of GEO 600 is close to the initial sensitivity of km baseline detectors. This paper describes the status of the detector as of November 2003 with special emphasis on its performance during the first serious data-taking periods and on the experimental challenges encountered during the commissioning of the dual-recycled detector.

  5. SLC - status and development

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.

    1986-06-01

    The status of a three year construction program, begun October 1, 1983, of the SLAC Linear Collider is reviewed and evolutions of the original conceptual design are discussed. Subsystems of the project, that are described with emphasis on new or unusual technology, include: Electron Source and Injector, Damping Rings, Linear Accelerator Development, Energy (Klystron and Modulator) Upgrades, Positron Production and Reinjection, Arc Transport, Final Focus System, Control System and Conventional Facilities. Results from the commissioning program, which began in early 1986, and plans for the operation of the machine are presented.

  6. Status of Wheeler Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of status reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Wheeler Reservoir summarizes reservoir purposes and operation, reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, and water quality and aquatic biological conditions. The information presented here is from the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. If no recent data were available, historical data were summarized. If data were completely lacking, environmental professionals with special knowledge of the resource were interviewed. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Acid Rain: A Description of Bilingual Friesland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zondag, Koen

    1984-01-01

    Using acid rain as a metaphor, discusses the status of the Frisian language and culture as one which, though apparently thriving, is really threatened. Examines the sources of this threat, i.e., the education system, the church, mass communication and transportation, and the demise of the Frisian village community. (SED)

  8. RESULTS FROM THE MOUNTAIN ACID DEPOSITION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro) was initiated in 1993 as part of the research necessary to support the objectives of the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet), which was created to address the. requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). The main ob...

  9. Designer, acidic biochar influences calcareous soil characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An acidic (pH 5.8) biochar was created using a low pyrolysis temperature (350 degrees celsius) and steam activation to potentially improve the soil physicochemical status of an eroded calcareous soil. Biochar was added at 0, 1, 2, and 10 percent (by weight) to an eroded Portneuf soil (coarse-silty,...

  10. Why engineering lactic acid bacteria for biobutanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Gram-positive Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are considered attractive biocatalysts for biomass to biofuels for several reasons. They have GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) status that are acceptable in food, feed, and medical applications. LAB are fermentative: selected strains are capable of f...

  11. Cholesterol Status Modulates mRNA and Protein Levels of Genes Associated with Cholesterol Metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary saturated (S), monounsaturated (MU) and polyunsaturated (PU) fatty acids (FA) and cholesterol have been shown to be major determinants of plasma lipoprotein profiles. The objective was to determine the effect of whole body cholesterol status and dietary fatty acid saturation on genes associ...

  12. [Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus].

    PubMed

    Mizobuchi, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is a type of status epilepticus (SE) lacking a predominant motor manifestation. The annual prevalence of NCSE is estimated to reach 10 to 20 cases in every 100,000 people. While almost half of all SE cases are nonconvulsive, there are several different types of NCSE: 1) epileptic absence SE, 2) epileptic focal seizure SE with consciousness disturbance (complex partial SE), 3) de novo NCSE of late onset, 4) NCSE due to acute brain injury or prolonged consciousness disturbance after convulsive SE. An electroencephalography (EEG) evaluation is necessary to diagnose NCSE. However, continuous EEG (cEEG) monitoring over at least 24 hours is preferable to detect NCSE, as cognitive disturbances due to this condition may fluctuate over time. In addition, neuroimaging techniques, such as MRI with arterial spin labeled sequences or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can demonstrate hyperperfused areas in cases of focal onset. Thus, patients presenting with alternative cognitive disturbance with or without mild confusion should be evaluated using cEEG monitoring or blood flow imaging so as not to overlook treatable NCSE. PMID:27056863

  13. Folic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease called vitiligo, and an inherited disease called Fragile-X syndrome. It is also used for reducing harmful side ... to blood clots (ischemic stroke). Inherited disease called Fragile-X syndrome.Taking folic acid by mouth does not improve ...

  14. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    An overview is presented of acid rain and the problems it causes to the environment worldwide. The acidification of lakes and streams is having a dramatic effect on aquatic life. Aluminum, present in virtually all forest soils, leaches out readily under acid conditions and interferes with the gills of all fish, some more seriously than others. There is evidence of major damage to forests in European countries. In the US, the most severe forest damage appears to be in New England, New York's Adirondacks, and the central Appalachians. This small region is part of a larger area of the Northeast and Canada that appears to have more acid rainfall than the rest of the country. It is downwind from major coal burning states, which produce about one quarter of US SO/sub 2/ emissions and one sixth of nitrogen oxide emissions. Uncertainties exist over the causes of forest damage and more research is needed before advocating expensive programs to reduce rain acidity. The President's current budget seeks an expansion of research funds from the current $30 million per year to $120 million.

  15. Formic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Formic acid ; CASRN 64 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  16. Selenious acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenious acid ; CASRN 7783 - 00 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  17. Benzoic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzoic acid ; CASRN 65 - 85 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  18. Trichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Trichloroacetic acid ( TCA ) ; CASRN 76 - 03 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonca

  19. Dichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Dichloroacetic acid ; CASRN 79 - 43 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  20. Acrylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylic acid ( CASRN 79 - 10 - 7 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  1. Cacodylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Cacodylic acid ; CASRN 75 - 60 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  2. Phosphoric acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phosphoric acid ; CASRN 7664 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  3. Stearic Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) is presented for the chemical, stearic acid. The profile lists the chemical's physical and harmful characteristics, exposure limits, and symptoms of major exposure, for the benefit of teachers and students, who use the chemical in the laboratory.

  4. Plasma fatty acid profile and alternative nutrition.

    PubMed

    Krajcovicová-Kudlácková, M; Simoncic, R; Béderová, A; Klvanová, J

    1997-01-01

    Plasma profile of fatty acids was examined in a group of children consisting of 7 vegans, 15 lactoovovegetarians and 10 semivegetarians. The children were 11-15 years old and the average period of alternative nutrition was 3.4 years. The results were compared with a group of 19 omnivores that constituted an average sample with respect to biochemical and hematological parameters from a larger study of health and nutritional status of children in Slovakia. Alternative nutrition groups had significantly lower values of saturated fatty acids. The content of oleic acid was identical to omnivores. A significant increase was observed for linoleic and alpha-linolenic (n-3) acids. The dihomo-gamma-linolenic (n-6) acid and arachidonic (n-6) acid values were comparable to omnivores for all alternative nutrition groups. Values of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in lactoovovegetarians were identical to those of omnivores whereas they were significantly increased in semivegetarians consuming fish twice a week. Due to the total exclusion of animal fats from the diet, vegans had significantly reduced values of palmitoleic acid as well as eicosapentaenoic (n-3) acid and docosahexaenoic (n-3) acid resulting in an increased n-6/n-3 ratio. Values of plasma fatty acids found in alternative nutrition groups can be explained by the higher intake of common vegetable oils (high content of linoleic acid), oils rich in alpha-linolenic acid (cereal germs, soybean oil, walnuts), as well as in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (fish). The results of fatty acids (except n-3 in vegans) and other lipid parameters confirm the beneficial effect of vegetarian nutrition in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:9491192

  5. Status review of PMR polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.

    1978-01-01

    The current status of first and second generation PMR polyimides are reviewed. Synthesis, processing, and applications were considered, using prepreg materials based on processable, high temperature resistant polyimides.

  6. EBIS preinjector construction status

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi,J.; Barton, D.; Beebe, E.; Bellavia, S.; Gould, O.; Kponou, A.; Lambiase, R.; Lessard, E.; Lockey, R.; LoDestro, V.; Mapes, M.; McCafferty, D.; McNerney, A.; Okamura, M.; Pendzick, A.; Phillips, D.; Pikin, A.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Scaduto, J.; Snydstrup, L.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; et al.

    2008-09-29

    A new heavy ion preinjector is presently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This preinjector uses an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), and an WQ and IH Linac, both operating at 100.625 MHz, to produce 2 MeV/u ions of any species for use, after further acceleration, at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory. Among the increased capabilities provided by this preinjector are the ability to produce ions of any species, and the ability to switch between multiple species in 1 second, to simultaneously meet the needs of both physics programs. Fabrication of all major components for this preinjector is in process, with testing of the EBIS and WQ starting this year. The status of this construction is presented.

  7. Mars Drilling Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, Humboldt, C., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the current status of work to explore Mars beneath the surface of planet. One of the objective of this work is to enable further exploration of Mars by humans. One of the requirements for this is to find water on Mars. The presences of water is critical for Human Exploration and a permanent presence on Mars. If water is present beneath the surface it is the best chance of finding life on Mars. The presentation includes a timeline showing the robotic missions, those that have already been on Mars, and planned missions, an explanation of why do we want to drill on Mars, and some of the challenges, Also include are reviews of a missions that would drill 200 and 4,000 to 6,000 meters into the Martian bedrock, and a overview description of the drill. There is a view of some places where we have hopes of finding water.

  8. ARAC status report: 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.; Greenly, G.D.

    1985-05-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability is a real-time emergency-response service available to federal and state agencies for providing estimates of the environmental consequences of accidental releases of radioactivity into the atmosphere. This includes the estimation of radiation doses to nearby population centers and the levels and extent of surface contamination. The service is currently being expanded to support the emergency response plans at approximately 50 Department of Defense and Department of Energy facilities. This expansion consists of the installation of enhanced computational and data communications and processing systems, development of terrain and geographic data bases, improvements in modeling capabilities, as well as increased staff housing facilities. This report summarizes the current status of ARAC and the requirements to receive the service.

  9. Status of French reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ballagny, A.

    1997-08-01

    The status of French reactors is reviewed. The ORPHEE and RHF reactors can not be operated with a LEU fuel which would be limited to 4.8 g U/cm{sup 3}. The OSIRIS reactor has already been converted to LEU. It will use U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} as soon as its present stock of UO{sub 2} fuel is used up, at the end of 1994. The decision to close down the SILOE reactor in the near future is not propitious for the start of a conversion process. The REX 2000 reactor, which is expected to be commissioned in 2005, will use LEU (except if the fast neutrons core option is selected). Concerning the end of the HEU fuel cycle, the best option is reprocessing followed by conversion of the reprocessed uranium to LEU.

  10. ITER EDA project status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuyanov, V. A.

    1996-10-01

    The status of the ITER design is as presented in the Interim Design Report accepted by the ITER council for considerations by ITER parties. Physical and technical parameters of the machine, conditions of operation of main nuclear systems, corresponding design and material choices are described, with conventional materials selected. To fully utilize the safety and economical potential of fusion advanced materials are necessary. ITER shall and can be built with materials already available. The ITER project and advanced fusion material developments can proceed in parallel. The role of ITER is to establish (experimentally) requirements to these materials and to provide a test bed for their final qualification in fusion reactor environment. To achieve this goal, the first wall/blanket modules test program is foreseen.

  11. Orion Project Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiewing, Albert; Hopkins, Jeffrey L.

    2015-05-01

    Originally started in 2012 as the Betelgeuse Project, interest in the other bright stars of Orion soon expanded the Project stars to include a total of six of the brightest stars in Orion. The name was then changed to the Orion Project. Orion is one of the most famous constellations. Its declination along the celestial equator is such that it is visible from most of northern and southern hemispheres. In addition, the stars of Orion are very bright and interesting. The Orion Project now includes the stars Betelgeuse, Rigel, Saiph and the three stars of Orion's belt, Mintaka, Alnilam and Alnitak. The projects objectives are both to help the observer produce quality photometric and spectroscopic data and to produce archival quality photometric (BVRIJH bands) and spectroscopy (low, mid and high-resolution) data. This paper is a summary of the Orion Project status.

  12. Status of RENO Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Jee-Seung

    2011-10-06

    The RENO (Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation) experiment is under construction to measure the smallest neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} using anti-neutrinos emitted from the Yonggwang nuclear power plant in Korea. The experiment is planning to start data-taking in early 2011 with two identical 16-ton Gadolinium loaded liquid scintillator detectors located near and far from the center of the reactor array. The estimated systematic uncertainty associated with the measurement is less than 0.6%. Based on three years of data, the expected statistical error is about 0.3% and it would be sensitive to measure the neutrino mixing angle in the range, sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13})> 0.02. In this talk, the overview and status of RENO experiment are described.

  13. Status of RENO Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jee-Seung

    2011-10-01

    The RENO (Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation) experiment is under construction to measure the smallest neutrino mixing angle θ13 using anti-neutrinos emitted from the Yonggwang nuclear power plant in Korea. The experiment is planning to start data-taking in early 2011 with two identical 16-ton Gadolinium loaded liquid scintillator detectors located near and far from the center of the reactor array. The estimated systematic uncertainty associated with the measurement is less than 0.6%. Based on three years of data, the expected statistical error is about 0.3% and it would be sensitive to measure the neutrino mixing angle in the range, sin2(2θ13)> 0.02. In this talk, the overview and status of RENO experiment are described.

  14. Status of RENO Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Eun-Ju; RENO Collaboration

    2011-08-01

    An experiment, RENO ( Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation), is under construction to measure the smallest and unknown neutrino mixing angle ( θ) using anti-neutrinos emitted from the Yonggwang nuclear power plant in Korea. The experimental setup consists of two identical 16-ton Gadolinium loaded liquid scintillator detectors located near and far from the reactor array to measure the deviations from the inverse square distance law. The experiment is planned to start data-taking in early 2011. An estimated systematic uncertainty associated with the measurement is less than 0.6%. Based on three years of data, it would be sensitive to measure the neutrino mixing angle in the range of s(2θ)>0.02. In this talk, the status of RENO experiment is described.

  15. ALSSAT Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. Y. Jannivine; Brown, Cheryl B.; Jeng, Frank F.; Anderson, Molly; Ewert, Michael K.

    2009-01-01

    The development of the Advanced Life Support (ALS) Sizing Analysis Tool (ALSSAT) using Microsoft(Registered TradeMark) Excel was initiated by the Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD) of Johnson Space Center (JSC) in 1997 to support the ALS and Exploration Offices in Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) design and studies. It aids the user in performing detailed sizing of the ECLSS for different combinations of the Exploration Life support (ELS) regenerative system technologies. This analysis tool will assist the user in performing ECLSS preliminary design and trade studies as well as system optimization efficiently and economically. The latest ALSSAT related publication in ICES 2004 detailed ALSSAT s development status including the completion of all six ELS Subsystems (ELSS), namely, the Air Management Subsystem, the Biomass Subsystem, the Food Management Subsystem, the Solid Waste Management Subsystem, the Water Management Subsystem, and the Thermal Control Subsystem and two external interfaces, including the Extravehicular Activity and the Human Accommodations. Since 2004, many more regenerative technologies in the ELSS were implemented into ALSSAT. ALSSAT has also been used for the ELS Research and Technology Development Metric Calculation for FY02 thru FY06. It was also used to conduct the Lunar Outpost Metric calculation for FY08 and was integrated as part of a Habitat Model developed at Langley Research Center to support the Constellation program. This paper will give an update on the analysis tool s current development status as well as present the analytical results of one of the trade studies that was performed.

  16. Stigma, status, and population health

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Jo C.; Lucas, Jeffrey W.; Ridgeway, Cecilia L.; Taylor, Catherine J.

    2014-01-01

    Stigma and status are the major concepts in two important sociological traditions that describe related processes but that have developed in isolation. Although both approaches have great promise for understanding and improving population health, this promise has not been realized. In this paper, we consider the applicability of status characteristics theory (SCT) to the problem of stigma with the goal of better understanding social systemic aspects of stigma and their health consequences. To this end, we identify common and divergent features of status and stigma processes. In both, labels that are differentially valued produce unequal outcomes in resources via culturally shared expectations associated with the labels; macro-level inequalities are enacted in micro-level interactions, which in turn reinforce macro-level inequalities; and status is a key variable. Status and stigma processes also differ: Higher- and lower-status states (e.g., male and female) are both considered normal, whereas stigmatized characteristics (e.g., mental illness) are not; interactions between status groups are guided by “social ordering schemas” that provide mutually agreed-upon hierarchies and interaction patterns (e.g., men assert themselves while women defer), whereas interactions between “normals” and stigmatized individuals are not so guided and consequently involve uncertainty and strain; and social rejection is key to stigma but not status processes. Our juxtaposition of status and stigma processes reveals close parallels between stigmatization and status processes that contribute to systematic stratification by major social groupings, such as race, gender, and SES. These parallels make salient that stigma is not only an interpersonal or intrapersonal process but also a macro-level process and raise the possibility of considering stigma as a dimension of social stratification. As such, stigma’s impact on health should be scrutinized with the same intensity as that of

  17. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  18. Regulation of hippocampal Fas receptor and death-inducing signaling complex after kainic acid treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Keller, Benjamin; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-12-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced brain neuronal cell death (especially in the hippocampus) was shown to be mainly mediated by the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway. This study investigated the regulation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway mediated by Fas ligand/Fas receptor and components of the indispensable death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) in the hippocampus (marked changes) and cerebral cortex (modest changes) of KA-treated mice. KA (45mg/kg) induced a severe behavioral syndrome with recurrent motor seizures (scores; maximal at 60-90min; minimal at 72h) with activation of hippocampal pro-apoptotic JNK (+2.5 fold) and increased GFAP (+57%) and nuclear PARP-1 fragmentation (+114%) 72h post-treatment (delayed neurotoxicity). In the extrinsic apoptotic pathway (hippocampus), KA (72h) reduced Fas ligand (-92%) and Fas receptor aggregates (-24%). KA (72h) also altered the contents of major DISC components: decreased FADD adaptor (-44%), reduced activation of initiator caspase-8 (-47%) and increased survival FLIP-S (+220%). Notably, KA (72h) upregulated the content of anti-apoptotic p-Ser191 FADD (+41%) and consequently the expression of p-FADD/FADD ratio (+1.9-fold), a neuroplastic index. Moreover, the p-FADD dependent transcription factor NF-κB was also increased (+61%) in the hippocampus after KA (72h). The convergent adaptation of the extrinsic apoptotic machinery 72h after KA in mice (with otherwise normal gross behavior) is a novel finding which suggests the induction of survival mechanisms to partly counteract the delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus. PMID:26044520

  19. Effects of genistein on cognitive dysfunction and hippocampal synaptic plasticity impairment in an ovariectomized rat kainic acid model of seizure.

    PubMed

    Khodamoradi, Mehdi; Asadi-Shekaari, Majid; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Esmaeilpour, Khadije; Sheibani, Vahid

    2016-09-01

    The major objective of this study was to investigate the probable effects of genistein (one of the most important soy phytoestrogens-SPEs) on seizure-induced cognitive dysfunction, hippocampal early long-term potentiation (E-LTP) impairment and morphological damage to CA1 neurons in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Three weeks after ovariectomy, cannulae were implanted over the left lateral ventricle. After a 7-day recovery period, animals were injected by genistein (0.5 or 5mg/kg) or vehicle during four consecutive days, each 24h. One h after the last treatment, kainic acid (KA) or vehicle was perfused into the left lateral ventricle to induce generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Finally, 7 days later, spatial learning and memory of animals were examined using the Morris water maze (MWM) task, hippocampal E-LTP was assessed using in-vivo field potential recordings and the morphology of hippocampal CA1 area was examined using Fluoro-Jade C staining. KA-induced generalized seizures resulted in spatial learning and memory impairment, E-LTP deficit and CA1 cell injury. Seizure-induced abnormalities improved partially only by the lower dose of genistein (0.5mg/kg). However, genistein at the higher dose (5mg/kg) did not have any beneficial effects. Also, genistein did not affect seizure activity. It is concluded that genistein may have partially preventive effects against seizure-induced cognitive impairment in OVX rats. Also, it seems that such effects of genistein are correlated with its beneficial effects on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and morphology. PMID:27235295

  20. STATUS OF THE MINOS EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    DIWAN,M.

    2002-09-13

    The author presents the status of the long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment MINOS at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). He also summarizes the status of the detector and beam construction, the expected event rates and sensitivity to physics. He also comments on possible future plans to improve the performance of the experiment.

  1. “AQMEII Status Update”

    EPA Science Inventory

    “AQMEII Status Update”This presentation provided an overview and status update of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initative (AQMEII) to participants of a workshop of the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (TF-HTAP) . In addition, the p...

  2. Status Offenders and Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Mason P., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Reviews recent changes in North Carolina law and policy affecting compulsory school attendance and status offenders. Status offenders are children who commit offenses that are unique to children--such as being truant, running away from home, or being beyond the disciplinary control of their parents. (Author/IRT)

  3. Status as a Valued Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberman, Bernardo A.; Loch, Christoph H.; Onculer, Ayse

    2004-01-01

    The striving for status has long been recognized in sociology and economics. Extensive theoretical arguments and empirical evidence propose that people view status as a sign of competence and pursue it as a means to achieve power and resources. A small literature, however, based on arguments from biology and evolutionary psychology, proposes that…

  4. Marital Status, Happiness, and Anomia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, John

    1981-01-01

    Survey data indicates that neither marital status nor marital happiness is related to anomia. Suggests a moderately strong negative relationship exists between education and anomia with a weak negative relationship between overall life satisfaction and anomia. Results indicate socioeconomic status remains the primary determinant of anomia for most…

  5. Early pregnancy B vitamin status, one carbon metabolism, pregnancy outcome and child development.

    PubMed

    Solé-Navais, Pol; Cavallé-Busquets, Pere; Fernandez-Ballart, Joan D; Murphy, Michelle M

    2016-07-01

    Periconception supplementation with folic acid is recommended until 12 gestational weeks to prevent neural tube defects. Doses of folic acid contained in supplements and timing and length of use during pregnancy vary. The effects of status in periconception and pregnancy folate, cobalamin, betaine and their interactions on one carbon metabolism (1C), as well as the global effect of 1C on foetal growth and pregnancy outcome, are reviewed. Results from prospective studies are reviewed. Cessation of folic acid supplement use after the first trimester is associated with a sharp drop in plasma folate status and enhanced conversion of betaine to dimethylglycine. Dimethylglycine production is also higher in mothers with low folate status than in those with normal-high folate status. The effects of high doses of folic acid on one carbon metabolism in mothers with low early pregnancy cobalamin status and on foetal growth are also reviewed. Several studies report that moderately elevated early pregnancy fasting plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) is inversely associated with birth weight and a predictor of intrauterine growth retardation. There is also evidence for increased risk of preterm birth when maternal folate status is low. PMID:26700149

  6. Effect of acute airway inflammation on the pulmonary antioxidant status.

    PubMed

    Deaton, Christopher M; Marlin, David J; Smith, Nicola C; Harris, Patricia A; Dagleish, Mark P; Schroter, Robert C; Kelly, Frank J

    2005-09-01

    Effects of acute airway inflammation induced by organic dust inhalation on pulmonary antioxidant status were investigated in healthy horses and horses affected by recurrent airway obstruction. Exposure to organic dust induced acute airway neutrophilia, which was associated with increases in elastase and decreases in ascorbic acid concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. However, markers of oxidative stress were unaffected, as was hydrogen peroxide in breath condensate. Decreases in ascorbic acid correlated with increased respiratory resistance (P = .001) when both groups were combined. In conclusion, acute neutrophilic airway inflammation does not result in significant evidence of oxidative stress in horses affected by recurrent airway obstruction. PMID:16203621

  7. Folic acid supplementation and IVF pregnancy outcome in women with unexplained infertility.

    PubMed

    Murto, T; Skoog Svanberg, A; Yngve, A; Nilsson, T K; Altmäe, S; Wånggren, K; Salumets, A; Stavreus-Evers, A

    2014-06-01

    Folic acid supplements are commonly used by infertile women which leads to a positive folate status. However, the effect of folic acid supplements on pregnancy outcome in women with unexplained infertility has not been well investigated. This study evaluated folic acid supplement use and folate status in women with unexplained infertility in relation to IVF pregnancy outcome. In addition, use of folic acid supplements and folate status were compared between women with unexplained infertility and fertile, nonpregnant control women. Women with unexplained infertility used significantly more folic acid supplements and had higher median total folic acid intake from supplements compared with fertile control women (both P < 0.001). Women with unexplained infertility also had significantly higher median plasma folate and lower median plasma homocysteine concentrations than fertile women (both P < 0.001), but folic acid supplementation or folate status were not related to pregnancy outcome in women with unexplained infertility. In conclusion, folic acid supplementation or good folate status did not have a positive effect on pregnancy outcome following infertility treatment in women with unexplained infertility. Folate is one of the B vitamins which has been suggested to be related to infertility. Folic acid is an artificial form of folate which is commonly used in dietary supplements. Folic acid supplementation has been shown to increase folate concentrations and decrease concentrations of the amino acid homocysteine in the blood. Folic acid supplementation is commonly used by infertile women, but the effect on pregnancy outcome in women with a diagnosis of unexplained infertility has not been thoroughly investigated. In the present study, folic acid supplement use and folate status (concentrations of folate and homocysteine) in women with unexplained infertility were evaluated in relation to pregnancy outcome. In addition, the use of folic acid supplements and folate

  8. ANAIS: Status and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaré, J.; Cebrián, S.; Cuesta, C.; García, E.; Ginestra, C.; Martínez, M.; Oliván, M. A.; Ortigoza, Y.; Ortiz de Solórzano, A.; Pobes, C.; Puimedón, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Villar, J. A.; Villar, P.

    2016-07-01

    ANAIS experiment will look for dark matter annual modulation with large mass of ultra-pure NaI(Tl) scintillators at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC), aiming to confirm the DAMA/LIBRA positive signal in a model-independent way. Two 12.5 kg each NaI(Tl) crystals provided by Alpha Spectra are currently taking data at the LSC. Present status of ANAIS detectors background and general performance is summarized; in particular, thanks to the high light collection efficiency prospects of lowering the threshold down to 1 keVee are reachable. Crystal radiopurity goals are fulfilled for 232Th and 238U chains and 40K activity, although higher than original goal, could be accepted; however, high 210Pb contamination out-of-equilibrium has been identified. More radiopure detectors are being built by Alpha Spectra. The ongoing high quantum efficiency PMT tests and muon veto characterization are also presented. Finally, the sensitivity of the experiment for the annual modulation in the WIMP signal, assuming the already achieved threshold and background in ANAIS-25 is shown. Further improvement should be achieved by reducing both threshold and background, as expected.

  9. Present Status of Kamland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Kunio

    2001-01-01

    The KamLAND experiment can explore world lowest mass difference region of neutrino oscillation parameter with an artificial neutrino source. It observes anti-neutrinos from various power plants spread in Japan with about 175 km baseline. This baseline is two order of magnitude longer than those of previously performed reactor experiments 1,2. This challenging measurement requires very low background environment as low as 10-13 g/g Uranium and Thorium impurities. In order to achieve this very low impurity level, various techniques (detector design, material selection, construction scheme etc) have been invested. These efforts have been rewarded rather quickly and current achievement doesn't hinder even the 7Be solar neutrino observation requiring 10-16 g/g U and Th impurities. Various background sources relevant to the reactor and solar neutrino observation are considered and description of efforts to eliminate those backgrounds are the main issue of this manuscript. Physics goal and current successful construction status are also highlighted.

  10. Status of MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2010-03-30

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an experiment currently under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. The aim of the experiment is to demonstrate the concept of ionization cooling for a beam of muons, crucial for the requirements of a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider. Muon cooling is achieved by measuring the reduction of the four dimensional transverse emittance for a beam of muons passing through low density absorbers and then accelerating the longitudinal component of the momentum using RF cavities. The absorbers are maintained in a focusing magnetic field to reduce the beta function of the beam and the RF cavities are kept inside coupling coils. The main goal of MICE is to measure a fractional drop in emittance, of order -10% for large emittance beams, with an accuracy of 1%(which imposes a requirement that the absolute emittance be measured with an accuracy of 0.1%). This paper will discuss the status of MICE, including the progress in commissioning the muon beam line at the ISIS accelerator at RAL, the construction of the different detector elements in MICE and the prospects for the future.

  11. Status of NESTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Agafonov, A.; Lebedev, A.; Androsov, V.; Bulyak, E.; Dovbnya, A.; Drebot, I.; Gladkikh, P.; Grevtsev, V.; Grigor'ev, Y.; Gvozd, A.; Ivashchenko, V.; Karnaukhov, I.; Kovalyova, N.; Kozin, V.; Lapshin, V.; Markov, V.; Mocheshnikov, N.; Mytsykov, A.; Neklyudov, I.; Peev, F.

    2007-01-19

    NSC KIPT proposed to construct a new X-ray and soft ultraviolet source NESTOR with a 40 - 225 MeV electron storage ring in Kharkov. NESTOR is a new type radiation source on the base of Compton scattering and a storage ring. Electrons are injected in the storage ring at 100 MeV and ramped up to final energy of 225 MeV. So, using interaction angle 10 deg. and 150 deg., the facility covers operation energy range of radiation from soft ultraviolet trough synchrotron radiation from bending magnets up to hard X-ray radiation through Compton scattering ({approx}1 eV {approx}1 MeV). It is supposed that stored electron beam current will be of about 200 mA. Along with use of Nd:Yag laser of 10 W average power which was developed by High-Q laser firm and optical resonator with accumulation gain of about 1000 it allows to provide X-ray radiation flux up to 1011 phot/s. NESTOR is the cooperative facility and its development is supported by Ukrainian government and NATO SfP project number 977982. It is supposed that NESTOR will be in operation by mid-2007 year. The status of the project and main facility systems are described in the report.

  12. Status of NICA project

    SciTech Connect

    Meshkov, I. N.

    2012-05-15

    The project of Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility NICA/MPD (+MultiPurpose Detector) under development at JINR (Dubna) is presented. The general goals of the project are providing of colliding beams for experimental studies of both hot and dense strongly interacting baryonicmatter and search for the mixed phase and critical endpoint and spin physics in collisions of polarized protons (deuterons). The first program requires providing of heavy-ion collisions in the energy range of {radical}s{sub NN} = 4 - 11 GeV at average luminosity of L = 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 27} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for {sup 197}Au{sup 79+}. The polarized beams mode is proposed to be used in energy range of {radical}s = 12 - 27 GeV (protons) at luminosity of L {>=} 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The report contains description of the facility scheme and characteristics in heavy-ion operation mode, status and plans of the project development.

  13. Biosimilar drugs: Current status.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajiv; Singh, Jagjit

    2014-07-01

    Biologic products are being developed over the past three decades. The expiry of patent protection for many biological medicines has led to the development of biosimilars in UK or follow on biologics in USA. This article reviews the literature on biosimilar drugs that covers the therapeutic status and regulatory guidelines. Appraisal of published articles from peer reviewed journals for English language publications, search from PubMed, and guidelines from European Medicines Agency, US Food Drug Administration (FDA) and India were used to identify data for review. Literature suggest that biosimilars are similar biological products, i.e., comparable but not identical to the reference product, are not generic version of innovator product and do not ensure therapeutic equivalence. Biosimilars present more challenges than conventional generics and marketing approval is also more complicated. To improve access, US Congress passed the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation act 2009 and US FDA allowed "abbreviated pathway" for their approval. U.S law has defined new standards and terms and EMA scientific guidelines have also set detailed approval standards. India being one of the most preferred manufacturing destinations of biosimilars, there is a need for stringent safety and regulatory guidelines. The New India Guidelines "Draft Guidelines on Similar Biologics were announced in June 2012, by Department of Biotechnology at Boston bio and available online. PMID:25143877

  14. LIL laser performance status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julien, Xavier; Adolf, Alain; Bar, Emmanuel; Beau, Vincent; Bordenave, Edouard; Chiès, Thierry; Courchinoux, Roger; Di-Nicola, Jean-Michel; Féral, Christophe; Gendeau, Patrick; Graillot, Hervé; Grosset-Grange, Claire; Henry, Olivier; Higonenq, Vincent; Journot, Eric; Lacampagne, Lionel; Lafond, Eric; Le Déroff, Laurent; Martinez, Arnaud; Patissou, Loic; Roques, Alain; Thauvin, Ludovic; Thiell, Gaston

    2011-03-01

    The Laser Integration Line (LIL) was first designed as a prototype to validate the concepts and the laser architecture of the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ). The LIL facility is a 4-beam laser representing a quad structure of the LMJ. A set of test campaigns were conducted to safely ramp up laser performance. The main goal was to measure quad-specific features such as beam synchronization and focal spot (size, smoothing contrast ratio or irradiation nonuniformity) versus the LMJ requirements. Following the laser commissioning, the LIL has become a major instrument dedicated to the achievement of plasma physics experiments for the French Simulation Program and was also opened to the academic scientific community. One of the attributes of the LIL facility is to be very flexible to accommodate the requests of plasma physicists during campaigns. The LIL is constantly evolving to best meet the needs of target physicists. Changes made or planned are either to improve the quality of laser beams, or to increase the LIL Energy-Power operating space. To optimize preparation and design of shot campaigns, the LIL performance status has been elaborated. It gives information about the characteristics of the laser in terms of near field and far field, defines the steps to maintain performance, explains how the facility responds to the request, details settings (smoothing, shaping of the focal spot, energy, temporal pulse shaping, beam pointing) and gives the limits in energy and power. In this paper, an overview of the LIL performance is presented.

  15. THE MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR: OVERVIEW AND STATUS UPDATE

    SciTech Connect

    Keeter, K.; Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, Estanislao; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, Alexander; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Combs, Dustin C.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, Matthew P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, Reyco; Hoppe, Eric W.; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Mertens, S.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; O'Shaughnessy, Mark D.; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Snyder, N.; Soin, Aleksandr; Strain, J.; Suriano, Anne-Marie; Swift, Gary; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, Werner; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, Sergey; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; White, Brandon R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir

    2013-04-12

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is being constructed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD by the MAJORANA Collaboration to demonstrate the feasibility of a tonne-scale neutrinoless double beta decay experiment based on 76Ge. The observation of neutrinoless double beta decay would indicate that neutrinos can serve as their own antiparticles, thus proving neutrinos to be Majorana particles, and would give information on neutrino masses. Attaining sensitivities for neutrino masses in the inverted hierarchy region requires large tonne-scale detectors with extremely low backgrounds. The DEMONSTRATOR project will show that sufficiently low backgrounds are achievable. A brief description of the detector and a status update on the construction will be given, including the work done at BHSU on acid-etching of Pb shielding bricks.

  16. Biotechnological routes based on lactic acid production from biomass.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid, the most important hydroxycarboxylic acid, is now commercially produced by the fermentation of sugars present in biomass. In addition to its use in the synthesis of biodegradable polymers, lactic acid can be regarded as a feedstock for the green chemistry of the future. Different potentially useful chemicals such as pyruvic acid, acrylic acid, 1,2-propanediol, and lactate ester can be produced from lactic acid via chemical and biotechnological routes. Here, we reviewed the current status of the production of potentially valuable chemicals from lactic acid via biotechnological routes. Although some of the reactions described in this review article are still not applicable at current stage, due to their "greener" properties, biotechnological processes for the production of lactic acid derivatives might replace the chemical routes in the future. PMID:21846500

  17. Biobased organic acids production by metabolically engineered microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-02-01

    Bio-based production of organic acids via microbial fermentation has been traditionally used in food industry. With the recent desire to develop more sustainable bioprocesses for production of fuels, chemicals and materials, the market for microbial production of organic acids has been further expanded as organic acids constitute a key group among top building block chemicals that can be produced from renewable resources. Here we review the current status for production of citric acid and lactic acid, and we highlight the use of modern metabolic engineering technologies to develop high performance microbes for production of succinic acid and 3-hydroxypropionic acid. Also, the key limitations and challenges in microbial organic acids production are discussed. PMID:26748037

  18. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... acid is a substance produced when proteins, called amino acids, in the body break down. The health care ... Cederbaum S, Berry GT. Inborn errors of carbohydrate, ammonia, amino acid, and organic acid metabolism. In: Gleason CA, Devaskar ...

  19. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a type of B vitamin. This article discusses the test to measure the amount of folic acid in the blood. ... that may interfere with test results, including folic acid supplements. Drugs that can decrease folic acid measurements ...

  20. Uric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    The uric acid urine test measures the level of uric acid in urine. Uric acid level can also be checked using a blood ... help determine the cause of a high uric acid level in the blood. It may also be ...

  1. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    MedlinePlus

    The methylmalonic acid blood test measures the amount of methylmalonic acid in the blood. ... Methylmalonic acid is a substance produced when proteins, called amino acids, in the body break down. The health care ...

  2. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Folic Acid and Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Folic Acid and ... before conception and during early pregnancy . About Folic Acid Folic acid, sometimes called folate, is a B ...

  3. Monitoring the battery status for photovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myungsoo; Hwang, Euijin

    Photovoltaic power systems in Korea have been installed in remote islands where it is difficult to connect the utilities. Lead/acid batteries are used as an energy storage device for the stand-alone photovoltaic system. Hence, monitoring the battery status of photovoltaic systems is quite important to extend the total system service life. To monitor the state-of-charge of batteries, we adopted a current interrupt technique to measure the internal resistance of the battery. The internal resistance increases at the end of charge/discharge steps and also with cycles. The specific gravity of the electrolyte was measured in relation to the state-of-charge. A home-made optical hydrometer was utilized for automatic monitoring of the specific gravity. It is shown that the specific gravity and stratification increase with cycle number. One of the photovoltaic systems in a remote island, Ho-do, which has 90 kW peak power was checked for actual operational conditions such as solar generation, load, and battery status.

  4. Folate status and neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Molloy, A M; Mills, J L; Kirke, P N; Weir, D G; Scott, J M

    1999-01-01

    Periconceptional folic acid supplementation prevents approximately 70% of neural tube defects (NTDs). While most women carrying affected fetuses do not have deficient blood folate levels, the risk of having an NTD affected child is inversely correlated with pregnancy red cell folate levels. Current research is focused on the discovery of genetic abnormalities in folate related enzymes which might explain the role of folate in NTD prevention. The first candidate gene to emerge was the C677T variant of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. Normal subjects who are homozygous for the mutation (TT) have red cell folate status some 20% lower than expected. It is now established that the prevalence of the TT genotype is significantly higher among spina bifida cases and their parents. Nevertheless, our studies show that the variant does not account for the reduced blood folate levels in many NTD affected mothers. We conclude that low maternal folate status may in itself be the most important risk factor for NTDs and that food fortification may be the only population strategy of benefit in the effort to eliminate NTDs. PMID:10609896

  5. Large block test status report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, D.G.; Lin, W.; Blair, S.C.

    1997-08-26

    This report is intended to serve as a status report, which essentially transmits the data that have been collected to date on the Large Block Test (LBT). The analyses of data will be performed during FY98, and then a complete report will be prepared. This status report includes introductory material that is not needed merely to transmit data but is available at this time and therefore included. As such, this status report will serve as the template for the future report, and the information is thus preserved.

  6. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  7. New bioactive fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to the new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octad...

  8. New Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecen...

  9. [Differential diagnosis of status epilepticus].

    PubMed

    Navarro, V; Fischer, C; Convers, P

    2009-04-01

    The diagnosis of status epilepticus can be retained, wrongly, in several circumstances. Nonepileptic pseudoseizures from a psychiatric origin and some movement disorders can mimic convulsive status epilepticus. Encephalopathy of various causes (post-anoxic, metabolic, toxic, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease) can be wrongly taken for non-convulsive status epilepticus, mainly due to inadequate interpretation of the electroencephalogram (EEG). In these encephalopathies, the existence of (non-epileptic) myoclonus and the abolition of the EEG abnormalities with the use of a benzodiazepine (without correction of the clinical symptoms) are additional confounding factors, leading to false diagnosis. Nevertheless, in general, the diagnosis of status epilepticus can be confirmed or rejected base on a combined analysis of the clinical data and the EEG. PMID:19217635

  10. CASTNET VISIBILITY IMPLEMENTATION AND STATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) is an integrated monitoring network combining different long-term monitoring projects and their data collection activities under one umbrella. urrent monitoring projects include the CASTNet Dry Deposition Network, the CASTNet Visi...

  11. Fusion technology status and requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1982-01-26

    This paper summarizes the status of fusion technology and discusses the requirements to be met in order to build a demonstration fusion plant. Strategies and programmatic considerations in pursuing engineering feasibility are also outlined.

  12. ESA Missions Planetary Protection Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kminek, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    This presentation will report the planetary protection status of ESA flight projects with planetary protection requirements. It will cover Rosetta, Mars Express, ExoMars 2016, ExoMars 2018, JUICE, Solar Orbiter, and Bepi Colombo.

  13. Status of Oregon's Bull Trout.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, David V.; Hanson, Mary L.; Hooton, Robert M.

    1997-10-01

    Limited historical references indicate that bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in Oregon were once widely spread throughout at least 12 basins in the Klamath River and Columbia River systems. No bull trout have been observed in Oregon's coastal systems. A total of 69 bull trout populations in 12 basins are currently identified in Oregon. A comparison of the 1991 bull trout status (Ratliff and Howell 1992) to the revised 1996 status found that 7 populations were newly discovered and 1 population showed a positive or upgraded status while 22 populations showed a negative or downgraded status. The general downgrading of 32% of Oregon's bull trout populations appears largely due to increased survey efforts and increased survey accuracy rather than reduced numbers or distribution. However, three populations in the upper Klamath Basin, two in the Walla Walla Basin, and one in the Willamette Basin showed decreases in estimated population abundance or distribution.

  14. [Acute alterations of neurotransmitters levels in striatum of young rat after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus].

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; de Sousa, Francisca Cléa Florenço; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes; Viana, Glauce Socorro Barros; Fonteles, Marta Maria de França

    2003-06-01

    High doses of the muscarinic cholinergic agonist, pilocarpine, result in behavioural changes, seizures and status epilepticus in rats. The purpose of the present work is to invetigate the striatal neurotransmissors level in young rats after status epilepticus induced by pilocarpine. Wistar rats were treated with a single dose of pilocarpine (400mg/Kg; s.c.). Controls received saline. Young animals were closed observed for behavioural changes during 1 and 24h. In these periods, the animals that developed status epilepticus and didn't survive this acute phase of seizures had the brains removed and striatal neurotransmissors level determined by HPLC. The concentration of dopamine, serotonine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid was reduced and an increase in 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenylacetic acid was observed. These results suggest that cholinergic activation can interage with dopaminergic and serotonergic systems in acute phase of the convulsive process in immature striatum. PMID:12894279

  15. Status of women microbiologists.

    PubMed

    Kashket, E R; Robbins, M L; Leive, L; Huang, A S

    1974-02-01

    beginning student. For older women, there must be increased placement in positions of responsibility and visibility. Protective practices that discourage women from entering arenas of competition can only be viewed as discrimination on the basis of sex, since women professionals are rarely given the choice between being protected and being independent. Unexpectedly, this study illustrates the lower status of another group of individuals who are considered deviants from the expected roles of the established society-single men with doctorates, who were found in the positions predominately filled by women. In conclusion, this study of a select group of scientists probably has general applicability to all women professionals in their roles vis-à-vis men. Examination and documentation of discriminatory practices based on sex points to the areas in which women must direct their demands for equality. PMID:4809561

  16. Sentinel-2 Mission status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoersch, Bianca; Colin, Olivier; Gascon, Ferran; Arino, Olivier; Spoto, Francois; Marchese, Franco; Krassenburg, Mike; Koetz, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Copernicus is a joint initiative of the European Commission (EC) and the European Space Agency (ESA), designed to establish a European capacity for the provision and use of operational monitoring information for environment and security applications. Within the Copernicus programme, ESA is responsible for the development of the Space Component, a fully operational space-based capability to supply earth-observation data to sustain environmental information Services in Europe. The Sentinel missions are Copernicus dedicated Earth Observation missions composing the essential elements of the Space Component. In the global Copernicus framework, they are complemented by other satellites made available by third-parties or by ESA and coordinated in the synergistic system through the Copernicus Data-Access system versus the Copernicus Services. The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission provides continuity to services relying on multi-spectral high-resolution optical observations over global terrestrial surfaces. Sentinel-2 capitalizes on the technology and the vast experience acquired in Europe and the US to sustain the operational supply of data for services such as forest monitoring, land cover changes detection or natural disasters management. The Sentinel-2 mission offers an unprecedented combination of the following capabilities: ○ Systematic global coverage of land surfaces: from 56°South to 84°North, coastal waters and Mediterranean sea; ○ High revisit: every 5 days at equator under the same viewing conditions with 2 satellites; ○ High spatial resolution: 10m, 20m and 60m; ○ Multi-spectral information with 13 bands in the visible, near infra-red and short wave infra-red part of the spectrum; ○ Wide field of view: 290 km. The data from the Sentinel-2 mission are available openly and freely for all users with online easy access since December 2015. The presentation will give a status report on the Sentinel-2 mission, and outlook for the remaining ramp-up Phase, the

  17. Zinc status as compared to zinc intake and iron status: a case study of Iranian populations from Isfahan province.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, Nazanin; Wegmueller, Rita; Kelishadi, Roya; Schulin, Rainer; Hurrell, Richard F

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) status of different age groups in rural (Rooran) and suburban (Khomeini Shahr) populations in central Iran, to relate the Zn status to Zn intake from animal and plant foods, and to examine the relationship between Zn and Fe status. Blood samples from 341 subjects including preschool children (27), schoolchildren (157), women (91), and men (66) were analyzed for serum zinc (SZn), serum ferritin (SF), total C-reactive protein, and hemoglobin. Daily Zn and phytic acid (PA) intakes from major food groups were estimated using a 3-day weighed food record. The overall prevalence of Zn deficiency based on low SZn was 5.9 % in Rooran and 7.2 % in Khomeini Shahr. Anemia was higher in the village than in the suburb (33.5 % vs. 22.7 %; p = 0.04) and almost half of the anemia in Khomeini Shahr and 36 % in Rooran was associated with iron deficiency (ID) based on low SF. The PA:Zn molar ratio in the diet was 10 - 13, indicating a diet of moderate Zn bioavailability. About 18 % of the population consumed less Zn than their WHO Estimated Average Requirements. There was no association between Zn status and Fe status. The modest prevalence of Zn deficiency in the study populations can be explained by a relatively high Zn intake from animal source foods. Anemia however is a serious public health problem affecting some 30 % of the subjects, with almost half due to ID. The lower Fe status than Zn status could be due to the frequent consumption of tea and dairy products. PMID:25497777

  18. Rag GTPase in amino acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joungmok; Kim, Eunjung

    2016-04-01

    Rag small GTPases were identified as the sixth subfamily of Ras-related GTPases. Compelling evidence suggests that Rag heterodimer (RagA/B and RagC/D) plays an important role in amino acid signaling toward mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which is a central player in the control of cell growth in response to a variety of environmental cues, including growth factors, cellular energy/oxygen status, and amino acids. Upon amino acid stimulation, active Rag heterodimer (RagA/B(GTP)-RagC/D(GDP)) recruits mTORC1 to the lysosomal membrane where Rheb resides. In this review, we provide a current understanding on the amino acid-regulated cell growth control via Rag-mTORC1 with recently identified key players, including Ragulator, v-ATPase, and GATOR complexes. Moreover, the functions of Rag in physiological systems and in autophagy are discussed. PMID:26781224

  19. Is folic acid good for everyone?

    PubMed

    Smith, A David; Kim, Young-In; Refsum, Helga

    2008-03-01

    Fortification of food with folic acid to reduce the number of neural tube defects was introduced 10 y ago in North America. Many countries are considering whether to adopt this policy. When fortification is introduced, several hundred thousand people are exposed to an increased intake of folic acid for each neural tube defect pregnancy that is prevented. Are the benefits to the few outweighed by possible harm to some of the many exposed? In animals, a folic acid-rich diet can influence DNA and histone methylation, which leads to phenotypic changes in subsequent generations. In humans, increased folic acid intake leads to elevated blood concentrations of naturally occurring folates and of unmetabolized folic acid. High blood concentrations of folic acid may be related to decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity, and high folate status may reduce the response to antifolate drugs used against malaria, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and cancer. In the elderly, a combination of high folate levels and low vitamin B-12 status may be associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment and anemia and, in pregnant women, with an increased risk of insulin resistance and obesity in their children. Folate has a dual effect on cancer, protecting against cancer initiation but facilitating progression and growth of preneoplastic cells and subclinical cancers, which are common in the population. Thus, a high folic acid intake may be harmful for some people. Nations considering fortification should be cautious and stimulate further research to identify the effects, good and bad, caused by a high intake of folic acid from fortified food or dietary supplements. Only then can authorities develop the right strategies for the population as a whole. PMID:18326588

  20. Is Subjective Status Influenced by Psychosocial Factors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundberg, Johanna; Kristenson, Margareta

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Associations between subjective status and health are still relatively unexplored. This study aimed at testing whether subjective status is uniquely confounded by psychosocial factors compared to objective status, and what factors that may predict subjective status. Design: A cross-sectional analysis of a population-based, random sample…

  1. Cytokine-dependent bidirectional connection between impaired social behavior and susceptibility to seizures associated with maternal immune activation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Washington, James; Kumar, Udaya; Medel-Matus, Jesus-Servando; Shin, Don; Sankar, Raman; Mazarati, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    Maternal immune activation (MIA) results in the development of autism in the offspring via hyperactivation of IL-6 signaling. Furthermore, experimental studies showed that the MIA-associated activation of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) concurrently with IL-6 increases the rate and the severity of hippocampal kindling in mice, thus offering an explanation for autism-epilepsy comorbidity. We examined whether epileptic phenotype triggered by prenatal exposure to IL-6 and IL-1β combination is restricted to kindling or whether it is reproducible in another model of epilepsy, whereby spontaneous seizures develop following kainic acid (KA)- induced status epilepticus. We also examined whether in mice prenatally exposed to IL-6 and IL-6+IL-1β, the presence of spontaneous seizures would exacerbate autism-like features. Between days 12 and 16 of pregnancy, C57bl/6j mice received daily injections of IL-6, IL-1β or IL-6+IL-1β combination. At postnatal day 40, male offspring was examined for the presence of social behavioral deficit and status epilepticus was induced by intrahippocampal KA injection. After six weeks of monitoring for spontaneous seizures, sociability was tested again. Both IL-6 and IL-6+IL-1β offspring presented with social behavioral deficit. Prenatal exposure to IL-6 alleviated, while such exposure to IL-6+IL-1β exacerbated the severity of KA-induced epilepsy. Increased severity of epilepsy in the IL-6+IL-1β mice correlated with the improvement of autism-like behavior. We conclude that complex and not necessarily agonistic relationships exist between epileptic and autism-like phenotypes in an animal model of MIA coupled with KA-induced epilepsy, and that the nature of these relationships depends on components of MIA involved. PMID:26103532

  2. Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxygenated fatty acids are useful as specialty chemicals, plasticizers, and biomedicals. Microbial enzymes convert fatty acids to mono-, di-, and trihydroxy fatty acid products. Among them, Bacillus megaterium ALA2 converted n-6 and n-3 PUFAs to many new oxygenated fatty acids. Linoleic acid was ...

  3. A randomized trial on folic acid supplementation and risk of recurrent colorectal adenoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Evidence from observational studies suggests that inadequate folate status enhances colorectal carcinogenesis, but results from some randomized trials do not support this hypothesis. Objective: To assess the effect of folic acid supplementation on recurrent colorectal adenoma, we conduc...

  4. Management of Pediatric Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Opinion Statement Status epilepticus (SE) is a medical emergency consisting of persistent or recurring seizures without a return to baseline mental status. SE is not a single entity, but can be divided into subtypes based on seizure types and underlying etiologies. Management should be implemented rapidly and based on continuously reassessed care pathways. The aim is to terminate seizures while simultaneously identifying and managing precipitant conditions. Seizure management involves “emergent” treatment with benzodiazepines (lorazepam intravenously, midazolam intramuscularly, or diazepam rectally) followed by “urgent” therapy (phenytoin/fosphenytoin, phenobarbital, levetiracetam or valproate sodium). If seizures persist, “refractory” treatments include infusions of midazolam or pentobarbital. Prognosis is dependent on the underlying etiology and seizure persistence. This paper reviews the current management options and strategies for pediatric convulsive status epilepticus. PMID:24909106

  5. Alleviation of Kainic Acid-Induced Brain Barrier Dysfunction by 4-O-Methylhonokiol in In Vitro and In Vivo Models

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jin-Yi; Ahn, Sun-Young; Yoo, Jae Hyeon; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Hong, Jin Tae; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2015-01-01

    This experiment was designed to investigate whether 4-O-methylhonokiol (MH), a principal ingredient of Magnolia (M.) officinalis bark, alleviated acute intraperitoneal (i.p.) kainic acid- (KA-) induced brain blood barrier dysfunction (BBBD) via pathological examination and cytological analyses of the brain tissues of mice. KA (10–30 mg/kg) time- and dose-dependently increased the water content of brain tissues and induced edema and encephalopathy. However, pretreatment with MH (5 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced the water content of the brain compared to that observed in the KA control group. Furthermore, MH significantly and dose-dependently reversed the remarkable variations in evan's blue dye (EBD) staining and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels that were induced by KA (10 mg/kg, i.p.). MH also decreased the elevated seizure scores that were induced by KA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in mice in a manner similar to scavengers such as DMTU and trolox. Additionally, MH significantly scavenged intracellular ROS and Ca2+ within hippocampal cells. The tight junction seals mediated by claudin (Cld-5) were also found to be modulated by MH. MH efficiently reduced 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) (IC50, 52.4 mM) and •OH with an electron spin resonance (ESR) signal rate constant of 4 × 109 M−1 · S−1, which is close to the reactivity of the vitamin E analog trolox. Taken together, these results suggest that MH may enhance radical scavenging in lipid and hydrophobic environments, which may be important for the physiological activity of the barrier. PMID:25688368

  6. Biochemistry of microbial itaconic acid production

    PubMed Central

    Steiger, Matthias G.; Blumhoff, Marzena L.; Mattanovich, Diethard; Sauer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Itaconic acid is an unsaturated dicarbonic acid which has a high potential as a biochemical building block, because it can be used as a monomer for the production of a plethora of products including resins, plastics, paints, and synthetic fibers. Some Aspergillus species, like A. itaconicus and A. terreus, show the ability to synthesize this organic acid and A. terreus can secrete significant amounts to the media (>80 g/L). However, compared with the citric acid production process (titers >200 g/L) the achieved titers are still low and the overall process is expensive because purified substrates are required for optimal productivity. Itaconate is formed by the enzymatic activity of a cis-aconitate decarboxylase (CadA) encoded by the cadA gene in A. terreus. Cloning of the cadA gene into the citric acid producing fungus A. niger showed that it is possible to produce itaconic acid also in a different host organism. This review will describe the current status and recent advances in the understanding of the molecular processes leading to the biotechnological production of itaconic acid. PMID:23420787

  7. Uric acid test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  8. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... defects & other health conditions > Amino acid metabolism disorders Amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... baby’s newborn screening may include testing for certain amino acid metabolism disorders. These are rare health conditions that ...

  9. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  10. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour in ...

  11. Azelaic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Azelaic acid gel is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin disease that ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat acne. Azelaic acid ...

  12. Facts about Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... of the baby's brain and spine. About folic acid Folic acid is a B vitamin. Our bodies ...

  13. Acid Lipase Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Cholesterol Ester Storage ... Trials Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Acid Lipase Disease ? Acid lipase disease or deficiency occurs ...

  14. National Transonic Facility Characterization Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobbitt, C., Jr.; Everhart, J.; Foster, J.; Hill, J.; McHatton, R.; Tomek, W.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the current status of the characterization of the National Transonic Facility. The background and strategy for the tunnel characterization, as well as the current status of the four main areas of the characterization (tunnel calibration, flow quality characterization, data quality assurance, and support of the implementation of wall interference corrections) are presented. The target accuracy requirements for tunnel characterization measurements are given, followed by a comparison of the measured tunnel flow quality to these requirements based on current available information. The paper concludes with a summary of which requirements are being met, what areas need improvement, and what additional information is required in follow-on characterization studies.

  15. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    ... folic acid measurements include: Alcohol Aminosalicylic acid Birth control pills Estrogens Tetracyclines Ampicillin Chloramphenicol Erythromycin Methotrexate Penicillin Aminopterin Phenobarbital Phenytoin Drugs to treat malaria

  16. Oxalic acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms of oxalic acid poisoning include: Abdominal pain Burns and blisters where the acid contacted the skin Collapse Convulsions Mouth pain Shock Throat pain Tremors (unintentional trembling) Vomiting

  17. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M.

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  18. Diet-induced changes in iron and n-3 fatty acid status and associations with cognitive performance in 8-11-year-old Danish children: secondary analyses of the Optimal Well-Being, Development and Health for Danish Children through a Healthy New Nordic Diet School Meal Study.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Louise Bergmann; Damsgaard, Camilla Trab; Dalskov, Stine-Mathilde; Petersen, Rikke Agnete; Egelund, Niels; Dyssegaard, Camilla Brørup; Stark, Ken D; Andersen, Rikke; Tetens, Inge; Astrup, Arne; Michaelsen, Kim Fleisher; Lauritzen, Lotte

    2015-11-28

    Fe and n-3 long-chain PUFA (n-3 LCPUFA) have both been associated with cognition, but evidence remains inconclusive in well-nourished school-aged children. In the Optimal Well-Being, Development and Health for Danish Children through a Healthy New Nordic Diet (OPUS) School Meal Study, the 3-month intervention increased reading performance, inattention, impulsivity and dietary intake of fish and Fe. This study investigated whether the intervention influenced n-3 LCPUFA and Fe status and, if so, explored how these changes correlated with the changes in cognitive performance. The study was a cluster-randomised cross-over trial comparing school meals with packed lunch (control). At baseline and after each treatment, we measured serum ferritin, whole-blood n-3 LCPUFA and Hb, and performance in reading, mathematics and d2-test of attention. Data were analysed using mixed models (n 726) and principal component analysis of test performances (n 644), which showed two main patterns: 'school performance' and 'reading comprehension'. The latter indicated that children with good reading comprehension were also more inattentive and impulsive (i.e. higher d2-test error%). The intervention improved 'school performance' (P=0·015), 'reading comprehension' (P=0·043) and EPA+DHA status 0·21 (95% CI 0·15, 0·27) w/w % (P<0·001), but it did not affect serum ferritin or Hb. At baseline, having small Fe stores was associated with poorer 'school performance' in girls, but with better 'reading comprehension' in both boys and girls. Both baseline EPA+DHA status and the intervention-induced increase in EPA+DHA status was positively associated with 'school performance', suggesting that n-3 LCPUFA could potentially explain approximately 20 % of the intervention effect. These exploratory associations indicate that increased fish intake might explain some of the increase in reading performance and inattention in the study. PMID:26359192

  19. Ares First Stage Element Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, Bruce K.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation summarizes the status of the various elements of the first stage of the Ares I vehicle. It includes views of the first stage in relation to the complete Ares rocket, details of the first stage, upgrades for the Ares, the Avionics system, and the thrust oscillation system. There are also pictures from the testing.

  20. Phytosanitary Status of California Citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The California citrus industry continues to maintain a high phytosanitary status, albeit one with serious external threats. Propagative materials in California originate with the Citrus Clonal Protection Program, a University of California program that provides pathogen-tested, apparently clean base...

  1. 2010 Chemical Working Group Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.

    2010-01-01

    The Steering Group for the Interagency Advanced Power Group (IAPG) held their business meeting on November 30-December 1st in McLean, Virginia. Status reports were presented from each of the IAPG's Working Groups. These charts contain a brief summary of the IAPG Chemical Working Group's activities during 2010 and its plans for 2011.

  2. Status of the MEG Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Aki

    2008-02-21

    The MEG experiment which searches for {mu}{yields}e{gamma} decays at the sensitivity level of 10{sup -13} is now in its final stage of the preparation. Some data run is expected by the end of the year 2007. The statuses of each detector components are described.

  3. Aircraft wiring program status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Rex

    1995-01-01

    In this Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) Aircraft Division status report, the general and wire and cable component activities, the systems engineering activities, the aircraft wiring lead maintenance activities, the NAVAIR/NASA interface activities, and the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Commission recommendations are presented.

  4. The Medicina Station Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orfei, Alessandro; Orlati, Andrea; Maccaferri, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    General information about the Medicina Radio Astronomy Station, the 32-m antenna status, and the staff in charge of the VLBI observations is provided. In 2012, the data from geodetic VLBI observations were acquired using the Mark 5A recording system with good results. Updates of the hardware were performed and are briefly described.

  5. Magnesium deficiency: what's our status?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low magnesium intake has been implicated in a broad range of cardiometabolic conditions, including diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Dietary magnesium and total body magnesium status have a widely-used but imperfect biomarker in serum magnesium. Despite serum magnesium’s limitation...

  6. The status of cold fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, E.

    This report attempts to update the status of the phenomenon of cold fusion. The new field is continuing to grow as a variety of nuclear reactions are discovered to occur in a variety of chemical environments at modest temperatures. However, it must be cautioned that most scientists consider cold fusion as something akin to UFO's, ESP, and numerology.

  7. NATIONAL STATUS AND TRENDS PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since 1984, the National Status and Trends (NS&T) Program has monitored, on a national scale, spatial and temporal trends of chemical contamination and biological responses to that contamination. Temporal trends are being monitored through the Mussel Watch project that analyzes m...

  8. Experimental Status of B Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Sheldon

    2006-09-25

    A short summary is given of the current status of B physics. Reasons for physics beyond the Standard Model are discussed. Constraints on New Physics are given using measurements of B mixing, BS mixing, and CP violation, along with |Vub|. Future goals, and upcoming new experiments are also mentioned.

  9. Status of the VEGA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamanin, D. V.; Alexandrov, A. A.; Alexandrova, I. A.; Kondtatyev, N. A.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Strekalovsky, A. O.; Strekalovsky, O. V.; Zhuchko, V. E.; Pyatkov, Yu. V.; Jacobs, N.; Malaza, V.

    2015-06-01

    Motivation and status of the VEGA (Velocity-Energy Guide based Array) project is presented. One armed fission fragments spectrometer with an electrostatic guide system is proposed for installation at the vertical experimental channel of the IBR-2 reactor. Scientific program aimed at investigation of new multi-body decays of actinides, shapeisomeric states in fission fragments and fission modes is reported.

  10. Status of the Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Derwent, P.F.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    The author presents the current operational status of the Fermilab Recycler Ring. Using a mix of stochastic and electron cooling, we prepare antiproton beams for the Fermilab Tevatron Collider program. Included are discussion of stashing and cooling performance, operational scenarios, and collider performance.

  11. Standards development status. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    The Standards Development Status Summary Report is designed for scheduling, monitoring, and controlling the process by which Regulatory Standards, Guides, Reports, Petitions, and Environmental Statements are written. It is a summary of the current schedule plans for development of the above products.

  12. Economic Status of Academic Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perret, Robert; Young, Nancy J.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines some of the factors affecting the current economic status of academic librarians, as well as the history of changes in that economic picture. Issues discussed include the ranking of beginning academic librarian salaries in comparison to others in the profession, historical differences between academic librarian salaries and…

  13. Environmental Research, A Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Petroleum Inst., Washington, DC. Committee for Air and Water Conservation.

    Summarized in this report are all environmental research projects sponsored by the American Petroleum Institute (API). Included are: (1) status reports on all current projects, (2) published reports on completed projects, together with abstracts of findings, and (3) an organization chart of the Committee for Air and Water Conservation and its…

  14. A new classification of HLA-DRB1 alleles based on acid–base properties of the amino acids located at positions 13, 70 and 71: impact on ACPA status or structural progression, and meta-analysis on 1235 patients with rheumatoid from two cohorts (ESPOIR and EAC cohort)

    PubMed Central

    Ruyssen-Witrand, Adeline; van Steenbergen, Hanna W; van Heemst, Jurgen; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Nigon, Delphine; Lukas, Cédric; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Jamard, Bénédicte; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Cantagrel, Alain; Dieudé, Philippe; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M; Constantin, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    Objective To group HLA-DRB1 alleles based on acid–base properties of amino acids at positions 13, 70 and 71 and analyse their association with the presence of anticitrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) and structural progression in 2 cohorts of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Patients with RA (N=612) from ESPOIR cohort and from EAC cohort (n=624) were genotyped for HLA-DRB1 alleles. The alleles containing the RAA sequence at positions 72–74 were classified into 3 groups according to the amino acid at positions 13, 70 and 71: BB encoding basic amino acids at positions 13, 70 and 71; A encoding acidic amino acids at positions 70 and 71; and BN encoding either neutral amino acids at position 13 and basic amino acids at positions 70 and 71, or basic amino acid at position 13 and neutral amino acids at positions 70 and 71. The associations between the different alleles and (1) the ACPA presence, and (2) the structural progression were assessed by χ2 test; a meta-analysis was performed on the 2 cohorts using the Mantel-Haenszel method. Results After meta-analysis, BB alleles were significantly associated with ACPA presence (OR (95% CI) 4.08 (3.14 to 5.31)) and structural progression (OR (95% CI) 2.33 (1.76 to 3.09)). The alleles protected significantly against ACPA presence (OR (95% CI) 0.37 (0.28 to 0.50)) and structural progression (OR (95% CI) 0.34 (0.23 to 0.50)). This acid–base classification allowed to separate another group BN with an intermediate risk of ACPA production (OR (95% CI) 1.14 (0.91 to 1.44)) and structural progression (OR (95% CI) 1.01 (0.77 to 1.33)). Conclusions This new classification permitted to make a hierarchy of HLA-DRB1 alleles in terms of association with ACPA presence or structural progression in early RA. PMID:26629363

  15. Oxalic acid alleviates chilling injury in peach fruit by regulating energy metabolism and fatty acid contents.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Lei; Shan, Timin; Zheng, Yonghua

    2014-10-15

    The effects of postharvest oxalic acid (OA) treatment on chilling injury, energy metabolism and membrane fatty acid content in 'Baifeng' peach fruit stored at 0°C were investigated. Internal browning was significantly reduced by OA treatment in peaches. OA treatment markedly inhibited the increase of ion leakage and the accumulation of malondialdehyde. Meanwhile, OA significantly increased the contents of adenosine triphosphate and energy charge in peach fruit. Enzyme activities of energy metabolism including H(+)-adenosine triphosphatase, Ca(2+)-adenosine triphosphatase, succinic dehydrogenase and cytochrome C oxidase were markedly enhanced by OA treatment. The ratio of unsaturated/saturated fatty acid in OA-treated fruit was significantly higher than that in control fruit. These results suggest that the alleviation in chilling injury by OA may be due to enhanced enzyme activities related to energy metabolism and higher levels of energy status and unsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio. PMID:24837925

  16. Jasmonic acid and salicylic acid activate a common defense system in rice

    PubMed Central

    Tamaoki, Daisuke; Seo, Shigemi; Yamada, Shoko; Kano, Akihito; Miyamoto, Ayumi; Shishido, Hodaka; Miyoshi, Seika; Taniguchi, Shiduku; Akimitsu, Kazuya; Gomi, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) play important roles in plant defense systems. JA and SA signaling pathways interact antagonistically in dicotyledonous plants, but, the status of crosstalk between JA and SA signaling is unknown in monocots. Our rice microarray analysis showed that more than half of the genes upregulated by the SA analog BTH are also upregulated by JA, suggesting that a major portion of the SA-upregulated genes are regulated by JA-dependent signaling in rice. A common defense system that is activated by both JA and SA is thus proposed which plays an important role in pathogen defense responses in rice. PMID:23518581

  17. Efficacy of Retigabine on Acute Limbic Seizures in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, LK; Slomko, AM; Wongvravit, JP; Naseer, Z; Hu, S; Wan, WY; Ali, SS

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The efficacy of retigabine (RGB), a positive allosteric modulator of K+ channels indicated for adjunct treatment of partial seizures, was studied in two adult models of kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus to determine it’s toleratbility. Methods: Retigabine was administered systemiclly at high (5 mg/kg) and low (1–2 mg/kg) doses either 30 min prior to or 2 hr after KA-induced status epilepticus. High (1 µg/µL) and low (0.25 µg/µL) concentrations of RGB were also delivered by intrahippocampal microinjection in the presence of KA. Results: Dose-dependent effects of RGB were observed with both models. Lower doses increased seizure behavior latency and reduced the number of single spikes and synchronized burst events in the electroencephalogram (EEG). Higher doses worsened seizure behavior, produced severe ataxia, and increased spiking activity. Animals treated with RGB that were resistant to seizures did not exhibit significant injury or loss in GluR1 expression; however if stage 5–6 seizures were reached, typical hippocampal injury and depletion of GluR1 subunit protein in vulernable pyramidal fields occurred. Conclusions: RGB was neuroprotective only if seizures were significantly attenuated. GluR1 was simultaneously suppressed in the resistant granule cell layer in presence of RGB which may weaken excitatory transmission. Biphasic effects observed herein suggest that the human dosage must be carefully scrutinized to produce the optimal clinical response. PMID:26819936

  18. Impact of Genotype on EPA and DHA Status and Responsiveness to Increased Intakes.

    PubMed

    Minihane, Anne Marie

    2016-03-01

    At a population level, cardioprotective and cognitive actions of the fish oil (FO) derived long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFAs) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been extensively demonstrated. In addition to dietary intake, which is limited for many individuals, EPA and DHA status is dependent on the efficiency of their biosynthesis from α-linolenic acid. Gender and common gene variants have been identified as influencing the rate-limiting desaturase and elongase enzymes. Response to a particular intake or status is also highly heterogeneous and likely influenced by genetic variants which impact on EPA and DHA metabolism and tissue partitioning, transcription factor activity, or physiological end-point regulation. Here, available literature relating genotype to tissue LC n-3 PUFA status and response to FO intervention is considered. It is concluded that the available evidence is relatively limited, with much of the variability unexplained, though APOE and FADS genotypes are emerging as being important. Although genotype × LC n-3 PUFA interactions have been described for a number of phenotypes, few have been confirmed in independent studies. A more comprehensive understanding of the genetic, physiological and behavioural modulators of EPA and DHA status and response to intervention is needed to allow refinement of current dietary LC n-3 PUFA recommendations and stratification of advice to "vulnerable" and responsive subgroups. PMID:26950146

  19. Impact of Genotype on EPA and DHA Status and Responsiveness to Increased Intakes

    PubMed Central

    Minihane, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    At a population level, cardioprotective and cognitive actions of the fish oil (FO) derived long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFAs) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been extensively demonstrated. In addition to dietary intake, which is limited for many individuals, EPA and DHA status is dependent on the efficiency of their biosynthesis from α-linolenic acid. Gender and common gene variants have been identified as influencing the rate-limiting desaturase and elongase enzymes. Response to a particular intake or status is also highly heterogeneous and likely influenced by genetic variants which impact on EPA and DHA metabolism and tissue partitioning, transcription factor activity, or physiological end-point regulation. Here, available literature relating genotype to tissue LC n-3 PUFA status and response to FO intervention is considered. It is concluded that the available evidence is relatively limited, with much of the variability unexplained, though APOE and FADS genotypes are emerging as being important. Although genotype × LC n-3 PUFA interactions have been described for a number of phenotypes, few have been confirmed in independent studies. A more comprehensive understanding of the genetic, physiological and behavioural modulators of EPA and DHA status and response to intervention is needed to allow refinement of current dietary LC n-3 PUFA recommendations and stratification of advice to “vulnerable” and responsive subgroups. PMID:26950146

  20. The effect of addition of linoleic acid on food intake regulation in linoleic acid tasters and linoleic acid non-tasters.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Marleen M J W; Saris, Wim H M; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2003-07-01

    In a randomised, single blind, placebo-controlled crossover design study, we investigated whether healthy, non-smoking, dietary unrestrained women (n 24), divided into linoleic acid tasters (LAT, n 14) and linoleic acid non-tasters (LANT, n 10), differed in food intake regulation when linoleic acid was added to ice creams. The determination of subjects as LAT or LANT was done using a 10 microm-linoleic acid solution. The ice creams were characterised by the subjects and a taste perception test using the triangle test was conducted three times. Food intake and appetite were measured using the universal eating monitor. LAT and LANT did not differ in characterisation or in taste perception of the ice creams, even though LAT were able to increase their ability to discriminate between the ice cream with linoleic acid from the one containing oleic acid. No effect of LAT status or type of ice cream was found for hedonic value of the ice creams. Linoleic acid taster status did affect food intake regulation. For LAT, but not LANT, the amount eaten was a function of Deltasatiety. Subjects ate by weight of food and not by energy content. In conclusion, differences in food intake regulation were seen between LAT and LANT, in that the amount eaten by LAT was a function of Deltasatiety, but was not for LANT. PMID:12844392

  1. Gas processing program: Status as of August 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-14

    Projects of the Gas Research Institute`s Gas Processing Program are summarized in this report. Activities of the following teams are described: Multivariable Control (MVC) system team, acid gas removal/sulfur recovery team, dehydration team, and natural gas liquids (NGL) extraction team. For each team, research objectives are outlined, contractors are listed, work scope and product status are characterized for each project, and the accomplished work is detailed. Separate sections of the report describe efforts not assigned to a team and completed efforts.

  2. HSR Aerodynamic Performance Status and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, William P.; Antani, Tony; Ball, Doug; Calloway, Robert L.; Snyder, Phil

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes HSR (High Speed Research) Aerodynamic Performance Status and Challenges. The topics include: 1) Aero impact on HSR; 2) Goals and Targets; 3) Progress and Status; and 4) Remaining Challenges. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  3. Recent advances in biological production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Ashok, Somasundar; Park, Sunghoon

    2013-11-01

    3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) is a valuable platform chemical that can be produced biologically from glucose or glycerol. This review article provides an overview and the current status of microbial 3-HP production. The constraints of microbial 3-HP production and possible solutions are also described. Finally, future prospects of biological 3-HP production are discussed. PMID:23473969

  4. Acid tolerance in amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    Studies of amphibian acid tolerance provide information about the potential effects of acid deposition on amphibian communities. Amphibians as a group appear to be relatively acid tolerant, with many species suffering increased mortality only below pH 4. However, amphibians exhibit much intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, and some species are sensitive to even low levels of acidity. Furthermore, nonlethal effects, including depression of growth rates and increases in developmental abnormalities, can occur at higher pH.

  5. The effect of fermentation on the nutrient status and on some toxic components of Icacinia manni.

    PubMed

    Antai, S P; Obong, U S

    1992-07-01

    The effect of fermentation on the nutrient status and on some toxic components of Icacinia manni was investigated. Chemical analysis of both unfermented and fermented products revealed an increase in protein, ash and fibre content while the lipid and carbohydrate content showed a decrease. The results indicated that fermentation resulted in protein enrichment of the fermented Icacinia manni mash. Fermentation was also observed to cause a marked decrease in the level of some toxic components (oxalic acid, phytic acid and hydrocyanic acid) of the product. The possibility of incorporating Icacinia manni among the edible starchy plant tubers is discussed. PMID:1502124

  6. Status of the DIOS mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawara, Y.; Sakurai, I.; Furuzawa, A.; Ohashi, T.; Ishisaki, Y.; Ezoe, Y.; Hoshino, A.; Akamatsu, H.; Ishikawa, K.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Takei, Y.; Shinozaki, K.; Masui, K.; Yoshino, T.; Hagihara, T.; Kimura, S.; Yoshitake, H.

    2008-07-01

    We present the current status of a small X-ray mission DIOS (Diffuse Intergalactic Oxygen Surveyor), consisting of a 4-stage X-ray telescope and an array of TES microcalorimeters, cooled with mechanical coolers, with a total weight of about 400 kg. The mission will perform survey observations of warm-hot intergalactic medium using OVII and OVIII emission lines, with the energy coverage up to 1.5 keV. The wide field of view of about 50' diameter, superior energy resolution close to 2 eV FWHM, and very low background will together enable us a wide range of science for diffuse X-ray sources. We briefly describe the current status of the development of the satellite, and the subsystems.

  7. Distributed systems status and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreidler, David; Vickers, David

    1990-01-01

    Concepts are investigated for an automated status and control system for a distributed processing environment. System characteristics, data requirements for health assessment, data acquisition methods, system diagnosis methods and control methods were investigated in an attempt to determine the high-level requirements for a system which can be used to assess the health of a distributed processing system and implement control procedures to maintain an accepted level of health for the system. A potential concept for automated status and control includes the use of expert system techniques to assess the health of the system, detect and diagnose faults, and initiate or recommend actions to correct the faults. Therefore, this research included the investigation of methods by which expert systems were developed for real-time environments and distributed systems. The focus is on the features required by real-time expert systems and the tools available to develop real-time expert systems.

  8. Socioeconomic status and the Rorschach.

    PubMed

    Frank, G

    1994-02-01

    People from lower socioeconomic status are making increasing use of mental health facilities. Surveys have indicated that the Rorschach is still one of the more frequently used instruments by psychologists in such facilities, but research has also shown that clinicians tend to misinterpret Rorschachs of people from the lower socioeconomic group as reflecting greater psychopathology than the same Rorschachs identified as being given by people from the middle class. Research has also shown that growing up in conditions of poverty significantly affects how people perform on tests of abstract thinking, tests of intelligence, and tests of academic achievement; the question was raised as to whether this extends to the Rorschach. The lack of sufficient research on the effect of socioeconomic status on responsiveness to the Rorschach precluded that question being answered. The kind of research still needed was discussed. PMID:8153241

  9. Lifting the Status of Learning Support Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusuma-Powell, Ochan; Powell, William

    2016-01-01

    Status, the perception of one's standing in relation to others in a group, negatively influence learning. Status issue have implications for educating students with special learning needs: Both these students and the learning support or special education teachers who serve them often hold low status in a school community. Like adults, children…

  10. 19 CFR 146.43 - Domestic status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES Status of Merchandise in a Zone § 146.43 Domestic status. (a) General... and repair material, to a zone, except upon order of the Commissioner of Customs. No application or... mixed or combined with merchandise in another zone status, or (2) upon order of the Commissioner...

  11. 19 CFR 146.43 - Domestic status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES Status of Merchandise in a Zone § 146.43 Domestic status. (a) General... and repair material, to a zone, except upon order of the Commissioner of Customs. No application or... mixed or combined with merchandise in another zone status, or (2) upon order of the Commissioner...

  12. 19 CFR 146.43 - Domestic status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES Status of Merchandise in a Zone § 146.43 Domestic status. (a) General... and repair material, to a zone, except upon order of the Commissioner of Customs. No application or... mixed or combined with merchandise in another zone status, or (2) upon order of the Commissioner...

  13. 19 CFR 146.43 - Domestic status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES Status of Merchandise in a Zone § 146.43 Domestic status. (a) General... and repair material, to a zone, except upon order of the Commissioner of Customs. No application or... mixed or combined with merchandise in another zone status, or (2) upon order of the Commissioner...

  14. Health Status of Older Immigrants to Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newbold, K. Bruce; Filice, John K.

    2006-01-01

    Using the 2000/2001 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), this paper examines the health status of the older (aged 55[thorn]) immigrant population relative to that of non-immigrants in order to identify areas where their health statuses diverge. First, we compare the health status of older immigrants (foreign-born) aged 55 and over in Canada to…

  15. 21 CFR 820.86 - Acceptance status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acceptance status. 820.86 Section 820.86 Food and... QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Acceptance Activities § 820.86 Acceptance status. Each manufacturer shall identify by suitable means the acceptance status of product, to indicate the conformance or...

  16. 21 CFR 820.86 - Acceptance status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acceptance status. 820.86 Section 820.86 Food and... QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Acceptance Activities § 820.86 Acceptance status. Each manufacturer shall identify by suitable means the acceptance status of product, to indicate the conformance or...

  17. Management of Status Epilepticus in Children

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Douglas M.; McGinnis, Emily L.; Walleigh, Diana J.; Abend, Nicholas S.

    2016-01-01

    Status epilepticus is a common pediatric neurological emergency. Management includes prompt administration of appropriately selected anti-seizure medications, identification and treatment of seizure precipitant(s), as well as identification and management of associated systemic complications. This review discusses the definitions, classification, epidemiology and management of status epilepticus and refractory status epilepticus in children. PMID:27089373

  18. Perception of "Gilding" in Occupational Statuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gitter, A. George; Mostofsky, David

    1972-01-01

    In examining the amount of gilding behavior a sample of female subjects attribute to different occupational statuses and to occupational statuses associated with specific ethnic minorities, results indicate that gilding approximates the general prestige rankings of the occupations when the status incumbent is perceived as similar to the subject.…

  19. 5 CFR 837.201 - Annuitant status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Annuitant status. 837.201 Section 837.201 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) REEMPLOYMENT OF ANNUITANTS Annuitant and Employee Status § 837.201 Annuitant status. Unless his or her...

  20. Status Configurations, Military Service and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lin; Elder, Glen H., Jr.; Spence, Naomi J.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Armed Forces offer educational and training benefits as incentives for service. This study investigates the influence of status configurations on military enlistment and their link to greater educational opportunity. Three statuses (socioeconomic status of origin, cognitive ability and academic performance) have particular relevance for…