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Sample records for acid lna antisense

  1. In vivo tumor growth inhibition and biodistribution studies of locked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Fluiter, Kees; ten Asbroek, Anneloor L. M. A.; de Wissel, Marit B.; Jakobs, Marja E.; Wissenbach, Margit; Olsson, Håkan; Olsen, Otto; Oerum, Henrik; Baas, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Locked nucleic acids (LNA) are novel high-affinity DNA analogs that can be used as genotype-specific drugs. The LNA oligonucleotides (LNA PO ODNs) are very stable in vitro and in vivo without the need for a phosphorothiolated backbone. In this study we tested the biological fate and the efficacy in tumor growth inhibition of antisense oligonucleotides directed against the gene of the large subunit of RNA polymerase II (POLR2A) that are completely synthesized as LNA containing diester backbones. These full LNA oligonucleotides strongly reduce POLR2A protein levels. Full LNA PO ODNs appeared to be very stable compounds when injected into the circulation of mice. Full LNA PO ODNs were continuously administered for 14 days to tumor-bearing nude mice. Tumor growth was inhibited sequence specifically at dosages from 1 mg/kg/day. LNA PO ODNs appeared to be non-toxic at dosages <5 mg/kg/day. Biodistribution studies showed the kidneys to have the highest uptake of LNA PO ODNs and urinary secretion as the major route of clearance. This report shows that LNA PO ODNs are potent genotype-specific drugs that can inhibit tumor growth in vivo. PMID:12560491

  2. Structure Activity Relationships of α-L-LNA Modified Phosphorothioate Gapmer Antisense Oligonucleotides in Animals.

    PubMed

    Seth, Punit P; Jazayeri, Ali; Yu, Jeff; Allerson, Charles R; Bhat, Balkrishen; Swayze, Eric E

    2012-01-01

    We report the structure activity relationships of short 14-mer phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) modified with α-L-locked nucleic acid (LNA) and related modifications targeting phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) messenger RNA in mice. α-L-LNA represents the α-anomer of enantio-LNA and modified oligonucleotides show LNA like binding affinity for complementary RNA. In contrast to sequence matched LNA gapmer ASOs which showed elevations in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels indicative of hepatotoxicity, gapmer ASOs modified with α-L-LNA and related analogs in the flanks showed potent downregulation of PTEN messenger RNA in liver tissue without producing elevations in plasma ALT levels. However, the α-L-LNA ASO showed a moderate dose-dependent increase in liver and spleen weights suggesting a higher propensity for immune stimulation. Interestingly, replacing α-L-LNA nucleotides in the 3'- and 5'-flanks with R-5'-Me-α-L-LNA but not R-6'-Me- or 3'-Me-α-L-LNA nucleotides, reversed the drug induced increase in organ weights. Examination of structural models of dinucleotide units suggested that the 5'-Me group increases steric bulk in close proximity to the phosphorothioate backbone or produces subtle changes in the backbone conformation which could interfere with recognition of the ASO by putative immune receptors. Our data suggests that introducing steric bulk at the 5'-position of the sugar-phosphate backbone could be a general strategy to mitigate the immunostimulatory profile of oligonucleotide drugs. In a clinical setting, proinflammatory effects manifest themselves as injection site reactions and flu-like symptoms. Thus, a mitigation of these effects could increase patient comfort and compliance when treated with ASOs.Molecular Therapy - Nucleic Acids (2012) 1, e47; doi:10.1038/mtna.2012.34; published online 18 September 2012. PMID:23344239

  3. Development of a Method for Profiling Protein Interactions with LNA-Modified Antisense Oligonucleotides Using Protein Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Kakiuchi-Kiyota, Satoko; Whiteley, Lawrence O; Ryan, Anne M; Mathialagan, Nagappan

    2016-04-01

    Development of locked nucleic acid (LNA) gapmers, antisense oligonucleotides used for efficient inhibition of target RNA expression, is limited by nontarget-mediated hepatotoxicity. Increased binding of hepatocellular proteins to toxic LNA gapmers may be one of the mechanisms contributing to LNA gapmer-induced hepatotoxicity in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the protein binding propensity of nontoxic sequence-1 (NTS-1), toxic sequence-2 (TS-2), and severely highly toxic sequence-3 (HTS-3) LNA gapmers using human protein microarrays. We previously demonstrated by the transcription profiling analysis of liver RNA isolated from mice that TS-2 and HTS-3 gapmers modulate different transcriptional pathways in mice leading to hepatotoxicity. Our protein array profiling demonstrated that a greater number of proteins, including ones associated with hepatotoxicity, hepatic system disorder, and cell functions, were bound by TS-2 and HTS-3 compared with NTS-1. However, the profiles of proteins bound by TS-2 and HTS-3 were similar and did not distinguish proteins contributing to severe in vivo toxicity. These results, together with the previous transcription profiling analysis, indicate that the combination of sequence-dependent transcription modulation and increased protein binding of toxic LNA gapmers contributes to hepatotoxicity. PMID:26643897

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Activity of a Novel Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA)-Inhibitor-miR-221 against Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Altomare, Emanuela; Amodio, Nicola; Leone, Emanuela; Morelli, Eugenio; Lio, Santo Giovanni; Caracciolo, Daniele; Rossi, Marco; Frandsen, Niels M.; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aim The miR-221/222 cluster is upregulated in malignant plasma cells from multiple myeloma (MM) patients harboring the t(4;14) translocation. We previously reported that silencing of miR-221/222 by an antisense oligonucleotide induces anti-MM activity and upregulates canonical miR-221/222 targets. The in vivo anti-tumor activity occurred when miR-221/222 inhibitors were delivered directly into MM xenografts. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-MM activity of a novel phosphorothioate modified backbone 13-mer locked nucleic acid (LNA)-Inhibitor-miR-221 (LNA-i-miR-221) specifically designed for systemic delivery. Methods In vitro anti-MM activity of LNA-i-miR-221 was evaluated by cell proliferation and BrdU uptake assays. In vivo studies were performed with non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD.SCID) mice bearing t(4;14) MM xenografts, which were intraperitoneally or intravenously treated with naked LNA-i-miR-221. RNA extracts from retrieved tumors were analyzed for miR-221 levels and modulation of canonical targets expression. H&E staining and immunohistochemistry were performed on retrieved tumors and mouse vital organs. Results In vitro, LNA-i-miR-221 exerted strong antagonistic activity against miR-221 and induced upregulation of the endogenous target p27Kip1. It had a marked anti-proliferative effect on t(4;14)-translocated MM cells but not on MM cells not carrying the translocation and not overexpressing miR-221. In vivo, systemic treatment with LNA-i-miR-221 triggered significant anti-tumor activity against t(4;14) MM xenografts; it also induced miR-221 downregulation, upregulated p27Kip1 and reduced Ki-67. No behavioral changes or organ-related toxicity were observed in mice as a consequence of treatments. Conclusions LNA-i-miR-221 is a highly stable, effective agent against t(4;14) MM cells, and is suitable for systemic use. These data provide the rationale for the clinical development of LNA-i-miR-221 for the

  5. Ribonuclease H1-dependent hepatotoxicity caused by locked nucleic acid-modified gapmer antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Kasuya, Takeshi; Hori, Shin-ichiro; Watanabe, Ayahisa; Nakajima, Mado; Gahara, Yoshinari; Rokushima, Masatomo; Yanagimoto, Toru; Kugimiya, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Gapmer antisense oligonucleotides cleave target RNA effectively in vivo, and is considered as promising therapeutics. Especially, gapmers modified with locked nucleic acid (LNA) shows potent knockdown activity; however, they also cause hepatotoxic side effects. For developing safe and effective gapmer drugs, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity is required. Here, we investigated the cause of hepatotoxicity derived from LNA-modified gapmers. Chemical modification of gapmer’s gap region completely suppressed both knockdown activity and hepatotoxicity, indicating that the root cause of hepatotoxicity is related to intracellular gapmer activity. Gene silencing of hepatic ribonuclease H1 (RNaseH1), which catalyses gapmer-mediated RNA knockdown, strongly supressed hepatotoxic effects. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of a target mRNA did not result in any hepatotoxic effects, while the gapmer targeting the same position on mRNA as does the siRNA showed acute toxicity. Microarray analysis revealed that several pre-mRNAs containing a sequence similar to the gapmer target were also knocked down. These results suggest that hepatotoxicity of LNA gapmer is caused by RNAseH1 activity, presumably because of off-target cleavage of RNAs inside nuclei. PMID:27461380

  6. Single and double stranded DNA detection using locked nucleic acid (LNA) functionalized nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Fiona; Stokes, Robert; Faulds, Karen; Graham, Duncan

    2008-08-01

    Gold and silver nanoparticles functionalized with oligonucleotides can be used for the detection of specific sequences of DNA. We show that gold nanoparticles modified with locked nucleic acid (LNA) form stronger duplexes with a single stranded DNA target and offer better discrimination against single base pair mismatches than analogous DNA probes. Our LNA nanoparticle probes have also been used to detect double stranded DNA through triplex formation, whilst still maintaining selectivity for only complementary targets. Nanoparticle conjugates embedded with suitable surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) labels have been synthesized enabling simultaneous detection and identification of multiple DNA targets.

  7. Optimization of an AMBER Force Field for the Artificial Nucleic Acid, LNA, and Benchmarking with NMR of L(CAAU)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Locked Nucleic Acids (LNAs) are RNA analogues with an O2′-C4′ methylene bridge which locks the sugar into a C3′-endo conformation. This enhances hybridization to DNA and RNA, making LNAs useful in microarrays and potential therapeutics. Here, the LNA, L(CAAU), provides a simplified benchmark for testing the ability of molecular dynamics (MD) to approximate nucleic acid properties. LNA χ torsions and partial charges were parametrized to create AMBER parm99_LNA. The revisions were tested by comparing MD predictions with AMBER parm99 and parm99_LNA against a 200 ms NOESY NMR spectrum of L(CAAU). NMR indicates an A-Form equilibrium ensemble. In 3000 ns simulations starting with an A-form structure, parm99_LNA and parm99 provide 66% and 35% agreement, respectively, with NMR NOE volumes and 3J-couplings. In simulations of L(CAAU) starting with all χ torsions in a syn conformation, only parm99_LNA is able to repair the structure. This implies methods for parametrizing force fields for nucleic acid mimics can reasonably approximate key interactions and that parm99_LNA will improve reliability of MD studies for systems with LNA. A method for approximating χ population distribution on the basis of base to sugar NOEs is also introduced. PMID:24377321

  8. Computational investigation of locked nucleic acid (LNA) nucleotides in the active sites of DNA polymerases by molecular docking simulations.

    PubMed

    Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Madala, Praveen K; Højland, Torben; Veedu, Rakesh N

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers constitute a potential class of therapeutic molecules typically selected from a large pool of oligonucleotides against a specific target. With a scope of developing unique shorter aptamers with very high biostability and affinity, locked nucleic acid (LNA) nucleotides have been investigated as a substrate for various polymerases. Various reports showed that some thermophilic B-family DNA polymerases, particularly KOD and Phusion DNA polymerases, accepted LNA-nucleoside 5'-triphosphates as substrates. In this study, we investigated the docking of LNA nucleotides in the active sites of RB69 and KOD DNA polymerases by molecular docking simulations. The study revealed that the incoming LNA-TTP is bound in the active site of the RB69 and KOD DNA polymerases in a manner similar to that seen in the case of dTTP, and with LNA structure, there is no other option than the locked C3'-endo conformation which in fact helps better orienting within the active site. PMID:25036012

  9. Development of bis-locked nucleic acid (bisLNA) oligonucleotides for efficient invasion of supercoiled duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Pedro M. D.; Geny, Sylvain; Pabon, Y. Vladimir; Bergquist, Helen; Zaghloul, Eman M.; Rocha, Cristina S. J.; Oprea, Iulian I.; Bestas, Burcu; Andaloussi, Samir EL; Jørgensen, Per T.; Pedersen, Erik B.; Lundin, Karin E.; Zain, Rula; Wengel, Jesper; Smith, C. I. Edvard

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the many developments in synthetic oligonucleotide (ON) chemistry and design, invasion into double-stranded DNA (DSI) under physiological salt and pH conditions remains a challenge. In this work, we provide a new ON tool based on locked nucleic acids (LNAs), designed for strand invasion into duplex DNA (DSI). We thus report on the development of a clamp type of LNA ON—bisLNA—with capacity to bind and invade into supercoiled double-stranded DNA. The bisLNA links a triplex-forming, Hoogsteen-binding, targeting arm with a strand-invading Watson–Crick binding arm. Optimization was carried out by varying the number and location of LNA nucleotides and the length of the triplex-forming versus strand-invading arms. Single-strand regions in target duplex DNA were mapped using chemical probing. By combining design and increase in LNA content, it was possible to achieve a 100-fold increase in potency with 30% DSI at 450 nM using a bisLNA to plasmid ratio of only 21:1. Although this first conceptual report does not address the utility of bisLNA for the targeting of DNA in a chromosomal context, it shows bisLNA as a promising candidate for interfering also with cellular genes. PMID:23345620

  10. Application of Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) Primer and PCR Clamping by LNA Oligonucleotide to Enhance the Amplification of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) Regions in Investigating the Community Structures of Plant–Associated Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Ikenaga, Makoto; Tabuchi, Masakazu; Kawauchi, Tomohiro; Sakai, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous extraction of host plant DNA severely limits investigations of the community structures of plant–associated fungi due to the similar homologies of sequences in primer–annealing positions between fungi and host plants. Although fungal-specific primers have been designed, plant DNA continues to be excessively amplified by PCR, resulting in the underestimation of community structures. In order to overcome this limitation, locked nucleic acid (LNA) primers and PCR clamping by LNA oligonucleotides have been applied to enhance the amplification of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. LNA primers were designed by converting DNA into LNA, which is specific to fungi, at the forward primer side. LNA oligonucleotides, the sequences of which are complementary to the host plants, were designed by overlapping a few bases with the annealing position of the reverse primer. Plant-specific DNA was then converted into LNA at the shifted position from the 3′ end of the primer–binding position. PCR using the LNA technique enhanced the amplification of fungal ITS regions, whereas those of the host plants were more likely to be amplified without the LNA technique. A denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis displayed patterns that reached an acceptable level for investigating the community structures of plant–associated fungi using the LNA technique. The sequences of the bands detected using the LNA technique were mostly affiliated with known isolates. However, some sequences showed low similarities, indicating the potential to identify novel fungi. Thus, the application of the LNA technique is considered effective for widening the scope of community analyses of plant–associated fungi. PMID:27600711

  11. Computational Investigation of Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) Nucleotides in the Active Sites of DNA Polymerases by Molecular Docking Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Madala, Praveen K.; Højland, Torben; Veedu, Rakesh N.

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers constitute a potential class of therapeutic molecules typically selected from a large pool of oligonucleotides against a specific target. With a scope of developing unique shorter aptamers with very high biostability and affinity, locked nucleic acid (LNA) nucleotides have been investigated as a substrate for various polymerases. Various reports showed that some thermophilic B-family DNA polymerases, particularly KOD and Phusion DNA polymerases, accepted LNA-nucleoside 5′-triphosphates as substrates. In this study, we investigated the docking of LNA nucleotides in the active sites of RB69 and KOD DNA polymerases by molecular docking simulations. The study revealed that the incoming LNA-TTP is bound in the active site of the RB69 and KOD DNA polymerases in a manner similar to that seen in the case of dTTP, and with LNA structure, there is no other option than the locked C3′-endo conformation which in fact helps better orienting within the active site. PMID:25036012

  12. An Exocyclic Methylene Group Acts As a Bioisostere of the 2′-Oxygen Atom in LNA

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, Punit P.; Allerson, Charles R.; Berdeja, Andres; Siwkowski, Andrew; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Gaus, Hans; Prakash, Thazha P.; Watt, Andrew T.; Egli, Martin; Swayze, Eric E.

    2010-12-07

    We show for the first time that it is possible to obtain LNA-like (Locked Nucleic Acid 1) binding affinity and biological activity with carbocyclic LNA (cLNA) analogs by replacing the 2{prime}-oxygen atom in LNA with an exocyclic methylene group. Synthesis of the methylene-cLNA nucleoside was accomplished by an intramolecular cyclization reaction between a radical at the 2{prime}-position and a propynyl group at the C-4{prime} position. Only methylene-cLNA modified oligonucleotides showed similar thermal stability and mismatch discrimination properties for complementary nucleic acids as LNA. In contrast, the close structurally related methyl-cLNA analogs showed diminished hybridization properties. Analysis of crystal structures of cLNA modified self-complementary DNA decamer duplexes revealed that the methylene group participates in a tight interaction with a 2{prime}-deoxyribose residue of the 5{prime}-terminal G of a neighboring duplex, resulting in the formation of a CH...O type hydrogen bond. This indicates that the methylene group retains a negative polarization at the edge of the minor groove in the absence of a hydrophilic 2{prime}-substituent and provides a rationale for the superior thermal stability of this modification. In animal experiments, methylene-cLNA antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) showed similar in vivo activity but reduced toxicity as compared to LNA ASOs. Our work highlights the interchangeable role of oxygen and unsaturated moieties in nucleic acid structure and emphasizes greater use of this bioisostere to improve the properties of nucleic acids for therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  13. Synthesis of selenomethylene-locked nucleic acid (SeLNA)-modified oligonucleotides by polymerases.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Megan; Chardon, Antoine; Goubet, Astrid; Morihiro, Kunihiko; Tsan, Sze Yee; Edwards, Stacey L; Kodama, Tetsuya; Obika, Satoshi; Veedu, Rakesh N

    2012-11-18

    Enzymatic recognition of SeLNA nucleotides was investigated. KOD XL DNA polymerase was found to be an efficient enzyme in primer extension reactions. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of SeLNA-modified DNA templates was also efficiently achieved by Phusion and KOD XL DNA polymerases. PMID:23042489

  14. Potent and sustained cellular inhibition of miR-122 by lysine-derivatized peptide nucleic acids (PNA) and phosphorothioate locked nucleic acid (LNA)/2'-O-methyl (OMe) mixmer anti-miRs in the absence of transfection agents

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Adrian G.; Threlfall, Richard N.

    2011-01-01

    Efficient cell delivery of antisense oligonucleotides (ONs) is a key issue for their potential therapeutic use. It has been shown recently that some ONs can be delivered into cells without the use of transfection agents (gymnosis), but this generally requires cell incubation over several days and high amounts of ONs (micromolar concentrations). Here we have targeted microRNA 122 (miR-122), a small non-coding RNA involved in regulation of lipid metabolism and in the replication of hepatitis C virus, with ONs of different chemistries (anti-miRs) by gymnotic delivery in cell culture. Using a sensitive dual-luciferase reporter assay, anti-miRs were screened for their ability to enter liver cells gymnotically and inhibit miR-122 activity. Efficient miR-122 inhibition was obtained with cationic PNAs and 2'-O-methyl (OMe) and Locked Nucleic Acids (LNA)/OMe mixmers containing either phosphodiester (PO) or phosphorothioate (PS) linkages at sub-micromolar concentrations when incubated with cells for just 4 hours. Furthermore, PNA and PS-containing anti-miRs were able to sustain miR-122 inhibitory effects for at least 4 days. LNA/OMe PS anti-miRs were the most potent anti-miR chemistry tested in this study, an ON chemistry that has been little exploited so far as anti-miR agents towards therapeutics. PMID:22567190

  15. Antisense 2′-Deoxy, 2′-Fluoroarabino Nucleic Acid (2′F-ANA) Oligonucleotides: In Vitro Gymnotic Silencers of Gene Expression Whose Potency Is Enhanced by Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Souleimanian, Naira; Deleavey, Glen F; Soifer, Harris; Wang, Sijian; Tiemann, Katrin; Damha, Masad J; Stein, Cy A

    2012-01-01

    Gymnosis is the process of the delivery of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to cells, in the absence of any carriers or conjugation, that produces sequence-specific gene silencing. While gymnosis was originally demonstrated using locked nucleic acid (LNA) gapmers, 2′-deoxy-2′fluoroarabino nucleic acid (2′F-ANA) phosphorothioate gapmer oligonucleotides (oligos) when targeted to the Bcl-2 and androgen receptor (AR) mRNAs in multiple cell lines in tissue culture, are approximately as effective at silencing of Bcl-2 expression as the iso-sequential LNA congeners. In LNCaP prostate cancer cells, gymnotic silencing of the AR by a 2′F-ANA phosphorothioate gapmer oligo led to downstream silencing of cellular prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression even in the presence of the androgenic steroid R1881 (metribolone), which stabilizes cytoplasmic levels of the AR. Furthermore, gymnotic silencing occurs in the absence of serum, and silencing by both LNA and 2′F-ANA oligos is augmented in serum-free (SF) media in some cell lines when they are treated with oleic acid and a variety of ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-6 PUFAs), but not by an aliphatic (palmitic) fatty acid. These results significantly expand our understanding of and ability to successfully manipulate the cellular delivery of single-stranded oligos in vitro. PMID:23344235

  16. Internalization of Locked Nucleic Acids/DNA Hybrid Oligomers into Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Traglia, German M; Sala, Carol Davies; Fuxman Bass, Juan I; Soler-Bistué, Alfonso J C; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Ramírez, María Soledad; Tolmasky, Marcelo E

    2012-10-01

    Delivery inside the cells is essential for practical application of antisense technologies. The hybrid locked nucleic acid (LNA)/DNA CAAGTACTGTTCCACCA (LNA residues are underlined) was labeled by conjugation to Alexa Fluor 488 (fLNA/DNA) and tested to determine its ability to penetrate Escherichia coli cells and reach the cytoplasm. Flow cytometry analysis showed that the fLNA/DNA was associated with 14% of cells from a stationary phase culture, while association with a labeled isosequential oligodeoxynucleotide was negligible. Laser scanning confocal microscopy confirmed that the fLNA/DNA was located inside the cytoplasm. PMID:23515318

  17. Enzymatic synthesis of DNA strands containing α-L-LNA (α-L-configured locked nucleic acid) thymine nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Højland, Torben; Veedu, Rakesh N; Vester, Birte; Wengel, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We describe the first enzymatic incorporation of an α-L-LNA nucleotide into an oligonucleotide. It was found that the 5'-triphosphate of α-L-LNA is a substrate for the DNA polymerases KOD, 9°N(m), Phusion and HIV RT. Three dispersed α-L-LNA thymine nucleotides can be incorporated into DNA strands by all four polymerases, but they were unable to perform consecutive incorporations of α-L-LNA nucleotides. In addition it was found that primer extension can be achieved using templates containing one α-L-LNA nucleotide. PMID:22679529

  18. Design and evaluation of locked nucleic acid-based splice-switching oligonucleotides in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shimo, Takenori; Tachibana, Keisuke; Saito, Kiwamu; Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Tomita, Erisa; Waki, Reiko; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Doi, Takefumi; Inoue, Takao; Kawakami, Junji; Obika, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Antisense-mediated modulation of pre-mRNA splicing is an attractive therapeutic strategy for genetic diseases. Currently, there are few examples of modulation of pre-mRNA splicing using locked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense oligonucleotides, and, in particular, no systematic study has addressed the optimal design of LNA-based splice-switching oligonucleotides (LNA SSOs). Here, we designed a series of LNA SSOs complementary to the human dystrophin exon 58 sequence and evaluated their ability to induce exon skipping in vitro using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We demonstrated that the number of LNAs in the SSO sequence and the melting temperature of the SSOs play important roles in inducing exon skipping and seem to be key factors for designing efficient LNA SSOs. LNA SSO length was an important determinant of activity: a 13-mer with six LNA modifications had the highest efficacy, and a 7-mer was the minimal length required to induce exon skipping. Evaluation of exon skipping activity using mismatched LNA/DNA mixmers revealed that 9-mer LNA SSO allowed a better mismatch discrimination. LNA SSOs also induced exon skipping of endogenous human dystrophin in primary human skeletal muscle cells. Taken together, our findings indicate that LNA SSOs are powerful tools for modulating pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:24935206

  19. Next-generation bis-locked nucleic acids with stacking linker and 2′-glycylamino-LNA show enhanced DNA invasion into supercoiled duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Geny, Sylvain; Moreno, Pedro M. D.; Krzywkowski, Tomasz; Gissberg, Olof; Andersen, Nicolai K.; Isse, Abdirisaq J.; El-Madani, Amro M.; Lou, Chenguang; Pabon, Y. Vladimir; Anderson, Brooke A.; Zaghloul, Eman M.; Zain, Rula; Hrdlicka, Patrick J.; Jørgensen, Per T.; Nilsson, Mats; Lundin, Karin E.; Pedersen, Erik B.; Wengel, Jesper; Smith, C. I. Edvard

    2016-01-01

    Targeting and invading double-stranded DNA with synthetic oligonucleotides under physiological conditions remain a challenge. Bis-locked nucleic acids (bisLNAs) are clamp-forming oligonucleotides able to invade into supercoiled DNA via combined Hoogsteen and Watson–Crick binding. To improve the bisLNA design, we investigated its mechanism of binding. Our results suggest that bisLNAs bind via Hoogsteen-arm first, followed by Watson–Crick arm invasion, initiated at the tail. Based on this proposed hybridization mechanism, we designed next-generation bisLNAs with a novel linker able to stack to adjacent nucleobases, a new strategy previously not applied for any type of clamp-constructs. Although the Hoogsteen-arm limits the invasion, upon incorporation of the stacking linker, bisLNA invasion is significantly more efficient than for non-clamp, or nucleotide-linker containing LNA-constructs. Further improvements were obtained by substituting LNA with 2′-glycylamino-LNA, contributing a positive charge. For regular bisLNAs a 14-nt tail significantly enhances invasion. However, when two stacking linkers were incorporated, tail-less bisLNAs were able to efficiently invade. Finally, successful targeting of plasmids inside bacteria clearly demonstrates that strand invasion can take place in a biologically relevant context. PMID:26857548

  20. Next-generation bis-locked nucleic acids with stacking linker and 2'-glycylamino-LNA show enhanced DNA invasion into supercoiled duplexes.

    PubMed

    Geny, Sylvain; Moreno, Pedro M D; Krzywkowski, Tomasz; Gissberg, Olof; Andersen, Nicolai K; Isse, Abdirisaq J; El-Madani, Amro M; Lou, Chenguang; Pabon, Y Vladimir; Anderson, Brooke A; Zaghloul, Eman M; Zain, Rula; Hrdlicka, Patrick J; Jørgensen, Per T; Nilsson, Mats; Lundin, Karin E; Pedersen, Erik B; Wengel, Jesper; Smith, C I Edvard

    2016-03-18

    Targeting and invading double-stranded DNA with synthetic oligonucleotides under physiological conditions remain a challenge. Bis-locked nucleic acids (bisLNAs) are clamp-forming oligonucleotides able to invade into supercoiled DNA via combined Hoogsteen and Watson-Crick binding. To improve the bisLNA design, we investigated its mechanism of binding. Our results suggest that bisLNAs bind via Hoogsteen-arm first, followed by Watson-Crick arm invasion, initiated at the tail. Based on this proposed hybridization mechanism, we designed next-generation bisLNAs with a novel linker able to stack to adjacent nucleobases, a new strategy previously not applied for any type of clamp-constructs. Although the Hoogsteen-arm limits the invasion, upon incorporation of the stacking linker, bisLNA invasion is significantly more efficient than for non-clamp, or nucleotide-linker containing LNA-constructs. Further improvements were obtained by substituting LNA with 2'-glycylamino-LNA, contributing a positive charge. For regular bisLNAs a 14-nt tail significantly enhances invasion. However, when two stacking linkers were incorporated, tail-less bisLNAs were able to efficiently invade. Finally, successful targeting of plasmids inside bacteria clearly demonstrates that strand invasion can take place in a biologically relevant context. PMID:26857548

  1. Diagnosis of Phytoplasmas by Real-Time PCR Using Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) Probes.

    PubMed

    Palmano, Sabrina; Mulholland, Vincent; Kenyon, David; Saddler, Gerry S; Jeffries, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplasma infections are regularly reported worldwide, and concerns about their threats on agricultural production, especially in relation to global climate change, are increasing. Sensitive and reliable detection methods are important to ensure that propagation material is free of phytoplasma infection and for epidemiological studies that may provide information to limit the extent of phytoplasma diseases and to prevent large-scale crop losses. The detection method described here uses LNA chemistry in real-time PCR. It has been developed and validated for use on potatoes, and its sensitivity and specificity make it suitable for use in postentry potato quarantine and initiation of potato nuclear stocks to ensure that material is phytoplasma-free. PMID:25981250

  2. A Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA)-Based Real-Time PCR Assay for the Rapid Detection of Multiple Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance Genes Directly from Positive Blood Culture

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lingxiang; Shen, Dingxia; Zhou, Qiming; Li, Zexia; Fang, Xiangdong; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial strains resistant to various antibiotic drugs are frequently encountered in clinical infections, and the rapid identification of drug-resistant strains is highly essential for clinical treatment. We developed a locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based quantitative real-time PCR (LNA-qPCR) method for the rapid detection of 13 antibiotic resistance genes and successfully used it to distinguish drug-resistant bacterial strains from positive blood culture samples. A sequence-specific primer-probe set was designed, and the specificity of the assays was assessed using 27 ATCC bacterial strains and 77 negative blood culture samples. No cross-reaction was identified among bacterial strains and in negative samples, indicating 100% specificity. The sensitivity of the assays was determined by spiking each bacterial strain into negative blood samples, and the detection limit was 1–10 colony forming units (CFU) per reaction. The LNA-qPCR assays were first applied to 72 clinical bacterial isolates for the identification of known drug resistance genes, and the results were verified by the direct sequencing of PCR products. Finally, the LNA-qPCR assays were used for the detection in 47 positive blood culture samples, 19 of which (40.4%) were positive for antibiotic resistance genes, showing 91.5% consistency with phenotypic susceptibility results. In conclusion, LNA-qPCR is a reliable method for the rapid detection of bacterial antibiotic resistance genes and can be used as a supplement to phenotypic susceptibility testing for the early detection of antimicrobial resistance to allow the selection of appropriate antimicrobial treatment and to prevent the spread of resistant isolates. PMID:25775001

  3. Altering behavioral responses and dopamine transporter protein with antisense peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Tyler-McMahon, B M; Stewart, J A; Jackson, J; Bitner, M D; Fauq, A; McCormick, D J; Richelson, E

    2001-10-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) plays a role in locomotion and is an obligatory target for amphetamines. We designed and synthesized an antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA) to rat DAT to examine the effect of this antisense molecule on locomotion and on responsiveness to amphetamines. Rats were injected intraperitoneally daily for 9 days with either saline, an antisense DAT PNA, a scrambled DAT PNA, or a mismatch DAT PNA. On days 7 and 9 after initial motility measurements were taken, the animals were challenged with 10 mg/kg of amphetamine and scored for motility. On day 7, there was no significant difference between the baseline levels of activity of any of the groups or their responses to amphetamine. On day 9, the antisense PNA-treated rats showed a statistically significant increase in their resting motility (P < 0.01). When these rats were challenged with amphetamine, motility of the saline-, scrambled PNA-, and mismatch PNA-treated animals showed increases of 31-, 36-, and 20-fold, respectively, while the antisense PNA-treated animals showed increases of only 3.4-fold (P < 0.01). ELISA results revealed a 32% decrease in striatal DAT in antisense PNA-treated rats compared with the saline, scrambled PNA, and mismatch PNA controls (P < 0.001). These results extend our previous findings that brain proteins can be knocked down in a specific manner by antisense molecules administered extracranially. Additionally, these results suggest some novel approaches for the treatment of diseases dependent upon the function of the dopamine transporter. PMID:11543728

  4. Comparison of hepatic transcription profiles of locked ribonucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides: evidence of distinct pathways contributing to non-target mediated toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kakiuchi-Kiyota, Satoko; Koza-Taylor, Petra H; Mantena, Srinivasa R; Nelms, Linda F; Enayetallah, Ahmed E; Hollingshead, Brett D; Burdick, Andrew D; Reed, Lori A; Warneke, James A; Whiteley, Lawrence O; Ryan, Anne M; Mathialagan, Nagappan

    2014-03-01

    Development of LNA gapmers, antisense oligonucleotides used for efficient inhibition of target RNA expression, is limited by non-target mediated hepatotoxicity issues. In the present study, we investigated hepatic transcription profiles of mice administered non-toxic and toxic LNA gapmers. After repeated administration, a toxic LNA gapmer (TS-2), but not a non-toxic LNA gapmer (NTS-1), caused hepatocyte necrosis and increased serum alanine aminotransferase levels. Microarray data revealed that, in addition to gene expression patterns consistent with hepatotoxicity, 17 genes in the clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) pathway were altered in the TS-2 group. TS-2 significantly down-regulated myosin 1E (Myo1E), which is involved in release of clathrin-coated pits from plasma membranes. To map the earliest transcription changes associated with LNA gapmer-induced hepatotoxicity, a second microarray analysis was performed using NTS-1, TS-2, and a severely toxic LNA gapmer (HTS-3) at 8, 16, and 72 h following a single administration in mice. The only histopathological change observed was minor hepatic hypertrophy in all LNA groups across time points. NTS-1, but not 2 toxic LNA gapmers, increased immune response genes at 8 and 16 h but not at 72 h. TS-2 significantly perturbed the CME pathway only at 72 h, while Myo1E levels were decreased at all time points. In contrast, HTS-3 modulated DNA damage pathway genes at 8 and 16 h and also modulated the CME pathway genes (but not Myo1E) at 16 h. Our results may suggest that different LNAs modulate distinct transcriptional genes and pathways contributing to non-target mediated hepatotoxicity in mice. PMID:24336348

  5. Potent Antibacterial Antisense Peptide–Peptide Nucleic Acid Conjugates Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Anubrata

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen causing severe infections in hospital settings, especially with immune compromised patients, and the increasing prevalence of multidrug resistant strains urges search for new drugs with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we introduce antisense peptide–peptide nucleic acid (PNA) conjugates as antibacterial agents against P. aeruginosa. We have designed and optimized antisense peptide–PNA conjugates targeting the translation initiation region of the ftsZ gene (an essential bacterial gene involved in cell division) or the acpP gene (an essential bacterial gene involved in fatty acid synthesis) of P. aeruginosa (PA01) and characterized these compounds according to their antimicrobial activity and mode of action. Four antisense PNA oligomers conjugated to the H-(R-Ahx-R)4-Ahx-βala or the H-(R-Ahx)6-βala peptide exhibited complete growth inhibition of P. aeruginosa strains PA01, PA14, and LESB58 at 1–2 μM concentrations without any indication of bacterial membrane disruption (even at 20 μM), and resulted in specific reduction of the targeted mRNA levels. One of the four compounds showed clear bactericidal activity while the other significantly reduced bacterial survival. These results open the possibility of development of antisense antibacterials for treatment of Pseudomonas infections. PMID:23030590

  6. Hepatotoxicity of high affinity gapmer antisense oligonucleotides is mediated by RNase H1 dependent promiscuous reduction of very long pre-mRNA transcripts.

    PubMed

    Burel, Sebastien A; Hart, Christopher E; Cauntay, Patrick; Hsiao, Jill; Machemer, Todd; Katz, Melanie; Watt, Andy; Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Younis, Husam; Sabripour, Mahyar; Freier, Susan M; Hung, Gene; Dan, Amy; Prakash, T P; Seth, Punit P; Swayze, Eric E; Bennett, C Frank; Crooke, Stanley T; Henry, Scott P

    2016-03-18

    High affinity antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) containing bicylic modifications (BNA) such as locked nucleic acid (LNA) designed to induce target RNA cleavage have been shown to have enhanced potency along with a higher propensity to cause hepatotoxicity. In order to understand the mechanism of this hepatotoxicity, transcriptional profiles were collected from the livers of mice treated with a panel of highly efficacious hepatotoxic or non-hepatotoxic LNA ASOs. We observed highly selective transcript knockdown in mice treated with non-hepatotoxic LNA ASOs, while the levels of many unintended transcripts were reduced in mice treated with hepatotoxic LNA ASOs. This transcriptional signature was concurrent with on-target RNA reduction and preceded transaminitis. Remarkably, the mRNA transcripts commonly reduced by toxic LNA ASOs were generally not strongly associated with any particular biological process, cellular component or functional group. However, they tended to have much longer pre-mRNA transcripts. We also demonstrate that the off-target RNA knockdown and hepatotoxicity is attenuated by RNase H1 knockdown, and that this effect can be generalized to high affinity modifications beyond LNA. This suggests that for a certain set of ASOs containing high affinity modifications such as LNA, hepatotoxicity can occur as a result of unintended off-target RNase H1 dependent RNA degradation. PMID:26553810

  7. Hepatotoxicity of high affinity gapmer antisense oligonucleotides is mediated by RNase H1 dependent promiscuous reduction of very long pre-mRNA transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Burel, Sebastien A.; Hart, Christopher E.; Cauntay, Patrick; Hsiao, Jill; Machemer, Todd; Katz, Melanie; Watt, Andy; Bui, Huynh-hoa; Younis, Husam; Sabripour, Mahyar; Freier, Susan M.; Hung, Gene; Dan, Amy; Prakash, T.P.; Seth, Punit P.; Swayze, Eric E.; Bennett, C. Frank; Crooke, Stanley T.; Henry, Scott P.

    2016-01-01

    High affinity antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) containing bicylic modifications (BNA) such as locked nucleic acid (LNA) designed to induce target RNA cleavage have been shown to have enhanced potency along with a higher propensity to cause hepatotoxicity. In order to understand the mechanism of this hepatotoxicity, transcriptional profiles were collected from the livers of mice treated with a panel of highly efficacious hepatotoxic or non-hepatotoxic LNA ASOs. We observed highly selective transcript knockdown in mice treated with non-hepatotoxic LNA ASOs, while the levels of many unintended transcripts were reduced in mice treated with hepatotoxic LNA ASOs. This transcriptional signature was concurrent with on-target RNA reduction and preceded transaminitis. Remarkably, the mRNA transcripts commonly reduced by toxic LNA ASOs were generally not strongly associated with any particular biological process, cellular component or functional group. However, they tended to have much longer pre-mRNA transcripts. We also demonstrate that the off-target RNA knockdown and hepatotoxicity is attenuated by RNase H1 knockdown, and that this effect can be generalized to high affinity modifications beyond LNA. This suggests that for a certain set of ASOs containing high affinity modifications such as LNA, hepatotoxicity can occur as a result of unintended off-target RNase H1 dependent RNA degradation. PMID:26553810

  8. Application of Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) Oligonucleotide–PCR Clamping Technique to Selectively PCR Amplify the SSU rRNA Genes of Bacteria in Investigating the Plant-Associated Community Structures

    PubMed Central

    Ikenaga, Makoto; Sakai, Masao

    2014-01-01

    The simultaneous extraction of plant organelle (mitochondria and plastid) genes during the DNA extraction step is a major limitation in investigating the community structures of bacteria associated with plants because organelle SSU rRNA genes are easily amplified by PCR using primer sets that are specific to bacteria. To inhibit the amplification of organelle genes, the locked nucleic acid (LNA) oligonucleotide–PCR clamping technique was applied to selectively amplify bacterial SSU rRNA genes by PCR. LNA oligonucleotides, the sequences of which were complementary to mitochondria and plastid genes, were designed by overlapping a few bases with the annealing position of the bacterial primer and converting DNA bases into LNA bases specific to mitochondria and plastids at the shifted region from the 3′ end of the primer-binding position. PCR with LNA oligonucleotides selectively amplified the bacterial genes while inhibited that of organelle genes. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis revealed that conventional amplification without LNA oligonucleotides predominantly generated DGGE bands from mitochondria and plastid genes with few bacterial bands. In contrast, additional bacterial bands were detected in DGGE patterns, the amplicons of which were prepared using LNA oligonucleotides. These results indicated that the detection of bacterial genes had been screened by the excessive amplification of the organelle genes. Sequencing of the bands newly detected by using LNA oligonucleotides revealed that their similarity to the known isolated bacteria was low, suggesting the potential to detect novel bacteria. Thus, application of the LNA oligonucleotide–PCR clamping technique was considered effective for the selective amplification of bacterial genes from extracted DNA containing plant organelle genes. PMID:25030190

  9. Poly(propylacrylic acid) enhances cationic lipid mediated delivery of antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Li Kim; Williams, Charity L.; Devore, David; Roth, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    The use of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) to inhibit the expression of specific mRNA targets represents a powerful technology for control of gene expression. Cationic lipids and polymers are frequently used to improve the delivery of ODNs to cells, but the resulting complexes often aggregate, bind to serum components, and are trafficked poorly within cells. We show that the addition of a synthetic, pH-sensitive, membrane-disrupting polyanion, poly(propylacrylic acid) (PPAA), improves the in vitro efficiency of the cationic lipid, DOTAP, with regard to oligonucleotide delivery and antisense activity. In characterization studies, ODN complexation with DOTAP/ODN was maintained even when substantial amounts of PPAA were added. The formulation also exhibited partial protection of phosphodiester oligonucleotides against enzymatic digestion. In Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, incorporation of PPAA in DOTAP/ODN complexes improved two- to threefold the cellular uptake of fluorescently tagged oligonucleotides. DOTAP/ODN complexes containing PPAA also maintained high levels of uptake into cells upon exposure to serum. Addition of PPAA to DOTAP/ODN complexes enhanced the antisense activity (using GFP as the target) over a range of PPAA concentrations in both serum-free, and to a lesser extent, serum-containing media. Thus, PPAA is a useful adjunct that improves the lipid-mediated delivery of oligonucleotides. PMID:16677032

  10. Solution structure of a dsDNA:LNA triplex

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Jesper J.; Nielsen, Jakob T.; Petersen, Michael

    2004-01-01

    We have determined the NMR structure of an intramolecular dsDNA:LNA triplex, where the LNA strand is composed of alternating LNA and DNA nucleotides. The LNA oligonucleotide binds to the dsDNA duplex in the major groove by formation of Hoogsteen hydrogen bonds to the purine strand of the duplex. The structure of the dsDNA duplex is changed to accommodate the LNA strand, and it adopts a geometry intermediate between A- and B-type. There is a substantial propeller twist between base-paired nucleobases. This propeller twist and a concomitant large propeller twist between the purine and LNA strands allows the pyrimidines of the LNA strand to interact with the 5′-flanking duplex pyrimidines. Altogether, the triplex has a regular global geometry as shown by a straight helix axis. This shows that even though the third strand is composed of alternating DNA and LNA monomers with different sugar puckers, it forms a seamless triplex. The thermostability of the triplex is increased by 19°C relative to the unmodified DNA triplex at acidic pH. Using NMR spectroscopy, we show that the dsDNA:LNA triplex is stable at pH 8, and that the triplex structure is identical to the structure determined at pH 5.1. PMID:15550567

  11. PEI-complexed LNA antiseeds as miRNA inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Maren; Lange-Grünweller, Kerstin; Dayyoub, Eyas; Bakowsky, Udo; Weirauch, Ulrike; Aigner, Achim; Hartmann, Roland K.; Grünweller, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Antisense inhibition of oncogenic or other disease-related miRNAs and miRNA families in vivo may provide novel therapeutic strategies. However, this approach relies on the development of potent miRNA inhibitors and their efficient delivery into cells. Here, we introduce short seed-directed LNA oligonucleotides (12- or 14-mer antiseeds) with a phosphodiester backbone (PO) for efficient miRNA inhibition. We have analyzed such LNA (PO) antiseeds using a let-7a-controlled luciferase reporter assay and identified them as active miRNA inhibitors in vitro. Moreover, LNA (PO) 14-mer antiseeds against ongogenic miR-17–5p and miR-20a derepress endogenous p21 expression more persistently than corresponding miRNA hairpin inhibitors, which are often used to inhibit miRNA function. Further analysis of the antiseed-mediated derepression of p21 in luciferase reporter constructs - containing the 3′-UTR of p21 and harboring two binding sites for miRNAs of the miR-106b family - provided evidence that the LNA antiseeds inhibit miRNA families while hairpin inhibitors act in a miRNA-specific manner. The derepression caused by LNA antiseeds is specific, as demonstrated via seed mutagenesis of the miR-106b target sites. Importantly, we show functional delivery of LNA (PO) 14-mer antiseeds into cells upon complexation with polyethylenimine (PEI F25-LMW), which leads to the formation of polymeric nanoparticles. In contrast, attempts to deliver a functional seed-directed tiny LNA 8-mer with a phosphorothioate backbone (PS) by formulation with PEI F25-LMW remained unsuccessful. In conclusion, LNA (PO) 14-mer antiseeds are attractive miRNA inhibitors, and their PEI-based delivery may represent a promising new strategy for therapeutic applications. PMID:22894918

  12. Changes in Oleic Acid Content of Transgenic Soybeans by Antisense RNA Mediated Posttranscriptional Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Yang, Xiang-dong; Zhang, Yuan-yu; Yang, Jing; Qi, Guang-xun; Guo, Dong-quan; Xing, Guo-jie; Yao, Yao; Xu, Wen-jing; Li, Hai-yun; Li, Qi-yun; Dong, Ying-shan

    2014-01-01

    The Delta-12 oleate desaturase gene (FAD2-1), which converts oleic acid into linoleic acid, is the key enzyme determining the fatty acid composition of seed oil. In this study, we inhibited the expression of endogenous Delta-12 oleate desaturase GmFad2-1b gene by using antisense RNA in soybean Williams 82. By employing the soybean cotyledonary-node method, a part of the cDNA of soybean GmFad2-1b 801 bp was cloned for the construction of a pCAMBIA3300 vector under the soybean seed promoter BCSP. Leaf painting, LibertyLink strip, PCR, Southern blot, qRT-PCR, and fatty acid analysis were used to detect the insertion and expression of GmFad2-1b in the transgenic soybean lines. The results indicate that the metabolically engineered plants exhibited a significant increase in oleic acid (up to 51.71%) and a reduction in palmitic acid (to <3%) in their seed oil content. No structural differences were observed between the fatty acids of the transgenic and the nontransgenic oil extracts. PMID:25197629

  13. Antitumor Effects of EGFR Antisense Guanidine-Based Peptide Nucleic Acids in Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sufi M.; Sahu, Bichismita; Rapireddy, Srinivas; Bahal, Raman; Wheeler, Sarah E.; Procopio, Eva M.; Kim, Joseph; Joyce, Sonali C.; Contrucci, Sarah; Wang, Yun; Chiosea, Simion I.; Lathrop, Kira L.; Watkins, Simon; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Armitage, Bruce A.; Ly, Danith H.

    2013-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids have emerged over the past two decades as a promising class of nucleic acid mimics because of their strong binding affinity and sequence selectivity toward DNA and RNA, and resistance to enzymatic degradation by proteases and nucleases. While they have been shown to be effective in regulation of gene expression in vitro, and to a small extent in vivo, their full potential for molecular therapy has not yet been fully realized due to poor cellular uptake. Herein, we report the development of cell-permeable, guanidine-based peptide nucleic acids targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in preclinical models as therapeutic modality for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A GPNA oligomer, 16 nucleotides in length, designed to bind to EGFR gene transcript elicited potent antisense effects in HNSCC and NSCLC cells in preclinical models. When administered intraperitoneally in mice, EGFRAS-GPNA was taken-up by several tissues including the xenograft tumor. Systemic administration of EGFRAS-GPNA induced antitumor effects in HNSCC xenografts, with similar efficacies as the FDA-approved EGFR inhibitors: cetuximab and erlotinib. In addition to targeting wild-type EGFR, EGFRAS-GPNA is effective against the constitutively active EGFR vIII mutant implicated in cetuximab resistance. Our data reveals that GPNA is just as effective as a molecular platform for treating cetuximab resistant cells, demonstrating its utility in the treatment of cancer. PMID:23113581

  14. Non-covalent complexes of folic acid and oleic acid conjugated polyethylenimine: An efficient vehicle for antisense oligonucleotide delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuang; Yang, Xuewei; Liu, Yan; Zheng, Bin; Meng, Lingjun; Lee, Robert J.; Xie, Jing; Teng, Lesheng

    2016-01-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI) was conjugated to oleic acid (PEI-OA) and evaluated as a delivery agent for LOR-2501, an antisense oligonucleotide against ribonucleotide reductase R1 subunit. PEI-OA/LOR-2501 complexes were further coated with folic acid (FA/PEI-OA/LOR-2501) and evaluated in tumor cells. The level of cellular uptake of FA/PEI-OA/LOR-2501 was more than double that of PEI/LOR-2501 complexes, and was not affected by the expression level of folate receptor (FR) on the cell surface. Efficient delivery was seen in several cell lines. Furthermore, pathway specific cellular internalization inhibitors and markers were used to reveal the principal mechanism of cellular uptake. FA/PEI-OA/LOR-2501 significantly induced the downregulation of R1 mRNA and R1 protein. This novel formulation of FA/PEI-OA provides a reliable and highly efficient method for delivery of oligonucleotide and warrants further investigation. PMID:26263216

  15. Short antisense-locked nucleic acids (all-LNAs) correct alternative splicing abnormalities in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wojtkowiak-Szlachcic, Agnieszka; Taylor, Katarzyna; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa; Sznajder, Lukasz J.; Mykowska, Agnieszka; Sroka, Joanna; Thornton, Charles A.; Sobczak, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an autosomal dominant multisystemic disorder caused by expansion of CTG triplet repeats in 3′-untranslated region of DMPK gene. The pathomechanism of DM1 is driven by accumulation of toxic transcripts containing expanded CUG repeats (CUGexp) in nuclear foci which sequester several factors regulating RNA metabolism, such as Muscleblind-like proteins (MBNLs). In this work, we utilized very short chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides composed exclusively of locked nucleic acids (all-LNAs) complementary to CUG repeats, as potential therapeutic agents against DM1. Our in vitro data demonstrated that very short, 8- or 10-unit all-LNAs effectively bound the CUG repeat RNA and prevented the formation of CUGexp/MBNL complexes. In proliferating DM1 cells as well as in skeletal muscles of DM1 mouse model the all-LNAs induced the reduction of the number and size of CUGexp foci and corrected MBNL-sensitive alternative splicing defects with high efficacy and specificity. The all-LNAs had low impact on the cellular level of CUGexp-containing transcripts and did not affect the expression of other transcripts with short CUG repeats. Our data strongly indicate that short all-LNAs complementary to CUG repeats are a promising therapeutic tool against DM1. PMID:25753670

  16. Chimeric Antisense Oligonucleotide Conjugated to α-Tocopherol

    PubMed Central

    Nishina, Tomoko; Numata, Junna; Nishina, Kazutaka; Yoshida-Tanaka, Kie; Nitta, Keiko; Piao, Wenying; Iwata, Rintaro; Ito, Shingo; Kuwahara, Hiroya; Wada, Takeshi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    We developed an efficient system for delivering short interfering RNA (siRNA) to the liver by using α-tocopherol conjugation. The α-tocopherol–conjugated siRNA was effective and safe for RNA interference–mediated gene silencing in vivo. In contrast, when the 13-mer LNA (locked nucleic acid)-DNA gapmer antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) was directly conjugated with α-tocopherol it showed markedly reduced silencing activity in mouse liver. Here, therefore, we tried to extend the 5′-end of the ASO sequence by using 5′-α-tocopherol–conjugated 4- to 7-mers of unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) as a “second wing.” Intravenous injection of mice with this α-tocopherol–conjugated chimeric ASO achieved more potent silencing than ASO alone in the liver, suggesting increased delivery of the ASO to the liver. Within the cells, the UNA wing was cleaved or degraded and α-tocopherol was released from the 13-mer gapmer ASO, resulting in activation of the gapmer. The α-tocopherol–conjugated chimeric ASO showed high efficacy, with hepatic tropism, and was effective and safe for gene silencing in vivo. We have thus identified a new, effective LNA-DNA gapmer structure in which drug delivery system (DDS) molecules are bound to ASO with UNA sequences. PMID:25584900

  17. Hsp90 protein interacts with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides containing hydrophobic 2'-modifications and enhances antisense activity.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Kinberger, Garth A; Prakash, Thazha P; Nichols, Joshua G; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-05-01

    RNase H1-dependent antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are chemically modified to enhance pharmacological properties. Major modifications include phosphorothioate (PS) backbone and different 2'-modifications in 2-5 nucleotides at each end (wing) of an ASO. Chemical modifications can affect protein binding and understanding ASO-protein interactions is important for better drug design. Recently we identified many intracellular ASO-binding proteins and found that protein binding could affect ASO potency. Here, we analyzed the structure-activity-relationships of ASO-protein interactions and found 2'-modifications significantly affected protein binding, including La, P54nrb and NPM. PS-ASOs containing more hydrophobic 2'-modifications exhibit higher affinity for proteins in general, although certain proteins, e.g. Ku70/Ku80 and TCP1, are less affected by 2'-modifications. We found that Hsp90 protein binds PS-ASOs containing locked-nucleic-acid (LNA) or constrained-ethyl-bicyclic-nucleic-acid ((S)-cEt) modifications much more avidly than 2'-O-methoxyethyl (MOE). ASOs bind the mid-domain of Hsp90 protein. Hsp90 interacts with more hydrophobic 2' modifications, e.g. (S)-cEt or LNA, in the 5'-wing of the ASO. Reduction of Hsp90 protein decreased activity of PS-ASOs with 5'-LNA or 5'-cEt wings, but not with 5'-MOE wing. Together, our results indicate Hsp90 protein enhances the activity of PS/LNA or PS/(S)-cEt ASOs, and imply that altering protein binding of ASOs using different chemical modifications can improve therapeutic performance of PS-ASOs. PMID:26945041

  18. Optimized DNA-targeting using triplex forming C5-alkynyl functionalized LNA.

    PubMed

    Sau, Sujay P; Kumar, Pawan; Anderson, Brooke A; Østergaard, Michael E; Deobald, Lee; Paszczynski, Andrzej; Sharma, Pawan K; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2009-11-28

    Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) modified with C5-alkynyl functionalized LNA (locked nucleic acid) monomers display extraordinary thermal affinity toward double stranded DNA targets, excellent discrimination of Hoogsteen-mismatched targets, and high stability against 3?-exonucleases. PMID:19885469

  19. Hsp90 protein interacts with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides containing hydrophobic 2′-modifications and enhances antisense activity

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Kinberger, Garth A.; Prakash, Thazha P.; Nichols, Joshua G.; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2016-01-01

    RNase H1-dependent antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are chemically modified to enhance pharmacological properties. Major modifications include phosphorothioate (PS) backbone and different 2′-modifications in 2–5 nucleotides at each end (wing) of an ASO. Chemical modifications can affect protein binding and understanding ASO-protein interactions is important for better drug design. Recently we identified many intracellular ASO-binding proteins and found that protein binding could affect ASO potency. Here, we analyzed the structure-activity-relationships of ASO-protein interactions and found 2′-modifications significantly affected protein binding, including La, P54nrb and NPM. PS-ASOs containing more hydrophobic 2′-modifications exhibit higher affinity for proteins in general, although certain proteins, e.g. Ku70/Ku80 and TCP1, are less affected by 2′-modifications. We found that Hsp90 protein binds PS-ASOs containing locked-nucleic-acid (LNA) or constrained-ethyl-bicyclic-nucleic-acid ((S)-cEt) modifications much more avidly than 2′-O-methoxyethyl (MOE). ASOs bind the mid-domain of Hsp90 protein. Hsp90 interacts with more hydrophobic 2′ modifications, e.g. (S)-cEt or LNA, in the 5′-wing of the ASO. Reduction of Hsp90 protein decreased activity of PS-ASOs with 5′-LNA or 5′-cEt wings, but not with 5′-MOE wing. Together, our results indicate Hsp90 protein enhances the activity of PS/LNA or PS/(S)-cEt ASOs, and imply that altering protein binding of ASOs using different chemical modifications can improve therapeutic performance of PS-ASOs. PMID:26945041

  20. Molecularly resolved label-free sensing of single nucleobase mismatches by interfacial LNA probes.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sourav; Lahiri, Hiya; Banerjee, Siddhartha; Mukhopadhyay, Rupa

    2016-05-01

    So far, there has been no report on molecularly resolved discrimination of single nucleobase mismatches using surface-confined single stranded locked nucleic acid (ssLNA) probes. Herein, it is exemplified using a label-independent force-sensing approach that an optimal coverage of 12-mer ssLNA sensor probes formed onto gold(111) surface allows recognition of ssDNA targets with twice stronger force sensitivity than 12-mer ssDNA sensor probes. The force distributions are reproducible and the molecule-by-molecule force measurements are largely in agreement with ensemble on-surface melting temperature data. Importantly, the molecularly resolved detection is responsive to the presence of single nucleobase mismatches in target sequences. Since the labelling steps can be eliminated from protocol, and each force-based detection event occurs within milliseconds' time scale, the force-sensing assay is potentially capable of rapid detection. The LNA probe performance is indicative of versatility in terms of substrate choice - be it gold (for basic research and array-based applications) or silicon (for 'lab-on-a-chip' type devices). The nucleic acid microarray technologies could therefore be generally benefited by adopting the LNA films, in place of DNA. Since LNA is nuclease-resistant, unlike DNA, and the LNA-based assay is sensitive to single nucleobase mismatches, the possibilities for label-free in vitro rapid diagnostics based on the LNA probes may be explored. PMID:27025649

  1. Molecularly resolved label-free sensing of single nucleobase mismatches by interfacial LNA probes

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sourav; Lahiri, Hiya; Banerjee, Siddhartha; Mukhopadhyay, Rupa

    2016-01-01

    So far, there has been no report on molecularly resolved discrimination of single nucleobase mismatches using surface-confined single stranded locked nucleic acid (ssLNA) probes. Herein, it is exemplified using a label-independent force-sensing approach that an optimal coverage of 12-mer ssLNA sensor probes formed onto gold(111) surface allows recognition of ssDNA targets with twice stronger force sensitivity than 12-mer ssDNA sensor probes. The force distributions are reproducible and the molecule-by-molecule force measurements are largely in agreement with ensemble on-surface melting temperature data. Importantly, the molecularly resolved detection is responsive to the presence of single nucleobase mismatches in target sequences. Since the labelling steps can be eliminated from protocol, and each force-based detection event occurs within milliseconds' time scale, the force-sensing assay is potentially capable of rapid detection. The LNA probe performance is indicative of versatility in terms of substrate choice - be it gold (for basic research and array-based applications) or silicon (for ‘lab-on-a-chip’ type devices). The nucleic acid microarray technologies could therefore be generally benefited by adopting the LNA films, in place of DNA. Since LNA is nuclease-resistant, unlike DNA, and the LNA-based assay is sensitive to single nucleobase mismatches, the possibilities for label-free in vitro rapid diagnostics based on the LNA probes may be explored. PMID:27025649

  2. In vitro incorporation of LNA nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Veedu, Rakesh N; Vester, Birte; Wengel, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    An LNA modified nucleoside triphosphate 1 was synthesized in order to investigate its potential to act as substrate for DNA strand synthesis by polymerases. Primer extension assays for the incorporation experiments revealed that Phusion High Fidelity DNA polymerase is an efficient enzyme for incorporation of the LNA nucleotide and for extending strand to full length. It was also observed that pfu DNA polymerase could incorporate the LNA nucleotide but it failed to extend the strand to a full length product. PMID:18058567

  3. Invader LNA – Efficient Targeting of Short Double Stranded DNA†

    PubMed Central

    Sau, Sujay P.; Kumar, T. Santhosh; Hrdlicka, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite progress with triplex-forming oligonucleotides or helix-invading peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), there remains a need for probes facilitating sequence-unrestricted targeting of double stranded DNA (dsDNA) at physiologically relevant conditions. Invader LNA probes, i.e., DNA duplexes with “+1 interstrand zipper arrangements” of intercalator-functionalized 2’-amino-α-L-LNA monomers, are demonstrated herein to recognize short mixed sequence dsDNA targets. This approach, like pseudo-complementary PNA (pcPNA), relies on relative differences in stability between probe duplexes and the corresponding probe:target duplexes for generation of a favourable thermodynamic gradient. Unlike pcPNA, Invader LNA probes take advantage of the “nearest neighbour exclusion principle”, i.e., intercalating units of Invader LNA monomers are poorly accommodated in probe duplexes but extraordinarily well tolerated in probe-target duplexes (ΔTm/modification up to +11.5 °C). Recognition of isosequential dsDNA-targets occurs: a) at experimental temperatures much lower than the thermal denaturation temperatures (Tm’s) of Invader LNAs or dsDNA-targets, b) at a wide range of ionic strengths, and c) with good mismatch discrimination. dsDNA recognition is monitored in real-time using inherent pyrene-pyrene excimer signals of Invader LNA probes, which provides insights into reaction kinetics and enables rational design of probes. These properties render Invader LNAs as promising probes for biomedical applications entailing sequence-unrestricted recognition of dsDNA. PMID:20401378

  4. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of a 13-mer LNA-inhibitor-miR-221 in Mice and Non-human Primates.

    PubMed

    Gallo Cantafio, Maria Eugenia; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Mignogna, Chiara; Arbitrio, Mariamena; Botta, Cirino; Frandsen, Niels M; Rolfo, Christian; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Di Martino, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) oligonucleotides have been successfully used to efficiently inhibit endogenous small noncoding RNAs in vitro and in vivo. We previously demonstrated that the direct miR-221 inhibition by the novel 13-mer LNA-i-miR-221 induces significant antimyeloma activity and upregulates canonical miR-221 targets in vitro and in vivo. To evaluate the LNA-i-miR-221 pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, novel assays for oligonucleotides quantification in NOD.SCID mice and Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) plasma, urine and tissues were developed. To this aim, a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method, after solid-phase extraction, was used for the detection of LNA-i-miR-221 in plasma and urine, while a specific in situ hybridization assay for tissue uptake analysis was designed. Our analysis revealed short half-life, optimal tissue biovailability and minimal urine excretion of LNA-i-miR-221 in mice and monkeys. Up to 3 weeks, LNA-i-miR-221 was still detectable in mice vital organs and in xenografted tumors, together with p27 target upregulation. Importantly, no toxicity in the pilot monkey study was observed. Overall, our findings indicate the suitability of LNA-i-miR-221 for clinical use and we provide here pilot data for safety analysis and further development of LNA-miRNA-based therapeutics for human cancer. PMID:27327137

  5. Logic gates and antisense DNA devices operating on a translator nucleic Acid scaffold.

    PubMed

    Shlyahovsky, Bella; Li, Yang; Lioubashevski, Oleg; Elbaz, Johann; Willner, Itamar

    2009-07-28

    A series of logic gates, "AND", "OR", and "XOR", are designed using a DNA scaffold that includes four "footholds" on which the logic operations are activated. Two of the footholds represent input-recognition strands, and these are blocked by complementary nucleic acids, whereas the other two footholds are blocked by nucleic acids that include the horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking DNAzyme sequence. The logic gates are activated by either nucleic acid inputs that hybridize to the respective "footholds", or by low-molecular-weight inputs (adenosine monophosphate or cocaine) that yield the respective aptamer-substrate complexes. This results in the respective translocation of the blocking nucleic acids to the footholds carrying the HRP-mimicking DNAzyme sequence, and the concomitant release of the respective DNAzyme. The released product-strands then self-assemble into the hemin/G-quadruplex-HRP-mimicking DNAzyme that biocatalyzes the formation of a colored product and provides an output signal for the different logic gates. The principle of the logic operation is, then, implemented as a possible paradigm for future nanomedicine. The nucleic acid inputs that bind to the blocked footholds result in the translocation of the blocking nucleic acids to the respective footholds carrying the antithrombin aptamer. The released aptamer inhibits, then, the hydrolytic activity of thrombin. The system demonstrates the regulation of a biocatalytic reaction by a translator system activated on a DNA scaffold. PMID:19507821

  6. Sub-cellular temporal and spatial distribution of electrotransferred LNA/DNA oligomer.

    PubMed

    Orio, Julie; Bellard, Elisabeth; Baaziz, Houda; Pichon, Chantal; Mouritzen, Peter; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Teissié, Justin; Golzio, Muriel; Chabot, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Low biological activity and inefficient targeted delivery in vivo have hindered RNA interference (RNAi)-based therapy from realising its full clinical potential. To overcome these hurdles, progresses have been made to develop new technologies optimizing oligonucleotides chemistry on one hand and achieving its effective delivery on the other hand. In this report, we achieved, by using the electropulsation technique (EP), efficient cellular delivery of chemically-modified oligonucleotide: The locked nucleic acid (LNA)/DNA oligomer. We used single cell level confocal fluorescence microscopy to follow the spatial and temporal distribution of electrotransferred cyanine 5 (Cy5)-labeled LNA/DNA oligomer. We observed that EP allowed LNA/DNA oligomer cellular uptake providing the oligomer a rapid access to the cytoplasm of HeLa cells. Within a few minutes after electrotransfer, Cy5-LNA/DNA oligomers shuttle from cytoplasm to nucleus whereas in absence of pulses application, Cy5-LNA/DNA oligomers were not detected. We then observed a redistribution of the Cy5 fluorescence that accumulated over time into cytoplasmic organelles. To go further and to identify these compartments, we used the HeLa GFP-Rab7 cell line to visualise late endosomes, and lysosomal or mitochondrial specific markers. Our results showed that the EP technique allowed direct entry into the cytoplasm of the Cy5-LNA/DNA oligomer bypassing the endocytosic pathway. However, in absence of pulses application, Cy5-LNA/DNA oligomer were able to enter cells through the endocytosic pathway. We demonstrated that EP is an efficient technique for LNA-based oligonucleotides delivery offering strong advantages by avoiding the endolysosomal compartmentalization, giving a rapid and free access to the cytoplasm and the nucleus where they can find their targets. PMID:23946765

  7. Antisense oligonucleotides and all-trans retinoic acid have a synergistic anti-tumor effect on oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qin; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Wantao

    2008-01-01

    Background Antisense oligonucleotides against hTR (As-ODN-hTR) have shown promising results as treatment strategies for various human malignancies. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is a signalling molecule with important roles in differentiation and apoptosis. Biological responses to ATRA are currently used therapeutically in various human cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of As-ODN-hTR combined with ATRA in vivo. Methods In situ human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) models were established by subcutaneous injection of Tca8113 cells. Mice were treated with sense oligonucleotides against hTR(S-ODN-hTR) alone, As-ODN-hTR alone, ATRA alone, As-ODN-hTR plus ATRA, or S-ODN-hTR plus ATRA. Tumor size and weight were assessed in the mice. Telomerase activity was detected by a TRAP assay, apoptotic cells were evaluated with a Tunel assay, the expression of apoptosis-related proteins (Bcl-2 and Bax) was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural morphological changes in the tumor specimen were examined. Results Both As-ODN-hTR and ATRA can significantly inhibit tumor growth in this OSCC xenograft solid-tumor model, and the combination of the two agents had a synergistic anti-tumorogenic effect. We also demonstrated that this anti-tumor effect correlated with inhibition of telomerase activity. Furthermore, significant increases in the number of apoptotic cells, typical apoptotic morphology and a downregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein, bcl-2 were observed in the treated tissues. Conclusion The combination of As-ODN-hTR and ATRA has a synergistic anti-tumor effect. This anti-tumor effect can be mainly attributed to apoptosis induced by a decrease in telomerase activity. Bcl-2 plays an important role in this process. Therefore, combining As-ODN-hTR and ATRA may be an approach for the treatment of human oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:18522733

  8. Viral escape from antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Bull, J J; Jacobson, A; Badgett, M R; Molineux, I J

    1998-05-01

    RNA coliphage SP was propagated for several generations on a host expressing an inhibitory antisense RNA complementary to bases 31-270 of the positive-stranded genome. Phages evolved that escaped inhibition. Typically, these escape mutants contained 3-4 base substitutions, but different sequences were observed among different isolates. The mutations were located within three different types of structural features within the predicted secondary structure of SP genomic RNA: (i) hairpin loops; (ii) hairpin stems; and (iii) the 5' region of the phage genome complementary to the antisense molecule. Computer modelling of the mutant genomic RNAs showed that all of the substitutions within hairpin stems improved the Watson-Crick pairing of the stem. No major structural rearrangements were predicted for any of the mutant genomes, and most substitutions in coding regions did not alter the amino acid sequence. Although the evolved phage populations were polymorphic for substitutions, many substitutions appeared independently in two selected lines. The creation of a new, perfect, antisense RNA against an escape mutant resulted in the inhibition of that mutant but not of other escape mutants nor of the ancestral, unevolved phage. Thus, at least in this system, a population of viruses that evolved to escape from a single antisense RNA would require a cocktail of several antisense RNAs for inhibition. PMID:9643550

  9. The Antisense RNA Approach: a New Application for In Vivo Investigation of the Stress Response of Oenococcus oeni, a Wine-Associated Lactic Acid Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Darsonval, Maud; Msadek, Tarek; Alexandre, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni is a wine-associated lactic acid bacterium mostly responsible for malolactic fermentation in wine. In wine, O. oeni grows in an environment hostile to bacterial growth (low pH, low temperature, and ethanol) that induces stress response mechanisms. To survive, O. oeni is known to set up transitional stress response mechanisms through the synthesis of heat stress proteins (HSPs) encoded by the hsp genes, notably a unique small HSP named Lo18. Despite the availability of the genome sequence, characterization of O. oeni genes is limited, and little is known about the in vivo role of Lo18. Due to the lack of genetic tools for O. oeni, an efficient expression vector in O. oeni is still lacking, and deletion or inactivation of the hsp18 gene is not presently practicable. As an alternative approach, with the goal of understanding the biological function of the O. oeni hsp18 gene in vivo, we have developed an expression vector to produce antisense RNA targeting of hsp18 mRNA. Recombinant strains were exposed to multiple stresses inducing hsp18 gene expression: heat shock and acid shock. We showed that antisense attenuation of hsp18 affects O. oeni survival under stress conditions. These results confirm the involvement of Lo18 in heat and acid tolerance of O. oeni. Results of anisotropy experiments also confirm a membrane-protective role for Lo18, as previous observations had already suggested. This study describes a new, efficient tool to demonstrate the use of antisense technology for modulating gene expression in O. oeni. PMID:26452552

  10. COMPLETE RESPONSE OF CTNNB1-MUTATED TUMORS TO β-CATENIN SUPPRESSION BY LOCKED NUCLEIC ANTISENSE IN MOUSE HEPATOCARCINOGENESIS MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Evan; Okabe, Hirohisa; Preziosi, Morgan; Russell, Jacquelyn Olivia; Alvarado, Tamara Feliciano; Oertel, Michael; Nejak-Bowen, Kari Nichole; Zhang, Yixian; Monga, Satdarshan P

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Hepatocellular cancer (HCC) remains a disease of poor prognosis highlighting the relevance of elucidating key molecular aberrations that may be targeted for novel therapies. Wnt signaling activation chiefly due to mutations in CTNNB1 have been identified in a major subset of HCC patients. While several in vitro proof-of-concept studies show the relevance of suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling in HCC cells or tumor xenograft models, no study has addressed the impact of β-catenin inhibition in a relevant murine HCC model driven by CTNNB1 mutations. Methods We studied the in vivo impact of β-catenin suppression by locked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense treatment after establishing CTNNB1 mutations-driven HCC by Diethylnitrosamine and Phenobarbital (DEN/PB) administration. Results The efficacy of LNA-directed against β-catenin versus scrambled sequence on Wnt signaling was demonstrated in vitro in HCC cells and in vivo in normal mice. DEN/PB model led to HCC with CTNNB1 mutations. A complete therapeutic response in the form of abrogation of HCC was observed after ten treatments of tumor-bearing mice with β-catenin LNA every 48 hours as compared to the scrambled control. A decrease in β-catenin activity, cell proliferation and increased cell death was evident after β-catenin suppression. No effect of β-catenin suppression was evident in non-CTNNB1 mutated HCC observed after DEN only administration. Conclusions Thus, we provide in vivo proof-of-concept that β-catenin suppression in HCC will be of significant therapeutic benefit provided the tumors display Wnt activation via mechanisms like CTNNB1 mutations. PMID:25457204

  11. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus (HBV) by LNA-mediated nuclear interference with HBV DNA transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhen; Xiang, Wenqing; Guo, Yajuan; Chen, Zhi; Liu, Wei; Lu, Daru

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} LNA-modified oligonucleotides can pass through the plasma membrane of cultured cells even without using transfection machinery. {yields} LNA-modified oligonucleotides passed efficiently across the cell membrane, and lipid-coating facilitated translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. {yields} LNA-oligonucleotide designed to target nuclear HBV DNA efficiently suppresses HBV replication and transcription in cultured hepatic cells. -- Abstract: Silencing target genes with small regulatory RNAs is widely used to investigate gene function and therapeutic drug development. Recently, triplex-based approaches have provided another attractive means to achieve targeted gene regulation and gene manipulation at the molecular and cellular levels. Nuclear entry of oligonucleotides and enhancement of their affinity to the DNA targets are key points of such approaches. In this study, we developed lipid-based transport of a locked-nucleic-acid (LNA)-modified oligonucleotide for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA interference in human hepatocytes expressing HBV genomic DNA. In these cells, the LNA-modified oligonucleotides passed efficiently across the cell membrane, and lipid-coating facilitated translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The oligonucleotide specifically targeting HBV DNA clearly interfered with HBV DNA transcription as shown by a block in pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) production. The HBV DNA-targeted oligonucleotide suppressed HBV DNA replication and HBV protein production more efficiently than small interfering RNAs directed to the pgRNA. These results demonstrate that fusion with lipid can carry LNA-modified oligonucleotides to the nucleus where they regulate gene expression. Interfering with HBV DNA transcription by LNA-modified oligonucleotides has strong potential as a new strategy for HBV inhibition.

  12. Functionalized 2'-amino-alpha-L-LNA: directed positioning of intercalators for DNA targeting.

    PubMed

    Kumar, T Santhosh; Madsen, Andreas S; Østergaard, Michael E; Sau, Sujay P; Wengel, Jesper; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2009-02-01

    Chemically modified oligonucleotides are increasingly applied in nucleic acid based therapeutics and diagnostics. LNA (locked nucleic acid) and its diastereomer alpha-L-LNA are two promising examples thereof that exhibit increased thermal and enzymatic stability. Herein, the synthesis, biophysical characterization, and molecular modeling of N2'-functionalized 2'-amino-alpha-L-LNA is described. Chemoselective N2'-functionalization of protected amino alcohol 1 followed by phosphitylation afforded a structurally varied set of target phosphoramidites, which were incorporated into oligodeoxyribonucleotides. Incorporation of pyrene-functionalized building blocks such as 2'-N-(pyren-1-yl)carbonyl-2'-amino-alpha-L-LNA (monomer X) led to extraordinary increases in thermal affinity of up to +19.5 degrees C per modification against DNA targets in particular. In contrast, incorporation of building blocks with small nonaromatic N2'-functionalities such as 2'-N-acetyl-2'-amino-alpha-L-LNA (monomer V) had detrimental effects on thermal affinity toward DNA/RNA complements with decreases of as much as -16.5 degrees C per modification. Extensive thermal DNA selectivity, favorable entropic contributions upon duplex formation, hybridization-induced bathochromic shifts of pyrene absorption maxima and increases in circular dichroism signal intensity, and molecular modeling studies suggest that pyrene-functionalized 2'-amino-alpha-L-LNA monomers W-Y having short linkers between the bicyclic skeleton and the pyrene moiety allow high-affinity hybridization with DNA complements and precise positioning of intercalators in nucleic acid duplexes. This rigorous positional control has been utilized for the development of probes for emerging therapeutic and diagnostic applications focusing on DNA targeting. PMID:19108636

  13. Functionalized 2′-Amino-α-L-LNA - Directed Positioning of Intercalators for DNA Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, T. Santhosh; Madsen, Andreas S.; Østergaard, Michael E.; Sau, Sujay P.; Wengel, Jesper; Hrdlicka, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    Chemically modified oligonucleotides are increasingly applied in nucleic acid based therapeutics and diagnostics. LNA (Locked Nucleic Acid) and its diastereomer α-L-LNA are two promising examples hereof that exhibit increased thermal and enzymatic stability. Herein, the synthesis, biophysical characterization and molecular modeling of N2′-functionalized 2′-amino-α-L-LNA is described. Chemoselective N2′-functionalization of protected amino alcohol 1 followed by phosphitylation afforded a structurally varied set of target phosphoramidites, which were incorporated into oligodeoxyribonucleotides. Incorporation of pyrene-functionalized building blocks such as 2′-N-(pyren-1-yl)carbonyl-2′-amino-α-L-LNA (monomer X) led to extraordinary increases in thermal affinity of up to +19.5 °C per modification against DNA targets in particular. In contrast, incorporation of building blocks with small non-aromatic N2′-functionalities such as 2′-N-acetyl-2′-amino-α-L-LNA (monomer V) had detrimental effects on thermal affinity toward DNA/RNA complements with decreases of as much as −16.5 °C per modification. Extensive thermal DNA selectivity, favorable entropic contributions upon duplex formation, hybridization-induced bathochromic shifts of pyrene absorption maxima and increases of circular dichroism signals, and molecular modeling studies suggest that pyrene functionalized 2′-amino-α-L-LNA monomers W-Y having short linkers between the bicyclic skeleton and the pyrene moiety, allow high-affinity hybridization with DNA complements and precise positioning of intercalators in nucleic acid duplexes. This rigorous positional control has been utilized for the development probes for emerging therapeutic and diagnostic applications focusing on DNA-targeting. PMID:19108636

  14. Novel Methodology for Rapid Detection of KRAS Mutation Using PNA-LNA Mediated Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification.

    PubMed

    Itonaga, Masahiro; Matsuzaki, Ibu; Warigaya, Kenji; Tamura, Takaaki; Shimizu, Yuki; Fujimoto, Masakazu; Kojima, Fumiyoshi; Ichinose, Masao; Murata, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Detecting point mutation of human cancer cells quickly and accurately is gaining in importance for pathological diagnosis and choice of therapeutic approach. In the present study, we present novel methodology, peptide nucleic acid-locked nucleic acid mediated loop-mediated isothermal amplification (PNA-LNA mediated LAMP), for rapid detection of KRAS mutation using advantages of both artificial DNA and LAMP. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP reactions occurred under isothermal temperature conditions of with 4 primary primers set for the target regions on the KRAS gene, clamping PNA probe that was complimentary to the wild type sequence and LNA primers complementary to the mutated sequences. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP was applied for cDNA from 4 kinds of pancreatic carcinoma cell lines with or without KRAS point mutation. The amplified DNA products were verified by naked-eye as well as a real-time PCR equipment. By PNA-LNA mediated LAMP, amplification of wild type KRAS DNA was blocked by clamping PNA probe, whereas, mutant type KRAS DNA was significantly amplified within 50 min. Mutant alleles could be detected in samples which diluted until 0.1% of mutant-to-wild type ratio. On the other hand, mutant alleles could be reproducibly with a mutant-to-wild type ratio of 30% by direct sequencing and of 1% by PNA-clamping PCR. The limit of detection (LOD) of PNA-LNA mediated LAMP was much lower than the other conventional methods. Competition of LNA clamping primers complementary to two different subtypes (G12D and G12V) of mutant KRAS gene indicated different amplification time depend on subtypes of mutant cDNA. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP is a simple, rapid, specific and sensitive methodology for the detection of KRAS mutation. PMID:26999437

  15. Cholesterol-lowering Action of BNA-based Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting PCSK9 in Atherogenic Diet-induced Hypercholesterolemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Nakatani, Moeka; Wada, Shunsuke; Yasuhara, Hidenori; Narukawa, Keisuke; Sasaki, Kiyomi; Shibata, Masa-Aki; Torigoe, Hidetaka; Yamaoka, Tetsuji; Imanishi, Takeshi; Obika, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings in molecular biology implicate the involvement of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) in low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) protein regulation. The cholesterol-lowering potential of anti-PCSK9 antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) modified with bridged nucleic acids (BNA-AONs) including 2′,4′-BNA (also called as locked nucleic acid (LNA)) and 2′,4′-BNANC chemistries were demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. An in vitro transfection study revealed that all of the BNA-AONs induce dose-dependent reductions in PCSK9 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels concomitantly with increases in LDLR protein levels. BNA-AONs were administered to atherogenic diet-fed C57BL/6J mice twice weekly for 6 weeks; 2′,4′-BNA-AON that targeted murine PCSK9 induced a dose-dependent reduction in hepatic PCSK9 mRNA and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C); the 43% reduction of serum LDL-C was achieved at a dose of 20 mg/kg/injection with only moderate increases in toxicological indicators. In addition, the serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels increased. These results support antisense inhibition of PCSK9 as a potential therapeutic approach. When compared with 2′,4′-BNA-AON, 2′,4′-BNANC-AON showed an earlier LDL-C–lowering effect and was more tolerable in mice. Our results validate the optimization of 2′,4′-BNANC-based anti-PCSK9 antisense molecules to produce a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. PMID:23344002

  16. Thermal stability of G-rich anti-parallel DNA triplexes upon insertion of LNA and α-L-LNA.

    PubMed

    Kosbar, Tamer R; Sofan, Mamdouh A; Abou-Zeid, Laila; Pedersen, Erik B

    2015-05-14

    G-rich anti-parallel DNA triplexes were modified with LNA or α-L-LNA in their Watson-Crick and TFO strands. The triplexes were formed by targeting a pyrimidine strand to a putative hairpin formed by Hoogsteen base pairing in order to use the UV melting method to evaluate the stability of the triplexes. Their thermal stability was reduced when the TFO strand was modified with LNA or α-L-LNA. The same trend was observed when the TFO strand and the purine Watson-Crick strand both were modified with LNA. When all triad components were modified with α-L-LNA and LNA in the middle of the triplex, the thermal melting was increased. When the pyrimidine sequence was modified with a single insertion of LNA or α-L-LNA the ΔTm increased. Moreover, increasing the number of α-L-LNA in the pyrimidine target sequence to six insertions, leads to a high increase in the thermal stability. The conformational S-type structure of α-L-LNA in anti-parallel triplexes is preferable for triplex stability. PMID:25833006

  17. Novel Methodology for Rapid Detection of KRAS Mutation Using PNA-LNA Mediated Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Warigaya, Kenji; Tamura, Takaaki; Shimizu, Yuki; Fujimoto, Masakazu; Kojima, Fumiyoshi; Ichinose, Masao; Murata, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Detecting point mutation of human cancer cells quickly and accurately is gaining in importance for pathological diagnosis and choice of therapeutic approach. In the present study, we present novel methodology, peptide nucleic acid—locked nucleic acid mediated loop-mediated isothermal amplification (PNA-LNA mediated LAMP), for rapid detection of KRAS mutation using advantages of both artificial DNA and LAMP. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP reactions occurred under isothermal temperature conditions of with 4 primary primers set for the target regions on the KRAS gene, clamping PNA probe that was complimentary to the wild type sequence and LNA primers complementary to the mutated sequences. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP was applied for cDNA from 4 kinds of pancreatic carcinoma cell lines with or without KRAS point mutation. The amplified DNA products were verified by naked-eye as well as a real-time PCR equipment. By PNA-LNA mediated LAMP, amplification of wild type KRAS DNA was blocked by clamping PNA probe, whereas, mutant type KRAS DNA was significantly amplified within 50 min. Mutant alleles could be detected in samples which diluted until 0.1% of mutant-to-wild type ratio. On the other hand, mutant alleles could be reproducibly with a mutant-to-wild type ratio of 30% by direct sequencing and of 1% by PNA-clamping PCR. The limit of detection (LOD) of PNA-LNA mediated LAMP was much lower than the other conventional methods. Competition of LNA clamping primers complementary to two different subtypes (G12D and G12V) of mutant KRAS gene indicated different amplification time depend on subtypes of mutant cDNA. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP is a simple, rapid, specific and sensitive methodology for the detection of KRAS mutation. PMID:26999437

  18. Synthesis, improved antisense activity and structural rationale for the divergent RNA affinities of 3'-fluoro hexitol nucleic acid (FHNA and Ara-FHNA) modified oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Egli, Martin; Pallan, Pradeep S; Allerson, Charles R; Prakash, Thazha P; Berdeja, Andres; Yu, Jinghua; Lee, Sam; Watt, Andrew; Gaus, Hans; Bhat, Balkrishen; Swayze, Eric E; Seth, Punit P

    2011-10-19

    The synthesis, biophysical, structural, and biological properties of both isomers of 3'-fluoro hexitol nucleic acid (FHNA and Ara-FHNA) modified oligonucleotides are reported. Synthesis of the FHNA and Ara-FHNA thymine phosphoramidites was efficiently accomplished starting from known sugar precursors. Optimal RNA affinities were observed with a 3'-fluorine atom and nucleobase in a trans-diaxial orientation. The Ara-FHNA analog with an equatorial fluorine was found to be destabilizing. However, the magnitude of destabilization was sequence-dependent. Thus, the loss of stability is sharply reduced when Ara-FHNA residues were inserted at pyrimidine-purine (Py-Pu) steps compared to placement within a stretch of pyrimidines (Py-Py). Crystal structures of A-type DNA duplexes modified with either monomer provide a rationalization for the opposing stability effects and point to a steric origin of the destabilization caused by the Ara-FHNA analog. The sequence dependent effect can be explained by the formation of an internucleotide C-F···H-C pseudo hydrogen bond between F3' of Ara-FHNA and C8-H of the nucleobase from the 3'-adjacent adenosine that is absent at Py-Py steps. In animal experiments, FHNA-modified antisense oligonucleotides formulated in saline showed a potent downregulation of gene expression in liver tissue without producing hepatotoxicity. Our data establish FHNA as a useful modification for antisense therapeutics and also confirm the stabilizing influence of F(Py)···H-C(Pu) pseudo hydrogen bonds in nucleic acid structures. PMID:21919455

  19. Synthesis, Improved Antisense Activity and Structural Rationale for the Divergent RNA Affinities of 3;#8242;-Fluoro Hexitol Nucleic Acid (FHNA and Ara-FHNA) Modified Oligonucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, Martin; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Allerson, Charles R.; Prakash, Thazha P.; Berdeja, Andres; Yu, Jinghua; Lee, Sam; Watt, Andrew; Gaus, Hans; Bhat, Balkrishen; Swayze, Eric E.; Seth, Punit P.

    2012-03-16

    The synthesis, biophysical, structural, and biological properties of both isomers of 3'-fluoro hexitol nucleic acid (FHNA and Ara-FHNA) modified oligonucleotides are reported. Synthesis of the FHNA and Ara-FHNA thymine phosphoramidites was efficiently accomplished starting from known sugar precursors. Optimal RNA affinities were observed with a 3'-fluorine atom and nucleobase in a trans-diaxial orientation. The Ara-FHNA analog with an equatorial fluorine was found to be destabilizing. However, the magnitude of destabilization was sequence-dependent. Thus, the loss of stability is sharply reduced when Ara-FHNA residues were inserted at pyrimidine-purine (Py-Pu) steps compared to placement within a stretch of pyrimidines (Py-Py). Crystal structures of A-type DNA duplexes modified with either monomer provide a rationalization for the opposing stability effects and point to a steric origin of the destabilization caused by the Ara-FHNA analog. The sequence dependent effect can be explained by the formation of an internucleotide C-F {hor_ellipsis} H-C pseudo hydrogen bond between F3' of Ara-FHNA and C8-H of the nucleobase from the 3'-adjacent adenosine that is absent at Py-Py steps. In animal experiments, FHNA-modified antisense oligonucleotides formulated in saline showed a potent downregulation of gene expression in liver tissue without producing hepatotoxicity. Our data establish FHNA as a useful modification for antisense therapeutics and also confirm the stabilizing influence of F(Py) {hor_ellipsis} H-C(Pu) pseudo hydrogen bonds in nucleic acid structures.

  20. Antisense Therapy in Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joshua J.A.; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Antisense therapy is an approach to fighting diseases using short DNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides. Recently, antisense therapy has emerged as an exciting and promising strategy for the treatment of various neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders. Previous and ongoing pre-clinical and clinical trials have provided encouraging early results. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), Huntington’s disease (HD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), dysferlinopathy (including limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2B; LGMD2B, Miyoshi myopathy; MM, and distal myopathy with anterior tibial onset; DMAT), and myotonic dystrophy (DM) are all reported to be promising targets for antisense therapy. This paper focuses on the current progress of antisense therapies in neurology. PMID:25562650

  1. Enzymatic polymerisation involving 2'-amino-LNA nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Johannsen, Marie W; Veedu, Rakesh N; Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Wengel, Jesper

    2012-05-15

    The triphosphate of the thymine derivative of 2'-amino-LNA (2'-amino-LNA-TTP) was synthesised and found to be a good substrate for Phusion® HF DNA polymerase, allowing enzymatic synthesis of modified DNA encoded by an unmodified template. To complement this, 2'-amino-LNA-T phosphoramidites were incorporated into DNA oligonucleotides which were used as templates for enzymatic synthesis of unmodified DNA using either KOD, KOD XL or Phusion polymerases. 2'-Amino-LNA-T in the template and 2'-amino-LNA-TTP as a substrate both decreased reaction rate and yield compared to unmodified DNA, especially for sequences with multiple 2'-amino-LNA-T nucleotides. PMID:22503454

  2. Discriminating unalike single nucleobase mismatches using a molecularly resolved, label-free, interfacial LNA-based assay.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Hiya; Mishra, Sourav; Mana, Tanushree; Mukhopadhyay, Rupa

    2016-06-20

    A number of reports have been made in recent times on label-free detection of nucleic acid sequences. However, most of these studies deal with ensemble measurements, therefore lacking in molecular level resolution. These assays have usually employed ssDNA sensor probes, and often suffered from problems of irreproducibility and poor sequence-selectivity. Herein, the applicability of surface-anchored single stranded locked nucleic acid (ssLNA) probes has been assessed in the detection of target DNA sequences, as an alternative to the DNA-based assay. Importantly, the effectiveness of the LNA-based assay in identifying different types of single nucleobase mismatches has been tested. Since the duplex melting temperature is an indicator of duplex stability, the ensemble on-surface Tm values of the surface-confined LNA-DNA duplexes have been compared to the duplex unbinding force values obtained from atomic force spectroscopy (AFS) experiments. A common mismatch discrimination pattern elicited by both the ensemble and the molecular level AFS approach could be identified. Apart from quantitative delineation of the different types of mismatches, the label-free AFS analysis confirms different degrees of efficiency of the purine and pyrimidine bases, present on the LNA backbone, in discriminating different nucleobase mismatch types. Importantly, the LNA-based AFS analysis can distinguish between the disease-relevant gene fragments, e.g., multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) mutation, and the wild type. Since LNA probes are nuclease-resistant, these findings could potentially pave way to diagnostic applications of the LNA-based AFS assay. PMID:27124266

  3. Evaluation of LNA, MGB and non-modified DNA probes to improve the detection limit of TaqMan real-time PCR assay for Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this study was to compare the sensitivity and amplification efficiency of the TaqMan assay using locked nucleic acid (LNA), minor groove binder (MGB) ligands and non-modified DNA probes. In monoplex or single target TaqMan assays for P. stewartii subsp. stewartii, LNA and MGB probes impr...

  4. Fine-Tuning of the Fatty Acid Pathway by Synthetic Antisense RNA for Enhanced (2S)-Naringenin Production from l-Tyrosine in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junjun; Yu, Oliver; Du, Guocheng

    2014-01-01

    Malonyl coenzyme A (malonyl-CoA) is an important precursor for the synthesis of natural products, such as polyketides and flavonoids. The majority of this cofactor often is consumed for producing fatty acids and phospholipids, leaving only a small amount of cellular malonyl-CoA available for producing the target compound. The tuning of malonyl-CoA into heterologous pathways yields significant phenotypic effects, such as growth retardation and even cell death. In this study, fine-tuning of the fatty acid pathway in Escherichia coli with antisense RNA (asRNA) to balance the demands on malonyl-CoA for target-product synthesis and cell health was proposed. To establish an efficient asRNA system, the relationship between sequence and function for asRNA was explored. It was demonstrated that the gene-silencing effect of asRNA could be tuned by directing asRNA to different positions in the 5′-UTR (untranslated region) of the target gene. Based on this principle, the activity of asRNA was quantitatively tailored to balance the need for malonyl-CoA in cell growth and the production of the main flavonoid precursor, (2S)-naringenin. Appropriate inhibitory efficiency of the anti-fabB/fabF asRNA improved the production titer by 431% (391 mg/liter). Therefore, the strategy presented in this study provided a useful tool for the fine-tuning of endogenous gene expression in bacteria. PMID:25239896

  5. Upping the Antisense Ante.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Rick

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is a designer-drug technology called antisense which blocks messenger RNA's ability to carry information to protein producing sites in the cell. The applications of this drug to AIDS research, cancer therapy, and other diseases are discussed. (KR)

  6. Antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutics for malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Ho, P T; Parkinson, D R

    1997-04-01

    modifications, chimeric oligonucleotides, or peptide nucleic acids. Continued progress in this arena will require that many of the preclinical challenges confronting antisense development are satisfactory resolved. PMID:9129689

  7. Sense-, antisense- and RNAi-4CL1 regulate soluble phenolic acids, cell wall components and growth in transgenic Populus tomentosa Carr.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaoming; Xie, Jin; Zhao, Yanling; Lu, Hai; Liu, Shichang; Qu, Long; Li, Jianmei; Gai, Ying; Jiang, Xiangning

    2013-04-01

    Regulation of lignin biosynthesis affects plant growth and wood properties. Transgenic downregulation of 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL, EC 6.2.1.12) may reduce lignin content in cell walls, which could improve the qualities of pulp in papermaking and increase the efficiency of bioenergy applications. To determine the effects of Ptc4CL1 on lignin biosynthesis and plant growth, Populus tomentosa Carr. was transformed using sense-, antisense-, and RNAi-4CL1 genes. The growth properties, gene expression, enzyme activity, lignin content and composition and content of soluble phenolic acids were investigated in 1-year-old field-grown transgenic poplar trees. Transgenic up- and down-regulation of 4CL1 altered lignin content and composition in transgenic poplars, but there were no negative effects on the growth of transgenic plants. In addition, the severe changes in auxin observed in transgenic lines led to significantly enhanced growth performance. Furthermore, lignin content was tightly correlated with the alteration of 4CL1 enzymatic activity, which was correlated with 4CL1 gene expression. A significant increase in S units in lignin with a slight increase in sinapic acid was observed in 4CL1 down-regulated transgenic poplars. These results suggest that 4CL1 is a traffic control gene in monolignol biosynthesis and confirm that 4CL1 activity has been implicated with sinapoyl activation. Finally, our data demonstrate that there is cross-correlation among 4CL1 gene expression, 4CL1 enzyme activity, soluble phenolic acid, lignin monomer biosynthesis, and lignin content. PMID:23434928

  8. Polymerase-directed synthesis of C5-ethynyl locked nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Veedu, Rakesh N; Burri, Harsha V; Kumar, Pawan; Sharma, Pawan K; Hrdlicka, Patrick J; Vester, Birte; Wengel, Jesper

    2010-11-15

    Modified nucleic acids have considerable potential in nanobiotechnology for the development of nanomedicines and new materials. Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is one of the most prominent nucleic acid analogues reported so far and we herein for the first time report the enzymatic incorporation of LNA-U and C5-ethynyl LNA-U nucleotides into oligonucleotides. Phusion High Fidelity and KOD DNA polymerases efficiently incorporated LNA-U and C5-ethynyl LNA-U nucleotides into a DNA strand and T7 RNA polymerase successfully accepted the LNA-U nucleoside 5'-triphosphate as substrate for RNA transcripts. PMID:20932755

  9. A newly discovered member of the fatty acid desaturase gene family: a non-coding, antisense RNA gene to delta5-desaturase.

    PubMed

    Dreesen, Thomas D; Adamson, Aaron W; Tekle, Michael; Tang, Chongren; Cho, Hyekung P; Clarke, Steven D; Gettys, Thomas W

    2006-08-01

    The rate limiting steps in the conversion of 18-carbon unsaturated fatty acids to 20- and 22-carbon products are catalyzed by two desaturase enzymes (Delta5-desaturase and Delta6-desaturase) found within a lipid desaturase gene cluster. Careful examination of this cluster revealed the existence of a conventionally spliced (human) and an intronless (mouse and rat) non-coding RNA gene, reverse Delta5-desaturase, which is transcribed from the opposite strand of the Delta5-desaturase gene. The 654 bp human reverse Delta5-desaturase transcript contains 269 nucleotides that are complementary to exon 1 and intron 1 of the Delta5-desaturase transcript, and the 3'-end of this sequence contains a 143 nucleotide stretch that is 100% complementary to the 5'-end of the Delta5-desaturase. The rat and mouse transcripts are 1355 and 690 bp long and complementary to a portion of the first intron and the entire first exon of their respective Delta5-desaturases. All reverse Delta5-desaturase transcripts contain several stop codons in all frames suggesting that they do not encode a peptide. Reverse Delta5-desaturase RNA was detected in all rat tissues where Delta5-desaturase is expressed, and the transition between fasting and refeeding produced a significant increase in reverse Delta5-desaturase RNA relative to Delta5-desaturase mRNA. Transient expression of reverse Delta5-desaturase in CHO cells stably transformed with Delta5-desaturase produced a modest decrease in Delta5-desaturase mRNA (30%), but lowered Delta5-desaturase enzymatic activity by >70%. More importantly, a diet enriched in fish oil produced a reciprocal increase in reverse Delta5-desaturase mRNA and decrease in Delta5-desaturase mRNA that was accompanied by a 5-6-fold decrease in Delta5-desaturase enzyme activity. These findings support a significant role for reverse Delta5-desaturase as a natural antisense regulator of Delta5-desaturase. PMID:16846730

  10. Synthesis and antisense properties of fluoro cyclohexenyl nucleic acid (F-CeNA), a nuclease stable mimic of 2'-fluoro RNA.

    PubMed

    Seth, Punit P; Yu, Jinghua; Jazayeri, Ali; Pallan, Pradeep S; Allerson, Charles R; Østergaard, Michael E; Liu, Fengwu; Herdewijn, Piet; Egli, Martin; Swayze, Eric E

    2012-06-01

    We report the design and synthesis of 2'-fluoro cyclohexenyl nucleic acid (F-CeNA) pyrimidine phosphoramidites and the synthesis and biophysical, structural, and biological evaluation of modified oligonucleotides. The synthesis of the nucleoside phosphoramidites was accomplished in multigram quantities starting from commercially available methyl-D-mannose pyranoside. Installation of the fluorine atom was accomplished using nonafluorobutanesulfonyl fluoride, and the cyclohexenyl ring system was assembled by means of a palladium-catalyzed Ferrier rearrangement. Installation of the nucleobase was carried out under Mitsunobu conditions followed by standard protecting group manipulations to provide the desired pyrimidine phosphoramidites. Biophysical evaluation indicated that F-CeNA shows behavior similar to that of a 2'-modified nucleotide, and duplexes with RNA showed slightly lower duplex thermostability as compared to that of the more rigid 3'-fluoro hexitol nucleic acid (FHNA). However, F-CeNA modified oligonucleotides were significantly more stable against digestion by snake venom phosphodiesterases (SVPD) as compared to unmodified DNA, 2'-fluoro RNA (FRNA), 2'-methoxyethyl RNA (MOE), and FHNA modified oligonucleotides. Examination of crystal structures of a modified DNA heptamer duplex d(GCG)-T*-d(GCG):d(CGCACGC) by X-ray crystallography indicated that the cyclohexenyl ring system exhibits both the (3)H(2) and (2)H(3) conformations, similar to the C3'-endo/C2'-endo conformation equilibrium seen in natural furanose nucleosides. In the (2)H(3) conformation, the equatorial fluorine engages in a relatively close contact with C8 (2.94 Å) of the 3'-adjacent dG nucleotide that may represent a pseudo hydrogen bond. In contrast, the cyclohexenyl ring of F-CeNA was found to exist exclusively in the (3)H(2) (C3'-endo like) conformation in the crystal structure of the modified A-form DNA decamer duplex [d(GCGTA)-T*-d(ACGC)](2.) In an animal experiment, a 16-mer F

  11. Open reading frames provide a rich pool of potential natural antisense transcripts in fungal genomes.

    PubMed

    Steigele, Stephan; Nieselt, Kay

    2005-01-01

    Natural antisense transcripts are reported from all kingdoms of life and several recent reports of genomewide screens indicate that they are widely distributed. These transcripts seem to be involved in various biological functions and may govern the expression of their respective sense partner. Very little, however, is known about the degree of evolutionary conservation of antisense transcripts. Furthermore, none of the earlier analyses has studied whether antisense relationships are solely dual or involved in more complex relationships. Here we present a systematic screen for cis- and trans-located antisense transcripts based on open reading frames (ORFs) from five fungal species. The relative number of ORFs involved in antisense relationships varies greatly between the five species. In addition, other significant differences are found between the species, such as the mean length of the antisense region. The majority of trans-located antisense transcripts is found to be involved in complex relationships, resulting in highly connected networks. The analysis of the degree of evolutionary conservation of antisense transcripts shows that most antisense transcripts have no ortholog in any other species. An annotation of antisense transcripts based on Gene Ontology directs to common terms and shows that proteins of genes involved in antisense relationships preferentially localize to the nucleus with common functions in the regulation or maintenance of nucleic acids. PMID:16147987

  12. Undetected antisense tRNAs in mitochondrial genomes?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The hypothesis that both mitochondrial (mt) complementary DNA strands of tRNA genes code for tRNAs (sense-antisense coding) is explored. This could explain why mt tRNA mutations are 6.5 times more frequently pathogenic than in other mt sequences. Antisense tRNA expression is plausible because tRNA punctuation signals mt sense RNA maturation: both sense and antisense tRNAs form secondary structures potentially signalling processing. Sense RNA maturation processes by default 11 antisense tRNAs neighbouring sense genes. If antisense tRNAs are expressed, processed antisense tRNAs should have adapted more for translational activity than unprocessed ones. Four tRNA properties are examined: antisense tRNA 5' and 3' end processing by sense RNA maturation and its accuracy, cloverleaf stability and misacylation potential. Results Processed antisense tRNAs align better with standard tRNA sequences with the same cognate than unprocessed antisense tRNAs, suggesting less misacylations. Misacylation increases with cloverleaf fragility and processing inaccuracy. Cloverleaf fragility, misacylation and processing accuracy of antisense tRNAs decrease with genome-wide usage of their predicted cognate amino acid. Conclusions These properties correlate as if they adaptively coevolved for translational activity by some antisense tRNAs, and to avoid such activity by other antisense tRNAs. Analyses also suggest previously unsuspected particularities of aminoacylation specificity in mt tRNAs: combinations of competition between tRNAs on tRNA synthetases with competition between tRNA synthetases on tRNAs determine specificities of tRNA amino acylations. The latter analyses show that alignment methods used to detect tRNA cognates yield relatively robust results, even when they apparently fail to detect the tRNA's cognate amino acid and indicate high misacylation potential. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr Juergen Brosius, Dr Anthony M Poole and Dr Andrei S Rodin (nominated

  13. Morpholinos: Antisense and Sensibility.

    PubMed

    Blum, Martin; De Robertis, Edward M; Wallingford, John B; Niehrs, Christof

    2015-10-26

    For over 15 years, antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs) have allowed developmental biologists to make key discoveries regarding developmental mechanisms in numerous model organisms. Recently, serious concerns have been raised as to the specificity of MO effects, and it has been recommended to discontinue their usage, despite the long experience of the scientific community with the MO tool in thousands of studies. Reviewing the many advantages afforded by MOs, we conclude that adequately controlled MOs should continue to be accepted as generic loss-of-function approach, as otherwise progress in developmental biology will greatly suffer. PMID:26506304

  14. A 65 nm CMOS LNA for Bolometer Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tom Nan; Boon, Chirn Chye; Zhu, Forest Xi; Yi, Xiang; He, Xiaofeng; Feng, Guangyin; Lim, Wei Meng; Liu, Bei

    2016-04-01

    Modern bolometers generally consist of large-scale arrays of detectors. Implemented in conventional technologies, such bolometer arrays suffer from integrability and productivity issues. Recently, the development of CMOS technologies has presented an opportunity for the massive production of high-performance and highly integrated bolometers. This paper presents a 65-nm CMOS LNA designed for a millimeter-wave bolometer's pre-amplification stage. By properly applying some positive feedback, the noise figure of the proposed LNA is minimized at under 6 dB and the bandwidth is extended to 30 GHz.

  15. Sense antisense DNA strand?

    PubMed

    Boldogkói, Z; Kaliman, A V; Murvai, J; Fodor, I

    1994-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that alphaherpesviruses express latency associated transcripts (LATs) from the antisense strand of immediate-early (IE) genes of the viral genome. It has been suggested that LATs containing extended open reading frames (ORFs), might be translated into (a) protein product(s). We found that a salient feature of some herpesvirus DNAs is a high GC preference at the third codon positions. The consequence of this feature is that the probability of a stop-codon appearing at two of the six reading frames of the DNA strand is very low. Therefore, the presence of an extended ORF does not necessarily mean that it is relevant to real translation. PMID:7810418

  16. Targeting Cancer with Antisense Oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Hnatowich, DJ

    2008-10-28

    With financial assistance from the Department of Energy, we have shown definitively that radiolabeled antisense DNAs and other oligomers will accumulate in target cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by an antisense mechanism. We have also shown that the number of mRNA targets for our antisense oligomers in the cancer cell types that we have investigated so far is sufficient to provide and antisense image and/or radiotherapy of cancer in mice. These studies have been reported in about 10 publications. However our observation over the past several years has shown that radiolabeled antisense oligomers administered intravenously in their native and naked form will accumulate and be retained in target xenografts by an antisense mechanism but will also accumulate at high levels in normal organs such as liver, spleen and kidneys. We have investigated unsuccessfully several commercially available vectors. Thus the use of radiolabeled antisense oligomers for the imaging of cancer must await novel approaches to delivery. This laboratory has therefore pursued two new paths, optical imaging of tumor and Auger radiotherapy. We are developing a novel method of optical imaging tumor using antisense oligomers with a fluorophore is administered while hybridized with a shorter complementary oligomer with an inhibitor. In culture and in tumored mice that the duplex remains intact and thus nonfluorescent until it encounters its target mRNA at which time it dissociates and the antisense oligomer binds along with its fluorophore to the target. Simultaneous with the above, we have also observed, as have others, that antisense oligomers migrate rapidly and quantitatively to the nucleus upon crossing cell membranes. The Auger electron radiotherapy path results from this observation since the nuclear migration properties could be used effectively to bring and to retain in the nucleus an Auger emitting radionuclide such as 111In or 125I bound to the antisense oligomer. Since the object becomes

  17. The effect of linoleic acid on the whole body synthesis rates of polyunsaturated fatty acids from α-linolenic acid and linoleic acid in free-living rats.

    PubMed

    Domenichiello, Anthony F; Kitson, Alex P; Chen, Chuck T; Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; Stavro, P Mark; Bazinet, Richard P

    2016-04-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is thought to be important for brain function. The main dietary source of DHA is fish, however, DHA can also be synthesized from precursor omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA), the most abundantly consumed being α-linolenic acid (ALA). The enzymes required to synthesize DHA from ALA are also used to synthesize longer chain omega-6 (n-6) PUFA from linoleic acid (LNA). The large increase in LNA consumption that has occurred over the last century has led to concern that LNA and other n-6 PUFA outcompete n-3 PUFA for enzymes involved in DHA synthesis, and therefore, decrease overall DHA synthesis. To assess this, rats were fed diets containing LNA at 53 (high LNA diet), 11 (medium LNA diet) or 1.5% (low LNA diet) of the fatty acids with ALA being constant across all diets (approximately 4% of the fatty acids). Rats were maintained on these diets from weaning for 8 weeks, at which point they were subjected to a steady-state infusion of labeled ALA and LNA to measure DHA and arachidonic acid (ARA) synthesis rates. DHA and ARA synthesis rates were generally highest in rats fed the medium and high LNA diets, while the plasma half-life of DHA was longer in rats fed the low LNA diet. Therefore, increasing dietary LNA, in rats, did not impair DHA synthesis; however, low dietary LNA led to a decrease in DHA synthesis with tissue concentrations of DHA possibly being maintained by a longer DHA half-life. PMID:27012633

  18. Novel applications of locked nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Veedu, Rakesh N; Vester, Birte; Wengel, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) nucleoside triphosphates were prepared and their substrate properties for different polymerases during primer extension and PCR experiments investigated. Phusion High Fidelity DNA polymerase and 9( degrees )Nm(TM) DNA polymerase readily accept LNA nucleoside 5'-triphosphates as substrates in primer extension assays. However, in PCR assays, However, in PCR assays, DNA 9oN(m) polymerase proved to be the best for amplification employing the LNA-A nucleotide. PMID:18029570

  19. Antisense mediated exon skipping therapy for duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).

    PubMed

    Brolin, Camilla; Shiraishi, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) that result in the absence of essential muscle protein dystrophin. Among many different approaches for DMD treatment, exon skipping, mediated by antisense oligonucleotides, is one of the most promising methods for restoration of dystrophin expression. This approach has been tested extensively targeting different exons in numerous models both in vitro and in vivo. During the past 10 years, there has been a considerable progress by using DMD animal models involving three types of antisense oligonucleotides (2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (2OME-PS), phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO)) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA). PMID:21686247

  20. Inhibition of AAC(6′)-Ib-Mediated Resistance to Amikacin in Acinetobacter baumannii by an Antisense Peptide-Conjugated 2′,4′-Bridged Nucleic Acid-NC-DNA Hybrid Oligomer

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Christina; Arivett, Brock A.; Actis, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    Multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii, a common etiologic agent of severe nosocomial infections in compromised hosts, usually harbors aac(6′)-Ib. This gene specifies resistance to amikacin and other aminoglycosides, seriously limiting the effectiveness of these antibiotics. An antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN4) that binds to a duplicated sequence on the aac(6′)-Ib mRNA, one of the copies overlapping the initiation codon, efficiently inhibited translation in vitro. An isosequential nuclease-resistant hybrid oligomer composed of 2′,4′-bridged nucleic acid-NC (BNANC) residues and deoxynucleotides (BNANC-DNA) conjugated to the permeabilizing peptide (RXR)4XB (“X” and “B” stand for 6-aminohexanoic acid and β-alanine, respectively) (CPPBD4) inhibited translation in vitro at the same levels observed in testing ODN4. Furthermore, CPPBD4 in combination with amikacin inhibited growth of a clinical A. baumannii strain harboring aac(6′)-Ib in liquid cultures, and when both compounds were used as combination therapy to treat infected Galleria mellonella organisms, survival was comparable to that seen with uninfected controls. PMID:26169414

  1. Antisense downregulation of polyphenol oxidase results in enhanced disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Thipyapong, Piyada; Hunt, Michelle D; Steffens, John C

    2004-11-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs; EC 1.14.18.1 or EC 1.10.3.2) catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, highly reactive intermediates whose secondary reactions are responsible for much of the oxidative browning that accompanies plant senescence, wounding, and responses to pathogens. To assess the impact of PPO expression on resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato we introduced a chimeric antisense potato PPO cDNA into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.). Oxidation of caffeic acid, the dominant o-diphenolic aglycone of tomato foliage, was decreased ca. 40-fold by antisense expression of PPO. All members of the PPO gene family were downregulated: neither immunoreactive PPO nor PPO-specific mRNA were detectable in the transgenic plants. In addition, the antisense PPO construct suppressed inducible increases in PPO activity. Downregulation of PPO in antisense plants did not affect growth, development, or reproduction of greenhouse-grown plants. However, antisense PPO expression dramatically increased susceptibility to P. syringae expressing the avirulence gene avrPto in both Pto and pto backgrounds. In a compatible (pto) interaction, plants constitutively expressing an antisense PPO construct exhibited a 55-fold increase in bacterial growth, three times larger lesion area, and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. In an incompatible (Pto) interaction, antisense PPO plants exhibited 100-fold increases in bacterial growth and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. Although it is not clear whether hypersusceptibility of antisense plants is due to low constitutive PPO levels or failure to induce PPO upon infection, these findings suggest a critical role for PPO-catalyzed phenolic oxidation in limiting disease development. As a preliminary effort to understand the role of induced PPO in limiting disease development, we also examined the response of PPO promoter::beta-glucuronidase constructs when plants are challenged with P

  2. Neighboring Gene Regulation by Antisense Long Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Victoria E.; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Antisense transcription, considered until recently as transcriptional noise, is a very common phenomenon in human and eukaryotic transcriptomes, operating in two ways based on whether the antisense RNA acts in cis or in trans. This process can generate long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), one of the most diverse classes of cellular transcripts, which have demonstrated multifunctional roles in fundamental biological processes, including embryonic pluripotency, differentiation and development. Antisense lncRNAs have been shown to control nearly every level of gene regulation—pretranscriptional, transcriptional and posttranscriptional—through DNA–RNA, RNA–RNA or protein–RNA interactions. This review is centered on functional studies of antisense lncRNA-mediated regulation of neighboring gene expression. Specifically, it addresses how these transcripts interact with other biological molecules, nucleic acids and proteins, to regulate gene expression through chromatin remodeling at the pretranscriptional level and modulation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes by altering the sense mRNA structure or the cellular compartmental distribution, either in the nucleus or the cytoplasm. PMID:25654223

  3. Photosynthetic Performance and Fertility Are Repressed in GmAOX2b Antisense Soybean1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Tsun-Thai; Simmonds, Daina; Day, David A.; Colmer, Timothy D.; Finnegan, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    The alternative oxidase (AOX) is a cyanide-resistant oxidase that provides an alternative outlet for electrons from the respiratory electron transport chain embedded in the inner membrane of plant mitochondria. Examination of soybean (Glycine max) plants carrying a GmAOX2b antisense gene showed AOX to have a central role in reproductive development and fecundity. In three independently transformed antisense lines, seed set was reduced by 16% to 43%, whereas ovule abortion increased by 1.2- to 1.7-fold when compared with nontransgenic transformation control plants. Reduced fecundity was associated with reductions in whole leaf cyanide-resistant, salicylhydroxamic acid-sensitive respiration and net photosynthesis, but there was no change in total respiration in the dark. The frequency of potential fertilization events was reduced by at least one-third in the antisense plants as a likely consequence of prefertilization defects. Pistils of the antisense plants contained a higher proportion of immature-sized, nonfertile embryo sacs compared with nontransgenic control plants. Increased rates of pollen abortion in vivo and reduced rates of pollen germination in vitro suggested that the antisense gene compromised pollen development and function. Reciprocal crosses between antisense and nontransgenic plants revealed that pollen produced by antisense plants was less active in fertilization. Taken together, the results presented here indicate that AOX expression has an important role in determining normal gametophyte development and function. PMID:20097793

  4. Antisense approaches in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chi, Kim N; Gleave, Martin E

    2004-06-01

    Patients with hormone refractory prostate cancer have limited treatment options and new therapies are urgently needed. Advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms implicated in prostate cancer progression have identified many potential therapeutic gene targets that are involved in apoptosis, growth factors, cell signalling and the androgen receptor (AR). Antisense oligonucleotides are short sequences of synthetic modified DNA that are designed to be complimentary to a selected gene's mRNA and thereby specifically inhibit expression of that gene. The antisense approach continues to hold promise as a therapeutic modality to target genes involved in cancer progression, especially those in which the gene products are not amenable to small molecule inhibition or antibodies. The current status and future direction of a number of antisense oligonucleotides targeting several genes, including BCL-2, BCL-XL, clusterin, the inhibitors of apoptosis (IAP) family, MDM2, protein kinase C-alpha, c-raf, insulin-like growth factor binding proteins and the AR, that have potential clinical use in prostate cancer are reviewed. PMID:15174974

  5. Low-cost high-performance W-band LNA MMICs for millimeter-wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Michael G.; Pobanz, Carl W.; Weinreb, Sander; Matloubian, Mehran; Hu, Ming; Wetzel, Michael; Janke, Paul; Ngo, Catherine M. H.

    2000-07-01

    The main limitation to the sensitivity of a radiometer or imager is its equivalent noise temperatures, Te. Placing a low noise amplifier (LNA) at a radiometer's front end can dramatically reduce Te. LNA performance has steadily improved over recent years, and here we report on a W-band LNA with the lowest Te measured at room temperature. Furthermore, we present statistical RF data showing high yield and consistency for future high volume production that is needed for commercial radiometric imaging array applications such as security screening, aircraft landing, and other systems.

  6. Complementary DNA cloning of the pear 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase gene and agrobacterium-mediated anti-sense genetic transformation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jing; Dong, Zhen; Zhang, Yu-Xing

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to genetically modify plantlets of the Chinese yali pear to reduce their expression of ripening-associated 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO) and therefore increase the shelf-life of the fruit. Primers were designed with selectivity for the conserved regions of published ACO gene sequences, and yali complementary DNA (cDNA) cloning was performed by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The obtained cDNA fragment contained 831 base pairs, encoding 276 amino acid residues, and shared no less than 94% nucleotide sequence identity with other published ACO genes. The cDNA fragment was inversely inserted into a pBI121 expression vector, between the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the nopaline synthase terminator, in order to construct the anti‑sense expression vector of the ACO gene; it was transfected into cultured yali plants using Agrobacterium LBA4404. Four independent transgenic lines of pear plantlets were obtained and validated by PCR analysis. A Southern blot assay revealed that there were three transgenic lines containing a single copy of exogenous gene and one line with double copies. The present study provided germplasm resources for the cultivation of novel storage varieties of pears, therefore providing a reference for further applications of anti‑sense RNA technology in the genetic improvement of pears and other fruit. PMID:26460204

  7. LNA modification of single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides allows subtle gene modification in mismatch-repair-proficient cells.

    PubMed

    van Ravesteyn, Thomas W; Dekker, Marleen; Fish, Alexander; Sixma, Titia K; Wolters, Astrid; Dekker, Rob J; Te Riele, Hein P J

    2016-04-12

    Synthetic single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) can be used to generate subtle genetic modifications in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells without the requirement for prior generation of DNA double-stranded breaks. However, DNA mismatch repair (MMR) suppresses the efficiency of gene modification by >100-fold. Here we present a commercially available ssODN design that evades MMR and enables subtle gene modification in MMR-proficient cells. The presence of locked nucleic acids (LNAs) in the ssODNs at mismatching bases, or also at directly adjacent bases, allowed 1-, 2-, or 3-bp substitutions in MMR-proficient mouse embryonic stem cells as effectively as in MMR-deficient cells. Additionally, in MMR-proficient Escherichia coli, LNA modification of the ssODNs enabled effective single-base-pair substitution. In vitro, LNA modification of mismatches precluded binding of purified E. coli MMR protein MutS. These findings make ssODN-directed gene modification particularly well suited for applications that require the evaluation of a large number of sequence variants with an easy selectable phenotype. PMID:26951689

  8. Nucleic acid programmed polymeric nanomaterials for biological communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rush, Anthony Michael

    A number of nucleic acid-polymer conjugates were synthesized, resulting in amphiphilic polymer-nucleic acid conjugates with the capability to self-assemble into a range of discrete nanoscale architectures. These nanomaterials, termed DNA-polymer amphiphile nanoparticles (DPA NPs), were studied with respect to their enzymatic processing by both endo- and exonucleases and further deployed as antisense genetic regulatory elements in live cultured human cells. DPA NPs were designed to act as substrates for both non sequence-specific exonucleases and a sequence-specific endonuclease. In all cases, nucleic acids arranged in the corona of spherical nanoparticles exhibited increased resistance to nucleolytic cleavage as compared to native single- or double-stranded analogues. For the exonucleases studied (Exonuclease III from E. Coli and phosphodiesterase I from Crotalus adamanteus), nanoparticle display retarded enzymatic processing by roughly a factor of five. For the endonuclease studied (Nt.CviPII), nanoparticle display prohibited virtually all enzyme activity on oligonucleotides within the nanoparticle shell. To test the ability of these materials to regulate mRNA levels in live cultured human cells, LPA (LNA-polymer amphiphile) NPs were designed to be perfectly complementary to a 20-base region of mRNA encoding the anti-apoptosis protein survivin. In this study two key observations were made. The first observation is that packaging LNA into spherical micellar nanoparticles serves to dramatically enhance cellular uptake of LNA based on flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy data. The second observation is that LPA NPs are capable of regulating mRNA levels by what is hypothesized to be activation of target mRNA for catalytic RNase H-mediated degradation. These materials represent a unique class of DNA delivery system capable of rendering nucleic acids with natural backbone chemistry resistant to nuclease degradation and further serving to deliver DNA into cells to

  9. Fast and efficient synthesis of Zorro-LNA type 3'-5'-5'-3' oligonucleotide conjugates via parallel in situ stepwise conjugation.

    PubMed

    Gissberg, O I; Jezowska, M; Zaghloul, E M; Bungsu, N I; Strömberg, R; Smith, C I E; Lundin, K E; Honcharenko, M

    2016-04-14

    Zorro-LNA is a new class of therapeutic anti-gene oligonucleotides (ONs) capable of invading supercoiled DNA. The synthesis of single stranded Zorro-LNA is typically complex and laborious, requiring reverse phosphoramidites and a chemical linker connecting the two separate ON arms. Here, a simplified synthesis strategy based on 'click chemistry' is presented with a high potential for screening Zorro-LNA ONs directed against new anti-gene targets. Four different Zorro type 3'-5' 5'-3' constructs were synthesized via parallel in situ Cu(i) [3 + 2] catalysed cycloaddition. They were prepared from commercially obtained ONs functionalized on solid support (one ON with the azide and the other ON with the activated triple bond linker N-propynoylamino)-p-toluic acid (PATA)) and after cleavage from resin, they were conjugated in solution. Our report shows the benefit of combining different approaches when developing anti-gene ONs, (1) the ability for rapid and robust screening of potential targets and (2) refining the hits with more anti-gene optimized constructs. We present as well the first report showing double-strand invasion (DSI) efficiency of two combined Zorro-LNAs. PMID:26975344

  10. Antagonism of microRNA-122 in mice by systemically administered LNA-antimiR leads to up-regulation of a large set of predicted target mRNAs in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Elmén, Joacim; Lindow, Morten; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Bak, Mads; Christensen, Mette; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Hedtjärn, Maj; Hansen, Jens Bo; Hansen, Henrik Frydenlund; Straarup, Ellen Marie; McCullagh, Keith; Kearney, Phil; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNA-122 (miR-122) is an abundant liver-specific miRNA, implicated in fatty acid and cholesterol metabolism as well as hepatitis C viral replication. Here, we report that a systemically administered 16-nt, unconjugated LNA (locked nucleic acid)-antimiR oligonucleotide complementary to the 5′ end of miR-122 leads to specific, dose-dependent silencing of miR-122 and shows no hepatotoxicity in mice. Antagonism of miR-122 is due to formation of stable heteroduplexes between the LNA-antimiR and miR-122 as detected by northern analysis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated uptake of the LNA-antimiR in mouse liver cells, which was accompanied by markedly reduced hybridization signals for mature miR-122 in treated mice. Functional antagonism of miR-122 was inferred from a low cholesterol phenotype and de-repression within 24 h of 199 liver mRNAs showing significant enrichment for miR-122 seed matches in their 3′ UTRs. Expression profiling extended to 3 weeks after the last LNA-antimiR dose revealed that most of the changes in liver gene expression were normalized to saline control levels coinciding with normalized miR-122 and plasma cholesterol levels. Combined, these data suggest that miRNA antagonists comprised of LNA are valuable tools for identifying miRNA targets in vivo and for studying the biological role of miRNAs and miRNA-associated gene-regulatory networks in a physiological context. PMID:18158304

  11. Antisense precision polymer micelles require less poly(ethylenimine) for efficient gene knockdown.

    PubMed

    Fakhoury, Johans J; Edwardson, Thomas G; Conway, Justin W; Trinh, Tuan; Khan, Farhad; Barłóg, Maciej; Bazzi, Hassan S; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2015-12-28

    Therapeutic nucleic acids are powerful molecules for shutting down protein expression. However, their cellular uptake is poor and requires transport vectors, such as cationic polymers. Of these, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) has been shown to be an efficient vehicle for nucleic acid transport into cells. However, cytotoxicity has been a major hurdle in the development of PEI-DNA complexes as clinically viable therapeutics. We have synthesized antisense-polymer conjugates, where the polymeric block is completely monodisperse and sequence-controlled. Depending on the polymer sequence, these can self-assemble to produce micelles of very low polydispersity. The introduction of linear poly(ethylenimine) to these micelles leads to aggregation into size-defined PEI-mediated superstructures. Subsequently, both cellular uptake and gene silencing are greatly enhanced over extended periods compared to antisense alone, while at the same time cellular cytotoxicity remains very low. In contrast, gene silencing is not enhanced with antisense polymer conjugates that are not able to self-assemble into micelles. Thus, using antisense precision micelles, we are able to achieve significant transfection and knockdown with minimal cytotoxicity at much lower concentrations of linear PEI then previously reported. Consequently, a conceptual solution to the problem of antisense or siRNA delivery is to self-assemble these molecules into 'gene-like' micelles with high local charge and increased stability, thus reducing the amount of transfection agent needed for effective gene silencing. PMID:26597764

  12. Development of Antisense Drugs for Dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Fumito; Harada-Shiba, Mariko

    2016-09-01

    Abnormal elevation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in plasma as well as dysfunction of anti-atherogenic high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have both been recognized as essential components of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and are classified as dyslipidemia. This review describes the arc of development of antisense oligonucleotides for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Chemically-armed antisense candidates can act on various kinds of transcripts, including mRNA and miRNA, via several different endogenous antisense mechanisms, and have exhibited potent systemic anti-dyslipidemic effects. Here, we present specific cutting-edge technologies have recently been brought into antisense strategies, and describe how they have improved the potency of antisense drugs in regard to pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. In addition, we discuss perspectives for the use of armed antisense oligonucleotides as new clinical options for dyslipidemia, in the light of outcomes of recent clinical trials and safety concerns indicated by several clinical and preclinical studies. PMID:27466159

  13. The development of a method of suspension RNA-FISH for forensically relevant epithelial cells using LNA probes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Eletra; Lin, Meng-Han; Harbison, Sallyann; Fleming, Rachel

    2014-03-01

    Messenger RNA profiling is becoming a common method for body fluid identification in forensic science but there are disadvantages when cell mixtures are present from more than one individual. A method that could identify and separate such cell mixtures would simplify downstream analysis. To do this, we have developed a novel method of RNA suspension-fluorescent in situ hybridization (RNA S-FISH) using a locked nucleic acid (LNA) probe for the keratin 10 (KRT10) mRNA that is suitable as a potential marker for epithelial cells. As sample size may be restricted in forensic samples, this method has focused on minimizing cell loss whilst maintaining signal strength. Furthermore, we have shown that it is possible to obtain full DNA profiles from 150 RNA S-FISH labeled cells isolated using laser microdissection. PMID:24528586

  14. Antisense-mediated exon inclusion

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yimin; Krainer, Adrian R

    2012-01-01

    Exon skipping induced by gene mutations is a common mechanism responsible for many genetic diseases. A practical approach to correct the aberrant splicing of defective genes is to use antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). The recognition of splice sites and the regulation of splicing involve multiple positive or negative cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors. Base-pairing of ASOs to a negative element in a targeted pre-mRNA blocks the binding of splicing repressors to this cis-element and/or disrupts an unfavorable secondary structure; as a result, the ASO restores exon inclusion. For example, we have recently shown that appropriate 2’-O-(2-methoxyethyl) (MOE) phosphorothioate-modified ASOs can efficiently correct survival motor neuron 2 (SMN2) exon 7 splicing in a cell-free splicing assay, in cultured human cells—including patient fibroblasts—and in both peripheral tissues and the CNS of SMA mouse models. These ASOs are promising drug leads for SMA therapy. PMID:22454070

  15. A sub-1-dB noise figure monolithic GNSS LNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renjie, Zhou; Yong, Xiang; Hong, Wang; Yebing, Gan; Min, Qian; Chengyan, Ma; Tianchun, Ye

    2013-09-01

    A monolithic integrated low noise amplifier (LNA) based on a SiGe HBT process for a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) is presented. An optimizing strategy of taking parasitic capacities at the input node into consideration is adopted and a method and design equations of monolithically designing the LC load and the output impedance matching circuit are introduced. The LNA simultaneously reaches excellent noise and input/output impedance matching. The measurement results show that the LNA gives an ultra-low noise figure of 0.97 dB, a power gain of 18.6 dB and a three-order input intermodulation point of -6 dBm at the frequency of 1.575 GHz. The chip consumes 5.4 mW from a 1.8 V source and occupies 600 × 650 μm2 die area.

  16. Schizophyllan-folate conjugate as a new non-cytotoxic and cancer-targeted antisense carrier.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Teruaki; Fujisawa, Tomohisa; Haraguchi, Shuichi; Numata, Munenori; Karinaga, Ryouji; Kimura, Taro; Okumura, Shiro; Sakurai, Kazuo; Shinkai, Seiji

    2005-01-17

    Schizophyllan having folate-appendages was synthesized from native schizophyllan through NaIO(4)-oxidation and the subsequent reductive amination in aqueous ammonia followed by amido-coupling with folic acid. The resulting folate-appended schizophyllan can form stable complex with poly(dA), show specific affinity toward folate binding protein, and mediate effective antisense activity in cancer cells. PMID:15603948

  17. Functionalization of an Antisense Small RNA

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Prakash, Satya; Cordero, Teresa; Kushwaha, Manish; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the possibility of adding new functions to preexisting genes, we considered a framework of riboregulation. We created a new riboregulator consisting of the reverse complement of a known riboregulator. Using computational design, we engineered a cis-repressing 5′ untranslated region that can be activated by this new riboregulator. As a result, both RNAs can orthogonally trans-activate translation of their cognate, independent targets. The two riboregulators can also repress each other by antisense interaction, although not symmetrically. Our work highlights that antisense small RNAs can work as regulatory agents beyond the antisense paradigm and that, hence, they could be interfaced with other circuits used in synthetic biology. PMID:26756967

  18. Does Active Learning through an Antisense Jigsaw Make Sense?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seetharaman, Mahadevan; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2003-12-01

    Three journal articles on nucleic acid antisense modification strategies were assigned to 12 students as part of an active learning "jigsaw" exercise for a graduate-level chemistry course on nucleic acids. Each student was required to read one of the three articles. This assignment was preceded by an hour-long lecture on the basic concepts in antisense antigene technology. On the day of the jigsaw, the students with the same article (three groups of four students) discussed their article briefly, and then formed four new groups where no one had read the same article. Each student spent about five minutes teaching his or her article to the other group members, using specific questions provided to guide the discussion. This exercise laid the foundation for bringing the discussion to the entire class, where most of the students actively participated. To test the students' comprehension of the reading materials, a problem set was designed that required not only an understanding of the three articles, but also application of the concepts learned. The effectiveness of this active learning strategy and its applicability to other topics are discussed in this article.

  19. Does everything now make (anti)sense?

    PubMed

    Timmons, J A; Good, L

    2006-12-01

    The data generated by the FANTOM (Functional Annotation of Mouse) consortium, Compugen and Affymetrix have collectively provided evidence that most of the mammalian genomes are actively transcribed. The emergence of an antisense RNA world brings new practical complexities to the study and detection of gene expression. However, we also need to address the fundamental questions regarding the functional importance of these molecules. In this brief paper, we focus on non-coding natural antisense transcription, as it appears to be a potentially powerful mechanism for extending the complexity of the protein coding genome, which is currently unable to explain inter-species diversification. PMID:17073772

  20. Spatio-Temporal Variations of High and Low Nucleic Acid Content Bacteria in an Exorheic River

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lili; Ji, Yurui; Bartlam, Mark; Wang, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria with high nucleic acid (HNA) and low nucleic acid (LNA) content are commonly observed in aquatic environments. To date, limited knowledge is available on their temporal and spatial variations in freshwater environments. Here an investigation of HNA and LNA bacterial abundance and their flow cytometric characteristics was conducted in an exorheic river (Haihe River, Northern China) over a one year period covering September (autumn) 2011, December (winter) 2011, April (spring) 2012, and July (summer) 2012. The results showed that LNA and HNA bacteria contributed similarly to the total bacterial abundance on both the spatial and temporal scale. The variability of HNA on abundance, fluorescence intensity (FL1) and side scatter (SSC) were more sensitive to environmental factors than that of LNA bacteria. Meanwhile, the relative distance of SSC between HNA and LNA was more variable than that of FL1. Multivariate analysis further demonstrated that the influence of geographical distance (reflected by the salinity gradient along river to ocean) and temporal changes (as temperature variation due to seasonal succession) on the patterns of LNA and HNA were stronger than the effects of nutrient conditions. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that the distribution of LNA and HNA bacteria, including the abundance, FL1 and SSC, was controlled by different variables. The results suggested that LNA and HNA bacteria might play different ecological roles in the exorheic river. PMID:27082986

  1. Antisense RNA suppression of peroxidase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S.; De Leon, F.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The 5{prime} half the anionic peroxidase cDNA of tobacco was inserted into a CaMV 35S promoter/terminator expression cassette in the antisense configuration. This was inserted into the Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation vector pCIBIO which includes kanamycin selection, transformed into two species of tobacco (N. tabacum and M. sylvestris), and plants were subsequently regenerated on kanamycin. Transgenic plants were analyzed for peroxidase expression and found to have 3-5 fold lower levels of peroxidase than wild-type plants. Isoelectric focusing demonstrated that the antisense RNA only suppressed the anionic peroxidase. Wound-induced peroxidase expression was found not to be affected by the antisense RNA. Northern blots show a greater than 5 fold suppression of anionic peroxidase mRNA in leaf tissue, and the antisense RNA was expressed at a level 2 fold over the endogenous mRNA. Plants were self-pollinated and F1 plants showed normal segregation. N. sylvestris transgenic plants with the lowest level of peroxidase are epinastic, and preliminary results indicate elevated auxin levels. Excised pith tissue from both species of transgenic plants rapidly collapse when exposed to air, while pith tissue from wild-type plants showed little change when exposed to air. Further characterization of these phenotypes is currently being made.

  2. Antisense precision polymer micelles require less poly(ethylenimine) for efficient gene knockdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhoury, Johans J.; Edwardson, Thomas G.; Conway, Justin W.; Trinh, Tuan; Khan, Farhad; Barłóg, Maciej; Bazzi, Hassan S.; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2015-12-01

    Therapeutic nucleic acids are powerful molecules for shutting down protein expression. However, their cellular uptake is poor and requires transport vectors, such as cationic polymers. Of these, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) has been shown to be an efficient vehicle for nucleic acid transport into cells. However, cytotoxicity has been a major hurdle in the development of PEI-DNA complexes as clinically viable therapeutics. We have synthesized antisense-polymer conjugates, where the polymeric block is completely monodisperse and sequence-controlled. Depending on the polymer sequence, these can self-assemble to produce micelles of very low polydispersity. The introduction of linear poly(ethylenimine) to these micelles leads to aggregation into size-defined PEI-mediated superstructures. Subsequently, both cellular uptake and gene silencing are greatly enhanced over extended periods compared to antisense alone, while at the same time cellular cytotoxicity remains very low. In contrast, gene silencing is not enhanced with antisense polymer conjugates that are not able to self-assemble into micelles. Thus, using antisense precision micelles, we are able to achieve significant transfection and knockdown with minimal cytotoxicity at much lower concentrations of linear PEI then previously reported. Consequently, a conceptual solution to the problem of antisense or siRNA delivery is to self-assemble these molecules into `gene-like' micelles with high local charge and increased stability, thus reducing the amount of transfection agent needed for effective gene silencing.Therapeutic nucleic acids are powerful molecules for shutting down protein expression. However, their cellular uptake is poor and requires transport vectors, such as cationic polymers. Of these, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) has been shown to be an efficient vehicle for nucleic acid transport into cells. However, cytotoxicity has been a major hurdle in the development of PEI-DNA complexes as clinically viable

  3. Mismatch discrimination of lipidated DNA and LNA-probes (LiNAs) in hybridization-controlled liposome assembly.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Vogel, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Assays for mismatch discrimination and detection of single nucleotide variations by hybridization-controlled assembly of liposomes, which do not require tedious surface chemistry, are versatile for both DNA and RNA targets. We report herein a comprehensive study on different DNA and LNA (locked nucleic acids) probe designs, including membrane-anchoring requirements, studies on different probes and target lengths (including overhangs), DNA and RNA targets (including sequences associated with pathogens) for lipidated nucleic acids (LiNAs). Advantages and limitations of the liposome assembly based assay in the context of mismatch discrimination and SNP detection are presented. The advantages of membrane-anchored LiNA-probes compared to chemically attached probes on solid nanoparticles (e.g. gold nanoparticles) are described. Key functionalities such as non-covalent attachment of LiNA probes without the need for long spacers and the inherent mobility of membrane-anchored probes in lipid-bilayer membranes will be described for several different probe designs. PMID:27356098

  4. Antisense long noncoding RNAs regulate var gene activation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Amit-Avraham, Inbar; Pozner, Guy; Eshar, Shiri; Fastman, Yair; Kolevzon, Netanel; Yavin, Eylon; Dzikowski, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The virulence of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the deadliest form of human malaria, is attributed to its ability to evade human immunity through antigenic variation. These parasites alternate between expression of variable antigens, encoded by members of a multicopy gene family named var. Immune evasion through antigenic variation depends on tight regulation of var gene expression, ensuring that only a single var gene is expressed at a time while the rest of the family is maintained transcriptionally silent. Understanding how a single gene is chosen for activation is critical for understanding mutually exclusive expression but remains a mystery. Here, we show that antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) initiating from var introns are associated with the single active var gene at the time in the cell cycle when the single var upstream promoter is active. We demonstrate that these antisense transcripts are incorporated into chromatin, and that expression of these antisense lncRNAs in trans triggers activation of a silent var gene in a sequence- and dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, interference with these lncRNAs using complement peptide nucleic acid molecules down-regulated the active var gene, erased the epigenetic memory, and induced expression switching. Altogether, our data provide evidence that these antisense lncRNAs play a key role in regulating var gene activation and mutually exclusive expression. PMID:25691743

  5. Functional correction by antisense therapy of a splicing mutation in the GALT gene.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Ana I; Lourenço, Sílvia; Trabuco, Matilde; Silva, Maria João; Oliveira, Anabela; Gaspar, Ana; Diogo, Luísa; Tavares de Almeida, Isabel; Vicente, João B; Rivera, Isabel

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, antisense therapy has emerged as an increasingly important therapeutic approach to tackle several genetic disorders, including inborn errors of metabolism. Intronic mutations activating cryptic splice sites are particularly amenable to antisense therapy, as the canonical splice sites remain intact, thus retaining the potential for restoring constitutive splicing. Mutational analysis of Portuguese galactosemic patients revealed the intronic variation c.820+13A>G as the second most prevalent mutation, strongly suggesting its pathogenicity. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize this intronic variation, to elucidate its pathogenic molecular mechanism(s) and, ultimately, to correct it by antisense therapy. Minigene splicing assays in two distinct cell lines and patients' transcript analyses showed that the mutation activates a cryptic donor splice site, inducing an aberrant splicing of the GALT pre-mRNA, which in turn leads to a frameshift with inclusion of a premature stop codon (p.D274Gfs*17). Functional-structural studies of the recombinant wild-type and truncated GALT showed that the latter is devoid of enzymatic activity and prone to aggregation. Finally, two locked nucleic acid oligonucleotides, designed to specifically recognize the mutation, successfully restored the constitutive splicing, thus establishing a proof of concept for the application of antisense therapy as an alternative strategy for the clearly insufficient dietary treatment in classic galactosemia. PMID:25052314

  6. Nd:LNA laser optical pumping of He-4 - Application to space magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, R. E.; Schearer, L. D.; Tin, P.; Marquedant, R.

    1988-01-01

    Results obtained from laser pumping in a helium magnetometer sensor, using a tunable Nd:LNA laser pumped with a high-power diode laser, are reported. It is shown that it was possible to observe both the Hanle signals and the n = 0, p = 1 parametric resonance by monitoring the pumping radiation passing through the cell. As the diode laser-pumped Nd:LNA laser was tuned through the D0, D1, and D2 transitions, three distinct resonance signals were produced. A comparison of the slope of lamp-pumped signals and laser-pumped D1 signals showed that, under otherwise identical conditions, the slope of the D1 laser signal was 45 times greater than the lamp-pumped signal.

  7. Nd:LNA laser optical pumping of He-4 - Application to space magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slocum, R. E.; Schearer, L. D.; Tin, P.; Marquedant, R.

    1988-12-01

    Results obtained from laser pumping in a helium magnetometer sensor, using a tunable Nd:LNA laser pumped with a high-power diode laser, are reported. It is shown that it was possible to observe both the Hanle signals and the n = 0, p = 1 parametric resonance by monitoring the pumping radiation passing through the cell. As the diode laser-pumped Nd:LNA laser was tuned through the D0, D1, and D2 transitions, three distinct resonance signals were produced. A comparison of the slope of lamp-pumped signals and laser-pumped D1 signals showed that, under otherwise identical conditions, the slope of the D1 laser signal was 45 times greater than the lamp-pumped signal.

  8. Noise-optimal control of HEMT LNA's for compensation of temperature deviations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccarley, C.; Bautista, J. J.; Willis, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Noise-optimal control of high-electron mobility transistor low noise amplifier (HEMT LNA) bias voltage and current values was achieved at room temperature. The performance metric maximized was the amplifier gain divided by the amplifier input noise temperature, G/T(sub e). Additionally, the feasibility of automating the initial determination of bias settings was demonstrated in the laboratory. Simulation models of an HEMT were developed from available measurement data, installed on a Sun SPARC 1 workstation and used in investigating several optimization algorithms. Simple tracking-type algorithms, which follow changes in optimum settings if started at or near the global optimum point, produced the best performance. Implementation of the optimization algorithms was performed using a three-stage Field Effect Transistor (FET) LNA and an existing test apparatus. Software was written to control the bias settings of the first stage of the LNA and to perform noise and gain measurements by using the test apparatus. The optimization control was then integrated with existing test software to create a master test and optimization program for test apparatus use.

  9. Noise-optimal control of HEMT LNA's for compensation of temperature deviations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccarley, C.; Bautista, J. J.; Willis, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Noise-optimal control of high-electron mobility transistor low noise amplifier (HEMT LNA) bias voltage and current values was achieved at room temperature. The performance metric maximized was the amplifier gain divided by the amplifier input noise temperature, G/T(sub e). Additionally, the feasibility of automating the initial determination of bias settings was demonstrated in the laboratory. Simulation models of an HEMT were developed from available measurement data, installed on a Sun SPARC 1 workstation, and used in investigating several optimization algorithms. Simple tracking-type algorithms, which follow changes in optimum settings if started at or near the global optimum point, produced the best performance. Implementation of the optimization algorithms was performed using a three-stage Field Effect Transistor (FET) LNA and an existing test apparatus. Software was written to control the bias settings of the first stage of the LNA and to perform noise and gain measurements by using the test apparatus. The optimization control was then integrated with existing test software to create a master test and optimization program for test apparatus use.

  10. Layer-by-Layer Assembled Antisense DNA Microsponge Particles for Efficient Delivery of Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides can be employed as a potential approach to effectively treat cancer. However, the inherent instability and inefficient systemic delivery methods for antisense therapeutics remain major challenges to their clinical application. Here, we present a polymerized oligonucleotides (ODNs) that self-assemble during their formation through an enzymatic elongation method (rolling circle replication) to generate a composite nucleic acid/magnesium pyrophosphate sponge-like microstructure, or DNA microsponge, yielding high molecular weight nucleic acid product. In addition, this densely packed ODN microsponge structure can be further condensed to generate polyelectrolyte complexes with a favorable size for cellular uptake by displacing magnesium pyrophosphate crystals from the microsponge structure. Additional layers are applied to generate a blood-stable and multifunctional nanoparticle via the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique. By taking advantage of DNA nanotechnology and LbL assembly, functionalized DNA nanostructures were utilized to provide extremely high numbers of repeated ODN copies for efficient antisense therapy. Moreover, we show that this formulation significantly improves nucleic acid drug/carrier stability during in vivo biodistribution. These polymeric ODN systems can be designed to serve as a potent means of delivering stable and large quantities of ODN therapeutics systemically for cancer treatment to tumor cells at significantly lower toxicity than traditional synthetic vectors, thus enabling a therapeutic window suitable for clinical translation. PMID:25198246

  11. Antisense oligonucleotides bound in the polysaccharide complex and the enhanced antisense effect due to the low hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Mizu, Masami; Koumoto, Kazuya; Anada, Takahisa; Sakurai, Kazuo; Shinkai, Seiji

    2004-07-01

    Schizophyllan is a beta-(1-->3)-D-glucan and can form a novel complex with some single-chains of DNAs. As the preceding paper revealed, the polynucleotide bound in the complex is more stable to nuclease-mediated hydrolysis than the polynucleotide itself (i.e., naked polynucleotide). This paper examined possibility to apply this complex to an antisense DNA carrier, using an in vitro (cell-free) transcription/translation assay. In this assay, we used a plasmid DNA coding a green fluorescence protein (GFP) and an antisense DNA designed to hybridize the ribosome-binding site in the GFP-coded mRNA. When the antisense DNA was administered as the complex, a lower GFP expression efficiency (or higher antisense effect) is observed over naked DNA. This is because the antisense DNA in the complex is protected from the attack of deoxyribonuclease. When exonuclease I, which specifically hydrolyzes single DNA chains, was present in the GEP assay system, the antisense effect was not changed for the complex while being weakened in the naked antisense DNA system. These results imply that the exonuclease I cannot hydrolyze the antisense DNA in the complex, while it can hydrolyze naked DNA to reduce its antisense effect. PMID:14967546

  12. Repression of Acetolactate Synthase Activity through Antisense Inhibition (Molecular and Biochemical Analysis of Transgenic Potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv Desiree) Plants).

    PubMed Central

    Hofgen, R.; Laber, B.; Schuttke, I.; Klonus, A. K.; Streber, W.; Pohlenz, H. D.

    1995-01-01

    Acetolactate synthase (ALS), the first enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of leucine, valine, and isoleucine, is the biochemical target of different herbicides. To investigate the effects of repression of ALS activity through antisense gene expression we cloned an ALS gene from potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv Desiree), constructed a chimeric antisense gene under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, and created transgenic potato plants through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer. Two regenerants revealed severe growth retardation and strong phenotypical effects resembling those caused by ALS-inhibiting herbicides. Antisense gene expression decreased the steady-state level of ALS mRNA in these plants and induced a corresponding decrease in ALS activity of up to 85%. This reduction was sufficient to generate plants almost inviable without amino acid supplementation. In both ALS antisense and herbicide-treated plants, we could exclude accumulation of 2-oxobutyrate and/or 2-aminobutyrate as the reason for the observed deleterious effects, but we detected elevated levels of free amino acids and imbalances in their relative proportions. Thus, antisense inhibition of ALS generated an in vivo model of herbicide action. Furthermore, expression of antisense RNA to the enzyme of interest provides a general method for validation of potential herbicide targets. PMID:12228373

  13. Deficit in Prepulse Inhibition in Mice Caused by Dietary n-3 Fatty Acid Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, Irina; Alvheim, Anita R.; Hussein, Nahed; Salem, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) may be biosynthesized from a precursor α-linolenic acid (LNA) or obtained preformed in the diet. Dams were fed four diets with different levels of the various n-3 fatty acids during pregnancy and lactation, and their offspring were weaned to the same diets: “n-3 Deficient”, containing (as % total fatty acids) 0.07% of LNA; “Low LNA” (0.4%); “High LNA” (4.8%); and a “DHA+EPA” diet, containing 0.4% of LNA, 2% DHA and 2% EPA. Sensorimotor gating was measured by prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response in C57Bl6 mice. The n-3 Deficient and Low LNA diets caused a substantial deficit in PPI compared to the DHA+EPA diet, whereas the High LNA diet induced a less pronounced, but significant reduction of PPI. These are the first data that demonstrate a deficit in sensorimotor gating in rodents caused by an inadequate amount of the n-3 fatty acids in the diet. Our results differentiate the effects of a High LNA diet from one with added EPA and DHA even though the difference in brain DHA content is only 12% between these dietary groups. PMID:20001105

  14. The landscape of antisense gene expression in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Balbin, O Alejandro; Malik, Rohit; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M; Prensner, John R; Cao, Xuhong; Wu, Yi-Mi; Robinson, Dan; Wang, Rui; Chen, Guoan; Beer, David G; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2015-07-01

    High-throughput RNA sequencing has revealed more pervasive transcription of the human genome than previously anticipated. However, the extent of natural antisense transcripts' (NATs) expression, their regulation of cognate sense genes, and the role of NATs in cancer remain poorly understood. Here, we use strand-specific paired-end RNA sequencing (ssRNA-seq) data from 376 cancer samples covering nine tissue types to comprehensively characterize the landscape of antisense expression. We found consistent antisense expression in at least 38% of annotated transcripts, which in general is positively correlated with sense gene expression. Investigation of sense/antisense pair expressions across tissue types revealed lineage-specific, ubiquitous and cancer-specific antisense loci transcription. Comparisons between tumor and normal samples identified both concordant (same direction) and discordant (opposite direction) sense/antisense expression patterns. Finally, we provide OncoNAT, a catalog of cancer-related genes with significant antisense transcription, which will enable future investigations of sense/antisense regulation in cancer. Using OncoNAT we identified several functional NATs, including NKX2-1-AS1 that regulates the NKX2-1 oncogene and cell proliferation in lung cancer cells. Overall, this study provides a comprehensive account of NATs and supports a role for NATs' regulation of tumor suppressors and oncogenes in cancer biology. PMID:26063736

  15. Voltage-gated calcium channel and antisense oligonucleotides thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruska, Keith A. (Inventor); Friedman, Peter A. (Inventor); Barry, Elizabeth L. R. (Inventor); Duncan, Randall L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An antisense oligonucleotide of 10 to 35 nucleotides in length that can hybridize with a region of the .alpha..sub.1 subunit of the SA-Cat channel gene DNA or mRNA is provided, together with pharmaceutical compositions containing and methods utilizing such antisense oligonucleotide.

  16. The landscape of antisense gene expression in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Balbin, O. Alejandro; Malik, Rohit; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M.; Prensner, John R.; Cao, Xuhong; Wu, Yi-Mi; Robinson, Dan; Wang, Rui; Chen, Guoan; Beer, David G.; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput RNA sequencing has revealed more pervasive transcription of the human genome than previously anticipated. However, the extent of natural antisense transcripts’ (NATs) expression, their regulation of cognate sense genes, and the role of NATs in cancer remain poorly understood. Here, we use strand-specific paired-end RNA sequencing (ssRNA-seq) data from 376 cancer samples covering nine tissue types to comprehensively characterize the landscape of antisense expression. We found consistent antisense expression in at least 38% of annotated transcripts, which in general is positively correlated with sense gene expression. Investigation of sense/antisense pair expressions across tissue types revealed lineage-specific, ubiquitous and cancer-specific antisense loci transcription. Comparisons between tumor and normal samples identified both concordant (same direction) and discordant (opposite direction) sense/antisense expression patterns. Finally, we provide OncoNAT, a catalog of cancer-related genes with significant antisense transcription, which will enable future investigations of sense/antisense regulation in cancer. Using OncoNAT we identified several functional NATs, including NKX2-1-AS1 that regulates the NKX2-1 oncogene and cell proliferation in lung cancer cells. Overall, this study provides a comprehensive account of NATs and supports a role for NATs' regulation of tumor suppressors and oncogenes in cancer biology. PMID:26063736

  17. Nanoparticle for delivery of antisense γPNA oligomers targeting CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Bahal, Raman; McNeer, Nicole Ali; Ly, Danith H.; Saltzman, W. Mark; Glazer, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of a new class of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), i.e., gamma PNAs (γPNAs), creates the need for a general and effective method for its delivery into cells for regulating gene expression in mammalian cells. Here we report the antisense activity of a recently developed hydrophilic and biocompatible diethylene glycol (miniPEG)-based gamma peptide nucleic acid called MPγPNAs via its delivery by poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based nanoparticle system. We show that MPγPNA oligomers designed to bind to the selective region of Chemokine Receptor 5 (CCR5) transcript, induce potent and sequence-specific antisense effects as compared with regular PNA oligomers. In addition, PLGA nanoparticle delivery of MPγPNAs is not toxic to the cells. The findings reported in this study provide a combination of γPNA technology and PLGA-based nanoparticle delivery method for regulating gene expression in live cells via the antisense mechanism. PMID:23954968

  18. A broadband 47-67 GHz LNA with 17.3 dB gain in 65-nm CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Wang; Zhiqun, Li; Qin, Li; Yang, Liu; Zhigong, Wang

    2015-10-01

    A broadband 47-67 GHz low noise amplifier (LNA) with 17.3 dB gain in 65-nm CMOS technology is proposed. The features of millimeter wave circuits are illustrated first and design methodologies are discussed. The wideband input matching of the LNA was achieved by source inductive degeneration, which is narrowband in the low-GHz range but wideband at millimeter-wave frequencies due to the existence of gate-drain capacitance, Cgd. In order to minimize the noise figure (NF), the LNA used a common-source (CS) structure rather than cascode in the first stage, and the noise matching principle is explored. The last two stages of the LNA used a cascode structure to increase the power gain. Analysis of the gain boost effect of the gate inductor at the common-gate (CG) transistor is also performed. T-shape matching networks between stages are intended to enlarge the bandwidth. All on-chip inductors and transmission lines are modeled and simulated with a 3-dimensional electromagnetic (EM) simulation tool to guarantee the success of the design. Measurement results show that the LNA achieves a maximum gain of 17.3 dB at 60 GHz, while the 3-dB bandwidth is 20 GHz (47-67 GHz), including the interested band of 59-64 GHz, and the minimum noise figure is 4.9 dB at 62 GHz. The LNA absorbs a current of 19 mA from a 1.2 V supply and the chip occupies an area of 900 × 550 μm2 including pads. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2011AA010202).

  19. Splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Havens, Mallory A; Hastings, Michelle L

    2016-08-19

    Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) are short, synthetic, antisense, modified nucleic acids that base-pair with a pre-mRNA and disrupt the normal splicing repertoire of the transcript by blocking the RNA-RNA base-pairing or protein-RNA binding interactions that occur between components of the splicing machinery and the pre-mRNA. Splicing of pre-mRNA is required for the proper expression of the vast majority of protein-coding genes, and thus, targeting the process offers a means to manipulate protein production from a gene. Splicing modulation is particularly valuable in cases of disease caused by mutations that lead to disruption of normal splicing or when interfering with the normal splicing process of a gene transcript may be therapeutic. SSOs offer an effective and specific way to target and alter splicing in a therapeutic manner. Here, we discuss the different approaches used to target and alter pre-mRNA splicing with SSOs. We detail the modifications to the nucleic acids that make them promising therapeutics and discuss the challenges to creating effective SSO drugs. We highlight the development of SSOs designed to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy, which are currently being tested in clinical trials. PMID:27288447

  20. EGFR Mutation Analysis of Circulating Tumor DNA Using an Improved PNA-LNA PCR Clamp Method

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kana; Fukuhara, Tatsuro; Tsukita, Yoko; Morita, Mami; Suzuki, Aya; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Terasaki, Hiroshi; Nukiwa, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Rebiopsies have become more crucial in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Instead of invasive biopsies, development of collecting biological data of the tumor from blood samples is expected. We conducted a prospective study to assess the feasibility of detection of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation in plasma samples. Method. NSCLC patients harboring EGFR activating mutations, who were going to receive EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) as first-line treatment, were enrolled in this study. Plasma EGFR activating mutations and the T790M resistance mutation were analyzed by an improved PNA-LNA PCR clamp method, characterized by a 10-fold or more sensitivity compared with the original methods. Result. Six patients with wild-type EGFR and 24 patients with EGFR mutations were enrolled in this study. Pretreatment plasma samples achieved sensitivity of 79%. The 6 patients with wild-type EGFR were all negative for plasma EGFR mutations. At the time of disease progression, plasma T790M mutation was detected in 8 of 16 cases. Absence of T790M before and during TKI treatment and disappearance of activating mutations during TKI treatment were considered as predictors of EGFR-TKIs efficacy. Conclusion. We were able to detect EGFR mutations in plasma samples by using an improved PNA-LNA PCR clamp method. PMID:27478396

  1. Re-sensitizing drug-resistant bacteria to antibiotics by designing Antisense Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Colleen; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2014-03-01

    ``Super-bugs'' or ``multi-drug resistant organisms'' are a serious international health problem, with devastating consequences to patient health care. The Center for Disease Control has identified antibiotic resistance as one of the world's most pressing public health problems as a significant fraction of bacterial infections contracted are drug resistant. Typically, antibiotic resistance is encoded by ``resistance-genes'' which express proteins that carryout the resistance causing functions inside the bacterium. We present a RNA based therapeutic strategy for designing antimicrobials capable of re-sensitizing resistant bacteria to antibiotics by targeting labile regions of messenger RNAs encoding for resistance-causing proteins. We perform in silico RNA secondary structure modeling to identify labile target regions in an mRNA of interest. A synthetic biology approach is then used to administer antisense nucleic acids to our model system of ampicillin resistant Escherichia coli. Our results show a prolonged lag phase and decrease in viability of drug-resistant E. colitreated with antisense molecules. The antisense strategy can be applied to alter expression of other genes in antibiotic resistance pathways or other pathways of interest.

  2. [Treatment with antisense oligonucleotides in Duchenne's disease].

    PubMed

    Pascual-Pascual, Samuel I

    2012-05-21

    In this paper I review the results of the treatments directed to modify the mRNA of dystrophin with the goal of converting the severe Duchenne type to the milder Becker muscular dystrophy. Antisense oligomers potential to modify Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene expression and therapeutic strategies to induce ribosomal read-through of nonsense mutations (PTC124) are described. They are an important advance in the treatment of DMD, so far unspecific. Significant expression of new dystrophin is observed in biopsies of peripheral muscle, although the functional improvement is not so encouraging. New modification of chemistries are expected to improve the liberation, broad distribution in muscles, as well as their efficacy and safety enough to allow a positive chronic treatment of DMD. PMID:22605630

  3. RNA therapeutics: RNAi and antisense mechanisms and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Chery, Jessica; Näär, Anders

    2016-01-01

    RNA therapeutics refers to the use of oligonucleotides to target primarily ribonucleic acids (RNA) for therapeutic efforts or in research studies to elucidate functions of genes. Oligonucleotides are distinct from other pharmacological modalities, such as small molecules and antibodies that target mainly proteins, due to their mechanisms of action and chemical properties. Nucleic acids come in two forms: deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) and ribonucleic acids (RNA). Although DNA is more stable, RNA offers more structural variety ranging from messenger RNA (mRNA) that codes for protein to non-coding RNAs, microRNA (miRNA), transfer RNA (tRNA), short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). As our understanding of the wide variety of RNAs deepens, researchers have sought to target RNA since >80% of the genome is estimated to be transcribed. These transcripts include non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs and siRNAs that function in gene regulation by playing key roles in the transfer of genetic information from DNA to protein, the final product of the central dogma in biology1. Currently there are two main approaches used to target RNA: double stranded RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) and antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). Both approaches are currently in clinical trials for targeting of RNAs involved in various diseases, such as cancer and neurodegeneration. In fact, ASOs targeting spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown positive results in clinical trials2. Advantages of ASOs include higher affinity due to the development of chemical modifications that increase affinity, selectivity while decreasing toxicity due to off-target effects. This review will highlight the major therapeutic approaches of RNA medicine currently being applied with a focus on RNAi and ASOs. PMID:27570789

  4. Inhibition of Gastric Tumor Cell Growth Using Seed-targeting LNA as Specific, Long-lasting MicroRNA Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Staedel, Cathy; Varon, Christine; Nguyen, Phu Hung; Vialet, Brune; Chambonnier, Lucie; Rousseau, Benoît; Soubeyran, Isabelle; Evrard, Serge; Couillaud, Franck; Darfeuille, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs regulate eukaryotic gene expression upon pairing onto target mRNAs. This targeting is influenced by the complementarity between the microRNA “seed” sequence at its 5′ end and the seed-matching sequences in the mRNA. Here, we assess the efficiency and specificity of 8-mer locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified oligonucleotides raised against the seeds of miR-372 and miR-373, two embryonic stem cell-specific microRNAs prominently expressed in the human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cell line. Provided that the pairing is perfect over all the eight nucleotides of the seed and starts at nucleotide 2 or 1 at the microRNA 5′ end, these short LNAs inhibit miR-372/373 functions and derepress their common target, the cell cycle regulator LATS2. They decrease cell proliferation in vitro upon either transfection at nanomolar concentrations or unassisted delivery at micromolar concentrations. Subcutaneously delivered LNAs reduce tumor growth of AGS xenografts in mice, upon formation of a stable, specific heteroduplex with the targeted miR-372 and -373 and LATS2 upregulation. Their therapeutic potential is confirmed in fast-growing, miR-372-positive, primary human gastric adenocarcinoma xenografts in mice. Thus, microRNA silencing by 8-mer seed-targeting LNAs appears a valuable approach for both loss-of-function studies aimed at elucidating microRNA functions and for microRNA-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:26151747

  5. Selection of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides against glutathione S-transferase Mu.

    PubMed Central

    't Hoen, Peter A C; Out, Ruud; Commandeur, Jan N M; Vermeulen, Nico P E; van Batenburg, F H D; Manoharan, Muthiah; van Berkel, Theo J C; Biessen, Erik A L; Bijsterbosch, Martin K

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify functional antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) against the rat glutathione S-transferase Mu (GSTM) isoforms, GSTM1 and GSTM2. These antisense ODNs would enable the study of the physiological consequences of GSTM deficiency. Because it has been suggested that the effectiveness of antisense ODNs is dependent on the secondary mRNA structures of their target sites, we made mRNA secondary structure predictions with two software packages, Mfold and STAR. The two programs produced only marginally similar structures, which can probably be attributed to differences in the algorithms used. The effectiveness of a set of 18 antisense ODNs was evaluated with a cell-free transcription/translation assay, and their activity was correlated with the predicted secondary RNA structures. Four phosphodiester ODNs specific for GSTM1, two ODNs specific for GSTM2, and four ODNs targeted at both GSTM isoforms were found to be potent, sequence-specific, and RNase H-dependent inhibitors of protein expression. The IC50 value of the most potent ODN was approximately 100 nM. Antisense ODNs targeted against regions that were predicted by STAR to be predominantly single stranded were more potent than antisense ODNs against double-stranded regions. Such a correlation was not found for the Mfold prediction. Our data suggest that simulation of the local folding of RNA facilitates the discovery of potent antisense sequences. In conclusion, we selected several promising antisense sequences, which, when synthesized as biologically stable oligonucleotides, can be applied for study of the physiological impact of reduced GSTM expression. PMID:12515389

  6. Bimodal expression of PHO84 is modulated by early termination of antisense transcription

    PubMed Central

    Castelnuovo, Manuele; Rahman, Samir; Guffanti, Elisa; Infantino, Valentina; Stutz, Françoise; Zenklusen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Many S. cerevisiae genes encode antisense transcripts some of which are unstable and degraded by the exosome component Rrp6. Loss of Rrp6 results in the accumulation of long PHO84 antisense RNAs and repression of sense transcription through PHO84 promoter deacetylation. We used single molecule resolution fluorescent in situ hybridization (smFISH) to investigate antisense-mediated transcription regulation. We show that PHO84 antisense RNA acts as a bimodal switch, where continuous low frequency antisense transcription represses sense expression within individual cells. Surprisingly, antisense RNAs do not accumulate at the PHO84 gene but are exported to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, loss of Rrp6, rather than stabilizing PHO84 antisense RNA, promotes antisense elongation by reducing its early transcription termination by Nrd1-Nab3-Sen1. These observations suggest that PHO84 silencing results from constant low frequency antisense transcription through the promoter rather than its static accumulation at the repressed gene. PMID:23770821

  7. A Monolithic W-Band Three-Stage LNA Using 0.1 Micron InAlAs/InGaAs/InP HEMT Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H.; Lai, R.; Chen, T. H.; Chow, P. D.; Velebir, J.; Tan, K. L.; Streit, D. C.; Liu, P. H.; Ponchak, G.

    1993-01-01

    A monolithic W-band three-stage Low Noise Amplifiers (LNA) based on 0.1 um pseudomorphic InAlAs/InGaAs/InP (High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) has been developed. this LNA demonstrated a noise figure of 4.3 dB and an associated small signal gain of 19 dB at 100 GHz with a low dc power consumption of 20 mW. This is the best reported monolithic W-band LNA performance using InP-based HEMT technology and demonstrates the potential of InP HEMT technology for higher millimeter-wave applications.

  8. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Xavier; Garanto, Alejandro; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several technical challenges so far prevent a broad clinical application of this approach for other forms of IRD. Many of the mutations leading to these retinal diseases affect pre-mRNA splicing of the mutated genes . Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated splice modulation appears to be a powerful approach to correct the consequences of such mutations at the pre-mRNA level , as demonstrated by promising results in clinical trials for several inherited disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, hypercholesterolemia and various types of cancer. In this mini-review, we summarize ongoing pre-clinical research on AON-based therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD , speculate on other potential therapeutic targets, and discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead to translate splice modulation therapy for retinal disorders to the clinic. PMID:26427454

  9. Natural antisense transcription from a comparative perspective.

    PubMed

    Piatek, Monica J; Henderson, Victoria; Zynad, Hany S; Werner, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) can interfere with the expression of complementary sense transcripts with exquisite specificity. We have previously cloned NATs of Slc34a loci (encoding Na-phosphate transporters) from fish and mouse. Here we report the cloning of a human SLC34A1-related NAT that represents an alternatively spliced PFN3 transcript (Profilin3). The transcript is predominantly expressed in testis. Phylogenetic comparison suggests two distinct mechanisms producing Slc34a-related NATs: Alternative splicing of a transcript from a protein coding downstream gene (Pfn3, human/mouse) and transcription from the bi-directional promoter (Rbpja, zebrafish). Expression analysis suggested independent regulation of the complementary Slc34a mRNAs. Analysis of randomly selected bi-directionally transcribed human/mouse loci revealed limited phylogenetic conservation and independent regulation of NATs. They were reduced on X chromosomes and clustered in regions that escape inactivation. Locus structure and expression pattern suggest a NATs-associated regulatory mechanisms in testis unrelated to the physiological role of the sense transcript encoded protein. PMID:27241791

  10. Optimizing antisense oligonucleotides using phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers.

    PubMed

    Popplewell, Linda J; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2012-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations that disrupt the reading frame of the human DMD gene. Selective removal of exons flanking an out-of-frame DMD mutation can result in an in-frame mRNA transcript that may be translated into an internally deleted Becker muscular dystrophy-like functionally active dystrophin protein with therapeutic activity. Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) can be designed to bind to complementary sequences in the targeted mRNA and modify pre-mRNA splicing to correct the reading frame of a mutated transcript. AO-induced exon skipping resulting in functional truncated dystrophin has been demonstrated in animal models of DMD both in vitro and in vivo, in DMD patient cells in vitro in culture, and in DMD muscle explants. The recent advances made in this field suggest that it is likely that AO-induced exon skipping will be the first gene therapy for DMD to reach the clinic. However, it should be noted that personalized molecular medicine may be necessary, since the various reading frame-disrupting mutations are spread across the DMD gene. The different deletions that cause DMD would require skipping of different exons, which would require the optimization and clinical trial workup of many specific AOs. This chapter describes the methodologies available for the optimization of AOs, in particular phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers, for the targeted skipping of specific exons on the DMD gene. PMID:22454060

  11. On primordial sense-antisense coding

    PubMed Central

    Rodin, Andrei S.; Rodin, Sergei N.; Carter, Charles W.

    2010-01-01

    The genetic code is implemented by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS). These twenty enzymes are divided into two classes that, despite performing same functions, have nothing common in structure. The mystery of this striking partition of aaRSs might have been concealed in their sterically complementary modes of tRNA recognition that, as we have found recently, protect the tRNAs with complementary anticodons from confusion in translation. This finding implies that, in the beginning, life increased its coding repertoire by the pairs of complementary codons (rather than one-by-one) and used both complementary strands of genes as templates for translation. The class I and class II aaRSs may represent one of the most important examples of such primordial sence-antisence (SAS) coding (Rodin and Ohno, 1995). In this report, we address the issue of SAS coding in a wider scope. We suggest a variety of advantages that such coding would have had in exploring a wider sequence space before translation became highly specific. In particular, we confirm that in Achylia klebsiana a single gene might have originally coded for an HSP70 chaperonin (class II aaRS homolog) and an NAD-specific GDH-like enzyme (class I aaRS homolog) via its sense and antisense strands. Thus, in contrast to the conclusions in (Williams et al., 2009), this could indeed be a “Rosetta stone” (eroded somewhat, though) gene for the SAS origin of the two aaRS classes (Carter and Duax, 2002). PMID:19956936

  12. A high-fat, high-oleic diet, but not a high-fat, saturated diet, reduces hepatic alpha-linolenic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid content in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Considerable research centers upon the role of linoleic acid (LNA; 18:2n6) as a competitive inhibitor of a-linolenic (ALA; 18:3n3) metabolism; however, little data exist as to the impact of saturated fatty acids (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) on ALA metabolism. We tested the hypothesi...

  13. Inhibition of Hsp27 Radiosensitizes Head-and-Neck Cancer by Modulating Deoxyribonucleic Acid Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Guttmann, David M.; Hart, Lori; Du, Kevin; Seletsky, Andrew; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To present a novel method of tumor radiosensitization through Hsp27 knockdown using locked nucleic acid (LNA) and to investigate the role of Hsp27 in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival assays, immunoblotting, the proximity ligation assay, and γH2AX foci analysis were conducted in SQ20B and FaDu human head-and-neck cancer cell lines treated with Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Additionally, nude mice with FaDu flank tumors were treated with fractionated radiation therapy after pretreatment with Hsp27 LNA and monitored for tumor growth. Results: Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 shRNA radiosensitized head-and-neck cancer cell lines in an Hsp27-dependent manner. Ataxia-Telangectasia Mutated-mediated DNA repair signaling was impaired in irradiated cells with Hsp27 knockdown. ATM kinase inhibition abrogated the radiosensitizing effect of Hsp27. Furthermore, Hsp27 LNA and shRNA both attenuated DNA repair kinetics after radiation, and Hsp27 was found to colocalize with ATM in both untreated and irradiated cells. Last, combined radiation and Hsp27 LNA treatment in tumor xenografts in nude mice suppressed tumor growth compared with either treatment alone. Conclusions: These results support a radiosensitizing property of Hsp27 LNA in vitro and in vivo, implicate Hsp27 in double strand break repair, and suggest that Hsp27 LNA might eventually serve as an effective clinical agent in the radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer.

  14. Quantification of low-expressed mRNA using 5' LNA-containing real-time PCR primers

    SciTech Connect

    Malgoyre, A.; Banzet, S.; Mouret, C.; Bigard, A.X.; Peinnequin, A. . E-mail: andrepeinnequin@crssa.net

    2007-03-02

    Real-time RT-PCR is the most sensitive and accurate method for mRNA quantification. Using specific recombinant DNA as a template, real-time PCR allows accurate quantification within a 7-log range and increased sensitivity below 10 copies. However, when using RT-PCR to quantify mRNA in biological samples, a stochastic off-targeted amplification can occur. Classical adjustments of assay parameters have minimal effects on such amplification. This undesirable amplification appears mostly to be dependent on specific to non-specific target ratio rather than on the absolute quantity of the specific target. This drawback, which decreases assay reliability, mostly appears when quantifying low-expressed transcript in a whole organ. An original primer design using properties of LNA allows to block off-target amplification. 5'-LNA substitution strengthens 5'-hybridization. Consequently on-target hybridization is stabilized and the probability for the off-target to lead to amplification is decreased.

  15. Inhibition of dengue virus by novel, modified antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Raviprakash, K; Liu, K; Matteucci, M; Wagner, R; Riffenburgh, R; Carl, M

    1995-01-01

    Five different target regions along the length of the dengue virus type 2 genome were compared for inhibition of the virus following intracellular injection of the cognate antisense oligonucleotides and their analogs. Unmodified phosphodiester oligonucleotides as well as the corresponding phosphorothioate oligonucleotides were ineffective in bringing about a significant inhibition of the virus. Novel modified phosphorothioate oligonucleotides in which the C-5 atoms of uridines and cytidines were replaced by propynyl groups caused a significant inhibition of the virus. Antisense oligonucleotide directed against the target region near the translation initiation site of dengue virus RNA was the most effective, followed by antisense oligonucleotide directed against a target in the 3' untranslated region of the virus RNA. It is suggested that the inhibitory effect of these novel modified oligonucleotides is due to their increased affinity for the target sequences and that they probably function via an RNase H cleavage of the oligonucleotide:RNA heteroduplex. PMID:7983769

  16. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, John; Agrawal, Sudhir; Civeira, Maria P.; Sarin, Prem S.; Sun, Daisy; Zamecnik, Paul C.

    1988-08-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs.

  17. A novel dysferlin mutant pseudoexon bypassed with antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Dominov, Janice A; Uyan, Özgün; Sapp, Peter C; McKenna-Yasek, Diane; Nallamilli, Babi R R; Hegde, Madhuri; Brown, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mutations in dysferlin (DYSF), a Ca2+-sensitive ferlin family protein important for membrane repair, vesicle trafficking, and T-tubule function, cause Miyoshi myopathy, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B, and distal myopathy. More than 330 pathogenic DYSF mutations have been identified within exons or near exon–intron junctions. In ~17% of patients who lack normal DYSF, only a single disease-causing mutation has been identified. We studied one family with one known mutant allele to identify both the second underlying genetic defect and potential therapeutic approaches. Methods We sequenced the full DYSF cDNA and investigated antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) as a tool to modify splicing of the mRNA transcripts in order to process out mutant sequences. Results We identified a novel pseudoexon between exons 44 and 45, (pseudoexon 44.1, PE44.1), which inserts an additional 177 nucleotides into the mRNA and 59 amino acids within the conserved C2F domain of the DYSF protein. Two unrelated dysferlinopathy patients were also found to carry this mutation. Using AONs targeting PE44.1, we blocked the abnormal splicing event, yielding normal, full-length DYSF mRNA, and increased DYSF protein expression. Interpretation This is the first report of a deep intronic mutation in DYSF that alters mRNA splicing to include a mutant peptide fragment within a key DYSF domain. We report that AON-mediated exon-skipping restores production of normal, full-length DYSF in patients’ cells in vitro, offering hope that this approach will be therapeutic in this genetic context, and providing a foundation for AON therapeutics targeting other pathogenic DYSF alleles. PMID:25493284

  18. Antisense suppression of LOX3 gene expression in rice endosperm enhances seed longevity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huibin; Wei, Yidong; Zhu, Yongsheng; Lian, Ling; Xie, Hongguang; Cai, Qiuhua; Chen, Qiushi; Lin, Zhongping; Wang, Zonghua; Xie, Huaan; Zhang, Jianfu

    2015-05-01

    Lipid peroxidation plays a major role in seed longevity and viability. In rice grains, lipid peroxidation is catalyzed by the enzyme lipoxygenase 3 (LOX3). Previous reports showed that grain from the rice variety DawDam in which the LOX3 gene was deleted had less stale flavour after grain storage than normal rice. The molecular mechanism by which LOX3 expression is regulated during endosperm development remains unclear. In this study, we expressed a LOX3 antisense construct in transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants to down-regulate LOX3 expression in rice endosperm. The transgenic plants exhibited a marked decrease in LOX mRNA levels, normal phenotypes and a normal life cycle. We showed that LOX3 activity and its ability to produce 9-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (9-HPOD) from linoleic acid were significantly lower in transgenic seeds than in wild-type seeds by measuring the ultraviolet absorption of 9-HPOD at 234 nm and by high-performance liquid chromatography. The suppression of LOX3 expression in rice endosperm increased grain storability. The germination rate of TS-91 (antisense LOX3 transgenic line) was much higher than the WT (29% higher after artificial ageing for 21 days, and 40% higher after natural ageing for 12 months). To our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that decreased LOX3 expression can preserve rice grain quality during storage with no impact on grain yield, suggesting potential applications in agricultural production. PMID:25545811

  19. DESIGN OF 2.4 GHZ CMOS DIRECT CONVERSION LNA AND MIXER COMBINATION FOR WIRLESS DATA LINK TRANSCEIVER.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHAO, D.; OCONNOR, P.

    2002-04-10

    Three LNA and mixer combinations in 0.6{micro}m and 0.4{micro}m standard CMOS processes for direct-conversion receiver of 2.4GHz ISM band short-range wireless data-link applications are described in this paper. Taking low power dissipation as first consideration, these designs, employing differential common-source LNA and double balanced mixer architectures, achieve total conversion gain as high as 42.4dB, DSB noise figure as low as 9.5dB, output-referred IP3 as high as of 21.3dBm at about 4mA DC current consumption. This proves it is possible to apply standard CMOS process to implement receiver front-end with low power dissipation for this kind of application, but gain changeable LNA is needed to combat the dominant flicker noise of the mixer in order to achieve acceptable sensitivity and dynamic range at the same time.

  20. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Christopher A.; Hoffman, Jackson A.; Trotter, Kevin W.; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Bennett, Brian D.; Burkholder, Adam B.; Fargo, David C.; Archer, Trevor K.

    2016-01-01

    Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. PMID:27487356

  1. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Christopher A; Cannady, Kimberly R; Hoffman, Jackson A; Trotter, Kevin W; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Bennett, Brian D; Burkholder, Adam B; Burd, Craig J; Fargo, David C; Archer, Trevor K

    2016-08-01

    Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. PMID:27487356

  2. Reversal of phenotypes in MECP2 duplication mice using genetic rescue or antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Sztainberg, Yehezkel; Chen, Hong-mei; Swann, John W; Hao, Shuang; Tang, Bin; Wu, Zhenyu; Tang, Jianrong; Wan, Ying-Wooi; Liu, Zhandong; Rigo, Frank; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-12-01

    Copy number variations have been frequently associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. MECP2 duplication syndrome is one of the most common genomic rearrangements in males and is characterized by autism, intellectual disability, motor dysfunction, anxiety, epilepsy, recurrent respiratory tract infections and early death. The broad range of deficits caused by methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) overexpression poses a daunting challenge to traditional biochemical-pathway-based therapeutic approaches. Accordingly, we sought strategies that directly target MeCP2 and are amenable to translation into clinical therapy. The first question that we addressed was whether the neurological dysfunction is reversible after symptoms set in. Reversal of phenotypes in adult symptomatic mice has been demonstrated in some models of monogenic loss-of-function neurological disorders, including loss of MeCP2 in Rett syndrome, indicating that, at least in some cases, the neuroanatomy may remain sufficiently intact so that correction of the molecular dysfunction underlying these disorders can restore healthy physiology. Given the absence of neurodegeneration in MECP2 duplication syndrome, we propose that restoration of normal MeCP2 levels in MECP2 duplication adult mice would rescue their phenotype. By generating and characterizing a conditional Mecp2-overexpressing mouse model, here we show that correction of MeCP2 levels largely reverses the behavioural, molecular and electrophysiological deficits. We also reduced MeCP2 using an antisense oligonucleotide strategy, which has greater translational potential. Antisense oligonucleotides are small, modified nucleic acids that can selectively hybridize with messenger RNA transcribed from a target gene and silence it, and have been successfully used to correct deficits in different mouse models. We find that antisense oligonucleotide treatment induces a broad phenotypic rescue in adult

  3. Effect of 2'-O-methyl/thiophosphonoacetate-modified antisense oligonucleotides on huntingtin expression in patient-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Masayuki; Threlfall, Richard N; Caruthers, Marvin H; Corey, David R

    2014-12-15

    Optimizing oligonucleotides as therapeutics will require exploring how chemistry can be used to enhance their effects inside cells. To achieve this goal it will be necessary to fully explore chemical space around the native DNA/RNA framework to define the potential of diverse chemical modifications. In this report we examine the potential of thiophosphonoacetate (thioPACE)-modified 2'-O-methyl oligoribonucleotides as inhibitors of human huntingtin (HTT) expression. Inhibition occurred, but was less than with analogous locked nucleic acid (LNA)-substituted oligomers lacking the thioPACE modification. These data suggest that thioPACE oligonucleotides have the potential to control gene expression inside cells. However, advantages relative to other modifications were not demonstrated. Additional modifications are likely to be necessary to fully explore any potential advantages of thioPACE substitutions. PMID:26865404

  4. Stability measurements of antisense oligonucleotides by capillary gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Bruin, G J; Börnsen, K O; Hüsken, D; Gassmann, E; Widmer, H M; Paulus, A

    1995-08-11

    The approach of using antisense oligonucleotides as potential drugs is based on hybridization of a short chemically-modified oligonucleotide with complementary cellular DNA or RNA sequences. A critical question is the stability of chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides in cellular environments. In a model system, resistance against various nucleases was evaluated by capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE). For some of the samples, matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was used as an additional analytical tool to perform stability measurements. Using CGE, the enzymatic degradation of single nucleotides from the oligomer can be followed after different incubation times. 10% T polyacrylamide gels give baseline resolution for oligonucleotides ranging between 5 and 30 bases in length. The kinetic influence of a specific nuclease concentration and the antisense oligonucleotide structure on the cleavage reaction are discussed. Also, a simple desalting method to improve the injection efficiency and sensitivity of the method are described. Examples of measurements of chemically modified antisense 19-mers are presented. PMID:7581844

  5. Natural antisense transcripts associated with salinity response in alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) complimentary to the messenger (sense) RNA (Wang et al. 2014). Many of them are involved in regulation of their own sense transcripts thus playing pivotal biological roles in all processes of organismal development and responses...

  6. Antisense RNA regulation and application in the development of novel antibiotics to combat multidrug resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yinduo; Lei, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Despite the availability of antibiotics and vaccines, infectious diseases remain one of most dangerous threats to humans and animals. The overuse and misuse of antibacterial agents have led to the emergence of multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens. Bacterial cells are often resilient enough to survive in even the most extreme environments. To do so, the organisms have evolved different mechanisms, including a variety of two-component signal transduction systems, which allow the bacteria to sense the surrounding environment and regulate gene expression in order to adapt and respond to environmental stimuli. In addition, some bacteria evolve resistance to antibacterial agents while many bacterial cells are able to acquire resistance genes from other bacterial species to enable them to survive in the presence of toxic antimicrobial agents. The crisis of antimicrobial resistance is an unremitting menace to human health and a burden on public health. The rapid increase in antimicrobial resistant organisms and limited options for development of new classes of antibiotics heighten the urgent need to develop novel potent antibacterial therapeutics in order to combat multidrug resistant infections. In this review, we introduce the regulatory mechanisms of antisense RNA and significant applications of regulated antisense RNA interference technology in early drug discovery. This includes the identification and evaluation of drug targets in vitro and in vivo, the determination of mode of action for antibiotics and new antibacterial agents, as well as the development of peptide-nucleic acid conjugates as novel antibacterials. PMID:23738437

  7. Improved biological activity of antisense oligonucleotides conjugated to a fusogenic peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Bongartz, J P; Aubertin, A M; Milhaud, P G; Lebleu, B

    1994-01-01

    Recently several groups reported a dramatic improvement of reporter gene transfection efficiency using a fusogenic peptide, derived from the Influenza hemagglutinin envelop protein. This peptide changes conformation at acidic pH and destabilizes the endosomal membranes thus resulting in an increased cytoplasmic gene delivery. We describe the use of a similar fusogenic peptide in order to improve the antiviral potency of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (anti TAT) and oligophosphorothioates (S-dC28) on de novo HIV infected CEM-SS lymphocytes in serum-free medium. We observed as 5 to 10 fold improvement of the anti HIV activities of the phosphodiester antisense oligonucleotides after chemical coupling to the peptide in a one to one ratio by a disulfide or thioether bond. No toxicities were observed at the effective doses (0.1-1 microM). No sequence specificity was obtained and the fusogenic peptide possessed some antiviral activities on its own (IC50: 6 microM). A S-dC28-peptide disulfide linked conjugate and a streptavidin-peptide-biotinylated S-dC28 adduct showed similar activities as the free S-dC28 oligonucleotide (IC50: 0.1-1 nM). As expected, all the compounds were less potent in the presence of serum but the relative contribution of peptide coupling was maintained. Images PMID:7984418

  8. Cellular Antisense Activity of PNA-Oligo(bicycloguanidinium) Conjugates Forming Self-Assembled Nanoaggregates.

    PubMed

    Valero, Julián; Shiraishi, Takehiko; de Mendoza, Javier; Nielsen, Peter E

    2015-07-27

    A series of peptide nucleic acid-oligo(bicycloguanidinium) (PNA-BGn ) conjugates were synthesized and characterized in terms of cellular antisense activity by using the pLuc750HeLa cell splice correction assay. PNA-BG4 conjugates exhibited low micromolar antisense activity, and their cellular activity required the presence of a hydrophobic silyl terminal protecting group on the oligo(BG) ligand and a minimum of four guanidinium units. Surprisingly, a nonlinear dose-response with an activity threshold around 3-4 μM, indicative of large cooperativity, was observed. Supported by light scattering and electron microscopy analyses, we propose that the activity, and thus cellular delivery, of these lipo-PNA-BG4 conjugates is dependent on self-assembled nanoaggregates. Finally, cellular activity was enhanced by the presence of serum. Therefore we conclude that the lipo-BG-PNA conjugates exhibit an unexpected mechanism for cell delivery and are of interest for further in vivo studies. PMID:26010253

  9. Antisense inhibition of threonine synthase leads to high methionine content in transgenic potato plants.

    PubMed

    Zeh, M; Casazza, A P; Kreft, O; Roessner, U; Bieberich, K; Willmitzer, L; Hoefgen, R; Hesse, H

    2001-11-01

    Methionine (Met) and threonine (Thr) are members of the aspartate family of amino acids. In plants, their biosynthetic pathways diverge at the level of O-phosphohomo-serine (Ser). The enzymes cystathionine gamma-synthase and Thr synthase (TS) compete for the common substrate O-phosphohomo-Ser with the notable feature that plant TS is activated through S-adenosyl-Met, a metabolite derived from Met. To investigate the regulation of this branch point, we engineered TS antisense potato (Solanum tuberosum cv Désirée) plants using the constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. In leaf tissues, these transgenics exhibit a reduction of TS activity down to 6% of wild-type levels. Thr levels are reduced to 45% wild-type controls, whereas Met levels increase up to 239-fold depending on the transgenic line and environmental conditions. Increased levels of homo-Ser and homo-cysteine indicate increased carbon allocation into the aspartate pathway. In contrast to findings in Arabidopsis, increased Met content has no detectable effect on mRNA or protein levels or on the enzymatic activity of cystathionine gamma-synthase in potato. Tubers of TS antisense potato plants contain a Met level increased by a factor of 30 and no reduction in Thr. These plants offer a major biotechnological advance toward the development of crop plants with improved nutritional quality. PMID:11706163

  10. Antisense-Based Progerin Downregulation in HGPS-Like Patients' Cells.

    PubMed

    Harhouri, Karim; Navarro, Claire; Baquerre, Camille; Da Silva, Nathalie; Bartoli, Catherine; Casey, Frank; Mawuse, Guedenon Koffi; Doubaj, Yassamine; Lévy, Nicolas; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara

    2016-01-01

    Progeroid laminopathies, including Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS, OMIM #176670), are premature and accelerated aging diseases caused by defects in nuclear A-type Lamins. Most HGPS patients carry a de novo point mutation within exon 11 of the LMNA gene encoding A-type Lamins. This mutation activates a cryptic splice site leading to the deletion of 50 amino acids at its carboxy-terminal domain, resulting in a truncated and permanently farnesylated Prelamin A called Prelamin A Δ50 or Progerin. Some patients carry other LMNA mutations affecting exon 11 splicing and are named "HGPS-like" patients. They also produce Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Δ35 and Δ90) at the transcriptional and/or protein level. The results we present show that morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (AON) prevent pathogenic LMNA splicing, markedly reducing the accumulation of Progerin and/or other truncated Prelamin A isoforms (Prelamin A Δ35, Prelamin A Δ90) in HGPS-like patients' cells. Finally, a patient affected with Mandibuloacral Dysplasia type B (MAD-B, carrying a homozygous mutation in ZMPSTE24, encoding an enzyme involved in Prelamin A maturation, leading to accumulation of wild type farnesylated Prelamin A), was also included in this study. These results provide preclinical proof of principle for the use of a personalized antisense approach in HGPS-like and MAD-B patients, who may therefore be eligible for inclusion in a therapeutic trial based on this approach, together with classical HGPS patients. PMID:27409638

  11. Application of locked nucleic acid-based probes in fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Carvalho, Daniel; Guimarães, Nuno; Madureira, Pedro; Figueiredo, Céu; Wengel, Jesper; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) employing nucleic acid mimics as probes is becoming an emerging molecular tool in the microbiology area for the detection and visualization of microorganisms. However, the impact that locked nucleic acid (LNA) and 2'-O-methyl (2'-OMe) RNA modifications have on the probe that is targeting microorganisms is unknown. In this study, the melting and hybridization efficiency properties of 18 different probes in regards to their use in FISH for the detection of the 16S rRNA of Helicobacter pylori were compared. For the same sequence and target, probe length and the type of nucleic acid mimics used as mixmers in LNA-based probes strongly influence the efficiency of detection. LNA probes with 10 to 15 mers showed the highest efficiency. Additionally, the combination of 2'-OMe RNA with LNA allowed an increase on the fluorescence intensities of the probes. Overall, these results have significant implications for the design and applications of LNA probes for the detection of microorganisms. PMID:26969040

  12. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase antisense oligodeoxynucleotides protect against cytosine arabinonucleoside-induced apoptosis in cultured cerebellar neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Ishitani, R; Chuang, D M

    1996-01-01

    Cytosine arabinonucleoside (AraC) is a pyrimidine antimetabolite that kills proliferating cells by inhibiting DNA synthesis and, importantly, is also an inducer of apoptosis. We recently reported that age-induced apoptotic cell death of cultured cerebellar neurons is directly associated with an over-expression of a particulate 38-kDa protein, identified by us as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH; EC 1.2.1.12). We now show that the AraC-induced neuronal death of immature cerebellar granule cells in culture is effectively delayed by actinomycin-D, cycloheximide, or aurintricarboxylic acid (a DNase inhibitor). Furthermore, two GAPDH antisense, but not their corresponding sense, oligodeoxyribonucleotides markedly arrested AraC-induced apoptosis. This protection was more effective than that induced by the above-mentioned classical inhibitors of apoptosis. Prior to AraC-induced neuronal death, GAPDH mRNA levels increased by approximately 2.5-fold, and this mRNA accumulation was blocked by actinomycin-D and the GAPDH antisense (but not sense) oligonucleotide. Like actinomycin-D, a GAPDH antisense oligonucleotide also suppressed the AraC-induced over-expression of the 38-kDa particulate protein (i.e., GAPDH), while the corresponding sense oligonucleotide was totally ineffective. Thus, the present results show that GAPDH over-expression is involved in AraC-induced apoptosis of cultured cerebellar granule cells. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8790435

  13. Nanoparticle Delivery of Antisense Oligonucleotides and Their Application in the Exon Skipping Strategy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Passarelli, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Antisense therapy is a powerful tool for inducing post-transcriptional modifications and thereby regulating target genes associated with disease. There are several classes of antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) with therapeutic use, such as double-stranded RNAs (interfering RNAs, utilized for gene silencing, and single-stranded AONs with various chemistries, which are useful for antisense targeting of micro-RNAs and mRNAs. In particular, the use of AONs for exon skipping, by targeting pre-mRNA, is proving to be a highly promising therapy for some genetic disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy. However, AONs are unable to cross the plasma membrane unaided, and several other obstacles still remain to be overcome, in particular their instability due to their nuclease sensitivity and their lack of tissue specificity. Various drug delivery systems have been explored to improve the bioavailability of nucleic acids, and nanoparticles (NPs) have been suggested as potential vectors for DNA/RNA. This review describes the recent progress in AON conjugation with natural and synthetic delivery systems, and provides an overview of the efficacy of NP-AON complexes as an exon-skipping treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:24506782

  14. Weed control possibilities and harvest strategies for the Omega-3 fatty acid producing crop common purslane (Portulacca oleracea var. sativa)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common purslane is traditionally considered a weed. Recent literature suggests the potential human health benefits of omega-3 fatty acid consumption. Omega-3 fatty acids are found in flax seed oil (LNA) and fish oil (DHA and EPA), but the highest known producer of Omega-3 fatty acid in plant tissu...

  15. From aquatic to terrestrial food webs: decrease of the docosahexaenoic acid/linoleic acid ratio.

    PubMed

    Koussoroplis, Apostolos-Manuel; Lemarchand, Charles; Bec, Alexandre; Desvilettes, Christian; Amblard, Christian; Fournier, Christine; Berny, Philippe; Bourdier, Gilles

    2008-05-01

    Fatty acid composition of the adipose tissue of six carnivorous mammalian species (European otter Lutra lutra, American mink Mustela vison, European Mink Mustela lutreola, European polecat Mustela putorius, stone marten Martes foina and European wild cat Felis silvestris) was studied. These species forage to differing degrees in aquatic and terrestrial food webs. Fatty acid analysis revealed significant differences in polyunsaturated fatty acid composition between species. More specifically, our results underline a gradual significant decrease in the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)/linoleic acid (LNA) ratio of carnivore species as their dependence on aquatic food webs decreases. In conclusion, the use of the DHA/LNA ratio in long-term studies is proposed as a potential proxy of changes in foraging behaviour of semi-aquatic mammals. PMID:18335265

  16. Regulation of Antisense Transcription by NuA4 Histone Acetyltransferase and Other Chromatin Regulatory Factors.

    PubMed

    Uprety, Bhawana; Kaja, Amala; Ferdoush, Jannatul; Sen, Rwik; Bhaumik, Sukesh R

    2016-01-01

    NuA4 histone lysine (K) acetyltransferase (KAT) promotes transcriptional initiation of TATA-binding protein (TBP)-associated factor (TAF)-dependent ribosomal protein genes. TAFs have also been recently found to enhance antisense transcription from the 3' end of the GAL10 coding sequence. However, it remains unknown whether, like sense transcription of the ribosomal protein genes, TAF-dependent antisense transcription of GAL10 also requires NuA4 KAT. Here, we show that NuA4 KAT associates with the GAL10 antisense transcription initiation site at the 3' end of the coding sequence. Such association of NuA4 KAT depends on the Reb1p-binding site that recruits Reb1p activator to the GAL10 antisense transcription initiation site. Targeted recruitment of NuA4 KAT to the GAL10 antisense transcription initiation site promotes GAL10 antisense transcription. Like NuA4 KAT, histone H3 K4/36 methyltransferases and histone H2B ubiquitin conjugase facilitate GAL10 antisense transcription, while the Swi/Snf and SAGA chromatin remodeling/modification factors are dispensable for antisense, but not sense, transcription of GAL10. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time the roles of NuA4 KAT and other chromatin regulatory factors in controlling antisense transcription, thus illuminating chromatin regulation of antisense transcription. PMID:26755557

  17. Use of locked nucleic acid oligonucleotides to add functionality to plasmid DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hertoghs, Kirsten M. L.; Ellis, Jonathan H.; Catchpole, Ian R.

    2003-01-01

    The available reagents for the attachment of functional moieties to plasmid DNA are limiting. Most reagents bind plasmid DNA in a non-sequence- specific manner, with undefined stoichiometry, and affect DNA charge and delivery properties or involve chemical modifications that abolish gene expression. The design and ability of oligonucleotides (ODNs) containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) to bind supercoiled, double-stranded plasmid DNA in a sequence-specific manner are described for the first time. The main mechanism for LNA ODNs binding plasmid DNA is demonstrated to be by strand displacement. LNA ODNs are more stably bound to plasmid DNA than similar peptide nucleic acid (PNA) ‘clamps’ for procedures such as particle-mediated DNA delivery (gene gun). It is shown that LNA ODNs remain associated with plasmid DNA after cationic lipid-mediated transfection into mammalian cells. LNA ODNs can bind to DNA in a sequence-specific manner so that binding does not interfere with plasmid conformation or gene expression. Attachment of CpG-based immune adjuvants to plasmid by ‘hybrid’ phosphorothioate–LNA ODNs induces tumour necrosis factor-α production in the macrophage cell line RAW264.7. This observation exemplifies an important new, controllable methodology for adding functionality to plasmids for gene delivery and DNA vaccination. PMID:14530430

  18. Bacterial antisense RNAs are mainly the product of transcriptional noise.

    PubMed

    Lloréns-Rico, Verónica; Cano, Jaime; Kamminga, Tjerko; Gil, Rosario; Latorre, Amparo; Chen, Wei-Hua; Bork, Peer; Glass, John I; Serrano, Luis; Lluch-Senar, Maria

    2016-03-01

    cis-Encoded antisense RNAs (asRNAs) are widespread along bacterial transcriptomes. However, the role of most of these RNAs remains unknown, and there is an ongoing discussion as to what extent these transcripts are the result of transcriptional noise. We show, by comparative transcriptomics of 20 bacterial species and one chloroplast, that the number of asRNAs is exponentially dependent on the genomic AT content and that expression of asRNA at low levels exerts little impact in terms of energy consumption. A transcription model simulating mRNA and asRNA production indicates that the asRNA regulatory effect is only observed above certain expression thresholds, substantially higher than physiological transcript levels. These predictions were verified experimentally by overexpressing nine different asRNAs in Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Our results suggest that most of the antisense transcripts found in bacteria are the consequence of transcriptional noise, arising at spurious promoters throughout the genome. PMID:26973873

  19. Bacterial antisense RNAs are mainly the product of transcriptional noise

    PubMed Central

    Lloréns-Rico, Verónica; Cano, Jaime; Kamminga, Tjerko; Gil, Rosario; Latorre, Amparo; Chen, Wei-Hua; Bork, Peer; Glass, John I.; Serrano, Luis; Lluch-Senar, Maria

    2016-01-01

    cis-Encoded antisense RNAs (asRNAs) are widespread along bacterial transcriptomes. However, the role of most of these RNAs remains unknown, and there is an ongoing discussion as to what extent these transcripts are the result of transcriptional noise. We show, by comparative transcriptomics of 20 bacterial species and one chloroplast, that the number of asRNAs is exponentially dependent on the genomic AT content and that expression of asRNA at low levels exerts little impact in terms of energy consumption. A transcription model simulating mRNA and asRNA production indicates that the asRNA regulatory effect is only observed above certain expression thresholds, substantially higher than physiological transcript levels. These predictions were verified experimentally by overexpressing nine different asRNAs in Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Our results suggest that most of the antisense transcripts found in bacteria are the consequence of transcriptional noise, arising at spurious promoters throughout the genome. PMID:26973873

  20. Antisense treatment of caliciviridae: an emerging disease agent of animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alvin W; Matson, David O; Stein, David A; Skilling, Douglas E; Kroeker, Andrew D; Berke, Tamas; Iversen, Patrick L

    2002-04-01

    The Earth's oceans are the primary reservoir for an emerging family of RNA viruses, the Caliciviridae, which can cause a spectrum of diseases in marine animals, wildlife, farm animals, pets and humans. Certain members of this family have unusually broad host ranges, and some are zoonotic (transmissible from animals to humans). The RNA virus replicative processes lack effective genetic repair mechanisms, and, therefore, virtually every calicivirus replicate is a mutant. Hence, traditional therapeutics dependent on specific nucleic acid sequences or protein epitopes lack the required diversity of sequence or conformational specificity that would be required to reliably detect, prevent or treat infections from these mutant clusters (quasi-species) of RNA viruses, including the Caliciviridae. Antisense technology using phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers shows promise in overcoming these current diagnostic and therapeutic problems inherent with newly emerging viral diseases. PMID:12044040

  1. Targeting Several CAG Expansion Diseases by a Single Antisense Oligonucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Evers, Melvin M.; Pepers, Barry A.; van Deutekom, Judith C. T.; Mulders, Susan A. M.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M. C.

    2011-01-01

    To date there are 9 known diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat, with the most prevalent being Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder for which currently no therapy is available. It is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HTT gene, which results in an expansion of a glutamine stretch at the N-terminal end of the huntingtin protein. This polyglutamine expansion plays a central role in the disease and results in the accumulation of cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates. Here, we make use of modified 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate (CUG)n triplet-repeat antisense oligonucleotides to effectively reduce mutant huntingtin transcript and protein levels in patient-derived Huntington's disease fibroblasts and lymphoblasts. The most effective antisense oligonucleotide, (CUG)7, also reduced mutant ataxin-1 and ataxin-3 mRNA levels in spinocerebellar ataxia 1 and 3, respectively, and atrophin-1 in dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy patient derived fibroblasts. This antisense oligonucleotide is not only a promising therapeutic tool to reduce mutant huntingtin levels in Huntington's disease but our results in spinocerebellar ataxia and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy cells suggest that this could also be applicable to other polyglutamine expansion disorders as well. PMID:21909428

  2. Targeting several CAG expansion diseases by a single antisense oligonucleotide.

    PubMed

    Evers, Melvin M; Pepers, Barry A; van Deutekom, Judith C T; Mulders, Susan A M; den Dunnen, Johan T; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2011-01-01

    To date there are 9 known diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat, with the most prevalent being Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder for which currently no therapy is available. It is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HTT gene, which results in an expansion of a glutamine stretch at the N-terminal end of the huntingtin protein. This polyglutamine expansion plays a central role in the disease and results in the accumulation of cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates. Here, we make use of modified 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (CUG)n triplet-repeat antisense oligonucleotides to effectively reduce mutant huntingtin transcript and protein levels in patient-derived Huntington's disease fibroblasts and lymphoblasts. The most effective antisense oligonucleotide, (CUG)(7), also reduced mutant ataxin-1 and ataxin-3 mRNA levels in spinocerebellar ataxia 1 and 3, respectively, and atrophin-1 in dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy patient derived fibroblasts. This antisense oligonucleotide is not only a promising therapeutic tool to reduce mutant huntingtin levels in Huntington's disease but our results in spinocerebellar ataxia and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy cells suggest that this could also be applicable to other polyglutamine expansion disorders as well. PMID:21909428

  3. Phosphorothioate Antisense Oligonucleotides Induce the Formation of Nuclear Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Peter; Baker, Brenda F.; Bennett, C. Frank; Spector, David L.

    1998-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides are powerful tools for the in vivo regulation of gene expression. We have characterized the intracellular distribution of fluorescently tagged phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (PS-ONs) at high resolution under conditions in which PS-ONs have the potential to display antisense activity. Under these conditions PS-ONs predominantly localized to the cell nucleus where they accumulated in 20–30 bright spherical foci designated phosphorothioate bodies (PS bodies), which were set against a diffuse nucleoplasmic population excluding nucleoli. PS bodies are nuclear structures that formed in cells after PS-ON delivery by transfection agents or microinjection but were observed irrespectively of antisense activity or sequence. Ultrastructurally, PS bodies corresponded to electron-dense structures of 150–300 nm diameter and resembled nuclear bodies that were found with lower frequency in cells lacking PS-ONs. The environment of a living cell was required for the de novo formation of PS bodies, which occurred within minutes after the introduction of PS-ONs. PS bodies were stable entities that underwent noticeable reorganization only during mitosis. Upon exit from mitosis, PS bodies were assembled de novo from diffuse PS-ON pools in the daughter nuclei. In situ fractionation demonstrated an association of PS-ONs with the nuclear matrix. Taken together, our data provide evidence for the formation of a nuclear body in cells after introduction of phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides. PMID:9571236

  4. Phylogenetic characterisation of picoplanktonic populations with high and low nucleic acid content in the North Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Schattenhofer, Martha; Wulf, Jörg; Kostadinov, Ivalyo; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Zubkov, Mikhail V; Fuchs, Bernhard M

    2011-09-01

    In flow cytometric analyses of marine prokaryotic picoplankton often two populations with distinct differences in their apparent nucleic acid content are discernable, one with a high and one with a low nucleic acid content (HNA and LNA, respectively). In this study we determined the phylogenetic composition of flow cytometrically sorted HNA and LNA populations, collected at six stations along a transect across three oceanic provinces from Iceland to the Azores. Catalysed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridisation (CARD-FISH) analysis of sorted cells revealed distinct differences in phylogenetic composition between the LNA and HNA populations with only little overlap. At all stations the LNA population was dominated by the alphaproteobacterial clade SAR11 (45-74%). Also, Betaproteobacteria were always present at 2-4%. While the LNA composition was rather stable, the HNA populations were composed of distinct phylogenetic clades in the different oceanic provinces of Arctic and Tropics. For example Cyanobacteria dominated the North Atlantic Gyre HNA population (29-44%) with Prochlorococcus as the major clade (34-44%), but were low in Arctic and Polar waters (1% and 5%, respectively). In contrast, Bacteroidetes accounted for the majority of HNA cells in the Polar and Arctic province (26% and 32%, respectively), but were low in the Gyre region (3-10%). The DNA content of the HNA population was about 3.5 times higher than that of the LNA populations. This reflects differences in the genome sizes of closely related cultured representatives of HNA clades (3-6Mbp) and LNA clades (1.3-1.5Mbp). PMID:21596506

  5. Linolenic acid grafted hyaluronan: Process development, structural characterization, biological assessing, and stability studies.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Angeles, Gloria; Brandejsová, Martina; Kulhánek, Jaromír; Pavlík, Vojtěch; Šmejkalová, Daniela; Vágnerová, Hana; Velebný, Vladimír

    2016-11-01

    In this study, hyaluronan (HA) was grafted with alpha-linolenic acidLNA) by benzoyl mixed anhydrides methodology, which allowed the derivatization of HA under mild reaction conditions. The reaction was optimized and transferred from laboratory to semi-scale production. The derivative revealed an unexpected cytotoxicity after oven drying and storage at 40°C. For this reason, the storage conditions of sodium linolenyl hyaluronate (αLNA-HA) were optimized in order to preserve the beneficial effect of the derivative. Oven, spray dried and lyophilized samples were prepared and stored at -20°C, 4°C and 25°C up to 6 months. A comprehensive material characterization including stability study of the derivative, as well as evaluation of possible changes on chemical structure and presence of peroxidation products were studied by Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and complemented with assessment of in vitro viability on mouse fibroblasts NIH-3T3. The most stable αLNA-HA derivative was obtained after spray drying and storage at ambient temperature under inert atmosphere. The choice of inert atmosphere is recommended to suppress oxidation of αLNA supporting the positive influence of the derivative on cell viability. The encapsulation of hydrophobic drugs of αLNA-HA were also demonstrated. PMID:27516333

  6. Avoidance of antisense, antiterminator tRNA anticodons in vertebrate mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2010-07-01

    Protein synthesis (translation) stops at stop codons, codons not complemented by tRNA anticodons. tRNAs matching stops, antitermination (Ter) tRNAs, prevent translational termination, producing dysfunctional proteins. Genomes avoid tRNAs with anticodons whose complement (the anticodon of the 'antisense' tRNA) matches stops. This suggests that antisense tRNAs, which also form cloverleaves, are occasionally expressed. Mitochondrial antisense tRNA expression is plausible, because both DNA strands are transcribed as single RNAs, and tRNA structures signal RNA maturation. Results describe potential antisense Ter tRNAs in mammalian mitochondrial genomes detected by tRNAscan-SE, and evidence for adaptations preventing translational antitermination: genomes possessing Ter tRNAs use less corresponding stop codons; antisense Ter tRNAs form weaker cloverleaves than homologuous non-Ter antisense tRNAs; and genomic stop codon usages decrease with stabilities of codon-anticodon interactions and of Ter tRNA cloverleaves. This suggests that antisense tRNAs frequently function in translation. Results suggest that opposite strand coding is exceptional in modern genes, yet might be frequent for mitochondrial tRNAs. This adds antisense tRNA templating to other mitochondrial tRNA functions: sense tRNA templating, formation and regulation of secondary (light strand DNA) replication origins. Antitermination probably affects mitochondrial degenerative diseases and ageing: pathogenic mutations are twice as frequent in tRNAs with antisense Ter anticodons than in other tRNAs, and species lacking mitochondrial antisense Ter tRNAs have longer mean maximal lifespans than those possessing antisense Ter tRNAs. PMID:20399828

  7. A riboswitch-regulated antisense RNA in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Mellin, J R; Tiensuu, Teresa; Bécavin, Christophe; Gouin, Edith; Johansson, Jörgen; Cossart, Pascale

    2013-08-01

    Riboswitches are ligand-binding elements located in 5' untranslated regions of messenger RNAs, which regulate expression of downstream genes. In Listeria monocytogenes, a vitamin B12-binding (B12) riboswitch was identified, not upstream of a gene but downstream, and antisense to the adjacent gene, pocR, suggesting it might regulate pocR in a nonclassical manner. In Salmonella enterica, PocR is a transcription factor that is activated by 1,2-propanediol, and subsequently activates expression of the pdu genes. The pdu genes mediate propanediol catabolism and are implicated in pathogenesis. As enzymes involved in propanediol catabolism require B12 as a cofactor, we hypothesized that the Listeria B12 riboswitch might be involved in pocR regulation. Here we demonstrate that the B12 riboswitch is transcribed as part of a noncoding antisense RNA, herein named AspocR. In the presence of B12, the riboswitch induces transcriptional termination, causing aspocR to be transcribed as a short transcript. In contrast, in the absence of B12, aspocR is transcribed as a long antisense RNA, which inhibits pocR expression. Regulation by AspocR ensures that pocR, and consequently the pdu genes, are maximally expressed only when both propanediol and B12 are present. Strikingly, AspocR can inhibit pocR expression in trans, suggesting it acts through a direct interaction with pocR mRNA. Together, this study demonstrates how pocR and the pdu genes can be regulated by B12 in bacteria and extends the classical definition of riboswitches from elements governing solely the expression of mRNAs to a wider role in controlling transcription of noncoding RNAs. PMID:23878253

  8. Pseudogenes as an alternative source of natural antisense transcripts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Naturally occurring antisense transcripts (NATs) are non-coding RNAs that may regulate the activity of sense transcripts to which they bind because of complementarity. NATs that are not located in the gene they regulate (trans-NATs) have better chances to evolve than cis-NATs, which is evident when the sense strand of the cis-NAT is part of a protein coding gene. However, the generation of a trans-NAT requires the formation of a relatively large region of complementarity to the gene it regulates. Results Pseudogene formation may be one evolutionary mechanism that generates trans-NATs to the parental gene. For example, this could occur if the parental gene is regulated by a cis-NAT that is copied as a trans-NAT in the pseudogene. To support this we identified human pseudogenes with a trans-NAT to the parental gene in their antisense strand by analysis of the database of expressed sequence tags (ESTs). We found that the mutations that appeared in these trans-NATs after the pseudogene formation do not show the flat distribution that would be expected in a non functional transcript. Instead, we found higher similarity to the parental gene in a region nearby the 3' end of the trans-NATs. Conclusions Our results do not imply a functional relation of the trans-NAT arising from pseudogenes over their respective parental genes but add evidence for it and stress the importance of duplication mechanisms of genetic material in the generation of non-coding RNAs. We also provide a plausible explanation for the large transcripts that can be found in the antisense strand of some pseudogenes. PMID:21047404

  9. Intra-Amygdala Injections of CREB Antisense Impair Inhibitory Avoidance Memory: Role of Norepinephrine and Acetylcholine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Infusions of CREB antisense into the amygdala prior to training impair memory for aversive tasks, suggesting that the antisense may interfere with CRE-mediated gene transcription and protein synthesis important for the formation of new memories within the amygdala. However, the amygdala also appears to modulate memory formation in distributed…

  10. 3'-modified antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides complementary to calmodulin mRNA alter behavioral responses in Paramecium.

    PubMed Central

    Hinrichsen, R D; Fraga, D; Reed, M W

    1992-01-01

    The calcium-binding protein calmodulin has been shown to modulate the Ca(2+)-dependent ion channels of Paramecium tetraurelia. Mutations in the calmodulin gene of Paramecium result in an altered pattern of behavioral responses. Antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs), complementary to calmodulin mRNA in Paramecium, were synthesized from a modified solid support that introduced a 3'-hydroxyhexyl phosphate. These 3'-modified ODNs were tested for their ability to alter the behavioral response of Paramecium. The microinjection of antisense ODNs temporarily reduced the backward swimming behavior of the cells in test solutions containing Na+. The injection of sense and random 3'-modified ODNs, or unmodified antisense ODNs, had no effect. The antisense ODN-induced effect was reversed by the injection of calmodulin protein. The pattern of response of the injected cells in various behavioral test solutions indicated that the calmodulin antisense ODNs reduce the Ca(2+)-dependent Na+ current. Antisense ODNs, complementary either to the 5' start site or to an internal sequence of the calmodulin mRNA, were similarly effective in altering behavior. These results show that antisense ODNs may be utilized in ciliated protozoa as a tool for reducing the expression of specific gene products. In addition, Paramecium represents a powerful model system with which to study and develop antisense ODN technology. PMID:1528867

  11. From Cryptic Toward Canonical Pre-mRNA Splicing in Pompe Disease: a Pipeline for the Development of Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Bergsma, Atze J; In 't Groen, Stijn Lm; Verheijen, Frans W; van der Ploeg, Ans T; Pijnappel, Wwm Pim

    2016-01-01

    While 9% of human pathogenic variants have an established effect on pre-mRNA splicing, it is suspected that an additional 20% of otherwise classified variants also affect splicing. Aberrant splicing includes disruption of splice sites or regulatory elements, or creation or strengthening of cryptic splice sites. For the majority of variants, it is poorly understood to what extent and how these may affect splicing. We have identified cryptic splicing in an unbiased manner. Three types of cryptic splicing were analyzed in the context of pathogenic variants in the acid α-glucosidase gene causing Pompe disease. These involved newly formed deep intronic or exonic cryptic splice sites, and a natural cryptic splice that was utilized due to weakening of a canonical splice site. Antisense oligonucleotides that targeted the identified cryptic splice sites repressed cryptic splicing at the expense of canonical splicing in all three cases, as shown by reverse-transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and by enhancement of acid α-glucosidase enzymatic activity. This argues for a competition model for available splice sites, including intact or weakened canonical sites and natural or newly formed cryptic sites. The pipeline described here can detect cryptic splicing and correct canonical splicing using antisense oligonucleotides to restore the gene defect. PMID:27623443

  12. 0.9 GHz and 2.4 GHz dual-band SiGe HBT LNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhiyi, Lu; Hongyun, Xie; Wenjuan, Huo; Wanrong, Zhang

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents design and implementation of a dual-band LNA using a 0.35 μm SiGe HBT process for 0.9 GHz GSM and 2.4 GHz WLAN applications. PCB layout parasitic effects have a vital effect on circuit performance and are accounted for using electro-magnetic (EM) simulation. Design considerations of noise decoupling, input/output impedance matching, and current reuse are described in detail. At 0.9/2.4 GHz, gain and noise figure are 13/16 dB and 4.2/3.9 dB, respectively. Both S11 and S22 are below -10 dB. Power dissipation is 40 mW at 3.5 V supply.

  13. Characteristics of Antisense Transcript Promoters and the Regulation of Their Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shudai; Zhang, Li; Luo, Wen; Zhang, Xiquan

    2015-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of studies on natural antisense transcripts have been reported, especially regarding their classification, temporal and spatial expression patterns, regulatory functions and mechanisms. It is well established that natural antisense transcripts are produced from the strand opposite to the strand encoding a protein. Despite the pivotal roles of natural antisense transcripts in regulating the expression of target genes, the transcriptional mechanisms initiated by antisense promoters (ASPs) remain unknown. To date, nearly all of the studies conducted on this topic have focused on the ASP of a single gene of interest, whereas no study has systematically analyzed the locations of ASPs in the genome, ASP activity, or factors influencing this activity. This review focuses on elaborating on and summarizing the characteristics of ASPs to extend our knowledge about the mechanisms of antisense transcript initiation. PMID:26703594

  14. Peripheral reduction of FGFR4 with antisense oligonucleotides increases metabolic rate and lowers adiposity in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xing Xian; Watts, Lynnetta M; Manchem, Vara Prasad; Chakravarty, Kaushik; Monia, Brett P; McCaleb, Michael L; Bhanot, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a primary risk factor for multiple metabolic disorders. Many drugs for the treatment of obesity, which mainly act through CNS as appetite suppressants, have failed during development or been removed from the market due to unacceptable adverse effects. Thus, there are very few efficacious drugs available and remains a great unmet medical need for anti-obesity drugs that increase energy expenditure by acting on peripheral tissues without severe side effects. Here, we report a novel approach involving antisense inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) in peripheral tissues. Treatment of diet-induce obese (DIO) mice with FGFR4 antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) specifically reduced liver FGFR4 expression that not only resulted in decrease in body weight (BW) and adiposity in free-feeding conditions, but also lowered BW and adiposity under caloric restriction. In addition, combination treatment with FGFR4 ASO and rimonabant showed additive reduction in BW and adiposity. FGFR4 ASO treatment increased basal metabolic rate during free-feeding conditions and, more importantly, prevented adaptive decreases of metabolic rate induced by caloric restriction. The treatment increased fatty acid oxidation while decreased lipogenesis in both liver and fat. Mechanistic studies indicated that anti-obesity effect of FGFR4 ASO was mediated at least in part through an induction of plasma FGF15 level resulted from reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression. The anti-obesity effect was accompanied by improvement in plasma glycemia, whole body insulin sensitivity, plasma lipid levels and liver steatosis. Therefore, FGFR4 could be a potential novel target and antisense reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression could be an efficacious therapy as an adjunct to diet restriction or to an appetite suppressant for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders. PMID:23922646

  15. Antisense Suppression of the Small Chloroplast Protein CP12 in Tobacco Alters Carbon Partitioning and Severely Restricts Growth1[W

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Thomas P.; Fryer, Michael J.; Singh, Prashant; Metodiev, Metodi; Lytovchenko, Anna; Obata, Toshihiro; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Kruger, Nicholas J.; Quick, W. Paul; Lloyd, Julie C.; Raines, Christine A.

    2011-01-01

    The thioredoxin-regulated chloroplast protein CP12 forms a multienzyme complex with the Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes phosphoribulokinase (PRK) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). PRK and GAPDH are inactivated when present in this complex, a process shown in vitro to be dependent upon oxidized CP12. The importance of CP12 in vivo in higher plants, however, has not been investigated. Here, antisense suppression of CP12 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) was observed to impact on NAD-induced PRK and GAPDH complex formation but had little effect on enzyme activity. Additionally, only minor changes in photosynthetic carbon fixation were observed. Despite this, antisense plants displayed changes in growth rates and morphology, including dwarfism and reduced apical dominance. The hypothesis that CP12 is essential to separate oxidative pentose phosphate pathway activity from Calvin-Benson cycle activity, as proposed in cyanobacteria, was tested. No evidence was found to support this role in tobacco. Evidence was seen, however, for a restriction to malate valve capacity, with decreases in NADP-malate dehydrogenase activity (but not protein levels) and pyridine nucleotide content. Antisense repression of CP12 also led to significant changes in carbon partitioning, with increased carbon allocation to the cell wall and the organic acids malate and fumarate and decreased allocation to starch and soluble carbohydrates. Severe decreases were also seen in 2-oxoglutarate content, a key indicator of cellular carbon sufficiency. The data presented here indicate that in tobacco, CP12 has a role in redox-mediated regulation of carbon partitioning from the chloroplast and provides strong in vivo evidence that CP12 is required for normal growth and development in plants. PMID:21865489

  16. Cis-Antisense Transcription Gives Rise to Tunable Genetic Switch Behavior: A Mathematical Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bordoy, Antoni E.; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2015-01-01

    Antisense transcription has been extensively recognized as a regulatory mechanism for gene expression across all kingdoms of life. Despite the broad importance and extensive experimental determination of cis-antisense transcription, relatively little is known about its role in controlling cellular switching responses. Growing evidence suggests the presence of non-coding cis-antisense RNAs that regulate gene expression via antisense interaction. Recent studies also indicate the role of transcriptional interference in regulating expression of neighboring genes due to traffic of RNA polymerases from adjacent promoter regions. Previous models investigate these mechanisms independently, however, little is understood about how cells utilize coupling of these mechanisms in advantageous ways that could also be used to design novel synthetic genetic devices. Here, we present a mathematical modeling framework for antisense transcription that combines the effects of both transcriptional interference and cis-antisense regulation. We demonstrate the tunability of transcriptional interference through various parameters, and that coupling of transcriptional interference with cis-antisense RNA interaction gives rise to hypersensitive switches in expression of both antisense genes. When implementing additional positive and negative feed-back loops from proteins encoded by these genes, the system response acquires a bistable behavior. Our model shows that combining these multiple-levels of regulation allows fine-tuning of system parameters to give rise to a highly tunable output, ranging from a simple-first order response to biologically complex higher-order response such as tunable bistable switch. We identify important parameters affecting the cellular switch response in order to provide the design principles for tunable gene expression using antisense transcription. This presents an important insight into functional role of antisense transcription and its importance towards

  17. MYCNOS functions as an antisense RNA regulating MYCN

    PubMed Central

    Vadie, Nadia; Saayman, Sheena; Lenox, Alexandra; Ackley, Amanda; Clemson, Mathew; Burdach, Jon; Hart, Jonathan; Vogt, Peter K; Morris, Kevin V

    2015-01-01

    Amplification or overexpression of neuronal MYC (MYCN) is associated with poor prognosis of human neuroblastoma. Three isoforms of the MYCN protein have been described as well as a protein encoded by an antisense transcript (MYCNOS) that originates from the opposite strand at the MYCN locus. Recent findings suggest that some antisense long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) can play a role in epigenetically regulating gene expression. Here we report that MYCNOS transcripts function as a modulator of the MYCN locus, affecting MYCN promoter usage and recruiting various proteins, including the Ras GTPase-activating protein-binding protein G3BP1, to the upstream MYCN promoter. Overexpression of MYCNOS results in a reduction of upstream MYCN promoter usage and increased MYCN expression, suggesting that the protein-coding MYCNOS also functions as a regulator of MYCN ultimately controlling MYCN transcriptional variants. The observations presented here demonstrate that protein-coding transcripts can regulate gene transcription and can tether regulatory proteins to target loci. PMID:26156430

  18. Antisense Reduction of Tau in Adult Mice Protects against Seizures

    PubMed Central

    DeVos, Sarah L.; Goncharoff, Dustin K.; Chen, Guo; Kebodeaux, Carey S.; Yamada, Kaoru; Stewart, Floy R.; Schuler, Dorothy R.; Maloney, Susan E.; Wozniak, David F.; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C. Frank; Cirrito, John R.; Holtzman, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Tau, a microtubule-associated protein, is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) in regard to both neurofibrillary tangle formation and neuronal network hyperexcitability. The genetic ablation of tau substantially reduces hyperexcitability in AD mouse lines, induced seizure models, and genetic in vivo models of epilepsy. These data demonstrate that tau is an important regulator of network excitability. However, developmental compensation in the genetic tau knock-out line may account for the protective effect against seizures. To test the efficacy of a tau reducing therapy for disorders with a detrimental hyperexcitability profile in adult animals, we identified antisense oligonucleotides that selectively decrease endogenous tau expression throughout the entire mouse CNS—brain and spinal cord tissue, interstitial fluid, and CSF—while having no effect on baseline motor or cognitive behavior. In two chemically induced seizure models, mice with reduced tau protein had less severe seizures than control mice. Total tau protein levels and seizure severity were highly correlated, such that those mice with the most severe seizures also had the highest levels of tau. Our results demonstrate that endogenous tau is integral for regulating neuronal hyperexcitability in adult animals and suggest that an antisense oligonucleotide reduction of tau could benefit those with epilepsy and perhaps other disorders associated with tau-mediated neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:23904623

  19. Extensive Polycistronism and Antisense Transcription in the Mammalian Hox Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Mainguy, Gaëll; Koster, Jan; Woltering, Joost; Jansen, Hans; Durston, Antony

    2007-01-01

    The Hox clusters play a crucial role in body patterning during animal development. They encode both Hox transcription factor and micro-RNA genes that are activated in a precise temporal and spatial sequence that follows their chromosomal order. These remarkable collinear properties confer functional unit status for Hox clusters. We developed the TranscriptView platform to establish high resolution transcriptional profiling and report here that transcription in the Hox clusters is far more complex than previously described in both human and mouse. Unannotated transcripts can represent up to 60% of the total transcriptional output of a cluster. In particular, we identified 14 non-coding Transcriptional Units antisense to Hox genes, 10 of which (70%) have a detectable mouse homolog. Most of these Transcriptional Units in both human and mouse present conserved sizeable sequences (>40 bp) overlapping Hox transcripts, suggesting that these Hox antisense transcripts are functional. Hox clusters also display at least seven polycistronic clusters, i.e., different genes being co-transcribed on long isoforms (up to 30 kb). This work provides a reevaluated framework for understanding Hox gene function and dys-function. Such extensive transcriptions may provide a structural explanation for Hox clustering. PMID:17406680

  20. Strand-Specific RNA-Seq Reveals Ordered Patterns of Sense and Antisense Transcription in Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Passalacqua, Karla D.; Varadarajan, Anjana; Weist, Charlotte; Ondov, Brian D.; Byrd, Benjamin; Read, Timothy D.; Bergman, Nicholas H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although genome-wide transcriptional analysis has been used for many years to study bacterial gene expression, many aspects of the bacterial transcriptome remain undefined. One example is antisense transcription, which has been observed in a number of bacteria, though the function of antisense transcripts, and their distribution across the bacterial genome, is still unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Single-stranded RNA-seq results revealed a widespread and non-random pattern of antisense transcription covering more than two thirds of the B. anthracis genome. Our analysis revealed a variety of antisense structural patterns, suggesting multiple mechanisms of antisense transcription. The data revealed several instances of sense and antisense expression changes in different growth conditions, suggesting that antisense transcription may play a role in the ways in which B. anthracis responds to its environment. Significantly, genome-wide antisense expression occurred at consistently higher levels on the lagging strand, while the leading strand showed very little antisense activity. Intrasample gene expression comparisons revealed a gene dosage effect in all growth conditions, where genes farthest from the origin showed the lowest overall range of expression for both sense and antisense directed transcription. Additionally, transcription from both strands was verified using a novel strand-specific assay. The variety of structural patterns we observed in antisense transcription suggests multiple mechanisms for this phenomenon, suggesting that some antisense transcription may play a role in regulating the expression of key genes, while some may be due to chromosome replication dynamics and transcriptional noise. Conclusions/Significance Although the variety of structural patterns we observed in antisense transcription suggest multiple mechanisms for antisense expression, our data also clearly indicate that antisense transcription may play a genome-wide role

  1. Triplex-stabilizing properties of parallel clamps carrying LNA derivatives at the Hoogsteen strand.

    PubMed

    Alvira, Margarita; Eritja, Ramon

    2010-02-01

    DNA Parallel clamps with a polypurine strand linked to a polypyrimidine Hoogsteen strand containing locked nucleic acids bind their corresponding polypyrimidine targets with high affinity. PMID:20151386

  2. Regulating malonyl-CoA metabolism via synthetic antisense RNAs for enhanced biosynthesis of natural products.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yaping; Lin, Yuheng; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J; Yan, Yajun

    2015-05-01

    Malonyl-CoA is the building block for fatty acid biosynthesis and also a precursor to various pharmaceutically and industrially valuable molecules, such as polyketides and biopolymers. However, intracellular malonyl-CoA is usually maintained at low levels, which poses great challenges to efficient microbial production of malonyl-CoA derived molecules. Inactivation of the malonyl-CoA consumption pathway to increase its intracellular availability is not applicable, since it is usually lethal to microorganisms. In this work, we employ synthetic antisense RNAs (asRNAs) to conditionally down-regulate fatty acid biosynthesis and achieve malonyl-CoA enrichment in Escherichia coli. The optimized asRNA constructs with a loop-stem structure exhibit high interference efficiency up to 80%, leading to a 4.5-fold increase in intracellular malonyl-CoA concentration when fabD gene expression is inhibited. Strikingly, this strategy allows the improved production of natural products 4-hydroxycoumarin, resveratrol, and naringenin by 2.53-, 1.70-, and 1.53-fold in E. coli, respectively. In addition, down-regulation of other fab genes including fabH, fabB, and fabF also leads to remarkable increases in 4-hydroxycoumarin production. This study demonstrates a novel strategy to enhance intracellular malonyl-CoA and indicates the effectiveness of asRNA as a powerful tool for use in metabolic engineering. PMID:25863265

  3. rasiRNA pathway controls antisense expression of Drosophila telomeric retrotransposons in the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Shpiz, Sergey; Kwon, Dmitry; Rozovsky, Yakov; Kalmykova, Alla

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres in Drosophila are maintained by the specialized telomeric retrotransposons HeT-A, TART and TAHRE. Sense transcripts of telomeric retroelements were shown to be the targets of a specialized RNA-interference mechanism, a repeat-associated short interfering (rasi)RNA-mediated system. Antisense rasiRNAs play a key role in this mechanism, highlighting the importance of antisense expression in retrotransposon silencing. Previously, bidirectional transcription was reported for the telomeric element TART. Here, we show that HeT-A is also bidirectionally transcribed, and HeT-A antisense transcription in ovaries is regulated by a promoter localized within its 3′ untranslated region. A remarkable feature of noncoding HeT-A antisense transcripts is the presence of multiple introns. We demonstrate that sense and antisense HeT-A-specific rasiRNAs are present in the same tissue, indicating that transcripts of both directions may be considered as natural targets of the rasiRNA pathway. We found that the expression of antisense transcripts of telomeric elements is regulated by the RNA silencing machinery, suggesting rasiRNA-mediated interplay between sense and antisense transcripts in the cell. Finally, this regulation occurs in the nucleus since disruption of the rasiRNA pathway leads to an accumulation of TART and HeT-A transcripts in germ cell nuclei. PMID:19036789

  4. Functional analysis of mce4A gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv using antisense approach.

    PubMed

    Chandolia, Amita; Rathor, Nisha; Sharma, Monika; Saini, Neeraj Kumar; Sinha, Rajesh; Malhotra, Pawan; Brahmachari, Vani; Bose, Mridula

    2014-01-01

    Antisense strategy is an attractive substitute for knockout mutations created for gene silencing. mce genes have been shown to be involved in mycobacterial uptake and intracellular survival. Here we report reduced expression of mce4A and mce1A genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using antisense technology. For this, 1.1 kb region of mce4A and mce1A was cloned in reverse orientation in pSD5 shuttle vector, resulting into antisense constructs pSD5-4AS and pSD5-1AS, respectively. In M. tuberculosis H37Rv approximately 60% reduction in Mce4A and 66% reduction in expression of Mce1A protein were observed. We also observed significantly reduced intracellular survival ability of both antisense strains in comparison to M. tuberculosis containing pSD5 alone. RT-PCR analysis showed antisense did not alter the transcription of upstream and downstream of mceA genes of the respective operon. The colony morphology, in vitro growth characteristics and drug susceptibility profile of the antisense construct remained unchanged. These results demonstrate that antisense can be a promising approach to assign function of a gene in a multiunit operon and could be suitably applied as a strategy. PMID:24556072

  5. Functional analysis of polyphenol oxidases by antisense/sense technology.

    PubMed

    Thipyapong, Piyada; Stout, Michael J; Attajarusit, Jutharat

    2007-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, the secondary reactions of which lead to oxidative browning and postharvest losses of many fruits and vegetables. PPOs are ubiquitous in angiosperms, are inducible by both biotic and abiotic stresses, and have been implicated in several physiological processes including plant defense against pathogens and insects, the Mehler reaction, photoreduction of molecular oxygen by PSI, regulation of plastidic oxygen levels, aurone biosynthesis and the phenylpropanoid pathway. Here we review experiments in which the roles of PPO in disease and insect resistance as well as in the Mehler reaction were investigated using transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants with modified PPO expression levels (suppressed PPO and overexpressing PPO). These transgenic plants showed normal growth, development and reproduction under laboratory, growth chamber and greenhouse conditions. Antisense PPO expression dramatically increased susceptibility while PPO overexpression increased resistance of tomato plants to Pseudomonas syringae. Similarly, PPO-overexpressing transgenic plants showed an increase in resistance to various insects, including common cutworm (Spodoptera litura (F.)), cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner)) and beet army worm (Spodoptera exigua (Hübner)), whereas larvae feeding on plants with suppressed PPO activity had higher larval growth rates and consumed more foliage. Similar increases in weight gain, foliage consumption, and survival were also observed with Colorado potato beetles (Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say)) feeding on antisense PPO transgenic tomatoes. The putative defensive mechanisms conferred by PPO and its interaction with other defense proteins are discussed. In addition, transgenic plants with suppressed PPO exhibited more favorable water relations and decreased photoinhibition compared to nontransformed controls and transgenic plants overexpressing PPO, suggesting

  6. Antisense c-myb oligonucleotides inhibit intimal arterial smooth muscle cell accumulation in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Michael; Edelman, Elazer R.; Dekeyser, Jean-Luc; Langer, Robert; Rosenberg, Robert D.

    1992-09-01

    SYNTHETIC antisense oligonucleotides have been used to dissect gene function in vitro. Technical difficulties prevented the use of this approach for investigating the effect of gene products in vivo. Here we report the use of local delivery of antisense c-myb oligonu-cleotide to suppress intimal accumulation of rat carotid arterial smooth muscle cells. Our results suggest that antisense oligonucleotides can be used to define the in vivo biological role of specific macromolecules in the blood vessel wall and could potentially serve as a new class of therapeutic agents for cardiovascular disorders.

  7. A 0.75 dB NF LNA in GaAs pHEMT utilizing gate-drain capacitance and gradual inductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuo, Wang; Xinnian, Zheng; Hao, Yang; Haiying, Zhang

    2015-07-01

    A two-stage monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) low noise amplifier (LNA) fabricated in 0.5 μm GaAs pHEMT is presented. The Miller effect introduced by the parasitic gate-drain capacitance is utilized to decrease the value of the input inductor. Additionally, the input on-chip inductor is a novel high Q gradual structure. The noise figure is reduced with these two methods. With good input and output matching, the LNA achieves a noise figure of 0.75 dB and a small signal gain of 32.7 dB over 698-806 MHz. The input 1 dB compression point is -21.8 dBm and the input third order interception point is -10 dBm. Project supported by the External Cooperation Program of BIC, Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. 172511KYSB20130108).

  8. Antisense oligonucleotide for tissue factor inhibits hepatic ischemic reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kenji; Kadotani, Yayoi; Ushigome, Hidetaka; Akioka, Kiyokazu; Okamoto, Masahiko; Ohmori, Yoshihiro; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji; Yoshimura, Rikio; Yoshimura, Norio

    2002-09-27

    Tissue factor (TF) is an initiation factor for blood coagulation and its expression is induced on endothelial cells during inflammatory or immune responses. We designed an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS-1/TF) for rat TF and studied its effect on hepatic ischemic reperfusion injury. AS-1/TF was delivered intravenously to Lewis rats. After 10 h, hepatic artery and portal vein were partially clamped. Livers were reperfused after 180 min and harvested. TF expression was studied using immunohistochemical staining. One of 10 rats survived in a 5-day survival rate and TF was strongly stained on endothelial cells in non-treatment group. However, by treatment with AS-1/TF, six of seven survived and TF staining was significantly reduced. Furthermore, we observed that fluorescein-labeled AS-1/TF was absorbed into endothelial cells. These results suggest that AS-1/TF can strongly suppress the expression of TF and thereby inhibit ischemic reperfusion injury to the rat liver. PMID:12270110

  9. Antisense oligonucleotide induction of progerin in human myogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yue-Bei; Mitrpant, Chalermchai; Adams, Abbie M; Johnsen, Russell D; Fletcher, Sue; Mastaglia, Frank L; Wilton, Steve D

    2014-01-01

    We sought to use splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides to produce a model of accelerated ageing by enhancing expression of progerin, translated from a mis-spliced lamin A gene (LMNA) transcript in human myogenic cells. The progerin transcript (LMNA Δ150) lacks the last 150 bases of exon 11, and is translated into a truncated protein associated with the severe premature ageing disease, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). HGPS arises from de novo mutations that activate a cryptic splice site in exon 11 of LMNA and result in progerin accumulation in tissues of mesodermal origin. Progerin has also been proposed to play a role in the 'natural' ageing process in tissues. We sought to test this hypothesis by producing a model of accelerated muscle ageing in human myogenic cells. A panel of splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides were designed to anneal across exon 11 of the LMNA pre-mRNA, and these compounds were transfected into primary human myogenic cells. RT-PCR showed that the majority of oligonucleotides were able to modify LMNA transcript processing. Oligonucleotides that annealed within the 150 base region of exon 11 that is missing in the progerin transcript, as well as those that targeted the normal exon 11 donor site induced the LMNA Δ150 transcript, but most oligonucleotides also generated variable levels of LMNA transcript missing the entire exon 11. Upon evaluation of different oligomer chemistries, the morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligonucleotides were found to be more efficient than the equivalent sequences prepared as oligonucleotides with 2'-O-methyl modified bases on a phosphorothioate backbone. The morpholino oligonucleotides induced nuclear localised progerin, demonstrated by immunostaining, and morphological nuclear changes typical of HGPS cells. We show that it is possible to induce progerin expression in myogenic cells using splice-switching oligonucleotides to redirect splicing of LMNA. This may offer a model to investigate

  10. Mapping the nicking efficiencies of nickase R.BbvCI for side-specific LNA-substituted substrates using rolling circle amplification

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hua; Zhao, Guojie; Hu, Tianyu; Tang, Suming; Jiang, Jiquan; Hu, Bo; Guan, Yifu

    2016-01-01

    We used a novel asymmetric cleavage analysis method based on rolling circle amplification (RCA) to determine the effects of LNA modification of substrate on the two subunits of R.BbvCI cleavage. We designed two sets of cleavage circular substrates by using two different ligation strategies and analyzed the single strand cleavage efficiency affected by different modification positions both from the cleaved strands and the uncleaved strands. Results showed that the effects of LNA on cleavage rates of modified strands and unmodified strands were both site-dependent. The Nb.BbvCI and Nt.BbvCI were affected by LNA modification in different way. Most of the modification positions showed strong inhibition of both of these two nickases cleavage. However, the modification in T3 position of bottom strand hardly affected both of the two nickases activities. The results suggested an intimated interaction between the two subunits of R.BbvCI, and the T3 position in bottom strand might be a less tight position which was hard to be disturbed. PMID:27582033

  11. Spt4 selectively regulates the expression of C9orf72 sense and antisense mutant transcripts.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Nicholas J; Carlomagno, Yari; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Almeida, Sandra; Cook, Casey N; Gendron, Tania F; Prudencio, Mercedes; Van Blitterswijk, Marka; Belzil, Veronique; Couthouis, Julien; Paul, Joseph West; Goodman, Lindsey D; Daughrity, Lillian; Chew, Jeannie; Garrett, Aliesha; Pregent, Luc; Jansen-West, Karen; Tabassian, Lilia J; Rademakers, Rosa; Boylan, Kevin; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Josephs, Keith A; Parisi, Joseph E; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Boeve, Bradley F; Deng, Ning; Feng, Yanan; Cheng, Tzu-Hao; Dickson, Dennis W; Cohen, Stanley N; Bonini, Nancy M; Link, Christopher D; Gao, Fen-Biao; Petrucelli, Leonard; Gitler, Aaron D

    2016-08-12

    An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in C9orf72 causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (c9FTD/ALS). Therapeutics are being developed to target RNAs containing the expanded repeat sequence (GGGGCC); however, this approach is complicated by the presence of antisense strand transcription of expanded GGCCCC repeats. We found that targeting the transcription elongation factor Spt4 selectively decreased production of both sense and antisense expanded transcripts, as well as their translated dipeptide repeat (DPR) products, and also mitigated degeneration in animal models. Knockdown of SUPT4H1, the human Spt4 ortholog, similarly decreased production of sense and antisense RNA foci, as well as DPR proteins, in patient cells. Therapeutic targeting of a single factor to eliminate c9FTD/ALS pathological features offers advantages over approaches that require targeting sense and antisense repeats separately. PMID:27516603

  12. Bolaamphiphile-based nanocomplex delivery of phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, John P; Krzeminski, Jacek; Sharma, Arun K; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Weissig, Volkmar; Stewart, David B

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a conceptually appealing alternative to conventional antibiotics, a major challenge toward the successful implementation of antisense treatments for bacterial infections is the development of efficient oligonucleotide delivery systems. Cationic vesicles (bolasomes) composed of dequalinium chloride ("DQAsomes") have been used to deliver plasmid DNA across the cardiolipin-rich inner membrane of mitochondria. As cardiolipin is also a component of many bacterial membranes, we investigated the application of cationic bolasomes to bacteria as an oligonucleotide delivery system. Antisense sequences designed in silico to target the expression of essential genes of the bacterial pathogen, Clostridium difficile, were synthesized as 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). These antisense gapmers were quantitatively assessed for their ability to block mRNA translation using luciferase reporter and C. difficile protein expression plasmid constructs in a coupled transcription-translation system. Cationic bolaamphiphile compounds (dequalinium derivatives) of varying alkyl chain length were synthesized and bolasomes were prepared via probe sonication of an aqueous suspension. Bolasomes were characterized by particle size distribution, zeta potential, and binding capacities for anionic oligonucleotide. Bolasomes and antisense gapmers were combined to form antisense nanocomplexes. Anaerobic C. difficile log phase cultures were treated with serial doses of gapmer nanocomplexes or equivalent amounts of empty bolasomes for 24 hours. Antisense gapmers for four gene targets achieved nanomolar minimum inhibitory concentrations for C. difficile, with the lowest values observed for oligonucleotides targeting polymerase genes rpoB and dnaE. No inhibition of bacterial growth was observed from treatments at matched dosages of scrambled gapmer nanocomplexes or plain, oligonucleotide-free bolasomes compared to untreated control cultures. We describe

  13. Bolaamphiphile-based nanocomplex delivery of phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, John P; Krzeminski, Jacek; Sharma, Arun K; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Weissig, Volkmar; Stewart, David B

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a conceptually appealing alternative to conventional antibiotics, a major challenge toward the successful implementation of antisense treatments for bacterial infections is the development of efficient oligonucleotide delivery systems. Cationic vesicles (bolasomes) composed of dequalinium chloride (“DQAsomes”) have been used to deliver plasmid DNA across the cardiolipin-rich inner membrane of mitochondria. As cardiolipin is also a component of many bacterial membranes, we investigated the application of cationic bolasomes to bacteria as an oligonucleotide delivery system. Antisense sequences designed in silico to target the expression of essential genes of the bacterial pathogen, Clostridium difficile, were synthesized as 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). These antisense gapmers were quantitatively assessed for their ability to block mRNA translation using luciferase reporter and C. difficile protein expression plasmid constructs in a coupled transcription–translation system. Cationic bolaamphiphile compounds (dequalinium derivatives) of varying alkyl chain length were synthesized and bolasomes were prepared via probe sonication of an aqueous suspension. Bolasomes were characterized by particle size distribution, zeta potential, and binding capacities for anionic oligonucleotide. Bolasomes and antisense gapmers were combined to form antisense nanocomplexes. Anaerobic C. difficile log phase cultures were treated with serial doses of gapmer nanocomplexes or equivalent amounts of empty bolasomes for 24 hours. Antisense gapmers for four gene targets achieved nanomolar minimum inhibitory concentrations for C. difficile, with the lowest values observed for oligonucleotides targeting polymerase genes rpoB and dnaE. No inhibition of bacterial growth was observed from treatments at matched dosages of scrambled gapmer nanocomplexes or plain, oligonucleotide-free bolasomes compared to untreated control cultures. We

  14. Natural Antisense Transcripts and Long Non-Coding RNA in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Arthanari, Yamini; Heintzen, Christian; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Crosthwaite, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) and natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has been reported in a variety of organisms. While a consensus has yet to be reached on their global importance, an increasing number of examples have been shown to be functional, regulating gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Here, we use RNA sequencing data from the ABI SOLiD platform to identify lncRNA and NATs obtained from samples of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown under different light and temperature conditions. We identify 939 novel lncRNAs, of which 477 are antisense to annotated genes. Across the whole dataset, the extent of overlap between sense and antisense transcripts is large: 371 sense/antisense transcripts are complementary over 500 nts or more and 236 overlap by more than 1000 nts. Most prevalent are 3′ end overlaps between convergently transcribed sense/antisense pairs, but examples of divergently transcribed pairs and nested transcripts are also present. We confirm the expression of a subset of sense/antisense transcript pairs by qPCR. We examine the size, types of overlap and expression levels under the different environmental stimuli of light and temperature, and identify 11 lncRNAs that are up-regulated in response to light. We also find differences in transcript length and the position of introns between protein-coding transcripts that have antisense expression and transcripts with no antisense expression. These results demonstrate the ability of N. crassa lncRNAs and NATs to be regulated by different environmental stimuli and provide the scope for further investigation into the function of NATs. PMID:24621812

  15. An egr-1 (zif268) Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotide Infused Into the Amygdala Disrupts Fear Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Malkani, Seema; Wallace, Karin J.; Donley, Melanie P.; Rosen, Jeffrey B.

    2004-01-01

    Studies of gene expression following fear conditioning have demonstrated that the inducible transcription factor, egr-1, is increased in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala shortly following fear conditioning. These studies suggest that egr-1 and its protein product Egr-1 in the amygdala are important for learning and memory of fear. To directly test this hypothesis, an egr-1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (antisense-ODN) was injected bilaterally into the amygdala prior to contextual fear conditioning. The antisense-ODN reduced Egr-1 protein in the amygdala and interfered with fear conditioning. A 250-pmole dose produced an 11% decrease in Egr-1 protein and reduced long-term memory of fear as measured by freezing in a retention test 24 h after conditioning, but left shock-induced freezing intact. A larger 500-pmole dose produced a 25% reduction in Egr-1 protein and significantly decreased both freezing immediately following conditioning and freezing in the retention test. A nonsense-ODN had no effect on postshock or retention test freezing. In addition, 500 pmole of antisense-ODN infused prior to the retention test in previously trained rats did not reduce freezing, indicating that antisense-ODN did not suppress conditioned fear behavior. Finally, rats infused with 500 pmole of antisense-ODN displayed unconditioned fear to a predator odor, demonstrating that unconditioned freezing was unaffected by the antisense-ODN. The data indicate that the egr-1 antisense-ODN interferes with learning and memory processes of fear without affecting freezing behavior and suggests that the inducible transcription factor Egr-1 within the amygdala plays important functions in long-term learning and memory of fear. PMID:15466317

  16. RNA synthetic biology inspired from bacteria: construction of transcription attenuators under antisense regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawid, Alexandre; Cayrol, Bastien; Isambert, Hervé

    2009-06-01

    Among all biopolymers, ribonucleic acids or RNA have unique functional versatility, which led to the early suggestion that RNA alone (or a closely related biopolymer) might have once sustained a primitive form of life based on a single type of biopolymer. This has been supported by the demonstration of processive RNA-based replication and the discovery of 'riboswitches' or RNA switches, which directly sense their metabolic environment. In this paper, we further explore the plausibility of this 'RNA world' scenario and show, through synthetic molecular design guided by advanced RNA simulations, that RNA can also perform elementary regulation tasks on its own. We demonstrate that RNA synthetic regulatory modules directly inspired from bacterial transcription attenuators can efficiently activate or repress the expression of other RNA by merely controlling their folding paths 'on the fly' during transcription through simple RNA-RNA antisense interaction. Factors, such as NTP concentration and RNA synthesis rate, affecting the efficiency of this kinetic regulation mechanism are also studied and discussed in the light of evolutionary constraints. Overall, this suggests that direct coupling among synthesis, folding and regulation of RNAs may have enabled the early emergence of autonomous RNA-based regulation networks in absence of both DNA and protein partners.

  17. A Covalently Stabilized lipid-polycation-DNA (sLPD) Vector for Antisense Oligonucleotide Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojuan; Peng, Yong; Yu, Bo; Yu, Jianhua; Zhou, Chenguang; Mao, Yicheng; Lee, L. James; Lee, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotide G3139 is designed for Bcl-2 downregulation and is known to induce toll-like receptor activation. Novel stabilized lipid-polycation-DNA (sLPD) nanoparticles were constructed and evaluated for the delivery of G3139 to human carcinoma KB cells and for bioactivity in vivo. Polyethylenimine (PEI) was incorporated as a DNA condensing agent. The lipid composition used was DOTAP/DDAB/Chol/TPGS/linoleic acid/hexadecenal at molar ratios of 30/30/34/1/5/0.2. The nanoparticles were stabilized by the formation of a reversible covalent bond between the aldehyde group on the cis-11-hexadecenal and amines on the PEI. When sLPDs were used to transfect KB cells, 90.4% Bcl-2 downregulation was observed, compared to no significant down-regulation by free G3139 and 54.6% down regulation by non-stabilized LPD-G3139. The sLPDs were then evaluated for therapeutic efficacy in mice bearing KB subcutaneous tumors and were found to trigger a strong antitumor response, inhibiting tumor growth and prolonging survival with 72% increase in lifespan (ILS). Consistent with previous reports on other G3139 nanoparticles, the increased anti-tumor activities of sLPDs in vivo were found to be associated with increased cytokine induction rather than Bcl-2 down-regulation, suggesting an immunological mechanism. PMID:21366344

  18. Identification and characterization of high affinity antisense PNAs for the human unr (upstream of N-ras) mRNA which is uniquely overexpressed in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Huafeng; Yue, Xuan; Li, Xiaoxu; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2005-01-01

    We have recently shown that an MCF-7 tumor can be imaged in a mouse by PET with 64Cu-labeled Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) tethered to the permeation peptide Lys4 that recognize the uniquely overexpressed and very abundant upstream of N-ras or N-ras related gene (unr mRNA) expressed in these cells. Herein we describe how the high affinity antisense PNAs to the unr mRNA were identified and characterized. First, antisense binding sites on the unr mRNA were mapped by an reverse transcriptase random oligonucleotide library (RT-ROL) method that we have improved, and by a serial analysis of antisense binding sites (SAABS) method that we have developed which is similar to another recently described method. The relative binding affinities of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) complementary to the antisense binding sites were then qualitatively ranked by a new Dynabead-based dot blot assay. Dissociation constants for a subset of the ODNs were determined by a new Dynabead-based solution assay and were found to be 300 pM for the best binders in 1 M salt. PNAs corresponding to the ODNs with the highest affinities were synthesized with an N-terminal CysTyr and C-terminal Lys4 sequence. Dissociation constants of these hybrid PNAs were determined by the Dynabead-based solution assay to be about 10 pM for the highest affinity binders. PMID:16314303

  19. [Exon skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy by using antisense Morpholino].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2009-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by the lack of dystrophin protein at the sarcolemma. Exon skipping by antisense oligonucleotides is a novel method to restore the reading frame of the mutated DMD gene, and rescue dystrophin production. We recently reported that systemic delivery of Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeting exon 6 and 8 of the canine DMD gene, efficiently recovered functional dystrophin proteins at the sarcolamma of dystrophic dogs, and improved performance of affected dogs without serious side effects (Yokota et al., Ann Neurol. 65 (6): 667-676, 2009). To optimize therapeutic antisense Morpholinos for more frequent mutations of the DMD gene, we designed antisense Morpholinos targeting exon 51 of the mouse DMD gene, and injected them separately or in combination into the muscles of mdx52 mice, in which exon 52 has been deleted by a gene targeting technique (Araki et al., 1997). We also tried systemic delivery of antisense Morpholino to skip exon 51 in mdx52 mice. It is important to verify the effectiveness and side effects of antisense Morpholino in experimental animal models such as dystrophic dogs or mdx52 mice, before clinical trials in DMD patients. PMID:20030230

  20. Programmed fluctuations in sense/antisense transcript ratios drive sexual differentiation in S. pombe.

    PubMed

    Bitton, Danny A; Grallert, Agnes; Scutt, Paul J; Yates, Tim; Li, Yaoyong; Bradford, James R; Hey, Yvonne; Pepper, Stuart D; Hagan, Iain M; Miller, Crispin J

    2011-01-01

    Strand-specific RNA sequencing of S. pombe revealed a highly structured programme of ncRNA expression at over 600 loci. Waves of antisense transcription accompanied sexual differentiation. A substantial proportion of ncRNA arose from mechanisms previously considered to be largely artefactual, including improper 3' termination and bidirectional transcription. Constitutive induction of the entire spk1+, spo4+, dis1+ and spo6+ antisense transcripts from an integrated, ectopic, locus disrupted their respective meiotic functions. This ability of antisense transcripts to disrupt gene function when expressed in trans suggests that cis production at native loci during sexual differentiation may also control gene function. Consistently, insertion of a marker gene adjacent to the dis1+ antisense start site mimicked ectopic antisense expression in reducing the levels of this microtubule regulator and abolishing the microtubule-dependent 'horsetail' stage of meiosis. Antisense production had no impact at any of these loci when the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery was removed. Thus, far from being simply 'genome chatter', this extensive ncRNA landscape constitutes a fundamental component in the controls that drive the complex programme of sexual differentiation in S. pombe. PMID:22186733

  1. Programmed fluctuations in sense/antisense transcript ratios drive sexual differentiation in S. pombe

    PubMed Central

    Bitton, Danny A; Grallert, Agnes; Scutt, Paul J; Yates, Tim; Li, Yaoyong; Bradford, James R; Hey, Yvonne; Pepper, Stuart D; Hagan, Iain M; Miller, Crispin J

    2011-01-01

    Strand-specific RNA sequencing of S. pombe revealed a highly structured programme of ncRNA expression at over 600 loci. Waves of antisense transcription accompanied sexual differentiation. A substantial proportion of ncRNA arose from mechanisms previously considered to be largely artefactual, including improper 3′ termination and bidirectional transcription. Constitutive induction of the entire spk1+, spo4+, dis1+ and spo6+ antisense transcripts from an integrated, ectopic, locus disrupted their respective meiotic functions. This ability of antisense transcripts to disrupt gene function when expressed in trans suggests that cis production at native loci during sexual differentiation may also control gene function. Consistently, insertion of a marker gene adjacent to the dis1+ antisense start site mimicked ectopic antisense expression in reducing the levels of this microtubule regulator and abolishing the microtubule-dependent ‘horsetail' stage of meiosis. Antisense production had no impact at any of these loci when the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery was removed. Thus, far from being simply ‘genome chatter', this extensive ncRNA landscape constitutes a fundamental component in the controls that drive the complex programme of sexual differentiation in S. pombe. PMID:22186733

  2. A novel antisense long noncoding RNA regulates the expression of MDC1 in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Qiuhan; Chu, Haiyan; Tong, Na; Yuan, Lin; Qin, Chao; Yin, Changjun; Zhang, Zhengdong; Wang, Meilin

    2015-01-01

    Antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in regulating the expression of coding genes in post-transcriptional level. However, detailed expression profile of lncRNAs and functions of antisense lncRNAs in bladder cancer remains unclear. To investigate regulation of lncRNAs in bladder cancer and demonstrate their functions, we performed lncRNAs microarray analysis in 3 paired bladder cancer tissues. Further molecular assays were conducted to determine the potential role of identified antisense lncRNA MDC1-AS. As a result, a series of lncRNAs were differentially expressed in bladder cancer tissues in microarray screen. In a larger size of samples validation, we found that the expression levels of MDC1-AS and MDC1 was down-regulated in bladder cancer. After over-expression of MDC1-AS, increased levels of MDC1 were observed in bladder cancer cells. We also found a remarkably inhibitory role of antisense lncRNA MDC1-AS on malignant cell behaviors in bladder cancer cells EJ and T24. Subsequently, knockdown of MDC1 revealed that suppressing role of MDC1-AS was attributed to up-regulation of MDC1. In summary, we have identified a novel antisense lncRNA MDC1-AS, which may participate in bladder cancer through up-regulation of its antisense tumor-suppressing gene MDC1. Further studies should be conducted to demonstrate detailed mechanism of our findings. PMID:25514464

  3. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to the cystic fibrosis gene inhibits anion transport in normal cultured sweat duct cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sorscher, E.J.; Kirk, K.L.; Weaver, M.L.; Jilling, T.; Blalock, J.E.; LeBoeuf, R.D. )

    1991-09-01

    The authors have tested the hypothesis that the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene product, called the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), mediates anion transport in normal human sweat duct cells. Sweat duct cells in primary culture were treated with oligodeoxynucleotides that were antisense to the CFTR gene transcript in order to block the expression of the wild-type CFTR. Anion transport in CFTR transcript antisense-treated cells was then assessed with a halide-specific dye, 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropryl)quinolinium, and fluorescent digital imaging microscopy to monitor halide influx and efflux from single sweat duct cells. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment for 24 hr virtually abolished Cl{sup {minus}} transport in sweat duct cells compared with untreated cells or control cells treated with sense oligodeoxynucleotides. Br{sup {minus}} uptake into sweat duct cells was also blocked after a 24-hr CFTR transcript antisense treatments, but not after treatments for only 4 hr. Lower concentrations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides were less effective at inhibiting Cl{sup {minus}} transport. These results indicate that oligodeoxynucleotides that are antisense to CFTR transcript inhibit sweat duct Cl{sup {minus}} permeability in both a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. This approach provides evidence that inhibition of the expression of the wild-type CFTR gene in a normal, untransfected epithelial cell results in an inhibition of Cl{sup {minus}} permeability.

  4. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to the cystic fibrosis gene inhibits anion transport in normal cultured sweat duct cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sorscher, E J; Kirk, K L; Weaver, M L; Jilling, T; Blalock, J E; LeBoeuf, R D

    1991-01-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene product, called the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), mediates anion transport in normal human sweat duct cells. Sweat duct cells in primary culture were treated with oligodeoxynucleotides that were antisense to the CFTR gene transcript in order to block the expression of the wild-type CFTR. Anion transport in CFTR transcript antisense-treated cells was then assessed with a halide-specific dye, 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropyl)quinolinium, and fluorescent digital imaging microscopy to monitor halide influx and efflux from single sweat duct cells. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment (3.9 or 1.3 microM) for 24 hr virtually abolished Cl- transport in sweat duct cells compared with untreated cells or control cells treated with sense oligodeoxynucleotides. Br- uptake into sweat duct cells was also blocked after a 24-hr CFTR transcript antisense treatment, but not after treatment for only 4 hr. Lower concentrations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides were less effective at inhibiting Cl- transport. These results indicate that oligodeoxynucleotides that are antisense to CFTR transcript inhibit sweat duct Cl- permeability in both a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. This approach provides evidence that inhibition of the expression of the wild-type CFTR gene in a normal, untransfected epithelial cell results in an inhibition of Cl- permeability. Images PMID:1715578

  5. Upstream Anti-sense Promoters are Hubs of Transcription Factor Binding and Active Histone Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Scruggs, Benjamin S.; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Nechaev, Sergei; Muse, Ginger W.; Burkholder, Adam; Fargo, David C.; Adelman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Anti-sense transcription originating upstream of mammalian protein-coding genes is a well-documented phenomenon, but remarkably little is known about the regulation or function of anti-sense promoters and the non-coding RNAs they generate. Here we define at nucleotide resolution the divergent transcription start sites (TSSs) near mouse mRNA genes. We find that coupled sense and anti-sense TSSs precisely define the boundaries of a nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) that is highly enriched in transcription factor (TF) motifs. Notably, as the distance between sense and anti-sense TSSs increases, so does the size of the NDR, the level of signal-dependent TF binding and gene activation. We further discover a group of anti-sense TSSs in macrophages with an enhancer-like chromatin signature. Interestingly, this signature identifies divergent promoters that are activated during immune challenge. We propose that anti-sense promoters serve as platforms for TF binding and establishment of active chromatin to further regulate or enhance sense-strand mRNA expression. PMID:26028540

  6. Incorporation of n-3 fatty acids into plasma and liver lipids of rats: importance of background dietary fat.

    PubMed

    MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley K; Garg, Manohar L

    2004-06-01

    The health benefits of long-chain n-3 PUFA (20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3) depend on the extent of incorporation of these FA into plasma and tissue lipids. This study aimed to investigate the effect of the background dietary fat (saturated, monounsaturated, or n-6 polyunsaturated) on the quantitative incorporation of dietary 18:3n-3 and its elongated and desaturated products into the plasma and the liver lipids of rats. Female weanling Wistar rats (n = 54) were randomly assigned to six diet groups (n = 9). The fat added to the semipurified diets was tallow (SFA), tallow plus linseed oil (SFA-LNA), sunola oil (MUFA), sunola oil plus linseed oil (MUFA-LNA), sunflower oil (PUFA), or sunflower oil plus linseed oil (PUFA-LNA). At the completion of the 4-wk feeding period, quantitative FA analysis of the liver and plasma was undertaken by GC. The inclusion of linseed oil in the rat diets increased the level of 18:3n-3, 20:5n-3, and, to a smaller degree, 22:6n-3 in plasma and liver lipids regardless of the background dietary fat. The extent of incorporation of 18:3n-3, 20:5n-3, and 22:5n-3 followed the order SFA-LNA > MUFA-LNA > PUFA-LNA. Levels of 22:6n-3 were increased to a similar extent regardless of the type of major fat in the rat diets. This indicates that the background diet affects the incorporation in liver and plasma FA pools of the n-3 PUFA with the exception of 22:6n-3 and therefore the background diet has the potential to influence the already established health benefits of long-chain n-3 fatty acids. PMID:15554153

  7. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA encoding granule-bound starch synthase in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) and its antisense expression in potato.

    PubMed

    Salehuzzaman, S N; Jacobsen, E; Visser, R G

    1993-12-01

    A tuber-specific cDNA library of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) was constructed and a full-length cDNA for granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS, also known as waxy protein), the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of amylose in reserve starch, was cloned. Sequencing of the cloned cDNA showed that it has 74% identity with potato GBSS and 60-72% identity with GBSS from other plant species. The cDNA encodes a 608 amino acid protein of which 78 amino acids form a chloroplast/amyloplast transit peptide of 8.37 kDa. The mature protein has a predicted molecular mass of 58.61 kDa (530 amino acids). Comparison of the GBSS proteins of various plant species and glycogen synthase of bacteria showed extensive identity among the mature form of plant GBSS proteins, in which the monocots and dicots form two separate branches in the evolutionary tree. From analysis of the genomic DNA of allotetraploid cassava, it is shown that GBSS is a low-copy-number gene. GBSS transcript is synthesized in a number of different organs, but most abundantly in tubers. Potato plants were transformed with the cassava GBSS cDNA in antisense orientation fused between the potato GBSS promoter and the nopaline synthase terminator. The expression of the endogenous GBSS gene in these transgenic potato plants was partially or completely inhibited. Complete inhibition of GBSS activity by the cassava antisense gene resulted in absence of GBSS protein and amylose giving rise to almost complete amylose-free potato starch. This shows that also heterologous genes can be used to achieve antisense effects in other plant species. PMID:8260633

  8. Annexin A2 facilitates endocytic trafficking of antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyu; Sun, Hong; Tanowitz, Michael; Liang, Xue-hai; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2016-01-01

    Chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) designed to mediate site-specific cleavage of RNA by RNase H1 are used as research tools and as therapeutics. ASOs modified with phosphorothioate (PS) linkages enter cells via endocytotic pathways. The mechanisms by which PS-ASOs are released from membrane-enclosed endocytotic organelles to reach target RNAs remain largely unknown. We recently found that annexin A2 (ANXA2) co-localizes with PS-ASOs in late endosomes (LEs) and enhances ASO activity. Here, we show that co-localization of ANXA2 with PS-ASO is not dependent on their direct interactions or mediated by ANXA2 partner protein S100A10. Instead, ANXA2 accompanies the transport of PS-ASOs to LEs, as ANXA2/PS-ASO co-localization was observed inside LEs. Although ANXA2 appears not to affect levels of PS-ASO internalization, ANXA2 reduction caused significant accumulation of ASOs in early endosomes (EEs) and reduced localization in LEs and decreased PS-ASO activity. Importantly, the kinetics of PS-ASO activity upon free uptake show that target mRNA reduction occurs at least 4 hrs after PS-ASOs exit from EEs and is coincident with release from LEs. Taken together, our results indicate that ANXA2 facilitates PS-ASO trafficking from early to late endosomes where it may also contribute to PS-ASO release. PMID:27378781

  9. Natural antisense transcripts regulate the neuronal stress response and excitability

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xingguo; Valakh, Vera; DiAntonio, Aaron; Ben-Shahar, Yehuda

    2014-01-01

    Neurons regulate ionic fluxes across their plasma membrane to maintain their excitable properties under varying environmental conditions. However, the mechanisms that regulate ion channels abundance remain poorly understood. Here we show that pickpocket 29 (ppk29), a gene that encodes a Drosophila degenerin/epithelial sodium channel (DEG/ENaC), regulates neuronal excitability via a protein-independent mechanism. We demonstrate that the mRNA 3′UTR of ppk29 affects neuronal firing rates and associated heat-induced seizures by acting as a natural antisense transcript (NAT) that regulates the neuronal mRNA levels of seizure (sei), the Drosophila homolog of the human Ether-à-go-go Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel. We find that the regulatory impact of ppk29 mRNA on sei is independent of the sodium channel it encodes. Thus, our studies reveal a novel mRNA dependent mechanism for the regulation of neuronal excitability that is independent of protein-coding capacity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01849.001 PMID:24642409

  10. Oligodeoxynucleotide studies in primates: antisense and immune stimulatory indications.

    PubMed

    Farman, Cindy A; Kornbrust, Doug J

    2003-01-01

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide compounds (AS ODN) are being developed as therapeutics for various disease indications. Their safety and pharmacokinetics are most commonly evaluated in rodents and nonhuman primates. Traditional AS ODN are short, single strands of DNA, and they target specific mRNA sequences. Plasma clearance of AS ODN is rapid, broad tissue distribution occurs, and elimination is by nuclease metabolism. Structural modifications to AS ODN have been made to enhance their efficacy and improve their safety. A number of class effects are observed with AS ODN that are unrelated to the specific targeted mRNA sequence. Acute effects include activation of the alternative complement pathway and inhibition of the intrinsic coagulation pathway. In monkeys, rodents, and dogs given repeated doses of AS ODN, accumulation of AS ODN and/or metabolites occurs in the form of basophilic granules in various tissues, including the kidney, lymph nodes and liver. A new potential therapeutic application of ODN is that of immune stimulation. Immunostimulatory ODN (IS ODN) are being investigated for use in treating cancer, infectious disease, and allergy. For the development of both AS and IS ODN, primates will continue to be important for safety assessment. PMID:12597439

  11. A high-fat, high-oleic diet, but not a high-fat, saturated diet, reduces hepatic n3 fatty acid content in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While considerable research has centered upon the role of linoleic acid (LNA; 18:2n6) as a competitive inhibitor of alpha-linolenic (ALA; 18:3n3) metabolism, a growing literature indicates that the amount of fat consumed can reduce the elongation and desaturation process. However, little data exist ...

  12. Directional gene expression and antisense transcripts in sexual and asexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It has been shown that nearly a quarter of the initial predicted gene models in the Plasmodium falciparum genome contain errors. Although there have been efforts to obtain complete cDNA sequences to correct the errors, the coverage of cDNA sequences on the predicted genes is still incomplete, and many gene models for those expressed in sexual or mosquito stages have not been validated. Antisense transcripts have widely been reported in P. falciparum; however, the extent and pattern of antisense transcripts in different developmental stages remain largely unknown. Results We have sequenced seven bidirectional libraries from ring, early and late trophozoite, schizont, gametocyte II, gametocyte V, and ookinete, and four strand-specific libraries from late trophozoite, schizont, gametocyte II, and gametocyte V of the 3D7 parasites. Alignment of the cDNA sequences to the 3D7 reference genome revealed stage-specific antisense transcripts and novel intron-exon splicing junctions. Sequencing of strand-specific cDNA libraries suggested that more genes are expressed in one direction in gametocyte than in schizont. Alternatively spliced genes, antisense transcripts, and stage-specific expressed genes were also characterized. Conclusions It is necessary to continue to sequence cDNA from different developmental stages, particularly those of non-erythrocytic stages. The presence of antisense transcripts in some gametocyte and ookinete genes suggests that these antisense RNA may play an important role in gene expression regulation and parasite development. Future gene expression studies should make use of directional cDNA libraries. Antisense transcripts may partly explain the observed discrepancy between levels of mRNA and protein expression. PMID:22129310

  13. Depletion of Bcl-2 by an antisense oligonucleotide induces apoptosis accompanied by oxidation and externalization of phosphatidylserine in NCI-H226 lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Koty, Patrick P; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Tyurin, Vladimir A; Li, Shang-Xi; Kagan, Valerian E

    2002-01-01

    Oxidant-induced apoptosis involves oxidation of many different and essential molecules including phospholipids. As a result of this non-specific oxidation, any signaling role of a particular phospholipid-class of molecules is difficult to elucidate. To determine whether preferential oxidation of phosphatidylserine (PS) is an early event in apoptotic signaling related to PS externalization and is independent of direct oxidant exposure, we chose a genetic-based induction of apoptosis. Apoptosis was induced in the lung cancer cell line NCI-H226 by decreasing the amount of Bcl-2 protein expression by preventing the translation of bcl-2 mRNA using an antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide. Peroxidation of phospholipids was assayed using a fluorescent technique based on metabolic integration of an oxidation-sensitive and fluorescent fatty acid, cis-parinaric acid (PnA), into cellular phospholipids and subsequent HPLC separation of cis-PnA-labeled phospholipids. We found a decrease in Bcl-2 was associated with a selective oxidation of PS in a sub-population of the cells with externalized PS. No significant difference in oxidation of cis-PnA-labeled phospholipids was observed in cells treated with medium alone or a nonsense oligonucleotide. Treatment with either nonsensc or antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotides was not associated with changes in the pattern of individual phospholipid classes as determined by HPTLC. These metabolic and topographical changes in PS arrangement in plasma membrane appear to be early responses to antisense bcl-2 exposure that trigger a PS-dependent apoptotic signaling pathway. This observed externalization of PS may facilitate the 'labeling' of apoptotic cells for recognition by macrophage scavenger receptors and subsequent phagocytic clearance. PMID:12162425

  14. The Drosophila micropia retrotransposon encodes a testis-specific antisense RNA complementary to reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, S; Corces, V G; Lankenau, D H

    1994-01-01

    The micropia transposable element of Drosophila hydei is a long terminal repeat-containing retrotransposon present in both the autosomes and the Y chromosome. micropia expression gives rise to a complex set of sense and antisense RNAs transcribed primarily during spermatogenesis. The most abundant sense RNAs constitute an assortment of heterogeneous high-molecular-weight transcripts expressed as constituents of the Y-chromosomal lampbrush loops of primary spermatocytes. In addition, micropia encodes a full-length RNA that extends between the two long terminal repeats of the element. The major 1.0-kb antisense RNA characterized is complementary to the reverse transcriptase and RNase H coding regions of micropia. It is expressed from a testis-specific promoter during the primary spermatocyte stages and is detectable until spermatid elongation stages. Sequence comparison of this promoter with the 5' region of other testis-specific genes allows the conception of a conserved sequence that is responsible for this pattern of expression. A 284-bp fragment containing this sequence is able to drive testis-specific expression of the Escherichia coli lacZ gene in Drosophila melanogaster. This sequence is conserved in the micropia elements present in other Drosophila species that also encode an antisense RNA. The evolutionary conservation of micropia antisense RNA expression and the sequences responsible for its testis-specific transcription suggests a role for this antisense RNA in the control of germ line expression of the full-length transcript or transposon-encoded proteins. Images PMID:7509447

  15. Anti-parallel triplexes: Synthesis of 8-aza-7-deazaadenine nucleosides with a 3-aminopropynyl side-chain and its corresponding LNA analog.

    PubMed

    Kosbar, Tamer R; Sofan, Mamdouh A; Waly, Mohamed A; Pedersen, Erik B

    2015-05-15

    The phosphoramidites of DNA monomers of 7-(3-aminopropyn-1-yl)-8-aza-7-deazaadenine (Y) and 7-(3-aminopropyn-1-yl)-8-aza-7-deazaadenine LNA (Z) are synthesized, and the thermal stability at pH 7.2 and 8.2 of anti-parallel triplexes modified with these two monomers is determined. When, the anti-parallel TFO strand was modified with Y with one or two insertions at the end of the TFO strand, the thermal stability was increased 1.2°C and 3°C at pH 7.2, respectively, whereas one insertion in the middle of the TFO strand decreased the thermal stability 1.4°C compared to the wild type oligonucleotide. In order to be sure that the 3-aminopropyn-1-yl chain was contributing to the stability of the triplex, the nucleobase X without the aminopropynyl group was inserted in the same positions. In all cases the thermal stability was lower than the corresponding oligonucleotides carrying the 3-aminopropyn-1-yl chain, especially at the end of the TFO strand. On the other hand, the thermal stability of the anti-parallel triplex was dramatically decreased when the TFO strand was modified with the LNA monomer analog Z in the middle of the TFO strand (ΔTm=-9.1°C). Also the thermal stability decreased about 6.1°C when the TFO strand was modified with Z and the Watson-Crick strand with adenine-LNA (A(L)). The molecular modeling results showed that, in case of nucleobases Y and Z a hydrogen bond (1.69 and 1.72Ǻ, respectively) was formed between the protonated 3-aminopropyn-1-yl chain and one of the phosphate groups in Watson-Crick strand. Also, it was shown that the nucleobase Y made a good stacking and binding with the other nucleobases in the TFO and Watson-Crick duplex, respectively. In contrast, the nucleobase Z with LNA moiety was forced to twist out of plane of Watson-Crick base pair which is weakening the stacking interactions with the TFO nucleobases and the binding with the duplex part. PMID:25868748

  16. Lumped element 12 GHz LNA MMIC using InGaAs/GaAs MODFETs with optimised gate width and reactive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, R.; Tasker, P. J.; Schlechtweg, M.; Braunstein, J.; Reinert, W.

    1993-07-01

    A two-stage 12 GHz LNA has been realized as a lumped element MMIC on GaAs substrates using In(0.25)Ga(0.7)As channel PM-MODFETs. The gain is over 17 dB and noise figure is less than 1.25 dB. Input (output) match is better than -21 dB (-14 qB). The MMIC design includes reactive feedback by source inductances and makes use of optimized gate widths for broad noise circles and easy impedance match.

  17. Antisense approach to inflammatory bowel disease: prospects and challenges.

    PubMed

    Marafini, Irene; Di Fusco, Davide; Calabrese, Emma; Sedda, Silvia; Pallone, Francesco; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    Despite the great success of anti-tumour necrosis factor-based therapies, the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) still remains a challenge for clinicians, as these drugs are not effective in all patients, their efficacy may wane with time, and their use can increase the risk of adverse events and be associated with the development of new immune-mediated diseases. Therefore, new therapeutic targets are currently being investigated both in pre-clinical studies and in clinical trials. Among the technologies used to build new therapeutic compounds, the antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) approach is slowly gaining space in the field of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), and three ASOs have been investigated in clinical trials. Systemic administration of alicaforsen targeting intercellular adhesion molecule-1, a protein involved in the recruitment of leukocytes to inflamed intestine, was not effective in CD, even though the same compound was of benefit when given as an enema to UC patients. DIMS0150, targeting nuclear factor (NF) κB-p65, a transcription factor that promotes pro-inflammatory responses, was very promising in pre-clinical studies and is currently being tested in clinical trials. Oral mongersen, targeting Smad7, an intracellular protein that inhibits transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 activity, was safe and well tolerated by CD patients, and the results of a phase II clinical trial showed the efficacy of the drug in inducing clinical remission in patients with active disease. In this leading article, we review the rationale and the clinical data available regarding these three agents, and we discuss the challenge of using ASOs in IBD. PMID:25911184

  18. Correction of a Cystic Fibrosis Splicing Mutation by Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Igreja, Susana; Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Marques, Luís; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-threatening genetic disease in Caucasians, is caused by ∼2,000 different mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A significant fraction of these (∼13%) affect pre-mRNA splicing for which novel therapies have been somewhat neglected. We have previously described the effect of the CFTR splicing mutation c.2657+5G>A in IVS16, showing that it originates transcripts lacking exon 16 as well as wild-type transcripts. Here, we tested an RNA-based antisense oligonucleotide (AON) strategy to correct the aberrant splicing caused by this mutation. Two AONs (AON1/2) complementary to the pre-mRNA IVS16 mutant region were designed and their effect on splicing was assessed at the RNA and protein levels, on intracellular protein localization and function. To this end, we used the 2657+5G>A mutant CFTR minigene stably expressed in HEK293 Flp-In cells that express a single copy of the transgene. RNA data from AON1-treated mutant cells show that exon 16 inclusion was almost completely restored (to 95%), also resulting in increased levels of correctly localized CFTR protein at the plasma membrane (PM) and with increased function. A novel two-color CFTR splicing reporter minigene developed here allowed the quantitative monitoring of splicing by automated microscopy localization of CFTR at the PM. The AON strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach for the specific correction of alternative splicing. PMID:26553470

  19. Mass Spectrometric Confirmation of γ-Linolenic Acid Ester-Linked Ceramide 1 in the Epidermis of Borage Oil Fed Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyong-Oh; Kim, Kunpyo; Jeon, Sanghun; Seo, Cho-Hee; Lee, Yong-Moon; Cho, Yunhi

    2015-10-01

    Ceramide 1 (Cer1), a Cer species with eicosasphingenine (d20:1) amide-linked to two different ω-hydroxy fatty acids (C30wh:0:C32wh:1), which are, in turn, ester-linked to linoleic acid (LNA; 18:2n-6), plays a critical role in maintaining the structural integrity of the epidermal barrier. Prompted by the recovery of a disrupted epidermal barrier with dietary borage oil [BO: 36.5% LNA and 23.5% γ-linolenic acid (GLA; 18:3n-6)], in essential fatty acid (EFA)-deficient guinea pigs, we further investigated the effects of BO on the substitution of ester-linked GLA for LNA in these two epidermal Cer1 species by LC-MS in positive and negative modes. Dietary supplementation of BO for 2 weeks in EFA-deficient guinea pigs increased LNA ester-linked to C32wh:1/d20:1 and C30wh:0/d20:1 of Cer1. Moreover, GLA ester-linked to C32wh:1/d20:1, but not to C30wh:0/d20:1, of Cer1 was detected, which was further confirmed by the product ions of m/z 277.2 for ester-linked GLA and m/z 802.3 for the deprotonated C32wh:1/d20:1. C20-Metabolized fatty acids of LNA or GLA were not ester-linked to these Cer1 species. Dietary BO induced GLA ester-linked to C32wh:1/d20:1 of epidermal Cer1. PMID:26233818

  20. Kinetics and Products of Heterogeneous Oxidation of Oleic acid, Linoleic acid and Linolenic acid in Aerosol Particles by Hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nah, T.; Leone, S. R.; Wilson, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    A significant mass fraction of atmospheric aerosols is composed of a variety of oxidized organic compounds with varying functional groups that may affect the rate at which they chemically age. Here we study the heterogeneous reaction of OH radicals with different sub-micron, alkenoic acid particles: Oleic acid (OA), Linoleic acid (LA), and Linolenic acid (LNA), in the presence of H2O2 and O2. This research explores how OH addition reactions initiate chain reactions that rapidly transform the chemical composition of an organic particle. Particles are chemically aged in a photochemical flow tube reactor where they are exposed to OH radicals (~ 1011 molecule cm-3 s) that are produced by the photolysis of H2O2 at 254 nm. The aerosols are then sized and their composition analyzed via Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization (APCI). Detailed kinetic measurements show that the reactive uptake coefficient is larger than 1, indicating the presence of secondary chemistry occurring in the condensed phase. Reactive uptake coefficient is found to scale linearly with the number of double bonds present in the molecule. In addition, the reactive uptake coefficient is found to depend sensitively upon the concentrations of O2 in the photochemical flow tube reactor, indicating that O2 plays a role in secondary chemistry. In the absence of O2 the reactive uptake coefficient increases to ~ 8, 5 and 3 for LNA, LA, and OA, respectively. The reactive uptake coefficient approaches values of 6, 4 and 2 for LNA, LA, and OA respectively when 18% of the total nitrogen flow is replaced with O2. Mechanistic pathways and products will also be presented herein.

  1. Antisense overlapping open reading frames in genes from bacteria to humans.

    PubMed Central

    Merino, E; Balbás, P; Puente, J L; Bolívar, F

    1994-01-01

    Long Open Reading Frames (ORFs) in antisense DNA strands have been reported in the literature as being rare events. However, an extensive analysis of the GenBank database revealed that a substantial number of genes from several species contain an in-phase ORF in the antisense strand, that overlaps entirely the coding sequence of the sense strand, or even extends beyond. The findings described in this paper show that this is a frequent, non-random phenomenon, which is primarily dependent on codon usage, and to a lesser extent on gene size and GC content. Examination of the sequence database for several prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, demonstrates that coding sequences with in-phase, 100% overlapping antisense ORFs are present in every genome studied so far. PMID:8208617

  2. Repair of Thalassemic Human β -globin mRNA in Mammalian Cells by Antisense Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowska, Halina; Sambade, Maria J.; Agrawal, Sudhir; Kole, Ryszard

    1996-11-01

    In one form of β -thalassemia, a genetic blood disorder, a mutation in intron 2 of the β -globin gene (IVS2-654) causes aberrant splicing of β -globin pre-mRNA and, consequently, β -globin deficiency. Treatment of mammalian cells stably expressing the IVS2-654 human β -globin gene with antisense oligonucleotides targeted at the aberrant splice sites restored correct splicing in a dose-dependent fashion, generating correct human β -globin mRNA and polypeptide. Both products persisted for up to 72 hr posttreatment. The oligonucleotides modified splicing by a true antisense mechanism without overt unspecific effects on cell growth and splicing of other pre-mRNAs. This novel approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore rather than to down-regulate the activity of the target gene is applicable to other splicing mutants and is of potential clinical interest.

  3. Gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection for high-throughput antisense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalies, S.; Heinemann, D.; Schomaker, M.; Birr, T.; Ripken, T.; Meyer, H.

    2013-06-01

    The delivery of antisense structures, like siRNA, is beneficial for new therapeutic approaches in regenerative sciences. Optical transfection techniques enable high spatial control combined with minimal invasive treatment of cells due to the use of short laser pulses. However, single cell laser transfection by a tightly focused laser beam, for example femtosecond laser transfection, has the major drawback of low throughput. Compared to this, high-throughput in laser transfection is possible by applying gold nanoparticles irradiated by a weakly focused laser beam scanning over the cell sample. Herein, we show the delivery of antisense molecules and demonstrate the minimal cytotoxicity of a method called gold nanoparticle mediated (GNOME) laser transfection. A 532 nm microchip laser in conjugation with 200 nm gold nanoparticles at a concentration of 0.5 μg/cm2 is used. In addition to antisense molecules, the uptake of dextrans of several sizes is analyzed.

  4. A Simple Three-Step Method for Design and Affinity Testing of New Antisense Peptides: An Example of Erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Štambuk, Nikola; Manojlović, Zoran; Turčić, Petra; Martinić, Roko; Konjevoda, Paško; Weitner, Tin; Wardega, Piotr; Gabričević, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Antisense peptide technology is a valuable tool for deriving new biologically active molecules and performing peptide–receptor modulation. It is based on the fact that peptides specified by the complementary (antisense) nucleotide sequences often bind to each other with a higher specificity and efficacy. We tested the validity of this concept on the example of human erythropoietin, a well-characterized and pharmacologically relevant hematopoietic growth factor. The purpose of the work was to present and test simple and efficient three-step procedure for the design of an antisense peptide targeting receptor-binding site of human erythropoietin. Firstly, we selected the carboxyl-terminal receptor binding region of the molecule (epitope) as a template for the antisense peptide modeling; Secondly, we designed an antisense peptide using mRNA transcription of the epitope sequence in the 3'→5' direction and computational screening of potential paratope structures with BLAST; Thirdly, we evaluated sense–antisense (epitope–paratope) peptide binding and affinity by means of fluorescence spectroscopy and microscale thermophoresis. Both methods showed similar Kd values of 850 and 816 µM, respectively. The advantages of the methods were: fast screening with a small quantity of the sample needed, and measurements done within the range of physicochemical parameters resembling physiological conditions. Antisense peptides targeting specific erythropoietin region(s) could be used for the development of new immunochemical methods. Selected antisense peptides with optimal affinity are potential lead compounds for the development of novel diagnostic substances, biopharmaceuticals and vaccines. PMID:24865486

  5. A simple three-step method for design and affinity testing of new antisense peptides: an example of erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Štambuk, Nikola; Manojlović, Zoran; Turčić, Petra; Martinić, Roko; Konjevoda, Paško; Weitner, Tin; Wardega, Piotr; Gabričević, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Antisense peptide technology is a valuable tool for deriving new biologically active molecules and performing peptide-receptor modulation. It is based on the fact that peptides specified by the complementary (antisense) nucleotide sequences often bind to each other with a higher specificity and efficacy. We tested the validity of this concept on the example of human erythropoietin, a well-characterized and pharmacologically relevant hematopoietic growth factor. The purpose of the work was to present and test simple and efficient three-step procedure for the design of an antisense peptide targeting receptor-binding site of human erythropoietin. Firstly, we selected the carboxyl-terminal receptor binding region of the molecule (epitope) as a template for the antisense peptide modeling; Secondly, we designed an antisense peptide using mRNA transcription of the epitope sequence in the 3'→5' direction and computational screening of potential paratope structures with BLAST; Thirdly, we evaluated sense-antisense (epitope-paratope) peptide binding and affinity by means of fluorescence spectroscopy and microscale thermophoresis. Both methods showed similar Kd values of 850 and 816 µM, respectively. The advantages of the methods were: fast screening with a small quantity of the sample needed, and measurements done within the range of physicochemical parameters resembling physiological conditions. Antisense peptides targeting specific erythropoietin region(s) could be used for the development of new immunochemical methods. Selected antisense peptides with optimal affinity are potential lead compounds for the development of novel diagnostic substances, biopharmaceuticals and vaccines. PMID:24865486

  6. Antisense inhibition of cyclin D1 expression is equivalent to flavopiridol for radiosensitization of zebrafish embryos

    SciTech Connect

    McAleer, Mary Frances; Duffy, Kevin T.; Davidson, William R.; Kari, Gabor; Dicker, Adam P.; Rodeck, Ulrich; Wickstrom, Eric . E-mail: eric@tesla.jci.tju.edu

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Flavopiridol, a small molecule pan-cyclin inhibitor, has been shown to enhance Radiation response of tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. The clinical utility of flavopiridol, however, is limited by toxicity, previously attributed to pleiotropic inhibitory effects on several targets affecting multiple signal transduction pathways. Here we used zebrafish embryos to investigate radiosensitizing effects of flavopiridol in normal tissues. Methods and Materials: Zebrafish embryos at the 1- to 4-cell stage were treated with 500 nM flavopiridol or injected with 0.5 pmol antisense hydroxylprolyl-phosphono nucleic acid oligomers to reduce cyclin D1 expression, then subjected to ionizing radiation (IR) or no radiation. Results: Flavopiridol-treated embryos demonstrated a twofold increase in mortality after exposure to 40 Gy by 96 hpf and developed distinct radiation-induced defects in midline development (designated as the 'curly up' phenotype) at higher rates when compared with embryos receiving IR only. Cyclin D1-deficient embryos had virtually identical IR sensitivity profiles when compared with embryos treated with flavopiridol. This was particularly evident for the IR-induced curly up phenotype, which was greatly exacerbated by both flavopriridol and cyclin D1 downregulation. Conclusions: Treatment of zebrafish embryos with flavopiridol enhanced radiation sensitivity of zebrafish embryos to a degree that was very similar to that associated with downregulation of cyclin D1 expression. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that inhibition of cyclin D1 is sufficient to account for the radiosensitizing action of flavopiridol in the zebrafish embryo vertebrate model.

  7. The role of antisense long noncoding RNA in small RNA-triggered gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xizhe; Li, Haitang; Rossi, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are known to regulate neighboring protein-coding genes by directing chromatin remodeling complexes, imprinting, and X-chromosome inactivation. In this study, we explore the function of lncRNAs in small RNA-triggered transcriptional gene activation (TGA), a process in which microRNAs (miRNAs) or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) associated with Argonaute (Ago) proteins induce chromatin remodeling and gene activation at promoters with sequence complementarity. We designed a model system with different lncRNA and chromatin environments to elucidate the molecular mechanisms required for mammalian TGA. Using RNA-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR, we demonstrated that small RNA-triggered TGA occurs at sites where antisense lncRNAs are transcribed through the reporter gene and promoter. Small RNA-induced TGA coincided with the enrichment of Ago2 at the promoter region, but Ago2-mediated cleavage of antisense lncRNAs was not observed. Moreover, we examined the allele-specific effects of lncRNAs through a Cre-induced inversion of a poly(A) sequence that was designed to block the transcription of antisense lncRNAs through the reporter gene region in an inducible and reversible manner. Termination of nascent antisense lncRNAs abrogated gene activation triggered by small RNAs, and only allele-specific cis-acting antisense lncRNAs, but not trans-acting lncRNAs, were capable of rescuing TGA. Hence, this model revealed that antisense lncRNAs can mediate TGA in cis and not in trans, serving as a molecular scaffold for a small RNA–Ago2 complex and chromatin remodeling. PMID:25344398

  8. The Role of Transcription Factors at Antisense-Expressing Gene Pairs in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Thiemicke, Alexander; Hsu, Tiffany Y.; Brem, Rachel B.

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoded close to one another on the chromosome are often coexpressed, by a mechanism and regulatory logic that remain poorly understood. We surveyed the yeast genome for tandem gene pairs oriented tail-to-head at which expression antisense to the upstream gene was conserved across species. The intergenic region at most such tandem pairs is a bidirectional promoter, shared by the downstream gene mRNA and the upstream antisense transcript. Genomic analyses of these intergenic loci revealed distinctive patterns of transcription factor regulation. Mutation of a given transcription factor verified its role as a regulator in trans of tandem gene pair loci, including the proximally initiating upstream antisense transcript and downstream mRNA and the distally initiating upstream mRNA. To investigate cis-regulatory activity at such a locus, we focused on the stress-induced NAD(P)H dehydratase YKL151C and its downstream neighbor, the metabolic enzyme GPM1. Previous work has implicated the region between these genes in regulation of GPM1 expression; our mutation experiments established its function in rich medium as a repressor in cis of the distally initiating YKL151C sense RNA, and an activator of the proximally initiating YKL151C antisense RNA. Wild-type expression of all three transcripts required the transcription factor Gcr2. Thus, at this locus, the intergenic region serves as a focal point of regulatory input, driving antisense expression and mediating the coordinated regulation of YKL151C and GPM1. Together, our findings implicate transcription factors in the joint control of neighboring genes specialized to opposing conditions and the antisense transcripts expressed between them. PMID:27190003

  9. SiRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds induce RISC-mediated antisense strand selection and strong gene-silencing activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Takanori; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Takei, Yoshifumi; Mihara, Keichiro; Sato, Yuichiro; Seyama, Toshio

    2012-10-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds (Ar-siRNAs) at 5 Prime -sense strand were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ar-siRNAs increased resistance against nuclease degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ar-siRNAs were thermodynamically stable compared with the unmodified siRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High levels of cellular uptake and cytoplasmic localization were found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strong gene-silencing efficacy was exhibited in the Ar-siRNAs. -- Abstract: Short interference RNA (siRNA) is a powerful tool for suppressing gene expression in mammalian cells. In this study, we focused on the development of siRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds in order to improve the potency of RNAi and thus to overcome several problems with siRNAs, such as cellular delivery and nuclease stability. The siRNAs conjugated with phenyl, hydroxyphenyl, naphthyl, and pyrenyl derivatives showed strong resistance to nuclease degradation, and were thermodynamically stable compared with unmodified siRNA. A high level of membrane permeability in HeLa cells was also observed. Moreover, these siRNAs exhibited enhanced RNAi efficacy, which exceeded that of locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified siRNAs, against exogenous Renilla luciferase in HeLa cells. In particular, abundant cytoplasmic localization and strong gene-silencing efficacy were found in the siRNAs conjugated with phenyl and hydroxyphenyl derivatives. The novel siRNAs conjugated with aromatic compounds are promising candidates for a new generation of modified siRNAs that can solve many of the problems associated with RNAi technology.

  10. Bacterial production of conjugated linoleic and linolenic Acid in foods: a technological challenge.

    PubMed

    Gorissen, Lara; Leroy, Frédéric; De Vuyst, Luc; De Smet, Stefaan; Raes, Katleen

    2015-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA) isomers are present in foods derived from ruminants as a result of the respective linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (LNA) metabolism by ruminal microorganisms and in animals' tissues. CLA and CLNA have isomer-specific, health-promoting properties, including anticarcinogenic, antiatherogenic, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic activity, as well as the ability to reduce body fat. Besides ruminal microorganisms, such as Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, many food-grade bacteria, such as bifidobacteria, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), and propionibacteria, are able to convert LA and LNA to CLA and CLNA, respectively. Linoleate isomerase activity, responsible for this conversion, is strain-dependent and probably related to the ability of the producer strain to tolerate the toxic effects of LA and LNA. Since natural concentrations of CLA and CLNA in ruminal food products are relatively low to exert their health benefits, food-grade bacteria with linoleate isomerase activity could be used as starter or adjunct cultures to develop functional fermented dairy and meat products with increased levels of CLA and CLNA or included in fermented products as probiotic cultures. However, results obtained so far are below expectations due to technological bottlenecks. More research is needed to assess if bacterial production kinetics can be increased and can match food processing requirements. PMID:24915316

  11. Molecular detection of harmful algal blooms (HABs) using locked nucleic acids and bead array technology

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Mara R.; Jacobson, James W.; Goodwin, Kelly D.; Dunbar, Sherry A.; Fell, Jack W.

    2010-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are a serious public health risk in coastal waters. As the intensity and frequency of HABs continue to rise, new methods of detection are needed for reliable identification. Herein, we developed a high-throughput, multiplex, bead array technique for the detection of the dinoflagellates Karenia brevis and Karenia mikimotoi. The method combined the Luminex detection system with two novel technologies: locked nucleic acid–modified oligonucleotides (LNA) and Mirus Label IT® nucleic acid technology. To study the feasibility of the method, we evaluated the performance of modified and unmodified LNA probes with amplicon targets that were biotin labeled with two different strategies: direct chemical labeling (Mirus Label IT) versus enzymatic end-labeling (single biotinylated primer). The results illustrated that LNA probes hybridized to complementary single-stranded DNA with better affinity and displayed higher fluorescence intensities than unmodified oligonucleotide DNA probes. The latter effect was more pronounced when the assay was carried out at temperatures above 53°C degree. As opposed to the enzymatic 5′ terminal labeling technique, the chemical-labeling method enhanced the level of fluorescence by as much as ~83%. The detection limits of the assay, which were established with LNA probes and Mirus Label IT system, ranged from 0.05 to 46 copies of rRNA. This high-throughput method, which represents the first molecular detection strategy to integrate Luminex technology with LNA probes and Mirus Label IT, can be adapted for the detection of other HABs and is well suited for the monitoring of red tides at pre-blooming and blooming conditions. PMID:21165155

  12. Novel method for PIK3CA mutation analysis: locked nucleic acid--PCR sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ang, Daphne; O'Gara, Rebecca; Schilling, Amy; Beadling, Carol; Warrick, Andrea; Troxell, Megan L; Corless, Christopher L

    2013-05-01

    Somatic mutations in PIK3CA are commonly seen in invasive breast cancer and several other carcinomas, occurring in three hotspots: codons 542 and 545 of exon 9 and in codon 1047 of exon 20. We designed a locked nucleic acid (LNA)-PCR sequencing assay to detect low levels of mutant PIK3CA DNA with attention to avoiding amplification of a pseudogene on chromosome 22 that has >95% homology to exon 9 of PIK3CA. We tested 60 FFPE breast DNA samples with known PIK3CA mutation status (48 cases had one or more PIK3CA mutations, and 12 were wild type) as identified by PCR-mass spectrometry. PIK3CA exons 9 and 20 were amplified in the presence or absence of LNA-oligonucleotides designed to bind to the wild-type sequences for codons 542, 545, and 1047, and partially suppress their amplification. LNA-PCR sequencing confirmed all 51 PIK3CA mutations; however, the mutation detection rate by standard Sanger sequencing was only 69% (35 of 51). Of the 12 PIK3CA wild-type cases, LNA-PCR sequencing detected three additional H1047R mutations in "normal" breast tissue and one E545K in usual ductal hyperplasia. Histopathological review of these three normal breast specimens showed columnar cell change in two (both with known H1047R mutations) and apocrine metaplasia in one. The novel LNA-PCR shows higher sensitivity than standard Sanger sequencing and did not amplify the known pseudogene. PMID:23541593

  13. Functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II.

    PubMed

    Matos, Liliana; Gonçalves, Vânia; Pinto, Eugénia; Laranjeira, Francisco; Prata, Maria João; Jordan, Peter; Desviat, Lourdes R; Pérez, Belén; Alves, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis II is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the IDS gene, including exonic alterations associated with aberrant splicing. In the present work, cell-based splicing assays were performed to study the effects of two splicing mutations in exon 3 of IDS, i.e., c.241C>T and c.257C>T, whose presence activates a cryptic splice site in exon 3 and one in exon 8, i.e., c.1122C>T that despite being a synonymous mutation is responsible for the creation of a new splice site in exon 8 leading to a transcript shorter than usual. Mutant minigene analysis and overexpression assays revealed that SRSF2 and hnRNP E1 might be involved in the use and repression of the constitutive 3' splice site of exon 3 respectively. For the c.1122C>T the use of antisense therapy to correct the splicing defect was explored, but transfection of patient fibroblasts with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (n=3) and a locked nucleic acid failed to abolish the abnormal transcript; indeed, it resulted in the appearance of yet another aberrant splicing product. Interestingly, the oligonucleotides transfection in control fibroblasts led to the appearance of the aberrant transcript observed in patients' cells after treatment, which shows that the oligonucleotides are masking an important cis-acting element for 5' splice site regulation of exon 8. These results highlight the importance of functional studies for understanding the pathogenic consequences of mis-splicing and highlight the difficulty in developing antisense therapies involving gene regions under complex splicing regulation. PMID:26407519

  14. Translational Inhibition of CTX-M Extended Spectrum β-Lactamase in Clinical Strains of Escherichia coli by Synthetic Antisense Oligonucleotides Partially Restores Sensitivity to Cefotaxime.

    PubMed

    Readman, John B; Dickson, George; Coldham, Nick G

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic antisense oligomers are DNA mimics that can specifically inhibit gene expression at the translational level by ribosomal steric hindrance. They bind to their mRNA targets by Watson-Crick base pairing and are resistant to degradation by both nucleases and proteases. A 25-mer phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) and a 13-mer polyamide (peptide) nucleic acid (PNA) were designed to target mRNA (positions -4 to +21, and -17 to -5, respectively) close to the translational initiation site of the extended-spectrum β-lactamase resistance genes of CTX-M group 1. These antisense oligonucleotides were found to inhibit β-lactamase activity by up to 96% in a cell-free translation-transcription coupled system using an expression vector carrying a bla CTX-M-15 gene cloned from a clinical isolate. Despite evidence for up-regulation of CTX-M gene expression, they were both found to significantly restore sensitivity to cefotaxime (CTX) in E. coli AS19, an atypical cell wall permeable mutant, in a dose dependant manner (0-40 nM). The PMO and PNA were covalently bound to the cell penetrating peptide (CPP; (KFF)3K) and both significantly (P < 0.05) increased sensitivity to CTX in a dose dependent manner (0-40 nM) in field and clinical isolates harboring CTX-M group 1 β-lactamases. Antisense oligonucleotides targeted to the translational initiation site and Shine-Dalgarno region of bla CTX-M-15 inhibited gene expression, and when conjugated to a cell penetrating delivery vehicle, partially restored antibiotic sensitivity to both field and clinical isolates. PMID:27047482

  15. Novel non-viral gene delivery systems composed of carbosilane dendron functionalized nanoparticles prepared from nano-emulsions as non-viral carriers for antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Fornaguera, Cristina; Grijalvo, Santiago; Galán, Marta; Fuentes-Paniagua, Elena; de la Mata, Francisco Javier; Gómez, Rafael; Eritja, Ramon; Calderó, Gabriela; Solans, Conxita

    2015-01-15

    The development of novel and efficient delivery systems is often the limiting step in fields such as antisense therapies. In this context, poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles have been obtained by a versatile and simple technology based on nano-emulsion templating and low-energy emulsification methods, performed in mild conditions, providing good size control. O/W polymeric nano-emulsions were prepared by the phase inversion composition method at 25°C using the aqueous solution/polysorbate80/[4 wt% PLGA in ethyl acetate] system. Nano-emulsions formed at oil-to-surfactant (O/S) ratios between 10/90-90/10 and aqueous contents above 70 wt%. Nano-emulsion with 90 wt% of aqueous solution and O/S ratio of 70/30 was chosen for further studies, since they showed the appropriate characteristics to be used as nanoparticle template: hydrodynamic radii lower than 50 nm and enough kinetic stability. Nanoparticles, prepared from nano-emulsions by solvent evaporation, showed spherical shape, sizes about 40 nm, negative surface charges and high stability. The as-prepared nanoparticles were functionalized with carbosilane cationic dendrons through a carbodiimide-mediated reaction achieving positively charged surfaces. Antisense oligonucleotides were electrostatically attached to nanoparticles surface to perform gene-silencing studies. These complexes were non-haemolytic and non-cytotoxic at the concentrations required. The ability of the complexes to impart cellular uptake was also promising. Therefore, these novel nanoparticulate complexes might be considered as potential non-viral carriers in antisense therapy. PMID:25448573

  16. Translational Inhibition of CTX-M Extended Spectrum β-Lactamase in Clinical Strains of Escherichia coli by Synthetic Antisense Oligonucleotides Partially Restores Sensitivity to Cefotaxime

    PubMed Central

    Readman, John B.; Dickson, George; Coldham, Nick G.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic antisense oligomers are DNA mimics that can specifically inhibit gene expression at the translational level by ribosomal steric hindrance. They bind to their mRNA targets by Watson-Crick base pairing and are resistant to degradation by both nucleases and proteases. A 25-mer phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) and a 13-mer polyamide (peptide) nucleic acid (PNA) were designed to target mRNA (positions -4 to +21, and –17 to –5, respectively) close to the translational initiation site of the extended-spectrum β-lactamase resistance genes of CTX-M group 1. These antisense oligonucleotides were found to inhibit β-lactamase activity by up to 96% in a cell-free translation-transcription coupled system using an expression vector carrying a blaCTX-M-15 gene cloned from a clinical isolate. Despite evidence for up-regulation of CTX-M gene expression, they were both found to significantly restore sensitivity to cefotaxime (CTX) in E. coli AS19, an atypical cell wall permeable mutant, in a dose dependant manner (0-40 nM). The PMO and PNA were covalently bound to the cell penetrating peptide (CPP; (KFF)3K) and both significantly (P < 0.05) increased sensitivity to CTX in a dose dependent manner (0-40 nM) in field and clinical isolates harboring CTX-M group 1 β-lactamases. Antisense oligonucleotides targeted to the translational initiation site and Shine-Dalgarno region of blaCTX-M-15 inhibited gene expression, and when conjugated to a cell penetrating delivery vehicle, partially restored antibiotic sensitivity to both field and clinical isolates. PMID:27047482

  17. The zebrafish progranulin gene family and antisense transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Cadieux, Benoît; Chitramuthu, Babykumari P; Baranowski, David; Bennett, Hugh PJ

    2005-01-01

    Background Progranulin is an epithelial tissue growth factor (also known as proepithelin, acrogranin and PC-cell-derived growth factor) that has been implicated in development, wound healing and in the progression of many cancers. The single mammalian progranulin gene encodes a glycoprotein precursor consisting of seven and one half tandemly repeated non-identical copies of the cystine-rich granulin motif. A genome-wide duplication event hypothesized to have occurred at the base of the teleost radiation predicts that mammalian progranulin may be represented by two co-orthologues in zebrafish. Results The cDNAs encoding two zebrafish granulin precursors, progranulins-A and -B, were characterized and found to contain 10 and 9 copies of the granulin motif respectively. The cDNAs and genes encoding the two forms of granulin, progranulins-1 and -2, were also cloned and sequenced. Both latter peptides were found to be encoded by precursors with a simplified architecture consisting of one and one half copies of the granulin motif. A cDNA encoding a chimeric progranulin which likely arises through the mechanism of trans-splicing between grn1 and grn2 was also characterized. A non-coding RNA gene with antisense complementarity to both grn1 and grn2 was identified which may have functional implications with respect to gene dosage, as well as in restricting the formation of the chimeric form of progranulin. Chromosomal localization of the four progranulin (grn) genes reveals syntenic conservation for grna only, suggesting that it is the true orthologue of mammalian grn. RT-PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis of zebrafish grns during development reveals that combined expression of grna and grnb, but not grn1 and grn2, recapitulate many of the expression patterns observed for the murine counterpart. This includes maternal deposition, widespread central nervous system distribution and specific localization within the epithelial compartments of various organs

  18. Detection and quantification of genetically modified organisms using very short, locked nucleic acid TaqMan probes.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Sergio; D'Orso, Fabio; Morelli, Giorgio

    2008-06-25

    Many countries have introduced mandatory labeling requirements on foods derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based upon the TaqMan probe chemistry has become the method mostly used to support these regulations; moreover, event-specific PCR is the preferred method in GMO detection because of its high specificity based on the flanking sequence of the exogenous integrant. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of very short (eight-nucleotide long), locked nucleic acid (LNA) TaqMan probes in 5'-nuclease PCR assays for the detection and quantification of GMOs. Classic TaqMan and LNA TaqMan probes were compared for the analysis of the maize MON810 transgene. The performance of the two types of probes was tested on the maize endogenous reference gene hmga, the CaMV 35S promoter, and the hsp70/cryIA(b) construct as well as for the event-specific 5'-integration junction of MON810, using plasmids as standard reference molecules. The results of our study demonstrate that the LNA 5'-nuclease PCR assays represent a valid and reliable analytical system for the detection and quantification of transgenes. Application of very short LNA TaqMan probes to GMO quantification can simplify the design of 5'-nuclease assays. PMID:18494480

  19. Silencing of miR-21 by locked nucleic acid-lipid nanocapsule complexes sensitize human glioblastoma cells to radiation-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Griveau, A; Bejaud, J; Anthiya, S; Avril, S; Autret, D; Garcion, E

    2013-10-01

    The recent discovery of microRNA (miRNA) as major post-transcriptional repressors prompt the interest of developing novel approaches to target miRNA pathways to improve therapy. In this context, although the most significant barrier to their widespread clinical use remains delivery, nuclease-resistant locked nucleic acid (LNA) that bind specifically and irreversibly to miRNA represent interesting weapons. Thus, by focusing on oncongenic miR-21 miRNA, which participate to cancer cell resistance to apoptotic signals, the aim of the present study was to investigate the possibility of silencing miRNA by LNA conjugated to lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) as miRNA-targeted nanomedicines in U87MG glioblastoma (GBM) cells. After synthesis of an amphiphilic lipopeptide affine for nucleic acids, a post-insertion procedure during the LNC phase inversion formulation process allowed to construct peptide-conjugated LNCs. Peptide-conjugated LNCs were then incubated with LNAs to allow the formation of complexes characterized in gel retardation assays and by their physicochemical properties. U87MG cell treatment by LNA-LNC complexes resulted in a marked reduction of miR-21 expression as assessed by RTqPCR. In addition, exposure of U87MG cells to LNA-LNC complexes followed by external beam radiation demonstrated a significant improvement of cell sensitivity to treatment and emphasizes the interest to investigate further this miRNA-targeted strategy. PMID:23732394

  20. Comparative crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of locked nucleic acid and RNA stems of a tenascin C-binding aptamer

    SciTech Connect

    Förster, Charlotte; Brauer, Arnd B. E.; Brode, Svenja; Schmidt, Kathrin S.; Perbandt, Markus; Meyer, Arne

    2006-07-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) nucleotides are RNA analogues with a useful additional conformational constraint; the current investigation will provide the first crystallographic view of an all-LNA duplex. The pharmacokinetic properties of an aptamer against the tumour-marker protein tenascin-C have recently been successfully improved by the introduction of locked nucleic acids (LNAs) into the terminal stem of the aptamer. Since it is believed that this post-SELEX optimization is likely to provide a more general route to enhance the in vitro and in vivo stability of aptamers, elucidation of the structural basis of this improvement was embarked upon. Here, the crystallographic and X-ray diffraction data of the isolated aptamer stem encompassed in a six-base-pair duplex both with and without the LNA modification are presented. The obtained all-LNA crystals belong to space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 52.80, c = 62.83 Å; the all-RNA crystals belong to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 45.21, c = 186.97 Å, γ = 120.00°.

  1. Development of Antisense Therapeutic and Imaging Agents to Detect and Suppress Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) Expression in Acute Lung Injury (ALI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuefei

    This dissertation focuses on the development and investigation of antisense imaging and therapeutic agents, combined with nanotechnology, to detect and suppress inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression for the diagnosis and treatment of acute lung injury (ALI). To achieve this goal, several efforts were made. The first effort was the identification and characterization of high binding affinity antisense peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and shell-crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticle (SCK)-PNA conjugates to the iNOS mRNA. Antisense binding sites on the iNOS mRNA were first mapped by a procedure for rapidly generating a library of antisense accessible sites on native mRNAs (MASL) which involves reverse transcription of whole cell mRNA extracts with a random oligodeoxynucleotide primer followed by mRNA-specific PCR. Antisense PNAs against the antisense accessible sites were accordingly synthesized and characterized. The second effort was the investigation of cationic shell crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticle (cSCK)-mediated siRNA delivery to suppress iNOS expression for the treatment of ALI. siRNA with its unique gene-specific properties could serve as a promising therapeutic agent, however success in this area has been challenged by a lack of efficient biocompatible transfection agents. cSCK with its nanometer size and positive charge previously showed efficient cellular delivery of phosphorothioate ODNs (oligodeoxynucleotides), plasmid DNA and PNA. Herein, cSCK showed good siRNA binding and facilitated efficient siRNA transfection in HeLa, a mouse macrophage cell line and other human cell lines. cSCK led to greater silencing efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000 in HeLa cells as determined by the viability following transfection with cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic siRNAs, as well in 293T and HEK cells, and was comparable in BEAS-2B and MCF10a cells. The third effort was the preparation of an iNOS imaging probe through electrostatic complexation between a radiolabeled

  2. Sustained Release of Cx43 Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides from Coated Collagen Scaffolds Promotes Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin, Daniel J; Soon, Allyson; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Phillips, Anthony R J; Jayasinghe, Suwan N; Becker, David L

    2016-07-01

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeting the mRNA of the gap junction protein Cx43 promote tissue repair in a variety of different wounds. Delivery of the antisense drug has most often been achieved by a thermoreversible hydrogel, Pluronic F-127, which is very effective in the short term but does not allow for sustained delivery over several days. For chronic wounds that take a long time to heal, repeated dosing with the drug may be desirable but is not always compatible with conventional treatments such as the weekly changing of compression bandages on venous leg ulcers. Here the coating of collagen scaffolds with antisense oligonucleotides is investigated and a way to provide protection of the oligodeoxynucleotide drug is found in conjunction with sustained release over a 7 d period. This approach significantly reduces the normal foreign body reaction to the scaffold, which induces an increase of Cx43 protein and an inhibition of healing. As a result of the antisense integration into the scaffold, inflammation is reduced with the rate of wound healing and contracture is significantly improved. This coated scaffold approach may be very useful for treating venous leg ulcers and also for providing a sustained release of any other types of oligonucleotide drugs that are being developed. PMID:27253638

  3. Suppression of conditioned fear by administration of CCKB receptor antisense oligodeoxynucleotide into the lateral ventricle.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, T; Akiyoshi, J; Hikichi, T; Kiyota, A; Kohno, Y; Katsuragi, S; Yamamoto, Y; Isogawa, K; Nagayama, H

    2001-11-01

    We investigated the role of CCK in the development of anxiety by determining whether CCKB receptor antisense suppressed intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in vitro or suppressed conditioned fear stress in vivo. First, for the in vitro studies, we used rat pituitary tumor GH3 cells since these cells have CCKB receptors. GH3 cells were stimulated by 10 microM CCK-4; intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was measured. The CCKB receptor antisense at 1 or 10 microM reduced the subsequent response to 10 microM CCK-4 in a time-dependent manner. Second, for the in vivo studies, the CCKB receptor antisense, sense, random sense, or saline was infused at a constant rate for 6 days into rat lateral ventricles via mini-osmotic pumps. Individual rats were then subjected to 30 min of inescapable electric footshock in a chamber with a grid floor. Twenty-four hours later, the rat was again placed in the chamber and observed for 5 min without shocks. This study showed that CCKB receptor antisense significantly suppressed intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in GH3 cells and significantly reduced freezing behavior in rats, indicating that the CCKB receptor plays an important role in anxiety. PMID:11778143

  4. A competitive enzyme hybridization assay for plasma determination of phosphodiester and phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Deverre, J R; Boutet, V; Boquet, D; Ezan, E; Grassi, J; Grognet, J M

    1997-01-01

    An enzyme competitive hybridization assay was developed and validated for determination of mouse plasma concentrations of a 15mer antisense phosphodiester oligodeoxyribonucleotide and of two phosphorothioate analogs. Assays were performed in 96-well microtiter plates. The phosphodiester sense sequence was covalently bound to the microwells. The 5'-biotinylated antisense sequence was used as tracer. The principle of the assay involves competitive hybridization of tracer and antisense nucleotide to the solid phase-immobilized sense oligonucleotide. Solid phase- bound tracer oligonucleotide was assayed after reaction with a streptavidin-acetylcholinesterase conjugate, using the colorimetric method of Ellman. As in competitive enzyme immunoassays, coloration was inversely related to the amount of analyte initially present in the sample. The limit of quantification was 900 pM for phosphodiester antisense oligonucleotide using a 100 microl volume of plasma without extraction. Cross-reactivity was negligible after a four base deletion in either the 3'or 5'position. The assay was simple and sensitive, suitable for in vitro screening of oligonucleotide hybridization potency in biological fluids and for measuring the plasma pharmacokinetics of phosphorothioate and phosphodiester sequences. PMID:9278477

  5. Intragenic pausing and anti-sense transcription within the murine c-myc locus.

    PubMed Central

    Nepveu, A; Marcu, K B

    1986-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of strand-specific transcription in different regions of the murine c-myc locus. In normal and transformed cell lines, RNA polymerase II directed transcription occurs in the sense and anti-sense direction. Three noncontiguous regions show a high level of transcription in the anti-sense orientation: upstream of the first exon, within the first intron and in the 3' part of the gene (intron 2 and exon 3). In a cell line carrying a c-myc amplification (54c12), anti-sense transcription is not uniformly increased throughout the locus and is differentially affected by inhibition of protein synthesis. These results suggest that anti-sense transcription in various parts of the locus is independently regulated. In the sense orientation, transcriptional activity is higher in the first exon than in the rest of the gene indicating that transcription pauses near the 3' end of the first exon. The extent of this intragenic pausing varies among different cell lines and is most severe in cells with a c-myc amplification. Transcription initiation and pausing are both negatively regulated by labile proteins. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3024965

  6. An HIV-Encoded Antisense Long Noncoding RNA Epigenetically Regulates Viral Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Saayman, Sheena; Ackley, Amanda; Turner, Anne-Marie W; Famiglietti, Marylinda; Bosque, Alberto; Clemson, Matthew; Planelles, Vicente; Morris, Kevin V

    2014-01-01

    The abundance of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and their wide range of functional roles in human cells are fast becoming realized. Importantly, lncRNAs have been identified as epigenetic modulators and consequently play a pivotal role in the regulation of gene expression. A human immunodeficiency virus-encoded antisense RNA transcript has recently been reported and we sought to characterize this RNA and determine its potential role in viral transcription regulation. The intrinsic properties of this human immunodeficiency virus-expressed lncRNA were characterized and the data presented here suggest that it functions as an epigenetic brake to modulate viral transcription. Suppression of this long antisense transcript with small single-stranded antisense RNAs resulted in the activation of viral gene expression. This lncRNA was found to localize to the 5′ long-term repeats (LTR) and to usurp components of endogenous cellular pathways that are involved in lncRNA directed epigenetic gene silencing. Collectively, we find that this viral expressed antisense lncRNA is involved in modulating human immunodeficiency virus gene expression and that this regulatory effect is due to an alteration in the epigenetic landscape at the viral promoter. PMID:24576854

  7. Protein-coding cis-natural antisense transcripts have high and broad expression in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Shuhua; Lukens, Lewis

    2013-04-01

    Pairs of genes within eukaryotic genomes are often located on opposite DNA strands such that transcription generates cis-natural sense antisense transcripts (cis-NATs). This orientation of genes has been associated with the biogenesis of splice variants and natural antisense small RNAs. Here, in an analysis of currently available data, we report that within Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), protein-coding cis-NATs are also characterized by high abundance, high coexpression, and broad expression. Our results suggest that a permissive chromatin environment may have led to the proximity of these genes. Compared with other genes, cis-NAT-encoding genes have enriched low-nucleosome-density regions, high levels of histone H3 lysine-9 acetylation, and low levels of H3 lysine-27 trimethylation. Promoters associated with broadly expressed genes are preferentially found in the 5' regulatory sequences of cis-NAT-encoding genes. Our results further suggest that natural antisense small RNA production from cis-NATs is limited. Small RNAs sequenced from natural antisense small RNA biogenesis mutants including dcl1, dcl2, dcl3, and rdr6 map to cis-NATs as frequently as small RNAs sequenced from wild-type plants. Future work will investigate if the positive transcriptional regulation of overlapping protein-coding genes contributes to the prevalence of these genes within other eukaryotic genomes. PMID:23457227

  8. Comparison of the pharmacological profiles of murine antisense oligonucleotides targeting apolipoprotein B and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Lee, Richard G; Fu, Wuxia; Graham, Mark J; Mullick, Adam E; Sipe, Donna; Gattis, Danielle; Bell, Thomas A; Booten, Sheri; Crooke, Rosanne M

    2013-03-01

    Therapeutic agents that suppress apolipoprotein B (apoB) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) levels/activity are being developed in the clinic to benefit patients who are unable to reach target LDL-C levels with maximally tolerated lipid-lowering drugs. To compare and contrast the metabolic consequences of reducing these targets, murine-specific apoB or MTP antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) were administered to chow-fed and high fat-fed C57BL/6 or to chow-fed and Western diet-fed LDLr⁻/⁻ mice for periods ranging from 2 to 12 weeks, and detailed analyses of various factors affecting fatty acid metabolism were performed. Administration of these drugs significantly reduced target hepatic mRNA and protein, leading to similar reductions in hepatic VLDL/triglyceride secretion. MTP ASO treatment consistently led to increases in hepatic triglyceride accumulation and biomarkers of hepatotoxicity relative to apoB ASO due in part to enhanced expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ target genes and the inability to reduce hepatic fatty acid synthesis. Thus, although both drugs effectively lowered LDL-C levels in mice, the apoB ASO produced a more positive liver safety profile. PMID:23220583

  9. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition of a swelling-activated cation channel in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, R L; Kizer, N; Barry, E L; Friedman, P A; Hruska, K A

    1996-01-01

    By patch-clamp analysis, we have shown that chronic, intermittent mechanical strain (CMS) increases the activity of stretch-activated cation channels of osteoblast-like UMR-106.01 cells. CMS also produces a swelling-activated whole-cell conductance (Gm) regulated by varying strain levels. We questioned whether the swelling-activated conductance was produced by stretch-activated cation channel activity. We have identified a gene involved in the increase in conductance by using antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) derived from the alpha 1-subunit genes of calcium channels found in UMR-106.01 cells (alpha1S, alpha1C, and alpha1D). We demonstrate that alpha 1C antisense ODNs abolish the increase in Gm in response to hypotonic swelling following CMS. Antisense ODNs to alpha1S and alpha1D, sense ODNs to alpha1C, and sham permeabilization had no effect on the conductance increase. In addition, during cell-attached patch-clamp studies, antisense ODNs to alpha1c completely blocked the swelling-activated and stretch-activated nonselective cation channel response to strain. Antisense ODNs to alpha1S treatment produced no effect on either swelling-activated or stretch-activated cation channel activity. There were differences in the stretch-activated and swelling-activated cation channel activity, but whether they represent different channels could not be determined from our data. Our data indicate that the alpha1C gene product is involved in the Gm and the activation of the swelling-activated cation channels induced by CMS. The possibility that swelling-activated cation channel genes are members of the calcium channel superfamily exists, but if alpha1c is not the swelling-activated cation channel itself, then its expression is required for induction of swelling-activated cation channel activity by CMS. PMID:8700850

  10. Antisense treatment directed against mutated Ki-ras in human colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Andreyev, H; Ross, P; Cunningham, D; Clarke, P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Kirsten ras (Ki-ras) mutations are common in gastrointestinal cancer and one codon 12 mutation, glycine to valine, is particularly aggressive in colorectal cancer.
AIMS—To investigate if this valine point mutation could be targeted with antisense oligonucleotides and to determine the efficacy of any antisense/mRNA interaction.
METHODS—Twenty nine antisense oligonucleotides were screened against target and control Ki-ras RNA in a cell free system and against target and control cell lines in culture.
RESULTS—The activity and specificity of the oligonucleotides varied. Results for the individual oligonucleotides were consistent in a cell free model and in cell culture using two different uptake promoters. Only one oligonucleotide was specific in its cleavage of target Ki-ras mRNA in the cell free system and appeared specific in cell culture, although changes in Ki-ras mRNA and protein expression following a single treatment could not be detected. Experiments in the cell free system showed that the point mutation is relatively inaccessible to oligonucleotides. Other sites on the Ki-ras RNA molecule, away from the point mutation, can be targeted more effectively.
CONCLUSIONS—Successful targeting of the clinically relevant Ki-ras point mutation with antisense oligonucleotides is difficult because of RNA structure at the mutated site and is inefficient compared with other sites on the Ki-ras mRNA.


Keywords: Ki-ras mutation; antisense treatment; colorectal carcinoma PMID:11156646

  11. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition of a swelling-activated cation channel in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. L.; Kizer, N.; Barry, E. L.; Friedman, P. A.; Hruska, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    By patch-clamp analysis, we have shown that chronic, intermittent mechanical strain (CMS) increases the activity of stretch-activated cation channels of osteoblast-like UMR-106.01 cells. CMS also produces a swelling-activated whole-cell conductance (Gm) regulated by varying strain levels. We questioned whether the swelling-activated conductance was produced by stretch-activated cation channel activity. We have identified a gene involved in the increase in conductance by using antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) derived from the alpha 1-subunit genes of calcium channels found in UMR-106.01 cells (alpha1S, alpha1C, and alpha1D). We demonstrate that alpha 1C antisense ODNs abolish the increase in Gm in response to hypotonic swelling following CMS. Antisense ODNs to alpha1S and alpha1D, sense ODNs to alpha1C, and sham permeabilization had no effect on the conductance increase. In addition, during cell-attached patch-clamp studies, antisense ODNs to alpha1c completely blocked the swelling-activated and stretch-activated nonselective cation channel response to strain. Antisense ODNs to alpha1S treatment produced no effect on either swelling-activated or stretch-activated cation channel activity. There were differences in the stretch-activated and swelling-activated cation channel activity, but whether they represent different channels could not be determined from our data. Our data indicate that the alpha1C gene product is involved in the Gm and the activation of the swelling-activated cation channels induced by CMS. The possibility that swelling-activated cation channel genes are members of the calcium channel superfamily exists, but if alpha1c is not the swelling-activated cation channel itself, then its expression is required for induction of swelling-activated cation channel activity by CMS.

  12. Probable presence of an ubiquitous cryptic mitochondrial gene on the antisense strand of the cytochrome oxidase I gene

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mitochondria mediate most of the energy production that occurs in the majority of eukaryotic organisms. These subcellular organelles contain a genome that differs from the nuclear genome and is referred to as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Despite a disparity in gene content, all mtDNAs encode at least two components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, including cytochrome c oxidase I (Cox1). Presentation of the hypothesis A positionally conserved ORF has been found on the complementary strand of the cox1 genes of both eukaryotic mitochondria (protist, plant, fungal and animal) and alpha-proteobacteria. This putative gene has been named gau for gene antisense ubiquitous in mtDNAs. The length of the deduced protein is approximately 100 amino acids. In vertebrates, several stop codons have been found in the mt gau region, and potentially functional gau regions have been found in nuclear genomes. However, a recent bioinformatics study showed that several hypothetical overlapping mt genes could be predicted, including gau; this involves the possible import of the cytosolic AGR tRNA into the mitochondria and/or the expression of mt antisense tRNAs with anticodons recognizing AGR codons according to an alternative genetic code that is induced by the presence of suppressor tRNAs. Despite an evolutionary distance of at least 1.5 to 2.0 billion years, the deduced Gau proteins share some conserved amino acid signatures and structure, which suggests a possible conserved function. Moreover, BLAST analysis identified rare, sense-oriented ESTs with poly(A) tails that include the entire gau region. Immunohistochemical analyses using an anti-Gau monoclonal antibody revealed strict co-localization of Gau proteins and a mitochondrial marker. Testing the hypothesis This hypothesis could be tested by purifying the gau gene product and determining its sequence. Cell biological experiments are needed to determine the physiological role of this protein. Implications of

  13. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition as a potent diagnostic tool for gene function in plant biology

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Christer; Sun, Chuanxin; Ghebramedhin, Haile; Hoglund, Anna-Stina; Jansson, Christer

    2008-01-15

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) inhibition emerges as an effective means for probing gene function in plant cells. Employing this method we have established the importance of the SUSIBA2 transcription factor for regulation of starch synthesis in barley endosperm, and arrived at a model for the role of the SUSIBAs in sugar signaling and source-sink commutation during cereal endosperm development. In this addendum we provide additional data demonstrating the suitability of the antisense ODN technology in studies on starch branching enzyme activities in barley leaves. We also comment on the mechanism for ODN uptake in plant cells. Antisense ODNs are short (12-25 nt-long) stretches of single-stranded ODNs that hybridize to the cognate mRNA in a sequence-specific manner, thereby inhibiting gene expression. They are naturally occurring in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes where they partake in gene regulation and defense against viral infection. The mechanisms for antisense ODN inhibition are not fully understood but it is generally considered that the ODN either sterically interferes with translation or promotes transcript degradation by RNase H activation. The earliest indication of the usefulness of antisense ODN technology for the purposes of molecular biology and medical therapy was the demonstration in 1978 that synthetic ODNs complementary to Raos sarcoma virus could inhibit virus replication in tissue cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts. Since then the antisense ODN technology has been widely used in animal sciences and as an important emerging therapeutic approach in clinical medicine. However, antisense ODN inhibition has been an under-exploited strategy for plant tissues, although the prospects for plant cells in suspension cultures to take up single-stranded ODNs was reported over a decade ago. In 2001, two reports from Malho and coworker demonstrated the use of cationic-complexed antisense ODNs to suppress expression of genes encoding pollen

  14. Reversal of phenotypes in MECP2 duplication mice using genetic rescue or antisense oligos

    PubMed Central

    Sztainberg, Yehezkel; Chen, Hong-mei; Swann, John W.; Hao, Shuang; Tang, Bin; Wu, Zhenyu; Tang, Jianrong; Wan, Ying-Wooi; Liu, Zhandong; Rigo, Frank; Zoghbi, Huda Y.

    2015-01-01

    Copy number variations have been frequently associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability, and autism spectrum disorders1. MECP2 duplication syndrome is one of the most common genomic rearrangements in males2 and is characterized by autism, intellectual disability, motor dysfunction, anxiety, epilepsy, recurrent respiratory tract infections, and early death3–5. The broad range of deficits caused by methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) overexpression poses a daunting challenge to traditional biochemical pathway-based therapeutic approaches. Accordingly, we sought strategies that directly target MeCP2 and are amenable to translation into clinical therapy. The first question, however, was whether the neurological dysfunction is reversible after symptoms set in. Reversal of phenotypes in adult symptomatic mice has been demonstrated in some models of monogenic loss-of-function neurological disorders6–8, including loss of MeCP2 in Rett syndrome9, indicating that, at least in some cases, the neuroanatomy may remain sufficiently intact so that correction of the molecular dysfunction underlying these disorders can restore healthy physiology. Given the absence of neurodegeneration in MECP2 duplication syndrome, we hypothesized that restoration of normal MeCP2 levels in MECP2 duplication adult mice would rescue their phenotype. Therefore, we first generated and characterized a conditional Mecp2-overexpressing mouse model and showed that correction of MeCP2 levels largely reversed the behavioral, molecular, and electrophysiological deficits. Next, we sought a translational strategy to reduce MeCP2 and turned to antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). ASOs are small modified nucleic acids that can selectively hybridize with mRNA transcribed from a target gene and silence it10,11, and have been successfully used to correct deficits in different mouse models12–18. We found that ASO treatment induced a broad phenotypic rescue in adult symptomatic transgenic MECP2

  15. Unravelling the Secrets of Mycobacterial Cidality through the Lens of Antisense

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Santanu; Shandil, Radha Krishan; Kumar, Naveen; Robert, Nanduri; Sokhi, Upneet K.; Guptha, Supreeth; Narayanan, Shridhar; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    One of the major impediments in anti-tubercular drug discovery is the lack of a robust grammar that governs the in-vitro to the in-vivo translation of efficacy. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is capable of growing both extracellular as well as intracellular; encountering various hostile conditions like acidic milieu, free radicals, starvation, oxygen deprivation, and immune effector mechanisms. Unique survival strategies of Mtb have prompted researchers to develop in-vitro equivalents to simulate in-vivo physiologies and exploited to find efficacious inhibitors against various phenotypes. Conventionally, the inhibitors are screened on Mtb under the conditions that are unrelated to the in-vivo disease environments. The present study was aimed to (1). Investigate cidality of Mtb targets using a non-chemical inhibitor antisense-RNA (AS-RNA) under in-vivo simulated in-vitro conditions.(2). Confirm the cidality of the targets under in-vivo in experimental tuberculosis. (3). Correlate in-vitro vs. in-vivo cidality data to identify the in-vitro condition that best predicts in-vivo cidality potential of the targets. Using cidality as a metric for efficacy, and AS-RNA as a target-specific inhibitor, we delineated the cidality potential of five target genes under six different physiological conditions (replicating, hypoxia, low pH, nutrient starvation, nitrogen depletion, and nitric oxide).In-vitro cidality confirmed in experimental tuberculosis in BALB/c mice using the AS-RNA allowed us to identify cidal targets in the rank order of rpoB>aroK>ppk>rpoC>ilvB. RpoB was used as the cidality control. In-vitro and in-vivo studies feature aroK (encoding shikimate kinase) as an in-vivo mycobactericidal target suitable for anti-TB drug discovery. In-vitro to in-vivo cidality correlations suggested the low pH (R = 0.9856) in-vitro model as best predictor of in-vivo cidality; however, similar correlation studies in pathologically relevant (Kramnik) mice are warranted. In the acute

  16. Modification of tobacco plant development by sense and antisense expression of the tomato viroid-induced AGC VIIIa protein kinase PKV suggests involvement in gibberellin signaling

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The serine-threonine protein kinase gene, designated pkv (protein kinase- viroid induced) was previously found to be transcriptionally activated in tomato plants infected with the plant pathogen Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd). These plants exhibited symptoms of stunting, and abnormal development of leaf, root, and vascular tissues. The encoded protein, PKV, is a novel member of the AGC VIIIa group of signal-transducing protein kinases; however, the role of PKV in plant development is unknown. In this communication, we report the phenotypic results of over expression and silencing of pkv in transgenic tobacco. Results Over expression of pkv in Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi (tobacco) resulted in stunting, reduced root formation, and delay in flowering, phenotypes similar to symptoms of PSTVd infection of tomato. In addition, homozygous T2 tobacco plants over expressing PKV were male sterile. Antisense expression of pkv, on the other hand, resulted in plants that were taller than non-transformed plants, produced an increased number of flowers, and were fertile. Exogenous application of GA3 stimulated stem elongation in the stunted, sense-expressing plants. PKV sense and antisense expression altered transcript levels of GA biosynthetic genes and genes involved in developmental and signaling pathways, but not genes involved in salicylic acid- or jasmonic acid-dependent pathways. Our data provide evidence suggesting that PKV plays an important role in a GA signaling pathway that controls plant height and fertility. Conclusion We have found that the over expression of the tomato protein kinase PKV resulted in stunting, modified vascular tissue development, reduced root formation, and male sterility in tobacco, and we propose that PKV regulates plant development by functioning in critical signaling pathways involved in gibberellic acid metabolism. PMID:19689802

  17. Regulation of the NPT gene by a naturally occurring antisense transcript.

    PubMed

    Werner, Andreas; Preston-Fayers, Keziah; Dehmelt, Leif; Nalbant, Perihan

    2002-01-01

    The epithelial Na/Pi cotransporter (NaPi-II) is instrumental in maintaining phosphate (Pi) homeostasis in vertebrates. Hormones and metabolic factors (PTH, Pi availability) that acutely influence renal Pi excretion have been demonstrated to target NaPi-II expression. Upon stimulation, newly synthesized transporter molecules become integrated into the brush-border membrane to increase the Vmax of Pi uptake; reduction of Pi reabsorption is achieved by endocytosis of NaPi-II followed by lysosomal degradation of the protein. The long-term regulation of the protein is less well studied. Only recently, regulatory elements for vitamin D3 and Pi have been identified in the promoter region of the npt gene. However, signaling pathways leading to the activation of these regulatory sequences need to be established. Other reports suggested messenger RNA stability to play a role in the medium range regulation of NaPi-II expression. Recent findings in our laboratory added to the complex picture of npt gene regulation. We have identified npt-related endogenous antisense transcripts from mouse, zebrafish, and winter flounder. The two fish transcripts have been cloned and characterized; the mouse homolog has only very recently been detected. The transcripts are devoid of an open reading frame and appear in different splice forms. The evolutionary conservation of bidirectional transcription of the npt gene implies a regulatory function for the antisense transcript. In order to test the functional consequences of bidirectional transcription, we coexpressed sense and the antisense transcripts from zebrafish in Xenopus oocytes. Pi transport activity was reduced as a result of the presence of antisense RNA. Re-extraction of the RNA from injected oocytes followed by Northern blot revealed that the coexpression had no significant effect on the stability of either transcript. We concluded that the antisense mRNA interfered with the translation of the transporter if coexpressed in the

  18. Strand-specific community RNA-seq reveals prevalent and dynamic antisense transcription in human gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Guanhui; Wang, Mingjie; Doak, Thomas G.; Ye, Yuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomics and other meta-omics approaches (including metatranscriptomics) provide insights into the composition and function of microbial communities living in different environments or animal hosts. Metatranscriptomics research provides an unprecedented opportunity to examine gene regulation for many microbial species simultaneously, and more importantly, for the majority that are unculturable microbial species, in their natural environments (or hosts). Current analyses of metatranscriptomic datasets focus on the detection of gene expression levels and the study of the relationship between changes of gene expression and changes of environment. As a demonstration of utilizing metatranscriptomics beyond these common analyses, we developed a computational and statistical procedure to analyze the antisense transcripts in strand-specific metatranscriptomic datasets. Antisense RNAs encoded on the DNA strand opposite a gene’s CDS have the potential to form extensive base-pairing interactions with the corresponding sense RNA, and can have important regulatory functions. Most studies of antisense RNAs in bacteria are rather recent, are mostly based on transcriptome analysis, and have been applied mainly to single bacterial species. Application of our approaches to human gut-associated metatranscriptomic datasets allowed us to survey antisense transcription for a large number of bacterial species associated with human beings. The ratio of protein coding genes with antisense transcription ranges from 0 to 35.8% (median = 10.0%) among 47 species. Our results show that antisense transcription is dynamic, varying between human individuals. Functional enrichment analysis revealed a preference of certain gene functions for antisense transcription, and transposase genes are among the most prominent ones (but we also observed antisense transcription in bacterial house-keeping genes). PMID:26388849

  19. PU.1 antisense lncRNA against its mRNA translation promotes adipogenesis in porcine preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Wei, N; Wang, Y; Xu, R-X; Wang, G-Q; Xiong, Y; Yu, T-Y; Yang, G-S; Pang, W-J

    2015-04-01

    Antisense long non-coding RNAs (AS lncRNAs) play important roles in refined regulation of animal gene expression. However, their functions and molecular mechanisms for domestic animal adipogenesis are largely unknown. Here, we found a novel AS lncRNA transcribed from the porcine PU.1 gene (also known as SPI1) by strand-specific RT-PCR. Results showed that PU.1 AS lncRNA was expressed and generally lower than the level of PU.1 mRNA in porcine subcutaneous adipose, heart, liver, spleen, lympha, skeletal muscle and kidney tissues. We further found that the levels of PU.1 mRNA and PU.1 protein were significantly lower in subcutaneous and intermuscular adipose than in mesenteric and greater omentum adipose, whereas the levels of PU.1 AS lncRNA showed no difference in porcine adipose tissues from four different parts of the body. During porcine adipogenesis, levels of PU.1 mRNA increased at day 2 and then gradually decreased. Meanwhile, PU.1 AS lncRNA exhibited an expression trend similar to PU.1 mRNA but sharply decreased after day 2. Interestingly, PU.1 protein level rose during differentiation. In addition, at day 6 after differentiation, knockdown of endogenous PU.1 promoted adipogenesis, whereas knockdown of endogenous PU.1 AS lncRNA had the opposite effect. Moreover, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) and fatty acid synthase (FASN) were significantly upregulated in the PU.1 shRNA treatment group (P < 0.05), whereas they were downregulated in the PU.1 AS shRNA treatment group (P < 0.05). Adipose triglyceride lipase [ATGL; also known as patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 2 (PNPLA2)] and hormone-sensitive lipase [HSL; also known as lipase, hormone-sensitive (LIPE)] contrasted with PPARG and FASN. Finally, the PU.1 mRNA/PU.1 AS lncRNA duplex was detected by an endogenous ribonuclease protection assay combined with RT-PCR. Based on the above results, we suggest that PU.1 AS lncRNA (vs. its mRNA translation) promotes adipogenesis through

  20. Therapeutic correction of ApoER2 splicing in Alzheimer's disease mice using antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hinrich, Anthony J; Jodelka, Francine M; Chang, Jennifer L; Brutman, Daniella; Bruno, Angela M; Briggs, Clark A; James, Bryan D; Stutzmann, Grace E; Bennett, David A; Miller, Steven A; Rigo, Frank; Marr, Robert A; Hastings, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoER2) is an apolipoprotein E receptor involved in long-term potentiation, learning, and memory. Given its role in cognition and its association with the Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk gene, apoE, ApoER2 has been proposed to be involved in AD, though a role for the receptor in the disease is not clear. ApoER2 signaling requires amino acids encoded by alternatively spliced exon 19. Here, we report that the balance of ApoER2 exon 19 splicing is deregulated in postmortem brain tissue from AD patients and in a transgenic mouse model of AD To test the role of deregulated ApoER2 splicing in AD, we designed an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) that increases exon 19 splicing. Treatment of AD mice with a single dose of ASO corrected ApoER2 splicing for up to 6 months and improved synaptic function and learning and memory. These results reveal an association between ApoER2 isoform expression and AD, and provide preclinical evidence for the utility of ASOs as a therapeutic approach to mitigate Alzheimer's disease symptoms by improving ApoER2 exon 19 splicing. PMID:26902204

  1. A new antisense tRNA construct for the genetic treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Biasolo, M A; Radaelli, A; Del Pup, L; Franchin, E; De Giuli-Morghen, C; Palu, G

    1996-01-01

    Different strategies proposed in the literature to attempt gene therapy of AIDS are based mainly on the intracellular production of RNA and protein therapeutics. This report describes the construction and the anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity of a new type of antisense tRNA directed against a nucleotide region in the first coding exon of HIV-1 tat (nucleotides 5924 to 5943; Los Alamos data bank) which is conserved among many HIV-1 clones. The anti-tat antisense sequence was inserted into a tRNA(Pro) backbone by replacement of the anticodon loop, without altering the tRNA canonic tetraloop structure. The antisense tRNA was able to interact effectively with its target in vitro. Jurkat cells that constitutively expressed the anti-tat tRNA following retroviral vector transduction exhibited significant resistance to HIV-1 de novo infection. Resistance seemed to correlate with the level of antisense expression. This is the first time that such a tRNA antisense strategy has been shown to be effective as a genetic treatment of HIV-1 infection in tissue culture. The construct design proposed in this report has some intrinsic advantages: the transcript is driven by a polymerase III promoter, the short length of the RNA minimizes effects of intramolecular base pairing that may impair target recognition, and the antisense RNA has the stability and intracellular fate of a native tRNA molecule. PMID:8642637

  2. Chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of the developmental switch gene eud-1 control predatory feeding plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Serobyan, Vahan; Xiao, Hua; Namdeo, Suryesh; Rödelsperger, Christian; Sieriebriennikov, Bogdan; Witte, Hanh; Röseler, Waltraud; Sommer, Ralf J.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been suggested to act through developmental switches, but little is known about associated molecular mechanisms. In the nematode Pristionchus pacificus, the sulfatase eud-1 was identified as part of a developmental switch controlling mouth-form plasticity governing a predatory versus bacteriovorous mouth-form decision. Here we show that mutations in the conserved histone-acetyltransferase Ppa-lsy-12 and the methyl-binding-protein Ppa-mbd-2 mimic the eud-1 phenotype, resulting in the absence of one mouth-form. Mutations in both genes cause histone modification defects and reduced eud-1 expression. Surprisingly, Ppa-lsy-12 mutants also result in the down-regulation of an antisense-eud-1 RNA. eud-1 and antisense-eud-1 are co-expressed and further experiments suggest that antisense-eud-1 acts through eud-1 itself. Indeed, overexpression of the antisense-eud-1 RNA increases the eud-1-sensitive mouth-form and extends eud-1 expression. In contrast, this effect is absent in eud-1 mutants indicating that antisense-eud-1 positively regulates eud-1. Thus, chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of eud-1 control feeding plasticity in Pristionchus. PMID:27487725

  3. Chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of the developmental switch gene eud-1 control predatory feeding plasticity.

    PubMed

    Serobyan, Vahan; Xiao, Hua; Namdeo, Suryesh; Rödelsperger, Christian; Sieriebriennikov, Bogdan; Witte, Hanh; Röseler, Waltraud; Sommer, Ralf J

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been suggested to act through developmental switches, but little is known about associated molecular mechanisms. In the nematode Pristionchus pacificus, the sulfatase eud-1 was identified as part of a developmental switch controlling mouth-form plasticity governing a predatory versus bacteriovorous mouth-form decision. Here we show that mutations in the conserved histone-acetyltransferase Ppa-lsy-12 and the methyl-binding-protein Ppa-mbd-2 mimic the eud-1 phenotype, resulting in the absence of one mouth-form. Mutations in both genes cause histone modification defects and reduced eud-1 expression. Surprisingly, Ppa-lsy-12 mutants also result in the down-regulation of an antisense-eud-1 RNA. eud-1 and antisense-eud-1 are co-expressed and further experiments suggest that antisense-eud-1 acts through eud-1 itself. Indeed, overexpression of the antisense-eud-1 RNA increases the eud-1-sensitive mouth-form and extends eud-1 expression. In contrast, this effect is absent in eud-1 mutants indicating that antisense-eud-1 positively regulates eud-1. Thus, chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of eud-1 control feeding plasticity in Pristionchus. PMID:27487725

  4. NOX2 Antisense Attenuates Hypoxia-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in Cardiomyocyte

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bo; Meng, Fanbo; Yang, Yushuang; Liu, Dongna; Shi, Kaiyao

    2016-01-01

    Heart ischemia is a hypoxia related disease. NOX2 and HIF-1α proteins were increased in cardiomyocytes after acute myocardial infarction. However, the relationship of the hypoxia-induced HIF-1α. NOX2-derived oxidative stress and apoptosis in cardiomyocyte remains unclear. In the current study, we use NOX2 antisense strategy to investigate the role of NOX2 in hypoxia-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in rat cardiomyocytes. Here, we show that transduction of ADV-NOX2-AS induces potent silencing of NOX2 in cardiomyocytes, and resulting in attenuation of hypoxia-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. This study indicates the potential of antisense-based therapies and validates NOX2 as a potent therapeutic candidate for heart ischemia. PMID:27499697

  5. Comparative hybrid arrest by tandem antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides or oligodeoxyribonucleoside methylphosphonates in a cell-free system.

    PubMed Central

    Maher, L J; Dolnick, B J

    1988-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides containing either anionic diester or neutral methylphosphonate internucleoside linkages were prepared by automated synthesis, and were compared for their ability to arrest translation of human dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) mRNA in a nuclease treated rabbit reticulocyte lysate. In the case of oligodeoxyribonucleotides, tandem targeting of three 14-mers resulted in synergistic and complete selective inhibition of DHFR synthesis at a total oligomer concentration of 25 microM. Hybrid arrest by three or six tandem oligodeoxyribonucleoside methylphosphonates was dramatically less effective. This difference does not result from preferential recognition of hybrids involving oligodeoxyribonucleotides by endogenous RNaseH activity. A ribonuclease protection assay demonstrated that antisense oligodeoxyribonucleoside methylphosphonates bind selectively to target RNA sequences, but with 275 fold lower affinity than the corresponding oligodeoxyribonucleotides. This low binding affinity results in poor arrest of translation, and may be related to the stereochemistry of the methylphosphonate linkage. Images PMID:2836793

  6. An Xist-activating antisense RNA required for X-chromosome inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Mrinal K.; Gayen, Srimonta; Kumar, Surinder; Maclary, Emily; Buttigieg, Emily; Hinten, Michael; Kumari, Archana; Harris, Clair; Sado, Takashi; Kalantry, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptional imbalance due to the difference in the number of X chromosomes between male and female mammals is remedied through X-chromosome inactivation, the epigenetic transcriptional silencing of one of the two X chromosomes in females. The X-linked Xist long non-coding RNA functions as an X inactivation master regulator; Xist is selectively upregulated from the prospective inactive X chromosome and is required in cis for X inactivation. Here we discover an Xist antisense long non-coding RNA, XistAR (Xist Activating RNA), which is encoded within exon 1 of the mouse Xist gene and is transcribed only from the inactive X chromosome. Selective truncation of XistAR, while sparing the overlapping Xist RNA, leads to a deficiency in Xist RNA expression in cis during the initiation of X inactivation. Thus, the Xist gene carries within its coding sequence an antisense RNA that drives Xist expression. PMID:26477563

  7. Histidylated oligolysines increase the transmembrane passage and the biological activity of antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Pichon, Chantal; Roufaï, Mahajoub Bello; Monsigny, Michel; Midoux, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    We have designed histidylated oligolysines which increase the uptake, the cytosolic delivery and the nuclear accumulation of antisense oligonucleotides (ODN). Flow cytometry analysis showed a 10-fold enhancement of the ODN uptake in the presence of histidylated oligolysines. The intracellular localizations of fluorescein-labeled ODN and of rhodamine-labeled histidylated oligolysines were investigated by confocal microscopy. Histidylated oligolysines favor the cytosolic delivery of ODN from endosomes and increase their nuclear accumulation. In contrast, in their absence fluorescent ODN were not observed inside the nucleus but were distributed overwhelmingly within the vesicles in the cytosol. In addition, histidylated oligolysines yielded a more than 20-fold enhancement of the biological activity of antisense ODN towards the inhibition of transient as well as constitutive gene expression. Prevention of endosome lumen acidification using bafilomycin A1 abolished the effect of histidylated oligolysines, suggesting that protonation of the histidyl residues was involved in the transmembrane passage of ODN. PMID:10606649

  8. Mining SAGE data allows large-scale, sensitive screening of antisense transcript expression.

    PubMed

    Quéré, Ronan; Manchon, Laurent; Lejeune, Mireille; Clément, Oliver; Pierrat, Fabien; Bonafoux, Béatrice; Commes, Thérèse; Piquemal, David; Marti, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    As a growing number of complementary transcripts, susceptible to exert various regulatory functions, are being found in eukaryotes, high throughput analytical methods are needed to investigate their expression in multiple biological samples. Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), based on the enumeration of directionally reliable short cDNA sequences (tags), is capable of revealing antisense transcripts. We initially detected them by observing tags that mapped on to the reverse complement of known mRNAs. The presence of such tags in individual SAGE libraries suggested that SAGE datasets contain latent information on antisense transcripts. We raised a collection of virtual tags for mining these data. Tag pairs were assembled by searching for complementarities between 24-nt long sequences centered on the potential SAGE-anchoring sites of well-annotated human expressed sequences. An analysis of their presence in a large collection of published SAGE libraries revealed transcripts expressed at high levels from both strands of two adjacent, oppositely oriented, transcription units. In other cases, the respective transcripts of such cis-oriented genes displayed a mutually exclusive expression pattern or were co-expressed in a small number of libraries. Other tag pairs revealed overlapping transcripts of trans-encoded unique genes. Finally, we isolated a group of tags shared by multiple transcripts. Most of them mapped on to retroelements, essentially represented in humans by Alu sequences inserted in opposite orientations in the 3'UTR of otherwise different mRNAs. Registering these tags in separate files makes possible computational searches focused on unique sense-antisense pairs. The method developed in the present work shows that SAGE datasets constitute a major resource of rapidly investigating with high sensitivity the expression of antisense transcripts, so that a single tag may be detected in one library when screening a large number of biological samples. PMID

  9. Transferrin Receptor-Targeted Lipid Nanoparticles for Delivery of an Antisense Oligodeoxyribonucleotide against Bcl-2

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojuan; Koh, Chee Guan; Liu, Shujun; Pan, Xiaogang; Santhanam, Ramasamy; Yu, Bo; Peng, Yong; Pang, Jiuxia; Golan, Sharon; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Jin, Yan; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Byrd, John C.; Chan, Kenneth K.; Lee, L. James; Marcucci, Guido; Lee, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotide G3139-mediated down-regulation of Bcl-2 is a potential strategy for overcoming chemoresistance in leukemia. However, the limited efficacy shown in recent clinical trials calls attention to the need for further development of novel and more efficient delivery systems. In order to address this issue, transferrin receptor (TfR)-targeted, protamine-containing lipid nanoparticles (Tf-LNs) were synthesized as delivery vehicles for G3139. The LNs were produced by an ethanol dilution method and lipid-conjugated Tf ligand was then incorporated by a post-insertion method. The resulting Tf-LNs had a mean particle diameter of ~ 90 nm and G3139 loading efficiency of 90.4%. Antisense delivery efficiency of Tf-LNs was evaluated in K562, MV4-11 and Raji leukemia cell lines. The results showed that Tf-LNs were more effective than non-targeted LNs and free G3139 (p <0.05) in decreasing Bcl-2 expression (by up to 62% at the mRNA level in K562 cells) and in inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis. In addition, Bcl-2 down-regulation and apoptosis induced by Tf-LN G3139 were shown to be blocked by excess free Tf and thus were TfR-dependent. Cell lines with higher TfR expression also showed greater Bcl-2 down-regulation. Furthermore, upregulation of TfR expression in leukemia cells by iron chelator deferoxamine resulted in a further increase in antisense effect (up to 79% Bcl-2 reduction in K562 at the mRNA level) and in caspase-dependent apoptosis (by ~ 3-fold) by Tf-LN. Tf-LN mediated delivery combined with TfR up-regulation by deferoxamine appears to be a potentially promising strategy for enhancing the delivery efficiency and therapeutic efficacy of antisense oligonucleotides. PMID:19183107

  10. Optimal antisense target reducing INS intron 1 retention is adjacent to a parallel G quadruplex

    PubMed Central

    Kralovicova, Jana; Lages, Ana; Patel, Alpa; Dhir, Ashish; Buratti, Emanuele; Searle, Mark; Vorechovsky, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) have been widely used to inhibit exon usage but antisense strategies that promote removal of entire introns to increase splicing-mediated gene expression have not been developed. Here we show reduction of INS intron 1 retention by SSOs that bind transcripts derived from a human haplotype expressing low levels of proinsulin. This haplotype is tagged by a polypyrimidine tract variant rs689 that decreases the efficiency of intron 1 splicing and increases the relative abundance of mRNAs with extended 5' untranslated region (5' UTR), which curtails translation. Co-expression of haplotype-specific reporter constructs with SSOs bound to splicing regulatory motifs and decoy splice sites in primary transcripts revealed a motif that significantly reduced intron 1-containing mRNAs. Using an antisense microwalk at a single nucleotide resolution, the optimal target was mapped to a splicing silencer containing two pseudoacceptor sites sandwiched between predicted RNA guanine (G) quadruplex structures. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance of synthetic G-rich oligoribonucleotide tracts derived from this region showed formation of a stable parallel 2-quartet G-quadruplex on the 3' side of the antisense retention target and an equilibrium between quadruplexes and stable hairpin-loop structures bound by optimal SSOs. This region interacts with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins F and H that may interfere with conformational transitions involving the antisense target. The SSO-assisted promotion of weak intron removal from the 5' UTR through competing noncanonical and canonical RNA structures may facilitate development of novel strategies to enhance gene expression. PMID:24944197

  11. Ultrasound-targeted antisense oligonucleotide attenuates ischemia/reperfusion-induced myocardial tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Erikson, John M; Freeman, Gregory L; Chandrasekar, Bysani

    2003-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are now emerging as effective vehicles for delivering therapeutic agents to target tissues. In the present study, we used ultrasound-targeted, contrast-bound antisense oligonucleotides to inhibit the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), a proinflammatory cytokine with negative inotropic effects. We compared the efficacy of left ventricular vs. intravenous administration and determined the optimal time for delivery. WKY rats were treated with perfluorocarbon-exposed sonicated dextrose albumin (PESDA) microspheres incubated with 100 microg of antisense oligonucleotide directed against TNF-alpha. Contrast was infused into either the superior vena cava or the left ventricular cavity along with simultaneous application of ultrasound. Twenty-four hours later, the animals underwent 15 min of ischemia and 2 h reperfusion. Control animals underwent sham operation only, ischemia/reperfusion only, or received PESDA only. A second group received treatment just prior to, or immediately after the onset of ischemia. At the end of the experimental period, hearts were removed and analyzed for TNF-alpha by northern and western blotting. While no TNF-alpha expression was detected in sham-operated animals, robust expression of TNF-alpha mRNA and protein was seen in controls treated with ultrasound and PESDA alone. In contrast, intravenous or left ventricular administration of antisense oligonucleotides significantly inhibited ischemia/reperfusion-induced TNF-alpha expression. Direct delivery into the left ventricular cavity was more effective than intravenous administration, and delivery just prior to ischemia was most effective in attenuating TNF-alpha expression. Furthermore, attenuation of TNF-alpha expression also significantly inhibited other post-ischemic inflammatory mediators including IL-1beta and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Thus, ultrasound-targeted antisense oligonucleotides can effectively attenuate post

  12. The first crystal structures of RNA–PNA duplexes and a PNA-PNA duplex containing mismatches—toward anti-sense therapy against TREDs

    PubMed Central

    Kiliszek, Agnieszka; Banaszak, Katarzyna; Dauter, Zbigniew; Rypniewski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    PNA is a promising molecule for antisense therapy of trinucleotide repeat disorders. We present the first crystal structures of RNA–PNA duplexes. They contain CUG repeats, relevant to myotonic dystrophy type I, and CAG repeats associated with poly-glutamine diseases. We also report the first PNA–PNA duplex containing mismatches. A comparison of the PNA homoduplex and the PNA–RNA heteroduplexes reveals PNA's intrinsic structural properties, shedding light on its reported sequence selectivity or intolerance of mismatches when it interacts with nucleic acids. PNA has a much lower helical twist than RNA and the resulting duplex has an intermediate conformation. PNA retains its overall conformation while locally there is much disorder, especially peptide bond flipping. In addition to the Watson–Crick pairing, the structures contain interesting interactions between the RNA's phosphate groups and the Π electrons of the peptide bonds in PNA. PMID:26717983

  13. The crystal structure of an ‘All Locked’ nucleic acid duplex

    PubMed Central

    Eichert, André; Behling, Katja; Betzel, Christian; Erdmann, Volker A.; Fürste, Jens P.; Förster, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    ‘Locked nucleic acids’ (LNAs) are known to introduce enhanced bio- and thermostability into natural nucleic acids rendering them powerful tools for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. We present the 1.9 Å X-ray structure of an ‘all LNA’ duplex containing exclusively modified β-d-2′-O-4′C-methylene ribofuranose nucleotides. The helix illustrates a new type of nucleic acid geometry that contributes to the understanding of the enhanced thermostability of LNA duplexes. A notable decrease of several local and overall helical parameters like twist, roll and propeller twist influence the structure of the LNA helix and result in a widening of the major groove, a decrease in helical winding and an enlarged helical pitch. A detailed structural comparison to the previously solved RNA crystal structure with the corresponding base pair sequence underlines the differences in conformation. The surrounding water network of the RNA and the LNA helix shows a similar hydration pattern. PMID:20530536

  14. Effect of hypoxia inducible factor-1 antisense oligonucleotide on liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongzhang; Chen, Jiaoe; Zen, Wanli; Xu, Xuehua; Xu, Yanjun; Chen, Qiang; Yang, Tiangan

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most frequent primary malignancies of the liver and is resistant to anticancer drugs. Hypoxia is a master cause of tumor resistance to chemotherapy. Hypoxia-inducible factor-one alpha (HIF-1α) plays a key role in the adaptive responses to hypoxic environments. HIF-1α is constitutively up-regulated in several tumor types might thus be implicated in tumor therapy resistance. We hypothesized that disruption of HIF-1α pathway could reverse the hypoxia-induced resistance to chemotherapy. In this report, we prepared DOTAP (a liposome formulation of a mono-cationic lipid N-[1-(2,3-Dioleoyloxy)]- N,N,N-trimethylammonium propane methylsulfate in sterile water) cationic liposomes containing an antisense oligonucleotide (AsODN) against HIF-1α. Gene transfer of antisense HIF-1α was effective in suppressing tumor growth, angiogenesis, and cell proliferation, and inducing cell apoptosis. Our results suggested that antisense HIF-1α therapy could be a therapeutic strategy for treating HCC. PMID:26550178

  15. Expression of TGMV antisense RNA in transgenic tobacco inhibits replication of BCTV but not ACMV geminiviruses.

    PubMed

    Bejarano, E R; Lichtenstein, C P

    1994-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing an antisense RNA targeted against tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV) show reduced/no symptoms and viral DNA accumulation upon TGMV infection [5]. The targeted region includes the AL1 gene, encoding an essential viral replication protein. This DNA sequence is conserved in various other geminiviruses, suggesting they too might show inhibition of replication in these plants. We infected leaf material with African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and beet curly top virus (BTCV) and saw a 4-fold reduction of BCTV, but not ACMV, DNA accumulation, compared to controls. The equivalent regions of BCTV and ACMV show similar overall homology to the TGMV target (63% and 64% respectively), but within this, BCTV displays a 280 nucleotide region of high homology (82%). In contrast, for ACMV, the homology is more dispersed. This indicates that a critical stretch of good complementarity is needed to block expression of the target mRNA, that is effective even within along antisense transcript. These studies indicate the potential for developing a multifunctional antisense cassette. PMID:8111023

  16. Antisense RNA-based High-Throughput Screen System for Directed Evolution of Quorum Quenching Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang-Soo; Park, Won-Ji; Kim, Hak-Sung; Kim, Geun-Joong

    2015-11-20

    Quorum quenching (QQ) enzymes, which disrupt the quorum sensing signaling process, have attracted considerable attention as new antimicrobial agents. However, their low catalytic efficiency for quorum sensing molecules remains a challenge. Herein, we present an antisense RNA-based high-throughput screen system for directed evolution of a quorum quenching enzyme. The screening system was constructed by incorporating an antisense RNA (RyhB) into a synthetic module to quantitatively regulate the expression of a reporter gene fused with a sense RNA (sodB). To control the expression of a reporter gene in response to the catalytic activity of a quorum quenching enzyme, the region of interaction and mode between a pair of antisense (RyhB) and sense (sodB) RNAs was designed and optimized through the prediction of the secondary structure of the RNA pair. The screening system constructed was shown to lead to a significant reduction in the false-positive rate (average 42%) in the screening of N-acyl-homoserine lactonase (AiiA) with increased catalytic activity, resulting in a true-positive frequency of up to 76%. The utility and efficiency of the screening system were demonstrated by selecting an AiiA with 31-fold higher catalytic efficiency than the wild-type in three rounds of directed evolution. The present approach can be widely used for the screening of quorum quenching enzymes with the desired catalytic property, as well as for a synthetic network for a stringent regulation of the gene expression. PMID:26366664

  17. Antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides: selective killing of the intracellular parasite Leishmania amazonensis.

    PubMed Central

    Ramazeilles, C; Mishra, R K; Moreau, S; Pascolo, E; Toulmé, J J

    1994-01-01

    We targeted the mini-exon sequence, present at the 5' end of every mRNA of the protozoan parasite Leishmania amazonensis, by phosphorothioate oligonucleotides. A complementary 16-mer (16PS) was able to kill amastigotes--the intracellular stage of the parasite--in murine macrophages in culture. After 24 hr of incubation with 10 microM 16PS, about 30% infected macrophages were cured. The oligomer 16PS acted through antisense hybridization in a sequence-dependent way; no effect on parasites was observed with noncomplementary phosphorothioate oligonucleotides. The antisense oligonucleotide 16PS was a selective killer of the protozoans without any detrimental effect to the host macrophage. Using 16PS linked to a palmitate chain, which enabled it to complex with low density lipoproteins, improved the leishmanicidal efficiency on intracellular amastigotes, probably due to increased endocytosis. Phosphorothioate oligonucleotides complementary to the intron part of the mini-exon pre-RNA were also effective, suggesting that antisense oligomers could prevent trans-splicing in these parasites. Images PMID:8058724

  18. A GmAOX2b antisense gene compromises vegetative growth and seed production in soybean.

    PubMed

    Chai, Tsun-Thai; Simmonds, Daina; Day, David A; Colmer, Timothy D; Finnegan, Patrick M

    2012-07-01

    The alternative oxidase mediates the cyanide-resistant respiratory pathway in plant mitochondria. In non-thermogenic plants, the role of alternative oxidase in plant growth and development is not well understood. Soybean (Glycine max) lines carrying a GmAOX2b antisense gene had compromised vegetative growth and reproductive performance under typical glasshouse growth conditions. The reduction in vegetative growth was demonstrated by reduction in shoot height, the number of leaves per plant and the green leaf area. Antisense plants also had decreased pod formation and seed to pod ratios, which together led to a reduction in the number and total mass of seed produced. The negative effects of the antisense gene on pod set, seed set, ovule availability and total seed mass were primarily confined to the branches, rather than the main stem. The preferential effect of alternative oxidase suppression in the branches is discussed in relation to the reproductive potential of soybean under stress. Taken together, these results demonstrate that alternative oxidase provides the benefit of sustaining plant vegetative growth and reproductive capacity in soybean. PMID:22307678

  19. β-1,3-Glucan/antisense oligonucleotide complex stabilized with phosphorothioation and its gene suppression.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Shinichi; Sakurai, Kazuo; Sakaurai, Kazuo

    2010-12-01

    Most of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) subjected to current clinical evaluation belong to phosphorothioate (PS) analogues. Although PS has great advantage in DNase resistance, it can induce nonspecific side-effects. Thus it is important to investigate the influence of ASOs with different PS contents. In this paper, we prepared the complex consisting of schizophyllan (SPG) and ASOs attached a dA₄₀ tail with different PS contents to the 3' end of the ODN, which is introduced to stabilize the complex with SPG. With increase of PS content in the dA₄₀, its complexation ability with SPG was improved and the complex showed high thermal stability. The thermal stability of the fully phosphorothioated ASOs was obtained by only replacing 20% of the oxygen of the phosphodiester moiety. The ability of gene suppression between PS and phosphodiester for antisense sequences was almost the same, indicating that the antisense sequences need not to be PS backbone. These data may provide new insight for the interaction between β-1,3-glucan and DNA and help to deliver therapeutic ODNs. PMID:20673953

  20. Antisense repression of sucrose phosphate synthase in transgenic muskmelon alters plant growth and fruit development

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hongmei; Ma, Leyuan; Zhao, Cong; Hao, Hui; Gong, Biao; Yu, Xiyan; Wang, Xiufeng

    2010-03-12

    To unravel the roles of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) in muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), we reduced its activity in transgenic muskmelon plants by an antisense approach. For this purpose, an 830 bp cDNA fragment of muskmelon sucrose phosphate synthase was expressed in antisense orientation behind the 35S promoter of the cauliflower mosaic virus. The phenotype of the antisense plants clearly differed from that of control plants. The transgenic plant leaves were markedly smaller, and the plant height and stem diameter were obviously shorter and thinner. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the membrane degradation of chloroplast happened in transgenic leaves and the numbers of grana and grana lamella in the chloroplast were significantly less, suggesting that the slow growth and weaker phenotype of transgenic plants may be due to the damage of the chloroplast ultrastructure, which in turn results in the decrease of the net photosynthetic rate. The sucrose concentration and levels of sucrose phosphate synthase decreased in transgenic mature fruit, and the fruit size was smaller than the control fruit. Together, our results suggest that sucrose phosphate synthase may play an important role in regulating the muskmelon plant growth and fruit development.

  1. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling: a novel in vivo property of antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Peter; Misteli, Tom; Baker, Brenda F.; Bennett, C. Frank; Spector, David L.

    2000-01-01

    Phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (P=S ODNs) are frequently used as antisense agents to specifically interfere with the expression of cellular target genes. However, the cell biological properties of P=S ODNs are poorly understood. Here we show that P=S ODNs were able to continuously shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and that shuttling P=S ODNs retained their ability to act as antisense agents. The shuttling process shares characteristics with active transport since it was inhibited by chilling and ATP depletion in vivo. Transport was carrier-mediated as it was saturable, and nuclear pore complex-mediated as it was sensitive to treatment with wheatgerm agglutinin. Oligonucleotides without a P=S backbone chemistry were only weakly restricted in their migration by chilling, ATP depletion and wheatgerm agglutinin and thus moved by diffusion. P=S ODN shuttling was only moderately affected by disruption of the Ran/RCC1 system. We propose that P=S ODNs shuttle through their binding to yet unidentified cellular molecules that undergo nucleocytoplasmic transport via a pathway that is not as strongly dependent on the Ran/RCC1 system as nuclear export signal-mediated protein export, U-snRNA, tRNA and mRNA export. The shuttling property of P=S ODNs must be taken into account when considering the mode and site of action of these antisense agents. PMID:10606658

  2. Inhibition of the synthesis of a cytochrome-c-oxidase subunit isoform by antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Sandonà, D; Bisson, R

    1994-02-01

    To investigate the role of subunit VIIe, an oxygen-regulated subunit isoform of Dictyostelium discoideum cytochrome-c oxidase, the full-length cDNA was inserted into an expression vector under the control of an actin promoter in the sense and antisense orientation. The DNA constructs were used for stable transformation of the slime mold amoebae. In most of the 28 antisense clones tested, the concentration of cytochrome-c oxidase was lowered compared to the wild type, while no significant changes were found in the sense mutants. Antisense RNA was abundantly expressed, leading to a drastic reduction of the steady-state level of the endogenous subunit VIIe mRNA, which was decreased up to 20-30% the level observed in parent cells. In these transformants, the amount of the target polypeptide and cytochrome c oxidase was 40-50% and 60-70% of control, respectively. A similar decrease was found in the level of the remaining nuclear and mitochondrial subunits. Unexpectedly, these changes affected neither basal nor uncoupled cell respiration suggesting an increase of the enzyme specific activity. Hypoxia completely relieved the cytochrome-c-oxidase deficit. These results indicate that subunit VII is needed for an efficient assembly of the protein complex and provide evidence for its involvement in the modulation of the enzyme activity. PMID:8112318

  3. A computational analysis of antisense off-targets in prokaryotic organisms.

    PubMed

    Worley-Morse, Thomas O; Gunsch, Claudia K

    2015-02-01

    The adoption of antisense gene silencing as a novel disinfectant for prokaryotic organisms is hindered by poor silencing efficiencies. Few studies have considered the effects of off-targets on silencing efficiencies, especially in prokaryotic organisms. In this computational study, a novel algorithm was developed that determined and sorted the number of off-targets as a function of alignment length in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. The mean number of off-targets per a single location was calculated to be 14.1 ± 13.3 and 36.1 ± 58.5 for the genomes of E. coli K-12 MG1655 and M. tuberculosis H37Rv, respectively. Furthermore, when the entire transcriptome was analyzed, it was found that there was no general gene location that could be targeted to minimize or maximize the number of off-targets. In an effort to determine the effects of off-targets on silencing efficiencies, previously published studies were used. Analyses with acpP, ino1, and marORAB revealed a statistically significant relationship between the number of short alignment length off-targets hybrids and the efficacy of the antisense gene silencing, suggesting that the minimization of off-targets may be beneficial for antisense gene silencing in prokaryotic organisms. PMID:25486012

  4. Antisense oligonucleotide therapy for the treatment of C9ORF72 ALS/FTD diseases.

    PubMed

    Riboldi, Giulietta; Zanetta, Chiara; Ranieri, Michela; Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Magri, Francesca; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P; Corti, Stefania

    2014-12-01

    Motor neuron disorders, and particularly amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), are fatal diseases that are due to the loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord, with progressive paralysis and premature death. It has been recently shown that the most frequent genetic cause of ALS, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and other neurological diseases is the expansion of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) in the non-coding region of the C9ORF72 gene. The pathogenic mechanisms that produce cell death in the presence of this expansion are still unclear. One of the most likely hypotheses seems to be the gain-of-function that is achieved through the production of toxic RNA (able to sequester RNA-binding protein) and/or toxic proteins. In recent works, different authors have reported that antisense oligonucleotides complementary to the C9ORF72 RNA transcript sequence were able to significantly reduce RNA foci generated by the expanded RNA, in affected cells. Here, we summarize the recent findings that support the idea that the buildup of "toxic" RNA containing the GGGGCC repeat contributes to the death of motor neurons in ALS and also suggest that the use of antisense oligonucleotides targeting this transcript is a promising strategy for treating ALS/frontotemporal lobe dementia (FTLD) patients with the C9ORF72 repeat expansion. These data are particularly important, given the state of the art antisense technology, and they allow researchers to believe that a clinical application of these discoveries will be possible soon. PMID:24809691

  5. Modulation of lipoprotein metabolism by antisense technology: preclinical drug discovery methodology.

    PubMed

    Crooke, Rosanne M; Graham, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are a new class of specific therapeutic agents that alter the intermediary metabolism of mRNA, resulting in the suppression of disease-associated gene products. ASOs exert their pharmacological effects after hybridizing, via Watson-Crick base pairing, to a specific target RNA. If appropriately designed, this event results in the recruitment of RNase H, the degradation of targeted mRNA or pre-mRNA, and subsequent inhibition of the synthesis of a specific protein. A key advantage of the technology is the ability to selectively inhibit targets that cannot be modulated by traditional therapeutics such as structural proteins, transcription factors, and, of topical interest, lipoproteins. In this chapter, we will first provide an overview of antisense technology, then more specifically describe the status of lipoprotein-related genes that have been studied using the antisense platform, and finally, outline the general methodology required to design and evaluate the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of those drugs. PMID:23912993

  6. A Vector Library for Silencing Central Carbon Metabolism Genes with Antisense RNAs in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Katsunori; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Tamura, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    We describe here the construction of a series of 71 vectors to silence central carbon metabolism genes in Escherichia coli. The vectors inducibly express antisense RNAs called paired-terminus antisense RNAs, which have a higher silencing efficacy than ordinary antisense RNAs. By measuring mRNA amounts, measuring activities of target proteins, or observing specific phenotypes, it was confirmed that all the vectors were able to silence the expression of target genes efficiently. Using this vector set, each of the central carbon metabolism genes was silenced individually, and the accumulation of metabolites was investigated. We were able to obtain accurate information on ways to increase the production of pyruvate, an industrially valuable compound, from the silencing results. Furthermore, the experimental results of pyruvate accumulation were compared to in silico predictions, and both sets of results were consistent. Compared to the gene disruption approach, the silencing approach has an advantage in that any E. coli strain can be used and multiple gene silencing is easily possible in any combination. PMID:24212579

  7. Reduction of EGF receptor levels in human tumor cells transfected with an antisense RNA expression vector

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Hirotomo; Koizumi, Shinji; Kimura, Masami ); Shimizu, Nobuyoshi )

    1989-09-01

    An expression vector was constructed from part of pSV2neo with the 3{prime}-ClaI fragment of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor cDNA inserted in an inverted orientation downstream from the human metallothionein (MT) IIa promoter. The human squamous carcinoma cell line NA, which overproduces EGF receptor, was transfected with this vector and selected for resistance to the neomycin derivative G418. One of the stable transfectants had a 90% reduction cell-surface EGF receptor in response to ZnSO{sub 4}. The nascent EGF receptor peptide was also decreased with concurrent induction of MT mRNA. These data suggest that the antisense transcript regulated by the MT promoter inhibits the expression of the endogenous EGF receptor genes. Although no transcripts from the antisense gene were detected, the results indicate that transfection with the antisense vector provides a technique by which to modulate the number of EGF receptors on the cell surface of squamous cell carcinomas.

  8. Role of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in the Production of Prostaglandin E2 and Nitric Oxide during Experimental Murine Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Sargi, S. C.; Dalalio, M. M. O.; Moraes, A. G.; Visentainer, J. E. L.; Morais, D. R.; Visentainer, J. V.

    2013-01-01

    There has recently been increased interest in the potential health effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on the immune system. Paracoccidioidomycosis is the most important endemic mycosis in Latin America. Macrophages have a fundamental role and act as first line of organism defense. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of n-3 fatty acids on the production of PGE2 and NO by mice infected with Pb18 and fed a diet enriched with LNA for 8 weeks. To study the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on macrophage activity during experimental paracoccidioidomycosis, mice were infected with Pb18 and fed a diet supplemented with LNA. PGE2 in the serum of animals was analyzed and NO in the supernatants of macrophages cultured and challenged in vitro with Pb18 was measured. Omega-3 fatty acids seemed to decrease the production of PGE2 in vivo in the infected group fed an LNA-supplemented diet during the 4th and 8th weeks of the experiment. At the same time, we observed an increase in synthesis of NO by peritoneal macrophages in this group. Omega-3 fatty acids thus appear to have an immunomodulatory effect in paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:24455741

  9. The use of nano-sized acicular material, sliding friction, and antisense DNA oligonucleotides to silence bacterial genes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Viable bacterial cells impaled with a single particle of a nano-sized acicular material formed when a mixture containing the cells and the material was exposed to a sliding friction field between polystyrene and agar gel; hereafter, we refer to these impaled cells as penetrons. We have used nano-sized acicular material to establish a novel method for bacterial transformation. Here, we generated penetrons that carried antisense DNA adsorbed on nano-sized acicular material (α-sepiolite) by providing sliding friction onto the surface of agar gel; we then investigated whether penetron formation was applicable to gene silencing techniques. Antisense DNA was artificially synthesized as 15 or 90mer DNA oligonucleotides based on the sequences around the translation start codon of target mRNAs. Mixtures of bacterial cells with antisense DNA adsorbed on α-sepiolite were stimulated by sliding friction on the surface of agar gel for 60 s. Upon formation of Escherichia coli penetrons, β-lactamase and β-galactosidase expression was evaluated by counting the numbers of colonies formed on LB agar containing ampicillin and by measuring β-galactosidase activity respectively. The numbers of ampicillin resistant colonies and the β-galactosidase activity derived from penetrons bearing antisense DNA (90mer) was repressed to 15% and 25%, respectively, of that of control penetrons which lacked antisense DNA. Biphenyl metabolite, ring cleavage yellow compound produced by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes penetron treated with antisense oligonucleotide DNA targeted to bphD increased higher than that lacking antisense DNA. This result indicated that expression of bphD in P. pseudoalcaligenes penetrons was repressed by antisense DNA that targeted bphD mRNA. Sporulation rates of Bacillus subtilis penetrons treated with antisense DNA (15mer) targeted to spo0A decreased to 24.4% relative to penetrons lacking antisense DNA. This novel method of gene silencing has substantial promise for

  10. Effective Antisense Gene Regulation via Noncationic, Polyethylene Glycol Brushes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xueguang; Jia, Fei; Tan, Xuyu; Wang, Dali; Cao, Xueyan; Zheng, Jiamin; Zhang, Ke

    2016-07-27

    Negatively charged nucleic acids are often complexed with polycationic transfection agents before delivery. Herein, we demonstrate that a noncationic, biocompatible polymer, polyethylene glycol, can be used as a transfection vector by forming a brush polymer-DNA conjugate. The brush architecture provides embedded DNA strands with enhanced nuclease stability and improved cell uptake. Because of the biologically benign nature of the polymer component, no cytotoxicity was observed. This approach has the potential to address several long-lasting challenges in oligonucleotide therapeutics. PMID:27420413

  11. Design and implementation of a 1-V transformer magnetic feedback low-noise amplifier (LNA) at 5-6 GHz, in a 90 nm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kytonaki, Eleni-Sotiria; Simitsakis, Paschalis; Bazigos, Antonios; Papananos, Yannis

    2011-02-01

    In this study, a low-noise amplifier (LNA) suitable for low-voltage operation is presented. The LNA operates at a frequency range between 5 and 6 GHz. Its topology exploits magnetic feedback to achieve high reverse isolation and low noise performance without a significant degradation of the gain and linearity of the circuit. The design has been fabricated, considering full electrostatic discharge protection, in a modern 90 nm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor process. The measured performance, at 5.4 GHz, shows a reverse isolation of -17.3 dB, a gain of 10.4 dB, a noise figure of 0.98 dB and an input intercept point of 1.4 dBm. The circuit dissipates 12.5 mW from a 1 V supply, while it occupies 0.162 mm2 of the die area.

  12. LNA aptamer based multi-modal, Fe3O4-saturated lactoferrin (Fe3O4-bLf) nanocarriers for triple positive (EpCAM, CD133, CD44) colon tumor targeting and NIR, MRI and CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-12-01

    This is the first ever attempt to combine anti-cancer therapeutic effects of emerging anticancer biodrug bovine lactoferrin (bLf), and multimodal imaging efficacy of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) together, as a saturated Fe3O4-bLf. For cancer stem cell specific uptake of nanocapsules/nanocarriers (NCs), Fe3O4-bLf was encapsulated in alginate enclosed chitosan coated calcium phosphate (AEC-CP) NCs targeted (Tar) with locked nucleic acid (LNA) modified aptamers against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and nucleolin markers. The nanoformulation was fed orally to mice injected with triple positive (EpCAM, CD133, CD44) sorted colon cancer stem cells in the xenograft cancer stem cell mice model. The complete regression of tumor was observed in 70% of mice fed on non-targeted (NT) NCs, with 30% mice showing tumor recurrence after 30 days, while only 10% mice fed with Tar NCs showed tumor recurrence indicating a significantly higher survival rate. From tumor tissue analyses of 35 apoptotic markers, 55 angiogenesis markers, 40 cytokines, 15 stem cell markers and gene expression studies of important signaling molecules, it was revealed that the anti-cancer mechanism of Fe3O4-bLf was intervened through TRAIL, Fas, Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) mediated phosphorylation of p53, to induce activation of second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (SMAC)/DIABLO (inhibiting survivin) and mitochondrial depolarization leading to release of cytochrome C. Induction of apoptosis was observed by inhibition of the Akt pathway and activation of cytokines released from monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells (interleukin (IL) 27, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC)). On the other hand, the recurrence of tumor in AEC-CP-Fe3O4-bLf NCs fed mice mainly occurred due to activation of alternative pathways such as mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and Wnt signaling leading to an increase in expression of survivin

  13. Water-absorbent polymer as a carrier for a discrete deposit of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bannai, M; Ichikawa, M; Nishimura, F; Nishihara, M; Takahashi, M

    1998-09-01

    One of the problems of introducing antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) into the central nervous system (CNS) is their rapid disappearance from the target site due to their dispersion and diffusion, which results in poor uptake and/or retention in cells (M. Morris, A.B. Lucion, Antisense oligonucleotides in the study of neuroendocrine systems, J. Neuroendocrinol. 7 (1995) 493-500; S. Ogawa, H.E. Brown, H.J. Okano, D.W. Pfaff, Cellular uptake of intracerebrally administrated oligodeoxynucleotides in mouse brain, Regul. Pept. 59 (1995) 143-149) [2,5]. Recently, we adapted a new method using water-absorbent polymer (WAP; internally cross-linked starch-grafted-polyacrylates) as a carrier for antisense ODN. The polymer forms a hydro-gel after absorbing water which is chemically and biologically inert. In these studies, the polymer (powder-form) is fully swollen by physiological saline containing antisense ODN (0.2 micromol/ml) to make 80-fold volume gel. Hydro-gel (1 microliter) is injected into the target site, and water solutes are assumed to be diffused stoichiometrically into CNS from the surface of the gel. Histological studies indicate that 24 h after the injection, antisense ODN (5'biotinylated-S-oligos of 15 mer) are distributed to within 800 micrometer from the edge of the area where the gel is located and then gradually disappear from this area within days, but still remain within 300-micrometer distance 7 days later. Antisense ODN are effectively incorporated by all the cell types examined, i.e., neurons, astrocytes and microglias, and suppress the synthesis of the target protein. This method can be adapted to slow delivery of antisense ODN and other water soluble substances into the CNS. PMID:9767125

  14. Variability of HHV8 LNA-1 Immunohistochemical Staining Across the 3 Histologic Stages of HIV-Associated Mucocutaneous Kaposi Sarcoma: Is There a Relationship to Patients' CD4 Counts?

    PubMed

    Mohanlal, Reena D; Pather, Sugeshnee

    2015-07-01

    The histologic diagnosis of Kaposi sarcoma (KS) can be confirmed with human herpes virus 8 (HHV8) latency-associated nuclear antigen (LNA)-1 immunohistochemistry, which may show variability in distribution and intensity. This retrospective study was aimed at addressing the factors that may contribute to this variability. All cases of mucocutaneous KS diagnosed in a 5-year period at the histopathology department at a tertiary hospital in South Africa with available patients' CD4 counts and HHV8 LNA-1 immunohistochemically stained slides were reviewed, and the biopsy stages of KS (patch/plaque/nodular), CD4 counts, immunohistochemistry staining method (manual vs. automated), and distribution (diffuse/focal) and intensity (strong/weak) of HHV8 LNA-1 staining were recorded. A total of 127 cases were reviewed. No relationship was demonstrated between the median CD4 count and the histologic stages of KS (P = 0.701) or the intensity and distribution of HHV8 immunohistochemical staining using either staining method. Multivariate analysis showed that method of immunohistochemical staining was a significant predictor of distribution (P = 0.006) and intensity (P = 0.044) of staining, and that stage was a significant predictor of distribution of staining (P = 0.033). PMID:26091511

  15. Therapeutic antisense oligonucleotides against cancer: hurdling to the clinic

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Pedro M. D.; Pêgo, Ana P.

    2014-01-01

    Under clinical development since the early 90's and with two successfully approved drugs (Fomivirsen and Mipomersen), oligonucleotide-based therapeutics has not yet delivered a clinical drug to the market in the cancer field. Whilst many pre-clinical data has been generated, a lack of understanding still exists on how to efficiently tackle all the different challenges presented for cancer targeting in a clinical setting. Namely, effective drug vectorization, careful choice of target gene or synergistic multi-gene targeting are surely decisive, while caution must be exerted to avoid potential toxic, often misleading off-target-effects. Here a brief overview will be given on the nucleic acid chemistry advances that established oligonucleotide technologies as a promising therapeutic alternative and ongoing cancer related clinical trials. Special attention will be given toward a perspective on the hurdles encountered specifically in the cancer field by this class of therapeutic oligonucleotides and a view on possible avenues for success is presented, with particular focus on the contribution from nanotechnology to the field. PMID:25353019

  16. Therapeutic Antisense Oligonucleotides against Cancer: Hurdling to the Clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Pedro; Pêgo, Ana

    2014-10-01

    Under clinical development since the early 90’s and with two successfully approved drugs (Fomivirsen and Mipomersen), oligonucleotide-based therapeutics have not yet delivered a clinical drug to the market in the cancer field. Whilst many pre-clinical data has been generated, a lack of understanding still exists on how to efficiently tackle all the different challenges presented for cancer targeting in a clinical setting. Namely, effective drug vectorization, careful choice of target gene or synergistic multi-gene targeting are surely decisive, while caution must be exerted to avoid potential toxic, often misleading off-target-effects. Here a brief overview will be given on the nucleic acid chemistry advances that established oligonucleotide technologies as a promising therapeutic alternative and ongoing cancer related clinical trials. Special attention will be given towards a perspective on the hurdles encountered specifically in the cancer field by this class of therapeutic oligonucleotides and a view on possible avenues for success is presented, with particular focus on the contribution from nanotechnology to the field.

  17. Inhibition of the alternative complement pathway by antisense oligonucleotides targeting complement factor B improves lupus nephritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Tamar R; Hettrick, Lisa A; Johnson, Robert B; Hung, Gene; Peralta, Raechel; Watt, Andrew; Henry, Scott P; Adamson, Peter; Monia, Brett P; McCaleb, Michael L

    2016-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that manifests in widespread complement activation and deposition of complement fragments in the kidney. The complement pathway is believed to play a significant role in the pathogenesis and in the development of lupus nephritis. Complement factor B is an important activator of the alternative complement pathway and increasing evidence supports reducing factor B as a potential novel therapy to lupus nephritis. Here we investigated whether pharmacological reduction of factor B expression using antisense oligonucleotides could be an effective approach for the treatment of lupus nephritis. We identified potent and well tolerated factor B antisense oligonucleotides that resulted in significant reductions in hepatic and plasma factor B levels when administered to normal mice. To test the effects of factor B antisense oligonucleotides on lupus nephritis, we used two different mouse models, NZB/W F1 and MRL/lpr mice, that exhibit lupus nephritis like renal pathology. Antisense oligonucleotides mediated reductions in circulating factor B levels were associated with significant improvements in renal pathology, reduced glomerular C3 deposition and proteinuria, and improved survival. These data support the strategy of using factor B antisense oligonucleotides for treatment of lupus nephritis in humans. PMID:26307001

  18. Post-transcriptional gene silencing triggered by sense transgenes involves uncapped antisense RNA and differs from silencing intentionally triggered by antisense transgenes

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Jean-Sébastien; Jauvion, Vincent; Bouché, Nicolas; Béclin, Christophe; Hachet, Mélanie; Zytnicki, Matthias; Vaucheret, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Although post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) has been studied for more than a decade, there is still a gap in our understanding of how de novo silencing is initiated against genetic elements that are not supposed to produce double-stranded (ds)RNA. Given the pervasive transcription occurring throughout eukaryote genomes, we tested the hypothesis that unintended transcription could produce antisense (as)RNA molecules that participate to the initiation of PTGS triggered by sense transgenes (S-PTGS). Our results reveal a higher level of asRNA in Arabidopsis thaliana lines that spontaneously trigger S-PTGS than in lines that do not. However, PTGS triggered by antisense transgenes (AS-PTGS) differs from S-PTGS. In particular, a hypomorphic ago1 mutation that suppresses S-PTGS prevents the degradation of asRNA but not sense RNA during AS-PTGS, suggesting a different treatment of coding and non-coding RNA by AGO1, likely because of AGO1 association to polysomes. Moreover, the intended asRNA produced during AS-PTGS is capped whereas the asRNA produced during S-PTGS derives from 3′ maturation of a read-through transcript and is uncapped. Thus, we propose that uncapped asRNA corresponds to the aberrant RNA molecule that is converted to dsRNA by RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 6 in siRNA-bodies to initiate S-PTGS, whereas capped asRNA must anneal with sense RNA to produce dsRNA that initiate AS-PTGS. PMID:26209135

  19. Post-transcriptional gene silencing triggered by sense transgenes involves uncapped antisense RNA and differs from silencing intentionally triggered by antisense transgenes.

    PubMed

    Parent, Jean-Sébastien; Jauvion, Vincent; Bouché, Nicolas; Béclin, Christophe; Hachet, Mélanie; Zytnicki, Matthias; Vaucheret, Hervé

    2015-09-30

    Although post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) has been studied for more than a decade, there is still a gap in our understanding of how de novo silencing is initiated against genetic elements that are not supposed to produce double-stranded (ds)RNA. Given the pervasive transcription occurring throughout eukaryote genomes, we tested the hypothesis that unintended transcription could produce antisense (as)RNA molecules that participate to the initiation of PTGS triggered by sense transgenes (S-PTGS). Our results reveal a higher level of asRNA in Arabidopsis thaliana lines that spontaneously trigger S-PTGS than in lines that do not. However, PTGS triggered by antisense transgenes (AS-PTGS) differs from S-PTGS. In particular, a hypomorphic ago1 mutation that suppresses S-PTGS prevents the degradation of asRNA but not sense RNA during AS-PTGS, suggesting a different treatment of coding and non-coding RNA by AGO1, likely because of AGO1 association to polysomes. Moreover, the intended asRNA produced during AS-PTGS is capped whereas the asRNA produced during S-PTGS derives from 3' maturation of a read-through transcript and is uncapped. Thus, we propose that uncapped asRNA corresponds to the aberrant RNA molecule that is converted to dsRNA by RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 6 in siRNA-bodies to initiate S-PTGS, whereas capped asRNA must anneal with sense RNA to produce dsRNA that initiate AS-PTGS. PMID:26209135

  20. Multi-exon Skipping Using Cocktail Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Canine X-linked Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Miskew Nichols, Bailey; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Lee, Joshua J A; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases worldwide, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Exon skipping employs short DNA/RNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that restore the reading frame and produce shorter but functional proteins. However, exon skipping therapy faces two major hurdles: limited applicability (up to only 13% of patients can be treated with a single AON drug), and uncertain function of truncated proteins. These issues were addressed with a cocktail AON approach. While approximately 70% of DMD patients can be treated by single exon skipping (all exons combined), one could potentially treat more than 90% of DMD patients if multiple exon skipping using cocktail antisense drugs can be realized. The canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (CXMD) dog model, whose phenotype is more similar to human DMD patients, was used to test the systemic efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8. The CXMD dog model harbors a splice site mutation in intron 6, leading to a lack of exon 7 in dystrophin mRNA. To restore the reading frame in CXMD requires multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8; therefore, CXMD is a good middle-sized animal model for testing the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping. In the current study, a cocktail of antisense morpholinos targeting exon 6 and exon 8 was designed and it restored dystrophin expression in body-wide skeletal muscles. Methods for transfection/injection of cocktail oligos and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping in the CXMD dog model are presented. PMID:27285612

  1. Multi-exon Skipping Using Cocktail Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Canine X-linked Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Lee, Joshua J.A.; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases worldwide, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Exon skipping employs short DNA/RNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that restore the reading frame and produce shorter but functional proteins. However, exon skipping therapy faces two major hurdles: limited applicability (up to only 13% of patients can be treated with a single AON drug), and uncertain function of truncated proteins. These issues were addressed with a cocktail AON approach. While approximately 70% of DMD patients can be treated by single exon skipping (all exons combined), one could potentially treat more than 90% of DMD patients if multiple exon skipping using cocktail antisense drugs can be realized. The canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (CXMD) dog model, whose phenotype is more similar to human DMD patients, was used to test the systemic efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8. The CXMD dog model harbors a splice site mutation in intron 6, leading to a lack of exon 7 in dystrophin mRNA. To restore the reading frame in CXMD requires multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8; therefore, CXMD is a good middle-sized animal model for testing the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping. In the current study, a cocktail of antisense morpholinos targeting exon 6 and exon 8 was designed and it restored dystrophin expression in body-wide skeletal muscles. Methods for transfection/injection of cocktail oligos and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping in the CXMD dog model are presented. PMID:27285612

  2. Sense and Antisense DMPK RNA Foci Accumulate in DM1 Tissues during Development

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Lise; Huguet-Lachon, Aline; Gourdon, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by an unstable expanded CTG repeat located within the DMPK gene 3’UTR. The nature, severity and age at onset of DM1 symptoms are very variable in patients. Different forms of the disease are described, among which the congenital form (CDM) is the most severe. Molecular mechanisms of DM1 are well characterized for the adult form and involve accumulation of mutant DMPK RNA forming foci in the nucleus. These RNA foci sequester proteins from the MBNL family and deregulate CELF proteins. These proteins are involved in many cellular mechanisms such as alternative splicing, transcriptional, translational and post-translational regulation miRNA regulation as well as mRNA polyadenylation and localization. All these mechanisms can be impaired in DM1 because of the deregulation of CELF and MBNL functions. The mechanisms involved in CDM are not clearly described. In order to get insight into the mechanisms underlying CDM, we investigated if expanded RNA nuclear foci, one of the molecular hallmarks of DM1, could be detected in human DM1 fetal tissues, as well as in embryonic and neonatal tissues from transgenic mice carrying the human DMPK gene with an expanded CTG repeat. We observed very abundant RNA foci formed by sense DMPK RNA and, to a lesser extent, antisense DMPK RNA foci. Sense DMPK RNA foci clearly co-localized with MBNL1 and MBNL2 proteins. In addition, we studied DMPK sense and antisense expression during development in the transgenic mice. We found that DMPK sense and antisense transcripts are expressed from embryonic and fetal stages in heart, muscle and brain and are regulated during development. These results suggest that mechanisms underlying DM1 and CDM involved common players including toxic expanded RNA forming numerous nuclear foci at early stages during development. PMID:26339785

  3. Revealing natural antisense transcripts from Plasmodium vivax isolates: evidence of genome regulation in complicated malaria.

    PubMed

    Boopathi, P A; Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Garg, Shilpi; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Pakalapati, Deepak; Saxena, Vishal; Aiyaz, Mohammed; Chand, Bipin; Mugasimangalam, Raja C; Kochar, Sanjay K; Sirohi, Parmendra; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Das, Ashis

    2013-12-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the most geographically widespread human malaria parasite causing approximately 130-435 million infections annually. It is an economic burden in many parts of the world and poses a public health challenge along with the other Plasmodium sp. The biology of this parasite is less studied and poorly understood, in spite of these facts. Emerging evidence of severe complications due to infections by this parasite provides an impetus to focus research on the same. Investigating the parasite directly from infected patients is the best way to study its biology and pathogenic mechanisms. Gene expression studies of this parasite directly obtained from the patients has provided evidence of gene regulation resulting in varying amount of transcript levels in the different blood stages. The mechanisms regulating gene expression in malaria parasites are not well understood. Discovery of Natural Antisense Transcripts (NATs) in Plasmodium falciparum has suggested that these might play an important role in regulating gene expression. We report here the genome-wide occurrence of NATs in P. vivax parasites from patients with differing clinical symptoms. A total of 1348 NATs against annotated gene loci have been detected using a custom designed microarray with strand specific probes. Majority of NATs identified from this study shows positive correlation with the expression pattern of the sense (S) transcript. Our data also shows condition specific expression patterns of varying S and antisense (AS) transcript levels. Genes with AS transcripts enrich to various biological processes. To our knowledge this is the first report on the presence of NATs from P. vivax obtained from infected patients with different disease complications. The data suggests differential regulation of gene expression in diverse clinical conditions, as shown by differing sense/antisense ratios and would lead to future detailed investigations of gene regulation. PMID:24121022

  4. Exon-Skipping Antisense Oligonucleotides to Correct Missplicing in Neurogenetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Siva, Kavitha; Covello, Giuseppina

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing is an important regulator of the transcriptome. However, mutations may cause alteration of splicing patterns, which in turn leads to disease. During the past 10 years, exon skipping has been looked upon as a powerful tool for correction of missplicing in disease and progress has been made towards clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the use of antisense oligonucleotides to correct splicing defects through exon skipping, with a special focus on diseases affecting the nervous system, and the latest stage achieved in its progress. PMID:24506781

  5. Schizophyllans carrying oligosaccharide appendages as potential candidates for cell-targeted antisense carrier.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Teruaki; Fujisawa, Tomohisa; Numata, Munenori; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Umeda, Mariko; Karinaga, Ryouji; Mizu, Masami; Koumoto, Kazuya; Kimura, Taro; Okumura, Shiro; Sakurai, Kazuo; Shinkai, Seiji

    2004-11-01

    Schizophyllans carrying beta-lactoside and alpha-mannoside appendages were prepared from native schizophyllan through NaIO4 oxidation followed by reductive amination using aminoethyl-beta-lactoside and alpha-mannoside, respectively. The resulting schizophyllans form stable macromolecular complexes with polynucleotides, such as poly(C) and poly(dA). Specific affinity between these macromolecular complexes and saccharide-binding proteins was demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance and agarose gel staining assays. beta-lactoside-appended schizophyllan enhanced an antisense activity in hepatocytes which express lactoside-binding proteins on their cell surfaces. PMID:15505713

  6. Development of Cotton leaf curl virus resistant transgenic cotton using antisense ßC1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj; Kamal, Mohammad A.; Ilah, Abdul; Husen, Azamal; Bhattacharya, P.S.; Rana, D.

    2014-01-01

    Cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) is a serious pathogen causing leaf curl disease and affecting the cotton production in major growing areas. The transgenic cotton (Gossypium hirsutum cv. Coker 310) plants were developed by using βC1 gene in antisense orientation gene driven by Cauliflower mosaic virus-35S promoter and nos (nopaline synthase) terminator and mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation and somatic embryogenesis system. Molecular confirmation of the transformants was carried out by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot hybridization. The developed transgenic and inoculated plants remained symptomless till their growth period. In conclusion, the plants were observed as resistant to CLCuV. PMID:27081361

  7. Development of Cotton leaf curl virus resistant transgenic cotton using antisense ßC1 gene.

    PubMed

    Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj; Kamal, Mohammad A; Ilah, Abdul; Husen, Azamal; Bhattacharya, P S; Rana, D

    2016-05-01

    Cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) is a serious pathogen causing leaf curl disease and affecting the cotton production in major growing areas. The transgenic cotton (Gossypium hirsutum cv. Coker 310) plants were developed by using βC1 gene in antisense orientation gene driven by Cauliflower mosaic virus-35S promoter and nos (nopaline synthase) terminator and mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation and somatic embryogenesis system. Molecular confirmation of the transformants was carried out by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot hybridization. The developed transgenic and inoculated plants remained symptomless till their growth period. In conclusion, the plants were observed as resistant to CLCuV. PMID:27081361

  8. A novel transforming growth factor beta2 antisense transcript in mammalian lung.

    PubMed Central

    Coker, R K; Laurent, G J; Dabbagh, K; Dawson, J; McAnulty, R J

    1998-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF) beta2 gene expression was examined in murine, rat and human lung by in situ hybridization with riboprobes. Hybridization signal was observed in a variety of cells with the sense probe, and Northern-blot analysis with this probe demonstrated the presence of a novel 3.5 kb transcript. This first report suggesting the existance of a natural TGFbeta2 antisense transcript raises the possibility that such a transcript may play a role in regulating TGFbeta2 production. PMID:9601055

  9. Transcriptional regulation of Oct4 by a long non-coding RNA antisense to Oct4-pseudogene 5.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Peter G; Morris, Kevin V

    2010-11-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to epigenetically regulate certain genes in human cells. Here we report evidence for the involvement of an antisense lncRNA in the transcriptional regulation of the pluripotency-associated factor Oct4. When an lncRNA antisense to Oct4-pseudogene 5 was suppressed, transcription of Oct4 and Oct4 pseudogenes 4 and 5 was observed to increase. This increase correlated with a loss of silent state epigenetic marks and the histone methyltransferase Ezh2 at the Oct4 promoter. We observed this lncRNA to interact with nucleolin and PURA, a 35 kD single-stranded DNA and RNA binding protein, and found that these proteins may act to negatively regulate this antisense transcript. PMID:21151833

  10. High transfection efficiency of quantum dot-antisense oligonucleotide nanoparticles in cancer cells through dual-receptor synergistic targeting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Zhen; Li, Cheng; Fang, Bi-Yun; Yao, Ming-Hao; Ren, Qiong-Qiong; Zhang, Lin; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2014-06-27

    Incorporating ligands with nanoparticle-based carriers for specific delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids (such as antisense oligonucleotides and siRNA) to tumor sites is a promising approach in anti-cancer strategies. However, nanoparticle-based carriers remain insufficient in terms of the selectivity and transfection efficiency. In this paper, we designed a dual receptor-targeted QDs gene carrier QD-(AS-ODN+GE11+c(RGDfK)) which could increase the cellular uptake efficiency and further enhance the transfection efficiency. Here, the targeting ligands used were peptides GE11 and c(RGDfK) which could recognize epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) and integrin ανβ3 receptors, respectively. Quantitative flow cytometry and ICP/MS showed that the synergistic effect between EGFR and integrin ανβ3 increased the cellular uptake of QDs carriers. The effects of inhibition agents showed the endocytosis pathway of QD-(AS-ODN+GE11+c(RGDfK)) probe was mainly clathrin-mediated. Western blot confirmed that QD-(AS-ODN+GE11+c(RGDfK)) could further enhance gene silencing efficiency compared to QD-(AS-ODN+GE11) and QD-(AS-ODN+c(RGDfK)), suggesting this dual receptor-targeted gene carrier achieved desired transfection efficiency. In this gene delivery system, QDs could not only be used as a gene vehicle but also as fluorescence probe, allowing for localization and tracking during the delivery process. This transport model is very well referenced for non-viral gene carriers to enhance the targeting ability and transfection efficiency. PMID:24896735

  11. [Effect of antisense oligonucleotides on myo-intimal hyperplasia in a model of abdominal aortic injury in the rat].

    PubMed

    Chemla, E; Julia, P; Nierat, J; Eudes, D; Bruneval, P; Carpentier, A; Fabiani, J N

    1995-03-01

    Restenosis at a rate > 30% at 6 months is the major complication of both coronary and peripheral arterial angioplasty. Restenosis is mainly due to proliferation of smooth muscle cells, extracellular matrix and collagen which form a neointima. The proto-oncogene c-myb is a gene with an immediate response which has been implicated in the proliferation and alteration of the phenotype of smooth muscle cells. The antisenses are molecules of single-helix DNA the sequence of which is inverse to that of messenger RNA of the target proto-oncogene. They therefore have the possibility of forming a double helix with the messenger RNA and of preventing its translation. The antisenses of c-myb have already been successfully tested in in vitro and in vivo models of neointimal proliferation. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the efficacy of c-myb antisenses on the proliferation of smooth muscle cells in a model of abdominal aortic injury in the rat. Thirty-five male Wistar rats with an average weight of 350 grams were operated. Smooth muscle cell proliferation was obtained by desendothelialisation of the abdominal aorta from the level of the left renal vein to the aortic bifurcation. Using a randomised, double-blind protocol, 17 rats were given 500 microliters of pluronic gel (control group), 9 a sense oligonucleotide of c-myb in 500 microliters of pluronic gel (sense group) and 9 a c-myb antisense oligonucleide in 500 microliters of pluronic gel (antisense group). Two rats were given fluorescinlabelled antisenses; one was sacrificed 4 hours and the other 24 hours later.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7487292

  12. Antisense Inhibition of the 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex in Tomato Demonstrates Its Importance for Plant Respiration and during Leaf Senescence and Fruit Maturation[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Wagner L.; Tohge, Takayuki; Osorio, Sonia; Lohse, Marc; Balbo, Ilse; Krahnert, Ina; Sienkiewicz-Porzucek, Agata; Usadel, Björn; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants expressing a fragment of the gene encoding the E1 subunit of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex in the antisense orientation and exhibiting substantial reductions in the activity of this enzyme exhibit a considerably reduced rate of respiration. They were, however, characterized by largely unaltered photosynthetic rates and fruit yields but restricted leaf, stem, and root growth. These lines displayed markedly altered metabolic profiles, including changes in tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and in the majority of the amino acids but unaltered pyridine nucleotide content both in leaves and during the progression of fruit ripening. Moreover, they displayed a generally accelerated development exhibiting early flowering, accelerated fruit ripening, and a markedly earlier onset of leaf senescence. In addition, transcript and selective hormone profiling of gibberellins and abscisic acid revealed changes only in the former coupled to changes in transcripts encoding enzymes of gibberellin biosynthesis. The data obtained are discussed in the context of the importance of this enzyme in both photosynthetic and respiratory metabolism as well as in programs of plant development connected to carbon–nitrogen interactions. PMID:22751214

  13. Synergism of α-linolenic acid, conjugated linoleic acid and calcium in decreasing adipocyte and increasing osteoblast cell growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youjin; Kelly, Owen J; Ilich, Jasminka Z

    2013-08-01

    Whole fat milk and dairy products (although providing more energy compared to low- or non-fat products), are good sources of α-linolenic acid (ALA), conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and calcium, which may be favorable in modulating bone and adipose tissue metabolism. We examined individual and/or synergistic effects of ALA, CLA and calcium (at levels similar to those in whole milk/dairy products) in regulating bone and adipose cell growth. ST2 stromal, MC3T3-L1 adipocyte-like and MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells were treated with: (a) linoleic acid (LNA):ALA ratios = 1-5:1; (b) individual/combined 80-90 % c9, t11 (9,11) and 5-10 % t10, c12 (10,12) CLA isomers; (c) 0.5-3.0 mM calcium; (d) combinations of (a), (b), (c); and (e) control. Local mediators, including eicosanoids and growth factors, were measured. (a) The optimal effect was found at the 4:1 LNA:ALA ratio where insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) production was the lowest in MC3T3-L1 cells. (b) All CLA isomer blends decreased MC3T3-L1 and increased MC3T3-E1 cell differentiation. (c) 1.5-2.5 mM calcium increased ST2 and MC3T3-E1, and decreased MC3T3-L1 cell proliferation. (d) Combination of 4:1 LNA:ALA + 90:10 % CLA + 2.0 mM calcium lowered MC3T3-L1 and increased MC3T3-E1 cell differentiation. Overall, the optimal LNA:ALA ratio to enhance osteoblastogenesis and inhibit adipogenesis was 4:1. This effect was enhanced by 90:10 % CLA + 2.0 mM calcium, indicating possible synergism of these dietary factors in promoting osteoblast and inhibiting adipocyte differentiation in cell cultures. PMID:23757205

  14. Evidence for a major role of antisense RNAs in cyanobacterial gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Georg, Jens; Voß, Björn; Scholz, Ingeborg; Mitschke, Jan; Wilde, Annegret; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2009-01-01

    Information on the numbers and functions of naturally occurring antisense RNAs (asRNAs) in eubacteria has thus far remained incomplete. Here, we screened the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for asRNAs using four different methods. In the final data set, the number of known noncoding RNAs rose from 6 earlier identified to 60 and of asRNAs from 1 to 73 (28 were verified using at least three methods). Among these, there are many asRNAs to housekeeping, regulatory or metabolic genes, as well as to genes encoding electron transport proteins. Transferring cultures to high light, carbon-limited conditions or darkness influenced the expression levels of several asRNAs, suggesting their functional relevance. Examples include the asRNA to rpl1, which accumulates in a light-dependent manner and may be required for processing the L11 r-operon and the SyR7 noncoding RNA, which is antisense to the murF 5′ UTR, possibly modulating murein biosynthesis. Extrapolated to the whole genome, ∼10% of all genes in Synechocystis are influenced by asRNAs. Thus, chromosomally encoded asRNAs may have an important function in eubacterial regulatory networks. PMID:19756044

  15. RNA sequencing uncovers antisense RNAs and novel small RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, Anaïs; Beer, Yan Yan; Reimegård, Johan; Chylinski, Krzysztof; Charpentier, Emmanuelle

    2016-02-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild to life-threatening infections. During the infectious process, the temporal and spatial expression of pathogenicity factors is tightly controlled by a complex network of protein and RNA regulators acting in response to various environmental signals. Here, we focus on the class of small RNA regulators (sRNAs) and present the first complete analysis of sRNA sequencing data in S. pyogenes. In the SF370 clinical isolate (M1 serotype), we identified 197 and 428 putative regulatory RNAs by visual inspection and bioinformatics screening of the sequencing data, respectively. Only 35 from the 197 candidates identified by visual screening were assigned a predicted function (T-boxes, ribosomal protein leaders, characterized riboswitches or sRNAs), indicating how little is known about sRNA regulation in S. pyogenes. By comparing our list of predicted sRNAs with previous S. pyogenes sRNA screens using bioinformatics or microarrays, 92 novel sRNAs were revealed, including antisense RNAs that are for the first time shown to be expressed in this pathogen. We experimentally validated the expression of 30 novel sRNAs and antisense RNAs. We show that the expression profile of 9 sRNAs including 2 predicted regulatory elements is affected by the endoribonucleases RNase III and/or RNase Y, highlighting the critical role of these enzymes in sRNA regulation. PMID:26580233

  16. In vitro characterization of two novel biodegradable vectors for the delivery of radiolabeled antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Shahhosseini, Soraya; Koslowsky, Ingrid; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh; Murray, David; Mercer, John

    2010-12-01

    The development of antisense oligonucleotides suitable for tumor targeting applications is hindered by low stability and bioavailability of oligonucleotides in vivo and by the absence of efficient and safe vectors for oligonucleotide delivery. Stabilization in vivo has been achieved through chemical modification of oligonucleotides by various means, but effective approaches to enhance their intracellular delivery are lacking. This study reports on the characterization in vitro of a fully phosphorothioated 20-mer oligonucleotide, complementary to p21 mRNA, radiolabeled with fluorine-18 using a thiol reactive prosthetic group. The potential of two novel synthetic block copolymers containing grafted polyamines on their hydrophobic blocks for vector-assisted cell delivery was studied in vitro. Extensive cellular uptake studies were performed in human colon carcinoma cell lines with enhanced or deficient p21 expression to evaluate and compare the uptake mechanism of naked and vectorized radiolabeled formulations. Uptake studies with the two novel biodegradable vectors showed a moderate increase in cell uptake of the radiofluorinated antisense oligonucleotide. The two vectors show, however, promising advantages over conventional lipidic vectors regarding their biocompatibility and subcellular distribution. PMID:21204767

  17. Non-coding RNA and Antisense RNA. Nature's Trash or Treasure?

    PubMed Central

    Knowling, Stuart; Morris, Kevin V.

    2011-01-01

    Although control of cellular function has classically been considered the responsibility of proteins, research over the last decade has elucidated many roles for RNA in regulation of not only the proteins that control cellular functions but also for the cellular functions themselves. In parallel to this advancement in knowledge about the regulatory roles of RNA there has been an explosion of knowledge about the role that epigenetics plays in controlling not only long-term cellular fate but also the short-term regulatory control of genes. Of particular interest is the crossover between these two worlds, a world where RNA can act out its part and subsequently elicit chromatin modifications that alter cellular function. Two main categories of RNA are examined here, non-coding RNA and antisense RNA both of which perform vital functions in controlling numerous genes, proteins and RNA itself. As the activities of non-coding and antisense RNA in both normal and aberrant cellular function are elucidated, so does the number of possible targets for pharmacopeic intervention. PMID:21843589

  18. Small regulatory RNAs in lambdoid bacteriophages and phage-derived plasmids: Not only antisense.

    PubMed

    Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Bloch, Sylwia; Licznerska, Katarzyna; Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Dydecka, Aleksandra; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-03-01

    Until recently, only two small regulatory RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages were known. These transcripts are derived from paQ and pO promoters. The former one is supposed to act as an antisense RNA for expression of the Q gene, encoding a transcription antitermination protein. The latter transcript, called oop RNA, was initially proposed to have a double role, in establishing expression of the cI gene and in providing a primer for DNA replication. Although the initially proposed mechanisms by which oop RNA could influence the choice between two alternative developmental pathways of the phage and the initiation of phage DNA replication were found not true, the pO promoter has been demonstrated to be important for both regulation of phage development and control of DNA replication. Namely, the pO-derived transcript is an antisense RNA for expression of the cII gene, and pO is a part of a dual promoter system responsible for regulation of initiation of DNA synthesis from the oriλ region. Very recent studies identified a battery of small RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages existing as prophages in chromosomes of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains. Some of them have very interesting functions, like anti-small RNAs. PMID:25111672

  19. Natural antisense RNA promotes 3′ end processing and maturation of MALAT1 lncRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Xinying; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Freier, Susan M.; Fei, Jingyi; Ha, Taekjip; Prasanth, Supriya G.; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V.

    2016-01-01

    The RNase P-mediated endonucleolytic cleavage plays a crucial role in the 3′ end processing and cellular accumulation of MALAT1, a nuclear-retained long noncoding RNA that promotes malignancy. The regulation of this cleavage event is largely undetermined. Here we characterize a broadly expressed natural antisense transcript at the MALAT1 locus, designated as TALAM1, that positively regulates MALAT1 levels by promoting the 3′ end cleavage and maturation of MALAT1 RNA. TALAM1 RNA preferentially localizes at the site of transcription, and also interacts with MALAT1 RNA. Depletion of TALAM1 leads to defects in the 3′ end cleavage reaction and compromises cellular accumulation of MALAT1. Conversely, overexpression of TALAM1 facilitates the cleavage reaction in trans. Interestingly, TALAM1 is also positively regulated by MALAT1 at the level of both transcription and RNA stability. Together, our data demonstrate a novel feed-forward positive regulatory loop that is established to maintain the high cellular levels of MALAT1, and also unravel the existence of sense-antisense mediated regulatory mechanism for cellular lncRNAs that display RNase P-mediated 3′ end processing. PMID:26826711

  20. Gene silencing of HIV chemokine receptors using ribozymes and single-stranded antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Amer; Zheng, Richard; Parlett, Terry; Shi, Xiaoju; Balaraman, Priyadhashini; Cheloufi, Sihem; Murphy, Brendan; Guntermann, Christine; Eagles, Peter

    2006-03-01

    The chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR5 are required for HIV-1 to enter cells, and the progression of HIV-1 infection to AIDS involves a switch in the co-receptor usage of the virus from CCR5 to CXCR4. These receptors therefore make attractive candidates for therapeutic intervention, and we have investigated the silencing of their genes by using ribozymes and single-stranded antisense RNAs. In the present study, we demonstrate using ribozymes that a depletion of CXCR4 and CCR5 mRNAs can be achieved simultaneously in human PBMCs (peripheral blood mononuclear cells), cells commonly used by the virus for infection and replication. Ribozyme activity leads to an inhibition of the cell-surface expression of both CCR5 and CXCR4, resulting in a significant inhibition of HIV-1 replication when PBMCs are challenged with the virus. In addition, we show that small single-stranded antisense RNAs can also be used to silence CCR5 and CXCR4 genes when delivered to PBMCs. This silencing is caused by selective degradation of receptor mRNAs. PMID:16293105

  1. Gene silencing of HIV chemokine receptors using ribozymes and single-stranded antisense RNA

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Amer; Zheng, Richard; Parlett, Terry; Shi, Xiaoju; Balaraman, Priyadhashini; Cheloufi, Sihem; Murphy, Brendan; Guntermann, Christine; Eagles, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR5 are required for HIV-1 to enter cells, and the progression of HIV-1 infection to AIDS involves a switch in the co-receptor usage of the virus from CCR5 to CXCR4. These receptors therefore make attractive candidates for therapeutic intervention, and we have investigated the silencing of their genes by using ribozymes and single-stranded antisense RNAs. In the present study, we demonstrate using ribozymes that a depletion of CXCR4 and CCR5 mRNAs can be achieved simultaneously in human PBMCs (peripheral blood mononuclear cells), cells commonly used by the virus for infection and replication. Ribozyme activity leads to an inhibition of the cell-surface expression of both CCR5 and CXCR4, resulting in a significant inhibition of HIV-1 replication when PBMCs are challenged with the virus. In addition, we show that small single-stranded antisense RNAs can also be used to silence CCR5 and CXCR4 genes when delivered to PBMCs. This silencing is caused by selective degradation of receptor mRNAs. PMID:16293105

  2. RNA sequencing uncovers antisense RNAs and novel small RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Le Rhun, Anaïs; Beer, Yan Yan; Reimegård, Johan; Chylinski, Krzysztof; Charpentier, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pyogenes is a human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild to life-threatening infections. During the infectious process, the temporal and spatial expression of pathogenicity factors is tightly controlled by a complex network of protein and RNA regulators acting in response to various environmental signals. Here, we focus on the class of small RNA regulators (sRNAs) and present the first complete analysis of sRNA sequencing data in S. pyogenes. In the SF370 clinical isolate (M1 serotype), we identified 197 and 428 putative regulatory RNAs by visual inspection and bioinformatics screening of the sequencing data, respectively. Only 35 from the 197 candidates identified by visual screening were assigned a predicted function (T-boxes, ribosomal protein leaders, characterized riboswitches or sRNAs), indicating how little is known about sRNA regulation in S. pyogenes. By comparing our list of predicted sRNAs with previous S. pyogenes sRNA screens using bioinformatics or microarrays, 92 novel sRNAs were revealed, including antisense RNAs that are for the first time shown to be expressed in this pathogen. We experimentally validated the expression of 30 novel sRNAs and antisense RNAs. We show that the expression profile of 9 sRNAs including 2 predicted regulatory elements is affected by the endoribonucleases RNase III and/or RNase Y, highlighting the critical role of these enzymes in sRNA regulation. PMID:26580233

  3. Vector insert-targeted integrative antisense expression system for plasmid stabilization.

    PubMed

    Luke, Jeremy M; Carnes, Aaron E; Hodgson, Clague P; Williams, James A

    2011-01-01

    Some DNA vaccine and gene therapy vector-encoded transgenes are toxic to the E. coli plasmid production host resulting in poor production yields. For plasmid products undergoing clinical evaluation, sequence modification to eliminate toxicity is undesirable because an altered vector is a new chemical entity. We hypothesized that: (1) insert-encoded toxicity is mediated by unintended expression of a toxic insert-encoded protein from spurious bacterial promoters; and (2) that toxicity could be eliminated with antisense RNA-mediated translation inhibition. We developed the pINT PR PL vector, a chromosomally integrable RNA expression vector, and utilized it to express insert-complementary (anti-insert) RNA from a single defined site in the bacterial chromosome. Anti-insert RNA eliminated leaky fluorescent protein expression from a target plasmid. A toxic retroviral gag pol helper plasmid produced in a gag pol anti-insert strain had fourfold improved plasmid fermentation yields. Plasmid fermentation yields were also fourfold improved when a DNA vaccine plasmid containing a toxic Influenza serotype H1 hemagglutinin transgene was grown in an H1 sense strand anti-insert production strain, suggesting that in this case toxicity was mediated by an antisense alternative reading frame-encoded peptide. This anti-insert chromosomal RNA expression technology is a general approach to improve production yields with plasmid-based vectors that encode toxic transgenes, or toxic alternative frame peptides. PMID:20607625

  4. Targeting gene expression in the preimplantation mouse embryo using morpholino antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Siddall, Laura S; Barcroft, Lisa C; Watson, Andrew J

    2002-12-01

    Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides act by blocking translation of their target gene products and are effective tools for down-regulating gene expression. The current study was conducted to define treatment conditions for the use of morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs) in mammalian preimplantation embryos, and to employ MOs to target genes and study gene function in the early embryo. For the first time, ethoxylated polyethylenimine (EPEI), Lipofectin or Lysolecithin delivery agents were employed in combination with a fluorescent control MO and an alpha-catenin specific MO, to down-regulate gene expression during murine preimplantation development. Experiments applied to both two- and eight-cell stage murine preimplantation embryos contrasted the efficacy of MO concentrations of 1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 microM and treatment delivery times of 3, 6, 24, and 48 hr. Continuous treatment of two-cell embryos with Lipofectin and 20 microM alpha-catenin MO for 48 hr resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in development to the blastocyst stage and was accompanied by a marked reduction in alpha-catenin protein. These results indicate that morpholino antisense oligonucleotides are effective tools for down-regulating gene expression during mammalian preimplantation development. PMID:12412042

  5. Antisense Mediated Splicing Modulation For Inherited Metabolic Diseases: Challenges for Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Belen; Vilageliu, Lluisa; Grinberg, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, research in targeted mutation therapies has experienced significant advances, especially in the field of rare diseases. In particular, the efficacy of antisense therapy for suppression of normal, pathogenic, or cryptic splice sites has been demonstrated in cellular and animal models and has already reached the clinical trials phase for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In different inherited metabolic diseases, splice switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) have been used with success in patients' cells to force pseudoexon skipping or to block cryptic splice sites, in both cases recovering normal transcript and protein and correcting the enzyme deficiency. However, future in vivo studies require individual approaches for delivery depending on the gene defect involved, given the different patterns of tissue and organ expression. Herein we review the state of the art of antisense therapy targeting RNA splicing in metabolic diseases, grouped according to their expression patterns—multisystemic, hepatic, or in central nervous system (CNS)—and summarize the recent progress achieved in the field of in vivo delivery of oligonucleotides to each organ or system. Successful body-wide distribution of SSOs and preferential distribution in the liver after systemic administration have been reported in murine models for different diseases, while for CNS limited data are available, although promising results with intratechal injections have been achieved. PMID:24506780

  6. Translation efficiency of mRNAs is increased by antisense oligonucleotides targeting upstream open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Migawa, Michael T; Vickers, Timothy A; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-08-01

    Increasing the levels of therapeutic proteins in vivo remains challenging. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are often used to downregulate gene expression or to modify RNA splicing, but antisense technology has not previously been used to directly increase the production of selected proteins. Here we used a class of modified ASOs that bind to mRNA sequences in upstream open reading frames (uORFs) to specifically increase the amounts of protein translated from a downstream primary ORF (pORF). Using ASO treatment, we increased the amount of proteins expressed from four genes by 30-150% in a dose-dependent manner in both human and mouse cells. Notably, systemic treatment of mice with ASO resulted in an ∼80% protein increase of LRPPRC. The ASO-mediated increase in protein expression was sequence-specific, occurred at the level of translation and was dependent on helicase activity. We also found that the type of RNA modification and the position of modified nucleotides in ASOs affected translation of a pORF. ASOs are a useful class of therapeutic agents with broad utility. PMID:27398791

  7. Antisense inhibition of coagulation factor XI prolongs APTT without increased bleeding risk in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Younis, Husam S; Crosby, Jeff; Huh, Jung-Im; Lee, Hong Soo; Rime, Soyub; Monia, Brett; Henry, Scott P

    2012-03-01

    A strategy to produce sufficient anticoagulant properties with reduced risk of bleeding may be possible through inhibition of factor XI (FXI), a component of the intrinsic coagulation cascade. The objective of this work was to determine the safety profile of ISIS 416858, a 2'-methoxyethoxy (2'-MOE) antisense oligonucleotide inhibitor of FXI, with focus on assessment of bleeding risk. Cynomolgus monkeys administered ISIS 416858 (4, 8, 12, and 40 mg/kg/wk, subcutaneous) for up to 13 weeks produced a dose-dependent reduction in FXI (mRNA in liver and plasma activity) and a concomitant increase in activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). ISIS 416858 (20 or 40 mg/kg/wk) reduced plasma FXI activity by 80% at 4 weeks of treatment that resulted in a 33% increase in APTT by 13 weeks with no effects on PT, platelets, or increased bleeding following partial tail amputation or gum and skin laceration. The dose-dependent presence of basophilic granules in multiple tissues in ISIS 416858-treated animals was an expected histologic change for a 2'-MOE antisense oligonucleotide, and no toxicity was attributed to hepatic FXI reduction. Basophilic granules reflect cellular drug uptake and subsequent visualization on hematoxylin staining. These results suggest that ISIS 416858 has an acceptable preclinical safety profile and is a promising clinical candidate to treat thrombotic disease. PMID:22246038

  8. Genomic SELEX for Hfq-binding RNAs identifies genomic aptamers predominantly in antisense transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, C.; Gesell, T.; Zimmermann, B.; Schoeberl, U.; Bilusic, I.; Rajkowitsch, L.; Waldsich, C.; von Haeseler, A.; Schroeder, R.

    2010-01-01

    An unexpectedly high number of regulatory RNAs have been recently discovered that fine-tune the function of genes at all levels of expression. We employed Genomic SELEX, a method to identify protein-binding RNAs encoded in the genome, to search for further regulatory RNAs in Escherichia coli. We used the global regulator protein Hfq as bait, because it can interact with a large number of RNAs, promoting their interaction. The enriched SELEX pool was subjected to deep sequencing, and 8865 sequences were mapped to the E. coli genome. These short sequences represent genomic Hfq-aptamers and are part of potential regulatory elements within RNA molecules. The motif 5′-AAYAAYAA-3′ was enriched in the selected RNAs and confers low-nanomolar affinity to Hfq. The motif was confirmed to bind Hfq by DMS footprinting. The Hfq aptamers are 4-fold more frequent on the antisense strand of protein coding genes than on the sense strand. They were enriched opposite to translation start sites or opposite to intervening sequences between ORFs in operons. These results expand the repertoire of Hfq targets and also suggest that Hfq might regulate the expression of a large number of genes via interaction with cis-antisense RNAs. PMID:20348540

  9. Antisense mediated splicing modulation for inherited metabolic diseases: challenges for delivery.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Belen; Vilageliu, Lluisa; Grinberg, Daniel; Desviat, Lourdes R

    2014-02-01

    In the past few years, research in targeted mutation therapies has experienced significant advances, especially in the field of rare diseases. In particular, the efficacy of antisense therapy for suppression of normal, pathogenic, or cryptic splice sites has been demonstrated in cellular and animal models and has already reached the clinical trials phase for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In different inherited metabolic diseases, splice switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) have been used with success in patients' cells to force pseudoexon skipping or to block cryptic splice sites, in both cases recovering normal transcript and protein and correcting the enzyme deficiency. However, future in vivo studies require individual approaches for delivery depending on the gene defect involved, given the different patterns of tissue and organ expression. Herein we review the state of the art of antisense therapy targeting RNA splicing in metabolic diseases, grouped according to their expression patterns-multisystemic, hepatic, or in central nervous system (CNS)-and summarize the recent progress achieved in the field of in vivo delivery of oligonucleotides to each organ or system. Successful body-wide distribution of SSOs and preferential distribution in the liver after systemic administration have been reported in murine models for different diseases, while for CNS limited data are available, although promising results with intratechal injections have been achieved. PMID:24506780

  10. Simultaneous characterization of sense and antisense genomic processes by the double-stranded hidden Markov model.

    PubMed

    Glas, Julia; Dümcke, Sebastian; Zacher, Benedikt; Poron, Don; Gagneur, Julien; Tresch, Achim

    2016-03-18

    Hidden Markov models (HMMs) have been extensively used to dissect the genome into functionally distinct regions using data such as RNA expression or DNA binding measurements. It is a challenge to disentangle processes occurring on complementary strands of the same genomic region. We present the double-stranded HMM (dsHMM), a model for the strand-specific analysis of genomic processes. We applied dsHMM to yeast using strand specific transcription data, nucleosome data, and protein binding data for a set of 11 factors associated with the regulation of transcription.The resulting annotation recovers the mRNA transcription cycle (initiation, elongation, termination) while correctly predicting strand-specificity and directionality of the transcription process. We find that pre-initiation complex formation is an essentially undirected process, giving rise to a large number of bidirectional promoters and to pervasive antisense transcription. Notably, 12% of all transcriptionally active positions showed simultaneous activity on both strands. Furthermore, dsHMM reveals that antisense transcription is specifically suppressed by Nrd1, a yeast termination factor. PMID:26578558

  11. Delivery of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide lipopolyplex nanoparticles assembled by microfluidic hydrodynamic focusing

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Chee Guan; Zhang, Xulang; Liu, Shujun; Golan, Sharon; Yu, Bo; Yang, Xiaojuan; Guan, Jingjiao; Jin, Yan; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Chan, Kenneth K; Byrd, John C.; Lee, Robert J.; Marcucci, Guido; Lee, L. James

    2015-01-01

    A multi-inlet microfluidic hydrodynamic focusing (MF) system to prepare lipopolyplex (LP) containing Bcl-2 antisense deoxyoligonucleotide (ODN) was developed and evaluated. The lipopolyplex nanoparticles consist of ODN:protamine:lipids (1:0.3:12.5 wt/wt ratio) and the lipids included DC-Chol:egg PC:PEG–DSPE (40:58:2 mol/mol%). Using K562 human erythroleukemia cells, which contain an abundance of Bcl-2 and overexpression of transferrin receptors (TfR), and G3139 (oblimerson sodium or Genasense™) as a model cell line and drug, respectively, the Bcl-2 down-regulation at the mRNA and protein levels as well as cellular uptake and apoptosis was compared between the conventional bulk mixing (BM) method and the MF method. The lipopolyplex size and surface charge were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential (ζ) measurement, respectively, while the ODN encapsulation efficiency was determined by gel electrophoresis. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) was used to determine the morphology of LPs. Our results demonstrated that MF produced LP nanoparticles had similar structures but smaller size and size distribution compared to BM LP nanoparticles. MF LP nanoparticles had higher level of Bcl-2 antisense uptake and showed more efficient down-regulation of Bcl-2 protein level than BM LP nanoparticles. PMID:19716852

  12. Transcription of rat mitochondrial NADH-dehydrogenase subunits. Presence of antisense and precursor RNA species.

    PubMed

    Tullo, A; Tanzariello, F; D'Erchia, A M; Nardelli, M; Papeo, P A; Sbisà, E; Saccone, C

    1994-10-31

    We have characterized the transcriptional pattern of the rat mitochondrial ND6-containing region in vivo. We have identified a stable polyadenylated RNA species complementary for the full length of the ND6 mRNA. The analysis of the ND5 region has revealed the presence of an antisense RNA only at its 3' end. The presence of these stable antisense species complementary to structural genes is intriguing and suggests a possible regulatory function. The quantitative analyses have demonstrated that the H transcripts, both codogenic and non-codogenic, are more stable than the L transcripts. We have defined the 5' end of the ND6 mRNA at the level of the ATG downstream of the tRNA(Glu). The mapping of the ND1 5' end has demonstrated that GTG is the first codon of the mRNA. Our findings suggest that the post-transcriptional mechanisms involved in the expression of the mt genome are much more numerous and complex than those already described in the literature. PMID:7957896

  13. On Measuring miRNAs after Transient Transfection of Mimics or Antisense Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Daniel W.; Bracken, Cameron P.; Szubert, Jan M.; Goodall, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to alter microRNA (miRNA) abundance is crucial for studying miRNA function. To achieve this there is widespread use of both exogenous double-stranded miRNA mimics for transient over-expression, and single stranded antisense RNAs (antimiRs) for miRNA inhibition. The success of these manipulations is often assessed using qPCR, but this does not accurately report the level of functional miRNA. Here, we draw attention to this discrepancy, which is overlooked in many published reports. We measured the functionality of exogenous miRNA by comparing the total level of transfected miRNA in whole cell extracts to the level of miRNA bound to Argonaute following transfection and show that the supraphysiological levels of transfected miRNA frequently seen using qPCR do not represent the functional levels, because the majority of transfected RNA that is detected is vesicular and not accessible for loading into Argonaute as functionally active miRNAs. In the case of microRNA inhibition by transient transfection with antisense inhibitors, there is also the potential for discrepancy, because following cell lysis the abundant inhibitor levels from cellular vesicles can directly interfere with the PCR reaction used to measure miRNA level. PMID:23358900

  14. Irradiation of Human Prostate Cancer Cells Increases Uptake of Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotide

    SciTech Connect

    Anai, Satoshi; Brown, Bob D.; Nakamura, Kogenta; Goodison, Steve; Hirao, Yoshihiko; Rosser, Charles J. . E-mail: charles.rosser@urology.ufl.edu

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether irradiation before antisense Bcl-2 oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) administration enhances tissue uptake, and whether periodic dosing enhances cellular uptake of fluorescently labeled ODN relative to constant dosing. Methods and Materials: PC-3-Bcl-2 cells (prostate cancer cell line engineered to overexpress Bcl-2) were subjected to increasing doses of irradiation (0-10 Gy) with or without increasing concentrations of fluorescently labeled antisense Bcl-2 ODN (G4243). The fluorescent signal intensity was quantified as the total grain area with commercial software. In addition, PC-3-Bcl-2 subcutaneous xenograft tumors were treated with or without irradiation in combination with various dosing schemas of G4243. The uptake of fluorescent G4243 in tumors was quantitated. Results: The uptake of G4243 was increased in prostate cancer cells exposed to low doses of irradiation both in vitro and in vivo. Irradiation before G4243 treatment resulted in increased fluorescent signal intensity in xenograft tumors compared with those irradiated after G4243 treatment. A single weekly dose of G4243 produced higher G4243 uptake in xenograft tumors than daily dosing, even when the total dose administered per week was held constant. Conclusions: These findings suggest that ionizing radiation increases the uptake of therapeutic ODN in target tissues and, thus, has potential to increase the efficacy of ODN in clinical applications.

  15. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-01-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense–antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis. PMID:23650872

  16. Antisense-mediated exon skipping: A versatile tool with therapeutic and research applications

    PubMed Central

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.

    2007-01-01

    Antisense-mediated modulation of splicing is one of the few fields where antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) have been able to live up to their expectations. In this approach, AONs are implemented to restore cryptic splicing, to change levels of alternatively spliced genes, or, in case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), to skip an exon in order to restore a disrupted reading frame. The latter allows the generation of internally deleted, but largely functional, dystrophin proteins and would convert a severe DMD into a milder Becker muscular dystrophy phenotype. In fact, exon skipping is currently one of the most promising therapeutic tools for DMD, and a successful first-in-man trial has recently been completed. In this review the applicability of exon skipping for DMD and other diseases is described. For DMD AONs have been designed for numerous exons, which has given us insight into their mode of action, splicing in general, and splicing of the DMD gene in particular. In addition, retrospective analysis resulted in guidelines for AON design for DMD and most likely other genes as well. This knowledge allows us to optimize therapeutic exon skipping, but also opens up a range of other applications for the exon skipping approach. PMID:17684229

  17. Locked nucleic acid couples with Fok I nucleases to target and cleave hepatitis B virus's gene in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Ma; Hongyan, Chen; Huaxing, Zhu; Wei, Li; Daru, Lu

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a dented double-stranded DNA virus. After infecting human hepatic cells, it forms cccDNA that replicates persistently and integrates randomly into the host’s genome during the process of reserve transcription. On average, in each cell with chronic HBV infection, there are about 33 copies of cccDNA with a half of 35-57 days, which can be difficult to eradicate. A new strategy is to inhibit HBV transcription by using locked nucleic acid (LNA). Besides, cleaving HBV genome by targeted genome editing technologies could potentially cure patients. In this study, we explored new genome editing tools for HBV treatment. Based on LNA’s ability to form triple helix by binding to duplex DNA, its stability towards nuclease and polymerase, and its sensitivity to single base mismatches, we designed LNA-modified oligonucleotides as DNA binding domain to effectively increase the specificity of target gene recognition. Meanwhile, by utilizing the small molecular weight and dimerization dependent activity of nuclease Fok I, we used Fok I recombinant dimer protein as DNA cleavage domain. Here, we established a method by chemical coupling of LNA-oligonucleotide with Fok I cleavage domain, and also validated the targeted cleavage of HBV genes with our new tools in vitro. These results provide new possibilities for future in vivo anti-virus gene therapy with high specificity and no integration risk. PMID:27103458

  18. Antisense Inhibition of Expression of Cysteine Proteinases Affects Entamoeba histolytica-Induced Formation of Liver Abscess in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Ankri, Serge; Stolarsky, Tamara; Bracha, Rivka; Padilla-Vaca, Felipe; Mirelman, David

    1999-01-01

    Trophozoites of virulent Entamoeba histolytica transfected with the antisense gene encoding cysteine proteinase 5 (CP5) have only 10% of the CP activity but retain their cytopathic activity on mammalian monolayers. In the present study we found that the transfected trophozoites with low levels of CP activity were incapable of inducing the formation of liver lesions in hamsters. PMID:9864246

  19. Targeting protein kinase C-alpha (PKC-alpha) in cancer with the phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide aprinocarsen.

    PubMed

    Lahn, Michael; Sundell, Karen; Moore, Stephanie

    2003-12-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) offer a novel pharmacological platform to develop highly specific drugs. As shown by the clinical development of aprinocarsen, an ASO directed against protein kinase C-alpha (PKC-alpha), this platform has made a remarkable advance from the bench to the bedside. This review summarizes the rationale of the early development of aprinocarsen and current clinical experience. PMID:14751841

  20. Reduction of methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress tolerance in antisense transgenic tobacco seedlings through restricted expression of StAPX *

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei-Hong; Wang, Yong; He, Hua-Gang; Li, Xue; Song, Wan; Du, Bin; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Ascorbate peroxidases are directly involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging by reducing hydrogen peroxide to water. The tomato thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase gene (StAPX) was introduced into tobacco. RNA gel blot analysis confirmed that StAPX in tomato leaves was induced by methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress. The sense transgenic seedlings exhibited higher tAPX activity than that of the wild type (WT) plants under oxidative stress conditions, while the antisense seedlings exhibited lower tAPX activity. Lower APX activities of antisense transgenic seedlings caused higher malondialdehyde contents and relative electrical conductivity. The sense transgenic seedlings with higher tAPX activity maintained higher chlorophyll content and showed the importance of tAPX in maintaining the optimal chloroplast development under methylviologen stress conditions, whereas the antisense lines maintained lower chlorophyll content than WT seedlings. Results indicated that the over-expression of StAPX enhanced tolerance to methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress in sense transgenic tobacco early seedlings, whereas the suppression of StAPX in antisense transgenic seedlings showed high sensitivity to oxidative stress. PMID:23825143

  1. Large-scale analysis of antisense transcription in wheat using the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are transcripts of the opposite DNA strand to the sense-strand either at the same locus (cis-encoded) or a different locus (trans-encoded). They can affect gene expression at multiple stages including transcription, RNA processing and transport, and translation....

  2. Additive effect of mPer1 and mPer2 antisense oligonucleotides on light-induced phase shift.

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, H; Takahashi, S; Moriya, T; Inouye, S T; Okamura, H; Akiyama, M; Shibata, S

    2001-01-22

    It is well known that light induces both mPer1 and mPer2 mRNA in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. We have reported that mPer1 antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) inhibited the light-induced phase delays of mouse locomotor rhythm. In this study, we asked whether both or either mPer1 or mPer2 expression is necessary to induce the phase shift. We examined the effects of inhibition of mRNA expression on light-induced phase delays of mouse circadian behavior rhythm. Light-induced phase delays were moderately attenuated by microinjection of mPer1 or mPer2 antisense ODN, but not by mPer3 antisense or mPer1, mPer2 scrambled ODNs, whereas following simultaneous injection of both mPer1 and mPer2 antisense ODNs they disappeared. The present results suggest that acute induction of mPer1 and mPer2 gene play an additive effect on photic entrainment. PMID:11201072

  3. Partial rescue of a lethal phenotype of fragile bones in transgenic mice with a chimeric antisense gene directed against a mutated collagen gene.

    PubMed Central

    Khillan, J S; Li, S W; Prockop, D J

    1994-01-01

    Previously, transgenic mice were prepared that developed a lethal phenotype of fragile bones because they expressed an internally deleted mini-gene for the pro alpha 1(I) chain of human type I procollagen. The shortened pro alpha 1(I) chains synthesized from the human transgene bound to and produced degradation of normal pro alpha 1(I) chains synthesized from the normal mouse alleles. Here we assembled an antisense gene that was similar to the internally deleted COL1A1 minigene but the 3' half of the gene was inverted so as to code for an antisense RNA. Transgenic mice expressing the antisense gene had a normal phenotype, apparently because the antisense gene contained human sequences instead of mouse sequences. Two lines of mice expressing the antisense gene were bred to two lines of transgenic mice expressing the mini-gene. In mice that inherited both genes, the incidence of the lethal fragile bone phenotype was reduced from 92% to 27%. The effects of the antisense gene were directly demonstrated by an increase in the ratio of normal mouse pro alpha 1(I) chains to human mini-pro alpha 1(I) chains in tissues from mice that inherited both genes and had a normal phenotype. The results raise the possibility that chimeric gene constructs that contain intron sequences and in which only the second half of a gene is inverted may be particularly effective as antisense genes. Images PMID:8022775

  4. [Connection of magnetic antisense probe with SK-Br-3 oncocyte mRNA nucleotide detected by high resolution atomic force microscope].

    PubMed

    Tan, Shude; Ouyang, Yu; Li, Xinyou; Wen, Ming; Li, Shaolin

    2011-06-01

    The present paper is aimed to detect superparamagnetic iron oxide labeled c-erbB2 oncogene antisense oligonucleotide probe (magnetic antisense probe) connected with SK-Br-3 oncocyte mRNA nucleotide by high resolution atomic force microscope (AFM). We transfected SK-Br-3 oncocyte with magnetic antisense probe, then observed the cells by AFM with high resolution and detected protein expression and magnetic resonance imagine (MRI). The high resolution AFM clearly showed the connection of the oligonucleotide remote end of magnetic antisense probe with the mRNA nucleotide of oncocyte. The expression of e-erbB2 protein in SK-Br3 cells were highly inhibited by using magnetic antisense probe. We then obtained the lowest signal to noise ratio (SNR) of SK-Br-3 oncocyte transfected with magnetic antisense probe by MRI (P<0.05). These experiments demonstrated that the high resolution AFM could be used to show the binding of magnetic antisense probe and SK-Br-3 mRNA of tumor cell nuclear. PMID:21774198

  5. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 produces a spliced antisense transcript encoding a protein that lacks a classic bZIP domain but still inhibits Tax2-mediated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Halin, Marilène; Douceron, Estelle; Clerc, Isabelle; Journo, Chloé; Ko, Nga Ling; Landry, Sébastien; Murphy, Edward L.; Gessain, Antoine; Lemasson, Isabelle; Mesnard, Jean-Michel

    2009-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and type 2 (HTLV-2) retroviruses infect T lymphocytes. The minus strand of the HTLV-1 genome encodes HBZ, a protein that could play a role in the development of leukemia in infected patients. Herein, we demonstrate that the complementary strand of the HTLV-2 genome also encodes a protein that we named APH-2 for “antisense protein of HTLV-2.” APH-2 mRNA is spliced, polyadenylated, and initiates in the 3′-long terminal repeat at different positions. This transcript was detected in all HTLV-2–infected cell lines and short-term culture of lymphocytes obtained from HTLV-2 African patients tested and in 4 of 15 HTLV-2–infected blood donors. The APH-2 protein is 183 amino acids long, is localized in the cell nucleus, and is detected in vivo. Despite the lack of a consensus basic leucine zipper domain, APH-2 interacts with cyclic adenosine monophosphate-response element binding protein (CREB) and represses Tax2-mediated transcription in Tax2-expressing cells and in cells transfected with an HTLV-2 molecular clone. Altogether, our results demonstrate the existence of an antisense strand–encoded protein in HTLV-2, which could represent an important player in the development of disorders, such as lymphocytosis, which is frequently observed in HTLV-2 patients. PMID:19602711

  6. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 produces a spliced antisense transcript encoding a protein that lacks a classic bZIP domain but still inhibits Tax2-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Halin, Marilène; Douceron, Estelle; Clerc, Isabelle; Journo, Chloé; Ko, Nga Ling; Landry, Sébastien; Murphy, Edward L; Gessain, Antoine; Lemasson, Isabelle; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Barbeau, Benoît; Mahieux, Renaud

    2009-09-17

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and type 2 (HTLV-2) retroviruses infect T lymphocytes. The minus strand of the HTLV-1 genome encodes HBZ, a protein that could play a role in the development of leukemia in infected patients. Herein, we demonstrate that the complementary strand of the HTLV-2 genome also encodes a protein that we named APH-2 for "antisense protein of HTLV-2." APH-2 mRNA is spliced, polyadenylated, and initiates in the 3'-long terminal repeat at different positions. This transcript was detected in all HTLV-2-infected cell lines and short-term culture of lymphocytes obtained from HTLV-2 African patients tested and in 4 of 15 HTLV-2-infected blood donors. The APH-2 protein is 183 amino acids long, is localized in the cell nucleus, and is detected in vivo. Despite the lack of a consensus basic leucine zipper domain, APH-2 interacts with cyclic adenosine monophosphate-response element binding protein (CREB) and represses Tax2-mediated transcription in Tax2-expressing cells and in cells transfected with an HTLV-2 molecular clone. Altogether, our results demonstrate the existence of an antisense strand-encoded protein in HTLV-2, which could represent an important player in the development of disorders, such as lymphocytosis, which is frequently observed in HTLV-2 patients. PMID:19602711

  7. Suppression of autocrine and paracrine functions of basic fibroblast growth factor by stable expression of perlecan antisense cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Aviezer, D; Iozzo, R V; Noonan, D M; Yayon, A

    1997-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) play a critical role in the formation of distinct fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-HS complexes, augmenting high-affinity binding and receptor activation. Perlecan, a secreted HSPG abundant in proliferating cells, is capable of inducing FGF-receptor interactions in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. Stable and specific reduction of perlecan levels in mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and human metastatic melanoma cells has been achieved by expression of antisense cDNA corresponding to the N-terminal and HS attachment domains of perlecan. Long-term perlecan downregulation is evidenced by reduced levels of perlecan mRNA and core protein as indicated by Northern blot analysis, immunoblots, and immunohistochemistry, using DNA probes and antibodies specific to mouse or human perlecan. The response of antisense perlecan-expressing cells to increasing concentrations of basic FGF (bFGF) is dramatically reduced in comparison to that in wild-type or vector-transfected cells, as measured by thymidine incorporation and rate of proliferation. Furthermore, receptor binding and affinity labeling of antisense perlecan-transfected cells with 125I-bFGF is markedly inhibited, indicating that eliminating perlecan expression results in reduced high-affinity bFGF binding. Both the binding and mitogenic response of antisense-perlecan-expressing clones to bFGF can be rescued by exogenous heparin or perlecan. These results support the notion that perlecan is a major accessory receptor for bFGF in mouse fibroblasts and human melanomas and point to the possible use of perlecan antisense constructs as specific modulators of bFGF-mediated responses. PMID:9121441

  8. Nanotechnologies and controlled release systems for the delivery of antisense oligonucleotides and small interfering RNA

    PubMed Central

    Fattal, Elias; Barratt, Gillian

    2009-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides and small interfering RNA have enormous potential for the treatment of a number of diseases, including cancer. However, several impediments to their widespread use as drugs still have to be overcome: in particular their lack of stability in physiological fluids and their poor penetration into cells. Association with or encapsulation within nano-and microsized drug delivery systems could help to solve these problems. In this review, we describe the progress that has been made using delivery systems composed of natural or synthetic polymers in the form of complexes, nanoparticles or microparticles. This article is part of a themed section on Vector Design and Drug Delivery. For a list of all articles in this section see the end of this paper, or visit: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=200 PMID:19366348

  9. R-loop stabilization represses antisense transcription at the Arabidopsis FLC locus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qianwen; Csorba, Tibor; Skourti-Stathaki, Konstantina; Proudfoot, Nicholas J; Dean, Caroline

    2013-05-01

    Roles for long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in gene expression are emerging, but regulation of the lncRNA itself is poorly understood. We have identified a homeodomain protein, AtNDX, that regulates COOLAIR, a set of antisense transcripts originating from the 3' end of Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). AtNDX associates with single-stranded DNA rather than double-stranded DNA non-sequence-specifically in vitro, and localizes to a heterochromatic region in the COOLAIR promoter in vivo. Single-stranded DNA was detected in vivo as part of an RNA-DNA hybrid, or R-loop, that covers the COOLAIR promoter. R-loop stabilization mediated by AtNDX inhibits COOLAIR transcription, which in turn modifies FLC expression. Differential stabilization of R-loops could be a general mechanism influencing gene expression in many organisms. PMID:23641115

  10. A cytoplasmic pathway for gapmer antisense oligonucleotide-mediated gene silencing in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Castanotto, Daniela; Lin, Min; Kowolik, Claudia; Wang, LiAnn; Ren, Xiao-Qin; Soifer, Harris S.; Koch, Troels; Hansen, Bo Rode; Oerum, Henrik; Armstrong, Brian; Wang, Zhigang; Bauer, Paul; Rossi, John; Stein, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are known to trigger mRNA degradation in the nucleus via an RNase H-dependent mechanism. We have now identified a putative cytoplasmic mechanism through which ASO gapmers silence their targets when transfected or delivered gymnotically (i.e. in the absence of any transfection reagent). We have shown that the ASO gapmers can interact with the Ago-2 PAZ domain and can localize into GW-182 mRNA-degradation bodies (GW-bodies). The degradation products of the targeted mRNA, however, are not generated by Ago-2-directed cleavage. The apparent identification of a cytoplasmic pathway complements the previously known nuclear activity of ASOs and concurrently suggests that nuclear localization is not an absolute requirement for gene silencing. PMID:26433227

  11. Biodegradable polymer nanocarriers for therapeutic antisense microRNA delivery in living animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Sekar, Narayana M.; Sekar, Thillai V.

    2012-03-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenous regulators of gene expression, deregulated in several cellular diseases including cancer. Altering the cellular microenvironment by modulating the microRNAs functions can regulate different genes involved in major cellular processes, and this approach is now being investigated as a promising new generation of molecularly targeted anti-cancer therapies. AntagomiRs (Antisense-miRNAs) are a novel class of chemically modified stable oligonucleotides used for blocking the functions of endogenous microRNAs, which are overexpressed. A key challenge in achieving effective microRNAbased therapeutics lies in the development of an efficient delivery system capable of specifically delivering antisense oligonucleotides and target cancer cells in living animals. We are now developing an effective delivery system designed to selectively deliver antagomiR- 21 and antagomiR-10b to triple negative breast cancer cells, and to revert tumor cell metastasis and invasiveness. The FDA-approved biodegradable PLGA-nanoparticles were selected as a carrier for antagomiRs delivery. Chemically modified antagomiRs (antagomiR-21 and antagomiR-10b) were co-encapsulated in PEGylated-PLGA-nanoparticles by using the double-emulsification (W/O/W) solvent evaporation method, and the resulting average particle size of 150-200nm was used for different in vitro and in vivo experiments. The antagomiR encapsulated PLGA-nanoparticles were evaluated for their in vitro antagomiRs delivery, intracellular release profile, and antagomiRs functional effects, by measuring the endogenous cellular targets, and the cell growth and metastasis. The xenografts of tumor cells in living mice were used for evaluating the anti-metastatic and anti-invasive properties of cells. The results showed that the use of PLGA for antagomiR delivery is not only efficient in crossing cell membrane, but can also maintain functional intracellular antagomiRs level for a extended period of time and achieve

  12. Lipid-Albumin Nanoparticles (LAN) for Therapeutic Delivery of Antisense Oligonucleotide against HIF-1α.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Quan, Jishan; Zhang, Mengzi; Yung, Bryant C; Cheng, Xinwei; Liu, Yang; Lee, Young B; Ahn, Chang-Ho; Kim, Deog Joong; Lee, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Lipid-albumin nanoparticles (LAN) were synthesized for delivery of RX-0047, an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) against the hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) to solid tumor. These lipid nanoparticles (LNs) incorporated a human serum albumin-pentaethylenehexamine (HSA-PEHA) conjugate, which is cationic and can form electrostatic complexes with negatively charged oligonucleotides. The delivery efficiency of LAN-RX-0047 was investigated in KB cells and a KB murine xenograft model. When KB cells were treated with LAN-RX-0047, significant HIF-1α downregulation and enhanced cellular uptake were observed compared to LN-RX-0047. LN-RX-0047 and LAN-RX-0047 showed similar cytotoxicity against KB cells with IC50 values of 19.3 ± 3.8 and 20.1 ± 4.2 μM, respectively. LAN-RX-0047 was shown to be taken up by the cells via the macropinocytosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis pathways while LN-RX-0047 was taken up by cells via caveolae-mediated endocytosis. In the KB xenograft tumor model, LAN-RX-0047 exhibited tumor suppressive activity and significantly reduced intratumoral HIF-1α expression compared to LN-RX-0047. Furthermore, LAN-RX-0047 greatly increased survival time of mice bearing KB-1 xenograft tumors at doses of either 3 mg/kg or 16 mg/kg. These results indicated that LAN-RX-0047 is a highly effective vehicle for therapeutic delivery of antisense agents to tumor. PMID:27253378

  13. CD133 antisense suppresses cancer cell growth and increases sensitivity to cisplatin in vitro

    PubMed Central

    BLANCAS-MOSQUEDA, MARISOL; ZAPATA-BENAVIDES, PABLO; ZAMORA-ÁVILA, DIANA; SAAVEDRA-ALONSO, SANTIAGO; MANILLA-MUÑOZ, EDGAR; FRANCO-MOLINA, MOISÉS; DE LA PEÑA, CARMEN MONDRAGÓN; RODRÍGUEZ-PADILLA, CRISTINA

    2012-01-01

    The increased incidence of cancer in recent years is associated with a high rate of mortality. Numerous types of cancer have a low percentage of CD133+ cells, which have similar features to stem cells. The CD133 molecule is involved in apoptosis and cell proliferation. The aim of this study was to determine the biological effect of CD133 suppression and its role in the chemosensitization of cancer cell lines. RT-PCR and immunocytochemical analyses indicated that CD133 was expressed in the cancer cell lines B16F10, MCF7 and INER51. Downregulation of CD133 by transfection with an antisense sequence (As-CD133) resulted in a decrease in cancer cell viability of up to 52, 47 and 22% in B16F10, MCF-7 and INER51 cancer cell lines, respectively. This decreased viability appeared to be due to the induction of apoptosis. In addition, treatment with As-CD133 in combination with cisplatin had a synergic effect in all of the cancer cell lines analyzed, and in particular, significantly decreased the viability of B16F10 cancer cells compared with each treatment separately (3.1% viability for the combined treatment compared with 48% for 0.4 μg As-CD133 and 25% for 5 ng/μl cisplatin; P<0.05). The results indicate that the downregulation of CD133 by antisense is a potential therapeutic target for cancer and has a synergistic effect when administered with minimal doses of the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin, suggesting that this combination strategy may be applied in cancer treatment. PMID:23226746

  14. Effect of Terminal Groups of Dendrimers in the Complexation with Antisense Oligonucleotides and Cell Uptake.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Miranda, Valeria; Peñaloza, Juan Pablo; Araya-Durán, Ingrid; Reyes, Rodrigo; Vidaurre, Soledad; Romero, Valentina; Fuentes, Juan; Céric, Francisco; Velásquez, Luis; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Otero, Carolina

    2016-12-01

    Poly(amidoamine) dendrimers are the most recognized class of dendrimer. Amino-terminated (PAMAM-NH2) and hydroxyl-terminated (PAMAM-OH) dendrimers of generation 4 are widely used, since they are commercially available. Both have different properties, mainly based on their different overall charges at physiological pH. Currently, an important function of dendrimers as carriers of short single-stranded DNA has been applied. These molecules, known as antisense oligonucleotides (asODNs), are able to inhibit the expression of a target mRNA. Whereas PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers have shown to be able to transfect plasmid DNA, PAMAM-OH dendrimers have not shown the same successful results. However, little is known about their interaction with shorter and more flexible molecules such as asODNs. Due to several initiatives, the use of these neutral dendrimers as a scaffold to introduce other functional groups has been proposed. Because of its low cytotoxicity, it is relevant to understand the molecular phenomena involving these types of dendrimers. In this work, we studied the behavior of an antisense oligonucleotide in presence of both types of dendrimers using molecular dynamics simulations, in order to elucidate if they are able to form stable complexes. In this manner, we demonstrated at atomic level that PAMAM-NH2, unlike PAMAM-OH, could form a well-compacted complex with asODN, albeit PAMAM-OH can also establish stable interactions with the oligonucleotide. The biological activity of asODN in complex with PAMAM-NH2 dendrimer was also shown. Finally, we revealed that in contact with PAMAM-OH, asODN remains outside the cells as TIRF microscopy results showed, due to its poor interaction with this dendrimer and cell membranes. PMID:26847692

  15. Effect of Terminal Groups of Dendrimers in the Complexation with Antisense Oligonucleotides and Cell Uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez-Miranda, Valeria; Peñaloza, Juan Pablo; Araya-Durán, Ingrid; Reyes, Rodrigo; Vidaurre, Soledad; Romero, Valentina; Fuentes, Juan; Céric, Francisco; Velásquez, Luis; González-Nilo, Fernando D.; Otero, Carolina

    2016-02-01

    Poly(amidoamine) dendrimers are the most recognized class of dendrimer. Amino-terminated (PAMAM-NH2) and hydroxyl-terminated (PAMAM-OH) dendrimers of generation 4 are widely used, since they are commercially available. Both have different properties, mainly based on their different overall charges at physiological pH. Currently, an important function of dendrimers as carriers of short single-stranded DNA has been applied. These molecules, known as antisense oligonucleotides (asODNs), are able to inhibit the expression of a target mRNA. Whereas PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers have shown to be able to transfect plasmid DNA, PAMAM-OH dendrimers have not shown the same successful results. However, little is known about their interaction with shorter and more flexible molecules such as asODNs. Due to several initiatives, the use of these neutral dendrimers as a scaffold to introduce other functional groups has been proposed. Because of its low cytotoxicity, it is relevant to understand the molecular phenomena involving these types of dendrimers. In this work, we studied the behavior of an antisense oligonucleotide in presence of both types of dendrimers using molecular dynamics simulations, in order to elucidate if they are able to form stable complexes. In this manner, we demonstrated at atomic level that PAMAM-NH2, unlike PAMAM-OH, could form a well-compacted complex with asODN, albeit PAMAM-OH can also establish stable interactions with the oligonucleotide. The biological activity of asODN in complex with PAMAM-NH2 dendrimer was also shown. Finally, we revealed that in contact with PAMAM-OH, asODN remains outside the cells as TIRF microscopy results showed, due to its poor interaction with this dendrimer and cell membranes.

  16. Bodywide skipping of exons 45-55 in dystrophic mdx52 mice by systemic antisense delivery.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Yokota, Toshifumi; Nagata, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Akinori; Tanihata, Jun; Saito, Takashi; Duguez, Stephanie M R; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Hoffman, Eric P; Partridge, Terence; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2012-08-21

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the commonest form of muscular dystrophy, is caused by lack of dystrophin. One of the most promising therapeutic approaches is antisense-mediated elimination of frame-disrupting mutations by exon skipping. However, this approach faces two major hurdles: limited applicability of each individual target exon and uncertain function and stability of each resulting truncated dystrophin. Skipping of exons 45-55 at the mutation hotspot of the DMD gene would address both issues. Theoretically it could rescue more than 60% of patients with deletion mutations. Moreover, spontaneous deletions of this specific region are associated with asymptomatic or exceptionally mild phenotypes. However, such multiple exon skipping of exons 45-55 has proved technically challenging. We have therefore designed antisense oligo (AO) morpholino mixtures to minimize self- or heteroduplex formation. These were tested as conjugates with cell-penetrating moieties (vivo-morpholinos). We have tested the feasibility of skipping exons 45-55 in H2K-mdx52 myotubes and in mdx52 mice, which lack exon 52. Encouragingly, with mixtures of 10 AOs, we demonstrated skipping of all 10 exons in vitro, in H2K-mdx52 myotubes and on intramuscular injection into mdx52 mice. Moreover, in mdx52 mice in vivo, systemic injections of 10 AOs induced extensive dystrophin expression at the subsarcolemma in skeletal muscles throughout the body, producing up to 15% of wild-type dystrophin protein levels, accompanied by improved muscle strength and histopathology without any detectable toxicity. This is a unique successful demonstration of effective rescue by exon 45-55 skipping in a dystrophin-deficient animal model. PMID:22869723

  17. Clinical development of an antisense therapy for the treatment of transthyretin-associated polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Elizabeth J; Guo, Shuling; Booten, Sheri; Alvarado, Luis; Benson, Merrill; Hughes, Steve; Monia, Brett P

    2012-06-01

    Transthyretin (TTR)-associated amyloidosis is a late-onset autosomal-dominant genetic disease. Over 100 amyloidogenic mutations have been identified in TTR which destabilize the TTR tetramer thereby inducing the formation of amyloid fibrils in tissues such as the heart and peripheral nerves. This disease mainly affects peripheral nerves, causing familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) or heart, causing familial amyloid cardiomyopathy (FAC). Circulating TTR is predominantly produced by liver, and the only widely available clinical treatment for FAP is orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), whereas no treatment currently exists for FAC. Using second-generation antisense technology, we identified an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) targeting TTR, ISIS-TTR(Rx), for the treatment of TTR-associated amyloidosis. When tested in a human TTR transgenic mouse model (hTTR Ile84Ser), ISIS-TTR(Rx) showed a dose-dependent reduction of human TTR (up to >80%) at both the mRNA and protein levels. In cynomolgus monkeys, ISIS-TTR(Rx) treatment produced a time-dependent reduction in plasma TTR levels. After 12 weeks of treatment in monkey, liver TTR mRNA and plasma TTR protein levels were reduced by ~80%. As expected, treatment with ISIS-TTR(Rx) also produced a significant decrease in plasma RBP4 levels that correlated with reductions in TTR levels. ISIS-TTR(Rx) treatment was well tolerated in both rodents and monkeys and produced a PK/PD profile consistent with prior experiences using this chemistry platform. ISIS-TTR(Rx) is currently under evaluation in a Phase 1 clinical trial in normal healthy volunteers, and interim results of this trial will be presented. PMID:22494066

  18. The effects of dietary lipid and strain difference on polyunsaturated fatty acid composition and conversion in anadromous and landlocked salmon (Salmo salar L.) parr.

    PubMed

    Rollin, Xavier; Peng, Jinglan; Pham, Diep; Ackman, Robert G; Larondelle, Yvan

    2003-02-01

    Five experimental diets containing different proportions of olive, sunflower and linseed oils were used in a 55-day feeding trial on both anadromous and landlocked parr of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) of the same age, in order to study the effects of diet and strain on growth and fatty acid composition and absolute gains in fish whole body triacylglycerols (TAG) and phospholipids (PL). Growth rate was higher in landlocked than in anadromous parr, but not between the different diets. By contrast, the effect of diet on whole body fatty acid composition was much more pronounced than that of strain difference. The fatty acids deposition results establish significant (P<0.05) positive correlations and linear relationships between the percentage of several fatty acids (18:1n-9, 18:2n-6, 18:3n-3) in dietary lipids and their absolute gains in whole body TAG and PL of both stocks. They also indicate the selective deposition of 18:1n-9 compared with linoleic acid (LLA) and linolenic acid (LNA). Finally, the results suggest the occurrence of the conversion of LLA and LNA to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, its stimulation by increased substrate availability, a significantly higher n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids conversion capacity in landlocked than in anadromous parr and a strong genetic influence on docosahexaenoic acid content in salmon parr PL. PMID:12568812

  19. Complex organisation and structure of the ghrelin antisense strand gene GHRLOS, a candidate non-coding RNA gene

    PubMed Central

    Seim, Inge; Carter, Shea L; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2008-01-01

    Background The peptide hormone ghrelin has many important physiological and pathophysiological roles, including the stimulation of growth hormone (GH) release, appetite regulation, gut motility and proliferation of cancer cells. We previously identified a gene on the opposite strand of the ghrelin gene, ghrelinOS (GHRLOS), which spans the promoter and untranslated regions of the ghrelin gene (GHRL). Here we further characterise GHRLOS. Results We have described GHRLOS mRNA isoforms that extend over 1.4 kb of the promoter region and 106 nucleotides of exon 4 of the ghrelin gene, GHRL. These GHRLOS transcripts initiate 4.8 kb downstream of the terminal exon 4 of GHRL and are present in the 3' untranslated exon of the adjacent gene TATDN2 (TatD DNase domain containing 2). Interestingly, we have also identified a putative non-coding TATDN2-GHRLOS chimaeric transcript, indicating that GHRLOS RNA biogenesis is extremely complex. Moreover, we have discovered that the 3' region of GHRLOS is also antisense, in a tail-to-tail fashion to a novel terminal exon of the neighbouring SEC13 gene, which is important in protein transport. Sequence analyses revealed that GHRLOS is riddled with stop codons, and that there is little nucleotide and amino-acid sequence conservation of the GHRLOS gene between vertebrates. The gene spans 44 kb on 3p25.3, is extensively spliced and harbours multiple variable exons. We have also investigated the expression of GHRLOS and found evidence of differential tissue expression. It is highly expressed in tissues which are emerging as major sites of non-coding RNA expression (the thymus, brain, and testis), as well as in the ovary and uterus. In contrast, very low levels were found in the stomach where sense, GHRL derived RNAs are highly expressed. Conclusion GHRLOS RNA transcripts display several distinctive features of non-coding (ncRNA) genes, including 5' capping, polyadenylation, extensive splicing and short open reading frames. The gene is also

  20. Second-generation antisense oligonucleotides against β-catenin protect mice against diet-induced hepatic steatosis and hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Popov, Violeta B; Jornayvaz, Francois R; Akgul, Emin O; Kanda, Shoichi; Jurczak, Michael J; Zhang, Dongyan; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Majumdar, Sachin K; Guigni, Blas; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Manchem, Vara Prasad; Bhanot, Sanjay; Shulman, Gerald I; Samuel, Varman T

    2016-03-01

    Although mutations in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway are linked with the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes in humans, the mechanism is unclear. High-fat-fed male C57BL/6 mice were treated for 4 wk with a 2'-O-methoxyethyl chimeric antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) to decrease hepatic and adipose expression of β-catenin. β-Catenin mRNA decreased by ≈80% in the liver and by 70% in white adipose tissue relative to control ASO-treated mice. β-Catenin ASO improved hepatic insulin sensitivity and increased insulin-stimulated whole body glucose metabolism, as assessed during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp in awake mice. β-Catenin ASO altered hepatic lipid composition in high-fat-fed mice. There were reductions in hepatic triglyceride (44%, P < 0.05) and diacylglycerol content (60%, P < 0.01) but a 30% increase in ceramide content (P < 0.001). The altered lipid content was attributed to decreased expression of sn-1,2 diacylglycerol acyltransferase and mitochondrial acyl-CoA:glycerol-sn-3-phosphate acyltransferase and an increase in serine palmitoyl transferase. The decrease in cellular diacyglycerol was associated with a 33% decrease in PKCε activation (P < 0.05) and 64% increase in Akt2 phosphorylation (P < 0.05). In summary, Reducing β-catenin expression decreases expression of enzymes involved in hepatic fatty acid esterification, ameliorates hepatic steatosis and lipid-induced insulin resistance. PMID:26644352

  1. Site-directed antisense oligonucleotide decreases the expression of amyloid precursor protein and reverses deficits in learning and memory in aged SAMP8 mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V B; Farr, S A; Flood, J F; Kamlesh, V; Franko, M; Banks, W A; Morley, J E

    2000-12-01

    beta amyloid protein (Abeta) is a 40-43 amino acid peptide derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP). Abeta has been implicated as a cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mice with spontaneous or transgenic overexpression of APP show the histologic hallmarks of AD and have impairments in learning and memory. We tested whether antisense phosphorothiolated oligonucleotides (AO) directed at the Abeta region of the APP gene given with or without antibody directed at Abeta could reverse the elevated protein levels of APP and the behavioral impairments seen in SAMP8 mice, a strain which spontaneously overexpresses APP. We found that intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of antibody with either of two AOs directed at the midregion of Abeta improved acquisition and retention in a footshock avoidance paradigm, whereas two AOs directed more toward the C-terminal, a random AO, and vehicle were without effect. Three injections of the more potent AO given without antibody reduced APP protein levels by 43-68% in the amygdala, septum, and hippocampus. These results show that AO directed at the Abeta region of APP can reduce APP levels in the brain and reverse deficits in learning and memory. PMID:11150636

  2. Cutting Edge: A Natural Antisense Transcript, AS-IL1α, Controls Inducible Transcription of the Proinflammatory Cytokine IL-1α.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jennie; Atianand, Maninjay; Jiang, Zhaozhao; Carpenter, Susan; Aiello, Daniel; Elling, Roland; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Caffrey, Daniel R

    2015-08-15

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are a class of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) that are complementary to other protein-coding genes. Although thousands of NATs are encoded by mammalian genomes, their functions in innate immunity are unknown. In this study, we identified and characterized a novel NAT, AS-IL1α, which is partially complementary to IL-1α. Similar to IL-1α, AS-IL1α is expressed at low levels in resting macrophages and is induced following infection with Listeria monocytogenes or stimulation with TLR ligands (Pam3CSK4, LPS, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid). Inducible expression of IL-1α mRNA and protein were significantly reduced in macrophages expressing shRNA that target AS-IL1α. AS-IL1α is located in the nucleus and did not alter the stability of IL-1α mRNA. Instead, AS-IL1α was required for the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to the IL-1α promoter. In summary, our studies identify AS-IL1α as an important regulator of IL-1α transcription during the innate immune response. PMID:26179904

  3. Sense and antisense transcripts of the developmentally regulated murine hsp70.2 gene are expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping areas in the adult brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the spatial pattern of expression of a member of the hsp70 gene family, hsp70.2, in the mouse central nervous system. Surprisingly, RNA blot analysis and in situ hybridization revealed abundant expression of an 'antisense' hsp70.2 transcript in several areas of adult mouse brain. Two different transcripts recognized by sense and antisense riboprobes for the hsp70.2 gene were expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping neuronal populations. RNA blot analysis revealed low levels of the 2.7 kb transcript of hsp70.2 in several areas of the brain, with highest signal in the hippocampus. Abundant expression of a slightly larger (approximately 2.8 kb) 'antisense' transcript was detected in several brain regions, notably in the brainstem, cerebellum, mesencephalic tectum, thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus. In situ hybridization revealed that the sense and antisense transcripts were both predominantly neuronal and localized to the same cell types in the granular layer of the cerebellum, trapezoid nucleus of the superior olivary complex, locus coeruleus and hippocampus. The hsp70.2 antisense transcripts were particularly abundant in the frontal cortex, dentate gyrus, subthalamic nucleus, zona incerta, superior and inferior colliculi, central gray, brainstem, and cerebellar Purkinje cells. Our findings have revealed a distinct cellular and spatial localization of both sense and antisense transcripts, demonstrating a new level of complexity in the function of the heat shock genes.

  4. Down-regulation of protein kinase Ceta by antisense oligonucleotides sensitises A549 lung cancer cells to vincristine and paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Sonnemann, Jürgen; Gekeler, Volker; Ahlbrecht, Katrin; Brischwein, Klaus; Liu, Chao; Bader, Peter; Müller, Cornelia; Niethammer, Dietrich; Beck, James F

    2004-06-25

    Previous studies point to protein kinase C (PKC) isozyme eta as a resistance factor in cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated whether down-regulation of PKCeta with second generation antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) would sensitise A549 human lung carcinoma cells to cytostatics. The effects were compared to the outcome of Bcl-xL down-regulation. Upon treatment with antisense ODNs, PKCeta and Bcl-xL were both significantly reduced on mRNA and protein level. Down-regulation of either PKCeta or Bcl-xL in combination with vincristine or paclitaxel resulted in a significant increase in caspase-3 activity compared to that in the control oligonucleotide treated cells. In addition, PKCeta down-regulation augmented vincristine-induced dissipation of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. In conclusion, these results confirm that PKCeta might represent a considerable resistance factor and an interesting target to improve anticancer chemotherapy. PMID:15159020

  5. Analysis of 14-3-3 Family Member Function in Xenopus Embryos by Microinjection of Antisense Morpholino Oligos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Jeffrey M. C.; Muslin, Anthony J.

    The 14-3-3 intracellular phosphoserine/threonine-binding proteins are adapter molecules that regulate signal transduction, cell cycle, nutrient sensing, apoptotic, and cytoskeletal pathways. There are seven 14-3-3 family members, encoded by separate genes, in vertebrate organisms. To evaluate the role of individual 14-3-3 proteins in vertebrate embryonic development, we utilized an antisense morpholino oligo microinjection technique in Xenopus laevis embryos. By use of this method, we showed that embryos lacking specific 14-3-3 proteins displayed unique phenotypic abnormalities. Specifically, embryos lacking 14-3-3 τ exhibited gastrulation and axial patterning defects, but embryos lacking 14-3-3 γ exhibited eye defects without other abnormalities, and embryos lacking 14-3-3 ζ appeared completely normal. These and other results demonstrate the power and specificity of the morpholino antisense oligo microinjection technique.

  6. Enrichment of poultry products with omega3 fatty acids by dietary supplementation with the alga Nannochloropsis and mantur oil.

    PubMed

    Nitsan, Z; Mokady, S; Sukenik, A

    1999-12-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of the microalga Nannochloropsis sp. (Nanno.), as a supplement to laying hens' diet, for the production of enriched eggs and meat with omega3 fatty acids (FA). Nanno. has a unique FA composition, namely, the occurrence of a high concentration of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5 omega3) and the absence of other omega3 FA. The effect of supplementing diets with Nanno. on omega3 FA levels in eggs, plasma, liver, and thigh muscle was compared to that of mantur oil, high in alpha-linolenic acid (LNA; 18:3 omega3). Nanno. is rich also in carotenoids, which may be useful for egg yolk pigmentation. The observed effect of Nanno. supplementation on yolk pigmentation was dose responsive, in both the rate of coloration and the color intensity. Addition of enzyme preparations (glucanase plus cellulase or glucanase plus pectinase) slightly elevated the yolk color score. The most prominent changes in the level of omega3 FA in egg yolk were evident when the diets were supplemented with 1% Nanno. or mantur lipid extracts. Levels of dietary algal meal (0.1-1.0%) had low and inconsistent effects on the level of yolk omega3 FA. Algal EPA is not accumulated in the liver or in the egg yolk; it is apparently converted and deposited as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). LNA from mantur oil was partially converted to DHA, and both DHA and LNA were deposited in egg yolks and livers. It is suggested that the absence of DHA and EPA from thigh muscle is due to the small amount of dietary omega3 FA used in this work, compared to other studies, and to the possibility that in laying hens the egg yolk has a priority on dietary FA over that of muscles. PMID:10606584

  7. In vitro correction of a novel splicing alteration in the BTK gene by using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Rattanachartnarong, Natthakorn; Tongkobpetch, Siraprapa; Chatchatee, Pantipa; Daengsuwan, Tassalapa; Ittiwut, Chupong; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2014-10-01

    A novel sequence variant, c.240+109C>A, in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene was identified in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia. This alteration resulted in an incorporation of 106 nucleotides of BTK intron 3 into its mRNA. Administration of the 25-mer antisense morpholino oligonucleotide analog in the patient's cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells was able to restore correctly spliced BTK mRNA, a potential treatment for X-linked agammaglobulinemia. PMID:24658450

  8. Antisense bcl-2 treatment increases programmed cell death in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Koty, P P; Zhang, H; Levitt, M L

    1999-02-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically regulated pathway that is altered in many cancers. This process is, in part, regulated by the ratio of PCD inducers (Bax) or inhibitors (Bcl-2). An abnormally high ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax prevents PCD, thus contributing to resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, many of which are capable of inducing PCD. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells demonstrate resistance to these PCD-inducing agents. If Bcl-2 prevents NSCLC cells from entering the PCD pathway, then reducing the amount of endogenous Bcl-2 product may allow these cells to spontaneously enter the PCD pathway. Our purpose was to determine the effects of bcl-2 antisense treatment on the levels of programmed cell death in NSCLC cells. First, we determined whether bcl-2 and bax mRNA were expressed in three morphologically distinct NSCLC cell lines: NCI-H226 (squamous), NCI-H358 (adenocarcinoma), and NCI-H596 (adenosquamous). Cells were then exposed to synthetic antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide treatment, after which programmed cell death was determined, as evidenced by DNA fragmentation. Bcl-2 protein expression was detected immunohistochemically. All three NSCLC cell lines expressed both bcl-2 and bax mRNA and had functional PCD pathways. Synthetic antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide treatment resulted in decreased Bcl-2 levels, reduced cell proliferation, decreased cell viability, and increased levels of spontaneous PCD. This represents the first evidence that decreasing Bcl-2 in three morphologically distinct NSCLC cell lines allows the cells to spontaneously enter a PCD pathway. It also indicates the potential therapeutic use of antisense bcl-2 in the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:10217615

  9. n-3 and n-6 fatty acid processing and growth effects in neoplastic and non-cancerous human mammary epithelial cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Grammatikos, S. I.; Subbaiah, P. V.; Victor, T. A.; Miller, W. M.

    1994-01-01

    The type rather than the amount of dietary fat may be more important in breast carcinogenesis. While animal studies support this view, little is known about the effects of essential fatty acids (EFAs) at the cellular level. The MCF-7 breast cancer and the MCF-10A non-cancerous human mammary epithelial cell lines are compared in terms of growth response to EFAs and ability to incorporate and process the EFAs. Eicosapentaenoic (EPA, n-3) and docosahexaenoic (DHA, n-3) acids, presented bound to albumin, inhibited the growth of MCF-7 cells by as much as 50% in a dose-dependent manner (6-30 microM) in medium containing 0.5% serum. alpha-Linolenic (LNA, n-3) and arachidonic (AA, n-6) acids inhibited growth less extensively, while linoleic acid (LA, n-6) had no effect. In contrast, MCF-10A cells were not inhibited by any of the EFAs at levels below 24 microM. The differential effects of AA, EPA and DHA on MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells support a protective role of highly unsaturated essential fatty acids against breast cancer. The EFAs were primarily incorporated into phosphoglycerides. MCF-7 cells showed chain elongations and possibly delta 8 desaturation, but no AA was formed from LA, nor EPA or DHA from LNA. In contrast, MCF-10A cells desaturated and elongated the exogenous EFAs via all the known pathways. These findings suggest defects in the desaturating enzymes of MCF-7 cells. LNA, DHA and AA presented to MCF-7 cells in phospholipid liposomes inhibited growth as extensively as albumin-bound free acids, but were less extensively incorporated, suggesting different mechanisms of inhibition for the two methods. PMID:8054269

  10. Episome-generated N-myc antisense RNA restricts the differentiation potential of primitive neuroectodermal cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Whitesell, L; Rosolen, A; Neckers, L M

    1991-01-01

    Neuroectodermal tumors of childhood provide a unique opportunity to examine the role of genes potentially regulating neuronal growth and differentiation because many cell lines derived from these tumors are composed of at least two distinct morphologic cell types. These types display variant phenotypic characteristics and spontaneously interconvert, or transdifferentiate, in vitro. The factors that regulate transdifferentiation are unknown. Application of antisense approaches to the transdifferentiation process has allowed us to explore the precise role that N-myc may play in regulating developing systems. We now report construction of an episomally replicating expression vector designed to generate RNA antisense to part of the human N-myc gene. Such a vector is able to specifically inhibit N-myc expression in cell lines carrying both normal and amplified N-myc alleles. Inhibition of N-myc expression blocks transdifferentiation in these lines, with accumulation of cells of an intermediate phenotype. A concomitant decrease in growth rate but not loss of tumorigenicity was observed in the N-myc nonamplified cell line CHP-100. Vector-generated antisense RNA should allow identification of genes specifically regulated by the proto-oncogene N-myc. Images PMID:1996098

  11. Hormone-Dependent Expression of a Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Natural Antisense Transcript in MA-10 Mouse Tumor Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Podestá, Ernesto J.

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol transport is essential for many physiological processes, including steroidogenesis. In steroidogenic cells hormone-induced cholesterol transport is controlled by a protein complex that includes steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Star is expressed as 3.5-, 2.8-, and 1.6-kb transcripts that differ only in their 3′-untranslated regions. Because these transcripts share the same promoter, mRNA stability may be involved in their differential regulation and expression. Recently, the identification of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has added another level of regulation to eukaryotic gene expression. Here we identified a new NAT that is complementary to the spliced Star mRNA sequence. Using 5′ and 3′ RACE, strand-specific RT-PCR, and ribonuclease protection assays, we demonstrated that Star NAT is expressed in MA-10 Leydig cells and steroidogenic murine tissues. Furthermore, we established that human chorionic gonadotropin stimulates Star NAT expression via cAMP. Our results show that sense-antisense Star RNAs may be coordinately regulated since they are co-expressed in MA-10 cells. Overexpression of Star NAT had a differential effect on the expression of the different Star sense transcripts following cAMP stimulation. Meanwhile, the levels of StAR protein and progesterone production were downregulated in the presence of Star NAT. Our data identify antisense transcription as an additional mechanism involved in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis. PMID:21829656

  12. Inhibition of luciferase expression in transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitoes by Sindbis virus expression of antisense luciferase RNA

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Barbara W.; Olson, Ken E.; Allen-Miura, Tanya; Rayms-Keller, Alfredo; Carlson, Jonathan O.; Coates, Craig J.; Jasinskiene, Nijole; James, Anthony A.; Beaty, Barry J.; Higgs, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    A rapid and reproducible method of inhibiting the expression of specific genes in mosquitoes should further our understanding of gene function and may lead to the identification of mosquito genes that determine vector competence or are involved in pathogen transmission. We hypothesized that the virus expression system based on the mosquito-borne Alphavirus, Sindbis (Togaviridae), may efficiently transcribe effector RNAs that inhibit expression of a targeted mosquito gene. To test this hypothesis, germ-line-transformed Aedes aegypti that express luciferase (LUC) from the mosquito Apyrase promoter were intrathoracically inoculated with a double subgenomic Sindbis (dsSIN) virus TE/3′2J/anti-luc (Anti-luc) that transcribes RNA complementary to the 5′ end of the LUC mRNA. LUC activity was monitored in mosquitoes infected with either Anti-luc or control dsSIN viruses expressing unrelated antisense RNAs. Mosquitoes infected with Anti-luc virus exhibited 90% reduction in LUC compared with uninfected and control dsSIN-infected mosquitoes at 5 and 9 days postinoculation. We demonstrate that a gene expressed from the mosquito genome can be inhibited by using an antisense strategy. The dsSIN antisense RNA expression system is an important tool for studying gene function in vivo. PMID:10557332

  13. Inhibition of luciferase expression in transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitoes by Sindbis virus expression of antisense luciferase RNA.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B W; Olson, K E; Allen-Miura, T; Rayms-Keller, A; Carlson, J O; Coates, C J; Jasinskiene, N; James, A A; Beaty, B J; Higgs, S

    1999-11-01

    A rapid and reproducible method of inhibiting the expression of specific genes in mosquitoes should further our understanding of gene function and may lead to the identification of mosquito genes that determine vector competence or are involved in pathogen transmission. We hypothesized that the virus expression system based on the mosquito-borne Alphavirus, Sindbis (Togaviridae), may efficiently transcribe effector RNAs that inhibit expression of a targeted mosquito gene. To test this hypothesis, germ-line-transformed Aedes aegypti that express luciferase (LUC) from the mosquito Apyrase promoter were intrathoracically inoculated with a double subgenomic Sindbis (dsSIN) virus TE/3'2J/anti-luc (Anti-luc) that transcribes RNA complementary to the 5' end of the LUC mRNA. LUC activity was monitored in mosquitoes infected with either Anti-luc or control dsSIN viruses expressing unrelated antisense RNAs. Mosquitoes infected with Anti-luc virus exhibited 90% reduction in LUC compared with uninfected and control dsSIN-infected mosquitoes at 5 and 9 days postinoculation. We demonstrate that a gene expressed from the mosquito genome can be inhibited by using an antisense strategy. The dsSIN antisense RNA expression system is an important tool for studying gene function in vivo. PMID:10557332

  14. Antisense downregulation of the barley limit dextrinase inhibitor modulates starch granule size distribution, starch composition and amylopectin structure.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Yvonne; Coates, Steve; Bryce, James H; Morris, Peter C

    2004-08-01

    The barley protein limit dextrinase inhibitor (LDI), structurally related to the alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor family, is an inhibitor of the starch debranching enzyme limit dextrinase (LD). In order to investigate the function of LDI, and the consequences for starch metabolism of reduced LDI activity, transgenic barley plants designed to downregulate LDI by antisense were generated. Homozygous antisense lines with reduced LDI protein level and activity were analysed and found to have enhanced free LD activity in both developing and germinating grains. In addition the antisense lines showed unpredicted pleiotropic effects on numerous enzyme activities, for example, alpha- and beta-amylases and starch synthases. Analysis of the starch showed much reduced numbers of the small B-type starch granules, as well as reduced amylose relative to amylopectin levels and reduced total starch. The chain length distribution of the amylopectin was modified with less of the longer chains (>25 units) and enhanced number of medium chains (10-15 units). These results suggest an important role for LDI and LD during starch synthesis as well as during starch breakdown. PMID:15272877

  15. Antisense inhibition of isoamylase alters the structure of amylopectin and the physicochemical properties of starch in rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Naoko; Kubo, Akiko; Suh, Dong-Soon; Wong, Kit-Sum; Jane, Jay-Lin; Ozawa, Kenjiro; Takaiwa, Fumio; Inaba, Yumiko; Nakamura, Yasunori

    2003-06-01

    This is the first report on regulation of the isoamylase1 gene to modify the structure of amylopectin and properties of starch by using antisense technology in plants. The reduction of isoamylase1 protein by about 94% in rice endosperm changed amylopectin into a water-insoluble modified amylopectin and a water-soluble polyglucan (WSP). As compared with wild-type amylopectin, the modified amylopectin had more short chains with a degree of polymerization of 5-12, while their molecular sizes were similar. The WSP, which structurally resembled the phytoglycogen in isoamylase-deficient sugary-1 mutants, accounted for about 16% of the total alpha-polyglucans in antisense endosperm, and it was distributed throughout the whole endosperm unlike in sugary-1 mutant. The reduction of isoamylase activity markedly lowered the gelatinization temperature from 54 to 43 degrees C and the viscosity, and modified X-ray diffraction pattern and the granule morphology of the starch. The activity of pullulanase, the other type of starch debranching enzyme, in the antisense endosperm was similar to that in wild-type, whereas it is deficient in sugary-1 mutants. These results indicate that the isoamylase1 is essential for amylopectin biosynthesis in rice endosperm, and that alteration of the isoamylase activity is an effective means to modify the physicochemical properties and granular structure of starch. PMID:12826626

  16. Effects of variations in length of hammerhead ribozyme antisense arms upon the cleavage of longer RNA substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Sioud, M

    1997-01-01

    The efficacy of intracellular binding of hammerhead ribozyme to its cleavage site in target RNA is a major requirement for its use as a therapeutic agent. Such efficacy can be influenced by several factors, such as the length of the ribozyme antisense arms and mRNA secondary structures. Analysis of various IL-2 hammerhead ribozymes having different antisense arms but directed to the same site predicts that the hammerhead ribozyme target site is present within a double-stranded region that is flanked by single-stranded loops. Extension of the low cleaving hammerhead ribozyme antisense arms by nucleotides that base pair with the single-stranded regions facilitated the hammerhead ribozyme binding to longer RNA substrates (e.g. mRNA). In addition, a correlation between the in vitro and intracellular results was also found. Thus, the present study would facilitate the design of hammerhead ribozymes directed against higher order structured sites. Further, it emphasises the importance of detailed structural investigations of hammerhead ribozyme full-length target RNAs. PMID:9016562

  17. Construction of a directed hammerhead ribozyme library: towards the identification of optimal target sites for antisense-mediated gene inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, M L; Ruffner, D E

    1998-01-01

    Antisense-mediated gene inhibition uses short complementary DNA or RNA oligonucleotides to block expression of any mRNA of interest. A key parameter in the success or failure of an antisense therapy is the identification of a suitable target site on the chosen mRNA. Ultimately, the accessibility of the target to the antisense agent determines target suitability. Since accessibility is a function of many complex factors, it is currently beyond our ability to predict. Consequently, identification of the most effective target(s) requires examination of every site. Towards this goal, we describe a method to construct directed ribozyme libraries against any chosen mRNA. The library contains nearly equal amounts of ribozymes targeting every site on the chosen transcript and the library only contains ribozymes capable of binding to that transcript. Expression of the ribozyme library in cultured cells should allow identification of optimal target sites under natural conditions, subject to the complexities of a fully functional cell. Optimal target sites identified in this manner should be the most effective sites for therapeutic intervention. PMID:9801305

  18. Knockdown of gene expression by antisense morpholino oligos in preimplantation mouse embryos cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuki; Sato, Shiori; Kikuchi, Takahiro; Nonaka, Asumi; Kumagai, Yuki; Sasaki, Akira; Kobayashi, Masayuki

    2016-09-15

    Knockdown of gene expression by antisense morpholino oligos (MOs) is a simple and effective method for analyzing the roles of genes in mammalian cells. Here, we demonstrate the efficient delivery of MOs by Endo-Porter (EP), a special transfection reagent for MOs, into preimplantation mouse embryos cultured in vitro. A fluorescein-labeled control MO was applied for monitoring the incorporation of MOs into developing 2-cell embryos in the presence of varying amounts of EP and bovine serum albumin. In optimized conditions, fluorescence was detected in 2-cell embryos within a 3-h incubation period. In order to analyze the validity of the optimized conditions, an antisense Oct4 MO was applied for knockdown of the synthesis of OCT4 protein in developing embryos from the 2-cell stage. In blastocysts, the antisense Oct4 MO induced a decrease in the amount in OCT4 protein to less than half. An almost complete absence of OCT4-positive cells and nearly complete disappearance of the inner cell mass in the outgrowths of blastocysts were also noted. These phenotypes corresponded with those of Oct4-deficient mouse embryos. Overall, we suggest that the delivery of MOs using EP is useful for the knockdown of gene expression in preimplantation mouse embryos cultured in vitro. PMID:27381842

  19. Inhibition of breast cancer growth in vivo by antiangiogenesis gene therapy with adenovirus-mediated antisense-VEGF

    PubMed Central

    Im, S-A; Kim, J-S; Gomez-Manzano, C; Fueyo, J; Liu, T-J; Cho, M-S; Seong, C-M; Lee, S N; Hong, Y-K; Yung, W K A

    2001-01-01

    Increased expression of VEGF in several types of tumours has been shown to correlate with poor prognosis. We used a replication-deficient adenoviral vector containing antisense VEGF cDNA (Ad5CMV-αVEGF) to down-regulate VEGF expression and increase the efficiency of delivery of the antisense sequence in the human breast cancer cell line MDA231-MB. Transfection of these cells with Ad5CMV-αVEGF in vitro reduced secreted levels of VEGF protein without affecting cell growth. Moreover, injection of the Ad5CMV-αVEGF vector into intramammary xenografts of these cells established in nude mice inhibited tumour growth and reduced the amount of VEGF protein and the density of microvessels in those tumours relative to tumours treated with the control vector Ad5(dl312). Our results showed that antisense VEGF 165 cDNA was efficiently delivered in vivo via an adenoviral vector and that this treatment significantly inhibited the growth of established experimental breast tumours. The Ad5CMV-αVEGF vector may be useful in targeting the tumour vasculature in the treatment of breast cancer. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11336478

  20. The Dynamics of Compound, Transcript, and Protein Effects After Treatment With 2OMePS Antisense Oligonucleotides in mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Verhaart, Ingrid E C; van Vliet-van den Dool, Laura; Sipkens, Jessica A; de Kimpe, Sjef J; Kolfschoten, Ingrid G M; van Deutekom, Judith C T; Liefaard, Lia; Ridings, Jim E; Hood, Steve R; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2014-01-01

    Antisense-mediated exon skipping is currently in clinical development for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) to amend the consequences of the underlying genetic defect and restore dystrophin expression. Due to turnover of compound, transcript, and protein, chronic treatment with effector molecules (antisense oligonucleotides) will be required. To investigate the dynamics and persistence of antisense 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligonucleotides, exon skipping, and dystrophin expression after dosing was concluded, mdx mice were treated subcutaneously for 8 weeks with 100 mg/kg oligonucleotides twice weekly. Thereafter, mice were sacrificed at different time points after the final injection (36 hours–24 weeks). Oligonucleotide half-life was longer in heart (~65 days) compared with that in skeletal muscle, liver, and kidney (~35 days). Exon skipping half-lives varied between 33 and 53 days, whereas dystrophin protein showed a long half-life (>100 days). Oligonucleotide and exon-skipping levels peaked in the first week and declined thereafter. By contrast, dystrophin expression peaked after 3–8 weeks and then slowly declined, remaining detectable after 24 weeks. Concordance between levels of oligonucleotides, exon skipping, and proteins was observed, except in heart, wherein high oligonucleotide levels but low exon skipping and dystrophin expression were seen. Overall, these results enhance our understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligos used for the treatment of DMD. PMID:24549299

  1. Nucleolin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides induce apoptosis and may be used as a potential drug for nasopharyngeal carcinoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Der; Chou, Hung-Wen; Kuo, Yuan-Sung; Lu, Ruei-Min; Hwang, Yu-Chyi; Wu, Han-Chung; Lin, Chin-Tarng

    2012-01-01

    Nucleolin (C23, NCL) mRNA was up-regulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells compared to that of normal nasomucosal (NNM) cells using a cDNA microarray approach. The level of nucleolin protein was also up-regulated in 13 NPC cell lines, 30 biopsy specimens and nine other cancer cell lines compared to five NNM cells or normal stromal cells, which were analyzed using immunoblotting or immunohistochemistry. We transfected nucleolin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (phosphorothioate-modified oligodeoxynucleotides; S-ODNs) into NPC-TW01 cells to knockdown nucleolin expression to evaluate the function of nucleolin in cancer cells. Nucleolin knockdown induced NPC cells but not NNM cells to undergo apoptosis. Furthermore, treatment of NPC-TW01 xenograft tumors with nucleolin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides suppressed the growth of xenograft tumors without obvious side effects. Therefore, we suggest that nucleolin may be a potential cancer therapeutic target and that nucleolin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides may be used as a potential drug for therapy in NPC. PMID:21956494

  2. Novel antisense therapeutics delivery systems: In vitro and in vivo studies of liposomes targeted with anti-CD20 antibody.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Justyna M; Toporkiewicz, Monika; Czogalla, Aleksander; Matusewicz, Lucyna; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2015-12-28

    Antisense gene therapy using molecules such as antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, siRNA or miRNA is a very promising strategy for the treatment of neoplastic diseases. It can be combined with other treatment strategies to enhance therapeutic effect. In acute leukemias, overexpression of the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 is observed in more than 70% of cases. Therefore, reduction of the Bcl-2 protein level could, in itself, prevent the development of cancer or could possibly help sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis inducers. The main objective of our work is to develop therapeutic liposome formulations characterized by high transfection efficiency, stability in the presence of serum, as well as specificity and toxicity for target (leukemic) cells. Each of our liposomal formulations consists of a core composed of antisense oligonucleotides complexed by either cationic lipid, DOTAP, or a synthetic polycation, polyethyleneimine, encapsulated within liposomes modified with polyethylenoglycol. In addition, the liposomal shells are enriched with covalently-bound antibodies recognizing a well characterized bio-marker, CD20, exposed on the surface of leukemia cells. The resulting immunoliposomes selectively and effectively reduced the expression of BCL2 in target cells. Model animal experiments carried out on mice-engrafted tumors expressing the specific marker showed high efficiency of the liposome formulations against specific tumor development. In conclusion, we show that lipid formulations based on a polyplex or lipoplex backbone additionally equipped with antibodies are promising non-viral vectors for specific oligonucleotide transfer into human tumor cells. PMID:26585505

  3. Analysis of the mechanism of protection in transgenic plants expressing the potato virus X coat protein or its antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Hemenway, C; Fang, R X; Kaniewski, W K; Chua, N H; Tumer, N E

    1988-05-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants engineered to express either the potato virus X (PVX) coat protein (CP+) or the antisense coat protein transcript (CP-antisense) were protected from infection by PVX, as indicated by reduced lesion numbers on inoculated leaves, delay or absence of systemic symptom development and reduction in virus accumulation in both inoculated and systemic leaves. The extent of protection observed in CP+ plants primarily depended upon the level of expression of the coat protein. Plants expressing antisense RNA were protected only at low inoculum concentrations. The extent of this protection was even lower than that observed in plants expressing low levels of CP. In contrast to previous reports for plants expressing tobacco mosaic virus or alfalfa mosaic virus CP, inoculation of plants expressing high levels of PVX CP with PVX RNA did not overcome the protection. Specifically, lesion numbers on inoculated leaves and PVX levels on inoculated and systemtic leaves of the CP+ plants were reduced to a similar extent in both virus and RNA inoculated plants. Although these results do not rule out that CP-mediated protection involves inhibition of uncoating of the challenge virus, they suggest that PVX CP (or its RNA) can moderate early events in RNA infection by a different mechanism. PMID:16453840

  4. PlantNATsDB: a comprehensive database of plant natural antisense transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dijun; Yuan, Chunhui; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Zhao; Bai, Lin; Meng, Yijun; Chen, Ling-Ling; Chen, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs), as one type of regulatory RNAs, occur prevalently in plant genomes and play significant roles in physiological and pathological processes. Although their important biological functions have been reported widely, a comprehensive database is lacking up to now. Consequently, we constructed a plant NAT database (PlantNATsDB) involving approximately 2 million NAT pairs in 69 plant species. GO annotation and high-throughput small RNA sequencing data currently available were integrated to investigate the biological function of NATs. PlantNATsDB provides various user-friendly web interfaces to facilitate the presentation of NATs and an integrated, graphical network browser to display the complex networks formed by different NATs. Moreover, a ‘Gene Set Analysis’ module based on GO annotation was designed to dig out the statistical significantly overrepresented GO categories from the specific NAT network. PlantNATsDB is currently the most comprehensive resource of NATs in the plant kingdom, which can serve as a reference database to investigate the regulatory function of NATs. The PlantNATsDB is freely available at http://bis.zju.edu.cn/pnatdb/. PMID:22058132

  5. Synthesis, biophysical properties and biological activity of second generation antisense oligonucleotides containing chiral phosphorothioate linkages

    PubMed Central

    Wan, W. Brad; Migawa, Michael T.; Vasquez, Guillermo; Murray, Heather M.; Nichols, Josh G.; Gaus, Hans; Berdeja, Andres; Lee, Sam; Hart, Christopher E.; Lima, Walt F.; Swayze, Eric E.; Seth, Punit P.

    2014-01-01

    Bicyclic oxazaphospholidine monomers were used to prepare a series of phosphorothioate (PS)-modified gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) with control of the chirality of each of the PS linkages within the 10-base gap. The stereoselectivity was determined to be 98% for each coupling. The objective of this work was to study how PS chirality influences biophysical and biological properties of the ASO including binding affinity (Tm), nuclease stability, activity in vitro and in vivo, RNase H activation and cleavage patterns (both human and E. coli) in a gapmer context. Compounds that had nine or more Sp-linkages in the gap were found to be poorly active in vitro, while compounds with uniform Rp-gaps exhibited activity very similar to that of the stereo-random parent ASOs. Conversely, when tested in vivo, the full Rp-gap compound was found to be quickly metabolized resulting in low activity. A total of 31 ASOs were prepared with control of the PS chirally of each linkage within the gap in an attempt to identify favorable Rp/Sp positions. We conclude that a mix of Rp and Sp is required to achieve a balance between good activity and nuclease stability. PMID:25398895

  6. Intravesical Liposome and Antisense Treatment for Detrusor Overactivity and Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Mahendra P.; Kawamorita, Naoki; Yoshizawa, Tsuyoshi; Chancellor, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The following review focuses on the recent advancements in intravesical drug delivery, which brings added benefit to the therapy of detrusor overactivity and interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS). Results. Intravesical route is a preferred route of administration for restricting the action of extremely potent drugs like DMSO for patients of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) and botulinum toxin for detrusor overactivity. Patients who are either refractory to oral treatment or need to mitigate the adverse effects encountered with conventional routes of administration also chose this route. Its usefulness in some cases can be limited by vehicle (carrier) toxicity or short duration of action. Efforts have been underway to overcome these limitations by developing liposome platform for intravesical delivery of biotechnological products including antisense oligonucleotides. Conclusions. Adoption of forward-thinking approaches can achieve advancements in drug delivery systems targeted to future improvement in pharmacotherapy of bladder diseases. Latest developments in the field of nanotechnology can bring this mode of therapy from second line of treatment for refractory cases to the forefront of disease management. PMID:24527221

  7. Rescue of hearing and vestibular function by antisense oligonucleotides in a mouse model of human deafness.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Jennifer J; Jodelka, Francine M; Hinrich, Anthony J; McCaffrey, Kate E; Farris, Hamilton E; Spalitta, Matthew J; Bazan, Nicolas G; Duelli, Dominik M; Rigo, Frank; Hastings, Michelle L

    2013-03-01

    Hearing impairment is the most common sensory disorder, with congenital hearing impairment present in approximately 1 in 1,000 newborns. Hereditary deafness is often mediated by the improper development or degeneration of cochlear hair cells. Until now, it was not known whether such congenital failures could be mitigated by therapeutic intervention. Here we show that hearing and vestibular function can be rescued in a mouse model of human hereditary deafness. An antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) was used to correct defective pre-mRNA splicing of transcripts from the USH1C gene with the c.216G>A mutation, which causes human Usher syndrome, the leading genetic cause of combined deafness and blindness. Treatment of neonatal mice with a single systemic dose of ASO partially corrects Ush1c c.216G>A splicing, increases protein expression, improves stereocilia organization in the cochlea, and rescues cochlear hair cells, vestibular function and low-frequency hearing in mice. These effects were sustained for several months, providing evidence that congenital deafness can be effectively overcome by treatment early in development to correct gene expression and demonstrating the therapeutic potential of ASOs in the treatment of deafness. PMID:23380860

  8. In Vivo Evaluation of Candidate Allele-specific Mutant Huntingtin Gene Silencing Antisense Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Southwell, Amber L; Skotte, Niels H; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; Østergaard, Michael E; Watt, Andrew T; Carroll, Jeffrey B; Doty, Crystal N; Villanueva, Erika B; Petoukhov, Eugenia; Vaid, Kuljeet; Xie, Yuanyun; Freier, Susan M; Swayze, Eric E; Seth, Punit P; Bennett, Clarence Frank; Hayden, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a dominant, genetic neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of voluntary motor control, psychiatric disturbance, and cognitive decline, for which there is currently no disease-modifying therapy. HD is caused by the expansion of a CAG tract in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. The mutant HTT protein (muHTT) acquires toxic functions, and there is significant evidence that muHTT lowering would be therapeutically efficacious. However, the wild-type HTT protein (wtHTT) serves vital functions, making allele-specific muHTT lowering strategies potentially safer than nonselective strategies. CAG tract expansion is associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that can be targeted by gene silencing reagents such as antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to accomplish allele-specific muHTT lowering. Here we evaluate ASOs targeted to HD-associated SNPs in acute in vivo studies including screening, distribution, duration of action and dosing, using a humanized mouse model of HD, Hu97/18, that is heterozygous for the targeted SNPs. We have identified four well-tolerated lead ASOs that potently and selectively silence muHTT at a broad range of doses throughout the central nervous system for 16 weeks or more after a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection. With further validation, these ASOs could provide a therapeutic option for individuals afflicted with HD. PMID:25101598

  9. Antibacterial activity and inhibition of protein synthesis in Escherichia coli by antisense DNA analogs.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M A; Summerton, J; Foster, E; Cunningham, K; Stirchak, E; Weller, D; Schaup, H W

    1991-01-01

    Protein synthesis, which takes place within ribosomes, is essential for the survival of any living organism. Ribosomes are composed of both proteins and RNA. Specific interaction between the 3' end CCUCC sequence of prokaryotic 16S rRNA and a partially complementary sequence preceding the initiating codon of mRNA is believed to be a prerequisite for initiation of protein synthesis. Here we report the use of short (three to six nucleotides) synthetic DNA analogs complementary to this sequence to block protein synthesis in vitro and in vivo in Escherichia coli. In the DNA analogs the normal phosphodiester bond in the antisense DNA was replaced by methylcarbamate internucleoside linkages to enhance transport across plasma membranes. Of the analogs tested, those with the sequence AGG and GGA inhibit protein synthesis and colony formation by E. coli strains lacking an outer cell wall. Polyethylene glycol 1000 (PEG 1000) was attached to the 5' end of some of the test methylcarbamate DNAs to enhance solubility. Analogs of AGG and GGAG with PEG 1000 attached inhibited colony formation in normal E. coli. These analogs may be useful food additives to control bacterial spoilage and biomedically as antibiotics. PMID:1821653

  10. Small antisense oligonucleotides against G-quadruplexes: specific mRNA translational switches

    PubMed Central

    Rouleau, Samuel G.; Beaudoin, Jean-Denis; Bisaillon, Martin; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplexes (G4) are intricate RNA structures found throughout the transcriptome. Because they are associated with a variety of biological cellular mechanisms, these fascinating structural motifs are seen as potential therapeutic targets against many diseases. While screening of chemical compounds specific to G4 motifs has yielded interesting results, no single compound successfully discriminates between G4 motifs based on nucleotide sequences alone. This level of specificity is best attained using antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). Indeed, oligonucleotide-based strategies are already used to modulate DNA G4 folding in vitro. Here, we report that, in human cells, the use of short ASO to promote and inhibit RNA G4 folding affects the translation of specific mRNAs, including one from the 5′UTR of the H2AFY gene, a histone variant associated with cellular differentiation and cancer. These results suggest that the relatively high specificity of ASO-based strategies holds significant potential for applications aimed at modulating G4-motif folding. PMID:25510493

  11. Antisense COOLAIR mediates the coordinated switching of chromatin states at FLC during vernalization.

    PubMed

    Csorba, Tibor; Questa, Julia I; Sun, Qianwen; Dean, Caroline

    2014-11-11

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been proposed to play important roles in gene regulation. However, their importance in epigenetic silencing and how specificity is determined remain controversial. We have investigated the cold-induced epigenetic switching mechanism involved in the silencing of Arabidopsis thaliana Flowering Locus C (FLC), which occurs during vernalization. Antisense transcripts, collectively named COOLAIR, are induced by prolonged cold before the major accumulation of histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), characteristic of Polycomb silencing. We have found that COOLAIR is physically associated with the FLC locus and accelerates transcriptional shutdown of FLC during cold exposure. Removal of COOLAIR disrupted the synchronized replacement of H3K36 methylation with H3K27me3 at the intragenic FLC nucleation site during the cold. Consistently, genetic analysis showed COOLAIR and Polycomb complexes work independently in the cold-dependent silencing of FLC. Our data reveal a role for lncRNA in the coordinated switching of chromatin states that occurs during epigenetic regulation. PMID:25349421

  12. Antisense COOLAIR mediates the coordinated switching of chromatin states at FLC during vernalization

    PubMed Central

    Csorba, Tibor; Questa, Julia I.; Sun, Qianwen; Dean, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been proposed to play important roles in gene regulation. However, their importance in epigenetic silencing and how specificity is determined remain controversial. We have investigated the cold-induced epigenetic switching mechanism involved in the silencing of Arabidopsis thaliana FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), which occurs during vernalization. Antisense transcripts, collectively named COOLAIR, are induced by prolonged cold before the major accumulation of histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), characteristic of Polycomb silencing. We have found that COOLAIR is physically associated with the FLC locus and accelerates transcriptional shutdown of FLC during cold exposure. Removal of COOLAIR disrupted the synchronized replacement of H3K36 methylation with H3K27me3 at the intragenic FLC nucleation site during the cold. Consistently, genetic analysis showed COOLAIR and Polycomb complexes work independently in the cold-dependent silencing of FLC. Our data reveal a role for lncRNA in the coordinated switching of chromatin states that occurs during epigenetic regulation. PMID:25349421

  13. Antisense-induced messenger depletion corrects a COL6A2 dominant mutation in Ullrich myopathy.

    PubMed

    Gualandi, Francesca; Manzati, Elisa; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Passarelli, Chiara; Bovolenta, Matteo; Pellegrini, Camilla; Perrone, Daniela; Squarzoni, Stefano; Pegoraro, Elena; Bonaldo, Paolo; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2012-12-01

    Collagen VI gene mutations cause Ullrich and Bethlem muscular dystrophies. Pathogenic mutations frequently have a dominant negative effect, with defects in collagen VI chain secretion and assembly. It is agreed that, conversely, collagen VI haploinsufficiency has no pathological consequences. Thus, RNA-targeting approaches aimed at preferentially inactivating the mutated COL6 messenger may represent a promising therapeutic strategy. By in vitro studies we obtained the preferential depletion of the mutated COL6A2 messenger, by targeting a common single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), cistronic with a dominant COL6A2 mutation. We used a 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (2'OMePS) antisense oligonucleotide covering the SNP within exon 3, which is out of frame. Exon 3 skipping has the effect of depleting the mutated transcript via RNA nonsense-mediated decay, recovering the correct collagen VI secretion and restoring the ability to form an interconnected microfilament network into the extracellular matrix. This novel RNA modulation approach to correcting dominant mutations may represent a therapeutic strategy potentially applicable to a great variety of mutations and diseases. PMID:22992134

  14. Tuning growth cycles of Brassica crops via natural antisense transcripts of BrFLC.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaorong; Zhang, Shaofeng; Bai, Jinjuan; He, Yuke

    2016-03-01

    Several oilseed and vegetable crops of Brassica are biennials that require a prolonged winter cold for flowering, a process called vernalization. FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) is a central repressor of flowering. Here, we report that the overexpression of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) of Brassica rapa FLC (BrFLC) greatly shortens plant growth cycles. In rapid-, medium- and slow-cycling crop types, there are four copies of the BrFLC genes, which show extensive variation in sequences and expression levels. In Bre, a biennial crop type that requires vernalization, five NATs derived from the BrFLC2 locus are rapidly induced under cold conditions, while all four BrFLC genes are gradually down-regulated. The transgenic Bre lines overexpressing a long NAT of BrFLC2 do not require vernalization, resulting in a gradient of shortened growth cycles. Among them, a subset of lines both flower and set seeds as early as Yellow sarson, an annual crop type in which all four BrFLC genes have non-sense mutations and are nonfunctional in flowering repression. Our results demonstrate that the growth cycles of biennial crops of Brassica can be altered by changing the expression levels of BrFLC2 NATs. Thus, BrFLC2 NATs and their transgenic lines are useful for the genetic manipulation of crop growth cycles. PMID:26250982

  15. Antisense inhibition of hyaluronan synthase-2 in human osteosarcoma cells inhibits hyaluronan retention and tumorigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Yoshihiro . E-mail: ynishida@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Knudson, Warren; Knudson, Cheryl B.; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2005-07-01

    Osteosarcoma is a common malignant bone tumor associated with childhood and adolescence. The results of numerous studies have suggested that hyaluronan plays an important role in regulating the aggressive behavior of various types of cancer cells. However, no studies have addressed hyaluronan with respect to osteosarcomas. In this investigation, the mRNA expression copy number of three mammalian hyaluronan synthases (HAS) was determined using competitive RT-PCR in the osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line, MG-63. MG-63 are highly malignant osteosarcoma cells with an abundant hyaluronan-rich matrix. The results demonstrated that HAS-2 is the predominant HAS in MG-63. Accumulation of intracellular hyaluronan increased in association with the proliferative phase of these cells. The selective inhibition of HAS-2 mRNA in MG-63 cells by antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides resulted in reduced hyaluronan accumulation by these cells. As expected, the reduction in hyaluronan disrupted the assembly of cell-associated matrices. However, of most interest, coincident with the reduction in hyaluronan, there was a substantial decrease in cell proliferation, a decrease in cell motility and a decrease in cell invasiveness. These data suggest that hyaluronan synthesized by HAS-2 in MG-63 plays a crucial role in osteosarcoma cell proliferation, motility, and invasion.

  16. Antisense oligonucleotides targeting the progesterone receptor inhibit hormone-independent breast cancer growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Caroline A; Helguero, Luisa A; Giulianelli, Sebastián; Soldati, Rocío; Vanzulli, Silvia I; Molinolo, Alfredo; Lanari, Claudia

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Previous data from our laboratory suggested that progesterone receptors (PRs) are involved in progestin-independent growth of mammary carcinomas. To investigate this possibility further, we studied the effects of PR antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (asPR) on in vivo tumor growth. Method BALB/c mice with subcutaneous 25 mm2 mammary carcinomas expressing estrogen receptor-α and PR were either injected intraperitoneally with 1 mg asPR every 24 or 12 hours for 5–10 days, or subcutaneously with RU 486 (6.5 mg/kg body weight) every 24 hours. Control mice received vehicle or scPR. Results Significant inhibition of tumor growth as well as a significant decrease in bromodeoxyuridine uptake was observed in asPR-treated mice, which correlated with histological signs of regression and increased apoptosis. Mice treated with RU 486 experienced almost complete tumor regression. No differences were detected between vehicle-treated and scPR-treated mice. Anti-progestin-treated and asPR-treated mice were in a continuous estrous/meta-estrous state. Decreased phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1 and ERK2 levels and estrogen receptor-α expression were observed as late events in RU 486-treated and asPR-treated mice with regressing tumors. Conclusion We demonstrate, for the first time, inhibition of tumor growth in vivo using asPR. Our results provide further evidence for a critical and hierarchical role of the PR pathway in mammary carcinomas. PMID:16457691

  17. Programmable control of bacterial gene expression with the combined CRISPR and antisense RNA system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Je; Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Leong, Matthew C.; Moon, Tae Seok

    2016-01-01

    A central goal of synthetic biology is to implement diverse cellular functions by predictably controlling gene expression. Though research has focused more on protein regulators than RNA regulators, recent advances in our understanding of RNA folding and functions have motivated the use of RNA regulators. RNA regulators provide an advantage because they are easier to design and engineer than protein regulators, potentially have a lower burden on the cell and are highly orthogonal. Here, we combine the CRISPR system from Streptococcus pyogenes and synthetic antisense RNAs (asRNAs) in Escherichia coli strains to repress or derepress a target gene in a programmable manner. Specifically, we demonstrate for the first time that the gene target repressed by the CRISPR system can be derepressed by expressing an asRNA that sequesters a small guide RNA (sgRNA). Furthermore, we demonstrate that tunable levels of derepression can be achieved (up to 95%) by designing asRNAs that target different regions of a sgRNA and by altering the hybridization free energy of the sgRNA–asRNA complex. This new system, which we call the combined CRISPR and asRNA system, can be used to reversibly repress or derepress multiple target genes simultaneously, allowing for rational reprogramming of cellular functions. PMID:26837577

  18. Antisense-mediated exon skipping: a therapeutic strategy for titin-based dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gramlich, Michael; Pane, Luna Simona; Zhou, Qifeng; Chen, Zhifen; Murgia, Marta; Schötterl, Sonja; Goedel, Alexander; Metzger, Katja; Brade, Thomas; Parrotta, Elvira; Schaller, Martin; Gerull, Brenda; Thierfelder, Ludwig; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Labeit, Siegfried; Atherton, John J; McGaughran, Julie; Harvey, Richard P; Sinnecker, Daniel; Mann, Matthias; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Gawaz, Meinrad Paul; Moretti, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Frameshift mutations in the TTN gene encoding titin are a major cause for inherited forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a heart disease characterized by ventricular dilatation, systolic dysfunction, and progressive heart failure. To date, there are no specific treatment options for DCM patients but heart transplantation. Here, we show the beneficial potential of reframing titin transcripts by antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated exon skipping in human and murine models of DCM carrying a previously identified autosomal-dominant frameshift mutation in titin exon 326. Correction of TTN reading frame in patient-specific cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells rescued defective myofibril assembly and stability and normalized the sarcomeric protein expression. AON treatment in Ttn knock-in mice improved sarcomere formation and contractile performance in homozygous embryos and prevented the development of the DCM phenotype in heterozygous animals. These results demonstrate that disruption of the titin reading frame due to a truncating DCM mutation can be restored by exon skipping in both patient cardiomyocytes in vitro and mouse heart in vivo, indicating RNA-based strategies as a potential treatment option for DCM. PMID:25759365

  19. A lignin-specific peroxidase in tobacco whose antisense suppression leads to vascular tissue modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blee, Kristopher A.; Choi, Joon W.; O'Connell, Ann P.; Schuch, Wolfgang; Lewis, Norman G.; Bolwell, G. Paul

    2003-01-01

    A tobacco peroxidase isoenzyme (TP60) was down-regulated in tobacco using an antisense strategy, this affording transformants with lignin reductions of up to 40-50% of wild type (control) plants. Significantly, both guaiacyl and syringyl levels decreased in essentially a linear manner with the reductions in lignin amounts, as determined by both thioacidolysis and nitrobenzene oxidative analyses. These data provisionally suggest that a feedback mechanism is operative in lignifying cells, which prevents build-up of monolignols should oxidative capacity for their subsequent metabolism be reduced. Prior to this study, the only known rate-limiting processes in the monolignol/lignin pathways involved that of Phe supply and the relative activities of cinnamate-4-hydroxylase/p-coumarate-3-hydroxylase, respectively. These transformants thus provide an additional experimental means in which to further dissect and delineate the factors involved in monolignol targeting to precise regions in the cell wall, and of subsequent lignin assembly. Interestingly, the lignin down-regulated tobacco phenotypes displayed no readily observable differences in overall growth and development profiles, although the vascular apparatus was modified.

  20. PRO-051, an antisense oligonucleotide for the potential treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Suzan M; Wood, Matthew Ja

    2010-08-01

    PRO-051 (GSK-2402968), being developed by GlaxoSmithKline plc, under license from Leiden University Medical Center and Prosensa Therapeutics BV, is a 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide for the potential treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The PRO-051 oligonucleotide sequence induces skipping of exon 51 of the dystrophin gene by binding to a sequence within the dystrophin pre-mRNA and masking the exon inclusion signals that are used for splicing. Removal of exon 51 from an exon 45 to 50, 47 to 50, 48 to 50, 49 to 50, 50, 52 or 52 to 63 deleted transcript allows restoration of the open reading frame and synthesis of an internally truncated, semi-functional dystrophin protein. By targeting exon 51, approximately 13% of patients with DMD could be treated, the largest proportion of patients that could benefit from targeting a single dystrophin exon. A proof-of-concept clinical trial of PRO-051 in patients with DMD demonstrated that a single intramuscular administration of PRO-051 induced exon skipping within muscle fibers adjacent to the injection site, while biopsies revealed dystrophin expression in treated but not control muscle fibers. At the time of publication, a phase I/IIa trial to evaluate subcutaneous delivery of PRO-051 had been completed, although full results were yet to be published. PMID:20677099

  1. Evaluation of 2'-Deoxy-2'-fluoro Antisense Oligonucleotides for Exon Skipping in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Jirka, Silvana M G; Tanganyika-de Winter, Christa L; Boertje-van der Meulen, Joke W; van Putten, Maaike; Hiller, Monika; Vermue, Rick; de Visser, Peter C; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscle wasting disorder typically caused by frame-shifting mutations in the DMD gene. Restoration of the reading frame would allow the production of a shorter but partly functional dystrophin protein as seen in Becker muscular dystrophy patients. This can be achieved with antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that induce skipping of specific exons during pre-mRNA splicing. Different chemical modifications have been developed to improve AON properties. The 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro (2F) RNA modification is attractive for exon skipping due to its ability to recruit ILF2/3 proteins to the 2F/pre-mRNA duplex, which resulted in enhanced exon skipping in spinal muscular atrophy models. In this study, we examined the effect of two different 2'-substituted AONs (2'-F phosphorothioate (2FPS) and 2'-O-Me phosphorothioate (2OMePS)) on exon skipping in DMD cell and animal models. In human cell cultures, 2FPS AONs showed higher exon skipping levels than their isosequential 2OMePS counterparts. Interestingly, in the mdx mouse model, 2FPS was less efficient than 2OMePS and suggested safety issues as evidenced by increased spleen size and weight loss. Our results do not support a clinical application for 2FPS AON. PMID:26623937

  2. A lignin-specific peroxidase in tobacco whose antisense suppression leads to vascular tissue modification.

    PubMed

    Blee, Kristopher A; Choi, Joon W; O'Connell, Ann P; Schuch, Wolfgang; Lewis, Norman G; Bolwell, G Paul

    2003-09-01

    A tobacco peroxidase isoenzyme (TP60) was down-regulated in tobacco using an antisense strategy, this affording transformants with lignin reductions of up to 40-50% of wild type (control) plants. Significantly, both guaiacyl and syringyl levels decreased in essentially a linear manner with the reductions in lignin amounts, as determined by both thioacidolysis and nitrobenzene oxidative analyses. These data provisionally suggest that a feedback mechanism is operative in lignifying cells, which prevents build-up of monolignols should oxidative capacity for their subsequent metabolism be reduced. Prior to this study, the only known rate-limiting processes in the monolignol/lignin pathways involved that of Phe supply and the relative activities of cinnamate-4-hydroxylase/p-coumarate-3-hydroxylase, respectively. These transformants thus provide an additional experimental means in which to further dissect and delineate the factors involved in monolignol targeting to precise regions in the cell wall, and of subsequent lignin assembly. Interestingly, the lignin down-regulated tobacco phenotypes displayed no readily observable differences in overall growth and development profiles, although the vascular apparatus was modified. PMID:12946415

  3. Genome-wide view of natural antisense transcripts in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chunhui; Wang, Jingjing; Harrison, Andrew P.; Meng, Xianwen; Chen, Dijun; Chen, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are endogenous transcripts that can form double-stranded RNA structures. Many protein-coding genes (PCs) and non-protein-coding genes (NPCs) tend to form cis-NATs and trans-NATs, respectively. In this work, we identified 4,080 cis-NATs and 2,491 trans-NATs genome-widely in Arabidopsis. Of these, 5,385 NAT-siRNAs were detected from the small RNA sequencing data. NAT-siRNAs are typically 21nt, and are processed by Dicer-like 1 (DCL1)/DCL2 and RDR6 and function in epigenetically activated situations, or 24nt, suggesting these are processed by DCL3 and RDR2 and function in environment stress. NAT-siRNAs are significantly derived from PC/PC pairs of trans-NATs and NPC/NPC pairs of cis-NATs. Furthermore, NAT pair genes typically have similar pattern of epigenetic status. Cis-NATs tend to be marked by euchromatic modifications, whereas trans-NATs tend to be marked by heterochromatic modifications. PMID:25922535

  4. Genome-wide view of natural antisense transcripts in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chunhui; Wang, Jingjing; Harrison, Andrew P; Meng, Xianwen; Chen, Dijun; Chen, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are endogenous transcripts that can form double-stranded RNA structures. Many protein-coding genes (PCs) and non-protein-coding genes (NPCs) tend to form cis-NATs and trans-NATs, respectively. In this work, we identified 4,080 cis-NATs and 2,491 trans-NATs genome-widely in Arabidopsis. Of these, 5,385 NAT-siRNAs were detected from the small RNA sequencing data. NAT-siRNAs are typically 21nt, and are processed by Dicer-like 1 (DCL1)/DCL2 and RDR6 and function in epigenetically activated situations, or 24nt, suggesting these are processed by DCL3 and RDR2 and function in environment stress. NAT-siRNAs are significantly derived from PC/PC pairs of trans-NATs and NPC/NPC pairs of cis-NATs. Furthermore, NAT pair genes typically have similar pattern of epigenetic status. Cis-NATs tend to be marked by euchromatic modifications, whereas trans-NATs tend to be marked by heterochromatic modifications. PMID:25922535

  5. Antisense oligonucleotide–mediated MDM4 exon 6 skipping impairs tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Dewaele, Michael; Tabaglio, Tommaso; Willekens, Karen; Bezzi, Marco; Teo, Shun Xie; Low, Diana H.P.; Koh, Cheryl M.; Rambow, Florian; Fiers, Mark; Rogiers, Aljosja; Radaelli, Enrico; Al-Haddawi, Muthafar; Tan, Soo Yong; Hermans, Els; Amant, Frederic; Yan, Hualong; Lakshmanan, Manikandan; Koumar, Ratnacaram Chandrahas; Lim, Soon Thye; Derheimer, Frederick A.; Campbell, Robert M.; Bonday, Zahid; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Shackleton, Mark; Blattner, Christine; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Guccione, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    MDM4 is a promising target for cancer therapy, as it is undetectable in most normal adult tissues but often upregulated in cancer cells to dampen p53 tumor-suppressor function. The mechanisms that underlie MDM4 upregulation in cancer cells are largely unknown. Here, we have shown that this key oncogenic event mainly depends on a specific alternative splicing switch. We determined that while a nonsense-mediated, decay-targeted isoform of MDM4 (MDM4-S) is produced in normal adult tissues as a result of exon 6 skipping, enhanced exon 6 inclusion leads to expression of full-length MDM4 in a large number of human cancers. Although this alternative splicing event is likely regulated by multiple splicing factors, we identified the SRSF3 oncoprotein as a key enhancer of exon 6 inclusion. In multiple human melanoma cell lines and in melanoma patient–derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models, antisense oligonucleotide–mediated (ASO-mediated) skipping of exon 6 decreased MDM4 abundance, inhibited melanoma growth, and enhanced sensitivity to MAPK-targeting therapeutics. Additionally, ASO-based MDM4 targeting reduced diffuse large B cell lymphoma PDX growth. As full-length MDM4 is enhanced in multiple human tumors, our data indicate that this strategy is applicable to a wide range of tumor types. We conclude that enhanced MDM4 exon 6 inclusion is a common oncogenic event and has potential as a clinically compatible therapeutic target. PMID:26595814

  6. Proteome changes in tomato lines transformed with phytoene synthase-1 in the sense and antisense orientations

    PubMed Central

    Bramley, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    The commercial cultivation of genetically engineered (GE) crops in Europe has met with considerable consumer resistance, which has led to vigorous safety assessments including the measurement of substantial equivalence between the GE and parent lines. This necessitates the identification and quantification of significant changes to the metabolome and proteome in the GE crop. In this study, the quantitative proteomic analysis of tomato fruit from lines that have been transformed with the carotenogenic gene phytoene synthase-1 (Psy-1), in the sense and antisense orientations, in comparison with a non-transformed, parental line is described. Multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT), with tandem mass spectrometry, has been used to identify proteins, while quantification has been carried out with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ). Fruit from the GE plants showed significant alterations to their proteomes compared with the parental line, especially those from the Psy-1 sense transformants. These results demonstrate that MudPIT and iTRAQ are suitable techniques for the verification of substantial equivalence of the proteome in GE crops. PMID:22987837

  7. Fatty acid-specific alterations in leptin, PPARα, and CPT-1 gene expression in the rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Coccia, Elena; Varricchio, Ettore; Vito, Pasquale; Turchini, Giovanni Mario; Francis, David Scott; Paolucci, Marina

    2014-10-01

    It is known that fatty acids (FA) regulate lipid metabolism by modulating the expression of numerous genes. In order to gain a better understanding of the effect of individual FA on lipid metabolism related genes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), an in vitro time-course study was implemented where twelve individual FA (butyric 4:0; caprylic 8:0; palmitic (PAM) 16:0; stearic (STA) 18:0; palmitoleic16:1n-7; oleic 18:1n-9; 11-cis-eicosenoic 20:1n-9; linoleic (LNA) 18:2n-6; α-linolenic (ALA) 18:3n-3; eicosapentenoic (EPA) 20:5n-3; docosahexaenoic (DHA) 22:6n-3; arachidonic (ARA) 20:4n-6) were incubated in rainbow trout liver slices. The effect of FA administration over time was evaluated on the expression of leptin, PPARα and CPT-1 (lipid oxidative related genes). Leptin mRNA expression was down regulated by saturated fatty acids (SFA) and LNA, and was up regulated by monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and long chain PUFA, whilst STA and ALA had no effect. PPARα and CPT-1mRNA expression were up regulated by SFA, MUFA, ALA, ARA and DHA; and down regulated by LNA and EPA. These results suggest that there are individual and specific FA induced modifications of leptin, PPARα and CPT-1 gene expression in rainbow trout, and it is envisaged that such results may provide highly valuable information for future practical applications in fish nutrition. PMID:25108415

  8. Reduction of Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Content by Antisense RNA Reduces Photosynthesis in Transgenic Tobacco Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Graham S.; Evans, John R.; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Arvidsson, Yvonne B. C.; Andrews, T. John

    1992-01-01

    A complementary DNA for the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was cloned from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and fused in the antisense orientation to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. This antisense gene was introduced into the tobacco genome, and the resulting transgenic plants were analyzed to assess the effect of the antisense RNA on Rubisco activity and photosynthesis. The mean content of extractable Rubisco activity from the leaves of 10 antisense plants was 18% of the mean level of activity of control plants. The soluble protein content of the leaves of anti-small subunit plants was reduced by the amount equivalent to the reduction in Rubisco. There was little change in phosphoribulokinase activity, electron transport, and chlorophyll content, indicating that the loss of Rubisco did not affect these other components of photosynthesis. However, there was a significant reduction in carbonic anhydrase activity. The rate of CO2 assimilation measured at 1000 micromoles quanta per square meter per second, 350 microbars CO2, and 25°C was reduced by 63% (mean value) in the antisense plants and was limited by Rubisco activity over a wide range of intercellular CO2 partial pressures (pi). In control leaves, Rubisco activity only limited the rate of CO2 assimilation below a pi of 400 microbars. Despite the decrease in photosynthesis, there was no reduction in stomatal conductance in the antisense plants, and the stomata still responded to changes in pi. The unchanged conductance and lower CO2 assimilation resulted in a higher pi, which was reflected in greater carbon isotope discrimination in the leaves of the antisense plants. These results suggest that stomatal function is independent of total leaf Rubisco activity. PMID:16668627

  9. Central and Peripheral Administration of Antisense Oligonucleotide Targeting Amyloid Precursor Protein Improves Learning and Memory and Reduces Neuroinflammatory Cytokines in Tg2576 (APPswe) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Susan A.; Erickson, Michelle A.; Niehoff, Michael L.; Banks, William A.; Morley, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. The World Health Organization estimates that there are currently 18 million people worldwide living with AD and that number is expected to double by early 2025. Currently, there are no therapies to stop or reverse the symptoms of AD. We have developed an antisense oligonucleotide (OL-1) against the amyloid betaprotein precursor (AβPP) that can decrease AβPP expression and amyloid beta protein (Aβ) production. This antisense rapidly crosses the blood-brain barrier, reverses learning and memory impairments, reduces oxidative stress and restores brain-to-blood efflux of Aβ in SAMP8 mice. In the current study, we examined the effects of this AβPP antisense in the Tg2576 mouse model of AD. The Tg2576 overproduces human Aβ, develops age-related learning and memory deficits, and exhibits oxidative damage in the brain. First, we administered the AβPP antisense centrally into the lateral ventricle 3 times at 2 week intervals. Seventy-two hours after the third injection, we tested learning and memory in T-maze foot shock avoidance. In the second study, we injected the mice with AβPP antisense 3 times at two week intervals via the tail vein. Seventy-two hours later, we tested learning and memory T-maze foot shock avoidance, novel object recognition and elevated plus maze. At the end of behavioral testing, mice were sacrificed and brain tissue was collected for evaluation of AβPP, Aβ, and expression of cytokines and chemokines. AβPP antisense administered centrally improved acquisition and retention of T-maze foot shock avoidance. AβPP antisense administered via tail vein improved learning and memory in both T-maze foot shock avoidance and novel object-place recognition. In the elevated plus maze the mice which received OL-1 AβPP antisense spent less time in the open arms and had fewer entries into the open arms indicating reduced disinhibitation. Biochemical analyses reveal significant

  10. Extremely High Expression of Antisense RNA for Wilms' Tumor 1 in Active Osteoclasts: Suppression of Wilms' Tumor 1 Protein Expression during Osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yin-Ji; Kukita, Akiko; Kyumoto-Nakamura, Yukari; Kukita, Toshio

    2016-09-01

    Wilms' tumor 1 (WT1), a zinc-finger transcription regulator of the early growth response family, identified as the product of a tumor suppressor gene of Wilms' tumors, bears potential ability to induce macrophage differentiation in blood cell differentiation. Herein, we examined the involvement of WT1 in the regulation of osteoclastogenesis. We detected a high level of WT1 protein expression in osteoclast precursors; however, WT1 expression was markedly suppressed during osteoclastogenesis. We examined expression of WT1 transcripts in bone tissue by RNA in situ hybridization. We found a high level of antisense transcripts in osteoclasts actively resorbing bone in mandible of newborn rats. Expression of antisense WT1 RNA in mandible was also confirmed by Northern blot analysis and strand-specific RT-PCR. Overexpression of antisense WT1 RNA in RAW-D cells, an osteoclast precursor cell line, resulted in a marked enhancement of osteoclastogenesis, suggesting that antisense WT1 RNA functions to suppress expression of WT1 protein in osteoclastogenesis. High level expression of antisense WT1 RNA may contribute to commitment to osteoclastogenesis, and may allow osteoclasts to maintain or stabilize their differentiation state. PMID:27393793

  11. alpha-Linolenic acid- and docosahexaenoic acid-enriched eggs from hens fed flaxseed: influence on blood lipids and platelet phospholipid fatty acids in humans.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, L K; Caston, L J; Leeson, S; Squires, J; Weaver, B J; Holub, B J

    1995-07-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effects that consumption of eggs from hens fed diets containing flaxseed would have on plasma and platelet lipids of male volunteers. Feeding diets containing 0%, 10%, and 20% ground flaxseed to Leghorn pullets provided a marked progressive increase in n-3 fatty acid content as alpha-linolenic acid (alpha-LNA) (28, 261, and 527 mg/egg) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (51, 81, and 87 mg/egg) but no alteration in the cholesterol concentration of the egg yolk. Twenty-eight male volunteers, divided into three groups, were fed four eggs per day for 2 wk according to a cyclic Latin-square design. No statistically significant changes were observed in total cholesterol, high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, or plasma triglyceride concentrations. Significant increases in total n-3 fatty acids and in DHA content (which rose from 1.5 to 2.0% by wt or 33% overall), and a significant decrease in ratio of n-6 to n-3 fatty acids were found in platelet phospholipids of subjects consuming eggs from flaxseed-fed hens. Health and Welfare Canada in 1990 set recommended intakes for dietary n-3 fatty acids and for the ratio of n-6 to n-3 fatty acids, which are not being met currently by the overall population. Eggs modified by the inclusion of flaxseed in the laying hens' diet could provide an important nutritional source of n-3 fatty acid. PMID:7598070

  12. Disarmed anthrax toxin delivers antisense oligonucleotides and siRNA with high efficiency and low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Paul D R; Shepherd, Thomas R; Gollings, Alexander S; Shorter, Susan A; Gorringe-Pattrick, Monique A M; Tang, Chun-Kit; Cattoz, Beatrice N; Baillie, Les; Griffiths, Peter C; Richardson, Simon C W

    2015-12-28

    Inefficient cytosolic delivery and vector toxicity contribute to the limited use of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and siRNA as therapeutics. As anthrax toxin (Atx) accesses the cytosol, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of disarmed Atx to deliver either ASOs or siRNA. We hypothesized that this delivery strategy would facilitate improved transfection efficiency while eliminating the toxicity seen for many vectors due to membrane destabilization. Atx complex formation with ASOs or siRNA was achieved via the in-frame fusion of either Saccharomyces cerevisiae GAL4 or Homo sapien sapien PKR (respectively) to a truncation of Atx lethal factor (LFn), which were used with Atx protective antigen (PA). Western immunoblotting confirmed the production of: LFN-GAL4, LFn-PKR and PA which were detected at ~45.9 kDa, ~37 kDa, and ~83 kDa respectively and small angle neutron scattering confirmed the ability of PA to form an annular structure with a radius of gyration of 7.0 ± 1.0 nm when placed in serum. In order to form a complex with LFn-GAL4, ASOs were engineered to contain a double-stranded region, and a cell free in vitro translation assay demonstrated that no loss of antisense activity above 30 pmol ASO was evident. The in vitro toxicity of both PA:LFn-GAL4:ASO and PA:LFn-PKR:siRNA complexes was low (IC50>100 μg/mL in HeLa and Vero cells) and subcellular fractionation in conjunction with microscopy confirmed the detection of LFn-GAL4 or LFn-PKR in the cytosol. Syntaxin5 (Synt5) was used as a model target gene to determine pharmacological activity. The PA:LFn-GAL4:ASO complexes had transfection efficiency approximately equivalent to Nucleofection® over a variety of ASO concentrations (24h post-transfection) and during a 72 h time course. In HeLa cells, at 200 pmol ASO (with PA:LFN-GAL4), 5.4 ± 2.0% Synt5 expression was evident relative to an untreated control after 24h. Using 200 pmol ASOs, Nucleofection® reduced Synt5 expression to 8.1 ± 2

  13. Sense-antisense gene-pairs in breast cancer and associated pathological pathways

    PubMed Central

    Grinchuk, Oleg V.; Motakis, Efthymios; Yenamandra, Surya Pavan; Ow, Ghim Siong; Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Tang, Zhiqun; Yarmishyn, Aliaksandr A.; Ivshina, Anna V.; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    More than 30% of human protein-coding genes form hereditary complex genome architectures composed of sense-antisense (SA) gene pairs (SAGPs) transcribing their RNAs from both strands of a given locus. Such architectures represent important novel components of genome complexity contributing to gene expression deregulation in cancer cells. Therefore, the architectures might be involved in cancer pathways and, in turn, be used for novel drug targets discovery. However, the global roles of SAGPs in cancer pathways has not been studied. Here we investigated SAGPs associated with breast cancer (BC)-related pathways using systems biology, prognostic survival and experimental methods. Gene expression analysis identified 73 BC-relevant SAGPs that are highly correlated in BC. Survival modelling and metadata analysis of the 1161 BC patients allowed us to develop a novel patient prognostic grouping method selecting the 12 survival-significant SAGPs. The qRT-PCR-validated 12-SAGP prognostic signature reproducibly stratified BC patients into low- and high-risk prognostic subgroups. The 1381 SAGP-defined differentially expressed genes common across three studied cohorts were identified. The functional enrichment analysis of these genes revealed the GABPA gene network, including BC-relevant SAGPs, specific gene sets involved in cell cycle, spliceosomal and proteasomal pathways. The co-regulatory function of GABPA in BC cells was supported using siRNA knockdown studies. Thus, we demonstrated SAGPs as the synergistically functional genome architectures interconnected with cancer-related pathways and associated with BC patient clinical outcomes. Taken together, SAGPs represent an important component of genome complexity which can be used to identify novel aspects of coordinated pathological gene networks in cancers. PMID:26517092

  14. Selective Neuromuscular Denervation in Taiwanese Severe SMA Mouse Can Be Reversed by Morpholino Antisense Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Te-Lin; Chen, Tai-Heng; Hsu, Ya-Yun; Cheng, Yu-Hua; Juang, Bi-Tzen; Jong, Yuh-Jyh

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease caused by deficiency of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein, which leads to synaptic defects and spinal motor neuron death. Neuromuscular junction (NMJ) abnormalities have been found to be involved in SMA pathogenesis in the SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. However, whether similar NMJ pathological findings present in another commonly used mouse model, the Taiwanese SMA mouse, has not been fully investigated. To examine the NMJs of the Taiwanese severe SMA mouse model (Smn-/-; SMN2tg/0), which is characterized by severe phenotype and death before postnatal day (P) 9, we investigated 25 axial and appendicular muscles from P1 to P9. We labelled the muscles with anti-neurofilament and anti-synaptophysin antibodies for nerve terminals and α-bungarotoxin for acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). We found that severe NMJ denervation (<50% fully innervated endplates) selectively occurred in the flexor digitorum brevis 2 and 3 (FDB-2/3) muscles from P5, and an increased percentage of fully denervated endplates correlated with SMA progression. Furthermore, synaptophysin signals were absent at the endplate compared to control littermate mice, suggesting that vesicle transport might only be affected at the end stage. Subsequently, we treated the Taiwanese severe SMA mice with morpholino (MO) antisense oligonucleotides (80 μg/g) via subcutaneous injection at P0. We found that MO significantly reversed the NMJ denervation in FDB-2/3 muscles and extended the survival of Taiwanese severe SMA mice. We conclude that early NMJ denervation in the FDB-2/3 muscles of Taiwanese severe SMA mice can be reversed by MO treatment. The FDB-2/3 muscles of Taiwanese severe SMA mice provide a very sensitive platform for assessing the effectiveness of drug treatments in SMA preclinical studies. PMID:27124114

  15. Survivin Antisense Oligonucleotides Effectively Radiosensitize Colorectal Cancer Cells in Both Tissue Culture and Murine Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Franz; Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Claus

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Survivin shows a radiation resistance factor in colorectal cancer. In the present study, we determined whether survivin messenger RNA levels in patients with rectal cancer predict tumor response after neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and whether inhibition of survivin by the use of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) enhances radiation responses. Methods and Materials: SW480 colorectal carcinoma cells were transfected with survivin ASO (LY2181308) and irradiated with doses ranging from 0-8 Gy. Survivin expression, cell-cycle distribution, {gamma}H2AX fluorescence, and induction of apoptosis were monitored by means of immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and caspase 3/7 activity. Clonogenic survival was determined by using a colony-forming assay. An SW480 xenograft model was used to investigate the effect of survivin attenuation and irradiation on tumor growth. Furthermore, survivin messenger RNA levels were studied in patient biopsy specimens by using Affymetrix microarray analysis. Results: In the translational study of 20 patients with rectal cancer, increased survivin levels were associated with significantly greater risk of local tumor recurrence (p = 0.009). Treatment of SW480 cells with survivin ASOs and irradiation resulted in an increased percentage of apoptotic cells, caspase 3/7 activity, fraction of cells in the G{sub 2}/M phase, and H2AX phosphorylation. Clonogenic survival decreased compared with control-treated cells. Furthermore, treatment of SW480 xenografts with survivin ASOs and irradiation resulted in a significant delay in tumor growth. Conclusion: Survivin appears to be a molecular biomarker in patients with rectal cancer. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo data suggest a potential role of survivin as a molecular target to improve treatment response to radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer.

  16. Manipulation of Strawberry Fruit Softening by Antisense Expression of a Pectate Lyase Gene1

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Bermúdez, Silvia; Redondo-Nevado, José; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L.; López-Aranda, José M.; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Pliego-Alfaro, Fernando; Quesada, Miguel A.; Mercado, José A.

    2002-01-01

    Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa, Duch., cv Chandler) is a soft fruit with a short postharvest life, mainly due to a rapid lost of firm texture. To control the strawberry fruit softening, we obtained transgenic plants that incorporate an antisense sequence of a strawberry pectate lyase gene under the control of the 35S promoter. Forty-one independent transgenic lines (Apel lines) were obtained, propagated in the greenhouse for agronomical analysis, and compared with control plants, non-transformed plants, and transgenic lines transformed with the pGUSINT plasmid. Total yield was significantly reduced in 33 of the 41 Apel lines. At the stage of full ripen, no differences in color, size, shape, and weight were observed between Apel and control fruit. However, in most of the Apel lines, ripened fruits were significantly firmer than controls. Six Apel lines were selected for further analysis. In all these lines, the pectate lyase gene expression in ripened fruit was 30% lower than in control, being totally suppressed in three of them. Cell wall material isolated from ripened Apel fruit showed a lower degree of in vitro swelling and a lower amount of ionically bound pectins than control fruit. An analysis of firmness at three different stages of fruit development (green, white, and red) showed that the highest reduction of softening in Apel fruit occurred during the transition from the white to the red stage. The postharvest softening of Apel fruit was also diminished. Our results indicate that pectate lyase gene is an excellent candidate for biotechnological improvement of fruit softening in strawberry. PMID:11842178

  17. Self-Assembly into Nanoparticles Is Essential for Receptor Mediated Uptake of Therapeutic Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Kariem; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Koo, Taeyoung; McClorey, Graham; Benner, Leif; Coenen-Stass, Anna; O'Donovan, Liz; Lehto, Taavi; Garcia-Guerra, Antonio; Nordin, Joel; Saleh, Amer F; Behlke, Mark; Morris, John; Goyenvalle, Aurelie; Dugovic, Branislav; Leumann, Christian; Gordon, Siamon; Gait, Michael J; El-Andaloussi, Samir; Wood, Matthew J A

    2015-07-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have the potential to revolutionize medicine due to their ability to manipulate gene function for therapeutic purposes. ASOs are chemically modified and/or incorporated within nanoparticles to enhance their stability and cellular uptake, however, a major challenge is the poor understanding of their uptake mechanisms, which would facilitate improved ASO designs with enhanced activity and reduced toxicity. Here, we study the uptake mechanism of three therapeutically relevant ASOs (peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PPMO), 2'Omethyl phosphorothioate (2'OMe), and phosphorothioated tricyclo DNA (tcDNA) that have been optimized to induce exon skipping in models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We show that PPMO and tcDNA have high propensity to spontaneously self-assemble into nanoparticles. PPMO forms micelles of defined size and their net charge (zeta potential) is dependent on the medium and concentration. In biomimetic conditions and at low concentrations, PPMO obtains net negative charge and its uptake is mediated by class A scavenger receptor subtypes (SCARAs) as shown by competitive inhibition and RNAi silencing experiments in vitro. In vivo, the activity of PPMO was significantly decreased in SCARA1 knockout mice compared to wild-type animals. Additionally, we show that SCARA1 is involved in the uptake of tcDNA and 2'OMe as shown by competitive inhibition and colocalization experiments. Surface plasmon resonance binding analysis to SCARA1 demonstrated that PPMO and tcDNA have higher binding profiles to the receptor compared to 2'OMe. These results demonstrate receptor-mediated uptake for a range of therapeutic ASO chemistries, a mechanism that is dependent on their self-assembly into nanoparticles. PMID:26042553

  18. Affinity capture of (Arg sup 8 )vasopressin-receptor complex using immobilized antisense peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xian Lu; Aiyar, N.; Chaiken, I. )

    1991-05-01

    Solubilized noncovalent complexes of (Arg{sup 8})-vasopressin (AVP) with receptor proteins from rat liver membranes were isolated by selective binding to silica-immobilized antisense (AS) peptide. The affinity chromatographic support was prepared with a chemically synthesized AS peptide whose sequence is encoded by the AS DNA corresponding to the 20 amino-terminal residues of the AVP bovine neurophysin II biosynthetic precursor (pro-AVP/BNPII-(20-1)), region that includes the AVP sequence at residues 1-9. The AS peptide-AVP interaction mechanism hypothesized, contact by hydropathic complementarity at multiple sites along the peptide chains, led to the prediction that AVP bound to its receptor would still have enough free surface to interact with immobilized AS peptide. To test this prediction of a three-way interaction, ({sup 3}H)AVP-receptor was obtained as a solubilized, partially purified fraction from rat liver membrane. Covalently crosslinked ({sup 3}H)AVP complex also was bound to the AS peptide column; binding was blocked by competition with unlabeled AVP in the elution buffer. Since the AVP-linked 31- and 38-kDa proteins have the same apparent molecular mass on SDS/PAGE as found previously by photoaffinity labeling, the authors conclude that the AS peptide column has affinity-captured AVP-receptor complexes. The 15-kDa protein appears to be an active AVP-receptor fragment of one or both of the larger proteins. It is generally concluded that immobilized AS peptides may be useful to isolate peptide and protein receptor complexes in other systems as well.

  19. Elucidation of the Biotransformation Pathways of a Galnac3-conjugated Antisense Oligonucleotide in Rats and Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, Colby S; Yu, Rosie Z; Gaus, Hans J; Greenlee, Sarah; Post, Noah; Schmidt, Karsten; Migawa, Michael T; Seth, Punit P; Zanardi, Thomas A; Prakash, Thazha P; Swayze, Eric E; Henry, Scott P; Wang, Yanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Triantennary N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc3) is a high-affinity ligand for hepatocyte-specific asialoglycoprotein receptors. Conjugation with GalNAc3 via a trishexylamino (THA)-C6 cluster significantly enhances antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) potency. Herein, the biotransformation, disposition, and elimination of the THA cluster of ION-681257, a GalNAc3-conjugated ASO currently in clinical development, are investigated in rats and monkey. Rats were administered a single subcutaneous dose of (3)H-radiolabeled ((3)H placed in THA) or nonradiolabeled ION-681257. Mass balance included radiometric profiling and metabolite fractionation with characterization by mass spectrometry. GalNAc3-conjugated ASOs were extensively distributed into liver. The THA-C6 triantenerrary GalNAc3 conjugate at the 5'-end of the ASO was rapidly metabolized and excreted with 25.67 ± 1.635% and 71.66 ± 4.17% of radioactivity recovered in urine and feces within 48 hours postdose. Unchanged drug, short-mer ASOs, and linker metabolites were detected in urine. Collectively, 14 novel linker associated metabolites were discovered including oxidation at each branching arm, initially by monooxidation at the β-position followed by dioxidation at the α-arm, and lastly, tri and tetra oxidations on the two remaining β-arms. Metabolites in bile and feces were identical to urine except for oxidized linear and cyclic linker metabolites. Enzymatic reaction phenotyping confirmed involvement of N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, deoxyribonuclease II, alkaline phosphatase, and alcohol + aldehyde dehydrogenases on the complex metabolism pathway for THA supplementing in vivo findings. Lastly, excreta from monkeys treated with ION-681257 revealed the identical series as observed in rat. In summary, our findings provide an improved understanding of GalNAc3-conjugated-ASO metabolism pathways which facilitate similar development programs. PMID:27164023

  20. Sense-antisense gene-pairs in breast cancer and associated pathological pathways.

    PubMed

    Grinchuk, Oleg V; Motakis, Efthymios; Yenamandra, Surya Pavan; Ow, Ghim Siong; Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Tang, Zhiqun; Yarmishyn, Aliaksandr A; Ivshina, Anna V; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A

    2015-12-01

    More than 30% of human protein-coding genes form hereditary complex genome architectures composed of sense-antisense (SA) gene pairs (SAGPs) transcribing their RNAs from both strands of a given locus. Such architectures represent important novel components of genome complexity contributing to gene expression deregulation in cancer cells. Therefore, the architectures might be involved in cancer pathways and, in turn, be used for novel drug targets discovery. However, the global roles of SAGPs in cancer pathways has not been studied. Here we investigated SAGPs associated with breast cancer (BC)-related pathways using systems biology, prognostic survival and experimental methods. Gene expression analysis identified 73 BC-relevant SAGPs that are highly correlated in BC. Survival modelling and metadata analysis of the 1161 BC patients allowed us to develop a novel patient prognostic grouping method selecting the 12 survival-significant SAGPs. The qRT-PCR-validated 12-SAGP prognostic signature reproducibly stratified BC patients into low- and high-risk prognostic subgroups. The 1381 SAGP-defined differentially expressed genes common across three studied cohorts were identified. The functional enrichment analysis of these genes revealed the GABPA gene network, including BC-relevant SAGPs, specific gene sets involved in cell cycle, spliceosomal and proteasomal pathways. The co-regulatory function of GABPA in BC cells was supported using siRNA knockdown studies. Thus, we demonstrated SAGPs as the synergistically functional genome architectures interconnected with cancer-related pathways and associated with BC patient clinical outcomes. Taken together, SAGPs represent an important component of genome complexity which can be used to identify novel aspects of coordinated pathological gene networks in cancers. PMID:26517092

  1. Regulation of human heme oxygenase in endothelial cells by using sense and antisense retroviral constructs.

    PubMed

    Quan, S; Yang, L; Abraham, N G; Kappas, A

    2001-10-01

    Our objective was to determine whether overexpression and underexpression of human heme oxygenase (HHO)-1 could be controlled on a long-term basis by introduction of the HO-1 gene in sense (S) and antisense (AS) orientation with an appropriate vector into endothelial cells. Retroviral vector (LXSN) containing viral long terminal repeat promoter-driven human HO-1 S (LSN-HHO-1) and LXSN vectors containing HHO-1 promoter (HOP)-controlled HHO-1 S and AS (LSN-HOP-HHO-1 and LSN-HOP-HHO-1-AS) sequences were constructed and used to transfect rat lung microvessel endothelial cells (RLMV cells) and human dermal microvessel endothelial cells (HMEC-1 cells). RLMV cells transduced with HHO-1 S expressed human HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein associated with elevation in total HO activity compared with nontransduced cells. Vector-mediated expression of HHO-1 S or AS under control of HOP resulted in effective production of HO-1 or blocked induction of endogenous human HO-1 in HMEC-1 cells, respectively. Overexpression of HO-1 AS was associated with a long-term decrease (45%) of endogenous HO-1 protein and an increase (167%) in unmetabolized exogenous heme in HMEC-1 cells. Carbon monoxide (CO) production in HO-1 S- or AS-transduced HMEC-1 cells after heme treatment was increased (159%) or decreased (50%), respectively, compared with nontransduced cells. HO-2 protein levels did not change. These findings demonstrate that HHO-1 S and AS retroviral constructs are functional in enhancing and reducing HO activity, respectively, and thus can be used to regulate cellular heme levels, the activity of heme-dependent enzymes, and the rate of heme catabolism to CO and bilirubin. PMID:11593038

  2. Increased calreticulin stability in differentiated NG-108-15 cells correlates with resistance to apoptosis induced by antisense treatment.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R J; Liu, N; Shanmugaratnam, J; Fine, R E

    1998-01-01

    Since its first identification as a high-affinity calcium-binding protein over two decades ago [T.J. Ostwald and D.H. MacLennan, Isolation of a high-affinity calcium-binding protein from sarcoplasmic reticulum, J. Biol. Chem., 249 (1974) 974-979], calreticulin has become recognized as a multifunctional protein involved in a wide variety of cellular processes. We have previously shown that it has a protective function in Ca2+-mediated cell death [N. Liu, R.E. Fine, E. Simons and R.J. Johnson, Decreasing calreticulin expression lowers the Ca2+ response to bradykinin and increases sensitivity to ionomycin in NG-108-15 cells, J. Biol. Chem. , 269 (1994) 28635-28639]. We report here that in NG-108-15 neuroblastomaxglioma hybrid cells, calreticulin protein levels increase markedly when these cells are induced to differentiate by treating them with N,N-dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP). We demonstrate that the reason for this increase is mostly due to a large increase in the turnover time of calreticulin in differentiated cells. We also show that a calreticulin antisense oligonucleotide, CrtAS1, previously described by Liu and co-workers [N. Liu, R.E. Fine, E. Simons and R.J. Johnson, Decreasing calreticulin expression lowers the Ca2+ response to bradykinin and increases sensitivity to ionomycin in NG-108-15 cells, J. Biol. Chem., 269 (1994) 28635-28639] causes cell death in undifferentiated NG-108-15 cells when antisense treatment is extended for more than 24 h. This effect is not seen in NG-108-15 cells that have been induced to differentiate with db-cAMP until the cells have been treated with antisense for more than 4 days, due to the increased stability of Crt in these cells. Our results indicate that the mechanism by which these cells die is likely to be apoptosis. PMID:9473613

  3. Long noncoding RNA FGFR3-AS1 promotes osteosarcoma growth through regulating its natural antisense transcript FGFR3.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiabing; Wang, Xuming; Fu, Chunjiang; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zou, Jilong; Hua, Hanbing; Bi, Zhenggang

    2016-05-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), a new class of RNAs with no protein-coding potential, have been reported to have crucial roles in the regulation of a variety of tumors. However, the functions and molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs to osteosarcoma are still largely unknown. The purpose of this study is to examine the expression, functions and molecular mechanisms of a new lncRNA FGFR3 antisense transcript 1 (FGFR3-AS1) in osteosarcoma. The expression of FGFR3-AS1 was examined by real-time quantitative PCR. The regulation of FGFR3 by FGFR3-AS1 was examined by RNase protection assay, real-time quantitative PCR, western blotting, and luciferase reporter assay. The effects of FGFR3-AS1 on osteosarcoma cell proliferation and cell cycle were determined by Cell Counting Kit-8, Ethynyl deoxyuridine incorporation assay and flow cytometry. FGFR3-AS1 was upregulated in osteosarcoma. Increased FGFR3-AS1 expression correlates with large tumor size, advanced Enneking stage, metastasis and poor survival. Through antisense pairing with FGFR3 3'UTR, FGFR3-AS1 increases FGFR3 mRNA stability and upregulates FGFR3 expression. The expression of FGFR3-AS1 and FGFR3 is positively correlated in osteosarcoma tissues. Knockdown of FGFR3-AS1 inhibits the proliferation and cell cycle progression of osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Moreover, knockdown of FGFR3-AS1 inhibits xenograft tumor growth of osteosarcoma cells in vivo. These data demonstrate the mechanisms of how antisense noncoding RNA regulate the expression of sense genes, and show the pivotal functions of FGFR3-AS1 in osteosarcoma. PMID:27022737

  4. PEG-appended beta-(1-->3)-D-glucan schizophyllan to deliver antisense-oligonucleotides with avoiding lysosomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Karinaga, Ryouji; Koumoto, Kazuya; Mizu, Masami; Anada, Takahisa; Shinkai, Seiji; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2005-08-01

    Schizophyllan is a natural beta-(1-->3)-d-glucan existing as a triple helix in water and as a single chain in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). As we already reported, when a homo-polynucleotide [e.g., poly(dA) or poly(C)] is added to the schizophyllan/DMSO solution and subsequently DMSO is exchanged for water, the single chain of schizophyllan forms a complex with the polynucleotide. One of the potential applications for this novel complex is an antisense-oligonucleotide (AS ODN) carrier. The present paper describes a modification technique that enabled us to introduce PEG only to the side chain of schizophyllan. This technique consisted of periodate oxidation of the glucose side chain and subsequent reaction between methoxypolyethylene glycol amine and the formyl terminate, followed by reduction with NaBH4. Subsequently, we made a complex from PEG-appended schizophyllan and an AS ODN sequence, and carried out an in vitro antisense assay, administrating the AS ODN complex to depress A375 c-myb mRNA of A375 melanoma cell lines. The PEG-SPG/AS ODN complex showed more enhanced antisnese effect than naked AS ODN dose, i.e., the same level as that of RGD-appended SPG. Here, the RGD system has been shown one on the most effective AS ODN carrier (Science 261 (1993) 1004-1012). When we added nigericin to the assay system, the antisense effect was not affected in the PEG-SPG system, on the other hand, it was almost eliminated in the RGD system. Nigericin is well known to interrupt transport from endosome to lysosome. Therefore, the difference between the PEG and RGD complexes indicates that, in the PEG system, AS ODN was able to escape from lysosomal degradation. The present work has thus proposed a new strategy to delivery AS ODN using schizophyllan as a new carrier. PMID:15763266

  5. Modulation of splicing of the preceding intron by antisense oligonucleotide complementary to intra-exon sequence deleted in dystrophin Kobe

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshima, Y.; Matuso, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Nishio, H.

    1994-09-01

    Molecular analysis of dystrophin Kobe showed that exon 19 of the dystrophin gene bearing a 52 bp deletion was skipped during splicing, although the known consensus sequences at the 5{prime} and 3{prime} splice site of exon 19 were maintained. These data suggest that the deleted sequence of exon 19 may function as a cis-acting factor for exact splicing for the upstream intron. To investigate this potential role, an in vitro splicing system using dystrophin precursors was established. A two-exon precursor containing exon 18, truncated intron 18, and exon 19 was accurately spliced. However, splicing of intron 18 was dramatically inhibited when wild exon 19 was replaced with mutated exon 19. Even though the length of exon 19 was restored to normal by replacing the deleted sequence with other sequence, splicing of intron 18 was not fully reactivated. Characteristically, splicing of intron 18 was inactivated more markedly when the replaced sequence contained less polypurine stretches. These data suggested that modification of the exon sequence would result in a splicing abnormality. Antisense 31 mer 2`-O-methyl ribonucleotide was targeted against 5{prime} end of deleted region of exon 19 to modulate splicing of the mRNA precursor. Splicing of intron 18 was inhibited in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This is the first in vitro evidence to show splicing of dystrophin pre-mRNA can be managed by antisense oligonucleotides. These experiments represent an approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore the function of a defective dystrophin gene in Duchenne muscular dystrophy by inducing skipping of certain exons during splicing.

  6. Gene silencing by gold nanoshell-mediated delivery and laser-triggered release of antisense oligonucleotide and siRNA.

    PubMed

    Huschka, Ryan; Barhoumi, Aoune; Liu, Qing; Roth, Jack A; Ji, Lin; Halas, Naomi J

    2012-09-25

    RNA interference (RNAi)--using antisense DNA or RNA oligonucleotides to silence activity of a specific pathogenic gene transcript and reduce expression of the encoded protein--is very useful in dissecting genetic function and holds significant promise as a molecular therapeutic. A major obstacle in achieving gene silencing with RNAi technology is the systemic delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. Here we demonstrate an engineered gold nanoshell (NS)-based therapeutic oligonucleotide delivery vehicle, designed to release its cargo on demand upon illumination with a near-infrared (NIR) laser. A poly-L-lysine peptide (PLL) epilayer covalently attached to the NS surface (NS-PLL) is used to capture intact, single-stranded antisense DNA oligonucleotides, or alternatively, double-stranded short-interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules. Controlled release of the captured therapeutic oligonucleotides in each case is accomplished by continuous wave NIR laser irradiation at 800 nm, near the resonance wavelength of the nanoshell. Fluorescently tagged oligonucleotides were used to monitor the time-dependent release process and light-triggered endosomal release. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing human lung cancer H1299 cell line was used to determine cellular uptake and gene silencing mediated by the NS-PLL carrying GFP gene-specific single-stranded DNA antisense oligonucleotide (AON-GFP), or a double-stranded siRNA (siRNA-GFP), in vitro. Light-triggered delivery resulted in ~47% and ~49% downregulation of the targeted GFP expression by AON-GFP and siRNA-GFP, respectively. Cytotoxicity induced by both the NS-PLL delivery vector and by laser irradiation is minimal, as demonstrated by a XTT cell proliferation assay. PMID:22862291

  7. Gene Silencing by Gold Nanoshell-Mediated Delivery and Laser-Triggered Release of Antisense Oligonucleotide and siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Huschka, Ryan; Barhoumi, Aoune; Liu, Qing; Roth, Jack A.; Ji, Lin; Halas, Naomi J.

    2013-01-01

    The approach of RNA interference (RNAi)- using antisense DNA or RNA oligonucleotides to silence activity of a specific pathogenic gene transcript and reduce expression of the encoded protein- is very useful in dissecting genetic function and holds significant promise as a molecular therapeutic. A major obstacle in achieving gene silencing with RNAi technology is the systemic delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. Here we demonstrate an engineered gold nanoshell (NS)-based therapeutic oligonucleotide delivery vehicle, designed to release its cargo on demand upon illumination with a near-infrared (NIR) laser. A poly(L)lysine peptide (PLL) epilayer covalently attached to the NS surface (NS-PLL) is used to capture intact, single-stranded antisense DNA oligonucleotides, or alternatively, double-stranded short-interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules. Controlled release of the captured therapeutic oligonucleotides in each case is accomplished by continuous wave NIR laser irradiation at 800 nm, near the resonance wavelength of the nanoshell. Fluorescently tagged oligonucleotides were used to monitor the time-dependent release process and light-triggered endosomal release. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing human lung cancer H1299 cell line was used to determine cellular uptake and gene silencing mediated by the NS-PLL carrying GFP gene-specific single-stranded DNA antisense oligonucleotide (AON-GFP), or a double-stranded siRNA (siRNA-GFP), in vitro. Light-triggered delivery resulted in ∼ 47% and ∼49% downregulation of the targeted GFP expression by AON-GFP and siRNA-GFP, respectively. Cytotoxicity induced by both the NS-PLL delivery vector and by laser irradiation is minimal, as demonstrated by a XTT cell proliferation assay. PMID:22862291

  8. SINEUPs are modular antisense long non-coding RNAs that increase synthesis of target proteins in cells

    PubMed Central

    Zucchelli, Silvia; Fasolo, Francesca; Russo, Roberta; Cimatti, Laura; Patrucco, Laura; Takahashi, Hazuki; Jones, Michael H.; Santoro, Claudio; Sblattero, Daniele; Cotella, Diego; Persichetti, Francesca; Carninci, Piero; Gustincich, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent efforts in discovering novel long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and unveiling their functions in a wide range of biological processes their applications as biotechnological or therapeutic tools are still at their infancy. We have recently shown that AS Uchl1, a natural lncRNA antisense to the Parkinson's disease-associated gene Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal esterase L1 (Uchl1), is able to increase UchL1 protein synthesis at post-transcriptional level. Its activity requires two RNA elements: an embedded inverted SINEB2 sequence to increase translation and the overlapping region to target its sense mRNA. This functional organization is shared with several mouse lncRNAs antisense to protein coding genes. The potential use of AS Uchl1-derived lncRNAs as enhancers of target mRNA translation remains unexplored. Here we define AS Uchl1 as the representative member of a new functional class of natural and synthetic antisense lncRNAs that activate translation. We named this class of RNAs SINEUPs for their requirement of the inverted SINEB2 sequence to UP-regulate translation in a gene-specific manner. The overlapping region is indicated as the Binding Doman (BD) while the embedded inverted SINEB2 element is the Effector Domain (ED). By swapping BD, synthetic SINEUPs are designed targeting mRNAs of interest. SINEUPs function in an array of cell lines and can be efficiently directed toward N-terminally tagged proteins. Their biological activity is retained in a miniaturized version within the range of small RNAs length. Its modular structure was exploited to successfully design synthetic SINEUPs targeting endogenous Parkinson's disease-associated DJ-1 and proved to be active in different neuronal cell lines. In summary, SINEUPs represent the first scalable tool to increase synthesis of proteins of interest. We propose SINEUPs as reagents for molecular biology experiments, in protein manufacturing as well as in therapy of haploinsufficiencies. PMID:26029048

  9. Maternal mRNA knockdown studies: antisense experiments using the host-transfer technique in X. laevis and X. tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Olson, David J.; Hulstrand, Alissa M.; Houston, Douglas W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability to inhibit the activity of maternally stored gene products in Xenopus has led to numerous insights into early developmental mechanisms. Oocytes can be cultured and manipulated in vitro and then implanted into the body cavity of a host female to make them competent for fertilization. Here, we summarize the methods for obtaining, culturing and fertilizing Xenopus oocytes, with the goal of inhibiting maternal gene function through antisense oligonucleotide-mediated mRNA knockdown. We describe a simplified technique for implanting donor oocytes into host females using intraperitoneal injection. Also, we present optimized methods for performing the host-transfer procedure with X. tropicalis oocytes. PMID:22956088

  10. Transgenic male-sterile plant induced by an unedited atp9 gene is restored to fertility by inhibiting its expression with antisense RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Zabaleta, E; Mouras, A; Hernould, M; Suharsono; Araya, A

    1996-01-01

    We have previously shown that the expression of an unedited atp9 chimeric gene correlated with male-sterile phenotype in transgenic tobacco plant. To study the relationship between the expression of chimeric gene and the male-sterile trait, hemizygous and homozygous transgenic tobacco lines expressing the antisense atp9 RNA were constructed. The antisense producing plants were crossed with a homozygous male-sterile line, and the F1 progeny was analyzed. The offspring from crosses between homozygous lines produced only male-fertile plants, suggesting that the expression antisense atp9 RNA abolishes the effect of the unedited chimeric gene. In fact, the plants restored to male fertility showed a dramatic reduction of the unedited atp9 transcript levels, resulting in normal flower development and seed production. These results support our previous observation that the expression of unedited atp9 gene can induce male sterility. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8855343

  11. Co-introduction of an antisense gene for an endogenous seed storage protein can increase expression of a transgene in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds.

    PubMed

    Goossens, A; Van Montagu, M; Angenon, G

    1999-07-30

    We have investigated whether the expression in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds of a transgene (the Phaseolus vulgaris arcelin (arc)5-I gene) could be enhanced by the simultaneous introduction of an antisense gene for an endogenous seed storage protein (2S albumin). Seeds of plants transformed with both the arc5-I gene and a 2S albumin antisense gene contained reduced amounts of 2S albumins and increased arcelin-5 (Arc5) accumulation levels compared to lines harboring the arc5-I gene only. Arc5 production could be enhanced to more than 24% of the total seed protein content, suggesting that antisense technology could be of great utility to favor high expression of transgenes. PMID:10452550

  12. Anti-sense DNA d(GGCCCC)n expansions in C9ORF72 form i-motifs and protonated hairpins.

    PubMed

    Kovanda, Anja; Zalar, Matja; Šket, Primož; Plavec, Janez; Rogelj, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The G4C2 hexanucleotide repeat expansion mutation (HREM) in C9ORF72, represents the most common mutation associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Three main disease mechanisms have been proposed to date: C9ORF72 haploinsufficiency, RNA toxicity, and accumulation of dipeptide repeat proteins. Pure GC content of the HREM potentially enables the formation of various non-B DNA structures such as G-quadruplexes and i-motifs. These structures are proposed to act as promoters and regulatory elements affecting replication, transcription and translation of the surrounding region. G-quadruplexes have already been shown on the G-rich sense DNA and RNA strands (G4C2)n, the structure of the anti-sense (G2C4)n strand remains unresolved. Similar C-rich sequences may, under acidic conditions, form i-motifs consisting of two parallel duplexes in a head to tail orientation held together by hemi-protonated C(+)-C pairs. We show that d(G2C4)n repeats do form i-motif and protonated hairpins even under near-physiological conditions. Rather than forming a DNA duplex, i-motifs persist even in the presence of the sense strand. This preferential formation of G-quadruplex and i-motif/hairpin structures over duplex DNA, may explain HREM replicational and transcriptional instability. Furthermore, i-motifs/hairpins can represent a novel pharmacological target for C9ORF72 associated ALS and FTLD. PMID:26632347

  13. Antisense down-regulation of the strawberry β-galactosidase gene FaβGal4 increases cell wall galactose levels and reduces fruit softening

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, Candelas; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Barceló-Muñoz, Marta; García-Gago, Juan A.; Waldron, Keith W.; Quesada, Miguel A.; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Mercado, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Strawberry softening is characterized by an increase in the solubilization and depolymerization of pectins from cell walls. Galactose release from pectin side chains by β-galactosidase enzymes has been proposed as one reason for the increase in soluble pectins. A putative β-galactosidase gene, FaβGal4, has been identified using a custom-made oligonucleotide-based strawberry microarray platform. FaβGal4 was expressed mainly in the receptacle during fruit ripening, and was positively regulated by abscisic acid and negatively regulated by auxins. To ascertain the role of FaβGal4 in strawberry softening, transgenic plants containing an antisense sequence of this gene under the control of the CaMV35S promoter were generated. Phenotypic analyses were carried out in transgenic plants during three consecutive growing seasons, using non-transformed plants as control. Two out of nine independent transgenic lines yielded fruits that were 30% firmer than control at the ripe stage. FaβGal4 mRNA levels were reduced by 70% in ripe fruits from these selected transgenic lines, but they also showed significant silencing of FaβGal1, although the genes did not share significant similarity. These two transgenic lines also showed an increase in pectin covalently bound to the cell wall, extracted using Na2CO3. The amount of galactose in cell walls from transgenic fruits was 30% higher than in control; notably, the galactose increase was larger in the 1 M KOH fraction, which is enriched in hemicellulose. These results suggest that FaβGal4 participates in the solubilization of covalently bound pectins during ripening, reducing strawberry fruit firmness. PMID:26585222

  14. Exploring Differentially Expressed Genes and Natural Antisense Transcripts in Sheep (Ovis aries) Skin with Different Wool Fiber Diameters by Digital Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianbin; Guo, Jian; Yuan, Chao; Feng, Ruilin; Niu, Chune; Sun, Xiaoping; Yang, Bohui

    2015-01-01

    Wool fiber diameter (WFD) is the most important economic trait of wool. However, the genes specifically controlling WFD remain elusive. In this study, the expression profiles of skin from two groups of Gansu Alpine merino sheep with different WFD (a super-fine wool group [FD = 18.0 ± 0.5 μm, n= 3] and a fine wool group [FD=23.0±0.5μm, n=3]) were analyzed using next-generation sequencing–based digital gene expression profiling. A total of 40 significant differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected, including 9 up-regulated genes and 31 down-regulated genes. Further expression profile analysis of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) showed that more than 30% of the genes presented in sheep skin expression profiles had NATs. A total of 7 NATs with significant differential expression were detected, and all were down-regulated. Among of 40 DEGs, 3 DEGs (AQP8, Bos d2, and SPRR) had significant NATs which were all significantly down-regulated in the super-fine wool group. In total of DEGs and NATs were summarized as 3 main GO categories and 38 subcategories. Among the molecular functions, cellular components and biological processes categories, binding, cell part and metabolic process were the most dominant subcategories, respectively. However, no significant enrichment of GO terms was found (corrected P-value >0.05). The pathways that were significantly enriched with significant DEGs and NATs were mainly the lipoic acid metabolism, bile secretion, salivary secretion and ribosome and phenylalanine metabolism pathways (P < 0.05). The results indicated that expression of NATs and gene transcripts were correlated, suggesting a role in gene regulation. The discovery of these DEGs and NATs could facilitate enhanced selection for super-fine wool sheep through gene-assisted selection or targeted gene manipulation in the future. PMID:26076016

  15. Antisense down-regulation of the strawberry β-galactosidase gene FaβGal4 increases cell wall galactose levels and reduces fruit softening.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Candelas; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Barceló-Muñoz, Marta; García-Gago, Juan A; Waldron, Keith W; Quesada, Miguel A; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Mercado, José A

    2016-02-01

    Strawberry softening is characterized by an increase in the solubilization and depolymerization of pectins from cell walls. Galactose release from pectin side chains by β-galactosidase enzymes has been proposed as one reason for the increase in soluble pectins. A putative β-galactosidase gene, FaβGal4, has been identified using a custom-made oligonucleotide-based strawberry microarray platform. FaβGal4 was expressed mainly in the receptacle during fruit ripening, and was positively regulated by abscisic acid and negatively regulated by auxins. To ascertain the role of FaβGal4 in strawberry softening, transgenic plants containing an antisense sequence of this gene under the control of the CaMV35S promoter were generated. Phenotypic analyses were carried out in transgenic plants during three consecutive growing seasons, using non-transformed plants as control. Two out of nine independent transgenic lines yielded fruits that were 30% firmer than control at the ripe stage. FaβGal4 mRNA levels were reduced by 70% in ripe fruits from these selected transgenic lines, but they also showed significant silencing of FaβGal1, although the genes did not share significant similarity. These two transgenic lines also showed an increase in pectin covalently bound to the cell wall, extracted using Na2CO3. The amount of galactose in cell walls from transgenic fruits was 30% higher than in control; notably, the galactose increase was larger in the 1 M KOH fraction, which is enriched in hemicellulose. These results suggest that FaβGal4 participates in the solubilization of covalently bound pectins during ripening, reducing strawberry fruit firmness. PMID:26585222

  16. Comparative Characterization of Hepatic Distribution and mRNA Reduction of Antisense Oligonucleotides Conjugated with Triantennary N-Acetyl Galactosamine and Lipophilic Ligands Targeting Apolipoprotein B.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ayahisa; Nakajima, Mado; Kasuya, Takeshi; Onishi, Reina; Kitade, Naohisa; Mayumi, Kei; Ikehara, Tatsuya; Kugimiya, Akira

    2016-05-01

    TriantennaryN-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc, GN3) and lipophilic ligands such as cholesterol andα-tocopherol conjugations dramatically improve the distribution and efficacy of second-generation antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) in the whole liver. To characterize ligands for delivery to liver cells based on pharmacokinetics and efficacy, we used a locked nucleic acid gapmer of ASO targeting apolipoprotein B as a model compound and evaluated the amount of ASO and apolipoprotein B mRNA in the whole liver, hepatocytes, and nonparenchymal (NP) cells as well as plasma total cholesterol after administration of ASO conjugated with these ligands to mice. Compared with unconjugated ASO, GN3 conjugation increased the amount (7-fold) and efficacy (more than 10-fold) of ASO in hepatocytes only and showed higher efficacy than the increased rate of the amount of ASO. On the other hand, lipophilic ligand conjugations led to increased delivery (3- to 5-fold) and efficacy (5-fold) of ASO to both hepatocytes and NP cells. GN3 and lipophilic ligand conjugations increased the area under the curve of ASOs and the pharmacodynamic duration but did not change the half-life in hepatocytes and NP cells compared with unconjugated ASO. In the liver, the phosphodiester bond between ASO and these ligands was promptly cleaved to liberate unconjugated ASO. These ligand conjugations reduced plasma total cholesterol compared with unconjugated ASO, although these ASOs were well tolerated with no elevation in plasma transaminases. These findings could facilitate ligand selection tailored to liver cells expressed in disease-related genes and could contribute to the discovery and development of RNA interference-based therapy. PMID:26907624

  17. Anti-sense DNA d(GGCCCC)n expansions in C9ORF72 form i-motifs and protonated hairpins

    PubMed Central

    Kovanda, Anja; Zalar, Matja; Šket, Primož; Plavec, Janez; Rogelj, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The G4C2 hexanucleotide repeat expansion mutation (HREM) in C9ORF72, represents the most common mutation associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Three main disease mechanisms have been proposed to date: C9ORF72 haploinsufficiency, RNA toxicity, and accumulation of dipeptide repeat proteins. Pure GC content of the HREM potentially enables the formation of various non-B DNA structures such as G-quadruplexes and i-motifs. These structures are proposed to act as promoters and regulatory elements affecting replication, transcription and translation of the surrounding region. G-quadruplexes have already been shown on the G-rich sense DNA and RNA strands (G4C2)n, the structure of the anti-sense (G2C4)n strand remains unresolved. Similar C-rich sequences may, under acidic conditions, form i-motifs consisting of two parallel duplexes in a head to tail orientation held together by hemi-protonated C+-C pairs. We show that d(G2C4)n repeats do form i-motif and protonated hairpins even under near-physiological conditions. Rather than forming a DNA duplex, i-motifs persist even in the presence of the sense strand. This preferential formation of G-quadruplex and i-motif/hairpin structures over duplex DNA, may explain HREM replicational and transcriptional instability. Furthermore, i-motifs/hairpins can represent a novel pharmacological target for C9ORF72 associated ALS and FTLD. PMID:26632347

  18. Regulation of Tissue LC-PUFA Contents, Δ6 Fatty Acyl Desaturase (FADS2) Gene Expression and the Methylation of the Putative FADS2 Gene Promoter by Different Dietary Fatty Acid Profiles in Japanese Seabass (Lateolabrax japonicus)

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Qinghui; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Yanjiao; Zuo, Rantao

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the influences of different dietary fatty acid profiles on the tissue content and biosynthesis of LC-PUFA in a euryhaline species Japanese seabass reared in seawater. Six diets were prepared, each with a characteristic fatty acid: Diet PA: Palmitic acid (C16:0); Diet SA: Stearic acid (C18:0); Diet OA: Oleic acid (C18:1n-9); Diet LNA: α-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3); Diet N-3 LC-PUFA: n-3 LC-PUFA (DHA+EPA); Diet FO: the fish oil control. A 10-week feeding trial was conducted using juvenile fish (29.53±0.86 g). The results showed that Japanese seabass had limited capacity to synthesize LC-PUFA and fish fed PA, SA, OA and LNA showed significantly lower tissue n-3 LC-PUFA contents compared to fish fed N-3 LC-PUFA and FO. The putative gene promoter and full-length cDNA of FADS2 was cloned and characterized. The protein sequence was confirmed to be homologous to FADS2s of marine teleosts and possessed all the characteristic features of microsomal fatty acid desaturases. The FADS2 transcript levels in liver of fish fed N-3 LC-PUFA and FO were significantly lower than those in fish fed other diets except LNA while Diet PA significantly up-regulated the FADS2 gene expression compared to Diet LNA, N-3 LC-PUFA and FO. Inversely, fish fed N-3 LC-PUFA and FO showed significantly higher promoter methylation rates of FADS2 gene compared to fish fed the LC-PUFA deficient diets. These results suggested that Japanese seabass had low LC-PUFA synthesis capacity and LC-PUFA deficient diets caused significantly reduced tissue n-3 LC-PUFA contents. The liver gene expression of FADS2 was up-regulated in groups enriched in C16:0, C18:0 and C18:1n-9 respectively but not in the group enriched in C18:3n-3 compared to groups with high n-3 LC-PUFA contents. The FADS2 gene expression regulated by dietary fatty acids was significantly negatively correlated with the methylation rate of putative FADS2 gene promoter. PMID:24498178

  19. Evidence for higher-order structure formation by the c-myb 18-mer phosphorothioate antisense (codons 2-7) oligodeoxynucleotide: potential relationship to antisense c-myb inhibition.

    PubMed

    Vilenchik, M; Benimetsky, L; Kolbanovsky, A; Miller, P; Stein, C A

    2001-04-01

    We have demonstrated the formation of higher-order structures (presumably tetraplexes) by an 18-mer phosphorothioate antisense c-myb oligodeoxyribonucleotide that has been shown to have activity in the treatment of leukemia xenograft models. Although not observable by conventionally employed techniques, such as PAGE and dimethyl sulfate (DMS) protection, the formation of such higher-order structures by this oligonucleotide was revealed by several techniques. These included capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE), which demonstrated the presence of molecules with greatly increased retention time compared with the monomer; magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy, which demonstrated a band at 290 nm, a characteristic of antiparallel tetraplexes; and fluorescence energy transfer measurements. For the last, the 18-mer phosphorothioate oligonucleotide was synthesized with a 5'-fluorescein group. Similar to the molecular beacon model, its fluorescence was quenched when combined in solution with tetraplex-forming oligomers that contained a 3'-Dabcyl moiety. 7-Deazaguanosine inhibits the formation of tetraplexes by eliminated Hoogsteen base pair interactions. The wild-type and 7-deazaguanosine-substituted antisense c-myb oligomers differentially downregulated the expression of the c-myb proto-oncogene in K562 and HL60 cells, with the wild-type oligomer being the least active. The 18-mer c-myb molecule can, therefore, form highly complex structures, whose analysis in solution cannot be limited to examination of slab gel electrophoresis results alone. PMID:11334144

  20. Effects of Oils Rich in Linoleic and α-Linolenic Acids on Fatty Acid Profile and Gene Expression in Goat Meat

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Rajion, Mohamed Ali; Goh, Yong Meng

    2014-01-01

    Alteration of the lipid content and fatty acid (FA) composition of foods can result in a healthier product. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of flaxseed oil or sunflower oil in the goat diet on fatty acid composition of muscle and expression of lipogenic genes in the semitendinosus (ST) muscle. Twenty-one entire male Boer kid goats were fed diets containing different levels of linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (LNA) for 100 days. Inclusion of flaxseed oil increased (p < 0.05) the α-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3) concentration in the ST muscle. The diet high in α-linolenic acid (p < 0.05) decreased the arachidonic acid (C20:4n-6) and conjugated linolenic acid (CLA) c-9 t-11 content in the ST muscle. There was a significant (p < 0.05) upregulation of PPARα and PPARγ gene expression and downregulation of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) gene in the ST muscle for the high α-linolenic acid group compared with the low α-linolenic acid group. The results of the present study show that flaxseed oil as a source of α-linolenic acid can be incorporated into the diets of goats to enrich goat meat with n-3 fatty acids, upregulate the PPARα and PPARγ, and downregulate the SCD gene expression. PMID:25255382

  1. 2'-O-[2-[2-(N,N-Dimethylamino)ethoxy]ethyl] Modified Antisense Oligonucleotides: Symbiosis of Charge Interaction Factors and Stereoelectronic Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Prhavc, M.; Prakash, T.P.; Minasov, G.; Egli, M.; Manoharan, M.

    2010-03-08

    Oligonucleotides with a novel, 2'-O-[2-[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethoxy]ethyl] (2'-O-DMAEOE) modification have been synthesized. This modification, a cationic analogue of the 2'-O-(2-methoxyethyl) (2'-O-MOE) modification, exhibits high binding affinity to target RNA (but not to DNA) and exceptional resistance to nuclease degradation. Analysis of the crystal structure of a self-complementary oligonucleotide containing a single 2'-O-DMAEOE modification explains the importance of charge factors and gauche effects on the observed antisense properties. 2'-O-DMAEOE modified oligonucleotides are ideal candidates for antisense drugs.

  2. Cleavage of HPV-16 E6/E7 mRNA mediated by modified 10-23 deoxyribozymes.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Gutiérrez, Pablo; Alvarez-Salas, Luis M

    2009-09-01

    Deoxyribozymes (DXZs) are small oligodeoxynucleotides capable of mediating phosphodiester bond cleavage of a target RNA in a sequence-specific manner. These molecules are a new generation of artificial catalytic nucleic acids currently used to silence many disease-related genes. The present study describes a DXZ (Dz1023-434) directed against the polycistronic mRNA from the E6 and E7 genes of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16), the main etiological agent of cervical cancer. Dz1023-434 showed efficient cleavage against a bona fide antisense window at nt 410-445 within HPV-16 E6/E7 mRNA even in low [Mg(2+)] conditions. Using a genetic analysis as guidance, we introduced diverse chemical modifications within Dz1023-434 catalytic core to produce a stable locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified DXZ (Dz434-LNA) with significant cleavage activity of full E6/E7 transcripts. Cell culture testing of Dz434-LNA produced a sharp decrement of E6/E7 mRNA levels in HPV-16-positive cells resulting in decreased proliferation and considerable cell death in a specific and dose-dependent manner. No significant effects were observed with inactive or scrambled control DXZs nor from using HPV-negative cells, suggesting catalysis-dependent effect and high specificity. The biological effects of Dz434-LNA suggest a potential use for the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:19732021

  3. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide against human telomerase reverse transcriptase inhibits the proliferation of Eca-109 esophageal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    FAN, XIANG-KUI; YAN, RUI-HUA; LI, BAO-JIANG; CHEN, XIANG-MING; WEI, LIN; WANG, ZHOU

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the growth of tumor cells may be inhibited by antisense oligonucleotides (ASODNs) targeted against human telomerase (hTR) or human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), resulting in antitumor activity in a wide variety of tumors. However, few studies have investigated the effect of hTERT gene-targeted ASODNs on telomerase activity and cell proliferation in human esophageal cancer. In the present study, an MTT assay was used to determine the growth inhibition rate of Eca-109 cells treated with a hTERT-targeted phosphorothioate-ASODN (PS-ASODN). An inverted microscope was used to observe the morphologic changes of the cells following treatment with 5 μM PS-ASODN for 10 days. Telomerase activity was detected using the silver staining semi-quantitative telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. Following treatment with the PS-ASODN (1–5 μmol/l), the proliferation of the Eca-109 cells was inhibited. The differences in inhibition rate between the PS-ASODN and blank control groups were statistically significant (P<0.05) when the concentration of the PS-ASODN was ≥2 μmol/l, whereas no statistically significant difference was identified between the non-specific-ASODN and blank control groups. The inhibition rate increased gradually as the concentration of the PS-ASODN increased and with time, suggesting that the PS-ASODN inhibited the growth of Eca-109 cells in a concentration-dependent, time-dependent and sequence-specific manner. The growth rate of the cells incubated with the PS-ASODN was reduced compared with that of the control cells. Cells treated with the PS-ASODN became round, suspended and reduced in size. The PS-ASODN was also found to inhibit telomerase activity. The ability of the PS-ASODN to inhibit the telomerase activity and cell proliferation of the Eca-109 cell line suggests that ASODNs have the potential to be novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of esophageal cancer. PMID:25187833

  4. Affinity capture of [Arg8]vasopressin-receptor complex using immobilized antisense peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, F X; Aiyar, N; Chaiken, I

    1991-01-01

    Solubilized noncovalent complexes of [Arg8]-vasopressin (AVP) with receptor proteins from rat liver membranes were isolated by selective binding to silica-immobilized antisense (AS) peptide. The affinity chromatographic support was prepared with a chemically synthesized AS peptide whose sequence is encoded by the AS DNA corresponding to the 20 amino-terminal residues of the AVP bovine neurophysin II biosynthetic precursor [pro-AVP/BNPII-(20-1)], a region that includes the AVP sequence at residues 1-9. The AVP-related AS peptide previously was shown to bind selectively to AVP. The AS peptide-AVP interaction mechanism hypothesized, contact by hydropathic complementarily at multiple sites along the peptide chains, led to the prediction that AVP bound to its receptor would still have enough free surface to interact with immobilized AS peptide. To test this prediction of a three-way interaction, [3H]AVP-receptor was obtained as a solubilized, partially purified fraction from rat liver membrane. When this fraction was eluted through AS pro-AVP/BNPII-(20-1) silica, a complex containing [3H]AVP was bound and separated from the major, unretarded membrane protein fraction as well as from free AVP. Chemical crosslinking of [3H]AVP complex, SDS/PAGE of the products, and analysis of gel slices by scintillation counting led to detection of two major radiolabeled bands of 31 and 38 kDa. Covalent labeling was blocked when unlabeled AVP was added as a competitor before crosslinking. A third radiolabeled protein band of 15 kDa was found when the receptor complex was solubilized from rat liver membranes in the absence of the protease inhibitor phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. Covalently crosslinked [3H]AVP complex also was bound to the AS peptide column; binding was blocked by competition with unlabeled AVP in the elution buffer. Since the AVP-linked 31- and 38-kDa proteins have the same apparent molecular mass on SDS/PAGE as found previously by photo-affinity labeling, we conclude

  5. Sterilization of sterlet Acipenser ruthenus by using knockdown agent, antisense morpholino oligonucleotide, against dead end gene.

    PubMed

    Linhartová, Zuzana; Saito, Taiju; Kašpar, Vojtěch; Rodina, Marek; Prášková, Eva; Hagihara, Seishi; Pšenička, Martin

    2015-10-15

    Sturgeons (chondrostean, acipenseridae) are ancient fish species, widely known for their caviar. Nowadays, most of them are critically endangered. The sterlet (Acipenser ruthenus) is a common Eurasian sturgeon species with a small body size and the fastest reproductive cycle among sturgeons. Such species can be used as a host for surrogate production; application is of value for recovery of critically endangered and huge sturgeon species with an extremely long reproductive cycle. One prerequisite for production of the donor's gametes only is to have a sterile host. Commonly used sterilization techniques in fishes such as triploidization or hybridization do not guarantee sterility in sturgeon. Alternatively, sterilization can be achieved by using a temporary germ cell exclusion-specific gene by a knockdown agent, the antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO). The targeted gene for the MO is the dead end gene (dnd) which is a vertebrate-specific gene encoding a RNA-binding protein which is crucial for migration and survival of primordial germ cells (PGCs). For this purpose, a dnd homologue of Russian sturgeon (Agdnd), resulting in the same sequence in the start codon region with isolated fragments of sterlet dnd (Ardnd), was used. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed tissue-specific expression of Ardnd only in the gonads of both sexes. Dnd-MO for depletion of PGCs together with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-biotin-dextran for PGCs labeling was injected into the vegetal region of one- to four-cell-stage sterlet embryos. In the control groups, only FITC was injected to validate the injection method and labeling of PGCs. After optimization of MO concentration together with volume injection, 250-μM MO was applied for sterilization of sturgeon embryos. Primordial germ cells were detected under a fluorescent stereomicroscope in the genital ridge of the FITC-labeled control group only, whereas no PGCs were present in the body cavities of morphants

  6. Cooperative inhibitory effects of antisense oligonucleotide of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on cancer cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Nan-Hong; Chen, Yan-Ling; Wang, Xiao-Qian; Li, Xiu-Jin; Yin, Feng-Zhi; Wang, Xiao-Zhong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the cooperative effects of antisense oligonucleotide (ASON) of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on the expression of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells and their adhesion to tumor cells. METHODS: After treatment of endothelial cells with ASON and/or cimetidine and induction with TNF-α, the protein and mRNA changes of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells were examined by flow cytometry and RT-PCR, respectively. The adhesion rates of endothelial cells to tumor cells were measured by cell adhesion experiment. RESULTS: In comparison with TNF-α inducing group, lipo-ASON and lipo-ASON/cimetidine could significantly decrease the protein and mRNA levels of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells, and lipo-ASON/cimetidine had most significant inhibitory effect on E-selectin expression (from 36.37 ± 1.56% to 14.23 ± 1.07%, P < 0.001). Meanwhile, cimetidine alone could inhibit the expression of E-selectin (36.37 ± 1.56% vs 27.2 ± 1.31%, P < 0.001), but not ICAM-1 (69.34 ± 2.50% vs 68.07 ± 2.10%, P > 0.05)and the two kinds of mRNA, either. Compared with TNF-α inducing group, the rate of adhesion was markedly decreased in lipo-E-selectin ASON and lipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine treated groups(P < 0.05), and lipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine worked better than lipo-E-selectin ASON alone except for HepG2/ECV304 group (P < 0.05). However, the decrease of adhesion was not significant in lipo-ICAM-1 ASON and lipo-ICAM-1 ASON/cimetidine treated groups except for HepG2/ECV304 group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that ASON in combination with cimetidine in vitro can significantly reduce the adhesion between endothelial cells and hepatic or colorectal cancer cells, which is stronger than ASON or cimetidine alone. This study provides some useful proofs for gene therapy of antiadhesion. PMID:14695770

  7. Regulation of Nav1.7: A Conserved SCN9A Natural Antisense Transcript Expressed in Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Jennifer; Werdehausen, Robert; Linley, John E.; Habib, Abdella M.; Vernon, Jeffrey; Lolignier, Stephane; Eijkelkamp, Niels; Zhao, Jing; Okorokov, Andrei L.; Woods, C. Geoffrey; Wood, John N.; Cox, James J.

    2015-01-01

    The Nav1.7 voltage-gated sodium channel, encoded by SCN9A, is critical for human pain perception yet the transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms that regulate this gene are still incompletely understood. Here, we describe a novel natural antisense transcript (NAT) for SCN9A that is conserved in humans and mice. The NAT has a similar tissue expression pattern to the sense gene and is alternatively spliced within dorsal root ganglia. The human and mouse NATs exist in cis with the sense gene in a tail-to-tail orientation and both share sequences that are complementary to the terminal exon of SCN9A/Scn9a. Overexpression analyses of the human NAT in human embryonic kidney (HEK293A) and human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cell lines show that it can function to downregulate Nav1.7 mRNA, protein levels and currents. The NAT may play an important role in regulating human pain thresholds and is a potential candidate gene for individuals with chronic pain disorders that map to the SCN9A locus, such as Inherited Primary Erythromelalgia, Paroxysmal Extreme Pain Disorder and Painful Small Fibre Neuropathy, but who do not contain mutations in the sense gene. Our results strongly suggest the SCN9A NAT as a prime candidate for new therapies based upon augmentation of existing antisense RNAs in the treatment of chronic pain conditions in man. PMID:26035178

  8. Antisense expression of Gossypium hirsutum UDP-glucuronate decarboxylase in Arabidopsis leads to changes in cell wall components.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D M; Pan, Y X; Zhang, Y; Li, Z K; Wu, L Q; Liu, H W; Zhang, G Y; Wang, X F; Ma, Z Y

    2016-01-01

    UDP-glucuronate decarboxylase (UDP-xylose synthase; UXS, EC 4.1.1.35) is an essential enzyme of the non-cellulosic polysaccharide biosynthetic pathway. In the present study, using transient expression of fluorescently labeled Gossypium hirsutum UXS (GhUXS3) protein in onion epidermal cells, we observed that this protein was distributed in the cytoplasm. The GhUXS3 cDNA of cotton was expressed in an antisense orientation in Arabidopsis thaliana by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Homozygous plants showing down-regulation of UXS were analyzed with northern blots. Compared to the untransformed control, transgenic plant showed shorter roots, earlier blossom formation, and delayed senescence. Biochemical analysis indicated that levels of rhamnose, mannose, galactose, glucose, xylose, and cellulose were reduced in some of the down-regulated antisense plants. These results suggest that GhUXS3 regulates the conversion of non-cellulosic polysaccharides and modulates their composition in plant cell walls. We also discuss a possible cellular function for GhUXS in determining the quality of cotton fibers. PMID:26909959

  9. The expression of ELK transcription factors in adult DRG: Novel isoforms, antisense transcripts and upregulation by nerve damage.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Niall; Pintzas, Alexander; Holmes, Fiona; Hobson, Sally-Ann; Pope, Robert; Wallace, Mark; Wasylyk, Christine; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Wynick, David

    2010-06-01

    ELK transcription factors are known to be expressed in a number of regions in the nervous system. We show by RT-PCR that the previously described Elk1, Elk3/Elk3b/Elk3c and Elk4 mRNAs are expressed in adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG), together with the novel alternatively spliced isoforms Elk1b, Elk3d and Elk4c/Elk4d/Elk4e. These isoforms are also expressed in brain, heart, kidney and testis. In contrast to Elk3 protein, the novel Elk3d isoform is cytoplasmic, fails to bind ETS binding sites and yet can activate transcription by an indirect mechanism. The Elk3 and Elk4 genes are overlapped by co-expressed Pctk2 (Cdk17) and Mfsd4 genes, respectively, with the potential formation of Elk3/Pctaire2 and Elk4/Mfsd4 sense-antisense mRNA heteroduplexes. After peripheral nerve injury the Elk3 mRNA isoforms are each upregulated approximately 2.3-fold in DRG (P<0.005), whereas the natural antisense Pctaire2 isoforms show only a small increase (21%, P<0.01) and Elk1 and Elk4 mRNAs are unchanged. PMID:20304071

  10. Control of enzymatic browning in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) by sense and antisense RNA from tomato polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Coetzer, C; Corsini, D; Love, S; Pavek, J; Tumer, N

    2001-02-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of Russet Burbank potato was inhibited by sense and antisense PPO RNAs expressed from a tomato PPO cDNA under the control of the 35S promoter from the cauliflower mosaic virus. Transgenic Russet Burbank potato plants from 37 different lines were grown in the field. PPO activity and the level of enzymatic browning were measured in the tubers harvested from the field. Of the tubers from 28 transgenic lines that were sampled, tubers from 5 lines exhibited reduced browning. The level of PPO activity correlated with the reduction in enzymatic browning in these lines. These results indicate that expression of tomato PPO RNA in sense or antisense orientation inhibits PPO activity and enzymatic browning in the major commercial potato cultivar. Expression of tomato PPO RNA in sense orientation led to the greatest decrease in PPO activity and enzymatic browning, possibly due to cosuppression. These results suggest that expression of closely related heterologous genes can be used to prevent enzymatic browning in a wide variety of food crops without the application of various food additives. PMID:11262007

  11. Delayed Time-to-Treatment of an Antisense Morpholino Oligomer Is Effective against Lethal Marburg Virus Infection in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Travis K.; Whitehouse, Chris A.; Wells, Jay; Welch, Lisa; Charleston, Jay S.; Heald, Alison; Nichols, Donald K.; Mattix, Marc E.; Palacios, Gustavo; Kugleman, Jeffrey R.; Iversen, Patrick L.; Bavari, Sina

    2016-01-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) is an Ebola-like virus in the family Filovirdae that causes sporadic outbreaks of severe hemorrhagic fever with a case fatality rate as high as 90%. AVI-7288, a positively charged antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMOplus) targeting the viral nucleoprotein gene, was evaluated as a potential therapeutic intervention for MARV infection following delayed treatment of 1, 24, 48, and 96 h post-infection (PI) in a nonhuman primate lethal challenge model. A total of 30 cynomolgus macaques were divided into 5 groups of 6 and infected with 1,830 plaque forming units of MARV subcutaneously. AVI-7288 was administered by bolus infusion daily for 14 days at 15 mg/kg body weight. Survival was the primary endpoint of the study. While none (0 of 6) of the saline group survived, 83–100% of infected monkeys survived when treatment was initiated 1, 24, 48, or 96 h post-infection (PI). The antisense treatment also reduced serum viremia and inflammatory cytokines in all treatment groups compared to vehicle controls. The antibody immune response to virus was preserved and tissue viral antigen was cleared in AVI-7288 treated animals. These data show that AVI-7288 protects NHPs against an otherwise lethal MARV infection when treatment is initiated up to 96 h PI. PMID:26901785

  12. Cationic polyelectrolyte-mediated delivery of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides for exon-skipping in vitro and in mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingxing; Wu, Bo; Tucker, Jason D; Lu, Peijuan; Lu, Qilong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated a series of cationic polyelectrolytes (PEs) with different size and composition for their potential to improve delivery of an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) both in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that the poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDAC) polymer series, especially PE-3 and PE-4, improves the delivery efficiency of PMO, comparable with Endoporter-mediated PMO delivery in vitro. The enhanced PMO delivery and targeting to dystrophin exon 23 was further observed in mdx mice, up to fourfold with the PE-4, compared with PMO alone. The cytotoxicity of the PEs was lower than that of Endoporter and polyethylenimine 25,000 Da in vitro, and was not clearly detected in muscle in vivo under the tested concentrations. Together, these results demonstrate that optimization of PE molecular size, composition, and distribution of cationic charge are key factors to achieve enhanced PMO exon-skipping efficiency. The increased efficiency and lower toxicity show this PDDAC series to be capable gene/antisense oligonucleotide delivery-enhancing agents for treating muscular dystrophy and other diseases. PMID:26366082

  13. Cationic polyelectrolyte-mediated delivery of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides for exon-skipping in vitro and in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingxing; Wu, Bo; Tucker, Jason D; Lu, Peijuan; Lu, Qilong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated a series of cationic polyelectrolytes (PEs) with different size and composition for their potential to improve delivery of an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) both in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that the poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDAC) polymer series, especially PE-3 and PE-4, improves the delivery efficiency of PMO, comparable with Endoporter-mediated PMO delivery in vitro. The enhanced PMO delivery and targeting to dystrophin exon 23 was further observed in mdx mice, up to fourfold with the PE-4, compared with PMO alone. The cytotoxicity of the PEs was lower than that of Endoporter and polyethylenimine 25,000 Da in vitro, and was not clearly detected in muscle in vivo under the tested concentrations. Together, these results demonstrate that optimization of PE molecular size, composition, and distribution of cationic charge are key factors to achieve enhanced PMO exon-skipping efficiency. The increased efficiency and lower toxicity show this PDDAC series to be capable gene/antisense oligonucleotide delivery-enhancing agents for treating muscular dystrophy and other diseases. PMID:26366082

  14. Pathogenic C9ORF72 Antisense Repeat RNA Forms a Double Helix with Tandem C:C Mismatches.

    PubMed

    Dodd, David W; Tomchick, Diana R; Corey, David R; Gagnon, Keith T

    2016-03-01

    Expansion of a GGGGCC/CCCCGG repeat sequence in the first intron of the C9ORF72 gene is a leading cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In this combined disorder, called c9FTD/ALS, the expansion is bidirectionally transcribed into sense and antisense repeat RNA associated with disease. To better understand the role of C9ORF72 repeat RNA in molecular disease pathology, we determined crystal structures of a [(CCCCGG)3(CCCC)] model antisense repeat RNA to 1.47 Å resolution. The RNA structure was an A-form-like double helix composed of repeating and regularly spaced tandem C:C mismatch pairs that perturbed helical geometry and surface charge. Solution studies revealed a preference for A-form-like helical conformations as the repeat number increased. Results provide a structural starting point for rationalizing the contribution of repeat RNA to c9FTD/ALS molecular disease mechanisms and for developing molecules to target C9ORF72 repeat RNA as potential therapeutics. PMID:26878348

  15. Delayed Time-to-Treatment of an Antisense Morpholino Oligomer Is Effective against Lethal Marburg Virus Infection in Cynomolgus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Warren, Travis K; Whitehouse, Chris A; Wells, Jay; Welch, Lisa; Charleston, Jay S; Heald, Alison; Nichols, Donald K; Mattix, Marc E; Palacios, Gustavo; Kugleman, Jeffrey R; Iversen, Patrick L; Bavari, Sina

    2016-02-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) is an Ebola-like virus in the family Filovirdae that causes sporadic outbreaks of severe hemorrhagic fever with a case fatality rate as high as 90%. AVI-7288, a positively charged antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMOplus) targeting the viral nucleoprotein gene, was evaluated as a potential therapeutic intervention for MARV infection following delayed treatment of 1, 24, 48, and 96 h post-infection (PI) in a nonhuman primate lethal challenge model. A total of 30 cynomolgus macaques were divided into 5 groups of 6 and infected with 1,830 plaque forming units of MARV subcutaneously. AVI-7288 was administered by bolus infusion daily for 14 days at 15 mg/kg body weight. Survival was the primary endpoint of the study. While none (0 of 6) of the saline group survived, 83-100% of infected monkeys survived when treatment was initiated 1, 24, 48, or 96 h post-infection (PI). The antisense treatment also reduced serum viremia and inflammatory cytokines in all treatment groups compared to vehicle controls. The antibody immune response to virus was preserved and tissue viral antigen was cleared in AVI-7288 treated animals. These data show that AVI-7288 protects NHPs against an otherwise lethal MARV infection when treatment is initiated up to 96 h PI. PMID:26901785

  16. Antisense RNA Controls LRP1 Sense Transcript Expression Through Interaction With a Chromatin-Associated Protein, HMGB2

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Yasunari; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Magistri, Marco; Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Lotz, Martin; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) including natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are expressed more extensively than previously anticipated, and have widespread roles in regulating gene expression. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms of action of the majority of NATs remain largely unknown. Here we identify a NAT of Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (Lrp1), referred to as Lrp1-AS, that negatively regulates Lrp1 expression. We show that Lrp1-AS directly binds to High mobility group box 2 (Hmgb2) and inhibits the activity of Hmgb2 to enhance Srebp1a-dependent transcription of Lrp1. Short oligonucleotides targeting Lrp1-AS inhibit the interaction of antisense transcript and Hmgb2 protein, and increase Lrp1 expression by enhancing Hmgb2 activity. qRT-PCR analysis of Alzheimer’s disease brain samples and aged-matched controls revealed upregulation of LRP1-AS and downregulation of LRP1. Our data suggest a new regulatory mechanism whereby a NAT interacts with a ubiquitous chromatin-associated protein to modulate its activity in a locus-specific fashion. PMID:25937287

  17. In depth analysis of the Sox4 gene locus that consists of sense and natural antisense transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Ling, King-Hwa; Brautigan, Peter J.; Moore, Sarah; Fraser, Rachel; Leong, Melody Pui-Yee; Leong, Jia-Wen; Zainal Abidin, Shahidee; Lee, Han-Chung; Cheah, Pike-See; Raison, Joy M.; Babic, Milena; Lee, Young Kyung; Daish, Tasman; Mattiske, Deidre M.; Mann, Jeffrey R.; Adelson, David L.; Thomas, Paul Q.; Hahn, Christopher N.; Scott, Hamish S.

    2016-01-01

    SRY (Sex Determining Region Y)-Box 4 or Sox4 is an important regulator of the pan-neuronal gene expression during post-mitotic cell differentiation within the mammalian brain. Sox4 gene locus has been previously characterized with multiple sense and overlapping natural antisense transcripts [1], [2]. Here we provide accompanying data on various analyses performed and described in Ling et al. [2]. The data include a detail description of various features found at Sox4 gene locus, additional experimental data derived from RNA-Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (RNA-FISH), Western blotting, strand-specific reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), gain-of-function and in situ hybridization (ISH) experiments. All the additional data provided here support the existence of an endogenous small interfering- or PIWI interacting-like small RNA known as Sox4_sir3, which origin was found within the overlapping region consisting of a sense and a natural antisense transcript known as Sox4ot1. PMID:26958646

  18. Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting Parasite Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor Inhibits Mammalian Host Cell Invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Muneaki; Nara, Takeshi; Hirawake, Hiroko; Morales, Jorge; Enomoto, Masahiro; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2014-02-01

    Chagas disease is caused by an intracellular parasitic protist, Trypanosoma cruzi. As there are no highly effective drugs against this agent that also demonstrate low toxicity, there is an urgent need for development of new drugs to treat Chagas disease. We have previously demonstrated that the parasite inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (TcIP3R) is crucial for invasion of the mammalian host cell by T. cruzi. Here, we report that TcIP3R is a short-lived protein and that its expression is significantly suppressed in trypomastigotes. Treatment of trypomastigotes, an infective stage of T. cruzi, with antisense oligonucleotides specific to TcIP3R deceased TcIP3R protein levels and impaired trypomastigote invasion of host cells. Due to the resulting instability and very low expression level of TcIP3R in trypomastigotes indicates that TcIP3R is a promising target for antisense therapy in Chagas disease.

  19. In depth analysis of the Sox4 gene locus that consists of sense and natural antisense transcripts.

    PubMed

    Ling, King-Hwa; Brautigan, Peter J; Moore, Sarah; Fraser, Rachel; Leong, Melody Pui-Yee; Leong, Jia-Wen; Zainal Abidin, Shahidee; Lee, Han-Chung; Cheah, Pike-See; Raison, Joy M; Babic, Milena; Lee, Young Kyung; Daish, Tasman; Mattiske, Deidre M; Mann, Jeffrey R; Adelson, David L; Thomas, Paul Q; Hahn, Christopher N; Scott, Hamish S

    2016-06-01

    SRY (Sex Determining Region Y)-Box 4 or Sox4 is an important regulator of the pan-neuronal gene expression during post-mitotic cell differentiation within the mammalian brain. Sox4 gene locus has been previously characterized with multiple sense and overlapping natural antisense transcripts [1], [2]. Here we provide accompanying data on various analyses performed and described in Ling et al. [2]. The data include a detail description of various features found at Sox4 gene locus, additional experimental data derived from RNA-Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (RNA-FISH), Western blotting, strand-specific reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), gain-of-function and in situ hybridization (ISH) experiments. All the additional data provided here support the existence of an endogenous small interfering- or PIWI interacting-like small RNA known as Sox4_sir3, which origin was found within the overlapping region consisting of a sense and a natural antisense transcript known as Sox4ot1. PMID:26958646

  20. Antisense-MDM2 Sensitizes LNCaP Prostate Cancer Cells to Androgen Deprivation, Radiation, and the Combination In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyanova, Radka; Hachem, Paul; Hensley, Harvey; Khor, L.-Y.; Mu Zhaomei; Hammond, M. Elizabeth H.; Agrawal, Sudhir; Pollack, Alan . E-mail: Alan.Pollack@fccc.edu

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To test the effects of antisense (AS)-MDM2 alone and with androgen deprivation (AD), radiotherapy (RT), and AD + RT on wild-type LNCaP cells in an orthotopic in vivo model. Methods: Androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells were grown in the prostates of nude mice. Magnetic resonance imaging-based tumor volume and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurements were used to assess effects on tumor response. Tumor response was measured by biochemical and tumor volume failure definitions and doubling time estimates from fitted PSA and tumor volume growth curves. Expression of MDM2, p53, p21, and Ki-67 was quantified using immunohistochemical staining and image analysis of formalin-fixed tissue, analogous to methods used clinically. Results: Antisense-MDM2 significantly inhibited the growth of LNCaP tumors over the mismatch controls. The most significant increase in tumor growth delay and tumor doubling time was from AS-MDM2 + AD + RT, although the effect of AS-MDM2 + AD was substantial. Expression of MDM2 was significantly reduced by AS-MDM2 in the setting of RT. Conclusions: This is the first in vivo investigation of the effects of AS-MDM2 in an orthotopic model and the first to demonstrate incremental sensitization when added to AD and AD + RT. The results with AD underscore the potential to affect micrometastatic disease, which is probably responsible for treatment failure in 30-40% of men with high-risk disease.

  1. Cellular localization of long non-coding RNAs affects silencing by RNAi more than by antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Kim A; Behlke, Mark A

    2016-01-29

    Thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified in mammalian cells. Some have important functions and their dysregulation can contribute to a variety of disease states. However, most lncRNAs have not been functionally characterized. Complicating their study, lncRNAs have widely varying subcellular distributions: some reside predominantly in the nucleus, the cytoplasm or in both compartments. One method to query function is to suppress expression and examine the resulting phenotype. Methods to suppress expression of mRNAs include antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and RNA interference (RNAi). Antisense and RNAi-based gene-knockdown methods vary in efficacy between different cellular compartments. It is not known if this affects their ability to suppress lncRNAs. To address whether localization of the lncRNA influences susceptibility to degradation by either ASOs or RNAi, nuclear lncRNAs (MALAT1 and NEAT1), cytoplasmic lncRNAs (DANCR and OIP5-AS1) and dual-localized lncRNAs (TUG1, CasC7 and HOTAIR) were compared for knockdown efficiency. We found that nuclear lncRNAs were more effectively suppressed using ASOs, cytoplasmic lncRNAs were more effectively suppressed using RNAi and dual-localized lncRNAs were suppressed using both methods. A mixed-modality approach combining ASOs and RNAi reagents improved knockdown efficacy, particularly for those lncRNAs that localize to both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. PMID:26578588

  2. SINEUPs: A new class of natural and synthetic antisense long non-coding RNAs that activate translation

    PubMed Central

    Zucchelli, S; Cotella, D; Takahashi, H; Carrieri, C; Cimatti, L; Fasolo, F; Jones, MH; Sblattero, D; Sanges, R; Santoro, C; Persichetti, F; Carninci, P; Gustincich, S

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, it has emerged that pervasive transcription in mammalian genomes has a tremendous impact on several biological functions. Most of transcribed RNAs are lncRNAs and repetitive elements. In this review, we will detail the discovery of a new functional class of natural and synthetic antisense lncRNAs that stimulate translation of sense mRNAs. These molecules have been named SINEUPs since their function requires the activity of an embedded inverted SINEB2 sequence to UP-regulate translation. Natural SINEUPs suggest that embedded Transposable Elements may represent functional domains in long non-coding RNAs. Synthetic SINEUPs may be designed by targeting the antisense sequence to the mRNA of choice representing the first scalable tool to increase protein synthesis of potentially any gene of interest. We will discuss potential applications of SINEUP technology in the field of molecular biology experiments, in protein manufacturing as well as in therapy of haploinsufficiencies. PMID:26259533

  3. Defining a role for Hfq in Gram-positive bacteria: evidence for Hfq-dependent antisense regulation in Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Jesper Sejrup; Lei, Lisbeth Kristensen; Ebersbach, Tine; Olsen, Anders Steno; Klitgaard, Janne Kudsk; Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Kallipolitis, Birgitte Haahr

    2010-01-01

    Small trans-encoded RNAs (sRNAs) modulate the translation and decay of mRNAs in bacteria. In Gram-negative species, antisense regulation by trans-encoded sRNAs relies on the Sm-like protein Hfq. In contrast to this, Hfq is dispensable for sRNA-mediated riboregulation in the Gram-positive species studied thus far. Here, we provide evidence for Hfq-dependent translational repression in the Gram-positive human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, which is known to encode at least 50 sRNAs. We show that the Hfq-binding sRNA LhrA controls the translation and degradation of its target mRNA by an antisense mechanism, and that Hfq facilitates the binding of LhrA to its target. The work presented here provides the first experimental evidence for Hfq-dependent riboregulation in a Gram-positive bacterium. Our findings indicate that modulation of translation by trans-encoded sRNAs may occur by both Hfq-dependent and -independent mechanisms, thus adding another layer of complexity to sRNA-mediated riboregulation in Gram-positive species. PMID:19942685

  4. Regulation of S-like ribonuclease levels in Arabidopsis. Antisense inhibition of RNS1 or RNS2 elevates anthocyanin accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bariola, P.A.; MacIntosh, G.C.; Green, P.J.

    1999-01-01

    The S-like ribonucleases (RNases) RNS1 and RNS2 of Arabidopsis are members of the widespread T{sub 2} ribonuclease family, whose members also include the S-RNases, involved in gametophytic self-incompatibility in plants. Both RNS1 and RNS2 mRNAs have been shown previously to be induced by inorganic phosphate (Pi) starvation. In this study the authors examined this regulation at the protein level and determined the effects of diminishing RNS1 and RNS2 expression using antisense techniques. The Pi-starvation control of RNS1 and RNS2 was confirmed using antibodies specific for each protein. These specific antibodies also demonstrated that RNS1 is secreted, whereas RNS2 is intracellular. By introducing antisense constructs, mRNA accumulation was inhibited by up to 90% for RNS1 and up to 65% for NS2. These plants contained abnormally high levels of anthocyanins, the production of which is often associated with several forms of stress, including Pi starvation. This effect demonstrates that diminishing the amounts of either RNS1 or RNS2 leads to effects that cannot be compensated for by the actions of other RNases, even though Arabidopsis contains a large number of different RNase activities. These results, together with the differential localization of the proteins, imply that RNS1 and RNS2 have distinct functions in the plant.

  5. Natural genetic variation impacts expression levels of coding, non-coding, and antisense transcripts in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Clément-Ziza, Mathieu; Marsellach, Francesc X; Codlin, Sandra; Papadakis, Manos A; Reinhardt, Susanne; Rodríguez-López, María; Martin, Stuart; Marguerat, Samuel; Schmidt, Alexander; Lee, Eunhye; Workman, Christopher T; Bähler, Jürg; Beyer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Our current understanding of how natural genetic variation affects gene expression beyond well-annotated coding genes is still limited. The use of deep sequencing technologies for the study of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) has the potential to close this gap. Here, we generated the first recombinant strain library for fission yeast and conducted an RNA-seq-based QTL study of the coding, non-coding, and antisense transcriptomes. We show that the frequency of distal effects (trans-eQTLs) greatly exceeds the number of local effects (cis-eQTLs) and that non-coding RNAs are as likely to be affected by eQTLs as protein-coding RNAs. We identified a genetic variation of swc5 that modifies the levels of 871 RNAs, with effects on both sense and antisense transcription, and show that this effect most likely goes through a compromised deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z. The strains, methods, and datasets generated here provide a rich resource for future studies. PMID:25432776

  6. Combination Antisense Treatment for Destructive Exon Skipping of Myostatin and Open Reading Frame Rescue of Dystrophin in Neonatal mdx Mice.

    PubMed

    Lu-Nguyen, Ngoc B; Jarmin, Susan A; Saleh, Amer F; Popplewell, Linda; Gait, Michael J; Dickson, George

    2015-08-01

    The fatal X-linked Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), characterized by progressive muscle wasting and muscle weakness, is caused by mutations within the DMD gene. The use of antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) modulating pre-mRNA splicing to restore the disrupted dystrophin reading frame, subsequently generating a shortened but functional protein has emerged as a potential strategy in DMD treatment. AO therapy has recently been applied to induce out-of-frame exon skipping of myostatin pre-mRNA, knocking-down expression of myostatin protein, and such an approach is suggested to enhance muscle hypertrophy/hyperplasia and to reduce muscle necrosis. Within this study, we investigated dual exon skipping of dystrophin and myostatin pre-mRNAs using phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers conjugated with an arginine-rich peptide (B-PMOs). Intraperitoneal administration of B-PMOs was performed in neonatal mdx males on the day of birth, and at weeks 3 and 6. At week 9, we observed in treated mice (as compared to age-matched, saline-injected controls) normalization of muscle mass, a recovery in dystrophin expression, and a decrease in muscle necrosis, particularly in the diaphragm. Our data provide a proof of concept for antisense therapy combining dystrophin restoration and myostatin inhibition for the treatment of DMD. PMID:25959011

  7. Endogenous siRNAs derived from a pair of natural cis-antisense transcripts regulate salt tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Borsani, Omar; Zhu, Jianhua; Verslues, Paul E; Sunkar, Ramanjulu; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2005-12-29

    In higher eukaryotes, miRNAs and siRNAs guide translational inhibition, mRNA cleavage, or chromatin regulation. We found that the antisense overlapping gene pair of Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH), a stress-related gene, and SRO5, a gene of unknown function, generates two types of siRNAs. When both transcripts are present, a 24-nt siRNA is formed by a biogenesis pathway dependent on DCL2, RDR6, SGS3, and NRPD1A. Initial cleavage of the P5CDH transcript guided by the 24-nt siRNA establishes a phase for the subsequent generation of 21-nt siRNAs by DCL1 and further cleavage of P5CDH transcripts. The expression of SRO5 is induced by salt, and this induction is required to initiate siRNA formation. Our data suggest that the P5CDH and SRO5 proteins are also functionally related, and that the P5CDH-SRO5 gene pair defines a mode of siRNA function and biogenesis that may be applied to other natural cis-antisense gene pairs in eukaryotic genomes. PMID:16377568

  8. Combination antisense treatment for destructive exon skipping of myostatin and open reading frame rescue of dystrophin in neonatal mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu-Nguyen, Ngoc B.; Jarmin, Susan A.; Saleh, Amer F.; Popplewell, Linda; Gait, Michael J.; Dickson, George

    2015-01-01

    The fatal X-linked Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), characterized by progressive muscle wasting and muscle weakness, is caused by mutations within the DMD gene. The use of antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) modulating pre-mRNA splicing to restore the disrupted dystrophin reading frame, subsequently generating a shortened but functional protein has emerged as a potential strategy in DMD treatment. AO therapy has recently been applied to induce out-of-frame exon skipping of myostatin pre-mRNA, knocking-down expression of myostatin protein, and such an approach is suggested to enhance muscle hypertrophy/hyperplasia and to reduce muscle necrosis. Within this study, we investigated dual exon skipping of dystrophin and myostatin pre-mRNAs using phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers conjugated with an arginine-rich peptide (B-PMOs). Intraperitoneal administration of B-PMOs was performed in neonatal mdx males on the day of birth, and at weeks 3 and 6. At week 9, we observed in treated mice (as compared to age-matched, saline-injected controls) normalization of muscle mass, a recovery in dystrophin expression, and a decrease in muscle necrosis, particularly in the diaphragm. Our data provide a proof of concept for antisense therapy combining dystrophin restoration and myostatin inhibition for the treatment of DMD. PMID:25959011

  9. Data in support of transcriptional regulation and function of Fas-antisense long noncoding RNA during human erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Villamizar, Olga; Chambers, Christopher B.; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Torry, Donald S.; Hofstrand, Reese; Riberdy, Janice M.; Persons, Derek A.; Wilber, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes data related to a research article titled, “Fas-antisense long noncoding RNA is differentially expressed during maturation of human erythrocytes and confers resistance to Fas-mediated cell death” [1]. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are increasingly appreciated for their capacity to regulate many steps of gene expression. While recent studies suggest that many lncRNAs are functional, the scope of their actions throughout human biology is largely undefined including human red blood cell development (erythropoiesis). Here we include expression data for 82 lncRNAs during early, intermediate and late stages of human erythropoiesis using a commercial qPCR Array. From these data, we identified lncRNA Fas-antisense 1 (Fas-AS1 or Saf) described in the research article. Also included are 5′ untranslated sequences (UTR) for lncRNA Saf with transcription factor target sequences identified. Quantitative RT-PCR data demonstrate relative levels of critical erythroid transcription factors, GATA-1 and KLF1, in K562 human erythroleukemia cells and maturing erythroblasts derived from human CD34+ cells. End point and quantitative RT-PCR data for cDNA prepared using random hexamers versus oligo(dT)18 revealed that lncRNA Saf is not effectively polyadenylated. Finally, we include flow cytometry histograms demonstrating Fas levels on maturing erythroblasts derived from human CD34+ cells transduced using mock conditions or with lentivirus particles encoding for Saf. PMID:27141526

  10. Data in support of transcriptional regulation and function of Fas-antisense long noncoding RNA during human erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Olga; Chambers, Christopher B; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Torry, Donald S; Hofstrand, Reese; Riberdy, Janice M; Persons, Derek A; Wilber, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes data related to a research article titled, "Fas-antisense long noncoding RNA is differentially expressed during maturation of human erythrocytes and confers resistance to Fas-mediated cell death" [1]. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are increasingly appreciated for their capacity to regulate many steps of gene expression. While recent studies suggest that many lncRNAs are functional, the scope of their actions throughout human biology is largely undefined including human red blood cell development (erythropoiesis). Here we include expression data for 82 lncRNAs during early, intermediate and late stages of human erythropoiesis using a commercial qPCR Array. From these data, we identified lncRNA Fas-antisense 1 (Fas-AS1 or Saf) described in the research article. Also included are 5' untranslated sequences (UTR) for lncRNA Saf with transcription factor target sequences identified. Quantitative RT-PCR data demonstrate relative levels of critical erythroid transcription factors, GATA-1 and KLF1, in K562 human erythroleukemia cells and maturing erythroblasts derived from human CD34(+) cells. End point and quantitative RT-PCR data for cDNA prepared using random hexamers versus oligo(dT)18 revealed that lncRNA Saf is not effectively polyadenylated. Finally, we include flow cytometry histograms demonstrating Fas levels on maturing erythroblasts derived from human CD34(+) cells transduced using mock conditions or with lentivirus particles encoding for Saf. PMID:27141526

  11. Dietary fat in relation to erythrocyte fatty acid composition in men.

    PubMed

    Takkunen, Markus; Agren, Jyrki; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Uusitupa, Matti; Schwab, Ursula

    2013-11-01

    Erythrocyte membrane fatty acid (EMFA) composition is used in the validation of food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) and the evaluation of dietary fat quality. In this cross-sectional study we aimed to investigate associations of diet with EMFA. Altogether, 1,033 randomly selected Finnish men, aged from 47 to 75 years filled in a FFQ and their EMFA composition was analyzed. Marine polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake correlated positively with erythrocyte eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (r(s) = 0.415 and r(s) = 0.340, respectively, P < 0.001) and inversely with all n-6 PUFA analyzed (P < 0.001). PUFA intake from spreads and cooking fats correlated positively with alpha-linolenic (ALA), linoleic (LNA) and nervonic acids (r(s) = 0.229, r(s) = 0.160 and r(s) = 0.143, respectively, P < 0.001). Milk fat intake was associated with myristic and behenic acids (r(s) = 0.186 and r(s) = 0.132, respectively P < 0.001). Butter users had lower ALA and LNA proportions (mol%) than non-users (0.16 ± 0.04 vs. 0.19 ± 0.05, P < 0.001 and 7.77 ± 1.02 vs. 8.12 ± 1.11, P = 0.001). Higher PUFA intake from meat was related to decreased long-chain n-3 (P < 0.001) and increased n-6 PUFA (P < 0.001) proportions. In conclusion, EMFA composition reflects particularly well the intakes of n-3 PUFA, whereas other associations remained lower. Yet, all main sources of dietary fat were related with EMFA. The dietary effect on the nervonic acid proportion was confirmed. PMID:23975575

  12. Production of Conjugated Linoleic and Conjugated α-Linolenic Acid in a Reconstituted Skim Milk-Based Medium by Bifidobacterial Strains Isolated from Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Villar-Tajadura, María Antonia; Rodríguez-Alcalá, Luis Miguel; Martín, Virginia; Gómez de Segura, Aránzazu; Rodríguez, Juan Miguel; Fontecha, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Eight bifidobacterial strains isolated from human breast milk have been tested for their abilities to convert linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (LNA) to conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and conjugated α-linolenic acid (CLNA), respectively. These bioactive lipids display important properties that may contribute to the maintenance and improvement human health. Three selected Bifidobacterium breve strains produced CLA from LA and CLNA from LNA in MRS (160–170 and 210–230 μg mL−1, resp.) and, also, in reconstituted skim milk (75–95 and 210–244 μg mL−1, resp.). These bifidobacterial strains were also able to simultaneously produce both CLA (90–105 μg mL−1) and CLNA (290–320 μg mL−1) in reconstituted skim milk. Globally, our findings suggest that these bifidobacterial strains are potential candidates for the design of new fermented dairy products naturally containing very high concentrations of these bioactive lipids. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing CLNA production and coproduction of CLA and CLNA by Bifidobacterium breve strains isolated from human milk in reconstituted skim milk. PMID:25110689

  13. Probing 3D Collective Cancer Invasion Using Double-Stranded Locked Nucleic Acid Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Dean, Zachary S; Elias, Paul; Jamilpour, Nima; Utzinger, Urs; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and metastases are responsible for over 90% of human cancer deaths. There is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutics for suppressing cancer invasion, the initial step of metastasis. Nevertheless, the regulation of cancer invasion is poorly understood due to a paucity of tools for monitoring the invasion process in 3D microenvironments. Here, we report a double-stranded locked nucleic acid (dsLNA) biosensor for investigating 3D collective cancer invasion. By incorporating multiphoton microscopy and the dsLNA biosensor, we perform dynamic single cell gene expression analysis while simultaneously characterizing the biomechanical interaction between the invading sprouts and the extracellular matrix. Gene profiling of invasive leader cells and detached cells suggest distinctive signaling mechanisms involved in collective and individual invasion in the 3D microenvironment. Our results underscore the involvement of Notch signaling in 3D collective cancer invasion, which warrants further investigation toward antimetastasis therapy in the future. PMID:27529634

  14. Lipid and polymeric carrier-mediated nucleic acid delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Mahato, Ram I

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Nucleic acids such as plasmid DNA, antisense oligonucleotide, and RNA interference (RNAi) molecules, have a great potential to be used as therapeutics for the treatment of various genetic and acquired diseases. To design a successful nucleic acid delivery system, the pharmacological effect of nucleic acids, the physiological condition of the subjects or sites, and the physicochemical properties of nucleic acid and carriers have to be thoroughly examined. Areas covered in this review The commonly used lipids, polymers and corresponding delivery systems are reviewed in terms of their characteristics, applications, advantages and limitations. What the reader will gain This article aims to provide an overview of biological barriers and strategies to overcome these barriers by properly designing effective synthetic carriers for nucleic acid delivery. Take home message A thorough understanding of biological barriers and the structure–activity relationship of lipid and polymeric carriers is the key for effective nucleic acid therapy. PMID:20836625

  15. Physiological compensation in antisense transformants: specific induction of an "ersatz" glucan endo-1,3-beta-glucosidase in plants infected with necrotizing viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Beffa, R S; Neuhaus, J M; Meins, F

    1993-01-01

    Plant class I glucan endo-1,3-beta-glucosidases (beta-1,3-glucanase; 1,3-beta-D-glucan glucanohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.39) have been implicated in development and defense against pathogen attack. Nevertheless, beta-1,3-glucanase deficiencies generated by antisense transformation of Nicotiana sylvestris and tobacco have little biological effect. We report here that another beta-1,3-glucanase activity is induced in these deficient mutants after infection with necrotizing viruses. Induction of class I beta-1,3-glucanase was markedly inhibited in leaves of N. sylvestris and tobacco antisense transformants infected with tobacco necrosis virus and tobacco mosaic virus, respectively. A serologically distinct beta-1,3-glucanase activity was present in the infected antisense transformants but was absent in both healthy and infected control plants and in antisense transformants treated with the stress hormone ethylene. Immunoblot analyses, localization studies, and measurements of antibody specificity indicate that this compensatory beta-1,3-glucanase activity is an intracellular enzyme different from known tobacco beta-1,3-glucanases. Therefore, plants can compensate for a deficiency in enzyme activity by producing a functionally equivalent replacement--i.e., "ersatz"--protein or proteins. The fact that compensation for beta-1,3-glucanase activity occurs in response to infection argues strongly for an important role of these enzymes in pathogenesis. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8415609

  16. Distinct transcripts are recognized by sense and antisense riboprobes for a member of the murine HSP70 gene family, HSP70.2, in various reproductive tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    The expression of hsp70.2, an hsp70 gene family member, originally characterized by its high levels of expression in germ cells in the adult mouse testis, was detected in several other reproductive tis