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Sample records for acid loop extension

  1. Quantum reduced loop gravity: Extension to scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilski, Jakub; Alesci, Emanuele; Cianfrani, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    The quantization of the Hamiltonian for a scalar field is performed in the framework of quantum reduced loop gravity. We outline how the regularization can be performed by using the analogous tools adopted in full loop quantum gravity, and the matrix elements of the resulting operator between basis states are analytic coefficients. These achievements open the way for a consistent analysis of the quantum gravity corrections to the classical dynamics of gravity in the presence of a scalar field in a cosmological setting.

  2. Extension of loop quantum gravity to f(R) theories.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangdong; Ma, Yongge

    2011-04-29

    The four-dimensional metric f(R) theories of gravity are cast into connection-dynamical formalism with real su(2) connections as configuration variables. Through this formalism, the classical metric f(R) theories are quantized by extending the loop quantization scheme of general relativity. Our results imply that the nonperturbative quantization procedure of loop quantum gravity is valid not only for general relativity but also for a rather general class of four-dimensional metric theories of gravity.

  3. Systematic U(1 ) B - L extensions of loop-induced neutrino mass models with dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Shu-Yu; Toma, Takashi; Tsumura, Koji

    2016-08-01

    We study the gauged U(1 ) B - L extensions of the models for neutrino masses and dark matter. In this class of models, tiny neutrino masses are radiatively induced through the loop diagrams, while the origin of the dark matter stability is guaranteed by the remnant of the gauge symmetry. Depending on how the lepton number conservation is violated, these models are systematically classified. We present complete lists for the one-loop Z2 and the two-loop Z3 radiative seesaw models as examples of the classification. The anomaly cancellation conditions in these models are also discussed.

  4. Panoramic radiographs underestimate extensions of the anterior loop and mandibular incisive canal

    PubMed Central

    Nejaim, Yuri; de Freitas, Deborah Queiroz; de Oliveira Santos, Christiano

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to detect the anterior loop of the mental nerve and the mandibular incisive canal in panoramic radiographs (PAN) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, as well as to determine the anterior/mesial extension of these structures in panoramic and cross-sectional reconstructions using PAN and CBCT images. Materials and Methods Images (both PAN and CBCT) from 90 patients were evaluated by 2 independent observers. Detection of the anterior loop and the incisive canal were compared between PAN and CBCT. The anterior/mesial extension of these structures was compared between PAN and both cross-sectional and panoramic CBCT reconstructions. Results In CBCT, the anterior loop and the incisive canal were observed in 7.7% and 24.4% of the hemimandibles, respectively. In PAN, the anterior loop and the incisive canal were detected in 15% and 5.5% of cases, respectively. PAN presented more difficulties in the visualization of structures. The anterior/mesial extensions ranged from 0.0 mm to 19.0 mm on CBCT. PAN underestimated the measurements by approximately 2.0 mm. Conclusion CBCT appears to be a more reliable imaging modality than PAN for preoperative workups of the anterior mandible. Individual variations in the anterior/mesial extensions of the anterior loop of the mental nerve and the mandibular incisive canal mean that is not prudent to rely on a general safe zone for implant placement or bone surgery in the interforaminal region. PMID:27672611

  5. Panoramic radiographs underestimate extensions of the anterior loop and mandibular incisive canal

    PubMed Central

    Nejaim, Yuri; de Freitas, Deborah Queiroz; de Oliveira Santos, Christiano

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to detect the anterior loop of the mental nerve and the mandibular incisive canal in panoramic radiographs (PAN) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, as well as to determine the anterior/mesial extension of these structures in panoramic and cross-sectional reconstructions using PAN and CBCT images. Materials and Methods Images (both PAN and CBCT) from 90 patients were evaluated by 2 independent observers. Detection of the anterior loop and the incisive canal were compared between PAN and CBCT. The anterior/mesial extension of these structures was compared between PAN and both cross-sectional and panoramic CBCT reconstructions. Results In CBCT, the anterior loop and the incisive canal were observed in 7.7% and 24.4% of the hemimandibles, respectively. In PAN, the anterior loop and the incisive canal were detected in 15% and 5.5% of cases, respectively. PAN presented more difficulties in the visualization of structures. The anterior/mesial extensions ranged from 0.0 mm to 19.0 mm on CBCT. PAN underestimated the measurements by approximately 2.0 mm. Conclusion CBCT appears to be a more reliable imaging modality than PAN for preoperative workups of the anterior mandible. Individual variations in the anterior/mesial extensions of the anterior loop of the mental nerve and the mandibular incisive canal mean that is not prudent to rely on a general safe zone for implant placement or bone surgery in the interforaminal region.

  6. A curve extension design for coordinated path following control of unicycles along given convex loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang-Yang; Tian, Yu-Ping

    2011-10-01

    This article utilises a dynamic model of unicycles to address the convergence of vehicle formation about closed convex curves. A novel curve extension method, extending the target loop along the vector from the loop centre to the point on the loop, is proposed to construct a family of level curves and the existence of a loop function on a tubular-like neighbourhood is proved by referring to the tubular neighbourhood theorem. Path following control is derived based on the loop function which incorporated into the arc-length function to propose the solution to coordinated formation control. We show how backstepping technique, Lyapunov-based theory and graph theory can be combined together to construct the coordinated path following controller under the bidirectional commutation topology. It is proved that the designed cooperative control system is asymptotically stable if the graph is connected. The proposed method is effective for a skewed superellipse, which is a type of curve that includes circles, ellipses and rounded parallelograms.

  7. Closed loop recycling of lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bied-Charreton, B.

    The traditional lead/acid battery is a recycleable product, irrespective whether it is of an automotive, traction or standby design. The product benefits from the traditional lead metallurgy that has been developed for both primary (mines) and secondary (recycling) smelting. Secondary smelting accounts for 60% of total lead production in Europe, and this market lead the most effectively metal. In secondary smelters, scrapped batteries are crushed and smelted. The polypropylene from the boxes is recycled to produce secondary plastic for battery, automotive, or other miscellaneous uses. The lead metal is refined to be re-used in the battery industry. The acid is retreated. Recycling requires a collection network. The lead/acid battery benefits from the traditional collection network that has been established for scrap-iron and non-ferrous metal scrap. In Western Europe, the recycling rate for scrapped batteries is estimated to be 80 to 90%. All participants in the battery recycling loop agree that the process must be a clean cycle for it to be credible. The collection organization is improving the quality of storage and transportation, especially with regard to the acid that can only be neutralized in correctly-controlled facilities, generally located at the smelters. The smelters themselves tend, through local regulations, to run at the optimum level of protection of the environment.

  8. GABA production by glutamic acid decarboxylase is regulated by a dynamic catalytic loop.

    PubMed

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Law, Ruby H P; Buckle, Ashley M; Langendorf, Christopher; Tuck, Kellie; Rosado, Carlos J; Faux, Noel G; Mahmood, Khalid; Hampe, Christiane S; Banga, J Paul; Wilce, Matthew; Schmidberger, Jason; Rossjohn, Jamie; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Pike, Robert N; Smith, A Ian; Mackay, Ian R; Rowley, Merrill J; Whisstock, James C

    2007-04-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is synthesized by two isoforms of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65 and GAD67). GAD67 is constitutively active and is responsible for basal GABA production. In contrast, GAD65, an autoantigen in type I diabetes, is transiently activated in response to the demand for extra GABA in neurotransmission, and cycles between an active holo form and an inactive apo form. We have determined the crystal structures of N-terminal truncations of both GAD isoforms. The structure of GAD67 shows a tethered loop covering the active site, providing a catalytic environment that sustains GABA production. In contrast, the same catalytic loop is inherently mobile in GAD65. Kinetic studies suggest that mobility in the catalytic loop promotes a side reaction that results in cofactor release and GAD65 autoinactivation. These data reveal the molecular basis for regulation of GABA homeostasis.

  9. Drosophila melanogaster kl-3 and kl-5 Y-loops harbor triple-stranded nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Piergentili, Roberto; Mencarelli, Caterina

    2008-05-15

    Primary spermatocyte nuclei of Drosophila melanogaster contain three prominent lampbrush-like loops. The development of these structures has been associated with the transcription of three fertility factors located on the Y chromosome, named kl-5, kl-3 and ks-1. These loci have huge physical dimensions and contain extremely long introns. In addition, kl-3 and kl-5 were shown to encode two putative dynein subunits required for the correct assembly of the sperm axoneme. Here, we show that both the kl-5 and kl-3 loops are intensely decorated by monoclonal antibodies recognizing triple-stranded nucleic acids, and that each loop presents a peculiar molecular organization of triplex structures. Moreover, immunostaining of Drosophila hydei primary spermatocytes revealed that also in this species - which diverged from D. melanogaster 58 million years ago - Y-loops are decorated by anti-triplex antibodies, strongly suggesting a conserved role of loop-associated triplexes. Finally, we showed that in D. melanogaster wild-type lines that are raised at the non-permissive temperature of 31+/-0.5 degrees C (which is known to induce male sterility in flies) both the triplex immunostaining and the axonemal dynein heavy chains encoded by kl-3 and kl-5 are no longer detectable, which suggests a functional correlation between loop-associated triplexes, the presence of axonemal proteins and male fertility in fly.

  10. Cry1Aa binding to the cadherin receptor does not require conserved amino acid sequences in the domain II loops

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yuki; Tanaka, Shiho; Otsuki, Manami; Hoshino, Yasushi; Morimoto, Chinatsu; Kotani, Takuya; Harashima, Yuko; Endo, Haruka; Yoshizawa, Yasutaka; Sato, Ryoichi

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing the binding mechanism of Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) Cry toxin to the cadherin receptor is indispensable to understanding the specific insecticidal activity of this toxin. To this end, we constructed 30 loop mutants by randomly inserting four serial amino acids covering all four receptor binding loops (loops α8, 1, 2 and 3) and analysed their binding affinities for Bombyx mori cadherin receptors via Biacore. High binding affinities were confirmed for all 30 mutants containing loop sequences that differed from those of wild-type. Insecticidal activities were confirmed in at least one mutant from loops 1, 2 and 3, suggesting that there is no critical amino acid sequence for the binding of the four loops to BtR175. When two mutations at different loops were integrated into one molecule, no reduction in binding affinity was observed compared with wild-type sequences. Based on these results, we discussed the binding mechanism of Cry toxin to cadherin protein. PMID:23145814

  11. Hierarchical scale dependence associated with the extension of the nonlinear feedback loop in a seven-dimensional Lorenz model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bo-Wen

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we construct a seven-dimensional Lorenz model (7DLM) to discuss the impact of an extended nonlinear feedback loop on solutions' stability and illustrate the hierarchical scale dependence of chaotic solutions. Compared to the 5DLM, the 7DLM includes two additional high wavenumber modes that are selected based on an analysis of the nonlinear temperature advection term, a Jacobian term (J(ψ, θ)), where, ψ and θ represent the streamfunction and temperature perturbations, respectively. Fourier modes that represent temperature in the 7DLM can be categorized into three major scales as the primary (the largest scale), secondary, and tertiary (the smallest scale) modes. Further extension of the nonlinear feedback loop within the 7DLM can provide negative nonlinear feedback to stabilize solutions, thus leading to a much larger critical value for the Rayleigh parameter (rc ˜ 116.9) for the onset of chaos, as compared to an rc of 42.9 for the 5DLM as well as an rc of 24.74 for the 3DLM. The rc is determined by an analysis of ensemble Lyapunov exponents (eLEs) with a Prandtl number (σ) of 10. To examine the dependence of rc on the value of the Prandtl number, a linear stability analysis is performed near the nontrivial critical point using a wide range of the Rayleigh parameter (40 ≤ r ≤ 195) and the Prandtl number (5 ≤ σ ≤ 25). Then an eLE analysis is conducted using selected values of the Prandtl number. The linear stability analysis is done by solving for the analytical solutions of the critical points, by linearizing the 7DLM with respect to the analytical solutions, and by calculating the eigenvalues of the linearized system. Within the range of (5 ≤ σ ≤ 25), the 7DLM requires a larger rc for the onset of chaos than the 5DLM. In addition to the negative nonlinear feedback illustrated and emulated by the quasi-equilibrium state solutions for high wavenumber modes, the 7DLM reveals the hierarchical scale dependence of chaotic solutions. For

  12. Long-term acid-induced wall extension in an in-vitro system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleland, R. E.; Cosgrove, D.; Tepfer, M.

    1987-01-01

    When frozen-thawed Avena sativa L. coleoptile and Cucumis sativa L. hypocotyl sections, under tension, are acid-treated, they undergo rapid elongation (acid-extension). The acid-extension response consists of two concurrent phases: a burst of extension which decays exponentially over 1-2 h (ExE), and a constant rate of extension (CE) which can persist for at least 6h. The extension (delta L) is closely represented by the equation: delta L = a-a e(-kt) + C t where a is the total extension of the exponential phase, k is the rate constant for ExE, and c is the rate of linear extension (CE). Low pH and high tension increased a and c, whereas temperature influenced k. The magnitude of the CE (over 50% extension/10 h), the similarity in its time course to auxin-induced growth, and the apparent yield threshold for CE indicate that CE is more likely than ExE to be the type of extension which cell walls undergo during normal auxin-induced growth.

  13. Evaluation of stem-loop reverse transcription and poly-A tail extension in microRNA analysis of body fluids.

    PubMed

    Dunnett, Hannah; van der Meer, Dieudonne; Williams, Graham A

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNA has been demonstrated to be a viable tool for body fluid identification purposes in forensic casework. Stem-loop reverse transcription (slRT) is regularly used for cDNA synthesis from mature miRNA, along with poly-A tail extension. Both have been used in a forensic context, but no direct comparison has been carried out. It has also not been shown whether poly-A tail extension can be used upon DNA extracts, as previously shown with slRT. Blood and saliva samples were collected and underwent DNA extraction with or without on-column DNA digestion. All samples were then aliquoted and underwent slRT and poly-A tail extension separately. qPCR was then conducted targeting microRNA markers hsa-miR-451 and hsa-miR-205. It was shown that the DNA digestion step did not affect the ability to differentiate between blood and saliva. It was also shown that this differentiation was possible using poly-A tail extension, and that poly-A tail extension exhibited more amplification than slRT. So whilst the choice of slRT and poly-A tail extension for the purpose of forensic body fluid identification is not critical, it may be best to use poly-A tail extension, particularly where there are low traces of sample.

  14. NAIL: Nucleic Acid detection using Isotachophoresis and Loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Borysiak, Mark D; Kimura, Kevin W; Posner, Jonathan D

    2015-04-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests are the gold standard for many infectious disease diagnoses due to high sensitivity and specificity, rapid operation, and low limits of detection. Despite the advantages of nucleic acid amplification tests, they currently offer limited point-of-care (POC) utility due to the need for complex instruments and laborious sample preparation. We report the development of the Nucleic Acid Isotachophoresis LAMP (NAIL) diagnostic device. NAIL uses isotachophoresis (ITP) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) to extract and amplify nucleic acids from complex matrices in less than one hour inside of an integrated chip. ITP is an electrokinetic separation technique that uses an electric field and two buffers to extract and purify nucleic acids in a single step. LAMP amplifies nucleic acids at constant temperature and produces large amounts of DNA that can be easily detected. A mobile phone images the amplification results to eliminate the need for laser fluorescent detection. The device requires minimal user intervention because capillary valves and heated air chambers act as passive valves and pumps for automated fluid actuation. In this paper, we describe NAIL device design and operation, and demonstrate the extraction and detection of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 cells from whole milk samples. We use the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) limit of detection (LoD) definitions that take into account the variance from both positive and negative samples to determine the diagnostic LoD. According to the CLSI definition, the NAIL device has a limit of detection (LoD) of 1000 CFU mL(-1) for E. coli cells artificially inoculated into whole milk, which is two orders of magnitude improvement to standard tube-LAMP reactions with diluted milk samples and comparable to lab-based methods. The NAIL device potentially offers significant reductions in the complexity and cost of traditional nucleic acid diagnostics for POC applications

  15. NAIL: Nucleic Acid detection using Isotachophoresis and Loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Borysiak, Mark D; Kimura, Kevin W; Posner, Jonathan D

    2015-04-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests are the gold standard for many infectious disease diagnoses due to high sensitivity and specificity, rapid operation, and low limits of detection. Despite the advantages of nucleic acid amplification tests, they currently offer limited point-of-care (POC) utility due to the need for complex instruments and laborious sample preparation. We report the development of the Nucleic Acid Isotachophoresis LAMP (NAIL) diagnostic device. NAIL uses isotachophoresis (ITP) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) to extract and amplify nucleic acids from complex matrices in less than one hour inside of an integrated chip. ITP is an electrokinetic separation technique that uses an electric field and two buffers to extract and purify nucleic acids in a single step. LAMP amplifies nucleic acids at constant temperature and produces large amounts of DNA that can be easily detected. A mobile phone images the amplification results to eliminate the need for laser fluorescent detection. The device requires minimal user intervention because capillary valves and heated air chambers act as passive valves and pumps for automated fluid actuation. In this paper, we describe NAIL device design and operation, and demonstrate the extraction and detection of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 cells from whole milk samples. We use the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) limit of detection (LoD) definitions that take into account the variance from both positive and negative samples to determine the diagnostic LoD. According to the CLSI definition, the NAIL device has a limit of detection (LoD) of 1000 CFU mL(-1) for E. coli cells artificially inoculated into whole milk, which is two orders of magnitude improvement to standard tube-LAMP reactions with diluted milk samples and comparable to lab-based methods. The NAIL device potentially offers significant reductions in the complexity and cost of traditional nucleic acid diagnostics for POC applications.

  16. Destabilization of pea lectin by substitution of a single amino acid in a surface loop.

    PubMed

    Hoedemaeker, F J; van Eijsden, R R; Díaz, C L; de Pater, B S; Kijne, J W

    1993-09-01

    Legume lectins are considered to be antinutritional factors (ANF) in the animal feeding industry. Inactivation of ANF is an important element in processing of food. In our study on the stability of Pisum sativum L. lectin (PSL), a conserved hydrophobic amino acid (Val103) in a surface loop was replaced with alanine. The mutant lectin, PSL V103A, showed a decrease in unfolding temperature (Tm) by some 10 degrees C in comparison with wild-type (wt) PSL, and the denaturation energy (delta H) is only about 55% of that of wt PSL. Replacement of an adjacent amino acid (Phe104) with alanine did not result in a significant difference in stability in comparison with wt PSL. Both mutations did not change the sugar-binding properties of the lectin, as compared with wt PSL and with PSL from pea seeds, at ambient temperatures. The double mutant, PSL V103A/F104A, was produced in Escherichia coli, but could not be isolated in an active (i.e. sugar-binding) form. Interestingly, the mutation in PSL V103A reversibly affected sugar-binding at 37 degrees C, as judged from haemagglutination assays. These results open the possibility of production of lectins that are active in planta at ambient temperatures, but are inactive and possibly non-toxic at 37 degrees C in the intestines of mammals. PMID:8400124

  17. Expression of the helix-loop-helix protein inhibitor of DNA binding-1 (ID-1) is activated by all-trans retinoic acid in normal human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Villano, C.M.; White, L.A. . E-mail: lawhite@aesop.rutgers.edu

    2006-08-01

    The ID (inhibitor of differentiation or DNA binding) helix-loop-helix proteins are important mediators of cellular differentiation and proliferation in a variety of cell types through regulation of gene expression. Overexpression of the ID proteins in normal human keratinocytes results in extension of culture lifespan, indicating that these proteins are important for epidermal differentiation. Our hypothesis is that the ID proteins are targets of the retinoic acid signaling pathway in keratinocytes. Retinoids, vitamin A analogues, are powerful regulators of cell growth and differentiation and are widely used in the prevention and treatment of a variety of cancers in humans. Furthermore, retinoic acid is necessary for the maintenance of epithelial differentiation and demonstrates an inhibitory action on skin carcinogenesis. We examined the effect of all-trans retinoic acid on expression of ID-1, -2, -3, and -4 in normal human keratinocytes and found that exposure of these cells to all-trans retinoic acid causes an increase in both ID-1 and ID-3 gene expression. Furthermore, our data show that this increase is mediated by increased transcription involving several cis-acting elements in the distal portion of the promoter, including a CREB-binding site, an Egr1 element, and an YY1 site. These data demonstrate that the ID proteins are direct targets of the retinoic acid signaling pathway. Given the importance of the ID proteins to epidermal differentiation, these results suggest that IDs may be mediating some of the effects of all-trans retinoic acid in normal human keratinocytes.

  18. A Mutational Analysis of the Active Site Loop Residues in cis-3-Chloroacrylic Acid Dehalogenase

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Gottfried K.; Huddleston, Jamison P.; Johnson, William H.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    cis -3-Chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (cis-CaaD) from Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170 and a homologue from Corynebacterium glutamicum designated Cg10062 share 34% sequence identity (54% similarity). The former catalyzes a key step in a bacterial catabolic pathway for the nematocide 1,3-dichloropropene, whereas the latter has no known biological activity. Although Cg10062 has the six active site residues (Pro-1, His-28, Arg-70, Arg-73, Tyr-103, Glu-114) that are critical for cis-CaaD activity, it shows only a low level cis-CaaD activity and lacks the specificity of cis-CaaD: Cg10062 processes both isomers of 3-chloroacrylate with a preference for the cis-isomer. Although the basis for these differences is unknown, a comparison of the crystal structures of the enzymes covalently modified by an adduct resulting from their incubation with the same inhibitor offers a possible explanation. A 6-residue active site loop in cis-CaaD shows a strikingly different conformation from that observed in Cg10062: the loop closes down on the active site of cis-CaaD, but not on that of Cg10062. In order to examine what this loop might contribute to cis-CaaD catalysis and specificity, the residues were changed individually to those found in Cg10062. Subsequent kinetic and mechanistic analysis suggests that the T34A mutant of cis-CaaD is more Cg10062-like. The mutant enzyme shows a 4-fold increase in Km (using cis-3-bromoacrylate), but not to the degree observed for Cg10062 (687-fold). The mutation also causes a 4-fold decrease in the burst rate (compared to the wild type cis-CaaD), whereas Cg10062 shows no burst rate. More telling is the reaction of the T34A mutant of cis-CaaD with the alternate substrate, 2,3-butadienoate. In the presence of NaBH4 and the allene, cis-CaaD is completely inactivated after one turnover due to the covalent modification of Pro-1. The same experiment with Cg10062 does not result in the covalent modification of Pro-1. The different outcomes are attributed to

  19. 77 FR 22560 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'').\\1\\ On...). \\2\\ See Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of...

  20. Retinoic acid regulation of the Mesp-Ripply feedback loop during vertebrate segmental patterning.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Tanya A; Jappelli, Roberto; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Kintner, Chris

    2008-03-15

    The Mesp bHLH genes play a conserved role during segmental patterning of the mesoderm in the vertebrate embryo by specifying segmental boundaries and anteroposterior (A-P) segmental polarity. Here we use a xenotransgenic approach to compare the transcriptional enhancers that drive expression of the Mesp genes within segments of the presomitic mesoderm (PSM) of different vertebrate species. We find that the genomic sequences upstream of the mespb gene in the pufferfish Takifugu rubripes (Tr-mespb) are able to drive segmental expression in transgenic Xenopus embryos while those from the Xenopus laevis mespb (Xl-mespb) gene drive segmental expression in transgenic zebrafish. In both cases, the anterior segmental boundary of transgene expression closely matches the expression of the endogenous Mesp genes, indicating that many inputs into segmental gene expression are highly conserved. By contrast, we find that direct retinoic acid (RA) regulation of endogenous Mesp gene expression is variable among vertebrate species. Both Tr-mespb and Xl-mespb are directly upregulated by RA, through a complex, distal element. By contrast, RA represses the zebrafish Mesp genes. We show that this repression is mediated, in part, by RA-mediated activation of the Ripply genes, which together with Mesp genes form an RA-responsive negative feedback loop. These observations suggest that variations in a direct response to RA input may allow for changes in A-P patterning of the segments in different vertebrate species.

  1. Disulfide bond tethering of extracellular loops does not affect the closure of OmpF porin at acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Wager, Beau; Baslé, Arnaud; Delcour, Anne H

    2010-11-01

    The permeability of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria is essentially controlled by pore-forming proteins of the porin family. The trimeric E. coli porin OmpF is assembled as a triple β-barrel, where each monomer contains a central pore and extracellular loops. Electrophysiological analysis of the behavior of OmpF at acidic pH reveals that the protein undergoes a conformational change leading to the sequential step-wise closure of the three monomers. A previous atomic force microscopy study suggested that the conformational change might be due to a bending of extracellular loops over the pore opening, and loop deletion experiments suggested that loops L1, L7, and L8 are involved. In order to test the hypothesis for loop movement, we engineered a series of double cysteine mutants in loops L1, L6, L7 and L8 in order to create disulfide bonds linking two loops to each other, or the two branches of a loop, or a loop to the β-barrel. Five out of the six mutants showed the formation of the disulfide bond. However, none of these had an altered response to acidic pH relative to the wildtype channel. Although we cannot dismiss the possibility that the mobility restriction introduced by each disulfide bond was too localized to impact a more global conformational change of the three loops, the fact that all of the different types of disulfide bond tethering were similarly ineffective suggests that the extracellular loops L1, L7, and L8 may not undergo a major acidic-pH induced conformational change leading to channel closure.

  2. Complete amino acid sequence of an acidic, cardiotoxic phospholipase A2 from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King Cobra): a novel cobra venom enzyme with "pancreatic loop".

    PubMed

    Huang, M Z; Gopalakrishnakone, P; Chung, M C; Kini, R M

    1997-02-15

    A phospholipase A2 (OHV A-PLA2) from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (King cobra) is an acidic protein exhibiting cardiotoxicity, myotoxicity, and antiplatelet activity. The complete amino acid sequence of OHV A-PLA2 has been determined using a combination of Edman degradation and mass spectrometric techniques. OHV A-PLA2 is composed of a single chain of 124 amino acid residues with 14 cysteines and a calculated molecular weight of 13719 Da. It contains the loop of residues (62-66) found in pancreatic PLA2s and hence belongs to class IB enzymes. This pancreatic loop is between two proline residues (Pro 59 and Pro 68) and contains several hydrophilic amino acids (Ser and Asp). This region has high degree of conformational flexibility and is on the surface of the molecule, and hence it may be a potential protein-protein interaction site. A relatively low sequence homology is found between OHV A-PLA2 and other known cardiotoxic PLA2s, and hence a contiguous segment could not be identified as a site responsible for the cardiotoxic activity.

  3. Evidence for extensive non-endocytotic translocation of peptide nucleic acids across mammalian plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Oehlke, Johannes; Turner, Yvonne; Pritz, Stephan; Bienert, Michael

    2011-09-01

    The ability of peptide nucleic acids (PNA) to enter and to cross filter-grown MDCK, HEK and CHO cells was studied by means of a protocol based on capillary electrophoresis combined with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The used approach avoided possible errors encountered in protocols based on confocal laserscanning microscopy and FACS analysis. In contradiction to the commonly anticipated unability of PNA to cross biomembranes, extensive translocation of unmodified PNA into and across the investigated cell types was found. The transport mode comprised a variety of energy dependent and -independent as well as temperature sensitive mechanisms being probably destined to natural substrates and hijacked by PNA. The presented results suggest active as well as passive export mechanisms rather than poor penetration into cells to be responsible for the only weak biological activity of unmodified PNA.

  4. Point-of-care multiplexed assays of nucleic acids using microcapillary-based loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Lu; Sun, Jiashu; Liu, Yulei; Ma, Xingjie; Cui, Shangjin; Ma, Liying; Xi, Jianzhong Jeff; Jiang, Xingyu

    2014-07-15

    This report demonstrates a straightforward, robust, multiplexed and point-of-care microcapillary-based loop-mediated isothermal amplification (cLAMP) for assaying nucleic acids. This assay integrates capillaries (glass or plastic) to introduce and house sample/reagents, segments of water droplets to prevent contamination, pocket warmers to provide heat, and a hand-held flashlight for a visual readout of the fluorescent signal. The cLAMP system allows the simultaneous detection of two RNA targets of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from multiple plasma samples, and achieves a high sensitivity of two copies of standard plasmid. As few nucleic acid detection methods can be wholly independent of external power supply and equipment, our cLAMP holds great promise for point-of-care applications in resource-poor settings. PMID:24937125

  5. A Complex Deoxyribonucleic Acid Looping Configuration Associated with the Silencing of the Maternal Igf2 Allele

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xinwen; Vu, Thanh H.; Lu, Qiucheng; Ling, Jian Qun; Li, Tao; Hou, Aiju; Wang, Shu Kui; Chen, Hui Ling; Hu, Ji Fan; Hoffman, Andrew R.

    2008-01-01

    Alternate interactions between the H19 imprinting control region (ICR) and one of the two Igf2 differentially methylated regions has been proposed as a model regulating the reciprocal imprinting of Igf2 and H19. To study the conformation of this imprint switch, we performed a systematic structural analysis across the 140 kb of the mouse Igf2-H19 region, which includes enhancers located both between the two genes as well as downstream of H19, by using a scanning chromosome conformation capture (3C) technique. Our results suggest that on the active paternal Igf2 allele, the various enhancers have direct access to the Igf2 promoters, whereas the imprinted silent maternal Igf2 allele assumes a complex three-dimensional knotted loop that keeps the enhancers away from the Igf2 promoters and allows them to interact with the H19 promoter. This complex DNA looping of the maternal allele is formed by interactions involving differentially methylated region 1, the ICR, and enhancers. Binding of CTC-binding factor to the maternal, unmethylated ICR in conjunction with the presence of multicomplex components including interchromosomal interactions, create a barrier blocking the access of all enhancers to Igf2, thereby silencing the maternal Igf2. This silencing configuration exists in newborn liver, mouse embryonic fibroblast, and embryonic stem cells and persists during mitosis, conferring a mechanism for epigenetic memory. PMID:18356289

  6. Loop mediated isothermal amplification combined with nucleic acid lateral flow strip for diagnosis of cyprinid herpes virus-3.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Hatem; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2010-02-01

    An improved loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for rapid, sensitive and specific detection of cyprinid herpes virus-3 (CyHV-3), also known as koi herpes virus (KHV), was developed. The lower detection limit of the CyHV-3-LAMP assay is 10 fg DNA which equivalent to 30 copies of CyHV-3 genome. Nucleic acid lateral flow assay was used for visual detection of the LAMP products. The LAMP- nucleic acid lateral flow assay relies on DNA hybridization technology and antigen-antibody reactions in combination with LAMP. For application of this assay, the biotinylated LAMP product was hybridized with a FITC-labelled specific probe for 5 min. The resulting DNA complex could be visualised as purple band at the strip test line within 5 min of sample exposure. The nucleic acid lateral flow analysis of the LAMP product was equivalent in sensitivity but more rapid than the conventional agarose gel electrophoresis. The combination of LAMP assay with the nucleic acid lateral flow analysis can simplify the diagnosis and screening of CyHV-3 as it is simple, requires very little training, does not require specialized equipment such as a thermal cycler, the results are read visually with no need to run a gel and has a high sensitivity and specificity.

  7. Characteristic of HIV-1 in V3 loop region based on seroreactivity and amino acid sequences in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, Kruavon; Matsuo, Kazuhiro; Sutthent, Ruengpung; Hoisanka, Narin; Boonsarthorn, Naphasawan; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom; Warachit, Paijit; Yamazaki, Shudo; Honda, Mitsuo

    2002-06-01

    The third variable (V3) domain of the envelop (env) protein has been used for determining genetic subtype and phenotypic characteristics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. Based on the seroreactivity of the HIV-1 subtype by V3 peptide binding enzyme immunoassay (EIA) of 351 samples obtained in 1998 from HIV-1 infected individuals and AIDS patients, we found that 283 (80.6%) were subtype E, 20 (5.7%) were subtype B, 28 (8.0%) were cross-reactive between both types and 20 (5.7%) were non-typeable. The degree of seroreactivity of HIV-1 subtype E decreased significantly when the amino acid at the crown of the V3 loop was substituted from a GPGQ motif to GPGR motif. Interestingly, AIDS patients who had V3 sequences of subtype E as GPGR motif had a stronger immunoreactivity to GPGQ motif peptides than to GPGR motif peptides, in contradiction for their proviral sequences. The results suggested that mutations in the V3 loop may lead to a changed immunoreactivity that makes HIV-1 mutants unrecognizable or allow escape from the primary immune response by means of neutralizing sensitivity. In connection with vaccine development, it should be pointed out that the combination of V3 sequencing and peptide EIA could provide a novel approach to obtain a primarily infected virus sequence as a target for a preventive AIDS vaccine.

  8. 76 FR 17835 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... Administrative Review, 75 FR 37759 (June 30, 2010). On January 25, 2011, the Department published the extension... Time Limit for the Preliminary Results of the Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 76 FR 4288... International Trade Administration A-570-937] Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's...

  9. Summary Report on Gamma Radiolysis of TBP/n-dodecane in the Presence of Nitric Acid Using the Radiolysis/Hydrolysis Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Dean R. Peterman; Bruce J. Mincher; Catherine L. Riddle; Richard D. Tillotson

    2010-08-01

    Design and installation has been completed for a state-of-the-art radiolysis/hydrolysis test loop system. The system is used to evaluate the effects of gamma radiolysis and acid hydrolysis on the stability and performance of solvent extraction process solvents. The test loop is comprised of two main sections; the solvent irradiation and hydrolysis loop and the solvent reconditioning loop. In the solvent irradiation and hydrolysis loop, aqueous and organic phases are mixed and circulated through a gamma irradiator until the desired absorbed dose is achieved. Irradiation of the mixed phases is more representative of actual conditions in a solvent extraction process. Additionally, the contact of the organic phase with the aqueous phase will subject the solvent components to hydrolysis. This hydrolysis can be accelerated by controlling the system at an elevated temperature. At defined intervals, the organic from the irradiation/hydrolysis loop will be transferred to the solvent reconditioning loop where the solvent is contacted with scrub, strip, and solvent wash solutions which simulate process flowsheet conditions. These two processes are repeated until the total desired dose is achieved. Since all viable solvent extraction components in an advanced fuel cycle must exhibit high radiolytic and hydrolytic stability, this test loop is not limited to any one solvent system but is applicable to all systems of interest. Also, the test loop is not limited to testing of process flowsheets. It is also a valuable tool in support of fundamental research on newly identified extractants/modifiers and the impact of gamma radiation on their stability in a dynamic environment. The investigation of the radiolysis of a TBP/n-dodecane process solvent in contact with aqueous nitric acid has been performed. These studies were intended to confirm/optimize the operability of the test loop system. Additionally, these data are directly applicable to numerous other solvent extraction

  10. Regulative Loops, Step Loops and Task Loops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This commentary suggests a generalization of the conception of the behavior of tutoring systems, which the target article characterized as having an outer loop that was executed once per task and an inner loop that was executed once per step of the task. A more general conception sees these two loops as instances of regulative loops, which…

  11. Sensitivity of bile acid breath test in the diagnosis of bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine with and without the stagnant (blind) loop syndrome.

    PubMed

    Farivar, S; Fromm, H; Schindler, D; Schmidt, F W

    1979-01-01

    The bile acid breath test was studied to examine its sensitivity for establishing the diagnosis of bacterial overgrowth in comparison to that of the Schilling test and small-intestinal cultures in 12 patients with a stagnant (blind) loop syndrome, as well as in 38 patients who had other conditions with suspected bacterial contamination of the small intestine. The presence of bile acid malabsorption was excluded in all 50 patients by studies of fecal excretion of radioactively labeled bile acids. The bile acid breath test was positive in 100% (12/12) of the patients with a stagnant (blind) loop syndrome, whereas 92% (11/12) had a positive Schilling test and 75% (9/12) a positive small-intestinal culture. The abnormal tests improved only in 2 of 4 patients treated with tetracycline. In the group of 38 patients without demonstrable dilated or blind loops of small bowel who were suspected of having bacterial contamination of small bowel, the bile acid breath test was positive in 53% (20/38), the Schilling test in 39% (15/38), and the small-intestinal culture in 45% (17/38). The difference in the incidence of positive results between the tests in the two patient groups was statistically not significant. The findings of these studies have the following diagnostic implications: (1) Bile acid breath test, Schilling test, and cultures of aspirates from the upper small bowel are of comparable sensitivity in the detection of bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine. (2) A negative bile acid breath test makes the diagnosis of a stagnant (blind) loop syndrome very unlikely.

  12. Length and Amino Acid Sequence of Peptides Substituted for the 5-HT3A Receptor M3M4 Loop May Affect Channel Expression and Desensitization

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Nicole K.; Bali, Moez; Akabas, Myles H.

    2012-01-01

    5-HT3A receptors are pentameric neurotransmitter-gated ion channels in the Cys-loop receptor family. Each subunit contains an extracellular domain, four transmembrane segments (M1, M2, M3, M4) and a 115 residue intracellular loop between M3 and M4. In contrast, the M3M4 loop in prokaryotic homologues is <15 residues. To investigate the limits of M3M4 loop length and composition on channel function we replaced the 5-HT3A M3M4 loop with two to seven alanine residues (5-HT3A-An = 2–7). Mutants were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and characterized using two electrode voltage clamp recording. All mutants were functional. The 5-HT EC50's were at most 5-fold greater than wild-type (WT). The desensitization rate differed significantly among the mutants. Desensitization rates for 5-HT3A-A2, 5-HT3A-A4, 5-HT3A-A6, and 5-HT3A-A7 were similar to WT. In contrast, 5-HT3A-A3 and 5-HT3A-A5 had desensitization rates at least an order of magnitude faster than WT. The one Ala loop construct, 5-HT3A-A1, entered a non-functional state from which it did not recover after the first 5-HT application. These results suggest that the large M3M4 loop of eukaryotic Cys-loop channels is not required for receptor assembly or function. However, loop length and amino acid composition can effect channel expression and desensitization. We infer that the cytoplasmic ends of the M3 and M4 segments may undergo conformational changes during channel gating and desensitization and/or the loop may influence the position and mobility of these segments as they undergo gating-induced conformational changes. Altering structure or conformational mobility of the cytoplasmic ends of M3 and M4 may be the basis by which phosphorylation or protein binding to the cytoplasmic loop alters channel function. PMID:22539982

  13. A novel, sensitive and label-free loop-mediated isothermal amplification detection method for nucleic acids using luminophore dyes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sharmili; Wei, Sim Xiao; Ying, Jean Liew Zhi; Safavieh, Mohammadali; Ahmed, Minhaz Uddin

    2016-12-15

    Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) has been widely rendered for nucleic acid testing. Here, we integrate loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) with ECL technique for DNA detection and quantification. The target LAMP DNA bound electrostatically with [Ru(bpy)3](+2) on the carbon electrode surface, and an ECL reaction was triggered by tripropylamine (TPrA) to yield luminescence. We illustrated this method as a new and highly sensitive strategy for the detection of sequence-specific DNA from different meat species at picogram levels. The proposed strategy renders the signal amplification capacities of TPrA and combines LAMP with inherently high sensitivity of the ECL technique, to facilitate the detection of low quantities of DNA. By leveraging this technique, target DNA of Sus scrofa (pork) meat was detected as low as 1pg/µL (3.43×10(-1)copies/µL). In addition, the proposed technique was applied for detection of Bacillus subtilis DNA samples and detection limit of 10pg/µL (2.2×10(3)copies/µL) was achieved. The advantages of being isothermal, sensitive and robust with ability for multiplex detection of bio-analytes makes this method a facile and appealing sensing modality in hand-held devices to be used at the point-of-care (POC). PMID:27393827

  14. "Opening" the ferritin pore for iron release by mutation of conserved amino acids at interhelix and loop sites.

    PubMed

    Jin, W; Takagi, H; Pancorbo, B; Theil, E C

    2001-06-26

    Ferritin concentrates, stores, and detoxifies iron in most organisms. The iron is a solid, ferric oxide mineral (< or =4500 Fe) inside the protein shell. Eight pores are formed by subunit trimers of the 24 subunit protein. A role for the protein in controlling reduction and dissolution of the iron mineral was suggested in preliminary experiments [Takagi et al. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 18685-18688] with a proline/leucine substitution near the pore. Localized pore disorder in frog L134P crystals coincided with enhanced iron exit, triggered by reduction. In this report, nine additional substitutions of conserved amino acids near L134 were studied for effects on iron release. Alterations of a conserved hydrophobic pair, a conserved ion pair, and a loop at the ferritin pores all increased iron exit (3-30-fold). Protein assembly was unchanged, except for a slight decrease in volume (measured by gel filtration); ferroxidase activity was still in the millisecond range, but a small decrease indicates slight alteration of the channel from the pore to the oxidation site. The sensitivity of reductive iron exit rates to changes in conserved residues near the ferritin pores, associated with localized unfolding, suggests that the structure around the ferritin pores is a target for regulated protein unfolding and iron release.

  15. Complex folding and misfolding effects of deer-specific amino acid substitutions in the β2-α2 loop of murine prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sonya; Döring, Kristina; Gierusz, Leszek A.; Iyer, Pooja; Lane, Fiona M.; Graham, James F.; Goldmann, Wilfred; Pinheiro, Teresa J. T.; Gill, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    The β2–α2 loop of PrPC is a key modulator of disease-associated prion protein misfolding. Amino acids that differentiate mouse (Ser169, Asn173) and deer (Asn169, Thr173) PrPC appear to confer dramatically different structural properties in this region and it has been suggested that amino acid sequences associated with structural rigidity of the loop also confer susceptibility to prion disease. Using mouse recombinant PrP, we show that mutating residue 173 from Asn to Thr alters protein stability and misfolding only subtly, whilst changing Ser to Asn at codon 169 causes instability in the protein, promotes oligomer formation and dramatically potentiates fibril formation. The doubly mutated protein exhibits more complex folding and misfolding behaviour than either single mutant, suggestive of differential effects of the β2–α2 loop sequence on both protein stability and on specific misfolding pathways. Molecular dynamics simulation of protein structure suggests a key role for the solvent accessibility of Tyr168 in promoting molecular interactions that may lead to prion protein misfolding. Thus, we conclude that ‘rigidity’ in the β2–α2 loop region of the normal conformer of PrP has less effect on misfolding than other sequence-related effects in this region. PMID:26490404

  16. Complex folding and misfolding effects of deer-specific amino acid substitutions in the β2-α2 loop of murine prion protein.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sonya; Döring, Kristina; Gierusz, Leszek A; Iyer, Pooja; Lane, Fiona M; Graham, James F; Goldmann, Wilfred; Pinheiro, Teresa J T; Gill, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    The β2-α2 loop of PrP(C) is a key modulator of disease-associated prion protein misfolding. Amino acids that differentiate mouse (Ser169, Asn173) and deer (Asn169, Thr173) PrP(C) appear to confer dramatically different structural properties in this region and it has been suggested that amino acid sequences associated with structural rigidity of the loop also confer susceptibility to prion disease. Using mouse recombinant PrP, we show that mutating residue 173 from Asn to Thr alters protein stability and misfolding only subtly, whilst changing Ser to Asn at codon 169 causes instability in the protein, promotes oligomer formation and dramatically potentiates fibril formation. The doubly mutated protein exhibits more complex folding and misfolding behaviour than either single mutant, suggestive of differential effects of the β2-α2 loop sequence on both protein stability and on specific misfolding pathways. Molecular dynamics simulation of protein structure suggests a key role for the solvent accessibility of Tyr168 in promoting molecular interactions that may lead to prion protein misfolding. Thus, we conclude that 'rigidity' in the β2-α2 loop region of the normal conformer of PrP has less effect on misfolding than other sequence-related effects in this region. PMID:26490404

  17. Complex folding and misfolding effects of deer-specific amino acid substitutions in the β2-α2 loop of murine prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Sonya; Döring, Kristina; Gierusz, Leszek A.; Iyer, Pooja; Lane, Fiona M.; Graham, James F.; Goldmann, Wilfred; Pinheiro, Teresa J. T.; Gill, Andrew C.

    2015-10-01

    The β2-α2 loop of PrPC is a key modulator of disease-associated prion protein misfolding. Amino acids that differentiate mouse (Ser169, Asn173) and deer (Asn169, Thr173) PrPC appear to confer dramatically different structural properties in this region and it has been suggested that amino acid sequences associated with structural rigidity of the loop also confer susceptibility to prion disease. Using mouse recombinant PrP, we show that mutating residue 173 from Asn to Thr alters protein stability and misfolding only subtly, whilst changing Ser to Asn at codon 169 causes instability in the protein, promotes oligomer formation and dramatically potentiates fibril formation. The doubly mutated protein exhibits more complex folding and misfolding behaviour than either single mutant, suggestive of differential effects of the β2-α2 loop sequence on both protein stability and on specific misfolding pathways. Molecular dynamics simulation of protein structure suggests a key role for the solvent accessibility of Tyr168 in promoting molecular interactions that may lead to prion protein misfolding. Thus, we conclude that ‘rigidity’ in the β2-α2 loop region of the normal conformer of PrP has less effect on misfolding than other sequence-related effects in this region.

  18. Extension of UNRES force field to treat polypeptide chains with D-amino-acid residues

    PubMed Central

    Sieradzan, Adam K.; Hansmann, Ulrich H.E.; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Coarse-grained force fields for protein simulations are usually designed and parameterized to treat proteins composed of natural L-amino-acid residues. However, D-amino-acid residues occur in bacterial, fungal (e.g., gramicidins), as well as human-designed proteins. For this reason, we have extended the UNRES coarse-grained force field developed in our laboratory to treat systems with D-amino-acid residues. We developed the respective virtual-bond-torsional and double-torsional potentials for rotation about the Cα · · · Cα virtual-bond axis and two consecutive Cα · · · Cα virtual-bond axes, respectively, as functions of virtual-bond-dihedral angles γ. In turn, these were calculated as potentials of mean force (PMFs) from the diabatic energy surfaces of terminally-blocked model compounds for glycine, alanine, and proline. The potential-energy surfaces were calculated by using the ab initio method of molecular quantum mechanics at the Møller-Plesset (MP2) level of theory and the 6-31G(d,p) basis set, with the rotation angles of the peptide groups about Ci-1α⋯Ciα(λ(1)) and Ciα⋯Ci+1α(λ(2)) used as variables, and the energy was minimized with respect to the remaining degrees of freedom. The PMFs were calculated by numerical integration for all pairs and triplets with all possible combinations of types (glycine, alanine, and proline) and chirality (D or L); however, symmetry relations reduce the number of non-equivalent torsional potentials to 13 and the number of double-torsional potentials to 63 for a given C-terminal blocking group. Subsequently, one- (for torsional) and two-dimensional (for double-torsional potentials) Fourier series were fitted to the PMFs to obtain analytical expressions. It was found that the torsional potentials of the x-Y and X-y types, where X and Y are Ala or Pro, respectively, and a lowercase letter denotes D-chirality, have global minima for small absolute values of γ, accounting for the double-helical structure of

  19. Impaired Acid Catalysis by Mutation of a Protein Loop Hinge Residue in a YopH Mutant Revealed by Crystal Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Brandao, T.; Robinson, H; Johnson, S; Hengge, A

    2009-01-01

    Catalysis by the Yersinia protein-tyrosine phosphatase YopH is significantly impaired by the mutation of the conserved Trp354 residue to Phe. Though not a catalytic residue, this Trp is a hinge residue in a conserved flexible loop (the WPD-loop) that must close during catalysis. To learn why this seemingly conservative mutation reduces catalysis by 2 orders of magnitude, we have solved high-resolution crystal structures for the W354F YopH in the absence and in the presence of tungstate and vanadate. Oxyanion binding to the P-loop in W354F is analogous to that observed in the native enzyme. However, the WPD-loop in the presence of oxyanions assumes a half-closed conformation, in contrast to the fully closed state observed in structures of the native enzyme. This observation provides an explanation for the impaired general acid catalysis observed in kinetic experiments with Trp mutants. A 1.4 Angstroms structure of the W354F mutant obtained in the presence of vanadate reveals an unusual divanadate species with a cyclic [VO]2 core, which has precedent in small molecules but has not been previously reported in a protein crystal structure.

  20. Atomistic Free Energy Model for Nucleic Acids: Simulations of Single-Stranded DNA and the Entropy Landscape of RNA Stem-Loop Structures.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chi H

    2015-11-25

    While single-stranded (ss) segments of DNAs and RNAs are ubiquitous in biology, details about their structures have only recently begun to emerge. To study ssDNA and RNAs, we have developed a new Monte Carlo (MC) simulation using a free energy model for nucleic acids that has the atomisitic accuracy to capture fine molecular details of the sugar-phosphate backbone. Formulated on the basis of a first-principle calculation of the conformational entropy of the nucleic acid chain, this free energy model correctly reproduced both the long and short length-scale structural properties of ssDNA and RNAs in a rigorous comparison against recent data from fluorescence resonance energy transfer, small-angle X-ray scattering, force spectroscopy and fluorescence correlation transport measurements on sequences up to ∼100 nucleotides long. With this new MC algorithm, we conducted a comprehensive investigation of the entropy landscape of small RNA stem-loop structures. From a simulated ensemble of ∼10(6) equilibrium conformations, the entropy for the initiation of different size RNA hairpin loops was computed and compared against thermodynamic measurements. Starting from seeded hairpin loops, constrained MC simulations were then used to estimate the entropic costs associated with propagation of the stem. The numerical results provide new direct molecular insights into thermodynaimc measurement from macroscopic calorimetry and melting experiments.

  1. Extensive interbreeding occurred among multiple matriarchal ancestors during the domestication of dogs: evidence from inter- and intraspecies polymorphisms in the D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA between dogs and wolves.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, K; Kikkawa, Y; Yonekawa, H; Tanabe, Y

    1997-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that the domestic dogs are derived from several different ancestral gray wolf populations, we compared the sequence of the displacement (D)-loop region of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from 24 breeds of domestic dog (34 individual dogs) and 3 subspecies of gray wolf (Canis lupus lupus, C.l. pallipes and C.l. chanco; 19 individuals). The intraspecific sequence variations within domestic dogs (0.00-3.19%) and within wolves (0.00-2.88%) were comparable to the interspecific variations between domestic dogs and wolves (0.30-3.35%). A repetitive sequence with repeat units (TACACGTA/GCG) that causes the size variation in the D-loop region was also found in both dogs and wolves. However, no nucleotide substitutions or repetitive arrays were specific for domestic dogs or for wolves. These results showed that there is a close genetic relationship between dogs and wolves. Two major clades appeared in the phylogenetic trees constructed by neighbor-joining and by the maximum parsimony method; one clade containing Chinese wolf (C.l. chanco) showed extensive variations while the other showed only slight variation. This showed that there were two major genetic components both in domestic dogs and in wolves. However, neither clades nor haplotypes specific for any dog breed were observed, whereas subspecies-specific clades were found in Asiatic wolves. These results suggested that the extant breeds of domestic dogs have maintained a large degree of mtDNA polymorphisms introduced from their ancestral wolf populations, and that extensive interbreedings had occurred among multiple matriarchal origins. PMID:9418263

  2. Site-directed mutagenesis of highly conserved amino acids in the first cytoplasmic loop of Drosophila Rh1 opsin blocks rhodopsin synthesis in the nascent state.

    PubMed Central

    Bentrop, J; Schwab, K; Pak, W L; Paulsen, R

    1997-01-01

    The cytoplasmic surface of Drosophila melanogaster Rh1 rhodopsin (ninaE) harbours amino acids which are highly conserved among G-protein-coupled receptors. Site-directed mutations which cause Leu81Gln or Asn86Ile amino acid substitutions in the first cytoplasmic loop of the Rh1 opsin protein, are shown to block rhodopsin synthesis in the nascent, glycosylated state from which the mutant opsin is degraded rapidly. In mutants Leu81Gln and Asn86Ile, only 20-30% and <2% respectively, of functional rhodopsins are synthesized and transported to the photoreceptive membrane. Thus, conserved amino acids in opsin's cytoplasmic surface are a critical factor in the interaction of opsin with proteins of the rhodopsin processing machinery. Photoreceptor cells expressing mutant rhodopsins undergo age-dependent degeneration in a recessive manner. PMID:9130705

  3. Inhibition of non-templated nucleotide addition by DNA polymerases in primer extension using twisted intercalating nucleic acid modified templates.

    PubMed

    Güixens-Gallardo, Pedro; Hocek, Michal; Perlíková, Pavla

    2016-01-15

    A simple and elegant method for inhibition of non-templated nucleotide addition by DNA polymerases and for following DNA 3'-heterogeneity in enzymatic DNA synthesis by primer extension (PEX) is described. When template bearing ortho-twisted intercalating nucleic acid (ortho-TINA) at the 5'-end is used, non-templated nucleotide addition is reduced in both the A- and B-family DNA polymerases (KOD XL, KOD (exo-), Bst 2.0, Therminator, Deep Vent (exo-) and Taq). Formation of a single oligonucleotide product was observed with ortho-TINA modified template and KOD XL, KOD (exo-), Bst 2.0, Deep Vent (exo-) and Taq DNA polymerases. This approach can be applied to the synthesis of both unmodified and base-modified oligonucleotides. PMID:26707394

  4. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  5. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-24

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  6. The Effect of Surface Modification of Aligned Poly-L-Lactic Acid Electrospun Fibers on Fiber Degradation and Neurite Extension

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Nicholas J.; Le Beux, Clémentine; Miao, Jianjun; Linhardt, Robert J.; Alauzun, Johan G.; Laurencin, Danielle; Gilbert, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    The surface of aligned, electrospun poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) fibers was chemically modified to determine if surface chemistry and hydrophilicity could improve neurite extension from chick dorsal root ganglia. Specifically, diethylenetriamine (DTA, for amine functionalization), 2-(2-aminoethoxy)ethanol (AEO, for alcohol functionalization), or GRGDS (cell adhesion peptide) were covalently attached to the surface of electrospun fibers. Water contact angle measurements revealed that surface modification of electrospun fibers significantly improved fiber hydrophilicity compared to unmodified fibers (p < 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of fibers revealed that surface modification changed fiber topography modestly, with DTA modified fibers displaying the roughest surface structure. Degradation of chemically modified fibers revealed no change in fiber diameter in any group over a period of seven days. Unexpectedly, neurites from chick DRG were longest on fibers without surface modification (1651 ± 488 μm) and fibers containing GRGDS (1560 ± 107 μm). Fibers modified with oxygen plasma (1240 ± 143 μm) or DTA (1118 ± 82 μm) produced shorter neurites than the GRGDS or unmodified fibers, but were not statistically shorter than unmodified and GRGDS modified fibers. Fibers modified with AEO (844 ± 151 μm) were significantly shorter than unmodified and GRGDS modified fibers (p<0.05). Based on these results, we conclude that fiber hydrophilic enhancement alone on electrospun PLLA fibers does not enhance neurite outgrowth. Further work must be conducted to better understand why neurite extension was not improved on more hydrophilic fibers, but the results presented here do not recommend hydrophilic surface modification for the purpose of improving neurite extension unless a bioactive ligand is used. PMID:26340351

  7. The Effect of Surface Modification of Aligned Poly-L-Lactic Acid Electrospun Fibers on Fiber Degradation and Neurite Extension.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Nicholas J; Le Beux, Clémentine; Miao, Jianjun; Linhardt, Robert J; Alauzun, Johan G; Laurencin, Danielle; Gilbert, Ryan J

    2015-01-01

    The surface of aligned, electrospun poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) fibers was chemically modified to determine if surface chemistry and hydrophilicity could improve neurite extension from chick dorsal root ganglia. Specifically, diethylenetriamine (DTA, for amine functionalization), 2-(2-aminoethoxy)ethanol (AEO, for alcohol functionalization), or GRGDS (cell adhesion peptide) were covalently attached to the surface of electrospun fibers. Water contact angle measurements revealed that surface modification of electrospun fibers significantly improved fiber hydrophilicity compared to unmodified fibers (p < 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of fibers revealed that surface modification changed fiber topography modestly, with DTA modified fibers displaying the roughest surface structure. Degradation of chemically modified fibers revealed no change in fiber diameter in any group over a period of seven days. Unexpectedly, neurites from chick DRG were longest on fibers without surface modification (1651 ± 488 μm) and fibers containing GRGDS (1560 ± 107 μm). Fibers modified with oxygen plasma (1240 ± 143 μm) or DTA (1118 ± 82 μm) produced shorter neurites than the GRGDS or unmodified fibers, but were not statistically shorter than unmodified and GRGDS modified fibers. Fibers modified with AEO (844 ± 151 μm) were significantly shorter than unmodified and GRGDS modified fibers (p<0.05). Based on these results, we conclude that fiber hydrophilic enhancement alone on electrospun PLLA fibers does not enhance neurite outgrowth. Further work must be conducted to better understand why neurite extension was not improved on more hydrophilic fibers, but the results presented here do not recommend hydrophilic surface modification for the purpose of improving neurite extension unless a bioactive ligand is used. PMID:26340351

  8. Highly Conserved Salt Bridge Stabilizes Rigid Signal Patch at Extracellular Loop Critical for Surface Expression of Acid-sensing Ion Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Yu, Ye; Cheng, Jin; Liu, Yan; Liu, Di-Shi; Wang, Jin; Zhu, Michael X.; Wang, Rui; Xu, Tian-Le

    2012-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are non-selective cation channels activated by extracellular acidosis associated with many physiological and pathological conditions. A detailed understanding of the mechanisms that govern cell surface expression of ASICs, therefore, is critical for better understanding of the cell signaling under acidosis conditions. In this study, we examined the role of a highly conserved salt bridge residing at the extracellular loop of rat ASIC3 (Asp107-Arg153) and human ASIC1a (Asp107-Arg160) channels. Comprehensive mutagenesis and electrophysiological recordings revealed that the salt bridge is essential for functional expression of ASICs in a pH sensing-independent manner. Surface biotinylation and immunolabeling of an extracellular epitope indicated that mutations, including even minor alterations, at the salt bridge impaired cell surface expression of ASICs. Molecular dynamics simulations, normal mode analysis, and further mutagenesis studies suggested a high stability and structural constrain of the salt bridge, which serves to separate an adjacent structurally rigid signal patch, important for surface expression, from a flexible gating domain. Thus, we provide the first evidence of structural requirement that involves a stabilizing salt bridge and an exposed rigid signal patch at the destined extracellular loop for normal surface expression of ASICs. These findings will allow evaluation of new strategies aimed at preventing excessive excitability and neuronal injury associated with tissue acidosis and ASIC activation. PMID:22399291

  9. In vitro mutagenesis study of two critical glutamic acids in the calcium binding loop of the factor IX heavy chain.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, N; Stafford, D

    1994-12-01

    We investigated the structural and functional significance of calcium binding in the factor IXa heavy chain by introducing point mutations into the probable calcium binding site (residues 235 and 245). According to factor IXa computer modelling based on trypsin x-ray structure, side chains of two glutamic acid residues, 235 and 245, together with backbone carbonyl groups of residues 237 and 240, bind a calcium ion. Factor IX clotting activity decreased approximately 25 percent on substitution of glutamic acid 235 with lysine. Activity decreased more than 90 percent on substitution of glutamic acid 245 with lysine. Activity also decreased more than 90 percent on substitution of both glutamic acids by lysines. Factor XIa cleavage of factor IXGlu235Lys and factor IXGlu245Lys appeared normal by polyacrylamide gel analysis. (Factor IXGlu235Lys: Factor IX with Lysine substituted for Glutamic acid at residue 235. Factor IXGlu245Lys: Factor IX with Lysine substituted for Glutamic acid at residue 245. Factor IXGlu235&245Lys: Factor IX with Lysine substituted for Glutamic acid at residues 235 and 245.) Activated factor IXGlu235Lys bound the fluorescent active site probe, p-aminobenzamidine, normally, while factor XIa cleaved factor IXGlu245Lys and factor IXGlu235&245Lys failed to bind p-aminobenzamidine. Plasma purified factor IX titrated with terbium showed an increase in luminescence; however, factor IXGlu235Lys and factor IXGlu245Lys had no effect on terbium luminescence. Radioimmunoassays indicate that in calcium's absence, factor IXGlu245Lys adopts a conformation similar to normal factor IX in the presence of calcium. By contrast, factor IXGlu245Lys's conformation in the presence of calcium is similar to that of plasma purified factor IX in the absence of calcium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7740454

  10. 76 FR 4288 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Extension of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the... administrative review of citric acid from the PRC within this time limit. Among other things, additional time...

  11. Extensive cell migration, axon regeneration and improved function with polysialic acid-modified Schwann cells after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Mousumi; Tuesta, Luis M.; Puentes, Rocio; Patel, Samik; Melendez, Kiara; Maarouf, Abderrahman El; Rutishauser, Urs; Pearse, Damien Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cells (SC) implantation after spinal cord injury (SCI) promotes axonal regeneration, remyelination repair and functional recovery. Reparative efficacy, however, may be limited due to the inability of SCs to migrate outward from the lesion-implant site. Altering SC cell surface properties by over-expressing polysialic acid (PSA) has been shown to promote SC migration. In the current study, a SCI contusion was used to evaluate the migration, supraspinal axon growth support and functional recovery associated with polysialyltransferase (PST)-over-expressing SCs (PST-GFP SCs) or controls (GFP SCs). Compared to GFP SCs, which remained confined to the injection site at the injury center, PST-GFP SCs migrated across the lesion:host cord interface for distances of up to 4.4 mm within adjacent host tissue. In addition, with PST-GFP SCs, there was extensive serotonergic and corticospinal axon in-growth within the implants that was limited in the GFP SC controls. The enhanced migration of PST-GFP SCs was accompanied by significant growth of these axons caudal to lesion. Animals receiving PST-GFP SCs exhibited improved functional outcome, both in the open-field and on the gridwalk test, over modest improvements provided by GFP SC controls. The current study for the first time demonstrates that a lack of migration by SC may hinder their reparative benefits and that cell surface overexpression of PSA enhances the ability of implanted SCs to associate with and support the growth of corticospinal axons. These results provide further promise that PSA modified SCs will be a potent reparative approach for SCI. PMID:22460918

  12. Extensive cell migration, axon regeneration, and improved function with polysialic acid-modified Schwann cells after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Mousumi; Tuesta, Luis M; Puentes, Rocio; Patel, Samik; Melendez, Kiara; El Maarouf, Abderrahman; Rutishauser, Urs; Pearse, Damien Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Schwann cell (SC) implantation after spinal cord injury (SCI) promotes axonal regeneration, remyelination repair, and functional recovery. Reparative efficacy, however, may be limited because of the inability of SCs to migrate outward from the lesion-implant site. Altering SC cell surface properties by overexpressing polysialic acid (PSA) has been shown to promote SC migration. In this study, a SCI contusion model was used to evaluate the migration, supraspinal axon growth support, and functional recovery associated with polysialyltransferase (PST)-overexpressing SCs [PST-green fluorescent protein (GFP) SCs] or controls (GFP SCs). Compared with GFP SCs, which remained confined to the injection site at the injury center, PST-GFP SCs migrated across the lesion:host cord interface for distances of up to 4.4 mm within adjacent host tissue. In addition, with PST-GFP SCs, there was extensive serotonergic and corticospinal axon in-growth within the implants that was limited in the GFP SC controls. The enhanced migration of PST-GFP SCs was accompanied by significant growth of these axons caudal to lesion. Animals receiving PST-GFP SCs exhibited improved functional outcome, both in the open-field and on the gridwalk test, beyond the modest improvements provided by GFP SC controls. This study for the first time demonstrates that a lack of migration by SCs may hinder their reparative benefits and that cell surface overexpression of PSA enhances the ability of implanted SCs to associate with and support the growth of corticospinal axons. These results provide further promise that PSA-modified SCs will be a potent reparative approach for SCI. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Extensive cell migration, axon regeneration, and improved function with polysialic acid-modified Schwann cells after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Mousumi; Tuesta, Luis M; Puentes, Rocio; Patel, Samik; Melendez, Kiara; El Maarouf, Abderrahman; Rutishauser, Urs; Pearse, Damien Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Schwann cell (SC) implantation after spinal cord injury (SCI) promotes axonal regeneration, remyelination repair, and functional recovery. Reparative efficacy, however, may be limited because of the inability of SCs to migrate outward from the lesion-implant site. Altering SC cell surface properties by overexpressing polysialic acid (PSA) has been shown to promote SC migration. In this study, a SCI contusion model was used to evaluate the migration, supraspinal axon growth support, and functional recovery associated with polysialyltransferase (PST)-overexpressing SCs [PST-green fluorescent protein (GFP) SCs] or controls (GFP SCs). Compared with GFP SCs, which remained confined to the injection site at the injury center, PST-GFP SCs migrated across the lesion:host cord interface for distances of up to 4.4 mm within adjacent host tissue. In addition, with PST-GFP SCs, there was extensive serotonergic and corticospinal axon in-growth within the implants that was limited in the GFP SC controls. The enhanced migration of PST-GFP SCs was accompanied by significant growth of these axons caudal to lesion. Animals receiving PST-GFP SCs exhibited improved functional outcome, both in the open-field and on the gridwalk test, beyond the modest improvements provided by GFP SC controls. This study for the first time demonstrates that a lack of migration by SCs may hinder their reparative benefits and that cell surface overexpression of PSA enhances the ability of implanted SCs to associate with and support the growth of corticospinal axons. These results provide further promise that PSA-modified SCs will be a potent reparative approach for SCI. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22460918

  14. 76 FR 47146 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China...'') published the initiation of the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''). See Initiation...

  15. 76 FR 56158 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... administrative review of the countervailing duty order on citric acid and certain citrate sales from People's Republic of China, covering the period September 19, 2008, through December 31, 2009. See Citric Acid...

  16. 77 FR 1455 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ..., 76 FR 37781, 37785 (June 28, 2011). This review covers the period May 1, 2010, through April 30, 2011... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'')....

  17. Loop-to-loop coupling.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lucero, Larry Martin; Langston, William L.; Salazar, Robert Austin; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Basilio, Lorena I.; Bacon, Larry Donald

    2012-05-01

    This report estimates inductively-coupled energy to a low-impedance load in a loop-to-loop arrangement. Both analytical models and full-wave numerical simulations are used and the resulting fields, coupled powers and energies are compared. The energies are simply estimated from the coupled powers through approximations to the energy theorem. The transmitter loop is taken to be either a circular geometry or a rectangular-loop (stripline-type) geometry that was used in an experimental setup. Simple magnetic field models are constructed and used to estimate the mutual inductance to the receiving loop, which is taken to be circular with one or several turns. Circuit elements are estimated and used to determine the coupled current and power (an equivalent antenna picture is also given). These results are compared to an electromagnetic simulation of the transmitter geometry. Simple approximate relations are also given to estimate coupled energy from the power. The effect of additional loads in the form of attached leads, forming transmission lines, are considered. The results are summarized in a set of susceptibility-type curves. Finally, we also consider drives to the cables themselves and the resulting common-to-differential mode currents in the load.

  18. H11-H12 loop retinoic acid receptor mutants exhibit distinct trans-activating and trans-repressing activities in the presence of natural or synthetic retinoids.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, B; Mouchon, A; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1998-06-30

    Retinoids, such as the naturally occurring all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) and synthetic ligand CD367 modulate ligand-dependent transcription through retinoic acid receptors (RARs). Retinoid binding to RAR is believed to trigger structural transitions in the ligand-binding domain (LBD), leading to helix H1 and helix H12 repositioning and coactivator recruitment and corepressor release. Here, we carried out a detailed mutagenesis analysis of the H11-H12 loop (designated the L box) to study its contribution to hRARalpha activation process. Point mutations that reduced transactivation by atRA also reduced atRA-induced transrepression of AP1 transcription, correlating ligand-induced activation and repression. However, a correlation was not observed with these mutations when tested with another ligand CD367, a synthetic agonist with binding properties identical to those of atRA. Transcription was strongly inhibited in the presence of CD367 for some mutants, thus leading to an inverse agonist activity of this ligand. None of these mutations significantly altered binding affinity for either ligand, indicating that altered transcription was not caused by altered ligand binding by these mutations. Although simple correlations with transcriptional activities were not found, these mutations were also characterized by altered ligand-induced structural transitions, which were distinct for the atRA-hRARalpha or CD367-hRARalpha complexes. These results indicate that amino acids in the L box are involved in specifying trans-repressive and trans-activating properties of the hRARalpha, and support the notion that different agonists induce distinct conformations in the LBD of the receptor.

  19. Long-Term Control of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Replication Despite Extensive Resistance to Current Antiretroviral Regimens: Clonal Analysis of Resistance Mutations in Proviral Deoxyribonucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Stella-Ascariz, Natalia; Montejano, Rocio; Martin-Vicente, María; Mingorance, Jesús; Pérez-Valero, Ignacio; Bernardino, José I.; Arribas, Jose R.

    2016-01-01

    Archived resistance mutations compromise antiretroviral treatment. We have investigated 3 selected aviremic patients who had extensive historical resistance to their current regimen. All 3 patients underwent unstructured treatment interruptions associated to the re-emergence of wild-type virus before starting their current suppressive regimes. Almost all historical resistance mutations detected in plasma were found in circulating proviral deoxyribonucleic acid. None of the clones analyzed was fully resistant to the current antiretroviral regimen. PMID:27006965

  20. 76 FR 82275 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... countervailing duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts from the People's Republic of China (PRC). See Countervailing Duty Orders and Amendments of Final Affirmative Countervailing Duty Determinations: Citric...

  1. 76 FR 2648 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... Revocation in Part, 75 FR 37759 (June 30, 2010). The preliminary results of this administrative review are... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From People's Republic of China... initiation of administrative review of the countervailing duty order on citric acid and certain citrate...

  2. Effects of postweaning administration of conjugated linoleic acid on development of obesity in nescient basic helix-loop-helix 2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoo; Kim, Daeyoung; Good, Deborah J; Park, Yeonhwa

    2015-06-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been reported to prevent body weight gain and fat accumulation in part by improving physical activity in mice. However, the effects of postweaning administration of CLA on the development of obesity later in life have not yet been demonstrated. The current study investigated the role of postweaning CLA treatment on skeletal muscle energy metabolism in genetically induced inactive adult-onset obese model, nescient basic helix-loop-helix 2 knockout (N2KO) mice. Four-week-old male N2KO and wild type mice were fed either control or a CLA-containing diet (0.5%) for 4 weeks, and then CLA was withdrawn and control diet provided to all mice for the following 8 weeks. Postweaning CLA supplementation in wild type animals, but not N2KO mice, may activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ (PPARδ) as well as promote desensitization of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and sensitization of protein kinase B (AKT) at threonine 308 in gastrocnemius skeletal muscle, improving voluntary activity and glucose homeostasis. We suggest that postweaning administration of CLA may in part stimulate the underlying molecular targets involved in muscle energy metabolism to reduce weight gain in normal animals, but not in the genetically induced inactive adult-onset animal model.

  3. MYB Elongation Is Regulated by the Nucleic Acid Binding of NFκB p50 to the Intronic Stem-Loop Region

    PubMed Central

    Malaterre, Jordane; Huiling, Xu; Sonza, Secondo; Cures, Alina; Purcell, Damian F. J.; Ramsland, Paul A.; Gerondakis, Steven; Gonda, Thomas J.; Ramsay, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    MYB transcriptional elongation is regulated by an attenuator sequence within intron 1 that has been proposed to encode a RNA stem loop (SLR) followed by a polyU tract. We report that NFκBp50 can bind the SLR polyU RNA and promote MYB transcriptional elongation together with NFκBp65. We identified a conserved lysine-rich motif within the Rel homology domain (RHD) of NFκBp50, mutation of which abrogated the interaction of NFκBp50 with the SLR polyU and impaired NFκBp50 mediated MYB elongation. We observed that the TAR RNA-binding region of Tat is homologous to the NFκBp50 RHD lysine-rich motif, a finding consistent with HIV Tat acting as an effector of MYB transcriptional elongation in an SLR dependent manner. Furthermore, we identify the DNA binding activity of NFκBp50 as a key component required for the SLR polyU mediated regulation of MYB. Collectively these results suggest that the MYB SLR polyU provides a platform for proteins to regulate MYB and reveals novel nucleic acid binding properties of NFκBp50 required for MYB regulation. PMID:25853889

  4. MYB elongation is regulated by the nucleic acid binding of NFκB p50 to the intronic stem-loop region.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Lloyd A; Hugo, Honor J; Malaterre, Jordane; Huiling, Xu; Sonza, Secondo; Cures, Alina; Purcell, Damian F J; Ramsland, Paul A; Gerondakis, Steven; Gonda, Thomas J; Ramsay, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    MYB transcriptional elongation is regulated by an attenuator sequence within intron 1 that has been proposed to encode a RNA stem loop (SLR) followed by a polyU tract. We report that NFκBp50 can bind the SLR polyU RNA and promote MYB transcriptional elongation together with NFκBp65. We identified a conserved lysine-rich motif within the Rel homology domain (RHD) of NFκBp50, mutation of which abrogated the interaction of NFκBp50 with the SLR polyU and impaired NFκBp50 mediated MYB elongation. We observed that the TAR RNA-binding region of Tat is homologous to the NFκBp50 RHD lysine-rich motif, a finding consistent with HIV Tat acting as an effector of MYB transcriptional elongation in an SLR dependent manner. Furthermore, we identify the DNA binding activity of NFκBp50 as a key component required for the SLR polyU mediated regulation of MYB. Collectively these results suggest that the MYB SLR polyU provides a platform for proteins to regulate MYB and reveals novel nucleic acid binding properties of NFκBp50 required for MYB regulation.

  5. Single amino acid insertions in extracellular loop 2 of Bombyx mori ABCC2 disrupt its receptor function for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac but not Cry1Aa toxins.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shiho; Miyamoto, Kazuhisa; Noda, Hiroaki; Endo, Haruka; Kikuta, Shingo; Sato, Ryoichi

    2016-04-01

    In a previous report, seven Cry1Ab-resistant strains were identified in the silkworm, Bombyx mori; these strains were shown to have a tyrosine insertion at position 234 in extracellular loop 2 of the ABC transporter C2 (BmABCC2). This insertion was confirmed to destroy the receptor function of BmABCC2 and confer the strains resistance against Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac. However, these strains were susceptible to Cry1Aa. In this report, we examined the mechanisms of the loss of receptor function of the transporter by expressing mutations in Sf9 cells. After replacement of one or two of the five amino acid residues in loop 2 of the susceptible BmABCC2 gene [BmABCC2_S] with alanine, cells still showed susceptibility, retaining the receptor function. Five mutants with single amino acid insertions at position 234 in BmABCC2 were also generated, resulting in loop 2 having six amino acids, which corresponds to replacing the tyrosine insertion in the resistant BmABCC2 gene [BmABCC2_R(+(234)Y)] with another amino acid. All five mutants exhibited loss of function against Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac. These results suggest that the amino acid sequence in loop 2 is less important than the loop size (five vs. six amino acids) or loop structure for Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac activity. Several domain-swapped mutant toxins were then generated among Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac, which are composed of three domains. Swapped mutants containing domain II of Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac did not kill Sf9 cells expressing BmABCC2_R(+(234)Y), suggesting that domain II of the Cry toxin is related to the interaction with the receptor function of BmABCC2. This also suggests that different reactions against Bt-toxins in some B. mori strains, that is, Cry1Ab resistance or Cry1Aa susceptibility, are attributable to structural differences in domain II of Cry1A toxins. PMID:26928903

  6. Shelf-life extension of vacuum-packaged meat from pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) by lactic acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Agathe; Smulders, Frans J M; Paulsen, Peter

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the influence of lactic acid treatment of pheasant meat before vacuum-packaged storage of 3, 7, and 10 d at +6°C on microbiota and pH. Breast muscle samples were collected from carcasses of slaughtered as well as from hunted (shot) wild pheasants. Immersion of meat samples in 3% (wt/wt) lactic acid for 60 s effectuated a significant drop in pH of approximately 0.5 to 0.7 units, which remained during the entire storage period. In parallel, total aerobic counts of such treated and stored samples were on an average 1.5 to 1.7 log units lower than in non-acid-treated samples. Similar results were found for Enterobacteriaceae. A significant decrease in pH was measured at d 7 and 10 in the acid-treated samples in comparison with the untreated ones. In summary, the immersion of pheasant breast meat cuts in dilute lactic acid significantly reduced microbiota during vacuum-packed storage, even at slight temperature abuse conditions.

  7. 75 FR 74684 - 1-Hydroxyethylidene-1, 1-Diphosphonic Acid From the People's Republic of China: Extension of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ..., 2010. \\1\\ See Initiation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews, 75 FR 29976... International Trade Administration 1-Hydroxyethylidene-1, 1-Diphosphonic Acid From the People's Republic of...: Effective Date: December 1, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Shawn Higgins, AD/CVD Operations,...

  8. Extensive amino acid polymorphism at the pgm locus is consistent with adaptive protein evolution in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Verrelli, B C; Eanes, W F

    2000-01-01

    PGM plays a central role in the glycolytic pathway at the branch point leading to glycogen metabolism and is highly polymorphic in allozyme studies of many species. We have characterized the nucleotide diversity across the Pgm gene in Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans to investigate the role that protein polymorphism plays at this crucial metabolic branch point shared with several other enzymes. Although D. melanogaster and D. simulans share common allozyme mobility alleles, we find these allozymes are the result of many different amino acid changes at the nucleotide level. In addition, specific allozyme classes within species contain several amino acid changes, which may explain the absence of latitudinal clines for PGM allozyme alleles, the lack of association of PGM allozymes with the cosmopolitan In(3L)P inversion, and the failure to detect differences between PGM allozymes in functional studies. We find a significant excess of amino acid polymorphisms within D. melanogaster when compared to the complete absence of fixed replacements with D. simulans. There is also strong linkage disequilibrium across the 2354 bp of the Pgm locus, which may be explained by a specific amino acid haplotype that is high in frequency yet contains an excess of singleton polymorphisms. Like G6pd, Pgm shows strong evidence for a branch point enzyme that exhibits adaptive protein evolution. PMID:11102370

  9. Separation and partial characterization of proteinases with substrate specificity for basic amino acids from human MOLT-4 T lymphocytes: identification of those inhibited by variable-loop-V3 peptides of HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus-1) envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Harvima, I T; Harvima, R J; Nilsson, G; Ivanoff, L; Schwartz, L B

    1993-01-01

    The V3 loop of the HIV (human immunodeficiency virus)-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 likely plays a role in HIV-1 infectivity. Although the amino acid sequence of the V3 loop is hypervariable, it contains a conserved region, Gly-Pro-Gly-Arg, that shows similarity to the active-site Gly-Pro-Cys-Arg sequence of inter-alpha-trypsin and trypstatin proteinase inhibitors. The purpose of the present work was to identify proteinases recognizing substrates with basic amino acids in the P1 substrate site that are present in MOLT-4 cells, a human CD4-positive T helper lymphocyte cell line, and to characterize these enzymes in terms of substrate, pH and ionic-strength preferences, size and susceptibility to various inhibitors, including 24- and 36-amino-acid-long V3 loop peptides. Extraction of MOLT-4 cells at low ionic strength solubilized nearly all of the trypsin-like activity, which was separable into five peaks of activity by chromatography on Mono-Q: Peaks 1, 2a, 2b, 3 and 4. All showed a neutral pH optimum, and all except Peak 4 showed optimal activity at high ionic strength. Peak 1 preferred Tos-Gly-Pro-Arg, p-nitroanilide (-pNA) substrate; Peaks 2-4 preferred benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Leu-Gly-Arg-pNA. Peak 1, a zinc-dependent enzyme with serine and histidine in the active site, exhibited an M(r) of 75,000 on Superose 12 and was poorly inhibited by V3 loop peptides. Peak 2 contained two overlapping peaks, called 2a and 2b, that exhibited properties of zinc-dependent metalloproteinases. Gel filtration of Peak 2 activities revealed a major peak of activity at 81 kDa and a shoulder centred at 240 kDa. Each was modestly inhibited by V3 loop peptides. Peak 3, a zinc-dependent proteinase, exhibited a molecular mass of 100 kDa by gel filtration and was particularly sensitive to inhibition by V3 loop peptides. Peak 4 exhibited a molecular mass of 1100 kDa by gel filtration and was not inhibited by V3 loop peptides. None of these enzymes could be classified as mast-cell tryptase

  10. Hybrid character of a large neurofilament protein (NF-M): intermediate filament type sequence followed by a long and acidic carboxy-terminal extension.

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, N; Fischer, S; Vandekerckhove, J; Plessmann, U; Weber, K

    1984-01-01

    The sequence of the amino-terminal 436 residues of porcine neurofilament component NF-M (apparent mol. wt. in gel electrophoresis 160 kd), one of the two high mol. wt. components of mammalian neurofilaments, reveals the typical structural organization of an intermediate filament (IF) protein of the non-epithelial type. A non-alpha-helical arginine-rich headpiece with multiple beta-turns (residues 1-98) precedes a highly alpha-helical rod domain able to form double-stranded coiled-coils (residues 99-412) and a non-alpha-helical tailpiece array starting at residue 413. All extra mass of NF-M forms, as a carboxy-terminal tailpiece extension of approximately 500 residues, an autonomous domain of unique composition. Limited sequence data in the amino-terminal region of this domain document a lysine- and particularly glutamic acid-rich array somewhat reminiscent of the much shorter tailpiece extension of NF-L (apparent mol. wt. 68 kd), the major neurofilament protein. NF-M is therefore a true intermediate filament protein co-polymerized with NF-L via presumptive coiled-coil type interactions and not a peripherally bound associated protein of a filament backbone built exclusively from NF-L. Along the structurally conserved coiled-coil domains the two neurofilament proteins show only approximately 65% sequence identity, a value similar to that seen when NF-L and NF-M are compared with mesenchymal vimentin. The highly charged and acidic tailpiece extensions of all triplet proteins particularly rich in glutamic acid seem unique to the neurofilament type of IFs. They could form extra-filamentous scaffolds suitable for interactions with other neuronal components.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6439558

  11. Omega—3 fatty acid and ADHD: Blood level analysis and meta-analytic extension of supplementation trials

    PubMed Central

    Hawkey, Elizabeth; Nigg, Joel T.

    2015-01-01

    Interest in the value of Omega—3 (n—3) fatty acid supplementation for treatment of ADHD remains high. No prior meta-analysis has examined whether ADHD is associated with alterations in blood lipid levels and meta-analyses of supplementation have reached conflicting conclusions. Methods We report two new meta-analyses. Study 1 examined blood levels of Omega—3 fatty acids in relation to ADHD. Study 2 examined a larger sample of randomized intervention trials than previously reported. Results Study 1 included 9 studies (n = 586) and found lower overall blood levels of n—3 in individuals with ADHD versus controls (g = 0.42, 95% CI = 0.26–0.59; p < .001). Study 2 included 16 studies (n = 1408) and found that n—3 supplementation improved ADHD composite symptoms; using the best available rating and reporter (g = 0.26, 95% CI = 0.15–0.37; p < .001). Supplementation showed reliable effects on hyperactivity by parent and teacher report, but reliable effects for inattention only by parent report. Conclusions Omega—3 levels are reduced in children with ADHD. Dietary supplementation appears to create modest improvements in symptoms. There is sufficient evidence to consider Omega—3 fatty acids as a possible supplement to established therapies. However it remains unclear whether such intervention should be confined to children with below normal blood levels. PMID:25181335

  12. Extensive feeding versus oleic acid and tocopherol enriched mixed diets for the production of Iberian dry-cured hams: Effect on chemical composition, oxidative status and sensory traits.

    PubMed

    Ventanas, S; Ventanas, J; Tovar, J; García, C; Estévez, M

    2007-10-01

    The present study aimed to analyse the chemical composition and oxidative status of Iberian dry-cured hams from pigs fed different finishing diets: extensive feeding on acorns and pasture in a "Montanera" traditional system (MON), fed in confinement with a mixed diet containing high-oleic sunflower oil (115g/kg of diet) and supplemented with 250mg/kg α-tocopherol (HOVE), and fed in confinement control mixed diet (CON) without added tocopherol and oleic acid fat. Muscles from MON dry-cured hams contained significantly (p<0.05) higher amounts of intramuscular fat (IMF) than those from HOVE and CON hams. The feeding background affected the tocopherol levels in dry-cured hams as those from MON and HOVE pigs had significantly higher levels of α-tocopherol than those from CON pigs whereas the extensive feeding provided muscles from MON pigs with significantly higher levels of γ-tocopherol than the experimental diets did to CON and HOVE pigs. The HOVE diet significantly increased the levels of oleic acid in Iberian dry-cured hams with these levels being similar to the oleic acid levels found in MON hams and significantly higher than those in CON hams. Compared to dry-cured hams from CON pigs, those from MON and HOVE pigs exhibited a higher oxidative stability as a likely result of a most favourable fatty acid composition and the presence of higher tocopherol levels. The principal component analysis (PCA) successfully discriminated between dry-cured hams from pigs fed different finishing diets.

  13. Effect of season on fatty acid and terpene profiles of milk from Greek sheep raised under a semi-extensive production system.

    PubMed

    Papaloukas, Loukas; Sinapis, Efthymios; Arsenos, George; Kyriakou, George; Basdagianni, Zoitsa

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of season on the fatty acid and terpene composition in ewe milk. A total of 760 samples of bulk sheep milk were collected during winter (147 samples), spring (314 samples) and summer (299 samples) of 2011, from 90 commercial farms of dairy sheep from the prefecture of Grevena, Greece. Regarding fatty acid composition, summer samples had higher concentrations of α-linolenic acid, cis-9, trans 11- CLA, trans-11, C18 : 1 and PUFAs but lower content of saturated fatty acids particularly C12 : 0, C14 : 0 and C16 : 0. The winter milk had the lowest content of terpenes, in particular sesquiterpenes, compared to spring and summer milk. The terpene profile of milk samples, in all three seasons, revealed the presence of monoterpenes: a-pinene, b-pinene and D-limonene, especially with a higher frequency of appearance in summer. The most common and abundant sesquiterpenes found in milk samples were β-caryophyllene and α-caryophyllene with a higher frequency of appearance in summer. In conclusion, the available pastures in semi-extensive farming systems can contribute to the production of high quality milk. PMID:27600974

  14. Effect of season on fatty acid and terpene profiles of milk from Greek sheep raised under a semi-extensive production system.

    PubMed

    Papaloukas, Loukas; Sinapis, Efthymios; Arsenos, George; Kyriakou, George; Basdagianni, Zoitsa

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of season on the fatty acid and terpene composition in ewe milk. A total of 760 samples of bulk sheep milk were collected during winter (147 samples), spring (314 samples) and summer (299 samples) of 2011, from 90 commercial farms of dairy sheep from the prefecture of Grevena, Greece. Regarding fatty acid composition, summer samples had higher concentrations of α-linolenic acid, cis-9, trans 11- CLA, trans-11, C18 : 1 and PUFAs but lower content of saturated fatty acids particularly C12 : 0, C14 : 0 and C16 : 0. The winter milk had the lowest content of terpenes, in particular sesquiterpenes, compared to spring and summer milk. The terpene profile of milk samples, in all three seasons, revealed the presence of monoterpenes: a-pinene, b-pinene and D-limonene, especially with a higher frequency of appearance in summer. The most common and abundant sesquiterpenes found in milk samples were β-caryophyllene and α-caryophyllene with a higher frequency of appearance in summer. In conclusion, the available pastures in semi-extensive farming systems can contribute to the production of high quality milk.

  15. Rollercoaster loop shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2005-11-01

    Many modern rollercoasters feature loops. Although textbook loops are often circular, real rollercoaster loops are not. In this paper, we look into the mathematical description of various possible loop shapes, as well as their riding properties. We also discuss how a study of loop shapes can be used in physics education.

  16. Water Stream "Loop-the-Loop"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefimenko, Oleg

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design of a modified loop-the-loop apparatus in which a water stream is used to illustrate centripetal forces and phenomena of high-velocity hydrodynamics. Included are some procedures of carrying out lecture demonstrations. (CC)

  17. The amino acid sequence of GTP:AMP phosphotransferase from beef-heart mitochondria. Extensive homology with cytosolic adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Wieland, B; Tomasselli, A G; Noda, L H; Frank, R; Schulz, G E

    1984-09-01

    The amino acid sequence of GTP:AMP phosphotransferase (AK3) from beef-heart mitochondria has been determined, except for one segment of about 33 residues in the middle of the polypeptide chain. The established sequence has been unambiguously aligned to the sequence of cytosolic ATP:AMP phosphotransferase (AK1) from pig muscle, allowing for six insertions and deletions. With 30% of all aligned residues being identical, the homology between AK3 and AK1 is well established. As derived from the known three-dimensional structure of AK1, the missing segment is localized at a small surface area of the molecule, far apart from the active center. The pattern of conserved residues demonstrates that earlier views on substrate binding have to be modified. The observation of three different consecutive N-termini indicates enzyme processing.

  18. Seminal role of deletion of amino acid residues in H1-S2 and S-loop regions in eukaryotic β-tubulin investigated from docking and dynamics perspective.

    PubMed

    Selvaa Kumar, C; Gadewal, Nikhil; Mohammed, Sudheer Mm

    2015-08-01

    Tubulin is the fundamental unit of microtubules. It is reported to effect different functions like cell division, chromosomal segregation, motility and intracellular transportation. α- and β-tubulin associate laterally and longitudinally to form protofilaments. Both the subunits are structurally identical to each other except for the deletions reported in H1-S2 and S loop regions in eukaryotic β-tubulin. These deletions mimic the ancestral tubulin protein named Latest Common FtsZ-Tubulin Ancestor (LCFTA) with a shorter S-loop region resulting in weak dimerization. However, in eukaryotic beta tubulin, the significance of this shorter region remains elusive till date. The main objective of this study was to model variants of beta tubulin (βmut1, βmut2 and βmut3) with inserts that lengthened the loop, and to compare them with the native α- and β-subunits to understand their biological significance. Further, one more mutant was modeled with the intention of understanding the counter effect of additional deletion of amino acid residues from both H1-S2 and S-loop regions; this mutant was designated as βmut4. Our study confirms that the insertion of amino acid residues considerably increases the protein-protein interactions in βmut1-βmut1, βmut2-βmut2 and βmut3-βmut3 compared to their native β-subunit. Similarly, the binding affinity of GTP also increases in βmut2 and βmut3 as compared to the wild type. However, these deletions result in decreased protein-protein and ligand interactions in wild beta tubulin and βmut4, as compared to βmut1, βmut2,and βmut3. Therefore, we conclude here that residual inserts in the H1-S2 and S loop sub segments bring about conformational changes in regions critically involved in lateral interactions and in the nucleotide binding site, thus altering the binding affinities between the dimers and the ligands. Regarding the biological importance of such deletions in wild beta tubulin, these deletions result in flexible M-loop

  19. Activity of Colistin in Combination with Meropenem, Tigecycline, Fosfomycin, Fusidic Acid, Rifampin or Sulbactam against Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in a Murine Thigh-Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiumei; Cong, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Few effective therapeutic options are available for treating severe infections caused by extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDR-AB). Using a murine thigh-infection model, we examined the in vivo efficacy of colistin in combination with meropenem, tigecycline, fosfomycin, fusidic acid, rifampin, or sulbactam against 12 XDR-AB strains. Colistin, tigecycline, rifampin, and sulbactam monotherapy significantly decreased bacterial counts in murine thigh infections compared with those observed in control mice receiving no treatment. Colistin was the most effective agent tested, displaying bactericidal activity against 91.7% of strains at 48 h post-treatment. With strains showing a relatively low minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for meropenem (MIC ≤ 32 mg/L), combination therapy with colistin plus meropenem caused synergistic inhibition at both 24 h and 48 h post-treatment. However, when the meropenem MIC was ≥64 mg/L, meropenem did not significantly alter the efficacy of colistin. The addition of rifampin and fusidic acid significantly improved the efficacy of colistin, showing a synergistic effect in 100% and 58.3% of strains after 24 h of treatment, respectively, while the addition of tigecycline, fosfomycin, or sulbactam did not show obvious synergistic activity. No clear differences in activities were observed between colistin-rifampin and colistin-fusidic acid combination therapy with most strains. Overall, our in vivo study showed that administering colistin in combination with rifampin or fusidic acid is more efficacious in treating XDR-AB infections than other combinations. The colistin-meropenem combination may be another appropriate option if the MIC is ≤32 mg/L. Further clinical studies are urgently needed to confirm the relevance of these findings. PMID:27315107

  20. Extension of Tosèla cheese shelf-life using non-starter lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Settanni, Luca; Franciosi, Elena; Cavazza, Agostino; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro; Poznanski, Elisa

    2011-08-01

    Six strains of non-starter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) were used to extend the shelf-life of the fresh cheese Tosèla manufactured with pasteurised cows' milk. The acidification kinetics of three Lactobacillus paracasei, one Lactobacillus rhamnosus and two Streptococcus macedonicus were studied in synthetic milk medium. Lb. paracasei NdP78 and NdP88 and S. macedonicus NdP1 and PB14-1 showed an interesting acidifying capacity and were further characterised for growth in UHT milk and production of antimicrobial compounds. Lb. paracasei NdP78 and S. macedonicus NdP1 grew more than 2 log cycles in 6 h. Lb. paracasei NdP78 was also found to produce a bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) active against Listeria monocytogenes. The four NSLAB strains (singly or in combination) were used to produce experimental pilot-scale cheeses which were compared by a panel. The cheese manufactured with the mixed culture Lb. paracasei NdP78 - S. macedonicus NdP1 was the most appreciated for its sensory properties. The cheeses produced at factory-scale showed higher concentrations of lactobacilli (7.90 log CFU/g) and streptococci (6.10 log CFU/g), but a lower development of coliforms (3.10 log CFU/g) and staphylococci (2.78 log CFU/g) than control cheese (4.86, 4.89, 4.93 and 5.00 log CFU/g of lactobacilli, streptococci, coliforms and staphylococci, respectively) processed without NSLAB addition. The food pathogens Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes were never detected. The dominance of the species inoculated was demonstrated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), whereas strain recognition was evaluated by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR. From the results obtained, Lb. paracasei NdP78 and S. macedonicus NdP1 were able to persist during the storage of Tosèla cheese and their combination influenced positively the sensory characteristics and shelf-life of the final product.

  1. Isolation and characterization of Exodus-2, a novel C-C chemokine with a unique 37-amino acid carboxyl-terminal extension.

    PubMed

    Hromas, R; Kim, C H; Klemsz, M; Krathwohl, M; Fife, K; Cooper, S; Schnizlein-Bick, C; Broxmeyer, H E

    1997-09-15

    Chemokines are a group of small, homologous proteins that regulate leukocyte migration, hemopoiesis, and HIV-1 absorption. We report here the cloning and characterization of a novel murine and human C-C chemokine termed Exodus-2 for its similarity to Exodus-1/MIP-3alpha/LARC, and its chemotactic ability. This novel chemokine has a unique 36 or 37 (murine and human, respectively) amino acid carboxyl-terminal extension not seen in any other chemokine family member. Purified recombinant Exodus-2 was found to have two activities classically associated with chemokines: inhibiting hemopoiesis and stimulating chemotaxis. However, Exodus-2 also had unusual characteristics for C-C chemokines. It selectively stimulated the chemotaxis of T-lymphocytes and was preferentially expressed in lymph node tissue. The combination of these characteristics may be a functional correlate for the unique carboxyl-terminal structure of Exodus-2.

  2. Combined effects of thermosonication and slightly acidic electrolyzed water on the microbial quality and shelf life extension of fresh-cut kale during refrigeration storage.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Ahmad Rois; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of thermosonication combined with slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAcEW) on the shelf life extension of fresh-cut kale during storage at 4 and 7 °C. Each kale (10 ± 0.2 g) was inoculated to contain approximately 6 log CFU/g of Listeria monocytogenes. Each inoculated or uninoculated samples was dip treated at 40 °C for 3 min with deionized water, thermosonication (400 W/L), SAcEW (5 mg/L), sodium chlorite (SC; 100 mg/L), sodium hypochlorite (SH; 100 mg/L), and thermosonication combined with SAcEW, SC, and SH (TS + SAcEW, TS + SC, and TS + SH, respectively). Growths of L. monocytogenes and spoilage microorganisms and changes in sensory (overall visual quality, browning, and off-odour) were evaluated. The results show that lag time and specific growth rate of each microorganism were not significantly (P > 0.05) affected by treatment and storage temperature. Exceeding the unacceptable counts of spoilage microorganisms did not always result in adverse effects on sensory attributes. This study suggests that TS + SAcEW was the most effective method to prolong the shelf life of kale with an extension of around 4 and 6 days at 4 and 7 °C, respectively, and seems to be a promising method for the shelf life extension of fresh produce. PMID:26187840

  3. Combined effects of thermosonication and slightly acidic electrolyzed water on the microbial quality and shelf life extension of fresh-cut kale during refrigeration storage.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Ahmad Rois; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of thermosonication combined with slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAcEW) on the shelf life extension of fresh-cut kale during storage at 4 and 7 °C. Each kale (10 ± 0.2 g) was inoculated to contain approximately 6 log CFU/g of Listeria monocytogenes. Each inoculated or uninoculated samples was dip treated at 40 °C for 3 min with deionized water, thermosonication (400 W/L), SAcEW (5 mg/L), sodium chlorite (SC; 100 mg/L), sodium hypochlorite (SH; 100 mg/L), and thermosonication combined with SAcEW, SC, and SH (TS + SAcEW, TS + SC, and TS + SH, respectively). Growths of L. monocytogenes and spoilage microorganisms and changes in sensory (overall visual quality, browning, and off-odour) were evaluated. The results show that lag time and specific growth rate of each microorganism were not significantly (P > 0.05) affected by treatment and storage temperature. Exceeding the unacceptable counts of spoilage microorganisms did not always result in adverse effects on sensory attributes. This study suggests that TS + SAcEW was the most effective method to prolong the shelf life of kale with an extension of around 4 and 6 days at 4 and 7 °C, respectively, and seems to be a promising method for the shelf life extension of fresh produce.

  4. Look before You Loop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellis, Marilyn

    1999-01-01

    Explores looping, which involves one teacher staying with the same group of children for more than one year. Recognizes that, with today's changing demographics, looping can be a way to foster a family-like classroom atmosphere. Discusses advantages and disadvantages to looping. Includes a chart of looping opportunities and considerations;…

  5. Fast flux locked loop

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-09-10

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  6. OPE for super loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sever, Amit; Vieira, Pedro; Wang, Tianheng

    2011-11-01

    We extend the Operator Product Expansion for Null Polygon Wilson loops to the Mason-Skinner-Caron-Huot super loop dual to non MHV gluon amplitudes. We explain how the known tree level amplitudes can be promoted into an infinite amount of data at any loop order in the OPE picture. As an application, we re-derive all one loop NMHV six gluon amplitudes by promoting their tree level expressions. We also present some new all loops predictions for these amplitudes.

  7. The preprocessed doacross loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltz, Joel H.; Mirchandaney, Ravi

    1990-01-01

    Dependencies between loop iterations cannot always be characterized during program compilation. Doacross loops typically make use of a-priori knowledge of inter-iteration dependencies to carry out required synchronizations. A type of doacross loop is proposed that allows the scheduling of iterations of a loop among processors without advance knowledge of inter-iteration dependencies. The method proposed for loop iterations requires that parallelizable preprocessing and postprocessing steps be carried out during program execution.

  8. Analyses of inter- and intra-patient variation in the V3 loop of the HIV-1 envelope protein

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, B.; Myers, G. ); Wolinsky, S. . Medical School)

    1991-09-17

    The third hypervariable domain of the HIV-1 gp120 envelope protein (V3) has been the focus of intensive sequencing efforts. To date, nearly one thousand V3 loop sequences have been stored in the HIV sequence database. Studies have revealed that the V3 loop elicits potent type-specific immune responses, and that it plays a significant role in cell tropism and fusion . The immunogenic tip of the loop can serve as a type-specific neutralizing antibody epitope, as well as a cytotoxic T-cell epitope. A helper T-cell epitope that lies within the amino terminal half of the V3 loop has also been characterized. Despite the richness of the immunologic response to this region, its potential for variation makes it an elusive target for vaccine design. Analyses of sibling sequence sets (sets of viral sequences derived from one person) show that multiple forms of the immunogenic tip of the loop are found within most HIV-1 infected individuals. Viral V3 sequences obtained from epidemiologically unlinked individuals from North America and Europe show extensive variation. However, some amino acid positions distributed throughout the V3 loop are highly conserved, and there is also conservation of the charge class of amino acid able to occupy certain positions relative to the tip of the loop. By contrast, the sequences obtained from many countries throughout the African continent reveal that V3 is a remarkably fluid region with few absolute constraints on the nature of the amino acids that can occupy most positions in the loop. The high degree of heterogeneity in this region is particularly striking in view of its contribution to biologically important viral functions.

  9. Conformationally sensitive proximity of extracellular loops 2 and 4 of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter GAT-1 inferred from paired cysteine mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Hilwi, Maram; Dayan, Oshrat; Kanner, Baruch I

    2014-12-01

    The sodium- and chloride-coupled GABA transporter GAT-1 is a member of the neurotransmitter:sodium:symporters, which are crucial for synaptic transmission. Structural work on the bacterial homologue LeuT suggests that extracellular loop 4 closes the extracellular solvent pathway when the transporter becomes inward-facing. To test whether this model can be extrapolated to GAT-1, cysteine residues were introduced at positions 359 and 448 of extracellular loop 4 and transmembrane helix 10, respectively. Treatment of HeLa cells, expressing the double cysteine mutant S359C/K448C with the oxidizing reagent copper(II)(1,10-phenantroline)3, resulted in a significant inhibition of [(3)H]GABA transport. However, transport by the single cysteine mutant S359C was also inhibited by the oxidant, whereas its activity was almost 4-fold stimulated by dithiothreitol. Both effects were attenuated when the conserved cysteine residues, Cys-164 and/or Cys-173, were replaced by serine. These cysteines are located in extracellular loop 2, the role of which in the structure and function of the eukaryotic neurotransmitter:sodium:symporters remains unknown. The inhibition of transport of S359C by the oxidant was markedly reduced under conditions expected to increase the proportion of inward-facing transporters, whereas the reactivity of the mutants to a membrane-impermeant sulfhydryl reagent was not conformationally sensitive. Our data suggest that extracellular loops 2 and 4 come into close proximity to each other in the outward-facing conformation of GAT-1.

  10. Critical role of the H6-H7 loop in the conformational adaptation of all-trans retinoic acid and synthetic retinoids within the ligand-binding site of RARalpha.

    PubMed

    Mailfait, S; Thoreau, E; Belaiche, D; Formstecher And B Sablonniè, P

    2000-06-01

    The pleiotropic effects of the natural and synthetic retinoids are mediated by the activation of the two subfamilies of nuclear receptors, the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and the retinoic X receptors (RXRs). At the molecular level, these events begin with the specific ligand recognition by a nuclear receptor subtype. The adaptation of ligands to the receptor binding site leads to an optimal number of interactions for binding and selectivity which justifies elucidation of the structural requirements of the ligand binding pocket. To explore the contribution of H6-H7 loop folding in the ligand-induced conformational changes explained by the mouse-trap model, four RARalpha mutants were constructed. Ligand binding and transactivation studies revealed that three residues from the H6-H7 loop (Gly(301), Phe(302) and Gly(303)) are critical for the conformational adaptation of both synthetic agonists and antagonists. Model building and analysis of both RARalpha-ATRA and RARalpha-CD367 complexes demonstrate that accommodation of CD367 results in a less tight contact of the saturated ring of this ligand with the amino acid side chains of the receptor ligand-binding pocket compared with that of ATRA. According to the flexibility of the agonists tested (ATRA>TTNPB=Am580> CD367), we observed a decrease in binding that was dependent on ligand structure rigidity. In contrast, the binding and transactivating activities of the L266A mutant confirmed the structural constraints imposed by synthetic ligands on binding affinity for the receptor and revealed that subtle local rearrangements induced by specific conformational adaptation changes result in different binding affinities. Our results illustrate the dynamic nature of the interaction between RARalpha and its ligands and demonstrate the critical role of the H6-H7 loop in the binding of both synthetic retinoid agonists and antagonists.

  11. Phenylacetic Acid Is ISR Determinant Produced by Bacillus fortis IAGS162, Which Involves Extensive Re-modulation in Metabolomics of Tomato to Protect against Fusarium Wilt.

    PubMed

    Akram, Waheed; Anjum, Tehmina; Ali, Basharat

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus fortis IAGS162 has been previously shown to induce systemic resistance in tomato plants against Fusarium wilt disease. In the first phase of current study, the ISR determinant was isolated from extracellular metabolites of this bacterium. ISR bioassays combined with solvent extraction, column chromatography and GC/MS analysis proved that phenylacetic acid (PAA) was the potential ISR determinant that significantly ameliorated Fusarium wilt disease of tomato at concentrations of 0.1 and 1 mM. In the second phase, the biochemical basis of the induced systemic resistance (ISR) under influence of PAA was elucidated by performing non-targeted whole metabolomics through GC/MS analysis. Tomato plants were treated with PAA and fungal pathogen in various combinations. Exposure to PAA and subsequent pathogen challenge extensively re-modulated tomato metabolic networks along with defense related pathways. In addition, various phenylpropanoid precursors were significantly up-regulated in treatments receiving PAA. This work suggests that ISR elicitor released from B. fortis IAGS162 contributes to resistance against fungal pathogens through dynamic reprogramming of plant pathways that are functionally correlated with defense responses. PMID:27148321

  12. Phenylacetic Acid Is ISR Determinant Produced by Bacillus fortis IAGS162, Which Involves Extensive Re-modulation in Metabolomics of Tomato to Protect against Fusarium Wilt

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Waheed; Anjum, Tehmina; Ali, Basharat

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus fortis IAGS162 has been previously shown to induce systemic resistance in tomato plants against Fusarium wilt disease. In the first phase of current study, the ISR determinant was isolated from extracellular metabolites of this bacterium. ISR bioassays combined with solvent extraction, column chromatography and GC/MS analysis proved that phenylacetic acid (PAA) was the potential ISR determinant that significantly ameliorated Fusarium wilt disease of tomato at concentrations of 0.1 and 1 mM. In the second phase, the biochemical basis of the induced systemic resistance (ISR) under influence of PAA was elucidated by performing non-targeted whole metabolomics through GC/MS analysis. Tomato plants were treated with PAA and fungal pathogen in various combinations. Exposure to PAA and subsequent pathogen challenge extensively re-modulated tomato metabolic networks along with defense related pathways. In addition, various phenylpropanoid precursors were significantly up-regulated in treatments receiving PAA. This work suggests that ISR elicitor released from B. fortis IAGS162 contributes to resistance against fungal pathogens through dynamic reprogramming of plant pathways that are functionally correlated with defense responses. PMID:27148321

  13. AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FARQUHAR, R.N.

    AUSTRALIAN AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION HAS LONG EMPHASIZED TECHNICAL ADVISORY SERVICE AT THE EXPENSE OF THE SOCIOECONOMIC ASPECTS OF FARM PRODUCTION AND FARM LIFE. ONLY IN TASMANIA HAS FARM MANAGEMENT BEEN STRESSED. DEMANDS FOR THE WHOLE-FARM APPROACH HAVE PRODUCED A TREND TOWARD GENERALISM FOR DISTRICT OFFICERS IN MOST STATES. THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT,…

  14. The Effect of 3 Versus 6 Years of Zoledronic Acid Treatment of Osteoporosis: A Randomized Extension to the HORIZON-Pivotal Fracture Trial (PFT)

    PubMed Central

    Black, Dennis M; Reid, Ian R; Boonen, Steven; Bucci-Rechtweg, Christina; Cauley, Jane A; Cosman, Felicia; Cummings, Steven R; Hue, Trisha F; Lippuner, Kurt; Lakatos, Peter; Leung, Ping Chung; Man, Zulema; Martinez, Ruvie Lou Maria; Tan, Monique; Ruzycky, Mary Ellen; Su, Guoqin; Eastell, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Zoledronic acid 5 mg (ZOL) annually for 3 years reduces fracture risk in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. To investigate long-term effects of ZOL on bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture risk, the Health Outcomes and Reduced Incidence with Zoledronic acid Once Yearly–Pivotal Fracture Trial (HORIZON-PFT) was extended to 6 years. In this international, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled extension trial, 1233 postmenopausal women who received ZOL for 3 years in the core study were randomized to 3 additional years of ZOL (Z6, n = 616) or placebo (Z3P3, n = 617). The primary endpoint was femoral neck (FN) BMD percentage change from year 3 to 6 in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population. Secondary endpoints included other BMD sites, fractures, biochemical bone turnover markers, and safety. In years 3 to 6, FN-BMD remained constant in Z6 and dropped slightly in Z3P3 (between-treatment difference = 1.04%; 95% confidence interval 0.4 to 1.7; p = 0.0009) but remained above pretreatment levels. Other BMD sites showed similar differences. Biochemical markers remained constant in Z6 but rose slightly in Z3P3, remaining well below pretreatment levels in both. New morphometric vertebral fractures were lower in the Z6 (n = 14) versus Z3P3 (n = 30) group (odds ratio = 0.51; p = 0.035), whereas other fractures were not different. Significantly more Z6 patients had a transient increase in serum creatinine >0.5 mg/dL (0.65% versus 2.94% in Z3P3). Nonsignificant increases in Z6 of atrial fibrillation serious adverse events (2.0% versus 1.1% in Z3P3; p = 0.26) and stroke (3.1% versus 1.5% in Z3P3; p = 0.06) were seen. Postdose symptoms were similar in both groups. Reports of hypertension were significantly lower in Z6 versus Z3P3 (7.8% versus 15.1%, p < 0.001). Small differences in bone density and markers in those who continued versus those who stopped treatment suggest residual effects, and therefore, after 3 years of annual ZOL, many patients may discontinue

  15. Capillary pumped loop application guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullimore, Brent A.

    Capillary pumped loops (CPLs) have undergone extensive development since the late 1970's, and represent a maturing technology that is beginning to appear in spacecraft designs. Perhaps because most CPL literature is intended for CPL and heat pipe dedvelopers, or perhaps because of the myriad of component design and layout options available, many thermal control designers are either unfamiliar with the capabilities offered by CPLs, or are confused about their limitations. This survey paper is targeted toward thermal control designers who must decide when and where to use CPLs, or having chosen a CPL solution, must deal with system-level integration and test issues.

  16. A stretch of 11 amino acids in the betaB-betaC loop of the coat protein of grapevine fanleaf virus is essential for transmission by the nematode Xiphinema index.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Pascale; Andret-Link, Peggy; Schmitt-Keichinger, Corinne; Bergdoll, Marc; Marmonier, Aurélie; Vigne, Emmanuelle; Lemaire, Olivier; Fuchs, Marc; Demangeat, Gérard; Ritzenthaler, Christophe

    2010-08-01

    Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) and Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV) from the genus Nepovirus, family Secoviridae, cause a severe degeneration of grapevines. GFLV and ArMV have a bipartite RNA genome and are transmitted specifically by the ectoparasitic nematodes Xiphinema index and Xiphinema diversicaudatum, respectively. The transmission specificity of both viruses maps to their respective RNA2-encoded coat protein (CP). To further delineate the GFLV CP determinants of transmission specificity, three-dimensional (3D) homology structure models of virions and CP subunits were constructed based on the crystal structure of Tobacco ringspot virus, the type member of the genus Nepovirus. The 3D models were examined to predict amino acids that are exposed at the external virion surface, highly conserved among GFLV isolates but divergent between GFLV and ArMV. Five short amino acid stretches that matched these topographical and sequence conservation criteria were selected and substituted in single and multiple combinations by their ArMV counterparts in a GFLV RNA2 cDNA clone. Among the 21 chimeric RNA2 molecules engineered, transcripts of only three of them induced systemic plant infection in the presence of GFLV RNA1. Nematode transmission assays of the three viable recombinant viruses showed that swapping a stretch of (i) 11 residues in the betaB-betaC loop near the icosahedral 3-fold axis abolished transmission by X. index but was insufficient to restore transmission by X. diversicaudatum and (ii) 7 residues in the betaE-alphaB loop did not interfere with transmission by the two Xiphinema species. This study provides new insights into GFLV CP determinants of nematode transmission.

  17. Automatic parallelization of while-Loops using speculative execution

    SciTech Connect

    Collard, J.F.

    1995-04-01

    Automatic parallelization of imperative sequential programs has focused on nests of for-loops. The most recent of them consist in finding an affine mapping with respect to the loop indices to simultaneously capture the temporal and spatial properties of the parallelized program. Such a mapping is usually called a {open_quotes}space-time transformation.{close_quotes} This work describes an extension of these techniques to while-loops using speculative execution. We show that space-time transformations are a good framework for summing up previous restructuration techniques of while-loop, such as pipelining. Moreover, we show that these transformations can be derived and applied automatically.

  18. Dynamics of closed-loop systems containing flexible bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadikonda, Sivakumar S. K.; Singh, Ramendra P.

    1991-01-01

    An important characteristic of flexible multibody systems containing closed-loop topologies is that the component modes used to describe individual bodies will no longer be independent because of loop closure constraints. Thus, the issue of component modal selection becomes even more complicated. In addition, the foreshortening effect that has been studied extensively in the literature in the context of open-loop topologies will also be present in these constraint equations. Simulation results presented demonstrate the effects of modal selection and foreshortening on the dynamic response of closed-loop flexible systems.

  19. Fairy “tails”: flexibility and function of intrinsically disordered extensions in the photosynthetic world

    PubMed Central

    Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; Avilan, Luisana; Kojadinovic, Mila; Gontero, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs), or protein fragments also called Intrinsically Disordered Regions (IDRs), display high flexibility as the result of their amino acid composition. They can adopt multiple roles. In globular proteins, IDRs are usually found as loops and linkers between secondary structure elements. However, not all disordered fragments are loops: some proteins bear an intrinsically disordered extension at their C- or N-terminus, and this flexibility can affect the protein as a whole. In this review, we focus on the disordered N- and C-terminal extensions of globular proteins from photosynthetic organisms. Using the examples of the A2B2-GAPDH and the α Rubisco activase isoform, we show that intrinsically disordered extensions can help regulate their “host” protein in response to changes in light, thereby participating in photosynthesis regulation. As IDPs are famous for their large number of protein partners, we used the examples of the NAC, bZIP, TCP, and GRAS transcription factor families to illustrate the fact that intrinsically disordered extremities can allow a protein to have an increased number of partners, which directly affects its regulation. Finally, for proteins from the cryptochrome light receptor family, we describe how a new role for the photolyase proteins may emerge by the addition of an intrinsically disordered extension, while still allowing the protein to absorb blue light. This review has highlighted the diverse repercussions of the disordered extension on the regulation and function of their host protein and outlined possible future research avenues. PMID:26042223

  20. The AP-3 adaptor complex mediates sorting of yeast and mammalian PQ-loop-family basic amino acid transporters to the vacuolar/lysosomal membrane

    PubMed Central

    Llinares, Elisa; Barry, Abdoulaye Oury; André, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The limiting membrane of lysosomes in animal cells and that of the vacuole in yeast include a wide variety of transporters, but little is known about how these proteins reach their destination membrane. The mammalian PQLC2 protein catalyzes efflux of basic amino acids from the lysosome, and the similar Ypq1, −2, and −3 proteins of yeast perform an equivalent function at the vacuole. We here show that the Ypq proteins are delivered to the vacuolar membrane via the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) trafficking pathway, which requires the AP-3 adaptor complex. When traffic via this pathway is deficient, the Ypq proteins pass through endosomes from where Ypq1 and Ypq2 properly reach the vacuolar membrane whereas Ypq3 is missorted to the vacuolar lumen via the multivesicular body pathway. When produced in yeast, PQLC2 also reaches the vacuolar membrane via the ALP pathway, but tends to sort to the vacuolar lumen if AP-3 is defective. Finally, in HeLa cells, inhibiting the synthesis of an AP-3 subunit also impairs sorting of PQLC2 to lysosomes. Our results suggest the existence of a conserved AP-3-dependent trafficking pathway for proper delivery of basic amino acid exporters to the yeast vacuole and to lysosomes of human cells. PMID:26577948

  1. Residues in the extracellular loop 4 are critical for maintaining the conformational equilibrium of the gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter-1.

    PubMed

    MacAulay, Nanna; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Zeuthen, Thomas; Gether, Ulrik

    2003-08-01

    We mutated residues Met345 and Thr349 in the rat gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter-1 (GAT-1) to histidines (M345H and T349H). These two residues are located four amino acids apart at the extracellular end of transmembrane segment 7 in a region of GAT-1 that we have previously suggested undergoes conformational changes critical for the transport process. The two single mutants and the double mutant (M345H/T349H) were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and their steady-state and presteady-state kinetics were examined and compared with wild type GAT-1 by using the two-electrode voltage clamp method. Oocytes expressing M345H showed a decrease in apparent GABA affinity, an increase in apparent affinity for Na+, a shift in the charge/voltage (Q/Vm) relationship to more positive membrane potentials, and an increased Li+-induced leak current. Oocytes expressing T349H showed an increase in apparent GABA affinity, a decrease in apparent Na+ affinity, a profound shift in the Q/Vm relationship to more negative potentials, and a decreased Li+-induced leak current. The data are consistent with a shift in the conformational equilibrium of the mutant transporters, with M345H stabilized in an outward-facing conformation and T349H in an inward-facing conformation. These data suggest that the extracellular end of transmembrane domain 7 not only undergoes conformational changes critical for the translocation process but also plays a role in regulating the conformational equilibrium between inward- and outward-facing conformations.

  2. Thermal power loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottschlich, Joseph M.; Richter, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The concept of a thermal power loop (TPL) to transport thermal power over relatively large distances is presented as an alternative to heat pipes and their derivatives. The TPL is compared to heat pipes, and capillary pumped loops with respect to size, weight, conservation of thermal potential, start-up, and 1-g testing capability. Test results from a proof of feasibility demonstrator at the NASA JPL are discussed. This analysis demonstrates that the development of specific thermal power loops will result in substantial weight and cost savings for many spacecraft.

  3. Multiprotein DNA Looping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, Jose M. G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2006-06-01

    DNA looping plays a fundamental role in a wide variety of biological processes, providing the backbone for long range interactions on DNA. Here we develop the first model for DNA looping by an arbitrarily large number of proteins and solve it analytically in the case of identical binding. We uncover a switchlike transition between looped and unlooped phases and identify the key parameters that control this transition. Our results establish the basis for the quantitative understanding of fundamental cellular processes like DNA recombination, gene silencing, and telomere maintenance.

  4. Natively Unstructured Loops Differ from Other Loops

    PubMed Central

    Schlessinger, Avner; Liu, Jinfeng; Rost, Burkhard

    2007-01-01

    Natively unstructured or disordered protein regions may increase the functional complexity of an organism; they are particularly abundant in eukaryotes and often evade structure determination. Many computational methods predict unstructured regions by training on outliers in otherwise well-ordered structures. Here, we introduce an approach that uses a neural network in a very different and novel way. We hypothesize that very long contiguous segments with nonregular secondary structure (NORS regions) differ significantly from regular, well-structured loops, and that a method detecting such features could predict natively unstructured regions. Training our new method, NORSnet, on predicted information rather than on experimental data yielded three major advantages: it removed the overlap between testing and training, it systematically covered entire proteomes, and it explicitly focused on one particular aspect of unstructured regions with a simple structural interpretation, namely that they are loops. Our hypothesis was correct: well-structured and unstructured loops differ so substantially that NORSnet succeeded in their distinction. Benchmarks on previously used and new experimental data of unstructured regions revealed that NORSnet performed very well. Although it was not the best single prediction method, NORSnet was sufficiently accurate to flag unstructured regions in proteins that were previously not annotated. In one application, NORSnet revealed previously undetected unstructured regions in putative targets for structural genomics and may thereby contribute to increasing structural coverage of large eukaryotic families. NORSnet found unstructured regions more often in domain boundaries than expected at random. In another application, we estimated that 50%–70% of all worm proteins observed to have more than seven protein–protein interaction partners have unstructured regions. The comparative analysis between NORSnet and DISOPRED2 suggested that long

  5. Natively unstructured loops differ from other loops.

    PubMed

    Schlessinger, Avner; Liu, Jinfeng; Rost, Burkhard

    2007-07-01

    Natively unstructured or disordered protein regions may increase the functional complexity of an organism; they are particularly abundant in eukaryotes and often evade structure determination. Many computational methods predict unstructured regions by training on outliers in otherwise well-ordered structures. Here, we introduce an approach that uses a neural network in a very different and novel way. We hypothesize that very long contiguous segments with nonregular secondary structure (NORS regions) differ significantly from regular, well-structured loops, and that a method detecting such features could predict natively unstructured regions. Training our new method, NORSnet, on predicted information rather than on experimental data yielded three major advantages: it removed the overlap between testing and training, it systematically covered entire proteomes, and it explicitly focused on one particular aspect of unstructured regions with a simple structural interpretation, namely that they are loops. Our hypothesis was correct: well-structured and unstructured loops differ so substantially that NORSnet succeeded in their distinction. Benchmarks on previously used and new experimental data of unstructured regions revealed that NORSnet performed very well. Although it was not the best single prediction method, NORSnet was sufficiently accurate to flag unstructured regions in proteins that were previously not annotated. In one application, NORSnet revealed previously undetected unstructured regions in putative targets for structural genomics and may thereby contribute to increasing structural coverage of large eukaryotic families. NORSnet found unstructured regions more often in domain boundaries than expected at random. In another application, we estimated that 50%-70% of all worm proteins observed to have more than seven protein-protein interaction partners have unstructured regions. The comparative analysis between NORSnet and DISOPRED2 suggested that long

  6. Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. This course will discuss operating principles and performance characteristics of a loop heat pipe. Topics include: 1) pressure profiles in the loop; 2) loop operating temperature; 3) operating temperature control; 4) loop startup; 4) loop shutdown; 5) loop transient behaviors; 6) sizing of loop components and determination of fluid inventory; 7) analytical modeling; 8) examples of flight applications; and 9) recent LHP developments.

  7. Loop Quantum Gravity and Asymptotically Flat Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnsdorf, Matthias

    2002-12-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in the field of non-perturbative (loop) quantum gravity in the last decade or so and it is now a rigorously defined kinematical theory (c.f. [5] for a review and references). We are now at the stage where physical applications of loop quantum gravity can be studied and used to provide checks for the consistency of the quantisation programme. Equally, old fundamental problems of canonical quantum gravity such as the problem of time or the interpretation of quantum cosmology need to be reevaluated seriously. These issues can be addressed most profitably in the asymptotically flat sector of quantum gravity. Indeed, it is likely that we should obtain a quantum theory for this special case even if it is not possible to quantise full general relativity. The purpose of this summary is to advertise the extension of loop quantum gravity to this sector that was developed in [1]...

  8. Blind loop syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... operations for extreme obesity As a complication of inflammatory bowel disease Diseases such as diabetes or scleroderma may slow down movement in a segment of the intestine, leading to blind loop syndrome.

  9. Arabidopsis Triphosphate Tunnel Metalloenzyme2 Is a Negative Regulator of the Salicylic Acid-Mediated Feedback Amplification Loop for Defense Responses1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ung, Huoi; Moeder, Wolfgang; Yoshioka, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    The triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme (TTM) superfamily represents a group of enzymes that is characterized by their ability to hydrolyze a range of tripolyphosphate substrates. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) encodes three TTM genes, AtTTM1, AtTTM2, and AtTTM3. Although AtTTM3 has previously been reported to have tripolyphosphatase activity, recombinantly expressed AtTTM2 unexpectedly exhibited pyrophosphatase activity. AtTTM2 knockout mutant plants exhibit an enhanced hypersensitive response, elevated pathogen resistance against both virulent and avirulent pathogens, and elevated accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) upon infection. In addition, stronger systemic acquired resistance compared with wild-type plants was observed. These enhanced defense responses are dependent on SA, PHYTOALEXIN-DEFICIENT4, and NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1. Despite their enhanced pathogen resistance, ttm2 plants did not display constitutively active defense responses, suggesting that AtTTM2 is not a conventional negative regulator but a negative regulator of the amplification of defense responses. The transcriptional suppression of AtTTM2 by pathogen infection or treatment with SA or the systemic acquired resistance activator benzothiadiazole further supports this notion. Such transcriptional regulation is conserved among TTM2 orthologs in the crop plants soybean (Glycine max) and canola (Brassica napus), suggesting that TTM2 is involved in immunity in a wide variety of plant species. This indicates the possible usage of TTM2 knockout mutants for agricultural applications to generate pathogen-resistant crop plants. PMID:25185123

  10. Choking loops on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin; Tong, Yiying

    2013-08-01

    We present a method for computing "choking" loops--a set of surface loops that describe the narrowing of the volumes inside/outside of the surface and extend the notion of surface homology and homotopy loops. The intuition behind their definition is that a choking loop represents the region where an offset of the original surface would get pinched. Our generalized loops naturally include the usual 2g handles/tunnels computed based on the topology of the genus-g surface, but also include loops that identify chokepoints or bottlenecks, i.e., boundaries of small membranes separating the inside or outside volume of the surface into disconnected regions. Our definition is based on persistent homology theory, which gives a measure to topological structures, thus providing resilience to noise and a well-defined way to determine topological feature size. More precisely, the persistence computed here is based on the lower star filtration of the interior or exterior 3D domain with the distance field to the surface being the associated 3D Morse function. PMID:23744260

  11. ZmPUMP encodes a fully functional monocot plant uncoupling mitochondrial protein whose affinity to fatty acid is increased with the introduction of a His pair at the second matrix loop

    SciTech Connect

    Favaro, Regiane Degan; Borecky, Jiri; Colombi, Debora; Maia, Ivan G. . E-mail: igmaia@ibb.unesp.br

    2006-05-26

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are specialized mitochondrial transporter proteins that uncouple respiration from ATP synthesis. In this study, cDNA encoding maize uncoupling protein (ZmPUMP) was expressed in Escherichia coli and recombinant ZmPUMP reconstituted in liposomes. ZmPUMP activity was associated with a linoleic acid (LA)-mediated H{sup +} efflux with K {sub m} of 56.36 {+-} 0.27 {mu}M and V {sub max} of 66.9 {mu}mol H{sup +} min{sup -1} (mg prot){sup -1}. LA-mediated H{sup +} fluxes were sensitive to ATP inhibition with K {sub i} of 2.61 {+-} 0.36 mM (at pH 7.2), a value similar to those for dicot UCPs. ZmPUMP was also used to investigate the importance of a histidine pair present in the second matrix loop of mammalian UCP1 and absent in plant UCPs. ZmPUMP with introduced His pair (Lys155His and Ala157His) displayed a 1.55-fold increase in LA-affinity while its activity remained unchanged. Our data indicate conserved properties of plant UCPs and suggest an enhancing but not essential role of the histidine pair in proton transport mechanism.

  12. A single amino acid substitution in IIIf subfamily of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor AtMYC1 leads to trichome and root hair patterning defects by abolishing its interaction with partner proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaoxue; Zhu, Dandan; Cui, Sujuan; Li, Xia; Cao, Ying; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-04-20

    Plant trichomes and root hairs are powerful models for the study of cell fate determination. In Arabidopsis thaliana, trichome and root hair initiation requires a combination of three groups of proteins, including the WD40 repeat protein transparent TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1), R2R3 repeat MYB protein GLABRA1 (GL1), or werewolf (WER) and the IIIf subfamily of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein GLABRA3 (GL3) or enhancer of GLABRA3 (EGL3). The bHLH component acts as a docking site for TTG1 and MYB proteins. Here, we isolated a mutant showing defects in trichome and root hair patterning that carried a point mutation (R173H) in AtMYC1 that encodes the fourth member of IIIf bHLH family protein. Genetic analysis revealed partial redundant yet distinct function between AtMYC1 and GL3/EGL3. GLABRA2 (GL2), an important transcription factor involved in trichome and root hair control, was down-regulated in Atmyc1 plants, suggesting the requirement of AtMYC1 for appropriate GL2 transcription. Like its homologs, AtMYC1 formed a complex with TTG1 and MYB proteins but did not dimerized. In addition, the interaction of AtMYC1 with MYB proteins and TTG1 was abrogated by the R173H substitution in Atmyc1-1. We found that this amino acid (Arg) is conserved in the AtMYC1 homologs GL3/EGL3 and that it is essential for their interaction with MYB proteins and for their proper functions. Our findings indicate that AtMYC1 is an important regulator of trichome and root hair initiation, and they reveal a novel amino acid necessary for protein-protein interactions and gene function in IIIf subfamily bHLH transcription factors.

  13. Loop modeling: Sampling, filtering, and scoring

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Cinque S; Fasnacht, Marc; Zhu, Jiang; Forrest, Lucy; Honig, Barry

    2008-01-01

    We describe a fast and accurate protocol, LoopBuilder, for the prediction of loop conformations in proteins. The procedure includes extensive sampling of backbone conformations, side chain addition, the use of a statistical potential to select a subset of these conformations, and, finally, an energy minimization and ranking with an all-atom force field. We find that the Direct Tweak algorithm used in the previously developed LOOPY program is successful in generating an ensemble of conformations that on average are closer to the native conformation than those generated by other methods. An important feature of Direct Tweak is that it checks for interactions between the loop and the rest of the protein during the loop closure process. DFIRE is found to be a particularly effective statistical potential that can bias conformation space toward conformations that are close to the native structure. Its application as a filter prior to a full molecular mechanics energy minimization both improves prediction accuracy and offers a significant savings in computer time. Final scoring is based on the OPLS/SBG-NP force field implemented in the PLOP program. The approach is also shown to be quite successful in predicting loop conformations for cases where the native side chain conformations are assumed to be unknown, suggesting that it will prove effective in real homology modeling applications. Proteins 2008. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:17729286

  14. Extension of a PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid to include the competitive formation and clearance of metabolites associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, R.A.; Saghir, S.A.; Bartels, M.J.; Hansen, S.C.; Creim, J.; McMartin, K.E.; Snellings, W.M.

    2011-02-01

    A previously developed PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid was extended to include glyoxylic acid, oxalic acid, and the precipitation of calcium oxalate that is associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans. The development and evaluation of the PBPK model was based upon previously published pharmacokinetic studies coupled with measured blood and tissue partition coefficients and rates of in vitro metabolism of glyoxylic acid to oxalic acid, glycine and other metabolites using primary hepatocytes isolated from male Wistar rats and humans. Precipitation of oxalic acid with calcium in the kidneys was assumed to occur only at concentrations exceeding the thermodynamic solubility product for calcium oxalate. This solubility product can be affected by local concentrations of calcium and other ions that are expressed in the model using an ion activity product estimated from toxicity studies such that calcium oxalate precipitation would be minimal at dietary exposures below the NOAEL for kidney toxicity in the sensitive male Wistar rat. The resulting integrated PBPK predicts that bolus oral or dietary exposures to ethylene glycol would result in typically 1.4-1.6-fold higher peak oxalate levels and 1.6-2-fold higher AUC's for calcium oxalate in kidneys of humans as compared with comparably exposed male Wistar rats over a dose range of 1-1000 mg/kg. The converse (male Wistar rats predicted to have greater oxalate levels in the kidneys than humans) was found for inhalation exposures although no accumulation of calcium oxalate is predicted to occur until exposures are well in excess of the theoretical saturated vapor concentration of 200 mg/m{sup 3}. While the current model is capable of such cross-species, dose, and route-of-exposure comparisons, it also highlights several areas of potential research that will improve confidence in such predictions, especially at low doses relevant for most human exposures.

  15. Extensive esterification of adrenal C19-delta 5-sex steroids to long-chain fatty acids in the ZR-75-1 human breast cancer cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, R.; Poirier, D.; Merand, Y.; Theriault, C.; Belanger, A.; Labrie, F.

    1989-06-05

    Estrogen-sensitive human breast cancer cells (ZR-75-1) were incubated with the 3H-labeled adrenal C19-delta 5-steroids dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its fully estrogenic derivative, androst-5-ene-3 beta,17 beta-diol (delta 5-diol) for various time intervals. When fractionated by solvent partition, Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography and silica gel TLC, the labeled cell components were largely present (40-75%) in three highly nonpolar, lipoidal fractions. Mild alkaline hydrolysis of these lipoidal derivatives yielded either free 3H-labeled DHEA or delta 5-diol. The three lipoidal fractions cochromatographed with the synthetic DHEA 3 beta-esters, delta 5-diol 3 beta (or 17 beta)-monoesters and delta 5-diol 3 beta,17 beta-diesters of long-chain fatty acids. DHEA and delta 5-diol were mainly esterified to saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids. For delta 5-diol, the preferred site of esterification of the fatty acids is the 3 beta-position while some esterification also takes place at the 17 beta-position. Time course studies show that ZR-75-1 cells accumulate delta 5-diol mostly (greater than 95%) as fatty acid mono- and diesters while DHEA is converted to delta 5-diol essentially as the esterified form. Furthermore, while free C19-delta 5-steroids rapidly diffuse out of the cells after removal of the precursor (3H)delta 5-diol, the fatty acid ester derivatives are progressively hydrolyzed, and DHEA and delta 5-diol thus formed are then sulfurylated prior to their release into the culture medium. The latter process however is rate-limited, since new steady-state levels of free steroids and fatty acid esters are rapidly reached and maintained for extended periods of time after removal of precursor, thus maintaining minimal concentrations of intracellular steroids.

  16. Chemical composition and oxidative status of tissues from Iberian pigs as affected by diets: extensive feeding v. oleic acid- and tocopherol-enriched mixed diets.

    PubMed

    Ventanas, S; Tejeda, J F; Estévez, M

    2008-04-01

    The present work was intended to analyse the chemical composition and oxidative stability of the muscle biceps femoris and adipose tissues from Iberian pigs fed different finishing diets: free-range feeding on grass and acorns in a 'Montanera' traditional system (MON), fed in confinement with a mixed diet containing high-oleic sunflower oil (115 g/kg of diet) and supplemented with 250 mg/kg α-tocopherol (HOVE), and fed in confinement with a tocopherol-non-supplemented control mixed diet (CON). Muscles from MON pigs contained significantly (P < 0.05) higher amounts of intramuscular fat than those from HOVE and CON pigs. Muscles from MON and HOVE pigs had significantly higher levels of α-tocopherol than muscles from CON pigs whereas free-range feeding provided significantly higher levels of γ-tocopherol to muscles from MON pigs than the experimental diets did to CON and HOVE pigs. Adipose tissues from MON and HOVE pigs contained significantly lower proportions of saturated fatty acids and significantly higher levels of oleic acid and monounsaturated fatty acids than those from CON pigs. Tissues from MON pigs contained significantly smaller levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids than those from CON and HOVE pigs. To a higher extent, feeding background affected the fatty acid composition of polar lipids from the muscle biceps femoris than that of neutral lipids. Tissues from MON pigs contained significantly smaller ω-6/ω-3 values than those from pigs fed mixed diets. Compared to tissues from CON pigs, those from MON and HOVE pigs exhibited a higher oxidative stability as a likely result of a most favourable fatty acid composition and the presence of higher tocopherol levels.

  17. The Second Extracellular Loop of Pore-Forming Subunits of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters for Basic Amino Acids Plays a Crucial Role in Interaction with the Cognate Solute Binding Protein(s)▿

    PubMed Central

    Eckey, Viola; Weidlich, Daniela; Landmesser, Heidi; Bergmann, Ulf; Schneider, Erwin

    2010-01-01

    In the thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the uptake of basic amino acids is mediated by an ABC transporter composed of the substrate binding protein (receptor) ArtJ and a homodimer each of the pore-forming subunit, ArtM, and the nucleotide-binding subunit, ArtP. We recently identified two putative binding sites in ArtJ that might interact with the Art(MP)2 complex, thereby initiating the transport cycle (A. Vahedi-Faridi et al., J. Mol. Biol. 375:448-459, 2008). Here we investigated the contribution of charged amino acid residues in the second extracellular loop of ArtM to contact with ArtJ. Our results demonstrate a crucial role for residues K177, R185, and E188, since mutations to oppositely charged amino acids or glutamine led to a complete loss of ArtJ-stimulated ATPase activity of the complex variants in proteoliposomes. The defects could not be suppressed by ArtJ variants carrying mutations in site I (K39E and K152E) or II (E163K and D170K), suggesting a more complex interplay than that by a single salt bridge. These findings were supported by cross-linking assays demonstrating physical proximity between ArtJ(N166C) and ArtM(E182C). The importance of positively charged residues for receptor-transporter interaction was underscored by mutational analysis of the closely related transporter HisJ/LAO-HisQMP2 of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. While transporter variants with mutated positively charged residues in HisQ displayed residual ATPase activities, corresponding mutants of HisM could no longer be stimulated by HisJ/LAO. Interestingly, the ATPase activity of the HisQM(K187E)P2 variant was inhibited by l- and d-histidine in detergent, suggesting a role of the residue in preventing free histidine from gaining access to the substrate binding site within HisQM. PMID:20154136

  18. The second extracellular loop of pore-forming subunits of ATP-binding cassette transporters for basic amino acids plays a crucial role in interaction with the cognate solute binding protein(s).

    PubMed

    Eckey, Viola; Weidlich, Daniela; Landmesser, Heidi; Bergmann, Ulf; Schneider, Erwin

    2010-04-01

    In the thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the uptake of basic amino acids is mediated by an ABC transporter composed of the substrate binding protein (receptor) ArtJ and a homodimer each of the pore-forming subunit, ArtM, and the nucleotide-binding subunit, ArtP. We recently identified two putative binding sites in ArtJ that might interact with the Art(MP)(2) complex, thereby initiating the transport cycle (A. Vahedi-Faridi et al., J. Mol. Biol. 375:448-459, 2008). Here we investigated the contribution of charged amino acid residues in the second extracellular loop of ArtM to contact with ArtJ. Our results demonstrate a crucial role for residues K177, R185, and E188, since mutations to oppositely charged amino acids or glutamine led to a complete loss of ArtJ-stimulated ATPase activity of the complex variants in proteoliposomes. The defects could not be suppressed by ArtJ variants carrying mutations in site I (K39E and K152E) or II (E163K and D170K), suggesting a more complex interplay than that by a single salt bridge. These findings were supported by cross-linking assays demonstrating physical proximity between ArtJ(N166C) and ArtM(E182C). The importance of positively charged residues for receptor-transporter interaction was underscored by mutational analysis of the closely related transporter HisJ/LAO-HisQMP(2) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. While transporter variants with mutated positively charged residues in HisQ displayed residual ATPase activities, corresponding mutants of HisM could no longer be stimulated by HisJ/LAO. Interestingly, the ATPase activity of the HisQM(K187E)P(2) variant was inhibited by l- and d-histidine in detergent, suggesting a role of the residue in preventing free histidine from gaining access to the substrate binding site within HisQM. PMID:20154136

  19. Bouncing loop quantum cosmology in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haro, J.; Makarenko, A. N.; Myagky, A. N.; Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2015-12-01

    We develop an effective Gauss-Bonnet extension of loop quantum cosmology, by introducing holonomy corrections in modified F (G ) theories of gravity. Within the context of our formalism, we provide a perturbative expansion in the critical density, a parameter characteristic of loop quantum gravity theories, and we result in having leading order corrections to the classical F (G ) theories of gravity. After extensively discussing the formalism, we present a reconstruction method that makes it possible to find the loop quantum cosmology corrected F (G ) theory that can realize various cosmological scenarios. We exemplify our theoretical constructions by using bouncing cosmologies, and we investigate which loop quantum cosmology corrected Gauss-Bonnet modified gravities can successfully realize such cosmologies.

  20. The Anderson Current Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Karl F.

    1994-01-01

    Four-wire-probe concept applied to electrical-resistance transducers. Anderson current loop is excitation-and-signal-conditioning circuit suitable for use with strain gauges, resistance thermometers, and other electrical-resistance transducers mounted in harsh environments. Used as alternative to Wheatstone bridge. Simplifies signal-conditioning problem, enabling precise measurement of small changes in resistance of transducer. Eliminates some uncertainties in Wheatstone-bridge resistance-change measurements in flight research. Current loop configuration makes effects of lead-wire and contact resistances insignificantly small. Also provides output voltage that varies linearly with change in gauge resistance, and does so at double sensitivity of Wheatstone bridge.

  1. Wilson-loop instantons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kimyeong; Holman, Richard; Kolb, Edward W.

    1987-01-01

    Wilson-loop symmetry breaking is considered on a space-time of the form M4 x K, where M4 is a four-dimensional space-time and K is an internal space with nontrivial and finite fundamental group. It is shown in a simple model that the different vacua obtained by breaking a non-Abelian gauge group by Wilson loops are separated in the space of gauge potentials by a finite energy barrier. An interpolating gauge configuration is then constructed between these vacua and shown to have minimum energy. Finally some implications of this construction are discussed.

  2. Loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Dah-Wei

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an "in-a-nutshell" yet self-contained introductory review on loop quantum gravity (LQG) — a background-independent, nonperturbative approach to a consistent quantum theory of gravity. Instead of rigorous and systematic derivations, it aims to provide a general picture of LQG, placing emphasis on the fundamental ideas and their significance. The canonical formulation of LQG, as the central topic of the paper, is presented in a logically orderly fashion with moderate details, while the spin foam theory, black hole thermodynamics, and loop quantum cosmology are covered briefly. Current directions and open issues are also summarized.

  3. Topspin Networks and Topology in Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duston, C. L.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the extension of loop quantum gravity to topspin networks, a proposal which allows topological information to be encoded in spin networks. This requires minimal changes to the phase space, C*-algebra and Hilbert space of cylindrical functions. Here we focus on the changes to the area operator and determine how it depends on the topology. We hope these ideas will extend the idea of "background independence" in loop quantum gravity to include topology as well as geometry.

  4. Livermore Compiler Analysis Loop Suite

    2013-03-01

    LCALS is designed to evaluate compiler optimizations and performance of a variety of loop kernels and loop traversal software constructs. Some of the loop kernels are pulled directly from "Livermore Loops Coded in C", developed at LLNL (see item 11 below for details of earlier code versions). The older suites were used to evaluate floating-point performances of hardware platforms prior to porting larger application codes. The LCALS suite is geared toward assissing C++ compiler optimizationsmore » and platform performance related to SIMD vectorization, OpenMP threading, and advanced C++ language features. LCALS contains 20 of 24 loop kernels from the older Livermore Loop suites, plus various others representative of loops found in current production appkication codes at LLNL. The latter loops emphasize more diverse loop constructs and data access patterns than the others, such as multi-dimensional difference stencils. The loops are included in a configurable framework, which allows control of compilation, loop sampling for execution timing, which loops are run and their lengths. It generates timing statistics for analysis and comparing variants of individual loops. Also, it is easy to add loops to the suite as desired.« less

  5. Livermore Compiler Analysis Loop Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, R. D.

    2013-03-01

    LCALS is designed to evaluate compiler optimizations and performance of a variety of loop kernels and loop traversal software constructs. Some of the loop kernels are pulled directly from "Livermore Loops Coded in C", developed at LLNL (see item 11 below for details of earlier code versions). The older suites were used to evaluate floating-point performances of hardware platforms prior to porting larger application codes. The LCALS suite is geared toward assissing C++ compiler optimizations and platform performance related to SIMD vectorization, OpenMP threading, and advanced C++ language features. LCALS contains 20 of 24 loop kernels from the older Livermore Loop suites, plus various others representative of loops found in current production appkication codes at LLNL. The latter loops emphasize more diverse loop constructs and data access patterns than the others, such as multi-dimensional difference stencils. The loops are included in a configurable framework, which allows control of compilation, loop sampling for execution timing, which loops are run and their lengths. It generates timing statistics for analysis and comparing variants of individual loops. Also, it is easy to add loops to the suite as desired.

  6. Combining Long-Term Watershed Monitoring at Buck Creek with Spatially Extensive Ecosystem Data to Understand the Processes of Acid Rain Effects and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, G. B.; Ross, D. S.; Sullivan, T. J.; McDonnell, T. C.; Bailey, S. W.; Dukett, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Buck Creek Monitoring Watershed, in the western Adirondack Region of New York, has provided long-term data back to 1982 for tracking acid rain effects and recovery, and for supporting fundamental research on environmental change. At Buck Creek, monitoring acidic deposition effects as they worsened, then diminished, has advanced our understanding of key biogeochemical processes such as Al mobilization. Although Al mobilization has been one of the primary adverse effects of acidic deposition, in the recovery phase it is now affecting terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in new ways that could be both positive and negative, as soils and surface waters respond to further declines in acidic deposition. Using stream Al measurements from Buck Creek over varying seasons and flows, a new index, the base cation surplus (BCS), was developed to account for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) effects on the relationship between ANC and inorganic Al. Mobilization of inorganic Al, the form toxic to biota, occurs below a BCS of zero, regardless of DOC concentrations. Soil and stream data from Adirondack surveys showed that a BCS value of zero corresponds to a soil base saturation value in the B horizon of approximately 12%. Additional Adirondack survey work indicated that, where sugar maple stands grew in soils with base saturation values below 12%, seedling regeneration was nearly zero, suggesting a link between Al mobilization and impairment of tree regeneration. In recovering Adirondack lakes, the BCS was also used to show that increasing trends in DOC were accelerating decreases of inorganic Al beyond what would be expected from the increasing trends of ANC. Similar decreases of inorganic Al in Buck Creek, were coupled with increases in organic Al concentrations, which resulted in no trend in total Al concentrations despite a strong increase in pH. Sampling of Buck Creek soils in 1997, and again in 2009-2010, indicated a substantial decrease in forest floor exchangeable Al, of

  7. Closing the Loop Sampler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Integrated Waste Management Board, Sacramento.

    Closing the Loop (CTL) is a science curriculum designed to introduce students to integrated waste management through awareness. This document presents five lesson plans focusing on developing an understanding of natural resources, solid wastes, conservation, and the life of landfills. Contents include: (1) "What Are Natural Resources?"; (2)…

  8. Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piguet, O.

    2014-09-01

    In this talk, I give a short general introduction to Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG), beginning with some motivations for quantizing General Relativity, listing various attempts and then focusing on the case of LQG. Work supported in part by the Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico - CNPq (Brazil).

  9. A Looping Journey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Janet

    1999-01-01

    Recounts a teacher's experiences staying with the same group of children for more than one year (looping) as they progress through kindergarten and first grade. Discusses advantages of more stability and less trauma for the child, and more instructional time and less stress for the teacher. Addresses possible disadvantages of children having…

  10. Intestinal adaptation after extensive small bowel resection: differential changes in growth and insulin-like growth factor system messenger ribonucleic acids in jejunum and ileum.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, T R; Mantell, M P; Chow, J C; Rombeau, J L; Smith, R J

    1998-07-01

    The distal small bowel exhibits greater adaptive growth than proximal segments after partial small intestine resection. To explore this process, we evaluated adaptive cellularity, intestinal insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts, and effects of recombinant IGF-I treatment in jejunum and ileum of adult rats. Gastrostomy-fed animals underwent 80% jejuno-ileal resection or intestinal transection and reanastomosis without resection, followed by infusion of human recombinant IGF-I (2.4 mg/kgXday) or vehicle. After 7 days, resected rats demonstrated modest adaptive growth in jejunum and marked cell proliferation in ileum. Resection increased IGF-I mRNA in both jejunum (183%) and ileum (249%) and up-regulated IGFBP-4 mRNA levels in both tissues. IGFBP-3 mRNA fell significantly in ileum after resection. IGF-I infusion modestly increased ileal cellularity after resection, but had no effect in jejunum. IGF-I markedly increased IGFBP-3 mRNA levels in jejunum after both transection and resection. These data confirm that bowel resection induces greater adaptive growth in ileum than jejunum. IGF-I administration modestly increases ileal, but not jejunal, growth after resection. Increased levels of intestinal IGF-I and IGFBP-4 mRNA suggest roles for IGF-I and IGFBP-4 in mediating small bowel adaptation. Higher levels of jejunal IGFBP-3 mRNA may be related to limited jejunal vs. ileal growth after extensive jejuno-ileal resection.

  11. COLD TEST LOOP INTEGRATED TEST LOOP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, TJ

    2003-10-22

    A testing facility (Cold Test Loop) was constructed and operated to demonstrate the efficacy of the Accelerated Waste Retrieval (AWR) Project's planned sluicing approach to the remediation of Silos 1 and 2 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, Ohio. The two silos contain almost 10,000 tons of radium-bearing low-level waste, which consists primarily of solids of raffinates from processing performed on ores from the Democratic Republic of Congo (commonly referred to as ''Belgium Congo ores'') for the recovery of uranium. These silos are 80 ft in diameter, 36 ft high to the center of the dome, and 26.75 ft to the top of the vertical side walls. The test facility contained two test systems, each designed for a specific purpose. The first system, the Integrated Test Loop (ITL), a near-full-scale plant including the actual equipment to be installed at the Fernald Site, was designed to demonstrate the sluicing operation and confirm the selection of a slurry pump, the optimal sluicing nozzle operation, and the preliminary design material balance. The second system, the Component Test Loop (CTL), was designed to evaluate many of the key individual components of the waste retrieval system over an extended run. The major results of the initial testing performed during July and August 2002 confirmed that the AWR approach to sluicing was feasible. The ITL testing confirmed the following: (1) The selected slurry pump (Hazleton 3-20 type SHW) performed well and is suitable for AWR application. However, the pump's motor should be upgraded to a 200-hp model and be driven by a 150-hp variable-frequency drive (VFD). A 200-hp VFD is not much more expensive and would allow the pump to operate at full speed. (2) The best nozzle performance was achieved by using 15/16-in. nozzles operated alternately. This configuration appeared to most effectively mine the surrogate. (3) The Solartron densitometer, which was tested as an alternative mass flow measurement

  12. Extensive impact of saturated fatty acids on metabolic and cardiovascular profile in rats with diet-induced obesity: a canonical analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although hypercaloric interventions are associated with nutritional, endocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular disorders in obesity experiments, a rational distinction between the effects of excess adiposity and the individual roles of dietary macronutrients in relation to these disturbances has not previously been studied. This investigation analyzed the correlation between ingested macronutrients (including sucrose and saturated and unsaturated fatty acids) plus body adiposity and metabolic, hormonal, and cardiovascular effects in rats with diet-induced obesity. Methods Normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats were submitted to Control (CD; 3.2 Kcal/g) and Hypercaloric (HD; 4.6 Kcal/g) diets for 20 weeks followed by nutritional evaluation involving body weight and adiposity measurement. Metabolic and hormonal parameters included glycemia, insulin, insulin resistance, and leptin. Cardiovascular analysis included systolic blood pressure profile, echocardiography, morphometric study of myocardial morphology, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) protein expression. Canonical correlation analysis was used to evaluate the relationships between dietary macronutrients plus adiposity and metabolic, hormonal, and cardiovascular parameters. Results Although final group body weights did not differ, HD presented higher adiposity than CD. Diet induced hyperglycemia while insulin and leptin levels remained unchanged. In a cardiovascular context, systolic blood pressure increased with time only in HD. Additionally, in vivo echocardiography revealed cardiac hypertrophy and improved systolic performance in HD compared to CD; and while cardiomyocyte size was unchanged by diet, nuclear volume and collagen interstitial fraction both increased in HD. Also HD exhibited higher relative β-MHC content and β/α-MHC ratio than their Control counterparts. Importantly, body adiposity was weakly associated with cardiovascular effects, as saturated fatty acid intake was directly associated with most

  13. Functional extension of amino acid triads from the fourth transmembrane segment (S4) into its external linker in Shaker K(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Chin; Lin, Shin; Chang, Po-Chun; Lin, Hsiao-Chun; Kuo, Chung-Chin

    2011-10-28

    The highly conserved fourth transmembrane segment (S4) is the primary voltage sensor of the voltage-dependent channel and would move outward upon membrane depolarization. S4 comprises repetitive amino acid triads, each containing one basic (presumably charged and voltage-sensing) followed by two hydrophobic residues. We showed that the triad organization is functionally extended into the S3-4 linker right external to S4 in Shaker K(+) channels. The arginine (and lysine) substitutes for the third and the sixth residues (Ala-359 and Met-356, respectively) external to the outmost basic residue (Arg-362) in S4 dramatically and additively stabilize S4 in the resting conformation. Also, Leu-361 and Leu-358 play a very similar role in stabilization of S4 in the resting position, presumably by their hydrophobic side chains. Moreover, the double mutation A359R/E283A leads to a partially extruded position of S4 and consequently prominent closed-state inactivation, suggesting that Glu-283 in S2 may coordinate with the arginines in the extruded S4 upon depolarization. We conclude that the triad organization extends into the S3-4 linker for about six amino acids in terms of their microenvironment. These approximately six residues should retain the same helical structure as S4, and their microenvironment serves as part of the "gating canal" accommodating the extruding S4. Upon depolarization, S4 most likely moves initially as a sliding helix and follows the path that is set by the approximately six residues in the S3-4 linker in the resting state, whereas further S4 translocation could be more like, for example, a paddle, without orderly coordination from the contiguous surroundings.

  14. Loop-loop interactions govern multiple steps in indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zaccardi, Margot J; O'Rourke, Kathleen F; Yezdimer, Eric M; Loggia, Laura J; Woldt, Svenja; Boehr, David D

    2014-03-01

    Substrate binding, product release, and likely chemical catalysis in the tryptophan biosynthetic enzyme indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase (IGPS) are dependent on the structural dynamics of the β1α1 active-site loop. Statistical coupling analysis and molecular dynamic simulations had previously indicated that covarying residues in the β1α1 and β2α2 loops, corresponding to Arg54 and Asn90, respectively, in the Sulfolobus sulfataricus enzyme (ssIGPS), are likely important for coordinating functional motions of these loops. To test this hypothesis, we characterized site mutants at these positions for changes in catalytic function, protein stability and structural dynamics for the thermophilic ssIGPS enzyme. Although there were only modest changes in the overall steady-state kinetic parameters, solvent viscosity and solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effects indicated that these amino acid substitutions change the identity of the rate-determining step across multiple temperatures. Surprisingly, the N90A substitution had a dramatic effect on the general acid/base catalysis of the dehydration step, as indicated by the loss of the descending limb in the pH rate profile, which we had previously assigned to Lys53 on the β1α1 loop. These changes in enzyme function are accompanied with a quenching of ps-ns and µs-ms timescale motions in the β1α1 loop as measured by nuclear magnetic resonance studies. Altogether, our studies provide structural, dynamic and functional rationales for the coevolution of residues on the β1α1 and β2α2 loops, and highlight the multiple roles that the β1α1 loop plays in IGPS catalysis. Thus, substitution of covarying residues in the active-site β1α1 and β2α2 loops of indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase results in functional, structural, and dynamic changes, highlighting the multiple roles that the β1α1 loop plays in enzyme catalysis and the importance of regulating the structural dynamics of this loop through noncovalent

  15. Inner mappings of Bruck loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzer, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    K-loops have their origin in the theory of sharply 2-transitive groups. In this paper a proof is given that K-loops and Bruck loops are the same. For the proof it is necessary to show that in a (left) Bruck loop the left inner mappings L(b)L(a) L(ab)[minus sign]1 are automorphisms. This paper generalizes results of Glauberman [3], Kist [8] and Kreuzer [9].

  16. Loop Heat Pipes and Capillary Pumped Loops: An Applications Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Dan; Ku, Jentung; Swanson, Theodore; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Capillary pumped loops (CPLS) and loop heat pipes (LHPS) are versatile two-phase heat transfer devices which have recently gained increasing acceptance in space applications. Both systems work based on the same principles and have very similar designs. Nevertheless, some differences exist in the construction of the evaporator and the hydro-accumulator, and these differences lead to very distinct operating characteristics for each loop. This paper presents comparisons of the two loops from an applications perspective, and addresses their impact on spacecraft design, integration, and test. Some technical challenges and issues for both loops are also addressed.

  17. Modelling the coordination of the controls of stomatal aperture, transpiration, leaf growth, and abscisic acid: update and extension of the Tardieu-Davies model.

    PubMed

    Tardieu, François; Simonneau, Thierry; Parent, Boris

    2015-04-01

    Stomatal aperture, transpiration, leaf growth, hydraulic conductance, and concentration of abscisic acid in the xylem sap ([ABA]xyl) vary rapidly with time of day. They follow deterministic relations with environmental conditions and interact in such a way that a change in any one of them affects all the others. Hence, approaches based on measurements of one variable at a given time or on paired correlations are prone to a confusion of effects, in particular for studying their genetic variability. A dynamic model allows the simulation of environmental effects on the variables, and of multiple feedbacks between them at varying time resolutions. This paper reviews the control of water movement through the plant, stomatal aperture and growth, and translates them into equations in a model. It includes recent progress in understanding the intrinsic and environmental controls of tissue hydraulic conductance as a function of transpiration rate, circadian rhythms, and [ABA]xyl. Measured leaf water potential is considered as the water potential of a capacitance representing mature tissues, which reacts more slowly to environmental cues than xylem water potential and expansive growth. Combined with equations for water and ABA fluxes, it results in a dynamic model able to simulate variables with genotype-specific parameters. It allows adaptive roles for hydraulic processes to be proposed, in particular the circadian oscillation of root hydraulic conductance. The script of the model, in the R language, is included together with appropriate documentation and examples.

  18. Synergistic Effect of Slightly Acidic Electrolyzed Water and Ultrasound at Mild Heat Temperature in Microbial Reduction and Shelf-Life Extension of Fresh-Cut Bell Pepper.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ke; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of combined treatments (slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW), ultrasound (US), or mild heat (60°C)) on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in fresh-cut bell pepper, and the shelf-life and sensory quality (color and texture) were followed during storage at 4°C and 25°C. An additional 0.65, 1.72, and 2.70 log CFU/g reduction was achieved by heat treatments at 60°C for 1 min for DW, SAEW, and SAEW+US, respectively. Regardless of the type of pathogen, the combined treatment (SAEW+US+60°C) achieved a significantly (p < 0.05) longer lag time in all treatment groups. This combined treatment also prolonged the shelf-life of bell pepper up to 8 days and 30 h for the storage at 4°C and 25°C, respectively. There was also no significant difference in the color and hardness of treated (SAEW+US+60°C) bell pepper from that of control during the storage. This new hurdle approach is thus expected to improve the microbial safety of bell peppers during storage and distribution.

  19. Modelling the coordination of the controls of stomatal aperture, transpiration, leaf growth, and abscisic acid: update and extension of the Tardieu–Davies model

    PubMed Central

    Tardieu, François; Simonneau, Thierry; Parent, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Stomatal aperture, transpiration, leaf growth, hydraulic conductance, and concentration of abscisic acid in the xylem sap ([ABA] xyl) vary rapidly with time of day. They follow deterministic relations with environmental conditions and interact in such a way that a change in any one of them affects all the others. Hence, approaches based on measurements of one variable at a given time or on paired correlations are prone to a confusion of effects, in particular for studying their genetic variability. A dynamic model allows the simulation of environmental effects on the variables, and of multiple feedbacks between them at varying time resolutions. This paper reviews the control of water movement through the plant, stomatal aperture and growth, and translates them into equations in a model. It includes recent progress in understanding the intrinsic and environmental controls of tissue hydraulic conductance as a function of transpiration rate, circadian rhythms, and [ABA] xyl. Measured leaf water potential is considered as the water potential of a capacitance representing mature tissues, which reacts more slowly to environmental cues than xylem water potential and expansive growth. Combined with equations for water and ABA fluxes, it results in a dynamic model able to simulate variables with genotype-specific parameters. It allows adaptive roles for hydraulic processes to be proposed, in particular the circadian oscillation of root hydraulic conductance. The script of the model, in the R language, is included together with appropriate documentation and examples. PMID:25770586

  20. Synergistic Effect of Slightly Acidic Electrolyzed Water and Ultrasound at Mild Heat Temperature in Microbial Reduction and Shelf-Life Extension of Fresh-Cut Bell Pepper.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ke; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of combined treatments (slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW), ultrasound (US), or mild heat (60°C)) on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in fresh-cut bell pepper, and the shelf-life and sensory quality (color and texture) were followed during storage at 4°C and 25°C. An additional 0.65, 1.72, and 2.70 log CFU/g reduction was achieved by heat treatments at 60°C for 1 min for DW, SAEW, and SAEW+US, respectively. Regardless of the type of pathogen, the combined treatment (SAEW+US+60°C) achieved a significantly (p < 0.05) longer lag time in all treatment groups. This combined treatment also prolonged the shelf-life of bell pepper up to 8 days and 30 h for the storage at 4°C and 25°C, respectively. There was also no significant difference in the color and hardness of treated (SAEW+US+60°C) bell pepper from that of control during the storage. This new hurdle approach is thus expected to improve the microbial safety of bell peppers during storage and distribution. PMID:26032362

  1. Closed-loop anesthesia.

    PubMed

    LE Guen, Morgan; Liu, Ngai; Chazot, Thierry; Fischler, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Automated anesthesia which may offer to the physician time to control hemodynamic and to supervise neurological outcome and which may offer to the patient safety and quality was until recently consider as a holy grail. But this field of research is now increasing in every component of general anesthesia (hypnosis, nociception, neuromuscular blockade) and literature describes some successful algorithms - single or multi closed-loop controller. The aim of these devices is to control a predefined target and to continuously titrate anesthetics whatever the patients' co morbidities and surgical events to reach this target. Literature contains many randomized trials comparing manual and automated anesthesia and shows feasibility and safety of this system. Automation could quickly concern other aspects of anesthesia as fluid management and this review proposes an overview of closed-loop systems in anesthesia.

  2. Determinants of RNA hairpin loop-loop complex stability.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, R S; Crothers, D M

    1995-05-19

    Complexes formed by RNA hairpin loops with complementary loop sequences derived from Escherichia coli RNA I and RNA II, which are involved in the control of DNA replication of plasmid ColE1, have been analyzed to determine the sequence and structural elements required to achieve full affinity. Of particular interest is the origin of the enhanced stability of the complex formed by hairpin loops whose loop sequences have been inverted 5' to 3' with respect to wild-type sequences. Full complementarity of the two interacting loops is required to achieve full or enhanced affinity, while the stems of the two hairpins can differ. The major determinant of enhanced affinity lies in the base-pairs formed at positions 1 and 7 of the loops, together with the two base-pairs of each stem which are closest to the loop. Sequence variation in the middle of the loops, or further down the stem away from the loops, exerts only a modest influence on complex stability. We incorporate these results into a model for the loop-loop interaction which accounts for the importance of positions one and seven and the first two nucleotides of the stem, while providing potentially unique structures for recognition by the RNA one modulator protein. PMID:7539081

  3. Determinants of RNA hairpin loop-loop complex stability.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, R S; Crothers, D M

    1995-05-19

    Complexes formed by RNA hairpin loops with complementary loop sequences derived from Escherichia coli RNA I and RNA II, which are involved in the control of DNA replication of plasmid ColE1, have been analyzed to determine the sequence and structural elements required to achieve full affinity. Of particular interest is the origin of the enhanced stability of the complex formed by hairpin loops whose loop sequences have been inverted 5' to 3' with respect to wild-type sequences. Full complementarity of the two interacting loops is required to achieve full or enhanced affinity, while the stems of the two hairpins can differ. The major determinant of enhanced affinity lies in the base-pairs formed at positions 1 and 7 of the loops, together with the two base-pairs of each stem which are closest to the loop. Sequence variation in the middle of the loops, or further down the stem away from the loops, exerts only a modest influence on complex stability. We incorporate these results into a model for the loop-loop interaction which accounts for the importance of positions one and seven and the first two nucleotides of the stem, while providing potentially unique structures for recognition by the RNA one modulator protein.

  4. Chemical Looping Combustion Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Eyring; Gabor Konya

    2009-03-31

    One of the most promising methods of capturing CO{sub 2} emitted by coal-fired power plants for subsequent sequestration is chemical looping combustion (CLC). A powdered metal oxide such as NiO transfers oxygen directly to a fuel in a fuel reactor at high temperatures with no air present. Heat, water, and CO{sub 2} are released, and after H{sub 2}O condensation the CO{sub 2} (undiluted by N{sub 2}) is ready for sequestration, whereas the nickel metal is ready for reoxidation in the air reactor. In principle, these processes can be repeated endlessly with the original nickel metal/nickel oxide participating in a loop that admits fuel and rejects ash, heat, and water. Our project accumulated kinetic rate data at high temperatures and elevated pressures for the metal oxide reduction step and for the metal reoxidation step. These data will be used in computational modeling of CLC on the laboratory scale and presumably later on the plant scale. The oxygen carrier on which the research at Utah is focused is CuO/Cu{sub 2}O rather than nickel oxide because the copper system lends itself to use with solid fuels in an alternative to CLC called 'chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling' (CLOU).

  5. Force distribution in a semiflexible loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, James T.; Kim, Harold D.

    2016-04-01

    Loops undergoing thermal fluctuations are prevalent in nature. Ringlike or cross-linked polymers, cyclic macromolecules, and protein-mediated DNA loops all belong to this category. Stability of these molecules are generally described in terms of free energy, an average quantity, but it may also be impacted by local fluctuating forces acting within these systems. The full distribution of these forces can thus give us insights into mechanochemistry beyond the predictive capability of thermodynamics. In this paper, we study the force exerted by an inextensible semiflexible polymer constrained in a looped state. By using a simulation method termed "phase-space sampling," we generate the equilibrium distribution of chain conformations in both position and momentum space. We compute the constraint forces between the two ends of the loop in this chain ensemble using Lagrangian mechanics, and show that the mean of these forces is equal to the thermodynamic force. By analyzing kinetic and potential contributions to the forces, we find that the mean force acts in the direction of increasing extension not because of bending stress, but in spite of it. Furthermore, we obtain a distribution of constraint forces as a function of chain length, extension, and stiffness. Notably, increasing contour length decreases the average force, but the additional freedom allows fluctuations in the constraint force to increase. The force distribution is asymmetric and falls off less sharply than a Gaussian distribution. Our work exemplifies a system where large-amplitude fluctuations occur in a way unforeseen by a purely thermodynamic framework, and offers computational tools useful for efficient, unbiased simulation of a constrained system.

  6. An Extensible Information Grid for Risk Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Bell, David G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes recent work on developing an extensible information grid for risk management at NASA - a RISK INFORMATION GRID. This grid is being developed by integrating information grid technology with risk management processes for a variety of risk related applications. To date, RISK GRID applications are being developed for three main NASA processes: risk management - a closed-loop iterative process for explicit risk management, program/project management - a proactive process that includes risk management, and mishap management - a feedback loop for learning from historical risks that escaped other processes. This is enabled through an architecture involving an extensible database, structuring information with XML, schemaless mapping of XML, and secure server-mediated communication using standard protocols.

  7. The Effects of Hairpin loops on Ligand-DNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Binh; Wilson, W. David

    2009-01-01

    Hairpin nucleic acids are frequently used in physical studies due to their greater thermal stability compared to their equivalent duplex structures. They are also good models for more complex loop-containing structures such as quadruplexes, i-motifs, cruciforms, and molecular beacons. Although a connecting loop can increase stability, there is little information on how the loop influences the interactions of small molecules with attached base-paired nucleic acid regions. In this study, the effects of different hairpin loops on the interactions of A/T specific DNA minor groove binding agents with a common stem sequence have been investigated by spectroscopic and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor methods. The results indicate that the hairpin loop has little influence on the specific site interactions on the stem but significantly affects nonspecific binding. The use of a non-nucleotide loop (with a reduced negative charge) not only enhances the thermal stability of the hairpin but also reduces the non-specific binding at the loop without compromising the primary binding affinity on the stem. PMID:19778070

  8. Coupled dual loop absorption heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Sarkisian, Paul H.; Reimann, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1985-01-01

    A coupled dual loop absorption system which utilizes two separate complete loops. Each individual loop operates at three temperatures and two pressures. This low temperature loop absorber and condenser are thermally coupled to the high temperature loop evaporator, and the high temperature loop condenser and absorber are thermally coupled to the low temperature generator.

  9. Structure of stem-loop IV of Tetrahymena telomerase RNA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Fender, Jessica; Legassie, Jason D; Jarstfer, Michael B; Bryan, Tracy M; Varani, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    Conserved domains within the RNA component of telomerase provide the template for reverse transcription, recruit protein components to the holoenzyme and are required for enzymatic activity. Among the functionally essential domains in ciliate telomerase RNA is stem-loop IV, which strongly stimulates telomerase activity and processivity even when provided in trans. The NMR structure of Tetrahymena thermophila stem-loop IV shows a highly structured distal stem-loop linked to a conformationally flexible template-proximal region by a bulge that severely kinks the entire RNA. Through extensive structure–function studies, we identify residues that contribute to both these structural features and to enzymatic activity, with no apparent effect on the binding of TERT protein. We propose that the bending induced by the GA bulge and the flexibility of the template-proximal region allow positioning of the prestructured apical loop during the catalytic cycle. PMID:16778765

  10. Closing the loop.

    PubMed

    Dassau, E; Atlas, E; Phillip, M

    2011-02-01

    Closed-loop algorithms can be found in every aspect of everyday modern life. Automation and control are used constantly to provide safety and to improve quality of life. Closed-loop systems and algorithms can be found in home appliances, automobiles, aviation and more. Can one imagine nowadays driving a car without ABS, cruise control or even anti-sliding control? Similar principles of automation and control can be used in the management of diabetes mellitus (DM). The idea of an algorithmic/technological way to control glycaemia is not new and has been researched for more than four decades. However, recent improvements in both glucose-sensing technology and insulin delivery together with advanced control and systems engineering made this dream of an artificial pancreas possible. The artificial pancreas may be the next big step in the treatment of DM since the use of insulin analogues. An artificial pancreas can be described as internal or external devices that use continuous glucose measurements to automatically manage exogenous insulin delivery with or without other hormones in an attempt to restore glucose regulation in individuals with DM using a control algorithm. This device as described can be internal or external; can use different types of control algorithms with bi-hormonal or uni-hormonal design; and can utilise different ways to administer them. The different designs and implementations have transitioned recently from in silico simulations to clinical evaluation stage with practical applications in mind. This may mark the beginning of a new era in diabetes management with the introduction of semi-closed-loop systems that can prevent or minimise nocturnal hypoglycaemia, to hybrid systems that will manage blood glucose (BG) levels with minimal user intervention to finally fully automated systems that will take the user out of the loop. More and more clinical trials will be needed for the artificial pancreas to become a reality but initial encouraging

  11. Systematic study of the d = 5 Weinberg operator at one-loop order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Florian; Hirsch, Martin; Ota, Toshihiko; Winter, Walter

    2012-07-01

    We perform a systematic study of the d = 5 Weinberg operator at the one-loop level. We identify three different categories of neutrino mass generation: (1) finite irreducible diagrams; (2) finite extensions of the usual seesaw mechanisms at one-loop and (3) divergent loop realizations of the seesaws. All radiative one-loop neutrino mass models must fall into one of these classes. Case (1) gives the leading contribution to neutrino mass naturally and a classic example of this class is the Zee model. We demonstrate that in order to prevent that a tree level contribution dominates in case (2), Majorana fermions running in the loop and an additional {Z_2} symmetry are needed for a genuinely leading one-loop contribution. In the type-II loop extensions, the Yukawa coupling will be generated at one loop, whereas the type-I/III extensions can be interpreted as loop-induced inverse or linear seesaw mechanisms. For the divergent diagrams in category (3), the tree level contribution cannot be avoided and is in fact needed as counter term to absorb the divergence.

  12. Two loop divergences studied with one loop constrained differential renormalization

    SciTech Connect

    Seijas, Cesar . E-mail: cesar@fpaxp1.usc.es

    2007-08-15

    In the context of differential renormalization, using constrained differential renormalization rules at one-loop, we show how to obtain concrete results in two-loop calculations without making use of Ward identities. In order to do that, we obtain a list of integrals with overlapping divergences compatible with CDR that can be applied to various two-loop background field calculations. As an example, we obtain the two-loop coefficient of the beta function of QED, SuperQED and Yang-Mills theory.

  13. Accelerating the loop expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Ingermanson, R.

    1986-07-29

    This thesis introduces a new non-perturbative technique into quantum field theory. To illustrate the method, I analyze the much-studied phi/sup 4/ theory in two dimensions. As a prelude, I first show that the Hartree approximation is easy to obtain from the calculation of the one-loop effective potential by a simple modification of the propagator that does not affect the perturbative renormalization procedure. A further modification then susggests itself, which has the same nice property, and which automatically yields a convex effective potential. I then show that both of these modifications extend naturally to higher orders in the derivative expansion of the effective action and to higher orders in the loop-expansion. The net effect is to re-sum the perturbation series for the effective action as a systematic ''accelerated'' non-perturbative expansion. Each term in the accelerated expansion corresponds to an infinite number of terms in the original series. Each term can be computed explicitly, albeit numerically. Many numerical graphs of the various approximations to the first two terms in the derivative expansion are given. I discuss the reliability of the results and the problem of spontaneous symmetry-breaking, as well as some potential applications to more interesting field theories. 40 refs.

  14. Ekpyrotic loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2013-08-01

    We consider the ekpyrotic paradigm in the context of loop quantum cosmology. In loop quantum cosmology the classical big-bang singularity is resolved due to quantum gravity effects, and so the contracting ekpyrotic branch of the universe and its later expanding phase are connected by a smooth bounce. Thus, it is possible to explicitly determine the evolution of scalar perturbations, from the contracting ekpyrotic phase through the bounce and to the post-bounce expanding epoch. The possibilities of having either one or two scalar fields have been suggested for the ekpyrotic universe, and both cases will be considered here. In the case of a single scalar field, the constant mode of the curvature perturbations after the bounce is found to have a blue spectrum. On the other hand, for the two scalar field ekpyrotic model where scale-invariant entropy perturbations source additional terms in the curvature perturbations, the power spectrum in the post-bounce expanding cosmology is shown to be nearly scale-invariant and so agrees with observations.

  15. High temperature storage loop :

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  16. Loop Sequence Context Influences the Formation and Stability of the i-Motif for DNA Oligomers of Sequence (CCCXXX)4, where X = A and/or T, under Slightly Acidic Conditions.

    PubMed

    McKim, Mikeal; Buxton, Alexander; Johnson, Courtney; Metz, Amanda; Sheardy, Richard D

    2016-08-11

    The structure and stability of DNA is highly dependent upon the sequence context of the bases (A, G, C, and T) and the environment under which the DNA is prepared (e.g., buffer, temperature, pH, ionic strength). Understanding the factors that influence structure and stability of the i-motif conformation can lead to the design of DNA sequences with highly tunable properties. We have been investigating the influence of pH and temperature on the conformations and stabilities for all permutations of the DNA sequence (CCCXXX)4, where X = A and/or T, using spectroscopic approaches. All oligomers undergo transitions from single-stranded structures at pH 7.0 to i-motif conformations at pH 5.0 as evidenced by circular dichroism (CD) studies. These folded structures possess stacked C:CH(+) base pairs joined by loops of 5'-XXX-3'. Although the pH at the midpoint of the transition (pHmp) varies slightly with loop sequence, the linkage between pH and log K for the proton induced transition is highly loop sequence dependent. All oligomers also undergo the thermally induced i-motif to single-strand transition at pH 5.0 as the temperature is increased from 25 to 95 °C. The temperature at the midpoint of this transition (Tm) is also highly dependent on loop sequence context effects. For seven of eight possible permutations, the pH induced, and thermally induced transitions appear to be highly cooperative and two state. Analysis of the CD optical melting profiles via a van't Hoff approach reveals sequence-dependent thermodynamic parameters for the unfolding as well. Together, these data reveal that the i-motif conformation exhibits exquisite sensitivity to loop sequence context with respect to formation and stability. PMID:27438583

  17. Probabilistic Choice, Reversibility, Loops, and Miracles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddart, Bill; Bell, Pete

    We consider an addition of probabilistic choice to Abrial's Generalised Substitution Language (GSL) in a form that accommodates the backtracking interpretation of non-deterministic choice. Our formulation is introduced as an extension of the Prospective Values formalism we have developed to describe the results from a backtracking search. Significant features are that probabilistic choice is governed by feasibility, and non-termination is strict. The former property allows us to use probabilistic choice to generate search heuristics. In this paper we are particularly interested in iteration. By demonstrating sub-conjunctivity and monotonicity properties of expectations we give the basis for a fixed point semantics of iterative constructs, and we consider the practical proof treatment of probabilistic loops. We discuss loop invariants, loops with probabilistic behaviour, and probabilistic termination in the context of a formalism in which a small probability of non-termination can dominate our calculations, proposing a method of limits to avoid this problem. The formal programming constructs described have been implemented in a reversible virtual machine (RVM).

  18. The double loop mattress suture

    PubMed Central

    Biddlestone, John; Samuel, Madan; Creagh, Terry; Ahmad, Tariq

    2014-01-01

    An interrupted stitch type with favorable tissue characteristics will reduce local wound complications. We describe a novel high-strength, low-tension repair for the interrupted closure of skin, cartilage, and muscle, the double loop mattress stitch, and compare it experimentally with other interrupted closure methods. The performance of the double loop mattress technique in porcine cartilage and skeletal muscle is compared with the simple, mattress, and loop mattress interrupted sutures in both a novel porcine loading chamber and mechanical model. Wound apposition is assessed by electron microscopy. The performance of the double loop mattress in vivo was confirmed using a series of 805 pediatric laparotomies/laparoscopies. The double loop mattress suture is 3.5 times stronger than the loop mattress in muscle and 1.6 times stronger in cartilage (p ≤ 0.001). Additionally, the double loop mattress reduces tissue tension by 66% compared with just 53% for the loop mattress (p ≤ 0.001). Wound gapping is equal, and wound eversion appears significantly improved (p ≤ 0.001) compared with the loop mattress in vitro. In vivo, the double loop mattress performs as well as the loop mattress and significantly better than the mattress stitch in assessments of wound eversion and dehiscence. There were no episodes of stitch extrusion in our series of patients. The mechanical advantage of its intrinsic pulley arrangement gives the double loop mattress its favorable properties. Wound dehiscence is reduced because this stitch type is stronger and exerts less tension on the tissue than the mattress stitch. We advocate the use of this novel stitch wherever a high-strength, low-tension repair is required. These properties will enhance wound repair, and its application will be useful to surgeons of all disciplines. PMID:24698436

  19. 40 CFR 72.42 - Phase I extension plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.42 Phase I extension plans. (a... I extension plan from the requirement to comply with such unit's Acid Rain emissions limitations for... a.m. and 5 p.m. Eastern Standard Time at Acid Rain Division, Attn: Early Ranking, U.S....

  20. 40 CFR 72.42 - Phase I extension plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.42 Phase I extension plans. (a... I extension plan from the requirement to comply with such unit's Acid Rain emissions limitations for... a.m. and 5 p.m. Eastern Standard Time at Acid Rain Division, Attn: Early Ranking, U.S....

  1. 40 CFR 72.42 - Phase I extension plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.42 Phase I extension plans. (a... I extension plan from the requirement to comply with such unit's Acid Rain emissions limitations for... a.m. and 5 p.m. Eastern Standard Time at Acid Rain Division, Attn: Early Ranking, U.S....

  2. 40 CFR 72.42 - Phase I extension plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.42 Phase I extension plans. (a... I extension plan from the requirement to comply with such unit's Acid Rain emissions limitations for... a.m. and 5 p.m. Eastern Standard Time at Acid Rain Division, Attn: Early Ranking, U.S....

  3. 40 CFR 72.42 - Phase I extension plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.42 Phase I extension plans. (a... I extension plan from the requirement to comply with such unit's Acid Rain emissions limitations for... a.m. and 5 p.m. Eastern Standard Time at Acid Rain Division, Attn: Early Ranking, U.S....

  4. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2016-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The startup transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe startup behaviors. Topics include the four startup scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the startup scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power startup, and methods to enhance the startup success. Also addressed are the pressure spike and pressure surge during the startup transient, and repeated cycles of loop startup and shutdown under certain conditions.

  5. Loop-the-Loop: Bringing Theory into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suwonjandee, N.; Asavapibhop, B.

    2012-01-01

    During the Thai high-school physics teacher training programme, we used an aluminum loop-the-loop system built by the Institute for the Promotion of Teaching Science and Technology (IPST) to demonstrate a circular motion and investigate the concept of the conservation of mechanical energy. There were 27 high-school teachers from three provinces,…

  6. Dynamic PID loop control

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, L.; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.; Soyars, W.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R.; DeGraff, B.; Darve, C.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    The Horizontal Test Stand (HTS) SRF Cavity and Cryomodule 1 (CM1) of eight 9-cell, 1.3GHz SRF cavities are operating at Fermilab. For the cryogenic control system, how to hold liquid level constant in the cryostat by regulation of its Joule-Thompson JT-valve is very important after cryostat cool down to 2.0 K. The 72-cell cryostat liquid level response generally takes a long time delay after regulating its JT-valve; therefore, typical PID control loop should result in some cryostat parameter oscillations. This paper presents a type of PID parameter self-optimal and Time-Delay control method used to reduce cryogenic system parameters oscillation.

  7. Pulse thermal loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A pulse thermal loop heat transfer system includes a means to use pressure rises in a pair of evaporators to circulate a heat transfer fluid. The system includes one or more valves that iteratively, alternately couple the outlets the evaporators to the condenser. While flow proceeds from one of the evaporators to the condenser, heating creates a pressure rise in the other evaporator, which has its outlet blocked to prevent fluid from exiting the other evaporator. When the flow path is reconfigured to allow flow from the other evaporator to the condenser, the pressure in the other evaporator is used to circulate a pulse of fluid through the system. The reconfiguring of the flow path, by actuating or otherwise changing the configuration of the one or more valves, may be triggered when a predetermined pressure difference between the evaporators is reached.

  8. Vortex loops and Majoranas

    SciTech Connect

    Chesi, Stefano; Jaffe, Arthur; Loss, Daniel; Pedrocchi, Fabio L.

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the role that vortex loops play in characterizing eigenstates of interacting Majoranas. We give some general results and then focus on ladder Hamiltonian examples as a test of further ideas. Two methods yield exact results: (i) A mapping of certain spin Hamiltonians to quartic interactions of Majoranas shows that the spectra of these two examples coincide. (ii) In cases with reflection-symmetric Hamiltonians, we use reflection positivity for Majoranas to characterize vortices in the ground states. Two additional methods suggest wider applicability of these results: (iii) Numerical evidence suggests similar behavior for certain systems without reflection symmetry. (iv) A perturbative analysis also suggests similar behavior without the assumption of reflection symmetry.

  9. University of Wisconsin - Extension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Academic Affairs From the Provost Scholarship Governance Advancing Innovation Reimagining UW-Extension Awards Provost Staff Jobs Available ... extension , business and entrepreneurship , and broadcast and media innovations . Content on this page requires a newer version ...

  10. The Loop Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evertz, Hans Gerd

    1998-03-01

    Exciting new investigations have recently become possible for strongly correlated systems of spins, bosons, and fermions, through Quantum Monte Carlo simulations with the Loop Algorithm (H.G. Evertz, G. Lana, and M. Marcu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 875 (1993).) (For a recent review see: H.G. Evertz, cond- mat/9707221.) and its generalizations. A review of this new method, its generalizations and its applications is given, including some new results. The Loop Algorithm is based on a formulation of physical models in an extended ensemble of worldlines and graphs, and is related to Swendsen-Wang cluster algorithms. It performs nonlocal changes of worldline configurations, determined by local stochastic decisions. It overcomes many of the difficulties of traditional worldline simulations. Computer time requirements are reduced by orders of magnitude, through a corresponding reduction in autocorrelations. The grand-canonical ensemble (e.g. varying winding numbers) is naturally simulated. The continuous time limit can be taken directly. Improved Estimators exist which further reduce the errors of measured quantities. The algorithm applies unchanged in any dimension and for varying bond-strengths. It becomes less efficient in the presence of strong site disorder or strong magnetic fields. It applies directly to locally XYZ-like spin, fermion, and hard-core boson models. It has been extended to the Hubbard and the tJ model and generalized to higher spin representations. There have already been several large scale applications, especially for Heisenberg-like models, including a high statistics continuous time calculation of quantum critical exponents on a regularly depleted two-dimensional lattice of up to 20000 spatial sites at temperatures down to T=0.01 J.

  11. Uranyl Nitrate Flow Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L

    2008-10-01

    The objectives of the work discussed in this report were to: (1) develop a flow loop that would simulate the purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP); (2) develop a test plan that would simulate normal operation and disturbances that could be anticipated in an NUCP; (3) use the flow loop to test commercially available flowmeters for use as safeguards monitors; and (4) recommend a flowmeter for production-scale testing at an NUCP. There has been interest in safeguarding conversion plants because the intermediate products [uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}), and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6})] are all suitable uranium feedstocks for producing special nuclear materials. Furthermore, if safeguards are not applied virtually any nuclear weapons program can obtain these feedstocks without detection by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Historically, IAEA had not implemented safeguards until the purified UF{sub 6} product was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. H. A. Elayat et al. provide a basic definition of a safeguards system: 'The function of a safeguards system on a chemical conversion plant is in general terms to verify that no useful nuclear material is being diverted to use in a nuclear weapons program'. The IAEA now considers all highly purified uranium compounds as candidates for safeguarding. DOE is currently interested in 'developing instruments, tools, strategies, and methods that could be of use to the IAEA in the application of safeguards' for materials found in the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle-prior to the production of the uranium hexafluoride or oxides that have been the traditional starting point for IAEA safeguards. Several national laboratories, including Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Brookhaven, have been involved in developing tools or techniques for safeguarding conversion plants. This study

  12. RCD+: Fast loop modeling server.

    PubMed

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Canosa-Valls, Alejandro Jesús; Li, Yaohang; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Modeling loops is a critical and challenging step in protein modeling and prediction. We have developed a quick online service (http://rcd.chaconlab.org) for ab initio loop modeling combining a coarse-grained conformational search with a full-atom refinement. Our original Random Coordinate Descent (RCD) loop closure algorithm has been greatly improved to enrich the sampling distribution towards near-native conformations. These improvements include a new workflow optimization, MPI-parallelization and fast backbone angle sampling based on neighbor-dependent Ramachandran probability distributions. The server starts by efficiently searching the vast conformational space from only the loop sequence information and the environment atomic coordinates. The generated closed loop models are subsequently ranked using a fast distance-orientation dependent energy filter. Top ranked loops are refined with the Rosetta energy function to obtain accurate all-atom predictions that can be interactively inspected in an user-friendly web interface. Using standard benchmarks, the average root mean squared deviation (RMSD) is 0.8 and 1.4 Å for 8 and 12 residues loops, respectively, in the challenging modeling scenario in where the side chains of the loop environment are fully remodeled. These results are not only very competitive compared to those obtained with public state of the art methods, but also they are obtained ∼10-fold faster. PMID:27151199

  13. RCD+: Fast loop modeling server

    PubMed Central

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Canosa-Valls, Alejandro Jesús; Li, Yaohang; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Modeling loops is a critical and challenging step in protein modeling and prediction. We have developed a quick online service (http://rcd.chaconlab.org) for ab initio loop modeling combining a coarse-grained conformational search with a full-atom refinement. Our original Random Coordinate Descent (RCD) loop closure algorithm has been greatly improved to enrich the sampling distribution towards near-native conformations. These improvements include a new workflow optimization, MPI-parallelization and fast backbone angle sampling based on neighbor-dependent Ramachandran probability distributions. The server starts by efficiently searching the vast conformational space from only the loop sequence information and the environment atomic coordinates. The generated closed loop models are subsequently ranked using a fast distance-orientation dependent energy filter. Top ranked loops are refined with the Rosetta energy function to obtain accurate all-atom predictions that can be interactively inspected in an user-friendly web interface. Using standard benchmarks, the average root mean squared deviation (RMSD) is 0.8 and 1.4 Å for 8 and 12 residues loops, respectively, in the challenging modeling scenario in where the side chains of the loop environment are fully remodeled. These results are not only very competitive compared to those obtained with public state of the art methods, but also they are obtained ∼10-fold faster. PMID:27151199

  14. Cooled artery extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artery vapor trap. A heat pipe artery is constructed with an extension protruding from the evaporator end of the heat pipe beyond the active area of the evaporator. The vapor migrates into the artery extension because of gravity or liquid displacement, and cooling the extension condenses the vapor to liquid, thus preventing vapor lock in the working portion of the artery by removing vapor from within the active artery. The condensed liquid is then transported back to the evaporator by the capillary action of the artery extension itself or by wick located within the extension.

  15. Pseudo Algebraically Closed Extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bary-Soroker, Lior

    2009-07-01

    This PhD deals with the notion of pseudo algebraically closed (PAC) extensions of fields. It develops a group-theoretic machinery, based on a generalization of embedding problems, to study these extensions. Perhaps the main result is that although there are many PAC extensions, the Galois closure of a proper PAC extension is separably closed. The dissertation also contains the following subjects. The group theoretical counterpart of pseudo algebraically closed extensions, the so-called projective pairs. Applications to seemingly unrelated subjects, e.g., an analog of Dirichlet's theorem about primes in arithmetic progression for polynomial rings in one variable over infinite fields.

  16. Higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangdong

    2016-07-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is the symmetric sector of loop quantum gravity. In this paper, we generalize the structure of loop quantum cosmology to the theories with arbitrary spacetime dimensions. The isotropic and homogeneous cosmological model in n+1 dimensions is quantized by the loop quantization method. Interestingly, we find that the underlying quantum theories are divided into two qualitatively different sectors according to spacetime dimensions. The effective Hamiltonian and modified dynamical equations of n+1 dimensional LQC are obtained. Moreover, our results indicate that the classical big bang singularity is resolved in arbitrary spacetime dimensions by a quantum bounce. We also briefly discuss the similarities and differences between the n+1 dimensional model and the 3+1 dimensional one. Our model serves as a first example of higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology and offers the possibility to investigate quantum gravity effects in higher dimensional cosmology.

  17. Wilson Loop Diagrams and Positroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwala, Susama; Marin-Amat, Eloi

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study a new application of the positive Grassmannian to Wilson loop diagrams (or MHV diagrams) for scattering amplitudes in N= 4 Super Yang-Mill theory (N = 4 SYM). There has been much interest in studying this theory via the positive Grassmannians using BCFW recursion. This is the first attempt to study MHV diagrams for planar Wilson loop calculations (or planar amplitudes) in terms of positive Grassmannians. We codify Wilson loop diagrams completely in terms of matroids. This allows us to apply the combinatorial tools in matroid theory used to identify positroids (non-negative Grassmannians) to Wilson loop diagrams. In doing so, we find that certain non-planar Wilson loop diagrams define positive Grassmannians. While non-planar diagrams do not have physical meaning, this finding suggests that they may have value as an algebraic tool, and deserve further investigation.

  18. Loop-bed combustion apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer-Yu; Mei, Joseph S.; Slagle, Frank D.; Notestein, John E.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a combustion apparatus in the configuration of a oblong annulus defining a closed loop. Particulate coal together with a sulfur sorbent such as sulfur or dolomite is introduced into the closed loop, ignited, and propelled at a high rate of speed around the loop. Flue gas is withdrawn from a location in the closed loop in close proximity to an area in the loop where centrifugal force imposed upon the larger particulate material maintains these particulates at a location spaced from the flue gas outlet. Only flue gas and smaller particulates resulting from the combustion and innerparticle grinding are discharged from the combustor. This structural arrangement provides increased combustion efficiency due to the essentially complete combustion of the coal particulates as well as increased sulfur absorption due to the innerparticle grinding of the sorbent which provides greater particle surface area.

  19. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2014-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The start-up transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe start-up behaviors. Topics include the four start-up scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the start-up scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power start-up, and methods to enhance the start-up success. Also addressed are the thermodynamic constraint between the evaporator and reservoir in the loop heat pipe operation, the superheat requirement for nucleate boiling, pressure spike and pressure surge during the start-up transient, and repeated cycles of loop start-up andshutdown under certain conditions.

  20. On loop corrections to subleading soft behavior of gluons and gravitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bern, Zvi; Davies, Scott; Nohle, Josh

    2014-10-01

    Cachazo and Strominger recently proposed an extension of the soft-graviton theorem found by Weinberg. In addition, they proved the validity of their extension at tree level. This was motivated by a Virasoro symmetry of the gravity S-matrix related to Bondi, van der Burg, Metzner, and Sachs symmetry. As shown long ago by Weinberg, the leading behavior is not corrected by loops. In contrast, we show that with the standard definition of soft limits in dimensional regularization, the subleading behavior is anomalous and modified by loop effects. We argue that there are no new types of corrections to the first subleading behavior beyond one loop and to the second subleading behavior beyond two loops. To facilitate our investigation, we introduce a new momentum-conservation prescription for defining the subleading terms of the soft limit. We discuss the loop-level subleading soft behavior of gauge-theory amplitudes before turning to gravity amplitudes.

  1. Tunable microwave metamaterial absorbers using varactor-loaded split loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jinfeng; Li, Delong; Yan, Shuang; Cai, Yijun; Huo Liu, Qing; Lin, Timothy

    2015-12-01

    Currently, implementation of active circuit elements within metamaterials is an effective way to make them electrically tunable. We combine varactors with split copper loops in a metamaterial absorber in order to obtain an electrically tunable microwave response. This absorber has a compact planar structure and a simplified back feeding network. Flexible frequency tunability of the microwave reflection in the range of 5-6 GHz is experimentally achieved. The design, simulation, and experimental results are systematically presented. The proposed method is scalable for developing active metamaterial absorbers based on metal loops, and shows a promising potential of active metamaterial absorbers for extensive microwave applications.

  2. Modeling loop entropy.

    PubMed

    Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    Proteins fold from a highly disordered state into a highly ordered one. Traditionally, the folding problem has been stated as one of predicting "the" tertiary structure from sequential information. However, new evidence suggests that the ensemble of unfolded forms may not be as disordered as once believed, and that the native form of many proteins may not be described by a single conformation, but rather an ensemble of its own. Quantifying the relative disorder in the folded and unfolded ensembles as an entropy difference may therefore shed light on the folding process. One issue that clouds discussions of "entropy" is that many different kinds of entropy can be defined: entropy associated with overall translational and rotational Brownian motion, configurational entropy, vibrational entropy, conformational entropy computed in internal or Cartesian coordinates (which can even be different from each other), conformational entropy computed on a lattice, each of the above with different solvation and solvent models, thermodynamic entropy measured experimentally, etc. The focus of this work is the conformational entropy of coil/loop regions in proteins. New mathematical modeling tools for the approximation of changes in conformational entropy during transition from unfolded to folded ensembles are introduced. In particular, models for computing lower and upper bounds on entropy for polymer models of polypeptide coils both with and without end constraints are presented. The methods reviewed here include kinematics (the mathematics of rigid-body motions), classical statistical mechanics, and information theory.

  3. Rogowski Loop design for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    McCormack, B.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; Hatcher, R.

    2000-01-06

    The Rogowski Loop is one of the most basic diagnostics for tokamak operations. On the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), the plasma current Rogowski Loop had the constraints of the very limited space available on the center stack, 5,000 volt isolation, flexibility requirements as it remained a part of the Center Stack assembly after the first phase of operation, and a +120 C temperature requirement. For the second phase of operation, four Halo Current Rogowski Loops under the Center Stack tiles will be installed having +600 C and limited space requirements. Also as part of the second operational phase, up to ten Rogowski Loops will installed to measure eddy currents in the Passive Plate support structures with +350 C, restricted space, and flexibility requirements. This presentation will provide the details of the material selection, fabrication techniques, testing, and installation results of the Rogowski Loops that were fabricated for the high temperature operational and bakeout requirements, high voltage isolation requirements, and the space and flexibility requirements imposed upon the Rogowski Loops. In the future operational phases of NSTX, additional Rogowski Loops could be anticipated that will measure toroidal plasma currents in the vacuum vessel and in the Passive Plate assemblies.

  4. Type Safe Extensible Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Wonseok

    2009-10-01

    Software products evolve over time. Sometimes they evolve by adding new features, and sometimes by either fixing bugs or replacing outdated implementations with new ones. When software engineers fail to anticipate such evolution during development, they will eventually be forced to re-architect or re-build from scratch. Therefore, it has been common practice to prepare for changes so that software products are extensible over their lifetimes. However, making software extensible is challenging because it is difficult to anticipate successive changes and to provide adequate abstraction mechanisms over potential changes. Such extensibility mechanisms, furthermore, should not compromise any existing functionality during extension. Software engineers would benefit from a tool that provides a way to add extensions in a reliable way. It is natural to expect programming languages to serve this role. Extensible programming is one effort to address these issues. In this thesis, we present type safe extensible programming using the MLPolyR language. MLPolyR is an ML-like functional language whose type system provides type-safe extensibility mechanisms at several levels. After presenting the language, we will show how these extensibility mechanisms can be put to good use in the context of product line engineering. Product line engineering is an emerging software engineering paradigm that aims to manage variations, which originate from successive changes in software.

  5. A Computer Model of a Phase Lock Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Ralph Paul

    1973-01-01

    A computer model is reported of a PLL (phase-lock loop), preceded by a bandpass filter, which is valid when the bandwidth of the bandpass filter is of the same order of magnitude as the natural frequency of the PLL. New results for the PLL natural frequency equal to the bandpass filter bandwidth are presented for a second order PLL operating with carrier plus noise as the input. However, it is shown that extensions to higher order loops, and to the case of a modulated carrier are straightforward. The new results presented give the cycle skipping rate of the PLL as a function of the input carrier to noise ratio when the PLL natural frequency is equal to the bandpass filter bandwidth. Preliminary results showing the variation of the output noise power and cycle skipping rates of the PLL as a function of the loop damping ratio for the PLL natural frequency equal to the bandpass filter bandwidth are also included.

  6. Asymmetric structure of five and six membered DNA hairpin loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, U.; Chang, S.

    1995-01-01

    The tertiary structure of nucleic acid hairpins was elucidated by means of the accessibility of the single-strand-specific nuclease from mung bean. This molecular probe has proven especially useful in determining details of the structural arrangement of the nucleotides within a loop. In this study 3'-labeling is introduced to complement previously used 5'-labeling in order to assess and to exclude possible artifacts of the method. Both labeling procedures result in mutually consistent cleavage patterns. Therefore, methodological artifacts can be excluded and the potential of the nuclease as structural probe is increased. DNA hairpins with five and six membered loops reveal an asymmetric loop structure with a sharp bend of the phosphate-ribose backbone between the second and third nucleotide on the 3'-side of a loop. These hairpin structures differ from smaller loops with 3 or 4 members, which reveal this type of bend between the first and second 3' nucleotide, and resemble with respect to the asymmetry anticodon loops of tRNA.

  7. SDO Sees Flourishing Magnetic Loops

    NASA Video Gallery

    A bright set of loops near the edge of the sun’s face grew and shifted quickly after the magnetic field was disrupted by a small eruption on Nov. 25, 2015. Charged particles emitting light in extre...

  8. Automatic blocking of nested loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Robert; Dongarra, Jack J.

    1990-01-01

    Blocked algorithms have much better properties of data locality and therefore can be much more efficient than ordinary algorithms when a memory hierarchy is involved. On the other hand, they are very difficult to write and to tune for particular machines. The reorganization is considered of nested loops through the use of known program transformations in order to create blocked algorithms automatically. The program transformations used are strip mining, loop interchange, and a variant of loop skewing in which invertible linear transformations (with integer coordinates) of the loop indices are allowed. Some problems are solved concerning the optimal application of these transformations. It is shown, in a very general setting, how to choose a nearly optimal set of transformed indices. It is then shown, in one particular but rather frequently occurring situation, how to choose an optimal set of block sizes.

  9. SDO Sees Brightening Magnetic Loops

    NASA Video Gallery

    Two active regions sprouted arches of bundled magnetic loops in this video from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory taken on Nov. 11-12, 2015. Charged particles spin along the magnetic field, tracing...

  10. Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure (LEEP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... that acts like a scalpel (surgical knife). An electric current is passed through the loop, which cuts away ... A procedure in which an instrument works with electric current to destroy tissue. Local Anesthesia: The use of ...

  11. Number of cosmic string loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Olum, Ken D.; Shlaer, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Using recent simulation results, we provide the mass and speed spectrum of cosmic string loops. This is the quantity of primary interest for many phenomenological signatures of cosmic strings, and it can be accurately predicted using recently acquired detailed knowledge of the loop production function. We emphasize that gravitational smoothing of long strings plays a negligible role in determining the total number of existing loops. We derive a bound on the string tension imposed by recent constraints on the stochastic gravitational wave background from pulsar timing arrays, finding Gμ ≤2.8×10-9. We also provide a derivation of the Boltzmann equation for cosmic string loops in the language of differential forms.

  12. Observations of loops and prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Keith T.

    1994-01-01

    We review recent observations by the Yohkoh-SXT (Soft X-ray Telescope) in collaboration with other spacecraft and ground-based observatories of coronal loops and prominences. These new results point to problems that SoHO will be able to address. With a unique combination of rapid-cadence digital imaging (greater than or equal to 32 s full-disk and greater than or equal to 2 s partial-frame images), high spatial resolution (greater than or equal to 2.5 arcsec pixels), high sensitivity (EM less than or equal to 10(exp 42) cm(exp -3)), a low-scatter mirror, and large dynamic range, SXT can observe a vast range of targets on the Sun. Over the first 21 months of Yohkoh operations SXT has taken over one million images of the corona and so is building up an invaluable long-term database on the large-scale corona and loop geometry. The most striking thing about the SXT images is the range of loop sizes and shapes. The active regions are a bright tangle of magnetic field lines, surrounded by a network of large-scale quiet-Sun loops stretching over distances in excess of 105 km. The cross-section of most loops seems to be constant. Loops displaying significant Gamma's are the exception, not the rule, implying the presence of widespread currents in the corona. All magnetic structures show changes. Time scales range from seconds to months. The question of how these structures are formed, become filled with hot plasma, and are maintained is still open. While we see the propagation of brightenings along the length of active-region loops and in X-ray jets with velocities of several hundred km/s, much higher velocities are seen in the quiet Sun. In XBP flares, for example, velocities of over 1000 km/s are common. Active-region loops seem to be in constant motion, moving slowly outward, carrying plasma with them. During flares, loops often produce localized brightenings at the base and later at the apex of the loop. Quiescent filaments and prominences have been observed regularly

  13. Dynamical behaviour in coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, Bernhard M.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid variability has been found in two active region coronal loops observed by the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) and the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS) onboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). There appear to be surprisingly few observations of the short-time scale behavior of hot loops, and the evidence presented herein lends support to the hypothesis that coronal heating may be impulsive and driven by flaring.

  14. The corrections from one loop and two-loop Barr-Zee type diagrams to muon MDM in BLMSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shu-Min; Feng, Tai-Fu; Zhang, Hai-Bin; Yan, Ben; Zhan, Xi-Jie

    2014-11-01

    In a supersymmetric extension of the standard model where baryon and lepton numbers are local gauge symmetries(BLMSSM) and the Yukawa couplings between Higgs doublets and exotic quarks are considered, we study the one loop diagrams and the two-loop Barr-Zee type diagrams with a closed Fermi(scalar) loop between the vector Boson and Higgs. Using the effective Lagrangian method, we deduce the Wilson coefficients of dimension 6 operators contributing to the anomalous magnetic moment of muon, which satisfies the electromagnetic gauge invariance. In the numerical analysis, we consider the experiment constraints from Higgs and neutrino data. In some parameter space, the new physics contribution is large and even reaches 24 × 10-10, which can remedy the deviation well.

  15. THE CORONAL LOOP INVENTORY PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.; Christian, G. M.; Dhaliwal, R. S. S.; Paul, K. S.

    2015-11-01

    Most coronal physicists now seem to agree that loops are composed of tangled magnetic strands and have both isothermal and multithermal cross-field temperature distributions. As yet, however, there is no information on the relative importance of each of these categories, and we do not know how common one is with respect to the other. In this paper, we investigate these temperature properties for all loop segments visible in the 171-Å image of AR 11294, which was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on 2011 September 15. Our analysis revealed 19 loop segments, but only 2 of these were clearly isothermal. Six additional segments were effectively isothermal, that is, the plasma emission to which AIA is sensitive could not be distinguished from isothermal emission, within measurement uncertainties. One loop had both isothermal transition region and multithermal coronal solutions. Another five loop segments require multithermal plasma to reproduce the AIA observations. The five remaining loop segments could not be separated reliably from the background in the crucial non-171-Å AIA images required for temperature analysis. We hope that the direction of coronal heating models and the efforts modelers spend on various heating scenarios will be influenced by these results.

  16. The Coronal Loop Inventory Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.; Christian, G. M.; Dhaliwal, R. S. S.; Paul, K. S.

    2015-11-01

    Most coronal physicists now seem to agree that loops are composed of tangled magnetic strands and have both isothermal and multithermal cross-field temperature distributions. As yet, however, there is no information on the relative importance of each of these categories, and we do not know how common one is with respect to the other. In this paper, we investigate these temperature properties for all loop segments visible in the 171-Å image of AR 11294, which was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on 2011 September 15. Our analysis revealed 19 loop segments, but only 2 of these were clearly isothermal. Six additional segments were effectively isothermal, that is, the plasma emission to which AIA is sensitive could not be distinguished from isothermal emission, within measurement uncertainties. One loop had both isothermal transition region and multithermal coronal solutions. Another five loop segments require multithermal plasma to reproduce the AIA observations. The five remaining loop segments could not be separated reliably from the background in the crucial non-171-Å AIA images required for temperature analysis. We hope that the direction of coronal heating models and the efforts modelers spend on various heating scenarios will be influenced by these results.

  17. Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    Research at the Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility was successfully concluded in September 1979. In 13,000 hours of operation over a three and one half year period, the nominal 10 megawatt electrical equivalent GLEF provided the opportunity to identify problems in working with highly saline geothermal fluids and to develop solutions that could be applied to a commercial geothermal power plant producing electricity. A seven and one half year period beginning in April 1972, with early well flow testing and ending in September 1979, with the completion of extensive facility and reservoir operations is covered. During this period, the facility was designed, constructed and operated in several configurations. A comprehensive reference document, addressing or referencing documentation of all the key areas investigated is presented.

  18. Run-time parallelization and scheduling of loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltz, Joel H.; Mirchandaney, Ravi; Baxter, Doug

    1988-01-01

    The class of problems that can be effectively compiled by parallelizing compilers is discussed. This is accomplished with the doconsider construct which would allow these compilers to parallelize many problems in which substantial loop-level parallelism is available but cannot be detected by standard compile-time analysis. We describe and experimentally analyze mechanisms used to parallelize the work required for these types of loops. In each of these methods, a new loop structure is produced by modifying the loop to be parallelized. We also present the rules by which these loop transformations may be automated in order that they be included in language compilers. The main application area of the research involves problems in scientific computations and engineering. The workload used in our experiment includes a mixture of real problems as well as synthetically generated inputs. From our extensive tests on the Encore Multimax/320, we have reached the conclusion that for the types of workloads we have investigated, self-execution almost always performs better than pre-scheduling. Further, the improvement in performance that accrues as a result of global topological sorting of indices as opposed to the less expensive local sorting, is not very significant in the case of self-execution.

  19. Loop quantum cosmology of Bianchi type I models

    SciTech Connect

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2009-04-15

    The ''improved dynamics'' of loop quantum cosmology is extended to include anisotropies of the Bianchi type I model. As in the isotropic case, a massless scalar field serves as a relational time parameter. However, the extension is nontrivial because one has to face several conceptual subtleties as well as technical difficulties. These include a better understanding of the relation between loop quantum gravity and loop quantum cosmology, handling novel features associated with the nonlocal field strength operator in presence of anisotropies, and finding dynamical variables that make the action of the Hamiltonian constraint manageable. Our analysis provides a conceptually complete description that overcomes limitations of earlier works. We again find that the big-bang singularity is resolved by quantum geometry effects but, because of the presence of Weyl curvature, Planck scale physics is now much richer than in the isotropic case. Since the Bianchi I models play a key role in the Belinskii, Khalatnikov, Lifshitz conjecture on the nature of generic spacelike singularities in general relativity, the quantum dynamics of Bianchi I cosmologies is likely to provide considerable intuition about the fate of generic spacelike singularities in quantum gravity. Finally, we show that the quantum dynamics of Bianchi I cosmologies projects down exactly to that of the Friedmann model. This opens a new avenue to relate more complicated models to simpler ones, thereby providing a new tool to relate the quantum dynamics of loop quantum gravity to that of loop quantum cosmology.

  20. Kalman Orbit Optimized Loop Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Lawrence E.; Meehan, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Under certain conditions of low signal power and/or high noise, there is insufficient signal to noise ratio (SNR) to close tracking loops with individual signals on orbiting Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. In addition, the processing power available from flight computers is not great enough to implement a conventional ultra-tight coupling tracking loop. This work provides a method to track GNSS signals at very low SNR without the penalty of requiring very high processor throughput to calculate the loop parameters. The Kalman Orbit-Optimized Loop (KOOL) tracking approach constitutes a filter with a dynamic model and using the aggregate of information from all tracked GNSS signals to close the tracking loop for each signal. For applications where there is not a good dynamic model, such as very low orbits where atmospheric drag models may not be adequate to achieve the required accuracy, aiding from an IMU (inertial measurement unit) or other sensor will be added. The KOOL approach is based on research JPL has done to allow signal recovery from weak and scintillating signals observed during the use of GPS signals for limb sounding of the Earth s atmosphere. That approach uses the onboard PVT (position, velocity, time) solution to generate predictions for the range, range rate, and acceleration of the low-SNR signal. The low- SNR signal data are captured by a directed open loop. KOOL builds on the previous open loop tracking by including feedback and observable generation from the weak-signal channels so that the MSR receiver will continue to track and provide PVT, range, and Doppler data, even when all channels have low SNR.

  1. Study of the Open Loop and Closed Loop Oscillator Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Imel, George R.; Baker, Benjamin; Riley, Tony; Langbehn, Adam; Aryal, Harishchandra; Benzerga, M. Lamine

    2015-04-11

    This report presents the progress and completion of a five-year study undertaken at Idaho State University of the measurement of very small worth reactivity samples comparing open and closed loop oscillator techniques.The study conclusively demonstrated the equivalency of the two techniques with regard to uncertainties in reactivity values, i.e., limited by reactor noise. As those results are thoroughly documented in recent publications, in this report we will concentrate on the support work that was necessary. For example, we describe in some detail the construction and calibration of a pilot rod for the closed loop system. We discuss the campaign to measure the required reactor parameters necessary for inverse-kinetics. Finally, we briefly discuss the transfer of the open loop technique to other reactor systems.

  2. Glycoprotein degradation in the blind loop syndrome: identification of glycosidases in jejunal contents.

    PubMed

    Prizont, R

    1981-02-01

    Contents obtained from jejunum of normal controls, self-emptying and self-filling blind loop rats were analyzed for the presence of glycoprotein-degrading glycosidases. The blind loop syndrome was documented by the increased fat excretion and slower growth rate of self-filling blind loop rats 6 wk after surgery. With p-nitrophenylglycosides as substrate, the specific activity of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, a potential blood group A destroying glycosidase, was 0.90+/-0.40 mU/mg of protein. This level was 23-fold higher than the specific activity of normal controls. In partially purified self-filling blind loop contents, the activity of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase was 9- to 70-fold higher than activities of self-emptying and normal controls. Antibiotic treatment with chloromycetin and polymyxin decreased 24-fold the glycosidase levels in self-filling blind loops. In experiments with natural substrate, the blood group A titer of a20,000g supernate from normal jejunal homogenates decreased 128-fold after 24-h incubation with blind loop contents. Normal contents failed to diminish the blood group reactivity of the natural substrate. Furthermore, blind loop contents markedly decreased the blood group A titer of isolated brush borders. Incubation between blind loop bacteria and mucosal homogenates or isolated brush borders labeled with d-[U-(14)C]glucosamine revealed increased production of labeled ether extractable organic acids. Likewise, intraperitoneal injection of d-[U-(14)C]glucosamine into self-filling blind loop rats resulted in incorporation of the label into luminal short chain fatty acids. These results suggest that glycosidases may provide a mechanism by which blind loop bacteria obtain sugars from intestinal glycoproteins. The released sugars are used and converted by bacteria into energy and organic acids. This use of the host's glycoproteins would allow blind loop bacteria to grow and survive within the lumen independent of exogenous sources.

  3. RPC gas recovery by open loop method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Avinash; Kalmani, S. D.; Mondal, N. K.; Satyanarayana, B.

    2009-05-01

    RPC detectors require to be flushed with small but continuous flow of gas mixture. Dealing with large number of detectors, gas consumption to very large volumes. Gas flow is a running expense and constituent gases are too expensive to be treated as consumables. Exhaust gas mixture from detectors is a potential environmental hazard if discharged directly into the atmosphere. Storage of gases on a large scale also leads to inventory- and safety-related problems. A solution to these problems is the recovery and reuse of exhaust gas mixture from RPC detectors. Close loop method employs recirculation of exhausted gas mixture after purification, analysis and addition of top-up quantities. In open loop method, under consideration here, individual component gases are separated from gas mixture and reused as source. During open loop process, gases liquefiable at low pressures are separated from ones liquefiable at high pressure. The gas phase components within each group are successively separated by either fractional condensation or gravity separation. Gas mixture coming from RPC exhaust is first desiccated by passage through molecular sieve adsorbent type (3A+4A). Subsequent scrubbing over basic activated alumina removes toxic and acidic contaminants such as S 2F 10 produced during corona (arcing) discharge. In the first stage of separation isobutane and freon are concentrated by diffusion and liquefied by fractional condensation by cooling upto -30 °C. Liquefied gases are returned to source tanks. In the second stage of separation, argon and sulphur hexafluoride, the residual gases, are concentrated by settling due to density difference. SF 6 is stored for recovery by condensation at high pressure while argon is further purified by thermal cracking of crossover impurities at 1000 °C followed by wet scrubbing.

  4. Waves in Solar Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T. J.

    2016-02-01

    The corona is visible in the optical band only during a total solar eclipse or with a coronagraph. Coronal loops are believed to be plasma-filled closed magnetic flux anchored in the photosphere. Based on the temperature regime, they are generally classified into cool, warm, and hot loops. The magnetized coronal structures support propagation of various types of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) waves. This chapter reviews the recent progress made in studies based on observations of four types of wave phenomena mainly occurring in coronal loops of active regions, including: flare-excited slow-mode waves; impulsively excited kink-mode waves; propagating slow magnetoacoustic waves; and ubiquitous propagating kink (Alfvénic) waves. This review not only comprehensively discusses these waves and coronal seismology but also topics that are newly emerging or hotly debated in order to provide the reader with useful guidance on further studies.

  5. Criteria for saturated magnetization loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harres, A.; Mikhov, M.; Skumryev, V.; Andrade, A. M. H. de; Schmidt, J. E.; Geshev, J.

    2016-03-01

    Proper estimation of magnetization curve parameters is vital in studying magnetic systems. In the present article, criteria for discrimination non-saturated (minor) from saturated (major) hysteresis loops are proposed. These employ the analysis of (i) derivatives of both ascending and descending branches of the loop, (ii) remanent magnetization curves, and (iii) thermomagnetic curves. Computational simulations are used in order to demonstrate their validity. Examples illustrating the applicability of these criteria to well-known real systems, namely Fe3O4 and Ni fine particles, are provided. We demonstrate that the anisotropy-field value estimated from a visual examination of an only apparently major hysteresis loop could be more than two times lower than the real one.

  6. Digital phase-lock loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Jr., Jess B. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved digital phase lock loop incorporates several distinctive features that attain better performance at high loop gain and better phase accuracy. These features include: phase feedback to a number-controlled oscillator in addition to phase rate; analytical tracking of phase (both integer and fractional cycles); an amplitude-insensitive phase extractor; a more accurate method for extracting measured phase; a method for changing loop gain during a track without loss of lock; and a method for avoiding loss of sampled data during computation delay, while maintaining excellent tracking performance. The advantages of using phase and phase-rate feedback are demonstrated by comparing performance with that of rate-only feedback. Extraction of phase by the method of modeling provides accurate phase measurements even when the number-controlled oscillator phase is discontinuously updated.

  7. Many Ways to Loop DNA

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Jack D.

    2013-01-01

    In the 1960s, I developed methods for directly visualizing DNA and DNA-protein complexes using an electron microscope. This made it possible to examine the shape of DNA and to visualize proteins as they fold and loop DNA. Early applications included the first visualization of true nucleosomes and linkers and the demonstration that repeating tracts of adenines can cause a curvature in DNA. The binding of DNA repair proteins, including p53 and BRCA2, has been visualized at three- and four-way junctions in DNA. The trombone model of DNA replication was directly verified, and the looping of DNA at telomeres was discovered. PMID:24005675

  8. Force fluctuation in a semiflexible loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, James; Kim, Harold; Harold Kim Team

    DNA-binding proteins can regulate genetic expression by holding two sites in close proximity, forming a closed loop. Such complexes may require strong bending of DNA segments on the order of one persistence length or less. Both this elastic bending and the thermal fluctuations of the DNA molecule are necessary to describe the resulting behavior. To explore this problem, we consider a discrete model of a wormlike chain, kept in the fixed extension ensemble. By using a novel method to sample conformations in both position and momentum space, we can obtain a distribution of constraint forces as a function of chain length, extension, and flexibility. Our coarse-grained model allows us to explore the space of these parameters more efficiently than a detailed molecular dynamics approach. We find that increasing contour length decreases average force by relieving bending stress, but that the additional freedom allows fluctuations in the constraint force to increase. This implies that the probability of large forces may go up even as the mean goes down, impacting the lifetime of such bound states in a way unforeseen by purely equilibrium methods.

  9. An Analysis of the Extension Worker's Knowledge of Extension Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stonecipher, Charles Leroy

    Forty-four employees of the General Extension Division of the Nebraska Agricultural Extension Service and 119 Agricultural Extension employees of the University of Nebraska comprised the population of this study comparing personnel's knowledge of Agricultural Extension and General Extension programs and differences in knowledge of programs…

  10. The C-terminal extension of PrhG impairs its activation of hrp expression and virulence in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Luo, Feng; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Kiba, Akinori; Yasuo, Igarashi; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    2015-04-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is the second most destructive bacterial plant pathogens worldwide and HrpG is the master regulator of its pathogenicity. PrhG is a close paralogue of HrpG and both belong to OmpR/PhoB family of two-component response regulators. Despite a high similarity (72% global identity and 96% similarity in helix-loop-helix domain), they display distinct roles in pathogenicity. HrpG is necessary for the bacterial growth in planta and pathogenicity, while PrhG is dispensable for bacterial growth in planta and contributes little to pathogenicity. The main difference between HrpG and PrhG is the 50-amino-acid-long C-terminal extension in PrhG (amino-acid residues 230-283), which is absent in HrpG. When this extension is deleted, truncated PrhGs (under the control of its native promoter) allowed complete recovery of bacterial growth in planta and wild-type virulence of hrpG mutant. This novel finding demonstrates that the extension region in PrhG is responsible for the functional difference between HrpG and PrhG, which may block the binding of PrhG to target promoters and result in impaired activation of hrp expression by PrhG and reduced virulence of R. solanacearum.

  11. Closed-Loop Neuromorphic Benchmarks.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Terrence C; DeWolf, Travis; Kleinhans, Ashley; Eliasmith, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating the effectiveness and performance of neuromorphic hardware is difficult. It is even more difficult when the task of interest is a closed-loop task; that is, a task where the output from the neuromorphic hardware affects some environment, which then in turn affects the hardware's future input. However, closed-loop situations are one of the primary potential uses of neuromorphic hardware. To address this, we present a methodology for generating closed-loop benchmarks that makes use of a hybrid of real physical embodiment and a type of "minimal" simulation. Minimal simulation has been shown to lead to robust real-world performance, while still maintaining the practical advantages of simulation, such as making it easy for the same benchmark to be used by many researchers. This method is flexible enough to allow researchers to explicitly modify the benchmarks to identify specific task domains where particular hardware excels. To demonstrate the method, we present a set of novel benchmarks that focus on motor control for an arbitrary system with unknown external forces. Using these benchmarks, we show that an error-driven learning rule can consistently improve motor control performance across a randomly generated family of closed-loop simulations, even when there are up to 15 interacting joints to be controlled. PMID:26696820

  12. Closing the Loop with Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altizer, Andy

    2008-01-01

    Conducting exercises provides a critical bridge between the theory of an Emergency Action Plan and its effective implementation. When conducted properly, exercises can fill the gap between training and after-action review to close the preparedness loop--before an actual emergency occurs. Often exercises are planned and conducted on campus based on…

  13. Telomeres thrown for a loop.

    PubMed

    Haber, James E

    2004-11-19

    A remarkable paper from the de Lange lab (Wang et al., 2004) in a recent issue of Cell reveals that homologous recombination can result in the abrupt shortening of telomeres in a process that appears to involve reciprocal crossing over within the t-loop structure that protects chromosome ends.

  14. Closed-Loop Neuromorphic Benchmarks

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Terrence C.; DeWolf, Travis; Kleinhans, Ashley; Eliasmith, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating the effectiveness and performance of neuromorphic hardware is difficult. It is even more difficult when the task of interest is a closed-loop task; that is, a task where the output from the neuromorphic hardware affects some environment, which then in turn affects the hardware's future input. However, closed-loop situations are one of the primary potential uses of neuromorphic hardware. To address this, we present a methodology for generating closed-loop benchmarks that makes use of a hybrid of real physical embodiment and a type of “minimal” simulation. Minimal simulation has been shown to lead to robust real-world performance, while still maintaining the practical advantages of simulation, such as making it easy for the same benchmark to be used by many researchers. This method is flexible enough to allow researchers to explicitly modify the benchmarks to identify specific task domains where particular hardware excels. To demonstrate the method, we present a set of novel benchmarks that focus on motor control for an arbitrary system with unknown external forces. Using these benchmarks, we show that an error-driven learning rule can consistently improve motor control performance across a randomly generated family of closed-loop simulations, even when there are up to 15 interacting joints to be controlled. PMID:26696820

  15. Role of connecting loop I in catalysis and allosteric regulation of human glucokinase

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Juliana A; Larion, Mioara; Conejo, Maria S; Porter, Carol M; Miller, Brian G

    2014-01-01

    Glucokinase (GCK, hexokinase IV) is a monomeric enzyme with a single glucose binding site that displays steady-state kinetic cooperativity, a functional characteristic that affords allosteric regulation of GCK activity. Structural evidence suggests that connecting loop I, comprised of residues 47–71, facilitates cooperativity by dictating the rate and scope of motions between the large and small domains of GCK. Here we investigate the impact of varying the length and amino acid sequence of connecting loop I upon GCK cooperativity. We find that sequential, single amino acid deletions from the C-terminus of connecting loop I cause systematic decreases in cooperativity. Deleting up to two loop residues leaves the kcat value unchanged; however, removing three or more residues reduces kcat by 1000-fold. In contrast, the glucose K0.5 and KD values are unaffected by shortening the connecting loop by up to six residues. Substituting alanine or glycine for proline-66, which adopts a cis conformation in some GCK crystal structures, does not alter cooperativity, indicating that cis/trans isomerization of this loop residue does not govern slow conformational reorganizations linked to hysteresis. Replacing connecting loop I with the corresponding loop sequence from the catalytic domain of the noncooperative isozyme human hexokinase I (HK-I) eliminates cooperativity without impacting the kcat and glucose K0.5 values. Our results indicate that catalytic turnover requires a minimal length of connecting loop I, whereas the loop has little impact upon the binding affinity of GCK for glucose. We propose a model in which the primary structure of connecting loop I affects cooperativity by influencing conformational dynamics, without altering the equilibrium distribution of GCK conformations. PMID:24723372

  16. Role of connecting loop I in catalysis and allosteric regulation of human glucokinase.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Juliana A; Larion, Mioara; Conejo, Maria S; Porter, Carol M; Miller, Brian G

    2014-07-01

    Glucokinase (GCK, hexokinase IV) is a monomeric enzyme with a single glucose binding site that displays steady-state kinetic cooperativity, a functional characteristic that affords allosteric regulation of GCK activity. Structural evidence suggests that connecting loop I, comprised of residues 47-71, facilitates cooperativity by dictating the rate and scope of motions between the large and small domains of GCK. Here we investigate the impact of varying the length and amino acid sequence of connecting loop I upon GCK cooperativity. We find that sequential, single amino acid deletions from the C-terminus of connecting loop I cause systematic decreases in cooperativity. Deleting up to two loop residues leaves the kcat value unchanged; however, removing three or more residues reduces kcat by 1000-fold. In contrast, the glucose K0.5 and KD values are unaffected by shortening the connecting loop by up to six residues. Substituting alanine or glycine for proline-66, which adopts a cis conformation in some GCK crystal structures, does not alter cooperativity, indicating that cis/trans isomerization of this loop residue does not govern slow conformational reorganizations linked to hysteresis. Replacing connecting loop I with the corresponding loop sequence from the catalytic domain of the noncooperative isozyme human hexokinase I (HK-I) eliminates cooperativity without impacting the kcat and glucose K0.5 values. Our results indicate that catalytic turnover requires a minimal length of connecting loop I, whereas the loop has little impact upon the binding affinity of GCK for glucose. We propose a model in which the primary structure of connecting loop I affects cooperativity by influencing conformational dynamics, without altering the equilibrium distribution of GCK conformations. PMID:24723372

  17. 40 CFR 76.12 - Phase I NOX compliance extension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.12 Phase I NOX compliance extension. (a... Administrator will approve the plan and revise the Acid Rain permit governing the unit in the plan in order to... the complete petition. The Acid Rain permit governing the unit will be revised in order to...

  18. 40 CFR 76.12 - Phase I NOX compliance extension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.12 Phase I NOX compliance extension. (a... Administrator will approve the plan and revise the Acid Rain permit governing the unit in the plan in order to... the complete petition. The Acid Rain permit governing the unit will be revised in order to...

  19. 40 CFR 76.12 - Phase I NOX compliance extension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.12 Phase I NOX compliance extension. (a... Administrator will approve the plan and revise the Acid Rain permit governing the unit in the plan in order to... the complete petition. The Acid Rain permit governing the unit will be revised in order to...

  20. 40 CFR 76.12 - Phase I NOX compliance extension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.12 Phase I NOX compliance extension. (a... Administrator will approve the plan and revise the Acid Rain permit governing the unit in the plan in order to... the complete petition. The Acid Rain permit governing the unit will be revised in order to...

  1. Mobile Applications for Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drill, Sabrina L.

    2012-01-01

    Mobile computing devices (smart phones, tablets, etc.) are rapidly becoming the dominant means of communication worldwide and are increasingly being used for scientific investigation. This technology can further our Extension mission by increasing our power for data collection, information dissemination, and informed decision-making. Mobile…

  2. Today's Youth: Extension's Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Russell D.

    1970-01-01

    The challenge to Extension youth work today is programing to deal with political and value issues in a way appealing to the small group who want to make things happen" without losing the majority, who let things happen" or wonder what happened. (EB)

  3. Vocabulary Extension through Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surajlal, K. C.

    1986-01-01

    Based on the notion that teaching vocabulary extension in isolation makes little impact on students, a three-part exercise, designed to develop students' vocabulary through poetry while providing meaningful enjoyment, uses the poem "The Hawk" by A. C. Benson. In the first class period, students are introduced to both the exercise and the poem and…

  4. Loop quantum cosmology from quantum reduced loop gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesci, Emanuele; Cianfrani, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    We show how loop quantum cosmology can be derived as an effective semiclassical description of loop quantum gravity. Using the tools of QRLG, a gauge fixed version of LQG, we take the coherent states of the fundamental microscopic theory suitable to describe a Bianchi I Universe and we find a mapping between the expectation value of the Hamiltonian and the dynamics of LQC. Our results are in agreement with a lattice refinement framework for LQC, thus the so-called “old” and “improved-dynamics” regularization schemes can be reproduced. These amount to different choices of relations between local variables and the smeared ones entering the definition of the coherent states. The leading order of the fundamental theory corresponds to LQC, but we also find different inverse volume corrections, that depend on a purely quantum observable, namely the number of nodes of the states.

  5. Inherent directionality explains the lack of feedback loops in empirical networks.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Pigolotti, Simone; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2014-12-22

    We explore the hypothesis that the relative abundance of feedback loops in many empirical complex networks is severely reduced owing to the presence of an inherent global directionality. Aimed at quantifying this idea, we propose a simple probabilistic model in which a free parameter γ controls the degree of inherent directionality. Upon strengthening such directionality, the model predicts a drastic reduction in the fraction of loops which are also feedback loops. To test this prediction, we extensively enumerated loops and feedback loops in many empirical biological, ecological and socio-technological directed networks. We show that, in almost all cases, empirical networks have a much smaller fraction of feedback loops than network randomizations. Quite remarkably, this empirical finding is quantitatively reproduced, for all loop lengths, by our model by fitting its only parameter γ. Moreover, the fitted value of γ correlates quite well with another direct measurement of network directionality, performed by means of a novel algorithm. We conclude that the existence of an inherent network directionality provides a parsimonious quantitative explanation for the observed lack of feedback loops in empirical networks.

  6. Inherent directionality explains the lack of feedback loops in empirical networks

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Pigolotti, Simone; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the hypothesis that the relative abundance of feedback loops in many empirical complex networks is severely reduced owing to the presence of an inherent global directionality. Aimed at quantifying this idea, we propose a simple probabilistic model in which a free parameter γ controls the degree of inherent directionality. Upon strengthening such directionality, the model predicts a drastic reduction in the fraction of loops which are also feedback loops. To test this prediction, we extensively enumerated loops and feedback loops in many empirical biological, ecological and socio-technological directed networks. We show that, in almost all cases, empirical networks have a much smaller fraction of feedback loops than network randomizations. Quite remarkably, this empirical finding is quantitatively reproduced, for all loop lengths, by our model by fitting its only parameter γ. Moreover, the fitted value of γ correlates quite well with another direct measurement of network directionality, performed by means of a novel algorithm. We conclude that the existence of an inherent network directionality provides a parsimonious quantitative explanation for the observed lack of feedback loops in empirical networks. PMID:25531727

  7. Evolution in a Braided Loop Ensemble

    NASA Video Gallery

    This braided loop has several loops near the 'base' that appear to be unwinding with significant apparent outflow. This is evidence of untwisting, and the braided structure also seeming to unwind w...

  8. Noise Performance Of A Digital Tanlock Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J.; Pomalaza-Raez, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    Slight improvement over sinusoidal phase-lock loop achieved. Report discusses theoretical studies and numerical simulations of performance of digital tangent phase-lock loop (DTL), in presence of noise.

  9. Fragmentation of cosmic-string loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    The fragmentation of cosmic string loops is discussed, and the results of a simulation of this process are presented. The simulation can evolve any of a large class of loops essentially exactly, including allowing fragments that collide to join together. Such reconnection enhances the production of small fragments, but not drastically. With or without reconnections, the fragmentation process produces a collection of nonself-intersecting loops whose typical length is on the order of the persistence length of the initial loop.

  10. Hard thermal loops in static external fields

    SciTech Connect

    Frenkel, J.; Takahashi, N.; Pereira, S. H.

    2009-04-15

    We examine, in the imaginary-time formalism, the high temperature behavior of n-point thermal loops in static Yang-Mills and gravitational fields. We show that in this regime, any hard thermal loop gives the same leading contribution as the one obtained by evaluating the loop integral at zero external energies and momenta.

  11. Microgyroscope with closed loop output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor); Tang, Tony K. (Inventor); Cargille, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A micro-gyroscope (10) having closed loop operation by a control voltage (V.sub.TY), that is demodulated by an output signal of the sense electrodes (S1, S2), providing Coriolis torque rebalance to prevent displacement of the micro-gyroscope (10) on the output axis (y-axis). The present invention provides wide-band, closed-loop operation for a micro-gyroscope (10) and allows the drive frequency to be closely tuned to a high Q sense axis resonance. A differential sense signal (S1-S2) is compensated and fed back by differentially changing the voltage on the drive electrodes to rebalance Coriolis torque. The feedback signal is demodulated in phase with the drive axis signal (K.sub..omega..crclbar..sub.x) to produce a measure of the Coriolis force.

  12. The Statistical Loop Analyzer (SLA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    The statistical loop analyzer (SLA) is designed to automatically measure the acquisition, tracking and frequency stability performance characteristics of symbol synchronizers, code synchronizers, carrier tracking loops, and coherent transponders. Automated phase lock and system level tests can also be made using the SLA. Standard baseband, carrier and spread spectrum modulation techniques can be accomodated. Through the SLA's phase error jitter and cycle slip measurements the acquisition and tracking thresholds of the unit under test are determined; any false phase and frequency lock events are statistically analyzed and reported in the SLA output in probabilistic terms. Automated signal drop out tests can be performed in order to trouble shoot algorithms and evaluate the reacquisition statistics of the unit under test. Cycle slip rates and cycle slip probabilities can be measured using the SLA. These measurements, combined with bit error probability measurements, are all that are needed to fully characterize the acquisition and tracking performance of a digital communication system.

  13. Lock detection in Costas loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mileant, A.; Hinedi, S.

    1992-01-01

    Previous analyses of lock detector algorithms for Costas loops have ignored the effects of the inherent correlation between samples of the phase error process. In this paper, both analysis and simulations are used to quantify the effects of phase correlation on lock detection for the 'square law' and 'absolute value' type detectors. Results are obtained which depict the lock detection probability as a function of loop signal-to-noise ratio for a given false alarm rate. It is shown that the square law detector experiences less degradation due to phase jitter than the absolute value detector and that the degradation in detector signal-to-noise ratio is more pronounced for squarewave than for sinewave signals.

  14. Lock detection in Costas loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileant, A.; Hinedi, S.

    1992-03-01

    Previous analyses of lock detector algorithms for Costas loops have ignored the effects of the inherent correlation between samples of the phase error process. In this paper, both analysis and simulations are used to quantify the effects of phase correlation on lock detection for the 'square law' and 'absolute value' type detectors. Results are obtained which depict the lock detection probability as a function of loop signal-to-noise ratio for a given false alarm rate. It is shown that the square law detector experiences less degradation due to phase jitter than the absolute value detector and that the degradation in detector signal-to-noise ratio is more pronounced for squarewave than for sinewave signals.

  15. Loop Diuretics in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Won; Han, Sang Youb

    2015-06-01

    Diuretics are commonly used to control edema across various clinical fields. Diuretics inhibit sodium reabsorption in specific renal tubules, resulting in increased urinary sodium and water excretion. Loop diuretics are the most potent diuretics. In this article, we review five important aspects of loop diuretics, in particular furosemide, which must be considered when prescribing this medicine: (1) oral versus intravenous treatment, (2) dosage, (3) continuous versus bolus infusion, (4) application in chronic kidney disease patients, and (5) side effects. The bioavailability of furosemide differs between oral and intravenous therapy. Additionally, the threshold and ceiling doses of furosemide differ according to the particular clinical condition of the patient, for example in patients with severe edema or chronic kidney disease. To maximize the efficiency of furosemide, a clear understanding of how the mode of delivery will impact bioavailability and the required dosage is necessary.

  16. Loop Diuretics in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se Won

    2015-01-01

    Diuretics are commonly used to control edema across various clinical fields. Diuretics inhibit sodium reabsorption in specific renal tubules, resulting in increased urinary sodium and water excretion. Loop diuretics are the most potent diuretics. In this article, we review five important aspects of loop diuretics, in particular furosemide, which must be considered when prescribing this medicine: (1) oral versus intravenous treatment, (2) dosage, (3) continuous versus bolus infusion, (4) application in chronic kidney disease patients, and (5) side effects. The bioavailability of furosemide differs between oral and intravenous therapy. Additionally, the threshold and ceiling doses of furosemide differ according to the particular clinical condition of the patient, for example in patients with severe edema or chronic kidney disease. To maximize the efficiency of furosemide, a clear understanding of how the mode of delivery will impact bioavailability and the required dosage is necessary. PMID:26240596

  17. Deconfinement and virtual quark loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik, T.; Engels, J.; Satz, H.

    1983-12-01

    We calculate paer Monte Carlo evaluation on an 83 × 3 lattice the energy density ɛG of the gluon sector of QCD, including virtual quark loops up to the fourth power in the hopping parameter expansion. For light quarks of one flavour, we observe at T/ΛL 95 +/- 10 a rapid variation of ɛG in T, accompanied by strong fluctuations from iteration to iteration. as clear signal of the deconfinement transition.

  18. DNA Looping, Supercoiling and Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finzi, Laura

    2007-11-01

    In complex organisms, activation or repression of gene expression by proteins bound to enhancer or silencer elements located several kilobases away from the promoter is a well recognized phenomenon. However, a mechanistic understanding of any of these multiprotein interactions is still incomplete. Part of the difficulty in characterizing long-range interactions is the complexity of the regulatory systems and also an underestimation of the effect of DNA supercoiling and tension. Supercoiling is expected to promote interactions between DNA sites because it winds the DNA into compact plectonemes in which distant DNA segments more frequently draw close. The idea that DNA is also under various levels of tension is becoming more widely accepted. Forces that stretch the double helix in vivo are the electrostatic repulsion among the negatively charged phosphate groups along the DNA backbone, the action of motor enzymes perhaps acting upon a topologically constrained sequence of DNA or chromosome segregation during cell mitosis following DNA replication. Presently, little is known about the tension acting on DNA in vivo, but characterization of how physiological regulatory processes, such as loop formation, depend on DNA tension in vitro will indicate the stretching force regimes likely to exist in vivo. In this light, the well studied CI protein of bacteriophage l, which was recently found to cause a of 3.8 kbp loop in DNA, is an ideal system in which to characterize long-range gene regulation. The large size of the loop lends itself to single-molecule techniques, which allow characterization of the dynamics of CI-mediated l DNA looping under controlled levels of supercoiling and tension. Such experiments are being used to discover the principles of long-range interactions in l and in more complex systems.

  19. Quantum reduced loop gravity and the foundation of loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesci, Emanuele; Cianfrani, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Quantum reduced loop gravity is a promising framework for linking loop quantum gravity and the effective semiclassical dynamics of loop quantum cosmology. We review its basic achievements and its main perspectives, outlining how it provides a quantum description of the Universe in terms of a cuboidal graph which constitutes the proper framework for applying loop techniques in a cosmological setting.

  20. Two-loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Ven, Anton E. M.

    1992-07-01

    We prove the existence of a nonrenormalizable infinity in the two-loop effective action of perturbative quantum gravity by means of an explicit calculation. Our final result agrees with that obtained by earlier authors. We use the background-field method in coordinate space, combined with dimensional regularization and a heat kernel representation for the propagators. General covariance is manifestly preserved. Only vacuum graphs in the presence of an on-shell background metric need to be calculated. We extend the background covariant harmonic gauge to include terms nonlinear in the quantum gravitational fields and allow for general reparametrizations of those fields. For a particular gauge choice and field parametrization only two three-graviton and six four-graviton vertices are present in the action. Calculational labor is further reduced by restricting to backgrounds, which are not only Ricci-flat, but satisfy an additional constraint bilinear in the Weyl tensor. To handle the still formidable amount of algebra, we use the symbolic manipulation program FORM. We checked that the on-shell two-loop effective action is in fact independent of all gauge and field redefinition parameters. A two-loop analysis for Yang-Mills fields is included as well, since in that case we can give full details as well as simplify earlier analyses.

  1. Loops in inflationary correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takahiro; Urakawa, Yuko

    2013-12-01

    We review the recent progress regarding the loop corrections to the correlation functions in the inflationary universe. A naive perturbation theory predicts that the loop corrections generated during inflation suffer from various infrared (IR) pathologies. Introducing an IR cutoff by hand is neither satisfactory nor enough to fix the problem of a secular growth, which may ruin the predictive power of inflation models if the inflation lasts sufficiently long. We discuss the origin of the IR divergences and explore the regularity conditions of the loop corrections for the adiabatic perturbation, the iso-curvature perturbation, and the tensor perturbation, in turn. These three kinds of perturbations have qualitative differences, but in discussing the IR regularity there is a feature common to all cases, which is the importance of the proper identification of observable quantities. Genuinely, observable quantities should respect the gauge invariance from the view point of a local observer. Interestingly, we find that the requirement of the IR regularity restricts the allowed quantum states.

  2. Gravitational radiation from realistic cosmic string loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Paul; Allen, Bruce

    1995-10-01

    We examine the rates at which energy and momentum are radiated into gravitational waves by a large set of realistic cosmic string loops. The string loops are generated by numerically evolving parent loops with different initial conditions forward in time until they self-intersect, fragmenting into two child loops. The fragmentation of the child loops is followed recursively until only non-self-intersecting loops remain. The properties of the final non-self-intersecting loops are found to be independent of the initial conditions of the parent loops. We have calculated the radiated energy and momentum for a total of 11 625 stable child loops. We find that the majority of the final loops do not radiate significant amounts of spatial momentum. The velocity gained due to the rocket effect is typically small compared to the center-of-mass velocity of the fragmented loops. The distribution of gravitatoinal radiation rates in the center of mass frame of the loops, γ0≡(Gμ2)-1ΔE/Δτ, is strongly peaked in the range γ0=45-55 however, there are no loops found with γ0<40. Because the radiated spatial momentum is small, the distribution of gravitational radiation rates appears roughly the same in any reference frame. We conjecture that in the center-of-mass frame there is a lower bound γ0min>0 for the radiation rate from cosmic string loops. In a second conjecture, we identify a candidate for the loop with the minimal radiation rate and suggest that γ0min~=39.003.

  3. Seizure Suppression Efficacy of Closed-Loop Versus Open-Loop Deep Brain Stimulation in a Rodent Model of Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Salam, M Tariqus; Perez Velazquez, Jose Luis; Genov, Roman

    2016-06-01

    We assess and compare the effects of both closed-loop and open-loop neurostimulation of the rat hippocampus by means of a custom low-power programmable therapeutic neurostimulation device on the suppression of spontaneous seizures in a rodent model of epilepsy. Chronic seizures were induced by intraperitoneal kainic acid injection. Two bipolar electrodes were implanted into the CA1 regions of both hippocampi. The electrodes were connected to the custom-built programmable therapeutic neurostimulation device that can trigger an electrical stimulation either in a periodic manner or upon detection of the intracerebral electroencephalographic (icEEE) seizure onset. This device includes a microchip consisting of a 256-channel icEEG recording system and a 64-channel stimulator, and a programmable seizure detector implemented in a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The neurostimulator was used to evaluate seizure suppression efficacy in ten epileptic rats for a total of 240 subject-days (5760 subject-hours). For this purpose, all rats were randomly divided into two groups: the no-stimulation group and the stimulation group. The no-stimulation group did not receive stimulation. The stimulation group received, first, closed-loop stimulation and, next, open-loop stimulation. The no-stimulation and stimulation groups had a similar seizure frequency baseline, averaging five seizures per day. Closed-loop stimulation reduced seizure frequency by 90% and open-loop stimulation reduced seizure frequency by 17%, both in the stimulation group as compared to the no-stimulation group. PMID:26571534

  4. Premeasured Chordal Loops for Mitral Valve Repair.

    PubMed

    Gillinov, Marc; Quinn, Reed; Kerendi, Faraz; Gaudiani, Vince; Shemin, Richard; Barnhart, Glenn; Raines, Edward; Gerdisch, Marc W; Banbury, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Premeasured expanded polytetrafluoroethylene chordal loops with integrated sutures for attachment to the papillary muscle and leaflet edges facilitate correction of mitral valve prolapse. Configured as a group of 3 loops (length range 12 to 24 mm), the loops are attached to a pledget that is passed through the papillary muscle and tied. Each of the loops has 2 sutures with attached needles; these needles are passed through the free edge of the leaflet and then the sutures are tied to each other, securing the chordal loop to the leaflet. PMID:27549563

  5. Agricultural Extension: Who Uses It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Michael; Lasley, Paul

    1979-01-01

    A Missouri study conducted to determine agricultural extension usage patterns found that heavy users of extension publications tended to be younger farmers, those with a relatively large amount of land, and pork producers. Extension meetings were a less frequent source of information than either publications or county extension office visits. (LRA)

  6. LIMB demonstration project extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-21

    The purpose of the DOE limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension is to extend the data base on LIMB technology and to expand DOE's list of Clean Coal Technologies by demonstrating the Coolside process as part of the project. The main objectives of this project are: to demonstrate the general applicability of LIMB technology by testing 3 coals and 4 sorbents (total of 12 coal/sorbent combinations) at the Ohio Edison Edgewater plant; and to demonstrate that Coolside is a viable technology for improving precipitator performance and reducing sulfur dioxide emissions while acceptable operability is maintained. Progress is reported. 3 figs.

  7. Chemical Looping Technology: Oxygen Carrier Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Luo, Siwei; Zeng, Liang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2015-01-01

    Chemical looping processes are characterized as promising carbonaceous fuel conversion technologies with the advantages of manageable CO2 capture and high energy conversion efficiency. Depending on the chemical looping reaction products generated, chemical looping technologies generally can be grouped into two types: chemical looping full oxidation (CLFO) and chemical looping partial oxidation (CLPO). In CLFO, carbonaceous fuels are fully oxidized to CO2 and H2O, as typically represented by chemical looping combustion with electricity as the primary product. In CLPO, however, carbonaceous fuels are partially oxidized, as typically represented by chemical looping gasification with syngas or hydrogen as the primary product. Both CLFO and CLPO share similar operational features; however, the optimum process configurations and the specific oxygen carriers used between them can vary significantly. Progress in both CLFO and CLPO is reviewed and analyzed with specific focus on oxygen carrier developments that characterize these technologies.

  8. Chemical Looping Technology: Oxygen Carrier Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Luo, Siwei; Zeng, Liang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2015-01-01

    Chemical looping processes are characterized as promising carbonaceous fuel conversion technologies with the advantages of manageable CO2 capture and high energy conversion efficiency. Depending on the chemical looping reaction products generated, chemical looping technologies generally can be grouped into two types: chemical looping full oxidation (CLFO) and chemical looping partial oxidation (CLPO). In CLFO, carbonaceous fuels are fully oxidized to CO2 and H2O, as typically represented by chemical looping combustion with electricity as the primary product. In CLPO, however, carbonaceous fuels are partially oxidized, as typically represented by chemical looping gasification with syngas or hydrogen as the primary product. Both CLFO and CLPO share similar operational features; however, the optimum process configurations and the specific oxygen carriers used between them can vary significantly. Progress in both CLFO and CLPO is reviewed and analyzed with specific focus on oxygen carrier developments that characterize these technologies. PMID:25898071

  9. High-temperature helium-loop facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarz, R.D.

    1981-09-01

    The high-temperature helium loop is a facility for materials testing in ultrapure helium gas at high temperatures. The closed loop system is capable of recirculating high-purity helium or helium with controlled impurities. The gas loop maximum operating conditions are as follows: 300 psi pressure, 500 lb/h flow rate, and 2100/sup 0/F temperature. The two test sections can accept samples up to 3.5 in. diameter and 5 ft long. The gas loop is fully instrumented to continuously monitor all parameters of loop operation as well as helium impurities. The loop is fully automated to operate continuously and requires only a daily servicing by a qualified operator to replenish recorder charts and helium makeup gas. Because of its versatility and high degree of parameter control, the helium loop is applicable to many types of materials research. This report describes the test apparatus, operating parameters, peripheral systems, and instrumentation system.

  10. Hyperstaticity and loops in frictional granular packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Lam, Edward; Metzger, Philip T.

    2009-06-01

    The hyperstatic nature of granular packings of perfectly rigid disks is analyzed algebraically and through numerical simulation. The elementary loops of grains emerge as a fundamental element in addressing hyperstaticity. Loops consisting of an odd number of grains behave differently than those with an even number. For odd loops, the latent stresses are exterior and are characterized by the sum of frictional forces around each loop. For even loops, the latent stresses are interior and are characterized by the alternating sum of frictional forces around each loop. The statistics of these two types of loop sums are found to be Gibbsian with a "temperature" that is linear with the friction coefficient μ when μ<1.

  11. Effect of helix stability on the formation of loop-loop complexes.

    PubMed

    Sehdev, Preeti; Crews, Gordon; Soto, Ana Maria

    2012-12-01

    Kissing loop complexes are loop-loop complexes where two RNA hairpins interact through their complementary loops. In this work, we have investigated the role of the helical stems on the ability of hairpins derived from the ColE1 plasmid to associate as kissing loop complexes in the presence and absence of divalent cations. Our results show that although kissing loop complexes form more readily in the presence of Mg(2+), they are able to form in the presence of 850 mM NaCl, as long as their stems contain at least six base-pairs. Formation of the Na(+) loop-loop complexes is facilitated by changing the sequence at the stem-loop interface to include less stable AU base pairs. We suggest that the conformation at the stem-loop interface is critical in the formation of kissing loop complexes and that in the absence of Mg(2+) the conformation at the stem-loop interface is packed more loosely than with Mg(2+), to allow for a lower charge density. Consistent with this hypothesis, shortening the stems to five base pairs results in unfolding of the hairpins and formation of an extended duplex rather than a kissing loop complex because the short stems are not stable enough to tolerate the necessary conformation at the stem-loop interface to allow the formation of a kissing loop complex. PMID:23094588

  12. Simultaneous determination of arsenic, cadmium, calcium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc in fertilizers by microwave acid digestion and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry detection: single-laboratory validation of a modification and extension of AOAC 2006.03.

    PubMed

    Webb, Sharon; Bartos, James; Boles, Rhonda; Hasty, Elaine; Thuotte, Ethel; Thiex, Nancy J

    2014-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation study was conducted for the simultaneous determination of arsenic, cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, chromium, iron, lead, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc in all major types of commercial fertilizer products by microwave digestion and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy analysis. This validation study proposes an extension and modification of AOAC 2006.03. The extension is the inclusion of calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, and zinc, and the modification is incorporation of hydrochloric acid in the digestion system. This dual acid digestion utilizes both hydrochloric and nitric acids in a 3 to 9 mL volume ratio/100 mL. In addition to 15 of the 30 original validation materials used in the 2006.03 collaborative study, National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 695 and Magruder 2009-06 were incorporated as accuracy materials. The main benefits of this proposed method are a significant increase in laboratory efficiency when compared to the use of both AOAC Methods 965.09 and 2006.03 to achieve the same objective and an enhanced recovery of several metals.

  13. Towards understanding the ultraviolet behavior of quantum loops in infinite-derivative theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talaganis, Spyridon; Biswas, Tirthabir; Mazumdar, Anupam

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we will consider quantum aspects of a non-local, infinite-derivative scalar field theory—a toy model depiction of a covariant infinite-derivative, non-local extension of Einstein’s general relativity which has previously been shown to be free from ghosts around the Minkowski background. The graviton propagator in this theory gets an exponential suppression making it asymptotically free, thus providing strong prospects of resolving various classical and quantum divergences. In particular, we will find that at one loop, the two-point function is still divergent, but once this amplitude is renormalized by adding appropriate counter terms, the ultraviolet behavior of all other one-loop diagrams as well as the two-loop, two-point function remains well under control. We will go on to discuss how one may be able to generalize our computations and arguments to arbitrary loops.

  14. Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Abhinaya; Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl; Chaudry, Majid; Quinn, Joseph

    2012-07-31

    This document provides the results of the project through September 2009. The Phase I project has recently been extended from September 2009 to March 2011. The project extension will begin work on Chemical Looping (CL) Prototype modeling and advanced control design exploration in preparation for a scale-up phase. The results to date include: successful development of dual loop chemical looping process models and dynamic simulation software tools, development and test of several advanced control concepts and applications for Chemical Looping transport control and investigation of several sensor concepts and establishment of two feasible sensor candidates recommended for further prototype development and controls integration. There are three sections in this summary and conclusions. Section 1 presents the project scope and objectives. Section 2 highlights the detailed accomplishments by project task area. Section 3 provides conclusions to date and recommendations for future work.

  15. The one loop corrections to the neutrino masses in BLMSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shu-Min; Feng, Tai-Fu; Dong, Xing-Xing; Zhang, Hai-Bin; Ning, Guo-Zhu; Guo, Tao

    2016-09-01

    The neutrino masses and mixings are studied in the model which is the supersymmetric extension of the standard model with local gauged baryon and lepton numbers (BLMSSM). At tree level the neutrinos can obtain tiny masses through the See-Saw mechanism in the BLMSSM. The one-loop corrections to the neutrino masses and mixings are important, and they are studied in this work with the mass insertion approximation. We study the numerical results and discuss the allowed parameter space of BLMSSM. It can contribute to study the neutrino masses and to explore the new physics beyond the standard model (SM).

  16. Designing a Gas Test Loop for the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Parry

    2005-11-01

    The Generation IV Reactor Program and the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are investigating some new reactor concepts which require extensive materials and fuels testing in a fast neutron spectrum. The capability to test materials and fuels in a fast neutron flux in the United States is very limited to non-existent. It has been proposed to install a gas test loop (GTL) in one of the lobes of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory and harden the spectrum to provide some fast neutron flux testing capabilities in the United States. This paper describes the neutronics investigation into the design of the GTL for the ATR.

  17. Effect of loop length variation on quadruplex-Watson Crick duplex competition

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Niti; Sahoo, Bankanidhi; Varun, K. A. S.; Maiti, Sudipta; Maiti, Souvik

    2008-01-01

    The effect of loop length on quadruplex stability has been studied when the G-rich strand is present along with its complementary C-rich strand, thereby resulting in competition between quadruplex and duplex structures. Using model sequences with loop lengths varying from T to T5, we carried out extensive FRET to discover the influence of loop length on the quadruplex-Watson Crick duplex competition. The binding data show an increase in the binding affinity of quadruplexes towards their complementary strands upon increasing the loop length. Our kinetic data reveal that unfolding of the quadruplex in presence of a complementary strand involves a contribution from a predominant slow and a small population of fast opening conformer. The contribution from the fast opening conformer increases upon increasing the loop length leading to faster duplex formation. FCS data show an increase in the interconversion between the quadruplex conformers in presence of the complementary strand, which shifts the equilibrium towards the fast opening conformer with an increase in loop length. The relative free-energy difference (ΔΔG°) between the duplex and quadruplex indicates that an increase in loop length favors duplex formation and out competes the quadruplex. PMID:18599514

  18. Testing of a Neon Loop Heat Pipe for Large Area Cryocooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Robinson, Franklin Lee

    2014-01-01

    Cryocooling of large areas such as optics, detector arrays, and cryogenic propellant tanks is required for future NASA missions. A cryogenic loop heat pipe (CLHP) can provide a closed-loop cooling system for this purpose and has many advantages over other devices in terms of reduced mass, reduced vibration, high reliability, and long life. A neon CLHP was tested extensively in a thermal vacuum chamber using a cryopump as the heat sink to characterize its transient and steady performance and verify its ability to cool large areas or components. Tests conducted included loop cool-down from the ambient temperature, startup, power cycle, heat removal capability, loop capillary limit and recovery from a dry-out, low power operation, and long duration steady state operation. The neon CLHP demonstrated robust operation. The loop could be cooled from the ambient temperature to subcritical temperatures very effectively, and could start successfully by applying power to both the pump and evaporator without any pre-conditioning. It could adapt to changes in the pump power andor evaporator power, and reach a new steady state very quickly. The evaporator could remove heat loads between 0.25W and 4W. When the pump capillary limit was exceeded, the loop could resume its normal function by reducing the pump power. Steady state operations were demonstrated for up to 6 hours. The ability of the neon loop to cool large areas was therefore successfully verified.

  19. Loop-linker PCR: an advanced PCR technique for genome walking.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Quoclinh; Shi, Hui; Xu, Wentao; Hao, Junran; Luo, Yunbo; Huang, Kunlun

    2012-10-01

    In this article, we developed a novel PCR method, termed loop-linker PCR, to isolate flanking sequences in transgenic crops. The novelty of this approach is its use of a stem-loop structure to design a loop-linker adapter. The adapter is designed to form a nick site when ligated with restricted DNA. This modification not only can prevent the self-ligation of adapters but also promotes the elongation of the 3' end of the loop-linker adapter to generate a stem-loop structure in the ligation products. Moreover, the suppressive effect of the stem-loop structure decreases nonspecific amplification and increases the success rate of the approach; all extension products will suppress exponential amplification except from the ligation product that contains the specific primer binding site. Using this method, 442, 1830, 107, and 512 bp left border flanking sequences were obtained from the transgenic maizes LY038, DAS-59122-7, Event 3272, and the transgenic soybean MON89788, respectively. The experimental results demonstrated that loop-linker PCR is an efficient, reliable, and cost-effective method for identifying flanking sequences in transgenic crops and could be applied for other genome walking applications.

  20. Cygnus Loop: A double bubble?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, J.; Safi-Harb, S.; Reichardt, I.; Stil, J.; Kothes, R.; Jaffe, T.; Galfacts Team

    2016-06-01

    The Cygnus Loop is a well-studied supernova remnant (SNR) that has been observed across the electromagnetic spectrum. Although widely believed to be an SNR shell with a blow-out region in the south, we consider the possibility that this object is two SNRs projected along the same line-of-sight by using multi-wavelength images and modelling. Our results show that a model of two objects including some overlap region/interaction between the two objects has the best match to the observed data.

  1. Singularities in loop quantum cosmology.

    PubMed

    Cailleteau, Thomas; Cardoso, Antonio; Vandersloot, Kevin; Wands, David

    2008-12-19

    We show that simple scalar field models can give rise to curvature singularities in the effective Friedmann dynamics of loop quantum cosmology (LQC). We find singular solutions for spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies with a canonical scalar field and a negative exponential potential, or with a phantom scalar field and a positive potential. While LQC avoids big bang or big rip type singularities, we find sudden singularities where the Hubble rate is bounded, but the Ricci curvature scalar diverges. We conclude that the effective equations of LQC are not in themselves sufficient to avoid the occurrence of curvature singularities.

  2. Extensive nonadditivity of privacy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graeme; Smolin, John A

    2009-09-18

    Quantum information theory establishes the ultimate limits on communication and cryptography in terms of channel capacities for various types of information. The private capacity is particularly important because it quantifies achievable rates of quantum key distribution. We study the power of quantum channels with limited private capacity, focusing on channels that dephase in random bases. These display extensive nonadditivity of private capacity: a channel with 2logd input qubits that has a private capacity less than 2, but when used together with a second channel with zero private capacity, the joint capacity jumps to (1/2)logd. In contrast to earlier work which found nonadditivity vanishing as a fraction of input size or conditional on unproven mathematical assumptions, this provides a natural setting manifesting nonadditivity of privacy of the strongest possible sort. PMID:19792417

  3. Overlap extension PCR cloning.

    PubMed

    Bryksin, Anton; Matsumura, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Rising demand for recombinant proteins has motivated the development of efficient and reliable cloning methods. Here we show how a beginner can clone virtually any DNA insert into a plasmid of choice without the use of restriction endonucleases or T4 DNA ligase. Chimeric primers encoding plasmid sequence at the 5' ends and insert sequence at the 3' ends are designed and synthesized. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is utilized to amplify the desired insert by PCR. The double-stranded product is subsequently employed as a pair of mega-primers in a PCR-like reaction with circular plasmids. The original plasmids are then destroyed in restriction digests with Dpn I. The product of the overlap extension PCR is used to transform competent Escherichia coli cells. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is used for both the amplification and fusion reactions, so both steps can be monitored and optimized in the same way. PMID:23996437

  4. Non-extensive radiobiology

    SciTech Connect

    Sotolongo-Grau, O.; Rodriguez-Perez, D.; Antoranz, J. C.; Sotolongo-Costa, O.

    2011-03-14

    The expression of survival factors for radiation damaged cells is based on probabilistic assumptions and experimentally fitted for each tumor, radiation and conditions. Here we show how the simplest of these radiobiological models can be derived from the maximum entropy principle of the classical Boltzmann-Gibbs expression. We extend this derivation using the Tsallis entropy and a cutoff hypothesis, motivated by clinical observations. A generalization of the exponential, the logarithm and the product to a non-extensive framework, provides a simple formula for the survival fraction corresponding to the application of several radiation doses on a living tissue. The obtained expression shows a remarkable agreement with the experimental data found in the literature, also providing a new interpretation of some of the parameters introduced anew. It is also shown how the presented formalism may have direct application in radiotherapy treatment optimization through the definition of the potential effect difference, simply calculated between the tumour and the surrounding tissue.

  5. Non-extensive radiobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotolongo-Grau, O.; Rodriguez-Perez, D.; Antoranz, J. C.; Sotolongo-Costa, O.

    2011-03-01

    The expression of survival factors for radiation damaged cells is based on probabilistic assumptions and experimentally fitted for each tumor, radiation and conditions. Here we show how the simplest of these radiobiological models can be derived from the maximum entropy principle of the classical Boltzmann-Gibbs expression. We extend this derivation using the Tsallis entropy and a cutoff hypothesis, motivated by clinical observations. A generalization of the exponential, the logarithm and the product to a non-extensive framework, provides a simple formula for the survival fraction corresponding to the application of several radiation doses on a living tissue. The obtained expression shows a remarkable agreement with the experimental data found in the literature, also providing a new interpretation of some of the parameters introduced anew. It is also shown how the presented formalism may have direct application in radiotherapy treatment optimization through the definition of the potential effect difference, simply calculated between the tumour and the surrounding tissue.

  6. Closed-Loop Neuroscience and Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation: A Tale of Two Loops.

    PubMed

    Zrenner, Christoph; Belardinelli, Paolo; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Ziemann, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Closed-loop neuroscience is receiving increasing attention with recent technological advances that enable complex feedback loops to be implemented with millisecond resolution on commodity hardware. We summarize emerging conceptual and methodological frameworks that are available to experimenters investigating a "brain in the loop" using non-invasive brain stimulation and briefly review the experimental and therapeutic implications. We take the view that closed-loop neuroscience in fact deals with two conceptually quite different loops: a "brain-state dynamics" loop, used to couple with and modulate the trajectory of neuronal activity patterns, and a "task dynamics" loop, that is the bidirectional motor-sensory interaction between brain and (simulated) environment, and which enables goal-directed behavioral tasks to be incorporated. Both loops need to be considered and combined to realize the full experimental and therapeutic potential of closed-loop neuroscience. PMID:27092055

  7. Turning an Extension Aide into an Extension Agent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seevers, Brenda; Dormody, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    For any organization to remain sustainable, a renewable source of faculty and staff needs to be available. The Extension Internship Program for Juniors and Seniors in High School is a new tool for recruiting and developing new Extension agents. Students get "hands on" experience working in an Extension office and earn college credit while in high…

  8. A role for flexible loops in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Malabanan, M Merced; Amyes, Tina L; Richard, John P

    2010-12-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase each use the binding energy from the interaction of phosphite dianion with a flexible phosphate gripper loop to activate a second, phosphodianion-truncated, substrate towards enzyme-catalyzed proton transfer, hydride transfer, and decarboxylation, respectively. Studies on TIM suggest that the most important general effect of loop closure over the substrate phosphodianion, and the associated conformational changes, is to extrude water from the enzyme active site. This should cause a decrease in the effective active-site dielectric constant, and an increase in transition state stabilization from enhanced electrostatic interactions with polar amino acid side chains. The most important specific effect of these conformational changes is to increase the basicity of the carboxylate side chain of the active site glutamate base by its placement in a 'hydrophobic cage'.

  9. Wilson loop from a Dyson equation

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, M.; Reinhardt, H.

    2009-12-15

    The Dyson equation proposed for planar temporal Wilson loops in the context of supersymmetric gauge theories is critically analyzed thereby exhibiting its ingredients and approximations involved. We reveal its limitations and identify its range of applicability in nonsupersymmetric gauge theories. In particular, we show that this equation is applicable only to strongly asymmetric planar Wilson loops (consisting of a long and a short pair of loop segments) and as a consequence the Wilsonian potential can be extracted only up to intermediate distances. By this equation the Wilson loop is exclusively determined by the gluon propagator. We solve the Dyson equation in Coulomb gauge for the temporal Wilson loop with the instantaneous part of the gluon propagator and for the spatial Wilson loop with the static gluon propagator obtained in the Hamiltonian approach to continuum Yang-Mills theory and on the lattice. In both cases we find a linearly rising color potential.

  10. Accurate and efficient loop selections by the DFIRE-based all-atom statistical potential.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Liu, Song; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2004-02-01

    The conformations of loops are determined by the water-mediated interactions between amino acid residues. Energy functions that describe the interactions can be derived either from physical principles (physical-based energy function) or statistical analysis of known protein structures (knowledge-based statistical potentials). It is commonly believed that statistical potentials are appropriate for coarse-grained representation of proteins but are not as accurate as physical-based potentials when atomic resolution is required. Several recent applications of physical-based energy functions to loop selections appear to support this view. In this article, we apply a recently developed DFIRE-based statistical potential to three different loop decoy sets (RAPPER, Jacobson, and Forrest-Woolf sets). Together with a rotamer library for side-chain optimization, the performance of DFIRE-based potential in the RAPPER decoy set (385 loop targets) is comparable to that of AMBER/GBSA for short loops (two to eight residues). The DFIRE is more accurate for longer loops (9 to 12 residues). Similar trend is observed when comparing DFIRE with another physical-based OPLS/SGB-NP energy function in the large Jacobson decoy set (788 loop targets). In the Forrest-Woolf decoy set for the loops of membrane proteins, the DFIRE potential performs substantially better than the combination of the CHARMM force field with several solvation models. The results suggest that a single-term DFIRE-statistical energy function can provide an accurate loop prediction at a fraction of computing cost required for more complicate physical-based energy functions. A Web server for academic users is established for loop selection at the softwares/services section of the Web site http://theory.med.buffalo.edu/.

  11. Super loop groups, Hamiltonian actions and super Virasoro algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnad, J.; Kupershmidt, B. A.

    1990-09-01

    The quotient{{widetilde{LG}} G} of a super loop groupwidetilde{LG} by the subgroup of constant loops is given a supersymplectic structure and identified through a moment map embedding MediaObjects/220_2005_BF02096652_f1.jpg with a coadjoint orbit of the centrally extended super loop algebra. The algebra widetilde{diff}^c S^1 of super-conformal vector fields on the circle is shown to have a natural representation as Hamiltonian vector fields on{{widetilde{LG}} G} generated by an equivariant moment map. This map is obtained by composition of 315-8 with a super Poisson map defining a supersymmetric extension of the classical Sugawara formula. Upon quantization, this yields the corresponding formula of Kac and Todorov on unitary highest weight representations. For any homomorphism ρ: u(1)→ G, an associated "twisted" moment map is also derived, generating a super Poisson bracket realization of a super Virasoro subalgebra widetilde{Vir} of the semi-direct sum. The corresponding super Poisson map is interpreted as a nonabelian generalization of the super Miura map and applied to two super KdV hierarchies to derive corresponding integrable generalized super MKdV hierarchies in Figure 8.

  12. Two loop correction to interference in $$gg \\to ZZ$$

    DOE PAGES

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Czakon, Michal; Kirchner, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    Here, we present results for the production of a pair of on-shell Z bosons via gluon-gluon fusion. This process occurs both through the production and decay of the Higgs boson, and through continuum production where the Z boson couples to a loop of massless quarks or to a massive quark. We calculate the interference of the two processes and its contribution to the cross section up to and including order O(αmore » $$_{s}^{3}$$ ). The two-loop contributions to the amplitude are all known analytically, except for the continuum production through loops of top quarks of mass m. The latter contribution is important for the invariant mass of the two Z bosons, (as measured by the mass of their leptonic decay products, m$$_{4l}$$), in a regime where m$$_{4l}$$ ≥ 2m because of the contributions of longitudinal bosons. We examine all the contributions to the virtual amplitude involving top quarks, as expansions about the heavy top quark limit combined with a conformal mapping and Padé approximants. Comparison with the analytic results, where known, allows us to assess the validity of the heavy quark expansion, and it extensions. We give results for the NLO corrections to this interference, including both real and virtual radiation.« less

  13. Two loop correction to interference in gg → ZZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Czakon, Michal; Kirchner, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    We present results for the production of a pair of on-shell Z bosons via gluon-gluon fusion. This process occurs both through the production and decay of the Higgs boson, and through continuum production where the Z boson couples to a loop of massless quarks or to a massive quark. We calculate the interference of the two processes and its contribution to the cross section up to and including order O( α s 3 ). The two-loop contributions to the amplitude are all known analytically, except for the continuum production through loops of top quarks of mass m. The latter contribution is important for the invariant mass of the two Z bosons, (as measured by the mass of their leptonic decay products, m 4 l ), in a regime where m 4 l ≥ 2 m because of the contributions of longitudinal bosons. We examine all the contributions to the virtual amplitude involving top quarks, as expansions about the heavy top quark limit combined with a conformal mapping and Padé approximants. Comparison with the analytic results, where known, allows us to assess the validity of the heavy quark expansion, and it extensions. We give results for the NLO corrections to this interference, including both real and virtual radiation.

  14. Loop anomalies in the causal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, Dan-Radu

    2015-01-01

    We consider gauge models in the causal approach and study one-loop contributions to the chronological products and the anomalies they produce. We prove that in order greater than 4 there are no one-loop anomalies. Next we analyze one-loop anomalies in the second- and third-order of the perturbation theory. We prove that the even parity contributions (with respect to parity) do not produce anomalies; for the odd parity contributions we reobtain the well-known result.

  15. Magnetic monopole in the loop representation

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Lorenzo; Lopez, Alexander

    2006-01-15

    We quantize, within the Loop Representation formalism, the electromagnetic field in the presence of a static magnetic pole. It is found that the loop-dependent physical wave functionals of the quantum Maxwell theory become multivalued, through a topological phase factor depending on the solid angle subtended at the monopole by a surface bounded by the loop. It is discussed how this fact generalizes what occurs in ordinary quantum mechanics in multiply connected spaces.

  16. Costas loop analysis for coherent optical receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, T. G.

    1986-03-01

    A homodyne Costas loop receiver is analyzed taking both shot and laser phase noise sources into acount. The reciever performance is compared with that of a heterodyne receiver using an electrical Costas loop and that of a coherent receiver using a pilot carrier phase-locked loop. It is shown that, to avoid large performance penalties, beat linewidth to bit-rate ratios smaller than 0.05 percent and 0.5 percent are needed for PSK homodyne and heterodyne systems, respectively.

  17. LMFBR with booster pump in pumping loop

    DOEpatents

    Rubinstein, H.J.

    1975-10-14

    A loop coolant circulation system is described for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) utilizing a low head, high specific speed booster pump in the hot leg of the coolant loop with the main pump located in the cold leg of the loop, thereby providing the advantages of operating the main pump in the hot leg with the reliability of cold leg pump operation.

  18. Wilson loops in open string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, K.

    1988-02-01

    Wilson loop elements on torus are introduced into the partition function of open strings as Polyakov's path integral at one-loop level. Mass spectra from compactification and expected symmetry breaking are illustrated by choosing the correct weight for the contributions from annulus and Mobius strip. The authors show that Jacobi's imaginary transformation connects the mass spectra with the Wilson loops. The application to thermo-partition function and cosmological implications are briefly discussed.

  19. The BGAN extension programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Juan J.; Trachtman, Eyal; Richharia, Madhavendra

    2005-11-01

    Mobile satellite telecommunications systems have undergone an enormous evolution in the last decades, with the interest in having advanced telecommunications services available on demand, anywhere and at any time, leading to incredible advances. The demand for braodband data is therefore rapidly gathering pace, but current solutions are finding it increasingly difficult to combine large bandwidth with ubiquitous coverage, reliability and portability. The BGAN (Broadband Global Area Network) system, designed to operate with the Inmarsat-4 satellites, provides breakthrough services that meet all of these requirements. It will enable broadband connection on the move, delivering all the key tools of the modern office. Recognising the great impact that Inmarsat's BGAN system will have on the European satellite communications industry, and the benefits that it will bring to a wide range of European industries, in 2003 ESA initiated the "BGAN Extension" project. Its primary goals are to provide the full range of BGAN services to truly mobile platforms, operating in aeronautical, vehicular and maritime environments, and to introduce a multicast service capability. The project is supported by the ARTES Programme which establishes a collaboration agreement between ESA, Inmarsat and a group of key industrial and academic institutions which includes EMS, Logica, Nera and the University of Surrey (UK).

  20. Transcription of potato spindle tuber viroid by RNA polymerase II starts in the left terminal loop

    SciTech Connect

    Kolonko, Nadine; Bannach, Oliver; Aschermann, Katja; Hu, Kang-Hong; Moors, Michaela; Schmitz, Michael; Steger, Gerhard; Riesner, Detlev . E-mail: riesner@biophys.uni-duesseldorf.de

    2006-04-10

    Viroids are single-stranded, circular RNAs of 250 to 400 bases, that replicate autonomously in their host plants but do not code for a protein. Viroids of the family Pospiviroidae, of which potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) is the type strain, are replicated by the host's DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II in the nucleus. To analyze the initiation site of transcription from the (+)-stranded circles into (-)-stranded replication intermediates, we used a nuclear extract from a non-infected cell culture of the host plant S. tuberosum. The (-)-strands, which were de novo-synthesized in the extract upon addition of circular (+)-PSTVd, were purified by affinity chromatography. This purification avoided contamination by host nucleic acids that had resulted in a misassignment of the start site in an earlier study. Primer-extension analysis of the de novo-synthesized (-)-strands revealed a single start site located in the hairpin loop of the left terminal region in circular PSTVd's secondary structure. This start site is supported further by analysis of the infectivity and replication behavior of site-directed mutants in planta.

  1. Privatising Agricultural Extension: Caveat Emptor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, A. D.; Lamers, J. P. A.; Ficarelli, P. P.; Hoffmann, V.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses forces promoting privatization of agricultural extension. Discusses experiences of privatization and commercialization of extension and related problems in various countries, particularly developing countries. Suggests that the state will continue to play an important role in agricultural extension in many countries and that…

  2. Unified framework for systematic loop transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, L.C.; Chen, M.

    1990-10-01

    This paper presents a formal mathematical framework which unifies the existing loop transformations. This framework also includes more general classes of loop transformations, which can extract more parallelism from a class of programs than the existing techniques. We classify schedules into three classes: uniform, subdomain-variant, and statement-variant. Viewing from the degree of parallelism to be gained by loop transformation, the schedules can also be classified as single-sequential level, multiple-sequential level, and mixed schedules. We also illustrate the usefulness of the more general loop transformation with an example program.

  3. Conservation law for linked cosmic string loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekenstein, Jacob D.

    1992-05-01

    Taking a cue from the connection between fluid helicity and the linkage between closed vortices in ordinary turbulent flow, we examine topological restrictions on the linkage of cosmic string loops (or superfluid quantum vortex rings). The analog of helicity in these cases vanishes, but loops (and vortex rings) can link together, the extent of linkage (knotting included) being related to the contorsion of the loops or rings by a topological conservation law. This law is respected by intercommunication. One consequence is that total loop contorsion is quantized in integers.

  4. Multi-instrument observations of coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Jason Terrence

    This document exhibits results of analysis from data collected with multiple EUV satellites (SOHO, TRACE, STEREO, Hinode, and SDO). The focus is the detailed observation of coronal loops using multiple instruments, i.e. filter imagers and spectrometers. Techniques for comparing the different instruments and deriving loop parameters are demonstrated. Attention is given to the effects the different instruments may introduce into the data and their interpretation. The assembled loop parameters are compared to basic energy balance equations and scaling laws. Discussion of the blue-shifted, asymmetric, and line broadened spectral line profiles near the footpoints of coronal loops is made. The first quantitative analysis of the anti-correlation between intensity and spectral line broadening for isolated regions along loops and their footpoints is presented. A magnetic model of an active region shows where the separatrices meet the photospheric boundary. At the boundary, the spectral data reveal concentrated regions of increased blue-shifted outflows, blue wing asymmetry, and line broadening. This is found just outside the footpoints of bright loops. The intensity and line broadening in this region are anti-correlated. A comparison of the similarities in the spectroscopic structure near the footpoints of the arcade loops and more isolated loops suggests the notion of consistent structuring for the bright loops forming an apparent edge of an active region core.

  5. Double dither loop for pseudonoise code tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, P. M.

    1977-01-01

    A new type of phase detector for pseudonoise code tracking is introduced and analyzed in comparison with the delay lock loop (DLL) and tau-dither loop (TDL) configurations. It is shown that the double dither loop (DDL) combines the best features of the DLL and the TDL in that the DDL is insensitive to gain and offset imbalances and does not suffer the 3-dB degradation in noise performance typically associated with the TDL. The double dither concept is applicable to other dual channel detectors such as in a Costas-type carrier tracking loop.

  6. Analysis Of Lock Detection In Costas Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mileant, Alexander; Hinedi, Sami M.

    1991-01-01

    Report presents analysis of detection of phase lock in Costas loops, used in coherent binary-phase-shift-keying communication systems to track both subcarrier and suppressed carrier signals. Detection of phase lock important part of operation and monitoring of operation of Costas or other tracking loop, provides insight into behavior of loop in real time. Focuses on effects of phase jitter and correlation between samples of phase error in all-digital Costas loop, in which lock detection implemented via algorithm. Applicable to both sinusoidal and square-law carrier signals, incorporates new mathematical models of square-law and absolute-value detectors.

  7. Screened perturbation theory to three loops

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Jens O.; Braaten, Eric; Strickland, Michael

    2001-05-15

    The thermal physics of a massless scalar field with a {phi}{sup 4} interaction is studied within screened perturbation theory (SPT). In this method the perturbative expansion is reorganized by adding and subtracting a mass term in the Lagrangian. We consider several different mass prescriptions that generalize the one-loop gap equation to two-loop order. We calculate the pressure and entropy to three-loop order and the screening mass to two-loop order. In contrast with the weak-coupling expansion, the SPT-improved approximations appear to converge even for rather large values of the coupling constant.

  8. Closed-Loop Neuroscience and Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation: A Tale of Two Loops

    PubMed Central

    Zrenner, Christoph; Belardinelli, Paolo; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Ziemann, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Closed-loop neuroscience is receiving increasing attention with recent technological advances that enable complex feedback loops to be implemented with millisecond resolution on commodity hardware. We summarize emerging conceptual and methodological frameworks that are available to experimenters investigating a “brain in the loop” using non-invasive brain stimulation and briefly review the experimental and therapeutic implications. We take the view that closed-loop neuroscience in fact deals with two conceptually quite different loops: a “brain-state dynamics” loop, used to couple with and modulate the trajectory of neuronal activity patterns, and a “task dynamics” loop, that is the bidirectional motor-sensory interaction between brain and (simulated) environment, and which enables goal-directed behavioral tasks to be incorporated. Both loops need to be considered and combined to realize the full experimental and therapeutic potential of closed-loop neuroscience. PMID:27092055

  9. Closing the loop with blur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Jacopo

    A great variety of systems use image sensors to provide measurements for closed loop operation. A drawback of using image sensors in real-time feedback is that they provide measurements at slower sampling rates as compared to the actuators, typically around 30 Hz for CCD cameras, hence acting as the bottleneck for closed loop control bandwidths. While high speed cameras exist, higher frame rates imply an upper bound on exposures which lowers the signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), reducing measurements accuracy. The integrative nature of image sensors though offers the opportunity to prolong the exposure window and collect motion blurred measurements. This research describes how to exploit the dynamic information of observed system outputs, encoded in motion blur, to control fast systems at the fast rate through slow rate image sensors. In order to achieve this objective it is necessary to (a) design a controller providing fast rate input to the system based on the slow image measurements. Ideally such a controller would require a fast rate estimate of the system's state variables in order to provide the necessary control action, therefore an (b) image blur based estimator is to be developed. State estimators typically need a model of the system in order to provide their estimates, so (c) a system identification problem has to be addressed, where a reliable model describing the frequency content of the system, up to frequencies corresponding to the fast rate, has to be determined through slow rate image sensor measurements. Alternatively when such a procedure is not possible for lack, e.g., of knowledge of the input to the system, then (d) a method to reconstruct the output signal frequency content up to frequencies above those set by the limitations of the sampling theorem is to be devised. Therefore in order to "close the loop with blur", this work describes how to pose and solve the problems of, namely: system identification , state estimation, closed loop control and

  10. UWB communication receiver feedback loop

    DOEpatents

    Spiridon, Alex; Benzel, Dave; Dowla, Farid U.; Nekoogar, Faranak; Rosenbury, Erwin T.

    2007-12-04

    A novel technique and structure that maximizes the extraction of information from reference pulses for UWB-TR receivers is introduced. The scheme efficiently processes an incoming signal to suppress different types of UWB as well as non-UWB interference prior to signal detection. Such a method and system adds a feedback loop mechanism to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of reference pulses in a conventional TR receiver. Moreover, sampling the second order statistical function such as, for example, the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the received signal and matching it to the ACF samples of the original pulses for each transmitted bit provides a more robust UWB communications method and system in the presence of channel distortions.

  11. Closed loop steam cooled airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Widrig, Scott M.; Rudolph, Ronald J.; Wagner, Gregg P.

    2006-04-18

    An airfoil, a method of manufacturing an airfoil, and a system for cooling an airfoil is provided. The cooling system can be used with an airfoil located in the first stages of a combustion turbine within a combined cycle power generation plant and involves flowing closed loop steam through a pin array set within an airfoil. The airfoil can comprise a cavity having a cooling chamber bounded by an interior wall and an exterior wall so that steam can enter the cavity, pass through the pin array, and then return to the cavity to thereby cool the airfoil. The method of manufacturing an airfoil can include a type of lost wax investment casting process in which a pin array is cast into an airfoil to form a cooling chamber.

  12. Delay locked loop integrated circuit.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2007-10-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Delay Locked Loop (DLL) integrated circuit (IC). The DLL was developed and tested as a stand-alone IC test chip to be integrated into a larger application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), the Quadrature Digital Waveform Synthesizer (QDWS). The purpose of the DLL is to provide a digitally programmable delay to enable synchronization between an internal system clock and external peripherals with unknown clock skew. The DLL was designed and fabricated in the IBM 8RF process, a 0.13 {micro}m CMOS process. It was designed to operate with a 300MHz clock and has been tested up to 500MHz.

  13. Multiple LacI-mediated loops revealed by Bayesian statistics and tethered particle motion

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stephanie; van de Meent, Jan-Willem; Phillips, Rob; Wiggins, Chris H.; Lindén, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial transcription factor LacI loops DNA by binding to two separate locations on the DNA simultaneously. Despite being one of the best-studied model systems for transcriptional regulation, the number and conformations of loop structures accessible to LacI remain unclear, though the importance of multiple coexisting loops has been implicated in interactions between LacI and other cellular regulators of gene expression. To probe this issue, we have developed a new analysis method for tethered particle motion, a versatile and commonly used in vitro single-molecule technique. Our method, vbTPM, performs variational Bayesian inference in hidden Markov models. It learns the number of distinct states (i.e. DNA–protein conformations) directly from tethered particle motion data with better resolution than existing methods, while easily correcting for common experimental artifacts. Studying short (roughly 100 bp) LacI-mediated loops, we provide evidence for three distinct loop structures, more than previously reported in single-molecule studies. Moreover, our results confirm that changes in LacI conformation and DNA-binding topology both contribute to the repertoire of LacI-mediated loops formed in vitro, and provide qualitatively new input for models of looping and transcriptional regulation. We expect vbTPM to be broadly useful for probing complex protein–nucleic acid interactions. PMID:25120267

  14. Usnic acid.

    PubMed

    Ingólfsdóttir, K

    2002-12-01

    Since its first isolation in 1844, usnic acid [2,6-diacetyl-7,9-dihydroxy-8,9b-dimethyl-1,3(2H,9bH)-dibenzo-furandione] has become the most extensively studied lichen metabolite and one of the few that is commercially available. Usnic acid is uniquely found in lichens, and is especially abundant in genera such as Alectoria, Cladonia, Usnea, Lecanora, Ramalina and Evernia. Many lichens and extracts containing usnic acid have been utilized for medicinal, perfumery, cosmetic as well as ecological applications. Usnic acid as a pure substance has been formulated in creams, toothpaste, mouthwash, deodorants and sunscreen products, in some cases as an active principle, in others as a preservative. In addition to antimicrobial activity against human and plant pathogens, usnic acid has been shown to exhibit antiviral, antiprotozoal, antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity. Ecological effects, such as antigrowth, antiherbivore and anti-insect properties, have also been demonstrated. A difference in biological activity has in some cases been observed between the two enantiomeric forms of usnic acid. Recently health food supplements containing usnic acid have been promoted for use in weight reduction, with little scientific support. The emphasis of the current review is on the chemistry and biological activity of usnic acid and its derivatives in addition to rational and ecologically acceptable methods for provision of this natural compound on a large scale.

  15. Quantitation of interactions between two DNA loops demonstrates loop domain insulation in E. coli cells.

    PubMed

    Priest, David G; Kumar, Sandip; Yan, Yan; Dunlap, David D; Dodd, Ian B; Shearwin, Keith E

    2014-10-21

    Eukaryotic gene regulation involves complex patterns of long-range DNA-looping interactions between enhancers and promoters, but how these specific interactions are achieved is poorly understood. Models that posit other DNA loops--that aid or inhibit enhancer-promoter contact--are difficult to test or quantitate rigorously in eukaryotic cells. Here, we use the well-characterized DNA-looping proteins Lac repressor and phage λ CI to measure interactions between pairs of long DNA loops in E. coli cells in the three possible topological arrangements. We find that side-by-side loops do not affect each other. Nested loops assist each other's formation consistent with their distance-shortening effect. In contrast, alternating loops, where one looping element is placed within the other DNA loop, inhibit each other's formation, thus providing clear support for the loop domain model for insulation. Modeling shows that combining loop assistance and loop interference can provide strong specificity in long-range interactions.

  16. [Qualitative and quantitative detection of bacterial flora in experimental blind loop syndrome of the rat].

    PubMed

    Menge, H; Simes, G; Germer, C T; Wagner, J; Hahn, H; Riecken, E O

    1985-08-01

    In the blind loop syndrome bacterial overgrowth--accompanied by an increase in bile acid deconjugation--is thought to be responsible for the observed morphological alterations of the small intestinal mucosa with its concomitant malabsorption syndrome. Since in this chain of events the bacterial overgrowth is of primary importance, we have performed a complete qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the intraluminal flora in rats with surgically created self-filling blind loops. The results show a significant increase in bacteria of the aerobic growing genera E. coli and Streptococcus (Enterococcus), and of the anaerobic growing genus Bacteroides, in one single rat also of the genera Lactobacillus/Bifidobacterium. In order to elucidate which strains of bacteria are predominantly responsible for the morphological and functional alterations observed in the stagnant loop syndrome, germ-free rats with self-filling blind loops should be contaminated selectively with bacteria of these genera.

  17. Improved methods for the formation and stabilization of R-loops

    PubMed Central

    Kaback, David B.; Angerer, Lynne M.; Davidson, Norman

    1979-01-01

    Improved methods for the formation and stabilization of R-loops for visualization in the electron microscope are presented. The two complementary strands of a duplex DNA are photochemically crosslinked once every 1 to 3 kb using 4, 5', 8 trimethylpsoralen. R-loops are then formed by incubation with RNA in 70% formamide at a temperature above the DNA melting temperature. Finally, the R-loops are stabilized by modifying the free single strand of DNA with glyoxal, thus minimizing the displacement of the hybridized RNA by branch migration. In this manner R-loops can be formed and visualized at a high frequency irrespective of the base composition of the nucleic acid of interest. Images PMID:379821

  18. The Cygnus Loop: An Older Supernova Remnant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straka, William

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Cygnus Loop, one of brightest and most easily studied of the older "remnant nebulae" of supernova outbursts. Discusses some of the historical events surrounding the discovery and measurement of the Cygnus Loop and makes some projections on its future. (TW)

  19. SP-100 liquid metal test loop design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallas, T. Ted; Kruger, Gordon B.; Wiltshire, Frank R.; Jensen, Grant C.; Clay, Harold; Upton, Hugh A.; Gamble, Robert E.; Kjaer-Olsen, Christian; Lee, Keith

    1992-01-01

    The SP-100 Power System Qualification (PSO) program validates the technology readiness of the SP-100 Generic Flight System (GFS). As part of the PSQ, the GFS reactor, heat transport and power generation systems are being validated, by test, in high temperature liquid metal test loops. The liquid metal test loop program consists of two test loops. The first, a natural circulation material test loop (MTL), has been successfully operating for the last year at GE's test facility in San Jose. The second, a forced circulation Component Test Loop (CTL) is in the preliminary design phase. Fabrication of the CTL and modifications to the Test Facility will be completed in FY94 with component testing scheduled to begin in FY95. The CTL is a Nb-1Zr test loop with an Electromagnetic (EM) pump providing forced circulation for the liquid lithium coolant. The CTL test program is comprised of a series of individual component tests. Test components containing thermoelectric cells will have their cold side ducts piped to an existing heat rejection loop external to the CTL vacuum vessel. The test assembly and test components are being designed by GE. The detail design of several loop components is being performed by Westinghouse Atomic Energy Systems (WAES). The CTL will be assembled and the test performed at GE's facilties in San Jose, California.

  20. Formation of Chromosomal Domains by Loop Extrusion.

    PubMed

    Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Imakaev, Maxim; Lu, Carolyn; Goloborodko, Anton; Abdennur, Nezar; Mirny, Leonid A

    2016-05-31

    Topologically associating domains (TADs) are fundamental structural and functional building blocks of human interphase chromosomes, yet the mechanisms of TAD formation remain unclear. Here, we propose that loop extrusion underlies TAD formation. In this process, cis-acting loop-extruding factors, likely cohesins, form progressively larger loops but stall at TAD boundaries due to interactions with boundary proteins, including CTCF. Using polymer simulations, we show that this model produces TADs and finer-scale features of Hi-C data. Each TAD emerges from multiple loops dynamically formed through extrusion, contrary to typical illustrations of single static loops. Loop extrusion both explains diverse experimental observations-including the preferential orientation of CTCF motifs, enrichments of architectural proteins at TAD boundaries, and boundary deletion experiments-and makes specific predictions for the depletion of CTCF versus cohesin. Finally, loop extrusion has potentially far-ranging consequences for processes such as enhancer-promoter interactions, orientation-specific chromosomal looping, and compaction of mitotic chromosomes. PMID:27210764

  1. Spring control of wire harness loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curcio, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    Negator spring control guides wire harness between movable and fixed structure. It prevents electrical wire harness loop from jamming or being severed as wire moves in response to changes in position of aircraft rudder. Spring-loaded coiled cable controls wire loop regardless of rudder movement.

  2. Feedback loop compensates for rectifier nonlinearity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Signal processing circuit with two negative feedback loops rectifies two sinusoidal signals which are 180 degrees out of phase and produces a single full-wave rectified output signal. Each feedback loop incorporates a feedback rectifier to compensate for the nonlinearity of the circuit.

  3. Extension education and the role of university extension departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Michael B.

    1994-03-01

    The categorisation by Yesufu is important in delineating the several functions and orientations through which extension education can be effected. Extension education as a catalyst in the field of development education is an imperative for all universities and other allied institutions, whether technological, agricultural, liberal or conventionally oriented. Towards this end, appropriately trained extension education personnel are a necessity. Extension departments have peculiar and unique problems due to their dual orientation. The need, therefore, arises for special attention and consideration in the areas of funding, organisational scheduling, and human and infrastructural resources.

  4. Acquisition performance of various QPSK carrier tracking loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinedi, S.; Shah, B.

    1992-09-01

    The frequency and phase acquisition performance of three quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) carrier tracking loops, the MAP estimation loop, the Costas crossover loop, and the generalized Costas loop, is described. Acquisition time and probability of acquisition as a function of both loop signal-to-noise ratio and frequency offset to loop bandwidth ratio are obtained via computer simulations for type II and III loops. It is shown that the MAP loop, which results in the smallest squaring loss for all signal-to-noise ratios, is sometimes outperformed by the other two loops in terms of acquisition time and acquisition probability.

  5. Acquisition performance of various QPSK carrier tracking loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinedi, S.; Shah, B.

    1992-01-01

    The frequency and phase acquisition performance of three quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) carrier tracking loops, the MAP estimation loop, the Costas crossover loop, and the generalized Costas loop, is described. Acquisition time and probability of acquisition as a function of both loop signal-to-noise ratio and frequency offset to loop bandwidth ratio are obtained via computer simulations for type II and III loops. It is shown that the MAP loop, which results in the smallest squaring loss for all signal-to-noise ratios, is sometimes outperformed by the other two loops in terms of acquisition time and acquisition probability.

  6. EVIDENCE OF SOLAR FLARE TRIGGERING DUE TO LOOP-LOOP INTERACTION CAUSED BY FOOTPOINT SHEAR MOTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pankaj; Srivastava, A. K.; Uddin, Wahab; Somov, B. V.; Manoharan, P. K.; Erdelyi, R. E-mail: aks@aries.res.i

    2010-11-10

    We analyze multi-wavelength data of an M7.9/1N class solar flare which occurred on 2006 April 27 in AR NOAA 10875. GOES soft X-ray images provide the most likely signature of two interacting loops and their reconnection, which triggers the solar flare. TRACE 195 A images also reveal the loop-loop interaction and the formation of 'X' points with converging motion ({approx}30 km s{sup -1}) at the reconnection site in between this interacting loop system. This provides evidence of progressive reconnection and flare maximization at the interaction site in the active region. The absence of type III radio bursts during this time period indicates no opening of magnetic field lines during the flare energy release, which implies that the change of field line connectivity/orientation occurred only during the loop-loop interaction and reconnection process. The Ondrejov dynamic radio spectrum shows an intense decimetric (DCIM) radio burst (2.5-4.5 GHz, duration {approx}3 minutes) during the flare initiation, which reveals the signature of particle acceleration from the reconnection site during loop-loop interaction. The double-peak structures at 4.9 and 8.8 GHz provide the most likely confirmatory signature of the loop-loop interaction at the flare site in the active region. RHESSI hard X-ray images also show the loop-top and footpoint sources of the corresponding two-loop system, which act like current-carrying flux tubes with resultant opposite magnetic fields and net force of attraction, and their coalescence during the flare maximum. We also suggest that the shear motion/rotation of the footpoint of the smaller loop, which is anchored in the opposite polarity spot, may be responsible for the flare energy buildup and its eventual release due to the loop-loop interaction.

  7. A Three-State Model with Loop Entropy for the Overstretching Transition of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Einert, Thomas R.; Staple, Douglas B.; Kreuzer, Hans-Jürgen; Netz, Roland R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We introduce a three-state model for a single DNA chain under tension that distinguishes among B-DNA, S-DNA, and M (molten or denatured) segments and at the same time correctly accounts for the entropy of molten loops, characterized by the exponent c in the asymptotic expression S ∼ –c ln n for the entropy of a loop of length n. Force extension curves are derived exactly by employing a generalized Poland-Scheraga approach and then compared to experimental data. Simultaneous fitting to force-extension data at room temperature and to the denaturation phase transition at zero force is possible and allows us to establish a global phase diagram in the force-temperature plane. Under a stretching force, the effects of the stacking energy (entering as a domain-wall energy between paired and unpaired bases) and the loop entropy are separated. Therefore, we can estimate the loop exponent c independently from the precise value of the stacking energy. The fitted value for c is small, suggesting that nicks dominate the experimental force extension traces of natural DNA. PMID:20643077

  8. Damped transverse oscillations of interacting coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Roberto; Luna, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    Damped transverse oscillations of magnetic loops are routinely observed in the solar corona. This phenomenon is interpreted as standing kink magnetohydrodynamic waves, which are damped by resonant absorption owing to plasma inhomogeneity across the magnetic field. The periods and damping times of these oscillations can be used to probe the physical conditions of the coronal medium. Some observations suggest that interaction between neighboring oscillating loops in an active region may be important and can modify the properties of the oscillations. Here we theoretically investigate resonantly damped transverse oscillations of interacting nonuniform coronal loops. We provide a semi-analytic method, based on the T-matrix theory of scattering, to compute the frequencies and damping rates of collective oscillations of an arbitrary configuration of parallel cylindrical loops. The effect of resonant damping is included in the T-matrix scheme in the thin boundary approximation. Analytic and numerical results in the specific case of two interacting loops are given as an application.

  9. Fast, vacancy-free climb of prismatic dislocation loops in bcc metals.

    PubMed

    Swinburne, Thomas D; Arakawa, Kazuto; Mori, Hirotaro; Yasuda, Hidehiro; Isshiki, Minoru; Mimura, Kouji; Uchikoshi, Masahito; Dudarev, Sergei L

    2016-01-01

    Vacancy-mediated climb models cannot account for the fast, direct coalescence of dislocation loops seen experimentally. An alternative mechanism, self climb, allows prismatic dislocation loops to move away from their glide surface via pipe diffusion around the loop perimeter, independent of any vacancy atmosphere. Despite the known importance of self climb, theoretical models require a typically unknown activation energy, hindering implementation in materials modeling. Here, extensive molecular statics calculations of pipe diffusion processes around irregular prismatic loops are used to map the energy landscape for self climb in iron and tungsten, finding a simple, material independent energy model after normalizing by the vacancy migration barrier. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations yield a self climb activation energy of 2 (2.5) times the vacancy migration barrier for 1/2〈111〉 (〈100〉) dislocation loops. Dislocation dynamics simulations allowing self climb and glide show quantitative agreement with transmission electron microscopy observations of climbing prismatic loops in iron and tungsten, confirming that this novel form of vacancy-free climb is many orders of magnitude faster than what is predicted by traditional climb models. Self climb significantly influences the coarsening rate of defect networks, with important implications for post-irradiation annealing. PMID:27549928

  10. Optimization of shRNA inhibitors by variation of the terminal loop sequence.

    PubMed

    Schopman, Nick C T; Liu, Ying Poi; Konstantinova, Pavlina; ter Brake, Olivier; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-05-01

    Gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) can be achieved by intracellular expression of a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) that is processed into the effective small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibitor by the RNAi machinery. Previous studies indicate that shRNA molecules do not always reflect the activity of corresponding synthetic siRNAs that attack the same target sequence. One obvious difference between these two effector molecules is the hairpin loop of the shRNA. Most studies use the original shRNA design of the pSuper system, but no extensive study regarding optimization of the shRNA loop sequence has been performed. We tested the impact of different hairpin loop sequences, varying in size and structure, on the activity of a set of shRNAs targeting HIV-1. We were able to transform weak inhibitors into intermediate or even strong shRNA inhibitors by replacing the loop sequence. We demonstrate that the efficacy of these optimized shRNA inhibitors is improved significantly in different cell types due to increased siRNA production. These results indicate that the loop sequence is an essential part of the shRNA design. The optimized shRNA loop sequence is generally applicable for RNAi knockdown studies, and will allow us to develop a more potent gene therapy against HIV-1. PMID:20188764

  11. DNA looping increases the range of bistability in a stochastic model of the lac genetic switch.

    PubMed

    Earnest, Tyler M; Roberts, Elijah; Assaf, Michael; Dahmen, Karin; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2013-04-01

    Conditions and parameters affecting the range of bistability of the lac genetic switch in Escherichia coli are examined for a model which includes DNA looping interactions with the lac repressor and a lactose analogue. This stochastic gene-mRNA-protein model of the lac switch describes DNA looping using a third transcriptional state. We exploit the fast bursting dynamics of mRNA by combining a novel geometric burst extension with the finite state projection method. This limits the number of protein/mRNA states, allowing for an accelerated search of the model's parameter space. We evaluate how the addition of the third state changes the bistability properties of the model and find a critical region of parameter space where the phenotypic switching occurs in a range seen in single molecule fluorescence studies. Stochastic simulations show induction in the looping model is preceded by a rare complete dissociation of the loop followed by an immediate burst of mRNA rather than a slower build up of mRNA as in the two-state model. The overall effect of the looped state is to allow for faster switching times while at the same time further differentiating the uninduced and induced phenotypes. Furthermore, the kinetic parameters are consistent with free energies derived from thermodynamic studies suggesting that this minimal model of DNA looping could have a broader range of application. PMID:23406725

  12. DNA looping increases the range of bistability in a stochastic model of the lac genetic switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earnest, Tyler M.; Roberts, Elijah; Assaf, Michael; Dahmen, Karin; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2013-04-01

    Conditions and parameters affecting the range of bistability of the lac genetic switch in Escherichia coli are examined for a model which includes DNA looping interactions with the lac repressor and a lactose analogue. This stochastic gene-mRNA-protein model of the lac switch describes DNA looping using a third transcriptional state. We exploit the fast bursting dynamics of mRNA by combining a novel geometric burst extension with the finite state projection method. This limits the number of protein/mRNA states, allowing for an accelerated search of the model's parameter space. We evaluate how the addition of the third state changes the bistability properties of the model and find a critical region of parameter space where the phenotypic switching occurs in a range seen in single molecule fluorescence studies. Stochastic simulations show induction in the looping model is preceded by a rare complete dissociation of the loop followed by an immediate burst of mRNA rather than a slower build up of mRNA as in the two-state model. The overall effect of the looped state is to allow for faster switching times while at the same time further differentiating the uninduced and induced phenotypes. Furthermore, the kinetic parameters are consistent with free energies derived from thermodynamic studies suggesting that this minimal model of DNA looping could have a broader range of application.

  13. Fast, vacancy-free climb of prismatic dislocation loops in bcc metals

    PubMed Central

    Swinburne, Thomas D.; Arakawa, Kazuto; Mori, Hirotaro; Yasuda, Hidehiro; Isshiki, Minoru; Mimura, Kouji; Uchikoshi, Masahito; Dudarev, Sergei L.

    2016-01-01

    Vacancy-mediated climb models cannot account for the fast, direct coalescence of dislocation loops seen experimentally. An alternative mechanism, self climb, allows prismatic dislocation loops to move away from their glide surface via pipe diffusion around the loop perimeter, independent of any vacancy atmosphere. Despite the known importance of self climb, theoretical models require a typically unknown activation energy, hindering implementation in materials modeling. Here, extensive molecular statics calculations of pipe diffusion processes around irregular prismatic loops are used to map the energy landscape for self climb in iron and tungsten, finding a simple, material independent energy model after normalizing by the vacancy migration barrier. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations yield a self climb activation energy of 2 (2.5) times the vacancy migration barrier for 1/2〈111〉 (〈100〉) dislocation loops. Dislocation dynamics simulations allowing self climb and glide show quantitative agreement with transmission electron microscopy observations of climbing prismatic loops in iron and tungsten, confirming that this novel form of vacancy-free climb is many orders of magnitude faster than what is predicted by traditional climb models. Self climb significantly influences the coarsening rate of defect networks, with important implications for post-irradiation annealing. PMID:27549928

  14. Fast, vacancy-free climb of prismatic dislocation loops in bcc metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinburne, Thomas D.; Arakawa, Kazuto; Mori, Hirotaro; Yasuda, Hidehiro; Isshiki, Minoru; Mimura, Kouji; Uchikoshi, Masahito; Dudarev, Sergei L.

    2016-08-01

    Vacancy-mediated climb models cannot account for the fast, direct coalescence of dislocation loops seen experimentally. An alternative mechanism, self climb, allows prismatic dislocation loops to move away from their glide surface via pipe diffusion around the loop perimeter, independent of any vacancy atmosphere. Despite the known importance of self climb, theoretical models require a typically unknown activation energy, hindering implementation in materials modeling. Here, extensive molecular statics calculations of pipe diffusion processes around irregular prismatic loops are used to map the energy landscape for self climb in iron and tungsten, finding a simple, material independent energy model after normalizing by the vacancy migration barrier. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations yield a self climb activation energy of 2 (2.5) times the vacancy migration barrier for 1/2<111> (<100>) dislocation loops. Dislocation dynamics simulations allowing self climb and glide show quantitative agreement with transmission electron microscopy observations of climbing prismatic loops in iron and tungsten, confirming that this novel form of vacancy-free climb is many orders of magnitude faster than what is predicted by traditional climb models. Self climb significantly influences the coarsening rate of defect networks, with important implications for post-irradiation annealing.

  15. Loop heat pipes and capillary pumped loops-an applications perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Dan; Ku, Jentung; Swanson, Theodore

    2002-01-01

    Capillary pumped loops (CPLs) and loop heat pipes (LHPs) are versatile two-phase heat transfer devices which have recently gained increasing acceptance in space applications. Both systems work based on the same principles and have very similar designs. Nevertheless, some differences exist in the construction of the evaporator and the hydro-accumulator, and these differences lead to very distinct operating characteristics for each loop. This paper presents comparisons of the two loops from an applications perspective, and addresses their impact on spacecraft design, integration, and test. Some technical challenges and issues for both loops are also addressed. .

  16. A communication scheme for the distrubted execution of loop nests with while loops

    SciTech Connect

    Griebl, M.; Lengauer, C.

    1995-10-01

    The mathematical model for the parallelization, or {open_quotes}space-time mapping,{close_quotes} of loop nests is the polyhedron model. The presence of while loops in the nest complicates matters for two reasons: (1) the parallelized loop nest does not correspond to a polyhedron but instead to a subset that resembles a (multi-dimensional) comb and (2) it is not clear when the entire loop nest has terminated. We describe a communication scheme which can deal with both problems and which can be added to the parallel target loop nest by a compiler.

  17. Contrasting HIV phylogenetic relationships and V3 loop protein similarities

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, B. Santa Fe Inst., NM ); Myers, G. )

    1992-01-01

    At least five distinct sequence subtypes of HIV-I can be identified from the major centers of the AMS pandemic. While it is too early to tell whether these subtypes are serologically or phenotypically similar or distinct in terms of properties such as pathogenicity and transmissibility, we can begin to investigate their potential for phenotypic divergence at the protein sequence level. Phylogenetic analysis of HIV DNA sequences is being widely used to examine lineages of different viral strains as they evolve and spread throughout the globe. We have identified five distinct HIV-1 subtypes (designated A-E), or clades, based on phylogenetic clustering patterns generated from genetic information from both the gag and envelope (env) genes from a spectrum of international isolates. Our initial observations concerning both HIV-1 and HIV-2 sequences indicate that conserved patterns in protein chemistry may indeed exist across distant lineages. Such patterns in V3 loop amino acid chemistry may be indicative of stable lineages or convergence within this highly variable, though functionally and immunologically critical, region. We think that there may be parallels between the apparently stable HIV-2 V3 lineage and the previously mentioned HIV-1 V3 loops which are very similar at the protein level despite being distant by cladistic analysis, and which do not possess the distinctive positively charged residues. Highly conserved V3 loop protein sequences are also encountered in SIVAGMs and CIVs (chimpanzee viral strains), which do not appear to be pathogenic in their wild-caught natural hosts.

  18. Contrasting HIV phylogenetic relationships and V3 loop protein similarities

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, B. |; Myers, G.

    1992-12-31

    At least five distinct sequence subtypes of HIV-I can be identified from the major centers of the AMS pandemic. While it is too early to tell whether these subtypes are serologically or phenotypically similar or distinct in terms of properties such as pathogenicity and transmissibility, we can begin to investigate their potential for phenotypic divergence at the protein sequence level. Phylogenetic analysis of HIV DNA sequences is being widely used to examine lineages of different viral strains as they evolve and spread throughout the globe. We have identified five distinct HIV-1 subtypes (designated A-E), or clades, based on phylogenetic clustering patterns generated from genetic information from both the gag and envelope (env) genes from a spectrum of international isolates. Our initial observations concerning both HIV-1 and HIV-2 sequences indicate that conserved patterns in protein chemistry may indeed exist across distant lineages. Such patterns in V3 loop amino acid chemistry may be indicative of stable lineages or convergence within this highly variable, though functionally and immunologically critical, region. We think that there may be parallels between the apparently stable HIV-2 V3 lineage and the previously mentioned HIV-1 V3 loops which are very similar at the protein level despite being distant by cladistic analysis, and which do not possess the distinctive positively charged residues. Highly conserved V3 loop protein sequences are also encountered in SIVAGMs and CIVs (chimpanzee viral strains), which do not appear to be pathogenic in their wild-caught natural hosts.

  19. Loop substitution as a tool to identify active sites of interleukin-1 beta.

    PubMed

    Palla, E; Bensi, G; Solito, E; Buonamassa, D T; Fassina, G; Raugei, G; Spano, F; Galeotti, C; Mora, M; Domenighini, M

    1993-06-25

    By computer analysis of the amino acid sequence of human interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and of the human type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1RI), we have identified two hydropathically complementary peptides (Fassina, G., Roller, P. P., Olson, A. D., Thorgeirsson, S. S., and Omichinski, J. G. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 11252-11257) capable of binding to each other. The sequence of the IL-1 beta peptide corresponds to that of residues 88-99 (loop 7 of the crystal structure of mature IL-1 beta) of mature IL-1 beta, one of the exposed and highly charged regions of the molecule. The substitution of this loop with an amino acid sequence of the same length but different hydropathic profile generates a mutant with drastically reduced binding activity to IL-1RI. In contrast, the binding affinity to the type II IL-1R (IL-1RII) is the same as that of wild type IL-1 beta. The results show that 1) loop 7 is part of the binding site of IL-1 beta to IL-1RI, but not to IL-1RII. 2) The structure of the mutant protein is not grossly altered except locally at the position of the substituted loop. 3) The substitution of amino acids by site-directed mutagenesis of the loop 7 region generates mutants with binding affinity constants slightly lower than that of wild type IL-1 beta and not comparable to that of the loop substitution analogue. 4. All mutants analyzed, including the loop substitutions, are biologically active, confirming the structural integrity of the proteins. We propose a binding site in which the cooperation of several low energy bonds extended over a wide area results in a high affinity complex between IL-1 and the type I receptor. PMID:7685764

  20. Gross motion and classification of manipulators with closed-loop, four-bar chains

    SciTech Connect

    Kwun-Lon Ting )

    1992-06-01

    This article presents an extensive study on the gross motion of 2-DOF manipulators with closed-loop, four-bar chains. The investigation is focused on (1) classification, (2) work space and sub-work space, (3) existence of singular circles, (4) number of postures and service angles, and (5) the effects of the orientation of the wrist on the floating link. One may find that closed-loop manipulators are not only lightweight, they can also provide better kinematic properties in view of work space, singularity, postures, and service angles.

  1. All one-loop scalar vertices in the effective potential approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo-Molina, José Eliel; Morais, António P.; Pasechnik, Roman; Sampaio, Marco O. P.; Wessén, Jonas

    2016-08-01

    Using the one-loop Coleman-Weinberg effective potential, we derive a general analytic expression for all the derivatives of the effective potential with respect to any number of classical scalar fields. The result is valid for a renormalisable theory in four dimensions with any number of scalars, fermions or gauge bosons. This result corresponds to the zero-external momentum contribution to a general one-loop diagram with N scalar external legs. We illustrate the use of the general result in two simple scalar singlet extensions of the Standard Model, to obtain the dominant contributions to the triple couplings of light scalar particles under the zero external momentum approximation.

  2. Cygnus Loop Supernova Blast Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This is an image of a small portion of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, which marks the edge of a bubble-like, expanding blast wave from a colossal stellar explosion, occurring about 15,000 years ago. The HST image shows the structure behind the shock waves, allowing astronomers for the first time to directly compare the actual structure of the shock with theoretical model calculations. Besides supernova remnants, these shock models are important in understanding a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, from winds in newly-formed stars to cataclysmic stellar outbursts. The supernova blast is slamming into tenuous clouds of insterstellar gas. This collision heats and compresses the gas, causing it to glow. The shock thus acts as a searchlight revealing the structure of the interstellar medium. The detailed HST image shows the blast wave overrunning dense clumps of gas, which despite HST's high resolution, cannot be resolved. This means that the clumps of gas must be small enough to fit inside our solar system, making them relatively small structures by interstellar standards. A bluish ribbon of light stretching left to right across the picture might be a knot of gas ejected by the supernova; this interstellar 'bullet' traveling over three million miles per hour (5 million kilometres) is just catching up with the shock front, which has slowed down by ploughing into interstellar material. The Cygnus Loop appears as a faint ring of glowing gases about three degrees across (six times the diameter of the full Moon), located in the northern constellation, Cygnus the Swan. The supernova remnant is within the plane of our Milky Way galaxy and is 2,600 light-years away. The photo is a combination of separate images taken in three colors, oxygen atoms (blue) emit light at temperatures of 30,000 to 60,000 degrees Celsius (50,000 to 100,000 degrees Farenheit). Hydrogen atoms (green) arise throughout the region of shocked gas. Sulfur atoms (red) form when the gas cools to

  3. Sequence–structure relationships in RNA loops: establishing the basis for loop homology modeling

    PubMed Central

    Schudoma, Christian; May, Patrick; Nikiforova, Viktoria; Walther, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    The specific function of RNA molecules frequently resides in their seemingly unstructured loop regions. We performed a systematic analysis of RNA loops extracted from experimentally determined three-dimensional structures of RNA molecules. A comprehensive loop-structure data set was created and organized into distinct clusters based on structural and sequence similarity. We detected clear evidence of the hallmark of homology present in the sequence–structure relationships in loops. Loops differing by <25% in sequence identity fold into very similar structures. Thus, our results support the application of homology modeling for RNA loop model building. We established a threshold that may guide the sequence divergence-based selection of template structures for RNA loop homology modeling. Of all possible sequences that are, under the assumption of isosteric relationships, theoretically compatible with actual sequences observed in RNA structures, only a small fraction is contained in the Rfam database of RNA sequences and classes implying that the actual RNA loop space may consist of a limited number of unique loop structures and conserved sequences. The loop-structure data sets are made available via an online database, RLooM. RLooM also offers functionalities for the modeling of RNA loop structures in support of RNA engineering and design efforts. PMID:19923230

  4. Quantitation of interactions between two DNA loops demonstrates loop domain insulation in E. coli cells

    PubMed Central

    Priest, David G.; Kumar, Sandip; Yan, Yan; Dunlap, David D.; Dodd, Ian B.; Shearwin, Keith E.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene regulation involves complex patterns of long-range DNA-looping interactions between enhancers and promoters, but how these specific interactions are achieved is poorly understood. Models that posit other DNA loops—that aid or inhibit enhancer–promoter contact—are difficult to test or quantitate rigorously in eukaryotic cells. Here, we use the well-characterized DNA-looping proteins Lac repressor and phage λ CI to measure interactions between pairs of long DNA loops in E. coli cells in the three possible topological arrangements. We find that side-by-side loops do not affect each other. Nested loops assist each other’s formation consistent with their distance-shortening effect. In contrast, alternating loops, where one looping element is placed within the other DNA loop, inhibit each other’s formation, thus providing clear support for the loop domain model for insulation. Modeling shows that combining loop assistance and loop interference can provide strong specificity in long-range interactions. PMID:25288735

  5. Temperature dependence of looping rates in a short peptide.

    PubMed

    Roccatano, Danilo; Sahoo, Harekrushna; Zacharias, Martin; Nau, Werner M

    2007-03-15

    Knowledge of the influence of chain length and amino acid sequence on the structural and dynamic properties of small peptides in solution provides essential information on protein folding pathways. The combination of time-resolved optical spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods has become a powerful tool to investigate the kinetics of end-to-end collisions (looping rates) in short peptides, which are relevant in early protein folding events. We applied the combination of both techniques to study temperature-dependent (280-340 K) looping rates of the Dbo-AlaGlyGln-Trp-NH2 peptide, where Dbo represents a 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene-labeled asparagine, which served as a fluorescent probe in the time-resolved spectroscopic experiments. The experimental looping rates increased from 4.8 x 10(7) s(-1) at 283 K to 2.0 x 10(8) s(-1) at 338 K in H2O. The corresponding Arrhenius plot provided as activation parameters Ea = 21.5 +/- 1.0 kJ mol(-1) and ln(A/s-1) = 26.8 +/- 0.2 in H2O. The results in D2O were consistent with a slight solvent viscosity effect, i.e., the looping rates were 10-20% slower. MD simulations were performed with the GROMOS96 force field in a water solvent model, which required first a parametrization of the synthetic amino acid Dbo. After corrections for solvent viscosity effects, the calculated looping rates varied from 1.5 x 10(8) s(-1) at 280 K to 8.2 x 10(8) s(-1) at 340 K in H2O, which was about four times larger than the experimental data. The calculated activation parameters were Ea = 24.7 +/- 1.5 kJ mol(-1) and ln(A/s(-1)) = 29.4 +/- 0.1 in H2O.

  6. 35. WEST END ELEVATION, PROPOSED EXTENSION OF COAL HOUSE, EXTENSIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. WEST END ELEVATION, PROPOSED EXTENSION OF COAL HOUSE, EXTENSIONS OF ENGINE AND COAL HOUSES, DEER ISLAND PUMPING STATION, METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD, METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE WORKS, JANUARY 1908, SHEET NO. 7. Aperture card 6498-7. - Deer Island Pumping Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  7. 34. PLAN, PROPOSED EXTENSION OF COAL HOUSE, EXTENSIONS OF ENGINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. PLAN, PROPOSED EXTENSION OF COAL HOUSE, EXTENSIONS OF ENGINE AND COAL HOUSES, DEER ISLAND PUMPING STATION, METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD, METROPOLITAN SEWARAGE WORKS, JANUARY 1909, SHEET NO. 11. Aperture card 6498-11. - Deer Island Pumping Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  8. Welding torch gas cup extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The invention relates to a gas shielded electric arc welding torch having a detachable gas cup extension which may be of any desired configuration or length. The gas cup extension assembly is mounted on a standard electric welding torch gas cup to enable welding in areas with limited access. The gas cup assembly has an upper tubular insert that fits within the gas cup such that its lower portion protrudes thereform and has a lower tubular extension that is screwed into the lower portion. The extension has a rim to define the outer perimeter of the seat edge about its entrance opening so a gasket may be placed to effect an airtight seal between the gas cup and extension. The tubular extension may be made of metal or cermaic material that can be machined. The novelty lies in the use of an extension assembly for a standard gas cup of an electric arc welding torch which extension assembly is detachable permitting the use of a number of extensions which may be of different configurations and materials and yet fit the standard gas cup.

  9. Robotic hand with modular extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Salisbury, Curt Michael; Quigley, Morgan

    2015-01-20

    A robotic device is described herein. The robotic device includes a frame that comprises a plurality of receiving regions that are configured to receive a respective plurality of modular robotic extensions. The modular robotic extensions are removably attachable to the frame at the respective receiving regions by way of respective mechanical fuses. Each mechanical fuse is configured to trip when a respective modular robotic extension experiences a predefined load condition, such that the respective modular robotic extension detaches from the frame when the load condition is met.

  10. Towards conformal loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H-T Wang, Charles

    2006-03-01

    A discussion is given of recent developments in canonical gravity that assimilates the conformal analysis of gravitational degrees of freedom. The work is motivated by the problem of time in quantum gravity and is carried out at the metric and the triad levels. At the metric level, it is shown that by extending the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) phase space of general relativity (GR), a conformal form of geometrodynamics can be constructed. In addition to the Hamiltonian and Diffeomorphism constraints, an extra first class constraint is introduced to generate conformal transformations. This phase space consists of York's mean extrinsic curvature time, conformal three-metric and their momenta. At the triad level, the phase space of GR is further enlarged by incorporating spin-gauge as well as conformal symmetries. This leads to a canonical formulation of GR using a new set of real spin connection variables. The resulting gravitational constraints are first class, consisting of the Hamiltonian constraint and the canonical generators for spin-gauge and conformorphism transformations. The formulation has a remarkable feature of being parameter-free. Indeed, it is shown that a conformal parameter of the Barbero-Immirzi type can be absorbed by the conformal symmetry of the extended phase space. This gives rise to an alternative approach to loop quantum gravity that addresses both the conceptual problem of time and the technical problem of functional calculus in quantum gravity.

  11. CORONAL LOOP EXPANSION PROPERTIES EXPLAINED USING SEPARATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Plowman, Joseph E.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Longcope, Dana W.

    2009-11-20

    One puzzling observed property of coronal loops is that they are of roughly constant thickness along their length. Various studies have found no consistent pattern of width variation along the length of loops observed by TRACE and SOHO. This is at odds with expectations of magnetic flux tube expansion properties, which suggests that loops are widest at their tops, and significantly narrower at their footpoints. Coronal loops correspond to areas of the solar corona which have been preferentially heated by some process, so this observed property might be connected to the mechanisms that heat the corona. One means of energy deposition is magnetic reconnection, which occurs along field lines called separators. These field lines begin and end on magnetic null points, and loops forming near them can therefore be relatively wide at their bases. Thus, coronal energization by magnetic reconnection may replicate the puzzling expansion properties observed in coronal loops. We present results of a Monte Carlo survey of separator field line expansion properties, comparing them to the observed properties of coronal loops.

  12. Mitotic chromosome compaction via active loop extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloborodko, Anton; Imakaev, Maxim; Marko, John; Mirny, Leonid; MIT-Northwestern Team

    During cell division, two copies of each chromosome are segregated from each other and compacted more than hundred-fold into the canonical X-shaped structures. According to earlier microscopic observations and the recent Hi-C study, chromosomes are compacted into arrays of consecutive loops of ~100 kilobases. Mechanisms that lead to formation of such loop arrays are largely unknown. Here we propose that, during cell division, chromosomes can be compacted by enzymes that extrude loops on chromatin fibers. First, we use computer simulations and analytical modeling to show that a system of loop-extruding enzymes on a chromatin fiber self-organizes into an array of consecutive dynamic loops. Second, we model the process of loop extrusion in 3D and show that, coupled with the topo II strand-passing activity, it leads to robust compaction and segregation of sister chromatids. This mechanism of chromosomal condensation and segregation does not require additional proteins or specific DNA markup and is robust against variations in the number and properties of such loop extruding enzymes. Work at NU was supported by the NSF through Grants DMR-1206868 and MCB-1022117, and by the NIH through Grants GM105847 and CA193419. Work at MIT was supported by the NIH through Grants GM114190 R01HG003143.

  13. Structures of Gate Loop Variants of the AcrB Drug Efflux Pump Bound by Erythromycin Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Ababou, Abdessamad; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli use tripartite efflux pumps such as AcrAB-TolC to expel antibiotics and noxious compounds. A key feature of the inner membrane transporter component, AcrB, is a short stretch of residues known as the gate/switch loop that divides the proximal and distal substrate binding pockets. Amino acid substitutions of the gate loop are known to decrease antibiotic resistance conferred by AcrB. Here we present two new AcrB gate loop variants, the first stripped of its bulky side chains, and a second in which the gate loop is removed entirely. By determining the crystal structures of the variant AcrB proteins in the presence and absence of erythromycin and assessing their ability to confer erythromycin tolerance, we demonstrate that the gate loop is important for AcrB export activity but is not required for erythromycin binding. PMID:27403665

  14. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method extension to quantify simultaneously melamine and cyanuric acid in egg powder and soy protein in addition to milk products.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Mondal, Ana Mary; Desmarchelier, Aurélien; Konings, Erik; Acheson-Shalom, Ruth; Delatour, Thierry

    2010-11-24

    As a consequence of the adulteration of infant formulas and milk powders with melamine (MEL) in China in 2008, much attention has been devoted to the analysis of MEL [and cyanuric acid (CA)] in dairy products. Several methods based on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), or Raman spectroscopy have been described in the literature. However, no method is available for the simultaneous determination of MEL and CA in other raw materials, which are considered as high-risk materials for economically motivated adulteration. The present paper reports the results of an interlaboratory-based performance evaluation conducted with seven laboratories worldwide. The purpose was to demonstrate the ability of a cleanup-free LC-MS/MS method, originally developed for cow's milk and milk-powdered infant formula, to quantify MEL and CA in egg powder and soy protein. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.02 and 0.05 mg/kg for MEL in egg powder and soy protein, respectively. For CA, LOD and LOQ were 0.05 and 0.10 mg/kg in egg powder and 1.0 and 1.50 mg/kg in soy protein, respectively. Recoveries ranged within a 97-113% range for both MEL and CA in egg powder and soy protein. Reproducibility values (RSD(R)) from seven laboratories were within a 5.4-11.7% range for both analytes in the considered matrices. Horwitz ratio (HorRat) values between 0.4 and 0.7 indicate acceptable among-laboratory precision for the method described. PMID:21038852

  15. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method extension to quantify simultaneously melamine and cyanuric acid in egg powder and soy protein in addition to milk products.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Mondal, Ana Mary; Desmarchelier, Aurélien; Konings, Erik; Acheson-Shalom, Ruth; Delatour, Thierry

    2010-11-24

    As a consequence of the adulteration of infant formulas and milk powders with melamine (MEL) in China in 2008, much attention has been devoted to the analysis of MEL [and cyanuric acid (CA)] in dairy products. Several methods based on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), or Raman spectroscopy have been described in the literature. However, no method is available for the simultaneous determination of MEL and CA in other raw materials, which are considered as high-risk materials for economically motivated adulteration. The present paper reports the results of an interlaboratory-based performance evaluation conducted with seven laboratories worldwide. The purpose was to demonstrate the ability of a cleanup-free LC-MS/MS method, originally developed for cow's milk and milk-powdered infant formula, to quantify MEL and CA in egg powder and soy protein. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.02 and 0.05 mg/kg for MEL in egg powder and soy protein, respectively. For CA, LOD and LOQ were 0.05 and 0.10 mg/kg in egg powder and 1.0 and 1.50 mg/kg in soy protein, respectively. Recoveries ranged within a 97-113% range for both MEL and CA in egg powder and soy protein. Reproducibility values (RSD(R)) from seven laboratories were within a 5.4-11.7% range for both analytes in the considered matrices. Horwitz ratio (HorRat) values between 0.4 and 0.7 indicate acceptable among-laboratory precision for the method described.

  16. Open-Loop Acquisition Of Frequency In BPSK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Biren N.; Holmes, Jack K.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed open-loop analog/digital signal-processing system would be Costas-loop error detector functioning in closed-loop manner overall. Detector estimates difference between frequency of input signal and internal reference oscillator. Estimate used to close frequency-control loop. Precise symbol timing not necessary. Performance better than systems that effect open-loop acquisition using integrators instead of low-pass filters in arms of Costas loops and in which performance varies with symbol timing.

  17. Repeat Customer Success in Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Melissa M.; Traub, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Four multi-session research-based programs were offered by two Extension specialist in one rural Missouri county. Eleven participants who came to multiple Extension programs could be called "repeat customers." Based on the total number of participants for all four programs, 25% could be deemed as repeat customers. Repeat customers had…

  18. GNU Fortran Cray Pointer Extension

    2005-07-27

    The gfortran compiler is a Fortran front end to the GNU Compiler Collection. The Cray Pointer extension adds to this existing compiler support for Cray-style integer pointers. This non-standard but widely used extension adds the functionality of C-like pointers to the Fortran language.

  19. Cooperative Extension: A Historical Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Robert A.

    1970-01-01

    The early goals of the Extension Service were to increase agricultural productivity and maintain a rural way of life. Extension has been unable to fulfill both goals; increasing agricultural production has led to the liquidation of the rural way of life and to the development of corporate farms. (DM)

  20. Energy Crisis vs. Extension Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liles, Harold R.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses what steps were taken by the Cooperative Extension Service in Oklahoma, after the energy crisis began, to help landowners make better decisions regarding oil and gas leases. Oklahoma's Extension educational efforts in mineral rights management have been successful because they met the needs of the people. (EM)

  1. Extensive Reading Coursebooks in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renandya, Willy A.; Hu, Guangwei; Xiang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a principle-based evaluation of eight dedicated extensive reading coursebooks published in mainland China and used in many universities across the country. The aim is to determine the extent to which these coursebooks reflect a core set of nine second language acquisition and extensive reading principles. Our analysis shows…

  2. Extension and the Practicing Veterinarian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyerholz, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    In order for Extension programs of veterinary medicine to succeed, good relationships are needed among university veterinarians, practicing local veterinarians, county Extension agents and the clientele. This author attempts to define some roles and relationships and offer some suggestions for the improvement of relationships to increase…

  3. Capillary-Pumped Heat-Transfer Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    New type of capillary-pumped heat-transfer loop primes itself at startup. Removes substantial quantities of heat like that generated by people and equipment in rooms and vehicles. Creates continuous path for its working fluid; both vapor and liquid move in same direction. Key element in operation of loop is formation of slugs of liquid, condensed from vapor and moved along loop by vapor bubbles before and after it. Both evaporator and condenser contain axial arteries carrying water. Heat entering evaporator from heat source provides energy for transport of fluid and heat. Dimensions in inches.

  4. Loop-quantum-gravity vertex amplitude.

    PubMed

    Engle, Jonathan; Pereira, Roberto; Rovelli, Carlo

    2007-10-19

    Spin foam models are hoped to provide the dynamics of loop-quantum gravity. However, the most popular of these, the Barrett-Crane model, does not have the good boundary state space and there are indications that it fails to yield good low-energy n-point functions. We present an alternative dynamics that can be derived as a quantization of a Regge discretization of Euclidean general relativity, where second class constraints are imposed weakly. Its state space matches the SO(3) loop gravity one and it yields an SO(4)-covariant vertex amplitude for Euclidean loop gravity.

  5. Boosted Fast Flux Loop Alternative Cooling Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst; Donna Post Guillen; James R. Parry; Douglas L. Porter; Bruce W. Wallace

    2007-08-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) Project was instituted to develop the means for conducting fast neutron irradiation tests in a domestic radiation facility. It made use of booster fuel to achieve the high neutron flux, a hafnium thermal neutron absorber to attain the high fast-to-thermal flux ratio, a mixed gas temperature control system for maintaining experiment temperatures, and a compressed gas cooling system to remove heat from the experiment capsules and the hafnium thermal neutron absorber. This GTL system was determined to provide a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) flux greater than 1.0E+15 n/cm2-s with a fast-to-thermal flux ratio in the vicinity of 40. However, the estimated system acquisition cost from earlier studies was deemed to be high. That cost was strongly influenced by the compressed gas cooling system for experiment heat removal. Designers were challenged to find a less expensive way to achieve the required cooling. This report documents the results of the investigation leading to an alternatively cooled configuration, referred to now as the Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL). This configuration relies on a composite material comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) in an aluminum matrix to transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels while at the same time providing absorption of thermal neutrons. Investigations into the performance this configuration might achieve showed that it should perform at least as well as its gas-cooled predecessor. Physics calculations indicated that the fast neutron flux averaged over the central 40 cm (16 inches) relative to ATR core mid-plane in irradiation spaces would be about 1.04E+15 n/cm2-s. The fast-to-thermal flux ratio would be in excess of 40. Further, the particular configuration of cooling channels was relatively unimportant compared with the total amount of water in the apparatus in determining performance. Thermal analyses conducted on a candidate configuration showed the design of the water coolant and

  6. System description of the ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) Slurry Loop Testing facility (SLTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Porges, K.G.; Cox, S.A.; Brewer, W.E.; Hacker, D.S.

    1986-09-01

    This report describes a test loop specifically designed for dense slurries. The loop provides flow velocity and medium composition calibrations within 1%, as well as online rheometric characterization in non-Newtonian, laminar flow, by means of several unique calibration facilities developed at Argonne National Laboratory. Two horizontal test sections of 6 and 12 m length, as well as a vertical test section of 6 m length, are provided for flowmeter calibration; up to 5 flowmeters can be accommodated simultaneously. In addition to the online calibration schemes, which rank this test loop among the most accurate facilities currently existing, extensive laboratory characterization of grab samples is available. Initial work with coal/oil and coal/water slurries ranged over 60% solids. 18 refs., 26 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Analytic three-loop static potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Roman N.; Smirnov, Alexander V.; Smirnov, Vladimir A.; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    We present analytic results for the three-loop static potential of two heavy quarks. The analytic calculation of the missing ingredients is outlined, and results for the singlet and octet potential are provided.

  8. A magnetohydrodynamic theory of coronal loop transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, T.

    1982-01-01

    The physical and geometrical characteristics of solar coronal loop transients are described in an MHD model based on Archimedes' MHD buoyancy force. The theory was developed from interpretation of coronagraphic data, particularly from Skylab. The brightness of a loop is taken to indicate the electron density, and successive pictures reveal the electron enhancement in different columns. The forces which lift the loop off the sun surface are analyzed as an MHD buoyancy force affecting every mass element by imparting an inertial force necessary for heliocentrifugal motion. Thermal forces are responsible for transferring the ambient stress to the interior of the loop to begin the process. The kinematic and hydrostatic buoyancy overcome the gravitational force, and a flux rope can then curve upward, spiralling like a corkscrew with varying cross section around the unwinding solar magnetic field lines.

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Loop Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaya, Tarik; Ku, Jentung; Hoang, Triem T.; Cheung, Mark L.

    1998-01-01

    The primary focus of this study is to model steady-state performance of a Loop Heat Pipe (LHP). The mathematical model is based on the steady-state energy balance equations at each component of the LHP. The heat exchange between each LHP component and the surrounding is taken into account. Both convection and radiation environments are modeled. The loop operating temperature is calculated as a function of the applied power at a given loop condition. Experimental validation of the model is attempted by using two different LHP designs. The mathematical model is tested at different sink temperatures and at different elevations of the loop. Tbc comparison of the calculations and experimental results showed very good agreement (within 3%). This method proved to be a useful tool in studying steady-state LHP performance characteristics.

  10. The universal one-loop effective action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, Aleksandra; Ellis, John; Quevillon, Jérémie; You, Tevong

    2016-03-01

    We present the universal one-loop effective action for all operators of dimension up to six obtained by integrating out massive, non-degenerate multiplets. Our general expression may be applied to loops of heavy fermions or bosons, and has been checked against partial results available in the literature. The broad applicability of this approach simplifies one-loop matching from an ultraviolet model to a lower-energy effective field theory (EFT), a procedure which is now reduced to the evaluation of a combination of matrices in our universal expression, without any loop integrals to evaluate. We illustrate the relationship of our results to the Standard Model (SM) EFT, using as an example the supersymmetric stop and sbottom squark Lagrangian and extracting from our universal expression the Wilson coefficients of dimension-six operators composed of SM fields.

  11. Hierarchical loop detection for mobile outdoor robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Dagmar; Winkens, Christian; Häselich, Marcel; Paulus, Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    Loop closing is a fundamental part of 3D simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) that can greatly enhance the quality of long-term mapping. It is essential for the creation of globally consistent maps. Conceptually, loop closing is divided into detection and optimization. Recent approaches depend on a single sensor to recognize previously visited places in the loop detection stage. In this study, we combine data of multiple sensors such as GPS, vision, and laser range data to enhance detection results in repetitively changing environments that are not sufficiently explained by a single sensor. We present a fast and robust hierarchical loop detection algorithm for outdoor robots to achieve a reliable environment representation even if one or more sensors fail.

  12. Loop Diuretics in the Treatment of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Malha, Line; Mann, Samuel J

    2016-04-01

    Loop diuretics are not recommended in current hypertension guidelines largely due to the lack of outcome data. Nevertheless, they have been shown to lower blood pressure and to offer potential advantages over thiazide-type diuretics. Torsemide offers advantages of longer duration of action and once daily dosing (vs. furosemide and bumetanide) and more reliable bioavailability (vs. furosemide). Studies show that the previously employed high doses of thiazide-type diuretics lower BP more than furosemide. Loop diuretics appear to have a preferable side effect profile (less hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and possibly less glucose intolerance). Studies comparing efficacy and side effect profiles of loop diuretics with the lower, currently widely prescribed, thiazide doses are needed. Research is needed to fill gaps in knowledge and common misconceptions about loop diuretic use in hypertension and to determine their rightful place in the antihypertensive arsenal.

  13. Open-loop digital frequency multiplier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Monostable multivibrator is implemented by using digital integrated circuits where multiplier constant is too large for conventional phase-locked-loop integrated circuit. A 400 Hz clock is generated by divide-by-N counter from 1 Hz timing reference.

  14. A multiple-pass ring oscillator based dual-loop phase-locked loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danfeng, Chen; Junyan, Ren; Jingjing, Deng; Wei, Li; Ning, Li

    2009-10-01

    A dual-loop phase-locked loop (PLL) for wideband operation is proposed. The dual-loop architecture combines a coarse-tuning loop with a fine-tuning one, enabling a wide tuning range and low voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) gain without poisoning phase noise and reference spur suppression performance. An analysis of the phase noise and reference spur of the dual-loop PLL is emphasized. A novel multiple-pass ring VCO is designed for the dual-loop application. It utilizes both voltage-control and current-control simultaneously in the delay cell. The PLL is fabricated in Jazz 0.18-μm RF CMOS technology. The measured tuning range is from 4.2 to 5.9 GHz. It achieves a low phase noise of -99 dBc/Hz @ 1 MHz offset from a 5.5 GHz carrier.

  15. Topological order from quantum loops and nets

    SciTech Connect

    Fendley, Paul

    2008-12-15

    I define models of quantum loops and nets that have ground states with topological order. These make possible excited states comprised of deconfined anyons with non-abelian braiding. With the appropriate inner product, these quantum loop models are equivalent to net models whose topological weight involves the chromatic polynomial. A simple Hamiltonian preserving the topological order is found by exploiting quantum self-duality. For the square lattice, this Hamiltonian has only four-spin interactions.

  16. Loop quantum cosmology in 2 +1 dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangdong

    2014-12-01

    As a first step to generalize the structure of loop quantum cosmology to the theories with the spacetime dimension other than four, the isotropic model of loop quantum cosmology in 2 +1 dimension is studied in this paper. We find that the classical big bang singularity is again replaced by a quantum bounce in the model. The similarities and differences between the (2 +1 )-dimensional model and the (3 +1 )-dimensional one are also discussed.

  17. Cyclic universe from Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianfrani, Francesco; Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy; Rosati, Giacomo

    2016-02-01

    We discuss how a cyclic model for the flat universe can be constructively derived from Loop Quantum Gravity. This model has a lower bounce, at small values of the scale factor, which shares many similarities with that of Loop Quantum Cosmology. We find that Quantum Gravity corrections can be also relevant at energy densities much smaller than the Planckian one and that they can induce an upper bounce at large values of the scale factor.

  18. Deployable radiator with flexible line loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeler, Bryan V. (Inventor); Lehtinen, Arthur Mathias (Inventor); McGee, Billy W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Radiator assembly (10) for use on a spacecraft (12) is provided including at least one radiator panel assembly (26) repeatably movable between a panel stowed position (28) and a panel deployed position (36), at least two flexible lines (40) in fluid communication with the at least one radiator panel assembly (26) and repeatably movable between a stowage loop (42) and a flattened deployed loop (44).

  19. Onset of inflation in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Germani, Cristiano; Nelson, William; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2007-08-15

    Using a Liouville measure, similar to the one proposed recently by Gibbons and Turok, we investigate the probability that single-field inflation with a polynomial potential can last long enough to solve the shortcomings of the standard hot big bang model, within the semiclassical regime of loop quantum cosmology. We conclude that, for such a class of inflationary models and for natural values of the loop quantum cosmology parameters, a successful inflationary scenario is highly improbable.

  20. Can Chemical Looping Combustion Use CFB Technology?

    SciTech Connect

    Gamwo, I.K.

    2006-11-01

    Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) technology has demonstrated an unparalleled ability to achieve low SO2 and NOx emissions for coal-fired power plants without CO2 capture. Chemical Looping combustion (CLC) is a novel fuel combustion technology which appears as a leading candidate in terms of competitiveness for CO2 removal from flue gas. This presentaion deals with the adaptation of circulating fluidized bed technology to Chemical looping combustion

  1. Tachyon matter in loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, A. A.

    2006-08-01

    An analytical approach for studying the cosmological scenario with a homogeneous tachyon field within the framework of loop quantum gravity is developed. Our study is based on the semiclassical regime where space time can be approximated as a continuous manifold, but matter Hamiltonian gets nonperturbative quantum corrections. A formal correspondence between classical and loop quantum cosmology is also established. The Hamilton-Jacobi method for getting exact solutions is constructed and some exact power law as well as bouncing solutions are presented.

  2. Conceptual Design of Forced Convection Molten Salt Heat Transfer Testing Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar S. Sohal; Piyush Sabharwall; Pattrick Calderoni; Alan K. Wertsching; S. Brandon Grover

    2010-09-01

    This report develops a proposal to design and construct a forced convection test loop. A detailed test plan will then be conducted to obtain data on heat transfer, thermodynamic, and corrosion characteristics of the molten salts and fluid-solid interaction. In particular, this report outlines an experimental research and development test plan. The most important initial requirement for heat transfer test of molten salt systems is the establishment of reference coolant materials to use in the experiments. An earlier report produced within the same project highlighted how thermophysical properties of the materials that directly impact the heat transfer behavior are strongly correlated to the composition and impurities concentration of the melt. It is therefore essential to establish laboratory techniques that can measure the melt composition, and to develop purification methods that would allow the production of large quantities of coolant with the desired purity. A companion report describes the options available to reach such objectives. In particular, that report outlines an experimental research and development test plan that would include following steps: •Molten Salts: The candidate molten salts for investigation will be selected. •Materials of Construction: Materials of construction for the test loop, heat exchangers, and fluid-solid corrosion tests in the test loop will also be selected. •Scaling Analysis: Scaling analysis to design the test loop will be performed. •Test Plan: A comprehensive test plan to include all the tests that are being planned in the short and long term time frame will be developed. •Design the Test Loop: The forced convection test loop will be designed including extensive mechanical design, instrument selection, data acquisition system, safety requirements, and related precautionary measures. •Fabricate the Test Loop. •Perform the Tests. •Uncertainty Analysis: As a part of the data collection, uncertainty analysis will

  3. Looping through the Lamb Shift

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A U

    2007-02-06

    Sometimes in science, a small measurement can have big ramifications. For a team of Livermore scientists, such was the case when they measured a small shift in the spectrum of extremely ionized atoms of uranium. The measurement involves the Lamb shift, a subtle change in the energy of an electron orbiting an atom's nucleus. The precision of the Livermore result was 10 times greater than that of existing measurements, making it the best measurement to date of a complicated correction to the simplest quantum description of how atoms behave. The measurement introduces a new realm in the search for deviations between the theory of quantum electrodynamics (QED), which is an extension of quantum mechanics, and the real world. Such deviations, if discovered, would have far-reaching consequences, indicating that QED is not a fundamental theory of nature.

  4. Low free energy cost of very long loop insertions in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Scalley-Kim, Michelle; Minard, Philippe; Baker, David

    2003-01-01

    Long insertions into a loop of a folded host protein are expected to have destabilizing effects because of the entropic cost associated with loop closure unless the inserted sequence adopts a folded structure with amino- and carboxy-termini in close proximity. A loop entropy reduction screen based on this concept was used in an attempt to retrieve folded sequences from random sequence libraries. A library of long random sequences was inserted into a loop of the SH2 domain, displayed on the surface of M13 phage, and the inserted sequences that did not disrupt SH2 function were retrieved by panning using beads coated with a phosphotyrosine containing SH2 peptide ligand. Two sequences of a library of 2 × 108 sequences were isolated after multiple rounds of panning, and were found to have recovery levels similar to the wild-type SH2 domain and to be relatively intolerant to further mutation in PCR mutagenesis experiments. Surprisingly, although these inserted sequences exhibited little nonrandom structure, they do not significantly destabilize the host SH2 domain. Additional insertion variants recovered at lower levels in the panning experiments were also found to have a minimal effect on the stability and peptide-binding function of the SH2 domain. The additional level of selection present in the panning experiments is likely to involve in vivo folding and assembly, as there was a rough correlation between recovery levels in the phage-panning experiments and protein solubility. The finding that loop insertions of 60–80 amino acids have minimal effects on SH2 domain stability suggests that the free energy cost of inserting long loops may be considerably less than polymer theory estimates based on the entropic cost of loop closure, and, hence, that loop insertion may have provided an evolutionary route to multidomain protein structures. PMID:12538883

  5. Multiple Flow Loop SCADA System Implemented on the Production Prototype Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Baily, Scott A.; Dalmas, Dale Allen; Wheat, Robert Mitchell; Woloshun, Keith Albert; Dale, Gregory E.

    2015-11-16

    The following report covers FY 15 activities to develop supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system for the Northstar Moly99 production prototype gas flow loop. The goal of this effort is to expand the existing system to include a second flow loop with a larger production-sized blower. Besides testing the larger blower, this system will demonstrate the scalability of our solution to multiple flow loops.

  6. Plasma Loops in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, R. J.; Cram, L. E.; Durrant, C.; Loughhead, R. E.

    1991-07-01

    A comprehensive account of the properties of plasma loops, the fundamental structural elements of the solar corona. Plasma loops cover a wide range of sizes and range in temperature from tens of thousands to millions of degrees. They not only define the structure of individual active regions but connect different active regions--even across the solar equator. Loops also play an integral and decisive role in the enormous solar explosions called flares. Over recent years a wealth of space and ground-based observations of loops has been obtained in various widely-spaced regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this book the authors have selected the best observational material from the literature on which to base a detailed account of the properties of flare and non-flare loops. The book also explores the larger implications of the loop structures for our understanding of solar and stellar coronae. The text is enhanced by a large number of illustrations and unique and beautiful photographs obtained from the ground and from space.

  7. Space Station evolution study oxygen loop closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, M. G.; Delong, D.

    1993-01-01

    In the current Space Station Freedom (SSF) Permanently Manned Configuration (PMC), physical scars for closing the oxygen loop by the addition of oxygen generation and carbon dioxide reduction hardware are not included. During station restructuring, the capability for oxygen loop closure was deferred to the B-modules. As such, the ability to close the oxygen loop in the U.S. Laboratory module (LAB A) and the Habitation A module (HAB A) is contingent on the presence of the B modules. To base oxygen loop closure of SSF on the funding of the B-modules may not be desirable. Therefore, this study was requested to evaluate the necessary hooks and scars in the A-modules to facilitate closure of the oxygen loop at or subsequent to PMC. The study defines the scars for oxygen loop closure with impacts to cost, weight and volume and assesses the effects of byproduct venting. In addition, the recommended scenarios for closure with regard to topology and packaging are presented.

  8. Surface loops of extracellular phospholipase A1 determine both substrate specificity and preference for lysophospholipids[S

    PubMed Central

    Arima, Naoaki; Inoue, Asuka; Makide, Kumiko; Nonaka, Takamasa; Aoki, Junken

    2012-01-01

    Members of the pancreatic lipase family exhibit both lipase activity toward triacylglycerol and/or phospholipase A1 (PLA1) activity toward certain phospholipids. Some members of the pancreatic lipase family exhibit lysophospholipase activity in addition to their lipase and PLA1 activities. Two such enzymes, phosphatidylserine (PS)-specific PLA1 (PS-PLA1) and phosphatidic acid (PA)-selective PLA1α (PA-PLA1α, also known as LIPH) specifically hydrolyze PS and PA, respectively. However, little is known about the mechanisms that determine their substrate specificities. Crystal structures of lipases and mutagenesis studies have suggested that three surface loops, namely, β5, β9, and lid, have roles in determining substrate specificity. To determine roles of these loop structures in the substrate recognition of these PLA1 enzymes, we constructed a number of PS-PLA1 mutants in which the three surface loops are replaced with those of PA-PLA1α. The results indicate that the surface loops, especially the β5 loop, of PA-PLA1α play important roles in the recognition of PA, whereas other structure(s) in PS-PLA1 is responsible for PS preference. In addition, β5 loop of PS-PLA1 has a crucial role in lysophospholipase activity toward lysophosphatidylserine. The present study revealed the critical role of lipase surface loops, especially the β5 loop, in determining substrate specificities of PLA1 enzymes. PMID:22172514

  9. μ →e γ decay in an MSSM extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Tarek; Itani, Ahmad; Nath, Pran

    2015-07-01

    An analysis is given of the decay μ →e +γ in an minimal supersymmetric standard model extension with a vectorlike generation. Here mixing with the mirrors allows the possibility of this decay. The analysis is done at the one-loop level with the exchange of charginos and neutralinos and of sleptons and mirror sleptons in the loops. A one-loop analysis with W- and Z-boson exchange and mirror leptons and neutrinos is also considered. The effects of C P -violating phases from the new sector on the decay μ →e γ are analyzed in detail. The constraints arising from the current upper limit on the branching ratio B (μ →e γ ) from the MEG experiment of 2.4 ×10-12 (at 90% C.L.) on the parameter space of supersymmetry (SUSY) models and on vectorlike models are explored. Further, the MEG experiment is likely to improve the upper limit by an order of magnitude in the coming years. The improved limits will allow one to probe a much larger domain of the parameter space of the extended models.

  10. Loops In Proteins (LIP)--a comprehensive loop database for homology modelling.

    PubMed

    Michalsky, E; Goede, A; Preissner, R

    2003-12-01

    One of the most important and challenging tasks in protein modelling is the prediction of loops, as can be seen in the large variety of existing approaches. Loops In Proteins (LIP) is a database that includes all protein segments of a length up to 15 residues contained in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). In this study, the applicability of LIP to loop prediction in the framework of homology modelling is investigated. Searching the database for loop candidates takes less than 1 s on a desktop PC, and ranking them takes a few minutes. This is an order of magnitude faster than most existing procedures. The measure of accuracy is the root mean square deviation (RMSD) with respect to the main-chain atoms after local superposition of target loop and predicted loop. Loops of up to nine residues length were modelled with a local RMSD <1 A and those of length up to 14 residues with an accuracy better than 2 A. The results were compared in detail with a thoroughly evaluated and tested ab initio method published recently and additionally with two further methods for a small loop test set. The LIP method produced very good predictions. In particular for longer loops it outperformed other methods.

  11. Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert Andrus; Gregory Burns; John Chiu; Gregory Lijedahl; Peter Stromberg; Paul Thibeault

    2009-01-07

    For the past several years Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom), a leading world-wide power system manufacturer and supplier, has been in the initial stages of developing an entirely new, ultra-clean, low cost, high efficiency power plant for the global power market. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion-gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology The process consists of the oxidation, reduction, carbonation, and calcination of calcium-based compounds, which chemically react with coal, biomass, or opportunity fuels in two chemical loops and one thermal loop. The chemical and thermal looping technology can be alternatively configured as (i) a combustion-based steam power plant with CO{sub 2} capture, (ii) a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas for gas turbines or fuel cells, or (iii) an integrated hybrid combustion-gasification process producing hydrogen for gas turbines, fuel cells or other hydrogen based applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. In its most advanced configuration, this new concept offers the promise to become the technology link from today's Rankine cycle steam power plants to tomorrow's advanced energy plants. The objective of this work is to develop and verify the high temperature chemical and thermal looping process concept at a small-scale pilot facility in order to enable AL to design, construct and demonstrate a pre-commercial, prototype version of this advanced system. In support of this objective, Alstom and DOE started a multi-year program, under this contract. Before the contract started, in a preliminary phase (Phase 0) Alstom funded and built the required small-scale pilot facility (Process Development Unit, PDU) at its Power Plant Laboratories in Windsor, Connecticut. Construction was completed in calendar year 2003. The objective for Phase I was to develop the indirect combustion loop with CO{sub 2

  12. An experimental investigation of a natural convection solar air loop

    SciTech Connect

    Mastrullo, R.; Mazzei, P.; Vanoli, R.

    1983-12-01

    The interest that has been shown in the use of solar energy to heat dwellings following the ''passive'' design criteria does not correspond to the development of accurate theoretical and experimental analysis. This is particularly true for natural circulation solar air heaters. A significant application of these components is wall panel to complement south-facing windows in supplying solar heat directly to buildings. This idea, formerly suggested by Trombe et al., leads to various realizations, one of which was theoretically investigated by present authors. A convective loop panel consists of a glass layer and a black absorber that is backed by insulation. In the configuration shown the air flows in the channel in front of the absorber and the deflecting panel allows cool air to settle to the bottom of the U channel, preventing reverse thermocirculation during night or very low insolation periods. Since thermocirculation is the primary mode of heat transfer for the solar air heaters, the definition of an accurate convection model for the channel is essential for performance predictions. Studies on this subject - free convection between asymmetrically heated vertical planes - deal mainly with theoretical solutions for laminar flow, with the two usual boundary conditions. As the heat transfer process in the solar air loop cannot be expected to follow this model, there is the need of extensive experimental investigation.

  13. Four-dimensional unsubtraction from the loop-tree duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sborlini, Germán F. R.; Driencourt-Mangin, Félix; Hernández-Pinto, Roger J.; Rodrigo, Germán

    2016-08-01

    We present a new algorithm to construct a purely four dimensional representation of higher-order perturbative corrections to physical cross-sections at next-to-leading order (NLO). The algorithm is based on the loop-tree duality (LTD), and it is implemented by introducing a suitable mapping between the external and loop momenta of the virtual scattering amplitudes, and the external momenta of the real emission corrections. In this way, the sum over degenerate infrared states is performed at integrand level and the cancellation of infrared divergences occurs locally without introducing subtraction counter-terms to deal with soft and final-state collinear singularities. The dual representation of ultraviolet counter-terms is also discussed in detail, in particular for self-energy contributions. The method is first illustrated with the scalar three-point function, before proceeding with the calculation of the physical cross-section for {γ}^{ast}to qoverline{q}(g) , and its generalisation to multi-leg processes. The extension to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) is briefly commented.

  14. Supervisory control of a pilot-scale cooling loop

    SciTech Connect

    Kris Villez; Venkat Venkatasubramanian; Humberto Garcia

    2011-08-01

    We combine a previously developed strategy for Fault Detection and Identification (FDI) with a supervisory controller in closed loop. The combined method is applied to a model of a pilot-scale cooling loop of a nuclear plant, which includes Kalman filters and a model-based predictive controller as part of normal operation. The system has two valves available for flow control meaning that some redundancy is available. The FDI method is based on likelihood ratios for different fault scenarios which in turn are derived from the application of the Kalman filter. A previously introduced extension of the FDI method is used here to enable detection and identification of non-linear faults like stuck valve problems and proper accounting of the time of fault introduction. The supervisory control system is designed so to take different kinds of actions depending on the status of the fault diagnosis task and on the type of identified fault once diagnosis is complete. Some faults, like sensor bias and drift, are parametric in nature and can be adjusted without need for reconfiguration of the regulatory control system. Other faults, like a stuck valve problem, require reconfiguration of the regulatory control system. The whole strategy is demonstrated for several scenarios.

  15. Extension Russian: A Few Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Irene J.

    1974-01-01

    Presents observations on the teaching of Russian in an evening extension course and four teaching techniques which involve variety in lesson planning, flexibility in presentation, a relaxed atmosphere and encouragement. (LG)

  16. Video 6 of 6: Extensions

    NASA Video Gallery

    Find out ways to modify and enrich this challenge to make it more suitable for the ability level of your students. These customizations also could be used as extensions to the existing challenge. D...

  17. Gravitational Two-Loop Counterterm Is Asymptotically Safe.

    PubMed

    Gies, Holger; Knorr, Benjamin; Lippoldt, Stefan; Saueressig, Frank

    2016-05-27

    Weinberg's asymptotic safety scenario provides an elegant mechanism to construct a quantum theory of gravity within the framework of quantum field theory based on a non-Gaussian fixed point of the renormalization group flow. In this work we report novel evidence for the validity of this scenario, using functional renormalization group techniques to determine the renormalization group flow of the Einstein-Hilbert action supplemented by the two-loop counterterm found by Goroff and Sagnotti. The resulting system of beta functions comprises three scale-dependent coupling constants and exhibits a non-Gaussian fixed point which constitutes the natural extension of the one found at the level of the Einstein-Hilbert action. The fixed point exhibits two ultraviolet attractive and one repulsive direction supporting a low-dimensional UV-critical hypersurface. Our result vanquishes the long-standing criticism that asymptotic safety will not survive once a "proper perturbative counterterm" is included in the projection space.

  18. Gravitational Two-Loop Counterterm Is Asymptotically Safe.

    PubMed

    Gies, Holger; Knorr, Benjamin; Lippoldt, Stefan; Saueressig, Frank

    2016-05-27

    Weinberg's asymptotic safety scenario provides an elegant mechanism to construct a quantum theory of gravity within the framework of quantum field theory based on a non-Gaussian fixed point of the renormalization group flow. In this work we report novel evidence for the validity of this scenario, using functional renormalization group techniques to determine the renormalization group flow of the Einstein-Hilbert action supplemented by the two-loop counterterm found by Goroff and Sagnotti. The resulting system of beta functions comprises three scale-dependent coupling constants and exhibits a non-Gaussian fixed point which constitutes the natural extension of the one found at the level of the Einstein-Hilbert action. The fixed point exhibits two ultraviolet attractive and one repulsive direction supporting a low-dimensional UV-critical hypersurface. Our result vanquishes the long-standing criticism that asymptotic safety will not survive once a "proper perturbative counterterm" is included in the projection space. PMID:27284643

  19. Gravitational Two-Loop Counterterm Is Asymptotically Safe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gies, Holger; Knorr, Benjamin; Lippoldt, Stefan; Saueressig, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Weinberg's asymptotic safety scenario provides an elegant mechanism to construct a quantum theory of gravity within the framework of quantum field theory based on a non-Gaussian fixed point of the renormalization group flow. In this work we report novel evidence for the validity of this scenario, using functional renormalization group techniques to determine the renormalization group flow of the Einstein-Hilbert action supplemented by the two-loop counterterm found by Goroff and Sagnotti. The resulting system of beta functions comprises three scale-dependent coupling constants and exhibits a non-Gaussian fixed point which constitutes the natural extension of the one found at the level of the Einstein-Hilbert action. The fixed point exhibits two ultraviolet attractive and one repulsive direction supporting a low-dimensional UV-critical hypersurface. Our result vanquishes the long-standing criticism that asymptotic safety will not survive once a "proper perturbative counterterm" is included in the projection space.

  20. Strange hadronic loops of the proton: A quark model calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Geiger; Nathan Isgur

    1996-10-01

    Nontrivial q{anti q} sea effects have their origin in the low-Q{sup 2} dynamics of strong QCD. The authors present here a quark model calculation of the contribution of s{anti s} pairs arising from a complete set of OZI-allowed strong Y{sup *}K{sup *} hadronic loops to the net spin of the proton, to its charge radius, and to its magnetic moment. The calculation is performed in an ``unquenched quark model'' which has been shown to preserve the spectroscopic successes of the naive quark model and to respect the OZI rule. They speculate that an extension of the calculation to the nonstrange sea will show that most of the ``missing spin'' of the proton is in orbital angular momenta.

  1. Performance evaluation of the time delay digital tanlock loop architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kharji Al-Ali, Omar; Anani, Nader; Al-Qutayri, Mahmoud; Al-Araji, Saleh; Ponnapalli, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the architectures, theoretical analyses and testing results of modified time delay digital tanlock loop (TDTLs) system. The modifications to the original TDTL architecture were introduced to overcome some of the limitations of the original TDTL and to enhance the overall performance of the particular systems. The limitations addressed in this article include the non-linearity of the phase detector, the restricted width of the locking range and the overall system acquisition speed. Each of the modified architectures was tested by subjecting the system to sudden positive and negative frequency steps and comparing its response with that of the original TDTL. In addition, the performance of all the architectures was evaluated under noise-free as well as noisy environments. The extensive simulation results using MATLAB/SIMULINK demonstrate that the new architectures overcome the limitations they addressed and the overall results confirmed significant improvements in performance compared to the conventional TDTL system.

  2. Inflation with the Starobinsky potential in loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonga, Béatrice; Gupt, Brajesh

    2016-06-01

    A self-consistent pre-inflationary extension of the inflationary scenario with the Starobinsky potential, favored by Planck data, is studied using techniques from loop quantum cosmology (LQC). The results are compared with the quadratic potential previously studied. Planck scale completion of the inflationary paradigm and observable signatures of LQC are found to be robust under the change of the inflation potential. The entire evolution, from the quantum bounce all the way to the end of inflation, is compatible with observations. Occurrence of desired slow-roll phase is almost inevitable and natural initial conditions exist for both the background and perturbations for which the resulting power spectrum agrees with recent observations. There exist initial data for which the quantum gravitational corrections to the power spectrum are potentially observable.

  3. Boiler-turbine life extension

    SciTech Connect

    Natzkov, S.; Nikolov, M.

    1995-12-01

    The design life of the main power equipment-boilers and turbines is about 105 working hours. The possibilities for life extension are after normatively regulated control tests. The diagnostics and methodology for Boilers and Turbines Elements Remaining Life Assessment using up to date computer programs, destructive and nondestructive control of metal of key elements of units equipment, metal creep and low cycle fatigue calculations. As well as data for most common damages and some technical decisions for elements life extension are presented.

  4. Structure of a cardiotoxic phospholipase A(2) from Ophiophagus hannah with the "pancreatic loop".

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Long; Xu, Su-Juan; Wang, Qiu-Yan; Song, Shi-Ying; Shu, Yu-Yan; Lin, Zheng-Jiong

    2002-06-01

    The crystal structure of an acidic phospholipase A(2) from Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra) has been determined by molecular replacement at 2.6-A resolution to a crystallographic R factor of 20.5% (R(free)=23.3%) with reasonable stereochemistry. The venom enzyme contains an unusual "pancreatic loop." The conformation of the loop is well defined and different from those in pancreas PLA(2), showing its structural variability. This analysis provides the first structure of a PLA(2)-type cardiotoxin. The sites related to the cardiotoxic and myotoxic activities are explored and the oligomer observed in the crystalline state is described. PMID:12217659

  5. Dangling bond deflection model: Growth of gel network with loop structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hang-Shing; Jullien, Rémi; Scherer, George W.

    2002-04-01

    It has been shown that the closed-loop structure in the model gel networks is responsible for their stiffness. However, the creation of loops has been underestimated in most of the existing kinetic aggregation models [e.g., DLCA (diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation) and derivatives]. A dangling bond deflection (DEF) mechanism is proposed to model the fluctuation of dangling branches or dead ends under thermal excitation. The random deflections of the dangling branches can create loops in the network by forming intracluster bonds, and proceed during both the gelling and aging processes. The resulting DLCADEF networks have extensive loop structure with a negligible number of dangling branches. Its growth kinetics and fractal behavior resemble those of real gels, including volume-invariant gel time and fractal dimension of about 2. The DLCADEF model is the first attempt to model the gel growth with loop formation by the physically realistic fluctuation mechanism. The mechanical properties of the resulting networks will be studied and verified by comparison with real gels.

  6. Black holes in loop quantum gravity: the complete space-time.

    PubMed

    Gambini, Rodolfo; Pullin, Jorge

    2008-10-17

    We consider the quantization of the complete extension of the Schwarzschild space-time using spherically symmetric loop quantum gravity. We find an exact solution corresponding to the semiclassical theory. The singularity is eliminated but the space-time still contains a horizon. Although the solution is known partially numerically and therefore a proper global analysis is not possible, a global structure akin to a singularity-free Reissner-Nordström space-time including a Cauchy horizon is suggested.

  7. An Antibody Loop Replacement Design Feasibility Study and a Loop-Swapped Dimer Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, L.; Boriack-Sjodin, P; Day, E; Eldredge, J; Fitch, C; Jarpe, M; Miller, S; Li, Y; Simon, K; van Vlijmen, H

    2009-01-01

    A design approach was taken to investigate the feasibility of replacing single complementarity determining region (CDR) antibody loops. This approach may complement simpler mutation-based strategies for rational antibody design by expanding conformation space. Enormous crystal structure diversity is available, making CDR loops logical targets for structure-based design. A detailed analysis for the L1 loop shows that each loop length takes a distinct conformation, thereby allowing control on a length scale beyond that accessible to simple mutations. The L1 loop in the anti-VLA1 antibody was replaced with the L2 loop residues longer in an attempt to add an additional hydrogen bond and fill space on the antibody-antigen interface. The designs expressed well, but failed to improve affinity. In an effort to learn more, one design was crystallized and data were collected at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. The designed L1 loop takes the qualitatively desired conformation; confirming that loop replacement by design is feasible. The crystal structure also shows that the outermost loop (residues Leu51-Ser68) is domain swapped with another monomer. Tryptophan fluorescence measurements were used to monitor unfolding as a function of temperature and indicate that the loop involved in domain swapping does not unfold below 60C. The domain-swapping is not directly responsible for the affinity loss, but is likely a side-effect of the structural instability which may contribute to affinity loss. A second round of design was successful in eliminating the dimerization through mutation of a residue (Leu51Ser) at the joint of the domain-swapped loop.

  8. TRUEX Radiolysis Testing Using the INL Radiolysis Test Loop: FY-2012 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dean R. Peterman; Lonnie G. Olson; Richard D. Tillotson; Rocklan G. McDowell; Jack D. Law

    2012-09-01

    The INL radiolysis test loop has been used to evaluate the affect of radiolytic degradation upon the efficacy of the strip section of the TRUEX flowsheet for the recovery of trivalent actinides and lanthanides from acidic solution. The nominal composition of the TRUEX solvent used in this study is 0.2 M CMPO and 1.4 M TBP dissolved in n-dodecane and the nominal composition of the TRUEX strip solution is 1.5 M lactic acid and 0.050 M diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Gamma irradiation of a mixture of TRUEX process solvent and stripping solution in the test loop does not adversely impact flowsheet performance as measured by stripping americium ratios. The observed increase in americium stripping distribution ratios with increasing absorbed dose indicates the radiolytic production of organic soluble degradation compounds.

  9. Agricultural extension and mass media.

    PubMed

    Perraton, H

    1983-12-01

    To learn more about the use of the mass media for agricultural extension, the World Bank has considered the efforts of 2 units: INADES-formation in West Africa and the Extension Aids Branch of Malawi. The INADES-formation study focuses on Cameroon but also considers work in Rwanda and the Ivory Coast. Some general conclusions emerge from a comparison of the 2 organizations. Malawi operates an extension service which reaches farmers through extension agents, through farmer training centers, and through mass media. The Extension Aids Branch (EAB) has responsibility for its media work and broadcasts 4 1/2 hours of radio each week. Its 6 regular radio programs include a general program which interviews farmers, a music request program in which the music is interspersed with farming advice, a farming family serial, and a daily broadcast of agricultural news and information. The 17 cinema vans show some agricultural films, made by EAB, some entertainment films, and some government information films from departments other than the ministry of agriculture. EAB also has a well-developed program of research and evaluation of its own work. INADES-formation, the training section of INADES, works towards social and economic development of the population. It teaches peasant farmers and extension agents and does this through running face-to-face seminars, by publishing a magazine, "Agripromo," and through correspondence courses. In 1978-79 INADES-formation enrolled some 4500 farmers and extension agents as students. Both of these organizations work to teach farmers better agriculture techniques, and both were created in response to the fact that agricultural extension agents cannot meet all the farmers in their area. Despite the similarity of objective, there are differences in methods and philosophy. The EAB works in a single country and uses a variety of mass media, with print playing a minor role. INADES-formation is an international and nongovernmental organization and its

  10. Mechanics of Protein-Mediated DNA Looping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2009-03-01

    The formation of looped DNA-protein complexes in which a protein or protein assembly binds to multiple distant operator sites on the DNA is a common feature for many regulatory schemes on the transcriptional level. In a living cell, a multitude of mechanical forces and constraints act on these complexes, and it is imperative to understand their effects on biological function. For this aim, we study the lactose repressor as a model system for protein-mediated DNA looping in single-molecule experiments. Using a novel axial constant-force optical trapping scheme that allows us to manipulate sub-micron DNA fragments with well-controlled forces down to the 10 fN range, we show that mechanical tension in the substrate DNA of hundred femtonewton is sufficient to disrupt the loop formation process, which suggests that such mechanical tension may provide a mechanical pathway to controlling gene expression in vivo. From the force sensitivity of the loop formation process, we can also infer the topology of the looped complex; in our case an antiparallel conformation. In addition, we will present new tethered-particle microscopy data that shows lifetimes of the looped complexes that are two to three orders of magnitude shorter than those measured in biochemical competition assays and discuss possible interpretations, including the suggestion that operator binding of the lactose repressor tetramer leads to a destabilization of the dimer-dimer interface and that thus the loop breakdown process is mostly a dissociation of the tetramer into two dimers, instead, as widely assumed, an unbinding of the tetramer from the DNA.

  11. Acquisition Performances Of QPSK Carrier-Tracking Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinedi, Sami M.; Shah, Biren N.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents comparative study of acquisition performances of several types of carrier-signal-tracking loops for reception of quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) signals. Loops classified into three types: maximum a-posteriori, (MAP) estimation loop, Costas cross-over loop, and generalized Costas loop. Mathematical models developed. In-phase and quadrature signals generated numerically and processed according to loop algorithms. Results show though MAP loop produces smallest squaring loss at all signal-to-noise ratios, others sometimes exhibit shorter acquisition time and greater probability of acquisition.

  12. Closing the tau loop: the missing tau mutation

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Allan; Lonergan, Roisin; Olszewska, Diana A.; O’Dowd, Sean; Cummins, Gemma; Magennis, Brian; Fallon, Emer M.; Pender, Niall; Huey, Edward D.; Cosentino, Stephanie; O’Rourke, Killian; Kelly, Brendan D.; O’Connell, Martin; Delon, Isabelle; Farrell, Michael; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Rowland, Lewis P.; Fahn, Stanley; Craig, Peter; Hutton, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration comprises a group of disorders characterized by behavioural, executive, language impairment and sometimes features of parkinsonism and motor neuron disease. In 1994 we described an Irish-American family with frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17 associated with extensive tau pathology. We named this disinhibition-dementia-parkinsonism-amyotrophy complex. We subsequently identified mutations in the MAPT gene. Eleven MAPT gene splice site stem loop mutations were identified over time except for 5’ splice site of exon 10. We recently identified another Irish family with autosomal dominant early amnesia and behavioural change or parkinsonism associated with the ‘missing’ +15 mutation at the intronic boundary of exon 10. We performed a clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging study on the proband and four siblings, including two affected siblings. We sequenced MAPT and performed segregation analysis. We looked for a biological effect of the tau variant by performing real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of RNA extracted from human embryonic kidney cells transfected with exon trapping constructs. We found a c.915+15A>C exon 10/intron 10 stem loop mutation in all affected subjects but not in the unaffected. The c.915+15A>C variant caused a shift in tau splicing pattern to a predominantly exon 10+ pattern presumably resulting in predominant 4 repeat tau and little 3 repeat tau. This strongly suggests that the c.915+15A>C variant is a mutation and that it causes frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17 in this pedigree by shifting tau transcription and translation to +4 repeat tau. Tau (MAPT) screening should be considered in families where amnesia or atypical parkinsonism coexists with behavioural disturbance early in the disease process. We describe the final missing stem loop tau mutation predicted 15 years ago. Mutations have now been identified at all predicted sites within the ‘stem’ when the

  13. LoopWeaver: Loop Modeling by the Weighted Scaling of Verified Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuai Cheng; Li, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Modeling loops is a necessary step in protein structure determination, even with experimental nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data, it is widely known to be difficult. Database techniques have the advantage of producing a higher proportion of predictions with subangstrom accuracy when compared with ab initio techniques, but the disadvantage of also producing a higher proportion of clashing or highly inaccurate predictions. We introduce LoopWeaver, a database method that uses multidimensional scaling to achieve better, clash-free placement of loops obtained from a database of protein structures. This allows us to maintain the above-mentioned advantage while avoiding the disadvantage. Test results show that we achieve significantly better results than all other methods, including Modeler, Loopy, SuperLooper, and Rapper, before refinement. With refinement, our results (LoopWeaver and Loopy consensus) are better than ROSETTA, with 0.42 Å RMSD on average for 206 length 6 loops, 0.64 Å local RMSD for 168 length 7 loops, 0.81Å RMSD for 117 length 8 loops, and 0.98 Å RMSD for length 9 loops, while ROSETTA has 0.55, 0.79, 1.16, 1.42, respectively, at the same average time limit (3 hours). When we allow ROSETTA to run for over a week, it approaches, but does not surpass, our accuracy. PMID:23461572

  14. Students' Understanding of Loops and Nested Loops in Computer Programming: An APOS Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore students' understanding of loops and nested loops concepts. Sixty-three mechanical engineering students attending an introductory programming course participated in the study. APOS (Action, Process, Object, Schema) is a constructivist theory developed originally for mathematics education. This study is the…

  15. TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS OF A COOLING CORONAL LOOP

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R. J.; Erdelyi, R. E-mail: Robertus@sheffield.ac.u

    2009-12-10

    Here we present an investigation into how cooling of the plasma influences the oscillation properties (e.g., eigenfunctions and eigenfrequencies) of transverse (i.e., kink) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in a compressible magnetic flux tube embedded in a gravitationally stratified and uniformly magnetized atmosphere. The cooling is introduced via a temperature-dependent density profile. A time-dependent governing equation is derived and an approximate zeroth-order solution is then obtained. From this the influence of cooling on the behavior of the eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions of the transverse MHD waves is determined for representative cooling timescales. It is shown analytically, as the loop cools, how the amplitude of the perturbations is found to decrease as time increases. For cooling timescales of 900-2000 s (as observed in typical EUV loops), it is shown that the cooling has important and relevant influence on the damping times of loop oscillations. Next, the theory is put to the test. The damping due to cooling is fitted to a representative observation of standing kink oscillation of EUV loops. It is also shown with an explicit approximate analytical form, how the period of the fundamental and first harmonic of the kink mode changes with time as the loop cools. A consequence of this is that the value of the period ratio P {sub 1}/P {sub 2}, a tool that is popular in magneto-seismological studies in coronal diagnostics, decreases from the value of a uniform loop, 2, as the temperature decreases. The rate of change in P {sub 1}/P {sub 2} is dependent upon the cooling timescale and is well within the observable range for typical EUV loops. Further to this, the magnitude of the anti-node shift of the eigenfunctions of the first harmonic is shown to continually increase as the loop cools, giving additional impetus to the use of spatial magneto-seismology of the solar atmosphere. Finally, we suggest that measurements of the rate of change in the

  16. 75 FR 48921 - Administrative Guidance for Multistate Extension Activities and Integrated Research and Extension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ...: ``Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service's Implementation of the Agricultural Research... amount of agricultural extension formula funds be expended on multistate extension activities. Section... agricultural research and extension formula funds be expended on integrated research and extension...

  17. Uniqueness of two-loop master contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron-Huot, Simon; Larsen, Kasper J.

    2012-10-01

    Generalized-unitarity calculations of two-loop amplitudes are performed by expanding the amplitude in a basis of master integrals and then determining the coefficients by taking a number of generalized cuts. In this paper, we present a complete classification of the solutions to the maximal cut of integrals with the double-box topology. The ideas presented here are expected to be relevant for all two-loop topologies as well. We find that these maximal-cut solutions are naturally associated with Riemann surfaces whose topology is determined by the number of states at the vertices of the double-box graph. In the case of four massless external momenta we find that, once the geometry of these Riemann surfaces is properly understood, there are uniquely defined master contours producing the coefficients of the double-box integrals in the basis decomposition of the two-loop amplitude. This is in perfect analogy with the situation in one-loop generalized unitarity. In addition, we point out that the chiral integrals recently introduced by Arkani-Hamed et al. can be used as master integrals for the double-box contributions to the two-loop amplitudes in any gauge theory. The infrared finiteness of these integrals allow for their coefficients as well as their integrated expressions to be evaluated in strictly four dimensions, providing significant technical simplification. We evaluate these integrals at four points and obtain remarkably compact results.

  18. Void growth by dislocation-loop emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, D. C.; Sofronis, P.; Kumar, M.; Belak, J.; Minich, R.

    2007-03-01

    Experimental results from spall tests on aluminum reveal the presence of a dense dislocation structure in an annulus around a void that grew under the tensile pulse when a shock wave was reflected at the free surface of the specimen. The proposition is that dislocation emission from the void surface under load is a viable mechanism for void growth. To understand void growth in the absence of diffusive effects, the interstitial-loop emission mechanism under tensile hydrostatic stress is investigated. First, the micromechanics of pile-up formation when interstitial loops are emitted from a void under applied macroscopic loading is reviewed. Demand for surface energy expenditure upon void-surface change is taken into consideration. It is demonstrated that in face-centered cubic metals loop emission from voids with a radius of ˜10 nm is indeed energetically possible in the hydrostatic stress environment generated by shock loading. On the other hand, the levels of hydrostatic stress prevalent in common structural applications are not sufficient to drive loops at equilibrium positions above a ˜10 nm void. However, for voids larger than about 100 nm, the energetics of loop emission are easily met as a necessary condition even under the low stress environment prevalent in structural applications.

  19. Bootstrapping the Three-Loop Hexagon

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Lance J.; Drummond, James M.; Henn, Johannes M.; /Humboldt U., Berlin /Santa Barbara, KITP

    2011-11-08

    We consider the hexagonal Wilson loop dual to the six-point MHV amplitude in planar N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory. We apply constraints from the operator product expansion in the near-collinear limit to the symbol of the remainder function at three loops. Using these constraints, and assuming a natural ansatz for the symbol's entries, we determine the symbol up to just two undetermined constants. In the multi-Regge limit, both constants drop out from the symbol, enabling us to make a non-trivial confirmation of the BFKL prediction for the leading-log approximation. This result provides a strong consistency check of both our ansatz for the symbol and the duality between Wilson loops and MHV amplitudes. Furthermore, we predict the form of the full three-loop remainder function in the multi-Regge limit, beyond the leading-log approximation, up to a few constants representing terms not detected by the symbol. Our results confirm an all-loop prediction for the real part of the remainder function in multi-Regge 3 {yields} 3 scattering. In the multi-Regge limit, our result for the remainder function can be expressed entirely in terms of classical polylogarithms. For generic six-point kinematics other functions are required.

  20. Fatigue-Resistant Metal Hook-And-Loop Fastener

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawaf, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Proposed metal hook-and-loop fastener engaged and disengaged many hundreds of times without breaking. Fastener opens by mechanical action. Translation moves hooks out of loops or pushes loops away from hooks. Hooks not required to flex and, therefore, do not fail by fatigue. Lifetime much greater than that of other metal hook-and-loop fasteners, depending on flexure for disengagement such as article, "Hook-and-Loop Metal Fastener" (MSC-21586).

  1. Extensive fitness and human cooperation.

    PubMed

    van Hateren, J H

    2015-12-01

    Evolution depends on the fitness of organisms, the expected rate of reproducing. Directly getting offspring is the most basic form of fitness, but fitness can also be increased indirectly by helping genetically related individuals (such as kin) to increase their fitness. The combined effect is known as inclusive fitness. Here it is argued that a further elaboration of fitness has evolved, particularly in humans. It is called extensive fitness and it incorporates producing organisms that are merely similar in phenotype. The evolvability of this mechanism is illustrated by computations on a simple model combining heredity and behaviour. Phenotypes are driven into the direction of high fitness through a mechanism that involves an internal estimate of fitness, implicitly made within the organism itself. This mechanism has recently been conjectured to be responsible for producing agency and goals. In the model, inclusive and extensive fitness are both implemented by letting fitness increase nonlinearly with the size of subpopulations of similar heredity (for the indirect part of inclusive fitness) and of similar phenotype (for the phenotypic part of extensive fitness). Populations implementing extensive fitness outcompete populations implementing mere inclusive fitness. This occurs because groups with similar phenotype tend to be larger than groups with similar heredity, and fitness increases more when groups are larger. Extensive fitness has two components, a direct component where individuals compete in inducing others to become like them and an indirect component where individuals cooperate and help others who are already similar to them.

  2. Hot topic, warm loops, cooling plasma? Multithermal analysis of active region loops

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.; Christian, G. M.; Dhaliwal, R. S.; Brooks, D. H.

    2014-11-10

    We have found indications of a relationship between the differential emission measure (DEM) weighted temperature and the cross-field DEM width for coronal loops. The data come from the Hinode X-ray Telescope, the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. These data show that cooler loops tend to have narrower DEM widths. If most loops observed by these instruments are composed of bundles of unresolved magnetic strands and are only observed in their cooling phase, as some studies have suggested, then this relationship implies that the DEM of a coronal loop narrows as it cools. This could imply that fewer strands are seen emitting in the later cooling phase, potentially resolving the long standing controversy of whether the cross-field temperatures of coronal loops are multithermal or isothermal.

  3. Hot Topic, Warm Loops, Cooling Plasma? Multithermal Analysis of Active Region Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.; Brooks, D. H.; Christian, G. M.; Dhaliwal, R. S.

    2014-11-01

    We have found indications of a relationship between the differential emission measure (DEM) weighted temperature and the cross-field DEM width for coronal loops. The data come from the Hinode X-ray Telescope, the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. These data show that cooler loops tend to have narrower DEM widths. If most loops observed by these instruments are composed of bundles of unresolved magnetic strands and are only observed in their cooling phase, as some studies have suggested, then this relationship implies that the DEM of a coronal loop narrows as it cools. This could imply that fewer strands are seen emitting in the later cooling phase, potentially resolving the long standing controversy of whether the cross-field temperatures of coronal loops are multithermal or isothermal.

  4. Three-loop hard-thermal-loop free energy for QED

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Jens O.; Strickland, Michael; Su, Nan

    2009-10-15

    We calculate the free energy of a hot gas of electrons and photons to three loops using the hard-thermal-loop perturbation theory reorganization of finite-temperature perturbation theory. We calculate the free energy through three loops by expanding in a power series in m{sub D}/T, m{sub f}/T, and e{sup 2}, where m{sub D} and m{sub f} are thermal masses and e is the coupling constant. We demonstrate that the hard-thermal-loop perturbation reorganization improves the convergence of the successive approximations to the QED free energy at large coupling, e{approx}2. The reorganization is gauge invariant by construction, and due to cancellation among various contributions, we obtain a completely analytic result for the resummed thermodynamic potential at three loops. Finally, we compare our result with similar calculations that use the {phi}-derivable approach.

  5. The performance of optical phase-locked loops in the presence of nonnegligible loop propagation delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, M. A.; Michie, W. C.; Fletcher, M. J.

    1987-04-01

    The optical phase-locked loop is analyzed taking into account shot noise, phase noise, and loop propagation delay. The degradation of loop phase error due to propagation delay is evaluated in terms of the delay bandwidth product. This product was found to have a maximum value of 0.736 for absolute loop stability. The resulting effect on a Costas loop system optimized for zero time delay is discussed. It is found that in order to maintain a 10 to the -9th BER system performance with the damping factor = 1/2 exp 0.5, responsivity of the photodiode = 0.85 A/W, power at the data detector = -59.2 dBm, and a 1-MHz beat linewidth, the delay time must be kept below 1.8 ns. If the beat linewidth increases to 15 MHz this figure drops to 0.12 ns.

  6. Linear phase demodulator including a phase locked loop with auxiliary feedback loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippy, R. R. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A phase modulated wave that may have no carrier power is demodulated by a phase locked loop including a phase detector for deriving an A.C. data output signal having a magnitude and a phase indicative of the phase of the modulated wave. A feedback loop responsive to the data output signal restores power to the carrier frequency component to the loop. In one embodiment, the feedback loop includes a phase modulator responsive to the phase modulated wave and the data output signal. In a second embodiment, carrier frequency power is restored by differentiating the data output signal and supplying the differentiated signal to an input of a voltage controlled oscillator included in the phase locked loop.

  7. Loop contributions to the folding thermodynamics of DNA straight hairpin loops and pseudoknots.

    PubMed

    Reiling, Calliste; Khutsishvili, Irine; Huang, Kai; Marky, Luis A

    2015-02-01

    Pseudoknots have diverse and important roles in many biological functions. We used a combination of UV spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry to investigate the effect of the loop length on the unfolding thermodynamics of three sets of DNA stem-loop motifs with the following sequences: (a) d(GCGCTnGCGC), where n = 3, 5, 7, 9; (b) d(CGCGCGT4GAAATTCGCGCGTnAATTTC), where n = 4, 6, and 8; and (c) d(TCTCTTnAAAAAAAAGAGAT5TTTTTTT), where n = 5, 7, 9, and 11. The increase in loop length of the first set of hairpins yielded decreasing TM's and constant unfolding enthalpies, resulting in an entropy driven decrease in the stability of the hairpin (ΔG° = -7.5 to -6.1 kcal/mol). In the second set, the increase in the length of the loops yielded similar TM's and slight increases in the unfolding enthalpies. This translated into more stable pseudoknots with an increasing ΔG° from -13.2 to -17.1 kcal/mol. This effect can be rationalized in terms of the increased flexibility of the pseudoknot with larger loops optimizing base-pair stacking interactions. In the last set of molecules, the increase in the length of one of the loops yielded an increase in the TM's and larger increases in the enthalpies, which stabilize the pseudoknot significantly increasing the ΔG° from -8.5 to -16.6 kcal/mol. In this set, the thymine loop is complementary to the stem of A·T base pairs and the longer loops are able to form T*A·T base triplets due to the partial folding of the thymine loop into the ceiling of the major groove of the duplex, thus yielding a net formation of 1-3 T*AT/T*AT base-triplet stacks at the middle of its stem, depending on the loop length. PMID:25584896

  8. Some generalizations of the Hewitt extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajakas, Jaan

    2012-02-01

    We introduce two extensions of a Tychonoff space that generalize the notions of the Hewitt extension and the "generalized Hewitt extension" introduced by Bachman, Beckenstein, Narici and Warner. The extensions are determined by sets of continuous functions. In particular, we study the extensions determined by all continuous functions and the extension determined by all continuous bounded functions and show that these can be regarded as epireflective functors. Finally we discuss the possibility of using these extensions to describe the characters of function algebras.

  9. Counting primary loops in polymer gels

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huaxing; Woo, Jiyeon; Cok, Alexandra M.; Wang, Muzhou; Olsen, Bradley D.; Johnson, Jeremiah A.

    2012-01-01

    Much of our fundamental knowledge related to polymer networks is built on an assumption of ideal end-linked network structure. Real networks invariably possess topological imperfections that negatively affect mechanical properties; modifications of classical network theories have been developed to account for these defects. Despite decades of effort, there are no known experimental protocols for precise quantification of even the simplest topological network imperfections: primary loops. Here we present a simple conceptual framework that enables primary loop quantification in polymeric materials. We apply this framework to measure the fraction of primary loop junctions in trifunctional PEG-based hydrogels. We anticipate that the concepts described here will open new avenues of theoretical and experimental research related to polymer network structure. PMID:23132947

  10. Loop quantum Brans-Dicke cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangdong; Artymowski, Michal; Ma, Yongge

    2013-04-01

    The spatially flat and isotropic cosmological model of Brans-Dicke theory with coupling parameter ω≠-(3)/(2) is quantized by the approach of loop quantum cosmology. An interesting feature of this model is that although the Brans-Dicke scalar field is nonminimally coupled with curvature, it can still play the role of an emergent time variable. In the quantum theory, the classical differential equation which represents cosmological evolution is replaced by a quantum difference equation. The effective Hamiltonian and modified dynamical equations of loop quantum Brans-Dicke cosmology are also obtained, which lay a foundation for the phenomenological investigation to possible quantum gravity effects in cosmology. The effective equations indicate that the classical big bang singularity is again replaced by a quantum bounce in loop quantum Brans-Dicke cosmology.

  11. Quantum reduced loop gravity: Semiclassical limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesci, Emanuele; Cianfrani, Francesco

    2014-07-01

    We discuss the semiclassical limit of quantum reduced loop gravity, a recently proposed model to address the quantum dynamics of the early Universe. We apply loop quantum gravity (LQG) techniques in order to define the semiclassical states in the kinematical Hilbert space and we demonstrate that the expectation value of the euclidean scalar constraint coincides with the classical expression, i.e., one of the local Bianchi I dynamics. The result holds as a leading order expansion in the scale factors of the Universe and opens the way to study the subleading corrections to the semiclassical dynamics. We outline how by retaining a suitable finite coordinate length for holonomies that our effective Hamiltonian at the leading order coincides with the one expected from loop quantum cosmology (LQC). This result is an important step in fixing the correspondence between LQG and LQC.

  12. The blind loop syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Stewart, B A; Karrer, F M; Hall, R J; Lilly, J R

    1990-08-01

    Anatomical abnormalities of the small bowel that cause intestinal stagnation result in bacterial overgrowth and a blind loop syndrome (BLS). Bacterial breakdown of bile salts and deamination of protein lead to malabsorption, steatorrhea, and fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies. Four children developed BLS as a complication of necrotizing enterocolitis, jejunal atresia, gastroschisis, and biliary atresia. BLS was suggested by abdominal pain, feculent vomiting, steatorrhea, and hypoalbuminemia. Dilated, stagnant bowel loops were demonstrated in each instance by upper gastrointestinal contrast study. Positive intestinal bacterial aspirates were confirmatory. Antibiotic treatment in two patients improved symptomatology but all children ultimately required surgery. Surgical procedures consisted of blind loop resection, intestinal plication, and catheterization of the bilioenteric conduit. All patients are now asymptomatic but one child suffers from parenteral nutrition-related cirrhosis and another requires chronic antibiotic therapy.

  13. Closed-loop approach to thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goupil, C.; Ouerdane, H.; Herbert, E.; Benenti, G.; D'Angelo, Y.; Lecoeur, Ph.

    2016-09-01

    We present the closed-loop approach to linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics considering a generic heat engine dissipatively connected to two temperature baths. The system is usually quite generally characterized by two parameters: the output power P and the conversion efficiency η , to which we add a third one, the working frequency ω . We establish that a detailed understanding of the effects of the dissipative coupling on the energy conversion process requires only knowing two quantities: the system's feedback factor β and its open-loop gain A0, which product A0β characterizes the interplay between the efficiency, the output power, and the operating rate of the system. By raising the abstract hermodynamic analysis to a higher level, the feedback loop approach provides a versatile and economical, hence fairly efficient, tool for the study of any conversion engine operation for which a feedback factor can be defined.

  14. Hierarchical curiosity loops and active sensing.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Goren; Ahissar, Ehud

    2012-08-01

    A curious agent acts so as to optimize its learning about itself and its environment, without external supervision. We present a model of hierarchical curiosity loops for such an autonomous active learning agent, whereby each loop selects the optimal action that maximizes the agent's learning of sensory-motor correlations. The model is based on rewarding the learner's prediction errors in an actor-critic reinforcement learning (RL) paradigm. Hierarchy is achieved by utilizing previously learned motor-sensory mapping, which enables the learning of other mappings, thus increasing the extent and diversity of knowledge and skills. We demonstrate the relevance of this architecture to active sensing using the well-studied vibrissae (whiskers) system, where rodents acquire sensory information by virtue of repeated whisker movements. We show that hierarchical curiosity loops starting from optimally learning the internal models of whisker motion and then extending to object localization result in free-air whisking and object palpation, respectively. PMID:22386787

  15. Current loop signal conditioning: Practical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Karl F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a variety of practical application circuits based on the current loop signal conditioning paradigm. Equations defining the circuit response are also provided. The constant current loop is a fundamental signal conditioning circuit concept that can be implemented in a variety of configurations for resistance-based transducers, such as strain gages and resistance temperature detectors. The circuit features signal conditioning outputs which are unaffected by extremely large variations in lead wire resistance, direct current frequency response, and inherent linearity with respect to resistance change. Sensitivity of this circuit is double that of a Wheatstone bridge circuit. Electrical output is zero for resistance change equals zero. The same excitation and output sense wires can serve multiple transducers. More application arrangements are possible with constant current loop signal conditioning than with the Wheatstone bridge.

  16. Extension for prevention: margin placement.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2012-01-01

    This article will review the concept of extension for prevention popularized by G.V. Black around the early 1900s. Concepts of extension and prevention have changed over the years with a more informed knowledge of the caries process, improved materials, cutting instruments, and techniques. The reasons for placement of the outline form relative to the tooth morphology, gingival tissue, relationship to adjacent teeth, and the choice of material will be described for all of the materials used in restorative dentistry. Research will be cited to support the scientific basis for outline form placement. PMID:22662468

  17. Coronal Loops: Evolving Beyond the Isothermal Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Cirtain, J. W.; Allen, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    Are coronal loops isothermal? A controversy over this question has arisen recently because different investigators using different techniques have obtained very different answers. Analysis of SOHO-EIT and TRACE data using narrowband filter ratios to obtain temperature maps has produced several key publications that suggest that coronal loops may be isothermal. We have constructed a multi-thermal distribution for several pixels along a relatively isolated coronal loop on the southwest limb of the solar disk using spectral line data from SOHO-CDS taken on 1998 Apr 20. These distributions are clearly inconsistent with isothermal plasma along either the line of sight or the length of the loop, and suggested rather that the temperature increases from the footpoints to the loop top. We speculated originally that these differences could be attributed to pixel size -- CDS pixels are larger, and more `contaminating' material would be expected along the line of sight. To test this idea, we used CDS iron line ratios from our data set to mimic the isothermal results from the narrowband filter instruments. These ratios indicated that the temperature gradient along the loop was flat, despite the fact that a more complete analysis of the same data showed this result to be false! The CDS pixel size was not the cause of the discrepancy; rather, the problem lies with the isothermal approximation used in EIT and TRACE analysis. These results should serve as a strong warning to anyone using this simplistic method to obtain temperature. This warning is echoed on the EIT web page: ``Danger! Enter at your own risk!'' In other words, values for temperature may be found, but they may have nothing to do with physical reality. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NASA grant NAG5-9783. This research was funded in part by the NASA/TRACE MODA grant for Montana State University.

  18. Quasi-periodic processes in the flare loop generated by sudden temperature enhancements at loop footpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.; Jelínek, P.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: During the impulsive flare phase, the plasma at the flare loop footpoints is rapidly heated by particle beams. In the present paper, we study processes that occur after this sudden heating in a two-dimensional magnetic loop. Methods: We adopt a 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, in which we solve a full set of the ideal time-dependent MHD equations by means of the FLASH code, using the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method. Periods in the processes are estimated by the wavelet analysis technique. Results: We consider a model of the solar atmosphere with a symmetric magnetic loop. The length of this loop in the corona is approximately 21.5 Mm. At both loop footpoints, at the transition region, we initiate the Gaussian temperature (pressure) perturbation with the maximum temperature 14, 7, or 3.5 times higher than the unperturbed temperature. In the corona, the perturbations produce supersonic blast shocks with the Mach number of about 1.1, but well below Alfvén velocities. We consider cases with the same perturbations at both footpoints (symmetric case) and one with different perturbations (asymmetric case). In the symmetric case, the shocks move along both loop legs upwards to the top of the loop, where they interact and form a transient compressed region. Then they continue in their motion to the transition region at the opposite side of the loop, where they are reflected upwards, and so on. At the top of the loop, the shock appears periodically with the period of about 170 s. In the loop legs during this period, a double peak of the plasma parameters, which is connected with two arrivals of shocks, is detected: firstly, when the shock moves up and then when the shock, propagating from the opposite loop leg, moves down. Increasing the distance of the detection point in the loop leg from the top of the loop, the time interval between these shock arrivals increases. Thus, at these detection points, the processes with shorter periods can be detected. After

  19. Pressure structure of solar coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishan, V.

    1987-01-01

    The steady state pressure structure of a coronal loop is discussed in terms of the MHD global invariants of an incompressible plasma. The steady state is represented by the superposition of two Chandrasekhar-Kendall functions corresponding to (n=m=0) and (n=m=1) modes. The relative contribution of the two modes (epsilon) is found to depend on the surface pressure of the coronal loop which is also the pressure of the external medium. The mixed mode state does not exist for high values of the external pressure because epsilon becomes complex.

  20. Wald entropy formula and loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodendorfer, N.; Neiman, Y.

    2014-10-01

    We outline how the Wald entropy formula naturally arises in loop quantum gravity based on recently introduced dimension-independent connection variables. The key observation is that in a loop quantization of a generalized gravity theory, the analog of the area operator turns out to measure, morally speaking, the Wald entropy rather than the area. We discuss the explicit example of (higher-dimensional) Lanczos-Lovelock gravity and comment on recent work on finding the correct numerical prefactor of the entropy by comparing it to a semiclassical effective action.

  1. Similarity Metrics for Closed Loop Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, Mark S.; Yang, Lee C.; Bedrossian, Naz; Hall, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    To what extent and in what ways can two closed-loop dynamic systems be said to be "similar?" This question arises in a wide range of dynamic systems modeling and control system design applications. For example, bounds on error models are fundamental to the controller optimization with modern control design methods. Metrics such as the structured singular value are direct measures of the degree to which properties such as stability or performance are maintained in the presence of specified uncertainties or variations in the plant model. Similarly, controls-related areas such as system identification, model reduction, and experimental model validation employ measures of similarity between multiple realizations of a dynamic system. Each area has its tools and approaches, with each tool more or less suited for one application or the other. Similarity in the context of closed-loop model validation via flight test is subtly different from error measures in the typical controls oriented application. Whereas similarity in a robust control context relates to plant variation and the attendant affect on stability and performance, in this context similarity metrics are sought that assess the relevance of a dynamic system test for the purpose of validating the stability and performance of a "similar" dynamic system. Similarity in the context of system identification is much more relevant than are robust control analogies in that errors between one dynamic system (the test article) and another (the nominal "design" model) are sought for the purpose of bounding the validity of a model for control design and analysis. Yet system identification typically involves open-loop plant models which are independent of the control system (with the exception of limited developments in closed-loop system identification which is nonetheless focused on obtaining open-loop plant models from closed-loop data). Moreover the objectives of system identification are not the same as a flight test and

  2. Slipping magnetic reconnection in coronal loops.

    PubMed

    Aulanier, Guillaume; Golub, Leon; Deluca, Edward E; Cirtain, Jonathan W; Kano, Ryouhei; Lundquist, Loraine L; Narukage, Noriyuki; Sakao, Taro; Weber, Mark A

    2007-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection of solar coronal loops is the main process that causes solar flares and possibly coronal heating. In the standard model, magnetic field lines break and reconnect instantaneously at places where the field mapping is discontinuous. However, another mode may operate where the magnetic field mapping is continuous but shows steep gradients: The field lines may slip across each other. Soft x-ray observations of fast bidirectional motions of coronal loops, observed by the Hinode spacecraft, support the existence of this slipping magnetic reconnection regime in the Sun's corona. This basic process should be considered when interpreting reconnection, both on the Sun and in laboratory-based plasma experiments. PMID:18063789

  3. Coronal loop formation resulting from photospheric convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoven, G. Van; Mok, Y.; Mikic, Z.

    1995-01-01

    We have demonstrated the dynamic formation of coronal magnetic loops in three dimensions as a result of horizontal vortex-like convection on the photosphere. Localized plasma motions twist bipolar magnetic field lines which are tied to the dense photosphere by high electrical conductivity. The twists propagate into the corona along the field and create a narrow quasi-toroidal region where the field lines interwind. At the same time, this tubeline region rises in altitude, expands in cross section, and distorts into a slight S shape before settling into an equilibrium state. The MHD stability of such line-tied magnetic loop structures is directly exhibited by this dynamic simulation.

  4. Accounting for elastic bodies in multibody loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, Manfred; Sokol, Peter

    A technique for modeling multibody systems with closed kinematic loops containing elastic bodies is developed analytically. The elastic body is treated as a beam element, and its linear-elastic deformation is discretized using ansatz functions. The free elastic body is then integrated into the multibody loop with the help of coupling equations, as described by Woernle (1988), and the equations of motion are obtained in minimal form via the principle of D'Alembert. The applicability of the present approach to problems in large space structures and robotics is indicated.

  5. A keyboard control method for loop measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Z.W.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a keyboard control mode based on the DEC VAX computer. The VAX Keyboard code can be found under running of a program was developed. During the loop measurement or multitask operation, it ables to be distinguished from a keyboard code to stop current operation or transfer to another operation while previous information can be held. The combining of this mode, the author successfully used one key control loop measurement for test Dual Input Memory module which is used in a rearrange Energy Trigger system for LEP 8 Bunch operation.

  6. Spontaneous fluxoid formation in superconducting loops

    SciTech Connect

    Monaco, R.; Mygind, J.; Rivers, R. J.; Koshelets, V. P.

    2009-11-01

    We report on the experimental verification of the Zurek-Kibble scenario in an isolated superconducting ring over a wide parameter range. The probability of creating a single flux quantum spontaneously during the fast normal-superconducting phase transition of a wide Nb loop clearly follows a scaling relation on the quenching time {tau}{sub Q}, as one would expect if the transition took place as fast as causality permits. However, the observed Zurek-Kibble scaling exponent {sigma}=0.62{+-}0.15 is two times larger than anticipated for large loops. Assuming Gaussian winding number densities we show that this doubling is well founded for small annuli.

  7. Temperature Oscillations in Loop Heat Pipe Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Kobel, Mark; Rogers, Paul; Kaya, Tarik; Paquin, Krista C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHPs) are versatile two-phase heat transfer devices that have gained increasing acceptance for space and terrestrial applications. The operating temperature of an LHP is a function of its operating conditions. The LHP usually reaches a steady operating temperature for a given heat load and sink temperature. The operating temperature will change when the heat load and/or the sink temperature changes, but eventually reaches another steady state in most cases. Under certain conditions, however, the loop operating temperature never really reaches a true steady state, but instead becomes oscillatory. This paper discusses the temperature oscillation phenomenon using test data from a miniature LHP.

  8. An analysis of DREO's (Defence Research Establishment Ottawa) analog rebalance loops for the CSG-2 (Canadian Strapdown Gyroscope) tuned-rotor gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Jeffrey S.

    1987-07-01

    A high performance analog rebalance loop was designed for the Canadian Strapdown Gyroscope (CSG-2). This instrument is a potentially low cost, near inertial grade, two degree-of-freedom, tuned-rotor gyro designed and manufactured by Litton Systems Canada Ltd. under contract to DREO. The resulting loops are analyzed extensively from a control systems point of view with the examination of such properties as closed-loop stability, frequency and time responses and, to some extent, stability margin, as interpreted from multivariable generalizations of classical control-theoretic notions of Nyguist plots and root locii. The results indicate that the loops will provide sufficient closed loop performance to achieve the desired goals of bandwidth, maximum input rate, low cross-axis coupling and acceleration compensation.

  9. Quantum mechanics in non-inertial reference frames: Time-dependent rotations and loop prolongations

    SciTech Connect

    Klink, W.H.; Wickramasekara, S.

    2013-09-15

    This is the fourth in a series of papers on developing a formulation of quantum mechanics in non-inertial reference frames. This formulation is grounded in a class of unitary cocycle representations of what we have called the Galilean line group, the generalization of the Galilei group to include transformations amongst non-inertial reference frames. These representations show that in quantum mechanics, just as the case in classical mechanics, the transformations to accelerating reference frames give rise to fictitious forces. In previous work, we have shown that there exist representations of the Galilean line group that uphold the non-relativistic equivalence principle as well as representations that violate the equivalence principle. In these previous studies, the focus was on linear accelerations. In this paper, we undertake an extension of the formulation to include rotational accelerations. We show that the incorporation of rotational accelerations requires a class of loop prolongations of the Galilean line group and their unitary cocycle representations. We recover the centrifugal and Coriolis force effects from these loop representations. Loops are more general than groups in that their multiplication law need not be associative. Hence, our broad theoretical claim is that a Galilean quantum theory that holds in arbitrary non-inertial reference frames requires going beyond groups and group representations, the well-established framework for implementing symmetry transformations in quantum mechanics. -- Highlights: •A formulation of Galilean quantum mechanics in non-inertial reference frames is presented. •The Galilei group is generalized to infinite dimensional Galilean line group. •Loop prolongations of Galilean line group contain central extensions of Galilei group. •Unitary representations of the loops are constructed. •These representations lead to terms in the Hamiltonian corresponding to fictitious forces, including centrifugal and Coriolis

  10. Teaching Structured Fortran without Structured Extensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worland, Peter B.

    Six control structures are used in teaching a college Fortran programing course: (1) simple sequences of instruction without any control statement, (2) IF-THEN selection, (3) IF-THEN-ELSE selection, (4) definite loop, (5) indefinite loop, and (6) generalized IF-THEN-ELSE case structure. Outlines, instead of flowcharts, are employed for algorithm…

  11. Mutational trends in V3 loop protein sequences observed in different genetic lineages of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Korber, B T; MacInnes, K; Smith, R F; Myers, G

    1994-01-01

    Highly variable international human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope sequences can be assigned to six major clades, or phylogenetically defined subtypes, designated A through F. These subtypes are approximately equidistant in terms of evolutionary distance measured by nucleotide sequences. This radiation from a common ancestral sequence may have been in step with the spread of the pandemic. In this study, V3 loop protein sequence relationships within these major clades are analyzed to determine how the different lineages might be evolving with respect to this biologically important domain. The V3 loop has been shown to influence viral phenotype and to elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses. To identify patterns in V3 loop amino acid evolution, we cluster the sequences by a phenetic principle which evaluates protein similarities on the basis of amino acid identities and similarities irrespective of evolutionary relationships. When phenetic clustering patterns are superimposed upon phylogenetic subtype classifications, two interesting mutational trends are revealed. First, a set of identical, or highly similar, V3 loop protein sequences can be identified within two otherwise dissimilar genetic subtypes, A and C. Second, the D subtype sequences are found to possess the most radically divergent set of V3 loop sequences. These and other patterns characteristic of the V3 loop reflect the acquisition of specific biological properties during the apparently recent evolution of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 lineages. PMID:8084005

  12. Three determinants in ezrin are responsible for cell extension activity.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, M; Roy, C; Montcourrier, P; Sahuquet, A; Mangeat, P

    1997-01-01

    The ERM proteins--ezrin, radixin, and moesin--are key players in membrane-cytoskeleton interactions. In insect cells infected with recombinant baculoviruses, amino acids 1-115 of ezrin were shown to inhibit an actin- and tubulin-dependent cell-extension activity located in ezrin C-terminal domain (ezrin310-586), whereas full-length ezrin1-586 did not induce any morphological change. To refine the mapping of functional domains of ezrin, 30 additional constructs were overexpressed in Sf9 cells, and the resulting effect of each was qualitatively and semiquantitatively compared. The removal of amino acids 13-30 was sufficient to release a cell-extension phenotype. This effect was abrogated if the 21 distal-most C-terminal amino acids were subsequently deleted (ezrin31-565), confirming the existence of a head-to-tail regulation in the whole molecule. Surprisingly, the deletion in full-length ezrin of the same 21 amino acids provided strong cell-extension competence to ezrin1-565, and this property was recovered in N-terminal constructs as short as ezrin1-310. Within ezrin1-310, amino acid sequences 13-30 and 281-310 were important determinants and acted in cooperation to induce cytoskeleton mobilization. In addition, these same residues are part of a new actin-binding site characterized in vitro in ezrin N-terminal domain. Images PMID:9285824

  13. Extension Resources for International Trade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seal, Susan D.

    2016-01-01

    With the opening of additional trade partnerships, the reduction of global transportation and communication costs, and the increase in demand for U.S. agricultural products and services, international trade is an area of great importance to more and more Extension clients and stakeholders. This article provides information about the primary…

  14. Removing the Tension from Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Lucy; Driscoll, Elizabeth; Bardon, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Job burnout and stress begin with day-to-day frustrations, roadblocks, and unmet expectations. These can transform job satisfaction and, ultimately, career choices, affecting the quality of programs, expense to universities, and relationships with the community. A series of innovative statewide workshops involving 97 agents and Extension directors…

  15. Agricultural Extension. A Reference Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maunder, Addison, H.

    The basic philosophy of agricultural extension was established in the more highly developed countries over the past century. Newly formed nations, the rural population of which formerly maintained a subsistence agriculture with limited industry, found it essential to establish a better-balanced economy. This led to a variety of rural services and…

  16. Strategic Opportunities for Cooperative Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In this new century, opportunities exist to help advance America's greatness in the midst of many challenges. Energy, water, food, environment, health, economic productivity, global competitiveness, and the quality of the living environments are all paramount to the future. Extension is, as a part of higher education, prepared to create new…

  17. Slope Extensions to ASL Library

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, David

    2010-03-31

    Extensions to the AMPL/solver interface library (http://netlib.sandia.gov/ampl/solvers) to compute bounds on algebraic expressions, plus a test program. use in uncertainty quantification and global optimization algorithms. This software is not primarily for military applications.

  18. Mortality among agricultural extension agents.

    PubMed

    Alavanja, M C; Blair, A; Merkle, S; Teske, J; Eaton, B

    1988-01-01

    The mortality experience of agricultural extension agents in the Cooperative Extension Service (CES) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture who died during the period January 1, 1970-December 31, 1979 (n = 1,495 white males) was evaluated in proportionate-mortality and case-control studies. The proportionate-mortality analysis was used to identify cancers that might be elevated in this occupational group compared with the U.S. white male population. All cancers with a significantly elevated proportionate-mortality ratio were more thoroughly evaluated in the case-control study, where there is presumably less of a selection bias in the comparison. In the case-control study, leukemia demonstrated a statistically significant linear trend with duration of employment as an extension agent. Smaller, but nonsignificant, trends were seen for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and brain cancer. The odds ratio for Hodgkin's disease and cancers of the colon, prostate, and kidney did not vary with the number of years on the job. These patterns resemble cancer risks seen among farmers, suggesting that agricultural factors may also play a role in the origin of these tumors among extension agents.

  19. NACRE Update and Extension Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Masayuki; Arai, Koji; Arnould, Marcel; Takahashi, Kohji; Utsunomiya, Hiroaki

    2006-04-01

    NACRE, the `nuclear astrophysics compilation of reaction rates', has been widely utilized in stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies since its publication in 1999. We describe here the current status of a Konan-Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) joint project that aims at its update and extension.

  20. Who Are Extension Council Members?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberle, Wayne H.

    1970-01-01

    Many Extension Council members were recommended by associates or friends, a procedure that contributed to homogeneity in council membership. Such homogeneity may make it difficult for council members to perceive problems of clientele with characteristics or attitudes different from their own. (DM)

  1. Rule Induction with Extension Matrices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Xindong

    1998-01-01

    Presents a heuristic, attribute-based, noise-tolerant data mining program, HCV (Version 2.0) based on the newly-developed extension matrix approach. Outlines some techniques implemented in the HCV program for noise handling and discretization of continuous domains; an empirical comparison shows that rules generated by HCV are more compact than the…

  2. Nuclear power plant life extension

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, D.D.; Bustard, L.D.; Harrison, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear plant life extension represents an opportunity to achieve additional productive years of operation from existing nuclear power facilities. This is particularly important since operating licenses for over 50 GW of nuclear capacity will expire by the year 2010. By the year 2015, 85% of the total planned nuclear electric capacity will face retirement due to license expirations. Achieving additional productive years of operation from the nation's existing light water reactors is the goal of ongoing utility, vendor, US Department of Energy, and Electric Power Research Institute programs. Identifying potential technical issues associated with extending plant life and scoping realistic solutions represent first steps toward the development of a coordinated national plant life extension strategy. This is a substantial effort that must consider the breadth of issues associated with nuclear power plant design, operation, and licensing, and the numerous potential plant life extension strategies that may be appropriate to different utilities. Such an effort must enlist the expertise of the full spectrum of organizations in the nuclear industry including utilities, vendors, consultants, national laboratories, and professional organizations. A primary focus of these efforts is to identify operational changes and improvements in record-keeping, which, if implemented now, could enhance and preserve the life extension option.

  3. NACRE Update and Extension Project

    SciTech Connect

    Aikawa, Masayuki; Arnould, Marcel; Takahashi, Kohji; Arai, Koji; Utsunomiya, Hiroaki

    2006-04-26

    NACRE, the 'nuclear astrophysics compilation of reaction rates', has been widely utilized in stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies since its publication in 1999. We describe here the current status of a Konan-Universite Libre de Brussels (ULB) joint project that aims at its update and extension.

  4. Protective coatings on extensible biofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holten-Andersen, Niels; Fantner, Georg E.; Hohlbauch, Sophia; Waite, J. Herbert; Zok, Frank W.

    2007-09-01

    Formulating effective coatings for use in nano- and biotechnology poses considerable technical challenges. If they are to provide abrasion resistance, coatings must be hard and adhere well to the underlying substrate. High hardness, however, comes at the expense of extensibility. This property trade-off makes the design of coatings for even moderately compliant substrates problematic, because substrate deformation easily exceeds the strain limit of the coating. Although the highest strain capacity of synthetic fibre coatings is less than 10%, deformable coatings are ubiquitous in biological systems. With an eye to heeding the lessons of nature, the cuticular coatings of byssal threads from two species of marine mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Perna canaliculus, have been investigated. Consistent with their function to protect collagenous fibres in the byssal-thread core, these coatings show hardness and stiffness comparable to those of engineering plastics and yet are surprisingly extensible; the tensile failure strain of P. canaliculus cuticle is about 30% and that of M. galloprovincialis is a remarkable 70%. The difference in extensibility is attributable to the presence of deformable microphase-separated granules within the cuticle of M. galloprovincialis. The results have important implications in the design of bio-inspired extensible coatings.

  5. Unusual ganglioglioma with extensive calcification and ossification.

    PubMed

    Kavishwar, Vikas Shashikant; Chadha, Kirti G; Barodawala, Shaikhali Moiz; Murthy, Anuradha Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Ganglioglioma is a slow-growing relatively low-grade mixed glioneuronal tumor with most cases corresponding to the WHO Grade I category. It frequently presents with seizures. The temporal lobe is the most common location followed by frontal, parietal, and occipital lobes. These generally behave in a benign fashion and have a favorable prognosis. We describe a case of a 24-year-old male presenting with convulsions and a calcified parieto-occipital mass. This mass removed from the parietal lobe showed neoplastic glial and dysplastic neuronal tissue amidst extensive areas of calcification and foci of ossification. On immunohistochemistry, the glial component expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein whereas the dysplastic neuronal component expressed synaptophysin and CD34. Epithelial membrane antigen was negative and Ki-67 showed a low proliferative index. After the surgery, the patient is free of neurological symptoms. Widespread calcification and ossification are very unusual in ganglioglioma, which prompted us to report this case. PMID:27510688

  6. Run-time parallelization and scheduling of loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltz, Joel H.; Mirchandaney, Ravi; Crowley, Kay

    1990-01-01

    Run time methods are studied to automatically parallelize and schedule iterations of a do loop in certain cases, where compile-time information is inadequate. The methods presented involve execution time preprocessing of the loop. At compile-time, these methods set up the framework for performing a loop dependency analysis. At run time, wave fronts of concurrently executable loop iterations are identified. Using this wavefront information, loop iterations are reordered for increased parallelism. Symbolic transformation rules are used to produce: inspector procedures that perform execution time preprocessing and executors or transformed versions of source code loop structures. These transformed loop structures carry out the calculations planned in the inspector procedures. Performance results are presented from experiments conducted on the Encore Multimax. These results illustrate that run time reordering of loop indices can have a significant impact on performance. Furthermore, the overheads associated with this type of reordering are amortized when the loop is executed several times with the same dependency structure.

  7. Radiation Enhanced Absorption of Frank Loops by Nanovoids in Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Zhang, X.; Wang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron and heavy ion irradiations generally induce voids in metallic materials, and continuous radiations typically result in void swelling and mechanical failure of the irradiated materials. Recent experiments showed that nanovoids in nanotwinned copper could act as sinks for radiation-induced Frank loops, significantly mitigating radiation damage. In this paper, we report on structural evolution of Frank loops under cascades and address the role of nanovoids in absorbing Frank loops in detail by using molecular dynamics simulations. Results show that a stand-alone Frank loop is stable under cascades. When Frank loops are adjacent to nanovoids, the diffusion of a group of atoms from the loop into nanovoids is accomplished via the formation and propagation of dislocation loops. The loop-nanovoid interactions result in the shrinkage of the nanovoids and the Frank loops.

  8. Modulation of DNA loop lifetimes by the free energy of loop formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ju; Johnson, Stephanie; Mulligan, Peter; Spakowitz, Andrew J.; Phillips, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Storage and retrieval of the genetic information in cells is a dynamic process that requires the DNA to undergo dramatic structural rearrangements. DNA looping is a prominent example of such a structural rearrangement that is essential for transcriptional regulation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and the speed of such regulations affects the fitness of individuals. Here, we examine the in vitro looping dynamics of the classic Lac repressor gene-regulatory motif. We show that both loop association and loop dissociation at the DNA-repressor junctions depend on the elastic deformation of the DNA and protein, and that both looping and unlooping rates approximately scale with the looping J factor, which reflects the system’s deformation free energy. We explain this observation by transition state theory and model the DNA–protein complex as an effective worm-like chain with twist. We introduce a finite protein–DNA binding interaction length, in competition with the characteristic DNA deformation length scale, as the physical origin of the previously unidentified loop dissociation dynamics observed here, and discuss the robustness of this behavior to perturbations in several polymer parameters. PMID:25411314

  9. PHOTOSPHERIC PROPERTIES OF WARM EUV LOOPS AND HOT X-RAY LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kano, R.; Ueda, K.; Tsuneta, S.

    2014-02-20

    We investigate the photospheric properties (vector magnetic fields and horizontal velocity) of a well-developed active region, NOAA AR 10978, using the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope specifically to determine what gives rise to the temperature difference between ''warm loops'' (1-2 MK), which are coronal loops observed in EUV wavelengths, and ''hot loops'' (>3 MK), coronal loops observed in X-rays. We found that outside sunspots, the magnetic filling factor in the solar network varies with location and is anti-correlated with the horizontal random velocity. If we accept that the observed magnetic features consist of unresolved magnetic flux tubes, this anti-correlation can be explained by the ensemble average of flux-tube motion driven by small-scale random flows. The observed data are consistent with a flux tube width of ∼77 km and horizontal flow at ∼2.6 km s{sup –1} with a spatial scale of ∼120 km. We also found that outside sunspots, there is no significant difference between warm and hot loops either in the magnetic properties (except for the inclination) or in the horizontal random velocity at their footpoints, which are identified with the Hinode X-Ray Telescope and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer. The energy flux injected into the coronal loops by the observed photospheric motion of the magnetic fields is estimated to be 2 × 10{sup 6} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}, which is the same for both warm and hot loops. This suggests that coronal properties (e.g., loop length) play a more important role in giving rise to temperature differences of active-region coronal loops than photospheric parameters.

  10. A Conserved Surface Loop in Type I Dehydroquinate Dehydratases Positions an Active Site Arginine and Functions in Substrate Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Peterson, Scott N.; Caffrey, Michael; Anderson, Wayne F.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-04-18

    Dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD) catalyzes the third step in the biosynthetic shikimate pathway. We present three crystal structures of the Salmonella enterica type I DHQD that address the functionality of a surface loop that is observed to close over the active site following substrate binding. Two wild-type structures with differing loop conformations and kinetic and structural studies of a mutant provide evidence of both direct and indirect mechanisms of involvement of the loop in substrate binding. In addition to allowing amino acid side chains to establish a direct interaction with the substrate, closure of the loop necessitates a conformational change of a key active site arginine, which in turn positions the substrate productively. The absence of DHQD in humans and its essentiality in many pathogenic bacteria make the enzyme a target for the development of nontoxic antimicrobials. The structures and ligand binding insights presented here may inform the design of novel type I DHQD inhibiting molecules.

  11. Thermal criteria to compare fast reactors coolants for the intermediate loop

    SciTech Connect

    Saez, Manuel; Rodriguez, Gilles

    2007-07-01

    Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR) are typically using a liquid metal as the primary coolant. Up to now, sodium is the referenced coolant for all large-scale FBR, but lead and sodium-potassium alloy have both also been used successfully for smaller rigs. The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) has an extensive experience and significant expertise in Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) over the past 40 years of R and D and feedback experiments. Some improvements are needed on the SFR to meet the Generation IV goals, and in particular the safety and the reliability through the intermediate loop coolant. As sodium reacts exo-thermically with air and water and to eliminate the drawback of the water-sodium interaction when a steam generator tube is ruptured, CEA is involved in a substantial effort in order to investigate the interest to use an alternative coolant than sodium in the intermediate loop. This paper presents the main thermal criteria to compare Fast Reactors coolants for the intermediate loop under natural and forced convection. Neutronics considerations are not taken into account for the intermediate loop coolant. Transport, transfer and energetic criteria are analysed in the field of turbulent flows. Criteria are applied to the following potential coolant candidates: sodium, lithium, tin, bismuth, lead, lead-bismuth alloy, lead-lithium alloy, gallium, indium, potassium and sodium-potassium alloy. According to this thermal analysis, the gallium as heat transfer agent for the intermediate loop is considered as a promising candidate. For the discussion of the applicability of the gallium as heat transfer agent for the intermediate loop, a limited thermal hydraulic pre-sizing of a steam generator is undertaken using simple engineering methods implemented in COPERNIC code, a CEA tool dedicated to reactor systems pre-sizing. (authors)

  12. Fiber reinforced composite loop space maintainer: An alternative to the conventional band and loop.

    PubMed

    Yeluri, Ramakrishna; Munshi, Autar Krishen

    2012-04-01

    The stainless steel band and loop appliance is the most commonly used fixed space maintainer in pediatric dentistry. But there are several disadvantages with this appliance such as the need for a cast or a working model, decalcification of the abutment tooth, loosening because of breakage or dissolution of the luting agent, tendency to get embedded in the soft tissue and the possibility of metal allergy. The purpose of this article is to present a simple, laboratory design of a "Fiber Reinforced Composite" (FRC) loop space maintainer and discuss the advantages over the traditional band and loop space maintainers.

  13. Fiber reinforced composite loop space maintainer: An alternative to the conventional band and loop

    PubMed Central

    Yeluri, Ramakrishna; Munshi, Autar Krishen

    2012-01-01

    The stainless steel band and loop appliance is the most commonly used fixed space maintainer in pediatric dentistry. But there are several disadvantages with this appliance such as the need for a cast or a working model, decalcification of the abutment tooth, loosening because of breakage or dissolution of the luting agent, tendency to get embedded in the soft tissue and the possibility of metal allergy. The purpose of this article is to present a simple, laboratory design of a “Fiber Reinforced Composite” (FRC) loop space maintainer and discuss the advantages over the traditional band and loop space maintainers. PMID:22629061

  14. Does Double Loop Learning Create Reliable Knowledge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Deborah; Connelly, James; Henderson, Steven

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses doubts concerning the reliability of knowledge being created by double loop learning processes. Popper's ontological worlds are used to explore the philosophical basis of the way that individual experiences are turned into organisational knowledge, and such knowledge is used to generate organisational learning. The paper…

  15. Modeling and experimental investigating loop heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Kiseev, V.M.; Pogorelov, N.P.; Nouroutdinov, V.A.

    1995-12-31

    Design variants of two-phase systems of thermal control with heat flux inversion and experimental data are presented. Simplified functional dependence of heat flux for loop heat pipes with heat flux inversion versus effective pore radius of capillary structures under various external conditions are obtained.

  16. Numerical multi-loop integrals and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, A.

    2016-09-01

    Higher-order radiative corrections play an important role in precision studies of the electroweak and Higgs sector, as well as for the detailed understanding of large backgrounds to new physics searches. For corrections beyond the one-loop level and involving many independent mass and momentum scales, it is in general not possible to find analytic results, so that one needs to resort to numerical methods instead. This article presents an overview of a variety of numerical loop integration techniques, highlighting their range of applicability, suitability for automatization, and numerical precision and stability. In a second part of this article, the application of numerical loop integration methods in the area of electroweak precision tests is illustrated. Numerical methods were essential for obtaining full two-loop predictions for the most important precision observables within the Standard Model. The theoretical foundations for these corrections will be described in some detail, including aspects of the renormalization, resummation of leading log contributions, and the evaluation of the theory uncertainty from missing higher orders.

  17. Common hardware-in-the-loop development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hajin J.; Moss, Stephen G.

    2010-04-01

    An approach to streamline the Hardware-In-the-Loop (HWIL) simulation development process is under evaluation. This Common HWIL technique will attempt to provide a more flexible, scalable system. The overall goal of the Common HWIL system will be to reduce cost by minimizing redundant development, operational labor and equipment expense. This paper will present current results and future plans of the development.

  18. Curvature operator for loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesci, E.; Assanioussi, M.; Lewandowski, J.

    2014-06-01

    We introduce a new operator in loop quantum gravity—the 3D curvature operator—related to the three-dimensional scalar curvature. The construction is based on Regge calculus. We define this operator starting from the classical expression of the Regge curvature, we derive its properties and discuss some explicit checks of the semiclassical limit.

  19. a Computable Framework for Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Viqar; Pawłowski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    We present a non-perturbative quantization of general relativity coupled to dust and other matter fields. The dust provides a natural time variable, leading to a physical Hamiltonian with spatial diffeomorphism symmetry. The methods of loop quantum gravity applied to this model lead to a physical Hilbert space and Hamiltonian. This provides a framework for physical calculations in the theory.

  20. Interstitial loop transformations in FeCr

    SciTech Connect

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Osetsky, Yuri N.; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-03-27

    Here, we improve the Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) algorithm by integrating the Activation Relaxation Technique nouveau (ARTn), a powerful open-ended saddle-point search method, into the algorithm. We use it to investigate the reaction of 37-interstitial 1/2[1 1 1] and 1/2[View the MathML source] loops in FeCr at 10 at.% Cr. They transform into 1/2[1 1 1], 1/2[View the MathML source], [1 0 0] and [0 1 0] 74-interstitial clusters with an overall barrier of 0.85 eV. We find that Cr decoration locally inhibits the rotation of crowdions, which dictates the final loop orientation. Moreover, the final loop orientation depends on the details of the Cr decoration. Generally, a region of a given orientation is favored if Cr near its interface with a region of another orientation is able to inhibit reorientation at this interface more than the Cr present at the other interfaces. Also, we find that substitutional Cr atoms can diffuse from energetically unfavorable to energetically favorable sites within the interlocked 37-interstitial loops conformation with barriers of less than 0.35 eV.

  1. Modeling antibody hypervariable loops: a combined algorithm.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, A C; Cheetham, J C; Rees, A R

    1989-01-01

    To be of any value, a predicted model of an antibody combining site should have an accuracy approaching that of antibody structures determined by x-ray crystallography (1.6-2.7 A). A number of modeling protocols have been proposed, which fall into two main categories--those that adopt a knowledge-based approach and those that attempt to construct the hypervariable loop regions of the antibody ab initio. Here we present a combined algorithm requiring no arbitrary decisions on the part of the user, which has been successfully applied to the modeling of the individual loops in two systems: the anti-lysozyme antibody HyHel-5, the crystal structure of which is as a complex with lysozyme [Sheriff, S., Silverton, E. W., Padlan, E. A., Cohen, G. H., Smith-Gill, S. J., Finzel, B. C. & Davies, D. R. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84, 8075-8079], and the free antigen binding fragment (Fab) of the anti-lysozyme peptide antibody, Gloop2. This protocol may be used with a high degree of confidence to model single-loop replacements, insertions, deletions, and side-chain replacements. In addition, it may be used in conjunction with other modeling protocols as a method by which to model particular loops whose conformations are predicted poorly by these methods. PMID:2594766

  2. Time loops in a gravitational theory

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, A.L.

    1993-06-01

    We demonstrate here that time loops can be constructed by pasting different wormhole solutions with higher order perturbative terms in a model originated by Gidding and Strominger and subsequently improved by Coule and Maeda. In this model a scalar field interacts with a gravitational axion in Euclidean space. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Warm inflationary model in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Ramon

    2010-06-15

    A warm inflationary universe model in loop quantum cosmology is studied. In general we discuss the condition of inflation in this framework. By using a chaotic potential, V({phi}){proportional_to}{phi}{sup 2}, we develop a model where the dissipation coefficient {Gamma}={Gamma}{sub 0}=constant. We use recent astronomical observations for constraining the parameters appearing in our model.

  4. Recurrent Feedback Loops in Associative Learning.

    PubMed

    Person, Abigail L; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2016-02-01

    In this issue of Neuron, Gao et al. (2016) report on a little-studied feedback pathway from the cerebellar nuclei back to the cerebellar cortex. They find that it contributes to associative conditioning and execution of learned movements, highlighting a role for local feedback loops in the brain. PMID:26844826

  5. Can Thermal Nonequilibrium Explain Coronal Loops?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.; Karpen, Judy T.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-01-01

    Any successful model of coronal loops must explain a number of observed properties. For warm (approx. 1 MK) loops, these include: 1. excess density, 2. flat temperature profile, 3. super-hydrostatic scale height, 4. unstructured intensity profile, and 5. 1000-5000 s lifetime. We examine whether thermal nonequilibrium can reproduce the observations by performing hydrodynamic simulations based on steady coronal heating that decreases exponentially with height. We consider both monolithic and multi-stranded loops. The simulations successfully reproduce certain aspects of the observations, including the excess density, but each of them fails in at least one critical way. -Xonolithic models have far too much intensity structure, while multi-strand models are either too structured or too long-lived. Storms of nanoflares remain the only viable explanation for warm loops that has been proposed so far. Our results appear to rule out the widespread existence of heating that is both highly concentrated low in the corona and steady or quasi-steady (slowly varying or impulsive with a rapid cadence). Active regions would have a very different appearance if the dominant heating mechanism had these properties. Thermal nonequilibrium may nonetheless play an important role in prominences and catastrophic cooling e(veen.gts..,coronal rain) that occupy a small fraction of the coronal volume. However, apparent inconsistencies between the models and observations of cooling events have yet to be understood.

  6. Closed Loop System Identification with Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, Mark S.

    2004-01-01

    High performance control design for a flexible space structure is challenging since high fidelity plant models are di.cult to obtain a priori. Uncertainty in the control design models typically require a very robust, low performance control design which must be tuned on-orbit to achieve the required performance. Closed loop system identi.cation is often required to obtain a multivariable open loop plant model based on closed-loop response data. In order to provide an accurate initial plant model to guarantee convergence for standard local optimization methods, this paper presents a global parameter optimization method using genetic algorithms. A minimal representation of the state space dynamics is employed to mitigate the non-uniqueness and over-parameterization of general state space realizations. This control-relevant system identi.cation procedure stresses the joint nature of the system identi.cation and control design problem by seeking to obtain a model that minimizes the di.erence between the predicted and actual closed-loop performance.

  7. BIOREACTOR DESIGN - OUTER LOOP LANDFILL, LOUISVILLE, KY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioreactor field demonstration projects are underway at the Outer Loop Landfill in Louisville, KY, USA. The research effort is a cooperative research effort between US EPA and Waste Management Inc. Two primary kinds of municipal waste bioreactors are under study at this site. ...

  8. Interstitial loop transformations in FeCr

    DOE PAGES

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Osetsky, Yuri N.; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-03-27

    Here, we improve the Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) algorithm by integrating the Activation Relaxation Technique nouveau (ARTn), a powerful open-ended saddle-point search method, into the algorithm. We use it to investigate the reaction of 37-interstitial 1/2[1 1 1] and 1/2[View the MathML source] loops in FeCr at 10 at.% Cr. They transform into 1/2[1 1 1], 1/2[View the MathML source], [1 0 0] and [0 1 0] 74-interstitial clusters with an overall barrier of 0.85 eV. We find that Cr decoration locally inhibits the rotation of crowdions, which dictates the final loop orientation. Moreover, the final loop orientationmore » depends on the details of the Cr decoration. Generally, a region of a given orientation is favored if Cr near its interface with a region of another orientation is able to inhibit reorientation at this interface more than the Cr present at the other interfaces. Also, we find that substitutional Cr atoms can diffuse from energetically unfavorable to energetically favorable sites within the interlocked 37-interstitial loops conformation with barriers of less than 0.35 eV.« less

  9. Wilson-loop symmetry breaking reexamined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, A.; Shiraishi, K.

    1988-12-01

    The splitting in energy of gauge field vacua on the non-simply connected space S 3/Z 2 is reconsidered. We show the calculation to the one-loop level for a Yang-Mills vector with a ghost field. We confirm our previous result and give a solution to the question posed by Freire, Romão and Barroso.

  10. Black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agulló, Iván; Barbero G, J. Fernando; Borja, E. F.; Díaz-Polo, Jacobo; Villaseñor, Eduardo J. S.

    2012-05-01

    We discuss the recent progress on black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity, focusing in particular on the recently discovered discretization effect for microscopic black holes. Powerful analytical techniques have been developed to perform the exact computation of entropy. A statistical analysis of the structures responsible for this effect shows its progressive damping and eventual disappearance as one increases the considered horizon area.

  11. Aesthetic rehabilitation with multiple loop connectors

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Ashish; Gowda, Mahesh E.; Verma, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Patients with a missing tooth along with diastema have limited treatment options to restore the edentulous space. The use of a conventional fixed partial denture (FPD) to replace the missing tooth may result in too wide anterior teeth leading to poor esthetics. The diastema resulting from the missing central incisors can be managed with implant-supported prosthesis or FPD with loop connectors. An old lady reported with chief complaints of missing upper anterior teeth due to trauma. Her past dental history revealed that she was having generalized spacing between her upper anterior teeth. Considering her esthetic requirement of maintaining the diastema between 12, 11, 22, and 21, the treatment option of 06 units porcelain fused to metal FPD from canine to canine with intermittent loop connectors between 21, 22, 11, 12 was planned. Connectors basically link different parts of FPDs. The modified FPD with loop connectors enhanced the natural appearance of the restoration, maintained the diastemas and the proper emergence profile, and preserve the remaining tooth structure of abutment teeth. This clinical report discussed a method for fabrication of a modified FPD with loop connectors to restore the wide span created by missing central incisors. PMID:23853468

  12. Implementation guidance for fiber optic loop sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, R.G.. Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-30

    Fiber optic loop sensors are a form of active security seal that can be used for detecting attempts to move or access secured items. This document is a guide that provides information about this type of sensor and suggests possible implementations.

  13. Selective purge for hydrogenation reactor recycle loop

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2001-01-01

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved contaminant removal and hydrogen recovery in hydrogenation reactors, particularly in refineries and petrochemical plants. The improved contaminant removal is achieved by selective purging, by passing gases in the hydrogenation reactor recycle loop or purge stream across membranes selective in favor of the contaminant over hydrogen.

  14. Particle scattering in loop quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Modesto, Leonardo; Rovelli, Carlo

    2005-11-01

    We devise a technique for defining and computing -point functions in the context of a background-independent gravitational quantum field theory. We construct a tentative implementation of this technique in a perturbatively finite model defined using spin foam techniques in the context of loop quantum gravity.

  15. Exploring the conformational diversity of loops on conserved frameworks.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Liang, S; Wang, R; Lai, L; Han, Y

    1999-12-01

    Loops are structurally variable regions, but the secondary structural elements bracing loops are often conserved. Motifs with similar secondary structures exist in the same and different protein families. In this study, we made an all-PDB-based analysis and produced 495 motif families accessible from the Internet. Every motif family contains some variable loops spanning a common framework (a pair of secondary structures). The diversity of loops and the convergence of frameworks were examined. In addition, we also identified 119 loops with conformational changes in different PDB files. These materials can give some directions for functional loop design and flexible docking. PMID:10611401

  16. Loop Evolution Observed with AIA and Hi-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulu-Moore, Fana; Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly E.; Golub, Leon; Kuzin, Sergei; Walsh, Robert William; DeForest, Craig E.; De Pontieu, Bart; Title, Alan M.; Weber, Mark

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, the evolution of EUV loops has been used to infer the loop substructure. With the recent launch of High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), this inference can be validated. In this presentation we discuss the first results of loop analysis comparing AIA and Hi-C data. In the past decade, the evolution of EUV loops has been used to infer the loop substructure. With the recent launch of High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), this inference can be validated. In this presentation we discuss the first results of loop analysis comparing AIA and Hi-C data.

  17. Building an Extension Network in Vietnam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poussard, H.

    1999-01-01

    Agricultural extension in Vietnam is in transition as the economy moves to a market orientation. The national extension service created in 1993 is constrained by lack of funding, staff, and access to current extension knowledge. (SK)

  18. Constructing QCD one-loop amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Forde, Darren; /SLAC /UCLA

    2008-02-22

    In the context of constructing one-loop amplitudes using a unitarity bootstrap approach we discuss a general systematic procedure for obtaining the coefficients of the scalar bubble and triangle integral functions of one-loop amplitudes. Coefficients are extracted after examining the behavior of the cut integrand as the unconstrained parameters of a specifically chosen parameterization of the cut loop momentum approach infinity. Measurements of new physics at the forthcoming experimental program at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will require a precise understanding of processes at next-to-leading order (NLO). This places increased demands for the computation of new one-loop amplitudes. This in turn has spurred recent developments towards improved calculational techniques. Direct calculations using Feynman diagrams are in general inefficient. Developments of more efficient techniques have usually centered around unitarity techniques [1], where tree amplitudes are effectively 'glued' together to form loops. The most straightforward application of this method, in which the cut loop momentum is in D = 4, allows for the computation of 'cut-constructible' terms only, i.e. (poly)logarithmic containing terms and any related constants. QCD amplitudes contain, in addition to such terms, rational pieces which cannot be derived using such cuts. These 'missing' rational parts can be extracted using cut loop momenta in D = 4-2 {var_epsilon}. The greater difficulty of such calculations has restricted the application of this approach, although recent developments [3, 4] have provided new promise for this technique. Recently the application of on-shell recursion relations [5] to obtaining the 'missing' rational parts of one-loop processes [6] has provided an alternative very promising solution to this problem. In combination with unitarity methods an 'on-shell bootstrap' approach provides an efficient technique for computing complete one-loop QCD amplitudes [7]. Additionally

  19. Dynamics of the ankle joint analyzed through moment-angle loops during human walking: gender and age effects.

    PubMed

    Crenna, Paolo; Frigo, Carlo

    2011-12-01

    Aim of this study was to provide a non-invasive assessment of the dynamic properties of the ankle joint during human locomotion, with specific focus on the effects of gender and age. Accordingly, flexion-extension angles and moments, obtained through gait analysis, were used to generate moment-angle loops at the ankle joint in 120 healthy subjects walking at a same normalized speed. Four reproducible types of loops were identified: Typical Loops, Narrow, Large and Yielding loops. No significant changes in the slopes of the main loop phases were observed as a function of gender and age, with the exception of a relative increase in the slope of the descending phase in elderly males compared to adult females. As for the ergometric parameters, the peak ankle moment, work produced and net work along the cycle were slightly, but significantly affected, with progressively decrease in the following order: Adult Males, Adult Females, Elderly Males and Elderly Females. The evidence that only few of the quantitative aspects of moment-angle loops were affected suggests that the control strategy which regulates the biomechanical properties of the ankle joint during walking is rather robust and qualitatively consistent across genders and age.

  20. Severe neural tube defects in the loop-tail mouse result from mutation of Lpp1, a novel gene involved in floor plate specification.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, J N; Doudney, K; Paternotte, C; Copp, A J; Stanier, P

    2001-10-15

    Neural tube defects (NTD) are clinically important congenital malformations whose molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. The loop-tail (Lp) mutant mouse provides a model for the most severe NTD, craniorachischisis, in which the brain and spinal cord remain open. During a positional cloning approach, we have identified a mutation in a novel gene, Lpp1, in the Lp mouse, providing a strong candidate for the genetic causation of craniorachischisis in LP: Lpp1 encodes a protein of 521 amino acids, with four transmembrane domains related to the Drosophila protein strabismus/van gogh (vang). The human orthologue, LPP1, shares 89% identity with the mouse gene at the nucleotide level and 99% identity at the amino acid level. Lpp1 is expressed in the ventral part of the developing neural tube, but is excluded from the floor plate where Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is expressed. Embryos lacking Shh express Lpp1 throughout the ventral neural tube, suggesting negative regulation of Lpp1 by SHH: Our findings suggest that the mutual interaction between Lpp1 and Shh may define the lateral boundary of floor plate differentiation. Loss of Lpp1 function disrupts neurulation by permitting more extensive floor plate induction by Shh, thereby inhibiting midline bending of the neural plate during initiation of neurulation.

  1. Sphenoethmoidal mucoceles with intracranial extension.

    PubMed

    Close, L G; O'Conner, W E

    1983-08-01

    Mucoceles of the paranasal sinuses are benign, expansile, locally destructive lesions that are thought to occur secondary to obstruction of the sinus ostia. Nasal and/or ocular signs and symptoms are the usual clinical manifestations of mucoceles arising in the ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses, and intracranial extension is rare. We describe three cases of widely destructive sphenoethmoidal mucoceles extending intracranially, with bone erosion and dural exposure in all cases and brain necrosis in one case.

  2. An Extension for ESO Headquarters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Robert; Walsh, Jeremy

    2009-03-01

    The ESO Headquarters was completed in 1980, but is now too small to house all the ESO staff and currently only about 50% reside in the original building. A decision was taken to seek an extension to the Headquarters building in close proximity to the current one and a competition was launched for architectural designs. Three designs were shortlisted and the process of selection for the final design is described. Construction will begin in 2010 and is due for completion in 2012.

  3. Mechanical heterogeneities and lithospheric extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretz, Thibault; Petri, Benoit; Mohn, Geoffroy; Schenker, Filippo L.; Schmalholz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Detailed geological and geophysical studies of passive margins have highlighted the multi-stage and depth-dependent aspect of lithospheric thinning. Lithospheric thinning involves a variety of structures (normal faults, low angle detachments, extensional shear zones, extraction faults) and leads to a complex architecture of passive margins (with e.g. necking zone, mantle exhumation, continental allochthons). The processes controlling the generation and evolution of these structures as well as the impact of pre-rift inheritance are so far incompletely understood. In this study, we investigate the impact of pre-rift inheritance on the development of rifted margins using two-dimensional thermo-mechanical models of lithospheric thinning. To first order, we represent the pre-rift mechanical heterogeneities with lithological layering. The rheologies are kept simple (visco-plastic) and do not involve any strain softening mechanism. Our models show that mechanical layering causes multi-stage and depth-dependent extension. In the initial rifting phase, lithospheric extension is decoupled: as the crust undergoes thinning by brittle (frictional-plastic) faults, the lithospheric mantle accommodates extension by symmetric ductile necking. In a second rifting phase, deformation in the crust and lithospheric mantle is coupled and marks the beginning of an asymmetric extension stage. Low angle extensional shear zones develop across the lithosphere and exhume subcontinental mantle. Furthemore, crustal allochthons and adjacent basins develop coevally. We describe as well the thermal evolution predicted by the numerical models and discuss the first-order implications of our results in the context of the Alpine geological history.

  4. Loop-acting diuretics do not bind to Tamm-Horsfall urinary glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Brunisholz, M C; Lynn, K L; Hunt, J S

    1987-09-01

    1. Binding between the radiolabelled loop-acting diuretics ([14C]frusemide, [14C]ethacrynic acid and [3H]bumetanide) and human Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein or human serum albumin in vitro was evaluated by equilibrium dialysis. 2. The diuretic action and binding to urinary Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein of the radiolabelled diuretics in vivo, after intravenous administration, were examined in rabbits. 3. In vitro, all three radiolabelled diuretics bound strongly to human serum albumin, but not to Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein. 4. Radiolabelled frusemide and bumetanide, but not ethacrynic acid, caused a diuresis in rabbits, but no binding between the drugs and Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein was seen in vivo. 5. Binding to Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein does not appear to be an important mechanism in the action of loop diuretics.

  5. SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVE OSCILLATION OF AN EXPANDING CORONAL LOOP

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J. M.; Ofman, L.

    2011-10-01

    We simulated an expanding loop or slow coronal mass ejection (CME) in the solar corona dimensioned with size parameters taken from real coronal expanding loops observed with the STEREO spacecraft. We find that the loop expands to Sun's size within about one hour, consistent with slow CME observations. At the top of the loop, plasma is being blown off the loop, enabled with the reconnection between the loop's flux rope magnetic field and the radial magnetic field of the Sun, thus yielding feeding material for the formation of the slow solar wind. This mechanism is in accordance with the observed blob formation of the slow solar wind. We find wave packets traveling with local sound speed downward toward the footpoints of the loop, already seen in coronal seismology observations and simulations of stationary coronal loops. Here, we generalize these results for an expanding medium. We also find a reflection of the wave packets, identified as slow magnetoacoustic waves, at the footpoints of the loop. This confirms the formation of standing waves within the coronal loop. In particular, the reflected waves can partly escape the loop top and contribute to the heating of the solar wind. The present study improves our understanding on how loop material can emerge to form blobs, major ingredients of slow CMEs, and how the release of the wave energy stored in slow magnetoacoustic waves, and transported away from the Sun within expanding loops, contributes to the acceleration and formation of the slow solar wind.

  6. Sfermion loop contribution to the two-loop level fermion electric dipole moment in R-parity violating supersymmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Nodoka

    2012-10-01

    We evaluate the Barr-Zee-type two-loop level contribution to the fermion electric and chromo-electric dipole moments with sfermion loop in R-parity violating supersymmetric models. It is found that the Barr-Zee-type fermion dipole moment with sfermion loop acts destructively to the currently known fermion loop contribution, and that it has small effect when the mass of squarks or charged sleptons in the loop is larger than or comparable to that of the sneutrinos, but cannot be neglected if the sneutrinos are much heavier than loop sfermions.

  7. A combined NLP-differential evolution algorithm approach for the optimization of looped water distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Feifei; Simpson, Angus R.; Zecchin, Aaron C.

    2011-08-01

    This paper proposes a novel optimization approach for the least cost design of looped water distribution systems (WDSs). Three distinct steps are involved in the proposed optimization approach. In the first step, the shortest-distance tree within the looped network is identified using the Dijkstra graph theory algorithm, for which an extension is proposed to find the shortest-distance tree for multisource WDSs. In the second step, a nonlinear programming (NLP) solver is employed to optimize the pipe diameters for the shortest-distance tree (chords of the shortest-distance tree are allocated the minimum allowable pipe sizes). Finally, in the third step, the original looped water network is optimized using a differential evolution (DE) algorithm seeded with diameters in the proximity of the continuous pipe sizes obtained in step two. As such, the proposed optimization approach combines the traditional deterministic optimization technique of NLP with the emerging evolutionary algorithm DE via the proposed network decomposition. The proposed methodology has been tested on four looped WDSs with the number of decision variables ranging from 21 to 454. Results obtained show the proposed approach is able to find optimal solutions with significantly less computational effort than other optimization techniques.

  8. Testing of a Loop Heat Pipe with Two Evaporators and Two Condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Birur, Gaj; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most existing Loop Heat Pipes (LHPs) consist of one single evaporator and one single condenser. LHPs with multiple evaporators will be very desirable for cooling multiple heat sources or a heat source with large thermal footprints. Extending the LHP technology to include multiple evaporators and multiple condensers faces some challenges, including the interaction between individual compensation chambers, operating temperature stability, and adaptability to rapid power and sink temperature transients. This paper describe extensive testing of an LHP with two evaporators and two condensers. Tests performed include start-up, power cycle, sink temperature cycle, reservoir temperature cycle, and capillary limit. Test results showed that the loop could operate successfully under various heat load and sink conditions. The loop operating temperature is a function of the total heat load, the heat load distribution between the two evaporators, and temperatures of the two condenser sinks. Under most conditions, only one reservoir contained two-phase fluid and the other reservoir was completely liquid filled. Moreover, control of the loop operating temperature could shift from one reservoir to the other as the test condition changed.

  9. Depression as a systemic syndrome: mapping the feedback loops of major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wittenborn, A. K.; Rahmandad, H.; Rick, J.; Hosseinichimeh, N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is a complex public health problem with considerable variation in treatment response. The systemic complexity of depression, or the feedback processes among diverse drivers of the disorder, contribute to the persistence of depression. This paper extends prior attempts to understand the complex causal feedback mechanisms that underlie depression by presenting the first broad boundary causal loop diagram of depression dynamics. Method We applied qualitative system dynamics methods to map the broad feedback mechanisms of depression. We used a structured approach to identify candidate causal mechanisms of depression in the literature. We assessed the strength of empirical support for each mechanism and prioritized those with support from validation studies. Through an iterative process, we synthesized the empirical literature and created a conceptual model of major depressive disorder. Results The literature review and synthesis resulted in the development of the first causal loop diagram of reinforcing feedback processes of depression. It proposes candidate drivers of illness, or inertial factors, and their temporal functioning, as well as the interactions among drivers of depression. The final causal loop diagram defines 13 key reinforcing feedback loops that involve nine candidate drivers of depression. Conclusions Future research is needed to expand upon this initial model of depression dynamics. Quantitative extensions may result in a better understanding of the systemic syndrome of depression and contribute to personalized methods of evaluation, prevention and intervention. PMID:26621339

  10. Simple Analytic Expressions for the Magnetic Field of a Circular Current Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James C.; Lane, John E.; Immer, Christopher D.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Analytic expressions for the magnetic induction (magnetic flux density, B) of a simple planar circular current loop have been published in Cartesian and cylindrical coordinates [1,2], and are also known implicitly in spherical coordinates [3]. In this paper, we present explicit analytic expressions for B and its spatial derivatives in Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates for a filamentary current loop. These results were obtained with extensive use of Mathematica "TM" and are exact throughout all space outside of the conductor. The field expressions reduce to the well-known limiting cases and satisfy V · B = 0 and V x B = 0 outside the conductor. These results are general and applicable to any model using filamentary circular current loops. Solenoids of arbitrary size may be easily modeled by approximating the total magnetic induction as the sum of those for the individual loops. The inclusion of the spatial derivatives expands their utility to magnetohydrodynamics where the derivatives are required. The equations can be coded into any high-level programming language. It is necessary to numerically evaluate complete elliptic integrals of the first and second kind, but this capability is now available with most programming packages.

  11. Loop diuretics in acute heart failure: beyond the decongestive relief for the kidney.

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, Alberto; Ruocco, Gaetano; Ronco, Claudio; McCullough, Peter A

    2015-09-03

    Current goals in the acute treatment of heart failure are focused on pulmonary and systemic decongestion with loop diuretics as the cornerstone of therapy. Despite rapid relief of symptoms in patients with acute decompensated heart failure, after intravenous use of loop diuretics, the use of these agents has been consistently associated with adverse events, including hypokalemia, azotemia, hypotension, and increased mortality. Two recent randomized trials have shown that continuous infusions of loop diuretics did not offer benefit but were associated with adverse events, including hyponatremia, prolonged hospital stay, and increased rate of readmissions. This is probably due to the limitations of congestion evaluation as well as to the deleterious effects linked to drug administration, particularly at higher dosage. The impaired renal function often associated with this treatment is not extensively explored and could deserve more specific studies. Several questions remain to be answered about the best diuretic modality administration, global clinical impact during acute and post-discharge period, and the role of renal function deterioration during treatment. Thus, if loop diuretics are a necessary part of the treatment for acute heart failure, then there must be an approach that allows personalization of therapy for optimal benefit and avoidance of adverse events.

  12. Convergent extension analysis in mouse whole embryo culture

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, Sophie E.; Massa, Valentina; Savery, Dawn; Greene, Nicholas D. E.; Copp, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations have been identified in a non-canonical Wnt signalling cascade (the planar cell polarity pathway) in several mouse genetic models of severe neural tube defects. In each of these models, neurulation fails to be initiated at the 3-4 somite stage, leading to an almost entirely open neural tube (termed craniorachischisis). Studies in whole embryo culture have identified a defect in the morphogenetic process of convergent extension during gastrulation, preceding the onset of neural tube closure. The principal defect is a failure of midline extension, both in the neural plate and axial mesoderm. This leads to an abnormally wide neural plate in which the elevating neural folds are too far apart to achieve closure. In this chapter, we provide details of several experimental methods that can be used to evaluate convergent extension in cultured mouse embryos. We describe analytical methods that can reveal the abnormalities that characterise neurulation-stage embryos with defective planar cell polarity signalling, in particular the loop-tail (Lp; Vangl2) mutant. PMID:22218898

  13. COAL COMBUSTION PRODUCTS EXTENSION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Tarunjit S. Butalia; William E. Wolfe

    2005-05-15

    The primary objective of the CCP Extension Program is to promote the responsible uses of Ohio CCPs that are technically sound, environmentally safe, and commercially competitive. A secondary objective is to assist other CCP generating states (particularly neighboring states) in establishing CCP use programs within their states. The goal of the CCP extension program at OSU is to work with CCP stakeholders to increase the overall CCP state utilization rate to more than 30% by the year 2005. The program aims to increase FGD utilization for Ohio to more than 20% by the year 2005. The increased utilization rates are expected to be achieved through increased use of CCPs for highway, mine reclamation, agricultural, manufacturing, and other civil engineering uses. In order to accomplish these objectives and goals, the highly successful CCP pilot extension program previously in place at the university has been expanded and adopted by the university as a part of its outreach and engagement mission. The extension program is an innovative technology transfer program with multiple sponsors. The program is a collaborative effort between The Ohio State University (College of Engineering and University Extension Service), United States Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Ohio Department of Development's Coal Development Office, and trade associations such as the American Coal Ash Association as well as the Midwest Coal Ash Association. Industry co-sponsors include American Electric Power, Dravo Lime Company, and ISG Resources. Implementation of the proposed project results in both direct and indirect as well as societal benefits. These benefits include (1) increased utilization of CCPs instead of landfilling, (2) development of proper construction and installation procedures, (3) education of regulators, specification-writers, designers, construction contractors, and the public, (4) emphasis on recycling and decrease in the need for landfill space, (5

  14. Coal Combustion Products Extension Program

    SciTech Connect

    Tarunjit S. Butalia; William E. Wolfe

    2004-12-31

    The primary objective of the CCP Extension Program is to promote the responsible uses of Ohio CCPs that are technically sound, environmentally safe, and commercially competitive. A secondary objective is to assist other CCP generating states (particularly neighboring states) in establishing CCP use programs within their states. The goal of the CCP extension program at OSU is to work with CCP stakeholders to increase the overall CCP state utilization rate to more than 30% by the year 2005. The program aims to increase FGD utilization for Ohio to more than 20% by the year 2005. The increased utilization rates are expected to be achieved through increased use of CCPs for highway, mine reclamation, agricultural, manufacturing, and other civil engineering uses. In order to accomplish these objectives and goals, the highly successful CCP pilot extension program previously in place at the university has been expanded and adopted by the university as a part of its outreach and engagement mission. The extension program is an innovative technology transfer program with multiple sponsors. The program is a collaborative effort between The Ohio State University (College of Engineering and University Extension Service), United States Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Ohio Department of Development's Coal Development Office, and trade associations such as the American Coal Ash Association as well as the Midwest Coal Ash Association. Industry co-sponsors include American Electric Power, Dravo Lime Company, and ISG Resources. Implementation of the proposed project results in both direct and indirect as well as societal benefits. These benefits include (1) increased utilization of CCPs instead of landfilling, (2) development of proper construction and installation procedures, (3) education of regulators, specification-writers, designers, construction contractors, and the public, (4) emphasis on recycling and decrease in the need for landfill space, (5

  15. Coal Combustion Products Extension Program

    SciTech Connect

    Tarunjit S. Butalia; William E. Wolfe

    2003-12-31

    The primary objective of the CCP Extension Program is to promote the responsible uses of Ohio CCPs that are technically sound, environmentally safe, and commercially competitive. A secondary objective is to assist other CCP generating states (particularly neighboring states) in establishing CCP use programs within their states. The goal of the CCP extension program at OSU is to work with CCP stakeholders to increase the overall CCP state utilization rate to more than 30% by the year 2005. The program aims to increase FGD utilization for Ohio to more than 20% by the year 2005. The increased utilization rates are expected to be achieved through increased use of CCPs for highway, mine reclamation, agricultural, manufacturing, and other civil engineering uses. In order to accomplish these objectives and goals, the highly successful CCP pilot extension program previously in place at the university has been expanded and adopted by the university as a part of its outreach and engagement mission. The extension program is an innovative technology transfer program with multiple sponsors. The program is a collaborative effort between The Ohio State University (College of Engineering and University Extension Service), United States Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Ohio Department of Development's Coal Development Office, and trade associations such as the American Coal Ash Association as well as the Midwest Coal Ash Association. Industry co-sponsors include American Electric Power, Dravo Lime Company, and ISG Resources. Implementation of the proposed project results in both direct and indirect as well as societal benefits. These benefits include (1) increased utilization of CCPs instead of landfilling, (2) development of proper construction and installation procedures, (3) education of regulators, specification-writers, designers, construction contractors, and the public, (4) emphasis on recycling and decrease in the need for landfill space, (5

  16. Laparoscopic Revision of an Omega Loop Gastric Bypass to Treat Afferent Loop Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kassir, Radwan; Blanc, Pierre; Lointier, Patrice; Breton, Christophe; Debs, Tarek; Tiffet, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    The omega loop gastric bypass (OLGB) has become a very commonly performed bariatric procedure because of the advantages it carries over the Roux en Y gastric bypass (RYGBP). However, mini gastric bypass is a misnomer, as this procedure is more malabsorptive than the RYGBP. Recently, it is called single or one anastomosis gastric bypass. The omega loop procedure is associated with a risk of afferent loop syndrome, a known complication of the Billroth II (Finsterer) operation. This rare complication of the OLGB can be debilitating, serious, and deadly. Afferent loop syndrome should be suspected in case of malabsorption syndrome with chronic diarrhea, steatorrhea, iron-deficiency anemia, edema, emaciation, and osteomalacia and also in case of simple biological anomalies such as macrocytosis or megaloblastic anemia. The diagnosis can be confirmed by measuring bacterial overgrowth, although this requires a jejunal aspirate performed during endoscopy with jejunal intubation. A microbial population of more than 106 organisms per milliliter of aspirate is pathological. Afferent loop syndrome is encountered less frequently now that the number of gastrectomies has dropped. Yet, with the omega loop bypass procedure becoming more common, surgeons must again be made aware of this potential complication. PMID:26210192

  17. Application of loop analysis for evaluation of malaria control interventions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite continuous efforts and recent rapid expansion in the financing and implementation of malaria control interventions, malaria still remains one of the most devastating global health issues. Even in countries that have been successful in reducing the incidence of malaria, malaria control is becoming more challenging because of the changing epidemiology of malaria and waning community participation in control interventions. In order to improve the effectiveness of interventions and to promote community understanding of the necessity of continued control efforts, there is an urgent need to develop new methodologies that examine the mechanisms by which community-based malaria interventions could reduce local malaria incidence. Methods This study demonstrated how the impact of community-based malaria control interventions on malaria incidence can be examined in complex systems by qualitative analysis combined with an extensive review of literature. First, sign digraphs were developed through loop analysis to analyse seven interventions: source reduction, insecticide/larvicide use, biological control, treatment with anti-malarials, insecticide-treated mosquito net/long-lasting insecticidal net, non-chemical personal protection measures, and educational intervention. Then, for each intervention, the sign digraphs and literature review were combined to analyse a variety of pathways through which the intervention can influence local malaria incidence as well as interactions between variables involved in the system. Through loop analysis it is possible to see whether increases in one variable qualitatively increases or decreases other variables or leaves them unchanged and the net effect of multiple, interacting variables. Results Qualitative analysis, specifically loop analysis, can be a useful tool to examine the impact of community-based malaria control interventions. Without relying on numerical data, the analysis was able to describe pathways through

  18. Run-time parallelization and scheduling of loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltz, Joel H.; Mirchandaney, Ravi; Crowley, Kay

    1991-01-01

    Run-time methods are studied to automatically parallelize and schedule iterations of a do loop in certain cases where compile-time information is inadequate. The methods presented involve execution time preprocessing of the loop. At compile-time, these methods set up the framework for performing a loop dependency analysis. At run-time, wavefronts of concurrently executable loop iterations are identified. Using this wavefront information, loop iterations are reordered for increased parallelism. Symbolic transformation rules are used to produce: inspector procedures that perform execution time preprocessing, and executors or transformed versions of source code loop structures. These transformed loop structures carry out the calculations planned in the inspector procedures. Performance results are presented from experiments conducted on the Encore Multimax. These results illustrate that run-time reordering of loop indexes can have a significant impact on performance.

  19. Bent helix formation between RNA hairpins with complementary loops.

    PubMed

    Marino, J P; Gregorian, R S; Csankovszki, G; Crothers, D M

    1995-06-01

    The initial interaction between the ColE1 plasmid specific transcripts RNA I and RNA II, which function as antisense regulators of plasmid replication, comprises a transient complex between complementary loops found within the RNA secondary structures. Multidimensional heteronuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to characterize complexes formed between model RNA hairpins having seven nucleotide complementary loops. Seven base pairs are formed in the loop-loop helix, with continuous helical stacking of the loop residues on the 3' side of their helical stems. A sharp bend in the loop-loop helix, documented by gel electrophoresis, narrows the major groove and allows bridging of the phosphodiester backbones across the major groove in order to close the hairpin loops at their 5'-ends. The bend is further enhanced by the binding of Rom, a ColE1 encoded protein that regulates replication. PMID:7539549

  20. Bent helix formation between RNA hairpins with complementary loops.

    PubMed

    Marino, J P; Gregorian, R S; Csankovszki, G; Crothers, D M

    1995-06-01

    The initial interaction between the ColE1 plasmid specific transcripts RNA I and RNA II, which function as antisense regulators of plasmid replication, comprises a transient complex between complementary loops found within the RNA secondary structures. Multidimensional heteronuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to characterize complexes formed between model RNA hairpins having seven nucleotide complementary loops. Seven base pairs are formed in the loop-loop helix, with continuous helical stacking of the loop residues on the 3' side of their helical stems. A sharp bend in the loop-loop helix, documented by gel electrophoresis, narrows the major groove and allows bridging of the phosphodiester backbones across the major groove in order to close the hairpin loops at their 5'-ends. The bend is further enhanced by the binding of Rom, a ColE1 encoded protein that regulates replication.